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UFPKY NEH LSTA



The Lake City reporter
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028308/01651
 Material Information
Title: The Lake City reporter
Uniform Title: Lake City reporter (Lake City, Fla. 1967)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: John H. Perry
Place of Publication: Lake City Fla
Publication Date: 9/2/2011
Frequency: daily (monday through friday)[<1969>-]
weekly[ former 1967-<1968>]
daily
normalized irregular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Lake City (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Columbia County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Columbia -- Lake City
Coordinates: 30.189722 x -82.639722 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 95, no. 4 (Oct. 5, 1967)-
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000358016
oclc - 33283560
notis - ABZ6316
lccn - sn 95047175
sobekcm - UF00028308_01569
System ID: UF00028308:01651
 Related Items
Preceded by: Lake City reporter and Columbia gazette

Full Text




More charges
Robbery suspect,
named in vehicle


Arrive alive
DUI is target of
law enforcement


break-ins, this weekend.
000016 120511 ****3-DIGIT 326 ry below
LIB OF FLORIDA HISTORY ,ry below
PO BOX 117007
205 SMA UNIV OF FLORIDA
GAINESVILLE FL 32611-1943


After Irene
More than
a million still
without power.
Inside, 6A


Lalie


ulty


Reporter


Friday, September 2, 201 I www.lakecityreporter.com Vol. 137, No. 187. 0 75 cents


SVTA


faces


fiscal


crunch

County will take
a look at agency's
spending habits.

By TONY BRITT
tbritt@lakecityreporter.com
Columbia County officials are
hoping to set up a meeting with
Hamilton and Suwannee County
officials to discuss the possibil-
ity of a financial "bailout" for
the Suwannee Valley Transit
Authority, as well as pending
litigation about water rights.
During Thursday night's
county commission meet-
ing, officials authorized Dale
Williams, county manager, to
set a meeting date with officials
from Suwannee and Hamilton
to discuss the Suwannee Valley
Transit Authority and its finan-
cial problems. The meeting will
also focus on possible litiga-
tion over the St. Johns River
Water Management District's
being issued a 20-year permit
for water to be drawn from the
Floridan Aquifer.
At a county commission meet-
ing earlier this month, Gwen
Pra, Suwannee Valley Transit
Authority executive director,
noted that the Suwannee Valley
Transit Authority provides
about 650,000 trips to Columbia,
Suwannee and Baker County
residents. The agency's aver-
age trip is about 40 miles.
The Suwannee Valley Transit
Authority is the regional tran-
SVTA continued on 3A


DUI is

police

target this

weekend
By TONY BRITT
tbritt@lakecityreporter.com
Area law enforcement offi-
cers plan to make a visible
presence on local roadways
and waterways over the Labor
Dayweekend.
Lt. Pat Riordan, Florida
Highway Patrol Troop B public
information officer, said addi-
tional troopers will be on the
roadway during the holiday
period, which begins 6 p.m.
Friday evening and ends mid-
night Monday.
"We're going to be focus-
ing on DUI, in fact there will
be a DUI checkpoint locally
in the city, Friday night at 10
p.m.," he said. "That will be
a multi-agency checkpoint with
the Florida Highway Patrol,
Lake City Police Department
and Columbia County Sheriff's
Office."
According to an FHP press
release, the checkpoint will be
set up between the 1351 and
DUI continued on 3A


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Columbia County Sheriff's Office Deputy Winston Warner (left) and Lt. Pete Spurlock search a suspect Thursday while serving warrants at a home in
northern Columbia County. The suspect fled into the woods after deputies say they found an active meth lab at the residence.


Meth lab discovery leads to 4 arrests


By TONY BRITT
tbritt@lakecityreporter.com
Four people were arrested Thursday after-
noon at a northern Columbia County address
when authorities found a methamphetamine
laboratory while serving two arrest war-
rants. Authorities said crystal meth was
being cooked in a building behind the home
when they arrived and attempted to serve the
warrants.


While the arrests took place around 5 p.m.,
authorities were filing the arrest paperwork
late into Thursday evening and the names
of the arrested parties were not available
at press time. The arrests took place at 448
Tammy Lane, just outside the city limits on
the northern end of town.
"Deputies went to an address on Tammy
Lane to attempt to individuals with arrest
warrants and in the process they discovered
there was an active clandestine metham-


Dinner for ducks


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Ducks crowd around Chloey Bryant, 4, waiting for her to throw them pieces of white and wheat bread Thursday at
Lake Isabella Park. 'It's fun,' she said. 'They're really mean because they always bite me, but only sometimes.'


phetamine lab at the residence," said Sgt. Ed
Seifert, Columbia County Sheriff's Office pub-
lic information officer. "The deputies immedi-
ately contacted the Columbia County Multi-
jurisdictional Task Force and they responded
as well as the Methamphetamine Task Force
to pull out the chemicals and make sure it's
safe to work around. At some point we'll have
ARRESTS continued on 3A


Robbery

suspect

charged in

break-ins

By TONY BRITT
tbritt@lakecityreporter.com
Local authorities recov-
ered about $500 in stolen
goods, including at least
three firearms, when an
armed robbery suspect
was arrested Wednesday
afternoon. The suspect and
two other Columbia resi-
dents now face charges in
connection with a string of
area vehicle break-ins, and
authorities say more charg-
es may be pending.
"We believe the (vehicle)
burglaries occurred in the
early morning hours on
Wednesday," said Sgt. Ed
Seifert, Columbia County
Sheriff's Office public infor-
mation officer.
He said authorities are
continuing their investiga-
tion to determine how many
BREAK-INS continued on


1 lii4 O0 1( 12


CALL US:
(386) 752-1293
SUBSCRIBE TO
THE REPORTER:
Voice: 755-5445
Fax: 752-9400


91
T-Storm


Chance


WEATHER, 2A


Opinion ................
People..................
Obituaries ..............
Advice & Comics........
Puzzles .................


S


TODAY IN
PEOPLE
Cher defends
Chaz Bono.


COMING
SATURDAY
Local news
roundup.









LAKE CITY REPORTER DAILY BRIEFING' FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 2, 2011


Play 4


A$H 3 Thursday:
v Afternoon: 4-4-0
Evening: N/A


Thursday:
Afternoon: 4-2-8-0
Evening: N/A


ezwatcl .
Wednesday:
9-23-24-25-30


PEOPLE IN THE NEWS


Cher defends Chaz Bono on DWTS


LOS ANGELES
Cher is taking to Twitter
to defend her son Chaz
Bono.
The superstar
posted several tweets
Wednesday defending his partici-
pation on the upcoming season of
"Dancing With the Stars." Bono is
the first transgender competitor on
the hit ABC show.
Cher said her son, who was born
female and underwent surgery to
become a man, is being "viciously
attacked" on blogs and message
boards since the new cast was
announced Monday.
'This is Still America right? It took
guts 2 do it," Cher wrote, adding that
she supports him no matter what he
chooses to do.
"Mothers don't stop Getting angry
with stupid bigots who (mess) with
their children!" the 65-year-old sing-
er wrote.
Bono, 42, is paired with pro
dancer Lacey Schwigimer on the
reality show, where celebrities and
their professional partners perform
various ballroom dances for judges'
scores and viewer votes.
"Dancing" fans have posted both
angry and supportive comments
on the show's message boards.
One called the casting choice "dis-
gusting" and said "ABC should be
ashamed of theirselves for harass-
ing mainstream Americans and
Christains."
Another wrote: "I never and mean
NEVER watch DWTS but will this
season to support/vote for (Chaz)."

Rihanna sues over leaks
at $7M LA-area home
LOS ANGELES Rihanna is
suing over a hillside home that she
claims has serious structural defects
that rendered it uninhabitable.
The pop singer on Wednesday
sued Prudential California Realty
and several companies that designed


111 I


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Cher (left) and Chaz Bono pose together after a ceremony to put Cher's hands
and feet in cement in front of Grauman's Chinese Theatre in Los Angeles: Cher
has posted several tweets, Wednesday supporting Chaz Bono's decision to partici-
pate in the celebrity dance competition series, 'Dancing with the Stars.'


and inspected the
home.
The "S&M" sing-
er's lawsuit claims
she would not have
paid $6.9 million for
the home in 2009
Rihanna if she had known
about the problems.
She claims water leaked into several
rooms of the house from a balcony
that lacks the proper slope and drain-
age after a rainstorm in early 2010.
The suit states the damage left the
home "uninhabitable."

Anthony to ABC: Split
not 'sensationalistic'
NEW YORK Marc Anthony is
setting the record straight on his
breakup from Jennifer Lopez in an
upcoming exclusive interview with
ABC.'


Anthony tells
ABC's "Nightline"
that the crumbling
of their marriage
"wasn't something
sensationalistic."
Tabloids have
Anthony claimed Anthony was
unfaithful, but he.
said the truth is the union no longer
worked. He also said the decision
was mutual.

WWII portraits of Jewish
'counterfeiters' donated
NEW YORK A collection of
rarely seen portraits of Jewish pris-
oners forced to work for the Nazis
in a money-forging scheme fictional-
ized in the Oscar-winning film "The
Counterfeiters" is being donated to
Israel's Holocaust museum.
* Associated Press


. Celebrity Birthdays


* Dancer-actress Marge
Champion is 92.
* Jazz musician Horace
Silver is 83.
* Actor Mark Harmon is 60.
Sen. Jim DeMint, R-S.C., is
60.
* Actor Keanu Reeves is 47.
* Former heavyweight
boxing champion Lennox


Lewis is 46.
* Actress Salma Hayek is 45.
Actress Kristen Cloke is 43.
Actress Cynthia Watros is 43.
* Rhythm-and-blues singer
K-Ci is 42.
* Actor-comedian Katt
Williams is 38.
* Actor Michael Lombardi is
37.


Daily Scripture
"Start children off on the way
they should go, and even when
they are old they will not turn
from it."
Proverbs 22:6


il Thought for Today


"Always remember that you
are absolutely unique. Just like
everyone else."


Lake City
HOW TO REACH US
Main number ........(386) 752-1293
Fax number .............752-9400
Circulation ..............755-5445
Online... www.lakecityreporter.com
The Lake City Reporter, an affiliate of
Community Newspapers Inc., is pub-
lished Tuesday through Sunday at 180
E. Duva l St, Lake City, Ra. 32055.
Periodical postage paid at Lake City, Fla.
Member Audit Bureau of Circulation and
The Associated Press.
'All material herein is property of the Lake
City Reporter. Reproduction in whole or
in part is forbidden without the permis-
sion of the publisher. U.S. Postal Service
No. 310-880.
POSTMASTER: Send address changes
to Lake City Reporter, P.O. Box 1709,
Lake City, Fla.32056.
Publisher Todd Wilson ..... 754-0418
(twilson@lakecltyreporter.com)
NEWS
Editor Robert Bridges .....754-0428
(rbridges@lakecityreporter.com)
ADVERTISING
Director Ashley Butcher ...754-0417
(abutcher@lakectyreporter.com)
CLASSIFIED
To place a classified ad, call 755-5440


Margaret Mead,
American anthropologist (1901-1978)


Reporter

BUSINESS
Controller Sue Brannon... .754-0419
(sbrannon@lakecityreporter.com)
CIRCULATION
Home delivery of the Lake City Reporter
should be completed by 6.30 a.m.
Tuesday through Saturday, and by 7.30
a.m. on Sunday.
Please call 386-755-5445 to report any
Problems with your delivery service.
In Columbia County, customers should
call before 10:30 am. to report a ser-
vice error for same day re-delivery. After
1030 a.m., next day re-delivery or ser-
vice related credits will be issued.
In all other counties where home delivery
is available, next day re-delivery or ser-
vice related credits will be issued.
Circulation ..............755-5445
(circulation@lakecityreporter.com)
Home delivery rates
(Tuesday through Sunday)
12 Weeks..................$26.32
24 Weeks.................$48.79
52 Weeks....................$83.46
Rates indude 7% sales tax
Mall rates
12 Weeks .................. $41.40
24 Weeks ...................$82.80
52 Weeks .................. $179.40


CORRECTION


The Lake City Reporter corrects errors of fact in news
items. If you have a concern, question or suggestion, please
call the executive editor. Corrections and clarifications will run
in this space. And thanks for reading.


Hotline set up for
homeland security
TALLAHASSEE -
Florida is marking the
approaching 10th anniver-
sary of the Sept. 11, 2001,
terrorist attacks by setting
up a homeland security
hotline.
Gov. Rick Scott on
, Thursday announced
Florida's participation in
the "If You See Something,
Say Something Program."
Citizens can report sus-
picious activity by dialing
855-FLA-SAFE, or 855-352-
7233.
The American Civil
Liberties Union criticized
the program. It said
encouraging people to spy
on their neighbors is not
an effective law enforce-
ment technique.

Carbon monoxide
kills 1, injures 2
TAMPA Tampa
Police said one person has
died and two people are
in the hospital after they
suffered carbon monoxide
poisoning when a man in
an apartment building left
his car running inside a
garage.
Shortly after 9:30 a.m.
Thursday, a maintenance
worker at the Vista Grande
Apartments apartment
smelled an odor and began
evacuating residents. The
maintenance worker called
Tampa Fire-Rescue, and
paramedics took three
people to an area hospital.
Authorities said Rebecca
Hawk, 23, died. The.
Hillsborough County
Sheriff's Office reports
that Hawk was training to
be a child protective inves-
tigator.

AG under fire
for terminations
TALLAHASSE -
Florida Attorney General
Pam Bondi is brush-
ing aside criticism over


Riding for a cause
Through a heavy downpour of rain, hundreds of Patriot Guard
Riders lead the motorcade escorting the body of slain U.S.
Marine Corps Lance Cpl. Travis Nelson, 19, of Pace from
the naval base to Petty-Eastside Funeral Home in Atmore on
Aug. 24.


employee firings and
whether she is doing
enough to help consumers.
Bondi, a former prosecu-
tor who never held elected
office before, has already
agreed to an outside probe
of the dismissals of two
attorneys leading foreclo-
sure fraud investigations.
Bondi in a recent interview
said she has restructured
the agency including
bringing in former pros-
ecutors to help target
those who are scamming
Floridians.

Teen girl gets life
for man's death
WEST PALM BEACH
- A South Florida teen
girl has been sentenced
to life in prison for fatally
stabbing her mother's boy-
friend.
A Broward County
judge sentenced Berenice
Juarez, 18, on Thursday
after a jury found her
guilty of first-degree mur-
der.
Authorities said Juarez
lured Gilardo Ramos Paz,
42, to a Delray Beach
parking lot in February
2010 by sending him a text
claiming to be her mother.
When the man arrived,


Juarez approached his
vehicle and stabbed Paz in
the chest.
Juarez testified that she
didn't intend to kill Paz.
She said she didn't want
him dating her mother and
was trying to scare him
off.

Man kills wife,
sentence to life
BARTOW A central
Florida man has been sen-
tenced to life in prison for
strangling his wife.
A Polk County judge
sentenced Bryan Hower,
34, on Wednesday after
jurors found him guilty of
first-degree murder.
Hower was arrested in
June 2010, after his wife's
remains were found in a
wooded area near their
home.

Teen charged with
shooting, injures 3
MIAMI GARDENS -
Authorities said they've
arrested a 17-year-old teen
who shot and wounded
three others near Miami
Carol City High.
The victims were in
stable condition.
* Associated Press


THE WEATHER


, .- OLATED CHC OF CHC OF
-STORMS STORMS -STORMS


HI 91 LO 71 HI 90 l0 72 HI 90 L 73


REGIONAL FORECAST .AP.f..
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SCity Saturday Sunday
4/ !, zk '4' --. I &t m~l= . .. .


Pensacola
90/75


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93/71 .
.0
Panama City
86/74


Lake City.
91/69
, Ga.es .e
90/69
Ocala
'90/70


TamPa, *
89/73,


. FL My
89/73

K


TEMPERATURES
High Thursday
Low Thursday
Normal high
Normal low
Record high
Record low

PRECIPITATION
Thursday
Month total
Year total
Normal month-to-date
Normal year-to-date


92
72
89
70
96 in 1970
62 in 1999

0.00"
0.00"
26.68"
0.19"
36.95"


,/0017


Daytona Beach
D, h Ft. Lauderdale
Dalytoa Beachdl Fort Myers
8"'\74 Galnesville
SJacksonville
Orando Cap Caaral Key West
90/74 83/74 Lake City
Miami
Naples
West Pahl Beach Ocala
85/75 Orlando
S .FL Lauderda4 Panama City
i.. 88/74 0 Pensacola
' Naples Tallahassee
, 89/79 Miami Tampa
Se'y Wt 89/75 Valdosta
9]8yW2t W. Palm Beach
89182 "


SUN
Sunrise today
Sunset today
Sunrise torn.
Sunset torn.

MOON
Moonrise today
Moonset today
Moonrise tom.
Moonset tom.


7:08 a.m.
7:52 p.m.
7:08 a.m.
7:51 p.m.

12:09 p.m.
10:58 p.m.
1:15 p.m.
11:50 p.m.


