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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028308/01648
 Material Information
Title: The Lake City reporter
Uniform Title: Lake City reporter (Lake City, Fla. 1967)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: John H. Perry
Place of Publication: Lake City Fla
Publication Date: 8/30/2011
Frequency: daily (monday through friday)[<1969>-]
weekly[ former 1967-<1968>]
daily
normalized irregular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Lake City (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Columbia County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Columbia -- Lake City
Coordinates: 30.189722 x -82.639722 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 95, no. 4 (Oct. 5, 1967)-
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000358016
oclc - 33283560
notis - ABZ6316
lccn - sn 95047175
sobekcm - UF00028308_01569
System ID: UF00028308:01648
 Related Items
Preceded by: Lake City reporter and Columbia gazette

Full Text






Fraud alleged
Computer docs
key to case,

So Lip OF i
2,-s G c- /Ir 7-


'LpIDZ:.


Blocked
Judge halts
enforcement of Ala.
immigration law.
I-STO C-G- 32w


Lake Uty


Tough cats
Cougars rough
up LCMS,
40-12.
Sports, I B


Reporter


Tuesday,August 30, 2011 www.lakecityreporter.com Vol. 137, No. 184 E 75 cents


Irene's toll jumps to 38;



Vt. towns battle floods


5 million homes,
businesses still lack
power in 12 states.

By JENNIFER PELTZ and
WILSON RING
Associated Press
MONTPELIER, Vt.
The full measure of
Hurricane Irene's fury
came into focus Monday as
the death toll jumped to 38,
, New England towns battled
epic floods and millions
faced the dispiriting pros-
pect of several days without
electricity.
From North Carolina
to Maine, communities
cleaned up and took stock
of the uneven and hard-to-
predict costs of a storm that
spared the nation's biggest
city a nightmare scenario,
only to deliver a historic
wallop to towns well inland.
In New York City, where
people had braced for a
disaster-movie scene of
water swirling around sky-
scrapers, the subways and
buses were up and run-
ning again in time for the
Monday morning commute.
And to the surprise of many
New Yorkers, things went
pretty smoothly.
But in New England,
landlocked Vermont con-
tended with what its gover-
nor called the worst flood-
ing in a century. Streams
also raged out of control in
upstate New York.
In many cases, the
moment of maximum dan-
ger arrived well after the
storm had passed, as rain-
water made its way into liv-
ers and streams and turned
them into torrents. Irene
dumped up to 11 inches of
rain on Vermont.and more
than 13 in parts of New
York.
"We were expecting
heavy rains," said Bobbi-
Jean Jeun of Clarksville, a
hamlet near Albany, N.Y.
'We were expecting flood-
ing. We weren't expecting
devastation. It looks like
somebody set a bomb off."
Meanwhile, the 11-state
death toll, which had stood
at 21 as of Sunday night,
rose sharply as bodies were
pulled from floodwaters and
people were electrocuted
by downed power lines.
The tally of Irene's
destruction mounted, too.
An apparently vacant home
exploded in an evacuated,
flooded area in Pompton
Lakes, NJ., early Monday,
and firefighters had to bat-
tle the flames from a boat.
In the Albany, N.Y., suburb
of Guilderland, police res-
cued two people Monday
after their car was swept
away. Rescuers found them
three hours later, clinging
to trees along the swollen
creek.
"It's going to take time
to recover from a storm of
this magnitude," President
Barack Obama warned as
he promised the govern-
ment would do everything
IRENE continued on 3A


ASSOCIATED PRESS
TOP: Tom Chase
waves atop of his
friend's beach home
in the aftermath of
Tropical Storm Irene,
in East Haven, Conn.
on Monday. LEFT: A
damaged historic cov-
ered bridge spans Cox
Brook in Northfield,
Vt., Monday, the day
after Tropical Storm
Irene dumped heavy
rainfall across the
region, causing flash
floods.


Occupied

home set

ablaze,

say police

Homeowner saw man
piling branches near
dwelling, reports show.

By TONY BRITT
tbritt@lakecityreporter.com
A Columbia County man, arrest-
ed Saturday evening, faces mul-
tiple charges for
allegedly setting
fire to an occupied
home. No one was
injured and the fire
was doused before
the home sustained
severe damage.
Ercoli Jesse Nicholas
Ercoli, 30, 234 SE
Sweet Gum Glen was charged with
arson and criminal mischief in con-
nection with the incident. He was
booked into the Columbia County
SDetention Facility on $15,000
bond.
According. to Columbia County
sheriff's reports, a deputy respond-
ed to a structure fire at 198 SW
Sweet Gmn Glen which the home-
owner allegedly saw her neighbor,
Ercoli, set.
Deputy Paul Hebb reported
that the woman showed him a
branch that had been ignited next
to the back part of her homeland
observed a large swath of siding
that had been melted by the fire.
The woman told authorities she
was lying In her bedroom when
she noticed a bright light from
outside her window. She said she
looked out her window and saw
ARSON continued on 3A


Federal judge blocks Ala. immigration law


the nation -- won't take effect as scheduled
on Thursday The ruling was cheered both
by Republican leaders who were pleased the
judge didn't gut the law and by opponents who
compare it to old Jim Crow-era statutes against.
racial integration.
Blackburn didn't address whether the law is
constitutional, and she could still let all or parts
of the law take effect later. Instead, she said
she needed more time to consider lawsuits filed
by the Justice Department, private groups and
individuals that claim the state is overstepping
its bounds.


By JAY REEVES
Associated Press
BIRMINGHAM, Ala. A federal judge tem-
porarily blocked enforcement of Alabama's new
law cracking down on illegal immigration, rul-
ing Monday that, she needed more time to
decide whether the law opposed by the Obama
administration, church leaders and immigrant-
rights groups is constitutional.
The brief order by U.S. District Judge Sharon
L. Blackburn means the law which opponents
and supporters alike have called the toughest in


Hitting just the right note


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Columbia High School trumpet player Paul Cordier, 17, practices with band
members Monday afternoon.


The judge said she will issue a longer rul-
ing by Sept. 28, and her temporary order will
remain in effect until the day after. She heard
arguments from the Justice Department and
others during a daylong hearing last week.
Similar laws have been passed in Arizona,
Utah, Indiana and Georgia. Federal judges
already have blocked all or parts of the laws in
those states.
Among other things, the law would require
schools to verify the citizenship status of stu-
LAW continued on 3A


Computer docs
lead to fraud,
forgery charge

By TONY BRITT
tbritt@lakecityreporter.com
A Columbia County man was
arrested Sunday and faces multiple
charges after he
allegedly filed fake
police and insur-
ance documents to
get money from his
retirement fund,
reports show.
Jason Dewitte
Douglas, 35, 2231 Douglas
SW Old Lake City
Terrace, High Springs, was charged
with fraud, counterfeiting of a public

FRAUD continued on 3A


Pick a nair


JASOUN MAT NEW WALKERIiL 1,y
Reporter
The reflection of a pair of
flowers is seen at a pond next
to the adult softball fields at
the Southside Recreation
Complex on Monday.


CALL US:
(386) 752-1293
#SUBSCRIBE TO
THE REPORTER:
Voice: 755-5445
Fax: 752-9400


94 7
T-Storm Chance-
WEATHER, 2A


Opinion ....... ........
People .... .
Obituaries .
Advice & Comics ..... .
Puzzles ....


TODAY IN
PEOPLE
Be., ane baLb.
t,.-,F, 5h -...


COMING
WEDNESDAY
L- al ne.'.s


'U

I


1 ic- 0 ... 1










LAKE CITY REPORTER DAILY BRIEFING TUESDAY, AUGUST 30, 2011


FLORID A, k
Saturday:
*-p 9-15-17-18-26-28 'F
X 5


Monday:
Afternoon: 3-4-1
Evening: N/A


Play.


Monday:
Afternoon: 5-8-6-8
Evening: N/A


Sunday:
3-6-25-29-31


PEOPLE IN THE NEWS


Perry big winner, Beyonce baby tops show


B eyonce and Jay-Z's off-
LOS ANGELES

spring doesn't even have
a name yet, but it was
the indisputable break-
out star of Sunday's
MTV Video Music Awards, upstag-
ing everyone, even Katy Perry's win
for video of the year.
Perry, who had the most nomina-
tions coming into the show with 10,
came away with three moonman tro-
phies, including video of the year for
the inspirational clip "Firework."
"I feel like I'm doing something
right when I sing that song," said
Perry, conservatively dressed in a
cotton-candy pink jacket, a skirt and
something best described as a Green
Bay Packers cheesehead decoration.
But the night's big news came
from Beyonce, who stole the show
before it even began when she
announced on the black carpet that
after more than three years of mar-
riage, the dazzling couple had pro-
duced the ultimate all-star collabora-
tion. Dressed in a loose-fitting, off-
the-shoulder red gown, she clutched
the baby bump that so many celeb-
watchers had been predicting since
the two wed.
Later, Beyonce performed "Love
on Top," and if Twitter hadn't
already spread the news, her outfit
gave clues to her impending moth-
erhood; instead of her typical sexy
outfits, she dressed in conservative
spangled tux but still danced
around in her signature stilettos.
Beyonce didn't utter a word about
the pregnancy, but ended the num-
ber by taking off her jacket and
rubbing her swollen belly; in the
audience, an elated Jay-Z hooted and
clapped for his wife as Kanye West
hugged him.

Jones cancels concert,
cites 'dehydration'
LONDON "Sex Bomb" singer
Tom Jones was recovering in a


Beyonce performs at the MTV Video Music Awards on Sunday in Los Angeles.


Monaco hospital
Sunday, saying
severe dehydra-
tion" forced him to
cancel a concert in
the glamorous prin-
cipality.
Jones The longtime star,
famed for his swivel-.
hipped appeal and soulful voice, apol-
ogized to his fans onhis website and
emphatically denied British press
reports .that he had suffered a heart
scare that forced him to cancel his
Monaco concert Saturday night.

Anthony prosecutor
writing book about case
ORLANDO One of the prosecu-
tors in the Casey Afithony murder
Trial is writing'a
book about the case.
Jeff Ashton con-
firmed that he is
finishing a book
entitled "Imperfect
Justice: Prosecuting
Casey Anthony."
Ashton It is scheduled for


release in November. He declined to
give details.
Ashton was the co-prosecutor
in the trial of Anthony, the young
Florida mother accused of murder-
ing her 2-year-old daughter Caylee.
The trial garnered national media
attention.'

Anti-Castro protesters
picket Miami concert
MIAMI About 200 anti-Castro
demonstrators picketed outside a
weekend concert by Cuban singer
Pablo Milanes, 68, in Miami.
Saturday's protest outside the
AmericanAirlines Arena was passion-
ate but peaceful.
The Cuban-American demonstra-
tors stood across the street and
shouted and shook their fists at the
concert-goers entering the arena.
The protesters see Milanes as a
supporter of Cuba's communist gov-
ernment, although in recent years
he has criticized its treatment of
dissidents and its unwillingness to
change..
* Associated Press


Celebrity Birthdays


* Country singer Kitty Wells
is 92.
* Opera singer Regina
Resnik is 89.
* Actor Bill Daily is 84.
* Comedian Lewis Black is


63.
* Actor Michael Chiklis is 48.
* Rock singer-musician Lars
Frederiksen (Rancid) is 40.
* Actress Cameron Diaz is
39.


Daily Scripture
"There is neither Jew nor
Gentile, neither slave nor free,
nor is there male and female,
for you are all one in Christ


Jesus."


Thought for Today


- Galatians 3:28 '


"Greatness is not measured by
what a man or woman accom-
plishes, but by the opposition
he or she has overcome to
reach his goals."
Dorothy Height,
American civil rights activist (1912-2010)

Lake City Reporter


HOW TO REACH US
Main number ........(386) 752-1293
Fax number ..............752-9400
Circulation ..............755-5445
Online ... www.lakecityreporter.com
The Lake City Reporter, an affiliate of
Community Newspapers Inc., is pub-
lished Tuesday through Sunday at 180
E. Duval St., Lake City, Fla. 32055.
Periodical postage paid at LakeCity, Fla.
Member Audit Bureau of Circulation arid
The Associated Press.
All material herein is property of the Lake
City Reporter. Reproduction in whole or
in part is forbidden without the permis-
sion of the publisher. U.S. Postal Service
No. 310-880.
POSTMASTER: Send address changes
to Lake City Reporter, P.O. Box 1709,
Lake City, RFla. 32056.
Publisher Todd Wilson ... .754-0418
(tWilson@lakecityreporter.com),
NEWS
Editor Robert Bridges .... 754-0428
(rbridges@lakecityreporter.com)
ADVERTISING
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BUSINESS
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Please call 386-755-5445 to report any
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(Tuesday through Sunday)
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Rates indude 7% sales x.
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CORRECTION


The Lake City Reporter corrects errors of fact in news
items. If you have a concern, question or suggestion, please
call the executive editor. Corrections and clarifications will run
in this space. And thanks for reading.


11 people injured
in party shooting
JACKSONVILLE -
Eleven people were injured
when gunfire erupted
during a block party near
downtown Jacksonville.
The shooting started
about 8:45 p.m. Sunday at
J.S. Johnson Park in the
city's Brooklyn neighbor-
hood. Jacksonville Sheriff
John Rutherford said a
pregnant woman lost her
baby and another pregnant
woman was injured in the
shooting.
Rutherford said victims
were taken to three hos-
pitals, but he didn't know
their conditions.
The sheriff said there
were multiple shooters
firing at each other. None
of the shooters had been
arrested late Sunday.

Body of missing
fisherman found
APOLLO BEACH -
Pilots from the
Hillsborough County
Sheriff's Office have found
the body of a missing fish-
erman. .
Authorities said Sean
Parrott, 39, and a friend
waded into the water at
Apollo Beach Nature Park
to fish Sunday afternoon.
The friend told detectives
he turned around and no
longer saw Parrott stand-
ing. He called 911.
His body was spotting
floating in the water early
Monday morning.
Detectives said they
believe strong currents
pulled Parrott underwater
and he drowned. They do
not suspect foul play, but
the Hillsborough County
Medical Examiner's Office
will conduct an investiga-
tion to see if other factors
were involved.

Copper wire
thefts along 1-95
WEST PALM BEACH


Rallying with Bachmann
Republican presidential candidate Rep. Michele Bachmann,
R-Minn., speaks during a Sunday rally in Sarasota.


- Parts of Interstate 95 in
Palm Beach County have
been left in the dark after
thieves stole underground
copper wiring needed for
overhead lighting.
Authorities said 18 sites
have been hit by thieves
who took 175,000 feet of
wiring during the past four
to six months. Last week,
West Palm Beach police
last week urged motorists
to call them or the Florida
Highway Patrol if they see
vehicle stopped near light
poles.
The problem is not lim-
ited to Palm Beach County.
The Institute of Scrap
Recycling Industries has
set up a website where law
enforcement authorities
in the United States and
Canada can report thefts.
The information is relayed
to recycling plants within
100 miles of the incident.

Man injured
at Pepsi plant
TAMPA Authorities
said a man's leg was
crushed in a machine at a
Pepsi-Cola plant in Tampa.
Employees called 911
about 11:30 a.m. Sunday,
saying a man was trapped
in a conveyor rail sys-
tem at the plant near


the University of South
Florida.
This was the third major
casualty at the plant in six
months.
Officials said the
39-year-old man was
cleaning the system when
co-workers heard him
scream.
It took members of
Tampa Fire Rescue's
heavy equipment team
nearly 90 minutes to free
the man from the machin-
ery.
The man was taken to
Tampa General Hospital
with what rescuers
described as life-threaten-
ing injuries.'

Woman mistakenly
pulls out drugs
CLEARWATER -
Police arrested a
29-year-old woman who
was sitting in a car in a
hotel parking lot at 3 a.m.
Saturday after she acci-
dentally pulls out a bag of
marijuana.
When she went into
her purse and pulled out
identification, she mistak-
enly pulled out the drugs.
When the police searched
her purse they found pain-
killers and sedatives.
* Associated Press


THE WEATHER



CHANCE PARTLY CHANCE
TO RMS CLOUDY STORMS


L HI LO 70 1.92LO 70




Valdesta
S98/72 Jacksonville
Tallahassee Lake City. 91 78
S9 73 '-1 4 1
Pe nsa o Gainesville Daytona Beach
'- 95 77 Panama City 91 9 76
91 ;76 Ocala
S94 72 *
Orlando Cape Cana
4 7, .9 7
Tampa S
93- 77 West Palm Be
'q qf'u t.


A,
A,
r

7
'6 ... -


TEMPERATURES
High Monday.
Low Monday .
Normal high
Normal low
Record high
Record low

PRECIPITATION
Monday
Month total
Year total
Normal month-to-date
Normal'year-to-date


96
73
89
70
99 in 1954
62 in 1984

0.00"
3.17"
26.56"
6.24"
36.37"


7:06 a.m.
7:56 p.m.
7:07 a.m,
7:55 p.m.


8:44 a.m.
8:47 p.m.
9:52 a.m.
9:27 p.m.


1 ._ 2


SUN.
Sunrise today
Sunset today
Sunrise tom.
Sunset tom.

MOON '
Moonrise today
Moonset today
Moonrise tom.
Moonset tom.


S RCHANCEM
STORMS


I ; 3 Lo I1


10nittolxii
Today's
ultra-violet
radiation risk
for the area on
a scale from 0
to 10+.


