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The Lake City reporter
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028308/01668
 Material Information
Title: The Lake City reporter
Uniform Title: Lake City reporter (Lake City, Fla. 1967)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: John H. Perry
Place of Publication: Lake City Fla
Creation Date: October 9, 2011
Publication Date: 1967-
Frequency: daily (monday through friday)[<1969>-]
weekly[ former 1967-<1968>]
daily
normalized irregular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Lake City (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Columbia County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Columbia -- Lake City
Coordinates: 30.189722 x -82.639722 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 95, no. 4 (Oct. 5, 1967)-
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000358016
oclc - 33283560
notis - ABZ6316
lccn - sn 95047175
sobekcm - UF00028308_01569
System ID: UF00028308:01668
 Related Items
Preceded by: Lake City reporter and Columbia gazette

Full Text





o00001 120511 ***-A....
LB B FLOpR? HISTOR2-=z1 ^":
0 B6 I311700
205 S l UNIV OF FLORIDA
GAINESVILLE EL 32611-1943


Reporter


Sunday, October 9, 201 I


www.lakecityreporter.com


Vol. 137, No. 219 U $1.00


I L


The Watertown lumber mill, founded in 1897 by the
East Coast Lumber Company, employed as many as
2,000 workers in its heyday. The mill and company
town were built on Watertown Lake in Columbia
County.


Whatever


happened to


Watertown?

Local man looking to learn
more about those who lived,
worked there a century ago.

By ANTONIA ROBINSON
arobinson@lakecityreporter.comrn
Researching his family's role in the his-
tory of Watertown made Rick Paul of
Lake City realize something was miss-
ing other sides of the story.
"I know about my family's history,
but I don't
know about
the families
that came to
Watertown,"
he said.
Paul has
since begun
collecting
information
on the people
who worked
for his family
business, the
East Coast
Lumber
Company
and lived in
Watertown COURTESY
from 1897 to This undated photo shows John Paul,
1928. He is founder of the John Paul Lumber
sharing his
work on the Company in La Crosse, Wi. and
project during the East Coast Lumber Company in
the Columbia Watertown.
County
Historical Society meeting 7 p.m. Tuesday at the
Columbia County Public Library Main Branch.
His family built the East Coast Lumber Company
mills on the banks of Watertown Lake in June 1897,


Rick Paul, Whose
family owned
Watertown more
than a century
ago.


Paul said. John Paul was the
founder of the John Paul Lumber
Company in La Crosse, Wis. and
the East Coast Lumber Company
in Watertown. .
The mill and its related busi-
nesses employed about 2,000
workers at its peak during World
War I, according to oral histories,
he said.
"I haven't a clue where these
people came from," Paul said.
"A few of the folks followed
my great-grandfather down to
Wisconsin before coming to
Florida. With 2,000, who knows


where they came from? Who knows what their sto-
ries are?"
It is believed that at one time Watertown had
more employees and was bigger than Lake City, he
said. Paul is working on documenting the history


COURTESY
The Watertown Trading Company, or
commissary. Mill workers purchased
goods here with tokens made of tin,
according to Rick Paul, a descendant of
the original owners.


to support
the num-
bers.
Overall
Watertown
was a vital
part of
Columbia
County his-
tory, Paul
said.
The first
part of his
talk at the
historical
society
will list the
names of
1 -


employees
found in the company's 1928 general ledger. Paul
will also discuss efforts to save the last few houses
built by the East Coast Lumber Company for its
WATERTOWN continued on 3A


Nudist resort plans



low-key approach


'It's a private resort,' says new owner of north county
campground. 'We don't want to cause problems.'

By GORDON JACKSON
glackson@lakecityreporter.com

The new owner of the -,. '
Suwannee Valley
Campground, in northern
Columbia County near
White Springs, isn't seek-
ing attention for her business.
In fact, B.G. Parkes said her goal is
to maintain a very low profile.
"They won't even know we're here,"
she said. "It will be quiet."
Despite her reassurances, some
nearby residents already know Parkes
and a business partner have bought
the campground and they're concerned
. about changes planned for the busi-
ness.
Parkes said she and her business
partner, Tom Gillenwater, plan to JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporte
spend $350,000 to renovate the 30-acre
campground on the Suwannee River. Bill Ferry (left), a maintenance technician, jokes with B.G. Parkes, co-owner of the
In May, the campground will change Suwannee Valley Campground near White Springs, who will be reopening the 30-
names to Suwannee Valley Resort and acre campground as a nudist resort.
guests will have the option of wearing
clothes or nothing at all. ''o
"Ift's a private resort,"'Parkes said.
"We don't want to cause problems."
Stephen Williams, 68, said he is wor-
ried about his property value plummet-
ing when people learn a nudist resort
is operating about 500 feet from the
house he has lived in the past 32 years.
"I'm not particularly concerned
about the lifestyle," he said. "I'm con-
cerned about the county's image. It
hurts other people's opportunities to
make a living."
Williams said a nudist resort could
harm the county's efforts to promote
eco-tourism on the Suwannee River
and throughout the region.
'This river is international in scope,"
he said. "Ifs revered throughout the
world."
Parkes, who is also the director of an
organization called Bare Buns Bikers,
said an eight-foot fence will be erected
around the campground's perimeter JASON MATTHEW WALKER/LakeCiry Pepor
and guests will be met by security at Co-owner Tom Gillenwater rests on a wooden deck overlooking the Suwannee
River. About $350,000 will be used to renovate the grounds including an eight-foot
RESORT continued on 3A perimeter fence, construction of a bar and grill and installation of a hot tub.


Al Davis, Oakland Raiders


maverick owner, dead at 82


By JOSH DUBOW
AP Sports Writer
OAKLAND, Calif. Al Davis, the ren-
egade owner of the Oakland Raiders who
bucked NFL authority while exhorting his
silver-and-black team to "Just win, baby!,"
died Saturday. He was 82.
The Hall of Famer died at his home in
Oakland, the team said. The cause of death
was not immediately disclosed.
Davis was one of the most important fig-
ures in NFL history a rebel with a subpoe-
na. That was most evident during the 1980s
when he went to court and won for the
right to move his team from Oakland to Los
Angeles. Even after he moved the Raiders
back to the Bay Area in 1995, he sued for $1.2
billion to establish that he still owned the
rights to the LA market.
It was Davis' willingness to take on the
DAVIS continued on 5A


In this 1989 file photo, Raiders owner Al Davis watches the Los Angeles
Raiders practice before an exhibition game against the Houston Oilers at
the Oakland Coliseum.


Cystic fibrosis walk making a return


From staff reports

Florida Gateway College and
Columbia County are gearing up for
the first Cystic Fibrosis Walk in more
than seven years, set to take place at
Florida Gateway College on Oct. 22.


CALL US: Opinion . 4A
(386) 7S2-1293 78 6 8 Business...... I[D
SUBSCRIBETO Cloudy,ran Obituaries . 5A
THE REPORTER: Advice...... 3D
a. 000 e Fax: 752-9400 VWEATHER, 8A Puzzles.................2B


Approximately 30,000 people nation-
wide have cystic fibrosis, a genetic
disorder that affects the lungs and
iligctive system. The Cystic Fibrosis
Foundation Great Strides Walks raise
money and awareness about the dis-
order.


dp"~9;-


"Ninety cents out of every dollar
goes to research, finding new medica-
tions and helping care centers across
the country," said Patricia Orender,
walk coordinator and FGC Practical
WALK continued on 3A


TODAY
IN LIFE
IClub House
gets makeover.


COMING
TUESDAY
Weekend news
roundup.


I


r.


-


ler


nor








SUNDAY REPORT SUNDAY, OCTOBER 9, 2011


Friday:
12-14-33-35 MB 10


Ievmatch-

Friday:
2-4-6-7-33


CA$H3.

Saturday:
Afternoon: N/A
Evening: N/A


Saturday:
Afternoon: N/A
Evening: N/A


AROUND FLORIDA


State seeks oil spill proposals from lawyers


TALLAHASSEE -'
Florida's attorney general
is seeking proposals from
private lawyers for pos-
sible legal action related to
last year's Gulf of Mexico
oil spill. *
Attorney General Pam
Bondi posted the request,
for proposals Friday.
Her office cautioned that
the proposal is part of an
exploratory process that is
non-binding and does not
signal imminent litigation.
Beaches in the Florida
Panhandle were tainted
last year by oil from a BP
well off Louisiana.
The spill followed
the explosion of the
Deepwater Horizon rig.
The amount of oil that.
reached Florida beaches
was relatively small.
Florida officials, though,
say nearly the entire
state sustained economic
damage because the spill
scared away tourists and
closed fishing grounds.
Numerous lawsuits have
been filed over the spill.
They include a U.S. Justice,
Department suit against
BP.


Teen.

pleads

guilty to

shooting

OCALA- A north
-1lorida teqn .has pleaded
guilty to fatally shooting
'another teen.
.;:*/


Alphonsa Lee
Washington III, who was
17 at the time of the shoot-'
ing, pleaded guilty Friday
to an adult count of man-
slaughter. He faces up to
15 years in prison.
Marion County authori-
ties say Washington, now
18, was at his apartment
with some friends, playing
with a handgun, in June
2010. After the shooting,
Washington told authori-
ties 18-year-old Jeremy Y.
Hester was handling the
gun when he apparently
shot himself. Washington
later changed his story,
saying he thought that
gun was unloaded when
he pointed it at Hester and
pulled the trigger.
The Ocala Star-Banner
reports that Hester's says
Washington got off light.
and should have been
charged witl4 murder.


Woman,

gets 20

years for

fatal crash

WEST PALM BEACH
A South Florida woman,
has been sentenced to 20
years in prison for a DUI ,
crash that left construc-
tion Workers dead and one
injured.
A Palm Beach County
judge sentenced 45-year-
old Cynthia Castoro Friday'
for the DUI manslaughter
charge.


ASSOCIATED PRESS,
In this April 21, 2010 file photo taken in the Gulf of Mexico more than 50 miles southeast
of Venice on Louisiana's tip, the Deepwater Horizon oil rig is seen burning. A BP scientist
identified a previously unreported deposit of flammable gas that could have played a role
in the Gulf of Mexico oil spill, but the oil giant failed to divulge the finding to government
investigators for as long as a year, according to interviews and documents obtained by The
Associated Press.


Authorities say Castoro
was so drunk she could
barely walk after hitting
three workers in June
2009. Killed in the collision
were 53-year-old Steve
Dunn and 34-year-old
Jesus Antonio Resendiz-
Banales. The Palm Beach
Post (http://bit.ly/nlzp35
) reports that a third work-
er, 39-year-old Clint Talley,
was injured in the crash.
Investigators say
Castoro's blood alcohol
level following the crash
was .235 percent, nearly
three times the legal limit.


Last rape

suspect

sentenced

. TAMPA Three years
after the brutal kidnapping
and rape of two women
restaurant workers, the
last of three defendants
has been sentenced to
prison in Tampa.
On Friday, 23-year-old
Vicente Reyes-Carbaja
got 50 years in prison for
the August 2008 attacks


on the women in Apollo
Beach, south of Tampa.
He pleaded guilty to
armed kidnapping, rob-
bery and carjacking.
Prosecutors dropped the
rape charge as part of the
plea deal.
The other two defen-
dants in the case had
already been sentenced to
long prison terms.
Police said the three-
some covered the women's
mouths with duct tape,
kidnapped thdm in orie of
their cars and repeatedly
raped them.


The defense asked for a
lesser sentence, claiming
that Reyes-Carbajal's drug
use contributed to his
delinquency and that he
needed treatment.


Anthony

will be

deposed in

civil case

ORLANDO Casey
Anthony is taking a video-
taped deposition for a civil
lawsuit in which she is
accused of ruining another
woman's reputation.
Attorneys for Zenaida
Gonzalez will use video-
conferencing Saturday to
question Anthony, who will
be at an undisclosed loca-
tion in Florida.
Anthony told detec-
tives in 2008 that her
2-year-old daughter,
Caylee, was kidnapped
by a nanny named
Zenaida Gonzalez.
Detectives said no such
baby sitter existed.
A woman with that name
sued Anthony, claiming '
her reputation was ruined.
Anthony was acquit-
ted of killing Caylee and
released from jail in July.
She is now serving pro-
bation on an unrelated
charge at an undisclosed
location in Florida.
Her whereabouts have
been kept secret since she
has received threats.

* Associated Press


PEOPLE IN THE NEWS


Fans gather for Jackson tribute


;y JILL LAWLESS
"Associated Press

CARDIFF, Wales Fans of
Michael Jackson are gathering in
.Wales for a tribute concert that has
divided the King of Pop's fans and
'family a celebration of the late star's
,life overshadowed by the Los Angeles
'manslaughter trial of his doctor.
The genre- and generation-
spanning lineup for the "Michael
'Forever" show at Cardiff's
"Millennium Stadium includes
Christina Aguilera, Smokey
Robinsoj, Gladys Knight, Leona
Lewis; British boyband JLS, Cee Lo
Green and, via video, Beyonce.
The Black Eyed Peas pulled out
this week, citing "unavoidable cir-
cumstances" amid reports the chart-
topping band is splitting up.
Despite the last-minute loss, orga-
nizer Chris Hunt said fans can expect
"a very, very spectacular show."
"Everything we've done has been
governed by one criterion would
Michael have done it this way, would
he approve, would he like it?" said
Hunt, chief executive of Global Live
Events. "We're trying to do some-
thing worthy of one of the greatest
showmen of modern times."
Jackson died in June 2009, aged
50, as he was preparing for a string
.,of comeback concerts in London.
His last hours are being relived in
graphic detail at the trial of Dr. Conrad
Murray, accused of giving Jackson a
"lethal dose of the anesthetic propofol
*;and other sedatives in the bedroom of
,his rented mansion on June 25, 2009.
Little that Jackson did in the final
,years of his life was without contro-
.versy, and the division has continued
'after his death.
Jackson's estate is not involved
din the concert, and his family is
divided about the show. Siblings
Marlon, Tito, Jackie and La Toya are
,scheduled to perform, and Michael
-Jackson's mother Katherine is due
'to attend, along with his children
Prince, 14, Paris, 13, and 9-year-
old Michael Joseph Jr., known as


ASSOCIATED PRESS
In this Jan. 5, 2011 file photo, Michale Jackson fan Lesley Cole, of Los Angeles,
shows her support for the late singer outside the preliminary hearing for Jackson's
doctor Conrad Murray, charged in the death of the singer, at Los Angeles Superior
Court. Around the globe, the King of Pop's supporters are scanning headlines and
airwaves for stories that contain inaccuracies about the singer's life.


Blanket.
Katherine Jackson has said the
concert is "exactly the way Michael
would have wanted to be remem-
bered."
But brothers Jermaine and Randy
Jackson have criticized the timing of
the show, saying Murray's trial should
take precedence over other events. In
a statement, the brothers said "we feel
that the most important tribute we can
give to our brother at this time is to
seek justice in his name."
Sister Janet Jackson also has said
she will not attend because the con-
cert coincides with Murray's trial.
Fan groups around the world have
also criticized the event, not just for
its timing, but for ticket prices that
started at about $100 and for what
some regard as an out-of-the-way


location in Cardiff, 150 miles (240
kilometers) west of London.
Organizers have struggled to
line up top-name acts for the show,
hosted by actor Jamie Foxx and
British TV presenter Fearne Cotton.
They outraged many fans by inviting
the rock band Kiss, whose bassist
Gene Simmons told a magazine last
year that there was "no doubt in my
mind" that Jackson, who was acquit-
ted of molestation charges in 2005, .
had abused children.
The invitation was hastily rescind-
ed, but many fans remain angry.
"The fans are not happy that the
Jackson estate is not involved," said
Wesley Noorhoff, president of a
Dutch Michael Jackson fan club. "It
seemed like they wanted to build a
colcetrt soon, to get money.


Oct. 9: Actor Fyvush
Finkel is 89. R&B singer
Nona Hendryx (LaBelle) is
67. Singer Jackson Browne
is 63. Actor Robert Wuhl
("Arli$$") is 60. Manager-
TV personality Sharon
Osbourne is 59. Actor Tony
Shalhoub is 58. Accordion


Daily Scripture


player James Fearnley of
The Pogues is 57. Actor
Scott Bakula is 57. Actor
John O'Hurley is 57. Actor
Michael Pare ("Eddie
and the Cruisers") is 53.
Actor Steve Burns ("Blues
Clues") is 38. Singer Sean
Lennon is 36.


"I, even I, am the LORD, and
apart from me there is no sav-
ior. I have revealed and saved
and proclaimed- I, and not
some foreign god among you.
You are my witnesses," declares
the LORD, "that I am God."
Isaiah 43:1 1-12 NIV


Lake City Reporter


HOW TO REACH US
Main number........ (386) 752-1293
Fax number..............752-9400
Circulation ..............755-5445
Online... www.lakecityreporter.com
The Lake City Reporter, an affiliate of
Community Newspapers Inc., is pub-
lished Tuesday through Sunday at 180
E. Duval St. Lake City, Fla. 32055.
Periodical postage paid at Lake City, Fla.
Member Audit Bureau of Circulation and
The Associated Press.
All material herein is property of the Lake
City Reporter. Reproduction'in whole or
in part is forbidden without the permis-
sion of the publisher. U.S. Postal Service
No. 310-880.
POSTMASTER: Send address changes
to Lake City Reporter, P.O. Box 1709,
Lake City, Fla. 32056.
Publisher Todd Wilson .....754-0418
(twilson@lakecityreporter.com)
NEWS
Editor Robert Bridges ..... 754-0428
(rbridges@lakedtyreporter.com)
ADVERTISING
Director Ashley Butcher ... 754-0417
(abutcher@lakecityreporter.com)
CLASSIFIED
To place a classified ad, canl 755-5440


BUSINESS
Controller Sue Brannon ....754-0419
(sbrannon@lakecityreporter.com)
CIRCULATION
Home delivery of the Lake City Reporter
should be completed by 6:30 a.m.
Tuesday through Saturday, and by 7:30
a.m. on Sunday.
Please call 386-755-5445 to report any
problems with your delivery service.
In Columbia County, customers should
call before 10.30 am. to report a ser-
vice error for same day re-delivery. After
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vice related credits will be issued.
In all other counties where home delivery
is available, next day re-delivery or ser-
vice related credits will be issued.
Circulation ..............755-5445
(circulation@lakectyreporter.com)
Home delivery rates
(Tuesday through Sunday)
12 Weeks .................. $26.32
24 Weeks.................. $48.79
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Rates include 7% sales tax
Mail rates
12 Weeks .............. $41.40
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52 Weeks.................. $179.40


CORRECTION
The Lake City Reporter corrects errors of fact in news
items. If you have a concern, question or suggestion,
please call the executive editor. Corrections.and clarifica-
tions will run in this space. And thanks for reading.


FLORIDA


Saturday:
N/A


Saturday:
N/A


Celebrity Birthdays


LAKE CITY REPORTER


Page Editor: Robert Bridges, 754-0428








LAKE CITY REPORTER NEWS SUNDAY, OCTOBER 9, 2011


WATERTOWN: Descendant of owners wants to know more about inhabitants
Continued From Page 1A


employees.
The company built hundreds of homes
for its workers, but now only five remain,
all on East Washington Street on the
south side of Watertown Lake. These
houses were built in the late 1890s of long
leaf yellow pine.
Paul is seeking information from the
community on any of their relatives who
lived and worked in Watertown from 1897
to 1928.


"It's kind of a tall order because if you
think about it, it was over 100 years ago,"
he said. "I hope to reach out to people in
the community. It's a pretty interesting
time and place in history."
Information is being compiled and
placed on a website Paul created, http://
www.watertownflorida.com. Families can
also look for relatives on the website. At
the end of the project Paul is donating the
information to the historical society for its


archives.
"The purpose of the website is really to
try to get people to talk about their his-
tory, not just Lake City but Watertown,"
he said. "What did your family do? How
did they get here? What I'm trying to do
is reach out to the community."
Gathering the stories helps the public
learn about its history, Paul said. To him
the project is fun and interesting.
"It's an important part of our commu-


nity," he said. "It's what makes us a com-
munity and how we got to be the way we
are."
Paul encourages people with informa-
tion to come to the historical society
meeting. Information can also be sent via
e-mail at rick@watertownflorida.com or
call (386) 623-7336.
"It's all petty interesting to me," he
said. "I hope it will be interesting to the
community."


RESORT: New owners of north county campground plan low-key approach
Continued From Page 1A


the entrance.
Gillenwater said "no trespassing" signs
will be posted around the resort's perim-
eter. Signs inside the resort will remind
guests where they are not allowed unless
they are clothed. Rule breakers will lose
membership privileges at the resort and
be asked to leave, he said.
"We want to make sure everyone's
protected, not offended," he said. "Our
security is our No. 1 priority."
Other plans include improvements to
roads and existing structures, as well as
opening a restaurant and bar at the site
for guests.
And a thorough background check will
be conducted on all members and their
guests staying at the campground.
"Our security standards are very
strict," Parkes said. "No one with a crimi-
nal history will be allowed in. We will not


have any riff-raff. We don't want to cause
any problems."
Parkes said most guests will arrive
in recreation vehicles or cars, though
some people will ride motorcycles to the
resort.
Most guests will be aged from the mid
40s to mid 70s and have a higher educa-
tion and income than average. Many
members are military veterans, she said.
Bill Ferry is another resident who is
curious about the campground's future.
Ferry has worked at the campground
doing general maintenance more than a
year. He agreed to stay on as an employ-
ee after Parkes and Gillenwater bought
the site.
"I'm not sure what the transition will be
like," Ferry said. "If this isn't the lifestyle
for us, we'll move on."
But Ferry said it's likely he will stay


and doesn't think White Springs residents
will have any complaints.
"People who are being negative have
to look at the positive," he said. "These
are great people to work with who have
big plans."
.During events that attract large groups
to the area, such as.the Suwannee River
Jam, resort guests will be transported in
vans provided by Parkes and Gillenwater
to minimize traffic in the White Springs
area.
Carolyn Hawkins, spokeswoman for
the American Association for Nude
Recreation, said nudist resorts typically
help local economies.
Hawkins said owners of other resorts
affiliated with her organization, founded
in 1931, follow strict guidelines to guaran-
tee the privacy of guests and respect the
surrounding community.


"When they are affiliated with us, they
know what standards they have to follow,"
she said. "The owner of that property will
follow all the procedures."
* Hawkins said the appeal to many nud-
ists is that all barriers are dropped when
they visit a clothing optional resort.
"They do have all walks of life," she
said. "Not wearing clothes, you dori'thave
anything to judge them on."
Williams said he realizes there is little
he can do to stop the resort from open-
ing. He simply hopes the owners live up
to their promise to run the business in a
responsible manner that will not offend
others in the community.
"I really want them to live up to what
they say they will do," he said. "I'm glad
they sound like they are going to be low
key."


Family of quarry

shooter expresses

condolences

By BETH DUFF-BROWN and
TERRY COLLINS
Associated Press
CUPERTINO, Calif. The family of the man who
shot and killed three colleagues at a Silicon Valley
cement plant and wounded six others said Saturday
they are shocked and have no explanation for why the
shooting happened.
In a statement, Shareef Allman's family called the
incident a "horrific tragedy" and expressed their condo-
lences to the victims and their families.
They said the Allman they knew was a loving father
and good man.
"There are no words that can express how very sorry
we are, or how badly we feel," the statement read.
It was released by Tony Williams, pastor of the
Maranatha Christian Center in San Jose, who said
Allman's family asked that he serve as a spokesman.




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WALK: Event making its return after 7 years
Continued From Page 1A


Nursing instructor. She also noted
the college's role in organizing
the event stems from the fact that
two people associated with the col-
lege are affected by cystic fibrosis
- FGC Procurement Specialist Misty
Taylor's son has the disorder, as does
a student on campus.
College faculty and staff have been
divided into a dozen teams, and all


are encouraged to walk on Oct. 22.
, Despite the fundraising aspect, there
is no magic number to reach, though
everyone walking is encouraged to
solicit donations for the walk or make
a donation themselves.
The walk is open to all members
of the community, and everyone is
asked to come support this cause.
The 6.2-mile walk will take place


on campus and also feature a num-
ber of children's activities, and a light
breakfast and lunch will be provided.
Registration begins at8 a.m. on October
22 for those who haven't registered in
advance, and the walk begins at 9 a.ni.
To register or for more informa-
tion, visit www.cff.org/great strides
or call Orender at (386) 754-4354. '*


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4355 NW American Ln Lake City, FL
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I 17UIII --,- L- PClb, "U*I


Page Editor: Robert Bridges, 754-0428


9












OPINION


unday, October 9, 201 I


OUR


OUR
OPINION


Walk to

make

strides

against CF


been made against
cystic fibrosis, a
genetic disorder of
the lungs and pan-
creas that afflicts 70,000 people
worldwide, nearly half of them
in the U.S.
As recently as the 1950s,
"few children with cystic fibro-
sis lived to attend elementary
school," according to the Cystic
Fibrosis Foundation. However,
"advances in research and med-
ical treatments have further
enhanced and extended life for
children and adults with CF.
Many people with the disease
can now expect to live into their
30s, 40s and beyond."
Good, but not good enough.
Continued research that
.means money is needed to
win the fight
A good way to help locally
is to participate in the Cystic
Fibrosis Walk at Florida
Gateway College Oct 22. (See
story, Page lA.)
The college has a special
interest in beating CE At least
two individuals associated with
FGC have the disorder.
But this is a foe we should all
take seriously.
There are 30,000 cases in the
U.S., but 10 million of us near-
ly one in 30 are carriers.
That should get you on your
feet and in your sneakers.
Or if you prefer, just write
a check. Either way, you'll be
0oing-ihnore than you know to
Ilp alleviate the suffering of
Wks whose need grows greater
,ery day.
Some facts on CF:
Cystic fibrosis clogs the lungs,
ading to life-threatening lung
ffections, and obstructs the
mncreas, preventing natural
Szymes from helping the body
b'eak down and absorb food;
More than 45 percent of the
&F patient population is age 18
t older;
'IThe predicted median age of
tdrvival for a person with CF is
id the mid-30s;
\, CF is most common in
aucasians, but it can affect all
rNces.
Cystic Fibrosis Foundation

Lake City Reporter
Serving Columbia County
Since 1874
The Lake City Reporter is pub-
lished with pride for residents of
Columbia and surrounding counties by
Community' Newspapers Inc.
We believe strong newspapers build
strong communities -"Newspapers
get things done!"
Our primary goal is to
publish distinguished and profitable
community-oriented newspapers.
This mission will be accomplished
through the teamwork of professionals
dedicated to truth, integrity and hard
work.
Todd Wilson, publisher
Robert Bridges, editor
Sue Brannon, controller
Dink NeSmith, president
Tom Wood, chairman

; LETTERS
POLICY
Letters to the Editor should be
typed or neatly written and double
(paced. Letters should not exceed
400 words and will be edited for
length and libel. Letters must be
signedd and include the writer's name,
address and telephone number for
Verification. Writers can have two
letterss per month published. Letters
and guest columns are the opinion of
Ihe writers and not necessarily that of


ie Lake City Reporter.
', BY MAIL: Letters, P.O. Box 1709,
(ake City, FL 32056; or drop off at
80 E. Duval St. downtown.
BY FAX: (386) 752-9400.
BY E-MAIL:
news@lakecityreporter.com


Though they have
largely faded from
public notice, two
U.S. soldiers remain
officially missing,
one in Iraq and the other in
Afghanistan. -
Army Reserve Spec. Ahmed
Kousay Altaie was assigned in
October 2006 to the Provincial
Reconstruction Team Baghdad
when he disappeared while on
his way to visit his wife's family
in Baghdad.
Two months later, Altaie,
then 41, was classified as "miss-
ing-captured" after a $250,000
ransom demand was received
and a grainy cellphone video
showed a battered man identi-
fied as Altaie by the kidnappers.
A "proof of life video" surfaced
in February 2007, showing a
thin man identified by a family
member as Altaie. He has not
been seen or heard from since.
In June 2009 in Afghanistan's
Paktika province, Army Pfc.


www.lakecityreporter.com


Occupy Wall Street: More

from the culture of narcissism


I wouldn't think it would
be worthwhile to draw
attention to the Occupy
Wall Street "movement,"
or its list of demands that
wouldn't pass muster in an aver-
age kindergarten class.
But if America's president
and vice president choose to
talk about it, and give it credibil-
ity, then ift's news.
According to Vice President
Joe Biden, demands such as
free college, pay independent
of work, a $20 minimum wage
(why not $100 or $1,000?), and
a nation with open borders have
legitimacy and "a lot in common
with the Tea Party movement."
President Barack Obama sees
these demonstrations against
corporate America as reason-
able protest toward "the same
folks who acted irresponsibly
trying to crack down on abusive
practices that got us into this
situation to begin with."
This should provide perspec-
tive to what our most fundamen-
tal problem is today.
We have an endangered spe-
cies in America whose loss
threatens our future. That
species is called the American
adult.
Can someone please explain
to our vice president the dif-
ference between a screaming
infant not getting what he wants
when he wants it, and an adult
who understands personal
responsibility, humility, work
and service to others?
A functioning free society
requires citizens who are adults,
capable of overseeing and
administering a government.
that enforces laws that protect
life and property.
Once government simply
becomes a playpen for those


Star Parker
parker@uirbapcure.org
who believe they run the uni-
verse and make its basic laws,
and also believe that the rest of
us must submit to their hallu-
cinations about what is just, we
wind up where we are today.
The Wall Street Journal
reported recently that, accord-
ing to the latest census data,
48.5 percent of American fami-
lies are on the receiving end of
some sort of government pro-
gram, the highest percentage in
our history.
To provide some perspective,
this figure was 10 percent in the
1920s, and a little more than 30
percent in 1980.
During the 1960s, a water-
shed decade when the infantile
culture of narcissism began
to subsume free adult culture
in America, more government
programs were born than in any
other period.
By 1980, four of these pro-
grams of the 1960s food
stamps, Pell grants, Medicare
and Medicaid accounted for
$164 billion in annual spend-
ing. Today these four programs
swallow almost an additional
trillion dollars.
. In all our history, there is
only one instance of major
reform of a government spend-
ing program, and that was the
welfare reform that was passed
in 1996.
These government programs


are pure monopolies driven by
political power, not by efficiency
or whether they are serving real
needs of citizens. They don't
change, they only grow.
This contrasts with America's
corporations, which Wall Street
protesters on the Brooklyn
Bridge, and America's president
and vice president, would like
us to believe control everything.
But if big corporations did
control everything, they would,
like government programs,
never change or lose power.
But large firms regularly
come and go, because, in con-
trast to government programs,
they remain powerful only as
long as they are serving con-
sumers.
Of the 30 major corporations
that constitute the Dow Jones
Industrial Average firms, only
eight were on the list in 1980.
The 30 Dow Jones Industrial
Average firms have changed
45 times since the average was
started 115 years ago.
No, Mr. Biden. Occupy Wall
Street has nothing in common
with the Tea Party movement
The Tea Party movement is
protest against abuse of political
power and the increasing mar-
ginalization and disrespect for
truths, such as protection of life,
liberty and property that define
American freedom.
Occupy Wall Street is about
lust for political power, about
defining what others should
have, and redistributing and
spending what belongs to some
else.

