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The Lake City reporter
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028308/01671
 Material Information
Title: The Lake City reporter
Uniform Title: Lake City reporter (Lake City, Fla. 1967)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: John H. Perry
Place of Publication: Lake City Fla
Creation Date: October 13, 2011
Publication Date: 1967-
Frequency: daily (monday through friday)[<1969>-]
weekly[ former 1967-<1968>]
daily
normalized irregular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Lake City (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Columbia County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Columbia -- Lake City
Coordinates: 30.189722 x -82.639722 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 95, no. 4 (Oct. 5, 1967)-
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000358016
oclc - 33283560
notis - ABZ6316
lccn - sn 95047175
sobekcm - UF00028308_01569
System ID: UF00028308:01671
 Related Items
Preceded by: Lake City reporter and Columbia gazette

Full Text




000 120511 *.**3.DG7
LTB OF FLORD HISTORy
PO BOX 117007
205 SMA UNIV OF FLORIDA
GAINESVILLE PL 32611-1943


T 32 6


Reporter


Thursday, October 13, 2011


www.iaKte.-i.7 -. orter.com


Vol. 137, No. 222 E 75 cents


GOING THE


EXTRA


ILE


- and


then


some

On a week's notice, 3
run half marathon in
honor of fallen friend.

By GORDON JACKSON
gjackson@lakecityreporter.com

Three Columbia
Correctional
Institution cor-
rections officers
recently taught
friends and family a lesson
about skepticism, determina-
tion and camaraderie.
Aaron Bass, Stephen
Esposito and James Hahsen
were met with skepticism
when they
*announced
plans to
run a half
marathon
on Oct 1.
The naysay-
ers laughed
Davis and most
expressed
doubt the three men would
finish the 13.1 mile race
because none of them were
runners and they had less
than a week to prepare.
Initially,he e three men
RACE continued on 3A


From left: Stephen Esposito, James Hansen, Misti Davis and Aaron Bass Esposito, Hansen and Bass were co-workers of Russell Enan Davis, killed Sept.
4 in Lake City while jogging in preparation for a half marathon in Orlando. In honor of Davis and on just a week's notice the three ran the race with his
wife Misti Oct. 1. All four completed the entire 13.1 mile course.


Alligator

fest recalls

county's

early days

By ANTONIA ROBINSON
arobinson@lakecityreporter.com
Reenactments, dancing and more this
weekend will commemorate a time when
Lake City was known simply as Alligator.
The Alligator Warrior Festival is set for
Friday through Sunday at O'Leno State
Park. The festival runs from 8 a.m. to 5
p.m. each day.
"It's an event that celebrates the years
when North Florida was in a transition from
a Spanish colony to the 27th state of the
United States," said Paul Rowley, Alligator
Warrior Festival Board secretary. "It is an
event that reenacts the Second Seminole
War battle of San Felasco Hammock fought
on Sept. 18, 1836."
The Alligator Warrior Festival is the
only one of its kind in Northeast Florida,
he said. The closest similar event is in
Inverness.
The first Alligator Festival was held in
1995 at Olustee Park in downtown Lake
City. It was founded by Dolly Barracca,
Margaret Wuest and Victor Vasco.
The festival later moved to Wilson Park
for 2002 and 2003, Florida Gateway College
from 2003 to 2007 and Memorial Stadium
in 2009. Last year was its first in O'Leno
State Park.
"The state park is a beautiful location for
the event," he said.
The festival also changed its name from
Alligator Festival to Alligator Warrior
Festival in 2010.
Lake City was called Alligator before
1859. A famous resident from the area was
Alligator Warrior, a Seminole commander.
The event features a Native American
ALLGATOR continued on 3A


FILE
Chi Meeker (left) and his wife Mary Kent, both of Folkston, Ga., shows Taj Smith, 7, how
to make a fire with flint and steel.


FILE
Johnny Gaston, assistant pastor at the Broken Lance Native American Church, uses a
hide scraper to remove the fur from a deer skin last year at the Alligator Warrior Festival.


Next moves

uncertain

on jobs bill

By ANDREW TAYLOR and
DARLENE SUPERVILLE
Associated Press
WASHINGTON A day after Senate
Republicans killed his $447 billion jobs bill,
President Barack Obama said he isn't tak-
ing no for an answer..
In his first, combative appearance since
a united Senate GOP caucus filibustered
the jobs plan to death, Obama promised
to keep the
pressure on
Congress for
his job initia-
tives.
"Now a lot
of folks in
Washington
and the
media will
look at last
night's vote
and say,
'Well, that's
it Let's move ASSOCIATED PRESS
on .to, the President Barack Obama
next, fight.' waves after speaking at
But I've got the Interior Department in
news for Washington on Wednesday.
them: Not
this time. Not with so many Americans out
of work," he said. "Not with so many folks
in your communities hurting. We will not
take no for an answer."
After pressing for Congress to award his
jobs package an up or down vote, Obama
and his Democratic allies promise to force
additional votes on separate pieces of the
measure, like infrastructure spending, job-
less assistance and tax cuts for individuals
and businesses.
"We will keep organizing and we will
JOBS continued on 3A


11111III I CALLUS:
(386) 752-1293
SUBSCRIBE TO
THE REPORTER:
Voice: 755-5445
1 846 002 1 Fax: 752-9400


86
T-Storms
WEATHER, 2A / i


Opinion ..... ........... 4A
People................... 2A j
Obituaries .............. 5A
Advice & Comics ......... 3B
Puzzles ................. 2B


4A


TODAY IN
PEOPLE
Gere guitars
fetch $ I M.


COMING
FRIDAY
Local news
roundup.


La









LAKE CITY REPORTER DAILY BRIEFING THURSDAY, OCTOBER 13, 2011


I H 3. Wednesday:
Afternoon: 7-8-5
Evening: 2-2-3


tly4 Wednesday:
Afternoon: 7-4-6-0
S_ Evening: 1-6-2-5


Tuesday:
4-6-10-15-32


PEOPLE IN THE NEWS



Richard Gere guitar collection fetches $1M


NEW YORK
A collection of American vintage
guitars owned by actor Richard Gere
has fetched nearly $1 million at auc-
tion in New York City.
Tuesday's sale of 110 guitars and
amplifiers it Christie's auction house
included brands such as C.E Martin,
Gibson, Fender and Gretsch and
guitars once owned by blues guitar-
ist Albert King and reggae musician
Peter Tosh.
The top sale went to a 1960 solid-
body Les Paul electric guitar by
Gibson, which sold for more than ,
$98,000. '
Gere says he's parting with the
instruments to support global
humanitarian causes. Christie's says
the "Pretty Woman" star studied
trumpet and is a self-taught pianist
and guitarist .
Gere says he never planned to
assemble a guitar collection and
bought only ones that he liked and
that sounded good to him.

Rodney Atkins reunites,
with his birth mother
NASHVILLE, Tenn. When
people become famous, long-lost
relatives often come out of the wood-
work.
That became a
particular problem
for country singer
Rodney Atdkins .
who released
his fourth album,
Atkins ,"Take A Back Road,"
last week ,- when.
he became the spokesman for the.
National Council for Adoption in
2008. Atkins was adopted as an t
infant and didn't have any contact
with his birth family.
"I needed to close that door,"'said
Atkins, 42, in a recent interview.
So in August of 2008, Atkldns went
through the proper channels and
reunited with his birth mother.


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Kerry Keane, head of Christie's musical instruments department, plays a guitar
from the collection of actor Richard Gere as other guitars from the collection are
displayed at Christie's in New York. The collection includes over 100 vintage
American guitars and amplifiers and was auctioned on Tuesday.


"It hit me at that moment, walk-
ing in that room, getting to know
her," Atkins said. "She's a wonderful,
beautiful lady. I realized that the rea-
son I needed to do that did not have
anything to do with my parents."
"She's been carrying that around,
wondering what happened, and I
could tell it was such a relief."
His birth mother got pregnant at
19 after what Atkins described as
a traumatic first date. She hid the
pregnancy from her family, and ulti-
mately chose to give Atkins up for
adoption instead of having an abor-
tion. For privacy reasons, Atkins did
riot want to reveal her identity.
"I just wanted to tell her thank
you, because she had some other
alternatives to end that situation,"
said Atkins, pausing. "So you don't
want to take it for granted. ... She.
kept saying, 'I'm sorry.' I kept say-
ing, Thank you."' His birth mother
went on to get married and have


another son of her own.

Former governor to host
Current TV talk show
NEW YORK Current TV is
announcing a prime-time talk show
to be .hosted by former Michigan
Gov. Jennifer
Granholm.
SThe new show,
called '"The War
Room," will premiere
in January at 9 p.m.
Eastern time, follow-.
Granholm ing "Countdown with
Keith Olbermann."
Granholm was the first woman to
be elected governor in Michigan and
served two terms beginning in 2003.
A contributor to NBC's "Meet the '
Press," she'recently co-authored "A
Governor's Story: The Fight for Jobs
and America's Economic Future."
* Associated Press


Celebrity Birthdays


* Actor Demond Wilson is
65.
* Singer-musician Sammy
Hagar is 64.
* Actor John Lone is 59.
* Model Beverly Johnson is
59.
* Producer-writer Chris
Carter is 55.
* Actor Reggie Theus is 54.
* Singer Marie Osmond is
52.


* Rock singer Joey
Belladonna is 51.
* NBA coach Doc Rivers is
50.
* College and Pro Football
Hall of Famer Jerry Rice is
49.
* Actress Kelly Preston is 49.
* Country singer John
Wiggins is 49.
* Actor Christopher Judge
is 47.


HOW TO REACH US
Marn number ........(386) 752-1293
Fax number ......:.......752-9400
Circulation ..............755-5445
Online ... www.lakecityreporter.com
The Lake City Reporter, an affiliate of
Community Newspapers Inc., is pub-
lished Tuesday through Sunday at 180
E. Duval St., Lake City, Fla. 32055.
Periodical postage paid at Lake City, Ra.
Member Audit Bureau of Circulation and
The Associated Press.
All material herein Is-property of the Lake
City Reporter. Reproduction In whole or
in part is forbidden without the permis-
sion of the publisher. U.S. Postal Service
No. 310-880.
POSTMASTER: Send address changes
to Lake City Reporter, P.O. Box 1709,
Lake City, Rea. 32056.
Publisher Todd Wilson .....754-0418
(twilson@lakecityreporter.com)
NEWS
Editor Robert Bridges .....754-0428
(rbridges@lakecityreporter.corm)
ADVERTISING
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BUSINESS
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Please call 386-755-5445 to report any
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CORRECTION


The Lake City Reporter correct errors of fact in news
items. If you have a concern, question or suggestion, please
call the executive editor. Corrections and clarifications will run
in this space. And tanks for reading.


Obama, workers
toast to more jobs
ORLANDO President
,Barack Obama joined four
unemployed construction
' workers in Florida for a
' round of beers on a day
his jobs bill met defeat on
Capitol Hill.
Obama met with the
group at Harp and Celt
Restaurant & Irish Pub in
downtown Orlando. He
solicited opinions on the
jobs situation and said he
was trying to figure out
how to get the construc-
tion trades back to work.
The three unemployed
pipe fitters and one unem-
ployed plumber drank
beer and soda; Obama
had a Guinness. They all
toasted "to more jobs."
Obama held the meet-"
ing between fundrais-
ers in Florida as Senate
Republicans and two
Democrats turned back
an effort to open debate on
the president's $447 billion
jobs bill. Obama said the
bill would create construc-
tion jobs.

CiM Icrop eMpe
to increase ned Y
ST. PETERSBURG-
The U.S. Department of
Agriculture is predicting
increases in citrus pro-
duction for the upcoming
growing season.
In a Wednesday release,
Florida Agriculture
Commissioner Adam
Putnam said the USDA
has forecast increases
in almost all varieties of
Florida citrus.
The USDA report said
all orange production
nationwide should increase
five percent in the 2011-
2012 season.
White grapefruit crops
and a variety of tangelos
are expected to drop
slightly.
The report estimates
that Florida will produce
147 million boxes of orang-


ASSOCIATED PRESS
President Barack Obama sits down for a beer with unem-
ployed construction workers at The Harp and Celt Irish Bar in
Orlando Tuesday.


es, a five percent increase
over last'year.

Small plane lands
on Turnpike'.'
HOLLYWOOD A
small plane has landed on
Florida's Turnpike north
of Miami.
Television shows
that the plane landed
Wednesday afternoon
on the turnpike near
Hollywood and broke in
several places. It didn't
appear to have hit any
cars. Television showed
at least two people on
stretchers being loaded
into ambulances. Neither
appeared seriously hurt
Hollywood police said
the plane landed in the
turnpike's northbound
lanes and all traffic has
been stopped.

Lawyer: Inmate may
not stop execution
LARGO A lawyer for
a condemned inmate said
his client may not want to
come back to the Tampa
Bay area for a court hear-
ing that could block his
execution.
Oba Chandler's attor-
ney told a judge in Largo
Wednesday the 65-year-
old inmate may not even
consent to having a motion


filed that could delay or
stop his scheduled Nov. 15
execution.
His attorney gaid
Chandler is sick and
"doesn't like-the ride" from
the prison in north Florida.
Chandler was found
guilty in the grisly 1989
murders of Joan Rogers
and her teenage daugh-
ters, Michelle and Christe,
of Ohio.

Miami police at
fault in ATV crash
MIAMI BEACH An
internal affairs investiga-
tion found gross neg-
ligence and neglect of
duty among Miami Beach
police officers before one
crashed his all-terrain
vehicle into two people on
the beach.
Investigators said sev-
eral police commanders,
supervisors and officers
lied about their where-
abouts on July 3, altered
time records, abandoned
their duties and had free
rein to carouse in uniform
with holiday weekend par-
tygoers.
Two pedestrians were
seriously injured when one
officer plowed his ATV
into them. The officer was
fired and faces criminal
charges.
0 Aosoclated Press


THE WEATHER


Tallahassee La
85/61 ,.. ,
Pensacola /,
82/58 Pait' a Ja Cit


MOSTLY MOSTLY PARTLY
SUNNY \SUNNY CLOUDY
/ I. L
HI84LO53 H185L059 HI 86 L063


City
Jacksonville Cape Canaveral
ae Cty, 86,66 Daytona Beach
6/61 Ft. Lauderdale
Gainesile Daytona Beach Fort Myers
,P6/62 8'7ja68 Gainesville
'86/63 Jacksonville
il Orlando Cape Canaveral Key West
S 88/69 84/67 Lake Cy
{ Miami
Tanpa \ Naples
87/68. West Palm Beach Ocala
87/77 Orlando
SFt. Lauderdale Panama City
Ft. Melr, 88/74 0 Pensacola
88/70 Naples Tallahassee
87/72 M(ani Tampa
Key West 87/72 Valdosta
KeyWe* W. Palm Beach


86/76I I 1 W. Pal BeacIhI


LAKE CI ALM ANA


TEMPERATURES
High Wednesday
Low Wednesday
Normal high
Normal low
Record high
Record low

PRECIPITATION
Wednesday
Month total
Year total
Normal month-to-date
Normal year-to-date


82
68
82
60
92 in 1911
46 in 1905

0.00"
2.08"
30.62"
1.11"
42.24"


7a Ip 7p la 6a
Thursday Friday







S-F rscasted telparese "Fes ike'twpvaire


SUN
Sunrise today
Sunset today
Sunrise torn.
Sunset tom.


7:31 a.m.
7:02 p.m.
7:32 a.m.
7:01 p.m.


MOON
Moonrise today 7:49 p.m.
Moonset today 8:51 a.m.
Moonrise torn. 8:29 p.m.
Moonset torn. 9:45 a.m.

(3000


Oct. Nov. Nov.
26 2 10
New First Full


17

MR
I5nimiestolun
Today's
ultra-violet
radiation risk
for the area on
a scale from 0
to 10+.

-


Friday
83/66,/s
86/63/s
87/72/pc
88/68/pc
84/53/s
83/60/s
86/76/sh
84/52/s
88/75/pc
86/69/pc
85/55/s
88/66/pc
80/54/s
79/57/s
83/51/s
89/64/pc
83/51/s
85/73/pc


Saturday
82,67,s
83/64/s
86/74/pc
87/67/s
83/54/s
80/60/s
86/78/sh
84/53/s
86/75/pc
88/71/pc
85/56/s
84/66/s
78/56/s
80/61/s
82/53/s
87/64/s
81/52/s
85/74/pc


An exclusive
service
brought to
our readers
by
The Weather
Channel.



weather.com


34 S- Forecasts, data and
2. t,, graphics 02011 Weather
, ig v Central, LP, Madison, is.
weather www.weatherpublsher.com


Daily Scripture
I"Many are the plans in a per-
son's heart, but it is the Lord's
purpose that prevails."
Proverbs 19:21


Thought for Today
"A hero cannot be a hero .
unless in a heroic world."
Nathaniel Hawthorne,
American author (1804-1864)

Lake City Reporter.


AROUND FLORIDA


[14FRIh fly


115 ISATRty


S NEBA


Page Editor: Laura Hampson, 754-0427


:17 MONDAY


F -- ,:- -- :


(386) 755-544


i








LAKE CITY REPORTER NEWS THURSDAY, OCTOBER 13, 2011


JOBS: Future of legislation uncertain
Continued From Page 1A


keep pressuring and we will keep vot-
ing until this Congress finally meets its
responsibilities and actually does some-
thing to put people back to work and
improve the economy," said Obama, who
spoke at an event organized by the White
House recognizing Latino contributions to
American history.
The White House is using the jobs issue
as a political sword as the 2012 campaign
heats up. But it'll take a more bipartisan
approach to actually deliver results sought
by an angry public.
Obama's plan died at the hands of Senate
Republicans on Tuesday, even though the
president had been campaigning for it
across the country for weeks. The $447
billion plan fell on a 50-49 tally in the 100-
member Senate, falling well short of the
60 votes needed to crack a filibuster by
Republicans. They opposed to its stimulus-
style spending and its tax surcharge for
the very wealthy.
Now, the White House and leaders in
Congress are moving on to alternative
ways to address the nation's painful 9.1
percent unemployment, including break-
ing the legislation into smaller, more
digestible pieces. And on Wednesday,
both the House and Senate are poised
to approve long-stalled trade pacts with
Korea, Panama and Colombia.
In the weeks and months ahead,
Democrats promise further votes on jobs.
But it remains to be seen how much of that
effort will involve more campaign-stoked
battles with Republicans and how much
will include seeking common ground in
hopes of passing legislation. Further com-
plicating matters is a deficit "supercommit-
tee" that is supposed to come up with $1.2


trillion or more in deficit savings some
of which Democrats may want to claim for
jobs initiatives.
Tuesday's tally also shows that
Republicans believe they have little to fear
by tangling with Obama.
"Republicans will continue to seek out any
Democrat who's more interested in jobs than
in political posturing and work with them on
bipartisan legislation like the trade bills well
vote on tonight," Senate Minority Leader
Mitch McConnell, R-Ky., said Wednesday.
"What we will not do, though, is vote in
favor of any more misguided stimulus bills
because some bill writer slapped the word
'jobs' on the cover page."
The White House appears most con-
fident that it will be able to continue a
2-percentage-point Social Security payroll
tax cut through 2012 and to extend emer-
gency unemployment benefits to millions
of people if only because, in the White
House view, Republicans won't want to
accept the political harm of letting those
provisions expire.
White House officials also are hopeful of
ultimately garnering votes for the approval
of infrastructure spending and tax credits for
businesses that hire unemployed veterans.
Senate Democrats will begin sorting
through their options on jobs at a weekly
closed-door caucus on Wednesday. .
Obama's plan would have combined
Social Security payroll tax cuts for work-
ers and businesses and other tax relief
totaling about $270 billion with $175 bil-
lion in new spending on roads, school
repairs and other infrastructure, as well as
unemployment assistance and help to local
governments to avoid layoffs of teachers,
firefighters and police officers.


