<%BANNER%>

UFPKY NEH LSTA



The Lake City reporter
ALL ISSUES CITATION THUMBNAILS MAP IT! PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028308/01659
 Material Information
Title: The Lake City reporter
Uniform Title: Lake City reporter (Lake City, Fla. 1967)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: John H. Perry
Place of Publication: Lake City Fla
Publication Date: 9/11/2011
Frequency: daily (monday through friday)[<1969>-]
weekly[ former 1967-<1968>]
daily
normalized irregular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Lake City (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Columbia County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Columbia -- Lake City
Coordinates: 30.189722 x -82.639722 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 95, no. 4 (Oct. 5, 1967)-
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000358016
oclc - 33283560
notis - ABZ6316
lccn - sn 95047175
sobekcm - UF00028308_01569
System ID: UF00028308:01659
 Related Items
Preceded by: Lake City reporter and Columbia gazette

Full Text








II II~l Ii i


Lake


Uny
II ****3 -DIGIT
IDA HISTORY 326
32G61 -1943



Silly


......


Aeporter


Sunday, September I I, 201 1www.lakecityreporter.com Vol. 137, No. 195 N $ 1.00


10


LATER


Lake City looks back at September 11, 2001


A nation

comes

together

as one

By GORDON JACKSON
gjackson@lakecityreporter. comr
Lake City is nearly
1,000 miles from
New York City.
But the Sept.
11, 2001 terror-
ist attacks made everyone
realize we're all Americans,
regardless of where we live.
For many, it's impossible
to forget TV coverage of
the World Trade Center's
twin towers collapsing, the
Pentagon burning and the
strewn wreckage of United
Airlines Flight 93 in a field
near Shanksville, Pa. -
Newspaper editors wres-
tiled with the decision to
publish disturbing photos of
desperate people plunging to
their death from the upper
floors of the twin towers
rather than be incinerated by
intense flames.
We later learned that the
19 terrorists responsible for
hijacking four passenger
jets for their suicide mission
were members of al-Qaeda. A
decade later, the war on ter-
rorism is still being waged.
Ceremonies are sched-
uled to commemorate the
10-year anniversary of the
attacks across the nation,
including a 3 p.m. tribute
today at Olustee Park, spon-
sored by Lake City AGLOW
Lighthouse. Local pastors
and community leaders will
speak at the event, which
includes flag ceremonies by
the American Legion and
SEA Cadets Honor Guard.
Lake City Mayor Stephen
Witt, a keynote speaker at
a 9/11 ceremony on Sept.
9, said the attacks impacted
everyone in ways that still
resonate.
He read a proclamation
vowing to never forget the
nearly 3,000 people who
died in the attacks, including
public safety officials who
sacrificed their lives to save
others.
The proclamation praised
the courageous firemen,
police officers, paramedics
and citizens who risked their
lives or died in the frenzied
hours after the attacks. Witt
also thanked those who
enlisted in the armed forces
in response to the attacks.
"Our country united in
compassion as Americans
came together to provide
relief and bring hope to oth-
ers," Witt said in the procla-
mation.
The nation emerged stron-
ger and inspired an enduring
spirit of national pride, he
said. The greatest memo-
rial to those who died in the
TOGETHER continued on 3A


Images

of events

as fresh

as ever

By ANTONIA ROBINSON
arobinson@lakecityreporter.com
N formally Wendy
Stevens of Lake
City keeps her
phone in the car
while teaching,
but on Sept 11, 2001 it was
in her first grade classroom
when she received a frantic'
call.
"My son was a senior in
Mr. (James Montgomery)
Mont's class and he was
OCIATED PRESS quite upset," she said. "He
lay marks said 'Mom, the country is
under attack'."
Stevens didn't believe him
at first, but soon she learned
about the devastating events
that unfolded that day
By lunch time students
across the school were talk-
ing about the events. Her stu-
dents began asking questions
but Stevens told them to talk
to her parents to avoid saying
anything to upset them.
M .y main concern was
keeping my first graders safe
and sheltered," she said.
.:. The memory of the attack
is still poignant in the minds
I of people across the nation,
just as it is for Stevens.
The attacks showed a
vulnerability in the United
States, Stevens said.
"You just feel like it could
happen again," she said. "If
l"i you have children you want
them to feel as safe as you
did growing up. It took our
innocents away."
It was a phone call from
a friend living in Queens,
N.Y. that alerted Tabatha .o
McMahon of Lake City
Lake City Reporter about the Sept 11 attacks.
ore than She was working in the print
Station 10, shop at the former Lake City
)ung don't Community College,.
e kids have "I didn't have a TV so I ran
a working to the resident hall," she said.
State Rep. Elizabeth Porter
was the resident hall advi-
sor at the time and the two
watched the events together.
re McMahon also remained on
the phone with her friend.
Sor "It was just surreal," she
said. "It was almost like a
made for TV movie or like
[1. the Blair Witch Project," she
said.
Everything stopped on
campus that day.
"We have defining
earned moments in our lives as indi-
iter-gen- viduals and a community,"
n McMahon said. "It was a
defining moment in our cul-
ture and in my life."
Since Sept 11 McMahon
has written a card or thank
you note every Wednesday to
send to someone.
erica: 'That made me appreciate
n.' people more," she said. "I


One World Trade Center rises above the lower Manhattan skyline and the Statue of Liberty in New York. Tod
the tenth anniversary of the terrorist attacks in the United States.


In schools, a new chapter of

American history to teach


By GORDON JACKSON
gjackson@lakecityreporter. corn
A recent vacation
to New York gave
Keith Hatcher a
new perspective on
the terrorist attacks
that destroyed the World Trade
Center's twin towers a decade
ago.
He visited the fire station
next to where the twin towers
once stood. Six firemen from
that station lost their lives that
day.
"It was sobering and hum-
bling to be there," he said. "You
could literally throw a rock from
the station to ground zero."
Hatcher, principal at Fort
White High School, said most
of his students have vague
memories of the attack since
they were in elementary school
at the time. But he wants them
to understand the significance
SCHOOLS continued on 5A


Not forgotten
ANTONIA ROBINSONILake City Reporter
The Lake City Police
Department Honor
Guard performs at the
city's 'Fallen But Not
ForgotteW' ceremony
Friday in Olustee Park.
The event featured
three speakers: Third
Circuit Chief Judge
Leandra Johnson, LCFD
Assistant Chief Frank
Armijo and FHP Lt.
Patrick Riordan. Mayor
Stephen Witt issued
a proclamation for the
event, which also fea-
tured song selections
from Stephen Jones.


JASON MATTHEW WALKER
Fort White High School principal Keith Hatcher looks over some of mi
500 letters written by students and mailed to New York firefighters at
near Ground Zero. 'One of the things that come to mind is that the yo
have vivid memories of what happened that day,' Hatcher said. 'Some
never seen the footage.. They were sheltered from it. They didn't have
knowledge of it, which is sobering to me.'


Attacks inspii

artistic vision

one local mai

By GORDON JACKSON
gjackson@lakecityreporter.comrn
Lake City artist Duffy Soto has
national recognition for his compu
erated art featuring
aircraft.
His art has been dis-
played at the National
Museum of Naval
Aviation and some of
his work has hung in
Jaclioonvillc City Hall 'Spirit of Am
and U.S. Rep. Ander Never Agair
Crenshaw's office.


ART continued on 5A


REACTION continued on 3A


1 I4264 I ) 1 8


CALL US:
(386) 752-1293
SUBSCRIBE TO
THE REPORTER:
Voice: 755-5445
Fax: 752-9400


91
Isolated showers
WEATHER, 6A


Opinion ......
Business ..
Life......... .
Advice ....... ..
Puzzles ... .


TODAY IN
BUSINESS
Halll looks to
aidd tenant.


COMING
TUESDAY
local ne.'.s


J


, I


YIEAIRS









LAKE CITY REPORTER SUNDAY REPORT SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 11, 2011


Friday:
8-11-15-24 MB 18


Friday:
1-8-18-21-22


CA($I. ;~

Saturday:
Afternoon: 5-5-3
Evening: N/A


S4-.

Saturday:
Afternoon: 0-4-5-5
Evening: N/A


AROUND FLORIDA


Florida marks 10th anniversary of Sept. 11


By TAMARA LUSH
Associated Press
TAMPA Hundreds of
people gathered in down-
town Tampa on Friday
to honor the heroes, the
victims and the survivors
of Sept 11 and the war on
terrorism:
It was one of dozens
of Sept 11-related events
around Florida scheduled
to mark the 10th anniversa-
ry of the day that terrorists
flew planes into the World
Trade Center in New
York City, the Pentagon in
Washington, D.C. and into
a field in Pennsylvania.
Nearly 3,000 people died in
the attacks that day.
Florida Gov. Rick Scott,
several officials from
MacDill Air Force Base
and United States Central
Command and various
local officials attended
Friday's noontime cer-
emony.
Scott's remarks were
brief and offered "solemn
prayers" to those lost in
the attacks.
Admiral-Bill McRaven,
who is commander of the
U.S. Special Operations
Command based at
MacDill, said the events of
Sept 11, 2001 are linked
to other recent events
- such as the helicop-
ter crash on Aug. 6 in
Afghanistan that killed 38
troops, including Navy
SEALS and special forces.
"Yes, we should remem-
ber who we lost, but we
should never forget what
we have," he said. "We
have our freedom and
that sounds trite, until you


meet people that don't
have it."
Later in the ceremony,
various people includ-
ing an Army ranger who
was paralyzed while fight-
ing in Afghanistan and a
woman who was working
in one of the World Trade
Center towers when it was
hit by the plane placed
wreaths on a long, rusted
piece of metal that had
been salvaged from the
twin towers.
Around the state, people
will mark the 10th anniver-
sary of the Sept. 11 terror-
ist attacks on Saturday and
Sunday with other events.
In Brevard County on
Friday, volunteers from the
county offices will place
2,977 flags commemorat-
ing the victims in Viera.
Volunteers from the
United States Attorney's
Office in Florida will visit
four public schools in
Miami-Dade, Broward,
Palm Beach and St Lucie
counties and talk about the
value of public service and
to help plant gardens.
Oi Sunday morning
in Fort Lauderdale, the
Broward County Sheriff's
Office was scheduled
to hold a Patriot Day
Memorial Service. In
Miami-Dade, Archbishop
Thomas Wenski will be
joined by first responders
of the city of Miami and
from throughout South
Florida for a morning
Catholic mass.
In Tallahassee, motor-
cycle riders will escort a
steel beam from the World
Trade Center to the state
capitol.


ASSOCIATED PRESS
,Retired Key West Fire Captain Alex Vega inspects a flag bearing names of victims of. the Sept. 11, 2001, terrorist attacks at
the Key West Firehouse Museum in Key West on Friday. Like so many organizations around America, the museum plans a
Sunday memorial tribute during the 10th anniversary of the attacks..


Florida set for big role in GOP presidential race


WASHINGTON (AP) Take a
breather, Iowa and New Hampshire.
Florida is about to get into the
Republican presidential race big
time,, starting with a televised debate
Monday in Tampa and ending with an
early primary in 2012 that conceivably
could wrap up the nomination.
It's quite plausible that front-run-
ners Rick Perry and Mitt Romney
could roughly divide the first four
contests, in Iowa, New Hampshire,


Nevada and South Carolina. If that
happens, Florida could prove the.
virtual tie-breaker, a prize so big in a
state so central to presidential elec-
tions that the loser might struggle to
stay afloat.
"My guess is that Florida is going
to be the big kahuna," said Brad
Coker, a Florida-based pollster for
Mason-Dixon who conducts surveys
nationwide. Florida is much larger,
diverse and expensive than the other


four early-voting states, he said, and
so it rewards the type of campaign-
ing a Republican must do around the
country to oust President Barack
Obama in November 2012.
Of course, events over the next
few months could upend that sce-
nario. Perry, the Texas governor, or
Romney, a former Massachusetts
governor, might stumble. Minnesota
Rep. Michele Bachmann could
revive her struggling campaign.


PEOPLE IN THE NEWS


Daughter of Uzbek leader's fashion show canceled


NEW YORK (AP) The produc-
ers of New York's Fashion Week
have canceled a show scheduled for
next week by the daughter of the
president of Uzbekistan amid pres-
sure from a human rights group and
a planned protest over the use of
child labor in her country.
"As a result of various concerns
raised we have canceled the Guli
show on September 15th," IMG
spokesman Zach Eichman said in an
email Friday.
He did not elaborate on the rea-
sons, but Human Rights Watch had
been in contact with organizers for
about a week, raising objections
to the planned show by Gulnara
Karimova because of what it calls
widespread human rights abuses in
Uzbekistan.
"The decision by New York Fashion
Week to cancel a show by the daugh-
ter of Uzbekistan's abusive ruler sends
a message to the Uzbek government
that its appalling human rights record
is of global concern," the group said in
a statement Friday night
Adding to the pressure on orga-
nizers, the Washington-based
International Labor Rights Forum
had called for a protest to coin-
cide with the Sept 15 show in the
Fashion Week tents at Lincoln
Center. While applauding Friday's
decision, the group still plans the
rally as a more general protest
against child labor in Uzbekistan's
cotton industry.
'This is still a broader issue,affect-
ing the entire fashion industry," said
Tim Newman, campaign director of
the labor group.
Karimova is the eldest daughter
of Uzbek leader Islam Karimov.
She has held several positions in
her country's government, includ-
ing heading its diplomatic missions
in Spain and at the United Nations
office in Geneva, where she lives
with her son and daughter.
This was not Karimova's first
appearance at Mercedes-Benz
Fashion Week in New York she
held a show last year as well. Asked
why no protest was mobilized then,
Newman said his group simply


ASSOCIATED PRESS
In this May 17, 2010 file photo, Gulnara
Karimova arrives for the Chopard 150th
anniversary party, during the 63rd inter-
national film festival, in Cannes, France,
hadn't been aware of her planned
appearance early enough. 'This year,
we were prepared," he said.
It was Human Rights Watch that
initiated the opposition, not only
because of the child labor issue but
because of other rights abuses,"
said Steve Swerdlow, Uzbekistan
researcher at the rights group.
'Torture, suppression of dissent
- there were many compelling rea-
sons," he said in a telephone inter-
view. "We felt the fashion industry
shouldn't be lending her a platform."
Karimova has been involved in
a number of charities. However,
her image as a philanthropist was
dealt a blow recently with the
release of U.S. diplomatic cables by
Wikileaks.
'The discussion of the honest,
hardworking (Gulnara), look-
ing out for the best interests of
her country, likely irks the many
business people who have been
crushed by Karimova and her
greed as well as the general public,
who view her as something of a
robber baron," one dispatch reads.


Michael Jackson 30-page
jury survey released

LOS ANGELES (AP) The first
phase of jury selection in the trial of
Michael Jackson's doctor concluded
Friday with 145 prospective jurors
cleared for further questioning after
answering an in-depth questionnaire
probing their views about the King of
Pop and the criminal case against his
doctor.
The 30-page questionnaire, which
seeks extensive personal informa-
tion, challenged prospective jurors to
share their feelings about the dead
superstar and about the fact that his
famous family members will be in
court every day for testimony.
They were asked whether they
have seen the posthumous Jackson
concert movie, "This Is It," and
whether they have bought Jackson
CDs, DVDs or memorabilia.
"Have you ever considered your-
self a fan of Michael Jackson or the
Jackson family?" they were asked.
They were required to specify
how much they know about the
involuntary manslaughter case
against Dr. Conrad Murray, who
has pleaded not guilty in Jackson's
death from an overdose of the anes-
thetic propofol.
Among the questions: Have
potential jurors read newspaper sto-
ries about the King of Pop's death?
Have they followed coverage of
legal developments? Did they watch
the funeral or memorial service for
Jackson who died on June 25, 2009,
or did they try to attend the ser-
vices in person?
The form also gave prospective
jurors a warning that publicity about
the case will be heavy and they must
ignore it.
"There will be cameras, reporters
members of the Murray and Jackson
families, and members of the public
present in the courtroom," said one
question. "... Would the presence of
cameras and these people affect your
responsibility to be completely fair
and impartial to both parties in the
case?"


Celebrity Birthdays


" Movie director Brian De Palma is 71.
" Drummer Mickey Hart of the Grateful Dead is 68.
" Actress Amy Madigan is 61.
" Actress Virginia Madsen is 50.
" Actress Kristy McNichol is 49.
" Musician Moby is 46.
" Singer Harry Connick Jr. is 44.
" Guitarist Jon Buckland of Coldplay is 34.
" Rapper Ludacris is 34.
* Singer Charles Kelley of Lady Antebellum is 30.

Daily Scripture


"Even to your old age and gray
hairs I am he, I am he who will
sustain you. I have made you
and I will carry you; I will sus-
tain you and I will rescue you."
Isaiah 46:4 NIV.


Lake City
HOW TO REACH US
Main number ........(386) 752-1293
Fax number ..............752-9400
Circulation .............. 755-5445
Online... www.lakecityreporter.com
The Lake City Reporter, an affiliate of
Community Newspapers Inc., is pub-
lished Tuesday through Sunday at 180
E. Duval St., Lake City, Fla. 32055.
Periodical postage paid at Lake City, Fla.
Member Audit Bureau of Circulation and
The Associated Press.
All material herein is property of the Lake
City Reporter. Reproduction in whole or
In part is forbidden without the permis-
sion of the publisher. U.S. Postal Service
No. 310-880.
POSTMASTER: Send address changes
to Lake City Reporter, P.O. Box 1709.
Lake City, Fla. 32056.
Publisher ToddWilson .... .754-0418
(twilson@lakecityreporter.com)
NEWS
Editor Robert Bridges .....754-0428
(rbridges@lakecityreporter.com)
ADVERTISING
Director Ashley Butcher ...754-0417
(abutcher@lakecityreporter.corm)
CLASSIFIED
To place a classified ad, call 755-5440


Reporter

BUSINESS
Controller Sue Brannon... .754-0419
(sbrannon@lakecityreporter.com)
CIRCULATION
Home delivery of the Lake City Reporter
should be completed by 6:30 a.m.
Tuesday through Saturday, and by 7:30
a.m. on Sunday.
Lease call 386-755-5445 to report any
problems with your delivery service.
In Columbia County, customers should
call before 10:30 a.m. to report a ser-
vice error for same day re-delivery. After
10:30 a.m., next day re-delivery or ser-
vice related credits will be issued.
In all other counties where home delivery
is available, next day re-delivery or ser-
vice related credits will be issued.
Circulation ...............755-5445
(circulationr@lakecityreporter.com)
Home delivery rates
(Tuesday through Sunday)
12 Weeks. ................. $26.32
24 Weeks .. ............... $48.79
52 Weeks ............... $83.46
Rates incude 79 sales tax.
Mall rates
12 Weeks .............. .. $41.40
24 Weeks .................. $82.80
52 Weeks ................ $179.40


CORRECTION

The Lake City Reporter corrects errors of fact in news
items. If you have a concern, question or suggestion,
please call the executive editor. Corrections and clarifica-
tions will run in this space. And thanks for reading.


FLORIDA


Saturday:
N/A


Saturday:
N/A


Page Editor: Robert Bridges, 754-0428








LAKE CITY REPORTER 9/11 SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 11, 2011 3


Flight 93 victims lauded at dedication


SHANKSVILLE, Pa. (AP) The 40 pas-
sengers and crew who fought back against
their hijackers aboard Flight 93 on Sept. 11
performed one of the most courageous acts
in U.S. history, former President George
W. Bush said Saturday at a ceremony dedi-
cating the first phase of a memorial at the
nation's newest national park.
The hijackers intended to crash the plane


in Washington but "never made it because
of the determination and valor of the pas-
sengers and crew of Flight 93, that plane
crashed in this field, less than 20 minutes by
air" from the target, said Jon Jarvis, director
of the National Park Service.
Bill Clinton likened the actions of those
aboard Flight 93 to the defenders of the
Alamo in Texas or the Spartans at the


Battle of Thermopylae some 2,500 years
ago, with a dramatic and telling difference:
'They were soldiers. They knew what they
had to do."
They were, he said, "ordinary people
given no time at all to decide and they did
the right thing. And 2,500 years from now,
I hope and pray to God that people will still
remember this."


They were among several speakers at
the dedication of the Flight 93 National
Memorial who told of the sacrifice and
honor of the passengers and crew. The
ceremony drew more than 4,000 people,
including hundreds of victims' relatives,
to the rural Pennsylvania field where the
hijacked plane crashed nearly 10 years
ago.


TOGETHER: A nation comes together as one in the wake of terror attacks

Continued From Page 1A


attacks is to confront the
threat of terrorism and
leave behind a legacy of
peace, he said.
"It changed our country
and the way we look at
things," Witt said.
Security at airports,
courthouses and other
government buildings is
much higher as a result
of the attacks. But the
attacks also showed that
Americans are resilient
and are unwilling to cower
in fear of terrorists.
"It taught us to appreci-
ate the freedoms we do
have," Witt said.
Retired Lt. Col. and
Columbia County Sheriff
Mark Hunter was a
National Guard major the


day of the attacks.
"There was a lot of dis-
belief," he said. "We lost a
lot that day."
As events unfolded,
Hunter said his perspec-
tive was different than his
co-workers because he
knew he would likely be
called to active duty.
"Quite obviously, I
wasn't thinking the way
they [co-workers] did," he
said. "I started thinking
about my unit and the role
we'd play."
Hunter, a National
Guard combat engineer,
was called to active duty
multiple times to train
troops at Camp Blanding
in Jacksonville before they
were deployed.


The very real threat of
another attack has forced
law enforcement agencies
nationwide to be prepared
to respond quickly to any
potential act of terrorism.
And they take all threats
seriously.
"In some ways the
changes are for the bet-
ter," Hunter said. "The
public is very understand-
ing."
When the Federal
Aviation Administration
grounded all aircraft in
response to the Sept. 11
terrorist attacks a decade
ago, Lake City Gateway
Airport got some unex-
pected traffic.
The airport isn't a desti-
nation for passenger jets,


but a U.S. Air jet headed to
South Florida was diverted
to the municipal airport.
Tom Sawyer, the air-
port's general manager,
said the airport runway
was long enough for the
jet to land safely. Though
the airport doesn't have pas-
senger service, workers
were prepared to accom-
modate the jet.
A portable stairway was
rolled out, allowing passen-
gers to safely disembark,
Sawyer said.
The passengers were
taken by bus to South
Florida.
While 9/11 ceremonies
held in nearly every com-
munity in the nation are
likely somber, bittersweet


events, there are reasons
for optimism.
A new World Trade
Center is under construc-
tion, many of al-Qaeda's
top leaders are dead or
captured, and Americans
continue to support law
enforcement and the
military for their roles in
national security.
Vince Lombardi, the
late, great Green Bay


Packers coach, once told
his players how to handle
adversity. While Lombardi
was talking about foot-
ball, his message easily
describes the resilience
shown by Americans a
decade after the attacks.
"It's not whether you get
knocked down," he said.
"It's whether you get up,"


N


REACTION: Shock, fear

Continued From Page 1A


take a few moments to
write a handwritten note."
Ten years don't seem to
have past since the attacks,
said Jim Garrison
"It stays fresh in my
mind," he said.
Garrison, was driving
from place to place to per-
form a deer track count
in the woods for the FWC
when news of the attacks
came on the radio.
"I quit what I was doing
for the day and went
home," he said. "I couldn't
keep working."
He was saddened and
shocked by the news and
watched details of the day
on the TV.
"I felt kind of hopeless,"
he said.
Bruce Lyon of Lake City
echoed Garrison's senti-
ments about the time that's
elapsed.
"Ten years is hard to
believe," he said.
Lyon was home watching
the BBC and saw the news
of the first tower falling.
At the time no one was
sure if it was an accident or
intentional, but by the sec-
ond one falling everyone
knew what was happening,
he said.
"I was just dumbfound-
ed," Lyon said.
Memories of Sept. 11 are
not limited to those who
were adults that day.
Jesika Sheffield of Lake
City remembers the day
well despite being in kin-
dergarten at the time.
"My teacher's husband
was there at the time and
she turned on the TV and
we saw the second tower
go down," she said. "She
was literally sobbing."
Sheffield's mother was
in tears when she came
home. Her father was just as
emotional.
"My dad came in and
held all three of us," she
said. "I'd never seen my dad
cry before."
It scared her to see the
events unfold, Sheffield said.
The lasting memory of 9-
11 has made her refuse to
ride on. an airplane, even to
this day, she said.
Just recently Miesha
Stewart of Lake City began
to really understand what
happened on Sept. 11,
2001, she said.
"I just knew a plane had
crashed," said Stewart,
also in kindergarten at the
time. "It never really set
in until last year what hap-
pened."
Life in America has
changed considerably
since that day, said Hayden
Stancil of Lake City.
"Back then it was


relaxed and calm," she
said. "We didn't really
know about terrorism or
being on high alert."
Even years after the
event, it still has a pro-
found affect on emotions.
"About a year ago it hit
me hard," Stancil said.
(After viewing clips) I felt
like I was going to cry for
all the people lost."


"i Florida
a Credit Union



CD Specials



25-Month Special- 1.07% APY



36-Month Special 1.61% APY




$10,000 Minimum


583 West Duval Street
Lake City


755-4141
www.flcu.org


Deit a lederly insured by the NCUA a US Goemment Agency, for up to $250,000. Annual
Percentage Trd (AP effeave 9/2/201 and subject to dange at any ime. Offer expires 9/30/011.


GET IN THE ZONE!
BOWL AND GET A TILGATE PACKAGE FEATURING YOUR FAVORITE SCHOOL
OVER 50 TOP rCLLEGS AVAILABLE!
JOIN THE LEAGUE TODAY!
Ask For Details At The Desk


rreeT Ie
FaC mTe
Colo" T"n!


OU anB m oll-M (hok


ClIII"1"meqT= C---a,,


4 Great Prize Packs

to Choose From
1. College Tailgate Package
2. Nascar Drives Jacket
3. Custom Bowling Ball
4. Lake City Bowl Gift Certificate *140.00

Wednesday Nights
4 Per Team
S Men, women, youth

Starts September 14
Meeting 8:00pm

SIGN UP TODAY


lake city


FOR MORE INFORMATION
CALL 755-2206
LakeCityBowl.net


NCU


Page Editor: Robert Bridges, 754-0428


S1L7r











OPINION


Sunday, September I1,2011


www.lakecityreporter.com


OUR


OUR
OPINION


Time to

rekindle

American

pride

We can remem-
ber Sept 11,
2001, on this
sunny Sunday
so similar to
that clear day in New York,
Washington and Pennsylvania
a decade ago, but do we live
up the challenge that still is
required to rebuild?
We can, but do we?
The sleeping American giant
was awakened on that terrible
day. Pride was at all-time high
and American citizens were up
to any challenge, any test We
would not be defeated.
Since, we've been engaged in
the longest war in our country's
history, a decade's fight on fronts
in Iraq and Afghanistan. We have
a government that won't and
can't pay its bills. Good people
are trapped in bad situations
and can't find work. Taxes are
too high and the return on our
federal government investment.
is lackluster.
Maybe that's why the flags
don't fly everywhere like they
once did? Where are all the
red, white and blue streamers
that waved from porches and
office fronts? Where has our
visible pride gone?
We are America, a land led,
ruled and run by the people.
We are resilient cannot
and will not be defeated. Not 10
years ago. Not ever.
Always remember what hap-
pened on Sept 11, 2001.
And always remember what
happened the next day and
in the weeks that followed.
Remember how America
stepped up and gave adversity
its walking papers. Remember
how citizens collectively said,
"We will not stand for this."
Fly your flags at half staff
today in tribute to the innocent
victims of that day.
Then tomorrow, fly your
flag high and mightily. If not
literally, at least let it rise in
your American spirit. Let your
resolve lift you above whatever
challenge we still face as the
citizens of the greatest country
to exist in world history.
We believe. It's the American
way.


Lake City Reporter
Serving Columbia County
Since 1874
The Lake City Reporter is pub-
lished with pride for residents of
Columbia and surrounding counties by
Community Newspapers Inc.
We believe strong newspapers build
strong communities -"Newspapers
get things done!"
Our primary goal is to
publish distinguished and profitable
community-oriented newspapers.
This mission will be accomplished
through the teamwork of professionals
dedicated to truth, integrity and hard
work.
Todd Wilson, publisher
Robert Bridges, editor
Sue Brannon, controller
Dink NeSmith, president
Tom Wood, chairman

LETTERS
POLICY
Letters to the Editor should be
typed or neatly written and double
spaced. Letters should not exceed
400 words and will be edited for
length and libel. Letters must be
signed and include the writer's name,
address and telephone number for
verification. Writers can have two
letters per month published. Letters
and guest columns are the opinion of
the writers and not necessarily that of
the Lake City Reporter.
BY MAIL: Letters, P.O. Box 1709,


Lake City, FL 32056; or drop off at
180 E. Duval St. downtown.
BY FAX: (386) 752-9400.
BY E-MAIL:
news@lakecityreporter.com


I like music as well as
anyone but would
mostly rather listen to
my own collection than
what's on the radio, and
would generally rather listen
to the news, or at least intel-
ligent discourse on the day's
events, than that The point Robert B
being, if something big hap- rbndges@lakecity(
pens while I'm in my car, I
don't want to be nodding along
to a Bob Dylan disc, oblivious to the chaos
unfolding around me.
And so on the morning of Tuesday, Sept. 11,
2001 I had tuned into Don Imus (whether that
qualifies as intelligent discourse is up to you)
as I made my way to an 8 a.m. appointment,
assuming he'd break in with a bulletin should
anything of interest happen on my two-hour
drive. At this point I should note I was living
in California at the time three hours behind
events on the East Coast.
Thank God for commercials.
During a break I scanned the dial and hit on
a news station just minutes after the second
plane struck.
The Imus broadcast I'd been listening to
was taped for West Coast consumption, of
course, and he never would have mentioned
the agony just starting to unfold in lower
Manhattan.


sary of the ter-
rorist attacks of
September 11,
2001 on the World
Trade Center twin towers in
New York City, the Pentagon
in Washington D.C. and in
the skies over Pennsylvania
demands considered reflec-
tion.
A decade provides useful
distance for relatively dispas-
sionate discussion of how we
have responded to the shock-
ing, grotesque mass murder,
now referred to in linguistic
shorthand as "9/11." How
should the American people in
total be graded?
Concerning our national
institutions and behavior as
people, there is solid justifica-
tion for high marks. Despite
the terrible nature of the
attacks, and the thousands of
deaths of Americans as well
as citizens of other countries,
as a national community we
remained remarkably calm.
The population as a whole
did not react with hysteria or
any extremism. Such incidents
have been mercifully infre- .
quent, relatively isolated and
have waned over time. Anti-
Islamic acts involving violation
of law have been diligently
investigated and prosecuted.
The clearest parallel event
to 9/11 is the surprise attack
by Japan on United States
naval forces at Pearl Harbor
Hawaii on December 7, 1941,
which had severe, continu-
ing repercussions within our
social and political life. Intense
fear as well as hostility led to
the internment and more gen-
eral persecution of Japanese-
Americans on much of the
West Coast of the U.S. Brutal


ridges
reporter.com


Arthur I. Cyr
acyr(at)corthoge.edu


Pacific combat in the war had
racist elements on both sides,
Internment was contrary
to President Franklin D.
Roosevelt's wartime emphasis
on national unity, and FBI
Director J. Edgar Hoover
opposed the move, but politi-
cally ambitious California
Attorney General Earl Warren
was adamant. This context
makes all the more heroic the
military service of Japanese-
American troops in the
European theatre.
Persecution of Japanese-
Americans is particularly noto-
rious but not entirely unique.
There was less extensive dis-
crimination against German-
Americans during both World
War I and World War II, and
against Italian-Americans in
the latter conflict. During the
Civil War, bloody riots against
the military draft in the North
included beatings and mur-
ders of African-Americans.
Against this backdrop,
American tolerance of Islamic-
Americans and Moslems in
general in the aftermath of
9/11 is impressive and note-
worthy. In a fundamental way,
Americans have demonstrated
maturity that is both ethically
right and practically helpful.
Al-Qaida has an interest
in promoting generalized
Western hostility to the
Moslem world, along with


The rest of the day was a
blur, as for most of us.
Folks kept invoking Pearl
Harbor.
I kept thinking of 1814,
when British troops burned
the White House and nearly
snuffed out the flame of liberty
for good.
Beyond that I kept wonder-


ing how anyone could be so
stupid and reckless as to launch
a frontal assault on the greatest military power
the planet has ever known. A suicide mission
in more ways than one, I imagined.
My incredulity slipped into rage. Then grief.
Whose didn't?
Our nation faces a number of pressing
problems today, most of them fiscal in nature.
Folks worry, as they will, for the future of the
republic.
I worry too.
But we've seen trouble before.
Don't doubt for a minute well emerge from
our current crisis even stronger-as a people.
I'm back where I belong now, and I don't
just mean Florida.
God bless America, and God bless each and
every one of you.
a Robert Bridges is editor of the Lake City
Reporter.


intimidation within our bor-
ders. We have permitted them
neither victory.
Failure to anticipate the
Pearl Harbor strike reflected
inter-service rivalry and intel-
ligence inefficiency, plus arro-
gance about Japanese military
effectiveness even though
that nation's navy, with stun-
ning efficiency, had destroyed
the Russian fleet only a few
decades earlier.
Pearl Harbor demonstrated
Tokyo's innovative use of
tactical aircraft for strategic
destruction of capital ships,
an approach. American com-
manders failed to foresee.
Even Adm. William E "Bull"
Halsey, more worried than
most about a Japanese strike,
who acted to keep vital aircraft
carriers safely out at sea, was
more concerned primarily
about submarine rather than
air attack at Pearl.
Likewise, 9/11 was facilitated
by secretiveness and rivalries
among our intelligence and
security services, and no little
cultural arrogance if not racism
regarding Arabs generally.
Immediately after 9/11, the
United Nations and NATO
acted, and remain together.
This marks the first wartime
deployment of the military alli-
ance formed during the Cold
War.
Americans collectively
should feel considerable pride
about how we as a people have
responded to grotesque mass
murder within our borders.
This benchmark of a decade
provides the opportunity for
reflection and renewal.

a Arthur I. Cyr is Clausen
Distinguished Professor at
Carthage College.


