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The Lake City reporter
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028308/01662
 Material Information
Title: The Lake City reporter
Uniform Title: Lake City reporter (Lake City, Fla. 1967)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: John H. Perry
Place of Publication: Lake City Fla
Publication Date: 9/18/2011
Frequency: daily (monday through friday)[<1969>-]
weekly[ former 1967-<1968>]
daily
normalized irregular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Lake City (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Columbia County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Columbia -- Lake City
Coordinates: 30.189722 x -82.639722 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 95, no. 4 (Oct. 5, 1967)-
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000358016
oclc - 33283560
notis - ABZ6316
lccn - sn 95047175
sobekcm - UF00028308_01569
System ID: UF00028308:01662
 Related Items
Preceded by: Lake City reporter and Columbia gazette

Full Text




Gators roll
UF downs
Vols 33-23. Full
.... inside.
0 12051 **** DIGIT
Li E O FI JA II -

GAINESVILLE FL 3261_1943)


'Noles
FSU hosts No. I
Oklahoma. Full
coverage inside.
Sports, IB


Lake


nlty


Reporter


Sunday, September 18, 2011 www.lakecityreporter.com Vol. 137, No. 201 N $ 1.00


Report:


Add 4


new fire


stations

Goal is to lower
insurance rates
for homeowners.

By TONY BRITT
tbritt@lakecityreporter.com
County officials may add more fire sta-
tions in order to maintain or improve local
Insurance Service Organization ratings,
which could mean lower
fire insurance rates for
county residents.
Dale Williams, county
manager, said a report
prepared by consul-
tants recommended the
county add four single-
bay fire stations, with no Williams
personnel but a Class
A type fire engine in three of them. The
cost of constructing the stations was esti-
mated at $120,000.
"The stations will house the Class A
pumpers for the volunteers to pick up."
said TresAtkinson, Columbia County Fire
Rescue chief. "That enhances our cover-
age for our ISO districts. That affords
more people a lower ISO rating."
The proposal also recommended pur-
chasing three Class A pumpers at an
estimated cost of $1,050,000.
County officials will have to decide
whether the proposed enhancements are
necessary before approving a new non
adyalorem assessment rate study for fire
assessment
In addition, last year the county was
awarded a grant for the new Eastside
STATIONS continued on 3A


More Smokin' Pig


Uni Diii IU/LdMk y reporuti
Tim Canada, of Two Cracker Cooking BBQ,
cuts into a slab of ribs during the Smokin'
Pig BBQ Fest Saturday at the Columbia
County Fairgrounds.


Photos by TONY BRITT/Lake City Reporter
LEFT: Zach Thebo (from left), 14, Caycee Gray, 15, and Uriah Thebo, 13, navigate a Baya Drive sidewalk as part of the Lake City
Pregnancy Care Center fundraiser Saturday morning. RIGHT: Mike Vaughn chats with Dorie Pollock following the event.


300 walk, jog, run for life


By TONY BRITT
tbritt@lakecityreporter.com
The Pregnancy Care Center of Lake
City has held an annual walk fundraiser
for the past 10 years to generate money
for the local facility.
With a fundraising goal of $10,000
established for this year's event, organiz-
ers i:iiiagi ,d to attract 300 i;tirti'ip:iitt


who were ready, willing and' able to help.
The fundraiser took place Saturday with
walkers and runners hitting the sidewalks
on 3.1-mile trek.
Participants ran, walked, jogged from
Olustee Park down local streets, back
to Olustee Park where the event ended.
Many wore pro-life signs, some pushed
baby strollers with their children and oth-
ers wore T-shirts supporting the event.


The first runner to complete the course
was Rich Royster
Judy Welch, FPegnancy Care Center
director of development, said she loved
everything associated with this year's
event.
"We had a great crowd, excitement,
enthusiasm and more runners this year,"
WALK continued on 3A


Crash cIosOs .i..


TONY BRITT/Lake City Reporter
Cpl. A. Banks, Florida Highway Patrol investigator, checks a vehicle after a two-car crash on Interstate 10 Saturday. The accident was
reported at 4:17 p.m. at the 317 mile marker on the eastbound lanes of 1-10, about three miles inside Baker County. Columbia County Fire
Rescue responded with three units and a command staff member and assisted Baker County emergency workers in tending to the victims.
The eastbound lanes of the roadway were reduced to one lane of traffic for more than an hour and traffic was later completely stopped for
about 30 minutes as a helicopter landed to take an injured person to an area hospital. The helicopter lifted off at 5:37 p.m. Further informa-
tion was unavailable at press time.


Lake City Medical Center wins major recognition


From staff reports

Lake City Medical Center has been
named one of the nation's top perform-
ers-on key quality measures by The Joint
Commission, the leading accreditor of
health care organizations in America.
Rankings were based on data reported
about evidence-based clinical processes
that are shown to improve care for cer-
tain conditions, including heart attack,
heart failure, pneumonia, surgical care
and children's asthma.
Lake City Medical. Center is one of
only 405 U.S. hospitals and critical access
hospitals earning the distinction of top


performer on key quality measures for
attaining and sustaining excellence in
accountability measure performance.
Inclusion on the list is based on an
aggregation of accountability measure
data reported to The Joint Commission
during the previous calendar year. For
example, this first recognition program
is based on data that were reported for
2010.
To be recognized as a top performer
on key quality measures an organization
must meet two 95 percent performance
thresholds. First it must achieve a com-
posite performance of 95 percent or
above after the results of all the account-


ability measures for which they report
data to The Joint Commission were fac-
tored into a single score, including mea-
sures that had less than 30 eligible cases
or patients. Second, they must meet or
exceed a 95 percent performance target
for every single accountability measure
for which they report data, excluding
any measures with less than 30 eligible
cases or patients.
Lake City Medical Center was recog-
nized for achieving these thresholds for
heart attack, heart failure, pneumonia
and surgical care.
LCMC continued on 3A


mUa nI


Lake City Medical Center has been named one of
the nation's top performing hospitals by The Joint
Commission.


CALL US: 1 8'
(3 86) 752-1293 8 7 ( '
SUBSCRIBE TO Isol showers
THE REPORTER:
Voice: 755-5445
,.. .I J I Fax: 752-9400 WEATHER, 6A


,tv- li .p Opinion . ...
Business ....
SObicuaries .........
Advice ....... . .
Puzzles ..........


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TODAY IN
BUSINESS
to,.'.I- I-0 -V'.een'
,L .i m .,'O-.


COMING
TUESDAY
Sl., Council
O. ; i ,Iie


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AMW









LAKE CITY REPORTER SUNDAY REPORT SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 18, 2011


A$S.H 3. f ) LRDA
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Friday: Friday: Saturday: Saturday: Saturday: Saturday:
11-17-31-39 MB 18 11-18-27-31-36 Afternoon: N/A Afternoon: N/A N/A N/A
Evening: N/A Evening: N/A


AROUND FLORIDA



French officials pay homage to WWII veterans


CAPE CORAL (AP)
A Florida man has been
honored by the French
government and military
for his service during
the Allied invasion of
Normandy in World War
II.
Jack Anderson of Cape
Coral received the Legion
of Honor medal last week
in Tampa, along with
eight other Normandy
Veterans.
Anderson was a para-
trooper with the 101st
Airborne Division. He
tells the News-Press that
he landed June 6, 1944,
on the thatch roof of a
farmhouse, startling the
French couple inside.
He says he barely sur-
vived the jump after his
plane was hit by a shell
while he was standing in
the doorway. The next
day, he was wounded
in the legs and sent to
the Normandy beaches
lefore being evacuated to
,England.

Charges
upgraded to
.murder after
wife dies

LUTZ (AP) A
Tampa-area man has
been charged with sec-
ond-degree murder after
authorities say his wife
.,died as a result of a beat-
ing he administered in
May.
The Hillsborough
County Sheriff's Office


ASSOCIATED PRESS
In this image provided by the U.S. Army Retired Col. Charles P. Murray, is pictured at last
year's Veterans' Day parade in Columbia, S.C. Murray, who was awarded the Medal of Honor
for heroic actions in World War II, was remembered Wednesday not only for his courage on
the battlefield but for his concern for the common soldier. Murray died Friday in Columbia at
age 89. He will be buried at Arlington National Cemetery.


reported Friday that 45-
year-old Chunping Lin is
also charged with battery,
battery domestic violence
and child abuse. Deputies
say he beat his wife, 43-
year-old Lixin Tian, and
tried to kill her and their
two sons in the May 25
incident at their home in
Lutz (LOOTZ), north of
Tampa.
Tian refused treatment
by emergency workers
at the time, but later had
pains in her head. One
of her sons drove her
to a hospital, where she
had surgery. She never
regained consciousness


and died July 15.
Prosecutors then decid-
ed to add the murder
charge against Lin.

Men charged
with capturing
baby alligators


MONTVERDE (AP)
- Two central Florida
men face charges after
wildlife officers reported
finding them with sacks
containing about 260 alli-
gator hatchlings.
The Florida Fish and


Wildlife Conservation
Commission reports
that 32-year-old Robert
Martin Duval.and 22-
year-old Christopher
Cork Scroggins had
been riding on an airboat
near Lake Apopka early
Thursday morning before
officers stopped them.
An arrest reports says
the men had been shining
a light over the water for
at least six hours. When
one wildlife officer told
the men he was going to
perform an inspection,
the report says Duval
immediately turned over
the hatchlings.


The wildlife officers
returned the baby alliga-
tors to the water.
Duval and Scroggins
were both arrested and
charged with felony
possession/capture
of hatchling alligators
and misdemeanor con-
spiracy charges. Duval
was also charged with
possession of firearms
and ammunition by a
convicted felon.

Charter flights
from Fort
Lauderdale to
Cuba begin


FORT LAUDERDALE
(AP) The first char-
ter flight from Fort
Lauderdale to Cuba is
scheduled to depart this
afternoon.
Passengers began
arriving at the airport
Saturday morning in
advance of the 12:30
p.m. departure. Airport
spokesman Gregory
Meyer says the terminal
is packed with passen-
gers and their luggage.'
Some 115 people
are expected to board
the one-hour flight to
Havana's Jose Marti
International Airport.
Airline Brokers
Company is organizing
the weekly flights. A
JetBlue plane and crew
will take passengers to
the island.
Several new charter
flights have recently


been approved by the
U.S. and Cuban govern-
ments. Flights from
Tampa to Havana began
for the first time in near-
ly 50 years on Sept. 9..

Pensacola
charter school
could close

PENSACOLA (AP)
- School board officials
are considering closing a
Pensacola charter school
facing financial and aca-
demic troubles.
The A.A. Dixon
Charter School of
Excellence was $100,000
in debt after its first year
and received an F from
the state on an annual
accountability report that
gathers information on
student performance.
The Pensacola News
Journal reports that
Superintendent Malcolm
Thomas will recommend
that the Escambia County
School board vote to
close the school after 90
days The board will vote
Tuesday.
I The school has an
enrollment of 143 stu-
dents.
Dixon's new principal,
Kathy Colbert, says the
staff is committed to
ensuring students learn.
Charter schools are
expected to expand
throughout Florida, after
legislators passed a law
this spring aimed at
growing those considered
high performing.


PEOPLE IN THE NEWS


Hollywood balks at big budget movies as DVDs drop


LOS ANGELES (AP)
- Hollywood long
considered the land of
excess- is becoming
more cost-conscious, as
movie executives rethink
what they're willing to pay
to make a blockbuster.
After years of beefing
up budgets to meet audi-
ence expectations, movie
studios are cutting back
and canceling projects that
are too costly. Half-baked,
expensive movie ideas
that would have received
approval a few years ago
are now under scrutiny.
For movies that are made,
producers have to settle
for toned-down special
effects, cheaper actors and
fewer locations for shoots.
In the past five years,
major studios have
trimmed the annual num-
ber of films they release by
nearly a third to cut costs
and avoid having big mov-
ies compete head-to-head
on opening weekends.
In July, two major proj-
ects were stopped mid-
stream because of budget
pressures. The Walt
Disney Co. halted "The
Lone Ranger," starring
Johnny Depp, even though
sets were already half-built
in New Mexico. Universal
.pulled out of "The Dark
Tower," a three-movie, two-
TV-series colossus based
on books by Stephen King.
A person familiar with
Disney's thinking said
the budget on "The Lone
Ranger" was creeping
north of $250 million, and
the company wanted to
shave it to around $200
million.
Universal, which
became a unit of cable TV
provider Comcast Corp.
:this year, withdrew from
"The Dark Tower" because


In this publicity image released by Universal Pictures, Daniel Craig is shown in a scene from
"Cowboys & Aliens." The declining DVD business has forced Hollywood to rethink what it's
willing to pay to make a blockbuster. "Cowboys and Aliens," which had an estimated budget
of $163 million but grossed just $129 million in global ticket sales since its release July 29.
Even if it does well on home video, Universal likely spent tens of millions of dollars on adver-
tising alone, and the film is headed toward a multimillion-dollar loss.


of problems with the busi-
ness model, according to
another person, who is
familiar with that matter.
Neither person was
authorized to speak public-
ly and spoke on condition
of anonymity.
Disney CEO Bob Iger
explained the company's
approach to analysts in
July. "It's our intention
to take a very careful
look at what films cost,"
Iger said. "If we can't get
them to a level that we're
comfortable with, we
think that we're better off
actually reducing the size
of our slate than making
films that are bigger and
increasingly more risky."
Blame it on declining
DVD sales.
Until recently, studios
could afford to churn out


movies with heart-pump-
ing action scenes featur-
ing pricey special effects
and high-salary actors.
Although many of those
movies cost more than
they garnered in ticket
sales, Hollywood could
count on overall strong
sales of DVDs to make up
for excessive expenses.
"The DVD buying boom
covered up a lot of sins in
the middle part of the last
decade," said Tom Adams,
principal analyst and direc-
tor of U.S. media for IHS
Screen Digest.
But the curtain is falling
on the DVD era. IHS said
U.S. video disc sales fell
from $10.3 billion in 2004
to $7 billion last year.
The popularity of low-
cost rental options, such as
Netflix and Redbox, along


with the ease of piracy,
has cut into DVD sales,
making it tougher to profit
from the movie business.
Blu-ray disc sales and
gains in digital purchases
haven't made up for the
shortfall.
Hollywood economics
have been strained by
movie budgets that have
been rising steadily over
the past couple of decades.
To cut costs, some studios
have dropped smaller bud-
get movies with big-name,
expensive actors, but kept
making summer block-
busters based on franchis-
es such as superheroes.
That trend has
increased the average
cost of major studio mov-
ies to $78 million in 2011
from about $42 million in
1995.


Sept. 18:

Singer Jimmie Rodgers
is 78.
Actor Robert Blake is 78.
Actor Fred Willard is 72.
Singer-actor Frankie
Avalon is 71.
Guitarist Kerry Livgren
(Kansas) is 62.
Actor James Gandolfini


Daily Scripture


("The Sopranos") is 50.
Guitarist Mark Olson of
The Jayhawks is 50.
Actress Holly Robinson
Peete ("CHangin' With Mr.
Cooper") is 47.
Actress Jada Pinkett
Smith is 40.
Actor James Marsden
("The Notebook," "Ally
McBeal") is 38.


"Follow God's example,
therefore, as dearly
loved children"
- Ephesians 5:1 NIV.


Lake City Reporter


HOW TO REACH US
Main number ........(386) 752-1293
Fax number .............752-9400
Circulation ...............755-5445
Online... www.lakecltyreporter.com
The Lake City Reporter, an affiliate of
Community Newspapers Inc., is pub-
lished Tuesday through Sunday at 180
E. Duval St., Lake City, Fla. 32055.
Periodical postage paid at Lake City, Fla.
Member Audit Bureau of Circulation and
The Associated Press.
All material herein is property of the Lake
City Reporter. Reproduction in whole or
in part is forbidden without the permis-
sion of the publisher. U.S. Postal Service
No. 310-880.
POSTMASTER: Send address changes
to Lake City Reporter, P.O. Box 1709,
Lake City, Fla. 32056.
Publisher Todd Wilson .....754-0418
(twilson@lakecityreporter.com)
NEWS
Editor Robert Bridges .....754-0428
(rbridges@lakecityreporter.com)
ADVERTISING
Director Ashley Butcher ...754-0417
(abutcher@lakecityreporter.com)
CLASSIFIED
To place a classified ad, call 755-5440


BUSINESS
Controller Sue Brannon ... .754-0419
(sbrannon@lakedtyreporter.com)
CIRCULATION
Home delivery of the Lake City Reporter
should be completed by 6:30 a.m.
Tuesday through Saturday, and by 730
a.m. on Sunday.
Please call 386-755-5445 to report any
problems with your delivery service.
In Columbia County, customers should
call before 10:30 am. to report a ser-
vice error for same day re-deliveay. After
10:30 a.m., next day re-delivery or ser-
vice related credits will be Issued.
In all other counties where home delivery
is available, next day re-delivery or ser-
vice related credits will be Issued.
Circulation ...............755-5445
(clrculation@lakecityreporter.com)
Home delivery rates
(Tuesday through Sunday)
12 Weeks .................. $26.32
24 Weeks.................. $48.79
52 Weeks................... $83.46
Rates Include 7% sales tax.
Mail rates
12 Weeks .................. $41.40
24 Weeks..................$82.80
52 Weeks................. $179.40


CORRECTION

The Lake City Reporter corrects errors of fact in news
items. If you have a concern, question or suggestion,
please call the executive editor. Corrections and clarifica-
tions will run in this space. And thanks for reading.


Celebrity Birthdays


Page Editor: Robert Bridges, 754-0428









LAKE CITY REPORTER NEWS SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 18, 2011


Courtesy photo
The Grammy-winning group Diamond Rio will perform at Florida Gateway College Sept. 24.


Diamond Rio to perform

at Florida Gateway College


By Troy Roberts
Special to the Reporter
For more than 20 years,
Diamond Rio has attracted
crowds of thousands wher-
ever they've performed.
They'll bring their success
to Florida Gateway College
on September 24th when
they perform as part of the
FGC Entertainment series.
"I think our success has
come from the fact that we
work really hard to find
material that's right for us,"
said Diamond Rio's Gene
Johnson, who plays mando-
lin, guitar and fiddle for the
band. "Ifs a painstaking pro-
cess. There are six of us and
we all have a vote on what
gets recorded and what
doesn't That gives you six
opinions and we always try
to find the ones that we're all
in agreement on."
The band has had more
hits than you could count
on both hands "Meet in
the Middle" was first and
was followed by 32 more


chart singles, including
four more No. 1 hits: "How
Your Love Makes Me Feel,"
"One More Day," "Beautiful
Mess" and "I Believe."
Diamond Rio has gar-
nered 13 Grammy nomina-
tions throughout its career,
and earned its first Grammy
win last year for its 2009
release, "The Reason." This
release was the group's first
venture into the Christian
music genre.
"That was something on
our bucket list," Johnson
said, "You know, for years
we were on Arista Records
and we couldn't do those
things. We wanted to do
a Christmas album, they
weren't really into it. We
wanted to a Christian
album, they weren't really
into it. They were looking
at numbers and sales, and
when we splintered off a
few years ago, the first thing
we did was a Christmas
album. We recorded it on
our own, took it around to
some labels and the Word


Records was the first that
saw it and wanted to put
it out After the release of
that album, they asked us
to do a Christian album.
"The opportunity was
there, and it kind of fell
into our laps. It wasn't next
on our list to do, but the
opportunity came up and
we took it," he said.
The September 24 con-
cert is sponsored by Shands
Lake Shore Regional
Medical Center and CMS
Professional Staffing, Inc.
Lake City's own Nashville
recording artist Adam
Sanders will open the show,
which takes place in the col-
lege's Howard Conference
Center, at 7 p.m. Diamond
Rio will take the stage
around 8:15 p.m.
Tickets for the concert
are still available $25 for
general admission and
$15 for FGC students, fac-
ulty and staff and can
be bought by calling (386)
754-4340 or visiting www.
fgcentertainmentcom.


UBS trading losses fuel


push for split banking


LONDON (AP) Would you trust
UBS with your money now?
As regulators join the Swiss bank in
scrambling to figure out how a single
suspect could have racked up as much as
$2 billion worth of rotten bets over three
years, analysts and politicians say the
catastrophic losses reinforce the case for
divorcing retail banks from their invest-
ment arms.
In Britain, plans to separate or "'ring
fence" the everyday banking familiar
to most people such as deposits, mort-
gages, and loans from the complex and
potentially dangerous investment trading
have been on the cards for months.-
The plans were approved by a govern-
ment-appointed commission a few days
ago, and backers of the ring-fencing idea
say that, in a way, the arrest of 31-year-
old trader Kweku Adoboli on charges of
fraud and false accounting could not have
come at a better time.
British Treasury chief George Osborne
told Britain's Sky News television that
the "shocking case" uncovered at the
Swiss bank was as strong an argument as
any for following the recommendations
made by the commission, chaired by
John Vickers, a former chief economist


of the Bank of England.
"If you ever wanted a better example
of why the kinds of ideas that John
Vickers was putting forward were right
for Britain, look at what happened at UBS
just a few days later," Osborne told the
broadcaster.
Vickers' 363-page report argued that
Britain's retail banks should be split off
by 2019 to reduce the risks of taxpay-
ers having to bear the cost of any future
bailouts, saying that "the risks inevita-
bly associated with banking have to sit
somewhere, and it should not be with
taxpayers."
The commission recommended that
retail banks should be "legally, economi-
cally and operationally separate" from
the parent companies, and should have
"distinct governance arrangements, and
should have different cultures."
The report got a mixed reception
earlier this week before Adoboli's
arrest. Some welcomed the report as
a way of insulating the bailout-weary
public from high-risk financial maneui-
vers derided as "casino bankirtg." Blit
the British Bankers' Association, the
industry's main lobby group, sounded
a cautious note.


WALK: 300 participate in event
Continued From Page 1A


she said. "We had a lot of
walkers and we took a lot
of group pictures because
there was a lot of church
involvement and commu-
nity involvement. It was
absolutely an amazing suc-
cessful event"
Donna Sandage,
Pregnancy Care Center
executive director, said
Saturday's fundraiser was
great.
'We had the biggest turn-
out ever, there was a lot of
runners, beautiful weather
- we couldn't have asked
for better," she said.
Welch said the fundrais-


er .serves as an important
event for the Pregnancy
Care Center.
"It's important to hold
this event annually because


we believe in life and we
are so glad that so many
people came out and stood
up for life," she said.


STATIONS: Report recommends building 4 more

Continued From Page 1A


Fire Station that would
have covered about
$630,000 of a $1.1 million
project. However, under
the rules of the grant, the
station would have been
required to comply with
Leadership in Energy and
Environmental Design


LCMC

Continued From 1A

"Today, the public
expects transparency in the
reporting of performance
at the hospitals where they
receive care, and The Joint
Commission is shining a
light on the top performing
hospitals such as Lake City
Medical Center that have
achieved excellence on a
number of vital measures of
quality of care," said Mark
R. Chassin, M.D., FACP,
M.P.E, M.PH., president,
The Joint Commission.
In addition to
being included in The Joint
Commission's "Improving
America's Hospitals" annual
report, Lake City Medical
Center will be recognized
on The Joint Commission's
Quality Check website
(www.qualitycheck.org).


standards. Williams said if
constructed to LEED stan-
dards, the building would
have required annual certi-
fications to verify continued
compliance and the county
rejected the grant.
The plan now calls for
construction of a new


Doctors' Discovery
Helps Diabetics
PHILADELPHIA A team of
doctors has found that a new formu-
lation of exotic sounding herbs and
spices gives new hope to diabetic
patients.
The formula, called CinnatrolTM
promotes healthy blood sugar levels
by effectively metabolizing glucose
into energy. In a research study, all
patients taking just one capful of
the liquid (one ounce) daily, dramati-
cally lowered their blood sugar lev-
els compared to a placebo group. An-
other scientific study Ibund that an
ingredient in Cinnatrol made insulin
20 times more capable converting
blond.,iuar 1 energy,
I' d, -ii Ini l ,jI. ; i vary, one
patient in the first study lowered his
blood sugar from 220-245 to the
100-130 range in only 28 days, de-
spite being instructed not to change
his dietary habits or physical activ-
ity. Some patients, under their doc-
tors care, are able to reduce or elimi-
nate their need for diabetic drugs.
Scientists say that Cinnatrol helps
diabetic drugs to work better. Get
full study results at cinnatrol.com.
Cinnatrol is available without a
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1-800-339-3301. Now at:
417_._. u,4 T._ ,,:.L


Eastside Fire Department
using the same basic
floor plan as Deep Creek,
Suwannee Valley/Winfield,
Columbia City and the
Ellisville departments. The


project will be paid from
the county's portion of the
original project.
"It was not cost effective
for us to put that grant in
place," Atkinson said.


Florida
Credit Union



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25-Month Special



36-Month Special


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Deposits are federally insured by the NCUA, a US Government Agency, for up to $250,000. Annual
Percentage Yield (APY) effective 9/2/2011 and subject to change at any time. Offer expires 9/30/2011. nguA


-wih [ree
Didoric [Lurek anda emeter,
Swift Creek Historic Church
\ ill be ha\ inog their annual homecoming
September 25. 2011. Ser\ ice \\ill start
at 10:45 AM. A covered dish luncheon
will follow the sern ice.
18567 SE Country Road 137
White Springs. FL
Cathy Erixton
386.397.2791:


'I


KIrnevinqC Go 's 7tIW


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I FOUR WEEK


Page Editor: Robert Bridges, 754-0428













OPINION


Sunday, September 18, 201 I1


www.lakecityreporter.com


OUR


OUR
OPINION


Follow the

money

please

L earning the county
is owed more
than $1.5 million
in unpaid bills for
ambulance service
was bad enough, but the real
kicker was yet to come. At
Thursday's county commission
meeting it was revealed that,
in addition to the outstanding
balance, there are 116 calls for
which the county may never be
paid.
The calls have been 'lost," it
seems, meaning nobody knows
where the ambulance went or
who to bill. And that's just for
the first half of the year, before
Lifeguard, a private company,
assumed EMS responsibility.
Records for 2010 haven't yet
been checked, so who knows
how many of those calls may
have been "lost" as well.
An audit is the right place to
start, as commissioners recog-
nized Thursday.
If that doesn't shed light on
the matter, let's look elsewhere.
The money may be gone for
good, but we'd like to know
how it got that way. These are
still public funds we're talking
about, after all.
With Lifeguard now in
charge this issue won't surface
again.
The Alabama-based company
does its own billing and can
fend for itself presumably
better than we've been able
- should anything go wrong.
Anyone opposed to privatiza-
tion in principle, please take
n o te .. .

HIGHLIGHTS
IN HISTORY
Today is Saturday, Sept. 18,
the 261st day of 2011. There
are 104 days left in the year.

On this date:
In 1793, President George
Washington laid the corner-
stone of the U.S. Capitol.
In 1970, rock star Jimi
Hendrix died in London at age
27.
In 1975, newspaper heiress
Patricia Hearst was captured
by the FBI in San Francisco, 19
months after being kidnapped
by the Symbionese Liberation
Army.


Lake City Reporter
Serving Columbia County
Since 1874
The Lake City Reporter is pub-
lished with pride for residents of
Columbia and surrounding counties by
Community Newspapers Inc.
We believe strong newspapers build
strong communities --Newspapers
get things done!"
Our primary goal is to
publish distinguished and profitable
community-oriented newspapers.
This mission will be accomplished
through the teamwork of professionals
dedicated to truth, integrity and hard
work.
Todd Wilson, publisher
Robert Bridges, editor
Sue Brannon, controller
Dink NeSmith, president
Tom Wood, chairman

LETTERS
POLICY
Letters to the Editor should be
typed or neatly written and double
spaced. Letters should not exceed
400 words and will be edited for
length and libel. Letters must be
signed and include the writer's name,
address and telephone number for
verification. Writers can have two
letters per month published. Letters
and guest columns are the opinion of
the writers and not necessarily that of
the Lake City Reporter.
BY MAIL: Letters, P.O. Box 1709,


Lake City, FL 32056; or drop off at
180 E. Duval St. downtown.
BY FAX: (386) 752-9400.
BY E-MAIL:
news@lakecityreporter.com


C oming onto the
budget-cutting radar
.screen on Capitol
Hill: the military
brass.
A Senate Armed
Services subcommittee zeroed
in on what some critics say has
become a top-heavy military,
where the number of generals
and admirals has ballooned in
recent years. *
At a Sept. 14 hearing,
Benjamin Freeman, the author
of a Project on Government
Oversight study, testified that
the number of general and flag
officers has risen from 871 to
964 in the last decade. In an all-
time high, the ratio of brass to
uniformed personnel grew to
seven officers for every 10,000
regular troops -l/2 times,.
higher than the ratio when the
Cold War ended, Freeman said.
Such "brass creep" is expen-
sive because the officers make
far more money and accrue
sweeter benefits than those in
lower ranks, he said.
The Air Force and the Navy
accounted for far more of the
officer inflation, with the Navy
coming "close to having more
admirals than ships for them to
command," Freeman said.
Former Defense Secretary
Robert Gates took note of the
proliferation and called for
cutting 103 general and flag
officers by 2014, and current
Pentagon chief Leon Panetta
wants to continue that course.
Whether that is enough to
satisfy Sens. Jim Webb, D-Va.,
and Lindsey Graham, R-S.C.,
who have spotlighted brass
creep, remains to be seen.


A 40-ton truck, going
70 mph, with a
driver distracted
by a cellphone.
It's a formula for
disaster, written many times
each year on America's road-
ways in the cellular age.
Federal statistics show that
"distracted" driving causes
around 5,500 highway deaths
and 448,000 injuries each year.
So it right seem like the
National Transportation Safety
Board (NTSB) was address-
ing the obvious when it issued
a call that all mobile-phone
use by commercial drivers be
banned except in emergencies.
The trigger was an Indiana
crash last year between a big
rig and a van that left the truck
driver and 10 occupants of
the van dead. Phone records
showed that the truck driver
had called or texted from his
"hands-free" phone 69 times in
the 24 hours before the wreck,
including one placed within
the minute the truck drifted
off the highway.
The NTSB can only make


Lisa Hoffman
lisohoffmon@shns.com



We can thank the recession
for one thing: The number of
homicides in U.S. workplaces
fell last year to the lowest total
ever recorded.
According to the Bureau
of Labor Statistics, about 500
Americans were shot, stabbed
or otherwise killed at work in
2010 a drop of 7 percent from
the year before.
The U.S. Labor Department
cites the continuing moribund
economy and high unemploy-
ment as major factors for the
homicide drop and a generally
unchanged overall fatality count
of 4,547 workers last year com-
pared to 4,551 in 2009. Fewer
people working means, in most
categories, fewer deaths;
That wasn't the case, howev-
er, for those in law enforcement.
Deaths of police officers jumped
40 percent to 134 last year from
96 the previous year. Of the 134,
57 died in highway incidents
and 48 in homicides, accord-
ing to the BLS' annual National
Census of Fatal Occupational
Injuries.
But in many of the job catego-
ries hardest hit by the reces-
sion, fatal injuries dropped. In
the private construction sector,
for instance, fatalities declined


recommendations to fed-
eral and state safety agencies.
The Federal Motor Carrier
Safety Administration, which
oversees federally licensed
commercial drivers, along
with many states, has already
imposed a ban on texting
while driving. Studies show
that texting increases the risk
of an accident 23-fold, but it's
not clear whether the "no cell"
call will be adopted by anyone
soon.
Some critics question
whether a ban on all phones is
practical troopers rarely go
after car drivers they see using
a phone, let alone truckers 8
feet up.
And there's uncertainty
whether singling out all cell-
phones for commercial drivers
goes far enough or too far.
Any given truck cab can be
decked out with a satellite nav-
igation system, CB and com-
mercial radios, laptops, iPads,
DVD players and mini-TVs as
well as cellphones.
There are many documented
cases of crashes that involved


10 percent last year from the
year before.
* *

Federal employees effectively
will be barred from accepting
any gifts, including those worth
less than $50, from registered
lobbyists if a proposed new
Office of Government Ethics
rule is approved.
Employees would also be for-
bidden from free attendance at .
social events, movie screenings
or "widely attended gatherings"
such as gala celebrations as the
guests of lobbyists or lobbying
organizations.
Essentially, the proposal
expands President Barack
Obaina's 2009 executive order,
which banned such freebies to
political appointees, to all career
civil servants.
But bureaucrats would still
be able to have lunch with
journalists when it's on a news
organization's dime, as well
as be a guest at "press din-
ners" such at the White House
Correspondents Association's
annual dinner extravaganza.
This permission would be
granted because such interac-
tions between journalists and
government officials "foster
relationships that further the
news-gathering functions of the
(news) organizations," accord-
ing to the 18-page proposed
regulations.
The public is invited to com-
ment on the draft rule, which
was published in the Federal
Register on Sept. 13, through
Nov. 14.
* Lisa Hoffman writes for Scripps
Howard News Service


drivers while operating CB
radios or GPS devices, or even
changing an FM channel. Yet
CBs are specifically exempted
from the proposed ban. Why?
One answer lies in the "smart-
ness" of today's mobiles.
Almost all models allow for
texting and a growing share
facilitate browsing and the
playing of videos. Then, too,
the old "breaker 1-9" radio has
range limits that tend to keep
drivers' minds on the road,
while those using cellphones
can chat with anyone any-
where about anything.
Truckers and cops know
that being able to report
drunks and accidents and
washed-out bridges on the
CB have saved many lives
over the years. Many profes-
sional drivers would argue
that fatigue and boredom
unalleviated by some types of
electronics on long runs pres-
ents a hazard on the road,
too. Regulators need to find a
safe median.

