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UFPKY NEH LSTA



The Lake City reporter
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028308/01653
 Material Information
Title: The Lake City reporter
Uniform Title: Lake City reporter (Lake City, Fla. 1967)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: John H. Perry
Place of Publication: Lake City Fla
Publication Date: 9/4/2011
Frequency: daily (monday through friday)[<1969>-]
weekly[ former 1967-<1968>]
daily
normalized irregular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Lake City (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Columbia County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Columbia -- Lake City
Coordinates: 30.189722 x -82.639722 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 95, no. 4 (Oct. 5, 1967)-
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000358016
oclc - 33283560
notis - ABZ6316
lccn - sn 95047175
sobekcm - UF00028308_01569
System ID: UF00028308:01653
 Related Items
Preceded by: Lake City reporter and Columbia gazette

Full Text





Gator time
UF vs. FAU:
Full coverage
inside.
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LIB OF FLORIDA HISTo j 36
PO BOX 2-1700 /
205 SHA UNIV OFB FOITj,
GAINESVILLE -)I '-
--6 _j 19-)


Diamond Rio
Grammy-winning
group making its
way to Lake City.
Inside, 3A


nir

I


ui ty


Reporter


Sunday, September 4, 201 I


www.lakecityreporter.com


Vol. 137, No. 189 0 $1.00


Lee


pelts


Gulf



Coast

Storm warnings
extend into the
Fla. Panhandle.

By MARY FOSTER
Associated Press
JEAN LAFITTE, La. Bands of
heavy rain and strong wind gusts
from Tropical Storm Lee knocked
out power to thousands in Louisiana
and Mississippi on Saturday and
prompted evacuations in bayou
towns like Jean Lafitte, where water
was lap-
ping at the
front doors
of some
homes.
The slug-
S gish storm
stalled just
for several
No hoursbefore
Lee's projected path resuming its
as of Saturday. slow march
northward
late in the afternoon. Landfall was
expected later in the day, and the
storm threatened to dump more
than a foot of rain across the Gulf
Coast and into the Southeast in com-
ing days. Its slow pace means the
clouds will have more time to drop
rain on cities in their path.
No injuries were reported, but
there were scattered reports of
water entering low-lying homes and
businesses.
Water was a foot deep under Eva
Alexie's house, which is raised about
eight feet off the flat ground.
"I should be used to this," said
Alexie, a 76-year-old storm veteran
who lost a home to Hurricane Ike in
2008. "It happens pretty often. I just
thank God it won't be getting in my
house this time."
She clutched an umbrella and a
pair of blue rubber gloves as she
walked down Louisiana Highway 45,
on her way to her husband's shrimp
boat to clean a recent catch.
The center of the slow-moving
storm was about 55 miles (90 kilo-
meters) south of Lafayette, La.,
Saturday afternoon, spinning inter-
mittent bands of stormy weather,
alternating with light rain and
occasional sunshine. It was moving
north at about 4 mph (6 kph) in the
late afternoon.
Its maximum sustained winds
were 60 mph (97 kph), but their
intensity was expected to decrease
by Sunday. Tropical storm warnings
stretched from the Louisiana-Texas
state line to Destin.
The National Weather Service in
Slidell reported two-day rain totals
approaching 9 inches in parts of
south Louisiana and more than 5
inches near the Mississippi coast.
the storm continued to move slowly
and forecasts still said rain totals
along the coast could reach 10 to 15
inches, even 20 in isolated spots.
The Entergy utility company
reported more than 37,000 custom-
er outages at one point Saturday
morning but that was down to below
29,000 by midday as the utility
restored electricity.


SPECIAL RECOGNITION

Bowling, powerlifting events give credit where it's due


Ir l "Jiri t I L L a 'w* III'KL ae Ity S p rt
Special Olympians cheer on Victoria Boswell, 18, as she rolls the ball Friday during the Columbia County Special Olympics 2011 Fall Classic at
Lake City Bowl.

Fall Classic draws 80-plus Special Olympians


By TONY BRITT
tbritt@lakecityreporter.com

Few people ever get to stand
on a podium and have a ribbon
pinned to their chest.
Local Special Olympians and
their supporters realize the


importance bf this form of rec-
ognition and spent a big chunk
of Friday morning congratulat-
ing, giving high-fives, cheer-
ing and hugging local athletes
who won ribbons in a Special
Olympics contest Friday morn-
ing.
The 2011 Columbia County


Special Olympics Fall Classic
was held Friday with Special
Olympians competing in bowl-
ing and powerlifting. -
More than 80 local Special
Olympians converged on the
Lake City Bowl to take compet-
ing in the bowling part of com-
petition. Brown said 5-6 athletes


Labor break


A family drifts down the Ichetucknee River on tubes and rafts on Labor Day 2010. The rlchetucknee will likely
end up having seen an immense number of visitors there to take a dip in the 72 degree water this Labor Day
weekend.


Police roadside check nets one arrest


By TONY BRITT
tbritt@lakecityreporter.com
. One person was arrested and
more than 500 vehicles checked
Friday night in an operation
in which the Florida Highway


Patrol teamed with several other cles went through the checkpoint
local law enforcement agencies Friday night. The 'operation was
as part of a comprehensive road- 'ag.ed from 10 p.m. 2 a.m. on
side safety checkpoint operation. U.S. Highway 90 across from the
According to statistics from FHP office.
FHP Capt. Eileen Powell, Troop Aih ilrit i,, issued 37 citations,
B District Commander, 574 vehi-
ARREST continued on 5A


participated in the powerlifting
event at Columbia High School.
"We had 86 athletes par-
ticipate in bowling," said John
Brown, Florida Special Olympics
Columbia County coordinator,
noting athletes from Niblack
CLASSIC continued on 3A


TO protect,

serve and

save lives
By ANTONIA ROBINSON
arobinson@lakecityreporter.com
The Lake City Police
Department will gain assis-
tance in helping save lives
through some new equip-
ment.
The department is pur-
chasing two automatic
electronic defibrillators for
$2,600.
An AED is applied to pro-
vide an electric shock to
the heart when a person
is facing life- threatening
situations, such as cardiac
arrest.
LCPD is excited to add
the defibrillators, said Capt.
John Blanchard, public
information officer.
"Saving a life is very impor-
tant to us," he said. "We can
assist on any cardiac call."
Funding for the defibrilla-
tors is coming through the
Edward Byrne Memorial
Justice Assistance Grant.
The department was award-
ed a total of $14,759 in grant

LCPD continued on 3A


1 a ~ 8


CALL US:
(386) 752-1293
SUBSCRIBE TO
THE REPORTER:
Voice: 755-5445
Fax: 752-9400


87
T-Storms
WEATHER, 6A


O pinion ................
Business ................
Obituaries ..............
A dvice..................
Puzzles .................


A


TODAY IN
BUSINESS
50 years in the
grocery trade.


COMING
TUESDAY
Weekend news
roundup.


A


SL ake









LAKE CITY REPORTER SUNDAY REPORT SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 4, 2011


w4$ :iY- 4 FLORIDA

Friday: Friday: Saturday: Saturday: Saturday: Saturday:
6-8-27-33 MB 4 8-12-21-32-34 Afternoon: N/A Afternoon: N/A N/A N/A
Evening: N/A Evening: N/A


AROUND FLORIDA


Romney rallies GOP Hispanics in Tampa


By TAMARA LUSH
Associated Press
TAMPA Republican
presidential candidate Mitt
Romney told an enthusi-
astic crowd of Hispanic
Republicans on Friday
that they are "living proof'
of the benefits of legal
immigration but called for
toughening enforcement
on illegal immigration.
"Our country must
do a better job of secur-
ing its borders and as
president, I will," the
former Massachusetts
governor told a meeting
of the Republican National
Hispanic Assembly of
Florida.
Although he never men-
tioned Rick Perry's name,
Romney clearly was trying
to draw a contrast with
a chief rival for the GOP
nomination. Perry, Texas'
longest-serving governor,
has been criticized by
some fellow conservatives
as being too lenient on ille-
gal immigration issues.
Perry now is leading
Romney in several national
polls some five months
before the first votes
are cast, and Romney is
seeking to make the case
subtly for now --- that
Perry is not as conserva-
tive as he is on the hot-but-
ton issue of illegal immi-
gration.
To that end, Romney
declared: "We must stop
providing the incentives
that promote illegal immi-
gration."
He argued that the fed-
eral government must "get
tough" on employers who-


hire illegal immigrants
and said that when he was
Massachusetts' governor,
he vetoed legislation that
would have provided in-
state tuition rates to illegal
immigrants and beefed up
the powers of state troop-
ers to enforce immigration
laws.
Romney also said he
supported "completing
construction of a high-
tech fence" along the US-
Mexico border.
A physical fence was
built in spots along
2,100-mile border from
California to Texas. But
a virtual fence along the
Mexican border was
officially abandoned in
January. The project was
originally expected to be in
place by this year. Instead,
only about 53 miles of
operational "virtual fence"
was put in place in Arizona
at a cost of about $15 mil-
lion a mile.
Perry does not think
the U.S. should build a
wall spanning the entire
Mexican border. And some
conservatives cringe at
Perry's support of discount-
ed tuition rates for the chil-
dren of illegal immigrants at
Texas universities as well as
his comment that Arizona's
tough-on-immigration law
wouldn't be right for Texas.
Beyond the contrast
with Perry, the event
underscored the impor-
tance of Hispanic voters
to Republican candidates
- there are about 138,000
more Hispanics registered
as Democrats in Florida
than are registered as
Republicans.


ASUOCAI tU tPRE
Republican presidential candidate, former Massachusetts Gov. Mitt Romney, center, meets with supporters during the grand
opening of his Florida campaign headquarters in Tampa Friday.


Tax scam alleged


TAMPA (AP) -
Authorities in Tampa say
they have busted a fed-
eral income tax fraud ring
responsible for more than
$100 million in losses.
Police Chief Jane Castor
said Friday that the accused
were using the Social
Security numbers of dead
people to file fraudtIlent
federal tax returns and get
refunds. One investigator
called it an "epidemic" and


said authorities believe the
Tampa ring is the tip of a
nationwide trend.
The Tampa Tribune
reported that some of the
accused even taught class-
es for others to learn how
to perpetrate the scam.
Castor said the criminals
also threw filing parties
where people got together
to file fraudulent tax
returns.The investigation
has resulted in -19 arrests.


Parents say school

doubles as nightclub


MIAMI (AP) Parents
of children attending the
Balare Language Academy
are seeking answers after
learning of party fliers
advertising bashes featur-
ing booze and scantily-clad
women on the school's
campus.
The Miami Herald
reported Friday that
school officials say they


don't know anything about
parties taking place at the
campus on Quial Roost
Drive in Miami.
The school district
received complaints from
parents last week wonder-
ing about empty beer bot-
tles and the lingering smell
of smoke at the school, as
well as the promotional
ads.


PEOPLE IN THE NEWS


,iVet: Honor WWII survivors now


By AUDREY McAVOY
Associated Press

PEARL HARBOR,
Hawaii A Marine who
fought in the Battle of
Okinawa urged Americans
on Friday to honor those
-who served in World War
II now, while veterans
from that conflict are still
alive.
E. Bruce Heilman,
speaking at a ceremony
marking the 66th year
since the end of the war,
noted fewer than 2 mil-
lion of the 16 million
men and women who
served in the war are
alive. They are dying at a
rate of 30,000 per month,
he said.
Some 20 World War II
veterans boarded the now
decommissioned battle-
ship, the Missouri the
same battleship where
Japanese signed surrender
documents formally ending
the war to participate
in this year's ceremony in
Pearl Harbor.
Heilman, who is a
spokesman for the
Greatest Generations
Foundation, predicted not
many would be able to
come back in a decade's
time.
"Most of those remain-
ing, including those in
the front row, will have
passed on, so that few, if
any, will be present for
the ceremony of the 76th
anniversary of the end of
the Pacific War. Those of
us still here will be of age
95 to 101," Heilman said.
"Therefore the impor-
tance of remembering
now the sacrifices and
acts of heroism represen-
tative of their service can-


World War II veterans listen during a ceremony aboard the Battleship Missouri Memorial
in Pearl Harbor, Hawaii, on Friday marking the 66th anniversary of the end of the war. The
battleship has been moored in Pearl Harbor for the past decade. It overlooks the spot where
the USS Arizona sank during the 1941 Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor.



At 87, Weight Watchers

founder keeps pounds off


PARKLAND (AP) Jean Nidetch
ambles down the hallway of the senior
community where she lives, two cups
of Coca-Cola teetering on her walker.
In her one-bedroom apartment, there
are Klondike bars in the freezer and, in
the fridge, Baileys Irish Cream beside
Chinese take-out. If these don't seem
the trappings of the woman who found-
ed Weight Watchers, don't be alarmed.
At 87, Nidetch has earned some allow-
ances.
Besides, she says, she doesn't touch
most of the stuff anyway.
Fifty years after Nidetch went on
the diet that changed her life, she says
she still lives by most of the ideals she


espoused when she started the interna-
tional weight loss group 50 years ago at
her New York City home. And among the
many thousands of Weight Watchers lead-
ers who have followed in her footsteps,
her name alone still prompts wide eyes,
rapt attention and unflinching reverence.
David Kirchhoff, Weight Watchers'
current chief executive, says he'll never
forget when he finally met Nidetch, three
years ago at a convention in Orlando.
He introduced her to a crowd of Weight
Watchers leaders that gasped, grabbed
for cameras and rushed the stage.
"I felt like I was at a Rolling Stones con-
cert," Kirchhoff said. "The whole place
just completely erupted."


Celebrity Birthdays


Sept 4:

Actress Mitzi Gaynor is
80.
Bassist Ronald LaPread
(The Commodores) is 61.
Actress Judith Ivey is 60.
Actress Khandi
Alexander is 54. Actor-


Daily Scripture


comedian Damon Wayans
is 51. Guitarist Kim Thayil
of Soundgarden is 51.
Actress lone Skye is 41.
Singer Richard Wingo of
Jagged Edge is 36.
Singer Dan Miller of
0-Town is 31. Singer
Beyonce Knowles is 30.


This is what the LORD says-
your Redeemer, the Holy One
of Israel:'I am the LORD your
God, who teaches you what is
best for you, who directs you in
the way you should go.' Isaiah
48:17 NIV.



Lake City Reporter


HOW TO REACH US
Main number ........(386) 752-1293
Fax number .............752-9400
Circulation ..............755-5445
Online ... www.lakecltyreporter.com
The Lake City Reporter, an affiliate of
Community Newspapers Inc., is pub-
lished Tuesday through Sunday at 180
E. Duval St., Lake City, Fla. 32055.
Periodical postage paid at Lake City, Fla.
Member Audit Bureau of Circulation and
The Associated Press.
All material herein is property of the Lake
City Reporter. Reproduction in whole or
In part is forbidden without the permis-
sion of the publisher. U.S. Postal Service
No. 310-880.
POSTMASTER: Send address changes
to Lake City Reporter, P.O. Box 1709,
Lake City, Fla. 32056.
Publisher ToddWilson .....754-0418
(twilson @ lakecityreporter.com)
NEWS
Editor Robert Bridges .....754-0428
(rbridges@lakecityreporter.com)
ADVERTISING
Director Ashley Butcher .. .754-0417
(abutcler@lakecityreporter.com)
CLASSIFIED
Tq place a classified ad, call 755-5440


BUSINESS
Controller Sue Brannon... .754-0419
(sbrannon@lakecityreporter.com)
CIRCULATION
Home delivery of the Lake City Reporter
should be completed by 6:30 a.m.
Tuesday through Saturday, and by 7:30
a.m. on Sunday.
Please call 386-755-5445 to report any
problems with your delivery service.
In Columbia County, customers should
call before 10:30 a.m. to report a ser-
vice error for same day re-delivery. After
10:30 a.m., next day re-delivery or ser-
vice related credits will be issued.
In all other counties where home delivery
is available, next day re-delivery or ser-
vice related credits will be Issued.
Circulation ..............755-5445
(circulation@lakecityreporter.com)
Home delivery rates
(Tuesday through Sunday)
12 Weeks .................. $26.32
24 Weeks ................... $48.79
52 Weeks..............$83.46
Rates include 7% sales tax.
Mall rates
12 W eeks................ $41.40
24 Weeks ................... $82.80
52 Weeks .. ...... . . .. $179.40


CORRECTION

The Lake City Reporter corrects errors of fact in news
items. If you have a concern, question or suggestion,
please call the executive editor. Corrections and clarifica-
tions will run in this space. And thanks for reading.


Page Editor: Robert Bridges, 754-0428










LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 4, 2011


Diamond Rio set to perform at FGC


From staff reports .

Following the success of the sold-out
Easton Corbin concert, Grammy-award
winner Diamond Rio will perform at "
Florida Gateway College on September
24.
The show, sponsored by Shands Lake
Shore Regional Medical Center and CMS
Professional Staffing, Inc., will begin
at 7:30 p.m. at the college's Howard
Conference Center.
The third show in the inaugural season
of FGC Entertainment, Diamond Rio is
one of the most successful bands to per-
form in Lake City they've received 13
Grammy nominations and sold more than
10 million albums. The band picked up its
first Grammy win in 2011, for its newest
album, 'The Reason."
The group has long been known for
such positive hits as "I Believe," "Maima
Don't Forget to Pray for Me" and "One
More Day." Formed in 1984, Diamond
Rio features Marty Roe, Jimmy Olander,.
drummer Brian Prout, keyboardist Dan.
Truman, bassist Dana Williams and Gene
Johnson on mandolin, guitar and fiddle.
The band signed with Arista in 1988 and -
embarked on one of the most successful -
Courtesy photo
FGC continued on 5A The Grammy-winning group Diamond Rio will perform at Florida Gateway College Sept. 24.


CLASSIC: Event draws 80-plus athletes

Continued From Page 1A


Elementary, Richardson
and Lake City Middle,
Fort White and Columbia
high schools took part'
in the games, along with
participants from CARC -
Advocates for Citizens with
Disabilities.
The bowling portion of
the competition took place
from 9 a.m. 1:30 p.m. at
Lake City Bowl.
Joe Robinson, a transi-
tion teacher at Columbia
High School, attended the
event with several CHS stu-
dents.
'The kids loved this," he
said. '"They shoot for this
from the beginning of the
year. We've got a couple of
students who talk a lot of
smack in class about what
they are going to do to the


other students, and they
just enjoy this event."
Robinson said Special
Olylmnpics competition is an
important social outlet for
the athletes.
"Anytime they can all
get together and perform,
because they are not out
here competing like other
athletes do, they just enjoy
getting together because
most of them have been
together for a long time,"
he said. "Special Olympics
is a way for them to get
together and socialize."
Brown said the event was
a success and the athletes
enjoyed themselves.
"It turned out to be a
great dhy," Brown said. "We
had lots of parents, volun-
teers and the chorus from


Richardson Middle School
come out and volunteer for
us. The participants really
enjoyed the day."
Brown said there are
265-270 Special Olympians
registered in Columbia
County.
"Special Olympics gives
them that sporting outlet
where they can go and
participate," he said. "At
the county level they win
ribbons; at the area level
they win ribbons and
if they get to go to the
state and compete they
win medals. They get an
opportunity to stick their
chests our and brag about
their accomplishments
and what they've done and
it's great to see that in the
athletes."


LCPD: Equipment will help save lives

Continued,From Page 1A

funds, Blanchard said:.Itwill
also use $12,159 of the grant
funds to replace 10 portable Learn How to M minister in
radios.n How to Minister in
These will be the first
two defibrillators in the God's Supernatural Power
department, he said.
Officers are already Classes start at
trained in how to use Christ Community Church
defibrillators and will just
have to become familiar September 7, 2011
with the particular mod-
els purchased. 7:00 P.M.
The grant program Using Bill Johnson's Bethel School of
allows states and local
governments to support a Supernatural Ministry Material
broad range of activities.
A formal request for Call Pastor Terry Shiver
the department-to accept 386-755-0055
the grant will come before
the city council Tuesday .For more information-


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Page Editor: Robert Bridges, 754-0428













OPINION


Sunday, September 4, 2011


OUR


OUR
OPINION


Ask the

tough

questions

W hen unexpected
situations
arise that may
require, a six-
figure payout to
rectify, we would prefer a few
questions be asked before pub-
lic money is spent. That goes
for any publicly funded agency.
Go ahead and ask a few ques-
tions and get to the bottom of
things.
That's where the Columbia
County Commission is in
regard to the need for funding
at the Suwannee Valley Transit
Authority. The agency that
serves Suwannee, Hamilton
and Columbia counties appar-
ently is stretched thin and
needs a financial boost from its
funding counties.
Ask the questions.
i How many people does this
agency serve?
How does it spend its rev-
enue?
4 What caused the revenue
shortfall and the desperate
pitch for more county assis-
tance?
County officials have
e dorsed a plan to allocate
$.64,000 for the organization,
b~ht thankfully put the brakes
on before signing the check.
) There is not enough public
money to go around. Cutbacks
everywhere are necessary.
Before we spend any money on
tlfe Suwannee Valley Transit
Authority, let's justify the
ekpennenaand out oeactly--
what value we're getting for our
investment.


HIGHLIGHTS
IN HISTORY

Today is Sunday, Sept. 4, the
247th day of 2011. There are
118 days left in the year.
On this date:
In 1781, Los Angeles was
founded by Spanish settlers.
In 1888, George Eastman
received a patent for his roll-
film box camera, and registered
his trademark: "Kodak."
In 1917, the American
Expeditionary Forces in France
suffered their first fatalities in
World War I when a German
plane attacked a British-run
hospital.

Lake City Reporter
Serving Columbia County
Since 1874
The Lake City Reporter is pub-
lished with pride for residents of
Columbia and surrounding counties by
Community Newspapers Inc.
We believe strong newspapers build
strong communities -"Newspapers
get things done!"
Our primary goal is to
publish distinguished and profitable
community-oriented newspapers.
This mission will be accomplished
through the teamwork of professionals
dedicated to truth, integrity and hard
work.
Todd Wilson, publisher
Robert Bridges, editor
Sue Brannon, controller
Dink NeSmith, president
Tom Wood, chairman

LETTERS
POLICY
Letters to the Editor should be
typed or neatly written and double
spaced. Letters should not exceed
400 words and will be edited for
length and libel. Letters must be
signed and include the writer's name,
address and telephone number for
verification. Writers can have two
letters per month published. Letters
and guest columns ate the opinion of
the writers and not necessarily that of
the Lake City Reporter.


BY MAIL: Letters, P.O. Box 1709,
Lake City, FL 32056; or drop off at
180 E. Duval St. downtown.
BY FAX: (386) 752-9400.
BY E-MAIL:
news@lakecityreporter.com


www.lakecityreporter.com


Labor leaders to Obama:


Stop killing jobs


As 9.1 percent unem-
ployment 'plagues
America this Labor
Day, major unions
are clashing with a
Democratic administration with
which they normally would
march lock step. Echoing the
U.S. Chamber of Commerce,
at least seven unions are beg-
ging the Obama administration
to abandon regulations, state-
ments, and procedures that
prevent jobs from being created
or saved.
Several labor unions decry
tEhvhroiTfoiie ntal-Pbtectioi n -
Agency's existing and prospec-
tive rules, mainly designed to
reduce coal emissions. These
stalwarts of the liberal Left
resemble capitalists who now
call the EPA the Employment
Prevention Agency.
The International Brotherhood
of Electrical Workers' Texas unit
wrote the EPA June 16 on behalf
of its 23,000 members. IBEW
executive Jonathan Gardner
warned that EPA red tape
"directly would jeopardize the
jobs of approximately 1,500 IBEW
members working at six different
power plants across the state of
Texas." Gardner argued, "The
shutdown of coal-fired units with-
out any meaningful benefit to the
environment is not justified..."
This catastrophe unfolds well
beyond the Lone Star State.
The 76,000-member United
Mine Workers estimates that
EPA-fueled power-plant closures
directly could kill 54,151 jobs and
indirectly destroy 197,140 others
in America's coal, utility, and rail-
road industries.
In an August 1 letter to Senator
Lisa Murkowski, R-Alaska,


Deroy Murdock
deroyr.murdock(@gmai.comr
Federal Energy Regulatory
Commission chairman Jon .
Wellinghoff and commissioners
John Norris and Cheryl LaFleur
wrote that FERC examined "how
coal-fired generating units could
be impacted (sic) by EPA rules."
FERC explained that this, "infor-
mal, preliminary assessment
showed 40 GW of coal-fired gen-
erating capacity 'likely' to retire,
with another 41 GW very likely'
to retire..."
If the EPA unplugs 81 giga-
watts, it would dim America's
electrical capacity 8.1 percent,
from 995 GW to 914. American
Electric Power, Duke Energy, and
the Southern Company among
other utilities declared that
these rules would force them to
close coal-fired generating sta-
tions. Padlocked power plants and
scarcer electricity would debilitate
America's feeble economy and
further imperil workers union-
ized and otherwise.
R Thomas Buffenbarger,
president of the 720,000-mem-
ber International Association
of Machinists, penned a June
29 letter with Peter J. Bunce,
CEO of the General Aviation
Manufacturers Association. This
labor-management duo pleaded
with President Obama to stop
slamming corporate jets.
"We are perplexed over recent


comments and actions question-
ing the value of corporate aircraft
use and proposing tax changes
that negatively would impact the
entire general aviation industry,"
Buffenbarger and Bunce wrote.
"During the severe economic
downturn in 2008, ill-informed
criticism of corporate jets and
business aviation exacerbated the
challenges facing our industry,
which led to depressed new air-
craft sales and jeopardized very
good, high-paying jobs through-
out the United States. More
than 20,000 highly skilled IAM
members were laid off in this
industry."
The Obama Administration
has not opposed the Keystone
XL oil pipeline, which would
transport petroleum from
Canada's oil sands to Texas'
refineries. Instead, it has studied ,
this project into paralysis. The
State Department'favors it, while
the EPA frowns "a process
that has gone on for more than
two years," the presidents of
the Plumbing and Pipefitters,
Operating Engineers, Laborers
International, and Teamsters
unions (with 2.6 million members
among all four) complained last
October. Eleven months onward,
Washington still contemplates
Keystone.
While 14 million Americans
wish they were workers, some in
Big Labor now cry "Uncle!" at Big
Government thanks to Obama's
job-killing machine.

* Commentator Deroy Murdock
is a columnist with the Scripps
Howard News Service and a
media fellow with the Hoover
Institution on War, Revolution and
Peace at Stanford University.


