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UFPKY NEH LSTA



The Lake City reporter
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028308/01660
 Material Information
Title: The Lake City reporter
Uniform Title: Lake City reporter (Lake City, Fla. 1967)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: John H. Perry
Place of Publication: Lake City Fla
Publication Date: 9/15/2011
Frequency: daily (monday through friday)[<1969>-]
weekly[ former 1967-<1968>]
daily
normalized irregular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Lake City (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Columbia County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Columbia -- Lake City
Coordinates: 30.189722 x -82.639722 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 95, no. 4 (Oct. 5, 1967)-
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000358016
oclc - 33283560
notis - ABZ6316
lccn - sn 95047175
sobekcm - UF00028308_01569
System ID: UF00028308:01660
 Related Items
Preceded by: Lake City reporter and Columbia gazette

Full Text








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ity


'Take Me Home'
Concert series
kicks off 53rd
season Friday.
Story below


Reporter


Thursday, September 15, 201 I www.lakecityreporter.com Vol. 137, No. 198 N 75 cents




Scam netted $77K, say police


Man took checks for mobile
homes that were never
delivered, authorities claim.
By GORDON JACKSON
gjackson@lakecityreporter.com
A Lake City man has been jailed for
allegedly cashing checks totaling more
than $77,000 for mobile homes he sold but
never delivered to customers.


Glen Matthews Williams, 45, was arrest-
ed by Columbia County sheriff's deputies
in early September and charged with two
counts of grand theft, two counts of fraud
and two larceny counts all felonies. His
listed address is 619 SE Country Club
Circle.
Sheriff's spokesman Sgt. Ed Seifert said
the investigation is ongoing and Williams
could face more charges.
"White collar crimes take a bit longer to
investigate," he said.


Patsy' Powell, 49, of
White Springs told inves-
tigators that she gave
Williams checks for $8,375,
$14,000 and $29,000 to buy
three repossessed mobile
homes in April and May,
Williams 2010.
Williams As recently as Aug. 31,
Williams told Powell's
daughter that he was trying to resolve
some title work problems, according to


the sheriff's incident report
When Williams was interviewed by
sheriff's investigators, he told them he
cashed the checks and that Williams had
not received any of the mobile homes.
Jeffrey Turner, 50, of Branford also filed
a complaint against Williams. Turner told
deputies he gave Williams two checks
totaling $26,000 in June and July for a
mobile home he never received.
FRAUD continued on 3A


School


bus hit;


injuries


minor

From staff reports

A Columbia County School bus
loaded with students was struck'
by a pickup truck Wednesday
morning near the entrance of
Columbia High School.
Minor injuries were reported,
but none required anyone to be
taken to a hospital, a trooper at
the accident scene said.
The 16-year-old driver of a 2001
Ford F150 pickup, P.J. Lindboe,
Jr., apparently didn't see the bus
BUS continued on 3A


REMINDER

'Take Me

Home' set

for Friday
From staff reports

The 53rd season for
Community Concerts of Lake
City Inc. kicks off Friday at
7:30 p.m. with the 'Take Me
Home" John Denver Tribute at
the Alfonso Levy Performing
Arts Center.
Jim Curry and his backup
band and singers will bring the
tribute to life.
Other events in the series
include:
Deborah & The Blue Harp is
7:30 p.m. Oct 14 and features
the artist performing an eclec-
tic mixture of styles while tell-
CONCERTS continued on 3A


GORDON JACKSON/Lake City Reporter
Florida Highway Patrol troopers assess damage to a pickup truck that struck a school bus near the entrance of
Columbia High School Wednesday morning. No injuries were reported in the accident that happened at 8:08 a.m.


Driverless car fliDs


JAStOU mI I nvv VVMT H .EW WA LKERIIk Uity Rpojuiteir
Florida Highway Patrol Trooper First Class C.L. Lee assesses damage to a Nissan Sentra Wednesday after the
car, which was being towed by another vehicle, landed upside dpwn along Bascom Norris Drive. No one was
injured.


Liberals:

Raise SS

tax for

the rich

Change would only
affect those making
more than $250IK

WASHINGTON (AP) -
Nervous that Social Security
seems under siege from all
sides, congressional liber-
als on Wednesday proposed
raising the payroll tax that
funds the program, but only
for people earning more than
$250,000 a year.
The legislation is designed
to keep the pension program
solvent for the next 75 years,
which is the standard used by
government actuaries, by put-
ting an additional $6.5 trillion
into the Social Security trust
fund over that period. The
plan also is intended to head
off other efforts to overhaul
the program or trim benefits,
or to use its funds to help pay
for debt reduction.
"No more discussion about
raising the retirement age, no
more discussion about cutting
benefits, no more discussion
about privatization," said Rep.
Peter DeFazio, D-Ore., one of
the sponsors.
With Republicans making
opposition to tax increases
their mantra, the measure
seems to have little chance of
enactment
Nonetheless, it gives liber-
als a chance to underscore
their support for the widely
popular program at a time
when President Barack
Obama has proposed cutting
the payroll tax to help cre-
ate jobs and GOP presiden-
tial contender Rick Perry, the
Texas governor, has called its
finances a "Ponzi scheme."
UBERALS continued on 3A


64,000 gallon question gets favorable response


City agrees to adjust
huge water bills in 2
instances.
By GORDON JACKSON
gjackson@lakecityreporter.com
Dave Sabraw posed a 64,000
gallon question to Lake City offi-
cials three weeks ago.
Since Lake City began pro-
viding water to the Eastwood
subdivision three years back,
Sabraw's monthly water state-
ment was about $30 until his
most recent bill.
The city sent the 61-year-old


CALL US:
(386) 752-1293
SUBSCRIBE TO
THE REPORTER:
Voice: 755-5445
Fax: 752-9400


retiree a bill stating he used
64,328 gallons of water during
the last billing period and owed
$328.14.
Sabraw called the city after
he got the bill and told them
there must be a mistake. Old
water bills from the city indicate
Sabraw used about 4,000 gallons
a month. '
Sabraw told the Lake City
Reporter Tuesday that city offi-
cials said he probably had a
water leak and would have to
pay the full amount, which was
due today.
But like the old TV show, "The


94
Mostly sunny
WEATHER, 2A


$64,000 Question," Sabraw won
the grand prize yesterday, when
he was called by a city official
Wednesday afternoon who told
him his bill had been adjusted
and he only owes $29.
"I'm happy this is over,"
Sabraw said. "They told me they
would readjust the meter."
CityManagerWendellJohnson
said all complaints about city
services are taken seriously.
"Our customers get the ben-
efit of the doubt in a dispute over
a water bill," hb said.
A neighbor who lives a block
from Sabraw also had his $450 bill


O pinion .. .. .... .
People ........
Advice & Comics.. .
Puzzles .......


modified, said Donna Duncan,
the city's finance director.
In both instances, Duncan said
there were problems with the
electronic water meters. Duncan
said it took water department
workers several weeks to iden-
tify the problem.
She said the goal was to resolve
the billing disputes before they
were due because the bills were
so much higher than normal.
"We were aware there was an
issue," Duncan said. "We have
idtlnlii
BILL continued on 3A


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
David Sabraw, 61, pictured here
Wednesday, recently disputed a
$328.14 city utility bill for 64,365 gal-
lons of water, far above his normal
monthly average.


TODAY IN
PEOPLE
Post-Emmt,
bash ,1 big one.


COMING
FRIDAY
Local nev.,s
I oundup.


1 1 1 .! J UI!










LAKE CITY REPORTER DAILY BRIEFING THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 15, 2011


Wednesday:
Afternoon: 6-2-1
Evening: 5-8-0


Wednesday:
Afternoon: 9-4-1-1
Evening: 5-9-4-4


Tuesday:
8-10-11-15-16


PEOPLE IN THE NEWS


Post-Emmy bash to be tricked out


LOS ANGELES

even losers won't be
seeing red at this year's
Governors Ball.
That's because
Sunday's official after-party for
the 63rd annual Primetime Emmy
Awards will be almost entirely
decked out with black and white
decor.
The behemoth 57,600-square-foot
space inside the West Hall of the Los
Angeles Convention Center has been
transformed into a two-tone haven
for the dinner party.
"This year's decor theme mod
illusions will take guests on a
trip of various movements, multiple
sensations and figments of the
imagination," said Shelia Manning, a
casting director and co-chairwoman
of the Governors Ball. "The eye will
continually be tricked and deceived
throughout the evening of black and
white with a touch of gold the
Emmy."
The party's glittering chandeliers
will rise and fall above the 3,600
invitees throughout the evening.
About 1,200 servers with temporary
facial tattoos will supply drinks and
hors d'oeuvres, while 42 "living art"
performers and aerial artists amuse
guests.

8.4M watched ABC's
Kennedy tapes special
NEW YORK Fifty years on,
Camelot has little apparent fasci-
nation for young
people.
The majority
of the 8.4 million
people who watched
ABC's two-hour spe-
cial featuring a previ-
Kennedy ously-unheard inter-
view with former
first lady Jacqueline Kennedy had
personal memories of the Kennedy
administration. The Nielsen ratings


A general view of the 63rd Primetime Emmy Awards Governors Ball is seen during
a preview in Los Angeles, Wednesday. The Emmy Awards will take place Sunday
in Los Angeles.


company said just under 2 million of
those viewers were aged 18 to 49.
More people in that youthful
demographic watched reruns of
"NCIS: Los Angeles" on CBS at.the
same time Tuesday or saw contes-
tants dropping into the water on
ABC's "Wipeout" earlier in the night.

Jack Black, Conan to
salute Will Ferrell in DC
WASHINGTON Jack Black,
Conan O'Brien and Larry King will
honor Will Ferrell with the nation's
top humor prize,
along'with Maya
Rudolph and Molly
Shannon from his
"Saturday Night
Live" days.
On Wednesday,
Ferrell the Kennedy Center
in Washington
announced a lineup of star come-


dians who will perform in Ferrell's
honor for the Mark Twain Prize for
American Humor. They'll salute him
Oct. 23 in a performance taped for
broadcast Oct 31 on PBS stations.

Country music pioneer
Wade Mainer, 104, dies
DETROIT Wade Mainer, a
country music pioneer who is cred-
ited with inventing the two-finger
banjo picking style that paved the
way for the Bluegrass era, has died.
He was 104.
Mainer died at his home in Flint
Township, about 60 miles northwest
of Detroit, according to the funeral
home where his service was to be
held.
He was a member of late brother
J.E. Mainer's Mountaineers, one of
the most popular sibling duos of the
1930s.
* Associated Press


I Celebrity Birthdays


* Baseball Hall-of-Famer
Gaylord Perry is 73.
* Writer-director Ron Shelton
is 66.
* Actor Tommy Lee Jones
is 65.
*.Football Hall-of-Famer
Dan Marino is 50.
* Actor Danny Nucci is 43.
* Rap DJ Kay Gee is 42.


* Actor Henry Darrow is 78.
* Pop-rock musician Zach
Filkins (OneRepublic) is 33.
* Britain's Prince Harry
of Wales is 27.
* TV personality Heidi
Montag is 25.
* Rock musician Mitch Dorge
(Crash Test Dummies) is 51.
* Actor Josh Charles is 40.


Daily Scripture
"Then make my joy complete
by being like-minded, having the
same love, being one in spirit
and of one mind."
Philippians 2:2


Thought for Today
"You cannot survive if you do
not know the past."
Oriana Fallaci
Italian journalist (1929-2006)

Lake City Reporter
HOW TO REACH US CLASSIFIED
Main number ...... (386) To place a classified ad, call 755-5440
752-1293
Fax number ....752-9400 BUSINESS
Circulation .....755-5445 Controller Sue Brannon... .754-0419
Online ........... www. (sbrannon@lakecityreporter.com)
lakecityreporter.com CIRCULATION
The Lake City Reporter, an affiliate of Home deiveryof the Lake City Reporter
Community Newspapers Inc., is pub- should be completed by 6:30 a.m.
wished Tuesday through Sunday at 180
E. Duval St., Lake City, Fla. 32055. Tuesday through Saturday, and by 730
Periodical postage paid at Lake City, Fla. a.m. on Sunday.
Member Audit Bureau of Circulation and Please call 386-755-5445 to report any
The Associated Press. problems with your delivery service.
All material herein is property of the Lake In Columbia County, customers should
City Reporter. Reproduction in whole or call before 10:30 a.m. to report a ser-
in part is forbidden without the permis- vice error for same day re-delivery. After
sion of the publisher. U.S. Postal Service 10:30 a.m., next day re-delivery or ser-
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POSTMASTER: Send address changes In all other counties where home delivery
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Publisher Todd Wilson .....754-0418 Circulation ...............755-5445
(twlson@lakectyreporter.com) (circulation@lakecityreporer.com)
Home delivery rates
NEWS (Tuesday through Sunday)
Editor Robert Bridges .....754-0428 12 Weeks.................. $26.32
(rtxidges@lakedtyreporter.com) 52 Weeks...................$83.46
ADVERTISING Rates include 7% sales tax
Mail rates
Director Ashley Butcher .. 754-0417 12 Weeks ................$41.40
(abutcher@lakecdtyreporter.com) 24 Weeks .................. $82.80
52 Weeks..................$179.40

CORRECTION

The Lake City Reporter corrects errors of fact in news
items. If you have a concern, question or suggestion, please
call the executive editor. Corrections and clarifications will run
in this space. And thanks for reading.


Turnpike drivers
are not paying up
FORT LAUDERDALE
- Authorities said 40
percent of the 1.2 million
bills sent to drivers under
Florida's Turnpike new
license plate tolling pro-
gram have not been paid.
The turnpike went to
a cashless toll system
six months ago, eliminat-
ing toll booths along the
47-mile stretch in Miami-
Dade County. Under
the toll-by-plate system,
a photo is taken of the
vehicle's license plate as
it passes throtigh a toll-
ing location. The vehicle's
registered owner receives
a monthly bill for the tolls,
plus a $2.50 administrative
fee.
Collections have been
,slower than the state
projected. Turnpike offi-
cials had predicted about
30 percent of those who
receive bills would not pay,
amounting to about $3.7
million annually.
'Still, officials said about
88 percent of turnpike driv-
ers pay automatically with
SunPass.


ORLANDO Four
Seasons Hotels and
Resorts officials said
tfley've secured financing
'td build a $360 million
resort at Walt Disney
World.
Officials announced
Tuesday that construction
of the 444-room hotel will
begin in December. Plans
call for a rooftop restaurant
with views of the Magic
Kingdom. It is scheduled
to open by late 2014.
Toronto-based Four
Seasons bought the land
from Disney World in 2008
for about $51 million. The
property includes Disney's
Osprey Ridge golf course,
which will be incorporated
into the resort.
Officials had hoped to


Injured sea turtle released
Staff and volunteers of The Turtle Hospital release a
Federally-protected loggerhead sea turtle back into the ocean
off the Florida Keys near Marathon Wednesday. The turtle
suffered a spearglin shot to its head in early August and a
hospital veterinarian surgically removed the spear that luckily
missed vital structures.


open the resort last year,
but it was slowed by the
global recession.
Four Seasons execu-
tive Scott Woroch said he
expects a 50-50 split of
leisure and business travel-
ers at the Orlando resort.


four hotels with a total of
5,200 rooms and two resi-
dential towers with 1,000
units.
The project represents
a $3 billion investment by
Genting Group. Officials
say it will be one of the
largest development proj-
ects in Florida history.
Developers estimate the
project will create 15,000
construction-related jobs
and 30,000 permanent
positions.

Gov. Scott backs
off HMO limits
TALLAHASSEE -
Florida is offering thou-
sands of state workers a
choice in their health care
plans as part of a settle-
ment it has reached to end
a legal battle.
The Scott administration
this summer signed off on
new contracts that would
restrict state workers to
one health maintenance
organization per county
starting in January. Scott
said the move would save
$400 million.
* Associated Press


MIAMI The company
that purchased The Miami
Herald building this past
spring says it will build
a 10-million-square-foot,
mixed-use development on
the site.
Malaysia-based Genting
Group announced its
plans for the bayside land
Wednesday.
The McClatchy
Company, which owns The
Miami Herald, sold the
building in May for $236
million, but the newspaper
wouldn't have to move out
for two years.
According to a news
release, Resorts World
Miami will feature coral-
reef-inspired skyscrap-
ers and a new three-mile
Baywalk. It will include


THE WEATHER


MOSTLY CHANCE CHANCE
SSUNNY TRMS RMS


HI 94 LO 67 1I92 LO 1I87LO


Pensacola
90/68


93/69 .....94/67
~* \Gaimdese
SPalaCty \92/67
87/70 Ocala *
93/67
9
I 9




FtL Myers
93/74

( lfM


TEMPERATURES
High Wednesday
Low Wednesday
Normal high
Normal low
Record high
Record low

PRECIPITATION
Wednesday
Month total
Year total
Normal month-to-date
Normal year-to-date


93
64
88
69
96 in 1952
60 in 1971


0.00"
1.11"
27.79"
2.36"
39.12"


7a Ip 7p la 6a
Thursday Friday







Fomcastedtemrhptbre "Feas like" tmpertre


'93/69

Dayltma Beach
8V72

)rndo Capi Cnaveral
2/71 8/75

West Pahn Beach
S89/77 *
Ft. Lauderdale
89/80 0
Naples ,
'91/74 Miami
,, 90/78
flJfU*


90/81


SUN
Sunrise today
Sunset today
Sunrise tom.
Sunset tom.

MOON
Moonrise today
Moonset today
Moonrise tom.
Moonset torn.


7:15 a.m.
7:36 p.m.
7:15 a.m.
7:35 p.m.

9:12 p.m.
10:03 a.m.
9:49 p.m.
10:57 a.m.


e)co
Sept. Sept. Oct. Oct.
20 27 3 11
Last New First Full


On this date in
2000, a heat ridge
extended from the
Rockies to the
Southwest bringing
record tempera-
tures to the region.
Cities with record
highs included Salt
Lake City, Utah, at
97 degrees and
Pocatello, Idaho, at
96 degrees.


City Friday
Cape Canaveral 86/75/pc
Daytona Beach 88/75/t
Ft. Lauderdale 89/81/pc
Fort Myers 92/72/t
Galnesvllle 91/67/pc
Jacksonville 90/69/t
Key West 90/81/t
Lake City 92/66/t
Miami 90/80/pc
Naples 93/74/pc
Ocala 93/68/pc
Orlando 91/74/t
Panama City 88/71/pc
Pensacola 86/72/pc
Tallahassee 90/69/pc
Tampa 92/74/t
Valdosta 91/67/pc
W. Palm Beach 89/79/pc


9

15 nites to ns
Today's
ultra-violet
radiation risk
for the area on
a scale from 0
to 10+.


