<%BANNER%>

UFPKY NEH LSTA



The Lake City reporter
ALL ISSUES CITATION THUMBNAILS MAP IT! PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028308/01664
 Material Information
Title: The Lake City reporter
Uniform Title: Lake City reporter (Lake City, Fla. 1967)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: John H. Perry
Place of Publication: Lake City Fla
Publication Date: 9/23/2011
Frequency: daily (monday through friday)[<1969>-]
weekly[ former 1967-<1968>]
daily
normalized irregular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Lake City (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Columbia County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Columbia -- Lake City
Coordinates: 30.189722 x -82.639722 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 95, no. 4 (Oct. 5, 1967)-
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000358016
oclc - 33283560
notis - ABZ6316
lccn - sn 95047175
sobekcm - UF00028308_01569
System ID: UF00028308:01664
 Related Items
Preceded by: Lake City reporter and Columbia gazette

Full Text








Sorid record run


I i' '_ 1 i[
Si i i -
* iLl.l i L


[,I,1 I
i-il I'*V~
I L 'I-IL'.
.11 I -V


ning at 8, Jeremy Barwick sets out on
Allect 300 tons of food in a single day.


Laie


Ulty


Reporter


Friday, September 23, 201 I


www.lakecityreporter.com


Vol. 137, No. 205 0 75 cents


Hungry to help


JASON MATTHEW WALKERILake City Reporter
Jeremy Barwick at a computer at the Columbia County Public Library Wednesday. The 15-year-old Eagle Scout candidate has made good
use of social media such as Facebook and Twitter in generating support for his world record attempt food drive.


Scout's food drive record try fueled

by memories of his own childhood


By GORDON JACKSON
gjackson@lakecityreporter.com
eremy Barwick knows what it's
like to be hungry.
When the 15-year-old
Columbia High School freshman
was eight years old, his mother
was more interested in support-
ing her drug habit than caring
for Jeremy and his five siblings, family
members say.
Jeremy, the oldest child, assumed the
responsibility of feeding his brothers
and sisters every day by going door to
door to beg for food from neighbors, said
Bill Phillips, his grandfather. Sometimes


Tourism

effort to

get boost

By TONY BRITT
tbritt@lakecityreporter.com
State funding for local promo-
tions and projects highlighting
the Suwannee Valley area could
be a huge economic benefit for
the Columbia County Tourist
Development Council.
The local TDC plans to apply for
a $35,000 OTTED Staffing Grant
from the Florida Office of Tourism,
Trade and Economic Development
in the near future for its 2011-12
fiscal budget. The decision to apply
for the grant funds was announced
Wednesday during the TDC board
of directors regular monthly meet-
ing.
"The grant is for $35,000 and..
we have to match it," said Harvey

GRANT continued on 3A


Jeremy resorted to gathering pecans from
a neighbor's tree to feed everyone.
If there wasn't enough food, Phillips
said Jeremy was the one who went hun-
gry.
Phillips got custody of Jeremy and
his sister Lacey after the Department of
Children and Families removed the chil-
dren from his mother's home. Other rela-
tives assumed custody of Jeremy's half
brothers and sisters, Phillips said.
Though he is well fed and in a stable
family environment now, the memory of
being hungry still motivates Jeremy.
'There are an estimated 12,000 hungry
people in Columbia County," he said.


Jeremy is spearheading a food drive
for his Eagle Scout project to benefit the
Food Bank of Suwannee Valley, Which
serves Columbia, Hamilton, Union and
Suwannee counties. His goal is to collect
600,000 pounds of non-perishable canned
and dry goods from 8 a.m. Saturday to
8 a.m. Sunday at the Columbia County
Fairgrounds.
Scott Elkins, manager of the food
bank, said his agency distributed 640,000
pounds of food last year. If Jeremy meets
his ambitious goal, the project will pro-
vide enough food to fill the food bank's
shelves to the brim and help meet the
DRIVE continued on 3A


Mall mishap


,,JMO .,,, n ,ATI I nHU V V l ,Sl/LU y Re norutI i
Janice Dorminey (center), the Lake City Mall operations and marketing manager, speaks to the
driver of a U-Haul truck Wednesday after the driver struck a newly installed clearance bar in the
mall parking lot. The truck, which had a 12-foot clearance, pulled the bar out of the ground. The
wreck caused about $2,000 in damage. No one was hurt.


Swinging


for the


fences

As Eagle Scout
projects go, this is
one for the books.

By GORDON JACKSON
gjackson@lakecityreporter.com

told fellow mem-
bers of the North
Florida Boy Scouts
of America about
Jeremy Barwick's proposed Eagle
Scout project, nearly everyone
responded with one word: "Wow!"
Jeremy, a 15-year-old Columbia
High School freshman, said he wanted
to organize a food drive that would
set a Guinness World Record. He
told scout leaders his goal is to solicit
600,000 pounds of canned and dry
goods for the four-county Food Bank
of Suwannee Valley.
The food bank distributed 640,000
pounds of food last year.
Sears, director and CEO of the
17-county Boy Scouts region, said
Jeremy's project is the most ambitious
he has heard in the 26 years he has
been involved in scouting.
"What an ambitious undertaking,"
Sears said. 'This young man has
brought to life what is good about a
lot of things."
Jeremy said board members who
listened to his proposal expressed dis-
belief, at first.
But as he gave more details, disbe-
lief turned into support.from his local
Troop 85, community leaders, class-
mates, teachers and school adminis-
trators.
'Teachers are saying it's the best
Eagle Scout project they've seen,"
Jeremy said. "I'll be the youngest
Eagle Scout in my troop in 30 years."
Bill Phillips, Jeremy's grandfather
and legal guardian, said his'grandson
is passionate about scouting.
"He lives and breathes Boy Scouts,"
Phillips said. "Jeremy is very out-
doors. He loves helping other boys in
his troop."
As an eighth grader, Jeremy wrote
an essay titled Take Stock in Children.

PROJECT continued on 3A



County

approves

budget

of $91M

By TONY BRITT
tbritt@lakecityreporter. com
The Columbia County Commission
adopted a $91 million total budget
for fiscal year 2011-12 following the
second public hearing on the matter
Thursday night.
The public hearing took place in
the Columbia County School Board
Administrative complex auditorium
with less than 30 people in attendance.
The county's first budget hearing was
Sept. 8.
The county's 2011-12 fiscal year
begins Oct. 1 and ends Sept. 30, 2012.
Dale Williams, county manager, gave
an overview on the budget during the

BUDGET continued on 3A
Tr t w ms. f .IktJ nitsh~rj&J i lpkllAft r di ^ hd liaJ|Hijftut-vJII Jt endfil '.WMI~ttlilausisedl

TO T-Storms
400 WEATHER, 2A 7


Opinion ...........
People ............
Obituaries .......
Advice & Comics..
Puzzles ..........


TODAY IN
PEOPLE
I. I li-,


COMING
SATURDAY
i_ I It 'I .'
I' 11unliup[


I_ I I- ,t-I
LI L 'i-
[- ,-, '.7 i
, -Kk IE..'


CALL US:
(386) 7S2-12
SUBSCRIBE
THE REPORT
Voice: 755-54
Fax: 752-94


;<
(
*
' .









LAKE CITY REPORTER DAILY BRIEFING FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 23, 2011


CASH 3 Thursday:
Afternoon: 3-7-3
Evening: 4-8-2


Thursday:
Afternoon: 1-2-5-5
Evening: 4-8-5-3


Wednesday:
3-16-19-28-29


PEOPLE IN THE NEWS



'Modem Family' beats 'X Factor' debut


LOS ANGELES
T he debut of Simon
Cowell's '"The X Factor"
played second fiddle to
"Modern Family."
On a competitive night
of fall debuts, Fox's singing contest
kicked off Wednesday with a total
audience of 12.5 million viewers,
according to Nielsen Co. ratings.
The real glory went to ABC's
Emmy-winning "Modern Family,"
which earned a leading 14.5 million
viewers.
Among advertiser-coveted young
adult viewers, the ABC 8-10 p.m.
EDT sitcom duo of "The Middle"
and "Modern Family" were the
leaders and topped "X Factor" by 5
percent.
"X Factor" was bested in total
viewers from 9-10 p.m. EDT by
both "Modern Family" and CBS'
"Criminal Minds," which drew 14.1
million viewers. But it was No. 1 in
the 8 p.m. hour, outperforming "The
Middle" and other shows including
CBS' "Survivor."

Couple from '16 and
Pregnant' arrested
JACKSONVILLE,. Ark. Two
teenagers who were featured on the
first season of the MTV reality show
"16 and Pregnant" have lost their
child to the state and are facing drug
and child endangerment charges.
Police said officers serving a
search warrant found their home
was filled with feces, flies and mag-
gots.
Joshua Rendon and Ebony
Jackson-Rendon, now both 19, were
charged after the search of their
home at the Little Rock Air Force
Base. The Arkansas Department
of Human Services took custody of
their child, 2, who was born while
the TV show was taping. Jacksonville
police said officers found synthetic
marijuana in the house.


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Simon Cowell (left) and Paula Abdul, judges on 'The X Factor,' joke with each
other on the red carpet at a world premiere screening event for the new series.
The competition series gives viewers the opportunity to choose the next breakout
music star or group.


Bill Clinton book on
economy out in Nov.
NEW YORK For Bill Clinton, it
is again the economy, stupid.
The former president has finished
writing a new book, "Back to Work,"
which comes out in November. He
said the 200-page
book is a guide to
the current econom-
ic slump, how it was
caused and how to
recover.
"I actually started
Clinton thinking about it (the
book) after the 2010
election, because I did 130 events
and after every event people would
come up to me and say, 'I didn't
know this,' 'I didn't know that,"'
Clinton said.
"Back to Work" is Clinton's third
book since leaving office, following
his memoir "My Life."


Clinton said Obama had been
doing a "good job" communicating
his ideas, but that he was up against
opponents who don't like his ideas
and don't like government

Former Colts TE will be
on 'The Amazing Race'
INDIANAPOLIS Marcus
Pollard is adding
one more line to
his already amazing
resume.
Reality star.
The former Colts
tight end will join
Pollard his wife, Amani, on
one of the teams
in this season's CBS show "The
Amazing Race."
"I never even thought I'd do some-
thing like this," he told said. "It was
different, a totally different experi-
ence than playing pro football."
N Associated Press


Celebrity Birthdays


* Actor Mickey Rooney is 91.
* Actress Margaret Pellegrini
("The Wizard of Oz") is 88.
* Singer Julio Iglesias is 68.
* Actor Paul Petersen is 66.
* Actor Chi McBride is 50.
* Rock star Bruce
Springsteen is 62.
* Rock musician Leon Taylor
(The Ventures) is 56.
* Actor Kip Pardue is 35.
* Golfer Larry Mize is 53.


Lake City
HOW TO REACH US
Main number ....... (386) 752-1293
Fax number ...............752-9400
Circulation ..............755-5445
Online ... www.lakecityreporter.com
The Lake City Reporter, an affiliate of
Community Newspapers 'Inc., is pub-
lished Tuesday through Sunday at 180
E. Duval St., Lake City, Fla. 32055.
Periodical postage paid at Lake City, Fla.
Member Audit Bureau of Circulation and
The Associated Press.
All material herein is property of the Lake
City Reporter. Reproduction in whole or
In part is forbidden without the permis-
sion.of the publisher. U.S. Postal Service
No. 310-880.
POSTMASTER: Send address changes
to Lake City Reporter, P.O. Box 1709,
Lake City, Fla. 32056.
Publisher Todd Wilson .....754-0418
(twilson@lakecltyreporter.com)
NEWS
Editor Robert Bridges .....754-0428
(rbridges@lakecdtyreporter.com)
ADVERTISING
Director Ashley Butcher .. .754-0417
(abutcher@lakecityreporter.com)
CLASSIFIED
To place a classified ad, call 755-5440


* Rock singer Sarah Bettens
(K's Choice) is 39.
* Recording executive
Jermaine Dupri is 39.
* Actor Kip Pardue is 35.
* Pop singer Erik-Michael
Estrada ("Making the Band")
is 32.
* Actress Aubrey Dollar is
31.
* Tennis player Melanie
Oudin is 20.


Reporter

BUSINESS
Controller Sue Brannon... .754-0419
(sbrannon@lakecityreporter.com)
CIRCULATION
Home delivery of the Lake City Reporter
should be completed by 6:30 a.m.
Tuesday through Saturday, and by 7.30
a.m. on Sunday.
Please call 386-755-5445 to report any
problems with your delivery service.
In Columbia County, customers should
call before 1030 a.m. to report a ser-
vice error for same day re-delivery. After
1030 a.m., next day re-delivery or ser-
vice related credits will be issued.
In all other counties where home delivery
is available, next day re-delivery or ser-
vice related credits will be issued.
Circulation ...............755-5445
(circulation@lakecityreporter.com)
Home delivery rates
(Tuesday through Sunday)
12 Weeks................ $26.32
24 Weeks................... $48.79
52 Weeks....................$83.46
Rates indude 7% sales tax.
Mail rates
12 Weeks.............. . . $41.40
24 Weeks .. ............. $82.80
52 Weeks...................$179.40


CORRECTION


The Lake City Reporter corrects errors of fact in news
items. If you have a concern, question or suggestion, please
call the executive editor. Corrections and clarifications will run
in this space. And thanks for reading.


Rare American
crocodile found
ST. PETERSBURG -
Residents of a St.
Petersburg gated commu-
nity have a new and unusu-
al neighbor: an American
crocodile.
Shondra Farner spotted
the croc over the week-
end. She snapped a photo
and called state, wildlife
authorities.
While crocodiles are
found in the Caribbean
and South Florida, it is
extremely unusual to see
them in central or north
Florida. There are only
about 1,500 of the shy and
reclusive reptiles in the
state.
The reptile cannot be
killed because it is an
endangered species.

Tomato pickers
sue Burger King
MIAMI More than
two dozen farmworkers
are suing Burger King
over wages they said the
company owes them under
a deal with a farmworker
advocacy group.
The workers want
unspecified pay of more
than $15,000. Their attor-
ney is seeking class action
status for the complaint
filed Tuesday in Miami-
Dade Circuit Court.
Under the 2008 agree-
ment between Miami-
based Burger King and
the Coalition of Immokalee
Workers, Florida tomato
pickers were to receive a
penny more per pound for
the tomatoes they picked.
The money from Burger
King was to be passed
to workers through their
employers, the tomato
growers.

1st case of West
Nile confirmed
MIAMI Health offi-
cials are asking Miami-
Dade County residents to


THE WEATHER



t-STORMS CHC OF CHC OF
-STORMS -STORMS


1 89 LO 70 HI 90 L0 65 HI 88 W0 62


7:19 a.m.
7:26 p.m.
7:20 a.m.
7:25 p.m.


3:03 a.m.
4:41 p.m.
4:07 a.m.
5:21 p.m.


15m oistlbm
Today's
ultra-violet
radiation risk
for the area on
a scale from 0
to 10+.

- a \ '


CHC OF
-STORMS


HI 88 LO 64


REG I ONA LF ,Fid p ;


ASSOCIATED PRESS
A nine-foot-long American crocodile is seen laying on the
bank of a lake in a gated community in St. Petersburg: While
crocodiles are found in the Caribbean and South Florida, it is
extremely unusual to see them in central or northern Florida.


be on the alert for mosqui-
tos after a 27-year-old manr
was diagnosed with West
Nile virus.
The man started feeling
ill in early to mid-August.
He was admitted to the
hospital and tests con-
firmed the virus. Since he
had spent no significant
time during the incubation
period outside Miami-Dade
County, health officials are
calling it the year's first
locally acquired case of
West Nile.
Officials said it's the first
locally acquired West Nile
case since 2009.
Health department offi-
cials say the man has fully
recovered.
Symptoms of West Nile
include headache, fever,
fatigue and dizziness.

Osprey population
on the rebound
PENSACOLA -
Experts said the number
of ospreys in the Florida
Panhandle has grown in
recent years.
The Wildlife Sanctuary
of Northwest Florida said
the number of eagle-like,
shoreline predator birds is
on the rise.
Sanctuary director


Dorothy Kaufmann said
this is a positive indica-
tion that the region has a
healthy ecosystem. In past
years, ospreys were a rare
sight in the Panhandle
because pesticide use had
damaged their habitat and
large-scale net fishing had
depleted their food source.

Carroll: Christians
under 'attack'
ORLANDO Florida
Lt. Gov. Jennifer Carroll is
denouncing what she calls
an attack on Christians she
says is underway in the
nation.
Carroll gave a fiery
speech at the Faith &
Family Coalition event
that is the kickoff of a
Republican Party gather-
ing known as Presidency
5. Carroll in her remarks
said it was a sad time
when those who are in
the minority are allowed
to poison the minds of the
majority.
She said that right now
more people trust car
salesmen and the govern-
ment than Jesus Christ.
* Associated Press


Tallahassee *
88/68


Pensacola
86/69


TEMPERATURES
High Thursday
Low Thursday
Normal high
Normal low
Record high
Record low

PRECIPITATION
Thursday
Month total
Year total .
Normal month-to-date
Normal year-to-date


89/68
Lake City-
89/70


Gainesvile .
Panama City 90/71
85/70 Ocala *
01 /7'


89
71
86
67
96 in 1925
48 in 1897


0.00"
1.32"
28.00"
3.45"
40.21"


SUN
Sunrise today
Sunset today
Sunrise tom.
Sunset torn.

MOON
Moonrise today
Moonset today
Moonrise tom.
Moonset tom.


Sept. Oct. Oct. Oct.
27 3 11 19
New First Full Last


'~ .-*.-'...,~.,.. ..t4Z~. -
''II


1,1a I 1 1


,. Friday
I ,


- Foreasted l'mpeiraLIe


Saturday


F[elh hke"hi mperatle


i,'ll : l,
1722, a powerful
hurricane struck
the northern Gulf
Coast, causing tie-
mendouts damage
from Mobile, Ala.,
to New Oileans,
La. 1 This storm was
also responsible for
SMobile being moved
to its prose nt loca-
I n, ,I l


*.


lacksonvlle
89/76

Daytona Beach
8875


City
Cape Canaveral
Daytona Beach
Ft. Lauderdale
Fort Myers
Gainesville
Jacksonville


Saturday
87/76/t
87/73/t
89/78/t
92/75/t
90/67/t
88/71/t
90/80/t
90/65/t
89/79/t
89/77/t
90/68/t
91/77/t
85/70/pc
84/68/s
88/67/pc
91/74/t
89/65/t
86/79/t


Sunday
87/74/t
88/71/t
91/79/t
90/74/t
88/63/t
87/68/t
89/79/t
88/62/pc
90/77/t
89/76/t
88/64/t
90/73/t
84/71/pc
85/70/s
88/65/pc
89/73/t
86/64/pc
89/75/t


An exclusive
service
brought to
our readers
by
The Weather
Channel.



Sweather.com


si Forecasts, data and
.. a graphics a 2011 Weather
1'Y rri Y Central, LP, Madison, WIs.
weather www.weatherpubllsher.com


I editionn oinline Access
b rsoluht I

FREE

Call foi login information.