* Scripps Howard News Service


Todd Wilson
twilson@lakecityreportercom


Good

luck,


Jeremy


clock is on for one
of the most excit-
ing Eagle Scout
projects in Lake
City history. Jeremy Barwick,
a 15-year-old Life Scout, goes
for a Guinness World Record
on Saturday at the Columbia
County Fairgrounds.
Barwick's goal is to set
a new world record for col-
lecting canned food during a
24-hour period. He needs to
collect 600,000 pounds of food
or more during the 24 hours to
set the new record.
During the past several
months, Barwick may have
come close to setting the
record for appearing in public
in a Scout uniform. He has
worked every angle to bring
his cause childhood hunger
- to the public's attention.
Through these food dona-
tions, his Eagle Scout project
will bring relief to hundreds of
families and make a positive
difference in the lives of thou-
sands of children.
He has made friends
among all local media out-
lets and reached out to the
public through these print,
broadcast and social media
contacts. He has visited with
nearly every civic organiza-
tion in the county and he has
reached out to the commu-
nity for support.
Barwick has gained support,
as of last week, from as far
south as Ocala. He's expecting
a semi tractor trailer of food
delivered to the fairgrounds
from a Marion County civic
organization on Saturday. That
will be added to the tons of
food he will collect from local
organizations.
There have been thousands
of dollars raised and donated
to his project that will translate
into donated food and assist
with the total.
Every canned good or
non-perishable food item will
help struggling families in
the local counties served by
the Food Bank of Suwannee
Valley. This local organization,
a part of the Catholic charities
organization, works to supply
food pantries at churches and
non-profit assistance organiza-
tions in Columbia, Suwannee,
Hamilton and Lafayette coun-
ties.
Barwick's Eagle project has
been a worthwhile endeavor.
He has defied the teenager ste-
reotype and reminds us all that
it's our responsibility to help
others who are less fortunate.
He reminds us how reward-
ing it is to be passionate about
a.cause in which we believe.
We've all learned something
from Barwick's Eagle Scout
Project food drive. He has set
a worthwhile example for all
of us.
Now, it's time to pay him
back for his effort and deliver
as many canned goods as pos-
sible to the Columbia County
Fairgrounds next Saturday.
The World Record period goes
from 8 a.m. Saturday to 8 a.m.
Sunday. Let's all rally and help
this young man achieve his
goal.
Jeremy Barwick has our
respect and our thanks for
setting a worthwhile goal
and working toward it. He
deserves a collective pat on
the back. Without question,
he is a champion of our com-
munity.

* Todd Wilson is publisher of the
Lake City Reporter.


4A


Brass creep ... Fewer going


postal.... No free lunch


Ban cell phone use

by commercial drivers?









LAKE CITY REPORTER NATIONAL SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 18, 2011 5A



Friends: Stunt pilot in Reno crash



was skilled airman who loved to fly


By MARTIN GRIFFITH a
SCOTT SONNER
Associated Press
RENO, Nev. Frie
an air racer and movii
pilot whose plane ci
into the edge of the
stand at a show sa
74-year-old was a skill
man and member of a
knit flying community
Pilot Jimmy Leew
Ocala, Fla., died in
the crash Friday
after apparently
losing control of
the P-51 Mustang,
which spiraled into
a box seat area
at the National
Championship Air
Races at about
4:30 p.m. Friday.
Leeward and at leas
others were killed; d
were injured.
Family members w
the air show and sa
crash, said Reno Air
President and CEO
Houghton.
'They obviously ar
statedd" he said. "I
to Jimmy's son and h
wanted me to knom
Jimmy would not wan
cancel the races but
times you have to do
that are not very popi
Leeward's pilot's
cal records were
date, and he was "a
qualified, very experi
pilot," Houghton said
been racing at the sh
Reno since 1975.
"Everybody knows
It's a tight-knit fa


By MARTHA IRVINE
AP National Writer
CHICAGO The young
people in the ad look dis-
satisfied and pouty. Barack
Obama's voice and the words
"winning the future," from one
of his old campaign speeches,
echo in the background.
"You're LOSING myfuture,"
says one young man.
The ad, which has aired
during sportscasts, reality TV
shows and ,late-night com-
edy programs popular with
younger people, was produced
for the College Republican
National Committee. It is an
attempt to play on the fears
that haunt college students,
that they won't find jobs and
will be living with less than


mnd


ends of
e stunt
crashed
grand-
id the
led. air-
a tight-
y.
ard of


Houghton said. "He's been
here for a long, long time."
Leeward gave an inter-
view at the air show
Thursday with Live Airshow
TV, standing in front of his
plane "The Galloping Ghost"
and saying he didn't want to
show his hand on how fast
the plane could go.
"We've been playing poker
since last Monday. And ...


their parents did.
Their fears aren't exclusive
to their generation. But given
that it seems to taken hold in
a voting bloc that helped elect
Obama with a wave of hope
and change, there could be
an -opening for Republicans,
unless the president can find a
way to get young people fired
up again.
"People are taking out
$100,000 in debt and they're
graduating next year," says
Nick Haschka, a 25-year-old
MBA student at Northwestern
University.
Haschka voted for Obama
in 2008 and remains a strong
supporter. "I think he's doing
the best he can in these cir-
cumstances," he says.


Ra(
on

pag
"Jir
now
live
As
spr
pos
dol
Sc


'He was more than a
competent pilot. He was
really quite a guy.'

Steve Silver, friend


it's ready, we're ready to (
st two show a couple more cards, enc
dozens so we'll see on Friday what he
happens, and on Saturday the
vere at we'll probably go ahead and "
iw the play our third ace, and on was
Races Sunday we'll do our fourth cal
Mike ace," Leeward said in the saie
interview. N
re dev- Leeward owned the Ala
talked Leeward Air Ranch Racing the
is wife Team and was a well-known was
v that racing pilot. His website she
it us to says he had flown more whi
some- than 120 races and served dom
things as a stunt pilot for numerous his
ular." movies, including "Amelia" hin
medi- and "Cloud Dancer." "
up-to- The vintage plane raced not
a very in the "Unlimited" category, "He
ienced where the planes race wing- and
. He'd tip-to-wingtip at speeds in con
low in excess of 500 mph. I
"How fast will she go? hac
s him. Hold on tight, you'll find and
imily," out soon enough. Reno Air Lee


ces 2011 ..." said a teaser
Leeward's website.
. post on his Facebook
ge Friday afternoon said
mmy is starting up right
w" and posted a link to
video of the airshow.
news of Leeward's death
read, Facebook users
sted comments and con-
ences on the post.
;teve Silver, 69, was
Leeward's next-door
neighbor at a gated
community in Ocala,
Fla.
"He's been my
friend for many
years," Silver said.
"He was more than
a competent pilot.
He was really quite a
guy."
Given Leeward's experi-
:e with flying, Silver said
doubts pilot error was
cause of the crash.
It would be my bet there
s some kind of mechani-
malfunction," Silver
d.
Maureen Higgins, of
bama, said Leeward was
best pilot she knew. She
s at the air show and said
could see his profile
ile the plane was going
wn. He was married and
wife often traveled with
n.
He's a wonderful pilot,
a risk taker," she said.
e was in the third lap
I all of a sudden he lost
Ltrol."
Leeward and his wife
d two adult sons, Dirk
d Kent, according to
ward's website.


He knows others have been
less patient.
That's been confirmed by
recent polls, which show that
young voters' support for
the president is waning. It's
true even on campuses like
Northwestern, one of many
where Obamamania began to
take hold four years ago, when
young voters supported the
president by a 2-1 margin.
"I don't really think he
can make a difference
now," says Charlotte Frei, a
24-year-old doctoral student at
Northwestern who's studying
transportation engineering.
She voted for the president in
2008 and will probably do so
again, though she's not very
enthusiastic about it


~l ~


.1


. ; 1."


"I' .. ..
A55UCIAIlD PIt!
A P-51 Mustang airplane is shown right before crashing at the Reno Air show on Friday, Sept.
16, 2011 in Reno Nevada. The plane plunged into the stands at the event in what an official
described as a "mass casualty situation,"



NOTICE OF BUDGET HEARING

The Town of White Springs, Florida has tentatively

adopted a budget for the fiscal year ending

September 30, 2012. A public hearing to make a

FINAL DECISION on the budget AND TAXES will

be held on Thursday, September 22, 2011

at 5:30 p.m., at the White Springs Town Hall,

10363 Bridge Street, White Springs, Florida



BUDGET SUMMARY

TOWN OF WHITE SPRINGS
Fiscal Year 2011-2012
The proposed operating budget expenditures of the Town of White Springs are 0.68% more than
last year's operating expenditures.


GENERAL ENTERPRISE
FUND FUND TOTAL


ESTIMATED REVENUES
Ad valorem taxes, 4.1865 mills
Local option gas taxes
Franchise and utility taxes
Licenses and permits
Intergovernmental grants and shared
revenues
Charges for services
Fines and forfeitures
Interest and other
Total revenues
Beginning cash
Total estimated revenues and balances

APPROPRIATIONS AND RESERVES
Appropriations:
General governmental services
Public safety
Sewer services
Water and solid waste services
Transportation
Health and welfare
Recreation
Debt service
Total appropriations
Reserves
Total appropriations and reserves


$ 67,000 $
36,000
94,700
7,200


190,514


19,800


45,000


39,700 310,000
3,050


$ 67,000
36,000
,114,500
7,200

235,514
349,700
3,050


3,100 600 3,700
441,264 375,400 816,664


167,445
$ 608,709
,, , , , , ,


127,786
$ 503,186


295,231
$ 1,111,895


$ 122,563 $ 75,665 $ 198,228


198,283


62,558


67,850

451,254
157,455
$ 608,709


103,638
150,521


45,000.
375,324
127,862
$ 503,186


198,283
103,638
150,521
62,558


67,850
45,000
826,578
285,317
$ 1,111,895


THE TENTATIVE, ADOPTED, AND/OR FINAL BUDGETS ARE ON FILE IN THE OFFICE OF THE ABOVE
MENTIONED TAXING AUTHORITY AS A PUBLIC RECORD


GOP seizes on waning


campus Obamamania









6A LAKE CITY REPORTER NEWS SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 18, 2011


2


accused of real-life 'Weekend at Bernie's'


By STEVEN K. PAULSON
Associated Press
DENVER-Two men are
accused of driving around
Denver with a dead friend,
running up a bar tab on his
account and using his ATM
card at a strip club in what
appeared to be a disturb-
ing reflection of the movie
'Weekend at Bernie's."
Robert Young, 43, and
Mark Rubinson, 25, have
been charged with abusing
a corpse, identity theft and
criminal impersonation.
It's unclear how Jeffrey
Jarrett, 43, died, but the
men are not charged in his
death. The coroner said tox-
icology tests were pending.
Young and Rubinson are
free on bond but couldn't
be reached for comment
Friday.
In the 1989 Hollywood


comedy, two ne'er-do-wells
find their boss dead at his
ritzy beachfront home and
escort his body around
town, attempting to save the
weekend of luxury they had
planned.
In Denver last month,
according to a police affi-
davit that gives an account
of a story first reported by
the Denver Post (http://bit.
ly/nEgeF4), Young arrived
at Jarrett's home and found
him unresponsive.
But rather than call the
authorities, police say, Young
went to find Rubinson.
The duo returned to
Jarrett's home and put his
lifeless body into Rubinson's
SUV and headed to a night-
spot where they spent more
than an hour drinking -
leaving Jarrett's body in the
vehicle, according to police


documents. Police say the
two men used Jarrett's card
to pay for the drinks on
Aug. 27, noting "they did
not have Jarrett's consent."
Rubinson and Young then
drove to another restaurant
to hang out, Jarrett's body
slumped in the back along
for the ride, police say.
They then returned to
Jarrett's home, carried
him in and put him in bed,
according to court papers.
From there, police say,
Rubinson and Young went
to get gas and made a stop
at a burrito joint, again using
Jarrett's card. The two men
then went to a strip club,
where authorities say they
used Jarrett's card to take
out $400 from an ATM.
As the men left the
Shotgun Willie's strip club
parking lot, one told the


valet and a police officer
standing nearby that "they
were driving around with
a dead guy and they didn't
know what to do with it and
they were just going to go
home really fast," general
manager Matthew Dunafon
said.
Police went to Jarrett's
home and found the body.
Police say Young told
them Jarrett was obviously
dead while they were at the
first stop of the night.
The Denver District
Attorney's Office said
Young posted a $2,500 bond
and is scheduled to appear
in Denver County Court for
a preliminary hearing on
Sept. 27.
Rubinson posted a $3,500
bond and is scheduled to
appear in Denver County
Court on Oct. 4.


The main entrance to Shotgun Willie's Show Club is pictured '
Friday in Glendale, Colo., a Denver suburb. Robert Young and,
Mark Rubinson are accused of driving around with a dead
friend, Jeffrey Jarrett, using his ATM card and visiting Shotgun
Willie's and another bar in a less amusing real-life version of
the film "Weekend at Bernie's." Both are free on bond.


GM, UAW agree on new 4-year contract


By DEE-ANN DURBIN and
TOM KRISHER
AP Auto Writers
DETROIT General Motors
Co. and the United Auto Workers,
sobered by the government bail-
out and bankruptcy just two years
ago, agreed on a new four-year con-
tract without the public acrimony or
strikes that have plagued the talks
in the past
Details weren't released, but the
union said the deal reached late
Friday includes some of its major
goals, including improvements in
profit-sharing, promises of new jobs
and better health care benefits. The
deal will serve as a template for
contracts that still must be negoti-
ated with Chrysler Group LLC and
Ford Motor Co., setting the pay and
benefits for 112,500 U.S. auto work-
ers. It also will set the bar for pay
and benefits at nonunion auto com-
panies and other industries across
the country.
The talks are the first since GM
and Chrysler needed government
aid to make it through bankruptcy
protection in 2009.
"When GM was struggling, our
members shared in the sacrifice.
Now that the company is posting
profits again, our members want to


GM was the first of the Detroit
Three to reach agreement with the
UAW. Chrysler is likely to be next,
followed by Ford, where little prog-
ress has been made in negotiations
so far. The UAW announced the
GM agreement just after 11 p.m.


ASSOCIATED PRESS
An assemblyman works on the line building Chrysler 200 vehicles at the
Sterling Heights Assembly Plant in Sterling Heights, Mich. People briefed
on the matter said Chrysler, Ford, and the United Auto Workers remain
far apart in labor talks just a week before the current contract expires.
Another person says General Motors has been talking pay for about two
weeks and is closer to an agreement.


share in the success," UAW Vice
President Joe Ashton, the chief
negotiator with GM, said in a state-
ment
The deal likely will include sweet-
er profit-sharing checks instead of
raises for most of GM's 48,500 union
workers in the U.S. Also likely is a


raise for entry-level workers who
make $14 to $16 per hour, about half
the pay of a longtime auto worker.
It also will include creative ways to
cut GM's labor costs, which are still
higher than those at nonunion U.S.
plants owned by foreign competi-
tors.


monthly premiums.
Earlier this year, GM factory
workers got profit-sharing checks
that totaled around $4,000, and UAW
President Bob King has said they'll
have to be larger in a new contract
if the union gives up annual pay


EDT Friday, after a little more than raises.
seven weeks of closed-door bargain- GM workers reached early
ing. Saturday were happy a deal had
Workers must vote on the plan been reached but anxious about the
before it will take effect Union lead- details.
ers from factories around the coun- At a factory complex in Spring
try have been asked to come to Hill, Tenn., where GM used to make
Detroit Tuesday to learn the details Saturns, worker Todd Horton was
so they can explain them to mem- hoping the promise of new jobs
bers. A vote is expected within 10 would mean reopening the assem-
days. bly plant where he worked before
"We used a creative problem solv- GM closed it in 2009.
ing. approach to reach an agree- Bobbi Marsh, a team leader in
ment that addresses the needs of Lordstown, Ohio, near Cleveland,
employees and positions our busi- said it would be nice if she and other
ness for long-term success," said entry-level workers got a pay raise,
Cathy Clegg, GM's vice president of but she's more concerned about job
labor relations. security. Marsh was hired in 2008 to
The union said in a statement that help make the hot-selling Chevrolet
it successfully fought efforts by the., Cruze compact car. She's worried
company to weaken its defined-ben-..: that if -salessalow, she. could, get
efit pension plan, which is among bumped out of work by people with
the best in U.S. manuifacturinfg. The 'more seniority.
company also wanted health care "If they want to throw us a dollar
cuts, but the union protected those or two, rm very excited," she said:
benefits and made improvements, "I really just need to keep my job:
the statement said. But it did not say I can't even think past any of the
if workers will see higher co-pays or other issues."


EU countries divided on possible new finance tax


By DAVID McHUGH
Associated Press
WROCLAW, Poland -
European Union finance
ministers are debating a tax
on financial transactions
that could raise money for
the EU as well as make
banks share the burden of
bailouts, but strong resis-
tance means the idea is
scaling back from a global
tax to just a European one.
Discussions Saturday in
Wroclaw, Poland, showed
the ministers were far from
an agreement. Opponents
of the EU-only approach
warned that such a tax will
only work if imposed glob-
ally, because otherwise
banks will 'simply move
t ansactions to places with
.io tax.
"There isn't a consensus,"
said EU Internal Market
Commissioner Michel
Barnier. "There is no com-
mon position on this idea,
no agreement in the EU.
We are only starting the
debate."
Supporters say the tax,
which would take a tiny
slice of a large number of
financial dealings, could
help make banks repay
governments for some of
massive amounts spent bail-
ing them out during the
2007-2009 financial crisis,
and could also reduce the
disconcerting volatility on
financial markets since the
crisis.
The European
Commission will present a
proposal next month for a
tax. France and Germany
back the plan but Britain is
strongly opposed because
London is a large bank-
ing center. The U.S. also
against the idea, meaning


the EU will have to decide
if it wants to go it alone or
even shrink the proposal to
just the 17-nation eurozone.
There is also deep
debate over who would
get the money national
governments or the EU in
Brussels and any pro-
posal would have to get
past member states and
the European Parliament.
The Commission propos-
als assume the tax could
generate 30 billion ($41
billion) a year for the EU
budget, relieving contribu-
tions from its 27 member
states, while governments
such as Germany think the
money should head to their
coffers.
The Commission propos-
al will lay out a minimum
rate, with the revenue going
to Brussels while countries
could impose a higher rate
and keep the difference. It
is not clear, however, how
popular that will be when
many Europeans begrudge
Brussels for its lack of cost-
cutting in austere times.
Also undefined is what
possible transactions it
*could apply to: stocks, for-
eign exchange, and deriva-
tives are among the pos-
sibilities.
Germany's Finance
Minister Wolfgang
Schaeuble, a supporter of
the tax, said he was "not
so pessimistic" about over-
coming opposition.
"Ideas are beginning to
shift," he said.
Schaeuble said collecting
the revenue was not just
about making banks pay
but would also "decelerate
the irrational exaggeration
in the markets."
Belgian Finance Minister
Didier Reynders indi-


cated that supporters did
not make much headway
at the meeting but would
raise the issue again at
next week's meetings of
the International Monetary
Fund and the Group of 20
rich and developing coun-
tries in Washington, DC.
"We tried to put this on
the table yesterday and
today and it's more difficult,
I must confess," Reynders
said Saturday.
He said if a tax can't be
imposed in all 27 EU mem-
ber countries, then it could
be discussed for the 17 that
use the euro a group
doesn't include Britain.
"I am sure it's possible to
start it in the 17," Reynders
said.


ASSOCIATED PRESS


Eurogroup president Jean-
Claude Juncker, right, and:
German Finance Minister
Wolfgang Schaeuble
speak after a group
photo session during an
informal meeting of the
Economic and Financial
Affairs Council (ECOFIN)
in Wroclaw, Poland on
Friday. Rescue partners
will decide in October
on a crucial payout of
bailout loan money to
bankruptcy-threatened
Greece. Juncker and other
eurozone finance ministers
were discussing Europe's
financial crisis at an infor-
mal meeting in. Wroclaw.


OBITUARIES


Mae Deola Newton
Mae Deola Newton 89, of Lake
City, Fl.,' Passed away Septem-
ber 11,2011. She is survived
by her Cousins Bertha Watts,
Daphne Porter;
Nephew Lyn-
wood .Anderson;
Nieces- Mary
Nel _-on. Virgina
R .ilngn. Mar-
yLa I rner; I lost
of Grand Nieces;
God Son Der-
rick Eva; Special
Friend Kerry Hendrix.
Funeral Services Tuesday, Sep-
tember 20, 2011, 1 pm at Sun-
coast Cathedral Church. Visita-
tion Mon., Sept. 19th, 3-8pm
with Wake service 5-6pm at
LAWSON FUNERAL HOME
727 623-9025.

Monta Marie Poitevint
Monta Marie Poitevint, 70, died
on Saturday, September 17, 2011


at the Health Care Center of
Lake City. She was born in Cross
City, Florida, the daughter of the
late Outler & Ruby Yawn Poite-
vint. She had lived in Lake City
for most of her life and was a
faithful member of the First Full
Gospel Church of Lake City. She
worked with the Georgia School
system for 4 years, and com-
pleted Cosmetology College in
Georgia after which, she worked
for 25 years as a manager for
Sherwin-Williams Paint Store,
first in Ormond Beach, then in
Lake City where she retired. She
was a caring woman who en-
joyed fishing, reading, all kinds
of water sports and watching
Georgia Bulldog Football. She
was preceded in death by her
brother, Dallas Poitevint.
Survivors include her sons,
William David (Kathy) Lewis
of Lake City, FL and Stephen
Tristom Lewis of Tampa, FL;
brothers, Ben Poitevint & Edgar
Poitevint both of Branford, FL;1
sisters, Grace Poitevint of Cal-
lahan, FL and Betty Boston of


Lake City, FL; numerous nieces
and nephews also survive.
Funeral services will be con-
ducted Tuesday, September 20,
2011 at 11:00 a.m. at First Full
Gospel Church with Pastor Stan
Ellis and Pastor Cagney Tanner
officiating. Visitation with the
family will be held on Monday
evening, September 19, 2011
from 5:00 p.m. until 7:00 p.m. at
the funeral home. Gateway-For-
est Lawn Funeral Home, 3596
South U.S. Hwy 441, Lake City,
FL 32025, (386) 752-1954 is in
charge of arrangements. Please
sign our guestbook at www.gate-
wayforestlawn.com
Henry Claude Martinez,
Jr.
Henry Claude Martinez, Jr. 82
a resident of lake City, Florida
passed away September 16,
2011.
Mr. Martinez is the son of the late
I lenry Claude and Mary Martin
Martinez, Sr.. Mr. Martinez had
resided in Lake City, Florida for


the past forty years and was re-
tired from the U.S. Army in 1972
and was a veteran of the Korean
Conflict. He is preceded in death
by his wife Monique Jeanne
Martinez.
Survivors include two sonM:
Marty (Marilynn) Martinez,
Lake City, Fl. and Patrick Mar-
tinez, Orlando, Fl. One sister:
Loretta Kleban, Gary, Indiana.
Three grandchildren, Christo-
pher Martinez, Natalie Martinez
and Sydney Martinez all of Lake
City, Fl.
Private fimuneral services will be
conducted in the Florida Na-
tional Cemetery, Bushnell, Flor-
ida. Guerry Funeral Home 2659
SW. Main Blvd, Lake City is in
charge of arrangements.




Obituaries are paid advertise-
ments. For details, call the Lake
City Reporter's classified depart-
ment at 752-1293.









LAKE CITY REPORTER NATIONAL SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 18, 2011 7t




GOP candidates: Privitatize SS


By STEPHEN OHLEMACHER
Associated Press
WASHINGTON Most
of the top Republicans
running for president are
embracing plans to partially
privatize Social Security,
reviving a contentious
issue that fizzled under
President George W. Bush
after Democrats relentlessly
attacked it
As President Barack
Obama sidesteps ways to
keep the retirement system
viable, his would-be rivals
are keen on letting younger
workers divert part of their
payroll taxes into some type
of personal account to be
invested separately from
Social Security.
Former Massachusetts
Gov. Mitt Romney has a
version. Reps. Michele
Bachmann of Minnesota and
Ron Paul of Texas have said


younger workers should be
allowed to invest in alterna-
tive plans. Texas Gov. Rick
Perry has raised the idea of
letting whole groups, such
as state and local govern-
ment workers, opt o.ut of
Social Security.
These proposals are pop-'
ular among conservatives
who believe workers could
get a better return from
investing in publicly traded
securities. But most in the
Republican race have been
careful to say they would
fight to preserve traditional
Social Security for current
retirees and those approach-
ing retirement. Younger
workers, they say, should
have more options.
Romney says the stock
market collapse in 2008
shouldn't scare workers
away from investing in pri-
vate accounts, but acknowl-


edges it's an issue.
"Given the volatility of
investment values that we
have just experienced, I
would prefer that individu-
al accounts were added to
Social Security, not diverted
from it, and that they were
voluntary," Romney wrote
in his book, "No Apology."
Any kind privatization,
however, is sacrilegious for
liberals and many moder-
ates. They say it would drain
resources from the more
than 50 million people who
now receive benefits. Social
Security experts say raising
the privatization issue could
give Democrats a potent
political weapon.
"Any Republican who
pushes personal accounts
too hard will ensure
Obama's re-election," said
Kent Smetters, a business
and public policy profes-


sor at the University of
Pennsylvania's Wharton
business school. "That's bad
news for the Social Security
system because President
Obama refuses to take a
leadership position in deal-
ing with the nation's entitle-
ment overspending."
In 2005, Bush made a push
to give workers the option to
privately invest a portion of
their payroll taxes to pro-
vide a supplement to govern-
ment benefits. Republican
lawmakers were reluctant to
jump aboard as Democrats
argued that Bush was trying
to "end Social Security as we
know it."
"We'll fight that fight
anytime," said Rep. Sander
Levin of Michigan, the
top Democrat on the
House Ways and Means
Committee, which oversees
Social Security. "Bad policy


is usually terrible politics,
and that's terrible politics."
Perry has helped make
Social Security a leading
issue in the campaign by
writing in his book, "Fed
Up!" that the program is a
"Ponzi scheme" and a "fail-
ure."
Perry boasts that his.pro-
vocative language is forcing
the candidates to talk about
an important issue. "Other
candidates in this race were
content on continuing to
sweep it under the rug and
continuing the status quo,"
Perry spokesman Mark
Miner said.
Obama mostly has avoid-
ed the issue in the first three
years of his presidency,
arguing that Social Security
has not been a major con-
tributor to the nation's fiscal
problems. As a candidate
in 2008, Obama proposed


increasing payroll taxes on
high-income workers to help
shore up the system, but he
hasn't pushed the idea since
taking office.
All the top Republican
candidates have denounced
tax increases.
Despite Perry's rhetoric,
he hasn't released a com-
prehensive plan to address
Social Security's financial
problems. Perry says per-
sonal accounts "ought to be
on the table," along with
raising the retirement age.
Perry says state and local
governments should be able
to opt out of Social Security
and enroll workers in alter-
native retirement plans. As
an example, Perry talks
about a plan in Galveston,
Texas, that allows county
employees to invest a por-
tion of their income in annu-
ities and bonds.


Housing danger: Slump


a 2012 liability for Obama


By NANCY BENAC
Associated Press
WASHINGTON -
Barack Obama's road to re-
election is lined with lots of
boarded-up homes.
Though the high unem-
ployment rate dominates
talk in Washington, for
many 2012 voters the hous-
ing crisis may well be a
more powerful manifesta-
tion of a sick economy. And,
in an unfortunate twist for
Obama, the problem is at
its worst in many of the
battleground states that will
be decisive in determining
whether he gets another
term.
Swing states Florida,
Arizona, Nevada, Ohio and
Michigan they all pulse
red-hot on a foreclosure
rate "heat map." And by
themselves those five add
up to 80 of the 270 elec-
toral votes needed to win
the presidency,
Mortgage default notic-
es surged nationally last
month. One in every 118
homes in Nevada received a
foreclosure filing in August,
according to the foreclosure
listing firm RealtyTrac. One
a


in 248 in Arizona.' One in
349 in Michigan. One in 376
in Florida. And so on.
A foreclosure's impact is
visceral and outsized, rip-
pling far beyond one house-
hold.
"Entire neighborhoods
see what's going on," says
Bill Galston, a senior fellow
at the Brookings Institution
and a former Clinton admin-
istration official. "The vis-
ibility contributes to the
psychology of continued
economic troubles."
There's the in-your-face
eyesore sometimes created
by a vacant house next door
sprouting weeds on the
front lawn.
There's the downward
pressure on housing values
that can follow for everyone
else in the neighborhood.
There's the welling frus-
tration felt by neighboring
homeowners who may owe
more on their own mort-
gages than their homes are
worth.
Nearly a quarter of all
U.S. homeowners with
mortgages are now under-
water, representing nearly
11 million homes, accord-
ing to CoreLogic, a real


estate research firm.
Again, many of the states
with the highest under-
water mortgage rates also
are political battleground
states: In Nevada, 60 per-
cent of homeowners are
upside down, according to
CoreLogic. Arizona is at 49
I


ASSOCIATED PRESS


A foreclosure sign sits atop
a for sale sign in front of
a single-family home tops
the for sale sign in Denver.
Barack Obama's road to
re-election is lined with
lots of boarded-up homes.
While the high unemploy-
ment rate dominates talk
in Washington, for many
2012 voters the housing
crisis may well be a more
powerful manifestation of
the sick economy.


BUDGET SUMMARY

COLUMBIA COUNTY BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS

FISCAL YEAR 2011 2012


CASH BALANCE BROUGHT FORWARD

ESTIMATED REVENUES:
TAXES: Millage per $1,000
Ad Valorem Taxes 8.015
Non-Ad Valorem Assessments
Sales & Use Taxes
Intergovernmental Revenues
Charges for Services
Licenses & Permits
Fines & Forfeitures
Franchise Fees
Interest Earned/Other
TOTAL REVENUES
Less 5% of Estimated Revenue
Transfers in
Loan Proceeds
TOTAL ESTIMATED REVENUES
AND BALANCES

EXPENDITURES/EXPENSE
General Government
Public Safety
Physical Environment
Transportation
Economic Environment
Human Services
Culture/Recreation
Debt Service
TOTAL EXPENDITURES/EXPENSES
Transfers out
Reserves
TOTAL APPROPRIATED EXPENDITURES
AND RESERVES


GENERAL
FUND
$ 11,000,000


18,178,555

2,962,000
2,605,476
845,018


ENTERPRISE
FUNDS
$2,550.000


70,580
2,355,252


409,600


640,550
25,641,199
(1,282,059)


$ 35,359,140


$6,099,116
14,104,472
955,083

183,534
1,832,143
959,345


24,133.693
267,178
10,958,269

$ 35,359,140


65,000
2,490,832
(124,541)

300,000

$ 5,216,291


2,418,508


148,398
2,566,906

2.649,385

$ 5,216,291


SPECIAL
REVENUE/
CAPITAL PROJECTS
FUNDS
$ 21,425,000


6,620,000
5,795,000
13.035,938

279,000
159,500
90,000
392.870
26,372,308
(1,211,868)
267,178
3,770,000

$ 50,622,618


$738,613
3.051,814
3,626,200
20,988,989
4,371,631

796,702
1,492,541
35,066,490

15,556,128

$ 50,622,618


TOTAL
BUDGET
$ 34,975.000



18,178,555
6,620,000
8,757,000
15,711,994
3,200,270
279,000
569,100
90,000
1,098,420
54.504,339

(2,618,468)
267,178
4,070,000

$ 91,198,049


$ 6,837,729
17.156.286
6,999,791
20,988,989
4,555,165
1,832,143
1,756,047
1,640,939
61,767,089
267,178
29.163,782

$ 91,198,049


THE TENTATIVE ADOPTED AND/OR FINAL BUDGETS ARE ON FILE IN THE OFFICE OF THE ABOVE MENTIONED TAXING AUTHORITY AS A PUBLIC RECORD.