90/81/pc
92/72/pc
88L66/pc
85/67/sh
89/79/t
87/65/pc
90/79/pc
93/74/pc
89/68/pc
90/72/pc
84/69/pc
85/70/pc
90/67/pc
92/74/pc
91/65/pc
89/78/pc


An exclusive
service
brought to
our readers
by
The Weather
Channel.



weather.com


.1V8 Forecasts, data and
W mt graphics 0 2011 Weather
"el !IVCentral, LP, Madison, Wis.
weatYer www.weatherpublsher.com


SE-edition Online Access

FREE

Call for login Infomiation.


AROUND FLORIDA


Four Seasons to Plans announced
build in Disney for Miami Herald


li


LAKE CITYALMANACm


- -I I II[ IH AIII II ] I IIII


Page Editor: Laura Hampson, 754-0430


IL--













Page Editor: Robert Bridges, 754-0428 LAKE CITY REPORTER NEWS THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 15, 2011


Ex-Marine to get

Medal of Honor


LOUISVILLE, Ky. (AP)
- Dakota Meyer was
ambling through the caf-
eteria of his Kentucky high
school in 2006 when he
came upon a recruiter for
the Marines. Curious, the
beefy senior struck up a
conversation, but told the
military man he was hop-
ing to play college football
after graduation.
Meyer walked away, the
taunting words ringing
in his ears. He returned
five minutes later, ready to
enlist.
Now more than five years


later, the Kentucky farm
boy is poised Thursday to
receive the military's high-
est award, the Medal of
Honor, lauded for charg-
ing through heavy gun-
fire on five death-defying
trips to rescue comrades
ambushed by insurgents in
Afghanistan in September
2009.
All told, Meyer saved 36
lives, all while providing
cover for the troops to fight
their way out of a wither-
ing, six-hour firefight with
the Taliban that killed five
other U.S. soldiers.


LIBERALS: Raise SS tax on the rich
Continued From Page 1A


The bill's sponsors
noted that during his 2008
presidential campaign,
Obama proposed raising
the payroll tax on people
earning over $250,000.
He's discussed the idea
as president but has yet to
offer legislation following
through on it.
Currently, workers and
their employers each owe
a payroll tax of 6.2 percent
of a worker's wages up
to $106,800 a year. That
tax would also be imposed
on wages above $250,000
under the liberals' plan.
Other sponsors include


Sens. Bernard Sanders,
I-Vt., Barbara Boxer,
D-Calif., and Sheldon
Whitehouse, D-R.I.
In an effort to boost
consumer spending and
create jobs, Obama last
week proposed paring the
6.2 percent payroll tax on
employees to 3.1 percent
next year and cutting the
payroll tax for employ-
ers as well. He would
replace the revenue Social
Security would lose with
money from the govern-
ment's overall budget.
In debt reduction
talks between Obama


and House Speaker John
Boehner, R-Ohio, this
summer, they discussed
a plan to slow the growth
of Social Security benefits
that they never embraced.
In 2005, President George
W. Bush proposed let-
ting recipients turn part
of their Social Security
nest egg into stock mar-
ket investments. The idea
went nowhere.


BUS
From 1A

as it crossed the intersec-
tion onto school property,
reports say.
Lindboe was charged
with turning left in front
of approaching traffic.
Neither Lindboe nor
the driver of the bus,
Dennis L. Bartholomew,
60, Lake City, was injured,
according to FHP.
Both were reportedly
wearing seat belts at the
time of the crash.


BILL: Dispute resolved
Continued From Page 1A ;


CONCERTS: 53rd season gets underway Friday
Continued From Page 1A


ing stories.
Identical twins Mark &
Clark perform 7:30 p.m.
Jan. 20 on identical custom-
built baby grand pianos.
The twins bring a double
dose of entertainment
The UNF Chamber
Singers return to Lake City
3 p.m. Feb. 25.
Carpe Diem String
Quartet performs 7:30 p.m.
March 9. The quartet is a
young energetic group that
plays a range of music from
classical to jazz.
The season ends 3 p.m.
May 20 with the "Patriotic


Pops Spectacular" program
featuring the Jacksonville
Symphony Orchestra. A
grant from the state is help-
ing pay for the orchestra.
Season tickets to the
concert series are $50 for
adults and $5 for students
in kindergarten through
12th grade. Members also
receive free admission to
all even Live! At Dowling
Park 2011-12 Artist Series
Concert atAdvent Christian
Village.
Single tickets are also
available one hour in
advance at the PAC for $18


for adults and $5 for stu-
dents.
"Grants from the State
of Florida Division of
Cultural Affairs and from
the Robert and Elizabeth
Haven Foundation enable
Community Concerts to
maintain its low member-
ship fee of $50 for adults
and $5 for students K-
12," said President Dave
Murdock.
Tickets are available
online at communitycon-
certs.info, at the Chamber
of Commerce located on
162 S. Marion Ave. or can


be mailed in to Community
Concerts of Lake City at
PO. Box 2531, Lake City,
FL 32056-2351.
More information is
available by calling (386)
466-8999.



SWood Heat-No Fuel Charges
Heck! No Fuel Charge! I


TE WWOOD SVE
AND FIIP lll rPlC INTfI
OPEN: M-F 9:30-5:30
611 N. Main Street Gainesville
1-800-524-2675
.... w ds t io 11efl 1h"d 1


Turner told investiga-
tors that Williams told
him the mobile home he
had bought was stolen.
But when Turner called
police, they could not find
a stolen property report for
the mobile home Williams
claimed was stolen, the
report said. '
....After the complaints
were filed, investigators
said they learned Williams
has an open criminal case
against him. Williams was


arrested on Feb. 2 and
charged with racketeering
and four counts of third
degree grand theft, accord-
ing to the report.
Investigators also
learned Williams' license
to sell mobile homes
was revoked on April 15,
2009. An official with the
Florida Department of
Motor Vehicles said the
state attorney's office has
five criminal cases against
Turner, according to the


arrest report.
Evidence has been given
to the Hamilton County
Sheriff's Office because
some of the transactions
occurred there, Seifert
said. That investigation is
ongoing, he said.
A $75,000 bond was
originally set for Williams,
but it was revoked after
more complaints were filed
against him. He is held
at the Columbia County
Detention Facility.


Before the dispute was
resolved, Sabraw said he
was prepared to hire a law-
yer, even if it cost more in
legal fees than he owed.
He said he doesn't have a
swimming pool or water his
lawn. He is certain nobody
hooked onto his water
without his knowledge and
believed the city's utility


Bus
john burns


department was at fault
Sabraw said he was coQ-
,fident he didn't have a leak
because the dial on his water
meter would be spinning like
. the second hand on a clock if
he was using as much water'
as the bill indicated.
"If I had a leak, I'd still
have a leak," he said. "If I
used it, I'd pay it."


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FRAUD: Lake City man charged
Continued From Page 1A


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LAKE CITY REPORTER NEWS THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 15, 2011


Page Editor: Robert Bridges, 754-0428


I














OPINION


Thursday, September 15, 2011


ONE
ANOTHER


ONE
OPINION


The high


price of


justice


in Iran


President Mahmoud
Ahmadinejad's visit to
the United Nations last
year, Iran released Sarah
Shourd, 32, one of three young
Americans arrested on [uly 31,
2009, on the Iraq border and
charged with espionage and
entering Iran illegally.
There was a price: $500,000'
bail, Tehran being confident she
would not return for her trial.
Last month, after a quick per-
functory trial, her companions,
Shane Bauer and Josh Fattal,
both 29, were convicted of the
charges and sentenced to eight
years in prison. The three had
been classmates at the University
of California, Berkeley.
Once again, Ahmadinejad is on
the eve of traveling to New York
to favor the U.N. with his pres-
ence. As a "unilateral humani-
tarian gesture," he proposes to
release Bauer and Fattal on $1
million bail for the pair.
Surely the cynical Iranian
president realizes that this is
not even close to a "humanitar-
ian gesture." It is extortion. By
any reasonable standard, the
three Americans were hostages
and the $1.5 million is ransom.

* Scripps Howard News Service


HIG
IN


H LIG H TS
HISTORY


Today is Thursday,
September 15, the 258th day of
2011. There are 107 days left in
the year.
On this date in:
1776 British forces occupy
New York City during the
American Revolution.
1916 Tanks are used for the
first time in war, in a British
attack on German lines near
the Somme in France.
1950 U.N. forces unaer U.S.
Gen. Douglas MacArthur land
at Inchon, South Korea, halting
North Korean advance.
1959 Soviet Premier Nikita
Khrushchev is welcomed
by U.S. President Dwight
Eisenhower as he arrives for an
unprecedented two-week visit
to the U.S.

Lake City Reporter
Serving Columbia County
Since 1874
The Lake City Reporter is pub-
lished with pride for residents of
Columbia and surrounding counties by
Community Newspapers Inc.
We believe strong newspapers build
strong communities -"Newspapers
get things done!"
Our primary goal is to
publish distinguished and profitable
community-oriented newspapers.
This mission will be accomplished
through the teamwork of professionals
dedicated to truth, integrity and hard
work.
Todd Wilson, publisher
Robert Bridges, editor
Sue Brannon, controller
Dink NeSmith, president
Tom Wood, chairman

LETTERS
POLICY
Letters to the Editor should be
typed or neatly written and double
spaced. Letters should not exceed
400 words and will be edited for
length and libel. Letters must be
signed and include the writer's name,
address and telephone number for
verification. Writers can have two
letters per month published. Letters
and guest columns are the opinion of
the writers and not necessarily that of
the Lake City Reporter.
BY MAIL: Letters, P.O. Box 1709,
Lake City, FL 32056; or drop off at
180 E. Duval St. downtown.
BY FAX: (386) 752-9400.
BY E-MAIL:
news@lakecltyreporter.com


www.lakecityreporter.com


Reach deep!


We all got an
important
reminder this
last weekend.
On the 10th
anniversary of the 9/11 attacks
on the Trade Center Twin
Towers, television shows docu-
mented details of the tragedy
all day long. Looking back, we
have seen so many changes
in our country and in we, the
people. To name a few, we've
spent incredible efforts pursu-
ing those who would terrorize
us, implemented major changes
in security, put efforts into
improving public transportation
safety, and made many changes
in each of our daily lives. The
disaster and the aftermath have
caused us pain, fear, regrets,
grief and sadness. But even in
the worst of times, there are
amazing good traits we can
find within us, and a hopeful
American spirit that we can
share. It's possible to find some
good from just about every
experience life sends us.
In her book, "Unmeasured
Strength: My Story of Survival
and Transformation", Lauren
Manning tells her story of
being terribly injured and
burned in the towers, and
of years of painful surgeries
and treatments in her recov-
ery. Interviewed on the NBC
"Today" show on Saturday,. she
related how she decided to
survive, even though she felt it


Robert Denny
Bob.Denny8@gmail.com


would be so easy to just let go.
Stumbling away from the build-
ing, she received help from
emergency responders, and
was transported for lifesaving
hospitalization and treatment.
She has a vital message for
each of us, and I think her most
important message is: "Reach
deep." She said there's a place
. deep within each of us that we
may not be aware of, but that
we can tap into and find the
strength and the will to live and
to recover. She made a deci-
sion to live, for her husband
and infant son, the loves of her
life. It offered her a purpose, a.
meaning for her life.
Often we're asked to "dig
deep," to contribute to one '
cause or the other. But she
asks nothing, and merely wants
to help each of us realize that
we have that deep down pool
of strength and determination
to give all of our efforts just
to live, rather than to take the
easier way and give up. She
tells about finding a deep faith


within, in her spirituality, and in
her self.
Life is a choice. As we go
through our days, we may
take life for granted. Fear,
pain, and distress seem far
away. Yes, we will all leave
our lives behind one day. But
in the hardest of times we can
find great power to survive
and recover. Someday we
may find ourselves in such a
desperate situation. It might
sometimes be easier to just
give up, but in those difficult
moments we can remember
some good reasons to choose
life. In those times, you could
use the opportunity to get
in touch with your religious
beliefs, and with what you
love in your life and those you
love, and to "reach deep" to
find that character, strength,
purpose, love of family and
friends, and love of life, and
to choose to take what life
has given you, and make the
most of what you've got to
-work with. How will you know
that it can get better again, if
you don't try? If you're ever
in such a situation, remember
those of us who care about
you.

* Robert Denny is a licensed
mental health therapist, and
teaches psychology at Florida
Gateway College in Lake City.
Comments welcome at Bob.
Denny8@gmail.com.


Obama's big government vision


at a
t /speech,"
any .
number
of pro-
gressives are saying about
President Barack Obama's per-
formance before a joint session
of Congress, and they're talking
not just about his no-jobs job
plan, but his defense of gung
ho collectivism.
Take for instance Elizabeth
Jacobs of the Brookings
Institution, who praised "his
clear vision for the role of
government in American life
- a much needed alternative to
the go-it-alone message from
Republicans."
Go it alone? Excuse me, but
the issue is that you cannot get
up in the morning without a
crowd of federal nannies giving
you orders on everything, even
including how much water can
be in the toilet you soon will
visit
Gradually, our exceptionalism
is being transformed by excep-
tionally high spending and the
exceptional number of directives
we have, some 356,000 pages
in the U.S. Code reaching far
beyond what's needed. It's red
tape enough to have helped give
us the mess we're now in and
cost the economy an estimated


Jay Ambrose
SpeaktoJay@aol.com


$1.75 trillion a year while vastly
diminishing our liberties.
The federal government
arrived at this point by cheat-
ing on the Constitution, playing
politics and assuming central
planning can do what it can't
Obama, who has been best of
friends with trillion-dollar defi-
cits and business-threatening
new programs, wants more of
the same and justifies his ambi-
tions with .history.
In his speech, he referred
to Abraham Lincoln's use of
power, though not his arrest
of Maryland legislators, as
much as that episode might
intrigue Obama when he looks
out on House Republicans. He
referred instead to Lincoln's
push for such projects as the
Transcontinental Railroad
and the National Academy of
Sciences.
It was quite a technological
feat, that railroad was, and also


quite a scandal as the govern-
nient's beneficence made a
very few very rich. There is no
doubt, however, that great good
came from joining the West
and East at a time when people
were mostly getting around by
foot, horse and riverboat Today
federal, state and local govern-
ments spend $100 billion a year
on transportation infrastructure,
flubbing much of the mission
because of pork and incompe-
tence, another kind of scandal.
Skipping over the New Deal's
disastrous policies of fostering
industry collusion, burning farm
crops and raising taxes, Obama
did mention Social Security,
certainly beloved by the public,
though even here is a lesson in
government bungling.
If Republicans do not pass
this jobs plan, he will blame his
disastrous economy on them.
If they do pass it, they will
share the blame when it fails.
The need is for significant debt
and regulation reduction that's
contrary to everything Obama
stands for.

* Jay Ambrose, formerly
Washington director of editorial
policy for Scripps Howard news-
papers and the editor of dailies in
El Paso, Texas, and Denver, is a
columnist living in Colorado.


4A


ANOTHER
VIEW


Obama's


latest tax


proposal


e White House
produced a mas-
S sive tax program
I on Monday that's
supposed to cre-
ate jobs. The big-government
push ought to be called the
American Higher Taxes Act.
President Obama's proposal,
now in the hands of Congress,
is a mish-mash of ideas that
have either been previously
discarded or have been tried
and failed. It's no wonder
Mr. Obama wants Congress
to pass it without comment,
amendment or even a thorough
reading. Providing temporary
tax breaks for employers who
make new hires is unlikely to
provide enough incentive for
businesses to expand their
payroll long-term. Any jobs
"created" through shoveling
taxpayer dash out the door will
dry up when the federal spigot
is turned off.
For millions of unemployed
Americans, the plan extends
unemployment benefits,
which recently the White
House bizarrely claimed "cre-
ates growth and income for
businesses that leads them
to decisions about jobs, more
hiring." By that twisted logic,
rising job losses could be an
encouraging sign of future
economic health. Agriculture
Secretary Tom Vilsack
recently called food stamps
"the most direct stimulus youi
can get in the economy during
these tough times." For liber-
als, having more Americans
on the unemployment dole
and record levels depending
on food aid are a sign of eco-
nomic health.
Mr. Obama's tax increases
would be immediate and per-
manent. The largest chunk
is $400 billion that will come
from limiting itemized deduc-
tions for families with more
than $250,000 in yearly tax-
able income and individuals
over $200,000. This includes
ramping back deductions
for home-mortgage interest
payments, state and local
property taxes and charitable
donations. Reducing the ben-
efit of the home-mortgage
deduction in a troubled hous-
ing market is breathtakingly
counterproductive, and mak-
ing charitable donations less
attractive is inhumane when
more people are in need. It's
a mystery how tax hikes will
create even one permanent
private-sector job when they
so clearly further harm the
struggling economy.
The White House claims
the pllan is "paid for over
10 years" using the same
illogic that resulted in record
deficits, retarded growth and
stymied job creation. It is
"paid for" in the same way
that someone could rapidly
run his credit card up to its
limit and pay it off over time
assuming he still has a job
and nothing else to purchase.
Mr. Obama wants to use gov-
ernment money now to help
buy his re-election and have it
paid off over 10 years, when
he will be in comfortable
retirement. And even that sce-
nario assumes his rosy eco-
nomic projections are more
accurate than they were in the
2009 stimulus plan or subse-
quent White House budgets.
Mr. Obama's proposal
reconfirms his obsession with
raising taxes. For the White
House, more government is
always the solution. But it


doesn't take 155 pages of fine
print to solve the jobs crisis;
it takes 10 words: Cut spend-
ing, cut taxes and get out of
the way.