CHANCE
STORMS


193 LO 71


City Wednesday Thursday


veral


ach


88 75 I
89 74 1
901) 801
93 75.
91 70.1
8 i?5

92 70.i
69 79 3
92 78.1
92. 72 1
92. 75 1
90' 7 ,
93, 75 .
92 701'
93. 76 i
92 68 1
S6 79 t


An exclusive
service
brought to
our readers
by
The Weather
Channel.



weather.com


4 ~ Forecasts, data and
graphics 0 2011 Weather
Cen IV trail, L, Madson, WIs.
weather www.weatherpubllisher.com


AROUND FLORIDA


Cape Canaveral 89 76't
Daytona Beach 90 75 pc
Ft. Lauderdale 90 ?0 I
Fort Myers 94 i;6
Gainesville 93 I1 pc
Jacksonville 9 17 pc
Key West 91 61. i
Lake City 94 in- pc.
Miami 90 S1 i
Naples 92' 78
Ocala '9. ?2 pi
Orlando 93 74 I
Panama City 90 7 7 p,:
Pensacola 93 7.p*
Tallahassee 95 2, pc
Tampa 93 I 7,
Valdosta 95 ;0 p.:
W. Palm Beach S9 S 0


Ft Lauderdale
FL Myers 91 7' *0
9377 *Naples 0
90 7 Miami
Key West, 1
11 *1


*O00(
Sept. Sept. Sept. Sept.
4 12 20 27
First Full Last New


_


Page Editor: Jason M.. Walker, 754-0430


(386) 755-5445











Page Editor: Robert Bridges, 754-0428 LAKE CITY REPORTER NEWS TUESDAY, AUGUST 30, 2011


IRENE: Death toll at 38; millions remain without power
Continued From Page 1A


in its power to help people get back on
their feet.
For many people, the aftermath could
prove more painful than the storm itself.
In North Carolina, where Irene blew
ashore along the Outer Banks on Saturday
before heading for New York and New
England, 1,000 people were still in emer-
gency shelters, awaiting word on their
homes.
At the same time, nearly 5 million homes
and businesses in a dozen states were still
without electricity, and utilities warned
it might be a week or more before some
people got their power back.
"Once the refrigerator gets warm, my
insulin goes bad. I could go into diabetic
shock. It's kind of scary because we don't
know how long it's going to be out for,"
said Patricia Dillon, a partially paralyzed
resident of a home for the disabled in
Milford, Conn., where the electricity was
out and a generator failed. Her voice crack-
ing, she added: "I'm very tired, stressed
out, aggravated, scared."
Russ Furlong of Barrington, RI., rue-
fully remembered the two weeks he went
without power -after Hurricane Bob 20
years ago.
"Hopefully, we won't have to wait that


long this time," he said. "Last night we had
candles. It was romantic. It was fun. But
that feeling doesn't last too long."
Up and down tie Eastern Seaboard,
commuters and vacationers found their
travel plans scrambled. Airlines warned
it would be days before the thousands of
passengers stranded by Irene find their
way home. Some Amtrak service in the
Northeast was suspended. Commuter
trains between New Jersey and New York
City were not running. Trains between the
city and its northern suburbs were also
disrupted.
Kris and Jennifer Sylvester of Brooklyn
sat on a bench in the town center in
Woodstock, N.Y., with luggage at their feet
and their daughters, aged 4 and 9, holding
signs reading, "Need a Ride 2 NYC" and
"Help Us, No Bus, No'Train." They rode
Amtrak out for a long weekend in the coun-
try, but were unable to get home.
"We're hoping for anything," Jennifer
Sylvester said.
In Vermont, the state's emergency
management headquarters stood empty,
evacuated because of river flooding from
Irene's heavy rains. Rescuers used a boat
and bucket loaders to pluck seven people
from a swamped mobile home park in


Lyndonville.
In upstate New York, authorities were
closely watching major dams holding back
drinking water reservoirs.
Throughout the region, hundreds of
roads were impassable because of flood-
ing or fallen trees, and some bridges had
simply given way, including a 156-year-
old hand-hewn, wooden, covered bridge
across Schoharie Creek in Blenheim, N.Y.
In all, more than a dozen towns in Vermont
and at least three in New York remained
cut off by flooded roads and bridges.
Still, there were glimmers of good news.
In Pennsylvania, the Delaware River large-
ly remained in its banks, cresting several
feet lower than feared. The fori-ecast for
flooding on the Mohawk River in New York
also eased at Schenectady, N.Y., where
officials had worried that high water might
threaten the city's drinking water and sew-
age treatment plant.
Early estimates put Irene's damage at
$7 billion to $10 billion, much smaller than
the impact of monster storms such as
Hurricane Katrina, which did more than
$100 billion in damage. Irene's effects are
small compared to the overall U.S. econ-
omy, which produces about $14 trillion of
. goods and services every year.


LAW: Struck down
Continued From Page 1A

dents, but it wouldn't prevent illegal
immigrants from attending public
schools.
The law also would make it a crime
to knowingly assist an illegal immigrant
by providing them a ride, a job, a place
to live or most anything else a sec-
tion that church leaders fear would
hamper public assistance ministries. It
also would allow police to jail suspected
illegal immigrants during traffic stops.
Finding a way to curtail public spend-
ing that benefits illegal immigrants has
been a pet project of Alabama con-
servatives for years. Census figures
released earlier this year show the
state's Hispanic population more than
doubled over a decade to 185,602 last
year, and supporters of .the law con-
tend many of them are in the country
illegally.
Isabel Rubio, executive director of the
Hispanic Interest Coalition of Alabama,
which is among the groups that sued
over the law, hopes Blackburn will
block it entirely but was happy with the
temporary reprieve.
'We are pleased thatJudge Blackburn
is taking more time to study the case,"
she said.


FRAUD: Local man faces charges
Continued From Page 1A


record and violation of pro-
bation in connection with
the case. He was booked
into the Columbia County
Detention Facility and denied
bond, as he is already on pro-
bation. Douglas's arrest cul-
minates a weeklong investi-
gation, say authorities.
Sgt. Ed Seifert, Columbia
County Sheriff's Office
public information offi-
cer, said Douglas lives in
Columbia County, though
he has a High Springs
address.
According to Columbia
County sheriff's reports,
on Aug. 18 a deputy spoke
with a woman who reported
Douglas used her computer
to create severalforged doc-
timents: .
The woman showed
CCSO Sgt. Jeff Watson doc-
uments bearing the heading
"Columbia County Police


Department" and titled
"property damage report."
There is no such agency
as the "Columbia County
Police Department."
The witness told Watson
she believes Douglas
tried filing a claim with
his insurance company
but was denied. She told
authorities Douglas was
trying to show a hard-
ship so he could retrieve
money from his retirement
fund. Further details of the
alleged scheme were not
clear.
A CCSO deputy had
been to Douglas's home
on Aug. 16 and complet-
ed a report at Douglas's
request. However, the
report merely documented
information Douglas pro-
vided. The report indicat-
ed Douglas was unhappy
with the way his mobile


home has been set up.
Watson reported find-
ing' several other docu-
ments on the computer,
including one that bore the
heading "Monroe Police
Department," as well as
a photo of -a Miami-Dade
Police badge. Other docu-
ments reportedly found on
the computer were said to
have been created from
an insurance company
template.
On Sunday Watson
went to Douglas's home,
at which point Douglas
reportedly admitted forg-
ing the documents.
"Based on Jason's con-
fession that he submitted
the report as an official
document to receive mon-
etary gain and the docu-
ments provided, I placed
Jason under arrest,"
Watson reported.


ARSON: Dwelling occupied, say police
Continued From Page 1A


Ercoli piling branches next to her home
and called 911.
Hebb went to Ercoli's home and inter-
viewed him, at which point Ercoli report-
edly gave statements contradicting those
he had earlier made, reports show. After
a brief investigation by Hebb, Ercoli


was arrested and taken to the Columbia
County Detention Facility without inci,
dent. He, has since been released, jail
records show.
Reports did not indicate a possible
motive for the alleged crime.


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LAKE CITY REPORTER NEWS TUESDAY, AUGUST 30, 2011


Page Editor: Robert Bridges, 754-0428


9 Il















OPINION


.Tuesday, August 30, 2011


ANOTHER
OUR


OUR
OPINION


Local storm

prep worth

the effort

^^"T'hankfully, Hurricane
I ene changed course
S from the earliest
I models, sidestepped
Florida and passed
us in the Atlantic before mak-
ing landfall in the Carolinas and
the Northeast
We never want to wish bad
weather on anyone else, but
we are thankful we missed
the brunt of the storm. The
early tracking models for Irene
showed a huge storm approach-
ing from the south and deliver-
ing a direct hit to Florida as it
crawled up the peninsula.
Local emergency manage-
ment officials had the benefit of
a dry run to implement any and
all plans to handle the storm.
That went as well as can be
expected, with no wind or rain
involved.
It was good practice and
the group not only has a solid
plan of action, but also had the
chance to test its implementa-
tion. By all accounts, we're
as ready in Columbia County
as we can be for the daunt-
ing presence of tropical storm
winds and torrential rains.


HIGHLIGHTS
IN HISTORY

Today is Tuesday, August 30,
the 242nd day of 2011. There
are 123 days left in the year.
Highlights in history on this
date:
30 B.C. Cleopatra of Egypt,
commits suicide by letting an
asp bite her.
1914 German forces take
Amiens during World War I.
1945 Britain re-establishes
its governance of Hong Kong,
ending three years of Japanese
occupation.
1960 East Germany imposes
partial blockade of West Berlin.
1967 Thurgood Marshall
becomes the first black
American appointed to the U.S.
Supreme Court.
1972 NOAA reports that
the five-megaton underground
nuclear explosion at Amchitka
Island in the Aleutians in
November caused 22 minor
earthquakes and hundreds of
aftershocks over three months.
Associated Press


Lake City Reporter
Serving Columbia County
Since 1874
The Lake City Reporter is pub-
lished with pride for residents of
Columbia and surrounding counties by
Community. Newspapers Inc.
We believe strong newspapers build
strong communities -"Newspapers
get things done!"
Our primary goal is to
publish distinguished and profitable
community-oriented newspapers.
This mission will.be accomplished
through the teamwork of professionals
dedicated to truth, integrity and hard
work.
Todd Wilson, publisher
Robert Bridges, editor
Sue Brannon, controller
Dink NeSmith, president
Tom Wood, chairman

LETTERS
POLICY
Letters to the Editor should be
typed or neatly written and double
spaced. Letters should not exceed
400 words and will be edited for
length and libel. Letters must be
signed and include the writer's name,
address and telephone number for
verification. Writers can have two
letters per month published. Letters
and guest columns are the opinion of


the writers and not necessarily that of
the Lake City Reporter.
BY MAIL: Letters, P.O. Box 1709,
Lake City, FL 32056; or drop off at
180 E. Duval St. downtown.
BY FAX: (386) 752-9400.
BY E-MAIL:
news@lakecityreporter.com


M y mother
couldn't stand
to see a hungry
child or one
inadequately
dressed for the weather. On
occasion when she had need
to drive me or one of my sib-
lings to school because we had
missed the bus, we would pass
children obviously suffering
from the afflictions of poverty.
"Oh my," she would say, her
eyes welling up. She would
immediately stop the car to
ask the child's name if I didn't
recognize him or her. With
that information she would find
some way to make sure they
had a warm coat and other
clothing and a basket of food.
We certainly weren't wealthy
but we were better off than
many in those days when the
aftershocks of the Depression
were still being felt
When my father died, a let-
ter to the editor of his local'
newspaper told how the writer
and his sister had been sitting
disconsolate on the stoop of
their small house just before
Christmas in the mid-1930s.
They were forlorn and hungry
realizing that there would be no
holiday cheer. Then my father
drove up, hopped out with a
basket full of food and clothes
and presents. My father never
spoke of it but the author of the
letter never forgot it more than
40 years later.
There weren't many govern-
ment safety nets for unfortu-
nate Americans in those days.
People through their churches
and social organizations and
just plain individuals picked
up the slack where they could.
That is still true, of course. But
the urbanization of America has
contributed to the still startling
number of children in what


f Mahmoud Ahmadinejad is not on Israel's
payroll, he should be.
On Quds Day, when Iran officially mourns
the loss of Jerusalem to Israel, the Iranian
president repeated in media interviews Iran's
determination to eradicate Israel.
Once a Palestinian state is established, he said,
Israel will be eliminated and all its lands restored
to Palestine. He did not mention what would hap-
pen to the Jewish inhabitants, but given Iran's
treatment of its own religious minorities like the
Baha'is, it's not a happy thought to dwell on.
Ahmadinejad's periodic versions of "wiping
Israel off the map" could be dismissed as his usual
rote ravings, except that Palestine has high hopes
for laying the groundwork for an independent state
at next month's meeting of the United Nations.
Palestine had planned to get a resolution before
the U.N. Security Council. But the U.S. has said
it would veto any such resolution, citing the
continuing presence of Hamas in Gaza and the
Palestinians' refusal to restart peace talks with
Israel.
However, the Palestinians are talking about mak-


Dan K. Thomasson

the experts call "food insecure
households"- homes where
boys,and girls aren't certain
whether they will have any-
thing to eat that day or the next
or even the next
One of the most tragic, inex-
cusable statistics I have seen
in years has nothing to do with
the political shenanigans of
this town, the inability of the
Congress to stop our financial
bleeding or the president's
slipping approval rating as
the economy deteriorates. It
is simply that the District of
Columbia leads the nation in
the .percentage of children who
aren't receiving enough to eat
A list of states and the federal
enclave compiled by the Con Agra
Foods Foundation and reprinted
recently in The New York Times
reveals that in the District 32.3 per-
cent or 36,870 boys and girls face
food deprivation.
The District is followed close-
ly by Oregon with 29.2 percent
or 252,510 children and Arizona
and Arkansas with 28.8 percent,
and 28.6 percent respectively.
Texas, which Gov. Rick Perry
in his presidential campaign
cites as a model of economic
success, has 28.2 percent or
a whopping 1.87 million of its
kids in the hungry category.
Other states in the top 10


percentage wise are Georgia,
Mississippi, Nevada, South
Carolina and Florida. California
is ranked 11th with a percentage
of 27.3 or 2.58 million, to lead all
51 venues in the numbers.
Altogether, there are a star-
tling 171 million youngsters
or one quarter of the nation's
children who aren't being prop-
erly fed, who often go to bed
hungry and trudge off in the
, morning, stomachs growling
until they get to school where,
they receive some sustenance if
some politician hasn't decided
feeding them costs too much.
In the District the number of'
students eligible for free or
reduced cost food at school is a
startling 76 percent.
A.large number, but by no
means all, of these children
nationwide live in the inner cit-
ies of our urban sprawl African
and Hispanic Americans and
other ethnic groups. There -
are also a large number of
white children suffering, par-
ticularly in the rural South and.
Appalachia. Hunger obviously
makes no ethnic distinction.
With joblessness stubbornly
resisting improvement, the num-
bers are growing steadily and
the pressures being put on the
public school systems and other
community services are acceler-
ating at the same rate.
For the District of Columbia
to lead the nation in hungry
kids in the shadow of the
Capitol and the White House
is disgraceful, an unforgiv-
able national tragedy. If those
who run this government so
badly these days do nothing
else, they should end this. My
mother would demand it if she
were alive.
Dan K. Thomasson writes this
column for Scripps Howard News
Service.


ing an end run around the council and going direct-
ly to the U.N. General Assembly, where, although it
would be nonbinding, an independence resolution
would have a decent chance of passage.
An overwhelming vote of support would
go a long way toward legitimizing an incipient
Palestinian state and building support for interna-
tional recognition whether or not there is a final
agreement with Israel. Congress says it would also
cost Palestinians all or part of their $450 million
annual aid from the U.S.
But Ahmadinejad's incendiary and murderous
rhetoric may make some wavering nations think
twice about endorsing a resolution of indepen-
dence, and those who do quietly resolve to do noth-
ing to bring it about
The Mideast nations are keenly aware that
Ahmadinejad, safely insulated from Israel by
Turkey, Syria, Iraq, Jordan and Saudi Arabia, is in
essence only offering to hold the Palestinians' coat
if they get into a fight with Israel.
Talk has always been cheap in the Mideast
Ahmadinejad's may be the cheapest
N Scripps Howard News Service


4A


ANOTHER
VIEW


All


Obama's


fault

B before Hurricane
Irene made land-
fall, environmental
extremists were
spouting off three
certainties about the storm: It
is catastrophic; it was caused
by global warming; and it is all
President Obama's fault.
On Thursday, climate alarm-
ist Bill McKibben wrote,
"Irene's got a middle name,
and it's Global Warming." His
thesis is that warmer ocean
temperatures mean hurricanes
will hold more moisture and
travel farther north than they
have in the past, resulting in
more devastation. Combine this
with melting Arctic ice, record
floods and record droughts,
and the "global weirding"
model is complete.
If anything is getting weirder,
it's the arguments of the
climate-change crowd. They
are increasingly unnerved
by the collapse of their belief
system, as was illustrated by
Al. Gore's emotional meltdown
at an Aspen Institute speech
earlier this month. Warmists
no longer can hold the public's
attention with cute pictures of
polar bears and earnest stories
of looming long-term catastro-
phes. They need deadly impact
now. Thus, every natural disas-
ter, be it a flood, a drought, an
earthquake, a tsunami, a tor-
nado, a hurricane, a blizzard, a
heatwave or even a cold snap,
is somehow tied to their pet
theory.
Hurricane Katrina was the
model for "climate disrup-
tion" alarmism. Amidst the
devastation wrought in 2005
in New Orleans and along the
Gulf coast, warmists promised
this was just the beginning.
Future storms would be big-
ger, badder and more deadly.
The next three years, however,
were among the mildest hur-
ricane seasons on record, and
long-term data show relative
stability in hurricane size and
frequency.
The past few years have seen
significant body blows to the
global warming theory, includ-
ing major revelations of altered,
misused or just plain fraudulent
data, undue financial interests
and appearances of impropriety
among climate scientists, and
contrived "carbon markets"
closely tied to global warming
alarmists who stood to make
millions of dollars from govern-
ment-mandated regulations like
the now defunct "cap-and-trade"
scheme. The Earth stopped
warming 10 years ago. A July
2011 NASA study found that
carbon dioxide traps far less
heat than warmist computer
models assume, and that "there
is a huge discrepancy between
the data and the forecasts
that is especially big over the
oceans."
The American people in their
wisdom have begun to tune
out the climate-change noise.
Global warming ranked last
on a March 2011 Gallup poll of
the environmental concerns of
Americans. In an open-ended
June 2011 CBS News/New
York Times poll asking what
Americans think is "the most
important problem facing this
country today," the environment
did not even make the list
Hard-core enviros blame
Mr. Obama for failing to lead
on this issue. Despite pushing
through the most radical pro-
green regulatory framework in
history, liberals say he hasn't
done enough and Irene is his
punishment No matter,'the
storm won't be a total write-off


for the left. The White House
will at least have another
natural disaster to blame for
America's economic woes.
The Washington Times "


www.lakecityreporter.com


U.S. has no excuse


for hungry children


Palestine should tell

Iran's president to shut up

















School's out forever for 'unschoolers'