Sept. Sept. Sept. Sept.
4 12 20 27
First Full Last New


9

ISinlestolbn
Today's
ultra-violet
radiation risk
for the area on
a scale from 0
to 10+.


s85,, 75; ,t
87/75/pc
88/76/pc
91/74/t
90/71/t
89/75/pc
90/81/t
91/71/pc
88/77/pc
90/76/t
89/72/t
90/75/pc
89/76/t
87/77/t
90/74/pc
91/75/t
93/72/pc
88/76/pc


88,79/ pc
89/78/pc
89/77/t
92/75/t
90/73/t
88/76/t
89/80/t
90/72/t
87/79/t
87/78/t
90/74/t
91/75/t
85/76/t
88/78/t
85/76/t
92/75/t
86/74/t
86/79/t


An exclusive
service
brought to
our readers
by
The Weather
Channel.



weather.com


A ~ Forecasts, data and
te graphics 0 2011 Weather
S Central LP Madison, Wis.
weather wYww.weatherpublWshe.com


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LAKE CITY REPORTER NEWS FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 2, 2011 3A




Mars rover studying new surroundings


By ALICIA CHANG
AP Science Writer

LOS ANGELES The
Mars rover Opportunity
is snapping pictures like
a tourist since arriving at
its latest crater destination,
much to the delight of
scientists many millions
of miles away.
The solar-powered
workhorse beamed back
images of the horizon,
soil and nearby rocks that
are unlike any it has seen
during its seven years
roaming the Martian
plains.
Opportunity is doing
more than just sightsee-
ing. It recently spent a
chunk of time using its
robotic arm to investi-
gate a flat-topped boul-
der that likely formed in
a hydrothermal environ-
ment.
Scientists were
giddy with excitement
Thursday a tone remi-
niscent of the mission's
early days.
"Mars is a very com-
plex planet, a very
diverse place," said chief
scientist Steve Squyres
of Cornell University.
"We're seeing some of
that diversity here."
After a three-year drive,
the six-wheel rover final-


ASSOCIATED PRESS
This image provided Thursday by NASA shows NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity
using its camera to take this picture showing the rover's arm extended toward a light-toned
rock, "Tisdale 2."
ly rolled up to the west- begin a new chapter of chose the locale because
ern rim of Endeavour exploration, it's older and differ-
Crater in early August to Project managers ent than previous spots


Opportunity has visited.
The view from orbit
reveals tantalizing evi-
dence of clay deposits
believed to have formed
in a warm and wet envi-
ronment early in Mars'
history.
The next task is to
head north in search of
more ancient rocks and
hunt for the elusive clay
minerals, said deputy
principal investigator Ray
Arvidson of Washington
University in St. Louis.
The most interesting
geology is to the south
of Opportunity's current
position, but it's unclear
whether it will go there.
"I'm game for it,"
Arvidson said.
Opportunity is showing
typical wear for its age. It
has to drive backward to
prevent one of its wheels
from freezing up and has
arthritis in its arm.
"We're no longer driv-
ing a hot new sports car,"
said Dave Lavery, who
heads the rovers pro-
gram at NASA headquar-
ters. "We're now driving a
1965 Mustang that hasn't
been restored."
Opportunity's latest
feat comes months after
NASA bid farewell to
its identical twin Spirit.
Both rovers parachuted


to opposite ends of the
red planet in 2004 and
lasted beyond their origi-
nal three-month task.
Spirit fell silent last
year not long after it got
mired in a sand trap.
NASA diligently listened
for a signal from the
rover and gave up in late
May.
To commemorate Spirit,
the rover team named a
spot on Endeavour Crater
"Spirit Point."
Opportunity will soon
have company on the
surface. NASA is set to
launch a mobile labora-
tory named Curiosity in
the latest quest to find
habitable environments.
The three-week launch
window opens on Nov.
25.
The space agency said
this week pre-flight test-
ing is taking longer than
expected and it does
not yet know whether it
can make the start of the
launch period.
With a $2.5 billion price
tag, Curiosity is the most
expensive and advanced
rover to Mars yet Once
it lands in summer 2012,
it will study a mountain
inside a 96-mile-wide crater
to determine whether con-
ditions were favorable to
support microbial life.


SVTA: Three-county transportation service faces fiscal crunch

Continued From Page 1A


sit provider.
Pra, who was hired to
the position earlier in the
month, said the agency
did not apply for all the
grants available and is now
in financial straits to pay
its bills and take care of
other financial obligations.
The agency is hoping to
get a total of $300,000 from
Columbia, Suwannee and
Hamilton officials. The
agency is asking that each
county pay a portion of the
$300,000 based on its popu-
lation.
Pra requested that
Columbia County pay 55
percent of the $300,000
- roughly $165,000.
Columbia County offi-
cials approved giving the
Suwannee Valley Transit
Authority approximately
$164,000. However, coun-
ty officials stipulated that
the transit authority must
provide a corrective action


plan to the county within
the next 30 days.
"Since that time there
have been some other
issues that have come up,"
Williams said. "Because
of those issues, I asked
the Board of County
Commissioners to meet
jointly with the other two
counties."
Commissioner Ron
Williams sits on the Transit
Authority Board and asked
Dale Williams to review
the Transit Authority's last
audit, for the period ending
Sept. 30, 2009.
"What that audit dem-
onstrated, in my opinion
what was happening is
they were collecting less
money than they anticipat-
ed, yet they weren't reduc-
ing expenditures," Dale
Williams said. "Therefore
they were having to take
the difference out of their
reserves. If they've spent all


ARRESTS: 4 charged

Continued From Page 1A


a contractor come into town
to dispose of the dangerous
chemicals."
Several Columbia County
sheriff's patrol vehicles
were on scene at the house,
removing several firearms
and at least one crossbow.
Additional law enforce-
ment personnel took more
than an hour to apprehend
one of the suspects, who ran
into a wooded area.
A sheriff's office K-9 unit
was called to the scene


to track the suspect, who
was reportedly covered
and buried in vegetation
and foliage. It has not been
determined if the suspect
apprehended in the wood-
ed area was the subject of
one of the arrest warrants.
It is not clear what charges
were contained in the origi-
nal warrants.
"We'll have more infor-
mation available at some
point once we process the
suspects," Seifert said.


DUI: Checkpoint set

Continued From Page 1A


1389 blocks of West U.S. 90
in Lake City.
"Through Monday we're
going to be having an
increased number of troop-
ers on the road, Riordan
said. "Officers that nor-
mally work administrative
hours will be out on the
road. That will be for visibil-
ity, assistance and enforce-
ment."
Karen Parker, FloridaFish
and Wildlife Conservation
Comrrission public infor-
mation coordinator, said
local FWC law enforcement
officers will be patrolling
the local waterway as well
as preparing for the hunt-
ing season in the woods
during the local holiday.


She said patrol efforts
will be focused on the
Suwannee and Santa Fe riv-
ers and local lakes.
"The biggest thing,
since this is the last offi-
cial summer holiday for
boating, will boating safe-
ty and Boating Under the
Influence violations," she
said. "We'll also be check-
ing for under-aged drink-
ing violators and resource
protection- making sure
everyone is staying within
the bag limits and have
their fishing license. We
want everybody to have
a good time, but we want
everybody to be safe and
arrive home alive."


the reserves, they obvious-
ly don't have any,money. If
they don't have any money,
they have the difficulty in


paying all the bills."
Dale Williams said he is
uncertain about the size of
the transit authority's finan-


, cial emergency.
'The county, although it
has approved the contribu-
tion, has not released that


funding," Dale Williams
Said. "The county has
not exchanged any funds
yet."


BREAK-INS: 3 face charges linked to burglaries

Continued From Page 1A


vehicle burglaries may be
connected to the case.
Johnny B. Robinson,
20, 352 Knights Ave., who
was arrested in connec-
tion with an armed rob-
bery at a Lake City ATM
Wednesday, faces new
charges in connection with
the burglaries. Robinson
was charged with pos-
session of a firearm by a
convicted felon (multiple
counts), burglary to a con-
veyance (multiple counts)
and grand theft (multiple
counts) in connection with
a series of Wednesday
morning vehicle burglar-
ies. He is being held at
the Columbia County
Detention Center without
bond.
Also arrested was
Jennifer Renee Harvey, 20,
352 NW Knights Ave. She
was charged with acces-
sory after the fact (bur-
glary) and was booked
into the Columbia County
Detention Center on $5,000
bond and Kayla Melinda
Robinson, 17, 352 NW
Knights Ave. She was also
booked into the Columbia
County Detention Facility
on $5,000 bond.
Authorities said they
didn't know whether the


two Robinsons were relat-
ed or the nature of the rela-
tionship between Johnny B.
Robinson and Harvey.
The arrests were made
Wednesday afternoon,
Seifert said.
According to Columbia
County sheriff's reports,
as the Lake City Police
Department was investigat-
ing an armed robbery at the
Bank of America branch
ATM on U.S. 90, Deputy
Slade McCardle was
searching the area for the
suspect's vehicle and found
a possible match parked
at the Jasmine Garden Inn
motel on Knights Avenue.
McCardle saw a spent
bullet casing in the Dodge
pickup truck, reports
show.
A man exited one of the
hotel rooms and McCardle
spoke to him. The man,
Johnny B. Robinson, told
McCardle that the truck
was his and gave McCardle
permission to look inside.
"A records check showed
that Robinson was a con-
victed felon and is forbid-
den from possessing fire-
arms," Seifert said.
Deputies notified LCPD
officers about the robbery
suspect and the vehicle


location.
Deputies then spoke
with other people inside
the hotel room occupied by
Robinson. After authorities
gained consent to enter the
room, dep-
uty Brian
Rix said
he imme-
diately
noticed
several
purses
J. Robinson that were
reported
stolen ear-
lier that
same day.
Seifert
saidthesus-
pects are
Columbia
Harvey County res-
idents, but
have been living at the motel
for some time.
He said deputies have
been investigating several
vehicle burglaries over the
past few days in which fire-
arms, purses and electron-
ic equipment were sto-
len from vehicles parked
in subdivisions in central
Columbia County.
"We're looking at well
over $500 worth of recdv-
ered property, including


the. three handguns. We
are looking at past cases as
well to see if they are relat-
ed and additional charges
are likely," Seifert said.
"Detectives and deputies
with the sheriff's office
are still actively investigat-
ing these burglaries and
additional charges are
likely to be made. Our
patrol deputies did a fan-
tastic job in patrolling the
area after the LCPD issued
the Be On the Look Out
alert. McCardle's efforts
led to the discovery and
apprehension of an armed
robber and also helped
spur the solving of several
vehicle burglaries."

E C ww.kvlatylvportercom,

CONN ED
REPORTER
NEWS
WEATHER
OPINION
PORTB
ARCHIVES
cI-AU IFIESo
COMMUNITY
ENTERTAINMENT
STAY_
CONNi ED


NOTICE OF TIME CHANGE FOR CITY COUNCIL MEETING
TO BE HELD BY THE CITY COUNCIL OF THE CITY OF LAKE CITY,
FLORIDA ON TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 6, 2011 AT 6:30 P.M. IN THE
COUNCIL CHAMBERS LOCATED ON THE SECOND FLOOR OF CITY
HALL AT 205 NORTH MARION AVENUE, LAKE CITY, FLORIDA

ITEMS OF INTEREST:

Public Hearing to receive public comment on the consideration of re-imposing fire
protection special assessment for the Fiscal Year beginning October 1, 2011.
City Council Resolution No. 2011-071
City Council Resolution No. 2011-069 Adopting FY 12 village rate
City Council Resolution No. 2011-070 Adopting FY 12 budget

SPECIAL REQUIREMI'NTS: If you require special aid or services for any of the meetings
identi fled above, as addressed in the American Disabilities Act, please contact the City
Manager's Office at (386) 719-5768.

AUDREY E SIKES
C ty Clerk













OPINION


Friday. September 2, 2011


ANOTHER
ONE


ONE
OPINION


In college

football,

where

are the

enforcers?

he 2011 college foot-
ball season, which
kicks off today, has
this PR disaster on
the schedule: On
Sept.17, Ohio State plays Miami
in the "Probation Bowl." Or at
least that should be the name.
Five key Ohio State play-
ers have been suspended for
five games for trading jerseys,
championship rings and other
memorabilia for tattoos and
other benefits. Absent, too,
will be coach Jim Tressel,
who resigned under fire after
school officials learned that he
had covered up his knowledge
about the players' wrongdoing.
Miami, meanwhile, has
one-upped the Buckeyes in
the scandal department On
Tuesday, eight players were
suspended for anywhere from
one to six games. The NCAA
is investigating allegations that
at least 72 Miami players took
money, prostitutes and other
'benefits overweight years from
'Nevin Shapiro, a Hurricanes
-booster now in prison for run-
ning a multimillion dollar Ponzi
p'cheme.
y Such wrongdoing is hardly
,Ware among NCAA power-
.houses. In the past year alone,
'former University of Southern
"California star Reggie Bush
,returned his Heisman Trophy,'
,and the recruitment of last
-season's Heisman winner, Cam
Newton, is under investigation.
Details differ, but no mat-
ter where cheating occurs, its
roots are the same: too much
money and too little leader-
ship.
*. Coaches won't change a
system that benefits them.
Neither will athletic directors.
'Only university presidents
can change the win-at-any-cost
mentality.
NCAA President Mark
'Emmert, who called a "retreat"
*'to discuss changes with 50
college presidents, promises
they're going to get tough this
time. We wish him well. But
this feels like instant replay.

.0 USA Today

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LETTERS
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The criminal justice
system, which too
often these days
operates as a crimi-
nal gotcha system,
just did something right, and
guess what? There is anger
in the land, people saying you
need to prosecute even when
there is no case because, after
all, a woman made the accusa-
tion. I say let's listen to Scott
Turow.
He's a well-known novelist,
~ former prosecutor and now a
defense lawyer, and he knows
whereof he speaks when he
says prosecutors too often take
cases to court when they know
good and well there's a reason-
able doubt the accused party
was guilty. Had the Manhattan
district attorney failed to drop
the case against Dominique
Strauss-Kahn, that's exactly
what he would have been
doing.
Half the country seemed joy-
ful about the prospect of seeing
,this rich, prominent Frenchman
doing time for allegedly forc-
ing a hotel maid from Africa
to have oral sex with him, but
then detectives did some inter-
esting detecting.
Among the maid's multiple
lies, they discovered, she had
falsely said while seeking asy-
lum in the United States that
she had been gang-raped in
Guinea. She told several differ-
ent stories about her activities
the day of the incident. She
was also found to have a bank
account in which felons had
deposited $100,000. And in a
phone call to her boyfriend in
prison, this woman who filed a
civil suit against Strauss-Kahn
said, "Don't worry, he has
plenty of money."
Pursuing a case based on


oday is Friday, Sept
2, the 245th day of
2011. There are 120
days left in the year.
Today's Highlight in History:
On Sept 2, 1945, Japan for-
mally surrendered in ceremonies
aboard the USS Missouri, ending
World War II.
On this date:
1666, the Great Fire of London
broke out, claiming thousands of
homes.
In 1789, the U.S. Treasury
Department was established.
In 1807, British forces began
bombarding Copenhagen for sev-
eral days, until the Danes agreed
to surrender their naval fleet
In 1864, during the Civil War,
Union Gen. William T. Sherman's
forces occupied Atlanta.
In 1901, Vice President


Jay Ambrose
Speoktojoy@ool.comr


this mishmash would be a
fraud, a way of making some-
one suffer for the fun of it.
Turow wrote in a New York
Times Sunday Review that such
adventures are additionally
a principal cause of wrongful
convictions. The last thing you
want is "prosecutorial intran-
sigence," a refusal to back up
from first judgments. A prof-
fered example from this law-
yer's experience: prosecutors
letting two men sit on death
row for years despite another
man's confession of murder.
That's repugnant, and some-
thing else that's repugnant
is certain ideologically inane
women's groups telling us we
shouldn't even be discussing
the maid's credibility. These
ultra-feminists are forever
arguing that women accusers
are always truly victims, are
always right, and that the male
defendants are always guilty,
are always wrong. How far a
distance is that from someone
saying he is an Aryan and you
are a Jew and therefore he is a
real human and you are not?
I do not deny generations of
mistreating women, but swing-
ing from one extreme to anoth-
er is multiplying error, not
erasing it. If members of these
groups fall short of Nazi ambi-
tions, they're still in the camp
that would happily ruin lives
on the basis of infantile gener-


HIGHLIGHTS
IN HISTORY

Theodore Roosevelt offered the
advice, "Speak softly and carry
a big stick" in a speech at the
Minnesota State Fair.
In 1930, the first nonstop air-
plane flight from Europe to the
United States was completed in
37 hours as Capt. Dieudonne
Costes and Maurice Bellonte
of France arrived in Valley
Stream, N.Y., aboard a Breguet
biplane. (The plane was known
as "The Question Mark"
because it bore the image of the
punctuation sign.)'
In 1935, a hurricane slammed
into the Florida Keys, claiming
more than 400 lives.
In 1945, Ho Chi Minh declared
Vietnam an independent republic.
In 1969, North Vietnamese
President Ho Chi Minh died.


alities. Right now, the Obama
administration is insisting that
universities work even harder
on the goal. To find out more,
listen to Peter Berkowitz.
In a Wall Street Journal
op-ed piece, this fellow at
Hoover Institution tells how
the Education Department is
advising universities to dis-
regard due process in decid-
ing the fate of male students
accused of sexual assault
Universities more concerned
about federal lucre than ethics
should listen up to even the
n astiness that says the accused
male student should not be
allowed to cross-examine the
female witness.
The 19-page document on Title
IX additionally advocates a low
proof standard. Reasonable doubt
does not get you off in Obama
land. If the accused is allowed
to appeal, the accuser can also
appeal, meaning the accused
could face double jeopardy. And
should the male student lose at
the hands of a campus disciplin-
ary board being urged to pre-
sume guilt, Berkowitz explains,
he can figure on expulsion, no
graduate school, possible criminal
prosecution and a lost reputation
for life.
Bigots always think they are
justified, of course. They always
find excuses for themselves,
pretending their immorality is
moral. But unfairness is unfair-
ness, and blatant, tyrannical,
fanatical unfairness is an abomi-
nation this nation should not
stand for.

W Jay Ambrose, formerly
Washington director of editorial
policy for Scripps Howard news-
papers and the editor of dailies in
El Paso, Texas, and Denver, is a
columnist living in Colorado.