Few clues in Missouri


baby disappearance


By BILL DRAPER and
MARIA SUDEKUM FISHER
Associated Press
KANSAS CITY, Mo. Authorities
searching for a missing baby in Kansas
City have marched shoulder-to-shoulder
through woods, rappelled down cliffs
and combed through landfills. They've
interrogated her parents for hours and
called in firefighters to search a 36-foot
well that seemed like a possible place to
hide a tiny body.
But after receiving more than 300 tips
and chasing down many others, police
still have no idea what happened to
Lisa Irwin, a fair-haired, big-eyed baby,
whose first birthday is now only a month
away.


Police on Wednesday were scouring
a new wooded area with all-terrain vehi-
cles and search dogs just east of the fam-
ily's home, though they said the efforts
weren't prompted by a tip. On Tuesday,
police searched a nearby abandoned
home and cistern, while more than 30
detectives pursued additional leads.
In the week since Lisa's parents report-
ed her missing, investigators also have
searched their home with metal detec-
tors and re-enacted a possible abduction
- all while camera crews film from the
street
Lisa's mother, Deborah Bradley, said
she checked on her daughter late Oct.
3, but the baby was gone early the next
morning when her father, Jeremy Irwin,
returned home from a late shift at work.


ALLIGATOR: County's earliest days
Continued From Page 1A


festival with music and dancing, living-
history camps, demonstrators of historic
skills, traders, craftspeople and food ven-
dors.
Reenactors, both men and women,
come from all over Florida, Georgia
and Alabama to participate, Rowley said.
More than 50 men are on the field dur-
ing the battle.
The Alligator Warrior Festival is orga-
nized by volunteers.
"The people put it on because they


love what they do," he said. "They're
passionate about teaching local history
and making it a fun experience for every-
one. It's a great resource, and great
place to learn about local history."
Park admission is $5 per vehicle hold-
ing two to eight people, $4 for single
occupant vehicle or $2 for pedestrians,
bicyclists and additional passengers.
"It's a great event for the entire fam-
ily," Rowley said.


RACE: With only a week to prepare, 3 run half-marathon in honor of friend
Continued From Page 1A


believed they had entered a 3-mile race.
After they realized the race was a half
marathon, they were more determined
than ever to run as a way to pay .tribute to
their late supervisor Russell Enans Davis
Jr.
Davis, 42, was struck and killed by a
motorist on Sept. 4 while jogging to pre-
pare for the marathon.
Bass said he and his coworkers
planned to surprise Davis' widow,
Misti Davis, an avid runner who was
planning to run the race in honor of
her husband.
"I didn't want her to run alone," Bass
said. "I thought Misti needed company."


Organizers of the Disney Wine and
Dine Half Marathon in Orlando waived
the entry fee and created room for the
three runners once they learned why
they wanted to run.
Bass said he didn't expect to finish the
race, but he planned to run as far as pos-
sible.
"I wasn't there to win a marathon,." he
said. "The main goal was to show sup-
port"
Misti Davis said she was not surprised
when she learned she'd have company
during the race.
"It's about honor and respect," she
said. "It's like being in the military. You


come in together and you leave together."
Hansen said he was uncertain if he
could, finish the race but he was deter-
mined to support his late supervisor's
widow.
"We were doing it for a reason," he
said. "She was comforted we were
there."
The surprise was all three men finished
the race in less than three hours.
Hansen said Russell Davis was looking
down from heaven and spurred on his
officers during the race.
"I think he smiled and was tickled
pink," he said.
Bass said he was motivated by his late


boss.
"I could feel him pushing," he said. "It
was a heck of a dream for us."
Davis said she had no doubt the three
men would finish the race.
"I'm so proud of those guys," she said.
"It would have been easy to give up. It
was amazing."
Hansen said he wasn't sore the next
day, but Bass said he is still limping.
Both Hansen and Bass said they plan
to continue running and will join Davis in
another race.
"Running in that race, I found it very
addicting," Hansen said. "I will run anoth-
er race with Misty."


Pay off your home in 5 years!

IF *m you have 30% or more equity in your home...
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(Please call for other rates & terms)


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(Loans of $200,000 or less)


CAMPUS

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Apply online at campuscu.com or call 754-2219 today!


Membership is open to everyone in Alachua, Clay, Columbia, Lake, Marion and Sumter counties!2
Offer not available on existing CAMPUS loans. Offer is for new loans only. May not be combined with any other offer. 1. Credit approval, sufficient income, adequate property valuation (maximum
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Page Editor: Robert Bridges, 754-0428












OPINION


Thursday, October 13, 2011


OUR
ANOTHER


OUR
OPINION


Keeping

the past

alive in

Lake City

There's a balance
to be maintained
Sin any community
between respect for
the past and enthu-
siasm for what's tojcome. Our
thanks to the local Woman's
Club and Garden Club for help-
,ing keep us well-balanced here.
As recounted in last Sunday's
Reporter, the clubs have com-
bined their efforts to. renovate
The Club House, an historic
% structure that served as the
city'ss first library and as a USO
during World War II.
The Club House now looks
good as new. Maybe better.
Improvements include new
exteriors as well as the addition
of brickwork and a new front
porch.
Best of all, the costly make-
over well into the six-figure
range, we're told is being paid
for with private donations and
fundraisers, and not at public
expense.
Nice work, ladies. ,
We're proud to live in a town
that takes its past seriously .
whie working hard to pave the
way for the future.
If you'd like to help defray
costs of the renovation, you can
buy a memorial brick or per-
haps a cookbook.
Call 755-0347 for more on
either club.


H 1'- L'IG .-I TS
IN HISTORY

Today is Thursday, October
13, the 286th day of 2011.
There are 79 days left in the
year.
On this date:
In 1775- The U.S. Navy is
founded as the Continental
ICongress orders the construc-
tion of a naval fleet.
In 1960 RichardM. Nixon
and John F. Kennedy par-
ticipate in the third televised
debate of their presidential,
campaign, with Nixon in
Hollywood, California, and
SKennedy in New York.
0 Associated Press


Lake City Reporter
Serving Columbia County
Since 1874
.The Lake City Reporter is pub-
lished with pride for residents of
Columbia and surrounding counties by
SCommunity Newspapers Inc.
We believe strong newspapers build
strong communities -WNewspapers
get things done!"
Our primary goal is to
publish distinguished and profitable
community-oriented newspapers.
This mission will be accomplished
through the teamwork of professionals
Dedicated to truth, integrity and hard
work.
S Todd Wilson, publisher
., Robert Bridges, editor
Sue Brannon, controller
Dink NeSmith, president
Tom Wood, chairman

LETTERS
POLICY
Letters to the Editor should be
typed or neatly written and double
spaced. Letters should not exceed
400 words and will be edited for
length and libel. Letters must be
signed and include the writer's name,
address and telephone number for
verification. Writers can have two
letters per month published. Letters
and guest columns are the opinion of
the writers and not necessarily that of
the Lake City Reporter.


BY MAIL: Letters, P.O. Box 1709,
Lake City, FL 32056; or drop off at
180 E. Duval St. downtown.
BY FAX: (386) 752-9400.
BY E-MAIL:
news@lakecityreporter.com


www.lakecityreporter.com


'Thanks for what you .do!'


T J. Holmes, CNN
anchor, ended his
Sunday morning
news report with
this statement
"Thank you for what you do."
This started me thinking. What
a meaningful message. Could
it be, that everyone contributes
something that we should feel
thankful for?
Pianist Roger Williams died
this week at age 87. Roger
touched us with sentimen-
tal, easy listening songs like
"Autumn Leaves" (1955, great-
est piano hit yet), "Born Free,"
"Near You," "La Mer" (Beyond
*the Sea), '"Wanting You," and
many more. Thanks Roger, for
what you did for those many
years.
Hecklers John Nichols and
John Reynolds, leaders of the
"Occupy Wall Street" move-
ment, prevented Representative-
John Lewis and Representative
John Reynolds from making
speeches this weekend in
Atlanta by heckling them. Word
for word, their message: "...the
point of this general assembly
is to kick start a democratic'
process, in which no singular
human being is inherently more
valuable than any other human
being." Representatives Lewis
and Charlie Rangel (New York)
were interviewed after being
shouted off the stage. They
agreed with the protesters, and
their right to be heard. They
agreed that no one human


w-


Robert Denny
Bob.Denny8@gmail.com


being should be treated as
more valuable than any other.'
Thanks, protesters, for helping
us to hear opinions that might
otherwise go unheard. All peo-
ple are valuable. We could ask
ourselves, should we continue
to borrow money from other
nations to bail out banks arid
Wall Street, while one of every
four children in Georgia grows
up in poverty?.
What about fruits and veg-
etables dying oni the vine in
America's heartland, because
of increased crackdown on
migrant workers, who are often
undocumented.aliens, who do
the picking? Farmers say they
will fail this year, without the
help of these workers. Yes, it's
true that since they are not in.
the established legal system,
they take advantage of many
services paid for by American
citizens. In the same circum-
stances, we might do the same
thing as these workers in order
to survive or keep our families
from suffering poverty or hun-


ger. I can't help but feel there
might be a better way. Could
our laws be more humane?
Could we develop a more
reasonable system, with an
opportunity for legalizing their
labor, or for providing a path-
way in which they could earn
citizenship? Then we might be
thanking them for getting food
to our tables instead of deport-
ing them. I'd include them in
'Thanks for what you do." Law
enforcement could still focus on
catching the really "bad guys."
We could also work on balanc-
ing the national budget, instead
of borrowing money for stimu-
lus plans we can't hope to pay
back.
I don't know who you are.
You may be a community lead-
er, a volunteer, a single parent
struggling to survive or raise
your children, an American
worker, in military service, a
young person getting an edu-
cation, a disabled person with
special needs, a parent, a vet-
eran, or a senior citizen who has
contributed to your country for
a lifetime. You're as valuable as
everyone else. Whoever you
are, I'd like to say thanks so
much for what you do!.

* Robert Denny is a licensed
mental health therapist, and
teaches psychology-at Florida
Gateway College in Lake City.
Comments welcome at Bob.
Denny8@gmail.com.


I am nana. Hear me snore.


What a difference
a day can make.
Yesterday, he
was restless
and cranky,
needing something, anything
to put him at ease. But nothing
quite hit the spot
Today, he's content, at peace
with the world, smiling in his
sleep like the Mona Lisa, and
sleeping, yes, like a baby.
That's what you're supposed
to do when you're 1 month old,
sleep like a baby. Henry is work-
ing on it He hasn't quite figured
it out, but he will, at least by the
time he's a teenager. (Babies
that you can't get to sleep grow
into teenagers that you can't
wake up.)
' It takes time to figure stuff
out Especially when there is so
much stuff to figure.
His hands, for example. I
watch how he studies them,
waving them like starfish before
his eyes as if he's wondering
how exactly they got stuck on
his arms, and what exactly he's
supposed to do vith them.
I watch how he studies his
mama, staring at her with such
longing, as if he wants not just
to nurse at her breast, but to
basically eat her alive. Which he
would do, I suspect, if he could.
I watch how he studies me,
his nana, when I hold him too
tight or kiss him too hard or
stare at him as if I want to eat
him alive. I wonder what he is
thinking.
("Who is this crazy woman
in a ninja nana sweatsuit who
will rock me for hours until her


Sharon Randall
www.sharonrandall.com -,
,neck goes into spasms just to
keep me from screaming so my
mama and daddy can sleep?")
Will he ever figure me out? If
he does, will he tell me?
He could ask his mama about
me. She's been trying to figure
me out for ages. Or he could
talk to his cousin Randy, who's
been studying me ever since
he was born, a little over a year
ago.
I wish you could see them
side by side, my grandsons.
What a difference a year can
make.
Did you know that in 12 short
months a baby can grow from
a 7-pound helpless, spitting-up
lump into a 30-pound fiercely
independent ball of fire who will
wake you up at 7 am. to watch
him run around the house in
a dragon costume chasing the
dogs with a wooden hammer?
Yes, by day I chase the
dragon. By night I rock with
the lump. I am nana. Hear me
snore.
Babies are not the only ones
who change in quantum leaps.
Their mamas and nanas leap
right along with them.
I marvel at how my daughter
has changed in carrying and
bearing and caring for Henry:


The calm in her voice. The hap-
piness in her smile.'The circles
under her eyes.
She's figuring out all sorts of
stuff. I always knew she'd be a
wonderful mother. But it's really
quite something to finally see it
- to see your baby with a baby.
I marvel, too, at the changes
I see in myself. When I push up
my sleeves, I see my mother's
hands. When I read an obitu-
ary, I note that the age of the
deceased is often not much
greater than my own. And
sometimes, when I go to a
movie, I ask for the senior-citi-
zen discount and pretend that
it's for my husband.
What a difference a genera-
tion can make.
I see other changes, too,
some I rather like. I care less,
for example, about how I look
and more about whom I'm with.
I talk less and listen better. At
25, when I walked into a room, I
wondered if people were talking
about me. Now I wonder who
might need someone to talk to.
I could say those same things
about my grandmothers. I'd like
to think it means I'm becoming
more like them. But maybe, like
Henry and his mama, I'm still
just figuring stuff out.
Aging isn't pretty, but it beats
the alternative, especially when
there are lumps to rock and
dragons to chase, memories to
make and stories yet to tell.
What a difference a lifetime
can make.
* Sharon Randall can be con-
tacted at P.O. Box 777394,
Henderson, NV 89077.


4A


ANOTHER
VIEW


Blaming

China for

currency

mess

The last thing the
American economy
needs now is a
trade war with
China. Yet, thafs
just what could happen after
a bipartisan majority in the
U.S. Senate approved Tuesday
the Currency Exchange Rate
Oversight Reform Act of 2011.
This bill, which now goes
to the House, would autho-
rize the federal government
to slap tariffs on countries
specifically, China that
supposedly undervalue their
currencies to make trade
more advantageous.
"My colleagues, both
Democrats and Republicans,
agree that China's deliber-
ate actions to devalue its
currency give its goods an
unfair competitive advantage
in the marketplace," .Senate
Majority Leader Harry Reid,
D-Nev., said days before the
final 63-35 vote. "It hurts our
economy. It costs American,
jobs."
One wonders if Mr. Reid,
or anyone on his staff, can do
simple research. An Internet
search took us about two
minutes to find Google charts
showing that, against the dol-
lar, the Chinese yuan has risen
in value 5 percent in the past
year and 22 percent in the past
five years., So it isn't depreciat-
Moreover, in the past three
years it's the U.S. ceritral bank,
the Federal Reserve, that
has been devaluing the dol-
lar through two inflationary
"quantitative easing" schemes.
That's why commodities are
rising in price in America, .as
anyone can see from a visit,
to a gas pump or the grocery
store.
America made this mistake
in 1971 with the infamous
Nixon shock, inflating the dol-
lar and imposing tariffs, in that
case globally. That was part
of the reason the country got
stuck in a decade of "stagfla-
tion" stagnation plus infla-
tion.
"It's not going to do any
good," Dan Griswold told us
of the Senate protectionism;
he's the director of trade policy
studies at the libertarian Cato
Institute. "It won't create any
new jobs. And it risks a trade
war with our No. 3 trade
partner (behind Canada and
Mexico).
"China also is America's fast-
est-growing export market,"
he said.
Mr. Griswold said this
protectionist scheme is not
as bad as some in the past,
such as the 2005 attempt by
Sen. Charles Schumer, D-
New York, and Sen. Lindsey
Graham, D-S.C., to impose
a 27.5 percent tariff on all
Chinese imports.
But the current bill is bad
enough because it could
increase costs of import
goods bought by already
hard-pressed consumers and
of import components that
go into products made by
our own companies, making
those companies less com-
petitive.
Mr. Griswold said the sena-
tors are trying to draw atten-
tion away from their own com-
plicity in America's economic
malaise, including "spiraling
spending and debt They're
searching for an external
bogeyman, and China is the
target"
Orange County's congres-


sional delegation should lead
the fight to prevent this act
from passing in the House of
Representatives.

* The Orange County Register









LOCAL & STATE THURSDAY, OCTOBER 13, 2011


Gov. Scott's daughter has

anthropology degree


Associated Press

TALLAHASSEE
- When Rick Scott
singled out anthropology
degrees as job market los-
ers, maybe he had inside
knowledge.
It turns out his daugh-
ter, Jordan Kandah, has an
anthropology degree from
the College of William &


Mary.
In remarks this week
about the need to steer
students towards degrees
with better job prospects,
Scott said, "You want to
use your tax dollars to edu-
cate more people who can't
get jobs in anthropology?"
Kandah did not go to
work in the field. She was
a special education teacher


before enrolling this fall
in a Masters of Business
Administration program.
Scott spokesman Brian
Burgess said Wednesday
the governor wasn't knock-
ing anthropologists, just
making the point that
there's a high demand for
graduates with engineer-
ing, mathematics, science
and technology degrees,


Happy House employees using computers purchased last year with grant money from Altrusa.
Children and staff at Happy House, a child care facility, use the computers and several staff
members have completed further education using the donated computers.


Altrusa offers grant money

to local nonprofit groups


From staffreports

Altrusa International of Lake City is
offering $9,500 in grant money to assist
local nonprofits with projects benefiting
women and children. Applications are


available from Tammy Hall at Odom,
Moses & Co., 4424 NW American Lane
(west of Interstate 75) or Mantha Young
at the Lake City Advertiser, 508 NW Main
Blvd. Applications must be submitted by 4
p.m. on Nov. 15.


Fla. lawmaker wants to

bring back firing squads


Associated Press
TALLAHASSEE, Fla.
- A Florida state lawmak-
er is calling for a return to
the electric chair and firing
squads for those sitting on
the state's Death Row.
Rep. Brad Drake this
week filed a bill that would
end the use of lethal injec-
tion. Instead those with


a death sentence could
choose between electrocu-
tion or a firing squad.
Drake, R-Eucheeanna,
said the idea came to him
after having a conversa-
tion at a DeFuniak Springs
Waffle House over the
legal battles associated
with the September execu-
tion of Manuel Valle. -
Valle's lawyers tried to


stop the execution by argu-
ing that a new drug cock-,
tail would cause him pain
and therefore be cruel and
unusual punishment
Florida switched to
lethal injection after prob-
lems with electrocutions
raised concerns that the
state's death penalty would
be declared unconstitu-
tional.


2 other companies cited over 2010 Gulf oil spill


NEW ORLEANS Federal regulators
have cited oil company BP PLC and two
other companies Transocean Ltd. and
Halliburton for alleged safety and envi-
ronmental violations stemming from last
year's rig explosion and massive oil spill


in the Gulf.
The companies have 60 days to appeal
Wednesday's citations issued by the
Interior Department's Bureau of Safety
and Environmental Enforcement.
The bureau said the alleged regulatory


violations could result in civil penalties
once the appeal period has ended.
These initial citations are the product
of a federal government probe of the
Deepwater Horizon' blast, which killed 11
workers and hastened the nation's worst


offshore oil spill.
One of the citations accuses well owner
BP, rig owner Transocean and cement
contractor Halliburton of failing to oper-
ate in a "safe and workmanlike manner."


Dolphin movie boosts attendance at aquarium

Associated Press
CLEARWATER, Fla. A movie about
a tail-less dolphin is bringing a record
number of visitors to the Tampa Bay-area
aquarium where the famous animal lives.
Winter the bottlenose dolphin is star
of "Dolphin Tale," which has earned
more than $50 million in three weeks in
the theaters.
The movie is based on true events.
Winter survived after having her dam-
aged tail amputated and then learned to
swim with a prosthetic tail. She lives at ,
Clearwater Marine Aquarium.
Aquarium CEO David Yates said more
than 6,000 people visited the place to see
Winter last week. He said last weekend
was the best in the aquarium's history. ASSOCIATED PRESS
The aquarium is opening a movie prop Clearwater Marine Aquarium senior marine mammal trainer Abby Stone works
exhibit in downtown Clearwater.next Clearwater Marine Aquarium senior marine mammal trainer Abby Stone works
month to help accommodate the crowds. with Winter the dolphin Aug. 31 in Clearwater, Fla.

