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The Lake City reporter
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028308/01650
 Material Information
Title: The Lake City reporter
Uniform Title: Lake City reporter (Lake City, Fla. 1967)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: John H. Perry
Place of Publication: Lake City Fla
Publication Date: 9/1/2011
Frequency: daily (monday through friday)[<1969>-]
weekly[ former 1967-<1968>]
daily
normalized irregular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Lake City (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Columbia County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Columbia -- Lake City
Coordinates: 30.189722 x -82.639722 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 95, no. 4 (Oct. 5, 1967)-
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000358016
oclc - 33283560
notis - ABZ6316
lccn - sn 95047175
sobekcm - UF00028308_01569
System ID: UF00028308:01650
 Related Items
Preceded by: Lake City reporter and Columbia gazette

Full Text





Missing link After Irene
Easement sought East Coast
for connector struggling
000016 120511 ***3-DIGIT 326 o recover.
Li OF FLORIDA HISTORY
P S BOX 117007side, 6A
GLNESV I"L 32611-1943


Home opener
Richardson Middle
School hosts Green
Cove Springs.
Sports, I B


Lake


City


Reporter


Thursday, September 1, 2011


www.lakecityreporter.com


Vol. 137, No. 186 0 75 cents


Armed robber fires shot, flees


Suspect taken
into custody; no
injuries reported.
By TONY BRITT
tbritt@lakecityreporter.com
An armed robber who held
up a man at a local ATM then
fired a shot before fleeing early



$1.7M in

housing

grants on

the way

By TONY BRITT
tbritt@lakecityreporter.com
Columbia County will soon
receive at least $1.7 million in
federal grants to improve the local
housing situation.
The county was award-
ed a $705,000 Community
Development Block Grant (Small
Cities grant) for single fanm-
ily housing and re-development.
The grant is federally funded by
the Department
of Housing
and Urban
Development.
SFunds go to
the Florida
Department
of Community
Krauss Affairs, which
distributes them
to the county.
The grant funds were awarded
the county for rehabilitation for
low and moderate income families
of single family residential hous-
es. County officials began taking
applications in January.
"Based on our housing assis-
tance plan, we prioritized the dis-
abled, the elderly and people with
children and tried to help," said
David Kraus, Columbia County
senior staff assistant. 'The prob-
lem was we received $705,000
total, but we've gotten over 70
applications. So there is a whole
lot more need than there are
funds."
County staff started home
inspections for administering the
funds close to two weeks ago.
"In a week or so we'll be going
out to bid on the first four or
five houses as well as the water
connections in Ellisville," Kraus
said. "The single-family' rehabili-
tation grant is for anybody living
in the unincorporated area of the
county. Included in.that $705,000
is money for people to hook-on to
water in Ellisville. There are still
funds for people to hook up to
water in Ellisville. With the single
family rehab, we'll probably run
out of funds and not be able to
fund all the houses."
He said local officials hIave
started working with the USDA
on some of that agency's pro-
grams, so if residents don't qualify
for the county's program they can
apply there.
"We're trying to coordinate the
two programs in order to leverage
our money," Kraus said. "We're
trying to help people if they fit
into those programs and maybe
get additional funding in case they

HOUSING continued on 3A


Wednesday was apprehended
hours later at a local motel,
according to police.
Johnny B. Robinson, 20, 352
NW Knight Ave., Lake City, was
charged with robbery while armed
and possession of a firearm during
the commission of a felony. He
faces additional charges in connec-
tion with other crimes in Columbia
County, authorities say.


By ANTONIA ROBINSON
arobinson@lakecityreporter.com
The Lake City Fire Department's annual
"Fill the Boot" campiaimi starts Friday and
runs through Sept. 5.
Firefighters will be at the intersections
of U.S. 90 and Branford llig1hi;l. and U.S.
90 and Bascom Norris collhctiig dona-


According to Lake City Police
Department reports, around 7
a.m. Wednesday officers were dis-
patched to the Bank of America
branch office at 2357 West US 90
in reference to a robbery.
Officers spoke to the victim,
who was near the bank's ATM
when they arrived. The victim
told authorities that a small, green,
Dodge truck parked next to him


and he was then
approached by a
white man wear-
ing an "object"
over his face.
Capt. John
Blanchard,
Lake City Police
Robinson Department
public information officer, said
authorities are unsure what the


tions to benefit flw Muscular Dystrophy
Association, said fir-.figlitr Gramby Croft
and MDA boot drive coordinator.
"Any amount, big or siimall. (is needed),"
he said.
Last year the fire department raised
'-,,:-'s. This year's .gi,al is .Ii i1
"We're upping -our goal, and really need
the support of the community," Croft said..


Stocks edged higher for a fourth straight day Wednesday on a
report that factory orders surged in July. The Dow's winning streak
ended a tumultuous August that included four consecutive days of
swings of 400 points or more, a first in the history of the index. This
image is from August 5.


By TONY BRITT
tbtitt@lakecityreporter. corn
Columbia County officials are
set to purchase a CSX Railroad
easement ihlII will put the county
closer to completing the Bascom
Norris Connector Road project.
County officials will dis-
cuss )purchasing the 'easement
at tonight's 7 p.m. Columbia
County Conummission meeting
at the Columbia County School
Board Administrative Complex
Auditorium, 372 W. Duval St.
Dale Williams, county mnanag-
er, said the easement is required


suspect was wearing when the
robbery was committed..
"We do know it was white, but
we are not sure what was over his'
face," he said.
The suspect demanded the vic-
tim's money and the victim gave
him his wallet.
The robber, reportedly armed
ROBBERY continued on 3A


Each shift at the station will compete to
see who raises the most money.
Money raised from the drive will help
in several ways, such as sending local
children to MDA c:,mp, purchasing wheel-
chairs or paying for doctor's visits.
"The money the majority of the time
goes to children in the community," he
said.


as part of the
Bascom Norris
S project.
"The ease-
-" ment will allow
over the (CSX)
Wlm railroad," he
Williams said. "It's an
easement that
we have to pay for."
The county is considering
offering CSX railroad $50,007 for
ilu 1.64 acres. The offer is based
on property appraisals.
CSX continued on 3A


CALL US:
(386) 752-1293
SUBSCRIBE TO
THE REPORTER:
Voice: 755-5445
1 424 01 Fax: 752-9400


93
Isolated T-Storms
WEATHER, 2A


O pinion ................
People..................
Obituaries ..............
Advice & Comics........
Puzzles ............... ..


TODAY IN
PEOPLE
'Fright Night'
in Europe.


COMING
FRIDAY
Full county
comm. coverage.


Firefighter Gramby Croft encourages the community to help the Lake City Fire Department "Fill the Boot" for Muscular Dystrophy Association.


Firefighters booting up for MD drive


County looks to CSX

for Bascom easement










LAKE CITY REPORTER DAILY BRIEFING THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 1, 2011


Wednesday:
Afternoon: 5-0-2
Evening: N/A


Wednesday:
Afternoon: 1-8-6-6
Evening: N/A


.. .r .

Tuesday:
13-15-17-28-34


PEOPLE IN THE NEWS


'Fright Night'
LONDON
Cast members of the com-
edy horror flick "Fright
Night" said they are
"bummed" by the film's
poor performance in the
United States and are looking for
redemption in Europe.
The film features Colin Farrell as
a vampire who goes after neighbors
who discover his secret. It took in
less than $10 million in its U.S. open-
ing weekend, placing fifth behind
films including "The Help" and "Rise
of the Planet of the Apes."
"If it sucked, we would have been
like 'alright' you know? But we
both like it a lot," Yelchin said of the
movie.
Christopher Mintz-Plasse said he
hoped the Craig Gillespie-directed
film described as a reimaginingg"
of the 1985 cult classic of the same
name will take a bigger bite out
of the European market when it
swoops into cinemas later this week.
"We were just proud of it and we
wanted people to see it. But maybe it
will have life on a DVD or something
or out here. But the critics loved it
and my family and friends loved it,
so that's important."
With solid reviews, Disney execu-
tives thought "Fright Night" would
offer a good mix of scares and
laughs for fans in their late teens and
early 20s.
But Disney distribution boss Dave
Hollis said "Fright Night" fell victim
to an issue that has troubled studios
all summer: How do you bring out
younger crowds when they have
so many personal entertainment
options, from video games to down-
loading movies? *

Rapper T.I. released
from prison month early
ATLANTA Atlanta-based rapper
T.I. has been released one month
early from a U.S. prison, where he
was serving a weapons violation sen-


flick seeks Europe success


Celebrity Birthdays


* Former Defense Secretary
Melvin R. Laird is 89.
* Actor George Maharis is
83.
* Conductor Seiji Ozawa is
76.
* Attorney and law professor
Alan Dershowitz is 73.
* Comedian-actress Lily
Tomlin is 72.
* Actor Don Stroud is 68.


* Conductor Leonard Slatkin
is 67.
* Singer Archie Bell is 67.
* Talk show host Dr. Phil
McGraw is 61.
* Singer Gloria Estefan is 54.
* Jazz musician Boney
James is 50.
* Actor Ricardo Antonio
Chavira ("Desperate
Housewives") is 40.


Daily Scripture
"Come, let us bow down in
worship, let us kneel before the
Lord our Maker."
Psalm 95:6

Thought for Today
"Tradition is what you resort to
when you don't have the time
or the money to do it right."
King Louis XIV,
King of France (1638-1715)


In this file film image released by Disney-DreamWorks Pictures, Anton Yelchin is
shown in a scene from the horror film 'Fright Night.'


tence.
Bureau of Prisons

Burke said the
artist, whose real
name is Clifford
Harris, was released
Harris Wednesday morn-
ing from the Forrest
City low-security prison in Arkansas.
The rapper was sentenced to 11
months in prison in October for
breaking his federal probation after
he was arrested in Los Angeles on
drug charges.

Franco drops out of
making Broadway debut
NEW YORK James Franco
can't make time for Broadway.
Publicist Robin
Baum confirmed
Tuesday that the
workaholic actor
has dropped out of
a planned produC-
tion of the steamy
Tennessee Williams
Franco play "Sweet Bird of


Youth."
It was to mark Franco's Broadway
debut and would have created one
of the hottest tickets of the season
because he was to be paired with
Nicole Kidman, who is still on board.

Gibson to pay ex $750K
to settle legal fight
, LOS ANGELES Mel Gibson
will pay $750,000 to his ex-girlfriend
and continue to provide housing and
financial support for their ypung
daughter to resolve a bitter legal
fight that followed sexist, racist rants
attributed to the actor.
The settlement disclosed
Wednesday is intended to end the
bickering and accusations that have
permeated the case handled in most-
ly secret proceedings for more than
a year, Judge Peter Lichtman said.
Gibson's payments to Russian
musician Oksana Grigorieva are
dependent on a lasting truce. Their
daughter will receive support equal.
to what the actor-director provides
for his other seven children.
* Associated Press


Lake City
HOW TO REACH US
Main number ........(386) 752-1293
Fax number .............752-9400
Circulation ..............755-5445
Online... www.lakecityreporter.com
The Lake City Reporter, an affiliate of
Community Newspapers Inc., is pub-
lished Tuesday through Sunday at 180
E. Duval St., Lake City, Fla. 32055.
Periodical postage paid at Lake City, Fla.
Member Audit Bureau of Circulation and
The Associated Press.
All material herein Is property of the Lake
City Reporter. Reproduction in whole or
In part is forbidden without the permis-
sion of the publisher. U.S. Postal Service
No. 310-880.
POSTMASTER: Send address changes
to Lake City Reporter, P.O. Box 1709,
Lake City, Fla. 32056.
Publisher Todd Wilson..... 754-0418
(twlsown@lakecityreporter.com)
NEWS
Editor Robert Bridges .....754-0428
(rbridges@lakecityreporter.com)
ADVERTISING
Director Ashley Butcher .. .754-0417
(abutcher@lakecltyreporter.com)
CLASSIFIED
To place a classified ad, call 755-5440


Reporter

BUSINESS
Controller Sue Brannon.... 754-0419
(sbrannon@lakecityreporter.com)
CIRCULATION
Home delivery of the Lake City Reporter
should be completed by 630 a.m.
Tuesday through Saturday, and by 7:30
a.m. on Sunday.
Please call 386-755-5445 to report any
problems with your delivery service.
In Columbia County, customers should
call before 1030 a.m. to report a ser-
vice error for same day re-delivery. After
1030 a.m., next day re-delivery or serl
vice related credits will be issued.
In all other counties where home delivery
is available, next day re-delivery or ser-
vice related credits will be issued.
Circulation ..............755-5445
(circulation@lakecityreporter.com)
Home delivery rates
(Tuesday through Sunday)
12 Weeks.................. $26.32
24 Weeks ................. ..$48.79
52 Weeks.................. $83.46
Rates indude 7% sales tax
Mall rates
12 Weeks ................ $41.40
24 Weeks ............... $82.80
52 Weeks..................$179.40


CORRECTION

The Lake City Reporter corrects errors of fact in news
items. If you have a concern, question or suggestion, please
call the executive editor. Corrections and clarifications will run
in this space. And thanks for reading.


Health officials
report swine flu
TAVARES Florida
health officials said an
80-year-old woman has
died after contracting the
swine flu.
Lake County Health
Department spokeswoman
Sheri Hutchinson con-
firmed the death Tuesday.
She said the woman
had recently traveled to
California so it is difficult
to determine whether she
picked up the virus during
her trip or in Florida.
Hutchinson said this
is Lake County's first
Swine Flu death this
year. She said officials
were "shocked" because
flu cases including the
swine flu are typically
diagnosed in the fall and
winter.

'Out of control'
man bites officer
PANAMA CITY-
Authorities said a police
officer was knocked down
and bitten by a man who
had been asked to leave a
homeless shelter.
Officials at the Panama
City Rescue Mission said
Karim Bien-Aime, 31, had
an altercation with staff
members Tuesday after-
noon and was asked to
leave. Executive Director
Billy Fox said the man was
"out of control."
Police said Bien-Aime
hit an officer in the eye,
knocked him to the
ground and bit him on the
head. The officer, who was
not identified, was treated
at the scene.
Officers used a stun-gun
to subdue the man, who
fell to the ground and hit
his head on the concrete.

Election law may
have been violated
TALLAHASSEE A
Central Florida state sena-
tor is dealing with charges


ASSOCIATED PRESS

A woman's best friend
Pamela Kent (right) gives resident Gertrude Suess a hug dur-
ing their visit at Newport Place senior residence in Boynton
Beach on Tuesday.


that he may have violated
state election laws.
The Florida Elections
Commission concluded
earlier this month there is
probable cause that Sen.
Gary Siplin, D-Orlando,
broke the law during his
2008 reelection campaign.
Siplin spent $13,000 in
campaign funds on poll
workers without disclos-
ing who was paid the
money. He is also accused
of exceeding campaign
finance limits when he
accepted two campaign
checks from the same
group.

More deputies to
fight drug abuse
DADE CITY -The
Pasco County Sheriff said
he wants more deputies
to help fight prescription
drug abuse.
Sheriff Chris Nocco told
Pasco County commission-
ers Tuesday he needs $1.6
million to create 23 jobs
as his office continues to
battle what he called a pre-
scription pill war.
The new jobs would be
broken down like this:
three analysts to help spot
trends, 12 officers to be
split into two squads to
fight prescription drugs


and eight nurses to handle
an increasing number of
inmates with drug issues.
Commissioners acknowl-
edged that prescription
abuse is a growing prob-
lem while expressing con-
cern about paying for the
additional positions.

Officer in drug
case missing
MIAMI U.S.
Marshals are searching for
a South Florida police offi-
cer who has gone missing
with trial looming on drug
charges.
Officials say Boynton
Beach officer David Britto,
28, removed his ankle
monitor and has broken
house arrest and a curfew.
Britto was arrested in July
on federal methamphet-
amine conspiracy charges.
Trial is set for next
month in Miami. Britto has
pleaded not guilty.
Britto was Bo'ynton
Beach's officer of the year
in 2010 and is a former
Marine. He has been on
paid administrative leave
since his arrest.
Britto's attorney said
he hopes the officer will
report back to authorities.
* Associated Press


THE WEATHER


OLATED PARTLY VIOLATEDD
-STORMS CLOUDY STORMS


HI193LO 70 Hi193 L70 HI92 LO71


Peonsacola
93/76


Friday
7. 75 pC
88/74/t
88/77/t
91/75/t
92/70/pc
89/77/s
90/80/t
93/70/pc
89/76/t
88/75/t
92/71/pc
91/73/t
88/75/t
90/75/t
92/71/pc
90/75/t
94/69/pc
88/75/t


Saturday
87, 74 pc
90/73/pc
88/79/t
93/74/t
91/71/pc
89/77/pc
89/80/t
92/71/pc
88/79/t
90/77/t
91/72/t
91/74/pc
87/76/t
89/76/t
92/73/t
86/76/t
92/71/t
88/76/t


An exclusive
service
brought to
our readers
by
The Weather
Channel.



weather.com


p91/11


Tn *aT


o9/


TEMPERATURES
High Wednesday
Low Wednesday
Normal high
Normal low
Record high
Record low

PRECIPITATION
Wednesday
Month total
Year total
Normal month-to-date
Normal year-to-date


93
74
89
70
96 in 1983
60 in 1891


0.00"
3.17"
26.56"
6.63"
36:76"


Miando Cape Canaveral Key West
0/74 87/75 Lake City
Miami
S Naples


West Panlm Beach Ocala
88/76 0 Orlando
*, Ft Lauderdale Panama City
Ft Mye~ 89/76 Pensacola
89/74 *Naples Tallahassee
89/76 Miami Tampa
Key West 89/78 Valdosta
90/82 W. Palm Beach
90/82


SUN
Sunrise today 7:07 a.m.
Sunset today 7:53 p.m.
Sunrise torn. 7:08 a.m.
Sunset tom. 7:52 p.m.

MOON
Moonrise today 11:01 a.m.
Moonset today 10:11 p.m.
Moonrise torn. 12:09 p.m.
Moonset tom. 10:58 p.m.

