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UFPKY NEH LSTA



The Lake City reporter
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028308/01658
 Material Information
Title: The Lake City reporter
Uniform Title: Lake City reporter (Lake City, Fla. 1967)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: John H. Perry
Place of Publication: Lake City Fla
Publication Date: 9/10/2011
Frequency: daily (monday through friday)[<1969>-]
weekly[ former 1967-<1968>]
daily
normalized irregular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Lake City (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Columbia County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Columbia -- Lake City
Coordinates: 30.189722 x -82.639722 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 95, no. 4 (Oct. 5, 1967)-
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000358016
oclc - 33283560
notis - ABZ6316
lccn - sn 95047175
sobekcm - UF00028308_01569
System ID: UF00028308:01658
 Related Items
Preceded by: Lake City reporter and Columbia gazette

Full Text




Tiger time
CHS takes on
Gainesville. Full
o 120 ****3-DIGIT
LIB OF FLORIDA HISTO
PO BOX L117007FLOI
205 SA UNIV FOF FLORIDA
GAINESVILLB -L


Indians in action
Fort White vs.


326


ry. Full
inside.
IOA


No. 6 upheld
Redistricting
amendment passes
judicial muster,
Story, 2A


Lake


City


Reporter


Saturday, September 10, 2011 www.lakecityreporter.com Vol. 137, No. 194 N 75 cents


President Barack Obama delivers a speech to a joint session of
Congress at the Capitol in Washington Thursday.Watching are Vice
President Joe Biden and House Speaker John Boehner.


House GOP

pledges quick


assessment of


jobs package


By DAVID ESPO
AP Special Correspondent
WASHINGTON House
Republicans unexpectedly
pledged an immediate review
of President Barack Obama's
jobs proposals on Friday as
he launched a public campaign
for urgent passage of his day-
old $447 billion program of tax
cuts and new spending. "The
time for gridlock and games is
over," the president declared.
"Nothing radical in this bill,"
Obama told a large crowd at
the University of Richmond
on the afternoon after his dra-
matic speech to Congress.
"Everything in it will put more
people back to work and more
money back in the pockets
of those who are working.
Everything in it will be paid


for."
Obama's contentions are
unlikely to go unchallenged by
Republicans, who have worked
without letup for months to cut
spending rather than increase
it. But he had barely complet-
ed his remarks when Speaker
John Boehner and other top
House GOP leaders released
their letter to him declaring
"our desire to work with you to
find common ground."
With unemployment at 9.1
percent, they wrote that while
their own proposals may dif-
fer from Obama's "we believe
your ideas merit consideration
by the Congress and believe
the American people expect
them to be given such consid-
eration."
JOBS continued on 5A


River cleanup gets off to

ceremonial start today


By ANTONIA ROBINSON
arobinson@lakecityreporter.comrn
The community is invited
to kickoff cleaning up the
Suwannee River today.
The Kickoff Celebration
for the Great Suwannee River
Cleanup is 10 a.m. to 2 p.m.
at Ivey Memorial Park in
Branford.
The event will feature live
entertainment, free food and
the opportunity for people to
learn about registering for
the cleanup, said Fritzi Olson,
Current Problems executive
director.
This is the second year


Current Problems has hosted
the cleanup, she said.
Last year 30,000 pounds
of trash were collected dur-
ing the cleanup. Groups were
formed to clean up two-mile
sections of the river.
"It's important to get the
trash out of any waterway,"
Olson said. "It doesn't do the
waterway any good."
Come to the event to meet
other people interested in
cleaning the river, she said.
"We're just hoping for a good
turnout," Olson said.- "We're
hoping to get the remaining
sections of the river taken care
of."


Lake City native to open


for Diamond Rio at FGC


Adam Sanders
returns home
September 24.

From staff reports
Lake City native and
Nashville recording artist
Adam Sanders will make
his return home Sept. 24,
opening for Diamond Rio at
Florida Gateway College.
The Columbia High
School graduate and for-
mer Lake City Community
College student will perform
an acoustic show at 7 p.m.
"The biggest thing is I'm
just happy to be back in
Lake City and playing anoth-
er show," Sanders said. "It's
been a long time since I've
been back, and it's going
to be cool to catch up with
people. It's hard to keep in
touch with everybody back
home. We get to do a little
bit over Facebook, but it'll
be fun to have a little down-
time before the show and


then catch up afterwards.
"It's exciting Diamond
Rio has been around a long
time, and they've had such
great success, and I think
it'll be a great show."
Growing up in Lake City,
Sanders always took part
in local talent shows, festi-
vals and fairs, but when he
graduated high school, he
knew a career in country
music and Nashville was
calling, one he couldn't real-
ize in Lake City.
"I wanted to take that next
step," he said. "I couldn't
really progress as a per-.
former without taking that
next step. It's kind of like
going off to college to get
your degree."
Sanders has been in
Nashville for more than two
years now, and said he's been
fortunate to have found the
right mix of musicians to
work with. He believes this
will make his forthcoming
SANDERS continued on 5A


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Columbia High School graduate Adam Sanders
will come home in style when he opens for
Diamond Rio Sept. 24 at FGC.


A challenge well met


JASOurN Mi mA I MTiTH.E rcL.a uCLiy Reponerf
Life Scout Jeremy Barwick, 15, receives a $1,300 check from the Rotary Club of Lake City on Friday in support of
Barwick's Eagle Scout Project and world record attempt to collect 600,000 pounds of non-perishable food items
in 24 hours on Sept. 24. Pictured are Rotary Club member John Blanchard (from left); Chris Candler, president of
the Rotary Club of Lake City; Barwick; Bruce Drawdy, Rotary Club community service director; and Todd Wilson,
Rotary Club member. The Rotary Club of Lake City surpassed the civic club challenge to donate at least $500 to
Barwick's cause.


9/11: Local folks
look back
MR I


Coming Sunday, the Lake City Reporter
examines the events of September 11,
2001 from a local perspective. Here, Fort
White High School principal Keith Hatcher
looks over letters students wrote to New
York firefighters recently.


Water district to hold

budget, tax hearings


From staff reports

The Suwannee River
Water Management District
Governing Board will hold its
first public hearing Tuesday
to discuss the proposed
budget and millage rate.
The hearing is scheduled
for 5:30 p.m., immediate-
ly following the board's
regular monthly meeting,
which will be held at a
special time, beginning at
3 p.m.
The tentative fiscal year
2011-12-budgetis$47.38.:589


and the proposed millage
rate is 0.4143. The tenta-
tive budget represents a 16
percent reduction over last
year's budget and the tenta:
tive millage rate reflects a 6
percent reduction over last
year's millage rate.
The final budget and mill-
age rate will be adopted at a
second hearing on Sept. 27
at 5:30 p.m. Both hearings
will be held at the District's
headquarters in Live Oak at
the corner of U.S. 90 and CR
49. All hearings are open to
the public.


CALL US:
(386) 752-1293
SUBSCRIBE TO
THE REPORTER:
Voice: 755-5445
Fax: 752-9400


87..
Partly cloudy
WEATHER, 2A


.*


O pinion ................
People ...... .......... ..
Advice & Comics.........
Puzzles .................


TODAY IN
PEOPLE
Gibson to make
Jewish-hero film.


COMING
SUNDAY
Ten years later, a
look back at 9/1 I.










LAKE CITY REPORTER DAILY BRIEFING SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 10, 2011


A$H 3 Friday: ,
"Afternoon: 2-7-2
Evening: x-x-x


* 4 Friday:
Afternoon: 3-6-3-4
Evening: x-x-x-x


e 1atc/
Thursday:
2-13-16-19-31


PEOPLE IN THE NEWS


Gibson plans to produce Jewish hero film


LOS ANGELES

Mel Gibson, who
reportedly made
anti-Semitic remarks
during a drunken
driving arrest five
years ago, is now producing a film
about the life of Jewish hero Judah
Maccabee.
Gibson's publicist, Alan Nierob,
said Friday that Gibson is working
on a deal with Warner Bros. to devel-
op the film through his company,
Icon Productions. What Gibson's
exact role will be whether he
might direct or even star in the film
- hasn't been determined.
"Warner Bros. would like him to
direct," Nierob said. "He is the first
choice for the studio to direct it, but
until there's a deal in place and a
script that's finished, it will be his ,
choice as to whether to direct it or
not."
Joe Eszterhas of "Basic Instinct"
ind "Flashdance" fame is writing the
script. No timetable is in place for it
to be completed and for production
to begin.
Maccabee, who's acclaimed as one
of the greatest warriors in Jewish
history, helped inspire the celebra-
tion of Hanukkah.
"We would have hoped that
Warner Bros. could have found
someone better than Mel Gibson to
direct or perhaps even star in a film
6n the life of the Jewish historical
iron Judah Maccabee," Abraham
Foxman, national director of the
Anti-Defamation League, said "As
a hero of the Jewish people and a
universal hero in the struggle for
religious liberty, Judah Maccabee
deserves better."

Software entrepreneur
to auction artworks
NEW YORK California software
entrepreneur Peter Norton will be
selling 60 contemporary artworks
from his collection at a New York


Attorney Larry Ginsberg (left) and actor Mel Gibson appear in a Los Angeles court-
room to settle a long-running custody dispute with girlfriend, Russian musician
Oksana Grigorieva, over their young daughter Aug. 31.


auction this fall.
Christie's auction house said the


Norton
programs,
AntiVirus


sale will be offered
on Nov. 8-9. The
works are expected
to fetch more than
$25 million.
The Los Angeles
collector and phi-
lanthropist created
a series of software
including the Norton


with her children in London and
;n couldn't return to .
Los Angeles for
Saturday's Creative
Arts Emmy Awards,
Where TV guest
roles are honored.
L i Paltrow would,
Paltrow however, return to
"Glee" to reprise the
free-spirited substitute teacher Holly
Holliday, if invited.


Bono said he'll be a
Paltrow loves 'Glee' proud American on 9/11
character. skin Fmmvs


LOS ANGELES Gwyneth
Paltrow, 38, said she was "totally
thrilled" to be nominated for an
Emmy for her guest starring role
on "Glee," but she won't be at the
ceremony this weekend where the
winner will be announced.
She said she just reunited


TORONTO As the 10th anni-
versary of the Sept. 11 terror attacks
draws near, U2 frontman Bono
admits he's "a very proud American
on 9/11." He said "it's just too big
a moment in all our lives. Even
if you're not American, everyone
became an American that day."
* Associated Press


Celebrity Birthdays


0 Golfer Arnold Palmer is 82.
0 Actor Philip Baker Hall is
80.
N Actor Tom Ligon is 66.
0 Actress Judy Geeson is 63.
0 Former Canadian first lady
Margaret Trudeau is 63.
* Political commentator Bill
O'Reilly is 62.
* Rock musician Joe Perry


(Aerosmith) is 61.
0 Actress Amy Irving is 58.
0 Actress Kate Burton is 54.
0 Movie director Chris
Columbus is 53.
0 Actor Colin Firth is 51.
0 Rapper Big Daddy Kane
is 43.
* Movie director Guy Ritchie
is 43.


Daily Scripture
"Teach the older men to be
temperate, worthy of respect,
self-controlled, and sound in
faith, in love and in endurance."
Titus 2:2

Thought for Today


"If there is no knowledge, there
is no understanding; if there is
no understanding, there is no
knowledge."


-The Talmud

Reporter
BUSINESS
Controller Sue Brannon... .754-0419
(sbrannon@lakecityreporter.com)
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Please call 386-755-5445 to report any
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In Columbia County customers should
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vice error for same day re-delivery. After
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vice related credits will be issued.
In all other counties where home delivery
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Circulation ..............755-6445
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Home delivery rates
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Rates iclude7%saes tax.
Mall rates
12 Weeks.................. $41.40
24 Weeks ...................$82.80
52 Weeks ..................$179.40


CORRECTION

The Lake City Reporter corrects errors of fact in news
items. If you have a concern, question or suggestion, please
call the executive editor. Corrections and clarifications will run
in this space. And thanks for reading.


Amendment

6 upheld

MIAMI (AP) A feder-
al judge on Friday upheld
a Florida constitutional
amendment imposing
new rules restricting how
congressional districts
are drawn, rejecting a
lawsuit by two members
of Congress and the state
House of Representatives
claiming it violates the U.S.
Constitution. .
Republican Mario Diaz-
Balart and Democrat
Corrine Brown, the two
U.S. House members,
argued that under the
U.S. Constitution only the
Florida Legislature not
voters through a referen-
dum can control how
congressional districts
are designed. State com-
mittees are currently
meeting to begin that
once-in-a-decade process,
which will come together
in a January legislative
session.
. But U.S. District
Jpdge Ursula Ungaro
sided with the Florida
Secretary of State's
office, the NAACP, the
American Civil Liberties
Union and five individual
Democratic state lawmak-
ers who contended vot-
ers had every right last
November to initiate and
overwhelmingly approve
Amendment 6, which
enacted the new rules.
In a 22-page order,
Ungaro concluded that
the Florida Constitution
"authorizes the people to
participate in the lawmak-
ing process."
"Once the people of
Florida act to limit the
Legislature's options
through a constitutional
amendment, the new con-
stitutional provision binds
the Legislature," the judge
wrote.
Harry Thomas, attorney
for the Florida Secretary
of State, noted at a hearing


THE WEATHER




S CLOUDY CLOUDY -STORMS


HI 87 L068 HI 91 L069 HI 89 LO 68


SUN
Sunrise today
Sunset today
Sunrise torn.
Sunset torn.

MOON
Moonrise today
Moonset today
Moonrise tom.
Moonset torn.


7:12 a.m.
7:42 p.m.
7:13 a.m.
7:41 p.m.


6:35 p.m.
5:36 a.m.
7:06 p.m.
6:30 a.m.


Sept. Sept. Sept. Oct.
12 20 27 3
Full Last New FIrst


On this date in
1811, a tropical
storm passed near
Charleston, S.C.,
producing a sig-
nificant tornado. The
tornado destroyed
60 homes, many of
them mansions.


10

lO10mestobwn
Today's
ultra-violet
radiation risk
for the area on
a sCale from 0
to 10+.
.--- **- .


\, MOSTLY
) SUNNY


HI 91LO68


E R IA T MP frS a:uraySepembr1

Sd ig lo


Singing like a patriot
First graders from the Rampello Magnet School sing 'God.
Bless America' during the 9/11 Memorial Ceremony Friday at
JoeChillura Courthouse Square in Tampa.


Friday that state lawmak-
ers still must finalize the
congressional districts
even with the new amend-
ment in place.
"The Legislature still
has the authority to draw
the district lines," Thomas
said. 'The amendment
only requires that they
consider certain criteria in
doing so."
Among other things,
Amendment 6 requires
that boundaries not be
drawn to favor a politi-
cal party or incumbent;
that the districts should
be compact rather than
sprawling; and that dis-
tricts cannot be designed
to shut racial or language
minorities out of the politi-
cal process. It passed with
more than 60 percent of
the vote last year.
The aim is to curb
so-called gerrymander-
ing of districts, in which
lawmakers design bound-
aries favorable to their
own election prospects or
contort them into unusual
geographic shapes for the
advantage of one political
party or the other.
In 1992, for example, dis-
tricts were created that led
to the election of Brown
and two other African-
Americans to Congress
from Florida for the first
time since the Civil War


- but made neighboring
districts much more solidly
Republican. That year, the
GOP aligned with minori-
ties to carve out those dis-
tricts, which ultimately led
to Republican dominance
of Florida's congressional
delegation.
Voters last year
approved an identical
amendment governing
state legislative districts,
but it was not challenged
by the lawsuit.
After the ruling, Diaz-
Balart and Brown said
they intended to appeal,
even to the U.S. Supreme
Court if necessary.
"I am disappointed,"
Brown said. "When you
are disappointed, what do
you do? You go on to take
the next step, and that's
what we're going to do."
A statement from
Katherine Betta, spokes-
woman for Republican
state House Speaker Dean
Cannon, said officials there
would review the ruling to
determine whether to also
appeal.
Howard Simon, execu-
tive director of the ACLU
of Florida, praised Ungaro
for her ruling.
"The decision today
upholds the clear will of
the people the fair dis-
tricting process can now
proceed," he said.


