<%BANNER%>

UFPKY NEH LSTA



The Lake City reporter
ALL ISSUES CITATION THUMBNAILS MAP IT! PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028308/01666
 Material Information
Title: The Lake City reporter
Uniform Title: Lake City reporter (Lake City, Fla. 1967)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: John H. Perry
Place of Publication: Lake City Fla
Publication Date: 04-30-2011
Frequency: daily (monday through friday)[<1969>-]
weekly[ former 1967-<1968>]
daily
normalized irregular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Lake City (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Columbia County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Columbia -- Lake City
Coordinates: 30.189722 x -82.639722 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 95, no. 4 (Oct. 5, 1967)-
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000358016
oclc - 33283560
notis - ABZ6316
lccn - sn 95047175
sobekcm - UF00028308_01569
System ID: UF00028308:01666
 Related Items
Preceded by: Lake City reporter and Columbia gazette

Full Text




















SaturdayApi 30, 20 I I wHww.I akecityreporvte r.co m Vol. 1 37, No. 83 :W 75 cents




Moving up the ranks 1


County residents line up for Arbor Day tree giveaway


~pm~~~,~~.,Y.:-tPt~i~LTS~:;~:~:~':*~=~~


~~""x""'~rornr~~FXp;


footballl contest. advance in playoffs.
Sporvooo'o?7 120511 ****3- IGI1 1 -L32; "
LIB OF FLORIDA HISTORY
PO BOX 117007
205 SMA UINIV OF FLORIDA
GAINESVIL~rLE F'L 32611-19)43


LoCash Cowboys.
close in on goal to
headline Jarn Fest.

By ANTONIA ROBINSON
arobinson@lakecityreporter.com



River Jarn
E ~bringsmneuaeac pefraChristi
Lucas and Preston Brust
of LoCash Cow~boys closer
to their goal of eventually
headlining the event.
The duo first appeared
at the Jam six years ago
on the 1st Street Music
and Budweiser Party Zone
stage.
"We said one day we're
going to be on the big stage
headlining," Lucas said.
Just three years ago they
moved to the main stage.
"Now we're just two slots
away from headliningg"
Brust said. -
Preston and Brust met in
Nashville, Tenn. after both
moved to the city 'to start
music careers,
Music was always a part
of. his -life, Lucas said. He


SAT., APRIL 30 GATES OPENc 12:00 P.M.


1:20p~m. State of Mind Band
2:00O p~m. Ms. Suwvannee lam
Daisy Duke
3:30 p~m. Colby Craig / SteffaieRi Renae
& Am. Kenneth Brian
S:48~C pem. M~ichael 'Cooper / Colby~ Craigi
Steffanie! Renae
7:30 pnm Ms. Suwatnnee fam Final
9Wj p~sb Toniny;I Rad
Michael Coope~r/ Colby Craig:
Steffanie Renae


4d5 p~m joe Diffie


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
LoCash Cowboys duo Chris Lucas and Preston Brust pose for a photograph Friday before
taking the stage at the Suwannee River Jam at the S~pirit of the Suwannee Music Park.


grew up listening to a vari-
ety of artists ranging from
Frank Sinatra to Al Green.
"I never thought I would
be a singer," he said.
SBrust grew up' in the
church as was the son of a
preacher. .
"I wasn't allowed to lis-


ten to anything but gospel
music," he said.
Eventually he heard the
songs of the secular world,
such as Michael Jackson's
"Thriller." -
Linking up with Lucas
opened his eyes to all
types of music, Brust said.


Together the -duo bring an
eclectic mix of the country
sound to the table.
Their single "Keep in
Mind" "did really well" and
placed on the Billboard top
40 for two weeks, Lucas


Darryl Wodeyr


&6:1 p


RANK(S continued on 3A1


NASAhopes
fOr a relaunch
on Monday

~By MARCIA DUNN .
AP Aerospace Writer
CAPE CANAVERAL
-- The historic next-to-last
space shuttle launch was
scratched Friday because


of mechanical problems,
spoiling a visit from, the
president and dashing
the hopes of the biggest
crowd of spectators in
years, incl ding the miis-
sion commander's wound-
ed wife, Rep. Gabrielle
Giffords.
NASA hopes to try
SHUTTLE continued on 3A


LEANNE TYO/Lake City Reporter
Shelby Forsyth (above left), 18, aColumb~ia High School senior, smiles as'she gets a French manicure at LA Nails Friday,
while Francis Diaz (above right), 18, Columbia High School student body president, tries on her prom dress one last time at
her house in preparation for the CHS junior/senior prom.



PROM PREPARATION


L-wmaer
settle on 7.9
pIellet cut.

BILL KACZOR
Associated Press
TALLAHASSEE -
Legislative budget nego-
tiators settled on a $540
per student, or 7.9 per-
cent, spending cut Friday,


to make up most of thait
difference through other ~
funding sources.
That includes what in
effect would be a 3 per-
cent pay cut for teachers
and other employees.
legislative leaders earlier
this week agreed the bud-
get will include a require-
BUDGET continued on 3A


ing forward to the CHS
junior/senior prom since.
February, when her date
asked her to the dance with
.a surprise message in a for-
tune cookie. .
"I was completely speech-
less and I thought it was the
most sweet and thoughtful
thing," she said, while she
got a French manicure in


CHS studentS
get ready for
tonight's event

By LEANNE TYO
Ityo@lakecityreporter.com
Francis Diaz of Columbia
High School has been look-


preparation for the event at
IA Nails Friday.
.Diaz, 18, CHS student
body president, will join
more than 360 CHS sta-
dents and their: guests at
the dance,' which takes
place at 9 p.m. today at the
Country Club at Lake City.
Students have been antic-
ip ating the event for weeks,


said Jill Hunter, CHS stu-
dent activities director.
'I can't wait for promn, I
can't wait for prom,' that's
what I keep hearing,"
H-unter said.
Each year, the jtinior
class plans the dance for
the senior class and this

F ROM continued on 3A


TWo free treeS
per person given
away a iet

By ANTONIA ROBINSON
arobinson@lakecityreporter. com
At 6 a.m. Bernice Brown
of Lake City made sure she


claimed a spot for receiv-
mng trees at an annual give-
away.
"I wouldn't miss this for
anything," she said. "I just
love it."
Brown was first in line
at the National Arbor Day
tree giveaway Friday at
Memorial Stadium.
Columbia County resi-


dent were able to receive
two free trees as well as
seedlings at the event
which was hosted by the
City of Lake City-Columbia
County Beautification
Committee.
TThis year's event was
wonderful, said Bettye
Lane, committee chair-
man,


"I'm happy about such
beautiful weather," she
said. "After the rain yester-
day, we weren't sure what it
would be like today."
Lane said she loved going
down the line of attendees
to talk with people waiting
for their trees.
Ellianos Coffee Company
and Dwight Stansel Farm


& Nursery donated trees
and seedlings for the event.
VyStar Credit Union also
donated $500. .
A moment of silence was
held in honor of Robert
Patterson of Lake City,
who recently passed away.
Patterson was first in line
for the past six years at the
event.


Mayor Stephen Witt
issued a proclamation for
National Ar-bor Day and
Ian Rodriguez, Latke City
Community College: golf
course operations and land-
scape .professor, provided
guidelines for planting and
caring for the trees.
ARBOR continued on 3A


SUBSCRIBETo
THE REPORTER:
Fa: #.12 90


Opinion .........' ..... 4A
-roday inPeople 'A
Advice &Comrcs. .... tB
Puzzles. .. .. . .. 2B I


TODAY IN
PEOPLE
The Po~als
tie thel knoI~t.


COMING
SUNDAY
Final da,
of P~l zer jarn.


~r.~ I J-~.ll, '."~ 'I.a


Surprise pick
Ponder selected
I 2th by Vikings
in NFL Draft.
Sports, IB


SMoving on
CHS softball defeats
Ed White to


Spring game
Indians and Raiders
to. face off


. in f


La e UIL


neporter


artspr.m. Phil }assar


Shuttle .nd-eavour's

last trip delayed;

Obamna makes visit


State budget

He OtiatOYS Rdree

on school spending


S Funny
WVEATH ER, 2A


,,. n





Celebrity Birthdays


H Actress Cloris Leachman
is 85.
H Singer Willie Nelson is 78.
M Actor Gary Collins is 73.
Actor Burt Young is 71.
M Singer Bobby Vee is 68.
M Singer Merrill Osmond is
58. .
Movie director Jane Camn-
pion is 57.

Daily Scripture


CO RREC TION

Catherine Green of Epiphany Catholic School won second
place out of the fourth- and fifth-graders who participated
in the Univ/ersity of Florida/Columbia' County 4-H Tropicana
Public Speaking Program, held April 8.


.


11~--11 ~11 ~" ar.ra~------~-. 1


1
Ea~i~


c urrca3


LAKE CITY REPORTER


SATURDAY, APRIL 30, 2011


Page Editor: C.J. Risak, 754-0427


Actor Paul Gross is 52.
A Basketball Hall of Famer
Isiah Thomas is 50.
Country musician Robert
Reynolds (The Mavericks)
is 49.
a Rapper Turbo B (Snap) is
44.
Rock musician Clark
Vogeler is 42*.


Friday-
Afternoon:1-7-4-4
Evening: 8-4-1-2


I~I~j~mjimBn3r~h -1 F~1~IICIIIIII


By PAISLEY. DODDS
Associated Press
LONDON
ith: not one but two
kisses and tender
whispered words'
Prince William an~d
Kate Middleton
smiled and blushed Friday as they
started their life as future king and
queen. A day of seamless pageantry
inspired hopes that this royal couple
'might live happily ever after.
They appeared at ease through-
out their wedding day, with William
fihting back giggles at times, while
Kate's smile lit up television screens,
especially when her newv husband
leaned over to say, "You look beauti-
Sfu .
Their intimacy stood~ in sharp
cotatto the lack of chemistry
between a wooden Prince Charles
and Diana Spencer 30 years ago
when they began a marriage that
ultimately collapsed in embarrassing
tabloid headlines and turned many
Britons against the monarchy.
A million people lined the proces-
sion route from Westminster Abbey
to jBuckingham Palace, many crying
with joy. Cheers went up as the cou-
ple exchanged the traditional kiss
.on the balcony, followed by chants
of "One more kiss!" The couple
tvaved and smiled and, to a frenzy of
delight, obliged.
An estimated 2 billion people
tuned into the live broadcast in what
may have been the most-viewed
event history.
The security operation was the
largest since Charles and Diana's
1981 wedding, and the day went off
~without a hitch. Police dispersed
scattered protests from anti-monar-
chists and anarchists and arrested
55 people for offenses including
drunkenness, breach of peace, and
theft, but the mood was overwhelm-


10rringestolhmi

utda-iolet
radiation risk
for the area on
a scale from 0
to 10+.


ICfYamMAA


ASSOCAdTED PRESS
Kate and William offer a wave from the-balcony to the masses gathered at
Buckingham Palace.


.Buckinigham Palace, he took his new
wife for a spin, di-iving a dark-blue -
Aston 1 artin Volante festooned with
ribbons, bows and balloons - and a
license plate that read "JU5T WED."
It was the kind of display that
made some wonder whether the
couple just might bring the British
monarchy back from the abyss.
"It's a real turning point for the
royal family," Nicki Hookings, 47,
said at one of thousands of street
parties across Britain to celebrate
the national holiday.
For much of the world, the wed-
ding was a dramatic reaffimation
of 29-year-old Kate's beguiling star
power. Despite the pressure, she
carried the day with an easy smile,
youthful exuberance and a sense of
decorum that matched the event
And when it was over all over,
she curtsied easily before Queen
Elizabeth II, comfortably sharing
the stage with the woman who has
reigned since 1952.


ingly celebratory.
"Everybody's happy, everybody's
united," said 61-year-old Sabry .
'Darwish, who was in the crowd watch-
ing the pai-ade route. "Everybody is
behind the bride and groom."
Many praised the couple's rare
combination of humility, humor and
grace. Kate was a commoner from
a wealthy but middle-class family
who actually worked for a living after
university; William has long had his
mother-'s touch in connecting to the
public, and surprised fans who slept
on the pavement overnight by per-
sonally thanking them Thursday for
braving the cold. .
The 28-year-old prince even dis-
played a quality almost never seen
among royalty: humor. Surveying
the 1,900 guests filing the abbey in
their wedding finery, he turned to
his father-in-law, Michael Middleton, .
and quipped: "We're supposed to
have just a small family affair."
Then after a reception at


a5/76/s
91/69/s
90/62/pc
86/63/pc
84/76/s

89/70/s
89/62/pc
89/68/pc
82/68/s
84/70/pc

91/62/s
84/74/s


/ a(cail oap Canami
Ft. Lauderdale
Dayle l Beach Fort Myers
8@4 Gainesville
a Jacksonville
Olando Capjt Canaveral e et
87/65 8`/65 I ke CI
Naples
West Palm 84acit Ocala
85/75 Orlando
FL Lauderdale Panama City
'S 85/77 Pensacola
68 t~pes 7llai Tallahassee

ner, 8~so,76 valdosta
\. t W. Palm Beach


Snda

85/77/s
, 89/66/s
87/60/s
84/60/s
84/75/s

91/70/s
88/59/s
S88/66/s
81/68/s
83/70/pc

89/59/s

85/74/s


Ta$ asee Lake City,
88/55 ~., 88/55
usacolaj '* Cainestille e
83/67 '\Palma uCity ~7/55
81/$4 \ Ocali
~75


JASON MATTHEW WALKERILake City Reporter
Adam Putnam, Florida's Agriculture commissioner, said
Friday the ~proposal to allow the Department of Agriculture
and Consumer Services to take over the school food and
nutrition programs will bring more fresh and wholesome foods
to school cafeterias. Putnam spoke to students at Columbia
City Elementary School last Monday.


90/~


That procedure angered
Sen. Jack Latvala, a
Clearwater Republican,
who left the meeting
before a final vote was
taken.

Senate expands
child porn laW -
TALIAHASSEE The
Florida Senate voted to
extend the state's anti-
child pornography law to .
include intentionally look-
ing at such images even
if one does not download
them.
The bill (SB 846) was
approved 39-0 on Friday. A
similar bill (HB 595) is in
the House.
It requires proof that
someone looked at more
than one image or movie
to protect those who may
accidentally come across
such material on the '
Internet.
The law is already a
third-degree felony and is
punishable by up to five
years in prison.


An exclusive
ServiCO
brought to
Our readers
by
The Weather
'Channel.


TEMPERATURES
High Friday
Low Friday
Normal high
Normal low
Rcor h g

PRECIPITATION
Friday
Month total
Year~ total
N~oramal month-to-date
Normal year-to-date


SUN
Sunrise today
Sunset today
Sunrise tom.
Sunset tom.

MOON
Moonsise today
Moonset today
Moonrise tom.
Moonset tom.


83
62
83
58



0 00"
1.17"
11.48"
2.78"
13.94"


6:49 a.m.
8:07 p.m.
6:48 a.m.
8:08 p.m.

5:01 a.m.
6:04 p.m.
5:33 a.m.
6:58 p.m.


JYC Forecasts, data and
graphics @ 2011 Weather
VetalLP Mal. n wis.
weathr W.B'ePblhLm


onh Ihl date lh
192-:. a series
ofl IornacjOes tore

carolina. Ine jrron
gest tornjdo was
r ir~ d at a majgnl


MAssociated Press


DAILY BRIEFING


Thursday:
1-17-18-28-34


*Afternoon: 1-9-0
C 3 ~Evening: 2-8-9 rdy


,
"


SW E ETO E INL EH P W



William weds Kate; bd hions watch


"I know that my redeemer
lives, and that in the end he will
.stand on the earth."


Job I 9:25


Lakre Oxty Reporter
HOW TO REACH US BUSINESS
Main number ........(386) 752-1293 Controller Sue Brannon....754-0419
Fax number .............752-9400 (sbrannon~lakecityreporterscom)
Circulation .........,......755-5445
Online ... www.Iakecityreporter.com CIRiCULATION
The Lake City Reporter, an affiliate of Home deliveryof the Lake City??eporter
Communnty Newspapers Inc., is pub- should be completed. by 6 30 a~m.
wished Tuesday through Sunday at 180 Tuesday through Saturday, and by 7:30
E w St. Lake C t, Fa. 3055. a.mson Sunday.
Member Audit Bureau of Circulation and Please call ~386-755-5445 to report any
The Associated Press. problems with your delivery service.
AIl materila herein~is property of the Lake In Columbia County, customers should
Cin Re rer deeproduo inwhole or cal befor 1ol0 d y. to readr a ser-
sion of the publisher. U.S. Postal Service 10:30 a.m., next day re-delivery or ser-
'No. 310-880. vice related credits will be issued.
POSTMASTER: Send address changes In all other counties where home delivery
to take City Reporter, P.O. Box 1709. is available, next day re-delivery or ser-
baelsCiy,I d >n 35...7401 vice related credits will be issued.
(twilson~lakeckyreporter.com) Circulation .............. .755-5445
(circulation@lakecityreporter.com)
As itant Editor CJ Risak..754-0427 Cred ehruh usnday)
After 1:00 p.m.. 12Weeks........... ....... $26.32
(crisak@lakecityreporterccom) 24 Weeks. .................. $48.79
ADVRTIING52 Weeks. .................. $83.46
Director Ashley Butcher ...75440417 MalRatesndeastx
(abutcher~lakecityreporter.com) 12 Weeks.~................. $41.40
CLASSIFIED 24 Weeks. .................. $82.80
To place classified ad, call 755-5440. 52 Weeks. .................$1 79.40


AROUND FLORIDA


THE WEATHER


CHANCE



I83 LO59


TALIAHASSEE
- The Florida Senate
has approved a proposal
from the Department of
Agriculture and Consumer
Services to take over
school food and nutrition
programs from the State
Board of Education.
Senators passed the

Healtty ies Ac (rSB
1312) unanimously
on Friday. Agriculture
Commissioner Adam
Putnam said the move
will bring more fresh
and wholesome foods to
Florida's school cafeterias.
But Education Board
member Roberto Martinez
had questioned the mea-
sure last month. He said
Putnam's goal is to pro-
tect Florida's agriculture
industry while children .
are the focus of the board.
Martinez was concerned
about a potential coinfict of
interest


Budget panel rolls
back controls
TALIAHASSEE A
joint legislative panel nego-
tiating economic develop
ment spending differences
has agreed to include
a rollback of Florida's
growth controls in the
state budget.
The deal Friday was a
victory for businesses and
Gov. Rick Scott, who has
made reducing state regu-
lations a top priority.
The House already has
passed a bill (HB 7129) to
lift most state controls over
urban sprawl. The Senate
has yet to act.
Making the growth man-
agement legislation part of
the budget will prevent the
Senate from revising it.
Compromise budget
bills get an up or down
vote in each chamber with
no changes allowed.


.SUNNY . SUNNY



HI 88 LO 551 HI 88 LD 5 -


Senate expands~
VOucher program
TALIAHASSEE
- The state Senate has
agreed with the House of
Representatives to expand
Florida's school voucher
program for students with
disabilities.
The Senate approved
the House's version of the
bill (HIB 1329) on Friday.
The House approved it the
day before. It now goes to
Gov. Rick Scott.
The McKay Scholarship
Program provides public
funds to 21,000 students
with physical and learn-
ing disabilities so they can
attend private schools.
School distriefs would lose
basic funding for each
voucher student but not
money spent on accommo-
dating their disabilities.
The new measure adds
children with lesser dis-
abilities such as asthma
and allergies.


May May May May
3 10 17 24
New First Full test





I


Well, we thought you'd like something productive on
your pad to prove to your spouse that it's really a useful
tool for financial management. Well worth the invest- -
ment you rfade to buy it. And so much more than just .,
a toy for playing Angry Birds.
See, you actually can do something useful with this new
technology. You can see if you've got paid yet, balance
your checkbook, pay a few bills, make a loan payment,
transfer funds to your kids away at college, and more!
Or you can just act like you're taking notes at that meet-
ing instead of updating your facebook page.
We aso have old-fashioned iteroet banking for those
who've not yet convinced their spouse that they really
need the newest pad devices or cell phones.
But keep in mind, if you want
S"p:". - to get the red tootsie pops,
you're going to have' to come
." visit us to get one. Peoples
1',;, State Bank. Now that's Bank-
ing!
P..v-

. 'emmmmme


Ublix.