Daily Scripture
"Accept one another, then, just
as Christ accepted you, in order
to bring praise to God."
.- Romans 15:7

Thought for Today
"Trust your own instinct.Your
mistakes might as well be your
own, instead of someone else's."
Billy Wilder,
Austro-Hungarian-born American movie director (1906-2002)


AROUND FLORIDA


^ CHC OF
-STORMS


"HI 89 LO63


Orlando Cape Canaveral LaKey West
92/77 87/75 Lake Cty
Miami
Tampa Naples
91/ 7 West Palm Beach Ocala
90/79 Orlando
Ft Lauderdale Panama City
Ft Myers 91/79 Pensacola
.92/75 Naples Tallahassee
90/77 Miani Tampa
KeWes 91/79 Valdosta
Key West* W. Palm Beach
90/80


Page Editor: Laura Hampson, 754-0427


LIA _YfALM


7,


In









LAKE CITY REPORTER NEWS FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 23, 2011 3A


DRIVE: Record try starts tomorrow


Continued From Page Vl
growing demand for food,
which is especially high
during the holiday sea-
son.
"It would be wonderful
to have a good supply of
food going into the holi-
day season," Elkins said.
"It will fill our facility up."
Jack Sears, executive
director and CEO of the
17-county North Florida
Boy Scouts of America,
said everyone was
stunned when Jeremy
proposed his Eagle Scout
project.
"The scale of this proj-
ect in my 26 years of pro-
fessional scouting it the '
most ambitious I've ever
heard," he said. "It makes
me proud of this young
man."
Mike Millikin, superin-
tendent of the Columbia
County School District,
said he is encouraging
people to bring food dona-
tions to tonight's football
games at Fort White and
Columbia high schools.
The food will be loaded
into trucks at the stadium
entrances, he said.
Terry Huddleston,
Columbia High School's
principal, said Jeremy is
gathering strong support


from students. He said
Jeremy inspired class-
mates to support the food
drive when he told the
story of his childhood
during a morning broad-
cast at school.
"He gave a testimony,
which is why this is so
important," Huddleston
said. "That was one of the
most courageous things
to say he was hungry,
homeless and malnour-
ished."
Huddleston said the
high school's student gov-
ernment sponsored a food
drive last week to support
Jeremy.
While most of his
friends were playing
baseball, video games
or watching TV, Jeremy
said he spent his summer
vacation planning and
organizing the project,
which will earn him his
Eagle Scout badge.
When he isn't work-
ing event preparations,
Jeremy. said he has been
busy promoting the food
drive through social net-
works such as Twitter
and Facebook. Local
media have interviewed
Jeremy about the food
drive.


"I've been going every-
where for support," he
said. "I was hungry once."
Jeremy said at least 50
volunteers will be at the
fairgrounds at all times
to collect and weigh food
during the drive. He plans
to stay awake directing
activities the entire time.
"I will be the main
director," he said. "I'm
trying to do the best I
can."
If he reaches his goal,
it would set a Guiness
World Record for the
most food donated in a
24-hour period. A notary
and local public officials
will be at the site to docu-
ment and authenticate the
amount of food donated.
Jeremy said Columbia
County residents will
deserve the credit if a
new record js set.
If he doesn't reach
his goal, Jeremy said he
will organize more food
drives. But if he does,
Jeremy said he plans to
focus on class work and
Boy Scouts.
"I'm not trying to get
fame," he said. "People
like participating in world
record events. I think I'm
going to break it."


PROJECT: A major undertaking

Continued From Page 1A.


He entered the essay
in a contest and won a
four-year college scholar-
ship. The one condition
is he must attend Florida
Gateway College for two
- years. After he earns his
associate degree, the
scholarship will pay his
tuition at any public uni-
versity in Florida, Phillips
said.
Jeremy said he hopes to
reach his 600,000-pound
goal. If not, he said he
will organize more food


drives. But if he reaches
his goal, he plans to focus
on school work and scout-
ing.
"I plan on staying in
scouting so I can mentor
other boys," he said.
Sears said he and other
scout leaders through-
out the region will be
at the Columbia County
Fairgrounds for the food
drive, which runs from
8 a.m. Saturday to 8 a.m.
Sunday.
"We're going to do


whatever he wants us to
do," Sears said. "We're
here to be supportive."
Regardless of the out-
come, Sears said Jeremy's
project shows that the
values scouting promotes
are still relevant among
today's youths.
"Whatever the out-
come, we want him to be
proud," he said. "Even if
he doesn't break a world
record, he'll feed a lot of
people."


BUDGET: Total is $91,198,049

Continued From Page 1A


meeting, which lasted less
than 20 minutes:
The only comments
made during the pub-
lic hearing were by Rita
Dopp, executive director
of the local United Way,
who gave officials an over-
view of the local programs
served by the agency.
The county's total bud-
get is $91,198,049, which
includes a cash balance
brought forward of $34.9
million and $29.1 million
in reserves.
"The total budget is up
about $2 million, but it's
not up because of expen-
ditures in property tax or
non ad valorem assess-
ments, it's up because of
the grant funds that have


been deposited into the
budget for expenditures
next year," said Williams.
The grant funds include
a $750,000 Community
Development Block
Grant and a $1.2 mil-
lion Neighborhood
Stabilization Program
grant
The largest fund in
the budget is the general
fund budget, which will be
$35,359,140, representing
a decrease from the cur-
rent year's general budget,
which was $36,020,042.
For the 2011-12 fiscal
budget, county officials
are expecting, a total ad
valorem revenue shortfall
of $1.2 million compared
to last year's budget. The


2010-11 fiscal budget had
a $700,000 revenue short-
fall.
The budget does not
contain an increase in the
millage rate, which will be
the same as the current
fiscal year 8.015 mills.
"Because of the drop in
property values, the mill-
age rate is actually going to
generate about 8 percent
less money than the cur-
rent fiscal year," Williams
said.
Following Dopp's com-
ments commissioners
unanimously adopted the
8.015 millage rate, then
unanimously adopted the
proposed budget


Pacific markets tumble


WELLINGTON, New Zealand (AP) -
Pacific stock markets are down sharply
in early trading following big losses on
Wall Street amid growing fears of another
global recession.
In early trading Friday, Australia's S&P/
ASX 200 index was down 66 points, or 1.7
percent, at 3,899. The Australian dollar
also tumbled below parity with the U.S.


dollar and is trading at its lowest level in
about eight months as investors seek safe
havens. New Zealand's NZX 50 index was
down 58 points, or 1.8 percent, at 3,254.
Markets in Japan are closed Friday for a
national holiday.
In New York Thursday, the Dow Jones
industrial average lost 391 points and at
one point was down more than 500.


Farm Bureau's big night

was one to remember


By ANTONIA ROBINSON
arobinson@lakecityreporter.com

It was a night of education and apprecia-
tion at the Columbia County Farm Bureau
annual meeting Tuesday night at the
fairgrounds banquet hall, said President
Charlie Crawford.
The meeting featured a business ses-
sion, state office update and entertainment
from Jerry Cameron of St Augustine as
Patrick Henry. Cameron delivered Henry's
famous "Give me liberty, or give me
death" speech.
A meeting highlight was also a Power
Point presentation of CCFB activities from
the past year, including an in-service day
at Lad's Soup Kitchen, a youth speech con-
test and the Farm-City Week breakfast.
Many things take place behind the scene
and a few on front for the Farm Bureau,
said Greg Harden, field service director.
"Columbia County Farm Bureau is on


the go," he said. "It's a growing tradition."
Also a new initiative of the farm bureau
is the FFA Leadership Academy, Harden
said. The organization saw the need to cre-
ate future leaders in the community.
It fell to FFA chapter advisors in
Columbia and Fort White to identify four
students deemed worthy to promote lead-
ership development, he said. The group
helps within the community.
Harden said he hoped people watch-
ing the presentation would want to get
involved with the organization.
"You are Columbia County Farm Bureau,
and you can make a differencee" he said.
It was a great meeting even with the
rain, Crawford said. His hope is attendees
left more confident in the farm bureau.
Anyone interested in joining the farm
bureau can call 752-4003.
"You don't have to have insurance to be
a member of the Farm Bureau," Crawford
said.


'Drive One 4 Ur School'


By TONY BRITT
tbritt@lakecityreporter.com

Area residents will be able to lend some
financial support to Columbia High School
and its clubs, with the support of the Ford
Motor Corporation, through a weekend
campaign promoting the automaker's 2012
line of vehicles.
George H. Hudson Jr., fleet manager
and master certified sales and leasing con-
sultant at Rountree-Moore Ford Lincoln,
said students from various Columbia High
School clubs and the school's jazz band, in
addition to the local classic car club, are
scheduled to be at the car dealership as
part of Saturday's fundraiser.
The "Drive One 4 Ur School" program
will take place from 9 a.m. 4 p.m. tomor-
row at the Rountree-Moore Ford Lincoln
dealership, 2588 W. U.S. Highway 90.
Ford Motor Company, with Rountree-
Moore, holds a test drive event proceeds
of which go to the local high school,
Columbia High, for its clubs and organiza-
tions.
"For every test drive of a new Ford or
Lincoln automobile, $20 is donated to the
school," Hudson said.
As part of the promotion, people who take
the test drive will be able choose the school
organization they want the funds to go.


"We try to get up to 300 test drives
for a total of $6,000," Hudson said. "This
time Ford is touting the all new 2012 Ford
Focus, so if the individual test drives a
Focus after they do their initial test drive,
then that's an extra $10, which will be $30
per test drive, which is potentially $9,000."
Saturday's "Drive One 4 Ur School"
marks the sixth test drive campaign event
the local Ford dealership has held. The
events are held in the spring and fall of
each year.
"It's important to have this event so that
Ford is introducing a new automobile not
only to potential customers, but they are
giving the opportunity for schools to earn
money because of the shortages of school
funds for different organizations," Hudson
said. "All of your school districts have
been trying to cut our certain sports or
student activities, such as golf, cheerlead-
ing, etc. because of shortages of funds, so
this gives an opportunity for us, along with
Ford, to give backing to help our local high
school."
Hudson said Fort White High School is
not in its Ford zone, so the company has
not been able to hold a test drive fund-
raiser for the school in the past, but a new
program through Ford will allow them to
hold a "Drive Smart For Ur School" test
drive campaign for that school in October.


GRANT: Tourism

Continued From Page 1A
Campbell, Columbia County Tourist Development Council
executive director, noting it's a dollar-for-dollar match.
"Columbia, Suwannee and Hamilton counties will be provid-
ing the matching funds."
He said the TDC could use the funds from the O'ITED
grant for its vacation guide, advertising, consumer trade
shows, Website construction work and hiring photogra-
phers for advertisements.
"This is the first time we've ever applied, but it's some-
thing you can apply for annually," Campbell said. "We'll use
the funds to market the Suwannee River Valley and it helps
us to reach out in ways that we might not otherwise be able
to afford to do. It really kind of stretches our dollars."
Campbell said TDC officials are working on devising
plans and setting priorities to use the funds in the event the
grant funds are awarded to the TDC.
Local officials plan to submit the grant application by
November. The grant funds will be disbursed Dec. 14 and is
paid in quarterly installments.


G E T --- | lakatyreporter.com
GE^ ----- -lk -

CONN!TED

REPORTER
* NEWS
* WEATHER
* OPINION -L
* SPORTS
* ARCHIVES
* CLASSIFIED
* COMMUNITY
* ENTERTAINMENT

w rC.om
CONNB TED


= M 318aV1IVAV AU3AI13l SS3UdX3
S90 & eS 9-0 &. !J-uoI



\ ib


"



S30Ud ..S38 3HI IV SINVU ..S38 3H.I




3ONVUV31O SSIIIVIW


Public Service Announcement


Value Adjustment Board Organizational Meeting


There will be an organizational meeting and

signing of the first certification of the tax roll

for the Columbia County Value Adjustment

Board on Tuesday, September 27th at 10:00

a.m. The meeting will be held in the Board

of County Commissioners Conference Room

on the 2nd floor located at 135 NE Hernando

Avenue, Lake City, Florida.













OPINION


Friday, September 23, 2011


ONE


ONE
OPINION


A cloud

over the

economy

Two months ago,
President Barack
Obama lamented
that a "cloud of
uncertainty" ham-
pered economic recovery. He
said Congress must agree on a
debt ceiling so businesses will
regain confidence to add work-
ers. Congress did. Businesses
didn't.
Nevertheless, we agree with
the president that economic .
uncertainty discourages busi-
ness and consumers. It's clear,
however, that the government
agreeing to raise the debt ceil-
ing didn't eliminate uncertainty,
as Mr. Obama hoped.
Economic uncertainty, we
believe, is a principal reason
consumers are saving more,
but spending less. Not knowing
what the future holds probably
also explains why businesses
have stashed trillions, rather
than investing, loaning or
spending.
Business plans give entrepre-
neurs and investors reasonable
expectation of profit
Taxes are only the beginning.
There is uncertainty about
how many of the hundreds
of potential new regulations
the Environmental Protection
Agency will impose and what
form they will take, what new
unionization changes may
come from the National Labor
Relations Board and myriad
other government regulations
that may or may not be
imposed, increasing business
costs. Then there is the 2,000-
page Obamacare health care
law's ambiguous mandates and
countless regulations yet to
be written by unaccountable
bureaucrats.
This is an example of the
magnitude of uncertainty: The
potential increase in health care
costs alone for a solitary com-
pany, CKE Restaurants, was esti-
mated by experts to range from
$7 million to $35 million a year.
One thing seems certain: The
more money siphoned out of
the private sector for feckless
attempts to prime the economic
pump, coupled with innumer-
able new regulations and,
perhaps, even higher taxes, the
longer the economic recovery
promises to be.
* The Orange County Register

Lake City Reporter
Serving Columbia County
Since 1874
The Lake City Reporter is pub-
lished with pride for residents of
Columbia and surrounding counties by
Community Newspapers Inc.
We believe strong newspapers build
strong communities -"Newspapers
get things done!"
Our primary goal is to
publish distinguished and profitable
community-oriented newspapers.
This mission will be accomplished
through the tea(nwork of professionals
dedicated to truth, Integrity and hard
work.
Todd Wilson, publisher
Robert Bridges, editor
Sue Brannon, controller
Dink NeSmith, president
Tom Wood, chairman


LETT
POLl


ERS
CY


Letters to the Editor should be
typed or neatly written and double
spaced. Letters should not exceed
400 words and will be edited for
length and libel. Letters must be
signed and include the writer's name,
address and telephone number for
verification. Writers can have two
letters per month published. Letters
and guest columns are the opinion of
the writers and not necessarily that of
the Lake City Reporter.
BY MAIL: Letters, P.O. Box 1709,
Lake City, FL 32056; or drop off at
180 E. Duval St. downtown.
BY FAX: (386) 752-9400.
BY E-MAIL:
news@lakecityreporter.com


I his
S I "Congress,
they are
accus-
,L tomed to
doing nothing, and they're
comfortable with doing noth-
ing, and they keep on doing
nothing," President Barack
Obama whined at a September
15 Democratic National
Committee gathering in a pri-
vate Washington residence.
Now that his "Blame Bush"
hobbyhorse finally has retired
to the glue factory, Obama
resorts to pinning America's
woes on the "Do-Nothing
Congress." If only these par-
liamentarians would stop tak-
ing endless lunches, sipping
cocktails at Capitol Hill happy
hours, and then napping at
their desks, America might
have some chance of returning
to normal. F
Obama speaks as if the entire
Congress were in lockstep
Republican opposition to his
every initiative. Damn those
pesky elephants!
Of course, Obama's rhetoric
cynically turns things upside
down.
Congress consists of a
do-something House of
Representatives, run by
Republicans, and a do-nothing
Senate controlled by Obama's
very own Democrats. Obama
evidently believes that if he can
keep spouting clever lies and
distortions, no one will call him
on it Well, it's time to do so.
The 112th Congress has
been characterized by a very
active legislative pace in the
Republican House, featuring
the passage of many measures
designed to revive America's
exhausted economy.
The Democratic Senate,
meanwhile, is a much lazier
place where far less gets done,


By Dale McFeatters
perhaps because so
any technical jour-
nals flow across my
desk, I missed this
particular automotive
milestone. All summer, two
driverless cars have been tool-
ing about Berlin, guided by a
sophisticated as opposed to,
say, a Tandy TRS80 computer
linked to a precision satellite
navigation system, cameras and
laser scanners on the roof and
the bumpers.
The navigation system is in
the trunk, which worries drivers
like me with hard-earned para-
noia. One bump from the rear at
a stoplight, the GPS goes nuts,
and you find yourself helplessly
headed for Peru until you run out
of gas on a particularly dangerous
stretch of the Mexican border.


www.lakecityreporter.com


ANO
VI


I~ I


Deroy Murdock
deroy.murdock@gmail.comn
and House Republicans' mea-
sures go to die.
The figures bear this out,
beyond debate.
Through September 15, the
Republican House this year has
been in session for 120 days.
In contrast, the Democratic
Senate through the same date
was in session only 115 days.
In terms of recorded votes,
the two bodies are as differ-
ent as Times Square and the
Everglades.
Through September 15, the
GOP House had voted 711
times. Meanwhile, across the
same period, the Democratic
Senate placed only 137
recorded votes. So, the alleg-
edly lethargic GOP legislators
whose sloth dooms the Nation
actually are five times more
energetic than their indolent
counterparts in the Democratic
Senate.
This distinction might dis-
credit House Republicans if
they wasted their time voting
on National Apricot Yogurt
Month and similar matters
of national urgency. In fact,
Republicans have approved
serious legislation designed to
get America moving.
"Our new majority has
passed more than a dozen pro-
growth measures designed to
address the jobs crisis," House
Speaker John Boehner, R-
Ohio, and Majority Leader Eric
Cantor, R-Va., wrote Obama on
September 6. "Aside from repeal


No worries, though. Your driv-
erless car automatically dials the
Matamoros police and summons
help, in German. The police,
assuming they can find a transla-
tor, may be less than motivated
when they learn they are effec-
tively talking to a robot Thus, a
false identity like Enrique Iglesias
might prove helpful, until a bunch
of angry Mexican cops take a ball
peen hammer to the car.
The engineers behind the
German prototypes $551,000
Volkswagen Passats say the
driverless cars recognize other
moving cars, pedestrians and
such common motoring hazards
as buildings and trees. It can
even see, explained on engineer,
"if the traffic lights ahead are
red or green and react accord-
ingly." We'd be pretty happy
if they could recognize yellow
lights too because no one in this


of the 1099 reporting require-
ment in the health care law,
however, none of the jobs mea-
sures passed by the House to
date have been taken up by the
Democrat-controlled Senate."
These have included bills to
reduce anti-business regula-
tions, accelerate offshore oil pro-
duction, and speed the Keystone
XL pipeline, which would carry
Canadian oil to refineries in
Texas. This alone would create
20,000 jobs.
Senate Democratic leader
Harry Reid seems to be in
no rush to consider Obama's
American Jobs Act, even though
Obama wants it enacted "right
now!"
"We've got to get rid of some
issues first," Reid said. For
now, he is not sure "exactly
what I'm going to do yet with
the president's jobs bill," espe-
cially since some of Reid's own
Democrats, such as Louisiana's
Mary Landrieu and Virginia's
Jim Webb, seem ho hum about
Obama's $447 billion Stimulus Jr.
While House Republicans
adopted a budget last April 15,
the Democratic Senate has
not approved a budget since
April 29, 2009. This Democratic
inaction seems to violate the
U.S. Congressional Budget
Act, which requires passage of
an annual budget resolution.
Indeed, the Senate rejected
Obama's budget in May 97-0
- with every Democrat in the
chamber voting Nay.
Obama can disagree with
every piece of paper passed
by the GOP House. But when
he slyly bashes Republicans
by accusing "the Congress"
of "doing nothing," he simply
is lying through his teeth.
If Obama wants the entire
Congress to "do something," he
should tell Harry Reid to wake
up and do his job.


country can.
The cars have been allowed
to run around unchaperoned
on automotive test tracks but
any consumer use is 30 to 40
years away. The head of the Free
University's artificial intelligence
group said, "This kind of tech-
nology is the future of mobility."
How is it mobility if the car is
going somewhere and you're
not?
It may be able to drive itself,
better and more safely than you,
but, at bottom, it is still a car.
You can't send it to gatherings
you'd rather not attend: "Bill
couldn't be here but he sent his
Volkswagen. What a thoughtful
guy. And, look, there's a fruit
basket in the back seat."


