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The Lake City reporter
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028308/01661
 Material Information
Title: The Lake City reporter
Uniform Title: Lake City reporter (Lake City, Fla. 1967)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: John H. Perry
Place of Publication: Lake City Fla
Publication Date: 9/16/2011
Frequency: daily (monday through friday)[<1969>-]
weekly[ former 1967-<1968>]
daily
normalized irregular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Lake City (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Columbia County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Columbia -- Lake City
Coordinates: 30.189722 x -82.639722 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 95, no. 4 (Oct. 5, 1967)-
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000358016
oclc - 33283560
notis - ABZ6316
lccn - sn 95047175
sobekcm - UF00028308_01569
System ID: UF00028308:01661
 Related Items
Preceded by: Lake City reporter and Columbia gazette

Full Text




Ready to win F
Columbia hosts
000014 120511 ****3 DIGIT
LIB OF FLORIDA HISTORY
PO BOX 117007
205 SMA UNIV OF FLORIDA
GAINESVILLE FL 32611- 1943





Lake Ci


familiarr foe
Fort White
t- meet Taylor


326


ogs at 7:30.
,orts, I B


ty


RMS falls
Richardson loses
20-0 to Hamilton
on homecoming.
Sports, IB


Reporter


Friday, September 16, 201 I www.lakecityreporter.com Vol. 137, No. 199 M 75 cents


SAT

scores

edge up

locally

State numbers fall
to lowest point in
5 years, however.

By ANTONIA ROBINSON
arobinson@lakecityreporter. corn
The Columbia County
School District scored more
than 30 points higher on" the
SAT Reasoning Test com-
pared to the state, according
to a report from the College
Board Wednesday.
The SAT
is a stan-
dardized
test through
the College
Board for col-
lege admis-
Millikin sions in the
United States.
Students are tested on read-
ing, math and writing. The
highest score possible on the
SAT is 2,400.
The district's score was
1478 for 2011, a 12 point
increase from the previous
year. A total of 77 students
took the exam in the county,
according to reports.
Students scored an aver-
age of 509 in reading (a 15
point increase), 491 in math
(a six point decrease) and
478 in writing (a three point
increase).
"Obviously we're very
pleased with those scores,"
said Mike Millikin, superin-
tendent of schools. "We spend
a lot of time and effort trying
to prepare our students when
they first enter high school
not only for high school cours-
es but college and entrance
exams such as the SAT and
Nationally the SAT total
score is 1,500, a six point
decrease from 2010.
Scores dropped nation-
ally according to the College
Board but the drop in Florida
was much steeper. Florida
scores are at their lowest in
five years.
The state dropped 26
points to 1447. Florida's stu-
dents averaged 483 in reading
(a nine-point drop from last
year), 486 in math (a nine-
point decrease), and 466 in
writing (an eight-point drop).
"As Florida continues to
raise its standards toward
college and career readiness,
some temporary decreases
in overall performance may
occur as increased numbers
of students acclimate to high-
er expectations and increased
rigor," said state Education
Commissioner Gerard
Robinson in a released state-
ment. '"This is the case with
Florida's average SAT scores
which declined significantly
this year in all three tested
subject areas. Although per-
formance decreases are never
welcome, our transition to
higher standards is critical if
we are to graduate all our
students with the skills and
knowledge they need to find
SCORES continued on 3A


CALL US:
(386) 752-1293
SUBSCRIBETO
THE REPORTER:
Voice: 755-5445
Fax: 752-9400


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Beverly McKeon, a member of the Lady of the Lake Quilting Guild, inspects a finished quilt Wednesday.
The group will be sending more than 150 quilts to Joplin, Mo., residents affected by a tornado that
destroyed much of the city in May. 'It feels wonderful,' McKeon said. 'It's nice and soft and would be
comfortable for someone to lay under. Lots of love went into making them.'


Outdoor classroom


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Columbia County school officials, Richardson Middle School students and staff, and members of Boy
Scout Troop 85 gather as Chandler Douglas cuts a ribbon Wednesday at RMS during a ceremony
unveiling the school's new outdoor classroom. The structure was Chandler's 2011 Eagle Scout project.
The outside classroom features a 24- by 24-foot deck made of eco-friendly pressure treated wood, a
dry erase board and benches.


Accident snarls traffic
| --J---


ANTONIA ROBINSON/ Lake City Reporter
A Chevy Silverado was struck from behind by a Ford Mustang at the intersection of U.S. 90 and Real
Terrace shortly before noon Thursday, according to Lake City Police Department Capt. Robert Smith.
Names of the drivers had not been released at press time by the LCPD. Traffic was backed up on 90
East due to the incident.


94
Mostly sunny
WEATHER, 2A


Opinion .
People ...
Obituaries .
Advice & Comics
Puzzles


116



EMS


calls

'lost'


By TONY BRITT
tbritt@lakecityreporter.com
Officials estimate Columbia County is
owned more than $1.5 million in unpaid
bills for EMS calls. In addition, roughly
116 EMS calls have been "lost," mean-
ing ambulances made runs but county
records do not indicate who was billed
or where the ambulances went.
The issue surfaced at the Columbia
County Commission meeting Thursday
night.
Jeff Crawford, Columbia County Fire
Rescue Chief and newly appointed liai-
son. between the county fire department
and Lifeguard Ambulance Services,
gave an update on the transition from
the county EMS service to Lifeguard's
CALLS continued on 3A


Dekle speaks


on Bundy case


COURTESY
During an appearance at Florida Gateway
College on Thursday, former assistant
state attorney George R. "Bob" Dekle,
Sr. signs a copy of his book, "The Last
Murder: The Investigation, Prosecution
and Execution of Ted Bundy" for Drs.
Chuck (FGC president) and Robin Hall.
About 100 people were in attendance
while Dekle spoke about the Bundy trial
and signed books afterwards.


No new

voting

gear, for

now
By TONY BRITT
tbritt@lakecityreporter.com
Local officials say the county needs
new voting machines, but commission-
ers are wary of spending the money
over $340,000 with elections so far in
the future.
Thursday night, during the Columbia
County Commission meeting, commis-
ioners unanimously voted to hold off
purchasing new voting machines for
now.
Liz Home, Columbia County
Supervisor of Elections, and Jean Lear,
assistant supervisor, addressed commis-
sioners at the meeting and said the
current voting machines are obsolete
because they can't be upgraded and due
VOTING continued on 3A

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COMING
SATURDAY
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TODAY IN
PEOPLE
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LAKE CITY REPORTER DAILY BRIEFING FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 16, 2011


fj H Thursday:
Afternoon: 5-6-1
Evening: N/A


ay,14) Thursday:
S' Afternoon: 3-7-7-4
''. ,. Evening: N/A


& Wednesday:
5-11-14-16-31


PEOPLE IN THE NEWS


Good action, graphics for 'Resistance 3'


Ihe saga of battle-weary
fighters and their cam-
paign against an invading,
parasitic alien army con-
tinues with "Resistance
3," a first-person shooter that covers
all of that gaming genre's basics but
feels a bit redundant otherwise.
"Resistance 3" ($59.99, PS3, rated
M for Mature 17+) is the third instal-
lation in the standout series from
Insomniac Games. A ragtag but well-
armed collection of human survivors
in revisionist 1957 is trying to outwit
.and outshoot the Chimerans, big
mean aliens of the usual glowing-
eyed variety. There are bosses and
battles and melee attacks and a good
. selection of weaponry. So the essen-
tials are all there.
However, the graphics looked flat,
and even the character movements,
both in live action and cut scenes,
felt corny and not up to speed with
other top-shelf FPS titles.
"Resistance 3" is an average addi-
tion to an above-average games
series. Two out of four stars.

Brad Paisley to release
first book Nov. 1
NASHVILLE Country superstar
Brad Paisley is set to release his first
book on Nov. 1.
It's called "Diary
of a Player" and
shows how the
guitaragods of coun-
try, blues and rock
'n' roll have shaped
Paisley his life.
Paisley said he
.can't imagine his life if he never
learned to play the guitar. His grand-
father gave him his first six-string at
age 8.
Paisley is the reigning Country
Music Association entertainer of the
year. He has sold over 11 million
albums and charted 20 No. 1 singles,
including "Remind Me."


A video game image from 'Resistance 3,'
Computer Entertainment America LLC.

Rapper T.I. back at
Atlanta halfway house
ATLANTA The rapper T.I. is
back at a halfway house in Atlanta.
The Grammy-win-
ning artist, born
Clifford Harris Jr,
was transferred
from a federal prison
to serve the remain-
der of 'his sentence"
Harris for a probation viola-
tion. He is set to be
released on Sept. 29.
T.I. had been released one month
early from a federal prison in
Arkansas on Aug. 31. But he was
back in federal custody a day later
after officials say he violated prison
rules by conducting business on his
375-mile journey to Atlanta.

Higher Netflix prices
equals fewer subscribers
SAN FRANCISCO Netflix's
decision to raise prices by as much
as 60 percent is turning into a hor-
ror show. The customer backlash
against the higher rates, kicking in


ASSUCAITuE IDKS
by Insomniac Games released by Sony

this month, has been much harsher
than Netflix Inc. anticipated.
Management predicted that the
company will end September with
600,000 fewer U.S. customers than it
had in June. It will mark just the sec-
ond time in 12 years that Netflix has
lost subscribers from one quarter to
the next.
Ex-art dealer accused of
selling forged artworks
LOS ANGELES A Florida man
was arrested Thursday and charged
with defrauding a Los Angeles art
collector out of more than $2 mil-
lion by selling him forged works of
Claude Monet, Vincent van Gogh
and Jackson Pollock.
Matthew Taylor of Vero Beach,
was indicted on seven felony counts
by a federal grand jury in Los
Angeles.
The former art dealer, 43, is
accused of altering paintings from
unknown artists to make them
appear to be those from their famous
counterparts and selling the bogus
pieces at much higher prices than
their actual worth.
N Associated Press


Celebrity Birthdays


* Actress Janis Paige is 89.
* Blues singer B.B. King is
86.
* Actor George Chakiris is
79.
* Director Jim McBride is 70.
* Actress Linda Miller is 69.
* Actress Susan Ruttan is


HOW TO REACH US
Main number ........ (386) 752-1293
Fax number ..... ; .......752-9400
Circulation ...............755-5445
Online... www.lakecityreporter.com
The Lake City Reporter, an affiliate of
Community Newspapers Inc., is pub-
lished Tuesday through Sunday at 180
E. Duval St., Lake City, Fla. 32055.
Periodical postage paid at Lake City, Fa.
Member Audit Bureau of Circulation and
The Associated Press.
All material herein Is property of the Lake
City Reporter. Reproduction in whole or
in part is forbidden without the permis-
sion of the publisher. U.S. Postal Service
No. 310-880..
POSTMASTER: Send address changes
to Lake City Reporter, P.O. Box 1709,
Lake City, Fla. 32056.
Publisher Todd Wilson.....754-0418
(twilson@lakecityreporter.com)
NEWS
Editor Robert Bridges .....754-0428
(rbridges@lakecityreporter.com)
ADVERTISING
Director Ashley Butcher .. .754-0417
(abutcher@lakectyreporter.com)
CLASSIFIED
To place a classified ad, call 755-5440


* Rock musician Ron
Blair (Tom Petty & the
Heartbreakers; Mudcrutch)
is 63.
* Actor Ed Begley Jr. is 62.
* Country singer David
Bellamy (The Bellamy
Brothers) is 61.


BUSINESS
Controller Sue Brannon... .754-0419
(sbrannon@lakecityreporter.com)
CIRCULATION
Home delivery of the Lake City Reporter
should be completed by 630 a.m.
Tuesday through Saturday, and by 730
a.m. on Sunday.
Please call 386-755-5445 to report any
problems with your delivery service.
In Columbia County, customers should
call before 1030 a.m. to report a ser-
vice error for same day re-delivery. After
10:30 a.m., next day re-delivery or ser-
vice related credits will be Issued.
In all other counties where home delivery
is available, next day re-delivery or ser-
vice related credits will be issued.
Circulation ..............755-5445
(circulation@lakecityreporter.com)
Home delivery rates
(Tuesday through Sunday)
12 Weeks .................. $26.32
24 Weeks...................$48.79
52 Weeks......... ........ $83.46
Rates icude 7%, sales tax
Mall rates
12 Weeks.................. $41.40
24 Weeks....................$82.80
52 Weeks .............. $179.40


CORRECTION

The Lake City Reporter corrects errors of fact in news
items. If you have a concern, question or suggestion, please
call the executive editor. Corrections and clarifications will run
in this space. And thanks for reading.


Man fined for
smuggling reptiles
MIAMI- A Brazilian
man plead guilty to trying
to smuggle python and
tortoise hatchlings in his
pants.
Simon Turola Borges
admitted Wednesday
that he tried to sneak the
reptiles through security
at Miami International
-Airport last month when
attempting to return to
Brazil.
They also found several
other pythons and tor-
toises contained in similar
hose inside the man's
underwear. All were small
hatchlings and all are pro-
tected under U.S. law.
A federal judge sen-
tenced Borges to proba-
tion anda $400 fine, which
she ordered paid to the
Miami Science Museum
for reptile preservation
programs.

Wife charged with
spiking coffee
DELAND A woman
was charged Wednesday
with spiking her husband's
coffee with the anti-anxiety
drug, Xanax.
Melissa Goetz, 46, was
charged with attempted
felony murder and poison-
ing of food or water.
Goetz told authorities
she was trying to calm her
husband down because he
had been physically abu-
sive to her.
Her own words helped
incriminate her because
she left a voicemail mes-
sage on her husband's cell
phone, apparently unaware
she was being recorded. In
the message she is heard
telling another woman
that she had spiked her
husband's coffee.

Gang member
gets 65 years
'DAYTONA BEACH -
The U.S. Attorney's Office


Seashells and tar balls are seen along Gulf Islands National
Sea Shore near Pensacola Beach Wednesday. A key
government panel reported today that BP is ultimately
responsible for the worst offshore oil spill in U.S. history.


said a member of the
loosely organized Daytona
Beach street gang 819
Boyz is heading to federal
prison.
A judge Wednesday
sentenced Antonio Deon
Bizzell, 28, to 65 years in
prison. He was convicted
in May by a jury that
found him guilty on 10
counts of selling crack
cocaine and firearms to
undercover officers.
The Bureau of Alcohol,
Tobacco and Firearms
videotaped Bizzell selling
drugs and guns to under-
cover agents on three
occasions.

Teen indicted for
killing parents
FORT PIERCE A
teenager accused of killing
his parents with a hammer
has been formally charged
with two counts of first-
degree murder.
A grand jury indicted
Tyler Hadley, 17, on
Wednesday.
Hadley had previously
been charged with second-
degree murder, which
carries a possible life sen-
tence. But a first-degree
murder conviction means
a mandatory life sentence.
Because of his age, he can-
not be executed.


Investigators said
Hadley killed his parents
- Blake and Mary-Jo
Hadley on July 16 and
concealed their bodies in a
bedroom while he hosted a
party with about 60 people.

Twin boys, 2, die
in house fire
BRANDON -
Authorities said twin boys,
2, died in a house fire near
Tampa.
The Hillsborough .
County Sheriff's officials
say the boys' aunt, who
owns the home, told fire-
fighters everyone was
safely out of the house
when they arrived early
Thursday. After the fire
was extinguished, fire-
fighters found Rishaw and
Richie Edwards in a back
bedroom.
Fire officials said Linda
Morgan, 52, told them the
boys' mother Jamey Sims,
19, stays with her some-
times. Morgan says her
niece must have stopped
by the house and put the
boys to bed after Morgan
was asleep.
Officials said Sims was
not at the home when the
fire broke out, so no one
knew the boys were sleep-
ing in the back room.
* Associated Press


THE WEATHER



MOSTLY CHANC CHANCE
SUNNY rOMS TRMS


HI 94 L 67 k192LO6 187065


City
*lascksonile Cape Canaveral
alassee Lake City 93/69 Daytona Beach
93/69 94/67 Ft. Lauderdale
saca Cainesile Daoa Bea Fort Myers
90/68s 8P0anCi, Gp92/67 8a72 Gainesville
87/70 3/67ala Jacksonville
Kay West


91/76


Ft.Myen
93/74


Odando Cape Caavera al e "cit.
92/71 85/75 Lake City
\ Miami
Naples
West Pah n Bach Ocala
89/77 Orlando
FLt Lauderdale Panama City
S,, 89/80 Pensacola
Naples Tallahassee
'91/74 MWii Tampa


... "\ 9"/78 Valdosta
/81tt Q "' W. Palm Beac.h


Key
901


F. LE1 A ALMANAC


TEMPERATURES
High Wednesday
Low Wednesday
Normal high
Normal low
Record high
Record low

PRECIPITATION
Wednesday
Month total
Year total
Normal month-to-date
Normal year-to-date


93
64
'88
69
96 in 1952
60 in 1971


0.00"
1.11"
27.79"-
2.36"
39.12"


I WATHR B -T I'HU


SUN
Sunrise today
Sunset today
Sunrise tom.
Sunset tom.

MOON
Moonrisetoday
Moonset today
Moonrise torn.
Moonset tom.


7:15 a.m.
7:36 p.m.
7:15 a.m.
7:35 p.m.

9:12 p.m.
10:03 a.m.
9:49 p.m.
10:57 a.m.


@000
Sept. Sept. Oct. Oct.
20 27 3 11
Last New First Full


On this date in
2000, a heat ridge
extended from the
Rockies to the
Southwest bringing
record tempera-
tures to the region.
Cities with record
highs included Salt
Lake City, Utah, at
97 degrees and
Pocatello, Idaho, at
96 degrees.


9

15si efitolun
Today's
ultra-violet
radiation risk


for the area on
a scale from 0
to 10+.

|1


Friday
86/75/pc
.88/75/t
89/81/pc
92/72/t
91/67/pc
90/69/t
90/81/t
92/66/t
90/80/pc
93/74/pc
93/68/pc
91/74/t
88/71/pc
86/72/pc
90/69/pc
92/74/t
91/67/pc
89/79/pc


Saturday
84/75/t
87/74/pc
90/81/pc
92/72/pc
88/66/pc
85/67/sh
89/79/t
87/65/pc
90/79/pc
93/74/pc
89/68/pc
90/72/pc
84/69/pc
85/70/pc
90/67/pc
92/74/pc
91/65/pc
89/78/pc


An exclusive
service
brought to
our readers
by
The Weather
Channel.



weather.com


Forecasts, data and
S graphics 0 2011 Weather
111 V central, LP, Madison, Wes.
weather www.weatherpublhlsher.com


get
SE-edition Online Access


FREE

Call for login Information.


