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The Lake City reporter
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028308/01667
 Material Information
Title: The Lake City reporter
Uniform Title: Lake City reporter (Lake City, Fla. 1967)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: John H. Perry
Place of Publication: Lake City Fla
Creation Date: October 8, 2011
Publication Date: 1967-
Frequency: daily (monday through friday)[<1969>-]
weekly[ former 1967-<1968>]
daily
normalized irregular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Lake City (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Columbia County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Columbia -- Lake City
Coordinates: 30.189722 x -82.639722 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 95, no. 4 (Oct. 5, 1967)-
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000358016
oclc - 33283560
notis - ABZ6316
lccn - sn 95047175
sobekcm - UF00028308_01569
System ID: UF00028308:01667
 Related Items
Preceded by: Lake City reporter and Columbia gazette

Full Text




-~A A
000018 120511 ****3-DIGIT 326
LIB OF FLORIDA HISTORY
PO BOX 117007
205 SMA UNIV OF FLORIDA
GAINESVILLE FL 32611-1943


ty


Reporter


Saturday, October 8, 2011 www.lakecityreporter.com Vol. 137, No. 218 N 75 cents




Former football coach jailed


Scott Anderson
led the CHS Tigers
briefly in 2004.
By TONY BRITT
tbritt@lakecityreporter.com
Former Columbia High
School head football coach
Scott Anderson and an assistant
at Escambia High School were
jailed earlier this week on charg-


es stemming from an alleged bat-
tery involving two Escambia High
football players, officials said.
Anderson, 51, is the head
football coach at the Pensacola
schooL
According to Escambia County
Sheriff's reports, Anderson and
assistant coach Timothy Jansky,
30, of Pensacola, were arrest-
ed Tuesday on misdemeanor
obstruction of justice charges.
They were released without


posting bail
from Escambia
County Jail.
Both have been
on administra-
tive leave from
the school sys-
tem since Friday,
Anderson Sept 30.
Police reports indicate
Anderson tampered with a wit-
ness after an Escambia High
football player reported that he


had been battered by another
member of the school's football
team Sept 13
On Sept 19 Anderson report-
edly spoke to a Escambia County
Sheriff's deputy and asked
whether charges were being pur-
sued against the player. When
he learned they were, Anderson
allegedly told the deputy "it would
mess up the team chemistry and
that he would be unable to ensure
the safety of the child."


South county presence for CCSO


Sheriff opens
satellite office
in Fort White.

By TONY BRITT.
tbritt@lakecityreporter.com
FORT WHITE The
Columbia County Sheriff's
Office is taking a perma-
nent stake in the town of
Fort White with the recent
opening of its District 2
office there.
The office opened Oct.
1, the start of the agency's
new fiscal year.
The office is located at
294 SW Bryant St in Fort
White. Hours of operation
are from 8 a.m. 5 p.m.
Monday Fridays. District
2 patrol officers will focus
on the area south of
County Road 240, including
Ellisville, Fort White and
Columbia City.

OFFICE continuedonm 3A


JASON MATTHEW WALKERILake C.ty Reporter
The Columbia County Sheriff's District 2 office, 294 SW Bryant St., Fort White officially opened Oct.1 and will have a
permanent law enforcement and office staff. The office will be open 8 a.m. 5 p.m. Monday through Fridays.


A day in
the park
Jordin Walker (left),
3, and Ameriah
Jackson, 7, hang
Upside down on a
set of monkey bars
last week at Youngs
Park.


$1.3 trillion

deficit is

estimated

WASHINGTON -A government
report released on Friday predicts
that the federal budget hit a near-
record $1.3 trillion in the j.ust-com-
pleted fiscal year.
The figure matches last year's
deficit tally 'but shows slight
improvement over a record set two.
years ago.
The Congressional Budget Office
analysis is in line with previous
estimates but offers yet another
reminder of the government's pre-
carious fiscal position just as
a congressional supercommittee is
working to produce at least 81.2
trillion in deficit savings over the
coming decade.
The 2009 record deficit of $1.4
trillion was registered as the coun-
try struggled through a recession
DEFICIT continued on 3A,


Hungarian string quartet

making stop in Lake City


From staff reports

In their first American tour,
the Tiberius String Quartet
will perform free in Lake City
Monday at 7:30 p.m. '
Founded in 1994, the
Hungarian group has performed
throughout Europe and Japan.
While in Lake City 'they will
perform the works of Haydn,
Mozart, Beethoven and more.
After the concert there will be
a meet and greet reception with
the artists.
The concert will be held at
the First Presbyterian Church,
697 SW Baya Drive in Lake City.


It is the first in the Friends of
Music concert series.
On Friday, Feb. 10, 2012, Dr.
Laura Ellis will play the organ
and harpsichord and Dr. Steven
Thomas, the cello.
' On Saturday, March 17, Bay
Street Brassworks will perform.
The Saturday, April 28 per-
formance will feature the
Jacksonville Mastrworks
Chorale, Dr. Mark Stallings,
director.
All events will take place at
First Presbyterian Church at
7:30 p.m.
For information call 386-752-
0670.


COURTESY PHOTO
The Tiberius String Quartet will make a stop in Lake City Monday at the First
Presbyterian Church. The Hungarian group has performed in Europe and
Japan.


A report of the conversation
was forwarded to Escambia High
School principal Michael Sherrill
and up the deputy's chain of com-
mand. On Sept 23, the princi-
pal reportedly told Anderson to
"stay out the matter and allow law
enforcement to do their job."
Four days later, a letter from
the victim was received by law
enforcement which detailed an
COACH continued on 3A



.103,000

new jobs

aren't

enough

September tally
barely kept pace with
population growth.

By CHRISTOPHER S. RUGABER
AP Economics Writer
WASHINGTON -The jobs
crisis isn't getting worse. But
it isn't getting much better,
either.
The" economy added just
enough jobs last month to ease
fears' of a new recession. But
hiring is still too weak to bring
down unemployment, which
has been stuck at about 9 per-
cent for more than two years.
The nation added 103,000
jobs in September, an improve-
ment from the month before,
the Labor Department said
Friday. But the total includes
45,000 Verizon workers who
were rehired after going on
strike and were counted as
job'gains.
Even counting those work-
ers, the job gains weren't
enough to get the economy
going. It takes about 125,000
jobs a month just to keep up
with population growth. For
September, the unemploy-
ment rate stayed stuck at 9.1
percent
"Well, the ,sky is not falling
lust yet," Joel Naroff, chief
economist at Naroff Economic
Advisors, said in a note to
clients. But there was noth-
ing great about the report, he
added. "It's incredible how low
our sights have been set"
On one hand, the unem-
ployment report was encour-
aging for economists. Some
of them had feared the
nation would lose jobs in
September, raising the risk
of a painful second reces-
sion.
But everyday Americans
can't take much solace
from it, either. The Great
Recession has been over
for almost two and a half
years, and while corporate
profits and the stock mar-
ket have bounced back in
that time, unemployment
is still high.
There are 14 million peo-
ple counted as unemployed
in the United States. An addi-
tional 9.3 million are working
part time and would rather
work full time. And 2.5 mil-
lion more have simply given
up looking for a job.
The Labor Department
said the economy added
more jobs than first estimat-
ed in July and August The
government's first reading
had said the economy added
zero jobs in August
While the report was
clearly better than feared,
it also showed the economy
is not gaining much momen-
tum, say experts.


CllA U1 ALLUS: Opinion. ................4A
I(386)752-1293 8 6 4 Business ................ 5A
SUBSCRIBETO T-Storm Chance Obituaries .............. 6A
THE REPORTER: Advice & Comics......... 7A
SVoice Fax: 752-9400 WEATHER, 2A Puzzles .............. 8A
1 $4 6 M I F i :Lj j ii: 752-9400i. iiii i iini iiiir. iiia^^^^^^


TODAY IN COMING
PEOPLE SUNDAY
Poe gets North county nudist
his due. colony: Inside look


I









LAKE CITY REPORTER DAILY BRIEFING SATURDAY, OCTOBER 8, 2011


Friday:
Afternoon: 6-3-2
Evening: N/A *


Friday:
Afternoon: 9-7-3-3
Evening: N/A


w Thursday:
3-11-14-25-30


PEOPLE IN THE NEWS



'The Raven' actors honor Edgar Allan Poe


BALTIMORE
A ctor Luke Evans and
director James McTeigue
laid a wreath at Edgar
Allan Poe's grave as they
paid their respects and
talked about their upcoming film
"The Raven," which reimagines the
American writer's last days.
Evans, 32, plays a young Baltimore
detective hunting for a killer who
is using Poe's grisly stories as the
inspiration for a string of murders.
John Cusack plays Poe, who joins
the hunt.
Poe died in Baltimore on Oct 7,
1849.
Evans said he was captured by
Poe's biography and considers him
the "godfather of American litera-
ture." He said he learned of Poe's
heartbreak and alcoholism and his
unique role in history as the first
American writer who tried to make'a
living by writing.
'This man started something
that's still thriving today, the murder
stories and the detective," Evans
said.
Both Evans, who is Welsh, and
McTeigue, who is Australian, were
eager to visit Baltimore for the first
time. McTeigue said he researched
Baltimore scenes for the film, but it
was shot in Budapest, Hungary for
its older architecture.
Visual effects were used to add
the historic Baltimore Harbor, Fell's
Point and the city's Washington
Monument to'the film.
"The Raven" opens nationwide on
March 9.

'Simpsons' actor: Cut
my salary to keep show
NEW YORK One of the voice
actors on 'The Simpsons" said
Friday that he's willing to cut his sal-
ary by 70 percent in order to keep
the show going beyond this season.
Harry Shearer, one of six actors


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Luke Evans (left) and John Cusack are shown in a scene from 'The Raven.'


who provide voices for the animated
characters on Fox's Sunday night
show, said producers turned down
his offer.
Negotiations over
the future of 'The
Simpsons," which
began its 23rd sea-
soaA last month, have
spilled out into the
$ Shearer public. Twentieth
Century Fox
Television, which makes the show,
said it can't continue without making
cuts. Each actor makes a reported
$8 million year for their work and
Fox said the show could not con-)
tinue without pay cuts,
"If pay cuts are what it will take to
keep the show on the air, then cut
my pay," Shearer-said Friday. "I'm
willing to let them cut my salary not
just 45 percent but more than 70
percent."
But Shearer said that in return,
actors want "a tiny share" of the bil-
lions of dollars the show has earned
through syndication and marketing.


Schwarzenegger
inaugurates his museum
THAL, Austria Arnold
Schwarzenegger the bodybuilder,
movie star and ex-governor who's
in the middle of a messy divorce
- invoked his life as a model for
young people during the formal
inauguration of a museum dedicated
to him in his native
Austria.
i hundreds of fans
braved driving rain
and chilly autumn
temperatures to
fete Austria's most
Schwarzenegger famous living son at
the museum.
The museum, open since July, is a
repository of items that include his
first barbell, the metal bed thathe
slept on as a youth, several life-size
'Terminator" models and the desk
he sat behind while California's gov-
ernor.
* Associated Press


Celebrity Birthdays


* Comedian Darrell Ham-
mond is 56.
* Actress Stephanie
Zimbalist is 55.
* Rock musician Mitch
Marine is 50.
* Actress Kim Wayans is 50.
* Rock singer Steve Perry
is 48.
* Actor lan Hart is 47.


* Gospel/rhythm-and-blues
singer CeCe Winans is 47.
* Rock musician C.J.
Ramone is 46.
* Actress-producer Karyn
Parsons is 45.
* Singer-producer Teddy
Riley is 45.
* Actress Emily Procter is 43.
* Actor Dylan Neal is 42.


HOW TO REACH US
Main number ........(386) 752-1293
Fax number .............752-9400
Circulation ..............755-5445
Online... www.lakecityreporter.com
The Lake City Reporter, an affiliate of
Community Newspapers Inc., is pub-
lished Tuesday through Sunday at 180
E. Duval St, Lake City, Fla. 32055.
Periodical postage paid at Lake City, Fla.
Member Audit Bureau of Circulation and
The Associated Press.
All material herein is property of the Lake
City Reporter. Reproduction in whole or
In part is forbidden without the permis-
sion of the publisher. U.S. Postal Service
No. 310-880.
POSTMASTER: Send address changes
to Lake City Reporter, P.O. Box .1709,
Lake City, Fla. 32056.
Publisher Todd Wilson.....754-0418
(twilson@lakedityreporter.com)
NEWS
Assistant Editor CJ Risak..754-0427
After 1:00 p.m.
(crisak@lakecityreporter.com)
ADVERTISING
Director Ashley Butcher ...754-0417
(abutcher@lakecityreporter.com)
CLASSIFIED
To place a classified ad, call 755-5440.


BUSINESS
Controller Sue Brannon... .754-0419
(sbrannon@lakecityreporter.com)
CIRCULATION
Home delivery of the Lake City Reporter
should be completed by 6:30 a.m.
Tuesday through Saturday, and by 7:30
a.m. on Sunday.
Please 'call 386-755-5445 to report any
problems with your delivery service.
In Columbia County, customers should
call before 10:30 a.m. to report a ser-
vice error for same day re-delivery. After
10:30 a.m., next day re-delivery or ser-
vice related credits will be issued.
In all other counties where home delivery
Is available, next day re-delivery or ser-
vice related credits will be Issued.
Circulation ..............755-5445
(circulation@lakecityreporter.com)
Home delivery rates
(Tuesday through Sunday)
,12Weeks................ $26.32
24 Weeks..................$48.79
52 Weeks..................$83.46
Rates indude 7% sates tax
Mail rates
12 Weeks..................$41.40
24 Weeks ..............$82.80
52 Weeks.................$179.40


CORRECTION

The Lake City Reporter corrects errors of fact in news
items. If you. have a concern, question or suggestion, please
call the executive editor. Corrections and clarifications will run
in this space. And thanks for reading.


AROUND FLORIDA


THE WEATHER


1st of 'Cuban 5'
spy ring released
' MARIANNA The first
member of a Cuban,spy
ring to complete his U.S.
prison sentence was greet-
ed Friday by his daughters
as news of his release
bombarded the airwaves
hundreds of miles away on
the communist island.
One of the so-called
"Cuban Five," Rene
Gonzalez, 55, served about
13 years on a convic-
tion for participating in a
scheme to infiltrate U.S.
military bases and keep
tabs on Cuban exiles for
Fidel Castro's government
Now Gonzalez must serve
three years' probation in
the U.S.
Gonzalez's wife, Olga
Salanueva, 51, told Cuban
state-run media her hus-
band telephoned shortly
after his release and
seemed "euphoric."
Gonzalez is declining
interview requests and is
concerned for his safety.
For now, he wants to stay
out of the spotlight
The Chicago native who
has dual American and
Cuban citizenship was
released early from a 15-
year sentence because of
good behavior and time he
served before and during
his trial.
Gonzalez and the other
four Cubans were con-
victed in 2001 of being
part of the ring known
as the '"Wasp Network"
that sought to spy on U.S.
military installations in
South Florida, Cuban exile
groups and politicians
opposed to Castro's gov-
ernment

Medicaid letters
sent 10 years later
MIAMI Attorneys
arguing a class-action
'lawsuit said Florida health
officials aren't adequately
marketing its Medicaid
program.


