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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028308/01652
 Material Information
Title: The Lake City reporter
Uniform Title: Lake City reporter (Lake City, Fla. 1967)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: John H. Perry
Place of Publication: Lake City Fla
Publication Date: 9/3/2011
Frequency: daily (monday through friday)[<1969>-]
weekly[ former 1967-<1968>]
daily
normalized irregular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Lake City (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Columbia County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Columbia -- Lake City
Coordinates: 30.189722 x -82.639722 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 95, no. 4 (Oct. 5, 1967)-
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000358016
oclc - 33283560
notis - ABZ6316
lccn - sn 95047175
sobekcm - UF00028308_01569
System ID: UF00028308:01652
 Related Items
Preceded by: Lake City reporter and Columbia gazette

Full Text




For openers
Columbia High,
Fort White
in ot--irnn Fririlv
000016 120511 ****3-DIGIT
LIB OF FLORIDA HISTORY
PO BOX 117007
205 SMA UNIV OF FLORIDA
GAINESVILLE FL 32611 1943


Lake


1 hurt
Driver injured
in Friday


326


crash.
e below


1 charged
McAlpin man
accused
of robbery.
See below


Reporter


Saturday, September 3, 201 I www.lakecityreporter.com Vol. 137, No. 188 E 75 cents


Rain-


packed

Lee

forms

off La.

Could bring 20
inches of rain to
Fla. Panhandle.

NEW ORLEANS (AP)
- A large storm system
churning in the Gulf Of
Mexico grew Friday into
Tropical Storm Lee, begin-
ning a Labor Day weekend-
long assault that could bring
up to 20 inches of rain in
some spots from Louisiana
to the Florida Panhandle.
The storm was expect-
ed to make landfall on the
central Louisiana coast
late Saturday and turn east
toward New Orleans, where
it would provide the biggest
test of rebuilt levees since
Hurricane Gustav struck
on Labor Day 2008.
Residents who have
survived killer hurricanes
such as Betsy, Camille and
Katrina didn't expect Lee to
live up to that legacy.
"It's a lot of rain. It's noth-
ing, nothing to Katrina,"
said Malcolm James, 59, a
federal investigator in New
Orleans who lost his home
after levees broke during
Katrina in August 2005 and
had to be airlifted by heli-
copter.
"This is mild," he said.
"Things could be worse."
Lee comes less than a
week after Hurricane Irene
killed more than 40 peo-
ple from North Carolina
to Maine and knocked out
power to millions. It was
too soon to tell if Hurricane
Katia, out in the Atlantic,
could endanger the U.S.
By Friday evening, the
outer bands of Lee, the 12th
named storm of the Atlantic
hurricane season, already
began dumping rain over
southeastern Louisiana,
southern Mississippi and
Alabama.
The storm's biggest
impact, so far, has been
in the Gulf of Mexico oil
fields. About half the Gulf's
normal daily oil production
has been cut as rigs were
evacuated, though oil prices
were down sharply Friday
on sour economic news.
Federal authorities said
169 of the 617 staffed pro-
duction platforms have
been evacuated, along with
16 of the 62 drilling rigs.
That's reduced daily pro-
duction by about 666,000
barrels of oil and 1.7 billion
cubic feet of gas.
Kevin Lucas, an offshore
worker from Lafayette, La.,
was evacuated Thursday by
boat from a production plat-
form. He was in the New
Orleans' French Quarter on
Friday. "It was rocking," he
said of the boat. "A few fel-
lows got seasick."
Tropical storm warn-
ing flags were flying from
Mississippi to Texas and
flash flood warnings extend-
LEE continued on 3A


Two injured in downtown crash


TONY BRITT/L3 e City Hep:,reri
A Columbia County sheriffs deputy helps load a wrecked vehicle onto a tow truck Thursday night following a crash
at the intersection of Main and Duval streets. The crash occurred around 10:21 p.m..when a 2001 Ford F-150 pickup
truck, driven by Darlene Diane Belcher, 46, Lake City, ran the traffic signal and collided with a 2007 Nissan Altima
driven by Ashley Brook Jolley, 18, of White Springs, according to Lake City Police Department reports. The drivers of
both vehicles were taken to iocal hospitals for treatment of their injuries. Belcher was cited for running the red light,
reports said.



Hiring standstill points to


growing risk of recession


WASHINGTON (AP)
- Employers added
no jobs in August an
alarming setback for the
economy that renewed
fears of another recession
and raised pressure on
Washington to end the
hiring standstill.
Worries flared Friday
after the release of the
worst jobs report since
September 2010. Total
payrolls were unchanged,
the first time since 1945
that the government
reported a net job change
of zero. The unemploy-
ment rate stayed at 9.1
percent.
The dismal news two
day before Labor Day
sent stocks plunging.

HIRING continued on 3A


In this Aug. 31, 2011 photo, some of an estimated 4,000 people wait to enter a job fair
called the "For The People Jobs Initiative," where job seekers met employers, job coun-
selors, skills trainers and others, at Crenshaw Christian Center in South Los Angeles.


1 hospitalized in Friday accident


' ~ -.


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Columbia County Sheriff's Deputy Patrick Smyth passes by a GMC truck resting on its
side along Southwest King Street Friday afternoon following a two-vehicle wreck. One
of the drivers was taken to an area hospital in an ambulance. Further details were not
available at press time.


McAlpin

man faces
robbery

charges
From staff reports
A McAlpin man was
arrested and faces rob-
bery charges after he
allegedly stole $9 from
a local motel patron
late Friday afternoon,
Columbia County sher-
iff's officials said.
Timothy Ralph
Bucklin, 49, South
U.S. 129, McAlpin, was
charged with robbery
and resisting an officer
in relation to the inci-
dent. He was booked into
the Columbia County
Detention Facility on
$2,000 bond.
MCALPIN continued on 3A


IDs

made

in drug

bust

Four arrested
after discovery
of meth lab.

From staff reports

Local authorities have
released the names and list-
ed the charges concerning
the discovery of a metham-
phetamine lab Thursday in
Columbia County.
Arrested were:
Simon Pawlak, 27, 448
NE Tammy
Lane. Pawlak
was charged
with viola-
tion of proba-
tion, posses-
sion of drug I
parapher-
nalia and Pawlak
possession
of metham-
phetamine
in connec-
tion with
the case. He
was booked
into the Periy
Columbia
Detention
Facility with-
out bond.
Rose
Marie Perry,
53, 2153 NW
Old Wire Hall
Road. Perry
was charged
with posses-
sion of drug
parapher-
nalia and
possession
of metham-
phetamine Trowell
in connec-
tion with the
case. She was booked into the
Columbia County Detention
Facility on $16,000 bond.
Raymond Hall, 24, 1600
E. Duval St. Hall was charged
with possession of drug par-
aphernalia. He was booked
into the Columbia County
Detention Facility without
bond.
Jackie Trowell, 56, 448
NE Tammy Lane. Trowell
was charged with possession
of a firearm by a convicted
felon, possession of drug
paraphernalia and possession
of methamphetamine in con-
nection with the case. She
was released from the jail on
$17,000 bond.
According to Columbia
County sheriffs reports, on
Thursday afternoon deputies
found a clandestine meth-
amphetamine laboratory on
arriving at 448 NE Tammy
Lane to serve an arrest war-
rant.
"Deputy Jesse Cieslik dis-
covered an active metham-
phetamine laboratory in a
shed on the property," said
Sgt. Ed Seifert, Columbia
County Sheriff's Office
public information officer.
"Methamphetamine was
actively being processed at
the time."
Columbia County Multi-
Jurisdictional Task Force
BUST continued on 3A


CALL US:
(386) 752-1293
SUBSCRIBE TO
THE REPORTER:
Voice: 755-5445
Fax: 752-9400


91
Partly cloudy
WEATHER, 2A


Opinion ................ 4A
Business ................ 2A
Advice & Comics.......... 6A
Puzzles ................. 8A


!iWo
I:


TODAY IN
PEOPLE
,pacio. Seagal
den, dog. killing.


COMING
TUESDAY
weekend d neA s
roundup


Uity


1 u84264 )1


!%









LAKE CITY REPORTER DAILY BRIEFING SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 3, 2011


S3 Friday:
Y Afternoon: 9-3-9
Evening: 4-3-6


'! 4) Friday:
Afternoon: 9-8-6-0
Evening: 4-1-9-6


', Thursday:
4-11-14-15-25


PEOPLE IN THE NEWS

Arpaio, Seagal deny dog killing during raid


PHOENIX
aricopa County
Sheriff Joe Arpaio
and actor Steven
Seagal deny accusa-
tions by a Phoenix
man and his lawyer that a family dog
was killed during a raid for Seagal's
reality TV show.
The sheriff's office said in a news
release the allegation is without
merit. Seagal added he's outraged.
The action movie actor was partici-
pating in the raid as a special deputy
sheriff for his show "Steven Seagal
Lawman" on the A&E cable channel.
His movie credits include "Under
Siege," "Above the Law" and "Fire
Down Below."
Seagal and numerous deputies and
posse members were present March
9 during a raid at the home of Jesus
Llovera. In the claim, Llovera said an
11-month-old puppy was killed along
with 100 roosters.
According to witnesses at the raid,
(a dog was present on Llovera's prop-
erty when deputies and SWAT team
members, including Seagal, entered
the premises with a search warrant
to arrest Llovera on cockfighting
charges and seize all evidence per-
taining to the crime.
Arpaio said there's no evidence to
back up the claim that his officers
killed a dog.
"If my deputies, or posse man
Seagal for that matter, had done
something so awful like shooting a
-family dog, then where are the pho-
.tos to prove it?" Arpaio asked.
In Llovera's claim, the sheriff's
office and Seagal are accused of set-
.ting off explosives to create a distrac-
tion and confusion. The claim said
Seagal was free to commandeer a
-tank and crash through an iron gate.

Judge: Prince should pay
$4M in perfume lawsuit
: NEW YORK- A New York court
said Prince should payalmost $4


Actor Steven Seagal smiles on his arrival at Sheremetyevo airport in Moscow.
Maricopa County Sheriff Joe Arpaio and actor Steven Seagal deny accusations by
Jesus Llovera and his lawyer that a family dog was killed during a raid for Seagal's
reality TV show.


million to a per-
fume company that
claimed he hobbled
its efforts to market
a perfume named for
one of his albums.
A court referee
Prince recommended a
roughly $3.95 million
award last week.' The award would
have to be confirmed by another
judge.


the Atlanta penitentia-
ry with a release date
of Sept 29. He had
checked into a half-
way house in Atlanta
this week after serv-
ing months in an
Harris Arkansas prison.
The transporta-
tion arrangements appear to be the
reason he's back behind bars, his
lawyer said.


Rapper T.I. returned to Green Day: Sagging
federal prison in Atlanta pants cost airline seat


ATLANTA The lawyer for rap-
per TI. said Friday that he's work-
ing to have the Grammy winner
returned to a halfway house after a
transportation flap left him locked up
again in a federal penitentiary.
The Federal Bureau of Prisons web-
site Friday shows that the rapper is at


OAKLAND Green Day front
man Billie Joe Armstrong said his
sagging pants cost him a seat on a
Southwest Airlines flight
He was asked before take-off to
hike his pants higher. He and a com-
panion were taken off the plane.
M Associated Press


,Celebrity Birthdays


* "Beetle Bailey" cartoonist
Mort Walker is 88.
* Actress Anne Jackson is
85.
* Actress Eileen Brennan is
79.
* Country singer Tompall
Glaser is 78. .
* Actress Pauline Collins is
71.


* Rock singer-musician Al
Jardine is 69.
* Actress Valerie Perrine is
68.
* Rock musician Donald
Brewer (Grand Funk
Railroad) is 63.
* Actor Charlie Sheen is 46.
* Olympic gold medal snow-
boarder Shaun White is 25.


Daily Scripture
"The earth is filled with your
love, Lord; teach me your
decrees."
Psalm I 19:64

Thought for Today
"In the arts, the critic is the
only independent source of
information.The rest is adver-
tising."
Pauline Kael,
American movie critic (1919-2001)

Lake City Reporter
HOW TO REACH US Controller Sue Brannon ....754-0419
Main number ........(386) 752-1293 (sbrannon@lakecdtyreporter.com)
Fax number ...............752-9400
Circulation............... 755445 CIRCULATION
Online... www.lakecKyreporter.com Home delivery of the Lake City Reporter
The Lake City Reporter, an affiliate of should be completed by 6:30 a.m.
Community Newspapers Inc., Is pub- Tuesday through Saturday, and by 7:30
Itshed Tuesday through Sunday at 180 am. on Sunday.
E. Duval St, Lake City, Fla. 32055.38-7 445 to report any
Periodical postage paild at LakeCity, Fla. Pa 7 to port any
Member Audit Bureau of Circulaton and problems with your delivery service.
The Associated Press. In Columbia County, customers should
All material herein Is property of the Lake call before 10.30 a.m. to report a ser-
City Reporter. Reproduction In whole or vice error for same day re-delivery. After
In part Is forbidden without the permls- 1030 am., next day re-delivery or ser-
ston of the publisher. U.S. Postal Service vice related credits will be issued.
No. 310480.
In all other counties where home delivery
POSTMASTER: Send address changes is available, next day re-delivery or ser-
S .O Box 1709' vice related credits will be issued.
Publisher Todd Wilson.....754-0418 Circulation ............755-5445
(twilson@lakedcltyreporter.com) (circulation@lakecityreporter.com)
NEWS Home delivery rates
Editor Robert Bridges .....754-0428 (Tuesday through Sunday)
(rbridges@lakedtyreporter.com) 12Weeks.................. $26.32
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Director Ashley Butcher ...754-0417 Rates h idude 7% sales tax
(abutcher@lakecltyreporter.com) Mail rates
CLASSIFIED 12 Weeks.................. $41.40
To place a classified ad, call 755-5440. 24 Weeks................... $82.80
BUSINESS 52 Weeks..................$179.40

CORRECTION
The Lake City Reporter corrects errors of fact in news
items. If you have a concern, question or suggestion, please
call the executive editor. Corrections and clarifications will run
in this space. And thanks for reading.


Fla. soldier killed
in Afghanistan
MIAMI Officials
said a soldier from cen-
tral Florida was killed
in Afghanistan support-
ing Operation Enduring
Freedom.
The Department of
Defense reports that
Spc. Dennis James Jr.,
21 of Deltona,Fla., died
Wednesday from wounds
suffered when insurgents
attacked his unit with
an.improvised explosive
device in Wardak province,
Afghanistan.
James was assigned
to the 2nd Battalion, 4th
Infantry Regiment, 4th
Brigade Combat Team,
10th Mountain Division,
Fort Polk, La.


PENSACOLA The
only woman charged in
connection to the 2009
slaying of a Pensacola
couple has been sentenced
to 28 years in prison.
Pamela Long was sen-
tenced Friday morning for
helping the people who
killing Byrd and Melanie
Billings.
Authorities said Long
helped hide the safe stolen
from the Billings' home
and disposed of handguns
used in the crime.
Prosecutors said seven
men dressed in black,
ninja-style garb and drove
to the wealthy couple's
home with a plan to steal
a safe they mistakenly
thought had more than $1
million in cash.

Surfer bit on
ankle by shark
NEW SMYRNA BEACH
- Authorities said a shark
bit a surfer in central
Florida.
Volusia County Beach
Patrol reports that a shark
got Daniel True, 19, on


MIAMI So a bride
walks into a bar....
Except it was no joke to
German newlywed Sandra
Scharf when she entered
the Rum Barrel'Bar in
Key West earlier this week
looking for her wedding
dress.
But thanks to a local bar
owner and the wonders
of social media, bride and
dress were reunited.
Scharf and her, husband
were headed to the airport
Tuesday with their
8-month-old twins when
they discovered they'd
left the dress on the roof
the car. A waitress there
recalled seeing a Facebook
posting from neighboring
Island Dogs Bar about the
lost dress and alerted the
couple.