In 1998, a Swissair MD-11
jetliner crashed off Nova Scotia,'
killing all 229 people aboard.
Ten years ago:
In London, a grieving human
tide engulfed St James's Palace,
where Princess Diana's body lay
in a chapel closed to the public,
as the British monarchy and gov-
ernment prepared for her funer-
al. The White House announced
that first lady Hillary Rodham
Clinton would attend on behalf of
the United States.
Five years ago:
Negotiators at the World
Sunmmit in Johannesburg, South
Africa, put the finishing touches
on a plan to improve the lives of
the poor while preserving the
environment. Glenn Tilton was
named chairman, president and
CEO of United Airlines parent
UAL Corp.
* Associated Press


4A


ANOTHER
VIEW



Obama's

solar

stimulus


snafu

president Obama
made a high-profile.
visit in May 2010
to Solyndra Inc., a .
solar-panel manu-
facturing plant in Fremont,
Calif. The company received:;
$535 million in loans from
the Energy Department and.
was a centerpiece of the
Obama administration's eco-
nomic stimulus effort. On
Wednesday, Solyndra closed
its corporate headquarters,
announced that it's filing for
bankruptcy and laying off
1,100 workers.
The Solyndra debacle is
a case study in the failure
of government intervention
in the economy. Founded in
2005, the company manufac-
tured a rooftop solar panel
designed chiefly for com-.
mercial applications. Solyndra.
was a poster child of the uto-
pian future envisioned by the
Obama administration when
oodles of green jobs would
relieve the nation's unemploy-
ment rate, generate clean
energy and help the envi-
ronment. Energy Secretary
Steven Chu rushed through
loan guarantees, and money
began to flow to Solyndra
from the Federal Financing
Bank. The terms of the loans,
just more than 1 percent inter-
est in most cases, were well
below the rates competitors
had to pay.
Competition in the solar
marketplace is stiff, par-
ticularly from China, and
Solyndra couldn't make a prof-
it. In the spring of 2010, the.
company spent around $3.5
million promoting an initial
public stock offering (IPO)
to raise $300 million to retire
some of the government debt,
but the company couldn't
escape an inconvenient truth:,
In the first three quarters of
2009, it grossed $59 million
against production costs of
$108 million.
When government loan
guarantees of more than half
a billion dollars were secured,
Solyndra bragged that its new
plant expansion would create:
3,000 construction jobs and
1,000 permanent manufactur-.
ing positions. Vice President
Joseph R. Biden Jr. enthused,
"These are jobs that won't be,
exported." Not so, Joe. After
the failure of the IPO attempt,
Solyndra sent half its manu-
facturing to China.
The House Committee
on Energy and Commerce
is attempting to investigate
Solyndra and the extent of its
political connections to the
White House, but it's being
stymied by no-show witnesses
and White House refusal to
turn over records. One of
the company's leading inves-,
tors, oil billionaire George
Kaiser, was a campaign-dona-
tion "bundler" for the 2008
Obama campaign. An inves- .
tigation by the Government
Accountability Office found"
the Department of Energy
announced Solyndra's loan
approval "prior to completion.
of external reviews required ,
under procedures."
Whatever sweetheart, back-
channel deals the investiga-
tion eventually reveals, the
lesson is that it takes more
to survive in the marketplace
than just trendy green cre-
dentials, political pull and a
boatload of taxpayer cash.
Last year, Mr. Obama said,
'The true engine of economic;


growth will always be compa-:
nies like Solyndra." Let's hope
not.

* The Washington Times


www.lakecityreporter.com


Thwarting justice


an ultra-feminist aim









LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL & STATE FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 2, 2011


Counterterror chief: Al-Qaida on the ropes


KIMBERLY DOZIER
AP Intelligence Writer

WASHINGTON- On a
steady slide. On the ropes.
Taking shots to the body
and head.
That's how White House
counterterrorism chief
John Brennan described
al-Qaida on Wednesday
as he offered the first on-
record confirmation that
al-Qaida's latest second-in-
command was killed last
week in Pakistan rough-
ly four months after Navy
SEALs killed Osama bin
Laden there.
In an Associated Press
interview, Brennan said
the death of Atiyah Abd
al-Rahman in Pakistan's
tribal areas last week was a
"huge blow" to the group,
damaging the network and
keeping al-Qaida's lead-
ership too busy trying to
hide to plot new attacks.
Al-Rahman reportedly was
hit by a CIA drone strike.
In a wide-ranging inter-
view, Brennan credited
aggressive U.S. action
against militants across


the region as the main
reason U.S. intelligence
has detected no active ter-
ror plots before the 10th
anniversary of the 9/11
attacks.
The former CIA officer
described that as proof that
the White House has found
the right formula to fight
al-Qaida, by pairing U.S.
intelligence and counter-
terrorist forces with host
nations from Pakistan to
Iraq to Yemen, fighting
beside them or sometimes
through them. The goal is
to keep al-Qaida off bal-
ance, unable to replace the
seasoned terrorists the
U.S. campaign is taking
out.
"If they're worrying
about their security ...
they're going to have less
time to plot and plan,"
Brennan said of the mili-
tants. "They're going to
be constantly looking over
their shoulder or up in the,
air or wherever, and it real-
ly has disrupted their oper-
ational cadence and ability
to carry out attacks."
He pointed to the killing


of Al-Rahman as an exam-
ple of how U.S. pressure is
degrading the network.
"There's no longer a
management grooming
program there. They don't
stay in place long enough,"
Brennan said.
U.S. officials' believe
al-Rahman is dead after
intercepting communica-
tions between militant
groups in Pakistan's
tribal areas reporting to
each other that he'd been
killed, according to a U.S.
official speaking anony-
mously to discuss matters
of intelligence.
Al-Rahman had barely
assumed a leadership posi-
tion since bin Laden's death
pushed his deputy, Ayman
al-Zawahri, into the top
spot. Brennan described
al-Rahman as a "worka-
holic" and an "operational
mastermind" who kept al-
Qaida's nodes from Yemen
to Europe connected.
'Taking him out of com-
mission is huge," Brennan
said. "There's not another
bin Laden out there. I don't
know if there's another


Infrastructure bank may


be part of jobs package
b f E 1 t RTO OS RCa I


By JIM ABRAMS
Associated Press

WASHINGTON A
national infrastructure
bank that would entice
private investors into road
and rail projects could be a
major part of the jobs pack-
age that President Barack
Obama hopes will finally
bring relief to the unem-
ployed.
The White House hasn't
divulged the contents of
the package that Obama is
to unveil in an address to a
joint session of Congress
next Thursday. But the
president has pushed the
idea of an infrastructure
bank in recent speeches
and has praised Senate and
House bills that create such
a government-sponsored
lending institution.
Whether the bank, which
would need time to orga-
nize, could have any real
impact on the jobs situation
in the coming year and
particularly before the
November 2012 elections
- is in dispute.
Obama seems to think it
would.
He said at a July news
conference that while the
bank he is proposing is
"relatively small," he could
imagine "a project where
we're rebuilding roads
and bridges and ports and
schools and broadband
lines and smart grids, and
taking all those construc- -
tion workers and putting
them to work right npw."
But Janet Kavinoky,
director of infrastructure
issues at the U.S. Chamber
of Commerce, cautioned
that "even in the next two
years I don't believe the
bank is going to be that
kind of job creator."
The best way to spur job
growth in the short term is
for Congress to pass long-
stalled bills to fund aviation
and highway programs,
she said.
The Chamber of
Commerce strongly sup-.
ports the infrastructure
bank.' Kavinoky said the
United States is one of the
few large countries that lack
a central source of low-cost
financing for construction
projects. But she said it's


5Hang Qf
a minute l>

Our customers receive
a Complimentary
copy of the
Lake City Reporter
when they drop off&
\ pickup their cleaning
Wh\ 17,1. S..nnlt, Inql,


going to take time to get it
running and come up with
a pipeline of projects where
funds can be invested.
Sen. John Kerry, D-
Mass., who's sponsoring
an infrastructure bank bill,
argued that "we have proj-
ects all across America that
are ready to go tomorrow."
He said the bank "could
have money flowing in the
next year easily."
Michael Likosky, senior
fellow at the NYU Institute
for Public Knowledge and
author of "Obama's Bank:
Financing a Durable New
Deal," says he is working
with transportation agen-
cies in California and New
York that "are waiting for
the federal government to
say they are.going to sup-
port these projects."
A commitment to a
national infrastructure
bank could also provide a
positive spark to financial
markets and encourage
investment, he said.
The bank would supple-
ment federal spending on
infrastructure by promot-
ing private-sector invest-.
ment in projects of national
or regional significance.
The private sector cur-
rently provides only about
6 percent of infrastructure
spending.
Supporters, which range
from the Chamber of
Commerce to the AFL.CIO,
say pension funds, private
equity funds and sovereign
wealth funds have hundreds
of billions of dollars ready
to be invested in low-risk
infrastructure projects.


It's better than having
pension fund money go to
Treasury bonds, Likosky
said. "It's really about
changing our approach;
we're in tough economic
times and we will be for
a while. We have to make
sure the money we have
goes further."
The Kerry bill would
require $10 billion in start-
up money from the govern-
ment to get the first loans
going and cover admin-
istrative costs. The bank
would be government
owned, run by a board
of directors, independent
of any federal agency and
self-sustaining after the
initial expense. Public-pri-
vate partnerships, corpo-
rations and state and local
governments would be eli-
gible for the loans.
The bank's directors
would pick which projects
to finance based on an
analysis of costs, benefits
and revenue streams, such
as from tolls or fees, for
repaying the loan. Once the
terms of the loan, includ-
ing interest rates and fees
to cover risk, are set, the
Treasury Department
would disburse the loan.
"There is going to be a
revenue stream for pay-
back and therefore the
. project is going to stand
on its own because it will
be a good enough proj-
ect to attract private-sec-
tor funding," said Sen. Kay
Bailey Hutchison of Texas,
one of several Republican
co-sponsors of the Kerry
plan.


Zachary

Prichard
May 16, 1990 Sept. 2, 2010
.Your laughter and lovely
smile are gone forever: We
cannot hold you, or touch you,
but we have many memories. Your
Memories are our keepsake and will
, remain with us until we see you
again. God has you in His keeping
and we have you in our hearts.
Dearly Loved-Sadly Missed-
Never Forgotten
Your Family


Atiyah Abd al-Rahman out
there."
Brennan said the key
to keeping another al-
Rahman from rising is to
keep constant pressure on
all locations where al-Qaida
operates, working through
host countries to target
operatives who "are flow-
ing sometimes back and
forth" among Pakistan,
Afghanistan, Iraq, Yemen,
Somalia and other parts of
Africa.


Benjamin J. Blue
Funeral services for Mr. Blue
will be held at FAITH TEM-
PLE C.O.G.I.C., Sanderson
Florida, 12:00 Noon, Sat-
urday, September 3, 2011.
Arrangements entrusted to
COMBS FUNERAL HOME.
292 NE Washington Street.
Lake City, FL. (386) 752-4366.
"The Caring Professionals"

Katrina Rene Cordell
Katrina Ren6 Cordell age 51 of
Orlando, passed away Wed. Aug.
31,2011. Shewas born April 12,
1960 in Mobile, AL to Katrina
and the late Lynn B. Counts of
Lake City. A Florida resident
since the early 60's, Rend was a
'78 graduate of Columbia High
School in Lake City, FL. In
1982 she moved to Orlando and
worked as a computer analyst
at Martin Marietta (Lockheed
Martin). In 1993 Rend became
a homemaker and devoted her
time to raising her two children,
Glenn and Katelyn. She is sur-
vived by her loving husband of
29 years, Marty; children, Glenn
and Katelyn; mother, Katrina
Counts; brother, Stephen Counts;
and sister, Natalie Kennedy. The
family will receive friends Sun-
day evening from 6-8 pm at Co-
lonial Funeral Home 2811 Curry
Ford, Orlando. The funeral ser-
vice will be held Monday, Sept.
5th at 11 am at First Baptist
Church of Pine Castle 1001 Hof-
ner Avenue Orlando, FL 3280'9.
In lieu of flowers, please consider
a donation to North Park Baptist
Church, 2047 Prospect Avenue,
Orlando, FL 32814 or the Amer-
ican Cancer Society. 208 W Can-
ton Ave, Winter Park, FL 32789

Harold Jiles Hall
Ilarold Jiles Htall, 60, resident of
Lake City, Florida passed away
August 30. 2011 in the VA Hos-
pital, Lake
City, Florida
terminating a W
short illness.
Born June 8,
1951 in Lake
City, Harold
was the son
of Mr. Jiles S.
Hall and Mrs.
Ruby Lee Martin
-Hall. Mrs. Hall ji .. .
preceded him
in death. He at-
tended the public schools of Co-
lumbia County, graduating with
the Columbia High School Class
of 1969. He furthered his educa-
tion at Florida A&M University,
Tallahassee, Florida majoring in
Chemistry. Harold joined the US
Army and was honorably dis-
charged. He was also predeceased


Brennan brushed off
some of the major crises in
those relationships of late,
from Pakistan's strident
objections to drone strikes
as a continued affront to its
sovereignty in the wake of
the bin Laden raid, to the
revolts across the Mideast
that swept from power U.S.
counterterror allies in plac-
es like Egypt.
He said the relationship
with Pakistan is improv-
ing.


OBITUARIES

by his wife, Bertie Owens-Hall.
Left to cherish fond memo-
ries: father, Jiles S. Hall; sis-
ter, Faye T. Hall, both of Lake
City, FL; numerous cousins,
other relatives and friends.
Funeral services for Mr. Hall
will be 10:00 A.M. Satur-
day, September 3, 2011 at
St. James Missionary Baptist
Church. Lake City, Florida.
Visitation with the fam-
ily will be from 6:00 8:00
P.M. Friday, September 2,
2011 at the funeral home.
Arrangements entrusted to
COMBS FUNERAL HOME.
292 NE Washington Street.
Lake City, FL. (386) 752-4366.
Marq Combs-Turner, L.F.D.


Aleene Markham Havird
Mrs. Aleene Markham Havird,
age 84, of Lake City, Fla. died
Monday, August 29, 2011, in
the Shands at
University of
Florida Hos-
pital, Gaines-
ville, Fla. fol-
lowing a brief
illness. She
was a lifelong
resident of
Lake City and Columbia County
and daughter of the late James
Leo Markham and Annie Lee
Cox Markham and widow of the
late James Kenneth Havird. She
had worked as a licensed practi-
cal nurse with medical practices
of Dr. L.J. Arnold and Barney
E. McRae, Jr. of Lake City for
over 30 years until her retire-
ment in 1973. She was a member
of the Bethel Urited Method-
ist Church, the U.DiC., D.A.R.,
O.E.S. and a mehber of the
Florida Pioneer families before
Florida reached statehood. She
was involved in local genealogy
and cemetery/monument. pres-
ervation. She is survived by her
son, Kurt B. (Dawn) Havird of
Lake City, Fla.: One brother, J.L.
Markham of Suwannee, Fla.:
Two grandsons, Justin C. Ha-
vird'of Auburn, Ala. and Joshua
C. Havird of Crawfordville, Fla.
Funeral services will be conduct-
ed at 4 P.M. Friday, September 2,
in the Bethel United Methodist
Church with Rev. Mike Wright
officiating and assisted by Rev.
Debra McKown, Pastor of Beth-
el United Methodist. Church.
Interment will be in the Bethel
Cemetery, Columbia County,
Fla. Visitation will be from
6 to 8 P.M. Thursday, Sep-
tember 1, at GUERRY FU-
NERAL HOME, 2659 S.W.
Main Blvd., Lake City, Fla.
In lieu of flowers, donations
may be made to the Bethel
Cemetery Fund. P.O. Box 503,


And he described the
Arab revolts as a "speed
bump" that only temporar-
ily disrupted cooperation.
He said U.S. contacts in
Egypt have been able to
recover quickly follow-
ing longtime leader Hosni
Mubarak's ouster earlier
this year. The counterter-
rorism relationship with
Tunisia, where the so-
called Arab Spring move-
ment began, also remains
strong, he added.


Ft. White, Fla. 32038-0503.
guerryfuneralhome. net

Charles A. Hottle
Charles A. Hottle, 73, passed
away in his Branford home on
August 23,2011 following a
lengthy illness. ,
Charles was a '
Master Sergeant ,
and a decorated '
veteran of the "_
Vietnam war and was retired
from the US Army after serving
his country for nearly 26 years.
Charles was a member of the 772
Purple Heart Chapter. He is sur-
vived by his beloved wife, Nor-
ma J. Hottle and her three sons,
Don, William and Kerry Kirk-
endall. He also leaves behind
his three loving daughters, Rumi
Bodenheimer, Ramona Recine,
and Charlotte Harvey. Charles is
also survived by grandchildren
and great-grandchildren. Memo-
rial Services will be held Friday,
September 2, 2011 in the V.A.
Medical Center Chapel at 2pm.

Dinah Scippio
Mrs. Dinah Scippio a resi-
dent of White Springs passed
away August 24, 2011 in the
Lake City Medical Center.
Mrs. Dinah
Scippio is sur-
vived by her
husband Rev.
Fred Scip-
pio. One son
Fred Scippio,
Jr., daughter-
in-law; Reva
Scippio. One grandson; Juwan
Scippio, god daughter; Tanlitro
Peterson, two bothers; Sammy
Bryant and Aruther Bryant, one
sister; Yvonne Bryant, sisters-in-
law; Susie Mizell, Dorothy Bry-
ant and Almarine Francis. Broth-
er-in-law, Mack Mizell and many
other close relatives and friends.
Funeral services for Mrs. Dinah
Scippio will be Saturday, Sep-
tember 3, 2011 at 1:00 p.m. at
the St. Luke Baptist Church in
White Springs, Florida. View-
ing and visitation for family
and friends will be Friday, Sep-
tember 2, 2011 at the Sweet
Home Baptist Church from 6
p.m. until 8 p.m. Burial will
be in the Swift Creek Cem-
etery in White Springs, Florida.
D.M. UDELL FUNERAL
HOME is in charge of all
arrangements. Call D.M.
Udell and Sons at (386)362-
4189 or cell (386)209-0233


Obituaries are paid advertise-
ments. For details, call the Lake
City Reporter's classified depart-
ment at 752-1293.


see what


sunday


S has in store

Caroline Kennedy
SIn a PARADE exclusive interview, Caroline Kennedy
recalls her mothers unique character as she
prepares to release a book of intimate, never-
bbefore-heard interviews with the former first lady.

Intelligence Report: Good
News on Jobs
On the ,ve of Labor Day, we focus on the
WorldSkills Competition an international
labor event featuring everything from welding
.. to cooking to IT networking. It could also be a
road map for decreasing unemployment in America.

Sunday with ... Mike Rowe
No job is too dirty for this TV star. Mike Rowe drops trou for a good cause, talks
about his Sunday routine and bad hair days.

A New Tower on a Sacred Site
After 10 years-and many setbacks-a magnificent American landmark is


www.pamde.comn


Page Editor: Robert Bridges, 754-0428









6A LAKE CITY REPORTER IRENE FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 2, 2011




When will the power come back on?


