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The Lake City reporter
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028308/01654
 Material Information
Title: The Lake City reporter
Uniform Title: Lake City reporter (Lake City, Fla. 1967)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: John H. Perry
Place of Publication: Lake City Fla
Publication Date: 9/6/2011
Frequency: daily (monday through friday)[<1969>-]
weekly[ former 1967-<1968>]
daily
normalized irregular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Lake City (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Columbia County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Columbia -- Lake City
Coordinates: 30.189722 x -82.639722 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 95, no. 4 (Oct. 5, 1967)-
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000358016
oclc - 33283560
notis - ABZ6316
lccn - sn 95047175
sobekcm - UF00028308_01569
System ID: UF00028308:01654
 Related Items
Preceded by: Lake City reporter and Columbia gazette

Full Text






Sex charges
Alachua Co. man


pay homage to jailed following
ab Four at FGC. allegations.

000016 120511 *3-DGIT 326 ee below
LIB OF FLORIDA HISTORY
PO BOX 117007
205 SMA UNIV OF FLORID
GAINESVILLE FL 32611-1943


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Selmon dies
First ever
draft pick by
Tampa Bay Bucs.
Sports, I B


Reporter


Tuesday, September 6, 2011 www.lakecityreporter.com Vol. 137, No. 190 E 75 cents




Nash Rd. jogger struck, killed


From staff reports

A Lake City man was killed Sunday
morning after being struck by a vehicle
as he was jogging on a local roadway.
Dead is Russell Enans Davis Jr., 42.
The driver of the vehicle, Brandon


Garrett Craig, 28, also of Lake City, was
uninjured, reports said.
The incident occurred around 7:15 a.m.
Sunday on Northwest Nash Road.
According to Florida Highway Patrol
reports, Craig was driving a 2005 Nissan
pickup truck east on Northwest Nash


Road as Davis was jogging west in the
eastbound lane.
As Craig's pickup truck was heading
east on the roadway, the front right side of
the truck struck Davis.
Davis was thrown onto the south
shoulder of the roadway upon impact.


He was pronounced dead at the scene by
Columbia County Fire Department per-
sonnel, reports said.
Charges in connection with the incident
are pending further investigation, reports
said.


Obama

says GOP

must back

U.S. first
By DARLENE SUPERVILLE
Associated Press
DETROIT President
Barack Obama used a boister-
ous Labor Day rally to put con-
gressional Republicans on the


ASSOCIATED PRESS
President Barack
Obama waves to
the audience after
the annual Labor
Day parade in
Detroit Monday.


spot, chal-
lenging
them to
place the
country's
interests
above all
else and
vote to cre-
ate jobs
and put
the econ-
omy back
on a path
to ward
growth.
" Sho w
us what
you 've
got," he
said.
In a par-
tial pre-
view of


the jobs speech he's delivering
to Congress Thursday night,
Obama said roads and bridges
nationwide need rebuilding and
more than 1 million unemployed
construction workers are itch-
ing to "get dirty" making the
repairs. He portrayed Congress
as an obstacle to getting that
work done.
I'm going to propose ways
to, put America back to work
that both parties can agree to,
because I still believe both par-
ties can work together to solve
our problems," Obama said at
an annual Labor Day rally spon-
sored by the Detroit-area AFL-
CIO. "Given the urgency of this
moment, given the hardship
that many people are facing,
folks have got to get together.
But we're not going to wait for
them."
"We're going to see if we've
got some straight shooters in
Congress. We're going to see if
congressional Republicans will
put country before party," he
said.
Congress returns from its
summer recess this week and
the faltering economy and jobs
shortage are expected to be a
dominant theme.
Besides spending on public
works, Obama said he wants
pending trade deals passed
to open new markets for U.S.
goods. He also said he wants
Republicans to prove they'll
fight as hard to cut taxes for
the middle class as they do for
profitable oil companies and the
wealthiest Americans.
The president is expected to
call for continuing a payroll tax
JOBS continued on 3A


4-vehicle crash caps Labor Day weekend


An unidentified pair surveys the scene of an accident that occurred at around 5:30 p.m. Monday on Branford Highway just south of Troy Road. At
least one person was injured. Authorities blocked a section of the road and rerouted traffic while first responders rendered aid to victims. No further
details were available at press time.


Beatles

tribute

concert

coming

to FGC

By TROY ROBERTS
Speclialto the Reporter
The Beatles are one
of the most recognizable
bands in the history of
music and their success
cannot be questioned.
Even more than 50 years
since their formation,
Beatlemania still exists,
as is evident by the num-
ber of tribute bands pay-
ing homage to the Fab
Four.
Let It Be: America's
LET IT BE continued on 3A


ouuI uey JpniuL


Let it Be, one of the first Beatles tribute bands, is set to perform Saturday at Florida Gateway College.


Nasty spill
TONY BRITTILake City Reporter
Lake City Police Department
officers Benjamin Winston
(left) and Elijha Serrano help
an unidentified man move a
motorcycle following a crash
shortly after noon Monday
on U.S. 90. Authorities did
not immediately release the
names of those involved.
The motorcyclist was taken
to Lake City Medical Center
for evaluation, authorities
said.


Alachua Co. man

faces sex charges


By TONY BRITT
tbritt@lakecityreporter.com
An Alachua County man, arrest-
ed early Saturday, faces sexual
assault charges stemming from
an :0al1g>d Friday night incident
in olviug three pre-teen youths,
police say.
Kevin Patrick Martin, 40, no
address listed, was chai god with
two counts of sexual assault
in relation to the case. He is


being held at the
Detention Center
on $21,000 bond,
According to
ColumbiaCounty
sheriff's reports,
Martin around 11 p.m.
Friday, a deputy
was dispatched to the Lake City
Speedway, 1022 SW Howell St., in
ARREST continued on 3A


1 181 2] 41 0 1


CALL US:
(386) 752-1293
SUBSCRIBE TO
THE REPORTER:
Voice: 755-5445
Fax: 752-9400


86
T-Storm


Chance
Chance


WEATHER, 2A


Opinion ............ 4A
People............. 2
Obituaries ......... .. 5A
Advice & Comics........ -4B
Puzzles ............. 2B


TODAY IN
PEOPLE
," bii ,., t or
[ 1D-


COMING
WEDNESDAY
Complete o t,
2:c iJncil cO.erl',, ge


Let it Be
Tribute band will


VOKOWMAM"PAWA


F;










LAKE CITY REPORTER DAILY BRIEFING TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 6, 2011


Saturday:
Afternoon: ---
Evening: ---


Saturday:
Afternoon: ---
Evening: ---


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Saturday:
Afternoon: ---
Evening: ---


Saturday:


PEOPLE IN THE NEWS



No Lewis, but telethon brings in more


By OSKAR GARCIA
Associated Press
LAS VEGAS Even
without Jerry Lewis, the
Muscular Dystrophy
Association telethon post-
ed its best gain since the
recession started, though
the program's longtime
host was on the minds
of many during the 46th
annual fundraiser.
"American Idol"
executive producer Nigel
Lythgoe said after co-host-
ing Sunday's program
that he's sorry the famed
comedian didn't partici-
pate, but the organization
needs to move on to
ensure the fundraiser con- This photo
tinues. Muscular
The telethon raised O'Dell, Jai
nearly $61.5 million to Jerry Le
Sunday, an increase of Lewis has
about $2.6 million over ments sin
last year, MDA officials
said.
Lythgoe told The Associated
Press minutes after the six-hour live
broadcast ended on the east coast
that he thought the 85-year-old actor
would show up either during the
telecast or earlier to film a taped seg-
ment of his signature song "You'll
Never Walk Alone."
"I was fully expecting him to turn
up at any point and join that six
hours and I'm sorry he didn't,"
Lythgoe told the AP. "And hopefully
another year he might. I mean, he
knows that he is always welcome on
the telethon. It's his baby."
An orchestra was ready to film
Lewis, but he didn't come to the Las
Vegas casino where the telethon was
filmed, Lythgoe said.
Lewis publicist Candi Cazau
declined comment when reached


ASSOCIATED PRESS
provided by Muscular Dystrophy Association, The 46th annual
Dystrophy Association telethon co-hosts, from left to right, Nancy
nn Carl, Nigel Lythgoe and Alison Sweeney ad-lib personal salutes
ewis, Sunday in Las Vegas. The hosts of the telethon say Jerry
retired from the yearly fundraiser, the organization's first com-
ce announcing the beloved icon's departure last month.


by the AP Earlier, she said Lewis
never agreed to any appearance
- recorded or live after the MDA
announced in August he wouldn't
take part in the show or be its chair-
man.
Lythgoe and co-host Jann Carl
said during the show that Lewis
"retired."
Lewis has not publicly said why he
is no longer chairman of the MDA,
or why he didn't personally appear
in this year's telethon. The co-hosts'
remarks during the show were the
first time the MDA has addressed
Lewis' departure since it was
announced, and telethon spokesman
Jim Brown declined further com-
ment about the split
Lewis' absence ended a 45-year
run in which he raised $1.66 billion.


The fundrais-
er raised $58.9
million last year,
but was short-
ened this year
from 21V2 hours.
Brown said
early Monday
that this year's
donations
increased to
nearly $61.5 mil-
lion, the MDA's
best showing
since 2008 when
the recession
started.
"The tremen-
dous success
of the telethon,
even in a tough
economy
where some
communities
are also being
challenged by
natural disas-
ters, shows that
America under-


stands and appreciates the truly
rapid progress being made by MDA-
funded researchers worldwide," R.
Rodney Howell, M.D., chairman of
the MDA Board of Directors, said in
a statement
Lythgoe said he and other tele-
thon hosts knew Lewis a man
inextricably bonded to the tele-
thon would be a presence even
in a show that never included his
voice.
'There appeared to be an elephant
in the room, and it's one that you
go talk about," Lythgoe said. "This
guy is someone who's put this whole
thing together."
Buy Lythgoe said the telethon and
cause can't center around one man
- even Lewis.


Celebrity Birthdays


Sept. 6:
Webbie 26 (rapper)
Natalia Cigliuti 33
(Saved By The Bell: The
New Class actress)
Foxy Brown 33 (rap-


Rosie Perez 47
(actress)
Elizabeth Vargas 49
(ABC newscaster)
Jeff Foxworthy 54
(comedian)
Jane Curtin 63


Lake City
HOW TO REACH US
Main number ........(386) 752-1293
Fax number .............752-9400
Circulation ..............755-S445
Online ... www.lakecttyreporter.com
The Lake City Reporter, an affiliate of
Community Newspapers Inc., is pub-
lished Tuesday through Sunday at 180
E. Duval-St., Lake City, Fla. 32055.
Periodical postage paid at Lake City, Ra.
Member Audit Bureau of Circulation and
The Associated Press.
All material herein is property of the Lake
City Reporter. Reproduction In whole or
in part Is forbidden without the permis-
sion of the publisher. U.S. Postal Service
No. 310-880.
POSTMASTER: Send address changes
to Lake City Reporter, P.O. Box 1709,
Lake City, Fla. 32056.
Publisher Todd Wilson.....754-0418
(twilson@lakecdtyreporter.com)
NEWS
Editor Robert Bridges .....754-0428
(rbridges@lakectyreporter.com)
ADVERTISING
Director Ashley Butcher .. .754-0417
(abutcher@lakectyreporter.com)
CLASSIFIED
To played a classified ad, call 755-5440


Reporter

BUSINESS
Controller Sue Brannon... .754-0419
(sbrannon@lakecityreporter.com)
CIRCULATION
Home delivery of the Lake City Reporter
should be completed by 630 a.m.
Tuesday through Saturday, and by 730
a.m. on Sunday.
Please call 386-755-5445 to report any
problems with your delivery service.
In Columbia County, customers should
call before 10:30 a.m. to report a ser-
vice err for same day re-delivery. After
1030 a.m., next day re-delivery or ser-
vice related credits will be issued.
In all other counties where home delivery
is available, next day re-delivery or ser-
vice related credits will be issued.
Circulation ..............755-5445
(circulation@lakecityreporter.com)
Home delivery rates
(Tuesday through Sunday)
12 Weeks.................$26.32
24 Weeks....................$48.79
52 Weeks ............... $83.46
Rates hcde 7% sales tax.
Mall rates
12 Weeks ................ $41.40
24 Weeks. . . . . . . $82.80
52 Weeks .................. $179.40


CORRECTION


The Lake City Reporter corrects errors of fact in news
items. If you have a concern, question or suggestion, please
call the executive editor. Corrections and clarifications will run
in this space. And thanks for reading.


St. Petersburg
making progress
with homeless


ST. PETERSBURG
(AP) Four years ago,
St. Petersburg's struggles
with some of the most
rampant homelessness
in the country reached
a crescendo when police
officers with box cutters
slashed up a makeshift
tent city near downtown.
The raid become a national
public-relations disaster
and didn't make a dent
in the growing crowd of
people living on the city's
streets.
Enter Robert Marbut, a
former San Antonio coun-
cilman and White House
staffer who came to town
last fall wielding what he
likes to call a "velvet ham-
mer." City leaders hired
the $5,300-a-m6nth consul-
tant after buying into his
idea of forcing the home-
less off the streets but tak-
ing them someplace better
- a sprawling, one-stop
complex where people
could be housed, fed and
start to get help with men-
tal illness, addictions and
the other problems that
put them on the streets.
More than a just big
shelter, it would be a
"transformational campus"
like the one Marbut helped
establish in San Antonio.
St. Petersburg started
getting tough last year
with a panhandling ban
and talk of limiting the
frequent public feedings.
downtown thrown by
churches and charities
that had become a magnet
for the homeless, a move
that has drawn grumbling
from those groups. Those
who get caught sleeping
on the sidewalk, having
an open beer of relieving
themselves in public have
been getting a free ride to
the new, 500-bed Pinellas


Robert Marbut, of Texas, poses for a photo inside of the
Pinellas Safe Harbor in Clearwater, a 500-bed shelter for
homeless people in the county. The shelter is being funded
by the Pinellas County Sheriffs office.


Safe Harbor, instead of a
trip to jail.
This summer, the
once-ubiquitous crowd of
homeless hanging out and
sleeping all over downtown
streets dwindled to just a
handful.
Marbut, who says he
has studied approaches
to homelessness in hun-
dreds of U.S. cities over
the last four years said
St. Petersburg had one of
the worst and most visible
problems he'd ever seen.
That was thanks to the
poor Florida economy, a
wave of discharged mili-
tary veterans with mental
health issues, easy access
to prescription painkillers
through "pill mill" pain
clinics and other factors.

Man tries to steal truck
at site of fatal crash

Tampa (AP) A
Hillsborough County
Sheriff's deputy was injured
in an altercation with a man
who tried to steal a pickup
truck from a witness at the
scene of a crash that killed
two people.
Authorities say 20-year-
old Colby Wade Cardoso
stopped his vehicle early
Monday near the crash
site on U.S. Highway 301
and tried to start a truck


belonging to a witness.
Deputies say Cardoso
ran when the truck didn't
stop and was pursued by
53-year-old Deputy Carl
Luis. The deputy caught
up with Cardoso and tried
to detain him. Cardoso vio-
lently resisted, hitting the
deputy in the hands and
neck. The suspect, who
tried to take the deputy's
gun, received upper body
injuries.
Both were taken to the
hospital. Cardoso now
faces multiple charges,
including resisting arrest
with violence.

Ex-husband of missing
teacher arrested

FORT MYERS (AP)
- Authorities say the ex-
husband of a missing Lee
County teacher has been
arrested outside a motel in
Okeechobee.
Fort Myers television
station WINK reports 44-
year-old Daniel Proctor
was arrested after U.S.
Marshals found him sleep-
ing in a car about 3:45 a.m.
Monday.
Proctor's ex-wife, 41-
year-old Amy Patterson,
has been missing since
late July when she didn't
show up for work at
Mariner Middle School.


THE WEATHER


CHANCE CHANCE ARTLY OLATED CHANCE
-STORMS -STORMS CLOUDY STORMS -STORMS


H1i866067 HI188L07 0 H190 L0 68 HI90 L068 HI191 69




City Wednesday Thursday
....ia .Cape Canaveral 88/76/t 89/76/t
TIvSh _- s 16W_ '$/ 72 -. -.


83/66
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86/67

83/67


86/67
Gabslesk *
789/70

>89/72

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Timas,



Ft. M
92/76


*


Dayi kna B
91(76


Daytona Beach
Ft. Lauderdale
Fort Myers
Gainesville
Jacksonville


-
Olando CapitCavei Key West
92/77 89/77 Lake Cy
Miami
Naples
West Palm Bea Ocala
91/77 Orlando
,1 Ft. Laudw Panama City
92/78 Pensacola
S Naples Tallahassee
,90/78 MWi Tampa


Kil1


TEMPERATURES
High Monday
Low Monday
Normal high
Normal low
Record high
Record low

PRECIPITATION
Monday
Month total
Year total
Normal month-to-date
Normal year-to-date


96
76
89
70
97 In 1944
63 In 1891

0.13"
0.13"
26.81"
0.92"
37.68"


Wt 92/79 Valdosta
/80 W. Palm Beach


SUN
Sunrise today
Sunset today
Sunrise torn.
Sunset tom.

MOON
Moonrise today
Moonset today
Moonrise torn.
Moonset tom.


