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The Lake City reporter
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028308/01663
 Material Information
Title: The Lake City reporter
Uniform Title: Lake City reporter (Lake City, Fla. 1967)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: John H. Perry
Place of Publication: Lake City Fla
Publication Date: 9/22/2011
Frequency: daily (monday through friday)[<1969>-]
weekly[ former 1967-<1968>]
daily
normalized irregular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Lake City (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Columbia County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Columbia -- Lake City
Coordinates: 30.189722 x -82.639722 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 95, no. 4 (Oct. 5, 1967)-
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000358016
oclc - 33283560
notis - ABZ6316
lccn - sn 95047175
sobekcm - UF00028308_01569
System ID: UF00028308:01663
 Related Items
Preceded by: Lake City reporter and Columbia gazette

Full Text




Hot start
Tigers go 7-2
to begin
If


000015 120511' IG
LIB OF FLORIDA HISTORy
PO BOX 117007
205 SMA UNIV OF FLORIDA
GAINESVILLE FL 32611-943


Food drive
World record attempt


( ity


Stand down
Friday event will
aid local
homeless vets.
Story below


Reporter


Thursday, September 22, 2011 www.lakecityreporter.com Vol. 137, No. 204 E 75 cents


Police:


Do


details


faked

2 local women arrested;
their pet was the culprit,
not stray, say authorities.

By TONY BRITT
tbritt@lakecityreporter.com
A Columbia County woman and her mother
have been jailed for lying about a dog attack
that left a 13-year-old in their care hospital-
ized, say police. The pair originally reported
a neighborhood stray was responsible for the
attack, when it was actually the women's pet,
according to reports.
Debra A. Crisp, 50, 121
NW Robson Court and her
mother Josephine Robson, 69,
same address, were charged
with making false and mis-
leading statements during a
felony investigation, making
Crisp false official statements and
tampering with evidence in
connection with the case.
Both were booked into the
Columbia County Detention
Facility on $7,000 bond.
Thirteen-year-old Ernie
Hodson Jr. suffered serious
injuries in the Monday after-
Robson noon attack at the women's
home. He underwent several
hours of surgery Monday but is doing well
and recuperating, his family said.
"He's going to be OK He's a tough little
soldier," Ernie Hodson, the victim's father,
said Wednesday afternoon.
It was originally reported to sheriffs offi-
cials that the attacking dog was unknown to
the victim and could not be found.
However, Sgt. Ed Seifert, Columbia County
Sheriff's Office public information officer,
said deputy Scott Ceckanowicz continued the
investigation Tuesday and determined the
child was not
attacked by a I "', !&


stray dog in
the front yard
as originally
reported.
Sheriff's
reports say
the victim
was in a home
belonging to
the mother
of his father's
girlfriend.
De bra
Crisp, the
mother
of Ernie
Hodson Sr.'s
girlfriend,


Terry Marques, Lake City
Humane Society/Columbia
County Animal Control Services
executive director, with Marley, a
pitbull/terrier mix that mauled a
local teen.


was babysitting the 13-year-old boy. The home
is located across the street from the Hodson
home.
"The child was attacked while in the kitchen
of the home," Seifert said. "For unknown
reasons, the family pit bull, named Marley,
attacked the victim. Crisp and her mother,
Robson, removed the victim from the kitchen
and took him onto the front porch of the
home. The child was then transported to a
local hospital by Crisp and her daughter Kathy
Thomas. The child was eventually taken by
helicopter to Shands of Gainesville."
Reports said Crisp told Ceckanowicz that
she originally lied about what happened
because she was afraid that she would get
in trouble since she was babysitting and felt
responsible.
Robson reportedly told Ceckanowicz that
she lied to protect her daughter, Debra.
The dog, white with a black and brindle spot

DOG continued on 3A


CALL US 8
(386)752.1293 87
SUBSCRIBE TO T-S
THE REPORTER:
Voice: 755-5445 WEAT
. ... ..l Fax: 752-9400 WEAT


World record try could


fill food bank for a year


Jeremy Barwick, 15, is
out to collect 300 tons
of food in a single day.
By GORDON JACKSON
gjackson@lakecityreporter.com
Last year, the Food
Bank of Suwannee Valley
distributed about 640,000
pounds of mostly non-per-
ishable food in Columbia,
Hamilton, Union and
Suwannee counties.
Scott Elkins, the food
bank's director, said local
supermarkets and can
drives help fill the storage
rooms where food is held
for distribution to an esti-
mated 35 non-profit orga-
nizations in the region.
The bulk of donated
items, however, are from
food banks in other large
municipalities throughout
Florida.
Elkins may soon be in
a position to help more
FOOD continued on 3A


JAMoI N ) incy ,nM LR.-uiLdie City RepoUl
Scott Elkins (left), Food Bank of Suwannee Valley manager, and Jeremy Barwick, 15, discuss
Barwick's upcoming food drive at the local food bank. 'That's a huge amount of food,' Elkins said.
'What's just as important is the awareness made about hunger in this area. It's an investment in the
future.'


'Give me liberty...


ANTONIA ROBINSON/Lake City Reporter
It was a night to remember at the Columbia County Farm Bureau's annual
meeting Tuesday at the fairgrounds banquet hall. TOP: Jerry Cameron
of St. Augustine, dressed for the part, delivers Patrick Henry's famous
'Give me liberty, or give me death' speech as part of the entertainment.
ABOVE: CCFB President Charlie Crawford makes a presentation to local
Life Scout Jeremy Barwick (see story, this page), who will attempt a world
record by collecting 600,000 lbs. of food. See more on the annual meet-
ing in Friday's paper.


' 71
Storms
HER, 2A


Opinion .. ...
People
Obtuaries .....
Advice & Comics. .
Puzzles .... ....


Another 4-year

program is on

the way at FGC


From staff reports
ORLANDO Florida
Gateway College is a
step closer to adding
its second baccalau-
reate program as the
Florida State Board of
Education approved the
college's proposal for
its Bachelor of Science
in Early Childhood
Education program
on Tuesday.FGC
President Dr. Charles
Hall made the presen-


station to the board on
Tuesday. Now that it
has been approved,
the proposal will go
before the Southern
Association of Colleges
and Schools for accredi-
tation approval. College
officials hope to begin
offering the baccalau-
reate-level program
in 2013.Hall said the
college chose to look
FGC continued on 3A


Stand Down will

help homeless vets


By ANTONIA ROBINSON
arobinson@lakecityreporter.com
As many as 100 home-
less veterans live in the
area, and providing
them needed resources
is a project of Florida
Crown Workforce
Board Inc.
"They're here and a
part of society," said
Jim North, veteran's
employment and train-
ing program manager.
"Sometimes we don't
like to see it."
Florida Crown
is sponsoring the
Homeless Veterans'
Stand Down from 9
a.m. to 3 p.m. Friday at
the Lake City National
Guard Armory.
The event connects
homeless veterans with
services and resources
to "make them feel
like sonitlihiig and not
just society's outcasts,"
North said.


I TODAY IN
PEOPLE
A Chtrrnp,-h'
of 'luth.'


Organizations at the
event provide resourc-
es for services with VA
enrollment, job infor-
mation and more.
"We're just trying to
remove the barriers so
they can get back to
mainstream society," he
said.
Homeless veterans
receive items such as
non-perishable food
packs, clothing and per-
sonal hygiene items.
They also receive free
haircuts,' showers and
medical screenings.
For Eddie "Cowboy"
Thomas, Stand Down
has aided him in his own
recovery from home-
lessness and addiction.
Thomas has been in
the Lake City area for
two years and lives at
Cabins in the Woods
Supporting Housing for
Veterans.
VETS continued on 3A


COMING
FRIDAY
JerC '- goc-s for
1h-i record


Lake


will get boost
at football games.
T 326 3









LAKE CITY REPORTER DAILY BRIEFING THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 22, 2011


Wednesday:
Afternoon: 1-1-1
Evening: N/A


Wednesday:
Afternoon: 3-4-3-3
Evening: N/A


ezmatch .
Tuesday:
1-2-16-17-19


PEOPLE IN THE NEWS



James honored by Boys & Girls Clubs


WASHINGTON

Heat has received the
"Champion .of Youth"
award from the Boys &
Girls Clubs of America.
The award was presented to
James by actor Denzel Washington,
the club's national spokesman. The
award recognizes the relationship
that the two-time NBA MVP has had
,with clubs across the country for the
past several years.
In a telephone interview, James
said he was "humbled" to both
.receive the honor and spend time
with kids, which has been one of his
priorities during the ongoing NBA
lockout.
"I was one of those underprivi-
leged kids where people thought we
,were a statistic and didn't have a way
out and would fall into the traps of
life and our surroundings. For these
kids to have a way out, that's amaz-
ing and I'm happy to be a part of it,"
James said.

The end of the world:
1R.E.M. calling it quits
NEWYORK- RI.PE to R.E.M.
The alternative rock group that
'hook up the music world with its
experimental, edgy sound and then
earned multiplatinum success and
a place in the Rock and Roll Hall
of Fame announced on its website
Wednesday that it has "decided to
call it a day as a band."
"A wise man once
said 'the skill in
attending a party
is knowing when
it's time to leave.'
We built something
extraordinary
Stipe together. We did
.this thing. And now
we're going to walk away from it,"
frontman Michael Stipe said in a


ASSOCIATED PRESS
LeBron James, of the Miami Heat, team talks about a public service advertising
campaign for the Boys and Girls Clubs of America, Wednesday at the National
Press Club in Washington.


statement on the website.
"I hope our fans realize this wasn't
an easy decision; but all things must
end, and we wanted to do it right, to
do it our way."
The group got its start in Athens,
Ga., coming out of the region's flour-
ishing indie-rock scene.
Later, the mainstream caught on,
and RE.M. became chart-topping
rockers, selling millions of albums
with hits like "It's the End of the
World as We Know It (And I Feel
Fine)," "Losing My Religion."

Funeral Mass held for
Ted Kennedy's daughter
WASHINGTON Kara Kennedy,
the oldest of three children of the
late Sen. Ted Kennedy, was remem-
bered at funeral services Wednesday
as a thoughtful friend and devoted


mother who had a mischievous side
like her father.
During services at Holy Trinity
Church in Washington, her brothers
remembered her as an avid swim-
mer.
Kara Kennedy, 51, died Friday
after a workout at
a Wasington health
club.
She was diagnosed
with lung cancer in
2002 but underwent
successful surgery
Kennedy and treatment.
Patrick Kennedy said
after her death that her cancer treat-
ment left her physically weakened
and that her heart gave out. The
District of Columbia's medical exam-
iner has not yet released an official
cause of death.
M Associated Press


Celebrity Birthdays


* Baseball Hall of Fame
manager Tommy Lasorda is
84.
* NBA Commissioner David
Stern is 69.
* Musician King Sunny Ade
is 65.
* Actor Paul Le Mat is 65.
* Capt. Mark Phillips is 63.


* Rock singer David
Coverdale is 60.
* Singer Debby Boone is 55.
* Country singer June
Forester (The Forester
Sisters) is 55.
M Singer Nick Cave is 54.
* Rock singer Johnette
Napolitano is 54.


Daily Scripture
'"May the grace of the Lord
Jesus Christ, and the love of
God, and the fellowship of the
Holy Spirit be with you all."
--2 Corinthians 13:14

Thought for Today

"Life resembles a novel more
often than novels resemble
life."
George Sand,
French author (1804-1876)

Lake City Reporter
HOW TO REACH US
Main number ........(386) 752-1293 BUSINESS
Fax number .............752-9400 Controller Sue Brannon... .754-0419
Circulation ...............755-5445 (sbrannon@lakecityreporter.com)
Online ... www.lakecltyreporter.com CIRCULATION
The Lake City Reporter, an affiliate of
Community Newspapers Inc., is pub- Home delivery of the Lake City Reporter
lished Tuesday through Sunday at 180 should be completed by 630 a.m.
E. Duval St., Lake City, Fla. 32055. Tuesday through Saturday, and by 7.30
Periodical postage paid at Lake City, Fla. a.m. on Sunday.
Member Audit Bureau of Circulation and Please call 386-755-5445 to report any
The Associated Press. problems with your delivery service.
All material herein is property of the Lake In Columbia County, customers should
City Reporter. Reproduction in whole or call before 10:30 a.m. to report a ser-
in part is forbidden without the permis- vice error for same day re-delivery. After
sion of the publisher. U.S. Postal Service 10:30 a.m., next day re-delivery or ser-
vice related credits will be issued.
POSTMASTER: Send address changes In all.other counties where home delivery
to Lake City Reporter, P.O. Box 1709, is available, next day re-delivery or ser-
Lake City, Ra. 32056. vice related credits will be issued.
Publisher Todd Wilson .....754-0418
(twilson@lakecityreporter.com) Circulation ...............755-5445
(drculation@lakecityreporter.com)
NEWS Home delivery rates
Editor Robert Bridges .....754-0428 (Tuesday through Sunday)
(rbridges@lakecityreporter.com) 12 Weeks ..................$26.32
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To place a classified ad, call 755-5440 52 Weeks.................$179.40

CORRECTION

A total of $19,149.38 was raised for the families of Brett
Fulton and Josh Burch, Division of Forestry rangers who lost
their lives on June 20. A story in Tuesday's edition stated
otherwise.


Burned boy gets
a fresh start
; MELBOURNE This
time, Brad and Victoria
'IMaddox hoped things
'would be different.
A few weeks ago, the
family y moved here from
Torth Carolina, where
4eir son Isaac had briefly
,attended kindergarten.
.Their memories were still
Sraw: of students, seeing
Isaac's burn scars and
not understanding; of the
name calling and shoving.
His parents didn't want
Sto take any chances that it
could happen again.
On Monday, Isaac's fam-
ily along with staffers
at Sherwood Elementary
School and members
of the Melbourne Fire
Department introduced
the 5-year-old to class-
mates in a way they hoped
would promote acceptance
Iand understanding. They
wanted to stop any bully-
ing before it started.
Firefighters talked with
kindergartners about burn
victims before watching a
Video explaining that they
were "just like you."
Isaac walked through
the door, accompanied by
the firefighters, kinder-
gartners clapped.
School-aged burn vic-
tims often struggle with
acceptance among their
peers. Scars can some-
times be visible.
If their classmates are
"not equipped with the
proper tools to handle
those differences, some-
times it can become
negative," said Amy Clark,
family services coordi-
nator at the nonprofit
Phoenix Society for Burn
Survivors..
It's why the "school re-
entry" process is so impor-
tant, why education and
awareness are key, and
why the Melbourne Fire
.Department agreed to help
introduce Isaac to his new
school.


Isaac Maddox, 5, who suffered severe burns over most of his
body, talks to students about his burns, and showed a film
to help his kindergarten classmates understand his condition
and appearance in Melbourne.


Pasco detectives
crack cold case
NEW PORT RICHEY
- Pasco County Sheriff's
deputies have arrested
the husband of a woman
whose body was found in
the Gulf of Mexico in 1982.
The Sheriff's Office on
Wednesday announced
the arrest of 59-year-old
William Gary Hurst. He
was arrested in Dawson
Springs, Ky., where he
will await extradition to
Florida.
Officials say Amy Rose
Hunt was 29 when she
went missing in August
1982. Her body was not
identified until July, when
her son alerted officials
to information he found
during an Internet search
for his mother. No further
details were immediately
available.

Marlins stadium
glare dimmed
MIAMI A glare
that's bothered drivers
on Interstate 95 and State
Road 836 in Miami will be
dimmed soon.
Some drivers have
complained of the strong
glare since spring, when
the retractable roof was


first closed on the Florida
Marlins new stadium, now
under construction.
Installation began last
week on a white rubber
membrane that will cover
the metal, reflecting the
sun and reducing the heat
inside when the roof is
closed.
The Martins play their
final games in Sun Life sta-
ditim next week.

Former Miami
booster sued
MIAMI Former
2 Live Crew frontman
Luther Campbell said
a former University of
Miami booster "slandered
and defamed" him in a
Yahoo Sports article.
Campell's lawsuit was
filed Tuesday. He seeks
more than $15,000. in dam-
ages from Nevin Shapiro,
an imprisoned Ponzi
scheme architect.
Shapiro has claimed he
provided 72 Miami play-
ers and recruits with cars,
money and prostitutes
over an eight-year span.
According to the lawsuit,
Shapiro's comments
falsely accuse Campbell of
"engaging in the same type
and category of illegal and
immoral behaviors relative
to college-age athletes."


THE WEATHER



HUNDER- HUNDER- CHANCE
STORMS STORMS -STORMS


HI 87.071 LO69 89067


Tallaassee. LakeCity
87/68 87/71
Pensacola Gaines
86/71 Panama City '88/7
85/70


Tan
92/


TEMPERATURES
High Wednesday
Low Wednesday
Normal high
Normal low
Record high
Record low

PRECIPITATION
Wednesday
Month total
Year total
Normal month-to-date
Normal year-to-date


91
70
87
67
99 in 1925
55 in 2006


0.00"
1.19"
27.87"
3.32"
40.08"


i.'.i p 7p la 6a


Thursday


Friday


SForecasted temperate Feels ke" tempeiMtin


87/2 Daytona Beach
Ft. Lauderdale
e Daytona Beach Fort Myers
1 75 Gainesville
0cala Jacksonville
0/71 0 6 KeyWest
Orldao Cape Canaveral Key West
91/74 87/76 Lake c
Miami
paa,, Naples
S West Pakn Beach Ocala
89/78 Orlando
FtL Lauderdale Panama City
Ft Myers 89/80 Pensacola
93/75 Naples Tallahassee
92/78 Miami Tampa
ty Wst, 90/79 Valdosta
Key West W. Palm Beach


8 o/8o


SUN
Sunrise today
Sunset today
Sunrise tom.
Sunset tom.


7:19 a.m.
7:27 p.m.
7:19 a.m.
7:26 p.m.


MOON
Moonrise today 2:01 a.m.
Moonset today 4:00 p.m.
Moonrise torn. 3:03 am.
Moonset tom. 4:41 p.m.


Sept. Oct. Oct. Oct.
27 3 11 19t Fu
New First Full Last


1890, a severe
hailstorm struck
Strawberry, Arizona.
Five days after the
storm, hail still
remained in diifts
12 to 18 inches
deep.


S CHANCE
F -STORMS


HI 87 LO 64


90/75/t
91/80/t
92/76/t
90/70/t
89/70/t
90/80/t
89/69/t
91/79/t
91/76/t
90/71/t
92/75/t
87/72/t
85/69/t
89/68/t
90/77/t
89/66/t
90/77/t


89/73/t
91/79/pc
90/76/t
89/69/t
88/69/pc
90/80/t
89/67/pc
92/78/t
90/76/pc
90/70/t
92/74/t
85/69/pc
85/67/s
88/67/pc
90/75/t
87/65/pc
90/77/t


An exclusive
service
brought to
VBfmt our readers
15nutoibu tm
Today's by
ultra-violet The Weather
radiation risk Channel.
for the area on
a scale from O
to 10+.

weather.com

j Forecasts, data and
w yt graphics 0 2011 Weather
r Y Central, LP, Madison, Wis.
weatherJ www.weatherpubllsher.com


E-ed irion Online Access


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Call for login Infonnation,


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Page Editor: Laura Hampson, 754-0427


-'d .t












Adult spelling bee is tonight VETS: Event will aid those homeless


From staff reports


The Friends of the Columbia County
Public Library is hosting the 8th annual
Columbia County Adult Team Spelling Bee
6:30 p.m. Thursday at center court at the
Lake City Mall.
The annual event's proceeds benefit the
Library's Adult Literacy Program.
Several community businesses and orga-
nizations are sponsoring a team: Chasteen's
Downtown, Carr &. Associates, Columbia
Bank, Lewis & Lewis Insurance, Scaffs S&S
Food Stores, Wheeler Insurance, Lake City
Reporter, Altrusa International, John Kasak
State Farm Insurance, First Federal Bank,


First Presbyterian Church, Guangdong
Chinese Restaurant, Literacy Volunteers,
Rotary Club, TD Bank, Comcast, Fort White
Busy Bees and the Columbia County Adult
Education teachers.
Businesses making a donation to
the literacy program include Robinson,
Kennon & Kendron Rountree Moore,
Parks Johnson Insurance, John Burns
State, Farm Insurance, Lion's Club and
Honeycutt Auto Sales.
For information about sponsoring a
team or making a donation to the literacy
program, please call Glennis Pounds at
758-2111.