NOTICE OF BUDGET HEARING


The Columbia County Board of County Commissioners has


tentatively adopted a budget for the fiscal year ending


September 30, 2012. A Public hearing to make a FINAL -


DECISION on the budget AND TAXES will be held on Thursday,


September 22, 2011 at 7:00 p.m., at the Columbia County School


Board Auditorium, 372 West Duval Street, Lake City, Florida











8A LAKE CITY REPORTER WEATHER SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 18, 2011


THE WEATHER



sOlATD CHANCE ,- .CHANCE CHANCE CHANCEj
OWNERS I**OWERS STORMS STORMS 7 STORMS



1187 L 065i H. 87 LO. ..88. LO 88LO | Ii89
ssr 7. ^ .- a-c o> -,..6-.i.1 -.1 *'- .- -.t, ''. - . I a- --' - "z-" a', .rst




87/63 City Monday Tuesday
87/63 *Jlcisonlle Cape Canaveral 85/74/sh 85/73/sn

Ta LasCse e t*e 82/72 Daytona Beach 86/72/t 85/71/sh
87/66, 87/65 Ft. Lauderdale 89/79/t 89/79/sh
i"" inesv lle Daytona Beach Fort Myers 93/71/t 91/70/t
87/70 85/69City 86/66 85'75 Gainesville 87/67/sh 88/67/t
85/69 Ocala Jacksonville 84/71/t 85/70/t
87/68 Key West 89/81/t 89/80/t
O rand CaP85Caver Lake City 87/65/sh 88/66/t
87 8 Miami 88/80/t 88/80/sh
bu:Ie Naples 91/74/t 91/74/t
91/74: West Palm Beach Ocala 88/68/t 88/68/t
87/80 Orlando 89/72/t 90/72/t
Ft. LajuderaI Panama City 84/69/pc 83/68/pc
FLtMyesi 89/78 Pensacola 86/69/pc 87/69/pc
93/72 Naples Tallahassee 88/63/pc 89/64/pc
91/75 Miami Tampa 91/72/t 90/71/t
88/79 Valdosta 88/63/c 91/64/pc
Key West W. Palm Beach 87/78/t 87/78/sh
88/79


TEMPERATURES
High Saturday
Low Saturday
Normal high
Normal low
Record high
Record low

PRECIPITATION
Saturday
Month total
Year total
Normal month-to-date
Normal year-to-date


86
73
87
68
98 in 1893
57 in 1999


0.00"
1.11"
27.79"
2.79"
39.55"


7a Sundaylp 7p onday









S-Fr .ii *F/h IIsoI i -


SUN
Sunrise today
Sunset today
Sunrise tom.
Sunset tom.


7:17 a.m.
7:32 p.m.
7:17 a.m.
7:31 p.m.


MOON
Moonrise today *11:16 p.m.
Moonset today 12:44 p.m.
Moonrise tom.
Moonset tom. 1:37 p.m.



Sept. Sept. Oct. Oct.
20 27 3 11
Last New First Full


On this date in
1991, 2.4 inches of
snow fell at Duluth,
Minn., to set not
only a new record
daily snowfall, but
also a new record
total for September.
The previous
record snowfall for
September was 1.5
Inches, set back in
1908.


9

ISnimbleoun
Today's
ultra-violet
radiation risk
for the area on
a scale from 0
to 10+.


: P)


An exclusive
service

brought to
our readers
by
The Weather
Channel.




weather.com


Forecasts, data and
graphics 0 201.1 Weather
S Central, LP, Madison, Wl .
www.weatherpubllsher.com


GtConnected



'q- .12
IM Rt.W


g NATIONAL FORECAST: An area of scattered precipitation will be spread from the western
Gulf Coast, along the Mississippi River Valley and into the Upper Midwest and Great Lakes.
Expect scattered thunderstorms along the southern Mississippi Valley, with showers extend-
ing north of the Great Lakes.



I. . -


YESTERDAY'S NATIONAL EXTREMES High: 960,Alice, Texas Low: 230. Stanley. Idaho

Saturday Today Saturday Today Saturday Today


CITY Hl/Lo/Pcp.
Albany NY 62/42/0
Albuquerque 73/58/0
Anchorage 50/45/0
Atlanta 76/56/0
Baltimore 62/51/0
Billings 62/53/.05
Birmingham 79/60/0
Bismarck 54/50/0
Bolee 66/45/0
Boston 62/48/0
Buffalo 63/47/0
Charleston SC 72/59/0
Charleston WV 71/49/0
Charlotte 63/54/0
Cheyenne 66/46/0
Chicago 67/50/0
Cincinnati 71/51/0
Cleveland 65/52/0
Columbia SC 64/56/0
Dallas 87/68/0
Daytona' Beach 87/73/0
Denver 74/52/0


HI/Lo/W CITY
67/44/s Des Molnes
82/56/pc Detroit
52/42/sh El Paso
78/62/c Fairbanks
67/55/c Greensboro
74/48/pc Hartford
84/67/pc Honolulu
71/45/pc Houston
77/52/c Indianapolis
66/49/s Jackson MS
70/52/s Jacksonville
76/65/c Kansas City
75/55/pc Las Vegas
74/56/c Uttle Rock
73/48/s Los Angeles
73/63/pc Memphis
78/63/pc Miami
71/58/pc Minneapolis
76/57/c Mobile
92/72/t New Orleans
85/75/pc New York
78/50/s Oklahoma City


HI/Lo/Pcp.
57/51/0
65/54/0
84/67/0
48/40/0
59/54/0'
66/44/0
82/73/0
91/73/.01
69/53/0
84/58/0
77/65/.80
58/52/.29
84/72/0
75/55/.04
69/64/0
81/61/0
90/78/0
63/49/0
84/64/0
84/68/0
65/53/0
87/59/0


HI/Lo/W
69/51/sh
71/61/pc
90/67/s
56/37/c
71/54/pc
69/46/s
88/73k
89/74/t\
74/64/pc
87/68/c
82/72/pc
76/55/t
92/69/s
84/68/t
71/62/s
85/69/c
88/79/t
65/49/sh
86/71/pc
87/72/pc
69/53/s
90/65/t


CITY
Omaha
Orlando
Philadelphia
Phoenix
Pittsburgh
Portland ME
Portland OR
Raleigh
,Rapid City
Reno
Richmond
Sacramento
St. Louis
Salt Lake City
San Antonio
San Diego
San Francisco
Seattle
Spokane
Tampa
Tucson
Washington


HI/Lo/Pcp.
54/52/.02
90/73/0
66/53/0
92/77/0
65/49/0
65/37/0
57/53/.05
61/55/.23
67/46/0
65/47/0
61/57/0
75/53/0
67/57/.02
66/56/.01
88/75/0
66/62/0
63/52/0
57/52/0
56/42/0
91/76/0
83/66/0
63/56/0


HI/Lo/W
70/51/sh
89/73/pc
72/53/pc
103/78/s
71/51/pc
. 63/44/s
71/58/sh
72/54/pc
71/52/pc
82/51/s
72/54/pc
87/59/s
78/65/t
75/61/s
92/75/t
72/65/s
71/55/s
64/57/sh
70/49/pc
91/74/t
92/69/s
71/56/c


III
Saturday Today ~atumay rooay nasuraay


CITY
Acapulco
Amsterdam
Athens
Auckland
Beiing
Berlin
Buenos Alres
Cairo
Geneva
Havana
Helsinki
Hong Kong
Kingston


Saturday
HI/Lo/Pcp.
88/78/0
63/57/0
86/75/0
61/50/0
72/50/0
73/46/0
68/57/0
93/73/0
73/61/0
91/68/0
60/48/.05
* 95/82/0
86/77/0


Today
HI/Lo/W
86/78/t
61/50/sh
87/73/s
61/52/sh
71/53/pc
61/50/sh
66/44/pc
94/75/s
64/48/sh
86/72/t
61/50/pc
90/82/t
88/75/t


CITY
La Paz
ULma
London
Madrid
Meico City
Montreal
Moscow
Nairobi
Nassau
New Delhi
Oslo .
Panama
Paris


saturday
HI/Lo/Pep.
59/30/0
66/59/0
64/54/0
88/61/0
73/61/0
63/45/0
59/48/0
75/61/0
90/81/0
90/75/0
55/34/0
88/73/0
66/57/0


Today
HI/Lo/W
55/33/sh
63/58/pc
60/49/c
84/50/pc
73/51/t
68/48/s
59/43/c
78/62/pc
90/78/t
90/79/t
52/45/sh
86/75/t
61/54/sh


CITY
Rio
Rome
St. Thomas VI
San Juan PR
Santiago
Seoul
Singapore
Sydney
Tel Aviv
Tokyo
Toronto
Vienna
Warsaw


HI/Lo/Pcp.
78/66/0
84/59/0
85/75/.06
85/73/.27
66/37/0
86/66/.09
88/79/0
73/59/0
88/71/0
88/79/.11
61/46/0
72/50/0
64/37/0


HI/Lo/W
73/65/s
82/64/pc
88/79/t
84/78/t
71/41/s
76/65/sh
87. 18.1
73, 61,
89/74/s
89/76/c
66/52/s
72/48/sh
73/57/c


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Lake City Reporter


Story ideas?

Contact
Tim Kirby
Sports Editor
754-0421
tkirby@lakecityreportercom


SPORTS


Sunday, September


18,2011


www.lakecityreporter.com


Section B


BRIEFS
FOMT WHME FOOTBALL
Q-back Club
meeting Monday
The Fort White
Quarterback Club's
weekly meeting is 7 p.m.
Monday in the teacher's
lounge at the high
school.
For details, call
club president Shayne
Morgan at 397-4954.


Q-back Club
meets Monday
The Columbia County.
Quarterback Club meets
at 7 p.m. Monday in the
Jones Fieldhouse.
For details, call club
president Blake Lunde at
867-0296.


Breast Cancer
Awareness run
Cancer Care of North
Florida and Dr. Khan
have a 5K run/walk
planned for 8 a.m.
Oct 1 at Wilson Park
in downtown Lake City.
Entry fee is $25
($30 day of run,
6:30-7:30 a.m.
registration). Suwannee
River Breast Cancer
Awareness Association is
hosting the run.
For details, call
Shannon Thomas at
2884692 or Donnie
Feagle at (386) 365-1191,
or go to www.suwannee
awareness.com.
From staff reports

GAMES

Tuesday
Columbia High girls
golf vs. Buchholz High
at Quail Heights Country
Club, 4 p.m.
Columbia High boys
golf vs. Santa Fe High at
Meadowbrook Golf Club,
4 p.m.
Fort White High
cross country at Bradford
High, 5 p.m.
Columbia High
volleyball at Suwannee
High, 6 p.m. (JV-5)
Fort White High
volleyball at Santa Fe
High, 6 p.m. (JV-5)
Thursday
Columbia High boys
golf vs. Oak Hall School
at The Country Club at
Lake City, 2 p.m.
Columbia High girls
golf vs. Chiles High at
Quail Heights Country
Club, 3 p.m.
Fort White High
volleyball vs. Branford
High, 6 p.m. (JV-5)
Columbia High
volleyball vs. Stanton
Prep, 6:30 p.m. (JV-5:30)
Columbia High JV
football at Gainesville
High, 7 p.m.
Fort White High JV
football vs. Union County
High, 7 p.m.
Friday
Columbia High
football vs. Oakleaf High,
7:30 p.m.
Fort White High
football vs. Wakulla High,
7:30 p.m.
Fort White High
volleyball at Keystone
Heights tournament,
TBA
Saturday
Columbia High
swimming vs. Fernandina
Beach High, 9 a.m.
Fort White High
volleyball at Keystone
Heights tournament,
TBA
Fort White High cross
country in Mountain Dew
Invitational at University


of Florida, TBA I


Gators take


out Tennessee


Florida beats Volunteers,
33-23, for seventh
straight win in series.
By MARK LONG
Associated Press
GAINESVILLE Chris Rainey
slipped out of the backfield, caught
the ball in the middle of the field and
turned toward the end zone.
No one was around him. No one


was going to catch him, either. Not
this time.
Rainey had 233 total yards, includ-
ing an 83-yard touchdown catch, and
No. 16 Florida beat rival Tennessee
33-23 Saturday to extend two decades
of dominance in the Southeastern
Conference series.
Rainey finished with 108 yards
rushing, 104 yards receiving and
blocked a punt that led to a field
GATORS continued on 3B


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Florida State quarterback EJ Manuel (3) eludes Oklahoma defensive back Tony Jefferson (1)
on a first quarter run during a their game in Tallahassee on Saturday.


No.


Oklahoma holds off FSU, 23-13


Associated Press

TALLAHASSEE-Kenny
Stills reached high to grab
a 37-yard touchdown pass
from Landry Jones midway
through the fourth quarter
for the tiebreaking score,
and Oklahoma's defense
made the lead stand as the
top-ranked Sooners beat


No. 5 Florida State 23-13 on
Saturday night.
Javon Harris picked off
two passes for the Sooners
(2-0), who forced three
turnovers and harassed
both Florida State quarter-
backs all night.
The Seminoles (2-1)
played the final 20 min-
utes without starting quar-


terback EJ. Manuel, who
left in the third with a left
shoulder injury.
Backup Clint Trickett
kept the Seminoles in it.
He hooked up with fresh-
man Rashad Greene for a
56-yard touchdown on a
third-and-28 with 9:32 left in
the fourth quarter to tie the
game at 13.


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Fort White quarterback Andrew Baker (12) hands off to Soron Williams
(21) in a game against Newberry High on Sept. 9.

Bulldogs beat Indians

with 77-yard drive


FortWhite twice
comes back from
two-TD deficits.
By TIM KIRBY
tkirby@lakecityreporter. com
PERRY With Taylor County
High's Eli Grambling and Moral
Stephens playing pitch and catch,
it looked Like Fort White High
was out of Friday's game early.


The Indians hung tough,
including turning the passing
game against the Bulldogs, to
force a 28-28 tie with 2:49 left in
the game. Taylor County drove
77 yards for the winning score
and a 35-28 win.
The Bulldogs took the opening
kickoff and marched 64 yards
in 10 plays for a touchdown.
Grambling hit Stephens on a
INDIANS continued on 3B


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Florida wide receiver Deonte Thompson (6) reaches for a John Brantley
pass in the end zone after it sailed over the head of Tennessee defender
Marsalis Teague (10) at Ben Hill Griffin Stadium in Gainesville on Saturday.


Next for 'Noles


n a game that had
been anticipated
for more than nine
months by the
Seminole nation,
the biggest question that
remains is what's next?
It's said that if a team
wins, it will win the crowd.
Florida State did its part
last season in bringing
the crowd back to Doak
Campbell Stadium, as a
sellout crowd packed the
Tallahassee stands early
with a rowdy flair.
Florida State's offense
tried to play its way out
of the game early, but
the Seminole defense
showed its grit twice
in the first half to keep
Oklahoma from running
away. Instead of a game
that could have easily
been 21-3 at the half, the
Seminoles went into the
locker room down only
13-3, thanks in large part
to their stingy goal-line
defense.
FSU must learn to
perform in critical
situations. Too many
times Florida State had
a chance to turn the
momentum, but too many
times the Seminoles failed
to do just that.
To move to the next
level, Florida State must
capitalize on those kind
of situations. It can't give
a team the caliber of
Oklahoma easy chances.
EJ Manuel can't throw


FROM THE SIDELINE


!-

Brandon Finley
Phone: (386) 754-0420
bfinley@dakecityreporter.com

interceptions over the
middle of the field. He
can't turn the ball over in
the red zone.
Manuel doesn't have to
be spectacular on every
play. He just needs to
execute. The athletes that
the Seminoles possess
are good enough to make
plays after the catch.
Manuel just has to give
them a chance.
Even when Trickett
tied the game at 13-13, the
Seminoles defense was
burned in a critical
situation.
The good news is that
Florida State should be
favored in every game it
plays for the rest of the
year.
The only question
that remains is how the
Seminoles will respond.
E Brandon Finley covers
sports for the Lake City
Reporter.


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Columbia High's Ronald Timmons (23) is chased by Buchholz High's Ryan
Sheppard (33) while running down the field Friday.


Allen's message the

same after first win


Columbia offense
comes alive in Tigers'
30-14 win on Friday.
By BRANDON FINLEY
l.r ,l,.'/.a rw i -. I, r i.com)
Win or lose, Columbia High coach
Brian Allen's message has stayed
the same. If the players believe
in the' coaches, Allen believes the


Tigers will only continue to get
better.
The signs of getting better start-
ed to show in a 30-14 win against
Buchholz High on Friday.
Columbia's offense came alive for
the first time this season after being
shutout in an 0-2 start to the season.
There were touchdowns from 29
and 41 yards.
CHS continued on 3H'1,


1 too much











LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 18, 2011


Page Editor: Tim Kirby, 754-0421


SCOREBOARD


TELEVISION

TV sports

Today
AUTO RACING
2 p.m.
ESPN NASCAR, Sprint Cup, Geico
400. at Joliet. IlI.
8:30 p.m.
ESPN2 NHRA, O'Reilly Auto Parts
Nationals, at Concord, N.C. (same-day
tape)
GOLF
8 a.m.
TGC European PGA Tour, Seve
Trophy, final round, at Paris
Noon
TGC PGA Tour, BMW
Championship, final round, at Lemont, Ill.
2 p.m.
NBC PGA Tour, BMW
Championship, final round, at Lemont, III.
TGC LPGA, Navistar Classic, final
round, at Prattville,Ala.
7 p.m.
TGC NationwideTour, Boise Open,
final round, at Boise, Idaho (same-day
tape)
I a.m.
TGC Champions Tour, Songdo
Championship, final round, at Songdo,
South Korea
MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL
1:30 p.m.
TBS -Tampa Bay at Boston
2 p.m.
WGN Chicago White Sox at
Kansas City
8 p.m.
ESPN St. Louis at Philadelphia
MOTORSPORTS
8 a.m.
SPEED MotoGP World
Championship, at Alcaniz, Spain
4 p.m.
SPEED MotoGP Moto2, at Alcaniz,
Spain (same-day tape)
NFL FOOTBALL
I p.m.
CBS Regional coverage .
FOX Regional coverage
4 p.m.
FOX Regional coverage
4:15 p.m.
CBS Doubleheader game
8 p.m.
NBC Philadelphia at Atlanta
RODEO
8 p.m.
VERSUS PBR. PFIwestern.com
Invitational, at Springfield, Mo. (same-day
tape)
SOCCER
2 p.m. or 4:30 p.m.
FOX Premier League, Chelsea at
Manchester United (same-day tape)
VOLLEYBALL
3 p.m.
VERSUS Jose Cuervo Series, Miami
Beach Pro, at Miami Beach
WNBA BASKETBALL
3 p.m.
ESPN2 Playoffs, first round, game 2,
Connecticut at Atlanta
5 p.m.
ESPN2 Playoffs, first round, game 2,
Minnesota at San Antonio

Monday
MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL
7 p.m.
MLB-Teams TBA
NFL FOOTBALL
8:30 p.m.
ESPN St. Louis at N.Y. Giants
WNBA BASKETBALL
8 p.m.
ESPN2 Playoffs, first round, game 3,
New York at Indiana
10 p.m.
ESPN2 Playoffs, first round, game 3,
Phoenix at Seattle (if necessary)


BASEBALL

AL standings


New York
Boston
Tampa Bay
Toronto
Baltimore


x-Detrolt
Cleveland
Chicago
Kansas Ci
Minnesota


Texas '
Los Angel
Oakland
Seattle
x-clinched


East Division
W L
91 59
87 64
S 84 67
76 75
62 88
Central Division
W L
88 64
74 75
73 78
ty 67 86
S 59 91
West Division
W L
87 65
es 82 69
69 83
63 88
division


Pct GB
.579 -
.497 12%'
.483 14%'
.438 21%'
.393 28

Pct GB
.572 -
.543 4%
.454 18
.417 23%


Thursday's Games
Tampa Bay 9, Boston 2
Texas 7, Cleveland 4
Kansas City 7, Chicago White Sox 2
Oakland 6, Detroit I
Friday's Games
Baltimore 8, L.A.Angels 3
Toronto 5, N.Y.Yankees 4
Boston 4,Tampa Bay 3
Kansas City 7, Chicago White Sox 6
Cleveland 7, Minnesota 6
Detroit 3, Oakland I
Seattle 4,Texas 0
Saturday's Games
N.Y.Yankees 7,Toronto 6
Cleveland 10, Minnesota 4
Oakland 5, Detroit 3
Tampa Bay 4, Boston 3
Baltimore 6, L.A.Angels 2
Kansas City 10, Chicago White Sox 3
Texas 7, Seattle 6
Today's Games
N.Y.Yankees (FGarcia 11-7) atToronto
(Morrow 9-11 I), 1:07 p.m.
L.A.Angels (Weaver 17-7) at Baltimore
(Simon 4-8), 1:35 p.m.
Tampa Bay (Price 12-12) at Boston
(Wakefield 7-6), 1:35 p.m.
Chicago White Sox (Danks 6-12) at
Kansas City (Chen I 1-7), 2:10 p.m.
Cleveland (Masterson 11-10) at
Minnesota (Pavano 8-12), 2:10 p.m.
Detroit (Verlander 23-5) at Oakland
(Moscoso 8-8), 4:05 p.m.
Texas (M.Harrison 12-9) at Seattle
(FHernandez 14-12), 4:10 p.m.
Monday's Games
Baltimore at Boston (DH), 1:05 p.m.,
7: 10 p.m.


Minnesota at N.Y.Yankees, 1:05 p.m.
Seattle at Cleveland, 4:05 p.m.
L.A.Angels at Toronto, 7:07 p.m.

NL standings


x-Philadel
Atlanta
New York
Washingto
Florida


Milwaukee
St. Louis
Cincinnati
Pittsburgh
Chicago
Houston


Arizona
San Franc
Los Angel
Colorado
San Diego
x-clinched


East Division.
W L
phia 98 52
87 65
72 80
on 71 79
69 83
Central Division
W L
e 89 63
82 69
i 74 78
68 83
67 85
51 100
West Division
W L
87 64
isco 81 70
es 74 76
70 80
64 87
division


Pct GB
.586 -
.543 6%
.487 15
.450 20'h
.441 22
.338 37%h

Pct GB
.576 -
.536 6
.493 12'h
.467 16'%
.424 23


Thursday's Games
Washington 10,N.Y. Mets I
Philadelphia 3-2, Florida 1-2,.2nd game
10 Innings
Cincinnati 8. Chicago Cubs 6, II
innings
San Francisco 8, Colorado 5
Pittsburgh 6, LA. Dodgers 2
Friday's Games
Chicago Cubs 4, Houston 3, 12 innings
Florida 3,Washington 0
St. Louis 4, Philadelphia 2, 11 innings
Milwaukee 6, Cincinnati 3
N.Y. Mets 12,Atlanta 2
San Francisco 9, Colorado I
San Diego 2,Arizona 0
LA. Dodgers 7, Pittsburgh 2
Saturday's Games
Chicago Cubs 2, Houston I
Atlanta I, N.Y. Mets 0
Florida 4,Washington I, 13 innings
Philadelphia 9, St. Louis 2
Milwaukee 10, Cincinnati I
San Francisco at Colorado (n)
Arizona at San Diego (n)
Pittsburgh at LA. Dodgers (n)
Today's Games
Milwaukee (Greinke 14-6) at Cincinnati
(Willis 0:6), 1:10 p.m.
Florida (Hand 1-7) at Washington
(Wang 2-3). 1:35 p.m.
N.Y. Mets (Gee 12-6) at Atlanta
(Beachy 7-2). 1:35 p.m.
Houston (Myers 5-13) at Chicago
Cubs (Dempster 10-12), 2:20 p.m.
San Francisco (Cain 11-10) at
Colorado (Rogers 6-5). 3:10 p.m.
Arizona (J.Saunders 11-12) at San
Diego (Harang 13-6), 4:05 p.m.
Pittsburgh (Lincoln 1-2) at L.A.
Dodgers (Billingsley 10-10), 4:10 p.m.
St. Louis (C.Carpenter 9-9) at
Philadelphia (Hamels 14-8), 8:05 p.m.
Monday's Games
St. Louis at Philadelphia, 7:05 p.m.
Atlanta at Florida, 7:10 p.m.
Houston at Cincinnati, 710 p.m.
Milwaukee at Chicago Cubs, 8:05 p.m.
San Diego at Colorado, 8:40 p.m.
Pittsburgh at Arizona. 9:40 p.m.


FOOTBALL

NFL schedule

Today
Chicago at New Orleans, I p.m.
Baltimore atTennessee, I p.m.
Tampa Bay at Minnesota, I p.m.
Kansas City at Detroit, I p.m.
Jacksonville at N.Y.Jets, I p.m.
Oakland at Buffalo, I p.m.
Arizona atWashington, I p.m.
Seattle at Pittsburgh, I p.m.
Green Bay at Carolina, I p.m.
Cleveland at Indianapolis, I p.m.
Dallas at San Francisco, 4:05 p.m.
Cincinnati at Denver, 4:15 p.m.
Houston at Miami, 4:15 p.m.
San Diego at New England., 4:15 p.m.
Philadelphia at Atlanta, 8:20 p.m.
Monday
St. Louis at N.Y. Giants, 8:30 p.m.


BASKETBALL

WNBA playoffs

CONFERENCE SEMIFINALS
Eastern Conference
Indiana vs. New York
Indiana 74, New York 72
Saturday
New York 87, Indiana 72
Monday
New York at Indiana, 8 p.m.
Connecticut vs.Atlanta
Friday
Atlanta 89, Connecticut 84
Today
Connecticut at Atlanta, 3 p.m.
Western Conference
Minnesota vs. San Antonio
Friday



Un6cramble these four Jumbles,
one letter to each square,
to form four ordinary words.

ITHEWA


Minnesota 66, San Antonio 65
Today
Minnesota at San Antonio, 5 p.m.
Seattle vs. Phoenix
Seattle 80, Phoenix 61
Saturday
Seattle at Phoenix (n)

AUTO RACING

Race week

NASCAR
SPRINT CUP
GEICO 400
Site: Joliet, 111.
Schedule: Today, race, 2 p.m. (ESPN,
1-5:30 p.m.).
Track: Chicagoland Speedway (tri-oval,
1.5 miles).
Race distance: 400.5 miles, 267 laps.
INDYCAR
INDY JAPAN 300
Site: Motegi, Japan.
Schedule: Today, race, 12:05 a.m.
(Versus, Saturday, 11:30 p.m.-2 a.m.).
Track:Twin Ring Motegi (road course,
2.983 miles).
Race distance: 187.9 miles, 63 laps.
NHRA FULL THROTTLE
O'REILLY AUTO PARTS
NATIONALS
Site: Concord, N.C.
Schedule: Today, final
eliminations (ESPN2,8:30-11:30 p.m.).
Track: zMAX Dragway
OTHER RACES
AMERICAN LE MANS SERIES:
ModSpace American Le Mans Monterey,
Saturday (ESPN2, Today, 1-3 p.m.), Mazda
Raceway Laguna Seca, Monterey, Calif.

Geico 400 qualifying

Saturday qualifying; race today
(Car number in parentheses)
I. (17) Matt Kenseth, Ford, 183.243,
mph.
2. (27) Paul Menard, Chevrolet,
183.125.
3. (22) Kurt Busch, Dodge, 183.032.
4. (39) Ryan Newman, Chevrolet,
183.007.
5. (99) Carl Edwards, Ford, 182.914.
6. (2) Brad Kesetowski, Dodge.
182.859. '
7.(16) Greg Biffle, Ford, 182.648.
8. (83) BrianVickers, Toyota, 182.587.
9. (18) Kyle Busch,Toyoca, 182.34.
10. (20) Joey Logano,Toyota, 182.309.
II. (47) Bobby Labonte, Toyota,
182.223.
12. (48) JImmie Johnson. Chevrolet,
182.02.
13. (78) Regan Smith, Chevrolet.
181.879.
14. (I) Jamle McMurray, Chevrolet,
181.843.
15.(6) David Ragan. Ford, 181.641.
16.(42) Juan Pablo Montoya. Chevrolet,
181.5.
17. (9) Marcos Ambrose. Ford, 181.5.
18. (43) A J Allmendinger, Ford,
181.409.
19. (88) Dale Earnhardt Jr., Chevrolet.
181.305.
20. (56) Martin Truex Jr.. Toyota.
181.287.
21. (33) Clint Bowyer. Chevrolet.
181.269.
22. (31) Jeff Burton, Chevrolet,
181.269.
23. (24) Jeff Gordon, Chevrolet,
181.165.
S24. (4) Kasey Kahne.Toyota, 181.135.
25. (5) Mark Martin, Chevrolet.
181.074.
26. (14) Tony Stewart. Chevrolet.
181.038.
27. (II11) Denny Hamlin, Toyota,
180.729.
28. (21) Trevor Bayne, Ford. 180.638.
29. (00) David Reutimann. Toyota,
180.602.
30. (29) Kevin Harvick, Chevrolet,
180.524.
31. (51) Landon Cassill, Chevrolet,
180.162.
32. (38) J.J.Yeley, Ford, 180.12.
33. (66) Michael McDowell, Toyota,
180.06.
34. (30) David Stremme, Chevrolet.
180.054.
35. (46) Scott Speed, Ford, 180.
36. (87) Joe Nemechek. Toyota,
179.904.
37. (7) Robby Gordon, Dodge,
179.766.
38. (34) David Gilliland, Ford, 178.832.
39. (36) Dave Blaney, Chevrolet,
178.642.
40. (71) Andy Lally, Ford, owner
points.
41. (13) Casey Mears, Toyota, owner
points.
42. (32) MIke Bliss, Ford, owner
points.
43. (37) Josh Wise, Ford, 179.188.
Failed to Qualify
44. (55) Travis Kvapll, Ford, 179.164.
45. (95) David Starr, Ford, 178.725.
46. (35) Stephen Leicht, Chevyolet,
178.159.
47. (60) Mike Skinner, Chevrolet,
176.517.
THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME
by David L. Hoyt and Jeff Knurek


S TLUSESNV o A---
Now arrange the circled letters
to form the surprise answer, as
suggested by the above cartoon.

Print your answer here: -L I I
(Answers tomorrow)
Saturday's Jumbles: MORON CEASE MASCOT PHOTON
Answer: The young chefs had not mastered -
COMMON "SCENTS"


ASSOCIATED PRESS

Football begins with jamboree

Members of the Jaguars celebrate an interception against the Braves in the Lake City
Recreation Department's Little League Football Jamboree at Memorial Stadium on Saturday.





ACC gets applications


By AARON BEARD
Associated Press

The Atlantic Coast
Conference has received
application letters from
Pittsburgh and Syracuse
to join the league, a move
that would leave the Big
East scrambling to replace
two of its longest tenured
members.
Florida State President
Eric Barron told The
Associated Press on Saturday
before the Seminoles
played No. 1 Oklahoma
that the ACC was excit-
ed about adding to its
"northern tier."


"PittsburghandSyracuse,
who have applied, these are
solid academic schools, and
the ACC is a truly academic
conference," Barron said.
"Certainly great basketball
teams, a good history of
football.
"I'm sure consideration
will be very fast. I'll be sur-
prised if it's not tomorrow
(Sunday)."
He confirmed that 11 of
12 ACC presidents attended
a meeting in Greensboro,
N.C., on Tuesday the
other participated by
phone and unanimously
approved raising the exit
fee to $20 million up


from $12 million to $14
million for any member
leaving the conference.
"The great thing is that
the conference is strong
and committed to a unani-
mous commitment to
staying together," North
Carolina State Chancellor
Randy Woodson said. "And
to the extent that this is
kind of a dramatic shift in
conferences, we're trying
to be proactive and stay
strong."
The Big East's exit fee is
$5 million, though schools
wanting to leave must
provide a notice of 27
months.


Kenseth on Geico 400 pole


Associated Press


JOLIET, Ill. MIatt
Kenseth will open the
Chase for the Sprint Cup
championship on the pole
at Chicagoland Speedway.
Kenseth had the fast-
est qualifying lap Saturday
with a speed of 183.243
mph in his Roush Fenway
Racing Ford. It easily held
off Paul Menard, who
turned a lap at 183.125 in
a Richard Childress Racing


ACROSS
1 Hose down
4 Kind of
helmet
8 Stick up
11 Disturb
13 Go on foot
14 Notable
decade
15 Ms.
Kournikova
16 Zoo arrivals
(2 wds.)
18 Fake
20 Nave
neighbor
21 Tyrannosaurus

22 RV haven
24 It may be
rattled
27 Goober
30 Money drawer
31 Cousteau's
Islands
32 Robin's beak
34 Vocalist -
Sumac
35 Mighty - oak


Chevrolet, and Kurt Busch,
who qualified third at
183.032 in a Penske Racing
Dodge.
It's just the sixth pole
in 12 full seasons for
Kenseth and puts him in
position for a strong run
in the opening race of the
10-event Chase.