N The Washington Times









LAKE CITY REPORTER NEWS THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 15, 2011 5A



Small cities struggle to pay for 9/11 memorials


Associated Press

The memorial started with a steel beam
salvaged from the World Trade Center a
small piece of the terrorist attacks that the city
of Pembroke Pines, Fla., was determined to
honor in its own way.
Nobody from this coastal town died on Sept
11. But plans for its memorial grew ever more
elaborate at one point projected to cost
more than $1 million as the years passed.
"It was a glass-enclosed, air-conditioned
house," recalled the city's mayor, Frank Ortis.
'"With a reflection pool and water running
down, hurricane-resistant glass. Obviously we
couldn't do that"
Hundreds of small memorials to Sept 11
have bloomed across the country in the 10
years since -the attacks. But in many towns,
what began as a simple tribute to the dead
turned into an expensive headache as the cost
of building such memorials ballooned and the
economy deteriorated.
Still short of funds, some cities dramatically
scaled down the scope of the projects, paid the
outstanding bill with public money or aban-
doned a memorial altogether. Others remain
unfinished with no completion date in sight
The numbers are minuscule compared with
what it cost to build the major national memo-
rials: $700 million for the National September
11 Memorial & Museum in New York City
and at least $60 million for the Flight 93 memo-
rial near Shanksville, Pa. But like these small
towns, even the Flight 93 memorial is still
struggling to raise enough money to build its
original design organizers need to raise
about $10 million to finish the memorial's first
phase and maintain it in the future.
Jerry Sanford, a former New York City
firefighter, has been soliciting money since
2004 for a granite memorial in the shape of
an American flag to be displayed in North
Naples, Fla. Through private donations; he
has raised about $600,000 but he still needs
$800,000 more to pay for the granite.
Sanford had been hoping to unveil the
memorial in time for the 10th anniversary,
but now he doesn't know when it will be com-
pleted.
"Times are very different now," he said.
"The unemployment is rampant People are
out of work. The economy is bad."
There was a nationwide rush to build Sept
11 memorials in the first few years after the
attacks that has since subsided, said Erika
Doss, a professor at the University of Notre
Dame and author of the book "Memorial


Mania: Public Feeling in America."
"Once the recession hit, the economic possi-
bilities of doing so went away," said Doss, who
discovered about 400 memorials to 9/11 while
researching her book. "People still wanted to
do it, but it became more and more difficult"
It's impossible to say how much money has
been spent on the proliferation of memorials
of all kinds across the U.S. from make-
shift crosses on the side of the road to mas-
sive monuments because most are funded
through a combination of private and public
money.
Memorials weren't always popular in this
country, though. In fact, after World War II,
monuments were eschewed in favor of "living
memorials" like auditoriums and swimming
pools named in memory of veterans, Doss
said. A construction boom began in the 1980s
when the Vietnam Veterans Memorial opened
on the National Mall to much fanfare, Doss
said.
"It has ushered in lots and lots of other
groups demanding that they be represented
by a memorial in the public sphere," she said.
"People think if they can make a memorial,
they can come to terms with what happened."
In Oklahoma City, the memorial to the 1995
bombing of the federal building that killed
168 people receives visitors from all 50 states
every month of the year, said Kari Watkins,
the executive director.
"They want to remember, and they're look-
ing for the reason why," she said. "They're
searching."
After the 9/11 attacks, Dennis Stout, then
the district attorney in San Bernardino County,
Calif., began an effort to build a pair of memo-
rials to the victims, one east of Los Angeles
and a twin in New York.
His nonprofit group, called the Freedom's
Flame Sept 11 Memorial, had a solid start,
raising more than $200,000 in its first two
years. It picked a design, which depicts people
escaping down a staircase at the twin towers
while rescuers climb up. They paid for render-
ings.
But when Stout failed to win re-election,
.the donations dried up. Now, nearly a
decade after the effort began, there is still
no memorial. The money is largely gone,
too, spent partly on organizing a tempo-
rary, traveling memorial exhibit made up
of limestone cladding from the Pentagon,
a damaged FDNY fire truck and World
Trade Center steel. Today they have only
around $20,000 left in the bank, out of
nearly $262,000 raised.


Hunt foes ask feds to

protect Nevada bear group


RENO, Nev. (AP) -
Opponents of Nevada's
first approved bear hunt
are arguing the state's
black bears should be
protected under the fed-
eral Endangered Species
Act.
Advocacy groups
Big Wildlife and
NoBearHuntNV.org filed
a petition with the U.S.
Department of Interior
to list bears they refer
to as the "Sky Island"
population as a "distinct
species."
Hunters have killed
seven bears since the
season began Aug. 20. It
is due to end Dec. 31.
The Nevada Wildlife
Commission authorized
up to 14 male and six
female bears to be killed.
Critics say the hunt will
have a "critical impact"
on a stressed bear popu-
lation
Nevada Department of


Wildlife spokesman Chris
Healy tells the Gazette-
Journal he doubts the


U.S. Fish and Wildlife
Service will grant the
petition.


.SOCIsAt t E roor
A section of steel from the World Trade Center is shown on display at the Patriot Memorial
Sunday, in Wellington, Fla.




Manufacturers scramble to


keep up with demand for


powerful new diet formula


Consumers flood phone lines looking for

SimplePure HCG weight loss solution


(Canoga Park,Ca) Ground
breaking developments are
shaking up the weight loss
industry. HCG (Human
Chorionic Gonadotropin)
is a hormone produced by
the human body that helps
the body use fat more
efficiently. According to
renowned endocrinologist,
Dr. Albert T.W. Simeons,
HCG effectively sends
signals to the brain to
release fat stores creating
rapid weight loss. For
years, HCG was only
available by injection
making it less available to
the general public. Now,
with its new advanced
liquid formula, SimplePure
Nutrition has made it
available in sublingual
drops. Suppliers have been
authorizing extra shifts
for employees in order to
fill the rising demand for
SimplePure's proprietary
formula.


Shipments are being rushed to suppliers In order to meet
demand for new rapid weight loss formula.


L Rapid weight loss of
up to 21bs per dayl
d No injections or
pills to take
6 Targets fat loss In
problem areas

The makers of SimplePure
HCG have set up a 'toll
free national hotline for


dieters in immediate need.
For a limited time, they are
giving away a free bottle so
consumers can experience
the rapid weight loss
themselves before
purchasing. The offer is
only good while supplies
last so the manufacturer
suggests calling the hotline
immediately to secure the
free supply.


How to get SimplePure HCG for RE
Operators have been dispatched to multiple
call centers to handle the growing number
of calls. To secure your free supply, call the
24 hour toll free hotline as soon as possible
because inventory is limited,

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HCG
t, --.-_ ---
LI


PIS First Baptist Church of Lake City
will host nationally known author and recording artist

Padrika Gray
Padrika Gray, a Jacksonville native, is author of a book entitled
And she has also produced a CD recording entitled, "Gotta Do
Better" (2011) The CD consists of Inspirational Spoken Word
set to Jazz music and is based on the artist's previously published
book. Padrika is an independent Minister of Music and takes the
.0 word of encouragement to the,people.
Her message is provocative; and to some challenging or offensive, but that is
exactly the way offenses come-rude, abruptly, inappropriately, sad, but sometimes
with the truth. Its purpose is not to accuse, embarrass, or tear down any of our
churches or other bodies of Christ, but to build them up. The 221-page book
discusses the nature of offenses, in true-to-life situations where we live. It offers
over 2.20 biblical coping skills (scriptures) which lead to overcoming power.
If you enjoy the combination of Jazz instruments and spoken word, then you
will enjoy this inspirational CD. Spoken word...from a different perspective,
candid, charismatic.
Join Padrika Gray and the folks at FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH
for an evening of inspiration,
Sunday, September 18, 2011 at 6PM. Admission is FREE.
COME HOME TO FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH
182 NE Justice Street Lake City, Florida
http://www.spiritandsoulfood.com/home http://www.firstbaptistlc.com/in(lex.html









6A LAKE CITY REPORTER NEWS THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 15, 2011


Los Angeles Zoo tiger

cub dies of head trauma


LOS ANGELES (AP)
- One of three Sumatran
tiger cubs born last month
at the Los Angeles Zoo has
died.
Zookeepers found the
dead cub on Monday.
Spokeswoman Leinani
Bernabe says a necropsy
shows the cub sustained a


head trauma, but veterinar-
ians are unable to deter-
mine how it happened.
The three cubs born
Aug. 6 don't have names.
The remaining two cubs
will continue to be raised
by their mother, Lulu. They
aren't being exhibited until
they are large enough for


the outdoor tiger habitat.
Lulu has previously
raised five cubs in two suc-
cessful litters in 2005 and
2007.
Sumatran tigers are an
endangered species due to
challenges such as habitat
loss, poaching and conflict
with human populations..


Florida teachers union


sues over merit pay law


Associated Press
MIAMI Florida's teacher union is suing
the state over a new law that requires merit
pay and ends tenure for new hires, one of
a number passed nationwide changing how
teachers are evaluated.
The Florida Education Association contends
that SB 736, which was signed in to law by
Gov. Rick Scott in March, is unconstitutional
because it substantially changes how teachers
are paid and evaluated while denying instruc-
tors their right to collective bargaining.
"The provisions of SB 736 radically trans-
form the teaching profession and not for the
better," said Cory Williams, a middle school
teacher included in the lawsuit. "'he expertise
and knowledge of teachers have been ignored
throughout this process and our constitutional
rights have been trampled."
The FEA and the Sarasota Classified/
Teachers Association filed the lawsuit
Wednesday in Circuit Court in Tallahassee
on behalf of teachers statewide. Florida's law
is one of several passed this past year that
weaken or eliminate tenure and create new
ways for evaluating teachers, most of which
deem a teacher "effective" based on how well
students do on tests.
Florida appears to be the only state, how-
ever, that is requiring merit pay statewide.
Other states are working to create effective
evaluation systems first and encouraging
districts to implement pilot performance
pay models, rather than including it as a
requirement, said Michelle Exstrom, edu-
cation program principal at the National


Conference of State Legislatures.
Minnesota's Q Comp program, for example,
allows districts and teacher unions to vol-
untarily opt in to a teacher evaluation and
performance pay program that is collectively
bargained. Fifty school districts implemented
or had approved plans to participate in the
2010-11 school year.
'Florida always has been ahead of the curve
when it comes to the merit pay issue," Exstrom
said. "They've just s struggled to do it in a way
that's most effective for their teachers and
their students.
And I think a lot of states have looked at
Florida's struggles and said, 'You know what,
it's not clear cut how to make this work"' ,
In response to the lawsuit, Scotts press
secretary, Lane Wright, said the governor was
looking out for students, to make sure they get
the best teachers in the classroom, while "the
special interest teachers union is looking out
for bad teachers who pay their union dues."
"Regular working folks don't have tenure,"
Wright said in a statement Wednesday. "Why
should bad teachers?"
The law passed last spring is similar to one
former Gov. Charlie Crist vetoed during his
Senate .campaign after widespread teacher
protests. It requires teachers hired after July
1, 2014, to be placed on a performance sal-
ary schedule. Teachers will be given one
of four performance ratings, 50 percent of
which must be based on data regarding stu-
dent growth, including scores on the Florida
Comprehensive Assessment Test It also gets
rid of provisions which allow districts to priori-
tize teachers with seniority during layoffs.


ASSOCIATED PRESS
A trio of Sumatran tiger cubs born in August 2011 at the Los Angeles Zoo are shown. One of
these three cubs died Monday.



NOTICE OF


BUDGET HEARING


The City of Lake City has tentatively adopted a
budget for 2012.


A public hearing to make a FINAL DECISION
on the budget AND TAXES will be held on:


MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 19,2011
6:30 P.M.
at
CITY HALL COUNCIL CHAMBERS
205 NORTH MARION AVENUE
LAKE CITY, FLORIDA 32055


BUDGET SUMMARY

CITY OF LAKE CITY

FISCAL YEAR 2011 2012

THE PROPOSED OPERATING BUDGET EXPENDITURES OF THE CITY OF LAKE CITY

ARE 32.72% MORE THAN LAST YEAR'S TOTAL OPERATING EXPENDITURES

Debt Special Total
General Service Revenue Enterprise All
Fund Fund Funds Funds Funds


ESTIMATED REVENUES


Millage Per $1000


Ad Valorem Taxes
Special Assessments
Charges for Services
Impact Trust Fund


3.9816


Intergovernmental Revenues
Licenses and Permits
Fines and Forfeitures
Franchise Fees
Interest Earned/Other
TOTAL SOURCES
Transfers In
Fund Balances/Reserves/Net Assets
TOTAL REVENUES, TRANSFERS AND
BALANCES


$ 2,820,475 $
1,722,580
724,024


3,256,359
171,562
29,057
1,166,553
1,703,098
11,593,708
804,782
670,544


0 $


0 $
1,541,174
1,170,557


0 $ 2,820,475


15,292,793
133,800


255,974


0
0
0
366,959
*' 0


$ 13,069,034 $ 366,959


0
32,574
3,000,279
280,096
2,379,063

$ 5,659,438


0
490,889
15,917,482
383,800
18,512,000

$ 34,813,282


3,263,754
17,187,374
133,800
3,512,333
171,562
29,057
1,166,553
2,226,561
30,511,469
1,835,637
21,561,607

$ 53,908,713


EXPENDITURES


General Government
Public Safety
Physical Environment
Economic Environment
Transportation
Debt Service
Health' and Welfare
Culture and Recreation
Reserves
TOTAL EXPENDITURES
Transfer Out
Fund Balances/Reserves/Net Assets

TOTAL APPROPRIATED EXPENDITURES
TRANSFERS, RESERVES AND BALANCES


$ 4,217,878 $
4,531,038
418,749


2,338,454
0
135,000
780,860


12,421,979
647,055
0


$ 13,069,034


0 $


0
366,959
0


0
366,959
0
0


$ 366,959


0 $
2,126,470


865,337
1,862,849


0 $ 4,217,878
0 $ 6,657,508


34,429,482 $
0 $


34,848,231
865,337


0 $ 4,201,303


0 $
0 $


0
4,854,656
804,782


$ 5,659,438


366,959
135,000


0 $ 780,860
0 $ 0
34,429,482 52,073,076
383,800 1,835,637
0


$ 34,813,282


$ 53,908,713


THE TENTATIVE ADOPTED AND/OR FINAL BUDGETS ARE ON FILE IN THE OFFICE OF THE ABOVE MENTIONED TAXING AUTHORITY AS A PUBLIC RECORD


Taxes:









LAKE CITY REPORTER HEALTH THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 15, 2011 7A


Cantaloupe warning issued after Listeria outbreak


Associated Press
DENVER Health officials
have issued a warning for can-
taloupes from a revered melon-
producing area of Colorado amid
a bacteria outbreak blamed for
four deaths in the state and New
Mexico, troubling farmers who
depend on sales of the fruit.
The warning from the
Centers for Disease Control and
Prevention came after numerous
cases of a strain of Listeria were
reported in six states, including
at least 11 from Colorado, 10 from
New Mexico, two from Texas, and


one each from Indiana, Nebraska
and Oklahoma. -
The agency said it was the first
Listeria outbreak linked to canta-
loupe in the United States. The
U.S. Food & Drug Administration
said it had not recalled the mel-
ons while it worked to locate the
source.
Rocky Ford cantaloupes,
named for a region along the old
Santa Fe Trail about 130 miles
southeast of Denver, are prized
for their above-average sugar con-'
tent. W.C. Fields reportedly said
bald guys have "a head shaped
like a Rocky Ford cantaloupe,"


and Lucile Ball had the melons
delivered to her dressing room.
"This is really silly. You can
get Listeria any place. I eat those
melons every day," said Kent
Lusk, a fifth-generation canta-
loupe farmer from Rocky Ford.
Colorado Agriculture
Commissioner John Salazar said
the contamination might not
be the cantaloupes, but a truck
or other source. But several
Colorado grocery chains pulled
their supplies as a precaution,
and New Mexico issued a volun-
tary recall. State Environmental
Health Bureau inspectors were


collecting cantaloupe samples
from grocery stores and distribu-
tors across New Mexico for labo-
ratory analysis.
Listeriosis is a serious infection
usually caused by eating food
contaminated with the bacterium
Listeria monocytogenes. The
disease primarily affects older
adults, pregnant women, new-
borns and adults with weakened
immune systems.
Colorado health director Chris
Urbina said people who are at
high risk included people 60
and older, those with weakened
immune systems from trans-


plants and people with chronic
diseases. Symptoms can include
fever, muscle aches, diarrhea,
headache, stiff neck, confusion
and convulsions. Listeriosis can
cause miscarriages and still-
births.
The CDC warning advised peo-
ple with cantaloupes at home to
see if they came from the Rocky
Ford region, and if so, not to eat
the melons if they're in a vulner-
able group. Health authorities
asked people throwing out Rocky
Ford cantaloupes to put them in a
sealed plastic bag before putting
them in the trash.


Push underway to cut drugs

for dementia patients


BY MATT SEDENSKY
Associated Press

Day after day, Hazel Eng
sat on her couch, a blank
stare on her face. The pow-
erful antipsychotics she
was taking often cloaked
her in sedation. And when
they didn't, the 89-year-old
lashed out at her 'nursing
home's. aides with such
anger and frequency her
daughter wondered if her
mother would be better off
dead..
Until, in a matter of days,
everything seemed to
change.
Eng's daughter, Jean
Lynch, says her mother was
moved to' a different sec-
tion of the Ecumen home in
North Branch, Minn., and
taken off every drug but
her daily aspirin. She now
beams as she ambles the
hallways, reads the news-
paper, tells stories and con-
stantly laughs.
"Now I hope she lives till


she's 200 years old," Lynch
said. "She's just so happy."
Antipsychotics are meant
primarily to help control
hallucinations, delusions
and other abnormal behav-
ior in people suffering from
schizophrenia and bipolar
disorder, but they're also
given to hundreds of thou-
sands of elderly nursing
home patients in the U.S.
to pacify aggressive and
paranoid behavior related
to dementia.
The drugs can limit
seniors' ability to effectively
communicate, socialize or
participate in everyday life.
But a series of warnings
has prompted a movement
of nursing homes trying
to reduce the decades-old
practice, often resulting in
remarkably positive chang-
es.
Still, doctors say the
drugs are sometimes the
only things that help the
small number of dementia
patients that display psy-
chotic behavior, making


them a danger to them-.
selves and others.
Ecumen's three-year-
old program called
"Awakenings" isn't just
about reducing drugs.
Personalized care plans use
exercise, aromatherapy,
pets and other methods.
Patients who were sedated
and detached are now play-
ing video games, listening
to music and playing bal-
loon volleyball.
"It was quiet before but
now it's not," said Eva
Lanigan, a nurse who pilot-
ed Ecumen's program. "Life
is going on here again."
A government audit
released in May looked
at Medicare payments for
atypical antipsychotics, as
a newer class of the drugs
is known, and found in a
six-month period that was
analyzed in 2007, about
one in seven nursing
home patients aged 65 or
older had been prescribed
them. Some 83 percent of
Medicare claims for such


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Hazel Eng, 89, shares a laugh with daughter Jean Lynch, right, and son-in-law Bob Lynch,
left, as they go for a walk Tuesday at the Ecumen nursing home in North Branch, Minn.


drugs were for off-label pur-
poses such as dementia, the
audit found.
Since 2005, atypical antip-
sychotics have been under
an FDA warning alerting
doctors they could increase
the risk of death in patients
with dementia due to heart


attacks or pneumonia. The
most common atypical antip-
sychotics are sold under
the brand names Risperdal,
Zyprexa, Seroquel, Geodon,
Abilify and Invega.
An older class of the
drugs, known as typical
antipsychotics, was added


to the FDA warning three
years later.
The warnings did not
apply to other medicines
widely used in nursing
homes, such as the antide-
pressants Prozac and Paxil,
and the anti-anxiety medi-
cines Xanax and Valium.


