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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028308/01647
 Material Information
Title: The Lake City reporter
Uniform Title: Lake City reporter (Lake City, Fla. 1967)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: John H. Perry
Place of Publication: Lake City Fla
Publication Date: 8/28/2011
Frequency: daily (monday through friday)[<1969>-]
weekly[ former 1967-<1968>]
daily
normalized irregular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Lake City (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Columbia County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Columbia -- Lake City
Coordinates: 30.189722 x -82.639722 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 95, no. 4 (Oct. 5, 1967)-
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000358016
oclc - 33283560
notis - ABZ6316
lccn - sn 95047175
sobekcm - UF00028308_01569
System ID: UF00028308:01647
 Related Items
Preceded by: Lake City reporter and Columbia gazette

Full Text




Inside this edition:





000016 120511 ****3-DIGIT 326
LIB OF FLORIDA HISTORY
PO EOZ 117007
205 SMA IUNIV OF FLORIDA
GAINES-ILLE FL 32611-1943


l aKe


Reporter


Sunday,August 28, 2011 www.lakecityreporter.com Vol. 137, No. 183 E $1.00
*


Irene


batters


coastal


N.C.

Death toll at least
5; power out for
nearly a million.

,By MITCH WEISS and
SAMANTHA GROSS
Associated Press
NAGS HEAD, N.C. Weaker but still
menacing, Hurricane Irene knocked out
power and piers in North Carolina, clob-
b e r e d
Virginia
wind and
churned
up the
coast
Saturday
to con-
front cit-
ies more
accus-
tomed
to snow ASSOCIATED PRESS
storms A message is left to guests,
t h a n who have since departed, in Kill
tropical Devil Hills, Outer Banks, N.C.
storms. Saturday as Hurricane Irene
N e w reaches the North Carolina
York City
emptied
its streets and subways and waited with
an eerie quiet.
With most of its transportation machin-


IRENE continued on 3A


FRESH PRODUCE




AND PATRIOTISM

Both were in good supply Saturday at farmers market.

By ANTONIA ROBINSON
arobinson@lakecityreporter.com
H hearing about
the patriotic
happenings
at the farm-
brought Danny Mitchell of
Lake City out "to see what
was going on." Mitchell.is
retired from the military H
and like interacting with
others in the service.
"I enjoy being around
them," he said.
Alitchell was among
the crowd at the.National
Guard Appreciation Day at
the Lake DeSoto Farmers
Market Saturday.
Local unit, Alpha
Company 53rd Brigade
Special Troops Battalion,
Florida Army National
Guard, was honored for its
service during the event.
The unit is composed
of members from across
the state, including Lake
City, Tampa and Orlando,
' said Sgt. First Class Larry
Roth. It deployed in 2005
to Afghanistan and 2010 to
Kuwait.
During the event the
guard had on display
equipment, such as a
Humvee, as well as recruit-
ment information.
Participating in the event ANTONIA ROBINSON/Lake City Rep
Hniti,,In D0+h 7 R nath a nhind th' whe l rf a -tuimpop dirinr Natirnoal uiiard Annreciation FlDa at the Iake


MARKET continued on 3A


ya ee o ,.ge s e n e w ee o a umvee g pp y e
DeSoto Farmers Market Saturday.


Rotary writes
check, issues
challenge
ANTONIA ROBINSONI L C.I, fe-,,nL -
The Rotary Club of Lake
City-Downtown presented
Life Scout Jerry Barwick.
15, with a check for $500
Saturday to aid his Eagle
Scout Project and world
record attempt food drive.
Barwick is trying to collect
600,000 lbs. of non-pensh-
able food in 24 hours from
8 a.m to 8 p.m Sept 24
at the Columbia County
Fairgrounds Rodeo Arena.
From left are Rotary
Secretary Melanie Cosentino,
Past District Governor Perley
Richardson, President Todd
Sampson, Barwick and
Assistant Governor Connie
Rollberg The club is chal-
lenging other organizations to
match.or beat their donation,
Sampson said.


Retired execs

will recognize

current talent


From star reports

There is still time to get
in nominations for SCORE's
Entrepreneur of the Year.
The nomination deadline is
Wednesday.
Through the award,
SCORE the Service Corps
of Retired Executives- rec-
ognizes a local small busi-
ness owner who is innova-
tive, has surmounted diffi-
culties and who contributes
to the community.
Winners will be recog-
nized at the seventh annual,
SCORE Entrepreneur of
the Year awards banquet
in October. Jill Nichols,
executive %ice president of


Jill Nichols of Vera Bradley
Designs will keynote this
year's SCORE banquet.
Vera Bradley Designs, will
be the guest speaker at the
SCORE continued on 3A


Local housing market down, with possible silver lining


By ANTONIA ROBINSON
arobinson@lakecityreporter.comrn
The Lake City-Live Oak market reflect-
ed a decrease in Realtor sales and median
sales price, according to the Florida Sales
Report second quarter 2011 single-family,
existing homes.
Realtor sales in the Lake City-Live Oak
market were 91 in the second quarter of


2011, a 30 percent decrease from the previ- lender takes less money for the house


ous year's total of 130.
The reason the Realtor sales are lower is
the number of foreclosures, distress sales
or short sales, said Dan Gherna, Lake City
Board of Realtors executive vice president
The median sales price decrease by 12 per-
cent from $120,000 in 2011 to $106,000.
Short sales occur when someone owes
more than the property is worth and the


than its original purchase price, he said.
In 2010 only 36 percent of the 130 were
distress sales, Gherna said. However, 45
out of the 91 were distress sales.
The median sales price means half the
homes sold for more and half sold for less
than that amount.
Statewide Realtor sales for the second
quarter were 52,421 in 2011, compared to


51,973 in 2010. The median sales price for
the quarter was $134,600, a five percent
decrease from $141,500 last year.
There is a silver lining for the Lake
City-Live Oak market area, Gherna said.
Some of the market in South Florida is
picking up which could signal the same for
the Lake City-LIve Oak market, which is
HOUSING continued on 3A


S111 4240 1H
1 a2400 1 8


CALL US:
(386) 752-1293
SUBSCRIBE TO
THE REPORTER:
Voice: 755-5445
Fax: 752-9400


96 ,
Mostly sunny
WEATHER, 6A


aS l Opinion ...............
Life..................
Obituaries ..............
A dvice..................
Puzzles .................


TODAY
IN LIFE
Facing down
diabetes.


COMING
TUESDAY
Local news
roundup.


.t


9WR6s aa *T y -'!>> l~;*.w*:-3i*j.


u ty









LAKE CITY REPORTER SUNDAY REPORT SUNDAY. AUGUST 28. 2011


Friday:
5-10-22-42 MB 1


Friday:
11-14-17-29-35


(ASH 3.

Saturday:
Afternoon: --
Evening: --


Saturday:
Afternoon: --
Evening: --


FLORIDA


Saturday:


Saturday:


AROUND FLORIDA



Video games crowded out man's real life


SARASOTA (AP) At the height of
what he calls his addiction, Ryan Van
Cleave would stand in the grocery store
checkout line with his milk and bread and
baby food for his little girls and for a split
second think he was living inside a video
game.
It sounds crazy, but it's true: Something
would catch his attention out of the cor-
ner of his eye maybe another shopper
would make a sudden move for a Hershey
bar and he was mentally and emotion-
ally transported to another world.
World of Warcraft, to be exact.
It was his favorite video game, the one
he played every night, every day, some-
times all weekend. The sudden move-
ment in the store triggered a response simi-
lar to when he was in front of the computer
screen, battling dragons arid monsters for
up to 60 hours a week. Van Cleave's heart
pounded. His breathing quickened.
But then the thirtysomething family man
would catch his breath and come back to
reality. Sort of.
World of Warcraft began to crowd out
everything in Van Cleave's world. His wife.
His children. His job as a university English
professor.
Before teaching class or late at night
while his family slept, he'd squeeze in time
at the computer screen, playing. He'd often
eat meals at the computer-- microwave
burritos, energy drinks, Hot Pockets, foods
that required only one hand, leaving the
other free to work the keyboard and the
mouse.
"Playing 'World of Warcraft' makes me
feel godlike," Van Cleave wrote. "I have
ultimate control and can do what I want
with few real repercussions. The real world
makes me feel impotent ... a computer mal-
function, a sobbing child, a suddenly dead
cell phone battery the littlest hitch in
daily living feels profoundly disempower-
ing." ,
Despite thoughts like this, he did not
think he had a problem IRL gamer-
speak for In Real Life. But he did, and a
reckoning was coming.

Van Cleave grew urpin suburban


Chicago. He
was adopted,
which he said
always made
him feel like an
, outsider in his
own home and
in the world. .
As a kid, he
was more inter-
ested in guitars
and computers.
In high
school, each
year brought
more exciting
games with
better graph-
ics, but his
parents didn't
see a prob-
lem because
all teen boys /
seemed to play
video games.
And their son
also played gui-
tar in a band,
so video games
weren't the Ryan Van Cleave sits behind
only thing in Sarasota. Gaming and think
his life. all-consuming for Van Cleav
Same World of Warcraft, which be
with college. preferable to the drudgery o
"Gaming 15-20
hours a week in college is no big deal,"
said Van Cleave, who graduated from
Northern Illinois University with a degree
in English. "The problem occurred after
that, when I got into the real world."
He earned a master's degree and a
PhD in creative writing at Florida State, was
named a poetry fellow at the University of
Wisconsin-Madison, and found a teaching
job at the University of Wisconsin-Green
Bay. Then in the fall of 2003, he was
offered a tenure-track position at Clemson
University in South Carolina his dream
job.
His wife, Victoria, became pregnant for
the first time; the baby was unplanned
and Van Cleave admitted being shocked


ASSOCIATED PRESS
d a computer at his home in
ing about video games was
ve. Yet.living inside the game
came his obsession, seemed
of everyday life.


at the idea
of becoming
a father. He
and his wife
were late for
her first ultra-
sound because
Van Cleave
was play-
ing Madden
Football, a
sports game.
It was
around this
time that
World of
Warcraft
entered his
life.
Van Cleave
ended up play-
ing one entire
weekend,
stealing away
to the com-
puter while
his family was
sleeping or
while his par-
ents, who were
visiting, played
with his baby
daughter.
Victoria
used one word


to describe her feelings: "disgusted."
She felt abandoned. "I couldn't believe
that someone could choose a virtual family
over. a real one."
Three years into his job at Clemson, Van
Cleave's life began to fall apart His four dogs
died, one after another from various causes.
His wife was pregnant again. Then Van
Cleave began to get the impression that other
faculty disliked him and wanted him gone.
But he didn't try to repair the rifts, instead
channeling his anxieties into WoW, a virtual
world he could control.
"All that tethered me to anything mean-.
ingful during this time was WoW, which I .
clung to for dear life," he wrote.
For millions who play, the lure of


games like WoW is hard to resist.
Players create an "avatar," or online
character, who operates within a startling-
ly detailed storyline and graphics. Playing
makes the gamer feel like the star of a
really awesome sci-fi movie.
By the time his second baby was born
in 2007, Van Cleave was playing some 60
hours a week.
A few months later, Clemson didn't
renew his contract and said he would not
achieve tenure. He was hired for a one-year
fellowship at George Washington Univrsity,
teaching one class, but that meant he had
more time for gaming while the stress of find-
ing a long-term, full-time job ratcheted up.
Van Cleave was about to hit bottom.
It was Dec. 31, 2007. Van Cleave was
halfway through his yearlong fellowship at
George Washington University. Yet there he
was, standing on the Arlington Memorial
Bridge. He was thinking about jumping into
the icy water.
That night marked the first time Van
Cleave realized he had a problem.
The self-examination pulled him back from
the bridge railing. He went home and deleted
the game from his computer.
For the next week, his stomach and head
hurt and he was drenched in sweat like an
addict withdrawing from drugs.
Staying away from WoW was difficult,
but he didn't re-install the game.
And he started rebuilding In Real Life.
Said his wife: "I didn't believe him. I had
heard it all before and had no confidence
that he would stop."
In 2010, he was hired as an English
professor at the Ringling School of Art and
Design in Sarasota. Van Cleave and his fam-
ily bought a beige stucco home in a quiet
subdivision.
It's an irony in Van Cleave's new, .
game-free life that Ringling is one of
the nation's top schools for video game
designers.
He knows his students spend much of
their lives online, and he worries about
them. "I don't think video games are evil,"
said Van Cleave. "That's not what I'm say-
ing at all. I think games are fine if they
are part of a balanced life."


PEOPLE IN THE NEWS


Gibson, ex-girlfriend reach settlement


LOS ANGELES
(AP) After
sparring for more
than a year, Mel
Gibson and his
ex-girlfriend
have reached a
financial and cus-
tody settlement
of a bitter dispute
that spawned a
criminal case and
left the Academy
Award winner's
reputation dam-
aged.
Los Angeles
Superior Court
officials said in
a statement late
Friday that
Gibson and
Russian musi-
cian Oksana
Grigorieva had
reached an
agreement after
days of negotia-
tion. Terms and
conditions of
the settlement


This combined image of two file photographs shows Mel Gibson and his.ex-girl- .
friend Oksana Grigorieva. (Left) Mel Gjbson appears at a Los Angeles Airport
Courthouse, regarding a misdemeanor spousal battery charge, in Los Angeles,
on March 11, 2011. (Right) Oksana Grigorieva talks during a news conference in
Moscow on April 19, 2010. Los Angeles Superior Court officials said in a state-
ment late Friday that after sparring for more than a year, Gibsorn and Grigorieva
have reached a financial and custody settlement.


were not announced, but a hearing
Wednesday will be held to discuss
the financial terms.
The equally contentious issue of
custody of the couple's infant daugh-
ter will be handled in closed session,
the court announced.
Gibson's spokesman Alan Nierob
confirmed the settlement and said
the actor-director appreciated the
judge's help in mediating the case.
Grigorieva spokesman Stephen
Jaffe declined comment.
The former couple have been
at odds for more than a year over
custody and financial issues in
a mostly-secret court proceed-
ing in Los Angeles. In June 2010,
Gibson's attorney Stephen Kolodny
said that his client had provided his
ex-girlfriend with a four-bedroom,
multimillion dollar home, vehicle
and tens of thousands of dollars a
month.
It is unclear exactly how much
Grigorieva has been receiving since


then.
The "Braveheart" star was
charged with misdemeanor domestic
battery as a result of a January 2010
fight with Grigorieva and pleaded no
contest earlier this year. The actor-
director entered his plea in a way
in which he admitted no guilt, and
Grigorieva cannot use the outcome
in a civil case.
He was ordered to undergo
counseling and recently completed
his community service by volun-
teering with a children's charity in
Guatemala.
The case became an international
story after recordings of racist and
sexist rants by Gibson were leaked
to the celebrity website RadarOnline.
com. Sheriff's officials took pos-
session of the recordings as part
of their criminal investigation, but
Grigorieva's attorney announced in
May that he would no longer seek
to use them against the former
Hollywood superstar in the custody
case.