Daily Scripture

"And so we know and rely on the
love God has for us. God is love.
Whoever lives in love lives in God,
and God in them."
1 John 4:16

Thought for Today
"'As a matter of fact' is an
expression that precedes many
an expression that isn't."
Laurence J. Peter,
Canadian writer (1919-1990)


Lake City Reporter


AROUND FLORIDA


Page Editor: Laura Hampson, 754-0427


11








LAKE CITY REPORTER NEWS FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 16, 2011 3A



Republican candidates bash stimulus


By STEVE PEOPLES
Associated Press

MANCHESTER, N.H. Republican
presidential contenders have crisscrossed
the nation bashing President Barack
Obama's economic stimulus plans as a
colossal waste of taxpayer money. But with
an awkward frequency, these same candi-
dates are campaigning at businesses that
benefited from the president's landmark
stimulus package.
With the cameras rolling, the
Republicans celebrate the hard work of
local entrepreneurs in places like Pella,
Iowa, and Milford, N.H., while later con-
demning the federal resources that helped
those entrepreneurs navigate the econom-
ic downturn.
The campaign-trail rhetoric has intensi-
fied as Obama travels the country to call
for a new package of spending and tax cuts
to revitalize the nation's stalled economy.
"He came into office and said, 'Oh I
know how to create jobs; I'll spend billions
and billions, trillions of dollars,'" former
Massachusetts Gov. Mitt Romney recently
told cheering supporters at the Derryfield
Country Club, referring to Obama. "I don't
happen to think Barack Obama's a bad
guy. I just don't think he's got a clue."
But Romney himself made at least
two campaign appearances this summer
with stimulus beneficiaries. There are a
half dozen such examples involving sev-
eral candidates, former Utah Gov. Jon
Huntsman and Minnesota Rep. Michele
Bachmann, among them.
Huntsman last month toured the New
Hampshire manufacturer Cirtronics, which
received five stimulus-related contracts
worth $3.3 million since 2009, according
to data posted by the federal government.
A week later, Romney campaigned at the
Iowa-based Vermeer Corp., which ben-
efited from nearly $200,000 in stimulus
funds. And Tim Pawlenty, before he left
the presidential race, made similar visits in
each of the two early voting states.
This phenomenon has produced nega-
tive media attention in isolated cases, but
taken together the visits highlight the
candidates' complicated relationships with
the $78 billion stimulus program many
Republican primary voters hate. The issue
also underscores the often hypocritical
nature of American politics politicians
usually oppose the other party's policies,
but support the people who benefit from
them. The apparent inconsistencies offer
opponents Republicans and Democrats
alike fuel for political attacks.
"Every one of these candidates has
a potential problem with respect to the
stimulus," said Michael Dennehy, a GOP
operative who led Sen. John McCain's
presidential campaign four years ago.
Even those Republicans who have not
used stimulus beneficiaries as campaign


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Republican presidential candidates and possible contenders, along with President Barack Obama, left, are represented at an informal "corn
poll" where kernels of corn are deposited into jars as a vote at the Iowa State Fair in Des Moines, Iowa, Friday, Aug. 12, 2011. Shown
are former Alaska Gov. Sarah Palin, Texas Gov. Rick Perry, former Minnesota Governor Tim Pawlenty, Rep. Ron Paul, R-Texas, former
Massachusetts Gov. Mitt Romney, Rep. Michele Bachmann, R-Minn., businessman Herman Cain, former House Speaker Newt Gingrich, for-
mer Utah Gov. Jon Huntsman, Rep. Thaddeus McCotter, R-Mich.


props such as Texas Gov. Rick Perry
- may have trouble reconciling campaign
rhetoric with their records.
Perry once made headlines by refus-
ing $556 million in stimulus funds for
his state's unemployment insurance pro-
gram. But since February 2009, Texas
government agencies and businesses have
received more than $17 billion from the
recovery act. That's more than any state
in the union but one.
And the influx of stimulus funds some,
of which Perry used to plug budget holes -
came over the same period Texas enjoyed
significant job growth, an accomplishment
Perry cites at nearly every campaign stop.
But he railed against the federal policy in
his 2010 book, "Fed Up! Our Fight to Save
America From Washington."
"We are fed up with bailout after bailout
and stimulus plan after stimulus plan, each
one of which tosses principle out the window
along with taxpayer money," he wrote.
Bachmann, a conservative firebrand
who regularly knocks the federal stimu-
lus, held a recent campaign event at South
Carolina's Trident Technical College, an
institution that last year received a stimu-
lus grant to help boost its healthcare edu-
cation programs. Critics cried hypocrisy,
but her record as the representative for
Minnesota's 6th Congressional District
raises further questions.
Bachmann has repeatedly petitioned the
Obama administration to send federal dol-


lars including stimulus funds to her
district.
"I voted against the stimulus and
I was very public against the stimulus,"
Bachmann, leader of the Congressional Tea
Party Caucus, said last month on Fox News
Sunday. "After the stimulus was passed and
the money was there, why should my con-
stituents or anyone else be disadvantaged?"
Liberal attack groups, expected to play a
significant role as the presidential contest
goes forward, will ensure such questions
are not lost on voters.
"Nothing raises the hypocrisy meter
faster than the Republican presidential
candidates talking about the economic
recovery act. They love to pander to their
base by demonizing the bill, yet they are
all too eager to seek funding for projects
in their district, to use federal dollars to
balance their state's budget, or to hold
campaign events at successful companies
who received stimulus funding," said Ty
Matsdorf, spokesman for the independent
political group American Bridge, recently
established to help Democrats.
Some campaigns and companies
involved defend appearances with stimu-
lus beneficiaries as coincidences in states
where hundreds of businesses and institu-
tions accepted federal assistance over the
last two years. Indeed, entities in the early
voting states of New Hampshire, Iowa and
South Carolina received a combined $8 bil-
lion from the 2009 package to date.


"There was a tremendous amount of
money that went to all sectors. It would
be very hard for a Mitt Romney, or a
presidential candidate from any party, -to
go to any manufacturer and find someone
who was not directly, or indirectly, affected
somehow," said Steven Cohen, president
of Ohio-based Screen Machine Industries,
which hosted a Romney event in July and
received stimulus contracts worth nearly
$220,000.
"I think it would be irresponsible for
an American manufacturer not to go
after their fair share," Cohen told The
Associated Press this week. "The question
is whether it was a wise investment Thafs
for someone else to answer."
The stimulus package created or saved
as many as 3.3 million jobs and reduced
the nation's unemployment rate by as
much as 1.8 points, according to updated
estimates provided by the Congressional
Budget Office in late August
The campaigns say local companies
shouldn't be penalized simply because
they took advantage of the federal prfd-
gram.
"I'm just not going to hold a failed policy
against somebody," Huntsman told The
Associated Press when asked about his
Cirtronics visit.
Democrats love to highlight Huntsman's
previous statement as Utah governor that
the stimulus package "probably was not
large enough."


CALLS: County unsure how much it's owed for 116 transports

Continued From Page 1A


privatized service.
Lifeguard Ambulance Service
became the county's EMS service pro-
vider June 29 and has received 1,977
calls through Sept, 12, records, show.
Those calls have resulted in at least
1,501 transports.
However, Crawford said while he was
unable to provide an exact figure for out-
standing bills due Columbia County EMS,
it's estimated they total $1.5 million.


Crawford also noted that between Jan. 1
and June 28, when Lifeguard took over,
there were 116 calls by Columbia County
EMS in which ambulance runs were
made but officials don't know where the
ambulance went or who to bill for the
services.
"It concerns me there are 116 runs
we have no records for," Commissioner
Stephen Bailey said.
Crawford said 2010 records have not


been checked for lost calls.
County officials plan an audit to deter-
mine how many other calls may have
been lost and will discuss the matter in
the county's pre-audit period as an exter-
nal auditor prepares to examine county
records for fiscal year 2010-11, which
ends Sept. 30.
"Don't make no sense to go back
further than two year cause you ain't
gonna get no money all you're going


to do is get mad," Commission Chairman
Jody DuPree said, as officials discussed
options to track the 116 missing ambu-
lance runs.
County officials plan to review a pro-
posal from Lifeguard to check into the
delinquent bills or hire an outside com-
pany to collect the money owed.


SCORES: Up slightly

Continued From Page 1A


VOTING: No new machines, for now

Continued From Page 1A


success at the next level."
A total of 55 students at
Columbia High School aver-
aged 510 in reading, 488 in
math and 472 in writing.
The Advanced Placement
classes offered at CHS help
students better prepare for
the SAT, said Kay Dekle,
assistant principal.
"We're proud that our
average is above the state
average and we'll keep
doing what we can to
increase the rigor in the
classroom," she said.
The 22 students at Fort
White High School aver-
aged 504 in reading, 500 in
math and 492 in writing.
The school is going to
incorporate a program this
year that tutors students
in nrenaration for colletre


entrance exams, such as
the SAT and ACT, said
Keith Hatcher, principal.
Intensive studying will
begin before testing times.
"I'm very pleased with our
scores," he said. "We want
to do everything we can to
increase those scores."


aH9angn
a minute / ,.

Our customers receive
a Complimentary
copy of the
Lake City Reporter
when they drop off&
pickup their cleaning
'hi P.Si -n --s -A-


to the unavailability of replacement
optical scan memory cards.
Representatives from Dominion
Voting Systems, Rob Pritchett and Jay
Bollenbacher, gave a demonstration
of new voting machines for possible
use in the 2012 elections.
The new machines allow disabled
voters to cast ballots in the same man-
ner as other voters, as the machine


itself marks the ballot after getting
confirmation of the voter's choice. The
voter is able to use a keypad connected
to the system and can confirm his or
her choice through headphones.
The supervisor of elections office
wants to purchase 40 of the new units
at an estimated cost of $343,584.
However, Columbia County offi-
cials don't want to spend the money


just yet, should state officials later
be willing to reimburse some of the
funds, given Columbia's status as a
fiscally constrained county.
"Our equipment is not reliable,"
Lear said, noting unreadable memory
cards caused delayed election results
in the past "Our optical scan equip-
ment is not reliable."


NOTICE OF TIME CHANGE FOR CITY COUNCIL MEETING
TO BE HELD BY THE CITY COUNCIL OF THE CITY OF LAKE CITY,
FLORIDA ON MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 19, 2011 AT 6:30 P.M. IN THE
COUNCIL CHAMBERS LOCATED ON THE SECOND FLOOR OF CITY
HALL AT 205 NORTH MARION AVENUE, LAKE CITY, FLORIDA

ITEMS OF INTEREST:

City Council Resolution No. 2011-069 Adopting FY 12 village rate
City Council Resolution No. 2011-070 Adopting FY 12 budget

SPECIAL REQUIREMENTS: If you require special aid or services for any of the meetings
identified above, as addressed in the American Disabilities Act, please contact the City
Manager's Office at (386) 719-5768.

AUDREY E SIKES
City Clerk *












OPINION


Friday, September 16, 2011


ONE ANOTHER


ONE
OPINION


Finding


another


earth


gets


closer

years of search-
ing and facing the
possibility that the
Earth and its sister
planets might be alone in the
universe, the first extra-solar
planet a planet outside our
solar system was discovered
and its existence confirmed.
As of 2007, 242 "exoplanets"
had been found, most of them
gas giants in impossibly unin-
habitable orbits. The search for
Earth-like planets in the so-called
"Goldilocks zone," not too hot,
not too cold and capable of con-
taining liquid water, the key to
life, continued.
As the search continues, with
more and better instruments, the
number of exoplanets is more
than 600 and there are 1,200
candidate exoplanets waiting for
confirmation.
And the discoveries started
coming in batches. This
week European astronomers
announced the discovery of 50
new planets outside our solar
system, including 16 planets with
Earth-like possibilities because
their mass indicates they are
made out of rock, not gas.
But one of those planets really
stood out to the astronomers: A
"super-Earth," 3.5 times the size
of our own. It has the right mass
to be rock and, moreover, it is
in the Goldilocks zone, only the
second such planet located.
The astronomers believe the
planet, HD88512 in theconstella-'
tion Vela 36 light-years away, may
have water and an atmosphere
as well. If so, the temperatures
would range around 85 to 120
degrees and it would be extreme-
ly muggy. Conmparisons with
Washington, D.C., in July are a
little unfair but there are areas
of equatorial Africa that would fit
that bill
Finding our twin may now
only be a matter of time. Sadly,
when we do find it, we will be
looking at it as it was millions
of years in the past

* Scripps Howard News Service

Lake City Reporter
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get things done!"
Ourprimary goal is to
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This mission will be accomplished
through the teamwork of professionals
dedicated to truth, integrity and hard
work.
Todd Wilson, publisher
Robert Bridges, editor
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Dink NeSmith, president
Tom Wood, chairman

LETTERS
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Today is Friday, Sept. 16, the
259th day of 2011. There are 106
days left in the year.
Today's Highlight in History:
On Sept. 16, 1810, Mexicans
were inspired to begin their ulti-
mately successful revolt against
Spanish rule by Father Miguel
Hidalgo y Costilla and his "Grito
de Dolores (Cry of Dolores)."
(Mexico's independence was
finally achieved in 1821.)
On this date:
In 1498, Tomas de
Torquemada, notorious for his
role in the Spanish Inquisition,


www.lakecityreporter.com


Refugee from Muslim world


sees European caliphate


For more than 30
years, Bat Ye'or, a
refugee from Egypt,
has been writing
about dhimmis -
Christians and Jews living
under oppression in Muslim
lands for over a millennium.
Now, she has a new book,
"Europe, Globalization and the
Coming Universal Caliphate,"
that looks at Muslims living in
lands that once were Christian
but today call themselves mul-
ticultural.
She predicts Europe will not
remain multicultural for long.
She is convinced that Europe,
sooner rather than later, will be
dominated by Islamic extremists
and transformed into "Eurabia"
- a term she has popularized but
did not coin. It was first used in
the mid-1970s by a French pub-
lication pressing for common
European-Arab policies.
Immigrants can enrich a
nation. But there is a difference
between immigrants and colo-
nists. The former are eager to
learn the ways of their adopted
home, to. integrate and perhaps
assimilate which does not
require relinquishing their heri-
tage or forgetting their roots.
Colonists, by contrast, bring
their culture with them and live
under their own laws. Their loy-
alties lie elsewhere.
Ye'or contends that a con-
certed effort is being made
not only to ensure that Muslim
immigrants in Europe remain
squarely in the second catego-
ry but also that they become
the means to transform Europe
politically, culturally and reli-
giously. Leading this effort is
the Organization of the Islamic
Conference, established in 1969
and which, a few months ago,
no doubt upon the advice of
a highly compensated public
relations professional, renamed
itself the Organization of
Islamic Cooperation.
The OIC represents 56
countries plus the Palestinian
Authority. It claims also to
represent Muslim immigrants -
the "Diaspora" in Europe, the
Americas, Africa and Asia. It is


Cliff May
Speaktojoy@aol.com


pan-Islamic: It seeks to unify
and lead the world's 1.3 bil-
lion Muslims. In a manual first
published in 2001, "Strategy of
Islamic Cultural Action in the
West," the IOC asserts "Muslim
immigrant communities in
Europe are part of the Islamic
nation." It goes on to recom-
mend, Ye'or notes, "a series of
steps to prevent the integration
and assimilation of Muslims
into European culture."
The IOC, she argues, is noth-
ing less than a "would-be, uni-
versal caliphate." It might look
different from the caliphates
of the Ottomans, Fatamids and
Abbasids. It might resemble,
instead, a thoroughly modern
trans-national bureaucracy.
But, already, the OIC exercises
significant power through the
United Nations, and through
the European Union that has
been eager to accommodate
the OIC while simultane-
ously endowing the U.N. with
increasing authority for global
governance.
In the eyes of OIC officials,
no problem in the contem-
porary world is more urgent
than "Islamophobia" which it
calls "a crime against human-
ity" that the U.N. and the E.U.
must officially outlaw. The OIC
also has specifically "warned"
the "international commu-
nity" of the "dangers posed
by the influence of Zionism,
Neo-Conservatism, aggres-
sive Christian evangelicalism,
Jewish extremism, Hindu
extremism and secular extrem-
ism in international affairs and
the 'War on Terrorism.'"
Funding for terrorist groups
flows generously from individu-
als in oil-rich OIC countries.
Violence directed against those


it views as enemies of Islam
is defined as "resistance" -
even when civilians, including
women and children, are the
intended victims.
Why don't European diplo-
mats at least insist that the OIC
accept the principle of reciproc-
ity? How can a "dialogue of
civilizations" not discuss the
persecution of minorities in
OIC countries (including even
heterodox Muslim communi-
ties such as the Ahmadiyya)
and the egregious mistreatment
of foreign workers in the Gulf
countries?
Ye'or offers this explanation:
Committed to a multi-cultural,
multi-ethnic, multi-religious
and multi-lateral ideology that
rejects patriotism and even
national identity and cultural
pride, afflicted by guilt over
their imperial and colonial past
- and ignorant about more than
a thousand years of Islamic
imperialism and colonialism
- Europeans have become
dhimmis in their own coun-
tries: inferiors who accept their
status and submit The OIC,
'by contrast, rejects multi-cul-
turalism, openly professing the
superiority of the Islamic faith,
civilization and laws.
"The caliphate," Bat Ye'or
concludes, is "alive and grow-
ing within Europe ... It has
advanced through the denial of
dangers and the obfuscating of
history. It has moved forward
on gilded carpets in the corri-
dors of dialogue, the network of
the Alliances and partnerships,
in the corruption of its leaders,
intellectuals and NGOs, particu-
larly at the United Nations."
If you think that's alarmist,
if you think the OIC sincerely
seeks cooperation with the
West or that Europeans know
where lines must be drawn and
have the courage to draw them,
read her book. Or just wait a
few years.