Continued From Page 1A

He volunteers at the Lake
City VA Medical Center and
leads discussion groups on
alcohol and drug addiction.
Sometimes homeless vet-
erans are too proud to come
to the event, but organizers
are trying to reach as many
as possible, Thomas said.
"We're trying to get all of
them," he said.
Drugs, alcohol or a per-
sonal tragedy may have


happened in the lives of
homeless veterans, Thomas
said. They might feel like
they don't belong.
"They don't really want to
be around people and rep-
resent themselves as a vet-
eran," he said.
Thomas will share how
the event has helped him to
any veteran willing to listen.


"Ill be very visible and
have on a cowboy hat," he
said.
Donations of items a
homeless person would use
are needed for the event.
Contact North at (386) 755-
9026 ext. 3106 for more
information.


FGC: 4-year program


DOG: Will be euthanized within 10 days

Continued From Page 1A


around its left eye, is an adult pit bull
weighing approximately 60 pounds.
Authorities have confiscated and
quarantined the animal. At the end of
the quarantine period the dog will be
euthanized, officials said.
Terry Marques, executive director
of the Lake City Humane Society/
Columbia County Animal Control
Services, said the dog was impound-
ed between .midnight and 1 a.m.
Wednesday and is now at the animal
shelter. I
"The dog will be here until Sept 30
for the mandatory 10-day quarantine
period," he said.
Marques said the dog has not
shown any aggressive tendencies


while at the animal shelter.
Any time there is a dog or cat bite
in Florida, regardless of whether or
not the animal has been vaccinated
for rabies, it must be, quarantined for
a 10-day period for observation of
signs of the rabies virus. If the ani-
mal does have rabies, and it's at the
point where it can be transmittable to
humans through the salvia, then that
animal has approximately 8-10 days
left to live.
"So if it was shedding the rabies
virus at the time of the bite, it will
die within the quarantine period,"
Marques said. "This will give us
time to have it tested, confirmed
and the victim would still have


ample time to undergo post expo-
sure treatment."
Marques said the incident was the
dog's first reported attack.
Now that the dog is in custody of
authorities, Marques said the animal
will be cared for and quarantined for
the mandatory 10 days.
"The owner has signed over owner-
ship to the animal and at the end of
the 10-day quarantine period he will
be humanely euthanized," Marques
said.
According to Animal Control
records, there have been approxi-
mately 75 dog bites reported in the
county so far in 2011.


Continued From Page lA
toward adding a baccalau-
reate in Early Childhood
Education because of the
national movement toward
requiring a. bachelor's
degree for those working
in the daycare and early
childhood industries.
"We're trying to get in first,"
Hall said. 'We've got a pool
of probably 100 people who
could go through it imme-
diately. And once legislation
kicks in, we'll have more
people who will want to
return to school and keep
their educations current."


FGC has worked for more
than two years in its process
to begin offering baccalaure-
ate programs. In addition to
Early Childhood Education
and Nursing, which was
approved in June and is ten-
tatively planned to be offered
in Fall 2012, the college is
looking to add baccalaure-
ate programs for Logistics
and Environmental Water
Resources.
For more information,
contact Troy Roberts at
Troy.Roberts@fgc.edu or
by calling (386) 754-4247.


FOOD: World record attempt is this weekend

Continued From Page 1A


people without depending on other
food banks in the state thanks to a
Columbia County High School fresh-
man's Eagle Scout project.
Jeremy Barwick, 15, has orga-
nized. a 24-hour food drive from 8
a.m. Saturday to 8 a.m. Sunday at'
the Columbia County Fairgrounds.
Jeremy said he worked throughout
his summer vacation making prepara-
tions for the project.
He has also asked local elected
officials, media, friends and Columbia
High classmates for any support they
can provide.
His goal is to collect 600,000 pounds
of non-perishable canned and boxed
goods for the Suwannee food bank.


"There are 12,000 Columbia County
residents who go hungry every day,"
he said. "I'm trying to do the best I
can."
Elkins said the food drive is time-
ly because as the holiday season
approaches, the demand for assis-
tance increases.
"The demand for help doubles or
even quadruples during the holiday
season," he said. '"There is a lot of
interest throughout the area on this."
If Jeremy reaches his goal, the food
bank will receive nearly a year's sup-
ply of food at one time.
"It will fill up our facility but we'd
find a place for it," he said. "It would
be wonderful to have a good supply


of food going into the holidays like
this."
Donated food will be weighed on
scales at the fairgrounds as it comes
in and is loaded on trucks for the food
bank. Live entertainment and vendors
will be at the site as an added incen-
tive to support Jeremy's project.
If he reaches his goal, Jeremy said
it would reflect positively on Lake
City and Columbia County residents.
It would also' set a Guiness World
Record for the amount of food donat-
ed in a 24-hour period, he said.
"I'm not trying to get fame, he said.
"People like to participate in world
record events. I think I'm going to
break it."


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LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 22, 2011


Page Editor: Robert Bridges, 754-0428













OPINION


Thursday, September 22, 2011


ON ANOTHERy- IF-


ONE
OPINION


GOP leader

floats trial

balloon

for a draft


about spending cuts,
but tends to flinch in
the face of the actual
consequences.
'This summer, Congress
and the Obama administration
agreed on $350 billion in fed-
eral spending cuts across the
board. That would be on top
of $78 billion in cuts over five
years ordered by then-Defense
Secretary Robert Gates that
would, at the end of that time
span, reduce the Pentagon bud-
get to zero real growth, accord-
ing to the White House budget
office.
However, filled with fis-
cal rectitude and fired with
budget-cutting mania, Congress
empowered a panel of its mem-
bers to come up with a plan for
another $1.5 trillion in cuts by
Thanksgiving. If the panel fails
or Congress rejects its recom-
mendations, that would trigger
an automatic spending cut of $1.2
trillion with half of it coming
from the military.
Those cuts can only be
achieved by cutbacks in the size
of the military, including the
reserves and National Guard;
the amount and quality of equip-
ment, pay and retirement ben-
efits; housing; health care; and
the upkeep of base facilities.
Since the draft ended in 1973,
there has been no political sup-
port for reviving it. The military
has had few problems filling its
ranks with volunteers, especially
when the economy is bad. As
the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan
have shown, our professional
military is a formidable fighting
force.
Those wars are winding down,
but the unfinished business in
Ilbya, the unrest in the Mideast,
the Republicans outbidding each
for Israeli support ard China's
designs on islands claimed By its
neighbors make it premature to
see our troops retiring quietly to
their garrisons.
McKeon may be playing poker
to keep the military budget
intact, but the fact that he would
commit Republican heresy by
suggesting that tax increases
may be necessary indicates the
depths of his concern.

* Scripps Howard News Service

Lake City Reporter
Serving Columbia County
Since 1874
The Lake City Reporter is pub-
lished with pride for residents of
Columbia and surrounding counties by
Community Newspapers Inc.
We believe strong newspapers build
strong communities -"Newspapers
get things done!"
Our primary goal is to
publish distinguished and profitable
community-oriented newspapers.
This mission will be accomplished
through the teamwork of professionals
dedicated to truth, integrity and hard
work.
Todd Wilson, publisher
Robert Bridges, editor
Sue Brannon, controller
Dink NeSmith, president
Tom Wood, chairman

LETTERS
POLICY
Letters to the Editor should be
typed or neatly written and double
spaced. Letters should not exceed
400 words and will be edited for
length and libel. Letters must be
signed and include the writer's name,
address and telephone number for
verification. Writers can have two
letters per month published. Letters
and guest columns are the opinion of
the writers and not necessarily that of
the Lake City Reporter.


BY MAIL: Letters, P.O. Box 1709,
Lake City, FL 32056; or drop off at
180 E. Duval St. downtown.
BY FAX: (386) 752-9400.
BY E-MAIL:
news@lakecityreporter.com


Have you ever
thought how excit-
ing and amazing it
would be to travel
back in time, or
into the future? You could fix
problems of the past, or learn
secrets of the future, like see-
ing how your great great-grand-
children's lives are turning out?
What an opportunity it would
be to change history, to change
the world, or to take advantage
of the precious secrets hidden
in the future!
Some scientists speculate
that going back in time to cor-
rect mistakes may never be
possible. Like in the movie
"Back to the Future," if you
tried to interfere with your
parents getting together, fail-
ing might mean you'd never
be born. So how could you
be here in the first place to go
back? Some scientists also
think that if you were to make
any change at all, it would
alter the present universe and
make it unrecognizable. Each
change we made might create
an entirely different universe.
What about traveling into the
future? Could we visit it and
discover the next fortune to
be made, or see which lottery
numbers are going to win, then
come back and use that knowl-


www.lakecityreporter.com


Robert Denny
Bob.Denny8@gmoil.com


edge to our advantage? Or
could we see the future results
of choices you make in the
present, and use that knowl-
edge to use the opportunities
that life will present to you?
Well, we may never have
time travel. We can't now
change the past, but we can
choose how we think about it.
Instead of having regrets, we
can accept that we did what we
could with what we had to work
with. We can use our past mis-
takes to learn and grow from,
and to avoid making the same
mistakes again. We can make
better choices for the future.
Seeing history as having made
us what we are today, we could
choose not to harbor resent-
ments or have regrets. We
could see situations that life has
presented us in a more positive
light. Being able to learn from
the past is a sign of wisdom and
character.


Maybe we can't visit the
future now, but we can have
more control over the future
than the past. What would you
like to do with your future?
Your future is determined not
only by life's situations, but also
by your own dreams, hopes,
and plans. Positive thinkers
say that if you can visualize
what you want to do, to be, or
to have, you're already most of
the way to achieving it. When
set in the right direction, your
mind starts taking steps to
make it happen. Don't be
afraid to use your imagination.
Dream your wildest dreams.
When I've daydreamed about
what I want in my life, the
eventual results usually surpass
my dreams. What are your
dreams? What skills, talents,
knowledge, and character traits
will you need to develop to
make it happen?
So, even if you can't change
the past, you do have a lot of
control of the way you think,
your daily activities, and your
plans for a better life. Learn
and grow in the process. Wow.
Use your power!

* Bob Denny is a licensed metal
health counselor in Florida and
teaches psychology at Florida
Gateway College.


Cheney had it right


on Syrian nukes


Journalism, they say, is
a rough draft of history.
Sometimes, very rough.
I have in mind a recent
piece by Bob Woodward,
among America's most celebrated
journalists, about the debate that
took place within the Bush White
House over Syria's al-Kibar nucle-
ar reactor. CIA Director Michael
Hayden told the president his
agency had "only low confi-
dence" that the reactor was part
of a nuclear weapons program.
Nevertheless, Vice President
Dick Cheney favored a military'
strike, as he makes clear in his
newly released memoir.
According to Woodward, this
demonstrates Cheney's failure
to learn the lesson of Iraq where
flawed intelligence about Saddam
Hussein's possession of weapons
of mass destruction was a major
factor in Bush's decision to topple
the dictator. Woodward writes:
"Cheney said he wanted the
United States to commit an act of
war to send a message, demon-
strate seriousness and enhance
credibility a frightening prospect
given the doubts. Two partici-
pants in the key National Security
Council meeting in June 2007 said
that after Cheney, the lone voice,'
made his arguments, Bush rolled
his eyes."
Kudos to Washington Post edi-
tors: A few days later, they ran
an op-ed by four former Bush


Cliff May
Speaktojay@ool.corn


administration officials who par-
ticipated in the deliberations over
the Syrian reactor. Woodward's
account, they said, is a "revision-
ist and misleading history." And
Woodward "misunderstands the
reality of al-Kibar."
Among the facts Woodward
neglects to mention in his piece:
Al-Kibar did, in fact, turn out to
be a nuclear weapons facility.
Woodward may have seen that
as not relevant to his point that
unleashing military power in
the absence of rock-solid intel-
ligence is risky. But in the real
world rock-solid intelligence is
rare. What's more, intelligence
requires analysis. Those advising
Bush, the former officials recall,
knew that the reactor was built
"in the middle of the desert and
- according to the CIA 'was not
configured to produce electricity.'
For what likely purpose was it
built, then, if not to produce fissile
material for nuclear weapons?"
They knew, too, that Syrian dic-
tator Bashar al-Assad was build-


ing it secretly even though, as a
signatory to the Non-Proliferation
Treaty, he could have openly
and legitimately built a civilian
nuclear power plant so long as
he did so under the auspices of
the International Atomic Energy
Agency. Why would he choose
instead to violate his international
treaty obligations and obtain
secret assistance from, of all
places, North Korea?
History will record that the CIA
failed in this mission. The CIA
officers responsible for providing
the "low confidence" assessment
"were pleased they had succeeded
in avoiding the overreaching so
evident in the Iraq WMD case,"
Woodward writes. "So they issued
a very limited-circulation memorial
coin. One side showed a map of
Syria with a star at the site of the
former reactor. On the other side
the coin said, 'No core/No war.'"
In other words, they consid-
ered it a victory that they had pre-
vented Bush from acting. That is
shameful. The CIA's job is to pro-
vide the president with the intel-
ligence he needs to make policy.
TIlhe CIA's job is not to substitute
its policy preferences for those
of the commander in chief and
then celebrate such power-grabs.

* Clifford D. May is president of
the Foundation for the Defense
of Democracies, a policy institute
focusing on terrorism.


4A


ANOTHER
VIEW


Planning

ahead for

post-Assad

Syria

.S. intelligence
agencies were
taken by surprise
by the popular
uprisings this
spring in Tunisia, Egypt, Libya
and Syria. This is no slight to
those agencies. The secret
police and security forces in
those four countries were all
taken by even greater surprise.
The uprisings have brought
regime changes in Tunisia
and Egypt the jury is still out
whether for improvement or
more of the status quo ante.
In Libya, the end of Moammar
Gadhafi's long-running tenure
is only a matter of time.
Only in Syria is the second-
generation dictatorship of
Bashar Assad hanging on
with a certain vicious inten-
sity. While Assad's regime
blames assorted outsiders
for the unrest, the uprising
appears entirely homegrown in
response to repeatedly unful-
filled promises from Assad for
political reform and social liber-
alization.
His tactics have been to send
security forces into the host
restive districts, with the U.N.
estimating that, as a result,
more than 2,700 Syrian protest-
ers and bystanders have been
killed along with at least 100
children.
If these heavy-handed
crackdowns had worked in
the early days of the upris-
ing, Assad might have gotten
away with them, but Syrian
troops firing into unarmed
crowds quickly repelled his
few international supporters.
Turkey, Saudi Arabia and now
China are deserting him.. Even
Iran, which has a lot at stake
in terms of influence in the
region, is beginning to waver.
This time, the U.S., in con-
cert with allies in the region, is
preparing for Syria post-Assad.
Our ambassador, Robert Ford,
who has thoroughly annoyed
the regime by visiting con-
tested areas without permis-
sion, is staying on, a potentially
invaluable point of contact with
opposition leaders once they
emerge.
The task now facing the
U.S. and Turkey, Syria's most
important neighbor, is how
to prevent regime change
from breaking down into civil
war among the various sects
forcibly held together by the
Assad family's minority Alawite
regime Sunnis, Druse and
Christians.
The State Department had an
elaborate, detailed plan for sta-
bilizing post-Saddam Hussein
Iraq. But in a burst of Bush
administration hubris, it was
ignored and we know with
what result. In Syria we may
have Iraq written small and a
chance, along with allies like
Turkey and the Arab nations, to
redeem our idealism.
* Scripps Howard News Service

HIGHLIGHTS
IN HISTORY
Today is Thursday, Sept 22,
the 265th day of 2011. There
are 100 days left in the year.

In 1761, Britain's King
George III and his wife,
Charlotte, were crowned in
Westminster Abbey.
In 1862, President Abraham
Lincoln issued the preliminary
Emancipation Proclamation,
declaring all slaves in rebel
states should be free as of Jan.
1, 1863.
In 1975, Sara Jane Moore


attempted to shoot President
Gerald R. Ford outside a San
Francisco hotel, but missed.
(Moore served 32 years in
prison before being paroled on
Dec. 31, 2007.)


Time travel! (?)










LAKE CITY REPORTER OBITUARIES THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 22, 2011



White supremacist set m


to die for Texas dragging


By MICHAEL GRACZYK
Associated Press
HUNTSVILLE, Texas A
white supremacist gang mem-
ber was headed to the death
chamber Wednesday for the
infamous dragging death 13
years ago of James Byrd Jr., a
black man from Jasper in East
Texas.
Byrd, 49, was chained to the
back of a pickup truck and
pulled whip-like to his death
along a bumpy asphalt road
in one of the most grisly hate


crime murders in recent Texas
history.
Appeals to the courts for
inmate Lawrence Russell
Brewer, 44, were exhausted
and no last-day attempts to save
his life were filed.
Besides Brewer, John
William King, now 36, also was
convicted of capital murder and
sent to death row for Byrd's
death, which shocked the
nation for its brutality. King's
conviction and death sentence
remain under appeal. A third
man, Shawn Berry, 36, received


a life prison term.
"One down and one to go,"
said Billy Rowles, the retired
Jasper County sheriff who first
investigated the horrific scene.
"That's kihd of cruel, but that's
reality."
Byrd's sister, Clara Taylor,
said someone from her broth-
er's family needed to be pres-
ent to watch Brewer die so
she planned to be in the death
chamber.
"He had choices," she said
Tuesday, referring to Brewer.
"He made the wrong choices."


Siblings planned life in

Mexico after crime spree


noo/ l, lM u rrencoo
In a 1998 file photo, the rear of the 1982 pickup truck owned by Shawn Allen Berry,
of Jasper, Texas, where James Byrd Jr. was dragged to death, is shown.


Georgia seeks


waiver of No Child

Left Behind rules


P. SOLOMON BANDA
Associated Press

WALSENBURG, Colo. A sis-
ter and two brothers had planned
to head to Mexico with money sto-
* len in a Georgia bank robbery, then
obtain fraudulent documents and
elude authorities before the trio, now
accused in a cross-country crime
spree, were caught in Colorado, a
detective said.
The details in the case emerged dur-
ing a hearing Tuesday, with Colorado
Springs police Det. Larry Dyer say-
ing the youngest of the three, Ryan
Edward Dougherty, 21, told him that


he hatched the idea the day he was
sentenced to register as a sex offend-
er. Dougherty had earlier been con-
victed of sending sexually explicit text
messages to an 11-year-old girl.
"During the interview, he pretty
much led me to believe that he was
the mastermind of this plan," Dyer
said.'
Colorado District Judge Claude
Appel ruled that prosecutors had
enough evidence to place Dougherty,
his brother Dylan Stanley-Dougherty,
26, and their sister Lee Grace
Dougherty, 29, on trial for crimes
related to a high-speed chase and
shootout during capture.
The siblings are accused of rob-


ABBULIATII-L~U 'b,
Ryan Edward Doughtery (right) arrives
at the courthouse in Walsenburg, Colo.,
on Tuesday, for a preliminary hearing.

bing a bank in Georgia and shoot-
ing at police officers in Florida and
Colorado. They're also suspected in
two car thefts in Utah.