Rubio's mother
suffers strokes
MIAMI U.S. Sen.
Marco Rubio's mother has
suffered a series of debili-
tating strokes.
A spokesman for the


THE WEATHER


> PARTLY T-STORMS
CLOUDY


HI 9169 HI 89LO72


An Army carry team moves a transfer case containing the
remains of Spc. Dennis James Jr., 21 of Deltona Friday at
Dover Air Force Base, Del. According to the Department
of Defense, James, died supporting Operation Enduring
Freedom.


the ankle Friday morning,
south of Ponce de Leon
Inlet True had been wad-
ing in about 4 feet of water.


Florida lawmaker con-
firmed Friday that Rubio's
mother Oria Rubio Garcia,
79, had a relatively mild
stroke two weeks ago but
was hit with two more ear-
lier this week.
Rubio has canceled sev-
eral Florida appearances to
be with her in Miami.

Man gets 12
years for robbery
BARTOW A central
Florida man has been
sentenced to 12 years in
prison for a botched rob-
bery that left one of his
accomplices dead.
As part of a deal with
Polk County prosecutors,
Garie Lamay, 29, pleaded
no contest Wednesday
to third-degree murder,
armed burglary and
attempted armed robbery.
Authorities said Lamay
was part of a group of men
who intended to steal mari-
juana from a Poinciana
home in July 2010. A resi-
dent shot Berthony Pascal,
25, who was later found
dead.
Another man involved
in the robbery, Steeve
Vernet, 29, pleaded no
contest in July to the same
charges as Lamay. His will
be sentenced on Sept. 15.
* Associated Press


j T-STORMS



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labasseel 9
92/71 ,

86/76 -1 ilWNac
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City
M /Cape Canaveral
8/7 Daytona Beach
1 n Ft. Lauderdale
0 DaS74 Fort Myers
8 74 Gainesville
IN 0 Jacksonville
7 a Key West
90/73 8a/75 Lake City
S3 Miami
\ Naples
West Pai BN Ocala
87/75 Orlando
\ Ft. LaI Panama City
t t, 88/77 Pensacola
74 8/7 Tallahassee
17/75 'j Tampa
K. 8r76 Valdosta
K W. Palm Beach


I Al A KE I A AN


TEMPERATURES
High Friday
Low Friday
Normal high
Normal low
Record high
Record low

PRECIPITATION
Friday
Month total
Year total
Normal month-to-date
Normal year-to-date


93
69
89
70
99 in 1907
62 in 1891

0.00"
0.00"
26.68"
0.38"
37.14"


SUN
Sunrise todda
Sunset today
Sunrise toMr.
Sunset torn.

MOON
Moonrise today
Moonset today
Moonrise torn.
Moonset tornm.


.7Va.,m.
7:51 p.m.
7:09 a.m.
7:50 p.m.

1:15 p.m.
11:50 p.m.
2:17 p.m.


0000
Sept. Sept. Sept. Sept.
4 12 20 27
First Full Last New


Sunday
87/77/t
89/75/t
89/80/t
90/76/t
89/73/t
88/74/t
90/80/t
89/72/t
89/79/t
90/77/t
89/73/t
90/75/t
84/78/t
87/78/t
86/76/t
90/78/t
87/74/t
90/77/t


Monday
90/77/t
92/78/t
91/82/pc
92/77/pc
90/75/t
90/76/t
89/80/t
89/74/t
92/81/t
92/78/pc
91/75/t
93/76/t
88/79/t
90/77/t
88/77/t
91/79/t
88/76/t
91/80/t


S An exclusive
Service
brought to
MillMfl our readers
our dm tsLu
Today's by
ultraviolet The Weather
radiation risk Channel.
for the area on ane
to l

HM___& V--- =IW I-
Forecasts, data and
.j graph w.ire r 0 2011 Watherm
'fll t Centra, LP, Madmon, Wis.
hertieJ wwWweatherpublltle.con


On this date in
1998, Hurricane
Earl made landfall
early in the morn-
ing near Panama
City, RFla., as a cat-
egory 1 storm with
maximum sustained
winds of 80 mph.
The storm ended
a drought through
Georgia and the
Carolinas.


AROUND FLORIDA


Women gets 28
years for deaths Bride, dress united
through Facebook


I


1 SATURil-


SUNDAY


r WEAMER JY -THE.'NCUR


Page Editor: Jason M. Walker, 754-0430









LAKE CITY REPORTER NEWS SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 3, 2011


HIRING: Jobs picture stirs fears economy will slip back into recession

Continued From Page 1A


The Dow Jones industrial average fell 253
points, or more than 2 percent.
Analysts say the economy cannot con-
tinue to expand unless hiring picks up.
In the first six months of 2011, growth
was measured at an annual rate of 0.7
percent.
Companies are mostly keeping their
payrolls intact. They're not laying off
many workers. But they're not hiring,
either. Without more jobs to fuel con-
sumer spending, economists say another
recession would be inevitable. Consumer
spending accounts for about 70 percent of
economic growth.
Like a wobbling bicycle, "you either
reaccelerate or you fall over, said James
O'Sullivan, chief economist at MF Global.
"Something has to give."
When growth is slow and unemploy-
ment high, companies feel little pressure
to increase pay and benefits. In August, for


instance, hourly wages fell.
And when unemployment is chronically
high, even many people who have jobs
worry about losing them. So they're less
likely to sperid.
Eventually, as consumers cut back, cor-
porate sales decline. Companies scale back
hiring even more. Weak spending and hir-
ing can feed on each other and edge the
economy closer to recession.
When the economy is barely growing,
it's also vulnerable to shocks like natu-
ral disasters and political upheavals. An
economy growing 5 percent a year can
absorb more punishment than one grow-
ing at 1 percent before it would slip into
recession.
Consumer and business confidence
was shaken this summer by the politi-
cal standoff over the federal debt limit, a
downgrade of long-term U.S. debt and the
financial crisis in Europe. Tumbling stock


prices escalated the worries.
Even before it stalled last month, job
growth had been sputtering. The economy
added 166,000 jobs a month in the January-
March quarter, 97,000 a month in the
April-June quarter and just 43,000 a month
so far in the July-September period.
"Underlyingjob growth needs to improve
irimediately in order to avoid a recession,"
said HSBC economist Ryan Wang.
The dispiriting job numbers for August
will heighten the pressure on the Federal
Reserve, President Barack Obama and
Congress to find ways to stimulate the
economy.
So far, the Fed has been reluctant to
launch another round of Treasury bond
purchases. Its previous bond-buying pro-
grams were intended to force down long-
term interest rates, encourage borrowing
and boost stock prices.
On Thursday, Obama will give a tele-


vised speech to a joint session of Congress
to introduce a plan for creating jobs and
spurring economic growth.
"The importance of job growth cannot
be overstated," said Joshua Shapiro, chief
U.S. economist at MFR Inc.
The economy needs to add at least
250,000 jobs a month to rapidly bring
down the unemployment rate. The rate
has been above 9 percent in all but two
months since May 2009.
Roughly 14 million Americans are
unemployed. An additional 11.4 million are
either working part time but want full-time
jobs or have given up looking for work and
aren't counted as unemployed.
The weakness was underscored by revi-
sions to the jobs data for June and July.
Collectively, those figures were lowered to
show 58,000 fewer jobs added than previ-
ously thought. The downward revisions
were all in government jobs.


BUST: Authorities release names of 4 arrested in drug case

Continued From Page 1A


detectives arrived at the
site to assist in the inves-
tigation.
Seifert said Task Force
detectives are specially
trained to process metham-
phetamine laboratories and
render them safe.
"Detectives were able to
safely contain the hazard-


ous materials associated
with the illegal manufac-
ture of methamphetamine,"
he said.
Deputies made several
arrests at the location.
"The subject that depu-
ties were originally seeking
was found hiding in an adja-
cent wooded area," Seifert


said. "The suspect, Simon
Pawlak, had attempted to
conceal himself by half
burying himself under dirt.
He was arrested without
incident."
Deputies also arrested
the homeowner after they
reportedly found firearms
in the house.


"The homeowner,
Jackie Trowell, is a con-
victed felon and is for-
bidden by law to possess
firearms or ammunition,"
Seifert said.
A third man, Raymond
Hall, was found hiding
in a closet of the home,
reports show. Hall had


an active warrant and was
taken into custody with-
out incident, according to
Seifert.
"A female subject, Rose
Perry, was arrested on
drug charges," Seifert
said. "She was seen leaving
the shed when Cieslik first
arrived."


MCALPIN

Continued From 1A
The incident
occurred at the Budget
Inn. Sgt. Ed Seifert,
Columbia County
Sheriff's Office pub-
lic information officer
said no weapon was
used in the commis-
sion of the crime.
Further details were
unavailable at press
time.


LEE: Rain-packed tropical storm could dump 20 inches on Fla. Panhandle

Continued From Page 1A


ed along the Alabama coast
into the Florida Panhandle.
The National Hurricane
Center said the center of
Lee was about 180 miles
(290 km) west-south-
west of the mouth of the
Mississippi River on Friday
and moving north at just 3
mph (6 kph).
Forecasters say that
Lee's maximum sustained
winds had increased slight-
ly throughout the day to 45
mph (75 kph), and could
get stronger.
Governors in Louisiana
and Mississippi, as well as
the mayor of New Orleans,
declared states of emer-
gency. Officials in sever-
al coastal Louisiana and
-Mississippi communities
called for voluntary evacu-
ations.
The Army Corps of
Engineers was clos-
ing floodgates along the
Harvey Canal, a com-
mercial waterway in sub-,
urban New Orleans, but
had not moved to shut a
massive flood structure on
the Mississippi River-Gulf
Outlet shipping channel.
The MRGO was a major
conduit for Katrina's storm
surge, which overwhelmed
levees and flooded St.
Bernard and the city's
Lower 9th Ward.
City officials said they
expect some street flood-
ing but no levee problems.
Lee's storm surge, project-
ed around 4 to 5 feet, is
far short of the 20-feet-plus
driven by Katrina. Billions
of federal dollars have been
spent on new levees and
other flood protection.
In New Orleans' central
business district, Friday
seemed a typical day.
Employees at big-box home
improvement stores said
residents weren't rushing

YOUR


















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(386) 755-4042


in to stock up on supplies.
Merchants, however,
worried the storm would
dampen the Southern
Decadence festival, an
. annual gay lifestyle fixture
that rings cash registers
on Labor Day weekend.
Ann Sonnier, shift man-
ager of Jester's bar, said
receipts were disappoint-
ing so far.
"People are probably
scared to death to come
here 'after Katrina," she
said.
Some tourists were
caught off guard by Lee,
but didn't let it dampen
their spirits.
"I didn't even know
about it," said Kyla Holley
of Madison, Wis., who
along with husband Rob
was in town for the Labor
Day weekend holiday. "But
it wouldn't have stopped us
from coming."
The water-logged Lee
was tantalizingly close to
Texas but hopes dimmed
for relief from the state's
worst drought since the
1950s as the storm's fore-
cast track shifted east.
Forecasters said it could
bring drenching rains to
Mississippi and Alabama
early next week.
Morning skies were
overcast with spotty rain on
the Alabama coast Friday
morning, but workers were
still putting boats in the


water for the Labor Day
weekend at Sportsman
Marina in Orange Beach,
Ala.
"A lot of people go into
a panic, but it's mainly just
going to be a rainmaker,"
marina manager Ricky
Garrett said. "We're real-
ly not taking any precau-.
tions."
On the Mississippi coast,
tourism officials said there
was no spike in cancella-
tions for the holiday week-
end at hotels and casinos.
On Grand Isle,


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Louisiana's only inhabited
barrier island, people kept
an eye on the storm that
was already bringing rain
there. It's not as frighten-
ing as having a Category
2 or 3 hurricane bearing
down, said June Brignac,
owner of the Wateredge
Beach Resort.
"But we're still concerned
with all the rain that's com-
ing in, causing possible
flooding of the highway


going out If we don't leave,
we may be trapped here
.until it's completely past,"
she said.
The rain, however, had a
silver lining. In New Orleans,
it was helping to tamp down
a stubborn marsh fire that
for several days has sent
pungent smoke wafting
across the area.
Southern Louisiana
needs rain just not that
much, that fast.


"Sometimes you get what
you ask for," New Orleans
Mayor Mitch Landrieu said.
"Unfortunately it looks like
we're going to get more
than we needed."
Associated Press writers
Kevin McGillandAlan Sayre
in New Orleans, Melinda
Deslatte in Baton Rouge,
Jay Reeves in Birmingham,
Ala., and Holbrook Mohr in
Jackson, Miss., contributed
to this report.


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OPINI ON


Saturday, September 3, 2011


ONE ANOTHER


ONE
OPINION



A good


fiscal


role


model

T his spring,
Australia's govern-
ment submitted a
budget that included
something unheard
of among major industrialized
nations -a projected surplus
next year. The rosy fiscal
'outlook came as the global
'economy struggles to emerge
.from recession, and just two-
'and-a-half years after the coun-
,try adopted a costly stimulus
,measure much like the one
,passed in the United States. So
%how does Australia do it?
What is most immediately
'pertinent about Australia is
,that it lost its AAA credit rat-
*ing in 1986, suffered a further
"downgrade in 1989 and then
got back to triple-A in 2003.
.(Canada, Denmark, Finland
-and Sweden have also lost and
Regained AAA status.)
The story of how Australia
,got its fiscal groove back
explains why it has fared so
much better than other major
.industrialized nations. In 1986,
it had been running deficits for
.decades. Many of its industries
,were heavily regulated. And the
same natural resources com-
.panies that are booming now
:were in the doldrums.
The downgrades came as a
shhbltand had transformative
nilttuotsdlpoffflitcAl landscape.
Following a series of auster-
ity measures, Australia's accu-
mulated government debt is
less than a quarter of its annual
total economic output.
. To look at Australia is to see
a country with many similarities
to the United States. But its lead-
ers lack the deplorable cynicism
on budgetary matters that has
infected the U.S. Congress. Its
liberals do not engage in a denial
of the facts, as many Democrats
do when they insist that unsus-
tainable spending on entitlement
programs must go on. And its
conservatives do not box them-
selves in with rigid positions and
pledges that make it impossible to
raise new revenue.
There is much to learn from
AAA Australia.
* USA Today

Lake City Reporter
Serving Columbia County
Since 1874
The Lake City Reporter is pub-
lished with pride for residents of
Columbia and surrounding counties by
Community Newspapers Inc.
We believe strong newspapers build
strong communities -"Newspapers
get things done!"
Our primary goal is to
'publish distinguished and profitable
community-oriented newspapers.
This mission will be accomplished
through the teamwork of professionals
dedicated to truth, integrity and hard
*,work.
Todd Wilson, publisher
Robert Bridges, editor
Sue Brannon, controller
Dink NeSmith, president
Tom Wood, chairman

LETTERS
POLICY
Letters to the Editor should be
typed or neatly written and double
spaced. Letters should not exceed
400 words and will be edited for
length and libel. Letters must be
signed and include the writer's name,
address and telephone number for
verification. Writers can have two
letters per month published. Letters
and guest columns are the opinion of
tie writers and not necessarily that of
the Lake City Reporter.


BY MAIL: Letters, PO. Box 1709,
Lake City, FL 32056; or drop off at
180 E. Duval St. downtown.
BY FAX: (386) 752-9400.
BY E-MAIL:
. news@lakecityreporter.com


n late September, lead-
ers of the Palestinian
Authority are expected
to issue a Unilateral
Declaration of'
Independence and ask, in the
words of PA Foreign Minister
Nabil Shaath, that it receive
"the blessing of the U.N."
That blessing will not
come from the U.N. Security
Council: If the Palestinians
ask for approval from that
body, President Barack Obama
is expected to exercise the
American veto, though he has
not unequivocally pledged to
do so.
In the General Assembly,
however, blessings almost
certainly will be bestowed
through the passage of a non-
binding resolution. The General
Assembly has a permanent
anti-Israeli (and anti-American)
majority. More than 50 U.N.
members also belong to the
Organization of the Islamic
Conference. Many other
nations are eager to please the
OIC's oil exporters and not
displease its terrorism export-
ers.
The General Assembly does
not have the power to grant
statehood in any legal sense.
Nor can it admit new U.N.
members. The idea, as Shaath
phrased it, is simply "to exert
pressure on Israel."
For what purpose? Shaath's
goal, and that of his boss,
Palestinian Authority President
Mahmoud Abbas, is not what
Obama and other Western
leaders favor: a Palestinian
state and a Jewish state living
side by side in peace. On the
contrary, as Shaath said clearly:
"The story of 'two states for two
peoples' means that there will
be a Jewish people over there
and a Palestinian people here.
We will never accept this." Last
weekend, Abbas added: "Don't
order us to recognize a Jewish
state. We won't accept it."
What they would accept
instead: international recogni-
tion of a Palestinian state within
the 1949 armistice lines the
point at which armies from


n Sept. 3,1939,
Britain, France,
Australia and New
Zealand declared
war on Germany,
two days after the Nazi invasion
of Poland. A German U-boat
torpedoed and sank the British
liner SS Athenia some 250
miles off the Irish coast, killing
more than 100 out of the 1,400
or so people on board.