The coming
days could prove
crucial for Gibson
* to resolve some of
the messiness of
his personal life in
recent years.
Gibson, 55,
recently reached a
divorce settlement
with his estranged,
wife, Robyn,
and his attorney
announced in
June that the case
should be finalized
by Tuesday.
Robyn Gibson
filed to end her
nearly.28 year mar-
riage in April 2009,
just months before
Grigorieva gave
birth. The divorce
has been a mostly
private affair, in
sharp contrast to '
Gibson's fight with
Grigorieva.
Gibson
announced


Grigorieva's pregnancy to Jay Leno
on "The Tonight Show," but their
relationship sputtered after the girl's
birth.
In recent months, both have
appeared multiple times in court
for hearings and meetings with a
judge handling their case. Gibson
has not publicly spoken about the
case.
The leaked conversations
recorded by Grigorieva were the
latest scandal for Gibson, who
was arrested in 2006 for drunk-
en driving; a deputy's report
revealed he made a series of anti-
Semitic and sexist slurs while in
custody.
Despite positive reviews for his
performance as a deeply depressed
man who can only communicate
through a puppet, Gibson's return to
the big screen in "The Beaver" ear-
lier this year failed to catch on with
audiences.


Actor Ben Gazzara is 81.
Actor Sonny Shroyer
("The Dukes of Hazzard')
is 76.
Actor Ken Jenkins
("Scrubs") is 71.
Actor David Soul is 68.
Actress Barbara Bach is
65.
Actress Emma Samms
is 51.
Country singer Shania
Twain is 46.

Daily Scripture


Actor Billy Boyd ("Lord of
the Rings") is 43.
Actor-singer Jack Black of
Tenacious D is 42.
Actor Jason Priestley
("Beverly Hills, 90210") is
42.
Singer-bassist Max Collins
of Eve 6 is' 33. Actress Carly
Pope ("Popular") is 31
Country singer Leann
Rimes is 29.


"You will keep in perfect
peace those whose minds
are steadfast, because they
trust in you." Isaiah 26:3
NIV."


Lake City
HOW TO REACH US
Main number ........(386) 752-1293
Fax number..............752-9400
Circulation ..............755-5445
Online... www.lakecityreporter.com
The Lake City Reporter, an affiliate of
Community Newspapers Inc., is pub-
lished Tuesday through Sunday at 180
E. Duval St., Lake City, Fla. 32055.
Periodical postage paid at Lake City, Fla.
Member Audit Bureau of Circulation and
The Associated Press.
All material herein is property of the Lake
City Reporter. Reproduction in whole or
in part is forbidden without the permis-
sion of the publisher. U.S. Postal Service
No. 310-880.
POSTMASTER: Send address changes
to Lake City Reporter, P.O. Box 1709,
Lake City, Fla. 32056.
Publisher Todd Wilson.....754-0418
(twilson@lakecityreporter.com)
NEWS
Editor Robert Bridges .....754-0428
(rbridges@lakecityreporter.com)
ADVERTISING
Director Ashley Butcher .. .754-0417
(abutcher@lakecityreporter.com)
CLASSIFIED
To place a classified ad, call 755-5440


Reporter

BUSINESS
Controller Sue Brarinon... .754-0419
(sbrannon@lakecityreporter.com)
CIRCULATION
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Please call 386-755-5445 to report any
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CORRECTION


The Lake City Reporter corrects errors of fact in news
items. If you have a concern, question or suggestion,
please call the executive editor. Corrections and clarifica-
tions will run in this space. And thanks for reading.


Celebrity Birthdays


Page Editor: Robert Bridges, 754-0428










Page Editor: Robert Bridges, 754-0428 LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL & STATE SUNDAY, AUGUST 28, 2011


Pastor says goodbye at Bethlehem

Luthern Church, the state's oldest


From staff reports

For Dr. E. Wilbur Bock, 83, today's
service at Bethlehem Lutheran
Church will be bittersweet because
he is retiring as the supply pastor
after 20 years of service.
"I felt being there for 20 years was
enough," he said.
A supply pastor conducts the wor-
ship service in a congregation during
a pastoral vacancy or absence.
"He's the longest supply pastor we've
ever had," said Janice Feagle, church
historian. "He supplies our needs."
Bock came to the church on July 7,


1991, she said.
Bock wasn't the church's full-time
pastor but was always available when
needed, Feagle said.
"I wish pastor Bock the best in the
world," she said. "He did a lot for my
family."
He officiated over several duties
while at the church including wed-
dings and funerals, Bock said. He also
witnessed several milestones at the
church, including its 150th anniver-
sary in 2009.
Bethlehem Lutheran Church is the
oldest in the state and the church
continues to thrive.


'They have a very strong congre-
gation, and at 150 years are still going
strong," Bock said.
Since starting in the ministry in
1956 he has worked at a number of
churches, Bock said. He is also a
retired professor from the University
of Florida.
The church will share a pastor with
Sprit of Christ Lutheran Church for
now.
Bock had words of encouragement
for his former parishioners.
"Keep being united," he said. "Keep
on with the vision Jesus has given
them."


Ocala coach

admits to sex

with players

OCALA (AP) A North Florida
high school coach and teacher faces
a possible life sentence after pleading
guilty to having sex with three of his
players and fathering a child with one
of them.
The Ocala Star-Banner reported
Saturday that 32-year-old Omar Curry
pleaded guilty to three counts of sexual
battery earlier in the week. His maxi-
mum sentence is life, although guide-
lines call for less than 25 years.
Curry coached the girls' basketball
team at Belleview High School and
taught social studies. He was arrested
in 2009 after he was accused of hav-
ing sex with a 15-year-old girl in the
locker room. Two other girls then
came forward. One had given birth
to a child that DNA tests showed was
his.


Emails: Jeb Bush upset Scott fired staffers


By GARY FINEOUT
Associated Press
TALLAHASSEE Newly
released emails show that for-
mer Florida Gov. Jeb Bush
was disappointed that Gov.
Rick Scott fired the mother of
an Army soldier who had just
been killed in Afghanistan as
well as others who worked in
the governor's office.
Bush's comments were
included in more than 700
pages of emails released by
an attorney who worked on
Scott's transition team. The
new emails were recovered
from Scott's campaign man-
ager and give some insights
into those trying to influence
the new administration. The
emails also highlight some
tensions between members of
the transition team includ-
ing exchanges over who had


the authority to offer jobs in
the new administration.
The emails were writ-
ten before Scott took office
in January but after he was
elected. They were released
to the media late Friday. They
were lost when the private
company handling email for
Scott's transition office shut
down the accounts. Scott last
week ordered an investigation
into why the email accounts
were shut down and why the
public records were deleted in
.a possible violation of law.
But some of the records
have slowly begun to emerge
as they have been recovered
from personal accounts of
those worked for Scott.
The latest batch came from
the account maintained by
Susie Wiles, who was Scott's
campaign manager and then
took on the job of legislative


liaison during the transition
period. The emails provide
details of Scott's first few days
after winning the election last
November, including that he
attended a private dinner with
former President George W.
Bush, the former governor's
brother, at the home of well-
known central Florida devel-
oper Gary Morse on Nov. 12.
The emails also show that
Wiles was deeply involved in
screening potential hires.
That apparently led to
the decision by Jeb Bush to
directly email Wiles to ques-
tion moves being made in the
governor's office.
Bush sent an email to Wiles
in December about the deci-
sion to fire Mavis Knight,.
whom he said had worked with
"four governors well." Records,
show that Knight worked in
the appointments office.


"I don't quite understand
this decision," wrote Bush.
"The transition team is letting
dedicated admired people (go)
without hiring anyone?"
Wiles wrote back and said
that she would head to the
.governor's office "and see
what I can do about reversing
this."
Bush followed her comment
with another email in which he
notes that other people, includ-
ing Carolyn "Freda" King were
let go. King, a reformed drug
addict who first went to work
for the governor's office when
Bush was there, worked in the
external affairs office of the
governor. King's son, Aimy
Pfc. Brandon King, was killed
in Afghanistan in July 2010.
"All three are African
American, non-political and
good workers," Bush wrote
to Wiles.


IRENE: Begins her assault on Eastern Seaboard

Continued From Page 1A


MARKET: A patriotic day
Continued From Page 1A


ery shut down, the Eastern Seaboard
spent the day nervously watching
the .storm's kiarch across a swath
'6f'fthe "natidfi inhabited' by -65 -mil---
lioh' people. The hurric ne had, an
enormous wingspan 500 miles,
its outer reaches stretching from the
Carolinas to Cape Cod and packed
wind gusts of 115 mph.
Almost a million homes and busi-
nesses were without power. While it
was too early to assess the full threat,
Irene was blamed for five deaths.
The hurricane stirred up 7-foot


waves, and forecasters warned of
storm-surge danger on the coasts
of Virginia and Delaware, along
the 'jersey Shore and in New York
Harbor and Long Island Sound. In
the Northeast, drenched by rain this
summer, the ground is already satu-
rated, raising the risk of flooding.
Irene made its official landfall just
after first light near Cape Lookout,
N.C., at the southern end of the Outer
Banks, the ribbon of land that bows
out into the Atlantic Ocean. Shorefront
hotels and houses were lashed with


waves. Two piers were destroyed, and
at least one hospital was forced to run
on generator power.
"Things a-re banging against'the
house," Leon.Reasor said as he rode
out the storm in the town of Buxton.
"I hope it doesn't get .worse, but I
know it will. I just hate hurricanes."
By afternoon, the storm had weak-
ened to sustained winds of 80 mph,
down from 100 mph on Friday. That
made it a Category 1, the least threat-
ening on a 1-to-5 scale, and barely
stronger than a tropical storm.


SCORE: Looking for next generation of talent
Continued From Page 1A ,


banquet.
Nichols, CPA, has been with the
company for 21 years, serving as
controller, director of operations and
chief operating officer. She will share
the story of the beginnings of Vera
Bradley, especially their early men-


touring with the SCORE organization.
Every year, SCORE helps 20,000
businesses get their start The more.
than 12,000 counselors nationwide,
with 600 different business skills,
provide free, confidential, on-going
counseling for small businesses.


The local Suwannee Valley chapter
is entering its seventh year.
On-line nominations can be made
at www.northfloridanow.com by click-
ing on the SCORE button or e-mail
scorelakecity@gmail.com for a form.
Call 752-2000 for more information.


was great for the unit, he
said. They are planning a
bigger event in December.
:"It'sus who appreciates
the community for all its
support," Roth said..
" Other activities in con-
junction with the appre-
ciation day included a
children's bounce house,
free boiled peanuts from
the Columbia County Farm
Bureau and live entertain-
mentfrom the Terraplane
Blues Band.
It was another nice mar-
ket day, said Brian Gollery
co-market manager. The
day featured a steady turn-
out of families.
"It was nice to see fami-
lies out here," he said. "It's
a nice family environment.
, The National Guard
protects the country, and


it is important to recognize
their service, Gollery said.
S'They puttheirlife on
the lines 'hesaid,-1 4. -,
Honoring the guard was
a wonderful thiiig, said
Clarence Dingler of Lake
City. He came out to the
market with his family.
"The guard has been
here for everything," he
said.
It augments other
military branches, Dingler
said.
'The military, all branch-
es, are a blessing to the
country," he said.
The local unit is looking
to recruit as many people
as possible from Lake City
to serve in the National
Guard, Roth said. Call the
armory for more informa-
tion at (386) 758-0567.


HOUSING: Down, but with possible silver lining
Continued From Page 1A

usually about a year behind the area. an price, however, decreased nine Gherna said. Also, only homes sold
The Miami market area increased percent from $197,200 to $178,800. and reported to the Multiple Listing
31 percent with Realtor sales climb- The report only includes single- Service are included in the numbers.
ing from 2,007 in 2010 to 2,628 in family, existing homes and does Noneteless, it's a good measure of
2011 for the second quarter. Its medi- not include mobile homes, condos, the market, Gherna said.


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LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL & STATE SUNDAY, AUGUST 28, 2011


Page Editor: Robert Bridges, 754-0428













OPINION


Sunday,August 28, 201 I


ONE


ONE
OPINION


Like a

diamond

in the sky


sang "Lucy in
The Sky With
Diamonds,"
they may have
been closer to the truth than
their drug-infused lyrics sug-
gest.
Astronomers have spotted a
planet of such unprecedented
density that it almost has to
be crystalline carbon in
other words, solid diamond.
The only drawback to this
galactic girl's best friend is
that it sounds like a terribly
.inhospitable place. Australian
astronomer Matthew Bailes
described it as "a massive dia-
mond orbiting a neutron star
every two hours in an orbit
so tight it would fit inside our
own sun."
Its planetary "day is
two hours and 10 minutes,
and while it is considerably
smaller than Jupiter, it is 20
times as dense. Talk about a
diamond in the rough.
Astronomers believe the
planet itself is the intensely
compacted remains of a
once-massive star that now,
orbits a pulsar star whose
radiation beams are detectable
here on Earth. The pulsar is
PSRJ1719-1438, for those of
you keeping score.
The Obama administration
is hoping that private enter-
prise will pick up the slack in
our much-diminished space
program. If there was ever
a profit incentive to build a
spaceship and load it with
mining equipment, a diamond
five times the size of Earth
would certainly seem to fit the
bill.
Reuters optimistically
describes the planet in the
constellation Serpens (the
snake) as practically in
Earth's backyard. But it is
dight light-years away, and
astronomy websites say that,
at current levels of technol-
ogy, depending on the rocket,
it would take between 19,000
and 38,000 years to travel one
light-year.
You diamond lovers had
best get started.
* Scripps Howard News Service

Lake City Reporter
Serving Columbia County
Since 1874
The Lake City Reporter is pub-
lished with pride for residents of
Columbia and surrounding counties by
Community Newspapers Inc.
We believe strong newspapers build
strong communities -"Newspapers
get things done!".
Our primary goal is to
publish distinguished and profitable
community-oriented newspapers.
This mission will be accomplished
through the teamwork of professionals
dedicated to truth, integrity and hard
work.
Todd Wilson, publisher
Robert Bridges, editor
Sue Brannon, controller
Dink NeSmith, president
Tom Wood, chairman

LETTERS
POLICY
Letters to the Editor should be
typed or neatly written and double
spaced. Letters should not exceed
400 words and will be edited for
length and libel. Letters must be
signed and include the writer's
name, address and telephone
number for verification. Writers can
have two
letters per month published. Letters
and guest columns are the opinion
of the writers and not necessarily
that of the Lake City Reporter.
BY MAIL: Letters, P.O. Box


1709, Lake City, FL 32056; or drop
off at 180 E. Duval St. downtown.
BY FAX: (386) 752-9400.
BY E-MAIL:
news@lakecityreporter.com