By LEANNE ITAUE
Associated Press

School's never out
for 14-year-old
Zoe Bentley. Nor
is it ever in.
The perky
teen from Tucson, Ariz.,
explores what she likes,
when she likes as deeply
as she chooses every
day of the year. As an
"unschooler," Zoe is unte-
thered from the demands
of traditional, compulsory
education.
That means, at the
moment, she's check-
ing out the redwoods of
California with her family,
tinkering with her website
and looking forward to
making her next video on
her favorite subject, exoge-
ology, the study of geology
on other, planets.
"I love seeing the his-
toiy of an area," Zoe said.
"Maybe a volcano erupted
and grew taller over time, or
wind eroded rock into sand
dunes, or a meteor hit the
ground and made a crater.'
Finding out how these and
other formations formed is
something I just really like."
Zoe's cheer:
"Exogeology rocks!"
Uhnschooling has
been around for several,
decades, but advocates say
there has been an uptick
as more families turn to
home-schooling overall.
Reliable data is hard to
come by, but estimates of
.children and teens home-
schooled in the U.S. range
from 1.5 million to 2 mil-
lion. Of those, as many as
one-third could be con-
sidered unschoolers like
Zoe, meaning their parents
are "facilitators," available
with materials and other
resources, rather than top-
down "teachers."
There's no fixed cur-
riculum, course schedule
or attempt to mimic tradi-
tional classrooms. Unless,
- of course, their children
ask for those" things.
Zoe, for instance, want-
ed to know more about
geology once she turned
12, so she signed up for a
class at Pima Community
College. "I had to take
a placement test, which
was the first test I'd ever
taken;" she said. "It was
surprisingly easy."
She has since taken sev-
eral other college classes,
including astrobiology,
algebra and chemistry.
Maybe, Zoe,said, "Ill earn
a degree, but the important


--- -" -

















ASSOCIATED PRESS
This June 15, 2010 photo shows 14-year-old Zoe Bentley in the Mars Yard at NASA's Jet
Propulsion Lab in Pasadena, Calif. School's-never out for Bentley. Nor is it ever in. The perky
teen from Tucson, Ariz., explores what she likes, when she likes as deeply as she chooses
every day of the year. As an "unschooler," Bentley is untethered from the demands of tradi-


tional, compulsory education.
thing to me is to learn what
I need to and want to know.
Everything else is a bonus."
John Holt, considered
the father of "unschool-
ing," would have been,
proud. The fifth-grade
teacher died in 1985,
leaving behind books
and other reflections that
include his 1964 work
"How Children FA l."
The book and others
Holt later wrote propelled
him into the spotlight as
he argued that mainstream
schools stymie the learn-
ing process by fostering
fear and forcing children
to study things they have
no interest in.
Colorado unschool mom
Carol Brown couldn't
agree more.
"Being bored makes
school miserable for a lot of
kids, plus there is the ele-
ment of compulsion, which
completely changes any
activity," the filmmaker said.
Brown and her husband
unschooled their oldest
daughter until she left for
college and their young-
est until her junior year
in high school, when she
chose to attend Telluride
Mountain School, a small,


progressive school near
home.
"Unschooling parents
are doing what good
parents do anyway when
they're on summer vaca-.
tion," Brown said. "We just
had more time to do it."
Like other unschoolers,
Brown's girls had books
and films, art supplies and
building materials growing
up. They visited beaches,
'museums and forests.
"There's no one right way
for every child to learn
or grow up," Brown said.
"Freedom is essential for
that reason."
For Clark Aldrich's
16-year-old son in
Connecticut, that meant
raising hens for his own
business selling eggs.
"Ifs.a good way to learn
about animals, commerce
and economics as well as
inventory," Aldrich said.
Pat Farenga of Medford,
Mass., unschooled his three
daughters with his wife but
said: "I don't see unschool-
ing or homeschooling as
the answer for everybody.
It's the answer for those
who choose it"
Farenga, who worked
with Holt, said Holt coined


the term "unschooling" in
1977 but.was never terribly
fond of it It stuck for lack
of a better description. He
considers unschooling a
subset of home-schooling,
while some unschoolers
see themselves more akin
to democratic free schools,.
a century-old movement
based on a philosophy of
self-directed learning and
equality in decision-making.
As an educator, Holt's
journey began with his
career in posh private
schools, then more pro-
gressive ones.
"He called progres-
sive schools soft jails
and public schools hard
jails," Farenga said. "He
described learning that
takes place outside of
school, but doesn't have
to take place at home and
doesn't have to look like
school learning."
Rare, unschoolers said,
are children who never
find reasons to pick up the
basics and beyond. That
could mean reading later
than many parents might
be comfortable with, or
ignoring math until they
see a reason on their own
to use it


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OBITUARIES


Elmer E. Altenbaugh
Mr. Elmer E. Altenbaugh, 93,
passed away peacefully in his
sleep August
28th at Haven
Hospice of the
Suwannee Val-
ley. Elmer was
born March
31, 1918 in
Pittsburg,
Pennsylva-
nia. After graduating from trade
school, he attended the Pittsburg
Institute of Aeronautics, met and
married Geraldine Shields, and
moved to his first job in Avon
Park, Florida as a manager of an
airfield that serviced and trained
pilots in WWII. Here they began
their family until after the war
and moved to Miami to work
as a Master Mechanic for Pan
American World Airways. He
loved deep sea fishing, reading,
and storytelling. He was a "jack
of all trades." If it was broken
he could fix it. He loved the
Lord and was kind to all he met.
Elmer is survived by his wife
of 70 years, Geraldine, their
three daughters, Janet Riggs
(Marvin), Carol Altenbaugh,
and Pallas Gandy (William),
and five grandchildren Lisa


Libemrni, Carol Riggs, James
Riggs, Casi Campbell, and Tap-
pan Gandy. Six great-grandchil-
dren, one great-great grandchild,
and many friends he counted
as loved ones, also survive.
Funeral services for Mr. Alten-
baugh will be held 11:00 AM
Thursday, September 1, 2011
in the Dees-Parrish Family Fu-
neral Home Chapel, with Elder
Herman Griffin officiating. The
family will receive friends in
the Chapel one hour prior to the
service. In lieu of flowers the
family request memorial dona-
tions be made to Haven Hospice
of the Suwannee Valley, 6037
US Hwy 90 West, Lake City,
FL 32055. Arrangements are
under the direction of the DEES-
PARRISH FAMILY
FUNERAL HOME, 458
S. Marion -Ave., Lake City,
FL 32025. (386) 752-1234.
Please sign our guestbook at
parrishfamilyfuneralhome. corn

Helen Allred Edson
Mrs. Helen Allred Edson, 85, of
Lake City passed away Satur-
day, August 27, 2011 following
an extended illness. Mrs. Edson
was born in Deland, Florida, but


had lived in the Lake City area
since 1986 after moving here
from West Palm Bdach. Mrs.
Edson was a graduate of Mars
Hill College in North Carolina.
She had attended the First Pres-
byterian Church of Lake City
before her ill health prevented
her from attending. Mrs. Ed-
son was preceded in death by
her husband John E. Edson.
Mrs. Edson is survived by
her son Mark Edson (Lucy)
and her granddaughter Emma
Edson all of Lake City.
Funeral services for Mrs. Edson
will be held graveside 10:00 AM
Wednesday August 31, 2011
with Pastor Jon Jackson Offici-
ating at Forest Lawn Memorial
Gardens. The family will receive
friends at the funeral home to-
night from 5:00-7:00 PM. Ar-
rangements are under the direc-
tion of the DEES-PARRISH
FAMILY FUNERAL HOME,
458 S. Marion Ave., Lake City,
FL 32025. (386) 752-1234.
Please sign our guestbook at
parrishfamilyfuneralhome. corn

Obituaries are paid advertise-
ments. For details, call the Lake
City Reporter's classified depart-
ment at 752-1293.


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LAKE CITY REPORTER NATIONAL TUESDAY, AUGUST 30, 2011


Page Editor: Robert Bridges, 754-0428


},










6A LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL TUESDAY. AUGUST 30. 2011


COMMUNITY CALENDAR


* Submit Community Calendar
announcements by mail or drop
off at the Reporter office located at
180 E. Duval St., via fax to (386)
752-9400 or e-mail arobinson@
lakecityreporter.com.


Today


OSHA seminar
The Columbia County
Builder's Association is
having a two-hour OSHA
seminar Aug. 30 to intro-
duce the fall protection
guidelines. The seminar
is free to CCBA mem-
bers and only $25 for non-
members. Call the CCBA
office at (386) 867-1998 or
e-mail colcountybuild@
comcast.net to make your
reservation. Seating is
limited so call early to be
ensured a seat Payment
must be made prior to the
seminar.

Wednesday


Entrepreneur of the
Year
NominationsforSCORE's
Entrepreneur of the Year
close Aug. 31. Nominate a
local small business owner
who is innovative, has sur-
mounted difficulties, orwho
contributes to our commu-
nity. E-mail scorelakecity@
gmail.com for a form or
click on "SCORE" at www.
northfloridanow.com to
nominate on-line. Call 752-
2000.

LEC events
Shirley Bethel per-
forms 11-11:45 a.m. in the
Dining Hall at the LifeStyle
Enrichment Center. The
center is located at 628 SE
Allison Court

Thursday


Nursing home planning
workshop
A free Nursing Home
Planning Workshop"
is 10 a.m. Sept 1 at the
LifeStyle Enrichment
Center. Everyone who is
concerned about how they
will pay for nursing home
care should attend this
informative workshop led
by local elder law attorney
Teresa Byrd Morgan. The
center is located at 628 S.E.
Allison Court. Reservations
are required. Call Shana
Miller at (386) 755-1977.


Volunteer fair


A volunteer fair is 9 a.m.
- noon at the LifeStyle
Enrichment Center Sept.
1. Learn about the Various
Volunteer Opportunities
in Columbia County. The
LEC is located at 628 SE
Allison Court next to Baya
Pharmacy East

Saturday


CHS dance
The Columbia High
School Class of 1973 is hav-
i' g a Labor Day 70s dance 8
p.m. Sept. 3 at the Women's
Club on Martin Luther
King. All classmates and a
friend are invited to attend.
Contact Maynel Bailey at
(386) 961-1630 or Estralita
Taylor at (386) 867-6718.


Healing arts festival
Come to the River
Healing Arts Festival is
10 a.m.- 4 p.m. Sept. 3 at
the Stephen Foster Folk
Culture Center State Park
Craft Square in White
Springs. Visitors will
learn ways to become and
stay healthy. Sponsored
by Shands of Live Oak,
this event will have cho-
lesterol and glucose test-
ing, a nutritionist, yoga
workshops, acupuncture,
massage, herbs and much
more. For additional infor-
mation please call (386)
397-1920. The park is
located at 11016 Lillian
Saunders Drive.


Wednesday


Take Charge of Your
Diabetes
The deadline to register
for the Take Charge of Your
Diabetes classes is Sept 7.
The educational program
is designed to help adults
with type 2 diabetes con-
trol their blood sugar to
feel better and reduce risk
of health complications.
The program will include
nine classes taught by a
team of qualified educators
and health professionals,
and a personal consulta-
tion with a registered
dietitian. Classes will run
Friday Sept. 9 until Nov. 4
at the UF/IFAS Suwannee,
County Extension office.
Call Jenny Jump at the
Columbia Extension' office
at (386) 752-5384 or Cathy
Rogers at the Suwannee
County Extension office
at (386) 362-2771. The $75
program fee includes the
educational classes, nutri-
tion consultation, program
materials and health assess-
ments.

Saturday


F.A.C.E Kickoff
The FAC.E. Kickoff is
10 a.m.-1 p.m. Sept. 10
at the Sylvan Learning
Center. The center is
located at 2496 US Hwy. 90
West Information on home-
schooling K- 12, how to
get started, ongoing activi-
ties such as art. classes,
bowling and possible field
trips for all ages will be
available. Signup sheets
and membership applica-
tion will also be on hand,
for FACE, FPEA and 4H.
'-Contact Kim Wong at (386)
758-8896. Please leave a
detailed message and she
will return your call.

Beatles Tribute
The Beatles Tribute: Let
It Be America's Premiere
Tribute to The Beatles is
Sept 10 at Florida Gateway
College in the Howard
Conference Center. Call
386-754-4340 or visit http://
fgcentertainment.com/.

Monday


Cancer support group
meeting
The Women's Cancer
Support Group of Lake City
will meet 5:30-6:30 p.m.
Sept 12 at Baya Pharmacy
East. The pharmacy is
located at 780 SE Baya
Drive. The guest speaker,
Daina Greene MD, will be
addressing the changes in
women's medical care as it
has evolved. You don't have
to be a member to attend
a meeting. Call (386) 752-
4198 or (386) 755-0522.

Photography and
photoshop workshops
Don Williams will
teach a Level One Digital
Photography Workshop 10
a.m. 12:30 p.m., Advanced
Digital Photography
Workshop is 2-4:30 p.m.
and a Level One Photoshop
Class 6:30-8:30 p.m.
Sept. 12, Oct. 10 and
Nov. 14 at Stephen Foster
Folk Culture Center State
Park. The level one photog-
raphy workshop will teach
participants how to plan
good photography, create
photographic composition
and the shooting effects
of both color and black
and white. The advanced
workshop will extend par-
ticipants' knowledge from
the Level One workshop,
including learn how to
work with ISO settings,
studio setup and light-


ing, lens differences, and
the eleven guidelines for
awesome landscape pho-
tography. A hands-on out-


door photography session
is also planned for both
levels. Students will need
to bring their own cam-
era; either film or digital
is acceptable. Photqshop
Class Participants will learn
to enhance photographs
using lighting and color
adjustment. Experience
how to use the clone
and eraser tools, work
with layers and add text.
Photoshop Elements soft-
ware will be demonstrated
in class. A laptop computer
with Photoshop software
is recommended but not
required for the class. The
workshop fee is $30 per
class, including regular
park admission. Each class
is limited to 10 students.
For more information on
any of these workshops or
to register, please call $he
park Gift Shop at (386) 397-
1920 or visit www.stephen-
fosterCSO.org. The park
is located at 11016 Lillian
Saunders Drive in White
Springs.
Tuesday, Sept. 13


Level Two Photoshop
Class
A Level Two Photoshop
Class presented by Don
Williams is 6:30 8:30 p.m.
Sept. 13, Oct 11 or Nov.
15 at Stephen Foster Folk
Culture Center State Park.
As a follow up to the Level
One Photoshop Class,
this workshop will include
the use of the 'Photoshop
tools, work with hue and
saturation, continue into
advanced layers, filters
and other artistic features.
This hands on class uses
Photoshop Elements soft-
ware. Students will need a
.,laptop computer with any
Photoshop software. The
"workshop fee is $30 per
class and includes park
admission. Each class is
limited to 10 students. For
more information on any
of these workshops or to
register, please call the
park Gift Shop at (386) 397-
1920 or visit www.stephen-
fosterCSO.org. The park
is located at 11016 Lillian
Saunders Drive in White
Springs.

FFA Alumni/
Booster Parent/Student
Dinner

The FFA Alumni/
Boosters are sponsoring
a parent/student dinner
for all perspective mem-
bers 6 p.m. Sept 13 in the
'Columbia High School
cafeteria. This is a manda-
tory meeting for all per-
spective FFA students and
their parents. The meeting
will go over the calendar of
events for the coming year
as well as expectations for
students. It will also have
student and alumni regis-
trations as well as T-shirt
per-orders. T-shirts will be
$15 and membership fees
are $25. Please make plans
to attend this important
meeting.

Girls mentoring
Welcome to
Womanhood mentoring
program for middle and
high school girls is 5-8
p.m. Sept. 13. Meetings
are held at 532 Marion
St. Contact Sandra Price
at (386) 867-1601. Dinner
included. Transporta-
tion can be provided if
contacted one week in
advance.


Friday, Sept. 16

John Denver Tribute
The "Take Me Home"
John Denver Tribute is
7:30 p.m. Sept 16.at Florida
Gateway College Levy
Performing Arts Center.
Jim Curry's powerful per-
formance accompanied
by guitar/mandolin, flute,
keyboard, bass and drums,
and backup singers brings
John Denver's greatest
songs and feelings to life:
with "Rocky Mountain
High," "Annie's Song,"
"Calypso," and more. His
is the first & only full-
length John Denver tribute
in Las Vegas. He pres-
ents the enduring music of
America's troubadour with
his compelling voice and
heartfelt words. Ticket
and membership informa-
tion is at www.community-
concerts.info.

Saturday, Sept. 17


Literacy Day
The 4th Annual Literacy
Day Event is 10 a.m.-2
p.m. Sept 17 at O'Leno
State Park. Highlights
will include Magic and
the Gentle Carousel
Therapy. Horses promot-
ing "Reading is Magic!"
Puppet shows, guest
'readers and local authors
reading children's stories.
Take an adventure walk
"Where Tails Meet Trails".
Bring, a camera and take
the Outdoor Challenge
for Children and earn a
free day pass to a state
park for their whole fam-
ily. There twill also be an
arts and crafts, area, live.
animals and refreshments.
Admission to the park is
free if you show a library
card, a library book, or
with the donation of a new
or gently used family ori-
ented book.

Monday, Sept. 19


Bereavement Support
Group
An informal meeting
with the intent of eventually
establishing a local chap-
ter of The Compassionate
Friends is 7-9 p.m. at
Hospice in the Community
Room on U.S. 90. The
group is a nonprofit self-
help bereavement support
organization for families
who have experienced the
death of a child. Call Sandi
Tope at (386)697-0286 or
e-mail FindHopeToday@
gmail.com. To learn more
about The Compassionate
Friends, visit www.com-
passionatefriends.org.

Tuesday, Sept. 20


Diabetes workshop

The next community
diabetes workshop is 9:30
a.m. Sept. 20 at the Lake
Shore Authority Board
building. The topic is
Signs and symptoms of
diabetes. Ann Milligan,
RN, is the speaker. The
building is located at 259
NE Franklin Street. Call
Wendy Fisher at (386)
292-7815 for questions.
Classes are free of charge
and no pre-registration is
necessary.


Saturday, Sept. 24


Civil War Expo
The annual Civil War
Expo is 10 a.m.-3 p.m.
Sept 24 at the Olustee
Battlefield Historic State
Park. The annual Civil War
Expo is a day of authentic
military drills, music and
storytelling, exhibits, peri-


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the day. Demonstrations of
blacksmithing are sched-
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Demonstrations of authen-
tic weapons and fighting
tactics used in the Civil War
will take place throughout
the day. A donation of $5


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LAKE CITY REPORTER SCHOOLS TUESDAY, AUGUST 30, 2011


BulletinBoard




Take Stock scholarship students signed


Students at both
Columbia and
Fort White High
School were
signed into the
Take Stock in Children
program on two dates.
A total of 11 students
from CHS were signed
Aug. 3. Seven from CHS
and FWHS were signed
Aug. 10.
The Columbia County
School District and
Florida Gateway College


partner to promote
The Take Stock in
Children program, an
extraordinary program
for improving the lives
of
deserving children in
Columbia County.
Take Stock provides
an opportunity for the
students to EARN a
two or four year pre-,
paid tuition scholarship.
' Two-year scholarships
are for Florida Gateway


College and the two plus
two scholarships are
for two years at Florida
Gateway College and two
years at a public state
university.
Students sign an agree-
ment to stay drug and
crime free, make good
grades and stay out of
trouble.
Take Stock also .gives
caring citizens the
chance to contribute to a
local child's scholarship


fund and/or serve as a
mentor.
Currently, 229 chil-
dren have been awarded
scholarships. A total
of 58 of these students
are attending Columbia
High and Fort White
High Schools.
There are 33 stu-
dents presently attend-
ing Florida Gateway.
College. A total of 51
students have now grad-
uated from FGC.


a,
---a.-


Students signing Aug. 3 included: Natassia Watson, Jeremy Barwick, Tyler Wilson, Davion Jones,
Andre6 Dove, Kayla Follman, Leanna Hadley, Jessica Drysdale, Cole Arthur, Jasmine Horton -


Courtesy photo
Students signed Aug. 10 included Heather Bohling, Isabella Giannosa, Julian Little, Jacob Burrows, Ashley Chesney and
Shea Chesney.