Convicted Cuban spy Rene Gonzalez, one of the Cuban
Five, was released through this main gate at the Federal.
Correctional Institute near Marianna on Friday.


. In 2001, federal health
officials asked Florida to
send letters to the parents
of children on Medicaid
who had not had a dental
appointment for several
months.
The letters were sent
this fall ten years later.
The state is fighting a
class-action lawsuit which
claims 1.7 million children
on Medicaid do not have
access to critical medical
care.
The state is required to
market its Medicaid dental
program, but plaintiff's
attorneys warned the state
delayed doing so because
it couldn't meet the poten-
tial demand.
A top Florida Medicaid
official said the state wor-
ried about oversaturating
patients with too much
information.

Man gets life for
road rage death
BARTOW A man has
pleaded guilty to killing a
woman during a road rage
attack in 2008.
Prosecutors had planned
to seek the death penalty
for Casey Weldon Till, 29,
during a November trial.
But the Haines City man
decided Thursday to plead
guilty to first-degree mur-
der charges in exchange
for a sentence that will


keep him in prison for the
rest of his life.
Authorities said Till
went on a rampage follow-
ing a fender bender.
Till was accused'of stab-
bing, then running over
Odalis Cespedes, 41; who
later died.
Gov. wants Glades
cleanup delayed
WEST PALM BEACH
- An important deadline
in Everglades restoration
efforts already pushed
back four years would
be postponed another six
years under a proposal
made Thursday by Gov.
Rick Scott.
In a Washington meet-
ing Scott laid out a plan
to put off a deadline to
reduce the amount of
phosphorous flowing in
the Everglades to 10 parts
per billion. Under the gov-
ernor's proposal, the state
would have until 2022.
That change would
require the approval of
U.S. District Court Judge
Alan Gold, who has
already expressed dis-
satisfaction with Florida's
restoration efforts.
In an April ruling, he
said the state has "not
been true stewards of pro-
tecting the Everglades in
recent years."
* Associated Press


CHANCEE OF CHANCE OF IIHANCE OF ISOLATED I CHANCE OF
SHOWERS SHOWERS SHOWERS SHOWERS SHOWERS


HI 82 1.064 P HI81D 66 1791064 HI83 1O63 HI84L0D64



City Sunday Monday
Cape Canaveral 81,,77/sh 83,74.,sh
12LO J 1% ~ Dytn ec


Pesacla65
84,65


lalTanassee*
84/65 -

5 City
81/65


TEMPERATURES
High Friday
Low Friday
Normal high
Normal low
Record high
Record low

PRECIPITATION
Friday
Month total
Year total
Normal month-to-date
Normal year-to-date


82/64
- Gie
8, 81/




a83


86
67
83
62
95 in 1911
45 in 2010

0.00"
0.12"
28.66"
0.68"
41.81"


/' 'u Daytona Beach
Ft. Lauderdale
S P1ay hBeadi Fort Myers
66cala ,73. Gainesvlle
al a Jaceksonvllle
w2/68 .* Key West
1 0ria1o Lake City
S 82/71 8/74 Miami
Naples
West Palm Beach Ocala
84/78 0 Orlando
FL Laderdal Panama City
FtLilys 85/77 Pensacola
85/71 Naples Tallahassee
'86/73 Mihdn Tampa
S 8$/77 Valdosta
8Ke/7 est W. Palm Beach
k6/78


SUN
Sunrise today
Sunset today
Sunrise tom.
Sunset tornm.

MOON
Moonrise today
Moonset today
Moonrise torn.
Moonset torn.

00'
Oct Oct.
11 19
Full Last


7a lp 7p a. 6a
Saturday Sunday







FH1 h qafWtoft &e 1


7:28 a.m.
7:08 p.m.
7:29 a.m.
7:07 p.m.

S5:08 p.m.
4:26 a.m.
5:39 p.m.
5:19 a.m.


Oct. Nov.
26 2
New First


1988, snow was


reported across
parts of northern
New England. Two
inches of snow blan-
keted Mount Snow,
Vermont.


81/73/t
85/78/t
86/ 73/1
81./68'sh
79/72,'sh
87/77/sh
81,,66Ash
85/771t
86/ 73/1
83/69/sh
82/71/I
80/66,sh
81/67/sh
80,'66,sh
84,,73tr
80,65,1
.84,'78,'t


84/73/sh
89/78/sh
86/73/sh
81I66,sh
78/69/sh
86/77/sh
79/64/sh
88/771
87/ 73/sn
82/,68/sh
85/72,'sh
79/66/sh
81/66/t
78/67/sh
85., 73/sh
78/66/pc
86/78/1


34V1 Forecasts, data and
I W S Central, P, Madson, Wis.
weather www.weatherpubllihe.com


&tConnesed

||V|^
t ... ^^^^
iSSES^^S


SH3.


Daily Scripture
"You, God, are my God, ear-
nestly I seek you; I thirst for
you, my whole being longs for
you, in a dry and parched land
where there is no water."
Psalm 63:1

Thought for Today
"Don't let yesterday use up too
much of today."
Will Rogers,
American humorist (1879-1935)

Lake City Reporter


~


Page Editor: Laura Hampson, 754-0427


,I 1


. I


IF w'e'-I I J I=IO


LAKECIT ALANA


mur V INDEX


L WETE BY -TH-HOR


I


. ).









LAKE CITY REPORTER NEWS SATURDAY, OCTOBER 8, 2011


Prostate

advice

overturns

dogma


By LAURAN NEERGAARD
AP Medical Writer

WASHINGTON Men finally may be
getting a clearer message about undergo-
ing PSA screening for prostate cancer:
Don't do, it.
They may not listen. After all, the vast
majority of men over 50 already get test-
ed.
The idea that finding cancer early can
harm instead of help is a hard one to
understand. But it's at the heart of a
government panel's draft recommenda-
tion that those PSA blood tests should no
longer be part of routine screening for
healthy men.
The U.S. Preventive Services Task Force
examined all the evidence and found little
if any reduction in deaths from routine
PSA screening. But it did conclude that
too many men are diagnosed with tumors
that never would have killed them and
suffer serious side effects from resulting
treatment.


OFFICE: CCSO satellite station established in Fort White

Continued From Page 1A


The Fort White District
Office has an office manager,
Susan Cone, in addition to
four sheriff's corporals who
will supervise on a rotating
basis. A telephone that rings
directly to the dispatch center
has been installed outside the
office.
"This end of the county
was growing in population
and there were some specific
needs for the residents down
here, so in order to get some
continuity down here, we're
going to put permanently
assigned deputies down here,"
said Columbia County Sheriff
Mark Hunter. "We'll have 24-
hour coverage down here.
The deputies will still work
the 12-hour shifts."
Two detective positions,
already assigned to the area,
will remain to handle investi-
gations.'
Hunter said the same over-
all number of deputies will be
on patrol any given shift as
before.
"We promoted four new cor-
porals along with the four (cor-
porals) we currently have,"
Hunter said. "One of those


corporals will be down here at
the district office along with
two permanently assigned
deputies. They will report to
the sergeant overall and he'll
be responsible for ensuring
those people that are staffed
down here."
The District 2 office does
not have a holding cell and
there is already discussion
about moving to a new loca-
tion, should funds become
available. -
"The discussion has been
to have a district office down
here with the county commis-
sion and they are very sup-
portive of it," Hunter said. "If
they can find the year-end
money, they're going to reno-
vate the old library building
should money become avail-
able as soon as they can."
Hunter said having a perma-
nent office in Fort White will
allow residents in the south
end of the county to become
more familiar with the depu-
ties who patrol the area:
.Opening the District 2 office
was accomplished without
any additional expenditure of
funds, Hunter said.


"We did this within budget
as far as promoting the four
corporals," he said. "We col-
lapsed one full-time position
and were able to promote four
corporals within the sheriff's
office. We didn't ask for any
additional funding on the staff-
ing side of this."
Hunter said the idea of hav-
ing a satellite office is popular
for law enforcement agencies
across the state and while
it may be new for Columbia
County, it's a good way to go.
'The population density
down here is growing so we
need to be able to respond bet-
ter," he said. "When you have
people that are.working in the
same area, they can get a bet-
ter handle of what's going on.
This has been promised to the
people in Fort White and this
end of the county for a num-
ber of years, and the reason
we're able to do it is because
we can be more efficient. This
is something I committed to
when I was trying to get this
job is that we would have
a permanently assigned office
down here."
"It's good working down


here," said Cpl. Gfeg Horne,
CCSO District 2. "It's new and
it's going to be a little bit of
an adventure with everybody
getting to see us down here.
We've made contact with a lot
of businesses and we've done
some walk-throughs around
town."
Susan Cone, Columbia
County Sheriff's District
2 office manager, said she
has been working with the
Columbia County Sheriff's
Office for 25 years and loves
working in the District 2
office.
"I'm very excited because
we've needed this for a long
time," she said. "The citizens
like to be able to see the same
face and they become familiar
with them and they'll talk to
them and confide."
She said having the perma-
nent office in Fort White will
allow residents in the south
end of the county to come into
the office and get background
checks, copies of reports, get
deputies to do incident reports
and get general information
about the sheriff's office.


The sounds of Sister Hazel


From staff reports

Ken Block and Drew
Copeland will bring the
sounds of Sister Hazel to
Florida Gateway College
on October 22. Tickets are
on sale now for the special
acoustic performance.
The Gainesville-based
Sister Hazel is best known
for its popular radio hits
in the late '90s and early
2000s such as "All For You,"
"Change Your Mind," and
"Champagne High," but
the band originated earlier
as an acoustic duo consist-
ing of Block and Copeland.
Their performance, which is
sponsored by FGC Student
Activities, will take place in


the Levy Performing Arts
Center and begin at 7:30
p.m.
Tickets are $15 for FGC
students, staff and faculty,
and $25 (or general admis-
sion. In addition, limited on-
stage seating will be sold
for $50.
Season tickets for the
inaugural season of FGC
Entertainment are also
available $210 for VIP
seating, $105 for general
admission and $60 for FGC
students, staff and faculty
- and can be purchased by
calling (386) 754-4340.
For more information,
contact Troy Roberts at
Troy.Roberts@fgc.edu or
by calling (386)-754-4247.-.:


Ken Block and Drew.
.Copeland of Sister Hazel.,,


DEFICIT: Estimated at $1.3 trillion

Continued From Page 1A


and was in the mids
of the Wall St. bailout
Continuing weakness in
the economy has kept tay
revenues low. The revenue
picture did improve in 201:
as individual income taw
receipts rose 22 percent
to $1.1 trillion, CBO esti
mated.
The economy is being
weighed ,down by high
oil prices, an economic
slowdown in Europe, an(
continuing weakness in th4
housing sector. As a
result, corporate income
tax receipts dropped by
6 percent
Interest payments
on the $14.9 trillion
'national debt spiked"


COACH: Charged with obstruction of justice

Continued From Page 1A


alleged conversation from
Sept 26 in which Escambia
assistant, coach Timothy
Jansky talked to the child
at school and informed him
that "if he pursued charges
in the battery incident, he
would no longer be allowed
to play football."
In a sworn statement
Jansky later confirmed he
had spoken to the victim
and told him he would not
be allowed to play football
at the repeated request of
Anderson.
Anderson coached at
Columbia High School in
2004 and resigned amid
controversy involving a
local football player. He
only coached one game,
against Suwannee, which
Columbia lost.
According to Columbia
Schools Director of
Human Resources/
Management Development
Frank Moore and docu-
ments from Anderson's
personnel file, Anderson
resigned his positions at


Columbia High School on
Sept 10, 2004 after meeting
with then principal Joanne
Chamberlin.
The resignation took
effect Sept 16, 2004, and
was accepted by the school
board at its Sept 14 meet-
ing.
According to docu-
ments from the Florida
Education Practices
Commission filed in
September 2005, the state
commissioner of educa-
tion filed a petition to
have Anderson's educa-
tor's certificate suspend-
ed, revoked, permanent-
ly revoked or face other
disciplinary actions for
his actions against a 16-
year-old Columbia High
School football player in
2004.
The allegations centered
on supposedly inappropri-
ate conduct during football
practice on Sept 8, 2004.
ThereportsaidAnderson
"directed derogatory and
profane comments" to stu-


dents, including a 16-year-
old. The report also alleged
that Anderson pushed and
pulled the student by the
face mask and jersey and
indicated Anderson made
the student stand on the
50-yard-line while the team
ran 100-yard sprints, report-
edly telling the team they
would run all night unless
they "took the 16-year-old
student out" or words to
that effect The student was
knocked to the ground by
the charging players, the
document alleges.


Anderson was given a
letter of reprimand after a
settlement agreement was
reached.
Anderson coached at
Indiana State University
before he was hired by
Columbia High.
After coaching at CHS,
Anderson became head
coach at East Gasden High
School and Escambia High
School. He was hired as
the Escambia head coach
in August 2010.


t

n
x
e
1
I
x
t
i-

r
IC
d
e


by 17 percent, to $266 bil-
lion, despite historically
low rates. But the cost of
unemployment benefits
dropped by 24 percent as
fewer claims were filed.
Lower war costs limited
the increase in military
spending to just over 1 per-
cent, CBO said.
Most economists
believe the most impor-
tant measure of the deficit
is to compare it againstthe
size of the economy. The


2011 deficit equaled 8.6
percent of gross domes-
tic product, a slight drop
from the 8.9 percent of
GDP registered last year.
It'll take major changes to
the way the government
does business to get the
deficit down to about. 3
percent of GDP, the level
that many analysts say ,is
sustainable.

Associated Press


YOUR OLD COLUMBIA-
COUNTY lAIR PHOTOS
The Lake City Reporter
will be publishing the
57th Annual Columbia
County Fair Magazine.