0
Sept.
12
Full


W.EATHERY -THE-OUR


7:10 a.m.
7:47 p.m.
7:11 a.m.
7:46 p.m.

4:04 p.m.
1:43 a.m.
4:48 p.m.
2:43 a.m.


Sept. Sept. Oct.
20 27 3
Last New First


On this date In
1995, a very strong
thunderstorm pro-
duced winds that
caused damage to
250 homes in Lake
Havasu City, Arizona.
The winds over-
turned boats, some
of which landed in
the street.


VERYmit
lOmksibblmi
Today's
ultra-violet .
radiation risk


tn/74/t
90/78/t
89/76/t
88/71/t
88/76/t
89/80/t
88/70/t
91/79/t
88/78/t
88/71/t
89/77/t
85/70/s
82/68/pc
87/68/pc
89/76/t
88/67/pc
90/78/t


90/ 4/t
90/77/t
93/76/t
91/69/t
91/75/t
89/80/t
90/68/t
91/79/t
90/78/t
91/69/t
92/76/t
85/71/pc
85/68/s
90/68/pc
92/76/t
88/66/pc
89/77/t


An exclusive
service
brought to
our readers
by
11e Weather
Channel.


for the area on
a scale from 0 '


wather.com
4V6 Forecasts, data and
w graphics 0 201 Weather
"III |V Central, LP, Madison, Wis.
weather J www.weatherpublisher.com


SIN fE


Ge Cnece


Daily Scripture

Esau said to his father, "Do
you have only one blessing,
my father? Bless me too, my
father!" Then Esau wept aloud.
Genesis 27:38


Thought for Today

"Any man is liable to err, only a
fool persists in error."
Cicero


AROUND FLORIDA


Page Editor: Robert Bridges, 754-0428


[ LAKE CITY ALMANAC


i


IL 0 R I D -

ITit










Page Editor: Robert Bridges, 754-0428 LAKE CITY REPORTER NEWS TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 6, 2011


Lee's torrential remnants

turn deadly in Mississippi


JACKSON, Miss. (AP) The slow-
moving remnants of Tropical Storm Lee
dumped a torrent of rain across the South
on Monday and whipped up tornadoes as
it pushed further inland. One death was
reported, and at least one person was
injured.
In Mississippi, a man was swept away
by floodwaters after trying to cross a
swollen creek, authorities said Monday,
the first death caused by flooding or
winds from Lee. The system was sweep-
ing across Alabama and pushing into
Georgia, where suspected tornadoes
sent trees falling into homes and injured
at least one person.
Lt. Jay Baker of the Cherokee County
Sheriff's office northwest of Atlanta said
he'd gotten scattered reports of homes
damaged by falling trees, but couldn't
say how many. One person was taken to
a hospital with injuries that weren't life-
threatening.
As of Monday afternoon, at least 16,000
people were without power in Louisiana
and Mississippi, states that bore the
brunt of the storm over the weekend.
The man who died in Mississippi,
57-year-old John Howard Anderson Jr.,
had been in a car with two other peo-
ple trying to cross a rain-swollen creek
that naturally flows over the entrance
to JP Coleman State Park. Anderson
had been staying on a house boat at
the park's marina. Tishomingo County
Coroner Mack Wilemon said he was told


Anderson was outside of the car and had
been thrown a rope to be rescued, but he
couldn't hold on.
Jonathan Weeks, a 48-year-old sales-
man from Plantersville who owns a vaca-
tion home near .the park, said he helped
pull two people to shore and tried to sav6
Anderson.
Weeks said a strong storm had come
through the area and he and his wife
went out looking around when they
saw a van crossing the creek. He hap-
pened to have a rope in the tool box of
his truck.
"It all happened so fast. They were in
there trying to get out and panicking.
The power was out so everything was
dark," Weeks recalled in a phone inter-
view Monday.
"We threw them a rope and tied it to a
tree," Weeks said. "We got two of them
to the bank and were trying to help the
driver. We had him on the rope and were
trying to pull him in, but I don't think he
was able to hold on."
Art Gaines, a 69-year-old retiree who
lives near the park, said he and his wife
heard their dogs barking at the commo-
tion.
"When we looked out the window we
saw flashlights and then the next thing
we know there was a van going down
the creek, which is a misnomer, because
once the water gets rolling through there
it's like a small river, not a creek," Gaines
said.


LET IT BE: Beatles tribute at FGC

Continued From Page 1A


JOBS: Obama challenges GOP
Continued From Page 1A


cut for workers and jobless benefits for the
unemployed. Some Republicans oppose
extending the payroll tax cut, calling it an
unproven job creator that will only add
to the nation's massive debt. The tax cut
extension is set to expire Jan. 1.
Republicans also cite huge federal bud-
get deficits in expressing opposition to vast
new spending on jobs programs.
But Obama said lawmakers need to
act and act quickly. "The time for
Washington games is over. The time for
action is now," he said.
Obama could be including himself in
that call for action. His remarks, came
as he's facing biting criticism from the
GOP for presiding over a persistently
weak economy and high unemployment.
Republicans dubbed him "President Zero"
after a dismal jobs report last Friday
showed that employers added no jobs in
August which hasn't happened since
1945. The unemployment rate, meanwhile,
remained unchanged at 9.1 percent.
The report sparked new fears of a second
recession and injected fresh urgency into
Obama's efforts to help get the unemployed
back into the labor market and improve
his re-election chances. No incumbent in
recent times has been re-elected with a job-
less rate that high, and polls show the public
is losing confidence in Obama's handling
of the economy. His approval rating on that
issue dropped to a new low of 26 percent in a
recent Gallup survey.
GOP presidential candidate Mitt Romney
said the report was disappointing, unac-
ceptable and "further proof that President
Obaina has failed." Romney is scheduled
to get ahead of Obama by outlining his
job-creation plan,in a speech Tuesday in
Nevada, two days before the president
addresses Congress.


Tax credits for businesses that hire
and spending on school construction and
renovation also are expected to be part of
Obama's proposal.
Underscoring the political dueling under
way over the economy, Obama plans to
visit Richmond, Va., on Friday, the day
after his speech, on the first of many trips
hell make to rally the public behind his
plan. House Majority Leader Eric Cantor,
R-Va., one of Obama's fiercest critics, rep-
resents part of Richmond.
Obama's broader goal'with the speech is
to make a sweeping appeal for bipartisan
action on the economy by speaking not
just to the lawmakers in front of him but
also to the public at large. In that sense,
the speech will mark a pivot from dealing
with long-term deficit reduction to spur-
ring an economic recovery.
Aides say Obama will mount a fall cam-
paign centered on the economy, unveiling
different elements of his agenda heading
into 2012. If Republicans reject his ide4s,
the White House wants to use the mega-
phone of his presidency to enlist the public
as an ally, pressure Congress and make
the case for his re-election.
"People will see a president who will be
laying very significant proposals through-
out the fall leading up this next State of the
Union" address, Gene Sperling, director of
Obama's National Economic Council, told
The Associated .Press in an interview.
The speech also is not expected td
include a detailed plan to resolve the hous-
ing crisis, a central cause behind the weak
economy that has vexed the White House
since the beginning of Obama's adminis-
tration.
Sperling suggested that Obama would
address the housing issue separately dur-
ing the fall.


Premier Tribute to the
Beatles, was one of the'
first, forming more than 16
years ago, and is still going
strong. Consisting of Jeff
Black (Paul McCartney),
John Santarone (John
Lennon), Russell Perraut
(George Harrison) and
Mark Jones (Ringo Starr),
the Hollywood, Florida-
based group will perform
at Florida Gateway College
on Saturday, Sept. 10, in
the Levy Performing Arts.
Center. The show is spon-
sored by Drs. Chuck and
Robin Hall.
Even before forming the
group, Black had his hands
in Beatles ritual he tradi-
tionally played at Florida
beaches and his perfor-
mances typically included
some Beatles songs.
'"There used to be a
Broadway show called
'Beatlemania,'" Black
said. "That went on the
road and their guy play-
ing McCartney joined a
group called Badfinger. So
they were in need of a new
McCartney."
Black was recruited for
that role for the remain-
der of the tour and, after
its conclusion, decided to
form a tribute band of his
own. It wasn't long before
he recruited Santarone,
Perraut and Jones to the
cause, and the four have
been performing together
ever since.
Each show is a recre-
ation of the now mythos-
like history of the Beatles
and consists of three eras
- the Young Beatles, Sgt.
Pepper's Lonely Hearts
Band and the Magical
Mystery Tour and cul-
minates with the finale,
"Let It Be." Black said the
group does its best to lend
credibility to every perfor-
mance, utilizing recreated
costumes that the Beatles
would have worn during
their performances, as well
as the same model instru-
ments.
If you come away from
the show humming "Love


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then Black says the band
has done its job in honor-
ing the Beatles and their
music, music that has con-
tinued to be tremendously
popular, even today.
"The guys here on
American Idol, they're
famous and everything,
but at this time next year,
you won't remember
them," Black said. 'The
only thing more power-
ful than the Beatles in the
history of rock and roll is
Elvis Pressley, and that's
because he was the Beatles
in one person.
'The music is just better
than any other music, tech-
nically speaking," he contin-
ued. "It's simple music with
simple melodies that every-
one can sing and play, even
though there are different
levels you can play them at
And their songs just appeal
to different types of people


- "Yesterday" is at one end
of the spectrum," and then
"Yellow Submarine" and
"Octopus's Garden" is at
the other. Only the Beatles
could take a song that would
be embarrassing to some,
like 'I am the Walrus,' and
make it work."
Let It Be: America's
Premier Tribute to the
Beatles will take the stage at
7:30 p.m. on September 10
at Florida Gateway College
in Lake City. Tickets are
available for $15 for general
admission and $10 for FGC
students, staff and faculty.
Season tickets for the
remaining nine shows of
the inaugural season of
FGC Entertainment are
also available at $135 for
general admission and $60
for FGC students, staff and
faculty.
For more information,
visit www.fgcentertain-
ment.com or call the box
office at (386) 754-4340.


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ARREST: Alachua man charged
Continued From Page 1A


reference to a sexual battery.
When the deputy arrived at the scene,
he reported seeing a crowd of people sur-
rounding Martin. Several of the men in
the crowd reportedly accused Patrick of
fondling a couple of children in the bath-
room.
Martin refuted the allegations, but was
placed in police custody while the deputy
conducted an investigation, reports said.
One alleged victim told authorities
Martin paid $5 to touch the child inappro-
priately and two other victims said Martin


invited them to wrestle with him and while
wrestling, he allegedly touched their "pri-
vate parts," 'reports indicate one of the
children said. The children said they ran
to a bathroom to get away from Martin,
but that he followed them into the stalls
and left only when another child came into
the bathroom and threatened to tell what
Martin was doing, according to reports.
Martin was arrested without incident
and taken to the Columbia County Sheriff's
Office, reports said.


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LAKE CITY REPORTER NEWS TUESDAY, SEPTEMER 6, 2011


Page Editor: Robert Bridges, 754-0428


I |I-80 -7-0 51














OPINION


Tuesday, September 6, 201 I


ONE


ONE
OPINION


Let's clean

up after

ourselves

in space

Mankind's next big space
mission may be its least glam-
orous: cleaning up the tens of
thousands, maybe even mil-
lions, of pieces of debris left
behind in 54 years of space
exploration.
The space junk ranges from
large, discarded upper-stage
rockets and defunct satellites
to tiny metal fragments, many
of them a millimeter or smaller.
Even the little pieces are. a
threat to astronauts, the spade
station, the rockets supporting
them and working satellites
because they orbit at lethal,
super-high speeds.
The National Research
Council says that the amount
of space debris is past the "tip-
ping point" Space launches
will become riskier and more
expensive because of the prob-
lems of avoiding debris and
armoring space vehicles against
the impact of unavoidable junk.
The cleanup calls for a coor-
dinated international effort
by the dozen or so space-far-
ing nations. The U.S.'s NASA
should take the lead because it
has the skill to track debris -
the military space command is
currently tracking 22,000 pieces
4 inches or larger and the
Defense Advanced Research
Projects Agency has the inven-
tive minds to devise ways of
eliminating it.
Left alone, th6 problem Will
only get worse as random
pieces of space junk collide,
creating even more debris.
Unfortunately, the space
shuttles, with their long arms
and capacious cargo bays,
are now out of service. The
NRC recommends consolida-
tion and permanent funding
of NASA's debris-manage-
ment programs and close
coordination with the State
Department to involve the
other major space nations.
It would be a cruel twist
of fate if, in our eagerness
to explore space, we made
it nearly impossible to do
through our own careless lit-
tering.

* Scripps Howard News Service

Lake City Reporter
Serving Columbia County
Since 1874
The Lake City Reporter is pub-
lished with pride for residents of
Columbia and surrounding counties by
Community Newspapers Inc.
We believe strong newspapers build
strong communities -"Newspapers
get thingss done!"
Our primary goal is to
publish distinguished and profitable
community-oriented newspapers.
This mission will be accomplished
th he teamwork of professionals
dedicated to truth, integrity and hard
work.
Todd Wilson, publisher
Robert Bridges, editor
Sue Brannon, controller
Dink NeSmith, president
Tom Wood, chairman

LETTERS
POLICY
Letters to the Editor should be
typed or neatly'written and double
spaced. Letters should not exceed
400 words and will be edited for
length and libel. Letters must be
signed and include the writer's name,
address and telephone number for
verification. Writers can have two
letters per month published. Letters
and guest columns are the opinion of
the writers and not necessarily that of
the Lake City Reporter.
BY MAIL: Letters, P.O. Box 1709,


Lake City, FL 32056; or drop off at
180 E. Duval St. downtown.
BY FAX: (386) 752-9400.
BY E-MAIL:
news@lakecityreporter.com


Florida's young
Republican Sepn.
Marco Rubio
recently gave an
important speech at
the Reagan Presidential Library
in California that has set off the
liberal talking-head universe.
He had the temerity to sug-
gest that the huge growth in
government's role in American
life over the last century "actu-
ally weakened us as a people."
The resulting onslaught from
liberal blogs and cable hosts
comes as no surprise because
Rubio directly took on the idol
at which liberals worship Big
Government.
But his analysis was coura-
geous and profound.
Eighty percent of Americans
are not happy with the direction
of the country. And, new Gallup
polling shows that only 17 per-
cent are positively disposed
toward the federal government.
Americans want answers.
Rubio, in this speech, stepped
up to the plate to provide
answers.
If liberals disagree, they are
going to have to get equally
serious. They've certainly got
to do better than MSNBC's Ed
Schultz, calling Rubio "a politi-
cal hack" who wants "to get rid
of social safety nets."
Our fiscal crisis is undeniable.
The trillions in debt we've taken
on to finance massive govern-
ment spending has resulted in
the unthinkable rating down-
grade of our government's
bonds.
But Rubio took a bold step
beyond looking at our problems
just as an accountant would.
He suggested that we cannot
separate our budget from our
culture. The culture of govern-
ment has displaced the culture


www.lakecityreporter.com


Star Parker
parker@urbancure.org
of personal responsibility.
I have been making that point
for years regarding what the
welfare state culture has done
in our black communities. How
it has created a permanent
underclass, defined by family
breakdown, sexual promiscuity,
disease and crime.
American culture has
changed profoundly over these
years as Americans have come
increasingly to believe that gov-
ernment social engineering can
solve life's problems and chal-
lenges.
A snapshot of today's
American family shows how
much things have changed, .
even compared to 1981 when
then-President Ronald Reagan
took office:
Since 1980, the percentage
of babies in America born to
unwed mothers has doubled,
from 20 percent to 40 percent.
Fifty-two percent of
Americans over the age of 18
are married today, compared to
72 percent in 1960.
Among blacks, 44 percent
of the population over 18 has
never been married, compared
to 17 percent in 1960.
Sixty four percent of
American children today live in
a home with two married par-
ents, compared with 75 percent
in 1980 and 87 percent in 1960.
And, according to the Pew
Research Center, 44 percent of
those between ages of 18 to 29


"agree marriage is becoming
obsolete."
We used to be a nation, as
Rubio pointed out, where par-
ents raised and cared for chil-
dren, then those children cared
for their aging parents. Where
neighbors cared for neighbors.
We might note that the
welfare state idea is not an
American invention but an
import from Europe. We also
might note that about 20
percent of Europeans attend
church regularly, half that of
Americans.
Europe is characterized today
by low birth rates so low that
they are not replacing them-
selves and high unemploy-
ment rates. The unemployment
rate in France his hovered
between 8 percent and 11 per-
cent over the last 25 years.
We must wonder if even we
can take on our fiscal problems,
if traditional American family
life can be restored, and if we
believe it even matters.
It is to Rubio's considerable
credit that he has stood up
to argue that we must look at
the picture of our nation in its
entirety. That we cannot sepa-
rate our budget matters and
our attitude toward government
from our overall culture and our
personal behavior.
What is before us today is
not a battle of competing num-
bers but a battle of competing
visions.
Is America to continue in the
direction of welfare state mate-
rialism? Or will this be a free
nation under God?

10 Star Parker is president of
CURE, Coalition
on Urban Renewal and Education
(www.urbancure.org) and author
of three books.