Rehabbed speared turtle swims again


MARATHON (AP) A
federally protected logger-
head turtle was released
Wednesday off the Florida
Keys after recovering from a
spear gun shot to its head.
Cheered by spectators,
staff and volunteers from The
Turtle Hospital in Marathon
released the 115-pound rep-
tile near the iconic' Seven
Mile Bridge. The turtle was
rescued off Big Pine Key in
early August with a four-foot
underwater spear embedded
in its head.
Hospital veterinarian Doug
Mader removed the spear.
The reptile, named Sara
after the daughter of the man
who found it, recovered about
five weeks after surgery.
"This has to be one of the


luckiest turtles in history,"
said Mader. IThe spear went
in just behind the ear, criss-
crossed over the windpipe
and lodged against the jaw on
the other side.
"Quarter-of-an-inch in
either direction and that ani-
mal would be dead," he said.
Officials from National
Marine Fisheries and the
Florida Fish and Wildlife
Commission have launched
a criminal investigation, said
FWC spokesperson Bobby
Dube.
They hope to be aided
by donations from outraged
Keys residents and business
owners who contributed to
a reward for tips leading to
the arrest and conviction of
the guilty party. More than


$16,000 in cash has been
amassed, plus services includ-
ing fishing and dive trips, as
well as eight hours of free
welding by a local tradesman.
"We're used to animals get-
ting hit by a boat or tangled
up in fishing line or ropes,"
said Richie Moretti, who
founded the hospital 25 years
ago. "But this is where some-
body came in deliberately and
hurt our animals."
Moretti began the first
state-licensed veterinary sea
turtle hospital in 1986 as an
adjunct to his small Marathon
motel. Profits from the motel
were used to fund research
and treatment programs.
In 1993, Moretti expanded
facilities by purchasing an
adjacent building that once


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housed an exotic dance
lounge named Fanny's. The
building features a surgical
suite, examination room, com-
mons area and classroom.
Today, the motel no lon-
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8A LAKE CITY REPORTER HEALTH THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 15, 2011


UN investigator: Medical

waste risks were ignored S


GENEVA (AP) A
human rights investigator
for the United Nations says
up to a quarter of the world's
trash from hospitals, clin-
ics, labs, blood banks and
mortuaries is hazardous
and much more needs to be
done to regulate it.
Calin Georgescu, a U.N.
special rapporteur, says few
nations are developing the
rules needed to cope with
the growing mountains of
medical waste that pose a
hidden risk of infection and
could expose people to low
levels of radioactivity and
needle-stick injuries.
In a report to the U.N.
Human Rights Council, he
said nations pay "too little
attention" to their tons of
waste each year waste
that contains pathogens,
blood, low levels of radio-
activity, discarded needles,
syringes, scalpels, expired
drugs and vaccines. In many
poorer nations, discarded


chemicals and pharmaceu-
tical wastes go straight to
city dumps, down hospital
toilets into water systems,
or are burned in cement
kilns that just add to dioxide
emissions.
Norwegian diplomat
Hans Ola Urstad told the
council many developing
nations face "an unsustain-
able inflow" of medical
trash and "a considerable
increase in the export of
hazardous waste" from
wealthy countries.
In August, Amnesty
International said thousands
of people in Ivory Coast
still await compensation
for illness caused by toxic
waste illegally exported
from Amsterdam in a tank-
er chartered by Trafigura
Beheer BV in 2006.
Rich nations typically
generate up to 13 pounds
per person a year of hazard-
ous medical wastes, accord-
ing to the World Health


Organization, while lower-
income countries produce
up to 6.6 pounds.
WHO says millions of
cases of hepatitis and tens
of thousands of HIV infec-
tions could be prevented
each year if syringe needles
were disposed of safely
instead of getting reused
without sterilization. It says
radioactive medical waste
killed four people in Brazil
in 1988, and similar acci-
dents occurred before then
in Algeria, Mexico and
Morocco.
Georgescu noted that
"at times, medical waste is
illegally shipped to other
countries" but more often
it is dumped" illegally or
combined with household
discards. He noted an inci-
dent in 2009 when Brazil
returned 89 containers to
Britain that were shipped as
recyclable plastic, but held
used syringes, condoms
and old medicine.


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Used syringes and needles are piled on the ground under an underpass on the west side of
San Antonio where drug addicts shoot up in this 2008 file photo.


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Missing 5 years, Colorado cat

shows up on New York street


Associated Press
NEW YORK A calico
cat named Willow, who
disappeared from a home
near the Rocky Mountains
five years ago, was found
Wednesday on a Manhattan
street and will soon be
returned to a family in
which two of the three kids
and one of the two dogs
may remember her.
How she got to New York,
more than 1,600 miles away,
and the kind of life she lived
in the city are mysteries.
But thanks to a micro-
chip implanted when she
was a kitten, Willow will be
reunited in Colorado with
her owners, who had long
ago given up hope.
"To be honest, there
are tons of coyotes around
here, and owls," said Jamie
Squires, of Boulder. "She
was just a little thing, five


and a half pounds. We put
out the 'Lost Cat' posters
and the Craigslist thing, but
we actually thought she'd
been eaten by coyotes."
Squires and her hus-
band, Chris, were "shocked
and astounded" when they
got a call Wednesday from
Animal Care & Control,
which runs New York City's
animal rescue and shelter
system.
Willow had been found
on East 20th Street by a
man who took her to a shel-
ter.
"My husband said, 'Don't
say anything to the kids yet.
We have to make sure,'"
Squires said. "But then we
saw the picture, and it was
Willow. It's been so long."
ACC Executive Director
Julie Bank said a scanner
found the microchip that
led to the Squires family.


Student dies from

allergic reaction


Associated Press
KENNESAW, Ga. -
The Georgia Bureau of
Investigation says an
autopsy determined that a
20-year-old Kennesaw State
University student died
from an allergic reaction.
Tyler Cody Davis of
Marietta died Aug. 18 after
eating at the campus din-
ing hall. University officials
say Davis returned there in
distress, and Cobb County
emergency responders


were summoned.
Emergency workers
treated the third-year stu-
dent, who was pronounced
dead after being transport-
ed to WellStar Kennestone
Hospital.
GBI spokesman John
Bankhead said Tuesday
additional tests were done
to determine the cause of
death. He said test results
indicate the student died
from anaphylaxis, a severe
allergic reaction.


"All our pets are micro-
chipped," Squires said. "If
I could microchip my kids,
I would."
The children are 17, 10
and 3 years old, so the older
two remember Willow,
Squires said. As for the
3-year-old, "She saw the-
photo and said, 'She's a
pretty cat.'"


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Lake City Reporter


Story ideas?

Contact
Tim Kirby
Sports Editor
754-0421
tknrby@iakecityreportercom


SPORTS


Thursday, September 15, 201 I


www.lakecityreporter.com


Section B


BRIEFS

SEMINOLES
Seminole Club
gathering today
The Lake City
Seminole Club has a
get-together today at
Tailgators. Keith Jones is
guest speaker.
For details, call Norbie
Ronsonet at 752-2180.
YOUTH BASEBALL
Lake City
sign-up today
Lake City Columbia
County Youth Baseball
registration for the fall
season is 5-8 p.m. today
and Friday and 10 a.m.
to 4 p.m. Saturday at
Southside Recreation
Complex. Register online
at LCCCYB.com.
For details, call Tad
Cervantes at 365-4810.
CHS BASKETBALL
Meeting for Boys
and Girls today
Columbia High's boys
and girls basketball team
will be holding a
meeting for potential
players during the 2011
season. Coach Horace
Jefferson and Tera Perry
will be on hand to answer
any questions. The meet-
ing takes place in the CHS
auditorium at 6 p.m. today.

RUNNING
Cancer run wi!!
honor BettyKooin
Chomp Cancer
Foundation is hosting
the Chomp Cancer Run/
Walk at the Fort White
Community Center on
Oct 15. The raqe is in
honor of Betty Koon of
Fort White. Cost for the
5K is $25, and there will
be food, music and a
silent auction from
9-10:30 a.m. Sponsorship
opportunities are offered.
All proceeds will benefit
the UF & Shands Cancer
Center. Registration
online at www.active.com.
For details, e-mail
Lauren Valentine at
chompcancer@gmail. com.
From staff reports

GAMES

Today
Columbia High
swimming at Clay High
with Ridgewood High,
4 p.m.
Columbia High girls
golf vs. Eastside High
at Ironwood Golf Club,
4 p.m.
Columbia High boys
golf vs. 'Union County
High at Quail Heights
Country Club, 4 p.m.
Fort White High
volleyball vs. Keystone
Heights High, 6 p.m.
(JV-5)
Columbia High JV
football at Dunnellon
High, 7 p.m.
Friday
Columbia High
football vs. Buchholz
High, 7:30 p.m.
Fort White High
football at Taylor County
High, 7:30 p.m.
Columbia High
volleyball in Bell
tournament, TBA
Saturday
Columbia High
girls cross country in
Katie Caples Invitational
at Bishop Kenny High,
7 a.m.
Fort White High
cross country at Lincoln
Invitational, TBA


Columbia High
volleyball in Bell
tournament, TBA


Barber is



CHS QB


Junior to get
start as Atkinson
moves to WR.
By BRANDON FINLEY
bfinley@lakecityreporter.com
After a sluggish start to
the 2010 football season,
Columbia High coach" Brian
Allen is making changes.
The first-year coach named
Jayce Barber the starting
quarterback for the Tigers
on Friday against Buchholz
High.
Barber replaces Nigel
Atkinson, who will move
to a starting wide receiver
role, after the Tigers failed
to score an offensive touch-
down in its first-two games.
"We need a spark,"


Allen said. "Nigel might
provide that with the ball
in his hands and Jayce is
good enough to let us put
another player out there at
receiver. We needed to
shake it up."
Despite taking snaps at
quarterback full time in the
fall, Atkinson had enough
practice in the spring and
summer to step right in
against Buchholz.
"He'll be the starter,"
Allen said. "He's prepared
enough for it this summer
to have the ability to do
that. Quarterback was a
heated battle and I made
clear that all positions were
open. Nigel won it over the
summer. He was disap-
pointed for sure, but he's
come out to practice and


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter,
Columbia High's Jayce Barber breaks free for the Tigers during the fourth quarter of Friday's
game against Gainesville High.


hasn't slowed down." "He can be a deep threat,"
Allen also believes that Allen said. "He can take it
Atkinson can be a danger in off the jet sweep. He can
all facets of the offense. run the wildcat. He can do a


ton of things. He's the most
athletic person on that side
of the football. We want to
see him do some things."


CHS digs into Lady Indians


Lady Tigers sweep

Fort White Wednesday


Columbia High's Kelbie Ronsonet goes
White High on Wednesday.


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
up for a kill during the Lady Tigers' win against Fort


By BRANDON FINLEY
bfinley@lakecityreporter. corn
In the first-hal,'of the'
annual series between
Columbia and Fort White
high schools it was the Lady
Tigers coming out on top
with a three-set win against
the Lady Indians.
Columbia won the match
25-23, 25-23 and 25-19 in
the final.
In a back-and-forth
match, Columbia had
the early lead in the first
.game. Fort White battle
back before taking a 21-18
lead late before the Lady
Tigers won four of the
next six points to take the
game.
The Lady Indians jumped
out to an 8-2 lead in the
second game, but Columbia
battled back to take a 17-16
lead. Fort White wasn't able
to rally and Columbia again
rallied for the win.
"Last night we came out
flat against Bradford and
won, but tonight we came
out with a lot of energy,"
Fort White coach Doug
Wohlstein said. "We just
have to give credit to CHS.
They kind of beat us. I'm
looking forward to the
rematch. We had a couple


of stumbles and I think it
ended up being the differ-
ence."
'Fort White was led by
Ali Wrench with 13 assists.
Lync6 Stalnaker led in kills
with four and Emily Roach
led with two aces.
Columbia was led by
Ashleigh Bridges with 15
digs. Jessie Bates led in
assists with 19 in the match.
Kelbie Ronsonet had seven
kills and three blocks to
lead in both categories.
"I'm very proud of all
the girls," Columbia coach
Rebecca Golden said. "It
took each and every won of
them to pull out the win. It
was an excellent game."
The Lady Tigers improve
to 4-3 (1-0, district) on the
season while Fort White
falls to 3-3 (2-1, district). The
Lady Indians beat Bradford
High 25-21, 25-27, 25-16 and
25-15 on Tuesday.
Fort White hosts
Keystone Heights High at
6 p.m. tonight. Columbia
will play in the Bell
Invitational starting Friday
against Union County High'
at 5 p.m. The Lady Tigers
will play Williston High
at 8 p.m. Friday and Bell
High at 8:30 a.m. on
Saturday.


Indians on



road again


-A
.









JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Fort White High's Soron Williams (21) scrambles to escape tackles from Newberry High
defenders in a game on Sept. 9.


Fort White looks
for turnaround
against Bulldogs.
By TIM KIRBY
tkirby@lakecityreporter.com
FORT WHITE Due
to the switchover in dis-
trict alignments, Fort White
High's football team will
travel to Taylor County
High two years in a row.
Now in different dis-
tricts, the Indians play the
Bulldogs at 7:30 p.m. Friday
in Perry.
The two teams were in
District 2-2B for the last two
years. Taylor County won
the district last year and


Fort White was runner-up.
In 2009, Taylor County was
district runner-up to Florida
High.
The Bulldogs were unde-
feated last year and beat
Walton High in the first
round of the playoffs. Like'
Fort White, Taylor County
was eliminated by Pensacola
Catholic High.
Fort White and Taylor'
County will be playing for
the ninth straight year.
Fort White won the initial
meeting in 2003. but Taylor
County won the next three.
After Dl)emetric Jackson
took over at Fort White, the
Indians won two straight in
INDIANS continued on 2B












LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 15, 2011


TELEVISION

TV sports

Today
AUTO RACING
9 p.m.
SPEED TORC, Off Road Jam, at
Joliet, III. (same-day tape)
COLLEGE FOOTBALL
8 p.m.
ESPN LSU at Mississippi St.
GOLF
8:30 a.m.
TGC European PGA Tour, Seve
Trrophy, first round, at Paris
12:30 p.m.
TGC LPGA, Navistar Classic, first
[,ound, at Prattville.Ala.
r, 3 p.m.
TGC PGA Tour, BMW
Championship, first round, at Lemont, III.
6:30 p.m.
TGC Nationwide Tour. Boise Open,
,,first round, at Boise, Idaho (same-day
Iape)
MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL
7 p.m.
MLB Regional coverage, Tampa
*Bay at Boston OR Cleveland at Texas
(8 p.m. start)
PREP FOOTBALL
10 p.m.
FSN Chandler (Ariz.) at Basha
(Ariz.)
WNBA BASKETBALL
8 p.m.
ESPN2 Playoffs, first round, game I,
NewYork at Indiana
10 p.m.
ESPN2 Playoffs, first round, game I,
iPhoenix at Seattle


BASEBALL

AL standings

East Division
W L Pct GB
NewYork 90 57 .612 -
Boston 86 62 .581 4h'
'Tampa Bay 82 65 .558 8
Toronto 75 74 .503 16
Baltimore 59 88 .401 31
Central Division
W L Pct GB
Detroit 87 62 .584 -
,Cleveland 72 73 .497 13
Chicago 73 75 ,493 13'h
Kansas City 64 86 .427 23h'
Minnesota 59 89 .399 27'%
West Division
W L Pct GB
. Texas 84' 64 .568 -
Los Angeles 82 67 .550 2h'
Oakland 67 82 .450 17'%
Seattle 61 87 .412 23
Tuesday's Games
Baltimore 4,Tampa Bay 2
Boston 18,Toronto 6
Texas 10. Cleveland 4
Detroit 5, Chicago White Sox 0
Kansas City 4, Minnesota 0
LAAngels 6, Oakland 3
N.Y.Yankees 3, Seattle 2
Wednesday's Games
Toronto 5, Boston 4
Detroit 6, ChicagoWhie Sax 5,10 kv*gs
LA.Angels 4, Oakland I
Kansas City 7, Minnesota 3
Cleveland at Texas (n)
Tampa Bay at Baltimore (n)
N.Y.Yankees at Seattle (n)
Today's Games
Tampa Bay (Hellickson 12-10) at
Boston (Weiland 0-1), 7:10 p.m.
Cleveland (Carmona 6-14) at Texas
(Ogando 12-8), 8:05 p.m.
Chicago White Sox (Buehrle 11-8) at
Kansas City (Francis 5-16), 8:10 p.m.
Detroit (Scherzer 14-8) at Oakland
(McCarthy 8-8), 10:05 p.m.
Friday's Games
LA.Angels at Baltimore, 7:05 p.m.
N.Y.Yankees at Toronto, 7:07 p.m.
Tampa Bay at Boston, 7:10 p.m.
Chicago White Sox at Kansas City,
P:10 p.m.
Cleveland at Minnesota, 8:10 p.m.
Detroit at Oakland, 10:05 p.m.
"'- Texas at Seattle, 10:10 p.m.
V.
NL standings
' i
East Division
W L Pct GB
Philadelphia 94 51 .648 -
SAtlanta 85 64 .570 II
.'New York 71 77 .480 24h'
.Washington 69 77 '.473 25k%
'.Florida 67 80 .456 28
Central Division
W L Pct GB
tMilwaukee 87 62 .584 -
'.St. Louis 80 68 .541 6h
-Cincinnati 72 76 .486 l41
pittsburgh 67 81 .453 19',
Chicago 65 83 .439 21'A
'Houston s51 97 .345 35'/a
West Division
', W L Pct GB
.Arizona 87 62 .584 -
San Francisco 78 70 .527 8k
SLos Angeles 72 75 .490 14
Colorado 69 78 .469" 17
'San Diego 63 86 .423 24
Tuesday's Games
St. Louis 6, Pittsburgh 4
Cincinnati 2, Chicago Cubs I
Atlanta 7, Florida I
Washington 3, N.Y. Mets 2
,. Houston 5, Philadelphia 2
SMilwaukee 2, Colorado 1,I 11 innings
SArizona 5, LA. Dodgers 4, 10 innings
San Francisco 3, San Diego 2, 12
innings
i Wednesday's Games
Atlanta 4, Florida I
St. Louis 3, Pittsburgh 2
Philadelphia I, Houston 0
San Francisco 3, San Diego I
Chicago Cubs at Cincinnati (n)
Washington at N.Y. Mets (n)
Colorado at Milwaukee (n)
,. Arizona at LA. Dodgers (n)


Today's Games
Washington (Milone 0-0) at N.Y. Mets
(Schwinden 0-1), 1:10 p.m.
Florida (Ahi.Sanchez 8-7) at
Philadelphia (K.Kendrick 7-6), 2:35 p.m.,
I st game
Chicago Cubs (R.Wells 7-4) at
Cincinnati (H.Balley 8-7), 7:10 p.m.
Florida (Sanabla 0-0) at Philadelphia
(CI.Lee 16-7), 7:35 p.m., 2nd game
San Francisco (Vogelsong 10-7) at
Colorado (Chacin I-I 1 I), 8:40 p.m.
Pittsburgh (Ohlendorf 0-2) at L.A.