WE WILL NEVER FORGET


4A


I


Getting up to


speed on 9/11


A time for reflection


Todd Wilson
twilson@lakecityreportercom



One time


zone and


a world


away


My first memory of
Sept. 11, 2001, is
of a mother rock-
ing a sweet baby
girl wrapped in a
soft pink blanket, eyes wide as she
takes a morning bottle. The scene
is my wife and daughter, sitting
peacefully in my living room.
Ten years ago, we lived in
Arkansas, Central Time, and as
the carnage was breaking news in
the first hour of the workday in the
East, I was getting dressed for work
in the 7 o'clock hour. I had watched
our two-week-old baby daughter
sleep in her bassinet while I picked
a shirt from the closet My wife, at
home from her career on maternity
leave, had driven my stepson to
junior high school.
She returned around 7:45 to
scoop up the baby and offer the
bottle. In our living room rocker,
she turned on the TV and alerted
me to what she saw, thinking the
first tower had been struck acciden-
tally by an errant airplane.
I turned on the bedroom TV and
saw the smoldering black hole and
heavy smoke rising from the far
side of the single tower. TV talking
heads babbled incessantly trying to
fill airtime, unsure of exactly what
was happening.
I was buttoning my shirt as the
second plane came into view from
the side of the screen and slammed
into the second tower. Live TV, but
so surreal I did a double take and
the thought went through my head
that 'no way this is real.' There was
silence on the TV network, then
words were chosen slowly and very
carefully, as the magnitude of the
day began to come into focus.
At the time, I supervised the
news operation of two weekly news-
papers that covered portions of five
counties. We were completely local
news. No Associated Press stories
or any other syndicates. Our cover-
age of the day was based entirely
on local happenings and reaction.
It was all hands on deck and we
spent the day talking with and pho-
tographing people.
SBy noon, there was a prayer vigil
on our courthouse lawn. A country
preacher named Johnny led the
service and as he rocked back on
the heels of his sharp-toed cowboy
boots, tears streaming down his
face, he looked toward heaven and
asked the Lord to answer America's
9-1-1 call to rescue us from evil. Up
to that moment, it had been just
Tuesday. That's where I realized on
the calendar, it was 9-11.
By 2 p.m., there was a run on
gasoline at every convenience
store in town. A rumor got out
that gas was suddenly $6 a gal-
lon in Little Rock and all sup-
plies would be cut off. Vehicles
packed around the pumps and
log-jammed the street approaches
trying to get the last drop before
the anticipated price gouge and
empty tanks. None of it was true,
but, logic temporarily vanished on
Sept. 11, 2001, and we all had the
agonizing paranoia that with the
blow we already had been dealt,
anything was possible.
We lived in the flight path of the
Memphis airport. That night, I sat
on the tailgate in my driveway and
looked up through clear skies at
nothing but stars. No blinking air-
planes climbing or descending. No
distant jet noise from a mile up.
The world had changed in a
big way. I wondered what kind of
America my baby girl, bundled and
sleeping inside, would inherit.

* Todd Wilson is publisher of the
Lake City Reporter.









LAKE CITY REPORTER 9/11 SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 11, 2011


AP: No sign of U.S. entry for terror plot


WASHINGTON (AP) U.S. intelli-
gence agencies have found no evidence
that al-Qaida has sneaked any terrorists
into the country for a strike coinciding
with the 10th anniversary of the Sept. 11
attacks, senior officials said Saturday.
But authorities kept a high alert as
investigators looked for proof of a plot
possibly timed to disrupt events planned
Sunday in Washington or New York.
Since late Wednesday, counterterrorism
officials have chased a tip that al-Qaida
may have sent three men to the U.S. on a
mission to detonate a car bomb in either
city. At least two of those men could be
U.S. citizens, according to the tip.
No intelligence supported that tip as of
Saturday, and officials continued to ques-
tion the validity of the initial information.
While such tips are common among
intelligence agencies, this one received
more attention, and government officials
chose to speak publicly about it, because
of the connection to the anniversary of the


worst terrorist attack in U.S. history.
Al-Qaida long has hoped to strike again
on the anniversary.
Atthe FBI field office in Washington, asis-
tant director James McJunkin described
the tip and the response as routine. The
U.S. already had bolstered security nation-
wide before the upcoming anniversary
and anticipated an increase in tips.
"We expect we're going to get an
increase in threats and investigative activ-
ity around high-profile dates and events,"
he said. "This is a routine response for us.
It's routine because it's muscle memory."
Intelligence analysts have looked at
travel patterns and behaviors of people
who recently entered the country. While
they have singled out a few people for
additional scrutiny, none has shown any
involvement in a plot, according to the
senior U.S. officials, who insisted on ano-
nymity to discuss the investigation.
President Barack Obama met with his
national security team Saturday, but the


White House released no new information
about possible threats. A statement said
that counterterrorism efforts were work-
ing well and would not ease in the weeks
and months ahead.
The tip that touched off the most recent
investigation came from a CIA informant
who has proved reliable in the past,
according to U.S. officials. They said the
informant approached intelligence officials
overseas to say that the men were ordered
by new al-Qaida leader Ayman al-Zawahri
to mark the 10th anniversary of the Sept.
11 by doing harm on U.S. soil.
He took over as the group's leader
after the U.S. killed Osama bin Laden
during a raid in May at his compound in
Pakistan.
The informant said the would-be attack-
ers were of Arab descent and might speak
Arabic as well as English. Counterterrorism
officials were looking for certain names
associated with the threat, but it was
unclear whether the names were real or


fake.
Some intelligence officials have raised,
doubts about the threat, given the short
turnaround time. Someone who recently
arrived in the United States would have
just days to plan and obtain materials for a
car bomb attack, a difficult feat even with
a long lead time.
But they did not dismiss the threat.
Extra security was put in place to protect
the people in the two cities that took the
brunt of the jetliner attacks that killed
nearly 3,000 people at the World Trade
Center and the Pentagon.
Law enforcement agencies around the
country had increased security at air-
ports, nuclear plants, train stations and
elsewhere in the weeks leading to Sept.
11. The latest threat made those measures
more urgent.
U.S. embassies and consulates also
stepped up safeguards in preparation for
the anniversary.


ART: Local man memorializes spirit of America in the wake of 9/11 attacks

Continued From Page 1A


While his focus is
mostly airplanes, the 9/11
attacks inspired Soto to
deviate from his normal
genre.
The day after the
attacks, Soto drove a rental
car from Boston when he
began planning a paint-
ing to commemorate the
World Trade Center's twin
towers. He named the
painting "Spirit of America:
Never Again."
"I don't recall I ever
published or exhibited the
painting until some years
later because it was quite


of the 9/11 attacks and the
selfless sacrifices so many
made in response.
History about the
attacks was added to
the curriculum to help
students understand the
significance of the anniver-
sary, he said.
Students were encour-
aged to write letters to the
firemen at Station 10 to
thank them for their public
service and to pay tribute
to their fallen comrades.
More than 500 students
wrote letters that were.
mailed to the fire station
this week.
"These kids who wrote
the letters were so young
[when the attacks hap-
pened]," HJatcher said. "'We
found we had to re-educate
them."
Rebecca Bailey, a 16-
year-old sophomore; said
she had never seen video
of the aircraft striking
the twin towers until she
began research for her let-
ter. The video showing the
towers collapse gave her
a new perspective of the
attack, she said.
"I didn't understand at
the time," she said.
Her letter praised the
firefighters for their self-
less acts of courage.
"Not many people have
a chance to do something
heroic," she said. "I think
law enforcement is good."
Tenth-grader Andrew
Baker, 15, said he admires
the firefighters who serve,
knowing their lives are at
risk any time they respond
to a call.
"I can't imagine the loss
they felt, losing so many,"
he said. 'They showed
some real bravery and
courage to save so many."
Hatcher, who was the
high school's principal the.
day of the attacks, said he
struggled with the best
way to break news of the
attacks to students.
"We kept it to a certain
degree, low key," he said.
"By the end of the, every-
one knew it was a terrorist
attack, not an accident."
Some parents pulled
their children from class
that day, but most stu-
dents remained at school,
Hatcher said.
Teachers changed roles
and acted as counselors to
help reassure students that
they were safe.


personal to me and really
wasn't intended for public
view it was the result of
some emotions I needed to
release," he said.
It became the first of
three paintings inspired by
the event.
"Of the three paintings,
one is in the National
Museum of Naval Aviation,
one was sold at auction in
2006 with proceeds going
to charity-and I kept this
one," he said.
Soto said he arrived in
Boston for a conference
where he was scheduled


"Everybody was
very pensive," he said.
"Everyone was emotionally
drained."
Columbia High
School Principal Terry
IHuddfeston said a.special-
video was shown to stu-
dents to commemorate the
anniversary.
"I can never get that
picture out of my mind
seeing the debris and the
fireball," he said.
The day of the attack,
Huddleston said he was
principal at Eastside
Elementary School.
.Because they were so
young, fuddleston said
pupils were not told about
the attacks. -.


to make a presentation on
computer-generated art,
which was in its infancy at
the time.
He never made the pre-
sentation because the con-
ference was canceled after
the attacks. His return
flight from Boston's Logan
International Airport,
where terrorists hijacked
two the of jets used in the
attacks, was canceled.
"In the meantime, I was
wondering what to do," he
said. "I wondered how I
was going to get home."
Soto called the car


"We didn't say anything
to them that day," he


rental company for permis-
sion to drop off the car at
Jacksonville International
Airport,1,400 miles away.
The company refused
his request, but Soto drove
to Jacksonville anyway.
He expected the company
would charge him hun-
dreds of dollars in penal-
ties. When he dropped off
the car, Soto said he was
moved to tears when the
rental company charged
him an additional $30.95
for dropping off the car a
day late.
During the two-day trip


said. "We tried to insulate
them."

APPy






qq
iBJt.i 'Aj





Geo yJ J, 8tf
a G-U^tfv. ^ott
B a a~iui" laM


October is National Breast

SCancer Awareness Month.

In the take City Reporter we'd like to take
a moment to salute the strength and courage of
breast cancer survivors and to remember those
whose brave battle has ended.

Publishes Sunday, October 2, 2011

Sample Ad Actual Size


Anne Ratliff
Breast cancer survivor
for 10 years
The Greatest Mother
& Grandmother!
lie all love you,
Btig Richard, Richard,
Robert & Ramnh


Get your 2 i (3.458inx2in) a wit

photo and special message for only $40!

For more information call Mary at (386) 754-5440
Or stop by the Lake City Reporter at 180 E. Duval Street, Lake City, Florida 32055

DEADLINE: WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 26, 2011

Lake City Reporter


home, Soto said he was
glad he was alone.
"I didn't want to talk,"
he said. "I don't ever
recall talking about it until
I started doing my first
painting a week after I got
back."
The painting shows
an American flag filling
the background, which
Soto said symbolizes the
length and breadth of the
nation. A bald eagle depict-
ing America's strength is


shown landing on the twin
towers with the sun setting
in the background.
"It symbolizes the fact
that, while the Towers
were destroyed, they are
still with us, always," he
said. "The sun will never
set on the memory of
those innocent people that
died as a result of this
tragedy and that we will
never forget either those
lost souls-or the event
itself."


After "
EiEZA30LIC
RESEARCH CENTER '
Semetabolle.com 0 0

Visit us on your mobile device u s. u, on t fcwk comhnetlabois>chcen]r
i, i ", .. .. ," .' Injections -: Prescription
Il El .. .. '. , I Energy Stmina* Loan Muscle
FREE CONSULTATION
(352) 374-4534
426 S.W. Commerce Dr., Ste 130 Lake City


SCHOOLS: A new chapter in American history

Continued From Page 1A


Mercy Medical
Urgent Care
9 am -8 pm
We accept
BCBS PPO United Heathcare AvMed Medicare
Self Pay & Out of Network
We charge the Medicare Rates

305 East Duval Street, LakeCity, FL 32055
Phone: (386) 758-2944* Fax: (386) 758-9822


Page Editor: Robert Bridges, 754-0428











LAKE CITY REPORTER WEATHER SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 11, 2011


THE WEATHER



L' ISOLATEDi CHANCE MOSTLY
OWNERS STORMS SUNNY



"I91 LO 191,L0, HI91L0


MOSTLY
SUNNY



HI92LOi


kE EE ,A,;.:;. ..... .
-_- '- --,


Pensacola
88, 69


ted
93,

Tallahassee ake
92.-62 91

Panama City
86 66


90181


m~mrc/i


TEMPERATURES
High Saturday
Low Saturday
Normal high
Normal low
Record high
Record low

PRECIPITATION
Saturday
Month total
Year total
Normal month-to-date
Normal year-to-date


89
68
88
69
96 in 1925
60 in 1963


0.00"
1.11"
27.79"
1.75"
38.51"


SUN
Sunrise
Sunset
Sunrise
Sunset

MOON
Moonri
Moonse
Moonri
Moonse


0
Sept.
12
Full


MOSTLY
SUNNY



HI 91 LO


.-," .,
.,, A". r. r.fl'. ." .J
%-


Monday
88, 74 1
88. 72,
90 79,t
92 74.
90 69't
90' 74, 1
90, 81.'1
91 68 '1
90,79, t
91,1 71t
90. 70.1
91, 75,'!
89'73. s
90 70,s
92 67 s
91 74.,t
94 65. pc
88 78,1


Tuesday ,
87,74.,1
91'73, !
90.. 79's.
91 73. ,
91 ,68 sn
89 74,'pc
90. 81,1
91 68 sn
89. 19,s
91 77s
91 70sn
92, 73' 1
88, 76 pc
91'71 5
92 68,'pc
91. 74 1
93 66 pc
88 78,s


I .
" 1 '';ii 1


today 7:13 a.m. '
today 7:41 p.m. .. .
tom. 7:13a.m.. ,m t
tom. 7:40 p.m. ,l 0lBnil bmn
4 Today's
| ultra svolet ' ,
se today 7:06 p.m. radiaon nsr ',
et today 6:30 a.m. ,or the area on
se tom. 7:36 p.m. a S e from 0 i
to 10. ,
et tom. 7:24 a.m. I

iiit ) he.co
*^^y SBt ;- -.- "_ T' w t1."2.t- _,--
Sept. Sept. Oct-. VI Forecasts, data and
20 27 3 graphics 2011 Wether
Last New First Central, LP, Madison, WIs.
weero www.woatherpubllther.com


4ATIONAL FORECAST: An area of scattered showers and thunderstorms will be likely from
:he lower Mississippi Valley, up across the Ohio Valley and southern Great Lakes, and into
:he Northeast today. Meanwhile, high pressure will be in control of the weather west of the
Vlississippi River, with most of the West staying dry.


*, ......- -


Os--
gor
91





olon o
C6






Orlando warm Front
g25
Miami Stationary
Front
91/80
Occluded
Front


YESTERDAY NATIONAL EXTREMES


ITY
Ibany NY
Ibuquerque
nchorage
tlanta
aimmore
Killings
Irmlngham
Ismarck
ole ,
oston
buffalo
hadeston SC
harelton WV
hadotte
heyenne
hicago
Inclnnati
leveland
olumbMa SC
almtola e
-ytona Beach
enver


Saturday Today
HI/Lo/Pcp. HI/Lo/W CITY
73/60/0 72/59/c Dee
71/60/0 82/61/pc Detro
56/51/0 60/45/pc E Pas
83/58/0 86/61/s Falrba
83/64/0 82/63/t Green
78/54/0 91/53/s Hartfo
84/56/0 87/60/pc Honol
83/47/0 85/56/s Houst
86/64/0 88/52/pc Indian
70/64/0 70/60/pc Jacks
77/59/0 76/62/sh Jacks
87/66/0 87/71/s Kansa
77/60/0 79/61/pc Las V
85/57/0 87/61/s Little
69/43/0 78/51/pc Los A
76/56/0 77/67/pc Memp
74/61/0 77/60/t Miam
74/64/.30 75/65/t MInni
87/61/0 88/63/s Mobis
89/60/0 94/67/s New
85/71/0 90/73/t NewY
76/45/0 83/59/s Oldah


High: 100", Red Bruff, Calif, Low: 29", StanleyIdaho


lolnes
it
so
inks
sboro
ird
ulu
on
sapolls
on MS

s City
fgas
Rock
ngeles
phis

polls
Oceans
orkt
oma City


Saturday Today
HI/Lo/Pcp. HI/Lo/W CITY
81/59/0 86/61/pc Omaha
72/62/.68 72/62/t Orlando
83/69/0 91/65/pc Philadelphia
47/45/.03 60/38/pc Phoenix
82/62/0 86/62/s Pittsburgh
81/59/0 72/60/c Portland ME
80/73/.01 89/73/s Portland OR
95/67/0 98/69/s Raleigh
70/59/0 77/60/t Rapid City
85/55/0 90/60/pc Reno
88/69/0 90/75/pc Richmond
75/56/0 83/61/s Sacramento
81/78/0 93/73/pc St. Louis
88/58/0 86/62/pc Salt Lake City
69/63/0 69/59/pc San Antonio
87/60/0 85/63/t San Diego
91/77/0 91/80/t San Francisco
87/63/0 87/65/pc Seattle
85/58/0 90/67/s Spokane
86/62/0 88/69/s Tampa
77/70/0 76/63/sh Tucson-
85/61/0 88/62/s Washington


Saturday Today
HI/Lo/Pcp. HI/Lo/W
79/58/0 83/60/s
88/72/0 92/75/t
84/72/0 78/65/t
93/78/0. 100/81/pc
75/63/0 75/58/t
72/54/0 68/54/pc
78/60/0 93/61/s
85/64/0 87/63/s
79/46/0 88/61/s
81/57/0 84/59/t
85/65/0 87/66/s
85/66/0 88/58/pc
72/64/.02 80/62/pc
79/60/0 81/63/t
92/66/0 99/70/s
68/64/0 71/62/pc
67/56/0 64/55/pc
77/55/0 85/58/s
80/61/0 95/56/s
83/75/.08 91/75/t
87/69/0 94/73/t
83/68/0 84/66/t


On this date in
1976, the remnants
of Tropical Storm
Kathleen brought up
to 5 inches of rain
carrying millions
of tons of debris
into Bullhead City,
Ariz., from torrential
rainfall at elevations
above 3,000 feet.
I J^J^^Hj^H^^^M


Saturday
Y. HI/Lo/Pcp.
84/77/0
jnsterdn 77/59/0
thie nna/na/n
Sucland 63/45/0
ling 63/55/0
itn 72/67/0
ueno#rAll 10.51/6
alro 90,'75,0
onev 86/59/0
lvan 91/72/0
isMid 66/46/0
loKong 93.84/0
Jngton 86/77/0


Today
HI/Lo/W
88/77,1
67/5 7/sh
90/72/s
59/50/sh
77/61/pc
80/62/t
69/48/pc
91/72/s
78/61/1
88,'73/1
65/50/pc
87,179,/
88/79/pc


CITY
Lap P :'
Uma
London-
Madrid
Mexico Cty
Montreal
Moscow
Nairobi
New Dlh
Qslo
Panama
Paris


C.i r4Y. TO CNOmoM NS: e" rixodv It-
-.


Saturday Today
HI/Lo/Pcp. HI/Lo,/W
57136.0 58/30/sh1
66/59/0 64/59/pc
12,63,0 65/57/sh
91.'59'0 89/58/s
68/41/0 61/52/t
64/54/0 71/61/pc
5,7/50/0 58/52/sh
77/59/0 76/54/pc
91/79/0 90/79/t
91/79/0 90/79/t
63/46/0 66/53/sh
88/75/0 84/73/t
88/61/0 68/58/sh


CITY
Rio
Rome
St. Thomas VI
San Juan PR
Santago
Seoul
Singapore
Sydney
Tel Aviv
Tokyo
Toronto
Vienna
Warsaw


,.Today


Saturday To.. day
HI/,Lo/ Pcp. HI/'Lo. W
81/70/0 82/69/sh
84/63/0 88/67/s
87/80/.22 87/78/t
88/82/0 84/75/t
68/50/0 74/45/s
79/64/0 78/68/sh
86/75/0 85/78/t
63/45/0 62/48/sh
86/73/0 88/74/s
88/79/0 85/73/t
75/59/0 70/63/pc
81/61/0 84/63/pc
66/45/0 77/56/pc


-s e h, ,' l fr s y-windy
!" silO' -. ;-tI:nder't jrrnns. A-winfLy.


Pay off your home in 5 years!


F you have 30% or more equity in your home...
I F you want to avoid high closing costs...


5-year FIXED APR' First Mortgage
(Please call for other rates & terms)


TOTAL CLOSING COSTS'
(Loans of $200,000 or less)


CAMPUS


ScpUSA
Apply online at campuscu.om or calledit 754-2219 today!l

Apply online at campuscu.com or call 754-2219 today!


Membership is open to everyone in Alachua, Clay, Columbia, Lake, Marion and Sumter countiesP
Offer not available on existing CAMPUS loans. Offer Is for new loans only. May not be combined with any other offer. 1. Credit approval, sufficient Income, adequate property valuation (maximum
LTV of 70%), and first mortgage position required. Owner-occupied property only. Offer excludes mobile homes; certain other restrictions apply. Property insurance is required; appraisal fee, flood and/or title insurance may be
required at an additional expense to the borrower. Example: a $100,000 loan at 2.99% for 60 months would require 59 monthly payments of $1,796.69 and a final payment of $1,701,38, total finance charge of $7,967.94; for a
total of payments of $107,800.94. The amount financed is $99,833.00. APR=Annual Percentage Rate. APR is 3.057%. 2. Credit approval and initial $5 deposit required. Mention this ad and we'll waive the $15 new membership fee.


^^cl l^M- LENDER


LaeCty13 SW I BacmNri r *il .Cm u 20 W5hAe .Cm u 90S 4hS Jnsil 0 V 41 ere utrsW l 15IV4r t,'oe qae52 W7t t
Sh n sa FRom pingills C m os 9200NW *39h Av O aa3 9 WCle eR E stO aa2 4 .Sle pig Bv W s ai nIII1 W93rd ourtRd.* S 1 95 USH y4 1 1


162 City
2 Jacksonville Cape Canaveral
e Cit 90 Daytona Beach
67 Ft. Lauderdale
ainesville Daytona Beach Fort Myers
9I 68 90 73 Galnesvllle
Ocala Jacksonville
91.70 ey West
Oriando Cape Canaveral Key West
92 75 88, 75 Lake City
Miami
Tampa Naples
91, 75 West Palm Beach Ocala
90 79 Orlando
t Ft Lauderdale Panama City
Ft Myers 90. 78 Pensacola
93 76 Naples Tallahassde
93 77 Miami Tampa
91 80 Valdosta
ey West W. Palm Beach


7aSunday p
Sunday


7p Monday6


-- esd ia uqisrihi


Eb j h;I mink


Page Editor: Robert Bridges, 754-0428


aInta










Story ideas?

Contact
Tim Kirby
Sports Editor
754-0421
tkirby@lakecityreportercom


Lake City Reporter





SPORTS


Sunday, September I I, 2011


www.lakecityreporter.com


Section B


BRIEFS

CHS SOCCER
Fundraiser at
Texas Roadhouse
Columbia High soccer
has a Texas Roadhouse
fundraiser from 4-8 p.m.
Monday. The soccer
program will receive a
percentage of the sales.
For details call
365-1877.
CHS FOOTBALL
Q-back Club
meets Monday
The Columbia County
Quarterback Club meets
at 7 p.m. Monday in the
Jones Fieldhouse.
For details, call Blake
Lunde at 867-0296.
FORT WHIE FOOTBALL
Q-back Club
meeting Monday
The Fort White
Quarterback Club's
weekly meeting is 7 p.m.
Monday in the teacher's
lounge at FWHS.
For details, call Shayne
Morgan at 397-4954.
CHS CHEMREADING
Youth clinic
offered Saturday
Columbia High's
varsity and junior varsity
' cheerleaders are hosting
a clinic for girls in pre-K
through the eighth grade
on Saturday. Registration
begins at 8:30 a.m., with
the clinic from 9 a.m. to
noon. Cost is $25.
For details, call Debbie
Godbold or Maci Dukes
at 755-8080.
From staff reports

GAMES

Monday
Columbia High girls
golf vs. Suwannee High
at The Country Club at
Lake City, 4 p.m.
Tuesday
Fort White High
volleyball at Bradford
High, 6 p.m. (JV-5)
Columbia High
volleyball vs. Lee High,
6:30 p.m. (JV-5:30)
Wednesday
Columbia High
volleyball vs. Fort White
High, 6 p.m. (JV-5)
Thursday
Columbia High
swimming at Clay High
with Ridgewood High,
4 p.m.
Columbia High girls
golf vs. Eastside High
at Ironwood Golf Club,
4 p.m.
Columbia High boys
golf vs. Union County
High at Quail Heights
Country Club, 4 p.m.
Fort White High
volleyball vs. Keystone
Heights High, 6 p.m.
(JV-5)
Columbia High JV
football at Dunnellon
High, 7 p.m.
Friday
Columbia High
football vs. Buchholz
High, 7:30 p.m.
Fort White High
football at Taylor County
High, 7:30 p.m.
Columbia High
volleyball in Bell
tournament, TBA
Saturday
Columbia High
girls cross country in
Katie Caples Invitational
at Bishop Kenny High,
7 a.m.
Fort White High
cross country at Lincoln
Invitational, TBA
Columbia High
volleyball in Bell


tournament, TBA


Allen: Don't


quit believing


Columbia coach
has faith in
players, team.
By BRANDON FINLEY
bfinley@lakecityreporter. corn
No coach wants to fall to
0-2. It doesn't matter that its
the 100th year of Columbia
High football or the first
year of coach Brian Allen'si
head coaching career. The
start is never one to be
strived for.
Still, Allen set calmly in
his coaching office after
the Tigers' 28-6 home loss


against Gainesville High on
Friday. Instead of defeat,
he' showed faith. Instead
of asking questions, he
provided answers.
"Two games will not
identify who we are," Allen
said. "Right now, we're
suppose to be in pain, but
two games won't identify us.
I have belief in the system.
We're young, but we've got
to grow up fastY
, Columbia only had three
returning starters from last
year's team going in the
loss to the Hurricanes and
CHS continued on 4B


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Columbia High's Nate Ayers (81) dodges a tackle attempt by Ced Joiner (7) during the game
against Gainesyille High on Friday.







a-blazing


',* JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Florida's Trey Burton (8) runs through, a tackle by Cornelius Richards (28) in the Gators' win over the University of Alabama at
Birmingham in Gainesville on Saturday-


Florida shuts down UAB, 39-0


By MARK LONG after the offense bogo.*d
Associated Press down arid No. 18 Florida
beat UAB 39-0 Saturday
GAINESVILLE -Chris night.
Rainey ran for 119 yards and The Gators dominated
a touchdown, Caleb Sturgis both sides of the lines of
kicked three field goals scrimmage for the second


consecutive week and fin-
ished their early tune-ups
by outgaining their oppo-
nents 979 yards to 349.
Next up: Southeastern
Conference rivalTennessee.
The Volunteers should pro-


vide more of a test for a
team with plenty of unan-
swered questions on both
sides of the ball. This much
is certain: Rainey is clearly
RAINEY continued on 3B


FROM THE SIDELINE


Phone: (386) 754-0420
it~an~m, 7.


Gators

show off

new look

GAINESVILLE
t didn't take long
for Florida to open
up its offense on
a muggy night in
the Swamp as the
Florida Gators defeated
the University of
Alabama at Birmingham
Blazers 39-0 on Saturday.
With a flea-flicker
taken by Chris Rainey
and pitched back to
quarterback John
Brantley that resulted
in a 40-yard pass play,
the crowd instantly got
something they've been
waiting for a deep
pass down the field.
Quinton Dunbar hauled
GATORS continued on 3B


Grinding it out .


Fort White's
Jackson seeks
balanced attack.
By TIM KIRBY
tkirby@lakecityreporter.com
FORT WHITE Fort
White High head coach
Demetric Jackson's deter-
mination to develop ..a
running attack works on
several levels.
Pounding Montre .Cray,
Alexis Blake and JR Dixon
over the past two years has
contributed to the success
of the Indians.
Running the. ball takes
the pressure 6ff the pass-
ing game, something that
allowed Andrew Baker to
build his quarterback skills
as a freshman last year. *
Success running forces a
defense to use more bodies
to stop the ground game
and that opens up the out-
side and the passing attack.


The benefits showed
in Fort White's 21-7 win
over Newberry High at
Arrowhead Stadium on
Friday.
With dangerous receiver
A.J. Legree, the state high
jump champion, running
his routes, Fort White only
threw one pass in the first
half. The game was tied 7-7
at intermission.
The Indians opened the
second half with a pass and,
although the first attempt
fell incomplete, Baker com-
pleted his next four as Fort
White drove 65 yards for a
touchdown.
Fort White added anoth-
er touchdown in the fourth
quarter and the Indians'
defense shut down the
Panthers.
. "I am happy with where
we are at," Jackson said
after the game. "We tried
to do some different
INDIANS continued on 4B


""""-- '- ... .-- -- .. I
JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Fort White High's Soron Williams (21) runs through several tacklers in the home win
Newberry High on Friday.


uns-












2B LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 11, 2011


TELEVISION

TV sports

Today
AUTO RACING
7:30 a.m.
SPEED Formula One, Italian Grand
Prix, at Monza, Italy
BASKETBALL
5 a.m.
ESPN2 FIBA, Americas Tournament,
semifinal, at Mar del Plata, Argentina
(delayed tape)
8 p.m.
ESPN2 FIBA,Americas Tournament,
Gold Medal game, at Mar del Plata,
Argentina
12 Midnight
ESPN2 FIBA,Americas Tournament,
third place game, at Mar del Plata,
Argentina (same-day tape)
EXTREME SPORTS
4:30 p.m.
NBC Dew Tour, Toyota Challenge,
at Salt Lake City
GOLF
7 am.
TGC European PGA Tour,
KLM Open, final round, at Hilversum.
Netherlands
3 p.m.
TGC LPGA, NW Arkansas
Championship, final round, at Rogers, Ark.
MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL
2 p.m.
TBS Philadelphia at Milwaukee
8 p.m.
ESPN Chicago Cubs at N.Y. Mets
NFL FOOTBALL
I p.m.
CBS Regional coverage
FOX Regional coverage
4:15 p.m.
FOX Doubleheader game
8 p.m.
NBC Dallas at N.Y. Jets
SOCCER
2 a.m.
ESPN2 FIFA, Beach Soccer World
Cup, championship match, at Ravenna,
Italy (delayed tape)
TENNIS
I p.m.
ESPN2 U.S. Open, women's doubles
championship match, at New York
4 p.m.
CBS U.S. Open, women's
championship match, at New York

Monday
MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL
8 p.m.
MLB Regional coverage. Detroit
at Chicago White Sox or Philadelphia at
Houston
NFL FOOTBALL
7 p.m.
ESPN New England at Miami
10:15 p.m.
fSPN Oakland at Denver
TENNIS
4 p.m.
CBS U.S. Open, men's
championship match, at New York

BASEBALL

AL standings

East Division
W L Pct GB
New York 87 56 .608 -
Boston 85 60 .586 3
Tampa Bay 80 64 .556 7',
Toronto 73 73 .500 15'A
Baltimore 58 86 :403 29',
Central Division
W L Pct GB
Detroit 83 62 .572 -
Chicago 73 71 .507 9'A
Cleveland 71 72 .497 II
Kansas City 60 86 .411 23'h
Minnesota 59 86 .407 24
West Division
W L Pct GB
Texas 82 64 .562 -
Los Angeles 79 65 .549 2
Oakland 66 79 .455 15'h
Seattle 61 83 .424 20
Friday's Games
Detroit 8, Minnesota 4
Baltimore 2,Toronto 0
Tampa Bay 7, Boston 2
Texas 13, Oakland 4
Cleveland 8, Chicago White Sox 4
LA.Angels 2, N.Y.Yankees I
Seattle 7, Kansas City 3
Saturday's Games
Toronto 5, Baltimore 4
Chicago White Sox 7, Cleveland 3,
10 innings
Detroit 3, Minnesota 2
Oakland 8, Texas 7
Tampa Bay 6, Boston 5, 11 innings
N.Y.Yankees at LA.Angels (n)
Kansas City at Seattle (n)
Today's Games
FMinnesota (Diamond 1-3) at Detroit
(Fister 7-13), 1:05 p.m.
* Baltimore (Tom.Hunter 3-3) at
Foronto (McGowan 0-0), 1:07 p.m.
Boston (Lester 15-6) at Tampa Bay
(Shields 14-10), 1:40 p.m.
Cleveland (U.Jimenez 2-2) at Chicago
White Sox (Z.Stewart 2-3), 2:10 p.m.
Oakland (Outman 3-4) at Texas
(C.WIIson 15-6), 3:05 p.m.
N.Y. Yankees (F.Garcia 11-7) at LA.
Angels (E.Santana I 1-10), 3:35 p.m.
Kansas City (Teaford 0-0) at Seattle
(A.Vasquez I1-2), 4:10 p.m.
Monday's Games
Tampa Bay at Baltimore, 7:05 p.m.
Detroit at Chi.White Sox, 8:10 p.m.
LA.Angels at Oakland, 10:05 p.m.
N.Y.Yankees at Seattle, 10:10 p.m.