Obama: Unthaw the job market


The White House
could be forgiven
for looking back on
last month's earth-
quake, hurricane,
floods and wildfires as the good
old days. The August unemploy-
ment figures came out, and for
President Barack Obama they
couldn't have been much worse.
The unemployment rate
remained frozen at a politically
unpalatable 9.1 percent. The
private sector added only 17,000
jobs, not even close to the
70,000 forecast.
The private-sector figures
might have been better, but
the strike by 45,000 Verizon
workers ended'too late for
their return to work to be
counted. But, as former Defense
Secretary Donald Rumsfeld
might have said, you go into
political battle with the statis-
tics you have, not the ones you
want.
But the congressional wing


of the party was muted when
it might have been expected
to crow. That's because the
congressional Republicans'
intransigent Tea Party-move-
ment wing, with its reckless
rule-or-ruin attack on lifting
the debt ceiling, saddled the
Republicans with the down-
grading of U.S. creditworthi-
ness, introducing massive
uncertainty into the financial
system when the markets were
craving certainty and dealing a
body blow to the fragile recov-
ery of consumer confidence.
Moreover, other than calling
for politically improbable tax-
and-spending cuts, Republicans
seem bereft of ideas on how
to rekindle the job market.
Perhaps that's why GOP House
Speaker John Boehner offered
the anodyne observation that it
is time for cooperation "to end
the uncertainty facing families
and small businesses, and (to)
create a better environment for


long-term economic growth."
Obama is to offer his solu-
tions to those very problems in
a much-hyped speech Thursday
night. His political advisers have
told him to offer no small plans.
The president may be at the
point in his presidency where
it's literally go big or go home.
He likely will: demand extend-
ing the payroll-tax cut and long-
term unemployment insurance
yet again; propose major, and
expensive, public-works and
infrastructure spending; and
support public-sector hiring in
health and public safety and
perhaps another major stimulus
program.
Republicans almost certainly
will balk at this. Let them. And
then let them spend all of 2012
explaining why they are refus-
ing to put America back to
work.

* Scripps Howard News Service


4A


Phil Hudgins
phudgins@cninewspapers.com


A war hero

who didn't

want to go

Alvin C. York didn't
want to go to war.
That's essen-
tially what he put
on his draft card.
To the question, "Do you claim
exemption from draft (specify
grounds)?" he wrote simply,
"Yes, Don't Want to Fight." His
faith said killing was wrong,
and he believed it.
His conscientious objector
status was denied, however,
and York retreated to a moun-
tain in Pall Mall, Tenn., his
home all of his 30 years. There
he prayed fervently before
reporting to Camp Gordon,
Georgia, in November of 1917.
World War I was in its fourth
year.
At the end of his leave after
boot camp, York left home
to rejoin his company, then
convinced he was supposed to
fight and that God would keep
him safe. He shipped out to
France in May of 1918. He had
never traveled more than 50
miles from home.
Surely you've heard or read
the rest of the war story: Alvin
York was singled out as the
greatest soldier of the war. On
Oct 8, 1918, in a 15-minute
firefight behind enemy lines,
he took out a machine gun
nest and, along with eight
men of his platoon, killed 25
German soldiers and took 132
others captive. The fight took
place during the U.S.-led por-
tion of the Meuse-Argonne
Offense in France.
York became a famous
man. He was awarded 20 med-
als, including the Medal of
Honor and the French Croix
de Guere. Years later, Gary
Cooper portrayed him in an
Academy Award-winning
movie, "Sergeant York."
That's the short version of
Alvin York the soldier. But
what about Alvin York the
man?
"He was the type person
who, if somebody come up and
needed help, he'd help 'em.
He'd give 'em the last dollar he
had or whatever."
Andrew Jackson "Andy"
York, one of Alvin York's sons,
is speaking by telephone from
the home place in Pall Mall,
Tenn., now part of a state park
in his father's name.
"People have got away from
loving other people," the son,
81, says. "But that's the most
powerful word in the Bible.
Love."
His' daddy, he says, spoke
all over the nation after he
came home from the war. But
he never told the family any-
thing about what happened
in France. The family learned
details from his war record
and a story in the Saturday
Evening Post. He was a hum-
ble man, a peaceful man, Andy
York says.
On the last page of his war
diary, Alvin York wrote: "And
I went back to the place on
the mountain where I prayed
before the war, and received
my assurance from God that
I would go and come back.
And I just stayed out there and
thanked the same God who
had taken me through the
war."
York never wanted to go to
war. But sometimes a person
has no other choice.
Sunday is the 10th anni-
versary, of the 9-11 attacks on
America. The war goes on. If
he were here and able, would
Alvin York be willing to fight?

* Phil Hudgins is senior editor of
Community Newspapers Inc.


Marco Rubio's


courageous speech










LAKE CITY REPORTER INTERNATIONAL TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 6, 2011


Unique gladiator ruins unveiled in Austria


By GEORGE JAHN
Associated Press

PETRONELL-
CARNUNTUM, Austria -
They lived in cells barely
big enough to turn around
in and usually fought until
they died. This was the lot
of those at a sensational sci-
entific discovery unveiled
Monday: The well-pre-
served ruins of a gladiator
school in Austria.
The Carnuntum ruins
are part of a city of 50,000
people 28 miles (45 kilo-
meters) east of Vienna
that flourished about 1,700
years ago, a major military


and trade outpost link-
ing the far-flung Roman
empire's 'Asian boundaries
to its central and northern
European lands.
Mapped out by radar, the
ruins of the gladiator school
remain underground. Yet
officials say the find rivals
the famous Ludus Magnus
- the largest of the gladiato-
rial training schools in Rome
- in its structure. And they
say the Austrian site is even
more detailed than the well-
known Roman ruin, down
to the remains of a thick
wooden post in the middle
of the training area, a mock
enemy that young, desper-


ate gladiators hacked away
at centuries ago.
"(This is) a world sen-
sation, in the true mean-
ing of the word," said
Lower Austrian provincial
Governor Erwin Proell.
The archaeological park
Carnuntum said the ruins
were "unique in the world
... in their completeness
and dimension."
The gladiator complex is
part of a 10-square kilome-
ter (3.9-square mile) site
over the former city, an
archaeological site now vis-
ited by hundreds of thou-
sands of tourists a year.
Officials said they had no


date yet for the start of
excavations of the gladia-
tor school, saying experts
needed time to settle on
a plan that conserves as
much as possible.
"If one has a major
injury then you first
do a series of CT scans
before you let a surgeon
do his work," explained
Wolfgang Neubauer, direc-
tor of the Ludwig Bolzman
Institute for Archaeological
Prospecting and Virtual
Archaeology.
Digging at the city site
began around 1870, but
less than one percent of it
has been excavated, due to


the enormity of what lies
beneath and to the pains-
taking process of restor-
ing what already has been
unearthed.
Neubauer said an unusu-
al and unexplained "white
spot" on an aerial photo-
graph led experts to scan
the area with state-of-the-
art radar that shows a
three-dimensional image of
what lies underground.
"(It's) a clarity we nor-
mally find only in the
field of medicine," he
said Monday. The same
machines have been used
at Britain's Stonehenge and
other European archaeo-


logical sites.
A virtual video pre-
sentation of the former
Carnuntum gladiator
school showed images of
the ruins underground
shifting into what the com-
' plex must have looked like
in the third century.
It was definitely a school
of hard knocks.
"A gladiator school was a
mixture of a barracks and
a prison, kind of a high-
security facility," said the
Roemisch-Germanisches
Zentralmuseum, one of the
institutes involved in find-
ing and evaluating the dis-
covery.


.- ,-,-
. .. .. ....... ._
i '
,.., ., a,, *. ," ,- .


.5''.** '. .,' .. -.
.. 'i. . .-. ,.
., . ".'^'^7^""?. ^



ASSOCIATED PRESS
A model of a Roman gladiator school found with a underground radar in Carnuntum, Austria is presented at a press confer-
ence by the Ludwig Bolzmann institute for archaeology in Carnuntum, Austria, on Monday. They lived in cells barely big
enough to turn around in for the time allotted them until death; usually four or five battles in the arena. This was the lot of
those who trained at what experts described Monday as a world sensation the newly found and well preserved remnants of
a gladiator school.


. OBITUARIES


Roy A. Greene
Roy A. Greene, 71, died on
Sunday, September 4, 2011
at the Suwannee Valley Care
Center (Haven Hospice) after
an extended illness. He was a
native of Columbia County and
the son of the late Ralph and
Corene Brannen Greene. He
was a loving husband, father,
and grandfather who will be
greatly missed. He is preceded
in death by his parents and his
brother, Stanley Greene.
Survivors include his wife,
Linda Greene of Lake City, FL;
daughter, Jennifer Williams
of Tallahassee, FL; brothers,
Grady (Audrey Ann) Greene
and L.N. (Mary) Greene both of
Lake City, FL; sister, Jeanelle
Larramore of Jacksonville, FL;
granddaughter, Avery Williams
of Tallahassee, FL and sister in
law, Sharon Greene of Jackson-
ville, FL also survive.
Graveside memorial services
will be held on Thursday, Sep-
tember 8, 2011 at 11:00 a.m.
in Corinth Cemtery. In lieu
of flowers the family asks that
donations in his name be made
to the Suwannee Valley Care
Center, 6037 U.S. Hwy 90
West, Lake City, Florida 32055.
Gateway-Forest Lawn Funeral
' Home, 3596 South U.S. Hwy
441, Lake City, Florida 32025,
(386) 752-1954 is in charge of


G E -lakecityreporter.com

CONNECTED

REPORTER
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CONN TED


arrangements. Please sign our
guestbook at www.gatewayfor-
estlawn.com
Harold W. Kincaid
Harold W. Kincaid, 79, passed
away peacefully, September 4,
2011. He was born October 2,
1931 in Howard, Kansas to the
late William S. & Celia Glenn
Kincaid. A United States Navy
Veteran, he married the late
Jean F. Kincaid of Franklin,
Massachusetts in 1954. The
family relocated to Lake City in
1971. He retired in 1993 from
Occidental Chemical Corpora-
tion after working with them
25 years as an electrician. He
was a loving husband, father,
and grandfather, a Shriner and
a Perpetual Member of the
Wellborn Masonic Lodge. He
was preceded in death by his
parents and two brothers, Glenn
& Eddie Kincaid.
Survivors include his sons,
Harold W. (Crystal) Kincaid
Jr. of Atlanta, GA and Joseph
(Cherry) Kincaid of Lake City,
FL; daughter, Barbara (Charles)
Houston of Middleburg, FL;
brother, Jim Kincaid of Tustin,
CA; sister, Betty Orosz of
Golden, CO; 10 grandchildren,
17 great grandchildren & 3 great
grdat grandchildren also survive.
Graveside funeral services
with Masonic Rites will be held


Wednesday, September 7, 2011
at 11:00 a.m., in Forest Lawn
Memorial Gardens. Visitation
with the family will be held
Tuesday evening, September 6,
2011 from 5:00 p.m.- 7:00 p.m.
at the funeral home.
Gateway-Forest Lawn Funeral
Home, 3596 South U.S. Hwy


OPEN

24/7


441, Lake City, FL 32025
(386) 752-1954 is in charge of
arrangements. Please sign our
guestbook at www.gatewayfor-
estlawn.com
Obituaries are paid advertise-
ments. For details, call the Lake
City Reporter's classified depart-
ment at 752-1293.


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LAKE CITY REPORTER NATIONAL TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 6, 2011


Wildfire destroys 300 homes in Texas


By WILL WEISSERT
Associated Press

BASTROP, Texas A
wildfire burning southeast
of Austin, Texas, destroyed
about 300 homes and was
advancing unchecked on
Monday through parched
ranchland along a 16-mile
front, authorities said.
The fire, one of dozens
that crews were battling
throughout the drought-
stricken state, had black-
ened some 17,500 acres
but was not threatening the
state capital, as it was about
30 miles from the city and
headed the -opposite way.
But the ferocity and speed
with which it was moving
made it unsafe to fight from
the ground, Texas Forest
Service spokeswoman Jan
Amen said.
"It's a monster, and it's
zero percent contained"
Amen said.
Instead, the state was
scrambling its firefighting
air fleet, including National
Guard helicopters and four
heavy tanker planes. It also
was bringing in a tanker
from South Dakota.
The blaze was the larg-
est of dozens of wildfires
burning throughout the
state, including 63 that
had started since Sunday.
Texas is enduring its worst
drought since the 1950s,
and the wildfire threat
has been exacerbated by
powerful wind gusts cast
off by Tropical Storm Lee,
hundreds of miles to the
east.
The fires led Gov. Rick
Perry to cut short a visit to
South Carolina and cancel
a planned trip to California,
Ray Sullivan, a spokesman


u r rVirginia Esquivel, right, is comforted by her neighbor, Yolanda Rodriguez, after Esquivels home in Cedar Park, Texas, burned on Sunday. Two homes on the
Virginia Esquivel, right, is comforted by her neighbor, Yolanda Rodriguez, after Esquivel's home in Cedar Park, Texas, burned on Sunday. Two homes on the ,


street were destroyed by the fin

for his Republican presi-
dential campaign, said in a
statement.
Among Texas' many
weekend fires was one more
than 200 miles to the north-
east, in Gladewater, where
a 20-year-old woman and
her 18-month-old daughter
were killed Sunday when
they were unable to escape
from a fast-moving blaze
that consumed their mobile
home. That fire was eventu-
ally extinguished.
"Today is just as bad,"
Amen said Monday.
No injuries were report-


ed from the Bastrop County
fire near Austin, but several
subdivisions were ordered
evacuated on Sunday after
it broke out. Authorities
hadn't determined how it
started.
Nearly half of Bastrop
State Park, a 6,000-acre pre-
serve east of Bastrop, was
gone, KVUE-TV in Austin
reported.
"It's huge," a woman
at the park office who
declined to identify herself
said Monday from the park
office. "It's all over."
The park and several


major highways in the area
were closed but a hand-
ful of people whose RV's
were left overnight in the
popular park were being
allowed in to retrieve them,
she said.
Texas has experienced
more than its share of
destructive storms, includ-
ing Hurricane Ike three
years ago. But the state's
anxious farmers and ranch-
ers would have welcomed
the rain that Tropical
Storm Lee dumped instead
on Gulf Coast states fur-
ther east. Instead of water,


Texas got winds, which
combined with an advanc-
ing cold front to heighten
the wildfire threat.
All but three of the 254
counties in Texas were
under outdoor burn bans.
A wildfire in the Austin
suburb of Cedar Park
destroyed two homes
and damaged. two others
Sunday. Wildfires also
prompted evacuations of
other neighborhoods in
Cedar Park and some in
some suburbs.
In Corsicana, about
50miles south of Dallas,


a wildfire destroyed'
eight metal industrial
shop buildings. Mayor
Chuck McClanahan said
fire crews were fighting
to keep the flames from
reaching wooden struc-
tures.
Eight miles south of
Corsicana, the roughly
200 residents of Navarro
and those living in a rural
area outside of town fled
for safety because of three
separate blazes that had
burned some 2,000 acres,
Navarro County Judge
H.M. Davenport said.


San Bruno: A year later, scars remain

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SAN BRUNO, Calif. -
The young man staggered
into his neighbor's drive-
way, his body still smok-
ing, from the explosion
that mangled his torso and
sparked a gas-fueled fire-
ball rising fast above this
San Francisco suburb.
His girlfriend had been
at his side but was nowhere
to be seen as he collapsed
into his neighbor's car.
Somehow they kept him
lucid in the backseat, even
as Joseph Ruigomez shut
his eyes against the pain
and the flames tearing
through their street.
"I kept telling Joe, 'Don't
close your eyes,'" said
Tammy Zapata, who lives
only a block from the site
where a massive gas trans-
mission line ruptured the
evening of Sept. 9, 2010.
"We kept praying for him
the whole way to the emer-
gency room."
One year after the explo-
sion in San Bruno, Calif.,
Zapata, Ruigomez and hun-
dreds of other survivors are
still struggling to rebuild
their lives.
Eight people were killed,
dozenss were injured and
38 homes overlooking
San Francisco Bay were
torched to the ground.


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In this Sept. 9, 2010 file photo, a massive fire roars through a mostly residential neighborhood
in San Bruno, Calif. A year after the explosion, the neighborhood and survivors of the tragedy


are still struggling to rebuild.

The nation's deadliest
gas explosion in a decade
sparked a blaze that spread
across 15 acres and left a
26-foot wide crater that
still gapes at the bottom
of the street where the
pipeline ran.
Like many victims, Zapata
keeps reliving the panic of
that night in her mind.
"I just keep thinking
about what' Joe looked





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like when he came up
the street. His face was
all ash," said Zapata, 49,
a real estate agent. "It
looked like he was wear-
ing a shredded t-shirt,
but I looked closer and it
was all his skin melting
off."
Ruigomez's girlfriend,
20-year-old Jessica
Morales, was visiting his


house to watch the first
game of the NFL season
when the initial explosion
ripped through the neigh-
borhood. Side-by-side they
tried to flee the house, but
a second blast engulfed
them. The next thing
Ruigomez knew, he was
staggering in the street.
Her body was found in a
neighbor's shed.