. .



.~..








///al CIi #181 oF Bridget
To ou wofleddu TODAY to place~ a surprise
grentSall for someone you love!

(gS tegendous 755-5440 or
yearSl 755-5441
Love between 8-00aml & 5 00pm

}'our Childe


LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL & STATE SATURDAY, APRIL 30, 2011


Page Editor: Todd Taylor, 754-0424


S"If it becomes a single
we're goingto be 'MoCash,"'"
he said.
The duo hopes this leads
to more song- writing oppor-
tunities for other artists.
Next week they are per-
forming at the Grand Ole
Opry, Brust said. One day
they hope to be members.
"It's graduation for us,"
he said. "If~s cap and gown
night."
Despite the success they
achieve, LoCash Cowboys
won't forget their roots at
the Jam. .
'Y e alWayS look forward


to the Suwannee River
Jam," Lucas said.
The duo still return to
the party zone stage after
a performance, Brust said.
Singing a song or two
with one of the. bands has
become a tradition.
"Thaf~s like home,"' he
said. "If~s where we start-
ed."
More information on
LoCash Cowboys is avail-
able at www.locashcowbows.
com, and they can be fol-
lowed on Facebook and
Twitter under the same
name.


A stead flow of people
came throughout the day
to pick out trees, Lane
said.
"I hope they get a beau-
tiful tree," she said. "l hope
the tree, no matter what
they're getting, provides
for whatever their need
may be."
This was Mel Gavette's
second year at thq event,
and she left with a dog-
wood and magnolia tree
as well as red maple seed-
lings.
Hosting the tree give-
away is good for the com-
munity, she said. Tr-ees
help beautify the area.
"People can come and
"no a day of d tting
. a really good .thing, and
other organizations should
get involved in the give-
away too."
Some friends invited
Kimberly Jones of Lake
City to the giveaway.
"I love it," she said. "I
love planting anything. I'm
a plant lover."
Jones picked out a crepe
myrtle to plant in mem-
ory of her daughter who
passed away, as well as
a dogwood, she said. Her
fist tree giveaway won't
be the last.
"I'll be back next year,"
she said.


said. The newest single,
"You Got Me," is geared up
to be a summer anthem.
"We're excited about get-
ting it out,".he said.
Country music artist
Keith Urban also recorded
a song LOCash Cowboys
wrote, "LYou Gonna Fly,"
for his new album, "Get
Closer."
"Keith heard the song and
fell in love with it," Lucas
said. "We were ecstatic."
The album just went gold,
Brust said. It was humbling
to know Urban wanted the
SOng.


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Lake City residents Gracie Gould-Kinney' (from left),
3, her another Lisa Gould-Kinney, and sister Elizabeth
Gould-Kinney, 5, load dogwood and red maple trees into a
geoan Friday morning during the National Arbor Day Tree


dressed up, then going out
to dininer and showing up
at the prom. If's kind of like
that Cinderella moment."
Seniors who got ready for
the prom Friday agreed.
"If~s fun to get dressed
up and feel pretty, get my
nails done, and all that
stuff," said Shelby Forsyth,
18, who got a pedicure and
manicure with Diaz.
The prom .is an annual
tradition that gives stu-
dents a last chance to form
memories with each other,


.Hunter said.
That's what Tiffany
Thomas, 18, said she was
anticipating about the
prom.
"Making memories with
friendss" she said, "that's
what I'm looking forward
to."
Diaz also said she was
ready to dance, have fun and
make her last high school
memory with friends.
S"If~s kind of like one last
get-together before gradua-
tion," she said.


year, the theme is a black
light ball. '
"I'm hoping everyone will
like *it and think it's really
cool and have a blast," said
Meghan Collins, 17, junior
class president.
S"If~s (the planning) been
crazy and stressful, but if~l1
come together," she said.
Preparing frthe prom
Is what makes it special,
Hunter said.
'"That makes it more spe-
cial," she said, "the anticipa-
tion of the big day, getting


SJASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Robert Fowler collects two dogwood trees Friday at the '
-National Arbor Day Tree Giveaway,


Single vehicle
wreck leaves
one dead.

From staff reports

SU WAN NEE
COUNTY A
Wellborn man was
killed in single vehicle
wreck Thursday night
when he was. thrown
from his car after the
vehicle struck a cul-
vert, overturned, hit
an oak tree and landed
on him. Authorities say
vehicle speed, inclem-
ent weather conditions
and alcohol may have
played a factor in the
wreck.
Allen J. Markey, 39,
of Wellborn, was .pro-
nounced dead at the
scene.
The wreck occurred
around 9:30 p.m. on
County Road 137,


and culvert.
Markey's vehicle
then overturned to its
right side and struck
a large oak tree with
its top (which was a
convertible) as it was
overturning.
- -Markey, who was
unrestrained at the
time of the crash,
was thrown from the
vehicle and it came
to rest on top~ of him.
He was pronounced
dead at the sCene by
attending Suwannee
County EMS person-
nel, reports said.
"FHP investiga-
.tors are looking into
the possibility of alco-
hol involvement by
Markey prior to this
crash," wrote Florida
Highway Patrol Cpl.
J.T. Stalnaker, who
prepared the crash
report.


north of 192nd Street,
about 12 miles north of
Branford in Suwannee
County.
According to Florida
HighwayPatrolreports,
Markey was driving his
1997 Chrysler Sebring
noi-thlound on^Cotmty
Road 137 just after
heavy thunder storms
swept through the
area.
According to. crash
scene analysis Markey
lost control of his vehi-
cle as he attempted to
go around a curve.
Authorities who
conducted the inves-
tigation reported that
Markey most prob-
ably was traveling too
fast for the curve and
swerved across the
travel lanes, towards
the left shoulder of the
roadway, where his
vehicle struck a pri-
vate raised driveway


again Monday to launch space
shuttle Endeavour on its final
voyage.
President Barack Obama
and his family visited Kennedy
Space Center anyway but it
was unclear whether he would
still meet with the Arizona
congresswoman. Giffords,
who is recovering from a gun-
shot wound to the head, has
been in Cape Canaveral since
Wednesday to attend her hus
band's launch.
Giffords hasn't been seen
publicly since the Jan. 8 assas-
sination attempt, and left her
Houston rehabilitation hospi-
tal for the fist time to travel
to Florida. It was not imme-
diately known whether she
would stay for another try or
return to Houston.
She had been expected to
watch the liftoff in private -
Sas were the other astronaut
families.
"Bummed about the scrub!!
But important to make sure
everything on shuttle is work-
ing properly," her staff said via
Twitter,
Endeavour was fueled and
the six astronauts were head.
ing to the launch pad when
the countdown was halted,
about 3V/2 hours before the


3:47 p.m. liftoff. NASA's silver-
colored astrovan did a U-turn
at the launch control center
and returned them to crew
quarters.
It would have been the first
time in NASA history that a
sitting president and his fam
ily witnessed a launch. As a
consolation, Obama and his
family got an up-close look at
Atlantis. It will make the last
shuttle flight this summer as
NASA winds up the 30 year
program and retires the fleet
to mu~seums. .
The president and Michelle
Obama met briefly with
Endeavour's crew. Obama
told them he's hoping to get
back to Florida for a shuttle
launch
"One more chance, we may
be able to gtdcow h e"
Oebama said.e ow er,

Lenabuach said ch nxt la nc
try for Endeavour would be
Monday at the earliest and
hinted at an even longer delay.
Technicians will have to crawl
into the engine compartment
to track a suspected electrical
short in a power distribution
box.


RANKS: Duo performs at Jam

Continued From Page 1A


ARBOR: Residents receive free trees

Continued From Page 1A


PROM: Studen~ts ready for dance

Continued FrontPage 1A


Wellborn man killed


mn crash Thursda7


LPD h sts


Day today
From staff reports

The Lake City Police
Department will hold its second
annual Prescription Drug Take
Back Initiative from 10 a.m. 2
p.m. today at the Lake City Police
Department, 225 NW Main Blvd.
The community is encouraged
to take advantage of this oppor..
tunity. The event is d'e'sighied''to" "
provide a unified opportunity for
the public to voluntarily turn in
expired, unwanted or ~unused
pharmaceutically controlled sub-
stances and other medications
to' law enforcement officers for
destruction. All listed items can
be dropped off at the Lake City
Police Department.
The Columbia County Sheriff's
Office is also having its Take-
Back Day, in conjunction with
National Take BackDay, from
10 a.m.-2 p.m. today at the Park-
n-Ride lot at the U.S. Highway
90 and Commerce Boulevard
intersection. Any unused or
unwanted medications may be
disposed of.


SHUTTLE: NASA delays

launch until Monday

Continued From Page 1A


BUD'GET: Cuts to

school budget corning

ContinueltFrom Page 1A

ment for teachers, state workers and many local
government employees to contribute that much
of their pay to the Florida Retirement System,
now fully supported by taxpayers.
The employee retirement contributions are
expected to save $860 million for school districts
alone.
"Overall, education came out better than can be
expected," said Wayne Blanton, executive' direc-
tor of the Flonida School Boards Association.
But that doesn't mean all schools will be able to
avoid layoffs and program cuts.
The House and Senate started the day literally
pennies apart before agreeing to spend $6,269.56
per' student. A conference committee on pre-
kindergarten-12th grade funding was unable to
resolve all issues and bumped some up to the two
budget committee chairs, Rep. Denise Grimsley,
R-Sebring, and Sen. JD Alexander, R-Sebring.
Sen. David Simmon~s, a Maitland Republican
who heads the Senate side of conference commit-
tee, said a couple of the unresolved issues could
affect per student funding by that affect would
be slight.
The retirement contributions would put Florida
in line with most private companies and other
states, Simmons said but acknowledged that
amounts to a pay cut. He said everyone needs to
sacrifice as the recession-battered state tries to
make up a $3.75 billion shortfall expected in the
budget year beginning July 1.
"No one here enjoys doing what we're doing,"
Simmons said "It literally is a significant, sig-
nificant burden to me to in fact realize that this is
something that has to be done. At the same time
my goal is that there will be a day that we'll make
this up."

















III


ANOTHER OPINION




Allies with mutual disgust


4A


www.Iakecityreporter.com


jose De La Isla



Admir in g

composer

Daniel

Catan


interviewed by
St. John Flynn
on Houston's
D aie CaanwaPB PS radio station
the week "Il Postino", a work
Sby Maestro C, opened at
the University of Houston's
Moores Opera Ceniter.
The opera is based on
the ~1983 novel "Ardiente -
paciencia"' by Antonio
Skarmeta and the 1994 movie
"Il Postino" by Michael
Radford. It premiered to rave
reviews last year, with
Placido Domingo in the
leading role at the Los An~geles
Opera Center.
Flynn's first question to
Catan, often referred to as
a neo-romantic composer, .
concerned what the opera
was about. Catan told him it
was about how a young man
befriended the Chilean poet
Pablo Neruda and decided to
become a poet himself as a
way to win the admiration of
his love interest.
He added that his opera was
also about much more than
that. It was about "becoming
a full-fledged human being
as a result of an art form and
caring about society."
That in itself epitomized
Daniel Catan, who returned
to Austin, 165 miles away,
after the fist Houston
performance. The maestro in
residence was working on an
opera based on Frank Capra's
1941 movie "Meet John
Doe" commissioned by the
Butler School of Music at the
University of Texas.
Catan was expected back
in Houston the next weekend
for another performance of "11
Postino" but he didn't show
Sup.. Friends who checked
his Aulstin apartment found
him there, unresponsive.
Paramedlics were called and
Catan, who was believed
in good health, had died of
natural, but yet undisclosed,
causes,
In 1994 Catan's "Rappaccini's
Daughter" premiered at the
San Diego Opera. It was the
fist time a Mexican composer
had produced an opera in
the United Stat~es. His style
was often compared to that
of Puccini and Debussy, but
music critic David Patrick
Stearns said, "It changed with
every work." Catan had written
"Florencia en el Amazonas"
(1996), "Salsipuedes"(2004) ,
with ethnic Cuban
influences, and "11 Postino"
(2010). His orchestration was
said to have been influenced
by Richard Strauss and Heitor

Duibo te premier week of
"Florencia en el Amazorias,"
which was the fist Spanish-
language opera commissioned
in the United States, Catan
attended a reception at the
home of a Houston Grand
Opera arts patron. He and I
were talking when a guest sort
of butted in to ask whether
SCatan should have called
his opera Florencia en Las
Amazonas.
Without pique or change
of expression or tone, Catan
explained that el referred to
the river, el Rio Aniazonas, and
not the region, Las Amazonas.
He thanked the inquirer
politely for noticing.
a Jos de la 181a atho of "The
Risesof Hispanic P litica Powere
writes a weekly commentary for
Hispanic Link News Service.


eAmericans
love conspiracy
theories. Even
when facts get
in the way, we
hate to relinquish our obses-
sion that things are far darker
and more convoluted than they
appear.
There are millions of us con-
vinced that Lee Harvey Oswald
did not.act alone in killing
President: K;ennedy and that a
cobrer-u at the highest levels
198 (118 e id~'cd.ii (A visit ti; the
Texas School Book Depository,
now a museum that exhyaustive-
ly debunks this theory, should
quell this notion. Nonetheless,
Oliver Stone perpetuated the
idea in ~a movie, creating even
more conspiracy believers.)
The movies probably explain a
lot about our collective gullibility
when it comes to implausible
conspiracy theories. The power
of a fim is astonishing in its abil-
ity to make us eager to suspend
disbelief about absurd situations.
SAt any rate, here for disil-
lusioned birthers, yvho may be
feeling bereft now that their
belief President Obama was
not born in America was totally
destroyed, are some new con-
spiracy theories. (For those
birthers still clinging forlornly
to the hope Obama's citizen-
ship is still suspect, there is n~o
talking sense to them. Forget
them.) -
What-'s with CIA direc.
tor Leon Panetta taking over
Defense Secretary Robert
Gates' job while Army Gen.
David Petraeus prepares to
leave Afghanistan and take
over the CIA? Is that not clearly
conspiracy at the highest levels
to militarize intelligence gather-
ing? And we thought the term


nies and Congress, which keeps
"investigating" high gas prices
and never, ever, does anything
about them.
Perhaps those Republicans
who are trying to "end
Medicare as we know it"' and
gut Medicaid have a plan to get
rid of old people who vote and
poor people who need help.
Voila! A balanced budget!
Without doubt, Wall Street
and banks conspired to devalue
our houses so that we would
stop feeling smug and affluent.
The mere facts that nobody has
gone to jail and that hedge-fund
managers are still making more
money than anybody else in
the history of the world should
silence naysayers about that
conspiracy.
We' haven't even gotten to the
conspiracy ensuring that BP,
involved in the worst oil spill in
U.S. history which killed 11 peo-
ple and polluted whole swaths
of shoreline, is going right back
to drilling in the Gulf or Mexico
this summer (after reporting it
took in revenue of $88 billion for :
the fist quarter of the year).
And we forgot to touch on
the conspiracy involved in Wal-
Mart's stocking its shelves with
rifles, shotguns and ammuni-
tion to appeal to male shoppers.
Wasn't there a burst.of national
outrage over easy access to fire-
airms less than four months ago
when Congresswoman Gabrielle
Giffords was shot?
So you see, birthers, there
is life after Obama persuaded
Hawaii to release his long-form
birth certificate.

SScripps Howard columnist
Ann McFeatters has covered
the White House and national
politics since 1986.


Ann Mc~eatters
amcfeatters@nationalpress.com
"military intelligence" was an
OJ~~IymoO...
Meanwhile, the government :
`:a~n track our every movement
through phones. Does anyone
really believe Steve Jobs will fix
software "bugs" that let phones
build databases of locations
stretching back months, even
when related services are dis-
abled by the user? Why didn't
somebody just give an phone to
Osama bin Laden?
Speaking of cell phones, big
business clearly conspired with
the Supreme Court, which
ruled that consumers could not
get together under a California
law to sue AT&T for charging
$30.22 in salks tax for phones
advertised as free. AT&T said
consumers had to deal with the
company one by one through
arbitration although California
said that was unfair. The High
Court sided with AT&T. And
bir the way, why doesn't the
Supreme Court address the
issue that nothing advertised as
"free" is really free?
And how about those high
gasoline prices? We were just ~
driving along minding our own
business when we started see-
ing signs that gas was selling for
$3.59 a gallon. A few miles later, it
was $3.99 a gallon. OMG, it's over
$4, and there are predictions of
$6-a-gallon gas. Obviously, there's
collusion between the oil compa-


OUR
.O PINION



Officials


should


spend

wisely

taxpayers
everywhere are
unified in this belief
when it comes to
T~advice for public
officials: Spend wisely.
Every time there's another
revelation regarding taxr money
wasted on an ill-conceived .
project, the public gets a tighter
grasp on its pocketbook. Which
is to be anticipated.
So when Columbia County's
Board of Commissioriers
declared they were exploring
the possibility~of building a
combination crime scene and
vehicle maintenance addition
at a cost of nearly $500,000
the red flags went up.
And that's good. They
should.
But in this case, the
expenditure would not be
wasted.
The Sheriff's Office at
present does not have its own
crime scene lab to process
evidence. Providing them with
one should make the entire
process smoother and more
efficient. .
Most important, such
Sa facility can only aid the
Apprehension and conviction
of criminals. At an open
community meeting last
Tuesday, Sheriff Mark Hunter
told.ta~Fjo1i:he;sorpw~hedatd
the conviction rate to reach
S4096~fjb~.infby idt~ eit'ear It '
is currently at 33.5 percent,
which is much better than the
statewide average of 25 percent.
It's the job of oitr law officers
to discourage crime. It's our job
to provide those law officers
with the best tools possible to
do that job.
Convincing the criminal
Element that coming to
Columbia County isn't worth
Sthe risk is a good way to keep
Sthe crime rate at a minimum.
An elevated conviction rate,
which an in-house crime
Slab could help provide, can
only elevate a criminal's
apprehension. .
Our money needs to be spent
Sjudiciously. This expense would
seem a wise one.


Lakre City Reporter
Serving Columbia County
Since 1874
The Lake City Reporter is pub-
lished with pride for residents of
Clmbi and su dng counties by
We believe strong newspapers build
strong communities --"Newspapers
get things done!"
Our primary goal is to
pbimh distnuse dand prof table
This mission will be accomplished
through the teamworje of professionals
dedicated to truth, integrity and hard
work.
Todd Wilson, publisher
Sue Brannon, controller

DinkmN ~mithc, resident


LETTERS
POLICE Y
Letters to the Editor should be
typed or neatly written and double
spaced. Letters should not exceed
400 words and will be edited for
length and libel. Letters must be
signed and include the writer's name,
address and telephone number for
verification. Writers can have two
letters per month published. Letters
and guest columns are the opinion of
the writers and not necessarily that of
the Lake City Reporter. *
BY MAIL: Letters, P.O. Box 1709,


Lake City, FL 32056; or drop off at
180 E. Duval St. downtown.
BY FAX: (386) 752-9400.
BY E-MAIL:
news@lakecityreporter.com


he bizarre case of
Raymond Davis
the CIA contract
employee who
Shot and killed two
Pakistani men who were pursu-
ing him on the streets of Lahore
Jan. 27 illustrates just how
poisonous relations between the
United States and Pakistan have
become,
The controversy over Mr.
Davis's role in Pakistan, his
release, and Pakistan's internal
intelligence agency, the Inter-
Services Intelligence (ISI), has
spotlighted the already strained
US-Pakistan relationship. But
what's ultimately being fought
out is whose influence will
reshape Afghanistan, especially
after July, when the drawdown


of US troops begins.
The context of the Davis
incident mimics the spy novels
of John le Carr6 or Graham
Greene.
The streets of Pakistan -
where the confrontation unray-
eled are a dangerous place.
Most Westerners who travel in
Pakistan, and who can afford it,
hire an armed driver, a body-
guard, or both. I used to hide
my cellphone in a deep pocket
and carry a wallet filled with
paper to hand over to motor
scooter pirates at intersections if
someone struck a gun in the car
window to rob me.
While driving, Davis was
tailed by two men for more than
two hours (the timeline given by
Pakistani officials). According


to Davis's statements, at a stop
light, the two men pulled up
beside him, and one brandished
a pistol. He alleged that they
were going to rob him. But it
would not have been difficult
to imagine he was the target
of an assassination. As details
emerged to fill out the story,
such a possibility seems more
likely.
The former Green Beret
pleaded self-defense. Street pira-
cy, kidnapping, and murder are
so common on Pakistani streets
that local police normally shrug
at such incidents rather than
investigate. Not this time. It
turns out the pursuers weren't
just thugs.
SChristian Science Monitor


OINIO


Saturday,April 30, 20 II


Neuv~ *osirce f

birthers~~ tocig





r- -


NOTICE OF MEETING OF THE LAKE CITY COMMUNITY

REDEVELOPMENT AGENCY TO BE HELD ON MONDAY,

MAY 2, 2011 AT 6:15 PM, IN THIE COUNCIL CHAM~t~BERS

LOCATED ON THE SECOND FLOOR OF CITY HALL AT

205 NORTH MARION AVENUE, LAKE CITY, FLORIDA.


T'HE FOLLOWING ITEM'S ARE TO BE DISCUSSED:


*Engineering Proposal N~E Franklin Street, GTC Design Group
*Fagade Grant Program Applications



SCITY COUNCIL MEETING


THE CITY COUNCIL OF THIE CITY OF LAKE CITY, FLORIDA

WILL MEET ON MONDAY, MAY 2, 2011 AT 7:00 P.M. IN THE
COUNCIL CHAMBERS LOCATED ON THE SECOND FLOOR OF

CITY HALL AT 205 NORTH MARION AVENUE, LAKE CITY,
FLORIDA


SPECIAL REQUIREMENTS: If you require special aid or services for any of the meetings
identified abdve, as addressed in the American Disabilities Act, please contact the City
Mana her's Office at (386) 719-5768.