* Star Parker is president of
CURE, Coalition.
on Urban Renewal and Education


Lisa Hoffman
hoffmanl@shos.com
Bowe Bergdahl, then 23, was
captured while assigned to the
25th Infantry Division's 4th
Brigade Combat Team.
Since then, the Taliban have
released a series of videos
reportedly of him and demand-
ed a $1 million ransom and the
release of two-dozen Afghan
prisoners. The last video came
in May.
The Associated Press
reported this year that U.S. and
Taliban negotiators were mak-
ing progress toward Bergdahl's
release, but Afghan President
Hamid Karzai publicized the


talks, and the Taliban negotiator
went into hiding.
Meanwhile, the State
Department has put on hold
a $1 million program to help
locate and identify the remains
of Vietnamese war dead until
the Vietnamese government
assures the U.S. that the money
will be spent equally on the
remains of those who fought on
all sides of the conflict.
Sen. Jim Webb, a deco-
rated Vietnam War veteran and
Democrat from Virginia, had
prodded State to suspend the
program after he learned that
fallen South Vietnamese army
troops were not receiving the
same degree of attention as Viet
Cong and North Vietnamese
remains. Webb urged the pro-
gram be halted until assurances
were received that all those who
died were being honored.
m Scripps Howard News Service


4A


Todd Wilson
twilson@jakecityreporter.com


Big Boy

Toys Expo

should be

a treat

Everyone needs to
rfark their calen-
dars and make
plans to attend
the first-ever Lake
City Kiwanis Club Big Boy
Toys Expo on Saturday at the
Columbia County Fairgrounds.
Gates open at 9 a.m. and the
event goes into the evening.
This is the first event of this
type for .the local Kiwanians to
sponsor and it has all the mak-
ings of a great one that will
grow in the future.
The Big Boy Toy$ Expo is
a may show. Women are wel-
come, but the cool things on
display appeal to the guys.'
Cars and trucks. Campers
and recreational vehicles.
Classic and customized motor-
cycles on display. I can't wait
There will be an archery
contest. Lowes Home
Improvement will be offer-
ing "Learn How To" clinics
throughout the day.
A Jiu-Jitsu tournament will
be ongoing in one of the fair-
ground buildings during the
entire expo and this will be a
unique feature to watch during
the day.
Typical festival offerings will
be there, too. There will be
food fit for all tastebuds, games
for the family and an adult
dunking booth. (Who knows,
there might be a local celebrity
or two in the booth.)
SProfessional eaters can
try their hand at winning the
chicken wing eating contest
that will take place during the
festival.
While the show is geared for
Big Boys and their interests,
it is most certainly a family
event, so bring the kids. There
will be bounce houses and kids
games to entertain. It will be
worth every penny of the $5
ticket admission to get in the
gate.
It will be a fantastic place
to relax for a few hours on
Saturday and see all the
unique items offered by ven-
dors. There will be inside
booths offering vendor items
and services and the larger
items will be on display outside
near the fairground buildings.
Many of the vendors will be
offering a chance to win cool
prizes to those who stojf by
and register.
The Lake City Kiwanis Club
put a lot of thought into this
event. The group saw the need
for something geared toward
Big Boys and their toys and
they spent several months
planning for the inaugural
event
Our group of Lake City
Kiwanians are hard-working
men and women dedicated to
the Kiwanis mission statement
of helping children through all
of their endeavors.
Proceeds from this week-
end's Big Boy Toys Expo
will go toward another park
. project that will enhance the
recreational opportunities
of the youth of Lake City
and Columbia County. It's a
great effort, so invest in the
efforts of our Kiwanis Club,
get behind this initiative and
support the cause of these
members who volunteer their
time to make our community
stronger.
For more information, check
out the event's website at www.
KiwanisBigBoyToysExpo.com.
Todd Wilson is publisher of the
Lake City Reporter.


Forgotten MIAs in
Iraq, Afghanistan










LAKE CITY REPORTER OBITUARIES SUNDAY, OCTOBER 9, 2011


Partnership for Strong Families has new quarters


From staff reports

The Lake City office for Partnership for
Strong Families has moved to 1211 SW
Bascom Norris Drive. Previously it was
housed with the Department of Children
and Families.
This move promises to provide an
improved environment for clients and
employees.


Partnership for Strong Families is
the lead community-based care agency
for Florida's Judicial Circuits three and
eight.
Its new office is 9,000 square foot and
located on the first floor of a two-story
building. The newly renovated building
offers an economic efficiency that will
save PSF thousands of dollars in electric-


ity and utility costs as well as provide a
smaller impact on the environment.
The improvements will ultimately be
reflected in the enhanced quality of ser-
vice to the Lake City community.
"The new Lake City office is in
a great location, has ample space
for employees and will provide our
company with much needed savings,"


said PSF CEO Shawn Salamida. "The
staff is excited to move into this new
and improved office building. This
change comes at a great time for our
organization and for the children and
families we serve."
The new office can be reached by
phone at (386) 243-8800 and by fax at (386)
243-8700.


DAVIS: Oakland Raiders' maverick owner dead at the age of 82

Continued From Page 1A


establishment that helped turn the NFL
into money-making giant that it is the
most successful sports league in American
history.
"Al Davis's passion for, football and his
influence on the game were extraordi-
nary," commissioner Roger Goodell said.
"He defined the Raiders and contributed
to pro football at every level. The respect
he commanded was evident in the way
that people listened carefully every time
he spoke. He is a true legend of the game
whose impact and legacy will forever be
part of the NFL"
But Davis was hardly an NFL company
man.
Not in the way he dressed usually
satin running suits, one white, one black,
and the occasional black suit, black shirt
and silver tie. Not in the way he wore his
hair slicked back with a '50s duck-tail.
Not in the way he talked Brooklynese
with Southern inflection. Not in the way he
does business on his own terms, always
on his own terms.


Elected in 1992 to the Pro Football Hall
of Fame, Davis was a trailblazer. He hired
the first black head coach of the modern
era Art Shell in 1988. He hired the first
Latino coach, Tom Flores; and the first
woman CEO, Amy Trask. And he was
infallibly loyal to his players and officials:
to be a Raider was to be a Raider for life.
Coach Hue Jackson told the team of
Davis' death at a meeting in Houston on
Saturday morning.
Davis was charming, cantankerous and
compassionate a man who when his
wife suffered a serious heart attack in
the 1970s moved into her hospital room.
But he was best known as a rebel, a man
who established a team whose silver-and-
black colors and pirate logo symbolized
his attitude toward authority, both on the
field and off.
Until the decline of the Raiders into a
perennial loser in the first decade of the
21st century he was a winner, the man
who as a coach, then owner-general man-
vger-de facto coach, established what he


called "the team of the decades" based
on another slogan: "commitment to excel-
lence." And the Raiders were excellent,
winning three Super Bowls during the
1970s and 1980s and contending almost
every other season an organization
filled with castoffs and troublemakers who
turned into trouble for opponents.
"Al was a football man his entire life
revolved around the game he loved," said
Tennessee Titans owner Bud Adams, an
original AFL owner of the Houston Oilers.
"He worked his way up through the ranks
and had a knowledge of all phases of the
game. That experience aided him as an
owner. He was quite different from every
other owner in that way. As an AFL guy,
he was in that group of people who pushed
our league forward. I didn't get to see him
over the last few years and I know many,
including myself, will miss him."
Born in Brockton, Mass., Davis grew
up in Brooklyn and graduated from
Erasmus Hall High School, a spawning
ground in the. two decades after World


War II for a number of ambitious young
people who became renowned in sports,
business and entertainment Davis was
perhaps the second most famous, after
Barbra Streisand.
"We had a reunion in LosAngeles and 500
people showed up, including Bah-bruh," he
once told an interviewer in that combina-
tion of southern drawl/Brooklynese that
was often parodied among -his acquain-
tances within the league and without
A graduate of Syracuse University,
he became an assistant coach with the
Baltimore Colts at age 24; and was an
assistant at The Citadel and then Southern
California before joining the Los Angeles
Chargers of the new AFL in 1960. Only
three years later, he was hired by the
Raiders and became the youngest general
manager-head coach in pro football his-
tory with a team he called "the Raid-uhs"
in 1963.
He was a good one, 23-16-3 in three
seasons with a franchise that had started
its'life 9-23.


OBITUARIES


Mrs. Mabel Thomas
Harrison
Mrs. Mabel Thomas Harrison,
89, of Lake City, Fla. died Oct.
7 in The Health Center, Lake
City, Fla. following a long
illness. She was born in Lulu,
Florida and had resided in
Lake City for the past 70 years.
She was a homemaker and a
'member of the First Baptist
Church, Lake City, Fla. She
enjoyed watching Columbia
High School football and the
Florida Gators, loved to cook
and enjoyed her home on the
Santa Fe River. She was pre-
ceded in death by her.parents,
Bryant L. and Athie Williams
Thomas, her late husband, Bill


Charles Harrison and her son,
Charlie B. Harrison. She is sur-
vived by: her two sons, Bobby
(Karen) Harrison of Glen St.
Mary, Fla. and Donnie (Lynn)
Harrison of Lake City, Fla.; five
grandchildren, Greg (Mckenzie)
Harrison, Dillon (Kim) Har-
rison, Chris (Dawn) Brunner,
Stacy Harrison and Jason Har-
rison; four great-grandchildren,
Max Harrison, Rex Harrison,
Kate Harrison and Harrison
Brunner.. Funeral services
will be conducted at 11 a.m..
Monday, Oct. 10 in the Chapel
of Guerry Funeral Home with
Rev. Isadore Williams, pastor of
the Philadelphia Baptist Church,
officiating. Interment will be in
Memorial Cemetery, Lake City,
Fla. Visitation will be from 10


to 11 a.m. Monday (one hour
before services) at GUERRY
FUNERAL HOME, 2659 SW
Main Blvd., Lake City, Fla. In
lieu of flowers donation may
be made to the Alzheimer's As-
sociation at 1831 NW 13th St.,
Gainesville, FL 31707. Sign the
guestbook at www.guerryfuner-
alhome.net.
Mrs. Wilbert E. "Penny"
Smith .
Mrs. Wilbert E. "Penny" Smith,
93 of Lake City passed away
on Friday, October 7, 2011 at
the Health Center of Lake City.
She was a native of Felts Mills,
New York and daughter to the
late Wilbert and Eleanor Bell
Hull. Mrs. Smith had lived in


Lake City since 1979 having
moved here from Tampa. She
was a hair stylist with Sara
Beth's Beauty Salon on Davis
Island in Tampa for many years.
When able she enjoyed sewing,
crocheting, flowers and garden-
ing and spending time with her
grandchildren. She was preced-
ed in death by her husband of
51 years, Mr. James M. Smith
on September 25, 2011 and one
son, Stanley Shields in 1994.
Mrs. Smith is survived by two
sons, James R. Smith (Teresa),
Lake City and Bruce Shields,
Syracuse, NY, one daughter,
Barbara Pless (David), Ocala


and one sister, Ruth Livingston,
Melbourne, Fl. Five grandchil-
dren, Kevin James Smith (Di-
ana) and Ryan Richard Smith
(Alisa Hill Smith) all of New
Port Richey, Fl, Tommy Moore,
Tampa, Rob Moore, Ocala and
Kevin Shields, Salt Lake City,
UT, five great grandchildren,
Victor Dossey, D'Anthony
Dossey and Devin Smith all of
New Port Richey, Austin and
Piper Moore both of Ocala also
survive.
Funeral services for Mrs. Smith
will be conducted on Monday,
October 10, 2011 at 3:00 PM in
the Chapel of Guerry Funeral


Home. Interment will follow at.
Forest Lawn Memorial Garden*
SCemetery. Visitation with the
family will be one hour prior
to the service on Monday from
2-3:00 PM. Arrangements are'
under the direction of GUERRY;
Funeral Home, 2659 SW Main. -
Blvd., Lake City. Please sign
the guestbook at www.guerryfu-
neralhome.net


Obituaries are paid advertise-
ments. For details, call the Lake
City Reporter's classified depart-
ment at 752-1293,,..


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Page Editor: Robert Bridges, 754-0428








6A LAKE CITY REPORTER NATIONAL SUNDAY, OCTOBER 9,2011


Doubtful social conservatives eyeing Romney


By PHIUP ELLIOTT
Associated Press
WASHINGTON This
year, pocketbook issues seem
to matter more than pulpit
preaching among cultural
conservatives and at least
some are willing to embrace
Republican presidential con-
tender Mitt Romney, who
many have long looked at
skeptically for his reversals
on some of their priorities
and his Mormon faith.
"No one's perfect," says
Larry Smith of Newport
Beach, Calif, one of thou-
sands of conservatives gath-
ering in Washington this
weekend to hear from the
slate ofGOP candidates at the
annualValues Voters Summit
Smith cast the choice before
him as a compromise, and
says he's leaning toward the
former Massachusetts gov-
ernor. Even though Romney
has strayed from conserva-
tive orthodoxy on some
social issues in the past, he
still posts a strong record as
a businessman.
"He has the skills to help
us on this particular issue, at
this particular time," Smith
said.
By that, he means the
economy, with its stubborn-
ly high 9.1 percent unem-
ployment rate and sluggish
growth.


If interviews with con-
ference attendees are any
indication, that's what is giv-
ing Romney his best shot
at winning over some of the
social and Christian conser-
vatives who he failed to attract
in his first campaign in 2008.
He couldn't overcome skepti-
cism of his Mormon faith and
his record of reversing him-
self on issues like abortion
rights and gay rights.
Both subjects are start-
ing to percolate in this cam-
paign.
In a speech to the con-
servatives Friday, Texas Gov.
Rick Perry criticized Romney
for his shifting position on
abortion, without ever using
his chief rival's name.
"For some candidates, pro-
life is an election-year slogan
to follow the prevailing politi-
cal winds," Perry said in a
speech that at times felt more
like a sermon than a political
pitch.
Later, the pastor who ear-
lier had endorsed and intro-
duced Perry spoke to report-
ers- and called Mormonism
a cult.
"Rick Perry's a Christian.
He's an evangelical Christian,
a follower of Jesus Christ,"
said Robert Jeffress, senior
pastor at First Baptist Church
in Dallas. "Mitt Romney's a
good moral person, but he's
not a Christian. Mormonism


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Republican presidential candidate, former Massachusetts
Gov. Mitt Romney speaks to Citadel cadets and supporters
during a campaign speech inside Mark Clark Hall on The
Citadel campus in Charleston, S.C., Friday.


is not Christianity. It has
always been considered a
cult by the mainstream of
Christianity."
Perry quickly distanced
himself from the comment.


Asked by reporters Friday
night in Tiffin, Iowa, whether
Mormonism is a cult, Perry
replied, "No."
Romney was speaking
Saturday to the gathering.


It came same week that for-
mer Alaska Gov. Sarah Palin
and New Jersey Gov. Chris
Christie both announced they
would not run for president,
leaving donors and grass-
roots conservatives up for
grabs and giving Romney
an opportunity to try to cast
himself as the candidate who
can appeal to a broad swath
of the GOP
The cultural conserva-
tives gathered here aren't
a natural fit for him with
others like Minnesota Rep.
Michele Bachmann and for-
mer Pennsylvania Sen. Rick
Santorum who have long
championed their causes -
in the race.
But many of the roughly
two dozen interviewed indi-
cated that because the GOP
field lacks a candidate that
perfectly fits their wish list,
they were willing to con-
sider backing someone who
doesn't stack up perfectly but
who may have the strongest
chance at beating President
Barack Obama. Many said
Romney may well fit the bill.
"If you go vith your gut,
that's fine. But I would lean
toward the person who is
more electable," said Johnny
Lee, a 57-year-old federal
worker from the Washington
area. He is considering
backing Romney, as well'as
Georgia business executive


Herman Cain and Santorum.
Among Lee's many consider-
ations is who would fare best
at the ballot boxes against
Obama.
"If you're going with
your values and there aren't
enough people who share
those values, you're not going
to win the change in lead-
ership this country needs,"
Lee said. "And we need a
change."
At this venue at least, it
seems that activists aren't
heeding Bachmann's warn-
ings not to settle for a candi-
date who isn't rock solid on
their issues.
"It's time for the Republican
Party to nominate someone
who will lead the whole coun-
try," said Chris Balkema,
a 40-year-old Caterpillar
employee from Channahon,
Ill. "We don't need to settle.
But we need someone will
lead the left, right and center
of this country, while defend-
ing the Constitution."
Balkema said that could be
Romney, although he wasn't
ruling out others.
Even so, Bachmann -
who is a favorite of tea party-
ers, home schooling parents
and grassroots activists -
pitched herself as a pure con-
servative voters need, and
urged them not to choose
a moderate candidate who
might not share their values.


Authorities vow crackdown on California pot


By DON THOMPSON
Associated Press
SACRAMENTO, Calif.
- Federal authorities in
California vowed to shut
down dozens of pot grow-
ing and sales operations in
a major crackdown, saying
the worst offenders are
using the cover of medical
marijuana to act as. store-
front drug dealers.
The aggressive crack-
down comes a little more
than two months after the
Obama administration
toughened its stand on
medical marijuana.
Prosecutors Friday
described it as the first
coordinated statewide
offensive against marijuana
dealers and suppliers who
utse California's 15-year-
old medical marijuana law
as legal cover for running
sophisticated drug traffick-
inig ventures in plain sight
U.S. Attorney Benjamin
Wagner cited a 2009 fed-
eral study that 72 percent of
marijuana plants eradicated
nationwide were grown in


California.
"California's marijua-
na industry supplies the
nation," he said.
The actions were geared
toward stopping a prolifera-
tion that has led to thou-
sands of pot shops opening
their doors across the state.
The spread was fueled part-
ly by the Obama administra-
tion's assurance two years
ago that it did not plan to
devote federal resources to
countering marijuana out-
lets operating in compliance
with state laws.
One example cited by
the prosecutors Friday: In
one Orange County strip
mall, eight of the 11 second-
floor suites are occupied by
dispensaries and doctors'
offices for doctors where
healthy individuals obtain
"sham" recommendations
to use medical marijuana.
It is "a Costco, Walmart-
type model that we see
across California," said
Andre Birotte Jr., U.S. attor-
ney in the Los Angeles-
area. Some people making
money from medical mari-


juana openly revel in what
some have called "the new
California gold rush," he
said.
Landlords leasing prop-
erty to dozens of warehous-
es and agricultural parcels
where marijuana is being
grown and retail spaces
where pot is sold over the
counter are receiving writ-
ten warnings to evict their
tenants or face criminal
charges or seizure of their


583 West Duval Street
take City


assets, the state's four U.S.
attorneys said.
."The intention regarding
medical marijuana under
California state law was to
allow marijuana to be sup-
plied to seriously ill peo-
ple on a nonprofit basis,"
said U.S. Attorney Melinda
Haag, the top federal law
enforcement officer for the
San Francisco Bay area.
"What we are finding, how-
ever, is that California's


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YOUR OLD COLUMBIA(

COUNTY FAIR PHOTOS

The Lake City Reporter
will be publishing the
57th Annual Columbia
County Fair Magazine.

We are looking for old fair
photos from our readers.
you have interesting, fun
fair photos let as know!
Digital photos can
be ebmitted via
e-mail to Josh at
jbhcknmon@lakecityreporter.com


Reporter to have us
scan your photos.
Monday-Friday
.am-Spm
Deadline: October 11, 2011
ake City Reporter
.180 E. Duval Street
Lake City, FL 32055

For a^ l i in information in t he
Fai M cai clR lj(36) l52-29


* $10,000 Minimum








LAKE CITY REPORTER NATIONAL SUNDAY, OCTOBER 9, 2011 7A



Oil workers describe ordeal in Gulf


By JUAN A. LOZANO
Associated Press
HOUSTON When waves as high as
40 feet disabled the 94-foot research vessel
Jeremy Parfait and nine other oil workers
were on in the Gulf of Mexico last month,
he knew there was only one place they could
go into the water.
Their boat, which normally would be
elevated above the water by several metal
legs, had toppled in the tropical storm and
was floating helplessly, beaten by waves and
wind. The 10 men jumped into the Gulf and
clung to a 6-foot-by-3-foot raft.
"We know we don't want to go in that
water. I can see it in their eyes. They are
scared to death. They don't want to go in that
water. I don't want to go in that water," said
Parfait, the boat's captain.
Parfait, 39, and Ted Derise Jr., 32, told The
Associated Press on Friday that the ordeal
was a nightmare in which they saw friends
and co-workers slowly die. The workers


abandoned their vessel Sept 8 about eight
miles off shore from Frontera in the south-
eastern Mexican state of Tabasco. It was
nearly four days before they were rescued.
Three died in the water, and a fourth died
later at a hospital.
As the men floated, Mexico's state oil
company, Petroleos Mexicanos, or Pemex,
and the Mexican navy mounted a nearly
10,000-square-mile search by air and sea.
Most were found just before noon Sept 11
about 50 miles off the coast of the Mexican
state of Campeche.
Derise and Parfait, who are from Louisiana,
said they were pushed to the breaking point
but never lost hope they would be rescued.
"When we hit the water, I kept telling
them, 'They are going to come find us,"'
Parfait said.
Along with Derise and Parfait, four
Mexican oil workers and a Bangladeshi were
rescued alive. Craig Myers, 32, and, Nicholas
Reed, 31, both from Louisiana, were found
dead.


ASSOCIATED PRESS
The Trinity II lift-boat floats in the sea in the Gulf of Mexico after it was disabled during tropical
storm Nate and 10 oil workers went missing after they abandoned the vessel.


Explosions shake Illinois village after train derails


By KAREN HAWKINS
Associated Press
TISKILWA, M. With
flames shooting to the pre-
dawn sky from a train derail-
ment just blocks from her
home, a 17-year-old girl
refused to evacuate until she
helped a paralyzed young
neighbor with cancer get to
safety. She then banged on
the doors of seven houses to
make sure other neighbors
were awake and out of harm's
way.
"In small communities, you
know everybody," Cynnandra
Luttrell said. "It means more."
Explosions shook the
north-central Illinois village of
Tiskilwa early Friday when a
freight train loaded with high-
ly flammable ethanol crashed
and ignited, sending bright
orange flames jetting skyward
and forcing the evacuation of
hundreds of residents.
. Capt Steve Haywood of
the Ottawa Fire Department
said the train's tanker cars
were shipping ethanol and
other materials for Decatur-
based corn processor Archer
Daniels Midland Co. when
it derailed around 2 a.m. At


least six tanker cars burned,
he said. No injuries were
reported.
"It was the tallest thing
in town," 19-year-old Dylan
Carlson said of the flames,
which he recorded from his
home about four blocks away.
The evacuation of Tiskilwa,
a village of about 800 peo-
ple about 100 miles west of
Chicago, was strictly pre-
cautionary and there was
no immediate danger, said
Les Grant, a spokesman for
Bureau County Emergency
Management. Evacuees
were taken to a nearby high
school.
Terry Madsen, also of the
county's emergency man-
agement agency, says 90
percent of those evacuated
were allowed back into their
homes late Friday. Most of
those being kept away live in a
small cluster ofhouses on the
northeast side of town, near
the derailment
Officials said they expected
firefighters would be working'
to suppress the fire through-
out the night Madsen said
water arid foam would be
poured on seven burning rail
cars and.other derailed cars


all night
The glow from the initial
fire could be seen from miles
away, but Grant said the blaze
was contained by midmorn-
ing. Firefighters were using
foam and water to extinguish
the fire later in the day, Grant
said.
"The explosion woke me
-and blew me out of the bed,"
said Beverly Beams, who lives
less than a half block from
the fire. "I looked outside and
the sky was all aglow. ... I
could feel the heat It was that
intense. And then you could
hear other cars exploding."
A mile away, Laura Henry
said she heard a strange
clacking noise followed by an
unnerving boom that shook
her and her husband from
bed. Fearing a derailment, the
couple decided to see if they
could help and called 911 as
they ran to the tracks, Henry
said. At the edge of town, they
saw tanker cars ablaze.
' "It was just amazing. I've
never, seen a fire like that
before," Henry said. "When
it would ignite or the pressure
would relieve from one of the
cars it would shoot, probably
100 or 200 feet in the air, these


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Ethanol remaining in-tanker cars burns off at the scene of a train derailment in Tiskilwa, I1:
Friday morning.,
huge flames." train derailed, including seven prevented officials from imme-,
Each tanker cars gener- to nine loaded with ethanol, diately getting close enough
ally carries about 29,000 gal- according to Mick Burkart, to the train to determine what
Ions of ethanol, experts said. chief operating officer of Iowa caused the accident, Burkart
Twenty-six cars on the 131-car Interstate Railroad. The fire said.



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LAKE CITY REPORTER WEATHER SUNDAY, OCTOBER 9,2011


THE WEATHER



CLOUDY, CLOUDY, CHANCE CHANCE CHANCE'
RAIN RAIN STORMS STORMS STORMS


17811068 179 L182LO67 184 67182LO66


. :1 ,. ,,.i
REGONL OREAS MP fr unayOcobr


Tallahassee
80/67
Pmsacola
83/67, m aCity
80/67


79/
Lake
78Y

17


/67 city
/67 d svie Cape Canaveral
CtJ* 78/72 Daytona Beach
/63 Ft. Lauderdale
iesuie DaytenaBeadc Fort Myers
r6/69 83J,76 Gainesville
S *a Jacksonville
,77/69 0
OddO Cat Caa Kral Key West
S 84/72 82/76 Lake City
MiamI
S Naples
West Pahl Beach Ocala
83/77 *, Orlando
FL Lauderdale Panama City
Ft. Myers. 85/77 Pensacola
83/73 Naples Tallahassee
86/74 Mmiai Tampa
S 8/78 Valdosta
Key West W. Palm Beach


H/7I /


LAK T AL A


TEMPERATURES
High Saturday
Low Saturday
Normal high
Normal low
Record high
Record low

PRECIPITATION
Saturday
Month total
Year total
Normal month-to-date
Normal year-to-date


75
69
83
62
95 in 1925
43 in 1920


0.27"
0.39"
28.93"'
0.77"
41.90.


SUN
Sunrise today
Sunset today
Sunrise tom.
Sunset tom.

MOON
Moonrise today.
Moonset today'
Moonrise torn.
Moonset tom.


7:29 a.m.
7:07 p.m.
7:29 a.m.
7:05 p.m.


5:39 p.m.
5:19 a.m.
6:09 p.m.
6:12 a.m.


6
30 nMMbstbum
Today's
ultra-violet
radiation risk
for the area on
a scale from 0
to 10+
AEfb&


Monday
85,' 73,'sh
86/74/t
88/78/t
87/75/t
83/68/r
79/71/t
87/78/sh
79/68/r
87/77/t
87/73/t
85/70/sh
88/73/t
76/67/t
82/67/t
77/66/t
85/73/t
76/64/t
86/78/t


Tuesday
85,'73'sn
86/71/sh
89/78/sh
85/75/sh
83/69/t
80/70/t
87/79/sh
82/67/t
88/77/sh
88/73/sh
84/70/t
87/72/sh
79/67/t
81/67/t
81/65/t
84/75/t
82/62/t
86/77/sh


An.exclusive
service
brought to
our readers
by
The Weather
Channel.