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LAKE CITY REPORTER NEWS TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 6, 2011


Still undecided, Palin rails against Obama


By STEVE PEOPLES
Associated Press

MANCHESTER, N.H.
Sarah Palin left open the
possibility of a presiden-
tial bid Monday afternoon,
while encouraging tea party
activists to unite against
President Obama.
And the former Alaska
governorpraised Republican
presidential candidates for
working harder to appeal to
the tea party movement
"Now we're seeing more
and more folks realize the
strength of this grassroots
movement and they're want-
ing to be involved," she told
hundreds of activists at a
Tea Party Express rally in
the Granite State's largest
city. "I say, 'Right on, better
late than never,' for some
of these campaigns, espe-
cially."
She didn't name any
names, but former
Massachusetts governor
Mitt Romney is among
those courting tea party
groups this weekend.
But Palin's New
Hampshire appearance
comes amid rising frustra-
tion and indifference
among Granite State
Republicans and tea party
activists over her hazy
intentions.
She has drawn headlines,
dominated cable news cov-
erage and raised support-
ers' hopes through several
recent visits to early vot-
ing states. And as she did
Monday, she has consis-
tently left open the possi-
bility she would seek the
presidency.
A New Hampshire tea
party leader couldn't hold
back his frustration Sunday
night at another rally hosted
by the Tea Party Express.
"Once again it is time to
determine- are you here
to sell books or are you
here to run for president of
the United States?" asked
Corey Lewandowski, state
director for Americans
for Prosperity, a tea party
ally. "The people of New
Hampshire deserve to know,
are you serious? And if you
are serious, then welcome
to the race. And if you're
not serious, get out of the
way because we're going to
elect a new president"
Aside from Monday's
visit her second in New
Hampshire over the last
three months local opera-
tives say Palin has not moved
to hire staff or organize a
ground game here in the
state thatwill host the nation's
first presidential primary in
roughly five months.
"At this late stage, there's
been so little infrastructure
work for a potential candi-
dacy, I think this is simply
Sarah Palin wanting to be
part of the process and to
help shape the debate for
the presidential campaign,"
said Michael Dennehy, who
led Sen. John McCain's
presidential campaign four
years ago, but is uncommit-
ted this year. "At some point
immediately meaning the
next week or two she's
going to hurt herself badly
if she does not announce
that she's not going to run
for president."
The head of a prominent
Granite State conservative
think tank, also a tea party
ally, says there is a growing
sense of indifference among
local conservatives.
"If she had done it right
she could be popular here,"
said Kevin Smith, executive
director of Cornerstone.
"But I don't feel a lot of
energy or enthusiasm here
about a Palin run. Voters
here in this state, who
frankly have been taking
this primary seriously since
the beginning of the year,
are indifferent."
That said, she drew i
hundreds of supporters to


Monday afternoon's rally. i
And she was interrupted
once with chants of, "Run,
Sarah, run."
"I appreciate your encour-
agement, I do," she said,
offering no more insight into
her presidential ambitions.


Former vice presidential candidate and Alaska Gov. Sarah Palin waves to supporters as she
takes the stage before addressing a Tea Party Express Rally in Manchester, N.H., Monday
afternoon. Palin left open the possibility of a presidential bid Monday afternoon, while encour-
aging tea party activists to unite against President Obama.



Twin moon probes


will measure gravity


By MARCIA DUNN
AP Aerospace Writer

CAPE CANAVERAL Four decades
after landing men on the moon, NASA is
returning to Earth's orbiting companion,
this time with a set of robotic twins that
will measure lunar gravity while chasing
one another in circles.
By creating the most precise lunar
gravity map ever, scientists hope to fig-
ure out what's beneath the lunar surface,
all the way to the core. The orbiting
probes also will help pinpoint the best
landing sites for future explorers, wheth-
er human or mechanical.
Near-identical twins Grail-A and Grail-
B short for Gravity Recovery and
Interior Laboratory are due to blast off
Thursday aboard an unmanned rocket.
Although launched together, the two
washing machine-size spacecraft will
separate an hour into the flight and travel
independently to the moon.
It will be a long, roundabout trip -
three to four months because of
the small Delta II rocket used to boost
the spacecraft. NASA's Apollo astronauts
used the mighty Saturn V rocket, which
covered the approximately 240,000 miles
to the moon in a mere three days.
NASA's Grail twins will travel more
than 2 million miles to get to the moon
under this slower but more economical
plan.
The mission, from start to finish, costs
$496 million.
The moon's appeal is universal.
"Nearly every human who's every
lived has looked up at the moon and
admired it," said Massachusetts Institute
of Technology planetary scientist Maria
Zuber, Grail's principal investigator. "The
moon has played a really central role in
the human imagination and the human
psyche."
Since the Space Age began in 1957,
109 missions have targeted the moon,
12 men have walked its surface during
six landings, and 842 pounds of rock
and soil have been brought back to
Earth and are still being analyzed.
Three spacecraft currently are orbit-
ing the moon and making science
observations. A plan to return astro-
nauts to the moon was nixed in favor of
an asteroid and Mars.
Despite all the exploration, scien-
tists still don't know everything about
the moon, Zuber noted. For example,
its formation still generates questions
Grail's findings should help explain
its origin and its far side is still mys-
terious.
"You would think having sent many
missions to the moon we would under-
stand the difference between the near
side and the far side, but in fact we
don't," she said.
Recent research suggests Earth


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NASA technicians add a payload fairing to
the Gravity Recovery And Interior Laboratory
(GRAIL) booster at the Kennedy Space
Center in Cape Canaveral.
may have had a second smaller moon
that collided with our present moon,
producing a mountainous region. The
Grail mission may h1lp flush out that
theory, Zuber said.
Grail-A will arrive at the moon on
New Year's Eve, followed by Grail-B on
New Year's Day. They will go into orbit
around the lunar poles "and eventually
wind up circling just 34 miles above
the surface.
For nearly three months, the space-
craft "will chase one another around
the moon, meticulously flying in for-
mation. The distance between the
two probes will range from 40 miles
to 140 miles. Radio signals bouncing
between the twins will provide their
exact locations, even on the far side
of the moon.
Scientists will be able to measure
even the slightest variations in the gap
between orbiting Grail-A and Grail-B
every single second. These subtle
changes will indicate shifting masses
below or at the lunar surface: moun-
tains in some places, enormous lava
tubes and craters in others.
The moon actually has the most
uneven gravitational field in the solar
system, according to NASA. The moon's
gravity is about one-sixth Earth's pull.
"We measure the velocity change
between the two spacecraft to a couple
of fractions of a tenth of a micron per sec-
ond. It is an extremely accurate measure-
ment that has to be made," Zuber said,
A tenth of a micron is about half the
size of a red blood cell.


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LAKE CITY REPORTER NATIONAL TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 6, 2011


GOP candidates court tea party in S.C.


'By PHILIP ELL.IOTT
Associated Press

COLUMBIA, S.C. -
Texas Gov. Rick Perry said
voters at the ballot box are
the nation's most effective
form of term limits, begin-
ning a busy Monday of
politics that drew the top
Republicans vying for their
party's presidential nomi-
nation to this early voting
state.
With Labor Day marking
the unofficial start to the
2012 campaign, the con-


tenders were set to pitch
themselves to tea partyers
and the GOP base dur-
ing an afternoon forum
with Sen. Jim DeMint in
his home state. The event
was designed to probe the
candidates on their views
of spending, taxes and the
Constitution bedrock
principles for the tea party
activists whose rising clout
is likely to shape the nomi-
nating process.
Ahead of the forum,
Perry told a friendly, 400-
person audience in Myrtle


Beach that voters were the
best term limits and they
should look at his tenure
as Texas' longest-serving
governor.
"You are what term lim-
its should be about," Perry
told voters. He warned that
if elected lawmakers were
constantly .leaving office,
"you just embolden and
empower the bureaucrats"
who continue in their jobs
beyond officials' terms.
He also took the chance
to challenge President
Barack Obama, whom,


Republicans strongly want
to send home to Chicago
a one-term president after
the 2012 elections.
"The track record we
have creating jobs, I'd put
up against anyone running
for president of the United
States, particularly the cur-
rent resident of the White
House," Perry said before
heading home to Texas
in a last-minute schedule
change to monitor raging
wildfires.
The fires have destroyed
about 300 homes and were


advancing unchecked
through parched ranchland
along a 16-mile front south-
east of Austin. The fire is
one of several wildfires
crews are battling through-
out the drought-stricken
state. A fast-moving East
Texas blaze killed a woman
and her 18-month-daughter
in Gladewater on Sunday.
Facing potential criticisth
that he was seeking the
presidency at the expense
of his constituents, Perry
canceled his appearance
at Monday's forum that


later would draw former
Massachusetts Gov. Mitt
Romney, Rep. Michele
Bachmann of Minnesota,
Rep. Ron Paul of Texas, for-
mer House Speaker Newt
Gingrich and businessman
Herman Cain to woo tea
partyers.
Perry'slast-minutechange
was unlikely to change the
dynamics of the race.
Even before the forum, a
Bachmann-backing group
was running television ads
here criticizing Perry's!
record.


Earthquake prediction


still stymies scientists


By ALICIA CHANG
AP Science Writer

LOS ANGELES The
East Coast earthquake left
more than just residents
unaccustomed to feeling
the ground shake and sway
in a daze. It also surprised
some scientists who spend
their careers trying to
untangle the mysteries of
sudden ground shifts.
Despite decades of
research, earthquake pre-
diction remains elusive. As
much as society would like
scientists to tell us when a
jolt is coming, mainstream
seismologists are generally
pessimistic about ever hav-
ing that ability.
They lived through the
checkered history of earth-
quake prediction, filled with
passioned debates, failed
oracles and the enduring
search for warning signs
that may portend a power-
ful quake. The Earth so far
has refused to give up its
secrets.
In recent years, how-,
ever, a more hopeful camp
has emerged, pushed by
researchers using satel-
lites who say it may be pos-
sible to someday predict
earthquakes from space
and others who think they
can tease out signals in
rocks. The two schools of
thought swapped -notes
during a two-day meet-
ing in Los Angeles weeks
before a relatively mild
magnitude-5.8 rattled the
Eastern Seaboard.
"I was pretty skeptical
going in and I remain skep-
tical," said Washington
state seismologist John
Vidale, who was among
44 scientists from around
the world who attended the
invitation-only meeting.
Geophysicist Malcolm
Johnston with the U.S.
Geological Survey agreed.
"I've been chasing this
for a long time," he said. "If
you think you can detect
the start of an earthquake,
it's going to be very, very
difficult."
How earthquakes occur
is well known. The Earth's
crust is like a giant jigsaw
puzzle, broken into sev-
eral pieces known as tec-
tonic plates that constantly
bump and grind or slide
past each other. The move-
ment happens slowly, about
the speed at which our fin-
gernails grow. Eventually,
there's enough pent-up
stress and the rocks sud-
denly slip, releasing tre-
mendous energy that we
feel as shaking.
Most earthquakes are
small and imperceptible.
Occasionally, a powerful
one wreaks havoc like the
ones that ravaged Haiti last
year and coastal Japan in
March. No one knows how
a small rumble can cascade
into a big one.
Spurred in part by a pair
of megaquakes in the 1960s,
scientists began looking
in earnest for signals that
will help them distinguish
a serious quake from the
garden variety. Hopes
were high for reading the
seismic tea leaves. They
scoured for anything and
everything that might be a
clue: warping in the Earth's
crust, radon gas releases
along a fault, weird weather


and even the behavior of
cockroaches, snakes and
other animals.
None of the phenomena
studied panned out, but the
notion that animals might
have a "sixth sense" per-
sists to today.
Keepers at the National
Zoo in Washington, D.C.
reported that lemurs, a
gorilla and an orangutan
were restless and making
noises minutes before the
East Coast quake on Aug.
23.. Scientists say animals
can sometimes feel the
first arriving seismic waves
before people do, but this
happens after a fault has
ruptured. In other words,
the earthquake has already
begun.
The only prediction the
United States made was
back in the mid-1980s when
government scientists
said a strong quake will
hit a rural town straddling
California's famous San
Andreas Fault before 1993
based on how many tem-
blors had occurred there in
the past.
Crews buried high-tech
instruments in Parkfield,
halfway between Los
Angeles and San Francisco,
in hopes of catchiig it. The
deadline came and went
with no significant quiver.
A strong quake finally did
shake Parkfield 10 years
later.
USGS geophysicist
Michael Blanpied, who
considers himself agnostic
on whether quakes are pre-
dictable, said any sign that
might point to a big quake
would likely be subtle.
"I remain to be proven
wrong on that," Blanpied
said.
In the other corner
are researchers who are
more optimistic about find-
ing earthquake precur-
sors. They tend to work
in fields like physics and
atmospheric science. The
group got together with
earthquake researchers at
the University of Southern
California in late July to
start a. dialogue.
The campus houses
the Southern California
Earthquake Center where
a worldwide project is
underway to test. forecast
methods. The center spon-
sored the meeting with
NASA, which funds groups
looking into earthquake
prediction. Participants did
not rate the merits of the
contested theories, but all
agreed that more study was
needed.
Physicist Dimitar
Ouzounov of Chapman
University, who uses sat-
ellite data to discern how
changes in the atmosphere
might have a relation to
earthquakes, is well aware
of the frustrating history
of earthquake prediction.
Ouzounov, who is trained
in seismology, said the
field has reached a road-
block and that other dis-
ciplines might be able to
help.
NASA researcher
Friedemann Freund, who
studies electrical signals
from rocks being squeezed,
admits it's hard to change
people's minds.
"This is not going to
happen on the spot," he
said. "You can inoculate


them with new ideas. They
always want to keep their
skeptical 'distance and I
understand."
While scientists can't
pin down when a damag-
ing quake will strike in a
narrow time frame, they
are able to make long-
term forecasts based on a
region's seismic history.
For example, because of
California's shaky past, the
USGS has calculated that
the state faces an almost
certain risk a 99.7 per-
cent chance of being
rocked by a magnitude-6.7
quake or larger by 2038.
These long-term odds are
as specific as can get.
Despite the slow prog-
ress, scientists agree the
goal is worth pursuing.


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Tuesday, September 6, 201 I


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Section B


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CHS FOOTBALL
Q-back Club
will meet today
The Columbia County
Quarterback Club will
meet at 7 'p.m. today in
the Jones Fieldhouse.
For details, call club
president Blake Lunde at
867-0296.
LCMS FOOTBALL
Falcons play
Madison today
Lake City Middle
School's football game at
Madison County Central,
originally scheduled for
Sept 13, has been moved
to 7 p.m. today.
For details, call coach
Billy Jennings at
7584800.
LADY INDIANS SOCCER
Conditioning
begins today
Fort White High's
girls soccer will begin
conditioning after school
today at the football
stadium. Conditioning
will continue on
Monday, Tuesdays
and Thursdays through
Oct 10.
For details, call coach
Perry Sauls at 984-6578.
* From staff reports

GAMES

Tuesday
Columbia High girls
golf vs. Buchholz High at
Haile Plantation, 4 p.m.
Columbia High boys
golf vs. Buchholz High,
Santa Fe High at The
Country Club at Lake
City, 4 p.m.
Columbia High
swimming at Suwannee
High with Maclay School,
5 p.m.
Columbia High
volleyball at Baker County
High, 6:30 p.m. (JV-5)
Wednesday
Fort White High
volleyball vs. Suwannee
High, 6 p.m. (JV-5)
Thursday
Columbia High boys
golf vs. Oak Hall School
at Haile Plantation,
1 p.m.
Columbia High girls
golf vs. Santa Fe High at
The Country Club at Lake
City, 4 p.m.
M Columbia High
volleyball vs. Suwannee
High, 6 p.m. (JV-5)
Fort White High
volleyball at Williston
High, 6 p.m. (JV-5)
Columbia High JV
football vs. Baker County
High, 7 p.m.
Fort White High
JV football at Newberry
High, 7 p.m.
Friday
Columbia High
volleyball vs. Oak Hall
School, 5:30 p.m. (JV-4)
Columbia High
football vs. Gainesville
High, 7:30 p.m.
Fort White High
football vs. Newberry
High, 7:30 p.m.
Saturday
Columbia High
swimmingatSt.Augustine
High with Fletcher High,


9 a.m.