By SHANNON McCAFFREY
Associated Press
ATLANTA Georgia edu-
cation officials are seeking a
waiver from the federal No
Child Left Behind Act and put-
ting forward a new plan to
measure the performance of
the state's schools on more
than just test scores.
State School Superintendent
John Barge and U.S. Sen.
Johnny Isakson were set to
submit Georgia's waiver
request on Tuesday to U.S.


Education Secretary Arne
Duncan in Washington. The
state is among the first in the
nation to appeal some provi-
sions of the federal No Child
Left Behind Act
No Child Left Behind
relies on test scores to mea-
sure adequate yearly prog-
ress. The proposed Georgia
alternative supplements test
scores with other indicators
like attendance, career or col-
lege readiness and how well
the schools prepare students
for the next level.


OBITUARIES


Schnetta Ann Fulton
Schnetta Ann Fulton, resident of
Lake City, Florida passed away
September 16, 2011 in Shands at
the University of Florida Hospi-
tal after a brief illness. Schnetta,
25, was born June 23, 1986 in
Lake City to
Raymond and
Laura Turn-
er. She was
educated in .
the Columbia
County School
System, gradu- .
ating with the
Columbia High School Class of
2004. She further received cer-
tification in Medical Assistance
at ACT in Jacksonville, Florida.
She was a member of House of
Miracles Holiness Church and
affiliated with Freewill Church
of God In Christ. Schnetta was
employed with Country Inn
and Suites, working there until
her health failed. Precedents
in death: grandparents, Alvin
and Annie Laura Fulton, Fred-
die Turner and Erriedell Rowe.
Cherishing loving memories;
parents, Raymond and Laura
Turner, Lake City, FL.; five
brothers, Darrell Brown (Kel-
ley), Tony Fulton (Ebony), Ray-
mond Turner, Jr. (Regina), Mi-
chael Turner (Tamara), Daniel
Turner (Tina); one sister, Lisa
Henry, all of Lake City, FL; de-
voted aunt, Rosa Lee Clark; oth-
er uncles, aunts, hosts of nieces,
nephews, cousins and friends;
special friend Kesha Caldwell.
Funeral services for Schnetta
will be held Saturday, Septem-
ber 24, 2011 at New Day Springs
Missionary Baptist Church. 1325
NW Long Street. Lake City, FL.
Visitation with the fam-
ily will be Friday, Septem-
ber 23, 2011 from 5:00 6:30
P.M. at the funeral home.
Arrangements entrusted to
COMBS FUNERAL HOME.
292 NE Washington Street.
Lake City, FL. (386) 752-4366.
Marq Combs-Turner, L.F.D.
"The Caring Professionals"

Georgia E. Skaper
After 94 wonderful years, Geor-
gia Skaper passed away Septem-
ber 19th in the arms of her grand-
son. Born February 23, 1917 in


Cleveland, Ohio, Georgia was
the eldest child and only daugh-
ter of John and Amelia Pechota.
Georgia, known to many as Dol-
ly, was always known as a helper.
From a very young age, she
helped her working mother
with chores and watching her
younger brothers Ray and Gene.
She was an early graduate of the
historical Cleveland vocational
school Jane Addams High, fol-
lowing the home nursing and
culinary programs. During high
school she worked at the now-fa-
mous Executive Grille preparing
and catering meals and serving
business executives and dignitar-
ies visiting Cleveland. She was
married to Joseph Skaper, with
whom she remained sweethearts
for52yearsuntilhisdeathin 1991.
Dolly was a superlative mother
to Raymond Skaper of Cleve-
land, Ohio and Janice (John)
Irwin of Lake City, FL. She
faced the daunting task of rais-
ing a disabled child when Jan-
ice contracted polio at the age
of three. Georgia's strength
remained solid through many
years of caring for her child, in-
laws, and husband during their
struggles. Always full of en-
ergy, Dolly worked as a cafete-
ria manager for Maple Heights
City Schools, volunteered for
countless charities and was ac-
tive in St. Wenceslas Parish.
After moving to Lake City, she
.lived in Eastside Village, was a
member of Newcomer's Club,
Epiphany Parish and played in
the Kitchen Band for the Colum-
bia County Senior Center. She
also enjoyed cultural programs
presented by the First Presbyte-
rian Church, Levy Performing
Arts Center and Community
Concerts of Lake City. Georgia
is also survived by grandsons
Alex and Erik Irwin of Lake
City, Jeff Irwin of Atlanta, Er-
ik's fiancee, Anita (German)
Schneider and great-grandson,
Noah Schneider. Mass will be
offered at 11:00 am Friday, Sep-
tember 23rd at Epiphany Catho-
lic Church, followed by a memo-
rial service at Columbia County
Senior Center. In lieu of flowers,
donations to support the won-
derful work of Haven Hospice in
Lake City or to provide services

Arthritis Pain

Mystery Solved
Horse Liniment is the secret!
HIALEAll, FL. --An ingredient used
to treat inflammation in thoroughbred
racehorse legs, is now recognized as
safe and effective for human use. The
ingredient has been formulated into a
product called ARTH ARRFST' and
comes in a strength designed for hu-
mans.
Developed by a phannacist and a
chemist, theARTH ARREST formula
is a breakthrough in the treatment of
painful disorders ranging from minor
aches and pains to more serious condi-
tions such as arthritis. Researchers arc
excited and say the formula can relieve
arthritis pain for millions.
Scientists suggest that ARTHI AR-
REST works by intercepting lhe pain
messenger substance that sends pain
signals tothe brain. Although the mech-
anism is not totally clear, pain is re-
lieved in the affected area because the
pain signal actually disappears after
continued use..
ARTH ARREST is the only product
on the market with Neurocaine and is
available in a convenient, roll-on ap-
plicator without a prescription. Con-
sidered a medical miracle by some,
ARTH AR RR FST isavailable in phar-
macies or by calling 1-800-339-3301.
Now at:


through Columbia County Se-
nior Services would be appre-
ciated. Funeral arrangements
provided by DEES- PARRISH
FUNERAL HOME.


Gladys Little Smith
Mrs. Gladys Little Smith, 84,
died Tuesday September 20,
2011 at the Lake City Medical
Center in Lake City. She was the
daughter of George Walter and
Annie Evans Little. She is pre-
ceded in death by her husband,
Rema Smith. She has lived in
Lake City all her life. She was a
dedicated member of the Pleas-


ant Grove United Methodist
Church. She loved her Lord. She
enjoyed singing in the choir, gar-
dening, her children, grandchil-
dren and great grandchildren.
She is survived by her two sons
David Smith (Kathy), Topeka,
KS., Rickey Smith ( Nancy),
Lake City, FL.; one sister Mil-
dred Crews, Petersburg, VA;
four grandchildren Blake Smith,
Amie Smith, Karen Croft ( Sta-
cy), Walter Smith ( Krissy). Five
great-grandchildren Ethan Peik-
cr, Austin Nash. Ryan Smith.
Madeleine and Carolina Croft
four step grandchildren Ashleigh
and Justin Bridges, Bethany and
Kayla Croft. One step-great-
great grandchild Lance Croft.


Find a store near you at
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Funeral service will be conduct-
ed Friday September 23, 2011
at 11:00 A.M. at Pleasant Grove
United Methodist Church with
Pastor Dusty Bailey, and Rev-
erend Gerald Williams officiat-
ing. Interment will follow in the
Church Cemetery. Visitation with
the family will be held Thursday
September 22, 2011 from 5:00
P.M. till 7:00 P.M.at the chapel
of Dees-Parrish Family funeral
home. In Lieu of flowers family
ask donations be made to Su-
wannee Valley Care Center 6037
U.S. Hwy 90 west Lake City,
FL. 32055 or Pleasant Grove
United Methodist Church Cem-


etery Association 4709 SW State
Rd 47 Lake City, FL. 32024.
Funeral arrangements are un-
der the direction of DEES-
PARRISH FAMILY
FUNERAL HOME 458 South
Marion Avenue Lake City,
Florida 32025. (386) 752-
1234. Please sign guest book at
parrishfamilyfuneralhome. com.



Obituaries are paid advertise-
ments. For details, call the Lake
City Reporter's classified depart-
ment at 752-1293.


0 p- .








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6A LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL & S


Scott's numbers Romney

improve in polls questions
Perry


By BRENT KALLESTAD
Associated Press
TALLAHASSEE -
Florida Republican Gov.
Rick Scott remains bur-
lened with a low standing
among the state's voters, a
new Quinnipiac University
poll released Wednesday
shows.
More voters said they
like the governor personally
than they did a month ago,
but still don't like how Scott
is doing his job.
"All in all this isn't great
news for the governor, buthis
numbers are moving upward
slowly," pollster Peter Brown
Said Wednesday.
Quinnipiac (Conn.)
University randomly sur-
veyed 1,007 registered voters
by land line and cell phones
between Sept 14 and Sept.
19. The poll has a margin of
error of plus or minus 3.1
percentage points.
Voters were split evenly,
37 percent to 37 percent,
when asked if they liked the
new governor as a person,
but 50 percent said they
disapproved of the job he's
doing" compared to 37 per-
cent who gave him a favor-
able job rating.


The numbers were slight-
ly better for Scott than in
early August when 52 per-
cent disapproved compared
to 35 percent who believed
Scott was doing a good job
after slightly more than
eight months in office.
More than half, 53 per-
cent, said they do not
approve of Scott's policies
or the way he handled the
state budget Forty one per-
cent said they believed that
state budget cuts made ear-
lier this year went too far
and was unfair to people
like them.
"Voters don't like poli-
ticians they see as being
unfair, especially when it
comes to cutting programs
for people," Brown said.
"Politicians who can con-
vince voters they are being
fair on budget issues gain a
leg up."
But Scott showed
increased strength within
his own party where 70
percent of Republicans
ranked his job perfor-
mance favorably com-
pared to 18 percent who
disapproved. Democrats
disapproved by a margin
of 82 percent to 8 per-
cent.


By CURT ANDERSON
Associated Press
MIAMI Republican
presidential candidate Mitt
Romney is raising new
questions in Florida about
his rival Rick Perry's posi-
tion on Social Security.
Romney said at a Miami
town hall-style meeting
that Perry's proposal to
have states run the retire-
ment system won't work.
Romney asks what would
happen if some states
chose not to create a
Social Security plan, and
what would happen if peo-
ple move from one state
to another with a different
system.
Romney, a former
Massachusetts governor,
says he. wants to keep
Social Security intact


STATE THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 22, 2011

Unclaimed property

auction nets state $1M


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Republican presiden-
tial candidate, former
Massachusetts Gov. Mitt
Romney gestures as
he talks during a town
hall meeting in Miami on
Wednesday.
at the federal level and
make changes to keep it
financially healthy in the
future.
The Miami event comes
the day before the-next
big GOP presidential
debate in Orlando. Social
Security is likely to be a
key issue at the debate.


Associated Press
TALLAHASSEE As
detective Sherlock Holmes
often said ifs "elementary,"
but now he's also helping
Florida's middle and high
schools.
A handwritten letter signed
by Sherlock Holmes author
Sir Arthur Conan Doyle is
among unclaimed property
thafs been auctioned off to
benefit the state's schools.
Chief Financial Officer Jeff


Atwater said Tuesday that
Saturday's auction in Ponte
Vedra Beach brought in $1
million.
Other items included a
vintage Leica camera, an
American Indian belt with
200 grams of silver and a
gold Elgin pocket watch.
All were left in abandoned
safe deposit boxes at Florida
banks.
Most of the items, though,
are returned to their owners,.


Associated Press
GRAND CANYON
NATIONAL PARK, Ariz.
- Three California condor
chicks have hatched in the
wild in northern Arizona
for the first time during a
breeding season.
The Peregrine Fund says
the most recent chick was
seen by field staff on Sept


9. The other two chicks
were observed last month.,
Two of the chicks' nests
are on the south rim of the
Grand Canyon and another
is on thd Kaibab Plateau.
The wildlife group says
they're excited to see'
California condors repro-
ducing and increasing their
numbers on their own.


Wildlife officials say panther killed in Florida


IMMOKALEE Authorities say
-a Florida panther was struck and
killed by a vehicle in southwest
Florida.
The driver reported the Monday
night incident to authorities.


The Florida Fish and Wildlife
Conservation Commission says it
was the eighth panther killed by a
vehicle this year, compared to 16 in
2010. The panther was a 3- to-4-year-
old female without a tracking collar.


Wildlife officials say the driver
saw two panthers crossing the road.
He missed the first one, but said he
couldn't avoid the second.
Overall, this was the 23rd docu-
mented panther mortality in 2011.


$400B shifted to boost economy


By MARTIN CRUTSINGER
Associated Press
WASHINGTON The Federal Reserve
says it will sell $400 billion of its shorter-
term securities to buy longer-term holdings,
its latest effort to boost a weak economy.
The Fed's move to rebalance its $2.87 tril-
lion portfolio could lower Treasury yields
further. Ultimately, it might reduce rates on
mortgages and other consumer and busi-
ness loans.
Fed policymakers announced the move
Wednesday after a two-day meeting. Three
members dissented from the decision.
Many analysts have said the shift in the


Fed's portfolio could provide modest help to
the economy by reducing borrowing costs
and perhaps raising stock prices. Others say
it won't help and warn that the move could
escalate inflation.
In June, the Fed completed a $600 billion
bond-buying program that may have helped
keep rates low.
Stocksfell immediately after the announce-
ment The yield on the 10-year Treasury
note tumbled, and its price rose.
Expectations that the Fed would expand
its holdings of long-term securities, along
with fears of another recession, have led
investors to buy up U.S. Treasurys. Treasury
yields have dropped in response.


LAKE SHORE HOSPITAL AUTHORITY

Budget Summary



October 1, 2011

Through

September 30, 2012


Capital


Patient Care Funds


Operating


Improvement


Hospital Clinics Fund Fund Total


REVENUES AND BALANCES
Ad valorem taxes


.962 mills


$1,467,316


$ 730,000


- $ 2,197,316


Lease income


Interest earnings
Transfers in


Total revenue


Estimated beginning cash


40,000


600,000
2,107,316
700,000
$2,807,316


5,000


479,070
75,000


10,000


735,000 554,070 10,000


800,000
$1,535,000


3,400,000
$3,954,070


1,400,000
$1,410,000


479,070
130,000
600,000
3,406,386
6,300,000
$ 9,706,386


EXPENDITURES AND RESERVES


Administration


194,000 351,798 545,798


Healthcare services
Indigent patient care
Transfers out
Total appropriations
Ending cash reserves


2,540,000


730,000


25,000


2,734,000 730,000 376,798


73,316
$2,807,316


805,000
$1,535,000


3,577,272
$3,954,070


600,000
600,000
810,000
$1,410,000


3,295,000
600,000
4,440,798
5,265,588
$ 9,706,386


The Tentative/Adopted, and/or Final Budgets are on file in the Office of the above-mentioned taxing authority as a public record.


Condor chicks hatched


NOTICE OF BUDGET HEARING

The Lake Shore Hospital Authority has tentatively adopted a

budget for the fiscal year ending September 30, 2012. A public

hearing to make a FINAL DECISION on the budget AND TAXES

will be held on Monday, September 26, 2011 at 5:15 p.m., at

Lake Shore Hospital Authority, Administration Complex,

259 NE Franklin Street, Suite 102, Lake City, Florida.









LAKE CITY REPORTER HEALTH THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 22, 2011 7A


Survey: Significant drop

in uninsured young adults


RICARDO ALONSO-ZALDIVAR
Associated Press
WASHINGTON The
number of young adults
without health insurance
has dropped significantly, a
new survey finds, thanks
to a provision of President
Barack Obama's health care
law allowing them to stay on
their parents' plans.
The new Gallup poll find-
ings translate to about 1
million more young adults
with health insurance.
While the bleak economy
has made it hard for young
people trying to enter the
workforce, fewer are being
forced to also go without
medical care.
A Gallup survey released
Wednesday finds that the
share of adults ages 18-25
without health insurance
dropped from 28 percent
starting last fall to 24.2 per-
cent in the second quarter
of this year. That defies the
disheartening trend of ris-


ing numbers of working-age
Americans without cover-
age.
"While we did not see a
drop-off in any other age
group, we did see a drop in
this age group," said Frank
Newport, Gallup's polling
director.
Public opinion remains
divided about Obama's
health care overhaul, but
coverage for young adults
has proven to be a popular
and relatively low-cost ben-
efit that families were eager
to sign up for in these days
of prolonged school-to-work
transitions.
Health and Human
Services Secretary Kathleen
Sebelius planned her own
announcement Wednesday
about health insurance for
young adults. A Census
report last week hinted at
an increase in coverage.
The new law allows adult
children to remain on a par-
ent's plan until they turn
26, a provision that techni-
cally took last effect last


fall but wasn't implemented
by most workplace health
plans until Jan. 1.
"The big change started
in the last quarter of 2010
and continued further in
the first two quarters of this
year," said Newport. "Bingo,
it started going down."
Young adults some-
times termed the "invinci-
bles"- are still more likely
to be uninsured than any
other age group.
Some are making the
switch from school to work.
Others are in low-wage jobs
that don't usually offer cov-
erage. And some pass up
workplace health insurance
because they don't think
they'll use it and would rath-
er get a little extra in their
paychecks.
Census figures show
nearly 35 million people are
in the 18-25 age group, so
Gallup's 4 percentage-point
drop would translate to an
increase of roughly 1 mil-
lion or more getting health
insurance.


Florida Dems skeptical of


welfare drug testing law


KELU. KENNEDY
Associated Press
MIAMI Democratic
lawmakers questioned
state child welfare officials
Tuesday about a new law
requiring drug testing for
welfare recipients, includ-
ing whether recipients had
adequate access to testing
facilities and whether par-
ents who test positive would
significantly delay their chil-
dren from receiving funds.
Between 1,500 and 2,000
residents have taken the
test since the program


began in mid-July. About 2.7
percent tested positive for
drugs. Another 563 began
the application process but
did not take the tests, said
Pete Digre, deputy secre-
tary for the Department of
Children and Families.
There are 351 test sites
throughout the state, but
five counties, including
Monroe, Glades, Hendry,
Madison and Hamilton,
have none. DCF officials
said they are coordinating
with contractors in those
areas.
Critics wondered if resi-


dents weren't following
through with the drug tests
for fear of testing positive,
or because they couldn't
afford the $25-$35 test fee
or didn't have easy access to
a testing facility.
"Are people who aren't
following through with the
drug tests living in those
counties?" asked Rep. Lori
Berman, D-Delray Beach,
duringaTallahassee meeting
of the House Subcommittee
on Health and Human
Services Access.
"I don't know the answer
to that," said Digre.


DCF updates lawmakers

after ex-foster child death


KELLI KENNEDY
Associated Press
MIAMI The state
child welfare agency said
Tuesday it was diverting
tens of millions of dollars
to recruit and train child
protective investigators
and beef up an antiquated
abuse hotline system after
the death of a 10-year-old
former foster child.
Department of Children
and Families Secretary
David Wilkins updated
two legislative commit-
tees, saying his agency has
reduced child investigator
caseloads by 30 percent
and plans to reduce them
by another 30 percent. The
agency has hired about 100
child investigators, most-
ly in South Florida, and
trained more than 1,100 on
interviewing techniques,
shifting the focus of the
job from social work to law


enforcement. Wilkins said
DCF needs to do more to
train and retain them, call-
ing their position his top
priority.
DCF came under scru-
tiny earlier this year for
failing to piece together
warning signs from medi-
cal professionals and
school officials that some-
thing was wrong in the
home of Jorge and Carmen
Barahona in the years
before their child, 10-year-
old Nubia, was killed. The
agency blamed it on a sys-
tem wide failure, including
poor judgment by child
protective investigators,
overwhelming caseloads
and missed opportunities
at every turn.
Nubia's decomposing
body was found in the
back for her father's truck
by the side of the road on.
Valentine's Day. Her twin
brother Victoi, survived,


but was badly burned by
a toxic chemical. Jorge
and Carmen Barahona
have pleaded not guilty
to a first-degree murder
and a slew of child abuse
charges. The state has
said it will seek the death
penalty.
DCF has also asked
the legislature for permis-
sion to redirect $35 mil-
lion within their nearly $3
billion budget to revamp
technology and overhaul
the abuse hotline. The
Legislature provided $5
million last year to begin
the process.
Most of that funding
would go to front-line work-
ers for mobile devices and
other technology. When
hotline operators current-
ly receive a call, they can't
pull up a family's history,
showing prior complaints,
outcomes and school and
medical issues.