Niblack Elementary
School

WELCOME, WELCOME,
WELCOME!
The Niblack Elementary School
Family is delighted to welcome our
students back for another year of aca-


ON CAMPUS

demic success:
We look forward to a school year
filled with excitement, and academic
excellence.
We also have new faculty and staff
members: Staffing our TMH program
is Ms. Nikki Findlay, Ms. Sharon Creel,
and Ms. D'Ester Gaddis.
Our new Music teacher is Mr.


Matthew Baggarly.
Our new Guidance Counselor is
Ms. Terri Bicknell
We are soliciting volunteers and
mentors for our students.
If you can donate an hour, two hours,
or an entire day each week or month,
to make a difference in the life of a
child, it would be deeply appreciated.


Behind Apple's products is longtime designer


SAN FRANCISCO (AP) Steve
Jobs has been Apple's most recog-
nizable personality, but much of its
cachet comes from its clean, inviting
designs. For. that, Apple can credit its
head designer, Jonathan Ive.
Ive, a self-effacing 44-year-old Brit,
helped Jobls bring Apple back from
the brink of financial ruin with the
whimsical iMac computer, whose
original models came in bright colors
at a time when bland shades domi-
nated the PC world. He later helped
transform Apple into a consumer
electronics powerhouse and the envy
of Silicon Valley with the iPod, the
iPhone and, most recently, the iPad.


In the wake of Jobs' resignation
as CEO, Apple must show that it
can keep churning out head-turning
products even without its charismatic
leader. Apple's chief operating officer,
Tim Cook, is now CEO, taking on the
role of Apple's public face.
But in many ways the real pressure
will fall on Ive to make sure Apple con-
tinues its string of gadget successes.
Ive, known to his friends as "Jony,"
has led Apple's design team since the
mid-'90s. Working closely with Jobs,
Ive has built a strong legacy at Apple,
ushering in products that are sleek
and stylish, with rounded corners,
few buttons, brushed aluminum sur-


faces and plenty of slick glass.
Apple's pride in this work is evi-
dent even in the packaging: Open up
any iPhone box, for example, and see
Apple proudly proclaim, "Designed by
Apple in California." Six of Ive's works,
including the original iPod, are even
part of the collection at the Museum of
Modern Art in New York.
People who have worked with Ive
describe him as humble and sweet,
quiet and shy, but also confident,
hard-working and brilliant. Paola
Antonelli, senior curator of architec-
ture and design for MoMA, said she
knows "hardly anybody that is so uni-
versally loved and admired" as Ive.


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LAKE CITY REPORTER NATIONAL TUESDAY, AUGUST 30, 2011


Space station may be evacuated by Nov.


By MARCIA DUNN
AP Aerospace Writer

CAPE CANAVERAL
- Astronauts may need to
temporarily abandon the
International Space Station
this fall if last week's Russian
launch accident prevents
new crews from flying, a
NASA official said Monday.
If Russia's essential
Soyuz rockets remain
grounded beyond mid-
November, there will be
no way to launch any more
astronauts before the cur-
rent residents are supposed
to leave, said NASA's space
station program manager,
Mike Suffredini.
A space station sup-
ply ship was destroyed
last week following lift-
off from Kazakhstan. The
failed upper stage of the
Soyuz rocket is similar
to what's used to launch
astronauts.
The launch of the very
next crew already has been
delayed. It had been sched-
uled for Sept. 22.
To keep the orbiting out-
post with a full staff of six for
as long as possible, three of
the current residents will
remain in orbit for at least
an extra week. They were
supposed to return to Earth
on Sept 8.
Suffredini said flight con-
trollers could keep a desert-
ed space station operating
indefinitely, as long as all
major systems are working
properly.
But thafs always the last
resort The risk to the space
station goes up if no one's
on board to fix potential
equipment breakdowns.
"We have plenty of
options," Suffredini said.
"We'll focus on crew safety
as we always do."
Astronauts have been liv-
ing continuously aboard the
space station ever since the
first crew was launched in
2000.
NASA considered vacat-
ing the space station fol-
lowing the space shuttle
Columbia disaster in 2003.
Back then, shuttles were still
being used to ferry some
station residents back and
forth. Instead, the station
got by with two-man crews
for a few years because of
the significant cutback in
supplies.
Even if the space shut-
tles still were flying the
program ended last month
- space station crews
still would need Soyuz-
launched capsules to serve
as lifeboats, Suffredini
said. The capsules are cer-
tified for no more than 6%
months in space, thus the
need to regularly rotate
crews.
As for supplies, the space
station is well stocked and
could go until next sum-
met, Suffredini said. Space
shuttle Atlantis dropped off
a year's supply of goods just
last month.
For now, operations are
normal aboard the 240-mile-
high complex, he noted,
and the additional week on
board for half the crew will
mean additional science
research. .
The Russians have set up
an investigation team and
until it comes up with a
cause for the accident and a
repair plan, the launch and
landing schedules remain
in question. None of the
spacecraft debris has been
recovered yet the wreck-
age fell into a remote, wood-
ed section of Siberia.
Suffredini said he hasn't
had time to consider the
PR impact of abandoning
the space station, especially
coming so soon after the
end of the 30-year shuttle
program.


ASSOCIATED PRESS
This May 23 photo made by Expedition 27 crew member Paolo Nespoli from the Soyuz TMA-20 following its undocking and released by NASA shows the:
International Space Station and the docked space shuttle Endeavour, left. Astronauts may need to temporarily abandon the International Space Station this
fall if last week's Russian launch accident prevents new crews from flying, a NASA official said Monday.


Convicted polygamnist leader hospitalized


By MICHAEL GRACZYK
Associated Press

HOUSTON -
Polygamist leaderWarren
Jeffs has been hospital-
ized after not. eating or
drinking enough since
his recent conviction
on child sexual assault
charges, a prison official
said Monday.
The 55-year-old head
of the Fundamentalist
Church of Jesus Christ
of Latter Day Saints is in
critical but stable condi-
tion, Texas Department of
Criminal Justice spokes-
woman Michelk Lyons
told The Associated
Press. It is uncertain how
long he will be hospital-
ized.
Jeffs attorney Emily
Det6to told the AP that
he was taken to East.
Texas Medical Center in
Tyler on Sunday night.
She says he "hasn't been
feeling well" but wouldn't
elaborate.
A hospital spokeswom-
an said she could not
release any information
about whether Jeffs was
a patient.
Jeffs was convicted
earlier this month of sex-
ually assaulting under-
age followers he took as
spiritual brides. He had
been in a Huntsville pris-
on after a jury decided he
should spend life in pris-
on, then was moved last
week. to the Powledge
Unit outside Palestine,
about 100 miles south-
east of Dallas.
The punishment was
the harshest possible
and Jeffs isn't eligible for
parole until he is at least
100 years old.
Jeffs has been in pro-
tective custody, which is
among the most restric-
tiie forms of imprison-
ment in Texas. He was
to be alone in his cell
daily, not be involved in
any work programs and
be out of his cell only for
recreation alone and to
shower.
Now Texas inmate No.
01726705, Jeffs is among
only 85 inmates in the
156,000-prisoner Texas
corrections system to be


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ASSOCIATED PRESS
In this Aug. 5 file photo, Warren Jeffs, right, is escorted out
of the Tom Green County Courthouse by a lawienforcement
officer in San Angelo, Texas. The polygamist leader has been
hospitalized after not eating or drinking enough.i


assigned protective cus-
tody.
Former church mem-
bers have said Jeffs likely
would continue to lead his
Utah-based church from
inside prison and that
his followers likely still
revere him as a prophet
despite the considerable
evidence presented at his
trial showirig he sexually
assaulted -girls as young
as 12.
During his trial, pros-
ecutors used DNA evi-
dence to show Jeffs
fathered a child with a
15-year-old and played an
audio recording of what
they said was him sexu-
ally assaulting a 12-year-
old. Both were among
24 underage wives who
prosecutors said ,Jeffs
collected.
The basic principles of
Jeffs' FLDS are rooted
in polygamy, a legacy of
early Mormon church
teachings that held plu-
ral marriage brought
exaltation in heaven. The
Church of Jesus Christ
of Latter-day Saints, the


mainstream Mormon
church, abandoned the
practice in 189' as a con-
dition of Utah'S statehood
and excomnmunicates
members who engage in
the practice. I
Associated Pkess Writer
Diana Heidger4 in Dallas
contributed to this report.

GET-I lakecitr8Bpotter.com

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Story ideas?

Contact
Tim Kirby
Sports Editor
754-0421
tkirby@akecityreportercom-


Lake City Reporter





SPORTS


Tuesday,August 30,2011


www.lakecityreporter.com


Section B


BRIEFS
GATORS
Gator Club
social Thursday
The North Florida
Gator Club has its annual
kickoff social planned
at the home of John and
Betty Norris at 6 p.m.
Thursday. Chris Price
of TV-20 will be the
guest speaker., Dinner
will be provided by the
club. All Gator fans are
invited. The Gator Club
is raffling off two season
tickets for the upcoming
season. Chances are $50
with proceeds going to
the'UF scholarship fund.
For details, call Ian at
(352) 3164305.
SEMINOLES
Club gathering
on Thursday
The Lake City
Seminole Club has its
2011kickpff
gathering at 6 p.m.
Thursday at Tailgators
on U.S. Highway 90 west
For details, call Norbie
Ronsonet at 752-2180..
YOUTH BASEBALL
Fort White fall
registration set-
Fort White Youth
Baseball has fall
registration from
4-7 p.m. Thursday and
Sept 7, and 10 a.m. to
2 p.m. Sept 10 at the
concession stand at
South Columbia Sports
Park.
For details, call Milissa
Blakley at 365-4133.
WOMEN'S SOFTBALL
League seeking
players, sponsors
Columbia County
Women's Softball is 4
seeking players, coaches,
and sponsors for the fall
season.
For details, call
Casandra Wheeler at
365-2168 or e-mail john_
casandra@hotmail. com.
SEMI-PRO FOOTBALL
Lake City'team
seeking players
The Lake City Falcons
men's semi-pro football
team is seeking new
players and veterans for
the upcoming season.
Players must be 18 years
old or older, and able to
commit to. the team and
come to practice.
For details, call Elaine.
Harden at 292-3039.
* From staff reports

GAMES

Today
-Columbia High
volleyball at Union County
High, 6 p.m. (JV-5)
Wednesday
Fort White High
volleyball vs. Oak Hall
School, 6 p.m. (JV-5)
Columbia High
volleyball vs. Belleview
High, 6:30 p.m. (JV-5:30)
Thursday
Fort White High
volleyball at Interlachen
High, 6 p.m. (JV-5)
Columbia High
JV football at Madison
County High, 7 p.m.
Fort White High JV
football vs. Suwanoee
High, 7 p.m.
Friday
Columbia High
football at Brooks County
(Ga.) High, 7:30 p.m.
Fort White High
football at Hamilton


County High, 7:30 p.m.


Fort White, Hamilton

County look to improve


BRANDON FINLEY/Lake City Reporter
Fort White High head coach Demetric Jackson (left) talks with
Soron Williams during the kickoff classic game at Episcopal
School of Jacksonville on Thursday.


Camden


Middle school
Cougars rough up
Lake City, 40-12.
By TIM KIRBY
tkirby@lakecityreporter.com
Lake City Middle School
football coach BillyJennings
knew Camden Middle
School would be tough.
The Cougars exceeded
expectations with a 40-12
win over the Falcons at
Columbia High Stadium on
Monday .. . ....
Camden scored on. all
three of its possessions in
the first quarter, building
a 22-0 lead by the buzzer.
Lake City ran just seven
plays including a punt
The Falcons caught their
breath, made a defensive
stop and responded with a
10-play scoring drive late in
the second quarter.
Roger Cray ripped off
a 49-yard run when Lake
City went for it on fourth-
and-8. Jacob Thomas then
threw to Derontae Jordan
fori 10 yards. Thomas ran
in the touchdown from one
yard out for a 22-6 score at
halftime.
Lake City received the
second-half kickoff and
Thomas connected with
Devante Sercey on a
26-yard play. The drive
stalled and Camden scored
the next two touchdowns
for.a 34-6 lead.
Lake City came back with
a scoring drive.


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Lake City Middle School's Brandon Little (15) follows blockers Roger Cray (2), Derontae Jordan (3) and Jacob Thomas (7).
during a run against Camden Middle School on Monday at Columbia High.Stadium. LCMS fell to Camden, 40-12.


Thomas hit Cray for 26
yards and Sercey for 19
yards to bring on a first-
and-goal. Jordan scored on
a three-yard run..
Camden had a long
return on the kickoff and
tacked on one final score.


An interception by the
Cougars ended Lake City's
last possession.
"We had 19 who had
never started before, so this
was definitely a learning
experience," Jennings said.
"We have to go to Madison


next (Sept. 13) and we can't
underestimate anybody.
We made a lot of mental
mistakes and wore a lot of
guys. out going both -ways.
Roger Cray had a. good
game and Brandon Little
and Hunter Sweet stepped


up on defense."
Scoring touchdowns
for Camden .were Antonio
Hamilton (29-, 3-yard runs),
Jonathan Canada (22-, 34-
yard runs) and Deangelo
Williams (38-yard run, 67-
yard pass from Hamilton).


Sharapova rallies


for victory at Open


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Mardy Fish returns a shot to Tobias Kamke of Germany
during the first round of the U.S. Open tennis tournament
in New York on Monday. Fish of the United States won his
opening match in straight sets.


Russian runs 2011
record to 12-0 in
third-set matches.
By EDDIE PELLS
Associated Press
NEW YORK Maria
Sharapova's slow 'start
almost turned into an early
exit at the U.S. Open.
The three-time major
champion picked up her
game in time to avoid an
upset against 102nd-ranked
Heather Watson, rallying for
a 3-6,7-5,6-3 victory Monday
in the opening round.
After being thoroughly
outplayed in the first set,
third-seeded Sharapova let
a 4-1 lead in the second slip,
as well. She shored things
up at 5-all in the second
to pull out that set. She
also led 4-1 in the third, but


gave back a break. After
that, Sharapova broke right
back then served out her
match against the 19-year,
old Brit, who was making
her first appearance in
the main draw at Flushing
Meadows.
Sharapova improved to
12-0 this year in third sets.
"In the end, that's kind of
where it counts," she said
after a match that lasted 2
hours, 34 minutes. "No mat-
ter how tired or whether
you're playing your best ten-
nis or sometimes your worst,
you keep fighting for it"
Not showing the same
kind of fight was fifth-
seeded Petra Kvitova, who
became the first reigning
Wimbledon champion to
lose in the first round of
the U.S. Open. She made
52 unforced errors in a 7-6
(3), 6-3 loss to Alexandra


Dulgheru and has won only.
two matches since hoist-
ing the trophy at the All-
England Club last month.
"After I made some mis-
takes, I was mentally down,"
Kvitova said.
Last year's U.S. Open and
Wimbledon runner-up, sec-
ond-seeded Vera Zvonareva,
defeated Stephanie Foretz
Gacon of France, 6-3, 6-0,
Other women's winners
included No. 13 Peng Shuai,
No. 19 Julia Goerges and
No. 27 Lucie Safarova.
The early headliner for
the men was American
Mardy Fish, who at No. 8
is the highest-ranked .U.S.
player in the tournament
Fish lived up to his bill-
ing, opening his stay at
Flushing Meadows with
a 6-2, 6-2, 6-1 victory over
OPEN continued on 2B


Both teams lost
in kickoff classic
performances.
By TIM KIRBY
tirby@lakecityreporter.com
FORT WHITE Fort
White High travels to
Hamilton County High on
Friday for the opening game
of the 2011 football season.
Kickoff is 7:30 p.m.
Both teams will be
looking to improve on.
their kickoff classic perfor-
mances. Fort White lost,
42-27, at Episcopal School


of Jacksonville, while
Hamilton County lost at
Trenton High, 41-22.
Several other of Fort
White's upcoming oppo-
nents participated in clas-
sics and did well.
Newberry High, which
Fort White will host in
week two, welcomed in
Interlachen High and
spanked the Rams, 31-0.
Ra'keem Hoyt rushed for
128 yards and three touch-
downs for the Panthers.
Devonte Flagg turned in
three sacks. '
Fort White travels to
Union County High in week


.five. The Lake Butler Tigers
edged visiting Bradford
High, 7-6.
Fort White's lone district
foe, Trinity Catholic High,
routed Taylor County High,
47-7.
The Indians travel to play
Taylor County on Sept. 16.
Santa Fe High, which
comes to Fort White on
.Nov. 11 looking to regain
the Battle for the Paddle
trophy, lost 19-13 to visiting
Columbia High.
Coach Tommy Keeler
took over at Santa Fe this
season after several years
,at Newberry.


crackdown












LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS TUESDAY, AUGUST 30, 2011


Page Editor: Tim Kirby, 754-0421


TELEVISION

TV sports

Today
MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL
7 p.m.
MLB- Regional coverage. N.YYankees
at Boston or Philadelphia at Cincinnati
10:05 p.m.
WGN Chicago, Cubs at San
Francisco
TENNIS
I p.m., 7 p.m.
ESPN2 U.S. Open, first round, at
NewYork

BASEBALL

AL standings


Bo
Ne
Tar
To
Ba


De
Ch
ClI
Mi
Ka


Tex;
Los
Oa
Sea


East Division
W L
iston 82 5 I
ew York 79 52
mpa Bay 73 59
ronto 66 67
Itimore 53 78
Central Division
W L
etroit 73 60
hicago 66 65
eveland 65 65
nnesota 56 77
nsas City 55 79
West Division
W L
xas 76 59
s Angeles 72 61
akland 60 73
battle 56 76
Sunday's Games
Kansas City 2, Cleveland I
Tampa Bay 12,Toronto 0


Baltimore 2, N.Y.Yankees 0, 1st game
Oakland at Boston, ppd., hurricane
Minnesota II, Detroit 4
Chicago White Sox 9, Seattle 3
N.Y.Yankees 8, Baltimore 3,2nd game
Texas 9, LA.Angels 5
Monday's Games
Kansas City at Detroit (n)
N.Y.Yankees at Baltimore (n)
Oakland at Cleveland (n)
Tampa Bay at Toronto (n)
Minnesota at Chicago White Sox (n)
L.A.Angels at Seattle (n)
Today's Games
Kansas City (Francis 5-14) at Detroit
(Fister 6-13),7:05 p.m.
Oakland (Cahill 9-12) at Cleveland
(Undecided), 7:05 p.m.
Toronto (Cecil 4-7) at Baltimore
(Guthrie 6-16), 7:05 p.m.
N.Y.Yankees (Sabathia 17-7) at Boston
(Lackey 12-9), 7:10 p.m.
Tampa Bay (Hellickson 11-9) at Texas
(Feldman 0-0), 8:05 p.m.
Minnesota (Swarzak 3-4) at Chicago
White Sox (Z.Stewart 1-3), 8:10 p.m.
LA.Angels (.Williams 1-0) at Seattle
(AVasquez r-0), 10:f0 p.m.