NL standings


East Division
W L
Philadelphia 94 48
Atlanta 84 62
New York 71 74
Washington 66 77
Florida 65 79
Central Division
W L
Milwaukee 85 62
St. Louis 78 67
Cincinnati 71 '74
Pittsburgh 66 79
Chicago 63 82
Houston 49 96
West Division
W L
Arizona 84 61


Pct GB
.662 -
.575 12
.490 24%
.462 28%
.451 30


Pct GB
.579 -


San Francisco 75 69 .521 8'
Los Angeles 71 72 .497 12
Colorado 68 77 .469 16
San Diego 62 83 .428 22
Friday's Games
Florida 13, Pittsburgh 4
Washington 4. Houston 3, I I innings
N.Y. Mets 5, Chicago Cubs 4
Philadelphia 5, Milwaukee 3
St. Louis 4,Atlanta 3, 10 innings
Cincinnati 4, Colorado I
Arizona 3, San Diego 2
L.A. Dodgers 2, San Francisco I
Saturday's Games
Chicago Cubs 5, N.Y. Mets 4
Colorado 12, Cincinnati 7
Florida 3, Pittsburgh 0
Houston 9,Washington 3
Philadelphia 3, Milwaukee 2. 10
innings
St. Louis 4,Atlanta 3
San Diego atArizona (n)
L.A. Dodgers at San Francisco (n)
Today's Games
Florida (Vazquez 9-11) at Pittsburgh
(ja.McDonald 9-7), 1:35 p.m.
Houston (Sosa 2-3) at Washington
(Strasburg 0-0), 1:35 p.m.
Philadelphia (W rley 11 I1) at
Milwaukee (Gallardo 15-10), 2:10 p.m.
Atlanta (T.Hudson 14-9) at St. Louis
(Westbrook 11 -8), 2:15 p.m.
Cincinnati (Volquez 5-4) at Colorado
(Pomeranz 0,0), 3:10 p.m.
L.A. Dodgers (Kuroda 11-I5) at San
Francisco (Bumgarner 10-12), 4:05 p.m.
San Diego (LeBlanc -2-5) at Arizona
(Collmenter 9-8), 4:10 p.m.
Chicago Cubs (Garza 8-10) at N.Y.
Mets (Batista 4-2). 8:05 p.m.
Monday's Games
St. Louis at Pittsburgh, 7:05 p.m.
Chicago Cubs at Cincinnati, 7:10 p.m.
Florida at Atlanta. 7:10 p.m.
Washington at N.Y Mets, 7:10 p.m.
Philadelphia at Houston, 8:05 p.m.
Arizona at L.A. Dodgers, 10:10 p.m.
San Diego at San Francisco, 10:15 p.m.


FOOTBALL

NFL schedule

Thursday
Green Bay 42, New Orleans 34
Today
Pittsburgh at Baltimore, I p.m.
Atlanta at Chicago. I p.m.
Cincinnati at Cleveland, I p.m.
Indianapolis at Houston, I p.m.
Tennessee at Jacksonville, I p.m.
Buffalo at Kansas City. I p.m.
Philadelphia at St. Louis. I p.m.
Detroit at Tampa Bay. I p.m.
Carolina at Arizona, 4:15 p.m.
Minnesota at San Diego, 4:15 p.m.
Seattle at San Francisco, 4:15 p.m.
N.Y. Giants at Washington, 4:15 p.m.
Dallas at N.Y. Jets, 8:20 p.m.
Monday
New England at Miami, 7 p.m.
Oakland at Denver, 10:15 p.m.

BASKETBALL

WNBA schedule

Friday's Games
New York 83, Indiana 75
Seattle 85. Phoenix 70
Los Angeles 84.Tulsa 73
Saturday's Games
San Antonio 82,Washington 74
Chicago at Los Angeles (n)
Today's Games
New York at Connecticut, I p.m.
Atlanta at Indiana, 5 p.m.
Minnesota at Phoenix, 6 p.m.
San Antonio at Tulsa, 7 p.m.
Chicago at Seattle, 9 p.m.

GOLF

Walker Cup

At Royal Aberdeen Golf Club
Balgownie Course
Aberdeen, Scotland
Saturday
Britain & Ireland 7, United States 5
FOURSOMES
Tom Lewis and Michael Stewart,
Britain & Ireland, def. Peter Uihlein and
Harris English, United States. 2 and I.
Jack Senior and Andy Sullivan,,Britain
& Ireland, def. Russell Henley and Kelly
Kraft, United States, 2 and I.
Paul Cutler and Alan Dunbar,
Britain & Ireland, def. Nathan Smith
and Blayne Barber, United States,
5 and 4.
Patrick Cantlay and Chris Williams,
United States, def. Steven Brown and
Stiggy Hodgson, Britain & Ireland, 5 and
3.
SINGLES
Peter Ulhlein. United States, def. Tom
Lewis, Britain & Ireland, 2 and I
Jordan Spieth, United States, def. Jack
Senior, Britain & Ireland, 3 and 2
Harris English, United States, defAndy
Sullivan, Britain & Ireland, 2 and I
Rhys Pugh, Britain & Ireland def. Patrick
Rodgers, United States, 2 and I
Steven Brown, Britain & Ireland def.
Russell Henley, United States, I up
James Byrne, Britain & Ireland def.
Nathan Smith, United States, 2 and I
Paul Cutler, Britain & Ireland def. Kelly
Kraft, United States, 2 and I
Patrick Cantlay, United States, def.
Michael Stewart, Britain & Ireland, 2 and I
Sunday's Pairings
FOURSOMES
8:30 a.m. Jordan Spieth and Patrick
Rodgers, United States, vs.Tom Lewis and
Michael Stewart, Britain & Ireland
8:40 a.m.- Peter Uihilein and Harris
English, United States, vs. Jack Senior and
Andy Sullivan, Britain & Ireland
8:50 a.m. Kelly Kraft and
Blayne Barber, United States, vs.
Paul Cutler and Alan Dunbar, Britain
& Ireland


9 a.m. Patrick Cantlay and Chris
Williams, United States, vs. James Byrne
and Rhys Pugh, Britain & Ireland
SINGLES
1:15 p.m. Russell Henley, United
States, vs.Tom Lewis, Britain & Ireland
1:25 p.m. Jordan Spieth, United
States, vs.Andy Sullivan, Britain & Ireland
1:35 p.m. Nathan Smith, United
States, vs. Jack Senior. Britain & Ireland
1:45 p.m. Patrick Rodgers, United
States, vs. Michael Stewart, Britain &
Ireland


1:55 p.m. Peter Uihlein, United
States, vs. Stiggy Hodgson, Britain &
Ireland
2:05 p.m. Blayne Barber,
United States, vs. Steven Brown,
Britain & Ireland
2:15 p.m. Kelly Kraft, United States,
vs. Rhys Pugh, Britain & Ireland
2:25 p.m. Chris Williams. United
States, vs.Alan Dunbar, Britain & Ireland
2:35 p.m. Harris English, United
States, vs. James Byrne, Britain & Ireland
2:45 p.m. Patrick Cantlay, United
States, vs. Paul Cutler, Britain & Ireland


AUTO RACING

Race week

FORMULA ONE
ITALIAN GRAND PRIX
Site: Monza, Italy.-
Schedule: Today, race, 8 a.m. (Speed,
7:30-10 a.m., 4:30-7 p.m.).
Track:Autodromo Nazionale dl Monza
(road course, 3.6 miles).
Race distance: 190.8 miles, 53 laps.

TENNIS

U.S. Open

At The USTA Billie-jean King National
Tennis Center
Saturday
Singles
Men
Semifinals
Novak Djokovic (I), Serbia, def. Roger
Federer (3), Switzerland, 6-7 (7), 4-6, 6-3,
6-2,7-5.
Women
Semifinals
Sam Stosur (9),Australia,def.Angelique
Kerber, Germany, 6-3, 2-6, 6-2.
Junior Singles
Boys
Semifinals
Oliver Golding (13), Britain, def.
George Morgan (10), Britain 7-6 (2).
JiriVesely (I), Czech Republic, def. Kyle
Edmund, Britain, 6-4, 6-2.
Girls
Semifinals
Caroline Garcia (I); France, def.
Ashleigh Barty (3).Australia. 6-3, 6-2.
Grace Min, United States, def. Nicole
Gibbs, United States, 6-3, 6-3.
Junior Doubles
Boys
'Quarterfinals
Maxim Dubarenco, Moldova, and
Vladyslav Manafov, Ukraine, def. Luke
Saville and Andrew Whittington (2),
Australia, 6-4, 2-6, 10-8 tiebreak.
Flip Horansky, Slovakia, and JiriVesely
(I), Czech Republic, defts. Hugo Dellien,
Bolivia, and Diego Hidalgo (6), Ecuador,
6-4, 6-4.
George Morgan, Britain, and Dominic
Thiem (3), Austria, def. Mate Pavic.
Croatia, and Joao Pedro Sorgi (5). Brazil,
7-6 (1), 6-2.
Robin Kern and Julian Lenz, Germany,
def. Liam Broady and Oliver Golding (4),
Britain, 7-6 (4), 6-4.
Girls
Quarterfinals
Jeslka Maleckova, Czech Republic,
and Aliaksandra Sasnovich (8),. Belarus,
def. Samantha Crawford and Catherine
Harrison. United States, 6-3, 6-4.
Irina Khromacheva, Russia, and Demi
Schuurs (6), Netherlands, def. Annika
Beck, Germany, and Krista Hardebeck.
United States, 7-6 (5), 6-3.
Nicole Gibbs and Kyle S..McPhillips,
United States, def. Victoria Bosio.
Argentina, and Montserrat Gonzalez (2).
Paraguay, 6- I, 6-4.
Gabrielle Andrews and Taylor
Townsend. United States, def. Madison
Keys and Grace Min (5), United States,
6-3,4-6, 10-5 tiebreak.

Friday
Singles
Men
Quarterfinals
Andy Murray (4), Britain, def. John
Isner (28), United States, 7-5. 6-4, 3-6,
7-6 (2).
Rafael Nadal (2), Spain, def. Andy
Roddick (21), United States, 6-2. 6-1, 6-3.
Doubles
Men
Quarterfinals
Rohan Bopanna. India, and Aisam-ul-
Haq Qureshi (5). Pakistan. def. Colin
Fleming and Ross Hutchins, Britain, 7-5,
2-6, 7-5.
Semifinals
Jurgen Melzer, Austria, and Phllipp
Petzschner (9), Germany, def. Simone
Bolelli and Fablo Fognini, Italy. 6-4, 6-7
(3),6-1.
Mariusz Fyrstenberg and Marcin
Matkowski (6), Poland, def. Rohan
Bopanna, India, and Aisam-ul-Haq Qureshi
(5), Pakistan, 6-2, 7-6 (4).
Women
Semifinals
Liezel Huber and Lisa Raymond (4).,
United States, def. Daniela Hantuchova,
Slovakia, and Agnleszka Radwanska,
Poland, 6-2, 6-4.
Vania King, United States, and Yaroslava
Shvedova (3), Kazakhstan, def. Maria
Kirilenko and Nadla Petrova (5), Russia,
7-6 (7), 2-6, 6-3.
Mixed
Championship
Melanie Oudin and Jack Sock, United
States, def. Glsela Dulko and Eduard5
Schwank (8),Argentina, 7-6 (4), 4-6, 10-8
tiebreak.
Junior Singles
Boys
Quarterfinals
Kyle Edmund, Britain, def. Karim
Hossam, Egypt, 6-2, 6-4.
George Morgan (10), Britain, def.
Adam Pavlasek. Czech Republic, 6-7 (3),
6-4, 6-4.


Oliver Golding (13), Britain, def. Fllip
Horansky (6), Slovakia, 5-7, 6-4, 6-1.
jiri Vesely (I), Czech Republic, def.
Alexios Haleblan, United States, 7-5, 6-2.
Girls
Quarterfinals
Caroline Garcia (I), France, def.
Victoria Duval, United States, 6-3, 6-4.
Grace Min, United States, def. Ellen
Allgurin, Sweden, 7-6 (I), 6-2.
Ashleigh Barty (3),Australia, def. Krista
Hardebeck, United States, 6-0, 7-5.
Nicole Gibbs, United States, def.Yulia
Putintseva (6), Russia, 1-6, 6-4, 6-2.


Britain & Ireland take



7-5 lead in Walker Cup


Associated Press


ABERDEEN, Scotland
- Rhys Pugh, Steven
Brown, James Byrne and
Paul Cutler helped Britain
and Ireland take a 7-5 lead
over the United States
in the Walker Cup, win-
ning consecutive matches
Saturday.
Blayne Barber of Lake
City was teamed with
Nathan Smith in the four-
somes. they were defeated
5 and 4 by Cutler and Alan
Dunbar.
In today's foursomes,
Barber and Kelly Kraft will
play Cutler and Dunbar at
8:50 a.m.
Barber's singles oppo-
nent is Brown. their match
tees off at 2:05 p.m.
Britain and Ireland took


a 3-1 lead in the morning
foursomes in the two-day
amateur competition, but
the Americans went ahead
4-3 when Peter Uihlein,
Jordan Spieth and Harris
English won the first three
singles matches in the after-
noon. After a heavy rain,
the 17-year-old Pugh, from
Wales, started the rally.
"I've got a lot of confi-
dence in these boys," Britain
and Ireland captain Nigel
Edwards said. "They're a
great bunch of lads and
they've proved it this after-
noon. They've knuckled
down and done the job."
Top-ranked Patrick
Cantlay earned the last
point for the Americans,
beating Michael Stewart
on Royal Aberdeen's
Balgownie Course


The competition will
conclude today with four
foursomes and 10 singles
matches.
Cantlay also earned a
point for the United States
in the alternate-shot match-
es, teaming with Chris
Williams to beat Steven
Brown and Stiggy Hodgson
5 and 3.
In singles, Uihlein topped
Tom Lewis 2 and 1, Spieth
edged Jack Senior 3 and
2, English beat Sullivan 2
and 1 and Cantlay topped
Stewart 2 and 1.
For Britain and Ireland,
Pugh beat Patrick Rodgers
2 and 1, Brown topped
Henley 1-up, Byrne stopped
Nathan Smith 2 and 1 and
Cutler edged Kraft 2 and 1.'
The United States has a
34-7-1 series lead.


Djokovic, Nadal will



meet in U.S. Open final


By EDDIE PELLS
Associated Press

NEW YORK Facing
two match points against
a beloved player whose
name is already in the his-
tory books, Novak Djokovic
clenched his jaw, nodded
his head and flashed an
ever-so-slight glimpse of a
smile.
"I would lie if I say I
didn't think I'm going to
lose," Djokovic said.
Might as well go down
swinging then, right?
He turned violently on a
wide, 108 mph serve from
Roger Federer for a cross-
court, forehand winner that
barely nicked the line.
About 10 minutes later,
Djoko boogied at center
court to celebrate an epic
U.S. Open semifinal win
- one in which he dug
out of a two-set hole, then
saved two match points to
beat Federer.
Top-seeded Djokovic
won 6-7 (7), 4-6, 6-3, 6-2, 7-5
Saturday to improve to 63-2
on the year. This was only
his second career come-
back from two sets down,
while Federer lost a two-set


ACROSS
1 Hawaiian port
5 Sol
8 Boot upper
12 Cable channel
13 Rock's -
Leppard
14 Canal of song
15 Lobby call
16 Provide water
18 Roam
20 Tag
21 de cologne
22 Flour holder
23 Silky sound.
26 Rented
29 Camp
furnishings
30 Dappled
31 Caesar's 52
33 Financial mag
34 Greek war
god
35 Civil disorder
36 London's
river
38 Genuine
warmth


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Novak Djokovic of Serbia reacts after winning a semifinal
match against Roger Federer of Switzerland at the U.S.
Open tennis tournament in New York on Saturday.


lead for the second time in
three months after going
178-0 lifetime before this
year's Wimbledon quarter-
finals.
Next, DjoKovic wilLface
defending champion Rafael
Nadal in a rematch of last


39 Mouth part
40 California's
Big -
41 Mug
44 Archimedes'
shout
47 Friendly
49 Excuse me!
51 Where Bryce
Canyon is
52 Win -
nose
53 Have the
nerve
54 Golfer's tap
55 Spoil the
finish
56 Skier's wish

DOWN
1 Not square
2 What "vidi"
means
(2 wds.)
3 Links org.
4 Harmony
. *5 Farewell
6 Frau's spouse


year's final. No. 2 Nadal
beat No. 4 Andy Murray
6-4, 6-2, 3-6, 6-2 in the later
semifinal. Djokovic is 5-0
against Nadal this year. All
the meetings have been in
tournament finals, includ-
ing Wimbledon.


Answer to Previous Puzzle


STAB MIA T'EJM
DOME IRON AX E
AXS BACTERIA
K ISSUES SCOTT
CHIC wYO
ERASE LATE
J AG UNTIL EBA Y
ODES OLLA EOE
TALK MOSSY
I D _lllIM

IDS HI LL
GRAPE KEPLER
HELSIN K I PAGE
E VE TEEM EMIT
ESC YEAS DATE


7 Olduvai loc.
8 Human
herbivores
9 Bedouin
0 Tiny amount
1 Flake off, as
paint


Want more puzzles?
Check out the "Just Right Crossword Puzzles" books
at QuillDrlverBooks.com


17 Homer's tale
19 Lah-di- -
22 Social insects
23 Chem. or biol.
24 Established
custom
25 Prickly
sensation
26 Is supine
27 Charles Lamb
28 Big name in
fashion
30 Boarding
school
32 Gomez's hairy
cousin
34 Acid in
proteins
35 Goes over
again
37 Dismount
38 "Ben- -"
40 Cake
ingredient
41 Minestrone
42 Ballet
costume
43 Iowa, to
Jacques
44 "Orinoco.
Flow" singer
45 Kublai -
46 Space lead-in
48 PC maker
50 Kitten's cry


9-12 2011 UFS, Dist. by Universal Uclick for UFS


SCOREBOARD


Page Editor: Tim Kirby, 754-0421










LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 11, 2011


Manuel torches Bucs


By BRENT KALLESTAD
Associated Press

TALLAHASSEE EJ
Manuel threw for a career-
best 329 yards and four
touchdowns Saturday as
No. 5 Florida State beat
Charleston, Southern
62-10 in a tune-up for next
week's showdown against
top-ranked Oklahoma.
The Buccaneers, who
16st 62-0 last week at UCF,
didn't complete a pass or
have a first down in the first
half, and trailed 34-0.
Manuel hit Bert Reed oin
two short TD passes while
the Seminoles' defense lim-
ited Charleston Southern to
84 total yards.
Florida State (2-0) hosts
the Sooners next Saturday
in one of the most highly
anticipated games of the
young season.
Saturday's game, howev-
er, was over almost immedi-
ately as the highly favored
Seminoles took a 24-0 lead
less than 5 minutes into the
second quarter and domi-
nated throughout *-
Florida State amassed
29 first downs and 647
yards offense while hold-
ing Charleston Southern
to three first downs. The
Seminoles had a 371-8 yard-
age advantage in the first


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Florida State wide receiver Rodney Smith (84) scores a touchdown on a 45-yard pass in the
Seminoles' win over Charleston Southern in Tallahassee on Saturday.


half.
Fullback Lonnie Pryor
scored on a 14-yard pass
from Manuel and Chris
Thompson added a 2-yard'
touchdown run.
Backup quarterback
Rick Trickett took over for
Manuel midway through
the third quarter and com-
pleted 6 of 7 passes for 148


yards and two touchdowns
and ran 4 yards for a third.
Both TD throws were to
freshman Rashad Greene
on plays covering 29 and
69 yards.
James Wilder Jr. led the
Seminoles in rushing with
76 yards on 10 carries.
Manuel already had a
career highs in passing


at halftime with 299 yards
and three touchdowns,
but his interception early
in the third quarter set
up Charleston Southern's
touchdown.
Cornerback Charles
James intercepted at the
42 sped 39 yards to the
Seminole 3 before being
knocked out of bounds.


South Carolina wins



thriller over Georgia


Associated Press

ATHENS, Ga. Melvin
Ingram had never scored
a touchdown for South
Carolina. Not surprising,
since he plays defensive
end.
On Saturday, the 276-
pound senior finally made
it to the end zone.
Twice.
Ingram went 68 yards for
a touchdown with a fake
punt, then scooped up a
fumble and stepped into
the end zone with just over
3 minutes remaining
to clinch No. 12 South
Carolina's wild 45-42 vic-
tory over Georgia, hand-
ing embattled coach Mark
Richt another galling loss.
The Gamecocks gained
the early upper hand in
the East Division by taking
advantage of every Georgia
mistake: Antonio Allen
returned an interception 25
yards for a touchdown, and
Stephon Gilmore's 56-yard
return with a fumble set
up another score for South
Carolina.
"Really, it was three
defensive scores. And the
punt, too. Melvin, he's a
defensive player. So that's
basically four defensive
touchdowns," coach Steve
Spurrier said. "Georgia out-
played us. Give 'em credit.
They definitely outplayed
us. But we won the game.
Sometimes it happens like
that. Somebody was look-
ing out for us tonight."
Georgia got four touch-
down passes from Aaron
Murray but couldn't over-
come all the blunders.
The teams combined
for 60 points over the final
21:09 and the lead changed
hands four times (with a tie,
as well) during that span.
Marcus Lattimore, who
rushed for 176 yards on
27 bruising carries, put the
Gamecocks ahead for good
on a 3-yard run that made it
38-35 with 3'1 minutes left.
Then there was one last
crushing mistake by the
Bulldogs.

Auburn 41, No. 16
Mississippi State 34
Auburn backup safe-
ty Ryan Smith stopped
Mississippi State quarter-
back Chris Relf just shy of
the goal line on the final
play to preserve the Tigers'
41-34 win over the 16th-


ASSOCIATED PRESS
South Carolina running back Marcus Lattimore (21) runs for a
touchdown, chased by Georgia cornerback Jordan Love (10)
in the Gamecocks' 45-42 win in Athens, Ga., on Saturday.


ranked Bulldogs.
The Tigers might not be
able to keep up this kind of
winning for another season,
especially with a defense
that allowed 531 yards to
Mississippi State. Auburn
still needs to face SEC West
rivals LSU, Arkansas and
Alabama.
But the dramatic victory
against Mississippi State
might get the Tigers back
in the rankings.

No. 3 Alabama 27,
No. 23 Penn State 11
STATE COLLEGE, Pa.-
A.J. McCarron was poised
and efficient in a rare trip
into Big Ten country for
No. 3 Alabama, throwing for
163 yards and a touchdown
against No. 23 Penn State in
a victory on Saturday.
Alabama completed a
sweep of the home-and-
home series between the
two storied programs with a
methodical and smothering
performance reminiscent
of last year's 24-3 win in
Tuscaloosa.
McCarron was 19 for 31
with no turnovers and a
5-yard touchdown pass to
Michael Williams in the
first quarter.
For Penn State (1-1),
Nittany Lions fans might be
wondering if either Robert
Bolden or Matt McGloin
are the answer. They com-
bined to go 12 for 39 for 144
yards.


No. 6 Stanford 44,
Duke 14

DURHAM, N.C. -
Andrew Luck matched a
career high by throwing
four touchdown passes for
Stanford.
Luck was 20 of 28 for
290 yards with touchdown
passes of 60 and 3 yards to
Coby Fleener, 10 yards to
Chris Owusu and 3 yards to
Zach Ertz.
Stanford won its 10th
straight game dating to last
season and claimed a rare
regular-season win on the
East Coast while denying
the Blue Devils their first
Top 25 win since 1994.

No. 8 Wisconsin 35,
Oregon State 0
MADISON, Wis. -
Russell Wilson threw three
touchdowns and Wisconsin
overcame a slow start.
With Oregon State's
defense stuffing running
backs Montee Ball and
James White early on,
Wisconsin pounced on spe-
cial teams mistakes and
leaned on Wilson and the
defense to do the rest.
In his second career
start for the Badgers (2-0),
Wilson was 17 of 21 for 189
yards and the three touch-
downs, including a pair to
tight end Jacob Pedersen.
Wisconsin's running game
broke through after half-
time, and Ball had a pair of


touchdowns in the second
half.

No. 11 Virginia Tech 17,
East Carolina 10
GREENVILLE, N.C. -
Josh Oglesby ran for the
go-ahead 10-yard score with
7:30 left, helping Virginia
Tech give coach Frank
Beamer his 200th win at
the school.
David Wilson ran for 138
yards to lead the Hokies
and quarterback Logan
Thomas struggled in his
second career start while
the Hokies also committed
12 penalties and commit-
ted two turnovers, but their
defense completely shut
down the Pirates' high-
powered passing attack.

No. 13 Oregon 69,
Nevada 20
EUGENE, Ore.-Darron
Thomas matched a school
record with six touchdown
passes and No. 13 Oregon
bounced back from its
season-opening loss.
LaMichael James ran for
67 yards and a touchdown,
caught a scoring pass from
Thomas and returned a
punt for a score to help the
Ducks to their 17th straight
victory at Autzen Stadium.

No. 15 Ohio State 27,
Toledo 22
COLUMBUS, Ohio -
The Buckeyes' 90 years of
in-state domination almost
ended on a single play.
John Simon pressured
backup Toledo quarterback
Terrance Owens, forcing
an incompletion on fourth
down with 48 seconds left.

No. 17 Michigan State
44, Florida Atlantic 0
EAST LANSING, Mich.
- Kirk Cousins threw for
183 yards and two touch-
downs, and Michigan State
held Florida Atlantic to one
first down.

No. 19 West Virginia
55, Norfolk State 12
MORGANTOWN, W.Va.
- Geno Smith threw for
371 yards and four scores
and the Mountaineers
scored on their first seven
possessions of the second
half to erase a halftime defi-
cit to an FCS opponent.


College scores
EAST
Alabama 27, Penn St.I I
Bryant 27,American International 16
Bucknell 28, Marist 14
Buffalo 35, Stony Brook 7
Delaware 28,West Chester 17
Georgetown 14, Lafayette 13
Holy Cross 37, Colgate 7
New Hampshire 48, Lehigh 41, OT
Pittsburgh 35, Maine 29
San Diego St. 23,Army 20
Syracuse 21, Rhode Island 14
Towson 31 ,Villanova 10
WestVirginia 55, Norfolk St. 12
SOUTH
Appalachian St. 58, NC A&T 6
Auburn 41, Mississippi St. 34
Campbell 76,Apprentice 0
Chattanooga 38, Jacksonville St. 17
Clemson 35,Wofford 27
Coastal Carolina 20, Catawba 3
Davidson 28, Lenoir-Rhyne 10
Delaware St. 3 1, Shaw 27
E. Kentucky 28, Missouri St. 24
FSU 62, Charleston Southern 10
Furman 16,The Citadel 6
Georgia Southern 62,Tusculum 21
Georgia Tech 49, Mid.Tennessee 21
Howard 30, Morehouse 27
James Madison 14, CCSU 9
Kentucky 27, Cent. Michigan 13
Marshall 26, Southern Miss. 20
Miissippi 42, S. Illinois 24
Murray St 39, MVSU 0o
NC Central 42, Central St., Ohio 3
North Carolina 24, Rutgers 22
Old Dominion 40, Georgia St. 17
Presbyterian 38, N. Greenville 21
Richmond 21,Wagner 6
SC State 26, Bethune-Cookman
18
Samford 48, Stillman 6


South Alabama 30, Lamar 8
South Carolina 45, Georgia 42
Southern U. 21 ,Alabama A&M 6
Stanford 44, Duke 14
Tennessee 45, Cincinnati 23
Tulsa 31,Tulane 3
Virginia Tech 17, East Carolina 10
W. Carolina 52, Mars Hill 31
Wake Forest 34, NC State 27
William & Mary 24,VMI 7
MIDWEST
Drake 28, Grand View 21, OT
Duquesne 22, Dayton 13
E. Michigan 14,Alabama St. 7
Illinois 56, S. Dakota St. 3
Indiana St. 48, Butler 34
Iowa St. 44, Iowa 41, 30T
Michigan St. 44, FAU 0
New Mexico St. 28. Minnesota 21
Northwestern 42, E. Illinois 21
Ohio 30, Gardner-Webb 3
Ohio St. 27,Toledo 22
South Dakota 30, E.Washington 17
W. IIIInois 35, Jacksonville 21
W Michigan 38, Nicholls St. 7
Wisconsin 35, Oregon St. 0
Youngstown St. 77,Valparaiso 13
SOUTHWEST
Arkansas St. 47, Memphis 3
McMurry 24, UTSA 21
Rice 24, Purdue 22
FAR WEST
California 36, Colorado 33, OT
Colorado St. 33, N. Colorado 14
Idaho 44, North Dakota 14
Idaho St. 44,Western St. (Col.) 7
Montana 37, Cal Poly 23 .
Montana St. 38, UC Davis 14
N.Arizona 58, Fort Lewis 13
Oregon 69, Nevada 20
S. Utah 35, Sacramento St. 14
TCU 35,Air Force 19
Washington 40, Hawaii 32
Washington St. 59, UNLV 7
Wyoming 45, Texas St. 10


GATORS: Have potential


Continued From Page 11
in the reception for 40
yards and put the Gators
within striking distance at
the 3-yard line. The drive
stalled and resulted in a
Caleb Sturgis field goal,
but the excitement didn't
waver.
A drive later Florida
again stalled, but the
elements of explosion that
the offense has missed
over the last few games
were there to be seen.
The most important'
thing that Florida showed
was its ability to take
chances. Often times last
season teams were able to
play Florida in a 10-yard
box. The Gators showed
enough to make opposing
defenses think twice about
bringing safeties down to
cheat.
The numbers won't
jump off the page at you.
Jeff Denmps only had two
carries and( it was not said
whether he was injured or
not. Brantley didn't have
a monster 300-yard game,
but it was what Florida
showed without showing a
whole lot.
Florida won't break out


its entire playbook until
next week when it hosts
visiting Tennessee in the
annual rivalry. Half of its
playbook is probably yet
to be installed, but what
Florida did Saturday night
was show that they're
not the same offense that
frustrated so many fans.
Three running backs
had carries of 19 yards
or longer. Each of the six
Gators that caught a ball
from Brantley had at least
one pass reception of over
18 yards.
Florida coach Will
Muschamp talked about
how important it is for
the Gators to continually
win the turnover battle
and explosion plays (plays
over 20 yards). The
starting unit accomplished
both of those missions.
When looking back at
this game, don't think of
what the Gators were able
to do, but think about the
things Florida showed it
was capable of doing.

* Brandon Finley covers
sports for the Lake City
Reporter.


RAINEY: Top playmaker
Continued From Page 1B


the team's top playmaker.
A week after becoming
the first player in school
history to score touch-
downs rushing, receiving
and on a return, Rainey
was even better against
the Blazers.
A fifth-year senior trying
to overhaul his image after
last year's five-game sus-
pension, Rainey gouged
UAB for chunks of yard-
age nearly every time he
touched the ball. Spin
moves, jukes, ankle-break-
ing cuts, Rainey did it all.
He had a 32-yard touch-
down run negated by a
holding penalty in the
first quarter. H6 found the
end zone again early in
the third quarter, and this


Unscramble these four Jumbles,
one letter to each square,
to form four ordinary words.
LRUBB i


one stood. He scored from
19 yards out, capping the
run with a backward dive
across the goal line.
Florida leaned on Rainey
more than usual, too.
Jeff Demps, the other
half of Florida's dynamic
duo, sustained an injury
in the first quarter. Florida
officials refused to disclose
the nature of the injury. He
went to the locker room
and did not return.
The Gators accom-
plished everything they
wanted in the second game.
They got John Brantley
a little more comfortable
in Charlie Weis' pro-style
offense and eliminated
turnovers that bothered
coach Will Muschamp.
THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME,
by David L. Hoyt and Jeff Knurek
We only use 100%
Igenulne Ingredlents.
Our loave contain no I'll take a loaf of
fillers or additives, whole wheat.
c^V^V/


y5 ^IPw.


EERRFP | IT16E J
Now arrange the circled letters
to form the surprise answer, as
suggested by the above cartoon.

Ans:
(Answers tomorrow)
Saturday's Jumbles: AGENT UNFIT BYPASS TYPIFY
I Answer: If they wanted to get the staircase done on
time, they'd have to do this STEP IT UP


Page Editor: Tim Kirby, 754-0421









LAKE CITY REPORTER


SPORTS


SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 11, 2011


Page Editor: Brandon Finley, 754-0420


CHS: Aliens wants faith
Continued From Page 1B


it showed as the Tigers
failed to score an offensive
touchdown for the second-
consecutive game.
Still, the Tigers showed
signs of life in the second
half. After registering only
one first down in the open-
ing half, Columbia was
able to find a little rhythm
in the second half as the
Tigers moved the chains
six times.
Columbia also showed a
different look on' its final
drive as Jayce Barber came
in at quarterback and Nigel
Atkinson moved out to
receiver. The Tigers were
driving deep in Hurricane
territory when the clock
ran out, but it was one of
their most explosive drives.
Barber found Atkinson
on the first play for a
35-yard pass and scrambled
for 16 yards on a fourth-
and-15 to keep the drive
alive. Still, Allen went back
to the word faith when


talking about his quarter-
backs, where he doesn't
expect a change at starter.
"I'm not saying the job
is open," Allen said. "Nigel
won it throughout the
spring and summer. We
have to help ourselves do
some different things to get
going. If we see things, we
need to expose them."
Columbia still had its
bright spots, including the
play of Darius Williams.
Williams returned the open-
ing kickoff of the second half
95 yards for a touchdown.
Later in the half, he made
an interception in the end
zone. It was another exam-
ple of a defense that kept
fighting early in the season
as the offense grows.
"I never saw one of our
players lose faith," Allen
said. "They didn't come
off the field complaining. If
they need to play 65 plays
they will. That goes back to
summer conditioning."