Rick Perry has pole-
vaulted over Willard
Mitt Romney to
become the top
Republican to face
President Barack Obama on
Election Day 2012. Texas' gover-
nor beat Massachusetts' former
governor 29 percent to 17 per-
cent among Republicans, Gallup
reported Wednesday.
Perry deserves this distinc-
tion. While he lacks the-pro-
market purity of Dr. Milton
Friedman, Perry's record
should satisfy limited-govern-
ment conservatives far more
than Romney's:
As "America's jobs gov-
ernor," Perry is the one-man
antidote to Obama's venomous
policies that have held unem-
ployment above 9 percent for
25 of the last 27 months. Across
all 50 states between June
2009 and June 2011, the Dallas
Federal Reserve calculates that
49.9 percent of America's net
new jobs arose in Texas. July
was its 11th straight month of
payroll expansion, with 29,300
Texans finding work. Nearly
11 years into Perry's governor-
ship, Texas inarguably is No. 1
in job growth.
During Romney's single,
four-year term, however,
the U.S. Labor Department
ranked Massachusetts No. 47
in job growth. Employment
increased just 0.9 percent
between January 2003 and
January 2007. At that time,
U.S. job growth was roughly
five percent. Romney did
keep Massachusetts ahead
of Ohio and Michigan -
- two Rust Belt job sieves
- and Louisiana, crushed by
Katrina.
The libertarian Cato
Institute's Report Card on
America's Governors gives
Perry straight Bs and Romney
consistent Cs.
Cato praised Perry for intro-
ducing "a zero-based budget
to force the state agencies to


www.lakecityreporter.com


Deroy Murdock
deroy.murdock@gmail.com
justify their continued exis-
tence and funding levels" and
noted that "he has presided
over moderate increases in
the Texas general fund bud-
get." Cato applauded Perry's
"substantial achievement:" a
$6 billion property tax cut in
2004 including a first-year,
$1.5 billion net tax reduction.
However, Cato criticized Perry
for partially offsetting this
tax relief with a $1 per-pack
cigarette tax hike and a gross
receipts tax on business.
Cato observed that Romney's
"first budget, presented under
the cloud of a $2 billion deficit,
balanced the budget with some
spending cuts, but a $500 mil-
lion increase in various fees
was the largest component of
the budget fix." Cato also saw
that Romney "proposed, mod-
est increases to the budget
and line-item vetoed millions of
dollars each year, only to have
most of those, vetoes overrid-
den."
On health care, the free-
market Club for Growth
(where I twice have spoken)
lauds Perry for expand-
ing managed care within
Medicaid. Among other recent
modernizations, a CFG whitee
Paper on Perry explains, "this
bill could save Texas nearly
$468 million over two years."
After Perry's extensive law-
suit reforms, "the number of
insurance companies offering
medical malpractice insurance
soared 650 percent," along
with a massive influx of doc-
tors eager to perform diagno-
ses rather than depositions.
CFG credits Romney for
requiring Medicaid patients


to co-pay for some treatments
and increasing new state work-
ers' health contributions from
15 percent to 25. But CFG
describes RomneyCare as "one
lab experiment that completely
has failed." RomneyCare wields
an individual mandate. Also,
government-funded medicine
has zoomed from $133 million
in Fiscal Year 2007 to some
$880 million in FY2010- despite
Romney's promise that "the
costs of health care will be
reduced."
While CFG chides Perry
for "well-intentioned, but mis-
guided state-funded subsidy
programs to attract corpora-
tions to Texas," it praises him
for opposing the ethanol pro-
gram, possibly Washington's
grubbiest corporate-welfare
scheme.
Romney, in turn, boldly
told Iowa voters on May 27:
"I support the subsidy of
ethanol."
Perry describes so-
called "global warming" as an
unproven "scientific theory"
and believes that "there are a
substantial number of scientists
who have manipulated data" on
this issue.
"I believe the world is get-
ting warmer, and I believe that
humans have contributed to
that," Romney declared June 3.
On Wednesday, he retreated: "I.
don't know if it's mostly caused
by humans." *
Conservatives hungry for
free or at least freer mar-
kets are stampeding toward
Rick Perry. True, the cowboy-
boot-wearing governor recalls
President G.W. Bush in style.
Unfortunately, Willard Mitt
Romney reflects him in sub-
stance.

m Deroy Murdock is a columnist
with the Scripps Howard News.
Service and a media fellow with
the Hoover Institution on War,
Revolution and Peace at Stanford
University.


Vice President fumble-tongue


nothing that tumbles
fromVice President
Joe Biden's mouth
should surprise.
But he certain-
ly raised eyebrows and a
lot more with his stunning
remarks in China suggesting
support for Beijing's notorious
one-child policy.
A spokeswoman later had to
argue that what Biden actually
believes isn't necessarily what
he says.
Taking questions at Sichuan
University, Biden launched into
a riff on China's demographic
crisis.
"Your policy is one which
I fully understand I'm not
second-guessing of [allowing
only] one child per family," the


vice president helpfully offered.
Seriously? Apparently not
After an outpouring of con-
demnation, spokeswoman
Kendra Barkoff issued a state-
ment reiterating that "the
Obama administration strongly
opposes all aspects of China's
birth-limitation policies."
Which is good to hear. As was
her claim that, by calling the
policy "unsustainable," Biden
was actually "arguing against
the one-child policy to a Chinese
audience."
If she was telling the truth,
that is.
For the record, China's
three-decade-old one-child limit
for urban families has been
denounced by human-rights
groups, including Amnesty


International and Human Rights
Watch.
And with good reason: It
involves forced sterilization,
coerced abortions and de facto
"gendercide" the weeding out
of female babies, creating a huge
imbalance in favor of male births.
Frankly, it's astonishing that
the second-highest-ranking
official of an administration that
considers itself committed to
reproductive rights should give
tacit endorsement to a policy
that is the very antithesis of a
woman's right to choose.
So what does Biden really
think?
After that display of verbal
summersaults, who knows?

* New York Post


4A


Todd Wilson
twilson@Jakecityreportercom


School

daze marks

another

great year


At my house, fourth-
grade began in the-:
predawn, almost*
non-functional,:
hours of Monday.-:
One mid-toned suggestion to.,
awaken and our daughter had,.
feet on .the floor and moved at
warp speed.
Two minutes later she was
fully dressed in the outfit she ,',
first assembled and tried on
the previous Saturday after-
noon. She was on my heels in '.,
the living room harping at me :.
to get ready so we could leave,
She tells me there will be a lot,..
of traffic and there is a need
to be walked to class on the
first day (for which I am still
thankful) and there are many
things going on and we need
to hit the road, never mind the,
fact that it's zero dark thirty -'
outside and she has not eaten
breakfast.
Actually, it's 5:42 a.m. I'm
barely conscious.
I was never this excited
about school.
As I've written many times .
in the past, the first school day.,
is the equivalent of New Year's
Day in our household. A new
school year and a birthday
always fall in the same week.
It's a hectic time and always
memorable as we turn the fam-
ily calendar.
This year, Lauren records
a monumental birthday, and
turns 10. That means she's a
little more interested in fash-
ion than finger painting. That :
means her dad thinks she's
growing up too quickly, right
before his eyes.
Double digits.
I've already told the story
of our once-in-a-lifetime
trip this summer where our
daughter got to spend a week
in the Rockies with her 90-
year-old grandfather. That,
and a couple of obligatory
days at the beach, capped a .
relaxing summer that other- '
wise was iced by overcoming
her fear and going off the
high dive.
Baby girl, now fearless in
most arenas, is growing up.
Her mother and I are thank-
ful she enjoys school, enjoys
being a leader and is tenacious
when it comes to learning.
That makes life, and home-- .
work assignments, much more
pleasant
Every year at this time, I
pause, sit down with the girl
and intervieww" her. I always
want to hear about what she
knows for sure.
"I know it's only six more
years," she said without hesita-
tion. "A driver's license. That's-. -
what I know for sure. I really :
want that driver's license. Only :
six more years and I can get :
one." :
Then it hit me again. Double
digits. Almost in middle
school. Almost a teenager.
Sweet mercy.
I still plan to savor every :
accomplishment that makes
up every special day of my
little one being 10, but I know
stranger days are just beyond
the horizon.
Very soon, I won't be need- "
ed for that ride to school and
I won't have to get up as early. -=
But right now, I'm glad to stick^
with being a fourth grader's
all-everything chaffeur. '
This, I know for sure. -

Todd Wilson is publisher of the;
Lake City Reporter. -


Pro-market Perry vaults


over Romney in GOP race















Military widows bond at Alaska retreat


By MARK THIESSEN
Associated Press

GIRDWOOD, Alaska -
Jennifer Tullis still keeps
her husband's camouflage
uniform in the closet, all
starched, ironed and fold-
ed, even though he died 12
years ago.
"He took so much pride
in that," she said, smiling
at the memory of her hus-
band, Michael Peterson, a
powerlifting Marine from
Tooele, Utah, whose nick-
name was Ogre.
"I lost my husband when
I was 19 to suicide, which
is one of the harder ways
because there's so many
stigmas attached to it," said
Tullis, of Valley Center,
Calif.
Tullis and about 75 other
military widows rang-
ing in age from 21 to 62
shared memories of their
loved ones while hiking
rugged wooded trails, can-
yoneering in the backcoun-
try and rafting the rapids
of Alaska's Crow Creek last
weekend. They were partici-
pants in the second Alaska
Adventure excursion orga-
nized by TAPS, the Tragedy
Assistance Program for
Survivors.
Tullis turned to the group
for support when Peterson
died, and now gives back as
a peer mentor to the grow-
ing ranks of military wid-
ows and widowers whose
spouses or significant oth-
ers died in combat, from
illness, suicide, "every type
of loss imaginable," said
TAPS founder and presi-
dent Bonnie Carroll.
"What brings us togeth-
er and really binds us as
. a community is their life,
and their service and their
sacrifice to this nation. This
is about honoring the life,
and remembering the love
far more than it is about
mourning the death,"


Jennifer Hankins of San Diego, left, pets moose during a visit with Julie Robinson, of Ligonier, Pa., at the Alaska Wildlife Conservation Center near Girdwood,.
Alaska, during an Alaska Adventure excursion. The event was organized by Tragedy Assistance Program for Survivors for a group of about 75 widows of mili-,
tary veterans to share memories of loved ones while while hiking rugged trails and rafting the rapids.


Carroll said. band, Brig. Gen.. Tom
Tullis simply calls TAPS Carroll, the assistant adju-
family. tant general of the Alaska
"These people are fam- Army National Guard, and
ily because when you seven other Guard senior
go through the loss of a leaders died in an Army
spouse when you're young, C12 plane crash.
it's something that no one "Certainly for our family it
understands if they haven't was a devastating tragedy,"
lost their spouse because she said from a second-,
it's unnatural. So other story patio at the Alyeska
people are going through Resort, some 50 miles south
anniversaries and having of Anchorage in scenic
babies and buying houses, Girdwood. "But out of that,
and you're grieving," she we formed a small group
said. that recognized the healing
Carroll founded TAPS power of that peer connec-
,two years a r therh, ;us- ,, tionpfcoming together with


others who truly understand
the depth of this loss."
That was the intent
behind the Alaska week-
end, to create a safe haven
for the women where they
could tell the stories that
perhaps their friends and
family back home have
tired of hearing.
"What we do here isn't
therapy, but it is tremen-
dously therapeutic. You
know, the wbrd counseling
doesn't really apply. There's
a much better word, and
that's companionirg, when
'you're. working with some-,


one who has lost a loved
one," Carroll said.
The Washington, D.C.-
based group has helped
more than 30,000 survivors
since it formed in 1994, and
most of them, about.22,000,
since the terrorist attacks
of Sept 11.
The Alaska retreat didn't
involve whiteboards, speak-
ers or seminars. Instead, it
was only intended to allow
the women to enjoy their
time together in .Alaska's
wilderness. The organiza-
tion provides other, more
directed seminars, includ-


ing Good Grief Camps;_
across, the nation. A'
National Military Suicide'
Survivor seminar will be'
held in October in Colorad6
Springs, Colo.
Last year, TAPS took'
10,649 calls on its 24-hour'
resource and informa-'
tion line, receiving more'
than 184,000 calls since itT
formed 17 years ago. It also
made 63,452 calls to survi-
vors last year, everything
from reminding survivors.
they are not alone to fol--
lowing up on a wide array
of needed services.


O ,BITUARIES


Myrtle Lee Westbrook
Myrtle Lee Westbrook, 83,
of Lake City, passed away
on August 11, 2011 at
Shands- at Lake Shore Hos-
pital -after a long illness.
She was born September 6,
1927 in Vidalia Ga. Formerly
of Bradenton, Fl., she moved
to Lake City in May of 2011
to live with her daughter.
She was preceded in death
by her parents Mack Beasley
and Ethel Mae Johnson, her
husband Carl Westbrook, and
a great granddaughter Cirra
Tia Wells of Bradenton, Fl.
She is survived by her five
children; Carolyn Crawford
of Waycross, Ga., Lewis
Arland White, Paul White,
Linda- Pope, all of Lake
City, Fl., and Peggy Jack-
son of Sarasota, Fl., Seven-
teen grandchildren, twenty
great grandchildren, and
three great great grandchil-
dren, one sister, Pearlie Mae
Brown, of Wahneta, Fl., and
many nieces and nephews.
A memorial service will be
held at a later date. GATE-
WAY FOREST LAWN FU-
NERAL HOME (386) 752-
1954, 3596 S. US HWY 441
Lake City, Fl is in charge of
the arrangements. Please
sign our register book at
www.gatewayforestlawn. com

S*


Benjamin Franklin
Malinowski
Benjamin Franklin Ma-
linowski (Ben) passed away
peacefully on .. August 23,
2011 after battling a long ill-
ness. A resident of Lake City,
Florida, he was 82 years old.
Ben .was born on September 5,
1928 in Perth Amboy, New Jer-
sey to the late Mary and Frank
Malinowski of Perth Amboy,
New Jersey. Ben entered the
military in 1946 becoming a
Chief Warrant Officer in 1954.
During his 20 years of service
in the Army he served in Japan,
Italy, Germany, and Korea. In
1969 he returned to Augusta,
Georgia where he received
the Legion of Merit. He also
received one Commendation'
Medal from the Department of
the Army First Oak Leaf Clus-
ter, and later he received the
Department of the Army Com-
mendation Medal Second Oak
Leaf Cluster. Ben was chosen
to be on the Select Committee
on Assassinations for President
John F. Kennedy, U.S. House
of Representatives, due to his
expertise in polygraph. He
also assisted in the Assassina-
tion of Dr. Martin Luther King
and the Herman Talmadge Eth-
ics Investigation. He was in-
terviewed on the ABC 20/20
Show on the slaying of Viola
Luizzo in Alabama. He also
assisted the Alabama Attor-
ney General on the 16th Street
Church Bombing. He worked


Mercy Medical
Urgent Care
9 am 8 pm .

We accept
BCBS PPO United Heathcare AvMed Medicare
Self Pay & Out of Network
We charge the Medicare Rates
*
305 East Duval Street, Lake City, FL 32055
Phone: (386) 758-2944 Fax: (386) 758-9822



i0

Ig*
PB


on the My Lai Massacre Inves-
tigation for the U.S. Govern-
ment. He was a Charter Mem.
ber of the American Polygraph
Association, twice President of
the Georgia Polygraph Associ-
ation and he was appointed by
then Governor Jimmy Carter to
the Georgia Polygraph Licens-
ing Board. He later moved to
Savannah, Georgia where he
started his own polygraph ser-
vice, Malinowski Polygraph in
1975. Ben had a strong love of
the water and went fishing and
crabbing as much as he could,
which led him to semi-retire-
ment in Steinhatc hee, Florida,
where he became a licensed
fishing guide. Ben is preceded
in death by his first wife Bev-
erly Brown Malinowski; Sis-
ter Carol and Mike Nowicki;
son-in-law Kevin Ansley.
He, is survived by his lov-


Ar
F.1
C


' ing wife, Arlene Malinowski,
daughters Anita Tiedt and her
husband Scott of Atlanta, Geor-
gia; Marcia
Ansley of,
Imperial,
California;
son Michael
Malinowski
and his wife-
Karen of
Savannah,
Georgia;
Malinowski grandchil-
dren Am-
ber Ansley Haslam and her
husband Ryan of Savannah,
Georgia; Kyle Benjamin Ans-
ley of Atlanta, Georgia; Zach-
ary Thomas Ansley student at
Georgia Southern University;
.Beverly Jeannette Tiedt of At-
lanta, Georgia; Chad Tiedt and
his. wife Monica of Ft. Lau-
derdale, Florida; Kyle Tiedt


of Atlanta, Georgia; Nicole
Makayla Malinowski of Savan-
nah, Georgia and great grand-
son Nathan Brian Haslam of
Savannah, Georgia. Ben's sib-
lings include. Lillian and Leon
Dybiec of Homosassa, Florida;-
Stanley Malinowski of North
Brunswick, NJ; MaryAnn and
Frank Grabowski of Sayreville,
New Jersey; Suzanne and Earl
Smith of South Amboy, New
Jersey. He is also survived
by 17 nieces and nephews.
The" family will receive friends
,from 5 until 7 o'clock Thursday
evening at Gamble Funeral Ser-
vice 410 Stephenson Avenue:
The funeral service will' be
held at 10 o'clock Friday after-
noon at the graveside, Catholic
Cemetery, conducted by. The
Reverend Patrick S. O'Brien.
A memorial service will be
held at 12 noon, Septem-


ber 8, 2011 at the Moose
Lodge in Lake City, Florida.
Remembrances: Haven Hospice
at 6037 US 90 W, Lake City,'
Florida 32055 (386)961-0155..
"Come tome, all of you who"
are weary and carry heavy bur-.
dens, and Iwill give you rest...: -
Matthew 11:26-
Gamble Funeral Ser-
vice, Savannah, is in
charge of arrangements.
Please share your thoughts about:
Mr. Malinowski and his life at
www.gamblefunetalservice.com..