We are looking for old fair
photos from our readers.
If you have interesting, fun
fair photos let us know!
SDigital photos can
S* be submitted via
e-mail to Josh at
jblacknon@lakecityreporter.com
Please include your name, addieu, phone,
date ofphoto and photo de riptboa
Or stop by the Lake City
Reporter to have us
scan your photos.
-u .- -AV *' y Monday-Friday
8am-5pm
SDeadline: October 11, 2011
Lake City Reporter'
180 E. Duval Street
Lake City, FL 32055


F M a e l 3 71i293


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Page Editor: Robert Bridges, 754-0428


~T1












OPINION


.Saturday, October 8, 201 I


OUR


OUR
OPINION


Be there,

.be heard

E very vote counts,
whether in a race
for Congress or city
council.
As a practical mat-
ter, though, an individual citi-
zen carries more clout in local
and regional races than national
ones. It's simply a matter of
numbers.
Good reason to take a keen
interest in area politics, where
any given voice has a pretty
good shot at being heard.
An especially good forum
is Monday's meeting of
the Columbia County leg-
islative delegation, State
Representatives Elizabeth
Porter and Earl Bembry, along
with Senator Charlie Dean, will
offer comments and field ques-
tions starting at 9 a.m. in the
courthouse.
State legislators are good
folks to chat with. Powerful
enough to effect change on a
broad scale, yet local enough to
listen hard when you speak.
The courthouse is at 173 NE
Hernando St The meeting's set
-for Courtroom 3.
See you there.

HIGHLIGHTS
IN HISTORY
Today is Saturday, Oct 8, the
281st day of 2011. There are 84
days left in the year.
On this date:
In 1869, the 14th president
Sof the United States, Franklin
Pierce, died in Concord, N.H.
In 1918, U.S. Army Cpl.
Alvin C. York led an attack
that ~lled 25 German soldiers
and captured 132 others in the.
Argonne Forest in France.
,. In 1934, Bruno Hauptmann
Swas indicted by a grand jury in
New Jersey for murder in the
death of the son of Charles A.
A indbergh.
In 1945, President Harry
S. Truman announced that
the secret of the atomic bomb
would be shared only with
-Britain and Canada.
S,, In 1956, Don Larsen pitched
the only perfect game in a
World Series to date as the New
:.-York Yankees beat the Brooklyn
:'Dodgers in Game 5, 2-0.
In 1957, the Brooklyn
'Baseball Club announced it was
accepting an offer to move the
SDodgers from New York to Los
Angeles.

Lake City Reporter
Serving Columbia County
Since 1874
The Lake City Reporter is pub-
lished with pride for residents of
Columbia and surrounding counties by
Community Newspapers Inc.
We believe strong newspapers build
strong communities -"Newspapers
get things done!'
Our primary goal is to
publish distinguished and profitable
community-oriented newspapers.
This mission will be accomplished
through the teamwork of professionals
dedicated to truth, integrity and hard
'work.
Todd Wilson, publisher
Robert Bridges, editor
Sue Brannon, controller
Dink NeSmith, president
Tom Wood, chairman


LETT
POLl


ERS
CY


Letters to the Editor should be
typed or neatly written and double
spaced. Letters should not exceed
400 words and will be edited fir
length and libel. Letters must be
signed and include the writer's name,
address and telephone number for
verification. Writers can have two
letters per month published. Letters
and guest columns are the opinion of
.the writers and not necessarily that of
'the Lake City Reporter.
BY MAIL: Letters, P.O. Box 1709,
Lake City, FL 32056; or drop off at
180 E. Duval St. downtown.
BY FAX: (386) 752-9400.
BY E-MAIL:
news@lakecityreporter.com


Herman Cain will
never be presi-
dent of the United
States because he
doesn't understand
the Occupy Wall Street protests
and makes such statements as
"If you're not rich, it's your own
fault"
Millions of Americans played
by the rules, worked hard and
have no home because bad
eggs on Wall Street who got
filthy rich created subprime
mortgage pots and complicated
derivatives they didn't even
-understand.
Y These same hotshots fought
bitterly against new regulations
to make what they had done
illegal. The regulations were
signed into law by President
Obama. Now Wall Street and
GOP congressional leaders
are fighting to undo or at least
weaken them.
Like the protests against
the Vietnam War 40 years ago,
today's protests are born of
growing frustration and resent-
ment over the irresponsible use
of business and political power.
Like those anti-war protests,
the current protests will spread
around the nation and will have
stunning ramifications.-
Of course, an American man
or woman can still have a great
idea, work hard and become
wealthy. But it is also true that
26 million Americans don't
have jobs because of the bad
economy. Just try getting a loan
to start a risky new business
today. If you're lucky enough to
have, a job, just try retiring after
the economy has blown a huge
hole in your 401(k). (Only one -
of seven private sector retirees
has a pension.)
And now, the economic


t is a paradox of modem
times: We are committed to
diversity yet have enormous
difficulty imagining people
who actually are different
Americans and Europeans
prize peace and assume peace
has become a universal value.
The West has lost the will for
power and thirst for glory the
very phrases sound archaic
- so most of us assume no other
nations seek to conquer and dom-
inate. And because we are willing
to compromise, we are confident
others would settle for a half loaf
rather than killing and being
killed in pursuit of the whole.
Lack of imagination leads to
the conclusion that all conflicts
can be resolved. But this con-
clusion is erroneous. Anwar
al-Awlaki the al-Qaida cleric and
commander killed by a I Hellfire
missile last week provides a
vivid example.


Ann McFeatters
amcfeatters@nationalpress.org
upheaval in Europe is causing
havoc here,'and nobody knows
how its sovereign debt crisis
will turn out, including the out-
spoken Mr. Cain.
(Cain also said that he'has
no proof Ifut personally.is of
the belief that the anti-Wall
Street protests were organized
by Obama supporters trying
to distract voters. Lately, he's
been delivering more nutty
ideas than pizzas.)
The ill-structured, sort of
loopy Occupy Wall Street move-
ment is powered by the young,
just as the anti-war movement
was in the beginning. But as
messy as it was, the anti-war
movement begat huge changes
in American society and politics
and so will this one unless it
dies out or is co-opted.
The anti-Wall Street protests,
rapidly spreading from coast
to coast, are born of the unfair-
ness rampant in America.
We Americans have prided
ourselves on our insistence
on fairness. But there is little
fairness today. Here's a perfect
example: The head of Hewlett-
Packard was fired after 11
months on the job and walked
away with a farewell package
of $25 million.
At his latest press confer-
ence, Obama was asked why
nobody went to jail for causing
the economic meltdown, with


By 1996, Awlaki was leading a
small mosque in San Diego. Five
years later, he had moved to sub-
urban Washington, D.C., where
he was named imam of the Dar
al-Hijra mosque, one of America's
largest centers of Islamic worship.
A few weeks prior to the attacks
of Sept. 11, 2001, he was invited to
preach in the Capitol
Educated, traveled, sophis-
ticated and accomplished, his
American experience was filled
with freedom, tolerance and-
opportunity. He despised and
rejected it


its huge collateral damage
around the globe. He said it
was because a lot of what was
done was not technically ille-
gal, just immoral. That's why,
he said, financial regulations
to clean up Wall Street that
were passed with great dif-
ficulty mere months ago must
not be discarded and why the
new consumer fiscal watchdog
agency must not be weakened.
(Even in all this turmoil, what
are banks doing? They're
imposing new fees on custom-
ers.)
Like the amorphous Tea
Party, which almost put the
country into default, it is dif-
ficult thus far to know what the
Occupy Wall Street movement
wants to accomplish. The Tea
Party too sprang from dissatis-
faction with the way the coun-
try is being run, alarm at the
deficit and anger at homeless-
ness and joblessness. But along
the way it got enmeshed in
denial of basic science such as
evolution and climate change,
abortion, prayer, resentment
over bilingualism and a host of
unrelated issues.
The fledgling anti-Wall Street
movement will not make that
mistake because its supporters
include many young people less
interested in a conservative
social agenda than in finding
jobs and punishing corporate
greed and CEOs who are sit-
ting on huge profits and lack
vision. Their hero is not Mitt
Romney or Herman Cain or
Rick Perry but the entrepre-
neurial, imaginative, the late,
low-key Steve Jobs.

Ann McFeatters writes this
column for Scripps Howard News
Service.


According to law enforcement
authorities, two of the 9/11 al-Qai-
da hijackers regularly attended
Awlaki's mosque in San Diego
and held long meetings with him.
At Dar al Hijrah, he provided
"spiritual guidance" to Nidal
Malik Hasan who, on Nov. 5,
2009, at Fort Hood, Texas,
slaughtered as many Americans
as he could.
Awlaki, who by then had
returned to Yemen, called Hasan
a "hero." He added that jihad "is
becoming as American as apple pie
and as British as afternoon tea."
More than 30 years after Iran's
Islamic revolution and more than
a decade after 9/11, this is patently
obvious. Yet many Americans and
Europeans just can't accept the pos-
sibility that there are people who,
deep down, are not like them.
* Cliff May is a columnist for
Scripps Howard News Service


4A


ANO
VI


THEIR
EW


Obama's


secret


death


panel

Somewhere deep in
the National Security
Council, a death panel
is operating without
known legal basis,
without recognized rules, with-
out clear oversight and without
public record or knowledge of
its actions.
According to Reuters news
agency, a committee composed
of midlevel National Security
Council staffers is in charge
of compiling the "death list"
of terrorists to be targeted
by the CIA for killing. Their
recommendations are sent
to a principals committee for
approval. The president then
has the option of objecting to
the names on the list, but if
he remains silent he gives his
consent This system report-
edly was intended to "protect"
President Obama but instead
has created a growing political
predicament
The ,political question of
whether the United States can
wage a clandestine war against
terrorists through the use of
deadly force seems to have
been settled. The type of CIA
covert actions that shocked the
conscience ofthe nation when
they were revealed in the 1970s
are now taken for granted, even
lauded. It is a reflection of the
dangerous times in which we
live. But the question of wheth-
er these same deadly tech-
niques may be used against'
American citizens has never
even been debated. The mat-
ter has become acute since the
CIA killed al-Qaida leader and
U.S. citizen Anwar al-Awlaki in
Yemen last week.
Even under the more
permissive legal framework
established by the Patriot Act
and post-Sept 11 policy direc-
tives, the due-process rights of
American citizens, even those
abroad and actively involved
with terrorism, were supposed
to be sacrosanct This issue
was debated and adjudicated
from the first months of the
war, beginning with the ques-
tion of whether American
citizen John Walker Lindh,
captured in Afghanistan while
serving with the Taliban, was
given an adequate Miranda
warning.
The question of Awlaki's due-
process rights remains a mys-
tery. The Justice Department
reportedly produced a memo
justifying the killing, but it is
classified. Even if the White
Hbuse has a rationale for the
killing, it will not be conclusive
on its own merits.
The public has a right to
know what is being done in
its name. During the Reagan
era, members of the National
Security Council engaged in
far less controversial activity
that led some to murmur about
impeachment Arguments that
the activities of this committee
must be classified for reasons
of national security ring hol-
low from an administration
that entered office propelled
by fresh winds of openness
and promises of transparent
government The same presi-
dent who sent the moral high
horse galloping on questions
of torturing terrorist suspects
and closing the detainee facil-
ity at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba,
cannot now hide behind blank
walls and cipher locks while
secretive functionaries compile
lists condemning Americans to
death.
The American people should
know by what right, under
what law and by whose hand
their fellow citizens are being
marked for termination.


* The Washington Times


www.lakecityreporter.com


Wall Street protesters


-will produce change


Al-Awlaki's journey away

from freedom ends












FAITH


Saturday, October 8, 201 I v


&


VALUES


Nww.lakecityreporter.com


Reasons for being baptized


I was baptized in the river." Another
said, "I was baptized in the ocean.".
Still another said "I was baptized in
the church baptistery." The place is
not important; the reason is!
The book of Acts records several
examples of people being baptized. There
were about 3000 on the day of Pentecost
(2:41). In the city of Samaria "men and
women alike" were being baptized (8:12);
even a prominent magician was baptized
(8:13). An up-and-coming young Jewish
leader by the name of Saul of Tarsus was
baptized (9:18). Cornelius and those in
his household were ordered by Peter to
be baptized (10:48). Business woman
along with her household was baptized
(16:15). Maybe the strangest of all bap-
tisms was that of a jailor in Philippi and


his household who were BIBLICAL
baptized in the early hours
of the morning (16:33). In
the city of Corinth, a leader
.of a Jewish synagogue was
baptized (18:8); along with
many of his fellow-citizens.
The question is, why
go "down into the water"
and be baptized as was the
Ethiopian Eunuch (Acts CaritoI
8:38)? carlton_mc@
Luke records that after
those on the day of Pentecost were bap-
tized that God "added" them to "their
number" (Acts 2:41,47).
To the Romans, Paul says that those
who were baptized were "buried with
[Christ] through baptism into death ...


n McPeak
rmsn.com


I so we too might walk in
newness of life" (6:4).
Paul states that baptism
is where one crucifies the
old man of sin (6:6).
To the Galatians, Paul
said that those "who were
baptized into Christ have
clothed [themselves] with
Christ" (3:27).
To the Colossians,
Paul stated that those


who were "buried with
[Christ] in baptism" were "circumcised
with a circumcision made without hand"
(Colossians 2:10-12). This "work of God"
puts both Jew and Gentile into a covenant
relationship with God just like physical
circumcision put Abraham into a cov-


enant relationship with God (Genesis
17:10).
Peter used the flood as an example of
how "baptism now saves you ... through
the resurrection of Jesus Christ" (1 Peter
3:21).
Why be baptized? So that God can
make you a new man. So that God can.
dress you like an "heir to the promise"
(Galatians 3:29). So that God can put you
into a covenant relationship with Him. So
that God can save you.
The location of the water is not impor-
tant Coming "up out of the water" and
going on your way rejoicing because you
have obeyed God and God adding you to
the saved is very important!
E Carton G. McPeak is an evangelist
working in the Lake City area.