* Scripps Howard News Service


4A


THEIR
E W


MP


* Scripps Howard News Service


Obama wrong about


'Do-Nothing' Congress


On driverless cars


China's


'idol' too


good for


its own


good


C hina has pulled
the plug on the
nation's most
popular TV
show, a talent
contest especially popular
with young viewers, called
"Super Girl," a knockoff of
the various "Idol" shows,
that drew 400 million view-
ers.
The ostensible reason
was that the show's pro-
ducers had allowed it to
Srun over its allotted 90
minutes. If that were truly
a sin in top-rated shows, a
lot of American Oscar and
Emmy winners would at this
moment be weeding barbed
wire enclosed rice paddies.
The communist govern-
ment came up with the usual
embarrassingly fraudulent
excuses for canceling the
show. According to The
New York Times, govern-
ment mandarins variously
described "Super Girl" as
"vulgar," "manipulative" and
"poisonous to our youth."
Welcome to that club, guys.
The TV company that
broadcast the show, accord-
ing to the Times, said that it
will fill its prime-time slots
with programs that promote
healthy morals, public safety
and "practical information
about housework."
We're not TV experts but
these shows have turkey
written all over them. They
may pioneer a first in televi-
sion -- negative ratings. The
shows could be so bad view-
ers jettison their TVs rather
than watch.
In the interest of fair and
balanced reporting, we tried
to identify the worst U.S.
TV show of all time but
that honor turns out to be
highly competitive honor
and there were far too many
entrants for even our large
staff to sort through. But do
a Internet search for "worst-
rated TV shows of all time."
You'll get the idea.
The real reason for killing
the show, at least temporar-
ily, was that it was popular
beyond the control of the
Communist Party. The con-
testants tended to be exotic
beauties that would never
have been selected by more
mature government stuffed
shirts. And that the winners
were selected by popular
vote, a dangerously demo-
cratic no-no in the People's
Republic.
"Super Girls" went on
a three-year hiatus once
before after a former culture
minister, Liu Zhongde, said
the show "is certainly the
choice of the market, but we
can't have working people
reveling all day in low cul-
ture."
It says something about
China's governing cadres
that none of their members
found these remarks par-
ticularly demeaning, patron-
izing and insulting.
The 6th century Chinese
sage Confucius didn't say
it H.L. Mencken did but
he would have certainly
endorsed the paraphrase of
his observation, "Chinese
communism is the haunting
fear that someone, some-
where is having fun."









LAKE CITY REPORTER NEWS FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 23, 2011


Hungry? How about carp? Execution proceeds in Georgia
Associated Press activists say a fitting legacv decade struggle.


By SOPHIA TAREEN
Associated Press
CHICAGO Minced
Asian carp tacos? How about
spaghetti with carp sauce?
Illinois officials hope serv-
ing the invasive species on a
plate is the creative solution
to two big problems: control-
ling the plankton-gobbling
carp from entering the Great
Lakes and record numbers
of people facing hunger. But
the idea has major obstacles,
mainly overcoming people's
nose-crinkling response to
eating a fish that grows to
100 pounds and is able to
sail out of the water a
trait spotlighted in YouTube
videos.
"We are in unchartered
water here," said Illinois
Department of. Natural
Resources spokesman Chris
McCloud. "Why remove
them and put them into a
landfill when you can take
them and use them for good?
If we can get past the name
'carp' and the perception ...
we can prove this is going to
be a highly nutritious, cheap
meal."
Starting Thursday, the
department launched a cam-
paign to change the fish's


In this 2010 file photo, Asian bighead carp swim in an exhibit
at Chicago's Shedd Aquarium. Illinois officials say the solu-
tion to two major problems the Asian carp's threatening of
the Great Lakes and record numbers of people facing hunger
- could be simple. The Department of Natural Resources
launched a campaign to change the fish's image and teach
people how to cook the ultra-bony meat.


image and demonstrate how
to work with the ultra-bony
meat. Officials have enlist-
ed Louisiana chef Philippe
Parola; who's become a
national advocate for the fish
he calls silverfin. He plans
to fry up the fish that tastes
something like mahi mahi, so
audience members can taste
samples.


Getting carp to soup kitch-
ens' and food pantries is
months off, said Tracy Smith,
a director for Feeding Illinois,
which supplies food banks
and is helping on the project
The idea is modeled after a
state program that lets hunt-
ers donate deer meat to be
ground and distributed to
food pantries.


ATLANTA Minutes
before he was put to death,
Troy Davis asked his sup-
porters to "continue to fight
this fight" but will they,
and how?
The Georgia inmate's
case outraged hundreds of
thousands of people around
the world who found the
evidence against him weak,
and opponents of the death
penalty hope their anger
provokes a backlash against
capital punishment. Some


of the case would be laws
that bar death sentences
for those, like Davis, whose
convictions are based on
eyewitness testimony.
With Davis gone, how-
ever, the loose coalition of
groups who pushed for his
freedom may simply crum-
ble. Much may depend not
on the death penalty's most
strident opponents, but on
less politically active peo-
ple who were drawn into
the debate by Davis' two-


That includes Melvin
Middleton, who believes
capital punishment can be
appropriate. After learning
more details about Davis'
case, he decided to show up
at a downtown Atlanta rally
opposing the execution.
"If you're going to take
someone's life, you better
be damn sure you are mak-
ing the right decision," he
said. "I don't know if he's
guilty or not, but he's not
proven guilty."


Pillar of physics challenged


Associated Press theory of relativity the
GENEVA A pillar famous E (equals) mc2
of physics that noth- equation just doesn't
ing can go faster than the happen.
speed of light appears "The feeling that most
to be smashed by an odd- people have is this can't
ball subatomic particle be right, this can't be
that has apparently made real," said James Gillies,
a giant end run around a spokesman for the
Albert Einstein's theories. European Organization
Scientists at the world's for Nuclear Research.
largest physics lab said The organization, known
Thursday they have as CERN, hosted part of
clocked neutrinos travel- the experiment, which is
ing faster than light That's unrelated to the massive
something that according $10 billion Large Hadron
to Einstein's 1905 special Collider also located at the
to Einstein's 1905 special site.


Albert Einstein


Public weighs in

on Alaska refuge
Associated Press some Alaska Native people
ANCHORAGE, Alaska call sacred and that others
A battle over whether the say is a wild land too unique
coastal plain of the Arctic to ever be developed. But
National Wildlife Refuge opponents say it would lock
should be set aside as wil- up land that could become
derness or eventually Alaska's next big drilling
opened up for oil explora- mecca, hurting efforts to
tion brought dozens of create high-paying jobs,
people with polar-opposite generate revenue for gov-
views to a public hearing in ernment and bring new life
Anchorage. to an oil industry in decline.
On the table is a proposal All that would be off-limits
to expand the wilderness if the land were wilderness,
designation that already opponents say.
protects a large chunk of A different slice of the
ANWR to cover the poten- long-running debate .took
tially oil-rich coastal plain: .placo in Washingltpu, D.C.,
That would add another 1.4 on Wednesday. Alaska's U.S.
million acres of wilderness senators, congressman and
to the existing eight million governor all testified before
acres in the refuge and the U.S. House Natural
some say would effectively Resources Committee in
put drilling off-limits. Other support of drilling on the
options being considered refuge's coastal plain.
would add even more wil- The controversy over
derness. drilling in ANWR has
Wilderness supporters divided environmentalists
say the designation is essen- and development forces for
tial to preserving a place decades.


GOP leader sees House vote on disaster bill


By ANDREW TAYLOR
Associated Press
WASHINGTON -
House Republicans grap-
pled Thursday with ways to
revive a must-pass measure
to provide billions of dollars
in disaster relief and prevent
a government shutdown at
the end of next week.
House Majority Leader
Eric Cantor, R-Va., said the
House would vote anew on
the legislation Thursday
evening.
But it was unclear
whether GOP leaders had
decided on exactly what the
new legislation would look
like or. whether they had
enough votes to reverse
Wednesday's embarrassing
House rejection of the bill.
Cantor would provide
no details after emerging
from a closed-door meeting
among Republicans. House
Rules Committee Chairman
David Dreier, R-Calif., said
the legislation would be
similar to the earlier ver-
sion and perhaps contain,


additional savings to help
pay for the disaster aid.
On Wednesday, the House
voted 230-195 to reject the
legislation, which contained
$3.7 billion in disaster aid
"and enough money to keep
the government running
into mid-November. The
loss came at the hands of
Democrats and tea party
Republicans.
But time is short.
Homeland Security
Secretary Janet Napolitano
said Thursday that the
government's main disas-
ter aid account is "running
on fumes" and could be
tapped out as early as early
next week. She called on.
Congress to quickly resolve
the problem or risk delays
in getting disaster projects
approved.
"'I'm hopeful that
Cofigress will work this out
in the next couple of days,"
Napolitano said as she flew
to Joplin, Mo., to view tor-
nado damage. "We have
stretched this as far as it
can go. We are scraping the


House Majority Leader Eric Cantor, R-Va.,


bottom of the barrel."
Now the question con-
fronting GOP leaders includ-
ing Speaker John Boehner
of Ohio is whether to push
the legislation to the left or
the right in hopes of pass-


ing it through the House
and reaching agreement
with the Democratic Senate'
before disaster aid runs otit
for victims of Hurricane
Irene and other disasters
early next week.


Robert I. Cone
Mr. Robert I. Cone, 84, died
Wednesday evening at Lake City
Medical Center after an extended
illness, he was the son of the late
Lorene R. Cone. He had lived in
Lake City since 1971 after mov-
ing here from Monticello, FL.;.
He was member of the Southside
Baptist Church whgre he served
as a deacon, he enjoyed wood-
working, camping, and fish-
ing. He is preceded in death by
one son William Robert Cone.
He is survived by his wifd of
66 years Dorothy Cone, Lake
City, FL.; two sons John M.
Cone (Susan), Suwannee Coun-
ty, Tommy A. Cone, Tallahas-
see, FL.; one daughter Brenda
Cone Langston, Lake City,
FL.; eleven grandchildren,
and six great- grandchildren.
Funeral Services for Mr. Cone
will be conducted Friday Sep-
tember 23, 2011 at 10:00
A.M. at Dees-Parrish Family
Funeral Home. With reverend
Mike Brown officiating, visi-
tation with the family will be
held one-hour prior to service
time on Friday. Interment will
follow in Roseland Cemetery
in Monticello, FL.; at 1:30 P.M
DEES PARR ISH
FAMILY FUNERAL HOME
is in charge of all arrangements,
458 South Marion Avenue Lake
City, FL. 32025. (386) 752-
1234. Please sign guest book at
parrishfjnilyimneralhome.com.


OBITUARIES

John Wesley Wilson
Mr. John Wesley Wilson was
born in Valdosta, Georgia on
May 18, 1942 to the late Harie
and Mozella Wilson. John ac-
cepted Christ at an early age
and was baptize at the Branch
Street Baptist church, and in Oc-
tober Of 1980, John join Bethel
A.M.E. church in Albany, GA.,
where he held office as Steward.
John graduated from Pineville
HI igh School in 1960, and gradu-
ated from Albany State College
where he pledged kappa Alpha
Psi and played football, he was
called the "Bucken" Gioat. lie
obtained his Master's Degree
from Georgia State in Mathemat-
ics. John lived in Albany, Geor-
gia; where he worked at Albany
State University as Director of
Housing until he retired in 1998.
John's life here on earth came
to an end, Saturday, September
17, 2011 at the Select Specialty
Hospital in Gainesville, Florida.
He leaves to cherish his memo-
ries; (3) daughters: Sharon (Al-
bert) Oliver of Lake City, Flor-
ida; Lynn (I toward) Clarke, of
Lakeland, FL; Yolanda Wilson
of Durham, NC; (1) Son: Dar-
rick' (Latricia) Wilson of Cov-
ington, Washington; (1) Sister:
Brownie Owens of Valdosta,
Georgia. (12) Grandchildren, (7)
Great-Grandchildren, and a host
of other relatives and sorrow-
ing friends. Celebration of life
for John is to be held 3:00 P.M.
Saturday, September 24, 2011 at
Union Cathedral Church, I Q50


Floridians' income sees sharp drop


Associated Press


E. Hill Ave., Valdosta, Georgia.
Bishop Wade S. McCrae -is the
pastor and, Supt. Arletha Ser-
mons will officiate. Interment
will follow in the Sunset Hill
Cemetery in Valdosta, Ga. The
family will receive other rela-
tives and sorrowing friends 5:00
P.M. Friday, September 23, 2011
at Harrington's Funeral Home.
Professional Mortuary servic-
es entrusted to Eric A. Brown
& Son Funeral Home, Inc.
Mr. Nathaniel Keith of Ft. White,
Florida passed away from this
walk of life Saturday, September
17,2011 atthel.akeCity Medical
Center. Nathaniel was born April
22, 1934 to the late Orlando, and
Georgia Mac Keith. I Home going
services for Bro. Nathaniel will
be 10:00 A.M Saturday, Septem-
ber 24, 2011 at Antioch Mission-
ary Baptist Church in Ft. White,
Florida. Rev. Donell Sanders
is the pastor and will officiate.
Burial will follow in the Fort
Call cemetery in Providence.
Public viewing will be, Saturday
morning, September 24, 2011
from 8:30 A.M. until time of
the funeral service. Professional
Mortuary Services entrusted
to ERIC A. BROWN & SON
FUNERAL HOME, 1221
S.W. 3rd Street Jasper, Florida.


Obituaries are paid advertise-
ments. For details, call the Lake
City Reporter's classified depart-
ment at 752-1293.


Hang O
a minute

Our c storreces iven
a Complimentary
1C01)' 1 u/lew
lke, Ci( lReport IC)

ik i/wl


Thursday.


ORLANDO Floridians The median income of
had the biggest drop in Floridians dropped by more
income among residents i than 7 percent from almost
any state other than Nevada $48,000 in 2,007 to more than
during the past three years$44,000 last year.
of a recession and anemic Only Nevada had a bigger
economic recovery, accord- drop in income, 7.3 percent
ing to Census data released But Nevada residents were


earning more than Floridians
to begin with $55,000 in
2007 and $51,000 in 2010.
Florida has one of the
nation's highest unemploy-.
ment rates, 10.7 percent in.
August, and the state was at
the epicenter of the housing
boom and bust


see what


sunday


Shas in store


George Clooney for
President
The actoi-writer-ditector, who plays a presidential
candidate in The Ides of March, talks about politics,
life at 50, and what he's learned from failure.

Intelligence Report: The Man of
Steel Gets a Makeover
A more dwn-to-earth Superman? Find out how DC
Comics is revising the original story lines for many of
its superheroes.


Sunday Breakfast: Rise and Shine!
Alton Brown, star of the Food Network's Good Eats, takes his morning meal
seriously. He shares his "Diner-Worthy Hash Browns" recipe.

American Stories: The Little Library That Could
Arizona's Parker Public Library is a lifeline for its patrons, but it's struggling to
stay afloat.

Views: Old Faithfuls
For years, our pets have made us feel loved and adored. Now, as they age, it's
our turn.

SUNDAY, September 25, 2011 .

Lake City Reporter
WWWvi'wv ;ifutttO *om~









6A LAKE CITY REPORTER NEWS FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 23, 2011


Blackwater Festival this weekend Recession takes toll

.. on young adults,

.--- according to census


Electrontic rock group Sound Tribe Sector 9, abbreviated as STS9, will preform this weekend at the Blackwater Music Festival
at the Spirit of the Suwannee Music Park and Campground in Live Oak.


Next in the fall music fes-
tival lineup is the eclectic
sounds of the Blackwater
Music Festival this week-
end at the Spirit of the
Suwannee Music Park and
Campground in Live Oak.
The festival will feature
over 45 acts on five stages
including alt-rock band
The Flaming Lips, electro
group STS9, soloist Girl
Talk and rock funk duo


Ghostland Observatory.
The music starts at noon
today with Tallahassee-
based Catfish Alliance and
runs almost non-stop until
midnight. Tomorrow the
tunes start at 11 a.m., with
The Flaming Lips headlin-
ing at 8:20 p.m.
"It's a little bit of every-
thing," said Susan Lamb,
Spirit of the Suwannee
Music Park media rela-


tions, of the festival's
music. The influx of
concert-goers is a huge
financial boom to the area,
Lamb said.
Admission is $60 today
and $70 on Saturday.
Children under 6 years old
are free. Primitive camp-
ing, RV sites and cabin
rentals are available.
Concert-goers who
bring 10 non-perishable


food items will recieve a
Blackwater Music Festival
poster. Donations will
benefit the Food Bank of
Suwannee Valley in Lake
City. Food item should be
low sodium and health ori-
ented.
The music park is locat-
ed at 3076 95th Drive in
Live Oak. For more infor-
mation visit www.blackwa-
termusicfestival.com.


Marine Band to perform free


,'unc .rf.5 I
Members of the "The President's Own" United States Marine
Band will preform for free at the University of Florida Phillips
Center for the Performing Arts on Oct. 18 at 7:30 p.m.


Every United States presi-
dent since John Adams has
heard them reform and
soon they will be offering
up their historical sounds to
North Florida for free.
"The President's Own"
United States Marine Band
will perform at 7:30 p.m.
Oct. 18 at the University
of Florida Phillips Center
for the Performing Arts.
Founded in 1798 by an Act
of Congress, it is the oldest
continuously active music
organization.
The primary mission of
the Marine Band is to pro-
vide music for the U.S. presi-
dent and the Commandant
of ith. United States Marine
Corps. Musicians preform at


the White House more than
300 times each year.
The Marine Band tours in
the fall, performing about 28
concerts in different cities.
It rarely leaves Washington,
D.C. at other times because
of White House and ceremo-
nial commitments. While on
tour, the band plays a blend
of traditional concert band
and contemporary wind
ensemble music.
Tickets may be reserved
(limit four) by sending a
self-addressed, stamped
envelope to: University of
Florida Performing Arts P.O.
Box 112750 Gainesville, FL
3:') 11. The Phillips Center
is located at 315 Hull Road
in Gaine.sville


By HOPE YEN
Associated Press
WASHINGTON Call it
the recession's lost genera-
tion.
In record-setting numbers,
young adults struggling to
find work are shunning long-
distance moves to live with
Mom and Dad, delaying
marriage and buying fewer*
homes, often raising kids out
of wedlock. They suffer from
the highest unemployment
since World War II and risk
living in poverty more than
others nearly 1 in 5.
New 2010 census data
released Thursday show the
wrenching impact of a reces-
sion that officially ended in


mid-2009. It highlights the
missed opportunities and
dim prospects for a genera-
tion of mostly 20-somethings
and 30-somethings coming
of age in a prolonged slump
with high unemployment.
"We have a monster jobs
problem, and young people
are the biggest losers," said
Andrew Sum, an economist
and director of the Center
for Labor Market Studies at
Northeastern University. He
noted that for recent college
grads now getting by with
waitressing, bartending and
odd jobs, they will have to
compete with new graduates
for entry-level career posi-
tions when the job market
eventually does improve.