92e/6L
p op ,Lake Cihty


91/65
'Pe~asied q,-<_
88/67 Vatama
87/6


87/68
: Gainesv
City 90/
i9


Tam
89/


TEMPERA
High Friday
Low Friday
Normal high
Normal lnow


TURES


Record high
Record low


PRECIPITATION
Friday
Month total
Year total
Normal month-to-date
Normal year-to-date


82
68
89
70
96 in 1925
60 in 1997


0.00"
1.11"
27.79"
1.59"
38.35"


Sunday
88' 16, pc
89/75/t
91/81/t
93/77/t
90/69/pc
90/72/pc
89/82/t
91/69/pc
91/79/t
95/76/t
91/71/pc
92/75/t
87/73/pc
89/69/s
89/69/pc
91/78/t
91/67/pc
91/78/t


Monday
87' 775 p:
89/72/pc
90/80/pc
90/75/t
89/68/pc
87/71/pc
89/81/t
89/68/pc
91/79/t
92/75/pc
90/70/pc
92/72/pc
85/72/pc
90/71/pc
89/67/pc
89/76/t
89/65/t
91/77/t


An exclusive
service
brought to
our readers
by
The Weather
Channel.


I weather.com


30 80-L Forecasts, data and
we a graphics w 2011 Weather
p YIIV centralL, IP, Madison, WIs.
weate www.weatherpubllsher.com


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Lake City
HOW TO REACH US
Main number ........(386) 752-1293
Fax number..............752-9400
Circulation ................755-5445
Online... www.lakecltyreporter.com
The Lake City Reporter, an affiliate of
Community Newspapers Inc., is pub-
lished Tuesday through Sunday at 180
E. Duval St., Lake City, Ra. 32055.
Periodidal postage paid at Lake City, Fa.
Member Audit Bureau of Circulation and
The Associated Press.
All material herein is property of the Lake
City Reporter. Reproduction in whole or
in part is forbidden without the permis-
sion of the publisher. U.S. Postal Service
No. 310-880.
POSTMASTER: Send address changes
to Lake City Reporter, P.O. Box 1709,
Lake City, Fla. 32056.
Publisher Todd Wilson .....754-0418
(twilson@lakecityreporter.com)
NEWS
Assistant Editor CJ Rlsak..754-0427
After 1 100 p.m.
(crisak@lakectyporter.com)
ADVERTISING
Director Ashley Butcher ...754-0417
(abutcher@lakecltyreporter.com)
CLASSIFIED
To place a classified ad, call 755-5440.


AROUND FLORIDA


I


City
Jacksllone Cape Canaveral
* 87/71 Daytona Beach
Ft. Lauderdale
*ile Dayto Beach Fort Myers
58 8O73 Gainesville
caa0/69 Jacksonville
90/69 Key West
Orlando Cape Canaveral akeWesty
91/73 88/74 Miami
n, \* Naples
West Palm Beach Ocala
92/78 0 Orlando
FL Lauderdale Panama City
Ft. Myers 90/81 0 Pensacola
92/76 Naples e Tallahassee
93/76 Miami Tampa
Kett 9f1/80 Valdosta
KeWest* W. Palm Beach
89/82


7a lp 7p la 6a
Saturday Slinday







--Forcastedtempoture, "Fltike("thmperntre


Page Editor: Jason M. Walker, 754-0430


11RES


1 19


LAKE C17Y ALMANAC


1


I













FAITH



Saturday, September 10, 201 I v


&


VALUES


www.lakecityreporter.com


Looking for that


blessed hope


As we BIBLE STUDIES als and tribulations of their
approach lives that they no longer
the end of think in spiritual terms.
the Church Many have taken their
Age, we find eyes off Jesus like Peter
that the Devil is working when walking on the water
overtime. Christians the (Matt 14:17-30); stopped
word over are increas- studying His word (II
ingly recognizing that we Tim. 2:15); and, not pray-
are about to step off the ing as they ought (James
great span of time that Hugh Sherrill Jr. 5:16). They are simply
connects eternity past ems-hugh413@comcast.net bewildered as to why their
with eternity future. Our lives are suddenly so awry.
Groom has nearly fin- Some are bitter toward
ished preparing our mansions and must God for allowing them to suffer in the
almost have His hand upon the door- ways they suffer. Others are profoundly
knob... (After these things I looked, and depressed, and yet others find them- ,
behold, a door standing open in heaven, selves in the grip of utter despair. No, all
And the first voice which I heard was is not rosy in God's Church, but we can
like a trumpet speaking with me, say- all find strength and solace and great
ing, "Come up here, and I will show you hope, even in times of grievous trouble,
things which must take place after this" if we know where to look and where to
(Rev. 4:1) as He anticipates greeting His walk. Great hope is what the believer
bride when He calls her to meet Him has to rely on. Without great hope we
in the air. Please read I Thess. 4:16 would all be most miserable. Hope is
NKJ. Verse 17 & 18 say: Then we who confident expectation of the return of the
are alive and remain shall be caught Lord for His Church. Hope is the happy
up together with them in the clouds to anticipation of good. Col. 1:27 says:
meet the Lord in the air. And thus we ...Christ in you, the hope of glory.
shall always be with the Lord. Therefore Throughout the New Testament hope
Comfort one another with these words. is used for our encouragement, so that
These are exciting days in which to we may walk steadfast in these days
serve God upon the Earth, for we see when the god of this world influences us
ourselves as the "terminal" generation. so strong (II Cor. 4:3-4).
Even the apostate church is speaking in Hugh Sherrill is a Bible teacher at
guarded whispers about these matters. Eastside Baptist Church.
However, not all is rosy. As I stated in
the opening sentence, the Devil is work- ". d
ing feverishly to divert Christians from
their ministries. He has known man-
kind's every hot button since the days on Ied
of Adam and Eve in the Garden of Eden, ,.
and he has practiced pressing those but- .
tons for millenniums. More and more
every week, I hear from born again
Christians who do not understand how .
the Devil can be so effective, so wily, so tJ'iPOur.com
subtle in his attacks. Often the saints do
not even realize that it is the Devil at all.
They have become so diverted by the tri-


VI
,,. 9
C,,
'5 I
~


ADVENT CHRISTIAN
* RirstAdvent Christian
1881 SW McFariane Ave.
386-752-3900


9:45AM
11:00AM
7:00PM


ASSEMBLY OF GOD
FIRST ASSEMBLY OF GOD
1571 E Duval Street
386-438-5127
Sunday Worship 10:30A.M.

GLAD TIDINGS ASSEMBLY OF GOD
993 NW Lake Jeffery Road
386-752-0620
Sunday Worship 10:30AM & 6PM
Wed. Famn. Bible Study 7:00PM
"A church where JESUS is Real"

BAPTIST
BEREA BAPTIST CHURCH
SR47 S* 755-0900
Sunday School 9:30AM
Sunday Worship 10:45AM & 6PM
Wednesday Eve. Service 7PM
Interim Pastor: Kenneth Edenfield

EASTSIDE BAPTIST CHURCH
196 SE James Ave.* 386-752-2860
Sun. Bible Study '9:45AM
Sun. Worship 11AM & 6PM
Wed, Prayer Mtg/Bible Study 6PM
Rev. Brandon G. Witt

FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH
Sunday Bible Study 9:15AM
Sunday Worship 10:30AM & 6:00PM
Wed. 6:00PM Prayer Service, &
Children Ministry 6:15PM
Downtown Lake City 752-5422
Rev. Stephen Ahrens, Pastor

OLIVET MISSIONARY BAPTIST CHURCH
541 N.E Davis Street
(386) 752-1990
Ronald V. Walters, Pastor
Sunday School 9:45AM
Sunday Morning Worship 11:00AM
Wed. Mid-Week Worship 6:00PM
"In God's Word, Will & Way"


a.
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PINE GROVE BAPTIST CHURCH
1989 N US Hwy 441
386-752-2664
Sunday Bible Study 9:45AM
Sunday Worship 11AM & 6PM
Wed. Kids & Youth Ministry 6:30PM
Pastor Ron Thompson

SALEM PRIMITIVE BAPTIST
Sunday Services 10:30 AM
Pastor: Elder Herman Griffin
752-4198

SOUTHSIDE BAPTIST CHURCH
388 S.E. Baya Drive* 755-5553
Sunday:


Bible Study
Morning Worship
Evening Worship
Wednesday:
AWANA
Prayer & Bible Study


9:15 AM
10:30AM
6:15PM

5:45PM
6:15 PM


TABERNACLE BAPTIST CHURCH
(independent Baptist)
144 SE Montrose Ave.* 752-4274


Sunday School
Sun. Mom. Worship
Sunday Eve.
Wed. Prayer Meeting
Pastor: Mike Norman


10AM
11 AM
6 PM
7:30 PM


CATHOLIC
EPIPHANY CATHOLIC CHURCH
1905 SW Epiphany Court 752-4470
Saturday Vigil Mass 5:00 PM
Sunday Mass 8:15 AM, 10:30 AM,
5:00 PM (Spanish/English)
Sunday School/Religious Education
9:00 AM-10:15 AM


CHRISTIAN
CHRISTIAN SCIENCE SOCIETY
239 SE Baya Ave.


Sunday Service
Wednesday Evening Service


11:
7:


LAKE CITY CHRISTIAN CHURCH
Hwy 247 S.* 755-9436
Sunday School 9:
Sun. Morn. Worship 10:
Wed. Prayer Meeting
II ,


:OOAM
:30 PM


:30 AM
:30 AM
7PM


CHURCH OF CHRIST
NEW HORIZON .
Church of Christ
Directions & Times 386-623-7438
Jack Exum,Jr., Minister

CHURCH OF GOD
LAKE CITY CHURCH OF GOD
167 Ermine St *752-5965
Sunday School 9:45 AM
Sun. Worship 10:30AM & 6:00PM
Wed. Family Night 7 PM
Wed. Youth Service 7 PM
Pastor: Carroll Lee

EVANGEL CHURCH OF GOD
370 SW Monitor Glen 755-1939
Sunday School 9:45 AM
Sunday Worship 10:50 & 6:30
Wed. Spiritual Enrichment 7PM
"Shock Youth Church"
Boys and Girls Clubs
Bible Study
Pastor: John R, Hathaway

EPISCOPAL
ST. JAMES EPISCOPAL CHURCH
2423 SW Bascom Norris Dr,,
Lake City, Fl 32025- 386-752-2218
Website: www.stameslakecity.org
HOLY EUCHARIST
Sun. 8 & 10 AM
Wed. 6:00 PM
Priest: The Rev. Michael Armstrong

LUTHERAN
OUR REDEEMER LUTHERAN CHURCH
LCMS
1 1/2 miles S. of 1-75 on SR 47
755-4299


Sunday Services
(Nursery Provided)
Christian Education Hour
For all ages at 10:45AM
Pastor: Rev. Bruce Alkire


9:30AM


SPIRIT OF CHRIST LUTHERAN
Hwy 90,1.5 miles West of 1-75 752-3807
Sunday Worship 10:OOAM
Nursery Avail.
Wed. Pot Luck 6PM Worship 7PM
Vicar John David Bryant





Morrell's
Your Complete decorating and
home furnishings store
SW lD pipl Jellt tlis Iinc (tomnerl Pinemountl Rd.
7 t2-9t 1 or I 8(tl)-5)7 3526
Mo, l 'SI a (S -5'.ll 'Closcd Sttullni


METHODIST
First United Methodist Church
973 S. Marion Ave.
386-752-4488
Sunday School 9:45AM
Sunday Morning Worship
Casual Worship Service 8:50AM
Traditional Service 11:OOAM
Program opportunities available in all areas
for a ages.
For a complete schedule
contact church office at
752-4488

WESLEY MEMORIAL UNITED
1272 SW McFarlane 752-3513
(Adjacent to Summers School)
Sunday School 9:00AM
Worship 10:OOAM
Nursery provided
Vacation Bible School
9am-noon July 11-15
Pastor: The Rev. J. Louie Mabrey
Mw .wesleymem.com

WATERTOWN CONGREGATIONAL
METHODIST CHURCH
U.S. 90 E. turn on Cortez (next to Quality
Ind.) right on Okinawa.
Sunday School 9:45 AM
Sun. Worship 11AM & 6 PM
Wed. Night Service 7 PM
Pastor, Randy Ogbum

NAZARENE
LAKE CITY CHURCH OF THE NAZARENE
Services:
Sunday School 9:45AM
Sunday Worship 10:45AM
Wednesday 6:30PM
Adult, Youth Ministry, Children's Ministry
Pastor: Craig Henderson
Nursery Provided
SW SR 47 and Azalea Park Place

PRESBYTERIAN
FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
697 SW Baya Drive 752-0670
Sunday School 9:00AM
Sunday Worship Service 10:00 AM
NURSERY PROVIDED
Pastor: Dr. Roy A. Martin
Director of Music: Bill Poplin


The possibility of


a worldwide flood


How much rain did
Hurricane Irene drop?
During its slow trek
across the US, how
much rain did Tropical
Storm Lee dispense?
Forecasts of nearly
a foot of rain were


given for certain areas
for a 24-hour period.
Is it possible that a Carlton I
worldwide flood at cor/ton_mc@msn
some point in history
occurred?
In the book of Genesis, Moses tells
of a worldwide flood. He tells how God


TATION gave Noah instructions to
build an ark because a great
fl6od was coming. Noah
warned the people for 120
years, but they did not heed
his sermons, instead they
went on with their lives as
they had always done. Then
the rain began to fall from
the sky.
Peak Where did all this water
come from? Moses says
from "all the fountains of the
great deep" and "the floodgates of the

MCPEAK continued on 5A


Id
Mcr
.comr


A Wake Up Call For God's People with

Anne Graham Lotz and Joel Rosenberg

Sunday, September 11, 2011 at 7:oopm.

Hosted by First United Methodist Church

973 South Marion Avenue
Lake City, Florida

We invite you to watch as a church fellowship
on Sunday evening the teaching messages by
Ann Graham Lotz and Joet Rosenberg. This
simulcast, knit together with authentic
worship music led by Selah, we pray, will be
used by God to wake up His people. Join us
as we consider the times in which we live, *
refocus on Jesus as our Hope for the future, r j
and ask God to re-ignite such an intense V 4 iW
longing for His return that we live the rest of .
our lives with no regrets.
L\-


Located at 25A (Old a'"
Valdosta Hwy)
386-752-5696 or
386-867-2035
after hours .