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Shaq Johnson (18) goes up for a long pass in the game
against the Gainesville High Hurricanes on Friday.


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
A.J. Legree (3) and Terry Calloway (34) bring down a Newberry High runner during the game on Friday.


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Columbia High's Jara Courson (5) returns a serve Thursday
during a game against Suwannee.


Lady Tigers


fall to Oak Hall


From staff reports


Columbia High's volley-
ball team fell in a three-set
match against visiting Oak
Hall School on Friday.
The Lady Tigers were
close iall matches, falling
21-25, 23-25 and 18-25 in
the final.
Jessie Bates had four ser-
vice aces to lead the team,.
AnnieMiltonledwitheight


kills, while Jara Courson
and Kelbie Ronsonet each
had five. Lauren Eaker had
four kills. *
Courson also led the
team with 17 digs.
"The girls are learn-
ing how to play togeth-
er as a team and we are
getting stronger each and
every match," Columbia
head coach Rebecca Golden
said.


,JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Jonathan Dupree (51) takes down Newberry High's Ra'kheem Hoyt (4) for a four-yard loss in
the game on Friday.

INDIANS: Travel to Taylor Co. Friday


Continued From Page 11

things. It is our job to make
adjustments."
The changes worked, as
Fort White totaled 89 more
yards than Newberry in the
final two quarters.
Senior captain Jonathan
Dupree had his own
explanation.
"We got to the locker
room and we thought we
weren't doing enough,"
Dupree said. "We came out
with more intensity and
played Fort White football,
just like we do in practice.
We linemen love to have the
ball behind us and Soron
(Williams) runs hard."
Jackson wants to have a
100-yard back and Williams
came close. He gained 89
yards on 23 carries. He also
was effective as a receiver,
catching two passes for 33
yards in the third-quarter
scoring drive.
Fort White's defense
tightened down on the
Panthers following a


54-yard scoring drive in the
second quarter.
"We didn't play assign-
ment football," Jackson
said.
During the game, Wesley
Pitts forced a fumble for an
eight-yard loss and Dupree
had a tackle-for-loss of four
yards. Terry Callaway had
a tackle for a four-yard loss
and added a fumble recov-
ery when AJ. Legree inter-
cepted a fourth-down pass
late in the game and lost the
handle on the return.
Jackson praised the
defense and special teams,
and Fort White did not
have a single penalty in the
game.
Fort White (2-0) travels
to Taylor County High this
week, and look for more of
the same.
We have got to get the
running game going,"
Jackson said. "Looking
down the road, we have got
to be balanced."


Newberry 0 7 0 0 7
FortWhite 7 0 7 7 21
First Quarter
FW- Baker 5 run (Escalante kick),
4:35
Second Quarter
N-Fowler 4 run (Leschanz kick),
9:47
Third Quarter
FW-Cormier I run (Escalante kick),
5:12
Fourth Quarter
FW-S.Williams 2 run (Escalante kick),
4:07

Fort White Newberry
First downs 13 9
Rushes-yards 38-147 34-126
Passing 56 44
Comp-Att-Int 5-8-0 5-11 -1
Punts-Avg. 3-28 2-23
Fumbles-Lost 1-0 1-0
Penalties-Yards 0-0 6-27
INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS
RUSHING-Fort White, S. Williams
23-89, Baker 6-27, Cormier 4-12, Phillips
3-11I, Gainer 2-8. Newberry, Hoyt 13-46,
Fowler 9-32, Herbert 5-23, Long 6-18,
Boyette 1-7.
PASSING-Fort White, Baker 5-8-56-
0. Newberry, Herbert 5-11-44-1.
RECEIVING-Fort White, S. Williams
2-33, Legree 1-10, Pitts 1-8, Phillips
1-5. Newberry, Flagg 3-33, Fowler 1-8,
Seabrook 1-3.


S St




Along with the new name, Lake Shore Primary Care \\ sr, has a new face-
Joining the practice is Dr. Nikolaos Karamitsos, fresh out of residency
and bringing a fresh healthcare perspective with him. By being a part of
the medical staff at Shands Lake Shore Regional Medical Center, he'll 'be
available to provide full time medical services to you and your family.


To schedule an appointment, please call 386-292-7744.


Sl Regional sLidicalCentr
Regional MNdical Center
t "


LakPrimary ShCare West
Primary Care West


221 SW Stonegate Terrace, Suite 101, Lake City. FL 32024












Story ideas?

Contact
Robert Bridges
Editor
754-0428
rbtrides@lakecityreporter.com


Lake City Reporter





BUSINESS


Sunday, September I I, 201 I


www.lakecityreporter.com


Section C


COUNTY TOURISM


Mall looks to add a tenant


Harvey
Campbell


Pressed


for


time


according to a
recent article
in the Chicago
Tribune, a
recent snapshot
of U.S. travelers shows
them to be a stressed-out
bunch, who remain sensi-
tive to price and continue
to suffer from a syndrome
known as "time poverty."
When it comes to financ-
es, travelers say they most
concerned about almost
everything: the cost of
gas, cost of airline tickets
and the economy in gen-
eral. More than a third say
they are using coupons
more often, and 31 percent
say they're waiting for
sales more frequently.
However, despite the
nervousness about the
economy there is good
news for the tourism
industry. The number of
travelers who said they are
planning to take a leisure
trip in the near future is
rising with 61 percent of
those surveyed saying
they plan to take a vaca-
tion by October, up from
56 percent at this time last
year.
The reluctance to pay
high prices has been
extremely noticeable in
the Orlando market with
rates up only five percent
in the first half of 2011.
Meanwhile, Columbia
County has seen room
rates rise 8.3 percent
While vacation sales and
discounts are growing in
popularity, the "long-form
vacation" is losing ground
as travelers are abandon-
ing the weeklong escape
and looking instead for
close, quick getaways.
According to data from
VISIT FLORIDA, Orlando
drew more than half of
its 38.3 million domestic
visitors from within the
Sunshine State.

Tourism numbers
still strong
in Columbia County
According to the
Florida Department of
Revenue, Local Option
Tourist Development
Tax (bed tax) collections
were .$52,497 for June of
2011. That compares to
collections of $50,715 for
the same month in 2010.
Collections have been
up each month during
the first half of the year.
According to Smith Travel,
occupancy in Columbia
County was up 5.9 per-
cent for July with Average
Daily Rate up 8.3 percent
to $68.43 and total room
revenues increasing 17.7
percent.
CAMPBELL continued on 2C

* Harvey Campbell is the
executive director of the
Columbia County Tourist
Development Council. He can
be reached at 386-758-1397.


By TONY BRITT
tbritt@lakecityreporter. com
The Lake City Mall's interior
appearance is expected to change
in the near future with the addi-
tion of a new retail storefront.
Janice Dorminey, Lake City
Mall operations and marketing
imang;i;r. said the construction
has been taking place for some
time, and is uncertain when it
will be completed.
'The construction going on in
front of the Lake City Mall is a
new store front for a new retail
bay," she said. "It will be 4,200
sq. ft."
The work is taking place near
the mall's entrance by the T.J.
Maxx Store. Dorminey said the
construction is expected to be
completed in the near future.
She said the new space was
not constructed for a specific
future business and noted there


Wa


is no new business prospect to go
along with the new store front.
Not yet, anyway.
"We felt like it would be a lot
easier to acquire a strong tenant
if we had a store front," Dorminey
said.
The new storefront will have
an interior entrance that can be
accessed though the mall.'
"This addition will help the
Lake City Mall because new busi-
ness always attracts more traffic,"
Dorminey said. "The new bay will
add to the retail shopping mix on
the property, whoever we get.
Dorminey said the new bay is
not really expansion work at the
mall, but utilizing some of the
existing space that was available.
"The 4,200 sq. ft. bay we're
building is store front for what
was part of the former Goody's
store," she said. "It's not adding
onto the property because physi-
cally that space was there."


JASUN MATI I new vWALI\:t LaKe Lly Kepc
Robert Bartlett, maintenance technician at the Lake City Mall, looks at the
blueprints of a 4,200-square-foot leasing space located adjacent to T.J.
Maxx.


-Mart brings back layaway


By ANNE D'INNOCENZIO
AP Retail Writer
NEW YORK -- Wal-
Mart is bringing back
something its custom-
ers have been asking
for since the Great
Recession: layaway.
The world's largest
retailer, which ditched
the pay-as-you-go plans
in 2006, is rolling out
a holiday layaway plan
from Oct. 17 through
Dec. 16. Wal-Mart is
following rivals that
brought back the service'
during the thick of the
recession.
Wal-Mart's layaway
option comes at a time
when its mostly low-
income shoppers are
being squeezed by high
unemployment and ris-
ing costs. Wal-Mart is
trying to reverse nine
straight
quar-
ters of Wal-Mart's
revenue
declines option conm
ht its time when
name- Iow-income
sake U.S. are being sq
stores by high une
open at .ment and r
least a Wal-Mart is
year a reverse nin
key mea- quarters of
sure of a declines at
retailer's sake U.S.
health.
"We're at least a ye
always measure of
looking health.
for ways
to ease
budget
strain for our customers,
and we know this holi-
day season brings with
it additional financial
pressure," said Duncan
MacNaughton, chief
merchandising officer at
Wal-Mart's U.S. division.
'This was a key compo-
nent that our customers
asked us for."
Layaway which
allows shoppers to pay
over time, interest-
free, and pick up their
merchandise when it's
paid in full became
popular during the Great
Depression. The practice
had become largely a
thing of the past as the
economy flourished and
credit cards became
common.
But when credit dried
up and the job market
soured during the reces-
sion that began in late
2007, Sears and other
merchants added back
or expanded the service.
Citing increased
costs and lower cus-
tomer demand, Wal-Mart


phased out
its layaway .
in September
2006 -
roughly a
year before
the reces-
sion began
- with the
exception of
fine jewelry.
But the dis-
counter faced
criticism because it built
its reputation on helping
its low-income shoppers.
Wal-Mart Stores Inc.,
based in Bentonville,
Ark., said it will be able
to limit costs now by
limiting the layaway pro-
gram to toys and elec-
tronics with a price tag
of $15 or more. Also, the
total layaway purchase
has to add up to at least
$50.
Wal-Mart will also
charge a
5 non-
layaway refund-
es at a able
its mostly service
shoppers $10 can-
lueezed cellation
mploy- charge for
sing costs. orders not
s trying to picked up
e straight by Dec.
revenue 16 or can-
its name- celled by
ores open the cus-
*ar a key tomer.
a retailer's The
program
is only
available
at stores.
It also
requires a 10 percent
down payment. The com-
pany said if the program
is successful, it may
extend it throughout the
year.
The layaway plan
is part of Wal-Mart's
efforts to turn around
its struggling U.S. busi-
ness. In addition to the
layaway program, Wal-
Mart said that starting
Monday, it will cut prices
on dozens of holiday
toys to $15. The compa-
ny also said it will start
offering small samples
of holiday merchandise,
including outdoor d6cor,
later this month two
weeks earlier than a year
ago.
Wal-Mart has been
going back to "everyday
low prices" instead of pric-
ing gimmicks like tem-
porarily slashing prices
on select items. It's also
finishing up restocking
thousands of items it cut
during an overzealous bid
to clean up its stores.


The Wal-Mart logo is dis-
played in Springfield, III. Wal-
Mart is bringing back some-
thing it avoided during the
Great Recession: layaway.
Wal-Mart's layaway will kick
off Oct. 17 and run through
Dec. 16, but the company
said it may extend the option
throughout the year if the
program is successful.


Our Quality is Timeless

This Price Isn't!
.. ., .


"7 Y Miracle-Ear Quality
". For $795 Why Wait?
. ...ri,, 1* b us i an s f h tw noo. to, nt voiy 1iis timenr, you cn aj

Si u i fcol ous n4, 4 a ns it b I w rono Wa
a tuiffe, I's Expires September 30,2011
S The Miracle-Ear Advantage:
Experienced. Professional.
Convenient.
MtmacleEtt is Amewa's. monet awlted PFWvki Of iajhncecl )Ianr~ti
.t;E .. qtechnologto HerO's why: -....

S4 Getting Started. It's Free and Easy.
.M 'W 0 4 4Eat wo make pr44e444 ,44044414n4N(4 4 canve4444
AtdB K!..2 4 44eey


FREE Ear Canal I
----- - - - - - - - -ono

Save on one of our smallest
stom digital hearing aids! FREE Hearinge
FEE Hearing Tea
SNow only

J 51 ^ II tj LOWEST PRICE
u $79518o..............

.......M,.,oo TECHNOLOGY

r I T, 4Y 44" 4 e o n 4o 4 4
%.
rem m m m m m m n mI 11 k ,;v po+'+,+t a/m~t


Aquavr"
- - 4'.


4.
rittj i Wi-s


I Adand
l ti' tu ology rwe,
I hlfeptof( 'nlnvteringq


Buy one, get
one at 50% off.


I MOfernds9/30/2011 I
-J~~~~~-


444icr lo ,444444, '.4444gir'
I I r ,a i I:
i..ri ii......ti
I~fr:t,;: ,~u, *tl
ii zio;,, ~r? ii


inspections"
st' 4' 40 4404. Yaii


-,'
W" 4"4f4 W.4


4,f 44 op f i4t w o'o.


Our new RIC h -,, :.;, ', is
short for Receiver in Canal)
, .'- optimal receiver .
placement for optimal
sound enhancement.


PLUS, RECEIVE THIS
HEARING AID I ,o' iS
FREE WITH PURhiASl~


Don't waltl Offer ends September 30,2011


PURCHASE ONE PACK OF BATTERIES, GET ONE FREE


Gal'nesvlle
s .an MItMhlo-e-nr
Oaek< Matll
620s NowALorry Rd
362-,331-5040

i



^^if 1-krjp.^^-tf^'w^ ^^fh^W


qhle4We 3.S04-4ssO'c" ~
_C~0fi [ iPl$bi
i tI r e ahci
kbay~d --~ I6 rJrs:P~-- K


i


s




e


I


, "


I









2C LAKE CITY REPORTER BUSINESS SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 11, 2011


Bankruptcy
and Stocks
(QIf I'm a shareholder in a com-
pany that goes bankrupt, will
I lose my entire investment? -
S.D., Kankakee, Ill.
A You won't necessarily lose
everything, but you'll probably
take a big hit. Some companies file
Sfor bankruptcy protection and then
,turn themselves around, as Texaco
'aind Delta Air Lines did.
Even if a firm ultimately fails,
Sit's sometimes still worth some-
thing. Its assets (such as buildings or
equipment or business units) may be
sold off. The whole company may
',be bought by another company.'too.
- When these sales occur, y6u as
Sa common-stock shareholder:are in'
Saline to receive some ofthe proceeds.-
U unfortunately, though, ybu~le.last
in line. Creditors (banks, bondhold-
ers, suppliers, etc.) are paid fist,
Followed by preferred stockholders.
If there's anything left, holders of
,ommon stock may receive some-
,'thing. Don't count oi it, though.
SIt's best to keepPan;eye on your
stocks and their progress, so that you
don't e~d up holding a failed com-
pany. At a minimum, read quarterly
or annual reports. '

Q What is FDIC insurance? -
B.C., Syracuse, N.Y. .
SThe Federal Deposit Insurance
ACorp. (FDIC) was created in
1933 to protect investors against
bank failures. It insures
.checking, savings and money
market accounts (and CDs) for
up to $250,000 per depositor at
each bank and thrift. It does not
ctver stocks, bonds, mutual funds,
life insurance policies, annuities
and the like, though. For these,
check withyour financial service
company to see what kind of
protections may be.provided.
Learn more about the FDIC
at www.fdic.gov and-more about .
your short-term savings options
at www.fool.con/how-to-invest .
and www.bankrate.com. (You
do have three to six months of
expenses socked away in an
emergency fund, right?)
Got a question for the Fool? Send it in
see Write to Us


The Motley Foolf

To Educate, Amuse & Enrich


401(k) Basics
Most of us have to rely largely on
ourselves to provide for a comfort-
able retirement. There are helpful
tools at our disposal, such as 401(k)
plans, but they're helpful
only if we actually use and
make the most of them.
Here are some tips:
Begin participating in your
company's plan as soon as possible,
contributing as much as you can. It,
not only builds your nest egg, but
also reduces your taxable income.
For 2011, the maximtim contribu-
tion is up to $16,500.
If your employer matches your
contributions to any degree, take full
advantage of that it's free money.
For example, if your employer
will add $500 to a $1,000 contribu-
tion you make, you've just earned
an instant, risk-free return of 50
percent. That's hard to beat.
Keep emergency money sepa-
rate. Stocks are only for money you
won't need for at least five or more
years. (There's a penalty on 401(k)
withdrawals before age 59 1/2.)
* * S *0


r


Over the long run, stocks beat
most other investments. Unfor-
tunately, much 401(k) money is
invested in low-yielding bond or
money-market funds, where it
grows very slowly. The farther
away your retirement is, the more
you can have in stocks.
Look for an S&P 500 index
fund in your 401(k) offerings, as it
beats the vast majority of mutual
funds over the long run and has
lower annual fees, to boot. If your
401(k) plan doesn't include an
index fund based on the S&P 500
or the broader U.S. or global stock
market, ask if one can be added.
Leave your money in the plan
for as long as possible. This delays
the ultimate tax bite and permits
maximum growth. Don't borrow
from your account unless it's an
emergency.
Learn more at www.fool.com/
retirement, www.401k.org and
www.401khelpcenter.com. To
improve your financial future even
more, get concise and practical
guidance from our "Rule Your
Retirement" newsletter. Try it
for free at www.fool.com/shop/
newsletters.
*0*0055* 0055*0* @** 00*0*


Name That Company
Headquartered in Illinois, I'm the
world's second-largest food company,
with annual revenue totaling roughly
$50 billion, more than half of which is
generated outside North America. My
offerings include biscuits, cookies, confec-
tioneries, beverages, cheese, grocery prod-
ucts and convenience meals. More than 50
percent of my revenue comes from categories
where my market share is twice the size of the
nearest competitor's share. Twelve of my brands,
including Oreo, Oscar Meyer, Philadelphia, Trident,
Tang, Maxwell House, Cadbury and Nabisco, gener-
ate more than $1 billion annually, apiece. You'll find
my products in some 170 countries. Who am I?


i Im ii, t11I111 i[h

Sell on Rumors
I bought into the Belgian-Cypriot
shipping company ACLN before its
scandal erupted and held it until it
was worthless. There were actually
rumors beforehand that something
was wrong with the company -
that the financial might not be up
to snuff. This was pre-Enron, so I
wasn't jaded enough yet.
I ended up learning that if there's
ever a rumor of bad finan-
cials or that a company
isn't on the up-and-up, sell
and walk away. Even if the
rumor is not true, the stock is sure to
fall. Had I sold on the first rumors
about ACLN, I may have suffered
only a 10 percent or 20 percent loss.
- P.M, Santa Maria, Calif.
The Fool Responds: Plenty of
rumors may be baseless and the
companies involved may survive
and prosper, but since many actual
disasters start with rumors, it's not
crazy to play it safe and sell. Or
at least to start looking harder at
the company. The SEC found,
among other things, that the
company had falsely claimed to
have more than $100 million in
cash and that insiders had been
selling stock without making
required disclosures.
. Do you have an embarrassing
lesson learned the hard way?
Boil it down to 100 words (or
less) and send it to The Motley Fool co My
Dumbest Investment. Got one that worked?
Submit to My Smartest Investment. If we
print yours, you'll win a Fool's cap!


Solar Shakeout
Solar industry observers have
seen this train coming for months.
As prices fall, partly due to high
supply levels, and profit margins
are squeezed, there's bound to be
a shakeout of solar manufacturers.
And the first domino has fallen.
Evergreen Solar recently filed
for bankruptcy protection, citing
Chinese competition it just couldn't
overcome. Evergreen's technology
was supposed to lead to lower costs
than the competition, and a move
to China was supposed to be the
final cost-cutting step the company
needed. All of the things that were
"supposed to" happen never did.
Which other companies may be
in trouble? Energy Conversion
Devices is one possibility. The pic-
tures of its products are very impres-
sive, as are some of its projects. But
losses keep mounting, sales are fall-
ing, and there's a large debt burden
hanging over the company. Ascent
Solar is another one to watch.
Sticking with solar leaders with
high profit margins, such as Trina
Solar and First Solar, or manufac-
turers such as. SunPower that have
project development pipelines, is
much smarter than betting on a
risky solar technology.
Stocks might still trade after a
bankruptcy filing, but that doesn't
mean the shares are actually worth
anything. It's probably smartest
to cash them in and seek more
promising investments.
(First Solar is a "Motley Fool
Rule Breakers" recommendation.)


LAST WEEK'S TRIVIA ANSWER
Based in Kansas, I trace my roots back to the 1920s, when my founders
were developing technologies for the oil industry. Today I'm one of the two *
largest private companies in America, with annual revenue topping $100
billion. I'm a conglomerate, engaged in oil, chemicals, fertilizer, commodi-
ties and other industrial areas. I bought Georgia-Pacific in 2005, and my
offerings now include its Quilted Northern, Angel Soft, Brawny, Sparkle,
Soft 'n Gentle, Mardi Gras, Vanity Fair and Dixie brands. The brothers who
run me have contributed heavily to conservative causes and the GOP,
drawing fire and praise. Who am I? (Answer: Koch Industries)
Write to Us! Send questions for Ask the Fool, Dumbest (or


K e r d u h h a e n bSmartest) Investments (up to 100 words), and your Trivia entnes,
**** to Foolfoolcom or via regular mail do this newspaper, at: The
entered into a drawing for a nfiypie Motley Fool. Sorn'. we can 't provide individual financial advice.
*55550550 555550505 050 0505 05050 0 50 *S S S *0S* *
w %f, I IhXXINI. y t I'SIN ~I R" U, I x w WI w'y'2011I)


(EDITORS: For editorial questions, contact Alan McDermott at amcdermott@amuniversal.com.)
I


CAMPBELL: Pressed for time Continued From Page IC


Football Fridays scheduled
for Florida Welcome Center
The Columbia County Tourist
Development Council will be oper-
ating a booth inside the Florida
Welcome Center on 1-75 at the state
line to promote Lake City and the
Siwannee River Valley. The booth
will be manned on the Friday prior
to every University of Florida home
football game and will target Gator
fans and those of the visiting school
to.stay in our area both for the game
and for future visits to the area. In
addition, the LAke City Holiday Inn
Suites will be promoting its "Journey
to,the Swamp" promotion which pack-
ages a two-night hotel stay, round-trip
mptpr coach transportation to Florida
Field and a full breakfast on both
days of their stay. Bus transporta-
tion is available for all of the Florida
home games and reservation for the
bus can be made by calling 1-877-
463-2285, ext. 1150. The motor coach
transportation cost is $25.00 per per-
son.
Additionally, the Suwannee River
Valley will be featured in all five of
the Florida Welcome Centers dur-
ing the months of September and
October with a three-day vacation
package.

State park hosts Civil War Expo
The Olustee Battlefield Historic
State Park will host the annual Civil
War Expo on Saturday, Sept. 24. The
Expo is a day of authentic military
drills, music and storytelling, exhib-
its, period artisans and the war's trav-
eling merchants. The event features
re-enactors portraying both military
and civilian life during the Civil War.
The Expo will be open to the public
fiom 10:00 a.m. until 3:00 p.m. A
donation of $5 per car is requested.
Call 386-397-7009 for additional infor-
mation.
The Stephen Foster Folk Culture
Center will be hosting Florida
Frontier Day on Saturday, Oct. 1 in
Craft Square. The event features the
early days of farming, pottery, black-
smithing, twine making, game play-
ing, along with arts and crafts. For
additional information call the park
Gift Shop at 386-397-1920
O'Leno State Park to host Alligator
Fest
During the weekend of Oct. 14-16,


O'Leno State Park will again play
host to the annual Alligator Fest.
The event is held in memory of the
years before 1859 when Lake City
was called Alligator. There is also a
re-enactment of the 1836 Battle of
San Felasco Hammock. In addition,
the event features a Native American
festival with music and dancing, living
history camps, demonstrations of his-
toric skills, traders, craftspeople and
food vendors. There is free admission
for school groups, the fee'is $5 per
vehicle holding 2-8 people, $4 for a
single occupant vehicle and $2 for
pedestrians and bicyclists. Additional
information can be obtained by call-
ing 386454-1853.

BBQ Competition coming
to the fairgrounds
The Columbia County Fairgrounds
will be hosting the 3rd Annual
Smokin' Pig B-B-Q Fest during the
weekend of Sept. 16-17. Competition
cook teams from across the Southeast
will be participating in the event.
In addition, the music group China
Grove, which is a tribute band of the
Doobie Brothers, will be performing
on Friday evening. A special guest
will be Myron Mixon of the The
Learning Channel (TLC) Pitmasters
television show. For additional infor-
mation contact 386-752-8822.

Upcoming events at Spirit
of the Suwannee Music Park
The fall season will get off to
a strong start with three major
events scheduled being held in the
next three months at Spirit of the
Suwannee Music Park. First up is the
Blackwater Music Festival during the
weekend of Sept. 22-24. The events
continue the weekend of Oct. 20-23
with the 15th Annual Magnolia Fest.
The last major nonholiday music
event will be Nov. 11-13 with the Bear
Creek Music & Art Festival. For
additional information on any of these
festivals call 386-364-1683

Schedule of events for our area
Sept. 18, Old Time Dance, O'Leno
State Park. Contact information at
386-454-1853.
Sept 21, 12:00 Noon, Columbia
County Tourist Development Council
meeting, West Branch Public Library,


Hall of Fame Drive.
Oct. 13-20, Fourth Annual Paddle
Florida event, 123 mile canoeing/
kayaking trip on the Suwannee River,
starts at Spirit of the Suwannee Music
Park. Info at www.paddleflorida.org
Oct. 15-16, 10th Annual Suwannee
River Challenge. Three different
length canoe/kayak distances.
Information by calling 407-227-5606:

Upcoming sports schedule -
Contact the TDC office at 758-
1312 for information
Sept. 17-18 AAU/Florida Travel
Ball Leadoff Classic III
Baseball
Sept. 17-18 Girls Softball
Tournament
Softball
Sept. 24-25 USSSA Slamfest
Baseball


Oct. 8-9
Ball Lake City
Baseball
Oct. 15-16
Showcase
Softballl
Oct. 22-23


AAU/Florida Travel
Fall Classic

Girls Softball Fall


USSSA Spooktacular


Baseball
Oct. 29-30 AAU Florida Travel
Ball Halloween Shootout
Baseball

Sports council is formed for
Southside Complex
A new sports council has been
formed to establish priorities and
goals for upgrading the impressive
Southside Sports Complex. The coun-
cil, chaired by County Commissioner
Jody DuPree, includes Jack Muenchen
of baseball, Greg Kennon of girls soft-
ball, Scott Everett of soccer, Columbia
County Landscaping and Parks
Director Clint Pittman, Columbia
County Recreation Director Mario
Coppock and tournament promoter
Randall Plyn. During 2011, we have
scheduled a total of 60 sports tourna-
ments in the Suwannee River Valley.
Of that total, two events were hosted
in Fort White, one was held in Live
Oak, eight of the tournaments were
cancelled and 38 of the tournaments
have already been hosted in Lake City
at the Southside Complex with 11 addi-
tional tournaments scheduled during
the upcoming four months.


Feds investigate


solar firm's


$535M U.S. loan


By JASON DEAREN and
KEVIN FREKING
Associated Press
FREMONT, Calif.
FBI agents execut-
ed search warrants
Thursday .at the head-
quarters of California
solar panel manufac-
turer Solyndra, which
received more than
$500 million in federal
loans before filing for
bankruptcy last week.
Blue-jacket-clad
agents swarmed the
company's headquarters
in Fremont as part of an
investigation with the
Department of Energy's
Office of Inspector
General'into the manu-
facturer once touted
by President Barack
Obama as a beneficiary
of economic stimulus,


FBI agent carry boxes of
evidence from Solyndra
headquarters in Fremont,
Calif., on Thursday. The
FBI are executing search
warrants at the headquar-
ters of California olar firm
Solyndra that received a
$535 million loan from the
federal government.


FBI spokeswoman Julianne Sohn said.
The agents carried evidence in'dozens of boxes
and bags out of Solyndra's offices late Thursday
afternoon, loading the items into a large white
truck.
Sohn said she could not provide details about the
investigation, including what agents were gathering
as the search continued hours after the early morn-
ing raid. The agents were expected to finish their
search Thursday.
Solyndra spokesman Dave Miller said agents
were collecting documents but the company did not
know the reason for the search. Company execu-
tives were on the premises but were not likely to
make a statement Thursday, he said.
"It certainly was a shock this morning to arrive
and see the FBI here," Miller said.
The assumption was that the search was related
to the loans, he said. Those loans part of the $862
billion economic stimulus package that Congress
passed in 2009 have for months been the subject
of a probe by the House Energy and Commerce
Committee.
Republicans are using Solyndra's financial woes
as ammunition in attacking the effectiveness of
the stimulus package. The raid Thursday morning
came just hours before the president appears before
both chambers of Congress to appeal for more legis-
lation that would help the economy and reduce the
nation's 9.1 percent unemployment rate.