Keselowski wins
Nationwide

Brad Keselowski has won


36 Take cover
37 Threadbare
39 Fawned
40 All dads
41 Mdse.
42 Ryder Cup
sport
45 Staple,
perhaps
49 Dashboard
gauge
53 Well-ventilated
54 Narrow Inlet
55 Exam
56 Speak Irritably
57 Desk item
58 Rani's nurse
59 Dice throw

DOWN
1 Stole
2 Practically
forever
3 Fork part
4 Fragrant
perennial
5 Sundial
numeral
6 Bout ender


the Nationwide Series race
at Chicagoland Speedway
with a dominating run.
It's the third victory this
season for the defending
Nationwide champion.
It's also his first win since
returning to the series
three races ago. He sat
out three after he broke an
ankle in a crash while test-
ing at Road Atlanta.
Keselowski beat runner-
up Carl Edwards by 8.568
seconds Saturday.


Answer to Previous Puzzle


R IIPM BIAD M ESIA
F BIMAU TO AV ON
I SAG|REE TENT
S AB ER CAN


DWELL E'NAURORA
URE SPUN RISE

BANE EKED CHE
P YLONS ETHEL
ANN WKS
WATT RIATA
LORI MOONROCK
OREO GONG ERE
BEAN MPG DEN


7 Roost sitter
8 Do another
hitch (hyph.)
9 Poets' eyes
10 GI's home
12 Victor's
wreath


Want more puzzles?
Check out the "Just Right Crossword Puzzles" books
at QulllDrlverBooks.com


17 "Eraser" star
19 "-
Rosenkavalier"
22 Eager
23 W.
Hemisphere
alliance
24 Messy place
25 Draws a bead
on
26 Humdrum
27 Run the
stereo
28 College credit
29 Waterfront
event
31 Paperback ID
33 Motel
furnishing
35 Mr. Vigoda
36 Shade-lovers
38 Kind of radio
39 Insect killer
41 Singer -
Brooks
42 Trail mix
43 "Garfield"
pooch
44 Bank deal
46 "- That a
Shame"
47 Gullet
48 Injection
50 Depot Info
51 Speaker pro

52 Hockey's -
Tikkanen


2011 UFS, Dist. by Universal Uclick for UFS









LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 18, 2011


Miami beats Buckeyes


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lakd'City Reporter
Fort White High's Cameron White (32) attempts a tackle on Newberry High's Brandon .
Herbert (6) in a game on Sept. 9.

INDIANS: Fall a few plays short


Continued From Page L

25-yard play for the score.
After getting the ball back
on downs, Grambling hit
Stephens on a deep slant for
62 yards and a touchdown.
The Indians trailed 14-0 and
were forced to punt on their
next possession.
Fort White started to.turn
things around, beginning
with a defensive stop deep
in Taylor County territory.
Taylor County's punter
tried the rugby kick and
Terry Calloway showed he
also knew another sport.
Like a soccer goalkeeper,
Calloway made a diving
snag on the ball before it
could hit and bounce.
That set Fort White up
at the Bulldogs 35 and five
plays later Soron Williams
was in the end zone.
Nathan Escalante cut the
lead in half with his PAT.
Grambling then lobbed
a pass to Stephens who
hauled it in while Fort
White's defenders took
each other out diving for
the ball. The touchdown
play covered 47 yards.
After forcing another
punt, Taylor County tried
to convert a first down
from its 12 with another
Grambling-to-Stephen s
hookup. This time
Stephens was popped and
coughed up the ball.
AJ. Legree recovered at
the 10 and soon hauled in a
touchdown pass with 1:01
to play. The Indians were
back in it at 21-13
"We had some busted
assignments in the first
half," Indians head coach
Demetric Jackson said.
"We made some halftime
adjustments."
The adjustment included
shutting down Stephens in


the second half, and pick-
ing up the offense.
After an exchange of
punts, the Indians covered
71 yards in 12 plays for a
touchdown.
Baker threw to Trey
Phillips twice during the
drive for 25 yards. Williams
had runs of 16 and 18 yards
and Zach Cormier blasted
in the end zone from three
yards out Colton Jones'
PAT kick made it 21-20.
Calloway pounced on
Taylor County fumble on
the next possession, but
the Indians couldn't get
anything going.
Taylor County mounted
a 54-yard scoring drive for
a 28-20 lead with 10:51 left
in the game. Grambling
hit James Strawter for 30
yards to get the Bulldogs
close, then scored on a
quarterback keeper.
Fort White had to punt
again, but Legree got the
ball back with a leaping
interception. A' sideline
penalty cqst the Indians
15 yards and put the ball
back at their 26.
After another Fort
White punt, Taylor County
converted a third-and-8. A
holding penalty brought
on second-and-long and
the Bulldogs threw the
ball. The first throw was
incomplete, then they
did it again. Fort White's
Jomar Gainer broke in
on the pattern and inter-
cepted. He returned the
ball 31 yards to the Taylor
County 16.
Baker ran for 12 yards
and Williams did the
rest from four yards out.
Williams converted the
two-point run on a side-to-
side adventure and Fort


White had come all the
way back, 28-28, with 2:49
to play.
Taylor County drove
to the winning score.
Jonathan Dupree slowed
the Bulldogs down with a
sack, but Grambling had
two completions to Jalan
Jackson for 37 yards and
ran in the winning touch-
down with 27 seconds left
in the game.
"They made a few more
plays than we did," Jackson
said. "Right now, they have
got our number. They have
won three in a row."

Taylor Co. 14 7 0 14 35
FortWhite 0 13 7 8 28
First Quarter
TC-Stephens 25 pass from Grambling
(Wilder kick), 8:04
TC-Stephens 62 pass from Grambling
(Wilder kick), 3:37
Second Quarter
FW-S. Williams 4 run (Escalante
kick). 8:57
TC-Stephens 47 pass from Grambling
(Wilder kick). 5:47
FW-Legree 9 pass from Baker (kick
failed), 1:01
Third Quarter
FW-Cormier 3 run (Jones kick),
321
Fourth Quarter
FW-S. Williams 4 run (S. Williams
run), 2:49
TC-Grambling 2 run (Wilder kick).


First downs
Rushes-yards
Passing
Comp-Att-Int
Punts-Avg.
Fumbles-Lost
Penalties-Yards


Fort White
35-113
83
9-24-1
6-33
3-0
7-56


Taylor Co
14
39-158
234
13-20-2
2-31
3-2
9-55


INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS
RUSHING-Fort White, S. Williams
20-86, Baker 13-24, Cormier 2-3. Taylor
County. Grambling 19-71, Freeman 15-63,
Smyrnios 2-11 Strawter -8, Scott 2-5.
PASSING--FortWhite, Baker 9-24-83-
I.Taylor County, Grambling 13-20-234-2.
RECEIVING-Fort White, Legree
4-44, Phillips 3-28, Newman 2-11. Taylor
County, Stephens 5-138, Strawter 5-54.
Jackson 2-37. Smyrnios 1-5.


CHS: Tigers earn win over Buchholz


Continued From Page 11

Jayce Barber threw for
135 yards on 8-of-13 pass-
ing in .his first start.
'The seams were open
on each side in the sec-
ond half," Barber said.
"I should have thrown
it more in the first half,
but that's on me. It was
a team effort The wide
receivers caught the ball
and the line played amaz-
ing, especially in the sec-
ond half."
Rakeem Battle saw his
first action of the season
after nursing a high-ankle
sprain. He rushed for 67
yards on 10 carries.
The running game in (
general was better with P
the first push coming off
the offensive line for the
first time this season.
Braxton Stockton car-
ried the ball 17 times for
80 yards. Ronald Timmons
added another 20 yards in
limited carries.
Nigel Atkinson made
a seemless transition to
receiver and had a big
second-effort play to pick
up a first down on third
and long. A play later, he
hauled in a 23-yard recep-
tion to put the Tigers near
the goal line.
Still, Allen doesn't want
the Tigers too high after
the win just like he didn't


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Columbia High's Trey Marshall (21) and Solomon Bell (30)
pressure Jared Goar (9) of Buchholz High on Friday.


Want Columbia too low after
the losses. What the coach
wants is to iron out the
issues as Columbia begins
its quest for a district title
when it host Oak Leaf High
at 7:30 p.m. Friday.
'We're still running out
there a little wide eyed,"
Allen said. "We have to
believe in the system and
execute. We don't have to
wait to the third quarter to
turn on the light switch."
It was a 20-point quarter
for the Tigers, however,
and that showed signs of
life for the offense.
Barber started it off with


a 41-yard touchdown pass
to Nate Ayers. A drive later
and Barber hooked up
with Trey Marshall from
29-yards out. Battle closed
the quarter with a nine-
yard touchdown run.
And the defense con-
tinued with its consistent
play.
Solomon Bell had an
interception off a Dalvin
Kelly tip. Tyrone Sands had
a sack on the next drive and
Devontae Levy grabbed an
interception in the fourth
quarter as Columbia shut
out the Bobcats in the
second half.


By TIM REYNOLDS
Associated Press

MIAMI Lamar
Miller ran for' 188 yards,
Jacory Harris threw two
first-quarter touchdown
passes to Allen Hurns and
Miami avoided matching
its longest losing streak
in 33 years by topping
No. 17 Ohio State 24-6 on


Saturday night.
Ohio State quarterbacks
Joe Bauserman and Braxton
Miller combined to com-
plete 4 of 17 passes for only
36 yards. The Buckeyes
simply seemed to give up
on the game in the final
minutes, not even bother-
ing to try and stop the clock
despite having three time-
outs with Miami driving in


the final minutes with a 17-6
lead.
Mike James capped the
scoring with a 1-yard touch-
down run with 33 seconds
left.
Jordan Hall had 87
yards on 14 carries for the
Buckeyes, who are now in
danger now of falling out of
the AP Top 25 for the first
time in nearly seven years.


GATORS: Rainey has Harvin numbers


Continued From Page 11
goal. His touchdown pretty
much sealed it, allowing the
Gators (3-0, 1-0) to push
their winning streak in the
series to seven games.
"Rainey is a special ath-
lete," quarterback John
Brantley said. "He's really
grown up. He deserves all
this he's doing."
Florida has won 16 of 22
since the Eastern Division
teams started playing annu-
ally in 1990.
The Volunteers (2-1,
0-1) had hoped to snap the
streak with quarterback
Tyler Bray, but the game
ended with another Florida
celebration in the Swamp.
Rainey and a swarming
defense had a lot to do with
it.
Rainey proved again to
be the team's most valu-
able player. And he did it
with Florida legend and Pro



Thel

would I


Football Hall of Fame run-
ning back Emmitt Smith
roaming the sideline.
Rainey became the first
Florida player since Percy
Harvin in 2007 to have
100 yards rushing and 100
yards receiving in the same
game.
"He talks a lot, but he
doesn't complain- about
anything," Gators coach
Will Muschamp said. "He
works awful hard, he works
extremely hard. Playing
football, playing at Florida
is really important to him."
Rainey also returned
three punts for 21 yards,
giving him 563 all-
purpose yards through
three games.
Florida's defense has
been nearly as good. After
allowing just a field goal
in the first two games, the
unit was equally impres-


sive against the Volunteers
despite dropping five would-
be interceptions and getting
flagged for six pass interfer-
ence penalties.
After the fifth one, Bray
hooked up with tight end
Mychak Rivera for an
18-yard score that cut
Florida's lead to 33-23 with
4:46 remaining.
It could have been closer,
but Tennessee failed on a
2-point conversion in the
third quarter. Bray's final
pass was intercepted, end-
ing Tennessee's slim shot
at a comeback.
Bray completed 26 of 48
passes for 288 yards, with
three touchdowns and two
interceptions. He also was
sacked three times and hit
way more often.
Brantley completed 14 of
23 passes for 213 yards and
two touchdowns.


,ake City Reporter

like to congratulate


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on their September 6, 2011 ribbon cutting ceremony for their
new location at 484 S. W Commerce Dr, Lake City.


October is National Breast

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DEADLINE: WEDNESDAY, SEP r.26, 201

Lake CQtyRstM r 4


Page Editor: Tim Kirby, 754-0421







LAKE CITY REPORTER FOOTBALL SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 18, 2011


Clemson snaps Auburn's win streak


Associated Press

That porous defense finally
caught up to Auburn and the lon-
gest winning streak in the nation
no longer belongs to the defend-
ing national champions.
Led by Tajh Boyd, Clemson
didn't allow Auburn to play
one of those close games it has
become so good at winning. The
Tigers from the Atlantic Coast
Conference wiped out a big
deficit then pulled away from the
Tigers from the Southeastern
Conference in the fourth quarter
and won 38-24 Saturday.
Boyd threw for 386 yards and
four touchdowns.
Auburn took a 14-0 lead in the
first quarter before Boyd began
hitting his targets over the final
three periods. Clemson converted
10 straight third-down attempts
as it improved to 3-0 for the first
time since 2007.
Auburn may have a dynamic
offense, but its was last in SEC
defense coming in and it showed
at Death Valley. Clemson scored
on five of six possessions at one
point and gained .624 yards.
No. 7 Wisconsin 49,
Northern Illinois 7
CHICAGO Russell Wilson
threw for 347 yards and three
scores, Montee Ball rushed for
another two TDs and the Badgers
piled up more than 600 yards in
the game at Soldier Field.
Ball finished with 91 yards on
18 carries, James White added
100 yards and another score, and
Nick Toon had two TD catches
for the Badgers.,
No. 10 South Carolina 24,
Navy 21
COLUMBIA, S.C. Marcus
Lattimore ran for a career-high
246 yards and three touchdowns
to help No: 10 South Carolina
hang on for a victory over Navy.
. Lattimore carried 37 times and
averaged 6.6 yards a carry.
The Midshipmen ran their
option efficiently, rushing for 274
yards split among seven players.
After Lattimore was stopped
for a loss for the first time in the
game on a fourth down, Navy got


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Clemson's Sammy Watkins (left) slips a tackle from Auburn's T'Sharvan Bell during the third quarter of their
game in Clemson, S.C., on Saturday.


the ball at its 6-yard line wit
left. But Antonio Allen pick
a fourth down pass with a r
to go to seal the Gamecock
No. 11 Nebraska 51,
Washington 38
LINCOLN, Neb. -
Martinez threw for two
downs and ran for a third t
the Cornhuskers.
Martinez looked to hai
away the Huskies with his
TD run, but Keith Price
52 yards to James Johnso
his fourth TD toss to mal
13-point game with 4:27 left
Washington's Chris Pol
for 130 yards. Nebraska'


th 5:34
:ed off
minute


Burkhead had 120 yards rushing.
Price was 21 of 37 for 274 yards.


s win. No. 12 Oregon 56,
Missouri State 7
EUGENE, Ore. LaMichael
James ran for 204 yards and three
Taylor touchdowns, including a 90-yard-
touch- er, and the Ducks cruised.
to lead James' 90-yard dash was
Oregon's longest run since 1938.
ve put He also had a 1-yard TD in the
6-yard first quarter and a 50-yarder in
passed the third.
on for Darron Thomas threw for 206
ke it a yards and three touchdowns for
t. the Ducks. Lavasier Tuinei caught
lk ran scoring passes of 8 and 34 yards,
s Rex and Oregon sat most of its start-


ers early in the second half.
No. 13 Virginia Tech 26,
Arkansas State 7
BLACKSBURG, Va. Logan
Thomas threw for 292 yards and
two touchdowns for the Hokies,
who are 3-0 for the first time since
2006.
Thomas hit DJ. Coles with a
short pass that Coles took 49
yards for a touchdown and found
Danny Coale from 4 yards out.
Thomas was 21 for 33'and also
threw two interceptions.
Arkansas State came in aver-
aging 480 yards but managed
little after a 51-yard pass on
its first offensive play set up its


only scoring drive.
Notre Dame 31,
No. 15 Michigan State 13
SOUTH BEND, Ind. Cierre
Wood ran for two touchdowns,
freshman George Atkinson III
returned a kickoff 89 yards for a
score and Robert Blanton had a
late interception for the Irish.
Michigan State's Kirk Cousins
was 34 of 53 for 329 yards with one
TD and one interception. Tommy
Rees was 187 of 26 for 161 yards
with a TD and an interception.
No. 18 West Virginia 37,
Maryland 31
COLLEGE PARK, Md. Geno
Smith threw for a career-high
388 yards, and the Mountaineers
withstood a furious comeback.
After WVU let a 24-point lead
dwindle to .34-31 with 10:29
remaining, Smith directed a
14-play, 65-yard drive that pro-
duced a field goal with 4:42 left.
No. 23 Texas 49, UCLA 20
PASADENA, Calif. Case
McCoy passed for 168 yards and
two touchdowns, D.J. Grant made
his first three career TD catches,
and the Longhorns avenged last
season's stunning home loss to
the Bruins.
Malcolm Brown rushed for 110
yards and a score, and Fozzy
Whittaker ran for two more touch-
downs for the Longhorns. McCoy
went 12 for 15 without a turnover
in his first career start.
No. 23 TCU 38,
Louisiana-Monroe 17
FORT WORTH, Texas Greg
McCoy returned the second-half
kickoff 94 yards for a touchdown
for the Horned Frogs.
Three plays after McCoy's
sprint up the right sideline in front
of the Louisiana-Monroe bench,
the Warhawks gave the ball back
when Jyruss Edwards fumbled
after a hit from Stansly Maponga.
DJ. Yendrey recovered at the 28,
setting up Matthew Tucker's sec-
ond TD run, a 1-yarder for a 35-17
lead less than 5 minutes into the
second half.


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Page Editor: Tim Kirby, 754-0421












Story ideas?

Contact
Robert Bridges
Editor
754-0428
't ,, j? ,, ,: ,r ,:I ', '',, I,,'


Lake City Reporter





BUSINESS


Sunday, September 18, 2011


www.lakecityreporter.com


Section C


Howl-O-Ween and more at PetSmart

By ANTONIA ROBINSON
arobinson@lakecityreporter.com
PetSmart is officially open for busi-
ness in Lake City.
The new store opened Sept. 12
and had a grand opening celebration
Saturday, said Trevor Smith, store man-
ager.
Construction on the store began
March 14, according to PetSmart offi-
cials.
The store is located in NW Commons
Loop, next to Publix, and is 12,000
square feet.
"It's a little smaller than our typical
stores," he said. "It's a good size for this
area."
Previously the closest PetSmart was
in Jacksonville or Gainesville.
Customers have been enthusiastic
about having PetSmart in the area, he .
said.
"Anytime I walk out with my
PetSmart shirt they want to know what
things we have," Smith said. "It's been
great."
The store is dedicated to providing
pet needs for animals ranging from dogs
and cats to small reptiles, he said.
"We carry over 10,000 products to
help," Smith said.
The local PetSmart features dog
grooming and training services.
Training helps owners from returning
their pets to a shelter, he said. The store
looks at its training as a way of saving a
life and helping families keep their pets.
"Pet training is one of the best things
to get for a new dog," he said. "It fosters JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
a closer bond." PetSmart pet care specialist Jessie Dickens shows a male Guinea pig to William Reeder, 4, and 18-month-old Trinity Grant Friday. The store
Groomers in the store love to provide opened Monday and had its grand opening Saturday. 'I love PetSmart,' Dickens said. 'Having it here is very exciting. We needed a pet-friend-
the services needed to keep a pet look- ly store here. It gives me an opportunity to stay with the animals.'
ing its best, Smith said.


His passion is to teach pet owners
about proper nutrition for dogs or cats.
"We have more than 500 varieties of
food to offer," he said.
Currently there are 25 employees,


and the store is still looking for an expe-
rience pet stylist, Smith said.
The local store will feature seasonal
events such as the uplcoming Howl-O-


Ween Costume Party where pets can
model Halloween fashions.
It will also offer year-round choices to
save the life of a homeless pet and add


to the family through an in-store adop-
tion program.
"We're just really excited to be in
Lake City," he said.


Ala. county votes


to settle debt,


avoid bankruptcy


Associated Press
BIRMINGHAM, Ala. -
Leaders of Alabama's largest
county on Friday chose to
settle with Wall Street over
$3.1 billion in debt from a
sewer system overhaul rather
than go through with what
would have been the largest
municipal bankruptcy in U.S.
history.
Jefferson County
Commissioners agreed in
principle to the deal, but the
state legislature must take
action in a special session to
complete the deal and com-
missioners said bankruptcy
was still possible if that legis-
lation doesn't go through.
Commissioner Jimmie
Stephens, who oversees
county finances, said there
was no certainty legislators
would approve the mix of
local tax hikes and budget
changes required to make the
deal final. "Ifs a problem," he
said.
Jefferson County has been
trying to avoid filing bank-
ruptcy over the sewer system
debt since 2008. Its problems
stem from a mix of outdated
sewer pipes, the economy,
court rulings and public cor-
ruption.
The main effect of a settle-
ment for county residents
would be higher monthly bills
for sewer service. Jefferson
County has about 658,000
residents and is home to
both Alabama's largest city,
Birmingham, and its medical
and financial centers.
The sittllniinti proposal
with Wall Street investors led
by JPMorgan Chase & Co
includes the lenders agree-


The Jefferson County Commission announces their vote to
approve a term sheet to settle and refinance the county's
$3.14 billion debt, by a vote of 4-1, Friday in Birmingham, Ala.
The settlement would allow the county to avoid the largest
government bankruptcy in U.S. history.


ing to forgive about $1 billion
in debt, the county refinanc-
ing about $2 billion, and a
series of annual sewer rate
increases.
The Alabama constitution
gives state lawmakers a high
level of control over county
finances, so the legislature
will have to take several steps
to seal the debt deal. They
will need to approve forma-
tion of a public corporation
to take over the sewer sys-
tem from the county, agree
to fund the settlement if the
county comes up short and
pass legislation allowing the
county to reallocate money
already earmarked for other
uses and to somehow replace
lost revenues.
Itwas not immediately clear
if there is enough support
in the legislature. But Gov.
Robert B.nilry welcomed
di, deal and said he would


work with lawmakers and the
county so that the necessary
laws can be passed.
"It may have been easier
for the Commission to file for
bankruptcy, but this settle-
ment will result in a much bet-
ter deal for the ratepayers and
citizens of Jefferson County
and for the state, with more
than a billion dollars in debt
reduction for the county,"
Bentley said in a statement
A bankruptcy filing in this
case would have overshad-
owed the record one filed by
Orange County, Calif., in 1994
over debts hItaliiing $1.7 bil-
lion.
JPMorgan welcomed the
agreement. "We are encour-
aged by the county's decision
to refinance the sewer debt
and look forward to working
toward a successful resolu-
tion in the coming months," a
bank spokesman said.


NJ town praised


for renewal gets


rating downgrade


Associated Press
COLLINGSWOOD, NJ. -With
well-regarded restaurants, a walkable
main street dotted with yoga studios and
rail service that zips commuters to jobs
in downtown Philadelphia, this town of
14,000 is held high as a national model of
smart growth..
But Moody's Investors Service this
week said the town was unwise about
how it financed one of its highly praised
revitalization projects.
Moody's lowered the borough's bond
rating from investment grade to junk
status soimethling that has happened
to only a handful of the 18,000 public enti-
ties that the firm evaluates.
The downgrade is an admonishment
of the very approach that boosters say
made Collingswood indisputably one of
Philadelphia's hippest suburbs. It could
also be a warning to other towns: Be
careful how you pay for renewal.
"I don't think any of us would be here
if the current administration hadn't done
some really cool stuff," said Beth Filla, a

A large clock is seen in front
of an old school in downtown
Collingswood, N.J., Thursday.
As part of Collingswood's
redevelopment, the town
bought the vacant downtown
school and leases it to an
architecture firm and other
businesses, bringing 100
more office workers to the
community. Collingswood's
redevelopment approach
has won it praise far beyond
the people who live in its
quaint Victorians, shop at its
Saturday farmers market or
eat in its chic restaurants.


Collingswood native, homeowner, owner
of the Yogawood yoga studio, and the
wife of the town library director,
To be sure, there are people who have
long thought that city officials, including
Mayor James Maley, are overstepping
the bounds of what local government
should do. But there haven't been
enough of them to keep Maley from
being re-elected since 1997.
When Filla was a student at
Collingswood High School in the mid-
1980s, she thought of her community as
"working class to the lower end of the
middle class." By the time she moved
back in 2000, her hometown was starting
to look like a new place.
Maley, a lawyer specializing in redevel-
opment, became a borough councilman
in 1989 and mayor in 1997.
In his early days in office, he said busi-
nesses didn't want to come to town. They
would tell him the' same thing: "You're
too close to Camden," the neighboring
city that is among the most impoverished
and crime-ridden places in the nation.










2C LAKE CITY REPORTER BUSINESS & HOME SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 18, 2011


Are Bonds or CDs
Good for Kids?
Q Are savings bonds or CDs
good investments for kids? -
C.G., Bloomington, Ind.
AIt depends. Less volatile
investments such as savings
bonds or CDs can seem "safer,"
offering a modest return. But with
many CDs and bonds yielding
close to nothing, money in them
will likely lose purchasing power
over time just due to inflation.
In the long run, stocks
have generally outperformed
bonds and CDs. We can't know
how the stock market will fare
in the next months or years,
but the longer you leave your
money in healthy and growing
companies, the more likely
you'll be to do well.
With stocks, it's best to invest
only money you won't need for at
least five years (or 10, to be more
conservative). If your child is 15,
you might not want to put college
money in stocks. But if she's 6,
think about it.
Perhaps start with an index
fund, such as one based on the
S&P 500. You might also invest
in the stock of a few companies
that your children know and like,
and then follow them together.
, Learn more at www.treasury-
direct.gov, www.sec.gov/answers/
indexf.htm, and www.fooLcom.

Q Should I pay off my,
college loans as soon h
as possible, or stick to the long-
term repayment schedule and start
investing in stocks a little? J.S.,
Lake Charles, La.
It all boils down to inter-
est rates. If you're paying
6 percent on your loans, but you
expect to earn 9 percent annually
on your investments, then you'll
likely earn more than you pay
out, if you pay on schedule.
If your debt is costing you
much more than you expect to
earn, pay it off pronto.

Got a question for the Fool? Send it in
- see Write to Us


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(EDITORS: For editorial questions, contact Alan McDermott at amcdermott@amuniversal.com.)


Family Finance: Revisiting


financial advice of old


Associated Press
NEW YORK As hard times
grind on, many Americans are taking
a fresh look at the money lessons they
learned from their families. But while
some of the personal finance advice
from prior generations holds up, some
no longer applies and sometimes it
wasn't on target to begin with.
Even an adage as seemingly sound
as "Watch your pennies and your dol-
lars will take care of themselves" can
be called into question these days.
A modern twist of this advice has
made buying a daily latte the post-
er child for financial frivolity. That
makes perfect sense to Mark Boyer,
'CEO of Foundation Financial Group
in Jacksonville, Fla.
"It's all about the four bucks here,
and the 10 bucks there," he said, add-
ing that not only does he make his
own coffee at home, he also packs his
lunch.
Boyer looks at it as simple math: If
buying lunch each day costs $7, over
*a year that adds up to about $1,800 of
post-tax earnings. Someone earning
$30,000 a year can give themselves
an 8 percent raise by packing their
lunch, he said.
But not everyone's on board.
Author Ramit Sethi, who blogs about
personal finances at www.iwillteachy-
outoberich.com, thinks telling people
they can't have their daily half-caf-
extra-foam fix can derail the good
intentions that inspire the advice.
"When the first thing you hear is
what you can't do," he said, it makes
you dislike thinking about money.
Furthermore, he believes that focus-
ing on small numbers takes energy
away from bigger ones, like the impact
of maintaining a good credit rating.
"Excellent credit versus poor credit
can make a $100,000 difference" on a
home purchase, he said.
Who's right?
Both, in a sense, said Jason
Alderman, director of financial educa-
tion for Visa Inc..
"It's totally fine to buy your latte,
if you've budgeted for your latte,"
Alderman said. The problem for many
with such spending habits is, the pros-


A file photo shows a foreclosed home on Pine Island in Lee County, Fla. It's not
just that the housing market caved in, proving that houses can depreciate as well
as gain in value. For many potential buyers, the costs associated with a home are
higher than they realize.


pect of being restricted by a budget
is unpleasant, so most don't make
one. That would likely mean there's
no designated amount set aside for
eating out, "mad money" or whatev-
er other category a daily indulgence
might fall into. "If you're spending
$700 a year, and you have no idea
where that money is coming from,
you've got a problem."
Before you pass some of these
financial nuggets on to your kids, con-
sider whether they ring true:


-"Buying a home is always a
good investment."
Given the state of the housing mar-
ket, many would immediately question
this assertion. It's not just that many
markets saw housing prices cave in,
proving that homes can depreciate
as well as gain value. But for many
potential buyers, the costs associated
with a home are also higher than they
realize.


Sethi calls them the phantom
expenses, such as the closing costs
and fees associated with signing a
mortgage, filling lots of new rooms
with furniture, and taking care of a
backyard. What's more, Sethi said,
buying a home can limit mobility,
especially for younger buyers, which
.may in turn limit job prospects and
earnings potential. "For many, it's
not the best financial decision," he
stated.
But that doesn't negate the fact
that owning a home is the primary
goal for many, and is still likely to be
the biggest purchase most Americans
ever make. The issues that should be
considered are how long you plan to
stay and what kind of mortgage you
get, said Darryl Dahlheime;r, program
director for LSS Financial Counseling
Service, a credit counselor based in
Minneapolis.
"A home is the best investment for
a long term purchase, if you don't plan
to move," he said. "And you have a
fixed-interest-rate mortgage."


Recalls this week:

lawn tractors,

blenders, brakes


Associated Press
Models of lawn tractors
with various problems
with their gas lines,
brakes, and blades are
among the consumer
product recalls this week.
Others include blenders,
dehumidifiers, and bicycle
trailers for children.
Here's a look at the
details:

BLENDERS
DETAILS: Chefmate 6-speed
blenders manufactured in China
by Select Brands of Lenexa,
Kan., for Target Corp. and sold
nationwide at Target stores from
September 2007 to February
2011.
WHY: The plastic pitcher can
separate from the blade assem-
bly leaving the rotating blades
exposed, posing a laceration
hazard.
INCIDENTS: There have
been 11 reports of the pitcher
separating from blades. Seven
resulted in serious lacerations to
fingers and hands.
HOW MANY: 304,000
FOR MORE: Call 800-440-
0680; visit www.target.com.

BICYCLE PEDAL
TRAILERS
DETAILS: Weehoo iGo Bicycle
Pedal Trailers manufactured by
Weehoo Inc. of Golden, Colo.,
and sold at bicycle retail stores
nationwide between April and
July 2011. The trailer has a
steel frame with an adjustable
seat. The seat, pannier pock-
ets, and flag are made of red,
heavy-duty nylon. They were
manufactured in Taiwan.
WHY: The receiver on the trail-
er's seat post hitch can crack
and cause the trailer to detach,
posing fall and crash hazards to
the child in the seat.


Chefmate 6-speed blend-
ers sold at Target stores
from September 2007
through February 2011 can
pose a laceration hazard
when the pitcher separates
from the rotating blades.


INCIDENTS: There has been
one report of the trailer's receiv-
er cracking while in use. No
injuries have been reported.
HOW MANY: About 2,700
FOR MORE: Call 800-538-
6950; visit www.weehoobicyde-
trailer.com.

JOHN DEERE LAWN
TRACTORS-BRAKES
DETAILS: D100 Lawn tractors
manufactured by Deere & Co.
of Moline, Ill., and sold at John
Deere.dealers, Lowe's, and
Home Depot stores nationwide,
except California, from October
2010 through September 2011.
WHY: Hardware used to hold
the brake assembly to the trans-
mission housing can break. This
can cause the brakes to fail.
INCIDENTS: No injuries have
been reported.
HOW MANY: About 5,200
FOR MORE: Call 800-537-
8233; visit www.johndeere.
com.