AUDREY E SIKES
Cityr Clerk


LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL SATURDAY, APRIL 30, 2011


Page Editor: Todd Taylor, 754-0424


STo submit your Community
Calendar item, contact Antonia
Robinson at 754-0425 or by
e-mail at arobinson @
lakecityreporter.com.


everyone in your party.
Bring lawn charis and
come enjoy a day for
food, games, music and
more.

Annual ChariTEA
The Fourth Annual
ChariTEA is noon May
7 at the Woman's Club
of Lake City. Doors open
at 11:30 a.m. The event
will feature a silent auc-
tion and is a fundraiser
for Another Way Inc. Call
719-2700 for ticket infor-
mation.


Wild Florida event
Wild Florida is 10 a.m.
-3 p.m. May 7 in the
Craft Square at Stephen
Foster State Park in White
Springs. Nature and wild-
life experts from around
the state will talk about
the flora, the fauna and the
widimnimals that ma e
live. Call 397-1920 or visit
www~floridastateparks.org;/
stephenfoster

steer Competition
SThe beginning Steer
weigh-in is W10 a~m. May
7 at the Columbia County
Fair.

Living History demo
A Civil War Living
History. Demonstration

at Stephen Foster Folk
Culture Center State
Park in White Springs.
Admission to the park
is $5 per vehicle (up to
eight people). Additional
fees may apply for work-
shops offered in the craft
squatre.lCall the park at

Fu~ndraising dinner
The Tough Enough to
Wear Pink fundraising
dinner is 6 p.m. May 7
at the Columbia County
Fairgrounds Banquet
Hall. The event will
include dinner, casino
style gambling, live
and silent auctions and
more. Tickets are $25
per person and available
at Wilson's, The Money
Man, Chasteens, Smitty's
and the fair office. The
event raises money for
breast cancer awareness
and the Columbia County
Crisis Fund. Call 752-
8822.


COURTESY PHOTo


A Royal Party
Residents of th'e Health Center of Lake City nursing home celebrated Prince William and Catherine Middleton's wedding
Friday morning with a party that included wedding cake (photo at right), a toast, a reception and wedding favors,


at SuwanneeRiverfam.
com.


Show and sale
Arts and crafts show
and sale is 8 a.m.-5 p.m.
today at the Fort White
Depot on Hwy. 27. Items
will include paintings,
jewelry, fused glass,
sas and more. Call 965-
13

Homestading Exp~o
Sustainable
Homesteading Expo is
10 a.m.-5 p.m. today at
Magnolia Farms. Calls
include soap making,
home dairying, goat herd
dairy production and
more. Visit www.magno
1%afars rg for om lete
6450 .

HSCT play
"Moments of Weakness"
runs weekends through
May 8 at the High Springs
Commimity Theater.
Tickets are available


at The Framery, 341 S.
Marion St., corner of Knox
or purchase online at high-
springscommunitytheatel
com.

Sunday
Family Reunion
Descendants of William
Joseph & Harriet Green
Owens are having their
annual family reunion
Sunday at the Mason City
Community Center, US
41 South of Lake City. A
covered dish lunch will be
shared at 1 p.m. All friends
and rladiv1TsDa e in itd to
at 752-8497.

Monday
Zumbathon Charity
event
A Tough Enough to
Wear Pink Zumbathon
Charity event is 6-7:30
p.m. Monday at the
Columbia County
Fairgrounds Banquet Hall.
A $10 donation will benefit
the organization's breast
cancer awareness and cri
sis fund. Wear pink. Call
758-0009

Donors Wanted
LifeSouth Bloodmobile


needs donors 9 a.m.-5 p.m
Monday at the Columbia
County Courthouse. All
donors receive a LifeSouth
ball cap.

Tuesday
Community Garden
Meeting
A community garden
meeting is 6 p.m. Tuesday
at Richardson Community
Center. Anyone interested
in gardening is invited.
Contact Elishia Parker at
754-7095.

Wednesday
Newcomers and Friends
Luncheon
mhe May Friendship
Luncheon of the Lake City
Newcomers and Friends
is 11:30 a.m. Wednesday
at Kazbor's in the Publix's
shopping plaza. All mem-
bers, guests and friends
are welcome. Call 438-8100
or 754-7227.

Donors Wanted
LifeSouth Bloodmobile
needs donors 10 a.m.-5
p.m. Wednesday at the
Department' of Children
& Families. All donors
receive a LifeSouth ball
cap.


Ronald L. Call
Mr. Ronald L. Call, 71, of Lake
City, passed away late Wednes-
day afternoon April 27, 2011 in
the Shands @
thepia i ansUniversity ~i
ville, Florida -s
follnesowinseve Il months. A na-

I re Call had been aesin o
Lake City for the past seventeen
yeairsnhaving moved here frorn
ntheUnitedeSsta es Army and the
ing his service Mn: Call worked
for the Ford Motor Company
for thirty years prior to retiring
in 1994. In his spare time he en-
joyed bowling and woodwork-
ing. Mr. Call was a Lutheran.
Mr. Call is survived by his wife
of thirty-two years, Dorothee
Call; his daughters, Rhonda
Warren (Randy); Renae Call
and Rhoda Zasytis (James) all
of Hammond, Indiana; and his
sisters, Celia Whitehead of Lake
City, Florida and Georgette An-
derson of Hammond, Indiana.
Private family interment services
with full military honors will be
conducted in the Jacksonville
National Cemetery in Jackson-
ville, Florida. Arrangements
are under the direction of the
DREYE FRAS HOMEFA4 8
ML A225 (6)L 72- 2
Please sign our guestbook at
parrishfamilyfuneralhome. com

Mary Etta Feagle Lowe
Mrs. Mary Etta Feagle Lowe
age 91, went to be with the Lord,
Aepi ov g 201 s roundedb by
in Columbia County, November
12, 1919, the only child of the
late James Young and Delia Etta
Hancock. She was raised in the
Lulu community and graduated
from Columbia High School.
Mary Etta was preceded in death
by her husband Horace Lowe;
first husband Cline Feagle and
granddaughter Dawn Michelle


Stuart. Mary Etta was a de-
voted mother, grandmother and
great-grandmother and was af-
fectionately known to everyone
as "Granny". Mary Etta was a
homemaker who loved to cook.
Many may remember the food
sh wultdbpre are forkhesr fanxil
summers on the farm, especially
theer lres vegetables sand swe I
mnsi endas inSunday rev ning
Bluegrass Show. But most of all,
"Granny" loved slpendings tim

adailgr dhi mrn woulclid n k
her day. She is survived by her
seven children: James (Janice);
Geraldine Stuart; Aldine (Doro-
thy); Wendell; Marlin (Diane);
Olivia Greene (Bob) and Farrell
(Geraldine). Seventeen grand-
children: Joyce, Justin, Charlene,
Tirnmy, Brent, Jason, Ronald,
Clmne, Clay, Mandy, Brandon,
Ryan, Mark, Matthew, Michael,
Melissa and Wiley. Twenty-six
great-grandchildren, cousins;
Royce Albert Shaw and Tom
Moore. She will be greatly
missed by all who loved her,
including her friend, Denise
Sauls. Mary Etta was a life long
member of the Bethlehem Lu-
theran Church and was a mem-
ber of the choir for many years.
Funeral services will be conduct-
ehde Beth em LtdtaraM 11 rn
wih I v. Wnillbu stecdk,bPator:
Lowell O'Steen. Burial will be
in the churchecemetery. The fam-
ily will receive friends from 5
to 7 P.M. Saturday, April 30, at
GUERRY FUNERAL HOME,
2659 S.W. Main Blvd., Lake
City, Fla. Memorial donations
may be made to Bethlehem Lu-
th ran Chourch Cer tei tFu~nd
32056 or Suwannee Valley Hos-
pice Center, 6037 U.S H-ighway
90 West, Lake City, Fla. 32055
www. guer~rayfuner~alhome.com

Obituarter are ai acdalaertiaskee
City Reporter's classified depart-
ment at 752- 1293.


CO~~~DRMMUNT CLNA


Today
,Take-Back Day
National Take-Back Day
is 10 a.m.-2 p.m. today
at the Park-n-Ride lot at
the intersection of U.S.
90 West and Commerce
Blvd (across from Arby's).
This event will provide
an opportunity for local
residents to surrender
expired, unwanted or
unused pharmaceutical
controlled substances and
other medications. The
collection site is hosted
by the Columbia County
Sheriff's Office.

Freedom Fund' Luncheon
NAACP 29th Annual
Freedom Fund Luncheon
is noon today at Winfeld
Recreation Center.
The theme is "NAACP:
Affirming America's
Promise." Tickets are $35
and must be pu csed in


Fill The Banks Day
Donations of clothing,
money, food and blood will
be collected for Christian
Service Center, Suwannee
Valley Food Bank, LifeSouth
Blood Bank and other area
charities and non-profits 9
a~m.5 p.m. today.

Cemetary association
meeting
The Mt. Tabor .
Cemetary Association is
having its annual business
meeting at 10 a.m. today
at Bethlehem Lutheran
Church. Cookbooks will
be sold for $20 as a fund-
raiser. The money is put
toward the cemetery fund'

nhrc is o Em Burns
Lane off of US 441 South
near Ellisville

River Jam
Suwannee River Jam is
Saturday at the S irit of
Suwannee Music Park.
Performances include
Ronnie Dunn, Kellie
Pickler and more. Tickets
are available at S&S Food
Stores. Contact the park
at 364-1683. Order online


Friday
Spring Concert
The Richardson
Middle School annual
Spring Concert is 6:30
p.m. Friday in the RMS
auditorium. Under the
direction of Sherod Keen,
the follown bands and

S nprhmmee Ba Jazz '
Band and Drumline, this
will be the final concert of
the school year.

Relay For Life
Relay for Life begins at 6
p*m Friday andcni nH ules

Ti er Field. More than
40 team sites will have

to bne~tethe m rian
Cancer Society. There will
be continuous entertain-
ment except during the
silent inspiring Luminary
Ceremony honoring can-
cer victims. Call 288-2871
or 752-4198.

Maurday, May 7
Lulu Homecoming Day
The 32nd Annual Lulu
Homecoming Day is
10:30 a.m. May 7 at the
Lulu Community Center,
Luncl~is at 12:30 p.m-
Bring a bakest lunch for


OBITUARIE SO





CHURCH NOTES


vww.Iakecityreporter.com


BIBLE STUDIES


Pope's effortS -
rOCOgitized by
Jewish leaders.
By VICTOR L. SIIVPSON
Associated Press

ROME
visit to
Rome's main
synagogue.
Diplomatic
Relations with
Israel. Ai handwritten plea
asking forgiveness for
Christian persecution left
at Judaism's holiest site in
Jerusalem.
With his landmark
actions, Pope John Paul II
strove throughout his 27-
year papacy to overcome
the tortured two-millennia
history of Catholic-Jewish
relations.
In a sign of appre-
ciation for those efforts,
some in the crowd at his
beatification Sunday in St.
Peters's Square will be
Jews, including an Israeli
Cabinet minister who lost
most of his family in the
Holocaust but was hidden
by a Belgium family who
raised him as a Christian.
"W~e have a high respect,
a unique respect for
John Paul," Yossi Peled,
a retired Israeli general,
said Friday. "He is not just
.another pope for us."
The preparations for
the beatification the


emony, including 16 heads
of state, six heads of gov-
ernment and members of
five royal houses, Vatican
spokesman the Rev.
Federico Lombardi said.
P'eled, a minister in
Prime Minister Benjamin
Netanyahu's office, said
the participation of an
Israeli Cabinet member at
what is a religious event
the U.S. delegation is
limited to its ambassador
to the Holy See and two
former envoys is a sign
of the importance given
.to John Paul's accomplish-
ments.
After decades of reluc-
tance by the Vatican to
recognize the Jewish state,
.the Polish-born John Paul
forged formal relations in
S1993, following it up with
an official visit to Israel in
2000. that: included stops
at the Holocaust memo-
rial Yad Vashem and at the
Western Wall, where he
left his note.
Earlier, John Paul,
a' Pole who survived
the Nazi invasion of his
country, became the fist
pope to visit a synagogue,
where he referred to Jews
as "our older brothers in
faith."
Peled described the
tragedy of his fam-
ily, which had fled from
Poland to Belgium to .
escape the Nazis, during)
.a meeting with a small


group of correspondents
at the Israeli Embassy on
Friday. Shortly before the
family was seized, when
he was 6 months old, his
father entrusted him to a
.Belgian Catholie family.
"I ,grew up as a happy
Christian boy," he said.
flis mother was the only
member of his, family to
survive Ausch'witz and
reclaimed him when he
was 8.
In honor of John Paul's
beatification and legacy, the
Simon Wiesenthal Center's
Museum of Tolerance is
installing a permanent
exhibit about John Paul,
the center's founder and
dean, Rabbi ~Marvin Hier,
told The Associated Press
in Rome.
John Paul "chartered a
new course in the rela-
tions between the Caitholic
church and the Jewrish peo-
ple,l Hier said in~ a phone
interview. "No other pope
did what he did to repair
those relations."
The exhibit,~ which
includes~ a fim aiout the
late pope, is bemg installed
"in a very prime location"
in the Los Angeles muse-
um, the rabbi said, not-
mng it will be located just
across from the exhibit
featuring the desk of the
renowned late N~ai-hun~ter
Sand Holocatist survivor,
Simon Wiesenthal.


Hug hSherrillrv.
ems-h gh43@comcost~net


Jesus says

look, see

and believe


gave the Israelites a
great victory over the
Canaanites. As they
journeyed on the way
they became "very discour- .
aged" (v.4). When they spoke
against God and Moses, God
sent fiery serpents among
them to chastise them for
their unbelief. After many
were bitten and died (v.6),
the Israelites were moved to .
acknowledge their sin and
ask M~oses to pray to God on
their behalf, that' the poison-
ous serpents would be taken
away. But instead of immedi- .
ately removing th~e serpents,
G~od had Moses make a
bronze serpent and place
Sit high on a pole where all
pould see; saying to Moses
S"It shall be that everyone
:who is bitten when he looks
Sat it, shall live" (v.8).
Although Jesus and a
Bronze serpent are perhaps
Sthe least expected combina-
Stion of type and antitype,
Christ plainly identified the
bonz::sepen: HaM se
In the night meeting with
-Nicodemas, Jesus said to him
"And as Moses lifted up the
serpent in the wilderness, .
even so must the Son of Man
be lifted u that wh ee
believes uin Him should ot
perish bu haLv eternal life
In order to understand'the
full meaning of this, we fist
Must look at the symbolism
Surrounding the tyrpe itself.
Bi-onze, the metal, speaks of
divine judgment; and the ser-
pent, a symbol of judged sin,
anticipates the work of Christ
on the cross on behalf of the
guilty sinner. The complete
Picture of the bronze serpent
Speaks of Christ bearing our
own judgment, and thus, sin
Itself being judged by God in
Ilim. "For He made Him who
knew no sin to be sin for us
(2 Cor. 5:21a) The moment
is indicated in the cry "My
God, fMy God, why hast.thou
forsaken Me? (Matt. 27:46)."
The nwrt this qusin
found Pa r 22 3 'e 'ho
art Holy". Just as Sin separates
the sinner from God, because
He is holy, so too the Father
forsook the Son as He "Laid,
on Hun the iniquity of us all'
(Isaia 536).
Regarding the function of
the type, we see the Savior
agamn clearly as the antitype.
The Israelites, helpless with
the poison of the serpents,
had 1n one avn oofddelv-

not and could not come from
themselves, but was rather
provided for them by God
The only requirement that
they were able to fulfill, faith
the only thing sinful man can,
do without doing anything
at all, was that requirement
as they were instructed by
Moses to simply look. This
type illuminates the nature
of simple "childlike faith"
As the Israelites, once bit-

had 1o lot the sempt on
the pole for life. And i like
manner, we look to Christ
upon on His cross, as our
precious substitute, with the
same anticipation, and thus,
we h u hav not ooked
at the cross, please do so
tod ay.
a Hugh G. Sherrill is a
preacher in Lake City avail-
able for pulpit supply and
-revivals.


ASSOCIATED PRESS
In this March 26, 2000 file photo Pope John Paul II places
a signed note with typed words into a crack in the*Western
Wall, Judaism's holiest shrine in Jerusalem's Old City.


tomlbstone that had marked
John Paul's resting place
in the grottoes underneath
the basilica will be sent to
a new church dedicated to
him in Krakow, the Vatican
said.
Eighty-seven official del-
egations have confirmed
their presence at the cer-


last formal step before
possible sainthood got
under way in an official
capacity Friday morning
when John Paul's tomb
was opened and his sealed,
casket removed for public
viewing starting Sunday in
St. Peter's Basilica.
The simple white marble


Judge Hubert L. Grimes of .
.. Daytona is the keyixote speaker.
Tickets are $12. Call Delois
(Dee) Watson at 755-2445 or e-
mail deloiswatsonr~,gmail.com.

Pre-Mothers day ltelebration
A Pre-Mothers Djay apprecia-
tion and gospel celebration is 6
p.m. May 7 at New Day Springs
Missionary Baptist C~hurch.
The event is hosted by Angel
Ministries of Lake City Inc.
and will feature national and
local gospel artists. No ticket is
.required, but a love offering will
be collected.during tly service.
The church is located at 709 NW
Long Street. Call Past'r 1VMinnie
Williams Gomes at 7581886.

Sunday, May 8
Mother's Day service
A Mother's Day Service is
11 a.m. May 8 at the Greater
Truevine Baptist Church. The
speaker is Joyce Herring.

Submit Church Notes by e-mail
to arobinson Blakecityref~orter
com, fax to (386) 752-9400 or
drop-off at 180 E. Duval St., Lake
City. Call (386) 754-04~25 with
questions. Church Notes run as
space is available each Saturday.


to Teen Encounter j oree in Th~e church is located at 173 SE
Tennesse~e. Match ~fif r ds o~~ Ermine Ave., the corner of SE
vided by Thrivent Financial for uD 'jii~at Street (US Hwy. 90).


* itt~h'ethis. The church is located
just 1.5 miles west of I-75 on US
90 corner of Sweetbreeze Drive.