* Clifford D. May is president of
the Foundation for the Defense
of Democracies, a policy institute
focusing on terrorism.


died in Avila, Spain.
In 1893, more than 100,000
settlers swarmed onto a section
of land in Oklahoma known as
the "Cherokee Strip."
In 1908, General Motors
was founded in Flint, Mich., by
William C. Durant.
In 1910, Bessica Medlar
Raiche of Mineola, N.Y. made
the first accredited solo airplane
flight by a woman in the United
States.
In 1919, the American Legion
received a national charter from
Congress.


In 1940, President Franklin
D. Roosevelt signed into law the
Selective Training and Service
Act, which set up the first peace-
time military draft in U.S. histo-
ry. Samuel T. Rayburn of Texas
was elected Speaker of the U.S.
House of Representatives.
In 1982, the massacre of
hundreds of Palestinian men,
women and children by Israeli-
allied Lebanese militiamen
began in west Beirut's Sabra
and Chatilla refugee camps.
* The Associated Press


4A


ANOTHER
VIEW


Snooping

bill raises

risk of

ID theft

A Big Brother bill
quietly moving
through the House
of Representatives
would effectively
end Americans' online pri-
vacy. H.R.1981, the Protecting
Children from Internet
Pornographers Act of 2011,
would force Internet service
providers to maintain a national
database of every user's name,
address, phone number, credit
card information, bank account
numbers and IP address.
"The records would
involve all internet users
everywhere, and they would
be available to law enforce-
ment for any purpose,"
a coalition of 30 privacy
groups warned in an open
letter to Congress.
In our view, HR1981
might be the worst threat
to civil liberties since the
USA PATRIOT Act. It grants
law enforcement an unprec-
edented power to invade
our privacy and puts every
American at risk of identity
theft, all without keeping a
single child safe from sexual
exploitation.
It's no wonder why law
enforcement agencies,
spearheaded by the Justice
Department, are salivating
at the surveillance' powers
granted by this bill. We live
in an ever-connected world.
Even when our smart phones
and tablets are turned off,
these devices continue to
leave a digital footprint of
where we've been and with
whom we've communicated.
"Would you want your
neighbors to know the last
100 websites you visited?"
That's how a spokeswoman
for the Electronic Frontier
Foundation explained the
bill's coercive nature to us.
It's not just the guilty
who have reason to fear; it's
anyone who holds a radical
idea or challenges govern-
ment power. Consider, for
example, cases of police
brutality. Witnesses might
be intimidated from speaking
out if they knew police could
publicize their Internet histo-
ry at trial. We aren't exactly
stretching our imagination
with such a scenario.
Of course, there's also the
practical concern that our
personal information could
be stolen by hackers, terror-
ists or foreign governments.
Earlier this year, Sony admit-
ted that hackers had stolen
the personal information of
more than 100 million cus-
tomers. FBI Director Robert
Mueller has called cybertqr-
rorism a threat to national
security that is "real" and
"rapidly expanding." And
security experts have attrib-
uted at least two U.S. power
outages to computer hack-
ers working on behalf 'of the
Chinese government.
Like the bill's 26 congres-
sional co-sponsors, you might
remain steadfast: Child por-
nography should be fought at
any price. Then, we recom-
mend you read the Justice
Department's May 2006
report, "Child Pornography
on the Internet," which con-
cluded, "A computer-savvy
user can access these (child
pornography) groups by
using techniques that hide
his/her identity by conceal-
ing his/her true IP address."
HR 1981 won't stop pedo-
philes. However, it reminds
us that liberty is ever-vulner-
able in the ongoing tension


between security for all,
especially children, and per-
sonal freedom.

* The Orange County Register


Highlights in History








LAKE CITY REPORTER NEWS FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 16, 2011 5A


Lung cancer


rates down


By MIKE STOBBE
AP Medical Writer
ATLANTA The West
is leading a national decline
in the rate of new lung can-
cer cases, with states like
California and Nevada
accounting for much of the
improvement, particularly
among women.
Smoking' rates in the
West have long been lower,
and that's credited for the
good health news for that
region. Roughly 90 percent
of lung cancer cases are
attributed to smoking.
Lung cancer rates for men
havebeendecliningforyears,
but the drop among women
is much more recent The
Centers for Disease Control
and Prevention reported
Thursday that lung cancer
rates for women nationally
decreased about 2 percent
from 2006 to 2008, the last
year studied. But the rate
for women in select Western
states fell about 4 percent in
the same period.
Declines among men
were similar, including a 4
percent decline in the West
and about a 3 percent drop
nationally.
"Over the past 20 years,
lung cancer overtook breast
cancer and became the No.
1 cancer killer of women.
This is a horrific develop-
ment that we have begun
to turn around," said Dr.
Tim McAfee, director of the


Linda Diane Mudd
Linda Diane Mudd, 64,
born July 26, 1947 laid to
rest September 12, 2011.
Survivors include husband;
Thomas B. Mudd, Live Oak,.
FL; one son, Charles S. Oak-
ley (Denise), Lampasas, TX;
two daughters, Charlene A.
Oakley, Lake City, FL and Pa-


CDC's Office on Smoking
and Health.
Female lung cancer rates
did not decline in every state,
but six states saw significant
drops California, Nevada,
Oregon, Washington, Texas
and Florida. That was
enough to pull down the
national rate, even though
female cancer incidence
rose slightly in 14 states.
The rate of new lung can-
cer cases among males
dropped in 35 states.
Lung cancer was some-
thing of a medical rarity 100
years ago, but is now one
of the most commonly diag-
nosed cancers in the United
States and is the form of
cancer that kills the most
people. More than 150,000
Americans will die of it this
year, the American Cancer
Society estimates.
It can take many years for
lung cancer to develop in a
smoker, although lung can
cer rates can be seen to drop
as soon as five years after
smoking rates decline.
In the new report, CDC
researchers looked at
national cancer registries
for the years 1999 through
2008, and also studied state-
specific smoking rates from
a separate data base that cov-
ered the same time period.
The results are being pub-
lished this week in a CDC
publication, Morbidity and
Mortality Weekly Report.


OBITUARIES


tricia R. Yqung (Robert) both
of Live Oak, FL; brother, Terry
L. Whatley, Miami, FL; step-
children, Laura Mudd, Lee
County, FL, Sandra Mallinger,
Michigan, Thomas B. Mudd,
Vero Beach, FL, fifteen grand-
babies and 9 great grand babies.
Memorial at Haven Hos-
pice, Hwy 90, Septem-
ber 17, 2011 at 3:00 p.m.


Palin camp denounces

racy bio of ex-governor


Associated Press
WASHINGTON -
Sarah Palmin's husband on
Thursday called a book crit-
ical of his family "disgusting
lies, innuendo and smears"
as the former Alaska gov-
ernor's camp sought to dis-
credit a racy biography that
includes allegations of infi-
delity and drug use.
As Sarah Palin weighs a
White House bid, her hus-
band released a statement
seeking to blunt the fallout
from Joe McGinniss' 'The
Rogue: Searching for the
Real Sarah Palin." Palin
allies also released another
denial from the man alleged
to have carried on an affair
with Sarah Palin.
'This is a man who has
been relentlessly stalking
my family to the point of
moving in right next door
to us to harass us and
spy on us to satisfy his
creepy obsession with my
wife," Todd Palin wrote of
McGinniss. "His book is full
of disgusting lies, innuendo
and smears. Even The New
York Times called this book
'dated, petty,' and that it
'chases caustic, unsubstan-
tiated gossip.'"
The Republicans' 2008
vice presidential nominee
and former governor of
Alaska made no new ref-
erence on her Facebook
account to McGinniss' book,
although Sarah Palin pre-
viously mocked McGinniss
for moving into a rented
house next door to the Palin


Arrangements made by
ICS CREMATION AND
FUNERAL HOME, 357
N.W. Wilks Lane, Lake City,
FL 32055 (386) 752-3436.

Obituaries are paid advertise-
ments. For details, call the Lake
City Reporter's classified depart-
mentat 752-1293.


home.
"We're sure to have a
doozey to look forward to
with this treasure he's pen-
ning," Sarah Palin wrote
last year. "Wonder what
kind of material he'll gather
while overlooking Piper's
bedroom, my little garden
and the family's swimming
hole?"
McGinniss' book also
repeats allegations first
published in The National
Enquirer that Sarah Palin
carried on an affair with
Brad Hanson, Todd Palin's
former business partner.
In a statement released
through Palin allies, Hanson
again denied the allegation.
"This is the same old
story that went around in
2008. It is a complete and
outright lie," Hanson said.
'Todd and Sarah Palin have
been good friends for many
years, and in fact we still
own property together. We
sold a former joint business
venture for business rea-
sons, nothing more. These
attacks are shameful and
those making them seem to
be out only to destroy good
people and make money
doing so."
Appearing on NBC's
'Today Show," McGinniss
defended his reporting.


Former Republican *vice presidential candidate and Alaska
Gov. Sarah Palin waves to supporters before addressing a
Tea Partly Express Rally in Manchester, N.H. Palin's husband
Todd, released a statement on Thursday, responding to Joe
McGinniss' "The Rogue: Searching for the Real Sarah Palin,"
as "disgusting lies, innuendo and smears" as the former
Alaska governor's camp sought to discredit a racy biography
that includes allegations of infidelity and drug use.


LAKE SHORE HOSPITAL AUTHORITY


Budget Summary



October 1, 2011

Through

September 30, 2012


Patient Care Funds


Operating


Capital
improvement


Hospital Clinics Fund Fund Total


REVENUES AND BALANCES
Ad valorem taxes


.962 mills


Lease income


Interest earnings
Transfers in
Total revenue
Estimated beginning cash


$1,467,316


40,000
600,000
2,107,316
700,000
$2,807,316


$ 730,000


5,000


479,070
75,000


10,000


735,000 554,070 10,000


800,000.
$1,535,000


3t400,000
$3,954,070


1,400,000
$1,410,000


- $ 2,197,316


479,070
130,000


600,000
3,406,386
6,300,000
$ 9,706,386


EXPENDITURES AND RESERVES


Administration


194,000 351,798 545,798


Healthcare services
Indigent patient care
Transfers out
Total appropriations
Ending cash reserves


2,540,000


730,000


25,000


2,734,000 730,000 376,798


73,316
$2,807.316


805,000
$1,535,000


3,577,272
$3,954,070


600,000
600,000
810,000
$1,410,000


3,295,000
600,000
4,440,798
5,265,588
$ 9,706,386


The Tentative/Adopted, and/or Final Budgets are on file in the Office of the above-mentioned taxing authority as a public record.


NOTICE OF BUDGET HEARING

The Lake Shore Hospital Authority has tentatively adopted a
S S
budget for the fiscal year ending September 30, 2012. A public

hearing to make a FINAL DECISION on the budget AND TAXES

will be held on Monday, September 20, 2011 at 5:30 p.m., at

Lake Shore Hospital Authority, Administration Complex,

259 NE Franklin Street, Suite 102, Lake City, Florida.









6A LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL & STATE FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 16, 2011


Osburn completes


basic training


Air Force Airman
Brandon J. Osburn gradu-
ated from basic training at
Lackland Air Force Base
in San Antonio, Texas on
December 17, 2010.
,A 2010 graduate of
Columbia High School,
Osburn is the son of Jeff
and Tracy Osburn and the
grandson of Julia Osburn,
all of Lake City. He is also
the grandson of Pasco and
the late Loretta Jarvis of
Wellborn.
Osburn completed an
intensive eight and a half
week program on military
discipline, Air Force core
values, physical fitness
and basic warfare skills.


By completing basic train-
ing, Osburn earned four
credits toward an associate
in applied science degree
through the Community
College of the Air Force.
Osburn has completed
his indoctrination into the
pararescue program. He
will have one and a half
years of training left before
becoming a pararescue-
man, whose primary func-
tion is as a personnel recov-
ery specialist, with emer-
gency medical capabilities
in humanitarian and com-
bat environments. They
deploy in any available
manner, including air-land-
sea tactics, into restricted


environments to authenti-
cate, extract, treat, stabi-
lize and evacuate injured
personnel. Pararescuemen
participate in search and
rescue, combat search and
rescue, recovery support
for NASA and conduct
other operations as appro-
priate.
Pararescuemen are
among the most highly
trained emergency trauma
specialists in the U.S. mili-
tary. They must maintain
an emergency medical
technician-paramedic qual-
ification throughout their
careers. With this medi-
cal and rescue expertise,
along with their deploy-


Brandon J. Osburn


ment capabilities, para-
rescuemen are able to per-
form life-saving missions
in the world's most remote
areas.


Chancellor's ideas for higher ed reform


By CHRISTINE ARMARIO
Associated Press
MIAMI The chancel-
lor of Florida's state univer-
sity system wants education
leaders to consider reforms
that would increase degree
completion, boost the num-
ber of students of the sci-:
ences and reevaluate how
faculty are compensated
and tenured.
Chancellor Frank
Brogan presented the ideas
Thursday at a meeting of
the Board of Governors in
Miami. Republican Gov.
Rick Scott has shared his
interest in Texas' higher
education reform plan with
Florida university officials
recently, which includes
proposals such as a merit-
pay system for professors
and weakening tenure. The
proposals have been sup-
ported.by Texas Gov. Rick
Perry, a GOP presidential
candidate.
"I think the Texas plan is
fine for Texas," said Brogan,
who has held the chancel-
lor's post since 2009. "What
the governor has said is he
just likes the Texas plan as a
conversation starter."
Brogan presented a broad
overview of what Florida's


,plan might include. Ideas
include doubling the num-
ber of students earning
online degrees and moving
toward greater accountabili-
ty in funding, faculty pay and
tenure. Brogan said existing
compensation models need
to be reviewed to ensure
they attract and retain high
quality faculty, and said
there should be a way of
evaluating professors' ten-
ure status, once attained.
"How do we make sure
people are still hitting that
mark?" he asked.
Scott signed a law in
March that eliminates ten-
ure for new K-12 public
school teachers after July 1,
2014, and established a per-
formance pay plan. Florida's
statewide teachers union


has filed a lawsuit, claiming
the new law is unconstitu-
tional because it changed
pay and evaluation without
going through collective
bargaining.
The Board of Governors
will discuss ideas in more
detail at its meeting in
November, and then may
send proposals to the
Legislature for consider-
ation.
High on Brogan's list is
bringing more students into
thescience,technology, engi-
neering and math (STEM)
fields, which are expected
to see continued growth in
the years ahead. Of all bach-
elor degrees awarded in the
2008-09 school year, 13.8
percent were in STEM sub-
jects, placing Florida 11th


nationwide.
"Florida needs to do
more," Brogan said.
The board's $3.98 billion
legislative budget request
- a 14.5 percent increase
- for the state university
system includes $150 mil-
lion for STEM education and
increasing the number of
students earning four-year
degrees. Brogan said there
are two ways to increase
the number of graduates
in STEM fields: boost the
retention rates of those in
the pipeline, and provide
universities with additional
resources, like labs and
equipment.


Anthony must

pay almost $100K

for investigation


Associated Press
ORLANDO Casey
Anthony must pay almost
$100,000 in law enforce-
ment costs for investigat-
ing the death of her 2-year-
old daughter, a judge ruled
Thursday.
Circuit Judge Belvin
Perry's ruling fell well short
of the more than $500,000
that prosecutors and law
enforcement agencies in
Orlando asked for during a
hearing earlier this month.
Prosecutors had asked
that Anthony be forced to
pay those costs since she
lied repeatedly to investiga-
tors who were searching for
her missing toddler, Caylee,
in summer 2008. The judge
said the costs should only
cover the period when
detectives were investigat-
ing a missing person and
not the homicide investiga-
tion a sum of $97,676.
Anthony, 25, was acquit-
ted in July of murdering
Caylee. But she was con-
victed of four misdemeanor
counts of lying to authori-
ties. She told officers a
baby sitter had kidnapped
the child. Authorities later
learned the baby sitter
never existed.
Anthony has appealed
her misdemeanor convic-
tions. Her attorneys didn't
respond immediately to
emails seeking comment
Thursday.
Perry denied requests to
pay for prosecutors' costs of


Casey Anthony


pressing the murder charg-
es and said they were only
entitled to $50.
He ordered that $61,500
be paid to the Florida
Department of Law
Enforcement, that $25,837
be paid to the Orange
County Sheriff's Office
and that $10,283 be paid
to the Metropolitan Bureau
of Investigation in central
Florida. He left open the
possibility that the Orange
County Sheriff's Office
could recover more money
if the agency re-files expens-
es with greater details.
Anthony is serving proba-
tion at an undisclosed loca-
tion in Florida for unrelated
check fraud charges, She is
being hidden for her safety,
since she received death
threats after her'acquittal.


(Left to Right): Bret Robyck -VP Wholesale/ Auto Care, Greg Conti Shop Foreman, Jim Wilkinson
- Owner, Joe Keppell General Manager NAPA/Jacksonville Distribution Center


Greg Conti Master Certified Technician with
Jim's Auto Service has been awarded the SE
District NAPA Technician of the year award for
2G12. Greg had also won this award for the
years, 2008,2009,2010 and 2011. He has been
employed with Jim's Auto Service since April
1992. He has also been nominated for the
National NAPA Technician of the Year award.
The National award will be announced later
this year.
Today's automotive technician has to be
more than just a mechanic, He has to know
and understand hundreds of different systems
and just as many components on an enormous
number of increasingly complex platforms. In
order to stay current on the vehicles he works
on, training is not an option but a requirement.


Few technicians have the competence, pride in
workmanship, and just plain tenacity that Greg
possesses and applies to his profession.
Jim of Jim's Auto Service states, "It has been
my pleasure to have Greg work with me for 19
years. Greg has always exhibited qualities that
any employer would want in their employees.
He is skilled and competent in his field. Greg
has endeavored to keep the highest of quality
in all.work that he does. He has furthered his
knowledge in this field and has maintained
his ASE certifications. Greg is a Master Certi-
fied Technician, he has kept well informed of
advancements in his field of work.
Greg's experience with driveability concerns
and diagnostics have made him an exceptional
asset to our business.


Beyond Menopause

the Musical

Your age is up. Below the waist, things are down. In fact, they are
drooping, leaking and prolapsing. What can you do?

Join us for Girl Talk at Lake City Medical Center.
Gynecologist Dr. Anthony Agrios will discuss the latest treatments
for common conditions that many women think they just have
to live with as they get older.

Thursday, September 29
12:00 Noon 1:00 p.m.