On this date:

In 1609, English explorer
Henry Hudson and his crew
aboard the Half Moon entered'
present-day New York Harbor
and began sailing up the river


Cliff May


the Arab states surrounding
Israel were stopped after they
refused, for the first time, to
accept a "two-state solution"
and launched a war, the first
of several, intended to wipe
Israel off the map. Note well:
The Unilateral Declaration
of Independence does not
acknowledge Israel's right to
exist even on its side of the
1949 lines.
In other words, Shaath and
Abbas see the establishment of
a Palestinian state as a means,
not an end. They believe that a
widely recognized Palestinian
state can better demonize and
de-legitimize Israel, harness-
ing such institutions as the
International Criminal Court.
The truth is that Palestinian
leaders those we call moder-
ates quite as much as those we
call extremists remain intent
not.on a two-state solution but
on a two-stage execution: Israel
is to be weakened and then
annihilated. From 1949 to now,
the strategies have changed but
not the goal.
The Palestinian state Abbas
and Shaath envision would be,
to use the apt German word,
judenrein, ethnically cleansed
of Jews. Meanwhile, they hope,
the international community
will exert pressure on Israel
to accept a "right of return."
The opening of Israel's doors
to Palestinian refugees, their
descendants and relatives,
would leave Jews as a minor-
ity in Israel. They would then
enjoy the same rights that the
Bahai enjoy in Iran, Christians
enjoy in Pakistan and other
religious minorities enjoy
in other Organization of the
Islamic Conference states.
That is to say, they would
enjoy no rights.


HIGHLIGHTS
IN HISTORY
that now bears his name. (They
reached present-day Albany
before turning back.)

In 1783, representatives of
the United States and Britain
signed the Treaty of Paris,
which officially ended the
Revolutionary War.

In 1940, Artie Shaw and
his Gramercy Five recorded
"Summit Ridge Drive" and
"Special Delivery Stomp" for
RCA Victor.

In 1943, the British Eighth


Many Western leaders
choose to disregard these
facts. That may become more
difficult following General
Assembly approval of the
Unilateral Declaration of
Independence. At that point,
terrorist attacks on Israel can
be expected to escalate. Israel
will respond. Another war is
likely.
There is still time to prevent
this if there is the will to do so.
Ileana Ros-Lehtinen, chairman
-of the House Foreign Affairs
Committee, announced last
weekend that she will intro-
duce legislation cutting off U.S.
taxpayer funding to "any U.N.
entity that grants membership
or any other upgraded status"
to the Palestinians following
General Assembly approval
of a Unilateral Declaration of
Independence.
Obanma could do much
more. To start, he could make
a Wrong statement explain-
ing why unilateralism must be
opposed and why negotiations
must be resumed. He could
order a diplomatic surge,
instructing American ambas-
sadors to advise our allies in
Europe and our aid recipi-
ents elsewhere that he will
view a vote for the Unilateral
Declaration of Independence
with extreme disfavor.
At the very least, he could
push for a revised Unilateral
Declaration of Independence,
one that would make inter-
national recognition of a
Palestinian state contingent on
Palestinian recognition of the
Jewish state with borders to be
established only through nego-
tiations.
Is that not the outcome
that American presidents,
Democratic and Republican
alike, have for decades worked
to achieve? Does Obama really
want history to record that, on
his watch, it all crashed and
burned?

* Clifford D. May is president of
the Foundation for the Defense
of Democracies, a policy institute
focusing on terrorism.


Army invaded Italy during
World War II, the same day
Italy signed a secret armistice
with the Allies.

In 1967, Nguyen Van Thieu
was elected president of South
Vietnam under a new constitu-
tion. Motorists in Sweden began
driving on the right-hand side of
the road instead of the left.

In 1970, legendary football
coach Vince Lombardi, 57, died
in Washington, D.C.
In 1976, America's Viking 2
lander touched down on Mars
to take the first color photo-
graphs of the planet's surface.
* Associated Press


4A


ANOTHER
VIEW



'Too big


to fail'


is alive


and well

W arren Buffet is
a savvy inves-
tor. The CEO
of Berkshire
Hathaway
put $5 billion into Bank
of America, which owns
Countrywide and a large port-
folio of troubled mortgaged-
backed assets. The Obama
administration wants us to
believe this is a sign that the
ailing U.S. financial sector is
on the path to recovery. It's
not.
Mr. Buffett's 50,000 pre-
ferred shares in the country's
largest bank will pay ari amaz-
ing 6 percent annual dividend.
It's a great deal for the bil-
lionaire investor, but not for
everyone else. Mr. Buffett
will receive his money before
any common stockholders get
,paid. With the rest of the mar-
ket seeing interest rates that
are effectively at zero percent,
it's worth asking why Bank
of America was willing to pay
Mr. Buffet such a handsome
premium. If it's because no
one else was willing to provide
funds, that's a sign the bank is
in serious trouble, not that it's
turning the corner.
Mr. Buffett's investment
will yield at least $300 million
in cash every year. In addi-
tion, the "Oracle of Omaha"
secured the right to buy an
additional 700 million shares
over the next 10 years, which,
if exercised immediately, could
have yielded Mr. Buffett and
his company another $1 bil-
lion in profit. Great returns for
Berkshire Hathaway are bad
news for Bank of America -
and for American taxpayers.
Bank of America, like
Citigroup, is considered "sys-
temically important" as well
as "too big to fail." In decid-
ing to wager his money on
a financial giant that holds
billions in toxic assets, it's
likely Mr. Buffett calculated
the likelihood that taxpayers
would kick in bailout funds,
if needed. Similar thoughts
were likely behind his invest-
ment of $5 billion in Goldman
Sachs and $3 billion in General
Electric in 2008.
The past three years of
dumping billions in federal
dollars into the banking sector
has done little to address the
industry's most fundamen-
tal problems. There are still
too many toxic assets on the
books. In fact, the new Dodd-
Frank Wall Street regulations
will make it harder for banks
to clean up their act. Banks
remain overleveraged, and the
government continues to. inter-
vene in all the wrong ways.
That's because the idea that
some firms are "too big to fail"
has not gone away, and neither
has the implicit promise of
bailouts.
Government bailouts mean
hapless taxpayers get soaked,
while the truly rich, like Mr.
Buffett, reap the benefits.
Bank of America still plans to
shed some 10,000 jobs. UBS
has announced 3,500 layoffs.
Other big financial players
such as Barclays, Goldman
Sachs, HSBC, Lloyds and
Wells Fargo are likely to do
the same, despite an increase
in this quarter's profits. The
bailout policies aren't creating
any new jobs. That's because
having taxpayers subsidize
risk isn't going to heal the
banking sector. The true cure
would be a return to the dis-


cipline of the market, where
those who earn the rewards
also bear the risk.

* The Washington Times


www.lakecityreporter.com


Palestinian leaders


seek unilateral state














FAITH



Saturday, September 3, 201 I


&


VALUES


uww.lakecityreporter.com


ast week,
we left the
Israelites
standing
between a rock
and a hard place...more
literally between an
army and lots of water!
Observing their des-
peration made clear our
preference of going back
to what is familiar when


HEART MA


Angie L2
angielond3@win


things get scary, even if
what is familiar is very
unhealthy.
I believe this tendency is a result of
familiarity being directly linked to our
comfort. In other words, we may not
particularly like the situation, environ-
ment, or relationship we are in, but com-
pared to stepping into the unknown, we
often consider it preferable. Let's watch
as the Israelites display this behavior
over and over again in their journey from
Egypt through the wilderness:
Exodus 14 records part two of God's
rescue mission. In part one, Moses led
the way out of Egypt Don't forget their
desire to go back to Egypt rather than face
the army approaching. Part two describes
how God miraculously parted the Red Sea
for the Israelites to walk across on dry
ground. Do you think they were still wish-
ing to go back to slavery as they stood on
the other side of the Red Sea and watched
Pharaoh's army drown? Of course not!!
They celebrated, just like we would! But,
then its time to get moving again and now
water and food is in short supply. Exodus
16 records the next timely "if only" state-
ment
"The Israelites said to them (Aaron
and Moses), "If only we had died by
the Lord's hand in Egypt! There we sat
around pots of meat and ate all the food
we wanted, but you have brought us
out into this desert to starve this entire
assembly to death." (Exodus 16:3)
About now you're thinking what I'm
thinking: '"Are you kidding me?" Yet,
before we judge too harshly, let's think
about times when we are tempted to
sound just as ludicrous. In the face of


TTERS uncertainty, do we think
back to what is familiar
and remember it favor-
ably? Anyone over-
hearing the Israelites'
statement above would
never have guessed they
were slaves in Egypt. It
sounds like they lived in
paradise!
and I was talking about
idstre3m.net this with a friend of mine,
recently who shared
feeling very much the
same way during her divorce. The rela-
tionship was extremely unhealthy, her
spouse did not desire reconciliation, and
yet more than anything, she wanted to
go back. She agreed that the fear of the
unknown (being on her own as a single
mom) began to paralyze and prevent
her from moving forward. Where we
were brings us to where we are, and if
going back is ever to be a healthy option,
problems must be faced and changes
made...which means we are indeed mov-
ing forward. If not, we only prolong the
suffering.
I suppose our lesson this week is
simply to expect these kinds of feelings
when we fihd ourselves in the wilder-
ness. As you face unknown territory,
expect that overwhelming desire to go
back the way you came, and refuse to
let it be your GPS.. .directing your steps.
As Paul says in Philippians 3:14, "I press
on toward the goal to win the prize for
which God has called me heavenward .
in Christ Jesus." Press on in the face of
uncertainty. Know for certain that God
will lead you forward.. .because every
heart matters!
Blessings, Angie

Heart Matters is a weekly column writ-
ten by Angie Land, Director of the Family
Life Ministries of the Lafayette Baptist
Association, where she teaches Bible stud-
ies, leads marriage and family confer-
ences and offers Biblical counseling to
individuals, couples and families. Contact
Angie with questions or comments at angi-
eland3@windstream. net


The Rock and the Keys (Part 2)


Then Jesus said: BIBLE STUDI
"and I will give
to you (Peter) the
keys to the king-
dom of heaven".
This was part of our Lord's
response to Peter's confes-
sion in Matthew 16. We saw
that the foundation of the
church is none other than
Jesus Christ, but what is Hugh She
meant by the "keys to the ems-hugh43@com
kingdom of heaven"? Notice
that Jesus does not give Peter the keys to
the church but the keys to the kingdom
of heaven (see Matthew 13 for a better
understanding of the kingdom of heaven.)
It is important that we note the distinction
between the church and the kingdom of
heaven.


*rrill
costnet


The church consists
of the body of born again
believers. The kingdom of
heaven refers to the sphere
of Christian profession
and deals with professing
Christians set forth by Jesus
in Matthew 13 in the parable
of the kingdom.
Again, we have a por-
J r. tion of the scripture that has
caused much confusion. But


when we think about a key,
it is used to lock up or unlock something.
So with this in mind, let's look at some
different views. First, many say that
Jesus gave to Peter the full authority as
the head of the church, to open and shut

SHERRILL continued on 9A


A Public Debate on
the topic of

Defending Liberty

of Inhabitants
"Proclaim LIBERTY throughout all the Land unto
all the Inhabitants thereof Lev. XXVX"
This is the Bible verse inscribed on the Liberty Bell, which is under
tight security 24/7.
You are cordially invited to a public debate to defend Liberty of
Inhabitants from our conception until the end of our lives.
The public debate will be held Saturday, October 8, 2011 from 8:30
AM until 5:15 PM in the conference room of Country Inn & Suites
by Carlson, 350 SW Florida Gateway Drive, Lake City, Florida,
32024. Liberty and Freedom is given for you to bring your point of
view on this topic to the public debate and then be prepared and open
to defend it in a courteous and respectful manner. At the end of the
day a summary statement will be attempted in an effort to express the
general consensus of all who publicly debated during the day.


ADVENT CHRISTIAN
RrstAdventChistian
1881 SW McFarlane Ave.
386-752-3900


Sunday School:
Sunday Service:
Wednesday Service:


9:45AM
11:00AM
7:00PM


ASSEMBLY OF GOD
FIRST ASSEMBLY OF GOD
1571 EDuval Street.
386-438-5127
Sunday /orship 10:30A.M.

GLAD TIDINGS ASSEMBLY OF GOD
993 NW Lake Jeffery Road
386-752-0620
Sunday Worship 10:30AM & 6PM
Wed. Fam, Bible Study 7:00PM
"A church where JESUS is Real"

BAPTIST
BEREA BAPTIST CHURCH
SR47 S*755-0900
Sunday School 9:30AM
Sunday Worship 10:45AM & 6PM
Wednesday Eve. Service 7PM
Interim Pastor: Kenneth Edeiffield

EASTSIDE BAPTIST CHURCH
196 SE James Ave.. 386-752-2860
Sun. Bible Study 9:45AM
Sun. Worship 11AM & 6PM
Wed. Prayer Mtg/Bible Study 6PM
Rev. Brandon G. W'tt

RRST BAPTIST CHURCH
Sunday Bible Study 9:15AM
Sunday Worship 10:30AM & 6:00PM
Wed. 6:00PM Prayer Service, &
Children Ministry 6:15PM
Downtown Lake City 752-5422
Rev, Stephen Ahrens, Pastor

OLIVET MISSIONARY BAPTIST CHURCH
541 N.E Davis Street
(386) 752-1990
Ronald V. Walters, Pastor
Sunday School 9:45AM
Sunday Morning Worship 11:00AM
Wed. Mid-Week Worship 6:00PM
"In God's Word, Will & Way"


PINE GROVE BAPTIST CHURCH
1989 N US Hwy 441
386-752-2664
Sunday Bible Study 9:45AM
Sunday Worship 11AM & 6PM
Wed. Kids & Youth Ministry 6:30PM
Pastor Ron Thompson

SALEM PRIMITIVE BAPTIST
Sunday Services 10:30 AM
Pastor Bder Herman Griffin
752-4198


SOUTHSIDE BAPTIST CHURCH
388 S.E. Baya Drive *755-5553
Sunda:.