Police attend seminar


To meet the changing
and challenging demands
of Florida's future, two local
law enforcement managers
recently completed a three
week leadership seminar.
Captain John Blanchard
IV of the Lake City Police
Department and Captain
Jeff Coleman of the
Columbia County Sheriffs
Office graduated from the
Florida Department of
Law Enforcement's Chief


Executive Seminar in
Tallahassee on Aug. 18.
They were among 20
criminal justice profession-
als from around the state to
study trends and events that
may affect criminal justice
professionals and Florida in
the future. Participants took
classes on demography, bud-
geting, managing genera-
tions, ethics and implement-
ing strategic change.


Ex-W Va. miner sentenced


Associated Press
BECKLEY, W.Va. A
former Massey Energy
employee was sentenced
Thursday to 10 months in
prison for faking a fore-
man's license and lying to
federal authorities during
an investigation of a deadly
explosion at the company's
Upper Big Branch mine.
U.S. District Judge
Irene Berger also ordered
Thomas Harrah, 45, of Seth
to serve threes of super-
vised release after he com-


pletes the prison term.
"This sentence sends an
important and unmistakable
message: If you break the
law and threaten the lives
of coal miners, you should
expect prison time," U.S.
Attorney Booth Goodwin
said in a news release.
"Mine safety crimes are
tremendously serious.
Today's result puts to rest
any notion to the contrary.
We will continue to aggres-
sively prosecute those who
ignore the law and put our
miners at risk."


SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 24, 207
HOWARD CONFERENCE CENTER FLORI DA GATEWAY COLLEGE

Ptoudlypresented by *
Shands ,cnis
i F .si. '. -liA TAFN'.JA
A,.4 "LRtf,',.i',r .*,ii, of "'NIrur i( "


ADAM SANDERS OPENS @( 7:00PM
PRE-SHOW PARTY AND BBQ.SPONSORED BY T41,AO C U


.. .Chlk.,
&ISRtbln"MI


S ta,. g .' AA '* I ,FMG

fm ]aft- l>


Beyond Menopause

the Musical

Your age is up. Below the waist, things are down. In fact, they are
drooping, leaking and prolapsing. What can you doV
Join us for Girl Talk at Lake City Medical Center.
Gynecologist Dr. Anthony Agrios will discuss the latest treatments
for common conditions that many women think they just have
to live with as they get older.

Thursday, September 29

12:00 Noon 1:00 p.m.

Lake City Medical Center Classroom

Our program is free and Includes lunch.
Please RSVP by September 27. Call 1-800-611-6913.


NORTH FLORIDA LAKE CITY
IN lU IONALI A11L Al..iA MEDICAL CENTER










Lake City Reporter


Story ideas?

Contact
Tim Kirby
Sports Editor
754-0421
tkuby(@laokecityreporter com


SPORTS


Friday, September 23, 201 I


www.lakecityreporter.com


Section B


CHEAP SEATS






Tim Kirby
Phone:(386) 754-0421
tkitby@Iakecityreportercom

Taking

over for

an icon
W akulla
High's
Scott
Klees is
one of
those coaches that was
called on to replace an
icon.
Klees had a bit of
seasoning, since he
served a defensive
coordinator for the man,
J.D. Jones.
Beginning in 1977,
Jones led the War Eagles
to 14 playoff
appearances. He had an
impressive four-year stint
when Wakulla was state
runner-up in 1978, then
won back-to-back state
championships in
1980-81.
"Coach Jones is a
legend here," Klees
said. "He has over 200
wins and no doubt there
was pressure coming
in behind him. I was a
member of his staff for
four years and he taught
me a lot about football
and life."
Klees said he and
Jones are close. They
play golf in the summer
and do some hunting and
fishing together.
"I'm a little jealous
when he rides by every
day on his way to play
golf," Klees said.
Klees went to North
Florida Christian and
played football at
Valdosta State. He had
head coaching
experience when Jones
hired him at Wakulla.
"I was at Munroe in
Quincy for seven years
before Coach Jones and I
hooked up," Klees said.
Klees took Munroe
to the playoffs in 2001,
but hit his stride when
he joined the staff at
Wakulla.
'"The thing I am most
proud of here is that in
10 years we have only
missed the playoffs one
time," Klees said. 'That
was in 2009 and we went
7-2 that year."
Klees's War Eagles lost
to his alma mater last
week. He said his team
played poorly, but he had
things on his mind.
Klees' wife, Nicole,
gave birth to the couple's
third son on on Sept. 13.
Brody joins Haden, 6,
and Owen, 3.
The Texas Rangers
are fast closing in on the
American League West
Division title.
Prior to Thursday's
games, the magic
number for the Rangers
was three.
It will be the first
consecutive titles for
Texas since 1998-99.
Lake City's Michael
Kirkman made his
second appearance since
returning to the club.
On Tuesday, Kirkman
pitched the ninth inning
in the Rangers' 7-2 win
at Oakland. He gave up a
solo shot to Coco Crisp.

* Tim Kirby is sports editor


of the / ake City Reporter.


Stanton Prep


spikes CHS


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Columbia High's Kelbie Ronsonet (11) returns serve against Fort White on Sept. 14.


igers'


District opponent
proves too much
for Lady Tigers.
By BRANDON FINLEY
bfinley@lakecityreporter.com
Columbia High ran into
a brick wall on Thursday
in the form of Stanton Prep
School in a district contest.
The Lady Tigers fell into
a hole from the beginning
falling in the first set 25-8
before eventually falling in
the three-set match.
Columbia lost the second
game 25-22 and fell 25-14 in
the final set.
"Stanton came in and


new


played hard," Columbia
head coach Rebecca Golden
said. "They deserved the
win. We now know what it's
going to take to contend
in the district and we hope
to have another shot at
them in the district tourna-
ment."
Charlee Watson led the
Lady Tigers with 15 digs in.
the match. Jessie Bates had
14 assists.
Columbia's Lauren Eaker
and Jara Courson tied for
the team lead in kills with
four each.
The Lady Tigers (8-5)
resume play in an away
match against Wolfson High
at 6:30 p.m. on Tuesday.


foe


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Columbia High's Quaysean Monismith.(44) takes down Buchholz High's Kenny Scott (12) during a game on Sept. 16.


Columbia opens district with Knights


By BRANDON FINLEY
bfinley@lakecityreporter.comrn
For a team to become a
district champion, it must
win the games it is suppos-
sed to. Today is one of those
games for the Columbia
High Tigers.
At 1-2, the season is far


from over as the Tigers
enter district play by wel-
coming in a new opponent.
Columbia will host visit-
ing Oak Leaf High (0-2)
in the newly established
District 3-6A.
The Knights lost their
opening game by a point to
Forrest High, 13-14, before


Fort White's

seesaw schedule ,

brings in Wakullai


Baker, Legree
connection leads
Indians tonight.
By TIM IkIRBY
tkirby@lakecityreporter.com
FORT WHITE With a
football schedule that see-
saws between classes, Fort
White High gets a look at a
5A team when it welcomes
Wakulla High to Arrowhead
Stadium today.
Kickoff is 7:30 p.m. for
the first meeting between
the schools.
Both teams are 2-1 and
coming off losses last week
- Fort White at Taylor
County High and Wakulla
at home to North Florida


Christian School.
Fort White is averaging
221 yards and 23 points per
game. The Indians have
rushed for more than 100
yards in each game with
Soron Williams knocking at
the 100-yard door. Williams
had 89 yards against
Newberry High and 86
against Taylor County.
Quarterback Andrew
Baker has thrown for 290
yards and had his third
touchdown pass of the
season to A.J. Legree last
week. Trey Phillips leads
the Indians in receptions
with eight.
The 28 points for Fort
White was a season high,
INDIANS continued on .?3B


taking an early season bye
week. Last week, Oak Leaf
was handled by Clay High
in a 53-27 loss.
To contrast, the Tigers
found their mojo in a
30-14 win against visiting
Buchholz High last week.
Columbia looks to keep
it going when coach Joel


Brighton brings in his Columbia coach Brian Allen
passing attack at 7:30 p.m. said. "They scored a lot of
tonight, points last week, but they
Brian Pillsbury threw for also gave up a lot. They're
274 yards in the loss to going to try to spread us
Clay last week, something out, but also give us some
the Tigers will have to slow single back looks."
down. The Knights defense
"This is a new team
with its first senior class," CHS continued on 3B


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Fort White's Terry Calloway (34) and Tavaris Williams (2) chase a Newberry runner during a
game on Sept. 9.













LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 23, 2011


SCOREBOARD


TELEVISION

TV sports

Today
AUTO RACING
9:30 a.m.
SPEED Formula One, practice for
Singapore Grand Prix
11:30 a.m.
ESPN2 NASCAR, Sprint Cup,
practice for Sylvania 300, at Loudon,
N.H. 3 p.m.
ESPN2 NASCAR, Sprint Cup. pole
qualifying for Sylvania 300, at Loudon,
N.H.
COLLEGE FOOTBALL
I p.m.
ESPN UCF at BYU
GOLF
I p.m.
TGC PGATour,Tour Championship,
second round, at Atlanta
12:30 a.m.
TGC European PGATour.Austrian
Open, second round, at Atzenbrugg,
Austria (delayed tape)
2:30 a.m.
TGC LPGA, The Solheim Cup.
second round, at Dunsany, Ireland
MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL
7 p.m.
MLB Regional coverage, Boston at
N.Y.Yankees orToronto atTampa Bay
PREP FOOTBALL
p.m.
ESPN2 De La Salle (Calif.) at
St.Thomas Aquinas


BASEBALL

AL standings


x-NewYor
Boston
Tampa Bay
Toronto
Baltimore


x-Detrolt
Cleveland
Chicago
Kansas Cit
Minnesota


East Division
W L
rk 95 60
88 68
85 70
78 77
65 90
Cenrl Division
W L
90 65
76 78.
76 79
ty 68 88
59 95
Wes vision


W L Pct GB
Texas 90 65 .581 -
Los Angeles 85 70 .548 5
Oakland 69 86 .445 21
Seattle 66 89 .426 24
x-clinched division
Wednesday- Games
N.Y.Yankees 4,Tamps Bay 2,1st gane
Chicago White Sox 8, Cleveland 4
N.Y. Yankees 4, Tampa Bay 2, 2nd
game
L.A.Angels 7,Toronto 2
Baltimore 6, Boston 4
Detroit 6, Kansas City 3
Seattle 5, Minnesota 4
Texas 3, Oakland 2
Thursday a Gane
Minnesota 3. Seattle 2
Oakland 4,Texas 3
Baltimore at Detroit (n)
Chicago White Sax at Cleveland (n)
Tampa Bay at N.Y.Yankees (n)
LA.Angels at Toronto (n)
Today's Games
Baltimore (Simon 4-9) at Detroit
(Porcello 14-9), 7:05 p.m.
Boston (Lester 15-8) at N.Y. Yankees
(EGarcda I -8), 705 p.m.
Minnesota (Pavano 8-13) at Cleveland
(Masterson 12-10),7:05 pn.S
Toronto (Morrow 10-11) at Tampa
Bay (Price 12-12),7:10 p.m.
Seattle (A.Vasquez 1.4). at Texas
(M.Harrison 13-9),8:05 p.m.
Kansas City (Chen 11-8) at Chicago
White Sox (Z.Stewart 2-5), 8:10 p.m.
Oakland (G.Gonzalez 14-12) at LA.
Angels (Weaver 18-7), 10:05 p.m.
-Saturday Games
Minnesota at Cleveland, 1-05 p.m.,
1st game
Boston at N.Y.Yankees,4:10 p.m.
Seattle at Texas, 4:10 p.m.
Baltimore at Detroit, 705 p.m.
Minnesota at Cleveland, 7:05 p.m.,
2nd game
Kansas City at Chicago White Sox,
7:10 p.m.
Toronto at Tampa Bay, 7:10 p.m.
Oakland at LA.Angels, 905 p.m.

' NL standings


East Division
W L'
phia 98 57
88 68
on 75 79
73 82
71 85
Centrald Division
W L
91 65
86 69
76 80
69 87
69 87
53 102
West Division
W L
90 66
sco 84 71
es 77 77
70 85
68 88
division


Pct GB
.632 -
.564 10'k
.487 22'A
.471 25
.455 27%

Pct GB
.583 -
.555 4'A
.487 15
.442 22
.442 22
.342 37'A


Wednesday's Games
Cincinnati 2, Houston 0
Chicago Cubs 7, Milwaukee I
San Diego 4, Colorado 0
Arizona 8, Pittsburgh 5
Washington 7, Philadelphia 5
Florida 4,Adanta 0.
St. Louis 6, N.Y. Mets 5
San Francisco 8, LA Dodgers 5
Thursday's Games
N.Y. Mets 8, St. Louis 6Washlngton at
Philadelphia (n)
Colorado at Houston (n)
San Francisco at LA Dodgers (n)
Today's Games
Atlanta (T.Hudson 15-10) at
Washington (Strasburg 0-0), 705 p.m.
Cincinnati (Volquez 5-6) at Pittsburgh
(Locke 0-2), 7:05 p.m.
Philadelphia (Hamels 14-9) at N.Y.
Mets (Dickey 8-13), 7:10 p.m.
Colorado (Pomeranz 1-0) at Houston
(Myers 6-13),8:05 p.m.
Florida (Volstad 5-12) at Milwaukee


(Gallardo 17-10). 8:10 p.m.
Chicago Cubs (Dempster 10-13) at
St. Louis (C.Carpenter 10-9), 8:15 p.m.
San Francisco (Surkamp 2-0) at
Arizona (Collmenter 9-10), 9:40 p.m.
L.A. Dodgers (Lilly 10-14) at San
Diego (LeBlanc 4-5), 10:05 p.m.
Saturday's Games
Atlanta at Washington, 1:05 p.m.
Chicago Cubs at St. Louis, 1:10 p.m.
Philadelphia at N.Y. Mets, 1:10 p.m.
Cincinnati at Pittsburgh, 7:05 p.m.
Colorado at Houston, 7:05 p.m.
Florida at Milwaukee, 7:10 p.m.
San Francisco at Arizona, 8:10 p.m.
LA. Dodgers at San Diego, 8:35 p.m.


FOOTBALL

NFL standings

AMERICAN CONFERENCE


New England
Buffalo
N.Y.Jets
Miami


Houston
Jacksonville
Tennessee
Indianapolis


Baltimore
Cincinnati
Cleveland
Pittsburgh


Oakland
San Diego
Denver
Kansas City


East
W L TPct PF
2 0 01.00073
2 0 01.00079
2 0 01.00059
0 2 0.000 37
South
-W L TPct PF
2 0 01.00057
I I 0.500 19
I I 0.500 40
0 2 0.00026
North
W L TPct PF
I I 0.500 48
I I 0.500 49
I I 0.500 44
I I 0.500 31
West
W L TPct PF
I I 0.500 58
I I 0.500 45
I I 0.500 44
0 2 0.000 10


NATIONAL CONFERENCE
East
W L TPct PF PA
Washington 2 0 01.00050 35
Dallas I I 0.500 51 51
Philadelphia I I 0.500 62 48
N.Y. Giants I I 0.500 42 44
South
W L TPct PF PA
New Orleans I I 0.500 64 55
Atlanta I I 0.50047 61
Tampa Bay I I 0.50044 47
Carolina 0 2 0.000 44 58
North
W L TPct PF PA
GreenBay 2 0 01.00072 57
Detroit 2 0 01.00075 23
Chicago I I 0.500 43 42
Minnesota 0 2 0.000 37 48
West
W L TPct PF PA
San Francisco I I 0.500 57 44
Arizona I I 0.50049 43
St.Louis 0 2 0.000 29 59
Seattle 0 2 0.000 17 57
Sunday
Houston at New Orleans, I.p.m.
Denver at Tennessee, I p.m.
Detroit at Minnesota, I p.m.
San Francisco at Cincinnati. I p.m.
New England at Buffalo, I p.m.
N.Y. Giants at Philadelphia. I p.m.
Miami at Cleveland. I p.m.
Jacksonville at Carolina, I p.m.
Kansas City at San Diego, 4:05 p.m.
N.Y.Jets at Oakland, 4:05 p.m.
Baltimore at St. Louis, 4:05 p.m.
Arizona at Seattle,4:15 p.m.
Green Bay at Chicago, 4:15 p.m.
Adanta atTampa Bay, 4:15 p.m.
Pittsburgh at Indianapolis, 8:20 p.m.
Monday
Washington at Dallas, 8:30 p.m.
Sunday, Oct. 2
Detroit at Dallas, I p.m.
Washington at St. Louis, I p.m.
Minnesota at Kansas City, I p.m.
Carolina at Chicago, I p.m.
Pittsburgh at Houston, I p.m.
New Orleans at Jacksonville, I p.m.
San Francisco at Philadelphia, I p.m.
Tennessee at Cleveland, I p.m.
Buffalo at Cincinnati, I p.m.
N.Y. Giants at Arizona, 4:05 p.m.
Atlanta at Seattle, 4:05 p.m.
Miami at San Diego, 4:15 p.m.
New England at Oakland, 4:15 p.m.
Denver at Green Bay, 4:15 p.m.
N.Y.Jets at Baltimore, 8:20 p.m.
Monday, Oct. 3
Indianapolis atTampa Bay, 8:30 p.m.

College games

Today
Brown (1-0) at Harvard (0-1),7 p.m.
UCF (2-1) at BYU (I-2);8 p.m.

Top 25 schedule

Saturday
No. I Oklahoma vs. Missouri, 8 p.m.
No. 2 LSU at No. 16 West Virginia,
8 p.m.
No. 3 Alabama vs. No. 14 Arkansas,
3:30 p.m.
No. 4 Boise State vs.Tulsa, 8 p.m.
No. 6 Wisconsin vs. South Dakota,




Unscramble these four Jumbles,
one letter to each square,
to form four ordinary words.

I VAYEH I


3:30 p.m.
No. 7 Oklahoma State at No. 8 Texas
A&M, 3:30 p.m.
No. 9 Nebraska at Wyoming,
7:30 p.m.
No. 10 Oregon atArizona, 10:15 p.m.
No. II Florida State at No. 21
Clemson, 3:30 p.m.
No. 12 South Carolina vs.Vanderbilt,
7 p.m.
No. 13 Virginia Tech at Marshall,
3:30 p.m.
No. 15 Florida at Kentucky,
7 p.m.
No. 17 Baylor vs. Rice, 7 p.m.
No. 18 South Florida vs. UTEP,
7 p.m.
No. 20TCU vs. Portland State, 2 p.m.
No. 22 Michigan vs. San Diego State,
Noon
No. 23 Southern Cal at Arizona State,
10:15 p.m.
No. 24 Illinois vs. Western Michigan,
3:30 p.m.
No. 25 Georgia Tech vs. North
Carolina, Noon


BASKETBALL

WNBA playoffs

CONFERENCE FINALS
Eastern Conference
Indiana vs.Atlanta
Thursday
Atlanta at Indiana (n)
Sunday
Iridiana at Atlanta, 3 p.m.

Western Conference
Minnesota vs. Phoenix
Thursday
Phoenix at Minnesota (n)
Sunday
Minnesota at Phoenix, 5 p.m.