Advocates seek to quintuple

Missouri cigarette taxes


Associated Press
JEFFERSON CITY, Mo.
- Health advocates are
making another run at rais-
ing Missouri's lowest-in-
the-nation tax on cigarettes,
proposing an 80-cent-per-
pack increase that could
appear on the 2012 ballot
The American Cancer
Society says is it is leading
a coalition that will attempt
to qualify the measure for
the ballot.
Missouri's cigarette tax
of 17 cents per pack has
remained unchanged while
most other states increased
their tobacco taxes over the
past decade. The national


average for all states is
now $1.46 per pack. Ballot
measures that would have
raised Missouri's tax were
narrowly defeated in both
2002 and 2006.
The Cancer Society
estimates that the lat-
est proposal, which als6
would raise taxes on other
tobacco products besides
cigarettes, would generate
about $308 million annu-
ally for the state. The pro-
posal would allot half of
that money to elementary
and secondary education,
30 percent to colleges and
universities and 20 percent
to programs intended to
prevent people from using


tobacco or help them quit
doing so.
"Each year thousands
of Missourians are diag-
nosed with tobacco-relat-
ed cancer and some will
lose their lives to this
devastating disease,"
said Misty Snodgrass, of
American Cancer Society.
"This ballot measure will
mean increased longevity,
improved quality of life,
and fewer Missourians
who will needlessly suffer
and die from cancer."
The Cancer Society's
news release included sup-
portive comments from
several education, health
and business leaders.


Bachmann says food


industry overregulated


THOMAS BEAUMONT
Associated Press
DES MOINES, Iowa A
week after the Agriculture
Department announced
wider testing for potential-
ly deadly E. coli in meat,
Republican presidential can-
didate Michele Bachmann
said Tuesday that regula-
tions were overburdening
food producers.
Bachmann visited a
140-year-old, family-run meat-
packing plant in Des Moines
and took a turn at cutting
ribeye steaks in a chilly meat
locker as she pushed back
against regulations for food
makers and other business-
es. She did not call for the
repeal of any specific rules.
"We want to have safety,"
she said. "But we also want to
have common sense."
Bachmann says, as do most
of those in the GOP field,
that a lightened regulatory
load would allow employers
to spend money on expan-
sion rather than federal com-
pliance. But the Minnesota
congresswoman is the first
to focus the argument on the
food-processing industry.
"That's part of the problem,
the overkill," Bachmann told
reporters during an appear-
ance in which she posed


'Alarm fatigue'
cited in death
Associated Press
WORCESTER, Mass. -
UMass Memorial Medical
Center in Worcester is step-
ping up efforts to prevent
nurses from tuning out moni-
tor warning alarms following
the death of a patient whose
alarms signaling a fast heart
rate and potential breathing
problems went unanswered
for early an hour.
The 60-year-old man died
in August 2010, but the death
was only reported to the state
in the spring.


Call now for a Free Trial


What does he have that you don't?


Republican presidential candidate, Rep. Michele Bachmann,
R-Minn., gets a lesson in meat cutting from owner Kent
Wiese during a plant tour at Amend Packing Co., Tuesday in
Des Moines, Iowa.


with huge slabs of beef. "And
when they make it compli-
cated, they make it expensive
and so then you can no lon-
ger stay in business."
The Agriculture
Department said expanding
testing of E. coli in meat from
one strain to seven would
hasten recalls of tainted
products and help officials
identify more foodborne ill-


Q~i


nesses. However, the meat
industry opposed the move
as too expensive 'without
enough benefit The USDA
expects the additional testing
to begin in March.
Bachmann's backing of
the food industry view that
regulations are a problem
follows high-profile recalls
of peanuts, eggs and other
tainted food products.


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A LAKE CITY REPORTER HEALTH THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 22, 2011


Adults with autism hired

to test company software


CARLA K. JOHNSON
Associated Press
HIGHLAND PARK, Ill. The software
testers at Aspiritech are a collection of
characters. Katie Levin talks nonstop. Brian
Tozzo hates driving. Jamie Specht is both-
ered by bright lights, vacuum cleaners and
the feel of carpeting against her skin. Rider
Hallenstein draws cartoons of himself as a
DeLorean sports car. Rick Alexander finds
it unnerving to sit near other people.
This is the unusual workforce of a U.S.
startup that specializes in finding software
bugs by harnessing the talents of young
adults with autism.
Traits that make great software testers
- intense focus, comfort with repetition,
memory for detail also happen to be char-
acteristics of autism. People with Asperger's
syndrome, a mild form of autism, have nor-
mal to high intelligence and often are highly
skilled with computers.
. Aspiritech, a nonprofit in Highland Park,
Ill., nurtures these skills while forgiving the
quirks that can make adults with autism
unemployable: social awkwardness, poor
eye contact, being easily overwhelmed.
The company's name plays on the words
"Asperger's," "spirit" and "technology."
Clients, nine companies in Aspiritech's
first two years, have been pleased.
"They exceeded my expectations," said
Dan Tedesco of Shelton, Conn.-based


HandHold Adaptive, which took a chance
on Aspiritech to test an iPhone application.
"There is a pride in their product you don't
usually see in this type of work."
Aspiritech was founded by Moshe and
Brenda Weitzberg after their son, Oran,
now 32, was fired from a job bagging gro-
ceries. Oran was diagnosed with Asperger's
syndrome when he was 14. He now works
at Aspiritech.
"He went from failing at bagging grocer-
ies to being one of the best software testers
on our team," said Brenda Weitzberg.
The Weitzbergs modeled Aspiritech
on a successful Danish company called
Specialisterne, or "the Specialists."
Specialisterne also employs software tes-
ters with autism. Its satisfied clients include
Oracle and Microsoft.
Other companies in Belgium, Japan and
Israel are vithli hiring or training adults
with autism as software testers.
This year, Aspiritech projects $120,000
in revenue, with 60 percent coming from
donations and 40 percent from clients. The
Weitzbergs hope to raise the client revenue
to 50 percent next year.
"There have been a couple of attempts in
the U.S. and Aspiritech is the one that's mak-
ing it," said Scott Standifer of the University
of Missouri's Disability Policy and Studies
office and the organizer of a national con-
ference on adults with autism and employ-
ment.


Aspiritech co-founder
Moshe Weitzberg (standing
left) works with employees,
Katie Levin, Rick Alexander
and Jamie Specht, at the
nonprofit enterprise that
specializes in finding soft-
ware bugs as they test a
new program. Aspiritech
hires only people with
autism disorders. Traits that
make great software testers
- intense focus, comfort
with repetition, memory for
detail also happen to be
characteristics of autism.
Marc Lazar, Aspertech's
autism specialist works in
'the background.


Report: 3 Sarasota inmates

took smuggled cocaine


Associated Press
SARASOTA Sheriff's officials say
three inmates on suicide watch were taken
to a hospital last month after overdosing on
cocaine that had been smuggled into the
Sarasota County Jail.
Two of the inmates vomited and one had
stopped breathing after the Aug. 22 inci-
dent.Authorities say the substance tested
positive for cocaine.
According to reports, a corrections offi-


cer found inmate 49-year-old Willie Curry
unresponsive. Inmate Louis Nowicki had
also gotten sick and was on his bunk arid
inmate Shaun Monahan was having dif-
ficulty breathing. All three were taken to
the hospital. Curry spent three days in
intensive care.
Nowicki told investigators 31-year-old
Monahan had smuggled the drug into the
jail in his rectum. Monahan told deputies
he was too high on drugs to remember.


Troops amputations up

sharply in Afghan war
PAUUNE JEUNEK -----
Associated Press -


WASHINGTON The
counterinsurgency tactic that
is'sending U.S. soldiers out on
foot patrols among the Afghan
people, rather than riding in
armored vehicles, has contrib-
uted to a dramatic increase
in arm and leg amputations,
genital injuries and the loss of
multiple limbs following blast
injuries.
These devastating injuries
affected unit morale. And they
gave riseIto talk on- the bat-
tlefield that some troops had
made secret _acts not to help
each other survive if they were
so severely injured, anew
report said Tuesday.
The number of U.S. troops
who had amputations rose
sharply from 86 in 2009, to 187
in 2010 and 147 so far this year,
military officials said Tuesday,
releasing the report on cata-
strophic wounds.
Of those, the number of
troops who lost two or three
limbs rose from 23 in 2009
to 72 last year to 77 so far
this year. Only a dozen or so
of all amputations came from
Iraq and the rest were from
Afghanistan, where militants
are pressing the insurgency
with roadside bombs, hand-
made land mines and other
explosives.
Officials said genital inju-
ries also have risen signifi-
cantly, but they did not give


SOUTHERN

INTERNAL MEDICINE

Accepting New Patients
Specializing in adult medical care including:


U.S. Army flight Crew Chief Sgt. Drew Richardson from
Brevard NQ, pf Task Force Lift "Dust Off, Charle.Company
1-171 Avi.Mon Regiment (righi helps a-w6undie4soldier to a
medevaqiblicopter after he was hit in a roadside bomb in in
the Helmand Province of southern Afghanistan on Sept 11,
2011. This is a world of fear, resolve and dark humor that is
mostly hidden from accounts of the human cost of the war
in Afghanistan. American troops who patrol on foot in bomb-
laced areas know they might lose a leg, or two, if they step in
the wrong place.

specific figures.


The sharp rise in severe
injuries came as a buildup of
foreign forces expanded the
counterinsurgency strategy
that seeks to protect civilians,
win their support away from
insurgents and help build an
Afghan government the popu-
lationwillembraceinstead.The
soldier on foot is at greater risk
for severe injuries, Tuesday's
report noted, "and the injury
severity (in Afghanistan) con-
firms this."


Demi Lovato to young girls
with problems: Seek help


MESFIN FEKADU
Associated Press
NEW YORK Singer
Demi Lovato thanked her
fans at a concert for support-
ing her after she entered
rehab last year and encour-
aged young girls to seek
help if they are dealing with
similar problems.
"A year ago today ... I
was not in a good place,"
the 19-year-old said at her
concert Saturday night.
"I needed help and I want
anybody in this audience to


know that if you're strug-
gling with one of the issues
that I dealt with or a differ-
ent issue, that you can get
help, that you can recover
and it's possible if you just
tell someone."
Lovato entered a treat-
ment facility for three
months last year to deal
with "emotional and physi-
cal issues." The singer-
actress said as an 8-year-old
who faced bullying she had
an eating disorder and later
started cutting her wrists to
vent her despair.


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Story ideas?

Contact
Tim Kirby
Sports Editor
754-0421
tkirby@lakecityreporter.com


Lake City Reporter





SPORTS


ThursdaySeptember 22, 20 II


------, -


www.lakecityreporter.com


Section B


BRIEFS

HIGH SCHOOL FOOTBALL
Trucks for food
drive at games
School Superintendent
Mike Millikin announced
that principals Terry
Huddleston and Keith
Hatcher have agreed
to allow trucks at the
main entrance to both
Columbia High's and
Fort White High's home
football games on Friday.
The trucks will be
there to accept donations
for Jeremy Barwick's
Eagle Scout project food
drive.
Canned and
non-perishable goods (no
glass) will be accepted.
The trucks will
deliver the goods to
the Columbia County
Fairgrounds on Saturday.
RUNNING
Breast Cancer
Awareness run
Cancer Care of North
Florida and Dr. Khan
have a 5K run/walk
planned for 8 a.m.
Oct 1 at Wilson Park
in downtown Lake City.
Entry fee is $25 ($30 day
of run, 6:30-7:30 a.m.
registration). Suwannee
River Breast Cancer
Awareness Association
is hosting the run.
For details, call
Shannon Thomas at
288-4692 or Donnie
Feagle at 365-1191, or
go to
www.suwanneeawareness.
com.
* From staff reports

GAMES
Today
Columbia High boys
golf vs. Oak Hall School
at The Country Club at
Lake City, 2 p.m.
Columbia High girls
golf vs. Chiles High at
Quail Heights Country
Club, 3 p.m.
Fort White High
volleyball vs. Branford
High, 6 p.m. (JV-5)
Columbia High
volleyball vs. Stanton
Prep, 6:30 p.m. (JV-5:30)
Columbia High JV
football at Gainesville
High, 7 p.m.
Fort White High JV
football vs. Union County
High, 7 p.m.
Friday
Columbia High
football vs. Oakleaf High,
7:30 p.m.
Fort White High
football vs. Wakulla High,
7:30 p.m.
Fort White High
volleyball at Keystone
Heights tournament,
TBA
Saturday
Columbia High
swimming vs. Fernandina
Beach High, 9 a.m.
Fort White High
volleyball at Keystone
Heights tournament,
TBA
Fort White High cross
country in Mountain Dew
Invitational at University
of Florida, TBA


Lady Tigers


beat Bulldogs


CHS sweeps off
Suwannee in
three-set match.
From staff reports

Columbia High dusted
off rival Suwannee High in
a three-set win in Live Oak
on Tuesday.
The Lady Tigers won the
three-set match 25-18, 25-16
and 26-24 to take the win
back to Lake City.
"We played with a slow
pace with a lot of high


passes and sets," Columbia
head coach Rebecca Golden
said.
Columbia improved to
8-4 with the win.
The Lady Tigers host
Stanton Prep at 6:30 p.m.
today.
Fort White volleyball
Fort White High's vol-
leyball team completed its
first run through the tough
District 5-4A with a match at
PREP continued on 2B


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Fort White's Soron Williams (21) is taken down by Newberry
High defenders while attempting to gain yardage in a game
on Sept. 9.


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake Qity Reporter
Columbia High's Annie Milton (1) returns a volley in a game on Sept. 14.


Soucinek


soars


TIM KIRBY/Lake City Reporter
Members of the 2011 Columbia High boys golf team are Joseph Bivins (from left), Dillan VanVleck, Nick Jones, Tim Bagley, Dalton Mauldin, Dean Soucinek,
Andrew Johnson, Tristen Morgan, Garry Carman, Luke Soucinek and coach Steve Smithy.


Tigers host 18-hole match today


By BRANDON FINLEY
bfinley@lakecityreporter.com
Columbia High is off to
a hot start in its 2011 golf
campaign after compiling
a 7-2 record to begin the
season.


The Tigers got one of the
all-time low rounds in school
history from Dean Soucinek
as he shot a 4-under 31 at
Meadowbrook Golf Club in
Gainesville on Tuesday.
"It was one of the lowest
rounds I can remember for a


Columbia golfer," coach Steve
Smithy said. "Blayne Barber
and Carl Ste-Marie also shot
31s that I've personally seen.
Dean was really consistent
and made a tactical move to
take the driver out of the bag.
We're very happy with how it


turned out"
Soucinek's round helped
propel the Tigers to a 144-
166 victory over Santa Fe
High on Tuesday.
Nick Jones shot 35,
Tim Bagley scored 38 and
Andrew Johnson and Dalton


Mauldin both carded 40s.''
Garry Carman finished
with a 45.
Columbia returns home
for an 18-hole match against
Oak Hall at The Country
Club at Lake City today. Tee
time is set for 2 p.m.


War Eagles in
town to take on
Fort White Friday.
By TIM KIRBY
tkirby@lakecityreporter.com
FORT WHITE With
its small district Fort White
High head coach Demetric
Jackson had to hustle to
complete the 2011-12 foot-
ball schedule.
Jackson picked a heavy-


weight with Wakulla High
and the War Eagles come
to town on Friday. Kickoff
is 7:30 p.m.
Wakulla (2-1) is in
District 2-5A with Rickards,
Suwannee and Godby high
schools.
. The War Eagles made
the playoffs as runner-up in
District 3-4A last year. They
lost to fellow district mem-
ber Lincoln High in the
second round. The Trojans
carried on to win the state


championship.
The War Eagles lost to
North Florida" Christian
School last week, 25-20,
after opening with wins
over Mosley High (31-14)',
and Taylor County High
(30-21). The Mosley game
was on the road.
Fort White (2-1) lost to
Taylor County on Friday,
35-28, but Wakulla head
coach Scott Kless saw
INDIANS continued on 2B:


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LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 22, 2011


TELEVISION

TV sports

Today.
COLLEGE FOOTBALL
8 p.m.
ESPN N.C. State at Cincinnati
GOLF
9 am.
TGC European PGATour.Austrian
ppen, first round, at Atzenbrugg, Austria
I p.m.
TGC PGATour,Tour Championship,
firstt round, at Atlanta
2:30 a.m.
TGC LPGA,The Solheim Cup, first
round, at Dunsany, Ireland
MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL
7 p.m.
MLB Regional coverage,Tampa Bay
,;at N.Y.Yankees or LA.Angels atToronto
PREP FOOTBALL
7 p.m.
FSN Colerain (Ohio) at Middletown
(Ohio)
SOCCER
II p.m.
ESPN2 Women's national teams.
exhibition, U.S. vs. Canada, at Portland,
Ore.
WNBA BASKETBALL
7 p.m.
ESPN2 Playoffs, conference finals,
,game IAtlanta at Indiana
9 p.m.
ESPN2 Playoffs, conference finals,
game I, Phoenix at Minnesota

BASEBALL

AL standings


-i East Division
W L
New York 93 60
Boston 88 67
Tampa Bay 85 68
Toronto 78 *76
Baltimore 64 90
Central Division
W L
x-Detroit 89 65
Cleveland 76 77
Chicago 75 79
Kansas City 68 87
Minnesota 59 94
West Division
W L
Texas 89 65
Los Angeles 84 70
Oakland 69 85


Pct GB
.608 -
.568 6
.556 8
.506 15'
.416 29k'


Seattle 65 89 .422 24
x-clinched division
Tuesday's Games
Cleveland 4, Chicago White Sox 3,
1st game
Chicago White Sox 5. Cleveland 4,
2nd game
N.Y.Yankees 5,Tampa Bay 0
LA.Angels I 0,Toronto 6
Baltimore 7. Boston 5

Seattle 5, Minnesota 4
Texas 7, Oakland 2
Wednesday's Games
N.Y.Yankees 4,Tampa Bay 2, I st game
ChicagoWhite Sox at Cleveland (n)
Tampa Bay at N.Y. Yankees, 2nd game
(n)
LA.Angels at Toronto (n)
Baltimore at Boston (n)
Detroit at Kansas City (n)
Seattle at Minnesota (n)
Texas at Oakland (n)
Today's Games
Seattle (Beavan 5-5) at Minnesota
(Swarzak 3-7), 1:10 p.m.
Texas (C.Lewis 13-10) at Oakland
0(Cahill 11-14), 3:35 p.m.
P- Baltimore (Britton 10-10) at Detroit
L(a.Turner 0-I). 7:05 p.m.
t. Chicago White Sox (Humber 9-8) at
Cleveland (j.Gomez 4-2), 7:05 p.m.
Tampa Bay (Niemann 11-7) at N.Y.
Yankees (Colon 8-9), 7:05 p.m.
L.A. Angels (E.Santana I 1-12) at
Toronto (H.Alvarez I-2), 7:07 p.m.
Friday's Games
Baltimore at Detroit, 7:05 p.m.
Boston at N.Y.Yankees, 7:05 p.m.
Minnesota at Cleveland, 7:05 p.m.
Toronto at Tampa Bay, 7:10 p.m.
Seattle atTexas. 8:05 p.m.
Kansas City at Chicago White Sox,
-;:10 p.m.
Oakland at LA.Angels, 10:05 p.m.