OBITUARIES


Felecia Ann Martinez and
Clarence Samuel Milligan, Sr.
Both of Lake City,
, Florida
\ will celebrate their

I 50th Wedding'

Anniversary
1 to 3 PM
SSat., Oct. 15, 2011

A party will be given in their honor at
SChrist Central Ministries, Dyal Rd. in
Lake City by their four children:
Chuck (Roni), Milligan, Denise Milligan (Rodney)'Bose,
Rodney (Paige) Milligan, Michael Milligan
....


Linda Ann Hogan Allen
Linda Ann Hogan Allen, 55, of
Lady Lake, FL died on Thursday,
April 14, 2011 at the Leesburg
Regional Medical Center. She
was born in Lake City on Janu-
ary 5, 1956 and graduated from
Columbia High School with the
Class of 1975. She was preceded
in death by her mother, Hazel Jor-
dan and her father, Joseph Hogan.
Survivors include her daughter,
Jessica Amber Ring, Leesburg,
FL; son, David S. Allen III,
Hunting Beach, CA; brother Joe
Jordan, Lake City, FL; nephew,
Joby Jordan, Camby, IN; very
special friend and soul mate, Jim
Douglas and his daughter, Lidia
Douglas, both of Lady Lake, FL.
A memorial service will be con-
ducted at Saint James Episcopal
Church in Lake City at 11:00
AM on Saturday, October 15,
2011. A private interment ser-
vice will follow at the Riverside
Cemetery in White Springs, FL.
GUERRY FUNERAL HOME,
2659 S.W. Main Blvd., Lake
City, Fla. is in charge of ar-
rangements. Please sign guest-
book at guerryfuneralhome.net

Curtis Waldo Dasher, Sr.
Curtis Waldo "C.W." Dasher,
Sr., 80, of Palatka, passed away
Monday, October 10, 2011 at
Haven Hospice Roberts Care
Center following an extended
illness. A native of Live Oak,
he resided in Palatka since 1959
coming from Gainesville. Mr.


Dasher served
a brief time in
theh U.S. Army.
He worked as
a route tech-
nician with'
Florida Pest
Control for al-,
most 20 years,
retiring in 1996.
He had previ-
ously worked
with Pepsi Cola
for 25 years. "Waldo" was a
member of the College Road
Church of Christ. In his spare
time, he enjoyed fishing and
gardening and always looked
forward to time spent in wor-
shipping and studying with his
brothers and sisters in Christ.
He was preceded in death by his
wife 58 years, Bertie Lee Dash-
er and a son, C.W. Dasher, Jr.
He is survived by a son, Jimmy
Dasher and wife, Nina of Palat-
ka, a daughter, Marilyn Cynkar
of Denver, CO, a daughter-in-
law, Bonnie Dasher of Green
Cove Springs, 3 sisters, Wylene
Collins and husband, Harold
of Ocala, Ina Mae Boggus and
husband Lavoy of Live Oak and
Orilla Sieg of Jacksonville, 4
grandchildren, Jennifer Couch
and husband Jeremy, Shannon
Stallings and husband Ricky,
Amy Dasher and Curt Dasher
and 2 great-grandchildren, Jo-
nah Couch and Ella Couch.
Services will be at 2:00 P.M.
Friday, October 14, 2011 at the
College Road Church of Christ
with Bro. C.L. Overturf, Jr. of-
ficiating. Burial will follow at


Oak Hill Cemetery in Palatka.
Visitation will' be Thursday
from 6-8 P.M: at Johnson-Over-
turf Funeral Home in Palatka.
Memories and condolences may
be sent to the family at www.
JohnsonOverturffunerals. com.
Arrangements are under the
direction of JOHNSON-
O V E R T U R F
FUNERAL HOME in Palatka.

Elaine Louise Groh
Mrs. Elaine Louise Groh, 83 of
Wellborn passed away on Mon-
day, October 10, 2011 from
injuries sustained in an auto-
mobile accident. She was a na-
tive of Hicksville, New York
and had lived in Wellborn for
the past 13 years having moved
there from North Palm Beach,
Florida. Mrs. Groh had previ-
ously worked for Wal-mart and
Sears in North Palm .Beach and
the Lake City Wal-mart during
the Holiday Season. She en-
joyed craft making especially
her Christmas decorations. Mrs
Groh was known by her family
and friends as a person always
willing to lend a helping hand,
big hearted and a person who ev-


eryone wanted to visit with. She-
was of the Lutheran faith and
member of the Spirit of Christ
Lutheran Church in Lake City.
Mrs.. Groh is survived by her
husband of 65 years, Mr. Dan-
iel Arthur Groh, Wellborn, two
sons, Daniel Arthur Groh Jr.,
Stanton, TN and David Rob-
ert (Elizabeth Ann) Groh, Sr.,
Wellborn, one daughter, Debra
Liz Gibson-Werner, Vernon,
NY, one brother, Arthur Ul-
mer, Melbourne, FL, one sis-
ter, Trudy Seadon, North Palm
Beach, Fl, five grandchildren
and one great grandchild.
A memorial service honoring
the life of Mrs. Groh will be
held Saturday, October 15, 2011
at 2:00 P.M. at the Spirit of
Christ Lutheran Church in Lake .
City with Pastor John David
Bryant officiating. Arrange-
ments are under the direction of
GUERRYFUNERALHOME,
2659 SW Main Blvd., Lake City.
Please sign the guestbook at
www.guerryfuneralhome. net


Obituaries are paid advertise-
ments. For details, call the Lake
City Reporter's classified depart-
ment at 752-1293.


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NOTICE OF INITIAL

CERTIFICATION

OF TAX ROLL
Pursuant to Section 193.122, Florida
Statutes, J. Doyle Crews, Property Appraiser
of Columbia County, hereby gives notice
that the 2011 Tax Roll for Columbia County
was certified to the Tax Collector on the 6th
day of October for the collection of taxes.

J. DOYLE CREWS
PROPERTY APPRAISER


SAVE 75.0.


;^


Page Editor: Laura Hampson, 754-0427


LAKE CITY REPORTER


0









LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL NEWS THURSDAY, OCTOBER 13, 2011


COMMUNITY CALENDAR


Friday, Oct. 14
BBQ contest
The Second Annual
BBQ Contest is Oct. 14
at Southside Community
Center. Registration is $50.
Prizes will be awarded for
first and second place. Call
758-5450.
LEC Activity
A Craft Project is 1 p.m.
at the LifeStyle Enrichment
Center. Call (386) 755-0235.
The center is located at 628
S.E. Allison Court.
Deborah & the Blue
Harp
A performance featuring
Deborah & the Blue Harp
is 7:30 p.m. Oct. 14 at the
Levy Performing Arts Center.
Deborah Henson-Conant is
a Grammy-nominated lyrical
singer who plays blues-fla-
menco-Celtic-funk-folk-jazz
on a blue 36-string custom-
built electric "harness" harp
while'sharing tall tales. Visit
www.communityconcerts.
info for ticket information.
Mullis performance
Mike Mullis and his band
WhooWheee is performing,
Oct. 14 at the Sprit of the
Suwannee Music Hall.


Master Gardeners
workshop
A workshop on "Florida
Friendly Pruning Practices"
is 2 p.m. Oct. 15 at the
Columbia County Public
Library main branch. Learn
what, when, why and how
to prune shrubs, trees and
perennials. The workshop
is free and presented by
University of Florida Master
Gardeners.
Farmers market
The Lake DeSoto Farmers
Market is open 8 a.m-12
p.m. every.Saturday in
Wilson Park, located along
Lake DeSoto between
the Columbia County
Courthouse and Shands
Lakeshore Hospital. Vendor
space is available. For more
information about the Lake
DeSoto Farmers Market call
(386) 719-5766.
Vaccinations
The Columbia County
Health Department now has
flu vaccine and is offering
flu shots by appointment
Monday-Friday. The cost
is $20. Medicare Part B is
accepted. Pneumonia vac-
cinations are also available
for those eligible at $40. Call
758-1069 for appointments.


Saturday, Oct. 15 Sunday Oct. 16


Big Boy Toys Expo
The Kiwanis Big Boy
Toys Expo is Oct. 15 at
the Columbia County
Fairgrounds. The event will
feature food, games, ven-
dors and more. Visit www.
kiwanisbigboytoysexpo.com.
Drive Smart For Your
School
"Test drive a new Lincoln
automobile and Ford. Motor
Company will donate $20
per test drive to Fort White
High School Oct. 15 at
Rountree-Moore Ford-
Lincoln. Up to 300 test
drives for a total of $6,000.
Birthday celebration
A 26th birthday cel-
ebration for the Fort White
Lifestyle Enrichment Center-
is 9 a.m.- 1 p.m. Oct. 15. It
will feature free Southern-
Style BBQ, music by DJ
Scottie Berns of 94.3 FM, a
raffle and a dance contest.
The LEC is located at 18829
Hwy. 47 South Ft. White,
Contact Deborah -at (386)
497-1504 for more info.
Chomp Cancer events
The inaugural Chomp
Cancer Foundation 5K Run/
Walk and Community Day
begins 8 a.m. Oct. 15 at
the Fort White Community
Center. All proceeds from
the Chomp Cancer 5k
Run/Walk will benefit the UF
& Shands Cancer Center.
Registration for the 5K is $30
per person. Register the day
of the event is 7 a.m. Online
registration is available at
http://www.active.com key-
word "Chomp Cancer" or by
visiting www.chompcancer.
com. For more informa-
tion please e-mail Lauren
Valentine at chompcancer@
gmail.com.


Family reunion
The Wheeler-Robinson
Reunion is 1 p.m. Oct. 16 at,
Mason Community Center.
Bring your favorite dish,
drinks and desserts. Call
Carrie at (386) 965-3642.
iMW 0 Aft .. .


Feeding America Distribution
Center.

Entrepreneur of the
Year Awards Banquet
SCORE's Entrepreneur of
the Year will be announced
at the Annual Awards
Banquet 6 p.m. Oct. 18 at
the Florida Gateway College
Conference Center. Jill
Nichols, Executive Vice
President of Vera Bradley,
will be the speaker. Tickets
are $30, or $200 for a table
of eight. Call 752-2000 or
scorelakecity@gmail.com.
Diabetes workshop
The next community dia-
betes workshop is 9:30 a.m.
Oct. 18 at the Lake Shore
Authority Board building.
The topic is "How to handle
a diabetes crisis. Hyper and
hypoglycemia.." Ch.arron
Gilbert, RN, is the speaker.
The building is located at
259 NE Franklin Street. Call
Werndy Fisher at (386) 292-
7815 for questions. Classes
are free of charge and no
pre-registration is necessary.

Wednesday Oct. 19
Farm Bureau women
Columbia County Farm
Bureau Women's Committee
is meeting 10 a.m. Oct. 19
at the Farm Bureau's office.
All Farm Bureau women are
encouraged to attend.
Volunteers needed
Catholic Charities needs
helping hands 7:30 a.m.-
noon Monday-Thursday.
The office is at 258 NW Burk
Ave. Call 754-9180.


Monday, Oct. 17 C vent
LEC Event


School registration
Registration is open for
Shining Star Academy for
the Arts, an elementary
public charter school for
students with artistic tal-
ent. Contact Anthony J.
Buzzella, Executive Director
at (386) 965-9256.


A Geriactors Performance
is 11-11:45 a.m. and a
Cold Potato Game is 1 p.m.
Oct. 19 at the LifeStyle
Enrichment Center, 628 S.E.
Allison Court. Call (386) 755-
0235.

Thursday, Oct. 20


Culture Center State Park.
More than 200 quilts and a
special exhibit of Heritage
Quilts will be on display dur-
ing this three-day show. This
year's theme is "Fostering a
Legacy of Quilting." Quilts
will be displayed throughout
the park, in the Stephen
Foster Museum, the Stephen
Foster Memorial Carillon
Tower and the park's audito-
rium. Admission to the Quilt
Show is $4 per person.
Homecoming events
The Columbia High
School Homecoming Alumni
Breakfast is 8:30 a.m. in the
CHS Cafeteria. Following
the breakfast, all alumni are
invited to attend the CHS
PepRally from 10:30-12:00
in the CHS Gym. The home-
coming parade is 3 p.m.
Homecoming game time is
7:30 p.m. The Homecoming
Queen is crowned during
halftime of the game.

Saturday, Oct. 22
Pumpkin Fest
The Third Annual Family
Pumpkin Fest is 3:30 7:15
p.m. Oct. 22 at Big Shoals
State Park in White Springs
There is a children's pump-.
kin decorating contest and
a costume contest open for
both kids and adults. This
contest will have three cat-
egories in which contestants
will be judged funniest,
prettiest and most original.
Admission is $2 per per-
son or $4 per carload and
includes entry into all con-
tests, drinks and snacks,
live music, hayride through
the woods, twilight camp fire
with rlarshmallow roasting
and a park ranger lead hike
with hundreds of Mexican.
Free-Tailed Bats. Call (386)
867-1639.
Park workshop.
Planting and Propagating
Workshop presented' by Lei
Lani Davison is 9 a.m. -12
p.m. Oct. 22, in the herb '
garden of the Craft Square
at Stephen Foster Folk
Culture Center State Park.
There is a hands on seg-
ment of the.classand stu-
dents will take home items
they work on. The workshop
fee is $25 including regular
park admission. For more
information or to register,
please call the park 'Gift
Shop at (386) 397-1920 or
visit www.stephenfosterCSO.
org.

Monday, Oct. 24
FFA meeting
The FFA Alumni/Booster
Monthly Meeting is 6 p.m.
Oct. 24 at the Land Lab at
CHS. Please bring a cov-
ered dish. All parents of FFA
students are encourage to
attend. The discussion will
feature fundraisers and spe-
cial events coming up. Call
Lori Harkey at 386-397-9453
for any questions.


Fair contests entry
deadlines
The 57th Annual Columbia
County Fair Contests are
free to enter. Any County
resident may compete in the
following contests: Baked
Goods, Canned Goods,
Quilting, Sewing, Crafts,
Needle point, Woodworking,
Scrap Booking, Art,
Photography, Red Hat and
King 'Author Baking Contest.
For rulps www.columbia-
countyfair.org. All highest
placing entries will receive
monetary awards & all '
receive ribbons. Deadline '
for Baking Goods is 2-6 p.m.
Oct. 27 at the Extension
Office and all other contests
is 3-5 p.m. Oct. 18-Oct.
21 in the fair office and 9
a.m.-12 p.m. Oct. 22 at the
Banquet hall. Call 752-8822.
Grand opening
The Wine in the
Warehouse grand open-
ing and ribbon cutting for
Florida Gateway Food Bank
is 5 p.m. Oct. 18. The food-
bank is located at 553 NW
Railroad St. The food bank
is a program of Catholic
Charities Lake City Regional
Office. Come see the new


A free nursing home plan-
ning workshop is 2, p.m.
Oct. 20 at the LifeStyle
Enrichment Center. Everyone
who is concerned about
how they will .pay for nursing
home care should attend
this informative workshop
led by local elder law attor-
ney Teresa Byrd Morgan.
Reservations are required.
Call Shana Miller at 386-755-
1977.
Master Gardeners
workshop
A Master Gardener work-
shop, "Caring for,Roses in
North Florida" is 5:45 p.m.
Oct. 20 at the Fort White
Library Branch. Learn all the
best tips for growing your
own rose bushes. The work-
shop is free and .presented
by UF Master Gardener
Geoff Hart.

Friday, Oct. 21
Quilt Show and Sale
The 23rd Annual Stephen
Foster Quilt Show and Sale
is 9 a.m.- 5 p.m. Oct. 21-22
and-9 a.m.-4 p.m. Oct. 23
at the Stephen Foster Folk


* Submit to the calendar by e-mail to
rbridges@lakecityreporter.com, fax to (386) 752-
9400 or drop-off at 180 E. Duval St., Lake City.
Call (386) 754-0425 with questions. Items will
run as space is available:


Wednesday OcL 26
LEC Activity
A Geriactors performance
is 11-11:45 a.m. Oct. 26 at
the LifeStyle Enrichment
Center. Call (386) 755-0235.
The center is located at 628
S.E. Allison Court.
Fort White LEC
Senior Home Care is 10-
11 a.m. Oct. 26 at Fort White
LifeStyle Enrichment Center.
Call 386-497-1504. The cen-
ter is located at 18829 Hwy.
47 South.

Thursday, Oct. 27
Livestock
announcements
The mandatory End
Weigh-Ins for Steer, Swine,
Beef Heifer and Meat Goat
is 3-8 p.m. Oct. 27 and the
Record Book Deadline is
one hour following close of
scales. The Youth Swine &
Steer Show is scheduled
for 7 p.m. Nov.-3. Call 752-
8822.
LEC Activity
A Costume Contest is
11:30 a.m. Oct. 27 at the
LifeStyle Enrichment Center.
Call (386) 755-0235. The
center is located at 628 S.E.
Allison Court.
Fort White LEC
A Halloween Party and
Senior Home Care is 10
a.m.-noon Oct. 27 at Fort
White LifeStyle 'Enrichment
Center. Call 386-497-1504.
The center is located at
18829 Hwy. 47 South.
Info fair
The "Wealth of Information
Fair" is 9 a.m.-noon Oct. 27
at the LifeStyle Enrichment
Center. It promotes a "one
stop shop" where seniors
and soon to be seniors can
find out how physical activ-
ity, social connection, mental
stimulus and good nutrition
cah promote "Independent
living for a lifetime." The
center is located at 628 S.E.
Allison Court.

Friday, Oct. 28
LEC Activity
A Free ZUMBA Class is 1
p.m. Oct. 28 at the LifeStyle
Enrichment Center. The
event is open to the public.
Call (386) 755-0235. The
center is located at 628 S.E.
Allison Court.

Saturday, Oct. 29
Fall Safety Bash
The second annual White
Springs Fire Department Fall
Safety Bash is 6-9 p.m. Oct.
29 at Ogburn Ball Field. Free
flashing necklaces, blinking
lights, reflective trick-or-treat
bags and candy. Also food,
games, bounce house, hay
ride and more. Call 386-623-
4758 or 386-292-1720.


Tuesday, Oct. 25 Monday, Oct. 31


LEC Activity
A Sponge Toss Game is 1
p.m. Oct. 25 at the LifeStyle
Enrichment Center. Call
(386) 755-0235. The center
is located at 628 S.E. Allison
Court.


Train-the-Trainer class
, A vehicle rescue "Train-
the-Trainer class is Oct.
31 at the Columbia County
Sheriff's Office and Nov. 1 at
LQK North Florida. The class
provides the most up-to-date
information available for new


vehicle technologies. The
second day of training is
hands-on. Space is limited.
Register at www.sceneofthe-
accident.com.

Tuesday, Nov. 1
Fall memorial
Haven Hospice will host a
Fall Love and Remembrance
Memorial service 6 p.m.
Nov. 1 at the Haven Hospice
Suwannee Valley Care
Center Community Room,
6037 W. US Hwy. 90 in Lake
City. The memorial is open
to anyone in the community
who has lost a loved one.
Attendees are encour-
aged to bring pictures and
mementos of loved ones that
can be placed on the Table
of Memories. Refreshments
will be served and registra-
tion is not required to attend.
Call (386) 752-9191.

Wednesday, Nov. 2
Olustee meeting
The Blue Grey Army is
meeting 5:30 p.m. Sept. 14
at the Central Building to .
plan for Olustee 2012. The
building is located at 409
SW St. Johns St. across from
Aquatics Center.

Saturday, Nov. 5
Crossroads Pregnancy
Center Walk for Life
The Crossroads
Pregnancy Center seventh
annual Walk for Life fundrais-
er is Nov. 5 at Deese Square
in Fort White. Registration
starts 9 a.m. at the park
and walking begins 10.
Call 386-497-4978 to get a
sponsor sheet or come by
the Crossroads Pregnancy
Center at 19094 SW State
Rd 47 in Fort White.

Tuesday, Nov. 8
Auction
The Signature Chefs
Auction will be at 5:30 p.m.
Nov. 8 inthe Rountree Moore
Toyota showroom, US 90
W. There will be silent and
live auctions with Christmas
trees, live entertainment,
and a selection of specialty.
foods presented by over 20
area restaurants and cater-
ers. Call Kathy McCallister
623-1505 or Maureen Lloyd
397-0598.

