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The Lake City reporter
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028308/01674
 Material Information
Title: The Lake City reporter
Uniform Title: Lake City reporter (Lake City, Fla. 1967)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: John H. Perry
Place of Publication: Lake City Fla
Creation Date: October 16, 2011
Publication Date: 1967-
Frequency: daily (monday through friday)[<1969>-]
weekly[ former 1967-<1968>]
daily
normalized irregular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Lake City (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Columbia County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Columbia -- Lake City
Coordinates: 30.189722 x -82.639722 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 95, no. 4 (Oct. 5, 1967)-
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000358016
oclc - 33283560
notis - ABZ6316
lccn - sn 95047175
sobekcm - UF00028308_01569
System ID: UF00028308:01674
 Related Items
Preceded by: Lake City reporter and Columbia gazette

Full Text



000017 120511 **3-"DGIT 326-
LIE OF FLORIDA-
Po BOX 117007
205 SMA UNIV OF FLORIDA
GAINESVILLE FL 32611-1943


Uny


Rep


Sunday, October 16, 2011 www.lakecityreporter.com. Vol. 137, No. 225 U $ 1.00





Taking a Harder line


Former talk radio host
Chuck Harder of White
Springs is off the air, but
that doesn't mean his views
on federal power, individual
rights or anything else -
have softened in the least.

By GORDON JACKSON
glacksonblakecityreporter.com

For the time being, no signal
is broadcast from a cluster
of large satellite dishes on a
dirt road near White Springs.
But Chuck Harder has big
plans in a few months.
Harder is surrounded by electronic
equipment stacked from floor to ceil-
ing in two rooms at his house located a
short distance from the satellite dishes.
It's where he is making final prepara-
tions to launch his new family oriented
TV network, named TVTV.
"It'll be classic TV, live programming
and talk shows," he said. "You don't
have to worry about seeing people get-
ting cut
'Hillary (Clinton) upina
made no secret morgue.
of loathing radio I'll show
all the
talk show host classics.
Chuck Harder, I call it a
who frequently wonderful
delved into Bill's todayom
sexual .escapades vapid
on the air,' wrote program-
one best-selling ming."
At 68,
author, some
would
think Harder should be planning for
retirement instead of tackling such an
ambitious business venture.
"No, I'll never retire," he said.
'There's too much to do."
Harder has spent most of his life
working in the broadcast industry,
mostly radio.
He cut his teeth at 14 when he hosted
a half hour radio show in Elgin, ll. on
Saturday. A live band covering top 40
HARDER continued on 5A


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Rpone.
TOP: Former talk radio host Chuck Harder, 68, is trying his
hand at developing a family oriented TV network, TVTV.
The network will feature classic television shows and mov-
ies, he says. ABOVE: Harder's satellite uplink center,
through which he eventually plans to transmit three chan-
nels nationwide. RIGHT: Harder demonstrates operation of
a Korg music synthesizer, which will be used to create the
theme music for upcoming television programs.


U.S. troops leaving Iraq by January


By LARA JAKES and
REBECCA SANTANA
Associated Press
BAGHDAD The U.S. is abandon-
ing plans to keep U.S. troops in Iraq
past a year-end withdrawal deadline, The
Associated Press has learned. The deci-
sion to pull out fully by January will effec-
tively end more than eight years of U.S.
involvement in the Iraq war, despite ongo-


ing coficerns about its security forces and
the potential for instability.
The decision ends months of hand-
wringing by U.S. officials over whether to
stick to a Dec. 31 withdrawal deadline that
was set in 2008 or negotiate a new security
agreement to ensure that gains made and
more than 4,400 American military lives
lost since March 2003 do not go to waste.
In recent months, Washington has been
discussing with Iraqi leaders the possibil-


ity of several thousand American troops
remaining to continue training Iraqi secu-
rity forces. A Pentagon spokesman said
Saturday that no final decision has been
reached about the U.S. training relation-
ship with the Iraqi government
But a senior Obama administration offi-
cial in Washington confirmed Saturday
that all American troops will leave Iraq
except for about 160 active-duty soldiers
attached to the U.S. Embassy.


A senior U.S. military official confirmed
the departure and said the withdrawal
could allow future but limited U.S. military
training missions in Iraq if requested.
Both officials spoke on condition of
anonymity because of the sensitivity of
the issue.
Throughout the discussions, Iraqi
leaders have adamantly refused to give
IRAQ continued on 3A


Chamber launches new marketing campaign


From staff reports

The Lake City-Columbia
County Chamber of Commerce
on Monday will launch a new
marketing campaign designed
to enhance local businesses and
encourage residents to spend
money locally and invest in their
community.
"Think Lake City First" will
be the marketing initiative of
the Lake City-Columbia County
Chamber of Commerce.
The campaign urges residents
to consider local Chamber of
Commerce member businesses
for any goods and services they


might need to purchase. The
concept was introduced locally
by 2012 Chamber President
Todd Wilson, publisher of
the Lake City Reporter. The
Chamber's Board of Directors
approved the, marketing initia-
tive last month.
The idea came from research-
ing other marketing cam-
paigns with media members
and Chamber officials from
throughout the country, then
customizing it to fit Lake City
and Columbia County. The cam-
paign is "Think Lake City First"
CHAMBER continued on 3A


FIRST



10 FIRST.


JASON MAT


Lake City-Columbia County
Chamber of Commerce
Executive Director Dennille
Folsom (right) looks at a sign
announcing the Chamber's new
marketing initiative 'Think Lake
City First' with 2012 Chamber
President Todd Wilson, pub-
lisher of the Lake City Reporter.
Wilson introduced the slogan to
the Chamber's board of direc-
tors as a campaign to enhance
business in both retail and
service sectors in Columbia
County.


1 84I III-U


CALL US:
(386) 752-1293
SUBSCRIBE TO
THE REPORTER:
Voice: 755-5445
Fax: 752-9400


8857
Sunny
WEATHER, 8A


Opinion ......
Life .......
Obituaries .......
Advice .......... ..
Puzzles ... .....


.. 4A
ID
.... 5A
. .. 3D
2B


TODAY IN
LIFE
Safety day at
local school.


COMING
TUESDAY
City council
coverage.


iq at year's end. Story below.





Reporter


Lake









LAKE CITY REPORTER SUNDAY REPORT SUNDAY, OCTOBER 16, 2011


Friday: Friday: Saturday: Saturday: Saturday: Saturday:
4-10-25-44 MB 3 1-3-21-25-26 Afternoon: N/A Afternoon: N/A N/A N/A
Evening: N/A Evening: N/A


AROUND FLORIDA



Rapper Rick Ross reportedly hospitalized


By CURT ANDERSON
Associated Press

MIAMI Rapper Rick
Ross was reportedly hos-
pitalized in Alabama on
Friday evening after suf-
fering two medical scares
in six hours that required
planes to be diverted.
The first scare came
Friday afternoon as.
Ross was on a DeltaAir
Lines flight from Fort
Lauderdale, Fla., to
Memphis, Tenn., where
Ross was scheduled to
appear at a University
of Memphis basketball
event th4t.night The
plane returned to Florida
after Ross suffered an
unspecified medical prob- -
lem. He was treated at a
Fort Lauderdale hospital,
and he even tweeted
"Memphis here I come"
afterward.
But after Ross hopped
a Memphis-bound pri-
vate jet, it made an
unscheduled landing in
Birmingham, Ala., because
the 34-year-old singer
experienced another medi-
cal problem, Memphis bas-
ketball coach Josh Pastner
told a crowd at the Friday
night event where Ross
was to appear.
"On his way to
Memphis," Pastner said,
"he had to make another
emergency landing, in
Birmingham. He got really
sick again, and they had
to rush him to the emer-
gency room."
WMC(TV in Memphis
reported that Ross suf-
fered a second medical


seizure and had been
hospitalized. The news
station said the University
of Alabama-Birmingham
Hospital would not comr-
ment on his condition.
A hospital spokeswoman
told The Associated Press
that no one by Ross's
name or his real name,
William Leonard Roberts
II, was listed as a patient
Birmingham airport
spokeswoman Toni
Bast confirmed to The
Associated Press that a
private plane traveling
from Fort Lauderdale
to Memphis made an
unscheduled landing in
Birmingham at around
5:30 p.m.. because; of-a
medical emergency, but
she could not provide any
further details.
Calls to Ross' publicist
from the AP were not
returned Friday.
Ross was scheduled to
perform Friday night at
the University of Memphis
basketball team's midnight
opening practice event,
"Memphis Madness."
Authorities said Ross
was on the Delta Air Lines
flight when he suffered.
the first medical episode.
at around 1 p.m. The
flight, carrying 121 pas-
sengers, returned to Fort
Lauderdale.
Mike Jachles, a spokes-
man for Broward Sheriff
Fire Rescue, said the flight
landed at Fort Lauderdale-
Hollywood International
Airport and was met by
,paramedics. They per-
formed what Jachles called,
"advanced life-support
care," though it did not


/


4W
ASSOCIATED PRE$S
In this June 26 file photo, musician Rick Ross arrives at the
BET Awards in Los Angeles. Ross suffered a medical emer-
gency during an airline flight that forced the plane to return
abruptly to a Florida airport.


include CPR.
Jachles could not specify
what exact care Ross was
given, but he said the per-
former was stable, breath-
ing, conscious and alert.
Ross was in a seat when
paramedics reached him
and he walked off the
.plane, Jachles said. He
was taken to a terminal
area where he was evalu-
ited before being trans-
ported to the hospital to be
checked out.
Jachles said there was
a doctor on the plane who


had tried to assist Ross,
though he could not say
what, if anything, the doc-
tor did.
"Nobody told us, either
when we were advised, dis-
patched or on the scene,
no mention was made of
CPR being initiated or in
progress," Jachles said.
Soon after going to the
hospital, Ross contacted
, Memphis officials to tell
them he was still coming.
"He called a member of
our staff and said riot to
believe what's out there


and that he's on his way
to perform at Memphis
Madness," Lamar Chance,
a university athletics
department spokesman,
said Friday afternoon.
"He called us," Pastner
explained Friday evening.
"We talked to him after the
doctors cleared him. He
said it was the altitude."
A video on his Twitter
page Friday night showed
a relaxed Ross talking ,
from an airplane seat on
the second flight and
promising to appear as
scheduled in Memphis.
The Miami-based gang-
sta rapper gained fame
with his husky voice and
lyrics that spotlighted the
grimier side of Miami life.
He has become one of
rap's most popular figures
in recent years.
Ross-has a new album
entitled "God Forgives,
,I Don't," due out in
December. The hefty rap-
per's hits include "Aston
Martin Music," "B.M.E
(Blowing Money Fast)"
and "Hustlin'."

Hotel fires

worker for'
flag pin


ST. AUGUSTINE
A St Augustine hotel
accused of firing an
employee for wearing an
American flag pin says the
employee violated com-
pany policy.
A statement from
the Casa Monica Hotel


defends the firing. The
statement says the hotel
is a homegrown historic
hotel with an American
flag flying over the top.
Still, hotel representa-
tives say the employee
handbook specifies that
"no other buttons, badges,
pins or insignias of any-
kind are permitted to be
worn." The hotel says this
ensures equality for all
employees.
Sean May told WJXT TV
Friday that his manager
ordered him to remove his
lapel pin or go home. May,
a 26-year-old front desk
supervisor, went home. He
says he plans to fight the
policy.


Report
wildlife

violations

by testing

TALLAHASSEE
Florida's reward pro-
gram for citizens who
report wildlife violations is
expanding to include text
messaging.
Citizens have helped the
Florida Fish and Wild Life
Conservation Commission
catch thousands of viola-
tors over the past 30 years.
It began with a tele-
phone hotline. Then online
reporting was added. The
public now can report vio-
lations by texting informa-
tion to Tip@MyFWC.com.

E Associated Press


PEOPLE IN THE NEWS


Jackson case tactic dumped in May


By UNDA DEUTSCH
AP Special Correspondent

LOS ANGELES -- A defense law-
yer in the trial of Michael Jackson's
doctor disclosed in court Friday
that he knew months before trial
that a theoryithat the singer drank a
fatal dose of the anesthetic propofol
would have to be abandoned.
Defense attorney J. Michael
Flanagan, who represents Dr.
Conrad Murray in the involuntary
manslaughter case, made the state-
ment without the jury present.
The idea of Jackson orally giv-
ing himself the fatal dose was long
touted by defense attorneys as a
centerpiece of their case. Documents
had been filed and arguments heard
about studies on the issue.
The attorneys have even referred
to a fruit juice jar found on Jackson's
bedside table, suggesting he had
taken the drug with juice.
Flanagan initially dropped the
bombshell Wednesday that the
defense was abandoning the strat-
egy.
"We are not going to assert at
any point in this trial that Michael
Jackson at any time orally ingested
propofol," said Flanagan., who
revealed he had commissioned a
study that concluded propofol would
not be absorbed into the body when
ingested.
But he did not say when the study
had been done.
Prosecutors and the judge
appeared stunned at the announce-
ment.
At Friday's hearing, on a day when
testimony was not heard, Deputy
District Attorney David Walgren told
the judge, "We are dealing with an
ever-changing defense. It was just a
couple of days ago they abandoned
oral propofol."
"Oh, your honor, that is not cor-
rect," Flanagan said.
"No?' Walgren asked incredu-
lously.
"We abandoned oral propofol
months ago," said Flanagan, saying
they were swayed by a report from


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Toxicologist Dan Anderson, left, testifies under questioning by defense attorney J.
Michael Flanagan during Dr.Conrad Murray's trial in the death of pop star Michael
Jackson..


the leading expert on the drug, who
is expected to testify for the prosecu-
tion next week.
He said Dr. Steven Shafer had
questioned "the bioavailability of oral
propofol," meaning whether it would
be absorbed into the body if swal-
lowed.
Flanagan said the defense decided
to have its own study conducted and,
"We determined back in May that
bioavailability of oral propofol was
not feasible."
Superior Court Judge Michael
Pastor said he had never been
advised in advance that the theory
would be dropped. He said he would
note dealing with Walgren's claims
of an ever-changing defense.
"I don't have to go there," he said.
"It is what it is right now."
Murray was not in court for the
hearing. He has pleaded not guilty
to involuntary manslaughter in the
June 2009 death of the superstar
from an overdose of propofol.
Flanagan's disclosure offered a
backstage look at possible defense
gamesmanship in leading prosecu-
tors to prepare to answer a defense


theory that would never be pre-
sented.
A defense attorney not involved
in the case said it is not an ethical
or legal obligation of the defense to
keep the prosecution posted on its
strategies.
"I don't personally see a violation,"
said attorney Thomas Mesereau Jr.
"You're supposed to operate in good
faith, but you don't have to tell them
every little strategy you intend to
employ .... Maybe this defense team
was debating whether to use the
issue up to the end."
In opening statements, defense
attorney Edward Chernoff told-the
jury he would allege that Jackson
self-administered drugs but did not
specifically mention oral ingestion of
propofol.
In other developments, the pros-
ecution said its last witness will be
Shafer and his testimony could take
a day. The defense said it would call
15 witnesses including police offi-
cers, experts and some character
witnesses. Attorney Nareg Gourjian
estimated that would consume the
rest of next week.


Oct 16:
Actress Angela Lansbury
is 86.
Actor Barry Corbin is,
71.
Bassist C.F Turner
of Bachman-Turner
Overdrive is 68.
Actress Suzanne Somers
is 65.
Guitarist Bob Weir of the


HOW TO REACH US
Main number ........(386) 752-1293
Fax number .............752-9400
Circulation ..............755-5445
Online... www.lakecityreporter.com
The Lake City Reporter, an affiliate of
Community Newspapers Inc., Is pub-
lished Tuesday through Sunday at 180
E. Duval St., Lake City, Fla. 32055.
Periodical postage paid at Lake City, Fla.
Member Audit Bureau of Circulation and
The Associated Press.
All material herein is property of the Lake
City Reporter. Reproduction in whole or
In part is forbidden without the permis-
sion of the publisher. U.S. Postal Service
No. '310-880.
POSTMASTER: Send address changes
to Lake City Reporter, P.O. Box 1709,
Lake City, Fla 32056.
Publisher Todd Wilson.... 754-0418
(twilson@lakecityreporter.com)
NEWS
Editor Robert Bridges .....754-0428
(rbridges@lakecityreporter.com)
ADVERTISING
Director Ashley Butcher ...754-0417
(abutcher@lakecityreporter.com)
CLASSIFIED
To place a classified ad, call 755-5440


Grateful Dead is 64.
Actor Andy Kindler
("Everybody Loves
Raymond") is 55.
Bassist Flea of the Red
Hot Chili Peppers is 49.
Actress Terri J. Vaughn
("All of Us," "The Steve
Harvey Show") is 42.
Singer Wendy Wilson
of Wilson Phillips is 42.


BUSINESS
Controller Sue Brannon... .7540419
(sbrannon@lakecityreporter.com)
CIRCULATION
Home delivery of the Lakp City Reporter
should be completed by 6:30 a.m.
Tuesday through Saturday, and by 730
a.m. on Sunday.
Please call 386-755-5445 to report any
problems with your delivery service.
In Columbia County, customers should
call before 10:30 am. to report a ser-
vice error for same day re-delivery. After
10:30 am., next day re-delivery or ser-
vice related credits will be issued.
In a other counties where home delivery
is available, next day re-delivery or ser-
vice related credits will be issued.
Circulation ..............755-5445
(circulation@lakecityreporter.com)
Home delivery rates
(Tuesday through Sunday)
12 Weeks................. $26.32
24 Weeks ................ $48.79
52 Weeks..................$83.46
Rates include 7% sales tax.
Mail rates
12 Weeks.................. $41.40
24 Weeks...................$82.80
52 Weeks..................$179.40


CORRECTION

The Lake City Reporter corrects errors of fact in news
items. If you have a concern, question or suggestion,
please call the executive editor. Corrections and clarifica-
tions will run in this space. And thanks for reading.


Celebrity Birthdays


Daily Scripture



"How great you are, Sovereign
LORD! There is no one like you,
and there is no God but you,
as we have heard with our own
ears." 2 Samuel 7:22 NIV



Lake City Reporter


Page Editor: Robert Bridges, 754-0428









LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL SUNDAY, OCTOBER 16, 2011


IRAQ: U.S. troops will be leaving by January after all, sources say
Continued From Page 1A


U.S. troops immunity from prosecution
in Iraqi courts, and the Americans have
refused to stay without it. Iraq's leader-
ship has been split on whether it wanted
American forces to stay. Some argued the
further training and U.S. help was vital,
particularly to protect Iraq's airspace and
gather security intelligence. But others
have deeply opposed any American troop
presence, including Shiite militiamen who
have threatened attacks on any American
forces who remain.
Prime Minister Nouri al-Maliki has told
U.S. military officials -that he does not
have the votes in parliament to provide
immunity to the American trainers, the
U.S. military official said.
A western diplomatic official in Iraq
said al-Maliki told international diplomats
he will not bring the immunity issue to
parliament because lawmakers will not


approve it.
A White House spokesman, Tommy
Vietor, said discussions with Iraq about
the security relationship between the two
countries next year were ongoing.
Pentagon press secretary George Little
said the U.S. remains "committed to keep-
ing our agreement with the Iraqi govern-
ment to remove all of our troops by the
end of this year."
"At the same time we're building a com-
prehensive partnership with Iraq under
the Strategic Framework Agreement
including a robust security relationship,
and discussions with the Iraqis about the
nature of that. relationship are ongoing,"
Little said.
The Strategic Framework Agreement
allows for other forms of military coop-
eration besides U.S. troops on the ground.
Signed at the same time as the secu-


rity accord mandating the departure dead-
lines, it provides outlines for the U.S.-Iraqi
relationship in such areas as economic,
cultural and security cooperation.
Iraqi lawmakers excel at last-minute
agreements. But with little wiggle room on
the immunity issue and the U.S. military
needing to move equipment out as soon
as possible, a last-minute change between
now and December 31 seems almost out
of the question.
Regardless of whether U.S. troops
are here or not, there will be a massive
American diplomatic presence.
The U.S. Embassy in Baghdad is the larg-
est in the world, and the State Department
will have offices in Basra, Irbil and Kirkuk
as well as other locations around the country
where contractors will train Iraqi forces on
U.S. military equipment they're purchasing.
About 5,000 security contractors and


personnel will be tasked with helping
protect American diplomats and facilities
around the country, the State Department
has said.
The U.S. Embassy will still have a hand-
ful of U.S. Marines for protection and 157
U.S. military personnel in charge of facilitat-
ing weapons sales to Iraq. Those are stan-
dard functions at most American embassies
around the world and would be considered
part of the regular embassy staff.
When the 2008 agreement requiring all
U.S. forces leave Iraq was passed, many
U.S. officials assumed it would inevitably
be renegotiated so that American forces
could stay longer.
The U.S. said repeatedly this year it
would entertain an offer from the Iraqis
to have a small force stay behind, and
the Iraqis said they would like American
military help.


CHAMBER: New marketing campaign, 'Think Lake City First,' coming soon

Continued From Page 1A


because Lake City is the economic engine
that drives Columbia County, Chamber
officials said.
"We certainly want people to shop at
home in our local retail establishments,
but this campaign is more," Wilson said.
"We have many Chamber members who
offer professional services and we wanted
the marketing initiative to benefit every-
one.
"If you need medical services, Think
Lake City First' If you need a general con-
tractor, a plumber or an electrician, Think
Lake City First' If you need an attorney,
financial services, or to rent a facility for


a family reunion, Think Lake City First'
Ifts a simple slogan that covers everything
and promotes every sector of our business
community."
Chamber Executive Director Dennille
Folsom said she thinks the marketing
campaign will benefit existing Chamber
members and encourage others to join and
get involved in the Chamber's growing
business network.
"The Chamber wants to focus and bring
awareness to community members on all of
the businesses and services we offer here in
town," Folsom said. "We believe 'Think Lake
City First' will serve as a reminder to every-


one that Lake City has so much to offer. Our
goal is to make this campaign much more
than just a year-long venture. We want 'think-
ing' Lake City to become a habit in people's
decision-making process."
Wilson said he plans to use "'Think Lake
City First" as the theme of his Chamber
presidency in 2012, but for the benefit
of local retailers he suggested, and the
Chamber board agreed, it was important to
launch the campaign now when upcoming
holiday spending dominates retail sales.
'The Chamber of Commerce is getting
stronger every day as a business advocate
and now more than ever is the time to


join," Wilson said. "I hope the community
will rally behind 'Think Lake City First'
No one is going to boost our local econo-
my, except us. We all benefit and become
stronger when we work together."
For Chamber of Commerce members,
foam-board lawn signs and static window
cling signs proclaiming the slogan are
available for purchase. Businesses with
marquees are urged to put "Think Lake
City First" on their signs. For more infor-
mation on "Think Lake City First" and
the Chamber of Commerce, call (386)
752-3690 or visit www.lakecitychamber.
com.


Block, Copeland of Sister Hazel going unplugged at FGC


From staff reports


For fans of the alterna-
tive rock music genre,
Sister Hazel should be
fairly recognizable the
Gainesville-based band
could be heard on the radio
airwaves almost
constantly through I
the late '90s and
early 2000s with 4, .
slew of hits like "All
For You," "Change
Your Mind," and
"Champagne e
High."
Since then, the
group's eclectic
following of fans
- the self-described
"Hazelnuts" have
helped the group
continue that suc- -
cess, seen most
recently on its
current album,
" Heartland
Highway," released
in 2010.
Though many
fans are familiar Ken Bl
with the five-mem- Sister I
ber group, the band
originated as an acoustic
duo consisting of Ken Block
and Drew Copeland in the
early '90s. While Block
and Copeland admit they
aren't able to perform their
acoustic shows as often as
they'd like anymore, due
to the band's success, they
perform when they can.
One of those shows will be
on October 22 at Florida
Gateway College's Levy
Performing Arts Center.
The show is sponsored by
FGC Student Activities.
"Here's the thing Drew
and I have been perform-
ing together for 20 years


this spring," Block said.
"Even before there was a
Sister Hazel, there was Ken
and Andrew, and we played
a lot around North Florida
and the Southeast. We
don't get to do it a whole lot
anymore, but we pick situ-


-~ F


COURTESY
ock and Drew Copeland of
Hazel.
nations when we are able to.
It's fun for us it lets us
get back to the songs as'we
first wrote them."
Copeland said he and
Block always enjoy the
acoustic shows, which
allow them to focus more
on the harmonies and
singer/songwriter aspects
of each song.
"It's a good time," he
said. "It gives us the oppor-
tunity to joke around,
where a full band has a
pretty solid setlist and itfs
harder to truly delve into
the harmonies. You don't
get to appreciate those as


much with a full band play-
ing."
Whether you've been
to a Sister Hazel concert
or not, Block says their
acoustic performances are


unique, different than their
live, full-band shows.
"The plugged-in, full-
on Sister Hazel shows
are high-energy Southern
rock," he said. "It's a dif-


ferent thing with just a
couple of guitars and voic-
es. Our roots go back into
sitting down, like around
a fire at Ormond Beach
somewhere, playing, sing-


ing and telling stories.
There's just a different
type of flow we're able
to plug into the audience,
something we can't do
during a typical show."


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Page Editor: Robert Bridges, 754-0428













OPINION


Sunday, October 16, 201 1


OUR


OUR
OPINION


A good


move -


and just


in time
Until its recent move to larg-
er quarters, our area food bank
was the smallest in the state.
Ironic, considering how big
the hearts of local residents
have been in working to keep
it and the bellies of area chil- -
dren, among others full.
The breaking point would
have been the heroic efforts of
15-year-old Jeremy Barwick,
who collected a collossal 65,000
pounds of non-perishable food
last month. The 1,500 square
foot Food Bank of Suwannee
Valley would barely have been
able to accommodate all that
generosity. As noted in a story
on Page 1C of today's Reporter,
though, a group of jocal
businessmen stepped up and'
subsidized larger quarters for
the newly christened Florida
Gateway Food Bank.
At more than twice the size
of the previous facility, it can
hold Jeremy's donation plus
plenty more.
Thafs your cue, folks.
Let's fill this new storehouse
and keep it full year-round.
The need here is great, but
not so great as the spirit of
generosity we see on display in
these parts daily.
By the way, the grand open-
ing of the new food bank, at 53
NW Railroad Street, is set for
5 p.m: Tuesday. Stop by and
' 'check it out. And why not bring
a bag of canned goods along?


H: HIGHLIGHTS
I N HISTORY
Today is Sunday, Oct. 16, the
289th day of 2011. There are 76
. days left in the year.
4 On this date:
p In 1793, during the French
t Revolution, Marie Antoinette,
the queen of France, was
, beheaded.
' In 1962, the Cuban missile
crisis began as President John
E. Kennedy was informed that
reconnaissance photographs
w had revealed the presence of
missile bases in Cuba.
N U Associated Press

Lake City Reporter
Serving Columbia County
Since 1874
The Lake City Reporter is pub-
lished with pride for residents of
Columbia and surrounding counties by
Community Newspapers Inc.
We believe strong newspapers build
strong communities -"Newspapers
get things done!"
Our primary goal is to
publish distinguished and profitable
community-oriented newspapers.
This mission will be accomplished
through the teamwork of professionals
dedicated to truth, integrity and hard
work.
Todd Wilson, publisher
Robert Bridges, editor
Sue Brannon, controller
Dink NeSmith, president
Tom Wood, chairman

LETTERS
POLICY
Letters to the Editor should be
typed or neatly written and double
spaced. Letters should not exceed
S400 words and will be edited for
length and libel. Letters must be
signed and include the writer's name,
address and telephone number for
verification. Writers can have two
Letters per month published. Letters
Sand guest columns are the opinion of
Sthe writers and not necessarily that of


the Lake City Reporter.
. BY MAIL: Letters, P.O. Box 1709,
a Lake City, FL 32056; or drop off at
180 E. Duval St. downtown.
BY FAX: (386) 752-9400.
, BY E-MAIL:
!. news@lakecityreporter.com


LETTERS TO


"Clgus plSPATCH,
RARR.


THE EDITOR


Mired in the past


To the Editor:
I read where some store are putting in
recharge stations so the hybrids and electric cars
can recharge their batterie, while shopping.
We know that all levels of government lack
ICI (imagination, creativity, innovation). It is now
confirmed that the solar panel and automotive
industries also lack ICI. We have just spent hun-
dreds of millions to start a solar panel plant that
has now gone belly-up.
The hybrids and electric cars have a large
piece of steel on them called the "roof." Why


Life Scout

To the Editor:
I sat down and started typing an email to
thank everyone that participated in my Food
Drive. I was trying to thank everyone individu-
ally that participated in it. I soon realized, it
will take up a whole page! There are some that
stood out more than others, b'ut EVERYONE did
something!
In a county of roughly 75,000, I almost
raised 1 pound of food for each person! I
raised 65,257 pounds (32.63 tons)! THAT is
amazing! There were monetary donations,
people that brought food out on the day of
and people that did individual food drives and
donated it to my food drive. I am truly amazed
that I collected the. amount of food that I did.
I have had people that told me what a great
job I did. All I did was organize it, I was only
a tool in the mass production. It showed how
"conimunity oriented" OUR community is!
Thank you to Mr. Todd Wilson and the Lake


then are there no solar panels on them? Or on
the hood of all electric cars? Maybe on the back
shelf or on the dashboard or the trunk lid?
Both industries are apparently mired in the
same old, "We've always done it this way. It's
inefficient, ineffective and costly. But we've
always done it this way." Same as the govern-
ment thinking.. I
But what the heck do I know? I'm just a
grouchy old retired sailor.
W.R.Wright
Lake City


says thanks,

City Reporter! Thank you to everyone at the
Lake City Advertiser! You all did a GREAT job
of getting the word out.
There were lessons learned in this event and
I look forward to doing it again. I will be mailing
out a personal thank you to individuals and busi-
nesses, but that may take a little time. I have to
do some catching up on things that I have put
aside for the last 9 months.
Please know that I thank everyone from the
bottom of my heart I truly am blessed to be liv-
ing in such a wonderful community. I do want to
thank God for making all of this possible. One
person CAN make a difference an'd INSPIRE
thousands! THANK YOU! Also, please watch for
an invitation in the Lake City Reporter to attend
my Eagle Scout Court of Honor where I will be
awarded my Eagle Scout rank.
Jeremy Barwick
Life Scout, Troop 85
Lake City


Distortion and deception


To the Editor:
D.D.D.D.H.C.: The Most Destructive and
Costliest diseases in America
While it is true that there are many diseases
which can take a toll on our everyday lives,
there are none as destructive, costly and deadly
as: distortion, deception, division, distraction,
hypocrisy and corruption. These can devastate
the entire country and all citizens thereof.
Fortunately, there is a cure if treated properly
and in a timely manner. It is not easily adminis-.
tered, nor is it abundant in supply. It is the only
remedy for bringing our country back from the
brink of total destruction. The name of this cure
is renew and restore. In order to implement the
antidote, you have to be diligent in the treatment
and determined in order to not allow the dis-
ease to take root again, the results of this could
prove to be even more devastating than before
treatment. It is worse .than cancer and we know
how aggressive that can be. These diseases can-
not be treated individually because one is the
cause and effect of the other. It doesn't have to
be a painful process, but you can be assured
there will be some discomfort Remember, the
entire system is infected. Be aware, it will not
go quietly or easily. Stand firm and follow the
procedure correctly. When treatment is success-
ful, America will stand stronger and more united
than ever before. This will bring about the true
United States of America.
Allow me to give a brief explanation of
D.D.D.D.H.C


Distortion of our Constitution, rule of law and
of facts pertaining to just about anything, bring
about the ability to deceive; Deception of the
functionality of the system, intent of those in the
system and the facts of the success and abilities
of the system, bring about the promotion of the
system to divide us; Division of the people by
race, religion, economics, politics, etc. is insti-
tuted to distracts us; Distraction is implemented
in order to keep the people from paying atten-
tion to what the system and those in it are really
doing. This allows the hypocrites to do and say
as they see fit; Hypocrisy of the system: execu-
tive, legislative, judicial, financial, educational,
etc. and of organizations and other institutions
in this country leaves the ability to corrupt the
same; Corruption in our government system is
widespread and embedded, allowing those asso-
ciated with the system and other organizations
and institutions to become corrupt
This is what we are up against and trying to
correct So you see how all of there are relevant
to the other. We the people need to come togeth-
er, with one voice, and rid ourselves of these
devastating diseases. We are Americans and we
can accomplish anything we set out to do. Be
careful of whom we elect and be sure they have
the same values and hopes for our future, which
we are beholding to us all. Fight the good fight
(non-violently, of course). This will be the only
prohibition on our success.
Gene Weatherford
Lake City


4A


2012 NIRA SEASON...


and across the country come to
our area for recreation. A good
time is right here in our back-
yard. So get out and enjoy it
* Todd Wilson is publisher of the
Lake City Reporter.


www.lakecityreporter.comv


TE ~TE AM


Todd Wilson
twilson@akecityreportercom


Nothing


to do?