Bin Laden died a failure, and knew it


O sama bin Laden
should have been
killed or captured in
the months imme-
diately after 9/11
when he was fleeing from his
Afghan mountain hideout into
Pakistan, where he eventually
found refuge in a Pakistani garri-
son town, holed up in a prison of
his own making.
But in a sense it was a good
thing that he lived as long as he
did.
In his final days, bin Laden
vainly urged his dwindling and
demoralized band of al-Qaida fol-
lowers to launch another dramat-
ic attack against America. The
response was a telling silence


LETTERS


that must have bitterly frustrated
the old man as he strode around
the perpetual shadows of his
darkened headquarters.
His organization was in chaos,
most of its leaders dead and their
replacements assassinated, coldly
and mechanically, as soon as they
emerged. Also dead, as bin Laden
surely knew soon after he was
forced into hiding, was his dream
of restoring a mythical Islamic
caliphate stretching from Spain to
Indonesia.
When the Arab Spring came
and hundreds of thousands
of young Muslims took to the
streets to overthrow tyrants like
Egypt's Mubarak accomplish-
ing in weeks what al Qaida had


TO THE


failed to do in 20 years of trying -
bin Laden and al-Qaida were not
even afterthoughts.
There will be other terrorists
and other attacks because there
are always violence-prone young
men and women willing to follow
a charismatic leader. We fight
them all the time, most often suc-
cessfully.
And surely none of them
reflect that bin Laden died in the
company of only two followers,
his courier and sole contact with
the world beyond his walls, and
the courier's brother, all that
remained of the vast Islamic
army he planned to lead.

* Scripps Howard News Service


EDITOR


Show your pride in the U.S.


To the Editor:
Show your support to our
first responders and the men


and women of the armed forces
and those that served.
Fly our flag high fly it high
on the 10th anniversary of 9/11.


We will never forget.
Martin Rivero
Lake City


4A


Todd Wilson
twilson@/okecityreportercom


Believe in

Bellamy

Beaver

Many of you spent
the weekend
close to home
enjoying one of
our many great
rivers and streams, taking a
float trip or a boat ride or just
lounging in the presence of our
bountiful natural resources in
Columbia County.
Others may be visiting our
region of Natural Florida and
we welcome you and appreci-
ate you taking the time" to
slow down and recharge your
batteries in our neck of the
woods.
After such a weekend, the
need to preserve and promote
the rivers and springs in our
area gains top-of-mind aware-
ness for several days. Then
what happens after memories
of the relaxation fade and life
returns to normal?
Sometimes we take the
springs and rivers for granted.
There's forward motion by
The Ichetucknee Partnership
(TIP) to bring continued
awareness to the springs and
river through direct market-
ing to the next generation, our
children. TIP has had a mascot
for several years, Bellamy
Beaver, but an effort now is in
place to bring Bellamy to life
in mascot form.
Bellamy is a lovable beaver
who enjoys the springs and riv-
ers in North Florida. He wears.
a straw hat and shades, flip-
flops and green swim shorts.
With a yellow tube around his
waist, he's ready for a float
trip.
The Bellamy costume will be
worn at community functions,
in awareness programs at the
schools and around town dur-
ing festivals and events as a
visual embodiment of show-
ing the importance of pristine
springs and rivers. Bellamy is
cute and he's cool. The charac-.
ter will connect with children
of all ages in a Smokey Bear
kind of way.
High-end mascot costumes,
especially custom creations,
do not come cheap. I'll admit
at first glance several months
ago, I was unsure this was a
wise investment. But, after see-
ing publicly funded budgets
continually slashed, watchdog
and water awareness organiza-
tions are in the mix and feel
the pinch. Some have down-
sized or disappeared.
The Bellamy concept has
quickly become one of our
best, and most affordable,
options for long-term springs
awareness and visibility. The
beaver costume will be a con-
stant reminder of our wonder-
ful natural resources. If it is
well-maintained, it will last for
many years.
TIP supporters are raising
funds to purchase the Bellamy
costume. Government and
business organizations have
ponied up cash for the effort.
Many civic groups have been
approached and last week TIP
launched a campaign to raise
the final funds needed to bring .
Bellamy to life. The group still
needs $2,500 for the costume
and any donation is appreciated.
For more information on
how to donate toward the
project, contact Joel Foreman
at (386) 752-8420 or John
Wheeler at (386) 752-8660.
Both men are heavily involved
with the TIP organization and
are available to discuss the
Bellamy Beaver project in
more detail.

* Todd Wilson is publisher of the
Lake City Reporter.










Page EdItor: Robert Bridges, 754-0428 LAKE CITY REPORTER NEWS SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 4, 2011


Theology a hot issue in 2012 race


By RACHEL ZOLL
AP Religion Writer

Rick Perry dived right
in.The Texas governor, now
a Republican presidential
candidate, held a prayer
rally for tens of thousands,
read from the Bible, invoked
Christ and broadcast the
whole event on the Web.
There was no symbolic
nod to other American
faiths. No rabbi or Roman
Catholic priest was among
the evangelical speak-
ers. It was a rare, full-on
embrace of one religious
tradition in the glare of a
presidential contest.
Looks like another rau-
cous season for religion
and politics.
It used to be simpler.
Protestants were the


majority, and candidates
could show their piety
just by attending church.
Now, politicians are
navigating a landscape
in which rifts over faith
and policy have become
chasms. An outlook
that appeals to one
group enrages another.
Campaigns are desperate
to find language generic
enough for a broad con-
stituency that also con-
veys an unshakable faith.
There is no avoiding
the minefield, especially
with early primaries in
Iowa and South Carolina,
where evangelical voters
are so influential.
Nationally, more than
70 percent of Republicans
and more than half of
Democrats say it's some-


what or very important date have very strong reli-
that a presidential candi- gious beliefs.


ARREST: Police checkpoint

Continued From Page 1A


24 warnings, 22 faulty
equipment notices and
arrested one person on
an active warrant. Two
commercial motor vehicle
inspections were also per-
formed.
Law enforcement
agencies taking part in
the operation included:
The Florida Highway
Patrol, Columbia County
Sheriff's Office, Lake City
Police Department and
the Florida Department
of Transportation Motor


Carrier Compliance.
"The checkpoint went
very well," Powell said. "We
had lots of traffic through
here, we checked a lot of
drivers and we made con-
tact with a lot of people."
The purpose of the
checkpoint was to deter
vehicles from being oper-
ated with defective equip-
ment, deter drivers from
operating vehicles without
a license, proper insurance
or proper registration and
deter impaired driving.


OBITUARIES


Wannie Mae Brannan
Mrs. Wannie Mae Brannan,
87, passed away September 3,
2011 peacefully at the Good
Samaritan Center Dowling Park,
Florida. Wannie was born on
December 17, 1923 to Arthur
and Sarah Bennett Evans. She
is preceded in death by her
husband Clyde Brannan.
Wannie graduated from Suwan-
nee High School She worked
as an Avon Representative ,
Annie's Beauty Shop and retired
as a telephone operator from
Alltel telephone company. She
enjoyed working in her yard,
and most of all being with her
family and grandchildren.
She is survived by her three
daughters Judy Lamb, Bran-
ford, FL.; Jeanette Scarborough
(Jerry), Live Oak, FL.; and
Clydie Wheeler, Lake City,
FL.; three sisters Louise Smith,
Elizabeth Corbin, both of Live
Oak, FL.; and Christine Miller
(Clarence), Thornville, OH.; one
brother in law Billy Brannan,
(Ernestine), Live Oak, FL.; two
sister in laws Evelyn Langston,
Thompson, GA.; and Elizabeth
Evans Live Oak, FL.; numerous
grandchildren, great grandchil-
dren and nieces and nephews
also survive.
Funeral Services will be con-
ducted Tuesday September 6,


2011 at the Community Presby-
terian church in Live Oak, FL.;
at 11:00 A.M. Interment will
follow in Live Oak City Cem-
etery. In lieu of flowers family
ask donations be made to the
Advent Christian Village Center
Dowling Park, FL.: or Com-
munity Presbyterian Church in
Live Oak, Fla.
Dees Parrish Family Funeral
Home in charge of all arrange-
ments.

Lucille Bishop "Mema"
Greene
Mrs. Lucille Bishop "Mema"
Greene, 92, died Friday Septem-
ber 2, 2011 at her residence after
an extended illness. She was the
daughter of the late John W. and
Nellie Herb Bishop. Moving to
Lake City in 1932 from Well-
born, FL.; she was nurse at The
Malcolm Randall VA Medical
Center for the twenty plus years,
and she had been a resident of
the Lake City Health Center un-
til recently. Mrs. Greene was a
member of the Church Of Jesus
Christ Latter Day Saints, Deep
Creek Ward and was preceded
in death by her husband John F.
Greene, two daughters Muriel
Disbrow in 2008 and Johnlyn
Greene in 1953.
She is survived by four daugh-


ters Nona Norris, Melrose,
FL.; Linda Thomas, Lake City,
FL.; Carol Batey (Bill Baker),
Worthington, Springs, FL.; and
Donna Hughes (Steve), Hollis-
ter, FL.; one son Jimmy Greene
(Susan) Lake City, FL.; one son-
in-law Kenneth Disbrow, Lake
City, FL.; numerous grand-
children, great and great-great
grandchildren also survive.
Funeral Services will be
conducted Tuesday, Septem-
ber 6, 2011 at 11:00 A.M. at
the Church of Jesus Christ of
Latter Day Saints, (located on
Old Country Club Road) with
Bishop John Luthie, presid-
ing. Interment will follow in
Memorial Cemetery, in Lake
City. Visitation with the family


will be held Monday September
5, 2011 from 6 until 8P.M. at
Dees-Parrish Family Funeral
Rome. In lieu of flowers the
family request memorial dona-
tions be made to Haven Hospice
of the Suwannee Valley 6037
US Hwy 90 West, Lake City, FL
32055. Arrangements are under
direction of the Dees-Parrish
Family Funeral Home in charge
of all arrangements 458 South
Marion Avenue Lake City, FL.
32025. (386) 752-1234. please
sign guess book on line at www.
Obituaries are paid advertise-
.ments. For details, call the Lake
City Reporter's classified depart-
ment at 752-1293.


FGC: Diamond Rio coming
Continued From Page 3A


careers in country music.
Diamond Rio has
released seven studio
albums, two greatest hits
collections and "A Diamond
Rio Christmas: The Star
Still Shines," a 2007 holiday
album that marked their
debut with Nashville-based
Word Records. The band
has earned three platinum
albums and won the Country
Music Association's Vocal
Group of the Year award
four times as well as netting
two Academy of Country
Music Awards in the top
Vocal Group of the Year
category. When they
debuted in 1991 with the
hit "Meet in the Middle,"
Diamond Rio became the
first group in the history
of country music to have
a debut single reach No.
1. They continued to place
32 more singles on the
Billboard chart, including
"How Your Love Makes Me
Feel," "Norma Jean Riley,"
"Beautiful Mess" and "Love
a Little Stronger."
Tickets are now on
sale for the September 24


Dr. Dorothy
Walbey
Medicine and
Surgery of the
FootandAnkle


concert $25 for general
admission and $15 for FGC
students, staff and faculty.
Season ticket holders are
guaranteed VIP seating for
the Diamond Rio concert,
and season tickets are still
available $135 for gen-
eral admission and $60 for
FGC students, staff and
faculty.
More information can
be found at www.fgcenter-
tainment.com or by calling
the box office at (386) 754-
4340.

GE'E ,. ---.,p -
CONNL[TED

* NuWm
* WEATHER
* OPINION r
* BPORTV
* AianCIVE
* cL.AaUsFiDe
* COMMUNpITY
* ENITRTAINMErr
C 0 N P#Jif-r n-pN
iJ----


Family Medical Center
1226 SW Main Blvd
Lake City, Florida 32056
(904) 982-8841 OFFICE
(904) 766-7414 FAX


Ankle Sprains
Arthritis
Bunions
Blisters
Cullulitis
Circulation Problens
Corn/Callouses
Diabetic Foot Disordem-,
Diseases ofthe Skin .'
Flat Feet
Foot or Ankle Injuries
Foot Orthoses/Shoes
Fungal Nais
Hammertoes


Gout
Ganglon Cysts
Heel Pain
Heel Spurs


. nsa.wn....


RE


Waste Pro of Florida is offering the business

owners throughout Columbia County the

opportunity to participate in our Single

Stream Recycling Program. This program

allows you to mix ALL your recyclables into

one dumpster- there is no need to separate

the recyclables into different containers and

t drive them to the drop-off center! Recycling

is so important to our community: it helps

conserve landfill space, conserve our natu-

ral resources, and reduce our dependence on

foreign oil.

Did you know it is estimated that 60% of the

current waste stream is recyclable? Join your

neighboring counties in Florida by helping to

make a difference in our communities.



'Please contact Waste Pro with your questions,
or with your desire to participate in our single
stream recycling program. 386-758-7800
r


SeA-,


I
t


You don't have to live with foot pain, call for an
appointment today. ACCEPTING NEW PATIENTS


Most major health Insurance accepted


AST PB4r.i


LAKE CITY REPORTER NEWS SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 4, 2011


Page Editor: Robert Bridges, 754-0428












6A LAKE CITY REPORTER WEATHER SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 4, 2011


THE WEATHER



STORMS ) STORMS CHANCE CHANCE I ISOLATED
STORMS STORMS OWNERS



I I 73 881.0 90LO1 laf 90L0O A 8HI


^ yIR A ;;t-,ii~ia~~7 "***.'-- '~a -, ;'i!*' -''; *' ''*^ ^ i i iH H f


Pensacola
87/80


S88/73

Tallahassee Lake Cit
86/74 8 7/73
SGaines
Panana City 87/7
83/77 :


Tan
89/


TEMPERATURES
High Saturday
Low Saturday
Normal high
Normal low
Record high
Record low

PRECIPITATION
Saturday
Month total '
Year total
Normal month-to-date
Normal year-to-date


92
66
89
70
97 in 1912
61 in 1972


0.00"
0.00"
26.68"
0.56"
37.32"


City
*Jacksonville Cape Canaveral
o 88/76 Daytona Beach
Ft. Lauderdale
ville Daytona Beach Fort Myers
73 89/76 Gainesville
Ocala Jacksonville
88/73 Key West
Oriando Cape Canaveral Lake Cy
89/76 86/77 Lake City
lia Naples
'6 West Palm Beach Ocala
87/79 0 Orlando
Ft Lauderdale Panama City
Ft. Myers 89/78 Pensacola
89/76 Naples Tallahassee
87/77 Miami Tampa
t 88/79 Valdosta
Ky W0t* W. Palm Beach
90/80


SUN
Sunrise today
Sunset today
Sunrise tom.
Sunset tom.


7:09 a.m.
7:50 p.m.
7:09 a.m.
7:49 p.m.


MOON
Moonrise today 2:17 p.m.
Moonset today
Moonrise tom. 3:13 p.m.
Moonset tom. 12:45 a.m.



Sept. Sept. Sept. Sept.
4 12 20 27
First Full Last New


2

60 miuteso lmbn
Today's
ultra-violet
radiation risk
for the area on
a scale from 0
to 10+.


Monday
89/79/t
92/78/t
92/80/t
91/76/t
89/77/t
91/80/t
89/80/t
88/74/t
90/83/t
91/79/t
89/75/t
92/79/t
88/79/t
91/78/t
91/77/t
91/76/t
91/76/t
88/82/t


Tuesday
89/77/t
92/76/t
91/80/t
93/77/t
92/73/t
91/78/t
89/80/t
90/71/t
89/82/t
91/80/t
91/72/t
95/78/t
87/77/t
87/71/t
89/77/t
93/77/t
90/77/t
90/81/t


An exclusive
service
brought to
our readers
by
The Weather
Channel.


mamaassmse


YESTERDAY'S NAlTIONAL EXTREMES


Saturday Today


CITY HI/Lo/Pcp.
Albany NY 78/64/0
Albuquerque 85/66/0
Anchorage 52/47/0
Atlanta 94/74/0
Baltimore 76/67/.14
Billings 62/44/0
Birmingham 95/73/0
Bismarck 67/51/0
Bolse 70/48/0
Boston 84/60/0
Buffalo 87/75/0
Charleston SC 86/72/0
Charleston WV 95/70/0
Charlotte 86/66/0
Cheyenne 60/47/0
Chicago 89/73/0
Cincinnati 97/69/0
Cleveland 93/73/0
Columbia SC 91/73/0
Dallas 96/78/0
Daytona Beach 86/72/0
Denver 66/51/0


-Vis Forecasts, data and
d o graphics 0 201. Weather
S V Central, LP, Madison, Wls.
vojt.L .j'.. wwww.weatherpubllaher.com


I


CITY
Acapulco
Amsterdam
Athens
SAuckland
BelIng
Berln
Buenos Aires
Cairo
Geneva
Havana

SHong Kong
Kingston


- a u r a -o s - - - - - - - - - -- - - -u 'J u


HI/Lo/Pcp.
81/75/0
81/57/0
na/na/na
57/50/0
82/68/0
82/32/0
75/57/0
95/75/0
79/59/0
90/75/0
64/52/0
90/79/0
86/77/0


HI/Lo/W
88/70/t
79/58/c
55/46/r
85/70/t
89/71/pc
77/51/s
83/70/t
66/46/s
86/51/s
79/67/t
81/69/t
87/73/t
89/65/t
89/69/pc
69/46/s
74/56/pc
85/61/t
82/62/t
89/72/t
92/62/pc
89/76/t
76/56/pc


Toaay
HI/Lo/W
84/77/t
68/55/sht
90/75/s
59/46/pc
83/66/s
82/64/pc
57/40/sh
94/74/s
79/57/t
86/75/c
63/50/pc
90/82/t
84/75/t


CITY
Des Moines
Detroit
El Paso
Fairbanks
Greensboro
Hartford
Honolulu
Houston
Indianapolis
Jackson MS
Jacksonville
Kansas City
Las Vegas
Uttle Rock
Los Angeles
Memphis
Miami
Minneapolis
Mobile
New Orleans
New York
Oklahoma City


CITY
La Paz
Lima
London
Madrid
Mexico City
Montreal
Moscow
Nairobi
Nassau
New Delhi
Oslo
Panama
Paris


Page Editor: Robert Bridges, 754-0428





A ,,.; !'UL, A.' ".L'X




















an Orlando Warm Front
568976
lon.Stationary
Miami Front

Front


'Aca.mww.ew.s aswainssusmamS


High: 1040, Smyrna, Tenn. Low: 230, Stanley, Idaho


Saturday Today


HI/Lo/Pcp.
76/72/.23
93/73/0
94/72/0
51/42/0
85/68/0
84/63/0
82/77/0
94/77/0
98/72/0
82/74/.02
90/66/0
89/72/0
94/77/0
90/73/0
64/59/0
94/75/0
89/77/0
81/68/0
76/74/1.55
84/75/4.89
83/66/0
95/72/0


Saturuay
HI/Lo/Pcp.
57/23/0
64/57/0
73/59/0
73/59/0
72/61/0
84/70/0
63/50/0
82/55/0
88/77/0
91/77/0
57/50/0
88/75/0
86/61/0


HI/Lo/W
71/47/s
78/58/t
87/66/t
62/41/c
90/69/c
85/66/t
89/72/s
96/72/w
80/58/t
83/73/t
88/76/t
74/49/s
104/83/pc
85/63/t
73/63/s
82/63/t
88/79/t
67/48/pc
88/78/t
86/77/t
86/70/t
81/55/pc


HI/Lo/W
62/32/s
63/58/pc
66/54/sh
82/59/s
73/59/t
79/64/t
64/45/pc
79/63/pc
91/78/pc
89/79/t
61/55/sh
86/73/t
75/55/t


CITY
Omaha
Orlando
Philadelphia
Phoenix
Pittsburgh
Portland ME
Portland OR
Raleigh
Rapid City
Reno
Richmond
Sacramento
St. Louis
Salt Lake City
San Antonio
San Diego
San Francisco
Seattle
Spokane
Tampa
Tucson
Washington


CITY
Rio
Rome
St. Thomas VI
San Juan PR
Santiago
Seoul
Singapore
Sydney
Tel Aviv
Tokyo
Toronto
Vienna
Warsaw


Saturday Today
HI/Ld/Pcp. HI/Lo/W
75/72/.11 71/49/s
89/70/0 89/76/t
81/67/0 88/70/pc,
101/85/0 112/89/pc ,
93/72/0 86/66/t:
76/57/0 75/65/t
72/51/0 91/58/s
85/69/0 89/69/pc
65/53/0 69/46/s
74/50/0 92/57/pc
83/66/0 89/68/pc
,75/59/0 95/59/s
99/78/0 78/56/sh
76/51/0 84/65/s
98/78/0 101/72/pc
69/64/0 73/66/s
63/54/0 70/53/s
69/53/0 78/54/s
62/47/0 86/48/s
89/74/0 89/76/t
93/78/0 105/78/pc
80/70/0 90/71/pc


Hl/Lo/Pcp.
73/63/0
90/72/0
87/79/0
89/79/0
59/43/0
88/68/0
86/77/0
68/50/0
88/73/0
88/75/0
86/73/0
82/57/0
68/46/0


HI/Lo/W
75762/s
91/70/t
85/80/t
87/77/t
57/34/s
83/66/s
88/78/t
72/56/s
89/74/s
81/75/t
76/59/t
86/66/c
73/54/pc


KEY TO CONDITIONS: c-cloudy, dr-dnazle, f-fair, fg-fog, h-hazy, i-ice, pc-partly cloudy, r-rain, s-sunny,
sh-showers, sn-snow, ts-thunderstorms. w-windy.


Pay off your home in 5 years!

SFr you have 30% or more equity in your home...
I : you want to avoid high closing costs...


L.)


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(Please call for other rates & terms)


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(Loans of $200,000 or less)


CAMPUS


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Membership is open to everyone in Alachua, Clay, Columbia, Lake, Marion and Sumter countiesP2
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LTV of 70%), and first mortgage position required. Owner-occupied property only. Offer excludes mobile homes; certain other restrictions apply, Property insurance is required; appraisal fee, flood and/or title insurance may be
required at an additional expense to the borrower. Example: a $100,000 loan at 2.99% for 60 months would require 59 monthly payments of $1,796.69 and a final payment of $S1,01 38, total finance charge of $7.967.94; for a
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Lae it 13 W ascm ori r.Gvile-E.Cmps120*W5t ve. Camps 190 SW*4th SiJoesv i 0 WA4t erae HntrsWlk51 W 3dS. oe qur 75 W70
S and *at RomH-1*pi. ils om ons920 W 3thAv Ocala 397 SW Cl.ege R. Es aaa244E Sle Srnsald W s arin115S 93dCutR.Sum efe't 9O S~ y,


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Lake City Reporter


Story ideas?

Contact
Tim Kirby
Sports Editor
754-0421
"" ,i ( a ',_'T : ,' rr ,t,= ',:,, a r


SPORTS


Sunday, September 4, 201 I


www.lakecityreporter.com


Section B


BRIEFS


CHS FOOTBALL
Q-back Club will
meet Tuesday
The Columbia County
Quarterback Club will
meet this week at 7 p.m.
Tuesday in the Jones
Fieldhouse.
For details, call club
president Blake Lunde at
867-0296.
PORT WHITE FOOTBALL
No Q-back Club
meeting Monday
The Fort White
Quarterback Club is not
meeting this week.
For details, call
club president Shayne
Morgan at 397-4954.
LADY INDIANS SOCCER
Conditioning
begins Tuesday
Fort White High's girls
soccer will begin
conditioning after
school on Tuesday at
the football stadium.
Conditioning will
continue on Mondays,
Tuesday and Thursdays
through Oct 10.
For details, call coach
Perry Sauls at 984-6578.
YOUTH BASEBALL
Fort White fall
registration set
Fort White Youth
Baseball has fall
registration from
4-7 p.m. Wednesday
and 10 a.m. to 2 p.m.
Saturday at the South
Columbia Sports Park
concession stand.
For details, call Milissa
Blakley at 3654133.
* From staff reports

GAMES

Tuesday
Columbia High girls
golf vs. Buchholz High at
Haile Plantation, 4 p.m.
Columbia High boys
golf vs. Buchholz High,
Santa Fe High at The
Country Club at Lake
City, 4 p.m.
Columbia High
swimming at Suwannee
High with Maclay School,
5 p.m.
S Columbia High
volleyball at Baker County
High, 6:30 p.m. (JV-5)
Wednesday
Fort White High
volleyball vs. Suwannee
High, 6 p.m. (JV-5)
Thursday
Columbia High boys
golf vs. Oak Hall School
at Haile Plantation,
1 p.m.
Columbia High girls
golf vs. Santa Fe High at
The Country Club at Lake
City, 4 p.m.
Columbia High
volleyball vs. Suwannee
High, 6 p.m. (JV-5)
Fort White High
volleyball at Williston
High, 6 p.m. (JV-5)
Columbia High JV
football vs. Baker County
High, 7 p.m.
Fort White High
JV football at Newberry
High, 7 p.m.
Friday
Columbia High
volleyball vs. Oak Hall
School, 5:30 p.m. (JV-4)
Columbia High
football vs. Gainesville
High, 7:30 p.m.
Fort White High
football vs. Newberry
High, 7:30 p.m.
Saturday
Columbia High
swimmingatSt.Augustine
High with Fletcher High,
9 a.m.


Manuel leads 'Noles


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Florida State's EJ Manuel throws a pass
against Louisiana-Monroe in the Seminoles'
34-0 win in Tallahassee on Saturday.