Tuesday, Nov. 15
Diabetes workshop
The next Diabetes
Community Education Class
is 9:30 a.m. Nov. 15 at
Lake Shore Authority Board
Building, 259 NE Franklin
St. The topic is Diabetes
Basics led by Dr. Richard
Weizenecker, MD endocri-
nologist. Call Wendy Fisher
at 292-7815. Classes are
free.

Wednesday Nov. 16
Olustee meeting
The Blue Grey Army is
meeting 5:30 p.m. Sept. 14
at the Central Building to
plan for Olustee 2012. The
building is located at 409
SW St. Johns St. across from
Aquatics Center.


CHURCH NOTES


Friday, Oct. 14
The Cruise
True Church of God in
Unity presents "The Cruise"
7:30 p.m. Oct. 14 at Last
Chance Banquet Hall, 219
NW 10th St. in Gainesville.
The cost is $12 singles, $25
couples. Contact Pastor
Daniels at (386) 965-4037.
Artisan sale
The Ten Thousand
Villages Sale is 2 p.m.-8
p.m. Oct. 14, 10 a.m.-6 p.m.
Oct. 15 and 10 a.m.-2 p.m.
Oct. 16 at First Presbyterian
Church. The sale will dis-
play art pieces, gifts, d6cor,
and accessories from Third
World artisans. The event
will be in the Fellowship Hall
of the church.

Saturday, Oct. 15
Yard sale
An annual yard sale is


7 a.m.-11 a.m. Oct. 15 at
First Baptist Church of White
Springs. The church is locat-
ed at 16401 Camp Ave.

Sunday, Oct. 16
Lulu Homecoming
A homecoming celebra-
tion is 11 a.m. Oct. 16 at
Lulu Baptist Church. The
Rev. Tommy Bankston is the
guest speaker. A covered
dinner luncheon will follow
the service. All are welcome.

Southside Homecoming
A homecoming celebra-
tion is 10:30 a.m. Oct. 16 at
Southside Baptist Church.
The guest speaker is Dr.
Glen Owens. Dinner is on
the grounds and nursery will
be provided. Call 755-5553.
The church is located at 388
SE Baya DriVe.
Revival services
Revival services are 6


p.m. Oct. 16 and 7 p.m.
Oct. 17-19 at Athens Baptist
Church, on Route 240. The
guest speaker is the Rev.
Brandon Witt. The Rev.
Walter Bowman is pastor.
Call (386) 754-0750
Anniversary celebration
An anniversary celebra-
tion for Pastor Henry Ortiz
and his wife First Lady
Jacklyn Ortiz is 11 a.m. and
3 p.m. Oct. 16 at Magnolia
Missionary Baptist Church
of Raiford. The celebration
will honor the couple on
their fourth year of serving
the people of God. Pastor
J. Warren and the Greater
Elizabeth Missionary Baptist
Church of Lake Butler will
lead the morning service.
Pastor A. Greene, and the
St. Paul Missionary Baptist
Church of Lake City will lead
the evening service. Contact
Morris Paige at (904) 449-
2269 or (386) 431-1273.


* Submit Church Notes by e-mail to
rbridges@lakecityreporter.com, fax to (386) 752-
9400 or drop-off at 180 E. Duval St., Lake City. Call
(386) 754-0425 with questions. Church Notes run
as space is available during the week.


Camp meeting
Fresh Encounter Camp
Meeting is 10:30 a.m. and
6 p.m. Oct. 16 and 7 p.m.
17-19 at Lake City Church
of God. Nancy Harmon,
The Mighty Warriors and
Evangelist Kimberly Taylor
will be singing and minister-
ing. The church is located at
173 SE Ermine Ave.

Tuesday
Support group
Faithful and True meetings
are 7 p.m. every Tuesday
at Christ Central Church
in Lake City. The perils of
pornography and other
addictive sexual behaviors
are discussed. Men are
taught how to live in freedom
consistently everyday. The
group is strictly anonymous,
and meetings are held in
small private office just north
of the main church. Call Tom
at (386) 965-6377.


Thursday, Oct. 20
WOW Conference
The Women of the
Word Conference is 7:30
p.m. Oct. 20-21 and 10
a.m. Oct. 22. The theme
is A Spiritual Makeover
Renew my Mind, Refresh
my Sprit and Recapture
my Focus. Registration is
free. Tickets to the ladies
only luncheon on Saturday
is $10. Conference host
is Elder Kecia Robinson.
Speakers include Dr. E.
Denise Williams, Pastor
Patricia Jones and Minister
Donna Humphries. Musical
guest is Tanisha Hunter. The
church is located at 1190
SW Sisters Welcome Road.
Register online at www.wow-
confernce2011 .even'tbrite.
com.

Sunday, Oct. 30
Cancer survivors
observance


The annual "Cancer
Survivors. Through Courage
and Faith" observation is
11 a.m. Oct. 30 at Olivet
Missionary Baptist Church.
The church is located at 541
NE Davis Ave.

November
Yard sale
A bi-annual yard sale
is 8 a.m.-2:00 p.m. Nov.
4-5 at the Pleasant Grove
United Methodist Church
on Highway 47 south, just
past Dollar General on the
left. Also a bake sale is on
Saturday. Call Anne Little at
(386) 365-4267.
Vendors wanted
Vendors needed for the
4th Annual Providence
Village Baptist Church
Ladies Expo 9 a.m.- noon
Nov. 13. Contact Debbie at
752- 6209 or dclyatt.5956@
gmail.com.


Tuesday, Oct. 18 Nursing home planing
workshop


Page Editor: Laura Hampson, 754-0427









LAKE CITY REPORTER HEALTH NEWS THURSDAY, OCTOBER 13, 2011


Gov't pulls back on junk food marketing proposal


By MARY CLARE JALONICK
Associated Press
WASHINGTON Tony
the Tiger and Toucan Sam
can rest easy. Government
officials fine-tuning guide-
lines for marketing food
to children said they won't
push the food industry to
get rid of colorful cartoon
characters on cereal boxes
anytime soon.
Allowing the brand
icons from popular cere-
als to remain untouched
is one of thq concessions
officials said they are like-
ly to make-as they work to
convince food companies
to curb junk food market-
ing to children.
Voluntary guidelines for
industry proposed by the
government earlier this
year set maximum levels
of fat, sugars and sodium,
among other require-
ments, and asked food
companies not to market
foods that go beyond those
parameters to children
ages 2 through 17. The
guidelines would apply
to many media venues,
including ads on televi-


sion, in stores and on the
Internet, in an effort to
stem rising child obesity
levels.
The guidelines also
applied to food packaging
and store displays, but offi-
cials backed off that part
,of the proposal at a House.
hearing on the subject
Wednesday.
The food indus-
try, backed by I*ouse
Republicans who held the
hearing, has aggressively
lobbied against the vol-
untary guidelines, saying
they are too broad and
would limit marketing of
almost all of the nation's
favorite foods, including
some yogurts and many
children's cereals. Though
the guidelines would be
voluntary, food companies
say they fear the govern-
ment will retaliate against
them if they don't go
along.
"This appears to be a
first step toward Uncle
Sam planning our family
meals," House Energy and
Commerce Committee
chairman Rep. Fred
Upton, R-Mich., said at the


hearing.
Following the industry
objections, the congres-
sional pushback and a
public comment period
on the proposal, the
government agencies
involved appear to be
softening their approach.
Officials from the Federal
Trade Commission, the
Agriculture Department
and the Centers for
Disease Control and
Prevention, who collabo-
rated on the guidelines,
said at the hearing that'
they weren't done writing
them yet.
David Vladeck, direc-
tor of the Federal Trade
Commission's Bureau of
Consumer Protection, said
the coalition of govern-
ment agencies is "in the
midst of making significant
revisions" to the original
proposal.
Among the changes he
suggested are narrowing
the age group targeted and
focusing on children aged
2 to 11 instead of up to age
17 and allowing marketing
of the unhealthier foods at
fundraisers and sporting


Nathaniel Donaker, 4, eats Kellogg's Frosted Flakes cereal at his home in Palo Alto, Calif., in
April. Tony the Tiger and Toucan Sam can rest easy. Government officials fine-tuning guide-
lines for marketing food to children said they won't push the food industry to get rid of colorful
cartoon characters on cereal boxes anytime soon.


events. Vladeck also said
that his agency would not
recommend that compa-
nies change packaging
or remove brand charac-
ters from food products
that don't qualify, as was
originally suggested in the
guidelines.


The industry came out'
with its own guidelines
over the summer, propos-
ing to limit advertising on *
some foods for children
but adjusting the criteria.
Though the industry pro-
posal is more lenient than
the government plan, the


effort has won praise from'
federal officials, who said
they would consider it if
they finalize the guide-
lines.
If they are not delayed
by Congress, a final draft of
the standards could come
by the end of the year.


Md. man starts Men Against Breast

Cancer group after family experience


By STAN GOLDBERG
The Frederick News-Post
ADAMSTOWN, Md.
When Marc Heyison's
mother, Gloria Heyison,
was diagnosed with breast
cancer in 1992, he, his
brother and his father
were with her every step
,of the way as she battled
the disease.
They went to all her
appointments, to her che-
motherapy treatments;
everywhere she. went,
they went.
'That was just the way
we were brought up,
that was the norm," said
Heyison. "Our mother was
there for us, it was time
for us to be there for her.
We must be there."
While accompanying.
her to appointments, he
noticed there were other
women with breast can-
cer who were alone. He
thought that wasn't right,
that it was important for
men to be with the women
they love in such a time.
So, in 1999, he founded
Men Against Breast
Cancer, a nonprofit orga-
nization designed to help
men support a loved one
who has the disease.
,. "Marc said that some
men don't know how to
handle certain situations


like breast cancer," said
Gloria fleyison, who is
now cancer-free.
He became passionate
about helping men who
have a loved one with
cancer because he knows
firsthand how devastating
it can be, not only to the
person with cancer, but
their loved ones, too.
"You feel so hopeless,
"so helpless," said Heyison,
who was 29 years old
when his mother was
diagnosed. "I felt like a
4-year-old boy. I was think-
ing, 'My mommy is going
to die Aqd there,,is nothing
I can do about it 'I can't
fix it.' But I can be there.


Not being there is not an
option."
'Since MABC began,
Heyison, 49, has talked
with more than 1,000 men
in 36 states and Canada.
Much of his time is
* spent at half- to full-day
educational workshops
called Partners in
Survival. He does about
10 to 15 a year. -
When he started, five to
. 10 men would attend each
workshop. Now there may
be as many as 25. But he
has also been known to
work with just one man.
Greg Stansbury is one
of the people Heyison has.
worked with. Stansbiiry's


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wife is a four-year breast
cancer survivor.
'"We have a fellowship
with each other, we help
one another," Stansbury
said. "A good word is
cope.,It's like we learn
how to cope with the dis-
ease."
Stansbury has started
a local group at Mercy
Hospital in Baltimore.
"This has just become a
real passionrfor tne,",said
Heyison. "Breast cancer is
a family disease. It devas-
tatesIthe entire family."


CooperVision steps up

contact lens recall effort


By MATTHEW PERRONE
AP Health Writer

WASHINGTON One
of the nation's largest eye
care companies is step- /
ping up efforts to publicize
its recall of more than h
half-milflion contact lenses
after pressure from federal
health regulators. '
CooperVision issued
its second announcement
in two months about the
recall of 600,000 Avaira
Toric contact lenses
linked to pain, red eye and
blurred vision by wearers.:
But theFood and


Drug Administration said
Tuesday a larger effort
wds needed to alert con-
sumers to the defective
products, which contain a
residue caused by a manu-
facturing problem.
The increasingly public
back-and-forth between
CooperVision and the FDA
underscores the govern-
ment's limited authority
to dictate the handling of
recalls.
The FDA generally
negotiates product recalls
with companies, though the
agency cannot order a com-
pany to reca,a product.


~
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Page Editor: Laura Hampson, 754-0427










LAKE CITY REPORTER HEALTH NEWS THURSDAY, OCTOBER 13, 2011


Prostate testing's dark side: Men who were harmed


By MARILYNN MARCHIONE
Associated Press

Terry Dyroff's PSA
blood test led to a prostate
biopsy that didn't find
cancer but gave him a life-
threatening infection.
In the emergency room
several days later, "I didn't
sit, I just laid on the floor,
I felt so bad," said Dyroff,
65, a retired professor
from Silver Spring, Md. "I
honestly thought I might
be dying."
Donald Weaver was a
healthy 74-year-old Kansas
farmer until doctors went
looking for prostate cancer.
A PSA test led to a biopsy
and surgery, then a heart
attack, organ failure and
a coma. His grief-stricken
wife took him off life sup-
port.
"He died of unnecessary
preventive medicine," said
his nephew, Dr. Jay Siwek,
vice chairman of family
medicine at Georgetown
University. "Blood tests
can kill you."
Since Friday, when a
task force of independent
scientists said routine PSA
testing does more harm
than good, urologists who
make a living treating pros-
tate cancer have rushed


to defend the test, as have
patients who believe it
saved their lives.
Less visible are men
who have been harmed
by testing, as Dyroff and
Weaver were. The harm is
not so much from the test
itself but from everything
it triggers biopsies that
usually are false alarms,
and treatments that leave
many men incontinent or
impotent for cancers that
in most cases were not a
threat
Once a PSA test sug-
gests a problem, many
men can't live with the
worry that they might
have cancer. And once can-
cer is found, most men feel
they have to treat it, usu-
ally at the urging of their
urologist.
"There are many men
,who have had serious
consequences from treat-
ment. Those stories don't
get told and they are not
*uncommon," said Dr. Len
Uchtenfeld, deputy chief
medical officer of the
American Cancer Society,
which thinks the task force
reached "an appropriate
conclusion" about the PSA
test
"I'm not going to criti-
cize mei\who believe that


their lives have been saved
by this test," because that's
what doctors have told
them, Lichtenfeld said. "If
you're sitting there and
you wet your pants three
times a day, you've got to
believe it's worth it, that it
saved your life."
Some common miscon-
ceptions:
It shows cancer. In
fact, PSA is just a measure
of inflammation, and it
can be elevated for many
reasons besides cancer:
normal enlargement of
the prostate with age, an
infection, even recent sex,
a strenuous bike ride or
horseback riding.
It's been proven to
save lives. Only two large,
well-done studies have
looked at this, the task
force says. The American
study found annual
screening did not lower
the chances of dying of
prostate cancer. However,
cancer fear is so great,
and belief in the value of
screening so ingrained,
that half the men assigned
to the group not offered
PSA tests got one anyway.
That made comparisons
to the group given annual
screening difficult.


Deadly Black Death bug

hasn't changed, but we have


By SETH BORENSTEIN
Associated Press

WASHINGTON -
Scientists have cracked the
genetic code of the Black
Death, one of history's
worst plagues, and found
that its modern day bacte-
rial descendants haven't
changed much over 600
years.
Luckily, we have.
The evolution of ,ociet
and medicine and our
own bodies has-far out-..
paced the evolution of that
deadly bacterium, scientists
said.
The 14th century bug
Yersinia pestis is nearly
identical to the modern day
version of the same -germ.
There are only a few dozen
changes among the more
than 4 million building '
blocks of DNA, according
to a study published online
Wednesday in the journal
Nature.
What that shows is that
the Black Death, or plague,
was deadly for reasons
beyond its DNA, study
authors said. It had to do
with the circumstances,of
the world back then.
In its day, the disease
killed between 30 mil-
lion and 50 million people
about 1 of every 3
Europeans. It came at
the worst possible time
when the climate was
suddenly getting colder,
the world was in the midst
of a long war and horrible
famine, and people were
moving into closer quarters
where the disease could
infect them and spread
easily, scientists say. And
it was likely the first time
this particular disease had
struck humans, attacking
people without any innate
protection.
"People literally thought
it was the end of the
world," said study lead


A photo from the Museum of London Archaeology shows
skeletons in the East Smithfield Cemetery in London, where
Black-Death victims were buried in the 14th CeAtury.


author Johannes Krause of
the University of Tubingen
in Germany.
In devastating the
population, it changed the
human immune system,
basically wiping out people
who couldn't deal with the
disease and leaving the
stronger to survive, said
study co-author Hendrik
Poinar of McMaster
University in Ontario.
But simple antibiotics
today, such as tetracycline,
can beat the plague bacte-
ria, which doesn't seem to
have properties that enable
other germs to become
drug resistant, Poinar said.
Plus, changes in medi-
cal treatment of the sick,
coupled with improved
sanitation and economics,
. put humanity in a far better
position. And there's an
immune system protection
we mostly have now, he


Suit Home ignored abuse

of dementia patient
Associated Press


MEDIA, Pa. A lawsuit
has been filed over the
alleged abuse of a demen-
tia patient at a suburban
Philadelphia care home.
Relatives of the 78-year-
old Alzheimer's patient
said they recorded the
physical and verbal abuse
through a video camera
hidden in a clock radio.
Mary and Paul French
of Havertown said they
installed the camera after
nursing home officials
ignored her miothlr's com-


plaints of mistreatment,
attributing them to her
dementia. They filed suit
Wednesday in Delaware
County.
Sunrise Senior Living
Inc. of McLean, Va., which
operates more than 300
facilities, has said it takes
the allegations seriously.
Three former aides, all
women, are awaiting trial
on assault and neglect
charges in Delaware
County.
Sunrise officials did not
return a message.


Terry Dyroff sits on the porch of his home Tuesday in Silver Spring, Md. Dyroffs PSA blood
test led to a prostate biopsy that didn't find cancer but gave him a life-threatening infection.
Since Friday, when a task force of independent scientists said PSA testing does more harm
than good, urologists who make a living treating prostate cancer have rushed to defend the
test, as have patients who believe it saved their lives.













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Tim Kirby
Sports Editor
754-0421
tkirby@lakecityreporter.com


Lake City Reporter





SPORTS


Thursday, October 13, 201 I


www.lakecityreporter.com


Section B


BRIEFS


Zumbathon for
cancer Monday
"The Pink Party
Zumbathon to benefit the
Suwannee River Breast
Cancer Awareness
Association is 5:30-7 p.m.
Monday at the Skating
Palace. Donation is $10
and proceeds go to help
those in the community
who are experiencing
financial hardships while
undergoing cancer
treatments, and don't
forget to wear pink.
For details,
contact Sarah Sandlin on
Facebook at "Lake City
Zumba" or by e-mail at
lakecityzumba@gmail.
cornm.
FORT WHITE SPORTS
Drive Smart
fundraiser set
Rountree-Moore
Ford-Lincoln is
offering the Drive Smart.
For Your School program.
to Fort White High from
9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Saturday.
For all valid test drives
of a Lincoln (age 18 and
older, driver's license,
proof of insurance), Ford
Motor Company will
donate $20 (up to $6,000)
to the driver's school
organization of choice.
Fort White's
football team is -I
pre-selling barbecue
dinners for the event And
the Fort White Dugout
Club is hosting a car
wash and merchandise
booth.
, For details, call Shayne
Morgan at 397-4954 or
Jeanne Howell at
288-5337.
CHS BOWUNGI
Gas card raffle
for fundraiser
Columbia High's
bowling team is selling
raffle tickets for a $250
gas card as a fundraiser.
Tickets are $5 for one,
$10 for three, and $20
for 10.
For details, call coach
Brian Saunders at
755-8080, Ext. 148.
* From staff reports

GAMES

Today
Columbia High boys
golf in Alachua County
Tournament at Gainesville
Country Club, noon
Columbia High
swimming vs. Suwannee
High, 5 p.m.
Fort White High
volleyball vs. Santa Fe
High, 6 p.m. (JV-5)
Columbia High JV
football vs. Lake Weir
High, 7 p.m.
Friday
Fort White High
football vs. Williston High,
7:30 p.m.
Saturday
Columbia High cross
country in Keystone
Heights Invitational,
8 a.m.


Swim s


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Columbia High's Cale Shaw swims the 2001M event on Oct. 6 against Fleming Island at the
Columbia Aquatic Complex.