Get real

Don't tell me there's nothing
to do in Lake City. Ifs a tired
statement that simply isn't true.
If you can't find something
of interest to do in Columbia
County and the local area on
just about any given weekend,
then you're not paying atten-
tion.
We are wrapping up one of
these weekends right now. The
events and the Weather were
just about perfect
The Kiwanis Big Toys for Big
Boys fundraiser was the first
event and vendor and crowd
participation were excellent
for an inaugural show. The
expo was held at Mhe Columbia
County Fairgrounds and esti-
mates weie that a few thousand
people went through the gates
during the day.
The event had everything
from new cars and trucks, boats,
golf cars and all-terrain vehicles,
interactive hunting skill exhibits,
a taxidermy showcase, a classic
car and custom motorcycle show
and all the festival food one could
stand.
There were vendor booths ahd
displays of all shapes and sizes.
Chances at winning prizes were
available at nearly every booth.
It was a total man show and it
was a blast Actually, there were
plenty of activities for the ladies
and the kids and everyone
seemed to have a really good
time.
The event used the good-time
atmosphere to boost the expo-
sure and sales of partnering
vendors, but the underlying,
good-spirited goal of this expo
was to raise money to help build
another park for the children of
Lake City. Kiwanis Clubs have
the dedicated focus to center
all of their projects worldwide
around improving the lives of
children.
So if you went and participat-
ed in Big Toys for Big Boys on
Saturday, your gate admission,
if you spent no other money
during the day, Went to a good
cause.
That was the new. We had the
"old" festival in action, too.
The Alligator Warrior Festival
now calls O'Leno State Park
home and actually seems to fit in
better on the banks of the Santa
Fe River inside the state park. Its
a natural setting to see historians
re-enact life in the early settler
days and also catch a glimpse
of early American Indian life in
northern Florida.
On the entertainment front,
this is concert week. On
Saturday night, the monthly gig
on the Florida Gateway College
entertainment calendar is the
acoustic concert delivered
by the two front men of the
Gainesville-based group Sister
Hazel. Drew Copeland and Ken
Block will perform all of their
hits at the show inside the Levy
Performing Arts Center. A
few tickets still remain for this
show, but buy them early in the
week if you expect a seat
On Friday through Sunday
at the Spirit of the Suwannee
Music Park, ift's time for the
autumn visit of Magnolia Fest.
The music festival draws thou-
sands to the best outdoor music
venue in the state and enter-
tains with an eclectic blend of
alternative music.
People from across the region














HARDER: Plans new network for national broadcast of classic TV, movies

Continued From Page 1A


hits would perform in the
studio.
The station manager
liked the way he handled
himself on the air and
offered him a disc jockey
job. Harder said he
arranged his class sched-
ule in high school so his
study halls were at the end
of the day.
The teachers who moni-
tored study hall never took
attendance, so he sneaked
out of school early every
day to get to the station in
time for his shift, which
ran from 2 p.m. to 10 p.m.
Eventually, the princi-
pal heard the show and
called Harder into the
.office.
"He asked me about
the show and if it was
taped," he said. "When
I told him the truth, the.
principal said he'd turn a
blind eye if I wouldn't tell
anyone."

RISING CAREER

After he graduated
high school, 17-year-old
Harder found another
job hosting a morning
show for an FM station.
He created a group of
wacky characters to
entertain listeners dur-
ing their morning drive
to work.
But he wanted to be
closer to his parents,
who lived about 40 miles
outside Chicago, so he
brought a 20-minute
demo tape to the station
manager at WYNR in
Chicago with hopes he'd


be hired.
"He plugs in the tape
and he's rolling in laugh-
ter the entire time,"
Harder said. "He told me
to come back at 3 a.m. to
prepare for the 6 a.m. to
9 a.m. morning show."
Four months later, the
station was sold and the
new owners changed to
an all news format. It was
time to look for a new
job.
Harder said he saw
a Tampa radio station
ad for disc jockeys and
applied. He was hired
immediately and started
working the same day.
"It was a constant
party," he said. "If you
drank on the air, they
didn't care. If you got
drunk on the air, they
didn't care."
Eventually, Harder
branched out and helped
produce TV commercials
and ads for candidates
running for public office.,
In 1972, he got his first
job as a radio talk show
host discussing con-
sumer issues. His show
criticized companies he
believed were overcharg-
:ing or misleading custom-,
ers.
Soon, coi-porate America
drew his attention and his
audiences grew. He criti-
cized companies that fired
employees and moved
overseas to increase prof-
its.
"I saw this happening
over and over again," he
said.
He drew the ire of the


federal government when
he said free trade agree-
ments would bankrupt the
country.
In 1990, he bought the
Telford Hotel in White
Springs and started his
radio show, "For the
People." The show was
syndicated to nearly 300
stations nationwide.
He kept the hotel run-
ning while he broadcast
his program from the
lobby. His show rose to
the No. 5 radio program
in the nation. He puzzled
some listeners, however,
because it was unclear
how he leaned politically.
"Nobody could label
me because my concern
was the people who wake
up in the morning and
make this nation work,"
he said.
He also drew the ire of
Hillary Clinton for making
her husband's sexual indis-
cretions a frequent topic
on his radio show.
Best-selling author
Christopher Anderson
described Clinton's feel-
ings about Harder in his
book "American Evita,"
published in 2004.
"Hillary made no secret
of loathing radio talk show.
host Chuck Harder, who
frequently delved into
Bill's sexual escapades on
the air," Anderson wrote.
Harder said it was no
surprise with the IRS
audited his nonprofit
People's Radio Network
over six months.
"The people who loved
Bill Clinton hated me," he


said.
In June 1996, Harder's
talk show ended when he
agreed to create a new net-
work with the United Auto
Workers. The new station
was called the United
Broadcasting Network and
was scheduled to feature
some of the nation's top
consumer advocates on
both sides of the political
spectrum.
Harder said he was
squeezed out of the agree-
ment through a hostile
takeover by the UAW. He
said the agreement cost
him $1 million and he filed
a lawsuit.
"It's been settled," he
said. "I got a number of
settlements."

NEW CONCERNS

In 1999, Harder fell and
suffered serious leg inju-
ries. '
He saidhis insurance
company was so slow to
approve treatment that the
injuries to his knees and
ankles healed before the
bones could be properly
set Now he is confined
to a wheelchair while he
waits for a new set of leg
braces.
Since the accident,
Harder said he has suf-
fered several strokes.
Despite his health prob-
lems, Harder's mind is still
sharp and his opinions are
pointed.
"I believe the U.S. is in
the hands of criminal poli-
ticians right now," he said.
He believes government


officials are withholding
information about the
Sept. 11, 2011 terrorist
attacks. Harder said every
aircraft is required to file
a flight plan. Deviate from
that plan for even a few
minutes and the FAA will
be on the radio demanding
an explanation, he said.
"How did those high-
jackers fly around for an
hour?" he said. "I don't
buy it. Something is very
wrong. Why didn't they
bring them down?"
The more immediate
concern is the govern-
ment's apparent indeci-
sion to do anything about
powerful electromagnetic
pulses from strong solar
flare activity predicted to hit
the planet sometime in late
2012 or early 2013.
If the flares are as power-
ful as predicted by some
scientists, Harder said the
results could be catastroph-
ic. The flares could poten-
tially wipe out power grids,
telecommunications, com-
puters and most electronic
equipment worldwide.
In 1859, similar flares
wiped out Western
Union telegraph lines.
More recently, a solar
flare burned out power
transformers in Eastern
Canada, leaving some
areas without power for
nine months, he said.
Harder said the feder-
al government is inten-
tionally withholding
information while qui-
etly buying millions of
military MRE meals to
prepare for the oncorm-


ing disaster.
He shows a thick
metal ring with a ground
wire that could easily be
installed on electronic
equipment to protect it
from an electromagnetic
pulse.
Another solution is
to launch missiles with
nuclear warheads deep
into space between the
' earth and sun. The war-
heads would be detonated
once a pulse from the flare
approaches the planet
"It will neutralize the
flare without endangering
the public," he said. "It's
the only way to protect
the planet. This is really
important. People have
to call their congressmen
and scream about it."
If powerful solar flares
strike, Harder said a *
large percentage of the
world's population will
die within six months
because cars won't run,
factories won't be able
to produce goods, farm-
ers won't be able to grow
crops and people won't
be able to communicate
unless they talk face to
face.
He said it will take
12 years to rebuild the
power grid and by that
time society may have
fallen apart.
"We have all the nec-
essary technology to
protect the grid," he
said. "But I don't think
we have enough time to
do anything. We won't
be ready."


OBITUARIES


John Michael Wawzynski
John Michael Wawzyqski passed
away October 12th, 2011 in Lake
City, Florida. John was born De-
cember 2nd, 1966 in Bainbridge,
Maryland. He graduated from
Duncan U. Fletcher High School
in 1984. His service in the Army
Reserves and ROTC demonstrat-
ed his love for his country. John
earned his Associate of Science
degree in Nuclear Medical Tech-
nology from Santa Fe Commu-
nity College in Gainesville, Flor-
employed by -
Shands Hos-
pital in Lake
City Florida as
a nuclear med-
ical technolo-
gist. John was
a member of
Boy Scout Troop i
40 at Beach
United Meth-
odist- Church
and attained
the rank of Eagle Scout. He
was an avid surfer and loved
sailing our area waters.
John was preceded in death by
his father Felix Wawzynski. Sur-
vivors include his mother, Grace
Wavwzynski; his son Johnathan
Wawzynski of Lake City; his
brother Michael Wawzynski
(Laura); his sister Felicia Re-
gan (John); and many cousins,
nieces, nephews and friends.
A Mass of Christian Burial
will be celebrated at 11 a.m.,
Saturday, October 22nd in St.
Paul's Catholic Church, with
Reverend William Kelly as Cel-
ebrant. Interment will follow
in H. Warren Smith Cemetery.
In lieu of flowers, donations may
bemadetotheBeachesEmergency


Assistance Ministry (B.E.A.M.)
or the charity of your choice.
Please visit our online Trib-
ute at www.quinn-shalz.com.
Services under the direction
and care of QUINN-SHALZ,
A FAMILY FUNERAL
HOME, Jacksonville Beacfi, FL.
Madelyn Lee Powell
Madelyn Lee Powell, 4 month
old daughter of Marlin and Gin-
ger Powell of White Springs, FL.
passed away Saturday, Oct. 15,
2011 following an extended ill-
ness at Shands at U.F. in Gaines-
ville, FL. Madelyn was an inspi-
ration to all who had the chance
to meet her. She will be remem-
bered fondly by family members
as angel who was always loved.
Survivors include her parents,
Marlin and Ginger Thomas Pow-
ell; three brothers, Travis, Tyler
and-Marlin Powell; three sisters,
Magon Adams (George), Kai-
tlin Powell and Renee Powell;
grandparents, Shirley Burrows,
Robert Burrows and the late
Gessner and Esther Powell and
the late Harvey Thomas. Numer-
ous aunts, uncles, and cousins.
Funeral services will be held
at 2:00 -P.M. Monday, Octo-
ber 17, 2011 at the Lake City
Church of the Nazarene on
Hwy 47 in Lake City,. FL.
The family will receive
friends at the church begin-
ning at 1:00 P.M. on Monday.
Harry T. Reid Funer-
al Home, Jasper, FL. is in
charge of arrangements.

Obituaries are paid advertise-
ments. For details, call the Lake
City Reporter's classified depart-
ment at 752-1293.


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1-75 roadwork will mean delays


From staff reports

In conjunction with the resur-
facing of Interstate 75 in southern
Columbia County, US 441 in Ellisville
at the interchange with 1-75 will be
resurfaced beginning next week,
according to the Florida Department
of Transportation.
Plans are for the travel lanes
between State Road 238 and south
of Southwest Howell Road to be
milled, or the top layer of asphalt
removed, and replaced with new


asphalt. The work is being done
by Anderson Columbia Company of
Lake City which is under contract
to V.E. Whitehurst & Sons, Inc., of
Williston, the contractor hired by the
FDOT for the $17.3 million project.
The repaving on US 441 will take
several days to complete.
Also, the entrance and.exit ramps
at the US 441 interchange have been
realigned to make it easier for motor-
ists to look left for oncoming traf-
fic when exiting the ramps. These
ramps will be repaved beginning


Sunday night at 9 p.m.
The 10-mile long 1-75 resurfacing
project is about 75 percent complete,
almost 25 percent ahead of schedule.
It is not due to be complete until the
Spring of 2012.
Plans are to begin placing the final
layer of asphalt in early November
and the project could be completed
before the end of the year depending
on the weather.
Motorists should expect some
delays over the next week and allow
extra time to reach their destination.


The Columbia County Tobacco Free
Partnership and the Columbia County
Health Department have come together
to form a partnership in order to create a
tobacco free community. This year, the
partnership is focusing on polices that
effect our youth. We are working to-
wards developing 100% tobacco free
schools. Please come join us and help
protect our youth.
All community members, service
workers, and school aged youth...are in-
vited to attend.


Colmbi Cont


Tobcc FreIarterhi


Event: Columbia County Tobacco Free Partnership
Meeting
When: Wednesday, October 19, 2011
Where: Central School Board Office Room 153
409 SW St. Johns ST.
Lake City, FL 32055
Time: 1:15-2:15pm



All partnership meetings are open to the public.
For more information on how to become involved


in you local Tobacco Free Partnership, please
contact:
Kyle Roberts
Columbia County Health Department
386-754-7083 or Kyle_Roberts@doh.state.fl.us.


BE FR


TIMIS


LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL SUNDAY, OCTOBER 16, 2011


Page Editor: Robert Bridges, 754-0428


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LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL SUNDAY, OCTOBER 16, 2011


Toys for big boys and girls, too


Local Kiwanians'
expo a big hit at
the fairgrounds.

By GORDON JACKSON
giackson@lakecityreporter. corn

Organizers of
the first-ever
Big Toys for
Big Boys
fundraiser
learned yesterday that the
same things that get the
testosterone flowing in
men also appeal to women
and children.
People were lined up at
the gates of the Columbia
County Fairgrounds at
9 a.m. to look at new
and classic cars, trucks,
motorcycles, ATVs, hunt-
ing gear, martial arts
demonstrations and a
taxidermist booth on dis-
play.
Janet Howard, of Lake
City, said it was her idea
to drag her friend Preston
Van Dyke to the event.
"I had to twist his arm,"
Howard said. "There are a
lot of things here I'd like
to have."
Van Dyke said it didn't
take much convincing
when Howard told him
what she wanted to do..
"I had a good time," he
said. 'There were a lot of
things to look at."
Tommy Tompkins,
a Kiwanis Club board
member and one of the
organizers, said visitors
streamed into the fair-
ground throughout the
day. He predicted it will
easily be the most suc-
cessful fundraiser of the
year for the civic organi-
zation.
"We hope to clear
$20,000 in ticket sales,
vendors and sponsors," he
said. ., .
Tompkins said he wasn't
surprised at the large num-
ber of women and chil-


GORDON JACKSONILake City Reporter
Brianna Torrez hammers a nail into a box she built at the Big Toys for Big Boys fundraiser yesterday at the Columbia County Fairgrounds. Brianna was helped'
by Home Depot employees Shelly Brown and Brett Macy.


dren because organizers
planned it as a family event
with plenty of activities for
everyone of all ages.
Kiwanis Club members
credit Norbie Ronsonet
for the idea at a meet-
ing four months ago. He
said everyone agreed it
was a great idea when
he proposed it to fellow
Kiwanians.
'The response is what
we're so tickled about," he
said. "The county really
supported it I think it's
been a pretty great turn-
out."
Scott McCauley, owner
of In Season Archery, said


he was busy throughout
the day talking to visitors
about his merchandise.
Many people of all ages
and genders used bows
provided by In Season
Archery to fire arrows
at targets set up at his
display. McCauley said he
was not surprised at the
large number of women at
his display.
"There is not an age
or sexual advantage in
aichery," he said. "This is
something a 10-year-old
.can do as well as an adult."
Mabel Cecil, of Lake
*City, brought her grand-
daughter Brianna Torrez


to the event because she
believes women enjoy
many of the same outdoors
activities as men.
"We're starting to get up
there with the guys," she
said. "I like the same stuff
as guys. It's challenging.,'
June Kirby, of Like Oak,
said she accompanied her
husband Ronnie because
she was curious about
what would be on display.
But she also had an ulte-
rior motive.
"I want to make sure
he keeps his wallet in his
pocket," she said. "I'll be
standing real close."
Ronnie Kirby said there


was no debate when he
told her where he planned
to go Saturday.
"I was driving, so she
had no choice," he said.
"So far, I like it."
Tompkins said next
year's event will be much
bigger because the many
larger companies that
he invited didn't have
enough advance notice
to attend. Larger out-
doors companies only
go to established events
where organizers can
prove enough visitors will
show up to make it worth
their time and expense.
He said it's also possible


organizers will find a cor-,
porate sponsor for next
year.
Tompkins believes club
members will be able to
prove larger companies
will not waste their time
if they set up a booth at
next year's event, based on
yesterday's turnout
Proceeds will be used
to make improvements
at two parks built by the
Kiwanis Club in Lake City
and to build a new park in
the city.
"We wanted it to be a
family event," Tompkins
said. "I think it's already a
success."


Health fair draws a crowd at mall


Health screenings,
plus fingerprinting
of youngsters.
By GORDON JACKSON
giackson@lakecityreporter. corn
Eva Wilkes had two rea-
sons to attend the third
annual Community Health
Fair at the Lake City Mall
on Saturday.
And she wasn't there for
free health screenings or
to learn about medical ser-
vices offered by area pro-
viders. Instead she wanted
her two grandchildren
fingerprinted .and photo-
graphed in case authorities
ever need the information
to identify them.
'If a child comes up
missing, we have
something to work
r n,' a sheriff's vol-
Jnteer said of the
identification pro-
gram for children.
'Hopefully, we'll
never have to use
it.'

Members of the
Volunteer Service Unit
at the Columbia County
Sheriff's Office also asked
Wilkes for other informa-
*tion such as scars, birth-
marks, weight, and eye
and hair color, which was
included in a laminated ID
card for each child.
"It gives me great peace
of mind," Wilkes said. "It's
a great idea."
Jim Finley, a sheriff's
service unit volunteer, said
none of the information is
kept by authorities. The
intent is for parents to have
the information to help
investigators solve missing
children cases.


"If a child comes up
missing, we have some-
thing to work on," he said.
"Hopefully, we'll never have
to use it."
Corlette Duhart, of Lake
City, said she brought her
three children to the sheriffs
booth for the same reason.
"I want to secure my chil-
dren," she said.
Lois Merrick, a registered
nurse at Shands University
of Florida bone marrow
transplant unit and one of
the health fair organizers,
said people were offered free
health screenings to check
for diabetes, high cholester-
ol, abnormal blood pressure
and glucose levels.
"Most everything here is
free," she said.
Merrick said the turnout
is growing at the health fair
each year. She believes the
increased attendance might
have something to do with
the economy.
One booth was staffed by
Columbia High School stu-
dents who were trained to
take blood pressure in their
health academy classes.
Clay McCauley, a
Columbia High student,
said he plans to go to
school to be a registered
nurse after he graduates
high school. He said par-
ticipating in the health fair
helps confirm he is mak-
ing the right decision to
work in the medical field.
Charlene Bowles, of
Lake City, said she let
McCauley test her blood
pressure because it's been
higher than normal in
the past. McCauley told
Bowles her blood pres-
sure was just slightly
above average.
"I just wanted to have
peace of mind," Bowles
said. "I'm glad everything
is OK"


DUKUUN JACKSONILale y Repr:.ner
Charlene Bowles gets her blood pressure checked by Clay McCauley at a community health
fair at the Lake City Mall yesterday. The health fair featured free health screenings and infor-
mation by 26 vendors.


The Lake City Repor

would like to congrati

Cutacombs
on their October 11, 2011 ribbon cutting cere
their new location at 169 NW Gwen Lake
Congratulations owner Gail Hussar

- -S--


rter

late


mony for
Ave.


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Page Editor: Robert Bridges, 754-0428
Page Editor: Robert Bridges, 754-0428









LAKE CITY REPORTER DECISION 2012 SUNDAY, OCTOBER 16, 2011


Romney challenges tea party's clout


BY CHARLES BABINGTON
Associated Press

WASHINGTON Mitt
Romney's early success in
the Republican presidential
race is challenging the tea
party's clout Will it contin-
ue to pull the GOP sharply
right? Will it slowly fade?
Or merge with mainstream
Republican elements in a
nod to pragmatism, some-
thing it's hardly known for?
On the surface, Romney's
strength seems at odds with
the tea party's fiery suc-
cess in ousting Republicans
seen as compromisers, and
in making the House GOP,
caucus more ideological,
even when its leaders plead
for flexibility.
Romney defends the
government's 2008 bank
bailouts, plus the mandated
health insurance he initi-
ated as Massachusetts gov-'
ernor. He says he can work
with "good Democrats."
Although he later changed,
Romney once supported
abortion rights, gun control
and gay rights.
.These positions run
counter to the beliefs
and goals of many tea
party activists scattered
throughout the country.
Yet Romney is faring bet-
ter in polls, fundraising
and debates than are con-
tenders with stronger tea
party credentials, includ-
ing Michele Bachmann,
Rick Santorum and Rick
Perry.
Several Republican strat-
egists, and even some tea
party leaders, say they
aren't surprised or alarmed.
Their overarching goal is
to defeat President Barack
Obama next year, they say,
and if Romney is best-posi-
tioned to do that, they'll
endure his shortcomings,
"The perception that
tea partyers are ideologi-
cal purists is wrong," said
Sal Russo, a long-time
Republican strategist in
California and a leader of
the Tea Party Express. "We
are a broad-based move-
ment," he said, "and we are
looking to win in 2012."
DannyDiaz, aWashington-
based Republican strategist
unaligned with any presi-
dential candidates, agrees.
"The tea party movement
is an anti-Washington move-
ment," he said. While Perry
and Herman Cain might
make a more dynamic claim
to that mantle, -he said,
Romney .has never lived in
Washington, and tea party
activists won't rule him out
"Many of them are prag-
matists," Diaz said. They
desperately want to oust
Obama, he said, and "they
need a candidate that's
electable."
A CBS-New York Times
poll found that tea partyers
are more satisfied with the
GOP presidential field than
are Republicans in:general.
Cain was the top choice
among tea party activists,
with Romney second.
Some campaign veterans
see bigger problems' ahead
for Romney.
Polls of Republicans show
Romney holding steady
at about 25 percent while
Bachmann, Perry and Cain
take turns making surges.
"That tells me that 75 per-:
cent of the primary voters
would really rather have
someone else," said GOP
lobbyist and consultant
Mike McKenna.
Many tea party activists
have little or no loyalty to
the Republican Party, and
McKenna predicts big prob-
lems next year if they feel
their conservative values
were sacrificed for political
expediency. "Romney would
cause enormous numbers
of tea party-type voters to


simply not show on game
day," he said.
:The chief question,
he said, "is whether one
candidate will be able to
aggregate the anti-Romney
Republicans before it is
too late." Perry seems the
likeliest choice, McKenna
said, "but the clock is tick-
ing."


ASSOCIATED PRESS
In this Sept. 4 file photo Tea Party activists protest against Republicarn presidential candidate and former Massachusetts Gov. Mitt Romney as they hold their
own rally outside a Tea Party Express rally, where Romney appeared, in Concord, N.H. On the surface Romney's strength seems at odds with the tea party's
fiery success in ousting Republicans seen as compromisers. Yet he is faring better in polls, fundraising and debates than are contenders with stronger tea
party credentials, including Michele Bachmann, Rick Santorum and Rick Perry.



Cain's vision resonates with voters


By SHANNON McCAFFREY and the notion .that the
Associated Press messenger is as important
as the message.
JACKSON, Tenn. His everyman image is
Herman Cain is firing up resonating.
the crowd at a tea party "In the field right now,
rally in this WestTennessee he's the most, like me,"
town when the generator said Jimmy Hoppers, a 60-
powering his sound system year-old physician from
shudders to a halt Jackson, who was hoping
Cain stands awkwardly to meet Cain so he could
for a few moments then hand deliver a $1,000
suddenly begins to sing, donation to his campaign.
Slowly at first but gain "He's run a business and
ing in speed, he belts out paid the bills. He's authen-
"Impossible Dream" in the tic."
rich baritone he's honed in On Friday night :Cain,
church choir. who is African-American,
"Youknow, when it's your drew about 2,000 people
rally, you can do what you some in workshirts and
want to do!" Cain says as overalls and nearly all white
he finishes with a raucous to a feed barn in rural
laugh. The 500 or so sup- Waverly, Tenn.
*porters who have jammed This is a socially conser-
the strip mall parking lot vative country and Cain -
to hear the Republican ever the salesman-knows
Party's newest; tar speak his audience. He closes by
roar their approval; invoking God and sing-
Momentum., restored, ing the hymn "He Looked
Cain launches into' pitch Beyond My. Faults."
for his signature 19-9-9 "I -love him," gushed
tax plan, and the crowd truck driver James Bland
is right there wth him, after Cain spoke. "He
chanting 9-9-9 along with doesn't talk down to you. I
the Georgia businessman, think 'he gets the working
The plan would; scrap man." .
the current tax code and "And it makes me; so
replace it with a 9 percent happy that he's put God
tax on personal income back into things," chimed
and, corporations as well in Bland's wife, Karen.
as.a new 9 percent nation- In a year of anti-govern-
al sales tax. ment fervor, Cain is casting
The 65-year-old'simprob- himself as the anti-politi-
able campaign for the pres- cian Main Street candidate
idency is all about momen- who would bring common-
tum right now. How does sense business know-how
he maintain the wave he's to the bureaucratic thick
riding in recent polls that of Washington. The for-
have catapulted him from mer conservative radio
an also-ran in the GOP race show host is brash and
to the elite top.tier? straight-talking, saying that
There are many rea- "stupid people are ruining
sons his bid could fade America." He mimics lib-
as quickly as it rose. He erals with a high-pitched
acknowledged Friday whiny voice.
that he will trail former "Well, he doesn't have
Massachusetts Gov. Mitt foreign policy experience,"
Romney and Texas Gov. he says to laughs. "And the
Rick Perry significantly guy we have in there now
in fundraising. Cain. has does?"
never held elected office Cain doesn't ignore the
and could wilt under the race issue, saying that some
rigors of the campaign critics have called him "a
trail -and the withering racist" and an "Oreo" for
scrutiny coming his way. leaving the "Democrat
But Cain's moment is plantation."
right now, and the former "I have grown up telling
Godfather's pizza chief it like it is and I am going to
executive is marketing continue to tell it like it is,"
himself with practiced skill, he said at a campaign rally
banking on his charisma in a suburb of Memphis,


where he was born. "I don't
talk politician."
Voters are responding
He drew large and enthu-
siastic crowds Friday as he
kicked off a two-day bus
tour in Tennessee, hop-
scotching to a trio of tea
party events across 'the
state.
Tea party activists make
up the backbone of Cain's
support and he speaks
their language fluently.
"My fellow patriots," he
begins some sentences.
References; to freedom
arid liberty pepper his
remarks..
He dives into an anec-
dote about the Constitution
and takes a jab at President
Barack Oba'ia.
"You knov what? I kinda
like my guns and my
Bible," he says.
And at every turn, he
stresses B-i's business
background, noting that
at a recent debate fellow
Republican candidates,
dismissed his 9r9-9 tax.
plan as politically dead dtn-
arrival.
"Politicians put togeth-
er thing,; that will pass.
Businessmen put together
plans that solve the prob-
lems," he said.
Indeed, Cain's 9-9-9 plan
seems to have put him on
the map.
Following the rally in
Jackson, Cain bolted off
the stage and shook hands
with onlookers, including
Linda Fowler-Cole, who
had wandered over after
a shopping trip to Lowe's
and was wearing a T-shirt
with an oversized picture
of Obama
"I heard the 9-9-9 guy
was here and I came to
take a look," the Democrat
said. "I like Obama, but
that 9-9-9 is catchy."
In Bartlett, Tenn., Cain
drew a number of black
supporters who were excit-
ed at the prospect of a con-
servative African-American
of his stature.
'To me he represents
what Martin Luther King
was talking about when he
talked about his dream,"
Reginald Tooley, a 49-year-
old physical therapist from
Memphis, said. "With hard
work and self-reliance you


can do anything you want"
Cain says 'he has been
buoyed by support from
regular folks.
"You just don't know how
much this encourages me,
the fact that you all came
out tonight," he said in


Waverly.
S"You see, this is what
the folks in D.C. don't get
because they don't come
out here to m6et with
you."


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Page Editor: Robert Bridges, 754-0428


7A











8A LAKE CITY REPORTER WEATHER SUNDAY, OCTOBER 16, 2011


THE WEATHER


SUNNY MOSTLY CHANCE


SUNNY STORMS



HI88 L57 HI88 L62 85 L3o


ISOLATED
STORMS


t 179 L0 52


SUNNY



HI 78 LO 50


NATIONAL FORECAST: A weak frontal boundary will stretch across the entire United States
today. Showers associated with this system will fall over portions of the Northeast, Great
Lakes, and portions of the Ohio Valley. Showers will be scattered across the Northwest and
Intermountain West as well.



NATIO L FORECAST MAP 3 p mted


REGI F ,M f. I .,rS"a I, I Oc ob 1


Talahass0ee
88/53 ,...

86/65 8a- / 2Cy
85/62


* Miuti
87/55 j
Lake City.
88/57

.,87/59
Ocala
"38/61

S 8


'*85/66


City
Cape Canaveral
Daytona Beach


D Lac Pt. Lauder
DatW ach Fort Myer
8V66 Galnesvill
Jacksonvil
S Ca Key West
7/67 869 Lake City
Miami


dale
ls

lle


Monday
82, 75/pc
85/73/s
85/79/t
89/73/t
87/63/s
85/69/s
85/78/t
88/62/s
85/79/t
85/80/t
87/65/pc
88/71/s
85/70/s'
83/72/s
88/63/s
89/72/t
87/61/s
84/78/t


Tuesday
83i 74/sn
86/75/sh
86/76/sh
85/74/sh
85/64/t
84/71/t
86/78/sh
85/63/t
86/78/sh
87/76/sh
86/66/t
85/73/sh
82/60/t
81/58/t
83/61/t
85/74/sh
83/61/t
85/77/sh


An exclusIve
7 service
7 brought to
i our readers

Today's
ultra-violet The Weather
radiation risk
for the area on 1I
a scale from 0
to 1"M



,&V41. Forecasts, data and
Graphics 0 2(1 Weather
',,P ( Central, LP, Madison, WIs.
WeT .r www.weatheriubllshqr.com


LAKE 4 iY ALMANAC


TEMPERATURES
High Saturday
Low Saturday
Normal high
Normal low
Record high
Record low


PRECIPITATION
Saturday
Month total
Year total
Normal month-to-date
Normal year-to-date ,'


85
54
... 81
59
92 in; 1970
38 in 1977


0.00"
2.08"
30.62"
1.35"
42.48"


SUN
Sunrise today
Sunset today
Sunrise torn.
Sunset torn.


7:33 a.m.
6:59 p.m.
7:34 a.m.
6:58 p.m.


MOON
Moonrise today 10:02 p.m.
Moonset today 11:31 a.m.
Moonrise torn. 10:54 p.m.'
Moonset torn. 12:22 p.m.