Bible Study
Morning Worship
Evening Worship
Wes
AWANA
Prayer & Bible Study


9:15AM
10:30AM
6:15PM

5:45PM
6:15fPM


TABERNACLE BAPTIST CHURCH
(Independent Baptist)
144 SE Montrose Ave.* 752-4274


Sunday School
Sun. Mom. Worship
Sunday Eve.
Wed. Prayer Meeting
Pastor: Mike Norman


10AM
11AM
6 PM
7:30 PM


CATHOLIC
EPIPHANY CATHOUC CHURCH
1905 SW Epiphany Court ~ 752-4470
Saturday Vigil Mass 5:00 PM
Sunday Mass 8:15AM,10:30 AM,
5:0(PM (Spanish/English) ,
Sunday School/Religious Education
9:00 AM-10:15 AM

CHRISTIAN
CHRISTIAN SCIENCE SOCIETY
239 SE Baya Ave.
Sunday Service 11:00 AM
Wednesday Evening Service 7:30 PM

LAKE CITY CHRISTIAN CHURCH
Hwy 247 S. 755-9436
Sunday School 9:30 AM
Sun. Mom. Worship 10:30 AM
Wed. Prayer Meefing 7PM


CHURCH OF CHRIST
NEW HORION
Church of Christ
Directions & times 386-623-7438
Jack Exum,Jr., Minister


CHURCH OF GOD
LAKE CfTY CHURCH OF GOD
167 Ermine St. 752-5965
Sunday School 9:45 AM
Sun. Worship 10:30AM & 6:OOPM
Wed. Family Night 7 PM
Wed. Youth Service 7 PM
Pastor Carroll Lee

EVANGEL CHURCH OF GOD
370 SW Monitor Glen 755-1939
Sunday School 9:45 AM
Sunday Worship 10:50 & 6:30
Wed. Spiritual Enrichment 7PM
"Shock Youth Church"
Boys and Girls Clubs
Bible Study
Pastor: John R. Hathaway

EPISCOPAL
ST. JAMES EPISCOPAL CHURCH
2423 SW Bascom Norris Dr.,
Lake City, Fl 32025- 386-752-2218
Website: www.stameslakecity.org
HOLY EUCHARIST
Sun. 8 & 10 AM
Wed. 6:00 PM
Priest The Rev. Michael Armstrona

LUTHERAN
OUR REDEEMER LUTHERAN CHURCH
LCMS
1 1/2 miles S. of 1-75 on SR 47
755-4299


Sunday Services
(Nursery Provided)
Christian Education Hour
For all ages'at 10:45AM
Pastor Rev. Bruce AlkIre


9:30AM


SPIRIT OF CHRIST LUTHERAN
Hwy 90,1.5 miles West of 1-75 752-3807
Sunday Worship 10:00AM
Nursery Avail.
Wed. Pot Luck 6PM Worship 7PM
Vicar John David Bryant


Morrell's
Your Complete decorating and
home furnishings store
SW Deputy Jeff Davis Lane (fomerly Pinemount Rd.)
752-3910 or 1-800-597-3526
Mon,-Sat. 805:3110 ( Closed Sunday


METHODIST
First United Methodist Church
973 S. Marion Ave.
386-752-4488
Sunday School 9:45AM
Sunday Morning Worship
Casual Worship Service .8:50AM
Traditional Service 11:00AM
Program opportunities available in all areas
for all ages.
For a complete schedule
contact church office at
752-4488

WESLEY MEMORIAL UNITED
1272 SW McFarlane 752-3513
(Adjacent to Summers School)
Sunday School 9:00AM
Worship 10:00AM
Nursery provided
Vacation Bible School
9am-noon July 11-15
Pastor: The Rev. J. Louie Mabrey
ww.wesleymem.com

WATERTOWN CONGREGATIONAL
METHODIST CHURCH
U.S. 90 E. turn on Cortez (next to Quality
Ind.) right on Okinawa.
Sunday School 9:45 AM
Sun. Worship 11AM & 6 PM
Wed. Night Service 7 PM
Pastor, Randy Ogbum

NAZARENE
LAKE CITY CHURCH OFTHE NAZARENE
Services:
Sunday School 9:45AM
Sunday Worship 10:45AM
Wednesday 6:30PM
Adult, Youth Ministry, Children's Ministry
Pastor. Craig Henderson
Nursery Provided
SW SR 47 and Azalea Park Place

PRESBYTERIAN
FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
697 SW Baya Drive 752-0670
Sunday School 9:00AM
Sunday Worship Service 10:00AM
NURSERY PROVIDED
Pastor: Dr. Roy A. Martin
Director of Music: Bill Poplin


RICK'S RANGEE SERVICE
Located at 25A (Old
Valdosta Hwy)
386-752-5696 or
386-867-2035
after hours


PENTECOSTAL
RRST FULL GOSPEL CHURCH
NE Jones Way & NE Washington St
Sunday School 10:00 AM
Moving Worship 11:00 AM
Evangelistic Service 6:00 PM
Youth Services Wednesday 7:00PM
Mid-week SeMvice Wednesday 7:00 PM
For info call 755-3408@ Everyone Welcome
Pastor Rev. Stan EBs

NON-DENOMINATIONAL
CHRIST CENTRAL MINISTRIES
Leadership Services 9:00AM
Sunday Morning 11:00AM
Wednesday Service 7:00PM
217 Dyal Ave., from Hwy 90 take
Sisters Welcome Rd., go 5 miles, South,
church on left.* 755-2525
Lead Pastor Lonnie Johns
"A Church on the Move"

CHRISTIAN HERITAGE CHURCH
Comer SR. 47 & Hudson Circle
Sunday Celebration 10:30 AM
Pastor Chris Jones* 752-9119

FALLING CREEK CHAPEL
Falling Creek Road 755-0580
First and Third Sundays 9:30 A.M.
Second and Fourth Sundays 3:00 P.M.
Pastor Rev. Cheryl R. Pingel

NEW BEGINNING CHURCH
Highway 242 E, of Branford Highway
Sunday School 10:00AM
Morning Worship 11:00AM
Sunday Evening 6:00PM
Wednesday 7:00PM
A Full Gospel Church Everyone Welcomed
(386) 755-5197


Central States
Enterprises
Columbia County's Feed Headquarters
FEED PET SUPPLIES LAWN & GARDEN
ANIMAL HEALTH
668 NW Waldo St. 386-755-7445

MIKELL'S POWER EQUIPMENT, INC.
Your Lawn & Garden Headquarters
MOWERS CHAIN SAWS TRIMMERS
1152 US 90 WEST LAKE CITY, FL.
386-752-8098



LAKE CITY
?aSL"t 755-7050

BAYWAYjaitoria services
FIRE & Water Restoration
Floor & Carpet Care
Residential & Commercial
755-6142

North Florida
Pharmacy
7 LoCations to Serve You
Lake City, Ft. White, Branford,
Chiefland, Mayo & Keystone Heights








Supercenter
"LOW PRICES EVERYDAY"
US 90 WEST 755-2427

GWHunter, Inc.
Ch v= Chevron Oil
No- Jobber



Holl c ac.
"Quality ork at a reasonable price"
We also do solar hook-ups
(386) 755-5944


Owin 7 I)Days a Week
1036 Il. Dulval St,, I ke City F..
(386) 752-0067
Frlsh Meal, Frlshl Pnixluce!
Scan k> nil things lth igh tMhrist which tm gtheniclh iK"
hliil4 4 13


OBSTETRICS & GYNECOLOGY
Weight Loss '69 & Hair Renmoval '69
S, Accepting all Insurance, No I s visit 'SO
'' (386) 466-1106
t;(' te Shands Lake City & Lie (n


Wilderness series, Part 4


AClay Electric Cooperative, Inc,
Competitive rates, non-profit,
right here In your community.
Lake City District 386-752-7447
clayelectric.com


ANDERSON COLUMBIA CO., INC.
ASPHIIAI PAVING
COMMERCIAL *INDUSTRIAL
Site I'reparlon toad IBuillding Parking l.ols
Cra(Uing & Drainage
752-7585
871 NW Guerdon St., Lake City


I HARRY'S
^.P.. ".Heating & Air Conditioning Inc.
Harry Mosloy, President

.Pu.n 752-2308 Ias .


TIREMATF









Page Editor: Emogene Graham, 754-0415 LAKE CITY REPORTER ADVICE & COMICS SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 3, 2011 6A


DILBERT


OUR NEWEST PRODUCT
INFRINGES PATENTS
FROM GOOGLE, APPLE,
MICROSOFT, AND
ORACLE.


A


BLONDIE


BEETLE BAILEY


HAGAR THE HORRIBLE


DEAR ABBY


Adult son's critical father

isn't worth trying to please


THEY'VE JOINED
FORCES AND HIRED
NASA TO NUDGE AN
ASTEROID TOWARD
OUR HEADQUARTERS.



a '
E


I THINK I WONDER
WE CAN WHAT THE
WIN AVERAGE
THIS. LIFE SPAN OF
AN OPTIMIST
IS.

L Z I-
H 'T r


HOROSCOPES


SNUFFY SMITH


ZITS


GARFIELD


B.C.


a
Cr


How yCou UNLOCK A A4ONASTEP-Y.,


02011JohnL HartFLP R '
FRANK & ERNEST


I ARIES (March 21-April
19): You can change your
financial situation by
changing your budget,
overhead or living arrange-
ments. Discuss your cre-
ative ideas with someone
you respect. You will get
some great ideas that will
inspire you. *****
TAURUS (April 20-May
20): Put your time and
effort into self-improve-
ment, socializing and
enhancing any meaning-
ful relationship. Love and
romance are in the stars.
What you do will impress
someone you care about
far more than what you
say. A mini trip will con-
tribute to your emotional
well-being. ***
GEMINI (May 21-June
20): Stick close to home.
Emotional issues can be
raised and suggestions
will be offered that will
help you make the right
choice regarding personal
matters. Don't let anyone
cost you financially. Avoid
disputes. ***
CANCER (June 21-July
22): Consistency will be
important if you want to be
taken seriously. Love and
romance are highlighted,
and enjoying social activi-
ties or events will promote
interesting discussions and
closer ties to someone you
care for. *****
LEO (July 23-Aug. 22):
Stay away from emotional


THE LAST WORD
Eugenia Last

banter. It is best to con-
centrate on changes that
will boost your confidence.
You can find out important
information if you listen to
someone who has experi-
ence or an unusual back-
ground. Hard work will
pay off, but overreacting
will not. **
VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept.
22): Speak from the heart
and let your true feelings
be known. Sharing will
benefit you in the end.
Physically changing your
surroundings or your resi-
dence will pay off. You will
prosper if you pitch in and
help a cause you believe
in. ****
LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct.
22): Talk over your options
with someone you trust.
Getting a clear picture of
how you can improve your
life will help you make the
right choices. Try to deal
with any situation that has
made you look unstable.
Don't spend money you
don't have. ***
'SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov.
21): Put more effort into
your relationships. Love
is on the rise, and mak-
ing the right moves-or
suggestions will help you
get what you want later
in the day, as long as you
are honest and prepared


to follow through on
promises. Welcome any
change that comes your
way. ***
SAGITTARIUS (Nov.
22-Dec. 21): Confusion is
likely to take over if you
get caught in a lie or have
trouble making up your
mind about a personal rela-
tionship. You may have to
do some fancy footwork if
you want to maintain your
status quo. ***
CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-
Jan. 19): Spend time with
people you respect. You
can expect to be repaid an
old debt or make money
selling an unwanted pos-
session. Dress up your
surroundings, and you will
find them more compatible
with your current lifestyle.

AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-
Feb. 18): Don't give in to
anyone who is overreact-
ing or pushing you to take
on something you don't
want to do. Avoid being
stuck with other people's
responsibilities. It's time
to make personal changes
that will benefit you.

PISCES (Feb. 19-March
20): You may think that
getting emotional will help
you get your way, but in
the end it will ruin a rela-
tionship that means a lot.
A stalemate will develop if
you try to force someone
to agree with you. **


CELEBRITY CIPHER


by Luis Campos
Celebrity Cipher cryptograms are created from quotations by famous people, past and present.
Each letter in the cipher stiends for another.
TODAY'S CLUE: L equals M
" Z FK HNXOK ONRRKOZJ BAE
ZWBAJRBZKJ TNMW SBE VFTJXOBR
FKBRZF ... TNMW VKWJNABR
ZWNMSRKJ." VRBOXEN ENLXAUN

PREVIOUS SOLUTION: "The mind is the limit. As long as the mind can
envision the fact that you can do something, you can do it." -- David Hockney


(c) 2011 by NEA, Inc. 9-3


FOR BETTER OR WORSE


DEAR ABBY: My wife
and I have a good life and
are financially secure. Our
kids are grown and we
now have grandchildren.
The problem is my father.
Every time I'm around
him, he always comments
on my shortcomings and
faults. I have never mea-
sured up to my father's
standards, and I finally
realize I never will. I have
lost all respect for him and
do not want to be around
him at all.
My mother is nothing
like him, and I still enjoy
her company. I don't
understand why he treats
me this way. Most fathers
would be proud to have a
son like me. Any sugges-
tions, Abby? LOSING
SANITY IN KENTUCKY
DEAR LOSING SANITY:
Your father may act the
way he does out of a
need to control you. By
withholding approval, he
makes you constantly try
to win it Or, he may be
hypercritical out of some
deep-seated insecurity of
his own because it makes
him feel superior.
Believe it or not, your
father's behavior probably
has less to do with you
than with HIM. For further
insight into your toxic
parent, please talk to a psy-
chologist. It will be money
and time well-spent.

DEAR ABBY: A younger
brother died of cancer
four years ago. Recently


modations such as hotel or
motel.
If she says she can't
afford it, suggest that
her boyfriend "chip in"
- or better yet, visit her in
California.
** ** **
DEAR ABBY: A friend,
"bave," is coming here
for a visit. He wears
false teeth. My husband
refuses to have meals
with him because Dave
removes his teeth when
he eats. My husband
says it's repulsive and
ruins his dinner. Now he
wants me to tell Dave to
keep his teeth in or he
won't be joining us. I'm .
afraid it will make things
awkward and cause hard
feelings. What to do? IN
THE MIDDLE IN THE
COACHELLA VALLEY
DEAR IN THE
MIDDLE: One would
think that denture wear-
ers would need their den-
tal appliances in in order
to eat. The fact Dave
removes his may indicate
that his don't fit properly.
Call your friend and sug-
gest he see his dentist
before he makes the trip.
That way, Dave may be
able to eat comfortably
with his teeth in, and
your husband won't be so
grossed out he has to eat
elsewhere.

Write Dear Abby at
www.DearAbby.com or
P.O. Box 69440, Los
Angeles, CA 90069.


CLASSIC PEANUTS


Abigail Van Buren
www.dearobby.com
his wife, "Kaye," has been
coming to stay with my
husband and me for a
week or two at a time. The
reason for the frequent vis-
its is she has a boyfriend
here in Arizona. (She lives
in California.)
Kaye tells me she "miss-
es me" and uses that as an
excuse for her visits, but I
know she's doing it for the
free lodging. I don't want
to hurt her feelings, but
she isn't getting the hint.
My husband is retired
and doesn't want Kaye
in our home this often.
She has visited for three
weeks over the past two
months and wants to come
back again. I think her
boyfriend should pay for
her lodging. Then she can
come, see us, and spend
as much time as she wants
with him.
How can I help Kaye
see the big picture? -
SORE SISTER-IN-LAW IN
PHOENIX
DEAR "SIS": Your
hints haven't been strong
enough. Tell Kaye that the
time she wants to come
"isn't convenient" and
suggest she make arrange-
ments for other accom-










Classified Department: 755-5440


MIBW


LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 3, 2011

Lake City Reporter




CLASSIFIED


* ADvantage


Take ADvantage of the
Reporter Classifieds!

755-5440


4 n s days ah litional
Rate eppiles to private ind s





Each Item p must a Id e dco
Rate applies to pvate Individuals selling
B personal merchandise totalling $100 or less.



Each Item must Include a price.
This Isa non-retundable rate.


One Item per ad 61 O
4 lines 6 days a$ a |n
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personal merchandise totalling $500or les.
Each Item must Include a price.
This Is a non-refundable to.



One Item per ad Ai6
4I lnes a Each additional
Rate plestoprivate Indivuass sling
persona l m lerchandise totaig $1,000 or less.
Each Intem must Include a price.
This is a non-retundable rate..




4 ines6das onal
Rate applies to private In dlvdu.ls selling
personal mercIhandise totalli 2,500 or
Each item must include ice.
This Is a non toundab rate.



I One Item per ad
Rale apples to private Individuals sling
peasoeai merchaIdis totaling 4,000 or I s.
Each item most Inc price
This lIs aetoo.s7es s ot


One m per ad q
4 lines 6 days ach add tional
I Rate applies to private Individuals selling
personalmerchandise totalling $6,000 or lea.
Each its most Include a prim.
This Is a non-rftsndaMb rate.


Limited to service type advertis-
ing only.
4 lines, one month...."92.00
$10.80 each additional line
Includes an additional $2.00 per
ad for each Wednesday insertion.