PENTECOSTAL
RRST FULL GOSPEL CHURCH
NE Jones Way & NE Washington St
Sunday School 10:00 AM
Morning Worship 11:00 AM
Evangelistic Service 6:00 PM
Youth Services -Wednesday 7:00PM
Mid-week Service Wednesday 7:00 PM
For info call 755-3408* EveryonWelconme
Pastor Rev. Stan Ellis

NON-DENOMINATIONAL
CHRIST CENTRAL MINISTRIES
Leadership Services 9:00AM
Sunday Morning ( 11:00AM
Wednesday Service 7:00PM
217 Dyal Ave., from Hwy 90 take
Sisters Welcome Rd., go 5 miles, South,
church on left 755-2525
Lead Pastor Lonnie Johns
"A Church on the Move"

CHRISTIAN HERITAGE CHURCH
Comer SR. 47 & Hudson Circle '
Sunday Celebration 10:30 AM
Pastor Chris Jones 752-9119

FALLING CREEK CHAPEL
Falling Creek Road 755-0580
First and Third Sundays 9:30 A.M.
Second and Fourth Sundays 3:00 P.M.
Pastor: Rev. Cheryl R. Pingel

NEW BEGINNING CHURCH
Highway 242 E. of Branford Highway
Sunday School 10:00AM
Morning Worship 11:00AM
Sunday Evening 6:OOPM
Wednesday 7:00PM
A Full Gospel Church Everyone Welcomed
(386) 755-5197


1HA RRY'


IRUM Y HARRY'S
. n... .H & Ai Conditioning Inc
n Y 752-23Aos P08stnt

PUTOn 752-2308 ifma


Central States
Enterprises
Columbia County's Feed Headquarters
FEED PET SUPPLIES LAWN & GARDEN
ANIMAL HEALTH
668 NW Waldo St. 386-755-7445

MIKELL'S POWER EQUIPMENT, INC.
Your Lawn & Garden Headquarters
MOWERS CHAIN SAWS TRIMMERS
1152 US 90 WEST LAKE CITY, FL.
386-752-8098



LAKE CITY
If7-: 755-7050


BAYWAYjantorial Services
FIRE & Water Restoration
Floor & Carpet Care
Residenual & Commercial
755-6142

DNorth Florida
AK Pharmacy
7 Locations to Serve You
Lake City, Ft. White, Branford,
Chiefland, Mayo & Keystone Heights




W m.<* e2y m.d s.i.tfy |



Supercenter
"LOWPRICES EVERYDAY"
US 90 WEST a55-2427

GW Hunter, Inc.
Chea Chevron Oil
SJobber




Inc.
Holly eatnc, Inc.
"Quality /work at a reasonable price"
We also do solar hook-ups
(386) 755-5944


FOOD STORES
OpnI' 7 )I% a \\'eA
Il6 I D ial St, I laket' it I I .
(386) 752-0107
I leil Mea.l l iv-h 1 odliice


OBSTETRICS & GYNECOLOGY
W i'l|l los',ti o" l & I li nollovl '(0
S n Atoptnllj uii lllsil, 1 No Insvisll 't
(386) 466-1106
\'-\ i ,,rl Irkrs~ 0 trilv I l,


3A


BIBLICAL MEDIA'


rr-


Sunday School:
Sunday Service:
Wednesday Service:


CISlay Electric Cooperative, Inc.
Competitive rates, non-profit,
right here in your community.
Lake City District 386-752-7447
clayelectric.com


ANtK)ANI)Ii (:ON COLUMBIA CO., INC:.
B ffV] ASPHATl PAVING
COMMEIRCIAI, *INDIIISi'RIAL,
Silt' Prepantilioni Ruatl itnldingi ;irldng nLots
(7 tdugiitn g ilki t.l ty
752-7585
871 NW Guerdon St., Lake City


cbu 111".,













OPINION


Saturday, September 10, 2011


ONE


ONE
OPINION


100%


chance


of heavy


metal

r.' ASA says that in
*^ | ~the more than 50
years of the space
-,| U age, with more
.. than 17,000 man-
made pieces of debris reenter-
ing the Earth's atmosphere,
-no one has ever been hurt by
falling space junk.- that we
know of.
"; Maybe a solitary African
hunter deep in the bush got
flattened by an errant booster
fragment and we just never
heard about it. A 563-pound fuel
tank did hit within 50 yards of
d Texas farmhouse in 1997, but
close doesn't count
*- The Earth is a big place and
'175 percent of it is covered by
water, NASA likes to say in
explainingg why we don't have
to worry about a defunct 7-ton
U.S. research satellite hovering
155 to 174 miles up just waiting
for the moment to take its final
plunge.
The Upper Atmosphere'
Research Satellite was
deployed from the shuttle
*Discovery in 1991 and decom-
missioned in 2005. Now,
an 2011, one of the planet's
'unluckier years, it has chosen
,to return home.
.. NASA says it could fall
Jater this month. Or maybe
sometime in October. It could
land somewhere between
Juneau, Alaska, and just.norith.
of Sboth America. A fuksian"`
publication says Moscow is
in the "zone of risk." So you
might want to factor those
into your travel plans.
And the whole 7 tons of it
isn't going to hit Most of that
will burn up in the atmosphere,
but 1,200 pounds of metal will
probably survive long enough
to crash.
NASA says, with a verisi-
militude of accuracy that only
arouses suspicion, that the
chances of anyone being hit by
a piece of the satellite are only
one in 3,200.
Nonetheless, for the next
seven weeks or so, you might
want to look up in the air before
you step outside.

* Scripps Howard News Service

Lake City Reporter
Serving Columbia County
Since 1874
The Lake City Reporter is pub-
fished with pride for residents of
SColumbia and surrounding counties by
Community Newspapers Inc.
We believe strong newspapers build
strong communities -"Newspapers
get things done!"
Our primary goal is to
publish distinguished and profitable
community-oriented newspapers.
This mission will be accomplished
through the teamwork of professionals
dedicated to truth, integrity and hard
work.
Todd Wilson, publisher
Robert Bridges, editor
Sue B.rannon, controller
Dink NeSmith, president
Tom Wood, chairman

LETTERS
POLICY
Letters to the Editor should be
typed or neatly written and double
spaced. Letters should not exceed
400 words and will be edited for
length and libel. Letters must be
signed and include the-writer's name,
address and telephone number for
verification. Writers can have two
letters per month published. Letters
and guest columns are the opinion of
the writers and not necessarily that of


the Lake City Reporter.
BY MAIL: Letters, P.O. Box 1709,
Lake City, FL 32056; or drop off at
180 E. Duval St. downtown.
BY FAX: (386) 752-9400.
BY E-MAIL:
news@lakecityreporter.com


ames Hansen, global
alarming scientist with
NASA, was arrested
recently, and my first
reaction was that it's
about time, although, on sec-
ond thought, let him yap. He
himself has suggested warm-
ing-skeptical CEOs be tried for
crimes against humanity, but I
am in favor of free speech. May
the best arguments win.
When he and other civilly
disobedient, drama-seeking pro-
testers were carrying on outside
the White House, the Hansen
argument was that global warm-
ing will spell our end if we let a
Canadian company build an oil
pipeline to Texas refineries.
Nope. Not really. The other
day, I happened on a rebuttal
that was more than a rebuttal.
Robert Bryce of the Manhattan
Institute grabbed hold of the case
against the Keystone XL project
and stripped it naked to reveal the
bare truth.


www.lakecityreporter.com


Perry makes bold gamble


Rick Perry is mak-
ing a Texas-sized
gamble that a major-
ity of American
voters agree Social
Security is a failure, saying he
should be president because
he's bold enough to call it a
Ponzi scheme.
Wow! Unless the Texas gov-
ernor is all hat and no cattle,
this is an amazing development
in politics.
Ponzi schemes, as the evil
Bernie Madoff showed us, are
swindles where the perpetrator
defrauds by taking investors'
money, paying dividends from
.subsequent investors to a few
early investors to show "good
faith," and eventually absconds
with a lot of ill-gotten gains. It
is reprehensible. It is illegal.
Social Security requires
workers and employers to pay a
portion of earnings to a pot out
of which retirees who have paid
into the fund get a monthly
stipend. The idea is that cur-
rent workers help take care of
current retirees in perpetuity.
It most definitely is not a Ponzi
scheme.
It is also 1) not broken; 2)
not a cause of the nation's fiscal
indebtedness; 3) sustainable
indefinitely'with charges.
Perry, who wants to make
government "inconsequen-
tial" in our lives although he's
held taxpayer-funded jobs for
decades, says it is a "monstrous
lie" to tell young workers that
Social Security will be there for
them.
He's right that his target
audience is skeptical of Social
Security's viability. Many are
certain they'll never see a
Social Security check. Perry is
counting on their support, hop-
ing they'll outnumber voters
who get benefits or will soon
collect.


Ann McFeatters
qmcfeatters@notionalpress.com
Perry is betting Americans
will give up Social Security
even when jobs are scarce,
saving for retirement is incred-
ibly difficult and the states are
broke.
In the beautifully staged
GOP debate at the Ronald
Reagan Presidential Foundation
and Library in California,
Republican presidential can-
didates were in basic agree-
ment on how the economy can
recover. Basically, they argue
it would improve if President
Obama is ousted; the govern-
ment stops regulating business,
the environment and con-
sumer goods; labor unions are
crushed; business pays even
less tax than it does now (the
lowest iates in recent history
while many corporations pay
no federal tax). Perry is alone
in insisting Social Security is
unconstitutional.
President George W. Bush
tried and failed to privatize
Social Security. His plan was so
obviously designed to profit the
financial sector at the expense
of the elderly that it was a
national embarrassment After
the economy crashed in 2008
and the stock market plum-
meted, there was a collective
sigh of relief that he had not
succeeded.
But here we are again. The
current leader among GOP
hopefuls wants to ditch the only
program that prevents millions


from dying in abject poverty, a
program that gives them inde-
pendence dnd dignity, food and
shelter.
Perry spells it out in "Fed
Up!" his stunningly anti- '
government book full of brag-
gadocio and bombast published
just 10 months ago. "This was
no youthful sin of inexperience
or lack of knowledge," Perry
writes: "What kind of nation
are we becoming? I fear it's the
very kind the Colonists fought
against."
What'? The repressive Great
Britain of George III!?
Rick Perry's America would
have religion taught in public
schools (creationism preferred
over evolution), would prevent
the government from regulat-
ing oil companies' spills or air
pollution, would abolish food
safety mandates, wipe out fuel
efficiency standards, eradicate
gun control, end fairness rules
for political elections, restrict
medical malpractice suits and
return us to an era when might
made right
And when, lacking Social
Security, the elderly were
dependent on relatives for sur-
vival.
It is true that Medicare,
unless reformed, will run out of
funds because of soaring costs
and more beneficiaries. But
pay-as-you-go Social Security is
certainly salvageable. Everyone
who's studied Social Security
says tweaking it such as raising
the age of retirement or some
form of means testing will save it
We'll see if Perry's huge
gamble was brilliant or fool-
hardy.

U.Scripps Howard columnist
Ann McFeatters has covered
the White House and national
politics since 1986.


'Tm for cheap, abundant, reli-
able energy, particularly now
in the U.S., when we have over
45 million Americans on food
stamps... more than nine million
unemployed," he said on the PBS
NewsHour.
The tar sands source in '
Alberta, he said, holds 100 billion
barrels of oil that's second only
to Saudi Arabia. It's especially a
boon to start getting more from
a nearby ally at a time when
Mexico is producing less than
before, he pointed out
Bill McKibben, outspoken
environmentalist, was also on the
show, arguing that the carbon
emissions would be horrendous,
though, as Bryce pointed out, if we
don't buy the oil, somebody else
will. That means you will still have
the same carbon emissions while
the United States suffers from the
infliction of radical vacLuities.
Bryce gave some interesting
figures, noting that our carbon
dioxide emissions have fallen by


1.7 percent over the past decade
while global emissions have gone
up 28.5 percent. We could shut
the country down tomorrow, and
guess what? Emissions would
keep increasing worldwide.
The toughest conceivable
carbon dioxide measures in the
United States alone would do
nothing to allay the alarmists'
most gaseous scenarios, which,
by the way, are disputed in one
respect or another by a host of
exceptional scientists in relevant
fields, no matter what you may
have read to the contrary.
If this prime time player doesn't
get his way, he wants to do unto
them what was done unto him,
not just recently, but before. He
supposes importing this espe-
cially high-carbon oil could break
federal laws and would therefore
like to see the two arrested.
It doesn't seem to have helped
him.
M Scripps Howard News Service


4A


Sharon Randall
www.sharonrandall.com


Waiting

often

comes

with gifts


a, game of hurry up
and wait.
Hurry to the mar-
ket to get ice for a
party, then wait in line to check
out and watch it melt
Hurry to call your husband
to see if he wants to spend
$400 to fix his car, then sit in
a customer lounge listening to
people talk on their cell phones
while you wait for him to call
you back.
Hurry to have a test that
could change your life for-
ever, then wait an eternity for
results.
Hurry not to miss the birth
of your grandchild, then hang
out for two weeks waiting for
that grandchild to be born.
I knew it was a gamble when
I left Las Vegas, but it seemed
like a fairly safe bet My hus-
band and I were awaiting the
births of not one, but two
grandbabies one in Monterey,
the other in Santa Rosa 500
miles away.
His son's girlfriend was due
around the first of September.
My daughter's due date was.
two'weeks later, mid-nMonth. '
I figured, if evert'ig weat-.
as planned (yes, at times, I am
a bit naive), I could fly back
east to speak at a book club,
spend a week with my family
in the Carolinas and get back
,before any babies showed up.
But the day after I arrived at
my sister's house and settled in
to watch reruns of "Everybody
Loves Raymond," my daughter
called to say not to worry, but ...
She'd had complications.
They might induce labor early.
How early?
She'd know more the next
day after getting test results.
What I heard, more than
her words, was the tone of her
voice one she'd used as a
little girl to wake me the night
a stray cat climbed in her win-
dow.
"Mommy," she'd said, with
absolute calm, "something with
big eyes is sitting on my bed."
Not to worry, but...
Meanwhile, Hurricane Irene
was moving up the coast,
canceling flights. If I waited, I
might not get out
So the next morning, I flew
from Charlotte to Phoenix
to San Jose, rented a car and
arrived in Monterey around
2 a.m. Wagon trains made
that trip in less time. But I got
there. Sometimes getting there
is about the best we can do.
The following day, to my
great relief, my daughter's
condition improved and we
went right back to waiting. And
waiting.
I've decided instead to sit
back and enjoy the ride.
That's what I did some 30
years ago, in the two weeks
between the date I was due to
give birth to my daughter and
the day she finally arrived.
And she was worth the wait
There is nothing wrong
with waiting. It's what we do
with it that counts. We can
wish life away, try to hurry it
up. Or we can slow down, take
a breath and try to make the
best of the moments we are
given.
Waiting often comes with
gifts.
But the best part of waiting
is when it's finally over.

* Sharon Randall can be con-
tacted at P.O. Box 777394,
Henderson, NV 89077.