Dodgers (Eveland 2-0), 10:10 p.m.
Friday's Games
Houston at Chicago Cubs, 2:20 p.m.
Florida at Washington, 7:05 p.m.
St. Louis at Philadelphia, 7:05 p.m.
Milwaukee at Cincinnati, 7:10 p.m.
N.Y. Mets at Atlanta, 7:35 p.m.
San Francisco at Colorado, 8:10'p.m.
Arizona at San Diego, 10:05 p.m.
Pittsburgh at L.A. Dodgers, 10:1 p.m.

FOOTBALL

NFL schedule

AMERICAN CONFERENCE


East
W L
New England I 0
Buffalo I 0
N.Y.jets I 0
Miami 0 I
South
W L
Houston I 0
Jacksonville I 0
Tennessee 0 I
Indianapolis 0 I
North
W L
Baltimore I 0
Cincinnati I 0
Cleveland 0 I
Pittsburgh 0 I
West
W L T
San Diego I 0
Oakland I 0
Denver 0 I
Kansas City 0 I


TPct PF I
01.00038 :2
01.00041
01.00027 :
0.000 24 :

T Pct PF I
01.00034
01.00016
0.000 14
0.000 7 1

T Pct, PF I
01.00035
01.00027
0.000 17
0.000 7

Pct PF PA
01.00024
01.00023
0.000 20
0.000 7


NATIONAL CONFERENCE
East
W L TPct PF PA
Washington I 0 01.00028 14
Philadelphia I 0 01.00031 13.
Dallas 0 I 0.000 24 27
N.Y. Giants 0 I 0.000 14 28
South
W L T Pct PF PA
New Orleans 0 I 0.000 34 42
Tampa Bay 0 I 0.000 20 27
Carolina 0 I 0.00021 28
Atlanta 0 I 0.000 12 30
North
W L TPct PF PA
Chicago I 0 01.00030 12
Detroit I 0 01.00027 20
Green Bay I 0 01.00042 34
Minnesota 0 I 0.000 17 24
West
W L TPct PF PA
San Francisco I 0 01.00033 17
Arizona 1 0 01.00028 21
St. Louis 0 I 0.000 13 31
Seattle 0 I 0.000 17 33
Sunday
Chicago at New Orleans, I p.m.
Baltimore at Tennessee, I p.m.
Tampa Bay at Minnesota, I p.m.
Kansas City at Detroit, I p.m.
Jacksonville at N.Y. Jets. I p.m.
Oakland at Buffalo. I p.m.
Arizona at Washington, I p.m.
Seattle at Pittsburgh. I p.m.
Green Bay at Carolina. I p.m.
Cleveland at Indianapolis. I p.m.
Dallas at San Francisco, 4:05 p.m.
Cincinnati at Denver, 4:15 p.m.
Houston at Miami, 4:15 p.m.
San Diego at New England, 4:15 p.m.
Philadelphia at Atlanta, 8:20 p.m.
Monday
St. Louis at N.Y. Giants, 8:30 p.m.

Top 25 games

Today
No. 3 LSU at No. 25 Mississippi State,
8 p.m.
Friday
No. 4 Boise State at Toledo, 8 p.m.
Saturday
No. I Oklahoma at No. 5 Florida
State, 8 p.m.
No. 2 Alabama vs. North Texas,
7:30 p.m.
No. 6 Stanfordat Arizona, 10:45 p.m.
No. 7 Wisconsin vs. Northern Illinois
at Chicago, 3:30 p.m.
No. 8 Oklahoma State at Tulsa,
10 p.m.
No. 9 Texas A&M vs. Idaho. 7 p.m.
No. 10 South Carolina vs. Navy, 6 p.m.
No. 11 Nebraska vs. Washington,
3:30 p.m.
No. 12 Oregon vs. Missouri State.
3:30 p.m.
No. 13 Virginia Tech vs.Arkansas State,
4 p.m.
No. 14 Arkansas vs.Troy, 7:30 p.m.
No. 15 Michigan State at Notre Dame,
3:30 p.m.
No. 16 Florida vs. Tennessee,
3:30 p.m.
No. 17 Ohio State at Miami,
7:30 p.m.
No. 18 West Virginia at Maryland,
Noon
No. 19 Baylor vs. Stephen F. Austin,
7 p.m.
No. 20 South Florida vs. Florida
A&M, 7 p.m.




Unscramble these four Jumbles,
one letter to each square,
to form four ordinary words.

RMFUO I


No. 21 Auburn at Clemson, Noon
No. 22 Arizona State at Illinois, 7 p.m.
No. 23 TCU vs. Louisiana-Monroe,
2 p.m.
No. 23 Texas at UCLA, 3:30 p.m.


BASKETBALL

WNBA playoffs

CONFERENCE SEMIFINALS
(Best-of-3)
Eastern Conference
Indiana vs. NewYork
Today
NewYork at Indiana, 8 p.m.
Saturday
Indiana at New York, 4 p.m.
Monday
x-New York at Indiana, 8 p.m.
Connecticut vs.Atlanta
Friday
Atlanta at Connecticut, 7 p.m.
Sunday
Connecticut at Atlanta, 3 p.m.
Western Conference
Minnesota vs. San Antonio
Friday
San Antonio at Minnesota, 9 p.m.
Sunday
Minnesota at San Antonio, 5 p.m.
Seattle vs. Phoenix
Today
Phoenix at Seattle, 10 p.m.
Saturday
Seattle at Phoenix, 10 p.m.
Monday
x-Phoenix at Seattle, 10 p.m.
x-if necessary


AUTO RACING

Race week

NASCAR
SPRINT CUP
GEICO 400
Site:Joliet, III.
Schedule: Friday. practice (ESPN2,
2-3:30 p.m.; Speed, 6-7:30 p.m.); Saturday,
qualifying (Speed, 1:30-3 p.m.); Sunday,
race. 2 p.m. (ESPN, 1-5:30 p.m.).
Track: Chicagoland Speedway (tri-oval,
1.5 miles).
Race distance: 400.5 miles, 267 laps.
Next race: Sylvania 300, Sept. 25, New
Hampshire Motor Speedway, Loudon,
N.H.
Online: http://www.nascar.com
NATIONWIDE
DOLLAR GENERAL 300
Site: Joliet, III.
Schedule: Friday. practice (Speed,
4:30-6 p.m.); Saturday. qualifying (Speed,
noon-1:30 p.m.), race, 3:30 p.m. (ESPN2,
3-6 p.m.).
Track Chicagoland Speedway.
Race distance: 300 miles. 200 laps.
Next race: OneMain Financial 200.
Oct. I, Dover International Speedway,
Dover, Del.
CAMPING WORLD TRUCK
FAST FIVE 225
Site: Joliet. III.
Schedule: Friday, practice,
qualifying (Speed, 3:30-4:30 p.m.). race.
8 p.m. (Speed, 7:30-10:30 p.m.).
Track: Chlcagoland Speedway.
Race distance: 225 miles, 15O laps.
Next race: FW. Webb 175, Sept.
24, New Hampshire Motor Speedway,
Loudon, N.H.
INDYCAR
INDY JAPAN 300
Site: Motegi, Japan.
Schedule: Friday, practice; Saturday,
practice, qualifying; Sunday, race, 12:05 a.m.
(Versus, Saturday, 11:30 p.m.-2 a.m.).
Track:Twin Ring Motegi (road course,
2.983 miles).
Race distance: 187.9 miles.,63 laps.
Next race: Kentucky Indy 300, Oct. 2,
Kentucky Speedway, Sparta, Ky.
Online: httpJ/www.indycar.com
NHRA FULLTHROTTLE
O'REILLY AUTO PARTS
NATIONALS
Site: Concord. N.C.
Schedule: Friday, qualifying; Saturday,
qualifying (ESPN2, Sunday, 12:30-2 a.m.),
Sunday, final eliminations (ESPN2, 8:30-
11:30 p.m.).
Track: zMAX Dragway.
Next event:Texas Fall Nationals, Sept.
23-25,Texas Motorplex, Ennis,Texas.
Online: http://www.nhra.com
FORMULA ONE
Next race: Singapore Grand Prix, Sept.
25, Marina Bay Street Circuit. Singapore.
Online: http://www.fbrmula .com
OTHER RACES
AMERICAN LE MANS SERIES:
ModSpace American Le Mans Monterey,
Saturday (ESPN2, Sunday, 1-3 p.m.), Mazda
Raceway Laguna Seca, Monterey, Calif.
Online: http://www.americonlemans.com
GRAND-AM ROLEX SPORTS CAR
SERIES: EMCO Gears Classic, Saturday
(Speed, 3-6 p.m.), Mid-Ohio Sports Car
Course, Lexington, Ohio. Online: http://
www.grand-om.com

THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME
by David L. Hoyt and Jeff Knurek


Answer: A L I I L I

(Answers tomorrow)
Yesterday's Jumbles: SWOON VISOR EFFECT PURELY
I Answer: Double faulting resulted in this for the tennis
star A NET LOSS


Little League Football Jamboree


From staff reports


Lake City Recreation Department's Little
League Football Jamboree is Saturday at
Memorial Stadium.
Admission is $2 (ages 5 and younger
free) and the concession stand will be
open.
Stephen Jones will give the invocation
and sing the National Anthem, starting at
8:20 a.m.
Each team will play one 15-minute quar-
ter, with the following schedule:
8:30 a.m. Brian's Sports Wildcats


vs. Lions;
9:15 a.m. -Annie Mattox Park Eagles
vs. Glen Presley's Richardson Wolves;
10 a.m. Tiner Insurance Seminoles
vs. G & K Nursery Panthers;
10:45 a.m. Hunt's Aluminum
Jaguars vs. Indian Braves;
11:30 a.m. Townsend Timber
Inc. Tigers vs. Restoration Specialists
Hurricanes;
12:15 p.m. Martin Orthodontics
Bears vs. Ron David Plastering Cowboys;
1 p.m. Hunter Printing Gators vs.
Townsend Timber Inc. Tigers.


AMERICAN LEGION HOLD 'EM


COURTESY PHOTO
The monthly Texas Hold 'em fundraiser for veterans and children in Columbia County was
Sept. 9 at American Legion Post 57. Seventeen players participated and winners were:
Ron Durham, second place (from left); Johanna Esposito, third place; Brent Maltby, first
place. It was the 15th fundraiser and almost $7,000 has been raised.


Week three winners/ first; Bobby Brownell, sec- Debbie Stewart, fourth;
qualifiers in the American ond; Frank Capallia, third; I Sept. 10 Jim
Legion Post 57 Texas Stephan Jolley, fourth; Grimsley, first; Terry
Hold 'em Champions 0 Sept. 8'- Ron Lubas, Newth, second; Todd
Tournament first; Corey Capallia, sec- Yaxley, third; Irene Cook,
U Sept. 5-- John Farrell, ond; Martin Woods, third; fourth.




INDIANS: Baker a key for Fort White


Continued From Page 11


2007-08. After the last two
years, Taylor County leads
the series 5-3.
Last year's meeting fea-
tured two outstanding rushing
performance from seniors. JR
Dixon carried 26 times for 152
yards and a touchdown. Tony
Jackson rushed for 177 yards
on 16 carries.
Fort White quarterback
Andrew Baker was 7-of-12
passing for 110 yards with
a 53-yard touchdown pass


ACROSS
1 Dance band
6 Construction
rod
11 Poker stakes
12 BP
acquisition
13 Isolated
15 Talisman
16 Skoal and
cheers
18 Vane dir.
19 Nothing at all
21. Green parrot
22 noire
23 Name in
cheesecake
25 eBay milieu
28 Covered with
water
30 Diamond -
31 Period
32 Family mem.
33 Do the wrong
thing
35 Guitar sound
37 Uninteresting
38 Blurted out
40 Purple flower


41
42
43

46
48

50
54

55

56

57


to Donnell Sanders. A.J.
Legree and Trey Phillips
each had three 'catches.
Baker added a six-yard
touchdown run.
Eli Grambling and
William Wentworth each
threw two touchdown
passes for Taylor County.
Wentworth was a senior,
but Grambling is back with
the Bulldogs. Also back are
James Strawter and Raydon
Parker, who had touchdown


Safari animal
Potato bud
"Road movie"
locale
Greek sea
Not on the
beach
Long bouts
Like many a
King novel
Big Dipper
neighbor
Writer Franz

Legally
Impede

DOWN


1 Lo---
2 Lennon's
wife
3 reon fant,,re


receptions.
In addition to the last
two playoff seasons, the
Bulldogs have made nine
other trips to the playoffs.
The first came in 1968.
Taylor County won
a Class 2A state champi-
onship in 1997, beating
Clewiston High in the final.
In 1977, the Bulldogs
were Class 3A runners-up
to Bartow High, which was
coached by Paul Quinn.


Answer to Previous Puzzle


EI ET D E PUTY
IMAGES AP OG EE
DANGLE MIS HA P


A D L P N AVE
ULX T E E AGENA
RNA BRA PESTS
YCRA RVS TRI
CATER LOG REF
NOV 1ST R YE
ORB EVE
RUCKUS RAPIDS
IMPEDE SNORER
I M P ARDEN STEWS 0 R E
G. A R. D. E. I^ S NL T _W


4 Ladybugs and 9 Unreturnable
scarabs serves
5 Fjord port 10 By heart
6 Plows into 14 Wild oxen of
7 "Down under" Tibet
bird 15 Video game
8 Tree trunk pioneer


Want more puzzles?
Check out the "Just Right Crossword Puzzles" books
at QuillDrlverBooks.com


17 Signet maker
(2 wds.)
19 More modern
20 Venice's place
22 Shakespeare,
for example
24 Elev.
25 Tired
26, Comedian -
Kovacs
27 Luggage
29 Bucks and
toms
34 Stormed
about
36 Hot dogs
39 Country-club
fees
43 Expose to
danger
44 Cuzco
founder
45 Viking name
46 Novelist -
Seton
47 White House
staffer
49 Noah's vessel
51 B-movie
pistol
52 Kind of
system
53 Make soaking
wet


2011 UFS, Dist. by Universal Uclick for UFS


SCOREBOARD


Page Editor: Tim Kirby, 754-0421










LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 15, 2011


Sunshine state center of football world


By RALPH D. RUSSO
Associated Press

At the 2001 Orange Bowl,
Oklahoma ended one of the
greatest runs in college
football history when the
Sooners beat Florida State
to win the national champi-
onship.:
The Seminoles haven't
been serious title contend-
ers since that 13-2 loss in
Miami.
On Saturday night at
Doak .Campbell Stadium,
No. 5 Florida State can
change that against the
latest top-ranked Sooners
team.
Beat OU, and it'll feel
just like the not-so-old days
at Florida State, when the
road to the national title
always seemed to run
through Tallahassee.
"It'll be a measur-
ing stick," second-year
Seminoles coach Jimbo
Fisher said. "It's not the
season, but it can be a great
building block."
Over the last 10 years,
the Seminoles have played
in two Atlantic Coast
Conference title games and
a couple BCS bowls. But
during the final decade of
the Bobby Bowden era,
Florida State never could
recapture the success of
the 1980s and '90s.
From 1987-2000, Florida
State won at least 10 games
every season and never lost
more than two. The 'Noles
finished ranked no worse
than fifth in the AP poll
for 14 straight seasons, won
two national championships
and two other times played
in a bowl with a chance to
finish No. 1.
Their regular-season
games with rivals Miami
and Florida were often
national championship
elimination matches.
Florida State-Oklahoma
has potential to be one of
those games.
Both teams are talented,
but the Sooners are the
nationally known quantity.
Much of this team, including
quarterback Landry Jones
and All-America receiver
Ryan Broyles, returned from
last season's squad that won
the Big 12 and finished No.


at Birmingham in Gainesville Saturday.
.. .4








JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Florida's Trey Burton runs down the sideline for extra yardage during the Gators' 39-0 win against the University of Alabama
at Birmingham in Gainesville Saturday.


6 in the country.
While coach Bob Stoops'
Sooners came into this sea-
son with a strong case to
back up their No. 1 ranking.
Florida State's No. 6 rank-
ing to start the season was
more of a leap of faith.
Florida State won 10
games last season for the
first time since 2003. But
the Seminoles didn't even
win the Atlantic Coast
Conference and came into
this season with a new full-
time starting quarterback
in EJ Manuel.
The Seminoles are good,
but after beating Louisiana-
Monroe and Charleston
Southern the first two
weeks of the season, no one
yet knows how good.
Last season, Florida State
clearly wasn't ready to step
up in class when it went to


Norman, Okla. The Sooners
pounded the Seminoles 47-
17.
Oklahoma can put that
Florida State return to glory
on hold again Saturday
night.
The picks:
Today
No. 3 LSU (minus 3/')
at No. 25 Mississippi
State
The Tigers have won 11
straight against Bulldogs ...
LSU 28-23.
Friday
No. 4 Boise State
(minus 17'1) at Toledo
After narrow miss at Ohio
State, Rockets step up com-
petition ... BOISE STATE
41-21.
Saturday
No. 1 Oklahoma
(minus 31/.) at No. 5
Florida State


Not quite, 'Noles ...
OKLAHOMA 31-23.
North Texas (minus
46) at No. 2 Alabama
Looks like QB A.J.
McCarron's job to lose for
Tide ... ALABAMA 55-7
No. 6 Stanford (minus
10) at Arizona
Win this one and
Cardinal's schedule sets
up nicely for 7-0 start ...
STANFORD 35-21.
No. 7 Wisconsin
(minus 16'/2)vs. Northern
Illinois at Chicago
New UNI coach Dave
Doeren was Badgers D-
coordinator ... WISCONSIN
38-17.
No. 8 Oklahoma State
(minus 14) at Tulsa
Can anyone slow down
Cowboys WR Justin
Blackmon? ... OKLAHOMA
STATE 45-28.