Oct. Oct Nov. Nov.
19 26 2 10
Last New First Full


Warnm Front

Stationary
Front
Occluded
Front


i4I Fougasfte aj^LM 21-M


Saturday Today


CITY HI/.o/Pcp.
Albany NY 62/54/0:
Albuquerque 73/51/0
Anchorage 42/37/0
Atlanta 77/56/0
Baltimore 71/51/0
Billings 48/37/.01
Birmingham 78, 51'0
Bismarck 46/29/0
Bolise 68'501'0
Boston 67:.56 0
Buffalo 51/45/.35
Charleston SC 83/57/0
Charleston WV 65/51/0
Charlotte 75/51/0
Cheyenne 73/42/0
Chicago 61/47/0
Cincinnati 66/50/0
Cleveland 56/48/.01
Columbia SC 82/53/0
Dallas 86/59/0
Daytona Beach 81/62,/0
Denver 76; .49, 0


HI/Lo/W
60/43/sh
83/49/s
43/30/Sh
82/57/s
71/56/pc
55/39/sh
85/58/s
55/33/s
66/41/sh
64/54/pc
57/51/sh
82/58/s
78/54/s,
79/50/s
63/45/pc
62/48/pc
76/49/pc
60/49/sh
82/51/s
90/66/s
84/66/s
72/43/pc


Saturday Today


CITY HI/Lo/Pcp.
Des Molnes 67/41/0
Detroit 57/46/.09
El Paso 85/59/0
Fairbanks 36/27/0
Greensboro 71/47/0
Hartford 65/53/0
Honolulu 81/74/0
Houston 84/58/0
Indlanepolls 63/46/0
Jackson MS 82/49/0
Jacksonville 83/52/0
Kansas City 70/34/0
Las Vegas 83/63/0
Uttle Rock 76/52/0
Los Angeles 67/63/0
Memphis 75/54/0
Miami 82/79/0
MinneapolIs 58/43/0
Mobile 86,'52.'0
New Orleans 83/60/0
New Yorkit 64/54/0
Oklahoma City 81/56/0


HI/Lo/W
64/43/s
55/45/sh
90/56/s
37/23/c
77/54/s
65/45/pc
86/70/s
90/68/s
75/48/pc
88/58/s
85/66/s
71/50/pc
91/67/s
90/60/s
70/59/s
88/63/s
84/78/t
56/41/s
86/63/s
86/67/s
66/56/pc
90/60/s


CITY
Omaha
Orlando
Philadelphia
Phoenix
Pittsburgh
Portland ME
Portland OR
Raleigh
Rapid City
Reno
Richmond
Sacramento
St. Louis
Salt Lake City
San Antonio
San Diego
San Francisco
Seattle
Spokane
Tampa
Tucson
Washington


Saturday Today
HI/Lo/Pop. HI/Lo/W
67/38/0 63/41/pb
82/64/0 87/67/s
69/56/0 68/54/pp
92/71/0 100/70/s -
59/49/0 63/47/sh-
63/54/0 62/46/pc:
54/50/0 63/45/s -
73/47/0 78/53/s
68/31/0 57/39/sh
72/51/0 74/43/s
72/52/0 76/55/s
78/57/0 80/55/s
68/47/0 80/55/pc
78/51/0 75'51, pc
82/57/0 90/68,'s
67/63/0 71.65,'s
68/60/0 71/57/pc
48/43/0 58/49/pc
50/36/0 60/34/pc
81/66/0 86/66/s
93/62/0 96/62,s
70/50/0 71/55/pc


.7p On this date in
aSunay nday, 1980, a large por.
tion of southeast
South Dakota was
S' belted with winds
of50to70mph.
A f. Yankton, S.D.,
S reported winds of
'- . up to 70 mph while
'tSioux Falls, S.D.,
S Was hit with a 62
h gust. .."


CITY
Acapulco
Amsterdam
Athens
Auckland
Belling
Berlin
Buenos Alres
Cairo
Geneva
Havana
Helsinki
Hong Kong
Kingston


HI/Lo/Pcp. HI/Lo/W CITY
S84/75/0 87/79/t La Paz
57/36/0 57/37/s Uma
64/59/0 61/53/r, London
64/50/0 63/53/s Madrid
68/45/0 70/48/s Mexico, City
'54/30/0 57/36/s Montreal
81 '55/0 7650,'s Moscow
82 66/0 86, 69, s Nairobi
59/45/0 68,,44ts Nassau
82/73, 0 86.70'1 NewDelhi
4634'0 50/46/C Oslo
84/73/0 83/73/s Panama
84/73/0 .88/76t1 Paris


HI/Lo/Pcp.
64/37/0
64/59/0
63/43/0
79/48/0
66/52/0
57/52/0
.37/34/0
75/61/0
84/79/0
93/70/0
.52/25/0,
81/75/0
61/37/0


HI/Lo/W
64/30/c
67/60/pc
65/47/pc
78/47/s
70/53/pc
55/48/c
41/32/pc
78/64/t
91,'77 /t
93.' 70,'s
50,35,s
88/75/t
64/45/s


CITY
Rio
Rome
St. Thomas VI
San Juan PR
Santiago
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Sydney
Tel Aviv'
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HI/Lo/Pcp,
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72/43/0
63/48/0
88/81/0
73/64/0
81/64/0
79/72/0
52/48/0
52/30/0
45, 37/0


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-86/77/t
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. .. ... . . . .. . ... . ... .. .. ... 111 1 |1[ 1/11 -: : ; . .. . .. .. ... . .- - -









Lake City Reporter


Story ideas?

Contact
Tim Kirby
Sports Editor
754-0421
tkirby@lakecityreporter.com


SPORTS


Sunday, October 16, 2011 ,


www.lakecityreporter.com


Section B


BRIEFS


Zumbathon for
cancer Monday


The Pink Party
Zumbathon to benefit the
Suwannee River Breast
Cancer Awareness
Association is 5:30-7 p.m.
Monday at the Skating
Palace.
Donation is $10 and
proceeds go to help
those in the community
who are experiencing
financial hardships while
undergoing cancer
treatments, and don't
forget to wear pink.
For details,
contact Sarah Sandlin on
Facebook at "Lake City
Zumba" or by e-mail at
lakecityzumba@gmail:
corn.
nrOOTMLLNu,
Q-back Club
meets Monday
The Columbia County
Quarterback Club meets
at 7 p.m. Monday in the
Jones Fieldhouse.
For details, call club
president Blake Lunde at
867-0296.
ff WWMTE FOOTIALU
Q-back Club
meeting Monday
The Fort White
Quarterback Club's
weekly meeting is 7 p.m.
Monday in the teacher's
lounge at the high
school.
The meeting on
Oct 31 (Halloween) has
been moved to Nov. 1.
For details, call"
club president Shayne
Morgan at 3974954.


Moe's Night
on Wednesday
Fort White High
baseball has a Moe's
Night fundraiser from
5-8 p.m. Wednesday.
For details, call Jeanne
Howell at 288-5337.
* From staff reports

GAMES

Monday
Columbia High
boys golf in District 2-2A
tournament at Killearn
Estates in Tallahassee,
9 a.m.
Columbia High
girls golf in District
2-2A tournament at Haile
Plantation in Gainesville,
10 a.m.
Columbia High
volleyball vs. Union
County High, 5:30 p.m.
Tuesday
Fort White High
volleyball vs. Columbia
High, 6 p.m. (JV-5)
Wednesday
Columbia High
bowling vs. Fort White
High, Suwannee High at
Lake City Bowl, 4 p.m.
Fort White High
volleyball at Union County
High, 4 p.m.
Thursday
Fort White High
volleyball at Oak Hall
School, 6 p.m. (JV-5)
Columbia High JV
football at North Marion
High, 7 p.m.
Friday
Columbia High
football vs. Middleburg
High, 7:30 p.m.
Fort White High
football at Fernandina
Beach High, 7:30 p.m.
Saturday
Host Columbia High,
Fort White High cross
country in Alligator Lake
XC Invitational, 9 a.m.


Pine mount


Frank Vining
excelled as
player, coach.
By TIM KIRBY.
tkirby@lakecityreporter.com
Frank Vining
came off
Pinemount
Road in west
Columbia
County and exhibited
sports excellence at all
stages.
Vining graduated from
Columbia High in 1962,
then went to play college
football at Coffeyville ,
(Kan.) Community College
and Tampa University. He
became a highly successful
coach, taking three Florida
basketball teams to the
state playoffs and winning
state championships in
volleyball.
Vining was a feared
fastpitch softball pitcher,
back when Lake City had
men's leagues. He pitched
softball in the Hillsborough
County area for many
years (57 innings once
in one weekend), played
semi-pro football for a
season and considered
trying out for a new team
starting in Florida the
Miami Dolphins.
For the Tigers, Vining
lettered in four sports
all that were offered in
.those days as a junior
and senior. He played
quarterback and safety in
football, guard and
forward in basketball,
shortstop and pitcher in
baseball and ran the half-
mile in track.
Vining followed his
brother James, another
outstanding athlete, to
Columbia and Coffeyville.
They were two of six
children of Kie and Maggie
Vining. The Vinings were
great sports fans, and had
their regular seats at sports
events.
"They always said we
could not start a game
unless my dad was there,"
Vining said.

PRODIGY continued on 3B


prodigy


Photos by JASON MATTHEW WALKER
Lake City Reporter
ABOVE: Frank Vining digs
out a photograph of himself
in his mid-20s when he took
his first coaching job.

LEFT: Columbia County'
resident Frank Vining is
enjoying retirement, but often
reflects on the good old days
when he led three Florida
basketball teams to the state
playoffs along with winning
state championships in
volleyball.


Indians come


Out slinging


JASON MATTHEW WALKERJLake City Reporter
Fort White High's AJ Legree (3) attempts to catch a pass thrown by quarterback
Andrew Baker Friday in a game against Williston High.


Baker throws for
season High in
Fort White win.
By TIM KIRBY
tkirby@lakecityreporter com
FORT WHITE -Fort
White High came out sling-*
ing the football in its 35-20
home win over Williston
High on Friday.
In the first quarter, the
ground-oriented Indians
had eight passing attempts
by quarterback Andrew
Baker out of 16 plays. The
first five fell incomplete.
"We were underthrowing
and overthrowing and drop-
ping balls," Fort White head
coach Demetric Jackson
said. "We were fired up and
ready to go, but we were
not blocking guys. There
is so much more we could
have shown."
Trailing 7-0, Fort White
went to the tried and true.
Starting at the Indians
21, Soron Williams ran six
straight times for. 35 yards.
That opened up the pass-
ing game and Baker got


hot He completed a 35-yard
pass to AJ. Legree to set
the Indians up for Williams'
short touchdown run and
a tie score with 5:36 left in
,the half.
On Fort White's next
possession Baker complet-
ed five -more consecutive
passes to again move the
Indians to a first-and-goal.
Williams added his second
touchdown with 25 seconds
left in the second quarter
to give Fort White a 14-7
halftime cushion.
It held up, though
Williston (3-3) opened the
second half with a touch-
down drive. Brandon
Preston moved under cen-
ter for the Red Devils, who
lost quarterback David
Heinkel to an ankle injury.
The PAT kick hit the left
upright and bounced out
and Williston lost its last
chance to tie.
Williams ran the kickoff
back 33 yards to the Indians
43 and Fort White was in
the end zone nine plays
later. Baker hit Legree from
INDIANS continued on 2B











LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS SUNDAY, OCTOBER 16, 2011


SCOREBOARD


TELEVISION

TV sports
Today
AUTO RACING
2 p.m.
SPEED ARCA, Toledo 200, at
Toledo, Ohio
3:30 p.m.
ABC IRL, IndyCar, W6rld
Championships, at Las Vegas
7 p.m.
ESPN2 NHRA, Arizona Nationals,
at ChandlerAriz. (same-day tape)
EXTREME SPORTS
4:30 p.m.
NBC Dew Tour Championships,
at Las Vegas
GOLF
9 a.m.
TGC European PGATour, Portugal
Masters, final round, at Vilamoura,
Portugal
2 p.m.
TGC PGA Tour, The McGladrey
Classic, final round, at St. Simon Island,
Ga.
s p.m.
TGC NationwideTour, Miccosukee
Championship, final round, at Miami
(same-day tape)
7:30 p.m.
TGC Champions .Tour, AT&T
Championship, final round, at San Antonio
(same-day tape)
9:30 p.m.
TGC LPGA Malaysia, final round, at
Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia (same-day tape)
MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL
4 p.m.
TBS Playoffs, National League
Championship Series, game 6, St. Louis at
Milwaukee (8 p.m. IfALCS is completed)
8 p.m.
FOX Playoffs, American League
Championship Series, game 7, Petroit at,
Texas (if necessary)
MOTORSPORTS
4 p.m.
SPEED MotoGP .i World
Championship, Australian Grand ,Prix,
at Phillip Island, Australia (same-day
tape)
5 p.m.
SPEED.-- FIM World Superbike, at
Portimao, Portugal (same-day tape)
NFL FOOTBALL
i p.m.
CBS Regional coverage
FOX- Regional. coverage
4 p.m.
CBS Regional coverage
4:15 p.m.
FOX Doubleheader game
S8 p.m.
NBC Minnesota at Chicago
PAN AM GAMES
3 p.m. -
ESPN2 Events TBA, at Guadalajara,
Mexico
SOCCER
9 p.m.
ESPN :- MLS, CD Chivas 'USA at
Los Angeles ;
Monday
NFL FOOTBALL
8:30 p.m.
ESPN Miami at N.Y.Jets
NHL HOCKEY
7 p.m.
VERSUS Colorado at Toronto
PAN AMERICAN GAMES
8:30 p.m.
ESPN2 Events TBA, at Guadalajara,
Mexico

BASEBALL

MLB playoffs

LEAGUE CHAMPIONSHIP SERIES
American League


Texas 3, Detroit 2
Texas 7. Detroit 3, 11 innings
Detroit 5,Texas 2
Texas 7, Detroit 3, I1 innings
Detroit 7,Texas 5
Saturday
Detroit at Texas (n)
Today
Detroit (Fister 11-13) at Texas (Lewis
14-10), 8:05 p.m. (if necessary)
National League
Milwaukee 9, St. Louis 6
St. Louis 12, Milwaukee 3
St. Louis 4, Milwaukee 3
Milwaukee 4, St. Louis 2
Friday
St. Louis 7, Milwaukee I ,.St. Louis leads
series 3-2
Today
St. Louis (Jackson 12-9) at Milwaukee
(Marcum 13-7), 4:05 or 8:05 p.m
Monday
St. Louis (Carpenter 11-9) at
Milwaukee (Gallardo 17-10), 8:05 p.m. (if
necessary)

FOOTBALL

NFL standings

AMERICAN CONFERENCE


Buffalo
SNew England
N.Y.Jets
Miami

Houston
Tennessee
Jacksonville
Indianapolis.

Baltimore
Cincinnati
Pittsburgh
Cleveland


San Diego
Oakland
Kansas City
Denver .


East
W L
4 I
4 I
2 3
0 4
South
W L
3 2
3 2
1 4
0 5
North
W L
3 1
3 2
3 2"
2 2
West
W L
4 1
3 2'
2' 3
1 4


T Pct PF PA
0.800164 120
0.800165 119
0.400121 125
0.000 69 104
TPct PF PA
0.600127 95
0.600105 94
0.200 59 115
0.000 87 136

TPct .PF PA'
0.750119 57
0.600110 94
0.600102 89
0.500 74 93

TPct PF PA
'0. 800120 109
0.600136 133
0.400 77 150
0.200105 140


NATIONAL CONFERENCE


Washington
N.Y. Giants
Dallas
Philadelphia

New Orleans
Tampa Bay
Atlanta
Carolina

Green Bay
Detroit
Chicago
Minnesota


East
W L
3 I
3 2
2 2
I .4
South
W L
3 2
2 3
1 4
North
W L
5 0
5 0.
2 3
1 4
West


TPct PF PA
0.750 83 63
0.600127 123
0.500 99 101
0.200125 132

T Pct PF PA
0.800157 125
0.600 87 125
0.400104 130
0.200116 132

T Pct PF PA
01.000173111
010 0159 89
0.400 107122
0.200111 106


W L T Pct PF PA
San Francisco 4 1 0.800142 78
Seattle 2 3 0.400 94 122
Arizona I 4 0.200 96 121
StLbouls 0 '4 0.000 46 113'
Today's Games
St. Louis at Green Bay, I p.m.
Jacksonville at Pittsburgh, I p.m.,
Philadelphia atWashington, I p.m.
San Francisco at Detroit, I p.m.
Carolina at Atlanta, I p.m.
Indianapolis at Cincinnati, I p.m.
Buffalo at N.Y. Giants, I p.m.
Cleveland at Oakland, 4:05 p.m.
Houston at'Baltimore, 4:05 p.m.
Dallas at New Engladd, 4:15 p.m. ,
New Orleans atTampa Bay, 4:15 p.m.
Minnesota at Chicago, 8:20 p.m.
Monday's Game
Miami at N.Y. Jets, 8:30 p.m.
Open: Arizona, Denver, Kansas City,


San Diego, Seatdle,Tennessee
S Sunday, Oct. 23
Houston at Tennessee, I p.m.
Washington at Carolina, I p.m.
San Diego at N.Y.Jets, I p.m.
Seattle at Cleveland, I p.m.
Denver at Miami, I p.m.
Atlanta at Detroit, I p.m.
Chicago vs. Tampa Bay at London,
I p.m.
Kansas City at Oakland, 4:05 p.m.
Pittsburgh at Arizona, 4:05 p.m.
St. Louis at Dallas, 4:15 p.m.
Green Bay at Minnesota, 4:15 p.m.
Indianapolis at New Orleans, 8:20 p.m.
Monday, Oct. 24
Baltimore at Jacksonville, 8:30 p.m.
Open: Buffalo, Cincinnati, N.Y. Giants,
New England, Philadelphia, San Francisco

College scores

Friday
San Jose St. 28, Hawaii 27

AUTO RACING

Race week
INDYCAR
INDYCAR WORLD
CHAMPIONSHIPS
Site: Las Vegas.
Schedule: Today, race, 3:45 p.m. (ABC,
3-6 p.m.).
Track: Las Vegas Motor Speedway
(oval, 1.5 miles).
Race distance: 300 miles, 200 laps.
FORMULA ONE
KOREAN GRAND PRIX
Site:Yeongam, South Korea.
Schedule: Today, race, 2 a.m. (Speed,
1:30-4 a.m., 11:30 a.m.-2 p.m.).
Track: Korea International Circuit
(road course, 3.493 miles).
Race distance: 192.1 miles, 55 laps.
NHRA FULL THROTTLE
NHRA ARIZONA NATIONALS
Site: Chandler,Ariz.
Schedule: Today, final
eliminations (ESPN2,7-10 p.m.).
Track: Firebird International Raceway.

HOCKEY

NHL schedule
Thursday's Games
New Jersey 2, Los Angeles I, SO
Minnesota 2, Edmonton I, SO
N.Y. Islanders 5,Tampa Bay I
Washington 3, Pittsburgh 2, OT
Calgary 4, Montreal I
Colorado 7, Ottawa I
Detroit 2,Vancouver 0
Phoenix 5, Nashville 2
Chicago 4,Winnipeg 3
Dallas 3, St. Louis 2
Friday's Games
Carolina 4, Buffalo 3
Anaheim I, San Jose 0
Saturday's Games
Calgary at Toronto (n)
Colorado at Montreal (n)
N.Y. Rangers at N.Y. Islanders (n)
Los Angeles at Philadelphia (n)
Buffalo at Pittsburgh (n)
Ottawa atWashington (n)
Winnipeg at Phoenix (n)
Tampa Bay at Florida (n)
New Jersey at Nashville (n)
Detroit at Minnesota (n)
Columbus at Dallas (n)
Boston at Chicago (n)
Vancouver at Edmonton (n)
St. Louis at San Jose (n)
Today's Game
St. Louis at Anaheim' 8 p.m.
Monday's Games
Colorado at Toronto, 7 p.m.
Florida at Tampa Bay, 7:30 p.m.
Pittsburgh at Winnipeg, 8:30 p.m.
Nashville at Edmonton, 9:30 p.m.
Anaheim at San Jose, 10:30 p.m.


South Carolina escapes


Bulldogs'bite, 14- 12


Associated Press

STARKVILLE, Miss.
- Alshon Jeffrey caught a
4-yard touchdown pass from
Connor Shaw with 3:50 left
in the fourth quarter and
No. 15 South Carolina ral-
lied to beat Mississippi
State 14-12 on Saturday.
In his third career start,
Shaw struggled for much
of the afternoon. But the
South Carolina (6-1, 4-1
Southeastern Conference)
sophomore threw a per-
fect pass to Jeffrey, who
stretched his 6-foot-4, 229-'
pound frame over two
Mississippi State (3-4, .0-
4) defenders to catch the
game winner.
Shaw completed 21 of 31
passes for 160 yards, one
touchdown and two inter-
ceptions.
South Carolina's Marcus
Lattimore came into the
game averaging an SEC-
best 129.8 rushing yards
per game, but only man-
aged 39 against the hard-
hitting Bulldogs. He left the
game in the fourth quarter
with an apparent leg injury.


zone, and No. 23 Michigan
State held off .Denard
Robinson and No. 11
Michigan 28-14 on Saturday
for its fourth straight
victory over the
Wolverines.
The Spartans (5-1, 2-0 Big
Ten) equaled their longest
winning streak over their
in-state rivals.
Michigan (6-1, 2-1) lost
for the first time under
coach Brady Hoke. The




Unscramble these four Jumbles,
one letter to each square,
to form four ordinary words.


RHLLIS



I OTFRAC I


No. 23 Michigan State Ii W I
28, No. 11 Michigan 14 ,, A -Vy y-1


EAST LANSING, Mich.
- Keshawn Martin scored
twice in the third quarter
on similar lunges to the end


Ans: Jumbles: KAZOO

Jumbles: KAZOO


Wolverines had 'a chance
to tie it, but Robinson was
sacked on fourth-and-1
from the Michigan State
9-yard line with 6: 16 to
play.
Robinson later threw an
interception, and Isaiah
Lewis returned it 39 yards
for a touchdown with 4:31.
left to make it 28-14. Shortly
after that, Robinson was
shaken up by a hit and left
the game.


THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME
by David L. Hoyt and Jeff Knurek


WINNERS AT I
THE ARCTIC OLYMPICS |

Now arrange the circled letters
to form the surprise answer, as
suggested by the above cartoon.


(Answers tomorrow)
PRONE IMPALA ABATED


Saturday's I Answer: The librarian was very clear about how she
felt because she was AN OPEN BOOK


Harris' 3 TDs leads Miami


past North Carolina 30-24


Associated Press

CHAPEL HILL, N.C.
- Jacory Harris had an
opportunity to look at his
statistics, but he declined.
He already knew every-
thing he needed to know.
Harris passed for 267
yards and three touch-
downs to help Miami beat
North Carolina 30-24 on
Saturday.
"I'm just happy we got
the W," Harris said.
The Hurricanes (3-3, 1-2
Atlantic Coast Conference)
nearly lost a 24-point lead,
surviving a sluggish sec-
ond half for their first road
win under Al Golden.
Miami, which gained 263
of its 311 total yards in
the first half, avoided the
first 0-3 start in league play
in program history. The
Hurricanes also picked up
their first win in five tries at
.North Carolina.
'This was very key," line-
backer Sean Spence said.
"We feel like we're back in
the ACC race now."
Bryn Renner passed for
288 yards and two touch-


downs for the Tar Heels (5-
2, 1-2), who trailed 27-3 late
in the second quarter.
Giovani Bernard rushed
for 110 yardsand a touch-
down, becoming the first
North Carolina player to
rush for at least 100 yards in
five consecutive games since
Ethan Horton in 1984.
The Tar Heels scored
two fourth-quarter touch-
downs, cutting Miami's
lead to 30-24 on a 20-yard
catch by Reggie Wilkins
with 46 seconds remaining.
Curtis Campbell recovered
the onside kick for North
Carolina after Miami's
LaRon Byrd was unable to
secure the ball.
North Carolina moved
the ball to Miarni's 30 before
Spence sacked Renner. The
Tar Heels had a final play
from the Miami 37, but. a
pass to Bernard with later-
als to Erik Highsmith and
Jheranie Boyd was stopped
after a 13-yard gain.
The Tar Heels finished
with 429 total yards,
although 183 came in the
fourth quarter against a
softened Miami defense.


INDIANS: Beat Williston

Continued From Page 1B


22 yards out
Fort White soon added
a 78-yard scoring drive.
Williams softened the
defense with a 16-yard run,
then Baker and Legree
hooked up or 15 yards
and got -an additional 15
yards on a face mask pen-
alty.
Baker found Wesley Pitts
down the middle and Pitts
bowled through a defen-
sive back and into the end
zone for a 30-yard'
touchdown.
Following afumblerecov-
ered .by George Fulton,
Baker hit Trey Phillips
on a six-yard touchdown
pass.
Baker finished 15 of 25
for 199 yards, his season
high for yardage.
"We -wanted to give
Andrew chances to get
his completion percentage
up," Jackson said. "He had
touchdown passes to three
different receivers. Wesley
and Trey got their first


ACROSS
1 Howl at the
moon
4 Revival shout
8 Vane dir.
11 Board menj.
13 From memory
14 Call in sick
15 Jai -
16 Ship's banes
18 The jitters
20 colada
21 been
had!
.22 PlUnging
: neckline'
24 Temporary
peace
27 Least
30 Mine and
thine ,
31 Became
frayed
32 Skirt bottom
34 UK country
35 Elf
36 Have
supper
37 Weirdly
39 Accord maker


ones and we are pleased
with that"
Pitts also had a sack for
minus-14 yards to help kill
a Williston drive when the
score was 21-13.
Phillips led the Indians
in catches and added 59
yards rushing on three car-
ries.
Legree stopped a late
touchdown threat with a
tackle on Preston for a loss
of 10 yards. He also had
an interception, though
it came on fourth down
and pinned the Indians, at
their 1 '
Despite a sluggish start,
Fort White dominated in
yardage, 406-211.
"We competed .and we
won 'the game," Jackson
said. "I wish we could have
done that earlier to get
some younger guys in the
game."
. Fort White improved to


4-2 and
Fernandina
this week.


40 Laugh
syllable
41 Collide with
42 African
antelope
45 Relish tray
items
49 Bauxite's
metal
53 Tide during .
the moon's
first quarter
54 Med.
personnel
55 Hoarfrost
56 Belgian
river
57 Sturdy tree
58 Purina rival
59 Showed the
way

nnWNM


,travels to
Beach High


"We did not have any
rhythm all day," Renner
said. "But we came back to
fight, and that's a credit to
our character."
Miami's Lamar Miller
entered the game as the
ACC's leading rusher, but
his streak of five consecu-
tive 100-yard games ended.
He managed just 29 yards
on 16 carries.
Miami found other ways
to move the ball, jumping
on the Tar Heels for a 17-
0 lead after one quarter.
North Carolina had out-
scored its opponents by a
combined margin of 42-3 in
the first quarter before the
Hurricanes rolled into town.
"We didn'twantto be their
next victim," Golden said. "I
think we started fast, but
you still have to execute. I
think we did that today."
Miami led 14-0 before its
defense ever took the field.
Harris marched the
Hurricanes 71 yards for a
touchdown on the game's
opening drive, capping
the 13-play series with a 4-
yard scoring pass to Mike
James.


Williston 7 0 7 20
FortWhite 0 14 7 1.4 35
First Quarter
W-Preston 53 pass from Heinkel
(Deciderio kick), 3:26
Second Quarter
FW-S. Williams 2 run (Jones kick),
5:36
FW-S. Williams 5 run (Jones kick),
:25
Third Quarter
W-Strange, 10 pass from, Preston
(kick failed ), 7:36
FW-Legree 22 pass from Baker
(Jones kick), 4:08
Fourth Quarter
FW-Pitts 30 pass from Baker (Jones
kick), 10:39
FW---Phillips 6 pass from Baker (Jones
kick), 8:'36
W-Williams recovered fumble in end
zone (Deciderio kick), 1:22
Fort White Williston
.First downs 17 9
Rushes-yards 37-207 29-47
Passing, 199 164
Comp-Att-Int 15-25-0 12-18-1
PuntsiAvg 3-32. 5-36
Fumbles-Lost 2-I 3-I
Penalties-Yards 7-71 7-47
I INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS
RUSHING-Fort White, S. Williams
-18-91, Phillips 3-59, T. Williams 5-27,
Cormler 5-20, Chatman 1-7, Baker 2-5,
Sanders 2-2, Jones I-(-4). Williston, Neal
8-48, Rollins 2-6, Heinkel 2-2, Burns 3-1,
Preston 14-(-10).
PASSING-Fort White, Baker 15-25-
199-0.Williston, Heinkel 4-9-86-0, Preston
8-9-78-I.
RECEIVING-Fort White, Phillips
8-60, Legree 6-109, Pitts 1-30. Williston,
Strange 9-96, Preston 2-60, Hall 1-8.


Answer to Previous Puzzle


ESP G|M|C S L IpIM
LOO PURR W I S|P
GU I G EST A MA H
'A NS R R E K


WF T LN EOOM

LILT II SO ADE
OPLE NOMA
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[SPOT ETE NE B
6 Htp! time |in iU 'I


Coffee or 6 Hot time in
1 Coffee or Quebec
vanilla 7 Bird beak
2 Wagon part 8 Hindu
3 Two .attire
semesters 9 Pisces or
4 Crop up Libra
5 Beaded shoe .


10 Joy
A10 jAamson's
pet
12 Sociology
course
17 Fencing
category
19 Day before
22 Exceedingly
23 Wool supplier
24 Boot part
25 Viking letter
26 Impulse
27 Sly
28 Climb a rope
29 Water the
plants
31 Ploy
33 Call-- cab
35 Dessert cart
item
36 Game tile
38 Baba au -
39 "2001"
computer
41 Bard's teen
42 Syrup brand
43 Longest arm
bone
44 Twilight
46 Face cover
47 Self-
confidence
48 Went fast
50 401(k) cousin
51 World Cup
zero
52 Out caller


2011 UFS, Dist. by Universal Uclick for UFS


Page Editor: Brandon Finley, 754-0420


I


10-17


191









LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS SUNDAY, OCTOBER 16, 2011


PRODIGY: From Columbia great to coaching legend around the state
Continued From Page 1B


Football transition
Vining's senior year in
football was the midpoint
of Columbia's 100 years.
And, like this year, the
Tigers were playing under
a new head coach.
Before the 1961 season,
Don Brown had left to join
the staff at the University
of Florida and assistant
Wink Criswell took over as
head coach. Criswell, who
had starred as a player at
CHS, had Bobby Sandlin,
Joe Fields and Ed Thomas
on his staff.
It was the days of one-
team towns and Columbia
was playing Leon, Ocala,
Gainesville, Palatka, Live.
Oak and Starke.
The Tigers were 3-
2 when they ventured
into Georgia to play
Thomasville, a game they
lost 20-14.
"We were leading (14-
0) and they scored right
before the half and we
ended up losing," Vining
said. "That was the turning
point of the season. From
then on, we had trouble
winning a game and we
lost the close ones."
Columbia ended
the season at 4-6. One
of the losses was 14-
7 to Macclenny for
homecoming. Vining was
the escort for homecoming
queen Merrill Lynn Page.
The one win down the
stretch was 7-6 over Bishop
Kenny in a game played in
the Gator Bowl.
Bishop Kenny led all
'the way when Vining
recovered a fumble at the
(,olumbia 36 late in the
gamb. The Tigers moved
across the 50 with a couple
of first downs.
With the ball on the 30,
Vining rolled out to pass
and had to scramble away,
from the rush. He ran 30
yards for the tying points
and Jimmy Melton kicked
the game-winning.,PAT, .,
-Columbia ran the 'T1 '
formation on offense and'
run was the operative
word. Vining was allowed
to pass the ball, especially
since Columbia had Randy
Jackson as a tight end.
Jackson went on to play
football at Florida and for
the Chicago Bears.