N(. standings

East Division
W L Pct Gi'"
Philadelphia 83 46 .643 -
Atlanta 79 54 .594 6
NewYork 63 68 .481 21
Washington 62 70 .470 22'
Florida 59 73 .447 25'h
Central Division
W L Pct GB
Milwaukee 81 54 .600 -
St. Louis 70 64, .522 10h'
Cincinnati 67 66 .504 13
Pittsburgh 62 71 .466 18
Chicago 57 77 .425 23'A
Houston 44 90 .328 36'h
West Division
W L Pct GB
Arizona 75 59 .560 -
San Francisco 71 63 .530 4
Colorado 64 70 .478 II
Los Angeles 62 70 .470 12
San Diego 60 74 .448 15
Sunday's Games
-Cincinnati 5,Washington 4,14 innings
Atlanta at New York, ppd., hurricane
Florida at Philadelphia, ppd., hurricane
Milwaukee 3, Chicago Cubs 2
St. Louis 7, Pittsburgh 4
Houston 4, San Francisco 3, I1 innings
Colorado 7, LA. Dodgers 6
Arizona 6, San Diego I
Monday's Games
N.Y. Mets 2,F Rorida I, 1st game
Florida at N.Y. Mets, 2nd game (n)
Philadelphia at Cincinnati (n)
Pittsburgh at Houston (n)
Colorado at Arizona (n)
San Diego at LA. Dodgers (n)
Chicago Cubs at San Francisco (n)
Today's Games
Florida (Vazquez 7-11 I) at N.Y. Mets
(Pelfrey 7-10), 7:10 p.m.
Philadelphia (Halladay 15-5) at
Cincinnati (Arroyo 8-10), 7:10 p.m.
Washington (LHernandez 7-12) at
Atlanta (urrjens 13-5), 7:10 p.m.
Pittsburgh (Morton 9-7) at Houston
(Sosa 1-2), 8:05 p.m.
St. Louis (E.Jackson 3-2) at Milwaukee
(Marcum 11-4),8:10 p.m.
Colorado (A.Cook 3-7) at Arizona
(Miley I -I), 9:40 p.m.
San Diego (Stauffer 8-10) at LA.
Dodgers (Kuroda 10-14), 10:10 p.m.
Chicago Cubs (Garza 6-10) at San
Francisco (Vogelsong 10-4), 10:15 p.m.


FOOTBALL

NFL preseason games

Saturday
Buffalo 35, Jacksonville 32, OT
Tampa Bay 17, Miami 13
Pittsburgh 34,Atlanta 16
Houston 30, San Francisco 7
Dallas 23, Minnesota 17
Tennessee 14, Chicago 13
Detroit 34, New England 10
Denver 23, Seattle 20
San Diego 34,Arizona 31
Sunday
New Orleans 40, Oakland 20

BASKETBALL

WNBA schedule

Saturday's Game
Atlanta 86, Indiana 80
Sunday's Games


Minnesota 72., San Antonio 61
Tulsa 83, Connecticut 72
Phoenix 86,Washington 79
Chicago 74. New York 73
Seattle 65, Los Angeles 63
Today's Games
Chicago at New York, 7 p.m.
Indiana at Atlanta, 7:30 p.m.
Washington at Minnesota, 8 p.m.
Connecticut at San Antonio, 8 p.m.
Phoenix at Tulsa, 8 p.m.
Seattle at Los Angeles, 10 30 p.m.

AUTO RACING

Irwin Tools Night Race

At Bristol Motor Speedway
Bristol, Tenn.
Saturday
(Start position in parentheses)
I. (8) Brad Keselowski, Dodge, 500
laps, 128.2 rating, 47 points, $291,883.
2. (27) Martin Truex Jr., Toyota, 500,
106.4,43, $223,550.
3. (4) Jeff Gordon, Chevrolet, 500,
133.7,43, $202,986.
4. (13) Jimmie Johnson, Chevrolet, 500,
118.4,41,$186,161.
5. (6) Jarnie McMurray, Chevrolet, 500,
107.9,40,$158,064.
6. (3) Matt Kenseth, Ford, 500, 125.4.
39,$158,861.
7. (20) Denny Hamlin, Toyota, 500,
90.9,37, $154,250.
8. (I) Ryan Newman, Chevrolet, 500,
104.1,37, $157,600.
9. (2) Carl Edwards, Ford, 500, 106.2,
35,$148,841.
10. (I I) Marcos Ambrose, Ford, 500,
94.5,34, $134,941.
II: (25) Kasey Kahne, Toyota, 500,
75.5, 33, $126,233.
12. (18) A J Allmendinger, Ford, 500,
91.6,32,$138,41 1.
13. (9) Joey Logano,Toyota, 500, 85.3,
32, $109,475.
14. (23) Kyle Busch, Toyota, 500, 92.9,
3 1, $143,666;
15. (21) Jeff Burton, Chevrolet, 500,
73.5,29, $112,250.
16. (22) Dale Earnhardt Jr., Chevrolet,
500,76.3,28, $106,150.
17. (10) Kurt Busch, Dodge, 500, 84,
27, $139,025.
18. (12) Regan Smith, Chevrolet, 500,
83,26, $123,270.
19.(19) Juan Pablo Montoya, Chevrolet,
500, 67.5,25, $133,833. k
20. (24) David Ragan, Ford, 500, 69.6,
24, $105,275.
21. (26) Brian Vickers, Toyota, 499,
63.9,23,$122,214.
22. (15) Kevin Harvlck, Chevrolet, 499,
69.8,22, $140,786.
23. (29) Casey Mears,Toyota, 499,57.4,
21,$94,725.
24. (17) David Gilliland, Ford, 498,52.7,
20, $107,608.
25. (38) Andy Lally, Ford, 498,44.3, 19,
$102,500.
26. (16) Clint Bowyer, Chevrolet, 498,
53.5, 18, $132,608.
27. (37) David Starr, Ford, 497, 53.1.,
0, $87,930.
28. (42) Tony Stewart, Chevrolet, 497,
46.6, 16, $137,828.
29. (40) Mike Bliss, Chevrolet, 497,
41.2,0,$102,968.
30. (7) Paul Menard, Chevrolet, 496,
54.3, 14, $98,675.
31. (14) Greg Biffle, Ford, 496, 65.1,
13, $105,065.
32. (31) David Stremme, Chevrolet,
494,37.1, 12,$87,955.
33. (41) Terry Labonte, Ford, 494, 34,
II,$99,842.
34. .(30) Bobby Labonte, Toyota,
ignition, 471,53.8, 10, $ 113,055.
35.(35) Dave Blaney, Chevroletengine,
457,44.9,9, $861575.
36. (34) David Reutimann,Toyota, 430,
56.5,8, $114,373.
37. (33) Travis Kvapil, Ford, 371, 40.2,
0, $86,330:.
38. (5) Mark Martin, Chevrolet,
accident, 363, 67.3, 6, $94,220.
39. (32) Michael McDowell, Toyota,
electrical, 49,31.5, 5, $86, 110.
40. (28) Joe NemechekToy;ota, brakes,
42,33.9,0, $85,975.
41. (43) Mike Skinner, Toyota, brakes,
28,30.6,0, $85,750.
42. (36) Scott Speed, Ford, brakes, 28,
27.9,0, $85,635.
43. (39) Robby GorAon, Dodge, brakes,


10,25.4, I, $85,960.
Race Statistics
Average Speed of Race Winner:
96.753 mph.
Time of Race: 2 hours, 45 minutes,
16 seconds.
Margin of Victory. 0.951 seconds.
Caution Flags: 6 for 42 laps.
Lead Changes: 22 among 10 drivers.

TENNIS

U.S Open singles

Monday
Men
First Round
Fiavio Cipolla, Italy, def. Kei Nishikori,
Japan, 6-4, 6-2, retired.
Janko Tipsarevic (20), Serbia, def.
Augustin Gensse, France, 6-2,7-5, 6-0.
Alexandr Dolgopolov (22). Ukraine,
def. Frederico Gil, Portugal, 6-4,6-2,7-5.
Marcel Granollers (31), Spain, def.
Xavier Malisse, Belgium, 6-4.6-4,6-4.
Marin Cilic (27), Croatia. def. Ryan
Harrison, United States, 6-2,7-5, 7-6 (6).
Tomas Berdych (9), Czech Republic,
def. Romain Jouan, France, 6-2, 7-6 (4),
6-1.
Fabio Fognini, Italy, def. Horacio
Zeballos,Argentina, 5-7, 6-4,7-6 (5), 6-4.
Mardy Fish (8), United States, def.
Tobias Kamke, Germany, 6-2,6-2,6- I.
Richard Gasquet (13), France, def.
Sergiy Stakhovsky, Ukraine, 6-4, 6-4, 6-0.
Bernard Tomic, Australia, def. Michael
Yani, United States, 6-3,6-4,6-4.
Juan Monaco, Argentina, def. Andreas
Seppi, Italy, 7-6 (1I), 6-2,6-2.
S Philipp Petzschner, Germany, def.
Albert Ramos, Spain, 7-5, 6-7 (2), 6-3,
6-7 (5), 6-3.
Mikhail Kukushkin, Kazakhstan, def.
Albert Montanes, Spain, 7-5, 6-2, 3-6,
7-6 (5).
Ivo Karlovic, Croatia, def. Fernando
Gonzalez, Chile, 6-4, 6-4,7-6 (3).
Michael Llodra (29), France, def.Victor
Hanescu, Romania, 6-2, 4-6,4-6, 6-3,6-2.
Kevin Anderson, South Africa, def. Go
Soeda. Japan, 6-I, 6-3, 6-0.
Radek Stepanek (23), Czech Republic,
def. Philipp Kohischreiber, Germany, 6-4,
6-1,6-3.
Malek Jaziri, Tunisia, def. Thiemo de
Bakker, Netherlands, 4-6,6-1 6-4, 6-2.
Tommy Haas, Germnany, def. Jonathan
Dasnieres de Veigy, France, 6-3, 6-4, 6-7
(5),6-l1.
Dudi Selarlsrael, def.Thomaz Bellucci,
Brazil, 4-6,2-6,6-4,6-3,6-0.
Alejandro .Falla, Colombia, def.Viktor
Troicki (I5), Serbia, 3-6, 6-3,4-6, 7-5, 7-5.
Women
First Round
Monica Niculescid, Romania, def.
Patricia Mayr-Achleitner, Austria, 6-3, 6-3.
Julia Goerges (19), Germany, def.
Kristina Barrois, Germany, 6-3, 6-2.
Laura Pous-Tio, Spain, def. Misaki Doi,'
Japan, 6-2,6-7 (12), 5-2, retired.
Laura Robson, Britain, def. Ayumi
Morita, Japan, 7-6 (5), 1-0, retired.
Lucie Safarova (27), Czech Republic,
def. Magdalena Rybarikova, Slovakia, 2-6,
6-3, 6-2.
Alexandra Dulgheru, Romania, def.
Petra Kvitova (5), Czech Republic, 7-6
(3), 6-3.
Madison Keys, United States, def. Jill
Craybas, United States, 6-2,6-4.
Peng Shuai (13), China, def. Varvara
Lepchenko, United States, 6-3, 6-4.
Vera Zvonareva (2), Russia, def.
Stephanie Foretz Gacon, France, 6-3, 6-0.
Kateryna Bondarenko, Ukraine, def.
Lucie Hradecka, Czech Republic, 6-3,6-0,
Tsvetana Pironkova, Bulgaria, def.
Virginie Razzano, France, 6-2,6-3.
I Maria Sharapova (3), Russia, def.
Heather Watson, Britain, 3-6, 7-5, 6-3.
Dominika Clbulkova (14), Slovakia, def.
Zhang Shuai, China, 6-3,6-4.
Anabel Medina Garrigues (30), Spain,
def. Karin Knapp, Italy, 6-7 (4), 6-4,6-3.
Maria Kirilenko (25), Russia, def.
Ekaterina Makarova, Russia, 4-6, 6-1,
7-6(3).
Irina Falconi, United States, def. Klara
Zakopalova, Czech Republic, 3-6, 6-4, 6-2.
Marion Bartoli (8), France, def.
Alexandra Panova, Russia, 7-5,6-3.
Anastasiya Yakimova, Belarus, def.
Noppawan Lertcheewakarn, Thailand,
6-0,4-6,6-3."


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THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME
by David L. Hoyt and Jeff Knurek


Unscramble these four Jumbles,
one letter to each square,
to form four ordinary words. .

I RCDOH I


S I I Now arrange the circled letters
to form the surprise answer, as
suggested by the above cartoon.

Answer: A

(Answers tomorrow)
Yesterday's Jumbles: HUSKY AGING DROWSY ROBBER
Answer: Founded in 1898, Frank Seiberling's tire and rubber
company has had many GOOD YEARS


OPEN: Last U.S. men's win in 2003

Continued From Page 1B


Tobias Kamke of Germany.
The 29-year-old from Los
Angeles opened the match
by losing his serve, but
that turned out to be the
only hiccup. He is one of
14 American men entered
in the' U.S. Open, as the


host country continues
the quest to find its next
great champion. No U.S.
man has won a major since
Andy Roddick won in New
York in 2003.
"Andy's been the No. 1
player in our generation


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for years," Fish said. "This
is extremely different for
me, this feeling coming out
here and trying to show
everything you can, to
show you're the No. 1 guy,
at least for this tournament
Ifs been a lot of fun."


acre recreational lake covered in huge live oaks! Close
to the city. Paved roads, county water, power, phone,
community boat launch. Excellent financing. Call now
(866)952-5302

UPSTATE NEW YORK FARMLAND SACRIFICE!
5ACs $19,900. Gorgeous views, apple trees, woods &
meadows! Nearby lakes & state land! Perfect for country
getaway! (877)458-8227 www.NewYorkLandandLakes.
com

Miscellaneous

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Real Estate

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$9,900, Blue Ridge mountains, paved roads, utilities,
county water, panoramic views, excellent financing. Sale
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Schools & Instruction

Heat & Air JOBS Ready to work? 3 week accelerated
program. Hands on environment. Nationwide
certifications and Local Job Placement Assistance!
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ANF
ADVEPFTINrJG NET.w'OKS OF FLORIDA

.1,i lheu Display I Metro Dally


Land For Sale


LAKEFRONT BARGAIN! 1+ Acres -only $49,900
DOCKABLE DEEPWATER! Was $89,900. Prime
lakefront parcel with direct access to Gulf. On 12,000


ACROSS 39 Bone-dry
40 Dad's mate
- de. mer 41 Playful bite
Hassock 43 Implored
Beaded shoes 46 Genetic copy
Mormon prede- 50 Ember
cessor 51 Pays (2 wds.)
Soothe 54 "Dragnet" org.
Byron's works 55 Apply caulking
Hung around 56 Rush off
Arcade foul 57 Town near Des
AOL message Moines
Hues, 58 Canasta card
Mind-reader's 59 Had a snack


letters
Ump cousin
Sear a steak
Blissful spot
Deadly snake
Races the
engine
Edible seed
- alai
Pique
Mr. Brown
Fabricate
Cakelike cookie
Japanese
wrestling


DOWN


1 Backless slip-
per
2 Molecule part
3 "Star Wars"
princess


A Week of August 29,2011 ]


Answer to Previous Puzzle

SEA C LB AIM


ANACONDAS GET
PERIODS COACH
RHO .HUR
SPECS PUEBLOS
P FAB O VA
APR USS CREW
REUBENS L IENS


OU GHT SATIRES
AKA HITCHCOCK
TEL EL ATE CH I
SSE RENO KOD


4 Prepares
apples 10 Early Briton
5 Thole filler 11 Old Concorde
6 Capitalize on fleet
7 Kept up the fire 16 Rows of seats
8 Design 19 Late evening
9 Valhalla host 21 Dress feature


Want more puzzles?
Check out the "Just Right Crossword Puzzles" books
at QulllDriverBooks.com


22 Figure out
23 Storage bin
24 Jealous god-
dess
25 Assert with
confidence
27 Judge
28 Not quite shut
29 H.H. Munro
30 Dappled.
36 Sugar bush
tree
38 Turf piece
40 Canasta plays
42 Coldly
43 W. Coast cam-
pus
44 Gallivant
45 Stare at
47 Labor Dept.
division
48 Wee hours in
Cannes
49 "En garde"
weapon
51 Seattle hrs.
52 Above, to
Tennyson
53 Lassie's refus-
al


2011 UFS, Dist. by Univ. Uclick for UFS


-2B


SCOREBOARD


% -Wol


I


J
i
I
I









LAKE CITY REPORTER ADVERTISEMENT TUESDAY. AUGUST 30. 2011 3B


JOHN BURNS
STATE FARM


JOHN KASAK
STATE FARM


NOTRE DAME
AUBURN
ALABAMA
FLORIDA STATE
FLORIDA
LSU
OKLAHOMA
BOISE STATE
MIAMI (FL)
CLEMSON


PHILLIP CRENSHAW AND JAMES CRENSHAW
PHIS HEADS
NOTRE DAME
AUBURN
ALABAMA
FLORIDA STATE
FLORIDA
LSU
OKLAHOMA
GEORGIA
MARYLAND
CLEMSON


JASON FLOYD
FIRST COAST HOMES
NOTRE DAME
AUBURN
ALABAMA
FLORIDA STATE
FLORIDA
OREGON
OKLAHOMA
GEORGIA
MARYLAND
CLEMSON


DRAWDY INSURANCE
NOTRE DAME
AUBURN
ALABAMA
FLORIDA STATE
FLORIDA
LSU
OKLAHOMA
GEORGIA
MIAMI (FL)
CLEMSON


ROUNTREE MOORE CHEVY


GARY WILSON AND ERIC WILSON
WILSON OUTFITTERS


NOTRE DAME SOUTH FLORIDA
AUBURN AUBURN
ALABAMA ALABAMA
FLORIDA STATE FLORIDA STATE
FLORIDA FLORIDA
OREGON LSU
OKLAHOMA OKLAHOMA
GEORGIA GEORGIA
MIAMI (FL) MARYLAND
TROY CLEMSON












2 0 L 00JAI






AO


Phish Heads


Octi Dry


CMS Pro Staffing


Rountree Moore


Baker's Communication


Mikell's


CONTEST RULES NAE
On Tuesday selected games will be sponsored in each of the ads of the participating ADDRESS
merchants. Indicate which team you think will win by writing the team name beside the
sponsoring merchant's name in the entry blank. Entries may be mailed or dropped off at
the Lake City Reporter at 180 E. Duval St., Lake City, FL 32055 or fax to 386-752-9400. PHONE
Entries must be received by 5:00pm on Thursday following the contest. Prize will be
awarded weekly on the basis of most games selected correctly. In case of a tie, the
winner will be determined by the most accurate guess on the Tie-Breaker (score AGE
required). You must be 18 years of age to enter; one entry per person. Participating
sponsors and their families, employees of the Lake City Reporter and their families are
not eligible to enter.