NL standings


x-Philadelp
,, tlanta
AVashingto
New York
- lorida


Milwaukee
St. Louis
Ccicnnati
Pittsburgh
Chicago
Houston


Arizona
San Franci
Los Angele
Colorado
San Diego


East Division
W L
phia 98 56
88 67
in 74 79
73 81
70 85
Central Division
W L
91 64
85 69
75 80
69 86
68 87
53 101
West Division
W L
89 66
sco 83 71
es 77 76
70 84
67 88


.539 5'A
.503 II
.455 18h
.432 22


x-clinched division
Tuesday's Games
Washington 4, Philadelphia 3, 10
innings, 1st game
' Washington 3, Philadelphia 0, 2nd
game
Atlanta 4, Florida 0
Cincinnati 6, Houston 4
Milwaukee 5, Chicago Cubs I
St. Louis I 1.N.Y. Mets 6
San Diego 2, Colorado I
Pittsburgh S,Arizona 3
L.A. Dodgers 2, San Francisco I
Wednesday's Games
Cincinnati 2, Hpuston 0
Chicago Cubs 7, Milwaukee I
San Diego 4, Colorado 0
Arizona 8, Pittsburgh 5
Washington at Philadelphia (n),
Atlanta at Florida (n)
N.Y. Mets at St.'Louis (n)
San Francisco at LA. Dodgers (n)
Today's Games
N.Y. Mets (Capuano I 1-12) at St. Louis
(Westbrook 12-9), 1:45 p.m.
Washington (Peacock 1-0) at


Philadelphia (Oswalt 8-9), 7:05 p.m.
Colorado (White 2-2) at Houston
(Sosa 2-5), 8:05 p.m.
San Francisco (Bumgarner 12-12) at
L.A. Dodgers (Kuroda 12-16), 10:10 p.m.
Friday's Games
Atlanta at Washington, 7:05 p.m.
Cincinnati at Pittsburgh, 7:05 p.m.
Philadelphia at N.Y. Mets, 7:10 p.m.
Colorado at Houston, 8:05 p.m.
Florida at Milwaukee, 8:10 p.m.
Chicago Cubs at St. Louis, 8:15 p.m.
San Francisco at Arizona, 9:40 p.m.
L.A. Dodgers at San Diego, 10:05 p.m.

FOOTBALL

NFL schedule

Sunday
Houston at New Orleans, I p.m.
Denver at Tennessee, I p.m.
Detroit at Minnesota, I p.m.
San Francisco at Cincinnati, I p.m.
New England at Buffalo, I p.m.
N.Y. Giants at Philadelphia, I p.m.
Miami at Cleveland, I p.m.
Jacksonville at Carolina, I p.m.
Kansas City at San Diego. 4:05 p.m.
N.Y. Jets at Oakland, 4:05 p.m.
Baltimore at St. Louis, 4:05 p.m.
Arizona at Seattle, 4:15 p.m.
Green Bay at Chicago, 4:15 p.m.
Atlanta at Tampa Bay. 4:15 p.m.
Pittsburgh at Indianapolis, 8:20 p.m.
Monday
Washington at Dallas, 8:30 p.m.

College games

Today
Murray St. (2-1) at UT-Martin (1-1),
7 p.m.
Hampton (2-1) at Bethune-
Cookman (I-I), 7:30 p.m.
N.C. State (2-1) at Cincinnati (2-1).
8 p.m.
Friday
Brown (1-0) at Harvard (0-1), 7 p.m.
UCF (2-1) at BYU (I-2),8 p.m.

BASKETBALL

WNBA playoffs

CONFERENCE SEMIFINALS
Eastern Conference
Indiana 2, New York I
Indiana 74, New York 72
New York 87, Indiana 72
Indiana 72, New York 62
Atlanta 2, Connecticut 0
Atlanta 89, Connecticut 84
Atlanta 69, Connecticut 64
Western Conference
Minnesota vs. San Antonio
Minnesota 66. San Antonio 65
San Antonio 84, Minnesota 75
Tuesday
Minnesota ,85. San Antonio 67,
Minnesota wins series 2-1
Phoenix 2, Seattle I
Seattle 80, Phoenix 61
Phoenix 92. Seattle 83
Phoenix 77. Seattle 75
CONFERENCE FINALS
Eastern Conference
Indiana vs.Atlanta
Today
Atlanta at Indiana, 7 p.m.
Sunday
Indiana at Atlanta. 3 p.m.
Sept. 27
Atlanta at Indiana, TBD (if necessary)
Western Conference
Minnesota vs. Phoenix
Today
Phoenix at Minnesota, 9 p.m.
Sunday
Minnesota at Phoenix, 5 p.m.
Sept. 27
Phoenix at Minnesota, TBD (if
necessary)

AUTO RACING

Race week

NASCAR
SPRINT CUP
SYLVANIA 300
Site: Loudon, N.H.
Schedule: Friday, practice (ESPN2,
11:30 am.-I p.m.), qualifying (ESPN2,
3-4:30 p.m.); Saturday, practice (Speed,
S11:30 a.m.- 12:30 p.m.); Sunday, race, 2 p.m.
(ESPN, 1-5:30 p.m.).
Track: New Hampshire Motor
Speedway (oval, 1.058 miles).
Race distance: 317.4 miles, 300 laps.
Next race: AAA 400, Oct. 2, Dover
International Speedway, Dover, Del.
Online: http://www.nascar.com
CAMPING WORLD TRUCK
F.W.WEBB 175
Site: Loudon, N.H.
Schedule: Friday, practice; Saturday,
qualifying, race, 3 p.m. (Speed, 2:30-
5:30 p.m.).
Track: New Hampshire Motor




Unscramble these four Jumbles,
one letter to each square,
to form four ordinary words.


Speedway.
Race distance: 185.15 miles, 175 laps.
Next race: Kentucky 225, Oct. I,
Kentucky Speedway, Sparta, Ky.
NATIONWIDE
Next race: OneMain Financial 200,
Oct. I, Dover International Speedway,
Dover, Del.
FORMULA ONE
SINGAPORE GRAND PRIX
Site: Singapore.
Schedule: Friday, practice (Speed, 9:30-
11 a.m.), Saturday, practice, qualifying
(Speed, 10-11:30 a.m.); Sunday, race, 8 a.m.
(Speed, 7:30-10 a.m., 3-5:30 p.m.).
Track: Marina Bay Street Circuit
(street course, 3.148 miles).
Race distance: 191.97 miles, 61 laps.
Next race: Japanese Grand Prix, Oct.
9, Suzuka International, Suzuka, Japan.
Online: http://www.formulol.com
NHRA FULLTHROTTLE
TEXAS FALL NATIONALS
Site: Ennis,Texas.
Schedule: Friday, qualifying; Saturday.
qualifying (ESPN2, Sunday, 1:15-
2:30a.m.),Sunday,final eliminations (ESPN2,
7-10 p.m.).
Track:Texas Motorplex.
Next event: NHRA Arizona Nationals,
Oct. 14-16, Firebird International Raceway,
Chandler,Ariz.
Onlinh: http://www.nhra.com
INDYCAR
Next race: Kentucky Indy 300, Oct. 2,
Kentucky Speedway, Sparta, Ky.
Online: http://www.indycar.com

GOLF

Golf week

PGATOUR
FEDEX CUP PLAYOFFS
TOUR CHAMPIONSHIP
Site: Atlanta.
Schedule: Today-Sunday.
Course: East Lake Golf Club (7,319
yards, par 70).
Purse: $8 million. Winner's share:
$1.44 million.
Television: Golf Channel (Today-
Friday, 1-6 p.m.; Saturday, 1-2 p.m.; Sunday,
noon-1:30 p.m.) and NBC (Saturday,
2-6 p.m.; Sunday, 1:30-6 p.m.).
LPGATOUR/
LADIES EUROPEAN TOUR
SOLHEIM CUP
Site: Dunsany, Ireland.
Schedule: Friday-Sunday.
Course: Killeen Castle (6,531 yards.
par 72).
Television: Golf Channel (Friday-
Saturday, 2:30 a.m.-I p.m.; Sunday,
5-11:30 a.m.).
Format: Team match play. Friday
and Saturday, four morning foursome
(alternate-shot) and four afternoon four-
ball (best-ball) matches; Sunday. 12 singles
matches.
United States (c-captain's pick): Paula
Creamer, c-Vicky Hurst, Juli Inkster,
Cristle Kerr,.Christina Kim, Brittany Lang.
Brittany Lindcome. Stacy Lewis,. cRyann
O'Toole. Morgan Pressel,Angela Stanford.
Michelle Wle. Captain: Rosle Jones,
Europe: Christel Boeljon. Netherlands;
Laura Davies, England; c-Sandra Gal,
Germany; Sophie Gustafson. Sweden; c-
Caroline Hedwall. Sweden; Maria Hlorth,
Sweden; Catriona Matthew. Scotland; c-
Azahara Munoz, Spain; Anna Nordqvist.
Sweden; Suzann Pettersen, Norway;
Melissa Reid, England; c-Karen Stupples,
England. Captain: Alison Nicholas,
England.

HOCKEY

NHL preseason

Tuesday's Games
Philadelphia 4,Toronto 0
Columbus (ss) 5,Winnipeg (ss) I
Nashville 2,Washington 0
Dallas 6, Montreal 3
St. Louis 3,Tampa Bay I
Winnipeg (ss) 6, Columbus (ss) I
Edmonton (ss) 4, Chicago 2
Calgary (ss) S,Vancouver (ss) I
Minnesota 4, Edmonton (ss) 3
Phoenix 7,Anaheim 4
Vancouver (ss) 4, Calgary (ss) 3
Wednesday's Games
Toronto at Philadelphia (n)
Washington at Columbus (n)
Detroit at Pittsburgh (n)
St. Louis vs.Tampa Bay (n)
New Jersey vs. N.Y. Rangers (n)
Buffalo at Montreal (n)
Boston at Ottawa (n)
San Jose at Anaheim (n)
Los Angeles (ss) at Phoenix (ss) (n)
Phoenix (ss) at Los Angeles (ss) (n)
Today's Games
Chicago at Pittsburgh, 7 p.m.
Detroit vs. Philadelphia at London,
Ontario, 7 p.m.
Minnesota at St. Louis, 8 p.m.
Colorado at Dallas, 8:30 p.m.
Vancouver at Edmonton, 9 p.m.


THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME
by David L. Hoyt and Jeff Knurek


S I I THEY LEARNED ABOUT BIG |
BEN AFTER A PA5SER-BY
RMEPIR I Ti
Now arrange the circled letters
to form the surprise answer, as
suggested by the above cartoon.

Answer here: W
(Answers tomorrow)
Yesterday's Jumbles: PERCH EXACT UNFOLD HAMMER
Answer: He was very nervous after hearing that he
would be -- "RE-LAX-ED"


Jaguars to start rookie


QB Gabbert at Panthers


By MARK LONG
Associated Press

JACKSONVILLE The
Jacksonville Jaguars have
their third starting quar-
terback in 15 days. They
believe this one could be
the guy for 15 years.
Coach Jack Del Rio
named Gabbert the starter
Wednesday, switching sig-
nal callers three days after
Luke McCown threw four
interceptions against the
New York Jets. The move
comes a little more than a
week after Del Rio released
veteran starter David
Garrard following a poor
preseason and a three-inter-
ception practice.
Gabbertwill make his first
start Sunday at Carolina.
"He's a big strong kid
whose really been kind of a
star quarterback his whole
life," Del Rio said. "We
think he has a chance to
be a franchise-type quarter-
back. He's getting a chance
now to be our starting quar-
terback and become that
guy.


The transition was inevi-
table since the Jaguars
selected Gabbert with the
10th pick in April's draft.
Del Rio had hoped to take
it slow with the former
Missouri standout, even
planning to give him a
year to watch and learn
behind Garrard. But
Garrard struggled in the
preseason and was out-
played by McCown, a career
backup.
Del Rio named McCown
the starter five days before
the season opener. McCown
did enough to win the
opener against Tennessee,
but his ninth start in eight
seasons was a debacle. He
was picked off four times,
could have thrown a couple
more and was sacked for a
safety all in just three
quarters.
McCown wanted a
chance to redeem himself,
but understood the deci-
sion.
"Who's to say what
one deserves," McCown
said. "It would do me
or this team zero good


to sit and say I deserve
another chance. I didn't
perform last week .and
that's just the blunt fact
of it. I didn't play well
enough to give our team
a chance to win. I'm big
enough to stand up here
and say that."
.McCown completed 6
of 19 passes for 59 yards
against the Jets, finishing
with a 1.8 quarterback rat-
ing.
The Jets won 32-3, the
second worst loss in Del
Rio's nine-year tenure. And
since he's widely consid-
ered to be coaching for
his future team owner
Wayne Weaver said the
Jaguars need to make the
playoffs for Del Rio to stick
around another year it
was reasonable to wonder
whether he would put his
fate in the hands of a rookie
quarterback.
Del Rio chuckled when
asked whether he went to
Weaver to see if playing
14 games with a first-year
quarterback would change
expectations.


INDIANS: Must stop impressive back


Continued From Page 1B


similarities in the two
games.
"I know Fort White was
tied with Taylor County late
in the game," Klees said.
"With four minutes left,
they were up 3 on us and
we scored a couple of late
touchdowns."
Klees listed skill people
as players to watch on the
War Eagles.
Senior running back Will
Thomas is averaging more
than 100 yards per game.
Seniors Marshane Godbolt


and Deonte Hutchinson
are wingbacks and corner-
backs. Hutchinson returns
kickoffs and punts.
"We are really thin on
the offensive and defensive
lines," Klees said. "We have
six that play on offense and
three on defense. They
guys are good, but we have
no depth. If they play well,
we play well."
Klees said Wakulla walks
up a couple of skill players
to the line for a 50 defense.
The War Eagles run a


Georgia Tech-style offense.
"Fort White is a really
good coached team," Klees
said. "At this point they
are the most fundamen-
tally coached team we've
seen. No. 3 (A.J. Legree),
No. 21 (Soron Williams)
and the quarterback
(Andrew Baker) are special
athletes. The offensive line
comes off the ball very
hard and the defense runs
to the ball. We are on the
road and we expect a tough
game."


PREP. Indians tripleheader today


Continued From Page 1B


Santa Fe High on Tuesday.
The Raiders won 25-14,
25-19, 25-18, as the Lady
Indians fell to 3-5 overall
and 2-3 in district play.
Carson Robison, Lynce
Stalnaker and Mallorie
Godbey each had five kills


ACROSS
1 Playing area
in cricket
6 Workbench
gripper
0 Weep noisily
2 Prestige
4 Exceptionally
good
5 Most people
6 Takes a whiff
8 Pigment
9 Courtesy env.
21 my lips!
23 Johnny -
24 Water-power
org.
!6 Tress
29 Resound
11 Environmental
prefix
13 Slammer
15 Portico
16 Handy abbr.
17 Clarinet kin
18 Mex. miss
10 Hagen of
- "The Other"
12 Devotee


for Fort White. Stalnaker
had 12 service points. Ali
Wrench had 15 assists,
while Ashley Beckman and
Emily Roach each had six
digs.
"We played really well
against a real good team


43 Find out
* 45 Propane
holder
47 Not sm. or
med.
50 Euclid and
Plato
52 Victorian
garment
54 Japanese
form of
self-defense
58 Doctrines
59 Having high
and low spots
60 Verb preceder
61 Sugarcoated

DOWN
1 "Sesame
Street"
channel
2 Debt memo
3 Shirt or
blouse
4 Board game
5 Stinging
insect
6 Feudal tenant


in Santa Fe," coach Doug
Wohlstein said. "The girls
never gave up."
Fort White hosts
Branford High today in a
middle school-junior varsi-
ty-Varsity tripleheader. Play
begins at 4 p.m.


Answer to Previous Puzzle


PA-S1T m-
E EILE M LE
T T FEELER VIRI LE
UTTERS ANGELA
DENIM LIKE



DRA G ELI IIN
IIRIu
R T s o se
DRAG WAN NEL
HERB ATARI
MUD BERTH SON
ERE ANATS TNT
ASSAY DROP
TAL FOE YAWN
MUIR oLL
ACCOST CHOOSE
SEINES PIN NE D-
HEADS LOSER


7 Here, to Pierre
8 Food fish
9 Choose-up
opener
11 Teahouse
attire
12 Bistro


Want more puzzles?
Check out the "Just Right Crossword Puzzles" books
at QuillDrlverBooks.com


13 Mao -tung
17 Sports injury
19 Cults
20 Loathe
22 Karate studio
23 Home tel.
25 Notch shape
27 Rustic
dwelling
28 Magazine
stand
30 Word of
honor
32 Fall mo.
34 Authorize
39 Crete's sea
41 Guitarist
Chet -
44 Diploma word
46 Twisted to
one side
47 Kind of PC
monitor
48 Continue
(2 wds.)
49 Therefore
51 Perfume label
word
53 Mustangs'
sch.
55 Common
contraction
56 Billy -
Williams
57 Thunder Bay
prov.


9-22 2011 UFS, Dist. by Universal Uclick for UFS


SCOREBOARD


Page Editor: Brandon Finley, 754-0420










LAKE CITY REPORTER ADVICE & COMICS THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 22, 2011


DILBERT


BABY BLUES


BLONDIE
MARLENE, 010 YESSIR, THE
YOU HAVE THAT MAINTENANCE
WATER COOLER CREW JUST
REMOVE? 1 HAULED IT AWAY


j E ^ ._


BEETLE BAILEY


HAGARTHE HORRIBLE


DEAR ABBY


Readers differ on cemetries

as places to pray and play


DEAR ABBY: I am writ-
ing in response to the
letter you printed from
"Respectful in Ohio" (July
25). I am so glad you
addressed the subject of
proper etiquette in cem-
eteries. The cemetery
where my family members
are buried has become a
playground for the neigh-
bors in the area. When I
visit, I see people walk-
ing their dogs on and off
leashes even though they
are aware of the "No Dogs
Allowed" signs. Children
are bicycling, rollerblading
and skateboarding, along
with joggers and walkers.
I come to the cem-
etery to visit with my
lost loved ones and tend
to their graves. I find it
disgusting and disturb-
ing that these folks are
using our sacred place for
their personal pleasures.
Abby, thank you so much
for your wisdom on this
matter. JEAN C. IN
MASSACHUSETTS
DEAR JEAN: Thank
you for agreeing with me.
However, some readers
felt differently, believing
that cemeteries are for the
living as .well as the dead.
My newspaper readers
comment
DEAR ABBY: You
should know that there is a
trend where groups of dog
walkers are taking over
the care of deteriorating


Abigail Van Buren
www.deorabby.com
cemeteries. In return for
cleaning up, restoring and
maintaining graveyards,
dog walkers are given per-
mission to walk and run
their dogs there.
Some readers may find .
this practice disrespectful,
but it has resulted in many
cemeteries being restored
to the beauty and dignity
its occupants deserve. -
CARLA IN VIRGINIA
DEAR ABBY: When
I read the letter from
"Respectful," it took me
back a few years. As I
was mowing in the town
cemetery, I went around
a gravestone into some
tall grass and my mower
stalled. When I turned
it over to see what I
had hit, I found a pair
of pantyhose wrapped
around the blade of the
mower. Apparently, cem-
eteries are sometimes
used as a lover's lane.
I agree with you about
practicing good behavior
in places like these. But
I'll always laugh recall-
ing what happened to
me. I wonder if the lady


who forgot her hose that
night caught a cold. -
GROUNDSKEEPER
DEAR ABBY: I have
to disagree with you and
"Resentful." One needs to
have a historical perspec-
tive about cemeteries and
their place in our culture.
Prior to the advent of pub-
lic parks in the late 19th
century, the only open,
park-like setting in most
communities was the local
cemetery. People would
stroll the lawns, picnic and
socialize there.
Today, some cemeter-
ies even conduct his-
torical and nature tours..
While I don't condone
rowdy behavior, it's
wrong to think they are
simply for the dead and
mourning. Many families
of our fallen soldiers go
to Arlington Cemetery
to picnic and visit their
loved ones.
Cemeteries fall into dis-
repair when they are not
active and filled with living
hikers, bikers, bird watch-
ers, etc. Let's encourage
people to visit their local
cemetery. The alternative
is to allow them to go to
seed and disappear from
our landscape. PATRICK
H., OHIO

* Write Dear Abby at
www.DearAbby.com or
P.O. Box 69440, Los
Angeles, CA 90069.