The church and spiritual gifts


Part 1


Now concerning spiritual
gifts, brethren, I do not want
you to be ignorant.."
(ICor. 12:1 NKJ).
The Greek word for
"spiritual gifts" is plural (pneumatika)
and refers to things pertaining to the
Holy Spirit. It gives the key to I Cor.
chapters 12-14. Chapter 12 concerns
the Spirit in relation to the body of
Christ. This relation is twofold: 1)
The baptism with the Spirit forms the
body by uniting believers to Christ,
the risen and glorified Head, and to
each other (w. 12-13). The symbol of
the body thus formed is the natural,
human body (v. 12), and all the analo-
gies are freely used (w 14-26). 2)
To each Christian is given a spiritual
enablement and capacity for specific
service. None is destitute of such a
gift (vw 7,11,27), but in their distri-
bution the Spirit acts in free sover-
eignty (v 11). There is no room for


self-choosing; Christian BIBLE STUD
service is simply the
ministry of such a gift
or gifts as the individual
may have received (see
Rom 12:4-8). .
In I Cor. 12:7-10, "But
the manifestation of the
Spirit is given to each one
for the profit of all: for to
one is given the word of Hugh Sh
wisdom ..., to another the ems-hugh43@co
word of knowledge..., to
another faith..,, to another
gifts of healing;..,, to another the work-
ing of miracles, to another prophecy, to
another discerning of spirits, to another
different kinds of tongues, to another
the interpretation of tongue". Nine .
'gifts by the same Spirit; named or men-
tioned. No one gift is more important
than the other. One should never put
emphasis on any one gift.,
We must remember that this church


II


IES at Corinth was a church
born out of Heathenism
and they, as a whole, had
no knowledge of the Old
Testament scriptures. So
God seems to have done
things for this church that
was not needed in any
other churches. The gifts
are diverse (vv6,8-10,28-
errill Jr. 30), but all are equally
mcastnet honorable because they
are bestowed by the
same Spirit, administered
under the same Lord, and energized by
the same God. The Holy Spirit in the
NT is revealed as a divine Person. This
is expressly declared (John 14:16-17, 26;
15:26; 16:7-15; Compare Matt 28:19),
and everywhere implied. The revelation
concerning Him is progressive. The Holy
Spirit is. given without delay to those who
meet the one essential condition of trust
in Christ (Acts 10:44; 11:15-18). This is


the permanent fact for the entire Church
age. Every believer is born of the Spirit
(John 3:3-6; I John 5:1); indwelt by the
Spirit, whose presence makes the believ-
er's body a temple (I Cor. 6:19; compare
Rom. 8:9-15; Gal. 4:6; I John 2:27); and
baptized with the Spirit (I Cor. 12:12-13;
I John 2:20,27), thus sealing him for God
(Eph. 1:13; 4:30).
The NT distinguishes between having
the Spirit, which is true of all believers,
and being filled with the Spirit, which is
the Christian's privilege and duty (com-
pare-Acts 2:4 with 4:29-31; Eph. 2:13-14
with 5:18). There is one baptism with
the Spirit, but many filling with the
Spirit. (Some references by Dr. C. I.
Scofield.)



E Hugh Sherrill is a Bible teacher at Eastslde
Baptist Church.


iIas


ADVENT CHRISTIAN
irst Advent Christian
1881 SW Mcarlane Ave.
386-752-3900


,am oay. cnui:
Sunday Service.
Wednesday Service:


945AM:
11:00AM
7:00PM


ASSEMBLY OF GOD
RRST ASSEMBLY OF GOD
1571 E Dual Street
386-438-5127
Sunday Worship 10:30AM.
GLADTIDINGS ASSEMBLY OF GOD
993 NW Lake Jeffery Road
386-752-0620
Sunday Worhip 10:30AM &6PM
Wed.Fam. Bble Study 7:OOPM
A church where JESUS is Real"

BAPTIST
BEREA BAPIST CHURCH
SR47 S 755-0900
Sunday School 9:30AM
SundayWorship 10:45AM&6PM
Wednesday Eve Service 7PM
Interim Pastor Kenneth Edenlield
EASTSIDE BAPTIST CHURCH
196 SE JamesAve.* 386-752-2860 .
Sun. Bible Study 9:45AM
Su~Worship 11AM&6PM
Wed. Prayer Mtg/Blble Study 6PM
Rev. Brandon G.Witt.
FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH
Sunday Bible Study 915AM
Sunday Worship 10:30AM & 6:00PM
Wed. 6:00PM Prayer Service, &
Chidrens Ministry 6:15PM
SDowntown ake City* 752-5422
O MISSIONARY BAPTIST CHURCH
541 N.E.avis Street ,
(386)752-1990
Ronald V. Walters, Pastor
Sunday School 9:45AM
Sunday Momg Worship 11:00AM
Wed. Mid-Week Worship 6:OOPM
In Gods Word, Will & Way'


PINE GROVE BAPTIST CHURCH
1989 N USHwy441
386-752-2664
Sunday Bible Study 9:45AM
Sunday Worship 11AM & 6PM
Wed. Kids & Youth Ministry 6:30PM
Pastor Ron Thompson
SALEM PRIITVE BAPTIST
SundayServices, 10.30AM
Pastorn Bder Henmin Griffin
752-4198
SOUTHSIDE 8ARIST CHURCH
388 S.E. Baya Drive* 755-5553

Bible Study 9:15AM
Mor nig Worship 10:30AM
Even Worshi p 6:15PM


AWANA
Prayer & Bible Study


5:4IPM
6:15 PM


TABERNACLE BAPTIST CHURCH
(IndependentBaptist)
144 SE MontroseAve.* 752-4274
SundaySchool 10AM
Sun. Morn.Worship 11AM
Sunday Eve. 61PM
Wd. Prayer Meeting 7:30 PM
Pastor Mike Norman

THE VINEYARD
Sunday Chuch Services 10:30AM
Sunday Night 6:00 PM
1832 SWTomaka Tenace
(offSW eascom NorrisDr.)
theviev.rdoakecicom

CATHOLIC
EPIPHANY CATHOUC CHURCH
1905 SW Epiphany Court 752-4470.
Saturday Vigil Mass -12:30 PM
Sunday Mass 8:15AM, 10:3DAM,
5:00 PM (panishVEnglish)
Sunday SchoolReigious Education
9:00AM-10:15 AM
CHRISTIAN
CHRISTIAN SCIENCE SOCIETY
239 SE BayaAve..
Sunday Service 11:00AM
Wednesday Evening Service 7:30PM


Tires for every need.
US 90 West across from Wal-Mart
752-0054_


LAKE COY CHRISTIAN CHURCH
Hwy 247 S. 755-9436
Sunday School 9:30 AM
Sun. Morn. Worship 10:30AM
Wed. Prayer Meeting 7 PM

CHURCH OF CHRIST
NEW HORIZON
Church of Chnst
Directions & Times 386-623-7438
Jack Exum,Jr., Minister

CHURCH OF GOD
LAKE CITY CHURCH OF GOD
167 Ermine St 752-5965
Sunday School 9 45AM
Sun. Worship 10:30AM 6:0PM
Wed. Family Night 7PM
Wed. bYuthService 7PM
Pastor: Carroll Lee
EVANGE. CHURCH OF GOD
370 SW Monitor Glen* 755-1939
Sunday School 9:45AM
Sunday Worship 10:50 & 6:30
Wed. Spiritual Enrichment 7PM
Shock Youth Chh"
Boys andGirls Clubs
Bible Study
Pastor John R. Hathaway

EPISCOPAL
ST. JAMES EPISCOPAL CHURCH
. 2423 SW Bascom Norris Dr.,
Lake City, R 32025 386-752-2218
Webste: www aeslakecty.org
HOLY EUCARIST *
Sun.8 & 10AM
Wed. 6:00 PM
Priest The Rev. Michael Armstrong
LUTHERAN
OUR REDEEMER LUTHERAN CHURCH
LCMS
1 1/2 miles S. of 1-75 on SR 47
755-4299


Sunday Services
(Nursery Provided)
Christian Education Hour
For all ages at 1045AM.
Pastor Rev. Bruce AMre


9:30AM


SPIRIT OF CHRIST LUTHERAN
Hwy 90,1.5 miles West of 1-75 752-3807
Sunday Worship 10:OOAM
Nursery Avail.
Wed. Pot Luck 6PM Worship 7PM
Vcar John Dad Bryant

METHODIST
first United Methodist Church
973 S. Marion Ave.
386-752-4488
Sunday School 9:45AM
Sunday Morning Worship
Casual Worship Service 8:50AM
Traditional Service 11-00AM
Program opportunities available in all areas
for all ages
For a complete schedule
contact church office at
752-4488


TRINITY UNITED
METHODIST CHURCH
Sunday School
Morning Worship
Bible Study Wod.


9:45AM
11:00AM
7.00PM


MondayPrayer 12:00 NOON
Friday Prayerh 6:00:700PM
Pastlor Rev. Fatha M. DeSue

S WESLEY MEMORIAL UNITED
1272 SW McFarlane 752-3513
(Adjacent to Summers School)
Worship 800 & 10:00AM
Praise &Worship OOPM
Sunday School 9:00IAM
Numery provided
Awana (ages 3-18) 5:30-7:30PM
Pastor The Rev. J. Loule Mabrey
www.weymem.com
WATERTOWN CONGREGATIONAL
METHODIST CHURCH
U.S. 90 E.turn on Cortez (next to Quality
Ind.) right oni Oldnawa.
SundaySchool 9:45AM
Sun. Worship 11AM & 6 PM
Wed. Night Service 7PM
Pastor, Randy Ogbum

NAZARENE
LAKE CiTY CHU I OF THE NAZARENE
Services


Sunday School
Sunday Worship
Wednesday


9:45AM
10:45AM
6:30PM


RICK'S CRANE SERVICE
Located at 25A (Old
Valdosta Hwy)
386-752-5696 or
386-867-2035
after hours

Adult, south Ministry, Children's Ministry
Pastor Crag Henderson
Nursery Provided
SW SR 47 and Azalea Park Place
PENTECOSTAL
FIRST FULL GOSPEL CHURCH
NE Jones Way & NE Washington SL
Sunday School 10:00 AM
Morning Worship 11:00AM
Evangelstic Service 6:00 PM
Youh Services Wednesday 7:OOPM
Mid-week Service Wednesday 7:00 PM
For li call 755-3408' Everyone Wecme
Pastor Rev. Stan Ellis
PRESBYTERIAN
RRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
697 SW Baya Drive* 752-0670
Sunday School 10:0AM
Sunday Worhip Service
Contempory 9:00AM.
Traditonal 11:00AM.
NURSERY PROVIDED
Pastor Dr Roy A. Martin
Director of Music: Bill Poplin


NON-DENOMINATIONAL
CHEMIST CENTRAL MINISTRIES
Celebration Servlce 930 &11:15AM
Wednesday Service 7:OOPM
217 DyalAve.,fron Hwy901take
SSsters Welcome Rd., go 5 miles, South,
church on left 755-2525 *
Lead Pasto Lonnie Johns
"A Church onthe Move"
CHRISIAN HERITAGE CHURCH
Comer SR. 47 & Hudson Circle
Sunday Celebration 10.30AM
Pastor Chris Jones* 752-9119
FALLING CREEK CHAPEL
Fahing Creek Road 755-080
First and Third Sundays 930 AM.
Second and Fourth Sundays 3:00 P.M
Paston Rev. CherylR.Pnigel
NEW BEGMNG CHURCH
Highway 242 E of Branfd limiwa
Sunday School. 10 AM
Moming Worship 11OOAM
SundayEvning 6:OOPM
Wednesday *700PM
A ul Gospel ch-EeryonWelcoed
(386)755-5197


Hany Mosley President

Para 752-2308 Nf.


Central States
Enterprises r
Columbia County's Feed Headquarters
FEED PET SUPPLIES IAWN & GARDEN
ANIMAL HEATH
668 NW Waldo St. 386-755,74,45

MIKELL'S POWER EQUIPMENT, INC.
Your Lawn & Garden Headquarters
MOWERS CHAIN SAWS TRIMMERS
1152 US 90 WEST LAKE CITY, FL.
386-752-8098;




755-7050

BAYWAYjanitorial Services
FIRE & Water Restoration
Floor & Carpet Care
Residential & Commecital
755-6142

North Florida
Pharmacy
7 Locations to Serve You
Lake City Ft. White, Branford,
Chiefland, Mayo & Keystone Heights


Supercenter
"LOWPRICES EVERYDAY"
US 90 WEST 755-2427
GWHunter, Inc.
Iho Chevron Oil
Jobber



HollyInc
"QOuality /oat at reasonable price"
We also do solar hook-ups
(386) 755-5944


Open 7 Days a Week
1036 E- Duval St. LakcCity FL.
(386) 752-4067
Fresh Meat, Fresh Produce!
I -1 r. do -l vlI 5fllm CIlwl .dim. c n, blse+ ".
Philippin. 4

, +en's e si of n toe d
OBSTETRICS & GYNECOLOGY
Weight Loss 69& Hair Removal $69
k Accepting all Insurance, No Ins visit '50
S.*'' j (386) 466-1106
f Located ShandstLake City& LiveOak


5A


Competitive rates, non-profit,
right here In your community.
Lake City District 386-752-7447
clayelectrlc.com,


Morrell's
Your Complete decorating and
home furnishings store
SW Deputy Jeff Davis Lane (fonnerly Pinemount Rd.)
752-3910or I.80-597-3526
Mon.-SaL. 800-5:30 Cosed Sunday


@ aNW COUMIA CO., M
COMMERCLAl *INDUSHTIAL
Site mi Rod Building Parking tots
(;rding & Drainage
752-7585
871 NW Guerdon St, Lake City


)


1 -


.