Lake City Medical Center Classroom

Our program is free and includes lunch.
Please RSVP by September 27. Call 1-800-611 -6913.


j: NORTH FLORIDA LAKE CITY
I -REGIONAL HEALTHCARE I MEDICAL CENTER
A


"Providing you and your
family with expert advice."


The Ear Experts

Hearing Hearing Aids Ringing Ear Wax
Dizziness Balance Disorders


Hearing Solutions, Inc. & Columbia Balance Center

Call today to reserve a time that's convenient for you,


Dr. Debra K. Griffin, Au.D. Lake City, FL 386-758-3222


0inons,""


I I I


Live Oak, FL 386-330-2904 Cindy Thomas, H.I.S.


www.HearingSolutionlnc.com









Lake City Reporter


Story ideas?

Contact
Tim Kirby
Sports Editor
754-0421
tkirby@lakecityreporter.com


SPORTS


Friday, September 16, 201 I


www.lakecityreporter.com


Section B


CHEAP SEATS

o




Tim Kirby
Phone:(386) 754-0421
tkirby@/okecityreportercom

A time for

Tigers to

look back
Columbia
High's 100th
season of
football is a
good time to
look back and I recently
heard from former
Tigers lineman Gary
Harden.
Harden lives in
Camden County, Ga., and
works at Naval Hospital
Jacksonville.
Harden reflected on
two seasons in the
mid-70s and his memory
was pretty good.
He was a year off,
but spoke of the 1976
season when the Tigers
went 5-5. He wrote that
Columbia won every
road game that year
and lost every game at
Memorial Stadium.
It wasn't quite that
drastic according to
Morris Williams' and
Shayne Morgan's book
"Columbia High School
Tiger Football From
Memorial Stadium to the
Jungle." The record was
correct, but Columbia
was 2-3 at home.
In 1977, Columbia
lost its opening game,
7-0, to Fletcher High,
which eventually cost the
Tigers a spot in the
playoffs. It was during
the 11-year run when
Columbia and Fletcher
alternated winning
games on the opponent's
home field.
Columbia finished the
regular season 8-2, and
accepted an invitation to
what was billed as the
First Annual Elks Charity
Bowl in Lake City.
Godby High, which
had won the Class 4A
state championship the
previous year, put a 40
hurting on the Tigers.
Harden said his
brother, Bob, also played
for CHS.
Gary once
visited Bob, who lives in
Dallas, to attend a game
between the Jaguars and
Cowboys.
While there, the
brothers went to a book
signing by none other
than "Lake City's own"
Pat Summerall.
We welcome CHS
football memories during
this milestone year and
will do our best to check
them out.
Texas didn't wait long
to put Michael Kirkman
on the mound.
Called up Sunday,
Kirkman pitched the
ninth inning in the
Rangers' 10-4 win over
Cleveland on Tuesday.
Kirkmtnan gave up
one hit, hit Kosuke
Fukudome and struck
out a batter.
Another group, Alumni
Football USA, is looking
for high school alumni to
play in a full contact
football game.
For details and
registration on re-living
the dream, go to www.
alumnifootballusa.cornm.

* Tim Kirby is sports editor


of the Lake City Reporter.


CHS ready to


add one to


win column


Tigers host
visiting Bobcats
in Jungle today.
By BRANDON FINLEY
bfinley@lakecityreporter.com
Columbia High is ready
to mix things up. After a
0-2 start, the Tigers host
the Buchholz High Bobcats
at 7:30 p.m. today at Tiger
Stadium.
Coach Brian Allen is
ready for the Tigers to show
off a few new looks and new
players in different posi-
tions. Columbia announced
earlier this week that Jayce
Barber would take over
at quarterback With Nigel
Atkinson moving to wide
receiver. That doesn't mean
that Atkinson won't take
any snaps at quarterback as


Allen intends for Columbia
to come out with multiple
looks.
.The Tigers also plan on
bringing up freshman Ben
Kuykendall to start in the
secondary.
"He's a freshman junior
varsity player that we're
bringing up after we had
an injury in the secondary,"
Allen said. "We haven't
been pleased with the play.
It's a case where we can get
a young player in, have him
understand the defense and
we're already getting better
for the future."
Allen isn't looking ahead
to 2012, however, as the
coach still is working
on some things to make
the 2011 Tigers more
productive.
CHS continued on 3B


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Columbia High's Shaq Johnson (18) attempts to break through a tackle in a game against
Gainesville High on Sept. 9.


Homecoming heartbreak


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Richardson's Gabriel Williams (11) sacks Hamilton County quarterback Justin Culbreth (16) on Thursday.


Richardson Middle
School falls to Hamilton
County Trojans, 20-0.
By TIM KIRBY
S thirby@lakecityreporter. com
Richardson Middle School sched-
uled a tough opponent for homecom-
ing and it took a toll.
Hamilton County defeated
the Wolves, 20-0, on Thursday at
Columbia High Stadium.
"All week they were flat," Wolves
head coach Joey O'Neal said. "I
thought we were prepared, but that
is as bad as I've seen us play. We
have got to go back to the drawing
board."
Richardson's Gabriel Williams
had six tackles for losses total-
ing 43 yards. Joshua Aymond and
Tyrone Brown each had a tackle for
a loss.
Hamilton County's Malik Randolph;
scored with 26 seconds left in the
second quarter, the only points in a
defensive first half. A bad snap on a
punt set up the Trojans.
Late in the third quarter, a Wolves
lateral bounced to MichaelWhetstone
of the Trojans who returned it 17
yards for a touchdown.
Hamilton County's final score
came on a seven-yard pass from
Justin Culbreth to Lamar Brown.
Michael Jackson's 60-yard run to
the end zone for the Wolves was
called back because of a penalty.
Richardson (1-2) plays atSuwannee
Middle School at 7 p,m. Sept. 22.


Familiar foe


for Indians


Fort White to
rfmeet Taylor
County tonight.
By TIM KIRBY
tkirby@lakecityreporter.com
FORT WHITE Fort
White High will play a famil-
iar football opponent when
the Indians visit Taylor
County High today.
Kickoff at the Perry
school is 7:30 p.m.
Fort White and Taylor
County will be playing
for the ninth time in Fort
White's 12-year history.
The Bulldogs have a 5-3
edge, including the last two
years when the teams were


in District 2-2B.
In the FHSAA's new eight-
class format, Fort White
is in District 3-3A while
Taylor County has moved
up to District 1-4A. Taylor
County's district includes
Walton, East Gadsden and
Marianna high schools.
There is another differ-
ence at Taylor County.
Steve Price is the new
head coach. Price was the
defensive coordinator for
the Bulldogs during their
playoff seasons of 2009-10.
Former coach Shane Boggs
returned to his home state
and took a job at Tennessee
High in Bristol.
*INDIANS continued on 3B


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter,
Fort White kicker Nathan Escalante (80) goes for an extra point as quarterback Andrew Baker
(12) makes the hold in a game against Newberry High School on Sept. 9.













LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 16, 2011 Page EdItor: Tim Kirby, 754-0421


TELEVISION

TV sports

Today
AUTO RACING
2 p.m.
ESPN2 NASCAR, Sprint Cup,
practice for Geico 400, at Joliet, III.
3:30 p.m.
SSPEED-- NASCAR,Truck Series, pole
qualifying for Fast Five 225, at Joliet, Ill.
4:30 p.m.
SPEED NASCAR, Nationwide
Series, final practice for Dollar General
300, at Joliet, III.
6 p.m.
SPEED NASCAR, Sprint Cup,
"Happy Hour Series," final practice for
Geico 400, at Joliet, III.
8 p.m.
SPEED NASCARTruck Series, Fast
Five 225, at Joliet, ill.
COLLEGE FOOTBALL
8 p.m.
ESPN Boise St. at Toledo
ESPN2 Iowa St. at UConn
GOLF
8:30 a.m.
TGC European PGA Tour, Seve
Trophy, second round, at Paris
12:30 p.m.
TGC LPGA, Navistar Classic,
second round, at PrattvilleAla.
3 p.m.
TGC PGA Tour, BMW
Championship, second round, at Lemont,
III.
6:30 p.m.
TGC Nitionwide Tour, Boise Open,
second round, at Boise, Idaho (same-day
tape)
I a.m.
TGC Champions Tour, Songdo
Championship, first round, at Songdo,
South Korea
MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL
7 p.m.
MLB Regional coverage, Tampa Bay
at Boston OR N.Y.Yankees at Toronto

BASEBALL

AL standings

East Division
W L Pct GB
New York 90 58 .608 -
Boston 86 62 .581 4
Tampa Bay 82 66 .554 8
Toronto 75 74 .503 I5'%
Baltimore 60 88 .405 30
Central Division
W L Pct GB
Detroit 87 62 .584 -
Chicago 73 75 .493 13'h
Cleveland 72 74 .493 13'
Kansas City 64 86 .427 23'h
Minnesota 59 89 .399 27%
West Division
W L Pct GB
Texas 85 64 .570 -
Los Angeles 82 67 .550 3
Oakldad 47 82 .450 18
,Seattle, 62 87 .416, 23
Wednesday's Games
Toronto 5, Boston 4
Detroit 6. Chicago White Sox 5, 10
,Innings
L.A.Angels 4, Oakland I
Kansas City 7, Minnesota 3
Texas 9, Cleveland I
Baltimore 6,Tampa Bay 2
Seattle 2, N.Y.Yankees I1,12 innings
Thursday's Games
Tampa Bay at Boston (n)
Cleveland at Texas (n)
Chicago White Sox at Kansas City (n)
Detroit at Oakland, (n)
Today's Games
LA.Angels (Haren 15-8) at Baltimore
(Tom.Hunter 3-4), 7-05 p.m.
N.Y.Yankees (Sabathia 19-8) atToronto
(Cecil 4-9), 7:07 p.m.
Tampa Bay (Shields 15-10) at Boston
,(Beckett 12-5), 7:10 p.m.
Chicago White Sox (Humber 9-8) at
Kansas City (F.Paulino 3-6),8:10 p.m.
Cleveland (U.Jimenez 3-2) at
Minnesota (Slowey 0-5), 8:10 p.m.
Detroit (Fister 8-13) at Oakland
(Cahill 11-13), 10:05 p.m.
Texas (C.Wilson 16-6) at Seattle
(Beavan 4-5), 10:10 p.m.
Saturday's Games
N.Y.Yankees atToronto, 1:07 p.m.
Cleveland at Minnesota, 1:10.p.m.
Detroit at Oakland, 4:05 p.m.
Tampa Bay at Boston, 4:10 p.m.
LA Angels at Baltimore, 7:05 p.m.
Chicago White Sox at Kansas City,
7:10 p.m.
Texas at Seattle, 7:10 p.m.
Sunday's Games
N.Y.Yankees atToronto, 1:07 p.m.
L.A.Angels at Baltimore, 1:35 p.m.
Tampa Bay at Boston, 1:35 p.m.
Chicago White Sox at Kansas City,
2:10 p.m.
Cleveland at Minnesota, 2:10 p.m.
Detroit at Oakland, 4:05 p.m.
Texas at Seattle, 4:10 p.m.

NL standings


z-Phlladelp
Atlanta
Washingto
New York
Florida


Milwaukee
St. Louis
Cincinnati
Pittsburgh
Chicago
Houston


East Division
W L
hila 96 51
86 64
on 71 77
71 79
67 82
Central Division
W L
87 63
81 68
73 76
67 82
65 84
51 98
West Division


Pct GB
.653 -
.573 1 1'A
.480 25'A
.473 26'h
.450 30

Pct GB
.580 -
.544 5h'
.490 13'A
.450 19'h
.436 21'h
.342 35'h


W L I
Arizona 87 63 .5
San Francisco 79 70 .5
Los Angeles 73 75 .4
Colorado 70 78 .4
San Diego 63 87 .4
z-clinched playoff berth
Wednesday's Games
Atlanta 4, Florida I
St. Louis 3, Pittsburgh 2
Philadelphia I, Houston 0
San Francisco 3, San Diego I
Cincinnati 7, Chicago Cubs 2
Washington 2, N.Y. Mets 0
Colorado 6, Milwaukee 2
LA. Dodgers 3,Arizona 2
Thursday's Games


Washington 10,.N.Y. Mets I
Philadelphia 3, Florida I, 1st game
Chicago Cubs at Cincinnati (n)
Florida at Philadelphia, 2nd game (n)
San Francisco at Colorado (n)
Pittsburgh at LA. Dodgers (n)
Today's Games
Houston (W.Rodriguez 11-10) at
Chicago Cubs (Garza 8-10), 2:20 p.m.
Florida (Vazquez 10-11) atWashington
(Lannan 9-12), 7:05 p.m.
St. Louis (J.Garcia 12-7) at Philadelphia
(Worley 11-2), 7:05 p.m.
Milwaukee (Wolf 12-9) at Cincinnati
(Arroyo 8-1 I),7:10 p.m.
N.Y. Mets (Capuano 10-12) at Atlanta
(D.Lowe 9-14),7:35 p.m.
San Francisco (Bumgarner 11-12) at
Colorado (White 2-1), 8:10 p.m.
Arizona (Miley 3-1) at San Diego
(Stauffer 8-12), 10:05 p.m.
Pittsburgh (Locke 0-1) at LA. Dodgers
(Kuroda 11-16), 10:10 p.m.
Saturday's Games
Houston at Chicago Cubs, 1: 05 p.m.
N.Y. Mets at Atlanta, 4:10 p.m.
Florida at Washington, 7:05 p.m.
St. Louis at Philadelphia, 7:05 p.m.
Milwaukee at Cincinnati, 7:10 p.m.
San Francisco at Colorado, 8:10 p.m.
Arizona at San Diego, 8:35 p.m.
Pittsburgh at LA. Dodgers, 10:10 p.m.
Sunday's Games
Milwaukee at Cincinnati, 1:10 p.m.
Florida at Washington, 1:35 p.m.
N.Y. Mets at Atlanta, 1:35 p.m.
Houston at Chicago Cubs, 2:20p.m.
San Francisco at Colorado, 3:10 p.m.
Arizona at San Diego, 4:05 p.m.
Pittsburgh at LA. Dodgers, 4:10 p.m.
St. Louis at Philadelphia, 8:05 p.m.

Career save leaders

Through Wednesday
Career save leaders since 1969, when
saves became an official major league
statistic (x-active):
I.Trevor Hoffman 601
2. x-Mariano Rivera 600
3. Lee Smith 478
4. John Franc 424
5. Billy Wagner 422
6. Dennis Eckersley 390
7. Jeff Reardon 367
8.Troy Percival 358
9. Randy Myers 347
0I O. Rollie Fingers 341
I I.John Wetteland 330
12. Roberto Hernandez 326

FOOTBALL

NFL schedule

Sunday
Chicago at New Orleans, I p.m.
Baltimore at Tennessee, I p.m.
Tampa Bay at Minnesota. I p.m.
Kansas City at Detroit. I p.m.
Jacksonville at N.Y. Jets, I p.m.
Oakland at Buffalo, I p.m.
Arizona atWashington., I p.m.
Seattle at Pittsburgh. I p.m.
Green Bay at Carolina. I p.m.
Cleveland at Indianapolis. I p.m.
Dallas at San Francisco, 405 p.m.
Cincinnati at Denver, 4:15 p.m.
Houston at Miami, 4:15 p.m.
San Diego at New England, 4:15 p.m.
Philadelphia-at Atlanta, 8:20 p.m.
Monday
St. Louis at N.Y. Giants, 8:30 p.m.

Top 25 games

Today
No. 4 Boise State at Toledo, 8 p.m.
Saturday
No. I Oklahoma at No. 5 Florida
State, 8 p.m.
No. 2 Alabama vs. North Texas,
7:30 p.m.
No. 6 Stanford at Arizona, 10:45 p.m.
No. 7 Wisconsin vs. Northern Illinois
at Chicago, 3:30 p.m.
No. 8 Oklahoma State at Tulsa,
10 p.m.
No. 9 Texas A&M vs. Idaho, 7 p.m.
No. 10 South Carolina vs. Navy, 6 p.m.
No. I I Nebraska vs. Washington,
3"30 p.m.
No. 12 Oregon vs. Missouri State,
3:30 p.m.
No. 13 VirginiaTech vs.Arkansas State,
4 p.m.
No. 14 Arkansas vs.Troy, 7:30 p.m.
No. 15 Michigan State at Notre Dame,
3:30 p.m.
No. 16 Florida vs. Tennessee,
3:30 p.m.
No. 17 Ohio State at MiamI,
7:30 p.m.
No. 18 West Virginia at Maryland,
Noon
No. 19'Baylor vs. Stephen F Austin,
7 p.m.
No. 20 South Florida vs. Florida
A&M, 7 p.m.
No.21 Auburn at Clemson, Noon
No. 22 Arizona State at Illinois, 7 p.m.
No. 23 TCU vs. Louislana-Monroe,
2p.m.
No. 23 Texas at UCLA, 3:30 p.m.




Unscramble these four Jumbles,
one letter to each square,
to form four ordinary words.

I XOPYR


BASKETBALL

WNBA playoffs

Eastern Conference semifinals
Indiana vs. NewYork
Thursday
New York at Indiana (n)
Saturday
Indiana at New York, 4 p.m.
Connecticut vs. Atlanta
Today
Atlanta at Connecticut, 7 p.m.
Western Conference semifinals
Minnesota vs. San Antonio
Today
San Antonio at Minnesota, 9 p.m.
Seattle vs. Phoenix
Thursday
Phoenix at Seattle (n)
Saturday
Seattle at Phoenix, 10 p.m.