Obituaries are paid advertise-
ments. For details, call the Lake
City Reporter's classified depart-
ment at 752-1293.


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LAKE CITY REPORTER NATIONAL SUNDAY, AUGUST 28. 2011


f i tL < jLIf L.











LAKE CITY REPORTER WEATHER SUNDAY. AUGUST 28, 2011


THE WEATHER



MOSTLY MOSTLY ISOLATED CHANCE CHANCE
SUNNY SUNNY t-STORMS -STORMS -STORMS



HIlOS69 HIL72 HIL071 H192L070 HI 90LO 7


Pensacola
97/74


96/68

ailassee L1eCt*y
97/69 96/69
Gainesie
Pana City 96/70
93/74 Ocala
96/71


T94/a7
94/77


FL Myer
95/77


City
* Jacksonvile Cape Canaveral
94, 76 Daytona Beach
Ft. Lauderdale
Daytona Beach Fort Myers
97/76 Gainesville
* Jacksonville
Key West
Ordaido Cape Canaveral ake Cit
95/78 92/77 Lake City

Naples
West Pahn B"ead Ocala
93/80 0 Orlando
SFt Laderdale Panama City
s. 94/80 Pensacola
Naples Tallahassee
91/79 Miami Tampa


93/80 Valdosta
Key West* W. Palm Beach
911/83


Monday
'.I0 7 7.1
94/7 7/pc
92/81/t
95/77/L
95/72/pc
92/76/s
91/82/t
97/72/pc
91/80/t
90/79/t
95/73/pc
95/78/t
93/77/s
95/77/s
95/73/s
94/76/t
97/71/pc
90/80/t


Tuesday.
7? i
91/ 75/t
92/80/s
94/77/t
92/71/t
89/75/t
91/82/t
94/71/t
91/81/s
92/78/s
93/72/t
94/76/t
93/79/t
93/78/s
94/73/t
94/76/t
95/72/t
91/81/s


NATIONAL FORECAST: Irene will continue its journey up the Eastern Seaboard today, pro-
ducing widespread flooding rainfall from the northern Mid-Atlantic states into New England.
Tropical storm-force winds will affect much of the region, but hurricane conditions will be
limited to areas near the coast. Scattered showers and thunderstorms will affect parts of the
West and Great Plains, as well.




















Cold Front
.d Warnd Front


M'Stationary
Miami Front
93/80
Occluded
Front


YESTRATFy"rSuNAONAL EKEIRM T aStryn,TTo da

Saturday Today Saturday Today Saturday Today


TEMPERATURES
High Saturday
Low Saturday
Normal high
Normal low
Record high
Record low

PRECIPITATION
Saturday
Month total
Year total #
Normal month-to-date
Normal year-to-date


98
80
90
70
98 in 1959
61 in 1930


0.00"
3.17"
26.56"
5.84"
35.97"


SUN
Sunrise today
Sunset today
Sunrise tom.
Sunset tom.


7:05 a.m.
7:58 p.m.
7:06 a.m.
7:57 p.m.


10mitot

Today's


MOON ultra-violet
Moonrise today 6:29 a.m. radiation ri
Moonset today 7:30 p.m. for the arel
Moonrise tom. 7:37 a.m. to 10+
Moonset tom. 8:08 p.m.



Sept. Sept. Sept. Sept. jVL
4 12 20 27
First Full Last New f Y
,.eethor /


bl oulitto
our rcit'rs
m by

Tine Weather
sk
a on
m 0O


1 welther.com

Forecasts, data and
graphics 2011 Weather
Central, LP, Madison, Wis.
, www.weatherpubllisher.com


CITY
Albany NY
Albuquerque
Anchorage
Atlanta
Baltimore
Billings
Birmingham
Bismarck
Boise
Boston,
Buffalo
Charleston SC
Charleston WV
Charlotte
Cheyenne
Chicago
Cincinnati
Cleveland
Columbia SC
Dallas
Daytona Beach
Denver




CITY
Acapulco
Amsterdam
Athens
Auckland
Belling
Berlin
Buenos Aires
Cairo,
Geneva
Havand
Helsinki
Hong Kong_
Kingston


Hi/Lo/Pcp. HI/Lo/W CITY
82/64/0 69/55/r Des
90/73/0 97/67/t Detro
53/46/0 61/47/pc El Pa
93/74/0 89/66/s. Fairb
79/73/.15 82/62/sh Gree
89/61/0 93/59/pc Hartf
92/69/0 92/65/s Hono
78/57/.08 85/55/pc Hous
83/66/0 93/58/pc India
79/70/.11 74/64/r Jacks
80/60/0 74/58/pc Jacks
94/78/0 92/74/s Kans
81/65/0 81/56/s Las V
91/76/0 90/64/s Uttle
88/56/0 88/57/t Los A
81/67/0 75/66/s Mem
87/59/0 82/56/s Miam
76/58/0 74/59/pc Minn
95/80/0 94/69/s Mobl
104/80/0 107/80/s New
I 96/77/.02 97/76/pc New
89/64/0 90/68/t Oklal


HI/Lo/Pcp. HI/Lo/W
86/79/0 86/77/t
63/55/0 63/55/sh
57/53/0 88/75/s
61/45/0 60/50/c
81/66/0 86/68/s
72/57/0 68/52/pc
55/50/0 65/44/s
95/75/0 94/74/s
66/48/0 75/48/pc
90/72/0 91/73/t
77 59':1 1 77 59. pC 1
95/82/0 94/84/c
84/77/0 84/79/t


Moines
sit
so
anks
nsboro
ord
lulu
ton
riapolls
son MS
sonville
as City
Vegas
Rock
kngeles
phls
it
eapolls
le
Orleans
York
homa City


CITY
La Paz
Lima
London
Madrid
Mexico City
Montreal
Moscow
Nairobi
Nassau
New Delhi
Oslo
Panama
Paris


HI/Lo/Pcp.
86/68/0
85/61/0
94/73/0
56/43/0
85/74/0
75/68/.09
S'80/75/0
105/81/0
85/60/0
96/65/0
98/74/0
88/66/0
101/87/0
91/70/0
76/66/0
90/72/0
92/80/.10
79/60/0
93/75/0
93/78/0
78/73/.39
102/74/0


ni/Lo/ rp.
61/30/0
64/59/0
64/52/0
84/50/0
72/61/0
77/61/0
79/54/0
73/61/0
93/82/0-
90/82/0
66/63'0
90/77/0
66."54 0


HI/Lo/W CITY
79/61/pc Omah
76/58/s Orland
101/74/pc Phllac
67/43/pc Phoen
89/61/s Pittsb
73/58/r Portit
88/73/s Portia
104/76/s Raleig
80/59/s Rapid
95/66/s Reno
94/76/s Richn
84/65/pc Sacra
110/86/pc St. Lc
93/68/s Salt L
80/67/s San A
88/65/s San D
.93/80/pc San F
79/61/pc Seatt
95/73/s Spoka
95/79/s Tamps
77/60/r Tucso
104/77/pc Wash


Tuuay
HI/Lo/W
62 32.-s
63/59/s
65/48/s,
90/61/s
74/58/t
63/57/r
77/55/pc
74/59/sh
'91/82/t
90/80/t
5945 sn5
90. .
69.53 -ve


ah
do
lelphia
iix
urgh
md ME
nd OR
gh
dCity

nond
mento
Ails
ake City
Antonio
iego
rancisco
le
ane
a
in
ington


CITY
Rio
Rome
St. Thomas VI
San Juan PR
Santiago
Seoul
Singapore
Sydney
Tel Aviv
Tokyo
Toronto
Vienna
Warsaw


HI/Lo/Pcp. HI/Lo/W
84/68/0 78/62/t
94/79/0 95/78/pc
78/73/.24 80/61/sh
105/91/0 115/89/pc
82/63/0 76/50/pc
77/61/0 72/58/r
76/61/0 84/59/pc
77/74/.31 90/62/s
90/64/0 89/57/pc*
87/72/0 93/58/pc
79/72/1.84 89/64/pc.
81/57/0 97/62/s
91/70/0 85. 63 w
S92/73/0 95/70/t
102/77/0 105/75/s.
80/69/0 80/67/s
63/55/0 73/54/pc
73/56/0 80/57/s
88/63/0 93 56'i
92/86/0 :i. ; :, p..
101/77/0 110u oc
79/74/.23 85/61/pc


HI/Lo/Pcp.
79/72/0
86/68/0
na/na/na
91/76/0
55/45/0
88/73/0
82/75/0.
66/52/0
90/75/0
81/72/0
7,51 I)
90. '66.
90l66.0


Hi/Lo/W
84/68/s
90/68/s
;7 mi'l
87/78/t
59 35 r..
86/73/t
87 76.'.
67/50/s'
88/74/s
86/75/t
75 55 PC

70 55'r.i


KEY TO CONDTIONS: c-cloudy, dr=drizzle, f-fair, fg-fog, h-hazy, i-ice, pc=partly cloudy, r-rain, s=sanny,
sh=showers, sn-snow, ts=thunderstorms, w-windy.


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I LAKE CITY ALMANAC


Page Editor: Robert Bridges, 754-0428


E
,is
a
Dry


0,









Lake City Reporter


Story ideas?

Contact
Tim Kirby
Sports Editor
754-0421
tkirby ,akedtyreporter.com


SPORTS


Sunday.August 28, 2011


www.lakecityreporter.com


Section B-,


Allen: We'll fix mi


Tigers win kickoff classic

19-13 over Santa Fe


By BRANDON FINLEY
trimnley lake, roeorI ter.corn
First-year coaches usu-
ally don't talk about fixing
mistakes after an opening
win. but for Brian Allen
to take Columbia High to
where he wants the Tigers
to be. he knows that he
must address the errors.
"When looking at the
game tape, there were a ton
of errors, too many men-
tal mistakes," Allen said.
"That's something we'll
quickly correct."
Columbia sputtered
many times throughout the
19-13 kickoff classic win
against Santa Fe. mainly
due to errors on part of the
Tigers.
After reaching the five-
yard line. Columbia was
called for two offside's
penalties before shanking
a field goal. It's the kind
of things that are expected
with a young team, but that
doesn't make it an excuse


according to Allen.
"We can't have the small
procedural penalties when
we work. work, work at it,"
he said. "We can't have false
,starts from wide receivers
that aren't involved in the
play."
Still, when you come
away with a win in your
first game as head coach,
there's things that can be
looked at in a positive light
as well.
"Ronald Timmons played
well." Allen said. "He's a kid
%v tried not to brag about
too much, but when you
look at the numbers and
he's run for 149 yards on
seven carries, we walked
away pleased with that."
Columbia ran the ball 27
times for 260 yards in three
quarters of play. Besides
Timmons' 80-yard run. the
biggest play of the night
was quarterback Nigel
Atkinson's 34-yard run to
give the Tigers the lead
late.


"He's got the ability to
create," Allen said. "We've
just got to get him con-
fident enough to stand in
the pocket and look at the
touchdown from the ground
after taking a hit."
Defensively,. Allen gave
the Tigers a C grade, but he
was happy with the effort,
especially the players flying
to the ball.
"We preach that when
you run to the ball only
good things can happen,"
Allen said. "We scalded
(Quay Mlonismith), but last
night he was one of 11 guys
running to the ball. After
a big run by their quar-
terback, Darius Williams
knocks out the ball and he
falls on it. We have to play
with that mentality to run
to the ball."
In the end. the game
won't count as a win or
a loss, but it will work as
a good grading point for
CHS. The real thing begins
Friday.


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lae City 'R
Columbia High quarterback Nigel Atkinson (right) hands off to Ronald Timmons during the
Tigers 19-13 win on Friday.


Lake


City Middle


Falcons open 2011 football season at home on Monday


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Lake City Middle School cheerleaders for 2011-12 are captain Jaidyn Rogers (front left)
and co-captain Abby Giles. Second row (from left) are Ashley Nobles, Arshayla Bryant,
Sierra Beadles, Sharday Warren and Gabby Gillian. Third row (from left) are
Katelynn Hickman, Faith Johnson, Tori Jackson, Mathison Milligan, Taylor Brinkley,
Peyton Hardin, Savannah Johnson and Lindsey Langston. Back row (from left) are
Savannah Amparo, Chase Broome and Ilyssa Perkins. Iindsey Kennington and
Lindsey Pridgeon are coaches.


TIM KIRBY'Lae C.ry Reporter
Lake City Middle School Falconettes for 2011-12 are (front row, from left) Apriena Riley,
Takemma Stewart, Callie Williams, Riley Eubank, Buie Summerlin and Kerigan Kennon.
Second row (from left) are Taylor Rae Sikes, Lauren Mixon, co-captaih Hanna Perry,
Natalia Pardo, Dallas Ste-Marie, Cassady Feagle, Rebecca Creeley and Mackenzi Nichols.
Back row (from left) are Laurel Daniel, Samantha Jackson, Jordan Ryder,
captain Morgan Jackson, Sierra Thomas and Leighann Benefield. Alison Eu


'--W-,.-',I ', ',.'' 7 -. 'q wwIr]. -

JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Lake City Middle School's 2011 football team members are (by jersey number) 1-Hunter Houston, 2-Roger Cray, 3-Derontae Jordan, 4-Lorenzo Johnson, 5-Terrious Baker,
6-Dallon Washington, 7-Jacob Thomas, 8-Brant Nelson, 9-Jacquez Cray, 10-Darian Dallas, 11-Kaleb Thomas, 12-Garrett Finnell, 13-Branden Powell, 14-Brock Edge,
15-Brandon Little, 20-Kody Waldron, 21-Daryl Richardson, 22-Tre Sands, 23-Marian Dallas, 24-Jordan Culp, 25-Laqavious Paul, 28-Justin Truesdale, 30-Justn Br.
31-Devin Adams, 32-D'Kel Littles, 33-Dalton Howes, 34-Richard Cordner, 35-Dillon Madeiros, 36-Jason Baker, 39-Kristopher Ross, 40-Thomas Davis, 41-Jesse Davf'i._:-'
42-Timothy Dotson, 44-Harrison Shubert, 45-James Olin, 47-Tyler Bragdon, 48-Carson Crews, 49-Caleb Strickland, 50-Hunter Sweet, 51-Curtis Davis, 53-Zach Dawson," -i-
54-Jake Stephens, 55-Christian Diaz-Perez, 56-Christian Zecher, 58-Joshua Rosell, 60-Robert Getzan, 61-Jatavious Johnson, 62-Joseph Caputo, 63-Eli Rosell,
65-Jacob Strickland, 66-Doug Johnson, 70-Dustin Carwile, 71-Shelton Dickey, 72-William Shiver, 73-Sidney Dickey, 74-Joshua Kurtz, 75-Lee Peterson, 76-Marcus Zeighler,
80-Devante Sercey, 81-Joseph Beach, 82-Austin Chapman, 83-Jonathon Wright, 84-Ira Chasteen. Billy Jennings is head coach. Assistant coaches are James Albritton,
Ta'mar Jernigan, Neal Alford, Don Sloan, Chad Padgett and Brandon Kuykendall.














LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS SUNDAY AUGUST 28. 2011 Page Editor: Brandon Finley, 754-0420


SCOREBOARD


TELEVISION

TV sports

Today
AUTO RACING
7:30 anm.
SPEED Formula One, Grand Prix of
Belgium, at Francorchamps, Belgium
4 p.m.
VERSUS IRL. IndyCar, Grand Prix
of Sonoma, at Sonoma, Calif.
CYCUNG
2 p.m.
NBC USA Pro Challenge, final
stage, Golden, Colo. to Denver
11 p.m.
VERSUS USA Pro Challenge, final
stage, Golden, Colo. to Denver (same-
day tape)
GOLF
9 a.m.
TGC European PGA Tour, Johnnie
Walker Championship, final round, at
Perthshire, Scotland
Noon
TGC PGA Tour,The Barclays, final
round, at Edison, N.J.
2 p.m.
CBS PGA Tour, The Barclays, final
round, at Edison, N.J.
TGC LPGA, Canadian Women's
Open, final round, at Mirabel, Quebec
4 p.m.
NBC USGA, U.S., Amateur
Championship, championship match, at
Erin,Wis.
7 p.m.
TGC Champions Tour, Boeing
Classic, final round, at Snoqualmle.Wash.
(same-day tape)
LITTLE LEAGUE BASEBALL
II a.mt
ESPN World Series, third place
game, at South Williamsport, Pa.
3 p.m.
ABC World Series, championship
game, at South Williamsport, Pa.
MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL
2 p.m.
TBS Chicago Cubs at Milwaukee
4 p.m.
WGN Chicago White Sox at
Seattle
8 p.m.
ESPN LA.Angels at Teas
MAJOR LEAGUE LACROSSE
3 p.m.
ESPN2 Playoffs, championship
match, at Annapolis, Md.
MOTORSPORTS
2 p.m.
SPEED MotoGP World
Championship, at Indianapolis
6 p.m.
SPEED AMA XR 1200, at
Indianapolis (same-day tape)
NFL FOOTBALL
8 p.m.
NBC Preseason, New Orleans at
Oakland
PREP FOOTBALL
Noon
ESPN2 Glenbard West (III.) at
Wheaton Warrenville South (III.)
3 p.m.
ESPN Cocoa at Colerain (Ohio)
SOCCER
7 p.m.
ESPN2 MLS. Los Angeles at New
York
WNBA BASKETBALL
9p.m.'
ESPN2 Los Angeles at Seattle

Monday
MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL
7 p.m.
ESPN Philadelphia at Cincinnati
TENNIS
I p.m.
ESPN2 U.S. Open, first round, at
NewYork
7 p.m.
ESPN2 U.S. Open, first round, at
NewYork


BASEBALL

AL standings

East Division
W L Pct GB
Boston 80 51 .611 -
NewYork 78 51 .605 1
Tampa Bay 71 59 .546 8kA
Toronto 66 65 .504 14
Baltimore 52 77 .403 27
Central Division
W L Pct GB
Detroit 72 59 .550 -
Cleveland 64 64 .500 6'A
Chicago 64 65 .496 7
Minnesota 55 76 .420 17
Kansas City 54 78 .409 18'A


Te:
Lo
Oa
Sew


West Division
W L
xas 75 58
s Angeles 71 60
ikland 60 71
attle 56 74
Friday's Games
Cleveland 2, Kansas City I


Baltimore 12, N.Y.Yankees 5
Tampa Bay 6.Toronto I
Oakland IS, Boston 5
Texas I I, LA.Angels 7
Detroit 8, Minnesota I
Chicago White Sox 4, Seattle 2 .
Saturday's Games
N.Y. Yankees at Baltimore DH, ppd.,
rain
Oakland at Boston, I st game, ppd.
Tampa Bay 6,Toronto 5
Detroit at Minnesota (n)
Oakland at Boston, 2nd game (n)
Kansas City at Cleveland (n)
LA.Angels at Texas (n)
Chicago White Sox at Seattle (n)
Today's Games
Kansas City (Chen 9-5) at Cleveland
(Masterson 10-7), 1:05 p.m.
Tampa Bay (Price I1-11) at Toronto
(Morrow 9-8), 1:07 p.m.
N.Y.Yankees (Colon 8-8) at Baltimore
(Britton 7-9), 1:35 p.m., 1st game
Detroit (Penny 9-9) at Minnesota
(Duensing 8-13). 2.: 10 p.m.
Chicago White Sox (Floyd 11-10) at
Seattle (Vargas 7-11),4:10 p.m.
N.Y. Yankees (F.Garcia 10-7) at
Baltimore (Matusz 1-6), 7:35 p.m., 2nd
game
LA Angels (Weaver 15-6) at Texas
(C.Lewis 11-9), 8:05 p.m.
Oakland at Boston, ppd., hurricane
threat
Monday's Games


Kansas City at Detroit, 7:05 p.m.
N.Y.Yankees at Baltimore, 7-05 p.m.
Oakland at Cleveland, 7:05 p.m.
Tampa Bay at Toronto, 7:07 p.m.
Minnesota at Chicago White Sox,
8:10 p.mn.
LA.Angels at Seattle, 1010 p.m.

NL standings

East Division
W L Pct GB
Philadelphia 83 46 .643 -
Atlanta 79 54 .594 6
New York 62 68 .477 21'i
Washington 62 68 .477 21'A
Florida 59 72 .450 25
Central Division
W L Pct GB
Milwaukee 79 54 .594 -
St. Louis 69 63 .523 9'A
Cincinnati 65 66 .496 13
Pittsburgh 61 70 .466 17
Chicago 57 75 .432 21IA
Houston 43 89 .326 354
West Division
W L Pct GB
Arizona 73 59 .553 -
San Francisco 70 62 .530 3
Colorado 63 69 .477 10
Los Angeles 61 69 .469 II
San Diego 60 72 .455 13
Friday's Games
Florida 6, Philadelphia 5
N.Y. Mets 6,Atlanta 0
Cincinnati 4,Washington 3
Milwaukee 5#Chicago Cubs 2
St. Louis 5, Pittsburgh 4
Arizona 5, San Diego 0
LA. Dodgers 6, Colorado I
San Francisco 2, Houston I
Saturday's Games
Atlanta at New York, ppd., hurricane
threat
Florida at Philadelphia, 1st game
Florida at Philadelphia, 2nd game, ppd.,
rain
Colorado at LA. Dodgers (n)
Pittsburgh at St. Louis (n)
Chicago Cubs at Milwaukee (n)
Washington at Cincinnati (n)
San Diego at Arizona (n)
Houston at San Francisco (n)
Today's Games
Washington (Zimmermann 8-11), at
Cincinnati (Cueto 9-5), 1:10 p.m.
Chicago Cubs (C.Coleman 2-6) at
Milwaukee (Grelnke 12-5), 2:10 p.m.
Pittsburgh (Karstens 9-7) at St. Louis
(Lohse I11-8), 215 p.m.
Houston (Norris 6-8) at San Francisco
(Cain 10-9),4:05 p.m.
Colorado (Chacin 10-10) at LA.
Dodgers (Eovaldi 1-1), 4:10 p.m.
San Diego (Luebke 5-6) at Arizona
(I.Kennedy 16-4), 4:10 p.m.
Atlanta at New York, ppd., hurricane
threat
Florida at Philadelphia, ppd., hurricane
threat
Monday's Games
Florida at N.Y. Mets, 4:10 p.m., Ist
game
Philadelphia at Cincinnati, 7:10 p.m.
Florida at N.Y. Mets, 7:40 p.m., 2nd
game
Pittsburgh at Houston, 8:05 p.m.
Colorado at Arizona, 9:40 p.m.
San Diego at LA. Dodgers, 10:10 p.m.
Chicago Cubs at San Francisco,
10:15 p.m.

3,000 hits

Through Friday
(x-active; y-played prior to 19011)
Player Hits
I. Pete Rose 4,256
2.TyCobb 4,191.
3. Hank Aaron 3,771
4. Stan Musial 3,630
5.Tris Speaker 3,514
6. Carl Yastrzemski 3,419
7.y-Cap Anson 3,418
8. y-Honus Wagner 3,415
9. Paul Molitor 3,319
10. Eddie Collins 9,315
1I .Willle Mays 3,283.
12. Eddie Murray 3,255
13:y-Nap Lajoie 3,242
14. CalRlpken 3,184
15. George Brett 3,154
16. Paul Waner 3,152
17. Robin Yount 3,142
18.TonyGwynn 3,141
19.DaveWinfield .3,110
20. Craig Bigglo 3,060
2I1.x-Derek Jeter 3,059
22. Rickey Henderson 3,055
23. Rod Carew 3,053
24. Lou Brock 3,023
25. Rafael Palmeiro 3,020
26.Wade Boggs 3,010
27.AI Kallne 3,007
28. Roberto Clemente 3,000

Little League

WORLD SERIES
At South Willlamsport, Pa.
Saturday


International championship Japan
5, Mexico 2 ,
U.S. championship, Billings, Mont. vs.
Huntington Beach, Calif. (n)



Unscramble these four Jumbles,
one letter to each square,
to form four ordinary words.

KHSUY


02011 Tribune Media Services, Inc. a
All Rights Reserved.

GIIIGNA




WSROYD




BRBEOR
--7/ ----*
__ ^ __ LZ


Today
At Lamade Stadium
Third Place
International runner-up vs. U.S.
runner-up, II a-m.
World Championship
International champion vs. U.S.
champion, 3 p.m.


FOOTBALL

NFL preseason games

Thursday
Cincinnati 24, Carolina 13
Philadelphia 24. Cleveland 14
Baltimore 34,Washington 31
Friday
St. Louis 14, Kansas City 10
Green Bay 24, Indianapolis 21
Today
Jacksonville at Buffalo, 7 p.m.
N.Y.Jets at N.Y. Giants, 7 p.m.
Atlanta at Pittsburgh, 7:30 p.m.
Miami at Tampa Bay, 7:30 p.m.
New England at Detroit, 8 p.m. (CBS)
Dallas at Minnesota, 8 p.m.
Houston at San Francisco, 8 p.m.
Chicago at Tennessee, 8 p.m.
Seattle at Denver, 9 p.m.
San Diego atArizona, 10 p.m.
Sunday .
New Orleans at Oakland, 8 p.m.
(NBC)


BASKETBALL

WNBA schedule

Friday's Games
Connecticut 95, Phoenix 92
Minnesota 85, San Antonio 75
Chicago 80,Washington 67
Tulsa 77, Los Angeles 75
Saturday's Game
Atlanta at Indiana (n)
Today's Games
Minnesota at San Antonio, 3 p.m.
Connecticut atTulsa, 4 p.m.
Phoenix at Washington, 4 p.m.
New York at Chicago, 6 p.m.
Los Angeles at Seattle, 9 p.m.


GOLF

U.S.Amateur

Third round
Upper Bracket
Jordan Russell, College Station, Texas
(140), def. Bobby Leopold, Cranston, R.I.
(142), 19 holes
Peter Uihlein, Orlando (I 37), def. Scott
Langley, St. Louis (137), 2 and I
Max Buckley, Rye, N.Y. (141), def.
John Peterson, Fort Worth, Texas (139),
19 holes
Patrick Cantlay, Los Alamitos, Calif.
(140), def. Tom Lewis, England (139),
3 and I
Lower Bracket.
Kelly Kraft, Dentort, Texas (141), def.
Blake Biddle, St. Charles, III. (134), 23
holes
Patrick Rodgers, Avon, Ind. (136), def.
Sunil Jung, Korea (137),4 and 3
Jack Senior, England (140), def. John
Hahn, LasVegas (139), 3 and 2
Jordan Spieth, Dallas (137), def. Ben
Geyer,Arbuckle, Calif. (135), 7 and 5
Quarterfinals
Upper Bracket
Jordan Russell, College Station, Texas.
(140), def. Peter Uihlein, Orlando (137),
2 and I
Patrick Cantlay, Los Alamitos, Calif..
(140), def. Max Buckley, Rye, N.Y. (141),
19 holes
Lower Bracket
Kelly Kraft, Denton, Texas (141), def.
Patrick Rodgers,Avon, Ind.(136), 6 and 4
Jack Senior, England (140), def.Jordan
Spleth, Dallas (137), I up
Semifinals
Patrick Cantlay, Los Alamitos, Calif.
(140), def. Jordan Russell, College Station,
Texas (140),4 and 3.
Kelly Kraft, DentonTexas (141), d.Jack
Senior, England (140), 3 and 2.


AUTO RACING

Race week

INDYCAR
INDY GRAND PRIX OF SONOMA
Site: Sonoma, Calif.
Schedule:Today, race, 4:45 p.m. (Versus,
4-7 p.m.).
Track: Infineon Raceway (road course,
2.303 miles).
Race distance: 172.725 'miles, 75 laps.
FORMULA ONE
BELGIAN GRAND PRIX
Site: Spa-Francorchamps, Belgium.
Schedule: Today, race, 8 a.m. (Speed,
7:30-10 a.m., 3:30-7 p.m.).
Track: Spa-Francorchamps (road
course, 4.35 miles).
Race distance: 191.415 miles, 44 laps.


THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME
by David L. fPoyt and Jeff Knurek


FOUNPE IN 1895, FRANK
S. BEML-NG'S TE' ANP
RU6F)e COMPANY HAS
HAP MANY -
Now arrange the circled letters
to form the surprise answer, as
suggested by the above cartoon.


Answer here:
(Answers tomorrow)
Saturday's Jumbles: WEAVE AWAKE GARLIC SHODDY
Answer: He couldn't keep the fact that he was a zombie a
secret because he was a DEAD GIVEAWAY


S COURTESY PHOTO
Shayne Morgan completed the Florida Blue Stadium Challenge 5k in Jacksonville. He
finished the event with a time of 38:44.


Photos by ANTONIA ROBINSON/ Lake City Reporter
ABOVE: Boys and girls 7-14 had the opportunity to meet the Columbia High School coach-
ing staff and team members during the Future Tiger Football Camp Saturday morning at
Memorial Stadium. The free camp was sponsored by the Lake City Recreation Department
and the Columbia Youth Football Association and included 160 children. The camp is an
opportunity for young students to learn the drills used by Tiger football. BELOW: Jordan
Smith, 10 and Jacob Johnson, 8, prepare to face off during a drill.