I 9AWER.
1'K3M B)US DI$(3AR:-201(f


A pipeline to better times









LAKE CITY REPORTER NEWS SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 10, 2011


N.Y., Washington,


aware of terror


threat, not afraid


WASHINGTON (AP) Undaunted by
talk of a new terror threat, New Yorkers
and Washingtonians wove among police
armed with assault rifles and waited with
varying degrees of patience at security
checkpoints Friday while intelligence
officials scrambled to nail down informa-
tion on a possible al-Qaida strike timed
to coincide with the 10th anniversary of
9/11.
Counterterrorism officials have been
working around the clock to determine
whether the threat is accurate, and extra
* security was put in place to protect the
people in the two cities that took the
brunt of the jetliner attacks that killed
nearly 3,000 people at the' World Trade
Center and the Pentagon a decade ago.
It was the worst terror assault in the
nation's history, and al-Qaida has long
dreamed of striking again to mark the
anniversary. But it could be weeks before
the intelligence community can say
whether this particular threat is real.
Security worker Eric Martinez wore a
pin depicting the twin towers on his lapel
as he headed to work in lower Manhattan
on Friday where he also worked 10
years ago when the towers came down.
"If you're going to be afraid, you're just
going to stay home," he said.
Mayor Michael Bloomberg, too, made
a point of taking the subway to City Hall.
Briefed on the threat Friday morn-
ing, President Barack Obama instructed
his security team to take "all neces-
sary precautions," the White House said.
Obama still plans to travel to New York
on Sunday to mark the 10th anniversary
with stops that day at the Pentagon and
Shanksville, Pa.,
Washington commuters were well
aware of the terror talk.
Cheryl Francis, of Chantilly, Va., said
she travels over the Roosevelt bridge into
Washington every day and doesn't plan
to change her habits. Francis, who was


in Washington on Sept. 11, 2001, said a
decade later the country is more aware
and alert.
"It's almost like sleeping with one eye
open," she said, but she added that peo-
ple need to continue living their lives.
Late Wednesday, U.S. officials received
information about a threat that includ-
ed details they considered specific: It
involved up to three people, either in
the U.S. or who were traveling to the
country; a plan concocted with the help
of al-Qaida leader Ayman al-Zawahri; a
car bomb as a possible weapon and New
York or Washington as potential targets.
Officials described the information
to The Associated Press only on condi-
tion of anonymity because they were
not authorized to publicly discuss the
sensitive matters. Counterterrorism
officials were looking for certain names
associated with the threat, but it was
unclear whether the names were real
or fake.
The intelligence community regu-
larly receives tips and information of
this nature. But the timing of this par-
ticular threat had officials especially
concerned, because it was the first
"active plot" that came to light as the
country marked the significant anni-
versary, a moment that was also signifi-
cant to al-Qaida, according to informa-
tion gleaned in May from Osama bin
Laden's compound.
The U.S. government has long known
that terrorists see the 10th anniversary
of 9/11 and other uniquely American
dates as opportunities to strike. Officials
have also been concerned that some may
see this anniversary as an opportunity to
avenge bin Laden's death.
Britain, meanwhile, warned its citizens
who are traveling to the U.S. that there
was a potential for new terror attacks
that could include "places frequented by
expatriates and foreign travelers."


JOBS: Speedy review promised
Continued From Page 1A


The letter was far differ-
ent in tone from remarks
earlier in the day by Senate
Majority Leader Harry
Reid. Announcing plans to
begin work on the legisla-
tion as soon as possible, the
Nevada Democrat offered
no timetable, and urged
"reasonable Republicans to
resist the voices of those
who would oppose this leg-
islation and root for our
economy to fail."
They must not "con-
tinue to. bow to tea party
Republicans willing to do
anything to hurt the presi-
dent." That is hurting our
economy instead, he said.
Taken together, the day's
events underscored the pri-
macy of the issue of jobless-
ness in a country where
millions have been out
of work for months, true
unemployment exceeds
the government's measure-
ment of 9.1 percent and the
economy is barely grow-
ing.
"This has been a terrible
recession," Obama said in
Richmond, although by
traditional guidelines, the
economic downturn ended
more than two years ago.
Public opinion surveys
show Obama's approval
sinking, but Congress' own
marks are exceedingly
low, and one of the major
unknowns when lawmakers
returned from their August
vacation was whether politi-
cal leaders would reach for
compromise, or at least dis-
agree more politely than
they had this summer.
The president empha-
sized repeatedly in his
speech to a joint session
of Congress on Thursday
night that his recommenda-


SANDERS: Lake City native to open at concert
Continued From Page 1A


tions had been embraced
in the past and in some
cases authored by
Republicans.
The centerpiece of his
plan is lower Social Security
payroll taxes for individuals
and businesses, along with
new tax credits for compa-
nies that hire the long-term
unemployed or veterans.
Obama also wants to extend
the program that provides
unemployment benefits
through 2012, and renew
an existing tax break for
businesses that purchase
new equipment
The tax component totals
$253 billion, according to
the White House, and is
accompanied by $194 bil-
lion in spending increases.
Much of the spending
would go for school con-
struction, highways, bridg-
es and other projects, and
states would receive funds
to pay teachers and first
responders who might oth-
erwise be laid off.
Despite expressions of
urgency, it could be weeks
or months before debate
begins on the floor of the
House or Senate on the
president's recommenda-
tions.
The White. House is
not expected to present
Congress with formal leg-
islation until the week after
next, when the president
outlines additional propos-
als to offset the cost of his
tax cuts and new spending.


Additionally, Democratic
officials said the White
House wanted to allow time
for Obama to make the
case publicly for his pro-
gram before formal debate
begins in Congress. The
president is expected to fly
to Ohio and North Carolina
next week for appearances
along the same lines as the
. one he made in Richmond
- House Majority Leader
Eric Cantor's district on
Friday.
Nor is it clear what
role a newly appointed
debt reduction commit-
tee might play in consid-
ering Obama's proposals.
That panel began work on
Thursday and is charged
with producing legislation
by Nov. 23 that includes
a net reduction of at least
$1.2 trillion on deficits over
the next 10 years.
Unlike routine legisla-
tion, any measure pro-
duced by the committee is
guaranteed a yes-or-no vote
in both houses of Congress
and cannot be amended. .,
In their letter to the pres-
ident, Boehner, Cantor,
Reps. Kevin McCarthy
of California and Jeb
Hensarling of Texas said
the House would "immedi-
ately begin the process of
reviewing and considering
your proposals" and would
identify "modifications
and additional ideas that
could achieve economic
growth."


EP worth the wait
And while that EP isn't set to be released
for another few weeks, Sanders said he
knows the perfect place to pre-release it.
'The album will be finished this week,
and we're planning on coming back for this
show and making it the official CD release
concert, and showcase all of the new songs
off the album," he said. "Since Lake City is
my hometown, I want to give people there
the first chance to buy the album."


Tickets for the September 24th Diamohd
Rio concert are still available $15 for FGC
students, faculty and staff and $25 for general
admission. Tickets can be purchased by call-
ing (386) 754-4340 or by visiting www.fgcen-
tertainmentcom. The show is sponsored by
Shands Lake Shore Regional Medical Center
and CMS Professional Staffing, Inc.
For more information, contact Troy
Roberts at Troy.Roberts@fgc.edu or by
calling (386) 754-4247.


MCPEAK: A worldwide flood
Continued From Page 3A


sky" (Genesis 7:11). Is it
possible for there to be so
much water from this flood
that it could lift up the ark?
Is it possible for there to
be so much water that "all
the high mountains every-
where under the heavens
were covered" (Genesis
7:20) and "water pre-
vailed upon the earth one
hundred and fifty days"
(Genesis 7:24)? Numerous
civilizations record this
worldwide flood.
Based upon the vivid
images that we have seen
from different parts of our
country, I believe it was
possible. Consider that if
it rained EVERYWHERE
for 24 hours, for forty con-
secutive days, how much
water would be on the
earth? Would it be possible
for it to rain, on average,
725 feet per day?
Just think, if it were
raining in New Orleans
at the same time it was
raining in Boston, while at
the same time raining in
Seattle, as well as all points
in between, how much
water would there be?
Continuing the thought,
what if while it was rain-
ing in North America,
it was also raining in
Europe, Asia, Africa, South
America, Australia, and
over every ocean on the
planet?
The recent flooding
might lead one to think
there could be another
"world-wide flood."
However, the rainbow in
the sky tells us different!
The apostle Peter uses
the flood as proof that


one day the world will
be destroyed by fire. Is it
possible? Will we take the
"warnings" to heart? Will
we make preparations for
this destruction? Or, will
we be like the people in
the days of Noah?
Just some thoughts to
mediate upon while we
view the sadness others


are experiencing because
of all the rain.
Carlton G. McPeak is an
evangelist working in the
Lake City area.
All Scriptural quotations
are from the New American
Standard Bible, Holman
Bible Publishers, unless oth-
erwise stated.


FREE


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treat, or improve symptoms of high blood
pressure, certain heart conditions, diabetes,
and some'chronic kidney conditions, We
now offer this vital prescription at no charge
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on to publix.com/pharmacy for details.


P U B L I X



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*All strengths included. Maximum of 30 days supply (30 tablets).
Lisinopril-HCTZ combination products are excluded.


Page Editor: Robert Bridges, 754-0428









LAKE CITY REPORTER ADVICE & COMICS SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 10, 2011


DILBERT


BABY BLUES


BLONDIE


BEETLE BAILEY


HAGARTHE HORRIBLE
yo u 0 ,.,WA IgA 7 ew
.-1XPOA'Y AL-L. ";TkiRP
A WEEK... WoR GET Us ?
\ /


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ZITS


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FRANK & ERNEST


YOU L1"G1 6218
POUNDS. fUT,
ODDLY oNOUG6H
S You AVW NO
.. O YOUR MOMNTUMR.



FOR BETTER OR WORSE


DEAR ABBY


Dad, daughter disagree

about her love for soccer


DEAR ABBY: My dad
and I have been arguing
over whether I should
play soccer. I don't want
to because I don't like the
coach, the sport or having
Dad yell at me for every
little mistake I make. He
says I'm good at the game
and that I love it but I
DONT. How do I explain
it's just not for me without
disappointing him? I feel
terrible because I have let
him down. RATHER BE
A CHEERLEADER
DEAR RATHER: Please
don't feel that by not
participating in soccer
you're letting your father
down. Frankly, he has
let YOU down. When a
parent becomes so emo-
tionally involved with a
child's sport activity that
he yells, confuses his role
as an enthusiastic and sup-
portive parent with that of
the coach, and takes the
joy out of the sport for the
kid, this is more often than
not the result. If you enjoy
cheerleading, go for it and
don't feel guilty. If you
have the vitality and ath-
letic ability, you'll be a star.
** ** **

DEAR ABBY: I dated
"Albert" a wonderful, car-
ing man for nine months
until last week when I
ended it because of a false
promise. When we first
started dating, he offered
to fly me wherever he was
due to be working. His job


Abigail Van Buren
www.dearobby.com
requires a lot of travel. It
never happened.
Every year around this
time he's back home in
California to work the har-
vest at his ranch. We made
plans for me to fly there to
see him and meet the rest
of his family.
A month ago I asked
what was going on with
the purchase of my plane
ticket. I never got an
answer, so I asked again
two weeks later. Albert
made some excuses and
said it wasn't a good idea
for him to pay for my
flight there. After our
break-up, he admitted his
brother had convinced
him it wasn't right for me
to fly there at Albert's
expense and, if I loved
him I'd find a way to pay
for it myself.
I'm a single mom.
Albert knows my finan-
cial status. By no means
could I afford a trip at my
expense. I feel Albert's
family will always influ-
ence his decisions and
this would affect our rela-
tionship. Was this a good
reason to break up? -
STAYING PUT IN TEXAS
DEAR STAYING


PUT: Please don't be so
quick to blame Albert's
family. He may have been
"wonderful and caring,"
but he wasn't much of a
man for not telling you
that he had had a change
of heart about introduc-
ing you to his family,
because that's what really
happened. As you said,
he knows your financial
status. And yes, this was
a good reason to break it
.off because, from my point
of view, you had no other
choice.



DEAR ABBY: Just a
quick question regard-
ing airline flying eti-
quette. What would be
the proper way to handle
a situation where the
flight attendant comes
around to serve refresh-
ments and the person
next to you is napping?
Would it be appropriate
to give him a little nudge
when the attendant
gets to your row, or just
order your own and let
the person be skipped
over? UP IN THE AIR
IN MASSACHUSETTS
DEAR UP IN THE
AIR- Sometimes its better
to let sleeping dogs lie,
and this is one of them.


* Write Dear Abby at
www.DearAbby.com or
P.O. Box 69440, Los
Angeles, CA 90069.


HOROSCOPES


ARIES (March 21-April
19): Stick to what you know.
Discussing matters that are
based on assumptions will
lead to mistakes that will be
- difficult to fix. Don't be too
quick to jump into some-
thing that may be filled with
empty promises. ***
TAURUS (April 20-May
20): Pull together all your
ideas, past and present,
and you will come up with
something that will work
wonders. A new angle
or a little tweaking is all
that's needed to drum up
interest in what you want
to pursue. Love is high-
lighted. ****
GEMINI (May 21-June
20): Not everyone you deal
with is looking out for your
best interests. You have to
put your emotions aside
and choose based on facts,
not hearsay and what you
want to believe. Greater
effort should be put into
your home, family and sur-
roundings. **
CANCER (June 21-July
22): You can make per-
sonal changes that will
improve your living situa-
tion and ease your stress.
Get rid of responsibilities
that aren't necessary. An
impulsive move will not
turn out in your favor. Love
is on the rise. *****
LEO (July 23-Aug. 22):
You'll be tempted to make
poor financial choices. Do
your homework. A false


THE LAST WORD
Eugenia Last

impression regarding an
investment is apparent A
residential move may be
in your best interest, but it
has to be for the right rea-
son. ***
VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept
22): You have plenty to
look forward to if you
take advantage of exist-
ing opportunities. Travel,
socializing and exploring
new interests, places and
people will lead to an offer
you cannot refuse. Love
will be enhanced if you
include someone special in
your plans. ***
LIBRA (Sept 23-Oct
22): A social event will
help you realize what you
have to offer. Don't let
someone from your past
hold something over you.
It's time to free yourself of
any debts. Your originality,
coupled with your experi-
ence, will help you get rid
of whatever is holding you
back. *****
SCORPIO (Oct 23-Nov.
21): Don't be fooled by an
emotional plea to keep you
from experiencing some-
thing new. You need to get
out and participate. Follow
through with whatever you
feel passionate about, and
you will make progress.
It's time to make a clean
break.**


SAGITTARIUS (Nov.
22-Dec. 21): Rethink your
strategy, and you will real-
ize you may have had ulte-
rior motives. Before you
make a huge mistake that
will affect your personal
relationships, it is best to
take a moment to hash
over the good and the bad
that you've experienced.

CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-
Jan. 19): You have plenty
of options and must look
at every possibility before
making a move. Changing
your home or lifestyle
may appear to be difficult,
but once you get started,
everything will fall into
place. Before you start,
have your finances in
place. ****
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-
Feb. 18): Take care of
your personal financial
business. A partnership
with someone you've
known a long time can
be beneficial as long as
you keep things equal.
Helping someone will
lead to knowledge that
will help you make a per-
sonal decision. ***
PISCES (Feb. 19-March
20): You have to face emo-
tional issues head on. If
you don't take care of mat-
ters yourself, you will not
be dealt with properly. You
must raise any issues that
you feel are holding you
back. ***


CELEBRITY CIPHER


by Luis Campos
Celebrity Cipher cryptograms are created from quotations by famous people, past and present.
Each letter in the cipher stands for another.
TODAY'S CLUE: V equals P
"BABDIFMB M B B S L R F CKAB KN N B LL
W F R C R F OD KMSVKDBMRL KMS
ODKMSNCZJSDBM ZM FDSBD R F W B K


TPJJ CPHKM WBZMO."