I Aktheffg













LAKE CITY REPORTER BUSINESS SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 11, 2011 3C


THE WEEK IN REVIEW THE WEEK IN REVIEW THE WEEK IN REVIEW THE WEEK IN REVIEW THE WEEK IN REVIEW




The Week in Review


Weekly Stock Exchange Highlights

SNYSE Amex Nasdaq

7,045.01 -205.72 2,206.45 -69.64 2,467.99 -12.34


Gainers ($2 or more)
Name Last Chg %Chg
SWSGrp 5.25 +1.50 +40.0
Templelnld 31.05 +6.42 +26.1
ChinaGreen 4.96 +1.01 +25.6
GushanErs 2.19 +.41 +23.0
CSVS2xVxS67.83+11.62 +20.7
Talbots 2.83 +.43 +17.9
GencoShip 7.80 +1.16 +17.5
Standex 31.79 +4.67 +17.2
Blyth 62.02 +8.95 +16.9
DirOMBrrs 47.15 +6.79 +16.8

Losers ($2 or more)
Name Last Chg %Chg
JinkoSolar 10,59 -3.44 -24.5
TdnaSolar 10.41 -2.98 -22.3
YingliGm 4.53 -1.07 -19.1
iPlnvl-21Vx11.95 -2.68 -18.3
ProUltEafe 58.01-12.72 -18.0
AlonHIdgs 5.60 -1.22 -17.9
DirDMBull 34.29 -6.99 -16.9
PrisaAn 4.81 -.96 -16.6
CredSuiss 22.86 -4.52 -16.5
ING 6.64 -1.29 -16.3

Most Active ($1 or more)
Name Vol (00) Last Chg
S&P500ETF9938629115.92-1.93
BkofAm 9636787 6.98 -.27
SPDR Fnd4267661 12.23 -.31
GenElec 4047460 15.09 -.67
iShR2K 2785645 67.50 -.96
iShEMkts 2393038 40.01-1.55
FordM 2177905 10.05 -.37
DrxFnBull 2062994 12.09-1.00
JPMorgCh2032835 32.08-2.55
Pfizer 1870676 18.28 -.18

Diary
Advanced 962
Declined 2,186
New Highs 58
New Lows 284
Total issues 3,196
Unchanged 48
Volume 16,964,263,278


Gainers ($2 or more)
Name Last Chg %Chg
DocuSec 3.13 +.60 +23.7
ExeterRgs 5.45 +.91 +20.0
EntreeGold 2.29 +.36 +18.7
MidsthBcp 11.72 +1.42 +13.8
ClaudeRg 2.29 +.26 +12.8
Banrowt 2.80 +.26 +10.2
IEC Elec 5.87 +.54 +10.1
AlexcoRg 9.11 +.80 +9.6
Richmntg 12.12 +.90 +8.0
KeeganR g 8.75 +.64 +7.9

Losers ($2 or more)
Name Last Chg %Chg
B&HO 3.91 -.89 -18.5
NovaGldg 9.16-1.75 -16.0
AdcareHwt 2.15 -.35 -14.0
HaderaPap 41.40 -6.50 -13.6
Crexendo 3.90 -.59 -13.1
QuestRMg 4.09 -.55 -11.9
EngySvcun 2.90 -.38 -11.6
NA Pallg 3.40 -.36 -9.6
SaratogaRs 5.30 -.55 -9.4
Ballanty 3.30 -.33 -9.1

Most Active ($1 or more)
Name Vol (00) Last Chg
NthgtM 300717 4.00 -.24
NovaGIdg 268422 9.16-1.75
NwGoldg 208757 13.90 +.35
GoldStrg 170924 2.55 -.10
VantageDri 123252 1.39 +.02
CheniereEn 99057 7.01 -.16
GrtBasGg 81770 2.28 -.05
CFCdag 76164 25.12 -.75
NAPallg 66846 3.40 -.36
OpkoHith 62439 4.18 +.17

Diary
Advanced 197
Declined 317
New Highs 9
New Lows 24
Total issues 537
Unchanged 23
Volume 374,949,974


Gainers ($2 or more)
Name Last Chg %Chg
Spherixrs 2.65 +1.31 +97.6
Conns 8,02 +2.78 +53.1
MELA Sci 3.24 +1.08 +50.0
CaliperLSc 10.45 +3.38 +47.8
ClevBioLh 2.89 +.65 +29.0
USATechh 2.25 +.45 +25.0
PennMill 20.13 +3.88 +23.9
UltaSalon 68.45+13.12 +23.7
AmpioPhm 8.61 +1.59 +22.6
OptimerPh 11.93 +2.04 +20.6

Losers ($2 or more)
Name Last Chg %Chg
57StGen un 5.45 -9.15 -62.7
OakRidgeF 2.70 -1.29 -32.3
THT HeatT 2.04 -.85 -29.4
VascoDta 5.21 -1.71 -24.7
Elbillmg 2.25 -.72 -24.2
AdvATech 4.64 -1.32 -22.1
57StGenAc 4.59 -1.13 -19.7
BGMedn 3.86 -.94 -19.6
WestwdOne 4.32 -1.04 -19.4
DynaVox 4.84 -1.10 -18.5

Most Active ($1 or more)
Name Vol (00) Last Chg
Cisco 3008612 15.82 +.41
Yahoo 2812414 14.48 +1.61
Microsoft 2241644 25.74 -.06
PwShsQQQ218138553.18 -.10
Intel 1910687 19.70 +.06
MicronT 1726438 6.35 +.85
SiriusXM 1637557 1.72 -.01
Level 1497944 1.53 -.20
Oracle 1448872 26.00 -.97
NewsCpA 1028575 16.03 -.24

Diary


Advanced
Declined
New Highs
New Lows
Total issues
Unchanged
Volume


873
1,829
46
355
2,775
73
7,626,215,500


STOCKS OF LOCAL INTEREST


Wkly Wkly YTD
Name Ex DIv Last Chg%Chg%Chg


AT&T Inc NY 1.72 27.54
Altria NY 1.64 26.37
AutoZone NY ... 314.49
BkofAm NY .04 6.98
BariPVixrsNY 45.83
BobEvans Nasd 1.00 28.21
CNBFnPA Nasd .66 12.70
CSXs NY .48 19.58
Chevron NY 3.12 95.19
Cisco Nasd .24 15.82
Citigrp rs NY .04 26.74
CocaCola NY 1.88 69.37
Delhaize NY 2.45 61.44
DirFnBrrs NY ... 63.35
DrxFnBull NY ... 12.09
FamilyDir NY .72 50.28
FordM NY ... 10.05
GenElec NY .60 15.09
HewlettP NY .48 22.65
HomeDp NY 1.00 31.87
iShJapn NY .17 9.23
iShEMkts NY .84 40.01
iShR2K NY .94 67.50
Intel Nasd .84 19.70
JPMorgCh NY 1.00 32.08
Level3 Nasd ... 1.53
Lowes NY .56 18.96
McDnlds NY 2.44 85.03


-.51 -1.8 -6.3
-.35 -1.3 +7.1
+3.64 +1.2 +15.4
-.27 -3.7 -47.7
+4.35 +10.5 +21.9
-1.56 -5.2 -14.4
+.10 +0.8 -14.2
-.98 -4.8 -9.1
-1.22 -1.3 +4.3
+.41 +2.7 -21.8
-1.66 -5.8 -43.5
-.37 -0.5 +5.5
-3.99 -.1 -16.6
+2.73 +4.5 +34.1
-1.00 -7.6 -56.6
-1.63 -3.1 +1.1
-.37 -3.6 -40.1
-.67 -4.3 -17.5
-1.69 -6.9 -46.2
-.31 -1.0 -9.1
-.37 -3.9 -15.4
-1.55 -3.7 -16.0
-.96 -1.4 -13.7
+.06 +0.3 -6.3
-2.55 -7.4 -24.4
-.20 -11.3 +55.6
+.02 +0.1 -24.4
-4.06 -4.6 +10.8


Name Ex Div


MicronT Nasd
Microsoft Nasd .64
NY Times NY
NewsCpA Nasd .19
NextEraEn NY 2.20
NobilityH Nasd
OcciPet NY 1.84
Oracle Nasd .24
Penney NY .80
PepsiCo NY 2.06
Pfizer NY .80
Potash s NY .28
PwShsQQQNasd .42
PrUShS&PNY
RegionsFn NY .04
Ryder NY 1.16
S&PS00ETFNY 2.44
SearsHdgsNasd .
SiriusXM Nasd
SouthnCo NY 1.89
SprintNex NY
SPDR FndNY .18
SP Inds NY .67
TimeWam NY .94
VangEmg NY .82
WalMart NY 1.46
WellsFargo NY .48
Yahoo Nasd .


Wkly Wkly YTD
Last Chog%Cho %Cho


+.85 +15.5 -20.8
-.06 -0.2 -7.8
-.34 -4.5 -26.7
-.24 -1.5 +10.1
-2.03 -3.6 +3.1
-.01 -0.1 -6.3
-2.41 -2.9 -17.9
-.97 -3.6 -16.9
+.19 +0.8 -21.6
-3.31 -5.2 -8.2
-.18 -1.0 +4.4
-.96 -1.6 +11.3
-.10 -0.2 -2.4
+.67 +2.8 +4.8
-.16 -3.9 -43.3
-1.60 -3.6 -18.8
-1.93 -1.6 -7.8
-.95 -1.7 -27.4
-.01 -0.3 +5.2
-.42 -1.0 +6.6
-.08 -2.3 -18.4
-.31 -2.5 -23.3
-.67 -2.2 -13.4
-1.71 -5.6 -10.2
-1.64 -3.8 -14.5
-.67 -1.3 -4.8
-,68 -2.8 -24.1
+1.61 +12.5 -12.9


Stock Footnotes: = Dividends and earnings in Canadian dollars. h = Does not meet conltnued-lisling standards.
If Late filing with SEC, n = New In past 52 weeks, pf = Prelerred, rs = Stock has undergone a reverse stock split
of at least 50 percent within the past year. rt = Right to buy security at a specified price. s = Stock has split by at
least 20 percent within the last year, un = Units. vj In bankruptcy or receivership. wd = When distributed, wi =
When Issued, wt Warrants.
Mutual Fund Footnote;s b = Fee covering market costs is paid from fund assets. d = Deferred sales charge, or
redemption fee. I=front load (sales charges) m = Multiple fees are charged. NA not available, p previous day's
net asset value, s = lund split shares during the week. x = fund paid a distribution during the week.Galners and
Losers must be worth at least $2 to be listed In tables at let. Most Actives must be worth at least $1. Volume In
hundreds of shares. Source: The Associated Press. Sales figures are unofficial.


Money Rates
Last Pvs Week
Prime Rate 3.25 3.25
Discount Rate 0.75 0.75
Federal Funds Rate .00-25 .00-25
Treasuries
3-month 0.01 0.02
6-month 0.04 0.05
5-year 0.80 0.86
10-year 1.92 1.99
30-year 3.25 3.29


Currencies
Last Pva Day
Australia .9578 .9451
Britain 1.5864 1.5967
Canada .9973 .9891
Euro .7323 .7199
Japan 77.43 77.49
Mexico 12.6654 12.5073
Switzerind .8841 .8747
British pound expressed in U.S. dollars. All oth-
ers show dollar in foreign currency.


Weekly Dow Jones

Dow Jones Industrials CLOSED-100.96 275.56 -119.05 -303.68
Close: 10,992.13 ,) 1 ,,) 1
1-week change: -248.13 (-2.2%) MON TUES WED THUR FRI
13,000

12,500

12,000

11,500

11,000

10,500 M A M J J A S



MUTUAL FUNDS -
Total Assets Total Return/Rank Pet Min Int
Name Obj ($Mlns) NAV 4-wk 12-mo 5-year Load Invt
PIMCOTotRetls Cl 144,330 11.03 -0.1 +4.5/E +8.4/A NL 1,000,000
Vanguard TotStldx LB 58,721 28.93 -1.2 +7.3/A +0.4/B NL 3,000
American Funds GrthAmA m LG 57,082 27.82 -1.3 +4.8/D +0.2/D 5.75 250
Fidelity Contra LG 57,045 64.58 -0.9 +9.8/B +3.4/A NL 2,500
Vanguard Instldxl LB 55,901 106.04 -1.3 +6.6/B -0.2/B NL 5,000,000
Amercan Funds CaplncBuA m IH 55,898 48.00 -0.8 +4.5/C +1.9/C 5.75 250
American Funds IncAmerA m MA 51,184 16.01 +0.2 +6.7/A +2.1/C 5.75 250
Vanguard 500Adml LB 49,870 106.77 -1.3 +6.6/B -0.2/B NL 10,000
American Funds CpWIdGrlA m WS 48,359 31.25 -4.9 -2.3/E +0.4/C 5.75 250
Vanguard TotStlAdm LB -47,454 28.94 -1.2 +7.4/A +0.4/B NL 10,000
Amercan Funds InvCoAmA m LB 43,101 25.21 -2.5 +2.5/E -1.1/D 5.75 250
Dodge & Cox IntlStk FV 40,297 29.58 -7.4 -5.6/D -1.3/A NL 2,500
Dodge & Cox Stock LV 38,205 94.49 -2.7 +2.1/C -3.9/D NL 2,500
Amedcan Funds WAMutlnvA m LV 36,898 25.93 -0.5 +8.0/A -0.2/A 5.75 250
Vanguard InstPlus LB 34,848 106.05 -1.3 +6.6/B -0.2/B NL 200,000,000
FrankTemp-Frandkin Income Am CA 34,484 2.03 +0.6 +4.5/1 +3.2C 4.25 1,000
Amercan Funds EurPacGrA m FB 33,112 35.88 -6.6 -3.3/C +0.6/A 5.75 250
PIMCOTotRetAdm b Cl 32,335 11.03 -0.1 +4.3/E +8.1/A NL 1,000,000
Vanguard Totlntld FB 31,366 13.65 -5.0 -2.6/C -0.8/B NL 3,000
American Funds FnlnvA m LB 30,691 33.35 -1.4 +4.4/C +0.8/A 5.75 250
American Funds BalA m MA 30,370 17.34 -0.7 +7.0/A +2.5/B 5.75 250
Amercan Funds NewPerspA m WS 29,791 25.73 -3.6 +3.1/C +2.1/A 5.75 250
Vanguard TotBdAdml Cl 29,596 11.06 +0.9 +6.4/8 +6.8/B NL 10,000
Vanguard WelltnAdm MA 28,110 51.19 -1.5 +4.8/C +3.6/A NL 50,000
Vanguard 5001nv LB 27,422 106.74 -1.3 +6.5/B -0.31B NL 3,000
FrankTemp-Templeton GIBondAdvlB 27,140 13.66 +0.5 +7.4/C +11.9/A NL 50,000
PIMCOTotRetA m Cl 26,775 11.03 -0.1 +4.1/E +7.9/A 3.75 1,000


Wkly YTD Wkly
Name Div YId PE Chg %Chg Last
ABB Ltd .64 3.5 ...-2.18-19.4 18.09
AESCorp ... .. 12 +.01 -15.2 10.33
AFLAC 1.20 3.5 7 -1.16 -40.0 33.83
AK Steel .20 2.4 ... +.02 -49.8 8.22
AMR ... ...... -.07 -57.0 3.35
AOL ... ... 10 +.22 -37.9 14.72
AT&T Inc 1.72 6.2 8 -.51 -6.3 27.54
AbtLab 1.92 3.8 13 -.61 +5.3 50.43
Accenture .90 1.8 16-1.65 +2.7 49.82
AMD ... ... 6 +.20 -20.3 6.52
Aetna .60 1.6 8 -.89 +24.5 38.00
Agilent ... ... 12 -1.04 -19.5 33.36
AlcatelLuc ... ... ... -.40 +5.1 3.11
Alcoa .12 1.0 13 -.46 -24.8 11.58
Allstate .84 3.4 24 -.15 -22.2 24.81
AlphaNRs ... ... 75 -.08 -48.7 30.81
Altria 1.64 6.2 16 -.35 +7.1 26.37
AMovilLs .41 1.8 10 -1.46 -18.4 23.39
AEagleOut .44 4.1 13 +.26 -26.9 10.70
AEP 1.84 5.0 12 -1.18 +2.3 36.80
AmExp .72 1.5 12 -1.23 +10.2 47.28
AmlntlGrp ......... -.30 -51.6 23.36
Anadarko .36 .5 42 +.17 -8.2 69.88
AnalogDev1.00 3.1 11 +.10 -14.8 32.11
Annaly 2.59 14.5 6 +.44 -.6 17.81
Apache .60 .6 10 -3.53 -20,2 95.12
ArcelorMit .75 4.2 9 -2.18 -53.4 17.76
ArchCoal .44 2.3 14 +.38 -44.3 19.52
ArchDan .64 2.4 9 -.32 -9.9 27.11
ATMOS 1.36 4.1 15 -.39 +6.0 33.07
BB&TCp .64 3.1 15 -.01 -20.5 20.90
BHPBilLt 2.02 2.6 ...-3.71 -17.0 77.17
BakrHu .60 1.1 18 -1.48 -.7 56.79
BcoBrades .80 4.7 ... -.84 -15.3 17.19
BcoSantSA .82 10.4 ... -.71 -26.1 7.87
BcoSBrasil 1.65 18.5 ... -.74 -34.5 8.91
BkofAm .04 .6 ... -.27 -47.7 6.98
BkNYMel .52 2.6 9 -.03 -34.0 19.92
Barclay .36 4.0 ...-1.49 -44.9 9.11.
BariPVixrs .. ...... +4.35 +21.9 45.83
BarrickG .48 .9 14 +1.68 +2.6 54.55
Baxter 1.24 2.3 14 -.65 +5.0 53.16
BerkHB ...... 14 -1.60 -15.4 67.77
BestBuy .64 2.6 8 +.40 -28.6 24.50
Blackstone .40 3.3 68 -.81 -13.7 12.21
BlockHR .60 4.6 11 -.28 +10.2 13.13
Boeing 1.68 2.7 13 -2.24 -5.3 61.79
BostonSci ... ... 16 -.22 -18.1 6.20
BrMySq 1.32 4.5 15 +.15 +10.1 29.16
CBREllis ...... 18 -.30 -31.4 14.05
CBSB .40 1.8 14 -1.12 +16.2 22.14
CSXs .48 2.5 13 -.98 -9.1 19.58
CVSCare .50 1.4 15 +1.07 +5.0 36.50
CapOne .20 .5 6 -.50 -1.8 41.78
CapitSrce .04 .6 20 +.12-12.0 6.25
Carnival 1.00 3.3 13 -.18 -33.5 30.68
Caterpillar 1.84 2.2 14 -1.42 -10.4 83.96
Cemex ... ... ... -.10 -51.9 4.95
CenterPnt .79 4.0 16 +.07 +24.2 19.52
Cntryink 2.90 8.8 12 -1.08 -28.4 33.07
ChesEng .35 1.2 11 -1.73 +17.3 30.38
Chevron 3.12 3.3 8 -1.22 +4.3 95.19
Chimera .62 21.8 5 -.05 -30.9 2.84
Citigrprs .04 .1 8 -1.66 -43.5 26.74
CliffsNRs 1.12 1.5 7 -1.86 -1.8 76.63
CocaCola 1.88 2.7 14 -.37 +5.5 69.37
CocaCE .52 2.1 13 -1.43 +1.2 25.34
Comerica .40 1.8 11 -1.13 -47.2 22.31
CpnocPhil 2.64 4.1 8 -2,21 -5.7 64.23
ConsolEngy.40 .9 17 -1.66 -11.5 43.12
ConEd 2.40 4.4 16 -.95 +11.2 55.12
ConstellEn .96 2.5 18 -.08 +23.7 37.88
Coming .20 1.5 6 -.54 -29.7 13.58
Covidien .80 1.7 13 -2.81 +4.5 47.72
CSVellVSt s... ...... -.79 -44.9 6.59
Cummins 1.60 1.8 12 +1.34 -19.9 88.16
DRHorton .15 1.6 80 -.39 -19.7 9.58
DTE 2.35 4.8 12 -1.17 +7.0 48.47
Danaher .08 .2 15 -.46 -9.7 42.59




Wkly YTD Wkly
Name DIv YId PE Cha %Cha Last


AcmePkt ...
ActivsBliz .17
AdobeSy ...
AdvATech ...
AkamaiT ...
AllscriptH ...
AlleraCp If .32
Amazon
ACapAgy 5.60
AmCapLtd ...
Amgen 1.12
AmkorT If ...
Apollolnv 1.12
Apple Inc
ApldMatl .32
AriadP
ArmHld .15
ArubaNet ...
Almel
Autodesk..
AutoData 1.44
BMC Sft
Baidu
BedBath
BioSane ...
BrigExp
Broadcom .36
BrcdeCm ...
CA Inc .20
Cadence
CaliperLSc ...
CpslnTrbh ...
Celgene
CentEuro ...
Cephin
CienaCorp ...
Cisco .24
CitrixSvs ...


61 -.42
21 +.09
13 +.49
... -1.32
21 +.27
... -.03
13 -.14
93 +1.39
4 +1.12
3 +.10
11 -.06
6 +.14
6 +.02
15 +3.43
7 -.12
.+.24
+.74
97 -1.31
7 +.13
24 -.97
19 -.53
15 -.46
66 +3.18
17 -.15
... +.23
39 +.16
19 -1.13
16 +.14
12 -.44
12
...+3.38
... -.03
27 +1.43
... -1.02
12
... -1.23
14 +.41
30 -3.77


-14.2 45.59
--8.2 11.42
-19.9 24.64
+15.7 4.64
-55.9 20.77
-11.3 17.09
-2.7 34.61
+17.4 211.39
-1.2 28.39
+7.4 8.12
-1.6 54.05
-42.0 4.30
-22.9 8.54
+17.0 377.48
-23.7 10.73
+87.5 9.56
+32.3 27.46
-12.0 18.38
-29.5 8.69
-33.5 25.41
+2.9 47.62
-18.4 38.46
+48.8 143.63
+14.5 56.29
+67.7 2.75
+3.1 28.08
-23.2 33.44
-28.5 3.78
-19.4 19.71
+7.5 8.88
+64.8 10.45
+11.5 1.07
+1.1 59.77
-73.4 6.08
+30.6 80.61
-40.4 12.55
-21.8 15.82
-21.7 53.58


Name Div YId
Darden 1.72 4.0
DeanFds ...
Deere 1.64 2.2
DetaAir ...
DenbuR ...
DeutschBk1.07 3.4
DBGoldDS ... .
DevonE .68 1.1
DrSCBrrs.
DirFnBrrs ...
DirLCBrrs
DrxEnBear ...
DrxFnBull ...
DirxSCBull ...
DirxLCBull .10 ..
DirxEnBull ...
Discover .24 1.0
Disney .40 1.3
DollarGer, ...
DomRescs 1.97 4.2
DowChm 1.00 3.9
DukeEngy 1.00 5.4
EMC Cp ...
Eatons 1.36 3.5
EIPasoCp .04 .2
EldorGIdg .12 .
EmersonEI 1.38 3.2
EnCanag .80 3.5
ENSCO 1.40 2.8
Exelon 2.10 5.0
ExxonMbl 1.88 2.6
FstHorizon.04 .6
FrstEngy 2.20 5.2
FordM
ForestLab ...
ForestOil ...
FMCGs 1.00 2.4
FrontierCm .75 11.0
Gannett .32 3.3
Gap .45 2.8
GenGrPr n .40 3.3
GenMills 1.22 3.3
GenMot n ...
GenOn En ...
Genworth ...
Gerdau .25 3.0
GoldFLtd .24 1.4
Goldcrp g .41 .7
GoldmanS 1.40 1.4
Goodyear ...
HCP Inc 1.92 5.5
Hallibrtn .36 .9
HartfdFn .40 2.4
HeclaM
Heinz 1.92 3.8
Hertz
Hess .40 .7
HewlettP .48 2.1
HollyFrts .35 1.0
HomeDp 1.00 3.1
Honwlllntl 1.33 3.0
HostHotls .12 1.1
Huntsmn .40 3.4
IAMGIdg .20 .9
ING
iShGold ...
iSAslla 1.06 4.7
iShBraz 3.42 5.6
iShGer .67 3.8
iSh HK .42 2.5
iShJapn .17 1.8
iSh Kor .50 1.0
iSTaiwn .29 ...
iShSilver ...
iShChina25 .85 2.4
iSSP500 2.45 2.1
iShEMkts .84 2.1
iShB20T 4.02 3.5
iSEafe 1.68 3.4


Wkly YTD Wkly
PE Chg %Chq Last


13 -3.06
24 +.19
12 -2.77
14 -.09
21 -.84
... -5.13
... +.12
5 -1.42
... +1.09
... +2.73
... +1.54
+.78
... -1.00
.. -2.04
.. -2.80
.. -2.87
8 -.30
13 -1.42
18 -1.26
16 -.79
12 -.94
13 -.23
22 -.14
11 -1.66
24 -.39
51 +.63
14 -.63
50 -2.03
17 +2.45
13 -.23
9 -1.13
37 -.10
18 -.31
5 -.37
8 -.35
17 +.10
7 -2.95
43 -.24
5 -.52
9 +.52
... -.65
14 +.11
6 -.31
+.01
... -.57
.+.05
2 +.40
19 +.56
10 -4.81
-.72
29 -.60
15 -1.88
4 -.59
29 -.09
16 -1.14
13 -.47
7 -.27
5 -1.69
17 +1.01
14 -.31
13 -.73
... -.38
9 -.48
21 +1.07
-1.29
... -.25
... -.90
... -2.89
... -1.93
.. -.38
... -.37
... -2.46
... -.32
... -1.66
... -1.17
... -1.96
... -1.55
... +1.20
... -2.98


-6.6 43.37
-6.4 8.27
-9.4 75.26
-43.0 7.18
-26.2 14.09
-40.2 31.14
-47.6 4.18
-19.5 63.19
+3.9 48.66
+34.1 63.35
+1.5 44.49
-17.4 18.62
-56.6 12.09
-46.4 38.79
-29.3 50.52
-28.5 41.80
+29.1 23.92
-17.2 31.04
+13.5 34.80
+10.5 47.19
-24.5 25.77
+4.2 18.55
-7.0 21.29
-23.8 38.66
+32.6 18.24
+15.7 21.48
-24.1 43.40
-21.4 22.89
-7.8 49.24
+1.8 42.38
-2.9 71.01
-47.3 6.21
+15.4 42.71
-40.1 10.05
+2.4 32.75
-51.0 18.61
-30.1 4.1.99
-29.9 6.82
-34.8 9.84
-27.4 16.00
-22.1 12.06
+5.4 37.52
-41.0 21.76
-19.4 3.07
-55.7 5.82
-40.6 8.31
-5.0 17.23
+20.2 55.27
-39.2 102.25
-9.0 10.78
-5.0 34.94
-2.9 39.66
-37.2 16.64
-31.0 7.77
+2.2 50.57
'-32.2 9.83
-24.6 57.74
-46.2 22.65
+71.8 35.02
-9.1 31.87
-15.9 44.72
-40.2 10.69
-23.7 11.91
+26.3 22.49
-32.2 6.64
+30.4 18.12
-11.2 22.58
-21.2 60.97
-25.6 17.82
-11.7 16.71
-15.4 9.23
-14.7 52.19
-16.1 13.10
+34.3 40.52
-16.6 35.95
-7.9 116.26
-16.0 40.01
+20.8 113.71
-16.3 48.75


New York Stock Exchange





Markets Change.

Are You Prepared?

Wthen you stop and look back at what's nappented

in the markets, It's easy to realize how quickly

things can change. That's why we should sct'edule

some time to discuss how the market can impact

your financial goals. We can also conduct a free

portfolio review to help you decide If you should

make changes to your investments and whether

you're on track to reach your goals


Stop hy o01 .ill tod.iy to -.ihlu..lii. ) ou! t .:' I ir,',


Steve Jones, CFP*
Financial Advisor

S 2929 West U S Higlnvay 90
Suite 114
Lake City, FL 32055
386-752-384 7

1www.edwn arones.cosm ., -


Name Div YId
iShR2K .94 1.4
iShREst 2.09 3.8
ITW 1.44 3.4
IngerRd .48 1.5
IBM 3.00 1.9
IntlGame .24 1.7
IntPap 1.05 4.0
Interpublic .24 3.2
Invesco .49 3.0
ItauUnibH .84 4.9
JPMorgCh 1.00 3.1
Jabil .28 1.8
JanusCap .20 3.1
JohnJn 2.28 3.6
JohnsnCtl .64 2.2
JnprNtwk
KBHome .25 4.4
Keycorp .12 2.0
Kimco .72 4.4
Kinrossg .12 .7
KodlakOg ...
Kohls 1.00 2.3
Kraft 1.16 3.4
LSICorp
LVSands
LennarA .16 1.2
UllyEII 1.96 5.4
UncNat .20 1.1
MEMC
MFAFncl 1.00 14.3
MGIC
MGM Rsts ...


Widy YTD Wkly
PE Chg %Chg -Last
... -.96 -13.7 67.50
... -.27 -2.4 54.63
11 -1.16 -20.4 42.51
... +.01 -31.5 32.27
13 -5.61 +10.0 161.37
17 -.59 -21.1 13.96
9 +.68 -3.9 26.17
14 -.30 -29.5 7.49
9 -.55 -31.6 16.46
... -1.19 -28.4 17.11
7 -2.55 -24.4 32.08
11 -.61 -21.6 15.76
6 -.25 -51.0 6.36
14 -.43 +2.9 63.64
13 -.80 -24.3 28.90
20 +1.26 -41.9 21.46
...-.35 -58.0 5.67
6 -.12 -30.8 6.12
90 -.44 -10.3 16.19
25 +.36 -5.3 17.95
82 +.15 -13.2 5.73
11 -1.33 -21.6 42.60
20 +.24 +9.5 34.51
13 -.04 +9.3 6.55
34 +1.52 +1.5 46.62
25 -.40 -28.1 13.48
8 -.31 +3.1 36.13
5 -1,00 -35.2 18.03
21 +.23 -41.2 6.62
7 -.04 -14.2 7.00
+.18 -76.7 2.37
... -.24 -32.1 10.09


Name Div
Macys .40
Manitowoc .08
ManpwrGp .80
MarathnO s .60
MktVGold .40
MktVRus .18
MktVJrGId 2.93
MarlntA .40
MarshM .88
Masco .30
Medtmic .97
Merck 1.52
MellUfe .74
MelroPCS ...
MobileTele 1.06
Molycorp ...
Monsanlo 1.20
MonstrWw ...
Moodys .56
MorgStan .20
Mosaic .20
MolrlaSol n .88
MolriaMon ...
NCR Corp ..
NYSE Eur 1.20
Nabors
NalcoHId .14
NatGrid 2.92
NOilVarco .44
NatRelPrp 1.54
NatSemi .40
NY CmtyB 1.00


YId PE


Wkly YTD Wkly
Chg %Chg Last


1.6 10 -.19 -.5 25.17
.9 ... -.64 -29.4 9.25
2.3 ... -3.06 -45.1 34.46
2.4 5 -.96 +10.4 24.82
.6 ... +.89 +7.0 65.80
.6 ... -1.36 -18.0 31.07
7.7 ... -.01 -4.1 38.27
1.5 21-1.20 -37.2 26.08
3.1 16 -.42 +4.5 28.57
3.8 ... -.18 -38.4 7.80
2.9 12 -.83 -10.0 33.38
4.6 12 -.53 -11.7 31.84
2.5' 8 -.89 -32.8 29.88
... 16 +.14 -17.2 10.46
7.3 21 -2.03 -30.0 14.60
... ... -.70 +8.4 54.11
1.8 22 -.79 -6.6 65.01
... -.82 -66.5 7.91
1.9 11 -.37 +9.2 28.97
1.3 33 -.68 -43.8 15.28
.3 14 -.03 -8.4 69.97
2.2 ... -.06 +6.0 40.34
-.25 +28.9 37.50
11 ... +6.5 16.37
4.7 12 -.21 -14.4 25.67
... 17 -.79 -28.4 16.79
.4 23 -.70 +10.6 35.33
5.9 ... -.74 +11.6 49.53
.7 15 -.87 -6.8 62.66
5.9 32 -.31 -.9 26.25
1.6 21 -.04 +80.6 24.85
8.4 10 -.19 -37.0 11.88


Wkly YTD
Name Div Yld PE Cho %Chg


NewmtM 1.20 1.8
NextEraEn 2.20 4.1
NiSource .92 4.4
NobleCorp .53 1.6
NokiaCp .55 9.2
NorflkSo 1.72 2.7
Nucor 1.45 4.4
OcciPet 1.84 2.3
OfficeDpt
OIISvHT 1.58 .8
PG&ECp 1.82 4.5
PMIGrp
PNC 1.40 3.0
PPLCorp 1.40 '5.0
PatriotCoal ...
PeabdyE .34 .7
Penney .80 3.2
PepsiCo 2.06 3.4
PetrbrsA 1.34 5.5
Petrobras 1.26 4.7
Pfizer .80 4.4
PhilipMor 2.56 3.9
Potash s .28 .5
PS USDBull...
PnnFncI .55 24
ProLogis 1 12 4.4
ProShtS&P .
PrUShS&P ...
PrUShDow ...
ProUltOQ ...
PrUShOQ rs...
ProUltSP .35 .9
ProUShL20 ...
ProUtFin .05 .1
ProUltR2K .01 ...
ProUSSP500...
PrUtSP500 s.05 .1
ProUSSIvrs...
ProUShEuro...
ProgsvCp 1.40 2.2
ProUSR2K rs...
Prudentll 1.15 2.5
PulteGrp ...
QksilvRes ...
RadianGrp .01 .4
Raytheon 1.72 4.2
RegionsFn .04 1.0
RiteAid
RoyDShllA 3.36 5.3
SAIC ...
SLMCp .40 3.1
SpdrDJIA 3.12 2.8
SpdrGold
S&P500ETF2.44 2.1
SpdrHome .31 2.2
SpdrKbwBk .20 1.1
SpdrLel-3bll...
SpdrRell .46 1.0
SpdrOGEx .47 .9
STMicro .40 6.9
Safeway .58 3.2
Saks ...
SandRdge ...
Sanofi 1.82 5.6
SaraLee .46 2.7
Schlmbrg 1.00 1.4
Schwab .24 2.1
SemiHTr .64 2.2
SiderurNac .81 8.8
SilvWhtng .12 .3
SilvrcpM g .08
SmithfF
SoulhnCo 1.89 4.6
SwstAirl .02 .2
SwslnEngy ...
SpeclraEn 1.04 4.2
SprinNex ..
SP Malls 1.30 3.9
SP HIlhC .63 2.0


15 +1.09
13 -2.03
19 +.11
29 +1.18
... -.36
14 -.29
23 -.93
11 -2.41
+.07
... -2.21
15 -.68
... -.05
7 +.15
12 -.24
... +.95
14 +1.02
15 +.19
15 -3.31
... -1.12
... -1.31
12 -.18
15 -2.34
21 -.96
... +.69
9 -.23
-.50
+.66
+.67
+.80
-.40
-.02
-1.41
... -.57
.. -1.85
-.96
+.78
... -2.75
+.81
... +1.32
10 -.26
... +1.02
7 -.46
... -.08
4 -.40
... -.19
7 -.63
-.16
+.05
14 -1.85
9 -.18
9 +.03
... -2.46
.. -2.54
... -1.93
-... .36
-.37
-.01
+.36
-.38
5 -.50
11 +.26
19 +.11
29 -.04
... -2.35
8 -.28
19 -2.62
19 -.27
+.45
-.38
30 -.86
19 +.90
7 -1.53
17 -.42
12 -.19
20 -.78
14 -.56
-.08
-.80
-.48


Nasdaq Most Active


Name


Wkly YTD Wkly
Div Y(d PE Chb %Cho Last


CleanEngy ... ... ...
Clearwire ... ...
CognizTech... ... 23
ColdwtrCrk ... ... ...
Comcast .45 2.2 15
Comcspcl .45 2.2 14
CorinthC
Costco .96 1.2 25
Cree Inc ... ... 24
CypSemi .36 2.3 23
Dell Inc ... ... 7
Dndreon ... ...
DirecTVA ... ... 14
DishNetwk ... ... 9
DonlleyRR1.04 7.5 14
DryShips ... ... 5
E-Trade ... ... 45
eBay ... ... 21
ElectArts ... ...
EricsnTel .37 3.6 ...
Expedia .28 1.0 19
ExpScripts ... ... 19
F5 Nelwks... ... 28
Fastenals .52 1.6 30
FifthThird .24 2.4 10
Finisar ... 22
FstNiagara .64 6.3 14
FstSolar ... ... 14
Flextm ... ... 7
Fortinets ... ... 49
FuelCell ... ...
GileadSci ... ... 11
Globlind ... ...
Google ... 18
GreenMC ... ...
HarbinElec ... ... 11
HercOfsh ... ..
HudsCitv .32 5.8


+.87 -4.0
-.47 -48.8
-.31 -17.1
+.38 -62.1
-.09 -4.4
-.27 -.9
-.04 -64.1
+.34 +9.3
+1.11 -52.4
+.30 -16.4
-.27 +3.1
+.44 -67.4
-.80 +3.7
+.12 +24.2
-.48 -20.7
-.04 -46.9
-.66 -32.9
-.95 +2.3
-.63 +30.4
-.56 -9.8
-.11 +16.1
-1.67 -19.2
-1.71 -42.7
+.25 +7.9
+.19 -33.2
-1.21 -36.0
+.10 -27.3
-5.14 -34.7
-.03 -31.3
-.77 +9.0
+.16 -48.1
-1.01 +4.3
+.58 -25.7
+.01 -11.6
+2.85 +223.8
+2.36 +14.1
.. +13.2
-.24 -56.6