Great


Muschamp era
starts with 41-3
victory over FAU.
By MARK LONG
Associated Press
GAINESVILLE John
Brantley looked comfort-
able in Florida's revamped
offense, Chris Rainey scored
three different ways and the
22nd-ranked Gators opened
the Will Muschamp era by
beating Florida Atlantic 41-3
Saturday night
Brantley completed 21
of 30 passes for 229 yards
and a touchdown, show-
ing marked improvement
in Charlie Weis' pro-style
offense. He threw two
interceptions, but the first
was tipped at the line of
scrimmage.
Rainey touched the ball
18 times, scoring on a
14-yard reception and a
14-yard run. He also
scooped a blocked punt and
sprinted 22 yards for a score
that made it 31-3 early in the
third quarter.
Muschamp, admittedly'
anxious before his Florida
debut, enjoyed a relatively
stress-free night
Although the Gators
ruled defensive tackle
Sharrif Floyd ineligible
before the game, the only
other negative on this night
was an injury to versatile
Trey Burton.
Jeff Demps ran 12 times
for 105 yards and two scores
as Florida's offense racked
up 468 yards. It was a con-
siderably better showing
than Florida's last opener,
GATORS continued on 4B


FSU quarterback
throws for 252 yards,
two TDs in 34-0 win.
By BRENT KALLESTAD
Associated Press
TALLAHASSEE EJ
Manuel's family came all the
way from Virginia to see him
play his first game as Florida
State's undisputed No. 1 quar-
terback.
He made it worth the trip.
Manuel threw for 252 yards
and two touchdowns and back-
up quarterback Clint Trickett
threw a touchdown pass on his
first college play as No. 6 Florida
State beat Louisiana-Monroe
34-0 Saturday in the season-
opener for both teams.
"The first few drives I had


some jitters," admitted Manuel,
who completed 22 of 34
passes despite missing a hand-
ful of open receivers during the
course of the game.
Manuel said earlier in the
week that he knew he'd be ner-
vous with his parents, grand-
mother and the family dog all
coming from his Virginia home
for the season opener.
"It will be definitely be some-
thing I work on this week," he
said about calming down before
next week's visit by Charleston
Southern.
Although Florida State coach
Jimbo Fisher was sympathetic
with his quarterback's butter-
flies, he was upset about Manuel
being intercepted in the ULM
end zone in the first half when
he threw into double coverage.
"He just thought he could


juice it in there," Fisher said.
"He's got to learn from that"
ULM coach Todd Berry, how-
ever, was impressed with the
Seminoles.
"When you're an elite team,
you have to show that you're an
elite team early in the season,"
Berry said. "That's really signifi-
cant to the way that your team
performs the rest of the way out'
And they certainly came out and
played a very clean game."
ULM got to Florida State's
28 its deepest penetration in
the game in the opening min-
ute of the fourth quarter before
quarterback Kolton Browning
was dropped for a loss on a
fourth-and-1. The Warhawks
managed to reach Seminole
territory just once in the first
FSU continued on 2B


beginnings


ABOVE: University of Florida
quarterback John Brantley
(12) embraces Jeff Demps
(28) after Demps scored a
touchdown in the Gators'
41-3 win over Florida Atlantic
at Ben Hill Griffin Stadium in
Gainesville on Saturday.


LEFT: Florida quarterback
John Brantley (12) hands off
to running back Chris Rainey
(1) against Florida Atlantic
on Saturday,


Photos by
JASON MATTHEW WALKER/
Lake City Reporter


JEN CHASTEEN/Special to the Reporter
Columbia High's Austin Reiter (52) brings down a Brooks County High runner during the
Tigers' opening 12-0 loss Friday.


Tigers look to


bounce back


from defeat


Columbia falls in
opening game,
12-0, to Trojans.
By BRANDON FINLEY
bflnley@lakecityreporter.com
It wasn't pIretly. It didn't
look good. When Columbia
High looks back on the
2011 season, it will look
at the 12-0 loss to Brooks
County High (Ga.) in one of
two ways this will be the
game that fueled the Tigers


for a great season or it will'
set the tone for an abysmal
football season.
There were positives.,
Columbia's defense has'
played well in two weeks,
only giving up 25 points in,
two games. It's the Tigers'
offense that has to play:
catch up.
Through two weeks,
Columbia has yet to sus-,
tain a long drive for a
touchdown. All three of the
CHS continued on 4B


IWoS-loa













LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 4, 2011


TELEVISION

TV sports

Today
AUTO RACING
II a.m.
ESPN2 NHRA, qualifying for U.S.
Nationals, at Indianapolis
Noon
VERSUS IRL, Indy Lights, at
Baltimore
2 p.m.
VERSUS IRL, IndyCar, Baltimore
Grand Prix
5 p.m.
ESPN2 NHRA, qualifying for U.S.
Nationals, at Indianapolis (same-day tape)
7:30 p.m.
ESPN NASCAR, Sprint Cup.
AdvoCare 500, at Hampton, Ga.
COLLEGE FOOTBALL
Noon
ESPN NCAA, FCS. Prairie View
A&M vs. Bethune-Cookman, at Orlando
3:30 p.m.
ESPN Marshall at WefstVirginia
7:30 p.m.
FSN -SMU at Texas A&M
GOLF
7 a.m.
TGC European PGATour, European
Masters, final round, at Crans sur Sierre,
Switzerland
I p.m.
TGC PGA Tour, Deutsche Bank
Championship, third round, at Norton,
Mass.
3 p.m.
NBC PGA Tour, Deutsche Bank
Championship, third round, at Norton,
Mass.
7 p.m.
TGC Nationwide Tour, Mylan
Classic, final round, at Canonsburg, Pa.
(same-day tape)
MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL
1:30 p.m.
TBS -Texas at Boston
2:10 p.m.
WGN Pittsburgh at Chicago Cubs
8 p.m.
ESPN2 Chicago White Sox at
Detroit


MOTORSPORTS
8 a.m.
SPEED MotoGP
Championship, at Misano, Italy


World


2 p.m.
SPEED FIM World Superbike, at
Nuerburg, Germany (same-day tape)
10 p.m.
SPEED -AMA Pro Racing, at Millville,
N.J. (same-day tape)
PREP FOOTBALL
2 p.m.
ESPN2 Archbishop Wood (Pa.')
vs. Pittsburgh Central Catholic, at
Monroeville. Pa.
TENNIS
II a.m.
CBS U.S. Open, men's third and
women's fourth round, at New York

Monday
AUTO RACING
Noon
ESPN2 NHRA, U.S. Nationals, at
Indianapolis (same-day tape)
COLLEGE FOOTBALL
8 p.m.
ESPN Miami at Maryland
GOLF
Noon
TGC PGA Tour, Deutsche Bank
Championship, final round, at Norton,
Mass.
2 p.m.
NBC PGA Tour, Deutsche Bank
Championship, final round, at Norton,
Mass.
MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL
I p.m.
MLB Regional coverage, Baltimore
at N.Y.Yankees or Texas at Tampa Bay
2:10 p.m.
WGN Cincinnati at Chicago Cubs
7 p.m.
MLB Regional coverage, Atlanta at
Philadelphia or N.Y. Mets at Florida
PREP FOOTBALL
Noon
ESPN Camden County (Ga.) vs.
Cleveland Glenville (Ohio), at Columbus.
Ohio
2 p.m.
FSN Skyline (Texas) vs. Cocoa, at
Arlington,Texas
4 p.m.
ESPN Dwyer at Glades Central
5 p.m.
FSN Frederick A. Douglass
(Oklahoma) vs. DeSoto (Texas), at
Arlington,Texas
TENNIS
II a.m.
CBS U.S. Open, fourth round, at
NewYork
7 p.m.
ESPN2 U.S. Open, fourth round,
at New York


BASEBALL

AL standings


New York
Boston
Tampa Bay
Toronto
Baltimore


Detroit
Cleveland
Chicago
Minnesota
Kansas Cit


Texas


Lo
Oa
Se:


East Division
W L
84 53
84 54
75 63
69 70
55 82
Central Division
W L
77 62
69 67
68 68
58 79
:y 58 82
West Division
W L
79 61


Pct GB
.613 -
.609 A
.543 9A
.496 16
.401 29


Pct
.564


s Angeles 74 64 .536
ikland 63 76 .453
battle 58 80 .420
Friday's Games
Detroit 8, Chicago White Sox I
N.Y.Yankees 3,Toronto 2
Baltimore 3,Tampa Bay 2
Texas 10, Boston 0
Cleveland 5, Kansas City 4
Minnesota 13, L.A.Angels 5
Oakland 9, Seattle 2
Saturday's Games
N.Y.Yankees 6,Toronto 4
Oakland 3, Seattle 0
Detroit 9, Chicago White Sox 8


GB

4
15'A
20


Boston 12,Texas 7
Tampa Bay 6, Baltimore 3
Kansas City 5, Cleveland I
Minnesota at L.A.Angels (n)
Today's Games
Toronto (Cecil 4-7) at N.Y. Yankees
(Sabathia 18-7), 1:05 p.m.
Texas (M.Harrison 10-9) at Boston
(Lackey 12-10), 1:35 p.m.
Baltimore (Guthrie 6-16) atTampa Bay
(Hellickson I 1-10), 1:40 p.m.
Cleveland (J.Gomez 1-2) at Kansas
City (Francis 5-14), 2:10 p.m.
Minnesota (Slowey 0-3) at L.A.Angels
(Pineiro 5-6), 3:35 p.m.
Seattle (Beavan 3-4) at Oakland (Cahill
9-13), 4:05 p.m.
Chicago White Sox (Buehrle 11-6) at
Detroit (Scherzer 13-8), 8:05 p.m.
Monday's Games
Baltimore at N.Y.Yankees, 1:05 p.m.
Detroit at Cleveland, 1:05 p.m.
Boston atToronto, 1:07 p.m.
Texas atTampa Bay, 1:10 p.m.
ChicagoWhite Sox at Minnesota (DH),
2:10 p.m., 8:10 p.m.
Kansas City at Oakland, 4:05 p.m.
Seattle at L.A.Angels, 9:05 p.m.

NL standings

East Division


W L
Philadelphia 88 46
Atlanta 81 57
New York 67 70
Washington 64 73
Florida 60 77
Central Division
.W L
Milwaukee 83 57
St. Louis 74 65
Cincinnati 68 71
Pittsburgh 64 75
Chicago 59 80
Houston 47 92
West Division
W L
Arizona 78 60


Pct GB
.657 -
.587 9
.489 22'A
.467 25'A
.438 29'

Pct GB
.593 -
.532 8'h
.489 14'h
.460 18'I
-.424 23'A
.338 35'h

Pct GB
.565 -


San Francisco 73 65 .529 5
Los Angeles 68 70 .493 10
Colorado 65 73 .471 13
San Diego 60 78 .435 18
Friday's Games
Pittsburgh 3, Chicago Cubs I
N.Y. Mets 7,Washington 3
Philadelphia 5, Florida 3
LA. Dodgers 8,Atlanta 6
Milwaukee 8, Houston 2
Cincinnati I I, St. Louis 8
Colorado 3, San Diego 0
San Francisco 6,Arizona 2
Saturday's Games
Pittsburgh 7, Chicago Cubs 5
St. Louis 6, Cincinnati 4
Milwaukee 8, Houston 2
Washington 8, N.Y. Mets 7
LA. Dodgers 2.Atlanta 1,10 innings
Philadelphia at Florida (n)
Colorado at San Diego (n)
Arizona at San Francisco (r)
Today's Games
Philadelphia (Halladay 16-5) at Florida
(Ani.Sanchez 7-7). 1:10 p.m.
LA. Dodgers (Kershaw 17-5) at
Atlanta (Delgado 0-1), 1:35 p.m.
N.Y. Mets (Pelfrey 7-11) atWashlngton
(LHernandez 8-12), 1:35 pmm.
Milwaukee (Marcum 11-5) at Houston
(WRodriguez 10-9), 2:05 p.m.
Cincinnati (Arroyo 8-11) at St. Louis
(EJackson 4-2), 2:15 ISp.m.
Pittsburgh (Morton 9-8) at Chicago
Cubs (R.Wells 6-4), 2:20 p.m.
Arizona (D.Hudson 14-9) at San
Francisco (Vogelsong 10-5), 4:05 pur.m.
Colorado (A.Cook 3-8) at San Diego
(Latos 6-13),4:05 p.m.
Monday's Games
LA Dodgers at Washington. 10I5 p.m.
louston at Pittsburgh, 1:35 p.m.
Cincinnati at Chicago Cubs, 2:20 p.m.
Arizona at Colorado, 3:10 p.m.
San Francisco at San Diego, 4:05 p.m.
Milwaukee at St. Louis, 4:15 p.m.
Atlanta at Philadelphia, 7:05 p.m.
N.Y. Mets at Florida, 7:10 p.m.


FOOTBALL

Top 25 schedule

Today
No. 8 Texas A&M vs. SMU, 7:30 p.m.
No. 24 West Virginia vs. Marshall,
3:30 p.m.

NFL preseason final

AMERICAN CONFERENCE


Miami
New England
N.Y. Jets
Buffalo


Houston
Tennessee
Indianapolis
Jacksonville


Baltimore
Pittsburgh
Cincinnati
Cleveland


Denver
San Diego
Kansas City
Oakland


East
W L TPct PF PA
3 1 0.750 78 53
2 2 0.500105 78
2 2 0.500 74 54
1 3 0.250 54 82
South
W L TPct PF PA
3 I 0.750 77 65
3 1 0.750 76 42
I 3 0.250 51 86
1 3 0.250 76 119
North
W L TPct PF PA
3 I 0.750 92 64
3 I 0.750 98 63
I 3 0.250 47 91
I 3 0.250 83 95
West
W L TPct PF PA
2 2 0.500 77 80
2 2 0.500.88 82
0 4 0.000 42 90
0 4 0.000 44 101


NATIONAL CONFERENCE


Philadelphia
Washington
Dallas
N.Y. Giants


New Orleans
Tampa Bay
Carolina
Atlanta


Detroit
Green Bay
Chicago
Minnesota


St. Louis
Arizona
San Francisco
Seattle


East
W L
3 I
3 I
2 2
2 2
South
W L
2 2
2 2
1 3
0 4
North
W L
4 0
3 1
2 2
2 2
West
W L
4 0
2 2
2 2
2 2


TPct PF
0.500 87
0.500 80
6.250 .60
0.000 59

T Pct PF
01.000114
0.750 89
0.500 60
0.500 68

T Pct PF
01.00088
0.500 101
0.500 47
0.500 71


BASKETBALL

WNBA schedule

Saturday's Games
Seattle 70, San Antonio 60
Los Angeles at Phoenix (n)
Today's Games
Tulsa at Atlanta, 3 p.m.
Minnesota at NewYork, 4 p.m.
Connecticut at Washington, 4 p.m.
Indiana at Chicago, 6 p.m.

AUTO RACING

Race week

INDYCAR
BALTIMORE GRAND PRIX
Schedule:Today, race, 2:45 p.m. (Versus,
2-5 p.m.).
Track: Streets of Baltimore (street
course, 2.0 miles).
Race distance: 150 miles, 75 laps.
NHRA FULL THROTTLE
U.S. NATIONALS
Site: Clermont, Ind.
Schedule: Today, qualifying (ESPN2,
I I a.m.-2 p.m., ESPN2, 5-7 p.m.); Monday,
final eliminations (ESPN2, noon-6 p.m.).
Track: Lucas Oil Raceway.

AdvoCare 500 qualifying

At Atlanta Motor Speedway
Hampton, Ga.
Saturday qualifying; race today
(Car number in parentheses)
I. (4) Kasey Kahne,Toyota, 186.196.
2. (33) Clint Bowyer, Chevrolet,
185.922.
3.(18) Kyle Busch,Toyota, 185.841.
4. (83) Brian Vickers,Toyota, 185.772.
5. (24) Jeff Gordon, Chevrolet.
185.735.
6. (17) Matt Kenseth, Ford, 185.71.
7. (99) Carl Edwards, Ford, 185.561.
8. (56) Martin Truex Jr., Toyota,
185.542.
9. (39) Ryan Newman, Chevrolet,
185.486.
10. (22) Kurt Busch, Dodge, 185.325.
II. (43) A J Allmendinger, Ford,
185.288.
12. (42) Juan Pablo Montoya, Chevrolet,
185.177.
13. (II11) Denny Hamlin, Toyota,.
185.127.
14. (2) Brad Keselowski, Dodge,
185.115.
15. (16) Greg Biffle, Ford, 185.059.
16. (00) David Reutimann, Toyota,
184.8.
17. (48) Jimmie Johnson, Chevrolet.
184.462.
18. (9) Marcos Ambrose, Ford.
184.272.
19.(6) David Ragan. Ford. 184.015.
20. (14) Tony Stewart. Chevrolet.
183.899.
21. (29) Kevin Harvick. Chevrolet,
183.801.
22. (27) Paul Menard. Chevrolet.
183.68.
23. (47) Bobby Labonte. Toyota.
183.394.
24. (20) Joey Logano.Toyota. 183.382.
25. (I) Jamle McMurray, Chevrolet,
183.339.
26. (78) Regan Smith, Chevrolet,
183.152.
27. (31) Jeff Burton, Chevrolet,
183.121.
28. (66) Michael McDowell, Toyota.
183.025.
29. (88) Dale Earnhardt Jr., Chevrolet,
182.898. ?
30. (46) Scott Speed, Ford, 182.856.
31. (38) J.J.Yeley, Ford, 182.5.
32. (5) Mark Martin, Chevrolet,
182.44.
33. (7) Robby Gordon, Dodge,
181.759:
34. (87) Joe Nemechek, Toyota,
181.693.
35. (36) Dave Blaney, Chevrolet,
181.437.
36. (34) David GIlliland. Ford, 180.745.
37. (51) Landon Cassill, Chevrolet.
180.575.
38. (13) Casey Mears,Toyota, 180.2s2.
39. (60) Mike SkinnerToyota, 180.012.
40. (32) Mike Bliss, Ford, 179.889.
41. (55) Travis Kvapll, Ford, 179.872.
42. (71) Andy Lally, Ford, Owner
Points.
43. (95) David Starr, Ford, 179.737.
Failed to Qualify
44. (37) Tony Ralnes, Ford, 179.592.
45. (30) David Stremme, Chevrolet.
179.516.
46. (35) Geoffrey Bodine, Chevrolet.
178.758.
47. (50)T.J. Bell, Chevrolet. 178.643.

TENNIS

U.S. Open singles

Saturday
Third Round
Men
Janko Tipsarevic (20), Serbia, def.
Tomas Berdych (9), Czech Republic, 6-4,
5-0, retired.
Juan Carlos Ferrero, Spain, def. Marcel
Granollers (31), Spain, 6- I, 3-4, retired.
Roger Federer (3), Switzerland, def.
Marin Cillc (27), Croatia, 6-3, 4-6, 6-4,
6-2.
Alexandr Dolgopolov (22), Ukrairfne,
def. Ivo Karlovic, Croatia, 6-7 (4), 6-2,
6-4, 6-4.
Mardy Fish (8), United States, def.
Kevin Anderson, South Africa, 6-4, 7-6
(4), 7-6 (3).
Juan Monaco, Argentina, def. Tommy
Haas, Germany, 6-7 (3), 6-3,6-2, 6-3.
Women
Caria Suarez Navarro, Spain, def. Silvia
Soler-Esplnosa, Spain, 6-0,6-4.
Caroline Wozniackl (I), Denmark, def.
Vanla King, United States, 6-2, 6-4.
Francesca Schlavone (7), Italy, def.


Chanelle Scheepers, South Africa. 5-7,
7-6 (5), 6-3.
Anastasia Pavlyuchenkova (17), Russia,
def.Jelena Jankovic (I I), Serbia, 6-4, 6-4.
Andrea Petkovic (10), Germany, def.
Roberta Vinci (18), Italy, 6-4, 6-0.
Serena Williams (28), United States,
def. Victoria Azarenka (4), Belarus, 6-1,
7-6 (5).
Late Friday
Second round
Andy Roddick (21), United States, def.
Jack Sock, United States, 6-3, 6-3, 6-4.


CHS swimmers ready



to dive into season


By TIM KIRBY
tkirby@lakecityreporter.com

Columbia High's swim
team has stockpiled nine
seniors, and they will have
their hands full in a tough
district
Columbia's 13-team
District 2-2A includes
Chiles, Leon and Lincoln-
high schools from
Tallahassee.
Chiles was district
champion for both girls
and boys last year. The
Timberwolves' girls also
won region and the boys
placed second. Leon's girls
placed third and the boys
placed fifth in district, while
Lincoln was fourth in both
girls and boys.
Jacksonville schools
Stanton Prep (second in
girls and third in boys) and
Paxon School (second in
boys) also are back in the
district.
Columbia placed fifth in
the girls district competi-
tion and sixth in the boys.
The Lady Tigers return
state qualifiers Lindsay Lee
and Heather Burns., One
sister, Lauren Lee, is a
team captain and another
sister, Hannah Burns, joins
the team as a freshman.
"I am expecting Lauren
and Lindsay to do well at
district and return to
region," CHS head coach
Mary Kay Mathis said. "I
am hoping both make it to
state in individual and on a
relay team. Heather will do
well again. I expect her to
go to state. Hannah unof-
ficially broke the IM record
at the Purple and Gold
meet. She is our strongest
and fastest well-rounded
swimmer. We will see her
going to state."
Mathis is counting on co-


Reporter file photo
Columbia High returning swimmers Lindsay Lee (left) and
Heather Burns qualified for the state meet in 2010.


captain Cheyenne Brown,
Kayla Williams, Micheala
Polhamus, Syndey Morse,
Aleena Fields and Sara
Woodfield to contribute
points during the season.
"The other girls showed
great improvement at dis-
trict and I hope we will see
them shine enough to get
to region," Mathis said.
Rounding out the Lady
Tigers are Meghan Collins,
Kaicie Chasteen, Joana
Mata, Stephanie Silva,
Nichole Bapista, Courtney
Britt and Brianna Pope.
Senior captain David
Morse leads the boys. He
missed state by an eyelash
last year. Justin Tompkins
is co-captain and Jackson
Nettles and Joseph Piccioni
should lead in the sprint
races.
Marlon Polintan, Joshua
O'Connell, Jacob Finley,
Cale Shaw, Cody Smith,
Andrew Fortier and Randall
Soltis complete the boys
roster.


"Our hopes are to get
David to state and break
a school record in his last
year," Mathis said. "Many
of my guys are so close to
getting to region, but they
will have to step up to the
block and give it all they
have."
Mathis said the Lady
Tigers have a lot of depth,
which is missing from the
boys' roster.
"We have some very tal-
ented swimmers, but they
have to be ready to com-
pete," Mathis said. "We are
part-time swimmers that
compete against others that
swim year-round. We can
hold our own and we do a
great job at the big meets.
We have several new swim-
mers and we'll have to see
how they do."
The 2011 Tigers will get
their first taste of compe-
tition at 5 p.m. Tuesday
at Suwannee High. Maclay
School will make it a three-
team meet.


FSU: Reid returns in freshman form

Continued From Page 1B


half reaching the 44 before
having to punt
"Field position played a
huge factor and to their
credit they changed field
position," Berry said.
Florida State's Greg Reid
was the main culprit in
keeping his team in good
field position.


ACROSS

1 Resolution
5 Express grief
8 Bamlr
11 Theater award
12 Seafood choice
14 I, to Fritz
15 Large poison-
ous snake (2
wds.)
17 MII. rank
18 "Hamlet" prop
19 Prestige
21 Calf-length
23 1939 LugosI
role
24 Wild West
show
27 Make
meringues
29 Roswell crash-
er
30 Disappoints (2
wds.)
34 Wash-and-wear
(hyph.)
37 "Ball -"


Reid, who led the
nation in punt returns as a
freshman in 2009, picked
up 71 yards on four punt
returns.
"I'm the kind of guy that's
always looking to score,".
he said.
Florida State led 17-0 at
halftime and built its advan-


38 Astrologers of
old
39 New York area
41 Resinous
deposits
43 Yves' girlfriend
45 Round Table
knight
47 Nutty
50 APB datum
51 Moon viewer
54 Maui wreath
55 Pious assent
56 Adornment
57 Kind of critic
58 W. Hemisphere
alliance
59 Pouches

DOWN

1 Food steamer
2 Long-legged
wader
3 Kind of sau-
sage
4 Bean or pea
5 Chew out
6 Planet, in verse


tage to 27-0 before Manuel
gave way to Trickett.
Manuel connected with
Bert Reed on a 9-yard TD
pass to get the Seminoles
on the scoreboard in the
opening .quarter and hit
Greg Dent in full stride on
a 50-yard scoring play just
before tha half.


Answer to Previous Puzzle
TREE ROLLE

CHOLLA AUNT I.E
POTION INSIST
LUSH ADD SAS
UNLEASH
AL AYN AIMS
BEINGS MURALS
CAVEAT ACETIC
DEAN PRE AMI
ROG UISH
SPA IBM IL KS



EIG H TS BANANA
REHEAT ARGUED
FRAME CEDE


7 Disallows
8 Tonto's Scout,
e.g.
9 Happen
10 on first?


Want more puzzles?
Check out the "Just Right Crossword Puzzles" books
at QulllDrlverBooks.com


13 Hand-dyes
with wax
16 Muse of histo-
ry
20 Like prime
steak
22 Spain and
Portugal
24 Regret deeply
25 All - sud-
den
26 John -
Passos
28 Had brunch
30 Not keep up
31 Gloating cry
32 Ashen
33 Turn down
35 Swimming-
pool loc.
36 Bungalow
39 Dumpsters
40 Shows sur-
prise
41 L.A. cager
42 Expect
44 Behaviors
45 Fundraiser,
often
46 Jules Verne
captain
48 Mrs. Charles
49 Tale of adven-
ture
52 Grassy field
53 Printer's mea-
sures 4


9-5 2011 UFS, Dist. by Univ. Uclick for UFS


SCOREBOARD


Page Editor: Tim Kirby, 754-0421











LAKE CITY REPORTER FOOTBALL SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 4, 2011


Tigers escape


Aggies' upset


By JOHN ZENOR
Associated Press

AUBURN, Ala. This
resembled last season's
Auburn team for about
three minutes. Before that,
the defending national
champions could barely
keep up with a supposedly
overmatched Utah State.
Mike Dyer bulled through
the line for a game-saving
touchdown with 30 seconds
left and the 23rd-ranked
Tigers scored twice in the
final 2:07 to escape with an
opening 42-38 win over the
Aggies on Saturday.
Coach Gene Chizik's blunt
assessment: "Offensively
and defensively we're a
long way off of being able
to win very many games
right now."


The Tigers still pulled off
their fourth comeback from
a double-digit deficit in the
last 13 games.
."As they've done so
many times since I've been
here, they found a way to
come back and win," Chizik
said. "That's kind of been
instilled in this group that
you never look at the clock
and the scoreboard until it
says zero-zero-zero."
First-time starting quar-
terback Barrett Trotter hit
Philip Lutzenkirchen for
a 15-yard touchdown to
start the comeback. Emory
Blake collected the onside
kick to set up the game-win-
ning drive. Trotter complet-
ed three passes and Onterio
McCalebb had runs of 10
and 14 yards to push the
ball near the goal line.


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Utah State quarterback Chuckie Keeton (16) runs for a
three-yard touchdown as Auburn linebacker Daren Bates (25)
pursues during the first half in Auburn on Saturday.


ASSOCIATED PRESS,
Alabama coach Nick Saban (right) leads the Crimson Tide
onto the field for a college football game against Kent State in
Tuscaloosa, Ala., on Saturday.