0*)03
Sept. Sept. Sept. Sept.
4 12 20 27
First Full Last New


10 niest h bun
Today's
ultra-violet
radiation risk
for the area on
a scale from 0
to 10+,


AV t Forecasts, data and
;4 graphics 0 2011 Weather
S I I Central, LP, Madison, Wis.
WeatherJ www.weatherpubllsher.com


7a lp 7p la 6a
Thursday Friday







"-Fmastd temruture "F.sHe temperature
"ii~rii~iTTir~i -iiriij -iiim -im - -~ii~~rii


AROUND FLORIDA


.W . ?. *City
'0 L *J Cape Canaveral
Tallahassee* LakeCit* 9/74 Daytona Beach
94/71 93/70 B Ft. Lauderdale
G besle Daytona Beach Fort Myers
epa...c, 92/71 8J774
atmaCity 2/71 c Gainesville
90/75 Ocala Jacksonville
"-z,"... Jacksonville


I


THUR S '


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Page Editor: Jason M. Walker, 754-0430


SA R


15^^


LAKE CITY ALMANAC


11 L'Mm"!-0=IEm. ...-olm


I










LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 1, 2011


CSX: County needs easement for Bascom-Noris Connector Road project

Continued From Page 1A


"We're planning to go
over the top of the railroad,
which limits the railroad's
use of their own proper-
ty and we have to pay for
that," Williams said, noting
the county has been work-
ing on securing the ease-
ment for months.
If the county is able to
secure the easement, it will
have to secure two addition-
al parcels of property to con-
tinue work on the connector
road. County officials con-
tinue to be optimistic that
the construction work asso-
ciated with the final phase of
the project can begin within
the next 45 days.
In other business, the
Commission is scheduled
to:
,* Accept a check from
a Suwannee River Water
Management District rep-
resentative as part of the
Payment in Lieu of Taxes
program. The program
gives' money for proper-
ty that was taken off the
tax rolls. County officials
expect for the check, which


is given annually, to be at
least $40,000;
Schedule four public


hearings dealing with non
Ad Valorem assessments,
including the fire protec-


tion and solid waste assess-
ments. The county is not
proposing any increases in


ROBBERY: Local man arrested

Continued From Page 1A


with a pistol, fired in the
direction of the victim
before fleeing the scene,
authorities say.
"A round had been dis-
charged and ricocheted off the
pavement next to the victim's
car," Blanchard said, noting
neither the vehicle nor victim
was struck. "We are only sure
of one shot being fired."'
Authorities issued a Be On
the Look Out alert for the
suspect and the truck he was
driving shortly after 7 a.m.
Colunmbia County Sheriff's
deputy Slade McCardle
found a truck that matched
the description of the sus-
pect's vehicle at the Jasmine
Garden Inn parking lot, 352
NW Knights Ave.
Other law enforcement


authorities also spoke to
Robinson at the motel, who said
he was driving the truck
"Robinson and the truckwere
identified by the victim as being
the robber and suspect vehicle,"
Blanchard said, noting Robinson
has been staying in Room 209
there for some time.
It is not clear if Robinson
was arrested at the motel or
following a later interview at
the police department.
Authorities served a search
warrant on the room and the
vehicle and reportedly found
items in the room associ-
ated with local burglaries.
Blanchard said the Columbia
County Sheriffs Office is inves-
tigating into those crimes.
"The gun used in the
robbery and shooting was


located inside the suspect's
truck and taken into evi-
dence," Blanchard said.
"We do not want to disclose
the type of gun because the
investigation is ongoing into
other crimes unrelated to
the robbery. We did recover
the gun that was used in the
crime and more than one
gun was recovered."
Lake City Police Sgt.
Investigator Andy Miles
conducted an interview with
Robinson, who confessed to
the robbery and shooting,
according to Blanchard.
Robinson was booked
into the Columbia County
Detention Facility without
bond.
Additional charges may
be pending, say police.


those rates.
Review the proposed
solid waste collection con-


tract agreement with Veolia
to provide waste collection
services in the county.


HOUSING: Grants total $1.7 million

Continued From Page IA


don't get funded through the CDBG."
Up to 30 water connections to the
Ellisville Utility will ,be funded by the
CDBG grant and up to 10 houses will be
brought*up to code through the single fam-
ily rehabilitation grant funding.
The county is also hoping to help
residents through funds from the
Neighborhood Stabilization Grant.
"We've been awarded the grant and we
are awaiting the state to send us the grant
award letter for us to execute and begin
the grant award program," Kraus said.
The Neighborhood Stabilization Grant
is for $1,022,843. Once the county gets
the award letter, officials have one year to
spend at least half of the funds to acquire
the properties. There is also a requirement
the county purchase seven properties in
the affected area.
"The funding is for the purchase of bank-
owned properties," Kraus said. "Basically,
the property has been foreclosed on and
the bank has taken over. The purpose of


the grant is to stabilize a neighborhood by
buying these vacant, foreclosed-on proper-
ties, fixing them up and getting them back
onto the market."
When the sales are completed and the
homes updated, 50 percent of them will
have to be rental properties, and of those
rental units, 25 percent must be made
available to very low income residents.
Another 25 percent of the homes will
be available to moderate to low income
rental units, with the remaining 50 per-
cent available for purchase and renova-
tion and resale to families with moderate
to low incomes.
"We're stabilizing the neighborhood by
not leaving these properties vacant and
we're also helping low and moderate fami-
lies by providing both purchase properties
and rental units," Kraus said.
The target area for purchasing the hous-
es stretches from the downtown area to
Country Club Road west to County Road
252.


THE WOOD STOVE
AND iNRPLCR3 CENTER
OPEN: M-F 9:30-5:30
611 N. Main Street Gainesville
1-800-524-2675
awww'I' woodL stoefl IZ *l*h [llo i ei o


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LENDER


Page Editor: Robert Bridges, 754-0428















OPINION


Thursday, September 1, 201 1


www.lakecityreporter.com


ONE


ONE
OPINION


Paying

your

neighbor's

mortgage


wanted homes
on the market, with
unending foreclo-
sures in some parts
of the country, is a serious drag
holding.back any chance of
economic recovery. Instead of
eating our peas as President
Obama lectured Americans to
do and letting the market find
its equilibrium, the administra-
tion is looking for an easy, tem-
porary way out of the problem
through modified mortgages
for underwater homeowners. It
won't work.
The Obama administration
wants to let millions of hom-
eowners with government-
backed mortgages refinance
their loans at current low rates,
which are about 4 percent A
v very large percentage of those
loans are underwater, and the
homeowners couldn't get lower
rates without government inter-
vention. The White House is
acting as if forced refinancing is
a free lunch. It's not
This is a Hail Mary pass that
won't work. There is little evi-
dence that lowering payments
reduces the risk of default and
foreclosure. If that were indeed
the case, private lenders would
have an incentive to modify
mortgages, which they aren't
doing on a massive scale. It's
also not clear why irrespon-
sible people who bought larger
houses than they could afford
should be rewarded with cheap-
er mortgages than the market
is willing to provide.
The bottom line is, unem-
ployment has a far greater
impact on default risk than
monkeying with mortgages. If
millions of jobless Americans
had work, they.wouldn't be
defaulting on their Joans. To
create jobs, government needs
to cut spending and red tape so
the private sector has the con-
fidence to invest in new hires.
Washington bureaucrats won't
outsmart the market. Instead,
they need to let the housing
market find its bottom, which
is when recovery can begin.
Anything else simply pro-
longs the pain and this Great
Recession.
The Washington Times

Lake City Reporter
Serving Columbia County
Since 1874
The Lake City Reporter is pub-
- lished with pride for residents of
Columbia and surrounding counties by
Community Newspapers Inc.
We believe strong newspapers build
strong communities -"Newspapers
get things done!"
Our primary goal is to
publish distinguished and profitable
community-oriented newspapers.
This mission will be accomplished
through the teamwork of professionals
dedicated to truth, integrity and hard
work.
Todd Wilson, publisher .
Robert Bridges, editor
Sue Brannon, controller
Dink NeSmith, president
Tom Wood, chairman

LETTERS
POLICY
Letters to the Editor should be
typed or neatly written and double
spaced. Letters should not exceed
400 words and will be edited for
length and libel. Letters must be
signed and include the writer's name,
address and telephone number for
verification. Writers can have two
letters per month published. Letters
and guest columns are the opinion of
the writers and not necessarily that of
the Lake City Reporter.


BY MAIL: Letters, P.O. Box 1709,
Lake City, FL 32056; or drop off at
180 E. Duval St. downtown.
BY FAX: (386) 752-9400.
BY E-MAIL:
news@lakecityreporter.com


Wow! I didn't see that coming!


Sometimes we're blind-
sided by a hurricane
like last week's Irene,
by some other disas-
ter, or just by a curve
that life throws at us. With
Irene, we in Florida dodged a
bullet But, what about the sur-
prise waiting for us around the
corner? Surprise can be fun,
but when we're unprepared and
are hit with a serious situation,
we may retreat in fear or jump
in without thinking and make it
worse. What can we do?
Decide to be prepared. That
was the scout motto. We can
take steps needed to meet
unexpected challenges, and
adopt an attitude of "I can do
this!" "Bring it on!"
Take some time to notice
signs around us- like situations
or problems that could become
serious problems, crises, or
disasters.
Talk with your family,
friends, neighbors, or those you
work with. In Florida, we face
hurricane season every year.
Six years ago, four dying hur-
ricanes crossed north central
Florida. Suddenly there were
lakes where before there were
prairies! Who would have fore-
seen the damaging earthquake
in Mineral, Virginia? Will one
of our local thunderstorms
cause us to lose power for an


Robert Denny
Bob.Denny8@gmoil.com


afternoon, or a week? Will a
plane crash in our county? Or,
could a wildfire threaten our
homes and force us to flee or
relocate? These are real pos-
sibilities.
What could you do to be pre-
pared? Do you have a disaster
plan, and a disaster kit fresh
and ready to go? Your local
Emergency Operations Center
could answer your questions
and provide information. On
the web, you can find lots of
'information.
Get to know resources in your
area: your local fire station, emer-
gency operations center, and
the sheriffs station. Volunteer
fire stations often have pancake
breakfasts. Sheriff's Deputies
teams use volunteers to check on
the aged population, and those
disabled or chronically ill Each
has volunteer opportunities,
and regularly needs your help.
Especially in an emergency situ-
ation!


Educate yourself. Homeland
Security, FEMA, and your clos-
est Community Emergency
Response Team (CERT) offer
classes on disaster prepara-
tion, and can use your help
in disaster situations where
agencies may be overextended.
How about joining a commu-
nity group like Neighborhood
Watch?
Build a communication net-
work with friends, relatives,
and close neighbors. In crisis
situations, it's often individual
citizens that rise up to help.
When trained and prepared,
they can be most effective.
You may find that prepar-
ing for tough times not only is
of tremendous value to your
community and neighbors,
but that it can build your own
competence, confidence, and
well being. As a caring per-
son, you'll want to be ready, to
help out, and to be part of the
solution instead of part of the
problem. If you've already pre-
pared yourself or helped your
community, we all thank you
for your service!

* Robert Denny is a licensed
.mental health therapist, and
teaches psychology at Florida
Gateway College in Lake City.
Comments welcome at Bob.
Denny8@gmail.com.


Romney's right about corporations


Here's what I want
readers to do.
Put your hands
together with
fingers interlaced
and pointing downwards next
to your palms and bring the
heels of the palms together.
Then stick your two index
fingers and thumbs up until
the next to last paragraph
while I talk to you about cor-
porations, Republican Mitt
Romney and a widespread
misconception.
It's that corporations are
reptiles. Recently, when presi-
dential candidate Romney was
confronted by Democratic'
demonstrators, he said taxing
corporations is taxing people,
that corporations are people.
Though he happens to have
made millions as a corporate
whiz, many responded with
derision, including a TV report-
er who committed a gaffe by
calling it a gaffe.
Please. Someone or some-
thing has to own those corpora-
tions, run them and work in
them. The only creatures we
know of with enough brain-
power are people, unless there
is such a thing as corporate-
caused Darwinian devolution,
leaving these souls with rough,
green skin, long tails, sharp
teeth and barely more alertness
than TV reporters.
In truth, when corporations
go broke and close down, lots


Jay Ambrose
Speaktojay@aol.com


,of everyday Americans (aka,
people) find themselves unem-
ployed.
It's also the case that people
continue to be full-fledged citi-
zens in an association. Many
corporations are small, non-
profit and sometimes organized
as a means of people having
their rightful say in public
affairs.
That brings us to the next
reason for saying corporations
are not people the political
objective of dehumanizing
them, of making it seem that
while government is by, of and
for the people, corporations
are sly, alien and against the
people, commonly led by CEOs
with marginal homo sapiens
ratings.
Let's concede some CEOs
behave atrociously while add-
ing that you can also find vil-
lains among legislators, TV
reporters, columnists, you
name it.
But you really don't under-
stand American politics if you
don't get it that pleasing voters


is a more significant determi-
nant of action -. that the gov-
ernment delivers considerable
pain to corporations and that
the main reason for cronyism is
intrusiveness.
Corporations are primarily
friends, providing us with such
desirables as food, clothing,
shelter, the highest productiv-
ity of any nation in the world
and wages (aka, money).
Government coercively takes
much of that money to spend
wastefully. Fiscal recklessness
now has us in one of the most
threatening predicaments of
recent times.
Now, let's come back to
those two hands of yours, say-
ing first off that some may
think of churches as just build-
ings. Not so. Recall the child-
hood rhyme, saying, "Here's
the church, here's the, steeple,"
and then turn your hands
upside down with the fingers
sticking in the air and conclude,
"open the doors and see all the
people."
People good people, people
you know, maybe you your-
self, definitely the errant TV
reporter also constitute cor-
porations.

* Jay Ambrose, formerly
Washington director of editorial
policy for Scripps Howard news-
papers and the editor of dailies in
El Paso, Texas, and Denver, is a
columnist living in Colorado.


Dale McFeatters
mcfeattersd@shns.com



Gadhafi's

daughter

is alive

after all

f further evidence .is
needed that Moammar
Gadhafi is a loathsome
individual, here's more:
There's growing and
compelling evidence that he
lied about the death of Hana,
his adopted baby daughter,
in a 1986 U.S. airstrike on his
personal compound, the same.
one just overrun by the rebels.
The airstrike was in retalia-
tion for the bombing by Libyan
operatives of a Berlin disco
popular with American service-
men, and indeed two U.S. sol-
diers were killed in that attack.
Even after the 1988 bomb-
ing of a Pan Am flight over
Scotland that killed 270 people,
Libyan propagandists suggest-
ed it was partially in revenge
for the death of Hana. From
time to time, Gadhafi exhib-
ited a photo of a dead baby he
claimed was her.
(In another development
that raised eyebrows, the only
person convicted in that bomb-
ing, Abdel Baset al-Megrahi,
was released from a Scottish
prison in 2009 on the humani-
tarian grounds that he had
only three months to live.
He returned to Tripoli and a
hero's welcome, and is still
alive, although now he appar-
ently really is dying.)
Gadhafi had rio qualms about
invoking Hana when he wanted
to appear a more sympathetic
figure. In 2006, the Libyan
leader held the "Hana Festival
for Freedom and Peace" featur-
ing big-name entertainment to
commemorate the 20th anniver-
sary of her death.
However, records showed
that a Hana Gadhafi studied
English at the British Council
in Tripoli in 2007 and 2009.
Hana may have enjoyed the
secret thrill of Tom Sawyer
and Huck Finn in effectively
attending her own memorial
service.
In Gadhafi's compound the
rebels found photos of a young
woman identified as Hana,
including one taken in 1999
with, her stepsister, Aisha, who
just escaped to Algeria, having
a baby along the way.
It seems the adult Hana was
a newly graduated surgeon at
the Tripoli Medical Center,
where the director said she
became increasingly tense
and nervous as the rebels
approached and fled the hos-
pital last Friday. She has not
been seen since and was not
with the family contingent that
fled to Algeria.
The Associated Press
reports that many Libyans
never believed she was dead
and that it was "common
knowledge" that she had not
been killed in the air raid.
Gadhafi's cynicism in
exploiting the fictitious death
of his child is breathtaking,
but perhaps that's what it takes
to be a truly ruthless dictator.
Mohammed Ammar, who
told AP that his cousin attend-
ed medical school with Hana,
said, "It is not surprising he
would lie about his child's
death. He was capable of kill-
ing a whole population, why
not his own child?"
Let's hope the rebels cap-
ture him soon before he can
escape to enjoy the hospitality
of another like-minded despot.

* Dale McFeatters is editorial
writer for Scripps Howard News
Service.


4A











LAKE CITY REPORTER NATIONAL THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 1, 2011


U.S. sues to block AT&T, T-Mobile merger


By JOELLE TESSLER and
PETE YOST
Associated Press

WASHINGTON The
Justice Department filed
suit Wednesday to block
AT&Ts $39 billion deal
to buy T-Mobile USA on
grounds that it would raise
prices for consumers.
The government con-
tends that the acquisition
of the No. 4 wireless car-
rier in the country by No. 2
AT&T would reduce com-
petition and that would lead
to price increases.
At a news conference,
Deputy Attorney General
James Cole said the combi-
nation would result in "tens
of millions of consumers
all across the United States
facing higher prices, fewer
choices and lower quality
products for mobile wire-
less services."
The lawsuit seeks to
ensure that everyone can
continue to receive the
benefits of competition,
said Cole.
AT&T said it would fight
and ask for an expedited
court hearing "so the enor- -
mous benefits of this merg-
er can be fully reviewed."
The company said the gov-
ernment "has the burden
of proving alleged anti-
competitive effects, and we
intend to vigorously contest
this matter in court."
Four nationwide pro-
viders Verizon,. AT&T,
T-Mobile and Sprint -
account for more than 90
percent of mobile wireless
connections.
T-Mobile has been an
important source of com-
petition, including through
innovation and quality
enhancements such as the
roll-out of the first nation-
wide high-speed data net-
work, according to Sharis
Pozen, acting chief of
Justice's antitrust division.
Mobile wireless telecom


ASSOCIATED PRESS
This file combination photo displays logos for AT&T, left, and Deutsche Telekom AG. The Justice Department filed suit Wednesday to block AT&T's $39 billion
deal to buy T-Mobile USA on grounds that it would raise prices for consumers.


services play an increasing
role in day-to-day communi-
cations, with more than 300
million smart phones, data
cards, tablets and other
mobile wireless devices in
use.
Deutsche Telekom, the
owner of T-Mobile, had no
immediate comment.
The proposed cash-and-
stock transaction would
catapult AT&T past Verizon
Wireless to become the
nation's largest wireless
provider, and leave Sprint
Nextel Corp. as a distant
number three.
In a statement, Sprint said
the Justice Department's


lawsuit "delivered a deci-
sive victory for consumers,
competition and our coun-
try. By filing suit to block
AT&Ts proposed takeover
of T-Mobile, the DOJ has
put consumers' interests
first." .
AT&T and T-Mobile com-
pete nationwide, in 97 of the
largest 100 cellular market-
ing areas, according to the
suit filed in U.S. District
Court in Washington. They
also vie for business and
government customers.
The suit says AT&T's
acquisition of T-Mobile
would eliminate a company
that has been a competitive


factor through low pricing
and innovation. T-Mobile
had the first handset using
the Android operating sys-
tem, Blackberry wireless
email, the Sidekick smart
phone, national Wi-Fi "hot-
spot" access and a variety
of unlimited service plans.
In support of its case,
the department quoted an
unidentified AT&T employ-
ee on a competitive issue,
the sophisticated wireless
broadband devices that
can provide high-speed
data connections. The
AT&T employee, accord-
ing to the suit, noted that


T-Mobile was first to have
such devices in its portfolio
and that "we added them in
reaction to potential loss of
speed claims."
Federal Communications
Commission. chairman
Julius Genachowski said
the record before his agen-
cy "raises serious concerns
about the impact of the pro-
posed transaction on com-
petition." The FCC's sepa-
rate review of the proposed
merger is not complete.
Commission member
Michael Copps, a Democrat
and a staunch opponent
of industry consolidation,


said that he shares "the
concerns about competi-
tion and have numerous
other concerns about the
public interest effects of
the proposed transaction,
including consumer choice
and innovation."
Democratic Sen. Herb
Kohl of Wisconsin, who
heads the Senate Judiciary
subcommittee on antitrust,
competition policy and con-
sumer rights, said the suit
was an effort to protect
consumers "in a powerful
and growing industry that
reaches virtually every
American."