You can call us at 755-5440,
Monday through Friday from 8:00
a.m. to 5:00 p.m.
Some people prefer to place their
classified ads in person, and some
ad categories will require prepay-
ment. Our office is located at 180
East Duval Street.
You can also fax or email your ad
copy to the Reporter.
FAX: 386-752-9400 Please
direct your copy to the Classified
Department.
EMAIL: classifieds@lakecityre-
porter.com





Ad litoApper Call by: Fu lEmailby:
Tuesday Mon., 10:00 axm Mon., t00 a.m.
Wednesday Mon., 10:00a.m. Mon.,9:00a.m.
Thursday Wed.,10:00 .m. Wed., 9:00 a.m.
Friday lirs., 10:00am. Turs, 9.00 a.m.
Saturday Fi., 10:00 am. Fri.,9:00 am.
Sunday Fi, 10:00 a.m. Fri., .00 a.m.
These deadlines are subject to change without notice-




Ad Errors- Please read your ad
on the first day of publication.
We accept responsibility for only
the first Incorrect Insertion, and
only the charge for the ad space
In error. Please call 755-5440
Immediately for prompt correc-
tion and billing adjustments.
Cancellations- Normal advertising
deadlines apply for cancellation.
Billing Inquiries- Call 755-5440.
Should further information be
required regarding payments or
credit limits, your call will be trans-
ferred to the accounting depart-
ment.


Advertising copy is subject to
approval by the Publisher who
reserves the right to edit, reject,
or classify all advertisements under
appropriate headings. Copy should
be checked for errors by the
advertiser on the first day of pub-
lication. Credit for published errors
will be allowed for the first insertion
for that portion of the advertisement
which was incorrect. Further, the
Publisher shall not be liable for any
omission of advertisements ordered
to be published, nor for any general,
special or consequential damages.
Advertising language must comply
with Federal, State or local laws
regarding the prohibition of discrimi-
nation in employment, housing and
public accommodations. Standard
abbreviations are' acceptable; how-
ever, the first word of each ad may
not be abbreviated.

In Print and Online
www.likecitvrcportcr.com


Legal

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT IN AND
FOR COLUMBIA COUNTY,
FLORIDA
CASE NO. 11-751-SC
Robert A. Jones
243 SE Eloise St.
Lake City, FL 32025
Plaintiff
VS.
Denise Jones
171 SW Lasso
Lake City, FL. 32024
Defendant
A law suit has been filed to deter-
mine ownership and title of a certain
vehicle described as a 2001 Oldsmo-
bile with serial #
IG3WH52H91F198112 located in
Lake City, Columbia County, Flori-
da.
The following persons) may claim
some right title or interest therein:
Robert A. Jones
If you have a claim, interest, or de-
fense in this clause, you must file
your written answer or objection
with the Clerk of Court of Columbia
County within 10 days
(seal)
CLERK OF COURTS
BY: B. Scippio
Deputy Clerk
05527327
August 20, 27, 2011
September 3, 10, 2011
NOTICE OF MEETING OF THE
CITY OF LAKE CITY BOARD OF
TRUSTEES OF THE GENERAL
EMPLOYEES PENSION FUND TO
BE HELD ON THURSDAY, SEP-
TEMBER 15, 2011 AT 10:30 AM
IN THE COUNCIL CHAMBERS
LOCATED ON THE SECOND
FLOOR OF CITY HALL AT 205
NORTH MARION AVENUE,
LAKE CITY, FLORIDA.
*If you have any questions please
contact Laura Reissener, Trustee
@386-719-5754*
05527631
September 3, 2011

020 Lost & Found
FOUND Beautiful Pit Bull, near
CR 247 & CR 242,
Found on August. 30th,
Call 386-961-9514


Mechanic
Career Opportunity with
Excellent Benefits. Requires u
HS diploma/GED & 5 years
Fleet/diesel mechanic
experience. Apply today at
www.cityofgainesville.jobs
AA/EO/DFWP/VP

05527553
Large Southeast Restaurant
chain is now accepting resumes
for Management positions for
several Florida markets.
Competitive wages,
Advancement opportunities,
Complete Training package,
Health, Dental and Life
Insurance Benefits available.
DFWP EOE
Please send resumes to:
donni@heritagemanagement.net
or fax to: 352-387-0011.

05527641

TAM
Maintenance Person
Convenience Store Group is
seeking an experienced
Maintenance person. A/C &
Refrigeration, Electrical,
plumbing and carpentry
experience would be a plus
Competitive salary, bonus, paid
holidays, vacation, company
vehicle and opportunity to join a
progressive and fast growing
company
Fax or Email Resume to:
dtumer@fasttrackstores.com
Fax 1-352-333-1161

05527684



"COOKS"
Competitive Wages being
offered for cooks!!!
Please apply in person
Tues 9/6 thru Fri. 9/8
at the Alachua location ~
1-75 & US Hwy 441.

AVON!! Only $10 to start!
Earn bonus $ up to $150+
1-800-275-9945 pin #4206
www.youravon.com/tdavies

CDL Drivers Wanted,
dedicated routes, Target Account,
Out of Lake City, FL
Call AJ 229-630-0021

05526800
Earn Extra Money
Deliver the new AT&T Real
Yellow Pages
in the Lake City area. FT/PT,
daily work, quick pay, must be
18 yrs+, have drivers
license & insured vehicle.
(800) 422-1955 Ext. 1
8:OOA-4:30P Mon-Fri

Southside Baptist Church Two
Positions Available
PT Secretary Must be proficient
in Microsoft Word &
Microsoft Publisher.
Nursery Worker Hours are dur-
ing church services and functions.
Please apply at Southside Baptist
Church, for info 386-755-5553.


100 Job
t1o0 OOpportunities
FUNDRAISING MAJOR Gifts
Officer (Part Time). Exciting part-
time opportunity for a qualified
candidate with a proven track
record for success in major gift
fundraising, prospect research and
database management. The
responsibilities include designing
and implementing a strategy for
cultivating and stewarding major
donors, developing and imple-
menting major gift giving strat-
egies and programs, and creating a
sustained effort to identify, solicit,
involve, and retain major donors.
The candidate will also develop,
coordinate and execute cultivation
strategies for major gift prospects
and donors. Qualifications: BA/BS
in marketing (or related field),
minimum of 7 yrs. experience gen-
erating and expanding major gift
base, major gift cultivation, and
soliciting strategies. Excellent
computer, interpersonal and com-
munication skills also required:
Please send
resumes along with cover letter to:
ARC Foundation of North
Florida, Inc. PO Drawer L
Live Oak, FL. 32064
No Phone Calls please.

LICENSED OPTICIAN
Needed, Monday Friday,
Phone 386-754-6376 or email,
lcva@superioroptical.com
Mechanic needed for Truck shop,
must have own tools, apply
Southern Specialized, 1812 NW
Main Blvd., 386-752-9754
Mobile Home Sales!
Experienced Salesperson
Needed to sell the South's
#1 rated product! Call Kevin
386-719-5560
NEED CNC Machinist
Must have Metal Working
Machine Shop exp. Send resume,
Quality Mill, 3631 US Hwy. 90
East, Lake City, FL 32055.
Sales Position available for moti-
vated individual Rountree -Moore
Toyota, Great benefits, paid train-
ing/vacation. Exp. a plus but not
necessary. Call Anthony Cosentino
386-623-7442
Veterinarian Assist/Technician
needed. Exp desired. Must be able
to work flexible schedule & Sat.
mornings. Apply at Columbia
Animal Hospital 2418 S. Marion
Ave. Lake City. No phone calls.

120 Medical
120 Employment

05527328
LEARN TO DRAW BLOOD
Local Phlebotomy Course
offered in Lake City, FLA
Certificate program.
(904)566-1328

Counselor for substance abuse
program in Baker Correctional In-
stitution. BA w/2yrs exp., M-F day
shift F/T, $30,000 to start, E-mail
resume to sheliarand@aol.com.or
fax to 386-752-2387
Pharmacy Technician needed.
Must be Florida registered. Min. 1
year exp required. Preferably in a
retail environment. Excellent
computer & communication skills
needed. FT position. Competitive
pay. Send reply to Box 05074, C/O
The Lake City Reporter, P.O. Box
1709, Lake City, FL, 32056

141 Babysitters
Loving mom would like to care for
your child. Full or Part time in my
home. Near downtown. Only I
opening avail. 386-438-5394

240 Schools &
SEducation

055272X3
Interested in a Medical Career?
Express Training offers
courses for beginners & exp
Nursing Assistant, $479
next class-08/22/10
Phlebotomy national certifica-
tion, $800 next class-10/10/11
Continuing education
Fees incl. books, supplies, exam
fees. Call 386-755-4401 or
expresstrainingservices.com


310 Pets & Supplies

LOST
Silky/Yorkie
Terrier: Missing
since August 29
(am), Aprox 10
Ibs. Black
body/brown face
& feet. Needs medicine. Last
seen at S & S on 441 N. & 100.
His name is Bradley. Please call
386-623-2806

LABRADOODLE PUPPY,
10 weeks old, health certificate,
registered, $450, not a breeder
Call 386-364-2089
PUBLISHER'S NOTE
Florida Law 828.29 requires d(logs
and cats being sold to be at least 8
weeks old and have a health
certificate from a licensed
veterinarian documenting they
have mandatory shots and are


free from intestinal and external
parasites. Many species of wild-
life must be licensed by Florida
Fish and Wildlife. If you are
unsure, contact the local
office for information.


361 Farm Equipment 440 Miscellaneous


84 Ford 4610 Tractor.
2WD, Solid
2005 motor,$7,500. OBO
386-867-0005

407 Computers
ACER Flat screen monitor.
15 inch. $60. obo
386-755-9984 or
386-292-2170
HP Computer,
$80.00
386-755-9984 or
386-292-2170

408 Furniture
Coffee table and
2 square end tables.
All with glass tops. $90.00
386-758-4755

420 Wanted to Buy
K&H TIMBER
We Buy Pine Hardwood &
Cypress. Large or small tracts.
Call 386-961-1961.
Wanted Junk Cars, Trucks, Vans.
$275 & up CASH! Free Pick Up!
NO title needed !386-878-9260
After 5pm 386- 752-3648.

430 Garage Sales
BYRDS STORE CR 49. Fri.'
Sat.& Sun, (8-5). 247-240R CR
49R, 247 Beachville. CR 49N, 252
Pinemount Rd CR 49L. Lots of
antiques, new items inside, outside
if no Rain watch for signs.
FRI 9/2 & SAT. 9/3, 8-12, 192 SE
Mossy Ct., off CR 245/Price Creek
Rd.. freezer, wet suit, pole saw,
etc. Sunday Calls Only 984-0106
FRI. 9/2 & SAT. 9/3, 8-?,
412 SW Deanna Terrace, off Sis-
ters Welcome & Marvin Bumett
Rd .fum., clothes and much more
Huge Moving Sale. Sat. 7a-? 615
NW Zack Dr. (Emerald Lakes)
Lots of clothes, strollers, baby
stuff, hshold, furn.. & much more!
MOVING SALE
Fri. 9/2 & Sat. 9/3 8a-3p.
493 SW Angela Terr.
Everything must go!!!!
PUBLISHER'S NOTE
All Yard Sale Ads
Must be Pre-Paid.

Sat. 9am-? Pinemount to Barwick
Right on Parker Left on
Mollie. Furniture, clothes and lots
more. Look for signs.
Yard/Estate sale. Sat-Mon. Ellis-
ville turn rt on Otis Howell to Her-
long. Look for signs. Baby items,
TV, travel trailer, antiques, misc.
Yard/Moving: Sept 3, 7-12. SW
Harmony Ln. Off Hwy 47 S.
Tools, lawn equip, incl riding
mower & attachments. air comp.,
too much to list., hshold. Come
early to not miss out. But no early
buyers before 7am.


ACROSS

1 Beech or oak
5 Folklore dwarf
10 Spiny cactus
12 Daddy's sister
13 Wizard's con-
coction
14 Be firm
15 Like a rain
forest
16 Do sums
18 Stockholm
carrier
19 Turn the dog
loose
23 Sitcom ET
26 Novelist Rand
27 Draws a bead
on
30 Life forms
32 Wall paintings
34 Warning
35 Acid in vinegar
36 Faculty head
37 Before, in com-
bos
38 Jacques' pal
39 Mischievous


Stop gnat & Mosquito bites! Buy
Swamp Gator All natural insect re-
pellent. Family safe. Use head to
toe. Available at The Home Depot.
Summer Barbecue Special
Tow Behind
Grill/Smoker, $1,250 OBO.
386-719-4802

450 Good Things
450 to Eat

GREEN PEANUTS For Sale
Graded and washed.
$30.00 a bushel.
386-752-3434

OSCEOLA HONEY & BEE
FARM, Tupelo honey now avail.,
several other varieties, good pri-
ces. 386-755-2642, 386-754-1110


460 Firewood

Firewood for Sale. $65. per Truck
Load. Rick 386-867-1039 or Joey
965-0288 if no answer pis leave
message we will call you back.







Lawn & Landscape Service

J&M LAWN Service & more for
all your outdoor needs. Don't
waste your time or weekend,
Free Estimate. 386-984-2187




Unscramble these four Jumbles,
one letter to each square,
to form four ordinary words.

MCALP


(02011 Tribune Media Services, Inc.
All Rights Reserved.
LOKAC



FMLUEF "
Ia


5,


Mederi f



PHYSICAL


THERAPIST:
Home Health Care Agency
servicing Columbia and
surrounding counties
seeking Full-Time
experienced Physical
Therapist
Competitive Salary &
Benefits Available.
Please call contact
Lynn or Cindy at
386-758-3312
or apply online at
www.almostfamily.com


THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME
by David L. Hoyt and Jeff Knurek


WHAT STRCA.l..lNG IN
HOLLYWOOD CAN BB FCR


LSAYAW A MoVIesTAFr
Now arrange the circled letters
to form the surprise answer, as
suggested by the above cartoon.

Ans: A II
(Answers Monday)
Yesterday's Jumbles: CROAK USHER SCENIC UTOPIA
Answer: He called his broker to buy more shares
because he wanted to do this STOCK UP


42 Hot spring
45 "Big Blue"
46 Genres
50 Ice-skating fig-
ures
53 Kind of split
55 Warm over
56 Went back and
forth
57 Falsely
incriminate
58 Formally
relinquish


DOWN

1 A grand
2 Decomposes
3 Mr. Yale of Yale
4 "Hold On
Tight" rockers
5 Large winery
cask
6 Hosp. workers
7 Elevator name
8 Louvre's Mona
9 Allows
10 Noncom
11 Lab tech


Answer to Previous Puzzle

DI V D G MB
ROCKET SERIAL
SURELY CREASE

AUG T OADY UM P
G RIRTO NiS STA R
A BIAILON E.PATT I
S ATI I N MAL E TS
SN IPPIINA R
I AN DE O Y SRS
ERA IFS
AR CT C NA LED
MYRTLE TINGLE
PETAL REEF S


12 Verdi princess
17 Hibernate
20 1998 Winter
Olympics site
21 Pesto
and marinara


Want more puzzles?
Check out the "Just Right Crossword Puzzles" books
at QuilDriverBooks.com


22 Offer
a position
23 Alphabet trio
24 Soft metal
25 Playing card
28 Hari (Garbo
role)
29 Like some
chances
31 Not far away
32 Xylophone
kin
33 Chem. or biol.
37 Dartboard
locale
40 Main idea
41 Gate pivot
42 Feudal under-
ling
43 Jetty
44 Turkish offi-
cial
47 Praise highly
48 Patella's place
49 Heartrending
51 Border
52 kwon do
54 Electric
bridge


9-3 2011 UFS, Dist. by Univ. Uclick for UFS


O 100Job,
S 100 Opportunities
05527485
e I ElU atl~lul 4. f City of Gainesville Fleet


I


roll


w


I











Classified Department: 755-5440


LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 3, 2011


630 Mobile Homes
630 for Rent
2 BR/1 BA on 1/2 acre
in S. Columbia County,
$400 month
Call 386-755-8741
2 OR 3 BEDROOMS
Clean, Quiet Park $475-$525.mo
Water, septic, garbage included
758-2280 References, NO PETS!
3/2 Large MH. small park, near
FGCC, Small pets ok, $500 dep
$575 mo w/12 mo lease
386-752-1971 or 352-281-2450
3/2.5 S of Lake City, (Branford
area) $600 mo plus security
386-590-0642 or 386-867-1833
www.suwanneevalleyproperties.com
3BR/2BA BRANFORD area
Close to River. Nice yard.
Must see! Call for info.
386-752-7814 or 386-719-7010
3BR/2BA MH
Water & Garage included No Pets.
$550. mo. $400. security deposit..
386-752-9898 or 386-365-3633
LG clean 3br's $450. -$650. mo. +
dep. Also, 2br mobile home's
available. No Pets.
5 Points area. 386-961-1482
New 2br/2ba off Country Club. 1/2
ac. lot Front, back porch & storage
bldg. $600 mo. $600 sec. No Pets!
386-752-5911 or 466-2266