AUTO RACING

Race week

NASCAR
SPRINT CUP
SYLVANIA 300
Site: Loudon, N.H.
Schedule: Today, practice (ESPN2.
11:30 a.m.-I p.m.). qualifying (ESPN2,
3-4:30 p.m.); Saturday, practice (Speed.
11:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m.); Sunday, race, 2 p.m.
(ESPN, 1.-5:30 p.m.).
Track: New Hampshire Motor
Speedway (oval, 1.058 miles).
Race distance: 317.4 miles. 300 laps.
CAMPING WORLD TRUCK
F.W.WEBB 175
Site: Loudon. N.H.
Schedule: Today, practice; Saturday.
qualifying, race, 3 p.m. (Speed, 2:30-
5:30 p.m.).
Track: New Hampshire Motor
Speedway.
Race distance: 185.15 miles. 175 laps.
FORMULA ONE
SINGAPORE GRAND PRIX
Site: Singapore.
Schedule: Today, practice (Speed, 9:30-
II a.m.), Saturday, practice, qualifying
(Speed, 10-11:30 a.m.); Sunday, race, 8 a.m.
(Speed. 7:30-10 a.m.. 3-5:30 p.m.).
Track: Marina Bay Street Circuit
(street course, 3.148 miles).
Race distance: 191.97 miles, 61 laps.
NHRA FULL THROTTLE
TEXAS FALL NATIONALS
Site: Ennis.Texas.
Schedule: Today, qualifying; Saturday.
qualifying (ESPN2, Sunday, 1:15-
2:30 a.m.),Sunday.final eliminations (ESPN2.
7-10 p.m.).
Track:Texas Motorplex.


HOCKEY

NHL preseason

Wednesday's Games
Phoenix (ss) 2. Los Angeles (ss) I, SO
Toronto 4, Philadelphia 2
Columbus 4,Washington 3. OT
Pittsburgh 3, Detroit 2
St. Louis 4,Tampa Bay 3
New Jersey 2, N.Y. Rangers I, OT
Buffalo 3, Montreal I
Ottawa 2, Boston I, OT
SSan Jose 6,Anaheim I
Los Angeles (ss) 3, Phoenix (ss) 2
Thursday's Games
Chicago at Pittsburgh (n)
Detroit vs. Philadelphia (n)
Minnesota at St. Louis (n)
Colorado at Dallas (n)
Vancouver at Edmonton (n)
Today's Games
N.Y. Islanders at Boston, 7 p.m.
Buffalo at Toronto, 7 p.m.
Nashville at Carolina, 7 p.m.
N.Y. Rangers at New Jersey, 7 p.m.
Philadelphia at Detroit, 7:30 p.m.
Florida atTampa Bay. 7:30 p.m.
Montreal at Ottawa, 7:30 p.m.
Washington at Chicago, 8 p.m.
Columbus at Minnesota, 8 p.m.
St. Louis at Colorado, 9 p.m.
Anaheim at San Jose, 10:30 p.m.

THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME
by David L. Hoyt and Jeff Knurek


AFTER 5OME BIG SWINGS
DURING THE WEEK,
THE POW INPUSTRIAL-5
HAP ---
Now arrange the circled letters
to form the surprise answer, as
suggested by the above cartoon.


Ans: L f

(Answers tomorrow)
Yesterday Jumbles: CRUMB AVOID CLENCH PRIMER
I Answer: They learned about Big Ben after a passerby
did this CHIMED IN


League reports
Results of league bowling at Lake
City Bowl:
TGIF
Team standings: 1. Back At Ya
Again! (17-3); 2. Print This & That
(14-6, 12,535 pins); 3. Fun Tyme
Travel (14-6, 12,438 pins).
High scratch game: 1. Dorinda
Feasel 230; 2. Karen Coleman 220;
3. Pat Gallegos 213. 1. Zech Strohl
249; 2. Joe Ganser 243; 3. Bobby
Robinson 239.
High scratch series: 1. Karen
Coleman 611; 2. Pat Gallegos 581;
3. Dorinda Feasel 541. 1. Zech Strohl
708; 2. Jason Howell 632; 3. Dale
Coleman 617.
High handicap game: 1. Dorinda
Feasel 300; 2. Pat Gallegos 261;
3. Tarl Johnson 256. 1. Bobby
Robinson 290; 2. Joe Ganser 274;
3. (tie) Kamara Hollingsworth, Thomas
Stemp 267.
High handicap series: 1. Dorinda
Feasel 751; 2. Pat Gallegos 725;
3. Karen Coleman 686. 1. Bobby
Robinson 746; 2. Zech Strohl 708;
3. Dale Coleman 681.
(results from Sept. 16)
HIT & MISS
Team standings: 1. Oddballs
(15-5); 2. The Sandbaggers (14-6);
3. Spare Us (12-8).
High handicap game: 1. Joan
Carman 239; 2. Anna McDonald 231;
3. Shirley Highsmith 224.
High handicap series: 1. Angie
Meek 628; 2. Joyce Crandall 626;
3. Cythe Shiver 608.
(results from Sept. 20)
GOLDEN ROLLERS
Team standings: 1. Wild Things
(17-3); 2. Quirky Quad (16-4); 3. Jo's
Crew (15-5).
High handicap game: 1. Betty
Carmichael 249; 2. June Pat Klock
221; 3. (tie) Joanne Denton, Joyce
Hooper 219. 1. Bill Price 275;
2. Thomas Young 235; 3. Dan Ritter
234.
High handicap series: 1. Debbie
Walters 684; 2. Barbara Griner 624;
3. De De Young 608. 1. Vernon Black
724; 2. Earl Hayward 668; 3. David
Duncan 648.
High average: 1. De De Young
158.27; 2. Louise Atwood 154.13;
3. Betty Carmichael 153.13. 1. Bill
Dolly 180.07; 2. George Mulligan 179;


'BOWLING


3. David Duncan 174.4.
(results from Sept. 15)
SEXY SENIORS
Team standings: 1. Razzle Dazzle
(12-4, 9,327 pins); 2. Pin Droppers
(12-4, 9,267 pins); 3. Perky Pals
(11-5).
High scratch game: 1. Joanne
Denton 204; 2. Roberta Giordano
191;3. LouiseAtwood 187.1.Johnnle
Croft 185; 2. Dan Ritter 184; 3. Rick
Yates 180.
High scratch series: 1. Joanne
Denton 527; 2. Louise Atwood 514;
3. Roberta Giordano 475. 1. Dan
Ritter 527; 2. Rick Yates 512; 3. Art
Joubert 494.
High average: 1. Louise Atwood
151.92; 2. Joanne Denton 150.17;
3. Bea Purdy 147.5. 1. Dan RItter
181.33; 2. Art Joubert 168.08; 3. Rick
Yates 165.33.
(results from Sept. 13)
MONDAY NIGHT MAVERICKS
Team standings: 1. Ronsonet
Bulck/GMC (66-24, 9,446 pins);
2. Team 9 (66-24, 9,053 pins); 3. Team
2 (54.5-35.5).
High scratch game: 1. Robert
Stone 280; 2. Curtis Gutzmer 268;
3. Daniel Adel 266.
High scratch series: 1. (tie) Robert
Stone, Curtis Gutzmer 750; 3. Daniel
Adel 712; 4. Zech Strohl 696.
High handicap game: 1. Robert
Stone 286; 2. George Mulligan 278;
3. Daniel Adel 273.
High handicap series: 1. Robert
Stone 768; 2. Curtis Gutzmer 762;
3. Steve Bedenbaugh 747.
High average: 1. Curtis Gutzmer
229.22; 2. Zech Strohl 222.89;
3. Daniel Adel 213.89.
resultss from Sept. 12)
WATERGUARD
High scratch game: 1. Lorrime
Geiger 222; 2. Gloria Dennis 204;
3. Lori Davis 196. 1. Jim Lobaugh
253; 2. Mark Davis 246; 3. Luke
Milton 235.
High scratch series: 1. (tie) Lome
Geiger, Gloria Dennis 566; 3. Mary
Lobaugh 528; 4. Lori Davis 480.
1. Mark Davis 685; 2. George Mulligan
650; 3. Jim Lobaugh 622.
High handicap game: 1. Amanda
Meng 272; 2. Lorrie Geiger 248;
3. Lori Davis 239. 1. Jim Lobaugh
290; 2. Dan Cobb 252; 3. Luke Milton
243.
High handicap series: 1. Gloria


Dennis 698; 2. Lorrie Niquette 662;
3. Lau Sapp 639. 1. George Mulligan
752; 2. Mark Davis 727; 3. Steve
Fancy 691.
High average: Lorrie Geiger 181,
Luke Milton 202.
(results from Sept. 20)

Youth leagues

MAJORS SCRATCH
Team standings: 1. Angry Blrds(:
(41-23); 2. Balls to the Wall (38.5-
25.5); 3. Ninja Bowling Co. (34-30).
High scratch game: 1. Courtney
Schmit) 214; 2. Courtney Schmitt
194; 3. Sara Sykes 182. 1. Madison
Stephens 227; 2. Michael Burlingame
221; 3. Josh Fancy,216.
High scratch series: 1. Courtney
Schmitt 565; 2. Sara Sykes 518;
3. Lauren Snipes 497. 1. Madison
Stephens 643; 2. Josh Fancy 606;
3. Bobby Hosler 604.
MAJORS
Team standings: 1. Team 7 (14-2);
2. Team 6 (11-5); 3. Team 2 (10.5-
5.5).
High handicap game: 1. (tie)
Tiffany Ritch, Allison Dukes 241;
3. Sara Johns 230. 1. Charles Collins
248; 2. Jordan Salzer 235; 3. Jimmy
Milewski 234.
High handicap series: 1. Allison
"Dukes 656; 2. Sara Johns 642;
3. Chelsea Gore 638. 1. Charles
Collins 652; 2. Anthony Cohrs 624;
3. David Senokossoff 619.
JUNIORS
Team standings: 1. Crazy Kids
(13-3, 6,313 pins); 2. King Pins (13-3,
6,154 pins); 3. The Gator Girls (12-4).
High handicap game: 1. Alexis
Menna 223; 2. Amanda Schmitt 202;
3. (tie) Sarah Griffin, Sydney Griffin
200. 1. (tie) Blake Lyons, Luke Griffin
211; 3. Dalton LeRoux 200.
High handicap series: 1. Sydney
Griffin 572; 2. (tie) Alexis Manna 562,
Caitlyn Pyles 562. 1. Luke Griffin 596;
2. Blake Lyons 578; 3. Billy Griffin
575.
BANTAMS
High handicap game: 1. Jadyn
Freeman 158; 2. Heaven Camacho
152. 1. Carson Lyons 157.
High handicap series: 1. Heaven
Camacho 451; 2. Jadyn Freeman
429. 1. Carson Lyons 429.
(results from Sept. 17)


AMERICAN LEGION HOLD 'EM


Week four winners/ second; Johanna Esposito, 0 Sept. 17 Terry
qualifiers in the American third; Kal Schwarz, Newth, first; Jim Grimsley,
Legion Post 57 Texas fourth; second; Ray Benoit, third;
Hold 'em Champions 0 Sept. 15 Art Lowes, Brittany May, fourth.
Tournament: first; Bob Tarlton, second; Total qualified 32;
E Sept. 12 Brad Norb Kogutkiewciz, third;. Royal Flush Jackpot -
Woods, first; Art Lowes, Thomas Myrick, fourth; $300.


BRIEFS


* YOUTH BASEBALL

Lake City fall

sign-up extended

Lake City Columbia
County Youth Baseball
registration for the fall
season has been extended


ACROSS
Part of RSVP
Caught red-
handed
Ivy Leaguer
Humerus
neighbor
Lhasa -
Study
Basin in a
church
Traces
Remark
Dormant
Myrna of old
movies
Comfy shoe
Wears at the
edges
Cereal topper
Lightning
by-product
Grab a cab
Ruler before
Galba
Cask stopper
Pantyhose
woe


to 5-7 p.m. today and
10 a.m. to noon Saturday
at Southside Recreation
Complex. Online
registration at LCCCYB.
com. has been extended
through Oct. 1.
For details, call Tad
Cervantes at 365-4810.


37 Above, to
Tennyson
38 Browns
40 Some
eclipses
42 Gator Bowl st.
43 Realty
offering
44 Swollen
47 Flowering
trees
51 Divides by
three
53 colada
54 Lord Byron's
daughter
55 Faxed, maybe
56 Pen refills
57 Humble
dwelling
58 Fling
59 Famous Khan


HIGH SCHOOL FOOTBALL

Trucks for food

drive at games

Trucks will be at CHS
and Fort White football
games today for donations
to the food drive.


Answer to Previous Puzzle


PITCH V IE
BOOHOO CACHET
SUPER B ASIANS
S NFFS D YE
SASE READ
REB TVA LOCK
ECHO EGO J AIL
STOA ETC OBOE
SRTA UTA IST
HEAR TANK
L GE GREE KS
CORSET AI K IDO
DOGMAS UNEVEN
NOUN SWEET


5 Fencing
DOWN sword
6 Mountain
Untidy person curve
Motels of yore 7 Whim
Recently 8 Verge
Know-how 9 Bold look


' 10 Part of MIT
11 Starman's
vessel
16 Ancient
Peruvian
18 Hashanah
21 Actress -
Powers
22 Prevaricate
23 Force to flee
24 Half of AD
25 Dumpsters
26 Flashy sign
27 Zone
30 Film terrier
32 Puckster
Bobby -
34 Fish landers
36 Latch onto
39 Least
trustworthy
41 Perfect world
43 Shoppers'
aids
44 Nile god
45 Karachi
language
46 Authoritative
decree
47 Rockles,
briefly
48 What divas do
49 "My Way"
composer
50 Airline to
Stockholm
52 Mgmt. biggle


Sx-Phlladelp
Atlanta
"* Washingto
NewYork
Florida


M, Milwaukee
St. Louis
Cincinnati
Chicago
Pittsburgh
Houston


Arizona
San Franci
Los Angeli
Colorado
San Diego
x-clinched


Want more puzzles?
Check out the "Just Right Crossword Puzzles" books
at QuIIIDriverBooks.com


9-23 2011 UFS, Dist. by Universal Uclick for UFS


Page Editor: Tim Kirby, 754-0421


TOVIEL




MAHRPE
7 m -
__!> ^____S











LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS .FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 23, 2011


Tebow willing to do more


By ARNIE STAPLETON
Associated Press

ENGLEWOOD, Colo.
- Tim Tebow insists he'll
be a starting quarterback
in the NFL someday. In the
meantime, he wants to line
up anywhere his coaches
will let him.
The former Florida star
whose adjustment to the
pros is taking longer than
he and his rabid fan base.
would like was pressed into
duty as a slot receiver for
a handful of snaps Sunday
when the Denver Broncos'
injury epidemic claimed
starting wide receivers
Brandon Lloyd and Eddie
Royal.
A day later, his coach reit-
erated that Tebow, a third-
stringer in his second pro
season, is first and foremost
a passer.
Some of Tebow's staunch-
est supporters suggest that
while Tebow bides his time
at quarterback, his talents
could be put to use as an
H-back, tight end, wide
receiver or even on special
teams.
"Well, I want to be a quar-
terback. I believe I can be;
I believe I will be. And I've
just got to keep working
at that," Tebow said. "But
if I can help the team in


another way, that's what I'm
here for.
"You know, we're all foot-
ball players first."
Tebow dismisses the
notion that playing other
positions will stunt his
development at quarter-
back.
"How's it's going to stunt
my growth if I go out there
on Sunday afternoon, we
lose some receivers and I
have to go out there and
help the team?" Tebow said.
"It's not like I'm going to
the receivers' meetings.
I'm just blessed to have the
ability to go do it and if I'm
asked to go do it, I help the
team."
Tebow's game is built
around his multifaceted tal-
ents, his instincts and his
passion, not pinpoint pass-
ing, although the common
perception is that his 50
percent completion percent-
age will have to rise about
10 points for him to be able
to run an NFL offense full-
time.
Tebow said the dual-
threat talents that led him to
hoist Heisman and national
championship trophies with
the Gators should serve
him well in the pros, too.
"I mean, I look at it like
an attribute, not a nega-
tive," he said. "Some people


would look at it as a nega-
tive, but I don't. I say if I'm
blessed to be able to do that
and I have an opportunity
to do that, I don't look at it
as a bad thing."
Tebow lined up in the
slot Sunday after Lloyd was
a game-day scratch, rookie
tight end Julius Thomas
- who was the emergency
wide receiver sprained
an ankle on Denver's first
drive and Royal pulled up
lame on a deep route in the
second quarter.
All three joined wide
receiver Demaryius
Thomas on the sideline.
Thomas, the Broncos' top
draft pick a year ago, shat-
tered his left pinkie in his
first padded practice ear-
lier this month after being
cleared to play following a
relatively rapid recovery
from a torn Achilles tendon.
He underwent surgery to
put three screws in his pin-
kie and he's not expected
back for another month.
Tebow was never target-
ed, although quarterback
Kyle Orton said he wouldn't
have hesitated to throw his
way if he had to.
A day later when' asked
about using Tebow at other
positions, coach John Fox
said, "Let me make this
totally clear: he is a quar-


terback. He did that just
as an emergency situation,
and we'll list him on the
program as a quarterback."
And yet, just like last
week, Tebow was running
some routes at practice this
week just in case.
"Well, one, I did that last
year but just as extra con-
ditioning because it's fun
and I love playing football,"
Tebow said. "So, sometimes
this offseason I would do it
just as conditioning. Instead
of running a 20-yard gasser,
I'd just run a post and still
get conditioning. But then
(last week) they talked to
me about the what-if and so
then I started doing more
routes, to be ready.
"And thank goodness
those last few weeks I did
do it because my number
was called to go in there
even though I didn't get a
pass."
At 6-foot-3 and 235
pounds, Tebow had no trou-
ble blocking his defender,
however.
"There's not going to be
too many 240-pound cor-
ners, so yeah, I feel like
I can do OK out there,"
Tebow said with a smile.
Receivers coach
Tyke Tolbert said Tebow
can hold his own in the
slot.


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Denver Broncos' quarterback Tim Tebow takes the field
during an NFL football game between the Denver Broncos
and the Cincinnati Bengals Sunday in Denver.


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Florida's Chris Rainey (1) finds an open path as he ducks a tackle from Tennessee's
Austin Johnson (40) to run in a touchdown in Saturday's 33-23 win.


Florida's blocked punt


draws attention, no flags


By MARK LONG
Associated Press

GAINESVILLE -
Florida's latest blocked
punt caused quite a stir
around the Southeastern
Conference on Wednesday.
But coaches and the
league's coordinator of offi-
cials said it was much ado
about nothing.
Kentucky coach Joker
Phillips, Tennessee coach
Derek Dooley and the
league's head official,
Steve Shaw, said the 15th-
ranked Gators did noth-
ing illegal while blocking
a punt Saturday against
Tennessee.
Shaw watched replays
and found no problems.
"There's always going to
be hand-grabbing and shov-
ing but nothing to the level
of a pull and shoot," Shaw
said, referring to an illegal
tactic in which defenders
,grab opponents and yank
them to one side in hopes


of creating an opening for
another player to sprint to
the punter.
A blog post in the
Lexington Herald-Leader
suggested that Florida
- which has blocked four
field goals and two punts
against the Wildcats since
2006 was breaking rules
by having defensive line-
man create holes for speedy
blockers.
But Phillips, who was
quoted in the story, clarified
his remarks on the SEC tele-
conference Wednesday and
said he never intended to
question Florida's tactics.
"Everybody does it,"
Phillips said. 'We try to do
it also. Nothing illegal about
it. I wasn't saying there's
anything illegal about it. I
was saying they do a great
job of it."
Dooley avoided the topic
by putting the blame for the
block on his team.
"No, I'm not gonna ... if
we do our job the way we


need to do it, then we don't
even have that discussion,"
Dooley said. "So I put that
responsibility on us."
Florida has led the league
in blocked kicks four times
in the past five years. The
latest one involved speed-
ster Chris Rainey, who
broke the school record
with his fifth blocked kick
in four seasons.
Rainey split two line-
men and blocked Michael
Palardy's early in the sec-
ond quarter. The turnover
led to a field goal and a 13-0
lead.
Gators coach Will
Muschamp said talent,
speed and scheme are the
reason the program has
been so good at blocking
kicks.
"We play hard and coach
hard, and I'm real pleased
with what we (lid," he said.
"They didn't throw any flags,
did they, on that play?"
The Gators were not
penalized.