Tide rolls Kent


State in opener


By JAY REEVES
Associated Press

TUSCALOOSA -
Alabama put some smiles
back on the faces of the
people of Tuscaloosa and
gave a city rebuilding from
a devastating tornado a rea-
son to cheer. Often.
AJ McCarron stepped
up in Alabama's quarter-
back race Saturday, throw-
ing for a touchdown and
226 yards as the Crimson
Tide beat Kent State
48-7 in its first game since
the twister that destroyed
thousands of homes and
killed '50 people within a
few miles of campus four
months ago.
Trent Richardson, who
scored three touchdowns
rushing, said the team has
a reason to win aside from
the usual reasons.
"It was a tragic disaster
for us, and we were trying
to overcome it and bring joy
back to the town," he said.
Vying with Phillip Sims
to replace Greg McElroy,


McCarron had a 24-yard
scoring toss to Marquis
Maze and finished 14-of-23
passing.
McCarron was hardly
perfect, throwing two inter-
ceptions. Sims also threw
two interceptions one
that set up Kent State's
score and finished 7 of
14 for 73 yards.
Coach Nick Saban didn't
name either quarterback
his permanent starter after-
ward, and he said some
of the four picks were for-
givable because of tipped
balls.
"AJ, having a little more
poise, having played a little
bit more, probably played
with a little more poise today,
but we have a lot of confi-
dence in Phillip and in most
cases he plays extremely
well," said Saban, who
graduated from Kent State
and worked there as an
assistant coach. "I think
he learned a lot out there
today and I think he will
be a very good player for '
us here."


Bulls strike Irish


Associated Press

SOUTH BEND, Ind. -
Kayvon Webster returned a
fumble 96 yards for an early
touchdown as South Florida
came to Notre Dame for
the first time and stunned
the 16th-ranked Irish
23-20 Saturday in a game
disrupted for hours because
of storms.
The victory gave Skip
Holtz an emotional victo-
ry in his return to Notre
Dame, where he went to
school and his dad Lou led
the Irish to their last nation-
al title in 1988.
Webster's long return
for a score four minutes
into the game took all the
momentum from the Irish
and they couldn't recover. It
came after Notre Dame had
taken the opening kickoff
and drove to the USF 1.
What followed was a
nightmare first half that
included two fumbles, a
costly holding penalty that
nullified a Cierre Wood TD
run and then an intercep-
tion of Dayne Cristby USF's
Devekeyan Lattimore in the
end zone that turned the
Irish away.
Maikon Bonani kicked
three field goals and the
Bulls had a 16-0 halftime
lead.
Then things got even
stranger.
With lightning flashing
near the stadium at half-
time, officials asked fans
to evacuate Notre Dame
Stadium and kept the teams
in their locker rooms.
And they stayed there for
2 hours, 10 minutes
The game was delayed
a second time by severe
weather with 4:21 to go
and after a 43-minute delay,
Jerrell Young's intercep-
tion was Notre Dame's fifth
turnover of the game.

No. 7 Stanford 57,
San Jose State 3
STANFORD, Calif.
- Andrew Luck threw
two touchdowns and ran


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Notre Dame wide receiver Michael Floyd (3) is tackled by South Florida safety Jerrell Young
during the first half of the game in South Bend, Ind., on Saturday.


for another score to lead
Stanford.
The Heisman Trophy
runner-up completed 17 of
26 passes for 171 yards.
Stepfan Taylor ran for 61
yards and two touchdowns
and Chris Owusu caught
seven passes for 76 yards
for the Cardinal.

No. 10 Nebraska 40,
Chattanooga 7
LINCOLN, Neb.--Taylor
Martinez ran for 135 yards
and three touchdowns out
of Nebraska's -neNw no-hud-
dle offense.
Rex Burkhead added 75
yards and a touchdown as
the Cornhuskers won their
26th consecutive opener,
the longest streak in the
nation.
Martinez scored on runs
of 7, 43 and 47 yards and
completed 11 of 22 passes
for 116 yards.

No. 18 Ohio State 42,
Akron 0
COLUMBUS, Ohio -
Starting his first game at


quarterback for Ohio State,
Joe Bauserman ran for a
touchdown and threw three
TD passes to tight end Jake
Stoneburner to lead the
Buckeyes.
Luke Fickell made his
head-coaching debut for the
Buckeyes, elevated from
defensive assistant to take
the place of Jim Tressel.
Stoneburner became the
first Ohio State tight end to
catch three TD passes in a
game.
Bauserman, starting for
the first time since he was
a senior in high school in
Strasburg, Va., eight years
ago, ran for a 15-yard
score and threw TD passes
of 28, 11 and 2 yards to
Stoneburner.

No. 21 Missouri 17,
Miami, Ohio 6
COLUMBIA, Mo. -
James Franklin ran for one
touchdown and passed for
the clinching score in his
first career start, helping
Missouri open with a vic-
tory over stubborn Miami
of the MAC.


E.J. Gaines had an end
zone interception for the
Tigers.
Three of the first four
possessions ended quickly
with punts for an offense
that averaged 30 points last
season.

No. 25 USC 19,
Minnesota 17
LOS ANGELES -
Robert Woods caught a
school-record 17 passes for
177 yards and three touch-
downs, and USC hung on to
spoil Jerry Kill's coaching
debut for Minnesota.
Matt Barkley completed a
school-record 34 passes for
304 yards for the Trojans,
who still couldn't score in
the second half of their 14th
consecutive season-opening
victory.
Freshman quarterback
Max Shortell came off
the Gophers' bench in the
fourth quarter and threw a
12-yard TD pass to Brandon
Green with 8:03 to play, but
Torin Harris intercepted
his pass.near midfield with
53 seconds to play.


Boise State brings

it to Georgia, 35-21


Associated Press

ATLANTA Kellen
Moore and those BCS
Busters from Boise State
are off and running again.
Moore threw for three
touchdowns giving
him 102 in his career
- and the No. 5 Broncos
romped past the 19th-
ranked Bulldogs 35-21
Saturday night.
Moore, the nation's top-

College scores
Saturday
EAST
Bucknell 27, Duquesne 26
CCSU 35, S.Connecticut 21
Colgate 37,Albany (NY) 34, OT
Dayton 19, Robert Morris 13
Georgetown 40, Davidson 16
Lehigh 49, Monmouth (NJ) 24
Maine 28, Bryant 13
Marist 20, Sacred Heart 7
Navy 40, Delaware 17
Northwestern 24, Boston Coll. 17
Penn St.41, Indiana St.7
Pittsburgh 35, Buffalo 16
UConn 35, Fordham 3
Wagner 38, St. Francis (Pa.) 28
SOUTH
Alabama 48, Kent St. 7
Alabama St. 41. MVSU 9
Albany St. (Ga.) 37, Savannah St. 34
Auburn 42, Utah St. 38
BYU 14. Mississippi 13
Clemson 43,Troy 19
Coastal Carolina 30, Furman 23
Delaware St. 24,VMI 21 *
Florida A&M 28, Fort Valley
St. 22
Florida St. 34, Louisiana.
Monroe 0
Gardner-Webb 34, Brevard 17
Georgia Southern 31, Samford 17
Hampton 21,Alabama A&M 20
Jackson St. 42, Concordia-Selma 2
NC A&T.38,Va. Lynchburg 7
NC State 43, Liberty 21
Norfolk St. 37,Virginia St. 3
No. Carolina 42.James Madison 10


rated passer last season,
carved up Georgia's 3-4
defense after a sluggish
start. He completed 28 of
34 for 261 yards, with his
first scoring pass a 17-
yarder to freshman Matt
Miller giving him 100
for his brilliant career.
In other late SEC
action, LSU beat visiting
Oregon, 40-27, and host
South Carolina beat East
Carolina, 56-37.

Old Dominion 41, Campbell .14
The Citadel 31, Jacksonville 9
Tulane 47, SE Louisiana 33
UCF 62, Charleston Southern 0
Virginia 40,William & Mary 3
Virginia Tech 66,Appalachian St. 13
Wofford 35, Presbyterian 28
MIDWEST
Ball St. 27, Indiana 20
Butler 31, Albion 17
Illinois 33,Arkansas St. 15
Iowa 34,Tennessee Tech 7
Michigan 34,W. Michigan 10
Missouri 17, Miami (Ohio) 6
N. Dakota St. 42, Lafayette 6
Nebraska 40, Chattanooga 7
Ohio St. 42,Akron 0
Purdue 27, Middle Tennessee 24
S. Illinois 38, SE Missouri 10
South Florida 23, Notre Dame
20
SOUTHWEST
Houston 38, UCLA 34
Langston 19,Ark.-Pine Bluff 12
UTSA 31, Northeastern St. 3
FAR WEST
Air Force 37, South Dakota 20
Colorado St. 14, New Mexico 10
Lindenwood 22, N. Colorado 20
Portland St. 52, S. Oregon 0
Sacramento St. 29, Oregon St. 28,
OT
Southern Cal 19, Minnesota 17
Stanford 57, San Jose St. 3
Washington St. 64, Idaho St. 21
Friday
Michigan St. 28,Youngstown St. 6
Baylor 50.TCU 48


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THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME
by David L. Hoyl and Jell Knurok


Unscramble these four Jumbles,
one letter to each square,
to form four ordinary words.
IGUNYO I


KELWYE AYHA--
S- Now arrange the circled letters
to form the surprise answer, as
suggested by thie above cartoon.
A:
(Answers toinoi iw)
Saturday's Jumbles: CLAMP CLOAK MUFFLE AI WAY
Answer: What strolling in Hollywood can be toi
movie star A WALK OF FAME


Page Editor: Tim Kirby, 754-0420









LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 4, 2011


Photos by JEN CHASTEEN/Special to the Reporter


ABOVE: Columbia High quarterback Nigel Atkinson (12) steps up trying to locate a receiver
during the game against Brooks County High (Ga.) on Friday.
BELOW: Ronald Timmons (23) looks for running room against Brooks County High on Friday.


/


October is National Breast
Cancer Awareness Month.


SIn the Lake City Reporter we'd like to i
,I" ./ a moment to salute the strength and courage
breast cancer survivors'and to-remember tl
whose brave battle has end

Publishes Sunday, October 2, 2011

Sample Ad Actual Size

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For more information call Mary at (386) 754-5440 |
Or stop by the Lake Oty.Reporter at 180 L Duvdl Street, Lake Oty, Florida 32055

DEADLINE: WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 26, 2011
Lake City Repo .t ,I


CHS
From Page 1B


Tigers' touchdowns in the
kickoff classic came from
more than 30 yards. Two
touchdowns came from
Columbia's side of the field.
Columbia coach Brian
Allen didn't give the Tigers
a long lecture after Friday's
loss. It was obvious that it
hurt There was more than
one player with tears in
his eyes. The Tigers didn't.
sweat all summer to lose.
But Allen also saw posi-
tives. The Tigers offense
failed to get a first down
in the second half, but
the defense kept clawing.
Trey Marshall stood out.
Marshall produced turn-
overs for the Columbia
defense on three consecu-
tive drives in the fourth
quarter. Austin Reiter had a
sack when the Trojans took
over in Columbia territory
that resulted in a fumble for
a loss of 30 yards. It kept
the Tigers within a touch-
down at the time.
The difference will be
seen next week. Where will
it lead the 2011 Tigers? Allen
hopes it's motivation. It just
depends on how the Tigers
respond. Allen believes in
his football team, and he
told them so after the game
with few words.
"Do what you must do for
the next 24 hours, then for-
get about it," he said. "Keep
giving me the effort and I
promise you it will pay off."


GATORS
From Page 1B
which set the tone for a
disappointing 2010 season.
Little went wrong against
the Owls.
The Gators scored on
their first four possessions
and led 24-0 before Florida
Atlantic even got a first
down.
Florida's defense domi-
nated the Owls, control-
ling the line of scrimmage
and forcing four consecu-
tive three-and-outs to start
the game. FAU finished
with 137 yards, a rough
start for coach Howard
Schnellenberger's retire-
ment tour.
Schnellenberger, 77,
watched the game from an
upstairs coaching box fol-
lowing a hospital trip Friday.
when he experienced severe
discomfort in his surgically
repaired hip.


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Page Editor: Brandon Finley, 754-0420


1. .'









Lake City Reporter


Story ideas?

Robert Bridges
Editor
754-0428
K- ,q ., ') , . ,,


BUSINESS


Sunday, September 4, 201 I


. www.Iakecityreporter.com


Section C


Memories of the grocery trade


George Hudson's G & H Food Stores
were a welcome sight here for 50 years.


By ANTONIA ROBINSON
arobinson@lakecityreporter.com

Having just a seventh grade
education didn't stop
George Hudson of Lake
City from reaching his
dreams of owning several
grocery stores.
Hudson, who turns 99 Friday, was born
in the foothills of the Virginia mountains
"where we shot first and asked questions
later," he said.
His start in the grocery industry began
at the age of 16 when he started working
at the A&P Tea Company in Virginia.
To get hired, a person had to past a
test of adding up three rows of figures,
Hudson said.
"I was the only one to pass it," he said.
"It had a lot of figures to add together."
The job paid $12 a week and Hudson
eventually became one of the youngest
store managers in the Southern division.
In 1938 he was made supervisor over 18
stores.
Hudson's time in the industry was
interrupted in 1941 when he was
called into military service with the
Air Force.
"Uncle Sam came and got me," he said.
Eventually Hudson was able to work
his way up to running the commissary.
After leaving the military Hudson to
his old job at A&P but soon gave the busi-
ness 30 days' notice.
"I decided I had enough of working for
someone else and wanted to go into busi-
ness for myself," he said.
With $100 in his pocket, Hudson
opened his first stord,in May 19-16 in a
rented building at the intersection of
Railroad and Alachua streets.


The G & H Food Store was the
first in Lake City to operate as a cash
and carry instead of a credit and
delivery store, he said. The business
expanded to include a barbershop
and laundry mat and one location
was located on U.S. 90 West where
Dollar General and Subway now sit.
Hudson and his wife, Marian, have
been married 65 years.
"She's the sweetest wife ever," he
said.
*When the two first met, she wouldn't
even speak to him, Hudson said. He
eventually persuaded his future wife to
talk to and give him her number.
While on the way to pick her up to
get married, an officer stopped Hudson
for speeding.
"He said, 'Hey young fella, where are
you going?'" Hudson said. "I said I'm
going to get married."
The officer didn't write Hudson a ticket
and the two were married Oct. 15, 1946
Marian Hudson worked as a nurse
while he ran the grocery stores.
In May 1996, after a half-century,
Hudson retired from the grocery industry
and sold off eight stores.
Hudson enjoyed working with his
customers while in the grocery store
industry.
"I treated everybody the same," he
said.
Her husband trained all of their chil-
dren to work in the store while they
were growing up, said Marian Hudson
his wife.
Despite since long retiring from the
business, Hudson still drcam-s about
working in the store.
"He wishes he was still there," she
said.


ANTONIA ROBINSONILa-e iry PeK..rer
George Hudson Sr., center, appears with his wife, Marian, left and son, George Hudson Jr. by
a sign from one of his G&H Stores. With $100 in his pocket, Hudson opened his first store in-'
May 1946 in a rented building at the intersection of Railroad and Alachua streets. -


Every cancer path is unique.


Just like every cancer
LniKU,,.-.FB-,,.


patient is unique.


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HOWARD CONFERENCE CENTER a FLORIDA GATEWAY COLLEGE


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LAKE CITY REPORTER BUSINESS SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 4, 2011


Doing the Splits
Q What does "split-adjusted"
mean? N.H., Santa Maria,
Calif.
Alt reflects a stock price that
has been changed to account
for stock splits that have occurred
over time,
Consider Coca-Cola. It
went public in 1919 at $40 per
share and has split its stock 10'
times since then. Its stock price
has recently been trading for
around $67 per share. So have
the shares appreciated by only
$25 since 1919? Far from it.
Remember the effects of splitting.
With each split, you end up with
more shares, worth proportionately
less. (A 2-for-i split, for example,
gives you twice as many shares,
each worth half as much.)
Thanks to splits, one 1919
$40 share of Coca-Cola has now
become 4,608 shares. If the stock
had never split, each share would
be worth around $300,000, and
few people could afford to buy
even one! (That price reflects
dividends that were paid regularly
over the years.)
You'll see the term "split-
adjusted" when reviewing histori-
cal stock prices. For example, in
August 1970, Coke's stock price
was roughly $0.49, adjusted for
splits and dividends. The price
was actually around $72 per share
then, but to compare it with today's
price, you need to adjust the
price for splits that occurred ,
between then and now. That N
way, you can tell at a glance
that Coke's shares haven't fallen
from $72 to $67 since 1970,
but instead have iisen from the
equivalent of roughly $0.49 to $65
- a 130-fold increase.

- What's business "shrinkage"?
- T.R., Hickory, N.C.
Alt's the routine loss of
inventory, such as through
accidental breakage or theft.
Shoplifting, for example, shrinks
many retailers' profits sig-
nificantly, and retailers make
allowances for shrinkage in their
plans and reports.
Got a question for the Fool? Send it in
- see Write to Us


Inventory ABCs
A glance at a company's inventory
levels can help you assess it as a
possible investment.
Inventory refers to everything in a
company's pipeline. There are three
main categories of inventory: raw
materials, work in progress and fin-
ished goods. Imagine Home Surgery
Kits Inc. (ticker: OUCHH). Mak-
ing its products involves ordering,
receiving, storing and using materials,
which are assembled into finished
products. Inventory is likely to
include half-assembled kits, finished
boxes waiting to be shipped, and
products returned from retailers.
Having too little inventory will
hold up production when shortages
occur. Having too much will gener-
ate high storage costs and tie up
money that could be used elsewhere.
Finished goods sitting on shelves a
long time also risk not being sold.
Many American companies have
adopted "just-in-time" inventory
systems, pioneered by Ford and
then the Japanese. These systems
have firms holding precisely the


minimum necessary inventory,
replenishing supplies continually, as
needed. This can increase efficiency
and profitability, but can be prob-
lematic if demand spikes.
When evaluating inventory on a
firm's balance sheet, compare it with
year-ago levels and with revenue
growth. If inventory is rising faster
than revenue, it could signal a sales
slowdown. If inventory growth lags
sales, either the company is not
meeting demand or it's successfully
tightening controls on production
processes and distribution .
To get a sense of how quickly prod-
ucts are moving, calculate the "inven-
tory turnover." From the company's
income statement, find the last year's
"cost of goods sold." Divide that by
the average value of inventory (from
the balance sheet) between the begin-
ning and end of the year. (Or, call the
company's investor relations depart-
ment and ask for the number, or look
it up online at sites such as http://
moneycentral.msn.com.)
High and growing turnover num-
bers reflect well-managed compa-
nies freeing up funds for other uses.
Compare a company's results with
those of its competitors.
o t)


4 Name That Company
Based in Kansas, I trace my roots
back to the 1920s, when my found-
ers were developing technologies
p for the oil industry. Today I'm one of
CK the two largest private companies in
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in oil, chemicals, fertilizer, commodities
and other industrial areas. I bought Georgia-
Pacific in 2005, and my offerings now include
its Quilted Northern, Angel Soft, Brawny,
Sparkle, Soft 'n Gentle, Mardi Gras, Vanity Fair
and Dixie brands. The brothers who run me have
contributed heavily to conservative causes and the


r


-Sold Google Early
My dumbest mistake was to
sell my Google shares. I had only
about six and they were priced
way below $100. I instead bought
shares of a Canadian search-engine
company, due to its low price. Now
I am kicking myself for the stupid
move, as Google went way up and
the other company tanked. Lesson
learned. O.L., online
The Fool Responds: You may
have made the common mistake of
thinking that a $100 stock is more
"expensive" than, say, a $50 stock.
Never evaluate a stock price just
on its own. You need to compare it
to earnings, or revenue, or t .
some other numbers, to get
some meaning out of it.
That Google price,
for instance, has proven to have
been cheap, as shares trade above
$500 now. You might look for a
low price-to-eamings (P/E) ratio,
or better still, a low P/E paired
with strong revenue and earnings
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GM's Plan for World
Domination
Things have been changing in a
big way at General Motors (NYSE:
GM). CEO Dan Akerson and his
team have been paying attention to
how Ford hhs turned itself around,
and that's a good thing.
GM is aiming to reduce its number
of models sold around the world
and build them on the smallest
possible number of "platforms,"
industry-speak for a set of common
dimensions and parts that can be
shared among different models to
lower costs and streamline produc-
tion. Mary Barra, GM's new product
chief, expects that by 2018, the
company will be building 90 percent
of its vehicles on just 14 global plat-
forms, down from today's 30 or so.
That should result in better, more
competitive products, which can be
sold at higher prices with fewer of
those margin-killing "cash back"
incentive campaigns. And that means
strong sales and greater margins. Add
in strict cost controls, and the result is
solid, sustainable profits.
The trick will be in the execution.
It's one thing for GM managers to
lay out a sensible plan and another
to get GM's cumbersome bureau-
cracy to play along. It'll take some
time before we know how well
this revamp is going to work out in
practice, and continued skepticism
may well be warranted. (The Mot-
ley Fool owns shares of Ford, and
its newsletter services have recom-
mended General Motors and Ford.)


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Founded in 1907, I was the first North American company to commer-
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gen. I preserve foods, produce computer chips, improve the efficiency
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Starbucks CEO hosts town hall on politics


By SARAH SKIDMORE
AP Food Industry Writer

PORTLAND, Ore. -
Starbucks CEO Howard
Schultz changed how
America drinks coffee.
Now, he wants to change
the political system.
The leader of the cof-
fee giant says U.S. politi-
cal leaders have created a
"crisis of confidence" with
their political wrangling
that is wreaking havoc on
the economy. He said he
wants to give a voice to
all citizens by hosting a
national telephone forum
on Tuesday.
He's also running ads in
the New York Times and
USA Today ahead of the
event, featuring an open let-
ter that urges Americans to
participate in the forum and
insist politicians end their
hyper-partisan behavior.
"We must send the mes-
sage to today's elected offi-
cials ... that the time to put
citizenship ahead of par-
tisanship is now," Schultz
said in the letter.
The forum comes weeks
after Schultz called on other
CEOs to halt contributions
to U.S. political campaigns
until the nation's leaders
become financially disci-
plined and stop their politi-
cal wrangling. The CEOs of


more than 100 companies,
from AOL to Zipcar, joined
Schultz in his pledge to halt
contributions and do what
they could to stimulate
growth in their industries.
Schultz, who heads
Seattle-based Starbucks,
which operates more than
17,000 stores globally, said
he was moved to hold the
forum after receiving hun-
dreds of emails and letters
from citizens. They were
struggling to find jobs, keep
their homes or send their
children to school given the
economic conditions.
"It looks like we struck
a nerve with so many
people," Schultz told the
Associated Press. "I feel
a personal responsibility
to create a public dialogue
and make a voice for peo-
ple who feel like they can't
be heard."
The forum will be host-
ed by nonpartisan group
No Labels and held the
same week as the GOP
presidential debate and the
President's address to a
joint session of Congress
to share his plan for job
creation.
"America is at a fragile
and critical moment in its
history," Schultz said in his
letter. "We must restore
hope in the American
Dream."


In this Dec. 16 2010 photo, Starbucks CEO Howard Schultz is interviewed by The Associated Press at a Starbucks coffee
shop in the Soho neighborhood of New York. Schultz will host a "Conversation with America" telephone town hall on Tuesday.
He is running ads in the New York Times and USA Today ahead of the event urging U.S. citizens to insist politicians end their
hyper-partisan behavior.


Feds sue biggest U.S. banks over risky mortgages


By EILEEN AJ CONNELLY and
,PALLAVI GOGOI
'AP Business Writers

NEW YORK In a sweeping move, the
government on Friday sued 17 financial
firms, including the largest U.S. banks, for
.selling Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac bil-
lions of dollars worth of mortgage-backed
securities that turned toxic when the hous-
ing market collapsed.
Among the 17 targeted by the lawsuits
were Bank of America Corp., Citigroup
Inc., JP Morgan Chase & Co., Goldman
Sachs.
The lawsuits were filed Friday by the


Federal Housing Finance Agency which
oversees Fannie and Freddie, the two
agencies that buy mortgages loans and
mortgage securities issued by the lend-
ers.
The total price tag for the securities
bought by Fannie and Freddie affected by
the lawsuits: $196 billion.
The government didn't provide a dollar
amount of how much it seeks in damages.
It said that it wants to have the purchases
of the securities canceled, be compensated
for lost principal and interest payments
as well as attorney fees and costs. The
lawsuits allege the financial firms broke
federal and state laws with the sales.


Home mortgage-backed securities were
risky investments that collapsed after the
real-estate bust and helped fuel the finan-
cial crisis in late 2008.
In the lawsuits that were filed in federal
or state court in New York and the federal
court in Connlecticut, the government said
the securities were sold with registration
statements and prospectuses that "con-
tained materially false or misleading state-
ments and omissions."
The Fedei-al agency said tlie banks andI
mortgage lenders also falsely represented
that the mortgage loans in lthe securities
complied with underwriting guidelines
and standards. They also included repre-


sentations "that significantly overstated
the ability of the borrower to repay their
mortgage loans."
The 17 institutions are Ally Financial
Inc., formerly known GMAC LLC, Bank
of America Corp., Barclays Bank PLC,
Citigroup Inc., Countrywide Financial
Corp., Credit Suisse Holdings Inc.,
Deutsche Bank AG, First Horizon National
Corp., General Electric Co., Goldman Sachs
& Co., HSBC North America Holdings Inc.,
.IPMorgan Chase & Co., Merrill Lynch &
Co. and its unit First Franklin Financial
Corp., Morgan Stanley, Nomura Holding
America Inc., The Royal Bank of Scotland
Group l'l.C, and Societe Generale.