Mobile Homes
640 for Sale

o055:2774
!!ATTENTION!!
We purchase used mobile
homes. Call North Pointe
Homes. Gainesville
352-872-5566

05527375 !!!LOOK!!!
Before you but a Mobile Home
check out North Pointe Homes
in Gainesville--Hugh Discounts!
credit Scores Don't matter. Call
for Free Approval! Jacobson
Homes Factory Outlet (352)872-
5566 or mrb3370 lhotmail.com

05527376
NEW USED- REPO'S
Your Volume Giant! North
Pointe Homes. Millions to Lend.
Credit Scores 575 = 10% down.
Gainesville (352)872-5566 or
walker-david(Slive.com

Palm Harbor Homes
4/2 From 499 Mo Loaded
3/2 From 399 Mo Loaded
Homes on Your Lot 0 Down
800-622-2832

710 Unfurnished Apt.
For Rent








2br/l ba, 1I car garage.
W/D hook up. $525 month.
no pets I month sec,
386-961-8075
2BR/IBA. Close to town.
$565.mo plus deposit.
Includes water & sewer.
386-965-2922
A Landlord You Can Love!
2 br Apts $575. & up + sec. Great
area. CH/A washer/dryer hookups.
386-758-9351/352-208-2421
Amber Wood Hills Apts.
Private Patio area. Beautiful yard.
Washer/dryer hkup. Free water &
sewer. 1/1, 2/1. Move in special.
386-754-1800. wwwmyflapts.com
Columbia Arms Apt. located 1/2
mi from V.A. & Winn Dixie. Pet
Friendly. Move in Special $199.
Pool laundry & balcony.
386-754-1800. www.myflapts.com
Great location W of 1-75, spacious
deluxe 2br apts., garage, W/D
hookup. patio. $600/700 & up, +
Sec, 386-965-5560 or 344-3715
Greentree Townhouse
Summer special. 2/1, 2/1.5. Free
water & sewer. Balcony & patio.
Laundry. Behind Kens on Hwy 90.
386-754-1800 wwwmyflapts.com
Summer Special! 12th mq Free
w/signed yr lease. Updated, w/tile
floors/fresh paint. Great area.
From $450.+sec. 386-752-9626


710 Unfurnished Apt.
710 For Rent

ONE 51 PLACE APTS
Alachua
MOVE IN SPECIALS
1, 2, & 3 bedrooms
Call TODAY 386-462-0656
or visit us at one51 Iplace.com.

Redwine Apartments. Move in
special $199. Limited time. Pets
welcome. with 5 complexes,
we have a home for you.
386-754-1800. www.myflapts.com
Unfurnished Apt Eastside
Village Realty, Inc .2 bedroom
1 bath Duplex must be 55+ yrs of
age Call Denise Bose @
386-752-5290
Wayne Manor Apts.
Move in $199. Summer special.
2/1, washer/dryer. Behind Kens off
Hwy 90. 386-754-1800
www.myflapts.com
Windsor Arms Apartments.
Summer special $199. Move in!
2/1, 2/1.5, 2/2. Pet Friendy. Free
200 ch. Dish. Washer/dryer hkup.
386-754-1800. www.myflapts.com

720 Furnished Apts.
72 For Rent

Studio Apt. Private. Rent incl util-
ities, Satellite TV, appliances,
(washer/dryer). No pets 386-963-
4767 or 292-0385 Available 9/1

SUnfurnished
730 Home For Rent

'09 Executive Home for rent on 41
acres. 4br/3.5ba Available
October. Horses/outdoor pets ok.
$2000/mo but all terms negotiable
for right caretaker. 386-209-4610
2BR house $625.mo $625. dep.
Also, 2 large br apt. $525. mo
$525 dep. Conveniently close to
the VA & shopping. 386-344-2972
3 br/2ba house, 4 206 McFarlane
Avenue. Avail. 9/1/11. $850 mo
$400 sec dep. 904-376-0620 or
904-813-8864 for appt. No pets!
3/2 by Westside Elementary,
custom built home
$1050.00 per month.
Scott 352-318-8117
4B/1.5 BA, brick house for rent.
$850 a month & $550 security.
No pets!
386-752-9898 or 386-365-3633.
4BR BRICK home.
Azalea Park. $750. mo.
$750. security.
386-397-2619 or 386-365-1243
Brick 3br/2ba Large yard, garage,
CH/A. 189 Stanley Ct. Lake City.
$950. mo + $1000 dep.
Call 386-365-8543
LOVELY 3BR/IBA Farm house
for rent. Quiet country area.
Please call after 5pm.
386-752-0017. Leave message.
LULU, FL 3/2 recently
remodeled. CH/A. large porches.
$650. mo + dep.
386-752-3444 or 961-3031

750 Business &
Office Rentals

FOR LEASE: Downtown office
space. Convenient to
Court house.
Call 386-755-3456
For Lease: E Baya Ave. Two -
1000 sqft office space units or
combined for 2000 sqft. 386-984-
0622 or weekends 386-497-4762
MIDTOWN COMMERCIAL
CENTER, brand new executive
suite & suite with warehouse
$600 monthly.
Call Vicki or Joe 386-935-2832.
NICE OFFICE SPACE for lease.
Oak Hill Plaza. 900 sqft
from $450 a month
Tom 386-961-1086 DCA Realtor
SUB SHOP for lease.
All Equip. Avail. Old Willy J's
Across from Wal-Mart
386-623-2244


790 Vacation Rentals

Horseshoe Beach RV Lot.
Nice comer Lot with shade trees.
$295. mo Water/electric included
386-235-3633 or 352-498-5986


790 Vacation Rentals

Scalloping Horseshoe Beach Spcl
Gulf Front 2br, w/lg porch, dock,
fish sink. wkend $395./wk $895.
386-235-3633/352-498-5986
alwaysonvacation.com #419-181
"Florida's Last Frontier"


805 Lots for Sale
Foreclosure! 59.98 Ac. Close to
Suwannee River w/boat ramps &
Springs. Ideal parcel for your site
built or manuf. home. $139,000!
MLS# 78083 386-344-7662
Lots for Sale Eastside
Village Realty, Inc. buildable
vacant lot hight & dry in a estab-
lished neighbor priced @ $40,000.
Call Denise Bose @ 752-5290
Owner Financing. River comm &
nature lover's dream in Lee. 15
wooded ac by the Withlacoochee.
Property is already subdivided
MLS 75576 $48,000 623-6896
PUBLISHER'S NOTE
All real estate advertising in this
newspaper is subject to the fair
housing act which makes it illegal
to advertise "any preference,
limitation, or discrimination based
on race, color, religion, sex,
disability, familial status or nation-
al origin; or any intention to make
such preference, limitation or
discrimination." Familial status
includes children under the age of
18 living with parents or legal
custodians, pregnant women and
people securing custody of chil-
dren under the age of 18. This
newspaper will not knowingly
accept any advertising for real es-
tate which is in violation of the
law. Our readers are hereby in-
formed that all dwellings adver-
tised in this newspaper are availa-
ble on an equal opportunity basis.
To complain of discrimination call
HUD toll free at 1-800-669-9777,
the toll free
telephone number to the hearing
impaired is 1-800-927-9275.


810 Home for Sale

0.5.acre tract has 441 (4 lane)
frontage. 1/2 miles from Target
distribution. 2/1.5 currently zoned
residential. MLS#78506 $91,000
R.E.O. Realty Group 867-1271
2 Mobile homes on 5 ac. above
ground pool. (1)1800 sqft. &
(l)1500sqft.$235,000 $139,888
MLS 77552 Brittany Stoeckert
Results Realty 386-397-3473
3/2 Brick Home w/l car garage,
Metal roof, porch w/swing, detach
carport $96,000 MLS#77780
Jo Lytte Remax 386-365-2821
www.jolytte.florida-propeny-search.coni
3/2 Split floor plan built in 2010
on 2 acres.. Master bath with large
tub & standing shower. Trey ceil-
ings MLS#78520. $114,900
R.E.O. Realty Group 867-1271
4/2 fenced yard.
2 car garage, Fairly new roof &
I VAC Shed, fenced back yard.
MLS#77602, $162,500, R.E.O.
Realty Group 867-1271
4/2 on I ac. Modular home. Im-
maculate cond. New carpet, roof.
AC. more. Barn/workshop
$115,000 MLS 78833 Brittany
Results Realty 386-397-3473
Almost 17ac., spacious 3br/2ba
home, paved rd. Near Itchetucknee
Spgs. Pole barnm. gated, fenced.
MLS76902 $164,900 Brodi Allred
623-0906. Westfield Realty Group
Awesome Find! 3br/2ba, 1844sf,
wood floors, French doors to scr
back porch, 40x60 bldg w/office &
workshop, 6.17ac comer lot, 3
sides fenced. #77427 $199,900
Brick Ranch 3/2 FI room. Side en-
try garage & workshop. 2 sheds.
New AC apple & roof. MLS78442
$114,900. Millard Gillen 365-7001
Westfield Realty Group
Charming 2br/2ba home. Gated
community. REDUCED to
$158,000 MLS78740 Teresa
Spradley 386-365-8343
Hallmark Real Estate
Clean Well maintained 3/2 brick
w/chain link fenced back yard
w/Garage. $120,K MLS78440.
Debbie King 386-365-3886
Hallmark Real Estate


810 Home for Sale

Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
Neat & tidy 2/2, maybe 3/2. New
kitchen counters & tile. Open floor
plan. Mary Brown Whitehurst
965-0887 MLS# 77943 $99,000
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
10 acres w/well maintained brick
home. 2012 sqft. Open split floor
plan. Lori Giebeig Simpson
365-5678 MLS# 74447 $149,000
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
3br/3ba Spacious home in estab-
lished area. 2414 sqft. Private yard
& patio. Lori Giebeig Simpson
365-5678 MLS# 78175 $159,000
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
3br/2ba. 1590 sqft. Lori Giebeig
Simpson. 365-5678 or
Mary Brown Whitehurst
965-0887 MLS# 74542 $110,000
Country close to town 3/2 Brick 3
ac. Grape arbor & fruit trees. pole
barn, workshop. Metal roof. MLS
78096 $129,900 Ginger Parker
365-2135 Hallmark Real Estate
Country Club Condo 4br/3ba.
Mega storage, roomy kit, 3 porch-
es. $165,000 MLS 78719 Paula
Lawrence 386-623-1973
Hallmark Real Estate.
Deer in your back yard. 3/2 HUD
w/16X48 wrap around scr. porch.
Clean, well maintained, 5 ac.
$72,000 MLS78687 Ginger Parker
365-2135 Hallmark Real Estate
Foreclosure! 3/2 D/WMH boasts
a large kitchen. M/B w/ garden
tub, shower & dbl sinks-New car-
pet-fpl & more-Only $69,995
MLS# 76920. 386-344-7662
Foreclosure! Newer 3/2 DWMH.
Lg rooms, kitchen island, lots of
wdws, master w/garden tub & sep-
arate shower. $74,995
MLS# 74218 386-344-7662
Great 3/2 home w/2346 sq ft
under roof on .67 ac., Creekside
S/D. Big back yard w/plenty of
shade trees. On a cul-de-sac, MLS
77385 $169,900 623-6896
Home for Sale Eastside Village
Realty, Inc. 2 bedroom, 2 bath site
built home with screen porch,
large carport priced just right Call
Denise Bose @ 752-5290
Home in Lake City Country Club.
4/3. renovated. Great for entertain-
ing. Glass doors open to back yard.
MLS#78637 $184,900
R.E.O. Realty Group 867-1271
JASPER! 4BR/2.5BA 1,890 SqFt
mfg home on I acre where
wildlife is abundant $39,900
DANIEL CRAPPS AGENCY,
INC. 755-5110 #77922
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
Suwannee Co. 115 ac. Fenced &
cross Fenced. Pasture land, paved
rd. Elaine K. Tolar 386-752-4211
MLS# 77081 $345,000
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
.97 ac. Centrally located to Lake
City & G'ville. Fenced, planted
pines, pasture. Elaine K. Tolar
752-4211 MLS# 73879 $291,030
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
New home in May Fair. Super area
'comer lot. 4br split plan. Versatile
colors. Elaine K. Tolar
755-6488 MLS# 76919 $199,900
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
240 ac. Farm. Rolling Meadows.
Paved road, great access to Lake
City & G'ville. Elaine K. Tolar
386-752-4211 MLS# 70453
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
Suwannee Co. 115 ac. Fenced &
cross fenced. 10 & 20 ac parcels
avail. Elaine K. Tolar 386-752-
4211 MLS# 67766 $448,500
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
Brick home in town on lake front.
3br/2ba. New roof & hardwoods.
Glass room w/view Elaine Tolar
755-6488 MLS# 78092 $249,900
Lake front 3/2 custom Western Ce-
dar. Lots of storage space. Private
dock $229,900. MLS# 74681
Jo Lytte-Remax 386-365-2821
www.jolytte.florida-property-search.com
Large Home in the Country on
3.66 acres, fireplace, 2 outbldgs,
MLS#76471,. $89,900
Jo Lytte, Remax 386-365-2821
jolytte@remaxnfl.com
LEASE/OPTION BUY
3br/2ba Home 2010 w/garage
on 1/2 acre. Owner Financing
386-623-2244


810 Home for Sale

LOCATION! CONDITION!
PRICE! 3BR/2BA w/open floor
plan; freshly painted $96,000
DANIEL CRAPPS AGENCY,
INC. 755-5110 #78278
Lofty home on Itchetucknee River,
Wrap around covered decks on
two levels.MustSEE! $375,000
MLS#77006 Jo Lytte
Remax 386-365-2821
Motivated Seller. Country area,
paved rd. 3br/2ba manuf home.
New AC & upgraded wdows.
MLS 78027 $84K. Brodie Allred.
623-0906 Westfield Realty Group
MOVE-IN READY! 3BR/2BA in
pristine condition on 1.39 acres
$89,900 DANIEL CRAPPS
AGENCY, INC.
755-5110 #78345
New Reduced. 4br/2ba plus of-
fice. 2 living & dining areas. cov-
ered porch. Fl rm. Triple garage.
MLS77685 Charlie Sparks 755-
0808 Westfield Realty Group
Nice, large 4/2 on I acre
w/florida room, granite floors,
wrap around front porch, $139,900
Brittany Stoeckert Results Realty
386-397-3473 MLS 77292
Owner Financing. 2br/3ba country
home w/wrap around porches, 5ac.
Garage w/workshop. MLS77005
$179,900 Roger Lovelady 365-
7039 Westfield Realty Group
PRICE REDUCTION. 3/2 plus
pool house w/half bath, 2.25
fenced ac. Freshly painted. Split
plan, Large rear deck MLS 78103
$179,900 386-623-6896
PRICED TO SELL! 3BR/2BA
w/2,012 SqFt w/living rm & fami-
ly rm $57,000 DANIEL CRAPPS
AGENCY, INC.
755-5110 #78680
Private 2 ac parcel away from it
all. Hunting w/no restrictions.
Mace an offer on this 1764 sqft
home that need some TLC.
$109,900, MLS78331. Jay Sears.
867-1613 Hallmark Real Estate
Reduced Price! 3br/1.5 ba. Re-
modeled. Nice area close to VA.
MLS 77599 $69K. Estate Sale,
bring all offers. Josh Grecian 466-
2517 Westfield Realty Group
Remax Professionals Motivated
seller. Spacious brick w/many up-
grades. Newer roof, windows &
fixtures. Fenced back yard. MKS
78168 $119,900 Missy Zecher @
623-0237 www.missyzecher.com
Remax Professionals Ranch style
home on 10 ac w/barn & horse
stalls. 4 Ig bedrm + bonus rm. 2
car gar. MLS 77403 $325K.
Missy Zecher @ 386-623-0237
www.missyzecher.com
Rolling Meadows. 4 or 3br/2ba.
Over 1700 sqft. and 1/2 ac lot.
MLS77284 $154,900 Carrie Cason
386-623-2806
Westfield Realty Group
Something for Everyone! 3br/2ba.
2706sf, 4.02ac, island kitchen.
Corian counters, det garage. Koi
pond. fish house, green house.
fenced'& morj. #76255 $247,000
SPECTACULAR VIEW! ..
2BR/IBA, 1200sf. .65ac, scr front
porch, steps to deck/dock on Suw.
river, under house parking/storage.
shed & more. #77242 $194,900
Suwannee River Front
granite counters, covered patio,
deck & dock, $349.000
MLS#76336 Jo Lytte at Remax
Professionals. 386-365-2821
WELL-CARED FOR 4BR/2.5BA
mfg home w/formal LR plus fami-
ly rm $84,000 DANIEL CRAPPS
AGENCY, INC.
755-5110 #78585
WHITE SPRINGS! Sturdy block
3BR/IBA home in city limits,
fenced yd $49,000 DANIEL
CRAPPS AGENCY, INC.
755-5110 #78603