AUTO RACING

Race week

.NASCAR
SPRINT CUP
GEICO 400
Site: Joliet, Ill.
Schedule: Today, practice (ESPN2,
2-3:30 p.m.; Speed, 6-7:30 p.m.); Saturday,
qualifying (Speed, 1:30-3 p.m.); Sunday,
race, 2 p.m. (ESPN, 1-5:30 p.m.).
Track: Chicagoland Speedway (tri-oval,
1.5 miles).
Race distance: 400.5 miles, 267 laps.
NATIONWIDE
DOLLAR GENERAL 300
Site: Joliet, IlI.
Schedule: Today, practice (Speed,
4:30-6 p.m.); Saturday, qualifying (Speed,
noon-1:30 p.m.), race, 3:30 p.m. (ESPN2,
3-6 p.m.).
Track Chicagoland Speedway.
Race distance: 300 miles, 200 laps.
CAMPING WORLD TRUCK
FAST FIVE 225
Site: Joliet, III.
Schedule: Today, practice,
qualifying (Speed, 3:30-4:30 p.m.). race,
8 p.m. (Speed, 7:30-10:30 p.m.).
Track Chicagoland Speedway.
Race distance: 225 miles, 150 laps.
INDYCAR
INDY JAPAN 300
Site: Motegi, Japan.
Schedule: Today, practice; Saturday.
practice, qualifying; Sunday, race, 12:05 a.m.
(Versus, Saturday, 11:30 p.m.-2 a.m.).
Track: Twin Ring Motegi (road course,
2.983 miles).
Race distance: 187.9 miles, 63 laps.
NHRA FULLTHROTTLE
O'REILLY AUTO PARTS
NATIONALS
Site: Concord, N.C.
Schedule: Today, qualifying; Saturday,
qualifying (ESPN2, Sunday, 12:30-2 a.m.),
Sunday, final eliminations (ESPN2, 8:30-
11:30 p.m.).
Track: zMAX Dragway
OTHER RACES
AMERICAN LE MANS SERIES:
ModSpace American Le Mans Monterey,
Saturday (ESPN2, Sunday, 1-3 p.m.), Mazda
Raceway Laguna Seca. Monterey, Calif.
GRAND-AM ROLEX SPORTS CAR
SERIES: EMCO Gears Classic, Saturday
(Speed, 3-6 p.m.), Mid-Ohio Sports Car
Course, Lexington, Ohio.

TENNIS

ATP World Tour

(x-qualified for Barclays World Tour
Finals, Nov. 20-27)
I. x-Novak Djokovic, Serbia 14720
2. x-Rafael Nadal, Spain 10620
3. x-Roger Federer, Switzerland 8380
4. x-Andy Murray, Britain 7165
5. David Ferrer, Spain 4200
6. Robin Soderling, Sweden 3785
7. Gael Monfils, France 2850
8. Mardy Fish, United States 2820
9.T. Berdych, Czech Republic 2770
10. Jo-Wllfried Tsonga, France 2710
II. Gilles Simon, France 2415
12. Nicolas Almagro, Spain. 2300
13.JankoTlpsarevic, Serbia 2010
14. A. Roddick. United States 1995
15. Richard Gasquet, France 1945

WTA rankings

I. Caroline Wozniacki, Denmark 9335
2. Maria Sharapova, Russia 6226
3.Victorla Azarenka, Belarus 6055
4.Vera Zvonareva, Russia, 5920
5. LI Na, China 5870
6. R Kvitova, Czech Republic 5530
7. Sam Stosur, Australia 5380
8. Francesca Schlavone, Italy 4775
9. KIm Clijsters, Belgium 4501
10. Marion Bartoli, France 4225
I I.Andrea Petkovic, Germany 4025
12. Jelena Jankovic, Serbia 3270
13.A'leszka Radwanska,Poland 3270
14. S.Williams, United States 3180
15. Peng Shuai, China 2825

THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME
by David L. Hoyt and Jeff Knurek


THIS WAS ONE WAY TO
RSE TO THE TOP AT
THIS COMPANY.

Now arrange the circled letters
to form the surprise answer, as
suggested by the above cartoon.


Answer here: THE IT I II ]
(Answers tomorrow)
Yesterday's Jumbles: FORUM FLUID PURSER PUBLIC
Answer: They were given one when they went to buy
a softer mattress A FIRM PRICE


League reports

Results of league bowling at Lake
City Bowl: '
TGIF
Team standings: 1. Back At Ya
Againl (11-1); 2. Team 8 (8.5-3.5);
3. Alvin & The Chickmonks (8-4, 7,447
pins); 4. Gutter Dusters (8-4, 7,399
pins); 5. Team 10 (8-4, 7,387 pins).
High scratch game: 1. Karen
Coleman 215; 2. Ida Hollingsworth
204; 3. Shannon Howard 188. 1.
Jason Howell 232; 2. Patrick Markham
229; 3. Curtis Gutzmer 225.
High scratch series: 1. Karen
Coleman 619; 2. Ida Hollingsworth
549; 3. Cara Lashley 491. 1. Patrick
Markham 624; 2. Zech Strohl 620;
3. Jason Howell 596.
High handicap game: 1. Karen
Coleman 240; 2. Cara Lashley 238; 3.
Tina Sherrod 237. 1. Patrick Markham
258; 2. Jason Howell 256; 3. Mark
Rowland 250.
High handicap series: 1. Karen
Coleman 691; 2. Tina Sherrod 688; 3.
(tie) Chris Pauwels, Cara Lashley 653.
1. Patrick Markham 711; 2. Roger
Snipes 673; 3. Mark Rowland 670.
(results from Sept. 2)
HIT & MISS
Team standings: 1. Oddballs
(12-4); 2. The Sandbaggers (11-5);
3. Spare Us (8-8, 536 average) 4. Git
Up & Bowl (8-8, 472 average).


YOUTH BASEBALL

Lake City sign-up

today, Saturday

Lake City Columbia
County Youth Baseball
registration for the fall
season is 5-8 p.m. today
and 10 a.m. to 4 p.m.
Saturday at Southside
Recreation Complex.
To register online go to
LCCCYB.com.
For details, call Tad
Cervantes at 365-4810.

CHS CHEERLEADING

Youth clinic

offered Saturday

Columbia High's
varsity and junior varsity
cheerleaders are hosting
a clinic for girls in pre-K
through the eighth grade
on Saturday. Registration
begins at 8:30 a.m., with
the clinic to follow from
9 a.m. to noon. Cost is $25.
For details, call Debbie
Godbold or Maci Dukes at
755-8080.

RUNNING

Breast Cancer

Awareness run

Cancer Care of North
Florida and Dr. Khan have


ACROSS
Witty fellow
"- Walks in
Beauty"
Gives the
green light to
radiation of
color
Zeus' wife
Unwelcome
mall
Retiree's kitty
Pretoria cash
Jumble
Plundered
- -splicing
Size above
med.
Dodge, as
taxes
Territory
More unusual
Corrida cry
NASA
counterpart
Iffy attempts
More peculiar
Elev.


SCOREBOARD


BRIEFS


a 5K run/walk planned
for 8 a.m. Oct 1 at Wilson
Park in downtown Lake
City. Entry fee is $25 ($30
day of run, 6:30-7:30 a.m.
registration). Suwannee
River Breast Cancer
Awareness Association is
hosting the run. ,
For details, call Shannon
Thomas at 288-4692 or
Donnie Feagle at (386)
365-1191, or go to www.
suwanneeawareness.com.


Chomp Cancer

honors Betty Koon

Chomp Cancer
Foundation is hosting
the Chomp Cancer Run/
Walk at the Fort White
Community Center at
8 a.m. Oct. 15. The race
is in honor of Betty Koon
of Fort White. Cost for
the 5K is $25 through
Sept 30, and there will be
food, music and a silent
auction from 9-10:30 a.m.
Sponsorship opportunities
are offered. All proceeds
will benefit the UF &
Shands Cancer Center.
Online registration is at
www.active.com keyword
Chomp Cancer.
For details, e-mail
Lauren Valentine at chomp
cancer@gmail.com or visit


38 Use the
scissors
39 Shut down
41 ABA member
42 Decided, as a
jury
44 Travel on
powder
46 Goat cheese
47 Cheery one
52 Not for
53 Send packing
54 Paddle's
cousin
55 Moose or elk
56 Tender
57 Former LAX
client
58 Poetic adverb
59 "-
Miserables"
60 Your choice

DOWN
1 Passing fancy
2 Mystique
3 Transmission
part


BOWLING

High handicap game: 1. Sandra
Peterson 277; 2. Iva "Jean" Dukes
250; 3. Betty Carmichael 232.
High handicap series: 1. Angie
Meek 671; 2. Harriett Woods 641;
3. Jo Anne Carr 633. .
(results from Sept. 13)
GOLDEN ROLLERS
Team standings: 1. Wild Things
(14-2); 2. Quirky Quad (12-4); 3. 4 S's
(11.5-4.5).
High average: 1. Thomas Young
161.08; 2. Louise Atwood 157.75;
3. De De Young 156.92. 1. George
Mulligan 180.5; 2. Bill Dolly 179.5;
3. David Duncan 170.75.
(results from Sept. 8)
SEXY SENIORS
Team standings: 1. Pin Droppers
(9-3); 2. Jo's Crew (8-4, 6,895 pins);
3. Farmers (8-4, 5,769 pins).
High scratch game: 1. Janet Nash
193; 2. Louise Atwood 170; 3. Louise
Atwood 170. 1. Earl Hayward 211;
2. Wayne Johns 205; 3. Johnnie Croft
203.
High scratch series: 1. Louise
Atwood 503; 2. Yvonne Finley 480;
3. Joanne Denton 430. 1. Wayne
Johns 559; 2. Art Joubert 506; 3. Earl
Hayward 502.
(results from Sept. 6)
MONDAY NIGHT MAVERICKS
Team standings: 1. Team- 9
(44-16); 2. Team 3 (42-18); 3. Team
13 (38-22).


www.chompcancer.com.


Veterans Day Run,

Walk, Roll 5K

Gainesville Fisher
House Foundation has a
Veterans Day 5K event
planned on a course at
the University of Florida.
The event begins at 8 a.m.,
preceded by registration at
6:30 a.m. Early registration
(through Oct. 20) is $20.
Regular registration is $25
and day-of registration is
$30. For team participation
contact
Barry. murphy@va.gov.
For details, go to www.
GainesvilleFisherHouse. org.

SEMI-PRO FOOTBALL

Lake City team

seeking players

The Lake City Falcons
men's semi-pro football
team is seeking new
players and veterans for
the upcoming season.
Players must be 18 years
old or older, and able to
commit to the team and
come to practice.
For details, call Luis.
Santiago at 292-4138. *

* From staff reports


Answer to Previous Puzzle


NIL K EA


[BETE SARA WEB
A WASH LL ERA
REL ERR T WANG
DR Y SAID IRIS
--^G1NU E YE
RIO AEGEAN


4 Express
uncertainty
5 Dangerous
falls
6 Ocean bird
7 Lubricated


Want more puzzles?
Check out the "Just Right Crossword Puzzles" books
at QulilDriverBooks.com


9-16


8 "Dave" lead
9 Wild plum
12 Snake or
calculator
13 He married
Bacall
18 Tavern fare
22 Goose-down
garment
23 Collection of
fauna
24 Vintage
25 Rorem or
Beatty
27 Long sighs
29 Perry's
penner
31 Circus routine
32 Except
33 Farm
structure
35 Rich pastry
37 Nod or wave
40 Bloodhound's
clues
41 Goal
42 "Walk Away

43 Unmitigated
45 Paper toys
46 Get lighter
48 Motel plus
49 Letter before
kappa
50 Like lumber
51 Room service
Item


2011 UFS, Dist. by Universal Uclick for UFS


High scratch game: 1. Chris
Hamrick 278; 2. Wally Howard Jr.
269; 3. John McFeely Jr. 267.
High scratch series: 1. Ron
VanDeVoren Jr. 679; 2. David Adel
676; 3. Patrick Markham 668.
High handicap game: 1. John
McFeely Jr. 296; 2. Chris Hamrick
294; 3. Patrick Markham 284.
High handicap series: 1. Ron
VanDeVoren Jr. 760; 2. Jason Keith
751; 3. Patrick Markham 746.
High average: 1. Curtis Gutzmer
218.83; 2. Pa4ick Markham 218.5;
3. Zech Strohl 218.33.
(results from Sept. 5)
SUNDAY NITE MERCHANTS
Team standings: 1. WGASA
(10-2); .2. The Untouchables (8-4);
3. TAZ (7-5).
High scratch game: 1. Norma
Yeingst 235; 2. Norma Yeingst 192;
3. Chrlssy Fancy 161. 1. Dan McNair
246; 2. Bobby Trunnell 243; 3. A.J.
Darlano 229.
High scratch series: 1. Norma
Yeingst 585; 2. Angela Pond 434;
3. Chrissy Fancy 422. 1. Dan McNair
657; 2. A.J. Dariano 592; 3. Allen
Personette 584.
High average: 1. Norma Yeingst
167; 2. Jennifer Freeman 150.22;
3. Angela Pond 142.33. 1. A.J. Dariano
196.33; 2. Garrett Shay 188.83;
3. Dan McNair 188.56.
(results from Sept. 11)


Page Editor: Tim Kirby, 754-0421


LAKE CITY REPORTER


SPORTS FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 16, 2011


PCDITE
7 r i
_^ / __









LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 16, 2011


Florida's Floyd returns


- in time for Volunteers


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Florida State quarterback E.J. Manuel (3) gets a block as he throws against Charleston
Southern in the second quarter of an NCAA college football game on Saturday in Tallahassee.


ACC gets chance to flex

BCS muscle this weekend


By HANK KURZ Jr.
Associated Press

This weekend the basket-
ball-crazed Atlantic Coast
Conference can make a
BCS statement
The ACC has historically
struggled against schools
from the five other major
BCS conferences, but the
conference has rarely had a
better opportunity to show
it belongs in the football
debate.
Five ACC teams will play
squads from the major BCS
leagues this weekend all
on their home turf.
Georgia Tech quarter-
back Tevin Washington is
well aware of the basketball
tradition, but also knows
what's at stake on the field.
So he's heard all he wants
to hear about basketball.
"I get really tired of it," said
Washington, whose Yellow
Jackets will host Kansas
out of the Big 12. "I mean,
we're here to play football.
... We look at it like this is an
opportunity to come out, get
better and show we can play
football with any conference
in America."
The marquee pairing
is No. 1 Oklahoma out of
the Big 12 at No. 5 Florida
State, the ACC. The other
matchups are: Miami host-
ing No. 17 Ohio State (Big
Ten), No. 21 Auburn (SEC)
visiting Clemson, Maryland
hosting No. 18 WestVirginia
(Big East).
Georgia Tech is the only
school not hosting a ranked
opponent. That makes no
difference to Washington.
"We're gonna try to rep-
resent for the whole ACC.
We're gonna come out -to
play our best game, come
out at 100 miles per hour
and leave it all out there


on field," the quarterback
said.
The ACC doesn't have
much to show for its efforts
against BCS opponents
over the past five seasons.
Even the first two weeks
of this season haven't been
stellar. ACC schools are 2-3
against power conference
schools this year, with the
victories coming at Indiana
by Virginia and North
Carolina's victory at home
against Rutgers last week.
The losses include
Northwestern's victory at
Boston College, Syracuse's
comeback to beat Wake
Forest in overtime, and No.
6 Stanford's 44-14 thrashing
of Duke in Durham, N.C.
Clemson right tackle
Landon Walker embraces
the opportunity this week-
end presents.
"Yeah, it's huge. As far
as the ACC is concerned,
it's always big to win a
game outside of conference,
especially (against) the
Southeastern Conference, to
show what the ACC is capa-
ble of, especially Clemson,"
he said. "But all we really
want to concentrate on is
what Clemson can control
and what we can do as a
team. No matter what the
ACC does, we want to go
outside the conference and
beat really good teams, espe-
cially the defending national
champions."
Several coaches dis-
missed the importance of
making a league-wide state-
ment, choosing to focus on
their own team's need to
win. But Blue Devils coach
David Cutcliffe said how the
conference has fared when
matched against the others
has been a topic of discus-
sion among the coaches.
"I don't think we're look-


ing through, rose-colored
glasses when we feel like
we've got a very good con-
ference," he said. "I've men-
tioned before the numbers
of the draft choices. Last
year alone was phenomenal.
I think we have outstanding
head coaches, outstanding
coordinators on both sides
of the ball, special teams
play.
"We're just going to have
to win some of those big,
big games that are inter-
sectional, interconference
games. We've got to show
up like that."
And therein has been the
problem.
In the last five seasons,
the ACC has a winning
record only against the Big
Ten, at 5-4. The league is
19-21 against the Big East,
8-9 against the Big 12, 18-
29 against the SEC and 3-
8 against the Pac 12. In
BCS bowl games, the ACC
has won only one of its last
11 games, and that was
Virginia Tech's 20-7 victory
in 2009 over a Cincinnati
team many thought wasn't
BCS quality.
Frank Beamer's Hokies
account for three of the
BSC losses, too. and they
were on the losing end of
the ACC's only other vic-
tory since 1999 when it lost
to Florida State as a Big
East member in 2000.
The coach said one week-
end won't tell the story on
its own.
"For the reputation of the
league, it's a big week, but
I still think you just don't
judge on a weekend, you
judge it over a period of
time, and I still think the
ACC, with the quality pro-
grams and quality coaches,
we're going to win our share
of those," Beamer said.


By MARK LONG
Associated Press

GAINESVILLE -
Florida's Sharrif Floyd
watched from the sideline
the first two games, unable
to change his situation,
unable to help his defense.,
The sophomore defen-
sive lineman sat out the
season opener while under
NCAA investigation, then
missed another game after
the governing body ruled
he received $2,700 from an
individual not associated
with the university. He was
ordered to sit two games
and arrange to repay the
money to charity. The deci-
sion devastated Floyd, who
had tears in his eyes as
coach Will Muschamp told
him he couldn't play.
His return against rival
Tennessee on Saturday
could be equally emotion-
al.
"Getting Sharrif Floyd,
that does a lot for our
team," teammate Lerentee
McCray said. "Just moti-
vation, just bringing our
brother along. ... It gives
us a real big boost going
into an SEC game."
A much-needed boost,
too.
The 16th-ranked Gators
(2-0) failed to record a sack
in last week's game against
UAB, and Muschamp has
repeatedly said he wants
more pressure from his
defensive ends.