-HKDOKDBR HBKS


PREVIOUS SOLUTION: "All men are frauds. The only difference between
them is that some admit it. I myself deny It." H.L. Mencken
(c) 2011 by NEA, Inc. 9-10


CLASSIC PEANUTS


WHAT?! YOU AIN'T GONNA C(
SSUPERSIZE?! YOU ORNERY
VARMINT! LET'S SETTLE THIS
AT THE FRENCH FRY CORRAL!!
7( THE PROBLEM IS, YOU GOTTA
lo -0, ,0u WAN'
-iKODUG Li


'TIL I FOUND OUT HOW MUCH r/
I CAN GIT FER 'EM HERE AT
*TH" ATIDA'. e.
FLEA
..MARKET"fft <

Page Editor: Emogene Graham, 754-0415










Classified Department: 755-5440


BYI-
l~h'ilT,

FkIND I


LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 10, 2011

Lake City Reporter




CLASSIFIED


ADvantage


Take ADvantage of the
Reporter Classifieds!

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You can call us at 755-5440,
Monday through Friday from 8:00
a.m. to 5:00 p.m.
Some people prefer to place their
classified ads in person, and some
ad categories will require prepay-
ment. Our office is located at 180
East Duval Street.
You can also fax or email your ad
copy to the Reporter.
FAX: 386-752-9400 Please
direct your copy to the Classified
Department.
EMAIL: classifieds@lakecityre-
porter.com





Ad is to Appear Call by: Fax/Emar l by:
Tuesday Mon.,10:00a.m. Mon.,9:00 a.m.
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Friday Thurs, 10:0 am. Thurs., 9:00 a.m.
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These deadlines are subject to change without notice




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on the first day of publication.
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the first incorrect insertion, and
only the charge for the ad space
In error. Please call 755-5440
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tion and billing adjustments.
Cancellations- Normal advertising
deadlines apply for cancellation.
Billing Inquiries- Call 755-5440.
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required regarding payments or
credit limits, your call will be trans-
ferred to the accounting depart-
ment.


Advertising copy is subject to
approval by the Publisher who
reserves the right to edit, reject,
or classify all advertisements under
appropriate headings. Copy should
be checked for errors by the
advertiser on the first day of pub-
lication. Credit for published errors
will be allowed for the first insertion
for that portion of the advertisement
which was incorrect. Further, the
Publisher shall not be liable for any
omission of advertisements ordered
to be published, nor for any general,
special or consequential damages.
Advertising language must comply
with Federal, State or local laws
regarding the prohibition of discrimi-
nation in employment, housing and
,public accommodations. Standard
abbreviations are acceptable; how-
ever, the first word of each ad may
not be abbreviated.

In Print and Online
www.laliecilyreporler.comn


Legal

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT IN AND
FOR COLUMBIA COUNTY,
FLORIDA
CASE NO. 11-751-SC
Robert A. Jones
243 SE Eloise St.
Lake City, FL 32025
Plaintiff
VS.
Denise Jones
171 SW Lasso
Lake City, FL. 32024
Defendant
A law suit has been filed to deter-
mine ownership and title of a certain
vehicle described as a 2001 Oldsmo-
bile with serial #
IG3WH52H91F198112 located in
Lake City, Columbia County. Flori-
da.
The following persons) may claim
some right title or interest therein:
Robert A. Jones
If you have a claim, interest, or de-
fense in this clause, you must file
your written answer or objection
with the Clerk of Court of Columbia
County within 10 days
(seal)
CLERK OF COURTS
BY: B. Scippio
Deputy Clerk
05527327
August 20, 27, 2011
September 3, 10, 2011

Public Notice Notice is hereby
made to all those concerned and af-
fected that Boran Craig Barber Engel
Construction Co., Inc. is performing
state project # GL-35 (WRC) Lake
City Work Release Center at 1099
NW Dot Glen, Lake City, FL 32055
05527727
September 8, 9, 10, 11, 13, 14, 15,
2011


100 Job
Opportunities


05527699
PRODUCT ADVISOR
Travel Country RV is accepting
applications for product advisors
in our Lake City, FL location.
No experience necessary. We're
looking for personality, charac-
ter, and energy. Applicants must
be outgoing and have the ability
to interact and communicate
with our loyal customers.
This is an excellent opportunity
to learn a new career in a
thriving industry. Salary plus
bonuses with an excellent
employee benefit plan. Call Jeff
at 888-6644268 or emad to
jeff@travelcountryrv.com
for further information

05527728
Automotive Equipment
Mechanic II 42002554.
Applicants must apply at
peoplefirst.myflorida.com by
9/15/11. For more info contact
Florida Forest Service at 386-
758-5716. AA/EEO employer


EOPLES

STATE BANK
Fulltime Teller/Customer
Service Representative
Position available.
Experience preferred,
but will train the right
person. Apply at the
Peoples State Bank West
office located at:
3882 W US Hwy 90
Lake City, FL 32034
EEO Employer

Mederi(, i

( RE/l Ci / S

PHYSICAL


THERAPIST:
Home Health Care Agency
servicing Columbia and
surrounding counties
seeking Full-Time
experienced Physical
Therapist
Competitive Salary &
Benefits Available.
Please call contact
Lynn or Cindy at
386-758-3312
or apply online at
www.almostfamily.com







Lawn & Landscape Service

J&M LAWN Service & more for
all your outdoor needs. Don't
waste your time or weekend,
Free Estimate. 386-984-2187


too Job
100 OOpportunities

05527747




SERVERS
Now accepting applications
for Servers!!!
Please apply in person
at the Alachua location ~ 1-75 &
US Hwy 441.

(15527776
FLORIDA SHERIFFS
YOUTH RANCHES, INC.
DATA ENTRY
SPECIALIST IF
High school diploma or GED
with two years office
experience. Proficiency with
Windows based software,
including Microsoft Office
products is required.
$9.45 PER HOUR
EXCELLENT BENEFITS
SEND/FAX APPLICATION
Karen McGalliard
Florida Sheriffs
Youth Ranch
PO Box 2000
Boys Ranch, FL 32064
Fax: (386) 842-1055
EOE/DFWP

05527825




FLORIDA SHERIFFS
YOUTH RANCHES, INC.
DIRECTOR OF HUMAN
RESOURCES
Bachelor's degree in personnel
management, business
administration, or related field
w/ 3 years experience in a
human resources position.
5 years supervisory experience
and PHR/SPHR preferred.
Competitive Salary
With Benefits
SEND/FAX APPLICATION
hrjobs@youthranches.org
Fax: (386) 842-1055
Florida Sheriffs
Youth Ranches
PO Box 2000
Boys Ranch, FL 32064
EOE/DFWP

AVON!! Only $10 to start!
Earn bonus $ uup to $150+
1-800-275-9945 pin #4206
www.youravon.com/tdavies
BUSY OFFICE looking for full-
time receptionist. Experience in
multi-line phone system, updating
records, accounting and working
with the public. Computer skills
necessary. Fax resume at:
386-961-8802
F/T Exp Line cook needed. Kitch-
en is open site to public. Job in-
cludes taking orders, cooking,
cleaning, washing dishes. Pick up
Application at Milton's located 8
mi N of 1-10 on Hwy 441. $9.00
per hour. 386-365-7262
FUNDRAISING MAJOR Gifts
Officer (Part Time). Exciting part-
time opportunity for a qualified
candidate with a proven track
record for success in major gift
fundraising, prospect research and
database management. The
responsibilities include designing
and implementing a strategy for
cultivating and stewarding major
donors, developing and imple-
menting major gift giving strat-
egies and programs, and creating a
sustained effort to identify, solicit,
involve, and retain major donors.
The candidate will also develop,
coordinate and execute cultivation
strategies for major gift prospects
and donors. Qualifications: BA/BS
in marketing (or related field),
minimum of 7 yrs. experience gen-
erating and expanding major gift
base, major gift cultivation, and
soliciting strategies. Excellent
computer, interpersonal and com-
munication skills also required:
Please send
resumes along with cover letter to:
ARC Foundation of North
Florida, Inc. PO Drawer L
Live Oak, FL. 32064
No Phone Calls please.
IMMEDIATE OPENING for
Exp. Structural Steel Painter
Apply at QIA -3631 E US 90
In Lake City


100 Job
100 'Opportunities
Immediate position available for
F/T Bookkeeper/Receptionist at
busy retail office. Computer skills,
extensive knowledge of quick
book & good customer service
skills required. Fax resume to
386-754-1999
License CDL Driver w/2 yrs Log-
ging Exp. Must have Clean CDL.
Also, FT, semi/heavy equip.
mechanic wanted Deep South
Forestry 386-365-6966
Looking for an in home caregiver.
Room & board + Salary Negotible.
References required. Call for info.
386-365-3732
MECHANIC
. Heavy truck & trailer experience a
plus. Best pay in North Florida for
the right person. Southern
Specialized, 1812 NW Main Blvd.,
386-752-9754
Mobile Home Sales!
Experienced Salesperson
Needed to sell the South's
#1 rated product! Call Kevin
386-719-5560
Physical laborer needed. CDL
license req'd. Must have respect
for electricity & ability to work in
water & mud. Must be able to pass
drug test. Call 386-752-1854
Sales Position available for moti-
vated individual Rountree -Moore
Toyota, Great benefits, paid train-
ing/vacation. Exp. a plus but not
necessary. Call Anthony Cosentino
386-623-7442
Southside Baptist Church Two
Positions Available
PT Secretary Must be proficient
in Microsoft Word &
Microsoft Publisher.
Nursery Worker Hours are dur-
ing church services and functions.
Please apply at Southside Baptist
Church, for info 386-755-5553.

1 2n Medical
120 Employment

OiS273290
LEARN TO DRAW BLOOD
Local Phlebotomy Course
offered in Lake City, FLA
Certificate program.
(904)566-1328

527777
Admissions/Marketing
Director
Avalon Healthcare Center is
currently accepting applications
for the full time position of
Admissions/Marketing Director
RN/LPN Preferred
Good Organizational and
Communication Skills a Must
Prior SNF Experience
Preferred
Competitive Salary and
Excellent benefit package.
Please apply at Avalon
Healthcare and Rehabilitation
Center. 1270 S.W. Main Blvd.
Lake City, Florida 32025
386-752-7900
EOE

North Florida Pediatrics
Has positions open for both
L.P.N. and C.N.A's.
Interested parties need' to be flexible
S and dependable.
Peds Medical office experience
a plus. Please fax resume to
386-755-7940 or email to
hr(nflpediatrics.corn
Pharmacy Technician needed.
Must be Florida registered. Min. 1
year exp required. Preferably in a
retail environment. Excellent
computer & communication skills
needed. FT position. Competitive
pay. Send reply to Box 05074, C/O
The Lake City Reporter, P.O. Box
1709. Lake City, FL, 32056

141 Babysitters
Loving mom would like to care for
your child. Full or Part time in my
home. Near downtown. Only 1
opening avail. 386-438-5394

LAKE CITY REPORTER


240 RSchools &
240 Education

05527750
Interested in a Medical Career?
Express Training offers
courses for beginners & exp
Nursing Assistant, $479
next class-09/12/10
Phlebotomy national certifica-
tion, $800 next class-10/10/11
Continuing education
Fees incl. books, supplies, exam
fees. Call 386-755-4401 or
expresstrainingservices.com


310 Pets & Supplies
PUBLISHER'S NOTE
Florida Law 828.29 requires dogs
and cats being sold to be at least 8
weeks old and have a health
certificate from a licensed
veterinarian documenting they
have mandatory shots and are
free from intestinal and external
parasites. Many species of wild-
life must be licensed by Florida
Fish and Wildlife. If you are
unsure, contact the local
office for information.

402 Appliances
FROST FREE refrigerator.
Whirlpool Very clean. Works
good. White, $165. obo
386-292-3927
Whirlpool Washer & Dryer.
White, large capacity. Like new.
$385. for both.
386-292-3927 or 386-755-5331.

407 Computers
HP Computer,
$80.00
386-755-9984 or
386-292-2170
LAPTOP REPAIR
Fast, Professional
Call Star Tech
386-755-0277

408 Furniture
Country Finch King Bed w/head-
board & foot board & 2 night
stands (no mattress)
$12500 386-754-4094

420 Wanted to Buy
K&H TIMBER
We Buy Pine Hardwood &
Cypress. Large or small tracts.
Call 386-961-1961.
Wanted Junk Cars, Trucks, Vans.
$275 & up CASH! Free Pick Up!
NO title needed !386-878-9260
After 5pm 386- 752-3648.

430 Garage Sales
BIG Multi Family sale. Too
much to list. 412 SE Lehigh be-
hind Southside Baptist Church.
Sat. 8-lpm No early birds.
Multi Family. Thurs Sat. 8am-
3pm. Something for everyone.
Lake Jeffery Rd., first dirt road.
Past 135 turn left Follow signs.
PUBLISHER'S NOTE
All Yard Sale Ads
Must be Pre-Paid.

Sat. 8-? Emerald Street in Emerald
Forest. (Brandford Hwy). 2 desks,
recliner, books, clothes (some
new), game cube, lots of misc.

440 Miscellaneous
AC Window unit.
$65. obo
386-292-392?

GUNSHOW: 09/10 & 09/11
@ The Columbia County
Fairgrounds, Hwy 247 Lake City.
Sat 9am 4pm, Sun 9am-3pm.
Info: 386-325-6114
Microwave. Looks good, works
good. No carousel
$25.00
386-292-3927
Stop gnat & Mosquito bites! Buy
Swamp Gator All natural insect re-
pellent. Family safe. Use head to
toe. Available at The Home Depot.


440 Miscellaneous
WEEDEATER Push Mower. Runs
great. Need the money!
$85.00
386-292-3927

450 Good Things
450 to Eat
GREEN PEANUTS For Sale
Graded and washed.
$30.00 a bushel.
386-752-3434
OSCEOLA HONEY & BEE
FARM, Tupelo honey now avail.,
several other varieties, good pri-
ces. 386-755-2642, 386-754-1110

460 Firewood
Firewood for Sale. $65. per Truck
Load. Rick 386-867-1039 or Joey
965-0288 if no answer pls leave
message we will call you back.

520 Boats for Sale
2003 SEA PRO 170CC
YAMAHA 90 HP, low hours, live
wells, Bimini top, fish finder,
AL trailer, $7,500, 386-719-6537

630 Mobile Homes
630 for Rent
2 OR 3 BEDROOMS
Clean, Quiet Park $475-$525.mo
Water, septic, garbage included
758-2280 References, NO PETS!
2&3 BR MH. $395 $650. mo.
plus deposit. Water & sewer fur-
nished. Cannon Creek MHP
386-752-6422
2/2 Units. Great rental program *
for responsible tenants.
Call for details, 386-984-8448
13th Month FREE!!
3/2 Large MH, small park, near
FGCC, Small pets ok, $500 dep
$575 mo w/12 mo lease
386-752-1971 or 352-281-2450
3/2.5 S of Lake City, (Branford
area) $600 mo plus security
386-590-0642 or 386-867-1833
www.suwanneevalleyproperties.com
Ft. White Country living.
3br/2ba Mobile Home
Very clean! 386-497-1116.