820Farms &
820 Acreage

10-ac lot. Well/septic/pp. Owner
financing $300 dn, $663 mo 8.9%,
25 yrs. Deas Bullard Properties
386-752-4339 www.landnfl.com
4 1/2 acre lot. Lake Jeffery Road.
Gorgeous Oaks!Paved Rd
Owner Financing! NO DOWN!
$59,900. $525mo 352-215-1018.
www.LandOwnerFinancing.com


820 Farms &
S Acreage

4 acres, Wellborn, New Well
installed, Beautifully wooded
w/cleared Home Site, owner fin,
no down, $39,900, $410 mon
Call 352-215-1018
www.LandOwnerFinancing.com
6.45 ac river front property in
White Springs, cloe to Big Shoals.
Covered shelter for entertaining.
MLS# 77417 $104,900 386-867-
1271 R.E.O. Realty Group, Inc
FARM- 7 stall barn.
17+ acres, pasture, cross fenced.
Close in $500. mo.
386-961-1086
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
61 ac. Parcel. SR 27 & 1-75 inter-
change. Great potential, fenced &
cross fenced. Elaine K. Tolar
752-4211 MLS# 758060 $368,040
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
40 ac.Parcel. Less then 2 mi from
city limits. Fenced road frontage
on US Hwy 441. Elaine K. Tolar
752-4211 MLS# 62092 $194K

830 Commercial
830 Property

788 S. Marion Comm'l bldg on
highway frontage. Across from the
VA & near downtown. $49,900.
MLS 78129 Scott Stewart 867-
3498 Westfield Realty Group
Commercial. High traffic location
w/I-75 exposure. 2-story custom
log home. MLS77949
Josh Grecian 386-466-2517
Westfield Realty Group
Prime Commercial Location.
Just across from a plaza. Frontage
on Baya w/2 curbcuts. $350,000
MLS# 77485 Call 386-867-1271
R.E.O.Realty Group, Inc
Remax Professionals Commercial
Property. Located on expanding
west side of Lake City. Professio- 1
nal service or restaurant. MLS
77436 $575k Missy Zecher 386-
623-0237 www.missyzecher.com 2
Wellborn Commercial lot. 1.84
acres w/34' of Hwy frontage near
the new Dollar General. MLS
72381 Scott Stewart 386-867-3498
Westfield Realty Group

O860 Investment
8O6 Property

Rustic Fishing camp in Suwannee
Minutes to boat launch.
MLS#78709 $59,900
Jo Lytte/Remax 386-365-2821
www.jolytte.florida-property-search.com

870 Real Estate
87 Wanted

I Buy Houses
CASH!
Quick Sale Fair Price
386-269-0605


950 Cars for Sale

1995 BUICK PARK AVENUE,
4 Door, nice new cold air,,
excellent cond., $3,000 OBO.
Call 386-961-9700 evenings 6-10











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Page EdItor: Tim Kirby, 754-0421 LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 3, 2011


TELEVISION

TV sports

Today
AUTO RACING
II a.m.
SPEED NASCAR, Nationwide
Series, final practice for Great Clips 300,
at Hampton, Ga. (same-day tape)
1:30 p.m.
SPEED NASCAR, Sprint Cup,
"Happy Hour Series:' final practice for
AdvoCare 500, at Hampton., Ga.
3:30 p.m.
SPEED NASCAR, Nationwide
Series, pole qualifying for Great Clips 300,
at Hampton, Ga.
5 p.m.
SPEED NASCAR, Sprint Cup, pole
qualifying for AdvoCare 500, at Hampton,
Ga.
6 p.m.
VERSUS IRL, IndyCar, qualifying for
Baltimore Grand Prix
7:30 p.m.
ESPN2 NASCAR, Nationwide
Series, Great Clips 300, at Hampton, Ga.
BOXING
10:30 p.m.
HBO Champion Jan Zaveck
(31-1-1) vs.Andre Berto (27-1-0),for IBF
welterweight title, at Biloxi, Miss.
COLLEGE FOOTBALL
Noon
ESPN -Akron at Ohio St.
ESPN2 Utah St.at Auburn
FSN Miami (Ohio) at Missouri
3:30 p.m.
ABC W. Michigan at Michigan or
Minnesota at Southern Cal
ESPN2 -W. Michigan at Michigan or
Minnesota at Southern Cal
FSN UCLA at Houston
NBC South Florida at Notre
Dame
4:45 p.m.
ESPN BYU at Mississippi
8 p.m.
ABC Oregon vs. LSU, at Arlington,
Texas
ESPN Boise St. vs. Georgia, at
Atlanta
FX -Tulsa at Oklahoma
10 p.m.
FSN Louisiana Tech at Southern
Miss.
10:15 p.m.
ESPN2 Colorado at Hawaii
GOLF
7 a.m.
TGC- European PGATour, European
Masters, third round, at Crans sur Sierre,
Switzerland
3 p.m.
TGC PGA Tour, Deutsche Bank
Championship, second round, at Norton,
Mass.
6:30 p.m.
TGC Nationwide Tour, Mylan
Classic, third round, at Canonsburg, Pa.
(same-day tape)
HORSE RACING
5 p.m.
VERSUS NTRA, Forego Stakes and
Woodward Stakes, at Saratoga Springs,
N.Y.
MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL
I p.m.
WGN Pittsburgh at Chicago Cubs
4 p.m.
FOX Regional coverage, Cincinnati
at St. Louis, Texas at Boston, or Chicago
White Sox at Detroit
9 p.m.
MLB Regional coverage, Arizona
at Sar Francisco or Minnesota at LA.
Angels
MOTORSPORTS
8 p.m.
SPEED -AMA Pro Motocross 450, at
Delmont, Pa. (same-day tape)
9 p.m.
SPEED -AMA Pro Motocross 250, at
Delmont, Pa. (same-day tape)
TENNIS
II a.m.
CBS U.S. Open, third round, at
NewYork


BASEBALL

AL standings

East Division
W L Pct GB
NewYork 83 53 .610 -
Boston 83 54 .606 %'
Tampa Bay 74 63 .540 9'h
Toronto 69 69 .500 15
Baltimore 55 81 .404 28
Central Division
W L Pet GB
Detroit 76 62 .551 -
Cleveland 69 66 .511 5'h
Chicago 68 67 .504 6'A%
Minnesota 57 79 .419 18
Kansas City 57 82 .410 19/h
West Division
W L Pet GB
Texas 79 60 .568 -
Los Angeles 74 63 .540 4
Oakland 61 76 .445 17
Seattle 58 78 .426 19'
Thursday's Games
Oakland 7, Cleveland 0
Toronto 8, Baltimore 6
Kansas City II, Detroit 8
N.Y.Yankees 4, Boston 2
Texas 7,Tampa Bay 2
LA. Angels 4, Seattle 3
Friday's Games
Detroit 8, ChicagoWhite Sox I
N.Y.Yankees 3,Toronto 2
Baltimore 3,Tampa Bay 2
Texas I O.Boston 0
Cleveland 5, Kansas City 4
Cleveland at Kansas City (n)
Minnesota at LA.Angels (n)
Seattle at Oakland (n)
Today's Games
Toronto (R.Romero 13-9) at N.Y.
Yankees (Colon 8-9), 1:05 p.m.
Seattle (Pineda 9-8) at Oakland
(McCarthy 7-7), 4:05 p.m.


Chicago White Sox (Floyd 12-10) at
Detroit (Penny 9-10),4:10 p.m.
Texas (C.Lewis 11-9) at Boston
(Bedard 4-9),4:10 p.m.
Baltimore (Simon 4-7) at Tampa Bay
(W.Davis 8-8), 6:10 p.m.
Cleveland (D.Huff 2-2) at Kansas City
(Hochevar 9-10),7:10 p.m.
Minnesota (Duenslng 9-13) at L.A.
Angels (Weaver 15-7), 9:05 p.m.
Sunday's Games
Toronto at N.Y.Yankees, 1:05 p.m.
Texas at Boston, 1:35 p.m.


Baltimore atTampa Bay, 1:40 p.m.
Cleveland at Kansas City. 2:10 p.m.
Minnesota at L.A.Angels, 3:35 p.m.
Seattle at Oakland, 4:05 p.m.
Chicago White Sox at Detroit.
8:05 p.m.

NL standings


Philadelph
Atlanta
New York
Washingto
Florida


Milwaukee
St. Louis
Cincinnati
Pittsburgh
Chicago
Houston


Arizona


East Division
W L
ia 88 46
81 55
67 69
on 63 73
60 77
Central Division
W L
81 57
73 64
67 70
63 75
59 79
47 90
West Division
W L
78 59


Pct GB
.657 -
.596 8
.493 22
.463 26
.438 29%

Pct GB
.587 -
.533 7'A
.489 13'h
.457 18
.428 22
.343 33%

Pct GB
.569 -


San Francisco 72 65 .526 6
Los Angeles 66 70 .485 'I '1%
Colorado 64 73 .467 14
San Diego 60 77 .438 18
Thursday's Games
Philadelphia 6. Cincinnati 4
LA. Dodgers 6, Pittsburgh 4
St. Louis 8, Milwaukee 4
N.Y. Mets 7, Florida 5
Atlanta 5,Washington 2
Friday's Games
Pittsburgh 3, Chicago Cubs I
N.Y. Mets 7,Washington 3
Philadelphia 5, Florida 3
LA. Dodgers at Atlanta (n)
Milwaukee at Houston (n)
Cincinnati at St. Louis (n)
Colorado at San Diego (n)
Arizona at San Francisco (n)
Today's Games
Pittsburgh (Ohlendorf 0-1) at Chicago
Cubs (C.Coleman 2-7). 1:05 p.m.
Cincinnati (H.Balley 7-6) at St. Louis
OJ.Garcia 10-7), 4:10 p.m.
Milwaukee (Narveson 9-6) at Houston
(Norris 6-8), 7:05 p.m.
N.Y. Mets (Gee 12-5) at Washington
(Milone 0-0), 7:05 p.m.
LA. Dodgers (Eovaldi 1-2) at Atlanta
(Minor 4-2), 7:10 p.m.
Philadelphia (Hamels 13-7) at Florida
(Nolasco 9-10), 7:10 p.m.
Colorado (White 0-1) at San Diego
(Luebke 5-7), 8:35 p.m.
Arizona (I.Kennedy 17-4f at San
Francisco (Uncecum 12-1I), 9:05 p.m.
Sunday's Games
Philadelphia at Florida, 1:10 p.m.
LA. Dodgers at Atlanta. 1:35 p.m.
N.Y. Mets at Washington. 1:35 p.m.
Milwaukee at Houston, 2.05 p.m.
Cincinnati at St. Louis, 2:15 p.m.
Pittsburgh at Chicago Cubs, 2:20 p.m.
Arizona at San Francisco. 4:05 p.m.
Colorado at San Diego, 4.05 p.m.

FOOTBALL

NFL preseason games

Thursday
Detroit 16, Buffalo 6
Indianapolis 17, Cincinnati 13
Baltimore 21.Atlanta 7
N.Y. Giants 18, New England 17
Miami 17, Dallas 3
Washington 29,Tampa Bay 24
St. Louis 24,Jacksonville 17
Philadelphia 24, N.Y Jets 14
Chicago 24, Cleveland 14
Green Bay 20, Kansas City 19
Minnesota 28, Houston 0
Tennessee 32, New Orleans 9
Pittsburgh 33, Carolina 17
Arizona 26, Denver 7
San Francisco 20, San Diego 17
Friday
Oakland at Seattle (n)

Top 25 schedule

Today
No. I Oklahoma vs.Tulsa, 8 p.m.
No. 2 Alabama vs. Kent State,
12:21 p.m.
No. 3 Oregon vs. No. 4 LSU at
Arlington,Texas, 8 p.m.
No. 5 Boise State at No. 19 Georgia,
8 p.m.
No. 6 Florida State vs. Louisiana-
Monroe, 3:30 p.m.
No. 7 Stanford vs. San Jose State,
5 p.m.
.No. 8 Texas A&M vs. SMU. 7:30 p.m.
No. 9 Oklahoma State vs. Louisiana-
Lafayette, 7 p.m.
No. 10 Nebraska vs. Chattanooga,
3:30 p.m.
No. 12 South Carolina vs. East
Carolina, 8 p.m.
No. 13 Virginia Tech vs. Appalachian
State, 12:30 p.m.
No. 15 Arkansas vs. Missouri State,
7 p.m.
No. 16 Notre Dame vs. South
Florida, 3:30 p.m.
No. 18 Ohio State vs.Akron, Noon
No. 21'Missouri vs. Miami (Ohio),
Noon
No. 22 Florida vs. FAU, 7 p.m.
No. 23 Auburn vs. Utah State, Noon
No. 25 Southern Cal vs. Mirinesota,
3:30 p.m.

College scores

Thursday
Rutgers 48; NC Central 0
Syracuse 36,Wake Forest 29, OT
Temple 42,Villanova 7
UMass 24, Holy Cross 16
FIU 41, North Texas 16
Georgia Tech 63.W. Carolina 21
Jacksonville St. 24, UT-Martin 23
Kentucky 14,W Kentucky 3
Louisville 21, Murray St. 9
Mississippi St. 59, Memphis 14
Morehead St. 67, Ky. Christian 0
Nicholls St.42, Evangel 0
Northwestern St. 24, Delta St. 23
South Alabama 20,West Alabama 10
Cent. Michigan 21, SC State 6
E. Illinois 33, Illinois St. 26
North Dakota 16, Drake 0
Toledo 58, New Hampshire 22
Wisconsin 5I, UNLV 17
Cent Arkansas 38, Henderson St. 14
Sam Houston St. 20,W. Illinois 6
Stephen FAustin 82, McMurry 6
Arizona St. 48, UC Davis 14
Bowling Green 32, Idaho 15


Anastasia Pavlyuchenkova (17), Russia,
def. Petra Martic, Croatia, 6-4, 2-6, 6-4.
Akgul Amanmuradova, Uzbekistan, def.
Pauline Parmentler, France, 6-3, 7-5.
Svetlana Kuznetsova (15), Russia, def.
Elena Baltacha, Britain, 6-4, 6-3.
Sloane Stephens, United States, def.
Shahar Peer (23), Israel, 6-1,7-6 (4).
Vania King, United States, def. Jarmila
Gaidosova (29),Australla, 6-2, 6-0.
Caroline Woznlacki (I), Denmark, def.
Arantxa Rus, Netherlands, 6-2, 6-0.
Victoria Azarenka (4), Belarus, def.
Gisela Dulko,Argentina, 6-4, 6-3.


PREP ROUNDUP



CHS boys golf splits opener


Utah 27, Montana St. 100

BASKETBALL

WNBA schedule

Thursday's Games
Washington 85,Atlanta 81
San Antonio 86, Phoenix 68
Friday's Games
Atlanta 95,Washington 73
Connecticut 83, Indiana 55
New York 78, MIhnesota, 62
Seattle 78,Tulsa 72
Today's Games
Seattle at San Antonio, 8 p.m.
Los Angeles at Phoenix, 10 p.m.