Floyd's return should
help. He played in every
game lastyear and emerged
from fall practice as one of
the team's most versatile
and disruptive defenders.
"He's a great athlete, real
strong guy, real powerful,"
Gators center Jonotthan
Harrison said. "Sharrif is
an amazing pass rusher.
He's real good, real versa-
tile, everything on the line.
He's still pretty quick for a
big guy." *
The Volunteers (2-0)
have noticed. Coach Derek
Dooley said the Gators
"probably have the most
talented defensive line in
the country" with Floyd,
McCray, Dominique Easley,
Jaye Howard, Omar Hunter
and Ronald Powell.
"We're going to have
to block for these guys,"
Dooley said. "It doesn't
matter how open you are,
if you can't deliver the ball
to them it doesn't matter.
That's going to be our
biggest challenge. This is
as athletic and big as a
defensive front as you'll see
in college football. They're
good. They just roll right
through the offensive
line."
Tennessee rolled its first
two opponents, scoring
at least 40 points in both
games as sophomore Tyler
.Bray completed 79 percent
of his passes for 698 yards
and seven touchdowns.
Last week, Bray became


the second player in school
history to threw for 400
yards in a game.
After putting up gaudy
numbers against Montana
and Cincinnati, Bray now
leads the conference in
passing yards, total offense
and pass efficiency.
"He has certainly played
two very good football
kames," Dooley said. "He
has put a big investment in
trying to be good. You see
it on the practice field, you
see it in the time he's put-
ting in outside of practice.
When you are putting a
lot of investment and you
are committing yourself to
being good and you are
playing good, then you
have the ability to affect
others in a positive way."
The Gators believe the
key to beating Tennessee
is stopping running back
Tauren Poole and getting
steady pressure on Bray.
And it starts with the defen-
sive front
Florida leads the nation
in scoring defense, allow-
ing just a field goal in lop-
sided wins over Florida
Atlantic and UAB. The unit
has surrendered 349 yards,
most of it coming in the air
against the team's young
secondary.
But the defense has just
two sacks, partly because
opponents have used two-
and three-steps drops in
hopes of getting rid of the
ball quickly.


INDIANS: Face 1-1 Bulldogs tonight


Continued From Page 11

Fort White (2-0) has
opened the season with
wins over Hamilton County
High (21-6) and Newberry
High (21-7).
Taylor County (1-1)
opened with a 34-0 shutout
of Dixie County High and a
30-21 loss to Wakulla High.
Today's game is the home-
opener for the Bulldogs.
Fort White quarterback
Andrew Baker has complet-
ed 16 of 30 passes for 207
yards. He has two touch-
down passes to AJ. Legree
to go with one interception.


Baker has rushed seven
times for 37 yards and one
touchdown.
Soron Williams (five
catches-66 yards) and Trey
Phillips (five catches-36
yards) lead the Indians in
receptions. Legree leads in
passing yardage with 90
yards on three catches.
Shayne Newman, Wesley
Pitts and Tavaris Williams
each have one catch.
Tailback Soron Williams
has carried 39 times for 143
yards and one touchdown.
Fullback Zach Cormier has


eight carries for 19 yards
and one touchdown.
Nathan Escalante has
scored the other points for
the Indians with one field
goal and five PATs.
On defense, Terry
Calloway and Legree have
interceptions.
Directions: Take U.S.
Highway 27 west to Perry;
turn right at the first red
light (Center Street); drive
through two red lights,
then turn right on the
first paved road to the
stadium.


CHS: Looking for win over Bobcats


Continued From Page 1B

"We've got a package for
Dequan Ivory to play on
the offensive line," he said.
"I don't know how many
snaps he'll take, because
he can't go 100 percent of
the time on defense. We
can't expect him to come in
and go 100 percent of the


time on offense."
The Bobcats also enter
looking for their first win
after falling to 0-2 with
losses to Orange Park and
Eastside high schools.
Buchholz will do a lot of the
same things that the Tigers
have faced with scheming.


"They'll play an odd
front, some of. the same
stuff we've seen," Allen
said. "We have to attack
the things they're giving
us and knock people off
the ball. We have to beat
people off the ball that are
lining up in front of us."


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Fort White High's Lync6 Stalmaker (2) tries to hit the ball over Columbia High's Lauren Eaker
(12) and Annie Milton (1) prepare for in a game on Wednesday.

Lady Indians dominated

by Keystone Heights High


By BRANDON FINLEY
bflnley@lakecityreporter.com

FORT WHITE Fort
White High fell to Keystone
Heights High in a three-
game match on Thursday.
It was a one-sided match
as Keystone Heights won


25-12, 25-20 and 25-14.
'"That's the best team
we've played in five years,"
Fort White head coach Doug
Wohlstein said. "They just
played better than we did.
They went on a little run in
each game, but after a 10-0
run in the third game it was


15-14 the rest of the way. We
can play with them. We just
have to believe we can."
Lync6 Stalnaker led the
Lady Indians with seven
kills and three aces. Ali
Wrench had 18 assists and
Carson Robison had three
aces.


see what


sunday


has in store

Inside Brad Pitt's World
With films, family and finding ways to give back,
Brad Pitt is on a winning streak. He tells PARADE
what he's learned about life from his kids and from
his own dad. -

,.i, 1 Intelligence Report: Who's No.
~ on the Gdidiron?
ESPN's College GameDay is now entering its 25th
. ,,,.' '- season. The hosts' goofy antics and spot-on analysis
have won legions of fans, as this Saturday-moming
preview show has over 2 million weekly viewers and
had its highest ratings ever last year.

Sunday with ... Jane Lynch
This Glee Emmy winner loves her animals, her new family, and ... Jon Hamm?

What to Watch this Fall
Our picks of the season's notable film and TV series.

Sunday Dinner: Soup for the Soul
The Ukrainian-American actress Vera Farmiga shares a heartwarming dish she
learned from her "baba."


SUNDAY, September 18, 2011
Lake City Reporter


www.parade.com


Page Editor: Brandon Finley, 754-0420









4B)


Page Editor: Emogene Graham, 754-0415 LAKE CITY REPORTER ADVICE & COMICS FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 16, 2011


DILBERT


BABY BLUES


BLONDIE


BEETLE BAILEY


HAGAR THE HORRIBLE


DEAR ABBY


Sadness that lingers is a

symptom of depression


DEAR ABBY: I am 18
years old and would like to
know what kinds of symp-
toms show that it's time
for counseling depres-
sion, mood swings, etc.
- CONSIDERING IT IN
OHIO
DEAR CONSIDERING
IT: You have asked an
important question.
Everybody experiences
sadness at some point, but
sadness that doesn't go
away can actually be depres-
sion, a medical condition.
Anyone, regardless of age,
who experiences any FIVE
of the following symptoms
for two weeks or more
should discuss it with a
mental health professional:
1. Feeling of sadness
and/or irritability.
2. Loss of interest or
pleasure in activities once
enjoyed.
3. Changes in weight
and appetite.
4. Changes in sleep pat-
terns.
5. Feeling guilty, hope-
less or worthless.
6. Inability to concen-
trate, remember things or
make decisions.
7. Restlessness or
decreased activity noticed
by others.
8. Fatigue or loss of
energy.
9. Thoughts of death or
suicide.

DEAR ABBY: I have a


Abigail Van Buren
www.dearabby.com
wonderful hairdresser who
helps not only me but also
many of my friends and
family members. She's the
sole support for her family
and the sweetest person
you could ever meet. The
issue is her sense of time.
There's no problem if
you're the first or second
appointment of the day,
but after that she runs fur-
ther and further behind.
Yesterday, it took my
frail mother-in-law 3 1/2
hours to get her hair done
because of the wait time. I
was the first appointment
at 7:30 a.m. and she didn't
make it into the shop until
7:40. How can I help her
understand she's driv-
ing her customers away
without offending her? -
CUTTING TIME IN UTAH
DEAR CUTTING TIME:
Your hairdresser may be
good at styling hair but it
appears she's not a very
good businesswoman. If
she's losing customers
because she manages her
schedule so poorly, tell her
why. You will be doing her
a favor. And please, before


you bring your frail moth-
er-in-law in for another
appointment, call to find
out how late the woman is
running before letting your
mother-in-law sit for 3 1/2
hours before even seeing a
shampoo bowl.

DEAR ABBY: I recently
bought a small travel
trailer that I use for week-
end fishing trips. My dog,
"Goldie," accompanies me
on these short trips and
sleeps with me on the only
bed in the trailer.
My wife, "Shirley," is
now expecting to go on
some of my fishing trips
with Goldie and me. The
problem is, Goldie is used
to sleeping with me, and
I believe she should have
first dibs on the bed since
she was there first.
When I informed Shirley
that she'd be sleeping in the
back of the truck, she came
unglued. Am I out of line
here? GOIN' FISHING' IN
MIDLAND, TEXAS
DEAR GOIN' FISHING : If
you're expecting sympathy
from me, you're barking
up the wrong tree. A real
Texas gentleman would let
Shirley and Goldie share
the bed while HE slept in
the truck.

* Write Dear Abby at
www.DearAbby.com or
P.O. Box 69440, Los
Angeles, CA 90069.


HOROSCOPES


ARIES (March 21-April
19): Avoid slowing down
when you should be speed-
ing up. Express your
enthusiasm regarding a
project you are working
on. Getting together social-
ly with colleagues will lead
to an interesting propo-
sition. Consider all the
angles before you make a
decision. ***
TAURUS (April 20-May
20): You'll be open to learn-
ing and will pick up what's
conveyed to you quickly.
Your astute response will
keep you ahead of the com-
petition. Don't give in to
demands on your time. You
may feel like a change, but
don't do something you may
regret ***
GEMINI (May 21-June
20): It may be difficult to
keep a secret, but reveal-
ing what you shouldn't will
affect the outcome of a
decision and hinder your
reputation. Say less and do
more to avoid complaints.
Focus on making money
rather than spending on
things you don't really
need., ***
CANCER (June 21-July
22): You may feel like sit-
ting around at home, but
don't do so alone. Open
your doors and interact
with people to stimulate
your mind and prompt
interesting ideas for
projects you can pursue.
Favors will be granted for
your generosity and hospi-


THE LAST WORD
Eugenia Last

tality. ****
LEO (July 23-Aug. 22):
Take a passionate approach
to whatever you do. Invite
change and relish adven-
ture. Love is in the stars. A
greater need to embrace
life will come over you, but
avoid overspending when a
little creativity and ingenuity
will do. **
VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept.
22): Educate yourself
about an interest you want
to pursue or a person who
fascinates you. A trip will
pay off in whom you meet
and what you discover. Idle
time will be your enemy.
A change of routine will
give you a new lease
on life. *****
LIBRA (Sept 23-Oct 22):
Financial, legal and con-
tractual developments can
be expected. Keep tabs on
the progress and on every-
one involved. Precision
and clarity are key to
things turning out in your
favor. A concern about
property will change.

SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov.
21): Clear up any unfinished
business before the week-
end. A partnership will grow
closer if you share your
thoughts and intentions. A
passionate encounter should
be planned. Your actions
will affect the outcome of a
relationship. ***


SAGITTARIUS (Nov.
22-Dec. 21): Do whatever
it takes to boost your con-
fidence. Enhancing your
appearance will help.
Participate in events that
challenge you mentally or
physically. Do what you
can to make superiors
aware of your skills. Keep
busy and avoid negative
people. ***
CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-
Jan. 19); Make plans to fix
up your digs, make chang-
es to your property or
even move. Spending time
with family will be reward-
ing and allow you to make
personal changes with the
approval of loved ones.
Open your home to friends
and relatives. *****
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-
Feb. 18): Get your facts
straight before you talk
to someone you are con-
cerned about You mustn't
meddle or you may end up
being blamed for leading
someone down the wrong
path. Rely on your past
experience to keep you out
of trouble. **
PISCES (Feb. 19-March
20): The past will have a
lot to do with your pres-
ent circumstances. Have
old information readily
available in case some-
one wants to disrupt
your plans. Reunite with
someone who helped you
a lot in the past and new
possibilities will develop.
****


CELEBRITY CIPHER

by Luis Campos
Celebrity Cipher cryptograms are created from quotations by famous people, past and present.
Each letter In the cipher stands for another.
TODA Y'S CLUE: S equals F
"OAB FBDPMX NAM PBBLP EYY OABUD
EFFYECPB .SDMV MCOPUJB AEP OABUD
AEFFUXBPP UX EXMOABD'P LBBFUXT."
- JEYB REDXBTUB

PREVIOUS SOLUTION: "I urge you to ask yourself just how honorable it is to
preside over the abuse and suffering of animals." Richard Pryor
(c) 2011 by NEA, Inc. 9-16


CLASSIC PEANUTS


[II MR. ., 1IS lll WHAT'S WRON6
Ir NORMAL T0 WIrH rHAr? '
HAVE AN ENGINE,
A CAOOSE, AN %, -
SEVEN OINING
CARS.


SNUFFY SMITH


ZITS


GARFIELD


B.C.


FRANK & ERNEST












Classified Department: 755-5440


I-T
issuin


SELLIinr


LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 16, 2011

Lake City Reporter





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Reporter Classifieds!

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Includes an additional $2.00 per
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special or consequential damages.
Advertising language must comply
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In Print and Online
www.lakecityrelporter.comi


Legal

ATTENTION COMCAST CABLE
CUSTOMERS
On October 20th, 2011, Comcast
will add WCWJ BOUNCE TV on
channel 225 to the Limited Basic
tier.
This affects current and new residen-
tial and commercial subscribers in
Brunswick (GA), Jekyll Island (GA),
St. Mary's (GA), Lake City (FL) and
Yulee (FL).
A digital-ready television set and/or
digital equipment may be required to
receive certain digital channels or
services. Service charges may apply.
Services not available in all areas, re-
strictions apply. For information,
please call 1-800-934-6489.

05527897
September 16, 2011
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
COLUMBIA COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File No. 11-217-CP
Division Probate
IN RE: ESTATE OF CASIMER
JOHN SKORSKI A/K/A CASIMER
J. SKORSKI, JR.
Deceased
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
The administration of the estate of
Casimer John Skorski a/k/a Casimer
J. Skorski, Jr., deceased, whose date
of death was August 9, 2011, is
pending in the Circuit Court for Co-
lumbia County, Florida, Probate Di-
vision, the address of which is 173
NE Hernando Avenue, Lake City,
Florida. The names and addresses of
the personal representative and the
personal representative attorney are
set forth below. All creditors of the
decedent and other persons having
claims or demands against dece-
dent's estate on whom a copy of this
notice is required to be served must
file their claims with this court
WITHIN THE LATER OF 3
MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AF-
TER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF
A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON
THEM. All other creditors of the de-
cedent and other persons having
claims or demands against dece-
dent's estate must file their-claims
with this court WITHIN 3 MONTHS
AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST
PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE.
ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITH-
IN THE TIME PERIODS SET
FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF
THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE
WILL BE FOREVER BARRED,
NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME
PERIODS SET FORTH ABOVE,
ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2)
YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE
DECEDENT'S DATE OF DEATH
IS BARRED. The date of the first
publication of this notice is Septem-
ber9. 2011.
Attorney for Personal Representa-
tive:
John J. Kendron
Attorney for Personal Representative
Florida Bar Number: 0306850
Robinson, Kennon & Kendron, P.A.
PO Box 1178
Lake City, FL 32056-1178
Telephone: (386)755-1334
Facsimile: (386)755-1336
Personal Representatives:
By:/s/ Sherri Mewbom
6754 Tanglewood Bay Drive Apt.
414
Orlando, Florida 32821

05527746
September 9, 16, 2011
REGISTRATION OF Fictitious
Names
We the undersigned, being duly
sworn, do hereby declare under oath
that the names of all persons interest-
ed in the business or profession car-
ried on under the name of THE
LAKES APARTMENTS, 3722 S.
US 441, LAKE CITY, FL 32025

Contact Phone Number: (386) 752-
2741 and the extent of the interest of
each, is as follows:
Name: NMRV Enterprises, Inc.
Extent of Interest: 100%
by:/s/ Sakichand Dalchand

STATE OF FLORIDA
COUNTY OF COLUMBIA
Sworn to and subscribed before me
this 12th day of September, A.D.
2011.
by:/s/ ANGELA M. PHILLIPS
05527926
September 16, 2011
Public Notice "Notice is hereby
made to all those concerned and af-
fected that Boran Craig Barber Engel
Construction Co., Inc. is performing
state project #FL-35 (WRC) Lake
City Work Release Center at 1099
NW Dot Glen, Lake City, FL 32055.
All parties furnishing labor, materi-
als and/or equipment to said project
are to provide notice of such in writ-
ing by certified mail to the Depart-
ment of Corrections, 2601 Blair
Stone Road, Tallahassee, FL 32399-
2500, within twenty (20) calendar
days of 1st providing such labor, ma-
terials and/or equipment."