Tigers score four
first-place finishes
against Chiles.
From staff reports

Columbia High's swim
team played host to defend-
ing district champion Chiles
High on Tuesday. Chiles'
girls won 182-101; the boys
won 195-78.
Columbia brings in
Suwannee High at 5 p.m.
today for Senior Day.
The Tigers scored four
first places against the
powerhouse Timberwolves
- Hannah Burns in the 200
IM and 100 fly, Lindsay Lee
in the 50 free, and David
Morse in the 100 breast.


t


Morse placed second in the
100 fly.
Heather Burns placed
second in the 200 free and
third in the 500 free. Kayla
Williams placed second
in the 100 back. Micheala
Polhamus placed third in
the 100 free and fifth in
the 500 free. Sydney Morse
placed third in the 100
breast.
Cale Shaw placed third in
the 100 back and fourth in
the 200 IM. Joseph Piccioni
placed third in the 50 free
and fourth in the 100 free.
Also earning team points
by placing 'in the top five
were:
N Fourth place -
CHS continued on 6B


Return of the Red Devils


Williston visits
Fort White High
on Friday.
By TIM KIRBY
tkirby@lakecityreporter.com
FORT WHITE -
Williston High is playing
the 2011 football season
as an independent, but the
Red Devils are no stranger-
to the playoffs.
Fort White High hosts
Williston at 7:30 p.m. Friday
in a matchup of 3-2 teams.
Williston is coached by
Jamie Baker who had a
four-year playoff run at the
school in 2005-08. Derek
Chipoletti took over for the
2009 playoff season \and
Baker is back after one year
away. The Red Devils were
5-6 last year.
Williston has made the
state playoffs 18 times, start-
ing in 1968 when the Red
Devils were state runners-
up under coach Sam Miller.
Williston also was state run-
ner-up in 1988 under coach
Jimmy Ray Stephens, when
the Red Devils lost to Avon
Park High 14-7 in the final.
Williston was runner-up
to North Marion High in
District 5-3A for Baker's
four playoff years. Dropped
to Class 2B in 2009, the Red
INDIANS continued on 6B


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Fort White High's Andrew Baker runs through a hole on a quarterback keeper during a game against Newberry High on
Sept. 9.


Lady Tigers fall on

road to St. Augustine


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Columbia High's Kelbie Ronsonet goes up for the kill in a
match earlier this year.


Volleyball team
takes three-set
loss to Jackets.
By BRANDON FINLEY
bfinley@lakecityreporter. com
Columbia High fell in
a district contest to St.
Augustine High in a three-
set defeat on Tuesday.
The Lady Tigers fell 10-
25, 20-25 and 21-25 behind


a series of unforced errors
according to Columbia
coach Rebecca Golden.
"That was a good team,
but we made too many
mental mistakes," Golden
said. "We showed moments
of greatnes, but we have
to overcome the mental
errors. That would go a
long way. We're just hop-
ing to have another shot at
them."
Columbia was led by


Jessie Bates with 16 assists
and an ace.
Kelbie Ronsonet led
the team with six kills
in the match. Ashleigh
Bridges had 13 digs to lead
Columbia.
The Lady Tigers return
to the court with a home
match against another
group of Lady Tigers when
Union County High travels
to Lake City at 5:30 p.m. on
Monday.


Thursday,
November 3
At The Fair
*While supplies last.


October 29 thru November 5 pi t i
At The Columbia County Fair -
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., 28 LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS THURSDAY, OCTOBER 13, 2011


SCOREBOARD


TELEVISION

TV sports

Today
AUTO RACING
2 p.m.
ESPN2 NASCAR, Nationwide
Series, practice for 300 Miles of Courage,
at Concord, N.C.,
3:30 p.m.
ESPN2 NASCAR, Sprint Cup,
practice for Bank of America 500, at
Concord, N.C.
6 p.m.
ESPN2 NASCAR, Nationwide
Series, practice for 300 Miles of Courage,
at Concord, N.C.
7 p.m.
ESPN2 NASCAR, Sprint Cup, pole
qualifying for Bank of America 500, at
Concord, N.C.
I a.m.
SPEED Formula One, practice for
Korean Grand Prix, at Yeongam, South
Korea
COLLEGE FOOTBALL
9 p.m.
ESPN Southern Cal at California
GOLF
9a.m.
TGC European PGA Tour, Portugal
Masters, first round, at Vilamoura,
Portugal
2p.m.
TGC PGA Tour. The McGladrey
Classic, first round, at Sea Island, Ga.
5 p.m.
TGC Nationwide Tour, Miccosukee
Championship, first ,round, at Miami
(same-day t ape)
9:30 p.m. ,
TGC LPGA Malaysia, first round, at
Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia (same-day tape)
MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL
S4 p.m.
FOX Playoffs, American League
Championship Seriesame5,game 5, Texas at
Detroit
a p.m.
TBS Playoffs, National League
Championship Series, game 4, Milwaukee
at St. Louis-
PREP FOOTBALL
.8 p.m.
FSN -- Pearland (Texas) at Clear
Creek (Texas)


BASEBALL

MLB playoffs

LEAGUE CHAMPIONSHIP SERIES
Amilcan League
Texas 3, Detroit 2
Texas 7, Detroit 3,11 Innings
Tuesday
Detroit 5,Texas 2"
wednesday
Texas at Detroit, delayed (n)
Today
STexas at Detroit (Verlander 24-5),
4J9 p.m.

; s lt (Scherser; 15-9) at Texas,
8:05 p.m. (if necessary)
Sunday .
Detroit (Fister 11-13) at Texas,
8:05 p.m. (if necessary)
National League
Milwaukee 9, St. Louis 6
St. Louis I2, Milwaukee 3

Milwaukee at St. Louis (n) '
Today
Milwaukee (Wolf 13-10) at St. Louis'
(Lohse 14-8),8:05 p.m.
Friday
Milwaukee at St. Louls, 8:05 p.m.
Sunday
St. Louis at Milwaukee (if necessary)

FOOTBALL

NFL standings

AMERICAN CONFERENCE


East
W L
Buffalo 4 I
New England 4 I
N.Y.Jets 2 3
Miami 0 4
I, South
SW L
Houston 3 2
Tennessee 3 2
Jacksonville I 4
Indianapolis 0 5
North
W L
Baltim'ore 3 I
Cincinnati 3 2
Pittsburgh 3 2
Cleveland 2 2
West
W L
San Diego 4 I
Oakland 3 2
Kansas City 2 3
Denver I 4


TPct' PF PA
0.800164 120
0.800165 119
0.400121 125
0.000 69 104

TPct PF PA,
0.600127 95
0.600105 94
0.200 59 115
0.000 87 136

TPct PF PA
0.750119 57
0.600110 94
0.600102 89
0.50074 93

TPct PF PA
0.800120 109
0.600136 133
0.400 77 150
0.200105 140


NATIONAL CONFERENCE


Washington
N.Y. Giants
Dallas
Philadelphia


New Orleans
Tampa Bay
Atlanta
Carolina


East
W L
3 I
3 2
2 2
I 4
South
W L
4 1
3 2
2 3
1 4


TPct PF PA
0.750 83 63
0.600127 123
0.500 99'101
0.200125 132

TPct PF PA
0.800157 125
0.600 87 125
0.400104 130
0.200116 132


New Orleans atTampa Bay. 4:15 p.m.
Minnesota at Chicago, 8:20 p.m.
Monday's Game
Miami at N.Y.Jets, 8:30 p.m.
Open: Arizona, Denver, Kansas City,
San Diego, Seatde, Tennessee
Sunday, Oct. 23
Houston atTennessee, I p.m.
Washington at Carolina, I p.m.
San Diego at N.Y. Jets, I p.m.
Seatde at Cleveland, I p.m.
Denver at Miami, I p.m."
Atlanta at Detroit, I p.m.
Chicago vs. Tampa Bay at London,
I p.m.
Kansas City at Oakland, 4:05 p.m.
Pittsburgh at Arizona, 4:05 p.m.
St. Louis at Dallas, 4:15 p.m.
Green Bay at Minnesota, 4:15 p.m.
Indianapolis at New Orleans, 8:20 p.m.
Monday, Oct. 24
Baltimore at Jacksonville, 8:30 p.m.
Open: Buffalo, Cincinnati, N.Y. Giants,
New England, Philadelphia, San Francisco

College games

Today
Texas Southern (2-3) at Alabama A&M
(4-2), 7:30 p.m..
San Diego St. (3-2) at Air Force
(3-2), 8 p.m.
Southern Cal (4-1) at California
(3-2), 9 p.m.
Friday
Hawaii (3-2) at San jdse St. (2-4),
9 p.m.

Top 25 schedule

Saturday
No. I LSU at Tennessee, 3:30 p.m.
No. 2 Alabama at Mississippi, 6 p.m.
No. 3 Oklahoma at Kansas, 9:15 p.m.
No. 4Wlsconsin vs. Indiana, Noon
No. 5 Boise State at Colorado State,
6 pm.
No. 6 Oklahoma State at No. 22 Texas,
3:30 p.m.
No. 7 Stanford at Washington State,
7:30 p.m.
No.8 Clemson at Maryland; 7 p.m.
No.9 Oregon vs. No. 18 Arizona State,
10:.15 p.m.
No. 11 Michigan at No. 23 Michigan
State, Npon
No. 12 Georgia Tech at Virginia,
3:30 p.m.
No. 15 South Carolina at Mississippi
State, 12:21 pm.
No. 16 Illinois vs. Ohio State,
'3:30 p.m.
No. 17 Kansas State at Texas Tech,
S7p.m.
No. 19 Virginia Tech at Wake Fonest,
6:30 p.m.
No. 20 Baylor at No. 21 Texas A&M,
Noon
No.24 Auburn vs. Florida,7 p.m.

AUTO RACING

Race week

NASCAR
SPRINT CUP
BANK OF AMERICA 500
Site Concord, N.C. \ .
Schedule: Today, practice (ESPN2,
3:30S5 'p.m.), quillfying (ESPN2,
7-.830 pn.); Friday, practice (ESPN2, 4:30-
.7 p.m.), Saturday, race, 1:30 p.m. (ABC,
7-11:30 p.m.). .
Track Charlotte Motor .Speedway
(oval, 1.5 miles). .
Race distance: 01 miles, 334 laps,
Next race: Good Sam Club 500, Oct.
23, Talladega Superspeedway, Talladega,
Ala.
Online: http:flwww.nascar.com
NATIONWIDE
DOLLAR GENERAL 300
Site Concord, N.C. *
Schedule: Today, practice
(ESPN2, 2-3:30 p.m., 6-7 p.n.); Friday,
qualifying (ESPN2, 3-4:30 p.m.), race,
7:30 p.m. (ESPN2, 7-10:30 p.m.).
Track: Charlotte Motor Speedway.
Race distance: 300 miles, 200 laps.
Next race: O'Reilly Auto Parts
Challenge, Nov. 5,Texas Motor Speedway,
FortWorth,Texas.
CAMPING WORLD TRUCK
SMITH'S 350
Site: Las Vegas.
Schedule: Friday, practice, qualifying;
Saturday, race, 3:30 p.m. (Speed, 3-6 p.m.).
Track: Las Vegas Motor Speedway
(oval, 1.5 miles).
Race distance: 219 miles, 146 laps.
Next race: Coca-Cola 250,.Oct. 22,
Talladega Superspeedway,Talladega,Ala.
INDYCAR
INDYCARWORLD
CHAMPIONSHIPS
Site: Las Vegas.
Schedule: Today, practice; Friday,
pricdtice, qualifying; Sunday, race, 3:45 p.m.
(ABC, 3-6 p.m.).
Track: Las Vegas Motor Speedway
(oval, 1.5 miles).
Race distance: 300 miles, 200 laps.




Unscramble these four Jumbles,
one letter to each square,
to form four ordinary words.

I NTIEW


Online: httpJwww.indycor.com
FORMULA ONE
KOREAN GRAND PRIX
SiteYeongam, South Korea.
Schedule: Friday, practice (Speed.
1-2:30 a.m.), Saturday, practice, qualifying
(Speed, 1-2:30 a.m.); Sunday, race, 2 a.m.
(Speed, 1:30-4 a.m., 11:30 a.m.-2 p.m.).
Track Korea International Circuit
(road course, 3.493 miles).
Race distance: 192.1 miles, 55 laps.
Next race: Grand Prix of India, Oct.30.
Buddh International Orjuit, New Delhi.
Online: http//www.formualI.com
NHRA FULL THROTTLE
NHRA ARIZONA NATIONALS
Site: Chandler.Ariz.
Schedule: Friday, qualifying Saturday,
qualifying (ESPN2, Sunday, 12:30-
2 a.m.); Sunday, final eliminations (ESPN2,
7-10 p.m.).
Track: Firebird International Raceway.
Next event Big O Tires NHRA
Nationals, Oct. 27-30, The Strip at Las
Vegas Motor Speedway, LasVegas.
Online: httpJ/www.nhm.com

Chase standings

I. Carl Edwards, 2,161.
2. Kevin Harvick, 2,160.
3. Jimmie Johnson, 2,157.
4. Brad Keselowski, 2,150.
5. Matt Kenseth, 2,149.
6. Kurt Busch,2,145.
7.Tony Stewart, 2,142.
8. Kyle Busch, 2,141.
9. Dale Earnhardt Jr., 2,118.
10.Jeff Gordon, 2,114.
I I. Ryan Newman, 2,107.
12. Denny Hamlin, 2,082.

GOLF

Golf week


PGATOUR
McGLADREY CLASSIC
Site: St. Simons Island, Ga.
Schedule:Today-Sunday. '
Course: Sea Island Resort, Seaside
Course (7,005 yards, par 70).
Purse: $4 million. Winner's share:
$720,000.
Television: Golf Channel (Today-
Sunday, 2-5 p.m.). :
LPGATOUR
LPGA MALAYSIA
Site: Kuala Lumpur. Malaysia.
Schedule:Today-Sunday.
Course: Kuala Lumpur Golf and
Country Club (6,208 yards, par 71).
Purse: $1.9 million. Winner's share
$285,000.
Television:GolfChannel (Today-Sunday,
9:30-11:30 p.m.).
CHAMPIONS TOUR
AT&T CHAMPIONSHIP
Site: San Antonio.
Schedule: Friday-Sundaj.
SCourse: TPC San Antonio, Canyons
Course (6,923 yards, par 72).
Purse; $1.8 million. Winner's share:
$270,000.
t :elevision: 'Golf' '6h',el l(Frlday--
Sunday, 7:30-9:30 p.m.).
EUROPEAN TOUR
PORTUGAL MASTERS
Site:Vilamoura, Portugal.
Schedule: oday-Sunday.
Course: Oceanico Victoria Golf
Course (7,231 yards par 72).
Purse: '$3.41 million. Winner's share.
$568,135.
Television;' Golf Channel (Today-
Sunday, 9 a.m.-I p.m.).
NATIONWIDE TOUR
MICCOSUKEE CHAMPIONSHIP
Site: Miami.
Schedule:Today-Sunday.
Course: Miccosukee Golf and Country
Club (7,200 yards, par 71)..
Purse: $600,000. Winner's share:
$108,000.
- Television: None. .


HOCKEY

NHL schedule

TIllday's Games
Ottawa 4, Minnesota 3,SO
Pittsburgh 4, Florida 2
Wednesday's Ganes
Colorado at Columbus (n)
Vancouiver at Philadelphia (n)
Boston at Carolina (n)
Today's Gamne
Los Angeles at-New Jersey, 7 p.m.
Tampa Bay at N.Y. Islanders, 7 p.m.
Washington at Pittsburgh, 7 p.m.
Calgary at Montreal, 7:30 p.m.
Colorado at Ottawa, 7:30 p.m.
Vancouver at Detroit, 8 p.m.
Phoenix at Nashville, 8 p.m.
Edmonton at Minnesota,8 p.m.
Winnipeg at Chicago, 8:30 p.m.
St. Louis at Dallas, 8:30 p.m.
Friday'. Games
Carolina at Buffalo, 7:30 p.m.
San Jose atAnaheim, 10 p.m.

THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAM
by David L Hoyt and Jeff Knun


North _IMREUL _m
W L 'TPct PF PA
Green Bay 5 0 01.000173111
Detroit 5 0 01.000159 89
Chicago 2 3 0.400 107122 K j'
Minnesota 1 4 0.200111 06

W L TPct PF PA U | ~
San Francisco 4 I 0.800142 78 WH TH4 PRE95P NTIAL-
Seattle 2' 3 0.400 94 122 ANC2ATEWITJOC-eN ,
Arizona I 4 0.200%96121 I r- WT JOGGT "
st.Loul, 0 4 o0.0 46113 G KANF HE TOOK TH-15
SundLy-et .mes0 0 0 4 3Now arrange the circled letters
St. Louis at Green Bay, I p.m. [ to form the surprise answer, as
Jacksonville at Pittsburgh, I pm. suggested by the above cartoon.
Philadelphia at Washington, I p.m.
San Francco at Detroit, I p.m. A: HIS-
Carolina at Atlanta, I p.m. A
Indianapolis at Cincinnati, I p.m. (Answers tomorrow)

Cleveland at Oakland, 4.05 p.m. Yesterday's J blues: RODEO DRINK BULLET HOBBLE
Houston at Baltimore, 405 i.m. Answer: Dracula wanted to adopt the dog after
Dallas at New England, 4:15 p.m. realizing It was a BLOODHOUND


COURTESY PHOTOS


Eye of the Tiger 1-2-3 at Disney


TOP: Eye of the Tiger club won the Disney Cross Country Classic on Saturday with
runners Emma Tucker (right), Samantha Ziegaus (center) and Nicole Morse (left) placing
first, second and third. Tucker was the defending champion. The top three received a
personal Mickey Mouse trophy. Other girls running for the club were Bridget Morse (eighth),
Jillian Morse (12th), Bernita Brown (19th), Grace Kolovitz (22nd) and Lauren Revoir.

BOTTOM: Led by Shawn Ziegaus (left) in 10th place and Timothy Pierce (right) in ninth, the
Eye of the Tiger boys placed third. Other runners were Kelly Varndell, Dalton Devers,
Seth Ziegaus, Fin Tucker, Tyler Pierce, Austin Barwick and Zach Morse.