I








LAKE CITY REPORTER NEWS SATURDAY, OCTOBER 8, 2011


Stars must align to win a place


on Hollywood Walk of Fame


By GLENN WHIPP
Associated Press
LOS ANGELES
- Engelbert Humperdink
has one. Clint Eastwood
does not John, George
and Ringo yes. Paul
McCartney? Not yet. And
George Clooney would be
ii the club if only someone
could convince him to
show up for the ceremony.
When it comes to
receiving a star on the
Hollywood Walk of Fame,
the sidewalk tourist attrac-
tion that encompasses
15 blocks of Hollywood
Boulevard and three
blocks of intersecting Vine
Street, it's not so much
who you know, but wheth-
er you're willing to play by
the rules.
For starters, someone in
the celebrity's camp must
first fill out an application
form that includes the
star's signed promise that
they will attend the cer-
emony.
No pledge? No cer-
emony. Which is why
Eastwood, Julia Roberts
and Clooney aren't among
the 2,450 honorees lining
Hollywood's sidewalks.
A five-member commit-
tee meets annually in June
to consider some 250 to
300 applicants from five
categories of the enter-


tainment industry film,
television, music, broad-
cast radio and theater, a
category added in 1984.
As you might imagine,
some of the candidates
possess light resumes.
Others wouldn't be able
to show up for obvious
reasons.
"We've had applications
from Santa Claus and the
duck that represents an
insurance company on
commercials," says Walk
of Fame producer Ana
Martinez, who attends
the voting meeting and
decides where the stars
are eventually placed on
the street
"Somebody insisted
Shakespeare should have
a star," Martinez adds.
Typically, the Walk's
committee annually selects
20 to 24 new honorees,
who must then pay a
$30,000 sponsorship fee.
This covers the cost of
constructing the three-
foot-wide stars as well as
the cost of the ceremony.
A portion of this money
also goes to the Walk's
trust fund for continued
maintenance.
Of course, the honorees
themselves rarely foot the
bill. Recipients have five
years to schedule their
ceremony. Most celebrities
time the event to coincide


with a promotional oppor-
tunity.
"Stars like to make it
a big deal," Hollywood
Chamber of Commerce
president Leron Gubler
says. "Thafs the way they
are. They get a little more
bang for their buck out of
it when they time it right."
Rock star Melissa
Etheridge, a recent hon-
oree, saw her star unveiled
in front of the Hard Rock
Cafi, which, not coinciden-
tally, paid her bill.
Etheridge used the
ceremony both to thank
her fans and launch Hard
Rock's Pinktober breast
cancer awareness cam-
paign. Etheridge, 50, was
diagnosed with breast can-
cer in 2004 and has been a
spokesperson for the event
for the past six years.
"It's forever," Etheridge
says of her star, follow-
ing a morning ceremony
attended by an estimated
500 people, including
many fans who traveled
from across the country to
be at the event
"We've been playing
this fame game for 100
years here in this city of
dreams," Etheridge adds,
noting she came to the
Walk of Fame when she
visited Los Angeles as a
teenager.
At 51, the Walk of


Fame is roughly half of
Hollywood's age, and
many of its stars are in
need of a little cosmetic
surgery. Tree roots along
Vine Street have caused
the stars' black and pink
terrazzo concrete to crum-
ble. Heat and foot traffic
are factors, too, contribut-
ing to the buckling of the
stars' brass name lettering,
borders and emblems.
The Hollywood
Chamber of Commerce
initiated a restoration proj-
ect in 2008, grading each
of the walk's stars. Nearly
800 were targeted to be
repaired or replaced.
Raising the $4.2 mil-
lion needed to complete
the project hasn't been
easy. Corporate spon-
sors have donated about
half the total, to go along
with money from private
donors and a portion of
the proceeds from the star
ceremonies.
Though still short of the
goal, Gubler says he hopes
work can begin next year..
"We don't have the
money to do the whole
walk," Gubler says. "We'll
start with the worst sec-
tions and go from there."
Redevelopment, includ-
ing the Hollywood and
Highland complex and
its Kodak Theatre, the
permanent home of the


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Singer Melissa Etheridge posing Sept. 27, with her star on
the Hollywood Walk of Fame in Los Angeles.


Academy Awards, have.
bolstered the fortunes of
the walk's west end in the
past decade.
The Walk of Fame,
along with the famous
movie star footprints
at Grauman's Chinese
Theatre, remain popular
attractions for tourists vis-
iting Los Angeles.
'"They're iconic places
that still resonate with


people, though what's in
the imagination probably
doesn't align with the real-
ity," said USC professor
Leo Braudy.
"It's a way for people to
connect with their favorite
celebrities," Braudy contin-
ues, "though if you really
want to meet one, you'd
have a lot more luck going
to the nearest supermar-
ket."


;. ASSOCIATED PRESS
Republican presidential hopeful Gov. Rick Perry of Texas ges-
tures during a speech at the Values Voter Summit on Friday
in Washington.

Perry backer:

Romney in a 'cult'


By KASIE HUNT
Associated Press
WASHINGTON The
pastor who introduced
Texas Gov. Rick Perry at
a conservative gathering
Friday said rival presiden-
tial candidate Mitt Romney
is not a Christian and is
in a cult because he is a
Mormon.
Robert Jeffress, the
senior pastor at First
Baptist Church in Dallas,
made similar remarks
about Romney when he
ran in the 2008 campaign.
Event organizers at the
Values Voters Summit
selected Jeffress to intro-
duce Perry, but the Perry
campaign was consulted
about the choice and
approved Jeffress to intro-
duce the Texas governor.
Jeffress endorsed Perry
at the event and intro-
duced him as "a proven
leader, a true conservative,
and a committed follower
of Christ"
After his remarks,
Jeffress told reporters that
Perry's religion is different
from Romney's.
"Rick Perry's a
Christian. He's an evangeli-
cal Christian, a follower of
Jesus Christ," Jeffress said.
"Mitt Romney's a good
moral person, but he's not
a Christian. Mormonism
is not Christianity. It has
always been considered a
cult by the mainstream of
Christianity."
Romney is a member of
the Church of Jesus Christ
oi Latter-day Saints, whose
members are commonly
called Mormons.
Perry's campaign said
the Texas governor dis-
agrees with Jeffress.
S"'The governor does
not believe Mormonism


is a cult," said spokesman
Mark Miner.
Still, the campaign
refused to definitively say
whether they were accept-
ing his offered endorse-
ment "The governor
is running a campaign
of inclusion and looks
forward to receiving the
endorsement of many peo-
ple," Miner said. "People
can endorse whoever they
like."
Jeffress had made
similar comments about
Romney before, during
the former Massachusetts
governor's first presiden-
tial run in 2008.
"Mitt Romney is a
Mormon, and don't let
anybody tell you other-
wise. Even though he
talks about Jesus as his
lord and savior, he is
not a Christian," Jeffress
said in a 2007 sermon.
"Mormonism is not
Christianity. Mormonism
is a cult And just because
somebody talks about
Jesus does not make them
a believer."
In that sermon, Jeffress
said he was frustrated that
some religious leaders had
backed Romney anyway.
The campaign initially
said the decision to have
Jeffress introduce Perry
had been made strictly by
organizers, but a Perry
spokesman said Friday
night that the campaign
had agreed to it.
Jeffress is a prominent
religious leader in Texas.
His First Baptish Church
has more than 10,000
members. In 2009, Perry
recognized Jeffress by
name during his speech
at a dinner for the Light
of Life dinner and gala in
Dallas.


Gulf scientists swim with whale sharks


By JANET McCONNAUGHEY
Associated Press
, NEW ORLEANS Scientists
with the federal government and
from three Gulf of Mexico states say
efforts to find out more about the.
world's largest fish are picking up
steam.
Biologist Eric Hoffmayer of the
National Oceanic and Atmospheric
Administration fisheries service'
says two trips into the Gulf during
September resulted in 10 taggings,
significantly more than earlier
efforts. The tags will provide infor-
mation on the animals' movements.
In the summer, schools of the
harmless animals laze about at the
surface, where they can be tagged
easily. But as fall approaches, they
split off to hang out with schools of
tuna that herd baitfish to the sur-
face for an easy meal.
Relatively little is known about
whale sharks. Scientists don't have
a handle on population numbers, or
know much about their breeding
and migratory patterns.
Researchers from Louisiana,


Texas and Mississippi joined for the
September tagging expedition. They
were aided in their search by a spot-
ter plane provided by a California-
based nonprofit, On the Wings of
Care.
. On one trip to the Flower Garden
Banks National Marine Sanctuary
off Texas, Hoffmayer said the Gulf
seethed as whale sharks leaped
about, gulping mouthfuls of tiny
fish. Screaming seabirds dove to
grab some of the bounty.
The scientists had 30 seconds to
get photographs, anchor a GPS tag
in the thick, sandpaper-like skin of
one of the sharks and take a DNA
sample.
Hoffmayer said the trips were
successful they tagged five
-whale sharks on each of two such
trips. That's more per day than ever
before.
The tags will beam information
back to labs to track the sharks
whereabouts.
"We pretty much doubled the
amount tagged in the northern Gulf
in one week," said Hoffmayer, who
has studied whale 'sharks for nearly


a decade.
The newly tagged animals range
from 15-foot-long juveniles to 35-foot
adults.
Whale sharks can grow as long as
a school bus and are on the World
Conservation Union's "red list" of
threatened species.
"We're interested in how long
they stay here in the Gulf, and
where they go in winter," Hoffmayer
said.
But to find out requires swim-
ming with the sharks.
Fortunately, they're a docile spe-
cies. They cruise the gulf sucking
into tiny teeth meals of small fish
and plankton. They lack the fear-
some jaws of Gulf predator species
such as the mako, tiger and bull
shark.
Getting close to the gentle giants
isn't as easy as it seems, even as
they glide slowly through the warm
waters.
"Though it looks like it's swim-
ming nice and slow, it's a lot faster
than we are. We try to put ourselves
in front of the animal and let the ani-
mal swim to us," Hoffmayer said.


FBI: Search for baby leads to landfill


By MARIA SUDEKUM
FISHER
Associated Press
KANSAS CITY, Mo.
- FBI agents searched
a Kansas landfill on
Friday in connection with
the disappearance of a
10-month-old Missouri
girl, just hours after the
child's mother said police
accused her of being
involved.
Agents and Kansas City
police spent about two
hours at the Deffenbaugh
Industries landfill in the
suburb of Shawnee, FBI
spokeswoman Bridget
Patton said. She wouldn't
discuss details but con-
firmed the activity was
related to the search for
Lisa Irwin, whose parents
said was snatched from
her crib in the middle of
the night.
Patton said it was the
second time the FBI
had been at the landfill,
which investigators also


searched Tuesday the
same day the baby was
reported missing and
it wasn't uncommon to
search an area several
times. Police said agents
also went back to the
family's home and used
metal detectors to search
the yard.
Lisa's mother, Deborah
Bradley, said earlier
Thursday that police told
her she failed a lie detec-
tor test and accused her
of being involved in her
baby's disappearance.
Bradley said police
never showed her the
test results and she
denied knowing any-
thing about what hap-
pened to her daughter.
She and Lisa's father,
Jeremy Irwin, said their
daughter was abducted
sometime late Monday
night or early Tuesday
morning.
"They said I failed
(a polygraph test),"
Bradley, 25, said. "And I


continued to say that's not
possible because I don't
know where she's at and I
did not do this."
Irwin, 28, said he also
offered to take a test but
police told him it wasn't
necessary.
The couple said police
have treated them like
suspects and that Bradley
in particular has been pre-
paring for the possibility
of charges. She said detec-
tives told her: "'"You did it.
You did it And we have
nothing.'"
Experts said the frus-


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tration is understandable
but that police often focus
on close relatives in such
cases, in part because sta-
tistics show that far more
infants and young children
are killed by a parent than
a stranger.
"Suspicion almost
always falls heavily on the
parents, especially when
it's young kids," said
David Finkelhor, direc-
tor of the Crimes Against
Children Research Center
based at the University of
New Hampshire.






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Page Editor: Laura Hampson, 754-0427









LAKE CITY REPORTER ADVICE & COMICS SATURDAY, OCTOBER 8, 2011


DILBERT
I I '


STUDIES SHOW THAT
NICE GUYS GET PAID .
LESS THAN AGGRESSIVE
5-- JERKS.


BABY BLUES


BLONDIE


BEETLE BAILEY


MAYBE YOU SHOULD
OFFER YOUR DOCTOR
10% OF YOUR NEXT
RAISE IF HE GIVES
YOU TESTOSTERONE
INJECTIONS.


HAGARTHE HORRIBLE


THAT WOULD BE
ILLEGAL, DANGEROUS,
AND UNETHICAL.
( SAID THE
MAN WITH
THE TINY
INCOME.


DEAR ABBY: My fiance's
ex-girlfriend "Amanda"
has been living with his
parents for more than three
years. I feel cheated out of
the opportunity to have a


are married, you WILL be
the only daughter-in-law.
However, you will have to
accept that Amanda's child
will always be your in-laws'
first grandchild. Regardless
of how far or how fast


uluiner. lien oIer tier a
garment to cover up with.

* Write Dear Abby at
www.DearAbby.com or
P.O. Box 69440, Los
Angeles, CA 90069.


HOROSCOPES


SNUFFY SMITH


ZITS


GARFIELD


B.C.

WAAT peEeATIOS HAAVE
LNF riWANTINa T- To ro, uFT I:
f/. -, aHAVE; THE Iea tr VE.R,


FRANK & ERNEST


ARIES (March 21-April
19): Don't jump from
,o one thing to another.
10 Inconsistency will make
you appear incompetent
Take on a challenge that
requires both physical and
mental agility and concen-
trate on being successful.
SOne accomplishment is
better than several failures.

TAURUS (April 20-May
20): A short trip back in
time will help you put
things in perspective.
Reuniting with old friends
will remind you of old
goals you put aside to
AT pursue new endeavors.
Consider resurrecting
such ventures now and
you will entice someone
to contribute something
worthwhile. ****
GEMINI (May 21-June
20): Proceed with caution
when dealing with an emo-
tional matter. Take a look
at professional options and
consider what you can do
9 to earn more money. A cre-
t9 < ative idea or skill you have
.r can be turned into a small
0 part-time business. **
o CANCER (June 21-
July 22): Nothing is free,
and promises made will'
be broken. Avoid being
gullible when it comes to
products that profess to do
the impossible. An older
or younger person in your
life is likely to be a burden.
e Don't give in to unreason-
n>'Tr able demands. *****
LEO (July 23-Aug. 22):
-Put greater emphasis on


THE LAST WORD
Eugenia Last

home and fdily. Make
domestic improvements
that will add to the comfort
and the entertainment you
can offer others. Love is
in the stars, and a little
romance will enhance a
relationship with someone
special. ***
VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept
22): Don't leave anything
to chance. You must take
control and make strategic
moves that will protect you
and your possessions. A
change in your financial
situation can go either way,
depending on how you
react to the current eco-
nomic climate. ***
LIBRA (Sept 23-Oct.
22): Start a hobby that
will inspire you creatively.
Plan to join or participate
in an event or activity that
will bring you in contact
with like-minded people.
Love is in the stars, and
plans to get out and share
your feelings will be well
received. ***
SCORPIO (Oct. 23-
Nov. 21): Take care of
domestic matters and
make alterations to your
living arrangements that
will lead to a better rap-
port with family, friends
or neighbors. Keep your
thoughts to yourself and
make whatever you do a
surprise. Your plans will
bring you good fortune.
*****


SKRXKHK XA ZFKT IMJZ EN


SAGITTARIUS (Nov.
22-Dec. 21): Stretching the
truth will not be tolerated
and will lead to emotional ',
turmoil. You can expect
alterations to your cur- "'
rent living conditions.
Concentrate on pending
legal, financial or health
issues. Helping a cause
will unite you with interest-
ing people. **
CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-
Jan. 19): Express yourself
explicitly. Someone will
twist your words or try
to force you into some-
thing you'd rather avoid.
Protect your home and
refuse to let the words or
actions of others ruin your
day. Anger is the enemy.
Keeping the peace is your
saving grace. ****
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-
Feb. 18): Invest money and
resources into your abili-
ties. An inventive idea you
have will lead to a money-
making venture. Your time
and energy will be well
spent developing some-
thing you enjoy. Romance
is highlighted. Share your
plans with the one you
love. ***
PISCES (Feb. 19-March.
20): Attend a unique event
and you will connect with
someone who can contrib-
ute to a project you want
to pursue. An old concept
or idea with a new twist
will be timely in today's
marketplace. Make conces-
sions for the partner who
can contribute. ***


G F B Z' J


.LNJZ ONAHKAXKAZ BAE ZFKIA ZFKT
WKVKAZ." SNS ETRBA


. PREVIOUS SOLUTION: "We have so many words for states of the mind, and
so few for the states of the body." Jeanne Moreau
2011 by NEA, Inc. 10-8


FOR BETTER ORWORSE
LUBL(MFF,MUNCH) MOM PHL- CALLED UP RN'
GoIN'OUT WTHTED 8ORDSHV- WASCMrFfGiP)
GRIN AN' he RNTS DOMB To GO BRCK-To
To MOV IN HIM NYHOU....