High-level hoops
Columbia moved into
basketball season under
Fields, who had led the
Tigers to a district title
the previous year. The
Tigers were seasoned by
their playoff loss to Tampa
Robinson.
"I thought we would be
pretty good and we were,"
Vining said.
Columbia again won
district and entered the
state tournament at Florida
Gym, only. to have to face
defending state champion


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City
Frank Vining sifts through old laminated clippings featuring games he coached, and pauses at a page showcasing his w
and losses throughout the years. :


Seabreeze. High in the first
game. To make matters
worse, Columbia had lost
to the Sandcrabs twice
(57-49, 59-50) in the
regular season.
Columbia won the
game in overtime, 59-54.
Seabreeze got 28 points
from Larry Gagner, who
went on to play football at
Florida and in the pros.
Next up was another top
team in the state, Bishop
Kenny. Vining hit 13 of 14
-free throws in the game
including two to win it,
53-52.
"I guess I was a nemesis
to Bishop Kenny that year,"
Vining said. "I don't really
remember shooting the
free thro(vs. I shot them
like I always did and they
went in."
After knocking off
the big boys, Columbia
faced Apopka Memorial
in the final. Though not a
favorite, Apopka had ,
Dan Goolsby and he lit
up the Tigers for 32
points.
"Wherever Goolsby shot
from, it seemed to go in,"
Vining said. "They weren't
any layups, either. It's a
good thing they didn't.
have the 3-point shot then.
They would have beaten us
worse."
The game went into
overtime and finally hinged
on a block/charge call that
went against Columbia and
Vining, and left Lake City
fans heartbroken.
"It was real late and he
just ran over me," Vining
said. "We didn't get the


call. I remember all the
support we had from here
that followed us down
there."
Vining, who scored 49
points in the three games,
and Jackson, who scored
50, were both named to the
all-state tournament team
- the only school to have
two players so honored.

College athlete
After graduation, Vining
once again followed
brother James. This time
to Coffeyville to play
football, where James was
the starting quarterback.
'"They called it a
scholarship," Vining
said. "My freshman year
I played nothing but
defense, but I was starting
quarterback and safety my
next year."
After two years at
Coffeyville, Vining had
two options New
Mexico State and Tampa
University.
-"I said, I'm heading
home, and went to Tampa,"
Vining said.
Vining broke his hand
working at quarterback in
spring training and ended
up playing cornerback and
safety his two years.
After college Vining
played semipro football
with the St Pete Blazers
for $75 per game. The
team played in
Knoxville and Montgomery
and the big rival was
Lakeland.
"The league broke up
after one year," Vining


said. "I started to go to
Miami and try out for the
Dolphins, but decided not
to go."
Vining had landed a.
job at East Bay High and
decided the bird in the
hand might be better.

Becoming a coach
Vining *as hired as a
PE teacher and assistant
football coach at East
Bay. Soon, he accepted an
unusual invitation.
"The basketball players
asked if I would take over
as coach and I did," Vining
said.
The East Bay gym was
an auditorium and the
team played its home
games 10 miles away in
Wimauma. In his second
season (of three), Vining'
had the Indians in the state
playoffs.
It was the same year
Columbia made the final
four and both teams lost
in the semifinals. Monroe
beat East Bay, 76-63, and
the Tigers lost to eventual
state champion Roosevelt
High, 86-83.
Never one cowed
by following success,
Vining applied for the
Hillsborough High job
when coach Bob Shiver left
to coach the University of
South Florida team. Shiver
had taken Hillsborough
to the state playoffs six
straight years and the team
was state runner-up in
1965-66-69.
"I was a nervous wreck,
but we had great players,"


Vining said.
Vining led Hillsboro
to another runner-up:
in 1970 (loss to Carol
and also made the sta
playoffs in 1972 and 1
After nine years Vin
was lured into applyin
for the Brandon High
basketball job. He was
hired, but the basket
coach went back on h
decision to leave the
school.
"I had to take over
volleyball and coached
girls basketball for on
year," Vining said. "I
know anything about
volleyball. I just did th
basics." .....

Success at state
Those volleyball ba
at Brandon proved go
enough. Vining's volley
teams made the state
playoffs first in 1979 a
went on to 14 appear
through 1999.
From r.1983-86, the
Eagles won two state
championships (1984-
and were runners-up t
(1983-85). Brandon .als
made the final four in
1989-90.
Vining finished witi
volleyball career record
424-93.
After finally taking
basketball reins, Viniq
had Brandon in the fiu
four in 1984-85. The E
lost in the final to Pain
Beach Gardens (63-55
in 1984 and lost by tw
eventual state champi
Carol City in the 1985


semifinals.
Brandon made the state
playoffs four more times
under Vining. The coach's
career hoops record was
602-199.
In those first playoff
years at Brandon,
Vining coached Dwayne
Schintzius and Toney
Mack.
Schintzius played at
Florida, where he helped
the Gators to their first
SEC championship, and
later played in the pros.
Mack, who scored 71
points in a game on Feb.
22,1985, went to Georgia
before falling on hard
times.
"I had a run-in with
Norm Sloan," Vining said.
"They were there every
day at practice and I just let
Dwayne know he was not
obligated to go to Florida.
Toney was the real deal.
If we had the 3-pointer
then, I don't know how
many points he would have
scored. Dominique Wilkins
was his hero and that is
why he went to Georgia.
Central Missouri wanted
him really bad. Dwayne
was very shy in school and
y Reporter Toney was a tremendous
ins kid."

Coming back home
ough Vining coached and lives
finish old-school.
City) "I used the Joe Fields
te philosophy keep it
978. simple stupid," Vining said.
ning "We didn't beat ourselves.
1g' All the years I never had a
parent second-guess me. I
s played who I thought was
all the best and they knew
is .that I treated them all
fairly. I doq't know how
many times I picked kids,
girls up for practice or took
d them home."
e After retiring, Vining
didn't moved back to Lake City'
and built on the property
ie his parents had left to their
... children, He lives with
wife, Terri, who kept the
books for basketball and
volleyball for his 37-year
sics career.
)od' Vining, 67, has two.
eyball' ,, daughters, Amanda
and Julie, and four
md grandchildren. Both
nces daughters played volleyball
Sfr him.
Vining has 75 acres and
keeps busy with cows he
86), owns with a sister, planting
twice a garden and picking up
so pecans this time of year.
"I was ready to get out
of Tampa," Vining said. "
h a built on the old homestead,
rd of between two camellia
bushes that were here. I go
the to a few football games and
ng some softball and
nal volleyball games with
;agles my niece (CHS teacher
m Sharon Coats). There is
5) always something to do on
o to a farm."
on One other thing. "I can
still throw a softball."


Manuel's 2 TDs helps Florida State rout Duke, 41-16


Associated Press

DURHAM, N.C. EJ
Manuel threw for 239 yards
and two touchdowns to help
Florida State beat Duke 41-
16 on Saturday, giving the
Seminoles their first win in
a month.
Manuel had three com-
pletions of at least 50 yards
in the first quarter, includ-
ing a perfectly thrown
50-yard scoring toss deep
over the middle to Rodney
Smith. Manuel followed
with a 51-yard throw out of
his own end zone to Kenny
Shaw on the next drive,
which ended with Devonta
Freeman's 10-yard touch-
down run that helped the
Seminoles (3-3, 1-2 Atlantic
Coast Conference) jump
ahead 24-3, barely a minute
into the second quarter.
Florida State had no
trouble holding that lead,
snapping a three-game
losing streak with its first
victory since a 62-10 romp
over Charleston Southern
on Sept 10. The Seminoles
also improved to 17-0 all-


time against the Blue Devils
(3-3, 1-1).
Duke had won three
straight games to build
some optimism in David
Cutcliffe's fourth season.
But this game ended up
looking a lot like every
other trip the Seminoles
have made to Wallace Wade
Stadium since joining the
ACC two decades ago -
with the Blue Devils failing
to make it to the end zone
until the fourth quarter
when the outcome was all
but decided.
Manuel also ran for 62
yards and a pair of touch-
downs. His 3-yard scor-
ing pass to Nick O'Leary
midway through the third
quarter gave Florida State
its largest lead at 34-3,
then he answered a pair of
touchdowns from the Blue
Devils by scoring on a 6-
yard keeper with 9:49 left.
That made it 41-16, giving
the Seminoles .at least 40
points in all seven trips to
Durham.
Strange as it sounds,
FSU desperately needed to


beat Duke to regroup. The
Seminoles entered the year
with hopes of contending
for a national championship
only to see them dashed by
the end of September.
They beat overmatched
opponents in their first two
games and stood at No. 5
nationally heading into a
home game with then-No.
1 Oklahoma. But Manuel
sprained his left shoulder in
the third quarter of that 23-
13 loss, then missed the loss
at Clemson before return-
ing after the off week as a
reserve at Wake Forest.
Manuel completed 19 of
35 throws for 286 yards and
two scores, but he threw
two interceptions as part
of the Seminoles' five turn-
overs in last week's 35-30
loss that dropped them out
of the rankings.


NCAA suspensions, ran for
114 yards and a touchdown
in his return Saturday to
lead Ohio State past No. 16
Illinois, 17-7.
With true freshman
Braxton Miller at quar-
terback, the struggling
offense of Ohio State (4-3,
2-1 Big Ten) counted on
Herron against Illinois (6-1,
2-1). The Buckeyes didn't
complete a pass until Miller
hit Jake Stoneburner for a
fourth-quarter touchdown
and a 17-0 lead.
The Buckeyes' defense
forced three turnovers and
turned two of them into their
only touchdowns. Herron's
12-yard touchdown run fol-
lowed an interception by
Bradley Roby and put Ohio
State up 10-0 in the third
quarter.


No. 21 Texas A&M 55,
Ohio State 17, No. 16 No. 20 Baylor 28
Illinois 7


CHAMPAIGN, Ill. --
Daniel Herron, who hadn't
played since the Sugar
Bowl in January because of


COLLEGE STATION,
Texas Ryan Tannehill
threw for 415 yards and a
career-high six touchdowns
and Ryan Swope caught


four of them to lead No.
21 Texas A&M to a 55-28
win over No. 20 Baylor on
Saturday.
The Bears got within six
points after a touchdown
run by Terrance Ganaway
in third quarter before the
Aggies scored 21 straight to
take a 55-28 lead with about
six minutes remaining.
Swope's fourth touch-
down his second 68-yard
reception of the game -
was the first in that span.
He finished with 206 yards
receiving and also had a
68-yard TD reception in the
second quarter. He also
scored on receptions of 8
and 5 yards.
Baylor star quarterback
Robert Griffin III threw for
a school-record 430 yards
and three touchdowns,
but the Bears had trouble
running the ball and were
outgained 266-50 on the
ground.

UConn 16,
South Florida 10


EAST


HARTFORD,


Conn. Lyle McCombs
ran for 130 yards and Dave
Teggart kicked three
field, goals as Connecticut
beat South Florida 16-
10 on Saturday without
scoring an offensive touch-
down.
Cornerback Byron
Jones ran a thirc-quarter
fumble back 10-yhrds for
what turned out to be the
winning score after defen-
sive tackle Twyon Martin
stripped South Florida run-
ning back Darrel Scott deep
in UConn territory.
B.J. Daniels threw for 164
yards and ran for 64 and a
touchdown. But the South
.Florida quarterback also
threw two interceptions and
had a key fumble.
The Bulls (4-2,. 0-2 Big
East) failed to convert on a
fourth down with just under
2 1/2 minutes left, and the
Huskies (3-4, 1-1) ran out
the clock.
Teggart, who beat South
Florida -with last-minute
field goals in their two pre-
vious meetings, hit from 18,
46, and 28 yards.


Page Editor: Brandon Finley, 754-0420


M









LAKE CITY REPORTER


SPORTS


SUNDAY, OCTOBER 16, 2011 "


Page Editor: Brandon Finley, 754-0420


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Florida tight end Jordan Reed .(11) can't hold on to this pass in the end zone as Auburn
defensive back Neiko Thorpe defends in the first half of a NCAA college football game at
Jordan-Hare Stadium in Auburn, Ala. on Saturday.


Florida drops third straight

on road to Auburn, 17-6


By JOHN ZENOR
Associated Press
AUBURN, Ala. -
Onterio McCalebb opened
the fourth quarter with a
14-yard touchdown run,
Ikeem Means recovered a
muffed punt late and No. 24
Auburn beat Florida 17-6 in
a defensive game that saw
seven players take snaps at
quarterback.
Two teams that have
combined to win three of
the last five national titles
with creative attacks',
turned to backup QBs in
the second half in search of
some offensive life.
The Tigers (5-2, 3-1
Southeastern Conference)
got a spark from No. 2 quar-
terback Clint Moseley but
also received plenty of help
from Florida (4-2, 2-3), which
committed three turnovers
and muffed two punts.
The Gators would have


had the ball near midfield
with about 3 minutes left
but Robert Clark had the
ball squirt through his arms
after calling a fair catch.
Cody Parkey then put the
game away with a 42-yard
field goal with 35 seconds
Jeft.
Parkey, who had two ear-
lier misses, nailed the final
attempt after getting pushed
back 5 yards by a false start
penalty. The last five meet-
ings between the teams
have gone down to the final
minute, with Auburn win-
ning four of them.
Auburn coach Gene
Chizik pumped his fists in
the air going off the field
well after game's end, point-
ing with both hands toward
the "AU" on the back of his
jacket as he went
He had plenty to celebrate
for a team coming off a lop-
sided defeat at Arkansas.
The Tigers showed periodic


signs again that they
could still exceed expecta-
tions after losing most of
their key players from last
year's national title team.
A quarterback change
might be in the making,
too. Barrett Trotter went 2-
of-8 passing, though he also
had a 25-yard touchdown
pass to DeAngelo Benton
late in the first quarter.
Backup Clint Moseley
took over in the second
half. He wound up having
the strongest night of the
four primary quarterbacks,
going 4 of 7 for 90 yards
and a couple of big gainers.
With quarterback John
Brantley and tailback Jeff
Demps out with ankle inju-
ries, the Gators had to rely
on two freshmen passers.
Florida started Jacoby
Brissett for the second
straight game, but he also
was replaced in the second
half by Jeff Driskel.


"Armerlcan Board
R~.~,- a d NeurologY
i ; ychlatry,,-












Dr. Nidadavolu has always been driven by a strong desire to
ease the pain and suffering of others. He first demonstrated
that passion by participating in numerous vaccination and
prevention programs early in his career. And now, along with
his considerable neurological training and expertise, he brings
that same desire to ease suffering and improve lives to Lake City.
We proudly welcome a true professional with a very big heart.



Shands! -
Regional Medical Center


4355 NW American Lane
Lake City, FL 32055 386-755-1221


Holiday inn
Baya Pharmacy
P.Dewitt Cason
Haven Hospice
Florida Power & Light
Campus USA Credit Union
Heritage Bank of the South
New Millennulm Budlding Systems
State Farm Insurance I John Bums III)
Servpro of Columbia and Suwannee Cos.


Publix.
Sf'EL
ShandsLakeShore
Maureen and Vemn Lloyd
Dees-Parrish Family Funeral Home
Lake City Medical Center Auxiliary
Edward Jones investments(Steve Jones)


Lake City Reporter
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Newman Broadcasting
96.5 The Jet
Newman Media
Mix 94.3
Oldies 97.1
Oldies 1340
Northflorldanow.com
Power Country 102.1
Big 98/1The X 106.5


OCTOBER IS BREAST CANCER AWARENESS MONTH












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Massages and light refreshments will be provided.


Pre-registration is encouraged by calling

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4520 W US Highway 90 Lake City
More details at www.cccnf.com


tAAit;










SUNDAY, OCTOBER 16, 2011


CLASSIC PEANUTS/ by Charles Schulz


GARFIELD/ by Jim Davis
I'M GLAP Wf WENT IT's NICE TO HAVE
OUT FOR BREAKFAST SOME TIME ALONE

I60 H-AAM


IT' NOT RNlINIWN- I


r~T1~


AND DON'T SUGGEST
SOMETHING THAT IS
ALREADY BEING DONE.
THAT JUST PUTS YOUR
IGNORANCE ON PUBLIC
DISPLAY.


--
I DON'T UANT TO
HEAR ANY IDEAS
THAT COST MONEY
OR INCREASE RISK.


S1--I


____wm


So1- liu A










FOR THE MOMENT HIS HEART IS FULL OF
COURSE. OBLIGATION EVENTUALLY INTRUDES
-A COURTIER RUSHES UP: "YOUR GRACE,
THE REGENT SUMMONS YOU-."


WHAT VAL FINDS IS A BEMUSED ARN. A DISHEVELED GAWAIN -AND A BLOND
GIANT, STRANGE INDEED. BUT- 71S IS NO SAXON.- OPINES VAL.
"WELL.," HUFFS GAWAIN. IE FIGhTS AS DIRTY AS ONE. AND AS
FIERCE AS ALIOM

A'-


AS VAL HURRIES TO ARN'S OFFICE, THE
COURTIER EXPLAINS: "A BLOND GIANT
WAS FOUND OUT IN THE FIELDS. SOME
SAY HE IS A SAXON SPY, BUT- HE
IS STRANGE, POSSIBLY MAD... "


TE BUNM LISER

MBH M


by Art & Chip Sansom


t'A AgOTIRER EAR OLD.>RZl
BUAET IkT O.S'T SEE K. )
A OEA- R. S PkSS. N,


by parker and hart


A/...APOT THrAT
...I FOOTTO T OF YVY
MtATION 4 A W OUR
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SPOsN' coWAA
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Hank Ketcham 's
Dennis the Menace


+


Golden
( /.,',1 (







Mort Walker's


beetle

baile '


BEETLE, 'M GOING SHOULON'TZlHAVE
TO PUT YOU ON SOMETHING tTO
GARBAE DUTY SAYASOUTTHAT?
FOR A MONTH






AND THE SUN IS ONE OF BILLIONS
OF STARS IN THE MILKY WAY,,,




10-I'


ANP I AM JUST ONE SPECK
IN ONE TINY PARTOFATINY
BALL IN THAT VAST UNIVERSE


AND YOU ARE EVEN
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MY
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SHOE/ by Chris Cassatt & Gary Brookins


YOU STAND TOO CLOSE
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BY DEAN> 6 i-yJOHM MARSHALL


www.blondie.com


2011 King Features Syndicate Inc. World Rights Reserved.


& 4441>





FOXTROT/ by Bill Amend


BY BUNNY HOEST AND JOHN REINER


CLOSE TO HOME/ by John McPherson


J .Y NLY AN(,': WkHN HIS PAV(,
TEAM SCORES A TOUCHDOWN."


"THIS IS A VERY PRIVATE ROOM ... I f
SEEN A DOCTOR IN DAYS."


elm.-


wwwthloDctmrnlcon


I -i istb I

"HOW DO YOU MANAGE TO GET MORE HAIR
ON YOUR JACKET THAN WHAT ON YOUR HEAD?"


"THAT'S LEROY ... ALWAYS ME-DEEP IN CONVERSATION."


YOU
.PIIVES
SHOULD
~66T 90
OF THE.i ,
Ag
IUJEDLBS --- TIOS;
r/THINOS" ARB
RIDICuLOU.$!


my COLO9$
SAgo AIT

THE19
SPEAK!M
PEOPLE V
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Story ideas?

kobert Bridges
editor
Z54-0428
?pridges@okecityreportercom

Sunday, October 16,201 1


Lake City Reporter





BUSINESS


www.lakecityreporter.com


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Blackberry user reads a story about a Blackberry outage
Phat is affecting millions of users of the smartphone that has
now spread to North America Wednesday in Montreal.

lackBerrys buzz back

to life after long outage


y PETER SVENSSON
IP Technology Writer
N NEW YORK-
BlackBerrys across the
world buzzed back to life
PThursday, leaving custom-
frs outraged and threaten-
ing to cost the granddaddy
6f all smartphones more
business when it's already
struggling to keep up in a
crowded marketplace.
The three-day blackout
terrupted email and
ternet services for tens
f millions of frustrated
sers and inflicted more
amage on an already tar-
ished brand.
S"I've been 'a pretty big
lackBerry advocate," said
ate Jacobson, a student at
Michigan State University.
But I'ni done playing
these games with you,
BlackBerry."
After using a BlackBerry
for thr&e years, she said


the outage was the "last
straw." On Thursday, she
got an iPhone.
Her unhappiness was
shared by users across
several continents.
BlackBerrys in Europe,
Asia, Latin America and
Africa had been without
email or chat messages
since Monday.
In the U.S. and Canada,
the outage was shorter,
starting Wednesday. But
many, perhaps most, of
the world's 70 milliori ,
BlackBerry users were
affected.
"When I.woke up in the
morning and had zero
emails, I was like, That's
impossible,'" Jacobson
said. She had already
endured problems with her
BlackBerry Curve turning
off at the wrong moments.
It didn't play videos well,
PHONES continued on 2C


S Food bank has new home


New facility can
hold more than
twice as much.
By ANTONIA ROBINSON
arobinson@lakecityreporter.com
Moving into a larger
facility has allowed the
Florida Gateway Food
Bank, formerly the Food
Bank of Suwannee Valley,
to not only get more food
in its warehouse but put
more into the community.
"We're excited about
it," said Scott Elkins, Food
Bank of Suwannee Valley
manager. "Ifs pretty well'
put to good use."
The food bank is a pro-
gram of Catholic Charities'
Lake City Regional Office.
It moved into the new
facility Aug. 10. A grand
opening and ribbon cutting
celebration is set for 5 p.m.
Tuesday.
The food bank opened
in 2004 and was originally
located at 772 East Duval
St The new building,
located at 53 NW Railroad
St, is more than twice the
size of the original.
"In comparison the
office space is the same
size as the entire food
bank at the old one," he
said. "We only had 1,500
square feet"
Warehouse space is a lit-
tle more than 3,500 square
feet, and.it's high enough
to double-stack pallets if
necessary, Elkins said.
The move was long
overdue, said Suzanne
Edwards, Catholic
Charities COO.
"It's been a long time


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
In this Sept. 22 file photo, Scott Elkins (left), manager of the Florida Gateway Food Bank,
formerly the Food Bank of Suwannee Valley, and Jeremy Barwick, 15, discuss Barwick's then
upcoming food drive. The food bank needed more room to accommodate the 65,000 Ibs. of
food Barwick brought in.


coming, and we're just
excited about our new
partnership with the new
location," she said.
It was very exciting how
everything came together
for the new food bank to
move into a new location,
Edwards said. She shared
the urgency of the need
with a few businessmen in
the area one day.
"They took the need and
went to some of their other
business partners," she
said, "Before I knew it we
already had a deal worked
out."
The food bank has
a monthly lease with a
reduced rental fee through


the businessmen who own
the building, Elkins said.
"We've been looking for
a long time," he said. "We
needed to find some folks
who would cooperate with
us and understand that
we're a non-profit and can't
pay a going rdte for floor
space. We happen to find a
group of individuals inter-
ested in making the food
bank successful. So they
were able to help us out
by making the necessary
. arrangements."
A new name was decid-
ed on for the food bank
to express more about
its service area, Edwards
said. With 1-75 and 1-10


the area is the gateway to
Florida.
The food bank would
not have been able to han-
dle the donation provided
from Boy Scout Jeremy
Barwick's food drive
which collected more than
65,000 pounds.
"It would have been
very, very tight and prob-
lematic to handle that
amount of food, so the
timing was absolutely a
Godsend," 'she said.
Previously, the food
bank was the smallest in
the state.
It was also the most
FOOD continued on 2C


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~: 2C LAKE CITY REPORTER BUSINESS SUNDAY, OCTOBER 16, 2011 Page EdItor: Laura Hampson, 754-0427


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Lawmakers seek probe on banks' new debit card fees


By MARCY GORDON
AP Business Writer
WASHINGTON (AP) Democratic
lawmakers are asking the Justice
Department to investigate whether
Bank of America and other major banks
improperly worked together to charge
customers new monthly fees for using
their debit cards.
Rep. Peter Welch, D-Vt, and four other
Democrats said Thursday that they've
asked Attorney General Eric Holder to
see if big banks violated antitrust laws
before announcing'the fees.
Welch said the lawmakers have no evi-
dence of collusion. But he said the timing
of the fees merits an investigation.
"You don't have a competitive market-
place," Welch said at a news conference.
Bank of America said last month that it
would charge its customers $5 a month if
they'use their debit cards for purchases.


Customers who use their cards only at
ATMs will not have to pay the fee.
Chase and Wells Fargo are also test-
ing $3 monthly debit-card fees in select
markets.
SunTrust, a regional bank based in
Atlanta, began charging a $5 debit card
fee in June for customers with basic
checking accounts. Regions Financial,
based in Birmingham, Ala., started charg-
ing a $4'fee on Oct. 1 for accounts that
don't meet higher balance requirements.
The fees have sparked public outrage
and helped fuel anti-Wall Street protests.
Many have criticized the banks for charg-
ing to use debit cards after those same
banks received hundreds of billions of
dollars in taxpayer-funded bailouts. Bank
of America, Chase, Wells Fargo, SunTrust
and Regions were among the recipients of
rescue funds.
Bank of America, the nation's largest ,
bank, said the monthly charge was neces-


sary because the Federal Reserve this
year capped the fees that it can charge
merchants for swiping debit cards.
Congress directed the Fed cap swipe fees
under the financial overhaul law.
On Thursday, representatives for Bank
of America, Chase, SunTrust and Regions
declined to comment on the lawmakers'
request for a probe. A representative for
Wells Fargo wasn't immediately available
for comment.
Justice Department spokeswoman Gina
Talamona said "We have received the let-
ter and we will respond as appropriate."
Also requesting the investigation
were Democratic Reps. John Conyers of
Michigan, Keith Ellison of Minnesota,
Mike Honda of California and Raul
Grijalva of Arizona.
The lawmakers said statements made
by some banks and their trade associa-
tions raise questions about possible coor-P
dination.


In a letter to Holder, the lawmakers
cite an e-mail by the Texas Bankers
- Association to its members. The e-mail
was sent after legislation failed that would
have-delayed the cap on swipe fees.
The e-mail said: "Now the industry
must regroup and each and every one of
you must decide how you are going to
pay for the' use of debit cards. It may be
through a monthly fee."
The Merchants Payments Coalition, an
organization of trade groups for a variety
of retailers, supported the lawmakers'
move.
Bank of America will start charging
the fee early next year. New York-based
Chase started testing the fee in February
and Wells Fargo, based in San Francisco,
announced in August a test beginning
Oct. 14.
The banks haven't said when they will
make a final decision on whether to roll
outrthe debit-card fee more broadly.


PHONES: Messages backlogged after outage, CEOs apologize to customers

Continued From Page 1C


either.
Research In Motion
Ltd., which. makes the
phones and handles email
traffic to them, said the
system was steadily,pro.
cessing a vast backlog of .
stalled messages.
The company's two
CEOs apologized pro-
fusely. It was a break from
the past, when outages of
BlackBerry service mer-
ited only terse statements
from the company.
Mike Lazaridis and Jim
Balsillie said they had not
made plans yet to compen-
sate customers, but they
were turning their atten-
tion to that question.
"Our priority right up
until this moment (has
been) making sure the
system's up and running,"
Balsillie said. 'We're going
to fully commit to win that
trust back."
It will take more than
an apology to wia back
some Blackberry users.
But RIM's latest fiasco is
unlikely to result in a mass
exodus of its corporate and
government clients.
BlackBerrys, like


other imperfect business,
technologies, are deeply
entrenched in commercial
settings, and getting rid
of them represents time
and money that companies
may be reluctant to give
'up. ,;
Indeed, RIM may expe-
rience a slower, more
subtle migration from its
smartphone. Two types
-of people have kept the.
BlackBerry from sinking
further into the oblivion of
once-iconic but forgotten
gadgets: corporate IT man-
agers and aspiring young
people in developing coun-'
tries like India. Countries
outside North America
account for 54 percent of
RIM's revenue.
For big companies,
BlackBerrys are still the
gold standard in security.
But employees keep chip-
ping away at the power of
IT managers by bringing
in their owxilo*wBd -
tablets iPhones,iPads
or devices powered by
Google's Android soft-
ware- and demanding to
get their work email on
them, said Ahmed Datoo,


vice president of Zenprise
Inc., which helps compa-
nies manage their cell-
phone fleets.
With each.instance, the
BlackBerry's position in
its core market is under-
mined.
In the April-to-June
period of 2010, 19 per-
cent of the smartphones
sold in the -world were
BlackBerrys, while a near-
ly equal number, 18 per-
cent, were from a variety
of brands that use Google
Inc.'s Android software,
according to research firm
Gartner Inc.
In the same three-
month period this year, 12
percent of smartphones
were BlackBerrys, while
Android phones zoomed
to 43 percent, outselling
BlackBerrys more than
three to one.
BlackBerry phones have
not kept pace with the
iPhone and its imitators,
said Shaw Wu, an analyst
at Sterne Agee.
A recently launched
update of the flagship
"Bold" model with the
signature BlackBerry


keyboard is selling well,
he said, but an all-touch-
screen model isn't. It -
just doesn't match up to
the iPhone and Android
phones.
"If someone really
wanted a full touchscreen
experience, why would
they buy that? You have
much better alternatives
out there," Wu said.
RIM launched a tablet
computer, the PlayBook,
this year. But like other


iPad wannabes, it's been
a dud.
In the developing world,
the low-end BlackBerry
Curve has been the first
smartphone for many. It
works well on relatively
slow cellular networks,
which means carriers
are happy to push it,
knowing that it won't
overwhelm them, said ana-
lyst Matthew Robison at
Wunderlich Securities.
But that' being threat-


ened now that even Thirl
World phone companies
are upgrading their cellu-
lar networks to broadband
speeds. That means Web
browsing and multimedia
will be sexy new applica-
tions things the Curve
does not do well compared
with inexpensive touch-
screen phones.
"I think it will be tough-
er for RIM to compete
for the emerging-markets
consumer," Robison said.


FOOD: More space in new location

Continued From Page 1C


rural, he said. Most food banks have one
or two much larger cities in their cover-
age area.
More space has sparked a drastic
increase of output, Elkins said.
"We're able to bring more food in,"
he said. "In the other place, space was
so limited even if I was to find truckload
of food I just simply couldn't get it in the
building. It has made drastic changes for
us. We wouldn't be afraid to take anything
we locate."
Currently the food bank is only limited
by refrigeration, Elkins said. It is working
on getting a larger refrigerator to stock


colder items.
The bigger location will aid in trying to
end hunger in the area, Edwards said.
"We're certainly trying to raise aware-
ness of hunger and how many people in
our own community are struggUng," she
said.
The ceremony for the food bank is
an opportunity to show the agencies it
serves, local officials and board members
what it is available to provide, he said.
'We're excited and ready to see what
we can do and do what we always thought
we could do," he said.


*


LAKE CITY REPORTER BUSINESS SUNDAY, OCTOBER 16, 2011


S2C


Page Editor: Laura Hampson, 754-0427












LAKE CITY REPORTER BUSINESS & HOME SUNDAY, OCTOBER 16, 2011 3C


THE WEEK IN REVIEW *THE WEEK IN REVIEW THE WEEK IN REVIEW *THE WEEK IN REVIEW *THE WEEK IN REVIEW

,:; -. ,,o4 "..- , r *-,., . '- : r .


