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UFPKY NEH LSTA



The Lake City reporter
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028308/01657
 Material Information
Title: The Lake City reporter
Uniform Title: Lake City reporter (Lake City, Fla. 1967)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: John H. Perry
Place of Publication: Lake City Fla
Publication Date: 9/9/2011
Frequency: daily (monday through friday)[<1969>-]
weekly[ former 1967-<1968>]
daily
normalized irregular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Lake City (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Columbia County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Columbia -- Lake City
Coordinates: 30.189722 x -82.639722 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 95, no. 4 (Oct. 5, 1967)-
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000358016
oclc - 33283560
notis - ABZ6316
lccn - sn 95047175
sobekcm - UF00028308_01569
System ID: UF00028308:01657
 Related Items
Preceded by: Lake City reporter and Columbia gazette

Full Text




CHS vs. GHS
Tigers look to
bounce back against

000014 120511 ****3 -DIGIT
LIB OF FLORIDA HISTORY
PO BOX 117007
205 SMA UNIV OF FLORIDA
GAINESVILLE FL 32611-1943


Lake


Familiar foe
Fort White
opens at home
326 against Newberry.
Sports, I B


Aity


Down to earth
Dead NASA
satellite will
soon fall.
Inside, 5A


Reporter


Friday, September 9, 201 I www.lakecityreporter.com Vol. 137, No. 193 N 75 cents


Window on the world


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Workers install a window on Four World Trade Center,
Thursday in New York. The tower, designed by Fumihiko
Maki, will be 72 floors and is expected to open in 2013.
Sunday will mark the 10th anniversary of the September
11, 2001 attacks.


Journey to the

Swamp through

local partnership


By ANTONIA ROBINSON
arobinson@lakecityreporter.com
Gator fans can Journey
to the Swamp for the sec-
ond year in a row through
a local collaboration.
Round-trip transpor-
tation to University of
Florida Football home
games resumed Sept. 3
to Gainesville through
The initiative is a part-
nership between the Lake
City Holiday Inn & Suites,
Fabulous Coach Lines
& the Columbia County
Tourist Development
Council
Last year transporta-
tion was provided to four
home games but expand-
ed to include all seven
home games for 2011.
The service was well
received by guests and
local fans, said Rod Butler,


Holiday Inn general man-
ager.
"We had guests inquire
about transportation to
some of the games involv-
ing non-conference oppo-
nents," he said.
The service allow fans to
ride a luxury motor coach
provided by Fabulous
Tours to Gainesville for
game days.
New this year is the
departure times.
The coach will leave 2
and a half hours before
kick-off and depart for
Lake City 30 minutes after
the game ends.
"It allows riders to have
more time to enjoy the
festivities in and around
the stadium," Butler said.
Holiday Inn guests
have the opl)orlunily
GATORS continued on 3A


MDA Firefighter Appreciation Month


ANTONIA ROBINSONI Lake City Reporter
Mayor Stephen Witt with a proclamation declaring
September Muscular Dystrophy Association Firefighter
Appreciation Month during the City Council meeting
Tuesday night. From left firefighter Gramby Croft, MDA
boot drive coordinator, Witt and Lake City Fire Department
Chief Carlton Tunsil.

CALL US:87
(386) 7 -1I 293
SUBSCRIBE TO Partly cloudy
THE REPORTER:
I FVoi:e: 755-5445
14 6 I Fax: 752-9400 WEATHER, 2A


It's Romney-Perry



in a two-man race


By KASIE HUNT
-Associated Press
The GOP presidential
contest has quickly nar-
rowed to a two-man race.
As Rick Perry and Mitt
Romney jockey over their
ability to defeat President
Barack Obama, there
are deepening fault lines
between the two on Social
Security, immigration, jobs
and more that could shape
the contest.
Their stylistic differ-
ences are as stark as
their disagreements on
substance. Romney, the
former Massachusetts
governor, also is a former
venture capitalist who is at
his best when he's talking
GOP continued on 3A

Guest speaker


Republican presidential candidates former Massachusetts Gov. Mitt Romney, left, and Texas
Gov. Rick Perry answer a question during a Republican presidential candidate debate at the
Reagan Library Wednesday in Simi Valley, Calif.


COURTESY PHOTO
Life Scout Jeremy Barwick, 15, was the guest speaker at the local Masonic Lodge 27 Sept.
1. The lodge donated $620 for Barwick's Eagle Scout Project and world record attempt. He
is working to collect 600,000 lbs. of non-perishable food items in 24-hours. The event is 8
a.m. Sept. 24 to 8 a.m. Sept. 25 at the Columbia County Fairgrounds Rodeo Arena. Pictured,
back row from left: Bob Breyer, Bill Phillips, Richard Tompkins and Charles Peeler. Front row,
James Clayton, Louis Quintana, Barwick, Fowler and Pete Croft.


SCORE

semi-

finalists

named
From staff reports
Several local business-
es were nominated for
SCORE's Entrepreneur
of theYear Award.
The nominees are:
Ahead of Time Hair
Salon in Jasper, Bower's
Vettes and Classics,
Champ's Pizza, CK
Metal Fabricators, CMS
Professional Staffing,
Columbia County Cycles,
First Street Music,
GeGee's Studio and
Spa, Nancy Upshaw
Massage Therapist,
Ruppert's Bakery, Scott's
Gunsmithing, The Pet

SCORE continued on 3A


Altrusa: New look, same mission


From staff reports

Altrusa International recently unveiled
a new logo for the organization.
The re-branding project has been
three years in making, said Mantha
Young, Club Brand Ambassador. The
logo includes the use of bright colors to
reinforce the revitalization of the Altrusa
Brand.
"We felt like it was important that our
brand become fresh and new," she said.
The organization hired a media and
consulting firm to work on the re-brand-
ing, Young said. The firm collected input
from all over the nation to compiled it
together.
The new brand emphasizes clarity
with prominent use of the Altrusa name.
The brand promotes flexibility through
using a different dominant color ribbon:
blue for Altrusa, gold for Astra and green
for the Club Level. It is also inclusive by
forming the letter A with the color rib-
bons.
The phrase, "Leading to a Better
ALTRUSA continued on 3A


i


Opinion 4A
Peopk 2A
Obituaries .............. SA
Advice & Comics ......... 4B
Puzzles ................. 2B


COURTESY PHOTO
The new Altrusa logo is shown above with Charter Member Jeannette
Kennedy, President Joy Lizotte, and Leslie Rogers, one of Altrusa's newest
members. Altrusa International has been working diligently for three years on
the re-branding project that has finally come to completion.


I A ISTICI AF
IiiNCKSEtL
fa~tJ MIkUN


TODAY IN
PEOPLE
Jackson doctor
going on trial.


COMING
SATURDAY
City 9/I I ceremony
coverage.









LAKE CITY REPORTER DAILY BRIEFING FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 9, 2011


Celebrity Birthdays
0 Actor Cliff Robertson is 88. 59.
S Thursday: Thursday: Actress Sylvia Miles is 77. N Musi
Afternoon: 2-5-5 Afternoon: 4-5-4-5 Wednesday: Rhythm-and-blues singer Stewar
Evening: 9-6-5 Evening: 8-5-4-7 13-15-19-20-29 Luther Simmons is 69. N Acto
Singer Inez Foxx is 69. E Actre
SINSinger Dee Dee Sharp is is 46.
S66. M Acto
SPEOPLE IN THE NEWS Rock singer-musician Doug 0 Mod
Ingle is 65. E Acto

Potential Jackson case jurors dismissed Welleris64.untrysinger Freddy Acto
L A E Actor Tom Wopat is 60. U Actr
LOS ANGELES i- meIBth IlE Actress Angela Cartwright is is 31.


cian-producer Dave
t is 59.
r Hugh Grant is 51.
ess Constance Marie

r Adam Sandier is 45.
el Rachel Hunter is 42.
r Eric Stonestreet (TV:
rn Family") is 40.
r Goran Visnjic is 39.
ess Michelle Williams


More than half oft
the first panel
of prospective
jurors for the man-
slaughter trial of
Michael Jackson's doctor were dis-
missed because of hardship claims
Thursday, signaling a long search
ahead for those who will serve in the
five-week trial.
And it is yet unclear how many
prospects will be excused for disclos-
ing strong opinions about Jackson,
defendant Dr. Conrad Murray and
the high profile case with which all
potential panelists are familiar.
When the judge asked whether
anyone in the jury room was
unaware of case, not a single hand
was raised.
A larger than expected contingent
of 187 prospects showed up for ques-
tioning Thursday. Court officials said
that of those, 115 were dismissed
and 72 remained to fill out lengthy
questionnaires probing their views of
the case in which Murray is charged
with involuntary manslaughter in the
pop star's death. Murray has pleaded
not guilty in the case.
A new panel of prospects was on
call for Friday morning and ques-
tioning could continue Monday if a
sufficient pool has not been cleared
by then. The.judge has said he
wants 100 prospects available who
have no problems with hardship
and no views on their question-
naires extreme enough to require
dismissal.

"Wrestler gets 10 days
"in jail for drug charge
',' CARTHAGE, N.C. Professional
wrestlingg star Jeff Hardy, 34, will
?spend 10 days in jail after pleading
guilty to drug charges in a Moore
County court
Hardy will also pay a $100,000
fine and remain on probation for 30
months as part of the plea agree-


Activist Najee Ali, demonstrates outside court Thursday where jury selection has
begun for the trial of Conrad Murray, Michael Jackson's doctor, who has been
charged with involuntary manslaughter in the pop icon's death, in Los Angeles.
Jury selection is under way for the trial of Dr. Conrad Murray.


Hardy


ment.
The Cameron resi-
dent was arrested
in 2009 and charged
with multiple
felony drug counts.
Authorities said they
found hundreds of
Vicodin pills, ana-


bolic steroids and powder cocaine.

Brown hints at possible
TV opportunities
NEW YORK At most of their
concerts, the Zac Brown Band offers
fans more than burg-
ers and chicken
fingers. Instead,
they have a team of
chefs prepare what
the group's leader
calls "real, Southern
Brown gourmet."
Now, Zac Brown
may be taking his love for food to
television.
"We've talked about it," Brown


said about possibly doing a cooking
TV show. "We've filmed a lot of the
stuff, a lot of the cooking elements
of our stuff to possibly put a show
together, and we definitely will do
that one day."

Ul Wayne nominated for
18 BET Hip-Hop Awards
ATLANTA Rapper Lil Wayne
easily topped the charts this week
with his latest album. Now the self-
proclaimed "Best Rapper Alive" has
the most nominations for the BET
Hip-Hop Awards.
His 18 nominations include MVP
of the Year, Best live Performer and
Hustler of the Year.
Lil Wayne's album "'ha Carter
IV" debuted Aug. 29 at No. 1 on
Billboard's Top 200 charts, selling
964,000 for the second-best first-
week sales of the year behind Lady
Gaga. The awards ceremony will be
taped at Atlanta's Boisfeuillet Jones
Atlanta Civic Center.
M Associated Press


Daily Scripture
"Teach me to do your will, for
you are my God; may your good
Spirit lead me on level ground."
Psalm 143:10

Thought for Today
"A heretic is a man who.sees
with his own eyes."
Gotthold Lessing,
German dramatist-critic (1729-1781)

Lake City Reporter
HOW TO REACH US
Main number ........(386) 752-1293 BUSINESS
Fax number..............752-9400 Controller Sue Brannon... .754-0419
Circulation ................755-445 (sbrannon@lakecityreporter.com)
Online... www.lakecltyreporter.com CIRCULATION
The Lake City Reporter, an affiliate of
Community Newspapers Inc., Is pub- Home delivery of the Lake City Reporter
listed Tuesday through Sunday at 180 should be completed by 630 a.m.
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Periodical postage paid at Lake City, Ra. a.m. on Sunday.
Member Audit Bureau of Circulation and Please call 386-755-5445 to report any
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All material herein is property of the Lake In Columbia County, customers should
City Reporter. Reproduction in whole or call before 1030 a.m. to report a ser-
In part Is forbidden without the pennis- vice error for same day re-delivery. After
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POSTMASTER: Send address changes In all other counties where home delivery
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PublisherTodd Wilson.....754-0418
(twilson@lakecltyreporter.com) Circulation ...............755-5445
(circulation@lakecityreporter.com)
NEWS Home delivery rates
Editor Robert Bridges .....754-0428 (Tuesday through Sunday)
(rbridges@iakecltyreporter.com) 12 Weeks ..................$26.32
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CORRECTION

The Lake City Reporter corrects errors of fact in news
items. If you have a concern, question or suggestion, please
call the executive editor. Corrections and clarifications will run
in this space. And thanks for reading.


Flights resume
after 50 years
TAMPA Commercial
flights from Tampa to
Cuba are back for the first
time since 1962, when
'relations between the two
countries broke off during
the Cold War.
SThe first flight left
Tampa International
Airport Thursday after-
noon for Cuba. Tickets to
the island aren't cheap,
often running more than
$400 for the 75 minute trip.
, But the region's deep-
rooted Cuban-American
community no longer has
to travel to Miami or New
York to visit the island.

GOP leader, 62,
dies from disease
TALLAHASSEE -
Republican Party
Chairman David Bitner
died Thursday at his
Monticello home, just
two weeks before he was
scheduled to step down
as the state GOP boss. He
was 62.
Officials at the state
Republican Party head-
quarters announced
Bitner's death from
Amyotrophic Lateral
Sclerosis, which is more
commonly known as ALS
or Lou Gehrig's disease.
The incurable disease
progressively attacks the
brain and spine and leads
to complete paralysis.
Gehrig, the legendary
New York Yankees first
baseman who earned
the nickname "The Iron
Horse," for his durability
playing in 2,130 consecu-
tive games, died from ALS
in 1941 at the age of 37.

Man allegedly
stabs woman, dog
MULBERRY -
Authorities said a central
Florida man stabbed his
girlfriend, killed his dog
and then wounded himself.


THE WEATHER


ISO.
-STORMS


HI 91 L66


CHC. OF
-STORMS


HI 91 L0 67


0e City Saturday Sunday
14.,97/71 Cape Canaveral 88/76/t 88/75/pc


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Abelardo Arteaga (right) gets ready to board a flight to Cuba
Thursday in Tampa. Commercial flights from Tampa to Cuba
are back for the first time since 1962, when relations between
the two countries broke off during the Cold War.


The Polk County
Sheriff's Office reports
that David McCorkle, 55,
and his girlfriend came
out of their home, covered
with blood, when depu-
ties responded Tuesday.
Authorities said McCorkle
told a deputy to kill him
and threw a butcher knife
at the deputy.
Deputies said McCorkle
stabbed the woman several
times with the butcher
knife and killed the cou-
ple's pit bull mix when it
tried to defend the woman.


a lawsuit filed by New
Hampshire parents who
claimed their 10-year-old
son suffered emotional dis-
tress when he witnessed
a killer whale drown a
SeaWorld trainer.
Last week, Judge Julie
O'Kane ruled that Suzanne
and Todd Connell's lawsuit
was futile because it did
not show how SeaWorld
harmed the child. In
December, the judge dis-
missed another part of the
negligence claim.


IHospital faces
Bus runs through probe after arrest
rd light. hits car


ORLANDO The
Florida Highway Patrol
said no students were on a
bus that ran through a red
light and struck a car in
West Orange County.
Troopers said the bus
hit the driver's side of a
Kia Thursday morning,
critically injuring Cang
Trung To, 52.
Bus driver Joinel
Jorcelin, 32, was also
injured 'in the crash.
FHP says charges are
pending against Jorcelin.

Lawsuit against
SeaWorld tossed
ORLANDO A Florida
judge has dismissed


KISSIMMEE The
state Agency for Health
Care Administration will
review practices at a
Kissimmee hospital that
issued a physician assis-
tant badge to a teenager.
.The 17-year.old was
arrested last week after
officials at Osceola
Regional Medical Center
called police about sus-
picions that he was an
impostor. Officials said he
claimed to be a 23-year-old
student in the PA program
at Nova Southeastern
University. He faces five
felony counts of imperson-
ating a physician's assis-
tant. There will be surprise
inspections at the hospital.
* Associated Press


iassee *
86/63

84/65 nali~aCit
82/67


TEMPERATURES
High Thursday
Low Thursday
Normal high
Normal low
Record high
Record low

PRECIPITATION
Thursday
Month total
Year total
Normal month-to-date
Normal year-to-date


87

4~


84
61
89
70
96 in 1925
62 in 1997

0.00"
1.11"
27.79"
1.43"
38.19"


e Wye I/ "1 Daytona Beach
/65 \ Ft. Lauderdale
ainesvile Dayo eadi Fort Myers
36/66 8&71 Gainesville
Sca a \ Jacksonville
85/68 Key West
Oriando Ce Cap averal ey West
87/74 84 ak75 e City
T5/e--, Naples
85/75 West Pakn Beach Ocala
90/79 Orlando
FL Laerdale Panama City
Ft Myetr 90/78 Pensacola
90/75 *Naples Tallahassee
91/77 .Miami Tampa
k.West 90/78 Valdosta
Key West W. Palm Beach
89/81


SUN
Sunnse today
Sunset today
Sunrise tom.
Sunset tom.


7:12 a.m.
7:44 p.m.
7:12 a.m.
7:42 p.m.