Benjamin J. Blue
Mr. Benjamin J. Blue, 96, resi-
dent of Sanderson, Florida, de-
parted from this life August 29,
2011 at St.
Vincent's Hos-
pital, Jackson-
ville, Florida.
Mr. Blue was
born Febru-
ary 15, 1915
to Owen and
Annie Blue.
Both preceded him in death. He
Joined Faith Temple Church of
God In Christ at an early age un-
der the leadership of Elder M.L.
Presley. Mr. Blue was employed
by Northeast Florida State Hos-
pital and retired after 15 years of
employment. He algo worked
many years for Lays Potato
Chip Company of Jacksonville.
He was united in Matrimony to
Jessie Blue. Nine children were
born from that union. Three chil-
dren, Elizabeth, Mary and Jes-
sie Blue preceded him in death.
Left to cherish memories; his
lovely wife of 35 years; Cal-
lie Mae Blue, Sanderson, FL;
daughters, Lula Mae Fluellen,
Aileen Walker, Annie Ruise, all
of Pompano Beach, FL, Fred-
die Blue, Sanderson, FL, Flossie
(Hardrick) McGuire, Lake City,
FL; son, Benjamin J. Blue, Pom-
pano Beach, FL; stepson, Ned
McQuary, Pensacola, FL; 21
grandchildren; 4 great-grandchil-
dren; sister-in-law, Joyce Lee,
Pensacola, FL; nieces, neph-
ews, other relatives and friends.
Funeral services for Mr. Blue
will be 12:00 noon Saturday,
September 3, 2011 at Faith Bi-


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OBITUARIES

ble Church, Sanderson, Florida.
The family will receive friends
Friday from 5:00 7:00
pm at the Funeral Home.
Arrangements entrusted to
COMBS FUNERAL HOME.
292 NE Washington Street.
Lake City, FL. (386) 752-4366.
Marq Combs-Turner, L.F.D.
"The Caring Professionals"

Harold Jiles Hall
Harold Jiles Hall, 60, a resident
of Lake City, FL. passed away
August 30, 2011 in the Veterans
Hospital, Lake City. Full obitu-
ary and arrangements will be in
Friday's 9/2/2011 publication.
Arrangements entrusted to
COMBS FUNERAL HOME
"The Caring Professionals"

Aleene Markham Havird
Mrs. Aleene Markham Havird,
age 84, of Lake City, Fla. died
Monday, August 29, 2011, in
the Shands at
University of
Florida Hos-
pital, Gaines-
ville, Fla. fol-
lowing a brief
illness. She -
was a lifelong
resident of
Lake City and Columbia County
and daughter of the late James
Leo Markham and Annie Lee
Cox Markham and widow of the
late James Kenneth Havird. She
had worked as a licensed practi-


cal nurse with medical practices
of Dr. L.J. Arnold and Barney E.
McRae, Jr. of Lake City for over
30 years until her retirement in
1973. She was a member of
the Bethel United Methodist
Church, the U.D.C., D.A.R.,
O.E.S. and a member of the
Florida Pioneer families before
Florida reached statehood. She
was involved in local genealogy
and cemetery/monument pres-
ervation. She is survived by her
son, Kurt B. (Dawn) Havird of
Lake City, Fla.: One brother, J.L.
Markham of Suwannee, Fla.:
Two grandsons, Justin C. Ha-
vird of Auburn, Ala. and Joshua
C. Havird of Crawfordville, Fla.
Funeral services will be con-
ducted at 4 P.M. Friday, Sep-
tember 2, in the Bethel United
Methodist Church with Rev.
Mike Wright officiating and
assisted by Rev. Beverly
McKown, Pastor of Bethel
United Methodist Church.
Interment will be in the
Bethel Cemetery, Columbia
County, Fla. Visitation will
be from 6 to 8 P.M. Thursday,
September I, at GUERRY
FUNERAL HOME, 2659 S.W.
Main Blvd., Lake City, Fla.
In lieu of flowers, donations
may be made to the Bethel
Cemetery Fund. P.O. Box 503,
Ft. White, Fla. 32038-0503.
g u erryfu neralhome. net

Obituaries are paid advertise-
ments. For details, call the Lake
City Reporter's classified depart-
ment at 752-1293.


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Page Editor: Robert Bridges, 754-0428










LAKE CITY REPORTER NATIONAL THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 1, 2011


Widespread waste, fraud cited in war spending


By RICHARD LARDNER
Associated Press

WASHINGTON The
U.S. has lost billions of
dollars to waste and fraud
in Iraq and Afghanistan
and stands to repeat that
in future wars without
big changes in how the
government awards and
manages contracts for
battlefield support and
reconstruction projects,
independent investigators
said Wednesday.
- The Wartime Contracting
Commission urged
Congress and the Obama
administration to quickly
put in place its recommen-
dations to overhaul the
contracting process and
increase accountability.
The commission even sug-
gested that the joint House-
Senate debt reduction com-
mittee take a close look at
the proposals:
"What you're asking
for is more of the. same,"
said Dov Zakheim, a com-
mission member and the


Pentagon comptroller dur-
ing President George W.
Bush's first term. "More
waste. More fraud. More
abuse."
The bipartisan commis-
sion, created by Congress in
2008, estimated that at least
$31 billion and as much as
$60 billion has been lost in
Iraq and Afghanistan over
the past decade due to lax
oversight of contractors,
poor planning, inadequate
competition and corrup-
tion. "I personally believe
that the number is much,
much closer to $60 billion,"
Zakheim said.
Yet new legislation
incorporating the changes
remains a challenge for
lawmakers deeply divided
on the best way to reduce
the deficit.
"If these recommenda-
tions are not implemented,
there ought to be a Hall
of Shame," said Michael
Thibault, co-chairman of
the commission. '"There's
an opportunity at hand."
The commission's 15


recommendations include
creating an inspector gen-
eral to monitor war zone
contracting and opera-
tions, appointing a senior
government official' to
improve planning and
coordination among fed-
eral agencies, reducing
the use of private security
companies, and carefully
monitoring- contractor
performance.
Massachusetts Rep. John
Tierney, the top Democrat
on the House Oversight
and Government Reform
national security subcom-
mittee, said Wednesday
that the commission's
findings are "alarming."
Tierney said he plans to
introduce legislation next
week to create the inspec-
tor general's post.
Sen. Claire McCaskill,
D-Mo., chairwoman of
the Senate's contracting
oversight subcommittee,
said she plans to prepare
legislation based upon the
commission's recommen-
dations.


The commission's report
said contracting waste in
Afghanistan and Iraq could
grow as U.S. support for
reconstruction projects
and programs wanes. That
would leave the countries
to bear the long-term costs
of sustaining the schools,
medical clinics, barracks,
roads and power plants
already built with American
money.
Overall, the commission
said spending on contracts
and grants to support U.S.
operations is expected to
exceed $206 billion by the
end of the 2011 budget
year. Based on its inves-
tigation, the commission
said contracting waste in
Afghanistan ranged from
10 percent to 20 percent of
the $206 billion total. Fraud
during the same period ran
between 5 percent and 9
percent of the total, the
report said. Fraud includes
bribery, kickbacks, bid rig-
ging and defective prod-
ucts, according to the com-
mission.


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Commission on Wartime Contracting in Iraq and Afghahistan
Co-Chair, former Connecticut Rep. Christopher Shays holds a
copy of the commission's report during a news conference on
Capitol Hill in Washington on Wednesday.


East Coast


struggles


to recover


from Irene


By JOHN CURRAN and
MICHAEL HILL
Associated Press

KILLINGTON, Vt. -
Only one flooded Vermont
town remained cut off
from the outside world
Wednesday, but National
Guard helicopters were still
dropping food and water on
storm-ravaged parts of the
state as the Eastern sea-
board labored to recover
from hurricane-turned-
tropical-storm Irene.
About 2 million people
remained without power
in water-logged homes
and businesses from
North Carolina through
New England, where the
storm has beeh blamed for
at least 45 deaths in 13
states. Raging floodwaters
continued to ravage parts
of northern New Jersey
on Wednesday morning,
even after the state's rain-
swollen rivers crested and
slowly receded.
"It's like an island now,"
said Falguni Purohip, who
owns the Killington Pico
Motor Inn on Route 4 in
Mendon, Vt., where her
family and one guest are
trapped. "We can't go any-
where."
The town of Rutland is
15 miles away but impos-
sible to reach because of
extensive road damage.
Purohip said the family has
power and plenty of food
and water to keep them
going, but no way of leav-
i, g. Nearly 11 inches of
.ain triggered the delug-
es, which knocked hous-
es off their foundations,
destroyed covered bridges
and caused earthquake-
style damage to infrastruc-
ture all over Vermont.
"We are dropping water,
food and supplies, trying
to help out folks who are
hurting," said U.S. Army,
national Guard Capt. David
Fabricius, who was work-
ing at an airport in Fair
Haven, Vt., where ground
crews were loading provi-
sions onto helicopters that
recently had flown mis-
sions in Iraq.
Towns around New
Jersey resembled
large, soggy yard sales
Wednesday as residents
dragged flood-damaged
belongings out onto lawns
and into streets still mud-
died with floodwaters
left behind by Hurricane
Irene. In Wallington, a
heart-shaped, one-square-
mile town of about 12,000


residents, large sections
remained inundated with
floodwaters from the
Passaic River, which winds
around the .small hamlet
and hits it from several
angles.
"Sunday morning the
water was only up to here,"
said resident Kevin O'Reilly,
gesturing to where his front
lawn used to meet the side-
walk. "Sunday afternoon,
the waves were bouncing
off the house, and that's
when it blew out the base-
ment windows. It sounded
like Niagara Falls. It just
filled up immediately, and
this is what we've been
dealing with since then."
New Jersey Gov. Chris
Christie said Tuesday night
that he saw "just extraordi-
nary despair" after touring
flooded areas.
In Connecticut, the
Connecticut River at
Hartford crested Tuesday
evening at 24.8 feet, the
highest level since 1987,
according to Nicole Belk,
a hydrologist with the
National Weather Service,
in Taunton, Mass. But she
said levees helped mini-
mize flooding in riverside
communities.
She said the river could
still rise slightly farther
south, in Middletown,
where some streets and
neighborhoods were
already experiencing minor
flooding.
Vermont's largest elec-
tric utility says a convoy of
line crews is headed for the
town of Rochester where
a power substation was
completely destroyed by
flooding to begin work
to restore power. Officials


Contents from a home flooded by Hurricane Irene sit in the front yard with a warning sign Wednesday in Washingtonville, N.Y.
Irene destroyed 500 to 600 homes and thousands of acres of farmland and left six people dead upstate. As of Tuesday after-.
noon, about 470,000 customers were without power statewide.


say at least five Vermont
schools are closed until fur-
ther notice and about 120
have delayed opening for
the school year because of
roads or schools ravaged
by flooding.
Flood control dams and
basins that New England
states installed after 1955
floods helped prevent a
catastrophe in the lower
Connecticut River basin,
said Denise Ruzicka,
director of inland water
resources for Connecticut's
Department of Energy and
Environmental Protection.
In Vermont, officials
focused on providing basic
necessities to residents who
in many cases still have no
power, no telephone ser-
vice and no way to get in
or out of their towns. On
Tuesday night, 11 towns
- Cavendish, Granville,
Hancock, Killington,
Mendon, Marlboro,


Pittsfield, Plymouth,
Stockbridge, Strafford and
Wardsboro were cut off
from the outside.
But by Wednesday morn-
ing, all but one of the com-
munities Wardsboro-
had been reached by
ground crews, and emer-
gency management offi-
cials were hoping to reach
it shortly.
Vermont National Guard
choppers made three drops
in Killington, Mendon,
Pittsfield and Rochester
Tuesday while 10 other
towns received truck deliv-
eries of food, blankets,
tarps and water. Eight
Black Hawk and Chinook
helicopters from the Illinois


National Guard are expect-
ed to arrive Wednesday
to bolster the number of
flights.
Federal Emergency
Management Agency
administrator Craig Fugate
told CBS's "The Early
Show" a drawdown in
assistance funds 'will have
no negative impact on the
agency's efforts to help
stricken Eastern Seaboard
states. The agency has less
than $800 million left in its
disaster coffers.
In Woodstock, Vt.,
Michael Ricci spent the
day clearing debris from
his backyard along the
Ottauquechee River. What
had been a meticulously


mowed, sloping grass lawn.
and gorgeous flower beds.
was now a muddy expanse,
littered with debris, includ-:
ing wooden boards, pro-
pane tanks and a deer hunt-
ing target.
'"The things we saw go
down the river were just
incredible," Ricci said.
"Sheds, picnic tables,
propane tanks, furnaces,
refrigerators. We weren't
prepared for that. We had
prepared for wind and what
we ended up with was more
water than I could possibly,
possibly have imagined."
He said the water in his
yard was almost up to the
house, or about 15 to 20
feet above normal.


)


The Lake City Reporter

would like to congratulate


Bryan n Zecher
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on their August 26, 2011 ribbon cutting ceremony for their
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Tuesday September 6th -- Lake City
Phone: 386.752.9426


Page Editor: Robert Bridges, 754-0428


1%










LAKE CITY REPORTER HEALTH THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 1, 2011


1-child policy a surprising boon for China girls


By ALEXA OLESEN
Associated Press

BEIJING Tsinghua
University freshman Mia
Wang has confidence to
spare.
Asked what her home
city of Benxi in China's far
northeastern tip is famous
for, she flashes a cool smile
and says: "Producing excel-
lence. Like me."
A Communist Youth
League member at one of
China's top science univer-
sities, she boasts enviable.
skills in calligraphy, piano,
flute and ping pong.
Such gifted young
women are increasingly
common in China's cities
and make up the most edu-
cated generation of women
in Chinese history. Never
have so many been in col-
lege or graduate school,
and never has their ratio to
male students been more
balanced.
To thank for this, experts
say, is three decades of
steady Chinese economic
growth, heavy government
spending on education and
a4 third, surprising, factor:,
the one-child policy.
In 1978, women made up
only 24.2 percent of the stu-
dent population at Chinese
colleges and universities.
By 2009, nearly half of
China's full-time under-
graduates were women and
47 percent of graduate stu-
dents were female, accord-
ing to the National Bureau
of Statistics.
In India, by comparison,
women make up 37.6 per-
cent of those enrolled at
institutes of higher educa-
tion, according to govern-
ment statistics.
Since 1979, China's fam-
ily planning rules have
barred nearly all urban
families from having a
second child in a bid to
stem population growth.
With no male heir compet-
ing for resources, parents
have spent more on their
daughters' education and
well-being, a groundbreak-
ing shift after centuries of
discrimination.
"They've basically got-
ten everything that used to
only, go to the boys," said
Vanessa Fong, a Harvard
University professor and
expert on China's family
planning policy.
Wang and many of her
female classmates grew up
with tutors and allowances,
after-school classes and
laptop computers. Though
she is just one generation
off the farm, she carries an
iPad and a debit card, and
shops for the latest fash-
ions online.


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Mia Wang, right, reaches for a dish as her mother Zheng Hong, center, and grandmother Gao Mingxiang, left, eat lunch at the grandmother's farm house
near Benxi, in northeastern China's Liaoning province. Tall, confident and bilingual, Wang is remarkable but even more stunning is how common gifted young
women like her are in China's big cities today. She and her peers are arguably the most educated generation of women in Chinese history.


Her purchases arrive at
Tsinghua, where Wang's
all-girls dorm used to be
jokingly called a "Panda
House," because women
were so rarely seen on
campus. They now make
up a third of the student
body, up from one-fifth a
decade ago.
"In the past, girls were
raised to be good wives
and mothers," Fong said.
'They were going to marry
out anyway, so it wasn't a
big.deal if they didn't want
to study."
Not so anymore. Fong
says today's urban Chinese
parents "perceive their
daughters as the family's
sole hope for the future,"
and try to help them to out-
perform their classmates,
regardless of gender.
Some demographers
argue that China's fertil-
ity rate would have fallen
sharply even without the
one-child policy because
economic growth tends to
reduce family size. In that
scenario, Chinese girls may
have gotten more access to
education anyway, though
the gains may have been
more gradual.
Crediting the one-child
policy with improving the


lives of women is jarring,
given its history and how
it's harmed women in other
ways. Facing pressure to
stay under population quo-
tas, overzealous family plan-
ning officials have resorted
to forced sterilizations and
late-term abortions, some-
times within weeks of deliv-
ery, although such prac-
tices are illegal.
The birth limits are also
often criticized for encour-
aging sex-selective abor-
tions in a son-favoring soci-
ety. Chinese tradiliuinall.
prefer boys because they
carry on the family name
and are considered better
earners.
Withli th arrival of sono-
gram technology in the
1980's, some families no
longer merely hoped for a
boy, they were able to engi-
neer a male heir by termi-
nating pregnancies when
the fetus was a girl.
"It is gendercide,"
said Therese Hesketh, a
University College London
professor who has studied
China's skewed sex ratio.
"I don't understand why
China doesn't just really
penalize people who've had
sex-selective abortions and
the people who do them.