Sunday
Mt. Pisgah Homecoming *
celebration
A homecoming celebration is 11
a.m. Sunday at Mt. Pisgah Baptist
Church. Ian Clements is the guest
speaker. The event will feature
congregational singing and spe-
cials. A covered dish meal follows
in the fellowship hall.

Spring Revival
A Spring Revival is 11 a.m. and
6 .m.OSunday medn7 p m.p ay
Church.

Church of God Homecoming
celebration
The 80th Homecoming
Celebration is 10:30 a.m. Sunday
at Lake City Church of God. The
guest speaker is Bishop David
Stephens, State Administrative
Bishop. A covered dish luncheon
follows in the Family Life Center.


Wednesday
Camp Meeting
An Old Time Camp Mee~ting
Revival is.7:30 p.m. May 4-6
at the Church of Faith and
Deliverance Through Christ
Inc. The Rev. Charles Martin of
Compassion Love Center is the
speaker. The church is located at
370 NWQ Long Street. Call Pastor
Minnie Williams Gomes at 758-
1886.


Saturday, May 7
Yard sale
A Neighborhood Yard Sale is
8 a~m. May 7 at Shiloh Baptist
Church in Fort White. Spaces are
available for $15. Contact Brother
Earl at 454-4978. The church is
located at 173 SW Shiloh Street,
USHwy. 27.

Mother/Daughter banquet
A Mother & Daughter Banquet
is 6 p.m. May 7 at Mt. Pleasant
United Methodist Church
in Gainesville. The theme is
"Breaking the Silence," and


HEART MATTERS


I Timothy 2:9, women are
to dress modestly, with
decency and propriety.
It is interesting to note
that the word "modest"
translates from the Greek
root word for "adorn."
This word is often used to
speak of God's creation,
specifically the arrange-
ment of the stars. What
,is more beautiful and
points more clearly to
our Maker than looking
up at the sky on a starry
night? Such a view gen-
erates pure and unpol-
luted thoughts, unlike
the' thoughts ignited by
so many of the revealing
outfits popular today.
In an article titled Your
Daughter's wardrobe : A
Battle Worth Fighting,
author Dannah Gresh
explains that God's pur-
pose for a woman sexual-


ly is to captivate one man
with her beauty, but it is
her responsibility to keep
that beauty a treasured
secret for the man she
chooses to be her hus-
band. When women dress
immodestly, they are "tell-
ing their secret" to many
men. In doing this, we are
missing God's intended
plan. This is more than
fashion it is sin. As par-
ents, we must call it what
it is when we talk to our
daughters, and help them
make clothing choices
that will reflect their style
and taste without com_
promising their values.
Dannah says, heree is a
strong case to argue that
the end result of today's
immodest fashion is sexual
promiscuity. I don't know
about you, but I want to
remove anything that


places my sweet daughter
at risk of having her heart
broken by sexual smn."
This doesn't mean that
women can't dress with
a sense of personal style
or fashion. Why don't we
just make sure that like
the stars, we are adorned
in such a way as to point
those who are looking at
us to our Maker?
(For great tips on mod-
est fashion and parenting,
check out the website:
puref~reedom. org).
SHeart Matters is a
weekly column written by
tAe Fam ILif Mi ties
of the Lafayette Baptist
Association, where she
teaches bible studies, leads
marriage and family confer-
ences, and offers biblical
counseling to individuals,
couples and families.


11at says
",girl"
louder
than
Wruffles
iand bows? A family
that I love dearly just
welcomed a new baby
girl into their fold and
I immediately found
myself in the babyt section
of every store I entered,
admiring~ all the precious
pink outfits and buying
a few. As the mom of a
teenage daughter, I miss
the ease of this kind of
clothes shopping for my
daughter because in our
culture, "cute" takes a radi-
cal turn in the pre-teen and
teen years. As girls grow
and mature, the clothing
industry's advertisements
seem to offer less and less
coverage.
It seems that overall


Angie! Land '
angieland3@windstream.net
guys and girls are being
exploited by the fashion
industry, because guys
are wired to appreciate
visual beauty and girls
love looking beautiful, the
bar keeps being lowered
as to how much "beauty
is revealed.
In the name of fashion,
many girls are showing
much more skin than
modesty should allow.
According to the Bible in


FITH



Saturday,April 30, 20 II


&


VALUS


JeWS praise John Paul II on eve of beatification


Tod Of
Car wyash and yard sale

yarl sae s awa -12anpdnm. t

247.


Spring F~estival ,
A Spring Festival is 10 a.m.-2
p.m. today at Our Redeemer
Lutheran Church. The event
will feature a bake sale, free fun
and games and a concert by the
Mercy Mountain Boys fr-om 11:30
a.m.-1:30 p.m. Bring a blanket
or lawn chair. Chicken and rice .
plates are sold from 11 a.m.-1
p.m. A car and motorcycle show
is all day with prizes at 2 p.m.
The church is located on SR 47,
1 mile passed I-75 just passed ~the
Dollar General.


Rummage and cake sale
A rummage and bake sale to
benefit the Lakota Indian Tribe
is 8 a.m.-2 p.m. today at Spirit
of Christ. Youth will be selling
grilled chicken dinners from
10:30 a.m.-2 p.m. Call 752-3807
to order whole grilled chickens.
Proceeds will help send youth


FRShion industry is exploiting our children





WESLBY MM01HOUALUNIfED
132 SWMcFarlane*r752-3513
V(djacnt to SummerSchool)
Worship 8.00&B10:00AMI
Sunday School 9:00AM
Nursery prov~ded
PraiJe & Worship 6 00PM
AWANA-We~dnerdays 500PM
Paston: The Rev i. Loure Mlabrey
www.weSlememLcom
WAFERIOWN CONGREGATIONAL
METHODIST CHURCH
U.S.90 fi tumnon Conez (next to Qualrry
ind.) rigtonO kina wa.
Sunday School 9:45 Mt
Sun.Worship 11Ab1& 6PM
Wed.Nighr Servce ? PM
Pastor, Bandy Ogburn


uKE CM UCHURCH OFTHE NARENE

Sunday Worship 10.45Mih

i ndqA ouhMinstrChildrens: Mury
Pastor: Craig Henderson
Nursery Provided
SW SR 47 and Azalea Park Place



Sunday Contemporary 9:00OAM
SupdaySchodl 10:MAM
11~aditional Service II 00 AMl
senSeaRYPowoesZ
Pastor: Dr. Roy A. Martin
Diector of usic: m opan

FIRST FULL GOSPEL CHURCH
NVE onesWay &NE Wadhingon t.
Sunday School 10:0]0 AMl

Eva gelisdy Swlc 50 Ph
For afo call 155-3408* Eryone Wekene e
Paston: Rev.5Ilan Ellis



Leadership Services 9:00Ai
Sunday Morning 1 l.00Mi
Wednesday service 7.00PM h
217 Dyal Are.,fhrom Hwy940 take
51stersl~elome Rd., go 5 miles, South,
chtuth oil left 755-2525
lead amor-ILonde ohns
.- church onhe Move
CHRISTIAN HERITAGE CHURCH
Coriter SR. 47 & Hudson Circle
Sunday ielebradion 10:30p A~
Pastpr Chr~is lones 752-91 19
FALLING (~iBR CHAPEL
Falling Creek Hoade 55-0580
Rrstsand Th~ird Sundays 9:30 A.M.
Second and Fourth Sundays :00 EM.

NEWHEGINNINCCHURCH
Highway 242 E. of Branford Highwuay
Sunday.School IO:00AM
Mmn orhip LIt 0
Wednesday 7:00PM
A Full GospelChurch. everyone Wlcomed
(385) 755-5197


l~nEicayleriCoperatveInc
Competitive rates, non-profit,
right here in your community.
Lake City District 386-752-7447
clayelectric.com
To Advertise in
this Directory
Call Mary or Bridget
755-5440


US 90 Welaros 1rm e-Man
752-0054

IVIorrell's
y'our C~pcn jcc o mea~ nJ

ho efr nlhl. ..mr


0OIIL(.. U<.(




871 NW '7uero 7585tke C ty

i$ HARRY'S
.......c m. n1-llanry j Alr C<.r.1.2n lh nl lni


Puro- 752-2308 -r

To Advertise in
this Directory
Call Mary or Bridget
755-5440








Central -States

rolumbla County-'s Feed Headquarters
FED PET SUrPPLI~s UAhr & G lRDEN
ANIMAL HIALTH
668 NW Waldo St. 386-755-7445

illKELES POWER EQUIllrlElf, INC.
Y'our Laun & Garvden liend. uarrer
hl10# ER5 CClRUI 5AH3 5 T RIMbE R5
-I 1 52 u~S 9als-IRy.XE IiTY. FL
386-752-8098




"' 755-7050


TO Advertise in
this Directory
Call Mary or Bridget
755-5440


N8 orth Florida hrm~

t oiaon to Sene vo"
Lb~. ilr Fr Murle Braraci~r J
Chlctland~r Mlas.& k. orreni i-~leihts


To Adver~tise in
this Directory
Call Mary or Bridget
755-5440



Supercenter
"LOW PRICES EVERYDAY"
IIS 90r5EST55-2421


"Quality Fork at a reasonable price"
We also do solar hook-ups

(386) 755-5944


FOOD 8TORE8
Open 7 Days a Week
1036 E. Duval St., Lake City FL
Fresh Meat r Pr~oduce!
'I can do all things through Christ which strngthleneth ne
Philippians4I3

To Advertise in
this Directory
Call Mary or Bridget
755-5440

To Advertise in
this Directo~ry
Call Mary or Bridget
755-5440


RK(K'5 (RANE 5ERVI(5
Located at 25A "

386-867-2035
after hours n

To Advertise in
this Directory
Call Mar5 or Bridget


LAKE CITY REPORTER


SATURDAY, APRIL 30, 2011


._ `j~
& --3 ~


;nr


C~ s








mothe love begins before she feels
the first faint flutter of life. It continues

through endless diaper changes and sleepless

nights, through report cards and puppy love, '

graduations and weddings. She rejoices in each
tflumph and grieves with each tragedy, always

there, nurturing and loving. God is hike that, too,

always there, watching over us as we learn and

grow. 'His loving care can guide us along as we
travel through oulr lives. Worship with your mom

this week, and give thanks f~or mothers everywhere.






Scorptures Selected by The American Bible Society
C)2011, Kelster-W~llilams Newspaper Servllces. P.O Box 8187, Charlottesville, VA 22906, www kwnews com


Fust Advem Qhdsdia

Snak o386-752-399
Sunday 5e 00M I ~
\Yedn~sdpy rce. .00PM

GWIDTEDINGS ASSEMBLY OF G;OD
493 ~NW Lake ~elery Road
unayWoh 52 20 1

w~"4hr h Ihre iUS a Re l"O

II BE~ APHSTCHURCH

Sunday School 9 30AM
Sunday Worship 10:5AM & 6PM
Wednesday Eve. Srvie iPM
imterim Pastor: Kennethl Edendield

196sE lames Av.*386-752-2860
Sun. Bible Stdy 9:45AM
Sun orsinp HI &6PM
Wwd. Prayer trle l dy 6PM

SFIRT IAFFIST CHURMlf
SundasyBible~tmdy 9:15.Gf
Sunday Worship 10.30lAM & 6-00PM
Wed 6-00PM~ Prayer Service, &
childrens Miirurcry 6.IsPM
Rr( 'rapen te n~ P~l~
011VEFIMISSIONARI BAPTSTCHURCH
5411NE DaVi\Sf~tirt
unusl 5 19 11

SundayS naold WalrsP stoEas
Sunday Mormng Warship II1 0081 4
Wed. Mid Week Worship 600PM ~
k"r God a Word. Will &r Way

143 I S H 811
386-75.'-.'f614
Sunday Blble Study 9 45Mt l
Sunday Worship I LIMI & 6Phi
Wed. kids & Youtrh Minilr'mo 6-30Phi

S'hlE PRIN11IVE BAPT15'1
S unday ServCice 10:30) AM!
Pa stor. Elder lerinan G ntiln
75? 4198


Sunday Servie 100081
Wednesday Evening Servic 7:30 PM
lAKE Cfn' CHIUSTIAN CHURCH
Hwy2 47 5.*r755-9436


Directo&ns 1mes 8~2386-2-48
lack Enundr., Minister

IAKE CHY CHUIj0FC OGOD
S167 Ennine SL.*752-5965
Sunday School 9:45 AM
Sun. Worship 10:30AM & 6*00PM

Pastor. CarrollLee

EVANGEL CHURCHOFGOD
un3705SW ~onitor lenGi55- 9AM
Sunday Wrship 10-50 &6 30
Wed.5~piritualEnrichment 7PM
*Shock\iouth Church"
Boys and Glds Clubs
Ilible Study
Pastor: lohn R Hathaway

ST, IAMES EPISCO)PAL CHURCH
24235W Bacom Norris Dr., Lake
City,RFl32025- 386-752-22I8
Emal. srjamesepis330ubellsouth.net
Sun. 8&10AM .
Wednesday. 5:15pm
Pn~st: The Rev MicharlArmatongp
Dacn. The Re~v. limmie Hunsinger
Diretor of Music Dr. Alfonso IAevy

OUR REDEEMER WTHERAN CHURCH
ifMS
1 12 miles S. of I-75 on SR 47

Sunday evies?55 429 :30AM
INursery Provided)
Christian Education ifour
For all ages at 10:45AM ,
Pastor- Hev Bruce Alicie
SPIRIT OF CHRIST liTHERAN
Hwy~ 91), I 5 mile Wesr ofI 7 5*1:?5-3807
Sunday Worship 10.00AM
Nurrery Aval.
Wed.PotV I Davide Brya


BETH1EL UNITED METIODIST CHURCH
48s9 US 41l South
Sunday Worihip Services,
Tradmonal Semuces a 30& H :00MI
386-7ss- uss
mybethelumctom
FirstUn~ MethooiJtChudc
386 752-4488
SnIng Worshi 9:45AM
Casual War Ihlp Service 8:50AM
Tradrnenal ervice ll:00AM
Prograrn opporminue available in all
areas for all age-s
For a cormpelet schedule
:Exi W~latcuteie


TABEllNACI.E BAP~IST CHURCH
;Inde endsr [j3 us,
144 SE Montroseriv A52 sq :5!
Sunday School Ill M
Stin, Morn. Worship II1 81
Su~d MeetC hccing :l3 Pb
Pastor Mikes No~rman

EPIPHANY CATHOLIC CHURCH
1905 SWiv Epiphjny Court 75.' 4470
Saturday~agl Mawr 5:IM11 PM
Sunday Mali 31.1 03M.
5:/10 I'M I5panishe Engllshi ,
sunday) kLhvilike~ligiouds duianon


Sunday School
Sun. Mom. Worship
Wed. Prayer Meering


9:30 AM
10-30 AM
7 PM


GI
chevro"


Hunter In .
Chevron7 Oil
Jobber


W


50UTHSIDE BAPTI5T CHURCH
388 s.e. Baya Dnve ;55-55s3
SFurnday


E.15PM l


dlorshi jtd
Evening Worship


&ryr Bible' Srudy


615 5S


To Advertise in
this Directory
Call Mary or Bridget
755-5440

BAYWAY~anlor.iaservices
FIRE & Water Restoration
Floor & Carpet Care
Residential & Comnunrcial
755-6142








To Advertise in
this Directory
Call Mar5-or Bridget


ADVERTISEM ENT


1O LISt




Church

on the


Chur ch


Directory

Ca

752-12I






gi 'LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL SATURDAY, APRIL 30, 2011


Kailyn Barrett (left), of Houston, Texas, and Amber Robinson, of Valdosta; Ga., attempt to keep their balance while running around in water bubbles on Friday at the
Suwannee River Jam.



RIVE A ET:U


Garrett Shuler, of Byron, Ga., gingerly walks down the side of a rock wall while sus-
pended at least 40 feet in the air.


Country singer Jimmy Coleman performs Friday at the Suwannee River Jam.


Country singer Tyler Farr performs Thursday night during the Suwannee River Jam held at the Spirit of
the Suwannee Music Park.


Melissa Davenport (left) and Kristy Hubner, both of Keystone
Heights, wade through a puddle Thursday after storm clouds dump
inches of rain at the Spirit of the Suwannee Music Park.


Pho tos by JASON M~ATTHEW WALKER








Lakre City Reporter


I_ _


Story ideas?

Contact
Tim Kirby
Sports Editor
754-042 I
tkirby@lakecityreportecom


Section B


www.Iakecityreporter.com


FROM THE SIDELINE


Brandon Finley
Phone:(386) 754-0420
bfinley@lakecityreportercom


Th*is


year

Il tht t

mtt TRem

year of Columbia
High football,
but for new head
coach Brian Allen
all that matters is the
fist year.
Allen will lead the



game against Dunnellon
on May 20.
There will be a lot
of extra fanfare this

Tiger football, but for
Allen the only year that
should matter is the fist.
He's as big of a part
of the history as there
comes, but history is in
the past. Not only was
he a great player for
the Tigers, but he .. i~~
represented Columbia
at the next two levels'. '-
Still, all that matters is
Monday and next fall's
results.
Allen should have but
one goal. The tradition of
Tiger football is a great
one, but it~s suffered
in recent years. Gone
are long runs into the
playoffs. Thafs where?
Allen should focus on
having the Tigers head.
Ifs all about getting, ~
backi to being the
wmmnngest program
in Florida high school
history. Its ai moniker
that the Tigers have
proudly worn over its
history. Ifs one that
should strike fear into
any opponent walking
into the jungle, but
without a district
championship last
season, it won't have
much effect.
Allen has an
opportunity to change
that beginning Monday.
That's when the '
foundation will be laid.
Games aren't won in
the spring, but they can
certainly be lost. It's

togtae::::M p::e:-,
under a new coach.

implmene: ha "ilbe
trar ud frmwa
the Tigers looked like
last season on Monday.
Gone will be the spread.
In comes and offense
that looks more like
those seen on the NFL
level.
Allen wants his teams
to be physical, but he
also wants them to be
fast. Most of all, he wants
to put his own stamp on i
the program.
There will be a new
philosophy. There will
be a new playbook. The
Tigers can't waste any
time in preparing for
what is ahead. The 99
years before Allen are
over. Year 100 is in his
hands.
MBrandon Finley covers
sports for the Lake City
Reporter.


Fort White enterS
Witli questions '
One big answer.
By TIM KIRBY
tkirby@lakecityreporter. com
FORT WHITE - Fort
White High football enters
spring practice with several
questions, but one huge
answer.
The Indians are in
District 3-3A under the new
FHSAA classification, and
are already asstired of a
spot in the 2011 state play-
offs. Fort White and Trinity
Catholic High are the only


schools in the district and
one will go to the playoffs
as district champion and
one as runner-up.
That journey begins
with spring practice, which
starts after school Monday
for head coach Demetric
Jackson and his staff.
The highlight of spring
practice will be the spring
game at 7 p.m. May 20. Fort
White is hosting Orange
Park High, which is coached
by former Columbia High
coach Danny Green.
"It will be a challenge
to face a great program,"
INDIANS continued on 3B


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Fort White High head coach Demetric Jackson (second from left) speaks with quarterback
Andrew Baker (12), along with coaches Chad Bonds and Isiah Phillips during' the Indians'
game against Santa Fe High last season. The Indians open up spring practice on Monday.


Keene allows
three 11itS in Will
for Lady Tigers.
By BRANDON FINLEY
-blini **Ial~ecrttireperspomm
-'I. folumbia High li~diiee
beaten Ed White High
entering Friday's 5A sec-
ond-round playoff game.
The Lady Tigers would
. need a third win to move
one step closer to achieving
their' main goal of reaching
the Final Four. They got
it behind a strong pitching
performance from Jessica
Keene, winning 7-1.
Columbia moves on to
play the winner of Niceville
and Navarre high schools
at 7 p.m. on Tuesday. The
Lady Tigers would host
the game if Niceville beats
Navarre.
It wasn't always pretty,
but it was effective for the
junior. Keene finished with
the complete game allowing
three hits, striking out two
and walking six.
Ed White's only run
came off a passed ball in
the first inning. Alneisha
CHS continued on 3B


JASON MATTHEW WALKERILake City Reporter


Friday in a game against




No game
fo T

Falcons


Lake City cancels
COntest, pregame
feStivities today.