The Motley Fool1

To Educate, Amuse & Enrich


I


^M 'JUN


Page Editor: Robert Bridges, 754-0428













Page Editor: Robert Bridges, 754-0428


LAKE CITY REPORTER BUSINESS SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 4, 2011


THE WEEK IN REVIEW THE WEEK IN REVIEW THE WEEK IN REVIEW THE WEEK IN REVIEW THE WEEK IN REVIEW


The Week in Review


Weekly Stock Exchange Highlights STOCKS OF LOCAL INTEREST Weekly Dow Jones


NYSE A Amex
,250.73 +4.91 2,276.09 +43.26


Gainers ($2 or more)
Name Last Chg %Chg
MillerEnR 3.32 +1.05 +46.3
CoreLogic 11.42 +3.00 +35.6
Dynegy. 4.91 +1.12 +29.6
ZuoanF n 3.50 +.80 +29.6
Venoco 11.06 +2.08 +23.2
RBSctprM 13.29 +2.04 +18.1
RBSctprN 13.20 +1.99 +17.8
KidBrands 3.88 +.58 +17.6
RBSctprQ 13.84 +1.93 +16.2
Cameltlnfo 5.22 +.72 +16.0

Losers ($2 or more)
Name Last Chg %Chg
NetQin n 5.20 -1.58 -23.3
TRCCos 4.34 -.92 -17.5
VangHlthn 12.15 -2.34 -16.1
JinkoSolar 14.03 -2.55 -15.4
Pzenalnv 4.26 -.75 -15.0
Methode 7.98 -1.40 -14.9
TrinaSolar 13.39 -2.22 -14.2
CPI 7.38 -1.17 -13.7
Primero g 3.65 -.57 -13.5
JoumalCm 3.20 -.49 -13.3

Most Active (si or more)
Name Vol (00) Last Chg
BkofAm 14382517 7.25 -.50
S&P500ETF10852779117.85-12
SPDR Fnd4632601 12.54 -.23
SprintNex 4506512 3.53 +.28
iShR2K 3149202 68.46 -.65
iShEMkts 3005550 41.56 +1.04
FordM 2906703 10.42 +.02
GenElec 2800670 15.76 +.22
DrxFnBull 2608616 13.09 -.65
AT&T Inc 2217815 28.05 -.99

Diary
Advanced 1,828
Declined 1,342
New Highs 92
New Lows 51
Total issues 3,208
Unchanged 38
Volume 20,094,049,083


Gainers ($2 or more)
Name Last Chg %Chg
NthgtMg 4.24 +1.09 +34.6
HstnAEn 18.15 +4.22 +30.3
LGLGrp 8.62 +1.87 +27.7
Geokinetics 4.51 +.88 +24.2
EngySvcs 2.69 +46 +20.6
AvinoSGrg 2.94 +.42 +16.7
UnvSeclnst 6.11 +.79 +14.8
Richmntg 11.22 +1.42 +14.5
GtPanSilvg 3.36 +.41 +13.9
MexcoEn 7.03 +.84 +13.6

Losers ($2 or more)
Name Last Chg %Chg
AdcareHwt 2.50 -.45 -15.3
B&HO 4.80 -.70 -12.8
Crexendo 4.49 -.50 -10.0
SagaComm27:35 -2.82 -9.3
Compx 13.25 -1.34 -9.2
BioTime 4.55 -.44 -8.8
Versar 2.60 -.25 -8.8
PemixTh 8.24 -.78 -8.6
CTPtrsn 5.00 -.45 -8.3
MetroHIth 4.57 -.40 -8.0

Most Active ($1 or more)
Name Vol (00) Last Chg
NthMg 634881 4.24+1.09
Nw odg 292307 13.55 +.07
GoldStrg 159219 2.65 +.26
GrtBasGg 134423 2.33 +.24
NovaGldg 126700 10.91 +.97
CheniereEn118371 7.17 -.23
CFCdag 100604 25.87 +.89
Taseko 97408 3.78 -.08
VimetX 91547 20.83 -1.01
TmsatlPet 89131 1.27 +.21

Diary
Advanced 331
Declined 198
New Highs 17
New Lows 19
Total issues 542
Unchanged 13
Volue 485,899,055


A Nasdaq
2,480.33 +.48


Gainers ($2 or more)
Name Last Chg %Chg
MecoxLn 2.40 +.95 +65.5
PlumasBc 2.72 +.81 +42.4
THTHeatT 2.89 +.79 +37.6
MitekSys 11.93 +3.11 +35.3
GlobusM n 7.00 +1.77 +33.8
Liquidity 30.05 +7.50 +33.3
EdacTech 8.29 +2.04 +32.6
SMFEngy 2.50 +.60 +31.6
BTU Int 5.32 +1.27 +31.4
CentEuro 7.10 +1.63 +29.8

Losers ($2 or more)
Name Last Chg %Chg
NuPathe 2.53 -1.11 -30.5
BG Med n 4.80 -1.49 -23.7
Vefi n 7.98 -1.97 -19.8
MaysJ 13.77 -3.23 -19.0
Lightbrdge 2.50 -.58 -18.8
AWoodmk 12.86 -2.65 -17.1
UnvTrck 12.85 -2.61 -16.9
FslFnBwt 4.12 -.82 -16.6
Synutra 5.11 -1.00 -16.4
Epocratesn 9.32 -1.78 -16.0

Most Active ($1 or more)
Name Vol(00) Last Chg
SinusXM 3362355 1.72 +.02
PwShs QQ273526653.28 +.15
Cisco 2634801 15.41 +.09
Microsoft 2569114 25.80 +.55
Intel 2168444 19.64 -.13
Orade 1525429 26.97 +.32
MicronT 1455529 5.50 -.16
RschMoln 1360949 30.12 +.94
NewsCpA 1289357 16.27 -.60
Yahoo 1236455 12.87 +.13

Diary
Advanced 1,118
Declined 1,588
New Highs 64
New Lows 153
Total issues 2,772
Unchanged 66
Volume 8,905,778,887


Wkly Wkly YTD
Name Ex DIv Last Ch9%Chg%Chg


AT&TInc NY 1.72 28.05 -.99
Annaly NY 2.59 17.37 -.23
AutoZone NY .. 310.85 +9.55
BkofAm NY .04 7.2t -.50
Bar iPVix rsNY ... 41.48 +.41
BobEvans Nasd 1.00 29.77 -1.23
CNBFnPA Nasd .66 12.60 -.81
CSX s NY .48 20.56 -.77
Chevron NY 3.12 96.41 -.44
Cisco Nasd .24 15.41 +.09
Citigrp rs NY .04 28.40 -1.44
CocaCola NY 1.88 69.74 +1.24
Delhaize NY 2.45 65.43 -.47
DrSCBr rs NY ... 47.57 -.02
DrxFnBull NY ... 13.09 -.65
DirxSCBullNY ... 40.83 -1.64
ExxonMbI NY 1.88 72.14 -.50
FamilyDIr' NY .72 51.91 +4.36
FordM NY ... 10.42 +.02
GenElec NY .60 15.76 +.22
HomeDp NY 1.00 32.18 -1.57
iShEMkts NY .84 41.56 +1.04
iShR2K NY .94 68.46 -.65
Intel Nasd '.84 19.64 -.13
JPMorgCh NY 1.00 34,63 -1.58
Lowes NY .56 18.94 -1.30
McDnlds NY 2.44 89.09 -.23
MicronT Nasd ... 5.50 -.16


-3.4 -4.5
-1.3 -3.1
+3.2 +14.0
-6.5 -45.7
+1.0 +10.3
-4.0 -9.7
-6.0 -14.9
-3.6 -4.5
-0.5 +5.7
+0.6 -23.8
-4.8 -40.0
+1.8 +6.0
-0.7 -11.2
... +1.6
-4.7 -53.0
-3.9 -43.6
-0.7 -1.3
+9.2 +4.4
+0.2 -37.9
+1.4 -13.8
-4.7 -8.2
+2.6 -12.8
-0.9 -12.5
-0.7 -6.6
-4.4 -18.4
-6.4 -24.5
-0.3 +16.1
-2.8 -31.4


Name Ex DIv
Microsoft Nasd .64
NY Times NY
*NewsCpA Nasd .19
NextEraEn NY 2.20
NobilityH Nasd ...
NokiaCp NY .55
OcciPet NY 1.84
Oracle Nasd .24
Penney NY .80
PepsiCo NY 2.06
Pfizer NY .80
Potash s NY .28
PwShs QOQNasd .42
PrUShS&PNY
RschMotn Nasd .
Ryder NY ..1.6
S&P500ETFNY 2.44
SearsHdgsNasd .
SirusXM Nasd
SouthnCo NY 1.89
SprintNex NY
SPEngy NY 1.06
SPDR FndNY .18
SP Minds NY .67
TimeWam NY .94
WalMart NY 1.46
WellsFargo NY .48
Yahoo Nasd


WKIy WKly YIU
Last Chg %Chg %Chg
25.80 +.55 +2.2 -7.6
7.52 +.21 +2.9-23.3
16.27 -.60 -3.6 +11.7
55.63 +.22 +0.4 +7.0
7.61 +.45 +6.3 -6.2
6.34 +.42 +7.1 -38.6
83.41 +1.32 +1.6 -15.0
26.97 +.32 +1.2 -13.8
25.15 -1.54 -5.8 -22.2
63.30 +.66 +1.1 -3.1
18.46 +.25 +1,4 +5.4
58.42 +1.40 +2.5 +13.2
53.28 +.15 +0.3 -2.2
24.22 -.06 -0.2 +1.9
30.12 +.94 +3.2 -48.2
44.35 -.03 -0.1 -15.7
117.85 -.12 -0.1 -6.3
54.52 -1.15 -2.1 -26.1
1.72 +.02 +1.2 +5.5
41.16 +.33 +0.8 +7.7
3.53 +.28 +8.6 -16.5
66.22 +.41 +0.6 -3.0
12.54 -23 -1.8 -21.4
30.85 -.08 -0.3 -11.5
30.60 +.92 +3.1 -4.9
52.03 -.87 -1.6 -3.5
24.20 -.39 -1.6 -21.9
12.87 +.13 +1.0 -22.6


Stock Footnote:'g Dividends and earnings In Canadian dollars, h Does not meet continued-listing standards.
If = Late filing with SEC. n = New In past 52 weeks. pf= Preferred. rs i Stock has undergone a reverse stock split
of at least 50 percent within the past year. rt = Right to buy security at a specified price. s = Stock has spili by at
least 20 percent within the last year. un = Units. vi = in bankruptcy or receivership. wd = When distributed. wl =
When Issued. wt = Warrants.
Mutual Fund Footnotes: b = Fee covering market costs Is paid from fund assets, d = Deferred sas* charge, or
redemption fee. I front load (sales charges), m = Multiple fees are charged. NA not available, p = previous day's
net asset value, e = fund split shares during the week. x = fund paid a distribution during the week.Galnera and
Losers must be worth at least $2 to be listed in tables at left. Most Actives must be worth at least $1. Volume in
hundreds of shares. Source: The Associated Press. Sales figures are unofficial.


Money Rates
Last Pvs Week
Prime Rate 3.25 3.25
Discount Rate 0,75 0.75
Federal Funds Rate .00-25 .00-25
Treasuries
3-month 0.02 0.005
6-month 0.05 0.02
5-year 0.86 0.94
10-year 1.99 2.19
30-year 3.29 3.54


Dow Jones Industrials 254.71
Close: 11,240.26
1 -week change: -44.28 (-0.4%) MON
13,000 '

12,500

12,000 ..

11,500

11,000


10,500


20.70 53.58 -119.96 -253.31


TUES WED THUR FRI


M A M


MUTUAL FUNDS
Total Assets Total Return/Rank Pt Min Init
Name Obi ($Mlns) NAV 4-wk 12-mo 5-year Load Invt
PIMCOTotRetls Cl 144,330 11.05 -0.4 +4.4/E +8.4/A NL 1,000,000
American Funds GrthAmA m LG 62,446 28.27 -6.9 +7.9/D +0.2/D 5.75 250
Vanguard TotStldx LB 60,494 29.38 -6.8 +10.2/8 +0.5/B NL 3,000
Vanguard Instldxl LB 59,225 107.82 -6.1 +9.8/B -0.1/B NL 5,000,000
American Funds CaplncBuA m IH 58,091 49.04 -2.4 +7.6/C +2.2/C 5.75 250
Fidelity Contra LG 57,045 65.43 -5.3 +12.7/B +3.3/A NL 2,500
American Funds CpWIdGrIA m WS 53,019 32.50 -6.9 +2.9/D +0.9/B 5.75 250
American Funds IncAmerA m MA 52,940 16.25 -2.7 +8.9/A +2.3/C 5.75 250
Vanguard 500Adml LB 52,749 108.55 ,-6.1 +9.8/B -0.1/B NL 10,000
Vanguard TotStlAdm LB 50,380 29.39 -6.8 +10.3/A +0.5/B NL 10,000
American Funds InvCoAmA m LB 46,376 25.75 -6.6 +5.9/D -0.9/C 5.75 250
Dodge & Cox IntlStk FV 44,787 31.45 -8.9 +1.5/C -0.6/A NL 2,500
Dodge & Cox Stock LV 41,787 97.12 -7.8 +6.4/C -3.5/D NL 2,500
American Funds WAMutlnvA m LV 38,653 26.41 -4.5 +11.1/A 0.0/A 5.75 250
American Funds EurPacGrA m .FB 37,103 37.57 -8.4 +2.5/D +1.2/A 5.75 250
Vanguard InstPlus LB 36,525 107.83 -6.1 +9.9/B 0.0/B NL 200,000,000
FrankTemp-Franklin Income A m CA 34,484 2.07 -4.1 +7.6/A +3.5/C 4.25 1,000
Vanguard ToUntl d FB 33,374 14.33 -8.3 +3.6/C -0.2/B NL 3,000
American Funds FnlnvA m LB 33,111 34.09 -6.2 +7.8/C +0.9/A 5.75 250
PIMCOTotRetAdm b Cl 32,335 '11.05 -0.4 +4.1/E +8.1/A NL 1,000,000
American Funds NewPerspA m WS 32,317 26.59 -6.3 +7.5/B +2.3/A 5.75 250
American Funds BalA m MA 31,690 17.56 -3.6 +9.1/A +2.6/B 5.75 250
Vanguard WelltnAdm MA 29,353 52.00 -4.0 +7.1/C +3.7/A NL 50,000
Vanguard 5001nv LB 29,272 108.53 -6.1 +9.7/B -0.2/B NL 3,000
Vanguard TotBdAdml Cl 29,001 11.05 +1.5 +5.7/C +6.7/B NL 10,000
Vanguard TotStllns LB 27,750 29.40 -6.8 +10.3/A +0.6/B NL 5,000,000
Vanguard Welitn MA 27,197 30.11 -3.9 +7.0/C +3.6/A NL 3,000
CA -Conservs Alocaton Cl -kheredate-Tern Bond, ES -Europe Sdock, FB aoreUri age Bend, FG -Freign LargeGrowh, FV-or
Large Value, I-Wo ocation, LB-L ed, LG Gowl, LV Value, MA dera oon, aple,
Mieap Value, SH -Speallyheath, WS T SloctaRelum: r:inV wih liidends rewesed PRn How furd poorned vs.
otm erswi samn objected: A lins op 20% ,E hii bottlm20t Mn Sneeded t nvestdi nfuSrce mingsta


Name Div YId PE


ABB Ltd .64 3.2
AES Corp ...
AFLAC 1.20 3.4
AK Steel .20 2.4
AMR
AT&T Inc 1.72 6.1
AbtLab 1.92 3.8
Accenture .90 1.7
AMD
Aetna .60 1.5
Agilent
AlcalelLuc ...
Alcoa .12 1.0
Allstate .84 3.4
AlphaNRs ...
Alria 1.64 6.1
AmBevs 1.43 4.2
AMovilL s .41 1.6
AEagleOut .44 4.2
AEP 1.84 4.8
AmExp .72 1.5
AmIntlGrp ...
AmTower.
Anadarko .36 .5
AnalogDev 1.00 3.1
Annaly 2.59 14.9
Apache .60 .6
ArcelorMit .75 3.8
ArchCoal .44 2.3
ArchDan .64 2.3
ATMOS 1.6 4.1
AuRico g -...
Avon .92 4.3
BB&TCp .64 3.1
BakrHu .60 1.0
BcoBrades .80 4.4
BcoSantSA .82 9.6
BcoSBrasil 1.65 17.1
BkofAm .04 .6
BkNYMel .52 2.6
Barclay .36 3.4
Bar iPVixrs ...
BarrickG .48 .9
Baxter 1.24 2.3
BeazerHm ...
BerkHB ... ...
BestBuy .64 2.7
Blackstone .40 3.1
BlockHR .60 4.5
Boeing 1.68 2.6
BostonSci ...
BrMySq 1.32 4.6
BrkfldOfPr .56 3.4
CBREllis ... ...
. CBSB .40 1.7
CNOFincI ...
CSXs ..48 2.3
CVS Care .50 1.4
Cameron
CapOne .20 .5
CapitlSrce .04 .7
Carnival 1.00 3.2
Caterpillar 1.84 2.2
Cemex
CenterPnt .79 4.1
CntryLink 2.90 8.5
ChesEng .35 1.1'
Chevron 3.12 3.2
Chimera .62 21.5
Citigrp rs .04 .1
CliffsNRs 1.12 1.4
Coach .90 1.7
CocaCola 1.88 2.7
Comerica .40 1.7
ConAgra .92 3.6
ConocPhil 2.64 4.0
ConsolEngy.40 .9
ConEd 2.40 4.3
ConstellEn .96 2.5


Wkty YTD Wkly
Cho %Cha Last


... +.09
12 -.03
8 -.55
.. -.38
... +.16
9 -.99
13 +.89
16 -.13
6 -.17
8 +.66
13 -.47
... +.05
13 +.18
24 +.72
75 -2.38
16 +.42
... +1.14
11 +1.14
12 +.07
13 +.42
13 +.03
... +.40
55 +1.28
41 +.44
11 -.37
6 -.23
10 -1.64
10 -.23
13 +.26
9 -.37
15 +1.21
... -1.78
13 -.20
15 +.17
18 +1.68
... +1.25
... -.21
... +.80
-.50
9 -.26
... +.40
... +.41
14 +1.96
14 +.39
... +.08
14 -.47
8 -.69
72 +.70
12 -.55
14 +1.23
16 +.05
15 +.29
6 +.42
19 +.18
14 +.19
8 -.20
13 -.77
14 +1.09
21 +.87
6 -1.95
19 +.23
13 -.05
14 +.22
... +.05
16 -.10
12 +.44
11 +1.59
8 -.44
5 -.10
9 -1.44
7 +1.89
18 -1.32
14 +1.24
12 -.57
13 +.18
9 +.93
18 +1.37
16 +.48
18 +1.44


WNiay YTD Wkly
Name DIv YId PE Cho %Chg Last


CoreLogic ...
Coming .20 1.4
Covidien .80 1.6
CSVellVSI s... ...
DR Horton .15 1.5
DTE 2.35 4.7
DanaHIdg ...
Danaher .08 .2
Deere 1.64 2.1
DeflaAr .......
DenburyR ...
DBGodDS ... ...
DevelDiv .16 1.4
DevonE .68 1.1
DrSCBrrs ... ...
DirFnBr rs ...
DirLCBrrs ...
DrxEMBull 1.20 .1
DrxEnBear ...
DrxFnBull ... ...
DirxSCBuU ...
DirxLCBull .10 ...
DirxEnBull ...
Discover .24 1.0
Disney .40 1.2
DollarGen ...
DomRescs 1.97 4.1
DowChm 1.00 3.7
DukeEngy 1.00 5.3
EMCCp ... ...
Eaton s 1.36 3.4
ElPasoCp .04 .2
EldorGidg .12
EmersonEl 1.38 3.1
EnCana g .80 3.2
Exelon 2.10 4.9
ExxonMbi 1.88 2.6
FstHorizon .04 .6
FirstEngy 2.20 5.1
FordM
FMCGs 1.00 2.2
FrontierCm .75 10.3
Frontline .47 6.9
Gafisa SA .29 3.1
GameStop ....
Gannett .32 3.1
Gap .45 2.9
GenGrPr n .40 3.1
GenMills 1.22 3.3
GenMot n ...
GenOrfEn ...
Genworth ...
Gerdau .25 3.0
GoldFUd .24 1.4
Goldcrpg .41 .7
GoldmanS 1.40 1.3
Goodyear ...
HCP Inc 1.92 5.4
Hallibrtn .36 .9
HartfdFn .40 2.3
HectaM
Hertz
Hess .40 .7
HewlettP .48 2.0
HomeDp 1.00 3.1
Honwillntl 1.33 2.9
HostHotls .12 1.1
ING
iShGold ...
iSAktla 1.06 4.5
iShBraz 3.42 5.4
iShGer .67 3.4
iSh HK .42 2.5
iShJapn .17 1.8
iShSing .50 3.9
iSTaiwn .29 ...
iShSilver ...
iShChina25 .85 2.3
iSSP500 2.45 2.1


... +3.00
7 -.20
14 -.06
... -.14
83 +.29
12 +.27
58 +.44
15 +.16
13 +2.00
14 +.15
22 +.44
-.30
... +.13
5 +.23
... -.02
... +1.46
... -.30
... +1.52
... -.44
... -.65
... -1.64
.. -.43
.. +A46
8 -.57
14 +.06
18 +3.51
16 -.48
12 -.11
13 +.22
22 -.18
12 +.09
25 +.45
50*+1.35
14 -1.38
54 +.60
13 +.60
9 -.50
37 -.49
18 +.49
5 +.02
8 +.41
45 +.03
5 +.38
... +.59
8 -.63
5 -.25
9 -.68
... -.33
14 +.73
6 -.80
... +.20
... -.12
... -.01
2 +.70
19 +2.74
11 '-4.34
... -.31
30 -.21
16 +.17
4 +.14
29 +.18
14 +.24
7 +2.31
6 -.48
14 -1.57
13 -.03
... +.45
... -.05
... +.57
... +.01
.. +2.54
... -.57
... +.09
... +.01
.. +.17
... +.25
... +1.77
... +.16
.. -.20


-38.3 11.42
-26.9 14.12
+10.7 50.53
-38.3 7.38
-16.4 9.97
+9.5 49.64
-29.2 12.19
-8.7 43.05
-6.0 78.03
-42.3 7.27
-21.8 14.93
-49.1 4.06
-18.5 11.48
-17.7 64.61
+1.6 47.57
+28.3 60.62
-2.1 42.95
-44.8 22.80
-20.9 17.84
-53.0 13.09
-43.6 40.83
-25.4 53.32
-23.6 44.67
+30.7 24.22
-13.5 32.46
+17.6 36.06
+12.3 47.98
-21.8 26.71
+5.4 18.78
-6.4 21.43
-20.6 40.32
+35.4 18.63
+12.3 20.85
-23.0 44.03
-14.4 24.92
+2.3 42.61
-1.3 72.14
-46.4 6.31
+16.2 43.02
-37.9 10.42
-25.2 44.94
-25.5 7.25
-73.0 6.86
-35.0 9.44
-3.2 22.15
-30.8 10.44
-29.2 15.60
-17.9 12.71
+5.1 37.41
-40.1 22.07
-19.7 3.06
-51.4 6.39
-41.0 8.26
-7.2 16.83
+19.0 54.71
-36.3 107.06
-3.0 11.50
-3.4 35.54
+1.7 41.54
-35.0 17.23
-30.2 7.86
-28.9 10.30
-24.2 58.01
-42.2 24.34
-8.2 32.18
-14.5 45.45
-38.1 11.07
-19.0 7.93
+32.2 18.37
-7.7 23.48
-17.5 63.86
-17.5 19.75
-9.7 17.09
-12.0 9.60
-8.4 12.68
-14.1 13.42
+39.8 42.18
-13.9 37.12
-6.4 118.22


New York Stock Exchange






MAKE YOUR FINANCIAL



FUTURE A PRIORITY.


I like other horres that pile up ill their driveway, luitter
(lie gd'rage( or runl mild ill the I'frot yard. your niiualiial
situation is a little less obvious. lThat's Ihy it'. Ms O iiiiiportaitl
to take advantage of our (complintF nturyv 1fiancial review
at least once a vear.


\\V< ill discuss 1 "he diflIeren.t strategies aiilable to help
put your finances in lise willh both 1 oNr ihorl- aml long-
term gil als.


lTo schlediule your conmplimenituary financial l review, call
or visit todhn'.