Name DIv
HumGen
Informal
Infosys 1.35
Intel .84
Intuit .60
JA Solar
JDS Uniph ...
JetBlue
KLATnc 1.40
LamResrch ...
Level3
LibtyMlntA ...
UfeTech ...
UnearTch .96
lululemngs ...
MELA Sci ...
MarvellT .
Matel .92
Maximlntg .88
MelcoCrwn ...
MlcronT
Microsoft .64
NasdOMX ...
NetApp
Netfllx
NewsCpA .19
NewsCpB .19
Novlus
Nvidia
OmniVisn ...
OnSmcnd ...
OpenTable ..
Oracle .24
PDL Bio .60
PMC Sra ...
Paccar .48
PattUTI .20
Pavchex 1.24


Wkly YTD Wkly
YId PE Chg %Chg Last


... -.42
39 -1.19
17 -2.42
9 +.06
23 -1.11
2 -.49
40 -.45
13 -.07
8 +.64
6 +.96
... -.20'
13 +.04
20 -1.07
11 +.67
59 +1.91
... +1.08
11 +.80
13 -.10
14 +1.08
68 -.22
10 +.85
10 -.06
10 -.30
21 -.13
52 -9.14
14 -.24
14 -.30
8 +.95
15 +.96
7 -.22
11 +.25
69 -2.28
16 -.97
8 +.04
40 +.24
18 -.29
15 -.70
18 -.14


-51.8 11.51
-15,4 37.24
-38.0 47.17
-6.3 19.70
-6.2 46.24
-58.8 2.85
-14.8 12.34
-39.3 4.01
-8.2 35.46
-28.2 37.18
+55.6 1.53
-1.1 15.59
-29.3 39.22
-18.7 28.13
+60.9 55.06
-3.3 3.24
-26.2 13.69
+2.8 26.13
-2.2 23.11
+90.6 12.12
-20.8 6.35
-7.8 25.74
-6.2 22.26
-35.1 35.68
+16.1 203.97
+10.1 16.03
-1.0 16.26
-13.0 28.12
-9.9 13.88
-42.1 17.13
-27.4 7.17
-21.6 55.24
-16.9 26.00
-8.7 5.69
-30.5 5.97
-38.3 35.38
+5.2 22.66
-16.1 25.93


Wkly YTD Wkly
Name Div YId PE Chg %Chg Last


PeopUldF .63
Polycoms ...
Popular
PwShs QQ .42
Powrwav ...
PriceTR 1.24
Qualcom .86
RF MicD
RschMotn ...
Riverbed s
SanDisk
SeagateT .72
Sina
SiriusXM ...
SkywksSol ...
SodaSIrm n...
Staples .40
Starbucks .52
StIDynam .40
Symantec ...
TDAmeritr .20
Tellabs .08
TevaPhrm .87
TibcoSIt
TIVo Inc ...
TriQulnt .
UrbanOu ...
Verisign 5.75
VirgnMdah .16
Vodafone 1.45
WamerCh ...
Windstrm 1.00
Xilinx .76
YRC rsh ...
Yahoo
ZionBcp .04


25 +.25
34 +.05
5 -.13
... -.10
15 -.01
17 -.74
22 +.73
16 +.04
5 -.44
70 -.83
7 +3.79
10 +.47
... +3.46
57 -.01
18 -.04
33 +3.16
10 -.24
25 -.18
11 -.56
21 -.31
13 -.54
+.20
12 -1.74
38 -1.08
... -.20
6 -1.00
17 -1.40
6 -.98
... +.24
... -.55
32 -.91
21 +.03
13 +.21
... -.26
16 +1.61
... -.05


WlI Name
Last Name


+6.2 65.26
+3.1 53.60
+19.3 21.02
-5.4 33.84
-42.1 5.98
+3.2 64.83
-24.4 33.14
-17.9 80.54
-56.3 2.36
-10.7 125.47
-15.0 40.66
-93.6 .21
-23.6 46.38
+6.2 27.95
-25.2 14.49
-26.8 46.81
-21.6 25.34
-8.2 59.99
-28.9 24.28
-29.9 26.54
+4.4 18.28
+12.6 65.90
+11.3 57.46
-3.5 21.91
-29.3 23.02
-19.1 25.65
+3.7 45.46
+4.8 24.89
-1.4 20.41
-8.1 74.85
-7.6 53.77
-17.4 39.68
-39.8 22.31
-39.5 40.18
-29.5 30.08
+2.5 19.90
-28.0 49.20
-70.7 11.51
-8.4 18.60
-9.2 18.04
+9.0 54.76
-21.4 46.14
-42.8 4.30
-41.2 8.66
-64.8 2.84
-11.6 40.64
-43.3 3.97
+21.2 1.07
-4.4 63.82
-19.5 12.76
+1.0 12.71
-5.0 109.82
+30.3 180.70
-7.8 115.92
-20.3 13.86
-30.3 18.07
45.85
-2.4 47.22
-3.9 50.68
-44.4 5.80
-20.4 17.91
-12.2 9.39
-6.1 6.87
+1.5 32.70
-1.4 17.27
-14.0 71.80
-34.1 11.27
-12.3 28.52
-44.8 9.20
+2.1 39.85
-34.3 8.43
-5.7 19.45
+6.6 40.74
-37.9 8.06
-4.1 35.91
-.4 24.88
-18.4 3.45
-13.6 33.17
+1.5 31.97


Wkly YTD Wkly
Div Yld PE Chg %Chg Last


SPCnSt .83
SP Consum .59
SPEngy 1.06
SPDRFnd .18
SPInds .67
SPTech .35
SPUtil 1.33
StardHtl .30
StateStr .72
Stryker .72
Suncorgs .44
Sunoco .60
SunTrst .20
Supvalu .35
Synovus .04
Sysco 1.04
TJX .76
TaiwSemi .52
Talbots
TalismE g .27
Target 1.20
TeckRes g .60
TelefEsp s 1.98
Templelnld .52
TenetHth ...
Terex
Tesoro
Texlnst .52
Textron .08
ThermoRs...
3MCo 2.20
TimeWarn .94
Total SA 2.38
Transocn .79
Travelers 1.64
TrinaSolar ...
Tycolntl 1.00
Tyson .16
UBSAG ...
US Airwy ...
UnilevNV 1.21
UnionPac 1.90
UtdContl ..
UPS B 2.08
US Bancrp .50
USNGsrs ...
US OilFd ...
USSteel .20
UtdhlthGp .65
ValeSA 1.14
Vale SApf 1.14
ValeroE .20
VangEmg .82
VeriFone .
VerizonCm2.00
ViacomB 1.00
VimpelCm .79
Visa .60
Walgm .90
WaterEn .50
WsteMInc 1.36
Weathfllntl.
WellsFargo .48
WendysCo .08
WDgital ...
WstnUnion .32
Weyerh .60
WmsCos 1.00
XcelEngy 1.04
Xerox .17
Yamanag .18
YingliGm
Youku n
YumBmds 1.00


AMEX Most Active


Wkly YTD Wkly
Div YId PE Chg %Chg Last


AbdAsPac .42
Adventrx
AlexcoR g .
AlldNevG .
AntaresP
Augusta g ...
Aurizong ...
AvalRaren ...
Banro g
BarcGSOil ...
Brigusgrs ...
BritATob 3.86
CanoPet ...
CelSci
CFCdag .01
CheniereEn...
ClaudeRg ...
DenisnMg ...
ExeterRgs ...
GabGldNR 1.68
GascoEngy ...
Gastargrs..
GenMoly
GoldenMin ...
GoldSlr g
GranTrrag ...
GrtBasGg ..
GtPanSilv g ...
Homisphrx ...
HstnAEn .02
ImpOil gs .44
IntTowerg ..
KeeganRg ...
LadThalFn ...
LongweiPI ...
MadCatzg ...
Metalico
MdwGold q...


5.6 ...











4.5 ...








9.9 ...










.1 36




... 1
5
... 9


-.04 +11.0
+.11 -59.4
+.80 +11.2
+.01 +66.1
-.07 +31.8
-.24 -3.1
+.17 -8.1
-.13 -34.0
+.35 +25.6
+.16 -13.6
+.09 -22.4
-3.50 +11.6
-.02 -50.1
... -52.5
-.75 +21.2
-.16 +27.0
+.26 +4.6
-.06 -56.5
+.91 -12.2
+.06 -12.0
-.02 -30.6
+.01 -5.3
-.19 -44.4
-.98 -51.5
-.10 -44.4
-.33 -27.3
-.05 -23.0
+.05 +21.4
+.02 -33.0
+.18 +1.3
-1.89 -5.9
-.41 -23.1
+.64 -.5
+.05 +35.0
-.02 -60.2
-.05 -31.3
-.05 -32.8
+.09+225.0


Name Div
MincoG g ...
Minefnd g ...
Neoprobe ...
Nevsun g .06
NwGold g ...
NA Pall g
NDynMng ...
NthnO&G ...
NthgtM g ...
NovaGldg ...
Oilsandsg ...
Oilsands ..
OpkoHth
ParaG&S ...
PionDrill ...
Quepasa
RareEle g ...
Renlech
RexahnPh .
Richmnt g ...
Rubicon g
SamsO&G ...
TanzRyg .
Taseko
TimbenR ...
TrnsatllPet ...
TravelCtrs ...
TriValley ...
TriangPet
Ur-Energy...
Uranerz
UraniumEn ...
VantageDrl .
VimetX
VistaGold
WT Dr Bz 3.24
YM Bo ...


... -.34 +2.4
... -.64 -5.3
...-1.33 -4.9
... -.31 -23.3
... -.67 -13.4
... -.13 -6.7
-.49 +4.7
15 -2.42 -34.8
10 -1.28 -30.8
14 -.39 -12.7
14 -.91 -22.7
... +1.01 -7.9
23 +.03 -38.2
... -.12 -22.4
-.04 -50.8
14 -.46 -9.2
16 -.48 +16.7
... +.22 -5.3
... +.43 -66.8
-.88 -32.0
12 +.31 -16.8
...-1.67 -34.1
... -1.93 -21.0
18 +6.42 +46.2
2 -.01 -25.0
... -1.07 -56.0
8 +.37 +26.5
10 +1.00 -19.8
35 -.28 -35.4
15 -1.85 -8.8
13 -2.70 -11.2
12 -1.71 -10.2
... -2.41 -15.9
29 +.48 -22.0
10 -.32 -13.6
3 -2.98 -55.6
12 -.05 -4.2
7 -.38 -3.0
... -1.93 -27.9
4 -.20 -49.9
... -2.10 -.1
14 -3.18 -8.2
11 -.34 -25.6
16 -1.39 -11.5
11 +.39 -18.4
... +.16 -17.6
... +.21 -13.2
... -.26 -53.1
10 -.21 +26.1
...-.58 -22.8
S-.50 -19.2
18 +.38 -3.5
... -1.64 -14.5
26 +.82 -7.6
15 -.32 -1.5
13 -1.78 +9.9
7 -.96 -31.6
18 +.80 +22.7
14 +.56 -9.3
12+10.61 -31.0
15 -.23 -17.3
84 -.40 -30.1
9 -.68 -24.1
... -.05 +4.3
9 +1.02 -16.0
10 -.45 -16.3
4 -.25 -10.9
18 -.23 +4.0
14 -.44 +.9
14 -.50 -35.7
20 +.15 +32.7
3 -1.07 -54.1
... -1.80 -39.1
20 -1.12 +5.1


30.00
35.42
64.89
12.23
30.18
23.49
32.80
39.62
32.05
46.88
29.58
37.12
18.25
7.47
1.30
26.70
51.79
11.88
2.83
15.08
50.02
40.73
18.02
31.05
5.02
13.65
23.45
26.08
15.26
50.49
76.65
28.89
45.00
54.21
48.14
10.41
39.68
16.71
11.87
5.02
31.37
85.09
17.73
64.22
22.00
9.87
33.85
27.40
45.52
26.68
24.41
22.32
41.15
35.6,
35.24
43.52
10.28
86.35
35.33
88.22
30.48'
15,94
23.52
4.82
28.46
15.55
16.86
25.71
23.77
7.41
16.98
4.53
21.32-
51.53'.


Wky YTD Wkly
YId PE Chg %Chg Last
... -.07 -56.8 1.18
... ... +.35 +61.3 17.81
... ... +43.2 2.95
.9 34 -.31 -9.2 6.84
... +.35 +42.4 13.90
... -.36 -51.0 3.40
... -.36 -33.2 9.55
... 82 +.88 -27.5 19.74
..-.24 +25.0 4.00
... -1.75 -35.8 9.16
... +.01 -51.2 .21
00 ... .00
+.17 +13.9 4.18
9 +.02 -40.4 2.38
... -.56 +25.8 11.08
... -.05 -64.1 4.20
... -.41 -48.8 8.22
... -.06 -29.6 .86
.. +.22 +2.7 1.15
.. +.90+137.2 12.12
.. -.21 -25.4 4.26
... +.03 +89.4 2.50
... -.09 -20.7 5.79
... -.22 -32.2 3.56
... -05 -32.8 .80
... 5 -.14 -66,1 1.13
... ... +.21 +17.2 4.42
... ... +.00 -64.2 .20
+.29 -20.9 5.14
... -.10 -63.2 1.10
... -.11 -49.6 2.01
... ... +.02 -46,4 3.24
... +.02 -31.5 1.39
... -.21 +38.9 20.62
... 7 +.12 +54.8 3.70
... -.93 +3.1 27.36
+.11 -14.2 2.00


CA -Consevatve location. Cl ermediate-Tenn Bon ES -Europe Stck FB foreign Large Blend, FG -F LageGrh, FV-Forei
Laons Va/e, H -World ibcaton. LB -Large wLd, LG -Large Gow, LV .Large VLalues, A o-ledrutAlocatoM. M .dCap MV -
M= Cap Value. SH -Spedalyhea4- WS -Wod Stoc Tota Retrn: C in NV wi dm ds ste d w fund perRak m d vs.
othes wilsarme ecti A:s in top 20%, E in boltom 20%. Min Iit Irt Mmum needed toinvesse ind.Se :orc.e:


* *


1-9


- -


ivgiv 11 1 V l


I.,











Classified Department: 755-5440


LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED SUNDAY, SEPTEMER 11, 2011


Lake City Reporter





CLASSIFIED


ADvantageI


IBMWI,


SEfLhL I


F~INDIT


Take ADvantage of the
Reporter Classifieds!

755-5440


4 lines 6 days a~d5ditional
Rate applies to private Individuals selling
persona merchandise totalling $100 or less.
This Is a non-resundable rate.




One Item per ad $11101
4 lines 6 daysach additional
Rate applies to private Individuals selling
personal merchandise totalling $500 or less.
B Each Ite mt Include a prc
This isa non-reundablerae




OneItemperad 761
4 lines 6 days ch additional
y line $15
Rate applies to pvate Individuals selling
personal merchandise totalling $500 or less.





One Item per ad $ 3
4 lines 6 days E d 4 |onal

This is a non-refundcble rate





4 lines 6 daysEach additional
Rate applies to private Indivduals ling
Each Item must Include a price.
This isa non-refundable rate.




One Item per ad
4 lines 6 d Each additional
Rae applii ate Indsi vials -lng
pena merhandis o n iig 000 or It es.
Each Item must include a prc e.
i This sa nn-refunabl as
t b^J$3TS


Limited to service type advertis-
ing only.
4 lines, one month....$92.00
$10.80 each additional line
Includes an additional $2.00 per
ad for each Wednesday insertion.

-e

You can call us at 755-5440,
Monday through Friday from 8:00
a.m. to 5:00 p.m.
Some people prefer to place their
classified ads in person, and some
ad categories will require prepay-
ment. Our office is located at 180
East Duval Street.
You can also fax or email your ad
copy to the Reporter.
FAX: 386-752-9400 Please
direct your copy to the Classified
Department.
EMAIL: classifieds@lakecityre-
porter.com





Ad li to Appear Call by: Fax/Emall by:
Tuesday Mon., 10:00a.m. Mon., 00 am.
Wednesday Mon., 10:00 a.m. Mon., 9:00 a.m.
Thursday Wed., 10:00 a.m. Wed., 900a.m.
Friday Thurs., 10:00a.m. Thurs.,900tam.
Saturday Fi., 10:00 am. Fri., 9:00a.m.
Sunday Fri., 10:00 a.m. Fn., 9:00 am.
These deadlines are subject to change wll oui notice




Ad Errors- Please read your ad
on the first day of publication.
We accept responsibility for only
the first incorrect insertion, and
only the charge for the ad space
in error. Please call 755-5440
Immediately for prompt correc-
tion and billing adjustments.
Cancellations- Normal advertising
deadlines apply for cancellation.
Billing Inquiries- Call 755-5440.
Should further information be
required regarding payments or
credit limits, your call will be trans-
ferred to the accounting depart-
ment.


Advertising copy is subject to
approval by the Publisher who
reserves the right to edit, reject,
or classify all advertisements under
appropriate headings. Copy should
be checked for errors by the
advertiser on the first day of pub-
lication. Credit for published errors
will be allowed for the first insertion
for that portion of the advertisement
which was incorrect. Further, the
Publisher shall not be liable for any
omission of advertisements ordered
to be published, nor for any general,
special or consequential damages.
Advertising language must comply
with Federal, State or local laws
regarding the prohibition of discrimi-
nation in employment, housing and
public accommodations. Standard
abbreviations are acceptable; how-
ever, the first word of each ad may
not be abbreviated.

In Print and Online
www.htlecitlyreporter.conI


Legal

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
THIRD JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF
FLORIDA, IN AND FOR COLUM-
BIA COUNTY CIVIL DIVISION
Case No. 12-2011-CA-000112
FIRST FEDERAL SAVINGS
BANK OF FLORIDA
Plaintiff,
VS.
JOSEPH J. METZGER and CHER-
YL A. METZGER MORTGAGE
ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION
SYSTEMS, INC. AND UNKNOWN
TENANTS/OWNERS, Defendants.
NOTICE OF SALE
Notice is hereby given, pursuant to
Final Judgment of Foreclosure for
Plaintiff entered in this cause on Au-
gust 29, 2011, in the Circuit Court of
Columbia County, Florida, I will sell
the property situated in Columbia
County, Florida described as:
PARCEL A-2:
TOWNSHIP 5 SOUTH RANGE
16 SECTION 11: COMMENCE AT
THE SOUTHEAST CORNER OF
NE 1/4 OF NW 1/4 OF SW 1/4 OF
SECTION 11, TOWNSHIP 5
SOUTH, RANGE 16 EAST, CO-
LUMBIA COUNTY, FLORIDA
AND RUN THENCE N 1"32'39" W
ALONG THE EAST LINE OF
SAID NE 1/4 OF NW 1/4 OF SW
1/4, 25.01 FEET TO THE NORTH
RIGHT-OF-WAY LINE OF
YOUNG ROAD; THENCE S
87"10'02" W ALONG SAID
NORTH RIGHT-OF-WAY LINE,
341.79 FEET TO THE POINT OF
BEGINNING; THENCE CONTIN-
UE S 87"10'02" W ALONG SAID
NORTH RIGHT-OF-WAY LINE,
341.84 FEET; THENCE N 1"32'39"
W 637.89 FEET TO THE NORTH
LINE OF THE SW 1/4; THENCE N
87'09'04" E ALONG SAID NORTH
LINE, S 341.84 FEET; THENCE
1"32'39" E 637.99 FEET TO THE
POINT OF BEGINNING.
and commonly know as: 263 SW
WILLIAM YOUNG LN, LAKE
CITY, FL; including the building,
appurtenances, and fixtures located
therein, at public sale, to the highest
and best bidder, for cash. AT THE
FRONT DOOR OF THE THE CO-
LUMBIA COUNTY COURT-
HOUSE, 145 N. HERNANDO
STREET, LAKE CITY. FLORIDA,
on 10/5/11 at lla.m..
Any persons claiming an interest in
the surplus from the sale, if any, oth-
er than the property owner as of the
date of the lis pendens must file a
claim within 60 days after the sale.
Dated this 29th day of August, 2011
(seal)
Clerk of the circuit Court
By:/s/ B. Scippio
Deputy Clerk

05527808
September 11II, 18, 2011
Public Notice Notice is hereby
made to all those concerned and af-
fected that Boran Craig Barber Engel
Construction Co., Inc. is performing
state project # GL-35 (WRC) Lake
City Work Release Center at 1099
NW Dot Glen. Lake City, FL 32055

05527727
September 8, 9, 10, 11, 13, 14, 15,
2011 .
The Trustee Ministry of New Bethel
Missionary Baptist Church is now
accepting Lawn Maintenance Serv-
ice bids for 2012. The deadline for
returning application is October 15,
2011. Packages may be picked up
from Bernard George or any Trustee
Ministry member.

05527737
September 8, 11,2011
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
THIRD JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN
AND FOR COLUMBIA COUNTY,
FLORIDA
Case No.: 09-614CA
REGIONS BANK, D/B/A RE-
GIONS MORTGAGE,
Plaintiff,
vs.
ELIE BORGELLA, DAVID THE-
LUSMA, UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF
ELIE BORGELLA, UNKNOWN
SPOUSE OF DAVID THELUSMA,
UNKNOWN TENANT #1, UN-
KNOWN TENANT #2,
Defendant(s).
NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE
SALE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that
pursuant to the Final Judgment of
Foreclosure entered on August 25,
2011, in Case No. 09-614CA of the
Circuit Court of the Third Judicial
Circuit for Columbia County, Flori-
da, in which Regions Bank D/B/A
Regions Mortgage, is Plaintiff, and
Elie Borgella, David Thelusma, et
al., are Defendants, I will sell to the
highest and best bidder for cash, at
the Columbia County Courthduse
173 N.E. Hernando Avenue, Lake
City, Florida, at 11A.M. or as soon
thereafter as the sale may proceed,
on the 28th day of September, 2011,
the following described real property
as set forth in the said Final Judg-
ment, to wit:
A PORTION OF SECTION 14,
TOWNSHIP 4 SOUTH, RANGE 17
EAST, COLUMBIA COUNTY,
FLORIDA, BEING MORE PAR-
TICULARLY DESCRIBED AS
FOLLOWS; BEGIN AT THE
POINT WHERE THE WEST
RIGHT OF WAY LINE OF PRICE
CREEK CIRCLE INTERSECTS
THE NORTH RIGHT OF WAY
LINE OF ANDREW ROAD AND
RUN SOUTH 89"44'29" WEST
ALONG THE NORTH LINE OF
ANDREW ROAD, 470(.63 FEET;
THENCE NORTH 0'l15'31" WEST
315.00 FEET; THENCE NORTH
89M44'29" EAST 359.09 FEET;
THENCE SOUTH 19"45'25" EAST
ALONG THE WEST LINE OF
PRICE CREEK CIRCLE 334.16








Lawn & Landscape Service


Legal

FEET TO THE POINT OF THE BE-
GINNING.
Any person or entity claiming an in-
terest in the surplus, if any, resulting
from the foreclosure sale, other than
the property owner as of the date of
the Lis Pendens, must file a claim on
the same with the Clerk of Court
within 60 days after the foreclosure
sale.
If you are a person with a disability
who requires accommodations in or-
der to participate in a court proceed-
ing, you are entitled, at no cost to
you, the provision of certain assis-
tance. Individuals with a disability
who require special accommodations
in order to participate in a court pro-
ceeding should contact the ADA Co-
ordinator, 173 NE Hernando Ave-
nue, Room 408, Lake City, FL
32055, (386)719-7428, at least 7
days before your schedule court ap-
pearance, or immediately upon re-
ceiving notification if the time before
the scheduled appearance is less than
7 days; if you are hearing or voice
impaired, call 711.
P DEWITT CASON
Clerk of the Circuit Court
By:/s/ B. Scippio

05527810
September 11, 18, 2011

ADVERTISEMENT FOR BIDS
THE DISTRICT BOARD OF
TRUSTEES OF Florida Gateway
College WILL RECEIVE BIDS
FOR THE FOLLOWING:
Renovations and Reroof Building I
Florida Gateway College
Lake City, Florida
FGCBidNo. 12-1-01
Architect's Project No. 1002
Date & Time for
Receiving Bids:
WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 21,
2011 AT 2:00 P.M.
Date, Time and Place for
Pre-Bid Conference: All
interested bidders are required to at-
tend the MANDATORY PRE-BID
CONFERENCE to be held at 10:00
A.M. local time on WEDNESDAY,
SEPTEMBER 14, 2011 on the main
campus of Florida Gateway College.
Conference will start in Room 001B,
Building 003 which is physically lo-
cated at 127 SE Student Way. Lake
City, Florida 32025
Place for Receiving Bids: Bids may
be mailed as follows:
Florida Gateway College
Purchasing Department
149 S.E. College Place
Lake City, Florida 32025-8703
Hand delivered bids are to be pre-
sented to:
Florida Gateway College
Mail Room (BIdg 025)
149 S.E. College Place
Lake City. Florida 32025 8703
All bids niustm arrive and lb date/time
stamped by a Mail Room representa-
tive prior to the specified hid open-
ing date/time. The College will not
be responsible for Postal or other de-
livery service delays that cause a bid
to arrive at Florida Gateway Col-
lege's Mail Room after the designat-
ed bid opening date/time. Bids that
are mailed must be clearly marked
on the outside of the envelope "BID
# 12-1-01 Building I RenovationS
AND REROOF, Florida Gateway
College. BID OPENING WEDNES-
DAY, SEPTEMBER 21. 2011".
Bids will be opened in a public bid
opening in Room 001B, Building
003 which is physically located at
127 SE Student Way, Lake City,
Florida 32025.
Contractor's Prequalification: ALL
PRIME CONTRACTORS WISH-
ING TO BID THIS PROJECT
MUST BE PREQUALIFIED. Con-
tractors who wish to submit a bid on
this project must prequalify with
Florida Gateway College. To be con-
sidered for prequalification, contrac-
tors must request, complete and sub-
mit a prequalification package to the
College. Prequalification packages
may be obtained from the College's
Director of Purchasing, Bill Brown
at (386) 754-4360 or by email at
bill.brown@fgc.edu. COMPLETED
prequalification packages must be re-
turned to the College's Mail Room
which is located in Building 025 not
later than 1:(X00 PM local time Mon-
day, September 12, 2011. The Col-
lege will not be responsible for Post-
al or other delivery service delays
that cause a prequalification package
to arrive at the Mail Room after the
designated dale/lime.
Bid Documents Prepared By:
CRAIG SALLEY & ASSOCIATES,
ARCHITECTS
3911 Newberry Road. Suite D
Gainesville, FL 32607
(352) 372-8424, FAX (352) 377-
4945
Bid Documents
Available From:
http://www.csa-
architect.con/bid_documents.htm
Project Description: The
work includes, but is not limited to,
thle complete renovation of the interi-
or and retrofit reroofing of Building
1, the Administration Building on the
main campus of Florida Gateway
College in Lake City, Florida.
The work involves extensive demoli-
tion of the interior and new stud
walls, ceilings, flooring and related
work. Included is an addition for a
new mechanical room out of CMU
with stucco exterior finish. The ret-
rofit reroofing will liave metal truss-
es on stud knee walls, metal decking
and rigid insulation with standing
seam metal roofing, gutters and
downspouts.
New mechanical and electrical sys-
tems are included in the renovation
work.


Legal*

Right to Waive Irregularities and
Technicalities: Florida Gateway Col-
lege reserves the right to waive mi-
nor irregularities and/or technicali-
ties associated with this solicitation.
The Director of Purchasing of Flori-
da Gateway College shall be the final
authority regarding waivers of irreg-
ularities and technicalities.
FOR THE DISTRICT BOARD OF
TRUSTEES OF Florida Gateway
College
Charles W. Hall, President

05527543
August 28, 2011
September 04, 11, 2011

100 Job

100 Opportunities

05527699
PRODUCT ADVISOR
Travel Country RV is accepting
applications for product advisors,
in our Lake City, FL location.
No experience necessary. We're
looking for personality, charac-
ter, and energy. Applicants must
be outgoing and have the ability
to interact and communicate
with our loyal customers.
This is an excellent opportunity
to learn a new career in a
thriving industry. Salary plus
bonuses with an excellent
employee benefit plan. Call Jeff
at 888-664-4268 or email to
jeff@travelcountryrv.com
for further information

05527728
*Automotive Equipment
Mechanic II 42002554.
Applicants must apply at
peoplefirst.myflorida.com by
9/15/11. For more info contact
Florida Forest Service at 386-
758-5716. AA/EEO employer

05527747




SERVERS
Now accepting applications
for Servers!!!
Please apply in person
at the Alachua location 1-75 &
US Hwy 441.

1552777f
FLORIDA SHERIFFS
YOUTH RANCHES, INC.
DATA ENTRY
SPECIALIST I
High school diploma or GED
with two years office
experience. Proficiency with
Windows based software,
including Microsoft Office
products is required.
$9.45 PER HOUR
EXCELLENT BENEFITS
SEND/FAX APPLICATION
Karen McGalliard
Florida Sheriffs
Youth Ranch
PO Box 2000
Boys Ranch, FL 32064
Fax: (386) 842-1055
EOE/DFWP

05527825




FLORIDA SHERIFFS
YOUTH RANCHES, INC.
DIRECTOR OF HUMAN
RESOURCES
Bachelor's degree in personnel
management, business
administration, or related field
w/ 3 years experience in a
human resources position.
5 years supervisory experience
and PHR/SPHR preferred.
Competitive Salary
With Benefits
SEND/FAX APPLICATION
hrjobs@ youthrainches.org
Fax: (386) 842-1055
Florida Sheriffs
Youth Ranches
PO Box 2000
Boys Ranch, FL 32064
EOE/DFWP

AVON!! Only $10 to start!
Earn bonus $ up to $150+
1-800-275-9945 pin #4206
www.youravon.com/tdavies

BUSY OFFICE looking for full-
time receptionist. Experience in
multi-line phone system, updating
records, accounting and working
with the public. Computer skills
necessary. Fax resume at:
386-961-8802

Hiring Locally This Week
Liberty National Life Insurance
Company. Full Training Provided
Potential. of $60K+ Annmually.
401K, BCBS Insurance & Pension
for those who qualify.
Call 1-800-257-5500
to set up an interview.


100 OOpbportunities

Drivers: Teams: $6,000 Team
Sign-On Bonus when you team
drive for Werner Enterprises! Call
Now for details! 1-888-880-5902

F/T Exp Line cook needed. Kitch-
en is open site to public. Job in-
cludes taking orders, cooking,
cleaning, washing dishes. Pick up
Application at Milton's located 8
mi N of 1-10 on Hwy 441. $9.00
per hour. 386-365-7262

FUNDRAISING MAJOR Gifts
Officer (Part Time). Exciting part-
time opportunity for a qualified
candidate with a proven track
record for success in major gift
fundraising, prospect research and
database management. The
responsibilities include designing
and implementing a strategy for
cultivating and stewarding major
donors, developing and imple-
menting major gift giving strat-
egies and programs, and creating a
sustained effort to identify, solicit,
involve, and retain major donors.
The candidate will also develop,
coordinate and execute cultivation
strategies for major gift prospects
and donors. Qualifications: BA/BS
in marketing (or related field),
minimum of 7 yrs. experience gen-
erating and expanding major gift
base, major gift cultivation, and
soliciting strategies. Excellent
computer, interpersonal and com-
munication skills also required:
Please send
resumes along with cover letter to:
ARC Foundation of North
Florida, Inc. PO Drawer L
Live Oak, FL. 32064
No Phone Calls please.

IMMEDIATE OPENING for
Exp. Structural Steel Painter
Apply at QIA 3631 E US 90
In Lake City

Immediate position available for
FfT Bookkeeper/Receptionist at
busy retail office. Computer skills,
extensive knowledge of quick
book & good customer service
skills required. Fax resume to
386-754-1999

Industrial Sewing Machine
Operator with experience and
One Support Person of the same
Call Hafners 386-755-6481

FLORIDA
GATEWAY
COLLEGE

ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR,
ENGINEERING TECHNOLOGY
164 Duty Days Tenured Track
(Grant Funded)
POSITION #: F99924
Teach programmable logic
controllers, robotics, hydraulics and
pneumatics, electronics, electrical
systems, manufacturing processes.
Requires Master's degree in
engineering, manufacturing or related
field. Experience with manufacturing
processes including programmable
logic controllers, robotics, electronics
and hydraulics; teaching experience;
curriculum development; knowledge
of Manufacturing Skills Standard
Council's skills standards. Six Sigma
certification preferred. SALARY:
Based on degree and experience.
APPLICATION DEADLINE: 9/30/111
Persons interested should provide
College application, vita, and
photocopies of transcripts. All foreign
transcripts must be submitted with
official translation and evaluation.
Position details and applications
available on web at: www.fqc.edu
Human Resources
Florida Gateway College
149 S.E. College Place
Lake City, FL 32025-2007
Phone (386) 754-4314
Fax (386) 754-4814
E-Mail: humanrJfqc edu
r("C i, nccriacdtid tii hc ConIim, 'll on 'o.11'gos >r
the So,,uhcr Av.cailln of CIoilcgsII .I hoo-,
VPI ADA I0 A'- i Coll.5 c i I i duca-t .ad



,llederi ''

(IR/CIk)"ald'Is


PHYSICAL


THERAPIST:.