From staff reports

Lake City Falcons semi-
pro football team owner
Elaine Ortiz-Harden
announced Friday morning
that Saturday's game against
the Savannah Venom has
been canceled, due to her
recent illness.
The Falcons were plan-
ning pre-gaine festivities to
honor veterans and support
the U.S. troops.
It was the final scheduled
home game and no make-
up game was announced.
Lake City's (3-5) finah
game is 7 p.m. May 7
against the Rat-tlers in
Georgia.


Columbia High's Michaela Burton (88) tags a runner out at first after attempting to steal second
Edward H. White High.


I-

5


Former FSU QB
picked to relace
Brett Favre.

By DAVE CAMPBELL
Associated Press
~EDEN PRAIRIE, Minn.
- The Minnesota Vikings
had gone 12 years without
taking a quarterback in the
first round of the draft.
With Brett Favre back
to retirement, NFL free
agency not yet begun and
no other proven options
on the roster, the Vikings
grabbed gritty Christian
Ponder ~from Florida State
with the 12th overall pick
on Thursday night.
Fans gathered at a draft
party inside the team's prac-
tice facility groaned when
Washington's Jake Locker


went with the eighth pick
to the Tennessee Titans
and again when Missouri's
Blaine Gabbert was gone
at No. 10 after Jacksonville
traded up.
They booed when
Ponder's name wab
announced, the fourth
quarterback taken in this
quarterback-deep draft,
apparently convinced his
value didn't match the slot.
But Vikings vice president
for player personnel Rick
Spielman said the team
likes Ponder's poise, intel-
ligence and accuracy, and
he said the asking price was
too high for them to trade
up and get Gabbert before
the Jaguars.
'"The thing we went back
and forth on was, 'When are
PONDER continued on 3B


""""""""""""sl 1 ^'~R~ U 1
ASSOCIATED PRESS
In this Oct. 9, 2010 file photo, Florida State quarterback
Christian Ponder looks to pass during an NCAA college
football game against Miami in Miami. Ponder was
selected as the 12th overall pick in the first round of the
NFL football draft by the Minnesota Vikings on Thursday.


Saturday, April 30, 20 II


Indians will

host Raiders


1H Spring game


CHS charms


Ed White


7-1


for thr ie


POnder has


b 1g shoes to fill

1H MinHOSOtR





BOWVLI NG


Hunter safety Internet-completion course- offered


Answer to Previous Puzzle

SPIA ABIE Q TIY
W IG RIAIVIE PURE
U IK E B IL E IW H IAIU IL
MIEDI OICR IER RILIL
CIRIO READ YD
PIN K NIOSESE
I IOIU FY YI K EIAN IU
EIN NU I I S I S VA IT
TIRIEIEID J ETE
ClOMEIT EGG O
K ILIO HEARTENIIN S
IISIIS OTTOTTO I YP
SICIOT SITI~EPK EKE
SIOS AIDE DIEW


MWant THOre puZZies?
Check out the "Just Right Crossword Puzzles" books
at QulllDriverBooks.com


LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS SATURDAY, APRIL 30, 2011


Page Editor: Tim Kirby, 754-0421


League reports
Results of Lake City Bowl league
play follow.
SEXY SENIORS
Final standings
Top three teams: 1. Perky Pals
(85.5-50.5); 2. Farmers (83-53); 3. Jo's
Crew (78-58).
High average: 1. Betty Brown
148.93; 2. Louise Atwood 148.22;
3. Joanne Denton 144.75. 1. Dan
Ritter 175.04; 2. Earl Hayward 171.85;
3. Art Joubert 169.69.
WATERGUARD
SHigh scratch game: 1. Linda
Andrews 222; 2. Mary Lobaugh 213;
3. Terry Wayne 206. 1. Tom Sewejkis
277; 2. Zech Strohl 234; 3. Dess
Fennell.
High scratch series: 1. Mary
Lobaugh 536; 2. Terry Wayne 525;
3. Lori Davis 487. 1. Tom Sewejkis
688; 2. Zech Strohl 676; 3. Luke
Milton 657.
High handicap game: 1. Linda
Andrews 274; 2. Debbie Walters
255; 3. Mary Lobaugh 235. 1. Tom
Sewejkis 285; 2. Dess Fennell 251;
3. Jim Lobaugh 243.
High handicap series: 1. Terry
Wayne 673; 2. Bertha Black 630;
3. (tie) Pat Frazier, Karin Thompson
623. 1. Michael Mcinally 737; 2. Luke
Milton 726; 3. Frank Miller 681.
High average: 1. Mary Lobaugh
182. 1. Zech Strohl 211.
(results from April 19)
GOLDEN ROLLERS
Team standings: 1. Golden Niners
(81-51); 2. Gamblers (78-54); 3. Wild
Things (73-59).
High handicap game: 1. Bea Purdy
228; 2. (tie) Judy Sanders, Vy Ritter
225. 1. Sandy Sanders 249; 2. Bill
Price 247; 3. George Walters 242.
High handicap series: 1. Joan
Carman 644; 2. June pat Klock 632;
3. Pat Hale 622. 1. Lee Evert 677;
2. George Mulligan 664; 3. Dan Ritter
653.
SHigh average: 1. Shiriey Highsmith
156.86; 2. Elaine Nemeth 152.67;
3. Betty Carmichael 151.3. 1. David
Duncan 189.99; 2. Bill Dolly 184.26;
3. George Mulligan 183.23.
(results from April 14)
HIT & MISS
Team standings: 1. The
Sandbaggers (40-20); 2. Spare Us
(37-23); 3. Alley Oops (34-26).
High handicap game: 1. Susan
Mears 227; 2. Linda Adams 223;
3. Judy Daniels 218.
High handicap series: 1. Sandra
Peterson 624; 2. Linda Herndon 614;
3. Rose Brown 595.
(results from April 26)
SUNDAY NITE MERCHANTS
Team standings: 1. TAZ
(46.5-17.5); 2. Spare Us (39.5-24.5);
3. Fantastic Four (34.5-29.5).
High scratch game: 1. Liz Randall


High scratch series: 1. Karen
Coleman 653;. 2. Ida Hollingsworth
516; 3. Desiree Stemp 507. 1. Zech
Strohl 752; 2. Wally Howard 674;
3. George Rye Jr. 650.
High handicap game: 1. Karen
Coleman 268; 2. Kristy Lambert 261;
3. Mary Hamilton 254. 1. George
Rye Jr. 287; 2. Jim Pauwels Sr. 266;
3. Jason Howell 262.
High handicap series: 1. Karen
Coleman 728; 2. Kristy Lambert 682;
3. Mary Hamilton 674. 1. Zech Strohl
752; 2. George Rye Jr. 707; 3. Jay
Waterbury 693.
(results from April 22)


LosAngeles 13 13 .500 4%
San Francisco 12 12 .500 43
Arizona II 13 .458 51
san oiego 9 16 .3so a
Friday's Games
Washington 3, San Francisco 0
N.Y. Mets at Philadelphia (n)
Florida at Cincinnati (n)
St Louis at Atlanta (n)
Milwaukee at Houston (n)
Pitsburgh at Colorado (n)
Chicago Cubs at Arizomi (n)
San Diego at L.A. Dodgers (n)
Today's Games
N.Y. Mets (Niese 1-3) at Philadelphia
(Halladay 3-1), 1:10 p.m.
St. Louis (Westbrook 2-2) at Atlanta
(Beachy 1-1). 1:10 p.m:
San Francisco (j.Sanchez 2-1) at
Washington (Lannan 2-2), 4:05 p.m-
Milwaukee (W~olf 3-2) at Houston
(W.Rodriguez I-3),7:05 p.m-
Florida (jo.Johnson 3-0) at Cincinnati
(Volguez 2-1), 7:10 p.m.
Chicago Cubs (Garza 0-3) atArizona
(I.Kennedy 3-1), 8:I0 p.m.
Pittsburgh (Maholrn 1-3) at Colorado
(Hammel 2-1), 8:10 p.m-
San DIego (Stauffer 0-1) at L.A-
Dodgers (Kuroda 3-2), 10:10 p.m.
Sunday'sGames
San Francisco atWashingtoh, 1:35 p.m.
St. Louis atAtlanta, 1:35 p.m.
Milwaukee at Houston, 2;05 p.m.
Pittsburgh at Colorado, 3:10 p.m.
Chicago Cubs at Arizona,4:10 p.m.
Florida at Cincitinati, 4:IO p.m.
San Diego at L.A. Dodgers, 4:IO p.m.
N.Y. Mets at Philadelphia, 8:05 p.m.


BASKETBALL


NBA playoffs

FIRST ROUND
Thursday
Atlanta 84, Orlando 81, Atlanta wins
series 4-2
LA. Lakers 98, New Orleans 80, L.A.
Lakers wins series 4-2
SDallas 103, Portland 96, Dallas wins
series 4-2
Friday
San Antonio at Memphis (n)
CONFERENCE SEMIFINALS
(Best-of-7l)
Sunday
Boston at Miami, 3:30 p.m.


FOOTBALL

NFL Draft

Thursday
ROUND.ONE
I. Carolina, Cam Newton, QB,
, Auburn
2. Denver,Van Miller, LB,Texas A&M
3. Buffalo, MarcIll Dareus, DE,
Alabama
4. Cincinnati,Ad.JGreen,WR, Georgia
5.Arizona, Patrick Peterson, CB, LSU
6.Atlanta (from Cleveland),Julio jones,
WR,Alabama
7. San Francisco, Aldon Smith, DE,
Missouri '
in Tennessee, Jake Locker, QB.
9. Dallas,Tyron Smith,T, Southern Cai
10. Jacksonville (from Washington),
Blaine Gabbert, QB, Missouri
I .Houston,J jWat DElvWls r, i

QB, Florida State
13. Detroit, Nick Fairley, DT,Auburn
14. St. Louis, Robert Quinn, DE, North
Carolina
15. Miami, Mike Pouncey, C,
Florida
16. Washington (from Jacksonville),
Ryan Kerrigan, DE, Purdue
Nat oew Tlan dd(from Oakland),
18. San Diego, Corey Liuget, DT,
Illinois
19. N.Y. Giants, Prince Amukamara,
CB, Nebraska
20. Tampa Bay, Adrian Clayborn, DE,
Iowa

Ta21 Cleveland (from Kansas City), Phil
22. Indianapolis, Anthony Castonzo, T,
Boston College
23. Philadelphia, Danny Watkins, G,
Baylor
24. New Oricans, Cameron Jordant
DE, California
25. Seattle, James Carpenter, OG,
Alabama
26. Kansas City (from Atlanta,through
Cleveland), Jon Baldwin,WR, Pittsburgh
27. Baltimore-x, Jimmy Smith, CB,

ol8. Nw Orleans (from New England),
Mark Ingram, RB,Alabama
29. Chicago, Gabe Carimi, T'
Wisconsin
30. N.Y. Jets, Muhammad Wilkerson'
DT,Temple
Ohi31Pittsburgh, Cameron Heyward, DE'
32. Green BayDerek Sherrod, OF'
Mississippi State
x-pass on selection No. 26




Unscramble these four Jumbles, -
one letter to each square,
to form four ordinary words.

SEWVELH I


Zech Strohl bowled'his latest
300 game in Monday Night
MaVericks league play on
April 4. Strohl finished with
8 788 SerieS and leads the
68agUe With a 222 average.

191; 2. (tie) Kim Schneiders, Cara
Lashley 180. 1. Joe Cohrs 230; 2. (tie)
A.J. Dariano, Robert Pond 221.
High scratch series: 1. Kim
Schneiders 511;2.(tie) NormaYeingst,
Liz Randall 508. 1. A.J. Dariano 625;
2. Robert Pond 618; 3. Joe Cohrs
609.
High average: 1. Norma Yeingst
169.61; 2. Cheryl Jacks 158.56; 3. Liz
Randall 158.37. 1. Bill Duncan 199.1;
2. Joe Cohrs 195.32; 3. Mark Moore
192.97.
(results from April 24)
MONDAY NIGHT MAVERICKS
Team standings: 1. Rountree
Moore Ford (293-157); 2. Team 8
(286.5-163.5); 3. Neil Hoffman's Auto
(271-179).
High scratch game: 1. Zech Strohi
275; 2. Ricky Hewett 265; 3. John
Janki 256.
High scratch series: 1. Zech Strohl
760; 2. Ricky Hewett 724; 3. Brian
Meek 709.
High handicap game: 1. Ricky
Hewett 278; 2. Zech Strohl 275;
3. John Janki 270.
High handicap series: 1. Ricky
Heyvett 763; 2. Zech Strohl 760;
3. Robert Stone 725.
High average: 1. Zech Strohl
223.23; 2. Dale Coleman 214.38;
3. Brian Meek 207.77.
(results from April 11)
TGIF
Team standings: 1. Strike Zone
(44.5-15.5); 2. The Pacers (37-23);
3. 4 Cryin' Out Howd (35.5-24.5).
High scratch game: 1. Karen
Coleman 243; 2. Ida Hollingsworth
200; 3. Desiree Stemp 191. 1. George
Rye Jr. 268; 2. (tie) Zech Strohi, Wally
Howard 256.


MAJORS SCRATCH
Teard standings: 1. TEAM 2
(112.5-63.5); 2. Scrumdiddlyumptious
(104.5-71.5); 3. Chicken Alfredo!
(96-80).
High scratch game: 1. Christine
Peters 192; 2. Chrissy Fancy 188;
3. Courtney Schmitt 185. 1. Cody
Stuart 248; 2. Dalton Coar 243; 3.
Colin Madden 237.
High scratch series: 1. Christine
Peters 554; 2. Chrissy Fancy 522;
3. Courtney Schmitt 515. 1. Cody
Stu~art 649; 2. Dalton Coar 615;
3. Colin Madden 607.
MAJORS
Team Standings: 1. Care Bears on
Fire (68.5-31..5); 2. Noble Team (59.5-
40.5); 3. Iron Bowlers (58.5-41.5).
High handicap game: 1. Jennifer
Pharis 228; 2. Cheyenne Patterson
224; 3. Rikki Cole 222. 1. Jacob
Wheeler ~268; 2. Zach Mannira 267;
3. Brandon Willis 248.
High handicap series: 1. Jennifer
Pharis 664; 2. Rikki Cole 633;
3. Victoria Wise 615. 1. Gary Beames
681; 2. Jacob Wheeler 679; 3. (tie)
Jordan Salzer, Zach Mannira 648.
JUNIORS
Team Standings: 1. Spineless Pins
(66-34); 2. The Clones (63.5-36.5);
3. Spare Time (57-43).
High handicap game: 1. Amanda
Schmitt 192; 2. Alyson. Everette 187;
3. Bryannah Billingsley 184. 1. Jared
Scott 250; 2. Josh Pettigrew 216;
3. Anthony Cohrs 211.
High handicap series: 1. Amanda
Schmitt 535; 2. Bryannah Billingsley
525; 3. Alyson Everette 519. 1. Jared
Scott 681; 2. Josh Pettigrew 609;
3. Anthony Cohrs 589.
BANTAMS
High handicap game: 1. Biancah
Billingsley 169. 1. Mason Cooper 199;
2. Tylor Dudiey 191; 3. Eric Anderson
164.
High handicap series: 1. Biancah
Billingsley 435. 1. Tylor Dudley 517;
2. Mason Cooper 492; 3. Eric
SAnderson 449.
(results from April 16)


Commission release


The Florida Fish and
Wildlife Conservation
COmmiSSion is offering a
free hunter safety Internet-
COmpletion course May 6-7
in iLlke City.


Students who have taken
the online course and wish
to complete the classroom
portion must bring the
online-completion report
with them.
Register in advance by
calling the regional office


at 758-0525 or going to
MyFWC. com/HunterSafety.
All fiearms, ammunition
and materials are provided
free. Students should bring
pen or pencil and paper. An
adult must accompany chil-
dren under 16 at all times.


ACROSS

1 -de-sac
4 Gleefulshout
7 Early VCR for-
mat
11 CORCh
Pafseghian
12 Under the covers
13 Black cat,
maybe
14 Collar part
16 Stiff
17 Time periods
18 Green pod
19 kwon do
20 40-cup brewer
21 Gawked at
24 Quiver
contents
27 Monastery
dweller
28 "Fatha" Hines
30 Bangkok native
32 Cheerio!
(hyph.)
34 up (come
Clean)
36 Connections


37 Big scissors
39 Asks for ID
41 "Road movie"
locate
42 Hobby, slangily
43 One of the
POnderosa
sons
45 Not cool
48 Ink stain
49 Octopuis fea-
ture
52 Y chromosome
carrier
53 A bit preten-
tious
54 Nose-bag
morsel
55 Uncivilized
56 PSAT takers
57 Comic Louis

DOWN


TELEVISION


WV sports

-goday
ATHLETICS
8 p.m.
ESPN2 the Penn Relays, at
Philadelphia (same-daytape)
AUSTRALIAN RULES FOOTBALL
2 a~m.
ESPN2 Collingwood vs. Westem
Bulldogs, at Melbourne,Australia
AUTO RACING
6 p.m.
ESPN NHRA. qualifying for Spring
Nationals, at Baytown, Texas (same-day
oape)
VERSUS IRL, IndyCar, pole
qualifying for Sao Paulo Indy 300, at Sao
Paulo, Brazil (same-day tape)
7 p.m.
FOX NASCAR, Sprint Cup,
Matthew and Daniel Hansen 400, at
Richmond,Va.
COLLEGE BASEBALL
12:30 p.m.
FSN Oklahoma at Texas
I p.m.
ESPN Arkansas at Georgia
COLLEGE SOFTBALL
8 p.m.
ESPN Oklahoma at Texas
CYCLING
7 p.m.
VERSUS -Tour de Romandle, stage 4,
Aubonne to Signal-de-Bougy, Switzerland
(same-day tape)
GOLF
9 am.
TGC European PGA Tour'
Baliantine's Championship, third round, at
Seoul. South Korea (same-daytape)
3 p.m'
CBS PGA Tour, Zurich Classic,
third round, at Avondale, La.
4 p.m.
TGC LPGA, Avnet Classic, third
round, at Mobile,Ala.
HOCKEY
10 a~m.
VERSUS--IIHFWorld Championships,
preliminary round, U.S. vs. Austria, at
Kosice, Slovakia .
MAjOR LEAGUE BASEBALL
I p.m.
FOX Regional coverage, N.Y. Mets
at Philadelphia, St. Louis at Atlanta, or L.A.
Angels at Tampa Bay

MLB -Seattie atston
WGN Baltimore at Chicago White

Sx NFL FOOTBA LL
Noon
ESPN Draft, rounds 4-7, at New
York
NFL Draft, rounds 4-7, at New
York
NHL HOCKEY
3 p.m.
NBC Playoffs, conference
semifinals, game 1, Boston at Philadelphia
9 p.m.
VERSUS Playoffs, conference
semifinals, game I, Nashville atVancouver
SOCCER

ESPN2 Pree Le ge, Futham at
Sunderland


BASEBALL

AL standings ,

East Division
W L Pct GB
New York 14 8 .636 -
Tampa Bay 14 II .560 11
Toronto 12 13 .480 33
Boston II 13 .458 4
Baltimore' Cetali0vs n .435 4%

W L Pct GB
Cleveland 16 8 .667 -
Detroit 12 13 .480 43
Kansas City 12 13 .480 43
Chicago 10 16 .385 7
Minnesota 9 15 .375 7
West Division PtGB

Texas 15 10 .600 -
Los Angeles 14, II .560 I
Oakiand 12 13 .480 3
Seattle II 15 .423 4%
Friday's Games
Detrait at Cleveland (n)
Toronto at N.Y.Yankees (n)
L.A.Angels atTampa.Bay (n)
Seattle at Boston (n)
Baltimore at Chicago White Sox (n)
Minnesota at Kansas City (n)
Texas at Ooakad ames

L.A.Angels (Pineiro 0-0) at Tampa Bay
(Shields 2-1), 1:10 p.m.
Texas (Lewis 1-3) at Oakland
(Anderson 2-I), 4:05 p.m.
Toronto (Drabek 2-0) at N.Y.Yankees
(A~J.Bumtt I-), 405 p.m) tCeead

(White 0-0), 6:05 p.m.
Baltimore (Tillman 0-2) at Chicago
White Sox (Humber 2-2), 7:10 p.m.
Minnesota (Duensing 2-0) at Kansas
City (O'Sullivan 1-1), 7: 10 p.m-
2-2) 7 p(Fister I-3) at Boston (Lackey
Sunday's Games
Detroit at Cleveland, I:05 p.m.
Toronto at N.Y.Yankees, 1:05 p.m.
Seattle at Boston, 1:35 p.m.
L.A.Angels at Tampa Bay, 1:40 p.m.
20Baltimore at Chicago White Sox,
Minnesota at Kansas City,2:IO p.m.
Texas at Oakland, 4:05 p.m.