=-I."xn1













LAKE CITY REPORTER BUSINESS SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 18, 2011 3C


THE WEEK IN REVIEW THE WEEK IN REVIEW THE WEEK IN REVIEW THE WEEK IN REVIEW THE WEEK IN REVIEW




The Week in Review


Weekly Stock Exchange Highlights STOCKS OF LOCAL INTEREST


NYSE A Amex A Nasdaq
7,348.18 +303.17 2,237.86 +31.41 2,622.31 +154.32


Gainers ($2 or more) Gainers ($2 or more) Gainers ($2 or more)
Name Last Chg %Chg Name Last Chg %Chg Name Last Chg %Chg
Marcus 11.25 +3.02 +36.7 ChinNEPet 2.67 +.62 +30.2 TransceptP 5.65 +2.93 +107.7
iSoftStnn 10.76 +2.86 +36.2 NewConcEn 2.48 +.56 +29.2 Globlind 7.85 +2.70 +52.4
ExcelM 2.48 +.60 +31.9 Procerars 9.02 +1.71 +23.4 NetLogicM 48.33+16.42 +51.5
DrxSOXBII 33.35 +7.79 +30.5 NHItcre 37.87 +6.83 +22.0 Fundtch 23.18 +6.99 +43.2
ChKanghui 24.80 +5.74 +30.1 NthnO&G 22.93 +3.19 +16.2 EastlVaBk 3.08 +.79 +34.5
Comericwt 5.80 +1.31 +29.2 VistaGold 4.27 +.57 +15.4 Lightbrdge 3.12 +.75 +31.6
JoumalCm 3.90 +.81 +26.2 WstCoppg 3.32 +43 +14.9 Vermillion 3.01 +.69 +29,7
NeoPhoton 7.86 +1.59 +25.4 Quepasa 4.81 +.61 +14.5 IORn 19.24 +4.20 +27.9
PNCwt 10.14 +2.04 +25.2 Walterinv 25.70 +3.15 +14.0 Bluefly 2.30 +.50 +27.8
Textron 18.63 +3.37 +22.1 Arrhythm 4.10 +.50 +13.9 PadcraPh n 10.56 +2.23 +26.8


Losers ($2 or more)
Name Last Chg %Chg
DSOXBrrs 63.37-21.13 -25.0
DrxTcBear 19.69 -4.48 -18.5
CSVS2xVxS55.51-12.32 -18.2
C-TrCVOL 49.58-10.77 -17.8
PrUShtSm rs51.77-10.83 -17.3
iPSXR1K 42.35 -8.62 -16.9
SilvrcpMg 7.02 -1.41 -16.7
DrSCBrrs 40.64 -8.02 -16.5
PrUPShR2K20.11 -3.92 -16.3
DirFnBrrs 53.39 -9.96 -15.7

Most Active ($1 or more)
Name Vol (00) Last Chg
S&P500ETF13013340121.52+6.23
BkofAm 11565988 7.23 +.25
GenElec 4937187 16.33+1.39
SPDR Fncl4910263 12.91 +.73
iShR2K 3591532 71.52.+4.02
iShEMkts 3186602 40.53 +.52
SprintNex 2793918 3.36 -.09
DrxFnBull 2631249 14.09 +2.00
FordM 2619884 10.62 +.57
Pfizer 2478853 18.15 -.13

Diary
Advanced 2,399
Declined 759
New Highs 77
New Lows 315
Total issues 3,193
unchanged 35
Volume 21,522,266,008


Losers ($2 or more)
Name Last Chg %Chg
Geokinetics 3.21 -.97 -23.2
Aerocntry 8.95 -2.10 -19.0
SED Intl 3.75 -.81 -17.8
LoncorRsg 2.12 -.34 -13.8
GoldStrg 2.26 -.29 -11.4
XPO Log rs 9.97 -1.28 -11.4
OrientPap 2.66 -.34 -11.3
NovaGldg 8.13 -1.03 -11.2
ComstkMn 2.74 -.31 -10.2
SeabGld g 26.73 -2.74 -9.3

Most Active ($1 or more)
Name Vol (00) Last Chg
NthgtMg 276334 3.75 -.25
NwGoldg 244909 13.62 -.28
GoldStrg 200797 2.26 -.29
NovaGldg 200453 8.13-1.03
VantageDri 174238 1.35 -.04
VistaGold 154103 4.27 +.57
CFCdag 149695 25.61 +.49
GrtBasGg 139531 2.26 -.02
ParaG&S 127332 2.71 +.33
CheniereEn109639 7.33 +.32

Diary
Advanced 277
Declined 239
New Highs 6
New Lows 47
Total issues 533
Unchanged 17
Volume 469,626,248


Losers ($2 or more)
Name Last Chg %Chg
AutoChnlf 10.01-13.87 -58.1
Zogenix n 2.00 -.88 -30.6
PerfectWld 14.18 -4.58 -24.4
Netflix 155.19-48.78 -23.9
LMLPay 2.25 -.60 -21.1
illow n 29.19 -7.74 -21.0
RschMotn 23.93 -5.75 -19.4
57StGenun 4.40 -1.05 -19.3
ChinaNGas 2.07 -.48 -18.8
KIpsBMd n 2.50 -.57 -18.6

Most Active ($1 or more)
Name Vol (00) Last Chgi
SiriusXM 4145794, 1.83 +.12
PwShs QQQ372535756.59+3.52
Cisco 3077134 16.62 +.80
Intel 2973714 21.97 +2.27
Microsoft 2959909 27.12+1.38
MicronT 2786169 7.03 +.68
Yahoo 1975508 14.97 +.49
RschMotn 1888047 23.93 -5.75
Oracle 1808889 29.23+3.23
NewsCpA 1615713 16.96+1.03


Wkly Wkly YTD
Name Ex Div Last Chg%Chg %Chg
AT&T Inc NY 1.72 28.94 +1.40 +5.1 -1.5
AlcatelLuc NY ... 3.23 +.12 +3.9 +9.1
AutoZone NY ... 331.25+16.76 +5.3 +21.5
BkofAm NY .04 7.23 +.25 +3.6 -45.8
BariPVixrsNY ... 41.55 -4.28 -9.3 +10.5
BobEvans Nasd 1.00 29.70 +1.49 +5.3 -9.9
CNBFnPANasd .66 13.50 +.80 +6.3 -8.8
CSX s NY .48 21.43 +1.85 +9.4 -.5
Chevron NY 3.12 99.63 +4.44 +4.7 +9.2
Cisco Nasd .24 16.62 +.80 +5.1 -17.8
Citigrprs NY .04 28.99 +2.25 +8.4 -38.7
CocaCola NY. 1.88 71.23 +2.33 +3.4 +5.3
Delhaize NY 2.45 60.99 -.45 -0.7 -17.3
DrSCBrrs NY ... 40.64 -8.02 -16.5 -13.2
DrxFnBull NY ... 14.09 +2.00 +16.5 -49.4
FamilyDIr NY .72 53.43 +3.33 +6.6 +7.5
FofdM NY ... 10.62 +.57 +5.7 -36.7
GenElec NY .60 16.33 +1.39 +9.3 -10.7
HomeDp NY 1.00 34.61 +2.74 +8.6 -1.3
iShEMkts NY .84 40.53 +.52 +1.3 -14.9
ISEafe NY 1.68 50.90 +2.15 +4.4 -12.6
iShR2K NY .94 71.52 +4.02 +6.0 -8.6
Intel Nasd .84 21.97 +2.27 +11.5 +4.5
JPMorgCh NY 1.00 33.43 +1.35 +4.2 -21.2
Lowes NY .56 20.38 +1.42 +7.5 -18.7
McDnlds NY 2.44 88.29 +3.26 +3.8 +15.0
MicronT Nasd ... 7.03 +.68 +10.7 -12.3
Microsoft Nasd .64 27.12 +1.38 +5,4 -2.8


Name Ex DIv


NY Times NY
NewsCpA Nasd .19
NextEraEnNY 2.20
NobilityH Nasd ...
Nvidla Nasd ...
OcciPet NY 1.84
Orade Nasd .24
Penney NY .80
PepsiCo NY 2.06
Plizer NY .80
Potash s NY .28
PwShs QQQNasd .41
PrUShS&PNY
RegionsFnoNY .04
RschMotn Nasd ,...
Ryder NY 1.16'
S&P500ETFNY 2.46
SearsHIdgsNasd ..
SriusXM Nasd ...
SouthnCo NY 1.89
SprintNex NY
SPDR FndclNY .20
SP Inds NY .69
T1meWam NY .94
WalMart NY 1.46
WellsFargo NY ,48
YRC rsh Nasd
Yahoo Nasd ...


Wkly Wkly YTD
Last Chg %Cha %Chg


7.25 +.07 +1.0 -26.0
16.96 +1.03 +6.5 +16.5
55.28 +1.68 +3.1 +6.3
7.31 -.29 -3.8 -9.9
15.46 +1.58 +11.4 +.4
83.32 +2.78 +3.5 -15.1
29.23 +3.23 +12.4 -6.6
28.00 +2.66 +10.5 -13.3
62.05 +2.06 +3.4 -5.0
18.15 -.13 -0.7 +3.7
56.08 -1.38 -2.4 +8.7
56.59 +3.52 +6.6 +3.9
22.37 -2.52 -10.1 -5.9
4.00 +.04 +1.0 -42.9
23.93 -5.75 -19.4 -58.8
45.33 +2.58 +6.0 -13.9
121.52 +6.23 +5,4 -3,4
61.07 +7.50 +14.0 -17.2
1.83 +.12 +6.7 +12.3
42.59 +1.85 +4.5 +11.4
3.36 -.09 -2.6 -20.6
12.91 +.73 +6.0 -19.1
31.97 +1,97 +6.6 -8.3
30.96 +2.07 +7.2 -3.8
52.65 +1.29 +2.5 -2.4
24.95 +1.43 +6.1 -19.5
.0' -.41 -85.4 -98.1
14.97 +.49 +3.4 -10.0


Stock Footnotes: g a Dividends and earnings In Canadian dollars., h Does not meat continued-lsting standards.
If = Late fling with SEC. n a New In past 62 weeks. pf Preferred. r Stock has undergone a reverse stock split
of at least 50 percent within the past year. rt = Right to buy security at a specified price. s = Stock has split by at
least 20 percent within the last year. un a Units. vj = In bankruptcy or receivership. wd = When distributed, wl =
When Issued. wt-= Warrants.
Mutual Fund Footnotes: b = Fee covering market costs Isepaid from fund assets. d = Deferred sales charge, or
redemption oee. f a front load (sales charges), ma Multiple fees are charged. NA not available, p a previous day's
net asset value. s = fund split shares during the week, x a fund paid a distribution during the weekatners and
Losers must be worth at least $2 to be listed in tables at left. Most Actives must be worth at least $1. Volume in
hundreds of shares. Source: The Associated Press. Sales figures are unofficial.


Money Rates
Last Pva Weekl


Prime Rate


3.25 3.25


Diary Discount Rate 0.75 0.75
DiarFederal Funds Rate .00-25 .00-25
Advanced 2,058 Treasuries
Declined 677 3-month 0.005 0.01
New Lows 337 6-month 0.02 0.04
Total issues 2,787 5-year 0.92 0.80
Unchanged 52 10-year 2.05 1.92
Volume 11,018,171,699 30-year 3.32 3.25


CA-.onservat Alcallon C-Intermrediae-Tenn Bond, ES -Europe Stock FB -Foreign Large Blend, FG ore LageGrow1, F-Foreign
Large value, IH -Word A LkBaon La 4.aBge Gen, row, LV- Targe Value, MA4-Mdeate Afcastn, MB t, MV.
M-Cap value, SH -Spedany-hea, WS 1 .-Wod Stodd Total e : Ch wi iesed. Rarn How perma .vs
hers with same objece: A is in top 20%, E in bottom 20%. M t InIrt it m$ needed to nest in ftu. Source: Momingstr.


Wkly YTD Wkly
Name DIv YId PE Chg %Chg Last
AESCorp .... ... 13 +.73 -9.2 11.06
AFLAC 1.20 3.3 8 +2.50 -35.6 36.33
AK Steel .20 2.4 ... +.26 -48.2 8.48
AMR ... ... ... +.19 -54.6 3.54
AT&T Inc 1.72 5.9 9 +1.40 -1.5 28.94
AbtLab 1.92 3.7 13 +1.74 +8.9 52.17
Accenture .90 1.6 17 +5.20 +13.5 55.02
AMD ... ... 7 +.68 -12.0 7.20
Aetna .60 1.4 9 +3.53 +36.1 41.53
Agilent ... ... 14 +3.00 -12.2 36.36
AlcatelLuc ..... .. +.12 +9.1 3.23
Alcoa .12 1.0 13 +39 -22.2 11.97
Allstate .84 3.4 24 +.13 -21.8 24.94
AlphaNRs ... ... 73 -1.04 -50.4 29.77
Altria 1.64 6.1 17 +.94 +9.3 26.90
AMovilLs .41 1.7 11 +.83 -15.5 24.22
AEagleOut .44 3.8 14 +.76 -21.7 11.46
AEP 1.84 4.9 13 +.72 +4.3 37.52
AmExp .72 1.4 13 +2.84 +16.8 50.12
AmIntlGrp ... ...... +2.08 -47.3 25.44
AmTower ... ... 57 +2.52 +6.3 54.90
Anadarko .36 .5 45 +4.98 -1.8 74.77
AnalogDev1.00 2.9 12 +2.49 -8.1 34.60
Annaly 2.59 14.4 6 +.12 +.1 17.93
Apache .60 .6 10 +3.08 -176 98.20
ArcelorMit .75 4.1 9 +.74 -55 18.50
ArchCoal .44 2.2 14 +.39 -43.2 19.91
ArchDan .64 2.2 9 +1.51 -4.9 28.62
ATMOS 1.36 4.1 15 +.43 +7.4 33.50
Avon .92 4.2 13 +1.00 -24.0 22.10
BB&TCp .64 2.8 17 +1.77 -13.8 22.67
BakrHu .60 1.0 19 +2.36 +3.5 59.15
BcoBrades .80 4.7 ... -.03 -15.4 17.16
BcoSantSA .82 10.0 ... +.31 -23.2 8.18
BcoSBrasil 1.65 18.3 ... +.12 -33.6 9.03
BkofAm .04 .6 +.25 -45.8 7.23
BkNYMel .52 2.5 10 +1.22 -30.0 21.14
Barclay .36 3.5 ... +1.29 -37.0 10.40
BariPVixrs ... ... ... -4.28 +10.5 41.55
BarrickG .48 .9 14 -.97 +.8 53.58
Baxter 1.24 2.2 15 +3.51 +12.0 56.67
BerkH B ... ...14 +3.78 -10.7 71.55
BestBuy .64 2.5 9 +.93 -25.8 25.43
Blackstone .40 2.9 78 +1.74 -1.4 13.95
BlockHR .60 4.2 12 +1.15 +18.6 14.13
Boeing 1.68 2.6 14 +3.59 +.2 65.38
BostonSci ... ... 17 +.33 -13.7 6.53
BrMySq 1.32 4.3 16 +1.37 +15.3 30.53
CB REIlis ... ... 20 +1.09 -26.1 15.14
CBSB .40 1.7 15 +2.06 +27.0 24.20
CIGNA .04 .1 8 +3.52 +26.6 46.40
CSXs .48 2.2 14 +1.85 -.5 21.43
CVSCare .50 1.4 15 -.28 +4.2 36.22
CbivsNYs .60 3.4 13 +1.87 -24.6 17.86
Cameron ... ... 23 +4.15 +3.4 52.43
CdnNRsgs .36 ... ... +.92 -20.8 35.18
CapOne .20 .5 6 +1.19 +1.0 42.97
CapitlSrce .04 @6 21 +.63 -3.2 6.87
CardnlHith .86 2.0 16 +2.94 +12.6 43.12
CarMax ... ... 17 +3.06 -7.8 29.38
Carnival 1.00 3.0 14 +2.84 -27.3 33.52
Caterpillar 1.84 2.1 14 +1.94 -8.3 85.90
Cemex ... ...... -.09 -52.8 4.86
CenterPnt .79 4.0 16 +.41 +26.8 19.93
CntryUnk 2.90 8.3 13 +1.90 -24.3 34.97
ChesEng .35 1.1 11 +1.44 +22.8 31.82
Chevron 3.12 3.1 9 +4.44 +9.2 99.63
Chimera .62 20.7 5 +.16 -27.0 3.00
Citigrprs .04 .1 9 +2.25 -38.7 28.99
Coach .90 1.5 20 +5.85 +7.6 59.49
CocaCola 1.88 2.6 14 +2.33 +8.3 71.23
CocaCE .52 1.9 14 +1.98 +9.1 27.32
Comerica .40 1.6 13 +2.72 -41.0 24.93
ConAgra .92 3.8 13 +.13 +6.0 23.93
ConocPhil 2.64 3.9 9 +3.06 -1.2 67.29
ConsolEngy.40 .9 17 -.04 -11.6 43.08
ConEd 2.40 4.2 16 +2.30 +15.8 57.42
ConstellEn .96 2.5 19 +1.24 +27.7 39.12
Coming .20 1.4 7 +.36 -27.8 13.94



Wkly YT'D Wkly
Name Div Yld PE Chg %Chg Last


ASMLHId .58 1.6
AcmePkt ...
ActivsBliz .17 1.4
AdobeSy ...
AkamaiT
AlteraCp If .32 .8
Amazon
ACapAgy 5.60 19.0
AmCapLtd ...
Amgen 1.12 2.0
Apple Inc ...
ApidMatl .32 2.8
ArenaPhm ...
AriadP ... ...
ArmHId .15 .5
ArubaNet ...
Atmet
Autodesk ...
AutoData 1.44 2.8
AvagoTch .44 1.2
AvanirPhm ... ...
AvisBudg ...
Baidu
BedBath ...
Biogenldc ...
Broadcom .36 1.0
Broadwind ...
BrcdeCm ...
CA Inc .20 .9
Cadence ..
Celgene
CentEuro ...
Cephin
ChrmSh
CienaCorp ..
Cisco .24 1.4
CitrixSys
Clearwire


...+2.50 -4.5 36.60
69 +5.89 -3.2 51.48
22 +.72 -2.4 12.14
14 +.88 -17.1 25.52
23 +1.95 -51.7 22.72
14 +3.63 +7.5 38.24
...+27.91 +32.9 239.30
4 +1.15 +2.8 29.54
3 +.63 +15.7 8.75
12 +2.67 +3.3 56.71
16+23.02 +24.2 400.50
8 +.85 -17.7 11.57
... +.31 -9.3 1.56
... +.66 +100.4 10.22
... +.75 .+36.0 28.21
... +2.26 -1.1 20.64
8 +1.84 -14.5 10.53
27 +4.04 -22.9 29.45
20 +3.14 +9.7 50.76
17 +4.30 +28.4 36.49
... +.15 -27.5 2.96
11 +1.09 -17.5 12.83
68 +3.32 +52.2 146.95
18 +3.65 +22.0 59.94
23+10.65 +50.5 100.89
20 +2.23 -18.1 35.67
... -.08 -80.6 .45
18 +.58 -17.6 4.36
13 +1.54 -13.1 21.25
13 +1.03 +20.0 9.91
28 +1.27 +3.2 61.04
... +.80 -70.0 6.88
12 +.49 +31.4 81.10
+.35 -17.7 2.92
+.46 -38.2 13.01
14 +.80 -17.8 16.62
33 +4.66 -14.9 58.24
.. -.19 -52.4 2.45


Name Div YId
Covidien .80 1.7
CSVellVSt s...
Cummins 1.60 1.6
DCT Indl .28 5.7
DDRCorp .24 2.1
DRHorton .15 1.6
DTE 2.35 4.6
Danaher .10 .2
DeanFds ...
Deere 1.64 2.1
DeltaAir ...
DenburyR ...
DeutschBk1.07 3.1
DBGoldDS ...
DevonE .68 1.0
DrSCBrrs.. ...
DirFnBrrs ...
DirLCBrrs ...
DrxEMBull 1.20 .1
DrxEnBear ...
DrxFnBull ...
DirxSCBull ... ...
DirxLCBull .10 ...
DirxEnBull ...
Discover .24 .9
Disney .40 1.2
DomRescs 1.97 4.0
DowChm 1.00 3.5
DukeEngy 1.00 5.1
EMC Cp ...
Eatons 1.36 3.4
ElPasoCp .04 .2
EldorGld g .12
EmersonEl 1.38 3.0
EnCanag .80 3.4
ENSCO 1.40 2.9
Exelon 2.10 4.8
ExxonMbI 1.88 2.5
FstHorizon .04 .6
FirstEngy 2.20 4.8
FordM
ForestOil ... ...
FMCGs 1.00 2.4
FrontierCm .75 10.5
GameStop ...
Gannett .32 3.2
Gap .45 2.6
GenGrPrn .40 3.1
GenMills 1.22 3.2
GenMot n ...
GenOnEn ...
Genworth ...
Gerdau .25 2.9
GoldFLtd .24 1.4
Goldcrpg .41 .8
GoldmanS 1.40 1.3
Goodyear ...
HCAHdn ... ...
Hallibrtn .36 .9
HartfdFn .40 2.1
HeclaM ... ...
Heinz 1.92 3.7
Hertz
Hess .40 .6
HewlettP .48 2.0
HollyFris .35 1.0
HomeDp 1.00 2.9
Honwillnti 1.33 2.8
HostHotls .12 1.0
Huntsmn .40 3.2
ING
iShGold ...
iSAstla 1.06 4.7
IShBraz 3.42 5.6
iShGer .67 3.4
iSh HK .42 2.5
iShJapn .17 1.7
iSh Kor .50 .9
iSTaiwn .29


Wkly YTO Wkly
PE Cyg %Chg Last
13 +.64 +5.9 48.36
... +.65 -39.4 7.24
13 +9.68 -11.1 97.84
... +.48 -7.5 4.91
+.32 -17.3 11.65
80 +.07 -19.1 9.65
12 +2.68 +11.6 50.56
16 +3.35 -2.6 45.94
27 +.82 +2.8 9.09
13 +2.76 -6.1 78.02
16 +1.22 -33.3 8.40
21 +.39 -24.1 14.48
.. +3.68 -33.1 34.82
... +.23' -44.7 4.41
5 +3.09 -15.8 66.11
... -8.02 -13.2 40.64
..-9.96 +13.0 53.39
... -6.58 -13.5 37.91
+.75 -49.2 21.00
... -2.11 -26.8 16.51
... +2.00 -49.4 14.09
... +7.13 -36.6 45.92
... +8.39 -17.6 58.91
... +4.87 -20.2 46.67
9 +2.55 +42.8 26.47
14 +1.87 -12.3 32.91
17 +2.65 +16.7 49.84
13 +2.53 -17.1 28.30
14 +1.02 +9.9 19.57
24 +1.47 -.6 22.76
12 +1.08 -21.7 39.74
26 +1.04 +40.1 19.28
48 -1.39 +8.2 20.09
15 +2.34 -20.0 45.74
52 +1.16 -18.1 23.85
17 -.56 -8.8 48.68
13 +1.05 +4.3 43.43
10 +3.54 +2.0 74.55
40 +.56 -42.6 6.76
19 +2.72 +22.7 45.43
5 +.57 -36.7 10.62
17 +.72 -49.1 19.33
7 -.40 -30.7 41.59
44 +.29 -26.9 7.11
9 +1.76 +8.8 24.89
5 +.23 -33.3 10.07
9 +1.04 -22.7 17.04
... +.65 -17.9 12.71
14 +.18 +5.9 37.70
6 +.85 -38.7 22.61
... +.09 -17.1 3.16
... +.34 -53.1 6.16
... +.27 -38.7 8.58
2 -.14 -5.7 17.09
17 -3.74 +12.0 51.49
11 +5.24 -36.1 107.49
... +.31 -6.4 11.09
...+2.93 -31.6 21.23
15 +.22 -2.3 39.88
5 +2.30 -28.5 18.94
27 -.55 -35.9 7.22
17 +.95 +4.2 51.52
16 +1.63 -20.9 11.46
7 +3.97 -19.5 61.61
6 +1.00 -44.1 23.53
16 -1.54 +63.8 33.39
16 +2.74 -1.3 34.61
14 +2.41 -11.3 47.13
... +1.43 -32.2 12.12
10 +.76 -19.5 12.57
... +.78 -24.2 7.42
... -.49 +26.8 17.63
... +.08 -10.9 22.66
... -.02 -21.3 60.95
... +1.65 -18.7 19.47
... -.09 -12.2 16.62
.. +.50 -10.8 9.73
.. +1.39 -12.4 53.58
... +.22 -14.7 13.32


New York Stock Exchange






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things can change. That's why we should schedule

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Financial Advisor

2929 West U S Highway 90
Suite 114
Lake City, FL 32055
386-752-3847


www.edwaronese.com Memibe, SIPC


Name DIv Yld
iShSilver ...
iShChina25 .85 2.3
iShEMkts .84 2.1
iShB20 T 4.02 3.6
iS Eafe 1.68 3.3
iShR2K .94 1.3
iShREst 2.09 3.7
rTW 1.44 3.2
IngerRd .48 1.3
IBM 3.00 1.7
IntlGame .24 1.6
IntPap 1.05 3.8
Interpublic .24 3.0
Invesco .49 2.6
InvMtgCap 3.74 22.9
ItauUnibH .84 4.9
JPMorgCh 1.00 3.0
JanusCap .20 2.9
JohnJn 2.28 3.5
JohnsnCtl .64 2.1
JnprNtwk ...
KB Home .25 4.0
Keycorp .12 1.8
Klmco .72 4.3
Kinross g .12 .7
KodlakO g ..
Kohls 1.00 2.1
Kraft 1.16 3.3
LSICorp ...
LVSands ...
LeggMason .32 1.1
LennarA .16 1.2


WIdy YTD Wkly
PE Chg %Chg Last
...-1.13 +30.5 39.39
... +.67 -15.0 36.62
... +.52 -14.9 40.53
... -1.47 +19.3 112.24
... +2.15 -12.6 50.90
... +4.02 -8.6 71.52
... +2.06 +1.3 56.69
12 +2.88 -15.0 45.39
... +3.43 -24.2 35.70
14+11.62 +17.9 172.99
18 +1.37 -13.3 15.33
10 +1.81 +2.7 27.98
15 +.47 -25.0 7.96
10 +2.21 -22.4 18.67
4 +.88 -25.1 16.36
... -.06 -28.7 17.05
7 +1.35 -21.2 33.43
7 +.56 -46.6 6.92
14 +.95 +4.4 64.59
13 +1.29 -21.0 30.19
19 -1.31 -45.4 20.15
... +.65 -53.2 6.32
7 +.41 -26.2 6.53
94 +.74 -6.2 16.93
25 -.52 -8.1 17.43
92 +.69 -2.7 6.42
12 +4.90 -12.6 47.50
20 +.55 +11.3 35.06
13 +.10 +11.0 6.65
35 +.84 +3.3 47.46
17 +2.81 -20.5 28.83
26 +.32 -26.4 13.80


Name


DIv YId PE


LilyEli 1.96 5.2
Limited .80 2.0
UncNat .20 1.0
UoydBkg ... ...
MEMC
MFA Fndc 1.00 13.8
MGIC ...
MGM Rsts ...
Macys .40 1.4
Manitowoc .08 .9
ManpwrGp .80 2.2
Manulife g .52 ...
MarathnO s .60 2.4
MktVGold .40 .6
MktVRus .18 .6
MarintA .40 1.4
MarshM .88 3.1
Masco .30 3.8
McDrmlnt ... ...
McGrwH 1.00 2.2
MedcoHlh ... ...
Medtmic .97 2.8
Merck 1.52 4.7
MelLtfe .74 2.2
MetroPCS ... ...
MobileTele 1.06 7.1
Molycorp ...
Monsanto 1.20 1.7;
MorgStan .20 1.2
Mosaic .20 .3
MotrdaSol n .88 2.0
MotriaMon ...


W"y YMT
Cho %Chl


8 +1.68 +7.9 37.81
15 +3.68 +31.1 40.28
5 +1.17 -31.0 19.20
... +.29 -45.7 2.23
22 +.44 -37.3 7.06
7 +.26 -11.0 7.26
+.12 -75.6 2.49
+.71 -27.3 10.79
11 +2.67 +9.6 27.74
... +.07 -28.9 9.32
.. +2.44 -41.2 36.90
... +.34 -25.8 12,75
5 +.51 +12.7 25.33
...-1.69 +4.3 64:11
.. -.05 -18.2 31.02
23 +3.12 -29.7 29.20
16 ... +4.5 28.57
... +.17 -37.0 7.97
17 +1.37 -29.4 14.61
16 +6.57 +24.4 45.29
15 -1.06 -18.0 50.25
12 +1.64 -5.6 35.02
12 +1.22 -9.3 32.68
9 +3.16 -25.7 33.04
16 -.36 -20.0 10.10
21 +.23 -28.9 14.83
... -.37 +7.7 53.74
24 +4.76 +.2 69.77
36 +1.17 -39.5 16.45
14 +1.02 -7.0 70.99
.. +4.69 +17.8 44.81
... +.35 +30.1 37.85


Wkly YTD Wkly
Name Div YId PE Chg %Chg Last
NCR Corp ... ... 13 +2.00 +19.5 18.37
NYSE Eur 1.20 4.3 13 +2.06 -7.5 27.73
Nabors 19 +1.39 -22.5 18,18
NatGrid 2.92 5.9 ... +.10 +11.8 49.63
NOilVarco .44 .7 16 +2.37 -3.3 65.03
NatSemi .40 1.6 21 +.07 +81.1 24.92
NY CmtyB 1.00 7.8 11 +1.01 -31.6 12.89
NewmtM 1.20 1.8 15 +.46 +7.0 65.72
NextEraEn2.20 4.0 13 +1.68 +6.3 55.28
NiSource .92 4.1 20 +1.16 +25.9 22.18
NobleCorp .53 1.5 30 +1.53 -1.1 35.37
NokiaCp .55 9.1 ... +.05 -41.6 6.03
NorflkSo 1.72 2.4 15 +5.59 +12.1 70.42
Nucor 1.45 4.1 24 +1.90 -20.0 35.04
OcciPel 1.84 2.2 12 +2.78 -15.1 83.32
OfficeDpt ... ...... +.06 -55.2 2.42
OilSvHT 1.58 .8 ... +4.63 -7.4 130.10
PG&ECp 1.82 '4.3 16 +1.89 -11.1 42.55
PMI Grp ... ... ... +.02 -93.1 .23
PNC 1.40 2.7 8 +4.96 -15.4 51.34
PPLCorp 1.40 4.9 12 +.85 +9.4 28.80
PatriolCoal ... ... ..-1.63 -33.6 12.86
PeabdyE .34 .7 14 -.72 -28.0 46.09
Penney .80 2.9 16 +2.66 -13.3 28.00
PepsiCo 2.06 3.3 16 +2.06 -5.0 62.05
PetrbrsA 1.34 5.5 -.04 -29.1 24.24
Pelrobras 1.26 4.8 -.16 -30.3 26.38
Pfizer .80 4.4 12 -.13 +3.7 18.15
PhilipMor 3.08 4.5 16 +3.18 +18.0 69.08
Pieri ... ... 12 +.63 +6.7 11.20
Potash s .28 .5 20 -1.38 .8.7 56.08
PS USDBull... ...... -.17 -4.3 21.74
PrinFncl .55 2.2 10 +2.47 -21.7 25.49
ProLogis 1.12 4.0 ... +2.95 -10.7 28.32
ProShtS&P... ...... -2.36 -1.7 43.10
PrUShS&P ... ...... -2.52 -5.9 22.37
PrUIShDow ... ...... -1.84 -10.3 18.57
ProUtQQQ ... ... ...+10.04 +4.2 84.89
PrUShQQQrs.. ... ...-6.55 -18.8 4722
ProUltSP .35 .8 ... +4.39 -8.3 44.07
ProUShL20 ... ...... +.60 -38.1 22.91
ProUltFin .05 .1 ... +4.49 -32.7 44.67
ProUSSP500... ....... -2.96 -12.7 16.94
PrUItSP500 s.05 .1 ... +8.15 -16.0 57.35
ProUSSv rs... ...... +.60 -89.2 12.11
ProUShEuro... ...... -.37 -10.2 18.23
ProgsvCp 1.40 2.2 10 +.23 -8.1 18.27
ProUSR2Krs... ...... -6.14 -3.2 48.62
PrudentU 1.15 2.2 8 +5.31 -12.4 51.45
PulteGrp .. ...... +.16 -40.7 4.46
QksitvRes ... ... 4 +.66 -36.8 9.32
RadianGrp .01 .4 ... -.13 -66.4 2.71
Raytheon 1.72 4.1- 7 +1.49 -8.3 42.13
RegionsFn .04 1.0 ... +.04 -42.9 4.00
RiteAid ... ... ... +.05 +26.8 1.12
RockColl .96 1.7 15 +8.31 -3.5 56.21
SLM Cp .40 3.0 10 +.77 +7.1 13.48
SpdrDJIA 3.14 2.7 .. +5.25 -.7 114.86
SpdrGold ... ...... -4.67 +26.9 176.03
S&P500ETF2.46 2.0 ... +6.23 -3.4 121.52
SpdrHome .31 2.1 ... +.77 -16.1 14.59
SpdrKbwBk .26 1.4 ... +1.24 -25.9 19.21
SpdrLehHY4.23 10.3 ... +.42 -3.9 38.16
SpdrRell .49 1.0 ... +2.94 +3.5 50.06
SpdrOGEx .50 .9 ... +2.40 +.5 53.00
SpdrMetM .42 .7 ... +.99 -17.8 56.55
STMicro .40 5.8 6 +1.07 -34.2 6.87
Safeway .58 3.3 11 -.21 -21.3 17.70
SandRdge :.. 31 +.66 +2.9 7.53
Sanofi 1.82 5.4 ... +.86 +4.1 33.56
SaraLee .46 2.6 8 +.23 -.1 17.50
Schlmbrg 1.00 1.4 19 +1.04 -12.8 72.84
Schwab .24 1.9 21 +1.07 -27.9 12.34
SemiHTr .64 2.1 ... +2.41 -4.9 30.93
SiderurNac .81 8.5 +.38 -42.5 9.58
SilvWhtng .12 .3 30 -.28 +1.3 39.54
SilvrcpMg .08 ... 16 -1.41 -45.3 7.02
SouthnCo 1.89 4.4 18 +1.85 +11.4 42.59
SwstAid .02 .2 13 +.91 -30.9 8.97