Bucs great Selmon dies
o ; ^ ^jagg^-^^


First-ever Tampa
draft pick's stroke
proved fatal.
Associated Press

TAMPA Lee Roy
Selmon, the Tampa Bay
Buccaneers' Hall of Fame
defensive end who teamed
with his brothers to cre-
ate a dominant defensive
front and helped lead
Oklahoma to consecutive
national championships,
died Sunday two days
after being hospitalized for
a stroke. He was 56.
A statement released on
behalf of his wife, Claybra
Selmon, said he died at a
Tampa hospital surrounded
by family members.
"For all his accomplish-


ments on and off the field, to
us Lee Roy was the rock of
our family. This has been a
sudden and shocking event
and we are devastated by
this unexpected loss," the
statement said.
Selmon was hospitalized
Friday, and the Buccaneers
confirmed later that he
suffered a stroke.
The Glazer family, which
owns the team, released a
statement mourning him.
"Tampa Bay has lost
another giant. This is an
incredibly somber day for
Buccaneer fans, Sooner
fans, and all football fans.
Lee Roy's standing as the
first Buc in the Hall of Fame
surely distinguished him,
but his stature off the field
as the consummate gentle-
man put him in another


stratosphere," the state-
ment said.
Selmon and his brother,
Dewey, were both chosen
as All-Americans in 1975
when the Sooners won their
second straight champion-
ship under Barry Switzer.
They followed older brother
Lucious to Oklahoma, and
the three played together
during the 1973 season.
News of Lee Roy Selmon's
stroke had already spurred
tributes to Selmon on
Saturday, when members
of the University of South
Florida's football team wore
his number on their helmet.
Selmon had served as the
school's athletic director
from 2001 to 2004.
"We all loved him, and
SELMON continued on 2B


Indians start


Fort White goes
toe-to-toe in road
win over Trojans.
By TIM KIRBY
tkirby@lakecityreporter.com
JASPER Hamilton
County High coach Mike
Pittman's football teams are
always physical and Fort
White High measured up.
well in a 21-6 road win qn.
Friday.
"Our guys played real
hard," Indians head coach
Demetric Jackson said
following the game. "We
knew we would face a well-
coached team that would be
prepared and they were."
The Trojans deferred
after winning the coin toss
and it proved to be a mis-
take. Fort White quickly
marched 73 yards in six
plays for a touchdown.
On a fourth-and-1 run
by Soron Williams, Fort
White was flagged for hold-
ing. The 10-yard penalty
was just what the doctor
ordered. It allowed quar-
terback Andrew Baker to
throw a jump-ball pass to
A.J. Legree and the state
high jump champion won
that contest and completed
a 39-yard scoring play.
The teams traded posses-
sions with Fort White get-
ting the better of the field
position. Starting at its 14
Hamilton County went back-
wards on a penalty and two
negative plays. The snap on
the punt was low and Fort
White recorded a safety.
On the following kickoff
from the 20, Williams ran
it back 54 yards for a first-
and-goal. The Indians could
not get in the end zone
and turned the ball over
on downs at the Trojans
5. Hamilton County had
to punt again and it was
a replay of the previous
INDIANS continued on 2B


Genus signs with Packers


Former CHS, USF
star lands on Green
Bay practice squad.
By TIM KIRBY
tkirby@lakecityreporter.com
One of the great players of
all time for Columbia High is
good enough to make it with
the defending Super Bowl
champion.
Sampson Genus was one


of eight players signed by the
Green Bay Packers this week to
the team's practice squad.
National Football League
teams had to cut rosters to 53
players for the start of the sea-
son. Green Bay is hosting New
Orleans for the official 2011-12
season-opener on Thursday.
"After the cuts there is a
24-hour window where anoth-
er team can claim you," Genus
said on Monday. "One minute
you could be in Green Bay and


another with someone else. They
kind of let me know (about prac-
tice squad plans), then if you are
not claimed they call you."
Green Bay kept only eight
offensive lineman on the regular
roster, and signed Genus and
Ray Dominguez to the practice
squad.
"It is kind of like a develop-
mental stage, similar to a red-
shirt in college," Genus said.
GENUS continued on 2B


I~1iM1 I


ASSOCIATED PRESS
In this file photo from July 24, 1995, NFL Hall of Fame
member Lee Roy Selmon poses for a portrait in Tampa.
The Tampa Bay Buccaneers defensive end died at age 56
on Sunday after suffering a stroke. Selmon starred at the
University of Oklahoma and once served as athletic director
for the University of South Florida.


strong


ABOVE: Fort White
High fullback Zach
Cormier (28) is chased
by a gang of Hamilton
County High
defenders in the
Indians' 21-6 win over
the Trojans in Jasper
on Friday.



LEFT: Fort White's
Soron Williams gets
ready to stiff-arm
a Hamilton County
defender in the game
on Friday.





Photos by JASON
MATTHEW WALKER/
Lake City Reporter


Angry Panthers,
on the horizon for
home-opener.
By TIM KIRBY
tkirby@lakecityreporter.com
FORT WHITE Fort
White High will open at
home this week against
a Newberry High team
licking its wounds on a
couple of levels.
Newberry lost at home
to Santa Fe High, 17-16,
when the Panthers failed to
convert a tying extra point
in overtime.
Santa Fe is coached by
Tommy Keeler, who spent
the last six seasons as
Newberry head coach.
The Panthers had
their five-game winning.
streak against the Raiders.
snapped.
Fort White plays Santa
Fe in the final game of the,
regular season.
Fort White's district foe,
Trinity Catholic High, lost
to North Marion High,
23-20. There is no shame in
that for the Celtics, as the
Colts were ranked third in.
Class 5A.
The Indians' opponents
for weeks three, four and.
five had no trouble in their
openers, all on the road.
Taylor County High beat
Dixie County High, 34-0,
while Wakulla High beat
Mosley High, 31-14, and
Union County High beat
Fernandina Beach High,
29-3.
Fort White travels to
Fernandina Beach on
Oct. 21.
Williston High (Oct.
14 opponent) dropped a
one-point decision to vis-
iting P.K. Yonge School,
29-28.
Chiles High shut out
Fort White's Oct. 28 home-
coming opponent Rickards
High, 23-0, in a matchup of
Tallahassee schools.


Reporter file photo
Former Columbia High and USF center
Sampson Genus was signed by the Green
Bay Packers to their practice squad.


4. *. -

~
.7
- .. .-... C -t


I


I












LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 6, 2011


SCOREBOARD


TELEVISION

TV sports

Today
AUTO RACING
11 a.m.
ESPN NASCAR, Sprint Cup,
Advocare 500, at Hampton, Ga.
MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL
7 p.m.
MLB Regional coverage, Atlanta
at Philadelphia OR L.A. Dodgers at
Washington
SOCCER
2:30 p.m.
ESPN Men's national teams,
exhibition. U.S. vs. Belgium, at Brussels
TENNIS
II a.m.
ESPN2 U.S. Open, men's fourth
round and women's quarterfinals, at New
York
7 p.m.
ESPN2 U.S. Open, men's fourth
round and women's quarterfinals, at New
York

FOOTBALL

NFL schedule
Thursday
New Orleans at Green Bay, 8:30 p.m.'
Sunday
Pittsburgh at Baltimore, I p.m.
Atlanta at Chicago, I p.m.
Cincinnati at Cleveland, I p.m.
Indianapolis at Houston, I p.m.
Tennessee at Jacksonville, I p.m.
Buffalo at Kansas City, I p.m.
Philadelphia at St. Louis, I p.m.
Detroit at Tampa Bay, I p.m.
Carolina at Arizona. 4:15 p.m.
Minnesota at San Diego, 4:15 p.m.
Seattle at San Francisco, 4:15 p.m.
N.Y. Giants at Washington, 4:15 p.m.
Dallas at N.YJets, 8:20 p.m.
Monday
New England at Miami, 7 p.m.
Oakland at Denver, 10:15 p.m.

College scores

Sunday
WestVirginia 34, Marshall 13
Texas A&M 46, SMU 14
Bethune-Cookman 63, Prairie
View 14

BASKETBALL

WNBA schedule

Saturday's Games
Seattle 70, San Antonio 60
Phoenix 93, Los Angeles 77
Sunday's Games
Atlanta 73.Tulsa 52
Minnesota 86, New York 68
Connecticut 79,Washingon 48
Indiana 88, Chicago 80
Today's Games
Connecticut at Atlanta, 7:30 p.m.
San Antonio at Los Angeles,
10:30 p.m.
0 Wednesday's Game
Washington at Indiana, 7 p.m.

BASEBALL

AL standings

East Division
W L Pct GB
NewYork 86 53 .619 -
Boston 84 56 .600 2'h
Tampa Bay 77 63 ,550 9'h
Toronto 70 71 .496 17
Baltimore 55 84 .396 31
Central Division
W L Pct GB
Detroit 79 62 .560 -
Cleveland 70 68 .507 7'h



SELMON

From Page 1B

we're all deeply saddened,"
said USF President Judy
Genshaft. "We're a bet-
ter university because of
Lee Roy Selmon. He was
an incredible role model,
who cared about all of our
student-athletes, no mat-
ter what sport He built an
incredible legacy and he
will never be forgotten."
Selmon followed his Hall
of Fame college career with
an equally impressive run
in the NFL. He was the
No. 1 pick in the 1976 draft
the first ever selection
by expansion Tampa Bay
and suffered through a
winless inaugural season
before achieving success.
In 1979, he won the NFL
Defensive Player of the
Year award when he helped
Tampa Bay make it to the
NFC championship game.
The Buccaneers also won
the NFC Central title two
years later.
Selmon was inducted
into the Pro Football Hall
of Fame in 1995. Presented
by brother Dewey, Lee Roy


said it was his family back-
ground that was notewor-
thy and not his accomplish-
ments on the field.
"People have said, 'Your
parents must be proud of
you,' but I'm more proud of
them," he said.
Selmon played a key role
in the creation of the football
program at South Florida.


Chicago 69 69 .500 8'.
Minnesota 58 82 .414 20',
Kansas City 58 83 411 21
West Division
W L Pct GB
Texas 80 62 .563 -
Los Angeles 76 64 .543 3
Oakland 64 76 '457 15
Seattle 58 81 .417 20',,
Sunday's Games
N.Y.Yankees 9,Toronto 3
Texas 11, Boston 4
Tampa Bay 8, Baltimore I
Cleveland 9, Kansas City 6
L.A.Angels 4, Minnesota I
Oakland 8, Seattle 5
Detroit 18, Chicago White Sox 2
Monday's Games
N.Y.Yankees I I, Baltimore 10
Detroit 4, Cleveland 2
Toronto 1, Boston 0, 11 innings
Tampa Bay 5,Texas I
Chicago White Sox 2, Minnesota I,
I stgame
Kansas City at Oakland (n)
Chicago White Sox at Minnesota, 2nd
game (n)
Seattle at L.A.Angels (n)
Today's Games
Baltimore (Tom.Hunter 3-2) at N.Y.
Yankees (PHughes 4-5), 7:05 p.m.
Detroit (Porcello 12-8) at Cleveland
(Carmona 6-13), 7:05 p.m.
Boston (Lester 14-6) at Toronto
(L.Perez 3-2), 7:07 p.m.
Texas (C.Wilson 14-6) at Tampa Bay
(Niemann 9-6), 7:10 p.m.
Chicago White Sox (Peavy 6-7) at
Minnesota (Hendriks 0-0), 8:10 p.m.
Kansas City (Duffy 3-8) at Oakland
(G.Gonzalez 12-11 I), 10:05 p.m.
Seattle (FHernandez 13-1 1) at L.A.
Angels (E.Santana I 1-9), 10:05 p.m.
Wednesday's Games
Detroit at Cleveland, 12:05 p.m.
Baltimore at N.YYankees, 1:05 p.m.
Texas at Tampa Bay, 1:10 p.m.
Kansas City at Oakland, 3:35 p.m.
Boston at Toronto, 7:07 p.m.
Chicago White Sox at Minnesota,
8:10 p.m.
Seattle at LA Angels, 10:05 p.m.

NL standings


Philadelph
Atlanta
New York
Washingto
Florida


Milwaukee
St. Louis
Cincinnati
Pittsburgh
Chicago
Houston


Arizona


East Division
W L
ia 88 48
82 57
68 70
on 65 74
62 77
Central Division
W L
84 57
74 66
69 72
65 76
61 80
47 94
West Division
W L


Pct GB
.647 -
.590 7'2
.493 21
.468 24',
.446 27',


Pet


81 60 .574


San Francisco 74 67 .525 7
Los Angeles 68 72 .486 12':
Colorado 66 75 .468 15
San Diego 61 80 .433 20
Sunday's Games
Florida 5, Philadelphih 4, 14 innings
Atlanta 4, LA. Dodgers 3
N.Y. Mets 6, Washington 3
Milwaukee 4, Houston 0
Cincinnati 3, St. Louis 2, 10 innings
Chicago Cubs 6, Pittsburgh 3
Arizona 4, San Francisco I
San Diego 7, Colorado 2
Monday's Games
Washington 7. LA. Dodgers 2
Pittsburgh 3, Houston I
Chicago Cubs 4, Cincinnati 3
Arizona 10, Colorado 7
San Francisco 7, San Diego 2
Milwaukee at St. Louis (n)
Atlanta at Philadelphia (n)
N.Y. Mets at Florida (n)
Today's Games
Atlanta (THudson 14-8) at Philadelphia
(Worley 10-1), 7:05 p.m.
Houston (Myers 3-13) at Pittsburgh


Unscramble these four Jumbles,
one letter to each square,
to form four ordinary words.

NAEAR


(Lincoln I-I), 7:05 p.m.
L.A. Dodgers (Lilly 9-13) atWashington
(Strasburg 0-0), 7:05 p.m.
N.Y Mets (Batista 4-2) at Florida
(Volstad 5-12), 7:10 p.m.
Cincinnati (Leake 11-9) at Chicago
Cubs (R.Lopez 4-6), 8:05 p.m.
Milwaukee (Gallardo 15-9) at St. Louis
(Lohse 12-8), 8:15 p.m.
Arizona (Collmenter 9-8) at Colorado
(Hammel 7-13), 8:40 p.m.
San Francisco (Surkamp 0-0) at San
Diego (LeBlanc 2-4), 10:05 p.m.
Wednesday's Games
N.Y. Mets it Florida, 5:10 p.m.
San Francisco at San Diego, 6:35 p.m.
Atlanta at Philadelphia, 7:05 p.m.
Houston at Pittsburgh, 7:05 p.m.
L.A. Dodgers at Washington, 7:05 p.m.
Cincinnati at Chicago Cubs, 8:05 p.m.
Milwaukee at St. Louis, 8:15 p.m.
Arizona at Colorado, 8:40 p.m.

TENNIS

U.S. Open

At The USTA Billie Jean King National
Tennis Center, New York
Monday
Singles
Men
Fourth Round
Janko Tipsarevic (20), Serbia, def. Juan
Carlos Ferrero, Spain, 7-5, 6-7 (3), 7-5,
6-2.
Novak Djokovic (I), Serbia, def.
Alexandr Dolgopolov (22), Ukraine, 7-6
(14), 6-4, 6-2.
Women
Fourth Round
Anastasia Pavlyuchenkova (17), Russia,
def. Francesca Schiavone (7), Italy, 5-7,
6-3, 6-4.
Serena Williams (28), United States,
def.Ana Ivanovic (16), Serbia. 6-3, 6-4.
Doubles
Mixed
Quarterfinals
Lucie Hradecka and Frantisek Cermak,
Czech Republic, def. Irina Falconi and
Steve Johnson, United States, 7-5, 7-5.
Sunday
Men
Third Round
Rafael Nadal (2). Spain, def. David
Nalbandian,.Argentina, 7-6 (5)., 6-1,7-5.
Gilles Muller. Luxembourg, def. Igor
Kunitsyn, Russia. 6-1,6-4, 6-4.
David Ferrer (5), Spain, def. Florian
Mayer (26), Germany, 6-1,.6-2.7-6 (2).
Andy Roddick (21). United States, def.
Julien Benneteau, France, 6-1,6-4, 7-6 (5).
Donald Young. United States, def. Juan
Ignacio Chela (24), Argentina. 7-5. 6-4,
6-3.
Gilles Simon (12). France, def. Juan
Martin del Potro (18). Argentina. 4-6. 7-6
(5). 6-2, 7-6 (3).
John Isner (28). United States, def.
Alex Bogomolov Jr., United States, 7-6
(9), 6-4, 6-4.
Andy Murray (4). Britain, def. Feliciano
Lopez (25). Spain, 6-1, 6-4. 6-2.
Women
Fourth Round
Angelique Kerber. Germany, def.
Monica Niculescu. Romania. 6-4, 6-3.
Flavia Pennetta (26), Italy, def. Peng
Shuai (13), China. 6-4, 7-6 (6).
Sam Stosur (9), Australia. def. Maria
Kirilenko (25). Russia, 6-2,.6-7 (IS), 6-3.
Vera Zvonareva (2), Russia., def. Sabine
Lisicki (22). Germany, 6-2, 6-3.
Late Saturday
Third Round
Men
Jo-Wilfried Tsonga (II), France, def.
Fernando Verdasco (19), Spain, 6-3, 7-5,
6-4.
Novak Djokovic (I), Serbia, def.
Nikolay Davydenko, Russia, 6-3, 6-4; 6-2.
Women
Svetlana Kuznetsova (15), Russia, def.
Akgul Amanmuradova, Uzbekistan, 6-4,
6-2.
Ana Ivanovic (16), Serbia, def. Sloane
Stephens, United States, 6-3, 6-4.


r














In



a


THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME
by David L. Hoyt and Jeff Knurek


PFThRMININ&

ON A CALM DAY
AFRDIT 15TH5 .
Now arrange the circled letters
to form the surprise answer, as
suggested by the above cartoon.

Print your answer here: A
(Answers tomorrow)
Yesterday's Jumbles: YOUNG KITTY SAILOR WEEKLY
Answer: His new book about the origin of Labor Day
had a WORKING TITLE


Seminole gathering

Lake City Seminole Club president Steve Gordon (second from right), wife Amy and
daughter Emily celebrate at the Seminole Kickoff Gathering on Thursday with past president
Harold Mann (right). More than 65 Seminole fans attended to celebrate the start of a new
college football season and fans were optimistic about their No. 6-ranked team.