INDIANS: Donations asked for tonight


Continued From Page 1B

as Zach Cormier scored
a touchdown to go with
two TDs from Williams
and one from Legree.
Williams added a two-point
conversion to tie the
game at 28-all with 2:49 to
play.
Fort White's defense
forced four turnovers
against Taylor County and
two set up short touchdown
drives.


Jomar Gainer and
Legree had interceptions,
and Terry Calloway and
Legree had fumble recover-
ies.
The Indians gave up a
season-high 392 yards
- 158 on the ground and
234 passing and 35
points after holding their
first two opponents to
single digits on the
scoreboard.


Fort White wraps
up the first half of the
season next week at
Union County High,
then will have an open
week.
There will be a truck at
the main gate of the stadium
today to accept donations
(non-perishable goods, no
glass) for Jeremy Barick's
Eagle Scout food drive proj-
ect.


NASCAR tries to


break up Talladega


two-car tandems


By JENNA FRYER
Associated Press

CHARLOTTE, N.C.
- NASCAR tweaked
two rules for next
month's race at Talladega
Superspeedway, appar-
ently in an effort to limit
the two-car tandem rac-
ing that has dominated at
its two fastest tracks.
The first change
ordered Wednesday was
an increase in the size of
the restrictor plate that
will be used in the Oct.
23 race. The larger holes
in the carburetor plates
should lead to an increase
of horsepower that could
make the cars 2 to 3 mph
faster.
NASCAR also ordered
an adjustment on the pop-
off valve in the cooling
system that should lower
the maximum water
temperature in engines.
A threat of overheating
could prevent cars from
staying hooked together
for too long.
Drivers discovered
over the last year that it's
faster to run at Daytona
iand Talladega in two-car
tandems. That style has
replaced the popular two-
and three-wide packs, and
fans have been lukewarm
about the tandem racing.
Now, two cars hook up
bumper-to-bumper, one
clearly pushing the other
until the potential for over-
heating forces them to
separate and then swap.
It's made for record lead
changes and exciting fin-
ishes, but is a totally dif-
ferent style than the white-
knuckle pack racing fans
loved.
Drivers, meanwhile, said
it's impossible to see any-
thing when they are push-
ing another car and Dale
Earnhardt Jr., NASCAR's
most popular driver, has
repeatedly railed against
tandem racing.
"What kind of move can
you make in racing like


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Sprint Cup Series driver Kevin Harvick (29) sits during
practice for the NASCAR Sprint Cup Series auto race at
Chicagoland Speedway in Joliet, Ill., Friday,


this?" he asked in July.
"There ain't no move you
can make. You just hold it
on the mat and'try not to
wreck into each other."
NASCAR vice presi-
dent of competition Robin
Pemberton made no men-
tion of the tandem rac-
ing in explaining the rule
changes.
"After the last few super-
speedway races, we've
heard many drivers express
their desire to open up the
size of the restrictor plate
some and we thought the
time was right to do that,"
Pemberton said in a state-
ment. "We anticipate these
revisions in the rules pack-
age for Talladega will help
continue to provide com-
petitive and exciting racing
for the fans."
The larger restrictor
plate could push speeds
over 200 mph, but the
combination of the pop-off
valve change likely means
the cars won't be able
to stay locked together
for as many laps. David


Reutimann crew chief
Rodney Childers thinks
drivers might be limited
to a lap of pushing before
needing to swap.
"Changing the plates will
be better," Childers said. "It
should make it more racy,
where you can pull out and
pass. If they are wanting to
make it where people can't
draft as long, it's going to
do that. Probably only a
half of a lap or a lap is all
you're going to get out of
it."
Chad Johnston, crew
chief for Martin Truex
Jr., predicted that drivers
will have to swap positions
more. That could make
it dicey, he said, because
drivers will have to swap
while also avoiding the
two-car packs closing in
behind them.
"The chances of some-
thing going wrong on a
swap are going to go up
obviously, but hopefully
it will eliminate or lessen
the two-by-two racing," he
said.


CHS: Looks to light up scoreboard


Continued From Page 11
had some issues last week
and that's something Allen
hopes the Tigers can take
advantage of.
"'They'll give us a mix of
odd and even fronts withI


some 3-3-5 stack involved,"
Allen said. "We hope to
rush the ball and put
together four quarters like
we played the third quarter
last week."


The will be a truck at
the main gate to accept
donations (non-perishable
goods, no glass) for Jeremy
Barick's Eagle Scout food
drive project.


Page Editor: Brandon Finley, 754-0420












Page Editor: Emogene Graham, 754-0415 LAKE CITY REPORTER ADVICE & COMICS FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 23, 2011


DILBERT


BLONDIE


BEETLE BAILEY


HAGARTHE HORRIBLE


SNUFFY SMITH


ZITS


GARFIELD


B.C.


FRANK & ERNEST


DEAR ABBY


High in the sky is no

place to teach manners


DEAR ABBY: I am a
flight attendant for a major
carrier. I encounter rude
passengers every single
day, as well as people
(including children) with
no manners. I accept
that not everyone will
be friendly to me. Some
people are not capable of
being friendly, and others
may be going through per-
sonal issues and not real-
ize they're being rude.
I have a colleague,
"Joel," who can't get
past this. If a passenger
doesn't say "please" or
"thank you," Joel will
respond with, "What do
you say?" or, "What's the
magic word?" or a sarcas-
tic, "You're welcome!" if
a thank-you hasn't been
given. I am appalled by
this. While I agree that
manners are important, I
don't feel it's my place to
educate our passengers.
What's your take on this?
Is Joel out of line or offer-
ing a valuable lesson? How
can I voice my objection
and tell him he's embar-
rassing his co-workers,
the passengers and him-
self? ATTITUDES IN
ALTITUDES, IN FLORIDA
DEAR A IN A- From
my window seat it appears
there may be stormy
weather ahead for your co-
worker. However, this is a
lesson he will have to learn
for himself, so stay out of


Abigail Van Buren
www.dearabby.com
it. Yes, Joel is out of line,
and when enough passen-
gers complain about him
to the airline, he will suffer
the consequences.
** ** **
DEAR ABBY: I am an
accepting person who can
make friends with just
about anyone. Among my
friends there are some
who identify as homosexu-
al. I value their friendship
because they are caring,
honest and funny traits I
look for in any friend.
My grandparents -
whom I am close to are
not so accepting. They
have strict beliefs regard-
ing homosexuality. So
whenever I want to talk
to them about something
interesting that happened
when I was with my friend
and his or her partner, I'll
catch myself hesitating.
Is there a way I can be
graceful about this without
stirring up bad feelings?
- RAINBOW GIRL IN
SPRINGFIELD, MASS.
DEAR RAINBOW GIRL
Yes. Ask your grandparents
if they'd prefer you tell them


all about your activities
and whom you spend time
with, or if they'd rather you
remain silent about your
gay friends. Explain that you
sense tension when you're
open with them, and ask
if they'd feel better if you
were selective in discussing
your life, your friends and
your interests. That way the
choice will be theirs.

DEAR ABBY: I am a
middle-aged man with
an older sister who criti-
cizes the way I sneeze. She
thinks my sneezing isn't
"restrained" enough. It's
not a question of direction
or whether I put my hand
in front of my mouth or
not. She believes if I don't
try to stifle my sneeze
I'm uncouth. In my opin-
'ion, sneezing is a natural
automatic response and
serves to relieve whatever
causes it What do you
think? SOMETHING TO
SNEEZE AT
DEAR SOMETHING: I
agree with you. And I am
not convinced that trying
to stifle a sneeze is healthy
because it's nature's way of
expelling something from
the nose that is irritating.
Sneeze away, and God
bless you!

E Write Dear Abby at
www.DearAbby.com or
P.O. Box 69440, Los
Angeles, CA 90069.


HOROSCOPES


*ARIES (March 21-April
19): Your spontaneity will
aid you in making friends,
winning competitions and
impressing someone spe-
cial. You don't have to go
overboard; let your charm
and talent speak for you.
A change of plans will
turn out better than antici-
pated. Love is highlighted.

TAURUS (April 20-May
20): Don't do anything
rash. Think matters
through before you make
a move. Not everyone will
agree with your decision.
Do what's best for you, but
don't force your will on
others. Avoid arguments
and overindulgent people.

GEMINI (May 21-June
20): Expect more com-
munication with children,
seniors or your peer
group. You can make a dif-
ference by participating in
a worthy cause. Romance
is highlighted. You will
attract positive attention
and the interest of unique
individuals. ****
CANCER (June 21-July
22): Discussing personal
matters isn't likely to help.
Let the dust settle before
you broach sensitive sub-
jects that could result in an
unexpected change. Focus
on helping others. You
will make a difference and
impress someone you care
about. ***
LEO (July 23-Aug. 22):


THE LAST WORD
Eugenia Last

Listen to reason and don't
overreact The ease with
which you do things will
help you avoid trouble.
Your energy is high and
should be put to good use.
Your selflessness will be
appreciated and help to
raise your profile and your
popularity. **
VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept.
22): Money will come to
you unexpectedly. Don't
be too quick to spend what
you receive. There will be
underlying circumstances
you must deal with. Sit
tight until you have all the
facts and you have thought
matters through to the
end. ***
* LIBRA (Sept 23-Oct
22): Nothing will be stable,
but it certainly will be
interesting. Keep a close
watch on others. Your
timing is impeccable, but
expect someone to chal-
lenge your plans. Deal with
everyone confidently and
you will finish on top. Love
is in the stars. ****
SCORPIO (Oct 23-Nov.
21): Pace yourself. Making
changes abruptly can
be as bad as not making
any at all. Ease your way
into your plans so that
everyone will have time
to adjust An interesting
relationship will develop
through networking and
offering help. **


SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-
Dec. 21): Boost your sta-
tus. Interact with the com-
petition and change your
position. Pursue your goals
relentlessly. Challenge
anyone who gets in your
way and be prepared to go
further than anyone else to
get what you want. Love is
highlighted. *****
CAPRICORN (Dec.
22-Jan. 19): Gauge what
can and cannot be done
before making promises.
Know what you are up
against. Not everything
is in plain view. Someone
you thought you could
count on is likely to disap-
point. You may be put in
an unwelcome position.
Protect your assets. ***
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-
Feb. 18): A partnership or
joint endeavor can save
you money. Consider
choices and discuss pos-
sibilities. Love is highlight-
ed: Making personal and
physical changes will bring
compliments. Show effort
and pick up new skills for
an opportunity to advance.

PISCES (Feb. 19-March
20): Retreat and observe.
You stand to learn a lot
about the people around
you. Knowledge can be
a powerful tool. Don't
shy away from changes.
Sometimes you need a
nudge in order to start a
new adventure. Benefits
are apparent ***


CELEBRITY CIPHER


by Luis Campos
Celebrity Cipher cryptograms are created from quotations by famous people, past and present.
Each letter in the cipher stands for another.
TODAY'S CLUE: A equals B
"TRTG XN ZBUTY.KXGE XZ HTNY
PGFBGT, TRTLVBGT UPZY YMWT YXUT
YB ZXY ZYXHH MGF JMYSK YKT HTMRTZ
Y PLG. -- TH XCMATY K HM J LTGST

PREVIOUS SOLUTION: "A man's home may seem to be his castle on the
outside; Inside It Is more often his nursery." Clare Boothe Luce
(c) 201 1 by NEA, Inc. 9-23


FOR BETTER OR WORSE


HW'S IN TIOUgLL--- H'S IN CHAgO f
OF THf MW$ HALl-, ASROAD, AND
T/ HTg HAVW gEN IOTS |
f OF COMPI-AINTT THAT l
STHf FOODt I TOO SPICY.

OVf OV5,AE$5 T 11
OVf9- 5AMONIN61


Page Editor: Emogene Graham, 754-0415


LAKE CITY REPORTER


CLASSIC PEANUTS


ADVICE & COMICS FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 23,2011
lo













LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 23, 2011


Lake City Reporter





CLASSIFIED


-----ADvantage


Take ADvantage of the
Reporter Classifieds!

755-5440


4 lines 6 days Each additional
Rate applies to private individuals selling
personal merchandise totalling $100 or less.
Each am mst Include a pce.
This Is a non-refundable rae.




One Item per ad
4 lines 6 days line additional
Rate applies to private Individualsselling
personal merchandise totalling $500 or less.
Each Item must Include a price.
This is a non-refundable rate.




Slinte pe 6 ad Each additional
4 s ys line $1.15
4 lines 6 days a ^ on |
Rate applies to private Individuals selling
Each item must Include a pce
This is a non-refundable rate




One Item per ad $2370
4 lines 6 days ac |ional
Rate applies to private Individuals selling
personal me hands totalling $2,500 or le.
Il Each Item must In ud a prim.
This is a non-retundable rate.




One Item per ad
4 lines 6 daysEah |ional
Rate applies to private Individ uals selling
per1 nl merchandise totsalling $4,000 or less.
Each Item must Include a price
This isa non-refundablerate




SOne Iter per ad p3 e \ti
4 lines 6 daysmn tahs di0 d o
Rate orpplies to private divide. seian -












personal merohaise totr.ang $000 or e.












FaX 38o-752-:400 e.. a ls
Each Item must Include a price
This a non-refun to dae rateif







3 days 1750




Limited to service type advert s-
ing only.
4 lines one month....ll 92 00
$10.80 each additional line
includes an additional $2.00 per
ad for each Wednesday insertion.



You can call us at 755-5440,
Monday through Fri day from 8:00
a.m. to 5: 00 p m.
Some people prefer to place their
classified ads in person, and some
ad categories will require prepay-
ment. Our office is located at 180
East Duval Street.
You can also fax or email your ad
copy to the Reporter.
FAX: 386-752-9400 Please
direct your copy to the Classified
Department.
EMAIL: classifieds@lakecityre-
porter.comr





A istoAppear Call by: Fax/Email by:
Tuesday Mon,10:00a.m. Mon.,9:00iam..
Wednesday Mon,10:00a.m Mon,i9:00a.m.
Thursday Wed,100a.m. Wed.,9:00 a.m.
Friday Thurs., 10:00 a.m. Thrs,00am.
Saturday Fri., 10:00 am Fri., 9:00 am.
Sunday Fri., 10:00 a.m. Fri, 9:00a.m.
These deadlines are subject to change without notice.




Ad Errors- Please read your ad
on the first day of publication.
We accept responsibility for only
the first incorrect Insertion, and
only the charge for the ad space
in error. Please call 755-5440
Immediately for prompt correc-
tion and billing adjustments.
Cancellations- Normal advertising
deadlines apply for cancellation.
Billing Inquires- Call 755-5440.
Should further information be
required regarding payments or
credit limits, your call will be trans-
ferred to the accounting depart-



Advertising copy is subject to
approval by the Pullisher who
reserves the right to edit, reject,
or classify all advertisements under
appropriate headings. Copy should
be checked for errors by the

location. Credit for published errors
will be allowed for the first insertion

which was incorrect. Further, the
Publisher shall not be liable for any
omission of advertisements ordered
to be published, nor for any general,
special or consequential damages.
Advertising language must comply
with Federal, State or local laws
regarding the prohibition of discrimi-
nation in employment, housing and
public accommodations. Standard
abbreviations are acceptable; how-


ever, the first word of each ad may
not be abbreviated.

In Print a(M Online
www.hlie ilyrVporlcer.cotnm


Legal

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
3RD JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF
FLORIDA, IN AND FOR COLUM-
BIA COUNTY
Case #: 2010-CA-000543
Division #:
Regions Bank d/b/a Regions Mort-
gage, successor by Merger to Union
Planters Bank, N.A.
Plaintiff,
vs.
Joseph M. Spradley, Jr.; Columbia
Bank f/k/a Columbia County Bank
Defendant(s)
NOTICE OF SALE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pur-
suant to an Order of Final Judgment
of Foreclosure dated September 7,
2011, entered in Civil Case No.
2010-CA-000543 of the Circuit
Court of the 3rd Judicial Circuit in
and for Columbia County, Florida,
wherein Regions Bank d/b/a Regions
Mortgage, successor by Merger to
Union Planters Bank, N.A., Plaintiff
and Joseph M. Spradley, Jr. are de-
fendant(s), I will sell to the highest
and best bidder for cash AT THE
WEST FRONT DOOR OF THE
COLUMBIA COUNTY COURT-
HOUSE, LOCATED AT 145 HER-
NANDO STREET, LAKE CITY,
COLUMBIA COUNTY, FLORIDA,
AT 11:00 A.M. on October 12, 2011,
the following described property as
set forth in said Final Judgment, to-
wit:
COMMENCE AT THE SOUTH-
EAST CORNER OF SECTION 17,
TOWNSHIP 2 SOUTH, RANGE 17
EAST, COLUMBIA COUNTY,
FLORIDA AND RUN S 88' 23' 53"
WEST, ALONG THE SOUTH
LINE OF SAID SECTION 17, A
DISTANCE OF 931.11 FEET,
THENCE N 02' 02' 15" WEST,
24.22 FEET TO THE NORTH
RIGHT-OF-WAY LINE OF A DIRT
ROAD (AS NOW MAINTAINED)
AND THE POINT OF BEGIN-
NING, THENCE NORTH 02' 02'
15" WEST, 208.75 FEET, THENCE
SOUTH 89' 12' 59" WEST, 208.75
FEET, THENCE SOUTH 02' 02'
15" EAST, 208.75 FEET TO
NORTH SIDE OF A DIRT ROAD,
THENCE NORTH 89' 12' 59"
EAST, ALONG THE NORTH SIDE
OF DIRT ROAD 208.75 FEET TO
THE POINT OF BEGINNING.
ANY PERSON CLAIMING AN IN-
TEREST IN THE SURPLUS FROM
THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER
THAN THE PROPERTY OWNER
AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS
PENDENS MUST FILE A CLAIM
WITHIN '60 DAYS AFTER THE
SALE.
P. DEWIIT CASON
CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT
Columbia County, Florida
/s/: B. Scippio
DEPUTY CLERK OF COURT
ATTORNEY FOR PLAINTIFF:'
SHAPIRO, FISHMAN & GACHE,
LLP
4630 Woodland Corporate Blvd.
Suite 100
Tampa, FL 33614
(813) 880-8888
(813) 880-8800
05527848
September 16, 23, 2011
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT, THIRD
JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR
COLUMBIA COUNTY, FLORIDA.
Case No. 11-196-CA
H. A. BUIE, SR.,
Plaintiff,
Vs.
CLARENCE HOPE,
Defendant.
CLERK'S NOTICE OF SALE UN-
DER F.S. CHAPTER 45
NOTICE IS GIVEN that, in accord-
ance with the Summary Final Judg-
ment of Foreclosure dated September
20, 2011, in the above-styled cause, I
will sell to the highest and best bid-
der for cash at the Columbia County
Courthouse at 11:00 a.m. on October
19, 2011, the following described
property:
Lot 11, Oleno Estates, according to
the map or plat thereof as recorded in
Plat Book 5, Page 62, public records,
Columbia County, Florida.
Together with a 1994 Fleetwood
Weston, 14 X 80 single wide mobile
home, ID GAFLP75A20281 WE.
Any person claiming an interest in
the surplus from the sale, if any, oth-
er than the property owner as of the
date of the lis pendens must file a
claim within 60 days after the sale.
Dated: September 21, 2011
P. Dewitt Cason
Clerk of Court
By; B. Scippio
Deputy Clerk
(Court Seal)
CERTIFICATE OF SERVICE
I CERTIFY that a true and correct
copy of the foregoing has been fur-
nished by United States Mail on Sep-
tember 21, 2011 to each of the fol-
lowing: Thomas J. Kennon, III, Es-
quire, Post Office Box 1178, Lake
City, FL 32056-1178 and Clarence
Hope, Post Office Box 655, Alachua,
Florida 32616.