State Farm Insurance

Drawdy Insurance


Rountree Moore

First Coast Homes

Wilson's Outfitters


Furniture Showplace


mI
201











Page Editor: Emogene Graham, 754-0415 LAKE CITY REPORTER ADVICE & COMICS TUESDAY, AUGUST 30, 2011


DILBERT


BABY BLUES


BLONDIE
MAN-O-MAN, WHOA! CAREFUL"
TlHAT COLOGNE
MACHO DES LADIES WILD!
SCENT? 'S EXTRACTED FROM
THEPASSIONATE MUSK
WEASEL OF THE
ARCHIPELAGO




l


BEETLE BAILEY


HAGARTHE HORRIBLE


SNUFFY SMITH


ZITS


B.C.


FRANK & ERNEST


DEAR ABBY


Debate about thank-yous

boils over among readers


-DEAR ABBY: "Insulted
in Ohio" (July 9) was
offended because she's
being asked at bridal and
baby showers to address a
blank envelope so the hon-
oree can send her a thank-
you note. Good heavens,
lady, calm down.
At a shower, you are
celebrating a milestone
event in a young woman's
life. Your gift will help her
during the next phase
of her life. These joyous
events can be stressful and
require a lot of prepara-
tion. I'm sure the hostess's
intent in asking guests to
perform this minor task
is to ease the honoree's
responsibilities. It also
ensures the addresses
appear correctly on the
envelopes and everyone is
accounted for on the gift
list Is that really so "insult-
ing"?
"Ohio," if you feel so
imposed-upon being asked
do do such a simple thing,
may I offer a suggestion?
Gift the honoree with
your "regrets" and leave
your judgmental attitude
at home. (I'll bet you
count the days until you're
thanked, too.) GAIL IN
NACOGDOCHES, TEXAS
DEAR GAIL: Thank-
you notes are a hot-button
issue with my readers, and
frankly, I am surprised
more of you didn't stick up
for "Insulted." However, I
stand firm in my convic-
tion that the more personal
the thank-you note (includ-


Abigail Van Buren
www.deorabby.com
ing the envelope), the bet-
ter. My newspaper readers
comment
DEAR ABBY: With the
advent of email, social net-
working and online invita-
tion sites, mailing address-
es are used less often. I'd
be hard-pressed to find
the street addresses of
some of my closest friends
and relatives. As part of
the younger generation,
I'm more comfortable
with email. If I were host-
ing one of these events,
I'd have to kindly ask
guests to write down their
addresses for me to use
later for thank-yous. And
because it's being done on
paper, it might as well be
on the envelopes a practi-
cal, time-saving solution.
- JENNY IN QUEBEC,
CANADA
DEAR ABBY: I'm also
from Ohio, and I was ,
insulted, too. It appalled
me being asked to address
my own future thank-you
envelope. And would you
like to know the kicker? I
never received the enve-
lope or a thank-you after
the shower. CARLA T.
DEAR ABBY: While
the practice does seem a


little over the top, there
are creative alternatives.
At a baby shower, my sis-
ters gave everyone index
cards and asked them to
write down their name
and address and guess
the baby's birth weight
and length. The.guest
who came closest would
be mailed a prize. It was a
way to ensure I had every-
one's address for thank-
you cards. At bridal show-
ers, a blank address book
can be passed around for
guests to write their con-
tact information. The book
is then presented to the
bride for her new home.
- MELANIE IN THE i
MIDWEST
DEAR ABBY: To save ai
busy bride or mother-to-be
time and effort, address-
ing my envelope is another
"gift" I can give her. All
the envelopes could then
be placed in a basket, with;
one being drawn for the
"door prize." LYNN IN
DULUTH, MINN.
DEAR ABBY: "Insulted"
could take one of her
return address stickers
with her to the shower an4
place it on the envelope
provided. It's less work.
This new party ritual is not
the result of poor manners,
but a logical change for
changing times. NOT A
WHINER DOWN SOUTH

N Write Dear Abby at
www.DearAbby.com or
P.O. Box 69440, Los
Angeles, CA 90069.


HOROSCOPES


. ARIES (March 21-Aolril
19): Discuss what you can
do to make relationships
and your personal life, bet-
ter: Peace and calm -are
required, along with. rea-
sonable and responsible
response that will help you
get back on track. A minor
adjustment is all that's
needed. ***
TAURUS (April 20-May
20): Take care of you first
and foremost. Focus on
love, romance and new
possibilities that will add
to your experience, knowl-
edge and future. You won't
have to say much if you
take action. ***
GEMINI (May 21-June
20): Ups and downs can be
expected. You will enjoy
the benefits of friendships
but will experience prob-
lems with relationships
that expect more than you
are willing to give. Focus
on how you can exploit
your skills and talents.

CANCER June 21-July
22): Anxiety will prevail if
you don't keep things sim-
ple. Focus on what's really
important and forget about
all the little extras that
don't really matter. Take
baby steps until you reach
your destination. **
LEO (July 23-Aug. 22):
You may want to start
something new, but until
you take care of unfinished


THE LAST WORD
Eugenia Last

liusiness, it isb 1esto stay,
focused on the task at,
ihaid:'Uiig'force may be
one option, but it's prob- '
ably not the best one if
you don't want to upset
the people you are dealing
with. ****
VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept.
22): Make the first move,
rule the moment and con-
trol the outcome. You have
to be 100 percent behind
what you do if you want to
get results. Opportunity
knocks, and you must be
ready to take advantage of
what's being offered. ***
LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22):
Put your time and effort
into something you believe
in, and you will feel good
about your efforts. Don't
waste time overreacting or
overspending. Keep things
moderate and moving
along. ***
SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov.
21): Don't give out too
much information. You'll
be criticized for your
beliefs. Stick to physically
doing things for others and
saying as little as possible.
Your actions will grab
positive attention, not what
you say or try to enforce.
Deception is evident.
Question anything you find
odd. ****


SAGITTARIUS (Nov.
22-Dec. 21): You'll be torn
between what you want to
do and what you are able
to do. You have to balance
your time so you don't
miss out on something that
is fun and can lead to inter-
esting new connections or
knowledge. ****
CAPRICORN (Dec. 22- ,
Jan. 19): You can make
some interesting money
moves if you are quick to
take advantage of a deal.
Making changes at home
will pay off emotionally
and financially. You must
prepare to divvy up obliga-
tions in order to free up
your time for more impor-
tant business. **
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-
Feb. 18): Look at all your
options before you make
a commitment. You can
advance if you are respon-
sible and practical and fix
past mistakes before you
move forward. If some-
thing is not within budget
take a pass and keep your
cash. *****
PISCES (Feb. 19-March
20): Avoid mixing business
with pleasure. Demands
may be made, but that
doesn't mean you have to
cave in. Colleagues will
have a greater interest
in you than you realize.
Be careful not to lead on
someone unintentionally.
***


CELEBRITY CIPHER


by Luis Campos
Celebrity Cipher cryptograms are created from quotations by famous people, past and present.
Each letter in the cipher stands for another.
TODAY'S CLUE: T equals U
"VX CJX RH EHBTRXU HD ALX
PCAXJNCI CRWXBAR HE INEX ALCA VX
IHRX R NS LA HE XMXJOALNDS XIRX."
VCIIO CPHR


PREVIOUS SOLUTION: "No matter where you are in life, no matter how bad it
gets ... you can always turn it around." Steve Guttenberg
(c) 2011 by NEA, Inc. 8-30


FOR BETTER OR WORSE


CLASSIC PEANUTS


I


WHAT'S THE WELL, WHAT'S THE OMIGOOONESS/ <
FEEe DIERENCE BETWEEN WHAT'S THAT SMELL?
BETWEEN SPErMAN AND A
THIS AND NINETY-NINE-POUND
PLAIN OLD WEAKLING?!





B-30
-i~ ~~~s r 7^''3-/-


lol


-


Page Editor: Emogene Graham, 754-0415 LAKE CITY REPORTER


ADVICE & COMICS TUESDAY, AUGUST 30, 2011












Classified Department: 755-5440


SE


FINDI11


LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED TUESDAY, AUGUST 30, 2011

Lake City Reporter





CLASSIFIED


5B


Take ADvantage of the
Reporter Classifieds!

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[proal Mechnise


6 days Each additional
I. RlU pplle a to p e Indledula slln g
p personal m.rchan41 t-otalln $8,100 or lau.
Each Itm muat Inclpude a p a
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be checked for errors by the
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for that portion of the advertisement
which was incorrect. Further, the
Publisher shall not be liable for any
omission of advertisements ordered
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Advertising language must comply
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In Print and Online
wwv.lakecityreporter.com


Legal

IN THE CIRCrIT COURT
3RD JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
FOR COLUMBIA I
FLORIDA
CIVIL DIVISION
CASE NO. 12-2009-CA-00
DEUTSCHE BANK NA
TRUST COMPANY, AS 1
IN TRUST FOR THE BEI
THE CERTIFICATE
FOR AMERIQUEST MO
SECURITIES TRUST 200
SET-BACKED PASS-TI
CERTIFICATES, SERIES
Plaintiff,
vs.
DON O'SICKEY; ETHEL
EY; DAMON M. O'SICK
KNOWN SPOUSE OF DA
O'SICKEY; DAVID 0
UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF
O'SICKEY; STATE OF F
DEPARTMENT OF RE
GREEN TREE FINANCIAL
ICING CORP.; UNKNO'
SON(S) IN POSSESSION
SUBJECT PROPERTY;
Defendants.
NOTICE OF FOREC
SALE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GI
suant to a Final Judgment o
sure dated August 11, 2011
tered in Case No. 12-
000657, of the Circuit Co
3rd Judicial Circuit in and
LUMBIA County, Florida
SCHE BANK NATIONAl
-COMPANY, AS TRUS
TRUST FOR THE BEN
THE CERTIFICATE
FOR AMERIQUEST MO
SECURITIES TRUST 2005
SET-BACKED PASS-TH
CERTIFICATES, SERIES
is Plaintiff and DON 0
ETHEL O'SICKEY; DA]
O'SICKEY; UNKNOWN
OF DAMON M. O'SICK
VID O'SICKEY; UN
SPOUSE OF DAVID 0
UNKNOWN PERSONS)
SESSION OF THE.
PROPERTY; STATE OF
DA, DEPARTMENT OF
NUE; GREEN TREE FIN
SERVICING CORP., are de
I will sell to the highest and
der for cash at ON THE
FLOOR OF THE CO
COUNTY COURTHOUSE
N.E. HERNANDO A
LAKE CITY, FLORIDA,
a.m., on the 14th day of S
.2001, the following descrit
erty as set forth in said Fi
ment, to wit:
LOT 4, SANDY PINES, A
VISION ACCORDING T
PLAT THEREOF, RECORD
PLAT BOOK 5, PAGES
32A, INCLUSIVE, OF TI
LI' RECORDS U OF COI
COUNTY, FLORIDA.
TOGETHER WITH A 19
BILE
VIN#GAFLW54A82887HL
GAFLW54B82887HL21.
A person claiming an inter
surplus from the sale, if'.a
than the property owner
date of the lis pendens m
claim with 60 days after the
Dated this 12 day f August,
P. DEWITT CASON
As Clerk of said Court
By: /s/ B Scippio
As Deputy Clerk
05527342
August 23, 30, 2011


We. will sell the following
Community Self Storage
State Road 247/Branford H
tember9, 2011 at l:00OPM
WE SELL FOR CASH ONL
386-961-9926
SANGIA COTHRAN (2 un
Household / Photos
PAMELA WIGGINS
Household goods
EVELYN BALDWIN
.Furnituir
ANTHONY HACKER
Household Goods
DAVID RAULERSON
Household Goods
KATHERINE WHEAT
Personal Property -
CHRISTINE BARRETT
Personal Property

WE RESERVE THE RI
REFUSE ALL BIDS.


S Legal

T OF THE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OFTHE
, IN AND 3RD JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND
COUNTY, FOR COLUMBIA COUNTY,
FLORIDA
CIVIL DIVISION
00657 CASE NO. 12-2010-CA-000105-
ATIONAL CA-XXXX
TRUSTEE FEDERAL NATIONAL MORT-
NEFIT OF GAGE ASSOCIATION
[OLDERS Plaintiff,
IRTGAGE vs.
5-R4, AS- DINO A. DOBBINS, TRUSTEE OF
THROUGH THE DOBBINS TRUST DATED
2005-R4 JUNE 22, 2005, KIMBERLY S.
DOBBINS, TRUSTEE OF THE
DOBBINS TRUST DATED JUNE
O'SICK- 22, 2005; ANY AND ALL UN-
KEY; UN- KNOWN PARTIES CLAIMING
kMON M. BY, THROUGH, UNDER, AND
'SICKEY; AGAINST THE HEREIN NAMED
F DAVID INDIVIDUAL DEFENDANTS)
LORIDA, WHO ARE NOT KNOW TO BE
AVENUE; DEAD OR ALIVE, WHETHER
AL SERV- SAID UNKNOWN PARTIES MAY
WN PER- CLAIM AN INTEREST AS
OF THE SPOUSES, HEIRS, DEVISEES,
GRANTEES OR OTHER CLAIM-
ANTS; MORTGAGE ELECTRON-
LOSURE IC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS,
INC. AS NOMINEE FOR GREEN-
YEN pur- POINT MORTGAGE FUNDING,
)fForeclo- INC; UNKNOWN BENEFICIA-
1, and en- RIES OF THE DOBBINS TRUST
2009-CA- DATED JUNE 22,. 2005; JOHN
urt of the DOE, JANE DOE, AS UNKNOWN
d for CO- TENANTS IN POSSESSION
a. DEUT- Defendants
L TRUST RE-NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE
TEE IN SALE
EFIT OF NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pur-
[OLDERS suant to an Order Rescheduling
RTGAGE Foreclosure Sale dated August 23,
5-R4, AS- 2011, and entered in Case No. 12-
HROUGH 2010-CA-000105-CA-XXXX, of the
2005-R4 Circuit Court of the 3rd Judicial Cir-
'SICKEY; cuit in and for COLUMBIA County,
MON M. Florida. FEDERAL NATIONAL
SPOUSE MORTGAGE ASSOCIATION is
EY; DA- Plaintiff and DINO A. DOBBINS,
[KNOWN TRUSTEE OF THE DOBBINS
'SICKEY; TRUST DATED JUNE 22, 2005;
IN POS- KIMBERLY S. DOBBINS; TRUST-
SUBJECT EE OF THE DOBBINS TRUST
FLORI- DATED JUNE 22, 2005; ANY AND
F REVE- ALL UNKNOWN PARTIES
[ANCIAL CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UN-
efendants. DER AND AGAINST THE HERE-
d best bid- IN NAMED INDIVIDUAL DE-
E THIRD FENDANT(S) WHO ARE NOT
LUMBIA KNOW TO BE DEAD OR ALIVE,
i AT 173 WHETHER SAID UNKNOWN
AVENUE, PARTIES MAY CLAIM AN IN-
at 11:00 TEREST AS SPOUSES, HEIRS,
eptember, DEVISEES, GRANTEES OR OTH-
bed prop- 'ER CLAIMANTS; UNKNOWN
final Judg- BENEFICIARIES 'OF THE DOB-
BINS TRUST DATED JUNE 22,
kSUBDI- 2005; JOHN DOE; JANE DOE AS
TO THE UNKNOWN TENANTS IN POS-
WDED IN SESSION MORTGAGE ELEC-
32 AND TRONIC REGISTRATION SYS-
HE PUB- TEMS, INC. AS NOMINEE FOR,
LUMBIA' GREENPOINTr '.MORTGAGE-
FUNDING, INC.; are defendants. I
999 MO- will sIll to the highest and best bid-
HOME der for cash at ON THE THIRD
L21 and FLOOR, OF THE COLUMBIA
COUNTY COURTHOUSE AT 173
est in the NE HERNANDO AVENUE, LAKE-
ny, other CITY, FLORIDA 32055, at 11:00
as of the a.m., on the 28th day of September
lust file a 2011, the following described prop-
sale. erty as set forth in said Final Judg-
2011. ment, to wit:
LOT 1, OF CHARLESTON
COURT, A SUBDIVISION AC-
CORDING TO THE PLAT THERE-
OF RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK
6; PAGE .150, OF THE PUBLIC
RECORDS OF COLUMBIA
COUNTY, FLORIDA
A person claiming an interest in the
surplus from the sale, if any, other
than the property owner of the date if
g units at the lis pendens must file a claim with
814 SW 60 days after the sale.
twy., Sep- Dated this 23 day of August, 2011
LY P. DEWITT CASON
"Y AS Clerk of said Court
By:/s/B. Scippio
As Deputy Clerk
its) If you area person with a disability
who requires accommodations in or-
der to participate in a court proceed-
ing, you are entitled at no cost to
you, the provision of certain assis-
tance. Individuals with disability
who require special accommodations
in order to participate in a court pro-
ceeding should contact the ADA Co-
ordinator, 173 NE Hemando Ave-
nue, Room 408, Lake City, FL
32055, (386)719-7428, within two
(2) business days of receipt of notice
to appear. Individuals who are hear-
ing impaired should call (800)955-
8771. Individuals who are voice im-
paired should call (800)955-8770.
Submitted by:
Kahane & Associates, P.A.
8201 Peters Road, Ste; 3000
Plantation, FL 33324
ST Telephone: (954) 382-3486
GHT To Telefacsimile: (954) 382-5380


Cash only, 10% Buyers premium, Augst 30,2011
Jerry Duncan #AU527 September 6, 2011


05527435
August 23, 30, 2011


Lake City Reporter


Lawn & Landscape Service

J&M LAWN Service & more for
all your outdoor needs. Don't
waste your time or weekend,
Free Estimate. 386-984-2187

Services

DIVORCE, BANKRUPTCY,
RESUMES.
other court approved forms-
386-961-5896.