LG clean 3br's $450. -$650. mo. +
dep. Also, 2br mobile home's
available. No Pets.
5 Points area. 386-961-1482
Mobile Homes for rent in
White Springs, Lake City & Ft.
White Contact 386-623-3404
or 386-397-2779
Nature Lovers Xtra clean 2/1
Private landscaped acre. NO
UTILITY DEP. Carport, deck, pa-
tio, Washer, Dryer. Smoke free,
adult area-on creek, No pets, $500
mo. 1st + $200 dep., 752-7027.
Long term occupancy preferred.
New 2br/2ba off Country Club. 1/2
ac. lot Front, back porch & storage
bldg. $600 mo. $600 sec. No Pets!
386-752-5911 or 466-2266

640 Mobile Homes
S for Sale

05527374
!!ATTENTION!!
We purchase used mobile
homes. Call North Pointe
Homes, Gainesville
352-872-5566

05527375 !!!LOOK!!!
Before you but a Mobile Home
check out North Pointe Homes
in Gainesville--Hugh Discounts!
credit Scores Don't matter. Call
for Free Approval! Jacobson
Homes Factory Outlet (352)872-
5566 or nirb3371l(1hotmail.com

05527376
NEW USED- REPO'S
Your Volume Giant! North
Pointe Homes. Millions to Lend.
Credit Scores 575 = 10% down.
Gainesville (352)872-5566 or
walker-david(5live.com

Champion Home Inspections
Protect Your Investment
With A Professional
Inspection State Licensed
And Insured 386-344-5551
High Springs. 1629 sqft. on 10
acres. Needs to sell. $84,999.
Make an offer! MLS 78776
Bosshardt Realty Services.
386-965-4873


confused?



Call Lake City Reporter Classifieds!


WE CAN HELP 386-755-5440










LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 10, 2011


Classified Department: 755-5440


640 stMobile Homes
40 for Sale
Fort White. 2336 sqft on 5 acres.
Tape & textured walls. Needs to
sell. $99,999. Motivated, make an
oftter MLS 78841 (386)965-4873
Bosshardt Realty Services.
Lake City 1560 sqft. buit in 2002.
On 5 acres. $83,999. MLS 78931
Bosshardt Realty Services.
386-965-4873
3/2 DWMH "Model Home" condi-
tion. Just under I ac w/granddaddy
oaks and landscaped MLS#77988,
$84.900, Nancy Rogers
867-1271 R.E.O. Realty Group
Palm Harbor Homes
Cash for Clunkers
5K For Your Used Mobile Home -
Any Condition
S800-622-2832 ext. 210.

650 Mobile Home
& Land
Owner Finance. 3/2, on 1.5 acres,
S of Lake City, small down/$695
mo, 386-590-0642 / 386-867-1833
www.suwanneevalleyproperties.com
710 Unfurnished Apt.
For Rent







0t52770'
SPRING HILL VILLAGE
Excellent High Springs location.
1,.'2 & 3 bedroom floor-plans:
some with garages.
Call 386-454-1469
or visit our website:
www.springhillvillage.net

IBR APT.
Downtown Location. Clean.
$450 mo. plus Security.
NO PETS. Call 386-755-3456
2br/1 ba. 1 car garage,
W/D hook up, $525 month,
no pets 1 month sec,
386-961-8075
2BR/1BA. Close to town.
$565.mo plus deposit.
Includes water & sewer.
386-965-2922
2BR/2BA w/garage
5 minutes from VA hospital.
Call for details.
386-755-4590 or 365-5150
A Landlord You Can Love!
,2 brApts $575. & up + sec. Great
area. CH/A washer/dryer hookups.,
386-758-9351/352-208-2421
Amber Wood Hills Apts.
Private Patio area. Beautiful yard.
Washer/dryer hkup. Free water &
sewer. 1/1, 2/1. Move in special.
386-754-1800. wwwmyflapts.com
Columbia Arms Apt. located 1/2
mi from V.A. & Winn Dixie. Pet
Friendly. Move in Special $199.
Pool, laundry & balcony.
386-754-1800. www.myflapts.com
Great location W of 1-75. spacious
deluxe 2br apts., garage. W/D
hookup. patio. $600/700 & up. +
Sec. 386-965-5560 or 344-3715
Greentree Townhouse
Summer special. 2/1. 2/1.5. Free
water & sewer. Balcony & patio.
Laundry. Behind Kens on Hwy 90.
386-754-1800 wwwmyflapts.com

ONE 51 PLACE APTS
Alachua
MOVE IN SPECIALS
1, 2, & 3 bedrooms
Call TODAY 386-462-0656
or visit us at one51 place.com

Redwine Apartments. Move in
special $199. Limited time. Pets
welcome, with 5 complexes,
we have a home for you.
386-754-1800. www.myflapts.com
Summer Special! 12th mo Free
w/signed yr lease. Updated Apt.
w/tile floors/fresh paint. Great
area. From $450.+sec. 752-9626


710 A Unfurnished Apt.
711 For Rent
The Lakes Apts. Studios & IBr's
from $135/wk. Util. & cable incl.,
Sec 8 vouchers accepted, monthly
rates avail Call 386-752-2741
Wayne Manor Apts.
Move in $199. Summer special.
2/1, washer/dryer. Behind Kens off
Hwy 90. 386-754-1800
www.myflapts.com
Windsor Arms Apartments.
Summer special $199. Move in!
2/1, 2/1.5, 2/2. Pet Friendy. Free
200 ch. Dish. Washer/dryer hkup.
386-754-1800. www.myflapts.com

720 Furnished Apts.
720 For Rent
Rooms for Rent. Hillcrest, Sands,
Columbia. All furnished. Electric,
cable, fridge, microwave. Weekly
or monthly rates. 1 person $135.
2 persons $150. weekly
386-752-5808

Studio Apt. Private. Rent incl util-
ities. Satellite TV, appliances,
(washer/dryer). No pets 386-963-
4767 or 292-0385 Available 9/1

0730 Unfurnished
J Home For Rent

'09 Executive Home for rent on 41
acres. 4br/3.5ba Available
October. Horses/outdoor pets ok.
$2000/mo but all terms negotiable
for right caretaker. 386-209-4610
2BR house $625.mo $625. dep.
Also, 2 large br apt. $525. mo
$525 dep. Conveniently close to
the VA & shopping. 386-344-2972
/ 2/1 879 Poplar St. $600. mo.
/ 3/2 Highlands Loop $700.mo.
All require First and last...
386-755-3649
Please leave msg.. Only in office
Tues Thur. 8am 4pm
3BR/1.5 BA Large lot. Very clean
with storage shed. Quiet area.
$850 mo. + $850. dep.
386-752-7578
4br/2ba CHA Brick, 1200 sqft
lac., Close to FGCC, CR 245A.
Ceramic tile/carpet, $800 mo $800
dep (904)708-8478 App. req'd
Brick 3br/2ba Large yard, garage.
CH/A. 189 Stanley Ct. Lake City.
$950. mo + $1000 dep.
Call 386-365-8543
LARGE 3BR/2BA home close to
college. $750. mo $450 security.
Application required.
386-935-1482
LOVELY 3BR/IBA Farm house
for rent, Quiet country area.
Please call after 5pm.
386-752-0017. Leave message.
SITE-BUILT HOME.
On 5 acres, near Fort White,
1st last + deposit.
Call 386-758-1789
VERY LARGE 2 BR/2 BA, Brick
home. garage. CH & A. Clean.
386-590-0642 / 386-867-1833.
www.suwinneevalleypmperties.comn

750 Business &
50 Office Rentals
FOR LEASE: Downtown office
space. Convenient to
Court house.
Call 386-755-3456

For Lease: E Baya Ave. Two -
1000 sqft office space units or
combined for 2000 sqft. 386-984-
0622 or weekends 386-497-4762
Midtown Commercial Center,
brand new executive front suite &
suite w/warehouse.
Call Vicki or Joe 386-935-2832.
NICE OFFICE SPACE
for lease.
From $450 a month
Tom 386-961-1086 DCA Realtor
SUB SHOP for lease.
All Equip. Avail. Old Willy J's
Across from Wal-Mart
386-623-2244


790 Vacation Rentals
Horseshoe Beach RV Lot.
Nice corner Lot with shade trees.
$295. mo Water/electric included
386-235-3633 or 352-498-5986

805 Lots for Sale
BEAUTIFUL 5 acres in
Lake City, 100% owner financing,
no qualifying, $395 per month.
Please call 512-663-0065
Owner Financing. River comm &
nature lover's dream in Lee. 15
wooded ac by the Withlacoochee.
Property is already subdivided
MLS 75576 $48,000 623-6896
PUBLISHER'S NOTE
All real estate advertising in this
newspaper is subject to the fair
housing act which makes it illegal
to advertise "any preference,
limitation, or discrimination based
on race, color, religion, sex,
disability, familial status or nation-
al origin; or any intention to make
such preference, limitation or
discrimination." Familial status
includes children under the age of
18 living with parents or legal
custodians, pregnant women and
people securing custody of chil-
dren under the age of 18. This
newspaper will not knowingly
accept any advertising for real es-
tate which is in violation of the
law. Our readers are hereby in-
formed that all dwellings adver-
tised in this newspaper are availa-
ble on an equal opportunity basis.
To complain of discrimination call
HUD toll free at 1-800-669-9777,
the toll free
telephone number to the hearing
impaired is 1-800-927-9275.

810 Home for Sale
/ Champion Home Inspections
386-344-5551. Inspections
Starting At $ 249.00
Veterans Receive 10% Off
Full Inspection.
Champion Home Inspections
Contact John 386-344-5551
State Licensed
And Insured
championhomeinspections.us
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
10 acres w/well maintained brick
home. 2012 sqft. Open split floor
plan. Lori Giebeig Simpson
365-5678 MLS# 74447 $149,900
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
New home in May Fair. Super area
comer lot. 4br split plan. Versatile
colors. Elaine K. Tolar
755-6488 MLS# 76919 $199.900
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
3br/2ba. 1590 sqft. Lori Giebeig
Simpson. 365-5678 or
Mary Brown Whitehurst
965-0887 MLS# 74542 $109,900
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
Cute 3/2 brick in town. Wood
floors, Ig family room. Front &
back porch Lori Giebeig Simpson
365-5678 MLS# 77989 $79,900
LEASE/OPTION BUY
3br/2ba IHome 2010 w/garage
on 1/2 acre. Owner Financing
386-623-2244
Lg. 4/3 family home. 16x20
screened porch, workshop. 4.5 ac.
fenced/cross fenced MLS 74339
$219,900. N Fla Homeland Real-
ty Darlene Hart 386-288-2878
Great 3/2 home w/2346 sq ft
under roof on .67 ac., Creekside
S/D. Big back yard w/plenty of
shade trees. On a cul-de-sac, MLS
77385 $169,900 623-6896
Spacious 4/2 home on I ac. Split
floor plan. Great neighborhood.
Easy access to 1-75 $204,900 MLS
77859 N Fla Homeland Realty
Darlene Hart 386-288-2878
WoodCrest 3/2 Split floor plan
Screened porch. 10x12 storage
shed. $126,900 MLS 77932
Darlene Hart 386-288-2878
N Fla Homeland Realty
Home for entertaining 3/2 plus
pool house w/half bath, 2.25
fenced ac. Freshly painted. Split
plan, Large rear deck MLS 78103
$179,900 386-623-6896


810 Home for Sale
0.5 ac tract. 441 (4 lane) frontage.
1/2 mi from Target distribution.
2/1.5 zoned resid'l MLS# 78506
$88,000 Nancy Rogers 867-1271
R.E.O. Realty Group
Great home, Great neighborhood,
great price. 3/2 Close to town A
Must See!. MLS#77411, $79,900,
Nancy Rogers
867-1271 R.E.O. Realty Group
4/2 fenced yard, 2 car garage,
Fairly new roof & HVAC Shed,
fenced back yard. MLS#77602,
$162,500, Nancy Rogers
867-1271 R.E.O. Realty Group
Lake City Country Club. 4/3, reno-
vated. Great for entertaining. Glass
doors open to back yard. $179,900
MLS#78637 Nancy Rogers
R.E.O. Realty Group 867-1271
Investor Special Buy. 2br con-
crete block w/CH/A. Available "as
is" $22,900, MLS76821.
Vin Lantroop. 386-755-660(1
Hallmark Real Estate
Pool Home. 2 Story w/soaring
ceilings. Ig master w/Jacuzzi.
Fenced yard. $159,000 MLS77085
Teresa Spradley 386-365-8343
Hallmark Real Estate
Near Itchetucknee head springs,
easy Gainesville commute. For
sale or rent! $75,500, MLS77398.
Paula Lawrence. 386-623-1973
Hallmark Real Estate ,
REDUCED gated community.
Brick w/florida room & private
garden. Security system. Ginger
Parker. MLS77703. 386-365-2135
Hallmark Real Estate
Like to Entertain? Over 2900
sqft. 3br/2.5ba. Fenced w/sprinkler
& security system. MLS78404.
Sherry Willis. 386-365-8095
Hallmark Real Estate
Springhollow Ig brick. 4br/2ba
w/lg screened porch. Oversized
ga-
rage. upgraded kitchen & bath.
$109,900, MLS78787. Janet Creel.
719-0382 Hallmark Real Estate

820 Farms&
820 Acreage
4 1/2 acre lot. Lake Jeffery Road.
Gorgeous Oaks!Paved Rd
Owner Financing! NO DOWN!
$59,900. $525mo 352-215-1018.
www.LandOwnerFinancing.com
4 acres, Wellborn, New Well
installed, Beautifully wooded
w/cleared Home Site, owner fin,
no down. $39,900, $410 mon
Call 352-215-1018
wwwLandOwnerFinancing.com
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
Brick in LC Country Club. 4/3
Lots of extras. oversized garage &
storage. Elaine K. Tolar
752-4211 MLS# 78739 $239,90W(
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
Brick in WoodCrest S/D. Split
plan. Screened porch. Lg back
yard. El;ine K. Tolar
752-4211 MLS# 77015 $137,900
For Lease FARM- 7 stall barn.
17+ acres, pasture, cross fenced.
Close in $500. nmo.
386-961-1086
Owner financed land. Half acre to
ten acre lots. As low as $300
down. Deas Bullard Properties
386-752-4339 www.landnfl.com

Commercial
OJ0 Property
Commercial Parcel 2 acres w/252
ft frontage on SR 47 Add'l 4.76
ac. avail. $149,900 MLS# 78260
Call 386-867-1271 Nancy Rogers
R.E.O.Realty Group, Inc

870 Real Estate
87 Wanted
I Buy Houses
CASH!
Quick Sale Fair Price
386-269-0605


Y01lli




lIIII TH:IS
BS-HN-a^K--.


MOBLEY'S SEAFOOD
Fresh Seafood and Grocery Store
1801 Hwy 441 North in Five Points
(386) 755-4042





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Bring the picture in or
we will take it for you!
* Ad runs 10 consecutive days
with a description and photo in the
newspaper and online E-edition.
* Ad runs 10 consecutive days as a
classified line ad online.
* You must include vehicle price.
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* Private party only. ,





2006 EF250
Ford Van
3/4 ton, metal work
shelves/ladder rack,
60K miles, exc. cond.
$10,500
Call
386-555-5555
If you don't sell your vehicle
during the first 10 days, you
can run the same vehicle ad
for 10 additional days for
only $15.00
Terms and conditions remain the
same for the additional run.


a .i '13 I' . >L r
,. ';:...?r. .- .


':s* --


ADVERTISE YOUR
Job Opportunities in the
Lake City Reporter
Classifieds.
Enhance Your Ad with
Your Individual Logo
For just pennies a day.
Call today,
755-5440.