Steve Jones, CFPO
Financial Advisor

2929 West U S Highway 90
Suite 114
Lake City, FL 32055
386-752-3847 www.edwardjones.com M,,,e, s,,c


WvY y YTD WMh y
Div Yld PE Chg %Chg Last


iShEMkts .84 2.0
iShB20T 4.02 3.6
iS Eafe 1.68 3.2
iShR2K .94 1.4
iShREst 2.09 3.8
ITW 1.44 3.3
IngerRd .48 1.5
IBM 3.00 1.8
IntlGame .24 1.6
IntPap 1.05 4.1
Interpublic .24 3.1
Invesco .49 2.9
InvMtgCap 3.94 24.0
hauUnibH .84 4.6
JPMorgCh 1.00 2.9
Jabil .28 1.7
JanusCap .20 3.0
JohnJn 2.28 3.6
JohnsnCtl .64 2.1
JnprNtwk
KB Home .25 4.2
Keycorp .12 1.9
KlmbClk 2.80 4.1
Klmco .72 4.3
Kinross g .12 .7
KodiakO g ...
Kohls 1.00 2.3
Kraft 1.16 3.4
LDK Solar ..
LSI Corp ...
LVSands
LennarA .16 1.2


... +1.04 -12.8
... +4.34 +19.5
... +.04 -11.1
-.65 -12.5
+.25 -1.9
11 -1.12 -18.2
... +.82 -31.2
13 -2.16 +13.8
17 -.13 -17.8
9 -.19 -6.4
15 -.23 -26.1
9 -.07 -29.3
4 -.66 -24.8
... +1.37 -23.4
7 -1.58 -18.4
11 +.91 -18.5
7 -.16 -49.0
14 -.21 +3.6
13 -.39 -21.8
19 -.70 -45.3
... +.15 -55.4
6 -.18 -29.5
16 +.30 +8.1
92 ... -7.8
25 -.04 -7.2
80 ... -15.5
11 -2.72 -19.2
20 +.32 +8.8
2 -.54 -47.6
13 -.17 +10.0
33 +1.27 -1.8
26 +.30 -26.0


Name DIv Yld
UlyEli 1.96 5.4
Limited .80 2.2
UncNat .20 1.1
UzClaib ...
UoydBkg ...
LyonBas A .80 2.5
MEMC
MF Global ...
MFA Fnc 1.00 14.2
MGIC
MGM Rsts ...
Macys .40 1.6
Manitowoc .08 .8
ManpwrGp .80 2.1
Manulifeg .52 ...
MaralhnO s .60 2.3
MktVGold .40 .6
MktVRus .18 .6
MarlntA .40 1.5
MarshM .88 3.0
Masco .30 3.8
MedcoHlth ...
Medtmic .97 2.8
Merck 1.52 4.7
MelLife .74 2.4
MelroPCS ... ...
MobileTele 1.06 6.4
Molycorp ...
Monsanto 1.20 1.8
MonstrWw ...
MorgStan .20 1.3
Mosaic .20 .3


PE


WMky YTD Wkly
Cho %Cho Last


8 +.67 +4.0 36.44
13 -.56 +16.7 35.85
5 -.26 -31.6 19.03
... +.76 -22.9 5.52
... +.17 -48.9 2.10
... +.26 -6.7 32.11
20 -.48 -43.3 6.39
-.31 -40.4 4.98
7 -.19 -13.7 7.04
... -.27 -78.5 2.19
... +.04 -30.5 10.32
10 +.46 +.2 25.36
.. -.29 -24.6 9.89
... -.71 -40.2 37.52
... -.01 -24.6 12.96
5 -.11 +14.7 25.78
... +2.43 +5.6 64.91
... +.78 -14.5 32.43
22 -.24 -34.3 27.28
17 -.07 +6.0 28.99
-.07 -37.0 7.98
15 -.89 -13.6 52.91
12 +.16 -7.8 34.21
12 +.45 -10.2 32.37
9 -.69 -30.8 30.77
16 -.35 -18.3 10.32
24 +.74 -20.3 16.63
... +1.83 +9.8 54.81
23 -4.88 -5.5 65.80
... +1.18 -63.1 8.73
35 -.65 -41.3 15.96
14 +.62 -8.3 70.00


Name DIv YId PE
MotriaMon ... ... ...
NCR Corp ... ... 11
NYSE Eur 1.20 4.6 12
Nabors ... ... 18
NBkGreece .29 ......
NatGrid 2.92 5.8 ...
NOilVarco .44 .7 16
NatSemi .40 1.6 21
NYCmtyB 1.00 8.3 10
NewellRub .32 2.4 12
NewmtM 1.20 1.9 14
NextEraEn 2.20 4.0 14
NiSource .92 4.4 19
NikeB 1.24 1.5 19
NobleCorp .53 1.6 28
NokiaCp .55 8.7 ...
Nordstrm .92 2.1 14'
NorlkSo 1.72 2.6 14
Nucor 1.45 4.3 23
OcciPet 1.84 2.2 12
OfficeDpt ... ... ...
OilSvHT 1.58 .8 ...
PG&ECp 1.82 4.4 15
PMI Grp ... ... ...
PNC 1.40 3.0 7
PPLCorp 1.40 4.9 12
PatriotCoal ... ... ...
PeabdyE .34 .7 14
Penney ,80 3.2 15
PepsiCo 2.06 3.3 16
PetrbrsA 1.34 5.3 ...
Petrobras 1.28 4.6 ..
Pfizer .80 4.3 12
PhlilpMor 2.56 3.8 16
Potashs .28 .5 21
ProLogis 1.12 4.3 ...
ProShtS&P ... ... ...
PrUShS&P ... ... ...
PrUlShDow ... ... ...
ProUltQQQ ... ... ...
PrUShQQQ rs... .. ...
ProUItSP .35 .9
ProUShL20 ... ... ...
ProUltFin .05 .1 ...
ProUBR2K .01 ......
ProUSSP500... ... ...
PrUltSP500 s.05 .1 ...
ProUSSIv rs... ... ...
ProgsvCp 1.40 2.2 10
ProUSR2K rs.... ......
Prudent 1.15 2.5 7
PSEG 1.37 4.1 10
PulteGrp ... ... ...
OksilvRes ... ... 4
RadianGrp .01 .3 ...
Raytheon 1.72 4.2 7
RegionsFn 04 1.0
RiteAld ... ... ...
RylCarb .40 1.7 9
SAIC ... ... 9
SLMCp .40 3.2 9
SpdrDJIA 3.12 2.8
SpdrGold ... ... ...
SPMki 1.65 1.1 ...
S&P500ETF2.44 2.1 ...
SpdtHome .31 2.2
SpdrKbwBk .20 1.1
SpdrlehHY4.23 10.3 ..
SpdrLel-3bll.. ... ...
SpdrRetl .46 1.0 ...
SpdrOGEx .47 .9 .
STMIcro .40 6.3 6
Safeway .58 3.3 11
Saks ... ... 19
Salesforce ... ... ...
SandRdge ... ... 29
SaraLee .46 2,6 8
Schlmbrg 1,00 1.3 20
Schwab .24 2.1 19


Wkly YTD Wkly
Chg %Chg Last
+.03 +29.7 37.75
+.13 +6.5 16.37
-1.27 -13.7 25.88
-.12 -25.1 17.58
+.05 -47.1 .89
+.46 +13.3 50.27
-.09 -5.4 63.64
+.03 +80.9 24.89
-.43 -36.0 12.07
-.13 -27.1 13.25
+2.30 +4.9 64.47
+.22 +7.0 55.63
+.37 +18.7 20.91
-1.94 -1.6 84.04
+.88 -8.7 32.66
+.42 -38.6 6.34
+1.40 +2.1 43.26
-.06 +3.7 65.12
-.29 -22.3 34.07
+1.32 -15.0 83.41
-.04 -57.6 2.29
+1.28 -9.1 127.70
+.25 -13.6 41.34
+.01 -92.2 .26
-.61 -23.9 46.23
+.74 +6.4 28.54
-.27 -30.1 13.54
-1.31 -28.4 45.79
-1.54 -22.2 25.15
+.66 -3.1 63.30
+.13 -25.7 25.40
+.24 -26.4 27.85
+.25 +5.4 18.46
-.96 +16.6 68.24
+1.40 +13.2 58.42
+1.01 -17.5 26.15
... +2.2 44.80
-.06 +1.9 24.22
+.05 -5.3 19.61
+.38 -7.6 75.25
-.64 -7.5 53.79
-.19 -14.5 41.09
-1.97 -38.2 22.88
-1.47 -36.7 42.03
-.75 -27.3 31.04
-.12 -1.5 19.12
-.41 -23.9 51.95
-.98 -72.8 10.70
+.06 -7.9 18.30
+.27 +7.0 53.74
-.96 -20.6 46.60
+.08 +4.0 33.08
-.10 -41.8 4.38
+.36 -38.5 9.06
+.07 -62.5 3.03
-.32 -10.2 41.27
+.01 -41.0 4.13
-.01 +15.5 1.02
+.41 -48.9 24.02
-1.50 -18.4 12.94
-.87 +.7 12.68
-.42 -2.9 112.28
+5.77 +32.1 183.24
-.37 -8.0 151.53
-.12 -6.3 117.85
-.09 -18.2 14.22
-.55 -28.8 18.44
+.72 -3.5 38.32
... 45.86
-.26 -3.1 46.86
+.62 -3.2 51.06
+.01 -39.7 6.30
+.57 -21.5 17.65
+.12 -13.3 9.28
+6.11 -6.4 123.61
-.01 -5.6 6.91
+.11 +.2 17.55
-.17 -10.9 74.42
-.47 -32.6 11.54


Name DIv
SealAir .52
SemiHTr .64
'SiderurNac .81
SilvWhtn g .12
SilvrcpMg .08
SouthnCo 1.89
SwstAir .02
SwstnEngy ...
SpectraEn 1.04
SprintNex ...
SP Matis 1.30
SP HlthC .63
SPCnSt .83
SP Consum .59
SP Engy 1.06
SPDRFncl .18
SP Inds .67
SP Tech .35
SPUtil 1.33
StarwdHll .30
StateStr .72
Suncor gs .44
SunstnHt ...
SunTrst .20
Supvalu .35
Synovus .04
Sysco 1.04
TJX .76
TaiwSemi .52
Target 1.20
TeckResg .60
TenetHfth
Terex
Tesoro
Texinst .52
Textron .08
3M Co 2.20
TimeWam .94
TollBros
Total SA 2.38
Transocn .79
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Last Pvs Day
Australia .9398 .9308
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AMEX Most Active


.______________________________T_^,__,----* ^,^,-


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Legal

ADVERTISEMENT FOR BIDS
THE DISTRICT BOARD OF
TRUSTEES OF Florida Gateway
College WILL RECEIVE BIDS
FOR THE FOLLOWING:
Renovations and Reroof Building 1
Florida Gateway College
Lake City, Florida
FGC BidNo. 12-1-01
Architect's Project No. 1002
Date & Time for
Receiving Bids:
WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 21,
2011 AT 2:00 P.M.
Date, Time and Place for
Pre-Bid Conference: All
interested bidders are required to at-
tend the MANDATORY PRE-BID
CONFERENCE to be held at 10:(X00
A.M. local time on WEDNESDAY,
SEPTEMBER 14, 2011 on the main
campus of Florida Gateway College.
Conference will start in Room 001B,
Building 003 which is physically lo-
cated at 127 SE Student Way, Lake
City, Florida 32025
Place for Receiving Bids: Bids may
be mailed as follows:
Florida Gateway College
Purchasing Department
149 S.E. College Place
Lake City, Florida 32025-8703
Hand delivered bids are to be pre-
sented to:
Florida Gateway College
Mail Room (Bldg 025)
149 S.E. College Place
Lake City, Florida 32025-8703
All bids must arrive and be date/time
stamped by a Mail Room representa-
tive prior to the specified bid open-
ing date/time. The College will not
be responsible for Postal or other de-
livery service delays that cause a bid
to arrive at Florida Gateway Col-
lege's Mail Room after the designate,
ed bid opening date/time. Bids that
are mailed must be clearly marked
on the outside of the envelope "BID
# 12-1-01 Building 1 RenovationS
AND REROOF, Florida Gateway
College, BID OPENING WEDNES-
DAY, SEPTEMBER 21, 2011".
Bids will be opened in a public bid
opening in Room 001B, Building
003 which is physically located at
127 SE Student Way, Lake City,
Florida 32025.
Contractor's Prequalification: ALL
PRIME CONTRACTORS WISH-
ING TO BID THIS PROJECT
MUST BE PREQUALIFIED. Con-
tractors who wish to submit a bid on
this project must prequalify with
Florida Gateway College. To be con-
sidered for prequalification, contrac-
tors must request, complete and sub-
mit a prequalification package to the
College. Prequalification packages
may be obtained from the College's
Director of Purchasing, Bill Brown
at (386) 754-4360 or by email at
bill.brown@fgc.edu. COMPLETED
prequalification packages must be re-
turned to the College's Mail Room
which is located in Building 025 not
later than 1:00 PM local time Mon-
day, September 12, 2011. The Col-
lege will not be responsible for Post-
al or other delivery service delays
that cause a prequalification package
to arrive at the Mail Room after the
designated date/time.
Bid Documents Prepared By:
CRAIG SALLEY & ASSOCIATES,
ARCHITECTS
3911 Newberry Road, Suite D
Gainesville, FL 32607
(352) 372-8424, FAX (352) 377-
4945
Bid Documents
Available From:
http://www.csa-
architect.com/bid_documents.htm
Project Description: The
work includes, but is not limited to,
the complete renovation of the interi-
or and retrofit reroofing of Building
1, the Administration Building on the
main campus of Florida Gateway
Cdllege in Lake City, Florida.
The work involves extensive demoli-
tion of the interior and new stud
walls, ceilings, flooring and related
work. Included is an addition for a
new mechanical room out of CMU
with stucco exterior finish. The ret-
rofit reroofing will have metal truss-
es on stud knee walls, metal decking
and rigid insulation with standing
seam metal roofing, gutters and
downspouts.
New mechanical and electrical sys-
tems are included in the renovation
work.
Right to Waive Irregularities and
Technicalities: Florida Gateway Col-
lege reserves the right to waive mi-
nor irregularities and/or technicali-
ties associated with this solicitation.
The Director of Purchasing of Flori-
da Gateway College shall be the final
authority regarding waivers of irreg-
ularities and technicalities.
FOR THE DISTRICT BOARD OF
TRUSTEES OF Florida Gateway
College
Charles W. Hall, President
05527543
August 28, 2011
September 04, 11,2011
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
COLUMBIA COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File No. ll-211-CP
Division Probate
IN RE: ESTATE OF MELISSA B.
MACY A/K/A MELISSA MACY
Deceased
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
The administration of the estate of
Melissa B. Macy a/k/a Melissa Ma-
cy, deceased, whose date of death
was July 29, 2011, is pending in the
Circuit Court for Columbia County,
Florida, Probate Division, the ad-
dress of which if 173 NE Hemando
Avenue, Lake City, Florida. The
names and addresses of the personal
representatives and the personal rep-
resentatives' attorney are set forth
below. All creditors of the decedent
and other persons having claims or
demands against decedent's estate on
whom a copy of this notice is re-
quired to be served must file their
claims with this court WITHIN THE
LATER' OF 3 MONTHS AFTER
THE TIME OF THE FIRST PUBLI-
CATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30
DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF


Legal

3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE
OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE. ALL CLAIMS NOT
FILED WITHIN THE TIME PERI-
ODS SET FORTH IN SECTION
733.702 OF THE FLORIDA PRO-
BATE CODE WILL BE FOREVER
BARRED, NOTWITHSTANDING
THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH
ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED
TWO (2) YEARS OR MORE AF-
TER THE DECEDENT'S DATE OF
DEATH IS BARRED. The date of
the first publication of this notice is
August 28,2011.
Attorney for Personal Representa-
tives:
John J. Kendron
Attorney for Co-Personal Represen-
tatives
Florida Bar Number: 0306850
Robinson, Kennon & Kendron, P.A.
PO Box 1178
Lake City, FL 32056-1178
Telephone: (386)755-1334
Facsimile: (386)755-1336
personal representatives:
By:/s/ Constance Anne Barnett Ash-
worth
999 Genito West Blvd.
Moseley, Virginia 23120-1150
By:/s/ Judith A. Smith Jones
961 S. Dobson Street
Burleson, Texas 76028
05527569
August 28, 2011
September 4, 2011
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT, THIRD
JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR
COLUMBIA COUNTY, FLORIDA
CASE NO. 11-106-CA
COLUMBIA BANK, f/k/a, CO-
LUMBIA COUNTY BANK,
Plaintiff,
vs.
K&S HOUSING, LLC, a Florida
limited liability company, AARON
D.' SIMQUE, and MICHAEL L.
KAUTZ,
Defendants
AMENDED NOTICE OF PUBLIC
SALE
Notice is hereby given that the fol-
lowing described real property: SEE
SCHEDULE "A" ATTACHED
HERETO.
SCHEDULE A TO AMENDED
NOTICE OF PUBLIC SALE
COLUMBIA BANK vs. K&S
HOUSING, LLC. et al
Lot 3, Block B; Lots 10, 19 and 20,
Block C; Lots 1, 2, 3. 4. 5, 6, 7, 8, 9
and 10, Block D; and Lots 2. 3, 6, 7.
10, 11 and 15, Block E, Suwannee
Valley Estates, a subdivision accord-
ing to the plat thereof its recorded in
Plat Book 3. Page 87, public records
of COLUMBIA Coiunty. Florida.
AND
Lot 14. Block E. Suwannee Valley
Estates. a subdivision according to
the pint thereof as ccorled in Plati
Book 3, Page 87, public records,
COLUMBIA County. Florida. LESS
AND EXCEPT the following descri-
bed parcel:
That portion of Lot-14 lying East of a
line running NE from the SW comer
of Lot 14 to the SW comer of Lot 12
in Block E of Suwannee Valley Es-
tates, a subdivision according to the
plat thereof recorded in Plat Book 3,
Page 87, public records, COLUM-
BIA County, Florida.
AND
Lot 2, Block A; and Lot 1, Block E,
Suwannee Valley Estates, a subdivi-
sion according to the plat thereof as
recorded in Plat Book 3. Page 87.
public records of COLUMBIA
County, Florida.
shall be sold by the Clerk of this
Court, at public sale, pursuant to the
Final Judgment in this action dated
July 19, 2011, and also pursuant to
the subsequent Order Rescheduling
Public Sale 'in this action, at the Co-
lumbia County Courthouse in Lake
City, Columbia County, Florida, at
11:00 A.M., on Wednesday, Septem-
ber 21, 2011, to the best and highest
bidder for cash. Any person claiming
an interest in any surplus from the
sale, other than the property owner
as of the date of the notice of lis pen-
dens, must file a claim within 60
days after the sale.
WITNESS my hand and official seal
on the State and County aforesaid
this 24th day of August, 2011.
P. DEW1TT CASON
Clerk of Court
By:/s/ B Scippio
Deputy Clerk
05527572
August 28, 2011
September 4, 2011
NOTICE OF INTENT TO ADOPT
ORDINANCE
The Board of County Commissioners
of Columbia County, Florida will at
its regular meeting on Thursday,
September 15, 2011, in the Columbia
County School Board Administration
Building, 372 West Duval Street,
Lake City, Florida at 7:00 p.m. con-
sider the adoption of an ordinance
entitled:
AN ORDINANCE OR THE
BOARD OF COUNTY COMMIS-
SIONERS OF COLUMBIA COUN-
TY, FLORIDA ENACTED TO
COMPLY WITH THE REQUIRE-
MENTS OF CH. 2011-10(19, LAWS
OF FLA., RECOGNIZING THAT
THE LEGISLATURE HAS PRE-
EMPTED THE REGULATION OF
FIREARMS AND AMMUNITION
TO THE STATE; REPEALING
AND DECLARING VOID ALL
ORDINANCES, RESOLUTIONS,
RULES AND REGULATIONS
WHICH MAY ATTEMPT TO REG-
ULATE FIREARMS AND/OR AM-
MUNITION; PROVIDING FOR
REPEAL OF CONFLICTING OR-
DINANCES; PROVIDING FOR


Legal

SEVERABILITY; AND PROVID-
ING FOR AN EFFECTIVE DATE.
The substance of the above-named
ordinance is as provided in its name.
Copies of the proposed ordinance are
available for inspection at the office
of the County Manager located in the
County Administration Complex,
135 NE Hernando Avenue, Lake
City, Florida, between the hours of
8:00 a.m. and 5:00 p.m., Monday
through Friday. Any interested party
may appear and be heard at this pub-
lic hearing.
In the event any person decides to
appeal any decision by the Board of
County Commissioners with respect
to any matter relating to the consid-
eration of the ordinance at the above-
referenced public hearing, a record
of the proceeding may be needed and
in such event, such person may need
to ensure that a verbatim record of
the public hearing is made, which re-
cord includes the testimony and evi-
dence on which the appeal is to be
based.
In accordance with the Americans
With Disabilities Act, a person need-
ing special accommodations or an in-
terpreter to participate in this pro-
ceeding should contact Lisa Roberts
386/752-1006 or T.D. Services
386/758-2139, at least seven (7) days
prior to the date -of the hearing.
DATED this 1st day of September,
201 r.
/s/ P. DeWitt Cason by P.A. Perry
P. DEWITT CASON
Clerk of Court
05527677
September 4, 2011
NOTICE OF PUBLIC MEETINGS
OF THE NORTH FLORIDA
BROADBAND AUTHORITY
OPERATIONS COMMITTEE
The North Florida Broadband Au-
thority ("NFBA") announces meet-
ings of.the NFBA Operations Com-
mittee that'all interested persons are
invited to attend. The NFBA is a le-
gal entity and public body created
pursuant to the provisions of Section
. 163.01, Florida Statutes, and an In-
terlocal Agreement among Baker,
Bradford, Columbia, Dixie, Gil-
christ, Hamilton, Jefferson, Lafay-
ette,. Levy, Madison, Putnam. Su-
wannee, Taylor, Union and Wakulla
Counties and municipalities of Cedar
Key, Cross City, Lake City, Live
Oak, Monticello, Perry, White
Springs and Worthington Springs.
Florida. The NFBA's Operations
Committee meeting will be held at
10:00 a.m. on Thursday, September
8. 2011; and at 10:00 a.m. on the fol-
lowing Wednesdays, September 28,
2011; October 26, 2011; November
30, 2011; and December 28, 2011 all
at the Cabot Lodge Board Room.
3726 SW 4011th Boulevard, Gaines-
ville, FL 32008. The NFBA's Opera-
tional Committee meeting is to con-
duct general business. If a person de-
cides to appeal any decision made by
the NFBA with respect to any matter
considered at the meeting, such per-
son will need a record of the pro-
ceedings and may need to ensure that
a verbatim record is made, including
the testimony and evidence upon
which the appeal is to be made. In
accordance with the Americans with
Disabilities Act, persons needing
special accommodation or an inter-
preter to participate in this proceed-
ing or have iny questions please con-
tact Faith Doyle, Clerk to the NFBA
Board at (877) 552-3482 or (407)
629-6900 at least two (2) business
days prior to the date of the meeting.
05527673
September 4, 2011


020 Lost & Found

FOUND Beautiful Pit Bull, near
CR 247 & CR 242,
Found on August. 30th,
OWNERS PICKED UP

100 Job
100 Opportunities

05527485
City of Gainesville Fleet
Mechanic
Career Opportunity with
Excellent Benefits. Requires a
HS diploma/GED & 5 years
Fleet/diesel mechanic
experience. Apply today att
www.cityofgainesville.jobs
AA/EO/DFWP/VP

05.5275.5
Large Southeast Restaurant
chain is now accepting resumes
for Management positions for
several Florida markets.
Competitive wages,
Advancement opportunities,
Complete Training package,
Health, Dental and Life
Insurance Benefits available.
DFWP EOE
Please send resumes to:
donni@heritagemanagement.net
or fax to: 352-387-0011.

()5526800
Earn Extra Money
Deliver the new AT&T Real
Yellow Pages
in the Lake City area. FT/PT,
daily work, quick pay, must be
18 yrs+, have drivers
license & insured vehicle.
(800) 422-1955 Ext. 1
8:00A-4:30P Mon-Fri


100 Job
v100 Opportunities

05527641



Maintenance Person
Convenience Store Group is
seeking an experienced
Maintenance person. A/C &
Refrigeration, Electrical,
plumbing and carpentry
experience would be a plus
Competitive salary, bonus, paid
holidays, vacation, company
vehicle and opportunity to join a
progressive and fast growing
company
Fax or Email Resume to:
dtumer@fasttrackstores.com
Fax 1-352-333-1161

05527684 '



"COOKS"
Competitive Wages being
offered for cooks!!!
Please apply in person
Tues 9/6 thru Fri. 9/8
at the Alachua location ~
1-75 & US Hwy 441.

AVON!! Only $10 to start!
Earn bonus $ up to $150+
1-800-275-9945 pin #4206
www.youravon.com/tdavies
CDL Drivers Wanted,
dedicated routes, Target Account,
Out of Lake City, FL
Call AJ 229-630-0021
Hiring Locally This Week
Liberty National Life Insurance
Company. Full Training Provided
Potential. of $60K+ Annually.
401K, BCBS Insurance & Pension
for those who qualify.
Call 1-800-257-5500
to set up an interview.
Drivers: Teams: $6,000 Team
Sign-On Bonus when you team
drive for Werner Enterprises! Call
Now for details! 1-888-880-5902
FUNDRAISING MAJOR Gifts
Officer (Part Time). Exciting part-
time opportunity for a qualified
candidate with a proven track
record for success in major gift
fundraising, prospect research and
database management. The
responsibilities include designing
and implementing a strategy for
cultivating and stewarding major
donors, developing and imple-
menting major gift giving strat-
egies and programs, and creating a
sustained effort to identify, solicit,
involve, and retain major donors.
The candidate will also develop,
coordinate and execute cultivation
strategies for major gift prospects
and donors. Qualifications: BA/BS
in marketing (or related field),
minimum of 7 yrs. experience gen-
erating and expanding major gift
base, major gift cultivation, and
soliciting strategies. Excellent
computer, interpersonal and com-
munication skills also required:
Please send
resumes along with cover letter to:
ARC Foundation of North
Florida, Inc. PO Drawer L
Live Oak, FL. 32064
No Phone Calls please.
LICENSED OPTICIAN
Needed, Monday Friday,
Phone 386-754-6376 or email,
lcva@superioroptical.com
Mechanic needed for Truck shop,
must have own tools, apply
Southern Specialized, 1812 NW
Main Blvd., 386-752-9754'
Mobile Home Sales!
Experienced Salesperson
Needed to sell the South's
#1 rated product! Call Kevin
386-719-5560

Sales Position available for moti-
vated individual Rountree -Moore
Toyota, Great benefits, paid train-
ing/vacation. Exp. a plus but not
necessary. Call Anthony Cosentino
386-623-7442
Veterinarian Assist/Technician
needed. Exp desired. Must be able
to work flexible schedule & Sat.
mornings. Apply at Columbia
Animal Hospital 2418 S. Marion
Ave. Lake City. No phone calls.

12A Medical
120 Employment

05527328
LEARN TO DRAW BLOOD
Local Phlebotomy Course
offered in Lake City, FLA
Certificate program.
(904)566-1328

Pharmacy Technician needed.
Must be Florida registered. Min. 1
year exp required. Preferably in a
retail environment. Excellent
computer & communication skills
needed. FT position. Competitive
pay. Send reply to Box 05074, C/O
The Lake City Reporter, P.O. Box
1709, Lake City, FL, 32056


Lawn & Landscape Service

J&M LAWN Service & more for
all your outdoor needs. Don't
waste your time or weekend,
Free Estimate. 386-984-2187

Meterir,-



PHYSICAL


THERAPIST:
Home Health Care Agency
servicing Columbia and
surroUnding counties
seeking Full-Time
experienced Physical
Therapist

Competitive Salary &
Benefits Available.
Please call contact
Lynn or Cindy at
386-758-3312
or apply online at
www.almostfamily.coml


1 Medical
120 Employment

15527642-------




Meridian Behavioral
Healthcare Inc.
www.mbhci.org
Please visit our website to view
current open opportunities and
to apply online:
Meridian is an active partner
with the National Health
Service Corps
Therapists:
Program Manager ( Licensed)
Licensed, or Master's Level
in Outpatient
LCSW or Certified Behavioral
Therapists Preferred
Bachelor's-Level in Counselor
Support
Case Management
(adult & child)
Master's Therapist in
Methadone Clinic
Administration:
Medical Records
Client Relations Specialist
Medical Services
RN Nursing Manager DETOX
(Gville )
RN full-time Lake City CSU
PRN RN, LPN, C.N.A.
Recovery Specialist
(Direct Care )

To see our current openings in
Mental Health and to apply
online, please go to:
www.mbhci.org
EOE, DFWP, E-Verify

05527692
Medical Billing
several years experience in all
aspects of Medical Insurance
Billing required.
Please email resume to
admin@nfsc.comcastbiz.net
or fax to 386-438-8628

Counselor for substance abuse
program in Baker Correctional In-
stitution. BA w/2yrs exp., M-F day
shift F/T, $30,000 to start, E-mail
resume to sheliarand@aol.com.or
fax to 386-752-2387



140 Work Wanted

EXPERIENCE WORK
with elders, flexible hours, nights
& days. can also be assistance in
home care. 386-965-0009



141 Babysitters

Loving mom would like to care for
your child. Full or Part time in my
home. Near downtown. Only 1
opening avail. 386-438-5394


240 Schools &
2 Education

05527283
Interested in a Medical Career?
Express Training offers
courses for beginners & exp
Nursing Assistant, $479
next class-08/22/10

Phlebotomy national certifica-
tion, $800 next class-10/10/11

Continuing education
Fees incl. books, supplies, exam -
fees. Call 386-755-4401 or
expresstrainingservices.com










LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 4, 2011


310 Pets & Supplies

05527( Sk
LOST
Silky/Yorkie
since August 29
S(am), Aprox 10
lbs. Black
body/brown face
& feet. Needs medicine. Last
seen at S & S on 441 N. & 100.
His name is Bradley. Please call
386-623-2806
LABRADOODLE PUPPY,
10 weeks old, health certificate,
registered. $450, not a breeder
Call 386-364-2089

PUBLISHER'S NOTE
Florida Law 828:29 requires dogs
and cats being sold to be at least 8
weeks old and have a health
certificate from a licensed
veterinarian documenting they
have mandatory shots and are
free from intestinal and external
parasites. Many species of wild-
life must be licensed by Florida
Fish and Wildlife. If you are
unsure, contact the local
office for information.