05527729
September 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22,
23, 2011


I3 1,



Lawn & Landscape Service

J&M LAWN Service & more for
all your outdoor needs. Don't
waste your time or weekend,
Free Estimate. 386-984-2187


Legal

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
3RD JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF
FLORIDA, IN AND FOR COLUM-
BIA COUNTY
Case #: 2010-CA-000543
Division #:
Regions Bank d/b/a Regions Mort-
gage, successor by Merger to Union
Planters Bank, N.A.
Plaintiff,
vs.
Joseph M. Spradley, Jr.; Columbia
Bank f/k/a Columbia County Bank
Defendant(s)
NOTICE OF SALE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pur-
suant to an Order of Final Judgment
of Foreclosure dated September 7,
2011, entered in Civil Case No.
2010-CA-000543 of the Circuit
Court of the 3rd Judicial Circuit in
and for Columbia County, Florida,
wherein Regions Bank d/b/a Regions
Mortgage, successor by Merger to
Union Planters Bank, N.A., Plaintiff
and Joseph M. '3pradley, Jr. are de-
fendant(s), I will sell to the highest
and best bidder for cash AT THE
WEST FRONT DOOR OF THE
COLUMBIA COUNTY COURT-
HOUSE, LOCATED AT 145 HER-
NANDO STREET, LAKE CITY,
COLUMBIA COUNTY, FLORIDA,
AT 11:00 A.M. on October 12, 2011,
the following described property as
set forth in said Final Judgment, to-
wit:
COMMENCE AT THE SOUTH-
EAST CORNER OF SECTION 17,
TOWNSHIP 2 SOUTH, RANGE 17
EAST, COLUMBIA COUNTY,
FLORIDA AND RUN S 88' 23' 53"
WEST, ALONG THE SOUTH
LINE OF SAID SECTION 17, A
DISTANCE OF 931.11 FEET,
THENCE N 02' 02' 15" WEST,
24.22 FEET TO THE NORTH
RIGHT-OF-WAY LINE OF A DIRT
ROAD (AS NOW MAINTAINED)
AND THE POINT OF BEGIN-
NING, THENCE NORTH 02' 02'
15" WEST, 208.75 FEET, THENCE
SOUTH 89- 12' 59" WEST, 208.75
FEET, THENCE SOUTH 02' 02'
15" EAST, 208.75 FEET TO
NORTH SIDE OF A DIRT ROAD,
THENCE NORTH 89' 12' 59"
EAST, ALONG THE NORTH SIDE
OF DIRT ROAD 208.75 FEET TO
THE POINT OF BEGINNING.
ANY PERSON CLAIMING AN IN-
TEREST IN THE SURPLUS FROM
THE SALE, .IF ANY, OTHER
THAN THE PROPERTY OWNER
AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS
PENDENS MUST FILE A CLAIM
WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE
SALE.
P. DEWITT CASON
CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT
Columbia County, Florida
/s/: B. Scippio
DEPUTY CLERK OF COURT
ATTORNEY FOR PLAINTIFF:
SHAPIRO, FISHMAN & GACHE,
LLP '
4630 Woodland Corporate Blvd.
Suite 100
T,..apa, FL 33614
(813) 880-8888
(813) 880-8800

05527848
September 16, 23, 2011
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
THIRD JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN
AND FOR COLUMBIA COUNTY,
FLORIDA FILE NUMBER:
IN RE: ESTATE OF EUGENE
CARTER
Deceased
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
The administration of the estate of
EUGENE CARTER, deceased,
whose date of death was MAY 10,
2011, is pending in the Circuit Court
for Columbia County, Florida, Pro-
bate Division, the address of which
is 173 Northeast Hemando Avenue,
Lake City, Florida 32055. The names
and addresses of the personal repre-
sentative and the personal represen-
tative's attorney are set forth below.
All creditors of the decedent and oth-
er persons having claims or demands
against decedent's estate on whom a
copy of this notice is required to be
served must file their claims with
this court WITHIN THE LATER OF
3 MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AF-
TER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF
A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON
THEM.
All other creditors of the decedent's
estate must file their claims with this
court WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER
THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUB-
LICATION OF THIS NOTICE.
ALL CLAIMS NOT SO FILED
WILL BE FOREVER BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME
PERIOD SET FORTH ABOVE,
ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2)
YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE
DECEDENT'S DATE OF DEATH
IS BARRED.
The date of the first publication of
this notice is September 9, 2011.
Attorney for Personal Representa-


Legal

tives
Darby & Peele
By:/s/ Richard E. Stadler
Attorneys for Petitioners
Florida Bar No. 278661
Post Office Drawer 1707
Lake City, Florida 32056-1707
(386)752-4120
Personal Representative:
Steven M. Sikes
551 Lonnie Todd Road
Folkston, Georgia 31537

05527614
September 9, 16, 2011

NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING
CONCERNING AN AMENDMENT
TO THE
COLUMBIA COUNTY COMPRE-
HENSIVE PLAN
BY THE PLANNING AND ZON-
ING BOARD OF COLUMBIA
COUNTY, FLORIDA, SERVING
ALSO AS THE LOCAL PLAN-
NING AGENCY OF COLUMBIA
COUNTY, FLORIDA, NOTICE IS
HEREBY GIVEN that, pursuant to
Sections 163.3161 through 163.3248,
Florida Statutes, as amended, and the
Columbia County Land Develop-
ment Regulations, as amended, here-
inafter referred to as the Land Devel-
opment Regulations, objections, rec-
ommendations and comments con-
cerning an amendment, as described'
below, will be heard by the Planning
and Zoning Board of Columbia
County, Florida, serving also as the
Local Planning Agency of Columbia
County, Florida, at a public hearing
on September 29, 2011 at 7:00 p.m.,
or as soon thereafter as the matter
can be heard, in the County Exten-
sion Office, located at 164 Southwest
Mary Ethel Lane, Lake City, Florida.
CPA 11-03, an application by the
Board of County Commissioners, to
amend Policy 1.1.6 and Policy 1.2.2
of the Future Land Use Element of
the Comprehensive Plan by amend-
ing the Mixed Use District land use
classification to allow for develop-
ment with limitations in such dis-
tricts if community water and waste-
water facilities are not available at
time of development and to allow for
development with limitations within
stream to sink watersheds and the
ability to overcome the presumption
of such watershed areas by providing
site specific data and analysis evi-
dence.
The public hearing may be continued
to one or more future date. Any in-
terested party shall be advised that
the date, time and place of any con-
tinuation of the public hearing shall
be announced during the public hear-
ing and that no further notice con-
cerning the matter will be published,
unless said continuation exceeds six
calendar weeks from the( date of the
above referenced public hearing.
At the aforementioned public hear-
ing, all interested parties may appear
to be heard with" respect to the
amendment.
Copies of the amendment are availa-
ble for public inspection at the Office
of the County Planner, County Ad-
ministrative Offices located at 135
Northeast Hemando Avenue, Lake
City, Florida, during regular business
hours.
All persons are advised that if they
decide to appeal any decision made
at the above referenced public hear-
ing, they will need a record of the
proceedings, and that, for such pur-
pose, they may need to ensure that a
verbatim record of the proceedings is
made, which record includes the tes-
timony and evidence upon which the
appeal is to be based.
In accordance with the Americans
with Disabilities Act, persons need-
ing a special accommodation or an
interpreter to participate in the pro-
ceeding should contact Lisa K. B.
Roberts, at least seven (7) days prior
to the date of the hearing. Ms. Rob-
erts may be contacted by telephone
at (386)758-1005 or by Telecommu-
nication Device for Deaf at
(386)758-2139.

05527900
September 16, 2011
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
THIRD JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF
THE STATE OF FLORIDA, IN
AND FOR COLUMBIA COUNTY
GENERAL CIVIL DIVISION
Case No. 2011 -CA-000328
FV-I INC. IN TRUST FOR MOR-
GAN 'STANLEY MORTGAGE
CAPITAL HOLDINGS, LLC
Plaintiff, vs. SALVATORE P.
MONGELLI; KIM M. MONGELLI;
BANK OF AMERICA, N.A.; and
UNKNOWN OCCUPANTS, TEN-
ANTS, OWNERS, AND OTHER
UNKNOWN PARTIES, including, if
a named defendant is deceased, the
personal representatives, the surviv-
ing spouse, heirs ddvisees, grantees,
creditors, and all other parties claim-
ing by, through, under r or against that
defendant, and all claimants, persons
or parties, natural or corporate, or


Legal

whose exact legal status is unknown,
claiming under any of the above
named or described defendants,
Defendants.
NOTICE OF SUIT PROPERTY
TO: SALVATORE P. MONGELLI
UNKNOWN OCCUPANTS, TEN-
ANTS, OWNERS, AND OTHER
UNKNOWN PARTIES
Residence: Unknown
Mailing Address: Unknown
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED
that an action to foreclose a mort-
gage on the following property in
Columbia County, Florida:
LOT 9A OF BLOCK 1 OF OAK
RIDGE SUBDIVISION, AN UNRE-
CORDED SUBDIVISION IN SEC-
TION 30, TOWNSHIP 3 SOUTH,
RANGE 17 EAST, COLUMBIA
COUNTY, FLORIDA DESCRIBED
AS FOLLOWING:
COMMENCE AT THE SOUTH-
EAST CORNER OF THE SW 1/4
OF THE SW 1/4 OF SAID SEC-
TION 30 AND RUN THENCE N 00
DEG. 14' W ALONG THE WEST
RIGHT OF WAY LINE OF GWEN
LAKE BOULEVARD, 395.94
FEET, THENCE S 88 DEG. 54' 30"
W., 262.50 FEET TO THE SOUTH-
EAST CORNER OF SAID LOT
AND THE POINT OF FEET,
THENCE N 00 DEG. 14' W. 131.59
FEET, THENCE N 88 DEG. 55' 30"
E., 87.50 FEET, THENCE S 00
DEG. 14' E. 131.56 FEET TO THE
POINT OF BEGINNING
ALSO AN EASEMENT FOR SEM-
INOLE COURT DESCRIBED AS
FOLLOWS:
COMMENCE AT THE SOUTH-
EAST CORNER OF THE SW 1/4
OF THE SW 1/4 OF SAID SEC-
TION 30 AND RUN THENCE N 00
DEG. 14' W ALONG THE WEST
RIGHT-OF-WAY LINE OF GWEN
LAKE BOULEVARD, 345.94 FEET
TO THE POINT OF THE BEGIN-
NING, THENCE S 88 DEG. 54' 30"
W. 437.50 FEET, THENCE S 72
DEG. 16' W. 49.23 FEET, THENCE
S 88 DEG. 54' 30" W 40.61 FEET,
THENCE N 00 DEG. 14' W. 80.00.
FEET, THENCE N 88 DEG. 54' 30"
EAST 39.39 FEET, THENCE S 74
DEG. 27' E. 50.39 FEET, THENCE
N 88 DEG. 54' 30" E. 437.50 FEET
TO THE WEST RIGHT-OF-WAY
LINE OF GWEN LAKE BOULE-
VARD, THENCE S 00 DEG. 14' E
ALONG SAID WEST RIGHT-OF-
WAY LINE, 50.02 FEET TO THE
POINT OF BEGINNING.
has been filled against you, SALVA-
TORE P. MONGELLI and UN-
KNOWN OCCUPANTS, TEN-
ANTS, OWNERS, AND OTHER
UNKNOWN PARTIES, and you are
required to serve a copy of your writ-
ten defenses, if any to it, on the
Plaintiff's attorney, whose name and
address is ENRICO G. GONZALEZ,
P.A.. 6255 East Fowler Avenue,
Temple Terrace, Florida 33617, and
file the original with the clerk of the
above- styled Court no later than 30
days from the date of the first publi-
cation of this Action, otherwise, a
judgment may be entered against you
for the relief demanded in the Com-
plaint or Petition.
In accordance with the Americans
With Disabilities Act, persons need-
ing a special accommodation to par-
ticipate in this Hearing should con-
tact the A.D.A. Coordinator not later
than seven (7) days prior to the pro-
ceeding at the Florida Relay Service
at 1-800-955-8770.
WITNESS my hand and the seal of
said Court on August 29, 2011.
P. DeWitt Cason
Clerk of the Court
By: /s/ B. Scippio
Deputy Clerk

05527685
September 9, 16, 2011
NOTICE OF AVAILABILITY
DRAFT ENVIRONMENTAL AS-
SESSMENT
U. S. DEPARTMENT OF VETER-
ANS AFFAIRS
Proposed. Installation and Operation
of Ethanol-85 (E85) Fueling Station
at the Lake City VA Medical Center
619 S. Marion Avenue; City of Lake
City, Columbia County, FL
The'Department of Veterans Affairs
(VA) announces the availability of a
Draft "Environmental Assessment"
(EA) for the proposed Installation
and Operation of an Ethanol-85
(E85) Fueling Station at the Lake
City VA Medical Center; 619 S.
Marion Avenue; Lake City, Colum-
bia County, Florida..
The Draft EA has been prepared in
accordance with Council on Environ-
mental Quality (CEQ) regulations for
implementing the procedural provi-
sions of the National Environmental
Policy Act (NEPA), (Public Law 91-
190, 42 USC 4321-4347 January 1,
1970)' and amendments, and the
VA's Implementing Regulations (38
CFR Part 26). The VA intends to is-
sue a "Finding of No Significant Inm-
pact" following a 30-day comment
period in accordance with CEQ Reg-


Legal

ulations for Implementing NEPA,
Section 1508.13, providing there are
no substantive comments that war-
rant further evaluation.
A copy of this report can be viewed
in the Engineering Department at the
Lake City VA Medical Center at 619
S. Marion Avenue, Lake City, FL
32025 between the hours of 8:00
a.m. and 4:30 p.m. Monday through
Friday, from September 19th to Oc-
tober 19, 2011.
Please submit comments before Oc-
tober 19, 2011, to
Heather.Frebe@va.gov
(Please type "Lake City VAMC E85
DEA" in the subject line)
Or by regular mail to
Heather Frebe
Public Affairs Officer
Malcomr Randall VA Medical Center
RE: Lake City VAMC E85
DEA
1601 SW Archer Road
Gainesville, FL 32608
(352) 376-1611 extension 6648
05527834
September 16, 17, 18, 2011

100 Job
10 Opportunities

05527841
SENIOR REGISTERED
NURSE SUPERVISOR
The Florida Department of Veter-
ans' Affairs Jenkins Domiciliary
is seeking a supervisory level R.N.
to fill the position of Senior Regis-
tered Nurse Supervisor. All ap-
plicants must hold a Florida R.N.
license and be certified in C.P.R.
Requirements for all candidates
include a strong clinic
al background, good communica-
tion abilities, and excellent com-
puter skills. Ideal candidates will
have nursing management or su-
pervisory experience. Apply on-
line:
https://peoplefirst.myflorida.com/l
ogon.htm
Or call Susan Espenship for more
information at 386-758- 0600
xl1022
Req #50000426'
Closing Date 09/19/2011
EEO/AAE
LICENSED CLINICAL SO-
CIAL WORKER
The Florida Department of Veter-
ans'Affairs- Jenkins Domiciliary
is seeking a Licensed Clinical So-
cial Worker. MUST BE a Florida
Licensed Social Worker. Duties
include: One hour per week on-
site supervision of Registered In-
tern Clinical Social Worker, Pro-
vide consultation between on-site
visits, if needed: Sitte certification
as a "clinical supervisor" is 'NOT a
requirement. Apply on-line:
https://peoplefirst.myflorida.com/l
ogon.htm
Or call Amelia Tompkins for more
information at 386-758-0600
xl010
Req #50507062
Closing Date 9/19/2011
EEO/AAE

05527935
WANTED HONDA
AUTOMOTIVE
TECHNICIAN
Have own tools and Exp.
Must be able to work Sat.
Apply in person:
Sunbelt Honda
Jim Gallagher

Mobile Home Sales!
Experienced Salesperson
Needed to sell the South's
#1 rated product! Call Kevin
386-719-5560



EOPLES

STATE BANK
Fulltime Teller/Customer

Service Representative

Position available.

Experience preferred,

but will train the right

person. Apply at the

Peoples State Bank West

office located at:

3882 W US Hwy 90
Lake City, FL 32034
EEO Employer


confused?



Call Lake City Reporter Classifieds!


WE CAN HELP 386-755-5440











LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 16, 2011


Classified Department: 755-5440


100w Opportunities
BUSY OFFICE looking f6r full-
time receptionist. Experience in
multi-line phone system, updating
records, accounting and working
with the public. Computer skills
necessary. Fax resume at:
386-961-8802
EXPERIENCED LAWN Mower
repair person in Worthington
Springs area, some customer serv-
ice, Call 386-496-8431
NEED TEAM DRIVER
North Georgia to Miami
Good CDL
Call 256-797-3150
Sales Position available for moti-
vated individual Rountree -Moore
Toyota, Great benefits, paid train-
ing/vacation. Exp. a plus but not
necessary. Call Anthony Cosentino
386-623-7442
Security Officers needed. Live
Oak area, must have current D Se-
curity Lie., Clear background,
Drivers Lic, phone,
Diploma/GED. Benefits, DFWP
EEO Must Apply at:
www.dsisecurity.com MB 1000084
TANKER DRIVER
Night Position & Part time day po-
sition needed, Gasoline & Diesel
Fuel Transport Delivery Driver,
Tues. Sat.,
Truck based in Lake City, Florida,
Local Deliveries, Health Insur-
ance. 401K, Paid Vacation
Competitive Pay Structure,
Must have two years driver
experience, clean MVR,
Application available by mailing:
info@jj-fuel.com
Fax completed applications to
Heather at 850-973-3702.
Questions call 1-800-226-5434
after 3:00 p.m., Speak to Ronnie.
TAX PREPARERS Needed for
the upcoming tax season,
experienced preferred but tax
training is available. If you want to
work for a tax service where cus-
tomer service is the highest priori-
ty Call 386-754-0060.

1 Medical
120 Employment

05527777
Admissions/Marketing
Director
Avalon Healthcare Center is
currently accepting applications
for the full time position of
Admissions/Marketing Director
RN/LPN Preferred
Good Organizational and
Communication Skills a Must
Prior SNF Experience
Preferred
Competitive Salary and
Excellent benefit package.
Please apply at Avalon
Healthcare and Rehabilitation
Center. 1270 S.W. Main Blvd.
Lake City, Florida 32025
386-752-7900
EOE



(Care

CHECK OUT Clerk
High volume Medical facility
seeking a ChecKout Clerk. Duties
include Cash handling, schedule
appointments, data entry. Knowl-
edge of medical terminology and
medical insurance. Applicant
must be proficient in practice
management software (Intergy).
If you display a friendly, profes-
sional and courteous manner
please send your resume to jpa-
pesh(Tacancercarenorthflorida.com
or fax to 386-628-9231.


North Florida Pediatrics
Has positions open for both
L.P.N. and C.N.A's.
Interested parties need to be flexible
and dependable.
Peds Medical office experience
a plus. Please fax resume to
386-755-7940 or email to
hr(&anflpediatrics.com


140 Work Wanted
PIANO LESSONS
Any age, enroll now
25 years experience
386-438-4931.

240 Schools &
2 Education

05527750
Interested in a Medical Career?
Express Training offers
courses for beginners & exp
Nursing Assistant, $479
next class-09/12/10

Phlebotomy national certifica-
tion, $800 next class-10/10/l 1

Continuing education
Fees incl. books, supplies, exam
fees. Call 386-755-4401 or
expresstrainingservices.com



310 Pets & Supplies

105527616


$$REWARD$$

LOST

Silky/Yorkie
Terrier: Missing
since August 29
(am), Aprox 10
lbs. Black body/brown face &
feet. Needs medicine. Last seen
at S & S on441 N.& 100. His
name is Bradley.
Please call 386-623-2806

FOUND-2 Female Puppies at RR
Xing on Hwy. 135. Call to identify
or give info. on breed to help find
them a home. 386-365-7052
German Sheppard Puppy 10
weeks old Black & Tan. Health
Certs. & shots, Parents on
Premises. $300.00. 386-961-8130


402 Appliances

FROST FREE refrigerator.
Whirlpool Very clean. Works
good. White, $100.
386-292-3927


402 Appliances

WHIRLPOOL ELECTRIC
STOVE. White, Works Good,
$100.
386-292-3927


Whirlpool Washer & Dryer.
White, large capacity.
Works Great, $285. for both.
386-292-3927


407 Computers
HP Computer,
$80.00
386-755-9984 or
386-292-2170
IBM LAPTOP Computer, WITH
BAG $80.00
386-755-9984 or
386-292-2170


420 Wanted to Buy

K&H TIMBER
We Buy Pine Hardwood &
Cypress. Large or small tracts.
Call 386-961-1961.