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A NYSE Amex A Nasdaq
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EsinLtCap 2.82 -.27 -8.7
ComstkMn 2.14 -.15 -6.5
PacGEpfl 23.52 -.94 -3.8
BovieMed 2.81 -.10 -3.5
h'SBCCTI 720 -.26 -3.5
SwGA Fn 7.38 .-27 -3.5
ASpecRity 12.48 -.44 -3.4
SalisbryBc 21.74 -.76 -3.4
Innsuites 2.03 -.07 -3.3
HeraldNB 328 -.11 -3.2

Most Active ($1 or morel
Name Vol (00) Last Chg
CheniereEnl25616 5.74 +1.14
SoldStrg 120562. 2.26 +.37
NwGold g 118328 11.70 +.75
VantageDl 111952 1.28 +.07
SrtBasGg 103737 1.68 +.16
WhgtMg 89784 3.71 +.17
NovaGIdg 78467 7.41 +.68
NAPallg 71192 2.77 +.31
Rentech 66228 1.13 +.20
Taseko 58272 3.30 +.37

Diary
Advanced 387
Declined 134
NewHighs 7
New Lows 21
Total Issues 531
Unchanged 10
Volume 343,747,568


Losers ($2 or more)
Name Last Chg %Chg
Insmedrs 3.32 -1.03 -23.7
PrIJPShQQQ19.14-4.98 -20.6
SavanBcp 4.65 -1.16 -20.0
NatCineM 12.01 -2.46.-17.0
CSRplcwi 11.39 -2.16 -15.9
GIblEduc 3.85 -.70 -15.4
PathBcp 8.11 -1.39 -14.6
CarrollB 2.75 -.45 -14.0
MeruNetw 6.99 -1.05 -13.1
Volcano 25.49 -3.63 -12.5

Most Active ($1 or more)
Name Vol (00) Last Chg
PwShs QQQ313801258.18+4.11
SidusXM 2805000 1.80 +28
Cisco 2572101 17.55 +.89
Intel 2421085 23.50+1.21
Microsoft 2224503 27.27+1.02
MicronT 1428373 5.70 +.75
Oracle 1320991 31.85+1.94
Yahoo 1241128 15.91 +.44
Level 1074329 1.65 -.04
Dell Inc 946248 16.62+1.34

Diary
Advanced 2,283
Declined 445
New Highs 56
New Lows 136
Total issues 2,781
Unchanged 53
Volume 8,591,338,506


STOCKS OF LOCAL ImrEREST


WdyW ady YTDo
Name Ex Div Last Chg %Chg%Chg
AT&TInc NY 1.72 29.17 +.73 +2.6 -.7
Alcateluc NY ... 3.09 +.50 +19.3 +4.4
Alcoa NY .12 10.26 +.55 +5.7 -33.3
AutoZone NY ... 328.12 +4.10 +1.3 +20.4
kofAi NY .04 6.19 +29 +4.9 -53.6
BobEvans Nasd 1.00 31.35 +2.45 +8.5 -4.9
CNBFnPA Nasd .66 14.24 +1.00 +7.6 -3.8
CSXs NY .48 21.13 +1.04 +5.2 -1.9
Cemex NY ... 3.75 +.93 +33.0 -63.6
Chevron NY 3.12 100.47 +6.07 +6.4 +10.1
Cisco i Nasd .24 17.55 +.89 +5.3 -13.2
Ciigrp rs NY .04 28.40 +3.77+15.3 -40.0
CocaCola NY 1.88 67.85 +1.95 +3.0 +3.2
Delhaize NY 2.45 65.80 +4.99 +8.2 -10.7
DrSCBrrs NY ... 36.48-11.19 -23.5 -22.1
DrxFnBull NY ... 12.43 +2.02 +19.4 -55.4
DirxSCBuIINY ... 43.23 +9.20 +27.0 -40.3
FamilyDIr NY .72 54.40 +1.58 +3.0 +9.4
FordM NY ... 11.56 +.87 +8.1 -31.1
FMCG s NY 1.00 36.77 +3.01 +8.9 -38.8
GenElec NY .60 16.60 +1.10 +7.1 -92
HomeDp NY 1.00 35.05 +1.13 +3.3
iShChina25NY .85 34.67 +3.63 +11.7 -19.5
iShEMkts NY .84 39.59 +3.15 +8.6 -16.9
iShR2K NY 1.02 71.14 +5.64 +8.6 -9.1
Intel Nasd .84 23.50 +1.21 +5.4 +11.7
JPMorgCh NY 1.00 31.89 +1.19 +3.9 -24.8
Lowes NY .56 20.93 +.59 +2.9 -16.5


Name Ex Div Last Chg%Chg%Chg


McDnlds NY 2.80
MicronT Nasd ...
Microsoft Nasd .80
MorgStan NY .20
NY Tnimes NY
NextEraEn NY 2.20
NobltyHIf Nasd ...
OcciPet NY 1.84
Oracle Nasd .24
Penney NY .80
PepsiCo NY 2.06
Pfizer NY .80
Potash s NY .28
PwShs QQQNasd .41-
PrUShS&PNY
RegionsFnNY .04
Ryder NY 1.16
S&P500ETFNY 2.46
SearsHIdgsNasd ...
SidusXM Nasd ..
SoulhnCo NY 1.89
SprintNex NY
SPDR FnclNY .20
TimeWam NY .94
WalMart NY 1.46
WelsFargo NY .48
YRCish Nasd ...
Yahoo Nasd ...


89.94 +2.74 +3.1 +172
5.70 +.75 +152 -28.9
27.27 +1.02 +3.9 -2.3
1522 +.98 +6.9 -44.1
6.95 +.51 +7.9 -29.1
54.86 +.66 +1.2 +5.5
5.36 -.33 -5.8 -33.9
85.42 +8.17 +10.6 -12.9
31.85 +1.94 +6.5 +1.8
30.04 +1.11 +3.8 -7.0
6224 +1.22 +2.0 -4.7
19.04 +.60 +3.3 +8.7
50.70 +6.05 +13.5 -1.8
58.18 +4.11 +7.6 +6.8
21.46 -2.72 -11.2 -9.7
3.70 +.30 +8.8 -47.1
44.97 +5.99 +15.4 -14.6
122.57 +6.86 +5.9 -2.5
71.54 +9.42 +15.2 -3.0
1.80 +.28 +18.4 +104
42.67 +.30 +0.7 +116
2.79 +.38 +15.8 -34.0
12.60 +.77 +6.5 -21.0
33.53 +2.68 +6.7 +4.2
55.46 +1.76 +3.3 +2.8
26.67 +2.13 +8.7 -13.9
.06 -.00 -3.4 -98.5
15.91' +.44 +2.8 -4.3


Weekly Dow Jones-

Dow Jones Industrials -258.08 153.41 131.24 183.38 -20.21
Close: 11,103.12 t
1-week change: 189.74 (1.7%) MON TUES WED THUR FRI
1 3 ,0 0 0 ......... .. : ........ ....... .. .. . .. ... .. ............... :..... .. ......................... ........


12,00(


11,000


10,000


A *'M.


J....J. A


S O


..... MUTUAL FUND ,
TotalAssets Total Retum/Rank Pct in intt
Name Obi. ($MIns) NAV 4-wk 12-mo 5-year Load Invt
PIMCOTotRells Cl 143,222 10.69 -2.1 -0.8/E +7.8/A NL 1,000,000
VanguardTotStIdx LB 54,584 30.49 +2.6 +6.0/B +0.4/B NL 3,000
American Funds CaplncBuA m IH 52,811 48.96 +2.4 +2.0/A +1.8/C 5.75 250
Fidelity Contra LG 52,421 67.90 +2.4 +7.3/C +3.6/A NL 2,500
Vanguard Instldxl LB 52,251 112.13 +3.2 +6.4/A 0.0/B NL 5,000,000
American Funds GrthAmA m LG 51,434 29.03 +1.6 +2.1/E +0.2/D 5.75 250
American Funds IncAmerA m MA 48,664 16.31 +1.8 +4.1/B +1.9/C 5.75 250
Vanguard 500Adml LB 46,205 112.88 +3.2 46.4/A 0.0/B NL 10,000
Vanguard TotStlAdm LB 43,815 30.50 +2.6 +6.2/B +0.5/B NL 10,000
American Funds CpWIdGA m WS 43,482 32.76 +4.0 -5.2/D +0.7/B 5.75 250
American Funds InvCoAmA m LB 39,741. 26.75 +3.9 +1.9/D -0.6/C 5.75 250
Dodge & CoxInStlSk FV 35,768 31.42 +5.3 -10.3/D -0.8/A NL 2,500
American Funds WAMutinvA m LV 34,692 27.40 +3.4 +48.6/A 0.0/A 5.75 250
Dodge & Cox Stock LV 34,245 100.24 +3.3 +2.0/C -3.6/D NL 2,500
FraTemp-Franin Income Am CA 32,845 2.04 +0.6 +1.6/C +3.0/C 4.25 1,000
Vanguard InstPlus LB 32,673 112.13 +3.2 +6.5/A 0.0/B NL 200,000,000
PIMCOToBtelAdm b CI 31,525 10.69 -2.1 -1.0/E +7.5/A NL 1,000,000
Varguara TotBaAmrrd CI 30,034 10.90 -0.9 +3.9/A +6.4/B NL '10,000
Amencan FurndsEurPacGrAm FB 29,151, 36.85 +2.2 -10.0/D +0.6/A 5.75 250
American Funds BaJA m MA 28,742 17.93 +2.0 +6.3/A +2.6/B 5.75 250
Vanguard Totlnt d FB 28,698 14.02 +2.6 -9.21/ -1.0/B NL 3,000
American Funds FnlnvA m LB 27,768 34.95 +2.5 +2.8/D +1.0/A 5.75 250
Vanguard WellnAdm MA 26,965 52.81 +2.5 +4.3/A +3.7/A NL 50,000
American Funds NewPerspA m WS 26,896 26.91 +2.7 -1.6/C +2.3/A 5.75 250
PIMCOTotRetA m CI 26,312 10.69 -2.1 -1.2/E +7.3/A 3.75 1,000
Vanguard 5001nv LB 25,318 112.87 +3.2 +6.3/A -0.1/B NL 3,000
FrankTemp-TemletonGIBondAdvB 25,305 13.04 -1.6 -0.5/D +10.8/A NL 50,000
CA-CowsrvsalsAlocalio, CI-b rediaseTermo Bor mES -Eu intSd oiFBr~ nLarge Fo reign A F FV O
LoValue,IH. WWorld AlwocdaLB 4mieBaLO 4MG GN -aLV a^ M A Vealu.n MA M 4BM .
O w" ". .5pely4ieai, WS W- d 5 tdTo Rdaimn Ctng h NAV at dveskevRawkWt
otieratsawies e:Aahrno w%, Ekrb nIn.p2th, Ehlmbo r1Mxin2M.sIM S mdedio:trriTOOSTane:Igts.


Name Div YId PE Chg %Chg Last
ABB Ltd .64 3.3 ... +1.83 -13.2 19.48
AES Corp ... ... 12 +.49 -13.7 10.51
AFLAC 1.20 2.9 9 +4.67 -26.8 41.30
AKSteel .20 2.7 ... +.85 -54.1 7.52
AMR ... ..... +.44 -62.3 2.94
AT&TInc 1.72 5.9 9 +.73 -.7 29.17
AbtLab 1.92 3.6 13 +1.68 +10.1' 52.73
Accenture 1.35 2.3 19 +3.56 +21.3 58.80
AMD ... ... 4 +19 -39.9 4.92
Aeroposl ... ... 7 +1.50 -46.9 13.08
Aetna .60 1.6 8 +2.54 +24.T 37.86
Agilent ... ... 12 +1.97 -19.5 33.34
AlcatelLuc ... ...... +.50 +4.4 3.09
Alcoa .12 1.2 10 +.55 -33.3 10.26
Allstate .84 3.4 24 +1.24 -21.7 24.96
AlphaNRs ... ... 53 +3.26 -63.9 21.65
AlIlra 1.64 5.9 17 +.24 +12.4 27.67
AMovilLs .41 1.7 10 +2.35 -16.8 23.86
AEagleOut .44 3.5 15 +.57 -13.7 12.62
AEP 1.84 4.8 13 +.92 +7.4 38.66
AmExp .72 1.6 12 +2.67, +7.4 46.10
AmlnftGrp ... ....+2.40 -51.6 23.37
Anadarko .36 .5 42 +5.45 -7.3 70.57
AnalogDevl.00 2.8 12 +1.57 -4.9 35.82
Annaly 2.51 15.6 5 +.64 -10.0 16.12
ArcelorMit .75 3.8. 10 +2.59 -47.6 19.98
ArchCoal .44 2.5 12 +2.16 -50.1 17.50
ArchDan .64 2.3 9 +2.30 -7.7 27.75
ATMOS 1.36 4.1 15 +1.22 +6.3 33.16
Avon .92 4.1 13 +2.48 -23.3 22.30
BB&TCp .64 2.8 17 +1.77 -14.3 22.54
BHPBilLt 2.02 2.6 .... +6.17 -16.4 77.70
BakrHu .60 1.1 18 +7.35 -.9 56.67
BcoBrades .80 4.7 ... +1.64 -16.7 16.90
BcoSantSA .84 10.0 ... +.14 -20.8 8.44
BcoSBrasill 1.65 20.1 ... +.86 -39.6, 8.22
BkofAm. .04 .6 .. +.29 -53.6 6.19
Bklreind ... ...... -.08 -68.7 .83
BkNYMel .52 2.7 9 +1.14 -37.2 18.97
Barclay .36 3.2 ... +1.12 -31.8 11.27
Bar PVxrs ... ...... -9.76 +7.6 40.4'
BarrickG .48 1.0 12 +1.60 -9.3 48.24
Baxter 1.24 2.2 15 +27 +10.5 55.92
BerkHB ... ... 15 +3.05 -6.7 74.75
BestBuy .64 2.5 9 +.89 -25.2 25.66
Blackstone .40 2.9 76 +.90 -3.5 13.65.
Boeing 1.68 2.6 14 +2.08 -2.1 63.89
BostonSc ... ..15 +.07 -24.8 5.69
BrMySq 1.32 4,1 17 +.06 +22.5 32.44
CBREGrp ... ... 20 +1.71 -25.7 15.22
CBS B .40 1.7 14 +2.08 +23.8 23.59
CNOFind ... ... 8 +.59 -14.2 5.82
CSXs .48 2.3 14 +1.04 -1.9 .21.13
CVSCare .50 1.4 14 +1.35 +1.0 35.13
CdnNRsgs .36 .. +3.49 -26.6 32.62
CapOne .20 .5 6 +2.25 -1.2 42.06
CapitlSrce .04 .6 19 +28 -12.7 6.20
Carnival 1.00 2.9 14 +2.42 -26.2 34.03
Caterpillar 1.84 2.2 14 +8.57 -10.2 84.09
Ceomex ... ...... +.93 -63.6 3.75
ConterPnt .79 3.9 17 +.42 +29.5 20.35
CntryLink 2.90 8.4 12 +1.81 -25.1 34.60
.ChesEng .35 1.3 10 .+2.40 +7.1 27.75
Chevron 3.12 3.1 9 +6.07 +10.1 100.47
Chimera .57 20.1 5 +.18 -30.9 2.84
Citigrprs .04 .1 9 +3.77 -40.0 28.40
CliffsNRs 1.12 1.7 6 +9.34 -16.4 65.21
Coach .90 1.4 21 +5.61 +122 62.08
CocaCola 1.88 2.8 13 +1.95 +32 67.85
Comerica .40 1.6 13 +2.15 -39.3 25.66
CompPrdS ... ... 15+10.85 +5.7 31.23
ConocPhil 2.64 3.8 9 +5.49 +1.3 68.99
ConsolEngy.40 1.0 17 +5.40 -15.0 41.42
ConEd 2.40 4.2 16 +1.44 +16.1 57.55
ConstellEn .96 2.5 18 +1.12 +25.9 38.57
Coming .30 2.2 7 +.31 -29.0 13.71
Covidien .90 2.0 13 +2.71 +.8 46.01
CSVellVSts... ...... +1.30 -41.3 7.02
DCT Indl .28 6.3 ... +.44 -16.0 4.46



SWMy YTD Wkly
Name Div YId PE Chg %Cha Last


ASMLHid .58 1.4
ActivsBliz .17 1.3
AdobeSy ... ...
Adtran .36 1.1
AEtemag ...
AkamaiT ... ...
AleraCp If .32 .9
Amazon
ACapAgy 5.60 20.3
AmCapLtd ... ...
Amgen 1.12 1.9
A123 Sys ... ...
Apple Inc ...
ApidMatl .32 2.8
AriadP ... ...
ArmHId .15 .5
AnrbaNet...
Atmel ... ..
Autodesk ...
AutoData 1.44 2.8
AvagoTch .44 1.2
BMC St ...
Badu ... ...
BedBath ... ...
BigBandN ...
BrigExp
Broadcom .36 .9
BrcdeCm ...
CA Inc .20 .9
Cadence ...
Celgene ...
Cephln
ChrmSh
ClenaCorp...
Cisco .24 1.4
CitrixSys ...
Clearwire ...
CoffeeH .12 .9


... +3.98 +52 40.32
23 +.40 +3.9 12.92
15 +1.53 -12.9 26.81
14 +3.64 -12.0 31.87
... -.09 -14.0 1.48
25 +1.44 -48.0 24.46
13 +2.57 +1.0 35.93
...+21.97 +37.1 246.71
4 +.96 -3.8 27.65
2 +.58 -6.2 7.09
12 +1.22 ,+4.7 57.49
... +.52 -61.0 3.72
17+52.20 +30.8 422.00
8 +.89 -17.4 11.60
.. +.80 +100.0 10.20
.. +2.44 +37.1 28.44
41 +1.40 +17.5 24.53
8 +1.64 -17.3 10.19
30 +4.13 -15.1 32.42
21 +2.86 +11.8 51.72
16 +2.82 +25.6 35.70
15 +2.02 -173 39.00
64+18.39 +42.5 137.60
17 +4.04 +24.5 61.17
... +1.03 -19.3 2.26
.42 +4.66 +11.5 30.36
21 +2.66 -12.9 37.93
19 -24 -14.7 4.51
13 +1.02 -11.0 21.74
13 +.63 +22.5 10.12
30 +3.35 +12.1 66.30
12 +.42 +32.0 81.49
... +.38 -14.6 3.03
... +.82 -41.1 12.39
15 +.89 -13.2 17.55
36 +8.08 -7.9 63.02
... +.20 -69.1 1.59
24 +4.26 +257.5 13.30


Name Div YId
DDR Corp .24 2.1
DR Horton .15 1.5
DTE 2.35 4.6
DanaHIdg ... ...
Danaher .10 2
Deere 1.64 2.3
DeltaAir ... ...
Denbury ... ...
DeutschBk 1.07 2.8
DevonE .68 1.1
DrSCBrrs ...
DirFnBr rs ...
DrxEMBull 1.10 .2
DrxEnBear ... ...
DrxFnBull ... ...
DtrxSCBull ... ...
DirxEnBull ...
Discover .24 1.0
Disney .40 1.2
DomRescs 1.97 3.9
DowChm 1.00 3.6
DukeEngy 1.00 5.0
DukeRIty .68 6.5
EMCCp ..
Eaton s 1.36 3.2
EIPas6Cp .04 .2
EmersonEl 1.38 2.9
EnCana 9 .80 3.8
Exelon. 2.10 4.9
ExxonMbI 1.88 2.4
FairchldS ...
FstHorizon .04 .6
RrstEngy 2.20 5.0
FordM
ForestOils ... ...
FMCGs 1.00 2.7
FrontierCm .75 12.6
GameStop ...
Gannett .32 2.9
Gap .45 2.5
GenGrPrn .40 3.1
GenMarih ...
GenMills 1.22 3.1
GenMotn ...
GenOnEn...
Genworth ...
Gerdau 25 3.0
GlaxoSKIn 2.17 5.0
GolLinhas .12 1.7
Goldcp g .41 .8
GoldmanS 1.40 1.4
Goodyear ... ...
HCP Inc 1.92 5.3
Hallibrtn .36 1.0
HartfdFn .40 2.2
HitMgmt ... ...
HeclaM
Hertz
Hess .40 .7
HewlettP .48 1.8
HollyFirts .35 1.0
HomeDp 1.00 2.9
Honwillnti 1.33 2.7
HostHotls .16 1.3
Huntsmn .40. 3.9
ING
iShGold
iSAstla 1.06 4.5
IShBraz 3.42 5.8
iShGer .67 3.2
iSh HK .42 2.6
IShJapn .17 1.8
iSTaiwn .29
iShSilver ... ...
iShChina25 .85 2.5
iShEMkts .84 2.1
iShB20 T 3.94 3.5
iS Eafe 1.68 32
iShR2K 1.02 1.4


WIy YTD Wky
PE Chg %Chg Last
.... +.69 -19.9 11.28
83 +.79 -16.5 9.96
12 +.67 +11.6 50.58
64 +1.59 -22.3 13.37
16 +3.10 -3.8 4.38
12 +5.69 -14.0 71.39,
17 +.77 -32.0 8.57
21 +2.58 -25.1 14.30
... +3.09 -26.5 38.24
4 +4.23 -22.7 60.71
...-11.19 -22.1 36.48
...-12.12 +9.4 51.69
... +3.92 -55.6 18.35
... -4.97 -32.6 15.20
.. +2.02 -55.4 12.43
... +9.20 -40.3 43.23
... +9.75 -25.1 43.80
6 +.72 +30.2 24.13
15 +2.77 -8.1 34.47
17 +.22 +18.2 50.49
13 +2.92 -18.9 27.68
14 +.13 +11.8 ,19.92
53 +.80 -15.5 10.53
24 +.70 +.8 23.09
12 +3.54 -16.9 42.17
26 +1.23 +42.4 19.59
15 +3.50 -16.9 47.51
45 +1.84 -28.5 20.83
.I3 +1.30 +3.8 43.23
10 +4.55 +6.8 78.11
9 +1.01 -16.1 13.09
39 +.48 -44.3 6.56
18 +.01 +19.7 44.30
6 +.87 -31.1 11.56
11 +2.30 -54.3 12.49
6 +3.01 -38.8 36.77
37 +.09 -38.6 5.97
9 +.83 +10.0 25.16
5 +.5? -27.5 10.94
10 +.48 -19.3 17.78
... +1.03 -17.4 12.78
... +.16 -89.8 '.33
15 +.91 +11.4 39.66
7 +2.15 -34.5 24.16
... +.07 -27.0 2.78
... +.74 -55.3 5.87
.. +1.02. -40.9 8.27
.. +.76 +11.3 43.64
+.85 -52.9 7.24
16 +2.08 +5.2 48.38
10 +4.04' -42.5 96.73
... +1.97 +3.5 12.27
31 +1.22 -1.0 36.43
14 +4.11 -8,3 37.43
5 +1.51 -30.3 18.47
11 +1.14 -13.7 8.23
22 +.57 -46.8 5.99
15 +1.34 -24.2 10.98
7 +4.27 -24.9 57.47
6 +1.23 -38.0 26.11
17 +6.38 +69.8 34.62
16 +1.13 ... 35.05
15 +3.96 -7.0 49.45
... +1.60 -30.8 12.37
8 +.70 -33.6 10.36
... +1.03 -14.1 8.41
.. +.42 +17.9 16.39
... +1.89 -8.3 23.32
... +4.75 -24.0 58.79
... +1.92 -12.8 20.87
... +1.16 -15.2 16.05
... +.24 -11.8 9.62
.. +.64 -17.9 12.82
... +1.11 +3.8 31.34
... +3.63 -19.5 34.67
...+3.15 -16.9 39.59
... -4.29 +21.1 113.95
... +3.14 -10.5 52.12
... +5.64 -9.1 71.14


New York Stock Exchange


KEEP A LEVEL HEAD

IN AN UP-AND-DOWN MARKET


Amid recent market volatility, we've seen substantial
upswings and downturns. But when the market reacts one
way, it doesn't meap you should, too. The actions you take
today can significantly impact your financial future.)
So before you alter your investment strategy, schedule a
financial review. We can help you stay focused despite the
market's recerit disappointments and find opportunities
for the long term.

Call today to schedule your financial review.

Steve Jones, CFP
Financial Advisor
2929 West US Highway 90
Suite 114
Lake City, FL 32055
386-752-3847
www.edwardjones.com Member SIPC



^^ ^^^ ^


Name


DIv YId


iShREst 2.18
IngerRd .48
IBM 3.00
IntlGame .24
IntPap 1.05
Interpublic .24
Inveso .49
ItauUnibH .84
IvanhMg 1.48
JPMorgCh 1.00
Jabil .28
JanusCap .20
JohnJn 2.28
JohnsnCtl .64
JonesGrp .20
JnprNtwk ..
KB Home .25
KeyEngy ...
Keycorp .12
Kimco .72
Kinross g .12
KodiakOg ...
Kohls 1.00
Kraft 1.16
LSI Corp ...
LVSands ...
LennarA .16
ULillyEli 1.96
LincNat .20
LizClaib ...
UoydBkg
LyonBas A .80


Nasdaq Most Active


Name Div
CognizTech...
Comcast .45
Comc spc .45
Cree Inc ..
CypSemi .36
Dell Inc ..
Dndreon
DirecTVA ...
DishNetwk ...
DonlleyRR 1.04
DryShips .12
E-Trade ...
eBay
ElectArts ...
EricsnTel .37
Expedia .28
ExpScrpts...
Fastenals .56
FifthThird .32
Finisar
FstNiagara .64
FstSolar ...
RFlextn ...
FocusMda ...
Fortinets ..
GT AdvTc ...
GileadSd ...
LGoogle ...
GreenMtC ...
HercOffsh ...
Hologic
HudsCity .32
HumGen ...
Illumina ...
Infosys 1.35
Intel .84
Intuit .60
JA Solar ...


Wdy YTD WIdy
YId PE Chg %Chg Last


27 +6.60
17 +1.88
17 +1.81
22 +1.82
25 +2.02
9 +1.34
... +.93
16 +3.50
10 +1.32
16 +1.51
14 +.50
41 -+1.08
25 +2.62
... +2.17
... +.80
18 +1.03
17 +.72
29 -.15
11 +.76
21 -1.37
13 +.73
10 -3.51
8 +.41
17 +2.81
55 +1.87
5 -.36
12 +1.12
19+76.56
89 +.03
... +.51
+.55
+.41
-.88
31 -.27
21 +4.72
11 +1.21
27 +4.48
1 -.01


-1.5 72.22
+9.5 23.94
+14.2 23.66
-54.9 29.73
-8.1 17.08
+22.7 16.62
-'72.1 9.75
+17.8 47.03
+39.9 27.50
-9.2 15.86
-50.1 2.74
-38.8 9.80
+21.1 33.69
+49.8 24.54
-6.4 10.79
+11.6 28.01
-25.7 40.18
+11.5 33.40
-22.8 11.34
-38.6 18.22
-30.0 9.79
-56.8 56.23
-17.5 6.48
+17.6 25.78
+22.5 19.81
-15.7 7.69
+11.6 40.43
-.4 591.68
+180.2 92.09
-5.7 3.28
-17.4 15.54
-54.1 5.85
-53.5 11.12
-57.5 26.91
-25.1 57.00
+11.7 23.50
+7.5 53.01
-73.0 1.87


Name DIv YId
JDSUniph...
JetBlue
JoyGIbl .70 .9
KLATnc 1.40 3.2
LamResrch ...
Leve3 ...
UbtylntA ...
LifeTech ...
UnearTch .96 3.1
lululemn gs ...
MarvellT ... ...
Mattel .92 3.3
Maximlrtg .88 3.4
MelcoCrwn .. .
Microchp 1.39 4.1
MicronT ...
Microsoft .80 2.9
Nil Hldg ...
NasdOMX ...
NetLogicM ...
NetApp
Netflix ... ...
NewsCpA .19 1.1
NewsCpB ..19 1.1
NorTrst 1.12 3.0
NuanceCm ...
Nvidia
OmniViSn ...
OnSmcnd ...
OnyxPh ... ...
Oracle .24 .8
PDLBio .60 10.5
Paccar .72 1.8
PacEth rsh ... ...
PattUTI .20 1.0
Paychex 1.28 4.5
PeopUtdF .63 5.2
PharmPdt .60 1.8


Wkly YTD
PE Cho %Cha


... +3.09 -5.9
+2.79 -35.2
15 +6.14 +29.8
19. +.87 -7.9
9 +1.96 -4.5
15 +.41 -24.6
10 +1.95 -24.6
... +1.84 -24.2
... +1.94 -20.6
7 +1.19 -24.8
12 +1.47 -.1
6 +.67 -49.7
14 +1.59 +4.6'
14 +3.80 -15.3
47 +1.58 -30.6
21 +2.51 -41.6
... +.53 -50.5
11 +1.78 -11.2
7 +.35 -26.4
86 +.91 -14.1
21 +.95 -22.8
76 +.51 -19.8
13 +.28 -7.2
20 +1.47 +11.8
11 +.55 -.8
33 +3.63 -1.5
32 +1.19 -18.3
9 +.37 +9.3
5 +2.89 -35.3
... +2.93 +6.1
-.04 -49.4
... +2.68 -15.1-


Wkly YTD Wkly
PE Chg %Chg Last
35 +.85 -24.7 10.91
15 +.72 -30.6 4.59
14+10.79 -9.1 78.82
9 +2.31 +13.5 43.85
8 +2.99 -15.4 43.81
-.04 +68.4 1.65
13 +.72 -1.1 15.59
19 +.99 -31.9 37.81
12 +1.57 -9.8 31.21
52 +3.30 +58.6 54.24
12 -.37 -19.2 14.98
14 +.76 +8.2 27.51
16 +1.56 +8.7 25.67
62 +1.45 +71.5 10.91
15 -.23 -2.2 33.45
38 +.75 -28.9 5.70
10 +1.02 -2.3 27.27
11 +3.67 -35.9 28.63
11 +1.35 +7.3 25.46
... +.34 +54.4 48.50
.23 +1.94 -28.6 39.23
29 -1.17 -34.0 116.04
15 +.93 +18.0 17.18
15 +.99 +5.3 17.29
15 +1.26 -33.4 36.93
25 +2.30 +31.5 23.90
17 +1.57 +2.1 15.72
6 +.08 -46.1 15.95
12 +1.06 -17.3 8.17
... +3.03 -2.1 36.08
18 +1.94 +1.8 31.85
8 +.01 -8.7 5.69
20 +3.66 -30.5 39.84
... +.01 -94.1 .30
13 +2.78 -8.5 19.71
19 +1.39 -7.8 28.50
26 +.42 -14.2 12.02
23 +.93 +21.8 33.05


Wkly 1. WIy YD. Wkly
Last Name Div' YId PE Cho %C4a Last


MEMC
MFAFnd 1.00 15.3
MGIC
MGM Rsts .
Macys .40 1.4
MagHRes .
Manitowoc .08 .9
ManpwrGp .80 1.9
Manulife.g .52
MarathnO s .60 2.4
MarathP n .80 2.2
MktVGold .40 .7
MkIVRus .18 .6
MarlntA .40 1.3
Masco .30 3.5
McDrmlnt' ...
Mechel ...
Medtmic .97 2.9
Merck 1.52 4.6
MetLife .74 2.3
MetroPCS ...
MobileTele 1.06 7.4
Molycorp ...
Monsanto 1.20 1.6
MorgStan .20 1.3
Mosaic .20 .4
MotrlaMon ... ...
NCR Corp ...
NYSE Eur 1.20 4.4
Nabors
NBkGreece .29 ...
NatGrid 2.92 5.8


19 +.49 -45.8
7 +.28 -19.7
+:24 -76.5
+1.21 -31:2
12 +2.31 +15.7
+.79 -42.6
... +1.43 -33.6
... +4.89 -33.7
.. +1.36 -25.6
5 +2.02 +9.2
.... +4.54 -7.3
... +3.08 -5.7
... +3.12 -24.0
60 +2.48 -26.2
... +.98 -33.1
17 +.65 -29.4
... +1.90 -59.3
12 +.27 -10.8
12 +1.37 -8.5
9 +3.37 -27.6
14 +1.17 -27.9
11 +.79 -31.1
... +3.80 -21.7
25 +3.47 +6.8
33 +.98 -44.1
11 +5.92 -25.2
... +.80 +33.1
13 +.98 +21.0
12 +3.13 -8.3
16 +1.95 -34.5
... +.01 -64.0
... -.23 +13.5