By DAVID KLEPPER and
MICHAEL HILL
Associated Press

WARWICK, RI Cold
showers. Meals in the dark.
Refrigerators full of spoiled
food. No TV. No Internet
Up and down the East
Coast, patience is wearing
thin among the millions of
people still waiting for the
electricity to come back
on after Hurricane Irene
knocked out the power last
weekend.
"It's like 'Little House
on the Prairie' times," said
Debbie McWeeney, who
went to a Red Cross shelter
in Warwick to pick up food
and water after everything
in her refrigerator went
bad. "Except I'm not enjoy-
ing it at all."
With the waters receding
across much of the flood-
stricken region, homeown-
ers are mucking out their
basements and dragging
soggy furniture to the curb.
But the wait for power drags
on, with an estimated 1.38
million homes and busi-
nesses still without electric-
ity, down from a peak of 9.6
million.
And criticism of the utility
companies is mounting. In
Rhode Island, a state sena-
tor is calling for an investi-
gation, and Massachusetts'
attorney general is demand-
ing information from utili-
ties on how they are deal-
ing with the crisis, includ-
ing how many crews are in
the field and their response
time.
The industry has
defended its efforts, not-
ing it warned the public
that a storm like Irene was
bound to cause prolonged
outages and pointing out
that flooding and toppled
trees caused severe dam-
age to utility poles, sub-
stations and other equip-
ment.
Tim Horan, National
Grid president for Rhode
Island, said crews from as
far as Kansas and Idaho are
working 16-hour shifts, and
"we're committed to getting
this resolved as soon as pos-
sible."
In the meantime, people
are taking cold showers
or washing up at shelters,
using camp stoves and
grills to cook, competing
for ice at the grocery store
and relying on generators
and hand-cranked radios.
The late-summer weather,
at least, has been merci-
fully cool across much of
the East Coast.
Many homes that depend
on wells have no water
because they have no elec-
tricity to pump it. Relief
agencies have been hand-
ing out drinking water. An'd
a high school in Exeter, R.I.,
opened its gym to let people
shower.
In some places, people
on oxygen or other medical
devices that require elec-
tricity have been taken to
shelters that have power.
Irene has been blamed
for at least 46 deaths in
13 states. With the streets
drying out in hard-hit New
Jersey, some towns faced
new problems, namely
trash bins overflowing
with waterlogged debris. In
Vermont, with roads slow-
ly reopening, the National
Guard's airlift of food, water
and other supplies to once
cut-off towns was winding
down.
But Vermont faced new
danger Thursday evening:
A flash flood warning was
issued for the Rutland area
after two to five inches of
rain fell. Three state high-
way workers repairing dam-
age to a bridge were strand-
ed on a sandbar in a river
after flash flooding hit in
the town of Clarendon, and
helicopters were sent there
to rescue them.


Without power, the
Tirado family's septic
pump stopped working
at their home in Lake
Ariel, Pa., in the Pocono
Mountains, sending sew-
age through their shower
drain and into their fin-
ished basement.


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Connecticut Light and Power wires down guard Little Eagle Pementil monitors traffic and safety around down wires from Tropical Storm Irene, in Hebron,
Conn. on Wednesday. Pementil, who is working 16 hour shifts, says some people have been understanding and stopped to ask her how long until their power
is restored, while others have driven by yelling obscenities at her. Up and down the East Coast, the wait for power remains, with an estimated 1.38 million
homes and businesses still without electricity, down from a peak of 9.6 million, and criticism of the utility companies mounting.



N.C. gov. meets farmers; damage total grows


By GARY D. ROBERTSON
Associated Press

PINETOPS, N.C.
- Damage estimates for
North Carolina inched up
Thursday as teams assess-
ing the impact of Hurricane
Irene tallied the costs and
more counties were added
to the list of those whose
residents and businesses
could receive federal finan-
cial help.
Edgecombe County farm-
ers suffered at least $44 mil-
lion in crop damage from last
weekend's storm, the local
cooperative extension office
said Thursday, pushing the
statewide tally to $192 mil-
lion. The farm-service agency
said 70 percent of the county's
8,500 acres of tobacco was
damaged. Local farmers said
the estimate is low.
The statewide damage
estimate was expected to
grow as counties report
their figures, state emergen-
cy management spokesman
Ernie Seneca said.
Local governments
reported that their costs for
removing debris and mak-
ing infrastructure repairs
will be about $40 million,
Gov. Beverly Perdue's office
said. Martin County esti-
mated some $37 million in
damage to crops, especially
tobacco and cotton, officials
said Wednesday. Perdue had
said earlier that a prelimi-
nary estimate of damage hit
more than $71 million.
Perdue's office said the
federal government on
Thursday added Halifax
and Lenoir to the list of
seven counties Beaufort,
Carteret, Craven, Dare,
Hyde, Pamlico and Tyrrell
- already approved
Wednesday by President


Barack Obama for individual
assistance. Such assistance
includes grants and low-
interest loans for individuals
and businesses harmed by
the storm.
Perdue also said the state
has asked the federal gov-
ernment for 20 counties to
become eligible for federal
aid so local governments
can be compensated for
removing debris and mak-
ing infrastructure repairs.
Perdue ought to empha-
size the storm's toll on farm-
ers with a visit Thursday
with an Edgecombe County
tobacco farmer. Perdue used
the visit to sign an execu-
tive order that will make
it easier for state crews to
remove storm debris from
farmland and for farmers to
burn storm-related trash.
At Pitt Farms outside
Pinetops, as much as
about 100 acres of tobacco
appeared lost after Irene's
high winds shredded
leaves and turned them
yellow and brown. Farmer
Bert Pitt said he was able
to harvest about 20 acres
of his tobacco, working
even in the rain to salvage
a portion of his crop.
"What can you get from
this field?" Perdue asked
Pitt, looking out over
remaining rows of unhar-
vested tobacco plants.
"Heartache," Pitt
responded.
Other farmers vi iting
with Perdue asked her to
intervene with the federal
and state governments
for help, saying insurance
won't cover losses and fed-
eral programs don't offer
much immediate help
beyond more borrowing.
"We're going to need
some kind of help," said


Richard Anderson, a tobac-
co %grower in Tarboro.
"Those of us in the tobacco
industry are the first to be
taxed and we'd just like
some of our tax dollars to
come back and help us."
The governor told local
and state agriculture offi-
cials to assemble a letter
she can forward to U.S.
Agriculture Secretary Tomn
Vilsack to highlight urgent
needs and ways to end a
logjam in applications for


disaster relief.
"We've got to really just
stand up and fight," Perdue
said.
While many Outer
Banks beaches were open
Thursday, one was closed
because of floating debris.
Corolla's beach was
closed Wednesday after
lifeguards saw trash, wood
planks and tree branches
floating in the water and
worried they could hit a
swimmer. Officials were


waiting for the high tide to
recede Thursday to deter-
mine whether the water at
Corolla was safe, Currituck
County Emergency
Management spokesman
Randall Edwards said.
"I guess it's just one of
those things that happen
in a big storm like that
Things that wash out to
sea wash back up on the
shore," Edwards said. "It
just adds to the things we
need to take care of."


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Story ideas?

Contact
Tim Kirby
Sports Editor
754-0421
tkirby@lakecityreporter.com


Lake City Reporter





SPORTS


Friday, September 2, 2011


www.lakecityreporter.com


Section B


CHEAP SEATS


Tim Kirby
Phone: (386) 754-0421
tkirby@lakecityreporter.com


Football

all over

Florida

Levi McFatter
has been at
Charleston
Southern for
five years, but
he will be spending much
of this month in Florida.
Charleston Southern,
a member of the Big
South Conference, opens
the 2011 football season
with three games in the
Sunshine State.
The Buccaneers play
UCF at 7 p.m. Saturday
in Orlando, then take on
Florida State at 6 p.m.
Sept. 10 in Tallahassee
and, finally, Jacksonville
University at 1 p.m.
Sept. 17.
McFatter (No. 73) was
chosen to the Big South
Preseason All-Conference
team, along with FSC
Preseason All-American
selection Charles James.
The Columbia High
graduate also was
selected to the second
team on Phil Steele's
2011 FCS College
Football Preview's
Preseason All-Big South
Team
McFatter is a
third-year stalwart on an
offensive line that has
four of five
starters returning. The
Bucs rushed for more
than 1,000 years in 2010.
In 2009, the
Buccaneers played at
Florida and at South
Florida. Last year they
made a trip to Lexington
to play Kentucky.
Charleston Southern
opens at home on
Sept. 24 against Norfolk
State. Five of its final
eight game are Big
South matchups. Liberty
University is the
preseason pick to win the
conference.
Fort White High
graduate Robert Hartley
also is a preseason
all-conference
offensive lineman at
Florida A&M. Hartley
(No. 72) is a redshirt
junior for the Rattlers,
who open at home on
Saturday against Fort
Valley State.
Columbia High
graduate Brach Bessafnt
is coming off his redshirt
year at Troy University.
Bessant (No. 52) is listed
as backup at inside
linebacker to senior
Xavier Lamb, who played
at Lincoln High.
The Trojans have
a pretty cool opening
game when they visit
Clemson. Troy also plays
at Arkansas and FIU
this year, while hosting
Florida Atlantic and UAB.
Columbia's Tiger
Powell is now No. 6 for
Jones County Junior
College. Powell is the
only running back with
experience and is
expected to play a major
role for the Bobcats.
Last year, Powell had
51 carries for 197 yards
and caught nine passes
for 44 yards.

* Tim Kirby is sports editor
of the Lake City Reporter.


Border war for Tigers


Columbia kicks
off 2011 season at
Brooks County.
By BRANDON FINLEY
bfinley@lakecityreporter. corn

In what is becoming an
annual thing for Columbia
High, the Tigers will trav-
el to Georgia to take on
Brooks County High in its
opening game of 2011.
After a 20-13 win against
Santa Fe High in the kickoff
classic, coach Brian Allen
was happy for the win, but
hoping to find a better prod-
uct from his Tigers in their
first official game.
"I'm looking for better
execution," Allen said. "I've
been tough on them all
week in practice from the
top guy to the bottom guy.
We won the game, but the
execution was poor."
Brooks County is anoth-
er option team, much like
what the Tigers saw against
the Raiders last week. Allen


hopes it was a good les-
son for playing against the
option.
Brooks County runs out
of the Wing formation,
which varies slightly from
what Santa Fe did.
"We have to be a dis-
ciplined group and good
things will happen," Allen
said. "That's something
we want to emphasize.
If we're discipline good
things will happen as far as
turnovers."
Brooks County also will
offer an assortment of
speed for the Tigers.
"That's the first thing
that jumps out at you when
watching film," Allen said.
"They may run as quickly
to the ball as any team we'll
face all season."
Speed plays into Brooks
County's philosophy on
offense as well, even if they
do it a little unorthodox.
"Their fullback is about
165 pounds, but he can fly,"
Allen said. "They have a tri-
ple threat with the quarter-


back being able to keep it
or pitch it to the tailback."
Columbia will go against
a traditional four-man front
with a little variation from
Brooks County.
"They'll walk a strong
safety up and make it
almost an eight-man front
sometimes," Allen said.
That could lead the Tigers
to some big plays down field
if it catches Brooks County
in the right formation.
"One thing is, they live by
the blitz and die by the blitz,"
Allen said. "We don't nec-
essarily have to look deep
to beat them. We'll look at
some things in the seam and
on slants. We're going to try
to let Nate (Ayers) pick on
them a little bit"
Columbia could also be
without its leading rusher
from last season as Rakeem
Battle is fighting a high-
ankle sprain.
"I'm not sure if he'll go,"
Allen said. "He says he can,
but we have three capable
backs."


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reported
Columbia High's Javere Smith grabs Santa Fa High running
back Tray Presley from behind in the Tigers' 20-13 win in the
kickoff classic in Alachau last week.


Wolves spring into action


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BRANDON FINLEY/Lake City Reporer
Richardson Middle School quarterback Alfonso Battle (8) looks for an open receiver in the Wolves' opening game against
Green Cove Springs Junior High at Tiger Stadium on Thursday.
... :
~ .'. -m,-4li . ,.
. .. .-_. '.. -
.. ... .. ,.,..,
: .. . .:,,. . , :. .. .
,..,
. ' .- ., , : ... .. ,
BRANDON FINLEY/Lake City Reporter
Richardson Middle School quarterback Alfonso Battle (8) looks for an open receiver in the Wolves' opening game against
Green Cove Springs Junior High at Tiger Stadium on Thursday.


Richardson drops
first game, 34-28,
to Green Cove.
By TIM KIRBY
Stlliby~lhkbityrdbbftbt.bom' "

A defensive struggled
turned into a bonanza of
big plays on offensive in
Green Cove Springs Junior
High's 34-28 win over host'
Richardson Middle School
on Thursday.
Scores came early and late
in the first half. Green Cove'
Spring's Mekhi Reynolds
ran the opening kickoff back
75 yards for a touchdown.
After several posses-,
sion changes, Richardson's
Michael Jackson returned a,
punt 78 yards for an appar-"
ent touchdown. A penalty
negated the play, but the'
Wolves offense received a
spark.
Alfonso Battle threw to
Dillion Brown for 19 yards
to convert a third-and-10.
Ladarius Powell ripped
off a 29-yard run. Runs by
Kamario Bell and Jackson
and another completion to
Brown for a first-and-goal.
Gabriel Williams scored
WOLVES continued on 3B


Indians open season at Hamilton County


Fort White travels
to take on old foe
in the Trojans.

By TIM KIRBY
tkirby@lakecityreporter.com

FORT WHITE Fort
White High football is tak-
ing on an old foe for today's
opening game of the 2011
season.
The Indians travel to
Hamilton County High for
a 7:30 p.m. kickoff.
Both teams will look to
rebound from kickoff clas-
sic losses.
Fort White and Hamilton
County first met in 2001,
the second season of foot-
ball for the Indians. The
teams played for the next
eight years and split the
first six games. Included in
that was a five-overtime win
by Fort White in 2002.
When coach Demetric
Jackson took over in 2007,
the Indians won two straight


over the Trojans. After a
48-6 win in Fort White's 9-2
season of 2008, Hamilton
County took a break.
Hamilton County is com-
ing off a district cham-
pionship season. The
Trojans are in District
5-1A this season, along with
Lafayette, Branford and
Jefferson County high
schools.
Fort White also qualified
for the playoffs last year
as district runner-up. Both
teams lost in the opening
round the Indians to
Pensacola Catholic High
and the Trojans to Berkeley
Prep of Tampa.
Hamilton County is
coached by Mike Pittman.
In an earlier stint with
the Trojans, Pittman
took Hamilton County to
the playoffs in 2001 and
2003.
A former head coach at
Suwannee High, Pittman
INDIANS continued on 3B


r4


BRANDON FINLEY/Lake City Reporter
Fort White High's Aaron Johnson (4) and Trey Phillips (5) converge on an Episcopal High
running back during the kickoff classic in Jacksonville last week.












LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 2, 2011


TELEVISION

TV sports

Today
AUTO RACING
5 p.m.
g SPEED NASCAR,Truck Series, pole
qIalifying for Atlanta 200, at Hampton,
Ga.
6 p.m.
SPEED NASCAR, Sprint Cup,
practice for AdvoCare 500, at Hampton,
G1.
8 p.m.
SPEED NASCAR, Truck Series,
Atlanta 200, at Hampton, Ga.
COLLEGE FOOTBALL
8 p.m.
ESPN -TCU at Baylor
GOLF
9 a.m.
TGC European PGATour, European
Masters, second round, at Crans sur
Sierre, Switzerland
3 p.m.
TGC PGA Tour, Deutsche Bank
Championship, first round, at Norton,
Mass.
6:30 p.m.
TGC Nationwide Tour, Mylan
Classic, second round, at Canonsburg, Pa.
(same-day tape)
MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL
7 p.m.
MLB Regional coverage, Texas at
Boston or Chicago White Sox at Detroit
10 p.m.
MLB Regional coverage, Arizona
at San Francisco or Minnesota at LA
Angels
SOCCER
2:40 p.m.
ESPN CLASSIC UEFA, qualifier
for European Championship, Germany vs.
Austria, at Gelsenkirchen, Germany
II p.m.
ESPN2 Men's national teams,
exhibition, U.S. vs. Costa Rica, at Carson,
Calif.
TENNIS
I p.m.
ESPN2 U.S. Open, men's second
and women's third round, at New York
7 p.m.
ESPN2 U.S. Open, men's second
and women's third round, at NewYork

BASEBALL

AL standings

East Division
W L Pct GB
Boston 83 52 .615 -
NewYork 81 53 .604 CIA
Tampa Bay 74 61 .548 9
Toronto 69 68 .504 15
Baltimore 54 81 .400 29
Central Division
W L Pct GB
Detroit 75 61 .SSI -
Cleveland-- .-,.: 8-...6 -.507.. 6.
Chicagqc 68 66 .507 6
Minnesota 57 79 .419 18
Kansas City 56 81 .409 19'A
West Division
W L Pct GB
Texas 77 60 .562 -
Los Angeles 73 63 .537 3h
Oakland 61 76 .445 16
Seattle 58 77 .430 18
Wednesday's Games
Detroit 5, Kansas City 4
Minnesota 7, Chicago White Sox 6
Cleveland 4, Oakland 3. 16 innings
Toronto 13, Baltimore 0
Boston 9, N.Y.Yankees 5
Tampa Bay 4,Texas I
Seattle 2, LA.Angels I
Thursday's Games
Oakland 7, Cleveland 0
Toronto 8, Baltimore 6
Kansas City at Detroit
N.Y.Yankees at Boston (n)
Tampa Bay atTexas (n)
LA.Angels at Seattle (n)
Today's Games
Chicago White Sox (Danks 6-9) at
Detroit (Verlander 20-5), 7:05 p.m.
Toronto (Morrow 9-9) at N.Y.Yankees
(Nova 14-4), 7:05 p.m.
Baltimore (Britton 8-9) at Tampa Bay
(Price 12-11), 7:10p.m.
Texas (D.Holland 12-5) at Boston
(A.Miller 6-1), 7:10 p.m.
Cleveland (Masterson 10-8) at Kansas
City (Chen 10-5),8:10 p.m.
Minnesota (Pavano 6- I1) at LA.Angels
(Weaver 15-7), 10:05 p.m.
Seattle (Vargas 7-12) at Oakland
(Moscoso 6-8), 10;05 p.m.
Saturday's Games
Toronto at N.Y.Yankees, 1:05 p.m.
Seattle at Oakland, 4:05 p.m.
Chicago White Sox at Detroit,
4:10 p.m.
Texas at Boston, 4:10 p.m.
Baltimore at Tampa Bay, 6:10 p.m.
Cleveland at Kansas City, 7:10 p.m.
Minnesota at LA.Angels, 9:05 p.m.
Sunday's Games
Toronto at N.Y.Yankees, 1:05 p.m.
Texas at Boston, 1:35 p.m.
Baltimore at Tampa Bay, 1:40 p.m.
Cleveland at Kansas City, 2:10 p.m.
Midnesota at LA.Angels, 3:35 p.m.
Seattle at Oakland, 4:05 p.m.


Chicago White Sox at
8:05 p.m.