SNUFFY SMITH


ZITS


GARFIELD


B.C.


oAY',.,. ir To PRIVe, J s



I41


FRANK & ERNEST


HOROSCOPES


ARIES (March 21-
April 19): Challenge and
stimulation will help revive
your body and mind. Get
involved in activities that
allow you to explore new
territory, mentally and
physically. Encourage and
welcome change. It's the
outer aspects of life that
need to be revamped. **
TAURUS (April 20-May
20): Put more power
behind you and motor on
to victory. It's what you do
that will count, not what
you allude to doing. Anger
wastes time and resolves
nothing. Learn by past
mistakes. Don't neglect
what's most important to
you this time. ****
GEMINI (May 21-June
20): Listen to construc-
tive criticism and do what
it takes to correct what's
wrong. Spend time and
money on you and improve
your image. Don't over-
react when you should be
learning and doing your
best. Change will lead to a
better you and a better life.

CANCER (June 21-July
22): Don't waste time
complaining about added
responsibilities; if you
are organized, you can fit
everything in as planned.
Call in favors and avoid
an emotional display that
may embarrass y6u later.
A change of heart will also
change your direction.
**A*


THE LAST WORD
Eugenia Last

LEO (July 23-Aug. 22):
Don't let anyone take
advantage of your generos-
ity or kindness. Your urge
to take action should be
focused on getting work
done and making changes
to head in a more suitable
direction. Don't overreact.
Protect your own interests,
subtly. ***
VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept.
22): A team effort will
bring you closer to people
you share interests with
and help you acquire valu-
able knowledge. Your
ability to assess a situation
practically will be impres-
sive and bring you added
respect Contribute, but
don't overdo it. ****
LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct.
22): You'll make things
difficult if you take on
too many responsibilities.
You may want to keep the
peace and help everyone,
but you have to protect
your status and emotional
well-being. A residential
change can be beneficial, if
you are practical. **
SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov.
21): Don't let anxiety kick
in and ruin your rhythm.
Be calculating and precise,
in order to avoid costly
setbacks. Look for oppor-
tunities to utilize experi-
ence favors that you are
owed. Your knowledge will
be the key to your future.


SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-
Dec. 21): Your mind will be
in overdrive, but you must
look at change carefully
and assess whether you
are making moves for the
right reasons. The grass
may look greener on the
other side, but chances are
it's the same. Look before
you leap. ***
CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-
Jan. 19): Everything will
revolve around the way
you get along with others
and how you treat finan-
cial matters. Opportunity
will develop through fair
discussions and equal
effort. Improve your living
quarters, but do it yourself
and stick to a tight budget.

AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-
Feb. 18): Put your plan in
place. You will have good
fortune regarding work
and money. Diversify your
skills to better suit the
positions offered. Love is
in the stars. A partnership
with someone special can
make your life less stress-
ful. ***
PISCES (Feb. 19-March
20): Communicate with
those around you to clear
up misunderstandings
and help you prioritize.
Don't overreact if someone
doesn't agree with you.
Consider going your sepa-
rate ways. Do something
enjoyable and you'll meet
someone'special. *****


CELEBRITY CIPHER

by Luis Campos
Celebrity Cipher cryptograms are created from quotations by famous people, past and present.
Each letter in the cipher stands for another.
TODAY'S CLUE: S equals F
"W XWJ'G NFXL XWB GLLX OF ML NKG
HWGODL FJ ONL FEOGKUL; KJGKUL
KO KG XFZL FSOLJ NKG JEZGLZB." -
HDWZL MFFONL DEHL

PREVIOUS SOLUTION: "Never work before breakfast. If you have to w9rk
before breakfast, get your breakfast first." Josh Billings
(c) 2011 by NEA, Inc. 9-22


FOR BETTER OR WORSE


BEAUTIFUL! ONE LESS
VWAY FOR THOSE JOKERS
S TO FRITTER THEIR
TIME AWAV

//
5L''r:-~': ---.S


S THIS HE, DAG, WHY DON'T '
CORNER YOU ASK THE BOSS TO
LOOKS GET US SOME W-
AWFULLY G OF THOSE W HOA
EMPTY \,,,COOL GREAT
NOW, DBEANBASG EA
DOESN'T CHAIRS?

IT?


N


Page Editor: Emogene Graham, 754-0415


CLASSIC PEANUTS












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Legal

IN THE CIRCUIT CIVIL COURT
OF THE THIRD JUDICIAL CIR-
CUIT OF FLORIDA, IN AND FOR
COLUMBIA COUNTY CIVIL DI-
VISION
Case No. 12-2011 -CA-000105
Division
FIRST FEDERAL, BANK OF
FLORIDA
Plaintiff,
vs.
JARRED J. MCDONALD and STE-
PHANIE C. MCDONALD AND
UNKNOWN TENANTS/OWNERS,
Defendants.
NOTICE OF SALE
Notice is hereby given, pursuant to
Final Judgment of Foreclosure for
Plaintiff entered in this cause on Sep-
tember 1, 2011 in the Circuit Court
of Columbia County, Florida, I will
sell the property situated in Colum-
bia County., Florida described as:
LOT 17, GIEBEIG'S ADDITION,
ACCORDING TO THE MAP OR
PLAT THEREOF AS RECORDED
IN PLAT BOOK 3, PAGE 6, OF
THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF CO-
LUMBIA COUNTY, FLORIDA.
and commonly known as: 925 PUT-
NAM STREET, LAKE CITY, FL
32025; including the building, appur-
tenances, and fixtures located there-
in, at public sale, to the highest and
best bidder, for cash, AT, THE
FRONT DOOR OF THE COLUM-
BIA COUNTY COURTHOUSE,
145 N. HERNANDO STREET,
LAKE CITY, FLORIDA, on Octo-
ber 5, 2011 at 11:00 a.m. Any per-
sons claiming an interest in the sur-
plus from the sale, if any, other than
the property owner as of the date of
the lis pendens must file a claim
within 60 days after the sale.
Dated this 2nd day of September,
2011.
Clerk of the circuit Court
By: /s/ B. Scippio
Deputy Clerk
Edward B. Pritchard
(813) 229-0900 x 1309
Kass Shuler, P.A.
P.O. Box 800
Tampa, FL 33601-0800

05527843
September 15, 22, 2011
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
COLUMBIA COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
IN'RE: ESTATE OF,
NAOMI P. KOON.
Deceased
File No. 11-216-CP
Division Probate
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
The administration of the estate of
NAOMI P. KOON, deceased, whose
date of death was June 20. 2011. and
whose social security number is ***-
**-4803, is pending in the Circuit
Court for COLUMBIA County, Flor-
ida, Probate Division, the address of
which is 173 NE Hemando Ave.,
Columbia County Courthouse, Lake
City, Fl. 32055. The names and ad-
dresses of the personal representative
and the personal representative's at-
torney are set forth below.
All creditors of the decedent and oth-
er persons having claims or demands
against decedent's estate on whom a
copy of this notice is required to be
served must file their claims with
this court WITHIN THE LATER OF
3 MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AF-
TER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF
A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON
THEM.
All other creditors of the decedent
and other persons having claims or
demands against decedent's estate
must file their claims with this court
WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER THE
DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICA-
TION OF THIS NOTICE.
ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITH-
IN THE TIME PERIODS SET
FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF
THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE
WILL BE FOREVER BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME
PERIODS SET FORTH ABOVE,
ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2)
YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE
DECEDENT'S DATE OF DEATH
IS BARRED.
The date of first publication of this
notice is September 15, 2011.
Attorney for Personal Representa-
tive: Lloyd E. Peterson, Jr., Attorney
Florida Bar Number: 0798797
905 SW Baya Drive, Lake City, FL
32025
Telephone: (386) 961-9959
Personal Representative:
ELIZABETH P. HORNE,
P.O. Box 1645
Lake City, Florida 32056
05527837
September 15, 22, 2011
Public Notice "Notice is hereby
made to all those concerned and af-
fected that Boran Craig Barber Engel
Construction Co., Inc. is performing
state project #FL-35 (WRC) Lake
City Work Release Center at 1099
NW Dot Glen, Lake City, FL 32055.
All parties furnishing labor, materi-
als and/or equipment to said project
are to provide notice of such in writ-
ing by certified mail to the Depart-
ment of Corrections, 2601 Blair
Stone Road, Tallahassee, FL 32399-
2500, within twenty (20) calendar
days of 1st providing such labor, ma-
terials and/or equipment."

05527729
September 16, 17, 18, 20, 21, 22, 23,
2011

To place your
classified ad call

755-5440









Lawn & Landscape Service


000706, of the Circuit Court of the
3rd Judicial Circuit in and for CO-
LUMBIA County, Florida. DEUT-
SCHE BANK NATIONAL TRUST
COMPANY AS TRUSTEE FOR
AMERICAN HOME MORTGAGE


Legal

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT IN AND
FOR COLUMBIA COUNTY,
FLORIDA
CASE NO: 11-203-CA
DIVISION:
21ST MORTGAGE CORPORA-
TION, etc.,
Plaintiff
vs.
KEVIN KORNEGAY,
Defendants
NOTICE OF JUDICIAL SALE
PURSUANT TO SECTION
45.03(1), FLORIDA STATUTES
TO WHOM IT MAY CONCERN:
NOTICE is hereby given that pur-
suant to the Final Judgment entered
on September 13, 2011, in Case No.:
2011-CA-203 of the Circuit Court,
Columbia County Florida, in which
21st Mortgage Corporation is Plain-
tiff and Kevin Kornegay, et al, are
the defendants, the Clerk of this
Court will sell at public sale the fol-
lowing described real property:
Exhibit A
A part of Lot 10 of "Rolling Pines:"
as per plat thereof recorded in Plat
Book 5, page 75, public records of
Columbia county, Florida, being
more particularly described as fol-
lows:
Commence at the southeast comer of
said Lot 10, said comer also being
the Southeast corner of the NE 1/4 of
Section 19, Township 2 south, Range
16 East, Columbia County, Florida,
and run s 88* 32' 23" W, 278.14 feet;
thence N 30' 56' 36" W, 220.39 feet
to the point of beginning; thence
continue N 30' 56' 36" W, 615.10
feet to a point on a curve of a curve
having a radius of 289.88 feet and an
included angle of 14' 10' 33"; thence
run Northeasterly along the arc of
said curve an arc distance of 71.53
feet; thence S 54' 08' 02" E, 607.53
feet; S 43' 20' 00" W, 316.24 feet to
the point of beginning.
Subject to an easement for ingress
and egress more particularly descri-
bed as follows:
Commence at the Southeast comer
of said Lot 10, said comer also being
the southeast comer of the NE 1/4 of
Section 1,9, Township 2 South,
Range 16 East, Columbia County,
Florida, and run S 88' 32' 23" W,
278.14 feet;' thence N 30' 56' 36" W,
220.39 feet to the point of beginning
of said easement; thence continue N
30' 56' 36" W, 615.10 feet to a point
on the Southerly right of way line of
Sophie road, said point being in a
curve of a curve having a radius of
289.88 feet and an included angle of
06' 19'; 04"; thence run Northeaster-
ly along the arc of said curve an arc
distance of 31.96 feet; thence S 30'
56' 36" E, 617.64 feet; thence s 43'
20' 00" W. 31.17 feet to the point of
beginning.
Together with 1998 Grand Manor
4603-U, 64 x 28 manufactured
home, Serial Nos: GAGMTD2840A
& GAGMTD2840B
The sale will be held on Wednesday,
October 12, 2011, at 11:00 a.m. to
the highest and best bidder for cash,
at the front steps to the Columbia
County Courthouse, 173 NE Heman-
do Ave., Lake City, Florida.
ANY PERSON CLAIMING AN IN-
TEREST IN THE SURPLUS FROM
THE ALE, IF ANY, OTHER THAN
THE PROPERTY OWNER AS OF
THE DATE OF THE LIS PEN-
DENS MUST FILE A CLAIM
WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE
SALE.
If you are a person with a disability
who needs any accommodation to
participate in this proceeding, you
are entitled at no cost to you, to the
provision of certain assistance.
Please contact ADA Coordinator,
173 NE Hemando Ave., Lake City,
Florida 32055 (386) 719-7428 at
least 7 days before you scheduled
court appearance, or immediately
upon receiving this notification if the
time before the scheduled appear-
ance is less than 7 days; if you are
hearing or voice impaired, call 711.
Dated this 14 day of September,
2011.
P. DEWITT CASON
CLERK OF SAID COURT
By: /s/ B. Scippio
As Deputy Clerk
Lance P. Cohen
1723 Blanding Blvd., Suite 102
Jacksonville, FL 32210
904-388-6500(
Attorney for Plaintiff

05527944
September 22, 29, 20111
NOTICE OF PUBLIC AUCTION
1996 Chevrolet 4 Dr.
VIN# 2G I WL52MOT9259671 I
1986 CHEVROLET 4 Dr.
VIN# 1GITB68CXGA148422

To be held on October 3, 2011
At Daniel's Towing & Recovery
Arrowhead Road Lake City, Florida
32056-3026
At 9:00 am

05528001
September 22, 2011
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
3RD JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND
FOR COLUMBIA COUNTY,
FLORIDA
CIVIL DIVISION
CASE NO. 12-2009-CA-000706
DEUTSCHE BANK NATIONAL
TRUST COMPANY AS TRUSTEE
FRO AMERICAN HOME MORT-
GAGE ASSETS TRUST 2007-2
MORTGAGE-BACKED PASS-
THROUGH CERTIFICATES, SER-
IES 2007-2
Plaintiff,
vs.
DAVID EDGAR ODATO; CAPI
TAL ONE BANK (USA), N.A. FKA
CAPITAL ONE BANK; CACH,
LLC; UNITED STATES OF
AMERICA-DEPARTMENT OF
THE TREASURY; UNKNOWN
PERSONS) IN POSSESSION OF
THE SUBJECT PROPERTY;
Defendants.
NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE
SALE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pur-
suant to a Final Judgment of Foreclo-
sure dated September 1, 20111, and
entered in Case No. 12-2009-CA-


may be infants, incompetents or oth-
erwise not sui juris.
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED
that an action has been commenced
to foreclose a mortgage on the fol-
lowing real property, lying and being


Legal

ASSETS TRUST 2007-2 MORT-
GAGE-BACKED PASS-
THROUGH CERTIFICATES, SER-
IES 2007-2 is Plaintiff and DAVID
EDGAR ODATO; UNKNOWN
PERSONS) IN POSSESSION OF
THE SUBJECT PROPERTY; CAPI-
TAL ONE BANK (USA), N.A. FKA
CAPITAL ONE BANK; CACH,
LLC; UNITED STATES OF
AMERICA-DEPARTMENT OF
THE TREASURY; are defendants. I
will sell to the highest and best bid-
der for cash at ON THE THIRD
FLOOR OF THE COLUMBIA
COUNTY COURTHOUSE AT 173
N.E. HERNANDO AVENUE,
LAKE CITY, FLORIDA, at 11:00
a.m., on the 5th day of October,
2011, the following described prop-
erty as set froth in said Final Judg-
ment, to wit:
SECTION 22; A PART OF THE
SOUTH 1/2 OF THE SOUTHWEST
1/4 OF SECTION 22, TOWNSHIP 6
SOUTH, RANGE 17 EAST, MORE
PARTICULARLY DESCRIBED A
FOLLOWS; COMMENCE AT THE
SOUTHWEST CORNER OF SAID
SECTION 22 AND RUN N 88 DE-
GREES 06' 30" E, ALONG THE
SOUTH LINE THEREOF, 1564.25
FEET; THENCE N 1 DEGREE 41'
58" W, 11.70 FEET TO THE
NORTH RIGHT OF WAY LINE OF
AN EXISTING COUNTY GRAD-
ED ROAD FOR A POINT OF BE-
GINNING; THENCE S 87 DE-
GREES 32' 44" W, ALONG SAID
NORTH RIGHT OF WAY LINE
633.60 FEET TO A POINT ON
THE EASTERLY RIGHT OF WY
LINE OF U.S. HIGHWAY NO. 441;
THENCE N 8 DEGREES 39' 58" E,
ALONG SAID EASTERLY RIGHT
OF WAY LINE 339.64 FEET;
THENCE N 87 DEGREES 32' 44"
E, 646.40 FEET; THENCE S 3 DE-
GREES 38' 54" E, 333.34 FEET TO
A POINT ON THE NORTH RIGHT
OF WAY LINE OF SAID COUNTY
GRADED ROAD; THENCE S 87
DEGREES 32' 44" W, ALONG
SAID NORTH RIGHT OF WAY
LINE 85.25 FEET TO THE POINT
OF BEGINNING, COLUMBIA
COUNTY, FLORIDA.
A person claiming an interest in the
surplus from the sale, if any, other
than the property owner as of the
date of the lis pendens must file a
claim with 60 days after the sale.
Dated this 1st day of September,
2011.
P. DEWITT CASON
As Clerk of said Court
By: /s/ B. Scippio
As Deputy Clerk
If you are a person with a disability
who requires accommodation in or-
der to participate in a court proceed-
ing, you are entitled a no cost to you
the provision of certain assistance.
Individuals with disability who re-
quire special accommodations in or-
der to participate in a court proceed-
ing should contact the ADA coordi-
nator, 13 NE Hernando Avenue,
Room 408, Lake City, FL 32055.
(386) 719-7428. within two (2) busi-
ness days of receipt of notice to ap-
pear. Individuals who are hearing
'impaired should call (800) 955-8771.
Individuals who are voice impaired
should call (800) 955-8770.
Submitted By;
Kahane & Associates, P.A.
8201 Peters Road, Suite 3000
Plantation, FL 33324
Telephone: (954) 382-3486
Telefacsimile: (954) 382-5380
File No. 09-24566 AHM