Wky YTD Wkly
Name Div YId PE Chg %Chg Last
NOilVarco .44 .7 16 +7.60 -1.2 66.41
NYCCmtyB 1.00 7.9 11 +.65 -32.6 12.71
NewellRub .32. 2.4 11 +.89 -28.0 13.09
NewfldExp ... ... 11 +1.03 -42.2 41.68
NewnM- 1.20 1.8 15 +3.77 +8.8 66.86
Nexen g .20 ... +1.18 -26.2 .16.89
NextEraEn2.20 4.0 13 +.66 +5.5 54.86
NiSource .92 4.2 20 +20 +23.4 21.75
99 Cents ... ... 20 +1.53 +35.3 21.56
NobleCorp .53 1.7 27 +1.92 -12.0 31.48
NokiaCp .55 8.7 ... +.50 -38.6 6.34
NorflkSo 1.72 2.5 15 +3.30 +8.5 68.17
Nucor 1.45 4.0 24 +3.01 -18.1 35.88
OcciPet 1.84 2.2 12 +8.17 -12.9 85.42
OfficeDpt ... ... ... +07 -60.0 2.16
OilSvHT 1.58 .9 ...+13.01 -13.1 122.15
OpkoHlth ... ... ... +.71 +40.3 5.15
PG&ECp 1.82 4.3 16 -.47 -11.2 42.50
PNC 1.40 2.7 8 +3.41 -15.7 51.16
PPLCorp 1.40 4.9 12 +.42 +8.4 28.52
PatriotCoal ... ... ....+1.81 -44.1 10.83
PeabdyE .34 .9 12 +4.81 -38.3 39.46
Penney .80 2;7 18 +1.11 -7.0 30.04
PepsiCo 2.06 3.3 16 +1.22 -4.7 62.24
PetrbrsA 1.34 5.8 ... +2.18 -32.4 23.10
Petrobras 1.26 5.1 ... +2.27 -34.4 24.84
Pfizer .80 4.2 13 +.60 +8.7 19.04
PhilipMor 3.08 4.6 15 +2.27 +15.2 67.40
PlainsEx ... ... 20 +3.65 -14.4 27.52
Potash s .28 .6 18 +6.05 -1.8 50.70
PS USDBull... ...... -.62 -4.7 21.65
ProLogis 1.12 4.3 ... +2.26 -18.7 25.78
ProShtS&P ... ... ...-2.58 -3.3 42.38
PrUShS&P ... .... -2.72. -9.7 21.46
PrUlShDow ... ... -1.83 -14.3 17.74
ProUlQQQ... ....+11.96 +9.5 89.15
PrUShOQQQrs... ... -7.11 -24.8 43.75
ProUltSP .31. .7 ... +4.74 -7.6 44.38
ProUShL20 ... ... ... +1.48 -41.8 21.56
ProUSSP500... ... ..-3.15 -18.9 15.75
PrUftSP500s.03 .1 ... +8.92 -15.9 57.44
ProUSSIvrs... ... ... -1.17 -65.2 13.66
ProUShEuro... ...... -1.40 -11.9 17.90
ProgsvCp 1.40 2.2 11 -.14 -9.7 17.95
ProUSR2Krs... ... ...-8.79 -8.3 46.08
Prudent 1.15 2.3 8 +4.90 -13.3 50.92
PSEG 1.37 4.1 10 +.74 +3.9 33.06
PulteGrp ... ...... +.42 -41.1 4.43.
OksilvRes ... ... 4 +1.17 -41.2 8.66
RadianGrp .01 .4 ... +.21 -70.0 2.42
RangeRs .16 .2 ...+12.48 +61.1 72.46
Raytheon 1.72 4.0 7 +1.77 -6.9 42.77
RegionsFn .04 1.1 ... +.30 -47.1 3.70
Renrenn ... ...... +.26 -68.1 5.75
RioTlnto 1.17 2.2 ... +4.90 -25.3 53.51
RiteAid ... ...... +.13 +20.0 1.06
SLMCp .40 3.0 10 +.98 +7.5 13.54
SpdrDJIA 3.14 2.7 ... +5.32 +.6 116.34
SpdrGold ... ...... +4.22 +17.8 163.40
SPMid 1.64 1.1 ...+10.24 -5.6 155.48
S&P500ETF2.46 2.0 ... +6.86 -2.5 122.57
SpdrHome .31 2.1 ... +1.20 -13.6 15.03
SpdrKbwBk .26 1.4 ... +1.21 -27.0 18.91
SpdrLehHY4.28 10.6 ... +1.43 -5.3 37.59
SpdrRetl .49' 1.0 ... +2.71 +5.3 50.94
SpdrOGEx .50 1.0 ... +7.01 -3.6 50.85
SpdrMetM .42 .8 ... +5.45 -25.1 51.49
Safeway .58 3.3 10 +.24 -21.4 17.67
SallyBty ... ... 16 +.69 +21.7 17.69
SandRdge ... ... 28 +.67 -7.4 6.78
SaraLee .46 2.6 9 +1.31 +1.4 17.76
Schlmbrg 1.00 1.4 19 +8.30 -15.0 70.94
Schwab .24 1.9 21 +1.11 -25.5 12.75
SemiHTr .64 2.1 ... +2.01 -5.9 30.61
SenHous 1.52 7.0 21 +.83 -.8 21.77
SiderurNac .81 9.3 ... +.90 -47.9 8.69
SilvWhtng .12 .4 25 +2.07 -17.6 32.15
SilvrcpM g .08 ... 20 -.06 -33.0' 8.60
SouthnCo 1.89 4.4 18 +.30 +11.6 42.67


WD Y YTD Wdy
Div Yld PE Cha %Cho Last


SwstAlir .02
SwstnEngy ...
SpectraEn 1.04
SprintNex ...
SP Malls .82
SP HithC .64
SPCnSt .85
SP Consum .61
SP Engy 1.08
SPDR Fnd .20
SP Inds .69
SP Tech .36
SP Util 1.36
StarWdHtl .30
StateStr .72
StillwtrM ...
Suncorgs .44
Suntech ...
SunTrst .20
SupEnrgy ...
Supvalu .35
Synovus .04
TE Connect .72
TaiwSemi .52
TalismE g .27
Target 1.20
TeCkRes g .60
TelefEsp s 1.98
Tene-HIth ...
Teradyn ...
Terex
Tesoro
Texlnst .68
Textron .08
ThermoFis
3M Co 2.20
TimeWam .94
Total SA 2.38
Transocn .79
TrinaSolar ...
Tyson .16
UBSAG ...
USAiry ...
UtdContI ...
UPSB 2.08
USBancrp .50
USNGsrs...
US OlFd ...
USSteel 20
UtdhlthGp .65
Vale SA 1.14
Vale SApf 1.14
ValeroE .20
VangEmg .82
VerizonCm2.00
ViacomB 1.00
VimpelCm .79
Visa .60
Vishayint ...
Walgm .90
WalterEn .50
WsteMInc 1.36
WeathfntI
WellsFargo .48
Wendys Co .08
WDigital ...
WstnUnion .32
Weyerh .60
WmsCos 1.00
Xerox .17
Yamanag .18
YingliGm ...
Youku n
YumBmds 1.14


.2 13 +.92 '-33.7
... 22 +4.64 +42
3.9 15 +1.30 +6.6
...... +.38 -34.0
2.4 ... +2.36 -12.8
1.9 ... +.98 +4.4
2.8 ... +.80 .+5.3
1.6 ... +2.32 +3.4
1.6 ... +5.70 -2.4
1.6 ... +.77 -21.0
2.1 ... +1.85 -7.7
1.4 ... +1.70 +32
4.0 ... +.58 +8.4
.6 18 +6.39 -22.1
2.1 11 +2.31 -26.8
... 10 +1.31 -55.7
... 14 +3.30 -20.7
... 3 +.06 -70.0
1.1 24 +.90 -35.5
.. 17 -.79 -23.9
4.3 .. +.88 -15.2
3.0 ... +.20 -49.6
2.1 13 +4.75 -3.2
4.2 ... +.50 -1.9
... ... +1.64 -39.7
2.3 13 +1.39 -11.9
...... +3.94 -41.2
9.3 ... +1.34 -6.5
... 2 +.21 -31.8
... 7 +91 -7.7
... ... +1.90 -56.2
... 9 +4.08 +44.0
2.2 12 +1.98 -4.8
.4 43 +.20 -21.6
16 +2.80 -3.7
2.8 13 +5.07 -8.6
2.8 14 +2,68 +4.2
4.6 ... +4.97 -3.0
1.6 ... +3.93. -27.5
2 +1.18 -69.3
.9 8+1.18 +7.7
... ... 87 -26.2
... 5 +.83 -39.7
... 13' +1.90 -12.8
3.0 17 +2.70 -5.0
2.0 12 +1.37 -8.4
...... +.47 -24.6
...... +1.83 -13.2
.8 ... +2.70 -57.8
1.4 11 +2.33 +30.8
4.5 ... +2.06 -26.5
4.8 ... +2.15 -21.0
.8 19 +3.84 +2.2
2.0 ... .+3.21 -16.5
5.4 16 +1.17 +4.3
2.3 13 +3.16 +9.3
7.8 8 +.48 -32.4'
.6 20 +7.67' +33.4
... 5 +1.12 -30.8
2.7 11 -.41 -15.3
.6 10+16.28 -39.5
4.1 17 -.01 -10.7
78 +1.67 -35.2
1.8 10 +2.13 -13.9
1.7 ... +.21 +2.4
... 9 +1.40 -16.4
1.9 11 +.93 -9.8
3.5 4 +1.16 -92
3.7 20 +2.35 +10.5
2.2 14 +.56 -32.9
12 18 +1.16 +18.8
... 2 +.47 -60.5
... ... +2.23 -42.1
2.2 19 +3.19 +6.3


AM EX Most Active


Name DIv
Popular
Power-One...
PwShs QQQ.41
PriceTR 1.24
PrUPShQQQ...
Qualcom .86
RF MicD ...
RschMotn
Riverbeds .
SanDisk
SeagateT .72
SeattGen ..
Slcnware .28
Sina
SiriusXM ...
SkywksSol...
Staples .40
Starbucks .52
StDynam .40
Symantec ...
TD Ameritr .20
Tellabs .08
TevaPhrm .87
TibcoSft ...
TriQuint ...
UtdTherap ...
UrbanOut ...
VertxPh ...
*VirgnMdah .16
Vodafone 1.45
Windstrrn 1.00
Wynn 2.00
Xilinx .76
YRC rsh ...
Yahoo
ZionBcp .04


Wkly YTD Wkly
YId PE Chg %Chg Last


5 +.28 -44.6
5 +.88 -46.3
.. +4.11 +6.8
19 +4.52 -17.0'
... -4.98 -38.6
23 +4.75 +11.1
20 +.76 -1.0
4 +.61 -58.8
73 +2.58 -33.4
9 +3.65 -6.2
11 +1.09 -21.5
... -.65 +39.6
17 +.47 -12.9
...+19.27 +35.3
60 +.28 +10.4
20 +327 -21.8
11 +.66 -34.7
28 +2.96 +31.4
11 +1.05 -37.6
23 +.89 +7.5
15 +.32 -17.5
... +.04 -36.0
12 +2.42 -240
47 +2.60 +34.6
7 +1.53 -38.5
18 +2.83 -36.5
16 +.55 -33.4
... -1.16 +23.6
... +1.99 -3.2
... +1.35 +4.4
20 +.61 -15.0
45 +5.42 +29.5
13 +1.81 +5.6
... -.00 -98.5
18 +.44 -4.3
... +1.28 -31.0


_
'.. .

Name DIv YId PE
AbdAsPac .42 6.0 ...
Adventrx ... ... ...
AlldNevG ... ... ...
AntaresP ... ... ...
Aurizong ... ... ...
AvalRaren ... ......
BarcGSOil
Brigusgrs .......
BritATob 3.86 4.3 ...
CanoPet ... .
CardiumTh ... ......
CeISc ... ... ...
CFCdag .01 ..
ChenlereEn... .....
ChinaShen ... ....
DejourEg ... ... ...
DenisnMg ... ......
EbieMaen ... .... ...
eMagin ... ... 10
ExtorreGg ... ... ...
FrkStPrp .76 6.3 23
GabGIdNR 1.68 10.8 ...
GascoEngy ... ......
Gastargri ... ... ...
GenMoly ... ... ...
GoldResrc .60 2.9 ..
GoldenMin ... ......
GoldStrg ... ... ...
GranTrrag ... ... ...
GrtBasGg ... ... ...
GtPanSilvg... ... ..
ImpOilgs .44 ...
IntTowerg ... ... ...
KeeganRg ... ......
KimberRg ... ......
LadThalFn ... ......
LucasEngy ... ......
MadCatz q... ... 5


Wkly YTD Wkly
Chg %Chg Last
+.39 +3.7 7.00
+.12 -60.2 1.04
+2.04 +44.6 38.04
+.21 +36.5 2.32
+.48 -23.4 5.61
+.46 -46,0 3.37
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+.04 -44.8 1.16
+.81 +14.3 88.81
+.01 -62.5 .14
+.33 +17.0 .46
-.01 -66.1 .28
+.59 +4.3 21.63
+1.14 +4.0 5.74
+.42 -77.6 1.88
+.02 +6.3. .34
+.13 .-63.7 1.24
... -26.1 5.00
+1.52 -26.3 4.42
+1.30 +22.5 828
+.95 -16.0 11.97
+1.15 -19.6 15.49
+.02 -40.3 .21
+.47 -21.2 3.39
+.63 -50.0 324
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+1.72 -66.6 8.93
+.37 -50.8 2.26
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+.16 -43.2 1.68
+.02 -11.7 2.48
+3.36 -1.2 40.05
+.34 -48.3 5.21
+.25 -37.2 .5.52
+.05 ... 1.40
+.32 +55.6 1.82
+.27 -27.9 1.68
+.01 -33.3 .68


Name Div YId
MdwGotdg.... ...
Minefndg ...
Neoprobe ...
Nevsung .06 1.1
NwGoldg ... ...
NA Pallg ... ...
NDynMn g ... ...
NthnO&G ...
NthgM g ... ...
NovaGld g ...
Oisands g ...
ParaG&S ... ...
PhrmAth ...
PionDril ... .
Quepasa
OuestRMg
RareEleg .
Rentech ...
Richmntg ...
Rubicon g ...
SamsO&G ... ...
SeabGldg ... ...
TanzRyg ...
Taseko
TmsatlPet ...
TnValley
TriangPet ...
Ur-Energy ...
Uranerz
UraniumEn.
VangTotW .92 2.1
VantageDd ...
VimetX
VistaGold ...
WFAdvlncol.02 10.8
WizzardSfl ...
YM Bio ... ...


Wkly YTD WMy
PE Chig %Chg Last
... +.38+175.0 2.31
... +.37 +31.1 14.47
'... +.07r +48.1 3.05
27 +.36 -27.4 5.47
... +.75 +19.9 11.70
... +.31 -60.1 2.77
.. +.92 -47.4 7.52
87 +2.08 -23.3 20.87
93 +.17 +15.9 3.71
... +.68 -48.1 7.41
+.02 -42.9 .24
12 +21 -36.3 2.54
-.10 -60.5 1.67
.. +1.73 +3.7 9.14
+.33 -69.2 3.60
+.62 -42.9 3.22
+.60 -64.0 5.78
+.20 -7.4 1.13
+2.22+117.6 11.12
+.13 -38.7 3.50
... +.31 +687.1 2.47
+1.871 -24.1 23.30
.+23 -49.2 3.71
... +37 -37.1 3.30
4 -.01 -76.3 .79
+.02 -65.8 .20
'.. +.51 -36.5 4.13
+.22 -64.2 1.07
+.53 -49.9 2.00
... +.64 -46.2 3.25
+2.73 -6.8 44.53
+.07 -36.9 1.28
... +.36 +7.7 16.00
6 +.13 +48.5 3.55
.. +.46 -2.2 9.42
-.00 -40.0 .15
... -.10 -25.3 1.74


Stock Footnoes g = Dividends and earngis in Canadian dollars. h = Does not met continued standards.
f = Late filingvith SEC. n= New in past 52 weeks. pf = Preferred. r Sock has undergone a reverse stock spt
of at least 50percent within the past year. rt= Right to 'uy security at a specified price. = Stock has spit by at
least 20 percent within the lastyear. un = Units. v = In bankruptcy or receiverhil.wd = When dishruted.,wi
When Issued. wt=Warrants..
Mutual Fund Footnoes: b = Fee covering market costs Is paid from fund assets d = Deterred saes charge, or
redemption fee. f=front toad (sales chargee. m Multipte fees are charged. NA= notavailale. p = prevlou day's
net asset value. s= fund 6p shares during the week. x = fund paid a d ution during the week.Gales and
Loser must be worth at least $2 to be listed in tables at left. Most Actves must be worth a least $1. Volume in
hundreds of shares. Source. The Associated Press. Sales figures are unpflciaL


Money Rates
Last Pvs Week
Prime Rate 3.25 3.25
Discount Rate 0.75 0.75
Federal Funds Rate .00-.25 .00-.25
Treasuries
3-month 0.02 0.01
6-month 0.05 0.03
5-year 1.12 1.08
10-year 2.25 2.07
30-year 3.23 3.02


Currencies.
Last Pva Day
Australia .9675 .9805
Britain 1.5815 1.5769
Canada 1.0117 1.0190
Euro .7207 .7256
Japan 77.22 76.88
Mexico 13.2612 13.3670
Switzerlnd .8930 .8977
British pound expressed in U.S. dollars. All oth-
ers show dollar In foreign currency.


---.-------^ -------- ^. .--"


)









LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED SUNDAY, OCTOBER 16, 2011

Lake City Reporter




CLASSIFIED


Classified Department: 755-5440


Take ADvantage of the
Reporter Classifieds!

755-5440


BYIT-aaii-

SELLaYT"4

.[.^1IT


Each Item must include a price.
This Is non-refundab rate




SOne Item per ad iid.
4 lines 6 days, Each additional
Rate applies to private Individuals elng
personal merchandise totalling $500 or less.
Each Item muot Include a price.i
S This is a non-roeundable ra e. .



One Item per ad d16 |
4 lines 6 days Each additional
line $1.15
Rate applies to private Individuals selling
personal merchandise totalling $,000 orless.
Each Item must include a price.
This Is a non-refundable rate.



- One Hem per ad $2370
4 lines 6 days Each additionl
pRate apples to private Id dus ling
personal merchandise tottllg $250or less.
Each Item must include a price
This is a non-refundable rate.



One Item per ad c ai
4 lines 6 days Each addition
pRate applies to private Individuals se lling
personal erchandise totalling $4,000 or les.
Each hem moat Indude a price.
This Is a non-refundable rate.



One Item per ad .|
4 lines 6 days Eachdtional
Rate applies to private lIdtvidual selling
Each Item moot include a prIce
This Isa non-refundable rat a


Notice is hereby made to all those
concerned and affected that Beach
Construction Company, Inc. is per-
1 7 h forming Project Number GE-
4 n I 50J 35(WWTP), Water and Wastewater
3 d Treatment Plant Improvements at
3 dy 7 Columbia Correctional Institution.
IncuIdes 2 51gns Eadi ad titonl ine1 65 All parties furnishing labor, materi-
F als, and/or equipment to said project
are to provide notice of such in writ-
ing by certified mail to the Depart-
Limited to service type advertis- ment of Corrections, 2601 Blair
ing only. Stone Road, Tallahassee, Florida
4 lines, one month....92.00 32399-2500 within twenty (20) cal-
lines, one nendar days of first providing such Ia-
$10.80 each add it ipo0.ili9. .... br; materials and/orilitpmeent-.'
Includes an additional $2.00 per


ad for each Wednesday insertion.



You can call us at 755-5440,
Monday through Friday from 8:00
a.m. to 5:00 p.m.
Some people prefer to place their
classified ads in person, and some
ad categories will require prepay-
ment. Our office is located at 180
East Duval Street.
You can also fax or email your ad
copy to the Reporter.
FAX: 386-752-9400 Please
direct your copy to the Classified
Department.
EMAIL: classifieds@lakecityre-
porter.com





Ad Is to Appea Call by: Fax/Emaliby:
Tuesday Mon.,M100a.m. Mon.,9H 0am.
Wednesday Mon.,10:00a.m. Mon., 9:00 am.
Thursday Wed., 10:00a.m. Wed., 9:00 a.m.
Friday Thurs., 1000 a.m. Thurs,9:00a.m.
Saturday Fri., 10:00 am. Fri., 00a.m.
Sunday Fri., 10:00am. Fri.,9:00a.m.
These deadlines are subject to change without notice.




Ad Errors- Please read your ad
on the first day of publication.
We accept responsibility for only
the first Incorrect Insertion, and
only the charge for the ad space
In error. Please call 755-5440
Immediately for prompt correc-
tion and billing adjustments.
Cancellations- Normal advertising
deadlines apply for cancellation.
Billing Inquiries- Call 755-5440.
Should further information be
required regarding payments or
credit limits, your call will be trans-
ferred to the accounting depart-
ment.


Advertising copy is subject to
approval by the Publisher who
reserves the right to edit, reject,
or classify all advertisements under
appropriate headings. Copy should
be checked for errors by the
advertiser on the first day of pub-
lication. Credit for published errors
will be allowed for the first insertion
for that portion of the advertisement
which was incorrect. Further, the
Publisher shall not be liable for any
omission of advertisements ordered
to be published, nor for any general,
special or consequential damages.
Advertising language must comply
with Federal, State or local laws
regarding the prohibition of discrimi-
nation in -employment, housing and
public accommodations. Standard
abbreviations are acceptable; how-
ever, the first word of each ad may
not be abbreviated.

In Print aind Online
www.lakeityrreportcr.coni


05528.550
October 14, 16, 19, 2011
PUBLIC NOTICE
ON
INVITATION TO BID
ITB-005-2012
Sealed bids will be -accepted by the
City of Lake, City, Florida, 205 N
Marion Avenue, Lake City, Florida
32055 until Tuesday, October 25,
2011 at 11:00 A.M. All bids. ~ill be
opened and read aloud at 11.15 A.M.
in the City Coumncil Chambers locat-
ed on the 2nd floor of City Hall, 205
N Marion Avenue, Lake City, Flori-
da.
STORM WATER DRAIN PIPE &
ACCESSORIES
Documents may be obtained on the
City website
http://www.lcfla.com/purchasing.ht
. m; by contacting
purchasing@lcfla.com. or by phone
(386) 719-5816 or (386) 719-5818.
05528569
October 16, 2011
100 Job
Opportunities
AVON!! Only $10 to start!
Earn bonus $ tpto $f50+
1-800-275-9945 pin #4206
www.youravon.com/tdavies
05528576
NOW HIRING:
COMPANY DRIVERS
Enjoy the open road with
Our Line Haul division!
Now Hiring Driver Trainers!
CDL-A & 3 tmos TR exp req'd



Our tradition of stability gives
you a future of strength!
www.arnoldtrans.com
800-299-4744
Students Call 800-454-2887


NEED CNC Machinist
Must have Metal Working
Machine Shop Send tesme,
Quality Mill, 363" USH*' 90
East, Lake City, FL 32055.







Lawn & Landscape Service

J&M LAWN Service & more for
all your outdoor needs. Don't
waste your time or weekend,
Free Estimate. 386-984-2187

Services

DIVORCE, BANKRUPTCY,
RESUMES.
Other court approved forms-
386-961-5896.

HAULING. Rental clean out,
garage cleah out. Cut up ad
remove brtah. FRgE Btn !
386-497-3099


Legal

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT IN AND
FOR COLUMBIA COUNTY,.
FLORIDA.
File No. 11-242-NT
IN RE: GAYLE B. HAHN TRUST
UTD AUGUST 5,2010
NOTICE TO CREDITORS.
Notice is hereby given that GAYLE
B. HAHN, the settlor of the above-
references trust, died on September
28, 2011. The name of the trust is
Gayle B. Hahn Trust, and said trust
was established, by Agreement dated
August 5, 2010. The name and ad-
dress of the currently acting trustee,
servicing as a result of the settlor's
death, and said trustee's attorney are
set forth below.
ALL INTERESTED PERSONS
ARE NOTIFIED THAT:
All creditors of the decedent and oth-
er persons, who have claims or de-
mands against settlor's estate on
whom,'a copy of this notice have
been served must file their claims
with the trustee WITHIN THE LAT-
ER OF THREE (3) MONTHS AF-
TER THE DATE OP THE FIRST
PUBLICATION OF 0 1IS NOTICE
OR THIRTY (30) DAYS AFTER
THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A
COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON
THEM.
All creditors of the tettlor and per-
sons having claims or demands
against the settlor's estate must file
their claims with the Trustee WITH-
IN (3) MONTHS AFTER THE
DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICA-
TION OF THIS NOTICE.
ALL CLAIMS, DEMANDS AND
OBJECTIONS NOT SO FILED
WILL BE FOREVER BARRED.
THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUB-
LICATION OF THIS NOTICE IS
OCTOBER 16, 2011,
By:/s/ TERRY MCDAVID
TERRY MCDAVID -..
Post Office Box 13N8
Lake. City, FL 32056-1328
Telephone (386) 752-1896
Florida Bar No. 052454
Attorney for Successor Trustee
By:/s BETH H. WARREN
Successor Trustee
187 Golden Pond Dr.
Lexington, SC. 29073
05528574
October 16, 23, 2011


Due to increased sales volume at
Burkins Chevrolet of Macclenny,
we are currently seeking 2
professional sales consultants.
Experience is a plus, as well as
GM training. We have an
excellent working environment
with opportunity to grow in our
organization. Please contact Bob
Burkins at Burkins Chevrolet in
person Monday through Friday.
Experienced Welder needed.
Apply at Grizzly Mfg, Inc.,
174 NE Cortez Terrace,
Lake City, FL


LEGAL ASSISTANT/
RECEPTIONIST Three Rivers
Legal Services, Inc. is seeking a
legat assistant/receptionisi with
proficiency in using computers and
word.processing programs. Good
communication skills are a must.
Spanish-speaking individuals are.
encouraged to apply. Salary DOE;.
excellent benefits; EOE. Please
mail resume to Donna S. MacRae,
Three Rivers Legal Services,
334 NW Lake City Avenue,
Lake City, Florida 32055.


Manager/Receptionist needed for
busy styling salon. Must have
computer skills & be able to
multi task. Bring your resume, to
,Hair Graphics. 948 Baya Ave.
Interviews will follow.
Resolutions Health Alliance has
an immediate opening for a PT
Office Clerk' in Lake City.
Must be: timely, proficient in
Microsoft Word, Excel and
Outlook, organized, detail
oriented, data entry, filing,
excellent phone skills, and
customer oriented. Salary is $8.00
an hour. Email resume to:
employment@rhapa.net or
fax (386)754-9017 or website:
www.rhapa.com
Sales Help at Florida Visitors
Center. Benefits, hourly wage
plus commission. Excellent
opportunity with National
company. Call Ed. 904-540-2314
Whack A -Do now hiring Stylist.
Full time/Part time Hourly pay +
commission. No Clientel needed
Contact Darlene. 386-984-6738

120 Medical
1 Employment


05528030
LEARN TO DRAW BLOOD
Local Phlebotomy Course
offered in Lake City, FLA
Certificate program.
(904)566-1328

05528455
LICENSED CLINICAL
SOCIAL WORKER
The Florida department of
Veterans' Affairs- Jenkins
Domiciliary is seeking a
Licensed Clinical Social
Worker. MUST BE a Florida
Licensed Social Worker. Duties
include: One hour per week
oversight of Registered Intern
Clinical Social Worker; Provide
telephone consultation between
on-sie visits, if needed; State
certification as a "clinical super-
visor" is NOT a requirement for
this job. $60.00/hr.
Apply on-line:
https://peoplefirst.myflorida.co
m/logon.htm
Or call Amelia Tompkins,
Adm for more information at
386-758-0600 x1009
Req #50507062
Closing Date 10/24/2011
EEO/AAE


100 Job
S Opportunities

05528436
HeritageBank of the South
Lake City, Florida is seeking a
Branch Manager. Requirements
include branch manager
experience with a bank. This
position will also include
making client and prospect sales
calls, gathering, reviewing, and
underwriting financial informa-
tion, and managing and expand-
ing an existing portfolio of both
consumer and commercial loans.
HeritageBank of the South is a
community bank, with a solid
reputation and capital base. We
offer excellent benefits and a
salary commensurate with
education and experience.
Requirements: Bachelor's
degree in related field and or
minimum 5 years of branch
manager experience and
consumer and or commercial
lending experience at a bank.
Please forward resume and
salary requirements to humanre-
sources(aeheritagebank.com


05528560
Full.time Housekeeper/Laundry/
Maintenance person needed.
Experience preferred.
Apply in person at North Florida
Surgery Center
256 SW Professional Glen
Lake City, Fl. 32025
386-758-8937
or Fax 386-755-2169

ATTENTION:
Sports Minded Professionals
Sales positions for quality person-
net; We provide industry leading
stipport & development w/rapid
advancement & extensive benefit
packages Local positions available
Call Brian at 904-316-7232 to
schedule an interview..
Hiring Locally This Week'
Liberty National Life Insurance
Company. Full training provided -
Potential of $60K+ annually.
401(k), BCBS Insurance &
Pension for those who qualify.
Call 1-800-257-5500 to
set up an interview.


05528364
Interested in a Medical Career?
Express Training offers
courses for beginners & exp
* Nursing Assistant, $479
next class-10/24/10
* Phlebotomy national certifica-
tion, $800 next class-11/28/11
Continuing education
Fees incl. books, supplies, exam
fees. Call 386-755-4401 or
expresstrainingservices.com


310 Pets & Supplies


PUBLISHER'S NOTE
Florida Law 828.29 requires dogs
and cats being sold to be at least 8
weeks old and have a health
certificate from a licensed
veterinarian documenting they
have mandatory shots and are
free from intestinal and external
parasites. Many-species of wild-
life must be licensed by Florida
Fish and Wildlife. If you are
unsure, contact the local
office for information.


402 Appliances

FROST FREE refrigerator.
Whirlpool Very clean. Works
good. White, $160.
386-292-3927

HEAVY DUTY Whirlpool
dryer, great working condition.
Less than 2 yrs. old. $175.
386-755-9239
Lg capacity White Whirlpool
Washer. Works great.
$165.
386-292-3927


405 Bicycles


Swiss Mountain Bike.
Perfect condition. Paid $600.
ASKING $100.
386-755-3697


407 Computers

DELL Computer,
$100.00
386-755-9984 or
386-292-2170


120 Medical
120 Employment

05528575




Meridian Behavioral
Healthcare Inc.
www.mbhci.org
Please visit our website to view
current open opportunities
and to apply online :
Meridian is an active partner
with the National Health Service
Corps
For its Student Loan
Forgiveness program. Licensed
Clinicians who serve in our
approved locations may qualify
for up to $60k in Student Loan
forgiveness for FfT
2yr commitment.
Therapists:
Program Manager (Licensed)
Licensed, or Master's Level
in Outpatient
LCSW or Certified Behavioral
Analyst Preferred
Bachelor's-Level in
Counselor Support
Case Management
(adult & child)
Master's Therapist in
Methadone Clinic
Administration:
Client Relations Specialist.

Medical Services
RN Nursing Manager
DETOX ( Gville )
RN full-time Lake City
CSU
PRN RN, LPN, C.N.A.
Recovery Specialist
(Direct Care )
To see our current openings in
Mental Health and to apply
online, please go to:
www.mbhci.ore
EOE, DFWP, E-Verify
RN's needed, Med Surg/Psych
Exp. to work in local hospitals.
Immediate work, instant pay,
$300 sign-on bonus.
Call 352-336-0964.
www.suwanneemedical.com

240 Schools &
2 Education


LARGE CAT
carrier $20.
386-755-9239


Set of Michelin used tires.
225X50X17
$100.
386-292-3927
Tow Behind,
Grill/Smoker
386-249-3104 or
386-719-4802
-WALKER
w/basket seat and hand breaks
$40. 386-755-9239


450 Good Things
450 to Eat
The Nut Cracker, Robert Taylor
Buy, sell, crack & shell pecans
2738 CR 252 W, Lake City 32024
Pinemount Rd/CR 252 Taylorville
386-963-4138 or 961-1420


Experienced

TOPB

Great Benefi

401

Paid Va
Please call
Jay or Mike

755-6500


408 Furniture
Headboard & Footboard, Day Bed
w/mattresses. Red metal. Barely
slept on. $135.00
386-755-3697
Oak table w/leaf &
2 upholstered chairs.
$50.
386-755-9239
OVAL OAK Coffee Table.
Made in North Carolina. Very
Solid. Sacrafice for $50.00.
386-755-3697
Regular Height Bistro Set.
Metal w/glass top. Paid $259
ASKING $50.00
386-755-3697
Solid Oak Glider.
Made in North Carolina.
Beautiful, just recovered. $50.00
386-755-3697
WOODEN
ROCKER/GLIDER
chair $25.
386-755-9239

15 Photo
415 Equipment
KODAK/SLIDE PROJECTOR.
Kodak 650h carousel slide
projector plus 41 carousel trays.
$200. obo 386-755-5988

419 TV-Radio &
SRecording
15" LCD TV
$75.00
386-984-7510

20" SONY
Triniton TV.
$80.00
386-984-7510

420 Wanted to Buy
FL/GA License plates before
1958. $1000- Columbia Co. tags
1911-1917 gobucsl3(&aol.com
Top dollar pd. Jeff (727)424-1576
K&H TIMBER
We Buy Pine Hardwood &
Cypress. Large or small tracts.
.Call 386-961-1961.
Wanted'Junk Cars, Trucks, Vans.
$275 & up CASH! Free Pick Up!
NO title needed !386-878-9260
After 5pm 386- 752-3648.