361 Farm Equipment

84 Ford 4610 Tractor.
2WD. Solid
2005 motor,$7,500. OBO
386-867-0005


407 Computers

ACER Flat screen monitor.
15 inch. $60. obo
386-755-9984 or
386-292-2170

HP Computer,
$80.00
386-755-9984 or
386-292-2170
HP Computer,
$80.00
386-755-9984 or
386-292-2170


408 Furniture

Coffee table and
2 square end tables.
All with glass tops. $90.00
386-758-4755


420 Wanted to Buy

K&H TIMBER
We Buy Pine Hardwood &
Cypress. Large or snpall tracts.
Call 386-961-1961.

Wanted Junk Cars. Trucks, Vans.
$275 & up CASH! Free Pick Up!
NO title needed !386-878-9260
After 5pm 386- 752-3648.


430 Garage Sales
FRI 9/2 & SAT. 9/3, 8-12, 192 SE
Mossy Ct., off CR 245/Price Creek
Rd., freezer, wet suit, pole saw,
etc. Sunday Calls Only 984-0106
PUBLISHER'S NOTE
All Yard Sale Ads
Must be Pre-Paid.


440 Miscellaneous
GUNSHOW: 09/10 & 09/11
@ The Columbia County
Fairgrounds, Hwy 247 Lake City.
Sat 9am 4pm, Sun 9am-3pm.
Info: 386-325-6114
Stop gnat & Mosquito bites! Buy
Swamp Gator All natural insect re-
pellent. Family safe. Use head to
toe. Available at The Home Depot.
Summer Barbecue Special
Tow Behind
Grill/Smoker, $1,250 OBO.
386-719-4802

450 Good Things
45 to Eat
GREEN PEANUTS For Sale
Graded and washed.
$30.00 a bushel.
386-752-3434
OSCEOLA HONEY & BEE
FARM, Tupelo honey now avail.,
several other varieties, good pri-
ces. 386-755-2642, 386-754-1110

460 Firewood
Firewood for Sale. $65. per Truck
Load. Rick 386-867-1039 or Joey
965-0288 if no answer pis leave
message we will call you back.

Mobile Homes
630 for Rent
2 BR/1 BA on 1/2 acre
in S. Columbia County,
$400 month
Call 386-755-8741
2 OR 3 BEDROOMS
Clean, Quiet Park $475-$525.mo
Water, septic, garbage included
758-2280 References, NO PETS!
3/2 Large MH, small park. near
FGCC. Small pets ok, $500 dep
$575 mo w/12 mo lease
386-752-1971 or 352-281-2450
3/2.5 S of Lake City. (Branford
area) $600 mo plus security
386-590-0642 or 386-867-1833
www.suwanneevalleyproperties.com
3BR/2BA BRANFORD area
Close to River. Nice yard.
Must see! Call for info.
386-752-7814 or 386-719-7010
3BR/2BA MH
Water & Garage included No Pets.
$550. mo. $400. security deposit,.
386-752-9898 or 386-365-3633
LG clean 3br's $450. -$650. mo. +
dep. Also, 2br mobile home's
available. No Pets.
5 Points area. 386-961-1482


Classified Department: 755-5440


Mobile Homes
630 for Rent
New 2br/2ba off Country Club. 1/2
ac. lot Front, back porch & storage
bldg. $600 mo. $600 sec. No Pets!
386-752-5911 or 466-2266

640 rMobile Homes
64 0 Nfor Sale

0552717.1
!!ATTENTION!!
We purchase used mobile
homes. Call North Pointe
Homes, Gainesville
352-872-5566

05527375 !!!LOOK!!!
Before you but a Mobile Home
check out North Pointe Homes
in Gainesville-Hugh Discounts!
credit Scores Don't matter. Call
for Free Approval! Jacobson
Homes Factory Outlet (352)872-
5566 or mrb337 1@hotmail.com

05527376
NEW USED- REPO'S
Your Volume Giant! North
Pointe Homes. Millions to Lend.
Credit Scores 575 = 10% down.
Gainesville (352)872-5566 or
walker-david@live.comn

Palm Harbor Homes
Cash for Clunkers
5K For Your Used Mobile Home -
Any Condition
800-622-2832 ext. 210.

Unfurnished Apt.
710 For Rent







2br/1 ba, 1 car garage,
W/D hook up, $525 month,
no pets 1 month sec,
386-961-8075
2BR/1BA. Close to town.
$565.mo plus deposit.
Includes water & sewer.
386-965-2922
A Landlord You Can Love!
2 brApts $575. & up + sec. Great
area. CH/A washer/dryer hookups.
386-758-9351/352-208-2421
Great location W of 1-75. spacious
deluxe 2br apts., garage, W/D
hookup, patio. $600/700 & up, +
Sec. 386-965-5560 or 344-3715

ONE 51 PLACE APTS
Alachua
MOVE IN SPECIALS
1. 2. & 3 bedrooms
Call TODAY 386-462-0656
or visit us at one51place.com

Summer Special! 12th mo Free
w/signed yr lease. Updated, w/tile
floors/fresh pain. Great area.
From $450.+sec. 386-752-9026


720 Furnished Apts.
72 For Rent
Neat as a Whistle! Ibr., utilities,
AC TV, Cable, micro, clean, quiet,
shady, Close to town. 41S,
$135 wk. 386-755-0110

Unfurnished
730 Home For Rent
'09 Executive Home for rent on 41
acres. 4br/3.5ba Available
October. Horses/outdoor pets ok.
$2000/mo but all terms negotiable
for right caretaker. 386-209-4610
05527680
3 BR/2 BA, 1, 800 sq. ft, 2 car
garage, all appliances, sprinkler
system, fenced, NO PETS,
Very clean & ready to move in.
$1,000 mo, $1,000 sec.,
$30 apple. fee.
Call 386-752-4864.

2BR house $625.mo $625. dep.
Also, 2 large br apt. $525. mo
$525 dep. Conveniently close to
the VA & shopping. 386-344-2972
3 br/2ba house, 1206 McFarlane
Avenue. Avail. 9/1/11. $850 mo
$400 sec dep. 904-376-0620 or
904-813-8864 for appt. No pets!
4B/1.5 BA, brick house for rent.
$850 a month & $550 security.
No pets!
386-752-9898 or 386-365-3633.
4BR BRICK home.
Azalea Park. $750. mo.
$750. security.
386-397-2619 or 386-365-1243
Brick 3br/2ba Large yard, garage,
CH/A. 189 Stanley Ct. Lake City.
$950. mo + $1000 dep.
Call 386-365-8543
LOVELY 3BR/1BA Farm house
for rent. Quiet country area.
Please call after 5pm.
386-752-0017. Leave message.
LULU, FL 3/2 recently
remodeled. CH/A, large porches.
$650. mo + dep.
386-752-3444 or 961-3031

740 Furnished
S Homes for Rent
Southern Oaks Country Club.
3br/2.5ba Aprox 3000 sqft. Split
floor plan, on the 9th Fairway.
New AC, 2.5 car garage, sprinkler,
concrete drive. Furnished. Move in
ready w/all appliances. Avail. now
Yearly Lease.(305)872-7911 View
at www.lakecitygolfvilla.com

75O Business &
750 Office Rentals
FOR LEASE: Downtown office
space. Convenient to
Court house.
Call 386-755-3456
For Lease: E Baya Ave. Two -
10(X) sqft office space units or
combined for 2000 sqft. 386-984-
0622 or weekends 386-497-4762
MIDTOWN COMMERCIAL
CENTER. brand new executive
suite & suite with warehouse
$6(X) monthly.
Call Vicki or Joe 386-935-2832.


750 Business &
50 Office Rentals
NICE OFFICE SPACE for lease.
Oak Hill Plaza. 900 sqft
from $450 a month
Tom 386-961-1086 DCA Realtor
SUB SHOP for lease.
All Equip. Avail. Old Willy J's
Across from Wal-Mart
386-623-2244

790 Vacation Rentals
Horseshoe Beach RV Lot.
Nice comer Lot with shade trees.
$295. mo Water/electric included
386-235-3633 or 352-498-5986
Scalloping Horseshoe Beach Spcl
Gulf Front 2br, w/lg porch, dock,
fish sink. wkend $395./wk $895.
386-235-3633/352-498-5986
alwaysonvacation.com #419-181
"Florida's Last Frontier"

805 Lots for Sale
BEAUTIFUL 5 acres in
Lake City, 100% owner financing,
no qualifying, $395 per month.
Please call 512-663-0065
PUBLISHER'S NOTE
All real estate advertising in this
newspaper is subject to the fair
housing act which makes it illegal
to advertise "any preference,
limitation, or discrimination based
on race, color, religion, sex,
disability, familial status or nation-
al origin; or any intention to make
such preference, limitation or
discrimination." Familial status
includes children under the age of
18 living with parents or legal
custodians, pregnant women and
people securing custody of chil-
dren under the age of 18. This
newspaper will not knowingly
accept any advertising for real es-
tate which is in violation of the
law. Our readers are hereby in-
formed that all dwellings adver-
tised in this newspaper are availa-
ble on an equal opportunity basis.
To complain of discrimination call
HUD toll free at 1-800-669-9777,
the toll free
telephone number to the hearing
impaired is 1-800-927-9275.

810 Home for Sale

4/2 fenced yard,
2 car garage, Fairly new roof &
HVAC Shed, fenced back yard.
MLS#77602, $162,500, R.E.O.
Realty Group 867-1271

Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
Neat & tidy 2/2, maybe 3/2. New
kitchen counters & tile. Open floor
plan. Mary Brown Whitehurst
965-0887 MLS# 77943 $99,000

Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
10 acres w/well maintained brick
home. 2012 sqft. Open split floor
plan. Lori Giebeig Simpson
365-5678 MLS# 74447 $149,000


Janet Creel

719-0382
540 W. Duval Street,
Lake City, Florida 32055


22 Acres, 67 sites R. V. DEEP WATER, Suwannee FLY UP the driveway home.
Park at 1-10 exit. Home and River Hatch Bend. 1200 45x45 hangar accompanies
rental cabins. 20,30,5 amp, sqft home with fireplace, this 3 bedroom, 2 bath
service, Cable T.V. and WI- porches & apartment, home in the Air Park. Like
FI at all sites. Priced to sell. workshop and barn. MLS new! MLS 73256
MLS 78793 72068








FAMILY HOME, 4 bedroom, FARM HOUSE on 39 acres LEASE or SALE 13,000
2 bath brick home on 1 south of town with over sqft building adjoining Red
acre witn fenced yard and 2,000 sqft of southern Lobster & Applebee's. MLS
a 3 car garage. Near town charm. MLS 78139 78714
in a quiet area. MLS 78787


INVESTMENT PROPERTY, SHORT SALE. Auto shop BANK OWNED 3/2 over
4 Duplexes with over $50K or ??? on Sisters Welcome 2,000 sqft with an in-
income. MLS 69380 Road. MLS 77196 ground pool. $129,000.00
MLS 79039













bildin los:fr ae* et losinMdtw Comrial AN i 4. :"O-4
Dollr Gnera an acoss rom Cener. urbCut andDranag, -PSS ver
'hih


2008 Frontier K-Cab
$18,990
2009 Frontier PRO-4X
$17,990
2009 Fontier K-Cab
$16,990
2010 Frontier C-Cab
$20,990
2008 Titan C-Cab 4x4
'$20,990
2007 Murano SL
$17,990
2010 rogue AWD
$19,990
2004 Titan C-Cab LE
$12,990
2009 Altima SL
$18,490
2011 Sentra SR
$17,490
2011 Altima Coupe
$19,990
2008 Ram 1500 ST/SX
$15,951
2011 Malibu 1LT
$23,990
2008 Altima 2.5
$13,990
2008 Civic LX
$13,990
2011 Scion TC
$17,990
2011 Corolla LE
$17,990
2010 Impala LT
$19,990
2011 Civic LX
$19,990
2008 Suburban LS
$20,900
2009 Santa Fe SE
$21,900






(386)2687444










LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 4, 2011


810 Home for Sale
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
3br/3ba Spacious home in estab-
lished area. 2414 sqft. Private yard
& patio. Lori Giebeig Simpson
365-5678 MLS# 78175 $159.000
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
3br/2ba. 1590 sqft. Lori Giebeig
Simpson. 365-5678 or
Mary Brown Whitehurst
965-0887 MLS# 74542 $110,000
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
Suwannee Co. 115 ac. Fenced &
cross Fenced. Pasture land, paved
rd. Elaine K. Tolar 386-752-4211
MLS# 77081 $345,000


810 Home for Sale
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
.97 ac. Centrally located to Lake
City & G'ville. Fenced, planted
pines, pasture. Elaine K. Tolar
752-4211 MLS# 73879 $291,030
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
New home in May Fair. Super area
corner lot. 4br split plan. Versatile
colors. Elaine K. Tolar
755-6488 MLS# 76919 $199,900
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
240 ac. Farm. Rolling Meadows.
Paved road, great access to Lake
City & G'ville. Elaine K. Tolar
386-752-4211 MLS# 70453


810 Home for Sale
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
Suwannee Co. 115 ac. Fenced &
cross fenced. 10 & 20 ac parcels
avail. Elaine K. Tolar 386-752-
4211 MLS# 67766 $448,500
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
Brick home in town on lake front.
3br/2ba. New roof & hardwoods.
Glass room w/view Elaine Tolar
755-6488 MLS# 78092 $249,900

LEASE/OPTION BUY
3br/2ba Home 2010 w/garage
on 1/2 acre. Owner Financing
386-623-2244


820 Farms &
2 Acreage
10-ac lot. Well/septic/pp. Owner
financing $300 dn, $663 mo 8.9%,
25 yrs. Deas Bullard Properties
386-752-4339 www.landnfl.com
4 1/2 acre lot. Lake Jeffery Road.
Gorgeous Oaks!Paved Rd
Owner Financing! NO DOWN!
$59,900. $525mo 352-215-1018.
www.LandOwnerFinancing.com
4 acres, Wellborn, New Well
installed, Beautifully wooded
w/cleared Home Site, owner fin,
no down, $39,900, $410 mon
Call 352-215-1018
www.LandOwnerFinancing.com


820 Farms &
2 Acreage
FARM- 7 stall harn.
17+ acres, pasture, cross fenced.
Close in $500. mo.
386-961-1086
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
61 ac. Parcel. SR 27 & 1-75 inter-
change. Great potential, fenced &
cross fenced. Elaine K. Tolar
752-4211 MLS# 758060 $368,040
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
40 ac.Parcel. Less then 2 mi from
city limits. Fenced road frontage
on US Hwy 441. Elaine K. Tolar
752-4211 MLS# 62092 $194K


870 Real Estate
870 Wanted


I Buy Houses
CASH!
Quick Sale Fair Price
386-269-0605


950 Cars for Sale

1995 BUICK PARK AVENUE,
4 Door, nice new cold air,
excellent cond., $3,000 OBO.
Call 386-961-9700 evenings 6-10


Rountree Moore Toyota Bucks "*" Rountree Moore Toyota Bucks

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h 1101 US Hwy 90W, Suite 130, Lake City, FL
1101 US Hwy 90 W, Suite 130, Lake City, FL


Buying Gold

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Selling:
LAKE CITY'S Gold, Silver
Platinum Bullion,
PRECIOUS METAL AmericanEagles,
Canadian Maple


DEALER
Located in the
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Leafs,
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Classified Department: 755-5440












Story ideas?


Contact
Robert Bridges
Editor
754-0428
rbridges@lakecityreporter.com


Sunday, September 4, 201 I


www.lakecityreporter.com


Section D


CHS1


By ANTONIA ROBINSON
arobinson@lakeQityreporter.com
He's not a culinary mas-
ter himself, but Romane
Jean has always been a fan
of Caribbean cuisine.
"My mom and dad were
real tight in cooking," said
Jean, who is originally from
Haiti. "Me, on the other
hand, I'm not that good in
the kitchen."
Jean, who graduated from
Columbia High School
in 1994 and now lives in
Atlanta, created '"Watcha
Cookin," a YouTube
Caribbean cooking show
a year ago. He also is the
executive producer.
"I wanted to show oth-
ers how good it is and how
easy Caribbean food can
be," he said. "I found there
wasn't a Caribbean cooking
show on air."
Christina Curry is the
executive chef on the '
show, which is posted on
YouTube.
Linking up with Curry
was a blessing, Jean said.
He put out anadvertise-
ment via Craigslist for a
cooking show host and she
responded.
"I wasn't looking for an
actor," he said. "I was look-
ing for an actual chef and
someone who came across
well on camera."
The two clicked as soon
as they met and work on
the show began, Jean said.
Curry is not Caribbean,
but her husband is also
Haitian, which shows view-
ers, "You don't have to be
Caribbean to make this
food."
Curry had made her own
cooking videos in the past.
"It was nothing big or
too major," she said. "It was
just me taking myselfwith
my Mac Book just to start
improving in the kitchen."
Featured dishes are

SHOW continued on 4D


asks, 'Watcha Cookin'?


One of show's signature dishes include Caymanian crab and conch chowder with fried plantain chips served with a chilled fruity wine spritzer.


4,


.k&


ABOVE: A fan favorite is the Bajan coo-coo, a dish from Barbados usually served with fish. RIGHT: Chef
Christina Curry poses for a photograph. Jean perhaps more comfortable behind the camera failed to pro-
vide photos of himself for this story.


Jerry Lewis: MIA at this year's MDA Telethon


By FRAZIER MOORE
AP Television Writer
NEW YORK No one would
sniff at all the dollars Jerry Lewis
raised for muscular dystrophy:
a couple of billion during his 45-
year reign as host of the MDA
Telethon.
But what kind of TV did he
offer in exchange? The short
answer: Jerry put on a show like
no other.
Labor Day this year promises
to be bland by comparison, with
the 85-year-old Lewis now ban-
ished from the annual rite he
built from scratch and molded in
his image.
As if deflated by the absence
of its larger-than-life host, 'The
46th Annual MDA Labor Day
Telethon" will fill just six hours
(Sunday from 6 p.m. to midnight
in each time zone; check local
listings for station), rather than
the grueling 211/-hour endurance
contest that Lewis.used to churn
through with his viewers in tow.
On this year's broadcast
(which, ironically, will no longer
be actually airing on Labor Day), a
quartet of lightweights are stand-
ing in for Jerry: Nigel Lythgoe
("So You Think You Can Dance"),
Nancy O'Dell ("Entertainment
Tonight"), Alison Sweeney ("The
Biggest Loser") and Jann Carl
(billed as "an Emmy-winning
journalist").
Celebrities will include Celine
Dion, Jennifer Lopez, Lady
Antebellum, Richie Sambora and
Jordin Sparks.
It may be entertaining. It may
spur contributions. But as a
media event, this year's telethon


can hardly match the display of
wretched excess Jerry Lewis
guaranteed, especially in his epic,
unbridled prime.
"Jerry is a ferociously contra-
dictory personality, and that's
what makes him fascinating to
watch," says satirist-actor-writer
Harry Shearer, a Jerry-watcher
for a half-century. He noted just
two of Lewis' clashing identities:
"the inner 9-year-old, set loose"
and the would-be deep thinker
"who fancies himself something
of an autodidact."
"It all makes for psychodrama
of a high order," Shearer mar-
vels.
Year after year, Lewis bounced
between the polarities of smarmy
sentimentalism and badgering
lunacy as if in a weightless envi-
ronment. He put his multiple
identities on raw display, each
constantly jostling for the spot-
light.
Hear him on a circa-1970s tele-
thon introducing singer Julius
LaRosa with syntax-butcher-
ing effusiveness as "the kind of
human being that is wonderful
to get close to and near, and then
you pray that it's contagious" and
as "what the literal translation of
the word 'professional' means,"
in possession of "probably the
best singing voice I think anyone
has ever heard, when you listen
to the heart that goes into it."
It was fascinating, ridiculous,
cringe-worthy and spellbinding
to see how Jerry held court for
the parade of entertainers, the
checks-bearing civic leaders and
corporate sponsors, and the ador-
able, afflicted kids.
The Jerry Lewis telethon was


a reality show decades before the
term or genre had been invented.
It was video retailing, years before
QVC. It was round-the-clock TV
companionship long before cable
news and the Weather Channel.
For nearly a full day, it was a
spectacle of show-biz glitz, heart-
tugging emotion and suspense:
Would Jerry make it to the end
without unraveling? Would the
level of pledges do justice to his
efforts at soliciting them?
There was a perfect symbio-
sis of the telethon and Lewis.
He made muscular dystrophy as
big a star as he had once been.
Meanwhile, aligning himself
with the search for its cure gave
him the gravitas he had always
sought. He branded the disease
with himself, and vice versa.
He was not only the host of
the telethon and chairman of the
Muscular Dystrophy Association
(a job he would hold for 60
years), but the central figure in
a massive enterprise as the self-
styled avenging angel of a dread
disease.
The contradictions, though,
were legion, breathtaking to
behold. Shearer covered the 1976
telethon during its heyday for Film
Comment magazine.
"The telethon combines the hys-
terical mystique of the (Las Vegas)
Strip superstar with equally hyster-
ical desperation of the downtown i
lounge act," he wrote. "It mixes the :
glib disinterest of a TV star taping
a thirty-second public-service spot
with the glib agony of a comedian
on a crusade."
There was the unresolvable ques-
MDA continued on 4D


ASSOCIATED PRESS
In this Sept. 7, 1998 file photo, Jerry Lewis stands in front of a countdown
board after announcing a record $51.5 million in pledges and contributions
for the fight against neuromuscular diseases during, the 33rd annual Jerry
Lewis Muscular Dystrophy Telethon in Los Angeles.


Lake City Reporter





LIFE


lunesy pnoio


.:. "
T" *,. ,". :. ; "
: '.,,
,










LAKE CITY REPORTER LIFE SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 4, 2011


State of the planet


Now and then the president gives us a
"state of the union" address. Maybe we
could use a "state of the planet" report!
Every day, thousands of children are
starving in Africa. Several countries
are warring internally, resulting in rape,
torture, and other war crime atrocities.
Many European countries have civil
unrest, and failing economies.
And, the United States has its own seri-
ous problems. The national debt is out
of control. Corporations are fleeing over-
seas to avoid high taxes, and they can't
compete on a level playing field with the
lower wages and cheap manufacturing of
developing countries. The U.S. has the
highest unemployment rate in decades.
Highways are crumbling, and food
costs continually rise because of record
droughts and crop failures. Recently in
Florida we've had our share of natural
disasters-wildfires, hurricanes, numer-
ous and frequent tornadoes with record
loss of life, floods, and declining resourc-
es like fresh water.
We may feel helpless, and ask, "What
can I do?" Well, I don't think we can
change the world soon, or by ourselves.


But there may be some
small and easy things
we can do. Here are a
few ideas. Maybe you
can think of some more
things that might help.
Keep up your hope.
Without hope, all is lost.
Look for the positive Robert Dc
side. "Problems" can
be seen as challenges, Bob.Denny8@gmai
and even as opportuni-
ties. Remind yourself of
some of the one-liner philosophies: "It's
always darkest before the dawn." "Every
cloud has a silver lining." "Look upon the
doughnut, not upon the hole."
Don't dwell on the problems. Instead,
focus on goals and solutions. What would
you like the world to be like? What can I
do to help make it all work?
Don't blame others. It doesn't help to
blame the government, wealthy corpora-
tions or their wealthy executives, poor
undocumented immigrants trying des-
perately to feed their families, or one of
the political parties. Instead of blaming,
think about what you can do.


*n y


enny
l.com


Don't expect the gov-
ernment to solve the
problems for you. When
you point the finger at
someone, remember four
fingers are pointing back
at you.
Live within your means.
Don't spend more each
month than your monthly
income. Balance your


budget Spend less, or
find a way to earn more.
We can do this as individuals, as families, as
a community, and as a nation.
In these hard times, instead of pump-
ing money into investments in a continu-
ally declining economy, invest first in
yourself, your education, your home, and
your career.
Identify and develop your own resourc-
es, tools, and strengths. Make the most
of what you've got to work with.
Take care of your own back yard first.
But each of us also has an opportunity to
be a better citizen. Keep yourself edu-
cated and informed. Support local efforts
to improve schools, business, community


resources, and industries like farming
and ranching.
Volunteer. Lend a hand. Make a differ-
ence. If everyone on Earth did that, we'd
be on our way to solving all our problems.
There's always a need for more help
in many areas, like with schools, youth
centers, community centers, volunteer
fire departments, hospitals, hospices, and
senior centers.
Communicate with your elected offi-
cials. A democracy must have educated,
informed citizenry, because this is a land
"of the people, by the people, and for the
people." The Constitution has worked
since the nation's birth. Our governmen-
tal representatives need your input and
guidance, in order to maintain the coun-
try we've believed in for more than 200
years. Call or write to them. They are
accessible.
If everyone did just some of these
steps, we'd all be better off. Why not
start now, with you and me?

N Robert Denny is a licensed mental health
therapist, and teaches psychology at Florida
Gateway College in Lake City.


Space junk might need cleaning up


By SETH BORENSTEIN
AP Science Writer

WASHINGTON Space junk has made
such a mess of Earth's orbit that experts
say we may need to finally think about
cleaning it up.
That may mean vacuuming up debris
with weird space technology cosmic
versions of nets, magnets and giant umbrel-
las, according to the chairman of an expert
panel that issued a new report on the prob-
lem Thursday.
There are 22,000 objects in orbit that
are big enough for officials on the ground
to track and countless more smaller ones
that could do damage to human-carrying
spaceships and valuable satellites. The
International Space Station has to move
out of the way of debris from time to time.
"We've lost control of the environment,"
said retired NASA senior scientist Donald
Kessler, who headed the National Academy
of Sciences report "
Since the space age began 54 years~ago,
civilization has littered the area just above
Earth's atmosphere with leftover boost-
ers and other parts that come off during
launches, as well as old satellites. When
scientists noticed that this could be a
problem, they came up with agreements to
limit new space junk and those plans had
been working.
Those agreements are intended to make
sure what is sent into orbit eventually falls
back to Earth and burns up.
But two events in the past four years
- a 2007 Chinese anti-satellite weapon
test and a 2009 crash-in-orbit of two sat-
ellites put so much new junk in space
that everything changed, the report said.