El


0 (3^ 0 Ct w elther.com
Oct. Oct. Oct. Nov. _V Forecasts, data and
F11 19 26 2Ne Ft grapolcs 0 2011 Weather
Full Last New Firt V Central, LP, Madison, WIs.
weather < www.weatherpubllsher.com


- -


NATIONAL FORECAST: A low pressure system moving across the United States will bring
- scattered showers and thunderstorms from the northern Plains to the Gulf Coast of Texas.
Scattered showers and thunderstorms will extend over the Southeast as well. Meanwhile,
high pressure will continue to provide sunny and pleasant weather for the Northeast, Midwest
Ohio Valley and Mississippi River Valley.


IT-Storms






Cold Front
Warm Front

Stationary
Front
Occluded
Front


YESERDAY'S MNONAL. XP EMES H i: 920, Hafitgenp, Texas Low. 14, derfthdiud liC


CITY
Albany NY
Albuquerque
Anchorage
Atlanta
Baltimore
Billings
Birmingham
Bismarck
Boise
Boston
Buffalo
Charleston SC
Charleston WV
Charlotte
Cheyenne
Chicago
Cincinnati
Cleveland
Columbia SC
Dallas
Daytona Beach
Denver


Saturday Today
HI/Lo/Pcp. HI/Lo/W CITY
77/44/0 81/54/s Des M
53/38/0 63/39/s Detrol
43/38/0 44/32/pc El Pa
77/57/0 74/61/t Falrba
74/46/0 81/51/s Green
51/42/.07 63/40/s Hartft
79/63/0 79/62/c Honol
59/50/0 56/46/pc Houst
57/40/0 66/41/pc Indian
82/55/0 82/60/s Jacks
76/50/0 77/57/s Jacks
80/63/0 79/69/t Kansa
78/48/0 83/51/s Las.V
74/48/0 75/54/pc Uttle
45/32/.31 50/34/pc Los A
81/54/0 80/59/s Memp
80/46/0 82/54/s Miami
79/52/0 78/59/s Minne
77/58/0 79/62/pc Mobll
84/71/0 81/64/t New (
77/68/2.82 83/76/t New Y
56/35/.76 53/39/pc Oklah


Saturday Today


Molnes
so
inks
sboro
ord
ulu
ton
polls
on MS
onville
is City
gas
Rock
ngeles
phis
sapolls
Orleans
fork
oma City


HI/Lo/Pcp.
82/64/0
80/53/0
66/48/0
35/28/0
70 417 0
78/46/0
83/77/0
89/70/0
81/56/0
82/60/0
78/67/.16
82/65/0
69/53/0
85/56/0
71/55/0
82/61/0
79/71/2.05
82/71/0
83/66/0
82/71/0
77/54/0
81/69/0


HI/Lo/W
83/55/pc
77/56/s
74/51/s
40/24/c
77/53/s
84/57/s
88/74/pc
87/69/t
83/54/s
83/60/pc
78/72/t
83/60/pc
78/57/s
83/59/s
78/60/s
82/60/s
85/78/t
78/58/pc
83/66/sh
84/69/pc
84/63/s
77/62/t


CITY
Omaha
Orlando
Philadelphia
Phoenix
Pittsburgh
Portland ME
Portland OR
Raleigh
Rapid City
Reno
Richmond
Sacramento
St. Louis
Salt Lake City
San Antonio
San Diego
San Rancisco
Seattle
Spokane
Tampa
Tucson
Washington


HI/Lo/Pcp.
77/68/0
70/68/3.15
75/51/0
74/58/0
77/47/0
81/44/0
62/54/0
73/46/0
50/40/0
60/40/0
74/49/0
67/47/0
80/58/0
51/41/.06
82/73/.01
72/56/0
64/52/0
57/46/0
.53/36/0
79/69/0
69/45/0
73/53/0


Saturday Today -Saturday Today Satur
CITY HI/Lo/Pcp. HI/Lo/W CITY HI/Lo/Pcp. HI/Lo/W CITY HI/Lo,
Acapulco 88/77/0 86/79/t La Paz 59/37/0 56/36/sh Rio 82/7
Amsterdam 57/48/0 64/47/r Lima 66/61/0 67/59/pc Rome 72/5
Athens 80/64/.05 79/64/t London 57/50/0 67/60/sh St. Thomas VI 88/7
Auckland 63/52/0 63/55/sh Madrid 73/48/0 79/45/s San Juan PR 87/77/
Beiling 70/50/0 79/57/s Mexico City 72/52/0 70/58/t Santiago 61/4
Berlin 54/45/.14 58/41/pc Montreal 75/54/0 75/59/s Seoul 72/4
Buenos Aires 64/59/0 67/53/sh Moscow 70/54/0 52/46/sh Singapore 88/7
CaIro 93/72/0 94/76/s NaIrobi 79/57/0 80/64/pc Sydney ,66/6
Geneva 50/45/0 57/46/sh Nassau 86/79/0 88/76/t Tel Aviv 84/6
Havana 86/68/0 86/72/t New Delhi 95/73/0 94/72/s Tokyo 73/6
Helsinki 54'41.. 08 47/42/s Oslo 50/41/0 44/34/r Toronto 75/5
Hofg Kong 84/77/0 86/79/pc Panama 90/77/0 86/73/t Vienna 52/4
Kingston .84/79'0 86' 77.! Pads 55/48/0 66/55/sh Warsaw 52 43
KEYTO CONDmONS:.-LloudO, dr-dizzle, f-fair, fg-fog,.h-hazy, i-ice, pc-partly cloudy, r-rain, s-sunny,
r.-srowers, sn-snow,,ts-thunderstorms, w-windy.


day
/Pcp.
0/0
7/0
8/0
'.16
3/0
8/0
7/0
1/0
8/0
3/0
2/0
5/0
'.2


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Saturday Today


HI/Lo/0
81/61/t
84/72/t
84/59/s
86/61/s
81/50/s
80/56/s
62/51/shb
79/53/pc
51/40/sh.
69/42/s.
81/54/s;
77/54/s
83,60,'s
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80/70/t
73/63/s;
69/55/s
60/52/sh
61/43/c
81/71/t
83/54/1.
81/53/s.


Today
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83/71/pc
73/49/s
87/78/t.'
89/78/t
75/40/s-
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Sports Editor
754-0421
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Lake City Reporter





SPORTS


Sunday, October 9, 201 I


www.lakecityreporter.com


Section B


BRIEFS

CHS BOWUNG
Gas card raffle
for fundraiser
Columbia High's
bowling team is selling
raffle tickets for a $250
gas card as a fundraiser.
Tickets are $5 for one,
$10 for three and $20 for
10, for a Nov. 14 drawing.
For details, call coach
Brian Saunders at
755-8080, Ext. 148.
CHS FOOTBALL
Q-back Club
meets Monday
The Columbia County
Quarterback Club meets
at 7 p.m. Monday in the
Jones Fieldhouse.
For details, call Blake
Lunde at 867-0296.
FORT WHITE FOOTBALL
Q-back Club
meeting Monday
The Fort White
Quarterback Club's
weekly meeting is 7 p.m.
Monday in the teacher's
lounge at the high
school.
For details, call Shayne
Morgan at 397-4954.
FORT WIITE BASEBALL
Moe's Night set
for Oct. 19
Fort White High
baseball has a Moe's
Night fundraiser from
5-8 p.m. Oct. 19.
For details, call Jeanne
Howell at 288-5337.
From staff reports

GAMES

Monday
Columbia High girls
golf vs. Buchholz .High at
Haile Plantation, 4 p.m.
Columbia High boys
golf vs. Gainesville High
at Quail Heights Country
Club, 4 p.m.
Fort White High
volleyball at Suwannee
High, 6 p.m. (JV-5)
Tuesday
Columbia High girls
golf vs. Eastside High,
Suwannee High at The
Country Club at Lake
City,'4 p.m.
Columbia High boys
golf vs. Suwannee High
at Suwannee Country
Club, 4 p.m.
Columbia High
Swimming vs. Chiles
High, 5 p.m.
Fort White High
volleyball vs. Bradford
High, 6 p.m. (JV-5)
Columbia High
volleyball at St. Augustine
High, 6:30 p.m. (JV-5:30)
Wednesday
Columbia High
bowling vs. Fort White
High, Suwannee High at
Lake City Bowl, 4 p.m.
Columbia High
volleyball at Belleview
High, 6:30 p.m. (JV-5:30)
Thursday
Columbia High boys
golf in Alachua County
Tournament at Gainesville
Country Club, noon
Columbia High
swimming vs. Suwannee
High, 5 p.m.
Fort White High
volleyball vs. Santa Fe
High, 6 p.m. (JV-5)
Columbia High JV
football vs. Lake Weir
High, 7 p.m.
Friday
Fort White High
football vs. Williston High,
7:30 p.m.
Saturday
Columbia High cross


country in Keystone
Heights Invitational,
8 a.m.


Panthers,


Moore run


past Tigers


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Columbia High's Shaq Johnson (18) attempts to elude Buchholz High tacklers on Sept. 16.


LSU makes
statement by
demolishing UF
By BRETT MARTEL
Associated Press
BATON ROUGE, La. -
Experience at quarterback
wasn't the only advantage
top-ranked LSU held over
reeling Florida.
Spencer Ware rushed for
109 yards and two scores,
each of LSU's senior quar-
terbacks passed for touch-
downs, and the Tigers
comfortably defeated 17th-
ranked Florida 41-11 on
Saturday.
Jarrett Lee gave the
Tigers (6-0, 3-0 SEC) the
lead for good on their
second offensive play, hit-
ting Rueben Randle deep
over the middle for a
46-yard touchdown. Jordan
Jefferson used a jump pass
to Mitch Joseph for another
score.
LSU's fast, fierce defense
was too much for Florida
(4-2, 2-2), which started
freshman Jacoby Brissett
at quarterback because
of injuries to senior John
GATORS continued on 3B


Columbia falls on
the road, 34-26,
against Ridgeview.
By BRANDON FINLEY
bfinley@lakecityreporter.com
ORANGE PARK -
The big glaring stat after
Columbia's 34-26 loss to
Ridgeview High is 145
rushing yards. That's how
many yards Panthers' quar-
terback Josh Moore gashed
the Tigers' defense for on
Friday in Orange Park.


Moore ran it early and
often for the Panthers and
set the tone early. On the
first drive Moore kept the
ball after faking to Skyler
Humpreys on a handoff and
went 22 yards into the end
zone. A possession later
and a couple more Moore
scrambles set up a pass
to Mitchell Galloway from
seven-yards away. Moore
had carries of six and 17
yards on the drive.
When the Tigers brought
CHS continued on 4B


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Florida safety Matt Elam (22) cannot stop LSU running back Spencer Ware (11) from getting into the end zone for a
touchdown in the first half of an NCAA college football game in Baton Rouge, La., Saturday.


No. 23 FSU loses

3rd straight,

35-30 to Wake


Price's three TD
passes hand
Seminoles loss.
By JOEDY McCREARY
Associated Press
WINSTON-SALEM, N.C.
- E.J. Manuel came back
for No. 23 Florida State.
So did a bunch of familiar,
unwelcome problems.
Wake Forest handed
the Seminoles their third
straight loss Saturday,
beating them 35-30 behind
Tanner Price's three touch-
down passes and Josh
Harris' 136 yards rushing.
That spoiled Manuel's
first game action in three
weeks. The junior hadn't
played since injuring his


non-throwing shoulder in
the loss to Oklahoma on
Sept. 17, and finished 19 of
35 for 286 yards with two
touchdowns.
But he also threw two
interceptions as part of
the Seminoles' first five-
turnover game since 2009
- Wake Forest scored 17
points off those giveaways
- and they finished with 13
penalties for 109 yards.
Florida State (2-3, 0-2
ACC) averages three turn-
overs when it loses and one
when it wins, and cracked
triple digits in penalty yard-
age for the second straight
game.
"Very disappointing per-
formance. We had the same
FSU continued on 3B


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Florida State's Rodney Smith (84) is upended by Wake Forest's Merrill Noel (7) in the second
half of Wake Forest's 35-30 win in an NCAA college football game in Winston-Salem, N.C.,
on Saturday.











LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS SUNDAY, OCTOBER 9, 2011


TELEVISION

TV sports

Today
AUTO RACING
2 p.m.
ESPN NASCAR, Sprint Cup,
Hollywood Casino 400, at Kansas City,
Kan.
CYCUNG
10 p.m.
VERSUS Paris-Tours, Voves to
Tours, France (same-day tape)
GOLF
8 a.m.
TGC European PGA Tour, Madrid
Masters, final round, at Alcala de Henares,
Spain
2:30 p.m.
TGC LPGA, Hana Bank
Championship, final round, at Incheon,
South Korea (same-day tape)
5 p.m.
TGC PGA Tour, Frys.com Open,
final round, at San Martin, Calif.
8:30 p.m.
TGC Champions Tour, Insperity
Championship, final round, at The
Woodlands,Texas (same-day tape)
HORSE RACING
5 p.m.
VERSUS NTRA, Spinster Stakes
and Bourbon Stakes, at Lexington, Ky.
MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL
4 p.m.
TBS Playoffs, NL Championship
Series, game I, St. Louis at Milwaukee
7:30 p.m.
FOX Playoffs, AL Championship
Series, game 2, Detroit at Texas
NFL FOOTBALL
I p.m.
CBS Regional coverage
FOX Regional coverage
4 p.m.
FOX Regional coverage
4:15 p.m.
CBS Doubleheader game
8 p.m.
NBC Green Bay atAtlanta

Monday
MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL
8 p.m. *
TBS Playoffs, NL Championship
series, game 2, St. Louis at Milwaukee
NFL FOOTBALL
8:30 p.m.
ESPN Chicago at Detroit
NHL HOCKEY
7 p.m.
VERSUS -Tampa Bay at Washington

BASEBALL

MLB playoffs

DIVISION SERIES
American League
Detroit 3, NewYork 2,
NewYork 9, Detroit 3
Detroit 5, New York 3
Detroit 5, New York 4
New York 10, Detroit I
Detroit 3, New York 2
Texas 3,Tampa Bay I
Tampa Bay 9,Texas 0
Texas 8,Tampa Bay 6
Texas 4,Tampa Bay, 3
Texas 4,Tampa Bay 3
National League
St. Louis 3, Philadelphia 2,
Philadelphia I I, St. Louis 6
St. Louis 5, Philadelphia 4
SPhiladelphia 3,St. Louis 2
St. Louis 5, Philadelphia 3
S St. Louis 1, Philadelphia 0
Milwaukee 3,Arizona 2
Milwaukee 4,Arizona I
Milwaukee 9,Arizona 4
Arizona 8, Milwaukee I
Arizona 10, Milwaukee 6
Milwaukee 3,Arizona 2, 10 innings
LEAGUE CHAMPIONSHIP SERIES
American League
(All games televised by Fox)
Saturday
Detrolt.,at Texas (n)
' \ Today
Detroit (Scherzer 15-9) at Texas
(Holland 16-5), 7:45 p.m.
Tuesday
Texas (Lewis 14-10) at Detroit (Fister
I 1-13), 8:05 p.m. -
Wednesday
Texas (Harrison 14-9) at Detroit
(Porcello 14-9), 4:19 p.m.
National League
(All games televised by TBS)
Today
St. Louis (TBD) at Milwaukee (Greinke
16-6), 4:05 p.m.
Monday
St. Louis at Milwaukee, 8:05 p.m.

FOOTBALL

NFL standings

AMERICAN CONFERENCE


Buffalo
New England
N.Y.Jets
Miami


East
W L
3 I
3 I1
2 2
0 4
South
W L


TPct PF PA
0.750133 96
.0.750135 98
0.500100 95
0.000 69 104

TPct PF PA


Houston 3 I 0.750107
Tennessee 3 I 0.750 88
. Jacksonville I 3 0 .250 39
indianapolis 0 4 0 .000 63
North
W L TPct PF
,Baltimore 3 I 0.750119
inicinnati 2 2 0.500 80.
Cleveland 2 2 0.500 74
Pittsburgh 2 2 0.500 64
West
W L TPct PF
San Diego 3 I 0.75091
1Oakland 2 2 0.500111
Denver 1 3 0.25081 I
Kansas City I 3. 0 .25049 1
r NATIONAL CONFERENCE


Washington
YN.Y. Giants
Dallas
Philadelphia

*Tampa Bay
New Orleans
Atlanta


East
W L
3 I
3 I
2 2
I 3
South
W L
3 I
3 1
2 2


70
56
85
108

PA
57
74
93
72

PA
85
113
II I
126


TPct PF PA
0.750 83 63
0.750 102 87
0.500 99 101
0.250 101 101

TPct PF PA
0:750 8477
0.750 12798
0.50090 105


Carolina

Green Bay
Detroit
Chicago
Minnesota

San Francisco
Seattle
Arizona
St. Louis


I 3 0.25089 102
North
W L TPct PF PA
4 0 .01.000148 97
4 0 01.00013576
2 2 0.50094 98
0 4 0.00077 96
West
W L TPct PF PA
3 I 0.75094 75
1 3 0.25058 97
I 3 0.250 86 87
0 4 0.00046 113


Sunday's Games
Arizona at Minnesota, I p.m.
Oakland at Houston, I p.m.
Kansas City at Indianapolis, I p.m:
Philadelphia at Buffalo, I p.m.
New Orleans at Carolina, I p.m.
Cincinnati at Jacksonville, I p.m.
Tennessee at Pittsburgh, I p.m.
Seattle at N.Y. Giants, I p.m.
Tampa Bay at San Francisco, 4.05 p.m.
San Diego at Denver, 4:15 p.m.
N.Y.Jets at New England, 4:15 p.m.
Green Bay at Atlanta, 8:20 p.m.
Monday's Game
Chicago at Detroit, 8:30 p.m.
Open: Baltimore, Cleveland, Dallas,
Miami, St. Louis,Washington
Sunday, Oct. 16
St. Louis at Green Bay, I p.m.
Jacksonville at Pittsburgh, I p.m.
Philadelphia atWashington, I p.m.
San Francisco at Detroit, I p.m.
Carolina at Atlanta, I p.m.
Indianapolis at Cincinnati, I p.m.
Buffalo at N.Y. Giants, I p.m.
Cleveland at Oakland, 4:05 p.m.
Houston at Baltimore, 4:05 p.m.
Dallas at New England, 4:15 p.m.
New Orleans at Tampa Bay, 4:15 p.m.
Minnesota at Chicago, 8:20 p.m.
Monday, Oct. 17
Miami at N.Y. Jets, 8:30 p.m.
Open: Arizona, Denver, Kansas City,
San Diego, Seattle,Tennessee

College scores

Friday
Boise St. 57, Fresno St. 7

BASKETBALL

WNBA championship

Friday
Minnesota 73, Atlanta 67, Minnesota
wins series 3-0

MINNESOTA (73)
Augustus 7-12 2-2 16, Brunson 6-12
1-2 13, McWilliams-Franklin 1-6 5-6
7, Moore 6-9 1-3 15, Whalen 2-7 3-5
7, WIggins 3-6 1-2 10,Adair 0-4 3-4 3,
Wright I-5 0-0 2.Totals 26-61 16-24 73.
ATLANTA (67)
McCoughtry 9-25 4-6 22, Lyttle 3-9
2-2 8, Desouza 4-14 3-6 II, Price 3-7
0-0 6, Harding I-5 2-2 4, Castro Marques
4-120-09, Miller 1-3 0-0 2, Bales 2-3 0-0
5.Totals 27-78 11-16 67.
Minnesota 17 16 19 21 73
,Atlanta T"'20 17 8 22 67
3-Point Goals-Minnesota 5-12
(Wiggins 3-6, Moore 2-5, Wright 0-1);
Atlanta 2-8 (Bales 1-2, Castro Marques
1-3, Lyttle 0-1, McCoughtry 0-2). Fouled
Out-None. Rebounds-Minnesota 52
(Brunson 9), Atlanta 47 (Desouza 15).
Assists-Minnesota 17 (McWIllIams-
Franklin,Augustus 4),Atlanta 16 (Harding
7).Total Fouls-Minnesota 17,Atlanta 17.
Technicals-Minnesota Bench, Desouza.
A-I 1,543 (10,160). "

WNBA champions

2011 -- innesota Lynx
2010- Seattle Storm
2009 Phoenix Mercury
2008 Detroit Shock
2007 Phoenix Mercury
2006- Detroi Shock
2005 Sacramento Monarchs
2004 Seattle Storm
2003 Detroit Shock
2002 Los Angeles Sparks
2001 Los Angeles Sparks
2000 Houston Comets
1999 Houston Comets
1998 Houston Comets
1997 Houston Comets

AUTO RACING

Race week

NASCAR
SPRINT CUP
HOLLYWOOD CASINO 400
Site: Kansas City, Mo.
Schedule: Today, race, 2 p.m. (ESPN,
1-5:30 p.m.).
Track: Kansas Speedway (oval, 1.5
miles).
Race distance: 400.5 miles, 267 laps.
FORMULA ONE
JAPANESE GRAND PRIX
Site: Suzuka, Japan.
Schedule: Today, race, 2 a.m. (Speed,
2-4 a.m., 3:30-5:30 p.m.).



Unscramble these four Jumbles,
one letter to each square,
to form four ordinary words.

I DAEDD I


Trackde Suzuka International (road
course, 3.61 miles). *
Race distance: 191.12 miles, 53 laps.

Sprint Cup qualifying

At Kansas Speedway
Kansas City, Kan.
Friday qualifying; race today
(Car number In parentheses)
1. (16) Greg Biffle, Ford, 174.887 mph.
2.(99) Carl Edwards Fo, 174.571.
3.(18) Kyle Busch.Toyota, 174.447.
4.(17) Matt Kenseth, Ford, 174.436.
5. (4) Kasey Kahne,Toyota, 174.413.
6. (27) Paul Menard, Chevrolet,
174.317.
7.(I 1) Denpy Hamlin.Toyota, 174.222.
8. (56) Martin Truex Jr., Toyota,
174.126.
9. (5) Mark Martin, Chevrolet,
174.092.
10. (24) Jeff Gordon, Chevrolet,
174.048.
II. (39) Ryan Newman, Chevrolet,
174.031.
12. (2) Brad Keselowski, Dodge,
174.02.
13. (6) David Ragan, Ford, 173.863.
14. (29) Kevin Harvick, Chevrolet,
173.617.
15. (83) Brian Vickers,Toyota, 173.606.
16. (78) Regan Smith, Chevrolet,
173.527.
17. (22) Kurt Busch, Dodge, 173.327.
18. (88) Dale Earnhardt Jr., Chevrolet,
173.238.
19. (48). JImmie Johnson, Chevrolet,
173.182.
20. (20) Joey LoganoToyota, 173.171.
21. (9) Marcos Ambrose, Ford,
173.066.
22. (43) A J AIImendinger, Ford,
172.944.
23. (14) Tony Stewart, Chevrolet,
172.933.
24. (33) Clint Bowyer, Chevrolet,
172.889.
25. (46) Scott Speed, Ford, 172.866.
26. (98) Austin Dillon, Chevrolet,
172.723;
27. (00) David Reutimann, Toyota,
172.607.
28. (55) J.J.Yeley, Ford, 172.568.
29. (1) Jamie McMurray, Chevrolet,
172.535.
30. (34) David Gilliland, Ford, 172.43.
31. (31) Jeff Burton, Chevrolet,
172.397..
32. (30) David Stremme, Chevrolet,
172.177.
33. (47) Bobby Labonte, Toyota,
172.161.
34.(42) Juan Pablo Montoya, Chevrolet,
171.936.
35. (71) Andy Lally, Ford, 171.86.
36. (38) Travis Kvapil, Ford, 171.521.
37. (13) Casey Mears,Toyota, 171.429.
38. (36) Dave Blaney, Chevrolet,
170.989.
39. (7) Reed Sorenson, Dodge,
170.837.
40. (66) Michael McDowell, Toyota,
170.53. '"
41. (51) Landon Cassill, Chevrolet,
170.481.
42. (32) Mike Bliss. Ford, Owner
Points. 1
43. (87) Joe Nemechek, Toyota,
170.148.
Failed to Qualify
44. (95) David Starr, Ford, 170.068.
45. (37) Josh Wise, Ford, 169.614.
46. (60) Mike Skinner,Toyoa, 168.914.

HOCKEY

NHL schedule

Thursday's Games
Pittsburgh 4,Vancouver 3, SO
Philadelphia 2, Boston I
Toronto 2, Montreal 0 .
Friday's Games
Buffalo 4,Anahelm I
Los Angeles 3, N.Y. Rangers 2, OT
Tampa Bay 5, Carolina I
Detroit 5, Ottawa 3
Nashville 3, Columbus 2
Dallas 2,Chicago I
Saturday's Games
N.Y. Rangers vs.Anaheim
Tampa Bay at Boston (n)
Ottawa at Toronto (n)
Philadelphia at New Jersey (n)
Carolina atWashington (n)
Florida at N.Y. Islanders (n)
Nashville at St. Louis (n)
Columbus at Minnesota (n)
Dallas at Chicago (n)
Detroit at Colorado (n)
Pittsburgh at Calgary (n)
Phoenix at San Jose (n)
Buffalo at Los Angeles (n)
Today's Games
Montreal at Winnipe 5 p.m.
Pittsburgh at Edmonton, 9 p.m.
Monday's Games
Colorado at Boston, I p.m.
Carolina at New Jersey, I p.m.
Minnesota at N.Y. Islanders, I p.m.
Calgary at St. Louis, 2 p.m.
Phoenix at Dallas, 6 p.m.
Tampa Bay at Washington,7 p.m.
Vancouver at Columbus, 7 p.m.

THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME
by David L Hoyt and Jeff Knurek


ZAEADMI I
i 1 1 1
S-WHAT THE ZOM lE
TOOK AT THE ARCHERY
EMINMU OP'enTN
S -- [ Now arrange the circled letters
to form the surprise answer, as
7 suggested by the above cartoon.

Print answer here:
(Answers tomorrow)
Saturday's Jumbles: SHIFT CLOWN CURBED SHAKEN
Answer: The photography teacher had everything he
needed, but his students LACKED FOCUS


CHS moves to 9-1


From staff reports

Columbia High improved
its girls golf record to 9-1
with an 18-hole match vic-
tory against neighboring
Suwannee High at Quail
Heights Country Club on
Saturday. Columbia finished
with a 392 to Suwannee's 418.
The Lady Tigers got a
medalist performance from
Darian Ste-Marie with a
carded score of 82.
"She's won medalist for
us in every match this sea-
son," Columbia coach Todd
Carter said. "Her goal is to
get her game into, the 70s
and I believe she'll do that
with districts coming up."
Columbia's Ashley
Mixon and Shelby Camp
each finished with 102.
Brooke Russell rounded
out the top-four scores with
a 106.
The Lady Tigers also had
rounds of 111 and 129 from
Gillian Norris and Brandy
Spranger respectively.
Columbia also carded
two wins on Wednesday
in a quad-match. The
Lady Tigers fell to Chiles
High, which scored 373 to
Columbia's 393, but defeat-
ed Lincoln and Leon high
schools. Lincoln shot 455
and Leon finished at 463.
Ste-Marie was medal-
ist with an 81 on the day.
Mixon finished with a 99,
Russell carded a 106 and
Camp finished with a 107.
Columbia High's boys
golf team lost an 18-hole
match to Chiles High on
Thursday at Quail Heights
Country Club.
The undefeated
Timberwolves (43-0) pre-
vailed 305-321. Chase
Burkhalter of Chiles was
the medalist with a 74.
"I wasn't terribly disap-
pointed with our scores,"
coach Steve Smithy said.
"Chiles is really good and
deep, definitely the best
team in our district I told
our guys we are not that
far off."
Columbia scores were:
Nick Jones 78, Andrew
Johnson 80, Dean Soucinek
81, Dalton Mauldin 82,
Garry Carman 83, and
Dillan VanVleck 86.
Columbia (8-6). is on the
fast track to the District 2-
2A tournament at Killearn
Estates in Tallahassee on
Oct. 17.
The Tigers play Suwannee


ACROSS
1 Diminishes
5 Promise
8 Watch chains
12 Foe opposite
13 Tooth-fillers'
org.
14 Mystique
15 Sock tips
16 Preachy
18 Jumps the
line (2 wds.)
20 Hilltops
21 Codgers'
queries
22 Road-map
org.,
23 Peacock
feather
26 Walked slowly
29 Bran source
30 Football
corsages
131 Bottle cap
33 Diner staple
34 Casino game
35 Gin-fizz flavor
36 Casual wear
Lhyph.)
38 Pygmy kin


HighonMondayatSuwannee
Country Club and Gainesville
High on Tuesday at Quail
Heights. Both matches begin
at 4 p.m.
On Thursday, Columbia
will play in the Alachua
County Tournament at
noon at Gainesville Country
Club. All Tigers will play
the top five will tee it
up in, the varsity 18-hole
competition; the next five
will compete in.the 9-hole
junior varsity event
On Friday, Columbia vis-
its Killearn for a practice
round.