MOON
Moonrise today 6:03 p.m.
Moonset today 4:40 a.m.
Moonrise tom. 6:35 p.m.
Moonset tom. 5:36 a.m.

ooo0)
Sept. Sept. Sept. Oct.
12 20 27 3
Full Last New First


88/74/pc
90/81/pc
93/75/t
89/67/pc
89/71/pc
89/83/t
91/66/pc
89/81/pc
92/77/t
90/69/pc
91/76/pc
85/72/pc
86/67/s
90/67/pc
91/75/t
92/64/pc
88/80/pc


89/74/pc
90/81/t
91/76/pc
90/68/pc
89/72/pc
89/83/t
91/67/pc
89/81/t
91/77/t
91/69/pc
93/75/pc
85/73/pc
88/69/pc
88/71/pc
90/76/pc
88/67/pc
89/80/t


An exclusive
service
brought to
VwHfI our readers
15i miestoban b
Today's by
ultraviolet The Weather
radiation risk Channel.
for the area on Channel.
a scale from 0



S Foreca t, data and
C central, LP, Madison, Wi..
e www.weather pubImt er.com,


AROUND FLORIDA


IlL 3


19 RI


- "A ,, -- I


FW- I -- I Am


[ LAKE3 C ITY AiLMANAC,


I EMRB.-HHO J


(386) 755-5445


Page Editor: Jason M. Walker, 754-0430









LAKE CITY REPORTER NEWS FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 9, 2011 3A



GOP: Republican nomination now a two-man race, Perry vs. Romney

Continued From Page 1A


about how to help businesses help the
economy grow. Perry, the Texas gov-
ernor, is a fiery, red-meat conservative
who has already shown he loves to go on
the attack and isn't afraid to go after
his chief GOP rival.
Those contrasts have driven Romney's
campaign to fundamentally change a strat-
egy that was previously aimed squarely
at Obama. Until Perry jumped into the
race and almost immediately displaced
Romney as the front-runner, the former
Massachusetts governor focused his pub-
lic appearances and messaging on the
president.
Now, instead of running a general elec-
tion campaign in primary season, Romney
will spend the early months trying to con-
vince Republicans that Perry can't beat
Obama'in November.
It will start with Social Security, an
issue Romney's campaign has decided is
Perry's biggest liability. Aides privately
say they plan to make it a singular focus in
the coming weeks.
"You say that by any measure, Social
Security is a failure. You can't say tiat to
tens of millions of Americans who live on
Social Security and those who have lived
on it," Romney said in Wednesday night's
debate, after he and Perry had already


Community," has now been registered
with -US Patents and Trademarks, as the
new Altrusa wordmark.
The new brand should help the com-
munity to know what projects the organiza-
tion is affiliated with.
"It's just like how if you see the Nike
emblem, no one has to tell you that's a
Nike product," Young said.
Also it will possibly interested people in


traded jabs over their jobs records earlier
in the debate.
The Romney campaign has followed
that with a steady stream of press releases,
background material and on-the-record
quotes assailing Perry as a career politi-
cian who is unelectable.
"If (Perry) were to win the nomina-
tion, the most interesting thing that it
would prove is that God is a Democrat,"
said Stuart Stevens, a top Romney strate-
gist.
Romney has also started to take on
Perry's immigration record. Advisers
say that could be the next front in the
fight, largely because it could hurt Perry
with the conservative base he relies
on. As governor of a border state with
problems related to illegal immigration,
Perry has said a physical border fence
isn't necessary. Texas universities also
allow the children of illegal immigrants
to pay in-state tuition rates.
Romney used a recent immigration
address to emphasize his support for a
fence on the southern border and to
highlight his veto of an in-state tuition
bill in Massachusetts
But putting so much focus on such
issues carries risks: They're a distrac-
tion from the central, disciplined jobs-


GATORS: Journey to the Swamp
Continued From Page 1A


to participate in a hotel package which
includes deluxe accommodations, a full
made-to-order breakfast for two in the
Atlantis Caf6 and round-trip transportation
for two to the game.
Tropics Lounge in the Holiday Inn will
also be hosting Pre-game Parties which
will include drink and dining specials
before each game.
Local fans can purchase a round trip
ticket for $25.
The luxury bus is a good deal for guests
and local residents, said Harvey Campbell,
Columbia County Tourist Development
Council executive director.


Participants can avoid the hassle of hav-
ing to drive or find parking at the games,
he said. It allows the total game day expe-
rience complete with tailgating without
running the risk of getting into an accident
or DUI.
Advanced reservations are required by
7 p.m. the Friday prior to game day.
Room packages can be purchased
by calling (386) 754-1411 or by visiting
www.HILakeCityFL.com. Coach reser-
vations can be made by visiting www.
fabulouscoach.com or by calling 1-877-
GoFabulous.


becoming a member of Altrusa, she said.
The organization is service-oriented and
always looking for members.
"We'd like for it to spark an interest and
have people say, 'You know I'd like to hook
up with that bunch. They do some good
things,'" Young said. '
Altrusa is a service organization special-
izing in community needs such as literacy.


and-economy message that Romney has
been pushing steadily for months. The
economy is the issue most likely to drive
voters in 2012.
Perry has already made clear that
he will run primarily on his jobs record
- Texas gained more than 1 million jobs
during his tenure as governor. And he
has taken almost every opportunity to go
after Romney on the issue.
Speaking of his GOP opponents,
Perry told Republicans in California on
Thursday, "We got our differences and
we'll talk about them and what have you
and hopefully in a very respectful way."
Most important, he said, "is we need to
have a nominee that doesn't blur the
lines between themselves and the cur-
rent resident of the White House."
Perry's message is aimed squarely at


an angry GOP base that's clearly hungry
for a candidate who isn't afraid of a fight.
He's willing to deliver strong rhetoric on
issues like the death penalty, a subject
that drew applause at the debate.
Romney, by contrast, is positioning
himself as the technocratic, business-
friendly candidate in the race. He is
clearly most excited when he's talking
about what he calls his "business plan"
for the country. The last time he was
confronted with questions about Social
Security, he ended up talking about cor-
porations.
"Corporations are people, my friend,"
he exclaimed in August at the Iowa State
FAir, staring down a heckler in the crowd
who wanted to know how Romney was
going to protect citizens on Social Security
instead of looking out for companies.


SCORE: Semi-finalists named

Continued From Page 1A


Spot, and Wee Care Preschool.
Nominations were based upon impact
on the business community, community
responsibility, innovation, financial perfor-
mance, and entrepreneurial spirit
Following interviews, the field will be
narrowed to four finalists who will receive
recognition at the annual awards banquet
Oct. 18.
Receiving the designation is meaning-
ful, said Curt Burlingame, SCORE's 2007
Entrepreneur of the Year.
"It's recognition of your business suc-
cess in your local community," he said.
"And, it's bragging time. I put it up on my
business web page." -
Jill Nichols, executive vice president of
Vera Bradley Designs, will be the featured
speaker at the banquet


Vera Bradley Designs, famous for
brightly-patterned quilted cotton women's
luggage and accessories, utilized SCORE's
mentoring services shortly after starting
up, more than 20 years ago.
Burlingame, who is owner of Advantage
Steel Truss, was so impressed with the
organization he is now a volunteer mentor
with SCORE.
Nationally, SCORE aids 20,000 entre-
preneurs in starting new businesses each
year.
SCORE the Service Corps of Retired
Executives also supplies free, confiden-
tial, continuing mentoring to small busi-
nesses.
The local SCORE office can be reached
at 752-2000 or scorelakecity@gmail.com.


. "*31V11YVAV AU3AI13a SS3UdX3***

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has in store


9.11.11 A Day of
Remembrance
In this special issue, veteran news anchor Tom
Brokaw reflects on the indelible lessons of 9/11
we must never forget.


"I Put Everything in His Hands"
The wife of a Pentagon victim shares how she
found a lifelong guardian angel.

Giving 9/11 Families a Voice
What started in a living room has grown into a
strong organization. Find out how Voices of September 11th helps those affected
by the tragedy help each other.

Legacies of Hope
In the wake of 9/11, hundreds of scholarships, advocacy groups, and community
service programs were created in memory of the victims. Learn about some of the
ways you can honor those who were lost.

Intelligence Report: A Nation Tested
Photographer Tom Franklin discusses the meaning behind his powerful 9/11
image of three of New York's Bravest called "raising a flag:'

SUNDAY, September 11, 2011
Lake City Reporter www.parade.com


ALTRUSA: New look for an old friend

Continued From Page 1A


f Tentative Five Year Work Program
District Two
OrTS Fiscal Years Beginning July 1,2012 June 30, 2017
The Florida Department of Transportation (FDOT), District Two, is conducting public
hearings pursuant to Section 339.4 35(4)(c), Florida Statutes, to consider the
Department's Tentative Work Program for the Fiscal Years 2012/2013 through 2016/2017,
and to consider the necessity of making any changes to the Work Program, to which all
persons are invited to attend and be heard.
1. Live Oak Hearing: Specific notice is provided to the County Commissions for
Hamilton, Lafayette, Madison, Suwannee and Taylor counties serving as the Metropolitan
Planning Organization (MPO) for their respective counties.
DATE AND TIME: Thursday, October 6, 2011 at 5:30 p.m.
PLACE: Live Oak Passenger Depot
210 N. Ohio Avenue, Live Oak, FL

2. Lake City Hearing: Specific notice is provided to the Gainesville Metropolitan
Transportation Planning Organization (MTPO) and the County Commissions for Alachua,
Bradford, Columbia, Dixie, Gilchrist, Levy and Union counties serving as the Metropolitan
Planning Organization (MPO) fortheir respective counties.
DATE AND TIME: Monday, October 10, 2011 at 5:30 p.m.
PLACE: FDOT District Two Office, Madison Room
1109 South Marion Ave., Lake City, FL

3. Jacksonville Hearing: Specific notice is provided to the North Florida
Transportation Planning Organization (TPO), the Jacksonville City Council and the County
Commissions for Baker, Clay, Nassau, Putnam and St. Johns counties serving as the
Metropolitan Planning Organization for their respective counties.
DATE AND TIME: Thursday, October 13, 2011 at 5:30 p.m.
PLACE: FDOT Jacksonville Urban Office, Training Facility
2198 Edison Avenue, Jacksonville, FL

Public participation is solicited without regard to race, color, religion, sex, age, national
origin, disability or family status. Persons who require accommodations under the
Americans with Disabilities Act or persons who require translation services (free of
charge) should contact Mr. Bill Henderson, District Planning & Environmental Manager,
Lake City District Office at 1-800-749-2967 at least seven (7) days in advance of the
Public Hearings.
Written comments from the Metropolitan Planning Organizations (MPO's), County
Commissions and other interested parties will be received by the Department at the Public
Hearings and up to October 28, 2011 following the hearing. Comments should be
addressed to:
Mr. Alan R. Mosley, P.E., District Two Secretary
Florida. Department of Transportation, District Two
1109 South Marion Ave. Mail Station 2000
Lake City, FL 32025-5874
Telephone 1-800-749-2967
FLORIDA DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION













OPINION


Friday, September 9, 2011


ONE ANOTHER


ONE
OPINION


USPS,


R.I.P.

r at would
America do with-
out its govern-
W ment-run postal
V monopoly? The
U.S. Postal Service is set to go
bust within a few weeks, absent
yet another multibillion-dollar
bailout If it doesn't get one,
the postman threatens to can-
cel Christmas deliveries. This
threat could safely be ignored if
only we'd permit companies like
DHL, FedEx and UPS to handle
regular mail in addition to pack-
ages. The only thing we'd miss
without USPS would be long
lines and a careless postman los-
ing our mail.
The Post Office does "loss"
better than anyone. It's on
track to rack up nearly $10 bil-
lion in red ink this fiscal year.
The problems run so deep that
, there's no way to make the
dismal numbers add up without
a massive infusion of taxpayer
cash.
USPS is a government agency
that likes to pretend it's run like
a private business. Yet the bills
are coming due on the lavish
federal health care and pension
promises that currently account
for a whopping 30 percent of
operational expenses. There are
too many post offices and too
many overpaid, unionized post-
men for this outfit to survive in
a world where an email is cheap
and bills can be paid online.
To stay afloat, the new postal
plan is to opt out of the fed-
eral benefits program, lay off
125,000 career employees, shut
down 12,000 storefronts, raise
stamp prices and cut services.
That sort of reform might have
worked 10 years ago, but it's far
too late to take such steps now.
President Obama, of course,
will move to rescue this dysfunc-
tional and obsolete relic because
he needs the political muscle
of the postal union bosses
who represent 528,653 career
employees. Congress shouldn't
let that happen. The real answer
is to repeal the federal statute that
makes it a crime for private com-
panies to deliver a first-class letter.
These firms have proved they can
build a profitable enterprise by
providing lower prices and better
service to the nation's homes
and businesses. Let the market
take over where government
has failed.

The Washington Times

Lake City Reporter
Serving Columbia County
Since 1874
The Lake City Reporter is pub-
lished with pride for residents of
Columbia and surrounding counties by
Community Newspapers Inc.
We believe strong newspapers build
strong communities -"Newspapers
get things done!"
Our primary goal is to
publish distinguished and profitable
community-oriented newspapers.
This mission will be accomplished
through the teamwork of professionals
dedicated to truth, integrity and hard
work.
Todd Wllson, publisher
Robert Bridges, editor
Sue Brannon, controller
Dink NeSmith, president
Tom Wood, chairman

LETTERS
POLICY
Letters to the Editor should be
typed or neatly written and double
spaced. Letters should not exceed
400 words and will be edited for
length and libel. Letters must be
signed and include the writer's name,
address and telephone number for
verification. Writers can have two
letters per month published. Letters
and guest columns are the opinion of
the writers and not necessarily that of


the Lake City Reporter.
'BY MAIL: Letters, P.O. Box 1709,
Lake City, FL 32056; or drop off at
180 E. Duval St. downtown.
BY FAX: (386) 752-9400.
BY E-MAIL:
news@lakecityreporter.com


6 h Thatwent
" \/\t Iwrong?"
V That was
the title of
Bernard Lewis' landmark book
on Islam's thousand years of
global dominance followed
by the decline of the caliph-
ate between the 17th century,
when Muslim armies were halt-
ed at the Gates of Vienna, and
the early 20th century when
the Ottoman Empire collapsed.
This fall from grace left deep
scars grievances expressed
most lethally on Sept. 11, 2001,
soon after Lewis' book was
completed.
Ten years later, the question
we might be asking: What has
gone wrong with us? The atroc-
ities of 9/11 were said to be a
new Pearl Harbor that would
once again "awaken a sleeping
giant and fill him with a terrible
resolve."
Instead, many if not most of
our leaders fight fitfully and
without conviction, uncertain
about both the nature and the
gravity of the threat. One exam-
ple: Lady Eliza Manningham-
Buller, the former head of MI5,
Britain's storied intelligence
service, last week called the
9/11 attacks "a crime, not an
act of war." She did not explain
why she thought using hijacked
planes to destroy the military,
political and financial centers
of the Free World was akin to a
bank robbery. She did not cite
other instances in which crimi-
nals seek no monetary benefit,
kill themselves during the
commission of their crimes and
call that "martyrdom." She did
not say whether she thought
Osama bin Laden should have
been entitled to a presumption
of innocence rather than a bul-
let through the head.
A second example: National
Security Advisor Tom Donilon
said in a recent speech that he
and President Barack Obama
know what the Iranians are
against but "what are they for?"


www.lakecityreporter.com


Let me boil it down: They are
for restoring to Islam the power
and glory it enjoyed a millen-
nium ago. They are for the
defeat of the Great Satan and
the Little Satan and anyone else
who defies Allah's will as they
interpret it.
Manningham-Buller,'Donilon,
Obama they are smart
people. So, again, what has
gone wrong? I think they have
become disoriented. I use the
word advisedly.
The "Orient" is the east. Not
so long ago, the study of the
Middle East and Islam was a
discipline called Orientalism.
The greatest modern
Orientalist was and for my
money remains Professor
Lewis, now 95 years old and
still sharp as a scimitar.
In more than three dozen
books, he has detailed the
history of the great Islamic
empire founded by fierce and
determined conquerors who,
starting in the 7th century,
pushed west to Spain and east
to the Philippines, defeating,
among others, Christians and
occupying their lands includ-
ing, in 1453, the Byzantine
capital of Constantinople
(now called Istanbul). These
forces marched north into the
European heartland as well but
were beaten in two historic bat-
tles: Tours in 732 and Vienna
in 1683.
"The Muslim peoples," Lewis
has noted, "like everyone else
in the world, are shaped by
their history, but, unlike some
others, they are keenly aware
of it."


If many of our leaders fail to
comprehend all or any of this,
part of the explanation may be
that the intellectual waters have
been muddied. In 1978, Edward
Said, a Columbia University
professor of comparative
literature, published a book
titled "Orientalism," an assault
on Lewis and other Western
scholars. Said's contention was
that Europeans and Americans
were not competent to under-
stand Muslims and that their
attempts to do so should be dis-
missed as neo-colonialism.
Those concerned with the
rise of militant movements with-
in the Islamic world, Said con-
tended, were racists. His views
came to dominate American and
European universities. Small
wonder that the attacks of 9/11
were not anticipated by most
academic experts or the diplo-
mats and intelligence analysts
who had studied under them.
It should not go unmentioned
here: As much as Lewis has
been, denigrated by Islamists
and their apologists, he also
has been criticized by some on
the right who see no hope for
a reformed Islam an Islam
as distant from Khomeinism,
Wahhabism and bin Ladenism
as 21st century Christianity is
from the Inquisition.
But few Muslims are likely to
fight for such reform until and
unless Islamism is defeated.
And that cannot happen so long
as the West's leaders fail to rec-
ognize 9/11 for the act of war it
was, so long as they think they
can sweet-talk self-proclaimed
Jihadis into being reason-
able, so long as they remain
convinced that the conflict
now underway is a crime or a
mystery disconnected from the
powerful currents of history
and faith.

* Clifford D. May is president of
the Foundation for the Defense
of Democracies, a policy institute
focusing on terrorism.