Detroit,


NL standings


East Division
W L Pct
Philadelphia 87 46 .654
Atlanta 80 55 .593
New York 65 69 .485
Washington 63 71 .470
Florida 60 75 .444
Central Division
W L Pct
Milwaukee 81 56 .591
St.:Louis 72 64 .529
Cincinnati 67 70 .489
Pittsburgh 62 74 .456
Chicago 59 78 .431
Houston 47 90 .343
West Division
W L Pct
Arizona 78 59 .569
San Francisco 72 65 .526
Los Angeles 65 70 .481
Colorado 64 73 .467
San Diego 60 77 .438
Wednesday's Games
L.A. Dodgers 4, San Diego 2
San Francisco 4, Chicago Cubs 0


N.Y. Mets 3, Florida 2
Philadelphia 3., Cincinnati 0
Atlanta 3,Washington I
Houston 2, Pittsburgh 0
St. Louis 8, Milwaukee 3
Arizona 4, Colorado 2
Thursday's Games
Philadelphia 6, Cincinnati 4
LA. Dodgers 6, Pittsburgh 4
St. Louis 8, Milwaukee 4
Florida at N.Y. Mets (n)
Washington at Atlanta (n)
Today's Games
Pittsburgh (Undecided) at Chicago
Cubs (Dempster 10-10), 2:20 p.m.
N.Y. Mets (Dickey 6-11) atWashington
(Detwiler 2-4), 7:05 p.m.
Philadelphia (Oswalt 6-8) at Florida
(Undecided), 7:10 p.m.
LA. Dodgers (Billingsley 10-10) at
Atlanta (Beachy 7-2), 7:35 p.m.
Milwaukee (Greinke 13-5) at Houston
(Harrell 0-0), 8:05 p.m.
Cincinnati (Cueto 9-5) at St. Louis
(C.Carpenter 8-9), 8:15 p.m.
Colorado (Millwood I-I) at San Diego
(Harang 12-4), 10:05 p.m.
Arizona (.Saunders 9-1 I) at San
Francisco (Cain 10-9), 10:15 p.m.
Saturday's Games
Pittsburgh at Chicago Cubs, 1:05 p.m.
Cincinnati at St. Louis, 4:10 p.m.
Milwaukee at Houston, 7:05 p.m.
N.Y. Mets at Washington, 7:05 p.m.
LA. Dodgers at Atlanta, 7:10 p.m.
Philadelphia at Florida, 7:10 p.m.
Colorado at San Diego, 8:35 p.m.
Arizona at San Francisco, 9:05 p.m.
Sunday's Games
Philadelphia at Florida, 1:10 p.m.
LA. Dodgers at Atlanta, 1:35 p.m.
N.Y. Mets at Washington. 1:35 p.m.
Milwaukee at Houston, 2:05 p.m.
Cincinnati at St. Louis, 2:15 p.m.
Pittsburgh at Chicago Cubs, 2-20 p.m.
Arizona at San Francisco, 4:05 p.m.
Colorado at San Diego, 4:05 p.m.

All-time hits leaders

Through Wednesday
(x-active; y-played prior to 1901)
Player Hits
I. Pete Rose 4.256
2.Ty Cobb 4,191
3. Hank Aaron 3,771
4. Stan Musial 3,630
5.Tris Speaker 3,514
6.CarlYastrzemski 3,419
7. y-Cap Anson 3,418
8. y-Honus Wagner 3,415
9. Paul Molitor 3,319
10. Eddie Collins 3,315
I I.Wiliie Mays 3,283
11 Eddie Murray 3.255
13. y-Nap Lajole 3.242
14.Cal RJpken 3.184
15.George Brett 3,154
16.PaulWaner 3,152
17. Robin Yount 3.142
18.Tony Gwynn 3,141
19.DaveWinfleld 3.110
20. x-Derek Jeter 3,0 I1
21. Craig Biggio 3.060
22. Rickey Henderson 3,055
23. Rod, arew 3,053
24. Lou Brck 3.023
25. Rafael Pallheiro 3.020
26.WadeBoggs 3,010
27.AI Kaline 3,007
28. Roberto Clemente 3,000

FOOTBALL

NFL preseason games

Thursday
Detroit at Buffalo (n)
Indianapolis at Cincinnati (n)
Baltimore at Atlanta (n)
St. Louis at Jacksonville (n)
Dallas at Miami (n)
N.Y. Giants at New England (n)
Philadelphia at N.Y.Jets (n)
Tampa Bay at Washington (n)
Pittsburgh at Carolina (n)
Cleveland at Chicago (n)
Kansas City at Green Bay (n)
Houston at Minnesota (n)
Tennessee at New Orleans (n)
Denver at Arizona (n)
San Francisco at San Diego (n)
Today
Oakland at Seattle, 10:30 p.m.

Top 25 schedule

Today
No. 14TCU at Baylor,8 p.m.
No. 17 Michigan State vs.Youngstown
State, 7:30 p.m.
Saturday
No. I Oklahoma vs.Tulsa, 8 p.m.
No. 2 Alabama vs. Kent State,
12:21 p.m.
No. 3 Oregon vs. No. 4 LSU at
Arlington,Texas, 8 p.m.
No. 5 Boise State at No. 19 Georgia,
8 p.m.
No.6 Florida State vs. Louisiana-
Monroe, 3:30 p.m.
No. 7 Stanford vs. San Jose State, 5
p.m.
No. 8 Texas A&M vs. SMU. 7:30 p.m.
No. 9 Oklahoma State vs. Louisiana-
Lafayette, 7 p.m.
No. 10 Nebraska vs. Chattanooga,
3:30 p.m.
No. 12 South Carolina vs. East
Carolina, 8 p.m.
No. 13 Virginia Tech vs. Appalachian
State. 12:30 p.m.
No. 15 Arkansas vs. Missouri State,
7 p.m.
No. 16 Notre Dame vs. South
Florida, 3:30 p.m.
No. 18 Ohio State vs.Akron, Noon
No. 21 Missouri vs. Miami (Ohio),
Noon
No. 22 Florida vs. FAU, 7 p.m.
No. 23 Auburn vs. Utah State, Noon
No. 25 Southern Cal vs. Minnesota,
3:30 p.m.


Sunday
No. 24 West Virginia vs. Marshall,
3:30 p.m.

BASKETBALL

WNBA schedule

Thursday's Games
Atlanta at Washington (n)
Phoenix at San Antonio (n)
Today's Games
Washington at Atlanta, 7:30 p.m.
Indiana at Connecticut, 7:30 p.m.
New York at Minnesota, 8 p.m.


Seattle at Tulsa, 8 p.m.
Saturday's Games
Seattle at San Antonio, 8 p.m.
Los Angeles at Phoenix, 10 p.m.

AUTO RACING

Race week

NASCAR
SPRINT CUP
ADVOCARE 500
Site: Hampton, Ga.
Schedule: Today, practice '(Speed,
6-7:30 p.m.); Saturday, practice (Speed,
1:30-3 p.m.), qualifying (Speed, 5-7 p.m.);
Sunday, race, 7:30 p.m. (ESPN, 6:30-
11:30 p.m.).
Track: Atlanta Motor Speedway (tri-
oval, 1.54 miles).
Race distance: 500.5 miles, 325 laps.
NATIONWIDE
GREAT CLIPS 300
Site: Hampton, Ga.
Schedule: Saturday, practice (Speed,
II a.m.-12:30 p.m.), qualifying (Speed,
3:30-5 p.m.), race, 7:30 p.m. (ESPN2,
7-10 p.m.).
Track:Atlanta Motor Speedway.
Race distance: 300.3 miles, 195 laps.
CAMPING WORLD TRUCK
ATLANTA 200
Site: Hampton, Ga.
Schedule: Today, practice, qualifying
(Speed, 5-6 p.m.), race, 8 p.m. (Speed,
7:30-10:30 p.m.).
Track: Atlanta Motor Speedway (tri-
oval, 1.54 miles).
Race distance: 202.2 miles, 130 laps.
INDYCAR
BALTIMORE GRAND PRIX
Site: Baltimore.
Schedule: Today, practice; Saturday,
practice, qualifying (Versus, 2-3 p.m.);
Sunday, race, 2:45 p.m. (Versus, 2-5 p.m.).
Track Streets of Baltimore (street
course, 2.0 miles).
Race distance: 150 miles, 75 laps.
NHRA FULLTHROTTLE
U.S. NATIONALS
Site: Clermont. Ind.
Schedule: Today, qualifying; Saturday,
qualifying; Sunday, qualifying (ESPN2,
II a.m.-2 p.m., ESPN2, 5-7 p.m.); Monday,
final eliminations (ESPN2, noon-6 p.m.).
Track Lucas Oil Raceway.
OTHER RACES
AMERICAN LE MANS SERIES:
Baltimore Grand Prix. Saturday (ABC,
Sunday, 4-6 i.m.), Streets of Baltimore,
Baltimore.

TENNIS

U.S. Open singles

At The USTA Billie jean King National
Tennis Center
NewYork
Thursday
Men
Second Round
Tomas Berdych (9), Czech Republic.
def. Fablo Fognlnl, Italy, 7-5, 6-0, 6-0.
Kevin Anderson, South Africa, def.
Michael Uodra (29), France, 6-1,.6-2.6-2.
Juan Monaco, Argentina. def. Radek
Stepanek (23), Czech Republic, 6-4, 6-1,
2-0, retired.
Janko Tipsarevic (20), Serbia. def.
Phillpp Petzschner, Germany. 6-0, 6-3.
3-6,6-3.
Roger Federer (3), Switzerland, def.
DudI Sela. Israel, 6-3. 6-2. 6-2.
Tommy Haas, Germany, def. Alejandro
Falla, Colombia, 7-6 (5), 6-I, 7-5.
Marcel Granollers (31), Spain, def.
Mikhail Kukushkin, Kazakhstan, 7-5, 6-3,
6-4.
Jo-Wilfried Tsonga (I I), France, def.
Sergel Bubka, Ukraine, 6-3, 7-5, 6-2.
Marin Cilic (27). Croatia, def. Bernard
Tomlc,Australia, 6-1,6-0,.6-2.
Fernando Verdasco (19), Spain, def.
Marsel lihan,Turkey, 6-4,6-3,6-1.
Nikolay Davydenko, Russia, def. Potlto
Starace, Italy, 6-2,6-4,7-5.
Mardy Fish (8), United States, def.
Malek Jazir, Tunisla, 6-2.6-2.6-4.
Women
Second Round
Ana Ivanovic (16), Serbia, def. Petra
Cetkovska, Czech Republic, walkover.
Francesca Schiavone (7), Italy, def.
Mirjana Lucic, Croatia, 6-1,6-1.
Roberta Vinci (18), Italy, def. Alize
Comet, France, 6-2,6-3.
Jelena Jankovic (II), Serbia, def. Jelena
Doklc,Australla, 6-3, 6-4.
Silvia Soler-Esplnosa, Spain, def. Kala
Kanepl (31), Estonia, 6-4,6-2.
Carla Suarez Navarro, Spain, def.
SImona Halep, Romania, 3-6,6-2, 6-2.
Andrea Petkovic (10),,Germany, def.
Zheng Jle, China. 3-6,6-3,6-3.
Late Wednesday
Men
First Round
Fellclano Lopez (25), Spain, def.
Tatsuma Ito, Japan, 6-2,6-4,6-4.
Andy Murray (4), Britain, def. Somdev
Devvarman, India, 7-6 (5), 6-2, 6-3.
Alex Bogomolov Jr., United States, def.
Steve Johnson, United States, 4-6,4-6, 6-3,
7-6 (3), 6-3.
Gilles Simon (12), France, def. RIcardo
Mello, Brazil, 3-6, 6-3, 6-4,3-6, 6-4.
Robby Ginepri, United States, def. Joao
Souza, Brazil, 6-3, 6-4,6-7 (5), 6- I.
Jack Sock, United States, def. Marc
GIcquel, France, 6-4, 6-3, 1-6, 6-4.
John Isner (28), United States, def.
Marcos Baghdatis, Cyprus, 7-6 (2), 7-6
(I I), 2-6, 6-4.
Andy Roddlck (21), United States,
def. Michael Russell, United States, 6-2,
6-4,4-6,7-5.
Women
Second Round
Christina McHale, United States, def.
Marion Bartoll (8), France, 7-6 (2), 6-2.
Sabine Lisickl (22), Germany, def.Venus
Williams, United States, walkover.
Sam Stosur (9), Australia, def. CoCo
Vandeweghe, United States, 6-3, 6-4.


Irlna Falconl, United States, def.
Dominlka Cibulkova (14), Slovakia, 2-6,
6-3.7-5.
Flavia Pennetta (26), Italy, def. Romina
Oprandi, Italy, 6-0, 6-3.
Alla Kudryavtseva, Russia, def. Yanina
Wickmayer (20), Belgium, 6-1, 3-0,
retired.
Angelique Kerber, Germany; def.
Agnleszka Radwanska (12), Poland, 6-3,
4-6,6-3.
Maria Sharapova (3), Russia, def.
Anastaslya Yakimova, Belarus, 6-1, 6-1.


Fred Taylor retiring



after 13 seasons


By MARK LONG
Associated Press

JACKSONVILLE -
Running back Fred Taylor
is retiring from the NFL
after 13 seasons and near-
ly 12,000 yards.
Taylor will sign a one-,
day contract with the
Jacksonville Jaguars on
Friday so he can formally
retire with the team that
drafted him ninth overall
in 1998.
The ceremony surely
will be an emotional one,
with family members,
friends and former team-
mates on hand. The for-
mer Florida star spent 11
seasons in Jacksonville and
remains the franchise's
leading rusher with 11,271
yards. He ranks third with
286 catches and fourth
with 2,361 receiving
yards.
More telling than his
stats was his transition
from a shy college kid
who seemed to find trou-
ble in Gainesville into a
model player who became
a team leader and a strong
voice for league issues.
Coaches and teammates
lauded Taylor as one of
the hardest-working play-
ers in Jacksonville's locker
room. Media members and
team personnel regarded
him as the easiest to deal
with, a class act on and off
the field, regardless of wins
or losses.
Taylor spent the last two
seasons playing sparingly
in New England, where he
ran 106 times for 424 yards
and four touchdowns.
"I want to thank every
who has directly or indi-
rectly supported my career
and help shape my char-
acter," Taylor wrote on his
Twitter account, saluting
all "Gators/Jags/Pats."
Taylor ranks 15th on the
NFL's all-time rushing list
with 11,695 yards. He is
379 yards behind Thurman
Thomas and 343 ahead of
John Riggins both in the
Pro Football Hall of Fame.
Taylor's induction might
not be a guarantee. He
missed chunks of time
because of injuries early in
his career, never made the
Super Bowl not even with


ACROSS

1 Went headfirst
6 Okra dish
11 Shuttle launch-
er
13 Soap opera
14 Without ques-
tion
15 Ironer's target
16 Just a -!
17 A Vanderbilt
18 Leo mo.
21 Fawning flatter-
er
23 Out caller
26 Watchdog's
warning
27 Charged parti-
cles
28 Bright object
29 Mother-of-pearl
source
31 LaBelle or
LuPone
32 Tuxedo trim
33 Glockenspiel
strikers
35 Trim the hedge


ASSOCIATED PRESS
In this Oct. 12, 2008, file photo, Jacksonville Jaguars running
back Fred Taylor runs against the Denver Broncos during an
NFL football game in Denver. Taylor is retiring from the NFL
after 13 seasons and nearly 12,000 yards. Taylor will sign
a one-day contract with the Jacksonville Jaguars on Friday
so he can formally retire with the team that drafted him ninth
overall in 1998.


the Patriots and played
in just one Pro Bowl.
He ran for 1,202 yards
and five touchdowns in
2007 and earned his first
trip to Hawaii. He probably
should have made it before,
but playing in small-mar-
ket Jacksonville did little
to help his cause. He often
joked that he was the NFL's
version of famed daytime
actress Susan Lucci.
As Taylor's career start-
ed winding down, he talk-
ed openly about wanting
to pass Jim Brown (12,312
yards) on the all-time
rushing list But once the
Jaguars parted ways with
Taylor after the 2008 sea-
son, he started to realize it
might not happen.
Injuries might have been
the real culprit. -
Taylor missed 24 games
over his first four seasons
and was ineffective in sever-
al more because of various
injuries. He had a strained
hamstring that sidelined


36 colada (rum
drink)
37 Sleep-stage
acronym
38 John, in
Glasgow
39 Artificial duck
40 12th-graders
41 Memorable
decade
42 Contingencies
44 Polar bear
domain
47 Boarded up
51 Crape -
52 Feel excitement
53 Sachet compo-
nent
54 Coral ridges

DOWN

1 JAMA readers
2 Debtor's note
3 TV hookup,
once
4 Barely manag-
es
5 Erasure


him six games in 1999, a
strained knee ligament that
kept him out of the first
three games in 2000, and a
torn groin muscle that pre-
vented him from playing
the final 14 games in 2001.
That three-year stretch left
him labeled as soft, brittle
and injury prone.
But "Fragile Fred" proved
all the naysayers wrong by
starting 46 consecutive
games between 2002 and
2004, an impressive streak
at a position that deals with
more pain and punishment
than any other.
Taylor even played
through a broken bone in
his foot in 2004.
Through it all, he became
the face of the small-market
franchise.
Taylor had hoped to
spend his entire career
in Jacksonville, but the
Jaguars released him fol-
lowing the 2008 season
as part of a rebuilding
project.


Answer to Previous Puzzle

CO Gi TAA A P1O1S
UMA AMOS EMIR
PELICANS NAM
SNACKS NACHO
KIIS S DI EA




RED Y'LE HiREAL E
R E RA YSENHPCOS^





ENO ULTR


REAR DEAL S
ISMS EAL S


6 Insanitary
7 Nobel chemist
Harold
8 She played
Rosemary
9 Undergrad degs.


Want more puzzles?
Check out the "Just Right Crossword Puzzles" books
at QulllDrlverBooks.com


10 Fiesta cheer
12 Magnate
13 Oodles
18 Andre of ten-
nis
19 Home of the
Illini
20 Potatoes au

22 Lacking iron
23 Says aloud
24 Be important
25 Chandelier
pendants
28 "My gal" of
song
30 Bottle edge
31 Follow the
rules (2 wds.)
34 Consecrate
36 Truce result
39 Practice
41 Jazzy James
43 Trig function
44 Current meas.
45 Whiskey grain
46 PC screen
48 Size above
med.
49 Brownie
50 Moines


9-2 2011 UFS, Dist. by Univ. Uclick for UFS


SCOREBOARD


Page Editor: Tim Kirby, 754-0421










Page Editor: Brandon Finley, 754-0420


LAKE CITY REPORTER


SPORTS


FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 2, 2011


_ BOWLING


ASSOCIATED PRESS
In this Nov. 20, 2010, file photo, Florida State's Bert Reed runs the ball for a touchdown as Maryland's Trenton Hughes
chases during the second half of an NCAA college football game in College Park, Md.