Idaho (plus 36'k) at
No. 9 Texas A&M
Aggies getting ready
for home game against
Oklahoma State ... TEXAS
A&M 58-17.
Navy (plus 181,) at No.
10 South Carolina
Middies can be pesky ...
SOUTH CAROLINA 35-20.
Washington (plus 16'/2
) at No. 11 Nebraska
Again! ... NEBRASKA
34-21
Missouri State (no
line) at No. 12 Oregon
Ducks QB Darron
Thomas threw six TD pass-
es last week ... OREGON
58-3.
Arkansas State (plus
24) at No. 13 Virginia
Tech
Red Wolves coming off
47-3 win vs. Memphis ...
VIRGINIA TECH 35-17.


Troy (plus 23%/1) at No.
14 Arkansas
Hogs might give QB
Tyler Wilson (concussion
symptoms) some rest ...
ARKANSAS 48-20.
No. 15 Michigan
State (minus 5) at Notre
Dame
Spartans 2-0; Irish 0-2.
Irish favored? ... NOTRE
DAME 31-24.
Tennessee (plus 9A) at
No. 16 Florida
Urban Meyer owned
Vols. What about Will
Muschamp? ... FLORIDA
28-21.
No. 17 Ohio State
(plus 2) at Miami
Instead of marching
bands, halftime show will
be reading of NCAA rule
book ... MIAMI 23-17.
No. 18 West Virginia
(plus 1) at Maryland
Those Terps' uniforms
look much better when they
win ... WEST VIRGINIA
28-24.
Stephen F. Austin (no
line) at No. 19 Baylor
Could end up as confer-
ence rivals the way things
are going ... BAYLOR
55-14.
Florida A&M (no line)
at No. 20 South Florida
Could end up as confer-
ence rivals the way things
are going ... USF 38-7.
No. 21 Auburn (plus
3'%) at Clemson
One team finds ways to
win; the other, ways to lose
... AUBURN 27-24.
No. 22 Arizona State
(plus 1) at Illinois
If Sun Devils want to be
taken seriously, win this
one ... ARIZONA STATE
28-24.
Louisiana-Monroe
(plus 28%A) at No. 23
TCU
Horned Frogs have won
nine straight home openers
... TCU 45-14.
No. 23 Texas (minus
3'1) at UCLA
Longhorns.. visit .Pac-12.
Will they come back? ...
TEXAS 31-21.

Last week's record: 18-
2 (straight); 11-5-1 (vs.
spread).
Last week's record: 39-
4 (straight); 21-13-1 (vs.
spread).


Deep field gives NASCAR a wide open Chase


By JENNA FRYER
Associated Press

CHICAGO This could
finally be the year Kyle
Busch, he of all that raw
talent and ability, will win
NASCAR's highest honor.
Of course, everybody
said the same thing in 2008,
when he won eight races
and opened the Chase for
the Sprint Cup champi-
onship as the top seed in
the 10-race series. Busch
instead opened that Chase
with back-to-back clunkers
and never contended,
Here he is again, though,
headed into Round 1 of the
Chase as the top seed and
the early favorite to claim
the Sprint Cup title.
It's not that simple,
though.
This year's Chase field
is arguably the deepest to
date, and this year's cham-
pionship is actually up for
grabs.
"It's not somebody's
race," said Busch this week,
"it's anybody's race."
If that wasn't already evi-
dent, it was made crystal
clear last week at Richmond
in the final Chase qualify-
ing race. Busch had the
strongest car until a tire
problem took him out of
contention. Then it became
Jeff Gordon's race to lose,
which he did on a late
restart when Kevin Harvick
seized the victory with Carl
Edwards right behind him.
Harvick's win tied him
with Busch for a series-best
four victories, and proved
that every time Busch tries
to pull away from the com-
petition, his rivals find a
way to even it up.
And the most overlooked


ASSOCIATED PRESS
NASCAR Sprint Cup driver Jeff Gordon celebrates winning the AdvoCare 500 at Atlanta Motor Speedway on Tuesday in
Hampton, Ga.


guy in this Chase?. Well,
that's Jimmie Johnson. The
five-time defending champi-
on, who, by the way, doesn't
plan on handing his title
over without a fight. Nobody
has figured out how to beat
Johnson since Kurt Busch
and Tony Stewart took the
first two Chase titles. Since
then, Johnson has collected
five championships, includ-
ing last year when he ral-
lied late to withstand Denny
Hamlin's challenge.
Johnson has 19 Chase
victories in eight appear-
ances, and an average fin-
ish of 8.1 -- much better,
by a lot, than any driver.
He knows how to turn it


up when everything is on
the line, and he shouldn't
be dismissed because he's
got just one victory this sea-
son.
He believes he's a con-
tender.
"We're certainly hopeful
for a sixth," he said. "We
are obviously in a good spot
right now. We've proven to
ourselves time and time
again what we are capable
of and looking forward to
this year's challenge."
Right there with him
is Hendrick Motorsports
teammate Gordon, who
waged the most incredible
title race "to date against
Johnson in 2007. Gordon


was almost perfect that
season, but still couldn't
keep pace when Johnson
switched it to a higher
gear.
Gordon has been trying
to add a fifth championship
to his resume since collect-
ing No. 4 in 2001, and he
thinks his chances are bet-
ter than they were in 2007.
A three-time winner this
season, he probably could
have five or six wins had
things gone differently at
Indianapolis, Bristol and
Richmond.
"I feel like we've got more
momentum going into the
Chase," Gordon said. "I
feel like our team is really,


really strong. I feel like in
'07, while we gave Jimmie a
great run and a great battle,
I still feel like they had the
momentum. And were out-
running us just by a little bit
on a regular basis.
"We're competing with
everybody out there right
now, and lately I feel like
we've been better than most
on a lot of different types of
race tracks."
There's also Edwards and
Ilarvick, who at different
times this season seemed
to be the favorites. Harvick
won three early races, then
struggled through the sum-
mer and took charge late
last month in a lengthy (and


mandatory) Sunday meet-
ing after an abysmal run
at Bristol. He lit a fire at
Richard Childress Racing,
and stormed back into
championship contention
with the Richmond win that
sent a statement to the com-
petition.
Edwards, winner of one
race and the All-Star race,
also dropped off a bit as
the year went on. He led
the standings for 14 weeks,
faded to fourth in points,
but has rallied with three
consecutive top-10 finishes.
His contract negotiations
with Roush Fenway Racing
were wrapped up six weeks
ago, and there are no dis-
tractions standing in his
way.
His teammate, Matt
Kenseth, should not be dis-
counted. The last champion
under the old points system,
he's only contended for a
championship once under
the Chase format, in 2006
when he finished a not-so-
close second to Johnson.
Then came a string of lean
years, but Kenseth bounced
back this season with two
victories.
Kenseth may not win a
Chase race this year, but
his style of staying steady
and collecting top-10 fin-
ishes could just give him
the title.
The next group of drivers
are more dark horses than
serious contenders, and
Brad Keselowski is easily
the most dangerous guy in
the bunch.
He was 28th in the
standings at one point this
season, then turned it up
a notch after breaking
his ankle while testing in
August.


Page Editor: Brandon Finley, 754-0420











Page EdItor: Emogene Graham, 754-0415 LAKE CITY REPORTER ADVICE & COMICS THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 15, 2011


DILBERT


BABY BLUES
WATNT NM APoA1 3LE
FAuMm No0 Pmie,*,094


BEETLE BAILEY


HAGAR THE HORRIBLE


SNUFFY SMITH


ZITS


DEAR ABBY


Sneaking snacks into movies

sets a poor example for kids


DEAR ABBY: I go to
movies occasionally with
my niece "Connie" and
her two kids. Although
the theater has a sign "No
Outside Food or Drinks
Allowed," Connie sneaks
snacks in in her oversized
purse, then doles them out
after the lights go down.
I'm not talking about a
couple of candy bars; she
brings bags of candy, chips
and cans of soda.
While I agree with my
niece that the price of
refreshments is outra-
geous, I also believe it's
the theater operators'
prerogative to set prices
and policy. I suggested
Connie skip the snacks
during the movie and take
the kids out for ice cream
afterward, but she said she
didn't want to "deprive"
them. When I offered
to pay, she said it wasn't
about the money, it was
"the principle, and besides,
"everybody else does it"
I feel my niece is teach-
ing her kids it's OK to
break rules you find '
inconvenient as long as
you can get away with it.
I enjoy the outings with
them so I've dropped the
subject for the sake of
harmony, but it still both-
ers me. I'd love your opin-
ion, PAYING FOR MY
POPCORN IN OREGON
DEAR PAYING: Here
it is: Your thinking is spot
on. Your niece's behavior


Abigail Van Buren
www.deorabby.com
is dishonest, and children
model their behavior on
the example set by their
parents. Connie's excuse
that everybody does it is a
cop-out. Because "every-
one" does something
doesn't make it right.
Theater owners earn a
large portion of their prof-
its not from ticket sales,
but from their concession
stands. I am often struck
by the amount of food I
see purchased before peo-
ple enter a theater large
tubs of popcorn, king-sized
candy bars, bucket-sized
soft drinks and nachos.
What does this say about
us?
If Connie doesn't want to
"deprive" her children, she
should feed them a healthy
meal before they go to the
movie so they won't be
hungry. That's my opinion,
so I'm glad you asked me.

DEAR ABBY: After six
years of marriage I am
seven months pregnant. I
never wanted children and
did not expect this to hap-
pen. I am determined to be
an excellent mother, but


it's an intellectual exercise
for me. I feel nothing for
this baby and I have a hard
time imagining our future.
I also hate being pregnant
I can't find any web-
sites for women like me
- they're filled with women
cooing over their bellies
tnd fantasizing over their
babies-to-be. I mentioned
my feelings (or lack there-
of) to my husband and he
became furious with me.
Is there something wrong
with me? LACKS THE
MOTHERING GENE
DEAR LACKS: No,
there's nothing "wrong"
with you. You're just not
particularly maternal. I'm
sure many women have
felt as you do because
more than half the preg-
nancies in the U.S. are
"unplanned."
Discuss this with your
obstetrician to be sure
you're not suffering from
pre-partum depression.
When your baby arrives I
am sure that you will fall
in love with him or her
as many other mothers
have. Your husband may
have reacted the way he
did because he felt it was
in some way a rejection of
him, or because he DOES
want children.


*.Write Dear Abby at
www.DearAbby.com or
P.O. Box 69440, Los
Angeles, CA 90069.


HOROSCOPES


B.C.


FRANK & ERNEST


ARIES (March 21-
April 19): Mix business
with pleasure and dazzle
everyone with your social
skills. Share your ideas
and someone influential
will collaborate with you.
Expect a change in your
relationships with others.
Jealousy may cause some-
one to react poorly. ***
TAURUS (April 20-May
20): Embrace change with
open arms; you will learn
something new from the
experience. A change of
scenery will help you put
your future in perspective.
You will have a good eye
when it comes to trendy
items. Don't be afraid to be
daring. ***
GEMINI (May 21-June
20): Don't overlook oth-
ers' expectations. Satisfy
everyone's needs and you
will be able to take care of
your own concerns with-
out interference. Deal with
institutions swiftly. Give
out as little information
as possible to avoid being
detained. ***
CANCER (June 21-July
22): Mix and mingle with
friends, neighbors and
peers. The more you dis-
cuss your plans, the easier
it will be for others to see
things your way. Don't let
a problem with a loved one
cause you to be nonpro-
ductive. Get serious and
forge ahead. **
LEO (July 23-Aug. 22):
If there is somewhere you


THE LAST WORD
Eugenia Last

want to go or something
you have to do, take the
initiative, regardless of
what anyone else says.
Concentrate on your goals
and refrain from meddling
in others' affairs. You will
work better on your own,
so do your own thing.

VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept.
22): Be practical. Don't
let anyone talk you into
doing something that may
infringe on your security,
stability or well-being.
Listen and offer sound
advice, but don't take over.
Guide and motivate others,
but get on with your own
plans. ***
LIBRA (Sept 23-Oct
22): An investment will
pay off or lead to a new
venture that could improve
your current lifestyle.
Helping an older person
will result in rewards
that you weren't expect-
ing. Changes at work will
improve your reputation
and your status. ***
SCORPIO (Oct 23-Nov.
21): A false sense in a rela-
tionship must be identified
and reevaluated. Motives
must be based on realistic
expectations. A partner-
ship will be enhanced if
you openly discuss roles
and how they should be
administered. ***


SAGITrARIUS (Nov.
22-Dec. 21): Change is
upon you. You can stabilize
your life if you are diligent
regarding productivity.
However, if you get caught
up in personal melodrama,
you'll miss a chance to get
ahead. Your restless nature
will be your downfall.

CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-
Jan. 19): Show your true
colors. Once everyone
is aware of what you are
striving for, it will be dif-
ficult to alter your direc-
tion. Think big within your
budget Use your master-
ful ability to get the most
for your money by doing
what you can on your own.

AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-
Feb. 18): Take care of
issues quickly. The less
you have hanging over
your head, the easier it will
be to take advantage of an
opportunity to start some-
thing new. Work alone and
keep your project small
and simple until it's per-
fected. **
PISCES (Feb. 19-March
20): Your intuition will
help you avoid getting
involved in a troubled
partnership. Keep an
open mind and look into
unusual interests to dis-
cover a talent you didn't
know you had. Reunite
with someone you used to
know. ****


CELEBRITY CIPHER

by Luis Campos
Celebrity Cipher cryptograms are created from quotations by famous people, past and present.
Each letter In the cipher stands for another.
TODAY'S CLUE: I equals K
"D B N L J PMB UM GRI PMBNRJWA SBRU
OMF OMTMNGVWJ DU DR UM KNJRDXJ
MYJN UOJ GVBRJ GTX RBAAJNOTL MA
GTDZGWR." NDEOGNX KNPMN

PREVIOUS SOLUTION: "No house should ever be on a hill or on anything. It
should be of the hill. Belonging to it." Frank Lloyd Wright
(c) 2011 by NEA, Inc. 9-15


FOR BETTER OR WORSE


LAKE CITY REPORTER ADVICE & COMICS THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 15, 2011


Page Editor: Emogene Graham, 754-0415


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Legal

IN THE CIRCUIT CIVIL COURT
OF THE THIRD JUDICIAL CIR-
CUIT OF FLORIDA, IN AND FOR
COLUMBIA COUNTY CIVIL DI-
VISION
Case No. 12-2011-CA-000 105
Division
FIRST FEDERAL BANK OF
FLORIDA
Plaintiff,
vs.
JARRED J. MCDONALD and STE-
PHANIE C. MCDONALD AND
UNKNOWN TENANTS/OWNERS,
Defendants.
NOTICE OF SALE
Notice is hereby given, pursuant to
Final Judgment of Foreclosure for
Plaintiff entered in this cause on Sep-
tember 1, 2011 in the Circuit Couft
of Columbia County, Florida, I will
sell the property situated in Colum-
bia County, Florida described as:
LOT 17, GIEBEIG'S ADDITION,
ACCORDING TO THE MAP OR
PLAT THEREOF AS RECORDED
IN PLAT BOOK 3, PAGE 6, OF
THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF CO-
LUMBIA COUNTY, FLORIDA.
and commonly known as: 925 PUT-
NAM STREET, LAKE CITY, FL
32025; including the building, appur-
tenances, and fixtures located there-
in, at public sale, to the highest and
best bidder, for cash, AT THE
FRONT DOOR OF THE COLUM-
BIA COUNTY COURTHOUSE,
145 N. HERNANDO STREET,
LAKE CITY, FLORIDA, on Octo-
ber 5, 2011 at 11:00 a.m. Any per-
sons claiming an interest in the sur-
plus from the sale, if any, other than
the property owner as of the date of
the lis pendens must file a claim
within 60 days after the sale.
Dated this 2nd day of September,
2011.
Clerk of the Circuit Court
By: /s/ B. Scippio
Deputy Clerk.
Edward B. Pritchard
(813) 229-0900 x 1309
Kass Shuler, P.A.
P.O. Box 800
Tampa, FL 33601-0800

05527843
September 15, 22,.2011

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
COLUMBIA COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
IN RE: ESTATE OF
NAOMI P. KOON,
Deceased
File No. 11-216-CP
Division Probate
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
The administration of the estate of
NAOMI P. KOON. deceased, whose
date of death was June 20, 2011, and
whose social security number is ***-
**-4803, is pending in the Circuit
Court for COLUMBIA County, Flor-
ida, Probate Division, the address of
which is 173 NE Hemando Ave.,
Columbia County Courthouse, Lake
City, Fl. 32055. The names and ad-
dresses of the personal representative
and the personal representative's at-
torney are set forth below.
All creditors of the decedent and oth-
er persons having claims or demands
against decedent's estate on whom a
copy of this notice is required to be
served must file their claims with
this court WITHIN THE LATER OF
3 MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AF-
TER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF
A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON
THEM.
All other creditors of the decedent
and other persons having claims or
demands against decedent's estate
must file their claims with this court
WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER THE
DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICA-
TION OF THIS NOTICE.
ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITH-
IN THE TIME PERIODS SET
FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF
THE F1ORIDA PROBATE CODE
WILL BE FOREVER BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME
PERIODS SET FORTH ABOVE,
ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2)
YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE
DECEDENT'S DATE OF DEATH
IS BARRED.
The date of first publication of this
notice is September 15, 2011.
Attorney for Personal Representa-
tive: Lloyd E. Peterson, Jr., Attorney
Florida Bar Number: 0798797
905 SW Baya Drive, Lake City, FL
32025
Telephone: (386) 961-9959'
Personal Representative:
ELIZABETH P. HORNE,
P.O. Box 1645
Lake City, Florida 32056
05527837
September 15, 22, 2011

NOTICE OF PUBLIC SALE: JIM'S
AUTO SERVICE gives Notice of
Foreclosure of Lien and intent to sell
these vehicles on 09/30/2011, 08:30
am at 2550 SW MAIN BLVD.
LAKE CITY, FL 32025, pursuant to
subsection 713.78 of the 'Florida
Statutes.
JIM'S AUTO SERVICE reserves the
right to accept or reject any
and/or all bids.
VIN#1G1BL52W6RR183100
1994 CHEVROLET
VIN# 1J4GX48S64C206946
2004 JEEP
VIN# 4TIBE46K38U254649
2008 TOYOTA
VIN# JS1VX51LOP2103824
1993 SUZUKI
VIN #JYA4DUEOXSA046725
1995 YAMAHA

05527873
September 15, 2011


Lawn & Landscape Service

J&M LAWN Service & more for
all your outdoor needs. Don't
waste your time or weekend,
Free Estimate. 386-984-2187