Columbia bowling

Columbia's bowling team
swept Suwannee High and
Fort White High in a match
Wednesday at Thunder
Allen in Live Oak.
In the traditional series,
Columbia bowled 719-742
to 612-606 for Suwannee
and 476-514 for Fort White.
'In the Baker scoring game,
the Lady Tigers rolled a 135
to 126 for the Bulldogs and
125 for the Lady Indians.
Columbia's top bowl-
ers in the first game were
Christine Peters 170,
Courtney Schmitt 152,
Shea Spears 137, Lauren
Snipes 134, and Chelsea
Williams 126.
Tops in the second game
were Schmitt 166, Peters
151, Snipes 145, Jessica
Keene 144, and Linden
Barney 136.
Peters, Schmitt, Snipes,
Williams and Barney made
up the Baker scoring team.
Columbia will host the
same three-team match at
4 p.m. this Wednesday at
Lake City Bowl.

Columbia swimming

Columbia's swim team
is taking on some tough
teams to get ready for dis-
trict
The Tigers brought in
Fleming Island High on
Thursday. The Golden
Eagles boys were District
1-3A champions last year,
while the girls were run-
ners-up.
Columbia produced
some first places, led by
Hannah Burns who set a
school record in winning
the 500 free and also won
the 200 free.
David Morse won both
the 100 fly and 100 breast


39 Be in debt
40 Half a bray
41 Civilian dress
44 Turn
47 Detained
49 Dock
denizens
51 Archaeologist's
find
52 Slip up
53 Difficult
Youngster
54 Wheel bolts
55 Drop -
line
56 Kind of lock


DOWN
Wolf down
Political
coalition
Chicken
cordon -
Computer
networks
"Quo -?"
Norse Zeus
Crumple up
Beauty
treatment


Heather Burns won the
200 IM and was second
in the 100 fly. Lindsay Lee
won the 50 free and was
second in the 100 back.
Lauren Lee was second in
the 100 free and third in the
100 breast
Other Tigers earn-
ing team points were:
Sara Woodfield (third-200
free, fifth-100 free); Kayla
Williams (third-100. fly,
fifth-100 back); Joseph
Piccioni (third-100 free,
fourth-50 free); Cale Shaw
(third-200 IM, fourth-100
back); Michaela Polhamus
(third-500 free);
Stephanie Silva (fourth-
500 free, fifth-100 fly);
Randal Soltis (fourth-
500 free); Sydney Morse
(fourth-100 breast); Jacob
Finley (fifth-200 free);
Meghan Collins (fifth-200
IM); Cody Smith (fifth-100
fly); Jackson Nettles (fifth-
100 free); Justin Tompkins
(fifth-100 breast).
The Hannah and Heather
Burns and Lindsay and
Lauren Lee won both the
200 medley and 200 free-
style relays.
Columbia faces its
defending district champi-
on at 5 p.m. Tuesday when
Chiles visits. Senior day is
5 p.m. Thursday against
Suwannee.

Fort White volleyball

Fort White High vol-
leyball lost its "dig pink"
match to visiting Union.
County High on Friday.
The Lady Indians fell 22-25,
25-23, 25-8, 25-18 in front of
the student body.
Fort White (7-12) plays
Suwannee High at 6 p.m.
Monday in Live Oak.
District matches at home
against Bradford High and
Santa Fe High (also 6 p.m.)
follow on Tuesday and
Thursday, respectively.

Columbia volleyball

Columbia'svolleyballteam
lost a District 4-6A game at
Stanton Prep on Thursday.
The Blue Devils won 25-8,
25-21, 18-25, 25-21.
Jessie Bates had 27
assists for the Lady Tigers.
Jara Courson led CHS with
nine kills and four aces.
Annie Milton had three
blocks and three kills.
Charlee Watson had 13
digs.


Answer to Previous Puzzle


MU FF QUID KLM
AN L URSA AID
AFRO ANTFARMS


DARE SET
STACK ESPN
IVY ESAU COCO
WIDE P ALE LTD
WEST I NLET


SJOK ED ASSERT
ABALONES SANE
MIL RENT LUIS
BEE ESODA EX ES


Scoreboard
data
Camembert
cousin
Pouches
Burnoose
wearers


Want more puzzles?
Check out the "Just Right Crossword Puzzles" books
at QulllDriverBooks.com


19 Not he
22 AMMO
23 Grammy
category
24 Cafe au -
25 Sporty
vehicles
26 Em, Bee or
Polly
27 Jazzy
Fitzgerald
28 Designer label
30 Nothing but
.32 Phone button
34 Fruits or birds
35 Rely on
(2 wds.)
37 Inns
38 "-
Rosenkavalier"
40 Longest
constellation
41 Postcard,
maybe
42 Lahore
language
43 Lily pad sitter
44 "Primal Fear"
star
45 Scarlett's
mansion
46 And others
(abbr.)
48 Speaker
50ro -
50 ault Marie


10-10 2011 UFS, Dist. by Universal Uclick for UFS


SCOREBOARD


Page Editor: Brandon Finley, 754-0420










LAKE CITY REPORTER COLLEGE FOOTBALL SUNDAY, OCTOBER 9, 2011


Oklahoma serves up Red River beatdown


By JAIME ARON
Associated Press

DALLAS Travis Lewis
took the Golden Hat trophy
and treated it like a real hat,
holding it to his head as
he trotted along the field,
waving to the thousands of
Oklahoma fans still in their
seats. When he got to the
section where friends and
family were sitting, Lewis
walked alongside the rail-
ing, holding out the trophy
for folks to touch.
So many people starred
in this resounding victory
that it only made sense for
plenty of people to take part
in the celebration.
Landry Jones threw
three touchdown passes,
Dominique Whaley ran
64 yards for a touchdown
and three defensive play-
ers found their way into
the end zone, too, powering
No. 3 Oklahoma to a 55-17
victory over No. 11 Texas
on Saturday the kind of
whipping that could help
the Sooners return to the
top of the poll.
OU was No. 1 from the
preseason until two weeks
ago. The Sooners slipped
to second after struggling
at home against Missouri,
then to third even after whip-
ping lowly Ball State. Voters
were more impressed by
what they saw from SEC
heavyweights LSU and
Alabama.
This performance, how-
ever, showed that Oklahoma
is as good as folks originally
thought
The Sooners (5-0, 2-0
Big 12) were precise on
offense and swarming on
defense. They scored the
first four times they had the
ball and cruised to leads
of 24 at halftime and 45
midway through the fourth
quarter. Texas' only touch-
down on offense came in


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Oklahoma running back Brandon Williams (23) runs against Texas safety Kenny Vaccaro (4) during their NCAA college
football game at the Cotton Bowl in Dallas on Saturday.


the final minutes, long after
Oklahoma was on its way
to the most lopsided win
over its Red River rival
since 2003, when it won by
a series-record 52 P5oints.
"It was an excellent day,"
OU coach Bob Stoops said.
'To come down in here in
this situation and win like
that is really pretty spe-
cial."
Jones was, 31 of 50 for
367 yards and no turnovers.,
He improved to 2-0 against
the. Longhorns, and gave
Oklahoma its third win over
Texas in five years.
Oklahoma's most impres-
sive feat was the three
defensive touchdowns:
an interception returned
55 yards from Demontre
Hurst, a sack-fumble


returned 19 yards by David
King and a vicious strip of
a receiver taken 56 yards
by Jamell Fleming It was
the first time in the school's
long, proud history that its
defense has scored three
times in one game, and only
the second time a pair of
fumbles were returned for
TDs. Oklahoma matched
another school record with
eight sacks.
'To me there is nothing
more fun than a defensive
touchdown when you're on
that side of it," Stoops said.
Here's yet another nice
bit of history for Sooners
to savor: this win pushed
Oklahoma ahead of Texas
for the fourth-best winning
percentage among major
colleges. Only Michigan,


Notre Dame and Ohio State
are better. The lpnghorns
actually slipped from third
to fifth.
Texas (4-1, 1-1) was try-
ing to figure out how far it's
come since being 5-7 last
season. Now coach Mack
Brown's knows his squad
still has a ways to go, espe-
cially on offense.
Sophomore Case McCoy
and freshman David Ash
had their share of rookie
'mistakes at quarterback,
such as McCoy losing two
fumbles and Ash throwing
two interceptions. Receiver
Mike Davis was to blame
for the pickpocket fumble.
The two times Oklahoma
didn't immediately score
on those turnovers, the
Sooners still cashed them


in for points, getting a field
goal and a touchdown on
the ensuing drives.
"You don't give yourself
a chance to win," Brown
said.
With the Sooners swarm-
ing running plays and get-
ting heavy pressure on
passes, McCoy and Ash
couldn't keep drives going.
The longest completions
before the game turned
into a joke were a screen for
15 yards and an 18-yarder
along the sideline against a
prevent defense in the final.
seconds of the first half.
How silly did it become?
Late in the third quarter,
Texas let a first-and-10 at
the Oklahoma 15 turn into
a fourth-and-49 from its
own 47. The ensuing punt


didn't even reach the first-
down marker.
"You learn so much from
a loss like this," Ash said.
"You learn what it takes to
play at the level Oklahoma
plays. They're a great team.
It's great to get exposed to
that We're a young team.
The great thing is we have
so much potential to become
a really great team."
The Sooners were so
ready for the Longhorns
that they -let them know it
before kickoff. Oklahoma
players lined up between
the 30s and hollered at
Texas players as they ran
onto the field. Coaches and
officials scrambled to main-
tain peace-
OU drove inside the
Texas 10 on its first two
series, but settled for field
goals of 26 and 24 yards,
seemingly bothered by the
noise at the end of the field
occupied by Texas fans.
The Sooners moved into the
friendly end for the start of
the second quarter and, on
the first play, Jones threw a
19-yard touchdown pass to
Kenny Stills.
Oklahoma got the ball
back on an interception by
Tony Jefferson, a defensive
back who picked off passes
on three consecutive series
against Ball State. Jones
threaded a 30-yard pass
between two defenders
on a third-and-25, then hit
Ryan Broyles with a 5-yard
pass just inside the right
front corner of the end
zone.
The play had to be
reviewed, and Oklahoma
fans used the break to
start chanting "Boomer!
Sooner!" Longhorns fans
answered with their chant
"Texas! Fight!" Their cries
lasted longer and were
louder than their foe's, only
to end with the news that
the touchdown stood.


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Virginia Tech quarterback Logan Thomas (3) scores a touchdown in front of Miami's Davon
Johnson (24) and Adewale Ojomb (97) during the first half of an NCAA college football
game Saturday in Blacksburg, Va.

Hokies win thriller over Miami


Associated Press


BLACKSBURG, Va.
- Logan Thomas ran 19
yards for a touchdown
with 56 seconds to play
Saturday, capping a wild
fourth quarter as No. 21
Virginia Tech beat Miami
38-35.
The Hokies (5-1, 1-1
Atlantic Coast Conference)
rescued their chances of
contending in the Coastal
Division with the dramatic
rally, and may have killed
the hopes for Miami (2-3,
0-2).
And they did it less than
2 minutes after Lamar
Miller scored on a 30-yard
burst for the Hurricanes,
giving them a 35-31 lead
and forcing Thomas and
the Hokies to respond. .
Thomas did, with a big
assist from David Wilson,
driving the Hokies 77 yards
in eight plays, and capping
the drive with a draw play
on which he went virtually
untouched for the score.

No. 13 Georgia Tech 21,
Maryland 16
ATLANTA Late in a
tough loss, Maryland may


have found a new quar-
terback and discovered its
offense.
Maryland's fourth-quar-
'ter comeback, led by soph-
omore backup quarterback
C.J. Brown, came up short
as the Terrapins fell to No.
13 Georgia Tech 21-16 on
Saturday. Brown took over
for Danny O'Brien in the
second quarter after the
starter went 1 of 6 passing
for 17 yards and an inter-
ception.
Tevin Washington ran for
120 yards and two touch-
downs for Georgia Tech,
which led 21-3 before hold-
ing off the Terrapins.

No. 16 WVU 43,
Connecticut 16

MORGANTOWN, W.Va.
- Geno Smith threw for
450 yards and four touch-
downs in navigating No.
16 West Virginia through
another slow start to beat
Connecticut 43-16 in their
Big East opener Saturday.
West Virginia (5-1, 1-0)
struggled to a 10-9 half-
time lead before scoring
23 points in a 7:35 span of
the third quarter to take


control.

No. 18 South Carolina
54, Kentucky 3
COLUMBIA, S.C.
- Football finally got fun
again for South Carolina
coach Steve Spurrier.
Connor Shaw had a good
day, too.
Spurrier opened up
his offense Saturday with
direct snaps to the run-
ning backs, passes to
the tight end and even-
an option run as the No.
18 Gamecocks (5-1, 3-1
Southeastern Conference)
beat Kentucky 51-3, their
biggest margin of victory
in an SEC game since join-
ing the league in 1992.
The Wildcats (2-4, 0-3)
gained just 96 yards, and
their quarterbacks threw
four interceptions and just
four completions.

No. 19 Illinois 41,
Indiana 20
BLOOMINGTON, Ind.
- No. 19 Illinois used
three scoring plays of 66
yards or longer to rally
from an early 10-0 deficit
and rout Indiana 41-20.


FSU: Falls in third-straight game
Continued From Page 1B

issues," coach Jimbo Fisher "We're a football team another tough game next
said. "Five turnovers, you that's good enough to beat -week (Virginia Tech)."
can't win a football game. you, but we're not good "Manuel threw a 2-yard
Thirteen penalties, you enough to get away from scoring pass to Kenny Shaw
can't win a football game." you," coach Jim' Grobe to make it a five-point game
Clint Trickett, a red- said. with 54 seconds left, but
shirt freshman making his A 10-point underdog, he overthrew Nick O'Leary
second straight start, was Wake Forest trailed for in the corner of the end
pulled after his third turn- only about five minutes of zone on the two-point con-
over two interceptions the first half, led the entire version. Givens then recov-
and a fumble in favor second half and rolled up ered the onside kick for
of Manuel, who missed 391 yards against one of Wake Forest to seal it.
Florida State's last game the ACC's toughest defens- Manuel also threw a 46-
with an injured left shoul- es. Florida State (2-3, 0-2) yard touchdown pass to
der. Trickett finished 6 of entered giving up just 257 Rashad Greene for the turn-
11 for 29 yards, with two total yards per game. over-prone Seminoles. The
interceptions. Somehow, the Demon preseason ACC favorites
"They told me (Manuel) Deacons and a roster have lost three straight for
could play, but one good that includes 30 Florida the first time since 2009.
shot could set us back six natives seem to have the James Wilder Jr. and Ty
weeks," Fisher said. "He Seminoles figured out. Jones had 3-yard touchdown
could go in an emergency if Wake Forest has won four runs for Florida State.
we had to have him. ... The of six in the series, and each "When one side (of the
wvay the game was going, of its previous three teams ball) is playing well and the
and we had some turnovers to beat Florida State went other side needs stops, we're
... it was an emergency." on to play in bowl games. not getting them," Fisher
Price and' Harris helped The Demon Deacons' last said. "When the (defense) is
the Demon Deacons (4-1,3- three victories over Top 25 getting stops and the other
0) win their fourth straight teams also have come at the side needs to convert, we're
and open league play with Seminoles' expense. not doing it ... We're not
three wins for the first time "We can't sit all year and playing as a unit, as a team,
in school history. Those be like, 'We beat Florida as an organization, together,
ACC victories have come State. Our season's over and we've got to figure out
by a total 20 points. now,"' Harris said. "We have why it's not."


GATORS: Outmatched by Tigers


Continued From Page 1i

Brantley and freshman Jeff
Driskel.
Brissett was intercepted
twice on deep throws, once
each by safety Brandon
'Taylor and star cornerback
Tyrann Mathieu.
LSU led 17-0 after its first
three possessions and was
never threatened in what
became the sixth double-
digit victory in as many
games for the Tigers, who
have trailed for only 6:33 all
season. The Tigers more
than doubled the Gators in
total yards, 453-213. LSU
had 238 yards rushing
alone.
Alfred Blue added 70
yards on 14 carries and a
late 2-yard TD run to cap
the scoring for LSU.
After a week of decep-


tion by Florida head coach
Will Muschamp, who said
Driskel was his likely start-
er in place of Brantley, the
coach instead went with
Brissett, who became the
first freshman quarterback
in Florida history to take
his first snap as a starter.
Brissett was able to
buy time with his scram-
bling ability and complete
intermittent passes, but
struggled to sustain drives.
Taylor's interception came
on Brissett's seventh career
pass.
Brissett finally got Florida
in the end zone on a 65-
yard connection to Andre
Debose, who Mathieu
appeared to let run free after
shoving him out of bounds
and apparently thinking he


was out of the play.
Mathieu didn't let it hap-
pen again, stepping in front
of Brissett's next deep pass
for his second interception
of the season. That was
only the latest defensive
highlight for the LSU star,
who also has forced four
fumbles, and has returned
two of his three fumble
recoveries for touchdowns
this season.
Brissett finished 8 of 14
for 94 yards and the lone
score. Driskel, who injured
his ankle in relief of Brantley
during the Gators' 38-10 loss
to Alabama a week earlier,
did not play at all. Instead,
Muschamp tried rotating in
receiver Trey Burton and
Chris Rainey as single-wing
quarterbacks.


Page Editor: Brandon Finley, 754-0420









LAKE CITY REPORTER, SPORTS SUNDAY, OCTOBER 9, 2011


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Digging pink
Members of the Fort White High volleyball team get together before a volleyball game to raise
money for the fight against breast cancer. The "dig pink" game was played against Union
County on Friday.


COURTESY PHOTO
Columbia raises $800 in charity game
Members of the Columbia High volleyball team gather during a "dig pink" game to raise
money for breast cancer. "I am very proud of the girls and their efforts to reach $800,"
Columbia coach Rebecca Golden said.


NFL officials, players react to death of Davis


Associated Press

Reaction to the death of
longtime Qakland Raiders
owner Al Davis, who died
at 82 at his Oakland home
Saturday morning:

"Al Davis's passion for
football and his influence
on the game were extraordi-
nary. He defined the Raiders
and contributed to pro
football at every level. The
respect he commanded was
evident in the way that peo-
ple listened carefully every
time he spoke. He is a true
legend of the game whose
impact and legacy will for-
ever be part of the NFL." -
NFL Commissioner Roger
Goodell

"It is because of this
accomplished man and his
forever love of Silver and
Black, the fire that burned
in him I will honor and will


always and forever burn in
me." Oakland Raiders
head coach Hue Jackson

"Al Davis was a good
man, and we were friendly
rivals. He was a football man
and did a lot for the game
of football. I had a lot of
respect for him, and he will
be missed throughout the
entire NFL." Pittsburgh
Steelers chairman emeritus
Dan Rooney

"Al Davis .had a bril-
liant football mind, and his
teams set a standard for
excellence for many years."
- John Mara, New York
Giants president and CEO
"It's a sad day. When you
look at the landscape of the
National Football League
and what Al Davis did, ifs
immense. It's no secret that
we didn't see eye-to-eye at
times, but I've always been


grateful for the opportunity
that he gave me, and I'll
always remember that."
- Marcus Allen, the MVP
in the Raiders' last Super
Bowl win

"We've got to rally togeth-
er. The only thing Mr. Davis
would want us to do is win.
That's the only thing he ever
talks about is just winning,
and going out there and
playing as hard as you can
play. That's how you have to
do it from here on out You
just have ,to go out and if
you want to honor him, just
honor him by going out and
playing as hard as you can
to win." Oakland Raiders
QB Jason Campbell

"He was a pioneer. He did
so many things. He was a
coach, he was the commis-
sioner of the AFL, became
the owner of the Raiders
and he ran that club the way


he saw fit He brought in
players that everyone else
was discarding, including
me, and he made it work.
And he let you be who you
were. We had some guys
who liked to have a lot of
fun, me included. But when
it came Sunday and game
day, those guys were always
ready to play. He had a knack
for getting all of them to play
together." Jim Plunkett,
who won two Super Bowl
titles after Davis brought
him to Oakland

"A visionary who was
ahead of the curve in so
many ways, Coach Davis
had a great grasp of per-
sonnel, schemes and strat-
egy. I learned a tremendous
amount of football during
my six years with his orga-
nization. His sole focus
and passion in life was the
Raiders. He was at practice
every day and very aware


of what was going on orga-
nizationally. He challenged
you to be your best, and I
will always be grateful for
the opportunity he gave me
as a head coach."- former
Raiders coach and current
Jets assistant Bill Callahan

"Al was a football man
- his entire life revolved
around the game he loved.
He worked his way up
through the ranks and had
a knowledge of all phases
of the game. That experi-
ence aided him as an owner.
He was quite different from
every other owner in that
way. As an AFL guy, he was
in that group of people who
pushed our league forward.
I didn't get to see him over
the lastfewyears, and Iknow.
many, including myself, will
miss him." Tennessee
Titans owner Bud Adams,
an original AFL owner of the
Houston Oilers.


"He wasn't afraid of stand,
ing alone and making a bold
move such 'as- suing the
league. He had naysayers,
but he didn't care, because
he didn't care what people
thought He wasn't always'
right, but he did, what he
thought was right for the
Raiders and the league." -
former Raiders linebacker
Matt Millen.

"In my eyes, so much of
his legacy will be defined
by the loyalty he had for,
the men who played for,
the Raiders and the love
that they had for him. That
was a bond that extended
beyond the playing years
and lasted lifetimes. His
contributions and expertise
were inspiring at every level
- coach, general manager,
owner and commissioner."
- Dallas Cowboys owned
Jerry Jones.


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Trey Marshall (21) is trippedcup by a Buchholz High defender
while driving down the field on Sept. 16.

CHS: Falls to Ridgeview


Continued From Page 1i

pressure, Moore was able
to escape. Moore ran the
ball four times for 21 yards
on the Panthers' next drive.
Again, he capped it with
a pass to Galloway and
Columbia found itself down
20-0 early.
After a 14-play drive,
Columbia found away to put
points on the board. A hold-
ing call and blocked field
goal killed earlier attempts
for the Tigers. This time,
Barber capped the drive
with a sneak from one-yard
out into the end zone.
An interception that
bounced off the hands
of Shaq Johnson gave
Ridgeview the ball at
Columbia's 20-yard line to
start the second half. From
there, it was more of Moore
and he provided with a 12-
yard run for a 27-6 lead.
Barber was resilient and
provided a quarterback
threat for the Tigers as well.
He rushed for 89 yards on
15 carries, but the passing
game was hampered by
dropped passes. Barber'fin-
ished 9-of-21 through the
air with 114 yards. His sec-
ond touchdown in a four-
touchdown night cut the
Columbia lead to 27-12 on a


26-yard keeper.
Antonio Pelham recov-
ered a pooch kick that fell
to the ground untouched
by the Panthers on the fol-
lowing kickoff and Barber
again snuck the ball into the
end zone for Columbia.
With the score 27-18,
Moore came up with two
runs to convert first downs
and capped a 12-play drive
with a seven-yard touch-
down run.
Columbia battled back
into the game late with
Barber's fourth rushing
touchdown coming from
one-yard out. It was set up
by Barber runs of seven,
nine and 23 yards. Rakeem
Battle scored on a dive play
during a two-point conver-
sion to cut the lead to 34-
26.
The Tigers had a chance
to get the ball back after
failing on the onside kick,
but Moore finished off a
18 carry, 145-yard rushling
performance with a five-
yard run to move the chains
on third-and-three. It ended
the Tigers' chances.
Columbia enters a bye week
before returning home for a
District 3-6A contest against
Middleburg on Oct. 21.


OCTOBER IS NATIONAL BREAST CANCER AWARENESS MONTH.

Topic: Breast health and the latest medical advancements for detecting breast
] cancer, treatment options and prevention.


4


Guest Speakers:


When:


Where:


RSVP:


Edwin Gonzalez, M.D., FACS and Jerzy Polmerski, M.D.

Friday, October 14,12:00 p.m. 1:00 p.m.

Lifestyle Enrichment Center
628 SE Allison Ct., Lake City, FL 32025
Space is limited. Please call 386-292-8120 to reserve your space today.


Jerzy Polmerski, M.D., and
Ed' in Gonzalez, M.D., FACS


ShandsT ...
Regional Medical Center



755 SW State Road 47 Lake City, FL 32025
ShandsLakeShore.com


7


Page Editor: Brandon Finley, 754-0420;










Story ideas?

Contact
Robert Bridges
Editor
754-0428
rbridges@olakecityreporter.com


Lake City Reporter




BUSINESS


Sunday, October 9, 201 1


www.lakecityreporter.com


Section C


COUNTY TOURISM


Harvey Campbell
386-758-1397

Active

month

coming

for sports

additional sports
tournaments are
scheduled for
the remainder
of 2011. Listed below are
the dates, event and con-
tact information for each of
the events.
Oct. 15-16
Jacksonville Storm
Showcase
Greg Kennon
386-288-8783
Oct. 22-23
USSSA Baseball
Spooktacular
Tak Walden 407-518-1412
Oct. 29-30
AAU/Halloween Weekend
Shootout
Bert Holloway
407-808-7676
Oct. 29-20
Girls Softball
Tournament
Vinmce Tucker
904-591-3502
Nov. 5-6
AAU/Florida
Travel Ball
Bert Holloway
407-808-7676
TOURISM continued on 2C


By ANTONIA ROBINSON
arobinson@lakecityreporter.com
T om Foster,
owner of
Ruppert's
Bakery, was
shocked to
hear he was
among the four finalists for
SCORE Entrepreneur of
the Year.
"I just didn't think peo-
ple would nominate me,"
he said. "I feel it's quite an
honor."
Joining Foster, and his
wife Marie, as finalists are:
Karen Green of GeGee's
Studio Salon and Day Spa;
Chris Samson of CMS


Professional Staffing; and
Steve Briscoe of First
Street Music.
Finalists will be recog-
nized and the winner will
be announced at SCORE's
awards banquet 6 p.m.
Oct. 18 at the Florida
Gateway College Howard
Conference Center.
Finalists were selected
based upon impact on
the business community,
innovation, financial per-
formance, entrepreneurial
spirit and community
involvement.
Foster said he is proud
to be a finalist and grateful
to SCORE and the people
who nominated him.


"I thank them very
much," he said. *
Foster moved to Lake
City after more than 20
years as a Coca Cola con-
tractor in South Florida.
He bought the well-known
bakery and expanded it.
Ruppert's Bakery
serves breakfast, lunch
and dinner and the busi-
ness accepts orders by fax
and offers delivery.
He was one of the
founding businesses for
the farmer's market and
still participates weekly.
Other community activi-


SCORE narrows

choices for

Entrepreneur

of the Year


Tom Foster


ties for the Fosters include.
donations to youth sports
organizations and the
*March of Dimes Signature
Chef Auction.
His wife is as much
involved as he is with the
business, Foster said.
"She' takes the back
seat, but if it wasn't for her
we wouldn't be in the posi-
tion we're in," he said.
Receiving a nomination
and being named a final-
ist is a reflection on the
staff at CMS Professional
Staffing Inc., Samson said..
"It shows the kind of


respect people have for
the employees who work
for us," he said.
Samson began work-
ing locally as a registered
nurse but soon realized
the need for qualified
nurses, which led to
the founding of CMS
Professional Staffing. The
business was established
to provide qualified medi-
cal professionals to area
medical facilities and
demonstrate its motto
"A Different Kind of
Nursing."
FINAL FOUR continued on 2C


Dr. Begum's career is already marked with extensive training, research,
residencies, and accomplishments. Combine those successes with her
energetic and caring attitude, and the result is exemplary care for her patients.
She is committed to your good health getting you there and keeping you
there. Shands Lake Shore Regional Medical Center welcomes
Dr. Begum's enthusiasm for her patients. And you will, too.

To schedule an appointment, please call 386-758-1709.

Rgional MdNial Center
iLakeShor.
Primary Care West
221 SW Stonegate Terrace, Suite 101, Lake City, Pi. 32024
ShandslakeShorc.co m


Be Tough Enough tc
County Resources, Ir
a








LUNCI

Speaker: [

Thursday, Octc


wh
text
ave


SWear Pink & join Columbia
ic., Lake City Medical Center
Affiliates in


H- LEARN
)r. Mark Thompson


ober 13th


12 noon


Columbia County Fairgrounds Banquet Hall
438 SW SR 247 I Lake City, FL 32025

AS SEATING IS LIMITED, REGISTRATION
IS REQUIRED: 800-525-3248











y wait ongER?


t ER to 23000 for
rage ER Wait times. LakeCityMedical.com I (386) 719-9000
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Final




Four


Steve Briscoe Karen Green


--








C LAKE CITY REPORTER BUSINESS & HOME SUNDAY, OCTOBER 9, 2011


The Muni Scoop
Q What are municipal bonds,
and should I consider them?
R.B., Panama City, Fla.'
A "Munis" are issued by many
'.Lstate and local governments
to raise money for expenses such
as building bridges, expanding
schools, maintaining roads, and so
on. They borrow the money from
us, and the fixed interest rate they
pay is usually exempt from federal
taxes. It's often exempt from local
taxes, too, though it's taken into
account by Social Security.
Capital gains on municipal
bonds are taxable, and the bonds
sometimes trigger the compli-
cated Alternative Minimum Tax,
so perhaps consult a tax adviser,
before purchasing any.
Not all municipal bonds are
alike. Some issuers are riskier than
others, and rates vary. California,
for example, is one of the lowest-
rated states, while Vermont is
one of the highest-rated. "Generajl
obligation" municipal bonds are
backed by the issuer's credit, while
"revenue bonds" can be riskier, as .
they depend on the project being
funded to generate the needed
revenue. The minimum investment
in municipal bonds is often $5,000.
You can learn more at
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I. V. Lima, Ohio
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I-engaged in by some in the
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shares of a company for her per-'
sonal portfolio and then begin
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are al) examples of front-runming,
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IBM to the ER- Stat!
IBM's (NYSE: IBM) "Watson"
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perhaps even actual medical practices
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, owns shares of IBM and "The
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ter has recommended WellPoint.)