Home Health Care Agency

servicing Columbia and
surrounding counties

seeking Full-Time
experienced Physical

Therapist
Competitive Salary &
Benefits Available.
Please call COntact
Lynn or Cindy at
386-758-3312
or apply online at
www.almostffamily.coln


100 Job
100 'Opportunities

License CDL Driver w/2 yrs Log-
ging Exp. Must have Clean CDL.
Also, FT, semi/heavy equip.
mechanic wanted Deep South
Forestry 386-365-6966
Looking for an in home caregiver.
Room & board + Salary Negotible.
References required. Call for info.
386-365-3732
MECHANIC
Heavy truck & trailer experience a
plus. Best pay in North Florida for
the right person. Southern
Specialized, 1812 NW Main Blvd.,
386-752-9754
Mobile Home Sales!
Experienced Salesperson
Needed to sell the South's
#1 rated product! Call Kevin
386-719-5560
Physical laborer needed. CDL
license req'd. Must have respect
for electricity & ability to work in
water & mud. Must be able to pass
drug test. Call 386-752-1854
Sales Position available for moti-
vated individual Rountree -Moore
Toyota, Great benefits, paid train-
ing/vacation. Exp. a plus but not
necessary. Call Anthony Cosentino
386-623-7442

120 Medical
120 Employment

05527328
LEARN TO DRAW BLOOD
Local Phlebotomy Course
offered in Lake City, FLA
Certificate program.
(904)566-1328


FLORIDA
GATEWAY
COLLEGE

INSTRUCTOR/COORDINATOR,
EMERGENCY MEDICAL SERVICES
PROGRAMS
Full-time
224 Day Tenure Track Position
Teaches and assists the Executive
Director of Nursing and Health
Services in various aspects of
program development, planning and
implementation of the EMT- Basic,
Paramedic, and EMS Associate
Degree programs. Coordinates
course schedules, clinical sites and
part-time faculty, and assists in
program expansion and student
recruitment; maintains state and
national program certifications.
MINIMUM QUALIFICATIONS:
Bachelor's degree in emergency
medical services or closely related
field. Paramedic certification either at
the state or national level, Three
years experience as a paramedic.
Must be able to establish and
maintain effective working
relationships with others.
DESIRABLE QUALIFICATIONS:
Minimum three years teaching
experience at the technical school or
community college level. ACLS,
PALS. and PHTLS instructor
certification
Salary: Based on Degree and
Experience
Application Deadline: 9/23/11
Persons interested should provide
College application, vita, and
photocopies of transcripts. All foreign
transcnpts must be submitted with
official translation and evaluation.
Position details and applications
available on web at www.fgc.edu
Human Resources
Flonda Gateway College
149 S.E. College Place
Lake City, FL 32025-2007
Phone (386) 754-4314
Fax (386) 754-4814
E-Mail; hum anr a cfoc edi
V11,1 -dc \Si h, "'> I i'C tl., a"tlt,
hro u'. hed'icn \c,.', .v!,n it ,'ilk.'c a cscio
Vi' l>i !..\ < :<


FLORIDA
(A GATEWAY
COLLEGE

EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR, NURSING
AND HEALTH SERVICES
Position #: A99962
This is a professional classification
responsible for the development and
supervision of innovative and forward-
thinking programs. The primary
responsibilities are to implement and
maintain the Bachelor of Science
degree in Nursing, continue to expand
all program areas and resources,
provide effective leadership for
administration, faculty, and students,
manage multiple budgets, and an
understanding of strong personnel
management The Executive Director
will have the responsibility of
developing and maintaining a premier
institute that will support Flonda
Gateway College as it moves into the
baccalaureate degree program level,
'the individual applying for this position
must hold a minimum of a master's
degree and be eligible for or hold a
Florida Nursing license or closely
related field, have at least five years of
progressive administrative experience,
a strong background in program
design and accreditation, and a valid
Florida driver's license Desirable
Qualifications: Doctorate degree in
Nursing or health related field
preferred. Record of teaching at
tenured professor level; experience in
business in conjunction with health
background. Experience in the
community college teaching/working
environment,
Salary: $58,750 annually, plus
benefits
Application Deadline: 9/23/11
Persons interested should provide
College application, vita, and
photocopies of tianscripts All foreign
transcripts must be submitted with
official translation and evaluation
Position details and applications
available on web at' www.fgc.edu
Human Resources
Florida Gateway College
14.19 S E College Place


J&M LAWN Service & more for
all your outdoor needs. Don't
waste your time or weekend,
Free Estimate. 386-984-2187


Lake City, FL 32025 20(07
Phoneo (386) 754-431'4
Fax (386) 754-4814
E-Mail' huimmnlliii Otdu
16(..... '11 i h' (oI 1
Ih, ""turhcn \ p Ills lil lc l,% l











LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED SUNDAY, SEPTEMER 11, 2011


120\ Medical
120 Employment

05527777
Admissions/Marketing.
Director
Avalon Healthcare Center is
currently accepting applications
for the full time position of
Admissions/Marketing Director
RN/LPN Preferred
Good Organizational and
Communication Skills a Must
Prior SNF Experience
Preferred
Competitive Salary and
Excellent benefit package.
Please apply at Avalon
Healthcare and Rehabilitation
Center. 1270 S.W. Main Blvd.
Lake City, Florida 32025
386-752-7900
EOE






Meridian Behavioral
Healthcare Inc.
www.mbhci.org
Please visit our website to view
current open opportunities and
to apply online :
Meridian is an active partner
with the National Health
Service Corps
Therapists:
Program Manager ( Licensed)
Licensed, or Master's Level
in Outpatient
LCSW or Certified Behavio-
ral Therapists Preferred
Bachelor's-Level in Counselor
Support
Case Management
(adult & child)
Master's Therapist In
Methadone Clinic
Administration:
Client Relations Specialist
Medical Services
Medical Services
RN Nursing Manager DETOX
(Gville )
RN full-time Lake City CSU
PRN RN, LPN, C.N.A.
Recovery Specialist
(Direct Care )

To see our current openings in
Mental Health and to apply
online, please go to:
www.mbhci.org
.EOE, DFWP, E-Verify
North Florida Pediatrics
Has positions open fot both
L.P.N. and C.N.A's.
Interested parties need to be flexible
and dependable.
Peds Medical office experience
a plus. Please fax resume to
386-755-7940 or email to
hrl&nflpediatrics.com
Pharmacy Technician needed.
Must be Florida registered. Min. I
year exp required. Preferably in a
retail environment. Excellent
computer & communication skills
needed. FT position. Competitive
pay. Send reply to Box 05074, C/O
The Lake City Reporter, P.O. Box
1709, Lake City, FL, 32056


141 Babysitters
Loving mom would like to care for
your child. Full or Part time in my
home. Near downtown. Only 1
opening avail. 386-438-5394

240 Schools &
240 Education0

05527750
Interested in a Medical Career?
Express Training offers
courses for beginners & exp
Nursing Assistant, $479
next class-09/12/10
Phlebotomy national certifica-
tion, $800 next class-10/10/11
Continuing education
Fees incl. books, supplies, exam
fees. Call 386-755-4401 or
expresstrainineservices.com


310 Pets & Supplies

PUBLISHER'S NOTE
Florida Law 828.29 requires dogs
and cats being sold to be at least 8
weeks old and have a health
certificate from a'licensed
veterinarian documenting they
have mandatory shots and are
free from intestinal and external
parasites. Many species of wild-
life must be licensed by Florida
Fish and Wildlife. If you are
unsure, contact the local
office for information.

402 Appliances
FROST FREE refrigerator.
Whirlpool Very clean. Works
good. White, $165. obo
386-292-3927
Whirlpool Washer & Dryer.
White, large capacity. Like new.
$385. for both.
386-292-3927 or 386-755-5331.

407 Computers
LAPTOP REPAIR


Fast, Professional
Call Star Tech
386-755-0277


408 Furniture
Country Finch King Bed w/head-
board & foot board & 2 night
stands (no mattress)
$125.00 386-754-4094

420 Wanted to Buy
K&H TIMBER
We Buy Pine Hardwood &
Cypress. Large or small tracts.
Call 386-961-1961.
Wanted Junk Cars, Trucks, Vans.
$275 & up CASH! Free Pick Up!
NO title needed !386-878-9260
After 5pm 386- 752-3648.


430 Garage Sales
PUBLISHER'S NOTE
All Yard Sale Ads
Must be Pre-Paid.


440 Miscellaneous
AC Window unit.
$65. obo
386-292-3927

Microwave. Looks good, works
good. No carousel
$25.00
386-292-3927
Stop gnat & Mosquito bites! Buy
Swamp Gator All natural insect re-
pellent. Family safe. Use head to
toe. Available at The Home Depot.
WEEDEATER Push Mower. Runs
great. Need the money!
$85.00
386-292-3.927

450 Good Things
to Eat
GREEN PEANUTS For Sale
Graded and washed.
$30.00 a bushel.
386-752-3434
OSCEOLA HONEY & BEE
FARM, Tupelo honey now avail.,
several other varieties, good pri-
ces. 386-755-2642, 386-754-1110

460 Firewood
Firewood for Sale. $65. per Truck
Load. Rick 386-867-1039 or Joey
965-0288 if no answer pls leave
message we will call you back.

520 Boats for Sale
2003 SEA PRO 170CC
YAMAHA 90 HP, low hours, live
wells. Bimini top, fish finder,
AL trailer, $7,500, 386-719-6537

r3n Mobile Homes
630 for Rent
2 OR 3 BEDROOMS
Clean, Quiet Park $475-$525.ro
Water, septic, garbage included
758-2280 References. NO PETS!
2&3 BR MH. $395 $650. mo.
plus deposit. Water & sewer fur-
nished. Cannon Creek MHP
386-752-6422
2/2 Units. Great rental program
for responsible tenants.
Call for details, 386-984-8448
13th Month FREE!!
3/2 Large MH, small park, near
FGCC, Small pets ok, $500 dep
$575 mo w/12 mo lease
386-752-1971 or 352-281-2450
3/2.5 S of Lake City, (Branford
area) $600 mo plus security
386-590-0642 or 386-867-1833
www.suwanneevalleyproperties.com
Ft. White Country living.
3br/2ba Mobile Home
Very clean! 386-497-1116.


LG clean 3br's $450. -$650. mo. +
dep. Also, 2br mobile home's
available. No Pets.
5 Points area. 386-961-1482
Mobile Homes for rent in
White Springs, Lake City & Ft.
White. Contact 386-623-3404
or 386-397-2779
Nature Lovers Xtra clean 2/1
Private landscaped acre. NO
UTILITY DEP. Carport, deck, pa-
tio, Washer, Dryer. Smoke free,
, adult area on creek, No pets, $500
mo. 1st + $200 dep., 752-7027.
Long term occupancy preferred.

640 Mobile Homes
for Sale

05527374
!!ATTENTION!!
We purchase used mobile
homes. Call North Pointe
Homes, Gainesville
352-872-5566

05527375 !!!LOOK!!!
Before you but a Mobile Home
check out North Pointe Homes
in Gainesville--Hugh Discounts!
credit Scores Don't matter. Call
for Free Approval! Jacobson
Homes Factory Outlet (352)872-
5566 or mrb337l(@hotmail.corm

05527376
NEW USED- REPO'S
Your Volume Giant! North
Pointe Homes. Millions to Lend.
Credit Scores 575 = 10% down.
Gainesville (352)872-5566 or
walker-david()live.com

Champion Home Inspections
Protect Your Investmnent
With A Professional
Inspection State Licensed
And Insured 386-344-5551


A640 Mobile Homes
6 for Sale
High Springs. 1629 sqft. on 10
acres. Needs to sell. $84,999.
Make an offer! MLS 78776
Bosshardt Realty Services.
386-965-4873
Fort White. 2336 sqft on 5 acres.
Tape & textured walls. Needs to
sell. $99,999. Motivated, make an
offer MLS 78841 (386)965-4873
Bosshardt Realty Services.
Lake City 1560 sqft. buit in 2002.
On 5 acres. $83,999. MLS 78931
Bosshardt Realty Services.
386-965-4873
3/2 DWMH "Model Home" condi-
tion. Just under I ac w/granddaddy
oaks and landscaped MLS#77988,
$84,900, Nancy Rogers
867-1271 R.E.O. Realty Group
Palm Harbor Homes
Has 3 Modular Homes
Available at HUGE Savings
Over 40K Off
800-622-2832

650 Mobile Home
Q650& Land
Owner Finance, 3/2, on 1.5 acres,
S of Lake City, small down/$695
mo, 386-590-0642 / 386-867-1833
www.suwanneevalleyproperties.comi

710 Unfurnished Apt.
710 For Rent








05527705
SPRING HILL VILLAGE
Excellent High Springs location.
1, 2 & 3 bedroom floor-plans;
some with garages.
Call 386-454-1469
or visit our website:
www.springhillvillage.net

IBR APT.
Downtown Location, Clean.
$450 mo, plus Security.
NO PETS. Call 386-755-3456
2BR/1BA. Close to town.
$565.mo plus deposit.
Includes water & sewer.
386-965-2922
2BR/2BA w/garage
5 minutes from VA hospital.
Call for details.
386-755-4590 or 365-5150
A Landlord You Can Love!
2 br Apts $575. & up + sec. Great
area. CH/A washer/dryer hookups.
386-758-9351/352-208-2421
Amber Wood Hills Apts.
Private Patio area. Beautiful yard.
Washer/dryer hkup. Free water &
sewer. 1/1, 2/1. Move in special.,
386-754-1800. wwwmvflapts.com
Columbia Arms Apt. located 1/2
mi from V.A. & Winn Dixie. Pet
Friendly. Move in Special $199.
Pool, laundry & balcony.
386-754-1800. www.myflapts.com
Great location W of 1-75, spacious
deluxe 2br apts., garage, W/D
hookup. patio. $600/700 & up, +
Sec, 386-965-5560 or 344-3715
Greentree Townhouse
Summer special. 2/1, 2/1.5. Free
water & sewer. Balcony & patio.
Laundry. Behind Kens on Hwy 90.
386-754-1800 wwwmyflapts,com

ONE 51 PLACE APTS
Alachua
MOVE IN SPECIALS
1, 2. & 3 bedrooms
Call TODAY 386-462-0656
or visit us at one51place.com

Redwine Apartments. Move in
special $199. Limited time. Pets
welcome, with 5 complexes,
we have a home for you.
386-754-1800. www.myflapts.com


Summer Special! 12th mo Free
w/signed yr lease. Updated Apt,
w/tile floors/fresh paint. Great
area. From $450.+sec. 752-9626'
The Lakes Apts. Studios & IBr's
from $135/wk. Util. & cable incl.,
Sec 8 vouchers accepted, monthly
rates avail Call 386-752-2741
Wayne Manor Apts.
Move in $199. Summer special.
2/1, washer/dryer. Behind Kens off
Hwy 90. 386-754-1800
www.mvflapts.comn
Windsor Arms Apartments.
Summer special $199. Move in!
2/1, 2/1.5, 2/2. Pet Friendy. Free
200 ch. Dish. Washer/dryer hlikup.
386-754-1800. www.myflapts.com

70A Furnished Apts.
2 U For Rent
Rooms for Rent. Hillcrest, Sands,
Columbia. All furnished. Electric,
cable, fridge, microwave. Weekly
or monthly rates. 1 person $135,
2 persons $150. weekly
386-752-5808
Studio Apt. Private. Rent incl util-
ities, Satellite TV, appliances,
(washer/dryer). No pets 386-963-
4767 or 292-0385 Available 9/1

730 Unfurnished
I73 Home For Rent
'09 Executive Home for rent on 41
acres. 4br/3.5ba Available
October. Horses/outdoor pets ok.
$2000/mo but all terms negotiable
for right caretaker. 386-209-4610
2BR house $625.mo $625. dep.
Also, 2 large br apt. $525. mo
$525 dep. Conveniently close to
the VA & shopping. 386-344-2972


730 Unfurnished
730 Home For Rent
/ 2/1 879 Poplar St. $600. mo.
/ 3/2 Highlands Loop $700.mo.
All require First and last...
386-755-3649
Please leave msg., Only in office
Tues Thur. 8am 4pm
3BR/1.5 BA Large lot. Very clean
with storage shed. Quiet area.
$850 mo. + $850. dep.
386-752-7578
4br/2ba CHA Brick, 1200 sqft
lac., Close to FGCC, CR 245A.
Ceramic tile/carpet, $800 mo $800
dep (904)708-8478 App. req'd
Brick 3br/2ba Large yard, garage,
CH/A. 189 Stanley Ct. Lake City.
$950. mo + $1000 dep.
Call 386-365-8543
LARGE 3BR/2BA home close to
college. $750. mo $450 security.
Application required.
386-935-1482
LOVELY 3BR/1BA Farm house '
for rent. Quiet country area.
Please call after 5pm.
386-752-0017. Leave message.
Prime location 2br/lba.
Resid'l or comm'l. Comer of Baya
& McFarlane. $600. mo. $500 sec.
386-752-9f44 or 755-2235
SITE-BUILT HOME,
On 5 acres, near Fort White,
1st last + deposit.
Call 386-758-1789
VERY LARGE 2 BR/2 BA, Brick
home, garage, CH & A, Clean,
386-590-0642 / 386-867-1833,
www.suwanneevalleyproperties.com

740 Furnished
740 Homes for Rent
Southern Oaks Country Club.
3br/2.5ba Aprox 3000 sqft. Split
floor plan, on the 9th Fairway.
New AC, 2.5 car garage, sprinkler,
concrete drive. Furnished. Move in
ready w/all appliances. Avail. now
Yearly Lease.(305)872-7911 View
at www.lakecitygolfvilla.com

750 Business &
5-F Office Rentals
FOR LEASE: Downtown office
space. Convenient to
Court house.
Call 386-755-3456
For Lease: E Baya Ave. Two -
1000 sqft office space units or
combined for 2000 sqft. 386-984-
0622 or weekends 386-497-4762
Midtown Commercial Center,
brand new executive front suite &
stlite w/warehouse.
Call Vicki or Joe 386-935-2832.
NICE OFFICE SPACE
for lease.
From $450 a month
Tom 386-961-1086 DCA Realtor
SUB SHOP for lease.
All Equip. Avail. Old Willy J's
Across from Wal-Mart
386-623-2244

790 Vacation Rentals
Horseshoe Beach RV Lot.
Nice comer Lot with shade trees.
$295. mo Water/electric included
386-235-3633 or 352-498-5986

805, Lots for Sale
BEAUTIFUL 5 acres in
Lake City, 100% owner financing,
no qualifying, $395 per month.
Please call 512-663-0065
Great Deal! Must Sell Comer.Lot
in Ichetucknee Forest S/D Lot 47.
2 acs. $15,900 obo. (407)760-9921
or Email: itpir4'yahoo.com
Owner Financing. River comm &
nature lover's dream in Lee. 15
wooded ac by the Withlacoochee.
Property is already subdivided
MLS 75576 $48,000 623-6896


PUBLISHER'S NOTE
All real estate advertising in this
newspaper is subject to the fair
housing act which makes it illegal
to advertise "any preference,
limitation, or discrimination based
on race, color, religion, sex,
disability, familial status or nation-
al origin; or any intention to. make
such preference, limitation or
discrimination." Familial status
includes children under the age of
18 living with parents or legal,
custodians, pregnant women and
people securing custody of chil-
dren under the age of 18. Thlis
newspaper will not knowingly
accept any advertising for real es-
tate which is in violation of the
law. Our readers are hereby in-
formned that all dwellings adver-
tised in this newspaper are availa-
ble on an equal opportunity basis.
To complain of discrimination call
HUD toll free at 1-800-669-9777,
the toll free
telephone number to the hearing
impaired is 1-800-927-9275.

810 Home for Sale
2 Champion Home Inspections
386-344-5551. Inspections
Starting At $ 249.00
Veterans Receive 10% Off
Full Inspection.
Champion Home Inspections
Contact John 386-344-5551
State Licensed
And Insured
championhomeinspections.us
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
10 acres w/well maintained brick
home. 2012 sqft. Open split floor
plan. Lori Giebeig Simpson
365-5678 MLS# 74447 $149,900


810 Home for Sale
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
New home in May Fair. Super area
corner lot. 4br split plan. Versatile
colors. Elaine'K. Tolar
755-6488 MLS# 76919 $199,900
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
3br/2ba. 1590 sqft. Lori Giebeig
Simpson. 365-5678 or
Mary Brown Whitehurst
965-0887 MLS# 74542 $109,900
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
Cute 3/2 brick in town. Wood
floors, Ig family room. Front &
back porch Lori Giebeig Simpson
365-5678 MLS# 77989 $79,900
LEASE/OPTION BUY
3br/2ba Home 2010 w/garage
on 1/2 acre. Owner Financing
386-623-2244
Lg. 4/3 family home. 16x20
screened porch, workshop. 4.5 ac.
fenced/cross fenced MLS 74339
$219,900. N Fla Homeland Real-
ty Darlene Hart 386-288-2878
Great 3/2 home w/2346 sq ft
under roof on .67 ac., Creekside
S/D. Big back yard w/plenty of
shade trees. On a cul-de-sac, MLS
77385 $169,900 623-6896
Spacious 4/2 home on 1 ac. Split
floor plan. Great neighborhood.
Easy access to 1-75 $204,900 MLS
77859 N Fla Homeland Realty
Darlene Hart 386-288-2878
WoodCrest 3/2 Split floor plan
Screened porch. 10x12 storage
shed. $126,900 MLS 77932
Darlene Hart 386-288-2878
N Fla Homeland Realty
Home for entertaining 3/2 plus
pool house w/half bath, 2.25
fenced ac. Freshly painted. Split
plan, Large rear deck MLS 78103
$179,900 386-623-6896
0.5 ac tract. 441 (4 lane) frontage.
1/2 mi from Target distribution.
2/1.5 zoned resid'l MLS# 78506
$88,000 Nancy Rogers 867-1271
R.E.O. Realty Group
Great home, Great neighborhood,
great price. 3/2 Close to town A
Must-See!. MLS#77411, $79,900,
Nancy Rogers
867-1271 R.E.O. Realty Group
4/2 fenced yard, 2 car garage,
Fairly new roof & HVAC Shed,
fenced back yard. MI.S#77602,
$162,500, Nancy Rogers
867-1271 R.E.O. Realty Group
Lake City Country Club. 4/3, reno-
vated. Great for entertaining. Glass
doors open to back yard. $179,900
MLS#78637 Nancy Rogers
R.E.O.'Realty Group 867-1271
Investor Special Buy. 2br con-
crete block w/CH/A. Available "as
is" $22,900, MLS76821.
Vin Lantroop. 386-755-6600
Hallmark Real Estate
Pool Home. 2 Story w/soaring
ceilings. Ig master w/Jacuzzi.
Fenced yard. $159,000 MLS77085
Teresa Spradley 386-365-8343
Hallmark Real Estate
Near Itchetucknee head springs,
easy Gainesville commute. For
sale or rent! $75,500. MLS77398.
Paula Lawrence. 386-623-1973
Hallmark Real Estate
REDUCED gated commuRity.
Brick w/florida room & private
garden. Security system. Ginger
Parker. MLS77703. 386-365-2135.
Hallmark Real Estate
Like to Entertain? Over 2900
sqft. 3br/2.5ba. Fenced w/sprinkler
& security system. MLS78404.
Sherry Willis. 386-365-8095
Hallmark Real Estate
Springhollow Ig brick. 4br/2ba
w/lg screened porch. Oversized
ga-
rage. upgraded kitchen & bath.
$109,900, MLS78787. Janet Creel.
719-0382 Hallmark Real Estate

80 Farms &
Acreage
4 1/2 acre lot. Lake Jeffery Road.
Gorgeous Oaks!Paved Rd
Owner Financing! NO DOWN!
$59,900. $525mo 352-215-1018.
www.LandOwnerFinancing.com
4 acres, Wellborn, New Well
installed, Beautifully wooded,
w/cleared Home Site, owner fin,
no down, $39,900, $410 mon
Call 352-215-1018
www.LandOwneiFinancing.com
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
Brick in LC Country Club. 4/3
Lots of extras, oversized garage &
storage. Elaine K. Tolar
752-4211 MLS# 78739 $239,900
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
'Brick in WoodCrest S/D. Split
plan. Screened porch. Lg back
yard. Elaine K. Tolar
752-4211 MLS# 77015 $137,900
For Lease FARM- 7 stall barn.
17+ acres, pasture, cross fenced.
Close in $500. mo.
386-961-1086
Owner financed land. Half acre to
ten acre lots. As low as $300
down. Deas Bullard Properties
386-752-4339 www.landnfl.com

83O Commercial
3 Property
Commercial Parcel 2 acres w/252
ft frontage on SR 47 Add'l 4 76
ac. avail. $149,900 MLS# 78260
Call 386-867-1271 Nancy Rogers
R.E.O.Realty Group, Inc

870 Real Estate
8 Wanted
I Buy Houses
CASH!


Quick Sale Fair Price
386-269-0605


REPORTER Classifieds



In Print and On Line



www.lakecityreporter.com


...to never miss a day's
worth of all the
Lake City Reporter
has to offer:
Home delivery.
To subscribe call
755-5445



[Lake Clit Repore


Bring the picture in or
we will take it for youl
* Ad runs 10 consecutive days
with a description and photo in the
newspaper and online E-edition.
* Ad runs 10 consecutive days as a
classified line ad online.
* You must include vehicle price.
* All ads are prepaid.
* Private party only.





2006 EF250
Ford Van
3/4 ton, metal work
shelves/ladder rack,
60K miles, exc. cond.
$10,500
Call
386-555-5555
If you don't sell your vehicle
during the first 10 days, you
can run the same vehicle ad
for 10 additional days for
only $15.00
Terms and conditions remain the
same for the additional run.


Mayi r Bridget
(386) 75]S S44


We're on target!


Lake City Reporter
lakedtyreporter.com CURRENTS m*agl.i. e
Subscribe Today
386-755-5445


Classified Department: 755-5440







LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 11, 2011


Connected






0


.7 ,t IT T ITi" T"91


www.lakecityreporter.com


I.


777 ." 7


Buying Go




Mon. 1-6mpm
Tues-Fri. 10-6 pi
Sat. 10-3 pm
Closed Sunday


PR@Ato mE TBoWa I
1101 US Hwy 90 W, Suite 130, Lake City, FL
ld AKE CITY'S
| PRECIOUS METAL
DEALER


Located n tRhe
-Gateway Center


Selling:
Gold, Silver,
Platinum Bullion,
American Eagles,
Canadian Maple
Leafs,
Australian Nuggets,
Chinese Pandas,
Collectible Coins,
and
Currn'ci''


BANQUET ROOM EARLY BIRD SPECIAL 4PM-6PM
NO FEE Purchase 2 Buffets,
15 or more | 30 or more
10% OFF Get 1 Beverage FREE
'xpires Nov r 17, 2011 Expires November 17, 2011
Not La[bd ivth ,v iiot r sp.,cials or .oup s 'Ia or ,, oda. Nt, valid with aly othet specials r wouptis.


U


275 N. Madion .AVe
i*(386) a43-8;^
.Doi~towji'(next I
-..-. - -,, -., - S- - .



New Patient
Exam and Necessary X-rays
SDO 11.X,13 3 $2 9
*j First-time
patient
Reg. $136 SVINS OF Jo07
E.pire_ Sepember 30, 2011
ASPEN DENIAL GROUP
" .. "- www.aspenlakecity.com


PRESCRIPTIONS


^^^^^^^^'I


Classified Department: 755-5440


.,q


01


pm
I


.. Molo o m i % "St^I r.i'^A {'Mltt~ht''
io.Mte*
HLi~~jBi~ifau









Lake City Reporter


Story ideas?

Contact
Robert Bridges
Editor
754-0428
rbridges@lokecityreportercom


LIFE


Sunday, September I I, 2011


www.lakecityreporter.com


Section D


GARDEN TALK







Nichelle
Demorest


Time


fora


treat

The time to plant straw-
berry,plants is nearly upon
us. You may want to order
your bareroot plants now
so you can set them in the
ground between October
1st and mid November.
Roots will need to become
established first. Then
flowers and fruit will begin
to develop on most variet-
ies when temperatures are
between 50 and 80F and
daylight hours are 14 or
less.
Strawberry plants are
normally grown as annu-
als here in Florida and
replaced with fresh plants
each year. This is because
the plants will decline when
temperatures heat up in
the summer. The best qual-
ity fruit is produced by
young, first year garden
plants. Currently, UF sug-
gests three varieties for
the Florida home garden:
'Camarosa', 'Sweet Charlie',
and 'Festival'.
In other parts of the coun-
try, strawberry plants are
grown as perennials and will
bear fruit the following year.
New plants that develop
from the plant runners can
also be reset to produce
fruit This practice is not
advisable in Florida gardens
where nematodes build up
so quickly and are already
present in the new plantlets.
For the best results,
locate your strawberry
patch in a sunny area that
has well drained, slightly
acidic garden soil. Raised
beds or rows are preferred
to in-ground flat rows
because they provide a
well-drained soil in which
roots have plenty of oxygen
during periods of extended
rainfall. Strawberries also
can be grown in planters,
pots, barrels and in other
containers.
Mulched raised beds can
make harvesting your juicy
crop a lot easier, too. Black
plastic mulch, 1 to 1 ? mils
thick, is often used to cover
raised beds or rows. Mulch
keeps the fruit from lying
on the bare ground, slows
evaporation from the soil,
and provides excellent weed
control.
For planting instructions
and tips on fertilizing, water-
ing, and controlling pests,
visit http://edis.ifas.ufl.
edu/hs403 The UF Master
Gardeners answer questions
at the Fort White Public
Library every Wednesday
from 1:00 to 4:00 pm, or you
can call 752-5384.
It's time for Gerry
Murphy's Fall Vegetable
Gardening class. This free
class is offered at the Fort
White Library on Sept.
15th at 5:45 pm, and also
at the downtown Lake City
Library on Sept. 17th at
2:00 pm. Come and enjoy
Gerry's lively and informa-
tive presentation, and bring
along your questions and
enthusiasm.
UF/IFAS programs are
open regardless of race,
creed, color, religion, age,
disability, sex, sexual orien-
tation, marital status, nation-
al origin, political opinions


or affiliations.


Walk/Run 4 Life marks 10th


By ANTONIA ROBINSON
arobinson@lakecityreporter.comrn
The Pregnancy Care Center of
Lake City believes in life and says
it's looking for others who feel the
same.
"We're a pro-life nonprofit and
we believe in life and want to
stand up for life," said Judy Welch,
Pregnancy Care Center director of
development.,
The organization is hosting its
10th annual Walk/Run 4 Life at 9
a.m. Saturday at Olustee Park in
Downtown Lake City. Registration
for the event begins at 8 a.m.
The Walk/Run 4 Life is a prima-
ry fundraiser for the Center, she
said. The goal is to raise $10,000,
which will go toward operational
expenses at both centers. The
Live Oak center is also hosting a
Walk/5K Run 4 Life Sept. 24.
"It's a fundraising event for
us but also a community event,"
Welch said. "We try to get the
community involvedd"
Participants can walk, run or
even ride a bicycle on the 3.1 mile
course. The walk/run is open to


all ages, and businesses, church-
es, families and individuals who
want to show their support are
encouraged to attend.
Participating in the walk/run
demonstrates a stand for life, said
Donna Sandage, Pregnancy Care
Center executive director.
"Life is precious, and it's impor-
tant to get the community involved
to show one another we do care
about it," she said. "Without life
we would die. We want the com-
munity to grow."
The Pregnancy Care Center is
a non-profit that provides training
and resources for men and women
to be better parents, she said.
It provides free sonograms and
other services.
"All of our services are free,"
Welch said.
There are two locations for the
organization. The Lake City center
has been in existence for more
than 20 years and the Live Oak
center has been open 11 years.
The organization has helped
thousands of women, men and chil-
WALK continued on 2D


U
I'~.. '-
-~ ~- t~.


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Above: Betty Logan (left) helps Sandage tie laces on a brand new pair of
tennis shoes as she gears up for Saturday's event. 'It's going to be a busy
day,' Logan said. 'I'm excited about the goal we have set. Life is a very
important thing for us. We are saving the lives of the unborn.'
At left: Sandage holds up a pair of baby shoes made to fit 9- to 10-month-
olds. 'We are walking so babies this size can get a chance to wear tennis
shoes.'


Solo living drops in Manhattan


By MIKE SCHNEIDER and
VERENA DOBNIK
Associated Press
NEW YORK Nowhere else is living alone
celebrated the way it is in Manhattan, where
solo dwelling has been exulted, in pop culture
from "Seinfeld" to "Sex and the City."
But single living declined during the past
decade in Manhattan, though it still is the
nation's capital of single-person households. At
the same time, living alone grew nationwide to
an unprecedented level, particularly in parts of
the West and South, according to an Associated
Press analysis of 2010 census data.
Escalating rents during the last decade, as
well as the perception that New York's most
captivating borough is more family friendly
than in years past, forced a dip in the rate in
Manhattan from 48 percent of households
in 2000 to 46.3 percent in 2010. Nationwide, the
rate has reached an all-time high almost 27
percent of households.
Sociologists say long-term consequences of
this phenomenon are showing already: Parents
have less opportunity to influence who their
children select as mates, resulting in more
interreligious and interracial marriages. More
seniors, especially women, are living by them-
selves into their later years. And planners and
developers are figuring out how to accommo-
date the extra long-term demand for housing.
"I see the rise of living alone as one of the
great demographic changes in modern his-
tory," said New York University 'sociologist
Eric Klineberg, author of the soon-to-be-pub-
lished "Going Solo: The Extraordinary Rise and
Surprising Appeal of Living Alone." "It may be
the last great social change that we haven't fully
come to terms with."
The biggest growth in solo dwelling has been
in small communities such as Chattahootchee
County, Ga., near Fort Benning, and Park
County, Colorado, a result of other parts of
the nation catching up with what had been a
big-city trait. While some people initially are
frightened by the prospect of living in solitude,
others quickly find advantages.
Penny Jacobs was well aware of the extra
resources required to live alone when she
divorced her husband in 2003. But the 58-year-
old attorney can tick off the advantages of
solo living in her high-rise condo in downtown
Orlando.