Legal

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
3RD JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND
FOR COLUMBIA COUNTY,
FLORIDA
CIVIL DIVISION
CASE NO. 12-2009-CA-000706
DEUTSCHE BANK NATIONAL
TRUST COMPANY AS TRUSTEE
FRO AMERICAN HOME MORT-
GAGE ASSETS TRUST 2007-2
MORTGAGE-BACKED PASS-
THROUGH CERTIFICATES, SER-
IES 2007-2
Plaintiff,
vs.
DAVID EDGAR ODATO; CAPI-
TAL ONE BANK (USA), N.A. FKA
CAPITAL ONE BANK; CACH,
LLC; UNITED STATES OF
AMERICA-DEPARTMENT OF
THE TREASURY; UNKNOWN
PERSONS) IN POSSESSION OF
THE SUBJECT PROPERTY;
Defendants.
NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE
SALE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pur-
suant to a Final Judgment of Foreclo-
sure dated September 1, 2011, and
entered in Case No. 12-2009-CA-
000706, of the Circuit Court of the
3rd Judicial Circuit in and for CO-
LUMBIA County, Florida. DEUT-
SCHE BANK NATIONAL TRUST
COMPANY AS TRUSTEE FOR
AMERICAN HOME MORTGAGE
ASSETS TRUST 2007-2 MORT-
GAGE-BACKED- PASS-
THROUGH CERTIFICATES, SER-
IES 2007-2 is Plaintiff and DAVID
EDGAR ODATO; UNKNOWN
PERSONS) IN POSSESSION OF
THE SUBJECT PROPERTY; CAPI-
TAL ONE BANK (USA), N.A. FKA
CAPITAL ONE BANK; CACH,
LLC; UNITED STATES OF
AMERICA-DEPARTMENT OF
THE TREASURY; are defendants. I
will sell to the highest and best bid-
'der for cash at ON THE THIRD
FLOOR OF THE COLUMBIA
COUNTY COURTHOUSE AT 173
N.E. HERNANDO AVENUE,
LAKE CITY, FLORIDA, at 11:00
a.m., on the 5th day of October,
2011, the following described prop-
erty as set froth in said Final Judg-
ment, to wit:
SECTION 22; A PART OF THE
SOUTH 1/2 OF THE SOUTHWEST
1/4 OF SECTION 22, TOWNSHIP 6
SOUTH, RANGE 17 EAST, MORE
PARTICULARLY DESCRIBED A
FOLLOWS; COMMENCE AT THE
SOUTHWEST CORNER OF SAID
SECTION 22 AND RUN N 88 DE-
GREES 06' 30" E, ALONG THE
SOUTH LINE THEREOF, 1564.25
FEET; THENCE N I DEGREE 41'
58" W, 11.70 FEET TO THE
NORTH RIGHT OF WAY LINE OF
AN EXISTING COUNTY GRAD-
.ED ROAD FOR A POINT OF BE-
GINNING; THENCE S 87 DE-
GREES 32' 44" W. ALONG SAID
NORTH RIGHT OF WAY LINE
633.60 FEET TO A POINT ON
THE EASTERLY RIGHT OF WY
LINE OF U.S. HIGHWAY NO. 441;
THENCE N 8 DEGREES 39' 58" E,
ALONG SAID EASTERLY RIGHT
OF WAY LINE 339.64 FEET;
THENCE N 87 DEGREES 32' 44"
E, 646.40 FEET; THENCE S 3 DE-
GREES 38' 54" E, 333.34 FEET TO
A POINT ON THE NORTH RIGHT
OF WAY LINE OF SAID COUNTY
GRADED ROAD; THENCE S 87
DEGREES 32' 44" W, ALONG
SAID NORTH RIGHT OF WAY
LINE 85.25 FEET TO THE POINT
OF BEGINNING, COLUMBIA
COUNTY, FLORIDA.
A person claiming an interest in the
surplus from the sale, if any, other
than the property owner as of the
date of the lis pendens must file a
claim with 60 days after the sale.
Dated this 1st day of September,
2011.
P. DEWITT CASON
As Clerk of said Court
By: /s/ B. Scippio
As Deputy Clerk
If you are a person with a disability
who requires accommodation in or-
der to participate in a court proceed-
ing, you are entitled a no cost to you
the provision of certain assistance.
Individuals with disability who re-
quire special accommodations in or-
der to participate in a court proceed-
ing should contact the ADA coordi-
nator, 173 NE Hemando Avenue,
Room 408, Lake City, FL 32055,
(386) 719-7428, within two (2) busi-
ness days of receipt of notice to ap-
pear. Individuals who are hearing
impaired should call (800) 955-8771.
Individuals who are voice impaired
should call (800) 955-8770.
Submitted By;
Kahane & Associates, P.A.
8201 Peters Road, Suite 3000
Plantation, FL 33324
Telephone: (954) 382-3486
Telefacsimile: (954) 382-5380
File No. 09-24566 AHM

05527845
September 15, 22, 2011
PUBLIC AUCTION
Will be held by Davis Towing & Re-
covery, Inc, in Columbia County at
1226 NW Main Blvd., Lake City, Fl.
32055
Date September 26, 2011
Time: 9:00 A.M.
1991 GMC P/U
1GTDC14Z 1MZ518403
1988 HONDA CIVIC
JHMED6350JS013386
1987 DODGE
JB3BA34K3HU045331
2000 FORD CROWN VIC
2FAFP71W9YX187260
2002 FORD EXPEDITION
lFMPUl18L42LA56690
2006 CHRYSLER PACIFICA
2A4GM48476R755348
1998 PONTIAC SUNFIRE
1G2JB 1240W7591391
1991 FORD ESCORT
1FAPP10J3MW305123
1994 FORD RANGER
1FTCR 14U2RPC 16457
05527906
September 15, 2011


To place your
classified ad call

755-54 40


Legal

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
3RD JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF
FLORIDA, IN AND FOR COLUM-
BIA COUNTY
Case#: 2011-CA-000181
Division #
Regions Bank d/b/a Regions Mort-
gage Loan,
Plaintiff,
vs.
The Estate of Don Simmons, De-
ceased; Lemuel Simmons; Kriss
Lavalle Simmons; Sharon Melissa
Simmons; Unknown Heirs, Devi-
sees, Grantees, Assignees, Creditors,
Lienors and Trustees df Don Sim-
mons, Deceased, ,and all other Per-
sonal Claiming By, through, Under
and Against the Named
Defendant(s); Portfolio Recovery
Associates, Inc. successor in interest
to PRA III; Unknown Tenants in
Possession #1; Unknown Tenants in
Possession #2; If living, and all Un-
known Parties Claiming by, through,
under and against the above named
Defendant(s) who are not known to
be dead or alive, whether said Un-
known Parties may claim an interest
as Spouse, Heirs, Devisees, Grant-
ees, or Other Claimants
Defendant(s)
NOTICE OF ACTION FORECLO-
SURE PROCEEDINGS-PROPER-
TY
to:
TO: Unknown Heirs, Devisees,
Grantees, Assignees, Creditors, Lie-
nors and Trustees of Don Simmons,
Deceased, and all other Persons
Claiming By, Through, under and
Against the Named Defendant(s);
ADDRESS UNKNOWN BUT
WHOSE LAST KNOWN AD-
DRESS IS:, The Estate of Don Sim-
mons, Deceased; ADDRESS UN-
KNOWN BUT WHOSE LAST
KNOWN ADDRESS IS: and Sharon
Melissa Simmons; ADDRESS UN-
KNOWN BUT WHOSE LAST
KNOWN ADDRESS IS: 2334
Northeast 52nd Street, Lot #235,
Gainesville, FL 32609
Residence unknown, if living, in-
cluding any unknown spouse of the
said Defendants, if either has remar-
ried and if either or both of said De-
fendants are dead, their respective
unknown heirs, devisees, grantees,
assignees, creditors, lienors, and
trustees, and all other persons claim-
ing by, through, under or against the
named Defendant(s); and the afore-
mentioned named Defendant(s).and
such of the aforementioned unknown
Defendants and such of the afore-
mentioned unknown Defendants as
may be infants, incompetents or oth-
erwise not sui juris.
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED
that an action has been commenced
to foreclose a mortgage on the fol-
lowing real property, lying and being
and situated in Columbia County,
Florida, more particularly described
as follows:.
BEING AT NORTHWEST COR-
NER OF THE SE 1/4 OF SW 1/4
OF SECTION 30. TOWNSHIP 5
SOUTH, RANGE 17 EAST, CO-
LUMBIA COUNTY. FLORIDA
AND RUN THENCE N 89' 36' 40"
E. ALONG THE NORTH LINE OF
SAID SE 1/4 OF SW 1/4 525.00
FEET, THENCE S. 0' 09' 56" E.
456.35 FEET, THENCE S. 89' 36'
40" W. 525.00 FEET TO THE
WEST LINE OF SAID SE 1/4 OF
SW 1/4, THENCE NO. 09' 56" W
ALONG SAID WEST LINE, 456.35
FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGIN-
NING.
more commonly known as 778
Southwest Markham Street f/k/a
route 2 Box 369C, Lake City, FL
32024.
This action has been filed against
you and you are required to serve a
copy of your written defense, if any,
upon SHAPIRO, FISHMAN &
GACHE, LLP, Attorneys for Plain-
tiff, whose address is 4630 Wood-
land Corporate Blvd., Suite 100,
Tampa, FL 33614, within thirty (30)
days after the first publication of this
notice and file the original with the
clerk of thi Court either before serv-
ice on Plailtiff's attorney or immedi-
ately there after; otherwise a default
will be entered against you for the
relief demanded in the Complaint.
WITNESS my hand and seal of this
Court on the 31st day of August,
2011.
P. DEWITT CASON
Circuit and County Courts
By: /s/ B. Scippio
Deputy Clerk
05527846
September 15, 22, 2011
PUBLIC AUCTION
1996 GMC
VIN# IGTEC19ROTE541285
CREAMER'S WRECKER SERV-
ICE 290 NE SUNNYBROOK ST.
LAKE CITY, FL 32055
COLUMBIA COUNTY
386-752-2861
SALE DATE: October 7, 2011
8:00AM

05527895
September 15,2011
Public Notice -. Notice is hereby
made to all those concerned and af-
fected that Boran Craig Barber Engel
Construction Co., Inc. is performing
state project # GL-35 (WRC) Lake
City Work Release Center at 1099
NW Dot Glen, Lake City, FL 32055

05527727
September 8, 9, 10, 11, 13, 14, 15,
2011
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT, THIRD
JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR
COLUMBIA COUNTY, FLORIDA
CASE NO.: 11-254-CA
SHILOH RIDGE COMPANY,
a Florida corporation,
Plaintiff,
VS.
JACKIE E. RIGGINS,
Defendants.
NOTICE OF JUDICIAL SALE BY
THE CLERK
NOTICE IS RIIKREY GIVlN that
pursuant to an Order or Sumnariy Fi-


nal Judgment of Foreclosure entered
in the above-styled cause now pend-
ing in said court, that I will sell to the
highest and best bidder for cash on
the third floor of the Columbia
County Courthouse, 173 N.E. 1-er-
nando Avenue, Lake City, Florida
32055, at 11:00 o'clock, a.m. on Oc-


Legal

tober 5, 2011, the following property
described in Exhibit "A" attached
hereto.
EXHIBIT "A"
.ATS #1537
Lot 65
The SW 1/4 of the NE 1/4 of the SE
1/4 of Section 16, Township 7 South,
Range 16 East, Columbia County,
Florida, The East 30 feet of said
lands being subject to an easement
for ingress and egress.
TOGETHER WITH AN EASE-
MENT FOR INGRESS AND
EGRESS OVER AND ACROSS
THE FOLLOWING DESCRIBED
LANDS:
A strip of land 60 feet in width being
30 feet each side of a centerline de-
scribed as follows: Commence at the
Southeast comer of the SW 1/4 of
the NE 1/4, Section 15, Township 7
South, Range 16 East, Columbia
County, Florida and run thence S 89*
03' 48" W, 20.45 feet to the West
line of Fry Road and to the Point of
Beginning, thence continue S 89' 03'
48" W, 3952.99 feet to the East line
of Section 16, Township 7 South,
Range 16 east, thence S 89* 06' 19"
W, 661.99 feet to Reference Point
"C", thence continue S 89' 06' 19"
W, 1323.98 feet to Reference Point
"D", and to the Point of Termination.
Also begin at Reference Point "C"
and run thence N 00" 45' 21" W,
701.45 feet, to the radius point of a
cul-de-sac having a radius of 50 feet
and to the Point of Termination. Also
begin at Reference Point "C" and run
thence S 00' 45' 01" E, 1323.20 feet,
thence S 00' 44' 52" E, 701.59 feet
to the radius point of a cul-de-sac
having a radius of 50 feet and to the
Point of Termination. Also begin at
Reference Point "D" and run thence
N. 00" 46' 46" W, 701.37 feet to the
radius point of a cul-de-sac having a
radius of 50 feet and to the Point of
Termination. Also begin at Refer-
ence Point "D" and run thence S 00*
46' 12" E, 1323.42 feet, thence S 00'
46' 00" E, 701.68 feet to the radius
point of a cul-de-sac having a 50 foot
radius and to the Point of Termina-
tion.
Said sale will be made pursuant to
and in order to satisfy the terms of
said Summary Final Judgment of
Foreclosure. Any person claiming an
interest in the surplus from the sale,
if any, other than the property owner
as of the date of the lis pendens must
file a claim within 60 days after the
sale.
Dated: September 7, 2011.
P. DEWITT CASON, Clerk of Court
By: /s/ B. Scippio
Deputy Clerk

05527847
September 15, 22, 2011


100 Job
100 Opportunities

05527841
SENIOR REGISTERED
NURSE SUPERVISOR
The Florida Department of Veter-
ans' Affairs Jenkins Domiciliary
is seeking a supervisory level R.N.
to fill the position of Senior Regis-
tered Nurse Supervisor. All ap-
plicants must hold a Florida R.N.
license and be certified in C.P.R.
Requirements for all candidates
include a strong clinic
al background, good communica-
tion abilities, and excellent com-
puter skills. Ideal candidates will
have nursing management or su-
pervisory experience. Apply on-
line:
https://peoplefirst.myflorida.com/l
Or call Susan Espenship for more
information at 386-758- 0600
x1022
Req #50000426
Closing Date 09/19/2011
EEO/AAE

LICENSED CLINICAL SO-
CIAL WORKER
The Florida Department of Veter-
ans' Affairs- Jenkins Domiciliary
is seeking a Licensed Clinical So-
cial Worker. MUST BE a Florida
Licensed Social Worker. Duties
include: One hour per week on-
site supervision of Registered In-
tern Clinical Social Worker; Pro-
vide consultation between on-site
visits, if needed; State certification
as a "clinical supervisor" is NOT a
requirement. Apply on-line:
lihttps://peoplcfirst.myflorida.com/l
oeon.hlitm
Or call Amelia Tompkins for more
information at 386-758-0600
x1010
Req #50507062
Closing Date 9/19/2011
EEO/AAE

BUSY OFFICE looking for full-
time receptionist. Experience in
multi-line phone system, updating
records, accounting and working
with the public. Computer skills
necessary. Fax resume at:
386-961-8802

EXPERIENCED LAWN Mower
repair person in Wortlhington
Springs area, some customer serv-
ice, Call 386-496-8431





STATE BANK
Fulltime Teller/Customer

Service Representative

Position available.
Experience preferred,

but will train the right

person. Apply at the

Peoples State Bank West


100 Opbportunities

Looking for an in home caregiver.
Room & board + Salary Negotible.
References required. Call for info.
386-365-3732
Mobile Home Sales!
Experienced Salesperson
Needed to sell the South's
#1 rated product! Call Kevin
386-719-5560
NEED TEAM DRIVER
North Georgia to Miami
Good CDL
Call 256-797-3150
Physical laborer needed. CDL
' license req'd. Must have respect
for electricity & ability to work in
water & mud. Must be able to pass
drug test. Call 386-752-1854
Sales Position available for moti-
vated individual Rountree -Moore
Toyota, Great benefits, paid train-
ing/vacation. Exp. a plus but not
necessary. Call Anthony CQsentino
386-623-7442
TANKER DRIVER
Night Position & Part time day po-
sition needed, Gasoline & Diesel
Fuel Transport Delivery Driver,
Tues. Sat.,
Track based in Lake City, Florida,
Local Deliveries, Health Insur-
ance, 401K, Paid Vacation
Competitive Pay Structure,
Must have two years driver
experience, clean MVR,
Application available by mailing:
info@jj-fuel.com
Fax completed applications to
Heather at 850-973-3702.
Questions call 1-800-226-5434
after 3:00 p.m., Speak to Ronnie.
TAX PREPARERS Needed for
the upcoming tax season,
experienced preferred but tax
training is available. If you want to
work for a tax service where cus-
tomer service is the highest priori-
ty Call 386-754-0060.

12A Medical
120 Employment

05527777
Admissions/Marketing
Director
Avalon Healthcare Center is
currently accepting applications
for the full time position of
Admissions/Marketing Director
RN/LPN Preferred
Good Organizational and
Communication Skills a Must
Prior SNF Experience
Preferred
Co-mpetitiveSal-aahd
Excellent benefit package.
Please apply at Avalon
Healthcare and Rehabilitation
Center. 1270 S.W. Main Blvd.
Lake City, Florida 32025
386-752-7900
EOE


-Cancer
'1 North HAid
CHECK OUT Clerk
High volume Medical facility
seeking a Checkout Clerk. Duties
include Cash handling, schedule
appointments, data entry. Knowl-
edge of medical terminology and
medical insurance. Applicant
must be proficient in practice
management software (Intergy).
If you display a friendly, profes-
sional and courteous manner
please send your resume to jpa-
peshtancancercarenorthflorida.com
or fax to 386-628-9231.