College football is back as Boise


State ventures into SEC territory


By RALPH D. RUSSO
Associated Press

College football's most
debated team has another
referendum game.
No. 5 Boise State begins
a second straight season
playing across the country
on a field that is neutral
only in name.
But this time the stakes
are raised a bit. This time
the Broncos are ventur-
ing into Southeastern
Conference territory.
As impressive as Boise
State's 33-30 victory against
Virginia Tech at FedEx
Field in Maryland was last
season, Kellen Moore and
the Broncos have a chance
to bolster their credibil-
ity even more Saturday in
Atlanta against No. 19
Georgia.
The Boise State
debate breaks down like
this.
Pro-Boise: Coach Chris
Petersen's team can com-
pete and even beat any
team in the country if given
the opportunity. (See Fiesta
Bowl victories against
Oklahoma and TCU, plus
that victory against Virginia
Tech).
A relatively weak confer-
ence schedule should not
preclude the Broncos from
playing for a national cham-
pionship if they go unde-
feated.
Anti-Boise: Playing
in the Western Athletic
Conference, the Broncos
only faced a few teams
per season that were their
equals. Moving to the
Mountain West Conference
this season only provides


Boise State with a touch
more competition. Because
the Broncos' strength of
schedule lags well behind
the teams that play in the
SEC, Big Ten, Pac-12, etc.,
Boise State cannot possibly
be considered a national
championship contender.
SEC fans seem to get the
most riled up by Boise State
being included among the
nation's elite programs.
The last time Boise State
played an SEC team was
2005, when the. Broncos
were blasted by the
Bulldogs 48-13 in Athens.
A victory by the Broncos
not only means the Boise
State debate will rage most
of the season, but it might
even get them some respect
in the Deep South.
Maybe?
The picks:
Today
No. 14 TCU (minus 6)
at Baylor
QB Robert Griffin III
gives Bears upset hopes ...
TCU 24-17.
Youngstown State (no
line) at No. 17 Michigan
State
Spartans have best pre-
season ranking since 2001
... MICHIGAN STATE
42-10.
Saturday
Tulsa (plus 241%) at
No. 1 Oklahoma
Sooners have won five
straight against Tulsa,
including 45-0 two seasons
ago ... OKLAHOMA 58-21
Kent State (plus 38) at
No. 2 Alabama
Tide coach. Nick Saban
goes easy on his alma mater
... ALABAMA 35-7.
No.-3 Oregon (minus


3) vs. No. 4 LSU at
Arlington, Texas
Never, ever, count out
Les Miles ... LSU 28-27.
No. 5 Boise State
(minus 3%'!) at No. 19
Georgia
Kellen Moore is no Jared
Zabransky... BOISE STATE
28-24
Louisiana-Monroe
(plus 29/.!) at No. 6
Florida State
After filling in for
Christian Ponder, QB EJ
Manuel leads Seminoles ...
FLORIDA STATE 48-16.
San Jose State (plus
30) No. 7 Stanford
Andrew Luck gets
in a solid half of work ...
STANFORD 45-10.
Louisiana-Lafayette
(plus 37) at No. 9
Oklahoma State
QB Brandon Weeden at
27, could make a Weinke-
like run at the Heisman ...
OKLAHOMA ST. 55-13.
Chattanooga (no line)
vs. No. 10 Nebraska
Sort of an unsatisfying
way to begin a new era for
Huskers ... NEBRASKA 52-
14.
No. 12 South Carolina
(minus 20%) vs. East
Carolina at Charlotte,
N.C.
Steve Spurrier suggests
QB Connor Shaw could
start over Stephen Garcia
*... S.CAROLINA 38-14.
Appalachian State (no
line) at No. 13 Virginia
Tech
No one takes
Mountaineers lightly ...
VIRGINIA TECH 37-17.
Missouri State (no line)
at No. 15 Arkansas
Tyler Wilson takes over at


quarterback for Razorbacks
... ARKANSAS 58-20.
South Florida (plus
1012) at No. 16 Notre
Dame
The one time Lou Holtz
will be rooting AGAINST
the Irish maybe ...
NOTRE DAME 28-20.
Akron (plus 34) at No.
18 Ohio State
Suspensions shouldn't
be a problem for Buckeyes
here ... OHIO STATE 35-7.
Miami, Ohio (plus 18)
at No. 21 Missouri
New Tigers QB James
Franklin makes first start ...
MISSOURI 38-17.
Florida Atlantic (plus
35) at No. 22 Florida
Gators won only meeting
with Owls 59-20 in 2007 ...
FLORIDA 45-3.
Utah State. (plus 21/2)
at No. 23 Auburn.
Tigers will slip this sea-
son, but not far enough
to give Aggies a shot ...
AUBURN 52-21.
Minnesota (plus 22)
at No. 25 Southern
California
Gophers QB MarQueis
Gray could give USC trou-
ble ... USC 35-17.
Sunday
Marshall (plus 22) at
No. 24 West Virginia
You want offense
Mountaineers fans? Here
you go ... WEST VIRGINIA
48-14.
SMU (plus 15') at No.
8 Texas A&M
Maybe the Aggies can -
hand over their Big 12 keys
to Mustangs? ... TEXAS
A&M 35-21.
Last season: 216-72
(straight); 144-133-6 (vs.
points).


Lady Tigers split opening


volleyball games of 2011 season


By BRANDON FINLEY
bfinley@lakecityreporter.com

Columbia High split its
first two games of the 2011
season as the Lady Tigers
picked up a win against
Union County before
falling to Belleview on
Wednesday.
Columbia won a five-set
match against the other
Lady Tigers on the road


25-22, 21-25, 15-25, 25-22
and 15-9.
Jara Courson led the hit-
ting attack with 14 kills for
Columbia. Jessie Bates had
49 set assists, Annie Milton
had four blocks and Lauren
Eaker finished with three
aces.
"I'm very proud of the
girls," Columbia High
coach Rebecca Golden said.
"They learned what it takes


to play together as a team
and pulled through with a
win."
Columbia fell to Belleview
in its first home match of
the season on Wednesday
15-25, 17-25 and 19-25.
"We made some mental
mistakes that cost us the
game," Golden said. "We
had moments of greatness
and moments of weakness
tonight. We have to get bet-


ter every game."
Milton led in both kills
and blocks with five and
four, respectively. Courson
led in digs with 10 in the
contest.
Columbia returns to the
court in a road game at
6:30 p.m. Tuesday at Baker
County. The Lady Tigers
have a home match at
6 p.m. Thursday against
Suwannee High.


COURTESY PHOTO

Don Suhi winners
The second annual Don Suhl Memorial Tournament
was at Lake City Bowl on Aug. 12. Winners were:
Cody Stuart, Division 1 (from left); Caleb Meek, Division 2;
Gary Beams, Division 3. Stuart also qualified for the Junior
Gold Tournament, which will be in Indianapolis in July.


League reports
Results of league bowling at Lake
City Bowl:
TGIF
Team standings: 1. Waterbury
Builders (4-0, 2,579 pins); 2.
3 Chicks & A Rooster (4-0, 2,399
pins); 3. Back At Ya Againl (3-1,2,596
pins); 4. Alvin & The Chickmonks
(3-1, 2,560 pins); 5. Got A "Hemi"
(3-1, 2,455 pins).
High scratch game: 1. Brigette
Harrelson 246; 2. Ida Hollingsworth
245; 3. Shannon Howard 226.
1. Zech Strohl 259; 2. David Adel
231; 3. Rich Madden 226.
High scratch series: 1. Brigette
Harrelson 625; 2. Ida Hollingsworth
573; 3. Karen Coleman 564. 1.
Zech Strohl 713; 2. David Adel 597;
3. George Rye Jr. 590.
High handicap game: 1. Ida
Hollingsworth 268; 2. Shannon
Howard 266; 3. Brigette Harrelson
252. 1. Alvin Poynter 260; 2. Zech
Strohl 259; 3. Thomas Stemp 249. .
High handicap series: 1. Shannon
Howard 671; 2. Carol Younger 663;
3. Chrissy Fancy 650. 1. Thomas


Stemp 716; 2. Zech Strohl 713;
3. Alvin Poynter 653.
(results from Aug. 19)
HIT & MISS
Team standings: 1. Spare Us
(4-0); 2. Oddballs (3-1, 546 team
average); 3. The Sandbaggers (3-1,
523 team average).
(results from Aug. 23)
GOLDEN ROLLERS
Team standings: 1. Jo's Crew
(6.5-1.5); 2. Wild Things (6-2, 4,690
pins); 3. Quirky Quad (6-2, 4,677
pins); 4. BMW (6-2, 4,629 pins).
(results from Aug. 25)
SEXY SENIORS
Team standings: 1. Keglers (6-2);
2. Razzle Dazzle (5.5-2.5); 3. Pin
Droppers (5-3, 4,678 pins); 4. Jo's
Crew (5-3, 4,662 pins); 5. Farmers
(5-3, 4,606 pins); 6. Double Up (5-3,
4,527 pins).
High scratch game: 1. Bea Purdy
180; 2. Joyce Crandal 161; 3. Janet
Nash 159. 1. Dan Ritter 184; 2. Ross
Meyers 178; 3. Rick Yates 175.
High scratch series: 1. Bea Purdy
489; 2. Joanne Denton 459; 3. Janet
Nash 432. 1. Dan Rltter 507; 2. Rick
Yates 476; 3. Art Joubert 471.
(results from Aug. 30)


BRIEFS


RUNNING
Breast Cancer
Awareness run
Cancer Care of North
Florida and Dr. Khan have
a 5K run/walk planned
for 8 a.m. Oct. 1 at Wilson
Park in downtown Lake
City. Entry fee is $25 ($30
day of run, Q:30-7:30 a.m.
registration). Proceeds
go to those in the
community battling
cancer and experiencing
financial hardship with
the disease.
For details, call
Shannon Thomas at
288-4692 or Donnie
Feagle at 365-1191.


Veterans Day Run,
Walk, Roll 5K
Gainesville Fisher
House Foundation has a
Veterans Day 5K event
planned on a course at the
University of Florida. The
event begins at 8 a.m.,
preceded by registration
at 6:30 a.m. Early registra-
tion (through Oct. 20) is
$20. Regular registration
is $25 and day-of
registration is $30. For
team participation contact
Barry. murphy@va.gov.
For details, go to www.
GainesvilleFisherHouse.
org.


YOUTH GOLF
Chomp Cancer Junior tour
Run on Oct. 15 in Louisiana


Chomp Cancer
Foundation is hosting
the Chomp Cancer Run/
Walk at the Fort White
Community Center on
Oct. 15. Cost for the 5K
is $25, and there will be
food, music and a silent
auction. Sponsorship
opportunities are offered.
All proceeds will benefit
the UF & Shands Cancer
Center. Online
registration is at www.
active. com keyword
Chomp Cancer.
For details, e-mail
Lauren Valentine at
chompcancer@gmail.com
or visit
www.chompcancer.com.


Unscramble these four Jumbles,
one letter to each square,
to form four ordinary words.
IKARCO I


The Arrowhead Junior
Golf Tour has a
tournament Sept. 10-11 in
New Orleans. The
36-hole event for ages
12-18 is ranked by
the National Junior
Golf Scoreboard.
Tournament fee is $195.
Recommended
accommodations are
available at the Sleep Inn.
Call (504) 309-5700 for
reservations.
Registration deadline
is Sunday. To enter, call
(318) 402-2446 or enter
online at
www.arrowheadjgt.com.

From staff reports
THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME
by David L. Hoyt and Jeff Knurek


INDIANS: At Hamilton
Continued From Page 1B


led the Bulldogs to four
consecutive state titles
from 1987-90.
Suwannee was the
first team in Florida
to win four straight
championships. North
Florida Christian School
since tied the mark in
1998-2001.
Fort *White brings
in Newberry High for
its home-opener on
Sept. 9.


Directions: Take
U.S. Highway 41 north
through White Springs;
when the road dead-
ends into U.S. Highway
129, turn left; Harvest
Fellowship Church will be
on the left and Hamilton
County High follows
immediately on the right;
there is no sign on the
road, rather a turn-in lane
to the school and football
field.


WOLVES: Play Thursday


Continued From Page 1B
with one second left in the
half and the teams went into
intermission tied 6-6.
It was the first of four
times the Wolves answered
Green Cove Springs scores.
The Cougars put the game
away with 25 second left on
a 23-yard touchdown run by
Jerone Goodman.
Richardson's touchdowns
in the second half came on
a 25-yard run by Gabriel
Williams, a 75-yard kickoff


return by Jackson and a
20-yard run by Battle.
Battle threw to Ronnie
Williams for one two-point
conversion, and Powell ran
in another to tic the score
at 28-all with 1:12 left.
"We played hard," Wolves
head coach Joey O'Neal
said. "We have got to work
on defense to get some
kinks out and we have got
to work on special teams. All
in all, I'm proud of them."


I-- D '] j -Now arrange the circled letters
to form the surprise answer, as
suggested by the above cartoon.
Print answer here: LLII
(Answers tomorrow)
Yesterday'sI Jumbles: VOCAL CHECK GROWTH ABSURD
Answer: Being overcharged for the undercooked steak
was this A RAW DEAL









Page Editor: Emogene Graham, 754-0415 LAKE CITY REPORTER ADVICE & COMICS FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 2, 2011 4


DILBERT


BABY BLUES


BLONDIE


BEETLE BAILEY


HAGARTHE HORRIBLE


SNUFFY SMITH


GARFIELD


B.C.


FRANK & ERNEST


DEAR ABBY


Sister has to be stopped

before she hurts her son


DEAR ABBY: I have a
sister I love dearly. "Thea"
is married to a wonderful
man, and they have. a 3-
year-old son I love as if he
were my own. My'problem
is Thea has a nasty, violent
temper, and she doesn't
hesitate to use it toward
the boy.
Recently when he was
overtired and needed to
go to bed, Thea said he
"knows better than to
push me by throwing a
tantrum." She then threat-
ened to "beat him bloody"
if he didn't "shut up" and
go to sleep. Abby, she had
already swatted his behind
to the point that he could
no longer stand up.
This feels like abuse to
me. When I suggested that
perhaps Thea should try
to calm down before she
hits him (more than she
already had), she threw
me out of her house! I am
terrified that this may be
happening more often than
I realize. But what if what I
witnessed'was just an iso-
lated incident?
What (if anything) can
I do? I'm worried for the
safety of my nephew, but I
don't want to cause a rift I
can't mend. MIDWEST
AUNTIE
DEAR AUNTIE: It
appears your sister has
serious anger issues and
lacks parenting skills. A
mother who "swats" her
child to the point that he
can no longer stand IS an


Abigail Van Buren
www.dearabby.com
abuser, and she needs an
intervention before her
child is seriously hurt.
Because Thea's reaction
when you tried to inter-
vene and calm her down
was to throw you out of
the house, the next step is
to call Childhelp USA. The
toll-free number is 800-422-
4453. Your call will be kept
confidential and a counsel-
or can guide you further.
Please don't procrastinate.

DEAR ABBY: My fiance,
"Roger," died recently: I
am working through the
devastating grief of his
passing, but the core of my
pain was listening to the
eulogies at his funeral.
. I expected Roger's
friends and family to share
happy memories and cel-
ebrate the best of his life.
However, many of those
who spoke including his
granddaughter chose
to remember him as a
notorious womanizer both
while his wife was alive
and after her death. Stories
were shared about how
he constantly hit on much
younger women, including
his daughter's childhood


friends.
I knew about Roger's
past before he met me
and I managed to come
to terms with it, but I did
not expect it to be brought
up as entertainment at his
memorial.
Now my memories are
tainted, and I feel dirty
and used. I live 500 miles
from Roger's home and
will probably never see
those people again. What
can I do to get over this
anger that continues to
haunt me? STILL IN
MOURNING
DEAR STILL
MOURNING: A eulogy
is usually a respectful
recapitulation of the
deceased's life story,
which includes loving
memories, lessons taught,
examples set by the
person. What happened
at the funeral was an
indication that Roger left
behind bitter memories
that were voiced by those
who spoke. How sad for
all concerned.
However, this has noth-
ing to do with you and
your relationship with
Roger. And the quickest
way to work through your
feelings would be to prac-
tice forgiveness and go on
with your life in which
Roger was just a chapter.

* Write Dear Abby at
www.DearAbby.com or
P.O. Box 69440, Los
Angeles, CA 90069.


HOROSCOPES


ARIES (March 21-April
19): Don't limit the pos-
sibilities. If someone pres-
sures you, be prepared to
reciprocate. Concentrate
on honing your skills and
using what you have to
offer in a unique manner.
There is no time to bicker
over something you cannot
change. ***
TAURUS (April 20-May
20): A partnership will
open doors to bigger and
better opportunities. Lqve
is in the stars, and plan-
ning something special will
enhance your current rela-
tionship or, if single, lead
to an interesting encoun-
ter.***
GEMINI (May 21-June
20): Do your best to take
care of any pressing mat-
ters at home before you
go out with friends or get
involved in social events.
Avoid emotional discus-
sions. A personal problem
will develop if you are flir-
tatious. ***
CANCER (June 21-
July 22): Interact with
friends, neighbors and
relatives. You should
enjoy getting involved
in a hobby or interest
that makes you feel like
you are accomplishing
something. Shopping for
bargains should be sched-
uled. Love is in the stars.

LEO (July 23-Aug. 22):
Do your best to finish what


THE LAST WORD
Eugenia Last

you start, especially if it
has to do with a promise
you made to someone
special. You can change
your home or plan to visit
a place you've never been
before. The change will do
you good. **
VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept.
22): You'll have a clear-cut
vision regarding how you
can help friends, family
or someone in need. Your
kindness will impress
the people you encounter
throughout the day. Visit
familiar places or touch
base with someone from
your past with whom you
would like to reconnect.