430 Garage Sales
PUBLISHER'S NOTE
All Yard Sale Ads
Must be Pre-Paid.


440 Miscellaneous
22,000 BTU Window AC
WORKS GREAT
$150.
386-292-3927
BRINKS FIREPROOF
small safe $40.
386-755-9239


Salesperson

REED

ts Package

Ik

cation




HONDA


I ADvantage [


460 Firewood
Firewood for Sale. $65. per Truck
Load. Rick 386-867-1039 or Joey
965-0288 if no answer pls leave
message we will call you back.

520 Boats for Sale
07 SeaFox 17 ft. Center console.
Aprox. 40 hrs. Mecury 90HP. New
551b trolling motor. Alum trailer.
Pay off $13,000. 386-758-7766

'6 Mobile Homes
'630- for Rent
14 Wide, 3/2-$525, 2/2-$475.
Clean, Quiet Country Park
Water, septic, garbage incl. NO
PETS! 386-758-2280 References.
lbedrm/lbth $350 mo.,Also, Resi-
dential RV lots. Between Lake
City & G'ville. Access to 1-75 &
441 (352)317-1326 Call for terms.
2&3 BR MH. $395 $650. mo.
plus deposit. Water & sewer fur-
nished. Cannon Creek MHP
386-752-6422
2/2 Units..
October Special
$525. mo. Includes water.
386-984-8448
2BR/1BA CH/A includes
water, sewer, garbage.
$495. mo + $495 dep.
386-961-8466
3br/2.5ba S of Lake City,
(Branford area) $550 mo plus sec
386-590-0642 or 386-867-1833
www.suwanneevafleyproperties.com
3br/2ba moble home, in town,
private lot, front & rear porch,
storage shed $650/mo + security.
386-466-2266 or 752-5911
LG clean 3br's $450. -$650. mo. +
dep. Also, 2br mobile home's
avail. No Pets. 5 Points area. Also
3 br Westside. 386-961-1482
Mobile Homes for rent in
White Springs, Lake City & Ft.
White. Contact 386-623-3404
or 386-397-2779
X-CLEAN 2/2, 8 ihi NW of VA
nice country acre. $500 mo +
dep. No dogs, smoke-free
environment. 386.961.9181

Mobile Homes
640 for Sale
Just Reduced!'Clean inside & out.
Updated kit cabinets & counters.
Owner Finance offered $99,000,
MLS75853. Robin Williams.
719-0382 Hallmark Real Estate
It's Here. Jacobson Homes
"Sub Zero" Top Quality Home
with lots of tape and texture and
a dream kitchen and more.
North Point Homes, Gainesville
(352)872-5566
Jacobson Homes Factory Outlet
Try. us in Gainesville. Best Prices
and Financing in Florida. North
Pointe Homes (352)872-5566
Remax Professionals. Well main-
tained home, great open floor plan.
Spacious bedrooms. MLS 78757
$49,000 Missy Zecher 386-623-
0237 www.missyzecher.com
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
3br/2ba on 1.77 ac. midway
between Lake City & Live Oak.
Don or Sherry. Ratliff
365-8414 MLS# 78737 $59,900
3br/2ba, well maintained DWMH
on 4.85 ac. Fence, pasture, fruit
trees. MLS#72427, $64,900
Jo Lytte, Remax 386-365-2821
jolytte@remaxnfl.com
Very nice 3/2 DW "Model Home"-
cond. Split floor plan, Ig master,
1 ac nicely landscaped $84,900
MLS#77988, Nancy Rogers
867-1271 R.E.O. Realty Group
NEW 2012 Town Homes
28X44 3/2 Only $37,900, 32X80
4/2 Just $69,900. Both include
Delivery and set, AC, Skirting and
steps. No Games!
Nqrth Pointe Homes, Gainesville,
Fl. (352)872-5566
Palm Harbor Homes
Has 3 Modular Homes
Available at HUGE Savings
Over 40K Off
800-622-2832


I

!

1

t











LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED SUNDAY, OCTOBER 16, 2011


640 Mobile Homes
Sfor Sale
MOVE-IN READY! Country liv-
ing at it's best. 3br/2ba in pristine
condition on 1.39 acres $89,900
MLS#78345 DANIEL CRAPPS
AGENCY, INC. 386-755-5110

650 Mobile Home
650 & Land'
Outside of Fanning Springs. River-
walk is a gated community adja-
cent to Nature Coast Greenway.
$23,900 MLS 73574 Brittany Re-
sults Realty 386-397-3473
Affordable 4/3, lg 2,280 sqft in
nice S/D on 2 ac. New homeowner
will have fishing rights to Timber-
lake $59,900 MLS 74862 Brittany
Results Realty 386-397-3473
Hunting Tract. 40 ac. w/power
pole, water & septic. W/nice
camper. Owner finance offered
$84,000, MLS75532. Jay Sears.
867-1613 Hallmark Real Estate
4/2 on 10 ac.,in Bell. 2,268 heated
sqft. in a country setting. 10x20
frame shed. Bring offers!
$89,000 MLS 76582 Brittany
Results Realty 386-397-3473
3/2 1,008 SQFT. Cute affordable,
clean MH in Three Rivers Estates.
River access with $100 Fee annu-
ally $27,000 MLS 78725 Brittany
Results Realty 386-397-3473
Excellent homesite in a homes
only S/D. Just 10 min. from Live
Oak & 20 min. from Lake City
$23,999 MLS 78764 Brittany
Results Realty. 386-397-3473
3/2 DWMH on .91 ac. Three Riv-
ers Estates. Well maintained home
that shows pride in ownership
$130,000 MLS 78905 Brittany
Results Realty 386-397-3473
Hunter's Dream. near the National
Forest. 3/2 DW w/5 ac. Near
Olustee. Sold "as is". $48,800,
MLS79011. Ginger Parker.
365-2135 Hallmark Real Estate

710 Unfurnished Apt.
7 For Rent

05527705
SPRING HILL VILLAGE
Excellent High Springs location.
1, 2 & 3 bedroom floor-plans;
some with garages.
Call 386-454-1469
or visit our website:
www.springhillvillage.net








2BR/1IBA. Close to town.
$565.mo plus deposit.
Includes water & sewer.
386-965-2922
2BR/2BA w/garage
5 minutes from VA hospital.
Call for details.
386-365-5150
A Landlord You Can Love!
2 brApts $550. & up + sec. Great
area. CH/A washer/dryer hookups.
386-758-9351/352-208-2421
Amberwood Hills Apts.
Private Patio area. Beautiful yard.
Washer/dryer hkup. Free water &
sewer. 1/1, 2/1, Move in special.
386-754-1800. wwwmyflapts.com
Columbia Arms Apt. located 1/2
mi from V.A. & Winn Dixie. Pet
Friendly. Move in Special $199.
Pool, laundry & balcony.
386-754-1800. www.mvflapts.com
Duplex w/garage spacious, 2/1,
1300 sq ft, W/D hook up, CH/A,
$650.month & bckgmd chk,
386-697-3248 or 352-377-7652
Eastside Village 55+ Retirement
2br/ Iba duplex. No pets
Non-smoking environment
Eastside Village Realty, Inc.
Call Denise Bose @ 752-5290
Fall Special! 1/2 Price First
Month. Updated Apt, w/tile
floors/fresh paint. Great area.
From $395.+sec. 386-752-9626


Greentree Townhouse
Summer special. 2/1, 2/1.5. Free
water & sewer. Balcony & patio.
Laundry. Behind Kens on Hwy 90.
386-754-1800 wwwmyflapts.com
Large 2 br Apt In town
$500. mo $500 dep.
386-344-2972

Redwine Apartments. Move in
special $199. Limited time. Pets
welcome, with 5 complexes,
we have a home for you.
386-754-1800. www.myflapts.com


The Lakes Apts. Studios & lBr's
from $135/wk. Util. & cable incl.,'
Sec 8 vouchers accepted, monthly -
rates avail Call 386-752-2741
Wayne Manor Apts. ,
Move in $199. Summer special.,
2/1, washer/dryer. Behind Kens off
Hwy 90. 386-754-1800
www.myflapts.com
Windsor Arms Apartments.
Summer special $199. Move in!
2/1, 2/1.5, 2/2. Pet Friendy. Free
200 ch. Dish. Washer/dryer hkup.
386-754-1800. www.myflapts.com

720 Furnished Apts.
20 For Rent
Rooms for Rent. Hillcrest, Sands,
Columbia. All furnished. Electric,
cable, fridge, microwave. Weekly
or'monthly rates. 1 person $135,
2 persons $150. weekly
386-752-5808

730f Unfurnished
730 Home For Rent

'09 Custom Dream Home
4BR/3.5BA, 5+acres, horses ok.
Old brick & heart pine floors,
jet tub, DSL. Beautiful!
For right person $2000/mo.
negotiable 970-221-0090
1/1 Cottage pool access, no pets,
country setting, $695 mo includes
utlilities & cable. $300 sec. Near
SR 47 & 75 386-719-5616
2br/lba Huge living area. W/D in-
cluded. New carpet, nice area.
Convenient: VA, DOT, schools &
shopping. $750.mo. 386-344-0565.


Unfurnished
730 Home For Rent


3BR/1.5 BA Large lot. Very clean
with storage shed. Quiet area.
$850 mo. + $850. dep.
386-752-7578
3br/1.5ba. Very clean, Brick great
area w/bonus room. Carport, shed
& Fenced (privacy) back yard.
$800. mo $800. dep.
(941)920-4535
3BR/2BA HOME. Private
wooded lot. Rent $695. mo + sec.
dep. $450. Application required.
Call 386-935-1482
3BR/2BA NEW construction
Lease option. 1st, last plus $200
sec.$900. mo. South of town.
Credit ref's req'd. 386-755-9476
4br/2ba CHA Brick, 1200 sqft
lac., Close to.FGCC, CR 245A.
Ceramic tile/carpet, $700 mo $800
dep (904)708-8478 App. req'd
Brick 3br/2ba Large yard, garage,
CH/A. 179 SW Stanley Ct. Lake
City. $900. mo + $850 dep.
Call 386-365-8543
Nice in town 2br/lba CH/A
$700. mo. $700 deposit.
386-758-3922 or
386-344-5065
Prime location 2br/lba.
Resid'l or comm'l. Comer of Baya
& McFarlane. $600. mo. $500 sec.
' 386-752-9144 or 755-2235
Rent with option to-purchase.
3/2 Brick Home. Private on 1.5 ac.
386-752-5035x3112
7 Days 7-7 A Bar Sales, Inc.

750 Business &
5 Office Rentals

05528566
OFFICE SPACE for Lease
576 sq' $450/mth
900 sq' $600/mth
3568 sq' $2973/mth
8300 sq' $5533/mth
also Bank Building
Excellent Locations
Tom Eagle, GRI
(386) 961-1086 DCA Realtor

FOR LEASE: Downtown office
space. Convenient to
Court house.
'Call 386-755-3456
For Lease: E Baya Ave. Two -
1000 sqft office space units or
combined for 2000 sqft.'386-984-
0622 or weekends 386-497-4762
1525 S. Ohio Ave, Live Oak, FL
Flexible space for lease. Great
location. 1,500- 17,000sf. Scott
Stewart 867-3498 MLS# 77247
Wedtfield Realty Group


780 Condos for Sale


Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
Country Club. All remodeled.
2br/2ba Condo. Tennis court &
pool privileges. Elaine K. Tolar
755-6488 MLS# 77219 $129,900

805 Lots for Sale
BEAUTIFUL 5 acres in
Lake City, 100% owner financing,
no qualifying, $395.per month.
Please call 512-663-0065
Bring the Horses. 4br/2ba. Plenty
of room on 5 ac lot. Master suite
w/garden tub.$109,500 MLS
78982 Roger Lovelady
386-365-7039 Westfield Realty
PUBLISHER'S NOTE
All real estate advertising in this
newspaper is subject to the fair
housing act which makes it illegal
to advertise "any preference,
limitation, or discrimination based
on race, color, religion, sex,
disability, familial status or nation-
al origin; or any intention to make
.such preference, limitation or
discrimination." Familial status
includes children under the age of
18 living with parents or legal
custodians, pregnant women and
people securing custody of chil-
dren under the age of 18. This
newspaper will not knowingly
accept any advertising for real es-
tate .which is in violation of the,
law. Our readers are hereby in-
formed that all dwellings adver-
tised in this newspaper are availa-
ble on an equal opportunity basis.
To complain of discrimination call
HUD toll free at 1-800-669-9777,
the toll free
telephone number to the hearing
impaired is 1-800-927-9275.

810 Home for Sale


2BR/1BA mfg home on.4 acres in
Oakvwood Acres; owner financing
available $44,900 DANIEL
CRAPPS AGENCY, INC.
386-755-5110 #78838
3/2 built in 2010, split floor plan,
Master bath w/large tub
on 2 acres MLS#78520
$109,900, 386-243-8227
R.E.O. Realty Group
3800 sf two story, 5 br 3b, metal
roof, two kitchens, quiet nice
country acre 8-mi. NW of.VA.
$159,000 firm cash only
386.961.9181
3br/2ba on Alligator Lake..
Fireplace, cathedral ceilings. 2 car
garage. Tennis court in back.
$156,900 Lisa Waltrip 365-5900
Westfield Realty Group
CUTE 3BR/1.5BA recently reno-
vated; 1,455 SqFt with city utilities
ONLY $75,000 DANIEL
CRAPPS AGENCY, INC.
386-755-5110 #78971
Eastside Village 55+ Retirement
2br/2ba 1 car garage Priced
@ $72,900
Eastside Villag Realty, Inc.
Call Denise Bose @ 752-5290
Eastside Village 55+ Retirement
2br/2ba 1 car garage priced @
$75,000
Eastside Village Realty, Inc.
Call Denise Bose @ 752-5290
IN-GROUND POOL! Remodeled
3 or 4 BR w/hardwd floors, new
carpet & vinyl in 2011 $79,500
DANIEL CRAPPS AGENCY,.
INC. 386-755-5110 #79233
LAKE CITY 2006 Brick home
with shop, 3 BR/2 BA, 1,700 sq.
ft., double lot fenced, $199,900
or best offer, Call 417-396-2134.


810 Home for Sale


LOCATION! CONDITION!
PRICE! 3BR/2BA w/open floor
plan; freshly painted $96,000
DANIEL CRAPPS AGENCY,
INC. 755-5110 #78278
Own a piece of history. Folk Vic-
torian in Wellborn. Includes triple-
wide MH. Total of 9 br's & 3ba.
Patti Taylor @ Access Realty
MLS # 71594 $155,900 623-6896
Great 3/2 home w/2346 sq ft
under roof on .67 ac., Creekside
S/D. Big back yard w/plenty of
shade trees. On a cul-de-sac,
MLS # 77385 $164,900 623-6896
Remax Professionals. Beautiful
Log cabin on 5 manicured acres.
Wrap around porch. MLS 75550
$199,000 Missy Zecher 386-623-
0237 www.missyzecher.com
Attention Pilots! 3br/lba. high
ceilings, brick fireplace. Old Flori-
da living. MLS 77756
$349,900 Josh Grecian. 386-466-
2517 Westfield Realty Group
Motivated Seller. Country area,
paved rd. 3br/2ba home. New AC
& upgraded wdows. MLS 78027
$79,500. Brodie Allred. 623-0906
Westfield Realty Group
Home for entertaining 3/2 plus
pool house w/half bath, 2.25
fenced ac. Freshly painted. Split
plan, Large rear deck MLS 78103
$179,900 386-623-6896
Remax Professionals. New home
with large pond. Well maintained
w/open floor plan. MLS 78957
$139,000 Missy Zecher 386-623-
0237 www.missyzecher.com
Lake front 3/2 custom Western Ce-
dar. Lots of storage space. Private
dock $220,000. MLS# 74681
Jo Lytte-Remax 386-365-2821
www.jolyne.florida-property-search.com
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
Custom built brick home on 5+,ac.
5br/4ba. 3 car garage In ground
pool. Lori Giebeig Simpson
365-5678 MLS# 75854 $569,900
3br/2ba. 2706sf. Island kit. Corian
countertops. Det garage, Koi pond,
green house & more MLS# 76255
$247,000 Pam Beauchamp
Remax Professionals 758-8900
Wonderful Neighborhood. 2 story
in town. 3br/2.5ba. Beautiful wood
'burning fireplace. MLS# 77050
$114,900 Carrie Cason 386-623-
2806 Westfield Realty Group
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
Brick in WoodCrest S/D Over-
sized garage., 3/2 split floor plan.
Storage shed. Elaine K. Tolar
755-6488 MLS# 77708 $169,900


Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
Brick home in town on lake front.
3br/2ba. New roof & hardwoods.
Glass room w/view Elaine Tolar,
755-6488 MLS#,78092 $249,900
3br/2ba. Split plan, recessed
lighting, wood/lam/carpet/tile.
Appliances included. MLS# 78143
$160,000 Pam Beauchamp '
Remax Professionals 758-8900


4br/2.5ba Awesome deal in Russ-
wood on 1.46 ac. SS appliances,
granite countertops & more. MLS#
79188 $269,000 Pam Beauchamp,, .,
Remax Professionals 758-8900
Short Sale. Attention Golfers!'
3br/2.5ba. Fairway Villas in Quail
Heights. MLS#69928, $79,900.
Jo Lytte, Remax 386-365-2821
jolytte@remaxnfl.com -
Well maintained home.in adult
community. Spacious floor plan,
all season porch, carport. $67,900
MLS#76136 Charlid Sparks 755-
0808 Westfield Realty Group
Southern Oaks CC. Custom built
block & stucco. 3br/2ba open floor
plan. MLS#76395 $109,900
Mike Lienemann 386-867-9053
Westfield Realty Group
Lofty home on Itchetucknee River,
Wrap around covered decks on
two levels.MustSEE! $375,000
MLS#77006 Jo Lytte
Remax 386-365-2821
Just reduced 4/2 on 10.5 acres.,
Up to date kitchen, Ig detached
garage/workshop. MLS#77410.
$178,000 REO Realty Group
Heather Craig. 386-466-9223
Great home, Great neighborhood,
3/2 located in town A Must See!.
MLS#77411, $79,900,
Nancy Rogers 386-867-1271
R.E.O. Realty Group
4/2, immaculate, new carpet/fix-
tures. Lg kitchen, FI room, shed,
fence. 2 car garage, MLS#77602,
$159,200, Nancy Rogers 867-1271
R.E.O. Realty Group
3/2 w/1 :car garage, detach carport
Lifetime metal roof. MLS#77780
$96,000, Call Jo Lytte -
Remax386-365-2821
www.jolytte.florida-property-search.com
Amazing 4/3 Ranch style over
2000 sqft. & 56.28 rolling acres.
Too many extras. MLS#78420.
$500,000 REO Realty Group
Heather Craig. 386-466-9223
Lake City Country Club. 4/3
beautiful interior renovation, huge
kitchen. MLS#78637 $179,900
Nancy Rogers
R.E.O. Realty Group 867-1271
JUST LISTED, Beautiful 5 acres
w/3/2 DWMH & 2/1 SWMH.
Close to town. MLS#79010
$69,000 REO Realty Group
Heather Craig. 386-466-9223
Like New. 4/3 in Calloway w/new
carpet& laminate,-fresh paint &
mother-in-law suite. $159,000,
MLS78238. Teresa Spradley.
365-8343 Hallmark Real Estate
Brick Ranch 3/2 FI room. Side en-
try garage & workshop. 2 sheds.
New AC appl & roof. MLS78442
$109,900. Millard Gillen 365-7001
Westfield Realty Group
Investment Property! 3/2 home w/
updated kitchen, sun room. Wel
kept 3/2 DW on 2 ac. $69,900,
MLS79144. Ginger Parker.
365-2135 Hallmark Real Estate
3/2.5 DW w/extra Ig kitchen.
Wired 24x36 workshop, steel roof,
pole barn. Owner Finance offered
$139,900, MLS79187. Janet Creel.
719-0382 Hallmark Real Estate
PRICE SLASHED TO $95,000!
Well-maintained 3BR/2BA home
in Gwen Lake area on comer lot
DANIEL CRAPPS AGENCY,
INC. 386-755-5110 #77307


4 1/2 acre lot. Lake Jeffery Road.
Gorgeous Oaks!Paved Rd
Owner Financing! NO DOWN!
$59,900. $525mo 352-215-1018.
www.LandOwnerFinancing.com
4 acres, Wellborn, New Well
installed, Beautifully wooded
w/cleared Home Site, owner fin,
no down, $39,900, $410 mon
Call 352-215-1018
www.LandOwnerFinancing.com
For Lease FARM- 7 stall barn.
17+ acres, pasture, cross fenced.
Close in $500. mo.
386-961-1086
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
Brick in WoodCrest S/D. Split
plan.'Screened porch. Lg back ,
yard. Elaine K. Tolar
755-6488 MLS# 77015 $137,900
10 Acres with Free Travel- Trailer.
Convenient location. $38,000
MLS#76264 Millard Gillen
386&365-7001
Westfield Realty Group:

3QA0 Commercial
OJU Property
166 SW Main Blvd.
Next to Wendy's
For Sale Or Lease.
386-752-7938


- 3 lots zoned RMF1 near Baya/
McFarlane: one vacant, brick
duplex, frame cottage and building,
site $129,000 386-961-9181


810 Home for Sale
PRICED TO SELL! 3BR/2BA
w/2,012 SqFt w/living rm &
family rm $39,000
DANIEL CRAPPS AGENCY,
INC. 386-755-5110 #78680
READY TO MOVE IN!
Living rm, dining rm. family rm,
lots of space ONLY $45.000
MLS 75210 DANIEL CRAPPS
AGENCY, INC. 386-755-5110
Remodeled home or office in city
limits. Separate bldg, possible
mother-in-law suite. $79,500
MLS#77724 DANIEL CRAPPS
AGENCY, INC. 386-755-5110
3 or 4 br/2ba. Remodeled w/fresh
carpet paint, countertops & AC.
Fenced back yard. $79,900 .
MLS#78340 DANIEL CRAPPS
AGENCY, INC. 386-755-5110
Drastically Reduced, nice 3br/2ba.
home on comer lot. Fenced back
yard in Gwen Lake area!
MLS#77307 DANIEL CRAPPS
AGENCY, INC. 386-755-5110
WELL-CARED FOR 4br/2.5ba
mfg home w/formal LR plus
family rm $84,000 MLS#78585
DANIEL CRAPPS AGENCY,
INC. 386-755-5110

820 Farms &
82 Acreage
$10,000 reduction on our 10-acre
lots. Owner financed land.i
Deas Bullard Properties
386-752-4339 www.landnfl.com


Q830( Commercial
o83 Property
Wellborn Commercial lot. 1.84
acres w/34' of Hwy frontage near
the new Dollar General. MLS
72381 Scott Stewart 386-867-3498
for info. Westfield Realty Group
788 S. Marion Comm'l bldg on
highway frontage. Across from the
VA & near downtown. $49,900.
MLS 78129 Scott Stewart 867-
3498 Westfield Realty Group

850 Waterfront
8O5 Property
Upscale River Cabin on
Suwannee River, Shop, Dock
MLS#76336 $349,900
Call Jo Lytte @ Remax
386-365-2821

870 Real Estate
701 Wanted
I Buy Houses
CASH!
Quick Sale Fair Price
386-269-0605 4


$10,500
Call
386-555-5555
If you don't Sell your vehicle
during the first 10 days, you
can run the same vehicle ad
for 10 additional days for
only $15.00
Terms and conditions remain the
same for the additional run.


To Get Your


I& .WW. -wa. l-
17 ft. center console,
approx. 40 hrs. Mercury,
90hp. New 551b trolling
motor. Alum. trailer.'
Pay off.
$13,000.
Call
386-758-7766


Auction Location: 1396 SW Main Blvd., Lake City, FL 32025


". -. : S. .. .. .
28,300 shares ofPeopl el '


IGGENBO800-257-4161

S ERNAIA LTDA INC 1 higgenbotham.com
A Licensed Real Estate Broker
an alliance partner of FOA l Global MLHigHenbothamCAI,fLUcIAU305A8158


Bring the picture in or
we will take it for you!
* Ad runs 10 consecutive days
with a description and photo in the
newspaper and online E-edition.
* Ad runs 10 consecutive days as a
classified line ad online.
* You must include vehicle price.
* All ads.are prepaid.
* Private party only,


d makeesone

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LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED SUNDAY, OCTOBER 16, 2011


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Story ideas?


Contact
Robert Bridges
Editor
754-0428
rbridges@lakecityreportercom


Sunday, October 16, 201 I


www.lakecityreporter.com


Section D


GARDEN TALK
I-


Nichelle Demorest
dndemorest@ufl.edu

Best kept

secret:

Persimmons

Fall and winter
are excellent
times to plant
fruit and nut
trees such
as persimmon, pecan,
and Chinese chestnuts.
Planting during the dor-
mant season allows soil to
settle and roots to become
established before spring
growth begins.
Buy only strong plants
of average size and avoid
spindly trunks or old pot-
bound trees. The spacing
and pruning requirements
depend on the type of tree.
Persimmons are a good
source of vitamin A, and
their fruit ripen primarily
in October and November.
Pecan trees can be grown
fairly easily, will add shade
and beauty to your yard,
and the nuts are an excel-
lent source of protein.
Chestnuts are low-fat and
are a staple of the holiday
season.
Be sure to choose variet-
ies recommended for our
area. ff 3oO're not sure
which particular plants are
right for your landscape,
contact the Extension
office at 752-5384 or visit
http://www.solutionsfory-
ourlife.com
The two types of persim-
mons found throughout
most of the state are com-
mon persimmons and
oriental persimmons. The
native common persim-
mon fruits are valuable
to wildlife including deer,
raccoons, foxes, and birds.
But for us, the fruits have
real pucker-power punch
if the frosts have not mel-
lowed and softened the
little orange or purple orbs.
Oriental persimmons, on
the other hand, are savory
orange-colored fruits high
in fiber, as well as vitamins
A and C. Non-astringent
types can be eaten when
fully ripe or while still firm.
They were introduced to
Florida in the mid-1800s
and have been enjoyed
ever since.
Both types of persimmon
trees are well suited for
North Florida. These trees
can withstand short peri-
ods of drought, but do best
with regular watering dur-
ing dry spells. With a little
pruning, they can also be
trained as hedges or even
espaliers.
Most of Florida's per-
simmons are grown in
the central and northern '
parts of the state. You
should be able to find these
locally grown fruits at farm
markets from September
through December. For
sweet treats, look for
orange oriental Fuyu per-
simmons that are firm,
shiny and crisp. Eat them
right away, or allow the
fruits to soften in a paper
bag and enjoy them later.
Plan to join us at the
Fort White Library on
Thursday, October 20th for
'Growing Roses in North
Florida'. The free presenta-
tion begins at 5:45 pm.

Nichelle Demorest is a
horticulture agent with the
Columbia County Extension
of the University of Florida
Institute of Food and
Agricultural Sciences.


Joe Johnston,
a pilot for the
Florida Fish
and Wildlife
Conservation
Commission,
speaks to a
group of stu-
dents during
the Safety Day
event held
at Epiphany
Catholic School.


Columbia County
Sheriffs Deputy
Matt Grinstead
introduces a
group of Epiphany
Catholic School
third- and fourth-
graders to
Zombie, a 5-year-
old German shep-
herd and member
of the K-9 unit.


Safety day a big hit with the little ones


By ANTONIA ROBINSON
arobinson@lakecityreporter.com
Cadi Williams, 7,
expected a day of fun
at school while learn-
ing about safety and she
wasn't disappointed. *
"I had a lot of fun with
my friends," she said.
Williams joined the
other kindergarten,
first and second grade
students at Epiphany
Catholic School for its
safety day Oct. 7.
On hand were represen-
tatives and activities from
local public safety depart-
ments, which included a
K-9 demonstration from
the Columbia County
Sheriff's Office, the
Family Safety House from
Columbia County Fire
Rescue and a helicopter
from the Florida Fish and
Wildlife Commission.
The school used its
F"onnections wirtfhpublic
safety officials to organize
the event, said Jenalyn
McCray, second grade
teacher and event orga-
nizer. Her brother works
for the sheriff's office.
One student has a father
who is a firefighter and
another has a father who
is a captain with the FWC.
The FWC landed its
helicopter on the back
field to the amusement of
the students. The entire
school witnessed the land-
ing.
"It was really cool how
we saw the helicopter
come down," said Kylie
Parrish, 9.
Lilya Conley, 9, had the


opportunity to see the I-9
demonstration.
"The dogs are really
cool," she said. "They
know how to keep under
control."
The day not only taught
students safety but how to.
be comfortable with pub-
lic safety representatives,
McCray said.
Columbia County Fire
Rescue looks forward
to going to schools and
teaching students about
safety, said Lt. Scott
. Cassady. The fire safety
students learn they can
later share with their par-
ents.
"Hopefully it carries
into the household," he
said.
Firefighters showed
the gear they wear so stu-
dents would be familiar
with how they look and
less afraid when seeing
them in action, Cassady
said.
Events such as the safe-
ty day is an opportunity
to highlight the resources
students have working
for them with public
safety, said CCSO Cpl. Jay
Swisher.
"It's good for their own
well-being," he said. "If
we show kids we are out
there working for them,
they won't be afraid of us."
Williams learned just
what to do in case she is
trapped and encounters a
fire, "Stop, drop and roll,"
she said.
Each of the activities
made the day "cool."
"I thought it was really
fun to see," Williams said.


.JMOU'1 IMI I .L.V VVI L3'. .. l, .... .
Columbia County Fire/Rescue firefighter Jimmy Moffitt allows his son Dean, 5, to try on his
mask and helmet Wednesday at Epiphany Catholic School's Safety Day. The firefighters
taught the students the basics in fire safety including who to call in an emergency, how to
avoid entering a room filled with fire and how to stop. drop and roll. Moffitt said that children
should not fear firefighters and should know their address and to have an evacuation plan.


A group of
Epiphany
Catholic School
students show
their excitement
as an FWC
helicopter lands
in a field on the
school's campus
for a Safety Day
event.


Cider-simmered sausages perfect for fall


By ELIZABETH KARMEL
For The Associated Press
I grew up in North Carolina, where
sausage meant spicy sage breakfast meat
and was mostly sold as bulk meat, then
made into patties. Delicious, but more of
jM -... a side meat than a


Karmel
* Elizabeth
Karmel is a grill-
ing and Southern
foods expert. She
is the author of
three cookbooks,
including "Soaked,
Slathered and
Seasoned."


meal.
When I moved
to Chicago, I was
introduced to the
wonderful world of
German, Polish and
Italian sausages. I
quickly fell in love
with sausages of all
kinds, and though
they are popular all
year long, they are
my favorite way to
*celebrate fall.
This recipe for
hard cider-soaked
apple-sage sausages
is perfect for a tail-


gate, Halloween party, football Sunday
or Oktoberfest Everyone loves sausage,
so it's good for fans of all ages. And, if
you've happened to go apple picking and
wonder what you are going to do with all
the apples, here's the dish!
Once I got the hang of the basic "brat
fry," I started experimenting with the
less traditional "gourmet" sausages that
are widely available today. My favorite of
the new-fangled flavors is the chicken-
apple sausage. This dish uses those for
an uptown version of a Wisconsin brat
fry.
And for those of you like me who
aren't from Sheboygan, Wis., the brat


fry is not about deep-fried sausages, but
grilled (or pan fried) and simmered sau-
sages. The "brat" in wurst comes from
the German verb "braten," meaning to
pan fry or roast. Thus the "brat fry."
The great thing about grilling the sau-
sages first, then simmering them, is that
you can grill the sausages the day before
you plan to serve them. The simmering
will add flavor and re-heat the sausages
at the same time. It's also a great way to
keep them warm and juicy if you are hav-
ing a meal or a party where people are
helping themselves and eating at differ-
ent times.
You grill (or pan fry) the sausages first
to cook them and seal in the flavors. This
may be opposite from the way you have
done it, or seen it done, in the past, but
it is the best way to maximize the flavor,
especially with lean chicken sausages.
If you simmer first and grill second, you
will lose most of the flavor, as the fat in
the sausage melts into the soaking liquid
as the sausage boils. And if you think
about it, few of us like boiled meat!
You will concentrate the flavors in the
sausage if you.grill or pan fry them from
the start. Once the sausages are cooked,
they will absorb the hard cider or other
simmering liquid, enhancing the sau-
sage, not taking away from it Make sure
to place the sausages in cold liquid and
slowly bring them up to temperature as
the liquid gets hot.
You can serve the sausages on a hard
roll with caramelized onions and mus-
tard. Or if you are a little more ambitious
(and have loads of apples from that after-
noon picking), make my apple-fennel

RECIPE continued on 2D


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Hard cider-soaked apple-sage sausages with apple-fennel
sauerkraut in Concord, N.H. This recipe is perfect for a tail-
gate, a Halloween party, a football Sunday or an Oktoberfest.