NL standings


10 Even one
12 Wear away
15 Hepburn nick-
name
18 Boston Bruin
great
20 WWW
addresses
21 Poetic adverb
22 Mardi -
23 Thin strip
24 Greek war god!
25 Vibrate
26 dollar
29 Big hairdo
31 NASA destina-
tiOn
33 Made bubbly
35 Like some
SWimming
suits
38 Rifle range
command
40 Ottoman title
42 Baseball ploys
43 Jai -
44 Sweetheart
46 PC screen
image
47 Run the stereo
48 CEO's auto,
perhaps
49 Mahal
50 Slip up
51 When Paris
SIZZIOS


East Division
W L
Philadelphia 16 8
Florida IS 8
Atlanta 13 13
Washington II 13
New York II 14
Central Division
W L
St. Louis 14 11
Cincinnati 13 12
Milwaukee 12 12
Pittsburgh 11 14
~Chicago 10 14
Houston 9 16
West Division
W L
Colorado 16 7


/ 1 / / 1 I Now arrange the circled letters
Kr Km I Ito form the surprise answer, as
L / L /suggested by the above cartoon.

YOUT anSwer here:Kmm; K
(Answers Monday)
Yeteda's Jumbles: DAISY GRANT PEBBLE JACKET
Answer: The Martian didn't like taking the bus
because it made him feel "ALIENATED"


Pct GB
.696 -


4-30 @ 2011 by UFS, Inc.


SCOREBOARD


AUTO RACING

Race week

NASCAR
SPRINT CUP
Matthew and Daniel Hansen 400
Site: Richmond,Va.
Schedule: Today, race, 7:30 p.m. (FOX'
7-1 I p.m.).
Track: Richmond International
Raceway (oval,0.75 miles).
Race distance: 300 miles, 400 laps.
INDYCAR
Sao Paulo Indy 300
Site: Sao Paulo.
Schedule: Today, practice, qualifying
(Versus, 6-7 p.m.); Sunday, race, I2:20 p.m
(Versus, noon-3 p.m.).
Track~ Streets of Sao Paulo (street
course, 2.6 miles).
Race distance: 195 miles, 75 laps.
NHRA FULL THROTTLE
O'ReillyAuto Parts
NHRA Spring Nationls
Site: BaytownTexas.
Schedule: Today, qualifying (ESPN2'
6-8 p.m.); Sunday, final eliminations
(ESPN2, 7-10 p.m.).
Tracic Royal Purple Raceway.

Hansen 400 qualifying

At Richmond International Raceway
Richmond,Va.
Friday qualifying; race today
(Car number in parentheses)
I.(42) Juan Pablo Montoya, Chevrolet
128.639 mph.
2. (78) Regan Smith, Chevrolet,
128.382.
3. (33) Clint Bowyer, Chevrolet.
128.272.
4. (4) Kasey Kahne,Toyota, 128.15.
5. (5) Mark Martin, Chevrolet,
128.053. .
6. (24) Jeff Gordon, Chevrolet.
128.011.
7. (2) Brad Keselowski, Dodge,
128.011.
8. (99) Carl Edwards, Ford, 128.005.
9. (20) Joey Logano,Toyota, 127.98.
10. (27) Paul Menard, Chevrolet,
127.956.
I I.( I1) Denny HamlinToyota, 127.78.
12. (29) Kevin Harvick, Chevrolet.
127.66.
13. (39) Ryan Newman, Chevrolet,
127.473.
14. <47) Bobby Labonte, Toyota.
127.473.
15.(13) Casey Mears,Toyota, 127.455.
16. (30) David Stremme, Chevrolet,
127.401-
17. (1) Jamie McMurray, Chevrolet.
127.352-
18. (43) A J Allmendinger, Ford,
127.334.
19. (00) David Reutimann, Toyota,
127.334.
20. (18) Kyle Busch,Toyota, 127.31-
21. (56) Martin Truex Jr., Toyota,
127.304.
22. (66) Michael McDowell, Toyota,
127.298.
23.(16) Greg Biffle, Ford, 127. 131.
24. (88) Dale Earnhardt Jr., Chevrolet,
12795. (31) Jeff Burton, Chevrolet,
127.047.
26. (87) Joe Nemechek, Toyota,
127.023-
g7() DTvi sRan IF drd, 127. 1
29. (36) Dave Blaney, Chevrolet,
126.886.
30. (48) Jimmie Johnson, Chevrolet..
126.88.
31. (14) Tony Stewart, Chevrolet,
126.713.
32. (60) Mike SkinnerToyota 126.582
33.(17) MarttKenseth, Ford, I26.393.
1233 |(09) Landon Cassill, Chevrole
35. (9) Marcos Ambrose, Ford,
126.269 s
36. (22) Kurt Busch, Dodge, I26.21.
37. (83) Brian Vickers,Toyota, 126. 186.
38. (32) Ken Schrader, Ford, 126.139.
39.(34) David Gilliland, Ford, 125.915.
40. () J..Yeley, Ch~e rolet 1.488.

42. (7) Robby Gordon, Dodge, Owner
Points.
43.(37) Tony Raines, Ford, 125.482.
Failed to Qualify
44. (92) Brian Keselowski, Dodge,
123.288.


HOCKEY

NH L playoffs

CONFERENCE SEMIFINALS

Vancouver i ahu dv e 0, Vancouver
leads series 1-0
SFriday
Tampa Bay 4,Washington 2
Detroit at Sanjlose (n)

SBoston at Phildlpha,3 p.m.
Nashville atVancouver, 9 p.m.

THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME
by David L. Hoyt and Jeff Knurek


OTOHPY SETRUOC
YOHill leagueS
300 ga.me


Roost sitter
Say further
Gift tie
Bahrain VIP
Prefix for "tril-
lion"


Knows how
Deuterium dis-
coverer
BlOuse trim
Humble





- .;r r t


I ~r I Ihl -PONDER: Fills huge need for Vikings


INDIANS: Red & Black on M/ay 14


n] l g'ns o ake K noa Stat


RB Thnomas mn 2nd round


LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS SATURDAY, APRIL 30, 2011


Page Editor: Brandon Finley, 754-0420


Williams walked, stole
scnd androaudvnc-n do

The passed ball allowed Ed
White to hold its only lead
for half of the inning.
Columbia took control
of the lead and held it
throughout the rest of the
game in the bottom of the
first.
Hollianne Dohrn's
doubles scored Stephanie
Pilkington and Michaela
Burton to take the 2-1
lead.
Columbia would hang
tight to that lead until the
bottom of the fifth inning
when the Lady Tigers'
blew the game open.
"You can't keep a
good-hitting team down,"
Columbia head coach
Jimmy Williams said after
the game'. "Once we added
our fourth run, I felt pretty
good."
Keene helped her own
effort in the five-run fifth
with a single to right field
to score Kayli Kvistad, who
reached after being hit by a
pitch earlier in the inning.
Holly Boris was
squeezed in by Brittany
Morgan to move the lead
to 4-1. Morgan then made
her way home from second
off of two throwing errors
by Ed White to give the
Lady Tigers a 5-11ead.


"When I went to visit,
they told me I would not slip
past pick No. 38," Williams
said, his eyes still wet. "And
I respect them 100 percent.
Williams left school with
two years of eligibility
remaining. He rushed for
1,655 yards ~and 21 touch-
downs, averaging 5.6 yards
per carry, as a redshirt
freshman in 2009, but was
limited by a hamstring inju-
ry last season,
"The passion that I play
with separates myself from
a lot of people on the job,"
he said.
He said the prolonged
stay wasn't that bad for his
family and friends because
"they got another day out in
New York."
Earlier, the fans' mood
over the labor dispute
hadn't changed as, for the
second straight night, they
showered Goodell with
boos. And that was well
before the most recent
court decision.
A high-profile quarter-
backs preceded Williams
and his entourage to the
stage.
Cincinnati selected TCU
quarterback Andy Dalton.


By BARRY WILNER
Associated Press

NEW YORK Even as
Ryan Williams was bear-
hugging Roger Goodell at
the draft Friday, the NFL
was back in position to shut
down all other business.
The Virginia Tech run-
ning back waited in a side
room at Radio City Music
Hall for 37 picks. Arizona
finally called his name at
the sixth spot in the second
round moments before
the league was granted a
temporary stay against an
injunction that blocked its
lockout of players. .
The teary-eyed Williams
embraced the commission-
er and former Cardinals cor-
nerback Aenaes Williams,
who made the announce-
ment. Ryan Williams' family
and friends followed him on
stage about two dozen
people in all-- surrounding
him and Goodell in a sea of
celebratory supporters.
They had no ideaWilliams
might not be allowed to
report to the team if the
lockout is reinstated while a
court in St. Louis hears the
league's appeal.


'%
lr?;2 h- ~-~L
)L
.;


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Columbia High's Stephanie Pilkington (9) tries to avoid being struck in the back by a pitch
Friday against Edward H. White High School.


a shutout though. Jessica's
phenomenal. She's worked
so hard. I'm so proud of
her and she deserves it."
"We talked about win-
ning six in a row head-
ing into the district tour-
nament," Williams said.
"WIe're at five, so we just
need one more for the
Final Four."


After setting the Lady
Tigers regular-season mark
for home runs itt a season,
Kvistad came through with
her first shot of the post-
season. The homer sailed
ovter the left-field wall to
score Burton and give the
Lady Tigers the final 7-1
advantage.
The Lady Tigers ran into


a bases-loaded situation in
the bottom of the seventh,
but Keene and the Lady
Tigers' defense held strong
without allowing a run.
"It was just another day at
the park for her," Williams
said. "She allowed a few
scattered hits, and we gave
one up in the first. We're
only one pitch away from


Continued From Page 1E
you going to get another
chance to swing?' If Ponder
was gone, would we get .
another opportunity to take
a quarterback in this draft?"
Spielman said. "W~e didn't
want to take that risk." *
The Vikings also con-
sidered trading down, but
they simply worried about
waiting too long to take a
player at the position they
arguably needed the most
this season.
"Quarterback was a huge
need for us," Spielman said.
"Everybody knows that."
Ponder is only the third
quarterback the Vikings
have drafted in the first
round in their 51-year histo-
ry,joiningTomnmylI~ramerin
1977 and Daunte Culpepper
in 1999. Culpepper was a
multiyear Pro Bowl pick,
but ever since he tore up
his knee during a scram-
ble in a game in 2005 the
Vikings have been piecing
together the game's most
critical position.
Brad Johnson. Tarvaris
Jacksoil. Kelly Holcomb.
Brooks Bollinger. Gus
Frerotte. And Favre, whose
sensational, age-defying
2009 season that brought
them within four points of
the Super Bowl was fol-
lowed by an epic collapse by
the NFI's all-time leading
passer and the entire team.
Heck, even the stadium's
roof fell down, in that heavy
snowstorm last December.
The Vikings raved about


polished and cordial, eager
to embrace his role and
responsibilities.
"I dealt with being the
face of Florida State and han-
dling the pressure there,"
Ponder said. "Obviously
it's a whole anotherr level in
the NFL, but I don't think
anyone else puts as much
pressure on me as I do on
myself. I'm a perfectionist.
... No one's expectations
exceed mine."
With the lockout lifted
by a courf ruling, for now,
players will be welcome
to arrive at Winter Park
on Friday for workouts,
playbooks and conversa-
tions with coaches. Frazier
said he's putting together
a schedule for offseason
practices, known as orga-
nized team activities, and
the mandatory .mpinicamps.
Ponder was scheduled
to travel to Minnesota on
Friday to get his NFLecareer
started.
As airst-~time head coach,
Frazier's term however
long it lasts will likely be
tied to the success or failure
of Ponder in this coach- and
quarterback-driven league.
'"That may happen, but I
feel good about it," Frazier
said. "~That's one of the rea-
sons I endorsed this pick,
so that's not a problem for
me. I'm looking forward to
Christian being our quar-
terback and doing a great
job for us for a long time to
come."


the smarts that they believe
Ponder, who has his mas-
ter's degree in business
administration, will bring to
the position. He played in a
pro-style offense with the
Semiinoles that's similar to
what the Vikings will run
under new offensive coordi-
nator Bill Musgrave.
Ponder expressed confi-
dence about his ability to
quickly pick up the system.
"I think I'll be really pre-
pared," he said.
SThe downsides to Ponder,
according to most draft
analysts, are past injuries
' and perhaps arm strength.
But Ponder said he felt he
proved his health is not a
concern, recovering from
a forearm.problem with a
fluid buildup and finishing
his senior season strong.
His showing at the Senior
Bowl helped push his stock
higher, and a visit with
Spielman, Musgrave and
head coach Leslie Frazier
during his on-campus work-
out gave Vikings leaders
plenty to consider.
"WIe all came away from
that visit going, 'Man, if
that guy's there, it would
be hard to pass him up,"'
Frazier said.
Ponder joked that he'll
be all right with a left
tackle (Bryant McKinnie)
and a wide receiver (Percy
Har~vin) who came from
Florida State's two biggest
rivals, Miami and Florida,
respectively. He sounded


ASSOCIATED PREss
Missouri quarterback Blaine Gabbert responds to questions during a news conference after
he was selected as the 10th overall pick by the Jacksonville Jaguars in the first round of
the NFL football draft at Radio City Music Hall on Thursday in New York.



8 O O bbbr ob QGBt t


futHr Tor OT r7S


ible at that point in time.
You've got to put in your
work before people start to
trust you."
Although the Jaguars
insisted David Garrard
remains the starter, they
also said Gabbert will get a
chancet compete for the
Gabbert threw 40 touch-
down passes and 18 inter-
ceptions as a two-year
starter at Missouri. But his.
success came in the spread
offense and mostly from a
deep shotgun fqrmation,
so making the transition
to Jacksonville's prostyle
offense will be his tough-
est challenge.
"The biggest change
is going to be the foot-
work, and that's a physi-
cal thing that anybody's
got to adjust to," Gabbert
said. "But from a passing
concept-wise, I threw the
ball 500 times a year, and I
was asked to make critical
decisions on every play,
responsible decisions. I
couldn't throw intercep-
tions, and that's definitely
ging to carry over into

Gabbert was equally deft
handling questions about
competing with Garrard,
knowing fans will be clam-
oring for him to take over
after watching Garrard
fail to get the Jaguar-s to


the playoffs in three of his
four seasons as t-he team's
starter.
"It's going to work< itself
out, and I'm just happy for
this opportunity to come in
here and learn. Any qluar=
terbacki hopes to be in this
t pratunt oto hav ta
are going to teach a young
quarterback the ropes.
And we're all going to go
out there and compete and
have fun at the same time."
Jacksonville seemed
content to wait for its
turn at No. 16, but: when
Gabbert was still available
after San Francisco and
Tennessee selected, Smith
started making trade calls.
Washington agreed, giv-
ing up the No. 10 spot for
Jacktsonville's first- and
second-round picks, Nos.
16 andi 49, respectively.
"Hopefully he's the next
Peyton Manning. Who
knIows?" Jaguars offensive
coordinator Dirk Koetter
said. "He's got the skill set
to~ be a successful, top-tier
quarterback. H-e's mobile,

the esch nci, 1e' ',::2
he's articulate, excellent:
scrambler. The only knock
on7 this guIy, fr.oml where I
sit, and it's not a knock, is
that he's going to have to
transition from a spread
offense to a pro offense."


By MARK LONG
Associated Press

JACKSONVILLE -
Blaine Gabbert held up his
No. 11 jersey, posed for
pictures, then said all the
right things during his first
day with the Jacksonville

If he shows as much
poise in the pocket, the
Jaguars will have their
franchise quarterback.
Jacksonville traded up
six sphts to select the for-
mer Missouri star with the
10th pick in the first round
of the NFL draft Thursday
night. Gabbert took a pri-
vate jet to Jacksonville
on Friday, met with teqm
owner Wayne Weaver, gen-
eral manager Gene Smith
and coach Jack Del Rio,
went through the playbook,
then held his introductory
news conference.
Gabbert can only hope
the rest of his tenure goes
as smoothly.
"The biggest thing for
any rookie player is you've
got to come in and earn
yourtes t onabthirst fot
"You've got to come in and
put your time in the weight
room, the film room and
earn the trust of the other
players. You can't come
in being the vocal leader
because you're not cred-


Continued From Page 1B
Jacktson said. "One rea-
son we went with Coach
Green is it is fairly difficult
to schedule nine games in
the regular season and I
try not to play one of the
same teams in the spring.
That did not leave us a lot
of options. We are excited
about the opportunity to
face him and hopefully we
will have a good crowd."
Fort White's other red-
letter dates for the spring
are 10 a.m. May 14 for the
Red &r Black game for var-
sity and junior varsity play-


ers, and May 17 for the Red
&r White game for middle
school players.
Jackson said 55-60 play-
ers are participating in
off-season workouts that
includes daily weight
training.
"We generally have 10-15
more come out for spring,"
Jackson said. "During the
spring we bring all the guys
(varsity and JV) together to
go at it. We do a lot of teach-
ing. We would be pleased
to get 70 kids in the two
programs."


Jackson said the Indians
would get in a couple of
scrimmages before the
intrasquad game.
"We will go the first three
days in shorts and do some
hitting- on Thursday, but not
too much," Jackson said.
"~We will have a controlled
scrimmage on Friday and
work on situational stuff.
(The following) Tuesday
we will scrimmage again
and on Friday we will have
a walk-through before
the Red &e Black game on
Saturday morning."


and 30 touchdowns the past-
two seasons. Miami was in
the need of help at1 run-
ning back because Ronnic
Brown and Ricky William~s
both become fr-ee agents.


Associated Press ond round of the NFL draft.
Th~e Dolphins made a
DAVIE Running back. trade with the Washington
Daniel Thomas of K~ansas Redskins tomove up.
State has been taken by the The 6-foot, 230-pound
M/iami Dolphins in the sec- Thomas ran for 2,850 yards


Ryran Williams

hi hIg ts picks


On Day 2 of draft


CHS: Beat Ed WVhite to advance in 5A playoffs
Continued From Page 1B





SI'VE SEEN IT'S
YOUR USER MORE
MANUALS OF AN
AND I APATHY
d ASSUME THING.


SiGUTS.


DILBERT \


~~JRLO NOT M

71000 0


BABY BLUES

oaDr\e 1F' 56y
Pa\F CA MY ?




I Buu IT 80A A !T

ceas ps no


'


s~l rrrr\u ,


PPE iOu K10DrlG L
DREAM UKIE TWLY Orl
~, I11 L UEETME r- -


I


IYI


Page Editor: Emogene Graham, 754-0415


I RESEARCHED HOW
LONG YOUR CUSTOMERS
WILL STAY ON THE
PHONE TRYING TO( GET
TECH SUPPORT BEFORE
GIVING UP.


THEN I DESIGNED AN
AUDIO MENU TREE
THAT WILL TAKE THEM
SLIGHTLY LONGER THAN
THAT TO REACH YOUR
TECH SUPPORT.