AUTO RACING

Race week

NASCAR
SPRINT CUP
ADVOCARE 500
Site: Hampton, Ga.
Schedule: Today, practice (Speed,
1:30-3 p.m.), qualifying (Speed, 5-7 p.m.);
Sunday, race, 7:30 p.m. (ESPN, 6:30-
11:30 p.m.).
Track: Atlanta Motor Speedway (tri-
oval, 1,54 miles).
Race distance: 500.5 miles, 325 laps.
NATIONWIDE
GREAT CLIPS 300
Site: Hampton, Ga.
Schedule: Today, practice (Speed,
II a.m.-12:30 p.m.), qualifying (Speed;
3:30-5 p.m.), race, 7:30 p.m. (ESPN2,
7- W p.m.).
Track:Atlanta Motor Speedway.
Race distance: 300.3 miles, 195 laps.
INDYCAR
BALTIMORE GRAND PRIX
Schedule: Today, practice, qualifying
(Versus, 2-3 p.m.); Sunday, race, 2:45 p.m.
(Versus, 2-5 p.m.).
Track Streets of Baltimore (street
'course, 2.0 miles).
Race distance: 150 miles, 75 laps.
NHRA FULLTHROTTLE
U.S. NATIONALS
Site: Clermont, Ind.
Schedule: Today, qualifying, Sunday,
qualifying (ESPN2. II a.m.-2 p.m., ESPN2,
5-7 p.m.); Monday, final eliminations
(ESPN2, noon-6 p.m.).
Track Lucas Oil Raceway.
OTHER RACES
AMERICAN LE MANS SERIES:
Baltimore Grand Prix,Today (ABC, Sunday,
4-6 p.m.), Streets of Baltimore, Baltimore.

TENNIS

U.S. Open singles

Friday
Men
Second Round
Juan Martin del Potro (18).Argentina.
def. Diego Jupquelra, Argentina. 6-2, 6-1.
7-5.
Julien Benneteau, France, def. Denis
Istomin, Uzbekistan, 6-4,6-4.6-4.
Juan Ignacio Chela (24),Argentina. def.
Steve Darcis, Belgium, 6-2, 6-4, 6-4.
John Isner (28), United States, def.
Robby Ginepri., United States, 6-4. 6-3,
6-4.
Gilles Muller, Luxembourg, def. Ernests
Gulbis, Latvia, 3-6, 7-6 (4), 6-4,7-6 (5).
Donald Young. United States, def.
Stanislas Wawrinka (14). Switzerland. 7-6
(7),3-6,2-6,6-3,7-6 (I).
Gilles Simon (12), France, def.
Guillermo Garcia-Lopez, Spain, 6-4, 6-7
(4), 7-5,6-3.
Igor Kunitsyn, Russia, def. Jurgen
Melzer (17), Austria, 3-6, 6-3, 1-6, 6-2,
7-6 (5).
Rafael Nadal (2), Spain, def. Nicolas
Mahut, France, 6-2, 6-2. retired.
David Nalbandlan, Argentina, def. Ivan
Ijubicic (30), Croatia, 6-4,1-6,6-3,6-2.
Feliciano Lopez (25), Spain, def. Vasek
Pospisil, Canada, 5-7,6-4, 7-6 (3), 7-6 (5).
Andy Murray (4), Britain, def. Robin
Haase, Netherlands, 6-7 (5), 2-6, 6-2,
6-0.6-4.
David Ferrer (5),Spaln,vs.James Blake,
United States, 6-4, 6-3, 6-4.
Alex Bogomolov Jr., United States,
def. Rogerlo Dutra da Silva. Brazil, 6-4,
6-3,7-5.
Florian Mayer (26), Germany, def.Jean-
Rene Lisnard, Monaco, 6-2, 7-5, 6-2.
Women
Third Round
Monica NIculescu, Romania, def. Lucia
Safarova (27), Czech Republic, 6-0, 6-1I.
Angelique Kerber, Germany, def. Alia
Kudryavtseva, Russia, 6-3,6-I1.
Vera Zvonareva (2), Russia, def.Anabel
Medina Garrigues (30), Spain, 6-4,7-5.
Peng Shual (13), China, def. Julia
Goerges (19), Germany, 6-4,7-6 (I).
Flavia Pennetta (26), Italy, def. Maria
Sharapova (3), Russia, 6-3, 3-6, 6-4.
Sabine LIsickl (22), Germany, def. Irina
Falcons, United States, 6-0, 6- I.
Maria Kirilenko (25), Russia, def.
Christina McHale, United States, 6-2, 6-3.
Sam Stosur (9), Australia, def. Nadia
Petrova (24), Russia, 7-6 (5), 6-7 (5), 7-5.
Late Thursday
Men
Second Round
Alexandr Dolgopolov (22), Ukraine,
def. Flavio Cipolla, Italy, 6-0, 7-5, 2-6,
5-7, 6-4.
Ivo Karlovic, Croatia, def. Richard
Gasquet (13), France, 6-4, 6-2, 2-6, 7-6
(4).
Novak Djokovic (I), Serbia, def. Carlos
Beriocq, Argentina, 6-0, 6-0, 6-2.
Women
Second Round
Serena Williams (28), United States,
def. Michaella Kralicek, Netherlands,
6-0,6-1.
Chanelle Scheepers, South Africa, def.
Mona Barthel, Germany, 6-4,7-5.


match.
Tim Bagley shot a 39,
as the only other golfer
to break 40. Nick Jones
and Dillan VanVleck each
carded 40. Andrew Johnson
shot 41 and Dalton Mauldin
shot 42.
Columbia is 1-1 after the
first match, while Buchholz
improved to 4-0 in early-
season action. Oak Hall is
0-2.
"I'm very proud of the
way they played, especially
for the first match," Smithy
said. "We lost in a playoff,
but that doesn't take away
from the way we played."
Columbia returns to
Lake City for its first home
'match, of the season on
Tuesday. The Tigers will
host Buchholz and Santa Fe
high schools at The County
Club at Lake City.


Tigers JV football

Columbia's junior var-
sity football team started
the season off in the win
column by knocking off
host Madison County High,
20-0, on Thursday.
Akeem Williams caught
a touchdown pass for
the Tigers, while Lonnie
Underwood and Jessie
Nolan each had rushing
touchdowns.
"Austin Williams made
some good decisions at
quarterback," Columbia
varsity head coach Brian
Allen said. "Ben Kuykendall
played well on defense and
Lonnie Johnson had a good
game."
Columbia hosts Baker
County High in its sec-
ond game of the season at
7 p.m. Thursday.


Reporter file photo
Florida's Trey Burton (8) carries the ball against Kentucky in a game on Sept. 25.



Questions for Gators as



Muschamp era begins


By MARK LONG
Associated Press

GAINESVILLE Will
Muschamp grew up in
Gainesville, attended every
Florida game he could
and even sold drinks in
the stands to earn a little
money.
He longed to play for the
Gators, but ,ended up as
a walk-on at rival Georgia
because he "suffered some
temporary insanity there
for a while."
Now, nearly two decades
later, Muschamp finally
gets his time in The Swamp.
The Muschamp era official-
ly begins today when the
22nd-ranked Gators open


the season against Florida
Atlantic. Muschamp's
debut comes with intrigu-
ing subplots, unanswered
questions and the first real
look at the team's revamped
offense and defense.
"I'm emotional every
day," Muschamp said. "I'm
excited about it, but more
than anything, it's to just
focus on the task at hand.
It's coaching well, it's mak-
ing good decisions for your
football team, preparing
well during the week. ... I'm
not nervous. I'm anxious. I
think that's more of a bet-
ter word. But well be all
right"
The Gators hired
Muschamp in December,


just days after two-time
national champion Urban
Meyer resigned. For
Muschamp it was an oppor-
tunity to return home and
live out a childhood dream.
For Florida, it was a chance
to turn the program over to
a coach whose defensive
background seemed like a
perfect fit in the always-
physical Southeastern
Conference.
No one really knows how
the union will play out, but
Muschamp acknowledged
that he will be "measured
on game day."
"We can talk about all
this other stuff, but we're
measured how we play," he
said.


SHERRILL: The Rock and the Keys


Continued From Page 5A
heaven and to forgive sins. And some
say Peter was the first pope. Second,
there are some that teach the keys to the
kingdom were given to Peter, and Peter
handed down to elders, bishops, and pas-
tors so when they excommunicate some-
one from the local assembly, he is shut
out of heaven and can only be admitted
again by the one that shut him out. Third,
there are those that believe it to be the
preaching of the Gospel. While accepting
the Gospel does open heaven and rejec-
tion does close heaven, I believe there is
still another answer. And to find it, we
must follow the trail of the Gospel. Acts
1:8b says "...Ye shall be witness to me in
Jerusalem,
and in all Judea, and in Samaria, and unto
the utter most part of the earth".
I believe the first use of the keys
was on the day of Pentecost when
Peter preached the gospel to the Jews
in Jerusalem (key #1). Then in Acts
8:14 we see the second use of the keys.


Now when the apostles that were at
Jerusalem heard that Samaria had
received the word of God, they sent
unto them Peter and John. Verses 15-
17 tell us that none were saved til Peter
used the second key in Samaria (key
#2). That still leaves the uttermost
parts of the earth. In Acts chapter 10
(please read), Peter sees a vision of
a great sheet descending down from
heaven. The sheet contains all mat-
ter of unclean beasts (representing
Gentiles). The next day Peter meets
Cornelius, the Gentile; thus the last use
of the keys to the uttermost parts of the
world.
The stage is now set for the apostle
Paul, the apostle to the Gentiles. We
as Christians must continue to fulfill the
words of Jesus, "...to the uttermost parts
of the earth."

Hugh Sherrill is a Bible teacher at
Eastside Baptist Church.


SCOREBOARD


LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 3, 2011


Page Editor: Tim Kirby, 754-0421


From staff reports


Columbia High's boys
golf opened its 2011
season with split suc-
cess in a tri-match against
Buchholz High and Oak
Hall School at Ironwood
Country Club in Gainesville
on Thursday.
Dean Soucinek tied for
medalist with Oak Hall's Ty
Randell with matching 38s,
but it was Buchholz that
would come away with the
match win.
Columbia and Buchholz
tied at 157 after nine holes,
but Buchholz won on the
first playoff hole to take the
match. Oak Hall finished
with a 165 for third.
All six Tigers shot 42 or
lower in the match, a sta-
tistic coach Steve Smithy
liked in Columbia's first










Story ideas?

Contact
Tim Kirby
Sports Editor
754-0421
tkirby@lakecityreportercom


Lake City Reporter





SPORTS


Saturday, September 3,201 I


www.lakecityreporter.com


Page I OA


FROM THE SIDELINE






Braridon Finley
Phone:(386) 754-0420
bfinley@lakecityreporter.com

Tribute

to Taylor
I'm still south of 30,
but it makes me
feel a little older
when my two
favorite football
players are officially
retiring this season.
Growing up a Florida
Gator fan, it's no surprise
one of those players is
Fred Taylor. The other
- Brett Favre. I've been
preparing for the Favre
retirement for years.
Taylor, well, that saddens
me some.
Taylor lost a step in his
final few seasons with the
Jacksonville Jaguars and
New England Patriots,
but I'll always remember
him for what he did in
Orange and Blue.
It was a college career
that didn't blossom until
late, but he saved his
best for last against the
college team he almost
committed to.
Going into signing
day, Taylor was all set to
become a Florida State
Seminole. He was quoted
as saying that he wanted
to play behind Warrick
Dunn.
Taylor was thought to
be a package deal with
Reidel Anthony as Bobby
Bowden's boys. It was
those two players that in
large part cost Bowden
two championships.
Taylor didn't play a lot
during his sophomore
or junior seasons after
bursting onto the scene
with 873 yards as a
freshman. When he
finally returned as a
junior, he played in seven
games and accounted for
629 yards.
After returning as
a junior, Taylor never
looked back. Bowden
would forever regret not
signing him.
Taylor helped Florida
knock off the top-ranked
Seminoles, 52-20, in the
Sugar Bowl at the end of
the 1996 season to claim
the school's first national
championship.
A year later, Taylor
had his biggest moment
as a Gator. In one of the
most memorable wins
of Florida history, the
Gators knocked off
top-ranked Florida State
in the Swamp, 32-29.
Many people will
remember the rotating
quarterbacks during this
game. What I remember
is Taylor's 62-yard run up
the middle that set the
crowd into a frenzy.
Taylor followed that
up with a Citrus Bowl
record 234 yards against
Penn State to cap off his
college career.
In the NFL, Taylor was
always one of the most
underrated backs. He
only made one Pro Bowl.
He deserved at least
three or four.
Taylor may never
make it to the NFL's
Hall of Fame, but he was
named to the Gator Hall
of Fame in 2010.
He'll always have a
part in my hall.
* Brandon Finley covers
sports for the Lake City


Reporter.


Columbia


shut out


by Brooks


County


Georgia school
wins border war
over CHS, 12-0.
By BRANDON FINLEY
bfinley@lakecityreporter.com
QUITMAN, Ga. For
the first time, Columbia
High failed to win the war
as Brooks County High
(Ga.) defended its home
turf with a 12-0 victory over
the Tigers on Friday.
It wasn't a pretty victory
as both offenses struggled
to move the ball through-
out, but Brooks County put
together a long bomb and
one touchdown drive to
edge the Tigers.
At the nine minute
mark of the second quar-
ter, Trojans' quarterback
Malcolm Parrish connected
with Deric Herring on a
49-yard touchdown pass for
the only score of the first
half. The extra point was
no good.
Columbia received the
ball to start the second half,
but was ineffective moving
the chains. The Tigers were
able to remain in the game,
however, as the Columbia
defense held on Brooks


County's first two drives of
the second half.
On the Trojans' third pos-
session, a sustained drive
would give Brooks County
a two-score edge. A 14-play,
51-yard drive was capped by
Parrish's sneak into the end
zone. The Trojans attempt-
ed a two-point conversion,
but it was snuffed out by
the Tigers.
Columbia offense failed
to produce a first down in
the fourth quarter, but the
Tigers defense held them
in the game. Trey Marshall
intercepted two passes in
the end zone to keep the
final 12-0 as the defense
didn't quit until the end.
"The first thing we'll
think of looking back is the
defense played extremely
well," Columbia coach Brian
Allen said. "They played a
tough four quarters. You
take a couple of plays and
one of them is on me, and
they played perfect. We
just didn't move the ball on
offense. They were more
physical than us. We\'v got
to grow up. This was a hos-
tile environment, but we
didn't execute. We have to
take our hats off to them
and get better quick."


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Fort White High's Jonathan Dupree brings down Hamilton County High quarterback
Zach Deas during the Indians' 21-6 win in Jasper on Friday.




Road success

Fort White beats Hamilton County


By TIM KIRBY
tkirby@lakecityreporter.com
JASPER Fort White
High entered always tough
Hamilton County High ter-
ritory on Friday and hand-
ed the Trojans a 21-6 loss.
Fort White raced
down the field on its first
possession.
Soron Williams ripped
off runs of 13 and 22 yards,
and the Indians capped it
off with a 39-yard touch-
down pass from Andrew
Baker to AJ. Legree.
Legree outjumped the
defender and snatched


the ball for the comple-
tion. Following Nathan
Escalante's PAT, Fort
White led 7-0 with 2k min-
utes'gone in the game.
Things got tougher after
that.
Fort White's final touch-
down also came on a pass
from Baker to Legree, this
time from 41 yards out.
The Indians worked to
set up the play action pass
and Legree got behind
all the defenders. Baker's
pass was perfect for a
21-0 lead with :43 left in the
third quarter.
In between the two TD


passes, Fort White had
two safeties and Escalante
booted a 32-yard field goal
late in the first half.
Williams returned the
kickoff after the first safe-
ty 54 yards to set up the
second safety. Both came
on bad punt snaps in the
end zone.
Terry Calloway had an
interception and fumble
recovery as Fort White's
defense came within 33
seconds of a shutout.
Trey Zanders scored
on a one-yard run for the
Trojans on a drive set up
by a fumble return.


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Columbia High's Shaq Johnson fight for yardage in the
Tigers' kickoff classic win at Santa Fe High on Aug. 26.





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