Dark side of liberal government


There's no official
definition of liberal
government, but a
fair description would
be the proactive use
of official powers to protect and
enhance the public welfare, how-
ever that may be perceived.
The great political debates at
all levels of government are over
how deep that intrusion should
be such as the turmoil over
whether the federal government
should mandate purchase of
health care insurance.
That philosophical debate
aside, there is a darker side to
liberal government
Its regulation and taxation have
great financial impact, creating an
incentive to reshape public poli-


cies for private gain.
Every new regulatory or taxa-
tion policy immediately spawns
an array of financial stakeholders
who then hire lobbyists and politi-
cal consultants, distribute money
to political policymakers, and
seek self-serving applications of
government power.
They may be a subsidy from a
local government redevelopment
agency, a tax loophole, a regula-
tory crackdown on a competitor, a
change in the coastal zone's regu-
latory boundaries, or monopoly
licensing status, to name a few.
And politicians, for obvious
reasons, like having the power to
grant favors, even when it defies
rationality, such as the California
Legislature's micro-control over


which horse breed can race at
which track on which day, or over
company-by-company exceptions
to the state's liquor sales laws.
The Capitol's chief activity is, in
fact, directly or indirectly taking
money from someone and giving
it to someone else.
Two years ago, the
Legislature and then-Gov.
Arnold Schwarzenegger gave a
proposed professional football
stadium in Industry a blanket
exemption from the California
Environmental Quality Act's
requirements.
If CEQA is too onerous, it
should be changed, not merely
riddled with special-interest
loopholes.
* Sacramento Bee


4A


ANOTHER
VIEW


Screening

makes

skies less

unfriendly

N ineteen hijack-
ers who boarded
planes in small
groups in Boston,
Newark and
Washington on the morning
of Sept. 11, 2001, didn't so
much evade airline security as
walk boldly through its many
gaps. Terrorism watch lists
were of little bother. Box cut-
ters were permitted on planes.
Checkpoints were manned
by minimum-wage screeners
working for the lowest bidders
who won airline contracts. And
once on board, the hijackers
faced obstacles as flimsy as the
security on the ground.
Today, experts who com-
plain that security is still
porous and just "theater" must
be suffering from amnesia.
The Transportation Security
Administration (TSA), created
in the weeks after 9/11, has
brought security a long way in
the past 10 years. And while
the agency has had its share of
missteps and failures, there's
no question that flying is far
safer today than in 2001.
One of the most effective
changes, hardening cockpit
doors to make them impass-
able, was accomplished in a
matter of months, proving
how much the government
and industry can accomplish
when both are committed.
Many pilots are now armed
and trained to use guns in an
emergency. Air marshals are
deployed on more flights.
All checked baggage is
screened for explosives, and
TSA agents have taken over
screening from private com-
panies at the vast majority of
airports. Cargo in the bellies of
domestic passenger planes is
screened, too. At 78 airports,
many travelers pass through
full-body scanners designed to
detect explosives. And the TSA,
albeit belatedly, is finally check-
ing passengers against com-
bined government watch lists
- to detect dangerous people,
not just dangerous objects.
Of course, even all these
steps cannot eliminate risk.
What they can do is make it
harder for terrorists to succeed
and less enticing for them to
try.
That terrorists remain fix-
ated on airplanes is certain, as
evidenced by last October's
plot to ship parcel bombs on
planes from Yemen to the USA,
and the "underwear bomber"
who tried to blow up a Detroit-
bound jetliner on Christmas
Day of 2009. The parcel-bomb
plot was foiled by good intel-
ligence and swift international
cooperation, but it exposed
holes in the screening of
cargo on international flights.
The Christmas Day near-miss
revealed gaps in intelligence
sharing as well as the role that
alert, courageous passengers
can play in subduing terrorists.
The TSA and its director,
John Pistole, are taking some
cautious steps toward reduc-
ing the airport "hassle factor."
Next month, the agency will
start testing a new way to
identify frequent fliers who
are not risks and treat them
accordingly. Another over-
due program would limit the
screening of children. On
Tuesday, Homeland Security
Secretary Janet Napolitano
also mentioned allowing pas-
sengers to keep their shoes
on at some vague point in
the future.
We hope this doesn't take
another 10 years. Having the
nerve to decide when a pro-


cedure is no longer necessary
is as important as deciding to
add yet another layer of secu-
rity.
* USA Today


Western leaders remain


disoriented, post 9-11














Court tosses lawsuits over health reform


By LARRY O'DELL
Associated Press

RICHMOND, Va. A federal appeals
court in Virginia dismissed two lawsuits
Thursday that had claimed President
Barack Obama's health care overhaul was
unconstitutional, though it remains likely
the U.S. Supreme Court will eventually
decide whether the government can force
individuals to buy insurance.
A three-judge panel of the 4th U.S. Circuit
Court of Appeals cited technicalities in both
decisions and did not rule on the constitu-
tional issues raised by the lawsuits.
Two of the judges on the Virginia panel
were appointed by Obama, the other by
Bill Clinton.
The Richmond-based appeals court is
the third appellate court to rule in law-
suits challenging the health care reform


law, which requires individuals to buy
health insurance or pay a penalty. A federal
appeals court in Cincinnati upheld the law,
while an appeals court in Atlanta struck
down the insurance mandate.
More than 30 lawsuits have been filed
across the country.
The judges ruled 3-0 that Virginia
Attorney General Kenneth Cuccinelli did
not have legal standing to file his lawsuit.
Cuccinelli had argued that the federal
law conflicts with a state law that says no
Virginian can be forced to buy insurance.
Judge Diana Gribbon Motz wrote that
the only apparent function of the state law
was "to declare Virginia's opposition to a
federal insurance mandate."
Motz wrote that under Virginia's theory,
a state could acquire standing to challenge
any federal law just by enacting a state
law. For example, a state could pass a law


essentially opting out of Social Security.
"Thus, if we were to adopt Virginia's
standing theory, each state could become
a roving constitutional watchdog of sorts;
no issue, no matter how generalized or
quintessentially political, would fall beyond
a state's power to litigate in federal court,"
she wrote.
Cuccinelli said in a written statement
that he would appeal the ruling.
"Our disappointment not only stems
from the fact that the court ruled against
us, but also that the court did not even
reach the merits on the key question of
Virginia's lawsuit whether Congress
has a power never before recognized in
American history: the power to force one
citizen to purchase a good or service from
another citizen," Cuccinelli said.
The Justice Department did not immedi-
ately respond to emails seeking comment.


In the Liberty case, the curt ruled 2r1
that the appeals court did not have juris-"
diction to rule on the case because federal
law prohibits challenging a tax before it is
collected.
Judge Andre Davis dissented in the
Liberty case, writing that he believed the,
court did have jurisdiction. Furthermore
Davis wrote that if the court had ruled
on the constitutional issue, he would hoji
that the health care reform law is a consti-
tutional exercise of congressional power
under the Com'merce Clause.
"We believe*that this decision is clearly
wrong," said Liberty attorney Mat Staver.
"It goes against every other court decision
in the country and it goes against even the
interpretation of the U.S. Department of
Justice regarding the law."
Associated Press Writer Michael
Felberbaum contributed to this report.


Runaway big rig driver


gets prison in fatal crash

PASADENA, Calif. (AP) A trucker con-
victed of involuntary manslaughter in a run-
away big-rig crash that took the lives of a man
and his daughter was sentenced Thursday to
seven years and four months in state prison.
A Los Angeles Superior Court judge made
the final ruling for Marcos Costa, 46, after
hearing lengthy statements from friends and
relatives of the victims George and Angelina
Posca.
Costa, a Brazilian national who had been liv-
ing in Everett, Mass., was convicted in July by .
a jury that rejected charges of second-degree .' .
murder.
He was driving a 25-ton, double-decker car
hauler through the San Gabriel Mountains
northeast of Los Angeles when his brakes
failed on April 1, 2009. The truck barreled
down the Angeles Crest Highway and smashed
through traffic in the foothill town of La Canada
Flintridge, killing the Poscas and plowing into
some shops.
Angelina, 12, and her father, Angel George
Posca, 58, of Palmdale, died after their car was
struck. Four other cars were hit before the
truck plowed into a bookstore and nail salon.
Three other people were injured.
At trial, authorities blamed the crash on
Costa's decision to use a narrow, winding
mountain road instead of a freeway to get from
the desert to metropolitan Los Angeles.
Prosecutors said Costa ignored a warning
by an off-duty firefighter that Angeles Crest
Highway was too dangerous for the big-rig and
he should turn around. He continued to make I'
the 1 1/2-mile descent even though his brakes
began to smoke. Prosecutors say Costa poured
water on them instead of waiting for them to ASSOCATEDP
cool. ASSOCIATEDPRESS
"There were just so many opportunities to Truck driver Marcos Costa expresses his remorse to the victim's families
stop," deputy district attorney Carolina Lugo before his sentencing in court Thursday in Pasadena, Calif. Costa was
said after the sentencing. sentenced Thursday to seven years and four months in state prison.


OBITUARIES


Dead NASA


satellite will


soon fall


By SETH BORENSTEIN
AP Science Writer

WASHINGTON A
dead NASA satellite will
soon fall to Earth, but the
space agency says there
is very little chance that
a piece of it will hit some-
one.
NASA says the 20-
year-old satellite will
probably fall sometime
between late September
and October. Pieces of
it could land anywhere
in the six inhabited con-
tinents in a worldwide-
swath from south of
Juneau, Alaska, to just
north of the tip of South
America. NASA sci-
entists estimate a 1-in-
3,200 chance a satellite
part could hit someone.
Most of it will burn up
after entering Earth's
atmosphere.
The 6-ton Upper
Atmosphere Research
Satellite (UARS) ran out
of fuel in 2005 and will fall
uncontrolled out of orbit
Only about 1,200 pounds
of metal should survive,
NASA said.
This satellite is far
smaller than the 135-ton
Russian space station
Mir, which fell to Earth
in 2001 or the 100-ton
Skylab that fell in 1979.
Mir fell into the South


Pacific, while Skylab hit
the Indian Ocean and'
parts of sparsely popu-
lated western Australia.
Because two-thirds of,
the Earth is ocean, space
debris usually hits watet.-
"Things have been re-
entering ever since the
dawn of the Space Age;'
to date nobody has been
injured by anything that's
re-entered," said NASA
orbital debris chief Gene'
Stansbery. "That doesn't
mean we're not conf-
cerned." J
NASA now has a rule
that the chance of any,
of its satellites hitting
someone has to be more
than 1 in 10,000. But
UARS, which measured'
chemicals in the air, was
launched in 1991 before"
that rule was adopted&'
The agency usually tries
to put dead satellites int6
"a graveyard orbit" o6
steer them down to the:
ocean, Stansbery said.
But there was not enough'
fuel in this one to fire'
engines that would move,
it to a higher orbit or
steer it down safely.
The 1-in-3,200 odds of-
being hit pertain to any of
the nearly 7 billion people-
on Earth. But any one
individual's odds of being
struck are about 1 in 21
trillion.


Ollis "Shorty" Daniels
Mr. Ollis "Shorty" Daniels,
age 84, of Lake City, Fla. died
Wednesday, Sept. 7, in the V.A.
Medical Center, Lake City, Fla.
following a long illness. He was
a native of Wau- ....-.
chula, Florida
and had resided 5
in Lake City
for the past 80 '
years. He worked for Guerdon
Industries for over 10 years and
retired from the maintenance
department of the Columbia
County School Board in 1986
,after 15 years of service. He was
a member of the Philippi Baptist
.Church and an Army veteran of
the" Korean Conflict. He was pre-
ceded in death by his parents, Zeb
and Mamie Gay Daniels, sister
Edith Daniels, brother and sister-
in-laws, Alan and Merle Daniels
and Lee and Edith (Nig) Daniels.
He is survived by his wife of 62
years, Ernestine Daniels of Lake
City, Fla.: son, Bobby (Rachel)
Daniels, Sr. of Lake City, Fla.:
daughter, Julie (Rob) Jones of
Lampasas, Texas: brother, Lewis
(Mary Lou) Daniels of Lake City,
Fla.: six grandchildren, Bobby,
Jr., Elizabeth, Robert, James,
Nicholas and Carrie: nine great-
grandchildren, Kyle, Bobby III,
*Krista, Katelynn, Joshua, Jacob,
Mitchell, Devon and Anna. Fu-
neral services will be conducted
at 11 A.M. Saturday, Sept. 10, in
the Philippi Baptist Church with
Rev. Mark Cunningham, Asso-
ciate Pastor of Hopeful Baptist
Church, officiating and assisted
by Rev. Lewis Daniels, Pastor
of Oak Grove Baptist Church.
Interment will be in Philippi
Cemetery, Columbia County,
Fla. Visitation will be from 6
to 8 P.M. Friday, Sept. 9, at,
GUERRY FUNERAL
HOME, 2659 S.W. Main
Blvd., Lake City, Fla.
www.guerryfuneralhome.net

James R. Merritt, Jr.
James R. Merritt, Jr., 48, of Lake
City passed away on Tuesday,
Sept. 6, 2011 at Shands (a, the
University of Florida. He was


born in Orlando and was a shift
supervisor for Pilgrim's Pride
in Live Oak. He was a member
of Bethel Missionary Baptist
Church in Wellborn and enjoyed'
woodworking. He is survived by
his wife, Laura Gallery Merritt
of Lake City, his children, Jacob
and Megan Merritt of Lake City,
his parents, James and Janice
Dobson Merritt of Wellborn, his
brothers, Steve and wife Laurel
Merritt of Dothan, AL, Paul and
wife Christi Merritt of Ocala and
John Merritt of Wellborn, his
grandmother, Lilla Mae Dobson
of Vernon, his father-in-law and
mother- in-law, Jerry and Nancy
Gallery of Ocala and numer-
ous nieces, nephews, aunts and
uncles. Funeral services will be
held on Saturday, Sept. 10, 2011
at 11:00 A.M. at Hiers-Baxley
Funeral Services, 910 E. Silver
Springs Blvd., Ocala with Rev.
Steve Merritt and Rev. Larry
Patterson officiating. Visita-
tion will be Friday from 5-7
PM. Interment will be at Good
Shepherd Memorial Gardens.

Nathaniel B. Mobley
Mr. Nathaniel B. Mobley, 62,
of Lake City, died unexpectedly
on Monday, September 5, 2011.
Nathaniel was born in Gaines-
ville, Florida
and was raised Ii i
in Lake City.
He was a lov-
ing and devot-
ed son to his
parents the late
Rev. L. U. Mo-
bley and Mrs.
Mattie Mobley.
He obeyed the
gospel of Christ p .
at an early age. -'
He graduated from Richardson
High School in 1967. During his
adult life, he resided in Gaines-
ville, Florida and Lake City. iHe
was honorably discharged fiom
the US Army after serving in
Vietnam in 1969. Nathaniel was
married to Mrs. Bernice Herring
Mobley who preceded him in
death. He also had one brother
Samuel Mobley who preceded
him in death. Nathaniel Mob-


ley is survived by his mother
Mattie Mobley of Lake City, his
brothers Lewis of Lake City; and
Philip (Lotonia) of Jacksonville:
his sisters Mattie (Lynward)
Jones and Narragansett (J.R.)
Smith both of Lake City, and a
host of uncles, aunts, cousins,
nephews, nieces, and friends.
The Home Going service for Mr.
Nathaniel Mobley will be held
on Saturday, September 10th
at St. Paul Missionary Baptist
Church, 222 NW Oosterhoudt
Lane, Lake City, Florida 32055.
Rev Alvin Greene will deliver
the eulogy. The wake will be
Friday September 9th from 6
'- 8:00 P.M. Services entrusted
to Russell Allen Wright, Sr.
Mortuary 1547 Lisenby Avenue
Panama City, FL 32405 (850)
640-2077 email condolences:
rawsrmort@comcast.net. Cards
and flowers maybe sent to: Mat-
tie Mobley 265 SW Tunsil Street,
Lake City, FL 32023-1217

Ravon Powell
Ravon Powell, infant son of
Ramson & Charese Powell died
Tuesday, Sept. 6, 2011 follow-
ing a sud-
den illness.
Survivors in-
clude moth-
er, Charese
Powell; fa-
ther, Ramson
M itchel I ;


brothers & sisters, Martavian
Douglas, Ramson Mitchell, Don-
tai Mitchell, Kayleah Cordell and
Dwayne Cordell; a host of other
relatives and friends also survive.
Funeral services for Ravon Pow-
ell will be 10:00 a.m. Saturday,
Sept. 10, 2011 at Cooper Funeral
I lome. Chapel. Interment will fol-
lo\w in gardenn of Rest Cemetery.
Arratngmcnnts entrusted to:
(OOPH'.R FUNERAL HOME,
251 N. IF. \WashingtonStreet;Lake
City, FI.. Willis o. cooper, L.F.D.




Obituaries are paid advertise-
ments. For details, call the Lake
City Reporter's classified depart-
ment at 752-1293.


SHang Op
a minute-'J ,P

Our customers receive
a Complimentary
copy of the
Lake City Reporter
when thelv drop off&
-~^ pickup their cleaning
h \ ,. ...... .. ...