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
THIRD JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
IN AND FOR COLUMBIA COUN-
TY, FLORIDA
JUVENILE DIVISION
IN THE INTEREST OF:
CASE NO.: 2010-04-DP
D.A.DOB: 01/20/2007
MINOR CHILD.
SUMMONS AND NOTICE OF AD-
VISORY HEARING FOR TERMI-
NATION OF PARENTAL RIGHTS
AND GUARDIANSHIP
STATE OF FLORIDA:
TO: Anthony Avallone
Last known address:
294 SW Aspen Glen
Lake City, FL 32025
WHEREAS, a Petition for Termina-
tion of Parental Rights under oath
has been filed in this court regarding
the above-referenced childrenn, a
copy of which is on file with the
Clerk of the Circuit Court,
YOU ARE HEREBY COMMAND-
ED TO APPEAR before the Honora-
ble E. Vernon Douglas, Circuit
Judge, at the Columbia County
Courthouse, Lake City, Florida, on
OCTOBER 12, 2011, at 10:20 A.M.,
for a Termination of Parental Rights
Advisory Hearing.
YOU MUST APPEAR ON THE
DATE AND AT THE TIME SPECI-
FIED.
*****FAILURE TO PERSONAL-
LY APPEAR AT THIS ADVISORY
HEARING CONSTITUTES CON-
SENT TO THE TERMINATION OF


Legal

PARENTAL RIGHTS TO THIS
CHILD (OR CHILDREN). IF YOU
FAIL TO APPEAR ON THE DATE
AND TIME SPECIFIED YOU
MAY LOSE ALL LEGAL RIGHTS
TO THE CHILD (OR CHILDREN)
NAMED IN THE PETITION ON
FILE WITH THE CLERK OF THE
CIRCUIT COURT*****
WITNESS my hand and seal of this
Court at Lake City, Columbia Coun-
ty, Florida, on this 18th day of Au-
gust 2011.
P. DEWITY CASON
Clerk of Circuit Court
(SEAL)
By: Trisha Brewington
Deputy Clerk
Tracy L. Sorcek, Esq.
Florida Bar No. 46860
Children's Legal Services
1389 West US Highway 90, Suite
110
Lake City, FL 32055
(386) 758-1437
SPECIAL ACCOMMODATIONS:
In accordance with the Americans
With Disabilities Act, if you are a
person with a disability who needs
any accommodation in order to par-
ticipate in this proceeding, you are
entitled, at no cost to you, to the pro-
vision of certain assistance. Please
contact Carrina Cooper,* Court Ad-
ministration, 173 NE Herriando Ave-
nue, Room 408, Lake City, Florida
32055, Telephone (386) 758-2163, at
least seven (7) days before your
scheduled court appearance or imme-
diafely upon receiving this notifica-
tion if the time before the scheduled
appearance is less than seven (7)
days. If you are hearing impaired or
voice impaired, call 711.
05527432
August 23, 30, 2011 '
September 6, 13, 2011


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
THIRD JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
IN AND FOR COLUMBIA COUN-
TY, FLORIDA
JUVENILE DIVISION
IN, THE INTEREST OF:
CASE NO.: 2010-60-DP
M. F. DOB: 2/28/1995
MINOR CHILD.
SUMMONS AND NOTICE OF AD-
VISORY HEARING FOR TERMI-'
NATION OF PARENTAL RIGHTS
AND GUARDIANSHIP
STATE OF FLORIDA:
TO: Carlos Felix, father
and Maria de los Angeles Diaz.San-
chez, mother .
WHEREAS, a Petition for Termina-
tion of Parental Rights under oath
has been filed in this court regarding
the above-referenced childrenn, a
cop) of- which is on file with the
Clerk of. the Circuit Court, YOU
ARE -HER1fTY.COKMu ANDED TO
APPEAR before the Honorable E.
Verinon Douglas, Circuit Judge, at
the Columbia County Courthouse,
Lake 'City, Florida, on OCTOBER
12, 2011, at 10 A.M., for a Termina-
tion of Parental -Rights Advisory
Hearing.
YOU MUST APPEAR ON THE
DATE AND AT THE TIME SPECI-
FIED.
*****FAILURE TO PERSONAL-
LY APPEAR AT THIS ADVISORY
HEARING CONSTITUTES CON-
SENT TO THE TERMINATION OF
PARENTAL RIGHTS TO THIS
'CHILD (OR CHILDREN). IF YOU
FAIL TO APPEAR ON THE DATE
AND TIME SPECIFIED YOU
MAY LOSE ALL LEGAL RIGHTS:
TO THE CHILD (OR CHILDREN)
NAMED IN THE PETITION ON
FILE WITH THE CLERK OF THE
CIRCUIT COURT*****
WITNESS my han d seal of this
Court at Lake City, Columbia Coun-
ty, Florida, on this 18th day of Au-
gust 2011.
P. DEWITT CASON
Clerk of Circuit Court
(SEAL)
By: Trisha Brewington
Deputy Clerk
Tracy L. Sorcek, Esq.
Florida Bar No. 46860
Children's Legal Services
1389 West US Highway 90, Suite
110
Lake City, FL 32035
(386) 758-1437
SPECIAL ACCOMMODATIONS:
In accordance with the Americans
With Disabilities Act, if you are a
person with a disability who needs
any accommodation in order to par-
ticipate in this proceeding, you are
entitled, at no cost to you, to the pro-
vision of certain assistance. Please
contact Carrina Cooper, Court Ad-
ministration, 173 NE Hemando Ave-
nue, Room 408, Lake City, Florida


Legal

32055, Telephone (386) 758-2163, at
least seven (7) days before your
scheduled court appearance or imme-
diately upon receiving this notifica-
tion if the time before the scheduled
appearance is less than seven'(7)
days. If you are hearing impaired or
voice impaired, call 711.
05527433
August 23, 30, 2011
september 6, 13, 2011


060 Services

RESIDENTIAL
HOUSECLEANING
Excellent Work, Dependable,
Low 'Rates. Call 386-688-1018


100 Opportunities

05527357
ATTN: Wanted: 29 Serious
People to Work From Home
using a Computer. Earn
Up to $1,500-$5,000 PT/FT
954-708-2541
www.Ididitucan2.com

05527550
Full Time Receptionist
S & S Office is hiring A
full-time receptionist. Must be
proficient in Microsoft Excel
and Word, multi-line phones,
filing, typing and multi-tasking.
Benefits include: vacation, sick
leave, credit union, profit
sharing, dental, health and life
insurance. Drug Free Workplace
EOE. Apply in person at
S & S Office
134 SE Colburn Ave.,
Lake City, FL 32025

05527553
Large Southeast Restaurant
chain is now accepting resumes
for Management positions for
several Florida markets.
Competitive wages,
Advancement opportunities,
Complete Training package,
i Health, Dental and Life
Insurance Benefits available.
DFWP EOE
Please send resumes to:
donni@heritagemanagemerit.net
or fax to: 352-387-0011.


05527554
. Raymond James Financial
Services located at First Federal
Bank of Florida is currently
seeking a full-time Administra-
tive Assistant to support
financial advisors. Minimum
requirements include exception-
al interpersonal and organiza-
tional skills (attention to detail-a
must); excellent computer,
grammar, and mathematical
abilities; and advanced
technolo-
gy skills including Word, Excel.
and Web based software
programs. Previous knowledge
of investment services not
required. Send resumes to:
Human Resources, RJFS,
4424 NW American Lane, Ste
102, Lake City, FL 32055 or
email to: angie.oglesby()ray-
mondiames.com.

05527564
Assistant Dietary Manager
Assist w/Menu planning, Food
Prep, & Supervision.
Management exp a must.
Certification preferred. FT
position requires some week-
ends. Please apply Baya Pointe
Nursing & Rehabilitation
Center, 587 SE Ermine Ave.,
Lake City, Fl 32025 or fax
resume to 386-752-7337.

05527588.
NOW HIRING
Cashiers & Baggers for High
Springs fruit & gift stores.
Apply in Person at Florida
Citrus Center (Chevron)
18603 NW CR 236, High
Springs (exit 404 & 1-75)


100 Job
S Opportunities
AVON!! Only $10 to start!
Earn bonus $ up to $150+
1-800-275-9945 pin #4206
www.youravon.com/tdavies
CDL Driver 2 yrs exp clean MVR
for local company. Apply between
*8am & Noon only. Deadline isn-
noon Sept 2.247 NW Hillandale
Glen'Lake City No phone calls "
Mechanic needed for Truck shop,
must have own tools, apply
Southern Specialized, 1812 NW
Main Blvd., 386-752-9754
NEED CNC Machinist ,
Must have Metal Working
Machine Shop exp. Send resume,
Quality Mill, 3631 US Hwy. 90
East, Lake City, FL 32055.
05526800
Earn Extra Money
Deliver the new AT&T Real
Yellow Pages
in the Lake City area. FT/PT,
daily work, quick pay, must be
18 yrs+, have drivers
license & insured vehicle.
(800) 422-1955 Ext. 1
8:OOA-4:30P Mon-Fri

Security Officers needed. Lake
City & Live Oak area, must have
current D Security Lic., Clear
background, Drivers Lic, phone,
Diploma/GED. Benefits, DFWP
EEO Must Apply at:
www.dsisecurity.com MB 1000084


Medical
A120 Employment

05527328
LEARN TO DRAW BLOOD
Local Phlebotomy Course
offered in Lake City, FLA
Certificate program.
(904)566-1328

CLINICAL
RESOURCE MANAGER FT.
Qualifications, registered nurse
with min. of 3 years exp. Previous
homecare and coding experience.
preferred. Will provide training for
qualified applicant, contact
Jeff Tyre, Branch Director
386-628-9352 can fax resumes to
386-628-9364.


Counselor for substance abuse
program in Baker Correctional In- ,-,
stitution. BA w/2yrs. exp., M-F day"
shift F/T, $30,000 to start, E-mail,.
resume to sheliarand@aol.com.or' -
fax to 386-752-2387 .
Pharmacy Technician needed.
,Must'be Florida registered. Mil. -
year exp requ eferay in a
S retail'enyiroiment. cellJt
computer & communication skills
needed..FT position. Competitive,
pay. Send reply to Box 05074, C/O."
The Lake City Reporter, P.O. Box
1709, Lake City, FL, 32056


141 Babysitters

Loving mom wpuld like to care fo64
your child. Full or Part time in my
home. Near downtown. Only 1 .
opening avail. 386-438-5394

2 Schools &
240 Education

05527283
Interested in a Medical Career?
Express Training offers
courses for beginners & exp
Nursing Assistant, $479
next class-08/22/10

Phlebotomy national certifica-
tion, $800 next class-10/10/11 :;

Continuing education
Fees incl. books, supplies, exam
fees. Call 386-755-4401 or
expresstrainingservices.com




I nected


Suwannee


Valley


E electric


Cooperative

Suwannee Valley Cooperative, Inc.

GIS/Mapping Data Specialist 1
Suwannee Valley Electric Cooperative, Inc. has an immediate opening
for a GIS/Mapping Data Specialist position. This position reports to
the Director of Engineering and will be responsible for maintaining
Geographic Informati6n System Maps for the Cooperative. A high
school diploma and an Associate of Science degree or work equivalent
experience with a minimum of 1 year experience with GIS Mapping in
the electric utility.field is required.
Applications and job descriptions may be picked up at the Suwannee
Valley Electric administration building, 11340 100th St., Live Oak. The
job description can be viewed on www.svec-coop.com. Resumes and
applications can be turned in at the above address with Attn: Vicky
Talmadge, or emailed to vickyt@svec-coop.com. The deadline for
accepting applications is Tuesday, September 6, 2011.
SVEC is an equal opportunity employer.










Classified Department: 755-5440


LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED TUESDAY, AUGUST 30, 2011


310 Pets & Supplies
PUBLISHER'S NOTE
Florida Law 828.29 requires dogs
and cats being sold to be at least 8
weeks old and have a health
certificate from a licensed
veterinarian documenting they
have mandatory shots and are
free from intestinal and external
parasites. Many species of wild-
life must be licensed by Florida
Fish and Wildlife. If you are
unsure, contact the local
office for information.

361 Farm Equipment
84 Ford 4610 Tractor.
2WD, Solid
2005 motor,$7,500. OBO
386-867-0005

402 Appliances
White Whirlpool Dishwasher
2008 used 3 months
$75 obo
386-963-3295

407 Computers
ACER Flat screen monitor.
15 inch. $60. obo
386-755-9984 or
386-292-2170


HP Computer,
$80.00
386-755-9984 or
386-292-2170

420 Wanted to Buy

K&H TIMBER
We Buy Pine Hardwood &
Cypress. Large or small tracts.
Call 386-961-1961.
Wanted Junk Cars, Trucks, Vans.
$275 & up CASH! Free Pick Up!
NO title needed !386-878-9260
After 5pm 386- 752-3648.

430 Garage Sales

PUBLISHER'S NOTE
All Yard Sale Ads
Must be Pre-Paid.


440 Miscellaneous
Stop gnat & Mosquito bites! Buy
Swamp Gator All natural insect re-
pellent. Family safe. Use head to-
toe. Available at The Home Depot.
Summer Barbecue Special
Tow Behind
Grill/Smoker, $1,250 OBO.
386-719-4802


450 Good Things
. to Eat

GREEN PEANUTS For Sale
Graded and washed.
$30.00 a bushel.
386-752-3434

460 Firewood
Firewood for Sale. $65. per Truck
Load. Rick 386-867-1039 or Joey
965-0288 if no answer pls leave
message we will call you back.

630 Mobile Homes
6 for Rent
2 OR 3 BEDROOMS
Clean, Quiet Park $475-$525.mo
Water, septic, garbage included
758-2280 References, NO PETS!
2&3 BR MH. $395 $650. mo.
plus deposit. Water & sewer fur-
nished. Cannon Creek MHP
386-752-6422


2/2 Units, clean, well maintained,
nice safe park setting, 2 miles to
downtown Lake City, $575 month
+ $575 sec dep, 386-984-8448
13th Month FREE!!
3/2 Large MH, small park, near
FGCC, Small pets ok, $500 dep
$575 mo w/12 mo lease
386-752-1971 or 352-281-2450.
3/2.5 S of Lake City, (Branford
area) $600 mo plus security
386-590-0642 or 386-867-1833
www.suwanneevalleyproperties.com
3BR/2BA BRANFORD area
Close to River. Nice yard.
Must see! Call for info.
386-752-7814 or 386-719-7010
LG clean 3br's $450. -$650. mo. +
dep. Also, 2br mobile home's
available. No Pets.
5 Points area. 386-961-1482
Mobile Homes for rent in
White Springs, Lake City & Ft.
White. Contact 386-623-3404
or 386-397-2779


New 2br/2ba off Country Club. 1/2
ac. lot Front, back porch & storage
bldg. $650 mo. $650 sec. No Pets!
386-752-5911 or 466-2266

640 Mobile Homes
for Sale

05527374
!ATTENTION!!
We purchase used mobile
homes. Call North Pointe
Homes, Gainesville
352-872-5566

05527375 !!!LOOK!!!
Before you but a Mobile Home
check out North Pointe Homes
in Gainesville--Hugh Discounts!
credit Scores Don't matter. Call
for Free Approval! Jacobson
Homes Factory Outlet (352)872-
5566 or mrb337l(gahotmail.com

05527376
NEW USED- REPO'S
Your Volume Giant! North
Pointe Homes. Millions to Lend.
Credit Scores 575 = 10% down.
Gainesville (352)872-5566 or
walker-david(@live.com

Palm Harbor Homes
4/2 From 499 Mo Loaded
3/2 From 399 Mo Loaded
Homes on Your Lot 0 Down
800-622-2832


710 IUnfurnished Apt.
710 For Rent

05527089
SPRING HILL VILLAGE
Excellent High Springs location.
1, 2 & 3 bedroom floor-plans;
some with garages.
Call 386-454-1469
or visit our website:
www.springhillvillage.net







1BR APT.
Downtown Location, Clean.
$450 mo, plus Security.
NO PETS. Call 386-755-3456
2/2 w/garage & washer/dryer
hookups. West side of town,
Call for details
386-755-6867
2BR/1BA. Close to town.
$565.mo plus deposit.
Includes water & sewer.
386-965-2922
Amber Wood Hills Apts.
Private Patio area. Beautiful yard.
Washer/dryer hkup. Free water &
sewer. 1/1, 2/1. Move in special.
386-754-1800. wwwmyflapts.com
Columbia Arms Apt. located 1/2
mi from V.A. & Winn Dixie. Pet
Friendly. Move in Special $199.
Pool, laundry & balcony.
386-754-1800. www.myflapts.com
Furnished or unfurnished 1 or 2
bedroom townhomes on the golf
course. $625-$750. mo. + security.
Includes water. 386-752-9626
Great location W of 1-75, spacious
deluxe 2br apts., garage, W/D
hookup. patio. $600/700 & up, +
Sec, 386-965-5560 or 344-3715
Greentree Townhouse
Summer special. 2/1, 2/1.5. Free
water & sewer. Balcony & patio.
Laundry. Behind.Kens on Hwy 90.
386-754-1800 wwwmyflapts.com


ONE 51 PLACE APTS
Alachua
MOVE IN SPECIALS
1, 2, & 3 bedrooms
Call TODAY 386-462-0656
or visit us at one51place.com

Redwine Apartments. Move in
special $199. Limited time. Pets
welcome. wIth 5 complexes,
we have a home for you.
386-754-1800. www.myflapts.com
Summer Special! 12th mo Free
w/signed yr lease. Updated, w/tile
floors/fresh paint. Great area.
From $450.+sec. 386-752-9626
The Lakes Apts. Studios & lBr's
from $135/wk. Util. & cable incl.,
Sec 8 vouchers accepted, monthly
rates avail Call 386-752-2741
Unfurnished Apt Eastside
Village Realty, Inc .2 bedroom
1 bath Duplex must be 55+ yrs of
age Call Denise Bose @
386-752-5290
Wayne Manor Apts.
Move in $199. Summer special.
2/1, washer/dryer. Behind Kens off
Hwy 90. 386-754-1800
www.myflapts.com
Windsor Arms Apartments.
Summer special $199. Move in!
2/1, 2/1.5, 2/2. Pet Friendy. Free
200 ch. Dish. Washer/dryer hkup.
386-754-1800. www.myflapts.com