ACROSS

1 Mermaid's
domain
4 Driver with a
handle
8 Take off
11 Toupee kin
12 Dignified man-
ner
13 Thickness
14 Boas
16 Comedown
with
17 Eras
18 Bus
20 Sweater letter
21 Half of a Heston
role
22 Glasses, slangily
25 Spanish towns
29 Type option
30 The Four
(Beatles) -
31 Zoologist's eggs
32 Aries mo.
33 "Enterprise"
letters
34 Work gang


35 Deli sandwiches
38 Claims on
property
39 Lend a hand
40 VII doubled
41 Should:
44 Lampoons
48 FBI acronym
49 Suspense film
name
51 Util. bill
52 Overjoy
53 T'ai ch'uan
54 NNW opposite
55 Las Vegas rival
56 Down for the
count

DOWN

1 Barter
2 Bonn article
3 Culture dish
goo
4 Owned
apartment
5 Buys at auction
6 NASA counter-
part


Answer to Previous Puzzle

YARD ART LAC K
WHIR FOR AVON
CATO ROADSIDE
ABASE KTIN V EE


SEE RUES YOUR



POUF MA.YA RAM


YOW ANA SLEET
OMITTTING OR Z O
GELS ADO SIRE
ANTE LAB HEAD


7 Save from
disaster
8 Links org.
9 Sir Guinness
10 Bulfinch
specialty


12 Words of dis-
dain
15 About, date-
wise
19 Moon or sun
21 Wheel parts
22 Trade punches
23 Gas main
24 Pantyhose
shade
25 Free ticket
26 Handed-down
stories
27 Pie baker
28 Cuts timber
30 Provide capi-
tal
34 Municipal
36 Scrooge's
retort
37 One or the
other
38 Supple
40 Hobby knife
(hyph.)
41 Horse feed
42 Luau strum-
mers
43 Freighter haz-
ard
44 Ollie's partner
45 Quartz, e.g.
46 Yodeler's
answer
47 Slip sideways
50 Notre Dame
sight


2011 UFS, Dist. by Univ. Uclick for UFS


Warlt more puzzles?
Check out the "Just Right Crossword Puzzles" books
at QuillDriverBooks.com


Page Editor: Brandon Finley, 754-0420


I


LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS SUNDAY AUGUST 28. 2011














Crystal ball gazing: BCS projections


By RALPH D. RUSSO
Associated Press

The Big Ten and the Pac-
12 now have conference
title games. The Big 12,
for the first time, will not
play a league championship
game.
Advantage, Oklahoma.
Aside from a loaded ros-
ter, the top-ranked Sooners
seem to have a schedule
with just enough challenges
to get them to New Orleans
for this season's BCS cham-
pionship, but not so many
as to prevent them from
getting there.
The toughest road game
comes early against No.
6 Florida State, and even
with a competitive loss, the
Sooners should stay in the
title hunt
The- next treacherous
road game comes Dec. 3 at
Oklahoma State. In the past
that would be the day of the
Big 12 title game. Now with
one less hurdle to clear,
Oklahoma is less likely to
stumble, unlike Big Ten
heavyweights. Wisconsin
and Nebraska and Pac-
12 favorites Oregon and
Stanford:
The Southeastern
Conference still has its
championship game, but
with the SEC having won
five straight national cham-
pionships, its big game
in Atlanta has practically


S-* ASSOCIATED PRESS
This Oct. 23, 2010, file photo shows Oklahoma Sooners quarterback Landry Jones dropping back to pass during the.second
quarter of an NCAA college football game against Missouri, in Columbia, Mo. Jones has come full circle. After being
overwhelmed as an emergency replacement for former Heisman Trophy winner Sam Bradford two years ago, now Jones is
the one on the cover of preseason magazines and getting hype as a potential Heisman contender as the quarterback for


top-ranked Oklahoma.

become a play-in contest
for the BCS title game.
BCS projections:,
Sugar Bowl: Georgia vs.
Virginia Tech. Behind ris-


ing star and Heisman con-
tender Aaron, Murray, the
Bulldogs are the surprise
SEC runners-up. An ACC
team receiving an at-large


BCS might seem' strange,
but check out the Hokies'
schedule and try to find two
games they'll lose.
Orange Bowl: Florida


State vs. West Virginia.
Only a.loss to .Oklahoma
keeps the Seminoles out of
the national title game. The
.Mountaineers win the 13ig


East as Dana Holgorsen
replaces Chip Kelly as
this season's offensive
genius.
Rose Bowl: Wisconsin
vs. Oregon. Speaking of
Kelly and the Ducks, they
win a third straight Pac-
10/12 title, aided by not
having to face USC in the
conference title game.
Elusive QB Russell Wilson
helps the Badgers make
it two straight trips to the
Rose Bowl.
Fiesta Bowl: Notre
Dame vs. Boise State. If
the Fighting Irish are eli-
gible for the BCS it'll
take at least nine victo-
ries they'll be picked.
Kellen Moore and the
Broncos start the sea-
son with a victory against
Georgia and close it with
the program's third trip to
the BCS.
BCS championship:
Alabama vs. Oklahoma.
When Alabama reached the
national title game in 2009,
it was with a first-year start-'
ing quarterback, a fero-
cious defense and an All-
American tailback. Same
deal this time. Oklahoma
runs the table and reaches
the championship game for
the fifth time.
And the national cham-
pion is ... make it six in a
row for the SEC and anoth-
er title for Nick Saban's
Crimson Tide.


NFL says it's serious


about illegal hits


By BARRY WILNER
Associated Press

NEW YORK Players
ranted about the NFL's
crackdown on illegal hits
last season. Some even
questioned if the league
was heading toward touch
football.
Most vocal were defen-
sive players wvho won-
dered if everything they'd
learned about tackling
was being negated by the
emphasis on player safety.
One thing they should
remember about 2010 is
that nobody was suspend-
ed for a flagrant foul. They
can't count on such leni-
ency this year.
"Player safety is a prior-
ity and we will not relent
on it," says NFL executive
vice president for football
operations Ray Anderson,
the league's chief discipli-
narian. "Let me make it
very clear, particularly in
regard to repeat offenders,
that egregious acts will be
subject to suspension. We
will not feel the need to
hesitate in this regard."


Last October, after anf
especially gruesome week-
end in which Pittsburgh
linebackerJames Harrison,
New England safety
Brandon Meriweather and
Atlanta cornerback Dunta
Robinson -were fified a
total of $175,000 (subse-
quently reduced) for illegal
hits, the NFL threatened
suspensions. While the
number of fines and their
amounts were increased
throughout the rest of the
2010 season, no suspen-
sions were meted out
"Last year, particularly
after we announced we'd
be enforcing existing rules
more vigorously in regard
to these hits," Anderson
says, "there was a hesi-
tation, frankly, even in
cases of repeat offenders.
Suspensions were permis-
Ssible, but there was not
emphatic advance notice ...
so we determined to hold
back on suspensions.
'That hurdle 'has been
eliminated."
Each case will be
examined separately, and
Anderson makes it clear


a first-time offender or
* even someone who had a
previous offense two years
ago "and has been clean
since" will get different
consideration than. some-
one who has been fined
frequently for illegal hits.
Unless, of course, that
first-time offense is so fla-
grant that it warrants the
strongest punishment.
;1 Anderson, assistant
Merton Hanks, the for-
mer 49ers safety, and their
staff go over every play.
following each weekend.
Director of officiating Carl
Johnson and his staff also
are consulted. When it's
determined that a fine or
suspension is necessary,
Anderson says the player
and team will be notified as
quickly as possible..
The player can appeal
to former NFL coaches
Art Shell and Ted Cottrell,
who are paid by the league
and the NFL Players
Association to handle those
cases. Their appeal must
be heard by the second
Tuesday following notifica-
tion of the discipline.


UCLAs Cantlay to face

Kraft in US Amateur final


By CHRIS JENKINS
Associated Press

I ERIN, Wis. Patrick
Cantaly's impressive sum-
mer just keeps getting bet-
ter.
The UCLA star will face
Kelly Kraft for the U.S.
Amateur championship
after both players won
their semifinal matches at
Erin Hills on Saturday.
A win in Sunday's final
would be another big step
for Cantlay, a player who
many are pointing to as a
future star in the profes-
sional ranks especially
after proving he belonged
in an appearance at the
U.S. Open.
"Ifs been very special,"
Cantlay said. "Probably
the most fun I've ever had
in my life."
Cantlay, the world's No.
1-ranked amateur, beat
Jordan Russell 4 and 3 on
Saturday. Kraft, of Denton,
Texas, beat England's Jack
Senior 3 and 2 in the other
semifinal.


Kraft, 22, has played out
his eligibility at SMU but
still has a year of school
left. He'll have a tough test
in the final against a.player
with Cantlay's credentials,
but says he's up for the
challenge.
"We're both playing the
same golf course tomor-
row, and we've both made
it this far, so we're both
playing pretty good," Kraft
said. "I like my chances
out there tomorrow."
After stroke play to set
the field. earlier in the
week, the remainder of the
tournament is conducted
in a match play format.
Cantlay and Kraft will play
36 holes in Sunday's final,
with the first 18-hole round
beginning at 8:30 a.m.
Cantlay, 19, is going into
his sophomore season at
UCLA. He was the low
amateur at the U.S. Open,
'tying for 21st place. He
also tied for 24th at the
Travelers Championship in
June, shooting a 10-under
60 in the second round.


Cantlay currently sits
atop the world amateur
rankings maintained by
golf's R&A governing
body.
The second, third and
fourth-ranked players,
Americans Jordan Spieth,
Peter Uihlein and Patrick
Rodgers, all were defeated
in Friday's quarterfinals.
Uihlein was the defending
U.S. Amateur champion.
Uihlein beat Cantlay in
the semifinals of the 2010
U.S. Amateur.
"I didn't feel nearly as
nervous as I did in the
semifinal this year as I did
last year, so I think that
has something to do with
the all the tournaments
I've played," Cantlay said.
Cantlay's match with
Russell was all square
after six holes, but Cantlay
birdied the 617-yard, par-
5 seventh hole to go 1-
up in the match. Cantlay
bogeyed the next hole
but still added to his lead
as Russell took a double
bogey.


,r' ASSOCIATED PRESS
This Aug. 10 file photo shows Serena Williams watching her return to Julia Goerges, of
Germany, at the Rogers Cup women's tennis tournament,.in Toronto. Nearly a full year off,
after all sorts of health scares, Williams is right back at the top of her game.,


Serena Williams


eyes 14th major title


By HOWARD FENDRICH
Associated Press ,

NEW YORK -
Remember when Serena
Williams was chastised for
not taking tennis seriously
enough?
For picking and choos-
ing where to play and when
to expend full effort? For
not devoting herself fully
to the sport and instead
taking time to dabble in act-
ing, fashion design or other
interests?
Well, maybe she knew
exactly what she was doing
all along, because it cer-
tainly appears as though it's
all worked out pretty well
on the court. After nearly
a full year off thanks to
a series of health scares,
Williams is right back at the
top of her game and at
the top of the sport and
she can prove that at the
U.S. Open.
The season's last Grand
Slam tournament is sched-
uled to start Monday, so
long as Hurricane Irene
doesn't get in the way.
"I'm just here to play one
match, and the next match,
and hopefully I can get to
seven wins," Williams said,
referring to the number of
victories required to win a
Grand Slam title. "That's
what I'm here for."
She leads all active
women with 13 major sin-
gles titles, the sixth-highest
total in history, and won the
U.S. Open in 1999, 2002 and


2008. -
But the 29-year-old
American missed last year's
tournament at Flushing
Meadows, part of a lengthy
absence from the tour after
two foot operations from
getting cut by glass at a res-
taurant in July 2010, then
clots in her lungs, and then
a gathering of blood under
the skin of her stomach.
Since returning to action
in June at a grass-court
tuneup for Wimbledon,
she has gone 16-2, making
her the woman to watch in
New York, along with Maria
Sharapova (whose three
major titles include the 2006
U.S. Open). Most of the
attention in the men's field.
is, as usual, on the top trio
of Novak Djokovic, Rafael
Nadal and Roger Federer,
who have combined to win
25 of the past 26 Grand
Slam championships.
New No. 1 Djokovic is
having one of the greatest
tennis seasons in history:
57-2 with nine titles, includ-
ing at Wimbledon and the
Australian Open.
Showing off a renewed
dedication to fitness and
those same old stinging
serves the most dan-
gerous in women's tennis
- and powerful ground-
strokes, Williams won tour-
naments at Stanford and
Toronto this month on hard
courts, the surface used in
New York. They were her
first consecutive titles since
2008.


"She committed herself.
She practiced. She's won
two tournaments. That's
unbelievable. It's incred-
ible," 18-time major cham-
pion Chris Evert said. "Not
to undermine the rest of the
field, but it just shows that
she's head and shoulders
above anybody elsp, again,
when she's healthy." -
Evert was among those
who wondered aloud in the
past about Williams' dedi-
cation to tennis, writing an
open letter to her in Tennis
Magazine. That was in early
2006, when Williams was in
the midst of a stretch dur-
ing which she entered only
seven of 12 Grand Slam
tournaments, winning one.
"I've been thinking about
your career, and something
is troubling me," Evert
began.
"In the short term you
may be happy with the
various things going on
in your life, but I wonder
whether 20 years from now
you might reflect on your
career and regret not put-
ting 100 percent of yourself
into tennis. Because wheth-
er you want to admit it or
not, these distractions are
tarnishing your legacy," the
letter continued.
Since the start of the
2007 season, Williams has
won six of her major cham-
pionships, while continuing-
to pursue outside interests
and grow her status as a
celebrity who transcenls
her sport.


LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS SUNDAY AUGUST 28. 2011


Page Editor: Brandon Finley, 754-0420







LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS SUNDAY, AUGUST 28, 2011


JEN CHASTEEN/Special to the Reporter
Columbia High Senior Justin Tompkins competes in the Boys
100 Breaststroke during the Purple and Gold Alumni Meet at
the Columbia County Aquadic Complex on Saturday. CHS
alumni swimmers participated in the meet to promote the
upcoming swim season.


. . ..


-,,. --j-, . -.
,::,--.^ .. .'. .,;- ..^ ;
".. :. :, --: -' ._. ... .
*- ..- "-. ., ,,.i;. .. "" -' -*' .'
.' .' .. .- .-: ' 2 ^ ^ < ": .'." .' ;_ -,. .. ,, .-* ..
. -;. I .


JEN CHASTEEN/Special to the Reportel
Columbia High Senior David Morse sticks out his tongue during the Boys 100 Butterfly during the Purple and Gold Alumni
Meet at the Columbia County Aquadic Complex on Saturday.


Photos by JASON MATTHEW WALKERLaKe City Reporter
ABOVE: Columbia High's Austin Reiter (52) attempts to tackle Santa Fe High's Tray Presley
(6) while Javere Smith trails on the play.
BELOW: Columbia High's Hayden Lunde kicks the first PAT of the game.


^^^^*^-- -- ---------- HUiBI im Ui^^
I


SIncludes lenses & frames.
SSome Restrictions Apply.
COUPON REQUIRED EXPIRES AUGUST 31. 2011








22yl oCne comle aII of gli t mi
a Includes- Lenses & Frames ,
oSome Restrictions Apply.
COUPONREQUIRED EXPIRESAUGUST,31, 2011
Vera m m m Brad l m m m m m m

Like us on regular price & receive a




COUPON REQUIRED EXPIRES AUGuST 31 2011
Iir i i i i n i n m km m m i m i


S' BRANbON FINLEY/Lake City Reporter
Fort White High's Trey Phillips goes up for a touchdown reception during the kickoff classic.
UNow


Move this to the top of your list:


--FREE--

SKIN CANCER


SCREENING
Saturday. July 30th 9 a.m. Noon
Pre-registration is encouraged by calling 888.681.6388

Provided by:
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CANCER CENTER
OF NORTH FLORIDA
GAINESVILLE LAKE CITY
4520 W US Highway 90 Lake City 3m86.755.0601
More details at www.cccnf.com
Partners in the project:
Dr. J. Anthony Trott CMSMG Dermatology


I


Page Editor: Brandon Finley, 754-0420










Lake City Reporter


Story ideas?