LIBRA (Sept 23-Oct.
22): You have to pay more
attention to how you can
work toward greater finan-
cial freedom. Use your
insight and creative ideas
to come up with a prosper-
ous venture. Using emo-
tional tactics, you will have
no trouble persuading the
right people to support
your plans. ***
SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov.
21): It's time to have a
little fun. Whether you are
single or in a relationship,
it's important to interact
with people who interest
you. Much can be accom-
plished if you are upfront


about your feelings and
intentions. ***
SAGEITARIUS (Nov.
22-Dec. 21): Accept the
inevitable and keep on
moving. Not everyone will
agree with what you are
doing or planning, but as
long as you don't mislead
anyone, you should be
able to make the changes
required to reach your
goals. ***
CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-
Jan. 19): Added responsi-
bilities may be a burden,
but if you do what's being
asked, it will become clear
that good results will mate-
rialize. Changes at home
will pay off and bring you
greater respect, coupled
with a promise from some-
one who is important to
you. ****
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-
Feb. 18): Don't let emo-
tional matters escalate.
You have to stay in con-
trol and call the shots.
Listen and observe, and
it will help you avoid
trouble and make a wise
choice. **
PISCES (Feb. 19-March
20): Touch base with yes-
teryear. People, places
and old ideas will surface,
allowing you to revisit
some goals that got left
by the wayside. Don't be
afraid to contact someone
from your past who can
help you with a goal you
want to pursue. *****


CELEBRITY CIPHER


by Luis Campos
Celebrity Cipher cryptograms are created from quotations by famous people, past and present.
Each letter in the cipher stands for another.
TODAY'S CLUE: T equals F
"GNS VMOA MH GNS CMVMG. WH CDOU
WH GNS VMOA EWO SOZM H M DO GNS
TWEG GNWG LDR EWO AD HDVSGNMOU.


L DR EWO AD MG."


- AWZ M A NDEJOSL


PREVIOUS SOLUTION: "Meryl Streep said, 'I just want to do my job well.' And
really, that's all I'm ever trying to do." Paul McCartney


(c) 201 1 by NEA, Inc. 9-2


FOR BETTER OR WORSE
ANNF- I HV/W_. "1 3E.SD-S, IT'S
tAbFK-.EP FOR'SO &-,-T R COCPLE-
LODG- I REED OF MORNINGS n
LTmiSCi'iNCE,! LEEIK.

i^^-^ld.'


CLASSIC PEANUTS


SO NOW I'M STEALIN' CHICKENS FROM
BOTH SIDES OF TOWN !! F-----











Classified Department: 755-5440


BUYITii


SELL T^


iaFIND ITIT


LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 2, 2011

Lake City Reporter




CLASSIFIED


'ake ADvantage of the
Reporter Classifieds!

755-5440


* ADvantage I


Legal

IN THE COUNTY COURT IN
AND FOR COLUMBIA COUNTY,
FLORIDA
CASE NO. 11-563-SC
ROBERT SWEAT
9670 135TH LN
LIVE OAK, FL 32060
Plaintiff
vs.
JIMMY MARCUM
1334 NW TRIPLE RUN RD.
LAKE CITY, FL 32055
Defendant
A law suit has been filed to deter-
mine ownership and title of a certain
vehicle described as a 1988 Corvette
with serial #1G1YY2186J5114349
located in Lake City, Columbia
County, Florida.
The following persons) may claim
some right title or interest therein:
ROBERT SWEAT
If you have a claim,,interest, or de-
fense in this clause, you must file
your written response answer or ob-
jection with the Clerk of Court Co-
lumbia County within 10 days.
CLERK OF COURTS
By:/s/ D. Robinson
Deputy Clerk
05527366
August 19,26, 2011
September 2, 9, 2011


020 Lost & Found

FOUND Beautiful Pit Bull, near
CR 247 & CR 242,
Found on August. 30th,
Call 386-961-9514

100 Job
Opportunities

05527485
City of Gainesville Fleet
Mechanic
Career Opportunity with
Excellent Benefits. Requires a
HS diploma/GED & 5 years
Fleet/diesel mechanic
experience. Apply today at
www.cityofgainesville.jobs
AA/EO/DFWP/VP
05527553
Large Southeast Restaurant
chain is now accepting resumes
for Management positions for
several Florida markets.
Competitive wages,
Advancement opportunities,
Complete Training package,
Health, Dental and Life
Insurance Benefits available.
DFWP EOE
Please send resumes to:
donni@heritagemanagement.net
or fax to: 352-387-0011.
05527588
NOW HIRING
Cashiers & Baggers for High
Springs fruit & gift stores.
Apply in Pers6n at Florida
Citrus Center (Chevron)
18603 NW CR 236, High
Springs (exit 404 & 1-75)
05526800
Earn Extra Money
Deliver the new AT&T Real
Yellow Pages
in the Lake City area. FT/PT,
daily work, quick pay, must be
18 yrs+, have drivers
license & insured vehicle.
(800) 422-1955 Ext. 1
8:00A-4:30P Mon-Fri






Lawn & Landscape Service

J&M LAWN Service & more for
all your outdoor needs. Don't
waste your time or weekend,
Free Estimate. 386-984-2187

Services

DIVORCE, BANKRUPTCY,
RESUMES.
other court approved forms-
386-961-5896.


100i Job
100 'Opportunities

05527636



FLORIDA SHERIFFS
YOUTH RANCHES, INC.
DIRECTOR OF HUMAN
RESOURCES
Bachelor's degree in personnel
management, business
administration, or related field
w/ 3 years experience in a
human resources position.
5 years supervisory experience
and PHR/SPHR preferred.
$47,500 annually with
EXCELLENT BENEFITS
SEND/FAX APPLICATION
hrjobs@youthranches.org
Florida Sheriffs
Youth Ranches
PO Box 2000
Boys Ranch, FL 32064
Fax: (386) 842-1055
EOE/DFWP

05527641



Maintenance Person
Convenience Store Group is
seeking an experienced
Maintenance person. A/C &
Refrigeration, Electrical,
plumbing and carpentry
experience would be a plus
Competitive salary, bonus, paid
holidays, vacation, company
vehicle and opportunity to join a
progressive and fast growing
company
Fax or Email Resume to:
dturner@fasttrackstores.com
Fax 1-352-333-1161

3 TEMPORARY Farm Workers
needed. Employer: Hayward A.
Murray, McLean Co. KY. Tobacco,
Straw/Hay, & Row Crop, Row Crop
Produce & Altemative Work.
Employment Dates: 10/05/2011 -
01/30/2012. Wage of $9.48/hr.
Worker guaranteed 3/4 of contract
hours. Tools provided at no cost.
Free housing provided to non com-
muting workers. Transportation &
subsistence reimbursed when 50% of
contract is met. Apply for this job at
the nearest One Stop Center in your
area and reference the job order
#KY0433023.
AVON!! Only $10 to start!
Earn bonus $ up to $150+
1-800-275-9945 pin #4206
www.youravon.com/tdavies
CDL Driver 2 yrs exp clean MVR
for local company. Apply between
8am & Noon only. Deadline isn-
noon Sept 2. 247 NW Hillandale
Glen Lake City No phone calls
CDL Drivers Wanted,
dedicated routes. Target Account,
Out of Lake City, FL
Call AJ 229-630-0021
FUNDRAISING MAJOR Gifts
Officer (Part Time). Exciting part-
time opportunity for a qualified
candidate with a proven track
record for success in major gift
fundraising, prospect research and
database management. The
*responsibilities include designing
and implementing a strategy for
cultivating and stewarding major
donors, developing and imple-
menting major gift giving strat-
egies and programs, and creating a
sustained effort to identify, solicit,
involve, and retain major donors.
The candidate will also develop,
coordinate and execute cultivation
strategies for major gift prospects
and donors. Qualifications: BA/BS
in marketing (or related field),
minimum of 7 yrs. experience gen-
erating and expanding major gift
base, major gift cultivation, and
soliciting strategies. Excellent
computer, interpersonal and com-
munication skills also required:
Please send
resumes along with cover letter to:
ARC Foundation of North
Florida, Inc. PO Drawer L
Live Oak, FL. 32064
No Phone Calls please.


100 Job
100 Opportunities
Mechanic needed for Truck shop,
must have own tools, apply
Southern Specialized, 1812 NW
Main Blvd., 386-752-9754
NEED CNC Machinist
Must have Metal Working
Machine Shop exp. Send resume,
Quality Mill, 3631 US Hwy. 90
East, Lake City, FL 32055.
Sewing Machine Operator
with experience,
Good hourly rate
Call Hafners 386-755-6481
Veterinarian Assist/Technician
needed. Exp desired. Must be able
to work flexible schedule & Sat.
mornings. Apply -at Columbia
Animal Hospital 2418 S. Marion
Ave. Lake City. No phone calls.

120 Medical
120v Employment

05527328
LEARN TO DRAW BLOOD
Local Phlebotomy Course
offered in Lake City, FLA
Certificate program.
(904)566-1328
Counselor for substance abuse
program in Baker Correctional In-
stitution. BA w/2yrs exp., M-F day
shift F/T, $30,000 to start, E-mail
resume to sheliarand@aol.com.or
fax to 386-752-2387
Pharmacy Technician needed.
Must be Florida registered. Min. 1
year exp required. Preferably in a
retail environment. Excellent
computer & communication skills
needed. FT position. Competitive
pay. Send reply to Box 05074, C/O
The Lake City Reporter, P.O. Box
1709, Lake City, FL, 32056

141 Babysitters
Loving mom would like to care for
your child. Full or Part time in my
home. Near downtown. Only I
opening avail. 386-438-5394

240 Schools &
2*40 Education

05527283.
Interested in a Medical Career?
Express Training offers
courses for beginners & exp
Nursing Assistant, $479
next class-08/22/10
Phlebotomy national certifica-
tion. $800 next class-10/10/11
Continuing education
Fees incl. books, supplies, exam
fees. Call 386-755-4401 or
cxpresstraiininserviccs.com


Mede'ri r
( ARCt'lll)c!

PHYSICAL


THERAPIST:
Home Health Care Agency
servicing Columbia and
surrounding counties
seeking Full-Time
experienced Physical
Therapist
Competitive Salary &
Benefits Available.
Please call contact
Lynn or Cindy at
386-758-3312
or apply online at
wwwalmostfamily.com

REPORTER Classifieds
In Print and On Line
www.lakecityreporter.com


310 Pets & Supplies

05527616
LOST
Silky/Yorkie
S Terrier: Missing
(am), Aprox 10
lbs. Black
body/brown face
& feet. Needs medicine. Last
seen at S & S on 441 N. & 100.
His name is Bradley. Please call
386-623-2806
PUBLISHER'S NOTE
Florida Law 828.29 requires dogs
and cats being sold to be at least 8
weeks old and have a health
certificate from a licensed
veterinarian documenting they
have mandatory shots and are
free from intestinal and external
parasites. Many species of wild-
life must be, licensed by Florida
Fish and Wildlife. If you are
unsure, contact the local
office for information.


361 Farm Equipment
84 Ford 4610 Tractor.
2WD, Solid
2005 motor,$7,500. OBO
386-867-0005

402 Appliances
White Whirlpool Dishwasher
2008 used 3 months
$75 obo
386-963-3295

407 Computers
ACER Flat screen monitor.
15 inch. $60. obo
386-755-9984 or
386-292-2170
HP Computer,
$80.00
386-755-9984 or
386-292-2170

408 Furniture


420 Wanted to Buy
K&H TIMBER
We Buy Pine Hardwood &
Cypress. Large or small tracts.
Call 386-961-1961.
Wanted Junk Cars, Trucks, Vans.
$275 & up CASH! Free Pick Up!
NO title needed !386-878-9260
After 5pm 386- 752-3648.

430 Garage Sales
BYRDS STORE CR 49. Fri.
Sat.& Sun, (8-5). 247-240R CR
49R, 247 Beachville. CR 49N, 252
Pinemount Rd CR 49L. Lots of
antiques, new items inside, outside
if no Rain watch for signs.
FRI 9/2 & SAT. 9/3, 8-12, 192 SE
Mossy Ct., off CR 245/Price Creek
Rd., freezer, wet suit, pole saw,
etc. Sunday Calls Only 984-0106
FRI. 9/2 & SAT. 9/3, 8-?,
412 SW Deanna Terrace, off Sis-
ters Welcome & Marvin Burnett
Rd .furn., clothes and much more
Huge Moving Sale. Sat. 7a-? 615
NW Zack Dr. (Emerald Lakes)
Lots of clothes, strollers, baby
stuff, hshold, fum., & much more!
MOVING SALE
Fri. 9/2 & Sat. 9/3 8a-3p.
493 SW Angela Terr.
Everything must go!!!!
PUBLISHER'S NOTE
All Yard Sale Ads
Must be Pre-Paid.

Sat. 9am-? Pinemount to Barwick
Right on Parker Left on
Mollie. Furniture, clothes and lots
more. Look for signs.
Yard/Estate sale. Sat-Mon. Ellis-
ville turn rt on Otis Howell to Her-
long. Look for signs. Baby items,
TV, travel trailer, antiques, misc.
Yard/Moving: Sept 3, 7-12. SW
Harmony Ln. Off Hwy 47 S.
Tools, lawn equip. incl riding
mower & attachments, air comp..
too much to list., hshold. Come
....v t.., n _t ... .. n ... . .... t..I


Coffee table and Carly to not miss out. But no early
2 square end tables. buyers before 7am.
All with glass tops. $90,00
386-758-4755 440 Miscellaneous

REPORTER Classifieds -
REPORTER Classifieds Stop gnat & Mosquito bites! Buy
In Print and On Line Swamp Gator All natural insect re-
pellent. Family safe. Use head to
www.Ilakecityreporter.com toe. Available at The Home Depot.


440 Miscellaneous
Summer Barbecue Special
Tow Behind
Grill/Smoker, $1,250 OBO.
386-719-4802


450 Good Things
5 to Eat
GREEN PEANUTS For Sale
Graded and washed.
$30.00 a bushel.
386-752-3434
OSCEOLA HONEY & BEE
FARM, Tupelo honey now avail.,
several other varieties, good pri-
ces. 386-755-2642, 386-754-1110

460 Firewood
Firewood for Sale. $65. per Truck
Load. Rick 386-867-1039 or Joey
965-0288 if no answer pls leave
message we will call you back.

630 (Mobile Homes
6 for Rent
2 BR/1 BA on 1/2 acre
in S. Columbia County,
$400 month
Call 386-755-8741
2 OR 3 BEDROOMS
Clean, Quiet Park $475-$525.mo
Water, septic, garbage included
758-2280 References, NO PETS!
2&3 BR MH. $395 $650. mo.
plus deposit. Water & sewer fur-
nished. Cannon Creek MHP
386-752-6424
3/2 Large MH, small park, near
FGCC, Small pets ok, $500 dep
$575 mo w/12 mo lease
386-752-1971 or 352-281-2450
3/2.5 S of Lake City, (Branford
area) $600 mo plus security
386-590-0642 or 386-867-1833
www.suwanneevalleyproperties.com
3BR/2BA BRANFORD area
Close to River. Nice yard.
Must see! Call for info.
386-752-7814 or 386-719-7010
3BR/2BA MH
Water & Garage included No Pets.
$550. mo. $400. security deposit,.
386-752-9898 or 386-365-3633
LG clean 3br's $450. -$650. mo. +
dep. Also. 2br mobile home's
available. No Pets.
5 Points area. 386-961-1482
Mobile Homes for rent in
White Springs. Lake City & Ft.
White Contact 386,623-3404
or 386-397-2779
EE%-fA -- I?.9- --


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Suwannee

Valley

E electric

SCooperative

Suwannee Valley Cooperative, Inc.
GIS/Mapping Data Specialist 1
Suwannee Valley Electric Cooperative, Inc. has an immediate opening
for a GIS/Mapping Data Specialist position. This position reports to
the Director of Engineering and will be responsible for maintaining
Geographic Information System Maps for the Cooperative. A high
school diploma and an Associate of Science degree or work equivalent
experience with a minimum of 1 year experience with GIS Mapping in
the electric utility field is required.
Applications and job descriptions may be picked up at the Suwannee
Valley Electric administration building, 11340 100th St., Live Oak. The
job description can be viewed on www.svec-coop.com. Resumes and
applications can be turned in at the above address with Attn: Vicky
Talmadge, or emailed to vickyt@svec-coop.com. The deadline for
accepting applications is Tuesday, September 6, 2011.
SVEC is an equal opportunity employer.


mmmmwmw











LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 2, 2011


Classified Department: 755-5440


630 Mobile Homes
630 for Rent
New 2br/2ba off Country Club. 1/2
ac. lot Front, back porch & storage
bldg. $600 mo. $600 sec. No Pets!
386-752-5911 or 466-2266

Mobile Homes
640 for Sale

05527374
!!ATTENTION!!
We purchase used mobile
homes. Call North Pointe
Homes, Gainesville
1 352-872-5566

05527375 !!!LOOK!!!
Before you but a Mobile Home
check out North Pointe Homes
in Gainesville--Hugh Discounts!
credit Scores Don't matter. Call
for Free Approval! Jacobson
Homes Factory Outlet (352)872-
5566 or mrb3371(@hotmail.com

05527376
NEW USED- REPO'S
Your Volume Giant! North
Pointe Homes. Millions to Lend.
Credit Scores 575 = 10% down.
Gainesville (352)872-5566 or
walker-david(@live.com

Palm Harbor Homes
4/2 From 499 Mo Loaded
3/2 From 399 Mo Loaded
Homes on Your Lot 0 Down
800-622-2832

710 Unfurnished Apt.
For Rent







1BR APT.
Downtown Location, Clean.
$450 mo, plus Security.
NO PETS. Call 386-755-3456
2BR/1BA. Close to town.
$565.mo plus deposit.
Includes water & sewer.
386-965-2922
A Landlord You Can Love!
2 br Apts $575. & up + sec. Great
area. CH/A washer/dryer hookups.
386-758-9351/352-208-2421
Amber Wood Hills Apts.
Private Patio area. Beautiful yard.
Washer/dryer hkup. Free water &
sewer. 1/1, 2/1. Move in special.
386-754-1800. wwwmyflapts.com
Columbia Arms Apt. located 1/2
mi from V.A. & Winn Dixie. Pet
Friendly. Move in Special $199.
Pool, laundry & balcony.
386-754-1800. www.myflapts.com
Great location W of 1-75, spacious
deluxe 2br apts., garage, W/D
hookup, patio. $600/700 & up. +
Sec, 386-965-5560 or 344-3715
Greentree Townhouse
Summer special. 2/1, 2/1.5. Free
water & sewer. Balcony & patio.
Laundry. Behind Kens on Hwy 90.
386-754-1800 wwwmyflapts.com

ONE 51 PLACE APTS
Alachua
MOVE IN SPECIALS
1, 2, & 3 bedrooms
Call TODAY 386-462-0656
or visit us at one51 place.com

Redwine Apartments. Move in
special $199. Limited time. Pets
welcome, with 5 complexes,
we have a home for you.
386-754-1800. www.myflapts.com
Summer Special! 12th mo Free
w/signed yr lease. Updated, w/tile
floors/fresh paint. Great area.
From $450.+sec. 386-752-9626
Unfurnished Apt Eastside
Village Realty, Inc .2 bedroom
1 bath Duplex must be 55+ yrs of
age Call Denise Bose @
386-752-5290
Wayne Manor Apts.
Move in $199. Summer special.
2/1, washer/dryer. Behind Kens off
Hwy 90. 386-754-1800
www.myflapts.com
Windsor Arms Apartments.
Summer special $199. Move in!
2/1, 2/1.5, 2/2. Pet Friendy. Free
200 ch. Dish. Washer/dryer hkup.
386-754-1800. www.myflapts.com

720 Furnished Apts.
720 For Rent
Studio Apt. Private. Rent incl util-
ities, Satellite TV, appliances,
(washer/dryer). No pets 386-963-
4767 or 292-0385 Available 9/1

730 Unfurnished
730 Home For Rent
'09 Executive Home for rent on 41
acres. 4br/3.5ba Available
October. Horses/outdoor pets ok.
$2000/mo but all terms negotiable
for right caretaker. 386-209-4610
3 br/2ba house, 1206 McFarlane
Avenue. Avail. 9/1/11. $850 mo
$400 sec dep. 904-376-0620 or
904-813-8864 for appt. No pets!
3/2 by Westside Elementary,
custom built home
$1050.00 per month.
Scott 352-318-8117
3BR/1.5 BA Large lot. Very clean
with storage shed. Quiet area.
$850 mo. + $850. dep.
386-752-7578
4B/1.5 BA, brick house for rent.