05527845
September 15, 22, 2011
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
3RD JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF
FLORIDA, IN AND FOR COLUM-
BIA COUNTY
Case #: 201 1-CA-000181
Division #
Regions Bank d/b/a Regions Mort-
gage Loan,
Plaintiff,
vs.
The Estate of Don Simmons, De-
ceased; Lemuel Simmons; Kriss
Lavalle Simmons; Sharon Melissa
Simmons; Unknown Heirs, Devi-
sees, Grantees. Assignees, Creditors,
Lienors and Trustees of Don Sim-
mons, Deceased, and all other Per-
sonal Claiming By, through, Under
and Against the Named
Defendant(s); Portfolio Recovery
Associates. Inc. successor in interest
to PRA III; Unknown Tenants in
Possession #1; Unknown Tenants in
Possession #2; If living, and all Un-
known Parties Claiming by, through,
under and against the above named
Defendant(s) who are not known to
be dead or alive, whether said Un-
known Parties may claim an interest
as Spouse, Heirs, Devisees, Grant-
ees, or Other Claimants
Defendant(s)
NOTICE OF ACTION FORECLO-
SURE PROCEEDINGS-PROPER-
TY
to:
TO: Unknown Heirs, Devisees,
Grantees, Assignees, Creditors, Lie-
nors and Trustees of Don Simmons,
Deceased, and all other Persons
Claiming By, Through, under and
Against the Named Defendant(s);
ADDRESS UNKNOWN BUT
WHOSE LAST KNOWN AD-
DRESS IS:, The Estate of Don Sim-
mons, Deceased; ADDRESS ,UN-
KNOWN BUT WHOSE LAST
KNOWN ADDRESS IS: and Sharon
Melissa Simmons; ADDRESS UN-
KNOWN BUT WHOSE LAST
KNOWN ADDRESS IS: 2334
Northeast 52nd Street, Lot #235,
Gainesville, FL 32609
Residence unknown, if living, in-
cluding any unknown spouse of the
said Defendants, if either has remar-
ried and if either or both of said De-
fendants are dead, their respective
unknown heirs, devisees, grantees,
assignees, creditors, lienors, and
trustees, and all other persons claim-
ing by, through, under or against the
named Defendaint(s); and thle afore-
mentioned named Defendant(s) and
such of the aforementioned unknown
Defendants and such of the afore-
mentioned unknown Defendants as


Box 1709. Lake City, FL, 32056
Receptionist needed to answer
phones and light clerical work.
M-F 11:30-3:00
Fax resume to 386-758-5882


Legal

and situated in Columbia County,
Florida, more particularly described
as follows:
BEING AT NORTHWEST COR-
NER OF THE SE 1/4 OF SW 1/4
OF SECTION 30, TOWNSHIP 5
SOUTH, RANGE 17 EAST, CO-
LUMBIA COUNTY, FLORIDA
AND RUN THENCE N 89" 36' 40"
E. ALONG THE NORTH LINE OF
SAID SE 1/4 OF SW 1/4 525.00
FEET, THENCE S. 0' 09' 56" E.
456.35 FEET, THENCE S. 89" 36'
40" W. 525.00 FEET TO THE
WEST LINE OF SAID SE 1/4 OF
SW 1/4, THENCE NO. 09' 56" W
ALONG SAID WEST LINE, 456.35
FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGIN-
NING.
more commonly known as 778
Southwest Markham Street f/k/a
route 2 Box 369C, Lake City, FL
32024.
This action has been filed against
you and you are required to serve a
copy of your written defense, if any,
upon SHAPIRO, FISHMAN &
GACHE, LLP, Attorneys for Plain-
tiff, whose address is 4630 Wood-
land Corporate Blvd., Suite 100,
Tampa, FL 33614, within thirty (30)
days after the first publication of this
notice and file the original with the
clerk of this Court either before serv-
ice on Plaintiff's attorney or immedi-
ately there after; otherwise a default
will be entered against you for the
relief demanded in the Complaint.
WITNESS my hand and seal of this
Court on the 31st day of August,
2011.
P. DEWITT CASON
Circuit and County Courts
By: /s/ B. Scippio
Deputy Clerk

05527846
September 15, 22, 2011

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT, THIRD
JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR
COLUMBIA COUNTY, FLORIDA
CASE NO.: 11-254-CA
SHILOH RIDGE COMPANY,
a Florida corporation,
Plaintiff,
vs.
JACKIE E. RIGGINS,
Defendants.
NOTICE OF JUDICIAL SALE BY
THE CLERK
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that
pursuant to an Order or Summary Fi-
nal Judgment of Foreclosure entered
in the above-styled cause now pend-
ing in said court, that I will sell to the
highest and best bidder for cash on
the third floor of the Columbia
County Courthouse, 173 N.E. Her-
nando Avenue, Lake City, Florida
32055, at 11:00 o'clock, a.m. on Oc-
tober 5, 2011, the following property
described in Exhibit "A" attached
hereto.
EXHIBIT "A"
ATS #1531
Lot 65
The SW 1/4 of the NE 1/4 of the SE
1/4 of Section 16, Township 7 South,
Range 16 East, Columbia County,
Florida, The East 30 feet of said
lands being subject to an easenient
for ingress and egress.
TOGETHER WITH AN EASE-
MENT FOR INGRESS AND
EGRESS OVER AND ACROSS
THE FOLLOWING DESCRIBED
LANDS:
A strip of land 60 feet in width being
30 feet each side of a centerline de-
scribed as follows: Commence at the
Southeast comer of the SW 1/4 of
the NE 1/4, Section 15, Township 7
South, Range 16 East, Columbia
County, Florida and run thence S 89'
03' 48" W, 20.45 feet to the West
line of Fry Road and to the Point of
Beginning, thence continue S 89' 03'
48" W, 3952.99 feet to the East line
of Section 16, Township 7 South,
Range 16 east, thence S 89' 06' 19"
W, 661.99 feet to Reference Point
"C", thence continue S 89' 06' 19"
W, 1323.98 feet to Reference Point
"D", and to the Point of Termination.
Also begin at Reference Point "C"
and run thence N 00' 45' 21" W,
701.45 feet, to the radius point of a
cul-de-sac having a radius of 50 feet
and to the Point of Termination. Also
begin at Reference Point "C" and run
thence S 00' 45' 01" E, 1323.20 feet.
thence S 00' 44' 52" E, 701.59 feet
to the radius point of a cul-de-sac
having a radius of 50 feet and to the
Point of Termination. Also begin at
Reference Point "D" and run thence
N. 00' 46' 46" W, 701.37 feet to the
radius point of a cul-de-sac having a
radius of 50 feet and to the Point of
Termination. Also begin at Refer-
eace Point "D" and run thence S 00'
46' 12" E, 1323.42 feet, thence S 00'
46' 00" E, 701.69 feet to the radius
point of a cul-de-sac having a 50 foot
radius and to the Point of Termina-
tion.
Said sale will be made pursuant to
and in order to satisfy the terms of
said Summary Final Judgment of
Foreclosure. Any person claiming an
interest in the surplus from the sale,
if any, other than the property owner
as of the date of the lis pendens must
file a claim within 60 days after the
sale.
Dated: September 7, 2011.
P. DEWITT CASON, Clerk of Court
By: /s/ B. Scippio
Deputy Clerk

05527847
September 15, 22, 2011

SJob
SOpportunities
2 Experienced Drivers for Lake
City to Augusta Maine. One trip
only. Two autos with trailers.
When?? Very soon!!
Call 386-719-8872
AVON!! Only $10 to start!
Earn bonus $ up to $150+
1-800-275-9945 pin #4206
www.youravon.comn/tdavics
FULL TIME Delivery Driver for
Medical Equipment. Exp. Re-
quired. Send reply to Box 05076,
C/O The Lake City Reporter, P.O.


386 202 .21 /

lIP ll'CoipuitI'r,
$80.00
386-755 908-1 1
386-29'2 2170


100 Job
100 Opportunities
MECHANIC
Heavy truck & trailer experience a
plus. Best pay in North Florida for
the right person. Southern
Specialized, 1812 NW Main Blvd.,
386-752-9754

Sales Position available for moli-
vated individual Rountree -Moore
Toyota, Great benefits, paid train-
ing/vacation. Exp. a plus but not
necessary. Call Anthony Cosentino
386-623-7442
Security Officers needed. Live
Oak area, must have current D Se-
curity Lie., Clear background,
Drivers Lic, phone,
Diploma/GED. Benefits, DFWP
EEO Must Apply at:
www.dsisecurity.com MB 1000084
TANKER DRIVER ,
Night Position & Part time day po-
sition needed, Gasoline & Diesel
Fuel Transport Delivery Driver,
Tues. Sat.,
Truck based in Lake City, Florida,
Local Deliveries, Health Insur-
ance, 401K, Paid Vacation
Competitive Pay Structure,
Must have two years driver
experience, clean MVR,
, Application available by mailing:
info@jj-fuel.com
Fax completed applications to
Heather at 850-973-3702.
Questions call 1-800-226-5434
after 3:00 p.m., Speak to Ronnie.

120 Medical
120 Employment

05527777
Admissions/Marketing
Director
Avalon Healthcare Center is
currently accepting applications
for the full time position of
Admissions/Marketing Director
RN/LPN Preferred
Good Organizational and
Communication Skills a Must
Prior SNF Experience
Preferred
Competitive Salary and
Excellent benefit package.
Please apply at Avalon
Healthcare and Rehabilitation
Center. 1270 S.W. Main Blvd.
Lake City, Florida 32025
386-752-7900 EOE

05528030
LEARN TO DRAW BLOOD
Local Phlebotomy Course
offered in Lake City, FLA
Certificate program.
(904)566-1328

Busy Family Practice Office Seeks
Nursing Asst. for FT position.
Must be competent, organized, and
experienced in back office duties.
Fax resume to: 386-719-9494
Giebeig Family Medicine

240 Schools &
240 Education

05527750
Interested in a Medical Career.
Express Training offers
courses for beginners & exp
Nursing Assistant. $479
next class-09/26/10

Phlebotomy national certifica-
tion, $800 next class-10/10/11

Continuing education
Fees incl. books, supplies, exam
fees. Call 386-755-4401 or
expresstrainingservices.com



310 Pets & Supplies

0552761
S$$REWARD$$

L OST

Si4k./Yorkie
Tom rwIMissino
since August 29
(amn). Aprox 1(0
lbs. Black body/brown face &
feet. Needs medicine. Last seen
at S & S on 441 N. & 100. Hlis
name is Bradley.
Please call 386-623-2800

FOUND-2 Fenmale Puppies at RR
Xing on Hwy. 135. Call to identify
or give info. on breed to help find
them a home. 386-305-7052
German Sheppard Puppy 10
weeks old Black & Tan. lcalthi
Certs. & shots. Parents on
Premises..$250.00. 386-961-8130
PUBLISHER'S NOTE...
Florida Law 828.29 requires dogs
and cats being sold to bie at least 8
weeks old and have a health
certificate from a licensed
veterinarian documenting they
have mandatory shots andl are
free from intestinal and external
parasites. Many species of wild-
life must be licensed wby Florida
Fish and Wildlife. If you are
unsnre, contact the local
office for nforn.iation.

330 Livestock &


Registered. Angus Bull Yearling,
7 mons. old, exc. ibloodlines, off oil
a long line of top producers $050.
386-249-3104 or 386 71 I -ISO2


407 com nputers

Flat Pantel monitor.
15 inclt. $50
38( -7/55>oS I or


J&M LAWN Service & more for
all your outdoor needs. Don't
waste your time or weekend,
Free Estimate. 386-984-2187


BU YITTI



FIND HIT^H^H












LAKE CITY LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 22, 2011


408 Furniture
Large Cherry Roll
top desk. (C-Style) 2 File drawers.
Excellent condition. $750.
386-965-0762
SOFA BED, HUTCH. GREEN
WING BACK CHAIR, BEIGE
CHAIR, END TABLES,
CALL 386-758-5996


420 Wanted to Buy
K&H TIMBER
We Buy Pine Hardwood &
Cypress. Large or small tracts.
Call 386-961-1961.
Wanted Junk Cars, Trucks, Vans.
$275 & up CASH! Free Pick Up!
NO title needed !386-878-9260
After 5pm 386- 752-3648.


430 Garage Sales
7 Families. Sat. 7-?. Christ Central
Ministries in the gym. Behind the
church. Look for signs,.
Too much to list!!!
Big sale. 20yrs of accumulation. 8-
3. Fri-Sun. Behind Lake City Med-
ical Center, right on Egret, right on
Harris Lake Dr. look for signs.
Household, furniture, tools, cloth-
ing, sports/fishing, antiques, more
COMMUNITY YARD SALE.
Sat. 8 noon. Windsong Apts.
Off Hwy 247
Lots & Lots of Stuff!!!
Fri & Sat. 7:30-1:30. 190 SW
Fabian Way. Close to 242 & 247.
Look for signs. Too much to list.
Lots of new clothing!!!
Multi Family! Fri/Sat 8-4 In Roll-
ing Meadows off Branford Hwy, 3
mi. S. of Hwy 90, Follow signs,
fum., bedding, kids/adult clothes,
collectibles. MUST SEE
PUBLISHER'S NOTE
All Yard Sale Ads
Must be Pre-Paid.

SAT. 9/24, 7-Noon, 266 N.W.
Harris Lake Drive, Near Southern
Oaks, fum., antq. tools, baskets,
pictures, camping equip., tins.


450 Good Things
Sto Eat
GREEN PEANUTS For Sale
Graded and washed.
$30.00 a bushel.
386-752-3434

460 Firewood

Firewood for Sale. $65. per Truck
Load. Rick 386-867-1039 or Joey
965-0288 if no answer pls leave
message we will call you back.

630 Mobile Homes
6 for Rent
1 BR/i BA Furnished, all utilities'
included + satellite,
$135 week, $135 deposit.
Call 386-288-5526
2 OR 3 BEDROOMS
Clean, Quiet Park $475-$525.mo
Water, septic, garbage included
758-2280 References, NO PETS!
2&3 BR MH. $395 $650. mo.
plus deposit. Water & sewer fur-
nished. Cannon Creek MHP
386-752-6422
2/2 Units. Great rental program
for responsible tenants.
Call for details, 386-984-8448
13th Month FREE!!
3/2 DWMH, 1/2 ac. Shaded lot.
Paved Rd, 2 porches, 50'X50'
fenced small dog run. $600. mo +
$750 dep. References Req'd.
386-758-7184 or 984-0954
3/2 Large MH, small park, near
FGCC, Small pets ok, $500 dep
$575 mo w/12 mo lease
386-752-1971 or 352-281-2450
3/2.5 S of Lake City, (Branford
area) $575 mo plus security
386-590-0642 or 386-867-1833
www.suwanneevalleyproperties.com
4 BR/3BA Manufactured Home
Fireplace, Ig. kitchen, Ig. master
w/wallkin closets. Quiet Wellborn
area. $850 mo. 386-438-0285.
LG clean 3br's $450. -$650. mo. +
dep. Also, 2br mobile home's .
avail. No Pets. 5 Points area. Also
3 br Westside. 386-961-1482
Mobile Homes for rent in
White Springs, Lake City & Ft.
White Contact 386-623-3404
or 386-397-2779
Taking applications. 3br/2ba
moble home, in town, private lot,
front & rear porch, shed $650/mo
-' security. 466-2266 or 752-5911

640 Mobile Homes
for Sale
Champion Home Inspections
Protect Your Investment
With A Professional
Inspection State Licensed
And Insured 386-344-5551
It's Here. Jacobson Homes
"Sub Zero" Top Quality Home
with lots of tape and texture and
a dream kitchen and more.
North Point Homes, Gainesville
(352)872-5566
Jacobson Homes Factory Outlet
Try us in Gainesville. Best Prices
and Financing in Florida. North
Pointe Homes (352)872-5566
High Springs. 1629 sqft. on 10
acres. Needs to sell. $84,999.
Make an offer! MLS 78776
Bosshardt Realty Services.
386-965-4873


Fort White. 2336 sqft on 5 acres.
Tape & textured walls. Needs to
sell. $99,999. Motivated, make an
offer MLS 78841 (386)965-4873
Bosshardt Realty Services.
Lake City 1560 sqft. buit in 2002.
On 5 acres. $83,999. MLS 78931
Bosshardt Realty Services.
386-965-4873
3/2 DWMH "Model Home" condi-
tion. Just under I ac w/granddaddy
oaks and landscaped MLS#77988,
$84,900, Nancy Rogers
867-1271 R.E.O. Realty Group
Palm Harbor Homes
Red Tag Sale
Over 10 Stock Units Must Go
Save Up To 35K!
800-622-2832


640 7Mobile Homes
640 for Sale
NEW 2012 Town Homes
28X44 3/2 Only $37,900. 32X80
4/2 Just $69,900. Both include
Delivery and set, AC, Skirting and
steps. No Games!
North Pointe Homes, Gainesville,
Fl. (352)872-5566

65 Mobile Home
O650& Land
Owner Finance, 3/2, on 1.5 acres,
S of Lake City, small down/$695
mo, 386-590-0642 / 386-867-1833
www.suwanneevalleyproperties.com
WOW! 2 Mobile homes on 5
acres! 2006, 3/2.5, above pool,
1997 1,500 sq. ft. with nice
porch.$139,888 MLS 78531 Brit-
tany Results Realty 386-397-3473

710 AUnfurnished Apt.
710 For Rent

05527705
SPRING HILL VILLAGE
Excellent High Springs location.
1, 2 & 3 bedroom floor-plans;
some with garages.
Call 386-454-1469
or visit our website:
www.springhillvillage.net








1BR APT.
Downtown Location, Clean.
$450 mo, plus Security.
NO PETS. Call 386-755-3456
2br/1 ba, 1 car garage,
W/D hook up, $525 month,
no pets I month sec.
386-961-8075
2BR/1BA. Close to town.
$565.mo plus deposit.
Includes water & sewer.
386-965-2922
2BR/2BA w/garage
5 minutes from VA hospital.
Call for details.
386-755-4590 or 365-5150
Amber Wood Hills Apts.
Private Patio area. Beautiful yard.
Washer/dryer hkup. Free water &
sewer. 1/1, 2/1. Move in special.
386-754-1800. wwwmvflapts.com
Columbia Arms Apt. located 1/2
mi from V.A. & Winn Dixie. Pet
Friendly. Move in Special $199.
Pool. laundry & balcony.
386-754-1800. www.myflapts.com
Duplex w/garage spacious. 2/1,
1300 sq ft, W/D hook up. CH/A.
$650 month & bckgmd chk,
386-697-3248 or 352-377-7652
Fall Special! 1/2 Price First
Month. Updated Apt, w/tile
floors/fresh paint. Great area.
From $395.+sec. 386-752-9626
Greentree Townhouse
Summer special. 2/1. 2/1.5. Free
water & sewer. Balcony & patio.
Laundry. Behind Kens on Hwy 90.
386-754-1800 wwwmyflapts.comn

ONE 51 PLACE API'S
Alachua
MOVE IN SPECIALS
1, 2, & 3 bedrooms
Call TODAY 386-462-0656
or visit us at one51place.com

Redwine Apartments. Move in
special $199. Limited time. Pets
welcome. with 5 complexes.
we have a home for you.
386-754-1800. www.myflapts.com
The Lakes Apts. Studios & lBr's
from $135/wk. Util. & cable incl.,
Sec 8 vouchers accepted, monthly
rates avail Call 386-752-2741
Wayne Manor Apts.
Move in $199. Summer special.
2/1, washer/dryer. Behind Kens off
Hwy 90. 386-754-1800
www.myflapts.com
Windsor Arms Apartments.
Summer special $199. Move in!
2/1, 2/1.5, 2/2. Pet Friendy. Free
200 ch. Dish. Washer/dryer hkup.
386-754-1800. www.myflapts.com

720 Furnished Apts.
72 For Rent
lbr Apt. includes water, dec, &
cable. $595. mo. Good area. 7
minutes from town. References & .
sec. req'd. No pets. 386-719-4808
Rooms for Rent. Hillcrest, Sands,
Columbia. All furnished. Electric,
cable, fridge, microwave. Weekly
or monthly rates. 1 person $135,
2 persons $150. weekly
386-752-5808

73A Unfurnished
730 Home For Rent
2 BR/1 BA, Country, South. of
Lake City, private river access.
w/boat ramp, 2 garages, clean,
,$650 mo. + sec. 386-590-0642