9






S.,,r"
Cuttin





S ack?,
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way.t savemone











LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 10, 2011


TELEVISION

TV sports

Today
AUTO RACING
8 a.m.
SPEED Formula One. qualifying for
Italian Grand Prix, at Monza, Italy
7:30 p.m.
ABC NASCAR, Sprint Cup,
Wonderful 'Pistachios 400. at Richmond,
Va.
BASKETBALL
3 a.m.
ESPN2 FIBA,Americas Tournament,
semifinal, Brazil vs, Dominican Republic, at
Mar del PlataArgentina (delayed tape)
BOXING
4:45 p.m.-
HBO Champion Vitali Klitschko
(42-2-0) vs. Tomasz Adamek (44-1-0),
for WBC heavyweight tide, at Wroclaw,
Poland
10:30 p.m.
HBO Featherweights, Yuriorkis
Gamboa (20-0-0) vs. Daniel Ponce de Leon
(41-3-0), at Atlantic City, N.J. (includes re-
air of Klitschko-Adamek bout.
COLLEGE FOOTBALL
Noon
ESPN Oregon St. at Wisconsin
ESPN2 FAU at Michigan St.
FSN Iowa at Iowa St.
3:30 p.m.
ABC -Alabama at Penn St.
ESPN2 Cincinnati at Tennessee
FSN -Virginia Tech at East Carolina
FX Nevada at Oregon
VERSUS -TCU at Air Force
4:30 p.m.
ESPN South Carolina at Georgia
7 p.m.
ESPN2 BYU at Texas
FSN UTEP at SMU
7:30 p.m.
VERSUS Utah at Southern Cal
1 8 p.m.
ESPN Notre Dame at Michigan
EXTREME SPORTS
4:30 p.m.
NBC Dew Tour, Toyota Challenge.
at Salt Lake City
GOLF
.7 a.m.
TGC European PGA Tour,
KLM Open, third round, at Hilversum,
Netherlands
3 p.m.
TGC LPGA, NW Arkansas
Championship, second' round, at Rogers,
Ark.
MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL
4 p.m.
FOX Regional coverage, Minnesota
at Detroit, Cleveland at Chicago White
Sox. OR Oakland at Texas
9 p.m.
MLB Regional coverage, N.Y.
Yankees at LA. Angels OR San Diego at
Arizona (8 p.m. start)
MOTORSPORTS
7 p.m.
SEED AMA Pro Motocross 250,
at P-'CHf.
:. 8 p.m.
SPEED AMA Pro Motocross 450,
at Pala, Calif.
SOCCER
9:55 a.m.
ESPN2 Premier League, Chelsea
at Sunderland
TENNIS
Noon
CBS U.S. Open, men's 'semifinals,
at New York
8 p.m.
CBS U.S. Open, women's semifinals,
at New York

BASEBALL

AL standings


East Division
W L
NewYork 87 55
Boston 85 59
Tampa Bay 79 64
Toronto 72 73
Baltimore 58 85
Central Division
W L
Detroit 81 62
Chicago 72 70
Cleveland 70 71
Kansas City 60 85
Minnesota 59 84
West Division
W L
Texas 81 63
Los Angeles 78 65
Oakland 65 78
Seattle 60 83


Pct GB
.566 -
.507 8'
.496 10
.414 22
.413 22

Pct GB
.563 -
.545 2A
.455 15'h
.420 20'h


Thursday's Games
Baltimore 5, N.Y.Yankees 4, 10 innings
toronto 7, Boston 4
Chicago White Sox 8, Cleveland I
Seattle 4, Kansas City I
Friday's Games
Baltimore 2,Toronto 0
Tampa Bay 7, Boston 2
Minnesota at Detroit (n)
Oakland at Texas (n)
Cleveland at Chicago White Sox (n)
N.Y.Yankees at LA.Angels (n)
Kansas City at Seattle (n)
Saturday's Games
Baltimore (VandenHurk 0-0) at
Toronto (H.Alvarez 1-2)., 1:07 p.m.
Cleveland (Carmona 6-14) at Chicago
White Sox (Humber 9-8), 4:10 p.m.
Minnesota (Swarzak 3-6) at Detroit
(Scherzer 14-8),4:10 p.m.
. Oakland (Cahill 10-13) at Texas
(Ogando 12-7), 4:10 p.m.
Boston (Welland 0-1) at Tampa Bay
(Hellickson 12-10), 7:10 p.m.
N.Y. Yankees (Sabathia 19-7) at L.A.
Angels (Haren 14-8), 9:05 p.m.
Kansas City (FPaulino 2-6) at Seattle
(Pineda 9-9), 10:10 p.m.
Sunday's Games
Minnesota at Detroit, 1:05 p.m.
Baltimore at Toronto, 1:07 p.m.
Boston at Tampa Bay, 1:40 p.m.
Cleveland at Chicago White Sox,
2:10 p.m.
Oakland at Texas, 3:05 p.m.
N.Y.Yankees at L.A. Angels, 3:3,5 p.m.
Kansas City at Seattle, 4:10 p.m.

NL standings


East Division
W L
Philadelphia 92 48
Atlanta 84 60


Pct GB
.657 -
.583 10


New York 70 73
Washington 65 76
Florida 63 79
Central Division
W L
Milwaukee 85 60
St. Louis 76 67
Cincinnati 70 73
Pittsburgh 66 77
Chicago 62 81
Houston 48 95
West Division
W L
Arizona 83 61
San Francisco 75 68
Los Angeles 70 72
Colorado 67 76
San Diego 62 82


.490 23'A
.461 27'A
.444 30


Thursday's Games
L.A. Dodgers 7, Washington 4,. st
game
L.A. Dodgers at Washington, 2nd
game, ppd., rain
Atlanta 6, N.Y. Mets 5, 1st game
Atlanta 5, N.Y. Mets 1, 2nd game
Philadelphia 7, Milwaukee 2
Arizona 4; San Diego I
Friday's Games
Florida at Pittsburgh (n)
Houston at Washington (n)
Chicago Cubs at N.Y. Mets (n)
Philadelphia at Milwaukee (n)
Atlanta at St. Louis (n)
Cincinnati at Colorado (n)
San Diego at Arizona (n)
L.A. Dodgers at San Francisco (n)
Today's Games
Chicago Cubs (R.Wells 7-4) at N.Y.
Mets (Capuano 10-12), 1:10 p.m.
Cincinnati (Arroyo 8-1 I) at Colorado
(White I-1), 4:10 p.m.
Florida (Ani.Sanchez 7-7) at Pittsburgh
(Locke 0-0), 7:05 p.m.
Houston (W.Rodriguez 10-10) at
Washington (L annan 9-11),7:05 p.m.
Philadelphia (CI.Lee 16-7) atMilwaukee
(Wolf 12-9), 7:10 p.m.
Atlanta .(D.Lowe 9-13) at St. Louis
(J.Garcia 11-7), 7:15 p.m.
San Diego (Stauffer 8-12) at Arizona
(Miley 3-1), 8:10 p.m.
LA. Dodgers (Kuroda 11-15) at San
Francisco (Vogelsong 10-6), 905 p.m.
Sunday's Games..
Florida at Pittsburgh. 1:35 p.m.
Houston at Washington, 1:35 p.m.
Philadelphia at Milwaukee, 2:10 p.m.
Atlanta at St. Louis. 2:15 p.m.
Cincinnati at Colorado, 3:10 p.m.
L.A. Dodgers at San Francisco,
4:05 p.m.
San Diego at Arizona. 4:10 p.m.
Chicago Cubs at N.Y. Mets, 8:05 p.m.

FOOTBALL

NFL schedule

Thursday
Green Bay 42, New Orleans 34
Sunday
Pittsburgh at Baltimore. I p m
Atlanta at Chicago, I p m
Cincinnati at Cleveland. I p in
Indianapolis at Houston. I p in
Tennessee at Jacksonville. I p m
Buffalo at Kansas City. I p m
Philadelphia at St. Louts, I p m
Detroit at Tampa Bay. I p m.
Carolina at Arizona. 4 15 p m
Minnesota at San Diego, 4 15 pm.
Seattle at San Francisco. 4 15 p.m.
N.Y. Giants at Washington. 4 15 p'm.
Dallas at N.Y Jets, 8 20 p m
Monday
New England at Miami. 7p m.
Oakland at Denver, 10 15 pm.

Top 25 schedule

Today
No. 2 LSU vs Northwestern State,
8 p.m.
No. 3 Alabama at No. 23 Penn State,
3:30 p.m.
No. 5 Florida State vs. Charleston
Southern, 6 p.m.
No. 6 Stanford at Duke, 3:30 p.m.
No. 8 Wisconsin vs. Oreg6n State,
Noon
No. 10 Nebraska vs. Fresno State,
7 p.m.
No. 11 Virginia Tech at East Carolina,
3:30 p.m. *
No. 12 South Carolina at Georgia,
4:30 p.m
No. 13 Oregon vs. Nevada, 3:30 p.m.
No. 14 Arkansas vs. New Mexico at
Little Rock, Ark., 7 p.m.
No. IS Ohio State vs.Toledo, Noon
No. 16 Mississippi State at Auburn,
12:20 p.m.
No. 17 Michigan State vs. FAU,
Noon
No. 18 Florida vs. UAB, 7 p.m.
No. 19 West Virginia vs. Norfolk State,
I p.m.
No. 22 South Florida vs. Ball
State, 7 p.m.
No. 24 Texas vs. BYU, 7 p.m.
No. 25 TCU at Air Force, 3:30 p.m.

College scores

Thursday
Carson-Newman 56, Fayetteville St. 7
Hampton 23, Florida A&M 17
Tenn.Tech 56, Maryville (Tenn.) 7
Oklahoma St. 37,Arizona 14

GOLF

Walker Cup pairings

At Aberdeen, Scotland
Saturday
FOURSOMES
9 a.m. Tom Lewis and Michael
Stewart, Britain & Ireland,vs. Peter Uihlein
and Harris English, United States.
9:10 a.m. Jack Senior and Andy
Sullivan, Britain & Ireland, vs. Russell
Henley and Kelly Kraft, United States.
9:20 a.m.- Paul Cutler and Alan
Dunbar, Britain & Ireland, vs. Nathan
Smith and Blayne Barber, United
States.
9:30 a.m.- Steven Brown and Stiggy
Hodgson, Britain & Ireland, vs. Patrick
Cantlay and Chris Williams, United
States.
SINGLES
1:45 p.m Tom Lewis, Britain &
Ireland, vs. Peter Uihlein, United States.
1:55 p.m. Jack Senior, Britain &
Ireland, vs. Jordan Spelthfi, United States.
2:05 p.m. Andy Sullivan, Britain &
Ireland, vs. Harris English. United States.


2:15 p.m. Rhys Pugh, Britain &
Ireland, vs. Patrick Rodgers, United
States.
2:25 p.m. Steven Brown, Britain &
Ireland, vs. Russell Henley, United States.
2:35 p.m. James Byrne, Britain &
Ireland, vs. Nathan Smith, United States.
2:45 p.m. Paul Cutler, Britain &
Ireland, vs. Kelly Kraft, United States.
2:55 p.m.- Michael Stewart, Britain &
Ireland, vs. Patrick Cantlay, United States.

BASKETBALL

WNBA schedule

Thursday's Games
Minnesota 78, Chicago 69
Phoenix 91,Tulsa 76
Friday's Games
New York 83, Indiana 75
Phoenix at Seattle (n)
Tulsa at Los Angeles (n)
Today's Games
Washington at San Antonio, 8 p.m.
Chicago at Los Angeles, 10:30 p.m.
Sunday's Games
New York at Connecticut, I p.m.
Atlanta at Indiana, 5 p.m.
Minnesota at Phoenix, 6 p.m.
San Antonio at Tulsa, 7 p.m.
Chicago at Seattle, 9.p.m.

AUTO RACING

Richmond qualifying

Friday qualifying; race today
(Car number in parentheses)
1. (00) David Reutimann, Toyota,
127.383 mph.
2. (1) Jamie McMurray, Chevrolet,
127.334.
3. (48) Jimmie Johnson, Chevrolet,
127.214.
4. (5) Mark Martin, Chevrolet,
127.083.
5. (33) Clint Bowyer, Chevrolet,
127.011.
6. (31) Jeff Burton, Chevrolet,
126.993.
7. (29) Kevin Harvick, Chevrolet,
126.778.
8. (99) Carl Edwards, Ford, 126.707.
9. (43) A J Allmendlnger, Ford,
126.695.
10. (42) Juan Pablo Montoya, Chevrolet,
126.683.
II. (22) Kurt Busch, Dodge, 126.665.
12. (4) Kasey Kahne.Toyota, 126.624.
13. (18) Kyle Busch,Toyota. 126.612.
14. (16) Greg Biffle, Ford, 126.606.-
15. (27) Paul Menard, Chevrolet.
126.464.
16. (20) Joey LoganoToyota, 126.446.
17. (24) Jeff Gordon, Chevrolet,
126.369.
18. (39) Ryan Newman, Chevrolet,
126.369.
19. (2) Brad Keselowski, Dodge,
126.274.
20. (6) David Ragan, Ford. 126.245.
21. (51) Landon Cassill, Chevrolet.
126.245.
22. (14) Tony Stewart, Chevrolet,
126.21.
23 (78) Regan Smith. Chevrolet,
126.186.
24. (83) Brian Vickers.Toyota. 126.151.
25. (17) Matt Kenseth. Ford. 126.092.
26. (30) David Stremme, Chevrolet,
126.068.
27. (88) Dale Earnhardt Jr., Chevrolet.
126.02 I.
28. (II) Denny Hamlin, Toyota.
125.986.
29. (56) Martin Truex 'Jr., Toyota.
125.839.
30. (13) Casey Mears.Toyota, 125.716.
31. (66) Michael McDowell, Toyota,
125.587.
32. (47) Bobby Labonte, Toyota,
125.506.
33. (9) Marcos Ambrose, Ford, 125.43.
34. (35) Dave Blaney, Chevrolet,
125.43.
35. (38)Travis Kvapil, Ford, 125.232.
36.(34) David Gilliland, Ford, 125.139.-
37. (7) Robby Gordon, Dodge,
124.913.
38. (71) Andy Lally. Ford, 124.706.
39. (87) Joe Nemechek, Toyota,
124.602.
40. (36) Stephen- Leicht, Chevrolet,
124.596.
41. (46) Scott Speed, Ford, 124.321.
42. (32) Mike Bliss, Ford, Owner
Points.
43. (55)J.J.Yeliy, Ford, 124.235.
Failed to Qualify
44. (60) Mike Skinner, Chevrolet.
123.192.
45. (37) Erik Darnell,Toyota, 121.962.
46. (50) T.J. Bell, Chevrolet. 121.348.