ACROSS
1 Met
production
itForoeg


11 Drew together
12 Umbrage
13 Robots
15 Let pass
16 NASA outfits
(hyph.)
18 Oriental
sauce
19 Wimple
sporter
21 NASA
counterpart
22 Opposite of
wax
23 Polio vaccine
inventor
25 Economic
Ind.
28 Stage whisper
30 Casual
farewell
31 Bridal notice
word
32 Tank


33 Compass pt.
35 Diarist Nin
37 Loop trains
38 Earthen jar
40/ Fjord port
41 MacGraw
of films
42 Cousins'of
"urn"
43 Make a
decision
46 Captivate
48 Plane
developer
50 Anvil's place
54 Veld grazer
55 Hot topic,
56 Egg parts.
57 Sweater letter

DOWN
1 Prehistoric
2. Golf score
3 Writer,
Umberto -
4 Wore the
crown
5 Supplements


Answer to Previous Puzzle


DR AWN UNPAID
UMRAP COLDLY
LETUPS ORO LA E
NAE NAG
T AG URN HAG
AX IDA STILE
ARI NOB ASKED
RONS BOW IAN


DST ATA SOS


SS S I G RABLE
SI E S ESTEEM
PARKAS AEGIS


Hangs loosely
Media
network
They often
clash
Pianist
Peter -


10- Low card
14 Hauls into
court
15 Where Pisa is
17 Columbus'
patron
19 Twangy
20 Textbook
divisions
22 Ocean motion
24 Green parrot
25 Grind one's
teeth
26 Simon and
Diamond
27 Tijuana coin
29 Want-ad abbr.
34 Informal talk
36 Sustain with
food
39 Gets in the
cross hairs
43 Knuckle
under
44 Mallet game
45 Wild duck
46 Boundaries
47 Fail to include
49 Octopus
defense
51 Mao -tung
52 Rough shelter
53 Team cheer


10-13 2011 UFS, Dist. by Universal Uclick for UFS


Page Editor: Tim Kirby, 754-0421









LAKE CITY REPORTER ADVICE & COMICS THURSDAY, OCTOBER 13, 2011


DILBERT


BABY BLUES


BLONDIE


HONEY, I FIGURED OUT THE PERFECT SEE? BY EATING THE SAME THING IT COULD TAKE YOU YEARS TO
DIET! FROM NOW ON, I EAT ALL THE TIME, EVENTUALLY I'LL GET BORED EATING ROAST BEEF
NOTHING BUT ROAST BEEF GET BORED AND EAT LESS, AND SANDWICHES, SWEETHEART
SANDWICHES THEN I'LL LOSE WEIGHT! S T
j THAT'S THE
1- CHANCE




-I
I'LL wAVE -3


BEETLE BAILEY


HAGARTHE HORRIBLE


DEAR ABBY


Youngster's kidney disease

is topic for open discussion


DEAR ABBY: I have two
sons, 19 and 12. My young-
er boy has a rare form of
kidney disease. His kidney
function is currently nor-
mal, but his doctor says
that in the future he may
need a new kidney. At that
point, his brother would be
high on the list for compat-
ibility and availability. I,
sadly, would not.
How does one mention.
the possibility of being a
donor to his older brother?
Is it even fair to ask? If
he doesn't offer, would I
always resent it? Should
we wait until there is a
real need before asking?
PLANNING AHEAD IN
.CALIFORNIA.
DEAR PLANNING
AHEAD: All families are
different, and it's a credit
to yours that you're think-
ing ahead regarding some
of the difficult aspects
related to donation. This
subject can sometimes be
fraught with the potential
for perceived coercion. It
can be offset by NOT fram-
ing it as a "request" from
one family member, but
as a general family discus-
sion about the loved one's
health situation.
Among the issues that
should be raised: What
does it mean for your
younger son to have this
rare kidney disease?
What's the survival rate for
an adolescent who receives
a living donor transplant?
What is involved in the


Abigail Van, Buren
www.dearobby.com
donation process?
These questions should
be raised as a family in
conversation with a physi-
cian or other members
of the kidney care team.
Family members can then
talk about how they feel
about the-issue, NOT as
a response to a direct
question. This provides a
chance for better educa-
tion about the condition as
well as the process, and
reduces fear.
The decision to be a
living donor is a volun-
tary one and should be
entered into free of pres-
sure. Some people may not
want to take the risk and
their rights should be
respected. The evaluation
process is very thorough.
It's designed to minimize
risk and also can uncover
unexpected conditions in
the potential donor that
are important,
The National Kidney
Foundation provides
information on its website
regarding this subject.
Visit kidney.org to learn
more.
**** ** s
DEARABBY: I share a


small office space with a
co-worker, "Tammy," who
is going through a nasty
divorce. At first I tried to
be supportive and listen
to her problems, but now
I think it was a mistake. I
now dread going to work
because I know I'll have to
listen to a litany of com-
plaints as soon as I walk
through the door.
I have tried to encour-
age Tammy to talk to a
priest or a psychologist,
but she refuses because
she's embarrassed. Is it
time to inform our man-
ager? I don't want to get
Tammy in trouble, but I
feel I'm incapable of giving
her the kind of support
she seems to need. I'm not
sure how much longer I
can take this. Please help.
- WELL-INTENTIONED
IN MINNEAPOLIS
DEAR WELL-
INTENTIONED: Summon
up the courage to tell
Tammy that although you
care about her, you can no
longer listen to her prob-
lems because it's distract-
ing you from your respon-
sibilities at work. Explain
again that these are issues
she should be sharing with
a trained professional. If
she persists in bringing..
her personal problems to
you, THEN ask your man-
ager to put a stop to it
E Write Dear Abby at
www.DearAbby.com or
P.O. Box 69440, Los
Angeles, CA 90069.


HOROSCOPES


SNUFFY SMITH


ZITS


GARFIELD


B.C.
THIS MEw i-Lue uses secIAL-
souND WAVW&STHAT AIM
ippr-65i6s1LE To FISH I I


FRANK & ERNEST


ARIES (March 21-April
19): A force play is likely
to alter your point of view
or a decision you need to
make. Partnerships will
play an important role
in moying forward. A
opportuy,-through a past
acquaintance will prove
interesting. ***
TAURUS (April 20-
May 20): Arguments
and aggressive behavior
should not be allowed to
sway you. Don't feel guilty
when you should be look-
ing out for you and your
best interests. A partner-
ship will need to be altered
if it's going to continue.

GEMINI (May 21-June
20): You'll be motivated to
make changes by someone
who is set in his or her .
ways. Striving for some-
thing new will catapult
you into the forefront of
an industry desperate for
change. Good fortune and
greater opportunity are
heading your way. ***
CANCER (June 21-July
22): Volunteering for a
cause you believe in or
a community event will
bring you in touch with
interesting new people.
Expand your interests and
you will be able to offer
more, .as well as raise your
earning potential. New
beginnings are apparent

LEO (July'23-Aug. 22): -


THE LAST WORD
Eugenia Last

Don't go overboard. Too
much of anything can add
to your stress, especially
when the bills come in. .
If soide'offd'tfmands too
much, perhaps you should
reconsider your relation-
ship. Don't give in to temp-
tation or overindulgent
tendencies. **
VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept
22): Knowledge is key.
Find out all you can about
an interest you have.
Travel or visiting someone
who offers insight and
answers will pay-off. Apply
pressure, if it will help you
get what you want Love is
highlighted. *****.
LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct
22): A pending legal mat-
ter must be put to rest
Don't wait for results when.
pressure is needed to get
things moving. Be ready to
offer something unique to
get your way. A past expe-
rience will help you make
a beneficial decision. ***
SCORPIO (Oct 23-Nov.
21): Emotional ties will
require attention. Anger
will not solve problems. ,
A greater understanding
of what you want must be
conveyed if you plan to
get good results. Focus
on an important part-
nership that affects you
emotionally, as well as
productively. ***


SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-
Dec. 21): Hold on to your
cash; An impulsive finan-
cial move will not pan out.
Don't buy into something
because of someone else.
Make.ypyour own mind,
r even if it will putstess on
a relationship. Diplomacy
will be required, along
with integrity and disci-
pline. ***
CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-
Jan. 19): Give-and-take will
lead to love and romance.
It's how you manage your
personal affairs that will
make a difference in your
attitude and the way you
handle business. An oppor-
tunity to make alterations
at home will pay off. Listen
to constructive criticism.

AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-
Feb. 18): Don't let love
cost you emotionally or
financially. Refuse to let
anyone back you into a
corner. An opportunity
to travel may entice you,
but if the cost is too high,
find an alternative that will
bring similar, if not better,
results. **
PISCES (Feb. 19-March
20): Old contracts will help
you know exactly what
to ask for to seal a deal.
Love is in the stars, and a
celebration with someone
special will be the per-
fect ending to a day filled
with great potential to get
ahead. ****


CELEBRITY CIPHER

by Luis Campos
Celebrity Cipher cryptograms are created from quotations by famous people, past and present.
Each letter in the cipher stands for another.
TODAY'S CLUE: D equals G
"KTYMY NMY KSIYJ FTYX EYNM SJ
DBBZ. SK ICJK UYYL SKJ FNKOTECW
LWNOY NK KTY TYNMK'J OBXKMBWJ."
- NYJOTAWCJ

Previous Solution: "Never lend your car to anyone to whom you have given
birth." Erma Bombeck
2011 by NEA, Inc., dist. by Universal Uclick 10-13


FOR BETTER OR WORSE


I q


.,


Page Editor: Emogene Graham, 754-0415


CLASSIC PEANUTS










LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED THURSDAY, OCTOBER 13, 2011

Lake City Reporter




CLASSIFIED


Classified Department: 755-5440


Take ADvantage of the
Reporter Classifieds!

755.5440


IBU~I^


SEiLL Ti


FIND II I


Legal


Limited to service type advertis-
ing only. ,
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Includes an additional $2.00 per
ad for each Wednesday insertion.


-7-
You can call us at 755-5440,
Monday through Friday from 8:00
a.m. to 5:b0 p.m.
Some people prefer to place their
classified ads in person, and some
ad categories will require prepay-
ment. Our office is located at 180
East Duval Street.
You can also fax or email your ad
copy to the Reporter.
FAX: 386-752-9400 Please
direct your copy to,the Classified
Department.
EMAIL: classifieds@lakecityre-
porter.com





AditoApper. Callby. Fa iall~by:
Tuesday Mltff0a.0m. MO., twI nt
Wednesday M ,onJat11a..t Mton,tamnt.
Thursday Wed.,1ta.m. td.,.O am..
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These deadlines are subject to change without notice.




Ad Errors- Please read your ad:
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We accept responsibility for only
the first incorrect Insertion, and
only the charge for the ad space
In error. Please call 755-5440
Immediately for prompt correc-
tion and billing adjustments.
Cancellations- Normal advertising
deadlines apply for cancellation.
BilIIna Inquiries- Call 755-5440.
Should further information be
required regarding payments or
credit limits, your call will be trans-
ferred to the accounting depart-
ment.


Advertising copy is subject to
approval by the Publisher who
reserves the right to edit, reject,
or classify all advertisements under
appropriate headings. Copy should
be checked for errors by the
advertiser on the first day of pub-
lication. Credit for published errors
will be allowed for the first insertion
for that portion of the advertisement
which was incorrect. Further, the
Publisher shall not be liable for any
omission of advertisements ordered
to be published, nor for any general,
special or consequential damages.
Advertising language must comply
with Federal, State or local laws
regarding the prohibition of discrimi-
nation in employment, housing and
public accommodations. Standard
abbreviations are acceptable; how-
ever, the first word of each ad may
not be abbreviated.

In Print and Online
www.lakeeityreporter.com


Legal


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT, THIRD
THIRD JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR
AND FOR COLUMBIA COUNTY, COLUMBIA COUNTY, FLORIDA
FLORIDA CIVIL ACTION CASE NO.: 11-213-CA
CASE NO: 12-2009-CA-000596 DALE M. HOLLINGSWORTH,
WELLS FARGO BANK, N.A. Plaintiff,
MORTGAGE LOAN TRUST 2005- SOPHAPHUONG,
4 ASSET-BACKED CERTIFI- Defendant.
CATES, SERIES 2005-4 NOTICE OF PUBLIC SALE
Plaintiff Notice is hereby given that the ,fol-
vs. lowing described real property:
KIM B. FITZHUGH, et al. A Lot 52 1/2 feet East and West by
Defendants) 105 feet North and South in the NW
NOTICE OF SALE comer of Lot or Block 15, in the
Notice is hereby given that, pursuant Town of Fort White, Columbia
to a Final Judgment of Foreclosure County, Florida, also described as
or Order dated 26 day of September, North 1/8th of Lot No. 16, in the
2011, entered in Civil Case Number Town of Fort White, Florida, as Sur-
12-2009-CA-000596, in the Circuit veyed and mapped by W.E. Dortch,
Court for COLUMBIA County, Flor- County surveyor, running 52 and 1/2
ida, wherein WELLS FARGO feet on Jordan Street and 105 feet .
BANK, N.A. AS TRUSTEE FOR North and South on Second Street.
OPTION ONE MORTGAGE LOAN Under the Collins Survey of Fort
TRUST 2005-4 ASSET-BACKED White, Florida, the number of said
CERTIFICATES, SERIES 2005-4 is Lot is 54.
the Plaintiff, and KIM B. FITZ- shall be sold by the Clerk of this
HUGH, et al., are the defendants, I Court, at public sale, pursuant to the
will sell the property situated in CO- Final Judgment in the above styled
LUMBIA County, Florida, described action dated September 21, 2011, at .
as: the Columbia County Courthouse in
Parcel 18: Township 5 south Range Lake City, Columbia County, Flori-
16 East da, at 11:00 A.M., on Wednesday,
Section 1: Commence at a concrete October 26, 2011, to the best and
comer of the S 1/2 of the NW 1/4 of claiming an interest in any surplus
the NW 1/4,. Section 1, Township 5 from the sale, other than the property
South, Range 16 East, thence S 89 owner as of the date of the lis pen-
degrees 06' 22" W, along the North dens, must file a claim within 60
line of said S 1/2 of the NW 1/4 of days after the sale.
the NW 1/4, 443.36 feet to point of WITNESS my hand and official seal
beginning; run thence S 0 degrees in the State and County aforesaid this
15' 31" E, 320 feet to the North line 27 day of September, 2011.
of a 60 foot graded road; thence N 89 P. DEWITT CASON
degrees 06' 22" E, along said North Clerk of Court
line, 147.79 feet; thence N 0 degrees By:/s/ B. Scippio
15' 31" W, 320 feet; thence S 89 de- Deputy Clerk
grees 06' 22" W, 147.79 feet to point
of beginning.. 05528345
Parcel 19: Township 5 South Range October 6, 13, 2011
16 East IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
Section 1: Commence at a concrete THIRD JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN
monument which is the Northeast AND FOR COLUMBIA COUNTY,
comer of the S 1/2 of the NW 1/4 of FLORIDA
the NW 1/4, Section 1, Township 5 CASE NO.: 10-423-CA
South, Range 16 East, thence S 89 RBC BANK (USA), as successor by
degrees 06' 22" W, along the North RBC BANK (USA), as su MILLENNIccessorM BANK,
line of said S 1/2 of the NW 1/4 of Plaer with MILLENNIUM BAiff
the NW 1/4, 295.57 feet to point of ,vs.
beginning; thence S 0 degrees 15' VENTURE POINTE, LLC, a Florida
31" E, 320 feet to the North line of a Limited Liability Company; AAR-
60 foot graded road; thence N 89 de- ON NICKELSON; ISAAC J. NICK-
Sgrees 06' 22" E, along said North ELSON; CAPITAL CITY BANK
line, 147.79 feet; thence N 0 degrees JPMORGN;CAPITAL CITY BANK;, N.A
15' 31" W, 320 feet; thence S 89 de- UNKNOWN TENANTS IN POS-
grees 06' 22" W, 147.79 feet to point SESSION OF 215 SW FEDERAL
of beginnlTng. COURT, FORT WHITE, FLORI-
Parcel 20: Township 5 South Range DA; MELINDA NICKELSON f/k/a
16 East UNKNOWN TENANTS IN POS-
Section 1: Commence at a concrete SESSION OF 227 LUNDSFORD
monument which is the Northeast TERERAC, L A CITY, F r
comer of the S 1/2 of the NW 1/4 of T)EA C, etE ...al l
the NW 1/4, Section 1, Township 5 Defendanlts.,
South, Ranee 16 East Columbia NOTICE OF SALE PURSUANT
Cbegi-nin ;-ne S P e iets 0'TO CHAPTER 45, FLORIDA
, beginning; thep S 89 degrees 06' STATUTES '
22" W along the North line otsaid S TATUTES
/2 o e NW14ot te NWi/ ,NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pur-
1/2 of the NW 1/4 of the NW 1/45 suant to an Order or Final Judgment
147.78 feet; thence 0 degrees 15' of Foreclosure dated the 23rd day of
o60 foot graded road; thence N 9 de- September, 2011, and entered in
grees06 22"g 778et Case No. 2010-423-CA of the Cir-
gres 06' 22 E, 147.78 feet to the cuit Court in and for Columbia, Flor-
East line of said NW 0 de/4 of the NW15'31 ida, wherein RBC BANK (USA), as
1/4; run thence N 0 degrees 15' 31" successor in interest to by merger
W, along said East line 320 feet to with MILLENNIUM BANK; is the
point of beginning. Plaintiff, and VENTURE POINTE,
at public sale, to the highest and best LLC, AARON NICKELSON;
bidder, for cash, at Columbia County ISAAC J. NICKELSON; JPMOR-
Courthouse, 173 "N.E. Hemando GEN CHASE BANK N.A., et a.,
Avenue, Lake City, FL 32055, at are the Defendants, that I sell to
11:00 a.m. on the 26th day of Octo- the highest and best bidder for cash
ber, 2011. Any person claiming an on the 3rd Floor of the Columbia
interest in the surplus from the sale, County Courthouse, 173 N.E. Her-
if any, other than the property owner nando Avenue, Lake City, Florida
as of the date of the lis peRdens must 32055 at 11:00 a.m.. on.October 19,
file a claim within 60 days after the 2011, the following described prop-
Dated: September27, 2 011 erty as set forth in said Final Judg-
ted September 27, 2011 ment of Foreclosure, to wit:
Dewitt Cason PARC 1:
CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT PARCELot 16 of SUNVIEW ESTATES
By: B. Scippio Lot 16 of SUNVIEW ESTATES
"In accordance with the Americans DDITION, according to the Plat
With Disabilities Act, persons in thereof as recorded in Plat Book 7,
With Disabilities Act, persons in Pages(s) 106 & 107, of the Pubic
need of a special accommodation to Pages(s) 106 & 107, of Columbia County, Flori-c
participate in this proceeding shall, Records of Columbia County, Floa-
within seven (7) days prior to any PARCEL 2:
proceeding, contact the Administra- COMMENCE AT THE NORTH-
tive Office of the Court, Columbia EAST CORNER OF THE NE 1/4
County Courthouse, P.O. Box 2069, O F SE I
Lake City, FL 32056-2069, tele- OF THE SE 1/4 OF SECTION 35,
nLake i8-75 -132n560 T e- TOWNSHIP 4 SOUTH, RANGE 16
phone 386-758-1342, TDD 1-800- EAST, COLUMBIA COUNTY,
955-8771 or 1-800-955-8770 via FLORIDA, AND RUN S 87-16'30"
Florida Relay Service. PLLC W, A DISTANCE OF 20.00 FEET
Florida evoreclosureAttorneys PLLC TO THE WEST OF A COUNTY
601 Cleveland Street, Suite 690 GRADED ROAD, RUN THENCE S
Clearwater, Florida 33755 00 16'00" W, ALONG GRADED
iTelephone: (727) 446-4826 ROAD 796.78 FEET, RUN
PublishedinThe Lake City Reporter 'THENCE N 89-44'00" W, 140.00
Our File No.: CT-A918080/CS FEET TO THE P.O.B., RUN
THENCE S 00'16'00" W, 149.84
05528283, 13, FEET, RUN THENCE S 88'36'00",
October 6, 13, 2011 132.67 FEET TO THE EAST SIDE
OF A COUNTY GRADED ROAD,
LAKE CITY REPORTER RUN THENCE S 89"44'00" E,
-... ...... 149.31 FEET TO THE POINT OF
I BEGINNING. BEING A PART OF
THE NE 1/4 OF THE SE 1/4, SEC-
TION 35, TOWNSHIP 4 SOUTH,
RANGE 16 EAST, COLUMBIA
COUNTY, FLORIDA.
the surplus from the sale, if any other
S y than the property owner as, of. the
date of the is pendens must file a
claim within 60 days after the sale.
IN ACCORDANCE WITH THE
AMERICANS WITH DISABILI-
TIES ACT OF 1990 (ADA), DISA-
BLED PERSONS WHO, BECAUSE
___________________ OF THEIR DISABILITIES NEED
SPECIAL ACCOMMODATIONS
TO PARTICIPATE IN THIS PRO-
CEEDING SHOULD CONTACT
(AT NO COST TO YOU) YANEL
_GONZALEZ AT 386-719-7428
NOT LATER THAN FIVE BUSI-
Lawn & Landscape Service NESS DAYS PRIOR TO SUCH
PROCEEDING. IF YOU ARE
HEARING OR VOICE IMPAIRED
J&M LAWN Service & more for CALL 800-955-8770
all your outdoor needs. Don't DATED at Columbia County, Flori-
waste your time or weekend, da, on this 26th day of September,
Free Estimate. 386-984-2187 2011.
P. DEWITT CASON

Services By:/s/B. Scippio
As Deputy Clerk
DIVORCE, BANKRUPTCY, 4,2011 is in the Lake City Reporter.


Other court approved forms-
386-961-5896.