.UIrP DA
0& 07 &IVA
q q/
q ,,ye .OM4'a







Jantah, B'ae4t

a4 dU td j "4 Id


REGULAR MEETING/BUDGET HEARING
LAKE SHORE HOSPITAL AUTHORITY
BOARD OF TRUSTEES

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the Board of Trustees of the Lake Shore Hospital Authority will hold their Regular
Meeting following the Budget Hearing on Monday, September 12, ZO11 at 5:15 pm at the LSHA Administrative
Complex, Conference Room, 259 NE Franklin Street, Lake City, Florida. The purpose of the meeting is to take action on
regular business. All interested persons are invited to attend.
SPECIAL REQUIREMENTS: If you require special aid or services for the meeting identified above, as addressed in the i
American Disabilities Act, please contact Sute I'raze at (386) 755-1090.
KOBY ADAMS
Chairnan


LAKE CITY REPORTER NATIONAL FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 9, 2011


Page Editor: Robert Bridges, 754-0428









6A LAKE CITY REPORTER NATIONAL FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 9, 2011



Audio files reveal 9/11 air traffic horror


NEW YORK (AP) -
Newly posted audio files
depict the horror of 9/11
unfolding in the sky, as air
traffic controllers struggled
to follow the faint tracks of
hijacked planes, fighter jets
tried in vain to chase them
down and a flight attendant
made a desperate appeal
for help.
The sound files add a
layer of emotion to previ-
ously published transcripts,
as puzzlement and frustra-
tion seeps into the voices of
controllers, military com-
manders, and even pilots
watching the attacks from
the sky. There are shout-
ing and ringing phones
in the background the
soundtrack, usually omitted
from written transcripts, of
a nation suddenly at war.
In one chilling excerpt,
screaming and a shouted
"Hey!" is heard over the
radio as hijackers storm
the cockpit of United
Flight 93. That's followed
by a strange, strained cry.
Stunned controllers and
other pilots discuss the
sounds, trying to make
sense of what they heard.
"No dry words on a page
can capture that; you really
have to hear it," said John
Farmer, dean of the Rutgers
University School of Law
and former senior counsel
to the government's 9/11
Commission.
The sound files were
posted online Wednesday,
just days before the 10th
anniversary of the attacks,
to accompany a monograph
published by the Rutgers
University Law Review.
The monograph was writ-
ten by Farmer and other
investigators working for the
9/11 Commission but was
not completed by the time
the commission released its
final report in 2004.
Farmer and another
investigator, Miles Kara,
decided to finish the docu-
ment and add. the audio
after their draft and the
original Federal Aviation


ASSOCIATED PRESS
This June 16 file photo shows a sign describing the plan for the entire Flight 93 memorial on the fence at the temporary memorial as construction continues at
the Flight 93 Memorial in Shanksville, Pa. The first phase of the construction is set to be completed and dedicated on Sept. 10, one day before the tenth anni-
versary of the crash of United Flight 93 into a field during the attacks of Sept. 11, 2001.


Administration recordings
were declassified last year.
Law school students
helped review and edit the
recordings.
Most of recordings come
from the FAA and are of
controllers and the military
liaisons working with them.
But some come from other
sources, including a phone
call that Betty Ong, a flight


attendant on American
Airlines Flight 11, placed to
the airline.
"Somebody's stabbed in
business class, and, um I
think there is Mace that we
can't breathe," Ong says.
"I don't know, I think we're
getting hijacked."
After I'lighl 11 hit the
World Trade Center, tapes
recorded the conversa-


tion among controllers as
a second plane streaked
past the window of a radar
control facility on its way to
Manhattan.
"Another one just hit the
building," someone says.
Anotherpersonresponds:
"Oh my God."
And then: "Another one
just hit it hard. ... Another
one just hit the World


Trade."
It's followed by: "The
whole building just, ah,
came apart."
Someone utters again:
"Oh my God."
Some original recordings
from 9/11 still have not
been made public, includ-
ing military communica-
tions, discussions among
White House officials, and


the cockpit voice recorder
from Flight 93.
Farmer listened to the
cockpit voice recording dur-
ing the 9/11 Commission
investigation. He said it
is a stirring record of the
hijacking and of the pas-
-,in.,.rF-' attempt to retake
control of the plane before
it crashed near Shanksville,
Pa.


Beyond Menopause

the Musical

Your age is up. Below the waist, things are down. In fact, they are
drooping, leaking and prolapsing. What can you do?

Join us for Girl Talk at Lake City Medical Center.
Gynecologist Dr. Anthony Agrios will discuss the latest treatments
for common conditions that many women think they just have
to live with as they get older.

Thursday, September 29

12:00 Noon 1:00 p.m.

Lake City Medical Center Classroom

Our program is free and includes lunch.
Please RSVP by September 27. Call 1-800-611-6913.


NORTH FLORIDA-" LAKE CITY
REGIONALL HA.c.A.r. MEDICAL CENTER


V.SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 24, 2011 ;

HOWARD CONFERENCE CENTER ', FLORIDA GATEWAY COLLEGE:

Proul), pr,,-nred by.


Reoainal Medical C.enter


SCMS
.1 P ... : i, ,'.l"


OPENING ACTS START @ 7:00PM
PRE-SHOW PARTY AND BBQ.SPONSORED -BY g ,MCMA
I* O. Ar l .


Df Chuckim it,
A RobnH.II Hal d


, Potash ibt


'Pc-


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40 FMG .


m. ...i .. ftaSE^* *1( .. (rlo


, I .


|









Lake City Reporter


Story ideas?

Contact
Tim Kirby
$ports Editor
754-0421
tkitrby@lakecatyreportert:com


SPORTS


Friday, September 9, 201 I


www.lakecityreporter.com


Section B


CHEAP SEATS


Tigers ready to

bounce back


Tim Kirby
Phone:(386) 754-0421
tkirby@lakecityreporter.com

Signing

on with

champs

You can
measure
height, but
not heart.
The
no-NFL knock on
Sampson Genus was
that, at 6-even, he was
too short.
The Lake City native
proved the predictors
wrong when he was
added by the Green Bay
Packers this week to the
defending Super Bowl
champion's practice
squad.
The South Florida
team captain in his senior
was originally signed as
a non-drafted player on
July 28.
With the lockout, it
was a even a more
radical world for
newcomers.
"We did not have a
rookie camp and missed
nine days of OTA
(organized team
activities)," Genus said
Monday evening after
practice. "Missing
mini-camp made it kind
of hard."
It was like a TV series
that changed every day.
"You came straight into
training camp and had to
learn the playbook day
by day," Genus said. "It
was a tough situation.
Every day you have to
get out there and show
you can hang with the
other guys. I tried to put
on a good show and I
guess they liked what
they saw on tape."
Genus said the
shortened practice time
could make for a
sluggish start.
"It is different when
you are conditioning
on your own, when you
don't have guys to push
you," Genus said. "When
you get tired on your
own, you always'say
'OK, I'm done."'
Genus said he has
"met some good guys."
One is 10-year veteran
Ryan Pickett, who is
from Zephyrhills. Pickett
told Genus he
remembered playing
with Columbia High
coach Quinton Callum
in the Florida-Georgia
All-Star game back in the
day. Callum also played
at South Florida.
Genus got a few props
when the Bulls beat
Notre Dame on Saturday.
"A bunch of them let
me know about that," he
said.
Genus said the
rookie hazing is not too
extreme. He had to do
some singing and serves,
up water and coffee to
the veterans.
"It is a great
atmosphere, but I was
kind of nervous," Genus
said. "They pick on me
all the time because I am
from Florida. They tell
me it will be'a big change
when winter comes. It
was 64 here today and I
was already cold."

* Tim Kirby is sports editor
of the Lake City Reporter.


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Columbia High's Nigel Atkinson tries to evade pressure during the Tigers' win against Santa
Fe High on Aug. 26.


Tigers bite


Columbia brings
in Gainesville at
7:30 p.m. tonight.
By BRANDON FINLEY
bfinley@lakecityreporter.com
Columbia High coach
Brian Allen didn't want to
start the season 0-1, but he's
never been as concerned
about how the Tigers start
as how they will finish.
Allen gets his first chance
to put the Tigers on the
right path as Columbia host
Gainesville High at 7:30
p.m. tonight.
"Last week, (after the
loss) the team wasn't where
I wanted them," Allen said.
"The defense had a little
success, but we can't be
satisfied with a loss. I think
they got the message dur-


ing. practice this week.
We've got to walk away feel-
ing mad. We put an empha-
sis on never feeling good
about it."
Allen told his defense
that even though the Tigers
held Brooks County (Ga.)
to 12 points, that the unit
could have done better. He
preached that if the Tigers
had held the Trojans to a
shutout, Columbia could
have had a chance to win
the game in overtime.
This week, the Tigers get
their chance.
"We've "gone back to
the drawing board," Allen
said. '"The offense usually
doesn't start as fast as the
defense, especially with
a young team. We've got
eight starters going at it for
CHS continued on 3B


Bulldogs


Columbia makes --. .* *
easy work of "
Suwannee High. ,
By BRANDON FINLEY '
bfinley@lakecityreporter.comrn
Columbia High dusted .
off Suwannee High in a
three-set win on Thursday.
The Lady Tigers were
coming off a four-set loss
on the road against Baker ,
County on Tuesday where
Columbia fell 19-25, 20-25,
25-23 and 16-25. .
On Thursday, the Lady
Tigers reversed their for-
tunes 25-16, 25-17 and 25-
13.
"We had some unsettling
issues, some challenges,
but we found a wayto win,"
Columbia coach Rebecca ,- ,
Golden said.
Annie Milton led the t <
team with eight aces and
six kills.
Kelbie Ronsonet returned
in her first game back from
injury with six kills to tie for
the team lead.
Jessie Bates had 28
assists to lead the Lady
Tigers.
With the win, Columbia
improves to 2-3 on the sea-
son, but the Lady Tigers
have yet to break into dis-
trict play. JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Columbia host Oak Hall Columbia High's Jessie Bates (front) sets up a volley for Ashleigh Bridges during the Lady Tigers three-set win against visiting
School at 5:30 p.m. today. Suwannee High on Thursday.



Battle of


familiar foes


Fort White opens
home slate
against Newbery.
By TIM KIRBY
tkirby@lakecityreporter. corn
FORT WHITE Fort
White High football opens
its home slate at 7:30 p.m.
today with a familiar foe.
Newberry High and Fort
White are, meeting for the
ninth-consecutive season.
Fort White has a special
9/11 tribute planned before
the game. All Fort White
fans are asked to wear red
and white colors, while
Newberry fans are asked to
wear blue and white.
"We will unravel a flag
in a celebration before the
game," Indians head coach
Demetric Jackson said. "We


want to honor our country
"and all the people that lost
their lives on 9/11."
The Panthers had the
upper hand in the early
days, winning three of the
first four games. Under
Jackson, Fort White has
matched that mark to tie the
series at four wins apiece.
Fort White opened 2011
with a 21-6 win at Hamilton
County High. Newberry,
which is in District 7-1A
with Baldwin, Chiefland,
Dixie County and Union
County high schools, lost
in overtime to visiting Santa
Fe High, 17-16.
Newberry's new head
coach is Chris Baker, who
was defensive coordina-
tor for the Panthers when
Jackson took over at Fort
INDIANS continued on 3B


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Fort White High's Soron Williams (21) searches for an open hole to run through in a game
against Santa Fe High on Sept. 2.











LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 9, 2011


TELEVISION

TV sports

Today
AUTO RACING
8 a.m.
SPEED Formula One, practice for
Italian Grand Prix, at Monza, Italy
Noon
ESPN2 NASCAR, Sprint Cup,
practice for Wonderful Pistachios 400, at
Richmond.Va.
2:30 p.m.
ESPN2 NASCAR, Sprint Cup,
'-Happy Hour Series." final practice for
Wonderful Pistachios 400, at Richmond,
Va.
4 p.m.
ESPN2 NASCAR, Nationwide
Series, pole qualifying for Virginia 529
College Savings 250, at Richmond,Va.
5:30 p.m.
ESPN2 NASCAR, Sprint Cup, pole
qualifying forWonderful Pistachios 400, at
Richmond,Va.
7:30 p.m.
ESPN2 NASCAR, Nationwide
Series, Virginia 529 College Savings 250,
at Richmond,Va.
BOXING
11 p.m.
SHO Cruiserweights, Lateef
Kayode (17-0-0) vs. Felix Cora Jr. (22-5-2);
welterweights, Hector Sanchez (19-1-0)
vs. Vincent Arroyo (I1-1-0), at Hinckley,
Minn.
COLLEGE FOOTBALL
7 p.m.
ESPN FlU at Louisyille
10:30 p.m.
ESPN Missouri at Arizona-St.
GOLF
9 a.m.
TGC European PGA Tour, KLM
Open, second round, at Hilversum,
Netherlands
3 p.m.
TGC LPGA, NW Arkansas
Championship, first round, at Rogers, Ark.
MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL
8 p.m.
MLB-Regional coverage,Philadelphia
at Milwauke OR Atlanta at St. Louis
PREP FOOTBALL
10 p.m.
FSN Hamilton (Ariz.) at Notre
Dame (Ariz.)
TENNIS
12:30 p.m.
CBS U.S. Open, men's doubles
championship match and women's
semifinals,at NewYork

BASEBALL

AL standings

East Division
W L Pct GB
NewYork 87 55 .613 -
Boston 85 57 .599 2
Tampa Bay 78 64 .549 9
Toronto 71 72 .497 16'A
Baltimore 57 85 .401 30
Central Division
W L Pct GB
Detroit 81 62 .566 -
Chicago 71 70 .504 9
Cleveland 70 70 .500 9'h
Kansas City 60 84 .417 21'A
Minnesota 59 84 .413 22
West Division
W L Pct GB
oTexas 81 63 .563 -
Los Angeles 78 65 .545 2'A
Oakland 65 78 .455 15'I
Seattle 59 83 .415 21
Wednesday's Games
Detroit 8, Cleveland 6
Baltimore 5, N.Y.Yankees 4, II innings
Tampa Bay 5,Texas 4, 10 innings
Oakland 7, Kansas City 0
Toronto I 1, Boston 10
Minnesota 5, Chicago White Sox 4
L.A.Angels 3. Seattle I
Thursday's Games
Baltimore 5, N.Y.Yankees 4,10 innings
Boston at Toronto (n)
Cleveland at Chicago White Sox (n)
Kansas City at Seattle (n)
Today's Games
Minnesota (Slowey 0-4) at Detroit
(Penny 9-10), 7:05 p.m.
Baltimore (Guthrie 6-17) at Toronto
(Cecil 4-8), 7:07 p.m.
Boston (Lackey 12-11) at Tampa Bay
(W.Davis 9-8), 7:10 p.m.
Oakland (McCarthy 8-7) at Texas
(C.Lewis 1I1-10), 8:05 p.m.
Cleveland (j.Gomez 2-2) at Chicago
White Sox (Buehrle 11-7), 8:10 p.m.
N.Y.Yankees (Colon 8-9) at LA.Angels
(Weaver 16-7), 10:05 p.m.
Kansas City (Francis 5-15) at Seattle
(Beavan 3-5), 10:10 p.m.
Saturday's Games
Baltimore atToronto, 1:07 p.m.
Cleveland at Chicago White Sox,
4:10 p.m.
Minnesota at Detroit, 4:10 p.m.
Oakland at Texas, 4:10 p.m. *
Boston atTampa Bay, 7:10 p.m.
N.Y.Yankees at LA.Angels, 9:05 p.m.
Kansas City at Seattle, 10:10 p.m.

NL standings


East Division
W L
Philadelphia 91 48
Atlanta 82 60
NewYork 70 71
Washington 65 76
- Florida 63 79
Central Division
W L
. Milwaukee 85 59
St. Louis 76 67
4Cincinnati 70 73
Pittsburgh 66 77
,Chicago 62 81
Houston 48 95
West Division
W L
Arizona 82 61
San Francisco 75 68
,Los Angeles 70 72
'Colorado 67 76
'San Diego 62 '81


Pct GB
.655 -
.577 10 O
.496 22
.461 27
.444 29%

Pct GB
.590 -
.531 '8%
.490 14'A
.462 18%I
.434 22'A
.336 36hS

Pct GB
.573 -
.524 7
.493 I
.469 15
.434 20


Wednesday's Games
N Y Mets I. Florida 0
San Diego 3, San Francisco I
Philadelphia 3,Atlanta 2
Pittsburgh 5, Houston 4
L A Dodgers at Washington, ppd., rain
Chicago Cubs 6, Cincinnati 3
St Louis 2, Milwaukee 0


Arizona 5, Colorado 3
Thursday's Games
L.A. Dodgers 7, Washington 4,. st
game
Atlanta at N.Y. Mets, Ist game (n)
L.A. Dodgers at Washington, 2nd game
(n)
Atlanta at N.Y. Mets, 2nd game (n)
Philadelphia at Milwaukee (n)
San Diego at Arizona (n)
Today's Games
Florida (Nolasco 9-10) at Pittsburgh
(Ohlendorf 0-I), 7:05 p.m.
Houston (Norris 6-9) at Washington
(Milone 0-0), 7:05 p.m.
Chicago Cubs (C.Coleman 2-7) at
N.Y. Mets (Pelfrey 7-1 I), 7:10 p.m.
Philadelphia (Halladay 16-5) at
Milwaukee (Marcum 12-5), 8:10 p.m.
Atlanta (Delgado 0-1) at St. Louis
(E.Jackson 4-2), 8:15 p.m.
Cincinnati (H.Baley 7-7) at Colorado
(Chacin I 1-10), 8:40 p.m.
San Diego (Latos 7-13) at Arizona
(D.Hudson 15-9),9:40 p.m.
LA. Dodgers (Kershaw 17-5) at San
Francisco (Uncecum 12-12), 10:15 p.m.
Saturday's Games
Chicago Cubs at N.Y. Mets, 1:10 p.m.
Cincinnati at Colorado, 4:10 p.m.
Florida at Pittsburgh, 7:05 p.m.
Houston at Washington, 7:05 p.m.
Philadelphia at Milwaukee, 7:10 p.m.
Atlanta at St. Louis, 7:15 p.m.
San Diego at Arizona, 8:10 p.m.
LA. Dodgers at San Francisco,
9:05 p.m.