TENNIS

U.S. Open

Late Thursday
Singles
Quarterfinals
Men
Novak Djokovic (I), Serbia, def.Janko
TIpsarevic (20), Serbia, 7-6 (2), 6-7 (3), 6-0,
3-0, retired.
Roger Federer (3), Switzerland, def.Jo-
WilfrledTsonga (1 1), France, 6-4,6-3,6-3.
Women
Angelique Kerber, Germany, def. Flavia
Pennetta (26), Italy, 6-4,4-6, 6-3.
Doubles
Quarterfinals
Men
Rohan Bopanna, India, and Alsam-ul-
Haq Qureshi (5), Pakistan, lead Colin
Fleming and Ross Hutchins, Britain, 7-5,
2-6, 6-5 (15-30), susp., rain.
Women
Llezel Huber and LIsa Raymond (4),
United States, def. Iveta Benesova and
Barbora Zahlavova Strycova (9), Czech
Republic, 6-1, 6-4.
Daniela Hantuchova, Slovakia, and


Agnleszka Radwanska, Poland, def. Sara
ErranI and Roberta Vinci (15), Italy, 6-3,
7-6 (3).
Maria Kirilenko and Nadia Petrova
(5), Russia, def. Kveta Peschke, Czech
Republic, and Katarina Srebotnik (I),
Slovenia, 6-2, 6-3.
Mixed
Semifinals
Gisela Dulko and Eduardo Schwank
(8), Argentina, def. Lucie Hradecka and
Frantisek Cermak, Czech Republic, 6-4,
6-4. -


Columbia boys golf team


wins quad match at Haile


From staff reports


Columbia High's boys golf
team posted a 4-1 record in
matches this week.
The Tigers won a
four-team match at Haile
Plantation on Thursday,
besting Oak Hall School,
St. Francis High Catholic
and Chiefland High.
Scores in the 18-hole
match were CHS 317, Oak
Hall 327, St. Francis 333
and Chiefland 335.
On Tuesday, Columbia
(160) split with Buchholz


High (153) and Santa Fe
High (189) in a match at
The Country Club at Lake
City.
Columbia's Nick Jones
was medalist in both
matches. He had a 4-over 75
at Haile Plantation and an
even-par 36 in Lake City.
Other CHS scores at
Haile: Dillan VanVleck 76,
Dean Soucinek 82, Dalton
Mauldin 84, Tim Bagley 85,
Andrew Johnson 92.
Other CHS scores on
Tuesday: Mauldin 40,
Soucinek 42, VanVleck 42,


Bagley 43, Johnson 46.
"I was real proud of us
winning the quad match,"
Tigers head coach Steve
Smithy said. 'There are not
many times I remember
going to Gainesville and
coming back with three
wins.
"Our real problem ihas
been starting off. We have
been settling down and
playing strong at ilie end."
Columbia (5-2) hosts
Union County High at
4 p.m. Thursday at Quail
Heights Country Club.


Wolves shut out Taylor County


From staff reports


Richardson Middle
School's football team
bounced back in a big way
with a 30-0 win over Taylor
County Middle School in
Perry on Thursday.
Alfonso Battle had a
couple of touchdown runs
for the Wolves, one coming
on a 48-yard scamper.


Michael Jackson scored
on a 30-yard run, and the
Wolves added a big play
through the air when Dillon
Brown threw to Ronnie
Williamson for a 45-yard
touchdown.
Ladarius Powell had a
pair of two-point conversion
runs and Gabe Williams
was credited with a safety.
Coach Joey O'Neal


said linebacker Williams
and safety Powell led the
defense in the shutout.
"We had two penalties the
whole night and our special
teams played good," Q'Neal
said. "I am very proud of my
team tonight. They played
their hearts out."
Richardson (1-1) hosts
Hamilton Middle School at
6 p.m. this Thursday.


BRIEFS


CHS SOCCER

Fundraiser at

Texas Roadhouse

Columbia High soccer
has a Texas Roadhouse
fundraiser from 4-8 p.m.
Monday.
For details call
365-1877.

YOUTH BASEBALL

Fort White fall

registration today

Fort White Youth
Baseball has registration
from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m.
today at the concession
stand at South Columbia
Sports Park.
For details, call Milissa
Blakley at 365-4133.


Lake City sign-up

continues today

Lake City Columbia
County Youth Baseball
registration for the fall
season is 10 a.m. to

ACROSS 40 Ch
41 Li|
1 Wild guess log
5 Red giant in 43 Vis
Cetus po
9 Speaker pro 45 Sl
12 Geodesic 48 Pu
13 Do a laundry 51 Ea
chore me
14 Hatchet 53 Fir
15 Poles' connec- 56 Lo
tor 57 Fe
16 Many germs 58 Br
18 Foiled-wrapped 59 Gi,
candles 60 PC
20 "Ivanhoe" 61 Fa
author 62 His
21 Stylish an
22 Mont. neigh-
bor
23 Remove chalk
26 Don't be -I 1 Mi
30 Ruin a nylon 2 Ha
33 Elec. or gas 3 Bu
34 Auction site 4 Bli
35 Byron's works Sn
37 Clay pot 5 Ma
39 Fair-hiring 6 Ke
abbr.


4 p.m. today at Southside
Sports Complex. For
registration online go to
LCCCYB.com.



Unscramble these four Jumbles,
one letter to each square,
to form four ordinary words.

GNATE I


For details, call Tad
Cervantes at 365-4810.

From staff reports

THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME
by David L. Hoyt and Jeff Knurek


Answer here:


Yesterday's Jumbles:
Answer:


at
ke fallen
gs
sa and pass-
rt
wedding spot
urple color
rly astrono-
er
nn's capital
bby call
stive night,
istle with
ve off light
; button
ns' cries
story test
swer

DOWN

dwest st.
armful
iggy drivers
ues great
nith
irbles
ogh relative


(Answers Monday)
RUGBY RISKY PEWTER TYCOON
The relationship between the bodybuilders *
wasn't WORKING OUT


Answer to Previous Puzzle


HOK C A NC AT
ORBIT L IE AR I
R CE UMPIRED
KA YE AS A Y
BOASMSA AL
GAG E NGR EDA M
DD SK I TE E
LEA E AS LTD
SYNE E DD Y H I S
GS ASPIC
T-AXIS ESTA
I ESHO W ELIATIE
K I A AVE MENUS
IDA WAISM RATIA


7

8
9
10
11


Sinbad's trans-
port
Fidgety
Pol plant
Door
Carnivore's diet


17 Quebec
school
19 Neutral color
22 Petroleum
mines
24 Nuclear-
energy source
25 Fodder stor-
age
27 Honest prez
28 Cosmic force
29 Peacock spot
30 Scribble down
31 Orthodontist's
org.
32 Thicken
36 Omits
38 Queens stadi-
um
42 Barked
44 Jupiter or Ra
46 Pack animal
47 On the level
48 Clarified but-
ter
49 Gives it the
gas.
50 He played Obi-
Wan
51 Basinger and
Novak
52 Nerve network
54 Born as
55 Big green par-
rot


9-10 2011 UFS, Dist. by Univ. Uclick for UFS


SCOREBOARD


Page Editor: Tim Kirby, 754-0421










Story ideas?

Contact
Tim Kirby
Sports Editor
754-0421
tkirby@lakecityreporter.com


Lake City Reporter





SPORTS


Saturday, September 10, 2011


www.lakecityreporter.com


Page I OA


FROM THE SIDELINE


Brandon Finley
Phone:(386) 754-0420
bfinle@lakecityreportercom

When

things go

bad, they

go bad
Sometimes
things just don't
go right For
me, that was
last week.
If it wasn't one thing,
it was literally another.
In 2011, you would
think that it would be
impossible to get lost Oh
no, I am here as living
proof that it's completely
possible, even when you
plan accordingly.
I'm an IPhone owner.
One of the apps for
the smart phone is
called Google maps.
Basically, if you search
for a site, it will provide
you with directions to
a destination. Brooks
County High (Ga.) is not
one of these sites.
I left the office around
4:15 p.m. I passed the
schools busses from
Columbia High. I
probably should have
held back and followed
-them. If only I would
have known.
From what I had
heard throughout the
,community, the drive was
around two hours. I didn't
show up to my destination
(according to Google)
until 6:45 p.m. Still, this
left me plenty of time to
make it a few miles to the
stadium, so I decided to
get something to eat
When I walked into
Zaxby's, I noticed school-
aged students wearing
shirts that said "Seniors."
My first thought was
they were getting ready
for the game tonight as
well. By the time I got my
order, it was 7 p.m. and
I headed to the game. I
pulled into my destination
just minutes later. It was a
Home Depot
After asking a man
standing outside
for directions, I was
informed that I passed
the stadium about 40
miles back. Needless to
say, I was a little irate.
I called Jen Chasteen
at the game, who text
me play-by-play updates
until I arrived. It was the
first time I've ever drove,
wrote stats and text on my
phone at the same time.
I'm glad I didn't wreck.
To compound things,
I was set to cover the
University of Florida
opener on Saturday.
Florida changed its media-
credential policy this
season and my name was
left off the list To make
mailers worse, I had given
away (for free) a set of
season tickets I've had in
my family for 27 years.
By the time I had
walked back to my car,
which is about a
25-minute walk, and made
it back to the stadium, I
couldn't even find a ticket
for sale from a scalper. I
even walked around the
stadium twice.
It was the first time I
missed a season opener
in my life. Sometimes
things just don't work.
* Brandon Finley covers
sports for the Lake City
Reporter.


CHS can't weather
Hurricanes, fall
28-6 at home.

By BRANDON FINLEY
bfinley@lakecityreporter.com

Columbia High was
caught in a storm as the
visiting Gainesville High
Hurricanes beat the Tigers,
28-6, on Friday.
The Tigers couldn't get
an offense going in the
first half with only one
first down and went into
the* locker room trailing
14-0. Both touchdowns
came in the first quarter for
the Hurricanes.
On Gainesville's sec-
ond drive quarterback
Mark Cato found Chris
Thompsorf for a 50-yard
touchdown. Cato hooked
up with Antwar Jelks with
Trey Marshall draped on
him from 35-yards out on
the second score.
The biggest play of the
game for the Tigers came
from their special teams to
begin the second half.
Darius Williams took
the kickoff from the 5-yard
line to the end zone on a
95-yard return, but the extra
point went wide to leave
Columbia down 14-6.
Gainesville answered
right back, however, with
a quick hit of their own.
On the second play of the
Hurricanes' first drive of the
second half, Cordero Dixon
exploded up the middle for
a 74-yard touchdown run.
Columbia put two drives
together in the third
quarter, but came away
empty-handed on both. The
first ended in a failed fourth-
and-1 attempt and Hayden
Lunde missed a 30-yard field
goal on the following drive.
The Hurricanes' final
touchdown came with 8:43
remaining in the contest
when Cato hit Shaq Estes
for 18 yards and the score.
Columbia made a change
at quarterback late in the
game when Nigel Atkinson
was replaced by Jayce
Barber with 2:27 remain-
ing in the contest. Barber
then hit Atkinson, who went
in at receiver for a 35-yard
play on his first attempt. He
ended the drive 4-of-8 for 56
yards and a 16-yard rush to
pick up the first down on
fourth-and-15.
Columbia coach Brian
Allen said there was no
controversy for a starter
despite falling to 0-2. His
message was simple. Keep
believing.


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
ABOVE: Fort White High's Soron Williams (21) runs for extra yardage as defenders from
Newberry High swarm him Friday at Arrowhead Stadium. Fort White beat Newberry 21-7.
BELOW: Columbia High's Shaq Johnson (18) knocks helmets with Gainesville High's
Kion Jenkins (32) while driving down the field Friday. Gainesville beat Columbia 28-6.

**i-*f W -"


Indians control
second half in win
over Panthers.

By TIM KIRBY
tkirby@lakecityreporter.com

FORT WHITE Fort
White High's football team
went from trying to estab-
lish the run to exerting
complete control in a 21-7
win over visiting Newberry
High on Friday.
The teams were tied at
7-all at the end of the first
half. After intermission,
Fort White dominated play.
The Indians outgained
the Panthers 150-44 yards in
the second half. Fort White
ran 29 plays and rolled up
nine first downs to 15 plays
and two first downs for the
visitors.
Included in the onslaught
was a 12-play, 65-yard touch-
down drive following the
third-quarterkickoff. Andrew
Baker, who threw one pass in
the first half, completed four
of five along the way, includ-
ing 22 and 11 yards to Soron
Williams. Zach Cormier did
the scoring honors from one
yard out
The Indians added anoth-
er quick-strike drive midway
through the fourth quarter.
Taking over at the Newberry
47 following a punt, Fort
White went the distance
in seven running plays.
Williams gained the last 11
yards to the end zone in two
carries. Nathan Escalante
kicked his third extra point
to produce the final score
with 4:07 left in the game.
"We've got some different
things we can do," Indians
head coach Demetric
Jackson said about the
offensive changes in the
second half. "They were
doubling AJ. (Legree) and
were putting six on the line.
We went ahead and opened
up the running game with
some speed sweeps and
counters."
The Indians started the
game strong. After forcing
a quick punt, Fort White
marched 52 yards in 10
plays all runs. Williams
carried eight times for 40
yards and Baker scored on-
a keeper from five yards out
at 4:35 of the first quarter.
Newberry answered
back with a good kickoff
return and a 56-yard scor-
ing drive. The Panthers con-
verted a fourth-and-4 and
two first downs along the
way. Troy Fowler scored on
a four-yard run and Dylan
Leschanz kicked the PAT. '


Facing 0-2 start, Georgia gears up for Gamecocks


Seminoles, Gators
both have easy
second games.

By RALPH D. RUSSO
Associated Press

The picks:
Today
Northwestern State
(no line) at No. 2 LSU
Tigers get another week
to work on that passing
game ... LSU 42-7.
No. 3 Alabama (minus
10) at No. 23 Penn
State
Expect at least four quar-
terbacks to play and at
least one coach on field ...
ALABAMA 27-14.
Charleston Southern
(no line) at No. 5 Florida


State
Light workout for
Seminoles before Sooners
come to town ... FLORIDA
STATE 50-10.
No. 6 Stanford (minus
21) at Duke
Blue Devils can at least
hang with Cardinal in
classroom ... STANFORD
43-17.
Oregon State (plus 21)
at No. 8 Wisconsin
Badgers defense needs to
be better than it was against
UNLV ... WISCONSIN 38-
21.
Fresno State (plus 28)
at No. 10 Nebraska
Huskers have won 21
straight against WAC oppo-
nents ... NEBRASKA 41-17.
No. 11 Virginia Tech
(minus 20) at East


Carolina
Pirates QB Dominique
Davis will challenge Hokies
defense ... VIRGINIA TECH
48-27.
No. 12 South Carolina
(minus 3) at Georgia
Beware of under-Dawgs
... GEORGIA 23-17.
Nevada (plus 27) at
No. 13 Oregon
This Wolf Pack is very
different from one that
beat Boise State last year ...
OREGON 55-21.
New Mexico (plus 37)
vs. No. 14 Arkansas
Razorbacks WR Joe
Adams returned two
punts for TDs last week ...
ARKANSAS 58-14.
Toledo (plus 19) at
No. 15 Ohio State
Buckeyes haven't lost


to Ohio team since 1921;
for the record it was 7-6
Oberlin ... OHIO STATE
38-17.
No. 16 Mississippi
State (minus 7) at
Auburn
Think Tigers are feel-
ing more 0-1 than 1-0? ...
MISSISSIPPI STATE 31-27.
Florida Atlantic (plus
32'/2) at No. 17 Michigan
State
In between trips to
Florida and Auburn, Owls
visit Big Ten ... MICHIGAN
STATE 45-10.
UAB (plus 21'/,) at
No. 18 Florida
Gators'Jeff Demps, Chris
Rainey combined for 324
all-purpose yards last week
... FLORIDA 42-14.
Norfolk State (no line)


at No. 19 West Virginia,
Mountaineers D has held
11 of last 13 opponents
under 300 yards ... WEST
VIRGINIA 58-10.
Ball State (plus 21) at
No. 22 South Florida
Cardinals coming off
win against Indiana ... USF
34-10.
BYU (plus 7) at No.
24 Texas
Third meeting. Cougars
won both back in 1987 and
'88 ... TEXAS 24-14.
No. 25 TCU (minus 2)
at Air Force.
Frogs have won three
straight in series and seven
of eight ... TCU 28-20.

Last week's record:
21-12 (straight); 10-8 (vs.
spread).


0