The law exists but nobody
enforces it."
To combat the problem,
China allows families in
rural areas, where son pref-
erence is strongest, to have
a second child if their first
is a girl. The government
has also launched educa-
tion campaigns promoting
girls and gives cash subsi-
dies to rural families with
daughters
Still, 43 million girls have
"disappeared" in China
due to gender-selective
abortion as well as neglect
and inadequate access
to hl.ilth care and nutri-
tion, the United Nations
estimated in a report last
year.
Yin Yin Nwe, UNICEF's
irtClrCiintalivc to China,
puts it bluntly: The one-
child policy brings many
benefits for girls "but they
have to be born first."
Wang's birth in the
spring of 1992 triggered a
family rift that persists to
this day. She was a disap-
pointment to her father's


parents, who already had
one granddaughter from
their eldest son. They had
hoped for a boy.
"Everyone around us had
this attitude that boys were
valuable, girls were less,"
Gao Mingxiang, Wang's
paternal grandmother, said
by way of explanation -
but not apology.
Small and stooped, Gao


perched on the edge of her
farmhouse "kang," a heat-
ed brick platform that in
northern Chinese homes
serves as couch, bed and
work area. She wore three
sweaters, quilted pants and
slippers.
Her granddaughter, tall
and graceful and dressed
CHINA continued on 8A


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LAKE CITY REPORTER HEALTH THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 1, 2011


Monsanto seeks OK for low-fat soybean


By MICHAEL J. CRUMB
Associated Press
DES MOINES, Iowa
The soybean industry
is seeking government
approval of a genetically
modified soybean it says
will produce oil lower in
saturated fat, offer consum-
ers a healthier alternative to
foods containing trans fats
and increase demand for
growers' crops.
Demand for soybean oil
has dropped sharply since
2005, when the U.S. Food
and Drug Administration
began requiring labels
to list levels of trans fats,
which have been linked to
coronary heart disease.
Vegetable oil does not natu-
rally contain trans fats, but
when hydrogen is added to
make it suitable for use in
the food industry, trans fats
are created.
Agribusiness giant
Monsanto Co. says oil from
its new soybean will meet
manufacturers' require-
ments for baking and shelf
life without hydrogenation,
resulting in food that's free
of trans fats as well as lower
in saturated fat.
The FDA approved the
new bean, called Vistive
Gold, earlier this year,
and Monsanto and several
state and national soybean
groups are now seeking
approval from the U.S.
Department of Agriculture.
The USDA's Animal Plant
Health Inspection Service
said in an email to The
Associated Press that it
has no timeline for making
a decision.
U.S. farmers harvested
more than 3.3 billion bushels
of soybeans valued at nearly
$39 billion in 2010. But the
Iowa Soybean Association
said in a letter to APHIS
that the industry's share of
the food oil market dropped
from 83 percent tp.68 per-
cent after the FDA enacted
the labeling requirements
Iowa grows more soybeans
than any other state.
"We believe because of
the trans-fat labeling, 4.6
billion pounds of edible soy-
bean oil was not used for
food over a three-year peri-
od," said Bob Callanan, a
spokesman for the American
Soybean Association. The
oil was turned into biodie-
sel instead, and farmers got
less money for their soy-
beans, he said.
Industry officials believe
Vistive Gold could com-
mand as much as 60 cents
more per bushel than other
soybeans, raising a farmer's
income by thousands of dol-
lars.


Jim Andrew holds soybeans on his farm Tuesday near Jefferson, Iowa. Soybean growers are hoping the government will approve a new genetically modified
soybean they say will produce oil that is lower in saturated fat, allowing people to eat healthier, including fried foods they may have given up as they tried to
reduce fat in their diet.


CHINA: Girls taking lead
Continued From Page 7A


in Ugg boots and a sparkly
blue top, sat next to her
listening, a sour expres-
sion on her face. She
wasn't shy about showing
her lingering bitterness
or her eagerness to leave.
She agreed to the visit
to please her father but
refused to stay overnight
despite a .four-hour
drive each way.
Fong'$" the* Harvard
researcher, says that many
Chinese households are
like this these lays: a
microcosm of third world
and first world cultures
clashing. The gulf between
Wang and her grandmother
seems particularly vast.
The 77-year-old Gao grew
up in Yixian, a poor corn-
and wheat-growing county
in southern Liaonihg prov-
ince. At 20, she moved
less than a mile (about a
kilometer) to her new
husband's house. She had
three children and never
dared to dream what life
was like outside the village.
She remembers rain fell in
the living room and a cher-


ished pig was sold, because
there wasn't (.ein ugli money
for repairs or feed.
She relied on her daugh-
ter to help around ilih
house so her two sons
could study.
"Our kids understood,"
said Gao, her gray' hair
pinned back-,with a Lubby
pin,.her skin (h.pp .I by
weather. work and ago'. All
laminlie's around here' wer
like that."
But Wang's mother,
Zhenog Hong, did not under-
stand. She gre~w up 31 i kilo-
meters (185 mil's) .meI'|',
in the steel-factory town of
Benxi with two elder sis-
ters and went to vocational
college for manufacturing.
She lowers her voice to a
whisper as she recalls the
sting of her in-law's rejec-
tion when her daughter
was born.


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Lake City Reporter




SPORTS


Story ideas?

Contact
Tim Kirby
Sports Editor
754-0421
tkirby@lakecityreportercom


Thursday. September I, 2011


www.lakecityreporter.com


Section B


Tough start

for Fort White


Oak Hall School
defeats Lady
Indians in 3 sets.
By BRANDON FINLEY
bfinley@lakecityreporter. corn
FORT WHITE Fort
White High started out the
2011 season with one of the
best teams it will face all
season. The result was a
three-set loss for the Lady
Tigers, but head coach
Doug Wohlstein thinks it
will benefit his squad in the
long run.
'This is the first game
and we're a young team,"
Wohlstein said. 'The good
thing about having a young


team is that we are only
going to get better. We have
24 more games to do that."
Oak Hall came away with
the 25-9, 25-17 and 25-20
victory in the match,
Fort White can begin
to right the ship at
Interlachen High at 6 p.m.
tonight.
Ali Wrench led the
team in two statistical cat-
egories. She had 10 assists,
eight digs and added one
ace.
Lync6 Stalnaker led the
team in kills with five in the
contest Caitlin Congi had
two kills.
Emily Roach had seven
digs and Ashley Beckman
had five digs.


BRANDON FINLEY/Lake City Reporter
Members of the 2011 Fort White High volleyball team are (front row, from left) Emily Roach, Ashley Beekman, All Wrench
and Lynce Stalnaker. Back row (from left) are coach Doug Wohlstein, Leah Johnson, Mallorie Godbey, Parson Robinson and
Caitlin Congi.


Richardson


Middle School


Wolves host Green Cove Springs in home opener today


JASON MATTHEW WALKERILake City Reporter
Richardson Middle School cheerleaders for 2011-12 are (front row, from left) co-captain
Ashley O'Quinn, co-captain Jaide Strickland, Jameson Carter, captain Taylor Stephens and
captain Maya Foster. Second row (from left) are Addie Pipkins, Alexia Scott, Megan Dees,
Brianna Carman, Deaven Eichelsderfer and Mia McCray. In back'are assistant coach
Caleb Charles (left) and head coach Shannon Hall. Rachel Taylor and assistant coach
Jane Gherna also are on the team.


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Richardson Middle School Dazzlers for 2011-12 are (front row, from left) Anna Richardson,
Makena Freeman, Lynsie Witt, Kelsey Fowler and Kynsie Witt. Second row (from left) are
coach Dekela Bradley, Danna Whitehead, Zariya Hollie-Pope, Stacy Harper, Lauren Sapp,
Miracle Holton, Angel Bowen and manager Meka Robinson. back row (from left) are
Tiana Turner, Christa Markham, Ava White, Alexis Ross and Zuri Mixson.


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Richardson Middle School's 2011 football team members are (front row, from left) Teddy Bowman, Scott Carman, Jayron Washington, Marvin Fowler, J.T. Thomas, Nathaniel Williams,
Rodney Williamson, Kenneth Steele, Ronnie Collins, Ronnie Williamson, Jacquise Brown, Charlie Parker, John Mitchell, Zack Cribbs, Austin Strickland, Armani Dorsey, Tyler Walker,
Koeby Cannon, Jamie Bowen and Travis Harmon. Second row (from left) are Steven Stathan, Austin Robinson, D'Andre Combs, Bryan Samuels, Logan Raulerson, Allen Whitehead, Tayvion
Steward, Cedric Thompkins, coaches Quinton Jefferson, James Williamson, Joey O'Neal (head coach), Jeremiah Hook and Kaleb Watkins, O'Neal McMillian, Dylan Thomas, Kamario Bell,
Jamel Jackson, Dillon Brown and Michael Jackson. Back row (from left) are Deante Allen, Terry Cooper, Robert White, Branden Morris, Darrell Roberson, Gabe Williams, Preston Allen,
Lionel Thomas, Josh Aymond, Triston Tumblin, Cristopher Washington, Deaundrae Brewer, Kenny Stewart, Bruce Baker, Ladarius Powell, Tyrone Brown, Alfonso Battle and Jared Claridy.
Keith O'Neal also is a coach for the Wolves.


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73a. c X d 6,-/


All King Size
Candy Bars
Nestle M&M/ Mars Hershey











LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 1, 2011


Page Editor: Tim Kirby, 754-0421


TELEVISION

TV sports

Today
COLLEGE FOOTBALL
8 p.m.
ESPN UNLV at Wisconsin
FSN Mississippi St. Memphis
GOLF
9 a.m.
TGC European PGATour, European
Masters, first round, at Crans sur Slerre,
Switzerland
3 p.m.
TGC Nationwide Tour, Mylan
Classic, first round, at Canonsburg, Pa.
MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL
7 p.m.
MLB Regional coverage, N.Y.Yankees
at Boston or Washington at Atlanta
TENNIS
I p.m., 7 p.m.
ESPN2 U.S. Open, second round,
at New York

BASEBALL

AL standings

East Division
W L Pct GB
Boston 82 52 .612 -
NewYork 81 52 .609 'A
Tampa Bay 73 61 .545 9
Toronto 67 68 .496 15'/
Baltimore 54 79 .406 27'A
Central Division
W L Pct GB
Detroit 75 61 .551 -
Cleveland 67 65 .508 6
Chicago 68 66 .507 6
Minnesota 57 79 .419 18
Kansas City 56 81 .409 19'A
West Division
W L Pct GB
Texas 77 59 ..566 -
Los Angeles 73 62 .541 3'A
Oakland 60 75 .444 16'h
Seattle 57 77 .425 19
Tuesday's Games
Detroit 2, Kansas City I, 10 innings
Cleveland 6, Oakland 2
Baltimore 6,Toronto 5, 10 innings
N.Y.Yankees 5, Boston 2
Texas 2,Tampa Bay 0
Chicago White Sox 8, Minnesota 6
LA.Angels 13, Seattle 6
Wednesday's Games
Detroit 5, Kansas City 4
Minnesota 7, Chicago White Sox 6
Oakland at Cleveland (n)
Toronto at Baltimore (n)
N.Y.Yankees at Boston (n)
Tampa Bay at Texas (n)
LA.Angels at Seattle (n)
Today's Games
Oakland (G.Gonzalez I1-1I) at
Cleveland (Carmona 6-12), 12-05 p.m.
Toronto (LPerez 3-2) at Baltimore
(Tom.Hunter 3-2). 12:35 p.m.
Kansas City (Duffy 3-8) at Detroit
(Ja.Turner 0-1),.1:05 p.m.
N.Y. Yankees (A.J.Burnett 9-11) at
Boston (Lester 14-6), 7:10 p.m.
Tampa Bay (Niemann 9-5) at Texas
(C.Wilson 13-6), 8:05 p.m.
LA.Angels (E.Santana 10"-9) at Seattle
(Furbush 3-6). 10:10 p.m.
Friday's Games
Chi.White Sox at Detroit. 7:05 p.m.
Toronto at N.Y.Yankees, 7:05 p.m..
Baltimore at Tampa Bay, 7:10 p.m.
Texas at Boston, 7:10 p.m.
Cleveland at Kinsas City, 8:10 p.m.
Minnesota at LA.Angels, 10:05 p.m.
Seattle at Oakland, 10:05 p.m.

NL standings

East Division
W L Pct GB
Philadelphia 85 46 .649 -
Atlanta 79 55 .590 7%/
rIJewYork 64 69 .481 22
Washington 63 70 .474 23
Florida 60 74 .448 26'A
Central Division
W L Pct GB
Milwaukee 81 55 .596 -
St. Louis 71 64 .526 9'A
Cincinnati 67 68 .496 13'h
Pittsburgh 62 73 .459 18'A
Chicago 59 78 .431 22'h
Houston 46 90 .338 35
West Division
W L Pct GB
Arizona 77 59 .566 -
San Francisco 72 65 .526 5'%
Los Angeles 65 70 .481 I I'A
Colorado 64 72 .471 13
San Diego 60 77 .438 17'h
Tuesday's Games
Florida 6, N.Y. Mets 0
Philadelphia 9, Cincnati 0
Washington 9,Atlanta 2
Houston 8, Pittsburgh 2
St. Louis 2, Milwaukee I
Arizona 9, Colorado 4
LA. Dodgers 8, San Diego 5
Chicago Cubs 5, San Francisco 2
Wednesday's Games
LA. Dodgers 4, San Diego 2
San Francisco 4, Chicago Cubs 0
Florida at N.Y. Mets (n)
Philadelphia at Cincinnati (n)
Washington at Atlanta (n)
Pittsburgh at Houston (n)
St. Louis at Milwaukee (n)
Colorado at Arizona (n)
Today's Games
Philadelphia (Worley 9-1) at Cincinnati
(Leake 11-8), 12:35 p.m.
L.A. Dodgers (Eveland 0-0) at
Pittsburgh (Lincoln I1-0), 4:05 p.m.
St. Louis (Dickson 0-0) at Milwaukee
(Gallardo 15-8), 4:10 p.m.
Florida (Hensley 2-5) at N.Y. Mets
(Batista 3-2),7:10 p.m.
Washington (Wang 2-2) at Atlanta
(THudson 13-8), 7:10 p.m.
Friday's Games
Pittsburgh at Chicago Cubs, 2:20 p.m.
N.Y. Mets at Washington, 7:05 p.m.
Philadelphia at Florida, 7:10 p.m.


L.A. Dodgers at Atlanta, 7:35 p.m.
Milwaukee at Houston, 8:05 p.m:
Cincinnati at St. Louis, 8:15 p.m.
Colorado at San Diego, 10:05 p.m.
Arizona at San Francisco, 10:15 p.m.

FOOTBALL

NFL preseason games

Today
Detroit at Buffalo, 6:30 p.m.


Indianapolis at Cincinnati, 7 p.m.
Baltimore at Atlanta, 7:30 p.m.
St. Louis at Jacksonville, 7:30 p.m.
Dallas at Miami, 7:30 p.m.
N.Y. Giants at New England, 7:30 p.m.
Philadelphia at N.Y. Jets. 7:30 p.m.
Tampa Bay at Washington, 7:30 p.m.
Pittsburgh at Carolina, 8 p.m.
Cleveland at Chicago, 8 p.m.
Kansas City at Green Bay, 8 p.m.
Houston at Minnesota, 8 p.m.
Tennessee at New Orleans, 8 p.m.
Denver at Arizona, 10 p.m.
San Francisco at San Diego, 10 p.m.
Friday
Oakland at Seattle, 10:30 p.m.

Top 25 schedule

Today
No. II Wisconsin vs. UNLV, 8 p.m.
No. 20 Mississippi State at Memphis,
8 p.m.
Friday
No. 14TCU at Baylor, 8 p.m.
No. 17 Michigan State vs.Youngstown
State, 7:30 p.m.
Saturday
No. I Oklahoma vs.Tulsa, 8 p.m.
No. 2 Alabama vs. Kent State,
12:21 p.m.
No. 3 Oregon vs. No. 4 LSU at
Arlington,Texas, 8 p.m.
No. 5 Boise State at No. 19 Georgia,
8 p.m.
No. 6 Florida State vs. Louislana-
Monroe, 3:30 p.m.
No. 7 Stanford vs. San Jose State,
5 p.m.
No. 8 Texas A&M vs. SMU. 7:30 p.m.
No. 9 Oklahoma State vs. Louisiana-
Lafayette. 7 p.m.
No. 10 Nebraska vs. Chattanooga,
3:30 p.m.
No. 12 South Carolina vs. East
Carolina, 8 p.m.
No. 13 Virginia Tech vs. Appalachian
State, 12:30 p.m.
No. 15 Arkansas vs. Missouri State,
7 p.m.
No. 16 Notre Dame vs. South
Florida, 3:30 p.m.
No. 18 Ohio State vs.Akron, Noon
No. 21 Missouri vs. Miami (Ohio),
Noon
No. 22 Florida vs. FAU, 7 p.m.
No. 23 Auburn vs. Utah State. Noon
No. 25 Southern Cal vs. Minnesota,
3:30 p.m.
Sunday
No. 24 West Virginia vs. Marshall,
3:30 p.m.

BASKETBALL

WNBA schedule

Tuesday's Games
New York 71, Chicago 67
Atlanta 92. Indiana 90
Minnesota 73,Washington 56
San Antonio 78, Connecticut 66
Phoenix 96,Tulsa 74
Los Angeles 68, Seattle 62
Today's Games
Atlanta at Washington, 7 p.m.
Phoenix at San Antonio, 8 p.m.
Friday's Games
Washington at Atlanta. 7:30 p.m.
Indiana at Connecticut, 7:30 p.m.
New York at Minnesota, 8 p.m.
Seatde at Tulsa,8 p.m.