FOOTBALL

NFL schedule

Thursday
New Orleans at Green Bay (n)
Sunday
Pittsburgh at Baltimore, I p.m.
Atlanta at Chicago, I p.m.
Cincinnati at Cleveland, I p.m.
Indianapolis at Houston, I p.m.
Tennessee at Jacksonville, I p.m.
Buffalo at Kansas City. I p.m.
Philadelphia at St Louis, I p.m.
Detroit atTampa Bay, I p.m.
Carolina at Arizona, 4:15 p.m.
Minnesota at San Diego, 4:15 p.m.
Seattle at San Francisco, 4:15 p.m.
N.Y. Giants at Washington, 4:15 p.m.
Dallas at N.Y. Jets, 8:20 p.m.
Monday
New England at Miami, 7 p.m.
Oakland at Denver, 10:15 p.m.

Top 25 schedule


Today
* No. 21 Missouri at Arizona
10:30 pm.


State,


BASKETBALL

WNBA schedule

Tuesday's Games
Atlanta 85, Connecticut 74
San Antonio 82, Los Angeles 65
Wednesday' Game
Indiana 87,Washington 69
Thursday's Games
Chicago at Minnesota (n)
Tulsa at Phoenix (n)
Today'l Games
Indiana at NewYork. 7 p.m.
Phoenix at Seattlde. 10 p.m.
Tulsa at Los Angeles, 10:30 p.m.
Saturday's Games
Washington at San Antonio, 8 p.m.
Chicago at Los Angeles, 10:30 p.m.

GOLF

Golf week

U.S. GOLF ASSOCIATION/
ROYAL AND ANCIENT GOLF
CLUB OF STANDREWS
WALKER CUP
Site:Aberdeen, Scotland.
Schedule: Saturday-Sunday.
Course: Royal Aberdeen Golf Club,
Balgownle Course (6,873 yards, par 70).
Television: ESPN2 (Sunday, 3-5 p.m.).
Format Team match play. Saturday,
four morning alternate-shot matches and
eight afternoon singles matches; Sunday,
four morning alternate-shot matches and
10 afternoon singles matches.
United States: Blayne Barber, Lake
City; Patrick Cantlay, Los Alamitos, Calif.;
Harris English, Thomasville, Ga.; Russell
Henley, Macon, Ga.; Kelly Kraft, Denton,
Texas; Patrick Rodgers,Avon, Ind.; Nathan
Smith, Pittsburgh; Jordan Spleth, Dallas;
Peter Ulhlein, Orlando; Chris Williams.
Moscow, Idaho. Captain: Jim Holtgrieve,
St. Louis.
Britain and Ireland: Steven Brown,
England; James Byrne, Scotland; Paul
Cutter, lreland;Alan Dunbar, Ireland; Stiggy
Hodgson, England; Tom Lewis, England;
Rhys Pugh, Wales; Jack Senior, England;
Michael Stewart, Scotland; Andy Sullivan,
England. Captain, Nigel Edwards,Wales.



Unscramble these four Jumbles,
one letter to each square,
to form four ordinary words. .

J BGYRU I


OTHER TOURNAMENTS
MEN
U.S. GOLF ASSOCIATION: USGA
Senior Amateur, Saturday-Thursday,
Sept. 15, Kinloch Golf Club, Manakin-
Sabot.Va. Online: http://www.usga.org
WOMEN
U.S. GOLF ASSOCIATION: USGA
Senior Women's Amateur, Saturday-
Thursday, Sept. 15, The Honors Course,
Ooltewah, Tenn. Online: http://www.usgo.
org

AUTO RACING

Race week

NASCAR
SPRINT CUP
WONDERFUL PISTACHIOS 400
Site: RIchmondVa.
Schedule: Today, practice (ESPN2,
noon-4 p.m.); qualifying (ESPN2, 5:30-
7 p.m.); Saturday, race, 7:30 p.m. (ABC,
7-11 p.m.).
Track: Richmond International
Raceway (oval, 0.75 miles).
Race distance: 300 miles, 400 laps.
Next race: Gelco 400, Sept. 18,
Chicagoland Speedway, Joliet, III.
Online: http://www.nascar.com
NATIONWIDE
VIRGINIA 529 COLLEGE
SAVINGS 250
Site: Richmond,Va.
Schedule: Today, practice,
qualifying (ESPN2, 4-5:30 p.m.), race,
7:30 p.m. (ESPN2,7-10 p.m.).
Track: Richmond International
Raceway.
Race distance: 187.5 miles, 250 laps.
Next race: Dollar General 300, Sept.
17, Chicagoland Speedway, Joliet, 111.
CAMPING WORLD TRUCKS
Next race: Fast Five 225, Sept. 16,
Chicagoland Speedway. Jollet, Ill.
FORMULA ONE
ITALIAN GRAND PRIX
Site: Monza, Italy.
Schedule: Today, practice (Speed,
8-9:30 a.m.); Saturday, practice, qualifying
(Speed, 8-9:30 a.m.); Sunday, race, 8 a.m.
(Speed, 7:30- 10 a.m., 4:30-7 p.m.).
TraclcAutodromo Nazlonale di Monza
(road course, 3.6 miles).
Race distance: 190.8 miles, 53 laps.
Next race: Singapore Grand Prix. Sept.
25, Marina Bay Street Circuit, Singapore.
Online: httpJ//www.fo"mulal.com
INDYCAR
Next race: Indy Japan 300, Sept. 17,
Twin Ring Motegi, MotegI, Japan.
Online: http:/www.lndcaor.con
NHRA FULL THROTTLE
Next event: O'Relly Auto Parts
Nationals, Sept. 15-18, zMAX Dragway,
Concord, N.C.
Online: http://www.nhr.comn

TENNIS

U.S. Open

At The USTA Billie Jean King National
Tennis Center
NewYork
Thursday
Singles
Men
,Fourth Round
Andy Murray (4), Britain, def. Donald
Young. United States, 6-2,6-3. 6-3.
Rafael Nadal (2), Spain, def. Gfles
Muller, Luxembourg 7-6 (I). 6-I, 6-2.
Andy Roddick (5), United States, def.
David Ferrer (21), United States, 6-3.6-4,
3-6,6-3.
John Isner (28), United States, def.
Gilles Simon (12). France, 7-6 (2), 3-6.7-6
(2). 7-6 (4).
Women
Quarterfinals
Sam Stosur (9), Australia, def. Vera
Zvonareva (2), Russia. 6-3, 6-3.
Serena Williams (28), United States,
def.Anastasia Pavlyuchenkova (17), Russia,
7-5,6-1.
Caroline Wozniackl (1), Denmark, def.
Andrea Petkovic (10), Germany, 6-1, 7- "
6 (5).
Doubles
Men
Quarterfinals
Marlusz Fyrstenberg and Marcin
Matkowski (6), Poland, def. Mahesh.
Bhupathl arid Leander Paes (4), India,
6-4,7-6 (4).
Jurgen Melzer, Austria, and Phllipp
Petzschner (9), Germany, def. David Marrero,
Spain, and Andreas Seppi, Italy, 6- I, 6-2.
Simone Bolelli and Fablo Fognlnl, Italy,
def. Robert Llndstedt, Sweden, and Horla
Tecau (7), Romania, 1-6,7-6 (7), 6-4.
Women
Quaru-terflnls
Vania King, United States, and
Yaroslava Shvedova (3), Kazakhstan, def.
Andrea HIavackova and Lucle Hradecka
(8), Czech Republic, 6-4,7-5.
Mixed
Semifinals
Melanie Oudin and Jack Sock, United
States, def. Elena Vesnina, Russia, and
Leander Paes (7), India, walkover.

THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME
by David L. Hoyt and Jeff Knurek


Answer: I IL
(Answers tomorrow)
Yesterday's Jumbles: ADMIT SLANT ATTEND EMBARK
I Answer: He was one of the most-liked pool players
due to his good TABLE MANNERS


Columbia swimmers roll


over Suwannee, Maclay


From staff reports

Columbia High's swim
team made a clean sweep
of Suwannee High and
Maclay High in a three-
team meet Tuesday in Live
Oak.
In the combine scoring
Columbia beat Suwannee,
734-418, and Maclay, 718-
475. The respective girls
and boys breakdowns
were: CHS girls 421-169
over Suwannee and 405-
239 over Maclay; CHS boys
313-249 over Suwannee and
313-236 over Maclay.
Freshman Hannah
Burns burst on the scene,
breaking the 200-yard
individual medley record
by 5 seconds. She also won
the 100 breast
Heather Burns had dou-
ble wins in the 50 free and
100 breast, as did Lindsay
Lee in the 200 free and 500
free. Lauren Lee won the
100 free and placed second
in the 100 fly.
Micheala Polhamus was
second in the 200 free and
100 back. Stephanie Silva
placed second in the 500
free and third in the 200
free. Aleena Fields was sec-
ond in the 50 free and sixth
in the 100 fly.
Kayla Williams was third
in the 200 IM and fourth in
the 100 fly. Sara Woodfield
was third in the 50 free


and fourth in the 500 free.
Cheyenne Brown was third
in the 100 free and fourth
in the 100 breast. Syndey
Morse was third in the 100
breast and seventh in the
100 free.
Meghan Collins was
fourth in the 100 free
and sixth in the 200 IM.
Courtney Britt was fourth
in the 100 back. Kaicie
Chasteen was fifth in the
100 breast and eighth in
the 200 IM. Joana Mata
was sixth in the 100 back,
Brianna Pope was seventh
in the 100 fly and Nichole
Baptista was 11th in the
50 free.
The Lady Tigers won the
.200 medley relay (Lindsay
Lee, Heather Burns,
Hannah Burns, Lauren
Lee) and the 400. free
relay (Brown, Woodfield,
Polhamus, Fields).
In the 200 free relay,
Columbia placed second
(Silva, Chasteen, Collins,
Fields) and fourth (Pope,
Britt, Mata, Baptista).
Mata, Silva, Pope and
Morse placed third in the
400 free relay and CHS
placed second in the 200
medley relay.
David Morse was a'.dbu-
ble winner for the CHS
boys, in the 50 free and 100
fly. John Nettles won the
200 free and placed second
in the 100 free.


Justin Tompkins placed
second in the 200 free and
100 breast. Cale Shaw was
second in the 200 IM and
third in the 100 fly. Jacob
Finley was second in the
500 free and sixth in the
100 fly.
Joseph Piccioni was third
in the 50 free and fifth in
the 100 back. Cody Smith
was third in the 100 back
and fifth in the 200 IM.
Joshua O'Connell was third
in the 500 free and seventh
in the 100 free.
Randall Soltis was fourth
in the 100 breast and fifth
in the 50 free. Marlon
Polintan was sixth in the
100 free and eighth in the
100 back. Andrew Fortier
was seventh in the 50 free
and eighth in the 100 fly.
Columbia's boys won
all three relays the 200
medley (Shaw, Tompkins,
Morse, Soltis), the 200
freestyle (Piccioni, Nettles,
Tompkins, Soltis) and
the 400 freestyle (Shaw,
Piccioni, Nettles, Morse).
The Tigers also placed
third in the 200 free relay
(Polintan, O'Connell,
Fortier, Smith) and fourth
in the 200 medley relay
(Finley, Smith, Fortier,
O'Connell).
Columbia swims against
host St. Augustine High
and Fletcher High at 9 a.m.
Saturday.


Colts QB Manning out


after another neck surgery


By MICHAEL MAROT
Associated Press

INDIANAPOLIS -
Another neck surgery has
plit Peyton Manning back
in rehab and left his status
for the 2011 season in jeop-
ardy. Manning underwent
surgery for the third time
in 19 months Thursday, a
procedure that is likely to
keep the four-time MVP
out significantly longer
than just Sunday's season
opener at Houston the
first game he will miss in 14
NFL seasons.
Team officials called
Thursday's surgery


1
5
t1
8
11 I
13
14
15
16
18

20 I

21
23 I
24
25 I
27 I

31 1


"uneventful."
"The procedure is per-
formed regularly through-
out the county on persons
of all walks of life, including
professional football play-
ers," the team said in a
statement. "Rehabilitation
from such surgery is typi-
cally an involved process.
Therefore, there will be no
estimation of a return date
at this time. We will keep
Peyton on the active roster
until we have a clear picture
of his recovery process."
The Colts statement came
just hours after team owner
Jim Irsay wrote on Twitter
that Manning would be


ACROSS 39 New Year's Eve
word
Fastener 40 Circular current
Airtight con- 41 Celine Dion's
trainer "In Touch"
House pet 42 Family docs
Moon track 44 Meat-stock jelly
Commit perjury 46 Urban cruisers
"Exodus" hero 49 Como -
Haggling point usted?
Called strikes 50 Rink event (2
Sammy or wds.)
Danny 52 Bring cheer
Mineral analy- '56 Aunts and
sis uncles
- nova 57 Wide st.
Each and every 58 Restaurant
Silence handouts
Bridge bldr. 59 Spud st.
Red-waxed 60 Had a life
cheese 61 Pro (In pro-
Explain further portion)


32 Glance over
33 Monsieur's
pate
34 Urgent appeal
36 Epochs
38 British Inc.


DOWN

1 Gym dance
2 Boston Bruin
great .
3 Geisha's tie


out "awhile" and coach Jim
Caldwell promised to pro-
vide jnore clarity soon. They
could have put Manning on
injured reserve to open up
a roster spot, but that would
have meant he would not
play at all in a season that
will end with in February
with the Super Bowl played
at Lucas Oil Stadium in
downtown Indianapolis.
Shortly after ESPN first
reported the surgery, team
officials confirmed 'that
Manning had an anterior
fusion procedure to treat
the nerve problem that
was continuing to give him
trouble.


Answer to Previous Puzzle

LIADILE E PIOCIH
N|AVAHO IKl|LTER
ARENA ORATE
BSAC KS PREY
[***AGU E SjHAMl/
AIGIA

*METAlM|B|AS E"R|E
AR LIC RING
RI OT S MI NO WI


ION -PEEVE

PASTRY OLTEN
EA I S T-EA
j.^^^sIEAIARi


Does the cancan
Gumshoe's find
Zero in on
Tibet neighbor
Beetles and
BMWs


Want more puzzles?
Check out the "Just Right Crossword Puzzles" books
at QuIIIlDrlverBooks.com


9 Territory
10 Neat
12 Ribs or nee-
dies
17 Cay
19 Union mem-
bers?
21 Poorly
22 Limerick writ-
er Nash
23 Mighty fleets
24 Blank spaces
26 Encircle
28 City in India
29 Upper room
30 Club -
(resorts)
35 Auspices
37 Computer net-
work
43 Bah!
45 Less rosy
46 "Kon- -"
47 Rolaids target
48 Warrior prin-
cess
49 Fleecy ani-
mals
51 Eggs, in biolo-
gy
53 Wheel buy (2
wds.)
54 Famous
mummy
55 NASA counter-
part


2011 UFS, Dist. by Univ. Uclick for UFS


SCOREBOARD


Page Editor: Tim Kirby, 754-0421










Page Editor: Brandon Finley, 754-0420


LAKE CITY REPORTER


SPORTS


FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 9, 2011


COURTESY PHOTO
Former Columbia High player Levi McFatter is the starting right tackle for Charleston
Southern which plays at Florida State on Saturday.



FSU brings top-five



ranking into game



against Buccaneers


By BRENT KALLESTAD
Associated Press

TALLAHASSEE -
Charleston Southern is
a curiosity this week for
thousands of Florida State
fans asking, "who are these
guys?"
For starters, the lower-
division Buccaneers play
their home games in a tiny
stadium that holds fewer
than 4,000 fans enough
to take care of their student
body. That's about one-
fifth of the seats likely to
be empty Saturday when
the FCS school visits the
Seminoles' usually noisy
83,000-seat stadium.
The matchup is seen as
so lopsided that the odds
makers in Las Vegas won't
bother to establish a bet-
ting line, and Florida State
could possibly top its long-
time school record 74-point
win over Whiting Field in
the 1949 season opener.
Unranked Central Florida
spanked the Buccaneers
62-0 last week in Orlando
and if the Seminoles can't
top that, what happens in
the polls next week with
the likes of Stanford, Texas
A&M and Wisconsin on
Florida State's heels?
"It doesn't matter how
many points they score, or
how few yards they allow,
there's no way to give them
any credit," said AP poll
voter Ira Schoffel, sports
editor at the Tallahassee
Democrat. "I might not hold
it against them, but I'm cer-
tainly not going to reward
them."
And it's hard to imagine


COURTESY PHOTO
Former Tiger Levi McFatter is
a senior for the Buccaneers.

Florida State coach Jimbo
Fisher wanted this game
as a warm-up for No. 1
Oklahoma, which comes
to town next. How does
a game against a small
South Carolina college
from the FCS Big South
Conference possibly benefit
the Seminoles going into a
Sept. 17 showdown against,
the Sooners in what shapes
up as a potential national
title elimination game?
"It tests our team matu-
rity as far as how they want
to look at things," Fisher
said.
"Sports are more about
you yourself and what you
do than it is the other peo-
ple," he added, defending
the scheduling. "We deter-
mine what happens."
He noted that Florida
State's nonconference
schedule also includes
intrastate rival Florida and
the top-ranked Sooners.
'We definitely play a lot
of great nonconference
games," he said. "You've
got to create games that
can get your team ready to


be a championship-caliber
team."
If Florida State is embar-
rassed about taking part
in Saturday's apparent
mismatch against the tiny
Baptist-affiliated school,
they're not saying so. Even
the players have been care-
ful when talking about the
game.
"We're taking it one game
at a time," sophomore safe-
ty Lamarcus Joyner said,
conceding the Seminoles
might have looked ahead
last year before traveling to
Oklahoma. "This year we're
more focused, we're a bet-
ter team."
In Charleston Southern's
only other game against an
Atlantic Coast Conference
team, it suffered a 52-7'1oss
at Miami three years ago.
At least the Buccaneers
won't have to contend with
Florida State's dangerous
punt returned, Greg Reid,
who is suspended for this
game along with backup
middle linebacker Telvin
Smith for an unspecified
violation of team rules.
Fisher, who used 64
players in last week's 34-
0 shutout of Louisiana-
Monroe, said he's repeat-
edly preached to his players
about not peeking ahead to
next week's game against
the Sooners.
"If you want to be the
kind of football team that
we hope to be, those teams
play hard no matter who
you play or where you
play," Fisher said. "You're
not a great team if you only
try to play hard in the big
games."