By:/s/B. Scippio
Court Clerk

05528044
September 23, 30, 2011






HoLe* C *i CReortr


Lake City Reporter


Legal

IN THE COUNTY COURT, IN
AND FOR COLUMBIA COUNTY,
FLORIDA.
CASE NO. 11-448-CC
COLUMBIA BANK, F/K/A
COLUMBIA COUNTY BANK,
Plaintiff,
vs.
CHRISTOPHER T. OAKS, ROB-
ERT A. HAMPSON, ALICIA
HAMPSON, f/k/a ALICIA DIANE
MULLENS, FLORIDA PEST CON-
TROL, GAINESVILLE OPEN MRI
CENTER, INC., a Florida corpora-
tion, and COLUMBIA COUNTY,
FLORIDA,
Defendants
NOTICE OF PUBLIC SALE
Notice is hereby given that the fol-
lowing described real property:
Lots 2, 3, 4, and 5, Block 15, Mason
City, a subdivision according to the
plat thereof as recorded in Plat Book
1, Page 31, public records of CO-
LUMBIA County, Florida. Together
with a 1999 FLEE singlewide mobile
home, ID No.
GAFLW07A42936BB21.
shall be sold by the Clerk of this
Court, at public sale, pursuant to the
Final Judgment in the above styled
action dated September 13, 2011, at
Columbia County Courthouse in
Lake City,'Columbia County, Flori-
da, at 11:00 A.M., on Wednesday,
October 12, 2011, to the best and
highest bidder for cash. Any person
claiming an interest in any surplus
from the sale, other than the property
owner as of the date of the lis pen-
dens, must file a claim within 60
days after the sale.
WITNESS my hand and official seal
on the State and County aforesaid
this 19th day of September, 2011.
P. DEWITT CASON,
Clerk of Court
By:/s/ Sarah Barry
05528023
September 23, 30, 2011

NOTICE OF ENACTMENT OF
ORDINANCES BY THE CITY
COUNCIL OF THE CITY OF
LAKE CITY, FLORIDA
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that
the ordinances, which titles herein-
after appear, will be considered for
enactment by the City Council of the
City of Lake City, Florida, at public
hearings on October 3, 2011 at 7:00
p.m., or as soon thereafter as the
matters can be heard, in the City
Council Meeting Room, City Hall lo-
cated at 205 North Marion Avenue,
Lake City, Florida. Copies of said
ordinances may be inspected by any
member of the public at the Office of
the City Clerk, City Hall located at
205 Nqrth Marion Avenue. Lake
City, Florida, during regular business
hours. On the date, time and place
first above mentioned, all interested
persons may appear and be heard
with respect to the ordinances.
ORDINANCE NO. 2011-2016
AN ORDINANCE OF THE CITY
OF LAKE CITY, FLORIDA,
AMENDING THE OFFICIAL
ZONING ATLAS OF THE CITY
OF LAKE CITY LAND DEVELOP-
MENT REGULATIONS, AS
AMENDED; RELATING TO THE
REZONING OF LESS THAN TEN
CONTIGUOUS ACRES OF LAND,
PURSUANT TO AN APPLICA-
TION, LDR 11-02 BY THE PROP-
ERTY OWNER OF SAID ACRE-
AGE; PROVIDING FOR REZON-
ING FROM RESIDENTIAL OF-
FICE (RO) TO COMMERCIAL,
GENERAL (CG) OF CERTAIN
LANDS WITHIN THE CORPO-
RATE LIMITS OF THE CITY OF
LAKE CITY; PROVIDING SEV-
ERABIL1TY; REPEALING ALL
ORDINANCES IN CONFLICT;
AND PROVIDING AN EFFEC-
TIVE DATE
ORDINANCE NO. 2011-2017
AN ORDINANCE OF THE CITY
OF LAKE CITY, FLORIDA,
AMENDING THE OFFICIAL
ZONING ATLAS OF THE CITY
OF LAKE CITY LAND DEVELOP-
MENT REGULATIONS, AS
AMENDED; RELATING TO THE
REZONING OF LESS THAN TEN
CONTIGUOUS ACRES OF LAND,
PURSUANT TO AN APPLICA-
TION, LDR 11-03, BY THE PROP-
ERTY OWNERS OF SAID ACRE-
AGE; PROVIDING FOR REZON-
ING FROM RESIDENTIAL, SIN-
GLE FAMILY-3 (RSF-3) AND
COMMERCIAL, GENERAL (CG)
TO COMMERCIAL, INTENSIVE
(CI) OF CERTAIN LANDS WITII-
IN THE CORPORATE LIMITS OF
THE CITY OF LAKE CITY; PRO-
VIDING SEVERABILITY; RE-
PEALING ALL ORDINANCES IN
CONFLICT; AND PROVIDING
AN EFFECTIVE DATE
The public hearings may be contin-
ued to one or more future dates. Any
interested party shall be advised that
the date, time and place of any con-
tinuation of the public hearings shall
be announced during the public hear-
ings and that no further notice con-
ceming the matters will be publish-
ed.
All persons are advised that, if they
decide to appeal any decision made
at the public hearings, they will need
a record of the proceedings and, for
such purpose, they may need to en-
sure that a verbatim record of the
proceedings is made, which record
includes the testimony and evidence
upon which the appeal is to be based.
Persons with disabilities requesting
reasonable accommodations to par-
ticipate in this proceeding should
contact 352.463.3169 (Voice &
TDD) or via Florida Relay Service
800.955.8771.

05528024
September 23, 2011


Lawn & Landscape Service

J&M LAWN Service & more for
all your outdoor needs. Don't
waste your time or weekend,
Free Estimate. 386-984-2187


Legal

NOTICE OF ENACTMENT OF
ORDINANCES BY THE CITY
COUNCIL OF THE CITY OF
LAKE CITY, FLORIDA
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that
the ordinances, which titles herein-
after appear, will be considered for
enactment by the City Council of the
City of Lake City, Florida, at public
hearings on October 3, 2011 at 7:00
p.m., or as soon thereafter as the
matters can be heard, in the City
Council Meeting Room, City Hall lo-
cated at 205 North Marion Avenue,
Lake City, Florida. Copies of the
said ordinances may be inspected by
any member of the public at the Of-
fice of the City Clerk, City Hall lo-
cated at 205 North Marion Avenue,
Lake City, Florida, during regular
business hours. On the date, time
and place first above mentioned, all
interested persons may appear and be
heard with respect to the ordinances.
ORDINANCE NO. 2011-2014
AN ORDINANCE OF THE CITY
OF LAKE CITY, FLORIDA, RE-
LATING TO CHANGING THE
LAND USE CLASSIFICATION OF
TEN OR LESS ACRES OF LAND
ON THE FUTURE LAND USE
PLAN MAP OF THE CITY OF
LAKE CITY COMPREHENSIVE
PLAN, PURSUANT TO AN AP-
PLICATION, CPA 11-02, BY THE
PROPERTY OWNER OF SAID
ACREAGE, UNDER THE
AMENDMENT PROCEDURES
ESTABLISHED IN SECTIONS
163.3161 THROUGH 163.3248,
FLORIDA STATUTES, AS
AMENDED; PROVIDING FOR A
CHANGE IN THE LAND USE
CLASSIFICATION FROM RESI-
DENTIAL, MEDIUM DENSITY
(LESS THAN OR EQUAL TO 8
DWELLING UNITS PER ACRE)
TO COMMERCIAL OF CERTAIN
LANDS WITHIN THE CORPO-
RATE LIMITS OF THE CITY OF
LAKE CITY, FLORIDA; PROVID-
ING SEVERABILITY; REPEAL-
ING ALL ORDINANCES IN CON-
FLICT; AND PROVIDING AN EF-
FECTIVE DATE
ORDINANCE NO. 2011-2015
AN ORDINANCE OF THE CITY
OF LAKE CITY, FLORIDA, RE-
LATING TO CHANGING THE
LAND USE CLASSIFICATION OF
TEN OR LESS ACRES OF LAND
ON THE FUTURE LAND USE
PLAN MAP OF THE CITY OF
LAKE CITY COMPREHENSIVE
PLAN, PURSUANT TO AN AP-
PLICATION, CPA 11-03, BY THE
PROPERTY OWNERS OF SAID
ACREAGE, UNDER THE
AMENDMENT PROCEDURES
ESTABLISHED IN SECTIONS
163.3161 THROUGH 163.3248,
FLORIDA STATUTES. AS
AMENDED; PROVIDING FOR A
CHANGE IN THE LAND USE
CLASSIFICATION FROM RESI-
DENTIAL, MEDIUM DENSITY
(LESS THAN OR EQUAL TO 8
DWELLING UNITS PER ACRE)
TO COMMERCIAL OF CERTAIN
LANDS WITHIN THE CORPO-
RATE LIMITS OF THE CITY OF
LAKE CITY, FLORIDA; PROVID-
ING SEVERABILITY; REPEAL-
ING ALL ORDINANCES IN CON-
FLICT; AND PROVIDING AN EF-
FECTIVE DATE
The public hearings may be contin-
ued to one or more future dates. Any
interested party shall be advised that
the date, time and place of any con-
tinuation of the public hearings shall
be announced during the public hear-
ings and that no further notice con-
cerning the matters will be publish-
ed.
All persons are advised that, if they
decide to appeal any decisions made
at the public hearings, they will need
a record of the proceedings and, for
such purpose, they may need to en-
sure that a verbatim record of the
proceedings is made, which record
includes the testimony and evidence
upon which the appeal is to be based.
Persons with disabilities requesting
reasonable accommodations to par-
ticipate in this proceeding should
contact 352.463.3169 (Voice &
TDD) or via Florida Relay Service
800.955.8771.
05528025
September 23, 2011

Public Notice "Notice is hereby
made to all those concerned and af-
fected that Boran Craig Barber Engel
Construction Co., Inc. is performing
state project #FL-35 (WRC) Lake
City Work Release Center at 1099
NW Dot Glen, Lake City, FL 32055.
All parties furnishing labor, materi-
als and/or equipment to said project
are to provide notice of such in writ-
ing by certified mail to the Depart-
ment of Corrections, 2601 Blair
Stone Road, Tallahassee, FL 32399-
2500, within twenty (20) calendar
days of 1st providing such labor, ma-
terials and/or equipment."
05527729
September 16, 17, 18, 20, 21, 22, 23,
20111
Registration of Fictitious Names
We the undersigned, being duly
sworn, do hereby declare under oath
that the names of all persons interest-
ed in the business or profession car-
ried on under the name of WIL-
LIAMS CREDIT SHELTER
TRUST at 3196 104TH STREET.,
WELLBORN, FL., 32094
Contact Phone Number: 386-590-
9015 and the extent of the interest of
each, is as follows:
Name: TIMOTHY W. WILLIAMS
Extent of Interest: 100)%
hy:/s/Timothy W. Williams

STATE OF FLORIDA
COUNTY OF COLUMBIA
Sworn to and subscribed before me
this 19th day of September, A.D.
2011.
by:/s/ KATHL[EEN A. RIOTI'O
05528(X103
September 23, 2011


REPORTER Classifieds

In Print and On Line
www.lakecityreporter.com


Legal

Registration of Fictitious Names
We the undersigned, being duly
sworn, do hereby declare under oath
that the names of all persons interest-
ed in the business or profession cAr-
ried on under the name of EVE'S
NITTY GRITTY at 114 SW VIOLA
DRIVE, FORT WHITE, FL., 32038
Contact Phone Number: (786)371-
5617 eve or (786)223-9263 and the
extent of the interest of each, is as
follows:
Name: EVELYN ACEVEDO
Extent of Interest: 50%
by:/s/ Evelyn Acevedo
Name: ALBERT TACON
Extent of Interest: 50%
by:/s/ Albert Tacon
STATE OF FLORIDA
COUNTY OF COLUMBIA
Sworn to and subscribed before me
this 17th day of September, A.D.
2011.
by:/s/ JUAN DUENAS

05528041
September 23, 2011


100 Job
A Opportunities
2 Experienced Drivers for Lake
City to Augusta Maine. One trip
only. Two autos with trailers.
When?? Very soon!!
Call 386-719-8872
ATTN: Team Drivers needed for
dedicated acct. contracted by
Swift, CDL required, Six months
exp., Call Shawn 904-517-4620
AVON!! Only $10 to start!
Earn bonus $ up to $150+
1-800-275-9945 pin #4206
www.youravon.com/tdavies
FULL TIME Delivery Driver for
Medical Equipment, Exp. Re-
quired. Send reply to Box 05076,
C/O The Lake City Reporter, P.O.
Box 1709, Lake City, FL, 32056
MECHANIC
Heavy truck & trailer experience a
plus. Best pay in North Florida for
the right person. Southern
Specialized, 1812 NW Main Blvd.,
386-752-9754
NEED CNC Machinist
Must have Metal Working
Machine Shop exp. Send resume,
Quality Mill, 3631 US Hwy. 90
East, Lake City, FL 32055.
Receptionist needed to answer
phones and light clerical work.
M-F 11:30.3:00
Fax resume to 386-'758-5882
. Sales Position available for moti-
vated individual Rountree -Moore
Toyota, Great benefits, paid train-
ing/vacation. Exp. a plus but not
necessary. Call Anthony Cosentino
386-623-7442
TANKER DRIVER
Night Position & Part time day po-
sition needed, Gasoline & Diesel
Fuel Transport Delivery Driver,
Tues. Sat.,
Truck based in Lake City, Florida,
Local Deliveries, Health'Insur-
ance, 401K, Paid Vacation
Competitive Pay Structure,
Must have two years driver
experience, clean MVR,
Application available by mailing:
info@jj-fuel.com
Fax completed applications to
Heather at 850-973-3702.
Questions call 1-800-226-5434
after 3:00 p.m., Speak to Ronnie.

120 Medical
120 Employment

05527777
Admissions/Marketing
Director
Avalon Healthcare Center is
currently accepting applications
for the full time position of
Admissions/Marketing Director
RN/LPN Preferred
Good Organizational and
Communication Skills a Must
Prior SNF Experience
Preferred
Competitive Salary and
Excellent benefit package.
Please apply at Avalon
Healthcare and Rehabilitation
Center. 1270 S.W. Main Blvd.
Lake City, Florida 32025
386-752-7900 EOE

(I5528(X)5
SENIOR PHYSICIAN
The Columbia County Health
Department is seeking a Senior
Physician, position #64034060 to
work in primary care, pediatrics,
STDs and chronic diseases. Must
be licensed as a Physician
pursuant to Chapter 458, Florida
Statutes. Must be fingerprinted
and drug screened. May be
required to work extra hours or
days in the event of emergency.
Salary range is $3,003.29-
$6.752.44 bi-weekly. Applica-
tions will be accepted online at
https://peoplefirst.myforida.com/
or completed State of Florida
applications may be faxed to
(904)636-2627. Closes
9/27/2011. Call 1-877-562-7287
for assistance in applying on
line. EEO/AA/VP Employer.


LEARN TO DRAW BLOOD
Local Phlebotomy Course
offered in Lake City, FLA
Certificate program.
(904)566-1328

Busy Family Practice Office Seeks
Nursing Asst. for FT position.
Must be competent, organized, and
experienced in back office duties.
Fax resume to: 386-719-9494
G(lebeig Family Medicine


F/T RN with critical care/recovery
room exp needed. F/T MA/LPN
also needed for busy medical
practice in Lake City.
Fax resume to 386-487-1234.


240 Schools &
4 Education

05527750
Interested in a Medical Career?
Express Training offers
courses for beginners & exp
Nursing Assistant, $479
next class-09/26/10

Phlebotomy national certifica-
tion, $800 next class-10/10/11

* Continuing education
Fees incl. books, supplies, exam
fees. Call 386-755-4401 or
expresstrainingservices.com



310 Pets & Supplies


B $$REWARD$$

LOST

Silky/Yorkie
Terrier: Missing
since August 29
(am), Aprox 10
lbs. Black body/brown face &
feet. Needs medicine. Last seen
at S & S on 441 N. & 100. His
name is Bradley.
Please call 386-623-2806

German Sheppard Puppy 10
weeks old Black & Tan. Health
Certs. & shots, Parents on
Premises. $250.00. 386-961-8130
PUBLISHER'S NOTE
Florida Law 828.29 requires dogs
and cats being sold to be at least 8
weeks old and have a health
certificate from a licensed
veterinarian documenting they
have mandatory shots and are
free from intestinal and external
parasites. Many species of wild-
life must be licensed by Florida
Fish and Wildlife. If you are
unsure, contact the local
office for information.

330 Livestock &
Supplies

Registered. Angus Bull Yearling,
7 mons. old, exc. bloodlines, off of
a long line of top producers $950.
386-249-3104 or 386-719-4802


402 Appliances

Whirlpool Dish Washer
Clean. Works Great.
$135.00 obo
386-292-3927


407 Computers

Flat Panel monitor.
15 inch. $50.
386-755-9984 or
386-292-2170
HP Computer,
$80.00.
386-755-9984 or
386-292-2170


408 Furniture

Large Cherry Roll
top desk. (C-Style) 2 File drawers.
Excellent condition. $750.
386-965-0762


420 Wanted to Buy

K&H TIMBER
We Buy Pine Hardwood &
Cypress. Large or small tracts.
Call 386-961-1961.
Wanted Junk Cars, Trucks, Vans.
$275 & up CASH! Free Pick Up!
NO title needed !386-878-9260
After 5pm 386- 752-3648.


430 Garage Sales

7 Families. Sat. 7-?. Christ Central
Ministries in the gym. Behind the
church. Look for signs.
Too much to list !!!
Big sale. 20yrs of accumulation. 8-
3. Fri-Sun. Behind Lake City Med-
ical Center, right on Egret, right on
Harris Lake Dr, look for signs.
Household, furniture, tools, cloth-
ing, sports/fishing, antiques, more
.COMMUNITY YARD SALE.
Sat. 8 noon. Windsong Apts.
Off Hwy 247
Lots & Lots of Stuff!!!
Fri & Sat. 7:30-1:30. 190 SW
Fabian Way. Close to 242 & 247.
Look for signs. Too much to list.
Lots of new clothing!!!
Multi Family! Fri/Sat 8-4 In Roll-
ing Meadows off Branford Hwy, 3
mi. S. of Hwy 90, Follow signs,
furm., bedding, kids/adult clothes,
collectibles. MUST SEE
PUBLISHER'S NOTE
All Yard Sale Ads
Must be Pre-Paid.

SAT. 9/24,7-Noon. 266 N.W.
Harris Lake Drive, Ner Southern
Oaks. fum., antq. tools, baskets,
pictures, camping equip., tins.