GENUS: Practiced at center, guard


Continued From Page 1B

"There were three centers
ahead of me, so they moved
me to guard. I showed
them a little bit of power
and strength and what I
could do."
After finishing at South
Florida, Genus was hoping
foran NFL call.


"Throughout all
the lockout process, I
didn't really think of
Green .Bay," Genus said.
"My agent thought it was a
good place to start out and
I guess it was."
The Packers are report-
ed healthy for Thursday's


game, but a practice squad
player could get the call to
dress out any week.
. "Before the home game
they will come by and give
you a thumbs-up or thumbs-
down," Genus said. "On the
away games, they take one
rookie."


Continued From Page 11

safety.
Baker was intercepted
by Justin Milton on the
first play after the kickoff
and the Trojans rolled up a
couple of first downs. Terry
Calloway stopped the drive
with an interception and
returned it 15 yards to the
Indians 40.
After one first down,
Baker threw to Williams
who raced down close
to the goal line. An ille-
gal block behind the play
brought the ball back to
the Trojans 22. Fort White
settled for a 32-yard field
goal 'by Nathan Escalante
and went into halftime with
a 14-0 lead.
A couple of punts by
Hamilton County, sand-
wiched around a nine-pay
drive by the Indians, left
Fort White at midfield.
Baker threw to Trey
Phillips for 11 yards, then


ACROSS


1 Juicy pear
5 Blonde shade
8 Stick around
12 Europe-Asia
range
13 RV haven
14 Elevator pio-
neer
15 Glassed-in
porch
17 Source of light
18 Woosnam of
golf
19 Fool's attire
21 Zeppelin
24 Reasons
25 Dispose of
26 Elvis' home-
town
30 "Rag Mop"
brothers
32 Stray dog
33 Finish a jacket
37 Titled lady
38 ICU worker
39 Victorian oath
40 Degraded


fired a 41-yard scoring
bomb to Legree.
Fort White lost a fum-
ble late -in the game and
William Hill returned it 35
yards to the Indians 25.
The Trojans got into the
end zone from there to
spoil the shutout
Baker was 11-of-22 for
154 yards. Williams had 16
carries for 54 yards with 35
of those coming on the first
two plays.
"We are trying to estab-
lish the run," Jackson
said. "We are going to face
teams with decent sec-
ondaries and we have got
have the confidence we can
run the ball. You can't be
one-dimensional."
Winning also breeds
confidence.
"We were sloppy here
and there, but we are pro-
gressing," Jackson said.


Map dir.
Dundee citizen
Boca -
Warm, as left-
overs (2 wds.)
Sugarcane
product
Dr.'s visit
Chic
Trevi Fountain
coins
Hot tub
Aught or
naught
Weather fore-
cast
Recipe meas.
Poet's black

DOWN

Route follower
Cortes' gold
Folk-song mule
Miner's stake
Related
-'wester
Mia of soccer


Hamilton Co. 0 0 0 6 6
FortWhite 7 7 7 0 21
First Quarter
FW-Legree 39 pass from Baker
(Escalante kick), 9:29
Second Quarter
FW-Safety, punter tackled in end
zone, 11:54
FW-Safety, punter tackled in end
zone, 8:09
FW-Escalante 32 FG
Third Quarter
FW-Legree 41 pass from Baker
(Escalante kick), :43
Fourth Quarter
HC-Zanders I run (run failed), :33
I Fort White Hamilton
First downs 10 9
Rushes-yards 29-Ill 26-48
Passing 154 62
Comp-Att-nt 11-22-1 9-23-1
Punts-Avg. 2-26 2-35
Fumbles-Lost 1-1 2-1I
Penalties-Yards 7-50 3-15
INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS
RUSHING-Fort White, S. Williams
16-54, Phillips 1-18, Gainer 5-16, Baker
1-10, Cormier 4-7. Pitts 1-6, T Williams
I-0. Hamilton, Hill 17-59.
RECEIVING-Fort White, Phillips 4-
31, S.Williams 3-33, Legree 2-80, Newman
I -9,T.Williams I -1. Hamilton. Merine 4-18,
Hill 3-29, Cooks 1-9,Webb 1-6.


Answer to Previous Puzzle

WI LL S B Plow
OBIE CRAB CHR
KINGCOBRA NCO
SKULL STATUS
MIDI IGOR
RODEO BAK E
U FO LETSDO WN
EASY CARE HAl
MAGI BRONX
LA S AMTE

GA WAIN INANE
AKA TELESCOPE
LEI AMEN TRIM
ART GAS SACS


Means of escape
Tiber locale
Pocket change
Observe
Wholly
absorbed


Want more puzzles?
Check out the "Just Right Crossword Puzzles" books
at QulllDrlverBooks.com


20 Athena's sym-
bol
21 Carpet nail
22 Succotash
bean
23 Footnote
word
27 NCAA Bruins
28 Baby seals
29 Ocean flier
31 Abalone eater
(2 wds.)
34 Is that all -
-?
35 Prefix for sec-
ond
36 Churchill suc-
cessor
41 A/C measure
42 Antibiotic
44 Tintype hue
45 Blue Grotto
site
47 Dazzle
48 Gridiron peri-
od
49 Housefly, to
humans
50 Harvest
53 Former DJ
platters
54 Omaha's st.
55 -Magnon
man
56 L-o-n-g time


9-6 2011 UFS, Dist. by Univ. Uclick for UFS


INDIANS: Working to establish run


M O R it 431 W US H W Y 9
CHVOE I CA LLA INISSAN


Page Editor: Tim Kirby, 754-0421










LAKE CITY REPORTER


ADVERTISEMENT


TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 6, 2011


SHIRLEY MIKELL
MIKELL'S POWER EQUIPMENT
WISCONSIN
MICHIGAN STATE
OHIO STATE
MISSISSIPPI STATE
ALABAMA
VIRGINIA TECH -
SOUTH CAROLINA
FLORIDA STATE
FLORIDA
LSU
OREGON
TENNESSEE


ma


CHRIS POTTLE
FURNITURE SHOWPLACE
WISCONSIN
MICHIGAN STATE
OHIO STATE
AUBURN
ALABAMA
VIRGINIA TECH
SOUTH CAROLINA
FLORIDA STATE
FLORIDA
LSU
OREGON
TENNESSEE


JOHN BURNS JOHN KASAK
STATE FARM STATE FARM
WISCONSIN
MICHIGAN STATE
OHIO STATE
AUBURN
ALABAMA
VIRGINIA TECH
GEORGIA
FLORIDA STATE
FLORIDA
LSU
OREGON
TENNESSEE


JASON FLOYD
FIRST COAST HOMES
WISCONSIN
MICHIGAN STATE
OHIO STATE
MISSISSIPPI STATE
ALABAMA
VIRGINIA TECH
SOUTH CAROLINA
FLORIDA STATE
FLORIDA
LSU
OREGON
TENNESSEE


BAKER'S COMMUNICATION


WISCONSIN
MICHIGAN STATE
OHIO STATE
MISSISSIPPI STATE
ALABAMA
VIRGINIA TECH
SOUTH CAROLINA
FLORIDA STATE
FLORIDA
LSU
OREGON
TENNESSEE


PHILLIP CRENSHAW AND JAMES CRENSHAW
PHISH HEADS
WISCONSIN
FLORIDA ATLANTIC
OHIO STATE
AUBURN
ALABAMA
VIRGINIA TECH
GEORGIA
FLORIDA STATE
FLORIDA
LSU
OREGON
TENNESSEE


DRAWDY INSURANCE
WISCONSIN
MICHIGAN STATE
OHIO STATE
MISSISSIPPI STATE
ALABAMA
VIRGINIA TECH
SOUTH CAROLINA
FLORIDA STATE
FLORIDA
LSU
OREGON
TENNESSEE


hLi


CHRIS SAMSON
CMS PRO-STAFFING
WISCONSIN
MICHIGAN STATE
OHIO STATE
AUBURN
ALABAMA
VIRGINIA TECH
SOUTH CAROLINA
FLORIDA STATE
FLORIDA
LSU
OREGON
TENNESSEE


DONNIE ROSBURY
ROUNTREE MOORE CHEVY


WISCONSIN
MICHIGAN STATE
OHIO STATE
AUBURN
ALABAMA
VIRGINIA TECH
SOUTH CAROLINA
FLORIDA STATE
FLORIDA
LSU
OREGON
TENNESSEE


BRYAN BLAIR GARY WILSON AND ERIC WILSON
ROUNTREE MOORE CHEVY WILSON OUTFITTERS


WISCONSIN
MICHIGAN STATE
OHIO STATE
AUBURN
ALABAMA
VIRGINIA TECH
GEORGIA
FLORIDA STATE
FLORIDA
LSU
OREGON
TENNESSEE


WISCONSIN
MICHIGAN STATE
OHIO STATE
AUBURN
ALABAMA
VIRGINIA TECH
GEORGIA
FLORIDA STATE
FLORIDA
LSU
OREGON
TENNESSEE


-U


all FWUOUL



[ItitBED


At
ksi'O"N


201


FOTBL


E.


CONTEST RULES
On Tuesday selected games will be sponsored in each of the ads of the participating
merchants. Indicate which team you think will win by writing the team name beside the
sponsoring merchant's name in the entry blank. Entries may be mailed or dropped off at
the Lake City Reporter at 180 E. Duval St., Lake City, FL 32055 or fax to 386-752-9400.
IFntries must be received by 5:00pm on Thursday following the contest. Prize will be
awairdedl weekly on the basis of most games selected correctly. In case of a tie, the
winner will he determined by the most accurate guess on the Tie-Breaker (score
rFlIquired). You must be 18 years of age to enter; one entry per person. Participating
;p(unso;r,s and their families, employees of the Lake City Reporter and their families are
not ilihilelr Io enter


Phish Heads


Rountree Moore


RBaker's Pnmmuiinitinn


DEADLINE '
very Thursday, 5:00 pm
TIE BREAKER: Mikell's
Columbia -vs- Gainesville High


State Farm Insurance

Drawdy Insurance


NAME

ADDRESS

PHONE


Rountree Moore


First Coast Homes

Wllson's Outfitters

Furniture Showplace


CMS Pro Staffing


AGE


*
i I


DC rt
rJAjNl@I H


touillilluillballull











Page Editor: Emogene Graham, 754-0415 LAKE CITY REPORTER ADVICE & COMICS TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 6, 2011 4B


DILBERT


BLONDIE


BEETLE BAILEY


HAGARTHE HORRIBLE


DEAR ABBY


Aunt who heard confession

should keep vow of silence


DEAR ABBY: My neph-
ew, "Charles," a minister
in his 50s, confided to me
that he is unhappy in his
marriage and is attracted
to someone else. He asked
me to keep this confiden-
tial, and I have.
Charles' wife and I are
together a few hours per
week on a regular basis.
She is concerned because
he seems depressed and
spends most of his time
at home sleeping. She
knows Charles considers
me a mother figure now
that both his parents are
deceased. She is suggest-
ing that perhaps he has
shared with me some of
the reasons for his depres-
sion.
I feel horrible. If this
comes out and it will *
- Charles' wife will feel
betrayed on many levels.
I don't know what to do.
Can you help? IN TOO
DEEP IN MICHIGAN
DEAR IN TOO DEEP:
Your nephew's wife is on a
fishing expedition. That's
why she's "suggesting" he
might have shared confi-
dences with you. Do not
betray them. Instead, tell
her that if she's concerned
about her husband's state
of mind, the person she
should be asking is HIM.
It's the truth. They have
a lot that needs talking
about.

DEAR ABBY: Before my
husband's 30th birthday,


Abigail Van Buren
www.deorabby.com
I worked hard planning
a surprise party for him.
Family members came
from other states, and
I had housing available
for all of them. I hid the
food and other supplies
.at friends' homes. Things
went well, and my husband
was thrilled to see his fam-
ily and friends.
My milestone birth-
day was last year, and
my husband didn't do
anything special. I didn't
mind because I had told
him I was "done aging."
However, I accidentally
discovered he's planning
something this year.
Should I tell my hus-
band I know about the
party or continue to
play "dumb"?- NOT SO
SURPRISED
DEAR NOT SO
SURPRISED: Stop feeling
guilty you did nothing
wrong. Keep your mouth
shut and act surprised.
Your husband is going to a
lot of trouble to give you a
special gift, and you should
accept it in the spirit in
which it is being given.
** ** **I
DEAR ABBY: I'm a 31-


year-old woman who was
taught growing up that if a
person older than I doesn't
have a seat, to give mine
up. I now have a few ques-
tions about this practice.
If someone refuses the
seat I offer, what do I do?
How long should I remain
standing, waiting for him
or her to sit down? I have
experienced this issue with
the baby-boomer genera-
tion people in their 50s
and 60s who refuse to take
the seat I feel like an idiot
standing with them while
a seat is available. Any
help you can offer would
be great. MINDING
MY MANNERS IN NEW
YORK
DEAR MINDING YOUR
MANNERS: (And beauti-
ful manners they are.)
You are dealing with the
generation who coined the
phrase "Don't trust anyone
over 30." Most boomers,
some of whom are now
turning 65, do not consider
themselves to be "older."
Don't let it be lost on you
that there's a very success-
ful store called Forever
21 that doesn't cater just
to teenagers. If one of the
eternally young refuses
your generous offer, the
appropriate thing to do is
sit back down. No harm,
no foul.

* Write Dear Abby at
www.DearAbby.com or
P.O. Box 69440, Los
Angeles, CA 90069.


HOROSCOPES


SNUFFY SMITH


ZITS


GARFIELD


B.C.


FRANK & ERNEST


ARIES (March 21-April
19): You'll be unpredict-
able and apt to get into
trouble if you unleash your
temper. Concentrate on
accomplishment, not what
everyone else is doing or
saying. Isolation can be a
good thing, especially if
you have a job to do. **
TAURUS (April 20-May
20): Pick up information
that will help you advance.
Travel that is related to
business or education will
pay off and set you on a
course that will be prosper-
ous. Good fortune is head-
ing your way. *****
GEMINI (May 21-June
20): You'll have marvelous
suggestions, and offer-
ing help will certainly
raise your profile, but be
careful when it comes
to your financial affairs.
Someone may try to get
you to donate or pay for
something that is not your
responsibility. ***
CANCER (June 21-July
22): You can show emo-
tions as long as you aren't
erratic when making deci-
sions or discussing plans.
If you are honest about
how you feel and how you
see things unfolding, you
will avoid conflict. Love is
on the rise, and making
positive changes at home
will ensure that greater
opportunities will follow.

LEO (July 23-Aug. 22):


THE LAST WORD
Eugenia Last

Before you spend, lend
or borrow, get financial
advice. A change that
alters your overhead will
help you get back on track.
Relying on a promise that
has not been put in writing
will disappoint you. ***
VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept.
22): Follow through with
your plans. By taking
action, you will impress
someone who can help you
make positive changes. A
move, a business trip or
networking will pay off.
Set aside a few hours for
romance. *****
LIBRA (Sept 23-Oct.
22): Work behind the
scenes or tie up loose
ends that can help you
financially. Don't give in to
emotional threats or angry
complainers. Someone
may be trying to take
advantage of you.**
SCORPIO (Oct 23-Nov.
21): Pay attention to detail
and question unorthodox
methods. Stick to what you
know and do things that
feel comfortable. A lifestyle
change may be necessary
to continue doing what you
enjoy most.****
SAGITeARIUS (Nov.
22-Dec. 21): Think matters
through before making a
move. Not everything is
as simple as it appears.


Underlying circumstances
will present obstacles that
will put a damper on your
plans. You need to deal
with the people your plans
affect before you can move
forward without facing
opposition. ***
CAPRICORN (Dec.
22-Jan. 19): You have all
the right moves. Follow
through with your plans
and you will get ahead.
A contract, deal or settle-
ment will lean in your favor
if you are open and honest
regarding your motiva-
tions. You will impress
the people who can do the
most for you. ***
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb.
18): Dishonesty regarding
what's being offered and
what's expected in return
is evident Dissect your
options carefully, and you
will realize you should go
solo. Personal partnerships
can be fun, especially with
an old friend or lover, but
determine the cost before
venturing down that path.

PISCES (Feb. 19-March
20): It's whom you know
that will make a differ-
ence. Networking with
people you meet while
volunteering will bring
the highest returns. Good
fortune can be yours if
you form an alliance with
someone who offers as
much as you do in return.
**-**


CELEBRITY CIPHER

by Luis Campos
Celebrity Cipher cryptograms are created from quotations by famous people, past and present.
Each letter in the cipher stands for another.
TODAY'S CLUE: F equals Y
"KNZDZ'J JAYZKI4 BGS XUAHK KNZ
JAHGC AM X KDXBG KNXK'J IZDF
DAYXGKBL XGC GAJKXVSBL XGC
NAWZMHV." WXHV JBYAG


PREVIOUS SOLUTION: "God sells us things at the price of labor." -
Leonardo da Vinci "The end of labor is to gain leisure." Aristotle
(c) 2011 by NEA, Inc. 9-6


FOR BETTER OR WORSE


CLASSIC PEANUTS












Classified Department: 755-5440


LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 6, 2011

Lake City Reporter





CLASSIFIED


Take ADvantage of the
Reporter Classifieds!