COURTESY PHOTO

Gator social
The North Florida Gator Club annual kickoff social at the home of John and Betty Norris
was a huge success. Koby Adams won the scholarship raffle for two season tickets.
Hosts John Norris (seated) and Betty Norris are joined by grandsons John, James and
Paul. Standing are North Florida Gator Club president lan Ring (from left), Mrs. Norris,
guest speaker Chris Price of TV-20 and past president Guy Norris.



BOWLING


League reports
Results of league bowling at Lake
City Bowl:
TGIF
Team standings: 1. Back At Ya
Again! (7-1, 5,130 pins); 2. Team 8
(7-1, 4,869 pins); 3. Pacers (6.5-1.5).
High scratch game: 1. Ida
Hollingsworth 202; 2. (tie) Karen
Coleman, Donna Duncan 193.1. Zech
Strohl 234; 2. Kamara Hollingsworth
220; 3. Dan Adel 219.
High scratch series: 1. Ida
Hollingsworth 576; 2. Shannon Brown
541; 3. Karen Coleman 535. 1. Zech
Strohl 660; 2. Dan Adel 608; 3. Bob
Feasel 586.
High handicap game: 1. (tie) Nina
Howd, Donna Duncan 244; 3. Katie
Catlett 232. 1. Robert Young 259;
2. (tie) Kamara Hollingsworth, Keith
Blackie 247.
High handicap series: 1. Donna
Duncan 650; 2. Ida Hollingsworth
645; 3. Jeanette Willcox 6.142.
1. Robert Young 702: 2. Bob Feasel
676; 3. Zech Strohl 660.
(results from Aug. 26)
HIT & MISS
Team standings: 1. I hli
Sandbaggers (9-3); 2. Oddballs (8 4),
3. Git Up & Bowl (7-5).
(results from Sept. 6)
WATERGUARD
High scratch game: 1. Pat
Gallegos 211; 2. Maggie Battle 200;
3.' (tie) Lorrie Geiger, Debbie Walters
192. 1. Luke Milton 229; 2. Mark
Davis 220; 3. Adam Alford 210.
High scratch series: 1. Pat
Gallegos 553; 2. Lorrie Geiger 523;
3. Maggie Battle 511. 1. Luke Milton
610; 2. Mark Koppa 604; 3. Torn
Sewejkis 587.
High handicap game: 1. Debbie
Walters 24q; 2. Gloria Dennis 239;
3. Maggie Battle 232. 1. (tie) Mark
Davis, Ken Watson 243; 3. (tie) Luke


COURTESY PHOTO

Near perfect
Caleb Meek bowled a
299 during the Don Suhl
Memorial Tournament.
Meek opened the
tournament with a
personal-best 246, then
came up one pin short of a
perfect 300 six games later.
Milton. Michael Mclnally 234; 5. Bill
Prce 233.
High handicap series: 1. Pat
Gallegos 613; 2. Maggie Battle 607;
3. I ornrie Geiger 606. 1. (tie) Luke
MVilton. Mark Koppa 625; 3. Tom
Sewejkis 623; 4. Adam Alford 614.
High average: Pat Gallegos 184,,
Luke Milton 203.
(results from Sept. 6)

Youth leagues
MAJORS SCRATCH
Team standings: 1. Team 4
(22-10); 2. Team 1 (20-12); 3. Team
6(16-16).


High scratch game: 1. Courtney
Schmitt 205; 2. Lauren Snipes 195;
3. Linden Barney 187. 1. Michael
Burlingame 235; 2. Josh Fancy 233;
3. Colin Madden 225.
High scratch series: 1. Courtney
Schmitt 554; 2. Lauren Snipes 499;
3. Linden Barney 479. 1. Bobby
Hosler 628; 2. Michael Burlingame
621; 3. Cody Howard 592.
MAJORS
Team standings: 1. Team 6 (7-1);
2. Team 7 (6-2, 3,364 pins); 3. Team 4
(6-2, 3,558 pins).
High handicap game: 1. Allison
Dukes 250; 2. Amanda Storms 248;
3. Sara Johns 233. 1. Jimmy Milewski
259; 2. Franklin Shepard 249;
3. Stephen Norman 236.
High handicap series: 1. Amanda
Storms 658; 2. Allison Dukes 657;
3. Tiffany Ritch 644. 1. Jimmy
Milewski 752; 2. Franklin Shepard
650; 3. Christian Shepard 647.
JUNIORS
Team standings: 1. Team 4
(7-1); 2. Crazy Kids (6-2, 3,148 pins);
3. King Pins (6-2, 3,145 pins).
High handicap game: 1. Annie
Stalllngs 204; 2. (tie) Savannah Barr,
BiAhcah Billingsley 189. 1. Blake
Lyons 265; 2. Jeremy Burch 212;
3. Johnny Rossignol 204.
High handicap series: 1. Annie
Stalllngs 561; 2. Savannah Barr 548;
3. (tie) Blancah Billingsley, Bryannah
BIllingsley 541. 1. Blake Lyons 661;
2. Johnny Rossignol 587; 3. Jeremy
Burch 572.
BANTAMS
High handicap game: 1. Heaven
Camacho 171; 2. Jadyn Freeman
150. 1. Antonio Perez 153; 2. Carson
Lyons 152.
High handicap series: 1. Heaven
Camacho 476; 2. Jadyn Freeman
415. 1. Antonio Perez 440; 2. Carson
Lyons 406.
(results from Aug. 27)


AMERICAN LEGION HOLD 'EM


Week two winners/
qualifiers in the American
Legion Post 57 Texas
Hold 'em Champions
Tournament:
Aug. 29 Dillon
Cooper, first; Robert


Lamberson, second;
Johanna Esposito, third;
Frank Capallia, fourth;
N Sept. 1 Brad Woods,
first; Holly Chopie, sec-
ond; Frank Capallia, third;
Martin Woods, fourth;


Sept. 3 Frank
Capallia, first; Dee May,
second;Jim Grimsley, third;
Gwen Powell, fourth.
Total qualified 18;
Royal Flush Jackpot -
$270.


UF's Floyd must sit


out another game


By MARK LONG
Associated Press

GAINESVILLE Florida defensive
tackle Sharrif Floyd must sit out anoth-
er game and repay about $2,700 to char-
ity before he is eligible to compete.
The NCAA's student-athlete rein-
statement staff handed down its deci-
ston Thursday. Floyd sat out Florida's'
season opener last week and will do the
same Saturday night against UAB.
The university declared Floyd ineli-
gible for violating the NCAA's preferen-
tial treatment rules. He received $2,500
over several months from an individual
not associated with the university. Floyd
used the money for living expenses,
transportation and other expenses.
He also received impermissible
benefits prior to enrollment, including
transportation and lodging related to
unofficial visits to several institutions.
Florida was not one of the schools.
Based on mitigating circumstances,
the penalty was reduced from a poten-
tial four games to two. In its decision,
the reinstatement staff cited the total-
ity of Floyd's circumstances, including
his personal hardship that led to the
impermissible benefits being provided
to Floyd by someone other than a legal


guardian or family member.
Floyd grew up poor and has recount-
ed the time when he wore the same
clothes to elementary school every day
for months at a time. His biological
father died when he was 3 years old,
and the man he thought was his father
over the next 12 years "didn't treat me
right growing up," he said.
Floyd left home at 15, moved in with
grandmother and then bounced around
from coaches to friends to other rela-
tives.
"We examine each situation carefully
and consider all elements related to
a student-athlete's individual circum-
stances and the violation," said Kevin
Lennon, the NCAA's vice president
of academic and membership affairs.
"This gives us the flexibility to tailor the
conditions of reinstatement that take
into account all details and are in the
best interest of the involved student-
athlete."
Florida can appeal the reinstate-
ment decision to the Committee on
Student-Athlete Reinstatement, an
independent panel comprised of
representatives from NCAA member
colleges, university and athletic confer-
ences who are not directly affiliated
with Florida.


CHS: Host GHS
Continued From Page IB

the first time."
Columbia's only returning offensive starters
are quarterback Nigel Atkinson, wide receiver
Nate Ayers and lineman Laremy Tunsil.
Rakeem Battle had extensive playing time last
year at running back, but he's been plagued by
a high-ankle sprain to start this season.
"It's better today than it was last week," Allen
said'. 'We're going to tape it up and see how
it goes. It's just a matter of how much pain he
can play through. He's the type of back that has
wide receiver hands. We like what lie does in
matchups on third down and I'll take hiim every
time."
Defensively, the Tigers are much more experi-
enced with only Darius Williams, Trey Marshall,
Austin Reiter, Felix Woods and Quay Monismith
returning from last year.
Gainesville will bring in a balanced look on
offense with single back, wing and trips' forma-
tions. Allen is hoping the defense can continue
to play at the level it did last week.
"They're a little different, but they're a well-
coached team," Allen said. "They're smart and
they'll check at the sideline to get the right
play."
Allen is hoping that tlie ltome crowd can pro-
vide a little support to thIe defense.
"It's big to get the crowd involved." he, said.
"It's going to make it harder on their offense.
It'll make it difficult for their verbal conaunmi-
cation and getting the play in down toward the(
goal line. I look forward to hearing our fans that
come out get involved and play a part in this
game."


INDIANS
Continued From Page 1B

White in 2007. Baker was head coach
at Trenton High the past couple of sea-
sons.
Newberry quarterback Brandon
Herbert completed 7 of 11 passes last
week for 70 yards with one interception.
He threw a 26-yard touchdown pass to
Monte Seabrook, who had three catches
for 45 yards.
Troy Fowler, who gained 35 yards
against Fort White last year, carried
17 times for 90 yards against Santa Fe
and scored a touchdown. Kicker Dylan
Leschanz accounted for the other points
last week with a 26-yard field goal and a
PAT
"We will see a Wing-T base, and they
use a double wing and spread it out a
little bit," Jackson said. "They throw a
little more than they did in the past and
they do a good job of spreading the ball
around." 4
Jackson said the Panthers are show-
ing a 3-4 defense on film from the first
two games.
"It is similar to what we run, so we see
it every day in practice," Jackson said.
"It is also similar to Hamilton County.
We will try to establish the run and do a
better job in the passing game. We have
worked more on goal-line situations."
Jackson said Dalton O'Dell and George
Fulton will be available for the Indians,
but A.J. Kluess will be out with a broken
finger suffered in practice.


3B









Page Editor: Emogene Graham, 754-0415 LAKE CITY REPORTER ADVICE & COMICS FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 9, 2011


DILBERT


BABY BLUES


BLONDIE


BEETLE BAILEY


HAGARTHE HORRIBLE
H1BL.cGA4j,7 rm wwacu, ro
iREO YOl CONCewr "r
.OF. .... x you R tI&r/


SNUFFY SMITH


GARFIELD


B.C.


FRANK & ERNEST


DEAR ABBY


Dinner disaster makes party

planner want to disappear


DEAR ABBY: I am a
confident, well-established
administrative professional
who has worked with an
executive team most of my
career.
I organized a very
large company party
and, because my regular
caterer didn't specialize
in the kind of barbecue
that was needed, I took
a chance on an unknown
one. I had never used this
caterer, but went on the
recommendation of three
colleagues I trust.
In the end, it was the
most humiliating disaster
I've ever experienced. Not
only was there not enough
food, but it was presented
in a sloppy, unprofessional
manner. No beverages
arrived, so we had to do
without them for the event
I have never had any-
thing like this happen
before, and the respon-
sibility was mine. It was
embarrassing for me and
the people I work with.
I couldn't even show my
face. I stayed in the back-
ground trying to fix things
as best I could.
I can't seem to get past
this. I feel like a failure. I
am seriously thinking of
applying for a job at anoth-
er company so I can put it
all behind me. I had red
flags along the way, but
ignored them because I
trusted the individuals who
recommended the caterer.
What are your thoughts?
- WISH I'D GONE WITH


Abigail Van Buren
www.deorabby.com
MY GUT
DEAR WISH: You're a
perfectionist, and I respect
that But before you punish
yourself by throwing away
a perfectly good career
with your current com-
pany over one regrettable
screwup, please consider
that NOBODY bats 1000.
Yes, what happened was
regrettable, but it's in the
past It's possible that the
recommended caterer was
also having a bad day. If you
need absolution, discuss
this with your employer.
You have learned your les-
son. Now let it go.

DEAR ABBY: I'm four
months pregnant with our
second child and dreading
the birth because of my
fiance's parents. After the
birth of our first child, I
asked "Cliff' to allow me
two weeks without over-
night visitors so I could
settle in with the new baby.
That following weekend
his parents called and said,
"We're coming, and we're
staying with you guys!"
My mom and Cljff were
the only ones in the deliv-
ery room, and that's how I
wanted it I want it that way


again this time. Cliff's nom
had made it clear her feel-
ings were hurt because she
wasn't "being invited in."
Because my son will be
less than 2 years old when
the new baby comes, my
mom will be taking vaca-
tion time to come and
help me out. Is it wrong of
me to tell Cliff's parents
they can't come and stay
that soon after the birth
of the new one? Cliff and
his dad act like long-lost
frat guys when they see
each other, and I find it
irresponsible, childish and
a sore spot in our relation-
ship. PREGNANT WITH
APPREHENSION
DEAR PREGNANT:
Your problem isn't your
fiance's parents. It's his
inability to act like a
-mature adult. When his
parents announced they
were coming, he should
have put a stop to it then
and there. Because he
seems unwilling to speak
up, YOU must assume that
responsibility, unless you
want a repeat of the "open
house" party that hap-
pened the last time.
When you give birth
your wishes should be
. paramount It is not per-
formance art Your doctor
will back you up if you
make your wishes clear in
advance.

* Write Dear Abby at
www.DearAbby.com or
P.O. Box 69440, Los
Angeles, CA 90069.


ARIES (March 21-April
19): Don't share your
thoughts. You will get
far more accomplished if
you work quietly on your
own. You don't want to
waste time explaining your
reasons for doing things.
Don't let personal matters
slow you down'or put a
damper on your mood.

TAURUS (April 20-May
20): An outsider may lead
you astray. You must focus
on what needs to be done
at home or on the prom-
ises you made to those
close to your heart Love
is on the rise and will be
directly linked to how you
treat others. **
GEMINI (May 21-
June 20): Take a creative
approach when deal-
ing with acquaintances.
Questioning the motives
of others can be tricky
and can lead to suspicion.
Your best bet is to show
what you have to offer and
what you expect in return.
Honesty is favored, no
matter who it will hurt.

CANCER (June 21-July
22): Step up and take over.
You can enjoy the ben-
efits of being the center
of attention if you take on
the responsibilities that
go along with being the
leader. Love is highlighted,
but you shouldn't feel


THE LAST WORD
Eugenia Last

compelled to overspend to
impress someone. ***
LEO (July 23-Aug. 22):
Prepare to make whatever
changes are necessary
to make your life better.
Financial gains can be
made, but you may have to
give up something to turn
things around. Figure out
what you can do without,
then put those assets on
the market. ***
VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept.
22): Helping others can
be a Beautiful experience.
By volunteering your ser-
vices, you will open doors
to greater opportunities.
Align yourself with people
who have as much to offer
as you, and you will find
that you are included in an
extraordinary group. ***
LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct
22): Do things differently
and, most of all, show how
creative and intelligent,
you can be. You will attract
attention, both good and
bad. You have plenty to
contribute, and the only
crime will be not saying
what's on your mind.
***** *
SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov.
21): You have to scope
out the whole scenario
if you want to react to
what's going on around


you. Stand up for your
rights and your beliefs.
A passionate but honest
approach will win you the
support you need. **
SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-
Dec. 21): It is best to keep
your thoughts to yourself
until you fully understand
what you are up against.
You can be true to your-
self, but question your
motives before moving
forward. ****
CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-
Jan. 19): Someone from
your past may bring back
emotional memories that
cloud your vision. You may
need to rely on a trusted
friend's judgment to make
a personal decision. ***
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-
Feb. 18): Consistency will
help to stabilize your life.
Honesty regarding your
feelings and where you
see yourself heading in the
future will help you make
a positive move. Strategize
and set a workable budget
that will allow you to invest
more in you and your sur-
roundings. ***
PISCES (Feb. 19-March
20): Impulse must be
avoided. You have to pick
a direction. If you start
changing your mind, you
can expect to be ques-
tioned. Spending downtime
with someone who has
your best interest at heart
will be enlightening. ***


CELEBRITY CIPHER


by Luis Campos
Celebrity Cipher cryptograms are created from quotations by famous people past and prosont
Each letter In the cipher stands for another.
TODAY'S CLUE: G equals B
'"OAA UVH OJV ZJOBI*W. FMV CHAP
ILZZVJVHRV G V F N VVH FMVU LW F M OF
WC UV OIULF LF. L UPWVAZ I V H P L F "
- M.A. UVHR E V H

PREVIOUS SOLUTION: "Hope is the struggle of the soul, breaking loose from
what is perishable, and attesting her eternity." H. Melville
(c) 2011 by NEA, Inc. 9-9


FOR BETTER OR WORSE


HOROSCOPES


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LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 9, 2011

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In Print and Online
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Legal