LAST WEEK'S TRIVIA ANSWER
Founded by several brothers in New Jersey in 1886, today I'm the world's
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0 00*00T f-*I0I


e V en rll ffJI ro tlLUll U UNY:RA U C e O RELEASE0 2U0/ZI1)
t (EDITORS: For editorial questions, contact Alan McDermott at amcdermott@amuniversal.com.) .


TOURISM: Active month coming


3Continued From Page 1,
Nov. 12-13
NE Fall State
Championship-
'Tak Walden 407455-2399
Dec. 2-4
Florida vs. Georgia
Showdown
Tak Walden 407-455-2399

:'October Tourist
Development Council
meeting is moved
',Due to the fact two
'members of the Tourist
Development Council staff
will be attending the annual
"convention of the Florida
Association of Convention
and Visitors Bureaus the
October monthly meeting
of the board of directors
has been moved from the
19th to the 26th. The meet-
ing will be held beginning
'at 12 Noon at the Columbia
'County West Branch
Library, 435 Hall of Fame
Drive. The meeting is open
to the public and you area
cordially invited to attend.

Smith Travel shows
occupancy up-bed tax
collections down for July
According to the Florida
Department of Revenue,
Local Option Tourist'
Development Tax col-
lections for July totaled
$49,630, a drop of approxi-
mately $825.00 compared
to collections for 2010. In
part, collections were down
because of a large num-
ber of rooms booked by
tax exempt business from
fire fighters .staying in Lake
City, Meanwhile, Smith
Travel reported occupancy
was up 5.9% for July with
room revenues and revenue
per available room both up
17.7% for the month, com-
pared to year-ago numbers.

TDC to apply for
renewal of OTTED grant
The Suwannee River
Valley Marketing Group
will be applying for a new
$35,000 grant from the
Department of Economic
Opportunity (former-
'ly known as the Office
of Tourism, Trade and
'Economic Development).


The grant is eligible for
renewal on Dec. 15th, 2011.
Among the marketing pro-
grams being planned for
the New Year is paid adver-
tising in Southern Living
Magazine, AAA Going
Places South, Canoe &
Kayak Magazine and the
Florida Vacation Guide. A
consumer tourism show
booth will be manned at two
events at The Villages in
Central Florida, the Tampa
Tribune Outdoor Show and
ten military base -shows.
Plans are also in the works
to remove and install new
vinyl wrap on the TDC van
which is used for attending
all of the consumer tourism
shows.

New Vacation Guide
in the planning stages
The Columbia County
Tourist Development
Council is preparing to
distribute a Request for
Qualifications production
and printing of the new
2012 Suwannee River Valley
Vacation Guide. This past
year we printed 40,000 cop-
ies of the full-color, 44-page
digest which contains lodg-
ing information, a calendar
of events and feature arti-
cles on our tri-county area.
We currently have approxi-
mately 3,000 copies of the
magazine remaining with
the new guide expected to
be delivered in mid-January.
Not only were the guides
given out at all of the con-
sumer shows at which we
manned a booth, our office
mailed out 5,590 copies in
response to mail and tele-
phone requests.

Big impact is realized
locally by sports
tournaments
Columbia County is in
the process of joining the
Florida Sports Foundation,
an organization which
helps provide guidance on
sports promotion and also
generates economic impact
studies and reports which
provide a widely accepted
method of obtaining return
on investment information.
During the 2009-10 fis-


cal year we hosted a total
of 14 tournaments which
averaged 30 teams each.
Based on the Florida Sports
Foundation formula we gen-
erated 4,200 room nights
at local lodging and the.
tournaments created direct
spending of approximately
$2.261 million. That figure
should grow significantly in
2010-2011 with 59 tourna-
ments scheduled thus far.
Included in that count are
13 events which were can-
celled due to a lack of teams
signing-up.

An additional nine tourna-
ments remain on the sched-
ule for this year. We are
expecting, 75 teams for the
Jacksonville Storm Softball
Showcase Tournament
which will be held Oct 15-16
at the Southside Recreation
Complex.


Congratulations to
Stephen Foster Folk
Culture Center State Park
During the 44th Annual
Florida 1- Governor's.
Conference on Tourism,
held Sept. 25-27, at the
Westin Resort & Spa
in Hollywood, VISIT
FLORIDA announced the
2011 winners of the Flagler
Awards. Annually, leaders
in Florida tourism are cho-
sen by a selection commit-
tee to receive these presti-
gious awards. Named for
Henry Flagler, the Flagler
Awards were established
in 2000 to recognize out-
standing tourism marketing
in Florida. The Suwannee
River Valley Marketing
Group was represented in
the Best Special Event cate-
gory as Stephen Foster Folk
Culture Center State Park
was the Bronze Award win-
ner for the Stephen Foster
Festival of Lights event last.
December.


Thank you to all who
attended the North
Florida Marketing &
Advertising Expo
On Oct. 5 Florida's
Suwannee River Valley
hosted" the North Florida
Marketing & Advertising
Resource Expo at the
Spirit of the Suwanee
Music Park. This event is
just one of the many that
is made possible by the
OTTED grant the group
received from OTTED and
Enterprise Florida. ,
The purpose of the expo
was to give our hospital-
ity industry and the small
businesses in Columbia,
Hamilton and Suwannee
counties the opportunity to
find the tools and resourc-
es to promote their busi-
nesses. It was a chance
to explore, research, shop,
and compare different
types of media and other
resources.


* Exhibitoring representa-
tives who participated were
the Lake City Reporter (Print),
Florida's Official Fishing &
Boating Program (Magazine,
Print Advertising), The
Advertiser (a weekly publication
in North Central Florida & the
'Clip & Save), Florida Gateway
Clip and Save (Direct Mail),
Expb Source (Trade Show
Exhibits), Jennifer Chasteen
(Photographer-Writer), Miles
Media (Print, E-mail Web and
Mobile), Visit Florida (Florida
Vacation Guide, Forida Map,
Advertising), Prof Inc. (The
Villages Media, Travel Over 50,
Sports Directory, Student Travel
Magazine, Reunion Magazine),
Hardisonlnk.com (Web News,
Sports, Features and Ads),
WQIK 99.1Jacksonville's
K-Country radio station, WNFB
94.3, WJTK, 96.5 (Radio), and
Signature Media (Consultants
Marketing).

I Harvey Campbell is the
executive director of the
Columbia County Tourist
Development Council. He can
be reached at 386-758-1397.


FINAL FOUR: SCORE narrows choices


Continued From Page 1C
Samson has continued his pursuit
of this goal with the development
of SKEDULrT, a scheduling soft-
ware package. CMS Professional
Transport, his latest endeavor, pro-
vides non-emergency medical trans-
port services to the community at an
affordable rate.
He was previously recognized
by the Lake City-Columbia County
Chamber of Commerce for excel-
lence in business. Samson and
CMS are also strong supporters of
Columbia County's many community
service organizations and events.
"I'm just really thankful to all the
people who nominated me," he said.
"I'm really thankful for the staff who
work with me and the people in the
community and all the supporters
who have been with me over the last
12 years we've been in business and
helped us. I can't say enough."
For Briscoe, it is also an extreme
honor to be considered as a finalist.
"There's a lot of good people in the
running, and knowing I'm one of the
finalists really humbles me," he said.
Briscoe moved to Suwannee
County in 1988, and opened his first
business, The Money Man, in 1990.
He now owns three businesses,
including First Street Music and
Sound Company.
He saw another opportunity and
took his original 2,000 square foot
music business a few blocks away to


an empty building and expanded it
to what is now a 12,000 square foot
showcase and warehouse.
First Street provides instruments
and repairs for schools, sound equip-
ment for rock concerts and lessons
and instruments for the public.
Briscoe was nominated by both
the Chamber of Commerce and
SCORE for his previous entrepre-
neurial expertise. He serves on the
board for several organization includ-
ing Columbia County Resources and
Kiwanis.
"To end up as one of the four final-
ists is something to be very proud
about," he said.
It was rewarding to even be one of
the nominees, said Green.
"It's nice when someone recog-
nizes you to say you're doing a great
job and keep up the good work," she
said.
Gegee's Studio Day Spa and Salon
began as a skin care and model-
ing studio almost 10 years ago and
evolved and grew over the years.
The business offers skin ser-
vices, including medical grade peels,
manicures and medical pedicures
performed by a Certified Master
Pedicurist, complete hair services,
make-up and also massage.
Her community involvement
includes working with Altrusa, the
March of Dimes and cheerleaders.
"We appreciate (being a finalist),"


Green said. "It is a very nice honor."
The guest speaker for the banquet
is Jill Nichols, Vera Bradley Designs
executive vice president The com-
pany, located in Fort Wayne, Ind., is
famous for brightly-patterned quilted
cottonwomen's luggage and acces-
sories.
Vera Bradley Designs utilized
SCORE's mentoring services shortly
after starting up more than 20 years
ago. Door prizes will be provided by
Vera Bradley at the event
Semi-finalists for the award will also
be recognized: Jacqueline Pollack of
A-Head of Time Hair Salon in Jasper;
Mark Bower of Bower's Vettes and
Classics; Randy Morris of Champ's
Pizza; Chris Kerovac of CK Metal
Fabricators; Danny and Polly Murray
of Columbia County Cycles; Nancy
Upshaw Massage Therapist; Scott
Crew of Scott's Gunsmithing; Becky
Hollaway of The Pet Spot; and
Kimberly Service and Maria Ellis
Wee Care Preschool in Columbia
City.
SCORE aids 20,000 entrepreneurs
in starting new businesses each year
nationally. The organization supplies
free, confidential and continuing men-
toring to small businesses.
Tickets are $30 per person, or
$200 for a table of eight, for the ban-
quet and can be reserved by calling
the local SCORE office at 752-2000 or
e-mail scorelakecity@gmail.com.


Known the answer Send it to us with Foolish Trivia on the top and you'll
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*












LAKE CITY REPORTER BUSINESS & HOME SUNDAY, OCTOBER 9, 2011 3C


THE WEEK IN REVIEW THE WEEK IN REVIEW THE WEEK IN REVIEW THE WEEK IN REVIEW THE WEEK IN REVIEW


''c~ ~


Weekly Stock Exchange Highlights

A NYSE A Amex A Nasdaq
6,925.80 +134.15 2,094.30 +43.82 2,479.35 +63.95


Gainers ($2 or more) Gainers ($2 or more) Gainers ($2 or more)
Name Last Chg %Chg Name Last Chg %Chg Name Last Chg %Chg
AIrRlty 2.65 +1.03 +63.6 NDynMng 6.60+1.24 +23.1 In5riCon 4.50 +1.43 +46.6
JinkoSolar 6.30 +1.44 +29.6 ExtorreGg 6.98 +1.08 +18.3 CleanDslrs 3.33 +1.01 +43.5
McDrmlnt 13.95 +3.19 +29.6 OQuestRMg 2.60 +.36 +16.1 Sthwallrs 13.49 +3.89 +40.5
FordMwt 2.79 +.58 +26.2 Taseko 2.93 +.38 +14.9 FocusMda 22.97 +6.14 +36.4
Vancelnfo 8.35 +1.62 +24.1 Orbital 4.99 +.64 +14.7 Gevon 7.39 +1.82 +32.7
MarineP 4.20 +.78 +22.8 ComsltkMn 2.29 .+.29 +14.4 Andatee 2.40 +.57 +31.1
NwOriEds 27.30 +4.33 +18.9 CPIAero 10.85 +1.35 +14.2 MaysJ 16.96 +3.86 +29.5
TorchEngy 3.27 +.52 +18.9 BiPTm 52.53 +6.06 +13.0 TxCapBwt 13.62 +3.08 +29.2
Monsanto 70.93+11.19 +18.7 HaderaPap 45.25 +5.14 +12.8 LCAVis 2.75 +.61 +28.5
IvanhMg 16.25 +2.55 +18.6 MetroHlhh 5.06 +.52 +11.5 PhysnsFm 3.53 +.78 +28.4


Losers ($2 or more)
Name Last Chg %Chg
ET2xlnflPO 9.07 -5.16 -36.3
AMR Cp39 16.41 -4.63 -22.0
Lentuo n 3.01 -.83 -21.6
SprintNex 2.41 -.63 -20.7
Dirx Aid 24.83 -6.17 -19.9
NeoPhoton 5.53 -1.35 -19.6
NoahHId n 7.46 -1.74 -18.9
HomnEntun 6.00 -1.39 -18.8
Bitauton 4.99 -1.11 -18.2
WescoAirn 8.95 -1.98 -18.1

Most Active ($1 or more)
Name Vol (00) Last Chg
BkofAm 16871622 5.90 -.22
S&P500ETF14819287115.71+2.56
SPDR Fnd7706806 11.83 +.02
SprintNex 5995588 2.41 -.63
iShR2K 5034047 65.50+1.20
DrxFnBull 4760311 10.41 -.21
iShEMkts 4752351 36.44 +1.35
FordM 4437057 10.69+1.02
GenElec 4117670 15.50 +.28
Citigrp rs 3374707 24.63 -.99

Diary
Advanced 1,602
Declined 1,545
New Highs 30
New Lows 1,279
Total issues 3,198
Unchanged 51
Volume 27,621,088,718


Losers ($2 or more)
Name Last Chg %Chg
Richmntg 8.90 -1.67 -15.8
CCA Inds 4.39 -.74 -14.4
B&HO 3.55 -.57 -13.8
SyneryRs. 2.50 -.35 -12.3
OverhifF 3.26 -.44 -11.9
NewConcEn 2.10 -.28 -11.7
Medgenicn 3.98 .-.52 -11.6
ATS Corp 2,80 -.35 -11.1
AmShrd& 2.45 -.30 -10.9
CheniereEn 4.60 -.55 -10.7

Most Active ($1 or more)
Name Vol (00) Last Chg
NwGoldg 248320 10.95 +.66
NthgM g 236957 3.54 +.24
GoldStr g 203669 1.89 +.03
GrtBasGg 162112 1.52 -.17
NovaGldg 153940 6.73 +.28
VantageDri 147782 1.21 -.04
NAPallg 145438 2.46 -.09
CheniereEnl29958 4.60 -.55
VimetX 124094 15.64 +.65
CFCdag 96669 21.04 +.35

Diary
Advanced 205
Declined 314
New Highs 6
New Lows 174
Total issues m33
Unchanged 14
Volume 509,718,991


Losers ($2 or more)
Name Last Chg %Chg
MisnNEnh 2.63 -1.72 -39.5
Senla h 3.59 -1.93 -35.0
Illumina 27.18-13.74 -33.6
CardiovSys 7.58 -3.81 -33.5
as"ings 2.04 -.86 -29.7
SangBio 3.12 -1.23 -28.3
SifyTech 2.87 -1.12 -28.1
PorterBcp 2.84 -.99 -25.8
HorizPh n 5.20 -1.79 -25.6
Covenant 2.73 -.92 -25.2

Most Active ($1 or more)
Name Vol (00) Last Chg
PwShs QQQ472229354.07+1.58
SiriusXM 4664951 1.52 +.01
Level3 4350570 1.69 +.20
Cisco 4103560 16.66+1.22
Intel 3591530 22.29 +.96
Microsoft 3483840 26.25+1.36
Yahoo 2561480 15.47+2.30
MicronT 2319675 4.95 -.09
Oracle 2109028 29.91 +1.23
RschMotn 1639133 23.36+3.06

Diary
Advanced 1,482
Declined 1,236
New Highs 22
New Lows 928
Total issues 2,776
Unchanged 58
Volume 12,516,967,111


STOCKS OF LOCAL INTEREST


WMy Wy YTD
Name Ex Div Last Chg%Chg %Chg


AT&T nc NY 1.72 28.44
Alcoa NY .12 9.71
AutoZone NY ... 324.02
BkofAm NY .04 5.90
BariPVtxrsNY 50.22
obEvans Nasd 1.00 28.90
CNBFnPANasd .66 13.24
CSX s NY .48 20.09
Chevron NY 3.12 94.40
Cisco Nasd .24 16.66
Cifirprs NY .04 24.63
CocaCola NY 1.88 65.90
DelhaJze NY 2.45 60.81
DrSCBr rs NY ... 47.67
DrxFnBull NY ... 10.41
DirxSCBull NY ... 34.03
FamilyDIr NY .72 52.82
FordM NY ... 10.69
FMCGs NY 1.00 34.01
GenElec NY .60 15.50
HomeDp NY 1.00 33.92
iShEMIlts NY .84 36.44
iShR2K NY 1.02 65.50
Intel Nasd .84 22.29
JPMorgCh NY 1.00 30.70
Level3 Nasd ... 1.69
Lowes NY .56 20.34
McDnlds NY 2.80 87.20


+.35 +1.2 -3.2
+.14 +1.5 -36.9
+4.83 +1.5 +18.9
-3.6 -55.8
-3.1 -5.9 33.5
+.38 +1.3 -12.3
+.42 +3.3 -10.6
+1.42 +7.6 -6.7
+1.81 +2.0 +3.5
+1.22 +7.9 -17.6
-.99 -3.8 -47.9
-1.66 -2.5 +.2
+2.37. +4.1 -17.5
-5.30-10.0 +1.8
-.21 -2.0 -62.6
+1.03 +3.1 -53.0
+1.96 +3.9 +6.3
+1.02 +10.5 -36.3
+3.56+11.7 -43.4
+.28 +1.8 -15.3
+1.05 +3.2 -3.3
+1.35 +3.8 -23.5
+1.20 +1.9 -16.3
+.96 +4.5 +6.0
+.83 +2.8 -27.6
+.20 +13.4 +72.4
+1.00 +5.2 -18.9
-.62 -0.7 +13.6


Name Ex Div
MicronT Nasd
Microsoft Nasd .80
MogStan NY .20
NY Times NY
NextEraEnNY 2.20
NobityHIf Nasd
OcciPet NY 1.84
Oracle Nasd .24
Penney NY .80
PepsiCo NY 2.06
Pfizer NY .80
Potash s NY .28
PwShs QQQNasd .41
PrUShS&PNY
RegionsFn NY .04
Ryder NY 1.16
S&PSOOETFNY 2.46
SearsHIdgsNasd
SidusXM Nasd
SouthnCo NY 1.89
SprintNex NY
SPDRFndNY .20
TlimeWam NY .94
VangEmg NY .82
WalMart NY 1.46
WellsFargo NY .48
YRCrsh Nasd ...
Yahoo Nasd ...


Wly WAdy YTo
Last Chg%Chg%Chg
4.95 -.09 -1.8 -38.3
26.25 +1.36 +5.5 -5.9
14.24 +.73 +5.4 -47.7
6.44 +.63 +10.8 -34.3
54.20 +.18 +0.3 +4.3
5.69 -.91 -13.8 -29.8
77.25 +5.75 +8.0 -21.3
'29.91 +1.23 +4.3 -4.4
28.93 +2.35 +8.8 -10.5
61.02 -.88 -1.4 -6.6
18.44 +.76 +4.3 +5.3
44.72 +1.50 +3.5 -13.4
54.07 +1.58 +3.0 -.7
24.18 -1.31 -5.1 +1.8
3.40 +.07 +2.1 -51.4
38.98 +1.47 +3.9 -25.9
115.71 +2.56 +2.3 -8.0
62.12 +4.60 +8.0 -15.8
1.52 +.01 +0.7 -6.7
42.37 ...... +10.8
2.41 -.63 -20.7 -43.0
11.83 +.02 +0.2 -25.8
30.85 +.88 +2.9 -4.1
37.01 +1.18 +3.3 -23.1
53.70 +1.80 +3.5 -.4
24.54 +.42 +1.7 -20.8
.06 +.01 +18.4 -98.4
15.47 +2.30 +17.5 -7.0


Stock Footnotes: g = Divdendand ean in Canadian dollars. h= Does not meet continued-tiang standards.
l= Late flng with SEC: n=New n past 52 weeks pf Preterred.rs= Stockhas undergone areversestock spltt
of a east 50percent whin thepastyearl f =Rgh to buy security at a specdied prse s= Stock has spt by at
last 20 percent within the last year. un = Units, v = In bankruptcy or receivership.wd = When distributed, wi =
When Issued. wt= Warrants.
Mutual Fund Fotnotes: b' Fee covedrngmarke costs I paid from fund asset d = Deferred sales har, or
redemption tee. f front load (aes charges). m MultWe fees are aged. NA= not availabe. p previousdays
et asset value. s= fund split shares during the week. x = fund paid a dis ton during the week.Ganer a
Losers mustbe worth at least$2 to be listed in tables at lef. Most Atives must be worth al least $1. Volume in
hundreds of shares Source: Te Assodatd Press. Sales figures are unofficial.


Money Rates
Last Pvs Week
Prime Rate 3.25 3.25
Discount Rate 0.75 0.75
Federal Funds Rate .00-25 .00-25
Treasuries
3-month 0.01 0.02
6-month 0.03 0.05
5-year 1.08 0.96
10-year 2.07 1.92
30-year 3.02 2.91


WeekiyDowJo~


Dow Jones Industrials -258.08 153.41 131.24 183.38 -20.21
Close: 11,103.12 v 1 i* '
1 -week change: 189.74 (1.7%) MON TUES WED THUR FRI
13,000 .. ... .


11,000 ... ...... ..



10,000 A M


A ... ... ... 0 ...


PIMCO TotRetls Cl 143,222
Vanguard TotStldx LB 54,584
American Funds CaplncBuAm IH 52,811
Fidelity Contra LG 52,421
Vanguard Instldxl LB 52,251
American Funds Gr nA m ,LG 51,434
American Funds IncAmerA m MA 48,664
Vanguard 500Adml LB 46,205
Vanguard TotStAdm LB 43,815
American Funds CpWidGrIA m WS 43,482
American Funds InvCoAmA m LB 39,741
Dodge & Cox IntlStk FV 35,768
American Funds WAMutlnvA m LV 34,692
Dodge & Cox Stock LV 34,245
FrankTemp-Franklin income A m CA 32,845
Vanguard InstPlus LB 32,673
PIMCOTotRetAdm b Cl 31,525
Vanguard TotBdAdmi Cl 30,034
Amencan FundsturPacGrA m FB 29,151
American Funds BalA m MA 28,742
Vanguard Totlng d FB 28,698
American Funds FnInvA m LB 27,768
Vanguard WelltnAdm MA 26,965
American Funds NewPerspA m WS 26,896
PIMCOTotRetA m Cl 26,312
Vanguard 5001nv LB 25,318
FrankTemp-Templeton GIBondAdv IB 25,305


-0.7/E
+1.3/B
-0.4/B
+1.9/C
+1.8/A
-2.6/E
+1.6/A
+1.8/A
+1.5/B
-9.1/D
-2.2/D
-13.8/D
+4.4/A
-3.3/D
-1.4/E
+1.8/A
-0.9/E
+3.9/A
-13.6/D
+2.9/A
-13.1/D
-1.9/D
+1.4/B
-5.5/C
-1.1/E
+1.7/B
-1.8/E


NL 1,000,000
NL 3,000
5.75 250
NL 2,500
NL 5,000,000
5.75 250
5.75 250
NL 10,000
NL 10,000
5.75 250
5.75 250
NL 2,500
5.75 250
NL 2,500
4.25 1,000
NL 200,000,000
-NL 1,000,000
NL 10,000
5.75 250
5.75 250
NL 3,000
5.75 250
NL 50,000
5.75 250
3.75 1,000
NL 3,000
NL 50,000


CA-CAonsevaWAlocation, C wTerBond, -ES Europe StodiFB -Fo Led, -Fore L F Frn
Lage Vae, H -world AMkcatm, LBaWgeBlwSld, lG Gro LV Lar value, MAt-ModerateAisca MBK -Ia.Cp Me-t
i Value. WTod Relun: c VY wlh didends reied. Rank How ulnd M edr v
hers wilh bsa ecle: As in lop 20%, E lnbo 20%. Min t Invti $ needed toirest h frnd. Surce: Mm tr.


New York Stock Exchange


Wkly YTD Wkly
Name Div YId PE Chg %Chg Last


AES Corp ... ...
AFLAC 1.20 3.3
AK Steel .20 3.0
AMR ... ...
AT&T Inc 1.72 6.0
AbtLab 1.92 3.7
Accenture 1.35 2.4
AMD ... ...
Aetna .60 1.7
Agilent
AlcatelLuc ...
Alcoa .12 1.2
AllegTch .72 1.9
Allstate .84 3.5
AlphaNRs ...
Altria 1.64 6.0
AMovilLs .41 1.9
AEP 1.84 4.9
AmExp .72 1.7
AmIntlGrp ...
AmTower ...
AmeriBrgn .46 1.3
Anadarko .36 .6
AnalogDev 1.00 2.9
Annaly 2.51 16.2
Apache .60 .7
ArcelorMit .75 4.3
ArchCoal' .44 2.9
ArchDan -.64 2.5
ArmourRsd1.32 19.3
ATMOS 1.36 4.3
BB&TCp. .64 3.1
BHP BlLt 2.02 2.8
BakrHu .60 1.2
BcBilVArg .61 7.1
BcoBrades .80 5.2
BcoSantSA .82 9.7
BcoSBrasil 1.65 22.4
BkofAm .04 .7
BkNYMel .52 2.9
Barclay .36 3.5
BariPVix rs ...
BarrickG .48 1.0
BerkH B ... ...
BestBuy .64 2.6
Blackstone .40 3.1
Boeing 1.68 2.7
BostonSci ...
BrMySq 1.32 4.1
CBRE Grp ... ...
CBSB .40 1.9
CSX s .48 2.4
CVS Care .50 1.5
CdnNRs gs .36 ...
SCapOne .20 .5
CapitlSrce .04 .7
CardnlHlth .86 2.1
Carnival 1.00 3.2
Caterpillar 1.84 2.4
Cemex
CenterPnt .79 4.0
CntryUnk 2.90 8.8
ChesEng .35 1.4
Chevron 3.12 3.3
Chimera .57 21.4
Citigrp rs .04 .2
Citigp wtA ..
CliffsNRs 1.12 2.0
CocaCola 1.88 2.9
CocaCE .52 2.2
Comerica .40 1.7
ConAgra .96 3.8
ConocPhil 2.64 4.1
ConsolEngy .40 1.1
ConEd 2.40 4.3
ConstellEn .96 2.6
Coming .30 2.2
Covidien .90 2.1
CSVellIVSt s... ...