The widely criticized Chinese test used a
missile to smash an aging weather satel-
lite into 150,000 pieces of debris larger
than four-tenths of an inch and 3,118
pieces can be tracked by radar on the
ground, the report said.
"Those two single events doubled the
amount of fragments in Earth orbit and
completely wiped out what we had done in
the last 25 years," Kessler said.
All that junk that means something has
to be done, "which means you have to look
at cleaning space," said Kessler.
The study only briefly mentions the
cleanup possibility, raising technical, legal
and diplomatic hurdles. But it refers to
a report earlier this year by a Defense
Department science think-tank that out-
lines all sorts of unusual techniques. The
report by the Defense Advanced Research
Projects Agency is called "Catcher's Mitt"
and it mentions harpoons, nets, tethers,
magnets and even a giant dish or umbrella-
shaped device that would sweep up tiny
pieces of debris.
While the new report doesn't recom-
mend using the technology, Kessler said
it's needed. He likes one company's idea of
a satellite that is armed with nets that could
be sprung on wayward junk. Attached to
the net is an electromagnetic tether that
could either pull the junk down to a point
where it would burn up harmlessly or
boost it to safer orbit
NASA officials said they are examining
the study.
The report is from the National Research
Council, a branch of the National Academy
of Sciences, which is an independent orga-
nization chartered by Congress to advise
the government on science.


This computer generated graphic provided by NASA shows images of objects in Earth orbit
that are currently being tracked. Space junk has made such a mess of Earth's orbit that
experts say we may need to finally think about cleaning it up. That may mean vacuuming up
debris with weird space technology cosmic versions of nets, magnets and giant umbrel-
las, according to the chairman of an expert panel that issued a new report on the problem
Thursday.


Cousin of accused shooter starts charity


By AUCIA A. CALDWELL
Associated Press

WASHINGTON The cousin of the
Army psychiatrist accused in a shooting
rampage at an Army post in Texas has
created a Muslim charity that denounces
violence in the name of Islam, and is using
the 10th anniversary of the Sept. 11 attacks
to draw attention to the foundation.
Philanthropy experts said it's rare that
the family of someone allegedly respon-
sible for such violence would take such a
step, rather than a victim's relatives.
Nader Hasan is the cousin of Maj. Nidal
Hasan, who is charged with 13 counts
of premeditated murder and 32 counts
of attempted premeditated murder in
the November 2009 attack at Fort Hood,
Texas.
The Nawal Foundation is intended
to "unite people against violence in the
name of Islam unequivocally, and embrace
American patriotism." Nawal is an Arabic
Word for "gift."
Nader Hasan, a lawyer in Fairfax, Va.,
declined Wednesday to discuss his cousin.
The charity is starting up just days before
the 10th anniversary of the Sept. 11 attacks.
The website doesn't mention his family's
connections to the Fort Hood attack.
"No violence in the name of Islam.
.Ever," the website says.
Nidal Hasan could face the death pen-
alty if convicted in a military trial set to
start in March.
At a military court hearing last fall, wit-
nesses testified that a gunman wearing an
Army combat uniform shouted "Allahu
Akbar!" "God is great!" in Arabic and
opened fire in a small, crowded medical
building where deploying soldiers were
receiving vaccinations and having medical
tests.
Experts predicted the charity will face


serious challenges raising money.
The director of the Center for
Philanthropy and Public Policy at the
University of Southern California, Jim
Ferris, said relatives of victims typically
launch charitable groups to prevent a simi-
lar tragedy.
"A lot of giving is sort of emotional
(from) people who have a lot of empathy
for the victim or concern for the issues,"
Ferris said. "It's not quite the same when
you don't have the victim."
The charity also will run into reluctance
from the Muslim community, experts
said. Allegations of wrongdoing by other
Muslim charities may taint perceptions
of the foundation's work among potential
donors, said Jon Alterman, director of the
Middle East Program at the Center for
Strategic and International Studies. Some
of those charities have been accused of
steering money to groups opposed to U.S.
interests.
"There's a lot of concern that organiza-
tions might divert some of the money or
might not be entirely legitimate," Alterman
said. '"There's an additional level of scru-
tiny within this community. Who do you
want to support? And if you give support
are you going to end up with the FBI
knocking at your door?"
One relative of a Fort Hood victim, Leila
Hunt Willingham, said she supports any
group that promotes peace and patrio-
tism.
"If this is their true intention, I think
it is a wonderful and hopefully an educa-
tional example for those who may judge
and think all Muslims are violent," said
Willingham, whose brother Spc. Jason
Dean "J.D." Hunt was killed.
Nader Hasan said his foundation is in
the process of incorporating in Virginia
and filing for tax-exempt status with the
International Revenue Service.


Page Editor: Robert Bridges, 754-0428












Page EdItor: Emogene Graham, 754-0415 LAKE CITYREPORTER ADVICE & CROSSWORD SUNDAY SEPTEMBER 4, 2011


DEAR ABBY


Christian


the right

DEAR ABBY: I have been
seeing "Randy" for.more than
a year. We get along great.
He makes me laugh and I can
envision us sharing the rest of
our lives together.
SI am an atheist and Randy
is a Christian. I don't mind
his family's views, and I have
rip problem with. religion as
long as it isn't being forced
on me. However, thinking
about a future with Randy,
I wouldn't want his family's
religious views forced on my
children, either. I want them .
to make their own choices
when they're old enough to
understand.
Randy wants an "ideal
Christian family," where he
raises his children on his terms
and with his religious views. I
don't feel children should be
forced into something from
birth. Again, I have no problem
with Randy's or his family's
beliefs; I just don't want them
impressed on my children's
young minds. What can we do?
-A MIND OF MY OWN
DEAR MIND OF YOUR
OWN: You can part friends
and agree to disagree.
If Randy wants an "ideal
Christian family" in which he
raises his children "on his
terms and with his religious
beliefs," there will be no
compromise. And if you are
adamant that your children
choose their own beliefs
when they're old enough to
understand, you and they -
- will be better off if the father
you choose for them has simi-


i family man isn t


choice for atheist


Abigail Van Buren
www.deqrabbycom

lar beliefs.

DEAR ABBY: My friend
and roommate "Kristina" is a
great person with a big heart.
However, one of her "quirks" is.
starting to bother me, and Im
not sure how to deal with it.
Kristina is an extremely
picky eater who is repulsed
by any ethnic food. I am
AsLan, and if we pass an Asian
restaurant (or any other eth-
nic restaurant, for that matter)
she makes comments like,
"How can people eat that?" or,
"I'hat's disgusting!" When I
have pointed out to her that
her attitude can be insulting,
she casually apologizes but
her behavior continues.
I realize Kristina is set in
her ways and that there's
probably nothing I can do to
change her attitude toward
cultural cuisine. I feel like
a nag every time I suggest
she's being insensitive. Do
you have any suggestions
as to how I can respond to
her disparaging comments?
- RAISED ON RICE IN
CALIFORNIA
DEAR RAISED ON RICE:


"Great" people with "big
hearts" do not say the first
thing that pops into their
heads, particularly when
they know it can be hurtful.
Because you have,already
told Kristina her comments
are insensitive and insulting,
and she continues to make
them, it's time you recognize
that she doesn't care about
your feelings.
The surest ways to insulate
yourself are to avoid going
near ethnic restaurants when
you're with her, or spend less
time in her company.
** ** **
DEAR ABBY: I know a very
nice family from another
country whose little girl
would be adorable except for
one thing facial hair. The
child has a dark "unibrow"
and a thick moustache. She's
hairier than most men I know.
I would like to recommend
a cosmetologist to them, but
I know other cultures have
different views on facial hair.
My husband says I should
mind my own business. What
do you say, Abby? ILLINOIS
NEIGHBOR
DEAR NEIGHBOR. While
your impulse is laudable, lis-
ten to your husband. Unless
the little girl or her mother
mentions that she is being
teased because of her facial
hair, do not broach the sub-
ject.
* Write Dear Abby at
www.DearAbby.com or
P.O. Box 69440, Los
Angeles, CA 90069.


HOROSCOPES


ARIES (March 21-April
19): Positive thoughts will
bring positive action. Don't
let an argument with some-
one stifle your plans. You will
discover how skillful you are
when faced with an unexpect-
ed challenge. *****
TAURUS (April 20-May
20): Get out and enjoy your
day. Networking or getting
together with friends will be
entertaining and result in
an interesting development
that may entail travel or pick-
ing up valuable information.
Don't make a snap decision.
Love is on the rise. ***
GEMINI (May 21-June 20):
Don't give someone an ultima-
tum unless you are prepared
to walk away without getting
what you want. It will be dif-
ficult to resolve an emotional
matter. A partnership you rely
on will not be as supportive as
you hoped. ***
CANCER (June 21-July
22): Don't make a sudden
move because you are trying
to seek revenge. You have to
consider the consequences
and realize that you may be
as much at fault as the other
person. Compassion will get
you further ahead. ***

CELEBRITY


THE LAST WORD
Eugenia Word

LEO (July 23-Aug. 22):
You need a change. Travel,
visit friends or get out and
enjoy activities that bring you
in touch with new acquain-
tances. You will have the
discipline to finish what you
start.*****
VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22):
Listen, observe and, most of
all, do not take anything or
anyone for granted. You will
face a challenge at home if
you aren't willing to compro-
mise. Accept the inevitable
and you can make whatever
situation you face work for
you. ** .
LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22):
Reach out and volunteer your
skills and knowledge, but
don't be willing to part with
your cash. Charity begins at
home, and you need to focus
on how you can bring more
cash into your household,
not donate to an outside
cause. Don't let a last-minute
change end in anger. ****
SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov.
21): Get organized and make
your move. An opportunity

CIPHER


by Luis Campos
Celebrity Cipher cryptogms are created from quotations by famous people, past and present
Each letter in the cipher stands for another
TODAY'S CLUE; N equals V
"XRJ HCGGH MH WKYIXH TW WKC BPYSC
RZ GTDRP." -- GCRITPJR JT NYISY
" WKC CIJ RZ GTDRP YH WR XTYI
GCYHMPC." TPYHWRWGC ,

PREVIOUS SOLUTION: "The voice collects and translates your bad physical
health ... your personal troubles." Placldo Domingo
(C) 2011 by NEA, Inc 9-5


to partner with someone
from your past will allow you
to resurrect some of your
old ideas and goals, making
whatever challenge you face
a real adventure. ***
SAGITTARIUS (Nov.
22-Dec. 21): Don't take mat-
ters into your own hands,
especially where emotional
issues are involved. You will
risk losing a friendship that
turns out to be more impor-
tant to you than you realize.
You can make changes, but
be respectful of the people
who will be influenced by the
measures you take. ***
CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan.
19): Take a close look at your
situation and make a deci-
sion based on what you can
afford. A property deal or
other investment will devel-
op, giving you an opportunity
to improve your assets. Love
and romance are looking
good, but paying for others
will lead to loss. ***
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb.
18): Voice your opinion. You
will have some creative ideas
and suggestions that can
change your personal and
financial future. Revisiting
some of your past relation-
ships and experiences will
help you see connections with
greater clarity. ***
PISCES (Feb. 19-March
20): Listen to what others
have to say. Once you have a
good idea what's expected of
you, it will be easier to move -
forward with your own plans.
It's important to protect your
feelings, your finances and
your possessions if you want -
to avoid disappointment. **


SUNDAY CROSSWORD


PARDON 'E' INTERRUPTION By Patrick Berry / Edited by Will Shortz [12-3-4 5 6e 7 9 1i T 112 ii13 14116 16117


Across
1 Director
6 Stereo syst.
" component
JJ) Recipe abbr.
14 Number
crunchers, for
short
18 State capital
whose name
comes from the
French for
"wooded area"
19 Mississippi
River's largest
tributary
20 The Hermit
Kingdom, once
21 Lie a lot
22 Island from
which Tiberius
ruled
23 Lively dance
performed as a
six-pack is being
laid to resQ?
26 Canine king's
regime?
28 Small chain
component
29 Baker of jazz
30 Dominant theme
31 West African
monetary unit,
32 Ones crunched
during crunch
time?
35 Tanned skin.
38 Hostile feelings
41 Eco-warriors?
48 Grammatical
topic
49 Earth tone

For any three answers,
call from a touch-tone
phone: 1-900-285-5656,
$1.49 each minute; or,
with a credit card, 1-800-
814-5554.


50 Smoke
51 Web address -
component
54 Beat soundly
56 Encounter with
an Alaskan bear?
59 Beneficiary of a
2008 bailout
63 Expected
64 Very unpleasant
65 Red Scare
prosecutor Roy
67 Mr. of old
cartoons
68 1813-14 vice
president
70 Fan club focus
71 Stockpile
73 Hundred Acre
Wood young 'un
74 Not permanent
76 Set of shot
glasses for
Christmas?
80 A man or a mouse
83 ___ equivalent
(measure of
explosive
strength)
84 Eggs served raw
85 W.W. II title
88 Native New
Zealander
89 Sharpshooter
Oakley when she
was a charming
young musician?
93 Have an
emotional impact
96 "Or __ what?"
97 Interject
98 Canning seal
99 Paterson's.
successor as
New York
governor
104 Newborn on a
ranch
107 Sneaky trick


108 Interstellar
valet's job?
113 Ship info kept
for the Spanish
Armada?
115 Foo Fighters
frontman Dave
117 Golf rarities
118 Drew on a
screen
119 A.L. M.V.P. in
2005 and 2007,
informally
120 House that
won't catch fire
121 Old Harper's
Weekly
cartoonist
122 Wheelless
vehicle
123 Desires
124 Bygone
communication

Down
1 1970 #lj1it for the
Jackson 5
2 Waterfall sound
3 Sufficiently aged
4 "Hamlet" courtier
5 Consider carefully
6 Stiffly awkward.
as movement
7 One doing course
work
8. __ Minh (1940s
independence
movement)
9 "Miss Julie"
composer Ned
10 Shinto shrine
entrance
11 Filled in
12 Cook so as to
lock in the
flavor, say
13 Comrade
14 B'geymen's
hiding places


15 Hoi ___
16 Compound also
called an olefin
17 Puts on the ballot
20 Mathematician
Gtdel
24 Comrade
25 Continuing to
criticize
unnecessarily
27 Pop name
32 Border
33 "What
nonsense!"
34 Plan for the
evening?
36 Start of a Wagner
title
37 Biblical priest at
Shiloh
39 Stable sounds
40 Hurt badly
42 Opposing
43 Snug retreat
44 "Wall Street"
character Gordon

45 ___ Chicago
Grill
46 Far-away
connector
47 Notorious
investor
51 Brabantio's fair
daughter
52 Not deceived by
53 "Gotta go," in
chat rooms
55 "Last Time .1 Saw
--" (Diana
Ross song)
57 Seer's perception
58 Blue uniform
wearer
60 All-Star Dick of
the 1960s-'70s
Knicks
61 Dumbfounded


62 Knuckle-headed
action?
65 U.S.N. rank
66 It's due south of
Iran
68 "C'mon,
sleepyhead!"
69 Starchy staple of
Africa
72 Bloodmobile
supply
75 Tuscaloosa
university, for
short


77 Smidgen
78 Workers' rights
agcy.
79 W.P.A. initiator
81 Like the climate
of 66-Down
82 "So I ___"
86 "Evita" narrator
87 Predatory fish
89 Like the day of
the summer
solstice
90 Smiley's creator


91 Is caught up in
the Rapture, e.g.
92 "Cool"
93 Dennis of the
court
94 Orchestral work
premiered in
1805
95 Moves laterally
100 Tried to
convince
101 "That's fine"
102 Thousand thou
103 Certain dental
repair


105 Aboveboard
106 Valley ___
108 Ring
109 Richard of "Bee
Season"
110 Outhouse door
symbol
111 Take turns?
112 One going on
foot'?
114 HPproduAs
116 Salty fillet


Answers to last Sunday's Crossword.
0P|RONTG RRONDO LAP D RPMS
RUMOR OCEAN I NR I I RIM A
ON EMORETIME M NEMONICS
E NE EEG O|M A N JIA S MUGG L E
NEU AGAS SEEIT
J IF ENGINEMOUNTS OULU
AM I LLIONEDELILANTENNI S
PAN ASONI DAPS R EEVIE
EDDY NOTTOMENT ION M E M
NOOI L LEXUS AT EATR E

M A L SM 91MI I L E
MAGNETIC ISIS NME I LE
AR.N DIV INEMOTHER POOL"
DI E ENOL EASEMENTS
RAMONA ENIAC LATEDATE
ELAN NOMENCLATURE LOS
TRALA OCAS ITT
VIDEOED IRONMIKE OlD_
ONEMOMENT STATESWOMEN
COEN VISIT TORIC ATSEA
ENDS ATTY SNAC K SHORN


2 9


4 1 5 6


5 4


4 3 7 8


94 3 7


8 2 3


2 5 7 '8


8 4 1 6


7 3 1


9 L L 9 L7V 6 8 6


V1 61 9 8 L ZL


9 1 6 L 9 S ZL 8


L E 8 1 6 9 L 9


L 8 9 LZ 9 6 17

SL 8 6 9 L 9



S 9 9 L 8 L 6


6 L IV I9 L 8 I 9


Page Editor: Emogene Graham, 754-0415


LAKE CITYREPORTER ADVICE & CROSSWORD SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 4, 2011










4D LAKE CITY REPORTER LIFE SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 4, 2011



Reality TV show 'Russian Dolls' stirs controversy


By VERENA DOBNIK
Associated Press
NEW YORK A mother is lecturing
her 23-year-old daughter about her love
life, flailing a kitchen knife above her head
for emphasis.
Mom's point She'd like her immigrant
daughter, from the former Soviet republic
of Moldova, to marry a man with similar
roots, keeping the family's East European
Jewish tradition.
Alas, the daughter informs mom that
she's already dating a Hispanic man.
But she soon dumps him, on-camera,
during a restaurant date.
The scene is captured in a new TV real-
ity show called "Russian Dolls," which
premiered on the Lifetime cable network
in August and airs Thursdays at 11:30 p.m.
EST.
It's been called the Russian "Jersey
Shore" or "Real Housewives," featuring six
women and two men, plus colorful extras
like Anna Kosov, the mother. They're all
from the former Soviet Union and either
live or have lived in Brooklyn's Brighton
Beach neighborhood. But only two actu-
ally hail from Russia.
The show has drawn the wrath of neigh-
bors and community leaders who say it cre-
ates a caricature of their immigrant world,
turning cast members into "Russians in
tacky clothes who do little more than eat,
drink and party," says John Lisyanskiy,
founder of the new nonprofit Russian-
Speaking American Leadership Caucus
and a budget analyst for the New York City
Council.
The show's characters do represent
"a small portion of our community,"
acknowledges Yelena Makhnin, executive
director of the Brighton Beach Business
Improvement District But she says her
neighborhood by the Brooklyn boardwalk
is mostly "a very intelligent, very well edu-
cated, hardworking community."
Kosov, a hairdresser, had to mend rela-
tions with her Mexican-born boss over
remarks she'd made on the show about
her daughter, Diana Kosov, dating the
Hispanic man.
"I told her, 'I'm not racist,'" she says. "I
love any kind of people."As for the scene
with the knife, "I am not killer!" says Anna
Kosov, smiling with amusement.
Still, she's serious about correcting any
misunderstanding. She took time on a
sunny summer afternoon to join the cast
for interviews at the Rasputin nightclub
and set things straight
"At that moment, I make borscht" she
explains. "Who is make borscht without
knife? I cut vegetables."
The truth is, there's reality TV and
then there's reality.
"Is that what it says?" asks Albert
Binman, roaring with laughter as he reads
a promo describing him as a spiffy 26-year-
old, a "wheeler-dealer" who "parties every
night" and "wants to marry a nice Russian
girl."
"I do not party every night," he says.
"And I want to marry a nice Jewish girl,
not necessarily Russian. Or else, why did
my parents send me to yeshiva?" A yeshiva
is an Orthodox Jewish school.
Albert goes to work every day, doing
medical billing. He lives in the New York
borough of Queens.
"I love to hang out with my younger


brother; he's 17 and he's the love of my
life," he says.
Real life may be more boring than TV,
but not always.
A fight between two women in the
cast erupted during interviews with The
Associated Press at Rasputin.
"Get the (expletive) out!" screamed
Marina Levitis, 35, who runs the glitzy
cabaret with her lawyer husband.
The remark is aimed at Sveta Rakhman,
a 47-year-old banker Levitis didn't know
before the series. The women developed
a distaste for one another, displayed in a
tense upcoming episode set in Rasputin.
The latest faceoff was over who would
be interviewed first, with Rakhman ending
up last "because she came last," Levitis
says angrily.
In the series debut, she, her husband
and two young children walk out in the
middle of an amateur belly-dancing perfor-
mance by her 56-year-old mother-in-law,
Eva Levitis. She "is just my husband's
mother. She's nobody to me," Levitis says
in the episode.
In fact, "we're a very close-knit family;
everybody gets along just fine," Marina
Levitis later tells the AP But "on TV, you
have to shock people, otherwise they're
not going to watch it."
Her mother-in-law brushes off the "she's
nobody" comment with a burst of laugh-
ter, explaining that the seeming hostility
between them "does not exist, actually."
When auditioning for the show and sign-
ing contracts, no one bargained for the
negative reactions.
"Left the Volga, Kept the Vulgar," read
one newspaper headline.
Anna Khazanova, a 22-year-old com-
mercial model, is wearing an ultra-short
dress that gives her few options for sitting
politely in front of an AP television camera.
But she says there's much more to her
than meets the lens, including mentoring
teenage girls who attend the modeling
school she started and runs.
"Family means the world to me," says
Khazanova, who shared a bedroom with
her older sister until the sibling went off to
medical school recently. "I've been work-
ing since I'm 15, and helped support my
family."
Rakhman, the banker, welcomes any
punches and hits right back.
She calls Rasputin's owners "these peo-
ple. I can eat them for breakfast, and spit
them for lunch."
And if viewers see "some overblown
stuff," she says, "it's good TV, it was fun."
Makhnin, of the business improvement
district, agrees, saying she's "not offend-
ed" by the show. "It's not a documentary;
it's a commercial TV project, with stereo-
typing," she says.
"Unfortunately," she adds, "this is what
the public buys."
Others are less forgiving, including
Lisyanskiy, who is friends with Marina
Levitis and husband Michael.
"This is not who we are," says the
advocate for Russian-speaking Americans.
"Even if it's of entertainment value, when
people are watching this kind of material,
it sticks with them, they start to believe
it."
But when all is said and shot-for-TV, says
Michael Levitis (who doesn't appear in the
show), "if you take this reality show seri-
ously, the joke is on you."


In this image taken from AP Television video, "Russian Dolls" cast member Diana Kosov
speaks with a reporter in New York. Running on the Lifetime cable network, the show has
been called the Russian "Jersey Shore" or "Real Housewives," featuring six women and two
men, plus colorful extras. Critics say the program casts the Jew York City Russian community
in a bad light and creates a caricature of their community.


SHOW: CHS grad has aYouTube hit

Continued From Page 1D


from different Caribbean
countries, such as
Aruba, Jamaica and the
Dominican Republic.
Preparation for the
show usually starts with
research, Curry said.
"I think about the things
I already know or love in
a certain country," she
said. "There are so many
Caribbean countries."
Curry might research
the national dish of a coun-
try and put her twist on it.
"Some Caribbean ingre-
dients may not be available
here," she said. "I make
something extremely
approachable with items
you can get and find at a
grocery store."
Her favorite dish she's
prepared on "Watcha
Cookin" is the Caribbean
jerk turkey burgers.
"It was so good, moist
and juicy," she said.
Putting together a cook-


ing show is fun but a lot
more work than anyone
watching would think,
Curry said.
"I had somewhat of an
idea because I've been a
chefs assistant at a home
show," she said. "That was
just small section."
The show has received
feedback and comments
from viewers trying the
different dishes, Jean said.
Jean's short term goal is
to get "Watcha Cookin" on
a major cable outlet, such
as the Food Network.
"We want to be able to
get the show out there," he
said. "Our goal is not
to be flashy. Our goal
from the beginning is to
help those who need help
cooking in a creative and
fun way."
Caribbean food isn't all
spicy and can be very easy
to make, Jean said.
There are also healthy


food choices withinCarib-
bean cuisines.
"We just want to encour-
age people to try new and
different things and step
out box," he said.
Visit youbtube.com/
user/watchacookin to see
the show.
"View and vive us feed-
back," Jean said. "We want
to make the show pleasing
to the audience."
Working on the show
has been great, Curry
said.
'This is something
really, really special," she
said. "Our recipes are
pretty easy and bursting
with flavor."
"Watcha Cookin" could
one day go global.
"It would be great to see
'Watcha Cooking' on the
Food Network, Cooking
Channel or any network
that is just kind to some-
thing like that," she said.


MDA: Lewis MIA

Continued From Page ID

tion of Lewis' motives he has famously
refused to say why he poured so much of
his life into MDA How much of what he
did was prompted by humanitarian urges?
How much is explained by the voracious
appetites of an attention hog?
And how to explain the choice of
theme songs by Lewis for his righteous
cause: the piteousness of "Smile (When
Your Heart Is Aching)," and, of course,
the riotously inappropriate "You'll Never
Walk Alone" with which Lewis, over-
come by emotion, ended each telethon,
daring his. audience to consider it a cruel
joke.
Lewis found a perfect counterbalance
for his excesses and vanities in the purity
and urgent need of "his" kids. Everything
he did he was doing in their service,
which, in his mind, absolved him of his
carte blanche life-or-death extravagance.
And it made him, at last, a success on
TV. He was a comedian-singer-writer-
actor-director-producer-movie star who,
after splitting with his partner Dean
Martin in the mid-1950s, had failed to
match his other triumphs with any real
television inroads. But on the telethon
each year, for 21V2 hours, he was the
unquestioned boss of the Love Network.
It's not as if his TV acceptance wasn't
a mixed blessing, as Shawn Levy
observed in his Lewis biography, "King
of Comedy."
On the one hand, Lewis was the star of
a hit show "for which the nation not only
dropped all else on a summer holiday
weekend but actually opened its wallets."
On the other hand, Lewis could never
be certain "that it was to him and not
his cause that the American public was
responding with its support."


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