HAULING. Rental clean out,
garage clean out. Cut up and
remove brush. FREE Estimates!!
386-497-3099


05528201
October 6, 13, 2011

REPORTER Classifieds
In Print and On Line
www.Ilakecityreporter.com


[personal Merchandise"]


05528030
LEARN TO DRAW BLOOD
Local Phlebotomy Course
offered in Lake City, FLA
Certificate program.'
(904)566-1328


20" SONY
Triniton TV.
$80.00
386-984-7510


Legal

Notice is hereby given per Florida
Statue 98.075(2):
Last known address of:
Bobby Wilson
445 NE Kingston Lane
Lake City, FL 32055
David Guadagnoli
327 SW Wilcox Gin
Lake City, Fl 32024
Bricen Bowden
282 SE Eloise Ave.
Lake City, F1 32066
Dana C. Douglas Jr.
9764 SW Tusteniigee Ave.
Lake City, Fl 32024
Kristina Harrington
903 SW Lamboy
Lake City, Fl. 32024
is potentially ineligible to be regis-
tered to vote. Please respond within
30 days of publication of this notice
by contacting the Supervisor of Elec-
tions Office at the address or phone
number below. If no response is re-
ceived within 30 days of this publi-
cation, it may result in determination
of ineligibility by the supervisor and
removal of the registered voter's
name from the statewide voter regis-
tration system.
Published one time in the Lake City
Reporter
Elizabeth "Liz" P. Home
Columbia County Supervisor of
Elections
971 W. Duval Street, Suite 102
Lake City, FL 32055
(386)758-1026
05528368
October 13, 2011

100 Job
100 Opportunities
ATTENTION:
Sports Minded Professionals
Sales positions for quality person-
nel. We provide industry leading
support & development w/rapid
advancement & extensive benefit
packages Local positions available
Call Brian at 904-316-7232 to
schedule an interview.
AVON!! Only $10 to start!
Earn bonus $ up to $150+
1-800-275-9945 pin #4206
www.youravon.com/tdavies
Due to increased sales volume at
Burkins Chevrolet of Macclenny,
we are currently seeking 2
professional sales consultants.
Experience is a plus, as well as
GM training. We have an'
excellent working enViroenent.
with opportunity to grow in our
organization. Please contactf Bob
Burkins at Burkins Chevrolet in
person Monday through Friday.
Experienced Welder needed.
Apply at Grizzly Mfg, Inc.
174 NE Cortez Terrace,
Lake City, FL .
LEGAL ASSISTANT/
RECEPTIONIST Three Rivers
'Legal.Services, Inc. is seeking a
legal assistant/receptionist with
proficiency in using contputers and
word processing programs. Good
communication skills are a must.
Spanish-speaking individuals are
encouraged to apply. Salary DOE;
excellent benefits; EOE. Please
mail resume to Donna S. MacRae,
Three Rivers Legal Services,
334 NW Lake City Avenue,
Lake City, Florida 32055.
Local law firm seeks experienced
Real Estate closer. Send reply to
Box 05078, C/O The Lake City
Reporter, P.O. Box 1709,
Lake City, FL, 32056
Manager/Receptionist needed for
busy styling salon. Must have
computer skills & be able to
multi task. Bring your resume, to
Hair Graphics. 948 Baya Ave.
Interviews will follow.
NEED CNC Machinist
Must have Metal Working
Machine Shop exp. Send resume, .
Quality Mill, 3631 US Hwy. 90
East, Lake City, FL 32055.
Sales Help at Florida Visitors
Center. Benefits, hourly wage
plus commission. Excellent
opportunity with National
company. Call Ed. 904-540-2314
Whack A -Do now hiring Stylist.
Full time/Part time Hourly pay +
commission. No Clientelineeded
Contact Darlene. 386-984-6738

120 Medical
Employment


Experienced Salesperson

TOP BREED

Great Benefits Package

401k

Paid Vacation
Please call
Jay or Mike

755-6500 H 0 N B A


05528455
LICENSED CLINICAL
SOCIAL WORKER
The Florida Department of
Veterans' Affairs- Jenkins
Domiciliary is seeking a
Licensed Clinical Social
Worker. MUST BE a Florida '
Licensed Social Worker. Duties
include: One hour per week
oversight of Registered Intern
Clinical Social Worker; Provide
telephone consultation between
on-site visits, if needed; State
certification as a "clinical super-
visor" is NOT a requirement for
this job. $60.00/hr.
Apply on-line:
https://peoplefirst.myflorida.co
m/logon.htm
Or call Amelia Tompkins,
Adm for more information at
386-758-0600 x1009
Req #50507062
Closing Date 10/24/2011
EEO/AAE


* ADvantage [


-i


I12 Medical
20 Employment
RN's needed, Med Surg/Psych
Exp. to work in local hospitals.
Immediate work, instant pay,
$300 sign-on bonus.
Call 352-336-0964.
www.suwanneemedical.com

240 Schools &
A* V Education

05528364
Interested in a Medical Career?
Express Training offers
courses for beginners & exp
Nursing Assistant, $479
next class-10/17/10
Phlebotomy national certifica-
tion, $800 next class-11/28/11
Continuing education
Fees incl. books, supplies, exam
fees. Call 386-755-4401 or
expresstrainingservices.com


310 Pets & Supplies
FREE To Good Home.
Young male very tame Ferrett.
PLease call for more info.
ALREADY GONE
PUBLISHER'S NOTE
Florida Law 828.29 requires dogs
and cats being sold to be at least 8
weeks old and have a health
certificate from a licensed
veterinarian documenting they
have mandatory shots end are
free from intestinal and external
parasites. Many species of wild-
life must be licensed by Florida
Fish and Wildlife. If you are
unsure, contact the local
office for information.

402 Appliances
GE Nice Black Dish Washer
Clean. Works Great.
$135.00 obo
386-292-3927
HEAVY DUTY Whirlpool
dryer, great working condition.
Less than 2 yrs. old. $175.
386-755-9239
Lg capacity White GE Dryer.
Works great.
$145.
386-292-3927

405 Bicycles
Swiss Mountain Bike.
Perfect condition. Paid $600.
ASKING $100.
386-755-3697

407 Computers
DELL Computer,
$100.00
386-755-9984 or
386-292-2170

408 Furniture
Headboard & Footboard, Day Bed
w/mattresses. Red metal. Barely
slept on. $135.00
386-755-3697
Oak table w/leaf &
2 upholstered chairs.
$50.
386-755-9239
OVAL OAK Coffee Table.
Made in North Carolina. Very
Solid. Sacrafice for $50.00.
386-755-3697
Regular Height Bistro Set.
Metal w/glass top. Paid $259
ASKING $50.00
386-755-3697
Solid Oak Glider.
Made in North Carolina.
Beautiful, just recovered. $50.00
386-755-3697
WOODEN
ROCKER/GLIDER
chair $25.
386-755-9239

415 Photo
415 Equipment
KODAK/SLIDE PROJECTOR.
Kodak 650h carousel slide
projector plus 41 carousel trays.
$200. obo 386-755-5988

419 TV-Radio &
4 Recording
15" LCD TV
$75.00
386-984-7510


419 TV-Radio &
Recording
USED TV SALES EVENT
Holiday Inn Lake City is liquidat-
ing over 100 used 27" Zenith TVs
(2004'model; remote not includ-
ed). $50.00 each.SOLD "AS IS"
Friday, 3-6pm (while supplies
last). Call 386-754-1411.


420 Wanted to Buy
K&H TIMBER
We Buy Pine Hardwood &
Cypress. Large or small tracts.
Call 386-961-1961.
Wanted Junk Cars, Trucks, Vans.
$275 & up CASH! Free Pick Up!
NO title needed !386-878-9260
After 5pm 386- 752-3648.

430 Garage Sales

05528300
Estate of Federico Family.
HUGE ESTATE TAG SALE
25464 77th Road
O'Brien, Fl.32071
2 mi NE of Branford. Off 247.
October 14 & 15. 9am-5pm.
Clean Home packed with
everything! Beds, desks, sofa,
chairs, tables, bookcases, Lamps.
Kitchen, glassware, office, Elec-
tronics, books, TV's, linens,
more! Model cars. Garage filled
to brim with hand & power
tools.Bikes. Lots of electronic
repair items. Old car parts.
Antiques, Some costume Jewel-
ry. Way too much to list.
Lots of Surprises! All sold AS
IS,Where IS. V/MC/D & Cash.
Follow Orange signs.
Conducted by: Estate Sales
Service 352-377-7000

3 FAMILY Sale Off Price Creek
Rd on Wilderness Dr. Saturday
October 15, 8-2. Look for signs.
Too much to list. Cancel if Rain.
Annual Deer Creek Sub Sale.
Gas air compressor, leaf blower,
old carnival glass, 12 ga. shot gun,
Antiques, furniture, pre-lit
Christmas tree, trimmings, light,
clothes, everything. Sat. ONLY,
8-til. 252-B. Look for Signs
FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH-
White Springs Annual Yard Sale,
Sat. October 15th 7-1 llam
16401 Camp Ave. White Springs
Lake City Elks Annual yard sale
Sat. Oct 15th 8a-lp. To be held
in the Elks parking lot. Backs up to
Lake Desoto. Look for signs!
Mikesville Club Christmas in Oct
Bazarre. Sat.Oct 15th 9-5. 296 SE
Clubhouse Ln., Lake City, FL.
32024. For info (352)226-2100.
MULTI FAMILY. Sat. 8-?
Comer of Branford Hwy & Nurs-
ery Rd. Furniture, TV, clothes,
household items, & much more.
PUBLISHER'S NOTE
All Yard Sale Ads
Must be Pre-Paid.

SAT. 8-? 47 S Right on 242,
Right. on Angela Terr.
Look for signs. Hardware, toys,
clothes & more.
VENDORS WANTED! October
22, Lions Club Annual Flea
Market/Bike & Car show. Reserve
your spot by 10/19 & get $6.00
BBQ DinnerFREE. 12X 12 spot
is $15.00 FREE to enter the
Bike/Car show. Vendor Reg &
Show entry. Call Lion Shannon
561-523-5759 or the Club
386-454-4521 After 4pm. 26900
W US Hwy 27, High Springs

440 Miscellaneous
22,000 BTU Window AC
WORKS GREAT
$185. obo
386-292-3927
BRINKS FIREPROOF
small safe $40.
386-755-9239

LARGE CAT
carrier $20.
386-755-9239

Microwave. Looks good,
works good.
$35.00
386-292-3927
Tow Behind,
Grill/Smoker
386-249-3104 or
386-719-4802
WALKER.
w/basket seat and hand breaks
$40. 386-755-9239










LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED THURSDAY, OCTOBER 13, 2011


460 Firewood
Firewood for Sale. $65. per Truck
Load. Rick 386-867-1039 or Joey
965-0288 if no answer pis leave
message we will call you back.

520 Boats for Sale
07 SeaFox 17 ft. Center console.
Aprox. 40 hrs. Mecury 90HP. New
551b trolling motor. Alum trailer.
Pay off $13,000. 386-758-7766

630 Mobile Homes
630 for Rent
14 Wide, 3/2-$525, 2/2-$475.
Clean, Quiet Country Park
Water, septic, garbage incl. NO
PETS! 386-758-2280 References.
lbedrm/lbth $350 mo.,Also, Resi-
dential RV lots. Between Lake
City & G'ville. Access to 1-75 &
441 (352,)317-1326 Call for terms.
2&3 BR MH. $395 $650. mo.
plus deposit. Water & sewer fur-
nished. Cannon Creek MHP
386-752-6422
2/2 Units.
October Special
$525. mo. Includes water.
386-984-8448
2BR/1BA CH/A includes
water, sewer, garbage.
$495. mo + $495 dep.
386-961-8466
3/2.5 S of Lake City, (Branford
area) $550 mo plus security
386-590-0642 or 386-867-1833
www.suwanneevalleyproperties.com
3br/2ba moble home, in town,
private lot, front & rear porch,
storage shed $650/mo + security:
386-466-2266 or 752-5911
5br/2ba Close to Target
Distribution Center. $850. mo.
1st + dep. Credit references
required. 386-365-3761
LG cqean 3br's $450. -$650. mo. +
I dep. Also, 2br mobile home's
avail. No Pets. 5 Points area. Also
3 br Westside. 386-961-1482


Mobile Homes for rent in
White Springs, Lake City & Ft.
White. Contact 386-623-3404
or 386-397-2779
X-CLEAN 2/2, 8 mi NW of VA
nice country acre. $500 mo +
dep. No dogs, smoke-free
environment. 386.961.9181


640A Mobile Homes
U for Sale
Just Reduced! Clean inside & out.
Updated kit cabinets & counters.
Owner Finance offered $99,000,
MLS75853. Robin Williams.
719-0382 Hallmark Real Estate
It's Here. Jacobson Homes
"Sub Zero" Top Quality Home
with lots of tape and texture and
a dream kitchen and more.
North Point Homes, Gainesville
(352)872-5566
Jacobson homess Factory Outlet
'Try us'in Gainesville. Best Prices
and Financing in-Florida. North
.Pointe Homes (352)872-5566
Hunting Tract. 40 ac. w/power
pole, water & septic. W/nice
,.matper. Owner finance offered
$84,000, MLS75532. Jay Sears.
867-613 Hallmark Real Estate
Rep=ax Professionals. Well main-
tanied-home, great open floor plan.
Spacious bedrooms. MLS 78757
$49,000 Missy Zecher 386-623-
0237 www.missyzecher.com
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
3br/2ba on 1.77 ac. midway
,between Lake City & Live Oak.
Don or Sherry Ratliff
.365-8414 MLS# 78737 $59,900
3br/2ba, Well maintained DWMH
on 4.85 ac. Fence, pasture, fruit
trees. MLS#72427, $64,900
Jo Lytte, Remax 386-365-2821
jolytte@remaxnfl.com
Very nice 3/2 DW "Modef Home"
cond. Split floor plan; Ig master,
1 ac nicely landscaped $84,900
MLS#77988, Nancy Rogers
867-1271 R.E;O.Realt, Group
Like New. 4/3 in Calloway w/new
carpet& laminate, fresh paint &
mother-in-law suite. $159,000,
MLS78238, Teresa Spradley.
365-8343 Hallmark Real Estate
Hunter's Dream. near the National
Forest. 3/2 DW w/5 ac. Near
Olustee. Sold "as is". $48,800,
MLS79011 .Ginger Parker.
365-2135 Hallmark Real)Estate
Investment Property! 3/2 home w/
updated kitchen, sun room. Wel
kept 3/2 DW op 2 ac. $69,900,
MLS79144. Girger Parker.
365-2135 Hallmark Real Estate


3/2.5 DW.lWextralg kitclen.
Wired 24x36"workshop,,steel roof, '
pole barn. Owner Finance offered
$139,900, MLS'9187. Janet Creel.
719-0382 Hallmhark Real Estate
NEW 2012 Town Homes
28X44 3/2 Only $37,900, 32X80
4/2 Just $69,900. Both include
Delivery and set, AC, Skirting and
steps. No Games!
North Pointe Homes, Gainesville,
FL. 352)872-5566 ;'


Palm Harbor Homes
NEW HOME STIMULUS
5K For Your Used Mobile Home -'
Any Condition
800-622-2832 ext. 210
MOVE-IN READY! Country liv-
ing at it's best. 3br/2ba in pristine
condition on 1.39 acres $89,900
MLS#78345 DANIEL CRAPPS
AGENCY, INC. 386-755-51'10

650 Mobile Home
6 & Land
Outside of Fanning Springs. River-
walk is a gated community adja-
cent to Nature Coast Greenway.
$23,900 MLS 73574 Brittany Re-
sults Realty 386-397-3473


Affordable 4/3, Ig 2,280 sqft in
nice S/D on 2 ac. New homeowner
will have fishing rights to Timber-
lake $59,900 MLS 74862 Brittany
Results Realty 386-397-3473
4/2 on 10 ac. in Bell. 2,268 heated
sqft. in a country setting. 10x20
frame shed. Bring offers!
$89,000 MLS 76582 Brittany
Results Realty 386-397-3473


650 Mobile Home
650 &Land
3/2 1,008 SQFT. Cute affordable,
clean MH in Three Rivers Estates.
River accessvith $100 Fee annu-
ally $27,000 MLS 78725 Brittany
Results Realty 386-397-3473
Excellent homesite in a homes
only S/D. Just 10 min. from Live
Oak & 20 min. from Lake City
$23,999 MLS 78764 Brittany
Results Realty 386-397-3473
3/2 DWMH on .91 ac. Three Riv-
ers Estates. Well maintained-home
that shows pride in ownership
R130,000 MLS 78905 Brittany
Results Realty 386-397-3473


750 Business &
5v Office Rentals

05527923
OFFICE SPACE for Lease
576 sq' $450/mth
900 sq' $600/mth
3568 sq' $2973/mth
8300 sq' $5533/mth
also Bank Building
Excellent Locations
Tom Eagle, GRI
(386) 961-1086 DCA Realtor

1525 S. Ohio Ave, Live Oak, FL
Flexible space for lease. Great
location. 1,500 17,000sf. Scott .
Stewart 867-3498 MLS# 77247
Westfield Realty Group


710 Unfurnished Apt. 780 Condos for Sale,
70For Rent


05527705
SPRING HILL VILLAGE
Excellent High Springs location.
1, 2 & 3 bedroom floor-plans;
some with garages.
Call 386-454-1469
or visit our website:
www.springhillvillage.net







2BR/1BA. Close to town.
$165.mo plus deposit.
Includes water & sewer.
386-965-2922
2BR/2BA w/garage
5 minutes from.VA hospital.
Call for details.
386-365-5150
Amberwood Hills Apts.
*Private Patio area. Beautiful yard.
Washer/dryer hkup. Free water &
sewer. 1/1, 2/1. Move in special.
386-754-1800. wwwmyflapts.cQm
Columbia Arms Apt. located 1/2
mi from V.A. & Winn Dixie. Pet
Friendly. Move in Special $199.
Pool, laundry & balcony.
386-754-1800. www.myflapts.com


Duplex w/garage spacious, 2/1,
1300 sq ft, W/D hook up, CH/A,
$650 month & bckgmd chk,
386-697-3248 or 352-377-7652


Eastside Village 55+ Retirement
2br/ lba duplex. No pets
Non-smoking environment
Eastside Village Realty, Inc.
Call Denise Bose @ 752-5290
Fall Special! 1/2 Price First
Month. Updated Apt, w/tile
floors/fresh paint. Great area.
From $395.+sec. 386-752-9626
Greentree Townhouse
Summer special. 2/1, 2/1.5. Free
water & sewer.'Balcony & patio.
Laundry. Behind Kens on Hwy 90.
386-754-1800 wwwmyflapts.com
Large 2 br Apt In town
$500. mo $500 dep.
386-344-2972.