$850 a month & $550 security.
No pets!
386-752-9898 or 386-365-3633.
4BR BRICK home.
Azalea Park. $750. mo.
$750. security.
386-397-2619 or 386-365-1243
4br/2ba CHA Brick, 1200 sqft
lac., Close to FGCC, CR 245A.
Ceramic tile/carpet, $800 mo $800
dep (904)708-8478 App. req'd
Brick 3br/2ba Large yard, garage,
CH/A. 189 Stanley Ct. Lake City.
$950. mo + $1000 dep.
Call 386-365-8543
LOVELY 3BR/IBA Farm house
for rent. Quiet country area.
Please call after 5pm.
386-752-0017. Leave message.


73 Unfurnished
730 Home For Rent
LULU, FL 3/2 recently
remodeled. CH/A, large porches.
$650. mo + dep.
386-752-3444 or 961-3031
Remodeled 3br/2ba Brick. In town
1750 sqft. Lg lot. Includes washer,
dryer, stove, & fridge. Quiet area
$985. mo $985 dep. 386-752-7578

7 0 Business &
75 Office Rentals
FOR LEASE: Downtown office
space. Convenient to
Court house.
Call 386-755-3456
For Lease: E Baya Ave. Two -
1000 sqft office space units or
combined for 2000 sqft. 386-984-
0622 or weekends 386-497-4762
MIDTOWN COMMERCIAL
CENTER, brand new executive
suite & suite with warehouse
$600 monthly.
Call Vicki or Joe 386-935-2832.
NICE OFFICE SPACE for lease.
Oak Hill Plaza. 900 sqft
from $450 a month
Tom 386-961-1086 DCA Realtor
SUB SHOP for lease.
All Equip. Avail. Old Willy J's
Across from Wal-Mart
386-623-2244


790 Vacation Rentals
Horseshoe Beach RV Lot.
Nice comer Lot with shade trees.
$295. mo Water/electric included
386-235-3633 or 352-498-5986
Scalloping Horseshoe Beach Spcl
Gulf Front 2br, w/lg porch, dock,
fish sink. wkend $395./wk $895.
386-235-3633/352-498-5986
alwaysonvacation.com #419-181
"Florida's Last Frontier"


805 Lots for Sale
Foreclosure! 59.98 Ac. Close to
Suwannee River w/boat ramps &
Springs. Ideal parcel for your site
built or manuf. home. $139,000!
MLS# 78083 386-344-7662
Lots for Sale Eastside
Village Realty, Inc. buildable
vacant lot hight & dry in a estab-
lished neighbor priced @ $40,000.
Call Denise Bose @ 752-5290
Owner Financing. River comm &
nature lover's dream in Lee. 15
wooded ac by the Withlacoochee.
Property is already subdivided
MLS 75576 $48,000 623-6896
PUBLISHER'S NOTE
All real estate advertising in this
newspaper is subject to the fair
housing act which makes it illegal
to advertise "any preference,
limitation, or discrimination based
on race, color, religion, sex,
disability, familial status or nation-
al origin; or any intention to make
such preference, limitation or
discrimination." Familial status
includes children under the age of
18 living with parents or legal
custodians, pregnant women and
people securing custody of chil-
dren under the age of 18. This
newspaper will not knowingly
accept any advertising for real es-
tate which is in violation of the
law. Our readers are hereby in-
formed that all dwellings adver-
tised in this newspaperare availa-
ble on an equal opportunity basis.
To complain of discrimination call
HUD toll free at 1-800-669-9777,
the toll free
telephone number to the hearing
impaired is 1-800-927-9275.

810 Home for Sale

0.5 acre tract has 441 (4 lane)
frontage. 1/2 miles from Target
distribution. 2/1.5 currently zoned
residential. MLS#78506 $91,000
R.E.O. Realty Group 867-1271
2 Mobile homes on 5 ac. above
ground pool. (1)1800 sqft. &
(1)1500sqft.$235,000 $139,888
MLS 77552 Brittany Stoeckert
Results Realty 386-397-3473
3/2 Brick Home w/1 car garage,
Metal roof, porch w/swing, detach
carport $96,000 MLS#77780
Jo Lytte Remax 386-365-2821
www.jolytte.florida-property-search.corn
3/2 Split floor plan built in 2010
on 2 acres.. Master bath with large
tub & standing shower. Trey ceil-
ings MLS#78520, $114,90(0
R.E.O. Realty Group 867-1271
4/2 fenced yard,
2 car garage, Fairly new roof &
HVAC Shed, fenced back yard.
MLS#77602, $162,500, R.E.O.
Realty Group 867-1271
4/2 on 1 ac. Modular home. Im-
maculate cond. New carpet, roof,
AC. more. Barn/workshop
$115,000 MLS 78833 Brittany
Results Realty 386-397-3473
Almost 17ac., spacious 3br/2ba
home, paved rd. Near Itchetucknee
Spgs. Pole barn, gated, fenced.
MLS76902 $164,900 Brodi Allred
623-0906. Westfield Realty Group
Awesome Find! 3br/2ba, 1844sf,
wood floors, French doors to scr
back porch, 40x60 bldg w/office &
workshop, 6.17ac corner lot, 3
sides fenced. #77427 $199,900
Brick Ranch 3/2 Fl room. Side en-
try garage & workshop. 2 sheds.
New AC apple & roof. MLS78442
$114,900. Millard Gillen 365-7001
Westfield Realty Group


Charming 2br/2ba home. Gated
community. REDUCED to
$158,000 MLS78740 Teresa
Spradley 386-365-8343
Hallmark Real Estate
Clean Well maintained 3/2 brick
w/chain link fenced back yard
w/Garage. $120,K MLS78440.
Debbie King 386-365-3886
Hallmark Real Estate
Close to everything. Lg 3br/2ba
brick home. Close to VA & shop-
ping! $189,900 MLS78131 Carrie
Cason 386-623-2806
Westfield Realty Group
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
Neat & tidy 2/2, numaybe 3/2. New
kitchen counters & tile. Open floor
plan. Mary Brown Whitehurst
965-0887 MLS# 77943 $99,000


810 Home for Sale
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
10 acres w/well maintained brick
home. 2012 sqft. Open split floor
plan. Lori Giebeig Simpson
365-5678 MLS# 74447 $149,000
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
3br/3ba Spacious home in estab-
lished area. 2414 sqft. Private yard
& patio. Lori Giebeig Simpson
365-5678 MLS# 78175 $159,000
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
3br/2ba. 1590 sqft. Lori Giebeig
Simpson. 365-5678 or
Mary Brown Whitehurst
965-0887 MLS# 74542 $110,000
Country close to town 3/2 Brick 3
ac. Grape arbor & fruit trees, pole
barn, workshop. Metal roof. MLS
78096 $129,900 Ginger Parker
365-2135 Hallmark Real Estate
Country Club Condo 4br/3ba.
Mega storage, roomy kit, 3 porch-
es. $165,000 MLS 78719 Paula
Lawrence 386-623-1973
Hallmark Real Estate.
Deer in your back yard. 3/2 HUD
w/16X48 wrap around scr. porch.
Clean, well maintained, 5 ac.
$72,000 MLS78687 Ginger Parker
365-2135 Hallmark Real Estate
Foreclosure! 3/2 D/WMH boasts
a large kitchen. M/B w/ garden.
tub, shower & dbl sinks-New car-
pet-fpl & more-Only $69,995
MLS# 76920. 386-344-7662
Foreclosure! Newer 3/2 DWMH.
Lg rooms, kitchen island, lots of
wdws, master w/garden tub & sep-
arate shower. $74,995
MLS# 74218 386-344-7662
Great 3/2 home w/2346 sq ft
under roof on .67 ac., Creekside
S/D. Big back yard w/plenty of
shade trees. On a cul-de-sac, MLS
77385 $169,900 623-6896
Home for Sale Eastside Village
Realty, Inc. 2 bedroom, 2 bath site
built home with screen porch,
large carport priced just right Call
Denise Bose @ 752-5290
Home in Lake City Country Club.
4/3, renovated. Great for entertain-
ing. Glass doors open to back yard.
MLS#78637 $184,900
R.E.O. Realty Group 867-1271
JASPER! 4BR/2.5BA 1,890 SqFt
mfg home on 1 acre where
wildlife is abundant $39,900
DANIEL CRAPPS AGENCY,
INC. 755-5110 #77922
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
Suwannee Co. 115 ac. Fenced &
cross Fenced. Pasture land, paved
rd. Elaine K. Tolar 386-752-4211
MLS# 77081 $345,000(
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
.97 ac. Centrally located to Lake
City & G'ville. Fenced, planted
pines, pasture. Elaine K. Tolar
752-4211 MLS# 73879 $291,030
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
New home in May Fair. Super area
comer lot. 4br split plan. Versatile
colors. Elaine K. Tolar
755-6488 MLS# 76919 $199,900
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
240 ac. Farm. Rolling Meadows.
Paved road. great access to Latke
City & G'ville. Elaine K. Tolar
386-752-4211 MLS# 70453
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
Suwannee Co. 115 ac. Fenced &
cross fenced. 10 & 20 ac parcels
avail. Elaine K. Tolar 386-752-
4211 MLS# 67766 $448,500
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
Brick home in town on lake front.
3br/2ba. New roof & hardwoods.
Glass room w/view Elaine Tolar
755-6488 MLS# 78092 $249,900
Lake front 3/2 custom Western Ce-
dar. Lots of storage space. Private
dock $229,900. MLS# 74681
Jo Lytte-Remax 386-365-2821
www.jolytte.florida-property-search.com
Large Home in the Country on
3.66 acres, fireplace, 2 outbldgs,
MLS#76471, $89,900
Jo Lytte, Remax 386-365-2821
jolytte@remaxnfl.com
LEASE/OPTION BUY
3br/2ba Home 2010 w/garage
on 1/2 acre. Owner Financing
386-623-2244
LOCATION! CONDITION!
PRICE! 3BR/2BA w/open floor
plan; freshly painted $96,000
DANIEL CRAPPS AGENCY,
INC. 755-5110 #78278
Lofty home on Itchetucknee River,
Wrap around covered decks on
two levels.MustSEE! $375,000
MLS#77006 Jo Lytte
Remax 386-365-2821
Luxury home. 3br/2ba, 20 ac lot.
,Cherry cabinets & SS appliances.
Jacuzzi in master br. MLS 78190
$ 374,900 Roger Lovelady 365-
7039. Westfield Realty Group
Motivated Seller. Country area.
paved rd. 3br/2ba manuf home.
New AC & upgraded wdows.
MLS 78027 $84K. Brodie Allred.
623-0906 Westfield Realty Group
MOVE-IN READY! 3BR/2BA in
pristine condition on 1.39 acres
$89,900 DANIEL CRAPPS
AGENCY, INC.
755-5110 #78345


810 Home for Sale
New Reduced. 4br/2ba plus of-
fice. 2 living & dinig areas, cov-
ered porch. FI rm. Triple garage.
MLS77685 Charlie Sparks 755-
0808 Westfield Realty Group
Nice, large 4/2 on I acre
w/florida room, granite floors,
wrap around front porch, $139,900
Brittany Stoeckert Results Realty
386-397-3473 MLS 77292 '
Owner Financing. 2br/3ba country
home w/wrap around porches, 5ac.
Garage w/workshop. MLS77005
$179,900 Roger Lovelady 365-
7039 Westfield Realty Group
PRICE REDUCTION. 3/2 plus
pool house w/half bath, 2.25
fenced ac. Freshly painted. Split
plan, Large rear deck MLS 78103
$179,900 386-623-6896
PRICED TO SELL! 3BR/2BA
w/2,012 SqFt w/living rm & fami-
ly rm $57,000 DANIEL CRAPPS
AGENCY, INC.
755-5110 #78680
Private 2 ac parcel away from it
all. Hunting w/no restrictions.
Make an offer on this 1764 sqft
home that need some TLC.
$109,900, MLS78331. Jay Sears.
867-1613 Hallmark Real Estate
Reduced Price! 3br/1.5 ba. Re-
modeled. Nice area close to VA.
MLS 77599 $69K. Estate Sale,
bring all offers. Josh Grecian 466-
25 7 Westfield Realty Group
Remax Professionals Motivated
seller. Spacious brick w/many up-
grades. Newer roof, windows &
fixtures. Fenced back yard. MKS
78168 $119,900 Missy Zecher@
623-0237 www.missyzecher.com
Remax Professionals Ranch style
home on 10 ac w/bam & horse
stalls. 4 Ig bedrm + bonus rm. 2
car gar. MLS 77403 $325K.
Missy Zecher @ 386-623-0237 .
www.missyzecher.com
Rolling Meadows. 4 or 3br/2ba.
Over 1700 sqft. and 1/2 ac lot.
MLS77284 $154,900 Carrie Cason
386-623-2806
Westfield Realty Group
Something for Everyone! 3br/2ba,
2706sf, 4.02ac, island kitchen,
Corian counters, det garage, Koi
pond. fish house, green house,
fenced & more. #76255 $247,000
SPECTACULAR VIEW!
2BR/IBA, 1200sf, .65ac, scr front
porch, steps to deck/dock on Suw.
river, under house parking/storage,
shed & more. #77242 $194,900
Suwannee River Front
granite counters, covered patio,
deck & dock, $349,000
MLS#76336 Jo Lytte at Remax
Professionals. 386-365-2821
WELL-CARED FOR 4BR/2.5BA
mfg home w/formal LR plus fami-
ly rm $84,000 DANIEL CRAPPS
AGENCY, INC.
755-5110 #78585
WHITE SPRINGS! Sturdy block
3BR/IBA home in city limits,
fenced yd $49.000 DANIEL
CRAPPS AGENCY, INC.
755-5110 #78603

820 Farms &
2 Acreage
10-ac lot. Well/septic/pp. Owner
financing $300 dn, $663 mo 8.9%,
25 yrs. Deas Bullard Properties
386-752-4339 www.landnfl.com
4 1/2 acre lot. Lake Jeffery Road.
Gorgeous Oaks!Paved Rd
Owner Financing! NO DOWN!
$59,900. $525mo 352-215-1018.
www.LandOwnerFinancing.com
4 acres, Wellborn, New Well
installed. Beautifully wooded
w/cleared Home Site, owner fin,
no down. $39,900, $410 mon
Call 352-215-1018
www.LandOwnerFinancing.com
6.45 ac river front property in
White Springs, cloe to Big Shoals.
Covered shelter for entertaining.
MLS# 77417 $104,900 386-867-
1271 R.E.O. Realty Group, Inc
FARM- 7 stall barn.
17+ acres, pasture, cross fenced.
Close in $500. mo.
386-961-1086
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
61 ac. Parcel. SR 27 & 1-75 inter-
change. Great potential, fenced &
cross fenced. Elaine K. Tolar
752-4211 MLS# 758060 $368,040


820 Farms &
2 Acreage
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
40 ac.Parcel. Less then 2 mi from
city limits. Fenced road frontage
on US Hwy 441. Elaine K. Tolar
752-4211 MLS# 62092 $194K

830Q Commercial
Property
788 S. Marion Comm'l bldg on
highway frontage. Across from the
VA & near downtown.. $49,900.
MLS 78129 Scott Stewart 867-
3498 Westfield Realty Group
Commercial. High traffic location
w/I-75 exposure. 2-story custom
log home. MLS77949
Josh Grecian 386-466-2517
Westfield Realty Group
Prime Commercial Location.
Just across from a plaza. Frontage
on Baya w/2 curbcuts. $350,000
MLS# 77485 Call 386-867-1271
R.E.O.Realty Group, Inc
Remax Professionals Commercial
Property. Located on expanding
west side of Lake City. Professio-
nal service or restaurant. MLS
77436 $575k Missy Zecher 386-
623-0237 www.missyzecher.com
Wellborn Commercial lot. 1.84
acres w/34' of Hwy frontage near
the new Dollar General. MLS
72381 Scott Stewart 386-867-3498
Westfield Realty Group

K86 Investment
8O6 Property
Rustic Fishing camp in Suwannee
Minutes to boat launch.
MLS#78709 $59,900
Jo Lytte/Remax 386-365-2821
www.jolytte.florida-property-search.com

870 Real Estate
SWanted

I Buy Houses
CASH!
Quick Sale Fair Price
386-269-0605


950 Cars for Sale

FORD MUSTANG 2009
V-6, Auto., Silver.
40k miles Loaded. $17.500.
386-752-4850


3BR/2B brick home with inground pool. Corner lot, formal living-
room, large den, double garage. 265 S. Thurman MLS 76786
$99,900

Call Jessica Sheely .
SMARTER. BOLDER. FASTER
(386)288-2403 THE DARBY-ROGERS CO.


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