440 Miscellaneous

Set of Michelin used tires.
225X50x17
$135. obo
386-292-3927


450 GoodThings
50 to Eat

GREEN PEANUTS For Sale
Graded and washed.
$30.00 a bushel.
386-752-3434


JBUYI


HEL


FIN 1TI


Classified Department: 755-5440











Classified Department: 755-5440


LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 23, 2011


460 Firewood
Firewood for Sale. $65. per Truck
Load. Rick 386-867-1039 or Joey
965-0288 if no answer pls leave
message we will call you back.

520 Boats for Sale
2003 SEA PRO 170CC
YAMAHA 90 HP, low hours, live
wells, Bimini top, fish finder,
AL trailer, $6,200, SOLD

630 Mobile Homes
for Rent
1 BR/I BA Furnished, all utilities
included + satellite,
$135 week, $135 deposit.
Call 386-288-5526
2&3 BR MH. $395 $650. mo.
plus deposit. Water & sewer fur-
nished. Cannon Creek MHP
386-752-6422
2/2 Units. Great rental program
for responsible tenants.
Call for details, 386-984-8448
13th Month FREE!!
3/2 Large MH, small park, near
FGCC, Small pets ok, $500 dep
$575 mo w/12 mo lease
386-752-1971 or 352-281-2450
3/2.5 S of Lake City, (Branford
area) $575 mo plus security
386-590-0642 or 386-867-1833
www.suwanneevalleyproperties.com
4 BR/3BA Manufactured Home
Fireplace, Ig. kitchen, Ig. master
w/walkin closets. Quiet Wellborn
area. $850 mo. 386-438-0285.


LG clean 3br's $450. -$650. mo. +
dep. Also, 2br mobile home's
avail. No Pets. 5 Points area. Also
3 br Westside. 386-961-1482
Mobile Homes for rent in
White Springs, Lake City & Ft.
White Contact 386-623-3404
or 386-397-2779
Taking applications. 3br/2ba
moble home, in town, private lot,
front & rear porch, shed $650/mo
+ security. 466-2266 or 752-5911

640 Mobile Homes
for Sale
Champion Home Inspections
Protect Your Investment
With A Professional
Inspection State Licensed
,And Insured 386-344-5551
It's Here. Jacobson Homes
"Sub Zero" Top Quality Home
with lots of tape and texture and
a dream kitchen and more.
North Point Homes, Gainesville
(352)872-5566
Jacobson Homes Factory Outlet
Try us in Gainesville. Best Prices
and Financing in Florida. North
Pointe Homes (352)872-5566
High Springs. 1629 sqft. on 10
acres. Needs to sell. $84,999.
Make an offer! MLS 78776
Bosshardt Realty Services.
386-965-4873
Fort White. 2336 sqft on 5 acres.
Tape & textured walls. Needs to
sell. $99,999. Motivated, make an
offer MLS 78841 (386)965-4873
Bosshardt Realty Services.
Lake City 1560 sqft. buit in 2002.
On 5 acres. $83,999. MLS 78931
Bosshardt Realty Services.
386-965-4873
3/2 DWMH "Model Home" condi-
tion. Just under 1 ac w/granddaddy
oaks and landscaped MLS#77988,
$84,900, Nancy Rogers
867-1271 R.E.O. Realty Group
NEW 2012 Town Homes
28X44 3/2 Only $37,900, 32X80
4/2 Just $69,900. Both include
Delivery and set, AC, Skirting and
steps. No Games!
North Pointe Homes, Gainesville,
Fl. (352)872-5566
Palm Harbor Homes
Red Tag Sale
Over 10 Stock Units Must Go
Save Up To 35K!
800-622-2832

650 Mobile Home
& Land
Owner Finance, 3/2, on 1.5 acres,
S of Lake City, small down/$695
mo, 386-590-0642 / 386-867-1833
www.suwanneevalleyproperties.com
WOW! 2 Mobile homes on 5
acres! 2006, 3/2.5, above pool,
1997 1,500 sq. ft. with nice
porch.$139,888 MLS 78531 Brit-
tany Results Realty 386-397-3473

710 Unfurnished Apt.
7 For Rent







1BR APT.
Downtown Location, Clean.
$450 mo, plus Security.
NO PETS. Call 386-755-3456
2br/1 ba, 1 car garage,
W/D hook up, $525 month,
no pets I month sec,
386-961-8075
2BR/1BA. Close to town.
$565.mo plus deposit.
Includes water & sewer.
386-965-2922 -
2BR/2BA w/garage
5 minutes from VA hospital.
Call for details.
386-755-4590 or 365-5150
A Landlord You Can Love!
2 br Apts $550. & up + sec. Great
area. CH/A washer/dryer hookups.
386-758-9351/352-208-2421
Amber Wood Hills Apts.
Private Patio area. Beautiful yard.
Washer/dryer hkup. Free water &
sewer. 1/1, 2/1. Move in special.
386-754-1800. wwwn.yflapts.com
Columbia Arms Apt. located 1/2
mi from V.A. & Winn Dixie. Pet
Friendly. Move in Special $199.
Pool laundry & balcony.
386-754-1800. www.myflatpts.com
Duplex w/garage spacious, 2/1,
1300 sq ft, W/D hook up, CH/A,
$650 month & bckgrnd chk.
386-697-3248 or 352-377-7652


710 Unfurnished Apt.
710 For Rent


Fall Special! 1/2 Price First
Month. Updated Apt, w/tile
floors/fresh paint. Great area.
From $395.+sec. 386-752-9626
Greentree Townhouse
Summer special. 2/1, 2/1.5. Free
water & sewer. Balcony & patio.
Laundry. Behind Kens on Hwy 90.
386-754-1800 wwwmyflapts.com

ONE 51 PLACE APTS
Alachua
MOVE IN SPECIALS
1, 2, & 3 bedrooms
Call TODAY 386-462-0656
or visit us at one51 place.com

Redwine Apartments. Move in
special $199. Limited time. Pets
welcome. with 5 complexes,
we have a home for you.
386-754-1800. www.myflapts.com


The Lakes Apts. Studios & IBr's
from $135/wk. Util. & cable incl.,
Sec 8 vouchers accepted, monthly
rates avail Call 386-752-2741


Wayne Manor Apts.
Move in $199. Summer special.
2/1. washer/dryer. Behind Kens off
Hwy 90. 386-754-1800
www.myflapts.comn
Windsor Arms Apartments.
Summer special $199. Move in!
2/1, 2/1.5, 2/2. Pet Friendy. Free
200 ch. Dish. Washer/dryer hkup.
386-754-1800. www.mvflapts.com

720 Furnished Apts.
SFor Rent
lbr Apt. includes water, elec, &
cable. $595. mo. Good area. 7
minutes from town. References &
sec. req'd. No pets. 386-719-4808
Rooms for Rent. Hillcrest, Sands,
Columbia. All furnished. Electric,
cable, fridge, microwave. Weekly
or monthly rates. 1 person $135,
2 persons $150. weekly
386-752-5808

730 Unfurnished
730 Home For Rent

05527991


21.
SMAITTER. BOLDER. FASTER.
-The Darby Rogers Company
202 Country Club Rd.. 2/1
with fenced back yard.
$600./ mo + security deposit
222 SW 3rd St Jasper..
newly remodeled 3/2 with
fenced yard on large city lot.
$800./mo + security

199 Brandy Way..newer
4/2 brick home in Springfield
Estates. $975./mo + security
451 SW Riverside Ft. White..
River access with this 3/2
remodeled home.
$1000./mo + security

389 SW Mossy Oak..
Georgeous 4/3 upscale home
in prestigious Hunters Ridge.
$1575./mo + security

Kayla Carbono 386-623-9650 or
BJ Federico 386-365-5884


'09 Custom Dream Home
4BR/3.5BA, 5+acres, horses ok.
Old brick & heart pine floors,
jet tub, DSL. Beautiful!
For right person $2000/mo.
negotiable 970-221-0090
2 BR/1 BA, Country, South. of
Lake City, private river access.
w/boat ramp, 2 garages, clean,
$650 mo. + sec. 386-590-0642
3/2 DWMH.on I acre lot, partially
fenced, $550 month, $400 sec.,
near N entrance of Itchetucknee
Park, 386-961-8063/965-5093
3BR/1.5 BA Large lot. Very clean
with storage shed. Quiet area.
$850 mo. + $850. dep.
386-752-7578
3br/l.5ba. Very clean. Brick great
area w/bonus room. Carport, shed
& Fenced (privacy) back yard.
$850. mo $850. dep. Ref's req'd.
(941)920-4535
4br/2ba CHA Brick, 1200 sqft
lac., Close to FGCC, CR 245A.
Ceramic tile/carpet, $800 mo $800)
dep (904)708-8478 App. req'd
Brick 3br/2ba Large yard, garage,
CH/A. 189 Stanley Ct. Lake City.
$950. mo + $1000 dep.
Call 386-365-8543-
Close to the VA & shopping
2 br HoOse $625.mo $625. dep.
Also, large 2 br Apt. $525. mo
$525 dep. 386-344-2972
FOR RENT OR FOR SALE,
3 BR/2 BA,
$1,200 mo.
386-965-1019
LARGE 3BR/2BA home close to
college. $750. mo $450 security.
Application required.
386-935-1482
LOVELY 3BR/IBA Farm house
for rent. Quiet country area.
Please call after 5pm.
386-752-0017. Leave message.
Prime location 2br/lba.
Resid'l or comm'l. Corner of Baya
& McFarlane. $600. mo. $500 sec.
386-752-9144 or 755-2235
VERY LARGE 2 BR/2 BA, Brick
home, garage, CH & A, Clean,
386-590-0642 / 386-867-1833,
www.suwanneevalleyproperties.com

750 Business &
V Office Rentals

05527923
OFFICE SPACE for Lease
576 sq' $450/mth
900 sq' $600/mlth
3568 sq' $2973/mth
83(X) sq $5533/mth
also Bank Building
Excellent Local ions
Tom Eagle, GRI
(386) 961-1086 DCA Realtor

For Lease: E Baya Ave. Two -
1000( sqft office space units or
combined for 2000( sqft. 386-984-
0622 or weekends 386-497-4762


750 Business &
SOffice Rentals
Midtown Commercial Center,
brand new executive front suite &
suite w/warehouse.
Call Vicki or Joe 386-935-2832.


790 Vacation Rentals
Horseshoe Beach RV Lot.
Nice comer Lot with shade trees.
$295. mo Water/electric included
386-235-3633 or 352-498-5986


805 Lots for Sale
BEAUTIFUL 5 acres in
Lake City, 100% owner financing,
no qualifying, $395 per month.
Please call 512-663-0065
Owner Financing. River comm &
nature lover's dream in Lee. 15
wooded ac by the Withlacoochee.
Property is already subdivided
MLS 75576 $48,000 623-6896
PUBLISHER'S NOTE
All real estate advertising in this
newspaper is subject to the fair
housing act which makes it illegal
to advertise "any preference,
limitation, or discrimination based
on race, color, religion, sex,
disability, familial status or nation-
al origin; or any intention to make
such preference, limitation or
discrimination." Familial status
includes children under the age of
18 living with parents or legal
custodians, pregnant women and
people securing custody of chil-
dren under the age of 18. This
newspaper will not knowingly
accept any advertising for real es-
tate which is in violation of the
law. Our readers are hereby in-
formed that all dwellings adver-
tised in this newspaper are availa-
ble on an equal opportunity basis.
To complain of discrimination call
HUD toll free at 1-800-669-9777,
the toll free
telephone number to the hearing
impaired is 1-800-927-9275.


810 Home for Sale
/ Champion Home Inspections
386-344-5551. Inspections
Starting At $ 249.00
Veterans Receive 10% Off
Full Inspection.
4 BR/2 BA, on I acre, granite
floors thru out, open kitchen, wrap
around front porch.$139,900
MLS 77292 Brittany
Results Realty 386-397-3473
Beautiful home on 15 acres w/over
2,500 sq. ft. New appli., new tank
at well, new drain field, workshop.
$235,000 MLS 77552 Brittany
Results Realty 386-397-3473
Century 21 Darby Rogers
752-6575 Immaculate home on
5 acres. 3/2, new energy efficient
A/C system, metal roof, 12x28 work-
shop. #78508 Only $168.9(X)
Century 21 Darby Rogers
752-6575 3/2 located on 11th Fair-
way at Southern Oaks Country Club.
Huge master BR. huge kitchen, 2 car
garage. #78276 Only $129.90X)
Century 21 Darby Rogers
752-6575 Executive home, 4/3, 2557
sqft, plantation shutters, granite
counter tops, in-ground pool w/spa.
#78610 Only $269.000X)
Century 21 Darby Rogers
752-6575 Beautiful Victorian/White
Springs, 7BR/3.5B w/5 fireplaces, a
Must See. #76361
Only $185,000
Century 21- Darby Rogers
752-6575 Golf course living, 3/2.5,
vaulted ceilings, open floor plan,
place, breakfast area. #78941 (1-
year home warranty) Only $210,000
Champion Home Inspections
Contact John 386-344-5551
State Licensed
And Insured
championhomeinspections.us
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
10 acres w/well maintained brick
home. 2012 sqft. Open split floor
plan. Lori Giebeig Simpson
365-5678 MLS# 74447 $149.900


810 Home for Sale
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
New home in May Fair. Super area
corner lot. 4br split plan. Versatile
colors. Elaine K. Tolar
755-6488 MLS# 76919 $199,900
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
3br/2ba. 1590 sqft. Lori Giebeig
Simpson. 365-5678 or
Mary Brown Whitehurst
965-0887 MLS# 74542 $109,900
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
Cute 3/2 brick in town. Wood
floors, Ig family room. Front &
back porch Lori Giebeig Simpson
365-5678 MLS# 77989 $79,900
Lg. 4/3 family home. 16x20
screened porch, workshop. 4.5 ac.
fenced/cross fenced MLS 74339
$219,900. N Fla Homeland Real-
ty Darlene Hart 386-288-2878
Great 3/2 home w/2346 sq ft
under roof on .67 ac., Creekside
S/D. Big back yard w/plenty of
shade trees. On a cul-de-sac, MLS
77385 $169,900 623-6896
Spacious 4/2 home on 1 ac. Split
floor plan. Great neighborhood.
Easy access to 1-75 $204,900 MLS
77859 N Fla Homeland Realty
Darlene Hart 386-288-2878
WoodCrest 3/2 Split floor plan
Screened porch. 10x12 storage
shed. $126,900 MLS 77932
Darlene Hart 386-288'2878
N Fla Homeland Realty
Home for entertaining 3/2 plus
pool house w/half bath, 2.25
fenced ac. Freshly painted. Split
plan, Large rear deck MLS 78103
$179,900 386-623-6896
0.5 ac tract. 441 (4 lane) frontage.
1/2 mi from Target distribution.
2/1.5 zoned resid'l MLS# 78506
$88,000 Nancy Rogers 867-1271
R.E.O. Realty Group
Great home, Great neighborhood,
great price. 3/2 Close to town A
Must See!. MLS#77411, $79,900,
Nancy Rogers
867-1271 R.E.O. Realty Group
4/2 fenced yard, 2 car garage,
Fairly new roof & HVAC Shed,
fenced back yard. MLS#77602,
$162,500, Nancy Rogers
867-1271 R.E.O. Realty Group
Lake City Country Club. 4/3, reno-
vated. Great for entertaining. Glass
doors open to back yard. $179,900
MLS#78637 Nancy Rogers
R.E.O. Realty Group 867-1271
Investor Special Buy. 2br con-
crete block w/CH/A. Available "as
is" $22.900, MLS76821.
Vin Lantroop. 386-755-6600
Hallmark Real Estate
Pool Home. 2 Story w/soaring
ceilings. Ig master w/Jacuzzi.
Fenced yard. $159.000 MLS,77085
Teresa Spradley 386-365-8343
Hallmark Real Estate
Near Itchetucknee head springs,
easy Gainesville commute. For
sale or rent! $75,500, MLS77398.
Paula Lawrence. 386-623-1973
Hallmark Real Estate
REDUCED gated community.
Brick w/florida room & private
garden. Security system. Ginger
Parker. MLS77703. 386-365-2135
Hallmark Real Estate
Like to Entertain? Over 2900
sqft. 3br/2.5ba. Fenced w/sprinkler
& security system. MLS78404.
Sherry Willis. 386-365-8095
Hallmark Real Estate
Springhollow Ig brick. 4br/2ba
w/lg screened porch. Oversized
ga-
rage. upgraded kitchen & bath.
$239.500, MLS78787. Janet Creel.
719-0382 Hallmark Real Estate
Well maintained 4/2, 2566 sqft
oversized den w/fplace, Ig kitchen,
breakfast area overlooking gazebo.
#78347 Only $179,000 Century 21-
Darby Rogers 752-6575

820 Farms &
820 Acreage
For Lease FARM- 7 stall barn.
17+ acres, pasture. cross fenced.
Close in $500. mo.
386-961-1086


820 Farms &
SAcreage
4 1/2 acre lot. Lake Jeffery Road.
Gorgeous Oaks!Paved Rd
Owner Financing! NO DOWN!
$59,900. $525mo 352-215-1018.
www.LandOwnerFinancing.com
4 acres, Wellborn, New Well
installed, Beautifully wooded
w/cleared Home Site, owner fin,
no down, $39,900, $410 mon
Call 352-215-1018
www.LandOwnerFinancing.com
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
Brick in LC Country Club. 4/3
Lots of extras, oversized garage &
storage. Elaine K. Tolar
752-4211 MLS# 78739 $239,900
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
Brick in WoodCrest S/D. Split
plan. Screened porch. Lg back '
yard. Elaine K. Tolar
752-4211 MLS# 77015 $137,900
FOR SALE BY OWNER,
10 acres, approx. 7 acres planted
pines, with a 24 x 40 foot (Steel
Dean) bldg. w/18 foot opening,
own power, $85,000
Call Sonya 386-288-2557.
Owner financed land. Half acre to
ten acre lots. As low as $300
down. Deas Bullard Properties
386-752-4339 www.landnfl.com

Q83 Commercial
O Property
Commercial Parcel 2 acres w/252
ft frontage on SR 47 Add'l 4.76
ac. avail. $149,900 MLS# 78260
Call 386-867-1271 Nancy Rogers
R.E.O.Realty Group, Inc

870 Real Estate
7 Wanted
I Buy Houses
CASH!
Quick Sale Fair Price
386-269-0605


950 Cars for Sale
2000 CHEVY CAVALIER,
4 door, very dependable, one own-
er, good condition, cold AC,
$1,200 OBO, 386-205-7429




Contact us'-


|atthe paper.

..





SIFIED

386-755-5440


| SUBSCRIPTION

386-755-5445


SALL OTHER DEPARTMENTS

I 386-752-1293


Bring the picture in or
we will take it for you!

* Ad runs 10 consecutive days
with a description and photo in the
newspaper and online E-edition.
* Ad runs 10 consecutive days as a
classified line ad online.
* You must include vehicle price.
* All ads are prepaid.
* Private party only.


$10,500
Call
386-555-5555
If you don't sell your vehicle
during the first 10 days, you
can run the same vehicle ad
for 10 additional days for
only $15.00
Terms and conditions remain the
same for the additional run.


(36 ) 755-S440
^B~i~rTff~n* *


confused?


Call Lake City Reporter Classifieds!


WE CAN HELP 386-755-5440


...to never miss a day's
worth of all the
Lake City Reporter
has to offer:
Home delivery.
To subscribe call
755-5445



L ITIMM