12 +.26 -17.7
8 +1.68 -35.1
... +.13 -59.3
... -.46 -67.9
9 +.35 -3.2
13 +.39 +7.6
18 +3.84 +15.3
4 -.35 -42.2
8 -.87 +16.3
'12 +.12 -24.3
... -.24 -12.5
11 +.14 -36.9
26 +.24 -32.5
23 +.03 -25.6
45 +.70 -69.4
17 +.62 +11.4
9 -.57 -25.0
13 -.28 +4.9
11 -1.29 +1.2
... -.98 -56.6
57 +1.13 +6.4
14, -1.49 +4.9
39 +2.07 -14.5
12 +3.00 -9.1
5 -1.15 -13.6
9 +4.60 -28.8
9 +1.48 -54.4
11 +.76 -56.2
8 +.64 -15.4
8 +.04 -12.4
14 -.51 +2.4
15 -.40 -20.4
... +5.09 -23.0
16 +3.17 -13.7
... +.48 -15.3
.. +.48 -24.8
... +.44 -20.4
... +.04 -45.9
... -.22 -55.8
8 -.76 -41.0
... +.37 -38.6
... -3.15 +33.5
12 -.01 -12.3
14 +.66 -10.5
8 +1.47 -27.8
71- +.77 -9.9
13 +1.30 -5.3
14 -.29 -25.8
17 +1.33 +22.3
18 +.05 -34.0
13 +1.13 +12.9
13 +1.42 -6.7
14 +.19 -2.8
... -.14 -34.4
5 +.18 -6.5
19 -.22 -16.6
15 -1.62 +5.1
13 +1.31 -31.4
12 +1.68 -19.4
... -.34 -72.6
16 +.31 +26.8
12 -.33 -29.0
9 -.20 -2.2
8 +1.81 +3.5
5 -.11 -35.3
8 -.99 -47.9
... -.07 -61.1
5 +4.70 -28.4
13 -1.66 +.2
.13 -.77 -3.7
12 +.54 -44.3
14 +.81 +10.9
8 +.84 -5.8
14 +2.09 -26.1
16 -.91 +13.2
18 -.61 +22.3
6 +1.04 -30.6
12 -.57 -4.7
... +.24 -52.1


Wly YTD Wkly
DIv YId PE Chg %Chg Last


DDR Corp .24 2.3
DR Horton .15 1.6
DTE 2.35 4.7
Danaher .10 .2
Deere 1.64 2.5
DeltaAir ... ...
DenburyR ... ...
DeutschBk 1.07 3.0
DBGoldDS ...
DevonE .68 1.2
DrSCBrrs ...
DirFnBr rs ...
DirLCBr rs ...
DrxEMBull 1.10 .2
DrxEnBear ...
DrxFnBull ...
DirxSCBull ...
DirxLCBull ... ...
DirxEnBull ...
Discover .24 1.0
Disney .40 1.3
DomRescs 1.97 3.9
DowChm 1.00 4.0
DukeEngy 1.00 5.1
EMCCp ... ...
Ealon s 1.36, 3.5
EIPasoCp .04 .2
EmersonEI 1.38 3.1
EnCanag .80 4.2
Exeloh 2.10 5.0
ExxonMbl 1.88 2.6
FstHorizon .04 .7
FirstEngy 2.20 5.0
FordM
ForestOils ...
FBHmScn ...
FMCG s 1.00 2.9
FrontierCm .75 12.8
Ganrett .32 3.1
Gap .45 2.6
GenGrPrn .40 3.4
GenMills 1.22 3.1
GenMot n ...
GenOn En ...
Genworth ...
Gerdau .25 3.4
GoldFLtd .24 1.6
Goldcrp g .41 .9
GoldmanS 1.40 1.5
Goodrich 1.16 1.0
Goodyear ...
HCP Inc 1.92 5.5
Hallibrtn .36 1.1
HartfdFn .40 2.4
HitMgmt ... ....
HeclaM
Hertz
Hess .40 .8
HewlettP .48 1.9
HomeDp 1.00 2.9
Honwlllnt 1.33 2.9
HostHotls .16 1.5
Huntsmn .40 4.1
ING ... ...
iShGold ... ...
iSAstla 1.06 4.9
iShBraz 3.42 6.3
iShGer .67 3.5
iSh HK .42 2.8
iShJapn .17 1.8
iShKor .50 1.0
iShSing .50 4.5
iSTaiwn .29 ..
iShSilver ...
iShChina25 .85 2.7
iShEMkts .84 2.3
iShB20T 3.94 3.3
iS Eafe 1.68 3.4
iSR1KG .78 1.4


... -.31
76 +.13
12 +.89
15 +.34
11 +1.13
15 +.30
17 +.22
+.54
-.09
4 +1.04
... -5.30
... -2.16
... -3.50
+1.11
... -2.81
-.21
... +1.03
... +2.68
... +2.62
6 +.53
13 +1.54
17 -.50
11 +2.30
14 -.20
23 +1.40
1-1, +3.13
24 +.88
14 +2.70
41 -.22
13 -.68
10 +.93
36 +.12
18 -.62
5 +1.02
9 -.17
... -.05
6 +3.56
37 -.23
5 +.89
9 +1.18
... -.25
15 +.57
6 +1.83
... -.07
... -.61
... +.12
2 -.53
16 +.70
9 -1.86
28 -.30
... +.21
30 +.15
12 +2.80
4 +.82
10 +.17
20 +.06
13 +.74
6 +.74
6 +2.43
15 +1.05
,13 +1.58
... -.17
7 -.01
... +.33
... +.14
... +1.37
... +2.03
.. +.68
... +.56
-.08
... +1.92
... +.02
... +.37
... +1.32
... +.21
... +1.35
... -2.25
... +1.20
... +1.28


-24.8 10.59
-23.1 9.17
+10.1 49.91.
-10.4 42.28
-20.9 65.70
-38.1 7.80
-38.6 11.72
-32.5 35.15
-35.0 5.19
-28.1 56.48
+1.8 47.67
+35.0 63.81
-2.4 42.78
-65.1 14.43
-10.5 20.17
-62.6 10.41
-53.0 34.03
-31.4 49.05
-41.7' 34.05
+26.3 23.41
-15.5 31.70
+17.7 50.27
-27.5 24.76
+11.1 19.79
-2.2 22.39
-23.9 38.63
+33.4 18.36
-23.0 44.01
-34.8 18.99
4.7 41.93
+.6 73.56
-48.4 6.08
+19.6 44.29
-'36.3 10.69
-62.7 10.19
-2.8 12.35
-43.4 34.01
-39.6 5.88
-30.9 10.42
-21.5 17.30
-23.4 11.85
+8.9 38.75
-40.3 22.01
-28.9 2.71
-61.0 5.13
-48.2 7.25
-18.4 14.79
+.8 46.34
-44.9 92.69
+36.7 120.38
-13.1 10.30
-4.3 35.21
-18.4 33.32
-36.0 16.96
-25.7 7.09
-51.9 5.42
-33.5 9.64
-30.5 53.20
-40.9 24.88
-3.3 33.92
-14.4 45.49
-39.7 10.77
-38.1 9.66
-24.6 7.38
+14.9 15.97
-15.8 21.43
-30.2 54.04
-20.8 18.95
-21.3 14.89
-14.0 9.38
-20.8 48.49
-20.4 11.02
-22.0 12.18
+.2 30.23
-28.0 31.04
-23.5 36.44
+25.6 118.24
-15.9 48.98
-5.9 53.86


KEEP A LEVEL HEAD

IN AN UP-AND-DOWN MARKET


Amid recent market volatility, we've seen substantial
upswing and downturns. But when the market reacts one
way, it doesn't mean you should, too. The actions you take
today can significantly 'impact your financial future.
So before you alter your investment strategy, schedule a
financial review. We can help you stay focused despite the
market's recent disappointments and find opportunities
for the long term.


Call today to schedule your financial review.

SSte Jones, CFP
Financial Advisor
2929 West US Highway 90
Suite 114
Lake City, FL 32055
386-752.3847

www.edwardjones.com Member tSIC





--Al


Name DIv
iShR2K 1.02
iShREst 2.18
ITW 1.44
IngerRd .48
IBM 3.00
*IntlGame .24
IntPap 1.05
Interpublic .24
Invesco .49
IronMtn 1.00
ItauUnibH .84
IvanhM g 1.48
JPMorgCh 1.00
Jabil .28
JanusCap .20
JohnJn 2.28
JohnsnCtI .64
JnprNtwk ..
Keycorp .12
Kimco .72
Kinross g .12
KodiakO g ...
Kohls 1.00
Kraft 1.16
LSI Corp
LVSands
LennarA .16
LillyEli 1.96
UncNat .20
UoydBkg
LyonBas A .80
MEMC


Wkly YTD Wkly
YId PE Chg %Chg Last
1.6 ... +1.20 -16.3 65.50
4.4 ...-1.01 -11.4 49.56
3.3 11 +1.55 -19.2 43.15
1.7 ... -.35 -41.1 27.74'
1.6 15 +7.52 +24.3 182.39
1.6 18 +.90 -12.8 15.43
4.4 8 +.80 -11.7 24.05
3.2 14 +.40 -28.4 7.60
3.0 9 +.69 -32.7 16.20
3.4 29 -2.02 +18:4 29.60
5.2 ... +.76 -31.9 16.27
.... ... +2.55 -29.1 16.25
3.3 7 +.83 -27.6 30.70
1.5 11 +.81 -7.4 18.60
3.4 6 -.15 -54.9 5.85
3.6 14 -.56 +2.1 63.13
2.2 13 +2.17 -25.3 28.54
18 +1.79 -48.4 19.05
1.9 6 +.23 -30.4 6.16
4.9 81 -.27 -19.2 14.58
4 19 -1.10 -27.8 13.68
... 68 -.43 -27.6 ,4.78
2.0 13 +1.07 -7.7 50.17
3.4 19 +.18 +7.1 33.76
... 10 +.21 -10.0 5.39
.. 30 +3.28 -9.4 41.62
1.1 29 +.58 -24.7 14.12
5.2 8 +.95 +8.2 37.92
1.3 4 -.48 -45.7 15.10
. +.03 -48.4 2.12
3.0 ... +2.09 -22.9 26.52
... 18 +.37 -50.2 5.61


Name


Div YId PE


MFAFncl 1.00 15.9
MGIC ... ...
MGM Rsts ... ...
Macys .40 1.5
MagHRes
Mantowoc .08 1.1
ManpwrGp .80 2.2
Manulife g .52
MarathnO s .60 2.7
MarathP n .80 2.5
MktVGold .40 .7
MktVRus .18 .7
MarIntA .40 1.4
Masco .30 4.0
McDrmInt ...
Mechel ... ...
MedcoHIth ...
Medrtmic .97 3.0
Merck 1.52 4.8
MetLife .74 2.6
MetroPCS .. ...
MobileTele 1.06 7.8
Molycorp ...
Monsanto 1.20 1.7
MonstrWw ...
MorgStan .20 1.4
Mosaic .20 .4
NCR Corp ...
Nabors ... ...
NatGrid 2.92 5.8
NOilVarco .44 .7
NY CmtyB 1.00 8.3


Wkly YTD Wkly
Cha %Cha Last


6 -.50
... +.28
... -.28
11 +.63
+.03
+.57
+3.10
+.09
5 +.95
... +4.54
..-.31
... +.41
55 +.93
... +.45
16 +3.19
... -.20
14 +1.58
11 -.16
12 -1.09
8 +.79
12 -.78
10 +1.28
... +2.42
24+11.19
... +.45
31 +.73
10 +2.22
12 +.73
14 +1.16
... +.99
14 +7.59
10 +.16


Name DIv YId PE
NewmtM 1.20 1.9 14
NextEraEn 2.20 4.1 13
NiSource .92 4.3 20
NobleCorp .53 1.8 25
NokiaCp .55 9.4 ...
Nordstrm .92 1.9 16
NorflkSo 1.72 2.7 14
Nucor .1.45 4.4 22
OcciPet 1.84 2.4 11
OfficeDpt
OilSvHT 1.58 1.0 ...
Omncre .16 .6 ...
PG&ECp 1.82 4.2 16
PNC 1.40 2.9 7
PPLCorp 1.40 5.0 12
PatriotCoal ... ... ...
PeabdyE .34 1.0 10
Penney .80 2.8 17
PepsiCo 2.06 3.4 16
PetrbrsA 1.34 6.4 ...
Petrobras 1.26 5.6 ...
Pfizer .80 4.3 12
PhilipMor 3.08 4.7 15
Potash s .28 .6 16
PS USDBull..........
ProLogis 1.12 4.8
ProShtS&P ... ... ...
PrUShS&P ... ......
PrUIShDow ... ... ...
ProUltQQQ ... ......
PrUShQQQrs... .....
ProUftSP .31 .8 ...
ProUShL20 ... .. ...
ProUltSRE ... ... ...
ProUtFin .15 .4 ...
ProShtR2K ... ... ...
ProUflR2K ... ... ...
ProUSSP500... ......
PrUIISP500 s.03 .1 ..
ProUSSIvrs.. .....
ProUShEuro... ... ...
ProgsvCp 1.40 2.2 10
ProUSR2K rs... ... ...
Prudentl 1.15 2.5 7
PSEG .1.37 4.2 10
PulteGrp ... ... ...
QksilvRes ... ... 4
RadianGrp .01 .5 ...
Raytheon 1.72 4.2 7
RegionsFn .04 1.2 ..
ReneSola ... ... 1
RioTinto 1.17 2.4 ...
RiteAld ... ... ...
SLMCp .40 3.2 9
SpdrOJtA 3.14 2.8 ..
SpdrGold
SPMid 1.64 1.1
S&P500ETF2.46 2.1
SpdrHome .31 2.2 ..
SpdrKbwBk .26 1.5
SpdrLehHY4.28 11.0 ...
SpdrLel-3bll... ... .
SpdrKbwRB.40 2.0 ...
SpdrRetl .49 1.0 ...
SpdrOGEx .50 1.1 ...
SpdrMetM .42 .9 ..
Safeway .58 3.3 11
StJude .84 2.3 13
SandRdge ... ... 25
SaraLee .46 2.8 8
Schlmbrg 1.00 1.6 16
Schwab .24 2.1 19
SemiHTr .64 2.2 ...
SiderurNac .81 10.4 ...
SilvWhtng .12 .4 23
SilvrcpM g .08 ... 20
SouthnCo 1.89 4.5 18
SwstAiri .02 .3 11
SwstnEngy ...... 20


Wkly YTD Wkly
Ch9 %Chg Last
+.14 +2.7 63.09
+.18 +4.3 54.20
+.17 +22.3 21.55
+.21 -17.4 29.56
+.18 -43.4 5.84
+3.01 +14.9 48.69
+3.85 +3.3 64.87
+1.23 -25.0 32.87
+5.75 -21.3 77.25
+.03 -61.3 2.09
+6.03 -22.3 109.14
-.35 -1.2 25.08
+.67 -10.2 42.97
-.44 -21.4 47.75
-.44 +6.8 28.10
+.56 -53.4 9.02
+.77 -45.8 34.65
+2.35 -10.5 28.93
-.88 -6.6 61.02
+.20 -38.8 20.92
+.12 -40.4 22.57
+.76 +5.3 18.44
+2.75 +11.3 65.13
+1.50 -13.4 44.72
-.04 -1.9 22.27
-.73 -25.8 23.52
-1.14 +2.6 44.96
-1.1 +1.8 24.18
82 -5.5 19.57
+4.24 -5.2 77.19
-3.53 -12.6 50.86
+1.67 -17.5 39.64
+.64 -45.8 20.08
+.38 -1.9 17.79
-.19 -44.7 36.71
-.95 +8.4 34.88
+.81 -34.3 28.04
-1.58 -2.6 18.90
+2.64 -29.0 48.52
-2.28 -62.2 14.83
+.02 -5.0 19.30
+.33 -9.0 18.09
-3.50 +9.2 54.87
-.84 -21.6 46.02
-1.05 +1.6 .32.32
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Name DIv
CognizTech...
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Come spcl .45
Costco .96
Cree Inc
Crocs
CypSemi .36
Dell Inc
Dndreon
DirecTVA ...
DishNetwk ...
DonlleyRR 1.04
DryShips .12
E-Trade
eBay
ElectArts ...
Enerl hlf ...
EricsnTel .37
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ExpScripts ...
F5Netwks ..
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FifthThird .32
Finisar
FstNiagara .64
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Rextm n
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GT AdvTc ...
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Google
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Name DIv Yld
JA Solar ... ...
JDS Uniph ... I ...
JamesRiv ...
JetBlue
JoyGIbl .70 1.0
KLATnc 1.40 3.4
LamResrch ...
Level3 ... ...
UbGlobA ...
LUbtylntA ...
UfeTech ...
UnearTch .96 3.2
lluulemn gs ...
MarvelT ... ...
Mattel .92 3.4
Maximlntg .88 3.6
MelcoCrwn ...
Microchp 1.39 4.1
MicronT
Microsoft .80 3.0
Nil Hldg ... ...
NasdOMX ...
NetApp
Netflix ... ...
NewsCpA .19 1.2
NewsCpB .19 1.2
NorTrst 1.12 3.1
NuanceCm ...
Nvidia
OmniVisn ...
OnSmcnd.
Oracle .24 .8
PMC Sra ...
Paccar .72 2.0
PaltUTI .20 1.2
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DIv Yld PE Chg %Chg Last


Popular
Power-One...
PwShs QQQ.41
PrdceTR 1.24
PrUPShQQQ...
Qualcom .86
RF MicD
Rambus
RschMotn ...
Riverbeds s
S1 Corp
SanDisk ...
SeagateT .72
SeattGen ...
Sina ...
SiriusXM ...
SkywksSol ...
Staples .40
Starbucks .52
StlDynam .40
SusqBnc .08
Symantec ...
TDAneritr .20
Tellabs .08
TevaPhrm .87
TibcoSft ...
TriQuint
UrbanOut
VirgnMda h .16
Vodafone 1.45
Windstrm 1.00
Wynn 2.00
Xilinx .76
YRC rsh
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Wk YTD Wly
DIv YId PE Chg %Chg Last


AbdAsPac .42
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AlexcoRg ...
AlIdNevG ...
AntaresP ...
Augusta g ...
Aurizon g .,
AvalRare ...
Banro g
BarcUBS36...
BaGSOl ...
Brigus grs ...
BritATob 3.86
CAMAC En ...
CelSci
CFCdag .01
ChenlereEn...
ClaudeR g ..
CrSuiHIY .32
DejourEg ...
DenisnMg ...
EV LtdDur 1.25
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FrkStPrp .76
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GascoEngy ...
Gastar grs ...
GenMoly ...
GoldResrc .60
GoldStrg ...
GranTrrag ...
GrtBasGg ...
GtPanSv g ...
ImpOilgs .44
InovioPhm ...
IntTowerg ...
KeeganRg ...
KimberRq ...


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Name DIv
LadThalFn ...
MadCatzg ...
MdwGoldg ...
Minefndg ...
NeoStem ...
Neoprobe ..
Nevsun g .06
NwGold g ..
NA Pall g
NDynMng ...
NthnO&G
NthgM g ...
NovaGldg ...
Oilsandsg ...
PalatinTch,...
ParaG&S
PhmAth ..
PionDrill ...
QuestRMg ...
RareEleg ...
Rentech ...
Richmntg ...
Rubicon g ...
SamsO&G
TanzRyg
Taseko
TmsatPet
TriValley ..
TriangPet ...
Ur-Energy ...
Uranerz
UraniumEn ...
VantageDr ...
VirnetX
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Walternv .22
YMBio ...


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Yld PE Chg %Chg Last
... ... -.05 +28.2 1.50
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MUTUALUS ,... :
TotalAssets Total RetunRank Pot Mirint'
Name Obj ($Mlns) NAV 4-wk 12-mo 5-year Load Invt


Currencies
Last Pvs Day
Australia 1.0229 1.0252
Britain 1.5553 1.5431
Canada 1.0394 1.0390
Euro .7470 .7447
Japan 76.82 76.61
Mexico 13.3060 13.5380
Switzerlnd .9266 .9209
British pound expressed in U.S. dollars. All oth-
ers show dollar in foreign currency.


ACMooreIf ...
ASML HId .58 1.6
ATP O&G ...
AcmePkt ...
ActivsBliz .17 1.3
AdobeSy ...
AkamaiT ...
AlteraCp If .32 1.0
Amarin
Amazon
ACapAgy 5.60 21.0
AmCapLtd ... ...
Amgen 1.12 2.0
AmkorT If ...
Apple Inc ...
ApldMall .32 3.0
AriadP ... ...
ArmHId .15 .6
ArubaNet ...
Atmel
Autodesk ... ...
AutoData 1.44 2.9
AvagoTch .44 1.3
BMCSft ... ...
Baidu
BedBath ...
BdgExp ... ...
Broadcom .36 1.0
BrcdeCm ...
CA Inc .20 1.0
Cadence ... ...
Celgene ...
Cephln ... ...
CienaCorp ...
Cirrus
Cisco .24 1.4
CitrixSys ...
Clearwire ...


|I _____ Weekly Dow Jones I


---- y V










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Legal

Notice of public sale of the aban-
doned property of: John Robert Gib-
bons. On 10/17/2011 at 11am at 242
NW Jan Ct., Lake City, FL 32055,
Thomas Rockett will hold a public
sale of the following vehicles:
Vin# 1FMEU15H3JLA39000-
1988 Ford Bronco
.Vin# 1FDKE30GXLHB76502
1991 Ford Chassis/American by Co-
bra Motor Home
Property will be sold to the highest
and best bidder and property is of-
fered as is and Thomas Rockett re-
serves the right to accept or reject
any and all bids.
05528244
October 2, 9, 2011

Registration of Fictitious Names
We the undersigned, being duly
sworn, do hereby declare under oath
that the names of all persons interest-
ed in the business or profession car-
ried on under the name of LOUISIA-
NA PO BOY SHOP at 365 S. MAR-
ION AVE, STE. 104., LAKE CITY,
FL., 32025

Contact Phone Number: 386-682-
0854 and the extent of the interest of
each, is as follows:
Name: HEIDI LEBLANC OWENS
Extent of Interest: 100%
by:/s/ Heidi LeBlanc Owens
STATE OF FLORIDA
COUNTY OO COLUMBIA
Sworn to and subscribed before me
this 7th day of October, A.D. 2011.
by:/s/ KATHLEEN A. RIOTTO
05528429
October 9, 2011


100 Job
Opportunities

Applications are being accepted
for Police Officer for the Town of
White Springs Police Department.
Applications may be picked up at
Town Hall 10363 Bridge St.
White Springs, Florida.
EOE/drug free work place

AVON!! Only $10 to start!
Earn bonus $ up to $150+
1-800-275-9945 pin #4206
www.youravon.com/tdavies
Hiring Locally This Week
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Company. Full training provided -
Potential of $60K+ annually.
401(k), BCBS Insurance &
Pension for those who qualify.
Call 1-800-257-5500 to
set up an interview.


FLORIDA
.A-J-
GATE WA
( C0tCOL Ic G F

ADJUNCT INSTRUCTORS
SPRING TERIM2012
COLLEGE LEVEL MATHEMATICS
Master's degree in mathematics or a
master's degree with at least 18 graduate
credit hours in mathematics required.
Contact Paula Cifuentes at 386-754-4260
or caula.cifuentes(foc.edu for more
information.
CHEMISTRY
Evening classes. Applicants must have a
master's degree in chemistry or a master's
degree with at least 18 graduate credit
hours in chemistry. Contact Paula
Cifuentes at 386-754-4260 or
aulacifuentesSifoc.edu
for. more information.
MEDICAL BILLING AND INSURANCE
Classes meet on Monday evenings 6:30-
9:10. Minimum requirement is at least two
years of experience preferred. Contact
Pam Carswell at 386-754-4266 or send
resume and unofficial transcripts to
Damela.carswellifac.edu
INTRODUCTION TO ELECTRONICS
Bachelor's degree in Industrial
Engineering or similar required. Master's
degree preferred. Contact John Piersol
at 386-754-4225 or
iohn.Diersolfaoc.edu
MANUFACTURING MATERIALS AND
PROCESSES
Bachelor's degree In Industrial
Engineering or similar required. Master's
degree preferred. Contact John Piersol at
386-754-4225 or lohn.oiersolafac.edu.
INDUSTRIAL SAFETY
Bachelor's degree in Industrial
Engineering or similar required. Master's
degree preferred. Contact John Piersol at
386-754-4225 or lohn.olersoliafac.edu.
NURSING CLINICAL
BSN Required. Master's degree In nursing
preferred. At least two years of recent
clinical experience required. Contact
Mattie Jones at 386-754-4368 or
mattie.ionestlfoc.edu.
College application and copies of transcripts
required All foreign transcripts must be
submitted with a translation and evaluation.
Application available at www.fgs.sdu
FGC is accrtedited by thd Southern Association of
Colleges and Schools
VP/ADA/EA/EO College in Education & Employment







Lawn & Landscape Service

J&M LAWN Service & more for
all your outdoor needs. Don't
waste your time or weekend,
Free Estimate. 386-984-2187


Services

DIVORCE, BANKRUPTCY,
RESUMES.


Other court approved forms-
386-961-5896.


HAULING. Rental clean out,
garage clean out. Cut up and
remove brush. FREE Estimates!!
386-497-3099


100 Job
100 Opportunities
Due to increased'sales volume at
Burkins Chevrolet of Macclenny,
we are currently seeking 2
professional sales consultants.
Experience is a plus, as well as
GM training. We have an
excellent working environment
with opportunity to grow in our
organization. Please contact Bob
Burkins at Burkins Chevrolet in
person Monday through Friday.
Experience Sewing Machine
Operator. Also, will train
if qualified.
Call Hafners 386-755-6481
Local law firm seeks experienced
Real Estate closer. Send reply to
Box 05078, C/O The Lake City
Reporter, P.O. Box 1709,
Lake City, FL, 32056
Masons/Operators/Skilled Labor
Opportunities exist for
experienced construction
personnel. Reply to: PO Box 1239
Lake City, Florida 32056
PART TIME CDL DRIVER
Must have CLEAN driving record
and a minimum of 2 years experi-
ence. Call 386-935-1705
Stylist needed. Full time /Part time
Hourly pay. No Clientel needed
Contact Darlene.
386-984-6738
TANKER DRIVER
Night Position & Part time day po-
sition needed, Gasoline & Diesel
Fuel Transport Delivery Driver,
Tues. Sat.,
Truck based in Lake City, Florida,
Local Deliveries, Health Insur-
ance, 401K, Paid Vacation
Competitive Pay Structure,
Must have two years driver
experience, clean MVR,
Application available by mailing:
info@jj-fuel.com
Fax completed applications to
Heather at 850-973-3702.
Questions call 1-800-226-5434
after 3:00 p.m., Speak to Ronnie.
Training
Professional House Cleaners,
are you looking for a new career?
(386)752-5655 for more info.

Medical
120 Employment

05528030
LEARN TO DRAW BLOOD
Local Phlebotomy Course
offered in Lake City, FLA
Certificate program.
(904)566-1328
05528417
0



Meridian Behavioral
Healthcare Inc.
www.mbhci.org
Please visit our website to view
current open opportunities
and to apply online :.
Meridian is an active partner
with the National Health Service
Corps
For its Student Loan
Forgiveness program. Licensed
Clinicians who serve in our
approved locations may qualify
for up to $60k in Student Loan
forgiveness for F/T
2yr commitment.
Therapists:
Program Manager (Licensed)
Licensed, or Master's Level
in Outpatient
LCSW or Certified Behavioral
Analyst Preferred
Bachelor's-Level in
Counselor Support
Case Management
(adult & child)
Master's Therapist in
Methadone Clinic
Administration:
Client Relations Specialist

Medical Services

RN Nursing Manager
DETOX ( Gville)
RN full-time Lake City
CSU
PRN RN, LPN, C.N.A.
Recovery Specialist
(Direct Care)
To see our current openings in
Mental Health and to apply
online, please go to:
www.mbhci.org
EOE, DFWP, E-Verify
Home care agency in need of an
MSP biller for training office staff.
Will contract rates. Please email
wbonilla()suwanneemedical.com
Medicare accredited home care
agency in need of several LPNs to
assist in the care of a school age
child in Alachua. Potential of 33
hours a week. Please email
wbonill@suwanneemedical.com
for information.


240 Schools &
240* Education

05528364
Interested in a Medical Career?
Express Training offers
courses for beginners & exp
Nursing Assistant, $479
next class-10/17/10

Phlebotomy national certifica-
tion, $800 next class-11/28/11

Continuing education
Fees incl. books, supplies, exam
fees. Call 386-755-4401 or
expresstrainingservices.com



310 Pets & Supplies

FREE TO GOOD HOME
,Black American Lab. About
1 yr. old. Playful and happy!
386-365-8707
FREE To Good Home.
Young male very tame Ferrett.
PLease call for more info.
386-292-2784
PUBLISHER'S NOTE
Florida Law 828.29 requires dogs
and cats being sold to be at least 8
weeks old and have a health
certificate from a licensed
veterinarian documenting they
have mandatory shots and are
free from intestinal and external
parasites. Many species of wild-
life must be licensed by Florida
Fish and Wildlife. If you are
unsure, contact the local
office for information.

30 Livestock &
30j Supplies
Registered. Angus Bull Yearling,
7 mons. old, exc. bloodlines, off of
a long line of top producers $950.
386-249-3104 or 386-719-4802


361 Farm Equipment

2001 John Deere 4600, 4X4, Cab,
Loader, Diesel, Priced to sell
$5500 contact me for details at
mcha58pa@msn.com
941-343-8317

402 Appliances
GE Nice Black Dish Washer
Clean. Works Great.
$135.00 obo
386-292-3927
Lg capacity White GE Dryer.
Works great.
$145.
386-292-3927


407 Computers

DELL Computer,
$100.00
386-755-9984 or
386-292-2170
HP Computer,
$45.00
386-755-9984 or
386-292-2170

411 Machinery &
411 Tools
COMPRESSOR 2HP, 120V
motor, belt drive.
Asking $60. runs good.
SOLD


420 Wanted to Buy

K&H TIMBER
We Buy Pine Hardwood &
Cypress. Large or small tracts.
Call 386-961-1961.
Wanted Junk Cars, Trucks, Vans.
$275 & up CASH! Free Pick Up!
NO title needed !386-878-9260
After 5pm 386- 752-3648.


430 Garage Sales

PUBLISHER'S NOTE
All Yard Sale Ads
Must be Pre-Paid.


440 Miscellaneous.

22,000 BTU Window AC
WORKS GREAT
$185. obo
386-292-3927
3 PUSH Mowers.
Need TLC. (1) Craftsman,
(1) Bolen (1) Yardman.
$100.00 for all. 386-755-6963
4 ROOM USED CARPET
AND PADDING. Off white.
. You move, haul away and clean
the carpet. $75.00 386-755-6963
Microwave. Looks good,
works good.
$35.00
q92-").9-1WQ97


440 Miscellaneous
NEW TAPCO C2 House Floor
Jack 34in-55in. with 16,000 lb
compression at 3ft. Made in USA.
Only $50.00. 386-755-6963

Rock Polishing Kit
Tumbler, instructions,
polishing powders.
25. 386-752-0987
Tow Behind,
Grill/Smoker
386-249-3104 or
386-719-4802
Two Burial Plots for sale.
Forest Lawn Cemetery.
$600. ea.
386-755-9305


460 Firewood

Firewood for Sale. $65. per Truck
Load. Rick 386-867-1039 or Joey
965-0288 if no answer pis leave
message we will call you back.