Robert Bridges
Editor
754-0428
_':'. .; ,,' '- "- '


BUSINESS


Sunday, August 28, 2011


www.lakecityreporter.com


Section C


Businesses make back-to-school special


By TONY BRITT
tbritt@lakecityreporter. corn

The 2010-11 school year
began earlier this week for
Columbia County students.
To mark the first day of
school for local kindergart-
ners, the school district
partnered with area busi-
nesses to give students a
keepsake to make the event
a memorable occasion.
All local kindergartners
were given school bags as
a result of the partnership.
Dorothy Spradley,
Columbia School District
volunteer education mar-
keting coordinator, said the
business partners under-
write the cost of the bags.
"A lot of them have been
on board since the begin-
ning," she said, noting the
program is 11 years old.
"We do this each year to
welcome the kindergart-
ners and give them a little
'warm fuzzy' to hang on to
each year when they arrive
at school."
For the 2010-1.1 school
year, the program provided
900 bags to local kinder-
gartners. The bags were
distributed to .the students
during their first or second
day at school.
"Every kindergartner
in the district gets a bag
'filled with an activity book,
crayons, and pencils that
are from local businesses,"
Spradley said. "The bags
are the same all over the
county, so if a student hap-
pens to transfer from one
school to another during
the year, their kindergar-
ten bag is just like the oth-


Local business sponsors and students show off the 2010-11 kindergarten school bags. Pictured are (front row, from left) Brett Purvis, Savannah Charles,,
Travis Mullins, Nikki Knowles, (back row, from left) Kyle Keen, Kiwanis Club of Lake City; John Kasak, State Farm Insurance; Charlene Brown, Columbia
Bank; Rob Summerall and Donna Ellerkamp, Teeko Graphics; Celia Martin, Martin Orthodontics; Robyn Taylor, KC's Produce; Laurie Schmidt, Lake City
Dance Arts and Michael Allen, Five Points Elementary School principal. Other contributing businesses were Security Safe Company, Phish Heads and Green
Acres Learning Center, who were not able to send a representative to the event photo session.


ers' bag when they get to
the new school."
The kindergarten bags
are cloth bags made of a
burlap-type material and
carry graphics printed by
Teeko Graphics. Ten local
businesses participated in
this year's program.


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,this project in giving these
bags to kindergartners," he
said.
The bags contain a
graphic where the students
can add their names and


on the back contains a list-
ing of the local business
partners who participated
in this year's program.
The bags contain an
activity book and pencil


given by John Kasak, local
State Farm insurance agent
and pencils from Columbia
Bank and the local branch

BAGS continued on 3C


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LAKE CITY REPORTER BUSINESS SUNDAY, AUGUST 28, 2011


Run Rate Measures The Motley Foo
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Romney sticks with strategy despite Perry's surge


By CHARLES BABINGTON
Associated Press

DOVER, N.H. (AP) Despite a new
rival's surge, Mitt Romney is campaigning
as though he's still the GOP presidential
front-runner, focusing his criticisms on
President Barack Obama, taking few risks-
and keeping most proposals vague enough
to leave ample maneuvering room.
That may change soon, however,, as
events shift the contest to a higher gear.
September will bring several GOP debates
that will include Texas Gov. Rick Perry for
the first time, as well as renewed attention
to the question of how to create desper-
ately needed jobs.
.The -former Massachusetts governor
may be pushed out of his comfort zone
even sooner,if Perry's fast rise seems real
and lasting.
For months, Romney has largely float-
ed above the sparring. He let Michele
Bachmann knock hef fellow Minnesotan
Tim Pawlenty out of the race in Iowa,
for instance, and refused to be drawn
into tit-for-tat exchanges over policy
details. Perry, the suddefi favorite among
Republicans according to a Gallup poll,
may force Romney to turn his focus away
from Obama and sharpen his differences
with fellow Republicans.
This week, however, Romney stuck to
an easygoing, business-as-usual air as he
campaigned in New Hampshire, which
will hold the first primary in about five
months. He took a cautious stand on
climate change, downplayed GOP differ-
ences on jobs policies, and shrugged off
suggestions that Perry may have over-
taken him.
"If you're running for president, your
focus should be on the person who is
president and his failures, and how you're
going to make America better," Romney
told reporters in Claremont
About the only thing he changed this
week, he said with a laugh, was his shirt
He cut short a question about the Gallup
poll. There are many polls, Romney said,
although he conceded, "Rick is a very
effective candidate."
Romney still enjoys a big lead in fund-
raising and organization over Perry and
the others. For now, he seems eager to
blunt rather than highlight his differences
with them, a classic front-runner's strat-
egy.
At a packed forum in Keene on
Wednesday, Romney noted that he and all
the other contenders have vowed to reject
a deficit-reduction package if it contains


even $1 in new tax revenues for every
$10 in spending cuts. Obama called that
pledge,irresponsible pandering.
"We all have said taxes are off the table,"
Romney said. He later told reporters they
should not be surprised if his job propos-
als hardly differ from his rivals', because
Republicans share many values on that
issue.
Romney repeatedly called for a bal-
anced federal budget, but like many
other politicians he offered few details on
how to achieve it He embraced House
Republicans' demands for unspecified cuts
in discretionary domestic spending..
When a man in Keehe asked what sac-
rifices Americans should make, Romney
offered a largely pain-free roster.
Americans should "work hard" and cre-
ate new businesses, he said, but they need
not "give more money to government"
Young people should study harder and
"demand more from teachers," he said,
and learn that esteem comes from "living
with integrity and getting married before
they have kids."
"The sacrifice I look for is for Americans
to reach for excellence and greatness,"
Romney said to applause.
Romney often asked voters to trust him
to make good decisions as president, with
details to come as events unfold.
"I'll find the right approach" to ending
sanctuary cities if legally possible, he
said. Sanctuary cities take a hands-off
approach to pursuing illegal immigrants,
and Romney said he opposed them as
governor.
On Thursday in Exeter, Romney said he
would look "at the widest array of options"
to shore up the long-term fiscal health of
Medicare and Social Security. At other
stops he said the retirement age for eligi-
bility possibly could be raised over time.
Asked what he would do as president
if he had a GOP-controlled Congress,
Romney immediately veered to unrelated
praise of right-to-work states, which ban
mandatory union participation.
He took a noncommittal stand on cli-
mate change at a forum Thursday in
Dover. Humans probably contribute to
global warming, he said, but "I don't know
by how much."
"Could be a little, could be a lot," Romney
said. He noted he's not a scientist and said
he didn't want to spend trillions of dollars
on carbon-reduction programs for some-
thing not fully understood.
Some voters asked Romney about health
care, reminding him of his successful push
for mandatory health insurance cover-


AP Photo
Republican presidential candidate, former Massachusetts Gov. Mitt Romney speaks during a
town hall. meeting at the cities Recreation Center in Keene, N.H., Wednesday, Aug. 24, 2011.


age in Massachusetts. At every stop he
said he would overturn "Obamacare," a
sure-fire applause line. But he skated over
similarities between the president's health
delivery overhaul and his own push in.
Massachusetts several years ago.
Romney said the state law was needed
because some people 'took advantage of a
system that let them get free treatment in
emergency rooms without buying insur-
ance. That's also an argument Obama
made for requiring health coverage nation-
wide.
The Massachusetts law isn't perfect,
Romney said, and voters can over-
turn it by referendum if they like. The
Obama-backed law, he said, reaches far
more deeply into health affairs for all
Americans, and would reduce Medicare
spending.
In Dover, Romney said he hopes
Obama or the State Department warned
Libyan leader Moammar Gadhafi months
ago that the United States would "come
after you in a major way" if Gadhafi
attacked his own people. Last month,
Romney criticized Obama for saying


Gadhafi should be removed from power.
Romney told reporters Thursday that
the U.S. could have attacked the Libyan
dictator "in a major way" without neces-
sarily removing him from power.
Many New Hampshire voters
seemed satisfied with his proposals and
answers.
"I thought he did a fantastic job,"
said Greg Ford, 35, an orthopedic sur-
gery resident who attended a forum in
Lebanon. Romney offers practical solu-
tions to health and financial issues, Ford
said, adding, "I'm a 100 percent sup-
porter of eliminating Obamacare."
The. crowds were almost always
friendly, although Romney grew testy
when a woman in Lebanon pressed him
to acknowledge that many Americans
depend on government programs
Republicans want to cut. In four events
in two days, the only question he got
about his plans to greatly expand his
Southern California house came from
a reporter. Romney, a multimillionaire,
said he wants room for his 16 grandchil-
dren.


Josh Blackmon, 754-0428















Bernanke to Congress: Do more


By MARTIN CRUTSINGER
and PAUL WISEMAN
AP Economics Writers

JACKSON HOLE,
Wyo. Federal Reserve
Chairman Ben Bernanke
hit i m .t-tw fir Con'ri_-
Do more to stimulate hir-
ing and growth or risk
delaying the economy's
return to full health.
Bernanke held out the
prospect Friday that the
Fed may take further steps
later to help the economy.
But he offered no new
plans for now.
At a time when Congress
has focused on shrinkihg
budget deficits, Bernanke
agreed that doing so is
important for the long
term. But he warned law-
makers not to "disregard
the fragility of the current
economic recovery."
Investors had hoped
Bernanke would use his
much-anticipated speech
at an economic conference
in Jackson Hole to unveil
some aggressive measure
to jolt the economy.
He didn't. But he did say
the Fed's September policy
meeting will be extended
to two days, instead of the
scheduled one, to permit
a "fuller discussion" of the
central bank's options.
"He appears to be saying
that the Fed has largely
played its part and that
the politicians need to step


up their game," said Paul
Dales, senior U.S. econo-
mist at Capital Economics.
Investors seemed to take
comfort from Bernanke's
view that the job market
and the economy will
return to full health in the
long run and the notion
that the Fed might provide
more help in the future.
After -initial losses, the
Dow Jones industrial aver-
age closed up 134 points.
Broader stock indexes also
gained.
Bernanke's speech
came shortly after the
government said the
economy grew at a scant
1 percent annual rate in
the April-June quarter
- even slower than previ-
ously estimated.
The economy is still
hobbled by a depressed
housing market, high oil
prices and fears that the
European debt crisis will
deteriorate into a repeat
of the 2008 financial crisis.
The Dow has lost about 11
percent of its value since
late July on fears that the
economy might slip back
into recession.
On Friday, Bernanke
blamed this summer's polit-
ical squabbling over raising
the federal debt limit for
undermining constimer
and business confidence.
And he warned that further
gridlock in Washington
would "pose ongoing risks


to growth."
The Fed chief'noted that
the depressed hous-inc sec-
tor has delayed a full recov-
ery in the broader economy.
He said the home market
should gradually return to
health a process he said
the government should
support.
In his speech in Jackson
Hole a year ago, Bernanke
signaled that the Fed
would begin a new round of
Treasury bond purchases
to try to lower long-term
interest rates, spur spend-
ing and boost the stock
market His words ignited
a 28 percent, eight-month
rally in the Dow.
This time, Bernanke
merely repeated that the
Fed "has a range. of tools
that could be used to pro-
vide additional monetary
stimulus."
The most powerful weap-
on. the Fed has left would
be a third round of bond
purchases. Critics, from
congressional Republicans
to some Fed officials, have
raised concerns that the
Fed's Treasury purchases
could ignite inflation and
speculative buying on Wall
Street, while doing little to
aid the economy.
Bernanke pushed back
against that notion in his
speech. He said that with
oil and other commodity
prices easing, he expects
long-term inflation to


BAGS: Back-to-school

Continued From Page 1C


of Florida Farm Bureau provided a box of
crayons.
"If the businesses didn't support this
program and purchase those bags for us,
we wouldn't have those bags for the kin-
dergarthers. There's no way with the cut-
backs we've had," Spradley said. "It's not
something that .,the kindergartners have
to have, but it's an appropriate size bag for
them and the things they take home. The


remain low well into 2012.
Others have questioned
whether any further lower-
ing of long-term rates is
needed. Investors seeking
the safety of U.S. debt have
forced down the yield on
the 10-year Treasury note
to 2.19 percent a full
point lower than it was
when the Fed completed
its Treasury purchases
about two months ago. Yet
the economy is still sput-
tering.
The Fed also could
take more modest steps.
It could eliminate interest
payments on money that
banks keep on deposit at
the Fed, encouraging them
to make loans instead. Or it
could reshuffle its portfolio
of investments, replacing
shorter-term bonds with
longer-term ones to help


push down long-term inter-
est rates.
Aneta Markowska,
senior U.S. economist at
Societe Generale, said
the extension of the Fed's
September meeting to two
days suggests the possibil-
ity that it could unveil a
new program soon.
Roberto Perli, a former
Fed official who is a manag-
ing director at International
Strategy & Investment,
said Bernanke and other
Fed policymakers are wait-
ing to see if the economy
improves in the current
July-September quarter.
John Silvia, chief econo-
mist at Wells Fargo, sug-
gested that Bernanke
would have to overcome
opposition within the Fed
to take any further bold
steps to lift the economy.


Earlier this month, three
of the 10 members on the
Fed's policy committee
voted against Bernanke's
plan to keep short-term
rates near zero through
mid-2013.
Because of that rare level
of dissent, Silvia doubts that
Bernanke could muster
support for a third round of
Treasury purchases.
"When you're dealing
with three dissents," he
said, "it's hard to have an
aggressive policy."
Many economists note,
however, that the econo-
my's main problem is not
that interest rates are too
high. They say the main
problem is that consum-
er spending remains too
weak. So businesses feel
little incentive to hire,
expand and invest.


YrI If Iu ingS.v

' :: Chairman .Gordon P. Summers announces the retirement of director Ge#ev
Nelson from the Board of Directors of Columbia Bank. Mrs. Nelson joined.'tihe",.. Y
Board in 1979 and served as a member of the board's Audit Committee.
"For more than three decades, we've been privileged to have Genevieve Nelson
as a director of the bank. She has provided valuable insight and contribution;
and, I'm extremely grateful for the leadership she has brought to the bank over
the sears," said Chairman Summers.
Gene\ieve Nelson is the daughter of previous Columbia Bank (f.k.a. Columbia
County Banki President Samuel D. Summers. She is known for her involvement in
commurunty cnic and charitable organizations, and she is currently a member of the
Lake City Women's Club and the First United Methodist
.- .-. ..'. Church.


A


bags are appropriate, lightweight and we
would not be able to have one for every
kindergartner in the county if it were not
for our business partners. The business
partners are most important for us in these
economic times to help and support us
and we have a phenomenal business com-
munity that promotes student education in
Columbia County."


At its most recent Board meeting, the Board of
Directors of Columbia Bank appointed Mrs. Nelson
as Director Emeritus. It is with highest regard and
sm~centy that Columbia Bank directors, manage-
ment, and staff express appreciation for a lifetime
of service to our community and our bank.


Columbia Bank
,",912 -
', Nm12- 2mL n
gg g


LAKE CITY REPORTER BUSINESS SUNDAY. AUGUST 28. 2011


Page Editor: Robert Bridges, 754-0428














LAKE CITY REPORTER BUSINESS SUNDAY, AUGUST 28, 2011


Page Editor: Robert Bridges, 754-0428


THE WEEK IN REVIEW THE WEEK IN REVIEW THE WEEK IN REVIEW -THE WEEK IN REVIEW THE WEEK IN REVIEW


... eekn.Review.