430 Garage Sales

9/16 & 9/17, 8-?, 1647 S.E. Alfred
Markham St., 41 S turn left on
133A, household items, baby
clothes, tools, follow signs.


440 Miscellaneous
FOR SALE 200 AMP
POWER SERVICE POLE
$175
386-344-0226
Stop gnat & Mosquito bites! Buy
Swamp Gator All natural insect re-
pellent. Family safe. Use head to
toe. Available at The Home Depot.
TWO FREE Female Bull Dogs
10 months old
Shots, spayed, free to good home.
Call 386-288-5149

450 Good Things
5 to Eat
GREEN PEANUTS For Sale
Graded and washed.
$30.00 a bushel.
386-752-3434

630 Mobile Homes
630 for Rent
2 OR 3 BEDROOMS
Clean, Quiet Park $475-$525.mo
Water, septic, garbage included
758-2280 References, NO PETS!
2&3 BR MH. $395 $650. mo.
plus deposit. Water & sewer fur-
nished. Cannon Creek MHP
386-752-6422
2/2 Units. Great rental program
for responsible tenants.
Call for details, 386-984-8448
13th Month FREE!!
3/2 Large MH, small park, near
FGCC. Small pets ok. $500 dep
$575 mo w/12 mo lease
386-752-1971 or 352-281-2450
3/2.5 S of Lake City. (Branford
area) $600 mo plus security
386-590-0642 or 386-867-1833
www.suwanneevalleypropertics.conm
LG clean 3br's $450. -$650. mo. +
dep. Also, 2br mobile home's
available. No Pets.
5 Points area. 386-961-1482
Mobile Homes for rent in
White Springs, Lake City & Ft.
White. Contact 386-623-3404
or 386-397-2779

r64n Mobile Homes
60 0for Sale


Champion Home Inspections
Protect Your Investment
With A Professional
Inspection State Licensed
And Insured 386-344-5551
High Springs. 1629 sqft. on 10
acres. Needs to sell. $84,999.
Make an offer! MLS 78776
Bosshardt Realty Services.
386-965-4873


Fort White. 2336 sqft oh 5 acres.
Tape & textured walls. Needs to
sell. $99,999. Motivated, make an
offer MLS 78841 (386)965-4873
Bosshardt Realty Services..
Lake City 1560 sqft. buit in 2002.
On 5 acres. $83,999. MLS 78931
Bosshardt Realty Services.
386-965-4873
3/2 DWMH "Model Home" condi-
tion. Just under I ac w/granddaddy
oaks and landscaped MLS#77988.
$84,900, Nancy Rogers
867-1271 R.E.O. Realty Group
Palm Harbor Homes
Has 3 Modular Homes
Available at HUGE Savings
Over 40K Off
800-622-2832

650 Mobile Home
6 & Land
Owner Finance, 3/2, on 1.5 acres,
S of Lake City, small down/$695
mo, 386-590-0642 / 386-867-1833
www.suwanneevalleyproperties.com
WOW! 2 Mobile homes on 5
acres! 2006, 3/2.5, above pool,
1997 1,500 sq. ft. with nice
porch.$139,888 MLS 78531 Brit-
tany Results Realty 386-397-3473

71 Unfurnished Apt.
71 For Rent








05527705
SPRING HILL VILLAGE
Excellent High Springs location.
1, 2 & 3 bedroom floor-plans;
some with garages.
Call 386-454-1469
or visit our website:
www.springhillvillage.net

IBR APT.
Downtown Location, Clean.
$450 mo, plus Security.
NO PETS. Call 386-755-3456


FOR LEASE: Downtown office
space. Convenient to
Court house.
Call 386-755-3456


2003 Sea Pro 170CC
Yamaha 90hp, low hours,
live wells, Bimini top, fish
finder, aluminum trailer
w/spare, boat cover.
$7,500


Call
386-719-6537


750 Business &
SOffice Rentals
For Lease: E Baya Ave. Two -
1000 sqft office space units or
combined for 2000 sqft. 386-984-
0622 or weekends 386-497-4762
Midtown Commercial Center,
brand new executive front suite &
suite w/warehouse.
Call Vicki or Joe 386-935-2832.


710 f Unfurnished Apt.
710 For Rent

2br/l ba, I car garage,
W/D hook up. $525 month,
no pets I month sec,
386-961-8075
2BR/IBA. Close to town.
$565.mo plus deposit.
Includes water & sewer.
386-965-2922
2BR/2BA w/garage
5 minutes from VA hospital.
Call for details.
386-755-4590 or 365-5150
Amber Wood Hills Apts.
Private Patio area. Beautiful yard.
Washer/dryer hkup. Free water &
sewer. 1/1, 2/1. Move in special.
386-754-1800. wwwmyflapts.com
Columbia Arms Apt. located 1/2
mi from V.A. & Winn Dixie. Pet
Friendly. Move in Special $199.
Pool, laundry & balcony.
386-754-1800. www.myflapts.com
Duplex w/garage spacious, 2/1,
1300 sq ft, W/D hook up, CH/A,
$650 month & bckgmd chk,
386-697-3248 or 352-377-7652
Great location W of 1-75, spacious
deluxe 2br apts., garage, W/D
hookup. patio. $600/700 & up, +
Sec, 386-965-5560 or 344-3715
Greentree Townhouse
Summer special. 2/1, 2/1.5. Free
water & sewer. Balcony & patio.
Laundry. Behind Kens on Hwy 90.
386-754-1800 wwwmyflapts.com

ONE 51 PLACE APTS
Alachua
MOVE IN SPECIALS
1, 2, & 3 bedrooms
Call TODAY 386-462-0656
or visit us at one51 place.com

Redwine Apartments. Move in
special $199. Limited time. Pets
welcome. with 5 complexes,
we have a home for you.
386-754-1800. www.mvflapts.com
The Lakes Apts. Studios & lBr's
from $135/wk. Util. & cable incl.,
Sec 8 vouchers accepted, monthly
rates avail Call 386-752-2741
Wayne Manor Apts.
Move in $199. Summer special.
2/1, washer/dryer. Behind Kens off
Hwy 90. 386-754-1800
www.myflapts.com
Windsor Arms Apartments.
Summer special $199. Move in!
2/1. 2/1.5, 2/2. Pet Friendy. Free
200 ch. Dish. Washer/dryer hkup.
386-754-1800. www.myflapts.com

720 Furnished Apts.
72 For Rent

lbr Apt. includes water, elec, &
cable. $595. mo. Good area. 7
minutes from town. References &
sec. req'd. No pets. 386-719-4808
GARAGE APT. 1 BR/I BA
approx. 10 miles out of Lake City
South, $320 month.
Call 386-755-7324
Rooms for Rent. IHillcrest, Sands,
Columbia. All furnished. Electric.
cable, fridge, microwave. Weekly
or monthly rates. I person $135.
2 persons'$150. weekly
386-752-5808
Studio Apt. Private. Rent incl util-
ities, Satellite TV, appliances.
(washer/dryer). No pets 386-963-
4767 or 292-0385 Available 9/I

Unfurnished
730 Home For Rent

'09 Custom Dream Home
4BR/3.5BA, 5+acres, horses ok.
Old brick & heart pine floors,
jet tub, DSL. Beautiful!
For right person $2000/mo.
negotiable 970-221-0090
2 BR/1 BA, Country. South. of
Lake City, private river access.
w/boat ramp, 2 garages, clean.
$650 mo. + sec. 386-590-0642
2BR house $625.mo $625. dep.
Also, 2 large br apt. $525. mo
$525 dep. Conveniently close to
the VA & shopping. 386-344-2972
3-6 BR/2 BA oh Cty. Rd. 49,
Near Beachville. $650 mo.,
no pets. $650 sec., Call Margie
386-935-3447 or 386-984-5109
3BR/1.5 BA Large lot. Very clean
with storage shed. Quiet area.
$850 mo. + $850. dep.
386-752-7578
4br/2ba CHA Brick. 1200 sqft
lac., Close to FGCC, CR 245A.
Ceramic tile/carpet, $800 mo $800
dep (904)708-8478 App. req'd
Brick 3br/2ba Large yard, garage,
CH/A. 189 Stanley Ct. Lake City.
$950. mo + $1000 dep.
Call 386-365-8543
Prime location 2br/lba.
Resid'l or comm'l. Comer of Baya
& McFarlane. $600. mo. $500 sec.
386-752-9144 or 755-2235
VERY LARGE 2 BR/2 BA, Brick
home, garage, CH & A, Clean.
386-590-0642 / 386-867-1833,
www.suwanneevalleyproperties.com

750 Business &
7 Office Rentals


WoodCrest 3/2 Split floor plan
Screened porch. 10x12 storage
shed. $126,900 MLS 77932
Darlene Hart 386-288-2878
.N Fla Homeland Realty


810 Home for Sale
Home for entertaining 3/2 plus
pool house w/half bath, 2.25
fenced ac. Freshly painted. Split
plan, Large rear deck MLS 78103
$179,900 386-623-6896
0.5 ac tract. 441 (4 lane) frontage.
1/2 mi from Target distribution.
2/1.5 zoned resid'l MLS# 78506
$88,000 Nancy Rogers 867-1271
R.E.O. Realty Group
Great home, Great neighborhood,
great price. 3/2 Close to town A
Must See!. MLS#77411, $79,900,
Nancy Rogers
867-1271 R.E.O. Realty Group


OFFICE SPACE for Lease
576 sq' $450/mth
900 sq' $600/mth
3568 sq' $2973/mth
8300 sq' $5533/mth
also Bank Building
Excellent Locations
Tom Eagle, GRI
(386) 961-1086
DCA Realtor


805 Lots for Sale
BEAUTIFUL 5 acres in
Lake City, 100% owner financing,
no qualifying, $395 per month.
Please call 512-663-0065
FOR SALE BY OWNER,
10 acres, approx. 7 acres planted
pines, with a 24 x 40 foot (Steel
Dean) bldg. w/18 foot opening,
own power, $85,000
Call Sonya 386-288-2557.
Owner Financing. River comm &
nature lover's dream in Lee. 15
wooded ac by the Withlacoochee.
Property is already subdivided
MLS 75576 $48,000 623-6896


810 Home for Sale

3 BR/2 BA, with upstairs apt.2
rooms, (private entrance) with
3/4 bath, workshop, storage shed,
freshly painted, new walk-in
shower & stool, new base cabinets,
Call-386-365-2522
/ Champion Home Inspections
386-344-5551. Inspections
Starting At $ 249.00
Veterans Receive 10% Off
Full Inspection.


ON WHEELS & WATERCRAFT ,






1994 Chevy Cavalier 2000 GMC Safari Van
4DR. 115,283 mi., mini Runs great, has an 80,000
wagon, no accidents, factory warranty,
automatic, cold air, CD AC warranty.
player/radio. $7,469 OBO
$2,869 Call
386-292-9329
Call
386-292-9329 386-438-8731


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has to offer:
Home delivery.

To subscribe call

755-5445





Lak Ciy epote


4/2 fenced yard, 2 car garage,
Fairly new roof & HVAC Shed,
fenced back yard. MLS#77602,
$162,500, Nancy Rogers
867-1271 R.E.O. Realty Group
Lake City Country Club. 4/3, reno-
vated. Great for entertaining. Glass
doors open to back yard. $179,900
MLS#78637 Nancy Rogers
R.E.O. Realty Group 867-1271
Investor Special Buy. 2br con-
crete block w/CH/A. Available "as
is" $22,900, MLS76821.
Vin Lantroop. 386-755-6600
Hallmark Real Estate
Pool Home. 2 Story w/soaring
ceilings. Ig master w/Jacuzzi.
Fenced yard. $159,000 MLS77085
Teresa Spradley 386-365-8343
Hallmark Real Estate
Near Itchetucknee head springs,
easy Gainesville commute. For
sale or rent! $75,500, MLS77398.
Paula Lawrence. 386-623-1973
Hallmark Real Estate
REDUCED gated community.
Brick w/florida room & private
garden. Security system. Ginger
Parker. MLS77703. 386-365-2135
Hallmark Real Estate


Like to Entertain? Over 2900
sqft. 3br/2.5ba. Fenced w/sprinkler
& security system. MLS78404.
Sherry Willis. 386-365-8095
Hallmark Real Estate/
Springhollow Ig brick. 4br/2ba
w/lg screened porch. Oversized
ga-
rage. upgraded kitchen & bath.
$239,500, MLS78787. Janet Creel.
719-0382 Hallmark Real Estate
Well maintained 4/2, 2566 sqft
oversized den w/fplace, Ig kitchen,
breakfast area overlooking gazebo.
#78347 Only $179,000 Century 21-
Darby Rogers 752-6575

820 Farms &
O Acreage

4 1/2 acre lot Lake Jeffery Road.
Gorgeous Oaks!Paved Rd
Owner Financing! NO DOWN!
$59,900. $525mo 352-215-1018.
www.LandOwnerFinancing.com
4 acres, Wellborn, New Well
installed, Beautifully wooded
w/cleared Home Site, owner fin.
no down. $39.900. $410 mon
Call 352-215-1018
www.LandOwnerFinancing.com
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
Brick in LC Country Club. 4/3
Lots of extras, oversized garage &
storage. Elaine K. Tolar
752-4211 MLS# 78739 $239,900
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
Brick in WoodCrest S/D. Split
phlan. Screened porch. Lg back
yard. Elaine K. Tolar
752-4211 MLS# 77015 $137,900
For Lease FARM-. 7 stall bam.
17+ acres, pasture, cross fenced.
Close in $500. mo.
386-961-1086
Owner financed land. Half acre to
ten acre lots. As low as $300
down. Deas Bullard Properties
386-752-4339 www.landnfl.com

830 Commercial
O Property

Commercial Parcel 2 acres w/252
ft frontage on SR 47 Add'l 4.76
ac. avail. $149,900 MLS# 78260
Call 386-867-1271 Nancy Rogers
R.E.O.Realty Group, Inc

870 Real Estate
7 Wanted

I Buy Houses
CASH!
Quick Sale Fair Price
386-269-0605


940 Trucks

1972 BLUE CHEVY PICKUP.
3 Quarter. Ton,
Excellent Condition $5,000
Call 386-697-4547.


950 Cars for Sale
1994 CHEV. CAVALIER 4 DR.
115,283 miles, Mini Wagon, no
accidents, automatic, cold air,
CD/Radio $2,869, 386-292-9329

Vans & Sport
952 Util. Vehicles
2000 GMC SAFARI VAN, Runs
great, has an 80,000 factory war-
ranty, A/C warranty, $7,469 OBO,
386-292-9329 or 386-438-8731.


4 BR/2 BA, on 1 acre, granite
floors thru out, open kitchen, wrap
around front porch.$139,900
MLS 77292 Brittany
Results Realty 386-397-3473
Beautiful home on 15 acres w/over
2,500 sq. ft. New appli., new tank
at well, new drain field, workshop.
$235,000 MLS 77552 Brittany
Results Realty 386-397-3473
Century 21 Darby Rogers
752-6575 Immaculate home on
5 acres. 3/2, new energy efficient
A/C system, metal roof, 12x28 work-
shop. #78508 Only $168,900
Century 21 Darby Rogers
752-6575 3/2 located on I Ith Fair-
way at Southern Oaks Country Club.
Huge master BR, huge kitchen, 2 car
garage. #78276 Only $129.900(
Century 21 Darby Rogers
752-6575 Executive home, 4/3, 2557
sqft. plantation shutters, granite
counter tops. in-ground pool w/spa.
#78610 Only $269.000
Century 21 Darby Rogers
752-6575 Beautiful Victorian/White
Springs, 7BR/3.5B w/5 fireplaces, a
Must See. #76361
Only $185,0X00
Century 21- Darby Rogers
752-6575 Golf course living. 3/2.5.
vaulted ceilings, open floor plan.
place, breakfast area. #78941 (1-
year home warranty) Only $210,000X
Champion Home Inspections
Contact John 386-344-5551
State Licensed
And Insured
championhomeinspections.us
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
10 acres w/well maintained brick
home. 2012 sqft. Open split floor
plan. Lori Giebeig Simpson .
365-5678 MLS# 74447 $149,900
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
New home in May Fair. Super area
comer lot. 4br split plan. Versatile
colors. Elaine K. Tolar
755-6488 MLS# 76919 $199.900
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
3br/2ba. 1590 sqft. Lori Giebeig
Simpson. 365-5678 or
Mary Brown Whitehurst
965-0887 MLS# 74542 $109,900
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
Cute 3/2 brick in town. Wood
floors, Ig family room. Front &
back porch Lori Giebeig Simpson
365-5678 MLS# 77989 $79,900
LEASE/OPTION BUY
3br/2ba Home 2010 w/garage
on 1/2 acre. Owner Financing
386-623-2244
Lg. 4/3 family home. 16x20
screened porch, workshop. 4.5 ac.
fenced/cross fenced MLS 74339
$219,900. N Fla Homeland Real-
ty Darlene Hart 386-288-2878
Great 3/2 home w/2346 sq ft
under roof on .67 ac., Creekside
S/D. Big back yard w/plenty of
shade trees. On a cul-de-sac, MLS
77385 $169,900 623-6896
Spacious 4/2 home on I ac. Split
floor plan. Great neighborhood.
Easy access to 1-75 $204,900 MLS
77859 N Fla Homeland Realty
Darlene Hart 386-288-2878


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we will take it for youl
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with a description and photo in the
neWspaper and online E-edition.
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* You must include vehicle price.
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( l



2006 EF250
Ford Van
3/4 ton, metal work
shelves/ladder rack,
60K miles, exc. cond.
$10,500
Call
386-555-5555
If you don't sell your vehicle
during the first 10 days, you
can run the same vehicle ad
for 10 additional days for
only $15.00
Terms and conditions remain the
same for the additional run.



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Vehicle Sotl-'mNd,