630 Mobile Homes
630 for Rent

14 Wide, 3/2-$525, 2/2-$475.
Clean, Quiet Country Park
Water, septic, garbage incl. NO
PETS! 386-758-2280 References.

lbedrm/lbth $350 mo.,Also, Resi-
dential RV lots. Between Lake
City & G'ville. Access to 1-75 &
-441 (352)317-1326 Call for terms.
2&3 BR MH. $395 $650. mo.
plus deposit. Water & sewer fur-
nished. Cannon Creek MHP
386-752-6422
2/2 Units.
October Special
$525. mo. Includes water.
386-984-8448
2BR/1BA CH/A includes
water, sewer, garbage.
$495. mo + $495 dep.
386-961-8466
3/2.5 S of Lake City, (Branford
area) $550 mo plus security
386-590-0642 or 386-867-1833
www.suwanneevalleyproperties.com
3br/2ba moble home, in town,
private lot, front & rear porch,
storage shed $650/mo + security.
386-466-2266 or 752-5911
5br/2ba Close to Target
Distribution Center. $850. mo.
1st + dep. Credit references
required. 386-365-3761
CLEAN 3br/lba, In quiet,
private park. Large lot
Call: 386-752-6269
Iv message if no answer.
LG clean 3br's $450. -$650. mo. +
dep. Also, 2br mobile home's
avail. N6 Pets. 5 Points area. Also
3 br Westside. 386-961-1482
Mobile Homes for rent in
White Springs, Lake City & Ft.
White Contact 386-623-3404
or 386-397-2779
X-CLEAN 2/2, 8 mi NW of VA
nice country acre. $500 mo +
dep. No dogs, smoke-free
environment. 386.961.9181

640 Mobile Homes
Sfor SaleW

It's Here. Jacobson Homes
"Sub Zero" Top Quality Home
with lots of tape and texture and
a dream kitchen apd more.
North Point Homes, Gainesville
(352)872-5566

Jacobson Homes Factory Outlet
Try us in Gainesville. Best Prices
and Financing in Florida. North
Pointe Homes (352)872-5566
3br/2ba, well maintained DWMH
on 4.85 ac. Fence, pasture, fruit
trees. MLS#72427, $64,900
Jo Lytte, Remax 386-365-2821
jolytte@remaxnfl.com
NEW 2012 Town Homes
28X44 3/2 Only $37,900, 32X80
4/2 Just $69,900.'Both include
Delivery and set, AC, Skirting and
steps. No Games!
North Pointe Homes, Gainesville,
Fl. (352)872-5566
Palm Harbor Homes
NEW HOME STIMULUS
5K For Your Used Mobile Home -
Any Condition
800-622-2832 ext. 210
MOVE-IN READY! Country liv-
ing at it's best. 3br/2ba in pristine
condition on 1.39 acres $89,900
MLS#78345 DANIEL CRAPPS
AGENCY, INC. 386-755-5110

650 Mobile Home
& Land
Owner Finance, Large, clean 3/2
on 2.5 ac, place, sm down. $875
mo, 386-590-0642 / 386-867-1833
www.suwanneevalleyproperties.com


710 Unfurnished Apt.
710 For Rent







2br/1 ba. 1 car garage,


386-961-8075
2BR/1BA. Close to town.
$565.mo plus deposit.
Includes water & sewer.
386-965-2922
2BR/2BA w/garage
3 minutes from VA hospital.
Call for details.
386-365-5150
A Landlord You Can Love!
2 br Apts $550. & up + sec. Great
area. CH/A washer/dryer hookups.
386-758-9351/352-208-2421
Amberwood Hills Apts.
Private Patio area. Beautiful yard.
Washer/dryer hkup. Free water &
sewer. 1/1, 2/1. Move in special.
386-754-1800. wwwmvflapts.com
Columbia Arms Apt. located 1/2
mi from V.A. & Winn Dixie. Pt
Friendly. Move in Special $199.
Pool, laundry & balcony.
386-754-1800. www.myflapts.com
Duplex w/garage spacious, 2/1,
1300 sq ft, W/D hook up, CH/A,
$650 month & bckgrnd chk,
386-697,3248 or 352-377-7652
Fall Special! 1/2 Price First
Month. Updated Apt, w/tile
floors/fresh paint. Great area.
From $395.+sec. 386-752-9626
Greentree Townhouse
Summer special. 2/1, 2/1.5. Free
water & sewer. Balcony & patio.
Laundry. Behind Kens on Hwy 90..
386-754-1800 wwwmyflapts.com
Large 2 br Apt In town
$500. mo $500 dep.
386-344-2972

Redwine Apartments. Move in
special $199. Limited time. Pets
welcome, with 5 complexes,
we have a home for you.
386-754-1800. www.mvflapts.com
The Lakes Apts. Studios & IBr's
from $135/wk. Util. & cable incl.,
Sec 8 vouchers accepted, monthly
rates avail Call 386-752-2741
Wayne Manor Apts.
Move in $199. Summer special.
2/1, washer/dryer. Behind Kens off
Hwy 90. 386-754-1800
www.myflapts.com
Windsor Arms Apartments.
Summer special $199. Move in!
2/1, 2/1.5, 2/2. Pet Friendy.,Free
200 ch. Dish. Washer/dryer hkup.
386-754-1800. www.myflapts.com

0 Furnished Apts.
720 For Rent
Rooms for Rent. Hillcrest, Sands,
Columbia. All furnished. Electric,
cable, fridge, microwave. Weekly
or monthly rates. 1 person $135,
2 persons $150. weekly
386-752-5808

7 Unfurnished
730 Home For Rent

'09 Custom Dream Home
4BR/3.5BA, 5+acres, horses ok.
Old brick & heart pine floors,
jet tub, DSL. Beautiful!
For right person $2000/mo.
negotiable 970-221-0090
1/1' Cottage pool access, no pets,
country setting, $695 mo includes
utlilities & cable. $300 sec. Near
SR 47 & 75 386-719-5616
3/2 998 Highlands Loop 675.00mo
3/2 931 Highlands Loop 700.00mo-
Commercial Office avail.
386-755-3649
3BR/1.5 BA Large lot. Very clean
with storage shed. Quiet area.
$850 mo. + $850. dep.
386-752-7578
4BR/2BA 2800 sqft brick.
$850. mo. + $850 dep.
386-961-8466

4br/2ba CHA Brick, 1200 sqft
lac., Close to FGCC, CR 245A.
Ceramic tile/carpet, $700 mo $800
dep (904)708-8478 App. req'd
Brick 3br/2ba Large yard, garage,
CH/A. 179 SW Stanley Ct. Lake
City. $900. mo + $850 dep.
Call 386-365-8543
LOVELY 3BR/1BA Farm house
for rent. Quiet country area.
$500. mo. Please call after 5pm.
386-752-0017. Leave message.
Prime location 2br/lba.
Resid'l or comm'l. Corner of Baya
& McFarlane. $600. mo. $500 sec.
386-752-9144 or 755-2235

750 Business &
Office Rentals


___________________ WOW! 2 Mobile homes on 5
New Sloan Regal Flusho Matic. acres! 2006, 3/2.5, above pool, 1For Lease: E Baya Ave. Two -
Chrome finish, go tankless flush. 1997 1,500 sq. ft. with nice 1000 sqft office space units or
Made in USA. Only $95.00. Easy porch.$139,888 MLS 78531 Brit- combined for 2000 sqf. 386-984-
installation. 386-755-6963 tany Results Realty 386-397-3473 0622 or weekends 386-497-4762


SADvantage


I











LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED SUNDAY, OCTOBER 9, 2011


750 Business &
5 Office Rentals

05527923
OFFICE SPACE for Lease
576 sq' $450/mth
900 sq' $600/mth
3568 sq' $2973/mth
8300 sq' $5533/mth
also Bank Building
Excellent Locations
Tom Eagle, GRI
(386) 961-1086 DCA Realtor

1525 S. Ohio Ave, Live Oak, FL
Flexible space for lease. Great
location. 1,500- 17,000sf. Scott
Stewart 867-3498 MLS# 77247
Westfield Realty Group


805 Lots for Sale
BEAUTIFUL 5 acres in
Lake City, 100% owner financing,
no qualifying, $395 per month.
Please call 512-663-0065


Bring the Horses. 4br/2ba. Plenty
of room on 5 ac lot. Master suite
w/garden tub.$109,500 MLS
78982 Roger Lovelady
386-365-7039 Westfield Realty
PUBLISHER'S NOTE
All real estate advertising in this
newspaper is subject to the fair
housing act which makes it illegal
to advertise "any preference,
limitation, or discrimination based
on race, color, religion, sex,
disability, familial status or nation-
al origin; or any intention to make
such preference, limitation or
discrimination." Familial status '
includes children under the age of
18 living with parents or legal
custodians, pregnant women and
people securing custody of chil-
dren under the age of 18. This
newspaper will not knowingly
accept any advertising for real es-
tate which is in violation of the
law. Our readers are hereby in-
formed that all dwellings adver-
tised in this'newspaper are availa-
ble on an equal opportunity basis.
To complain of discrimination call
HUD toll free at 1-800-669-9777,
the toll free .
telephone number to the hearing
impaired is 1-800-927-9275.

810 Home for Sale ,
3800 sf two story, 5 br 3b, metal
roof, two kitchens, quiet nice
country acre 8 mi. NW of VA.
$159,000 firm cash only
386.961.9181 .
3br/2ba on Alligator Lake.
Fireplace, cathedral ceilings. 2 car
garage. Tennis court in back.
$156,900 Lisa Waltrip 365-5900
Westfield Realty Group
4 BR/2 BA, on 1.acre, granite
floors-thru out, open kitchen, wrap
around front porch.$139,900
MLS 77292 Brittany
Results Realty 386-397-3473
Beautiful home on 15 acres w/over
2,500 sq. ft. New appli., new tank
at well, new drain field, workshop.
$235,000 MLS 77552 Brittany
Results Realty 386-397-3473
Century 21 Darby Rogers
752-6575 Immaculate home on
5 acres. 3/2, new energy efficient
A/C system, metal roof, 12x28 work-
shop. #78508 Only $168,900
Century 21 Darby Rogers
752-6575 3/2 located on 11th Fair-
way at Southern Oaks Country Club.
Huge master BR, huge kitchen, 2 car
garage. #78276 Only $129,900
Century 21 Darby Rogers
752-6575 Executive home, 4/3, 2557
sqft, plantation shutters, granite
counter tops, in-ground pool w/spa.
#78610 Only $269,000.
Century 21 Darby Rogers
752-6575 Beautiful Victorian/White
Springs, 7BR/3.5B w/5 fireplaces, a
Must See. #76361
Only $185,000
Century 21- Darby Rogers
752-6575 Golf course living, 3/2.5,
vaulted ceilings, open floor plan,
place, breakfast area. #78941 (1-
year home warranty) Only $210,000


810 Home for Sale
LAKE CITY 2006 Brick home
with shop, 3 BR/2 BA, 1,700 sq.
ft., double lot fenced, $199,900
or best offer, Call 417-396-2134.
Own a piece of history. Folk Vic-
torian in Wellborn. Includes triple-
wide MH. Total of 9 br's & 3ba.
Patti Taylor @ Access Realty
MLS # 71594 $155,900 623-6896
Great 3/2 home w/2346 sq ft
under roof on .67 ac., Creekside
S/D. Big back yard w/plenty of
shade trees. On a cul-de-sac,
MLS # 77385 $164,900 623-6896
Attention Pilots! 3br/lba. high
ceilings, brick fireplace. Old Flori-
da living. MLS 77756
$349,900 Josh Grecian. 386-466-
2517 Westfield Realty Group
Motivated Seller. Country area,
paved rd. 3br/2ba home. New AC
& upgraded wdows. MLS 78027
$79,500. Brodie Allred. 623-0906
Westfield Realty Group
Home for entertaining 3/2 plus
pool house w/half bath, 2.25
fenced ac. Freshly painted. Split
plan, Large rear deck MLS 78103
$179,900 386-623-6896
Lake front 3/2 custom Western Ce-
dar. Lots of storage space. Private
dock $220,000. MLS# 74681
Jo Lytte-Remax 386-365-2821
www.jolytte.florida-property-search.com
Wonderful Neighborhood. 2 story
in town. 3br/2.5ba. Beautiful wood
burning fireplace. MLS# 77050
$114,900 Carrie Cason 386-623-
2806 Westfield Realty Group
Short Sale. Attention Golfers!
3br/2.5ba. Fairway Villas in Quail
Heights. MLS#69928, $79,900
Jo Lytte, Remax 386-365-2821
jolytte@remaxnfl.com


Well maintained home in adult
community. Spacious floor plan,
all season porch, carport. $67,900
MLS#76136 Charlie Sparks 755-
0808 Westfield Realty Group
Southern Oaks CC. Custom built
block & stucco. 3br/2ba open floor
plan. MLS#76395 $109,900
Mike Lienemann 386-867-9053
Westfield Realty Group
Lofty home on Itchetucknee River,
Wrap around covered decks on
two levels.MustSEE! $375,000
MLS#77006 Jo Lytte
Remax 386-365-2821
3/2 w/1 car garage, detach carport
Lifetime metal roof. MLS#77780
$96,000, Call Jo Lytte -
Remax386-365-2821
www.jolytte.florida-property-search.com
Brick Ranch 3/2 Fl room. Side en-
try garage & workshop. 2 sheds.
New AC appl & roof. MLS78442
$109,900. Millard Gillen 365-7001
Westfield Realty Group
Sale or Lease By Owner. 3/2
Brick 1500 sf., 2 car garage, shed,
fepced, friendly area, near schools
$115,000: Call 386-365-0480
READY TO MOVE IN!
Living rm, dining rm, family rm,
lots of space ONLY $45,000
MLS 75210 DANIEL CRAPPS
AGENCY, INC. 386-755-5110
Remodeled home or office in city
limits. Separate bldg, possible
mother-in-law suite. $79,500
MLS#77724 DANIEL CRAPPS
AGENCY, INC. 386-755-5110
3 or 4 br/2ba. Remodeled w/fresh '
carpet paint, countertops & AC.
Fenced back yard. $79,900
MLS#78340 DANIEL CRAPPS
AGENCY, INC. 386-755-5110
Drastically Reduced, nice 3br/2ba
home on comer lot. Fenced back
yard in Gwen Lake area!
MLS#77307 DANIEL CRAPPS
AGENCY, INC. 386-755-5110
WELL-CARED FOR 4br/2.5ba
mfg home w/formal LR plus
family rm $84,000 MLS#78585
DANIEL CRAPPS AGENCY,
INC. 386-755-5110
Well maintained 4/2, 2566 sqft
oversized den w/fplace, Ig kitchen,
breakfast area overlooking gazebo.
#78347 Only $179,000 Century 21-
Darby Rogers 752-6575


820 Farms &
O2 Acreage

$10,000 reduction on our 10-acre
lots. Owner financed land.
Deas Bullard Properties
386-752-4339 www.landnfl.com

4 1/2 acre lot. Lake Jeffery Road.
Gorgeous Oaks!Paved Rd
Owner Financing! NO DOWN!,
$59,900. $525mo 352-215-1018.
www.LandOwnerFinancing.com
4 acres, Wellborn, New Well
installed, Beautifully wooded
w/cleared Home Site, owner fin,
no down, $39,900, $410 mon
Call 352-215-1018
www.LandOwnerFinancing.com
For Lease FARM- 7 stall barn.
17+ acres, pasture, cross fenced.
Close in $500. mo.
386-961-1086
FOR $ALE BY OWNER,
10 acres, approx. 7 acres planted
pines, with a 24 x 40 foot (Steel
Dean) bldg. w/18 foot opening,
own power, $85,000
Call Sonya 386-288-2557.
FSBO, Ten acres, partially wood-
ed. 41 South fully fenced,
power accessible. $38,000
386-344-0504
10 Acres with Free Travel Trailer.
Convenient location. $38,000
MLS#76264 Millard Gillen
386-365-7001
Westfield Realty Group

REPORTER Classifieds
In Print and On Line
www.lakecityreporter.com


Bring the picture in or
we will take it for youl
* Ad runs 10 consecutive days
with a description and photo in the
newspaper and online E-edition.
* Ad runs 10 consecutive days as a
classified line ad online.
* You must include vehicle price.
* All ads are prepaid.
* Private party only.





2006 EF250
Ford Van
3/4 ton, metal work
shelves/ladder rack.
60K miles, exc. cond.-
$10,500
Call
386-555-5555
If you don't sell your vehicle
during the first 10 days, you
can run the same vehicle ad
for 10 additional days for
only $15.00
Terms and conditions remain the
same for the additional run.

To Gt Yorr

VeileSold,


830 ACommercial
830 Property
166 SW Main Blvd.
Next to Wendy's
For Sale Or Lease.
386-752-7938
Wellborn Commercial lot. 1.84
acres w/34' of Hwy frontage near
the new Dollar General. MLS
72381 Scott Stewart 386-867-3498
for info. Westfield Realty Group
788 S. Marion Comm'l bldg on
highway frontage. Across from the
VA & near downtown. $49,900.
MLS 78129 Scott Stewart 867-
3498 Westfield Realty Group

To place your
classified ad call

755-5440


85O Waterfront
8 Property
Upscale River Cabin on
Suwannee River. Shop. Dock
MLS#76336 $349.900
Call Jo Lytte @ Remax
386-365-2821
870 Real Estate
8 0 Wanted
I Buy Houses
CASH!
Quick Sale Fair Price
386-269-0605

Nonh Florid




Lake City Reporter


Cc R 6-. P r S

Auction Location: 1396 SW Main Blvd., Lake City, FL 32025




.- i..- ng -*' .... .e..iy, ,.-

Property Location: 1396SW Main Blvd., LakeCity

7,200 SF Commercial Building '


, .'. I.-


Riverfront Cabin Branford, Fl

Property Location: 12680NE 21st Terrace, Branford

2/2 Home on Sant&, River

1,4 Ao.-*Jv- boat r mp with dock



PERSONAL P j, y.RTY.
.,. "".-.Power Tools & E110 0. i^ a.'i .

Wedding Decor, Catering Equipmen6N ehi,&MU llore!
rP~'1


STOCKS
28,300 shares of People's State Bank stock sold.in 2 blocks


HIGGENBOTHAM 800-257-4161
AUCTIONEERS--
INTERRNTIONAL LTD.. VC h
A Licensed Real Estate Briker higgenbotham.com
n alliance partner of NA I G global" M.E.Higgenbotham,CAI,FLLc#AU305AB158


- -


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Lake City Reporter


Located on .97 Ac


Classified Department: 755-5440







Classified Department: 755-5440


LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED SUNDAY, OCTOBER 9, 2011


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Al'


It is thattime of year again for our annual
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and introducing, our brand new
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Where kids, young and young at heart can draw and decorate the!r
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So don't miss'out on being a sponsor
with-an ad on these great pages!


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DRAW YOUR OWN JACK-0-LAN1
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TRICK OR TREATING SAFETY PA<
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Story ideas?

Contact
Robert Bridges
Editor
754-0428
rbridges@aokecityreporter.com


Lake City Reporter





LIFE


Sunday, October 9, 201 I


www.lakecityreporter.com


Section D


GARDEN TALK






Nichelle D. Demorest


Plan

ahead

for cooler

temps

E ven though day-
time tempera-
tures are still
warm, it's the
right. time to
begin planning and plant-
ing for the cooler months
ahead. Warm season
flowers and vegetables are
declining as nights cool
down and days get short-'
er. Plan to replace these
with colorful cool 'weather
bloomers and garden
plants that provide fresh
edibles during the winter.
Cool-season vegetables
to plant now include leafy
greens and root crops. If
you plan to put out brussel
sprouts, cauliflower, col-
lards, spinach or turnips,
they should be planted
very soon. Other crops
with a longer fall planting
period include beets, cab-
bage, carrots, kale, onions
and radishes.
Pretty foxglove, petu-
nias, pansies, snapdragons
and daisies are timely
choices for the fall garden,
along with sweet smell-
ing alyssum and dianthus.
Consider planting some
of the many varieties of
bulbous lilies that will
reward you with spring or
summer blossoms. Add
organic matter to the
planting holes and water
during dry spells to help
young plants and bulbs
become established.
Don't forget to con-
sider a little less lawn
maintenance in your fall
work schedule. The
grass growth has slowed
down and your mow-
ing schedule is about to
ease up. No more fertil-
izer should be applied to
-North Florida lawns this
year. If you've been irri-
gating, start weaning your
lawn from twice per week
watering to once every 7
to 10 days.
Some residents are
still unaware of the lawn
watering restrictions in
the Suwannee River Water
Management District.
Chapter 40B-2 of the
Florida Administrative
Code allows homeowners
to irrigate their lawn two
times per week during
Daylight Saving Time.
Homeowners in the
District's 15 counties may
water only once a week
during Eastern Standard
Time, which begins the
first Sunday in November.
Even if your water is
drawn from a well, it is
still being drawn from the
same aquifer that we all
share equally.
So reset your irrigation
timers to coincide with
the reduced plant needs
for water this fall. And set
timers so that no irriga-
tion occurs between 10 am
and 4 pm.
Learn how to save water
and money by attending
a 'Do it Yourself' Micro-
Irrigation Workshop
offered by the University
of Florida Extension
Office on October 18th.
Call 752-5384 to sign up


for the free workshop in
either Fort White or in
Lake City.


Cheryl
Morgan, a
member and
past president
of Altrusa
International
Inc. of Lake
City, looks at
the portraits of
past Woman's
Club presi-
dents.


Part of the
Club House's
new facelift
include a
rock wall,
new land-
scaping, and
a renovated
handicap
ramp and
kitchen.


Club House




Makeover


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lar.e Cy Reporter
The Club House, home to the Lake City Garden Club and the Woman's Club of Lake City, features a new front
porch, brick facade and vinyl siding as part of recent renovations. The building, which was the city's first library
and was used as a USO during World WarIl, Was built more than 80 years ago.


Renovations to historic home nearly complete


By GORDON JACKSON
gjackson@lakecityreporter.com
'' ^T bmen have cared
Sforanhistori-
I call significant
W W structure near
V T downtown Lake
City since it was built more than
80 years ago.
Known as The Club House, the
building is where two women's
civic organizations Lake City
Garden Club and the Woman's
Club of Lake City have met to
plan and coordinate their many
community improvement projects.
The building was also the site of
the city's first library and served
as a USO to entertain troops dur-
ing World War II.
Lately, the two civic organiza-
tions have been busy with fund-
raisers to renovate the house on
Hernando Avenue near the city's
downtown historic district.
Improvements already com-
pleted include a new front porch,


brick facade and vinyl siding. A
handicap ramp was also reno-
vated, said Kay Poltorak, the
Woman's Club president Workers
will put final touches on the build-
ing's exterior in coming weeks.
Members from both women's
organizations are working to
raise nearly $75,000 to pay for the
improvements. They spent $52,000
on kitchen renovations two years
ago, Poltorak said. ,
Most of the money to pay for
the improvements came from
renting The Club House for wed-
dings, parties, private events
and civic organization meetings.
The Woman's Club is also selling
cookbooks and memorial bricks
. that will be at The Club House
entrance.
Fundraisers are also planned
to help pay for the work. On
Wednesday, the Woman's Club is
selling pulled pork lunches for $6
between 11 a.m. and 1 p.m. Meals
include a pulled pork sandwich,
cole slaw, macaroni and cheese


and cobbler. Club members will
deliver lunches to those who can't
go to The Club House to pick up
meals.
Marilyn Hamm, former
Woman's Club president who has
held the position twice, said the
renovation project has kept mem-
bers from-both clubs busy.
"We've really been working on
it," Hamm said. "The Garden Club
did our landscaping."
Mantha Young, chair of commu-
nications for the civic organization
Altrusa, said members from her
group hold regularly scheduled
meetings at The Club House.
"We're fortunate to have it," she
said.
, Young said the renovations are
a "100 percent improvement"
"It was telling its age," she said.
"It got a facelift that was much
needed. It's beautiful."
Call 755-0347 to support fund-
raisers such as Wednesday's
pulled pork lunch or for informa-
tion about both organizations.


More youth seeing their

Facebook, email hacked


By JENNIFER C. KERR
Associated Press
WASHINGTON Young people
are having a harder time keeping
their profile pages and email accounts
secure, especially from prankster
friends. And although many treat
hacking or spying as a joke, nearly
half who have been victims were
upset by it.
An Associated Press-MTV poll finds
3 in 10 teens and young adults have
had people get into their Facebook,
Twitter, MySpace or other Internet
accounts and either impersonate or
spy on them. That's nearly double the
level seen in 2009.
The poll found solid majorities say-
ing they knew who was behind it
72 percent for spying, 65 percent for


hacking.
Richard Undenfelzer, 20, says it's
happened to him, but it was more
playful than anything else.
Sometimes when he walks away and
leaves his laptoplogged into Facebook,
a roommate seizes the opportunity to
fiddle with Lindenfelzer's page, writ-
ing silly things.about love interests or
potty humor.
"It's meant to be funny," said
Undenfelzer, a junior at Ithaca College
in New York. "It's supposed to be
obvious that this is something I would
never say."
The same thing happened to recent
college graduate Emily Feldhake of
Pickford, Mich.
The 22-year-old had used a friend's
laptop and closed the browser but
hadn't logged out. Her friend took


A Jan. 3, 2011, file photo shows the
Facebook headquarters in Palo Alto,
Calif. More young people these days say
they've had their Internet accounts hacked
or spied on. Many also say they know
who did it and don't seem too bothered.

some humorous jabs at her on her
Facebook page. Not upset, she said:
"I knew who it was. It was my friend
and I was the one who stayed logged
on."
HACKING continued on 4D


TASTE BUDDIES


Genie Norman and
Mary Kay Hollingsworth

We've

got a

keeper at

Gondolier

On a recent
rainy evening,
we braved a
heavy down-
pour and liter-
ally ran into the Gondolier
restaurant for a bite to eat
We were greeted by a smil-
ing hostess who offered
"a pair of water skis" if we
needed them and a comfy
booth: The ambience is
warm and inviting with
touches of Italy and Greece
in the tasteful d6cor.
Our knowledgeable
waitress offered up an
extensive menu and daily
specials that highlight
both Greek and Italian
specialties. While look-
ing over the many choices
available from pizza, cal-
zones, Stromboli, hot and'
cold subs and sandwiches,
pasta dishes and more, i
we sipped on a nice Pinor
Noir and classic Mojito, a
traditional Cuban libation
of rum, cane sugar, lime
juice, sparkling water and
fresh mint. If you go dur-
ing Happy Hour (2 p.m.
- 7 p.m.) you get two for
one and you might want to
also check out their mar-
tini bar.
Warm, homemade fresh
breadsticks come compli-
mentary. These light and
airy sticks have just the
right amount of EVOO
(Extra Virgin Olive Oil
for our non-foodie read-
ers), parmesan cheese and
parsley. A sweet tomato
based marinara sauce was
a nice compliment, Eat
'em while they're hot!
Many of the appetizers
available are standard
fare and pretty predict-
able: mozzarella sticks,
fried mushrooms, chicken
fingers, bruschetta,,but
the fried zucchini sticks,
cut like shoestring french
fries were lightly breaded,
fried perfectly and were
served with scratch-made,
creamy yogurt and cucum-
ber Greek Tzatziki sauce.
In a word, Delicious!
With countless entr6e
options to choose from,
there sure to be some-
thing for everyone at your
table. On this night, we
decided to try out a tra-
ditional Greek dish, the
Pork Tenderloin Souvlaki
Plate, and one of the
evening's specials, Wild
Mushroom Ravioli. Prices
for specialties range from
$9.95 to $13.95. Other
entire prices range from
$6.79 up to the Zorba spe-
cialty combo at $17.99.
The Souvlaki Plate
arrived with tender, well
seasoned skewers of
pork with sliced purple
oiion garnish, warm pita
slices, Tzatziki sauce and
a Greek salad. Huge fans
of a good Greek Salad, we
can say Gondolier's dress-
ing is among the best
we've had and their feta
cheese some of the most
creamy and delicious this
side of Tarpon Springs.
The evening's special,
Wild Mushroom Ravioli,
really stood out. It was
TASTE BUDDIES
continued on 2D









2D LAKE CITY REPORTER LIFE SUNDAY, OCTOBER 9, 2011



Florida Gateway College's Career Center


-T-icn career
field is right
for you? Not
SV ^ sure what
V you want
to do? Florida Gateway
College has a career center
available to assist you in
exploring career possibili-
ties that will aid in making
a career decision or chang-
ing your current career.
Whether you are still in
high school arid undecided,
in college and undecided,
or currently working and:
just want a change, the
Career Services Center
at FGC is here to help.
Our mission is to provide
comprehensive resources
and services for students
to assist in meeting their
career development needs.
The Center provides a
number of career oriented
services such as advising,
assistance with writing a
resume, and help with inter-
view tips and techniques. In
addition our Career Center
includes a library with up- ,
to-date videos, DVD's and


books on choosing a career,
writing a resume, and inter-
viewing, as well as videos
and books that are occupa-
tion specific. Students can
read and/or view the materi-
als while at the career center
or, with the proper ID, can
check out those materials to
view at home.
You can explore career
possibilities with an advi-
sor by talking about your
interests, hobbies and skills;
you can then take a comput-
erized interest assessment
called "CHOICES" to deter-
mine the career cluster that
best fits your interests; and
finally, you can discuss the
results of that assessment
with your career advisor and
begin to think about career
choices that are right for
you.
Come by and check out
our interviewing station
in the Career Center. This
is an area where students
can actually practice inter-
viewing skills on video for
feedback and suggestions by
our interviewing skills coach