AUTO RACING

Race week

NASCAR
SPRINT CUP
ADVOCARE 500
Site: Hampton, Ga.
Schedule: Friday, practice (Speed,
6-7:30 p.m.); Saturday, practice (Speed,
1:30-3 p.m.), qualifying (Speed, 5-7 p.m.);
Sunday, race, 7:30 p.m. (ESPN, 6:30-
11:30 p.m.).
Track: Atlanta Motor Speedway (tri-
oval, 1.54 miles).
Race distance: 500.5 miles, 325 laps.
Next race:Wonderful Pistachios 400,
Sept. 10, Richmond International Raceway,
Richmond,Va.
Online: httpiJ/www.noscar.com
NATIONWIDE
GREAT CLIPS 300
Site: Hampton, Ga.
Schedule: Saturday, practice (Speed,
II a.m.-12:30 p.m.), qualifying (Speed,
3:30-5 p.m.), race, 7:30 p.m. (ESPN2,
7-10 p.m.).
Track:Atlanta Motor Speedway.
Race distance: 300.3 miles, 195 laps.
Next race:Virglnia 529 College Savings
250, Sept. 9, Richmond International
Raceway, Richmond,Va.
CAMPING WORLD TRUCK
ATLANTA 200
Site: Hampton, Ga.
Schedule: Friday, practice, qualifying
(Speed, 5-6 p.m.), race, 8 p.m. (Speed,
7:30-10:30 p.m.).
Track: Atlanta Motor Speedway (tri-
oval, 1.54 miles).
Race distance: 202.2 miles, 130 laps.
Next race: NASCAR Camping World
Truck Series 225, Sept 16, Chicagoland
Speedway, Joliet, III.
INDYCAR
BALTIMORE GRAND PRIX
Site: Baltimore.
Schedule: Friday, practice; Saturday,
practice, qualifying (Versus, 2-3 p.m.);
Sunday, race, 2:45 p.m. (Versus, 2-5 p.m.).
Track: Streets of Baltimore (street
course, 2.0 miles).
Race distance: 150 miles, 75 laps.
Next race: Indy Japan 300, Sept. 17,
Twin Ring Motegi, Motegi.Japan.
Online: http://www.indycar.com
NHRA FULLTHROTTLE
U.S. NATIONALS
Site: Clermont, Ind.
Schedule: Friday, qualifying; Saturday,
qualifying; Sunday, qualifying (ESPN2, 11
a.m.-2 p.m., ESPN2, 5-7 p.m.); Monday, final


eliminations (FSPN2, noon-6 p.m.).
Track: Lucas Oil Raceway.
Next event: O'Reilly Auto Parts
Nationals, Sept. 15-18, zMAX Dragway,
Concord, N.C.
Online: http://www.nhra.com
FORMULA ONE
Next race: Italian Grand Prix, Sept. 11,
Autodromo Nazionale di Monza, Monza,
Italy.
Online: http://www.formnulal.com
OTHER RACES
AMERICAN LE MANS SERIES:


Baltimore Grand Prix, Saturday (ABC,
Sunday, 4-6 p.m.), Streets of Baltimore,
Baltimore. Online: http://www.american
lemons.com

TENNIS

U.S. Open singles

At The USTA Billie Jean King National
Tennis Center
New York
Wednesday
Men
First Round
Vasek Pospisil, Canada, def. Lukas
Rosol, Czech Republic, 6-1, 6-2.6-1I.
Rogerlo Dutra da Silva, Brazil, def.
Luk Sorensen, Ireland, 6-2, 6-4, 6-4.
Julien Benneteau, France, def. Nicolas
Almagro (10), Spain, 6-2, 6-4,6-3.
Diego Junqueira, Argentina, def. Karol
Beck, Slovakia, 6-2, retired.
Robin Haase, Netherlands, def. Rul
Machado, Portugal, 6-0, 6-4, 6-4.
Guillermo Garcia-Lopez, Spain, def.
Daniel GImeno-Traver, Spain, 6-3, 1-6, 7-6
(I),4-6, 7-6 (4).
Juan Martin del Potro (18), Argentina,
def. Filippo Volandri, Italy, 6-3,6-1., 6-1I.
Denis Istomin, Uzbekistan, def, Ryan
Sweeting, United States, 3-6, 7-5, 6-4,
7-6 (4).
Women
Second Round
Maria Kirllenko (25), Russia, def.Vera
Dushevina, Russia, 6-1,6-2.
Anabel Medina Garrigues (30), Spain,
def. Laura Robson, Britain, 6-2, 6-3.
Monica Niculescu, Romania, def.
Alexandra Dulgheru, Romania, 6-3, 6-0.
Lucle Safarova (27). Czech Republic,
def. Madison Keys. United States, 3-6.
7-5,6-4.
Vera Zvonareva (2), Russia, def.
Kateryna Bondarenko, Ukraine, 7-5,
3-6, 6-3.
Peng Shuai (13), China, def. Tsvetana
Pironkova, Bulgaria, 6-2, 6-4.
Julia Goerges (19), Germany, def. Laura
Pous-Tio, Spain, 6-3, 6-I.
Nadia Petrova (24), Russia, def. Polona
Hercog, Slovenia, 6-2, 6-4.
Late Tuesday
Men
First Round
Stanislas Wawrinka (14), Switzerland,
def. Maximo Gonzalez. Argentina. 3-6.
6-4,6-1.6-3.
Novak Djokovic (I), Serbia, def. Conor
Niland, Ireland. 6-0, 5-I, retired.
Juan Ignacio Chela (24),Argentina, def.
Marinko Matosevic. Australia, 3-1, retired.
Gilles Muller, Luxembourg, def.
Edouard Roger-Vasselin, France. 7-6 (5).
6-4,6-4.
Florian Mayer (26), Germany, def.
Adrian Mannarino, France, 6-2,6-0, 6-I1.
Nikolay Davydenko, Russia, def. Ivan
Dodig (32), Croatia, 6-7 (6), 6-3, 6-0.
2-6,6-2.
Jean-Rene LIsnard, Monaco,def. Olivier
Rochus, Belgium. 7-6 (5). 6-2,6-4.
Fernando Verdasco (19), Spain, def.
Jarkko Nieminen. Finland. 3-6, 6-4, 6-1,
6-4.
Steve Darcis, Belgium, def. Dmitry
Tursunov, Russia, 6-7 (4). 4-6, 7-5, 6-1,
7-6 (0).
Carlos Berlocq, Argentina, def. Pere
Riba. Spain, 7-5. 6-0, 6-1.
Nicolas Mahut. France, def. Robert
Farah, Colombia, 3-6, 6-7 (4), 6-2, 6-4,
6-0.
Ivan Ljublcic (30). Croatia, def. Blaz
Kavcic, Slovenia. 7-6 (5), 3-6, 6-I, 7-5.
James Blake, United States. def. Jesse
Huta Galung, Netherlands. 6-4, 6-2. 4-6.
6-4.
David Nalbandian, Argentina, def.
Bobby Reynolds, United States, 4-6. 6-3,
6-4,6-3.
Rafael Nadal (2), Spain, def. Andrey
Golubev, Kazakhstan, 6-3,.7-6 (I), 7-5.
Women
First Round
Andrea Petkovic (10), Germany, def.
Ekaterina Bychkova, Russia, 6-2, 6-2.
Jelena Dokic, Australia, def. Olga
Govortsova, Belarus, 6-3, 6-1.
Francesca Schiavone (7), Italy, def.
Gallna Voskoboeva. Kazakhstan, 6-3. 1-6,
6-4.
Roberta Vinci (18), Italy, def. Irina-
Camelia Begu, Romania, 6-3,6-4.
Arantxa Rus, Netherlands, def. Elena
Vesnina, Russia, 6-2, 6-4.
Elena Baltacha, Britain, def. Jamie
Hampton, United States, 2-6. 6-2, 5-1.,
retired.
ZhengJle, China, defVitalla Diatchenko,
Russia, 4-6, 7-5,6-2.
Shahar Peer (23), Israel, def. Sania
Mirza, India, 6-7 (5),6-3,6-1.
Ana Ivanovic (16), Serbia, def. Ksenia
Pervak, Russia, 6-4,6-2.
Simona Halep, Romania, def. LI Na (6),
China, 6-2,7-5.
Alize Cornet, France, def. Casey
DellacquaAustralla, 7-5, 6-0.
Jarmlla Gajdosova (29), Australia, def.
Iveta Benesova, Czech Republic, 7-6 (5),
7-5.
Svetlana Kuznetsova (15), Russia, def.
Sara Errani, Italy, 7-5, 6-1.
Sloane Stephens, United States, def.
Reka-Luca Jani, Hungary, 6-2. 3-6, 7-6 (3).
Carla Suarez Navarro, Spain, def.
Mathilde Johansson. France, 6-2, 4-6,7-5.
Mona Barthel, Germany, def. Maria Jose
Martinez Sanchez (32), Spain, 6-3, 6-4.
Vania King, United States, def. Greta
Arnm. Hungary, 6-1, 6-4.
Pauline Parmentier, France, def. Daniela
Hantuchova (21), Slovakia, 6-2.6-3.
Petra Cetkovska, Czech Republic, def.
Evgenlya Rodina, Russia, 1-6, 6-1,6-2.
Chanelle Scheepers, South Africa, def.
Anne Keothavong, Britain, 7-5, 6-3.
Anastasia Pavlyuchenkova (17). Russia,
def.Anna Tatishvlli, Georgia, 6-2,6-2.
Petra Martic, Croatia, def. Barbora
Zahlavova Strycova, Czech Republic, 5-7,
6-3, 6-4.
Michaella Krajicek, Netherlands, def.
Eleni Danilidou, Greece, 3-6, 7-6 (4), 6-1.


SCOREBOARD


Venus Williams


out of US Open;


Zvonareva wins


BRIEFS

SEMINOLES
Club gathering

today at Tailgators
I The Lake City Seminole
Club has its 2011kickoff
gathering at 6 p.m. today
at Tailgators on U.S.
Highway 90 west.
For details, call Norbie
Ronsonet at 752-2180.

GATORS

Gator Club kickoff

social today

.The North Florida
Gator Club has its annual
kickoff social planned
at the home of John and
Betty Norris at 6 p.m.
today. Chris Price of
TV-20 is the guest
speaker. Dinner will be
provided by the club. All
Gator fansare invited.
The Gator Club is raffling
off two season tickets.
Chances are $50 with all
proceeds going to the UF
scholarship fund.
For details, call Angela
at 961-1766.

YOUTH BASEBALL

Fort White

registration today

Fort White Youth
Baseball has fall
registration 4-7 p.m. today
at the South Columbia
Sports Park concession
stand.
For details, call Milissa
Blakley at 365-4133.


* From staff reports Unscramble these four Jumbles,
one letter to each square,
to form four ordinary words. I
GAMES| AVLCO


Today
Columbia High
boys golf vs. Buchholz
High, Oak Hall School
at Ironwood Golf Club,
3:30 p.m.
Fort White High
volleyball at Interlachen
High, 6 p.m. (JV-5)
Columbia High JV
football at Madison County
High, 7 p.m.
Fort White High JV
football vs. Suwannee
High, 7 p.m.
Friday
Columbia High
football at Brooks County
(Ga.) High, 7:30 p.m.
Fort White High
football at Hamilton
County High, 7:30 p.m.


ACROSS

1 Gear tooth
4 Cheerio!
(hyph.)
8 Ask a ques-
tion
12 Ms. Thurman
of films
13 "Famous"
cookie maker
14 Qatar ruler
15 Pouched ani-
mals
17 Appoint
18 Chips and dips
19 Salsa go-with
21 Chocolate
candy
23 Ape studler
Fossey
24 Change colors
27 Recover
29 Always, in
verse
30 Scarce
32 Dundee citizen
36 The the
limit!


Serena Williams (28), United States,
def. Bojana Jovanovski, Serbia, 6-1. 6-1.

Grand Slam wins

Open era (I 968-present)
(Through Monday)


Jimmy Connors, 1970-92
Andre Agassi, 1986-06
Roger Federer, 1999-09
Ivan Lendl, 1978-94
Pete Sampras, 1988-02


By RACHEL COHEN
Associated Press

NEW YORK-The U.S.
Open's most stunning loss
Wednesday was bigger
than just the Grand Slam
tournament, with Venus
Williams withdrawing and
revealing she's suffering
from an autoimmune dis-
ease.
The seven-time major
champion said in a state-
ment that she was recently
diagnosed with Sjogren's
Syndrome, "an ongoing
medical condition that
affects my energy level
and causes fatigue and
joint pain."
The 31-year-old Williams
pulled out of two hard-
court tuneup tournaments
this summer because
she was not feeling well.
But she came back' at
Flushing Meadows, and
in her first match in two
months, Williams beat
Vesna Dolonts 6-4, 6-3 on
Monday.
She was supposed to
play 22nd-seeded Sabine
Lisicki in the second round.
Instead, the women's field
is even more uncertain.
"I think she's a tough
girl and I think she'll come
back," said Lsicki, who saw

T h,? !?_ m-F


SARDUB TEAK WAS THIS.
S- Now arrange the circled letters
to form the surprise answer, as
L suggested by the above cartoon.

Print answer here: A J
(Answers tomorrow)
Yesterday's Jumbles: CABIN TRUNK BUSILY FUSION
Answer: He finished second at the family reunion race
behind this HIS FIRST COUSIN


38 Menial worker
40 Mother lode
41 Plenty, to a
poet
43 Extremely
45 Carpet thick-
ness
47 Knight's wife
49 Better quali-
fled
51 Start up again
55 Toward shelter
56 Forever and a
day
58 Caboose's
place
59 1492 caravel
66T Laptops, brief-
ly
61 Beliefs
62 Do business
63 Yon maiden

DOWN

1 Pint pair
2 "May It not be
an -I"
3 Lavish party


Answer to Previous Puzzle

AC K FAD O 5IE
IRON AGE TANS
GENE RUBDO WNS
SEA NCE EONS

DOE NII L







FVElARL IRODS
OOT EAR HODS
A1A V I A EL I A
ALES C ES ELL DE E P


In poorer taste
Gather
2,000 pounds
Part of PGA
Doodlers' need
Boys Town site


Carly or Neil
Before now
Viscid
Tooth-puller's
org.
Calculating
Legal matter
Cartoon shriek
Parched
Fair-hiring let-
ters
GI mail drop
Fold-up bed
Ice hockey
great
Mild beverage
Merchants
Digit
Bridal notice
word
Ponce de -
Turns white
Steel girder
(hyph.)
Bullring
Tear apart
Dice spots
Engrave
Wall St. land-
mark
Onassis nick-
name
Even score


@ 2011 UFS, Dist. by Univ. Uclick for UFS


Williams on Wednesday
wearing match clothing
and was surprised to learn
she'd withdrawn.
Before the news broke
that the older Williams
sister was out, Vera
Zvonareva was already
happy just to advance. In a
wide-open women's draw,
that counts for a lot and
that became even more
true with Williams' exit.
The second-seeded
Russian needed three
ragged sets to reach
the third round, beating
69th-ranked Kateryna
Bondarenko 7-5, 3-6, 6-3.
With the winners of the last
four major tournaments
missing from the second
round, players with a lot of
Grand Slam experience are
in short supply. Zvonareva
has that, losing in the final
at Wimbledon and here
at Flushing Meadows in
2010.
"I wouldn't say I'm
pleased with the qual-
ity of tennis I showed,
but I'm pleased the way I
handled the match," said
Zvonareva, who overcame
46 unforced errors.
A two-time Grand Slam
runner-up on the men's
side didn't even get start-
ed at the Open.

THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME
by David L. Hoyt and Jeff Knurek


Want more puzzles?
Check out the "Just Right Crossword Puzzles" books
at QuillDrlverBooks.com
11 12 13 4 15 16 17 8 19 110 1Il










LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 1, 2011


Columbia boys j



golf tees up today -4 I


By TIM KIRBY
tkirby@lakecityreporter.com

Columbia High's boys
golf team returns its 1-2
punch and this year they
have better backup.
Columbia opens the sea-
son at 3:30 p.m. today in
a match against Buchholz
High and Oak Hall School
at Ironwood Golf Club in
Gainesville.
Buchholz and Gainesville
High have been added to
Columbia's District 2-2A,
which also returns Chiles,
Leon, Lincoln and Mosley
high schools.
Chiles is defending
district champion and
Mosley was runner-up.
However, it was Mosley
that placed second at
region and qualified for the
state tournament.
"Buchholz is always
good year in and year out,"
Columbia head coach Steve
Smithy said. "Gainesville is
up and down, but the two
definitely strengthen the
district field."
Columbia junior Dean
Soucinek and sophomore


Nick Jones return for
the Tigers at the top two
spots. Both qualified for
the region individual field
last year.
.Jones has the slight
edge as No. 1 in preseason
qualifying. He was the only
Tiger who played in all 11
matches last year and had
a season average of 41.8.
Soucinek had a 40.2 stroke
average last year.
"Dean and Nick have
separated themselves as
the top two," Smithy said.
"We're a young team with
no seniors, but we have
some experience. Five
of our top six played last
year and I feel like we have
the opportunity to get a lot
better."
Sophomore. Tim Bagley
is sitting at No. 3. He played
in nine matches last year
and had a 45.3 stroke aver-
age. Sophomore Dalton
Mauldin (two matches,
42.9 average) and fresh-
man Dillan VanVleck round
out the top five.
Six players participate in
matches and junior Andrew
Johnson currently has that


final spot. He played in
nine matches last year with
a 43.6 average.
Knocking on the door are
freshman Luke Soucinek,
junior Garry Carman (one
match last year), sopho-
more returnee Tristen
Morgan and sophomore
newcomer Joseph Bivins.
"The biggest thing about
this team is the depth has
improved tremendously,"
Smithy said. "Our No. 3
through No. 8 guys are
competing every day and
that will push them to
get better. Making the
matches more competitive
makes the team better."
Smithy, entering his
11th year as golf coach, is
the longest tenured head,
coach at CHS. The season
has him excited.
"I really look forward to
watching this team prog-
ress," Smithy said. "I think
we can be good. We have
always had quality players,
but the one thing we lacked
was depth and, most impor-
tantly, the competitiveness.
We have the opportunity to
grow and get better."


ASSOCIATED PRESS
In this Nov. 20, 2010 file photo, Texas A&M quarterback Ryan Tannehill (17) and Evan Eike
(65) celebrate with fans after beating Nebraska 9-6 in an NCAA college football game in
College Station, Texas. Texas-A&M dealt a blow to the Big 12 Conference on Wednesday
saying it plans to leave by July 2012 if it is accepted by the SEC or another league.