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Some people prefer to place their
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ment. Our office is located at 180
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Department.
EMAIL: classifieds@lakecityre-
porter.com





Ad Is to Apear: Call by: Fax/Email by:
Tuesday Mon, 10.00a.m. Mon., 900 a.am.
Wednesday Mon,l10:00aI.am Mon, 900a.m.
Thursday Wed,10.00am Wed, 900 a m.
Friday Thurs,10.00am. Thurs., 9:00 a.m.
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deadlines apply for cancellation.
Billing_ Inquiries- Call 755-5440.
Should further information be
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Advertising copy is subject to
approval by the Publisher who
reserves the right to edit, reject,
or classify all advertisements under
appropriate headings. Copy should
be checked for errors by the
advertiser on the first day of pub-
lication. Credit for published errors
will be allowed for the first insertion
for that portion of the advertisement
which was incorrect. Further, the
Publisher shall not be liable for any
omission of advertisements ordered
to be published, nor for any general,
special or consequential damages.
Advertising language must comply
with Federal, State or local laws
regarding the prohibition of discrimi-
nation in employment, housing and
public accommodations Standard
abbreviations are acceptable; how-


ever, the first word of each ad may
not be abbreviated.

In Pril m iid On inic
W \'B .I: ;! ,,.,,,, ',''tq


Legal

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
3RD JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND
FOR COLUMBIA COUNTY,
FLORIDA
CIVIL DIVISION
CASE NO. 12-2010-CA-000105-
CA-XXXX
FEDERAL NATIONAL MORT-
GAGE ASSOCIATION
Plaintiff,
vs.
DINO A. DOBBINS, TRUSTEE OF
THE DOBBINS TRUST DATED
JUNE 22, 2005, KIMBERLY S.
DOBBINS, TRUSTEE OF THE
DOBBINS TRUST DATED JUNE
22, 2005; ANY AND ALL UN-
KNOWN PARTIES CLAIMING
BY, THROUGH, UNDER, AND
AGAINST TIE HEREIN NAMED
INDIVIDUAL DEFENDANTS)
WHO. ARE NOT KNOW TO BE
DEAD OR ALIVE, WHETHER
SAID UNKNOWN PARTIES MAY
CLAIM AN INTEREST AS
SPOUSES, HEIRS, DEVISEES,
GRANTEES OR OTfER CLAIM-
ANTS; MORTGAGE ELECTRON-
IC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS,
INC. AS NOMINEE FOR GREEN-
POINT MORTGAGE FUNDING,
INC; UNKNOWN BENEFICIA-
RIES OF THE DOBBINS TRUST
DATED JUNE 22, 2005; JOHN
DOE, JANE DOE, AS UNKNOWN
TENANTS IN POSSESSION
Defendants
RE-NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE
SALE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pur-
suant to an Order Rescheduling
Foreclosure Sale dated August 23,
2011. and entered in Case No. 12-
2010-CA-000105-CA-XXXX, of the
Circuit Court of the 3rd Judicial Cir-
cuit in and for COLUMBIA County,
Florida. FEDERAL NATIONAL
MORTGAGE ASSOCIATION is
Plaintiff and DINO A. DOBBINS,
TRUSTEE OF THE DOBBINS
TRUST DATED JUNE 22, 2005;
KIMBERLY S. DOBBINS, TRUST-
EE OF THE DOBBINS TRUST
DATED JUNE 22. 2005; ANY AND
ALL UNKNOWN PARTIES
CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UN-
DER AND AGAINST THE HERE-
IN NAMED INDIVIDUAL DE-
FENDANT(S) WHO ARE NOT
KNOW TO BE DEAD OR ALIVE,
WHETHER SAID UNKNOWN
PARTIES MAY CLAIM AN IN-
TEREST AS SPOUSES, HEIRS,
DEVISEES. GRANTEES OR OTH-
ER CLAIMANTS: UNKNOWN
BENEFICIARIES OF THE DOB-
BINS TRUST DATED JUNE 22,
2()005; JOHN DOE; JANE DOE AS
UNKNOWN TENANTS IN POS-
SESSION MORTGAGE ELEC-
TRONIC REGISTRATION SYS-
TEMS. INC. AS NOMINEE FOR
GRIEENPOINT MORTGAGE
FUNDING, INC.; are defendants. I
will sell to the highest and best bid-
der for cash at ON THE THIRD
FLOOR, OF THE COLUMBIA
COUNTY COURTHOUSE AT 173
NE HERNANDO AVENUE, LAKE
CITY. FLORIDA 32055, at 11:00
a.m., on the 28th day of September
2011, the following described prop-
erty as set forth in said Final Judg-
ment, to wit:
LOT. 1. OF CHARLESTON
COURT, A SUBDIVISION AC-
CORDING TO THE PLAT THERE-
OF RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK
6, PAGE 150. OF THE PUBLIC
RECORDS OF COLUMBIA
COUNTY. FLORIDA
A person claiming an interest in the
surplus from the sale, if any, other
than the property owner of the date if
the lis pendens must file a claim with
60 days after the sale.
Dated this 23 day of August, 2011
P. DEWITT CASON
AS Clerk of said Court
By:/s/ B. Scippio
As Deputy Clerk
If you are a person with a disability
who requires accommodations in or-
der to participate in a court proceed-
ing, you are entitled at no cost to
you, the provision of certain assis-
lance. Individuals with disability
who require special accommodations
in order to participate in a court pro-
cceding should contact the ADA Co-
ordinator, .173 NE Hernando Ave-
nue, Room 408, Lake City, FL
32055, (386)719-7428. within two
(2) business days of receipt of notice
to appear. Individuals who are hear-
ing impaired should call (800)955-
8771. Individuals who are voice im-
paired should call (8(X))955-8770.
Submitted by:
Kahane & Associates, P.A.
8201 Peters Road, Ste. 3000
Plantation, FL 33324
Telephone: (954) 382-3486
Telefacsimile: (954) 382-5380
05527575
August 30, 2011
September 6, 2011



To place your

classified ad call



M ^^^^^


Legal

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
THIRD JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
IN AND FOR COLUMBIA COUN-
TY, FLORIDA
JUVENILE DIVISION
IN THE INTEREST OF:
CASE NO.: 2010-04-DP
D. A. DOB: 01/20/2007
MINOR CHILD.
SUMMONS AND NOTICE OF AD-
VISORY HEARING FOR TERMI-
NATION OF PARENTAL RIGHTS
AND GUARDIANSHIP
STATE OF FLORIDA:
TO: Anthony Avallone
Last known address:
294 SW Aspen Glen
Lake City, FL 32025
WHEREAS, a .Petition for Termina-
tion of Parental Rights under oath
has been filed in this court regarding
the above-referenced childrenn, a
copy of which is on file with the
Clerk of the Circuit Court,
YOU ARE HEREBY COMMAND-
ED TO APPEAR before the Honora-
ble E. Vernon Douglas, Circuit
Judge, at the Columbia County
Courthouse, Lake City, Florida, on
OCTOBER 12, 2011, at 10:20 A.M.,
for a Termination of Parental Rights
Advisory Hearing.
YOU MUST APPEAR ON THE
DATE AND AT THE TIME SPECI-
FIED.
*****FAILURE TO PERSONAL-
LY APPEAR AT THIS ADVISORY
HEARING CONSTITUTES CON-
SENT TO THE TERMINATION OF
PARENTAL RIGHTS TO THIS
CHILD (OR CHILDREN). IF YOU
FAIL TO APPEAR ON THE DATE
AND TIME SPECIFIED YOU
MAY LOSE ALL LEGAL RIGHTS
TO THE CHILD (OR CHILDREN)
NAMED IN THE PETITION ON
FILE WITH THE CLERK OF THE
CIRCUIT COURT*****
WITNESS my hand and seal of this
Court at Lake City, Columbia Coun-
ty, Florida, on this 18th day of Au-
gust 2011.
P. DEWITT CASON
Clerk of Circuit Court
(SEAL)
By: Trisha Brewington
Deputy Clerk
Tracy L. Sorcek, Esq.
Florida Bar No. 46860
Children's Legal Services
1389 West US Highway 90, Suite
110
Lake City, FL 32055
(386) 758-1437
SPECIAL ACCOMMODATIONS:
In accordance with the Americans
With Disabilities Act, if you are a
person with a disability who needs
any accommodation in order to par-
ticipate in this proceeding, you are
entitled, at no cost to you, to the pro-
vision of certain assistance. Please
contact Carrina Cooper. Court Ad-
ministration, 173 NE Hernando Ave-
nue, Room 408, Lake City, Florida
32055, Telephone (386) 758-2163, at
least seven (7) days before your
scheduled court appearance or imme-
diately upon receiving this notifica-
tion if the time before the scheduled
appearance is less than seven (7)
days. If you are hearing impaired or
voice impaired, call 711.
05527432
August 23, 30, 2011
September 6, 13, 2011


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
THIRD JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
IN AND FOR COLUMBIA COUN-
TY, FLORIDA
JUVENILE DIVISION
IN THE INTEREST OF:
CASE NO.: 2010-60-DP
M. F. DOB: 2/28/1995
MINOR CHILD.
SUMMONS AND NOTICE OF AD-
VISORY HEARING FOR TERMI-
NATION OF PARENTAL RIGHTS
AND GUARDIANSHIP
STATE OF FLORIDA:
TO: Carlos Felix, father
and Maria de los Angeles Diaz San-
chez, mother
WHEREAS, a Petition for Termina-
tion of Parental Rights under oath
has been filed in this court regarding
the above-referenced childrenn, a
copy of which is on file with the
Clerk of the Circuit Court, YOU
ARE HEREBY COMMANDED TO
APPEAR before the Honorable E.
Vernon Douglas, Circuit Judge, at
the Columbia County Courthouse,
Lake City, Florida, on OCTOBER
12, 2011, at 10 A.M., for a Termina-
tion of Parental Rights Advisory
Hearing.
YOU MUST APPEAR ON THE
DATE AND AT THE TIME SPECI-
FIED.
*****FAILURE TO PERSONAL-
LY APPEAR AT THIS ADVISORY
HEARING CONSTITUTES CON-
SENT TO THE TERMINATION OF
PARENTAL RIGHTS TO THIS
CHILD (OR CHILDREN). IF YOU
FAIL TO APPEAR ON THE DATE
AND TIME SPECIFIED YOU
MAY LOSE ALL LEGAL RIGHTS
TO THE CHILD (OR CHILDREN)
NAMED IN THE PETITION ON
FILE WITH THE CLERK OF THE
CIRCUIT COURT****
WITNESS my hand and seal of this
Court at Lake City, Columbia Coun-
ty, Florida, on this 18th day of Au-
gust 2011.
P. DEWITT CASON
Clerk of Circuit Court


Legal

(SEAL)
By: Trisha Brewington
Deputy Clerk
Tracy L. Sorcek, Esq.
Florida Bar No. 46860
Children's Legal Services
1389 West US Highway 90, Suite
110
Lake City, FL 32055
(386) 758-1437
SPECIAL ACCOMMODATIONS:
In accordance with the Americans
With Disabilities Act, if you are a
person with a disability who needs
any accommodation in order to par-
ticipate in this proceeding, you are
entitled, at no cost to you, to the pro-
vision of certain assistance. Please
contact Carrina Cooper, Court Ad-
ministration, 173 NE Hernando Ave-
nue, Room 408, Lake City, Florida
32055, Telephone (386) 758-2163, at
least seven (7) days before 'your
scheduled court appearance or imme-
diately upon receiving this notifica-
tion if the time before the scheduled
appearance is less than seven (7)
days. If you are hearing impaired or
voice impaired, call-711.

05527433
August 23, 30, 2011
September 6, 13, 2011


020 Lost & Found

FOUND Beautiful Pit Bull, near
CR 247 & CR 242,
Found on August. 30th,
OWNERS PICKED UP


100 Opportunities

05527485
City of Gainesville Fleet
Mechanic
Career Opportunity with
Excellent Benefits. Requires a
HS diploma/GED & 5 years
Fleet/diesel mechanic
experience. Apply today at
www.cityofgainesville.jobs
AA/EO/DFWP/VP

05527641




Maintenance Person
Convenience Store Group is
seeking an experienced
Maintenance person. A/C &
Refrigeration, Electrical,
plumbing and carpentry
experience would be a plus
Competitive salary, bonus, paid
holidays, vacation, company
vehicle and opportunity to join a
progressive and fast growing
company
Fax or Email Resume to:
dtumer@fasttrackstores.com
Fax 1-352-333-1161


0O527684



"COOKS"
Competitive Wages being
offered for cooks!!!
Please apply in person
Tues 9/6 thru Fri. 9/8
at the Alachua location ~
1-75 & US Hwy 441.

AVON!! Only $10 to start!
Earn bonus $ up to $150+
1-800-275-9945 pin #4206
www.youravon.com/tdavies

BUSY OFFICE looking for full-
time receptionist. Experience in
multi-line phone system, updating
records, accounting and working
with the public. Computer skills
necessary. Fax resume at:
386-961-8802

CDL Drivers Wanted.
dedicated routes, Target Account,
Out of Lake City, FL
Call AJ 229-630-0021


100 Job
100 Opportunities

20 TEMP Farmworkers needed
10/3/11- 12/10/11. Workers will
plant, cultivate, & harvest
Christmas trees. Must be able to
work in steep terrain. Must be able
to lift from 20 to 501bs &
occasionally lift trees weighing up
to 100lbs. Subject random drug
test at the employer's expense.
Guaranteed 3/4 of contract hours.
Tools provided at no cost. Free
housing provided for non-commut-
ing workers. Transportation &
subsistence reimbursed to worker
upon completion of 50% of
contract, or earlier, if appropriate.
$10.62/hr. or applicable piece rates
depending on crop activity.
Multiple worksites in Missaukee,
Wexford, Manistee, Antrim &
Osceola Co's MI. Report or send
a resume to nearest local Florida
Agency of Workforce Innovation
office & ref. job # MI 3109809.
Dutchman Tree Farms
LICENSED OPTICIAN
Needed, Monday Friday,
Phone 386-754-6376 or email,
lcva@superioroptical.com
Mobile Home Sales!
Experienced Salesperson
Needed to sell the South's
#1 rated product! Call Kevin
386-719-5560
Sales Position available for moti-
vated individual Rountree -Moore
Toyota, Great benefits, paid train-
ing/vacation. Exp. a plus but not
necessary. Call Anthony Cosentino
386-623-7442
Veterinarian Assist/Technician
needed. Exp desired. Must be able
to work flexible schedule & Sat.
mornings. Apply at Columbia
Animal Hospital 2418 S. Marion
Ave. Lake City. No phone calls.

Medical
120 Employment

05527328
LEARN TO DRAW BLOOD
Local Phlebotomy Course
offered in Lake City, FLA
Certificate program.
(904)566-1328

05527692
Medical Billing
several years experience in all
aspects of Medical Insurance
Billing required.
Please email resume to
admin@nfsc.comcastbiz.net
or fax to 386-438-8628

Counselor floor substance abuse
program in Baker Correctional In-
stilution. BA w/2yrs exp., M-F day
shift F/'. $30.000 to start. E-mail
resume to sheliarand@aol.com.or
fax to 386-752-2387
Pharmacy Technician needed.
Must be Florida registered. Min. 1
year exp required. Preferably in a
retail environment. Excellent
computer & communication skills
needed. FT position. Competitive
pay. Send reply to Box 05074, C/O
The Lake City Reporter, P.O. Box
1709, Lake City, FL. 32056


140 Work Wanted

-EXPERIENCE WORK
with elders, flexible hours, nights
& days, can also be assistance in
home care, 386-965-0009


RECYCLE YOUR
Lake City Reporter


240 Schools &
240v Education

05527283
Interested in a Medical Career?
Express Training offers
courses for beginners & exp
* Nursing Assistant, $479
next class-08/22/10

* Phlebotomy national certifica-
tion, $800 next class-10/10/11

* Continuing education
Fees incl. books, supplies, exani
fees. Call 386-755-4401 or
expresstrainingservices.com



310 Pets & Supplies



LOST
We Silky/Yorkie
Terrier: Missing
since August 29
(am), Aprox 10
lbs. Black
body/brown face
& feet. Needs medicine. Last
seen at S & S on 441 N. & 100.
His name is Bradley. Please call
386-623-2806

LABRADOODLE PUPPY,
10 weeks old, health certificate,
registered, $450, not a breeder
Call 386-364-2089

PUBLISHER'S NOTE
Florida Law 828.29 requires dogs
and cats being sold to be at least 8
weeks old and have a health
certificate from a licensed
veterinarian documenting they
have mandatory shots and are
free from intestinal and external
parasites. Many species of wild-
life must be licensed by Florida
Fish and Wildlife. If you are
unsure, contact the local
office for information.