Nasdaq Most Active


WIly YTD Wkly
Name Div YId PE Chg %Chg Last
CognizTech... ... 25 +4.45 -11.0 65.24
ColdwtrCrk ... ... ... +.22 -55.2 1.42
Comcast .45 2.0 16 +2.03 +4.9 22.94
Comc spcl .45 2.0 16 +2.09 +9.2 22.62
Costco .96 1.1 26 +5.34 +16.7 84.24
Cree Inc ... 26 +2.58 -48.5 33.92
CypSemi .36 2.1 26 +1.98 -5.7 17.52
Dell Inc ... 8 +1.23 +12.2 15.20
Dndreon ... ... ... +.25 -66.6 11.65
DirecTVA ... ... 15 +2.28 +9.4 43,70
DonlleyRR1.04 7.0 15 +1.10 -14.4 14.95
DryShips ... ... 16 +.33 -41.0 3.24
E-Trade ... ... 48 +.89 -27.3 11.63
eBay ... 25 +5.23 +21.1 33.69
ElectArts ... ... ... +1.65 +40.5 23.01
EricsnTel .37 3.4 ... +.34 -6.9 10.74
Expedia .28 .9 19 +.47 +18.0 29.60
ExpScripts ... ... 18 -2.38 -23.6 41.29
F5 Netwks ... ... 31 +9.12 -35.7 83.72
Fastenals .52 1.4 34 +4.00 +21.2 36.31
FifthThird .24 2.2 11 +.86 -27.3 10.67
Finisar ... ... 24 +2.27 -28.4 21.27
FstNiagara .64 6.1 14 +.29 -25.2 10.46
FstSolar ... ... 15 +.74 -34.1 85.70
Flextm ... 8 +.53 -24.6 5.92
FocusMda ... ... 21 +2.09 +44.6 31.72
GT AdvTc ... ... 6 -.96 +9.3 9.97
GileadSci ... ... 12 +2.60 +11.5 40.41
Globlind ... ... ... +2.70 +13.3 7.85
Google ... ... 19+21.83 -8.0 546.68
GreenMtC ... ... ... +1.58+228.6 107.99
Hasbro 1.20 3.3 14 -.2& -23.7 36.02
HercOffsh ... ... ... +.32 +22.4 4.26
HudsCity .32 5.3 +.50 -52.7 6.03
HumGen ... .....+1.52 -45.5 13.03
Infinera .....+1.06 -19.8 8.28
Intel .84 3.8 10 +2.27 +4.5 21.97
InterMune ... ... 13 -.88 -30.8 25.20


Wkly YTD Wkly
Name DIv YId PE Chg %Chg Last


Intuit .60
JA Solar
JDS Uniph ...
JetBlue
KLA Tnc 1.40
LamResrch ..
Level3
UbtyMIntA ...
UnearTch .96
lululemngs ...
MarvellT ...
Mattel .92
Maximlntg .88
MelcoCrwn ...
Microchp 1.39
MicronT
Microsoft .64
Move Inc
NasdOMX ..
NetLogicM ..
NetApp
Netflix
NewsCpA .19
NewsCpB .19
Novlus
Nvldia
OmniVisn ...
OnSmcnd ..
Oracle .24
PMC Sra ...
Paccar .72
PattUTI .20
Paychex 1.24
PeopUtdF .63
Polycom s ...
Popular
PwShs QQQ .41
Powrwav


25 +3.07 ... 49.31
-.50 -66.0 2.35
43 +.92 -8.5 13.25
15 +.49 -31.9 4.50
8 +3.89 +1.8 39.35
7 +2,57 -23.2 39.75
... +.06 +61.2 1.58
14 +.69 +3.2 16.28
12 +2.43 -11.7 30.56
55 +2.70 +68.8 57.76
12 +1.48 -18.2 15.17
14 +.93 +6.4 27.06
16 +2.21 +7.2 25.32
65 -.61 +81.0 11.51
16 +2.49 +1.0 34.55
12 +.68 -12.3 7.03
10 +1.38 -2.8 27.12
... +.02 -37.7 1.60
11 +3.01 +6.5 25.27
...+16.42 +53.9 48.33
23 +2.11 -31.2 37.79
39-48.78 -11.7 155.19
15 +1.03 +16.5 '16.96
15 +.88 +3.8 17.04
8 +1.91 -7.1 30.03
17 +1.58 +.4 15.46
7 +.49 -40.5 17.62
12 +1.06 -16.7 8.23
18 +3.23 -6.6 29.23
44 +.63 -23.2 6.60
19 +2.72 -33.6 38.10
15 -.02 +4.8 22.59
19 +1.15 -12.4 27.08
26 +.75 -11.6 12.39
35 +.53 +14.0 22.22
5 -.06 -44.9 1.73
... +3.52 +3.9 56.59
15 +.01 -35.0 1.65


Name DIv
PriceTR 1.24
Qualcom .86
RF MicD ...
RschMotn ...
Riverbed s ..
SanDisk
SeagateT .72
Sicnware .28
SilvStdg ...
Sina
SidusXM ...
SkywksSol ..
Sonus
Staples .40
Starbucks .52
StlDynam .40
Symantec ..
TD Ameritr .20
Tellabs .08
TevaPhrm .87
fibcoSft
TiVo Inc
TriQulnt
UnlvDIsp ...
UrbanOut
Verisign 5.75
VirgnMda h .16
Vodafone 1.45
WamerCh ...
WholeFd .40
Windstrm 1.00
Wynn 2.00
Xllinx .76
YRC rsh ...
Yahoo
ZionBcp .04


Wkly YTD Wkly
YId PE Chg %Chg Last
2.3 19 +3.91 -17.8 53.03
1.6 23 +3.46 +8.9 53,87
... 19 +1.13 -4.6 7,01
4 -5.75 -58.8 23.93
... 76 +1.88 -31.1 24.23
8 +4.05 -14.2 42.78
6.0 11 +.84 -20.0 12.02
5.6 17 +.29 -16.6 4.96
45 -4.02 -9.4 25.57
.. +5.66 +80.3 110.33
61 +.12 +12.3 1.83
20 +2.49 -22.9 22.07
... ... +.18 -8.6 2.44
2.7 11 +1.28 -34.8 14.85
1.3 26 +1.89 +22.0 39.20
3.3 -12 +.94 -33.3 12.21
... 22 +1.49 +4.8 17.54
1.3 15 +1.22 -21.1 14.98
1.8 ... +.49 -33.9 4.48
2.3 12 +.09 -26.0 38.58
... 42 +2.45 +13.5 22,38
... ... +.61 +29.2 11.15
... 5 -.27 -48.8 5.98
.. +5.84 +81.4 55.60
... 17 +.27 -30.7 24.83
... 6 -.03 -11.2 29.00
.6 ... +1.60 -4.1 26.13
5.5 ... +.36 -1.2 26.13
... 34 +1.20 -28.4 16.15
.6 40 +4.67 +36.5 69.05
7.8 22 +.35 -7.5 12.90
1.3 51 +3.69 +46.5 152.12
2.4 13 +1.73 +9.5 31.74
... ... -.41 -98.1 .07
... 17 +.49 -10.0 14.97
.2 ... +1.19 -28.5 17.32


Wkly YTD Wkly
Name Div YId PE Chg %Chg Last
AbdAsPac .42 5.7 ... -.07 +9.9 7.42
Adventrx ... ... ... +.12 -54.8 1.18
AlexcoR g ... ... ... -.21 +8.7 8.90
AlIdNevG ... ......-.08 +65.8 43.63
AntaresP ... ... .. +.10 +37.6 2.34
Aurizon g ... ... ... +.10 -6.7 6.83
AvalRaren ... ... ... -.16 -36.5 3.96
Banro g ... ... ... -.13 +22.4 4.92
BarcUBS36 ... ......-1.06 -3.7 47.28
BarcGSOil ... ... ... +.22 -12.7 22.35
Brigusgrs ... ... ... +.12 -16.7 1.75
CFCda g .01 ...... +.49 +23.5 25.61
ChenlereEn ... ... ... +.32 +32.8 7.33
CheniereE 1.70 11.6 58 -1.14 -31.4 14.61
ChinNEPet ... ... 2 +.62 -53.6 2.67
ClaudeR g ... ... ... -.02 +3.7 2.27
CrSuiHiY .32 11.0 ... -.03 -.3 2.88
DenisnM g ... ... ... -.02 -57.0 1.47
ExeterR gs ... ... ... -.49 -20.1 4.96
FrkStPrp .76 6.2 23 +.27 -14.0 12.26
GabGldNR 1.68 10.1 ... -.14 -13.5 16.67
GascoEngy ... ... ... -.01 -33.4 .23
Gastar grs ... ... ... +.20 -.7 4.27
GenMoly ... ... -.08 -45.7 3.52
Geokinetics ... ... ... -.97 -65.4 3.21
GoldResrc .60 2.7 .. +1.04 -23.1 22.60
GoldonMin ... ... ... -1.05 -55.4 11.91
GoldStr g ... ... -.29 -50.8 2.26
GranTrra g ... ... +.35 -23,0 6.20
GrtBasG g ... ... ... -.02 -23.6 2.26
GtPanSilvg ... ..... +.09 +24.6 3.50
ImpOil gs .44 ... +45 -4.8 38.56
InovloPhm ... ... +.06 -37.4 .72
IntTowor g ... ... ... -.44 -27.5 7.30
IsoRay ... ... ... -.05 -7.1 1.05
LadThalFn ... ... ... +.25 +56.4 1.83
LongweiPI ... ... 2 +.11 -56.0 1.14
MadCatzq ... ... 6 +.05 -26.6 .75


Name


Wkly YTD Wkly
Div YId PE Cha %Cha Last


SwstnEngy ...
SpectraEn 1.04
SprintNex ...
SP Malls .82
SP HIthC .64
SPCnSt .85
SP Consum .61
SPEngy 1.08
SPDR Fnd .20
SP Inds .69
SP Tech .36
SPUtil 1.36
StarwdHtl .30
StateStr .72
Suncorgs .44
Suntech ...
SunTrst .20
Supvalu .35
Synovus .04
Sysco 1.04
TJX .76
TaiwSemi .52
Talbots
TalismE g .27
Target 1.20
TelefEsp s 1.98
Templeilnd .52
TenetHIth ...
Teradyn
Terex
Tesoro
Texinst .68
Textron .08
3M Co 2.20
TimeWam .94
Total SA 2.38
Transocn .79
Travelers 1.64
Tycoln l 1.00
Tyson .16
UBS AG
USAirwy ...
UnilevNV 1.21
UnionPac 1.90
UtdContl
UPS B 2.08
USBancrp .50
US NGs rs ...
USOilFd ...
USSteel .20
UtdhfthGp .65
Vale SA 1.14
Vale SA pt 1.14
ValeroE .20
VangEmg .82
VeriFone
VerizonCm 2.00
ViacomB 1.00
Visa .60
Walgm .90
WsteMInc 1.36
Weathfintl ...
WellPoint 1.00
WellsFargo .48
Wendys Co .08
WstnUnion .32
Weyerh .60
WmsCos 1.00
XL Grp .44
XcelEngy 1.04
Xerox .17
Yamanag .18
YingliGm ..
YumBmds 1.14


22 +3.07 +4.1
15 +1.12 +4.0
... -.09 -20.6
... +1.54 -10.1
... +1.23 +4.8
+1.06 +52
+2.48 +1.0
... +2.47 -1.7
... +.73 -19.1
... +1.97 -8.3
... +1.59 -.8
...+1.53 +8.4
18 +5.84 -25.2
11 +2.38 -25.7
14 +.77 -20.7
4 -.43 -54.1
25 +1.67 -32.5
... +.22 -20.1
... +.11 -47.0
14 +.70 -6.8
17 +5.46 +29.0
... +.53 -1.0
... +.33 -62.9
.. -.43 -34.0
13 +2.64 -12.4
... +1.52 -14.3
18 +.26 +47.4
2 -.23 -28.4
7 +1.25 -9.0
... -.08 -56.3
8 +.27 +27.9
11 +1.74 -14.4
43 +3.37 -21.2
14 +3.88 -6.7
13 +2.07 -3.8
... +1.10 -15.3
32 +4.96 -14.9
10 +2.47 -9.2
13 +4.02 +5.5
8 +.72 +1.2
... +.01 -27.9
5 +.89 -41.0
... -.04 -.2
15 +6.55 -1.1
13 +2.73 -14.1
17 +2.37 -8.3
12 +2.11 -10.6
... -.20 -19.3
... +.29 -12.5
.. +.34 -52.5
11 +5.24 +40.6
... +.46 -21.5
... +.60 -17.2
18 -.13 -4.0
... +.38 -13.7
28 +3.19 +.6
16 +1.48 +2.6
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86 +.41 -28.3
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4 +.94 -6.0
19 +1.34 +9.4
26 +.78 -8.2
15 +1.50 +7.3
15 +.61 -30.4
19 -.84 +26.1
2 -.69 -61.1
20 +2.32 +9.8


Wkly YTD Wklty
Name DIv Yld PE Chg %Chg Last


MdwGoldg ...
Minefnd g ...
NeoStem ...
Neoprobe ...
Nevsun g .06
NwGold g ...
NA Pallg ...
NDynMng ...
NthnO&G ...
NthgtMg ...
NovaGidg
Oilsands g ...
ParaG&S
PionDrill
Quepasa ...
RareEleg ...
Rentech ...
Richmntg ...
Rubicon g ...
SamsO&G ...
SeabGldg ...
TanzRyg ...
Tadeko
TrnsatlPet ...
TriValley ...
TriangPet ...
Ur-Energy ...
Uranerz
UranlumEn ...
VangTotW .92
VantageDrl ...
VimetX
VistaGold
VoyagerOG
WT DrdBz 3.24
YM Bio g
ZBB Enav ...


+.18 +246.4
-.68 +55.2
+.01 -53.2
+.20 +52.9
-.42 -14.7
-.28 +39.5
+.15 -48.8
-.86 -39.2
+3.19 -15.7
-.25 +17.2
-1.03 -43.0
+.02 -46.4
+.33 -32.1
+.63 +32.9
+.61 -58.9
-.23 -50.2
+.04 -26.1
+.10 +139.1
+.33 -19.6
+.18 +103.0
-2.74 -12.9
-.08 -21.8
-.03 -32.8
-.02 -66.7
+.02 -61.4
+.25 -17.1
+.13 -58.9
-.06 -51.1
-.01 -46.5
+1.66 -7,5
-.04 -33.5
+.43 +41.8
+.57 +78.7
-.06 -56.1
-.67 +.5
-.01 -14.6
-.18 -26.9


Currencies
Last Pvs Day
Australia .9641 .9681
Britain 1.5788 1.5809
Canada .9798 .9840
Euro .7251 .7200
Japan 76.87 76.64
Mexico 12.9950 12.9500
Switzerind .8760 .8697
British pound expressed in U.S. dollars. All oth-
ers show dollar in foreign currency.


AMEX Most Active


I I


------ "-"---


Weekly Dow Jones

Dow Jones Industrials 68.99 44.73 140.88 186.45 75.91
Close: 11,509.09 1 1 Et .! Hit)
1-week change: 516.96 (4.7%) MON TUES WED THUR FRI
13,000 . . .

12,500o








10,500 M A M J J A S



MUTUAL FUNDS
Total Assets Total Return/Rank Pct Mn Inlt
Name Obi ($MIns) NAV 4-wk 12-mo 5-year Load Invt
PIMCO TotRetls CI 144,330 10.96 -0.7 +3.6/E +8.3/A NL 1,000,000
Vanguard TotStidx LB 58,721 30.50 +2.0 +10.9/A +1.1/B NL 3,000
American Funds GrthAmA m LG 57,082 29.14 +1.7 +7.8/E +1.0/D 5.75 250
Fidelity Contra LG 57,045 67.65 +2.3 +12.3/C +4.2/A NL 2,500
Vanguard Instldxl LB 55,901 111.79 +2.2 +10.3/B +0.5/B NL 5,000,000
American Funds CaplncBuA x IH 55,898 48.46 0.0 +5.1/C +2.2/C 5.75 250
American Funds IncAmerA x MA 51,184 16.24 +1.0 +8.0/B +2.5/C 5.75 250
Vanguard 500Adml LB 49,870 112.55 +2.2 +10.3/B +0.5/B NL 10,000
American Funds CpWIdGrIA x WS 48,359 32.22 -2.1 -1.0/E +1.0/C 5.75 250
Vanguard TotStlAdm LB 47,454 30.52 +2.1 +11.0/A +1.2/B NL 10,000,
American Funds InvCoAmA x LB 43,101 26.33 +0.8 +5.4/E -0.3/D 5.75 250
Dodge & Cox IntlStk FV 40,297 30.48 -5.5 -5.3/D -0.8/A NL 2,500
Dodge & Cox Stock LV 38,205 99.43 -0.4 +5.6/C -3.1/E NL 2,500
American Funds WAMutlnvA m JLV 36,898 27.29 +2.9 +12.1/A +0.5/A 5.75 250
Vanguard InstPlus LB 34,848 111.80 +2.2 +10.3/B +0.6/B NL 200,000,000
FrankTemp-Franklin Income A m CA '34,484 2.07 +0.6 +5.6/C +3.6/C 4.25 1,000
American Funds EurPacGrA m FB 33,112 36.81 -4.4 -3.0/D +1.1/A 5.75 250
PIMCO TotRetAdm b Cl 32,335 10.96 -0.8 +3.3/E +58.1/A NL 1,000,000
Vanguard Totlntl d FB 31,366 13.96 -4.4 -2.6/C -0.4/B NL 3,000
American Funds FnlnvA m LB 30,691 34.80 +1.4 +7.6/C +1.6/A 5.75 250
American Funds BalA m MA 30,370 17.88 +2.1 +9.5/A +3.1/B 5.75 250
American Funds NewPerspA m WS 29,791 26.73 -0.9 +4.4/C +2.8/A 5.75 250
Vanguard TotBdAdml Cl 29,596 11.00 +0.3 +5.7/B +6.7/B NL 10,000
Vanguard WeltnAdm MA 28,110 52.74 +0.5 +6.7/C +4.1/A NL 50,000
Vanguard 5001nv LB 27,422 112.52 +2.2 +10.1/B +0.4/B NL 3,000
FrankTemp-TempletonGIBondAdvlB 27,140 13.28 -2.6 +4.1/D +11.2/A NL 50,000
PIMCOTotRetA m Cl 26,775 10.96 -0.8 +3.2/E +7.8/A 3.75 1,000











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Legal

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
THIRD JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF
FLORIDA, IN AND FOR COLUM-
BIA COUNTY CIVIL DIVISION
Case No. 12-2011-CA-000112
FIRST FEDERAL SAVINGS
BANK OF FLORIDA
Plaintiff,
vs.
JOSEPH J. METZGER and CHER-
YL A. METZGER MORTGAGE
ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION
SYSTEMS, INC. AND UNKNOWN
TENANTS/OWNERS, Defendants.
NOTICE OF SALE
Notice is hereby given, pursuant to
Final Judgment of Foreclosure for
Plaintiff entered in this cause on Au-
gust 29, 2011, in the Circuit Court of
Columbia County, Florida, I will sell
the property situated in Columbia
County, Florida described as:
PARCEL A-2:
TOWNSHIP 5 SOUTH RANGE
16 SECTION 11: COMMENCE AT
THE SOUTHEAST CORNER OF
NE 1/4 OF NW 1/4 OF SW 1/4 OF
SECTION 11, TOWNSHIP 5
SOUTH, RANGE 16 EAST, CO-
LUMBIA COUNTY, FLORIDA
AND RUN THENCE N 132'39" W
ALONG THE EAST LINE OF
SAID NE 1/4 OF NW 1/4 OF SW
1/4, 25.01 FEET TO THE NORTH
RIGHT-OF-WAY LINE OF
YOUNG ROAD; THENCE S
87"10'02" W ALONG SAID
NORTH RIGHT-OF-WAY LINE,
341.79 FEET TO THE POINT OF
BEGINNING; THENCE CONTIN-
UE S 87'10'02" W ALONG SAID
NORTH RIGHT-OF-WAY LINE,
341.84 FEET; THENCE N 1'32'39"
W 637.89 FEET TO THE NORTH
LINE OF THE SW 1/4; THENCE N
87'09'04" E ALONG SAID NORTH
LINE, S 341.84 FEET; THENCE
1'32'39" E 637.99 FEET TO THE
POINT OF BEGINNING.
and commonly know as: 263 SW
WILLIAM YOUNG LN, LAKE
CITY, FL; including the building,
appurtenances, and fixtures located
therein, at public sale, to the highest
and best bidder, for cash, AT THE
FRONT DOOR OF THE THE CO-
LUMBIA COUNTY COURT-
HOUSE, 145 N. HERNANDO
STREET, LAKE CITY, FLORIDA,
on 10/5/11 at lla.m..
Any persons claiming an interest in
the surplus from the sale, if any, oth-
er than the property owner as of the
date of the lis pendens must file a
claim within 60 days after the sale.
Dated this 29th day of August, 2011
(seal)
Clerk of the circuit Court
By:/s/ B. Scippio
Deputy Clerk

05527808
September 11, 18, 2011
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
THIRD JUDICIAL CIRCUIT,
IN AND FOR COLUMBIA COUN-
TY, FLORIDA
CASE NO.: 2010 CA 804
CIRCUIT CIVIL DIVISION
VANDERBILT MORTGAGE AND
FINANCE, INC.. a Tennessee cor-
poration authorized to transact busi-
ness in Florida,
Plaintiff,
vs.
JOHN W. IVEY a/k/a JOHN WES-
LEY IVEY, Ill;
KIMBERLY T. IVEY; and UN-
IDENTIFIED JOHN
DOE(S) and/or UNIDENTIFIED
JANE DOE(S),
Defendants.
CLERK'S NOTICE OF SALE
NOTICE IS GIVEN that, in accord-
ance with the Plaintiff's Final Judg-
ment of Foreclosure entered on Au-
gust 29, 2011 in the above-styled
cause, I will sell to the highest and
best bidder for cash in Room Court-
room One or on the 3rd Floor of the
Columbia County Courthouse, 173
N.E. Hemando Drive, Lake City, FL
32055, at 11:00 A.M. on September
28, 2011, the following described
property:
Lot 15, Block B, Spring Hills Subdi-
vision, a subdivision as per plat
thereof, recorded in Plat Book 4,
Page(s) 33 and 33A, of the Public
Records of Columbia County, Flori-
da, together with that certain 1999
HOME OF MERIT CYPRESS
MANOR 24' x 48' Mobile Home,
ID No. FLHMLCY1I43020929A and
FLHMLCY143020929B,
ANY PERSON CLAIMING AN IN-
TEREST IN THE SURPLUS FROM
THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER
THAN THE PROPERTY OWNER
AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS
PENDENS MUST FILE A CLAIM
WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE
SALE.
Dated: August 30, 2011
P. DEWITT CASON
Clerk of Court
By: B. Scippio
Deputy Clerk
CERTIFICATE OF SERVICE
I CERTIFY that a true and correct
coy of the foregoing Certificate of
Sale has been furnished by United
States Mail on August 30, 2011, to
each of the following: Timothy D.
Padgett, Esq., 2878 Remington
Green Circle, Tallahassee, FL 32308;
Thomas J. Kennon, III, Esq., P.O.
Box 1178, Lake City, FL 32056; and
Sonya K. Daws, Esq., Sonya Daws,
PA., 3116 Capital Circle NE, Suite
5. Tallahassee, FL 32308.
/s/ B. Scippio
Court Clerk

05527842
September 13, 18, 2011


Legal

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
THIRD JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN
AND FOR COLUMBIA COUNTY,
FLORIDA
Case No.: 09-614CA
REGIONS BANK, D/B/A RE-
GIONS MORTGAGE,
Plaintiff,
vs.
ELIE BORGELLA, DAVID THE-
LUSMA, UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF
ELIE BORGELLA, UNKNOWN
SPOUSE OF DAVID THELUSMA,
UNKNOWN TENANT #1, UN-
KNOWN TENANT #2,
Defendant(s).
NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE
SALE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that
pursuant to the Final Judgment of
Foreclosure entered on August 25,
2011, in Case No. 09-614CA of the
Circuit Court of the Third Judicial
Circuit for Columbia County, Flori-
da, in which Regions Bank D/B/A
Regions Mortgage, is Plaintiff, and
Elie Borgella, David Thelusma, et
al., are Defendants, I will sell to the
highest and best bidder for cash, at
the Columbia County Courthouse
173 N.E. Hemando Avenue, Lake
City, Florida, at 11A.M. or as soon
thereafter as the sale may proceed,
on the 28th day of September, 2011,
the following described real property
as set forth in the said Final Judg-
ment, to wit:
A PORTION OF SECTION 14,
TOWNSHIP 4 SOUTH, RANGE 17
EAST, COLUMBIA COUNTY,
FLORIDA, BEING MORE PAR-
TICULARLY DESCRIBED AS
FOLLOWS; BEGIN AT THE
POINT WHERE THE WEST
RIGHT OF WAY LINE OF PRICE
CREEK CIRCLE INTERSECTS
THE NORTH RIGHT OF WAY
LINE OF ANDREW ROAD AND
RUN SOUTH 89"44'29" WEST
ALONG THE NORTH LINE OF
ANDREW ROAD, 470.63 FEET;
THENCE NORTH 0'15'31" WEST
315.00 FEET; THENCE NORTH
89'44'29" EAST 359.09 FEET;
THENCE SOUTH 19'45'25" EAST
ALONG THE WEST LINE OF
PRICE CREEK CIRCLE 334.16
FEET TO THE POINT OF THE BE-
GINNING.
Any person or entity claiming an in-
terest in the surplus, if any, resulting
from the foreclosure sale, other than
the property owner as of the date of
the Lis Pendens, must file a claim on
the same with the Clerk of Court
within 60 days after the foreclosure
sale.
If you are a person with a disability
who requires accommodations in or-
der to participate in a court proceed-
ing, you are entitled, at no cost to
you, the provision of certain assis-
tance. Individuals with a disability
who require special accommodations
in order to participate ini a court pro-
ceeding should contact the ADA Co-
ordinator, 173 NE Hemando Ave-
nue, Room 408, Lake City. FL
32055, (386)719-7428, at least 7
days before your schedule court ap-
pearance, or immediately upon re-
"ceiving notification if the time before
the scheduled appearance is less than
7 days; if you are hearing or voice
impaired, call 711.
P DEWITT CASON.
Clerk of the Circuit Court
By:/s/ B. Scippio

05527810
September 11, 18, 2011
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT, THIRD
JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR
COLUMBIA COUNTY
CASE NO. 11-95-CA
DMAC of LAKE CITY, INC.,
a Florida corporation,
Plaintiff,
vs.
YONETTE LEACOCK and YON-
SON LEACOCK, IF EITHER OF
THEM BE LIVING, AND IF EI-
THER OF THEM BE DEAD,
THEIR RESPECTIVE UNKNOWN
SPOUSES, HEIRS, DEVISEES,
LEGATEES, GRANTEES, AS-
SIGNEES, LIENORS. CRED-
ITORS, OR TRUSTEES; AND THE
UNKNOWN SPOUSE, HEIRS, DE-
VISEES, LEGATEES, GRANTEES,
ASSIGNEES, LIENORS, CRED-
ITORS, OR TRUSTEES OF CHER-
YLA. LEACOCK, DECEASED.
Defendants.
NOTICE OF PUBLIC SALE
Notice is hereby given that the fol-
lowing described real property:
Lots 3 and 4, Spring Hills West, a
subdivision according to the plat
thereof recorded at Plat Book 6, pa-
ges 52-52A, public records of Co-
lumbia County, Florida.
shall be sold by the Clerk of this
Court, at public sale, pursuant to the
Final Judgment in the above styled
action dated August 25, 2011, at the
Columbia County Courthouse in
Lake City, Columbia County, Flori-
da, at 11:00 A.M., on Wednesday,
September 28, 2011, to the best and
highest bidder for cash. Any person
claiming an interest in any surplus
from the sale, other than the property
owner as of the date of the notice of
lis pendens, must file a claim within
60 days after the sale.
WITNESS my hand and official seal
in the State and county aforesaid this
29th day of August, 2011.
P. DEWITT CASON
Clerk of Court
By:/s/B. Scippio
Deputy Clerk


Legal

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
THIRD JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF
THE STATE OF FLORIDA, IN
AND FOR COLUMBIA COUNTY
CIVIL DIVISION
CASE NO. 12-2010-CA-000598
CITIFINANCIAL EQUITY SERV-
ICES, INC.
Plaintiff,
vs.
UNKNOWN HEIRS, DEVISEES,
GRANTEES, ASSIGNEES, CRED-
ITORS, LIENORS, TRUSTEES, OF
HUGH STRATTON, DECEASED;
GLENDA STRATTON; GLENDA
STRATTON, HEIR; DAVID
STRATTON, HEIR; CYNTHIA AL-
FORD, HEIR; IF LIVING, IN-
CLUDING ANY UNKNOWN
SPOUSE OF SAID
DEFENDANTSS, IF REMARRIED,
AND IF DECEASED, THE RE-
SPECTIVE UNKNOWN HEIRS,
DEVISEES, GRANTEES, ASSIGN-
EES, CREDITORS, LIENORS,
AND TRUSTEES, AND ALL OTH-
ER PERSONS CLAIMING BY,
THROUGH, UNDER OR
AGAINST THE NAMED DE-
FENDANT(S); UNKNOWN TEN-
ANT #1; UNKNOWN TENANT #2;
Defendant(s)
AMENDED NOTICE OF ACTION
TO: UNKNOWN HEIRS, DEVI-
SEES, GRANTEES, ASSIGNEES,
CREDITORS, LIENORS, TRUST-
EES OF HUGH STRATTON, DE-
CEASED
Whose residence are/is unknown.
YOU ARE HEREBY required to file
your answer or written defenses, if
any, in the above proceeding with
the Clerk of this Court, and to serve
a copy thereof upon the plaintiff's at-
torney, Law Offices of Daniel C.
Consuegra, 9204 King Palm Drive,
Tampa, FL 33619-1328, telephone
(813) 915-8660, facsimile (813) 915-
0559, within thirty days of the first
publication of this Notice, the nature
of this proceeding being a suit for
foreclosure of mortgage against the
following described property, to wit:
SECTION 21; COMMENCE AT
THE SE CORNER OF THE NE 1/4
OF SE 1/4 AND RUN THENCE N
0* 47' 39" W ALONG THE EAST
LINE OF SAID SECTION 21, A
DISTANCE OF 15.00 TO THE
POINT OF INTERSECTION OF
THE WEST RIGHT-OF-WAY
LINE OF TURNER ROAD WITH
THE NORTH RIGHT-OF-WAY
LINE OF ASH ROAD; THENCE
RUN N 90' 17' 42" W ALONG
THE NORTH RIGHT-OF-WAY OF
ASH ROAD A DISTANCE OF
735.62 FEET TO THE POINT OF
BEGINNING; THENCE CONTIN-
UE N 89 17' 42" W ALONG THE
NORTH RIGHT-OF-WAY OF ASH
ROAD, A DISTANCE OF 133.2
FEET: THENCE RUN N 0' 34' 30"
W. A DISTANCE OF 238.85 FEET;
THENCE RUN N 89" 52' 14" E A
DISTANCE OF 133.26 FEET;
THENCE RUN 0" 34' 30:" E. A
DISTANCE OF 240.79 FEET TO
THE NORTH RIGHT-OF-WAY OF
ASH ROAD AND THE POINT OF
BEGINNING.
To include a:
20(03 SCHU. VIN HIG
A20K04480A and 0087095972
2003 SCHU, VIN HIG
A20K04480B and 0087096148
If you fail to file your answer or
written defenses in the above pro-
ceeding, on plaintiff's attorney, a de-
fault will be entered against you for
the relief demanded in the Complaint
or Petition.
DATED at COLUMBIA County this
7th day of September, 2011
Clerk of the Circuit Court
By: /s/ B. Scippio
Deputy Clerk
AMERICANS WITH DISABILI-
TIES ACT: If you are a person with
a disability who requires accommo-
dations in order to participate in a
court proceeding, you are entitled, at
no cost to you, the provision of cer-
tain assistance. Individuals with a
disability who require special accom-
modation in order to participate in a
court proceeding should contact the
AD Coordinator, 173 NE Hernando
Avenue, Room 408, Lake City, FI
32055, (386) 719-7428, within two
(2) business days of receipt of notice
to appear.
Individuals who are hearing impaired
should call (800) 955-8771.
Individuals who are voice impaired
should call (800) 955-8770.