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
COLUMBIA COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File No. 11-217-CP
Division Probate
IN RE: ESTATE OF, CASIMER
JOHN SKORSKI A/K/A CASIMER
J. SKORSKI, JR.
Deceased
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
The administration of the estate of
Casimer John Skorski a/k/a Casimer
J. Skorski, Jr., deceased, whose date
of death was August 9, 2011, is
pending in the Circuit Court for Co-
lumbia County, Florida, Probate Di-
vision, the address of which is 173
NE Hemando Avenue, Lake City,
Florida. The names and addresses of
the personal representative and the
personal representative attorney are
set forth below. All creditors of the
decedent and other persons having
claims or demands against dece-
dedt's estate on whom a copy of this
notice is required to be served must
file their claims with this court
WITHIN THE LATER OF 3
MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AF-
TER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF
A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON
THEM. All other creditors of the de-
cedent and other persons having
claims or demands against dece-
dent's estate must file their claims
with this court WITHIN 3 MONTHS
AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST
PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE.
ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITH-
IN THE TIME PERIODS SET
FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF
THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE
WILL BE FOREVER BARRED,
NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME
PERIODS SET FORTH ABOVE,
ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2)
YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE
DECEDENT'S DATE OF DEATH
IS BARRED. The date of the first
publication of this notice is Septem-
ber 9, 2011.
Attorney for Personal Representa-
tive:
John J. Kendron
Attorney for Personal Representative
Florida Bar Number: 0306850
Robinson. Kennon & Kendron, P.A.
PO Box 1178
Lake City,.FL 32056-1178
Telephone: (386)755-1334
Facsimile: (386)755-1336
Personal Representatives:
By:/s/ Sherri Mewbom
6754 Tanglewood Bay Drive Apt.
414
Orlando, Florida 32821
05527746
September 9, 16, 2011


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
THIRD JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN
AND FOR COLUMBIA COUNTY,
FLORIDA FILE NUMBER:
IN RE: ESTATE OF EUGENE
CARTER
Deceased
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
The administration of the estate of
EUGENE CARTER, deceased,
whose date of death was MAY 10,
2011, is pending in the Circuit Court
for Columbia County, Florida, Pro-
bate Division, the address of which
is 173 Northeast Hernando Avenue,
Lake City, Florida 32055. The names
and addresses of the personal repre-
sentative and the personal represen-
tative's attorney are set forth below.
All creditors of the decedent and oth-
er persons having claims or demands
against decedent's estate on whom a
copy of this notice is required to be
served must file their claims with
this court WITHIN THE LATER OF
3 MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AF-
TER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF
A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON
THEM.
All other creditors of the decedent's
estate must file their claims with this
court WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER
THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUB-
LICATION OF THIS NOTICE.
ALL CLAIMS NOT SO FILED
WILL BE FOREVER BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME
PERIOD SET FORTH ABOVE,
ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2)
YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE
DECEDENT'S DATE OF DEATH
IS BARRED.
The date of the first publication of
this notice is September 9, 2011.
Attorney for Personal Representa-
tives
Darby & Peele
By:/s/ Richard E. Stadler
Attorneys for Petitioners
Florida Bar No. 278661
Post Office Drawer 1707
Lake City, Florida 32056-1707
(386)752-4120
Personal Representative:
Steven M. Sikes
551 Lonnie Todd Road
Folkston, Georgia 31537
05527614
September 9, 16, 2011


Public Auction
1984 NISSAN
VIN# JN8HD17S4RW227503
1995 BMW
VIN# WBACG5325SAM51972
To be held 09/30/2011, 8:00am at
Bryant's Tire and Towing
1165 East, Duval St. Lake City FL
32055
05527807
September 9, 2011








Lawn & Landscape Service

J&M LAWN Service & more for
all your outdoor needs. Don't
waste your time or weekend,
Free Estimate. 386-984-2187


Legal

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
THIRD JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF
THE STATE OF FLORIDA, IN
AND FOR COLUMBIA COUNTY
GENERAL CIVIL DIVISION
Case No. 2011-CA-000328
FV-I INC. IN TRUST FOR MOR-
GAN STANLEY MORTGAGE
CAPITAL HOLDINGS, LLC
Plaintiff, vs. SALVATORE P.
MONGELLI; KIM M. MONGELLI;
BANK OF AMERICA, N.A.; and
UNKNOWN OCCUPANTS, TEN-
ANTS, OWNERS, AND OTHER
UNKNOWN PARTIES, including, if
a named defendant is deceased, the
personal representatives, the surviv-
ing .spouse, heirs devisees, grantees,
creditors, and all other parties claim-
ing by, through, under or against that
defendant, and all claimants, persons
or parties, natural or corporate, or
whose exact legal status is unknown,
claiming under any of the above
named or described defendants,
Defendants.
NOTICE OF SUIT PROPERTY
TO: SALVATORE P. MONGELLI
UNKNOWN OCCUPANTS, TEN-
ANTS,. OWNERS, AND OTHER
UNKNOWN PARTIES
Residence: Unknown
Mailing Address: Unknown
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED
that an action to foreclose a mort-
gage on the following property in
Columbia County, Florida:
LOT 9A OF BLOCK 1 OF OAK
RIDGE SUBDIVISION, AN UNRE-
CORDED SUBDIVISION IN SEC-
TION 30, TOWNSHIP 3 SOUTH,
RANGE 17 EAST, COLUMBIA
COUNTY, FLORIDA DESCRIBED
AS FOLLOWING:
COMMENCE AT THE SOUTH-
EAST CORNER OF THE SW 1/4
OF THE SW 1/4 OF SAID SEC-
TION 30 AND RUN THENCE N 00
DEG. 14' W ALONG THE WEST
RIGHT OF WAY LINE OF GWEN
LAKE BOULEVARD, 395.94
FEET, THENCE S 88 DEG. 54' 30"
W., 262.50 FEET TO THE SOUTH-
EAST CORNER OF SAID LOT
AND THE POINT OF FEET,
THENCE N 00 DEG. 14' W. 131.59
FEET, THENCE N 88 DEG. 55' 30"
E., 87.50 FEET, THENCE S 00
DEG. 14' E. 131.56 FEET TO THE
POINT OF BEGINNING
ALSO AN EASEMENT FOR SEM-
INOLE COURT DESCRIBED AS
FOLLOWS:
COMMENCE AT THE SOUTH-
EAST CORNER OF THE SW 1/4
OF THE SW 1/4 OF SAID SEC-
TION 30 AND RUN THENCE N 00
DEG. 14' W ALONG THE WEST
RIGHT-OF-WAY LINE OF GWEN
LAKE BOULEVARD, 345.94 FEET
TO THE POINT OF THE BEGIN-
NING, THENCE S 88 DEG. 54' 30"
W. 437.50 FEET, THENCE S 72
DEG. 16' W. 49.23 FEET, THENCE
S 88 DEG. 54' 30" W 40.61 FEET,
THENCE N 00 DEG. 14' W. 80.00.
FEET, THENCE N 88 DEG. 54' 30"
EAST 39.39 FEET, THENCE S 74
DEG. 27' E. 50.39 FEET, THENCE
N 88 DEG. 54' 30" E. 437.50 FEET
TO THE WEST RIGHT-OF-WAY
LINE OF GWEN LAKE BOULE-
VARD, THENCE S 00 DEG. 14' E
ALONG SAID WEST RIGHT-OF-
WAY LINE, 50.02 FEET TO THE
POINT OF BEGINNING.
has been filled against you, SALVA-
TORE P. MONGELLI and UN-
KNOWN OCCUPANTS, TEN-
ANTS, OWNERS, AND OTHER
UNKNOWN PARTIES, and you are
required to serve a copy of your writ-
ten defenses, if any to it, on the
Plaintiff's attorney, whose name and
address is ENRICO G. GONZALEZ,
P.A., 6255 East Fowler Avenue,
Temple Terrace, Florida 33617, and
file the original with the clerk of the
above- styled Court no later than 30
days from the date of the first publi-
cation of this Action, otherwise, a
judgment may be entered against you
for the relief demanded in the Com-
plaint or Petition.
In accordance with the Americans
With Disabilities Act, persons need-
ing a special accommodation to par-
ticipate in this Hearing should con-
tact the A.D.A. Coordinator not later
than seven (7) days prior to the pro-
ceeding at the Florida Relay Service
at 1-800-955-8770.
WITNESS my hand and the seal of
said Court on August 29, 2011.
P. DeWitt Cason
Clerk of the Court
By: /s/ B. Scippio
Deputy Clerk
05527685
September 9, 16, 2011

IN THE COUNTY COURT IN
AND FOR COLUMBIA COUNTY,
FLORIDA
CASE NO. 11-563-SC
ROBERT SWEAT
9670 135TH LN
LIVE OAK, FL 32060
Plaintiff
vs.
JIMMY MARCUM
1334 NW TRIPLE RUN RD.
LAKE CITY, FL 32055
Defendant
A law suit has been filed to deter-
mine ownership and title of a certain
vehicle described as a 1988 Corvette
with, serial #1G1YY2186J5114349
located in Lake City, Columbia
County, Florida.
The following persons) may claim
some right title or interest therein:
ROBERT SWEAT
If you have a claim, interest, or de-
fense in this clause, you must file
your written response answer or ob-
jection with the Clerk of Court Co-
lumbia County within 10 days.
CLERK OF COURTS
By:/s/ D. Robinson
Deputy Clerk
05527366
August 19,26,2011
September 2, 9, 2011


Public Auction
1985 CHEV
VIN#1GCEG25H8F7154001
To be held 09/15/2011, 8:00am at
Bryant's Tire and Towing
1165 East Duval St. Lake City FL
32055

05527805
September 9, 2011


Legal

Notice is hereby given per Florida
Statue 98.075(2):
Last known address of:
Shkeela R. Hall
1105 SWAnniston Cir. Apt 103
Lake City, FL 32025
Henry D. Rogers
171 SW Balboa PI.
Lake City, FI 32025
Caleb M. Linton
P.O. Box 77
Lake City, FI 32056-0077
is potentially ineligible to be regis-
tered to vote. Please respond within
30 days of publication of this notice
by contacting the Supervisor of Elec-
tions Office at the address or phone
number below. If no response is re-
ceived within 30 days of this publi-
cation, it may result in determination
of ineligibility by the supervisor and
removal of the registered voter's
name from the statewide voter regis-
tration system.
Published one time in the Lake City
Reporter
Elizabeth "Liz" P. Home
Columbia County Supervisor of
Elections
971 W. Duval Street, Suite 102
Lake City, FL 32055
(386) 758-1026
05527743
September 9, 2011

Public Auction
Will be held by Gainey Automotive,
Inc. in Columbia County at 3468
S.W. CR 138, Fort White, Fl. 32038
Date 09/20/2011
Time: 8:00 A.M.
1995 Chevrolet
VIN# 2C1MR2265S6766690
2000 ISUZU
VIN# 4S2CK58W4Y4313980
05527744
September 9, 2011
Public Notice Notice is hereby
made to all those concerned and af-
fected that Boran Craig Barber Engel
Construction Co., Inc. is performing
state project # GL-35 (WRC) Lake
City Work Release Center at 1099
NW Dot Glen, Lake City, FL 32055
05527727
September 8. 9, 10, 11, 13, 14, 15,
2011
Registration of Fictitious Names
We the undersigned, being duly
sworn, do hereby declare under oath
that the names of all persons interest-
ed in the business or profession car-
ried on under the name of COM-
MUNITY INCOME TAX OF
FLORIDA at 2941 W US HWY 90,
SUITE 117, LAKE CITY, FL.,
32055
Contact Phone Number: 3M6-623-
1721 and the extent of the interest of
each, is as follows:
Name: JAMES TOMPKINS
Extent of Interest: 50%
by:/s/ JAmes Tompkins
Name: AMELIA TOMPKINS
Extent of Interest: 50%
by:/s/ Amelia Tompkins
STATE OF FLORIDA
COUNTY OF COLUMBIA
Sworn to and subscribed before me
this 7th day of September, A.D.
2011.
by:/s/ KIM S. GRAHAM
05527775
September 9. 2011


060 Services
EXPERIENCE WORK
with elders, flexible hours, nights
& days, can also be assistance in
home care, 386-963-4061.
100 Job
1A0 Opportunities

05527684



"COOKS"
Competitive Wages being
offered for cooks!!!
Please apply in person
Tues 9/6 thru Fri. 9/8
at the Alachua location ~
1-75 & US Hwy 441.

05527699
PRODUCT ADVISOR
Travel Country RV is accepting
applications for product advisors
in our Lake City, FL location.
No experience necessary. We're
looking for personality, charac-
ter, and energy. Applicants must
be outgoing and have the ability
to interact and communicate
with our loyal customers.
This is an excellent opportunity
to learn a new career in a
thriving industry. Salary plus
bonuses with an excellent
employee benefit plan. Call Jeff
at 888-664-4268 or email to
jeff@travelcountryrv.com
for further information

05527728
Automotive Equipment
Mechanic II 42002554.
Applicants must apply at
peoplefirst.myflorida.com by
9/15/11. For more info contact
Florida Forest Service at 386-
758-5716. AA/EEO employer

055277,17


SERVERS
Now accepting applications
for Servers!!!
Please apply in person
at the Alachua location 1-75 &
US Hwy 441.


ioo Job
Opportunities
AVON!! Only $10 to start!
Earn bonus $ up to $150+
1-800-275-9945 pin #4206
www.youravon.com/tdavies,

BUSY OFFICE looking for full-
time receptionist. Experience in
multi-line phone system, updating
records, accounting and working
with the public. Computer skills
necessary. Fax resume at:
386-961-8802
F/T Exp Line cook needed. Kitch-
en is open site to public. Job in-
cludes taking orders, cooking,
cleaning, washing dishes. Pick up
Application at Milton's located 8
mi N of 1-10 on Hwy 441. $9.00
per hour. 386-365-7262
FUNDRAISING MAJOR Gifts
Officer (Part Time). Exciting part-
time opportunity for a qualified
candidate with a proven track
record for success in major gift
fundraising, prospect research and
database management. The
responsibilities include designing
and implementing a strategy for
cultivating and stewardihg major
donors, developing and imple-
menting major gift giving strat-
egies and programs, and creating a
sustained effort to identify, solicit,
involve, and retain tnajor donors.
The candidate will also develop,
coordinate and execute cultivation
strategies for major gift prospects
and donors. Qualifications: BA/BS
in marketing (or related field),
minirhum of 7 yrs. experience gen-
erating and expanding major gift
base, major gift cultivation, and
soliciting strategies. Excellent
computer, interpersonal and com-
munication skills also required:
Please send
resumes along with cover letter to:
ARC Foundation of North
Florida, Inc. PO Drawer L
Live Oak, FL. 32064
No Phone Calls please.
IMMEDIATE OPENING for
Exp. Structural Steel Painter
Apply at QIA 3631 E US 90
In Lake City
Immediate position available for
F/T Bookkeeper/Receptionist at
busy retail office. Computer skills,
extensive knowledge of quick
book & good customer service
skills required. Fax resume to
386-754-1999
License CDL Driver w/2 yrs Log-
ging Exp. Must have Cleaq CDL.
Also, FT. semi/heavy equip.
mechanic wanted Deep outh
Forestry 386-365-6966
Looking for an in home caregiver.
Room & board + Salary Negotible.
References required. Call for info.
386-365-3732
MECHANIC
Heavy truck & trailer experience a
plus. Best pay in North Florida for
the right person. Southern
Specialized, 1812 NW Main Blvd.,
386-752-9754
Mobile Home Sales!
Experienced Salesperson
Needed to sell the South's
#1 rated product! Call Kevin
386-719-5560
Physical laborer needed. CDL
license req'd. Must have respect
for electricity & ability to work in
water & mud. Must be able to pass
drug test. Call 386-752-1854
Sales Position available for moti-
vated individual Rountree -Moore
Toyota, Great benefits, paid train-
ing/vacation. Exp. a plus but not
necessary. Call Anthony Cosentino
386-623-7442

1 Medical
120 Employment

05527328
LEARN TO DRAW BLOOD
Local Phlebotomy Course
offered in Lake City, FLA
Certificate program.
(904)566-1328

Pharmacy Technician needed.
Must be Florida registered. Min. 1
year exp required. Preferably in a
retail environment. Excellent
computer & communication skills
needed. FT position. Competitive
pay. Send reply to Box 05074, C/O
The Lake City Reporter, P.O. Box
1709, Lake City, FL, 32056


141 Babysitters

Loving mom would like to care for
your child. Full or Part time in my
home. Near downtown. Only 1
opening avail. 386-438-5394

240 Schools &
2 Education

05527750
Interested in a Medical Career?
Express Training offers
courses for beginners & exp
Nursing Assistant, $479
next class-09/12/10

Phlebotomy national certifica-
tion, $800 next class-10/10/11

Continuing education
Fees incl. books, supplies, exam
fees. Call 386-755-4401 or
expresstrainingservices.com



310 Pets & Supplies


LABRADOODLE PUPPY,
10 weeks old, health certificate,
registered, $450, not a breeder
Call 386-364-2089


310 Pets & Supplies

PUBLISHER'S NOTE
Florida Law 828.29 requires dogs
and cats being sold to be at least 8
weeks old and have a health
certificate from a licensed
veterinarian documenting they
have mandatory shots and are
free from intestinal and external
parasites. Many species of wild-
life must be licensed by Florida
Fish and Wildlife. If you are
unsure, contact the local
office for information.


402 Appliances

FROST FREE refrigerator.
Whirlpool Very clean. Works
good. White, $165. obo
386-292-3927
Whirlpool Washer & Dryer.
White, large capacity. Like new.
$385. for both.
386-292-3927 or 386-755-5331.