'09 Custom Dream Home
4BR/3.5BA, 5+acres, horses ok.,
Old brick & heart pine floors,
jet tub, DSL. Beautiful!
For right person $2000/mo.
negotiable 970-221-0090


2003 Sea Pro 170CC
Yamaha 90hp, low hours,
live wells, Bimini top, fish
finder, aluminum trailer
w/spare, boat cover.
$7-,500
$6,200
Call
386-719-6537


730 Unfurnished
7 Home For Rent

055271')') I



SMARTER. BOLDER. FASTER.
The Darby Rogers Company
202 Country Club Rd.. 2/1
with fenced back yard.
$600./ mo + security deposit

222 SW 3rd St Jasper..
newly remodeled 3/2 with
fenced yard on large city lot.
$800./mo + security

199 Brandy Way..newer
4/2 brick home in Springfield
Estates. $975./mo + security

451 SW Riverside Ft. White..
River access with this 3/2
remodeled home.
$1000./mo + security

389 SW Mossy Oak..
Georgeous 4/3 upscale home
in prestigeous Hunters Ridge.
$1575./mo + security

Kayla Carbono 386-623-9650 or
BJ Federico 386-365-5884


2BR house $625.mo $625. dep.
Also, 2 large br apt. $525. mo
$525 dep. Conveniently close to
the VA & shopping. 386-344-2972
3BR/1.5 BA targe lot. Very clean
with storage shed. Quiet area.
$850 mo. + $850. dep.
386-752-7578
4br/2ba CHA Brick, 1200 sqft
lac., Close to FGCC, CR 245A.
Ceramic tile/carpet, $800 mo $800
dep (904)708-8478 App. req'd
Brick 3br/2ba Large yard, garage,
CH/A. 189 Stanley Ct. Lake City.
$950. mo + $1000 dep.
Call 386-365-8543
LARGE 3BR/2BA home close, to
college.'$750. mo $450 security.
Application required.
386-935-1482
Prime location 2br/lba.
Resid'l or comm'l. Comer of Baya
& McFarlane. $600. mo. $500 sec.
386-752-9144 or 755-2235
VERY LARGE 2 BR/2 BA, Brick
home, garage. CH & A, Clean,
386-590-0642 / 386-867-1833,
www.suwuiineevalleyproperties.com

750 Business&
750 Office Rentals

05527923
OFFICE SPACE for Lease
576 sq' $450/mthi
900 sq' $600/mth
3568 sq' S2973/inth
83(X) sq $5533/inthli
also Bank Building
Excellent Locations
Toim Eagle. GRI
(386) 961-1086 DCA Realtor

For Lease: E Baya Ave. Two -
1000 sqft office space units or
combined for 2000 sqft. 386-984-
0622 or weekends 386-497-4762


790 Vacation Rentals

Horseshoe Beach RV Lot.
Nice comer Lot with shade trees.
$295. mo Water/electric included
386-235-3633 or 352-498-5986


805 Lots for Sale

BEAUTIFUL 5 acres in
Lake City, 100% owner financing,
no qualifying, $395 per month.
Please call 512-663-0065

Owner Financing. River comm &
nature lover's dream in Lee. 15
wooded ac by the Withlacoochee.
Property is already subdivided
MLS 75576 $48,000 623-6896
PUBLISHER'S NOTE
All real estate advertising in this
newspaper is subject to the fair
housing act which makes it illegal
to advertise "any preference,
limitation, or discrimination based
on race, color, religion, sex,
disability, familial status or nation-
al origin; or any intention to make
such preference, limitation or
discrimination." Familial status
includes children under the age of
18 living with parents or legal
custodians, pregnant women and
people securing custody of chil-
dren under the age of 18. This
newspaper will not knowingly
accept any advertising for real es-
tate which is in violation of the
law. Our readers are hereby in-
formed that all dwellings adver-
tised in this newspaper are availa-
ble on an equal opportunity basis.
To complain of discrimination call
HUD toll free at 1-800-669-9777,
the toll free
telephone number to the hearing
impaired is 1-800-927-9275.


810 Home for Sale
i Champion Home Inspections
386-344-5551. Inspections
Starting At $ 249.00
Veterans Receive 10% Off
Full Inspection.


810 Home for Sale
4 BR/2 BA, on I acre, granite
floors thru out, open kitchen, wrap
around front porch.$139,900
MLS 77292 Brittany
Results Realty 386-397-3473
Beautiful home on 15 acres w/over
2,500 sq. ft. New appli., new tank
at well, new drain field, workshop.
$235,000 MLS 77552 Brittany
Results Realty 386-397-3473
Century 21 Darby Rogers
752-6575 Immaculate home on
5 acres. 3/2, new energy efficient
A/C system, metal roof, 12x28 work-
shop. #78508 Only $168,900
Century 21 Darby Rogers
752-6575 3/2 located on 11th Fair-
way at Southern Oaks Country Club.
Huge master BR, huge kitchen, 2 car
garage. #78276 Only $129,900
Century 21 Darby Rogers
752-6575 Executive home, 4/3, 2557
sqft, plantation shutters, granite
counter tops, in-ground pool w/spa.
#78610 Only $269,000
Century 21 Darby Rogers
752-6575 Beautiful Victorian/White
Springs, 7BR/3.5B w/5 fireplaces, a
Must See. #76361
Only $185,000
Century 21- Darby Rogers
752-6575 Golf course living, 3/2.5,
vaulted ceilings, open floor plan,
place, breakfast area. #78941 (1-
year home warranty) Only $210,000
Champion Home Inspections
Contact John 386-344-5551
State Licensed
And Insured
championhomeinspections.us
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
10 acres w/well maintained brick
home. 2012 sqft. Open split floor
plan. Lori Giebeig Simpson
365-5678 MLS# 74447 $149,900
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
New home in May Fair. Super area
comer lot. 4br split plan. Versatile
colors. Elaine K. Tolar
755-6488 MLS# 76919 $199,900
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
3br/2ba. 1590 sqft. Lori Giebeig
Simpson. 365-5678 or
Mary Brown Whitehurst
965-0887 MLS# 74542 $109,900
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
Cute 3/2 brick in town. Wood
floors, Ig family room. Front &
back porch Lori Giebeig Simpson
365-5678 MLS# 77989 $79,900
Lg. 4/3 family home. 16x20
screened porch, workshop. 4.5 ac.
fenced/cross fenced MLS 74339
$219,900. N Fla Homeland Real-
ty Darlene Hart 386-288-2878
Great 3/2 home w/2346 sq ft
under roof on .67 ac., Creekside
S/D. Big back yard w/plenty of
shade trees. On a cul-de-sac. MLS
77385 $169,900 623-6896
Spacious 4/2 home on I ac. Split
floor plan. Great neighborhood.
Easy access to 1-75 $204.900 MLS
77859 N Fla Homeland Realty
Darlene Hart 386-288-2878
WoodCrest 3/2 Split floor plan
Screened porch. I Ox 12 storage
shed. $126.9(X) MLS 77932
Darlene Hart 386-288-2878
N Fla Homeland Realty
Home for entertaining 3/2 plus
pool house w/half bath. 2.25
fenced ac. Freshly painted. Split
plan, Large rear deck MLS 78103
$179,900 386-623-6896
0.5 ac tract. 441 (4 lane) frontage.
1/2 mii from Target distribution.
2/1.5 zoned resid'l MLS# 78506
$88,000 Nancy Rogers 867-1271
R.E.O. Realty Group
Great home. Great neighborhood,
great price. 3/2 Close to town A
Must See!. MLS#77411, $79,900,
Nancy Rogers
867-1271 R.E.O. Realty Group
4/2 fenced yard, 2 car garage,
Fairly new roof & HVAC Shed,
fenced back yard. MLS#77602,
$162,500, Nancy Rogers
867-1?71 R.E.O. Realty Group
Lake City Country Club. 4/3, reno-
vated. Great for entertaining. Glass
doors open to back yard. $179,900
MLS#78637 Nancy Rogers
R.E.O. Realty Group 867-1271
Investor Special Buy. 2br con-
crete block w/CH/A. Available "as
is" $22,900, MLS76821.
Vin Lantroop. 386-755-6600
Hallmark Real Estate
Pool Home. 2 Story w/soaring
ceilings. Ig master w/Jacuzzi.
Fenced yard. $159,1)(10 MLS77085
Teresa Spradley 386-365-8343
Hallmark Real Estate
Near Itchetucknee head springs,
easy Gainesville commute. For
sale or rent! $75.500, MLS77398.
Paula Lawrence. 386-623-1973
Hallmark Real Estate
REDUCED gated community.
Brick w/florida room & private
garden. Security system. Ginger
Parker. MLS77703. 386-365-2135
Hallmark Real Estate
Like to Entertain? Over 2900
sqft. 3br/2.5ba. Fenced w/sprinkler
& security system. MLS78404.
Sherry Willis. 386-365-8095
Hallmark Real Estate
Springhollow Ig brick. 4br/2ba
w/lg screened porch. Oversized
ga-
rage. upgraded kitchen & bath.
$239,500, MLS78787. Janet Creel.
719-0382 Hallmark Real Estate


ON WHEELS & WATERCRAFT






1994 Chevy Cavalier 2000 GMC Safari Van
4DR. 115,283 mi., mini Runs great, has an 80,000
wagon, no accidents, factory warranty,
automatic, cold air, CD AC warranty.
player/radio. $7,469 OBO
$2,869 Call
386-292-9329
386-292-9329 386-438-8731


810 Home for Sale

Well maintained 4/2, 2566 sqft
oversized den w/fplace, Ig kitchen,
breakfast area overlooking gazebo.
#78347 Only $179,000 Century 21-
Darby Rogers 752-6575

820 Farms &
2V Acreage

4 1/2 acre lot. Lake Jeffery Road.
Gorgeous Oaks!Paved Rd
Owner Financing! NO DOWN!
$59,900. $525mo 352-215-1018.
www.LandOwnerFinancing.com
4 acres, Wellborn, New Well
installed, Beautifully wooded
w/cleared Home Site, owner fin,
no down, $39,900, $410 mon
Call 352-215-1018
www.LandOwnerFinancing.com
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
Brick in LC Country Club. 4/3
Lots of extras, oversized garage &
storage. Elaine K. Tolar
752-4211 MLS# 78739 $239,900
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
Brick in WoodCrest S/D. Split
plan. Screened porch. Lg back
yard. Elaine K. Tolar
752-4211 MLS# 77015 $137,900
For Lease FARM- 7 stall barn.
17+ acres, pasture, cross fenced.
Close in $500. mo.
386-961-1086
FOR SALE BY OWNER,
10 acres, approx. 7 acres planted
pines, with a 24 x 40 foot (Steel
Dean) bldg. w/18 foot opening,
own power, $85,000
Call Sonya 386-288-2557.
Owner financed land. Half acre to
ten acre lots. As low as $300
down. Deas Bullard Properties
386-752-4339 www.landnfl.com

83O Commercial
Property

Commercial Parcel 2 acres w/252
ft frontage on SR 47 Add'l 4.76
ac. avail. $149,900 MLS# 78260
Call 386-867-1271 Nancy Rogers
R.E.O.Realty Group, Inc

8 0 Real Estate
87 Wanted

I Buy Houses
CASH!
Quick Sale Fair Price
386-269-0605


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2006 EF250
Ford Van
3/4 ton, metal work
shelves/ladder rack,
60K miles, exc. cond.
$10,500
Call '
386-555-5555
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during the first 10 days, you
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LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 22, 2011


We interrupt



realignment talk



to play games


By RALPH D. RUSSO
Associated Press

Between board of regents
meetings and applications
for membership, there actu-
ally are a bunch of games
to be played this college
football season.
; Conference realignment
has dominated the news
throughout September and
"Who's going where?" has
trumped "Who's going to
win?" as the question of the
day.
The future of the leagues
has even diverted attention
from all those pesky NCAA
investigations. Oregon and
South Carolina in the past
week announced they had
received notices of inquiry
from the NCAA, which is
the governing body's way
of letting a university know
it has some explaining to
do. Neither caused much
of a stir.
The games, however, do
go on thank goodness
- and on Saturday the big-
gest one is in Morgantown,
W.Va.
No. 2 LSU, having already
faced two opponents who
were ranked in the Top 25,
visits No. 16 West Virginia
for a night game at Milan
Puskar Stadium that
figures to be raucous and
rowdy.
LSU coach Les Miles
said .West Virginia has an
SEC atmosphere for game
night and West Virginia
just might end up being the
Southeastern Conference's
14th ...
No, no, no. No realign-
ment talk.
West Virginia hired coach
Dana Holgorsen to goose
the Mountaineers' offense
and so far so good. *
Behind quarterback


Geno Smith, West Virginia
is stepping up the pace and
putting up some big num-
bers. The Mountaineers are
averaging 434 yards and 42
points, and are still working
the kinks out of Holgorsen's
spread.
They'll need to be bet-
ter than they have been
all season against a Tigers
defense that has already
chewed up and spit out
Oregon's spread offense
and Mississippi State's.
Elsewhere, both of the
teams that played in last
week's marquee game have
potentially tricky follow-up's
on Saturday.
No. 1 Oklahoma, coming
off a huge road victory at
Florida State, returns home
to play Missouri in the Big
12 opener and, appar-
ently,. its not last time the
Sooners will start a Big 12
season after they were shut
out of ...
NO! No conference
realignment
As for the 11th-ranked
Seminoles, they have a
much tougher task, trying
to rebound with a road trip
to No. 21 Clemson in an
Atlantic Coast Conference
game matching two teams
that have been rumored to
be targets of the ...
NO. CONFERENCE.
REALIGNMENT.
The.picks:
SATURDAY
Missouri (plus 21X) at
No. 1 Oklahoma
Tigers have lost 17
straight in Norman, dating
to 1966 ... OKLAHOMA
45-20.
No. 2 LSU (minus 51W)
at No. 16 West Virginia
Tigers defense has
allowed three touchdowns
and 3.16 yards per play ...
LSU 24-14.


No. 14 Arkansas (plus
12) at No. 3 Alabama
Razorbacks nearly
knocked off Tide last year
... ALABAMA 31-17.
Tulsa (plus 31%) at
No. 4 Boise State
Third top-10 oppo-
nent already for Golden
Hurricane ... BOISE STATE
55-21.
South Dakota (no line)
at No. 6 Wisconsin
Next up for Badgers, Big
Red invasion of Madison ...
WISCONSIN 60-10.
No. 7 Oklahoma State
(plus 4) at No. 8 Texas
A&M
Cowboys have won three
straight against Aggies
... OKLAHOMA STATE
35-34.
No. 9 Nebraska (minus
231/2) at Wyoming
Population of Omaha,
Neb.: 419,545. Population
of Wyoming: 563,626 ...
NEBRASKA 49-17.
No. 10 Oregon (minus
15') at Arizona
Coach Mike Stoops
needs to get Wildcats right-
.ed quickly ... OREGON 42-
28.
No. 11 Florida State
(plus 2) at No. 21
Clemson
Seminoles D will have
to compensate for banged-
up offense ... FLORIDA
STATE 28-23.
Vanderbilt (plus 16) at
No. 12 South Carolina
James Franklin is first
Vandy coach to start 3-
0 since World War II ...
S.CAROLINA 38-17.
No. 13 Virginia Tech
(minus 20t) at Marshall
Hokies last played at
Marshall in 1940 and lost
... VIRGINIA TECH 45-17.
No. 15 Florida (minus
19'.,) at Kentucky
Gators winning streak


S*- ~




L'A7..


L.. ,


JASON MATTHEW WALKERILake City Reporter
Florida line baker Jelani Jenkins (3) breaks up a pass intended for Mychal Rivera (81) in a
game against Tennessee on Saturday.


against Wildcats is 24 in a
row ... FLORIDA 45-10.
Rice (plus ;01'/) at No.
17 Baylor
Bears' Robert Griffin III
has as many incompletions
as TD passes (eight) ...
BAYLOR 55-20.
UTEP (plus 29) at No.
18 South Florida
Miners have lost 37
straight against current
BCS AQ teams ... USF
54-20.
Portland State (no


line) at No. 20 TCU
Frogs, who led nation in
total defense last three sea-
sons, rank 102nd ... TCU
58-13.
San Diego State (plus
10) at No. 22 Michigan
Wolverines fans get to see
just how good coach Brady
Hoke is ... MICHIGAN
35-27.
No. 23 Southern
California (plus 2') at
Arizona State
Trojans have won


five straight at Tempe ...
ARIZONA STATE 28-24.
Western Michigan
(plus 13) at No. 24
Illinois
Illini rank 17th in nation
in total defense ... ILLINOIS
36-17
* North Carolina (plus
6/2) at No. 25 Georgia
Tech
Jackets are highest
scoring team in country
at 59 points per game ...
GEORGIA TECH 28-24.


ASSOCIATED PRESS
In this Sept. 25, 2010, file photo, Arkansas running back Ronnie Wingo Jr. carries the ball
during an NCAA college football game against Alabama in Fayetteville, Ark. Arkansas' running
game wasn't strong enough to hold off Alabama in the second half last season. The No. 14
- _- .. l- I__--_ ;L--- -- / --...-- 0 ... t Q. .... ... ... __: l .:.... T:,I A : .. ..... : in .


Razorbacks nopet iney ve oun t ae answer against the No. 3 CriImsonUII ice this season in the "w- I I
formofWingo. SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 24, 201 1'

More clarity on the horizon in SEC HOWARD CONFERENCE CENTER & FLORIDA GATEWAY COLLEGE
By DAVID BRANDT ranked Crimson Tide the front-runners. They Proudly presented by
Associated Press hosts No. 14 Arkansas on have the vintage formula C M KVS
Saturday while second- for winning the SEC ter- RegoMedical te 1
If someone survives the ranked LSU plays in yet rific defense coupled with a '""*. \
Southeastern Conference another contest with cham- sound running game. But I 1 ; *.-.. mi -Niirsg '
gauntlet unscathed there's pionship implications when both teams have questions
little doubt they'll get a spot the Tigers travel to No. 16 at quarterback.
in the national champion- West Virginia. LSU's Jarrett Lee and ADAM SANDERS OPENS @ 7:00PM


ship and a shot at win-
ning the league's sixth con-
secutive title.
That's a big if, especially
without a clear-cut favorite
in the SEC.
There are plenty of
contenders, including
LSU, Alabama, South
Carolina, Arkansas and
Florida. All are ranked
in the top 15. Others like
Auburn, Georgia and
Mississippi State have
been previously ranked
and hope to be a factor in
November.
But there will be
many potential season-
breaking showdowns
before then.
This weekend the third-


Alabama linebacker
Dont'a Hightower prefers
starting conference play
with such a pivotal game.
"It's cool to open that way
because you know you have
two teams that will fight to
the end," Hightower said.
"Ain't nobody gonna give
up. So whoever comes out
the best man in this situa-
tion here you have a good
chance of going to the SEC
championship."
Just as it was last sea-
son, the Western Division
is loaded.
"If you win the SEC West,
you're the best in the coun-
try," Mississippi State coach
Dan Mullen said.
LSU and Alabama are


Alabama's A.J. McCarron
have shown the ability to
do good things, though
at some point they might
have to prove they can put
their team on their backs
and lead them to a win if
needed.
That test could come dur-
ing their showdown on Nov.
5 in Tuscaloosa.
And while Arkansas has
arguably the league's best
offense, the Razorbacks
haven't been able to get that
big win. The Tide has won
four straight in the series,
including a 24-20 victory
last season.
Arkansas safety Tramain
Thomas said this is their
chance.


PRE-SHOW PARTY AND BBQ.SPONSORED BY TIcMO mAu
.Ci"l (,Ia c ,oMP,,


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Page Editor: Brandon Finley, 754-0420