DEAR ABBY: I'm a 15-
year-old girl who has never
been popular with boys. It
has always been something
that has bothered me. The
hardest part is watching my
friends date while I have to
stay home.
One way I was able to
make myself feel better was
by telling myself everything
would change when high
school started. By the end of
our first week as freshmen,
my friend "Lily" had a new
boyfriend and I'm still alone.
Her boyfriend actually joked
that I should "play for the
other team" because I have
no chance of getting a guy.
Needless to say, my friend-
ship with Lily is over, but her
boyfriend's comment is still
sticking with me. -
Abby, do I really have no
chance with guys? Am I over-
reacting about not having a
boyfriend? I feel I should have
dated plenty by now. WAIT-
ING FOR THE FIRST KISS
IN iERSE
DEAR WAITING: The
comment Lilys boyfriend
made was asinine and un-
called for. Please don't mea-
sure your worth using that
immature boy's yardstick.
Not being a belle of the ball in
high school doesn't mean you
won't blossom socially latest
Many people do. kou will get
the kiss you're craving and
validation, too, if you'll be a
little more patient.
Use this time to concen-


tell her how you feel about
her sending you mixed mes-
sages. And if it happens again,
THEN stop inviting her.
DEAR ABBY: I recently
took my official college gradu-
ation photo and was excited
to show my mom. She said
she was OK with my giving
her one of the .small photos
because she didn't want to put
any more holes in the wall. It
really upset me.
I am the first person in my
family to graduate from col-
lege. Mom's comment about
not wanting holes in the wall
was unacceptable. I argued
with her, cried and told her
how I felt. Mom told me to
get out and that Ihad no right
to tell her what to do in her
house.
I'm still hurt. I feel that if
she's as proud of my accom-
'plishments. as she says, she
should show it. She apolo-
gized later, but her comment
still stings. Please help me get
over it. UPSEI' COLLEGE
SENIOR
DEAR UPSEI': I'll try.
Your mother may have been
tactless, but it's important
that you bury the hatchet.
Her pride in your accomplish-
ments is not as important as
your own pride in them. Re-
member that, and no one will
ever be able to make you feel
diminished!
SWrite Dear Abby at
www.Deardbby.com or
P.O. Box 69440, Los
Angeles, CA 90069.


0JL, ollpTINro6 ~)

AMosT c 3,


.
AbigaillVan Buren
www.deorabby.com
trate on your studies, athletics,
special interests, volunteering
in your community and com-
pleting your education. Those
things are more important
than a boyfriend right now _
and they'll leave you with less
time to brood. When you're
older, you will mbet men (not
boys) who value what you
have to offer. And yes, I know
you have probably heard this
before, but it's true.
DEAR ABBY: I have a
woman friend who is always
saying to me, "I wish just you
and I could go do something
together." So the other day
I called her and suggested
we visit a local flea market
- which we both love and
then go to a local festival. She
replied that it sounded great,
but she needed to talk to her
husband, "TTed," to see if he
wanted to join us.
Abby, she does this to me
all the time. I'm tired of invit-
ing her for a girls' day and
havirig her come only if Ted
is coming. Should I stop the
invitations? TICK(ED OFF
IN FLORIDA
DEAR TICKED OFF: No,
before you do that you should


BEETLE BAILEY


HAGAR THE HORRIBLE


your kind of talent. AAA
SAGflTARIUS (Nov.
22-Dec. 21): Getting into
shape will make you feel
good and boost your ego.
Begin a routine and stick to
it. Put time effort-and cash
into your residence, mak-
ing it more accommodating
and comfortable. AAAAA~
CAPRICORN (Dec.
22-Jan. 19): You may feel
as if you need a change but,
before you do anything,
consider taking a day out
for yourself. You need a
little pampering. It will help
you ignore some of the
situations you are unable to
change right now. AA
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-
Feb. 18): Be open about
your intentions or ideas
and it will lead to a money-
making opportunity. Check
out all your options before
you make a final decision.
A promise made a long
time ago will be honored.

PISCES (Feb. 19-
March 20): Working on
self-improvement will raise
your confidence and make
you feel goodl about the
possibilities available. You
will realize how stuck you
have been. A partnership
with someone who comple-
ments what you have to
offer will lead to a money-
making venture. AAAt


ARIES (March 21-
April 19): Don't jump to
conclusions before getting
all the facts. You should
be extremely careful when
discussing business or fi-
nancial matters with those
in a position of authority.
Deception is likely. Do your
own research. **
TAURUS (April 20-
May 20): Don't put up
with friends or relatives giv-
ing you a hard time. Deal-
ing with institutions may be
necessary if you or a loved
one needs medical help.
Keep your personal infor-
mation a secret or someone
is likely to meddle in your
a~ffairs. jrAA
GEMINI (May 21-
June 20): You can get
ahead if you organize your
day carefully. Getting in-
volved in a charitable event
will help raise your profile.
There is plenty to do and
your accomplishments will
impress someone you want
on your team. Suggest spe-
cial plans for two. AAAA
CANCER (June 21-
July 22): You'll upset
someone if you are too busy
to get together. It will prob-
ably be easier to be accom-
modating. Now is not the
time to annoy anyone or to
avoid promises you made
without thinking. k
LEO (July 23-Aug.
22): You will get along well


THE LAST WORD
Eu enia Last

with anyone you encoun-
ter and can even sell your
own ideas along the way.
A, chance to explore a new,
moneymaking venture will
get yo~u ~thinking about pos-
sibilities. Love is on the
rise. AAAAA
VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept.
22): Take a close look at
your personal paperwork.
Double check to make sure
you are taking advantage of
every possible deduction or
savings. There is money to
be made if you are smart in
the way yoil set things up in
the future. AAA t
LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct.
22): You'll draw potential
opportunities your way by
being outspoken about your
ideas for possible ventures.
Emotions will be high and
should be geared toward
having fun and socializing
with someone you are close
to or want to get to know

SCORPIIO (Oct. 23-
Nov. 21): Plan a fun-filled
day with plenty of physical
activity with lots of unusual
anld interesting people. A
challenge will get you all
revved up and motivated
Your contrbution to what'
ever you take on will im-
press someone looking for


SNUFFY SMITH


ZITS


GARFIELD


B.C.


JAND IVE FAILEo 4AMIN. Be SNels TouE~Ra i


by Luis Campos
Celebrity Cipher cryptograms are created from quotations by famous people, past and present.
Each letter in the cipher stands for another.
Today's clue: E equals H
"GMJ ZMK GMJ DI LSG, ZMK LSG
ZMK LSG DI PGAH, ZMK PDYJ SDBB
R J L U GA L JM D P U GA F M GS E GS L G


F RAN K & E RN EST


SGHF DL."


WZJ SJIL


PREVIOUS SOL~UTION: "I cheated a lot because I just couldn't sit and do
homework. I usually sat next to someone extremely smart." Leonardo
DICaprio
(c) 2011 by NEA, Inc. 4-30


FOR BETTER OR WORSE


CLASSIC PEANUTS


LAKE CITY REPORTER ADVICE & COMICS SATURDAY, APRIL 30, 2011


DEAR ABBY





behind in teen dating game


TUAT MUST HAVE SEEN QUITE
i A NGtHfMARE, DEAR
$ .. Tr


HO ROSCOP ES


CELEBRITY CIPHER





I I


10 Oopbportunities

05525772
Customer Service Rep
needed for established Insurance
Agency; Health Ins & 401K
plan available,Send replytoBx
05060, C/O The Lake City
Reporter, P.O. Box 1709,
Lake City, FL, 32056

Aurora Diagnostics; Part time
Courier Position; Must haive a
clean Driving record. Please fax
resume to 386-758-1791
*Please no phone calls*
AVON!!!, EARN up to 50%!!!
Only $10 for Starter Kit,
1-800-275-9945 pin #4206
www.youravon.com/tdavies
Barber/Hair Stylist needed.
Exeped nce preferred. Noclientnele
call 386-984-0101
BUSy Office seeking
eXperienced, energetic person for
receptionist position.
Fax resume to 386-961-8802
Energetic person w/initiative
needed to teach adult learners.
Eve classes, 40 hrs/mo, $11/hr
To apply go to:
expresstrainingservices.com/jobs
Licensed Insurance Salesperson,
for non-smoking office, 2-20
P & C Licensed preferred
Contact fmcknight81@cox.net
Live Oak CPA Firm seeks
full-time Secretary/Receptionist.
Please see Employment .
Opportunity at
www.1iveoakcpa~com.
Sales Position available for moti-
vated individual Rountree -Moore
Toyota, Great benefits, paid train-
ing/vacation. Exp. a plus but not
necessary. Call Anthony Cosentino
386-623-7442
Security Offcers
needed Lake City Area, must have
current D Security Lic., Clear
background, Drivers Lic, phone'
Diploma/lGED.
Benefits, DFWP EEO Apply at:
www.dsisecurity.com MB1000084
Wanted Highly motivated
individual for Sales Position.
Rountree -Moore Automotive
Group, Great benefits, paid vaca-
tion. Exp. a plus but not necessary.
Call Tony Reese 386-344-7517

~2 Medical
Emp moment
Aurok-a Diagnostics; Medical
Billmng Reprgsyntative needed;. .
1-2 yrs Medical Billing expt
preferred but no required. This
position is temporary with the
opportunity to become permanent.
Please fax resume to
386-758-1791
*Please no phone calls*
BILLING SPECIALIST
Busy local practice/outpt division,
attention to detail a must, strong
computer skills, $12-$13 per hr,
depending on skills 877-389-6538


10 rart Time

Nursery Position Available
Southside Baptist Church,
Hours on Wednesdays and
Sunday during regular church
service. Please call 386-755-5553
for more information


240 Education

04544505
Interested in a Medical Career?
Express Training offers
courses for beginners & exp
Nursing Assistant, $479
next class-04/25/10

Phlebotomy national certifica-
tion, $800 next class-05/09/11

Continuing education
Fees incl. books, supplies, exam
fees. Call 386-755-4401 or




310 Pets &Supplies

PUBLISHER'S NOTE
Florida Law 828.29 requires dogs
and cats being sold to be at least 8
weeks old and have a health
certificate from a licensed
veterinarian documenting they
have mandatory shots and are
free from intestinal and external
parasites. Many species of wild-
life must be licensed by Florida
Fish and Wildlife. If you are
unsure, contact the local
office for information.

330 Livestock &
SupplieS
04544561
Black Angus
Cows & Heifers
Registered & Commercial
Prices Vary
386-719-4802 or 386-623-9427



36 arm ~quipment

84 Ford 4610 Tractor. Runs good.
Solid 2WD. New front tires,
350hr on 2005 motor. Dependable.
$7500. obo. 386-867-0005


407 ComputerS

HP Cl pter'

3 -6- 5- 9814 o


407 computers

IBM Computer,
$65
386-755-9984 or
386-292-2170


420 Wanted to Buy

K&H TIMBER
We Buy Pine Hardwood &
Cypress. Large or small tracts.
Call 386-961-1961 '
SWanted Junk Cars, Trucks, Vans.
$250 & up CASH! Free Pick Up!
NO title needed !386-878-9260
After 5pm 386- 752-3648.


'430 Garage Sales

BIG YARD SALE:. Furniture'
baby and women clothes. Lots of
misc. And Church Pews. Sat. 8-?
334 E. Duval Street.






Fri-Sun. 8-? 144 SE Butler Ct.
100A down from Spires. Look for
signs. Baby items, furn, kids/adults
clothes, tools, more 386-719-4768
Friday & Sunday only 8 am-3pm,
Lots of Miscellaneous Items!
132 NW Broomsage Ct
(Southern Oaks Country Club)
Garage/Estate Sale. Fri. & Sat.
8-2. Woodhaven S/D Off Country
Club Rd. Follow signs tol94 SE
Crow Ct. Home furmishmngs, etc.
386-752-1818
Huge Multi Family Sat 8a-1p, plus
size women/xxl men/kids clothing,
fashion jewelry, electronics, furn,
books, toys &~ tools, Lake City
Country Club, behind Arby's 271
NW Mallard Place, No Early Birds
MOVING SALE. Fri & Sat. 9-?
Branford Hwy to 242, turn R o 4-
5 m.Sigs 6683 SW CR 242
Tom muc nt List! All must Go, *






PUBLISHER'S NOTE
Alls Yr aleP ds

Sat only, 7-?, Grandview Subdiv
386-697-5120, Bedrm set, T;V,1ug-
I gage, dressers, dell monitor,uni-
forms, armoir, ent. center, tools
Saturday Only, 9am-4pm,
desk, bunk/youth beds, tools,
clothing, refridge, much more, 722
Biscayne Glenn off Chapple Hill


440 MiscellnMOUS

Special Ends Soon!
M &M Fitness

386 5-d0a749
Tow Behind Grill/Smoker
$1,250 OBO
386-249-3104- o
386-719-480 or
WHAT A STEAL!
Restored 5 ft Cast Iron Claw Foot
Tub, white finish w/gold claw feet
$250 obo, Call Pete 386-344-5764


630 for Rent "
1 UNDER NEW MANAGEMENT
Oakview Mobile Home Par'k.
Clean well maintained 2/2 units in
nice park. 2 miles to downtown
Lake City. 386-984-8448
14x70 MH, 2Br/2Ba Real Clean
Good Location! CH/A $550/M~o-
+ $200 Dep. NO PETS.
(386)755-0064 or (904)771-5924
2&3 BR MH. $395 -$650. mo.
plus deposit. Water & sewer fur-
nished. Cannon Creek MHP
386-752-6422
2/2 MH w/screen porch, Irg yard,
quiet Inean/safe 705umit park,
NO PETS, 386-965-3003
2/2 Newly remodeled MH New
Foao scone tnropasstLg l, que
mo $300 sec will work w/payment
plan. Call Jenn 386-454-7724
2/2 Units, clean, well maintained'
tiice safe park setting, 2 miles to
dow town Lake City $95854 8m4th

2bt /2ba SWMH; also Residential
RV lots for rent between Lake City
& G'ville. Access to I-75 & 441
(352)317-1326 Call for terms
Mobile Homes for rent in
White Springs, Lake City & Ft.
White Contact 386-623-3404
or 386-365-1919
New 2br/2ba off Country Club. 1/2
ac. lot Front, back porch & storage
bldg. $600 mo. $600 sec. No Pets!
386-752-5911or 466-2266
Nice clean 2&3 bdrm, Five Points,
NO PETS, also 3 bd on the
Westside, 3 bdrm house on
Monroe St 386-961-1482







Quiet, Country Branford area


3/2 $400 dep, $600 month
386-867-1833 or 386-590-0642
www.suwanneevalleyproperties.com
X-CLEAN 2/2 SW, 8 mi
NW of VA. Clean acre lot, nice
area. $500. mo + dep No dogs
386-961-9181


640 M~omseoms
06 MH 3br/2ba open floor plan
w/lg kit w/ island, fireplace. 3 Riv-
ers Est, river access, MLS# 75661
Eastside Village Realty, Inc.
Denise Millgan-Bose 752-5290
3/2 DWMH over 1700 sqft. New
Roof & CH/A. Doublesided fire-
place, custom kit w/breakfast nook ,
& wet bar. $89,500 MLS# 73861
386-623-6896 Access Realty


805 Lots forSale

Beautiful .92 Acre Lot-
3 Rivers-Ft. White-High & Dry!
Only $11,900.
Call Taylor Goes of Access Realty
@ 386-344-7662.
Forest Country building lot,
scattering of trees, Motivated
Seller $19,999 MLS#75140
Remax Professionals, Inc.
Jo Lytte 386-365-2821


One Item per ad Eah ditonl
4 lines *6 days ~::,~"o"
Rate applies to private Indivi ual IIllng
personal merchandise totalling $100 or less.
Each ite nus fncud a pie




One Rtem per adadionl
4 lines *6 days line $1.10 l
Rate applies to private Individuals selling
persona me chandise to alIn ga500 or less.
This is a non-refundable rate.




One Item per add Eah ditonl
4 lines *6 dys line $1.15
pe soal sehaendl toaln divkIS 0 r less.
Each item must Include a price.
This is a non-refundable rate.








One Item per ad '2 7
4 lines *6 days S 5 tion'l
Rate applieshtao private Individuals selling
persondo? Iem mnise t tal ing 52, .0or less.
This is a non-refundable rate.




One item per ad 3 14
4 lines *6 daysha ti"onal
Rate applies to private Individuals selling
pesnal mer handise tiotalli $6,O or iess.
This is a non-refundable rate


FOR SALE: $85,000 10 Acres
W/2006 DW, McAlpin. 12 X 24
Back addition laundry/office &r 12
x 18 covered porch. 20 x 32 pole-
barn & 8 x 16 Utility shed. 863-
634-5283 for details & pictures,
Lv message w/name, phone
number & email address.
Hallmark Real Estate. DWMH


down and more. $114,900
MLS# 76188 386-867-1613
Owner Financing-3/2
TWMH in Wellborn. Only
$89,900! Call Taylor Goes
of Access Realty @ 386-344-7662.

71 A UfRTRI~hd Ap

Move in as low as $323
Call today for details!
386-758-8455
Windsong Apts ~

05525655
SPRING HILL VILLAGE
Excellent High Springs location.
1, 2 & 3 bedroom flo r-lans-
some with gara .
Call 386-454-1469
or visit our website:
www~springhillvillage.net

1 &i 2 Bedroom Apartments
Move in for as low as
$199
386-755-2423
2 br Apt. Close to shopping
and the VA Medical Center,
$525. mo plus deposit-
386-344-2972
SA Landlord You Can Love!
2 br Apts $575. & up + sec. Great
area. CH/A washer/dryer hookups.
386-758-935 1/352-208-2421
Great location W of I-75, spacious
delux 2BR apsgrgW/D
hook u. patio. $0 B p + SD,
386-344-3715 or 386-965-5560
Large &e clean. lbr/1ba apt.
CH/A la walk in closet. Close to
town. $395. mo and( 50. dep.
(904)563-6 0
Nice Apt. downtown. Remodeled
kit., 1 bd/ba, LR, dining & extra'
ro Ref rq $450. &o Brs
36362-80r7 or 386-m504-29 1
The Lakes Apts. Studios &r 1$'r'
from $135/wk. Util. & cable incl.,
Sec 8 vouchers accepted, monthly
rates avail Call 386-752-2741
Updated apartments w/tile floors
&, fresh paint. Excellent location.

Call omile 53 6 75 9626


720 -AP~

Rooms for Rent. Hillcrest, Sands,
Columbia. All furnished. Electric,
cable, fridge: microwave. Weekly
or monthly rates. I person $135,
2 persons $150. weekly
386-752-5808

Small furnished Studio Apt. for
Rent. $450. mo. $50. Deposit.
Utiite icued N n-8s Akg



73 nunseHome Fr Rent

3/2 Recently Built Custom Home,
1340 sq ft, stainless steel applian-
ces, custom cabinets, $920 mo,
1st. Last & Sec,off I-75 &r 47
Call Andrew 386-623-6066
3br/2ba brick, 2 car carport. Fire-
place, Florida room. Large 4 acre
yard. Country Club Rd. South
$950 month. 386-365-8504
BRICK HOME
for rent in nice Subdivision
3br/2ba $1,200 mo. $1,200 dep.
386-344-5065
Ft White, 2/1, CH/A, 2010 W2 &
ref's from current landlord req'd,
Access to Rivers $625 mo,
$600 sec., 386-497-4699


750 Bsns Office Rentals

For Lease: E Baya Ave. Tw~o -
1000 sqft office space units or
combined for 2000 sqft. 386-984-
0622 or weekends 386-497--4762
OFFICE SPACE for lease.
Oak Hill Plaza. 900 sqft
$675mo/$695. sec dep.
Tom 386-961-1086 DCA Realtor


790 Vacation RentalS

Horseshoe Beach Spring Special
Gulf Front 2br, w/ig porch, dock,
fish sink. wkend $345./wk $795.
(352)498-5986/386-235-3633
alwaysonvacation.com #419-181

805 Lots forSale

5.Acre Lot, Seclnded & Cleared,
MLS# 67871 $60,000
Call Lisa Waltrip
@ 386-365-5900
westfieldrealtygroup.com
A high &r dry buildable wooded
.734 of ac.,Forest Country. MLS#
76668 Eastside Village Realty,
Inc. Denise Milligan-Bose
@386-752-5290


Hallmark Real Estate. Cleared
2.57 ac. fenced w/32' Dutchman
camper. In O'Brien. Close to Live
Oak, Lake City, Branford. $25,000
MLS# 74534 386-867-1613
Nice 4 acre parcel located in
O'Brien. Won't last long at only
$13,500. Call Taylor Goes of
Access Realty @386-344-7662.
PUBLISHER'S NOTE
All real estate advertising in.this
newspaper is subject to the fair
housing act which makes it illegal
to advertise "any preference,
limitation, or discrimination based
on race, color, religion, sex,
disability, familial status or nation-
al origin; or any intention to make
such preference, limitation or
dissrmanadion. uFnma status
18 living with parents or legal
custodians, pregnant women and
people securing custody of chil-
dren under the age of 18. This
newspaper will not knowmngly
accept any advertising for real es-
tate which is in violation of the
law. Our readers are hereby in-
formed that all dwellings adver-
tised in this newspaper are availa-
ble on an equal opportunity basis.
To complain of discrimination call
HUD toll free at 1-800-669-9777,
the toll free
telephone number to the hearing
impaired is 1-800-927-9275.