Texas A&M plans to


leave Big 12 by July


By KRISTIE RIEKEN
Associated Press
HOUSTON The offi-
cial Texas A&M fight song
includes a line that bids
farewell to Texas, "so long
to the orange and white."
By this time next year,
Texas A&M may have said
goodbye to a lot more than
*its storied, century-old
rivalry with Texas.
Texas A&M announced
Wednesday that it will leave
the Big 12 Conference
by July 2012 if it can find
another home, ptefer-
ably in the Southeastern
Conference.
The decision could set
off another round of con-
ference realignment in col-
lege sports and it raises
questions about the future
of the Big 12, which is
starting the football season
with 10 teams after losing
Nebraska and Colorado.
The Big 12 said it would
move quickly to find at
least one replacement for
the Aggies but offered no
timeline.
"The presidents and
chancellors of the nine
remaining member institu-
tions are steadfast in their
commitment to the Big 12,"
Big 12 Commissioner Dan
Beebe said in a statement
"As previously stated, the
conference will move for-
ward aggressively exploring
its membership options."
The Southeastern
Conference said it hadn't
received an application
from Texas A&M to join
the league and that it would
have no further comment.
The SEC has reaffirmed its


12-school membership, but
remains open to expansion
talks.
Leaving the Big 12 "is in
the best interest of Texas
A&M," said university
President R Bowen Loftin,
who formally notified the
league with a letter after
earlier securing details ort
the withdrawal process. He
said he hopes the move
can be amicable and pre-
sumably hopes to negoti-
ate a reasonable exit fee.
'We are seeking to gen-
erate greater visibility
nationwide for Texas A&M
and our championship-
caliber student-athletes, as
well as secure the neces-
sary and Stable financial
resources to. support our
athletic and academic pro-
grams," Loftin said. 'This
is a 100-year decision that
we have addressed care-
fully and rtetlodically."
Texas A&M, which has
been in the Big 12 since
its founding in 1996, said it
will submit an application
to join another, unspecified
conference. If accepted,
Texas A&M will leave the
Big 12, effective June 30,
2012.
Texas said it remains
committed to the Big
12 even with its historic
rivalry with Texas A&M in
jeopardy. But Texas athlet-
ic director DeLoss Dodds
didn't address the game or
even A&M by name.
"As we stated last sum-
mer, we are strong sup-
porters and members' of
the Big 12 conference,"
Dodds said, "Recent events
have not altered our confi-
dence in the league. A Big


12 committee is in place to
look at all options, shaping
the future of the confer-
ence so it will continue to
be one of the top leagues
in the country."
Texas A&M athlet-
ic director Bill Byrne
addressed his school's
decision to leave in a blog
posted Wednesday.
"There have also been
other developments during
the past several months
that have caused a great
deal of uncertainty within
the Big 12," Byrne said
in the blog. "You all know
the landscape of the Big
'12 Conference was altered
by the creation of the
Longhorn Network."
He mentions the net-
work's attempts to televise
high school games and the
"attempt to coerce Big 12
schools to move their foot-
ball games in Austin" to
the network. Byrne also
said that Texas A&M was
not offered the chance to
join the Longhorns in the
venture.
Texas and Texas A&M
first met in football in
1894 and the annual
Thanksgiving game is a
highlight of the season for
many fans. Loftin said that
a "primary criterion" when
negotiating with another
conference would be the
ability to continue the rival-
ry, but there's no guarantee
the new conference or the
Longhorns would agree to
such a deal.
Like Texas, Baylor has
been in the same league
with Texas A&M since the
beginning of the Southwest
Conference in 1914.


COURTESY PHOTO
Team Tumblemania members are (front row, from left) Briley Larsen, Austin Benkoczy and
Allison Vargas. Second row (from left) are Hannah Paul, Casey Hammen, Madison Weber,
Olivia Paul and Kayley Halbrook. Third row (from left) are Katie Vaughn, Sophie Allen,
Joshua Gillen, Brooke Gillingham and Mary Jo McGrath.


Strong summer showing

for Team Tumblemania


From staff reports

Team Tumblemania of
High Springs competed at
two national championships
during the summer.
Team members brought
home 33 Top Ten National
titles including six National
Championships.
The team, which trains
under Marci Schneider,
traveled to Charleston,
W.Va., for the USTA
Trampoline & Tumbling
National Championships
on June 21-25, and to
New Orleans for the AAU
Junior Olympic Games on
July 29-Aug. 1. -
At the USTA Trampoline
& Tumbling National
Championships, athletes
from throughout the
United States competed
in the 'individual events
of Power Tumbling,
Trampoline and Double-
Mini Trampoline.
At the AAU Junior
Olympic Games, the ath-
letes competed for Team
Florida.


At the Junior Olympics,
TeamTumblemania's Casey
Hammen 'of Newberry
earned a gold medal in
Advanced Tumbling, while
Casey Halbrook and Kayley
Halbrook of High Springs
earned a gold medal in
Advanced Synchronized
Trampoline.
Austin Benkoczy of
Fort White earned three
first-place titles, winning
the Intermediate Double-
Mini at the USTA National
Championships and a
gold medal in both Novice
Tumbling and Intermediate
Trampoline at the Junior
Olympics.
Brooke Gillingham of
High Springs and Mary
Jo McGrath of Fort White
also claimed a National
Championships title, taking
first place in Sub-Advanced
Synchronized Trfitipoline.
Additional recognition
went to Joshua Gillen, who
was chosen as the 2011
recipient of the Amanda
Howe Memorial Scholarship
Award at the USTA National


Championships.
Individual team member
highlights were: Sophie
Allen (Newberry), 12th
overall Novice Trampoline;
Gillen, third overall
Advanced Double-Mini;
Gillingham, fifth overall
Sub-Advanced Trampoline;
Kayley Halbrook, sec-
ond overall Sub-Advanced
Tumbling; Briley Larsen
(Fort White), eighth over-
all Novice Trampoline;
McGrath, second overall
Sub-Advanced Trampoline;
Hannah Paul (Gainesville),
ninth overall Sub-Advanced
Double-Mini;
Olivia Paul (Gainesville),
ninth overall Sub-Advanced
Double-Mini; Allison Vargas
(Newberry), fifth overall
Sub-Advanced Trampoline;
Katie Vaughn (High
Springs), fourth overall
Novice Tumbling; Madison
Weber (Alachua), seventh
overall Sub-Advanced
Double-Mini; Hannah Paul
and Allison Vargas, sec-
ond overall Sub-Advanced
Synchronized Trampoline.


ABOVE: Players at the final Hold 'em table
at the Champions Tournament at American
Legion Post 57 are Thomas Myrick (from left),
Andrew Porter, dealer Keith Blackie,
Jim Grimsley, Chris Whitfield, Dee May,
Chase Capallia, Robert Lamberson,
Bobby Brownell and Marshall Garner,
LEFT: Winners at the Hold 'em table at the
Champions Tournament at American Legion
Post 57 are Dee May (front left) and
Chase Capallia; top prize winner
Robert Lamberson (back left) and
Bobby Brownell. Cheryll Kellett, Bob Tarlton
and Jarod Pruett were consolation winners.


Hold 'em at hit at Post 57


By TIM KIRBY
tkirby@lakecityreporter.corn

Texas Hold 'em is taking
a hold at American Legion
Post 57.
Under the direction of
Dennis Smith, the weekly
poker tournaments at
Post 57 are soon to complete
a third season. The tourna-
ments began with one day
a week and expanded from
two to three days over the
years.
Champions Tournament
playing days are Mondays,
Thursday and Saturdays.
'There is no charge for
chips," Smith wrote. "All
players start with 500 in
chips and can get more


chips by buying food and
beverages and tipping the
dealers."
A $100 nightly prize is'
put up by Post 57 and a
quarterly champions tour-
nament for weekly winners
pays $500. The top four
players in each week game
qualify for the champions
tournament. The more qual-
ifying days a player has, the
more chips lie gets for the
quarterly tournament.
Smith has run charity
fundraising tournaments
for Lake City Kiwanis and
the Shriners Club, and
American Legion Post 57
generates income from the
champions tournament.
Much like the pot holes


in the golf blitzes, there is
a progressive royal flush
jackpot for the champions
tournament.
The opening week
for the current quarterly
tournament began Aug. 22.
Qualifiers are:
Aug. 22 Frank
Capallia, first; DanielAdams,
second; Brad Woods, third;
Marylan Kerley, fourth;
Aug. 25 Frank
Capallia, first; Thomas
Myrick, second; Koby
Adams, third; George
Roberson, fourth;
Aug. 27 Frank
Capallia, first; Judith
Berube, second; Bob
Tarlton, third; Joseph May,
fourth.


Page Editor: Brandon Finley, 754-0420










Page Editor: Emogene Graham, 754-0415 LAKE CITY REPORTER ADVICE & COMICS THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 1, 2011 4B


DILBERT


BABY BLUES


BLONDIE


BEETLE BAILEY


HAGARTHE HORRIBLE


DEAR ABBY


Confused young mom torn

between ex and new lover


DEAR ABBY: I am 19
and have a 10-month-old
daughter. Her dad and I
broke up five months ago
because we were fighting
a lot, most of it caused by
him. I have been dating a
new guy, "Ron," for three
months.
Lately, my baby's dad
has been trying to con-
vince me he has changed,
and he wants me to take
him back. I still have
feelings for him, but I'm
in love with Ron. I don't
want to lose what I have
for a shot in the dark,
but what if my ex really
HAS changed? Plus, the
relationship I have with
Ron is a long-distance one.
As much as I'd love it to
work, I don't know how to
deal with the distance. Do
you have any advice on
how to make it less heart-
breaking when we are
apart? YOUNG MOM IN
FLORIDA
DEAR YOUNG MOM:
If you were in love with
your baby's father, you
wouldn't have fallen in
love with Ron so fast If
you were in love with Ron,
you wouldn't be debating
whether to reunite with
your argumentative ex
because he's geographi-
cally closer.
The way adults deal with
extended separations from
the people they love is to
stay busy. They work, take
classes, volunteer their
extra time to causes they


Abigail Van Buren
www.dearobby.com
believe in. They do not
bounce like tennis balls
from romance to romance.
And if they have a 10-
month-old, they devote
their attention to helping
their little one go from a
crawl to a walk.



DEAR ABBY: My daugh-
ter, 13, and son, 11, have
been taking piano lessons
for six years. My 5-year-
old has just started. They
are all bright children, and
the lessons were at their
request I told them they
would not be able to quit
until they were "older,"
but now the two older kids
are fighting me to quit I
tell them I have never met
anyone who was glad he or
she stopped taking piano
lessons. I say the lessons
are good for their brains,
teach them discipline, and
it sure beats surfing the
computer or playing video
games. Not only: are they
making me miserable, but
their attitude is rubbing off
on the little one.
My husband is
deceased, and he always


thought it was a good idea
for them to take lessons.
The kids are now involving
my mother, who is taking
their side. What should
I do? DISCORDANT
FAMILY, NEW CASTLE,
.PA.
DEAR DISCORDANT:
Your older children have
had many years to learn to
love the piano. If it hasn't
happened by now, forcing
them to continue won't
improve the situation.
Children are more coop-
erative when they have
choices and ownership of
the outcome.
Because you would.
prefer your daughter prac-
tice the piano rather than
surf the Net or play video
games, ask your 13-year-
old what constructive activ-
ity she plans to substitute
in its place. You might be
pleasantly surprised by her
answer.
Tell your 11-year-old and
5-year-old that they WILL
be taking lessons until
they are 13, at which point
they, too, will be given the
choice of what they would
like to substitute subject
to your approval. If you do,
there will be less conflict,
and your youngest child
will no longer be sur-
rounded by the same level
of negativity.

Write Dear Abby at
www.DearAbby.com or
P.O. Box 69440, Los
Angeles, CA 90069.


HOROSCOPES


SNUFFY SMITH


ZITS


GARFIELD


B.C.


FRANK & ERNEST


L j L


ARIES (March 21-April
19): Stubbornness and
overreacting are likely
to put you in a tight spot.
Before acting or saying
something you'll regret,
back up and rethink your
strategy. Although patience
isn't your strong point, it
will be necessary to take a
wait-and-see attitude. ***
TAURUS (April 20-May
20): Own whatever situa-
tion you face. Love is in the
stars, and time should be
put aside to nurture a rela-
tionship that means a lot to
you. Self-improvement proj-
ects will go well. ***
GEMINI (May 21-June
20): You can talk all you
want, but if you aren't
getting your point across,
you will have to resort to
taking action. Disciplined
actions will make a far
greater impression than
inconsistency and empty
promises. ***
CANCER (June 21-
July 22): Think matters
through. Don't make
changes unless you are
sure you can live with the
outcome. A sudden move
will result in anger and
disappointment. Someone
is likely to force you to
be honest about what you
really contribute. **
LEO (July 23-Aug. 22):
Take care of responsi-
bilities without making a
fuss. Your ability to follow


THE LAST WORD
Eugenia Last

through will impress some-
one who is considering
you for a better position.
Opportunities are pres-
ent; all you have to do is a
good job and to be a team
player. ****
VIRGO (Aug. 23-
Sept 22): Jump in and
do whatever it takes to
make things work. Your
hands-on contribution will
impress someone. Don't be
afraid to do things a little
differently. Your ability to
think outside the box and
offer feasible suggestions
will win praise.***
LIBRA (Sept 23-Oct
22): You can offer sug-
gestions, but don't offer
to take on a responsibility
that doesn't belong to you.
Emotional upset is appar-
ent due to a disagreement,
with a business or personal
partner. Focus on learning
something new or help-
ing a cause in which you
believe. ***
SCORPIO (Oct 23-
Nov. 21): Say less and do
more. You have to show
others what you can do. A
personal relationship will
lead to greater opportu-
nity. Opportunity is within
reach; don't hesitate to
grab what you want and
move forward. ***


SAGTITARIUS (Nov. 22-
Dec. 21): You may be able
to talk your way in or out
of a situation you face, but
when it comes to affairs
of the heart, it won't be so
easy. Don't take anyone for
granted or you will suffer
the consequences. A prom-
ise made is one you must
keep. Travel delays can be
expected. ****
CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan.
19): Strive for perfection and
advancement You can make
changes at home that will
improve your living situation
and your money matters.
Make the first move and you
will set a standard that every-
one else will have to live up
to. **
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-
Feb. 18): Remember past
experiences before you
dive into a situation that
will cost you emotionally,
physically or financially. It
is best to clear up any situ-
ation before you make a
decision that will alter your
personal life. **
PISCES (Feb. 19-March
20): Opportunity knocks
personally and with regard
to partnerships. Look at
your options and prepare
to get involved in some-
thing that you've wanted to
do for some time. Money
is heading your way
through an investment,
settlement, rebate or win-
ning. *****


"LTMPH XOMTTE XGFA,


SF N R X O J G K O


OC AC LP NCI JTHH.' GKA MTGHHP,
OWGO'X GHH F'L TBTM OMPFKV OC
A C E G R H LYYGMOKTP

PREVIOUS SOLUTION: "Be a yardstick of quality. Some people aren't used to
an environment where excellence is expected." Steve Jobs


(c) 2011 by NEA, Inc. 9-1


FOR BETTER OR WORSE
SO- --rFLL ME BoUT ,E
1Retflia O&OU I-iPE 1 V^-,5^
WlII-A THE nFK. 1; J TtE


CLASSIC PEANUTS


CELEBRITY CIPHER


by Luis Campos
Celebrity Cipher cryptograms are created from quotations by famous people, past and present.
Each letter in the cipher stands for another.
TODAY'S CLUE: I equals B












Classified Department: 755-5440


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In Print and Online
www.iliccityrcportcr.coIl


Legal

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE 3RD JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN
AND FOR COLUMBIA COUNTY,
FLORIDA
CIVIL DIVISION
CASE NO.: 11-243-CA
RONALD D. POOLE
Plaintiff,
vs.
LUCYS N. PORRO,
ANY AND ALL UNKNOWN PAR-
TIES CLAIMING BY, THROUGH,
UNDER, AND AGAINST THE
HEREIN NAMED
DEFENDANTS) WHO ARE NOT
KNOWN TO. BE DEAD OR
ALIVE, WHETHER SAID UN-
KNOWN PARTIES MAY CLAIM
AN INTEREST AS SPOUSES,
HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES
OR OTHER CLAIMANTS
Defendant
NOTICE OF ACTION
TO: LUCYS N. PORRO, and any
and all unknown parties claiming
by,, through, under, and against the
herein named defendants) who are
not known to be dead or alive,
whether said unknown parties may
claim an interest as spouses, heirs,
devisees, grantees or other claimants.
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action
for Foreclosure of Mortgage on the
following described property: THE
NORTH 1/2 OF THE NORTH 1/2
OF THE SOUTH 1/2 OF THE
SOUTHWEST 1/4 OF THE
SOUTHWEST 1/4 OF SECTION
21, TOWNSHIP 2 SOUTH, RANGE
16 EAST, PUBLIC RECORDS OF
COLUMBIA COUNTY, FLORIDA.
has been filed against you and you
are required to serve a copy of your
defenses, if any, to it on Branden
Strickland, Strickland Law Firm, PL,
3132 Ponce De Leon Blvd, Coral
Gables, FL 33134, within thirty days
after the first publication of this no-
tice and file the original with the
Clerk of this Court either before
service on Plaintiff's attorney or im-
mediately thereafter, otherwise a de-
fault will be entered against you for
the relief demanded in the complaint.
WITNESS my hand and the seal of
this Court this 17 day of August,
2011.
P. DeWitt Cason
As Clerk of the Circuit Court
By:/s/ B. Scippio
As Deputy Clerk
05527443
August 25, 2011
September 1.2011
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
THIRD JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN
AND FO COLUMBIA COUNTY,
FLORIDA
Case No.: 2011-768-DR
Division:
KAREN JOY NELMES,
Petitioner
and
TIMOTHY M. NELMES,
Respondent
NOTICE OF ACTION FOR PUBLI-
CATION
TO: Timothy M. Nelmes
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action
for Dissolution of Marriage, includ-
ing claims for dissolution of mar-
riage, payment of debts, division of
real and personal property, and for
payments of support, has been filed
against you. You are required to
serve a copy of your written defens-
es, if any, to this action on Stephen
M. Witt, Petitioner's attorney, whose
address is PO Box 2064, Lake City,
Florida 32056, on or before Septem-
ber 8, 2011, and file the original with
the clerk of this court at Columbia
County Courthouse, 135 N. Hernan-
do St., Lake City, Florida 32055, ei-
ther before service on Petitioner's at-
torney or immediately thereafter;
otherwise a default will be entered
against you for the relief demanded
in the petition.
WARNING: Rule 12.285, Florida
Family Law Rules of Procedure, re-
quired certain automatic disclosure
of documents and information. Fail-
ure to comply can result in sanctions,
including dismissal or striking of
pleadings.
ATED this 10th day of August,
2011
CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT
By:/s/ Trish Brewington *
Deputy Clerk
(seal)
05527320
August 18, 25, 2011
September 1,8,2011
Public Auction
1998 Nissan SUV
VIN# JN8AR05S7WW212862
1996 Chevy PU
VIN# 1GCCS19X6T8130318
at Auto Emporium of Lake City Inc.
2832 SE Main Blvd ,
Lake City FL. 32025
in Columbia County on September
15, 2011 at 10:30AM
05527622
September 1,2011









Lake City Reporter


Lawn & Landscape Service

J&M LAWN Service & more for
all your outdoor needs. Don't
waste your time or weekend,
Free Estimate. 386-984-2187

Services

DIVORCE, BANKRUPTCY,
RESUMES.
other court approved forms-
386-961-5896.