CLASSIC PEANUTS


DEAR ABBY


Man wants to pull plug on

late-night chat sessions

DEAR ABBY: I have been Amanda moves out, her
dating "Mindy" for a little child will have a place in
more than a year, and most- their hearts and their lives.
ly we get along. The one Having had their grandchild
thing that is not working is living in their home for this
Mindy likes to have long period of time has intensi-
talks on the phone, usually fied the bond. Please con-
very late into the night sider carefully how this will
When I get sleepy and Abigail Van Buren affect you before you marry
tell her I'm going to bed, www.dearobby.com this man, because feeling as
she either gets upset, daughter-like relationship you do, it may be a difficult
ignores me and continues with my fiance's parents. I adjustment
talking, or tries to guilt want her to move out ** * *
me into staying up later to I have discussed this DEAR ABBY: In our
talk. I resent it. I have tried with my fiance, and he house we have a simple
discussing it with her, but talked to his mother and dress code. We ban the
she doesn't seem to get told her that we're getting "three B's". If your clothing
it. How can I get across married and its time for shows your butt, your boobs
to Mindy that I'd like to Amanda to leave. Amanda or your.belly, you may not
go to bed without a fight? also agrees ifs time for wear it I just don't think ifs
- NODDING OFF IN her to move, but my future healthy for my teenage sons
BELMONT, CALIE mother-in-law doesn't I (or my older son and hus-
DEAR NODDING OFF: don't think she wants to band) to have that in their
Do it by telling your chatter- let go of Amanda and her faces as we eat dinner.
box girlfriend in the bright grandson. Ifs like Amanda Is there a tactful way to
light of day what time your is her daughter, approach the kids' friends
bedtime is. Tell her that if I don't like the situation. who are welcome at all
she wants to have long con- Ifs not normal, and I don't times, but sometimes show
versations in the evening, know what to do. I want to up with their boobs hang-
thafs fine with you but feel like I'm the daughter- ing out? COVERING UP
she needs to respect what in-law, not Amanda! Please IN NEW HAMPSHIRE
your bedtime is. As that help. CHEATED IN DEAR COVERING UP:
time approaches, remind HOLLAND, MICH. Yes. If someone comes to
Mindy by saying, "I'm giv- DEAR CHEATED: I the table suffering from
ing you five more minutes, see nothing positive to be overexposure, take the girl
then I'm hanging up the gained from a confrontation. aside and tell her that in
phone." Then do it Once you and your fiance your house you "dress" for


CELEBRITY CIPHER


by Luis Campos
Celebrity Cipher cryptograms are created from quotations by famous people, past and present.
Each letter in the cipher stands for another.
TODAY'S CLUE: M equals U
"VKNVRK ENA'Z EN GF.BZ ZFKT


Page Editor: Emogene Graham, 754-0415










LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED SATURDAY, OCTOBER 8, 2011

Lake City Reporter




CLASSIFIED


Classified Department: 755-5440


Take ADvantage of the
Reporter Classifieds!

755-5440


BU- I
SELLfc


FIND II I


4 ln s*6daysE additionnl
Rate applies to private Individuals selling
Personal merchandise totaling $100 or les.
REach Iem must Include a price.
This isa non-refundable rate.




E| One Item per ad aIlu a
4 lines 6 days |h ddtional
Rate applies to private individuals selling
personal merchandise otalling $500 or les.
Each Item must Include a price.
This is a non-refundable rate.



One Hem per ad V6 |
4 lines 6 days Each additional
Rate applies to private Individual s selling
personal chandise totalling $1,000 or less.
S Each tm must Include a price.
This is a non-refundable rate.



One hem per ad $237 0
4 lin a 6 dayvs ach Idditional
I Rats applies to private ididuals Ilng |
personal merchandise iotlng $25000 or less.
A Each item most Include a price
This is a non-refundable rate.





one H$m per ad .
Rate applies to private Individuals selling
personal merchandise totallg $4,000 o lss.
Each Item must Include a price.
This le anon-refundable rate..




4 lines 6 days ach tonal
| Rate applies to private sdduals se lg |
personal merchandise totallnag llr $ es.
Each em must inside a price
This Isa a non-refundable rate


Limited to service type advertis-
ing only.
4 lines, one month....*92.00
$10.80 each additional line
Includes an additional $2.00 per
ad for each Wednesday insertion.



You can call us at 755-5440,
Monday through Friday from 8:00
a.m. to 5:00 p.m.
Some people prefer to place their.
classified ads in person, and some
ad categories will require prepay-
ment. Our office is located at 180
East Duval Street.
You can also fax or email your ad
copy to the Reporter.
FAX: 386-752-9400 Please
direct your copy to the Classified
Department.
EMAIL: classifieds@lakecityre-
porter.com


U..-


Ad Is to Appea
Tuesday
Wednesday
Thursday
Friday
Saturday
Sunday


Call by:
Mon., 1 HO a.m.
Mon., 1000 a.m.
Wed., 10:00 a.m.
Thurs., 10:00 a.m.
Fri., 10:00 a.m.
Fri., 10:00a.m.


Fax/Email by:
Mon., 9:00 a.m.
Mon., 9:00 a.m.
Wed., 9 am.
Tlurs., H00 am.
Fri., 9:00a.m.
Fri., 9:00a.m.


These deadlines are subject to change without notice.




Ad Errors- Please read your ad
on the first day of publication.
We accept responsibility for only
the first incorrect insertion, and
only the charge for the ad space
in error. Please call 755-5440
Immediately for prompt correc-
tion and billing adjustments.
Cancellations- Normal advertising
deadlines apply tor cancellation.
Billing Inquiries- Call 755-5440.
Should further information be
required regarding payments or
credit limits, your call will be trans-
ferred to the accounting depart-
ment.


Advertising copy is subject to
approval by the Publisher who
reserves the right to edit, reject,
or classify all advertisements under
appropriate headings. Copy should
be checked for errors by the
advertiser on the first day of pub-
lication. Credit for published errors
will be allowed for the first insertion
for that portion of the advertisement
which was incorrect. Further, the
Publisher shall not be liable for any
omission of advertisements ordered
to be published, nor for any general,
special or consequential damages.
Advertising language must comply
with Federal, State or local laws
regarding the prohibition of discrimi-
nation in employment, housing and
public accommodations. Standard
abbreviations are acceptable; how-
ever, the first word of each ad may
not be abbreviated.

In Print and Online
wwwiv.lakecityreporter.coni


Legal

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
3RD JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND
FOR COLUMBIA COUNTY,
FLORIDA
CIVIL DIVISION
CASE NO.: 12-2010-CA-000132
BAC HOME LOANS SERVICING,
LP FKA COUNTRYWIDE HOME-
LOANS SERVICING LP,
Plaintiff,
vs.
JULIA CADY; RYAN CADY;
LAKE CITY GLASS INC; UN-
KNOWN TENANTSS; IN POS-
SESSION OF THE SUBJECT
PROPERTY
Defendants
RE-NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE
SALE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pur-
suant to an Order Resetting Foreclo-
sure Sale dated the 19th day of Sep-
tember, 2011, and entered in Case
No. 12-2010-CA-000132, of the Cir-
cuit Court of the 3RD Judicial Cir-
cuit in and for Columbia County,
Florida wherein BAC HOME
LOANS SERVICING, LP FKA
COUNTRYWIDE HOMELOANS
SERVICING LP, is Plaintiff and JU-
LIA CADY; RYAN CADY; LAKE
CITY GLASS INC; and UN-
KNOWN TENANTSS; IN POS-
SESSION OF THE SUBJECT
PROPERTY, are defendants. The
Clerk of this Court shall sell to the
highest and best bidder for cash at
the Columbia County Courthouse,
173 NE HERNANDO AVENUE,
LAKE CITY, FL 32055, 11:00 AM
on the 26th day of October, 2011, the
following described property as set
forth in said Findl Judgment, to wit:
LOT 2, SOUTHWOOD MEAD-
OWS, ACCORDING TO THE
PLAT THEREOF, AS RECORDED
IN PLAT BOOK 6, PAGE 49, OF
THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF CO-
LUMBIA COUNTY, FLORIDA
ANY PERSON CLAIMING AN IN-
TEREST IN THE SURPLUS FROM
THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER
THAN THE PROPERTY OWNER
AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS
PENDENS MUST FILE A CLAIM
WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE
SALE.
Dated this 23 day of September,
2011
P.Dewitt Cason
Clerk of the Circuit Court
By:/s/ B. Scippio
Deputy Clerk
Submitted by:
Law Office of Marshall C Watson
1800 NW 49 Street, Suite 120
Fort Lauderdale, Florida 33309
Telephone: (954) 453-0365
Facsimile: (954) 771-6052
Toll Free: 1-800-441-2438
05528216
October 1, 8, 2011

Dale L. Gerber DDS
Announifing the transfer of his dental
practice to Dr. Andrew Martin as of
September 28th, 2011.
Records will be mainta:-ed by Dr.
Martin at the same location of 844
South Marion Avenue, Lake City
The phone number remains 386-752-
8531
05528394
October 8, 15, 22, 29, 2011
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
COLUMBIA COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File No. 11-171-CP
Division Probate
IN RE: ESTATE OF ALICE
MARIE BOWER
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
The administration of the estate of
Alice Marie Bower, deceased, whose
date of death was March 25, 2011,
and whose social security number is
XXX-XX-9076, file number 11-171-
CP, is pending in the Circuit Court
for -Columbia County, Florida, Pro-
bate Division, the address of which
is 173 NE Hemando Avenue, Lake
City, Florida 32055. The names and
addresses of the personal representa-
tive and the personal representative's
attorney are set forth below.
All creditors of the decedent and oth-
er persons having claims or demands
against decedent's estate on whom a
copy of this notice is required to be
served must file their claims with
this court WITHIN THE LATER OF
3 MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AF-
TER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF
A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON
THEM.
All other creditors of the decedent
and other persons having claims or
demands against decedent's estate
must file their claims with this court
WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER THE
DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICA-
TION OF THIS NOTICE.
ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITH-
IN THE TIME PERIODS SET
FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF
THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE
WILL BE FOREVER BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME
PERIODS SET FORTH ABOVE,
ANY CLAIM FILE TWO (2)
YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE
DECEDENT'S DATE OF DEATH
IS BARRED.
The date of first publication of this


Lawn & Landscape Service

J&M LAWN Service & more for
all your outdoor needs. Don't
waste your time or weekend,
Free Estimate. 386-984-2187

Services

DIVORCE, BANKRUPTCY,
RESUMES.
Other court approved forms-
386-961-5896.

HAULING. Rental clean out,
garage clean out. Cut up and
remove brush. FREE Estimates!!
386-497-3099


Legal

notice is October 1, 2011.
Personal Representative:
Randolph Fields
301 East Pine Street, Suite 1400
Orlando, Florida 32801
Attorney for Personal Representa-
tive:
Anthony W. Palma
Florida Bar No. 351865
Broad and Cassel
390 North Orange Avenue,
Suite 1400
Orlando, Florida 32803
Telephone: (407) 839-4216
05527682
October 1, 8, 2011
100 Job '
100 Opportunities
AVON!! Only $10 to start!
Earn bonus $ up to $150+
1-800-275-9945 pin #4206
www.youravon.com/tdavies
Due to increased sales volume at
Burkins Chevrolet of Macclenny,
we are currently seeking 2
professional sales consultants.
Experience is a plus, as well as
GM training. We have an
excellent working environment
with opportunity to grow in our.
organization. Please contact Bob
Burkins at Burkins Chevrolet in
person Monday through Friday.
Local law firm seeks experienced
Real Estate closer. Send reply to
Box 05078, C/O The Lake City
Reporter, P.O. Box 1709,
Lake City, FL, 32056
Masons/Operators/Skilled Labor
Opportunities exist for
experienced construction
personnel. Reply to: PO Box 1239
Lake City, Florida 32056
NEED CNC Machinist
Must have Metal Working
Machine Shop exp. Send resume,
Quality Mill, 3631 US Hwy. 90
East, Lake City, FL 32055.
PART TIME CDL DRIVER
Must have CLEAN driving record
and a minimum of 2 years experi-
ence. Call 386-935-1705
Stylist needed. Full time /Part time
Hourly pay. No Clientel needed
Contact Darlene.
386-984-6738
TANKER DRIVER
Night Position & Part time day po-
sition needed, Gasoline & Diesel
Fuel Transport Delivery Driver,
Tues. Sat.;
Truck based in Lake City, Florida,
Local Deliveries, Health Insur-
ance, 401K, Paid Vacation
Competitive Pay Structure,
Must have two years driver
experience, clean MVR,
Application available by mailing:
info@jj-fuel.com
Fax completed applications to
Heather at 850-973-3702.
Questions call 1-800-226-5434
after 3:00 p.m., Speak to Ronnie.
Training
Professional House Cleaners,
are you looking for a new career?
(386)752-5655 for more info.