407 Computers

HP Computer,
$80.00
386-755-9984 or
386-292-2170
LAPTOP REPAIR
Fast, Professional
Call Star Tech
386-755-0277


408 Furniture

Country Fmch King Bed w/head-
board & foot board & 2 night
stands (no mattress)
$125.00 386-754-4094


420 Wanted to Buy

K&H TIMBER
We Buy Pine Hardwood &
Cypress. Large or small tracts.
Call 386-961-1961.
Wanted Junk Cars, Trucks, Vans.
$275 & up CASH! Free Pick Up!
NO title needed !386-878-9260
After 5pm 386- 752-3648.


430 Garage Sales

BIG Multi Family sale. Too
much to list. 412 SE Lehigh be-
hind Southside Baptist Church.
Sat. 8-1pm No early birds.
HUGH SALE Sat. 8 -3 On
Branford Hwy right before S&S
and B&B. Movies, clothes, shoes.
curtains, comforters, lots more.
Multi family. Fri & Sat. 9-?
90 to Hall of Fame (under 1-75) to
3832 NW Archer St. Look for
signs. Lots of great stuff!!
Multi Family. Thurs Sat. 8am-
3pm. Something for everyone.
Lake Jeffery Rd., first dirt road.
Past 135 turn left Follow signs.
PUBLISHER'S NOTE
All Yard Sale Ads
Must be Pre-Paid.



440 Miscellaneous

AC Window unit.
$65. obo
386-292-3927

GUNSHOW: 09/10 & 09/11
@ The Columbia County
Fairgrounds, Hwy 247 Lake City.
Sat 9am 4pm, Sun 9am-3pm.
Info: 386-325-6114
Microwave. Looks good, works
good. No carousel
$25.00
386-292-3927
Stop gnats& Mosquito bites! Buy
Swamp Gator All natural insect re-
pellent. Family safe. Use head to
toe. Available at The Home Depot.
WEEDEATER Push Mower. Runs
great. Need the money!
$85.00
386-292-3927


450 fGoodThings
5 to Eat

GREEN PEANUTS For Sale
Graded and washed.
$30.00 a bushel.
386-752-3434
OSCEOLA HONEY & BEE
FARM, Tupelo honey now avail..
several other varieties, good pri-
ces.. 386-755-2642, 386-754-1110


460 Firewood

Firewood for Sale. $65. per Truck
Load. Rick 386-867-1039 or Joey
965-0288 if no answer pls leave
message we will call you back.


520 Boats for Sale

2003 SEA PRO 170CC
YAMAHA 90 HP, low hours, live
wells, Bimini top. fish finder.
AL trailer, $7,500, 386-719-6537

630 Mobile Homes
V6 V for Rent
2 OR 3 BEDROOMS
Clean, Quiet Park $475-$525.mo
Wat.:, septic, garbage included
758-2280 References. NO PETS!
2&3 BR MH. $395 $650. mo.
plus deposit. Water & sewer hut
nished. Cannon Creek MIIl'


386-752-6422
2/2 Units. Great rental program
for responsible tenants.
Call for details, 386-984 84.118
13th Month FREE!!


BUY MII


....



FIND IT











Classified Department: 755-5440


LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 9, 2011


630 Mobile Homes
630 for Rent
3/2 Large MH, small park, near
FGCC, Small pets ok, $500 dep
$575 mo w/12 mo lease
386-752-1971 or 352-281-2450
3/2.5 S of Lake City, (Branford
area) $600 mo plus security
386-590-0642 or 386-867-1833
www.suwanneevalleyproperties.com
Ft. White Country living.
3br/2ba Mobile Home
Very clean! 386-497-1116.

LG clean 3br's $450. -$650. mo. +
dep. Also, 2br mobile home's
available. No Pets.
5 Points area. 386-961-1482
Mobile Homes for rent in
White Springs, Lake City & Ft.
White Contact 386-623-3404
or 386-397-2779
Nature Lovers Xtra clean 2/1
Private landscaped acre. NO
UTILITY DEP. Carport, deck, pa-
tio. Washer, Dryer. Smoke free,
adult area on creek, No pets, $500
mo. 1st + $200 dep., 752-7027.
Long term occupancy preferred.
New 2br/2ba off Country Club. 1/2
ac. lot Front. back porch & storage
bldg. $600 mo. $600 sec. No Pets!
386-752-5911 or 466-2266

Mobile Homes
0 for Sale

o52:7374
!!ATTENTION!!
We purchase used mobile
homes. Call North Pointe
Homes, Gainesville
352-872-5566

O5527375 !!!LOOK!!!
Before you but a Mobile Home
check out North Pointe Homes
in Gainesville--Hugh Discounts!
credit Scores Don't matter. Call
for Free Approval! Jacobson
Homes Factory Outlet (352)872-
5566 or mrb3371@hotmail.com

05527376
NEW USED- REPO'S
Your Volume Giant! North
Pointe Homes. Millions to Lend.
Credit Scores 575 = 10% down.
Gainesville (352)872-5566 or
walker-david( live.com

Champion Home Inspections
Protect Your Investment
With A Professional
Inspection State Licensed
And Insured 386-344-5551
High Springs. 1629 sqft. on 10
acres. Needs to sell. $84,999.
Make an offer! MLS 78776
Bosshardt Realty Services.
386-965-4873
Fort White. 2336 sqft on 5 acres.
Tape & textured walls. Needs to
sell. $99.999. Motivated, make an
offer MLS 78841 (386)965-4873
Bosshardt Realty Services.
Lake City 1560 sqft. buit in 2002.
On 5 acres. $83,999. MLS 78931
Bosshardt Realty Services.
386-965-4873
3/2 DWMH "Model Home" condi-
tion. Just under 1 ac w/granddaddy
oaks and landscaped MLS#77988.
$84,900, Nancy Rogers
867-1271 R.E.O. Realty Group
Palm Harbor Homes
Cash for Clunkers
5K For Your Used Mobile Home -
Any Condition
800-622-2832 ext. 210.

650 Mobile Home
6J5 & Land

Owner Finance, 3/2, on 1.5 acres,
S of Lake City, small down/$695
mo, 386-590-0642 / 38686-7-1833
www.suwanneevalleyproperties.com

710 Unfurnished Apt.
For Rent









SPRING HILL VILLAGE
Excellent High Springs location.
1, 2 & 3 bedroom floor-plans;
some with garages.
Call 386-454-1469
or visit our website:
www.springhillvillage.net

IBR APT.
Downtown Location, Clean.
$450 mo, plus Security.
NO PETS. Call 386-755-3456
2/2 w/garage & washer/dryer
hookups. West side of town,
Call for details
386-755-6867
2br/l ba, 1 car garage,
W/D hook up, $525 month,
no pets 1 month sec,
386-961-8075
2BR/I BA. Close to town.
$565.mo plus deposit.
Includes water & sewer.
386-965-2922
2BR/2BA w/garage
5 minutes from VA hospital.
Call for details.
386-755-4590 or 365-5150
A Landlord You Can Love!
2 br Apts $575. & up + sec. Great
area. CH/A washer/dryer hookups.
386-758-9351/352-208-2421
Amber Wood Hills Apts.
Private Patio area. Beautiful yard.
Washer/dryer hkup. Free water &
sewer. 1/1, 2/1. Move in special.


386-754-1800. wwwmyflapts.com
Columbia Arms Apt. located 1/2
mi from V.A. & Winn Dixie. Pet
Friendly. Move in Special $199.
Pool, laundry & balcony.
386-754-1800. www.myflapts.com
Great location W of 1-75, spacious
deluxe 2br apts., garage, W/D
hookup. patio. $600/700 & up, +
Sec, 386-965-5560 or 344-3715
Greentree Townhouse
Summer special. 2/1, 2/1.5. Free
water & sewer. Balcony & patio.
Laundry. Behind Kens on Hwy 90.
386-754-1800 wwwmvyflapts.com
Summer Special! 12th mo Free
w/signed yr lease. (Updated Apt,
w/tile floors/fresh paint. Great
area. From $450.+sec. 752-9626


710 Unfurnished Apt.
710 For Rqnt

ONE 51 PLACE APTS
Alachua
MOVE IN SPECIALS
1, 2. & 3 bedrooms
Call TODAY 386-462-0656
or visit us at one51 place.com


Redwine Apartments. Move in
special $199. Limited time. Pets
welcome, with 5 complexes,
we have a home for you.
386-754-1800. www.myflapts.com
The Lakes Apts. Studios & IBr's
from $135/wk. Util. & cable incl.,
Sec 8 vouchers accepted, monthly
rates avail Call 386-752-2741
Wayne Manor Apts.
Move in $199. Summer special.
2/1, washer/dryer. Behind Kens off
Hwy 90. 386-754-1800
www.myflapts.com
Windsor Arms Apartments.
Summer special $199. Move in!
2/1, 2/1.5., 2/2. Pet Friendy. Free
200 ch. Dish. Washer/dryer hkup.
386-754-1800. www.myflapts.com

720 Furnished Apts.
20 For Rent

Rooms for Rent. Hillcrest, Sands,
Columbia. All furnished. Electric,
cable, fridge, microwave. Weekly
or monthly rates. I person $135,
2 persons $150. weekly
386-752-5808
Studio Apt. Private. Rent incl util-
ities, SAellite TV, appliances,
(washer/dryer). No pets 386-963-
4767 or 292-0385 Available 9/1

0 Unfurnished
730 Hom For Rent

'09 Executive Home for rent on 41
acres. 4br/3.5ba Available
October. Horses/outdoor pets ok.
$2000/mo but all terms negotiable
for right caretaker. 386-209-4610
2BR house $625.mo $625. dep.
Also, 2 large br apt. $525. mo
$525 dep. Conveniently close to
the VA & shopping. 386-344-2972
/ 2/1 879 Poplar St. $600. mo.
/ 3/2 Highlands Loop $700.mo.
All require First and last...
386-755-3649
Please leave msg., Only in office
Tues Thur. 8am 4pm
3BR/1.5 BA Large lot. Very clean
with storage shed. Quiet area.
$850 mo. + $850. dep.
386-752-7578
4br/2ba CHA Brick, 1200 sqft
lac.. Close to FGCC, CR 245A.
Ceramic tile/carpet, $800 mo $800
dep (904)708-8478 App. req'd
Brick 3br/2ba Large yard. garage,
CH/A. 189 Stanley Ct. Lake City.
$950. mo + $1000 dep.
Call 386-365-8543
LARGE 3BR/2BA home close to
college. $750. mo $450 security.
Application required.
386-935-1482
LOVELY 3BR/IBA Farm house
for rent. Quiet country area.
Please call after 5pm.
386-752-0017. Leave message.
SITE-BUILT HOME.
On 5 acres, near Fort White,
1st last + deposit.
Call 386-758-1789

775 Business &
Office Rentals

FOR LEASE: Downtown office
space. Convenient to
Court house.
Call 386-755-3456
For Lease: E Baya Ave. Two -
1000 sqft office space units or
combined for 2000 sqft. 386-984-
0622 or weekends 386-497-4762
Midtown Commercial Center,
brand new executive front suite &
suite w/warehouse.
Call Vicki or Joe 386-935-2832.
NICE OFFICE SPACE
for lease.
From $450 a month,
Tom 386-961-1086 DCA Realtor
SUB SHOP for lease.
All Equip. Avail. Old Willy J's
Across from Wal-Mart
386-623-2244


790 Vacation Rentals

Horseshoe Beach RV Lot.
Nice corner Lot with shade trees.
$295. mo Water/electric included
386-235-3633 or 352-498-5986


805 Lots for Sale

BEAUTIFUL 5 acres in
Lake City, 100% owner financing,
no qualifying, $395 per month.
Please call 512-663-0065

Owner Financing. River comm &
nature lover's dream in Lee. 15
wooded ac by the Withlacoochee.
Property is already subdivided
MLS 75576 $48,000 623-6896
PUBLISHER'S NOTE
All real estate advertising in this
newspaper is subject to the fair
housing act which makes it illegal
to advertise "any preference,
limitation, or discrimination based


on race, color, religion, sex,
disability, familial status or nation-
al origin; or any intention to make
such preference, limitation or
discrimination." Familial status
includes children under the age of
18 living with parents or legal
custodians, pregnant women and
people securing custody of chil-
dren under the age of 18. This
newspaper will not knowingly
accept any advertising for real es-
tate which is in violation of the
law. Our readers are hereby in-
formed that all dwellings adver-
tised in this newspaper are availa-
ble on an equal opportunity basis.
To complain of discrimination call
HUD toll free at 1-800-669-9777,
the toll free
telephone number to the hearing
impaired is 1-800-927-9275.


810 Home for Sale

/ Champion Home Inspections
386-344-5551. Inspections
Starting At $ 249.00
Veterans Receive 10% Off
Full Inspection.
Champion Home Inspections
Contact John 386-344-5551
State Licensed
And Insured
championhomeinspections.us
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
10 acres w/well maintained brick
home. 2012 sqft. Open split floor
plan. Lori Giebeig Simpson
365-5678 MLS# 74447 $149,900
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
New home in May Fair. Super area
comer lot. 4br split plan. Versatile
colors. Elaine K. Tolar
755-6488 MLS# 76919 $199,900
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
3br/2ba. 1590 sqft. Lori Giebeig
Simpson. 365-5678 or
Mary Brown Whitehurst
965-0887 MLS# 74542 $109,9001
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
Cute 3/2 brick in town. Wood
floors, Ig family room. Front &
back porch Lori Giebeig Simpson
365-5678 MLS# 77989 $79,900
LEASE/OPTION BUY
3br/2ba Home 2010 w/garage
on 1/2 acre. Owner Financing
386-623-2244
Lg. 4/3 family home. 16x20
screened porch, workshop. 4.5 ac.
fenced/cross fenced MLS 74339
$219,900. N Fla Homeland Real-
ty Darlene Hart 386-288-2878
Great 3/2 home w/2346 sq ft
under roof on .67 ac., Creekside
S/D. Big back yard w/plenty of
shade trees. On a cul-de-sac, MLS
77385 $169,900 623-6896
Spacious 4/2 home on 1 ac. Split
floor plan. Great neighborhood.
Easy access to 1-75 $204,900 MLS
77859 N Fla Homeland Realty
Darlene Hart 386-288-2878
WoodCrest 3/2 Split floor plan
Screened porch. 10x12 storage
shed. $126,900 MLS 77932
Darlene Hart 386-288-2878
N Fla Homeland Realty
Home for entertaining 3/2 plus
pool house w/half bath, 2.25
fenced ac. Freshly painted. Split
plan, Large rear deck MLS 78103
$179,900 386-623-6896
0.5 ac tract. 441 (4 lane) frontage.,
1/2 mi from Target distribution.
2/1.5 zoned resid'l MLS# 78506
$88,000 Nancy Rogers 867-1271
R.E.O. Realty Group
Great home, Great neighborhood,
great price. 3/2 Close to town A
Must See!. MLS#77411 $79,900,
Nancy Rogers
867-1271 R.E.O. Realty Group
4/2 fenced yard. 2 car garage,
Fairly new roof & HVAC Shed.
fenced back yard. MLS#77602,
$162,500, Nancy Rogers
867-1271 R.E.O. Realty Group
Lake City Country Club. 4/3, reno-
vated. Great for entertaining. Glass
doors open to back yard. $179.900
MLS#78637 Nancy Rogers
R.E.O. Realty Group 867-1271
Investor Special Buy. 2br con-
crete block w/CH/A. Available "as
is" $22,900. MLS76821.
Vin Lantroop. 386-755-6600
Hallmark Real Estate
Pool Home. 2 Story w/soaring
ceilings. Ig master w/Jacuzzi.
Fenced yard. $159,000 MLS770S5
Teresa Spradley 386-365-8343
Hallmark Real Estate
Near Itchetucknee head springs,
easy Gainesville commute. For
sale or rent! $75,500, MLS77398.
Paula Lawrence. 386-623-1973
Hallmark Real Estate
REDUCED gated community.
Brick w/florida room & private
garden. Security system. Ginger
Parker. MLS77703. 386-365-2135
Hallmark Real Estate
Like to Entertain? Over 2900
sqft. 3br/2.5ba. Fenced w/sprinkler
& security system. MLS78404.
Sherry Willis. 386-365-8095
Hallmark Real Estate
Sprinfghollow Ig brick. 4br/2ba
w/1g screened porch. Oversized
ga-
rage. upgraded kitchen & bath.
$109,900, MLS78787. Janet Creel.
719-0382 Hallmark Real Estate

82O Farms &
S Acreage
4 1/2 acre lot. Lake Jelffery Road.
Gorgeous Oaks!Paved Rd
Owner Financing! NO DOWN!
$59,900. $525mo 352-215-1018.
www.LandOwnerFinancing.com
4 acres, Wellborn, New Well
installed, Beautifully wooded
w/cleared Home Site, owner fin,
no down, $39,900, $410 mon
Call 352-215-1018
www.LandOwnerFinancing.com
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
Brick in LC Country Club. 4/3
Lots of extras, oversized garage &
storage. Elaine K. Tolatr
752-4211 MLS# 78739 $239,91100
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
Brick ,in WoodCrest S/D. Split
plan. Screened porch. Lg back
yard. Elaine K. Tolar
752-4211 MLS# 77015 $137,900
For Lease FARM- 7 stall barn.
17+ acres, pasture, cross fenced.
Close in $500. mo.
386-961-1086
Owner financed land. Half acre to


ten acre lots. As low as $300
down. Deas Bullard Properties
386-752-4339 www.landnfl.com

80A Commercial
830U Property

Commercial Parcel 2 acres w/252
ft frontage on SR 47 Add'l 4.76
ac. avail. $149,90(0 MLS# 78260
Call 386-867-1271 Nancy Rogers
R.E.O.Realty Group, Inc

870 Real Estate
870 Wanted

I Buy Houses
CASH!
Quick Sale Fair Price
386-269-0605


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