Lake City Reporter





LIFE









2D LAKE CITY REPORTER LIFE SUNDAY, OCTOBER 16, 2011


Record memories for your family, friends and


October 16
has always
held a special
place in my
heart It was
on this day in 1940 that my
parents met. Mama had
recently graduated from
Florida State's teaching
school and had moved
back home to Lake City to
begin what would eventu-
ally be a 40-year career
in education. Daddy was
working on his parents'
farm. They were both
natives, both descended
from longtime Columbia
County-residing families.
Daddy had been born and
raised in Columbia City,
and Mama in Ellisville.
On October 16, 1940
Mama was among those
helping to register local
men for the World War II
peacetime draft. Daddy
was one of the many men
enrolling. I wish I had
thought to ask them for
the dialogue that ensued


when this tall, lean,
tanned, mustached guy
met this pretty, buxom,
hazel-eyed brunette. But,
darn it; there are some
parts of the story that I,
most regrettably, never
learned.
I often conjecture: Was
it like a bolt of lightning
between them at first
sight? Did he talk trash
to her or make a joke?
(He was very witty.) Was
either bowled over by the
other's looks instantly?
Did she ask for more infor-
mation than his vital sta-
tistics? What all happened
that day?
Whatever happened,
they didn't waste any time,
as they had their first date
that very same evening.
They went out for dinner
and he took her to the only
movie playing in town,
"The Fighting 69th." And
afterwards, when he took
her home, and they were
at the door, saying good


Mark Kirby
Mark.Kirby@'fgc.edu
night...I haven't the faint-
est idea what happened.
Because I never asked.
And have kicked myself
many times for not doing
so. Which leads to the
point of this essay: Not
to make sure we find out.
all the juicy details of our
parents' first date, but to
get more stories from our
folks. Of their first date.
Of their wedding day. Of
the times) they discov-
ered they were going to be
parents. You don't have to
make them go into labori-


ous detail, but chances
are, they'll like remember-
ing those times and be
glad that you want to know
about them. And trust me
on this, too-after they've
gone you'll be glad you
have those stories, and no
matter how many of them
you know you'll wish you
had asked for more.
So why don't the par-
ents write this information
down, you say? Or make
recordings of what things
were like? Well, in the
first place parents don't
think their kids will be
interested, and'in the sec-
ond, the sad fact is that the
kids are more often not,
especially in our younger
years. We have some
stupid idea in our heads
that our mom and dad
(and any older relative)
will be around forever and
we can catch up on their
"pre-us" lives later. But so
often we don't, then they
die, and those unanswered


questions and lost anec-
dotes weigh on our minds
ever more as the years go
by
So what to do? First, if
your parents are willing to
share them, save any cards
and letters they wrote.
Then, get a tape or video
or some kind of recorder.
and pin them down and
get as many stories as you
can out of them. Ask their
contemporaries for stories
about them. Then put the
stories in print, or better
yet, encourage them to
do it. To jot down stories
as they remember them.
Prod them to write or tell
as much as they can. In
their later years my Uncle
Jack and Aunt Betty each
wrote their autobiogra-
phies and the stories in
them are wonderful and
informative. I'd give any-
thing to have my parents'
autobiographies to read.
In some ways this is the
best legacy we can have.


yourself
Knowing the thoughts,
opinions, feelings, likes,
dislikes, hopes, fears, etc.,
of our folks. Having sto-
ries to pass down to future
generations. It's said that
well never totally under-
stand our parents until
after they're both dead.
Maybe, but getting their
memories while they're
still here gives us a head
start.
And while you're at it,
start recording your own
memories, stories, and
such. You never know
who will be grateful for
this information one day.
Happy "First Day You
Met" Anniversary, Mama
and Daddy. For the stories
I do know, I am ever grate-
ful.


Mark Kirby is the coor-
dinator for community cul-
tural Resources at Florida
Gateway College.


Empty nest? Not all


parents are sad about it


By LEANNE ITAUE
Associated Press
NEW YORK Pamela
Reilly and her husband
have big plans that don't
include moping when
their three teens finally
fly the coop over tVe next
two years.
She and husband Terry,
with a fourth child grown
and gone, hope to down-
size and leave Indianapolis
for more rural, sunny
? climes. They're dream-
ing about touring Costa.
Rica and Baja Mexico on
motorcycles. She's consid-
ering a return to school
to become a physician's
assistant or a nurse prac-
titioner.
'We definitely fall into,
the category of parent, .
who will be celebrating
their children's successes
instead of mourning
the fact that we have an
empty nest," said the 46-
year-old Reilly, a doctoral
student in naturopathic
medicine. "Having an
empty nest doesn't mean
you have an empty life. At
least it shouldn't."
Have the dark days of
"empty nest syndrome"
brightened among today's
parents, or has juggling
two careers on tightbud-
gets with over-busy kids':,.'
left them so stressed out
and child-centric that they
have no energy or skills
left to navigate their lives
alone?
What about all those
helicopter moms? How
will they fare in'their
empty nests after years
of applying Ivy League
educations to afterschool
spreadsheets filled with
soccer, test prep and
music classes?
First your kids crawl,
then they drive, then they
leave. Why isn't that a
good thing?
"Not all parents experi-
ence empty nest," said
psychologist Joseph
Cilona, a parenting spe-
cialist in Manhattan.
But the helicopters, he
said, those parents who
"tend to be controlling
and micro-manage their
child's life, are at a much
greater risk for negative
emotions such as deep
feelings of loss and sad-
ness when children leave
home."
No twinges of sorrow in
Bentonville, Ark, for mom
S" of five Pamela Haven and
her husband, Jeff. She has
a recurring thought about
life after the last of the
brood 17-year-old' twin


boys graduate high
school in June: 'Thank
God they weren't triplets!"
Up next? "We're booked
on a cruise right after
school ends, just the two
of us. We're purchasing a
travel trailer, and we cin't
wait to strip down the
upstairs and repaint, car-
pet and make two guest
rooms."
Also looking forward
to life after children is
Jeanette Simpson, an inte-
rior designer in Lakewood_
Ranch, Fla. She has six
kids (no boomerangers in
the bunch) and the last is
a high school senior.
"After 27 years of deal,
ing with school schedules,
and 33 years of kids at
home, I'll be an eipty
- nester in-less thahn ayear."--
she said, "With the a.st ...
one, I feel almost guilty,
about not being overly
saddened. I have a feeling
of 'job well done.'"
What's she looking
forward. to the most?
Traveling with her hubby
without worry about
school breaks and, 'Time,
for myself, something
that's been rare since the
first one came along."
Carl Hindy, a marriage
counselor in Nashua,
N.H., knows empty nests
don't always start off
smoothly. Those who seek
guidance are led in part
bf working couples who
have had little time to
indulge their marriages.
"Couples come to
counseling feeling they've
grown so far apart and
don't know what to do
now that the proverbial
product has shipped," he
said.
With three ranging
from 14 to 18, marketer
Charity Hisle-Zierten near
Atlanta can't wait to ship
some product and start
enjoying some me time.
"I cannot imagine that
I will have empty nest
syndrome," she said. "I'm
truly looking forward to
experiencing the rest of
my life. I started very
young, pregnant as a
senior in high school, and
I have never experienced
life without the respon-.
sibility of three human
beings weighing me
down."
Don't get her wrong. "I
love my children dearly,
but I have raised them
to be independent for a
reason. I want them to
grow up and be happy,
contributing members of
society."
Jolyn Brand, an educa-


tion consultant in subur-
ban Houston, has seen
her share of weepy par-
ents droppifig kids off at
college. What they don't
consider, she said, is the
guilt their tears whip up in
their children during that
crucial time when they're
just taking flight.
"I'm always baffled by
the parents who are enor-
mously saddened," said
'the mother of four, rang-
ing from 8 to 17. Her old-
est is college-bound next
fall. "Sure, we all love our
children and we'll miss
them, but we've been pre-
paring them for 18 years
to be independent and
leave the nest."
Writer Dede
Cummnings' nest in
Bratdeboro, Vt., is already
empty. Her celebration
took some time.
The last of her three
kids is 19 and in his
second year of college
at Lewis & Clark, across
the country in Portland,
Ore. The marital transi-
tion and stress of paying
tuition made things rocky
at first, so she and her
husband, an assistant pro-
fessor, went into marriage
therapy, started a garden
together and got a puppy.
"We both work busy
jobs, but we play tennis or
ride bikes together," she
said. They're also plan-
ning a 10-day trip to Japan
with their youngest along.
Cummings felt she and
her husband, Steve, had
made all the right.moves.
They raised self-reliant
kids prepared when the
time came to bust out,
yet anger and frustration
creeped into her marriage
after they were gone.
'"The marriage therapy
was specifically to deal'
with 'empty nest' issues,"
she said. "We were not
focused as a couple with-
out any kids at home.
So much of our energy
revolved around them.
"Our son was a big
jock, co-captain of both
soccer and lacrosse senior
year, all-state in lacrosse,
and traveling to sports
games took up a lot of
time, and some of our
social life was there, too,"
she said.
Cummings described
"a kind of sadness around
the loss of our kids" that
remained undefined once
they were gone.
"We didn't realize it and
took out our frustrations
on each other," she said..
"But we seem to have
weathered the storm."


RECIPE: Apple-sage sausages for fall


Continued From Page
sauerkraut. It looks just
like kraut but has a tangy,
slightly sweet apple-onion
flavor that is the perfect
complement to the chick-
en-apple sausages. .

HARD CIDER-SOAKED
APPLE-SAGE SAUSAGES
If you can't find the
pre-packaged "gourmet"
sausages, use a sweet
Italian sausage and add
chunks of apples (about
2 apples) and 4 to 5 fresh
sage leaves to the sim-
mering liquid. Serve with
frosty mugs of hard apple
cider and homemade hash
browns.
Start to finish: 45 min-
utes

Servings: 8
2 tablespoons olive oil
3 to 4 large sweet
onions, sliced
8 uncooked apple-sage,
chicken sausages
Two to three 12-ounce
Bottles hard apple cider
(regular apple cider also
can be used)
8 hard or French rolls,
warmed
Spicy honey mustard or
German mustard
Apple-fennel sauerkraut
(see recipe below)

In a large stockpot over
medium-high, heat the oil.
Add the onions and cook,
stirring occasionally, for 10
minutes. Reduce the heat'
to medium then continue
to cook until fully caramel-
ized, about 20 minutes.
If the onions dry out too
much, add several tea-


spoons of water.
Meanwhile, heat a gas
grill to medium or prepare
a charcoal fire.
Place the sausages
directly on the cook-
ing grate and grill over
indirect heat for 15 to 20
minutes, turning occa-
sionally to brown all over.
Alternatively, you can pan
fry the sausages.
If you are serving the
sausages the next day, let
them cool to room tem-
perature and cover before
refrigerating overnight.
Otherwise, pour the cider
into a large stockpot. Add
the sausages, making sure
they are.covered.
Bring the cider up to a
gentle boil, then reduce
the heat. Simmer over a
medium-low heat for 20
to 30 minutes, or until the
sausages have been fla-
vored by the hot cider.
Y P14ce th gausges#iq ,
the warm rolls, spread
with mustard and top with
caramelized onions and
sauerkraut.

APPLE-FENNEL
SAUERKRAUT
Start to finish: 1 hour
Servings: 10
1 large fennel bulb
2 tablespoons olive oil
1 large Vidalia onion,
chopped
Kosher salt
5 Granny Smith apples,
grated
Juice of 1 lemon
2 tablespoons unsalted
butter
1/2 to 1 cup hard (or
regular) apple cider


2 tablespoons caraway
seeds
Ground black pepper

Trim off the frilly top of
the fennel bulb, then finely
chop it and set aside. Slice
the fennel bulb itself into
long strips (julienne).
In a large heavy-bot-
tomed saucepan over
medium, heat the oil. Add
the onion and several
pinches of salt. Cook until
the onion begins to brown.
Add the fennel strips, stir
and cook, covered, for
about 5 minutes, or until
the fennel begins to wilt.
Reduce the heat to medi-
um-low.
Meanwhile, in a bowl
mix the grated apple with
the lemon juice, then add
it to the pan. Cover and
cook, stirring occasionally,
for 15 minutes. Add the
butter-,mixing well. Add
the cider, reserved fennel
tops and caraway seeds.
Cook for an additional 10
minutes, uncovered, or
until the mixture is soft
and cooked down. If it
needs more liquid, add
more cider. It will look like
sauerkraut. Season to taste
with salt and pepper.
Remove the pan from
the heat and set aside to
allow the flavors to blend.
The sauerkraut can be
made up to 2 days in
advance and kept covered
in the refrigerator until
ready to use. Warm just
before serving.











&1t


BIRTH ANNOUNCEMENT

Owen Lessie Wilkey
Chris and Teresa Wilkey of Lake City announce the birth of their son, Owen Lessie
Wilkey, Aug. 16 in North Florida Regional in Gainesville. He weighed 6 pounds, 11
ounces and measured 20 inches.
He joins a sister, Ryalee Wilkey, 6.
Grandparents are Danny and Polly Murray.










LAKE CITYREPORTER ADVICE & CROSSWORD SUNDAY, OCTOBER 16, 2011


DEAR ABBY


Son starts on second marriage


before ending his first one


DEAR ABBY: My son,
"Beau," married "Patsy" four
years ago. She left him after
two years and moved out of
state. There are no legal sepa-
ration papers, no child sup-
port, and my grandson lives
with his daddy.
Beau has a mistress now
and tells people they're
"engaged." "Lud's" family
refers to my son as her fiance
and she's considered Mommy
to my grandson. When I cor-
rected those titles at a recent
as family function, it caused,
-s friction.
In my opinion, they can't
be engaged until Beau is first
divorced. To mnie, marriage
is important; it matters. I am
disturbed by my son's refusal
to,end his marriage. I feel it
is unfair to Luci, who just had
his second child. Beau claims
Patsy left him, so she should
file for the divorce.
Please understand that
Luci and I have become close.
She's thoughtful, intelligent,
well-spoken, and a wonderful
mother to both my grandchil-
dren. I just feel Beau should
finish his first marriage.
This is not the type of man I
1 meant to raise, and that this
vi is the person he has become
3 shames me to my soul.
Am I out of step with
society? Am I the only one
who finds this setup unfair to
Lud and insulting to me, the
mother who tried to raise him
; to be a better man than this?
DISRESPECTED MOTHERS
SINTEXAS
.,


Abigail Van Buren
www.dearabby.com

DEAR MOM: You're not
out of step, and you are cor-
rect that the current arrange-
ment is unfair to Luci. If your
son should die tomorrow
(heaven forbid), Patsy would
be a merry widow with all
his assets, and Luci would be
left with fond memories and
a baby to raise by herself.
Period.
Not knowing Beau, I can't
know his reasons for not
divorcing the woman who left
him and ensuring that Luci
and the children are taken
care of. But I am sure of this:
His reasons are NOT solely
that he thinks his wife should
be the one to file.
** ** **
DEAR ABBY: I was out to
lunch with my son, his new
wife, "Taylor," and her fam-
ily. My son asked, "Mom,
do you want something else
to eat?" Naturally, I thought
he was speaking to me, so
I answered. I was crushed
when he said, "No, I was
talking to 'Sally"' (Taylor's
" mother)!
. I feel it's wrong for my son
to call someone else Mom,


and furthermore, Sally should
have said something, but she
didn't Taylor and I are close,
but she would never call me
Mom, especially in front of
her own mother. Am I being
silly? Or should I let this go?
- HIS ONLY MOM
DEAR ONLY MOM: Let
it go. Your son was prob-
ably calling Taylor's mother
"Mom" because he had been
asked to do so. ("'Sonny,'
we're family now. Please call
me 'Mom.'") It would not,
however, be confrontational to
tell your son that hearing him
do it was hard to swallow.
** ** **
DEAR ABBY: I walk daily
with a friend who constantly
complains about her job "I
have seven meetings, a person
to train and emails to write,
blah, blah, blah..." I occa-
sionally have an opening to
mention my problems, but it's
rare. I love this friend, but her
constant complaining is wear-
ing on me. How can I get her
to just enjoy the break and not
spend 20 minutes moaning and
groaning? WEARING THIN
IN VIRGINIA
DEAR WEARING THIN:
Try this. The next time she
does it, say: "Let's not take
the office with us. Let's enjoy
our break and use the time to
talk about other things." Say
it with a smile, then change.
the subject
* Write Dear Abby at
www.DearAbby.com or
P.O. Box 69440, Los
.Aggeles, CA 90069.


HOROSCOPES


ARIES (March 21-April
19): Don't share personal
information. Someone will
misinterpret what you say.
Concentrate on following
through and demonstrating
your capabilities. Your effort
will attract positive feedback.
A partnership will change
how you proceed. ****
TAURUS (April 20-May 20):
You can do so much more to
ensure that you have the skills
to get ahead. Travel to desti-
nations that are conducive to
self-promotion. Educational
pursuits will make you a more
complete package. ****
GEMINI (May 21-June
20): You have plenty to offer,
and you will receive recogni-
tion for your contribution.
A secret admirer will have
suggestions that pique your
interest Use your charm to
get what you want. Financial
gains can. be expected. ***A
CANCER (June 21-July 22):
Emotional tension will soar if
you don't address the prob-
lems you have with someone.
Socializing will bring back
the memory of a relationship
from your past that you let
slip away. Don't waste time
with regret when amends

CELEBRITY


THE LAST WORD
Eugenia Word

can be made. ****
LEO (July 23-Aug. 22):
Not everyone will agree with
your means or method of
doing things. Stay well below
the radar until you have
reached a point where it is
easier for others to compre-
hend. Avoid anyone asking
for a straight answer to a per-
sonal question. ****
VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept 22):
Ask, and you shall receive an
invite to a gathering that will
help you promote what you
have to offer. A change in your
vocation is apparent and will
lead to extra money in your
pocket Ask for help to bring a
dream to fruition. **
LIBRA (Sept 23-Oct 22):
Take it upon yourself to
make plans that suit your
needs. Good fortune will be
yours if you follow your heart
and your intuition. Don't let
the thoughts and action of
others deter you from doing
what will make you happy.
Make a move. *****
SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov.
21): It's the tried-and-true

CIPHER


by Luls Campos
Celebrity Cipher cryptograms are eated from quotalns by famous peopk.l peastand present.
Each latter In the Oiphpr Statlnd: for .nother.
,. TODAY'S CLUE: Vj.qalIs'W
"PJ WF LMGH AC ML G'K H HG K MAIG
Y, N HI. G VLAKL UHGIGRMC WC Y H NO
SGKNoARF F KHJREC." L; RHA
S'GH FCN R

Previous Solution: "God created a number ofapplIbllitles In case some of his
prototypes failed that is the meaning of evolution,".- Graham Greene
2011 by NEA, Inc., dist. by Univrsail Uclck 10-17


that will see you through..
Someone you've known for
a long time will not let you
down. Greater stability is
heading your way if you are
adamant about money mat-
ters. Time is of the essence,
so don't procrastinate. ***
SAGITTARIUS (Nov.
22-Dec. 21): Favors will be
granted and partnerships can
be formed. Your knowledge
and charm will dazzle the
people you want to impress.
Collaborating with someone
creative will help you pull
your ideas and plans togeth-
er. Success awaits you. ***
CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan.
19): You may know what's
expected of you, but following
through may not be so easy.
Look to the people who know
you best for advise. An inter-
esting point of view will help
you gain momentum. You can.
overcome anything. ***
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb.
18): Do what's required with-
out being asked and you will
impress someone who will
make a difference in your
life. Good fortune will come
your way if you are generous
with your knowledge, ideas
and hands-on help. Don't let
personal problems slow you
down. *****
PISCES (Feb. 19-March
20): An opportunity to
embrace an interesting part-
nership is apparent. There
are gains to be made person-
ally and financially. A prop-
erty matter can be resolved
if you apply a little pressure.
Love is highlighted, and a
personal contract will have a
positive impact **


SUNDAY CROSSWORD :


GRIN AND PARROT By Brendan Emmett Quigley / Edited by Will Shortz 1- 213 4 6 6 7T 8910 11 12 1i3 i14 [15 16 117 18


Across
1 Dancing misstep
,I 5 Time's 1981 Man
of the Year
t:',.l lI.Churchill itpan- i.
faul!i-16GChattering bird.' ,
19 Subject of,a
blurry photo,
maybe
20 Some terminals
21 Mild 11-Across
22 Ice climber's
tool
23 Ride
,* 24 D6tente as a
means of self-
preservation?
26 World Factbook .
publisher, in
brief
27, Floored by
29 Some extra bills,
1 maybe
30 Symbols of a
budding romance
32 Big name in
office supplies
33 "The ___ Bride"
(Rimsky-
Korsakov opera)
36 Take __ (rest)
37 Like most
churches
'40 Make a home's
turf unfit for
habitation? -
44 Adjust
45 "Today" rival,
for short
47 Veep Agnew
48 Off
49 Thai money
50 Dissertation
For any three answers,
call from a touch-tone
Done: 1-900-285-5656,
1.49 each minute; or,
with a credit card, 1-800-
814-5554.


53 Where the 34th
Infantry
Division fought:
Abbr.
54 Joint legislative
55 Israel's Weizman
56 Seven, for one
58 Songs for one
60 Eye part
61 Diminutive of a
common Russian
man's name
63 Antiulcer pill
65 Juice component
67 Lay out some
newspaper copy
the old-
fashioned way?
71 Debating two
options, say
72 Whine,
73 Barrel part
75 Match closer,
for short
78 Tucson sch.
80 Quickly
82 "While you
out ... "
,84 Go off.
86 They're laid by
aves
88 Shiny, hollow
paperweight
89 Prefix with
venous
90 Star men?
91 Churchgoers
93 Electoral map
shade
94 Blender maker
95 Rhombus on an
award?
99 Taking drugs
100 Dead letter?
101 Concert for
(2007 event)
102 Highflier's
home?


104 Derailleur
settings
106 Cartoon.
character whose
last name is
I-ti'dek
107 Dressing place
111 P
112 What a
"mysterious
restaurant critic
has?
116 1968 live folk
record
117 Company with
Patch Media
118 Sourpusses
119 Precipitation
prediction
/ 120 Something
special
121 Many a
shampoo
122 Court nobleman
in "Hamlet".
123 Bottoms
124 "Mr. Roboto"
band, 1983

Down
1 Banks raking in
the money?
2 Criticize severely,
with "out"
3 Chich6n __
(Mayan ruins)
4.Getaway where
Italian pies are
consumed?
5 Crumpled (up)
6 Close to, in poetry
7 Skyscraping
8 Dutch city
9 Mailed
10 Setting of the
castle Rocca
Maggiore
11 Early third-
century year


12 France's Belle-
; ___-en-Mer
13 Vacancies
14 Foe of the
, Pawnee
15 Cyrano de
Bergerac wooed
her
16 Strength required
to lift a car?
17 Revolutionary
line
18 What a raised
'hand may mean
25 "Can't beat that
contract"
28 Duke __..
Rocky's
manager/trainer
31 1986 Indy 500
winner
34 Weapon in Clue
35 Ticked-off states
-37 "Quidn __'?"
("Who knows?")
38 Shopping center
39 What PC gurus
provide
40 Some New
Guineans
41 Army units
42 "Yes __?"
43 Couple
45 Scholastic
measure': Abbr.
46 Seder-serving
51 Title character in
love with Elvira
52 Snitch's activity
54 Light on the
stove
56 Drag-racing fuel
57 Grubs, e.g.
59 Ukrainian city
62 Obliterates
64 Last thing a
fellow actor
says, maybe


66 Awards won by
shrimps?
68 Surround
69 Drop a letter or
two
70 Actress Mimieux
74 Dropped the ball,
75 Dole's running
mate of 1996
76 Like some
contraception
77 Where your
opinion on "One
lump or two?"
counts?


79 Skirt
81 Nascar Hall-of-
Famer J.arrett
83 Spots for
hammers and
anvils
85 Sharp irritation
87 Berry in some
energy boosters
89 Slice of old
Turkey?
91.Bird hangouts
92 Target competitor


96 Intl. humanities
group
97 Bowler's target
98 Refrain bit
99, End of a pricing
phrase
102 Japanese beer
103 Fire-__
(carnival
performer)
104 Home for a
certain old
woman:


105 Tattoo removal
reminder
108 Like some
sparkling, wines
109 Side (with)
110 Sauce thickener
Ill Car wash need
113'A single may
get you one,
briefly
114 PC key
115 Like some flat-
screen panels,
for short


Answers-to last Sunday's Crossword.
SL|AM ELMST AFOUL EASY
STIAIRTEAIMO NERVE ALTO
RA CHA LES GRE lNOR AAN
ROTOT I L VERSAT I LE
MCLI I CALLA ETS LIBRA
CHIC Fo0R CARE USER ID
SYN BO D LAN .NNERACE
SUN SOTTO AUBE
APP LETS LIENS TEDD IES
SARAN EVENS ATTN INLA
LIMA NING ALE TREBE
AMMO RAPT OVULE USONE
MtE'ANTIT ASSE EYE EXA
HONOR ONES URL
JO TO" RE L|OU ^ WLS HOG
ALARMS MASSE MAE ]POPE
MACAU GIN ESSEN MRMOM
UNCOUNTED POTATOES
ONCH ADLE _I NAL UISE
IRAE AREEL FREDO SCUM
AB\E FERRY F0OS s TE MP


5 8 9


3 1 5 2


9 6 14

_----3-----
3 4 7


8 3 7 21


4 2 1 9 3
------

1 5 6


7 8


2 .4 6


9 L 7 L 6 Z 9 8


L 9 8 C 1 L Z.6 9


6 Z 9 9 8 1V L.L
98-I 6191L L 17





-9 L- 1 L 8 8 6-




L V 6 Z 8 L 9 9

9 S6 9 6 Ll.Z


8 E L 9S L 6 9 9


6 9 LZE 17 8 9 L
i-TT-9e96_L T_


Page Editor: Emogene Graham 754-0415









4D LAKE CITY REPORTER LIFE SUNDAY, OCTOBER 16, 2011


Dr Pepper Ten: 'No women allowed'


By MAE ANDERSON
AP Retail Writer
* NEW YORK Dudes
don't drink diet.
. Or at least that's the
idea behind Dr Pepper
Ten, a 10-calorie soft drink
Pr Pepper Snapple Group
is rolling out on Monday
with a macho ad campaign
that proclaims "It's not for
women." The soft drink
was developed after the
company's research found
that men shy away from
diet drinks that aren't per-
ceived as "manly" enough.
: To appeal to men, Dr
Pepper made its Ten drink
180 degrees different than
Diet Dr Pepper. It has calo-
ries and sugar unlike its
diet counterpart Instead
of the dainty tan bubbles
on the diet can, Ten will
be wrapped in gunmetal
grey packaging with silver
bullets. And while Diet
Dr Pepper's marketing
is women-friendly, the ad
campaign for Ten goes
out of.its way to eschew.
women.


For instance, there's a
Dr Pepper Ten Facebook
page for men only. And TV
commercials are heavy on
the machismo, including
one spot that shows mus-
cular men in the jungle
battling snakes and bad
guys and appear to shoot
lasers at each other.
"Hey ladies. Enjoying
the film? Of course not
Because this is our movie
and this is our soda," a
man says as he attempts to
pour the soda into a glass
during a bumpy ATV ride.
"You can keep the roman-
tic comedies and lady
drinks. We're good."
Dr Pepper Ten is not
the first diet soda aimed
at men. (Think: Coke
Zero and Pepsi Max.)
But Dr Pepper Ten's ad
campaign is the first to be
so overt about courting
men who want to drink a
soda with fewer calories.
The ads come at a time
when overall sales in the
$74 billon soft drink indus-
try are slowing as more
Americans buy healthier


options like juice and
bottled water. Volume has
fallen from slightly over
10 billion cases in 2005 to
9.4 billion cases in 2010,
according to Beverage
Digest data.
"Regular sugared soft
drinks have declined in
recent years, and some
consumers have taste
issues with some of the
diet sodas," said John
Sicher, editor and publish-
er of Beverage Digest.
Dr Pepper said men, in
particular, are dissatisfied
with the taste and image
of diet drinks. The com-
pany wouldn't disclose the
formula of Dr Pepper Ten,
but said that the drink has
10 calories and 2 grams
of sugar, which gives it a
sweeter taste. Dr Pepper
said there are 23 flavors
in its regular soda, (which
has 150 calories and 27
grams of sugar per can)
and Dr Pepper Ten con-
tains all of them.
The company, which
declined to give figures
for how much was spent


on the campaign, also
worked hard to craft a
macho message. The
company said ads for Dr
Pepper Ten will air on all
major networks, FX and
ESPN during college foot-
ball games.
A Facebook page for
the drink contains an
application that allows it to
exclude women from view-
ing content, which includes
games and videos aimed
at being "manly." For
instance, there's a shooting
gallery where you shoot
things like high heels and
lipstick, for example.
"One topic people
never tire of talking or
arguing about is differ-
ences between men and
women, particularly if
women are excluded," said


Deborah Mitchell, execu-
tive director for the Center
for Brand and Product
Management at the
University of Wisconsin
School of Business. "That
will always get someone's
attention."
As for whether the ads
will resonate with men
remains to be seen. Paul
McDonald, 25, of Berkley,
Calif., says he drinks soda
labeled "diet" and doesn't
think there is any stigma
attached.
"No one has ever made
fun of me for drinking a
Diet Coke, and I'm on a
rugby team we make fun
of each other for every-
thing," he said.
ASSOCIATED PRESS
Right: A bottle of the new
soft drink Dr Pepper Ten.


Marijuana-shaped candy

alarms parents, officials


By CAROLYN THOMPSON
Associated Press
BUFFALO, N.Y. Candy shaped like
'marijuana that's showing up on store
shelves around the country won't get kids
high, but aghast city leaders and anti-
drug activists say the product and grocers
tarrying it represent a new low.
'"We're already dealing with a high
amount of drug abuse and drug activity
and trying to raise children so they don't
think using illegal substances is accept-
hble," said City Councilmember Darius
Pridgep. "So to have a licensed store sell
candy to kids that depicts an illegal sub-
stance is just ignorant and irresponsible."
; The "Pothead Ring Pots," "Pothead
Lollipops" and bagged candy are distrib-
uted to retail stores by the novelty supply
company Kalan LP of the Philadelphia
suburb of Lansdowne. It also wholesales
online for $1 for a lollipop and $1.50 for a


Felicia Williams, Community Liason for
Buffalo City Council member Darius Pridgen,
holding a 'Pot Pop' lollipop in Buffalo, N.Y.
package,of three rings.
Company president Andrew Kalan
said the candy, on the market six to nine
months and.in 1,000 stores around the
country, promotes the legalization of
marijuana.


Buy one complete pair of glasses at
regular price & receive a





Some Restrictions Apply.
COUPON REQUIRED EXPIRES OCTOBER 31. 2011
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