120 Medical
120 Employment

05528030
LEARN TO DRAW BLOOD
Local Phlebotomy Course
offered in Lake City, FLA
Certificate program.
(904)566-1328

05528324
LICENSED PRACTICAL
NURSE
The Columbia'County Health
Department is seeking an OPS
(temporary) Licensed Practical
Nurse, PSN #64901181
(part-time 20 hours per week).
This position is primarily to
provide nursing services in the
Ryan White Clinic. Applicant
must have a current LPN license
in the State of Florida. Must
have experience with electronic
medical records. Must have-
experience with immunizations.
Must be fingerprinted. May be
required to work during or
beyond normal work hours or
days irt the event of an
emergency. rate of pay is
$14.75 per hour.
Applications will be accepted
online at https://peoplefirst.my-
florida.com/ State of Florida
applications may be mailed to
State of Florida, People First,
Staffing Administration, PO
Box 44058, Jacksonville, FL
32231 or faxed to
(904) 636-2627 by 10/10/11.
EEO/AA/VP Employer

Home care agency in need of an
MSP biller for training office staff.
Will contract rates. Please email
wbonilla()suwanneemedical.com
Medicare accredited home care
agency in need of several LPNs to
assist in the care of a school age
child in Alachua. Potential of 33
hours a week. Please email
wbonilla@(suwanneemedical.com
for information.
240a Schools &
S Education

05528364
Interested in a Medical Career?
Express Training offers
courses for beginners & exp
Nursing Assistant, $479
next class-10/17/10
Phlebotomy national certifica-
tion, $800 next class-11/28/11


310 Pets & Supplies
FREE TO GOOD HOME
Black American Lab. About
1 yr. old. Playful and happy!
386-365-8707
FREE To Good Home.
Young male very tame Ferrett.
PLease call for more info.
386-292-2784
PUBLISHER'S NOTE.
Florida Law 828.29 requires dogs
and cats being sold to be at least 8
weeks old and have a health
certificate from a licensed
veterinarian documenting they
have mandatory shots and are
free from intestinal and external
parasites. Many species of wild-
life must be licensed by Florida
Fish and Wildlife. If you are
unsure, contact the local
office for information.

33 Livestock &
3 Supplies
Registered. Angus Bull Yearling,
7 mons. old, exc. bloodlines, off of
a long line of top producers $950.
3'86-349-3104 or 386-719-4802


361 Farm Equipment
2001 John Deere 4600, 4X4, Cab,
Loader, Diesel, Priced to sell
$5500 contact me for details at
mcha58pa@msn.com
941-343-8317

402 Appliances
GE Nice Black Dish Washer
Clean. Works Great.
$135.00 obo
386-292-3927
Lg capacity White GE Dryer.
Works great.
$145.
386-292-3927


407 Computers
DELL Computer,
$100.00
386-755-9984 or
386-292-2170

HP Computer,
'$45.00
386-755-9984 or
386-292-2170

411 Machinery &
411 Tools
COMPRESSOR 2HP, 120V
motor, belt drive.
Asking $60. runs good.
SOLD

419 TV-Radio &
4 Recording


USED TV SALES EVE1
Holiday Inn Lake City is liq
ing over 100 used 27" Zenitl
(2004 model; remote not inc
ed). $50.00 each.SOLD "A;
Friday, 3-6pm (while supp
last). Call 386-754-1411

ACROSS
1 Hand warmer
5 Tobacco
portion
9 Dutch carrier
12 Indigo dye
13 Bear in the
sky
14 Come to the
rescue
15 Huge hairstyle
16 Nature toys
(2 wds.)
18 Recollection
20 Protective
layer
21 Venture
22 Use hair
rollers
23 Make a pile
26 Cable channel
30 Leafy climber
33 Hairy twin
34 Chanel's
nickname
35 Broad-based
37 Colorless
39 Soho co.
40 Frontier, once


420 Wanted to Buy
K&H TIMBER
We Buy Pine Hardwood &
Cypress. Large or small tracts.
Call 386-961-1961.

Wanted Junk Cars, Trucks, Vans.
$275 & up CASH! Free Pick Up!
NO title needed !386-878-9260
After 5pm 386- 752-3648.


430 Garage Sales
Furniture & Furnishings Tent
Sale Friday & Saturday.
8-4. at 297 South Marion Ave.
!!!LOTS OF STUFF!!!

Gateway Baptist Church Youth are
having an indoor Yard Sale & Car
Wash on Sat, Oct 8, 7am-lpm.
Gateway is 3 miles south of US 90
on the Branford Hwy @ 3252 SW
State Rd 247. Come shop while
you get your car washed!
INDOORS VFW Post 2206,
343 Forest Lawn Way, Sat. 10/8,
8-1, household, clothes, Xbox,
baked goods, more, 386-752-5001
Inside sale. Fri 8-2 Sat 8-12. St.
James Episcopol comer of Bascom
Norris & McFarlane. Rain or shine
Bake table. Lots of treasures!!!
PUBLISHER'S NOTE
All Yard Sale Ads
Must be Pre-Paid.

SAT. 8-1. Off Country Club just
north of 252. on Victoria Glen.
Look for signs. TV's, CD's,
frames, pots, pans & more.
SAT. 8-? 3841 SW MAULDEN
AVE. South of 240 in Columbia
City. Something for everybody.
Sports collectibles and more.



Unscramble these four Jumnbles,
one letter to each square,
to form four ordinary words.

I FSTIH i


430 Garage Sales
Sat. 8-? Emerald Street in Emerald
Forest. (Brandford Hwy). 2 desks,
clothes (some new), stuffed ani-
mals, lots of misc.
Yard Sale 90W to Turner Rd.
Look for signs. *183 NW Pinellas
Ct. Ham Radio/CB items. We have
1001 What Nots & Knick Nacks.

440 Miscellaneous
22,000 BTU Window AC
WORKS GREAT
$185. obo
386-292-3927
3 PUSHI Mowers.
Need TLC. (1) Craftsman,
(1) Bolen.(1) Yardman.
$100.00 for all. 386-755-6963
4 ROOM USED CARPET
AND PADDING. Off white.
You move, haul away and clean
the carpet. $75.00 386-755-6963
Microwave. Looks good,
works good.
$35.00
386-292-3927
New Sloan Regal Flusho Matic.
Chrome finish, go tankless flush.
Made in USA. Only $95.00. Easy
installation. 386-755-6963
NEW TAPCO C2 House Floor
Jack 34in-55in. with 16,000 lb
compression at 3ft. Made in USA.
Only $50.00. 386-755-6963
Rock Polishing Kit
Tumbler, instructions,
olishing powders.
25. 386-752-0987
Tow Behind,
Grill/Smoker
386-249-3104 or
386-719-4802
THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME
by David L. Hoyt and Jeff Knurek


EBCDUR o -t
R I THE PHOTOGRAPHY
TEACHER HAP EVERYTHING.
FHE NEPEP1, BUT HIS
ASNKHE %I 5TUPErNT5---
to form the surprise answer, as
S- suggested by the above cartoon.

Ans:
(Answers Monday)
Yesterday's Jumbles: POLKA ANNEX PIGLET ABSORB
I Answer His explanation of how the famous crack
formed did this RANG A BELL


41 Cove
43 Ad -
committee
45 Oil job
48 Said in fun
51 Maintain
53 Shellfish
56 All there
57 Wire gauge
58 Budget item
59 San Obispo
60 Drone or
worker
61 Fizzy
beverage
62 Ballot marks

DOWN
1 Sir's
companion
2 Famished
3 Terra -
4 Knocks for. a
loop
5 Jetty
6 Coffee
brewer
7 Is, to Fritz


Answer to Previous Puzzle


FAC Y E YE BED,
LOGIC AMI ERA
NT.EL VAGUELY
".L.ANE ESTES
INDIA TRU
HI MCA RAMS
LEE SLOP PTAH
EJ

EACH IMPS TRI
AREA NEIN ISM
BOG NOTCH
N-N
MAGIC OGRE
BLOTTER ENSUE
APB ETC ROUTE
SOS TEA REE


8

9

10
11


"Platoon"
actor
Corn syrup
brand
Sketch
Dept. store
inventory


Want more puzzles?
Check out the "Just Right Crossword Puzzles" books
at QuillDriverBooks.com


17 Cortes foe
19 Nerve network
22 and
crossbones
24 Tomato jelly
25 "Misery"
co-star
27 Our sun
28 Interest amt.
29 High sign
30 Labor org.
31 C'est la -
32 Fabric meas.
36 Lucy's
sidekick
38 Morays and
congers
42 Fracas
44 Nose stimuli
46 Sweethearts
47 Sgt. Bilko
48 Doorpost
49 Stage award
50 Hardy green
51 Whodunit
terrier
52 Dick Tracy's
wife
54 Prefix for
classic
55 Draw to a
close


2011 UFS, Dist. by Universal Uclick for UFS


* ADvantage


* Continuing education
Fees incl. books, supplies, exam
fees. Call 386-755-4401 or
expresstrainingservices.com










LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED SATURDAY, OCTOBER 8, 2011


440 Miscellaneous
Two Burial Plots for sale.
Forest Lawn Cemetery.
$600. ea.
386-755-9305


460 Firewood
Firewood for Sale. $65. per Truck
Load. Rick 386-867-1039 or Joey
965-0288 if no answer pls leave
message we will call you back.

630 Mobile Homes
0 for Rent
14 Wide, 3/2-$525, 2/2-$475.
Clean, Quiet Country Park
Water, septic, garbage incl. NO
PETS! 386-758-2280 References.
lbedrm/lbth $350 mo.,Also, Resi-
dential RV lots. Between Lake
City & G'ville. Access to 1-75 &
441 (352)317-1326 Call for terms.


2&3 BR MH. $395 $650. mo.
plus deposit. Water & sewer fur-
nished. Cannon Creek MHP
386-752-6422
2/2 Units.
October Special
$525. mo. Includes water.
386-984-8448
2BR/1BA CH/A includes
water, sewer, garbage.
$495. mo + $495 dep.
386-961-8466
3/2.5 S of Lake City, (Branford
area) $550 mo plus security
386-590-0642 or 386-867-1833
www.suwanneevalleyproperties.com
3br/2ba mobile home, in town,
private lot, front & rear porch,
storage shed $650/mo + security.
386-466-2266 or 752-5911
5br/2ba Close to Target
Distribution Center. $850. mo.
1st + dep. Credit references
required. 386-365-3761
CLEAN 3br/lba, In quiet,
private park. Large lot
.Call: 386-752-6269
Iv message if no answer.
LG clean 3br's $450. -$650. mo. +
dep. Also, 2br mobile home's
avail. No Pets. 5 Points area. Also
3 br Westside. 386-961-1482
Mobile Homes for rent in
White Springs, Lake City & Ft.
White. Contact 386-623-3404
or 386-397-2779
X-CLEAN 2/2, 8 mi NWof VA
nice country acre. $500 mo +
dep. No dogs, smoke-free
environment. 386.961.9181

640 Mobile Homes
640 for Sale ,

It's Here. Jacobson Homes
"Sub Zero" Top Quality Home
with lots of tape and texture and
a dream kitchen and more.
North Point Homes, Gainesville
(352)872-5566
Jacobson Homes Factory Outlet
Try us in Gainesville. Best Prices
and Financing in Florida. North
Pointe Homes (352)872-5566
NEW 2012 Town Homes
28X44 3/2 Only $37,900, 32X80
4/2 Just $69,900. Both include
Delivery and set, AC,'Skirting and
steps. No Games!
North Pointe Homes, Gainesville,
Fl. (352)872-5566
Palm Harbor Homes
4/2 From 499 Mo Loaded
3/2 From 399 Mo Loaded
Homes on Y6ur Lot 0 Down
800-622-2832

6 Mobile Home
650 & Land
Owner Finance, Large, clean 3/2
on 2.5 ac, place, sm down. $875
mo, 386-590-0642 / 386-867-1833
www.suwanneevalleyproperties.com
WOW! 2 Mobile homes on 5
acres! 2006, 3/2.5, above pool,
S1997 1,500 sq. ft. with nice
porch.$139,888 MLS 78531 Brit-
tany Results Realty 386-397-3473
r- ---.


710 Unfurnished Apt. Unfurnished
For Rent 73 Home For Rent


2br/1 ba, 1 car garage,



2BR/1BA. Close to town.
$565.mo plus deposit.
Includes water & sewer.
386-965-2922
2BR/2BA w/garage
5 minutes from VA hospital.
Call for details.
386-365-5150
A Landlord You Can Love!
2 br Apts $550. & up + sec. Great
area. CH/A washer/dryer hookups.
386-758-9351/352-208-2421
Duplex w/garage spacious, 2/1,
1300 sq ft, W/D h9ok up, CH/A,
$650 month & bckgrnd chk,
386-697-3248 or 352-377-7652
Fall Special! 1/2 Price First
Month. Updated Apt, w/tile
floors/fresh paint. Great area.
From $395.+sec. 386-752-9626
Large 2 br Apt In town
$500. mo $500 dep.
386-344-2972


The Lakes Apts. Studios & IBr's
from $135/wk. Util. & cable incl.,
Sec 8 vouchers accepted, monthly
rates avail Call 386-752-2741

720 Furnished Apts.
72 For Rent
Rooms for Rent. Hillcrest, Sands,
Columbia. All furnished. Electric,.
cable, fridge, microwave. Weekly
or monthly rates. 1 person $135,
2 persons $150. weekly
386-752-5808

Unfurnished
730 Home For Rent


05528178
LAKE CITY
4BR/2BA, 1248SF $675, mo
3BR/2BA 1325SF $925. mo
3BR/2BA 1064SF $600. mo
2BR/1BA 700SF $475. mo
2 AVAILABLE.,
2BR/1BA 768SF $500 mo
2BR/2BA 1000SF $725 mo
LAKE BUTLER
4BR/2BA 1560SF $750 mo
MADISON
2BR/1BA JUST REMODELED
$450. mo. 3 AVAILABLE
3BR/1.5 BA REMODELED
$550. mo
LIVE OAK
3BR/2BA 1733SF $975. mo
4BR/2BA 1944SF $795. mo
Visit our website:
www.NorthFloridahomeandland.com
Mitchell Lee 386-867-1155
Mike Foster 386-288-3596
Accredited Real Estate Services
1688.SEBaya Dr., Suite 105
Lake City, FL 32025
Accredited Real Estate is a Full
Service Real Estate Office.
We do: Rentals -
Property Management ~
f~l Property Sales.