Lawn & Landscape Service

J&M LAWN Service & more for
all your outdoor needs. Don't
i waste your time or weekend,
Free Estimate. 386-984-2187

Ilederit ,



PHYSICAL


THERAPIST:
Home Health Care Agency
servicing Columbia and
surrounding counties
seeking Full-Time
experienced Physical
Therapist
Competitive Salary &
Benefits Available.
Please call contact
Lynn or Cindy at
386-758-3312
or apply online at
www.almostfamily.com



FLORIDA
GATEWAY
COLLEGE

INSTRUCTORICOORDINATOR,
EMERGENCY MEDICAL SERVICES
PROGRAMS
Full-tmeo
224 Day Tenure Track Position
Teaches and assists the Execitive
Director of Nursinq and Health
Services in vnaioiis aspects of
program developmntol, planning and
imnplementatioln of the F MT Basic,
Paramedic, and EMS Associate
Degree programs CoordinatIos
course schedules, clinical sites and
part-rime faculty, and assists in
program espalsion and slident
recruitment; mniIntains state aind
national program certifications
MINIMUM QUALIFICATIONS:
Bachelor's degree in eirei'gency
medical services or closely rtelited
field Paramedic certidliction either at
the state or national lovel 1 three
years experience as a, palnmrodic
Must be able to establish nnd
maintain effective wolkina
relationships with others
DESIRABLE QUALIFICATIONS:
Minimumri thlirec yeas te.chinq
experience at Ihe technical school or
community college level ACIS,
PALS. and PHTlLS instiictor
certification
Salary: Based on Dtri'tre arnd
Exponenirce
Application Deadline: 9,23 11
Persons Interested should provide
College application. wVla. amd
photocopies of transcript' All foreign
tra'rscripts iinis be siubrirtted \i,,lh
olh. trainslatiill rid ev i ilriririr
Posiltion details and applihcitions
avilatile on web at vwww.h.>qr;dti
HUIriari Resourf(is
t'li~r iii Gatreway i'oIupieii


119 S F Collee, PI 'o ie
Lnko City, iFL 320I 5 2007
Phont. (386) "5.,I 113 I.
Fax (3t86) 7i.l.4ti814
E-Mda l hl r] i,;lml';I I 'Jl


Clear the Clutter &


Make Some Cash!














-'7"^^ './ ; '









Advertise your Garage Sale


with the Lake City Reporter



ONLY $ I 17

4 Lines 3 Days 2 Free Signs

(386) 755-5440


'537,

IBUYIBHK~Mil^^^




laFIND >











LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 6, 2011


Classified Department: 755-5440


407 Computers
HP Computer,
$80.00
386-755-9984 or
386-292-2170

408 Furniture
Coffee table and
2 square end tables.
All with glass tops. $90.00
386-758-4755

420 Wanted to Buy
K&H TIMBER
We Buy Pine Hardwood &
Cypress. Large or small tracts.
Call 386-961-1961.
Wanted Junk Cars, Trucks, Vans.
$275 & up CASH! Free Pick Up!
NO title needed !386-878-9260
After 5pm 386- 752-3648.

430 Garage Sales
PUBLISHER'S NOTE
All Yard Sale Ads
Must be Pre-Paid.


440 Miscellaneous
GUNSHOW: 09/10 & 09/11
@ The Columbia County
Fairgrounds, Hwy 247 Lake City.
Sat 9am 4pm, Sun 9am-3pm.
Info: 386-325-6114
Stop gnat & Mosquito bites! Buy
Swamp Gator All natural insect re-
pellent. Family safe. Use head to
toe. Available at The Home Depot.

450 Good Things
to Eat
GREEN PEANUTS For Sale
Graded and washed.
$30.00 a bushel.
386-752-3434

460 Firewood
Firewood for Sale. $65. per Truck
Load. Rick 386-867-1039 or Joey
965-0288 if no answer pls leave
message we will call you back.

630 Mobile Homes
630 for Rent

2 OR 3 BEDROOMS
Clean, Quiet Park $475-$525.mo
Water, septic, garbage included
758-2280 References, NO PETS!
3/2 Large MH, small park, near
FGCC, Small pets ok, $500 dep
$575 mo w/12 mo lease
386-752-1971 or 352-281-2450
3/2.5 S of Lake City, (Branford
area) $600 mo plus security
386-590-0642 or 386-867-1833
www.suwanneevalleyproperties.com
3BR/2BA MH
Water & Garage included No Pets.
$550. mo. $400. security deposit,.
386-752-9898 or 386-365-3633
LG clean 3br's $450. -$650. mo. +
dep. Also, 2br mobile home's
available. No Pets.
5 Points area. 386-961-1482
New 2br/2ba off Country Club. 1/2
ac. lot Front, back porch & storage
bldg. $600 mo. $600 sec. No Pets!
386-752-5911 or 466-2266


640 { Mobile Homes
6 for Sale

Os5527374
!!ATTENTION!!
We purchase used mobile
homes. Call North Pointe
Homes, Gainesville
352-872-5566

05527375 !!!LOOK!!!
Before you but a Mobile Home
check out North Pointe Homes
in Gainesville--Hugh Discounts!
credit Scores Don't matter. Call
for Free Approval! Jacobson
Homes Factory Outlet (352)872-
5566 or mrb337 1(hotmail.com

05527376
NEW USED- REPO'S
Your Volume Giant! North
Pointe Homes. Millions to Lend.
Credit Scores 575 = 10% down.
Gainesville (352)872-5566 or
walker-david@ live.com

Palm Harbor Homes
Cash for Clunkers
5K For Your Used Mobile Home -
Any Condition
800-622-2832 ext. 210.

\710 Unfurnished Apt.
710 For Rent







2br/1 ba, I car garage,
W/D hook up, $525 month,
no pets 1 month sec,
386-961-8075
2BR/1BA. Close to town.
$565.mo plus deposit.
Includes water & sewer.
386-965-2922

ONE 51 PLACE APTS
Alachua
MOVE IN SPECIALS
1, 2, & 3 bedrooms
Call TODAY 386-462-0656
or visit us at one51 lplace.com

Summer Special! 12th mo Free
w/signed yr lease. Updated, w/tile
'floors/fresh paint. Great area.
From $450.+sec. 386-752-9626

720 Furnished Apts.
72 For Rent
Neat as a Whistle! lbr., utilities.
AC TV, Cable, mioro, clean, quiet.
shady, Close to town. 41S,
$135 wk. 386-755-0110

Unfurnished
730 Home For Rent
'09 Executive Home for rent on 41
acres. 4br/3.5ba Available
October. Horses/outdoor pets ok.
$2000/mo but all terms negotiable
for right caretaker. 386-209-4610
05527680
3 BR/2 BA, 1. 800 sq. ft, 2 car
garage. all appliances, sprinkler
system, fenced, NO PETS,
Very clean & ready to move in.
$1,000 mo. $1,000 sec.,
$30 appl. fee.
Call 386-752-4864.


730 Unfurnished
7 Home For Rent

2BR house $625.mo $625. dep.
Also, 2 large br apt. $525. mo
$525 dep. Conveniently close to
the VA & shopping. 386-344-2972

3 br/lba. $550. mo.
on Nassau Street
386-697-9950

3 br/2ba house, 1206 McFarlane
Avenue. Avail. 9/1/11. $850 mo
$400 sec dep. 904-376-0620 or
904-813-8864 for appt. No pets!
4B/1.5 BA, brick house for rent.
$850 a month & $550 security.
No pets!
386-752-9898 or 386-365-3633.
4BR BRICK home.
Azalea Park. $750. mo.
$750. security .
386-397-2619 or 386-365-1243
Brick 3br/2ba Large yard, garage,
CH/A. 189 Stanley Ct. Lake City.
$950. mo+ $1000 dep.
Call 386-365-8543

74O Furnished
4 v Homes for Rent

Southern Oaks Country Club.
3br/2.5ba Aprox 3000 sqft. Split
floor plan, on the 9th Fairway.
New AC, 2.5 car garage, sprinkler,
concrete drive. Furnished. Move in
ready w/all appliances. Avail. now
Yearly Lease.(305)872-7911 View
at www.lakecitvgolfvilla.com

750 Business &
Office Rentals

FOR LEASE: Downtown office
space. Convenient to
Court house.
Call 386-755-3456

For Lease: E Baya Ave. Two -
1000 sqft office space units or
combined for 2000 sqft. 386-984-
0622 or weekends 386-497-4762
NICE OFFICE SPACE for lease.
Oak Hill Plaza. 900 sqft
from $450 a month
Tom 386-961-1086 DCA Realtor
SUB SHOP for lease.
All Equip. Avail. Old Willy J's
Across from Wal-Mart
386-623-2244


790 Vacation Rentals

Horseshoe Beach RV Lot.
Nice comer Lot with shade trees.
$295. mo Water/electric included
386-235-3633 or 352-498-5986

Scalloping Horseshoe Beach Spcl
Gulf Front 2br, w/lg porch, dock.
fish sink. wkend $395./wk $895.
386-235-3633/352-498-5986
alwaysonvacation.com #419-181
"'Florida's Last Frontier"


805 Lots for Sale

BEAUTIFUL 5 acres in
Lake City. 100% owner financing,
no qualifying, $395 per month.
Please call 512-663-0065


S


















... . .. .




add










Siblished monthly by
':"..f't, ;. ,


805 Lots for Sale
PUBLISHER'S NOTE
All real estate advertising in this
newspaper is subject to the fair
housing act which makes it illegal
to advertise "any preference,
limitation, or discrimination based
on race, color, religion, sex,
disability, familial status or nation-
al origin; or any intention to make
such preference, limitation or
discrimination." Familial status
includes children under the age of
18 living with parents or legal
custodians, pregnant women and
people securing custody of chil-
dren under the age of 18. This
newspaper will not knowingly
accept any advertising for real es-
tate which is in violation of the
law. Our readers are hereby in-
formed that all dwellings adver-
tised in this newspaper are availa-
ble on an equal opportunity basis.
To complain of discrimination call
HUD toll free at 1-800-669-9777,
the toll free
telephone number to the hearing
impaired is 1-800-927-9275.


810 Home for Sale
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
Neat & tidy 2/2, maybe 3/2. New
kitchen counters & tile. Open floor
plan. Mary Brown Whitehurst
965-0887 MLS# 77943 $99,000
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
10 acres w/well maintained brick
home. 2012 sqft. Open split floor
plan. Lori Giebeig Simpson
365-5678 MLS# 74447 $149,000
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
3br/3ba Spacious home in estab-
lished area. 2414 sqft. Private yard
& patio. Lori Giebeig Simpson
365-5678 MLS# 78175 $159,000
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
3br/2ba. 1590 sqft. Lori Giebeig
Simpson. 365-5678 or
Mary Brown Whitehurst
965-0887 MLS# 74542 $110,000
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
Suwannee Co. 115 ac. Fenced &
cross Fenced. Pasture land, paved
rd. Elaine K. Tolar 386-752-4211
MLS# 77081 $345,000
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
.97 ac. Centrally located to Lake
City & G'ville. Fenced, planted
pines, pasture. Elaine K. Tolar
752-4211 MLS# 73879 $291,030
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
New home in May Fair. Super area
comer lot. 4br split plan. Versatile
colors. Elaine K. Tolar
755-6488 MLS# 76919 $199,900


810 Home for Sale

Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
240 ac. Farm. Rolling Meadows.
Paved road, great access to Lake
City & G'ville. Elaine K. Tolar
386-752-4211 MLS# 70453

Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
Suwannee Co.115 ac. Fenced &
cross fenced. 10 & 20 ac parcels
avail. Elaine K. Tolar 386-752-
4211 MLS# 67766 $448,500
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
Brick home in town on lake front.
3br/2ba. New roof & hardwoods.
Glass room w/view Elaine Tolar
755-6488 MLS# 78092 $249,900
LEASE/OPTION BUY
3br/2ba Home 2010 w/garage
on 1/2 acre. Owner Financing
386-623-2244

82O Farms &
Acreage

10-ac lot. Well/septic/pp. Owner
financing $300 dn, $663 mo 8.9%,
25 yrs. Deas Bullard Properties
386-752-4339 www.landnfl.com

4 1/2 acre lot. Lake Jeffery Road.
Gorgeous Oaks!Paved Rd
Owner Financing! NO DOWN!
$59,900. $525mo 352-215-1018.
www.LandOwnerFinancing.com
4 acres, Wellborn, New Well
installed, Beautifully wooded
w/cleared Home Site, owner fin,
no down, $39,900, $410 mon
Call 352-215-1018
www.LandOwnerFinancing.com
FARM- 7 stall barn.
17+ acres, pasture, cross fenced.
Close in $500. mo.
386-961-1086

Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
61 ac. Parcel. SR 27 & 1-75 inter-
change. Great potential, fenced &
cross fenced. Elaine K. Tolar
752-4211 MLS# 758060 $368,040
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
40 ac.Parcel'. Less then 2 mi from
city limits. Fenced road frontage
on US Hwy 441. Elaine K. Tolar
752-4211 MLS# 62092 $194K

Real Estate
870 Wanted

I Buy Houses
CASH!
Quick Sale Fair Price
386-269-0605


Adoption

A childless couple seeks to adopt. Flexible work
schedule. Will be HANDS-ON parents. Financial
security. Expenses paid. Catherine & Michael.
(ask for michelle/adam). (800)790-5260 FL
Bar#0150789

Education

ALLIED HEALTH career training-Attend
college 100% online. Job placement assistance.
Computer available.. Financial Aid if qualified.
SCHEV certified. Call (800)481-9409 www.
CenturaOnline.com

Financial Services

$$$ ACCESS LAWSUIT CASH NOW!!! $$$
As seen on TV.$$$ Injury Lawsuit Dragging?
Need $500-$500,000++within 48/hrs? Low rates
APPLY NOW BY PHONE! Call Today! Toll-
Free: (800)568-8321 www.lawcapital.com

Help Wanted

Driver- Southern Freight needs Drivers!!
Solo, Team, Company & 0/0. We have LOTS of
FREIGHT!!! Call (877)893-9645 for details.

Need 13 Good Drivers Top 5% Pay & 401K 2
Mos. CDL Class A Driving Exp (877)258-8782
www.meltontruck.com

Drivers- No Experience No Problem. 100%
Paid CDL Training. Immediate Benefits. 20/10
program. Trainers Earn up to 490 per mile!
CRST VAN EXPEDITED (800)326-2778 www.
JoinCRST.com

$5,000 Sign-On Bonus! Frac Sand Haulers with
complete Bulk Pneumatic Rigs only. Relocate to
Texas for tons of work! Fuel/Quick pay available.
(800)491-9022


Land For Sale


LAKEFRONT BARGAIN! 1+ Acres -only
$49,900 DOCKABLE DEEPWATER! Was
$89,900. Prime lakefront parcel with direct access
to Gulf. On 12,000 acre recreational lake covered
in huge live oaks! Close to the city. Paved roads,
county water, power, phone, community boat
launch. Excellent financing. Call now (866)952-
5302

GA LAND SALE 17 Tracts to choose from.
Creeks, pond sites, wooded, clear cut, etc. Visit
our website. stregispaper.com (478)987-9700 St.
Regis Paper Co.


950 Cars for Sale
1995 BUICK PARK AVENUE,
4 Door, nice new cold air,
excellent cond., $3,000 OBO.
Call 386-961-9700 evenings 6-10


IN WHEELS & WRTEHRCRFT F .7









Bring the picture in or
we will take it for you!
Ad runs 10 consecutive days
with a description and photo in the
newspaper and online E-edition.
Ad runs 10 consecutive days as a
classified line ad online.
You must include vehicle price.
All ads are prepaid.
Private party only.





2006 EF250
Ford Van
3/4 ton, metal work
shelves/ladder rack,
60K miles, exc. cond.

$10,500
Call
386-555-5555
If you don't sell your vehicle
during the first 10 days, you
can run the same vehicle ad
for 10 additional days for
only $15.00
Terms and conditions remain the
same for the additional run.


ToGtY u


rn-i' Sl,


Miscellaneous


SAWMILLS from only $3997- MAKE MONEY
& SAVE MONEY with your own bandmill- Cut
lumber any dimension. In stock ready to ship.
FREE Info & DVD: www.NorwoodSawmills.
com/300N (800)578-1363 Ext.300N

ATTEND COLLEGE ONLINE from Home.
*Medical, *Business, *Paralegal, *Accounting,
*Criminal Justice. Job placement assistance.
Computer available. Financial Aid if qualified.
Call (888)203-3179 www.CenturaOnline.com

AIRLINES ARE HIRING Train for high
paying Aviation Maintenance Career. FAA
approved program., Financial aid if qualified
- Housing available CALL Aviation Institute of
Maintenance (866)314-3769.

DIRECTV Summer Special! 1 Year FREE
Showtime! 3 mos FREE HBO/Starz/Cinemax!
NFL SUNDAY TICKET Free Choice Ultimate/
Premier Pkgs from $29.99/mo. Call by 9/30!
(800)360-2254

Real Estate

BANK FORECLOSED, LAND
LIQUIDATION, from $9,900, Blue Ridge
mountains, paved roads, utilities, county water,
panoramic views, excellent financing. Sale
September 24th, Call now! (888)757-6867 ext.
214RV's/Mobile Homes

RV's/Mobile Homes

PUBLIC AUCTION 150+ Spec and Dealer
Model Travel Trailers. NO MINIMUM PRICE!
Online Bidding Available Saturday, September 10,
10am Philadelphia, MS www.hendersonauction.
com (225)686-2252 Lic# 266

Schools & Instruction

Heat & Air JOBS Ready to work'? 3 week
accelerated program. Hands on environment.
Nationwide certifications and Local Job Placement
Assistance! (877)359-1690


ANF
ADVERTISING NETWORK Of oFLORIDA

Clasifled I Dtsplay i Metro Daily



( Week of September 5, 2011 )