Legal

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT, THIRD
JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR
COLUMBIA COUNTY, FLORIDA
CASE NO. 10-470-CA
ELLISVILLE INVESTMENTS,
INC.,
Plaintiff,
vs.
NKRP, INC., daFlorida corporation ,
KUSH B. PATHAK and NIMISH K.
PATHAK, Husband and Wife, SA-
KALCHAND S. PATEL, and LISA
ECHEVERRI, EXECUTIVE DI-
RECTOR, DEPARTMENT OF
REVENUE, STATE OF FLORIDA,
Defendants.
CLERK'S NOTICE OF SALE UN-
DER F.S. CHAPTER 45
NOTICE IS GIVEN that, in accord-
ance with the Summary Final Judg-
ment of Foreclosure dated August
18, 2011, in the above-styled cause. I
will sell to the highest and best bid-
der for cash at the Columbia County
Courthouse, Courtroom 1, 173
Northeast Hemando Avenue, Lake
City, Florida 32055 at 11:00 a.m. on
September 21, 2011, the following
described property:
TOWNSHIP 6 SOUTH RANGE
17 EAST
SECTION 3: COMMENCE AT
THE NORTHEAST CORNER OF
SECTION 3, TOWNSHIP 6
SOUTH, RANGE 17 EAST, CO-
LUMBIA COUNTY, FLORIDA
AND RUN THENCE S 0"52'01" E
ALONG THE EAST LINE OF
SAID SECTION 3, 1748.50 FEET;
THENCE S 55'17'59" W, 1515.56
FEET TO THE EAST RIGHT-OF-
WAY LINE OF STATE ROAD NO.
25 (U.S. HWY. 41 AND 441);
THENCE N 0'56'01" W ALONG
SAID EAST RIGHT-OF-WAY
LINE, 12.97 FEET TO THE POINT
OF BEGINNING; THENCE CON-
TINUE N 0'56'01" W ALONG
SAID EAST RIGHT-OF-WAY
LINE, 147.00 FEET; THENCE N
89"03'59" E, 200.00 FEET;
THENCE N 0O56'01" W 453.45
FEET: THENCE S 84'56'31" E
480.60 FEET TO THE POINT OF
CURVE OF A CURVE CONCAVE
TO THE RIGHT HAVING A RA-
DIUS OF 1577.0 FEET AND A TO-
TAL CENTRAL ANGLE OF
9T23'21"; THENCE SOUTHEAS-
TERLY ALONG THE ARC OF
SAID CURVE 221.39 FEET, SAID
ARC HAVING A CHORD DIS-
ANCE OF 221.20 FEET AND A
CHORD BEARING OF S 81'02'06"
E; THENCE S 55"17'59" W 494.24
FEET; THENCE S '0"56'01" E
237.35 FEET; THENCE S 89'
03'59" W 485.0 FEET TO THE
POINT OF BEGINNING.
ALSO: A NON-EXCLUSIVE PER-
PETUAL EASEMENT OVER AND
ACROSS A 20-FOOT DRIVEWAY
AS MORE PARTICULARLY DE-
SCRIBED AS FOLLOWS:
TOWNSHIP 6 SOUTH RANGE
17 EAST
SECTION 3: COMMENCE AT
THE NORTHEAST CORNER OF
SECTION 3, TOWNSHIP 6
SOUTH, RANGE 17 EAST. CO-
LUMBIA COUNTY, FLORIDA
AND RUN THENCE S 0'52'01" E
ALONG THE EAST LINE OF
SAID SECTION 3, 1748.50 FEET;
THENCE S 55'17'59" W, 1515.56
FEET TO THE EAST RIGHT-OF-
WAY LINE OF STATE ROAD NO.
25 (U.S. HWY. 41 AND 441);
THENCE N 0O56'01" W ALONG
SAID EAST RIGHT-OF-WAY
LINE, 12.97 FEET; THENCE CON-
TINUE N 0'56'01" W ALONG
SAID EAST RIGHT-OF-WAY
LINE, 147.00 FEET; THENCE N
89*03'59" E, 20.00 FEET TO THE
POINT OF BEGINNING; THENCE
N 0"56'01" W 110.98 FEET;
THENCE S 89'03'59" W 20.0 FEET
TO THE EAST RIGHT-OF-WAY
LINE OF U.S. 441; THENCE N
0'56'01" W ALONG SAID EAST
RIGHT-OF-WAY LINE 20.0 FEET;
THENCE N 89'03'59" E 40.0 FEET;
THENCE S 0'56'01" E 130.98
FEET; THENCE S 89'03'59" W
20.00 FEET TO THE POINT OF
BEGINNING.
ANY PERSON CLAIMING AN IN-
TEREST IN THE SURPLUS FROM
THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER
THAN THE PROPERTY OWNER
AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS
PENDENS MUST FILE A CLAIM
WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE
SALE.
Dated August 19, 2011
P. DeWitt Cason
Clerk of Court
By:/s/ P.A. Perry
Deputy Clerk
05527438
August 25, 2011
September 1, 2011

NOTICE OF BOARD MEETING
TO WHOM IT MAY CONCERN
The District Board of Trustees, Flori-
da Gateway College, will hold a re-
ception at 3:30p.m. followed by a
public meeting at 4:00 p.m. on Tues-
day, September 13, 2011, in the Dix-
ie County Public Library, 16328 SE
Hwy. 19, Cross City, FL. 32628.
Topics of consideration will be rou-
tine college business. Any person
wishing to be heard on any agenda
matter will be provided an opportu-
nity to do so by appearing before the
Board in the Board Room of the Dix-
ie County Public Library.
All objections to this notice and pro-
priety of the scheduled meeting
should be filed with Florida Gateway
College prior to noon, Friday, Sep-
tember 9, 2011. All legal issues
should be brought to the Trustees' at-
tention and an attempt made to re-
solve them prior to the meeting.
Please notify the President's Office
immediately if you require accom-
modation for participation in the
meeting.
05527643
September 1,2011



100 Opportunities


AVON!! Only $10 to start!
Earn bonus $ up to $150+
1-800-275-9945 pin #4206
www.youravon.com/tdavies


100 Opportunities


05527485
City of Gainesville Fleet
Mechanic
Career Opportunity with
Excellent Benefits. Requires a
HS diploma/GED & 5 years
Fleet/diesel mechanic
experience. Apply today at
www.cityofgainiesville.jobs
AA/EO/DFWP/VP

05527553
Large Southeast Restaurant
chain is now accepting resumes
for Management positions for
several Florida markets.
Competitive wages,
Advancement opportunities,
Complete Training package,
Health, Dental and Life
Insurance Benefits available.
DFWP EOE
Please send resumes to:
donni@heritagemanagement.net
or fax to: 352-387-00l1.

05527588
NOW HIRING
Cashiers & Baggers for High
Springs fruit & gift stores.
Apply in Person at Florida
Citrus Center (Chevron)
18603 NW CR 236, High
Springs (exit 404 & 1-75)

05527636




FLORIDA SHERIFFS
YOUTH RANCHES, INC.
DIRECTOR OF HUMAN
RESOURCES
Bachelor's degree in personnel
management, business
administration, or related field
w/ 3 years experience in a
human resources position.
5 years supervisory experience
and PHR/SPHR preferred.
$47,500 annually with
EXCELLENT BENEFITS
SEND/FAX APPLICATION
hrjobs@youthranches.org
Florida Sheriffs
Youth Ranches
PO Box 2000
Boys Ranch, FL 32064
Fax: (386) 842-1055
EOE/DFWP

0I552M00l
Earn Extra Money
Deliver the new AT&T Real
Yellow Pages
in the Lake City area. FT/PT,
daily work, quick pay, must be
18 yrs+, have drivers
license & insured vehicle.
(800) 422-1955 Ext. 1
8:00A-4:30P Mon-Fri


10io0 Job
Opportunities

05527641



Maintenance Person
Convenience Store Group is
seeking an experienced
Maintenance person. A/C &
Refrigeration, Electrical,
plumbing and carpentry
experience would be a plus
Conipetitive salary, bonus, paid
holidays, vacation, company
vehicle and opportunity to join a
progressive and fast growing
company
Fax or Email Resume to:
dtumer@fasttrackstores.com
Fax 1-352-333-1161

CDL Driver 2 yrs exp clean MVR
for local company. Apply between
8am & Noon only. Deadline isn-
noon Sept 2. 247 NW Hillandale
Glen Lake City No phone calls
CDL Drivers Wanted,
dedicated routes, Target Account,
Out of Lake City, FL
SCall AJ 229-630-0021
Mechanic needed for Truck shop,
must have own tools, apply
Southern Specialized, 1812 NW
Main Blvd., 386-752-9754
NEED CNC Machinist
Must have Metal Working
Machine Shop exp. Send resume,
Quality Mill, 3631 US Hwy. 90
East, Lake City, FL 32055.
Security Officers needed. Lake
City & Live Oak area, must have
current D Security Lic., Clear
background, Drivers Lic, phone,
Diploma/GED. Benefits, DFWP
EEO Must Apply at:
www.dsisecurity.com MB 1000084
Sewing Machine Operator
with experience,
Good hourly rate
Call Hafners 386-755-6481
Veterinarian Assist/Technician
needed. Exp desired. Must be able
to work flexible schedule & Sat.
mornings. Apply at Columbia
Animal Hospital 2418 S. Marion
Ave. Lake City. No phone calls.

120A Medical
120 Employment

05527328
LEARN TO DRAW BLOOD
Local Phlebotomy Course
offered in Lake City, FLA
Certificate program.
(904)566-1328

Counselor for substance abuse
program in Baker Correctional In-
stitution. BA w/2yrs exp., M-F day
shift F/T, $30,000 to start, E-mail
resume to sheliarand@aol.com.or
fax to 386-752-2387
Pharmacy Technician needed.
Must be Florida registered. Min. 1
year exp required. Preferably in a
retail environment. Excellent
computer & communication skills
needed. FT position. Competitive
pay. Send reply to Box 05074, C/O
The Lake City Reporter, P.O. Box
1709, Lake City, FL, 32056


141 Babysitters
Loving mom would like to care for
your child. Full or Part time in my
home. Near downtown. Only 1
opening avail. 386-438-5394

SSchools &
.240 Education

05527283
Interested in a Medical Career?
Express Training offers
courses for beginners & exp
Nursing Assistant, $479
next class-08/22/10
Phlebotomy national certifica-
tion, $800 next class-10/10/11

Continuing education
Fees incl. books, supplies, exam
fees. Call 386-755-4401 or
expresstrainingservices.com


310 Pets & Supplies
PUBLISHER'S NOTE
Florida Law 828.29 requires dogs
and cats being sold to be at least 8
weeks old and have a health
certificate from a licensed
veterinarian documenting they
have mandatory shots and are
free from intestinal and external
parasites. Many species of wild-
life must be licensed by Florida
Fish and Wildlife. If you are
unsure, contact the local
office for information.


361 Farm Equipment
84 Ford 4610 Tractor.
2WD, Solid
2005 motor,$7,500. OBO
386-867-0005

402 Appliances
White Whirlpool Dishwasher
2008 used 3 months
$75 obo
386-963-3295


407 Computers -
ACER Flat screen monitor.
15 inch. $60. obo
386-755-9984 or
386-292-2170
HP Computer,
$80.00
386-755-9984 or
386-292-2170


408 Furniture
Coffee table and
2 square end tables.
All with glass tops. $90.00
386-758-4755


420 Wanted to Buy
K&H TIMBER
We Buy Pine Hardwood &
Cypress. Large or small tracts.
Call 386-961-1961.
Wanted Junk Cars, Trucks, Vans.
$275 & up CASH! Free Pick Up!
NO tide needed !386-878-9260
After 5pm 386- 752-3648.

430 Garage Sales

BYRDS STORE CR 49. Fri.
Sat.&'Stm, (8-5). 247%240R -t."
49R, 247 Beachville. CR 49N, 252
Pinemount Rd CR 49L. Lots of
antiques, new items inside, outside
if no Rain watch for signs.
FRI. 9/2 & SAT. 9/3, 8-?,
412 SW Deanna Terrace, off Sis-
ters Welcome & Marvin Burnett
Rd .furn., clothes and much more
Huge Moving Sale. Sat. 7a-? 615
NW Zack Dr. (Emerald Lakes)
Lots of clothes, strollers, baby
stuff, hshold, furn., & much more!
MOVING SALE
Fri. 9/2 & Sat. 9/3 8a-3p.
493 SW Angela Terr.
Everything must go!!!!
PUBLISHER'S NOTE
All Yard Sale Ads
Must be Pre-Paid.

Sat 9am-? Pinemount to Barwick
Right on Parker Left on
Mollie. Furniture, clothes and lots
more. Look for signs.
Yard/Estate sale. Sat-Mon. Ellis-
ville turn rt on Otis Howell to Her-
long. Look for signs. Baby items,
TV, travel trailer, antiques, misc.
Yard/Moving: Sept 3, 7-12. SW
Harmony Ln. Off Hwy 47 S.
Tools, lawn equip, incl riding
mower & attachments, air comp.,
too much to list., hshold. Come
early to not miss out. But no early
buyers before 7am.


440 Miscellaneous
Stop gnat & Mosquito bites! Buy
Swamp Gator All natural insect re-
pellent. Family safe. Use head to
toe. Available at The Home Depot.


Mederd \



PHYSICAL


THERAPIST.
Home Health Care Agency
servicing Columbia and
surrounding counties
seeking Full-Time
experienced Physical
Therapist
Competitive Salary &
Benefits Available,
Please call contact
Lynn or Cindy at
386-758-3312
or apply online at
www.almostfamily'com


8 uwannee


Valley


E electric


Cooperative

Suwannee Valley Cooperative, Inc.
GIS/Mapping Data Specialist 1
Suwannee Valley Electric Cooperative, Inc. has an immediate opening
for a GIS/Mapping Data Specialist position. This position reports to
the Director of Engineering and will be responsible for maintaining
Geographic Information System Maps for the Cooperative. A high
school diploma and an Associate of Science degree or work equivalent
experience with a minimum of 1 year experience with GIS Mapping in
the electric utility field is required.
Applications and job descriptions may be picked up at the Suwannee
Valley Electric administration building, 11340 100th St., Live Oak. The
job description can be viewed on www.svec-coop.com. Resumes and
applications can be turned in at the above address with Attn: Vicky
Talmadge, or emailed to vickyt@svec-coop,com. The deadline for
accepting applications is Tuesday, September 6, 2011.
SVEC Is an equal opportunity employer.


IBUYI


SLLsiiT


FND IT14














440 Miscellaneous
Summer Barbecue Special
Tow Behind
Grill/Smoker, $1,250 OBO.
386-719-4802

450 Good Things
45 to Eat
GREEN PEANUTS For Sale
Graded and washed.
$30.00 a bushel.
386-752-3434


460 Firewood
Firewood for Sale. $65. per Truck
Load. Rick 386-867-1039 or Joey
965-0288 if no answer pls leave
message we will call you back.

630 Mobile Homes
630 for Rent
2 OR 3 BEDROOMS
Clean, Quiet Park $475-$525.mo
Water, septic, garbage included
758-2280 References, NO PETS!
2&3 BR MH. $395 $650. mo.
plus deposit. Water & sewer fur-
nished. Cannon Creek MHP
386-752-6422
3/2 Large MH, small park, near
FGCC, Small pets ok, $500 dep
$575 mo w/12 mo lease
386-752-1971 or 352-281-2450
#3/2.5 S of Lake City, (Branford
area) $600 mo plus security
386-590-0642 or 386-867-1833
www.suwanneevalleyproperties.com
3BR/2BA BRANFORD area
Close to River. Nice yard.
Must see! Call for info.
386-752-7814 or 386-719-7010
3BR/2BA MH
Water & Garage included No Pets.
$550. mo. $400. security deposit,.
386-752-9898 or 386-365-3633
LG clean 3br's $450. -$650. mo. +
dep. Also, 2br mobile home's
available. No Pets.
5 Points area. 386-961-1482
Mobile Homes for rent in
White Springs, Lake City & Ft.
White. Contact 386-623-3404
or 386-397-2779 *
New 2br/2ba off Country Club. 1/2
ac. lot Front, back porch & storage
bldg. $600 mo. $600 sec. No Pets!
386-752-5911 or 466-2266

640 Mobile Homes
640 for Sale

05527374
!!ATTENTION!!.
We purchase used mobile
homes. Call North Pointe
Homes, Gainesville
352-872-5566

05527375 !!!LOOK!!!
Before you but a Mobile Home
check out North Pointe Homes
in Gainesville--Hugh Discounts!
credit Scores Don't matter. Call
for Free Approval! Jacobson
Homes Factory Outlet (352)872-
5566 or mrb3371()hotmail.com

05527376
NEW USED- REPO'S
Your Volume Giant! North
Pointe Homes. Millions to Lend.
Credit Scores 575 = 10% down.
Gainesville (352)872-5566 or
walker-davidilive.com

Palm Harbor Homes
4/2 From 499 Mo Loaded
3/2 From 399 Mo Loaded
Homes on Your Lot 0 Down
800-622-2832

710 AUnfurnished Apt.
710 For Rent








1BR APT.
Downtown Location, Clean.
$450 mo, plus Security.
NO PETS. Call 386-755-3456
2/2 w/garage & washer/dryer
hookups. West side of town,
Call for details
386-755-6867
2BR/1BA. Close to town.
$565.mo plus deposit.
Includes water & sewer.
386-965-2922
Amber Wood Hills Apts.
Private Patio area. Beautiful yard.
Washer/dryer hkup. Free water &
sewer. 1/1, 2/1. Move in special.
386-754-1800. wwwmyflapts.com
Columbia Arms Apt. located 1/2
mi from V.A. & Winn Dixie. Pet
Friendly. Move in Special $199.
Pool, laundry & balcony.
386-754-1800. www.myflapts.com
Great location W of 1-75, spacious
deluxe 2br apts., garage, W/D
hookup, patio. $600/700 & up, +
Sec, 386-965-5560 or 344-3715
Greentree Townhouse
Summer special. 2/1, 2/1.5. Free
water & sewer. Balcony & patio.
Laundry. Behind Kens on Hwy 90.
386-754-1800 wwwmyflapts.com

ONE 51 PLACE APTS
Alachua
MOVE IN SPECIALS


1, 2, & 3 bedrooms
Call TODAY 386-462-0656
or visit us at oneSlplace.com

Redwine Apartments. Move in
special $199. Limited time. Pets
welcome. with 5 complexes,
we have a home for you.
386-754-1800. www.rryflapts.com
Summer Special! 12th mo Free
w/signed yr lease. Updated, w/tile
floors/fresh paint. Great area.
From $450.+sec. 386-752-9626
Unfurnished Apt Eastside
Village Realty, Inc .2 bedroom
I bath Duplex must be 55+ yrs of
age Call Denise Bose @
386-752-5290