'09 Custom Dream Home
4BR/3.5BA, 5+acres, horses ok.
Old brick & heart pine floors,
I jet tub, DSL. Beautiful!
For right person $2000/mo.
negotiable 970-221-0090
1/1 Cottage, pool access, no pets,
country setting, $695 mo includes
utilities & cable. $300 sec. Near
SR 47 & 75 386-719-5616


3/2 998 Highlands Loop 675.00mo
3/2 931 Highlands Loop 700.00mo
Commercial Office avail.
386-755-3649
3BR/1.5 BA Large lot. Very clean
with storage shed. Quiet area.
$850 mo. + $850. dep.
386-752-7578
4BR/2BA 2800 sqft brick.
$850. mo. + $850 dep.
386-961-8466

4br/2ba CHA Brick, 1200 sqft
lac., Close to FGCC, CR 245A.
Ceramic tile/carpet, $700 mo $800
dep (904)708-8478 App. req'd
Brick 3br/2ba Large yard, garage,
CH/A. 179 SW Stanley Ct. Lake
City. $900. mo + $850 dep.
Call 386-365-8543
LOVELY 3BR/1BA Farm house
for rent. Quiet country area.
$500. mo. Please call after 5pm.
386-752-0017. Leave message.
Prime location 2br/lba.
Resid'l or comm'l. Comer of Baya
& McFarlane. $600. mo. $500 sec.
386-752-9144 or 755-2235

750 Business &
75 Office Rentals

05527923
OFFICE SPACE for Lease
576 sq'$450/mth
900 sq'$600/mth
3568 sq' $2973/mth
8300 sq' $5533/mth
also Bank Building.
Excellent Locations
Tom Eagle, GRI
(386) 961-1086 DCA Realtor


For Lease; E Baya Ave. Two -
1000 sqft office space units or
combined for 2000 sqft. 386-984-
0622 or weekends 386-497-4762


805 Lots for Sale
BEAUTIFUL 5 acres in
Lake City, 100% owner financing,
no qualifying, $395 per month.
Please call 512-663-0065
PUBLISHER'S NOTE
.All real estate advertising in this
newspaper is subject to the fair
housing act which makes it illegal
to advertise "any preference,
limitation, or discrimination based
on race, color, religion, sex',
disability, familial status or nation-
al origin; or any intention to make
such preference, limitation or
discrimination." Familial status
includes children under the age of
18 living with parents or legal
custodians, pregnant women and
people securing custody of chil- -
dren under the age of 18. This
newspaper will not knowingly
accept any advertising for real es-
tate which is in violation of the
law. Our readers are hereby in-
formed that all dwellings adver-
tised in this newspaper are availa-
ble on an equal opportunity basis.
To complain of discrimination call
HUD toll free at 1-800-669-9777,
the toll free
telephone number to the hearing,
impaired is 1-800-927-9275.

'810 Home for Sale


3800 sf two story, 5 br 3b, metal
roof, two kitchens, quiet nice
country acre 8 mi. NW of VA.
$159,000 firm cash only
386.961.9181
4 BR/2 BA, on 1 acre, granite
floors thru out, open kitchen, wrap
around front porch.$139,900
MLS 77292 Brittany
Results Realty 386-397-3473
Beautiful home on 15 acres w/over
2,500 sq. ft. New appli., new tank
at well, new drain field, workshop.
$235,000 MLS 77552 Brittany
Results Realty 386-397-3473
Century 21 Darby Rogers
752-6575 Immaculate home on
.5 acres. 3/2, new energy efficient
A/C system, metal roof, 12x28 work-
shop. #78508 Only $168,900


I


4 acres, Wellborn, New Well
installed, Beautifully wooded
w/cleared Home Site, owner fin,
no down, $39,900, $410 mon
Call 352-215-1018
www.LandOwnerFinancing.com


For Lease FARM- 7 stall barn.
17+ acres, pasture, cross fenced.
Close in $500. mo.
386-961-1086
FOR SALE BY OWNER,
10 acres, approx. 7 acres planted
pines, with a 24 x 40 foot (Steel
Dean) bldg. w/18 foot opening,
'own power, $85,000,
Call Sonya 386-288-2557.

l830 Commercial
83 Property.
166 SW Main Blvd.
Next to Wendy's
For Sale Or Lease.
386-752-7938

870 Real Estate
7l Wanted
I Buy Houses
CASH!
Quick Sale Fair Price
386-269-0605


Corial Homes
by Arthur Rutenberg
.-, r. j :. H ,.J M ir.; .r l; .'.tf,.-,Jc, 1. ., ,
:.' ,!.u. ;,R .-.l..c, H ,:m es L..:e.i.: t .: .';l ''.


jasmine
SVisi the moddl in-
The Preserve =a
JAWud Lake.
227 Belflawer Drive
Model Hours:
Open Daily. 12rSptn
Satr 10-4 Sun: I-4pm
Call Bryan Zecher
(386) 752-8653


To place your
classified ad call

755-5440

-wg I I


810 Home for Sale
Century 21 Darby Rogers
752-6575 3/2 located on 11th Fair-
way at Southern Oaks Country Club.
Huge master BR, huge kitchen, 2 car
garage. #78276 Only $129,900
Century 21 Darby Rogers
752-6575 Executive home, 4/3, 2557
sqft, plantation shutters, granite
counter tops, in-ground pool w/spa.
#78610 Only $269,000
Century 21 Darby Rogers
752-6575 Beautiful Victorian/White
Springs, 7BR/3.5B w/5 fireplaces, a
Must See. #76361
Only $185,000
Century 21- Darby Rogers
752-6575 Golf course living, 3/2.5,
vaulted ceilings, open floor plan,
place, breakfast area. #78941 (1-
year home warranty) Only $210,000
LAKE'CITY 2006 Brick home
with shop, 3 BR/2 BA, 1,700 sq.
ft., double lot fenced, $199,900
or best offer, Call 417-396-2134.
Sale or Lease By Owner. 3/2
Brick 1500 sf., 2 car garage, shed,
fenced, friendly area, near schools
$115,000. Call 386-365-0480
Well maintained 4/2,2566 sqft
oversized den w/fplace, Ig kitchen,
breakfast area overlooking gazebo.
#78347 Only $179,000 Century 21-
Darby Rogers 752-6575

Osa Farms & ,
O82U Acrege
$10,000 reduction on our 10-acre
lots. Owner financed land.
Deas Bullard Properties
386-752-4339 www.landnfl.com
4 1/2 acre lot Lake Jeffery Road.
Gorgeous Oaks!Paved Rd
Owner Financing! NO DOWN!
$59,900. $525mo 352-215-1018.
www.LandOwnerFinancing.com


I ________________________________________


- -


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GARAGE SALE
WITH THE
LAKE CITY REPORTER
Only
$ 7o50

4 LINES 3 DAYS
2 FEE SIGNS I

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Bring the picture in or
we will take it for youl
* Ad runs 10 consecutive days
with a description and photo in the
newspaper and online E-edition.
* Ad runs 10 consecutive days as a
classified line ad online.
* You must include vehicle price.
* All ads are prepaid.
* Private party only.





2006 EF250
Ford Van
3/4 ton, metal work
shelves/ladder rack,
60K miles, exc. cond.

$10,500
Call
386-555-5555
If you don't sell your vehicle
during the first 10 days, you
can run the same vehicle ad
for 10 additional days for
only $15.00
Terms and conditions ramqin the
same for the additional run.



MayorBidget
(386 .755544


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Lake City Reporter


Story ideas?

Contact
Tim Kirby
Sports Editor
754-0421
tkirby@lakecityreporter.com


SPORTS


Saturday, October 8, 201 I


www.lakecityreporter.com


Page IOA


SCOREBOARD

TV sports
Today
AUTO RACING
10 a.m.
ESPN2 NASCAR, Nationwide
Series, pole qualifying for Kansas Lottery
300, at Kansas City, Kan.
12:30 p.m.
SPEED NASCAR, Sprint Cup,
practice for Hollywood Casino 400, at
Kansas City, Kan.
.1:30 p.m.
SPEED NASCAR, Sprint Cup,
"Happy Hour Series:' final practice for
Hollywood Casino 400, at Kansas City,
Kam
3:30 p.m.
ESPN2 NASCAR, Nationwide
Series, Kansas Lottery 300, at Kansas
City, Kan.
7 p.m.
SPEED V8 Supercars Australia, at
Bathurst.Australia
2 a.m.
SPEED Formula One, Japanese
Grand Prix, at Suzuka, Japan
COLLEGE FOOTBALL
Noon
ABC Oklahoma vs.Texas, at Dallas
ESPN Minnesota at Purdue
ESPN2 Louisville at North
Carolina
FSN Mississippi St. at UAB
3:30 p.m.
ABC Regional coverage, Miami at
Virginia Tech, Iowa at Penn St., or Missouri
at Kansas St.
CBS Florida at LSU
ESPN Regional coverage, Iowa at
Penn St. or Miami atVirginia Tech
FSN -Arizona St. at Utah
NBC -Air Force at Notre Dame
.7 p.m.
ESPN -Auburn atArkansas
ESPN2 Georgia at Tennessee
FSN Iowa St.at Baylor
FX -Texas A&M at Texas Tech
7:30 p.m.
VERSUS Colorado at Stanford
8:07 p.m.
ABC Ohio St. at Nebraska
10:30 p.m.
FSN -Washington St. at UCLA
GOLF
8 a.m.
TGC European PGA Tour, Madrid
Masters, third round, at Alcala de Henares,
Spain
2:30 p.m.
TGC LPGA, Hana Bank
Championship, second round, at Incheon,
South Korea (same-day tape)
5 p.m.
TGC PGA Tour, Frys.com Open,
third round, at San Martin, Calif.
8:30 p.m.
TGC Champions Tour, Insperity
Championship, second round, at The
Woodlands,Texas (same-day tape)
HORSE RACING
5 p.m.
VERSUS NTRA, Shadwell Turf
Mile and Dixiana Breeders' Futurity, at
Lexington, Ky.
MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL
7:30 p.m.
FOX Playoffs, American League
Championship Series, game I,. Detroit at
Texas
NHL HOCKEY
I p.m.
VERSUS N.Y. Rangers vs. Anaheim,
at Stockholm

FOOTBALL

Top 25 schedule
Today
' No. I LSU vs. No. 17 Florida,
3:30 p.m.
No. 2 Alabama vs.Vanderbilt, 7 p.m."
No. 3 Oklahoma vs. No. II Texas at
Dallas, Noon
No. 6 Oklahoma State vs. Kansas,
3:30 p.m.
No. 7 Stanford vs. Colorado, 7:30 p.m.
No. 8 Clemson vs. Boston College,
3 p.m.
No. 10 Arkansas vs. No. 15 Auburn,


7 p.m.
No.
7 p.m.
No.
Noon
No.
8 p.m.
No.
Noon


12 Michigan at Northwestern,
13 Georgia Tech vs. Maryland,
14 Nebraska vs. Ohio State,
16 West Virginia vs. Connecticut,


No. 18 South Carolina vs. Kentucky.
Noon
No. 19 Illinois at Indiana, 2:30 p.m.
No. 20 Kansas State vs. Missouri, 3:30
p.m.
No. 21 Virginia Tech vs. Miami,
3:30 p.m.
No. 22 Arizona State at Utah,
3:30 p.m.
No. 23 Florida State at Wake
Forest, 12:30 p.m.
No. 24 Texas A&M at Texas Tech,
7 p.m.
No. 25 Baylor vs. Iowa State, 7 p.m.

College scores
Thursday
W. Kentucky 36, Middle Tennessee 33,
20T
Oregon 43, California 15

BASEBALL

MLB playoffs
LEAGUE CHAMPIONSHIP SERIES,
American League
(All games televised by Fox)
Today
Detroit (Verlander 24-5) at Texas
(Wilson 16-7), 8:05 p.m.


Panthers


Columbia falls to
Ridgeview, 34-26,
in district game.

By BRANDON FINLEY
bflnley@lakecityreporter.com

ORANGE PARK -
Columbia High looked
to take the driver's seat
in the District 3-6A race.
Instead, the Tigers took
a back seat to Ridgeview
High in a 34-26 loss on
Friday in Orange Park.
The Panthers struck on
their first drive, moving
the ball 55 yards and scoi-
ing on a 22-yard keeper
from quarterback Josh
Moore to take a 6-0 lead.
The Panthers built
the lead to 20-0 with two
Moore touchdown passes
to Mitchell Galloway.
Columbia quarterback
Jayce Barber capped a
14-play drive with a quar-
terback sneak into the end
zone to cut the lead to 20-6
at the half.
After an interception
on the second play of the
second half, Moore added
to the lead with a 12-yard
touchdown run.
Columbia cut the lead to
27-12 after Barber broke
free from a sack and scram-
bled 26 yards.
Barber added another
sneak late in the third quar-
ter to cut the lead to 27-16.
Moore gave the
Panthers a 16-point cush-
ion in the fourth quarter
with a seven-yard run.
Barber's fourth rushing


Lift's always good to
hear positive things
about players I've
covered. This week,
I found out that
Lake City's own Lavoris
Powell has been
tearing up the junior
college ranks.
Most of us know him as
Tiger.
Powell is now letting
the junior college ranks
know what most of us
already know Tiger is
a player to be reckoned
with.
Last week, the Jones
County Junior College
player turned heads with
a six-touchdown
performance. The most
Powell had as a Tiger
was four.
"This was my first time
to score six touchdowns
in a game," Powell said.
His scoring runs came
from 1, 75, 7, 30, plus a
pair of 27-yard touchdown
catches.
Powell finished the
game with 24 rushes for
205 yards. He added 51
yards on three
receptions and
accumulated 17 yards on
a kickoff return. In total,
Powell had 273 yards from
scrimmage not a bad
day for the former Tiger.
The six touchdowns
tied a school record for
the Bobcats that has
stood for 43 years. Lynn
Horne previously scored
six touchdowns to help
the Bobcats defeat East
Central.
Powell still hasn't


FROM THE SIDELINE


Brandon Finley
Phone: (386) 754-0420
bfinley@lakecityreporter.com
forgotten how to thank
those that open up holes
for him.
"Our offensive line
played really well," he
said. "They blocked well
and opened up the holes.
They got a good push and
I just followed them."
It was those kind of
holes that broke open
for 75 yards that helped
Powell break out He had
161 yards in the first three
games of the season. In
the last two games, Powell
has rushed for 330 yards.
Powell ranks ninth
'nationally in rushing
yards and now averages
98.2 yards per contest
He's gaining more than
five yards per carry.
Powell's plans are to
graduate in December and
enroll into the University
of South Florida where he
originally committed out
of Columbia.
"Jones has helped me a
lot," he said. "I know what
I have to face when I get
to a university."

N Brandon Finley covers
sports for the Lake City
Reporter.


prevail


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Columbia High's Hayden Lundy (24) gets off a punt during a game against Buchholz High on Sept. 16.


touchdown of the game
and Rakeem Battle's two-
point conversion cut the
lead to 34-26 with 1:51 left
Columbia's attempt at
an onside kick failed.


wt an ad. .on t

R yYOUlt OWN JA0- O.tl
ion tes:
Sunday, October 16th
i. ay, October 23rd
Deadine: Monday, October 10th .

TRICK OR TREATING SAFETY PAGE


Powell putting


himself on the


map at Jones