810 Home for Sale

3/2 Brick Home in town, fenced
back yard w/12x12 workshop
$79,900 Call Nancy @ R.E.O.
Realty 386-867-1271MLS# 77414
nancytrogers@msn.com
3/2 Custom Western Cedar Home
on 2 acre lakefront lotMLS#74681
Call Jo Lytte at Remax
Professionals, Inc. 386-365-2821
jolytte@remaxnfl.com
3/2 in Creekside S/D. Fenced back
yard, sprinklers, large
screened rear lanal.
$175,000. MLS# 77385
386-623-6896 Access Realty
9/2 in town, lots of upgrades,
currently leased, MLS#76658,
$49,900 Call Jo Lytte at
Remax Professionals, Inc.
386-365-2821
3/2 in Woodhaven w/Fla Room,
fenced back yard MLS#75499,
$114,900 Call Pam @
Remax 386-303-2505 or
email- remaxpamb@gmail.com
3/2 MH on 1.5 acres, fenced,

$49,h0 cL 7431 9 Ca Js

westfieldrealtygroup.com
3/2 on 4.84 Acres, fireplace, sheds,
many fruit trees, Call Jo Lytte at
Remax $68,900, MLS#72427
386-365-2821, www~jolytte.
florida-property-search.com
3/2 on 8.7 acres w/Fla room,
several storage bldgs, fenced,
MLS#75295 Call Pam Beauchamp
@ 386-758-8900 Remax,
$179,000 www.visitpam~com
4/2 with 1000 sq ft workshop,
fenced back yard, 2 car garage,
MLS#77602, Bring Offers!
$174,900, Call Nancy @
R.E.O. Realty 386-867-1271
5 acre Home w/Horse Barn,
Wood floors, New Kitchen,
Gazebo &r Koi Pond MLS#76039
$169,900 Call Aaron @ Westfield
Realty Group 386-867-3534
Beautiful Home For Sale
The Preserve at Laurel Lake
4/2 or 3/2 $194,900 MLS#77257
Call Scott Stewart 386-867-3498
westfieldrealtygroup.com
CBC 3/1 home, inside city limits,
fenced backyard, detached carport
w/office MLS#77411 $82,900
Call R.E.O.Realty,
.Nancy Rogers @ 386-867-1271
Century 21/The Darby Rogers Co.
Nice home with eat in kitchen and
a nice sized living room. Pleanty
of room for entertaining.
MLS# 77584 $89,900
Century 21/The Darby Rogers Co.
3/2 on 9.7 acres. fenced &t cross
fenced. Separate pastures. Animals
are negotiable. Owners motivated.
MLS# 77431 $179,900
Century 21ffhe Darby Rogers Co.
3/2 on 5 acres. Large master suite
and open kitchen. Back 2 ac.
fenced for horses.
MLS# 75830 $102,900
Century 21/T~he Darby Rogers Co.
3br and Ig open floor plan
w/separate office. Beautifully
landscaped. Private access to Lake
Jeffery. MLS# 76231.$199,000
Century 21/T'he Darby Rogers Co.
Lots of acerage. All brick home.
Screened in porch. Extra big

eds# 67M5 u15,
Century 21/The Darby Rogers Co.
Welcome home. 3br/2ba brick.
Great location on the east side.
Priced to sell.
MLS# 776867 $69,900
Century 21ffhe Darby Rogers Co.
Well maintianed 37/2 1/2 acre
minutes from town. 20x40
workshop, screened porch.
MLS# 73787 $99,000


Legal

Registration of Fictitious Names
We the undersigned, being duly
sworn, do hereby declare under oath
that the names of all persons interest-
ed in the business or profession car-
ried on under the name of AT THE
CHECKERED FLAG at 1322 SE
EBENEZER RD., LAKE CITY, FL.
32025. '

Contact Phone Number: 386-466-
7384 and the extent of the interest of
each, is as follows:
Name: TIMOTHY S. CABRERA
Extent of Interest: 100%
by:/s/ Timothy S. Cabrera
STATE OF FLORIDA
COUNTY OF COLUMBIA
Sworn to and subscribed before me
this 28 day of April, AD. 2011.
by:/s/ Maryanne Acuna
04544608
April30, 2011

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
THIRD JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF
FRIDAY INLAND EOR COLUM-
CIVEL ACTION
CASE NO. 2008-000249-CA
UNITED STATES OF AMERICA,
atingthr uhe Ru~ralmDev lo ent,
tion (FmHA), United States Depart-
ment of Agriculture (USDA),
Plaintiff, '
vs.
LONNA L. RITCHIE; and COLUM-
BIA COUNTY, FLORIDA, Defend-
ants
NOTICE OF SALE
Notice is hereby given that pursuant
to an Order Rescheduling Foreclo-
Sure Sale entered in the above enti-
tied cause in the Circuit Court of Co-
lumbia County, Florida, I wil sell
the property located in Columbia
County, Florida, being specifically
described as follows:
Lot 9, Block 5, GOLF MANOR, ac-
cording to the map or plat thereof as
recorded in Plat Book 3, Page 44,
Public Records of Columbia County,
Florida
at public sale to the highest and best
bidder, for cash in a designated
Courtoom, to be determined by the
oCe ou e; the73Co ubiaH oun y
Street, Lake City, Florida, at 11:00
a.m. on the 18 day of May, 2011.
ANY PERSON CLAIMING AN IN-
TEREST IN THE SALE, IF ANY,
OTHER THAN THE PROPERTY
OWNER AES NF HE DATE EOA

CLAIM WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER
THE SALE.
IN ACCORDANCE WITH THE
AM~ERICANS -WITH DISABILI-
TIES ACT, PERSONS WITH DIS-
ABILITIES NEEDING A SPECIAL
ACCOMMODATION TO PARTIC-
IPATE IN THIS PROCEEDING
SHOULD CONTACT THE OFFICE
OF THE COURT ADMINISTRA-
TOR, 145 N. HERNANDO
STREET, 2ND FLOOR, Lake City,
FL 32055. TELEPHONE (386)758-
2163, WITHIN TWO (2) WORK-
ING DAYS OF YOUR RECEIPT
OF THIS NOTICE. IF HEARING
IMPAIRED, (TDD) 1-800-955-
8771, OR VOICE (V) 1-800-955-
A70 VIA FLORIDA RELAY

(seal)
P. DEWITTI CASON
Clerk of Circuit Court
Post Office drawer 2069
Lake City, FL 32056-2069
By:/s/ B. Scippio
Deputy Clerk
04544545
April 30, 2011
May 07, 2011


010 Announcements









020 Lost &Found

LOST: Lg 3 yr old white Calico
female cat. Goes by "Hannah".
oie 1 n 24 A1t h uckn T. 9ear
call 386-288-3916 REWARD!!!

To place your.
classified ad call











Lawn & Landscape Service

Clean Pine Straw,
You pick it up, $1.85 a bale
Delivery of 100 bales $260
386-688-9156
Landscape Maintenance Company
You can trust for knowledge &
pride, Mention this AD!
Mow Green, LLC 386-288-6532

Services

DIVORCE, BANKRUPTCY,
RESUMES.
other court approved forms-
386-961-5896-


Land Services


Back Hoe, Dozer, Chopping, root
raking, bush hog, seeding, sod,
disking, site prep, ponds &
irrigation. Free Est! 386-623-3200


Classified Department: 755-5440


8 I~


SLimited to service type advertis-
ing only.
4 lines, one month....s92.00
S$10.80 each additional line
Includes an additional $2.00 per
ad for each Wednesday insertion.



SYou can call us at 755-5440,
SMonday through Friday from 8:00
a.m. to 5:00 p.m.
SSome people prefer to place their
Classified ads in person, and some
.-ad categories will r cuir pea

East Duval Street.
You can also fax or email your ad
Copy to the Reporter.
SFAX: 386-752-9400 Please
Direct your cop to the Classified
SDepartment.
SEMAIL: classifieds@lakecityre-
.porter.com





AdistoAppear: Call by: Fax/Emal by:
Tuesday Mon., 10:00 a.m. Mon., 9:00 a.m.-
Wednesda Mon., 10:00 a.m. Man., 9:00 a.m.
Thursdayy Well.,10:00 a.m. Wed., 9:00 a.m.
,Friday Thurs.,10:00a~m. Thirs.,9:00a.m
Saturday Fri., 10:00 a.m Fri., 9:00 a.m.
Sunday Fri., 10:00 a.m. Fri., 9:00 a.m.
These deadlines are subject to change without notice




SAd Errors- Please read your ad
on the first day of publication.
We accept responsibility for only
the first incorrect mnsertion, and
only the charge for the ad space '
in error. Please call 755-5440
immediately for prompt Icorrec-
tion and billing adjustments-
Cancellations- Normal advertising
deadlines apply for cancellation.
Billing Inquiries- Call 755-5440.
Should further information be
required regarding payments or
credit limits, your call will be trans.
ferred to the accounting depart-
ment.


Advertising copy is subject to
approval by the Publisher who
reserves the right to edit, reject,
or classify all advertisements under
appropriate headings. Copy should
be checked for errors by the
advertiser on the first day of pub-
lication. Credit for published errors
will be allowed for the first insertion
for that portion of the advertisement
which was incorrect. Further, the
Publisher shall not be liable for any
omission of advertisements ordered
tso be published nor fotr and ge ea
SAdvertising language must comply
with Federal, State or local laws
regarding the prohibition of discrimi-
Snation in employment, housing and
Public accommodations. Standard
abbreviations are acceptable; how-
ever, the first word of each ad may
not be abbreviated.

n Prnb snd Onhine
WWWv.lakieeltyreporter~corn


LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFI ED SATURDAY, APRIL 30, 2011

Lake C~ity Reporter





CLADISS FE


Take ADvantage of the


ADvantage








LAKE CITY REPORTER


810 Home for Sale
Century 21/T~he Darby Rogers Co.
3/2 Brick home on .59 acre, on the
lake with back sunroom. Garage &
storage building.
MLS# 76769 $222,900
Century 21/The Darby Rogers Co.
Tw~o for the price of one. Updated
main home w/a 3/2 guest home. A
lot of living space for the price.
MLS# 77348 $244,900
Century 21/The Darby Rogers Co.
1999 Doublewide
3/2 fenced back ya d
on I acre
MLS# 76315 $64,900
Century 21/The Darby Rogers Co.
Custom built home with many
upgrades. Screened back porch'
16x24 workshop.
MLS# 77178 $184,500
Century 21/The Darby Rogers Co-
Great house in Piccadilly S/D. 2
car garage and inground pool.
Newly painted inside & out.
MLS# 76786 $133,500
Charming Remodeled Home

Charlie Sparks @ Westfield
Realty Group 386-755-0808
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
4br 1/5ba. 1332 sqft. Great floor
plan, noce yard, close to town.
Only $84,900 Lori Geibeig
SSimpson. 386-365-5678
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
5br/4ba on 5+ac. 3 car garage,

Geibeig Simpson. 386-365-5678
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
Superbly maintained home in
CresC d vers zd gE ae &
Tolar 386-755-6488 $209,900
Cold well Banker/Bishop realty
New home in Mayfair S/D. 4br on
corner lot. Split plan. $214,900
MLS# 76919 Elaine K. Tolar.
386-755-6488
Coldwell Bgmker/Bishop Realty
Home on the lake in town. 4br/3ba
MLS# 76085 Elaine K. Tolar 386- '
755-6488 or Mary Brown White-
hurst. 386-965-0887 $299,900
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
.Great home mn Woodcrest S/D 3/2
home cere 9b~a piorch, lear
386-755-6488 $129,900
Country Home on 2.5 Acres,
$95,000 ML~S#77039
Remax Professionals, Inc.,


Custom, 3/2.5 built in 2007,
on 10.8 manicured acres,
completely fenced, Owner Fin.
avail., MLS#77382 Call Patti
386-623-6896 Access Realty
Ft White MH on 16.27 Acres,
near many recreational activities
MLS#77404 $149,900
Jo Lytte Remax Professionals

Great 60p~port~unity',
Currently rented, Seller will
assist w/buyer's closing costs
MLS d7 33 Call0 Mc el at

Gwen Lake area. Beautiful up-
grades 4/3 w/tile & laminate
floors, fireplace, new kitchen, Ig
den, fenced yard. $125,000, 386-
397-4766 Hallmark Real Estate
Hallmark Real Estate. Brick 3/2.
Many upgrades. Gas fireplace,
Grotto tile. Great location on cul.
de-sac! $149,900.
MLS# 75931 386-867-1613
Historical Home on Lake Isabel-
la. 3/3 w/basement! Great as a pri-
vate residence or a wonderful pro-
fessional office. $240,000 386-
719-0382 Hallmark Real Estate
Home on 15 Acres w/2500 sq ft,
workshop, MLS# 77552 $235,000
Call Brittany Stoeckert at
Results Realty
386-397-3473
Just Reduced 4/2 on 1.57 acres'
fireplace. partially fenced, MLS#
77412, Call Nancy Rogers at
R.E.O. Realty Group
386-867-1271 $64,900
Large Brick, 3/1, 4.43 acres, metal
roof, MLS# 77415 $104,888
Call Nancy Rogers @ R.E.O.
Realty Group, Inc. 386-867-1271
nancytrogers@msn.com
Large Home on acre, 4/2,
Fla Rm, wrap around front porch
MLS#77292 $148,000
Call Brittany Stoeckert at
Results Realty386-397-3473
Lg home on corner lot w/garage,
Eastside Village. Clubhouse,
heated pool MLS# 71901 Eastside
Village Realty, Inc. Denise
Milligan-Bose 386-752-5290
Luxury 3/2 Log Home, Cypress
interior, whole house generator,
$269,900 MLS# 76899 Call
Roger Lovelady @386-365-7039
westfieldrealtygroup.com
Make an Offer! 3 br brick, quiet
resid'I street in Live Oak. HUD
home is sold "as is" Hallmark
Real Estate 386-365-5146
www.hudhomestore.com
Nearly 17 Acres w/House
on paved road, Very Spacious!
MLS#76902 $194,900
Call 386-487-7484 Speak to
Brodie Westfield Realty Group


810 Home for Sale
On Golf Course w/lake view. 3/2
home w/1g rooms, 3 fireplaces, wet
bar & big deck. Newly reduced to
$214,900. Hallmark Real Estate
386-365-2135
Open for Bid! 3/2 DW w/corner
stone fireplace, fenced yard & Ig
kit. HUD property, sold "as is"
MLS 77290- 386-365-3886 Deb-
bie King Hallmark Real Estate
Owner Fianncing! wooded 1/4 ac.
lots mn Suwannee County, close to
River, high & dry. Bring your SW
or DW or RV. $6,500
Derington Properties.965-4300
Ready for Fun & Family. 4br/2ba
custom home on 33.84 ac. has
stocked fish pond & huge 54x60
shop. $325,000. Hallmark Real
Estate 386-719-0382
Rolling Oaks, 3/3 + Bonus Rm,
5 acres, back porch & more!
MLS#77528 Call Pam Beauchamp
at 386-758-8900 Remax $284,900
remaxpamb@gmail.com
Solid Brick Home on 5 Acres,
Close to town but in the country!
M S#606 tMust Se$e 9888
386-397-3473 Results Realty
Spacious, Open Floor Plan Home,
fenced back yard, screen porch,
$179,900 MLS#76796 Call Jo
Lytte@Remax Professionals, Inc.
386-365-2821
Well Cared For 3/2 on 1.4 Acres,
open floor plan, MLS#75702
$199,900, Call Carrie Cason
wes fe 6 atyrop om
You can't beat this Price! 1995
SWMH on 3/4 ac. Paved road,
1216 sf, 2/2 split bedroom plan.
Deringten sP etis, 9 5-4300

s08 Farms &
Acreage
10 acres, with 'IRavel Trailer &
Electricity, close to Itchetucklaee
Springs, $38,000, MLS# 76264
Call Millard~jillen at
Westfield Realty 386-365-7001
4 1/2 acre lot. Lake Jeffery Road.
Gorgeous Oaks!Paved Rd
Owner Financing! NO DOWN!
$69,900. $613mo 352-215-1018.
www.LandOwnerFinancing.com
Saces We mulnNew Well

w cleard Home Ste, wner fin,
Call 352-215-1018
www.LandOwnerFinancing.com


Restricted site built homes only.
Equestrian community.
$65,000.obo. 386-965-5530
for information & pictures
Between Lake City & Ft. White.
6.44 rolling acres. DWMH, 3/2.
1836 sf, great value on paved road.
Need repairs. $49,900
Derington Properties. 965-4300
Half to ten acre lots. Some w/
d ell, septic, up Weronne lo w
386-752-4339. www.1andnfl.com
Heavily Wooded Land, 10 Acres
MLS#1578 49t4900
Remax Professionals, Inc.
386-365-2821

8 Commercial
83 property
Multiple Use 12,00() sqi f
of Office & Warehouse space,
Loading dock, Storage yard,
MLS#77349 $395,000, Charlie
386-755-0808 Westfield Realty

o0 VWaterfront
Proper y
DWMH on Ten Acres w/lakefront,
surrounded by oaks, $115,900
MLS#75571, Call Jo Lytte at
Remax Professionals 386-365-
2821, jolytte@remaxnfl.com
River Cabin on Suwannee River,
workshop, patio, deck & dock,
$349,900 MLS#76336 Call -
Jo Lytte at Remax Professionals
386-365-2821
River Front Property 6.45 Acres,
in White Sprgs close to Big Shoals
Park, Shelter for entertaining,
$124,888 MLS# 77417 Call Nancy
@ R.E.O. Realty 386-867-1271

890 Resort Property
Furnished Home on Itchetucknee
River, Wrap around coveted decks
on two levels,MustSEE! $375,000
MLS#77006 Call Jo Lytte
Remax 386-365-2821
River Access, Refurbished Rent-
al Units & Home + Lot,
Barn, Pool, Hot Tub $329,900
Call Jo Lytte 386-365-2821.
MLS#76734 Remax Professionals


Classified Department: 755-5440


SATURDAY, APRIL 30, 2011


~IIO


T CaptlOn is the description of your photo

that Will be seen by viewers.


Srfubmiti`


a Phroto Q88110fyl Hcsme





Send in your favorite photos


and share them with everyone!


Commeui~ nt and~r




~t *I Le t book


24' Pontoon Boat
Bass Trackner, 115hp
Mariner, new carpet &
lighrs tBrmii tpin tring

$4,500
call
386-752-2863


2004 Dodge Ram
Quad Cab
V8, 4.7L AT w/tow
package. 112,500 mi.
Lots of extras.
$9,999
Call
386-755-9894


CLASSIFIED


1.) Go to www.Iakecityreporter.com


*. Click the "Share Photos" icon




k4~~ --~mPT -si at


Share Photos











3.) Clic k*


Submit Events


Sulbmiit Pho~toi a


4.) Attach your photo (Choose File)


5.) Select the best album for your photo


*. COmplete the form and Submit


Albums will change during the year.

MOst photos will remain online for at least one month.



Photo Gallery > Submiht a Photo

i1 '.:: : submr~it your photso tos our online@ photo13ll: ''11 photos mfust be approve d by~ our Vieb staff befre;~ .: Iappear onr thl*
Weib site.
Submit ~a photo to this 301.:ry' (Cuent y weB only accp t imag~s In .: . ,format, thank :
( ("hoose ile no file 50 ected

IPet htos BirdS

Name-GX






The title is the name of your photo.