Redwine Apartments. Move in .
special $199. Limited time: Pets
welcome. with 5 complexes,-
we have a home for you.
386-754-1800. www.myflapts.com
The Lakes Apis. Studios & lBr's
from $135/wk. Util. & cable incl.,
Sec 8 vouchers accepted, monthly
rates avail Call 386-752-2741


Wayne Manor Apts. '
Move in $199. Summer special.
2/1, washer/dryer. Behind Kens off
Hwy 90 386-754-1800
www.myflapts.com
Windsor Arms Apartments.
Summer special $199. Move in!
2/1, 2/1.5, 2/2. Pet Friendy. Free
200 ch. Dish. Washer/dryer hkup.
386-754-1800. www.mvflapts.com

720 Furnished Apts.
720' For Rent
^^^^^_^^_^^_i^ _ _


Rooms for Rent. Hillcrest, Sands,
Columbia. All furnished. Electric,
.cable, fridge, microwave. Weekly
or monthly rates. 1 person $135,
- 2 persons $150. weekly
.386-752-5808 ,


Unfurnished
730 Home For Rent
'09 Custom Dream Home
4BR/3.5BA, 5+acres, horses ok.
Old brick & heart pine floors,
jet tub, DSL. Beautiful! ,
For right person $2000/mo.
negotiable 970-221-0090
1/1 Cottage ,pool access, no pets,
country setting, $695 mo includes
utilities & cable. $300 sec. Near
SR 47 `& 75 386-719-5616
3/2 998 Highlands Loop 675.00mo
3/2 931 Highlands:Loop 700.00mo
Commercial Office avail.
386-755-3649
3BR/1.5 BA Large lot. Very clean
'with storage shed. Quiet area.
$850 mo. + $850. dep.
386-752-7578
3BR/2BA HOME. Private
wooded lot. Rent $695. mo + sec.
dep. $450. Application required.
Call 386-935-1482


3BR/2BA NEW construction
Lease option. 1st, last plus $200
sec.$900. mo. South of town.
Credit ref's req'd. 386-755-9476
4br/2ba CHA Brick, 1200 sqft
lac., Close to FGCC, CR 245A.
Ceramic tile/carpet, $700 mo $800
dep (904)708-8478 App. req'd
Brick 3br/2ba Large yard, garage,
CH/A. 179 SW Stanley Ct. Lake
City. $900. mo + $850 dep.
Call 386-365-8543
House for rent. Completely
remodeled. 4br/2ba plus bonus
room, carport. Great area.
$975. mo. + sec. 386-867-2283


Prime location 2br/lba.
Resid'l or comm'l. Corner of Baya
& McFarlane. $600. mo. $500 sec.
386-752-9144 or 755-2235
750 Business &
750 Office Rentals
For Lease: E Baya Ave. Two -
1000 sqft office space'units or
combined for 2000 sqft. 386-984-
0622 or weekends 386-497-4762


Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
Country Club. All remodeled.
2br/2ba Condo. Tennis court &
pool privileges. Elaine K. Tolar
755-6488 MLS# 77219 $129,900

805 Lots for Sale'
BEAUTIFUL 5 acres in
Lake City, 100% owner financing,
no qualifying, $395 per month.
Please call 512-663-0065
Bring the Horses. 4br/2ba. Plenty
of room on 5 ac lot Master suite
w/garden tub.$109,500 MLS
78982 Roger Lovelady
386-365-7039 Westfield Realty
PUBLISHER'S NOTE
All real estate advertising in this
newspaper is subject to the fair
housing act which makes it illegal
to advertise "any preference,
limitation, or discrimination based
on race, color, religion, sex,
disability, familial status or nation-
al origin; or any intention to make
such preference, limitation or
discrimination." Familial status
includes children under the age of
18 living with parents or legal
custodians, pregnant women and
people securing custody of chil-
dren under the age of 18. This
newspaper will not knowingly
accept any advertising for real es-
tate which is in violation of the
law. Our readers are hereby in-
formed that all dwellings adver-
tised in this newspaper are availa-
ble on an equal opportunity basis.
To complain of discrimination call
HUD toll free at 1-800-669-9777,
the toll free
telephone number to the hearing
impaired is 1-800-92,7-9275.

810 Home for Sale
2BR/1BA mfg home on 4 acres in
Oakwood Acres; owner financing
available $44,900 DANIEL
CRAPPS AGENCY, INC.
386-755-5110 #78838
3/2 built in 2010, split floor plan,
Master bath w/large tub
on 2 acres MLS#78520
$109,900, 386-243-8227
R.E.O. Realty Group
3800 sf two story, 5 br 3b, metal
roof,-two, kitchens, quiet nice
country acre 8 mi.: NW of VA.
$159,000 firm cash only
386.961.9181
3br/2ba on Alligator Lake..
Fireplace, cathedral ceilings. 2 car
garage. Tennis court in back.
$156,900 Lisa Waltrip 365-5900
Westfield Realty Group


CUTE 3BR/1.5BA recently reno-
vated; 1,455 SqFt with city utilities
ONLY $75,000 DANIEL
CRAPPS AGENCY, INC.
386-755-5110 #78971
Eastside Village 55+ Retirement
2br/2ba 1 car garage Priced
@ $72,900
Eastside Village Realty, Inc.
Call Denise Bose @ 752-5290


Eastside Village 55+ Retirement
2br/2ba 1 car garage priced @
$75,000 .
Eastside Village Realty, Inc.
Call Denise Bose @ 752-5290
IN-GROUND POOL! Remodeled
3 or 4 BR w/hardwd floors, new
carpet & vinyl in 2011 $79,500
DANIEL CRAPPS AGENCY,
INC. 386-755-5110 #79233 -,


LAKE CITY 2006 Brick home
with shop, 3 BR/2BA, 1,700 sq.
. ft., double lot fenced, $199,900
or best offer, Call 417-396-2134.
LOCATION! CONDITION!
PRICE! 3BR/2BA w/op en floor
plan; freshly painted $96,000
DANIEL CRAPPS AGENCY,
INC. 755-5110 #78278
Own a piece of history. Folk Vic-
torian in Wellborn. Includes triple-
wide MH.:Total of 9 br's & 3ba.
Patti Taylor @ Access Realty
MLS # 71594 $155,900 623-6896
Great 3/2 home w/2346 sq ft
under roof on .67 ac., Creekside
S/D. Big back yard w/plenty of
shade trees. On a cul-de-sac,
MLS # 77385 $164,900 623-6896
Remax Professionals. Beautiful
Log cabin on 5 manicured acres.
Wrap around porch. MLS 75550
$199,000 Missy Zecher 386-623-
0237 www.missyzecher.com
Attention Pilots! 3br/lba. high
ceilings, brick fireplace. Old Flori-
da living. MLS 77756
$349,900 Josh Grecian. 386-466-.
2517 Westfield Realty Group
Motivated Seller. Country area,
paved rd. 3br/2ba home. New AC
& upgraded wdows. MLS 78027
$79,500. Brodie Allred. 623-0906
Westfield Realty Group
Home for entertaining 3/2 plus
pool hous6 w/half bath, 2.25
fenced ac. Freshly painted. Split
plan, Large rear deck MLS 78103
$179,900 386-623-6896
Remax Professionals. New home
with large pond. Well maintained
w/open floor plan. MLS 78957
$139,000 Missy Zecher 386-623-
0237 www.missyzecher.com
Lake front 3/2 custom Western Ce-
dar. Lots of storage space. Private
dock $220,000. MLS# 74681
Jo Lytte-Remax 386-365-2821
www.jolytte.florida-property-search.com
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
Custom built brick home on 5+ ac.
5br/4ba. 3 car garage In ground
pool. Lori Giebeig Simpson
365-5678 MLS# 75854 $569,900


810 'Home for Sale
3br/2ba. 2706sf. Island kit. Corian
countertops. Det garage, Koi pond,
green house & more MLS# 76255
$247,000 Pam Beauchamp
Remax Professionals 758-8900
Wonderful Neighborhood. 2 story
in town. 3br/2.5ba. Beautiful wood
burning fireplace. MLS# 77050
$114,900 Carrie Cason 386-623-
2806 Westfield Realty Group
'Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
Brick in WoodCrest S/D Over-
sized garage. 3/2 split floor plan.
Storage shed. Elaine K. Tolar
755-6488 MLS# 77708 $169,900
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
Brick home in town on lake front.
3br/2ba. New roof & hardwoods.
Glass room w/view Elaine Tolar
755-6488 MLS# 78092 $249,900,
3br/2ba. Split plan, recessed
lighting, .wood/lam/lcarpet/tile.
Appliances included. MLS# 78143
$160,000 Pam Beauchamp
Remax Professionals .758-8900
4br/2.5ba Awesome deal in Russ-
wood on 1.46 ac. SS appliances;
granite countertops & more. MLS#
79188 $269,000 Pam Beauchamp
Remax Professionals 758-8900
:Short Sale. Attention Golfers!
S3br/2.5ba. Fairway Villas in Quail
Heights, MLS#69928, $79,900
Jo Lytte, Remax 386-365-2821
jolytte@rerriaxnfl.com
Well maintained home in adult
community. Spacious floor plan,
all season porch, carport. $6.7,900
MLS#76136 Charlie Sparks 755-
0808 Westfiel Real Groulp
Southern Oaks CC. Custom,built
block'& stucco. 3br2ba'opeh floor
plan. MLS#76395 $109,900
Mike Lienemann 386-867-9053
Westfield Realty Group
Lofty home on Itchetucknee River,
Wrap around covered decks on
two levels.MustSEE! $375,000
MLS#77006 Jo Lytte
Remax 386-365-2821
Just reduced 4/2 on 10.5 acres.
Up to date kitchen, Ig detached
garage/workshop. MLS#77410.
$178,000 REO Realty Group
Heather Craig. 386-466-9223
Great home, Great neighborhood,
3/2 located in town A Must See!.
MLS#77411, $79,900,'
Nancy Rogers 386-867-1271
R.E.O. Realty Group
4/2, immaculate, new carpet/fix-
tures. Lg kitchen, FI room, shed,
fence. 2 car garage, MLS#77602,
$159,200, Nancy Rogers 867-1271
R.E.O. Realty Group
3/2 w/1 car garage, detach carport
Lifetime metal roof. MLS#77780
$96,000, Call Jo Lytte -
Remax386-365-2821
www.jolytte.florida-property-search.com
Amazing 4/3 Ranch style over
2000 sqft. & 56.28 rolling acres.
Too many extras. MLS#78420.
$500,000 REO Realty Group
Heather Craig. 386-466-9223
Lake City Country Club. 4/3
beautiful interior renovation, huge
kitchen. MLS#78637.$179,900
Nancy Rogers
R.E.O. Realty Group 867-1271
JUST LISTED, Beautiful 5 acres
w/3/2 DWMH & 2/1 SWMH.
Close to town. MLS#79010
$69,000 REO Realty Group
Heather Craig. 386-466-9223
Bripk Ranch 3/2 Fl room. Side en-
try garage & workshop. 2 sheds.
New AC appl & roof. MLS78442
$109,900. Millard Gillen 365-7001
Westfield Realty Group
PRICE SLASHED TO $95,000!
Well-maintained 3BR/2BA home
in Gwen Lake area on comer lot
DANIEL CRAPPS AGENCY,
INC. 386-755-5110 #77307
PRICED TO SELL! 3BR/2BA
w/2,012 SqFt w/livingrm &
family rm $39,000.
DANIEL CRAPPS AGENCY,
INC. 386-755-5110 #78680
Sale or Lease By Owner. 3/2
Brick 1500 sf., 2 car garage, shed,
fenced, friendly area, near schools
$115,000. Call 386-365-0480
READY TO MOVE IN!
Living rm, dining rm, family rm,
lots of space ONLY $45,000
MLS 75210 DANIEL CRAPPS
AGENCY, INC. 386-755-5110


810 Home for Sale
Remodeled home or office in city
limits. Separate bldg, possible
mother-in-law suite. $79,500
MLS#77724 DANIEL ICRAPPS
AGENCY, INC. 386-755-5110
3 or 4 br/2ba. Remodeled w/fresh
carpet paint, countertops & AC.
Fenced back yard. $79,900
MLS#78340 DANIEL CRAPPS
AGENCY, INC. 386-755-5110
Drastically Reduced, nice 3br/2ba
home oncomer lot. Fenced back
yard in Gwen Lake area!
MLS#77307 DANIEL CRAPPS
AGENCY, INC. 386-755-5110
WELL-CARED FOR 4br/2.5ba
mfg home w/formal LR plus
family rm $84,000 MLS#78585
DANIEL CRAPPS AGENCY,
INC. 386-755-5110 .

820 Farms &
82 Acreage
$10,000 reduction on our 10-acre
lots. Owner financed land.
Deas Bullard Properties
386-7524339 www.landnfl.com
4 1/2 acre lot. Lake Jeffery Road.
Gorgeous Oaks!Paved Rd
Owner Financing! NO DOWN!
$59,900. $525mo 352-215-1018.
www.LandOwnerFinancing.comn
4 acres, Wellborn, New Well
installed, Beautifully wooded
w/cleared Home Site, owner fin,
no down, $39,990, $410 mon
Call 352-215-1018
www.LandOwnerFinancing.com
For Lease FARM- 7 stall barn.
17+ acres, pasture, cross fenced.
Close in $5.00. mo.
386-961-1086
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
Brick in WoodCrest S/D. Split "
plan. Screened porch. Lg back
yard. Elainb K. Tolar
755-6488 MLS# 77015 $137,900
10 Acres with Free Travel Trailer.
Convenient location. $38,000
MLS#76264 Millard Gillen
386-365-7001
Westfield Realty Group

83O Commercial
830 Property
166 SW Main Blvd.
Next to Wendy's
For Sale Or Lease.
386-752-7938
3 lots zoned RMF1 near Baya/
McFarlane: one vacant, brick
duplex, frame cottage and building
site $129,000 386-961-9181
Wellborn Commercial lot. 1.84
acres w/34' of Hwy frontage near
the new Dollar General. MLS
72381 Scott Stewart 386-867-3498
for info. Westfield Realty Group
788 S. Marion Comm'l bldg on
highway frontage. Across from the
VA & near downtown. $49,900.
MLS 78129 Scott Stewart 867-
3498 Westfield Realty Group

"850 Waterfront
'850 Property
Upscale River Cabin on
Suwannee River, Slhop, Dock
MLS#76336 $349,900
Call lo Lytte @ Remax
386-365-2821
870 Real Estate
870 Wanted
I Buy Houses
CASH!
Quick Sale Fair Price
386-269-0605


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LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS THURSDAY, OCTOBER 13, 2011


Is it time to sell high on Michigan?


By RALPH D. RUSSO
Associated Press

If Michigan were a stock,
and the better its ranking
the higher the price, there
would be a lot of traders
wondering if now is the
time to sell high on the
Wolverines.
No. 11 Michigan is 6-0,
but the Wolverines started
fast and faded the past two
seasons under coach Rich
Rodriguez. An improved
defense under new coach
Brady Hoke makes the
Wolverines look better built
for the long run this year.
Still, halfway through the
season, there's much to
learn about Michigan.
Its most impressive vic-
tory was that wild game
against Notre Dame, and
before last week's 42-24 win
at Northwestern, Michigan
had not played a road
game.
The Wolverines are on
the road again Saturday,
facing No. 23 Michigan
State and trying to snap a
three-game losing streak in
a rivalry that they are not
used to losing.
"Obviously, the guys
know what the history has
been," Michigan coach
Brady Hoke said.
Sparty hasn't beaten 'big
brother' Michigan four
straight years since 1959-
62. And Michigan is 67-31-5
in the series.
"I believe in making (the
Michigan rivalry) impor-
tant," Spartans coach Mark
Dantonio said Tuesday.
"And, doing certain things
to try and put an asterisk
behind that game."
We haven't heard much
from the Spartans this sea-
son. They were dominated
31-13 by Notre Dame last
month and their best win
was 10-7 slog at Ohio State.
So we'll find out a lot about
them, too.
Michigan State's
defense is the toughest


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Michigan tight end Steve Watson (84) celebrates with offensive line Taylor Lewan (77) after Watson catching a
touchdown pass during the first quarter of an NCAA college football game against Northwestern on Saturday in Evanston, Ill.
Michigan won 42-24.


Denard Robinson and the
Wolverines have faced. The
Spartans rank among the
' best in the Big Ten and the
nation in yards and points
allowed. They haven't got-
ten a running game going
yet, but senior quarterback
Kirk -Cousins should test a
Michigan defense that is no
doubt better than last sea-
son and is just as assuredly
still vulnerable to a good
offense.
* A victory at Michigan
State could send
Michigan's price, er, rank-
ing into the top 10 with a
week off and a home game
against Purdue, to close
October.
That'sI when holding


on to Midchigan would get
really risky. November
is by far the Wolverines'
toughest month with road
games at Iowa and Illinois
followed by home games
against Nebraska and Ohio
State.
The picks:
Saturday
No. 1 LSU (minus 16)
at Tennessee
For second straight week,
Tigers get opponent with
injured QB ... LSU 28-10.
No. 2 Alabama (minus
25%) at Mississippi
Tide has won seven
straight against Rebels ...
ALABAMA 33-10.
No. 3 Oklahoma
(minus 341) at Kansas


Only kindness of Bob
Stoops' heart can prevent
OU from scoring 80 ...
OKLAHOMA 62-10.
Indiana (plus 40) at
No. 4 Wisconsin
Badgers put 83 on
Hoosiers last season ...
WISCONSIN 90-14.
No. 5 Boise State
(minus 32) at Colorado
State
Kellen Moore has 18
straight games of at least
two TD passes ... BOISE
STATE 42-7.
No. 6 Oklahoma State
(minus 7%). at No. 22
Texas
Longhorns are 13-0
under Mack Brown in game
after Red River Rivalry ...


OKIAHOMA ST. 41-35.
No. 7 Stanford (minus
21) at Washington State,
Cougars are much
improved, but not THAT
much ... STANFORD 45-17.
No. 8 Clemson (minus
71) at Maryland
QB Tajh Boyd (hip) has
practiced, all is well with
the Tigers ... CLEMSON
28-17.
No. 18 Arizona State
(plus 16) at No. 9
Oregon


Ducks have won six
straight against Sun Devils
... OREGON 38-31.
No. 11 Michigan (plus
3) at No. 23 Michigan
State ,
Sell ... MICHIGAN
STATE 27-21.
No. 12 Georgia Tech
(minus 71) at Virginia
Cavaliers rank third in
ACC in total offense and
defense ... VIRGINIA 31-28.
No. 15 South Carolina
(minus 31) at Mississippi
State '
Gamecocks can't blame
Stephen Garcia anymore ...
MISSISSIPPI STATE 28-24.
Ohio State (plus 4) at
No. 16 Illinois
Illini looking for first 7-0
start since 1951 ... ILLINOIS
24-18.
No. 17 Kansas State
(plus 3) at Texas Tech ,
Wildcats have lost threq
straight in .Lubbock .
TEXAS TECH 35-24. .
No. 19 Virginia Tech
(minus 7) At Wake
Forest
Wake coach Jim Grob
working on another ACC
coach of year award ..2
VIRGINIA TECH 28-23.
No. 20 Baylor (plus 9)
atNo. 21Texas A&M '
Baylor won't waive right
to sue if Aggies ruin Robert
Griffin Ill's Heisman hopes
... TEXAS A&M 48-38.
Florida (minus 2) a
No. 24 Auburn
Tigers sticking vith their.
QB; Gators not sure who
.theirs will be ... FLORIDA
27-24.

Last week's record:
16-4 (straight); 15-5 (vs
spread).
Season record: 106,
17 (straight), 59-40-1 (vs!
spread). "


INDIANS: Red Devils hold a 3-1 series lead


Continued From Page 1B
Devils found themselves
in the same district with
Trinity Catholic High.
Williston was grouped
with Fort White and Trinity
Catholic in the FHSAA
reclassification for 2011-12.
The school petitioned to


join the newly created Class
lA Rural Division, but was
denied. Williston then decid-
ed to play the season as an
independent It is not eli-
gible for state playoffs, but
can play in a bowl game.
Williston began the season


with three home games, start-
ing with a 29-28 loss to PK.
Yonge School The Red Devils
rebounded to beat Crystal
River High, 42-21, then lost to
West Nassau High, 30-26.
Now in the middle of
a five-game road stretch,


with an open date last week,
Williston has wins over
Newberry High (47-31) and
Wildwood High (35-28).
Fort White and Wildwood
played four times from 2001-
2004. The Red Devils hold a
3-1 lead in the series.


CHS: Splits with Timberwolves
Continued From Page 1B

Courtney Britt (100 back), n Fifth place Cheyenne 100 free), Randal Soltis
Aleena Fields (100 breast), Brown (100 free), Kaicie (200 free, 500 free), Marlon
Sara Woodfield (100 free), Chasteen (100 breast), Polintan (100 back) and
Jacob Finley (200 free) and Stephanie Silva (50 free), Justin Tompkins (100
Cody Smith (500 free); Jackson Nettles (50 free, breast).


Tebow now leader of Broncos


Associated Press

ENGLEWOOD, Colo. -
Tim Tebow isn't the cure-all
for the Denver Broncos.
He brings energy, enthu-
siasm and excitement to


a franchise sorely in need
of all three, but he can't
stop the run or defend the
pass. Nor can he do any-
thing about all the battered
bodies that have relegated
run-stuffers and playmak-


ers to the trainers' rooms
and operating tables.
Kyle Orton lost his
starting job following the
team's 1-4 start in coach
John Fox's first season in
Denver.


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