05527850
September 18, 25, 2011
Public Notice "Notice is hereby
made to all those concerned and af-
fected that Boran Craig Barber Engel
Construction Co., Inc. is performing
state project #FL-35 (WRC) Lake
City Work Release Center at 1099
NW Dot Glen, Lake City, FL 32055.
All parties furnishing labor, materi-
als and/or equipment to said project
are to provide notice of such in writ-
ing by certified mail to the Depart-
ment of Corrections, 2601 Blair
Stone Road, Tallahassee, FL 32399-
2500, within twenty (20) calendar
days of 1st providing such labor, ma-
terials and/or equipment."

05527729
September 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22,
23, 2011

To place your
classified ad call

755-5440


REPORTER Classifieds 05527844 [____
In Print and On Line September 13, 18, 2011

www.Ilakecityreporter.com v y r sights


on Something
._, w



Lawn & Landscape Service

J&M LAWN Service & more for ... ,
all your outdoor needs. Don't l .pply in person Or onl
waste your time or weekend,386-984-2187 n
Free Estimate. 386-984-2187


Legal

NOTICE OF AVAILABILITY
DRAFT ENVIRONMENTAL AS-
SESSMENT
U. S. DEPARTMENT OF VETER-
ANS AFFAIRS
Proposed Installation and Operation
of Ethanol-85 (E85) Fueling Station
at the Lake City VA Medical Center
619 S. Marion Avenue; City of Lake
City, Columbia County, FL
The Department of Veterans Affairs
(VA) announces the availability of a
Draft "Environmental Assessment"
(EA) for the proposed Installation
and Operation of an Ethanol-85
(E85) Fueling Station at the Lake
City VA Medical Center; 619 S.
Marion Avenue; Lake City, Colum-
bia County, Florida.
The Draft EA has been prepared in
accordance with Council on Environ-
mental Quality (CEQ) regulations for
implementing the procedural provi-
sions of the National Environmental
Policy Act (NEPA), (Public Law 91-
190, 42 USC 4321-4347 January 1,
1970) and amendments, and the
VA's Implementing Regulations (38
CFR Part 26). The VA intends to is-
sue a "Finding of No Significant Im-
pact" following a 30-day comment
period in accordance with CEQ Reg-
ulations for Implementing NEPA,
Section 1508.13, providing there are
no substantive comments that war-
rant further evaluation.
A copy of this report can be viewed
in the Engineering Department at the
Lake City VA Medical Center at 619
S. Marion Avenue, Lake City, FL
32025 between the hours of 8:00
a.m. and 4:30 p.m. Monday through
Friday, from September 19th to Oc-
tober 19, 2011.
Please submit comments before Oc-
tober 19, 2011, to
Heather.Frebe@va.gov
(Please type "Lake City VAMC E85
DEA" in the subject line)
Or by regular mail to
Heather Frebe
Public Affairs Officer
Malcom Randall VA Medical Center
RE: Lake City VAMC E85
DEA
1601 SW Archer Road
Gainesville, FL 32608
(352) 376-1611 extension 6648

05527834
September 16, 17, 18, 2011
NOTICE OF INTENT BY THE
SCHOOL BOARD OF COLUMBIA
COUNTYTO ADOPT RULE AND
SET PUBLIC HEARING
The School Board of Columbia
County will hold a public hearing on
Tuesday, October 25, 2011, at 7:00
p.m., at the School Board Adminis-
trative Complex, 372 West Duval
Street, Lake City, Florida, on pro-
posed amendments to rules, regula-
tions and procedures for the opera-
tion of the Columbia County School
System. The public is invited to at-
tend. Action is anticipated at this
meeting.
Persons with disabilities who require
assistance to participate in the public
hearing are requested to notify the
Office of the Superintendent at 755-
80X00 at least 48 hours in advance so
that their needs can be accommodat-
ed.
TITLE:Policy 3.40 Extended Day
Fee Generated Programs NEW
PURPOSE AND EFFECT: To create
board policy .endorsing the concept
of fee supported before or after
school programs'.
SPECIFIC LEGAL AUTHORITY:
1001.41; 1001.43; 1000.04, Florida
Statutes
A complete text of the proposed
amended rules, regulations and pro-
cedures can be obtained at the Office
of the Superintendent of Schools,
372 W. Duval St., Lake City, FL. be-
tween the hours of 8:00 a.m. and
4:00 p.m. Monday Friday. Eco-
nomic impact statements, where ap-
plicable, are on file in the Office of
Superintendent at the above listed
address.
DATED THIS 13th DAY OF
SEPTEMBER, 2011.
SCHOOL BOARD OF COLUMBIA
COUNTY
BY ATTEST
Linard Johnson, Chairman
Michael F. Millikin, Superintendent
05527922
September 18, 20111
Public Auction to be held
October 22, 2011 at 8AM at
Ozzie's Towing & Auto, LLC 2492
SE Baya Ave. Lake City FL, 32025.
(386)719-5608
Following Vin Numbers:
95 Nissan
Vin# IN4BU31DXSC251017
05 Vento Scooter
Vin#5KMMSG 1T055105733
05527938
September 18,2011

100 Job
v Opportunities
Drivers: Teams: $6,000 Team
Sign-On Bonus when you team
drive for Werner Enterprises! Call
Now for details! 1-888-880-5902
)5527935
WANTED HONDA
AUTOMOTIVE
TECHNICIAN
Have own tools and Exp.
Must be able to work Sat.
Apply in person:
Sunbelt Honda
Jim Gallagher


too Job
100 Opportunities

05527841
SENIOR REGISTERED
NURSE SUPERVISOR
The Florida Department of Veter-
ans' Affairs Jenkins Domiciliary
is seeking a supervisory level R.N.
to fill the position of Senior Regis-
tered Nurse Supervisor. All ap-
plicants must hold a Florida R.N.
license and be certified in C.P.R.
Requirements for all candidates
include a strong clinic
al background, good communica-
tion abilities, and excellent com-
puter skills. Ideal candidates will
have nursing management or su-
pervisory experience. Apply on-
line:
https://peoplefirst.myflorida.com/l
ogon.htm
Or call Susan Espenship for more
information at 386-758- 0600
x1022
Req #50000426
Closing Date 09/19/2011
EEO/AAE

LICENSED CLINICAL SO-
CIAL WORKER
The Florida Department of Veter-
ans' Affairs- Jenkins Domiciliary
is seeking a Licensed Clinical So-
cial Worker. MUST BE a Florida
Licensed Social Worker. Duties
include: One hour per week on-
site supervision of Registered In-
tern Clinical Social Worker; Pro-
vide consultation between on-site
visits, if needed; State certification
as a "clinical supervisor" is NOT a
requirement. Apply on-line:
https://peoplefirst.myflorida.com/l
ogon.htm
Or call Amelia Tompkins for more
information at 386-758-0600
xl010
Req #50507062
Closing Date 9/19/2011
EEO/AAE

(05527942
LPN, Night Shift 11 pm 7 am
Full Time
Please apply Baya Pointe
Nursing & Rehabilitation
Center, 587 SE Ermine Ave.,
Lake City, FL 32025 or fax
resume to 386-752-7337.

Busy Family Practice Office Seeks
Nursing Asst. for FT position.
Must be competent, organized, and
experienced in back office duties.
Fax resume to: 386-719-9494
Giebeig Family Medicine

BUSY OFFICE looking for full-
time receptionist. Experience in
multi-line phone system, updating
records, accounting and working
with the public. Computer skills
necessary. Fax resume at:
386-961-8802

Hiring Locally This Week
Liberty National Life Insurance
Company. Full Training Provided
Potential. of $60K+ Annually.
401K, BCBS Insurance & Pension
for those who qualify.
Call 1-800-257-5500
to set up an interview.

EXPERIENCED CERTIFIED
DIESEL MECHANICS and
TECHNICIANS needed for grow-
ing Motorcoach Company. Full
Time, Benefits. Profit Sharing.
Please Email
careers@ray-land.com

EXPERIENCED LAWN Mower
repair person in Worthington
Springs area, some customer serv-
ice, Call 386-496-8431

FIELD DATA COLLECTOR,
Perform Field Work & Computer
Reporting for a National Industry
Leader. No exp. Paid Training.
Performance Base Pay
$11-$12/HR. PT, Apply at
www.muellen'eports.com.
Ref. #16826

NEED TEAM DRIVER
North Georgia to Miami
Good CDL
Call 256-797-3150


FLORIDA




INSTRUCTORICOORDINATOR
PHYSICAL THERAPIST ASSISTANT
PROGRAM
224 Duty Days, Tenure Track
Teach courses in the Physical Therapist Assistant
program. Ensure appropriate clinical activities
of students Advise students. Conduct student
selection process of PTA program students. Review
PTA course syllabi, lesson plans, tests, course
offerings and sequences Monitor program and
implement needed improvements. Assist faculty
in developing, preparing and updating program
materials. Coordinate accreditation processes
Maintain accurate literature regarding program's
admission requirements Assist in preparation of
program budget Maintain PTAAdvisory Committee.
Oversee semiannual meetings. Assist in curriculum
reviews Maintain communication with health care
agencies. Promote posditve relationships Conduct
student follow upon surveys. Keep infomled of
changes affecting programs as mandated by
accrediting agencies. Requires Master's degree,
with at least one degree in the field of Physical
Therapy or Physicaherar h rapist Assistant Licansure
as a physical therapist or cedlfication as a physical
therapist assistair. Miniiruirr 3 years expenenco in
clinical practice, didactic and/or clinical teaching ex-
perience, exptenerinco l administration, educational
theory and methodology; experience in instructional
design and methodology; expenence is student
evaluation and outcomes assessment Conmmunity
College teaching expeennce preferred. Salary:
Based on degree and experience.
Application deadline: 10/12/11
Persons interested should provide Collego ap-
plication, vita, and photocopies of transcripts All
foreign transcripts must be submitted with official
translation and evaluation
Position details nd applications avilable on web
Hliniian Re'soiiun'os
Floiia GCiteway Cilletde
Lake City FL 3202-2007


Phono (3i) 754-4314
Faxin(386) u5154414
E-Mail husgaUltii.fjtdu
FGC is ccredlh Vl It ti C'oinnism oi on Co llides of th"
Sotllhwni Ass-tim Ion of1 Clk'1,1 s iii. S1'l ls VI'P\ADA I A
R, I 'i ,1nIi't i n lid lii ,bo i ii i plo iitirl


BUY 'JIT


SELL IT


iiFIN#IT


Siy Re'porter


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LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 18, 2011


100 OOpportunities
Sales Position available for moti-
vated individual Rountree -Moore
Toyota, Great benefits, paid train-
ing/vacation. Exp. a plus but not
necessary. Call Anthony Cosentino
386-623-7442
Security Officers needed. Live
Oak area, must have current D Se-
curity Lic., Clear background,
Drivers Lic, phone,
Diploma/GED. Benefits, DFWP
EEO Must Apply at:
wwwdsisecurity.com MB 1000084
TANKER DRIVER
Night Position & Part time day po-
sition needed, Gasoline & Diesel
Fuel Transport Delivery Driver,
Tues. Sat.,
Truck based in Lake City, Florida,
Local Deliveries, Health Insur-
ance, 401K, Paid Vacation
Competitive Pay Structure,
Must have two years driver
experience, clean MVR,
Application available by mailing:
info@jj-fuel.com
Fax completed applications to
Heather at 850-973-3702.
Questions call 1-800-226-5434
after 3:00 p.m., Speak to Ronnie.
TAX PREPARERS Needed for
the upcoming tax season,
experienced preferred but tax
training is available. If you want to
work for a tax service where cus-
tomer service is the highest priori-
ty Call 386-754-0060.

1 Medical
120 Employment
North Florida Pediatrics
Has positions open for both
'L.P.N. and C.N.A's.
Interested parties need to be flexible
and dependable.
Peds Medical office experience
a plus. Please fax resume to
386-755-7940 or email to
hr^nfloediatrics.com

140 Work Wanted
PIANO LESSONS
Any age, enroll now
25 years experience
386-438-4931.

240 Schools &
240 Education

05527750
Interested in a Medical Career?
Express Training offers
courses for beginners & exp
Nursing Assistant, $479
next class-09/12/10
Phlebotomy national certifica-
tion, $800 next class-10/10/l 1
Continuing education
Fees iqcl. books, supplies, exam
fees. Call 386-755-4401 or
expresstrainingservices.com

05527946
OBTAIN YOUR
COMMERCIAL DRIVERS
LICENSE
CLASSES FORMING NOW
AT FLORIDA GATEWAY
COLLEGE
CLASSROOM TRAINING,
STATE-OF-THE-ART
SIMULATOR, BEHIND THE
WHEEL DRIVING
FINANCING AVAILABLE
FOR QUALIFIED
APPLICANTS
CALL 386-754-4405



310 Pets & Supplies

05527616
rn$$REWARD$$
LOST

Silky/Yorkie
Terrier: Missing
since August 29
(am), Aprox 10
lbs. Black body/brown face &
feet. Needs medicine. Last seen
at S & S on 441 N. & 100. His
name is Bradley.
Please call 386-623-2806

FOUND-2 Female Puppies at RR
Xing on Hwy. 135. Call to identify
or give info. on breed to help find
them a home. 386-365-7052
German Sheppard Puppy 10
weeks old Black & Tan. Health
Certs. & shots, Parents on
Premises. $300.00. 386-961-8130


402 Appliances
FROST FREE refrigerator.
Whirlpool Very clean. Works
good. White, $100.
386-292-3927
WHIRLPOOL ELECTRIC
STOVE. White, Works Good,
$100.
386-292-3927
Whirlpool Washer & Dryer.
White, large capacity.
Works Great, $285. for both.
386-292-3927


407 Computers
HP Computer,
$80.00
386-755-9984 or
386-292-2170


IBM LAPTOP Computer, WITH
BAG $80.00
386-755-9984 or
386-292-2170

420 Wanted to Buy
K&H TIMBER
We Buy Pine Hardwood &
Cypress. Large or small tracts.
Call 386-961-1961.

440 Miscellaneous
TWO FREE Female Bull Dogs
10 months old
Shots, spayed, free to good home.
Call 386-288-5149


450 Good Things
450 to Eat
GREEN PEANUTS For Sale
Graded and washed.
$30.00 a bushel.
386-752-3434

f630 Mobile Homes
630 foiRent
2 OR 3 BEDROOMS
Clean, Quiet Park $475-$525.mo
Water, septic, garbage included
758-2280 References, NO PETS!
2&3 BR MH. $395 $650. mo.
plus deposit. Water & sewer fur-
nished. Cannon Creek MHP
386-752-6422
2/2 Units. Great rental program
for responsible tenants.
Call for details, 386-984-8448
13th Month FREE!!
3/2 Large MH, small park, near
FGCC, Small pets ok, $500 dep
$575 mo w/12 mo lease
386-752-1971 or 352-281-2450
'3/2.5 S of Lake City, (Branford
area) $575 mo plus security
386-590-0642 or 386-867-1833
www.suwanneevalleyproperties.coni
4 BR/3BA Manufactured Home
Fireplace, 1g. kitchen, 1g. master
w/walkin closets. Quiet Wellborn
area. $850 mo. 386-438-0285.
LG clean 3br's $450. -$650. mo. +
dep. Also, 2br mobile home's
available. No Pets.
5 Points area. 386-961-1482
Mobile Homes for rent in
White Springs, Lake City & Ft.
White Contact 386-623-3404
or 386-397-2779

f640 Mobile Homes
640 for Sale
Champion Home Inspections
Protect Your Investment
With A Professional
Inspection State Licensed
And Insured 386-344-5551
High Springs. 1629 sqft. on 10
acres. Needs to sell. $84,999.
Make an offer! MLS 78776
Bosshardt Realty Services.
386-965-4873
Fort White. 2336 sqft on 5 acres.
Tape & textured walls. Needs to
sell. $99,999. Motivated, make an
offer MLS 78841 (386)965-4873
Bosshardt Realty Services.
Lake City 1560 sqft. buit in 2002.
On 5 acres. $83,999. MLS 78931
Bosshardt Realty Services.
386-965-4873
3/2 DWMH "Model Home" condi-
tion. Just under I ac w/granddaddy
oaks and landscaped MLS#77988.
$84,900, Nancy Rogers
867-1271 R.E.O. Realty Group
Palm Harbor Homes
Red Tag Sale
Over 10 Stock Units Must Go
Save Up To 35K!
800-622-2832

Mobile Home
650 & Land

Owner Finance, 3/2. on 1.5 acres,
S of Lake City, small down/$695
mo, 386-590-0642 / 386-867-1833
www.suwanneevalleyproperties.com
WOW! 2 Mobile homes on 5
acres! 2006. 3/2.5, above pool,
1997 1,500 sq. ft. with nice
porch.$139,888 MLS 78531 Brit-
tany Results Realty 386-397-3473

Unfurnished Apt.
710 For Rent








05527705
SPRING HILL VILLAGE
Excellent High Springs location.
1, 2 & 3 bedroom floor-plans;
some with garages.
Call 386-454-1469
or visit our website:
www.springhillvillage.net

IBR APT.
Downtown Location, Clean.
$450 mo, plus Security.
NO PETS. Call 386-755-3456
2br/1 ba, I car garage,
W/D hook up, $525 month,
no pets 1 month sec,
386-961-8075
2BR/1BA. Close to town.
$565.mo plus deposit. '
Includes water & sewer.
386-965-2922
2BR/2BA w/garage
5 minutes from VA hospital.
Call for details.
386-755-4590 or 365-5150
Amber Wood Hills Apts.
Private Patio area. Beautiful yard.
Washer/dryer hkup. Free water &,
sewer. 1/1, 2/1. Move in special.
386-754-1800. wwwmyflapts.com
Columbia Arms Apt. located 1/2
mi from V.A. & Winn Dixie. Pet
Friendly. Move in Special $199.
Pool, laundry & balcony.
386-754-1800. www.myflapts.com
Duplex w/garage spacious, 2/1,
1300 sq ft, W/D hook up, CH/A,
$650 month & bckgrnd chk,
386-697-3248 or 352-377-7652
Great location W of 1-75, spacious
deluxe 2br apts., garage, W/D
hookup, patio. $600/700 & up, +
Sec, 386-965-5560 or 344-3715


Greentree Townhouse
Summer special. 2/1, 2/1.5. Free
water & sewer. Balcony & patio.
Laundry. Behind Kens on Hwy 90.
386-754-1800 wwwmyflapts.com

ONE 51 PLACE APTS
Alachua
MOVE IN SPECIALS
1, 2, & 3 bedrooms
Call TODAY 386-462-0656
or visit us at one51place.comrn

Redwine Apartments. Move in
special $199. Limited time. Pets
welcome, with 5 complexes,
we have a home for you.
386-754-1800. www.imylapts.com


710 Unfurnished Apt. 810 Home for Sale


The Lakes Apts. Studios & IBr's
from $135/wk. Util. & cable incl.,
Sec 8 vouchers accepted, monthly
rates avail Call 386-752-2741
Wayne Manor Apts.
Move in $199. Summer special.
2/1, washer/dryer. Behind Kens off
Hwy 90. 386-754-1800
www.myflapts.com
Windsor Arms Apartments.
Summer special $199. Move in!
2/1, 2/1.5, 2/2. Pet Friendy. Free
200 ch. Dish. Washer/dryer hkup.
386-754-1800. www.myflapts.com

720 Furnished Apts.
720 For Rent
lbr Apt. includes water, elec, &
cable. $595. mo. Good area. 7
minutes from town. References &
sec. req'd. No pets. 386-719-4808
GARAGE APT. 1 BR/1 BA
approx. 10 miles out of Lake City
SSouth, $320 month.
Call 386-755-7324
Rooms for Rent. Hillcrest, Sands,
Columbia. All furnished. Electric,
cable, fridge, microwave. Weekly
or monthly rates. I person $135,
2 persons $150. weekly
386-752-5808
Studio Apt. Private. Rent incl util-
ities, Satellite TV, appliances,
(washer/dryer). No pets 386-963-
4767 or 292-0385 Available 9/1

Unfurnished
730 Home For Rent
'09 Custom Dream Home
4BR/3.5BA, 5+acres, horses ok.
Old brick & heart pine floors,
jet tub, DSL. Beautiful!
For right person $2000/mo.
negotiable 970-221-0090
2 BR/1 BA, Country, South. of
Lake City, private river access.
w/boat ramp, 2 garages, clean,
$650 mo. + sec. 386-590-0642
2BR house $625.mo $625. dep.
Also, 2 large br apt. $525. mo
$525 dep. Conveniently close to
the VA & shopping. 386-344-2972
3-6 BR/2 BA on Cty. Rd. 49,
Near Beachville, $650 mo.,
no pets, $650 sec., Call Margie
386-935-3447 or 386-984-5109
3BR/1.5 BA Large lot. Very clean
with storage shed. Quiet area.
$850 mo. + $850. dep.
386-752-7578
4br/2ba CHA Brick, 1200 sqft
lac., Close to FGCC, CR 245A.
Ceramic tile/carpet, $800 mo $800
dep (904)708-8478 App. req'd
Brick 3br/2ba Large yard, garage,
CH/A. 189 Stanley Ct. Lake City.
$950. mo + $1000 dep.
Call 386-365-8543
FOR RENT OR FOR SALE,
3 BR/2 BA, with in ground pool,
$1,400 mo.
386-965-1019
Prime location 2br/lba.
Resid'l or comm'l. Comer of Baya
& McFarlane. $6q0. mo. $500 sec.
386-752-9144 or 755-2235
VERY LARGE 2 BR/2 BA, Brick
home, garage, CH & A, Clean,
386-590-0642 / 386-867-1833,
www.suwanneevalleyproperties.com

750 Business &
75 Office Rentals
FOR LEASE: Downtown office
space. Convenient to
Court house.
Call 386-755-3456
For Lease: E Baya Ave. Two -
1000 sqft office space units or
combined for 2000 sqft. 386-984-
0622 or weekends 386-497-4762
Midtown Commercial Center,
brand new executive front suite &
suite w/warehouse.
Call Vicki or Joe 386-935-2832.
OFFICE SPACE for Lease
576 sq' $450/mth
900 sq' $600/mth
3568 sq' $2973/mt
8300 sq' $5533/mth
also Bank Building
Excellent Locations
Torh Eagle, GRI
(386) 961-1086
DCA Realtor



805 Lots for Sale
BEAUTIFUL 5 acres in
Lake City, 100% owner financing,
no qualifying, $395 per month.
Please call 512-663-0065
FOR SALE BY OWNER,
10 acres, approx. 7 acres planted
pines, with a 24 x 40 foot (Steel
Dean) bldg. w/18 foot opening,
own power, $85,000
Call Sonya 386-288-2557.
Owner Financing. River comm &
nature lover's dream in Lee. 15
wooded ac by the Withlacoochee.
Property is already subdivided
MLS 75576 $48,000 623-6896


810 Home for Sale
/ Champion Home Inspections
386-344-5551" Inspections
Starting At $ 249.00
Veterans Receive 10% Off
Full Inspection.


2003 Sea Pro 170CC
Yamaha 90hp, low hours,
live wells, Bimini top, fish
finder, aluminum trailer
w/spare, boat cover.
$7,500

Call
386-719-6537


4 BR/2 BA, on I acre, granite
floors thru out, open kitchen, wrap
around front porch.$139,900
MLS 77292 Brittany
Results Realty 386-397-3473
Beautiful home on 15 acres w/over
2,500 sq. ft. New appli., new tank
at well, new drain field, workshop.
$235,000 MLS 77552 Brittany
Results Realty 386-397-3473
Century 21 Darby Rogers
752-6575 Immaculate home on
5 acres. 3/2, new energy efficient
A/C system, metal roof, 12x28 work-
shop. #78508 Only $168,900
Century 21 Darby Rogers
752-6575 3/2 located on Ilth Fair-
way at Southern Oaks Country Club.
Huge master BR, huge kitchen, 2 car
garage. #78276 Only $129,900
Century 21 Darby Rogers
752-6575 Executive home, 4/3, 2557
Ssqft, plantation shutters, granite
counter tops, in-ground pool w/spa.
#78610 Only $269,000
Century 21 Darby Rogers
752-6575 Beautiful Victorian/White
Springs, 7BR/3.5B w/5 fireplaces, a
Must See. #76361
Only $185,000
Century 21- Darby Rogers
752-6575 Golf course living, 3/2.5,
vaulted ceilings, open floor plan,
place, breakfast area. #78941 (1-
year home warranty) Only $210,000
Champion Home Inspections
Contact John 386-344-5551
State Licensed
And Insured
championhomeinspections.us
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
10 acres w/well maintained brick
home. 2012 sqft. Open split floor
plan. Lori Giebeig Simpson
365-5678 MLS# 74447 $149,900
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
New home in May Fair. Super area
comer lot. 4br split plan. Versatile
colors. Elaine K. Tolar
755-6488 MLS# 76919 $199,900
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
3br/2ba. 1590 sqft. Lori Giebeig
Simpson. 365-5678 or
Mary Brown Whitehurst
965-0887 MLS# 74542 $109,900
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
Cute 3/2 brick in town. Wood
floors, Ig family room. Front &
back porch Lori Giebeig Simpson
365-5678 MLS# 77989 $79,900
Lg. 4/3 family home. 16x20
screened porch, workshop. 4.5 ac.
fenced/cross fenced MLS 74339
$219,900. N Fla Homeland Real-
ty Darlene Hart 386-288-2878
Great 3/2 home w/2346 sq ft
under roof on .67 ac., Creekside
S/D. Big back yard w/plenty of
shade trees. On a cul-de-sac, MLS
77385 $169,900 623-6896
Spacious 4/2 home on I ac. Split
floor plan. Great neighborhood.
Easy access to 1-75 $204.900 MLS
77859 N Fla Homeland Realty
Darlene Hart 386-288-2878
WoodCrest 3/2 Split floor plan
Screened porch. 10x 12 storage
shed. $126,900 MLS 77932
Darlene Hart 386-288-2878
N Fla Homeland Realty
Home for entertaining 3/2 plus
pool house w/half bath, 2.25
fenced ac. Freshly painted. Split
plan. Large rear deck MLS 78103
$179,900 386-623-6896
0.5 ac tract. 441 (4 lane) frontage.
1/2 mi from Target distribution.
2/1.5 zoned resid'l MLS# 78506
$88,000 Nancy Rogers 867-1271
R.E.O. Realty Group
Great home, Great neighborhood,
great price. 3/2 Close to town A
Must See!. MLS#77411, $79,900,
Nancy Rogers
867-1271 R.E.O. Realty Group
4/2 fenced yard, 2 car garage,
Fairly new roof & HVAC Shed,
fenced back yard. MLS#77602,
$162,500, Nancy Rogers
867-1271 R.E.O. Realty Group
Lake City Country Club. 4/3, reno-
vated. Great for entertaining. Glass
doors open to back yard. $179,900
MLS#78637 Nancy Rogers
R.E.O. Realty Group 867-1271
Investor Special Buy. 2br con-
crete block w/CH/A. Available "as
is" $22,900, MLS76821.
Vin Lantroop. 386-755-6600
Hallmark Real Estate
Pool Home. 2 Story w/soaring
ceilings. Ig master w/Jacuzzi.
Fenced yard. $159,000 MLS77085
Teresa Spradley 386-365-8343
Hallmark Real Estate
Near Itchetucknee head springs,
easyGainesville commute. For
sale or rent! $75,500, MLS77398.
Paula Lawrence. 386-623-1973
Hallmark Real Estate
REDUCED gated community.
Brick w/florida room & private
garden. Security system. Ginger
Parker. MLS77703. 386-365-2135
Hallmark Real Estate
Like to Entertain? Over 2900
sqft. 3br/2.5ba. Fenced w/sprinkler
& security system. MLS78404.
Sherry Willis. 386-365-8095
Hallmark Real Estate
Springhollow Ig brick. 4br/2ba
w/lg screened porch. Oversized
ga-
rage. upgraded kitchen & bath.
$239,500, MLS78787. Janet Creel.
719-0382 Hallmark Real Estate


1994 Chevy Cavalier
4DR. 115,283 mi., mini
wagon, no accidents,
automatic, cold air, CD
player/radio.
$2,869

Call
386-292-9329


M e cash

ADVERTISE YOUR

GARAGE SALE
WITH THE
LAKE CITY REPORTER
Only

$1 750

4 LINES 3 DAYS
2 FREE SIGNS I

(386) 755-5440


We're on target!


zuuu M S, faaran van
Runs great, has an 80,000
factory warranty,
AC warranty.
$7,469 OBO
Call
386-292-9329
386-438-8731


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worth of all the
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has to offer:
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lakecltyreporter.com CURRENTS mng..n.
Subscribe Today
386-755-5445


810 Home for Sale

Well maintained 4/2, 2566 sqft
oversized den w/fplace, Ig kitchen,
breakfast area overlooking gazebo.
#78347 Only $179,000 Century 21-
Darby Rogers 752-6575

82O Farms &
2A Acreage

4 1/2 acre lot. Lake Jeffery Road.
Gorgeous Oaks!Paved Rd
Owner Financing! NO DOWN!
$59,900. $525mo 352-215-1018.
www.LandOwnerFinancine.com
4 acres, Wellborn, New Well
installed, Beautifully wooded
w/cleared Home Site, owner fin,
no down, $39,900, $410 mon
Call 352-215-1018
www.LandOwnerFinancing.com
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
Brick in LC Country Club. 4/3
Lots of extras, oversized garage &
storage. Elaine K. Tolar
752-4211 MLS# 78739 $239,900
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
Brick in WoodCrest S/D. Split
plan. Screened porch. Lg back
yard. Elaine K. Tolar
752-4211 MLS# 77015 $137,900
For Lease FARM- 7 stall barn.
17+ acres, pasture, cross fenced.
Close in $500. mo.
386-961-1086
Owner financed land. Half.acre to
ten acre lots. As low as $300
down. Deas Bullard Properties
386-752-4339 www.landnfl.com

8OA Commercial
830 Property

Commercial Parcel 2 acres w/252
ft frontage on SR 47 Add'l 4.76
ac. avail. $149,900 MLS# 78260
Call 386-867-1271 Nancy Rogers
R.E.O.Realty Group, Inc

870 Real Estate
87 Wanted

I Buy Houses
CASH!
Quick Sale Fair Price
386-269-0605


950 Cars for Sale

1994 CHEV. CAVALIER 4 DR,
115,283 miles, Mini Wagon, no
accidents, automatic, cold air,
CD/Radio $2,869. 386-292-9329

952 Vans & Sport
9 Util. Vehicles

2000 GMC SAFARI VAN, Runs
great, has an 80,000 factory war-
ranty, A/C warranty, $7.469 OBO,
386-292-9329 or 386-438-8731.


"--r O









Bring the picture in or
we will take it for you!
* Ad runs 10 consecutive days
with a description and photo in the
newspaper and online E-edition.
* Ad runs 10 consecutive days as a
classified line ad online.
* You must include vehicle price.
* All ads are prepaid.
* Private party only.





2006 EF250
Ford Van
3/4 ton, metal work
shelves/ladder rack,
60K miles, exc. cond.
$10,500
Call
386-555-5555
If you don't sell your vehicle
during the first 10 days, you
can run the same vehicle ad
for 10 additional days for
only $15.00
Terms and conditions remain the
same for the additional run.

ToGe Yu
VehcleSod, al
Mary or B ide

(36 5S54


Classified Department: 755-5440









LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 18, 2011


Connected www.lakeecityreporter.com











?" .,, -, i V. '" ie
......... .J'^' : .

1^ r1.,
I ., wnp;


275 N. NIarion Av'enue
Downtown (next to Kowans)
:. Open Tui -sdiy-Satirday
l-- Donna Hyde, Owner


)oa scps
by dc(i tn ; / unique gits
Many' Franr'wilcs of Soaps
(ask for your favorite scent)
We do favors for:
Weddiiqs. Baby Showers
and any occasion
- h MonoFrarned Soaps
(you (h(o)se. coklr 8S Frgrtance')
Custloin Silk Arranq-rnent-s


-- .---. Rotntre Mooe Toota ucks -


TOYOTA
Please present Rourniree
Moore Toyota BuCIks at
time of purchase No cash
value No reproduc1orlns
of the Rountree Moore
Toyota Bucls is allowed
Not wvali A in any otrier
coupon One coupon per
customer Fees ta r
& shop supplies not
included


10% OFF



SERVICE
Expires9-30-11 i
Not Legal Tender


New Patient
Exam and Necessary X-rays
D0150.D 031
iFril-time

Recg.$136 S\INGSOFS$107
. -.. Expires Sepember 30, 2011 '
ASPEN DENTAL GROUkP

'. Z. www.asponlakecity.com


m


2 Rountree Moore ITovota Bucks !KoUnllll


I -- I mml. I


Classified Department: 755-5440









Lake City Reporter


Story ideas?