240 Schools &
2 Education

05527750
Interested in a Medical Career?
Express Training offers
courses for beginners & exp
Nursing Assistant, $479
next class-09/12/10

Phlebotomy national certifica-
tion, $800 next class-10/10/11

Continuing education
Fees incl. books, supplies, examr,
fees. Call 386-755-4401 or
expresstrainingservices.com



310 Pets & Supplies

German Sheppard Puppy 10
weeks old Black & Tan. Health
Certs. & shots, Parents on
Premises. $300.00. 386-961-8130

Jlederi



PHYSICAL


THERAPIST:

Home Health Care Agency
servicing Columbia and
surrounding counties
seeking Full-Time
experienced Physical
Therapist
Competitive Salary &
Benefits Available.
Please call contact


office located at:
3882 W US Hwy 90

Lake City, FL 32034
EEO Employer


Lynn or Cindy at
386-758-3312
or apply online at
www.almlostfamily.coml


I


BUYITi-


"SELL iJT



*iFl~IND











Classified Department: 755-5440


LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 15, 2011


310 Pets & Supplies

05527616
$$REWARD$$
LOST

Silky/Yorkie
Terrier: Missing
since August 29
(am), Aprox 10
lbs. Black body/brown face &
feet. Needs medicine. Last seen
at S & S on 441 N. & 100. His
name is Bradley.
Please call 386-623-2806


402 Appliances
FROST FREE refrigerator.
Whirlpool Very clean. Works
good. White, $100.
386-292-3927
WHIRLPOOL ELECTRIC
STOVE. White, Works Good,
$100.
386-292-3927
Whirlpool Washer & Dryer.
White, large capacity.
Works Great, $285. for both.
386-292-3927

407 Computers
HP Computer,
$80.00
386-755-9984 or
386-292-2170
IBM LAPTOP Computer, WITH
BAG $80.00
386-755-9984 or
386-292-2170


420 Wanted to Buy
K&H TIMBER
We Buy Pine Hardwood &
Cypress. Large or small tracts.
Call 386-961-1961.
Wanted Junk Cars, Trucks, Vans.
$275 & up CASH! Free Pick Up!
NO title needed !386-878-9260
After 5pm 386- 752-3648.

430 Garage Sales

9/16 & 9/17, 8-?, 1647 S.E. Alfred
Markham St., 41 S turn left on
133A, household items, baby
clothes, tools, follow'signs.


440 Miscellaneous

FOR SALE 200 AMP
POWER SERVICE POLE
$175
386-344-0226
Stop gnat & Mosquito bites! Buy
Swamp Gator All natural insect re-
pellent. Family safe. Use head to
toe. Available at The Home Depot.


TWO FREE Female Bull Dogs
10 months old
Shots, spayed, free to good home.
Call 386-288-5149


450 Good Things
5 to Eat
GREEN PEANUTS For Sale
Graded and washed.
$30.00 a bushel.
386-752-3434


520 Boats for Sale
2003 SEA PRO 170CC
YAMAHA 90 HP, low hours, live
wells, Bimini top, fish finder,
AL trailer, $7,500, 386-719-6537

630 Mobile Homes
for Rent
2 OR 3 BEDROOMS
Clean, Quiet Park $475-$525.mo
Water, septic, garbage included
758-2280 References, NO PETS!
2&3 BR MH. $395 $650. mo.
plus deposit. Water & sewer fur-
nished. Cannon Creek MHP
386-752-6422
2/2 Units. Great rental program
for responsible tenants.
Call for details, 386-984,8448
13th Month FREE!!
3/2 Large MH, small park, near
FGCC, Small pets ok, $500 dep
$575 mo w/12 mo lease
386-752-1971 or 352-281-2450
3/2.5 S of Lake City, (Branford
area) $600 mo plus security
386-590-0642 or 386-867-1833
www.suwanneevalleyproperties.com
LG clean 3br's $450. -$650. mo. +
dep. Also, 2br mobile home's
available. No Pets.
5 Points area. 386-961-1482
Mobile Homes for rent in
White Springs, Lake City & Ft.
White Contact 386-623-3404
or 386-397-2779

640 Mobile Homes
Sfor Sale
Champion Home Inspections
Protect Your Investment
With A Professional
Inspection State Licensed
And Insured 386-344-5551
High Springs. 1629 sqft. on 10
acres. Needs to sell. $84,999.
Make an offer! MLS 78776
Bosshardt Realty Services.
386-965-4873
Fort White. 2336 sqft on 5 acres.
Tape & textured walls. Needs to
sell. $99,999. Motivated, make an
offer MLS 78841 (386)965-4873
Bosshardt Realty Services.
Lake City 1560 sqft. buit in 2002.
On 5 acres. $83,999. MLS 78931
Bosshardt Realty Services.
386-965-4873
3/2 DWMH "Model Home" condi-
tion. Just under 1 ac w/granddaddy
oaks and landscaped MLS#77988,
$84,900, Nancy Rogers
867-1271 R.E.O. Realty Group
Palm Harbor Homes
Has 3 Modular Homes
Available at HUGE Savings
Over 40K Off
800-622-2832


650 Mobile Home
650 & Land
Owner Finance, 3/2, on 1.5 acres,
S of Lake City, small down/$695
mo, 386-590-0642 / 386-867-1833
www.suwanneevalleyproperties.com
WOW! 2 Mobile homes on 5
acres! 2006, 3/2.5, above pool,
1997 1,500 sq. ft. with nice
porch.$139,888 MLS 78531 Brit-
tany Results Realty 386-397-3473

Unfurnished Apt.
710 For Rent








05527705
SPRING HILL VILLAGE
Excellent High Springs location.
1, 2 & 3 bedroom floor-plans;
some with garages.
Call 386-454-1469
or visit our website:
www.springhillvillage.net

IBR APT.
Downtown Location, Clean.
$450 mo, plus Security.
NO PETS. Call 386-755-3456
2br/l ba, I car garage,
W/D hook up, $525 month,
no pets 1 month sec,
386-961-8075
2BR/IBA. Close to town.
$565.mo plus deposit.
Includes water & sewer.
386-965-2922
2BR/2BA w/garage
5 minutes from VA hospital.
Call for details.
386-755-4590 or 365-5150
Amber Wood Hills Apts.
Private Patio area. Beautiful yard.
Washer/dryer hkup. Free water &
sewer. 1/1, 2/1. Move in special.
386-754-1800. wwwmyflapts.com
Columbia Arms Apt. located 1/2
mi from V.A. & Winn Dixie. Pet
Friendly. Move in Special $199.
Pool, laundry & balcony.
386-754-1800. www.myflapts.com
Duplex w/garage spacious, 2/1,
1300 sq ft, W/D hook up, CH/A,
$650 month & bckgmd chk,
386-697-3248 or 352-377-7652
Great location W of 1-75, spacious
deluxe 2br apts., garage, W/D
hookup, patio. $600/700 & up, +
Sec, 386-965-5560 or 344-3715
Greentree Townhouse
Summer special. 2/1, 2/1.5. Free
water & sewer. Balcony & patio.
Laundry. Behind Kens on Hwy 90.
386-754-1800 wwwmyflapts.com

ONE 51 PLACE APTS
Alachua
MOVE IN SPECIALS
1, 2, & 3 bedrooms
Call TODAY 386-462-0656
or visit us at one51place.com

Redwine Apartments. Move in
special $199. Limited time. Pets
welcome, with 5 complexes,
we have a home for you.
386-754-1800. www.myflapts.com
Summer Special! 12th mo Free
w/signed yr lease. Updated Apt,
w/tile floors/fresh paint. Great
area. From $450.+sec. 752-9626


The Lakes Apts. Studios & IBr's
from $135/wk. Util. & cable incl.,
Sec 8 vouchers accepted, monthly
rates avail Call 386-752-2741
Wayne Manor Apts.
Move in $199. Summer special.
2/1, washer/dryer. Behind Kens off
Hwy 90. 386-754-1800
www.mvflapts.com
Windsor Arms Apartments.
' Summer special $199. Move in!
2/1, 2/1.5, 2/2. Pet Friendy. Free
200 ch. Dish. Washer/dryer hkup.
386-754-1800. www.myflapts.com

720 Furnished Apts.
S2 For Rent

lbr Apt. includes water, elec, &
cable. $595. mo. Good area. 7
minutes from town. References &
sec. req'd. No pets. 386-719-4808
GARAGE APT. 1 BR/I BA
approx. 10 miles out of Lake City
South, $320 month.
Call 386-755-7324
Rooms for Rent. Hillcrest, Sands,
Columbia. All furnished. Electric,
cable, fridge, microwave. Weekly
or monthly rates. I person $135,
2 persons $150. weekly
386-752-5808
Studio Apt. Private. Rent incl util-
ities, Satellite TV, appliances,
(washer/dryer). No pets 386-963-
4767 or 292-0385 Available 9/1

73I0 Unfurnished
730 Home For Rent
'09 Executive home for rent on 41
acres. 4br/3.5ba Available
October. Horses/outdoor pets ok.
$2000/mo but all terms negotiable
for right caretaker. 386-209-4610
2 BR/1 BA, Country, South. of
Lake City, private river access.
w/boat ramp, 2 garages, clean,
$650 mo. + sec. 386-590-0642
2BR house $625.mo $625. dep.
Also, 2 large br apt. $525. mo
$525 dep. Conveniently close to
the VA & shopping. 386-344-2972
3-6 BR/2 BA on Cty. Rd. 49,
Near Beachville, $650 mo.,
no pets, $650 sec., Call Margie
386-935-3447 or 386-984-5109
3BR/1.5 BA Large lot. Very clean
with storage shed. Quiet area.
$850 mo. + $850. dep.
386-752-7578
4br/2ba CHA Brick, 1200 sqft
lac., Close to FGCC, CR 245A.
Ceramic tile/carpet, $800 mo $800
dep (904)708-8478 App. req'd
Brick 3br/2ba Large yard, garage,
CH/A. 189 Stanley Ct. Lake City.
$950. mo + $1000 dep.
Call 386-365-8543
Prime location 2br/lba.
Resid'l or comm'l. Comer of Baya
& McFarlane. $600. mo. $500 sec.
386-752-9144 or 755-2235


7 Unfurnished
730 Home For Rent
VERY LARGE 2 BR/2 BA, Brick
home, garage, CH & A, Clean,
386-590-0642 / 386-867-1833,
www.suwanneevalleyproperties.com

750 Business &
51 Office Rentals
FOR LEASE: Downtown office
space. Convenient to
Court house.
Call 386-755-3456
For Lease: E Baya Ave. Two -
1000 sqft office space units or
combined for 2000 sqft. 386-984-
0622 or weekends 386-497-4762
Midtown Commercial Center,
brand new executive front suite &
suite w/warehouse.
Call Vicki or Joe 386-935-2832.
NICE OFFICE SPACE
for lease.
From $450 a month
Tom 386-961-1086 DCA Realtor


805 Lots for Sale
BEAUTIFUL 5 acres in
Lake City, 100% owner financing,
no qualifying, $395 per month.
Please call 512-663-0065
FOR SALE BY OWNER,
10 acres, approx. 7 acres planted
pines, with a 24 x 40 foot (Steel
Dean) bldg. w/18 foot opening,
own power, $85,000
Call Sonya 386-288-2557.
Owner Financing. River common &
nature lover's dream in Lee. 15
wooded ac by the Withlacoochee.
Property is already subdivided
MLS 75576 $48,000 623-6896


810 Home for Sale
3 BR/2 BA, with upstairs apt.2
rooms, (private entrance) with
3/4 bath, workshop, storage shed,
freshly painted, new walk-in
shower & stool, new base cabinets,
Call-386-365-2522
/ Champion Home Inspections
386-344-5551. Inspections
Starting At $ 249.00
Veterans Receive 10% Off
Full Inspection.
4 BR/2 BA, on I acre, granite
floors thru out, open kitchen, wrap
around front porch.$139,900
MLS 77292 Brittany
Results Realty 386-397-3473
Beautiful home on 15 acres w/over
2,500 sq. ft. New appli., new tank
at well, new drain field, workshop.
$235,000 MLS 77552 Brittany
Results Realty 386-397-3473
*Century 21 Darby Rogers
752-6575 Immaculate home on
5 acres. 3/2, new energy efficient
A/C system, metal roof, 12x28 work-
shop. #78508 Only $168.900
Century 21 Darby Rogers
752-6575 3/2 located on 11th Fair-
way at Southemrn Oaks Country Club.
Huge master BR, huge kitchen, 2 car
garage. #78276 Only $129,900
Century 21 Darby Rogers
752-6575 Executive home. 4/3, 2557
sqft, plantation shutters, granite
counter tops, in-ground pool w/spH.
#78610 Only $269.(XX)
Century 21 Darby Rogers
752-6575 Beautiful Victorian/White
Springs, 7BR/3.5B w/5 fireplaces, a
Must See. #76361
Only $185,000
Century 21- Darby Rogers
752-6575 Golf course living, 3/2.5,
vaulted ceilings, open floor plan,
place, breakfast area. #78941 (1-
year home warranty) Only $210,000
Champion Home Inspections
Contact John 386-344-5551
State Licensed
And Insured
championhomeinspections.us
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
10 acres w/well maintained brick
home. 2012 sqft. Open split floor
plan. Lori Giebeig Simpson
365-5678 MLS# 74447 $149,900


zuus Sea Pro 1 7UUC
Yamaha 90hp, low hours,
live wells, Bimini top, fish
finder, aluminum trailer
w/spare, boat cover.
$7,500

Call
386-719-6537


810 Home for Sale
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
New home in May Fair. Super area
corner lot. 4br split plan. Versatile
colors. Elaine K. Tolar
755-6488 MLS# 76919 $199,900
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
3br/2ba. 1590 sqft. Lori Giebeig
Simpson. 365-5678 or
Mary Brown Whitehurst
965-0887 MLS# 74542 $109,900
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
Cute 3/2 brick in town. Wood
floors, Ig family room. Front &
back porch Lori Giebeig Simpson
365-5678 MLS# 77989 $79,900
LEASE/OPTION BUY
3br/2ba Home 2010 w/garage
on 1/2 acre. Owner Financing
386-623-2244
Lg. 4/3 family home. 16x20
screened porch, workshop. 4.5 ac.
fenced/cross fenced MLS 74339
$219,900. N Fla Homeland Real-
ty Darlene Hart 386-288-2878
Great 3/2 home w/2346 sq ft
under roof on .67 ac., Creekside
S/D. Big back yard w/plenty of
shade trees. On a cul-de-sac, MLS
77385 $169,900 623-6896
Spacious 4/2 home on I ac. Split
floor plan. Great neighborhood.
Easy access to 1-75 $204,900 MLS
77859 N Fla Homeland Realty
Darlene Hart 386-288-2878
WoodCrest 3/2 Split floor plan
Screened porch. 10x12 storage
shed. $126,900 MLS 77932
Darlene Hart 386-288-2878
N Fla Homeland Realty
Home for entertaining 3/2 plus
pool house w/half bath, 2.25
fenced ac. Freshly painted. Split
plan, Large rear deck MLS 78103
$179,900 386-623-6896
0.5 ac tract. 441 (4 lane) frontage.
1/2 mi from Target distribution.
2/1.5 zoned resid'l MLS# 78506
$88,000 Nancy Rogers 867-1271
R.E.O. Realty Group
Great home, Great neighborhood,
great price. 3/2 Close to town A
Must See!. MLS#77411, $79,900,
Nancy Rogers
867-1271 R.E.O. Realty Group
4/2 fenced yard, 2 car garage,
Fairly new roof & HVAC Shed,
fenced back yard. MLS#77602.
$162,500, Nancy Rogers
867-1271 R.E.O. Realty Group
Lake City Country Club. 4/3, reno-
vated. Great for entertaining. Glass
doors open to back yard. $179,900
MLS#78637 Nancy Rogers
R.E.O. Realty Group 867-1271
Investor Special Buy. 2br con-
crete block w/CH/A. Available "as
is" $22,900. MLS76821.
Vin Lantroop. 386-755-6600
Hallmark Real Estate
Pool Home. 2 Story w/soaring
ceilings. Ig master w/Jacuzzi.
Fenced yard. $159,000 MLS77085
Teresa Spradley 386-365-8343
Hallmark Real Estate
Near Itchetucknee head springs,
easy Gainesville commute. For
sale or rent! $75.500. MLS77398.
Paula Lawrence. 386-623-1973
Hallmark Real Estate
REDUCED gated community.
Brick w/florida room & private
garden. Security system. Ginger
Parker. MLS77703. 386-365-2135
Hallmark Real Estate
Like to Entertain? Over 2900
sqft. 3br/2.5ba. Fenced w/sprinkler
& security system. MLS78404.
Sherry Willis. 386-365-8095
Hallmark Real Estate
Springhollow Ig brick. 4br/2ba
w/lg screened porch. Oversized
ga-
rage. upgraded kitchen & bath.
$239,500, MLS78787. Janet Creel.
719-0382 Hallmark Real Estate
Well maintained 4/2, 2566 sqft
oversized den w/fplace, Ig kitchen,
breakfast area overlooking gazebo.
#78347 Only $179,000 Century 21-
Darby Rogers 752-6575


1994 Chevy Cavalier
4DR. 115,283 ml., mini
wagon, no accidents,
automatic, cold air, CD
player/radio.
$2,869

Call
386-292-9329


820 Farms &
2 Acreage

4 1/2 acre lot. Lake Jeffery Road.
Gorgeous Oaks!Paved Rd
Owner Financing! NO DOWN!
$59,900. $525mo 352-215-1018.
www.LandOwnerFinancing.com
4 acres, Wellborn, New Well
installed, Beautifully wooded
w/cleared Home Site, owner fin,
no down, $39,900, $410 mon.
Call 352-215-1018
www.LandOwnerFinancing.com
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
Brick in LC Country Club. 4/3
Lots of extras, oversized garage &
storage. Elaine K. Tolar
752-4211 MLS# 78739 $239,900
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
Brick in WoodCrest S/D. Split
plan. Screened porch. Lg back
yard. Elaine K. Tolar
752-4211 MLS# 77015 $137,900
For Lease FARM- 7 stall barn.
17+ acres, pasture, cross fenced.
Close in $500. mo.
386-961-1086
Owner financed land. Half acre to
ten acre lots. As low as $300
down. Deas Bullard Properties
386-752-4339 www.landnfl.com

830 Commercial
O3 Property

Commercial Parcel 2 acres w/252
ft frontage on SR 47 Add'l 4.76
ac. avail. $149,900 MLS# 78260
Call 386-867-1271 Nancy Rogers
R.E.O.Realty Group, Inc

8 0 Real Estate
S Wanted

I Buy Houses
CASH!
Quick Sale Fair Price
386-269-0605


940 Trucks

1972 BLUE CHEVY PICKUP,
3 Quarter. Ton,
Excellent Condition $5,000
Call 386-697-4547.


950 Cars for Sale

1994 CHEV. CAVALIER 4 DR,
115,283 miles, Mini Wagon, no
accidents, automatic, cold air,
CD/Radio $2,869, 386-292-9329

952 Vans & Sport
952 Util. Vehicles

2000 GMC SAFARI VAN, Runs
great, has an 80,000 factory war-
ranty, A/C warranty, $7,469 OBO,
386-292-9329 or 386-438-8731.

We're on target!


zUUU GMU safari van
Runs great, has an 80,000
factory warranty,
AC warranty.
$7,469 OBO
Call
386-292-9329
386-438-8731


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