Mathew Sanders, left, and Mark Bonner pose for a photograph in the two bedroom apartment they
share in New York. Census figures show that Manhattan had a dip in single-person households this
past decade, despite being the capital of single living.


"You know that if you put something in the
refrigerator, it will be there when you're ready
to eat it. If your house is a mess, you know you
made the mess. Nobody moves your stuff. The
toilet seat is where you left it," Jacobs said. "I
like the control, freedom and independence."
Record-high rents in the past decade contrib-
uted to the drop in single-person households in
Manhattan, experts say. Rents averaging $2,000
a month for studios are forcing residents like
Mathew Sanders, 27, and Mark Bonner, 29, to
share an apartment on the Upper East Side into
their late 20s and beyond. *
The college buddies from Louisiana rent a
one-bedroom, 700-square-foot "shotgun" apart-
ment that requires Sanders to walk through
Bonner's sleeping area to get to the front door.
The living arrangement sometimes creates
awkward moments, especially when it comes to
dating potential girlfriends.
"Living in Manhattan is so irrational," said
Bonner, an editor. "I came here with no job, but


I grew up thinking that New York is the greatest
city in the world. And if you're going to make
a run at New York the dream you should
live in Manhattan, in the heart of the city."
In the past decade, affordable housing has
been squeezed by Manhattan landlords who are
allowed to convert hundreds of rent-controlled
and rent-stabilized apartments into market-rate
units. There also has been a decline in the
number of affordable apartments in many new
buildings, said Zenaida Mendez, a longtime
tenant organizer in Manhattan's Clinton neigh-
borhood.
This West Side community had one of the
borough's biggest declines in single-person
households. It is home to many actors, musi-
cians and stagehands who work in nearby
Broadway and off-Broadway theaters and res-
taurants. Their incomes have shrunk because
of the economic downturn and the use of taped
SOLO continued on 2D









2D LAKE CITY REPORTER LIFE SUNDAY SEPTEMBER 11, 2011


Remembering Sept. 11


clay we
I member the
bombings of
S September 11,
2001. Terrorists
caused destruction in
New York City and at the
Pentagon, and intended to
do further damage before
a fourth plane crashed in
rural Pennsylvania. "9/11,"
as the attacks are called,
is unique in our history
for many reasons. Yet it is
similar to some other major
events as well.
The attacks on Pearl
Harbor immediately came
to mind. Yet that was a mili-
tary attack, by one nation, to
destroy an entire naval force.
9/11 was an act of intimida-
tion, to bring about fear and
chaos, brought about by
men from several different
nations. Thousands of sailors
died at Pearl Harbor. But
what made the attack truly
evil at the time was the straf-
ing of civilians by Japanese
planes. The deaths of thou-


sands of innocent, everyday
Americans give 9/11 a hor-
rific pall.
Pearl Harbor also has
some distance to it, since
Hawaii is physically far from
the continental United States.'
A little closer to home, an
1814 attack by the British
destroyed the White House.
The American military imme-
diately responded with a
victory in Baltimore and later
won at New Orleans, van-
quishing an enemy nation.
That attack was the worst
on the continental U.S. for
nearly two centuries. 9/11
changed all that
Acts of terror remain a-ter-
rible constant in our nation's
history as well. Recent events
such as the Oklahoma City
bombing and the mass
shootings in Arizona remain
fresh in our memory. A large
explosion on Wall Street
- in September of 1920, in
lower Manhattan remains
unsolved to this day. It is dif-
ficult to conceive of someone


Sean McMahon
History Instructor
Florida Gateway College


within our nation wanting
to cause such death and
destruction.
The domestic connec-
tions of 9/11 give it great
resonance. These terrorists
had lived within our nation
for several years. A few of
them lived, learned how to
fly, and partied in Florida.
They struck a landmark that
had already survived one
attack, in 1993, within our
largest city. Yet their ideol-
ogy, culture, and worldview


were largely unknown at the
time and still remain difficult
to fathom today.
America responded to
Pearl Harbor and to the
British attack by immediate
military action. On the first
anniversary of Pearl Harbor
we were fully engaged in a
world war. Shortly after the
White House burned, we
concluded a favorable peace
with the British. Yet today,
ten years after the 9/11
attacks, we remain engaged
in several places around
the globe. Our military has
just emerged from a very
destructive summer. These
far-away conflicts, taking
place within our modern
society, can seem remote at
times. 9/11 still hits home.
America responded to
the 9/11 attacks on the
home front by continuing its
business. To do so any dif-
ferently would have been a
victory for the terrorists. So
our President encouraged us
to fly on airplanes, to go to


theme parks, and to be with
our families. It was a unifying
moment
Over the last ten years,
most Americans have seen
their lives change in some
way. We now put up with
increased delays at airports
for a sense of security.
The recent earthquake in
New York City initially was
thought to be another attack.
In the back of everyone's
mind is the possibility of
another terror strike at any
moment Instead of the awful
certainty of world war, we
face new challenges against
an evasive enemy.
The 9/11 attacks are this
generation's "where were
you" moment Many of us
remember exactly where
we were when we saw the
plane hit the tower. Similarly,
older folks remember the
Kennedy assassination or
the 1986 Challenger explo-
* sion.
We enjoy celebrations
such as the 4th of July or


Memorial Day. The ritual-
izing of 9/11 represents
the large-scale, nationwide
remembrance of a truly
tragic event Individual
Americans can draw
strength as the entire nation
pauses to reflect
Today we will see solemn
commemorations across
the nation. A huge memo-
rial will be unveiled in New
York. Memorials are being
built or planned in several
locations, even as close as
Citrus County, Florida. We
do not see memorials to the
sailors of Pearl Harbor, or to
the Wall Street bomb outside
of those locales. To deal with
9/11, Americans want to -
share their feelings of rage,
sadness, and determination.
We want to leave permanent
physical memorials across
the nation to show the power
of our collective emotions.
This is a day to pause and
remember a terrible event
that forever will be part of
our memory.


SOLO: Single living drops in Manhattan Continued From Page 1A


music in Broadway shows, at
a time when real estate agents
estimate that residents need
an income of at least $80,000
to live alone in Manhattan in
a relatively attractive apart-
ment
"There are alot of double-up
families because of the lack of
affordable housing," Mendez
said. "People who come out


of college and are making
$45,000 and $50,000 cannot
afford to rent a Manhattan
apartment alone anymore,
so two or three have to live
together."
The perception that the bor-
ough is safer and the schools
are better is contributing to
families staying in Manhattan
rather than moving to the


suburbs, said Mitchell Moss,
an NYU urban policy profes-
sor.
"You now see baby strollers
and family dogs being walked
even on Wall Street," he said.
Nationally, women are
more likely than men to live
alone. A major reason is that
older women tend to outlive
their male mates, and older


men tend to marry younger
women. For under-45 single
dwellers, men outnumber
women, mainly because
women are more likely to
live with their children than
men, and women marry at a
younger age than men, said
Stanford University sociolo-
gist Michael Rosenfeld.
North Dakota had the high-


est percentage of solo living
of any state 31.5 percent
It also had the highest per-
centage a decade earlier, but
this time the reason is differ-
ent A decade ago, when the
rate was 29.3 percent, young
adults were moving from
North Dakota to other places
for better job opportunities,
leaving behind a population of


elderly residents who lived by
themselves after their spous-
es passed away.
This time, an oil boom is
transforming the western
part of the state and attract-
ing thousands of single, male
workers who have left families
behind, said Richard Rathge,
a demographer at North
Dakota State University.


ENGAGEMENTS

McMillan-Blair
Jimmy and Diane
McMillan of Live Oak
are happy to announce
the engagement and ba
upcoming wedding of
their daughter, Heather
Lynette McMillan,
to Brandon Blair. He
is the son of Barbara
Stephens of Jasper and
the grandson of Ellis
Stephens of Jasper.
She is also the grand-
daughter of Rheunette
Ramsey and the late
Alfred Ramsey of Live
Oak.
The bride-elect is a graduate of Suwannee High School
and North Florida Community College. She is employed
by the Columbia County Library.
The future groom is a graduate of Hamilton County
High School and attended Valdosta State University. He is
employed by SpeedySigns.com of Lake City.
The wedding will take place 6 p.m. Saturday, Oct. 1 at
the Church of Christ on Highway 47 in Lake City.
The reception will follow at the Lake City Woman's
Club.
No local invitations will be sent. All friends and family
are invited to attend.


Johnson-Hawkins

Mattie Johnson
Thomas of Lake City
announces the engage-
ment and approach-
ing marriage of her
daughter Monica M.
Johnson of Lake City
to Terrance L. Hawkins
of Lake City. He is the
son of Debbie Hawkins
of Cocoa and Johnny
Lewis of Lake City.
The bride is also the
daughter of the late
Michael D. Johnson of
Jacksonville.
The bride-elect is a 1997 graduate of Hamilton County
High School and works for hospice.
The future groom is a 1998 graduate of Columbia High
School and works for the Department of Transportation.
The wedding is planned for 3 p.m. Saturday Oct. 15 at
Union African Methodist Episcopal Church in Winfield. A
reception will follow at Winfield Recreation Center.
All family and friends are invited.

BIRTH ANNOUNCEMENT

Brantley Boston McCray


Corey and Jenalyn
McCray of Lake City
announce the birth of
their son, Brantley Boston
McCray, June 28 in
Gainesville.
He weighed 8 pounds, 9
ounces and measured 21
inches.
He joins siblings Bradee
Elizabeth, 5, and Tison


James, 3.
Grandparents are Jimmy
and Rita Swisher and Mike
and Marlene McCray.
Great-grandparents are
Betty Boston, and the late
C.A. Boston, Kate McCray
and the late L.J. McCray,
the late A.M. and Helen
Swisher and the late James
and Lamar Brady.


WALK: Pro-life event marks 10th Continued From Page 1A
dren since its existence, Welch
said. The Pregnancy Care Center
is dependent on donations and
fundraisers to meet their budget
for the Lake City and Live Oak
locations.
Aside from walking, the event
will feature free food, live enter-
tainment and prizes for partici- '
pants who raise the most money,
she said. Testimonies will also
be given from people who have '.
benefited from the centers.
There is a minimum $10 dona-
tion to participate. Sponsor forms
can be picked up at the Center
or requested by e-mailing judy-"V_.
welchpcc@gmail.com. Donations
can also be mailed to 399 S.W.-
Hernando, Lake City, FL 32025.
To learn more about the walk/ JWR..,yR
run call (386)758-8622. JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
"We just want to encourage Pregnancy Care Center of Lake City client counselor Judy Stiles (left) and executive
everybody to come out and stand director Donna Sandage prepare signs for the center's walk/Run 4 Life event, which
up for life and be a part of the will take place on Saturday at Olustee Park in downtown Lake City. 'I'm excited to see
walk," Welch said. "It's going o be the community come together to stand up for life,' Sandage said. 'We're giving the
a great day."4 community an opportunity to say that they agree with life.'


China, Crystal,
Flatware and Gifts
Couples registered:
Ashley Cloninger
Justin Brimrnmer
September 24, 2011


Jill Peck
Bryson Johnson
September 24, 2011


Jazan Nabinger
Blaiyze Neeley
October 21 2011
We know exactly what
they want In a wedding
or shower gift. We update
their list as gifts are
purchased, and gift wrap,

WARD'S
JEWELRY & GIFTS
156 N. Marion Ave.
Lake City
752-5470










LAKE CITY REPORTER ADVICE & CROSSWORD SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 11, 2011


DEAR ABBY


Somber anniversary is time


for prayers and reflection


DEAR READERS: Today
marks the 10th anniver-
sary of the attacks on the
World Trade Center and
the Pentagon. Please take
a moment and join me in
offering a prayer for those
innocent individuals who lost
their lives there and in the
field in Pennsylvania on that
horrific day. If September
11 has taught us anything, it
is how strong the American
people can be when we are
challenged.

DEAR ABBY: How do
you prevent damage in your
home from children whose
parents will not control them
while they're visiting? I keep
a box of toys and offer them
to the children, but they often
prefer to handle my personal
objects, many of which are
heirloom antiques.
One visitor offered to
replace a shattered ceramic
bowl her son had thrown like
a Frisbee. "It's not replace-
able," I told her. "It belonged
to my great-grandmother."
Her response was that I
should have put anything
valuable out of reach.
It seems even the most
polite suggestion to chil-
dren angers their parents.
Must I show everyone the
door because their chil-
dren behave like animals?
- WHO'S MINDING THE
MENAGERIE?
DEAR WHO'S: That's
one intelligent option.
Conscientious parents take


Abigail Van Buren
www.deorabby.cbm

the time to patiently teach
their children that they can't
touch. everything they see.
They also think ahead and
bring toys they know the
kids will enjoy in case they
become bored. In cases like
this, visit lazy parents only on
their own turf or when they're
child-free for an afternoon or
evening.

DEAR ABBY: I work in an
office with mostly women.
My husband and I bought a
new car a few months ago.
Whenever the car comes up,
in conversation, a few of my
co-workers don't hesitate to
say what they don't like about
it After I gave one of them a
ride home one night, she said
the "new car smell" gave her
a headache.
I wish I could come back
with some smart remark, but
they are in higher positions
than I am and I don't want
to create problems. They
don't seem to care if they do,
though.
I tell myself I'll never offer
a ride to them again. Let them
walk. Am I being rude for


thinking that? DRIVING
MYSELF CRAZY
DEAR DRIVING
YOURSELF: Your idea of not
providing transportation to
the complainers is a good
one. My advice is, in the
future, not to raise the sub-
ject of your new car which
should reduce the number of
comments you hear about it.

DEAR ABBY: I work for a
package delivery company
and there is a problem that's
all too common for people in
my line of work. PLEASE tell
dog owners to confine their
dog before opening a door to
accept a package.
I have been bitten twice in
the past two years by dogs
that "don't bite." When a
customer takes the time to
put their dog in another room
before coming to the door, I
make sure to let him or her
know how much I appreciate
it. It's difficult to,be pleas-
ant and professional when
someone's dog is barking and
running at me.
TWICE BITTEN IN
DAYTONA BEACH, FLA.
DEAR TWICE BITTEN:
You're welcome. If your let-
ter convinces the owners of
aggressive dogs to confine
them faster than you can spell
L-A-W-S-U-I-T, then its pur-
pose will have been served.

N Write Dear Abby at
www.DearAbby.com or
P.O. Box 69440, Los
Angeles, CA 90069.


HOROSCOPES


ARIES (March 21-April
19): Take care of personal
matters before it's too late.
Anger and upset will be a
waste of time after the fact.
Concentrate on opportunities
that allow you to use your
skills to make more money.
Avoid physical challenges
that may result in injury.
You must strive for stability.

TAURUS (April 20-May
20): Everything is leaning
in your favor, so it is best to
savor the moment. Travel,
meeting new people and
enhancing a love relationship
are all highlighted. Changing
your home to fit your evolv-
ing lifestyle will help you
bring about the result you
want much sooner. ****
GEMINI (May 21-June
20): Cut out the melodrama
and get down to business.
Playing emotional games
never turns out favorably.
You have to stick to the truth
and get on with your day.
Someone older and wiser will
have good advice you should
follow. **
CANCER (June 21-July
22): Reach out to friends,
relatives and neighbors


THE LAST WORD
Eugenia Word

and you will get a good
response. Entertaining the
people around you will have
its benefits. Romance is fea-
tured, and decisions about
your future can be made.

LEO (July 23-Aug. 22):
You need to listen to what
everyone else thinks before
you make a decision regard-
ing a change to your location,
profession or status. Travel
should be scheduled if it will
help deal with a problem that
needs attention. A simple
approach will bring the best
results. ***
VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept.
22): Do your best to please
friends, family and your
lover. 'If you are single, you
will meet someone special if
you travel or socialize with
other people looking for love.
A change of location will ease
your stress. ***
LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22):
You need to shake things up.
Taking a different approach
or changing the way you do
things will help you diversify.


CELEBRITY CIPHER
by Luis Campos
Celebrity Cipher cryptograms are cratd from quotatn by famous people. past and present.
Ech letter In the ciheer tends for another.
TODAY'S CLUE: G equals N
"NZDAZJ YXT GAK UZ UDXIZD KNXG
XG0TAGZ ZVJZ. KNZT DZ RH'JK UDXIZD
MBIZ YBG HKZJ VAGSZD.Z D.A G X V C
DZXSXG

PREVIOUS SOLUTION: "Everyone needs to have access both to grandparents
and grandchildren In order to be a full human being." Margaret Mead
(0) 2011 by NEA. Inc. 9-12


Don't let a job you are work-
ing on get to you. ***
SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov.
21): You can learn a lot
from others. Listen, and get
involved in new experiences
that will free your mind and
allow you to integrate your
old ideas with thoughts that
are a little more current.
Revive your love life with a
little excitement. *****
SAGITI'ARIUS (Nov. 22-
Dec. 21): You will face tough
opposition and had better
be prepared to recite facts
and figures if you want to be
taken seriously. Someone
you are indebted to will have
to be dealt with to avert emo-
tiotal upset. **
CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan.,
19): Don't sit back waiting for
things to come to you when
there is so much at stake.
You can double or triple the
outcome of a situation by
being an active participant.
Attending a reunion or visit-
ing familiar places will be
enlightening. ****
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb.
18): Bragging isn't your style,
and it won't help you get
what you want. It is best to
follow through with promises
and to do so without making
a fuss. Keep things simple,
affordable and functional.

PISCES (Feb. 19-March
20): Follow through with
promises or you will face
opposition. Question motives
to see if you are heading in
the same direction.as the
people you are with the most.
Common ground can be
found if you search. ***


SUNDAY CROSSWORD


THAT'S DISGUSTING! By Dana Delany and Matt Ginsburg / Edited by Will Shortz 1-213-I-[- -51617i-1-8i-567 91011 12 13 14 15 16 17 18


Across
I Word with liberal
or visual
5 Foliose
13 Hero of a John
Irving best seller
19 Beverage whose
logo was once
the bottom half
of a woman's
legs
20 Actress who co-
starred in
"Havana," 1990
21 Protect
22 Heads-up in
Ireland?
24 Danish cheese
25 "Gerontion" poet
26 "Yikes!"
27 Australia's Great
Basin
28 Dorm police, for
short
29 Superman's
attire, e.g.?
34 Head of London?
35 Venezuela's
Chavez
36 Security interest
37 Metric liquid
means.
38 Achievement
40 Farm pails?
47 City raided in
"Godzilla Raids
Again"
49 Cloud producer,
informally
50 ___ Highway
(route from
Dawson Creek)
For any three answers,
call from a touch-tone
hone: 1-900-285-5656,
1.49 each minute; or,
with a credit card, 1-800-
814-5554.


54 Willing to do
56 Fluid
57 Boxer on Season
4 of "Dancing
With the Stars'
60.Aggregate
61 Like items at a
supermarket
checkout
64 "I feel the earth
move under my
feet," e.g.?
65 Q.E.D. part
67 Paris's Musee

68 Benjamin
69 W.W. I German
admiral
70 Fancy garb for
Caesar?
72 Characterized by
74 Suffix with
absorb
75 Exploited
76 Sugar providers
77 Flower also
known as love-
in-idleness
79 French school
80 "- my case!"
81 "Button your
lip!"
83 Antisthenes,
notably?
88 Veronese
masterpiece
"The Feast in the
House of __
91 ___ Canals
94 Birthplace of the
Rep. Party
95 First tribe met by
Lewis and Clark
97 Hard butter
98 Something talked
about on
"Toda'y"?


105 Surrealist who
avoided the draft
by writing the
day's date in
every space on
his induction
paperwork
106 Victuals
107 Michael of
"Juno"
108 "Who ya ___
call?"
110 Unnatural
I11 Extremely
occult'?
115 Happy
116 Set sail
117 Tick off
118 Deeper blue?
119 O.K.
120 "The War Is
Over"
writer/singer

Down
I Ticked off
2 Beer served
without artificial
carbonation,
3 Vacation spot
that's crazily
busy?
4 Round storehouse
5 Cousin of Inc.
6 "Ick!"
7 Tennis's Ivanovic
8 Cabbies' clients
9 End of July by the
sound'?
10 Pelvis-related
II Somewhat
informal?
12 Grade school
subj.
13 Pointer's words
14 Start of all
Oklahoma ZIP
codes


15 Tumbler
16 Architectural
space
17 Regular price
IS Set for a
detective, maybe
21 "Eek!" e.g.
23 Yearn (for)
27 Suffix with
problem
30 Watch from the
sidelines
31 Rfo makeup
32 Kind of pad
33 Certain triple-
decker
39 U.K. decoration:
Abbr.
41 Bitter, in a way
42 "Ghosts".
playwright
43 What Bryn Mawr
College is not
44 N.Y.C. subway
inits.
45 Skyscraping
46 Wows
48 Married couple?
51 Prank involving a
hammer and
nails?
52 1986 film shot
partly in a
decommissioned
power plant
53 Mint on a hotel
pillow, e.g.
54 Good for
something
55 What karats
measure
56 Reversed
57 Columbia
athletes
58 Bread on the
table, maybe
59 that a lot"


62 Salsa singer
Celia
63 U.S. visa type
issued to visiting
diplomats
64 Labyrinthine
66 Complete: Prefix
68 Gradual increase
in vol.
7 I Row
72 Strip
73 Yes, to no: Abbr.
76 Woman's support


78 Bother
80 Word derived
from the Latin
unciaa,"
meaning "one-
twelfth"
81 Baked ___
82 Uncle Sam, for
one
84 "Hmmm ..."
85 Quick
86 Followers: Suffix
87 French vote


89 Nail polish, e.g.
90 Collisions
91 Sticky roll'?
92 "C'est si bon!"
93 Put in one's two
cents' worth
96 Like custard
99 "This has got me
fuming!"
100 Die out
101 Creamy shades
102 Dashes may be
part of them


103 Speak to the
masses
104 Betray
109 Capital near the
60th parallel
11l No. typically
between 2.0 and
4.0
112 Omaha Beach
craft, for short
113 One of these
days
114 Kind of jacket


Answers to last Sunday's Crossword.
ARROW RCVR TBSP CPAS
BOISE OHIO KOREA LOLL
CAPRI BEERBUR-I ALPOLKA
REIGNOFTERRIER ISL ET
CHET MOT IF LEONE
ABS HIDE ENMIT I T ES
BOTANICAL G GUARDIANS

THRASH KOD IAKMOMENT
CITIBANK DUE NASTY
COHN MAGOO GERRY I DOL
AMASS ROO ERASABLE
N G M A
PARTY I NGG|IFT MAMMAL





DODG E PARK I NGMETEORS
MI LESPERGALLEON GROHL
ACES CAREY AROD IGLO0
NAST SLED YENS TELEX


S8 9 L L 96.


9 1 9 6 8 L E-L


6 LL 9 Z C 8 l 9





6 8 6 L 9 ZV 9 L


Z 9 LL 6N6 9 8


L 6 V Z 8 9 9 L C


9 9 Z9 L L 6 8 V7


8 L. 6 9 7 L Z 9


52 46 3 7


4 1 3 5


8 1


7 1 6 2


7 4 5


9 6 8 7


8 5 9


3 6 2


9 1 6


Page Editor: Emogene Graham 754-0415









LAKE CITY REPORTER LIFE SUNDAY SEPTEMBER 11, 2011


Tired Western brands find new life in Asia


KELVIN CHAN
AP Business Writer
HONG KONG Faded
and forgotten Western brands
are being dusted off and
brought back to life by com-
panies in Asia targeting the
burgeoning number of people
looking for labels to match
new middle class lifestyles.
Asians have been buying
or licensing fashion names
many of them European
with long and rich histories
including royal connections
or haute couture origins -
that have fallen out of favor
back home, as they seek to
lure the region's newly afflu-
ent
Among them are
Aquascutum, founded in 1851
and whose trenchcoats were
worn by British officers in the
Crimean and two World Wars.
The British label was popular
with movie stars in the 1950s
and '60s but in later years its
appeal fizzled. Various own-
ers tried to turn it around
before a Hong K6ng com-
pany snapped up the Asian
rights in 2009 and now runs
dozens of Aquascutum stores
in China and elsewhere.
Meanwhile, Westerners
are picking up on the idea,
with one British startup aim-
ing to bring dormant luxu-
ry pen, whisky and British
butcher shop brands to Asia's
growing middle classes.
The strategy of acquiring
and revitalizing tired brands
has proved to be especially
successful in China, home to
a huge number of nouveau
riche combined with a culture
that is extremely brand and
status, conscious.
China is forecast to be the
world's third-largest luxury
market within five years,
according to a survey by Bain
& Company released in May.
Taking into account purchas-
es made abroad by globe-trot-
ting Chinese, they are already
the second-biggest spenders
on luxury goods, experts at,
Bain said. China's demand for
brand-name consumer goods
is also reflected in Italian fash-


ion house Prada's listing this
year on Hong Kong's stock
market.
"Chinese are a lot more
brand driven than other coun-
tries, and also they have rapid-
ly increasing income but their
brand product knowledge is
sort of behind their spend-
ing power. That creates an
interesting opportunity," said
Vincent Lui, a Hong Kong-
based partner at Boston
Consulting Group.
While top-tier brands such
as Gucci or Chanel may be
out of reach, it's possible for
companies to buy up lesser
known second- or third-tier
brands, Lui said. "Then you
sort of repackage it in China,
you try to rejuvenate it here
- it's kind of hard to rejuve-
nate it somewhere else. Here
you're .Luliing with a blank
sheet of paper."
A pioneer of this strategy
is Hong Kong-based Trinity
Ltd., which owns or licences
a handful of heritage British
and Italian menswear labels
that have been elbowed aside
in their home markets by
newer fast-fashion outlets.
Three years ago, Trinity
bought Kent & Curwen, an
English clothing label that
started out making school,
club and regimental military
ties in 1926. The brand's web-
site features faded black and
white images of sportsmen
wearing cricket whites aimed
at evoking English traditions.
"It's really propagating the
story that these brands have
strong heritage, long history
and the Chinese custom-
ers believe in it," said Sunny
Wong, the company's group
managing director.
"It's very common to find
customers walking into a
shop and spending a long
time in the shop not only try-
ing on clothing they like but
asking, 'What is this brand?'
There's a big curiosity in why
a brand can be so active over
200 years or more."
Trinity operates 95 Kent
& Curwen stores in main-
land China but the name has
nearly disappeared in Britain,


A customer looks at shirts at a shop of Kent & Curwen, an English clothing label that started out making school, club and regi-
mental military ties in 1926, at a shopping mall in Hong Kong.


where it only has one shop.
But don't tell that to the
mainland Chinese tourists
who flock to neighboring
Hong Kong for upmarket
shopping and believe such
brands remain coveted in
their places of origin.
"Living standards for peo-
ple in China have improved
so we would like to buy
these international brands,"
said a man who only gave
his last name Jiang, from
Dongguan in southern China,
as he browsed at the Kent &
Curwen outlet in an upscale
Hong Kong mall.
Trinity is also the Asian
retail licensee for Gieves &
Hawkes, a storied Savile Row
tailor with a stuffy reputation
that is best known for dress-
ing Prince William for his
wedding to Kate Middleton.
'lThe tailor, which is owned by
another Hong Kong compa-


ny, Wing Tai Properties Ltd.,
has a history stretching back
to 1771 .and boasts three royal
warrants, signifying its status
as an approved supplier to the
royal family.
Earlier this year, Trinity
purchased French fashion
label Cerrutti 1881, founded
by Italian designer Nino
Cerrutti, whb gained fame in
the 1980s for outfitting stars
such as Michael Douglas,
Richard IGere and Bruce
Willis in their movies.
Trinity, controlled by Hong
Kong-based sourcing com-
pany Li & Fung Ltd., now has
about 330 stores in mainland
China under various labels,
and plans to open 50 more by
the end of the year.
Hong Kong'sYGMTrading
ILd.,whichhastheAsian rights
to the Aquascutum clothing
brand that describes itself
as "quintessentially British,"


operates 59 Aquascutum out-
lets in mainland China and 32
in Hong, Macau and Taiwan.
Chinese conglomerate
Fosun International bought
a 7.1 percent stake last year
in French resort operator
Club Med, becoming one of
its biggest shareholders in
a partnership aimed at mak-
ing China the. second big-
gest market for Club Med
in the pext five years. The
French company, founded in
the 1950s, had pioneered all-
inclusive vacation packages
but by 2000 had an outdated
image.
Adult magazine publisher
Playboy Enterprises Inc.,
which has seen its profits and
popularity hit by competition
from adult websites, has been
licencing its name in mer-
chandising deals across Asia
and to a nightclub in Macau
as it seeks to regain profit-


ability. The trend has caught
the attention of a group of
British investors, who started
a company aimed specifically
at finding forgotten brands
and reviving them.
Sinde it was founded in
2009, the Brand Cellar has
bought 10 mostly forgotten
British brands, seven of which
are more than 100 years old.
In June, the company opened
an office in Hong Kong,
where its chief executive is
now based.
"In Asian markets, what
were finding is that there's a
real respect for the gravitas
and depth of a brand because
everything else here is vibrant
and brash and new and excit-
ing, and that's great but it
means there's a premium on
history and authenticity if vyo
can make it relevant," said
Andrew Harrison, the com-
pany's global brand director.


Amid DC's relaunch,


2 comics look at war


By Matt Moore
Associated Press
PHILADELPHIA Sgt
Rock was a gruff, hard-
charging Army soldier who
fought his way across Africa
and Europe during World
War II. Blackhawk was an
aerial daredevil who led a
team of international avia-
tors fighting Axis powers.
That was then. Now, the
characters have been revi-
talized and given a modern
flair more amenable to read-
ers who've spent the better
part of 10 years exposed to
real stories about fighting in
Afghanistan and Iraq.
It's part of DC Comics'
relaunch that this month
sees 52 new series focus-
ing on familiar but decid-
edly different characters
ranging from Superman to
Jonah Hex. Dubbed "The
New 52," the relaunch is
part of the 76-year-old pub-
lisher's efforts to stoke new
readership.
"Men of War" and
"Blackhawks" are hard
restarts of DC's famed war
comics that, in their heyday
in the 1960s and '70s, includ-
ed tales about Sgt. Rock, the
Haunted Tank, Blackhawks
and others in comics like
"GI Combat" and "Our Army
At War."
Those books, said Ivan
Brandon and Mike Costa,
the writers of "Men of War"
and "Blackhawks," are noth-
ing like the new breed.
For one thing, the new
series will see a tacit involve-
ment with superheroes,
something that was nit done
in the past.
"It's been interesting for
me to play with," Brandon
told The Associated Press.
"If you exist in this real army
and try to keep all of that
real as possible, what, realis-
tically, would the addition of


superheroes to that world,
what would that mean? How
would you react to that?" he
asked.
"The answer, in a lot of
cases, is not in a positive
way," Brandon said.
"Blackhawks" is a make-
over, with a new cast and
characters, said Costa.
"It's a daunting kind of
proposition, being a book
that is one of the very, very
few that has, exclusively, a
brand-new cast," Costa said
of the series, which will be
released Sept. 28. "It's closer
to a war book than it is a
super hero book., This is a
group of people, when lth'rt
are crises of a certain nature,.
are scrambled to respond to
it."
"It's like Seal Teamn Six in
the DC Universe," he said,
referring to the Navy team
that killed Osama bin Laden
four months ago.
In "Men Of War," which
was released Wednesday,
Rock is a corporal, decidedly
younger and tihe grandson
of his World War II name-
sake, Frank Rock.
For the new Rock, going
to war is the family legacy,
Brandon said.
"Out in Brooklyn, a lot
of kids he went to school


with their dads, their
uncles everyone around
them was a cop or a fireman.
Rock's family? They all went
to war. It's a legacy his fam-
ily holds proud, but it makes
for lonely Christmas din-
ners," Brandon explained,
reluctant to give away too
much of the story line.
"Rock's dad is dead. ... His
mother's indefinitely hos-
pitalized. He's alone. Rock
married a military girl, who
could maybe understand his
lonely life, but the war took
even that away."
The story details Rock's
career as a soldier not
quite a sergeant thanks to
insubordination and his
advancement to something
new, more detailed, as part
of a team of ex-military. But
he's no soldier for hire, and
the team is not a group of
private military contractors.
'They're an organiza-
tion that is going to interact
with the landscape in much
the way a government or a
branch of the military would.
For all intents and purposes
in terms of the work they do, I
they are the equivalent of a
smaller offshoot of the U.S.
Army," Brandon said. 'They
are dealing specifically with
the sorts of missions that
Rangers would be tasked to '."
do."
The Rock name is legend
in war comics, and Brandon
is cognizant not only of it,
but war comics, too.
"The war genre is called
the war genre because of
the content that was pro- ...
duced from that era. It is a
revered era," hlie said.
The new Rock lets him
"serve that purpose and, in
a way that hopefully was not
already being served and
on a DC line that has been 5
fairly unified in the kinds of
stories that it tells." 13-


SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 24,2"T,
IMDCoNFcMENCEmmTFe FLORIDA GATEWAY COLLEGE
.-.V


Shands


CMS
I I' '. .1 -. ii ", l'. '
"i Pif^.,',' !,., lh,-t Nunir'inL'


OPENING ACTS START @ 7:00PM

PRE-SHOW PARTY AND O ,BQSPONSORED BY URR .
^~ irl Hili m.4tOMH i


*FMG44W. I


lstfl~m t
1*nrf i


I i.,

~wm


IS~s qhd"I~lw