Toni Briley
toni.briley@fgc.edu

Chris Kabali. Mr. Kabali is
available (by appointment)
to assist students who are
concerned about having to
face the oftentimes dreaded
job interview. He will set
up and conduct a mock
interview that is recorded.
The interview is then played
back so the student can see
the interview. Mr. Kabali
and the student can critique
the interview process to
help students when they
engage in an actual inter-
view. Our video camera is
also available to students
who are enrolled in public


speaking courses so that
they can practice their class
speeches.
Other focuses of interest .
at the career center are the
employment website, intern-
ship opportunities, and
career fairs. The employ-
ment website is available to
assist students and others
in finding suitable employ-
ment in and around the area
as well as job opportunities
throughout the state of
Florida. You can log onto
the employment website
at www.fgc.edu. Once on
the homepage, click on
"Employment" then "Student
Employment Positions";
locate "Job Listings" on the
left side of page, click and
browse through the current
job openings. Employers can
call (386) 754-4334 or e-mail
toni.briley@fgc.edu to have
their job opportunities post-
ed on this website. Once you
find a job you are interested
in, you can apply based on
the information provided by
the employer.
As a college student,


you may be eligible for our
internship program where
businesses in the com-
munity employ students to
learn about their particu-
lar industry. We recently
placed a communications
major as an intern at our
local talk radio station.
We have placed interns in
computer businesses and
medical offices. If you have
a business in town and are
interested in discussing the
internship program here at
FGC, please contact Dr. Toni
Briley at 754-4334 or e-mail:
toni.briley@fgc.edu to dis-
cuss this great opportunity
for our students and your
business.
The Career Center is
also the center for Job and
Career Fairs. Each semes-
ter a job/career fair is held
on the grounds of the FGC
campus. Local businesses
are invited to come out
and meet with students
for potential employment
These activities are always
fun and gives the commu-
nity an opportunity to find


students who are interested
in working and give our stu-
dents the opportunity to find
potential employers.
Don't let choosing a
career become an uphill
climb. Take the necessary
steps to get to the top.
Seek out professionals in
the field of career advising-
we are here to help. Call
(386) 7544222 to make an
appointment with a career
advisor. The Career Center
is dedicated to ensuring that
you receive the best pos-
sible service through expert
advising, caring and concern
for your success at Florida
Gateway College. The
Career Center is open from
8 am until 4:30 pm Monday
through Friday and until
6:30 pm on Wednesdays.
Stop by and visit us in the
James Y Wilson Student
Union Building (Bldg 014).
* Dr. Toni Briley is an
Academic/Career Advisor at
Florida Gateway College and
can be reached by phone at
(386)754-4334 or E-mail at
toni.briley@fgc.edu


Swedish poet wins Nobel in literature


By KARL RITrER and
MALIN RISING
Associated Press
STOCKHOLM The
2011 Nobel Prize in litera-
ture was awarded Thursday
to Tomas Transtromer, a
Swedish poet whose sur-
realistic works about the
mysteries of the human
mind won him acclaim as
one of the most important
Scandinavian writers since
World War II.
The Swedish Academy
said it recognized the
80-year-old. poet "because,
through his condensed,
translucent images, he gives
us fresh access to reality.",
In 1990, Transtromer
suffered a stroke, which
left him half-paralyzed and
unable to speak, but he
continued to write and pub-
lished a collection of poems
- "The Great Enigma" -
in 2004.
'Waking up is a para-
chute jump from dreams.
Free of the suffocating tur-
bulence the traveler sinks
toward the green zone of
morning," the poem reads.
"Things flare up. From the
viewpoint of the quivering
lark he is aware of the huge


Secretary of the
Royal Swedish
Academy Peter
Englund, right,
announces
that Swedish
poet Tomas
Transtromer is
the winner of
the 2011 Nobel
Prize in litera-
ture, Stockholm,
Sweden on
Thursday.


root -systems of the trees,
their swaying underground
lamps. But, aboveground
there'sgreenery a tropi-
cal flood of it with lifted
arms, listening to the beat
of an invisible pump."
Transtromer has been a
perennial favorite for the
10 million kronor ($1.5 mil-
lion) award, and in recent
years Swedish journalists
have waited outside his
apartment in Stockholm on
. the day the literature prize
was announced.
Transtromer's most
famous works include the
1966 "Windows and Stones,"
in which he depicts themes


Owens-Gramble

Glenn and Debbie Owens
of Lake City announce the
engagement and approach-
ing marriage of their daugh-
tei, Ashley Lee Owens, to
Kenneth Gamble. He is the
son of Bryan and Brenda
Peterson of Eustis.
The bride-elect is a 2005
graduate of Columbia High '
School. She also graduated
in 2009 from the University 1
of North Florida with a bach- .
elor of science in nursing
and is working at Shands LakeShore as an OB/GYN- RN.
The future groom is a 2005 graduate of Eustis High
School. He also graduated in 2009 from the University of
North Florida with a bachelor of science in nursing and is
working at Shands of UF as a Trauma ICU RN.
The wedding is planned for 4 p.m. Saturday, Dec. 3 at
The Grand Bohemian Hotel in Ashevile, N.C. A reception
will follow at the hotel's Kessler Ballroom.

Lewis-Bertram

Ray and Susan Lewis of
Lake City announce the
engagement and approach-
ing marriage of their daugh-
ter, Brandi Deanne Lewis,
of Lake City to Jason Cody
Bertram. He is the son of
Jeff and Pennie Bertram of
Lake City.
The bride-elect is a 2001
graduate of Columbia High,
School. She also graduated
with a bachelor's degree in
business management from
St. Leo University. She is employed by Cady Fundraising
Services as operations manager.
The future groom is a 2001 graduate of Lake City
Christian Academy. He is employed by Columbia County
Fire Rescue as a firefighter.
The wedding is planned for 4 p.m. Saturday, Oct. 15 at
Mr. Sancho's Beach Club in Cozumel, Mexico.


from his many travels and
"Baltics" from 1974.
His works have been
translated into more than
50 languages and influ-
enced poets around the


globe, particularly in North
America.
"He's been writing poetry
since 1951 when he made
his debut And has quite
a small production, really,"
said Peter' Englund, the
permanent secretary of the
academy.
"He's writing about big
questions. He's writing
about death, he's. writing
about history and memory,
and nature," Englund said.
Transtromer is the first
Swede to receive the lit-
erature prize since Eyvind
Johnson and Harry
Martinson shared it in
1974.
Englund has said that
the academy is espeically
cautious about ,awarding
Swedish writers out of fear


of being seen as biased.
"And so I think we've
been quite thoughtful and
haven't been rash," Englund
said Thursday.
Since the 1950's,
Transtromer has had
a close friendship with
American poet Robert Bly,
who translated many of his
works into English. In 2001,
Transtromer's Swedish pub-
lishing house Bonniers pub-
lished the correspondence
between the two writers in
the book "Air Mail."
Earlier this year, Bonniers
released a collection of his
works, between 1954 and
2004 to celebrate the poet's
80th birthday.
Born in Stockholm in
1931; 'Traistromer grew
up alone with his teacher


mother after she divorced
his father a journalist
He started writing poetry
while studying at the Sodra
Latin school in Stockholm
and debuted with the col-
lection "Seventeen Poems"
at age 23.
He received a degree in
psychology from Stockholm
University and later divided
his time between poetry
and his work as a psycholo-
gist
British bookmaker
Ladbrokes said a surge of
late bets on Thursday had
made Transtromer the 4/6
favorite for the prize.
"He was second favorite
to begin with and stayed
quite prominent through-
out," said spokesman Alex
Donohue.


TASTE BUDDIES: Gondolier is a keeper


Continued From Page 11
shockingly .good! The
rich gravy based sauce
was chock full of hearty
chunks of tomato and sau-
teed mushrooms and the
tender mushroom and'
cheese filled ravioli melted
in your mouth. It came
with either pasta or salad
and of course the Greek
Salad was our choice!
Although we were
stuffed to the gills, we
couldn't pass up trying
one of the wonderful des-
serts encased in a glass-
front display that you pass
ril


China, Crystal,
Flatware and Gifts
Couples registered:
Renee Bates
Kyle Head
"November 5, 2011


Ashley Owens
Kenneth Gamble
December 3, 2011


Jazan Nabinger
Blaiyze Neeley
January 21, 2012
We know exactly what they
want In a wedding or shower
gift, We (update their list as gifts
are purchased, and gift wrap,

WARD'S

(156 N. Marion Ave.
\l Lake City
752-5470


by on the way in. "I need
,some help with this one"
should be written on the
cakes. The cheesecake,
made fresh daily, is out
of this world and tonight
came with a luscious blue-
berry topping. Desserts all
will need a to go box. They
are huge servings but melt
in your mouth delicious.
Hear tell it, there are some
folks who come in just for


a martini and one of these Telephone number is (386)
fabulous desserts. Heck, 758-4220.
we might try that next
time! Genie Norman and
The Gondolier is open Mary Kay Hollingsworth
7 days a week open- are Columbia County resi-
ing at 11:00 a.m. and it dents who love good food
is wheelchair accessible. and fun, at home and out.
Reservations are not Their column on area restau-
required. Definitely put rants appears twice month-
this one on your go to plac- ly. You can contact them at
es in Lake City it is located TasteBuddiesLakeCity@
at 2281 W. US Hwy. 90. gmail.com.


I











Page Editor: Emogene Graham 754-0415


LAKE CITY REPORTER ADVICE & CROSSWORD


DEAR ABBY


Granddaughter is too young


to understand harsh criticism


DEAR ABBY: My mother
watches my two children
before and after school and
durifig the breaks. She is a
caring person, but she is also
very critical of my daughter.
(She's fine with my son.)
Mom constantly tells my
daughter she needs to lose
weight or exercise more, or
her hair looks stringy, or she
isn't dressed properly. My
daughters only 9.
My mother did this to me
when I was younger, and it
made me feel I could never
live up to her standards. How
should I approach her about
this? I don't want my daugh-
ter to feel inadequate. She's
a beautiful, intelligent little
girl. FRUSTRATED IN
MISSOURI
,, DEAR FRUSTRATED:
Deal with this firmly, before
your mother erodes your
daughter's self-esteem as
she did yours. Tell her how
her constant criticism made
y6u feel, that you don't want
the same thing to happen
to your little girl, and that
anytime she's tempted to
make a negative comment,
she should substitute a
POSITIVE one instead. Be"
direct with her, and if she
isn't able to comply, make
other arrangements for your
daughter.
** ** **
DEAR ABBY: My siblings
have noticed my distant, odd
behavior toward one of my
brothers. This sibling and
I'have a history of incest.


Abigail Van Buren
www.dearobby.com

He raped me repeatedly for
years, and I want nothing to
do with him. When the fam-
ily gathers, one or the other
of us declines the invitation
if the other one is going to
be present
I have told one sibling,
"We just don't get along
- old stuff, ya' know!" and
left it at that. I want to keep
the reason to myself. I feel
I may be pushed for a bet-
ter answer. Shouldn't "old
stuff' be enough of a rea-
son? Should I tell or not? -
SHOULD I OR SHOULDN'T
I?
DEAR SHOULD I?: A
person who repeatedly rapes
someone "for years" is a
predator. This wasn't two
kids "experimenting"; it was
sexual assault. How do you
know he didn't prey on other
siblings or cousins? You.
should have sought counsel-
ing about this years ago, and
it's still not too late. Once
you do, I'm sure you'll find
the strength to stand up for
yourself and speak out.
** ** **S
DEAR ABBY: Seven years


ago, when I was 25, I quit a
good job before I had a new
one. Hard times ultimately
led to my husband and me
divorcing. I went back to
school and am now starting
a new career. But I can't
help but feel that if I had not
quit my job years back, I'd
be established in a career by
now and still be married.
I never listened to any-
one back then, although I'
was polite and quiet. I have
grown from the experi-
ence, but my heart aches
for what I lost. I don't drink
or do drugs, so there is no
numbing this pain. How do
I get over my regrets and
heal? LOOKING BACK IN
ILLINOIS
DEAR LOOKING BACK:
You can't change the past.
You can only concentrate on
and build a future. Do that
by making a conscious effort
to STAY IN THE PRESENT.
Wheh you feel yourself
slipping backward and
reliving the pain, pull your-
self into the here and now.
Then thank your higher
power for your'health,
your job, and the chance to
rebuild your emotional and
financial future. Regret is
the cancer of life. Dwell on
it, and it will keep you from
progressing.


N Write Dear Abby at
www.DearAbby.com or
P.O. Box 69440, Los
Angeles, CA 90069.


ARIES (March 21-April 19):
Don't settle for less when you
can have more. Adapting to
whatever comes your way will
allow you to get the most out
of any situation you face. Love
is highlighted, and discussing
future plans will add excite-
ment to your life. ***
TAURUS (April 20-May 20):
You'll overreact if something
doesn't go your way. Refrain
from letting stubbornness ruin
yourday and possibly your rela-
tionship with someone special.
Keep busy if you want to avoid a
showdown. Keep a tight lip and
an open mind and ear. ***
GEMINI (May 21-June
20): Discipline and hard work
will impress someone in a
key position. Dedication and
loyalty will make a difference
to the way others treat you.
An idea you have will lead to a
profitable venture. Honesty is
the key to a better future. -**
CANCER (June 21-July
22): Bypass anyone being
restrictive or abusive. Do
your own thing and make
time for the people you enjoy
being with most. Social or
romantic activities will lift
your spirits and your confi-
dence. Update your look and


SUNDAY, OCTOBER 9, 2011



HOROSCOPES


THE LAST WORD
Eugenia Word

you'll receive compliments.

LEO (July 23-Aug. 22):
Fix up your digs and enjoy
the company of friends and
family. Share your thoughts
and offer support and you
will get the same in return
when faced with obstacles.
Set a budget and stick to it.
Generosity will lead to finan-
cial trouble. ***
VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept 22):
Take advantage of an oppor-
tunity to travel or get together
with old friends. You will dis-
cover something about your- .
self that will help you advance.
Recognizing your talents and
implementing them into a
moneymaking venture will pay
off. Believe in what you have
to offer. ***
LIBRA (Sept 23-Oct. 22):
Don't let your emotions lead to
a lack of productivity. You have
to put the past behind you and
deal with the present if you
want to excel in the future.
Helping others will make you
feel good and encourage new
friendships. ***-I


CELEBRITY CIPHER
by Luis Campos
Celebrity Cipher cryptograms are created from quotations by famous people. past and present.
Each letter in the cipher stands for another,
TODAY Y'S CLUE: K equals P
"DA KHMMCRCMP H JH B OCMWAJH B HO
PZH MHWBHP AN PZH MPIBM AB
MICTHO PA ID SDWZIBPHO TIDO..
- ZHTHD XHTTHB

Previous Solution: "People'don't do.what they believe In they just do what's
most convenient and then they repent." Bob Dylan
@2011 by NEA, Inc., dist. by Universal Uclick 10-10


SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov.
21): Beautify your surround-
ings, your look, your relation-
ships. Express your thoughts
creatively. Strive to make
positive changes to your life-
style and you will also invite
good fortune. Include more
creative people in your circle
of friends. *****
SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-
Dec. 21): You'll be caught
in an emotional trap if you
aren't truthful. Don't lead
someone on or make chang-
es without the consent of
those affected by your deci-
sions. Keep things out in the
open or you may face legal
repercussions. **
CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-
Jan. 19): Demands can be
expected. Don't succumb to
any pressure to change your
lifestyle. Walk away in order
to live life your way. Look
at what you have, how hard
you've worked and the loss
you will suffer if you don't
stand your ground. ****
AQUARIUS (an. 20-Feb.
18): Take one step at a time.
You can make a difference if
you offer insight and sugges-
tions that are simple but effec-
tive. Take care of personal
paperwork and you will get
rid of some of the unwanted
responsibilities. ***
PISCES (Feb. 19-March
20): You will be expected
to make some alterations if
you want to be employable.
Pick up skills or develop an
idea that can help you earn
more cash. Plan a romantic
evening and you will enhance
your love life. ***


SUNDAY CROSSWORD


MASQUERADE By Eric Berlin / Edited by Will Shortz 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10. 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18

"TEN FAMOUS PEOPLE ARE ATTENDING A COSTUME PARTY IN THIS CROSSWORD. AFTER THE GRID IS 19 20 21 H22
FILLED, CHANGE THE TWO SHADED LETTERS IN EACH THEME ANSWER TO "UNMASK" A CELEBRITY. 232 25


Across
1 Tierra en el agua
'5 Horror movie
locale, in brief
10 Run ___ of
15 "Whoa! Calm
down!"
:19 Be featured (in)
20 Words- on a
Spanish
valentine
21 Temerity
22 Choir part
23 Rods on a
cowboy's truck
25 Environmentally
sound keyboard
27 Prepare the soil
for plantiiig,
perhaps
28 Multicapable
29 DLXXVI doubled.
30 Lily type
32 Foreign visitors?,.
33 Only nonseitient
Zodiac symbol
36 In style
37 Votibg.to pass.
38 Empathetic
words
40 Password
preceder,
,,generally
41 Example, for .
instance: A'bbr.
42 007'strategy
44 High card up
one's sleeve
46 Baltimore daily, .
with "the"
47 ___ voce
For any three answers,
call from a touch-tone
hone: 1-900-285-5656,
1.49 each minute; or, '
with a credit card, 1-800-
814-5554.


48 French river or
department
49 Smartphone
supplements
53 Property claims
55 Some sexy
nightwear
60 Clingy wrap
61 Ties up
63 Memo abbr.
65 "To Live and Die

66 Narrow overhang
68 Government
resister standing
ready
70 It might be in a
belt
71 More than
attentive
72 Immature egg
73 East Coast rte.
74 Was sincere
76 Strong point
78 It often involves
a Snellen chart
80 __ about '
82 All, in'old-fime
stage directions
84 Modern address
85. Shock a fairy-
i talemonster.
89 Nocturnal birds-
liable to keep
people awake
91 Take most of
'94 Burgla.r
discouragers
,'95 Billiards shot
97 Fannie ___
98' "Pastorals" poet
99 Former
Portuguese
colony in China
100 Certain game-
ending cry
101 Industrial hub
of.Germany


103 1983 domestic
comedy
104 Like invalid
ballots
107 Fries, e.g.
109 Soup spoon
designed for .
shellfish
111 Last costume at
a costume party
113 Requiem hymn
word
114 Visibly stunned
S115 Michael and
Sonny's brother
in "The 2
Godfather"
116 Cleaner target
117 Five-spots
118 Transport, as
across a river
119 1999 Broadway
revue,
120 Seasonal
worker, say

Down
1 U.N. member
since '49
2 Like,some newly
laundered shirts
.3 Ointment base
4 Bitterly cold
5 Californie, e.g.
6 Collection of
specialized '
words
7 Green-headed
water birds.
8 What wavy lines, '
may.indicate in a
comic strip
9 Lean-__
10 Celestial being,
.in France .
11 Actor Jos6
12 Trilogy that
includes
"Agamemnon"


13 Eye layers
14 Carnival follower
15 When the events
in flashbacks
took place
16 Field with
unknowns
17 RR stop
18 "___ knight doth
sit too
melancholy":
"Pericles"
24.Part of "the
many," in Greek
26 Canola, for one
28 Clears out of, as
a hotel room
29 Hosts, briefly
31 Cheerful and
,spirited, as a
voice
34 Singer Ocasek
35 Fruit drink
37 It might have
serifs
39 Before long
40 Straight .
42 ___ Vista'
(Disney video
Distributor)
43 Boiled corrimeal
45 Cashew, for one
46 Hit hard, as
brakes
49 Northeastern
*Indian state,
50 __ d'Or (film
award)
51 Italian "first"
52 Many a "IDamn
Yankees" role
54 Mutely showed
'respect.
56 Truck fuel
57 Paper collector
58 Kagan of the
Supreme Court
59 "The Crucible"
"locale


62 Pooh-bah
64 Business card
abbr.-
67 Gets the water
out of
68 Many Monopoly
spaces ,
69 They might atone
72 Moved like water
into plant roots
75 Very, very funny
77 Short answers?
79 Festive time


81 Note to self
83 in the
kitchen with .
Dinah" (old song
lyric)
85 B.ad situation
86 Suffix with Cray-
87 Unfilled spaces
88 Mesmerized
states
90 Newspaper
section that
competes with
Craigslist


91 Hockey team's
advantage
92 Smallish
marsupial
93 Prize
96 Elk's weapon
98 "The Prisoner"
author
100 "A Free Man of
Color"
playwright
102 Veep Agnew


103 Part of a
business sched.
105 Count ___
(Lemony Snicket
villain)
106 Snakelike
108 Palliative plant
109 Org. in "Burn
After Reading"
110 Round body
111 Opposite of ppp,
on scores
112 Hirohito's title:
Abbr.


Answers to last Sunday's Crossword.
M-AW R WIADI SIISC AM IR A N
EU'O EGAD DIANA STOLE
GREATDAZE EMPTYZESTER

HG R E A IKE SHALOM NFL S T E R
ALIACINO ASARULE LAHR
MA IZELOBSTER D AGREE
ATTA TREATS MCM TOEI N
STORK 1YTH REAP TONNE
SENDER SEEJUST CIEIDIOIZIE
S I | j T I E D OZ

H IG LIGHTERPEZ APPEAR
ENROL LEY REEL TONGA
ALAIM I AICOLLET OLAV

STEM ASSURES GROUP I ES
AMY TREATY YULE
MASKING GETSOIN POSSE
EMPERORZERO K I DZA PAPER
S MORE ASO R TU LILAVA
HIOITIS MANN SEEP EYEIS


4 5


9 35 8


4 27 6 1

------:- -
8 9376


9 5 6 8


2 1


3 9 7 2


54 83 6


1 5


., 8 Z 9 6 LL





VZ L 9 L 6 8C8 9


9 6 LZE 8 L 9 8


8 VE Z89 9 L 9 L 6


9 8 LE 6 1 9 LE 8





L 8 6 9 L6 8 9C









4D LAKE CITY REPORTER. LIFE SUNDAY, OCTOBER 9, 2011



Dream is over for space tourism venture


By AUCIA CHANG
AP Science Writer
LOS ANGELES Venture cap-
italist Alan Walton has trekked to
the North Pole, climbed Mount
Kilimanjaro and skydived over
Mount Everest. A hop into space
to enjoy a few minutes of weight-
lessness would have been the ulti-
mate adventure.
After waiting seven years to
fly aboard Sir Richard Branson's
Virgin Galactic spaceline, Walton
gave up on the dream and asked
for a $200,000 ticket refund on his
75th birthday this past spring.
Walton, who was among the
first 100 customers to sign up, is
not as spry as he used to be, and
he's concerned about the project
delays.
"This was a decision I wish
I didn't have to make," he said
recently. But "it was time."
Promises of space travel for the
masses reached a euphoric pitch
in 2004 when the experimental
SpaceShipOne air-launched over
the Mojave Desert and became the
first privately financed,
manned spacecraft to
dash into space. It won Sir Ric
the $10 million Ansari flights
X Prize on Oct. 4, 2004, toward
for accomplishing, the
feat twice in two weeks.
The flights were
hailed by space enthusiasts as
a leap toward opening the final
frontier to civilians.
Virgin Galactic, which licensed
the SpaceShipOne technology,
began taking reservations before
a commercial version was even
built. Branson predicted back
then that the maiden passenger
flight would take off in 2007.


This-Oct. 4, 2004 file photo shows SpaceShipOne and X Prize team
members posing with a U.S. flag carried aboard the spacecraft after its
successful flight into space and landing at Mojave, Calif. The flight tests in
2004 were hailed by space enthusiasts as a stepping stone toward open-
ing the final frontier to civilians.


Other private rocketeers hun-
kered down in their hangars and
sketched out designs to compete
with Virgin Galactic. Soon a cot-
tage industry rose. While there's
been progress made most are
in the testing stage there's still
no launch date.


hard Branson's Virgin Galactic s
hailed by space enthusiasts as a
d opening the final frontier to ci


"It's tough," said Erika Wagner
of the X Prize Foundation, which
sponsored the 2004 contest.
"We've seen slower progress than
a lot of people would have liked."
Human spaceflight so far has
been restricted to governments
and a handful of wealthy thrill-
seekers who have plunked down
millions of dollars to hitch rides


aboard Russian rockets to the
International Space Station, which
circles the Earth 250 miles high.
Instead of flying all the way
to orbit, current space tourism
efforts are focused on suborbital
trips using vehicles designed to
rocket up to the edge of space then
immediately descend
rather than circle the
paceline Earth. Virgin Galactic
leap promises flights to
vilians. altitudes of at least 62
miles with a few min-
utes of weightlessness.
Cost per head ranges
from $100,000 to $200,000 far
cheaper than the trips to orbit but
still pricey.
Besides Virgin Galactic, other
players include XCOR Aerospace
headed by rocketeer Jeff Greason;
Armadillo Aerospace founded by
computer game programmer John
Carmack; and Blue Origin headed
by Amazon.com chief executive


I .


HACKING: Youth see security problems


Continued From Page ID b
But sometimes the hacking can be mali-
cious.
Courtney Eisenbraun of Saint Francis,
Minn., is among the 46 percent of young
people left upset by a hacking experience.
The 15-year-old says she was at practice
for her high school dance team when she
got a text from her sister checking to see
if the 10th-grader was on Facebook. The
teen's status had been changed to say some-


thing inappropriate about girls in showers.
She says she doesn't share her password
with friends but assumes it was someone
in her grade because they knew who her
friends were and also posted things on their
Facebook pages, pretending to be her.
"I was really confused about how they got
my password," she said. "I felt violated."
Eisenbraun changed her password right
away, and changes it often now. She hasn't


had another problem.
In the AP-MTV poll, two-thirds of those
who had been hacked said at some point
they've changed their email, instant mes-
saging or social networking password in
response to digital abuse. Forty-six percent
have altered their e-mail address, screen
name or phone number, and 25 percent have
deleted a social networking profile.
- Josie Burris, 16, says she's shared her
Facebook password with her best friend as
well as her boyfriend. Once, she spied on
her boyfriend's page to peek at his private


messages and see what he was up to. He's
also spied on her private messages, she
said.'
"I don't care. I've done it to him. He's done
it to me," said Burris, a junior in high school
who lives in Ridgeland, S.C.
She says her parents are on Facebook,
too, but she doesn't worry about them spy-
ing on her.
"I make sure I don't put anything bad
on there," she said, but-added: "Old people
shouldn't have Facebook. I firmly believe in
that."


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Joining the practice is Dr. Nikolaos Karamitsos, fresh out of residency
and bringing a fresh healthcare perspective with him. By being a part of
the medical staff at Shands Lake Shore Regional Medical Center, he'll be
available to provide full time medical services to you and your family.

To schedule an appointment, please cal 386-292-7744.



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FGC ENTERTAINMENT-


m ~ 8 MJAI&"% 0aa *.j,-* '-n FMG- g
.r~f.-S^^ff-Now Alft RIVIG""^*"
P yT; k.- .1. n, ^ W i f.f i


Jeff Bezos. company gets a license from the
The companies are private- Federal Aviation Administration,
ly held and do not answer to he said.
shareholders. As a result, details About 450 ticket-holders are in
about progress are hard to come line to fly with Virgin Galactic.
by. Scaled Composites, which A small number of people -
designed SpaceShipOne and is fewer than 10 dropped out
building a passenger version for due to medical and other reasons.
Virgin Galactic, is publicity-shy, Whitesides said.. :
but posts results of test flights on "Folks are tremendously loyal
its website., and excited," he said. "They want
Blue Origin is the most tight- us to do it safely. They want us to
lipped. The company didn't dis- take our time and make sure we
s close a recent accident until a got it right"
week after it happened. Even now, Even if space tourism takes
details about what failed during off, it's unclear whether there's a
the test flight are sketchy. strong market for joy rides to view
Except for Blue Origin, the the curvature of the Earth, said
space tourism players are sepa- space policy expert John Logsdon
rate from those vying to build of George Washington University.
space taxis to the International "In the current economic cli-
Space Station under a NASA con- mate, how many people have that
tract. level of discretionary money?" he
John Gedmark, executive direc- said.
tor of the Commercial Spaceflight Space Tourism Society founder
Federation, a trade group that John Spencer said the industry
represents suborbital and orbital has matured in recent years with
space companies, is pleased with some branching out beyond pas-
the testing despite the longer- senger flights aifd inking deals
than-expected time frame to get with universities and NASA to
off the ground. take scientists and experiments
."Everything in aerospace to space.
always takes longer that you origi- Laterthis month, Virgin Galactic
nally think," he said. executives and selected customers
Scaled Composites, considered will gather at Spaceport America
by many in the industry as the in New Mexico for a dedication
front-runner, has been conducting ceremony. The company plans to
glide tests in the Mojave Desert launch from the spaceport once
since last year. The project suf-. construction is complete.
fered a setback in 2007 after a- One space tourist who will not
deadly explosion during testing be present is Walton, the British-
to develop the propellant flow sys- born venture capitalist who lives
tem for the hybrid rocket motor. in Connecticut. Walton booked
Virgin Galactic chief executive with Virgin Galactic in 2004 and
GeorgeWhitesides saidhe expect- became a "founder" a title
ed powered test flights to begin given to the first 100 customers
sometime next year. Commercial who paid in full. He got a refund
service will start up after the earlier this year.


' ~