720 Furnished Apts.
20 For Rent
Immaculate Studio Apt. Avail
9/1 $500. mo. $300. dep. Incl.
appliances, cable, internet, water.
Josen 386-965-9083 or 438-8190
Rooms for Rent. Hillcrest, Sands,
Columbia. All furnished. Electric,
cable, fridge, microwave..Weekly.
or monthly rates. 1 person $135,
2 persons $150. weekly
386-752-5808

730 HUnfurnished
730 Home For Rent


'09 Executive Home for rent on 41
acres. 4br/3.5ba Available
October. Horses/outdoor pets ok.
$2000/mo but all terms negotiable
for right caretaker. 386-209-4610


2BR house $640.mo $640. dep.
Also, 2br apt. $550. mo $550 dep.
Close to shopping.
386-344-2972
2BR/1BA Kitchen and Den. on
Alachua. $500. mo.
First & security.
386-397-0602
/ 2/1 879 Poplar St. $600. mo.
/ 3/2 Highlands Loop $700.mo.
/ 2/1 442 Praire St $650.mo.
All require First and last...
386-755-3649
Please leave msg., Only in office
Tues Thur. 8am 4pm
3 br/2ba house, 1206 McFarlane
Avenue. Avail. 9/1/11. $850 mo
$400 sec dep. 904-376-0620 or
904-813-8864 for appt. No pets!
3/2 by Westside Elementary,
custom built home
$1050.00 per month.
Scott 352-318-8117
3BR/1.5 BA Large lot. Very clean
with storage shed. Quiet area.
$850 mo. + $850. dep.
386-752-7578
4BR BRICK home.
Azalea Park. $750. mo.
$750. security.
386-397-2619 or 386-365-1243
4br/2ba CHA Brick, 1200 sqft
lac., Close to FGCC, CR 245A.
Ceramic tile/carpet, $800 mo $800
dep (904)708-8478 App. req'd
Brick 3br/2ba Large yard, garage,
CH/A. 189 Stanley Ct. Lake City.
$950. mo + $1000 dep.
Call 386-365-8543
LULU, FL 3/2 recently
remodeled. CH/A, large porches.
$650. mo + dep.
386-752-3444 or 961-3031
Remodeled 3br/2ba Brick. In town
1750 sqft. Lg lot. Includes washer,
dryer, stove, & fridge. Quiet area
$985. mo $985 dep. 386-752-7578


7 0 Furnished
740 Homes for Rent
Southern Oaks Country Club.
3br/2.5ba Aprox 3000 sqft. Split
floor plan, on the 9th Fairway.
New AC, 2.5 car garage, sprinkler,
concrete drive. Furnished. Move in
ready w/all appliances. Avail. now
Yearly Lease.(305)872-7911 View
at www.lakecitvgolfvilla.com

750 Business &
50 Office Rentals
FOR LEASE: Downtown office
space. Convenient to
Court house.
Call 386-755-3456
For Lease: E Baya Ave. Two -
1000 sqft office space units or
combined for 2000 sqft. 386-984-
0622 or weekends 386-497-4762
OFFICE SPACE for lease.
Oak Hill Plaza. 900 sqft
$675mo/$695..sec dep.
Tom 386-961-1086 DCA Realtor
SUB SHOP for lease.
All Equip. Avail. Old Willy J's
Across from Wal-Mart
386-623-2244 -

790 Vacation Rentals
Horseshoe Beach RV Lot.
Nice corner Lot with shade trees.
$295. mo Water/electric included
386-235-3633 or 352-498-5986
Scalloping Horseshoe Beach Spcl
Gulf Front 2br, w/lg porch, dock,
fish sink. wkend $395./wk $895.
386-235-3633/352-498-5986
alwaysonvacation.com #419-181
"Florida's Last Frontier"


805 Lots for Sale

05527058
Must See, Prettiest 10ac Rolling
Pasture Lot in North Fla.
3 mi. W. of Col. City School.
Red. to $6,990 P/A, Financing,
386-752-1364 or 386-965-4340

Foreclosure! 59.98 Ac. Close to
Suwannee River w/boat ramps &
Springs. Ideal parcel for your site
built or manuf. home. $139,000!
MLS# 78083 386-344-7662
Lots for Sale Eastside
Village Realty, Inc. buildable
vacant lot hight & dry in a estab-
lished neighbor priced @.$40,000.
Call Denise Bose @ 752-5290
Owner Financing. River comm &
nature lover's dream in Lee. 15
wooded ac by the Withlacoochee.
Property is already subdivided
MLS 75576 $48,000 623-6896


PUBLISHER'S NOTE
All real estate advertising in this
newspaper is subject to the fair
housing act which makes it illegal
to advertise "any preference,
limitation, or discrimination based
on race, color, religion, sex,
disability, familial status or nation-
al origin; or any intention to-make
such preference, limitation or
discrimination." Familial status
includes children under the age of
18 living with parents or legal
custodians, pregnant women and
people securing custody of chil-
dren under the age of 18. This
newspaper will not knowingly
accept any advertising for real es-
tate which is in violation of the
law. Our readers are hereby in-
formed that all dwellings adver-,
tised in this newspaper are availa-
ble on an equal opportunity basis.
To complain of discrimination call
HUD toll free at 1-800-669-9777,
the toll free
telephone number to the hearing
impaired is 1-800-927-9275.


810 Home for Sale
0.5 acre tract has 441 (4 lane)
frontage. 1/2 miles from Target
distribution. 2/1.5 currently zoned
residential. MLS#78506 $91,000
R.E.O. Realty Group 867-1271
2 Mobile homes on 5 ac. above
ground pool. (1)1800 sqft. &
(1)1500sqft.$235,000 $139,888
MLS 77552 Brittany Stoeckert
Results Realty 386-397-3473
3/2 Brick Home w/1 car garage,
Metal roof, porch w/swing, detach
carport $96,000 MLS#77780
Jo Lytte Remax 386-365-2821
www.jolytte.florida-$roperty-search.com
3/2 Split floor plan built in 2010
on 2 acres.. Master bath with large
tub & standing shower. Trey ceil-
ings MLS#78520, $114,900
R.E.O. Realty Group 867-1271
4/2 fenced yard,
2 car garage, Fairly new roof & .
HVAC Shed, fenced back yard.
MLS#77602, $162,500, R.E.O.
Realty Group 867-1271
4/2 on 1 ac. Modular home. Im-
maculate cond. New carpet, roof,
AC. more. Barn/workshop
$115,000 MLS 78833 Brittany
Results Realty 386-397-3473
Almost 17ac., spacious 3br/2ba
home, paved rd. Near Itchetucknee
Spgs. Pole bam, gated, fenced.
MLS76902 $164,900 Brodi Allred
623-0906. Westfield Realty Group
Awesome Find! 3br/2ba, 1844sf,
wood floors, French doors to scr
back porch, 40x60 bldg w/office &
workshop, 6.17ac comer lot, 3
sides fenced. #77427 $199,900
Brick Ranch 3/2 Fl room. Side en-
try garage & workshop. 2 sheds.
New AC appl & roof. MLS78442
$114,900. Millard Gillen 365-7001
Westfield Realty Group
Charming 2br/2ba home. Gated
community. REDUCED to
$158,000 MLS78740 Teresa
Spradley 386-365-8343
Hallmark Real Estate
Clean Well maintained 3/2 brick
w/chain link fenced back yard
w/Garage. $120,K MLS78440.
Debbie King 386-365-3886
Hallmark Real Estate
Close to everything. Lg 3br/2ba
brick home. Close to VA & shop-
ping! $189,900 MLS78131 Carrie
Cason 386-623-2806
Westfield Realty Group
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
Neat & tidy 2/2, maybe 3/2. New
kitchen counters & tile. Open floor
plan. Mary Brown Whitehurst
965-0887 MLS# 77943 $99,000


810 Home for Sale
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
10 acres w/well maintained brick
home. 2012 sqft. Open split floor
plan. Lori Giebeig Simpson
365-5678 MLS# 74447 $149,000
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
3br/3ba Spacious home in estab-
lished area. 2414 sqft. Private yard
& patio. Lori Giebeig Simpson
365-5678 MLS# 78175 $159,000
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
3br/2ba. 1590 sqft. Lori Giebeig
Simpson. 365-5678,or
Mary Brown Whitehurst
965-0887 MLS# 74542 $110,000
Country close to town 3/2 Brick, 3
ac. Grape arbor & fruit trees. pole
barn, workshop. Metal roof. MLS
78096 $129,900 Ginger Parker
365-2135 Hallmark Real Estate
Country Club Condo 4br/3ba.
Mega storage, roomy kit, 3 porch-
es. $165,000 MLS 78719 Paula
Lawrence 386-623-1973
Hallmark Real Estate.
Deer in your back yard. 3/2 HUD
w/16X48 wrap around scr. porch.
Clean, well maintained, 5 ac.
$72,000 MLS78687 Ginger Parker
365-2135 Hallmark Real Estate
Foreclosure! 3/2 D/WMH boasts
a large kitchen. M/B w/ garden
tub, shower & dbl sinks-New car-
pet-fpl & more-Only $69,995
MLS# 76920. 386-344-7662
Foreclosure! Newer 3/2 DWMH.
Lg rooms, kitchen island, lots of
wdws, master w/garden tub & sep-
arate shower. $74,995
MLS# 74218 386-344-7662
Great 3/2 home w/2346 sq ft
under roof on .67 ac., Creekside
S/D. Big back yard w/plenty of
shade trees. On a cul-de-sac, MLS
77385 $169,900 623-6896
Home for Sale. Eastside Village
Realty, Inc. 2 bedroom, 2 bath site
built home with screen porch,
large carport priced just right Call
Denise Bose @ 752-5290
Home in Lake City Country Club.
4/3, renovated. Great for entertain-
ing. Glass doors open to back yard.
MLS#78637 $184,900
R.E.O. Realty Group 867-1271
JASPER! 4BR/2.5BA 1,890 SqFt
mfg homeon 1 acre where
wildlife is abundant $39,900
DANIEL CRAPPS AGENCY,
INC. 755-5110 #77922
Coldwell 'Banker/Bishop Realty,
Suwannee Co.115 ac. Fenced.&
cross Fenced. Pasture land, paved
rd. Elaine K. Tolar 386-752-4211.
MLS# 77081 $345,000
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
.97 ac. Centrally located to Lake
City & G'ville. Fenced, planted
pines, pasture. Elaine K. Tolar .
752-4211 MLS#.73879 $291,030
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty,
New home in May Fair. Super area
comer lot. 4br split plan. Versatile
colors. Elaine K. Tolar
755-6488 MLS# 76919 $199,900
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
240 ac. Farm. Rolling Meadows.
Paved road, great access to Lake
City & G'ville. Elaine K. Tolar
386-752-4211,MLS# 70453
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
Suwannee Co.115 ac. Fenced &
cross fenced. 10 & 20 ac parcels'
avail. Elaine K. Tolar 386-752-
.4211 MLS# 67766 $448,500
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
Brick home in town on lake front.,
3br/2ba. New roof & hardwoods.
Glass room w/view Elaine Tolar
755-6488 MLS# 78092 $249,900
Lake front 3/2 custom Western Ce-
dar. Lots of storage space. Private.
dock $229,900. MLS# 74681
Jo Lytte-Remax 386-365-2821
www.jolytte.florida-prpperty-search.com
Large Home in the Country on
3.66 acres, fireplace, 2 outbldgs,
MLS#76471, $89,900,
Jo Lytte, Remax 386-365-2821
jolytte@remaxnfl.com
LEASE/OPTION BUY
3br/2ba Home 2010 w/garage
on 1/2 acre. Owner Financing
386-623-2244
LOCATION! CONDITION!
PRICE! 3BR/2BA w/open floor
plan; freshly painted $96,000
DANIEL CRAPPS AGENCY,
INC. 755-5110 #78278
Lofty home on Itchetucknee River,
Wrap around covered decks on
two levels.MustSEE! $375,000
MLS#77006 Jo Lytte
Remax 386-365-2821
Luxury home. 3br/2ba, 20 ac lot.
Cherry cabinets & SS appliances.
Jacuzzi in master br. MLS 78190
$ 374,900 Roger Lovelady 365-
7039. Westfield Realty Group
Motivated Seller. Country area,
paved rd. 3br/2ba manuf home..
New AC & upgraded wdows.
MLS 78027 $84K. Brodie Allred.
623-0906 Westfield Realty Group
MOVE-IN READY! 3BR/2BA in
pristine condition on 1.39 acres
$89,900 DANIEL CRAPPS
AGENCY, INC.
755-5110 #78345
New Reduced. 4br/2ba plus of-
fice. 2 living & dinig areas. cov-
ered porch. FH rm. Triple garage.
MLS77685 Charlie Sparks 755-
0808 Westfield Realty Group
Nice, large 4/2 on 1 acre
w/florida room, granite floors,
wrap around front porch, $139,900
Brittany Stoeckert Results Realty
386-397-3473 MLS 77292


Owner Financing. 2br/3ba country
home w/wrap around porches, 5ac.
Garage w/workshop. MLS77005
$179,900 Roger Lovelady 365-
7039 Westfield Realty Group
PRICE REDUCTION. 3/2 plus
pool house w/half bath, 2.25
fenced ac. Freshly painted. Split
plan, Large rear deck MLS 78103
$179,900 386-623-6896
PRICED TO SELL! 3BR/2BA
w/2,012 SqFt w/living rm & fami-
ly rm $57,000 DANIEL CRAPPS
AGENCY, INC.
755-5110 #78680
Private 2 ac parcel away from it
all. Hunting w/no restrictions.
Make an offer on this 1764 sqft
home that need some TLC.
$109,900. MLS78331. Jay Sears.
867-1613 Hallmark Real Estate


810 Home for Sale
Reduced Price! 3br/1.5 ba. Re-
modeled. Nice area close to VA.
MLS 77599 $69K. Estate Sale,
bring all offers. Josh Grecian 466-
2517 Westfield Realty Group
Remax Professionals Motivated
seller. Spacious brick w/many up-
grades. Newer roof, windows &
fixtures. Fenced back yard. MKS
78168 $119,900 Missy Zecher @
623-0237 www.missyzecher.com
Remax Professionals Ranch style
home on 10 ac w/barn & horse
stalls. 4 Ig bedrn + bonus rm. 2
*car gar. MLS 77403 $325K.
Missy Zecher @ 386-623-0237
www.missvzecher.com
Rolling Meadows. 4 or 3br/2ba.
Over 1700 sqft. and 1/2 ac lot.
MLS77284 $154,900 Carrie Cason
386-623-2806
Westfield Realty Group
Something for Everypne! 3br/2ba,
2706sf, 4.02ac, island kitchen,
Corian counters, det garage, Koi
pond, fish house, green house,
fenced & more. #76255 $247,000
SPECTACULAR VIEW!
2BR/1BA, 1200sf, .65ac, scr front
porch, steps to deck/dock on Suw.
river, under house parking/storage,
shed & more. #77242 $194,900
Suwannee River Front
granite counters, covered patio,
deck & dock; $349,000
MLS#76336 Jo Lytte at Remax
Professionals. 386-365-2821
WELL-CARED FOR 4BR/2.5BA
mfg home w/formal LR plus fami-
ly nnrm $84,000 DANIEL CRAPPS
AGENCY, INC.
755-5110 #78585
WHITE SPRINGS! Sturdy block
3BR/1BA home in city limits,
fenced yd $49,000 DANIEL
CRAPPS AGENCY, INC.
755-5110 #78603

820 Farms,&
Acreage
10-ac lot. Well/septic/pp. Owner
financing $300 dn, $663 mo 8.9%,
25 yrs. Deas Ballard Properties.
386-752-4339 www.landnfl.com
4 1/2 acre lot. Lake Jeffery Road.
Gorgeous Oaks!Paved Rd
Owner Financing! NO DOWN!
$59,900. $525mo 352-215-1018.
www.LandOwnerFinancing.com
4 acres, Wellborn, New Well
installed, Beautifully wooded
w/cleared Home Site, owner fin,
no down; $39,900, $410 mon
Call 352-215-1018
www.LardOwnerFinancing.com
6:45 ac river front property in
White Springs, cloe to Big Shoals.
Covered shelter for entertaining.
MLS# 77417 $104,900 386-867-
1271 R.E.O;,Realty Group, Inc
FARM- 7 stall barn.
17+ acres, pasture, cross fenced.
Close in $500. mo.
386-961-1086
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
61 ac. Parcel. SR 27 & 1-75 inter-
change. Great potential, fenced &.
cross fenced. Elaine K. Tolar
752-4211 MLS# 758060 $368,040
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
40 ac.Parcel.'Less then 2 mi from
city lirhits. Fenced road frontage
on US Hwy 441. Elaine K. Tolar
752-4211 MLS# 62092 $194K

S830 Commercial
3 Property
788'S. Marion Comm'l bldg on
highway frontage. Across from the
VA & near downtown. $49,900.
MLS 78129 Scott Stewart 867-
3498 Westfield Realty Group


2007 Honda
Motorcycle VTX 1300
Pearl green, one owner,
8600 mi., perfect cond.
$4,995
Call
386-758-5805
386-365-0817


830 fCommercial
8 Property
Commercial. High traffic location
w/I-75 exposure. 2-story custom
log home. MLS77949
Josh Grecian 386-466-2517
Westfield Realty Group
Prime Commercial Location.
Just across from a plaza. Frontage
on Baya w/2 curbcuts. $350,000
MLS# 77485 Call 386-867-1271
R.E.O.Realty Group, Inc
Remax Professionals Commercial
Property. Located on expanding
west side of Lake City. Professio-
nal service or restaurant. MLS
77436 $575k Missy Zecher 386-
623-0237 www.missyzecher.com
Wellborn Commercial lot. 1.84
acres w/34' of Hwy frontage near
the new Dollar General. MLS
72381 Scott Stewart 386-867-3498
Westfield Realty Group

860 Investment
860 Property
Rustic Fishing camp in Suwannee
Minutes to boat launch.
MLS#78709 $59,900
Jo Lytte/Remax 386-365-2821
www.jolytte.florida-property-search.com

870 Real Estate
87 Wanted
I Buy Houses
CASH!'
Quick Sale Fair Price
386-269-0605


950 Cars for Sale
FORD MUSTANG 2009
V-6, Auto., Silver.
40k miles Loaded. $17.500.
386-732-4850












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2007 Coach House
Platinum 272XL, 15K
miles, may consider partial
trade for Class B.
$110,000
Call
386-754-8505