710 Unfurni
710 For Ren


LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 1, 2011 Class

wished Apt. 805 Lots for Sale 810 Home for Sale '810 Home for Sale


Wayne Manor Apts.
Move in $199. Summer special.
2/1, washer/dryer. Behind Kens off
Hwy 90. 386-754-1800
www.myflapts.com
Windsor Arms Apartments.
Summer special $199. Move in!
2/1, 2/1.5, 2/2. Pet Friendy. Free
200 ch. Dish. Washer/dryer hkup.
386-754-1800. www.myflapts.com

720 Furnished Apts.
720 For Rent

Rooms for Rent. Hillcrest, Sands,
Columbia. All furnished. Electric,
cable, fridge, microwave. Weekly
or monthly rates. 1 person $135,
2 persons $150. weekly
386-752-5808
Studio Apt. Private. Rent incl util-
ities, Satellite TV, appliances,
(washer/dryer). No pets 386-963-
4767 or 292-0385 Available 9/1

73O Unfurnished
730 Home For Rent,

'09 Executive Home for rent on 41
acres. 4br/3.5ba Available
October. Horses/outdoor pets ok.
$2000/mo but all terms negotiable
for right caretaker. 386-209-4610
2BR house $630.mo $630. dep.
Also, 2br apt. $530. mo $530 dep.
Conveniently close to the VA and
shopping. 386-344-2972
2BR/1BA Kitchen and Den. on
Alachua. $500. mo.
First & security.
386-397-0602
/ 2/1 879 Poplar St. $600. mo.
' 3/2 Highlands Loop $700.mo.
/ 2/1 442 Praire St $650.mo.
All require First and last...
386-755-3649
Please leave msg., Only in office
Tues Thur. 8am 4pm
3 br/2ba house, 1206 McFarlane
Avenue. Avail. 9/1/11. $850 mo
$400 sec dep. 904-376-0620 or
904-813-8864 for appt. No pets!
3/2 by Westside Elementary,
custom built home
$1050.00 per month.
Scott 352-318-8117
3BR/1.5 BA Large lot. Very clean
with storage shed. Quiet area.
$850 mo. + $850. dep.
386-752-7578
4B/1.5 BA, brick house for rent.
$850 a month & $550 security.
No pets!
386-752-9898 or 386-365-3633.
4BR BRICK home.
Azalea Park. $750. mo.
$750. security.
386-397-2619 or 386-365-1243
4br/2ba CHA Brick, 1200 sqft
lac.. Close to FGCC, CR 245A.
Ceramic tile/carpet, $800 mo $800
dep (904)708-8478 App. req'd
Brick 3br/2ba Large yard, garage,
CH/A. 189 Stanley Ct. Lake City.
$950. mo + $1000 dep.
Call 386-365-8543
LULU, FL 3/2 recently
remodeled. CH/A, large porches.
$650. mo + dep.
386-752-3444 or 961-3031
Remodeled 3br/2ba Brick. In town
1750 sqft. Lg lot. Includes washer,
dryer, stove, & fridge. Quiet area
$985. mo $985 dep. 386-752-7578

70A Business &
750 Office Rentals
FOR LEASE: Downtown office
space. Convenient to
Court house.
Call 386-755-3456
For Lease: E Baya Ave. Two -
1000 sqft office space units or
combined for 2000 sqft. 386-984-
0622 or weekends 386-497-4762
NICE OFFICE SPACE for lease.
Oak Hill Plaza. 900 sqft
from $450 a month
Tom 386-961-1086 DCA Realtor
SUB SHOP for lease.
All Equip. Avail. Old Willy J's
Across from Wal-Mart
386-623-2244


790 Vacation Rentals

Horseshoe Beach RV Lot.
Nice comer Lot with shade trees.
$295. mo Water/electric included
386-235-3633 or 352-498-5986
Scalloping Horseshoe Beach Spcl
Gulf Front 2br, w/lg porch, dock,
fish sink. wkend $395./wk $895.
386-235-3633/352-498-5986
alwaysonvacation.com #419-181
"Florida's Last Frontier"


805 Lots for Sale
Foreclosure! 59.98 Ac. Close to
Suwannee River w/boat ramps &
Springs. Ideal parcel for your site
built or manuf. home. $139,000!
MLS# 78083 386-344-7662
Lots for Sale Eastside
Village Realty, Inc. buildable
vacant lot hight & dry in a estab-
lished neighbor priced @ $40,000.
Call Denise Bose @ 752-5290
Owner Financing. River comm &
nature lover's dream in Lee. 15
wooded ac by the Withlacoochee.
Property is already subdivided
MLS 75576 $48,000 623-6896
PUBLISHER'S NOTE


All real estate advertising in this
newspaper is subject to the fair
housing act which makes it illegal
to advertise "any preference,
limitation, or discrimination based
on race, color, religion, sex,
disability, familial status or nation-
al origin; or any intention to make
such preference, limitation or
discrimination." Familial status
includes children under the age of
18 living with parents or legal
custodians, pregnant women and
people securing custody of chil-
dren under the age of 18. This
newspaper will not knowingly
accept any advertising for real es-
tate which is in violation of the


law. Our readers are hereby in-
formed that all dwellings adver-
tised in this newspaper are availa-
ble on an equal opportunity basis.
To complain of discrimination call
HUD toll free at 1-800-669-9777,
the toll free
telephone number to the hearing
impaired is 1-800-927-9275.


810 Home for Sale

0.5 acre tract has 441 (4 lane)
frontage. 1/2 miles from Target
distribution. 2/1.5 currently zoned
residential. MLS#78506 $91,000
R.E.O. Realty Group 867-1271
2 Mobile homes on 5 ac. above
ground pool. (1)1800 sqft. &
(l)1500sqft.$235,000 $139,888
MLS 77552 Brittany Stoeckert
Results Realty 386-397-3473
3/2 Brick Home w/1 car garage,
Metal roof,, porch w/swing, detach
carport $96,000 MLS#77780,
Jo Lytte Remax 386-365-2821
www.jolytie.loriidii-prioperty-scarcli.coin
3/2 Split floor plan built in 2010
on 2 acres.. Master bath with large
tub & standing shower. Trey ceil-
ings MLS#78520, $114,900
R.E.O. Realty Group 867-1271
4/2 fenced yard,
2 car garage, Fairly new roof &
HVAC Shed, fenced back yard.
MLS#77602, $162,500, R.E.O.
Realty Group 867-1271
4/2 op I ac. Modular home. Im-
maculate cond. New carpet, roof,
AC. more. Barn/workshop
$115,000 MLS 78833 Brittany
Results Realty 386-397-3473
Almost 17ac., spacious 3br/2ba
home, paved rd. Near Itchetucknee
Spgs. Pole barn, gated, fenced.
MLS76902 $164,900 Brodi Allred
623-0906. Westfield Realty Group
Awesome Find! 3br/2ba, 1844sf,
wood floors, French doors to scr
back porch, 40x60 bldg w/office &
workshop, 6.17ac comer lot, 3
sides fenced. #77427 $199,900
Brick Ranch 3/2 Fl room. Side en-
try garage & workshop. 2 sheds.
New AC apple & roof. MLS78442
$114,900. Millard Gillen 365-7001
Westfield Realty Group
Charming 2br/2ba home. Gated
community. REDUCED to
$158,000 MLS78740 Teresa
Spradley 386-365-8343
Hallmark Real Estate
Clean Well maintained 3/2 brick
w/chain link fenced back yard
w/Garage. $120.K MLS78440.
Debbie King 386-365-3886
Hallmark Real Estate
Close to everything. Lg 3br/2ba
brick home. Close to VA & shop-
ping! $189.900 MLS78131 Carrie
Cason 386-623-2806
Westfield Realty Group
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
Neat & tidy 2/2, maybe 3/2. New
kitchen counters & tile. Open floor
plan. Mary Brown Whitchurst
965-0887 MLS# 77943 $99,000
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Really
10 acres w/well maintained brick
home. 2012 sqft. Open split floor
plan. Lori Giebeig Simpson
365-5678 MLS# 74447 $149.000
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
3br/3ba Spacious home in estab-
lished area. 2414 sqft. Private yard
& patio. Lori Giebeig Simpson
365-5678 MLS# 78175 $159,000
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
3br/2ba. 1590 sqft. Lori Giebeig
Simpson. 365-5678 or
Mary Brown Whitehurst
965-0887 MLS# 74542 $110,000
Country close to town 3/2 Brick 3
ac. Grape arbor & fruit trees. pole
bam, workshop. Metal roof. MLS
78096 $129,900 Ginger Parker
365-2135 Hallmark Real Estate
Country Club Condo 4br/3ba.
Mega storage, roomy kit, 3 porch-
es. $165,000 MLS 78719 Paula
Lawrence 386-623-1973
Hallmark Real Estate.
Deer in your back yard. 3/2 HUD
w/1 6X48 wrap around scr. porch.
Clean, well maintained, 5 ac.
$72,000 MLS78687 Ginger Parker
365-2135 Hallmark Real Estate
Foreclosure! 3/2 D/WMH boasts
a large kitchen. M/B w/ garden
tub, shower & dbl sinks-New car-
pet-fpl & more-Only $69,995
MLS# 76920. 386-344-7662
Foreclosure! Newer 3/2 DWMH.
Lg rooms, kitchen island, lots of
wdws, master w/garden tub & sep-
arate shower. $74,995
MLS# 74218 386-344-7662
Great 3/2 home w/2346 sq ft '
under roof on .67 ac., Creekside
S/D. Big back yard w/plenty of
shade trees. On a cul-de-sac, MLS
S77385 $169,900 623-6896
Home for Sale Eastside Village
Realty, Inc. 2 bedroom, 2 bath site
built home with screen porch,
large carport priced just right Call
Denise Bose @ 752-5290
Home in Lake City Country Club.
4/3, renovated. Great for entertain-
ing. Glass doors open to back yard.
MLS#78637 $184,900
R.E.O. Realty Group 867-1271
JASPER! 4BR/2.5BA 1,890 SqFt
mfg home on 1 acre where
wildlife is abundant $39,900
DANIEL CRAPPS AGENCY,
INC. 755-5110 #77922
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
Suwannee Co.115 ac. Fenced &
cross Fenced. Pasture land, paved
rd. Elaine K. Tolar 386-752-4211


MLS# 77081 $345,000
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
.97 ac. Centrally located toLake
City & G'ville. Fenced, planted
pines, pasture. Elaine K. Tolar
752-4211 MLS# 73879 $291,030
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Really
New home in May Fair. Super area
corner lot. 4br split plan. Versatile
colors. Elaine K. Tolar
755-6488 MLS# 76919 $199.900


Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
240 ac. Farm. Rolling Meadows.
Paved road, great access to Lake
City & G'ville. Elaine K. Tolar
386-752-4211 MLS# 70453


Coldwell Banker/Bishop Rtalty
Suwannee Co. 115 ac. Fenced &
cross fenced. 10 & 20 ac parcels
avail. Elaine K. Tolar 386-752-
4211 MLS# 67766 $448,500
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
Brick home in town on lake front.
3br/2ba. New roof & hardwoods.
Glass room w/view Elaine Tolar
755-6488 MLS# 78092 $249,900
Lake front 3/2 custom Western Ce-
dar. Lots of storage space. Private
dock $229,900. MLS# 74681
Jo Lytte-Remax 386-365-2821
www.jolytte. lorida-property-seaircli.com
Large Home in the Country on
3.66 acres, fireplace, 2 outbldgs,
MLS#76471, $89,900
Jo Lytte, Remax 386-365-2821
jolytte@remaxnfl.com
LEASE/OPTION BUY
3br/2ba Home 2010 w/garage
on 1/2 acre. Owner Financing
386-623-2244
LOCATION! CONDITION!
PRICE! 3BR/2BA w/open floor
plan; freshly painted $96,000
DANIEL CRAPPS AGENCY,
INC. 755-5110 #78278
Lofty home on Itchetucknee River,
Wrap around covered decks on
two levels.MustSEE! $375,000
MLS#77006 Jo Lytte
Remax 386-365-2821
Luxury home. 3br/2ba, 20 ac lot.
Cherry cabinets & SS appliances.
Jacuzzi in master br. MLS 78190
$ 374,900 Roger Lovelady 365-
7039. Westfield Realty Group
Motivated Seller. Country area,
paved rd. 3br/2ba manuf home.
New AC & upgraded wdows.
MLS 78027 $84K. Brodie Allred.
623-0906 Westfield Realty Group
MOVE-IN READY! 3BR/2BA in
pristine condition on 1.39 acres
$89,900 DANIEL CRAPPS
AGENCY, INC.
755-5110 #78345
New Reduced. 4br/2ba plus of-
fice. 2 living & dinig areas, cov-
ered porch. Fl rm. Triple garage.
MLS77685 Charlie Sparks 755-
0808 Westfield Realty Group
Nice, large 4/2 on 1 acre
w/florida room, granite floors,
wrap around front porch. $139,900
Brittany Stoeckert Results Realty
386-397-3473 MLS 77292
Owner Financing. 2br/3ba country
home w/wrap around porches, 5ac.
Garage w/workshop. MLS77005
$179,900 Roger Lovelady 365-
7039 Westfield Realty Group
PRICE REDUCTION. 3/2 plus
pool house w/half bath. 2.25
fenced ac. Freshly painted. Split
plan, Large rear deck MLS 78103
$179.900.386-623-6896
PRICED TO SELL! 3BR/2BA
w/2,012 SqFt w/living rm & fami-
ly rm $57,000 DANIEL CRAPPS
AGENCY, INC.
755-5110 #78680
Private 2 ac pam.cl away from it
all. Hunting w/no restrictions.
Make an offer on this 1764 sqft
home that need some TLC.
$109.900. MLS78331. Jay Sears.
867-1613 Hallmark Real Estate
Reduced Price! 3br/1.5 ba. Re-
modeled. Nice area close to VA.
MLS 77599 $69K. Estate Sale,
bring all offers. Josh Grecian 466-
2517 Westfield Realty Group
Remax Professionals Motivated
seller. Spacious brick w/many up-
grades. Newer roof, windows &
fixtures. Fenced back yard. MKS
78168 $119,900 Missy Zecher @
623-0237 www.missyzecher.com
Remax Professionals Ranch style
home on 10 ac w/barn & horse
stalls. 4 Ig bedrm + bonus rm. 2
car gar. MLS 77403 $325K.
Missy Zecher @ 386-623-0237
www.missyzecher.com
Rolling Meadows. 4 or 3br/2ba.
Over 1700 sqft. and 1/2 ac lot.
MLS77284 $154,900 Carrie Cason
386-623-2806
Westfield Realty Group
Something for Everyone! 3br/2ba,
2706sf. 4.02ac, island kitchen.
Corian counters, det garage, Koi
pond. fish house, green house.
fenced & more. #76255 $247,000
SPECTACULAR VIEW!
2BR/IBA. 1200sf. .65ac, scr front
porch, steps to deck/dock on Suw.
river, under house parking/storage.
shed & more. #77242 $194,900
Suwannee River Front
granite counters, covered patio.
deck & dock, $349,000
MLS#76336 Jo Lytte at Remax
Professionals. 386-365-2821


, n, II ql c
d" 1 (1 1 !" i 11 1 4 i


WELL-CARED FOR 4BR/2.5BA
mfg home w/formal LR plus fami-
ly rm $84,000 DANIEL CRAPPS
AGENCY, INC.
755-5110 #78585
WHITE SPRINGS! Sturdy block
3BR/1BA home in city limits,
fenced yd $49,000 DANIEL
CRAPPS AGENCY, INC.
755-5110 #78603

820 Farms &
2O Acreage
10-ac.lot. Well/septic/pp. Owner
financing $300 dn, $663 mo 8.9%,
25 yrs. Deas Bullard Properties
386-752-4339 www.landnfl.com
4 1/2 acre lot. Lake Jeffery Road.
Gorgeous Oaks!Paved Rd
Owner Financing! NO DOWN!
$59,900. $525mo 352-215-1018.
www.LandOwnerFinancing.com
4 acres, Wellborn, New Well
installed, Beautifully wooded
w/cleared Home Site, owner fin,
no down, $39,900, $410 mon
Call 352-215-1018
www.LandOwnerFinancing.com
6.45 ac river front property in
White Springs, cloe to Big Shoals.
Covered shelter for entertaining.
MLS# 77417 $104,900 386-867-
1271 R.E.O. Realty Group, Inc
FARM- 7 stall barn.
17+ acres, pasture, cross fenced.
Close in $500. mo.
386-961-1086
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
61 ac. Parcel. SR 27 & 1-75 inter-
change. Great potential, fenced &
cross fenced. Elaine K. Tolar
752-4211 MLS# 758060 $368,040
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
40 ac.Parcel. Less then 2 mi from
city limits. Fenced road frontage
on US Hwy 441. Elaine K. Tolar
752-4211 MLS# 62092 $194K

Commercial
830 Property
788 S. Marion Comm'l bldg on
highway frontage. Across from the
VA & near downtown. $49,900.
MLS 78129 Scott Stewart 867-
3498 Westfield Realty Group
Commercial. High traffic location
w/I-75 exposure. 2-story custom
log home. MLS77949
Josh Grecian 386-466-2517
Westfield Realty Group
Prime Commercial Location.
Just across from a plaza. Frontage
on Baya w/2 curbcuts. $350,000
MLS# 77485 Call 386-867-1271
R.E.O.Realty Group, Inc
Remax Professionals Commercial
Property. Located on expanding
west side of Lake City. Professio-
nal service or restaurant. MLS
77436 $575k Missy Zecher 386-
623-0237 www.missyzecher.com
Wellborn Commercial lot. 1.84
acres w/34' of Hwy frontage near
the new Dollar General. MLS
72381 Scott Stewart 386-867-3498
Westfield Realty Group

86n Investment
O6 Property
Rustic Fishing camp in Suwannee
Minutes to boat launch.
MLS#78709 $59,900
Jo Lytte/Remax 386-365-2821
ww.jolytte.lorida-propnerty -s.carch.com

870 Real Estate
SWanted
I Buy Houses
CASH!
Quick Sale Fair Price
386-269-0605


950 Cars for Sale

FORD MUSTANG 2009
V-6, Auto., Silver.
40k miles Loaded. $17.500.
386-752-4850


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2006 EF250
Ford Van
3/4 ton, metal work
shelves/ladder rack,
60K miles, exc. cond.
$10,500
Call
386-555-5555
If you don't sell your vehicle
during the first 10 days, you
can run the same vehicle ad
for 10 additional days for
only $15.00
Terms arind conditions remain the
same for the additional run.


3BR/2B brick home with inground pool. Corner lot, formal living-
room, large den, double garage. 265 S. Thurman MLS 76786
$99,900 0Nhy

Call Jessica Sheely =----.
SMARTER. BOLDER. FASTER
(386)288-2403 [ .E.O..O.ES..
f THE DARBY-ROGERS CO.


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