Contact
Robert Bridges
Editor
754-0428
rbridges@lakecityreporter.com


LIFE


Sunday, September 18, 2011


www.lakecityreporter.com


Section D


Life in the slow lane for motorists


By Gordon Jackson
gjackson@lakecityreporter.com
The beginning of the
school year is when
Columbia County school
administrators and staff
are most concerned about
student safety.
In Lake City, motorists
get accustomed to driv-
ing near schools at posted
speed limits, while students
stay home during summer
vacation. When the school
year starts in August,
motorists are often unpre-
pared to slow down when
the yellow caution lights
flash as students arrive
and leave school on foot,
bicycle, bus or car.
"The beginning of the
school year is really the
issue," said Joe Adkins,
principal at Melrose Park
Elementary School in Lake
City.
.TV, radio stations and
newspapers make public
service announcements
at the beginning of the
school year to remind
people to slow down in
school zones, especially
during posted times when
students arrive or leave.
"The challenge is get-
ting traffic to slow down,"
Adkins said. "What makes
our school unique is we
have a lot of foot traffic."
Ed Hogg, a Lake City
crossing guard, said stu-
dent safety is his No. 1
priority. He is responsible
for school crossings at
Melrose Park Elementary,
Richardson Middle School
and Columbia High School
every day classes are in
session.
City police are posted at
all Lake City schools for
the first few weeks and
randomly for the remain-
der of the school year to
slow down motorists.
"The police department
always has officers patrol-
ling," Hogg said. "They're
very visible."
Hogg said students are
very cooperative when
he stops traffic to safely
escort them across streets.
"The kids have been
really good this year," he
said. "They can't cross
until I tell them to cross."
Perhaps the greatest
concern is parents who do
not give their undivided
attention to driving. Hogg
said he has seen parents
talking on cell phones and
texting messages while


TO

A4


." -"" -



JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Above, Lake City Police Department crossing guard Ed Hogg
stops incoming traffic Monday at Southeast Ermine Avenue
and Southeast Baya Drive to allow a fifth-grader to safely
cross the street. At right a couple of students from Melrose
Park Elementary School hops on the back of a motorized
scooter while crossing Southeast Ermine Avenue Monday
after school.


driving their children to
school. Some children are
not wearing seat belts, or
in a car seat in the case of
younger kids, he said.
The challenges are dif-
ferent at rural schools
such as Columbia City
Elementary, said
Lana Boone, the


sheriff's deputy is posted
near the entrance to direct
traffic and ensure parents
safely enter and leave
school safely.
Without a deputy to
direct traffic, Boone said
it takes much longer for
parents to safely enter and
exit school property.
"If they [deputies] are
not there, we are totally
stopped up," Boone said.
"We realize how important
it is. It isn't like in town.
You don't have the same
people going through all
the time. "If they [depu-
ties] are not there, we are
totally stopped up," Boone
said of the school parking
lot"


Ed Hogg, a
Lake City
crossing
guard, said
student
safety is his
No. I
priority. He
is responsible
for school
crossings at
Melrose Park
Elementary,
Richardson
Middle School
and Columbia
High School
every day
classes are in
session.


school's principal.
The school is on State
Road 47, with a 55 mph
speed limit. A flashing cau-
tion light tells motorists
to slow to 30 mph before
classes begin and when,
students leave in the after-
noon.
A Columbia County


Guide dogs, handlers deal with


more distractions than ever


Associated Press
LOS ANGELES Guide dogs and
their handlers have always under-
gone intense training on dealing with
distractions from squirrels to skate-
boarders. But today's guide dogs have
a whole new generation of things to
worry about: quiet cars, button-acti-
vated walk signals, stroller traffic on
handicapped curb-cuts, and a greater
likelihood of interacting with other
dogs.
"It used to be you encountered
other dogs mostly on sidewalks while
you were going down the street," said
Morgan Watkins, acting president and
chief executive officer of Guide Dogs
for the Blind, which has campuses in
San Rafael, north of San Francisco,
and in Boring, Oregon.
Nowadays, he said, a guide dog
might encounter another dog in a
supermarket aisle or at the mall or the
dentist's office, he said. There are few
places pets can't be found these days.
"We work very hard with the
assumption that your dog can be dis-


tracted anywhere," said Watkins, who
started losing his vision at age 11.
Anything or anyone that keeps a
guide dog from focusing on its work
is considered a distraction and
becomes something the dog is trained
to ignore.
Everyone can help guide dogs and
their handlers avoid some distrac-
tions. One basic rule: Don't pet a
guide dog without permission.
Because the dogs are so highly
trained and well-behaved, people want
to touch them, Watkins said. Many
times, he said, he has reached down
to learn which way his dog Will is
looking, only to find someone else's
hand already on the dog.
Another simple way to minimize
'distractions for guide dogs is to keep
your own dog leashed.
If a dog barks at Will, Watkins
said he would probably keep moving.
"Odds are he won't flinch," he said.
Guide dogs are also not trained to
fight. If a guide dog is attacked by
another animal, handlers will drop the


harness and call for help.
Another new distraction or hazard
for guide dog teams is the electric
car.
Watkins has excellent hearing and
can usually make out the sound of an
electric car, but it's difficult at noisy
intersections. That's why guide dogs
are taught intelligent disobedience
- defying an order to keep a partner
safe, Watkins explained. If Watkins
tells Will to go and there is an electric
car going through an intersection, he
will not go.
When the dog disobeys, "I follow
my dog. It's part of the trust," he
said.
In addition to quiet car-, other envi-
ronmental elements and ditnraclions
that have necessitated changes in
guide-dog training include six-lane
streets, traffic islands, roundabouts,
cars turning right on red, wheelchair-
accessible curbs, button-activated
walk signals and even baby strollers
using handicapped ramps and curb
cuts, Watkins said.


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Cecilia von Beroldingen, a forensic scientist and direc-
tor of the California Criminalistics Institute at the California
Department of Justice, is seen with her guide dog, Neoki, in
Sacramento, Calif.










2D LAKE CITY REPORTER LIFE SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 18, 2011




Making memories in new ways


By Dr. Troy Appling
Associate Professor of English
Florida Gateway College
s my ENC 1102
(Writing about
Literature)
students can
test, material
objects can often serve as
symbols of the person who
has them (or wants to have
them). The other day my
family and I were talking
about heirlooms, and who
would get what when the
previous generation passed
on. As I've pondered that
conversation, I have come
to realize that what I want
more than anything else
from my family members is
their stories.
I want to know all
about Grampa's family in
California; he had around
a dozen brothers and sis-
ters, but I only got to meet
a couple of them over the
years. How did Grampa


go from watchmaker's
apprentice to naval aviator
to piano tuner for Liberace
and Elvis? How did he get
from northern California to
northern Florida over the
course of eight decades?
I want to know how
Granny met Grampa. What
was their courtship and
wedding like? I don't even
know where they got mar-
ried, just that it happened
65 years ago this past sum-
mer. I want to know the
story behind the gold nug-
get tie tack that came from
my great-grandfather's
gold mine in California.
I want to hear Granny's
reaction to finding out that
they were going to have
my uncle 10 years after
my father was born. I want
them to tell me exactly
how Cades Cove and the
Great Smoky Mountain
National Park became the
favorite Appling family


vacation grounds, and in
one instance even a wed-
ding site.
My parents, sister, and
I have moved collectively
over two dozen times;
Granny and Grampa have
lived in Duval or Clay coun-
ties almost all their married
life, except for a brief stint
in Lake City when Dad was
little; my other grandfather
lived in a suburb of Atlanta
from before my mother
was born until I was in col-
lege, and all in the same
house. What was it like
living in the same place for
so long?
Not to mention the fact
that all of my grandpar-
ents have to have SOME
wisdom they can share
with us, right? Someone
who has been married
for decades and who has
raised three boys (on my
dad's side) or twin girls
(on my mom's) surely


has child-rearing stories
that we've not heard; now
that I'm a parent myself, I
would love to have some
family history for compari-
son. (It would also help to
explain the knowing grins
that both my grandfathers
share whenever I recount
the exploits of my chil-
dren.)
To capture this wisdom,
and because I am not the
first person to want a last-
ing record of family stories,
there is an organization
dedicated to people with
similar desires. Founded
in 2003, StoryCorps, which
is regularly featured on
National Public Radio, is
an oral history project that
allows people to record
interviews with family
members about their lives
and stories. These in turn
are archived for future
generations in the Library
of Congress's American


Folklife Center and online
at storycorps.org, where
you can listen to many of
the stories and interviews.
The StoryCorps website
also notes that since its
inception the organization
has recorded over 30,000
interviews nationwide,
and offers this rationale
for what they do: "We do
this to remind one another
of our shared human-
ity, strengthen and build
the connections between
people, teach the value of
listening, and weave into
the fabric of our culture the
understanding that every
life matters."
While StoryCorps does
have a travelling studio
used to record stories
nationwide, I would encour-
age all of you not to wait.
for them to make it to Lake
City. If you have someone
whose story you want to
hear, or if you want to tell


your story for others, make
your own recording! Many
people upon hearing that I
am a professor of English
lament that they aren't
"writers." That's the beauty
of what StoryCorps does,
and what I am suggesting
that you do. For centuries,
human history was com-
pletely oral-stories were
passed by word of mouth
from one generation to
the next. Everybody has a
story, and even if you don't
feel like a writer, you can
still tell yours.
So the next time your
family members gather
around the dinner table
and start telling tales of
bygone days, break out the
tape recorder and a list of
questions-you might be
making a new memory of
your own.
Troy Appling can be reached
at troy.appling @fgc.edu or at
(386) 754-4369..


DHS: A new


airport security


policy for kids


under age 13


Associated Press
WASHINGTON -
Children 12 years old
and younger soon will
no longer be required
to remove their shoes
at airport security
checkpoints, Homeland
Security Secretary Janet
Napolitano
t o 1 d
Congress
on Tuesday. Instead
The pol- patting
icy also a- oung
includes screen
other ways
to screen SOon b
young chil- to Si
dren with- child
out resort- thrc
ing to a pat-
down that me
involves deteC
touching or t
private
areas on the walk"-tl
body. imal
T h e mach
changes
should be _,dmelan
rolled out offi
in the com- o
ing months,
Napolitano
said during a Senate hear-
ing on the terror threat to
the U.S.
Napolitano said there
may be some exceptions.
Terrorists have plotted to
use children as suicide
bombers, and some chil-
dren still may be required
to remove their shoes to
keep security random.
"There will always
be some unpredictabil-
ity built into the system,
and there will always be
random checks even for
groups that we are look-
ing at differently, such as
children," she said.
Many travelers have
complained that the TSA
does not use common
sense when it screens all
air travelers the same way,
including young children
and the elderly. Criticism
escalated last year when
the government began
using a pat-down more
invasive than what had
been used in the past, one
that involves screeners
feeling a traveler's genital
and breast areas.
Earlier this year, TSA
Administrator John
Pistole instructed screen-
ers to make every effort
to screen young children
without giving them the
new pat-down. Pistole had
called for a more aggres-
sive pat-down when he
took over the agency last
year because he thought


it gave screeners the best
chance at stopping a sui-
cide bomber like the one
who nearly brought down
an airliner over Detroit in
2009 with a bomb tucked
in his pants.
Instead of patting down
a young child, screeners
will soon be
told to send
c h i d r en
ad of "'throu g h
down metal detec-
tors or
Child, the walk-
erS Will through
e told imaging
end. machines
multiple
dren times to cap-
Dugh ture a clear
DtaM. picture and
actors use more
explosive
the trace detec-


iroughf tion tools
going such as
hand swabs,
lines. according to
a homeland
d Security security offi-
ial cialspeaking
on condition
of anonym-
ity because
he was not authorized to
speak publicly about the
measures.
The government is
expected to soon begin
testing a new airport
screening system on a
small number of travelers
who volunteer personal
information that, intelli-
gence officials will vet. If
cleared, these travelers
could go through secu-
rity faster, in some cases,
because they won't be
asked to take their shoes
off.
Raemoving shoes dur-
ing checkpoint screening
has been a common com-
plaint among airline trav-
elers since security was
increased after an al-Qaida
operative tried to set off a
bomb built into his shoe
on an American Airlines
flight in December 2001.
Not all countries
around the world have
the same requirements.
For instance, countries
in the European Union
have never required that
travelers take off their
shoes to go through secu-
rity at airports, Pistole
has acknowledged. And
while no one has attempt-
ed another shoe bomb
on a U.S. flight since
December 2001, Pistole
said the technique con-
tinues to be an option for
terrorists.


c
I,


Final night of NY Fashion


Week features big names


ASSOCIATED PRI
The 3.1 Phillip Lim Spring 2012 women's collection is mod-
eled during Fashion Week, Wednesday, Sept. 14, 2011, in
New York.


By Samantha Critchell
Associated Press
NEW YORK Marc
Jacobs. Calvin Klein.
Ralph Lauren. Spring pre-
views wrap up Thursday
at New York Fashion
Week with shows by
some of the most influen-
tial designers in the busi-
ness before the industry
moves on to the runways
of London, Milan and
Paris.
Lauren's show always
seems to come at the
right time, when the
exhausted crowd needs a
breath of fresh elegance
after eight days of non-
stop fashion.
They got it this time
around with Lauren's
loose "Great Gatsby" sil-
houettes and wide-legged
pants and shorts suits,
some paired with men's
ties that looked more
Tom than Daisy.
The pale palette shim-
mered in soft pinks, sil-
vers, whites and greens.
It was a distinct departure
from the bursts of bright
color and less-dainty flo-
rals that dominated eight
days of shows for editors,
stylists and retailers.
Feathers in boas were
carried over to the neck


and hemlines of flapper
dresses in outfits com-
plete with hats of the era.
Another classic
American brand, Bill
Blass, preserved the
past and forged a future
in the hands of Jeffrey
Monteiro. He was chosen
almost two years ago to
revive the line after years
of tough going for the
company.
He showed familiar,
impeccably tailored navy
coats and blazers, but
underneath a navy twill
peacoat was a bandeau
top. A white halter jump-
suit had no back at all.
A number of looks for
evening exposed an equal
amount- of skin.
As soon as the Lincoln
Center tents come down,
London Fashion Week
begins Friday.


China, Crystal,
Flatware and Gifts
Couples registered:

Ashley Cloninger
Justin Brimer
September 24, 2011


Jill Peck
Bryson Johnson
September 24, 2011


Renee Bates
Kyle Head
November 5, 2011


Ashley Owens
Kenneth Gamble
December 3, 2011


Jazan Nabinger
Blaiyze Neeley
January 21, 2012
We know exactly what
they want In a wedding
or shower gift. We update
their list as gifts are
purchased, and gift wrap.

r WARD'S
JEWELRY & GIFTS
156 N. Marion Ave.
Lake City
752-5470


,11











Page Editor: Emogene Graham, 754-0415


LAKE CITYREPORTER ADVICE & CROSSWORD SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 18, 2011


DEAR ABBY


It's time for sister-in-law to


hang sob story out to dry


DEAR ABBY: My brother
"Dan" cheated on his wife,
"Darlene." His affair lasted
five years before he dumped
Darlene to pursue a relation-
ship with the other woman.
My problem is, every time
family members invite
Darlene and her children to
be part of an event, we have
to listen to her long, drawn-
out monologue about Dan's
affair with "that woman."
I don't approve of Dan's
behavior, but I refuse to hate
him because their marriage
failed. It was on the downslide
for a long time before the
affair began. Darlene has
spent the last four years mak-
ing sure her kids never see
my brother's new wife or
meet their half-siblings. She
talks openly in front of them
about how "evil" their father
and "that woman" are, then
invites Dan on family trips,
which I'd find confusing if I
were in their shoes.
I don't want to cut my nieces
and nephews out of my life,
because they need stability. But
I don't care at this point if I ever
see Darlene again. Any sug-
gestions? Im at my wit's end.
- TIRED OF THE SOB STORY
DEAR TIRED: The reason
the No. 1 songs on the charts
keep changing is listeners final-
ly grow bored and stop buying
them. The same is true for the
"he done me wrong" chorus
your former sister-in-law keeps
repeating. While I understand
her pain and anger, it's a shame
Darlene hasn't accepted that


Abigail Van Buren
www.dearobby.com

she needs to get on with her
life. A step in that direction
would be to quit wallowing in
the past.
Because you can't control
her, when she starts her next
refrain, excuse yourself. Let
her entertain the rest of the
family while you spend qual-
ity time with your nieces and
nephews, and you'll all have a
better time.
** ** **
DEAR ABBY: I have been
married several years to
an only child. Despite our
objections, my mother-in-law,
"Diana," continues to treat my
husband, "Rob," as though
he's helpless and me as his
equally incapable sidekick.
I should have realized
there was trouble when Diana
and other in-laws came to
visit us on our honeymoon
- unannounced and uninvited.
When we go to a buffet res-
taurant, she prepares plates
for him. She tells him what
clothes to wear to events and
even irons them for him. She
includes our names on cards,
gifts, flowers, etc., for which
we've had no input or finan-


cial contribution. Anytime we
mention going out of town,
she attempts to invite her hus-
band and herself to tag along.
Rob and I are responsible
adults who work full time. We
have never asked his parents
for anything. I find her behav-
ior insulting and intrusive.
Even if I wanted to wait on
my husband hand and foot,
I'd have to beat my mother-in-
law to it.
I have done everything I
can think of to remedy this,
from having Rob speak to
her to being frank with her
myself. Aside from saying
hello when I answer the
phone, I choose to have no
relationship with her. Am
I being overly sensitive, or
is Diana overstepping her
boundaries? MARRIED
TO AN ONLY CHILD IN
KENTUCKY
DEAR MARRIED TO
AN ONLY CHILD: If your
description of your mother-in-
law is accurate, she's the liv-
ing definition of a mother who
can't let go. Because you and
Rob have spoken frankly to
her about this and her behav-
ior persists, she strikes me as
overbearing.
By now it should be clear
that Diana isn't going to
change. Your best recourse
may be to put geographic
distance between you if and
when it's feasible.
* Write Dear Abby at
www.DearAbby.com or
P.O. Box 69440, Los
Angeles, CA 90069.


HOROSCOPES


ARIES (March 21-April
19): Enjoy a community
event, reunion or get-togeth-
er with friends. Romance is
in the stars. If you have a
promise for someone special,
now is the time. Travel and
communication will result in
added information as well as
initiation. ****
TAURUS (April 20-May
20): Make changes at home.
Get people you've helped in
the past to pitch in and you
will be done in no time. A
space conducive to making
extra cash should be your
goal. Think big, but spend
the minimum. Baby steps will
lead to profits. ***
GEMINI (May 21-June
20): Focus on being the best
you can be and nurturing
meaningful relationships.
Arguments will lead to a non-
productive day. Shake off any
angst you are feeling and set
your mind on positive goals.'
Make love, not war. ***
CANCER (June 21-July
22): Make adjustments to
your environment to help
you feel more secure. Don't
let others' negativity or lack
of insight stop you. A project
that will help you earn more

CELEBRITY


THE LAST WORD
Eugenia Word

cash should be initiated, or
at least considered. Research
will pay off. ****
LEO (July 23-Aug. 22):
Don't take a pass if the
opportunity arises to do
something with friends. Jump
in and participate. A change
of scenery will get your mind
off your worries. Love is
highlighted and so is com-
mitment. Make time for a
little passion. **
VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22):
Opportunity knocks, so don't
hesitate to sign up for a course
or plan a day trip. Your mind is
in overdrive and you will pick
up knowledge quickly. Turn
the knowledge you acquire
into something that will bring
high returns. **
LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22):
Party and enjoy your friends
or lover. Your charm will
help bring about the changes
you've wanted to see. Don't
stop short when you can
move forward until your des-
tination is reached. Travel if
it helps seal a deal or confirm
your commitment. *****

Y CIPHER


by Luis Campos
Celebrity Cipher cryptograts are created trom quotations by famous people, past and present
Each letter in the cipher stands for another.
TODAY'S CLUE: I equals V
"KNZ BJGZJJ AM KNBGSJ BJ TZVV
TADKN J KHCFBGS ; U HK BK BJ KNZBD
TNFGZJJ KNXK YXPZJ VBMZ TADKN
VBI BG S." TBVVBXY UZZUZ

PREVIOUS SOLUTION: "It's a funny thing that when a man hasn't anything on
earth to worry about, he goes off and gets married." Robert Frost
(c) 2011 by NEA, Inc. 9-19


SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov.
21): Offer your help. It's your
turn to take charge and make
things happen. A passion-
ate, imaginative approach
to whatever you do will
be appreciated and talked
about. You stand to advance
based on your dedication and
relentless courage. ***
SAGITIARIUS (Nov.
22-Dec. 21): Though your
charm will help you drum up
support, your idea may not
* be as sound as you present.
Do your research, or you
may damage your reputation.
A change at home can be
expected and will enhance a
personal relationship. ***
CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan.
19): Buy, sell, make deals and .
take care of your personal busi-
ness. You stand to make a profit
if you take advantage of the eco-
nomic climate. Focus on home
and making your place better
suit your needs. A property deal
looks good. ***
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb.
18): Good fortune is heading
your way. Focus on deals that
are a sure thing. Love is in
the stars. Putting a promise
behind your feelings will be
well received. Changes at
home will bring you great
joy. A joint venture will help
financially.*****
PISCES (Feb. 19-March
20): Expect the unexpected.
Stand up for your rights and
be prepared to go it alone
if you don't get cooperation
from others. It's time to lay
feelings on the table and dis-
cuss what you want and need
to move forward. Follow your
heart, **


SUNDAY CROSSWORD


CORNERED By Kay Anderson / Edited by Will Shortz 1 2 [ [ 5 [6 17 8 [9 |0i 11113 14 1516 17 1


Across
1 Nitty-gritty, as of
negotiations
6 Boater
11 Sponge (up)
14 Title figure in an
Aesop fable
19 Royal African
capital
20 Something
plighted
21 Co. once owned
by Howard
Hughes
22 "L'shanah ___!
(Rosh Hashana
greeting)
23 Amtrak train
24 Emulated the
phoenix
26 New Mexico
county
27 Roughly plan
29 Effects
31 Losing casino
roll
32 Not included
34 James .
duettist on the
1982 #1 hit
"Baby, Come to
Me"
36 It might be
French, Swiss or
Italian
37 Insipid writing
40 Globular
42 Fight (off)
43 "Well, that's
odd"
44 Go___ great
length
46 More placid

For any three answers,
call from a touch-tone
hone: 1-900-285-5656,
1.49 each minute; or,
with a credit card, 1-800-
814-5554.


48 Boss
50 Corporate owner
52 Passe
54 Term of address
in Dixie
55 Susan of NPR
58 Work on at a
desk. say
60 Shot up
64 Death, in
Dresden
65 Thief
67 Take no action
regarding
69 Bale binder
70 Settled down
72 Grunts may come
out of them
74 Author Shute of
"On the Beach"
76 Throw out
77 Bracket shape
79 Mini-tantrums
81 Barrio babies
83 Eavesdrop,
maybe
84 Exactly like
86 Log holder
88 What Chesapeake
dogs are trained
to do
90 Golden rule word
92 Leader of
Abraham?
94 Time of lament
95 Ayn Rand
protagonist
99 "1 have been half
in love with
Death": "Ode to
a Nightingale"
102 Locus
103 "Il 6tait ___
fois ..." (French
fairy-tale
starter)
104 Ancient
kingdom in Asia
Minor


106 Incredibly
stupid
108 Newsman
Baxter on "The
Mary Tyler
Moore Show"
109 Kitten's cry
110 Fishermen with
pots
112 Onetime weight-
loss drug
114 Exclamation
after a workout
116 Convertible
118 The dot on the
"i" in the
Culligan logo
122 acid
124 Alabama
speedway locale
126 2011 revolution
locale
127 Crazy
128 Britney Spears's
Slave 4 U".
129 More judicious
130 Stimulant
131 Really feel for?
132 la. neighbor
133 Stellate : star ::
xiphoid :___
134 Artery opener

Down
1 Some intimates
2 Billiards n.ed
3 Have ___ in one's
bonnet
4 See 87-Down
5 Library area
6 Poetic stanza
7 Many a
vaudevillian
8 Listed
9 Polished off
10 Question from
one in another
room


1 I Bad marks
12 Because of
13 Roast go-with
14 The "it" in the
lyric "turn it on,
wind it up, blow
it out"
15 Campus drillers
16 C
17 Frozen food
brand
18 Ad-fille.d weekly
25 4 on a phone
28 Cool sorts
30 Computer option
for a document
33 Singer
Washington
35 Ernest and Julio
Gallo product
37 Regulars on VHI
38 Asia Minor
39 Model
41 The Whale
constellation
45 Pro ___
47 Enzyme
regulating blood
fluid and
pressure
49 Cabbage dishes
51 Original "Wagon
Train" network
53 Classic
McDonnell
Douglas aircraft
56 Goes bad
57 Usual amount to
pay
59 Act like a
protective
another
61 Hit one out of the
park, say
62 Sap
63 Innocent
66 Actress
Knightley


68 "The ___
Tailors,"
Dorothy L.
Sayers mystery
71 N.Y.C. landmark
73 Trite
75 Ign,,c, in a way
78 Fishing line
fiasco
80 Tick off
82 Monterrey Mrs.
85 One with
endurance


87 With 4-Down.
MgSO4*7H20
89 Fingers, for short
91 Source of many
English words
that come to us
via French
93 "Strap yourselves
in, kids ...
95 Part of a boxer's
training
96 Time it takes to
develop a set of
photos, maybe


97 Scrupulously
followed, as the
party line "
98 No-win
situation?
100 One living off
the land, maybe
101 One-piece
garment
105 Where kids get
creative in
school
107 It's pitched for
a large audience


111 Fifth of eight
113 Learn to get
along
115 Bit of smoke
117 Common secret
119 Smelly
120 Israeli
conductor Daniel
121 After-dinner
drink
123 Iowa college
,125 Margery of
rhyme


Answers to last Sunday's Crossword.
ARIT|S LE A ITKIE M T-SG ARIPI
NEHI LENAOL IN E L T E R
GAEL ICWARN IN HAVART I
ELI NoEGAD ARTESIAN
RAS CLASS ICACTIONSUIT
E L HUGOELIEN_ MI L S
DEED RUST ICBUCKETS
OSAK A BOMBC A N
UP FOR UNSET LAILAALI
SUM SCANNED INGLYRIC
ERAT RODIN CNOTE SPEE
FINETUNIC PRONETO ENTA


ORIGINALCYNIC LEVI
A L I M OTOE RAM
TOPICCOFTHEMORNING ARP

MANMADE GREATLYMYSTIC
P A E PU T T 0 A I S T


L 9 C9 L'l 6 8


6 V L 9 8 Z CS9 L


S z 8 L 6 9 L 17


6 V 6 S 9 9 LL 8


8 9 L tV 6 L Z 9 8


e L 9 8 E L 17 6 9


7 6 L L 9 8 Z 9


9 LZ 6 V 8 9 C L


L 8 9 Z 9 CIL l 6


3D


1 6 2


84 2 1


6 4


9 2 6 3


3 7 1 5


8 7 6 5 3


4 3 8


5 2 9


8 9 5 1









LAKE CITY REPORTER LIFE SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 18, 2011



S... Modern home decor out


":-:' i.il-1 Pr.



The Stevenson family grabs their gear out of their
minivan which they use to transport their children and
friends to games in Greer, S.C.

Carpool: Is it a

staple of modern

day parenting?


Associated Press
With three kids who
need to get to soccer,
lacrosse, football, cheer
and swim team not to
mention school Allison
Stevenson said her eight-
seater minivan is crucial
for carpooling.
"I always have extra
children in my car. I
couldn't function with
a smaller car," said
Stevenson, 37, of Greer,
S.C., who bought her
Honda Odyssey in 2007.
Stevenson, who has
6- and 7-year-old daugh-
ters and a 9-year-old
son, shares a morning
carpool to school with a
neighbor and swaps rides
with other parents after
school.
"They have lots of
children involved in
lots of activities, so we
depend on each other to
get everybody to where
they need to be," said


Stevenson, adding that
most of her neighbors
also have vehicles with
the important-for-carpool-
ing third row of seats.
Sure, carpooling has
been around for decades.
Kids got carted around
in the big station wagons
of the '70s and early '80s,
then the minivans of the
'90s and, most recently,
the SUV. But the carpool
has become an important
piece of the parenting
puzzle for some parents
of heavily scheduled kids.
"Unfortunately,
it's imperative these
days that your child is
extremely well-rounded,"
said Stevenson, who
believes after-school
activities can impart les-
sons in dedication and
teamwork that are impor-
tant later in life. "There
is pressure for your
children to do a thousand
different things."


of history's


Associated Press
Contemporary home
decor is yielding a little
this season to a more tradi-
tional style evocative of the
Edwardian and Victorian
eras. We're seeing steam-
er trunks used as tables,
Victorian illustrative prints
and wallpapers, and new
versions of period furni-
ture.
If you're interested in
experimenting with this
look without going all in,
consider vintage linens.
The craftsmanship and
uniqueness of fine old lin-
ens draw collectors, as well
as decorators who like to
mix old and new a vintage
quilt on a modern slab bed,
for example, or an antique
lace tablecloth dressed with
chic tableware.
Once considered an
important part of a woman's
personalbelongings, vintage
cotton and damask napery,
bed and bath linens are
often wonderful examples
of the loom and needle arts.
Textile weaving, lace tatting
and embroidery could take


craftspeople hundreds of
hours; the resulting pieces
were treasured, loved and
passed along through fami-
lies. And sooner or later,
some are given up to the
marketplace, for new own-
ers to enjoy.
English-born Anna
Redgrave of Annapolis
Royal, Nova Scotia, owns
Highland Lace, a vintage
linens web shop. Her life-
long passion for antique tex-
tiles was nurtured by her
grandmother, a member
of the Royal Needlework
Society and a seamstress at
Buckingham Palace.
"She was responsible for
finding and sewing all the
embellishments on the ball
gowns," says Redgrave. The
Society was the same group
that, 60 years later, made
the overlay of lace on Kate
Middleton's dress.
Redgrave sells lace cur-
tains, embroidered linen
napkins, cutwork cotton
cloths and a variety of items
crafted of repurposed lin-
ens, from the turn of the
century through the 1950s.


hope chest


Jane Nicholson (www.
mrsnicholson.com) is a
designer and decorator, also
in Annapolis Royal, who has
created elegant yet welcom-
ing spaces in Ottawa and
Montreal that meld modern
and traditional styles. She
began her textile collec-
tion with a 90-year-old set
of lace-trimmed bed linens
passed down from her great
aunt. They were made by an
order of nuns for her aunt's
trousseau in her small vil-
lage in Belgium.
"But she never married."
says Nicholson. "Her fiancE
was killed in World War I,
and she never used them.
They passed to my aunt
who also never used them.
Finally they came to me,
and I have them on my two
mahogany guest beds."

WHAT TO LOOK FOR
There's a large vintage-
linen fan base, Redgrave
says, and French mono-
grammed pieces, linen
napkins and vintage lace
hankies sell out fast.


"Monogrammed pieces
were usually handed down,
so they're highly valued,"
Redgrave says. A woman
would have her personal
and household linens
embroidered with her ini-
tials because they were
part of her personal wealth,
and went with her when
she married. Nicholson
looks for linens with a nice
weave. "If you're buying
'40s and '50s tablecloths,
look for good workmanship
and strong color."
Look for linens that have
a "soft" hand and a "warm"
smell, Redgrave advises.
"Damasks should shimmer,
and shouldn't smell musty
or bleached," she says.
Flea markets, tag sales,
estate auctions, thrift shops
and vintage stores are all
good sources, but try to
glean the provenance of
your find. To whom did
the piece belong? Was it
woven in this country?
Was it part of a trous-
seau? "Information like
that makes the piece come
alive," says Nicholson.


Goats clearing land in downtown Portland


Associated Press
PORTLAND, Ore.
- Residents and busi-
nesses in Portland, Ore.,
are using an effective,
chemical-free solution to
battle blackberry briars,
English ivy and weeds in
overgrown city lots.
Goats are the scourge
of the bramble, and a new
denizen in this city's long
love affair with agriculture
and all things green. City
chickens have become
vested Portland residents.
Urban goats are now get-
ting a look-over, with posi-


tive early reviews.
One satisfied customer
says goats are an "old-
fashioned solution to an
old-fashioned problem."
Georgina Stiner's Goat
Rental NW has about 100
goats. There are similar
businesses listed across
the country.
Stiner's sales pitch:
Goats eat all day, but you
pay by the acre, not by
the hour. Goats don't
need time off, worker's
comp or health insurance.
And goats will get the job
done.


Assocated Press
Goats take a bite of high growth in a vacant lot in Portland, Ore.


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