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DrSCBrrs 47.59-10.31 -17.8
PrtJPSM40026.60 -5.72 -17.7
PrUPShR2K23.50 -5.06 -17.7
DrxTcBear 24.17 -5.12 -17.5
TmsRty 2.58 -.51 -16.5
DrxMatBear46.75 -9.04 -16.2

Most Active (si or more)
Name Vol(OO) Last Chg
BkofAm 27425404 7.76 +.79
S&P500ETF13139166117.97 +5.33
SPDRFncli348224 12.77 +.64
DrxFnBull 3726027 13.74+1.73
iShR2K 3483967 69.11 +3.83
GenElec 3325204 15.54 +.45
Ciqrprs 3245716 29.84+3.07
SpnntNex 3165360 3.25 -.17
iShEMlIs 2910174 40.52 +.84
FordM 2851675 10.46 +.41

Diary
Advanced 2,544
Declined 635
New Highs 47
NewLows 343
Total issues 3,215
Unchanged 36
Volume 23,786,136,579


I Amex
2,232.83 -+30.70


Gainers ($2 or more)
Name Last Chg %Chg
Banro wt 2.54 74 +40.9
Neoprobe 3.10 .60 +24.0
B&IHO 5.50 +1.01 +22.6
EngySvcs 2.23 +.39 +212
Crexendo 4.99 +.84 +20.2
Banrog 4.78 +.80 +20.1
PhrmAth 2.53 .37 +17.1
Innsuites 2.04 +.29 +16.6
VmnetX 21.84 +2.91 +15.4
Taseko 3,86 +.50 +14.9

Losers ($2 or more)
Name Last Chg %Chg
HallwdGp 12.52 -2.23 -15.1
HaderaPap 47.00 -7.28 -13.4
GoldResrc 22.00 -2.99 -12.0
Geokinetics 3.63 -.37 -9.3
FieldPnt 2.39 -.23 -8.8
ContMalds 14.39 -1.30 -8.3
Sifco 17.31 -1.40 -7.5
Medgenicn 3.77 -.28 -6.9
MagHR pfD 42.20 -2.79 -6.2
GastarpfA 19.04 -1.14 -5.6

Most Active ($1 or more)
Name Vol (00) Last Chg
NwGoldg 279168 13.46+1.01
GoldStrg 199850 2.39 +.19
CFCdag 168971 24.98 -.84
GrtBasGg 152864 .2.09 +.07
NovaGIdg 142113 9.94 +.38
CheniereEn129429 7.40 +.29
NthgtMg 125831 3.15 -.02
NAPallg 109698 3.75 +.06
Taseko 95358 3.86 +.50
VimetX 91531 21.84+2.91

Diary
Advanced 329
Declined 199
New Highs 8
NewLows 46
Total issues 544
Unchanged 16
Volume 440,760,943


A Nasdaq
2,479.85 +138.01


Gainers ($2 or more)
Name Last Chg %Chg
UniOisp 51.71+23.79 +85.2
Verenium 3.12 +1.08 +52.9
Porteecp 4.47 +1.47 +49.0
AfpioPhm 7.20 +2.22 +44.0
8x8 Inc 4.25 +1.11 +35.4
ATPO&G 13.87 +3.58 +34.8
PnrmoWtn 5.19 +1.31 +33.8
ChinaNRes 11.69 +2.81 +31.6
Fossil Inc 95.31 +22.38 +30.7
TudouH n 25.10 +5.86 -30.5

Losers ($2 or more)
Name Last Chg %Chg
USA Trk 7.55 -3.43 -31.2
Skystario 2.22 -.95 -30.0
OmniVisn 17.27 -6.56 -27.5
AtICstFn 2.77 -.87 -23.9
SinoGIobal 2.76 -.70 -20.3
THTHeatT 2.10 -.49 -18.9
AdoloCp 2.09 -.47. -18.4
GLGLfTg 3.90 -.88-18.4
Exceed un 3.29 -.71 -17.8
UldTrherap 40.07 -8.70 -17.8

Most Active ($1 or more)
Name Vol(00) Last Chg
SiriusXM 5760689 1.70 -.07
PwShs QQQ402802253.13+3.10
Cisco 2882557 15.32 +.24
Microsoft 2757721 25.25+1.20
Intel 2599092 19.77 +.58
MicronT 2119088 5.66 +.41
Oracle 1779172 26.65+1.87
NewsCpA 1435543 16.87+1.31
Dell Inc 1382491 14.69 +.69
Yahoo 1137963 12.74 -.18

Diary


Advanced
Declined
New Highs
New Lows
Total issues
Unchanged
Volume


2,768
53
9,755,229,797


Wiy Wk YTD
Name Ex Div Last Chg%Chg %Chg
AT&TInc NY 1.72 29.04 +1.05 +3.8 -1.2
AutoZone NY ... 301.30 +9.88 +3.4 +10.5
BkofAm NY .04 7.76 +.79 +11.3 -41.8
BariPVixrsNY ... 41.07 -1.48 -3.5 +9.2
BobEvans Nasd 1.00 31.25 +2.41 +8.4 -52
CNBFnPA Nasd .66 13.58 +1.37 +11.2 -8.3
CSX s NY .48 21.45 +1.05 +5.1 -.4
Chevron NY 3.12 96.85 +3.56 +3.8 +6.1
Cisco Nasd .4 15.32 +.24 +1.6 -24.3
Citigrprs NY .04 29.84 +3.07+11.5 -36.9
CocaCola NY 1.88 68.50 +1.40 +2.1 +4.2
Delhaize NY 2.45 65.90 +20 +0.3 -10.6
Del Inc Nasd ... 14.69 +.69 +4.9 +8.4
DrxFnBull NY ... 13.74 +1.73 +14.4 -50.7
DirxSCBullNY ... 42.47 +.23 +172 -41.4
ExxonMbI NY 1.88 72.64 +2.84 +4.1 -.7
FamilyOIr NY .72 47.55 -1.06 -22 -4.3
FordM NY ... 10.40 +.41 +4.1 -38.1
GenElec NY .60 15.54 +.45 +3.0 -15.0
HewlettP NY .48 24.82 +1.22 +5.2 -41.0
HomeDp NY 1.00 34.00 +2.12 +6.6 -3.0
iShSitver NY ... 40.41 -1.27 -3.0 +33.9
iShEMkts NY .84 40.52 +.84 +2.1 -14.9
iShR2K NY .94 69.11 +3.83 +5.9 -11.7
Intel Nasd .84 19.77 +.58 +3.0 -6.0
JPMorgCh NY 1.0d 38.21 +1.86- +5.4 -14.6
Lowes NY .56 20.24 +.93 +4.8 -19.3
MGMRstsNY ... 10.28 +.8 +8.2 -30.8


Name Ex Div


Wdty w YTD
Last Cha %Chg %Chg


McOnlds NY 2.44 89.93 +2.70 .+3.1 +172
MiaconT Nasd ... 5.66 +.41 +7.8 -29.4
Miaosoft Nasd .64 2525 +1.20 +5.0 -9.5
MorgStan NY 20 16.61 +.61 +3.8 -39.0
NY Tirnes NY 7.31 +.68 +10.3 -25.4
NewspA Nasld .19 16.87 +1.31 +8.4 +15.9
NextEraEnNY 2.20 55.41 +1.67 +3 -.1 +6.6
NotyH Nasd ... 7.16 40 + 5.9 -11.7
OcdPet NY 1.84 82.09 +1.18 +1.5-16.3
Oracle Nasd 24 26.65 +1.87 +7.5 -14.9
Penney NY .80 26.69 +2.31 +9.5 -17.4
PepsiCo NY 2.06 3.16 +1.09 +1.8 -3.3
Pfizer NY .80 18.21 +.54 +3.1 +4.0
Potash s NY 28 57.02 +6.37+12.6 +10.5
PShsQQQONasd .42 53.13 +3.10 +62 -2.4
PrUJShS&PNY ... 24.28.-2.46 -92 +2.2
ProUltSP NY. .35 41.28 +3.55 +9.4 -14.1
Ryder NY 1.16 44.38 +3.52 +8.6 -15.7
SpdrGold NY ... 177.47 -2.48 -1.4 +27.9
S&P500E'FNY 2.44 117.97 +5.33 +4.7 -62
Searl.dgsNasd ... 55.57 +3.12 +5.9 -24.5
SirdusXM Nasld ... 1.70 -.07 -4.0 +4.3
SouthnCo NY 1.89 40.83 +.86 +2.2 +6.8
SprintNex NY ... 3.25 -.17 -5.0 -23.2
SPDRFndNY .18 12.77 +.64 +5.3 -19.9
TimeWam NY .94 29.92 +2.02 +7.2 -7.0
WalMart NY 1.46 52.90 +.60 +1.1 -1.9
WellsFargo NY .48 24.59 +1.23 +5.3 -20.7


Stock Footnots:g = Divderds and eamings hi Cnaian dollars. h = Does not meet continued-listing standards.
If = Late fiingwith SEC.n=New in past 52 weeks.pf= Preferred. rs=Stock hasundergone a reve stocksplit
of at least 50 percent win the past year. rt= Righ to buy security at a specifid price. s= Stock has spit by at
least 20 percent within the last year. un= UnitLs. vj= In bankruptcy or receivershipW. wd= When distributed. wl=
When issued wt=Warrants.
IMutuat Fund Foolenols: b= Fee covering market costs is paid frm fund assets. d = Deferred sales charge, or
redenptien fee. f = front toad (sates charges). m = Mulste fees are charged. NA=not sarlable, p = previous day's
net asset vatue, a =lund spt shares during the week. x = fund paid a ditribution during the week.Galnen and
Loser mustbe worth at least $2 to be listed in tables at left. Most Actives must be worth at least $t. Volume in
hundeds of shares. Soce The Associated Pries. Sles aigures ar unofficial.


Money RatesI
Last Pvs Week


Prime Rate
Discount Ra
Federal Fun
Treasuries
3-month
6-month
5-vear


3.25 3.25
0.75 0.75
Rate .00-25 .00-25

0.005 0.01
0.02 0.03
0.94 0.89


10-year 2.19 2.06
30-year 3.54 3.39


Weekly Stock Exchange Highlights


New York Stock Exchange


Wy YTD Wkly
Name Div YId PE Chg %Chg Last


AES Corp ...
AFLAC 1.20 3.4
AK Steel .20 2.3
AMR
AT&T Inc 1.72 5.9
AbtLab 1.92 3.8
Accenture .90 1.7
AMD ... ...
Aetna .60 1.6
Agilent
AlcatelLuc ..
Alcoa .12 1.0
Allstate .84 3.4
AlphaNRs ... ...
Altria 1.64 6.2
AMovilL s .41 1.7
AEagleOut .44 '4.2
AEP 1.84 4.9
AmExp .72 1.5
AmintlGrp ...
Ameriprise .92 2.1
Anadarko .36 .5
AnalogDev 1.00 3.1
Annaly 2.59 14.7
ArcelorMit .75 3.7
ArchCoal .44 2.3
ArchDan .64 2.3
ATMOS 1.36 4.2
Avon .92 4.2
BB&TCp .64 3.1
BHP BillLt 1.82 2.2
BakrHu .60 1.1
BcoBrades .80 4.8
BcoSantSA .82 9.3
BcoSBrasil 1.65 18.6
BkofAm .04 .5
BkNYMel .52 2.6
Barclay .36 3.5
Bar iPVix rs ...
BarrickG ..48 .9
Baxter 1.24 2.3
BerkH B ...
BestBuy .64 ?.6
Blackstone .40 3.2
BlockHR .60 4.3
Boeing 1.68 2.7
BostonSci ...
BrMySq 1.32. 4.6
CB REllis ...
CBS B .40 1.7
CSX s. .48 2.2
CVS Care .50 1.5
CblvsNY s .60 3.5
Calpine
CapOne .20 .5
CapitlSrce .04 .7
Carnival 1.00 3.2
Caterpillar 1.84 2.2
Cemex
CenterPnt .79 4.0
CntryUnk 2.90 8.4
ChesEng .35 1.1
Chevron 3.12 3.2
Chimera .62 20.7
Citigrprs .04 .1
Coach .90 1.6
CocaCola 1.88 2.7
CocaCE .52 2.0
CollctvBrd ...
Comerica .40 1.7
ConocPhil 2.64 4.0
ConsolEngy.40 .9
ConEd 2.40 4.3
ConstellEn .96 2.6
Coming .20 1.4
Covidien .80. 1.6
CSVellIVSts...
DR Horton .15 1.5
DTE 2.35 4.8


12 +.17 -15.0
8 +.93 -37.0
+.79 -47.6
... -.17 -58.2
9 +1.05 -1.2
13 +1.07 +4.7
17 +4.16 +6.4
6 +.51 -20.7
8 +2.75 +25.3
13 +3.79 -15.8
... +.13 +16.9
13 +.65 -22.9
10 +.09 -23.3
81 +4.33 -44.6
16 +.59 +6.8
14 +.36 -17.3
12 -.60 -29.1
13 +.50 +4.4
13 +4.01 +13.0
... +1.10 -51.8
9 +4.41 -24.5
41 +3.18 -9.0
11 +1.83 -14.0
6 -.19 -1.8
9 +.61 -47.1
13 +1.57 -45.8
9 +.28 -7.6
14 +.84 +3.4
13 +1.15 -25.4
15 +1.47 -21.1
... +4.35 -11.8
18 +1.77 -1.0
... +.34 -17.2
... +.07 -17.5
... +.08 -34.94
... +.79 -41.8
9 +1.26 -33.1
... +.31 -38.3
... -1.48 +9.2
13 +.25 -4.0
14 +2.09 +6.1
16 +1.51 -12.8
8 +.73 -27.7
68 +.68 -12.9
11 +.70 +17.2
13 +5.26 -3.8
16 +.25 -15.9.
15 +.84 +8.5
19 +.45 -30.8
14 +1.13 +21.6
14 +1.05 -.4
14 +1.97 -1.2
12 +.38 -26.7
... +.43 +2.7
6 +2.93 +3.9
18 +.42 -16.9
13 +1.64 -33.0
14 +5.19 -9.1
... +.02 -51.4
16 +.82 +24.4
12 +.74 -25.4
11 +1.21 +17.8
8 +3.56 +6.1
5 -.01 -27.3
9 +3.07 -36.9
19 +8.80 -1.0
14 +1.40 +4.2
14 +.40 +5.4
11 +3.19 -39.8
12 +1.43 -43.2
9 +1.92 -3.8
17 +1.70 -10.9
16 +1.23 +12.1
17 +.02 +20.0
7 +.05 -25.6
15 +2.77 +10.8
... +.24 -37.1
81 +.73 -18.9
12 +1.86 +8.9


Name Div YId
DanaHldg ... ...
Danaher .08 .2
Deere 1.64 2.2
DeltaAir
DenburyR ...
DBGoldDS ...
DevelDiv .16 1.4
DrSCBrrs ... ...
DirFnBrrs ...
DrxEMBull 1.20 .1
DrxEnBear ...
DrxFnBull .... ...
DirxSCBull ... ..
DirxLCBull .10 ...
DirxEnBull ... ...
Discover .24 1.0
Disney .40 1.2
DomRescs 1.97 4.1
DowChm 1.00 3.7
DukeEngy 1.00 5.4
DukeRty .68 6.2
EMC Cp ...
Eatons 1.36 3.4
Ecolab .70 1.4
ElPasoCp .04 .2
Elan
EldorGd g .12 ...
EmersonE 11.38 3.0
EnCanag .80 3.3
EndvSilvg ...
Exelon 2.10 5.0
ExxonMbI 1.88 2.6
FstHorizon .04 .6
FirstEngy 2.20 5.2
FootLockr .66 3.2
FordM ... ...
ForestOil ... ...
FMCG s 1.00 2.2
FrontierCm .75 10.4
GameStop ...
Gannett .32 3.0
Gap .45 2.8
GenGrPrn .40 3.1
GenMills 1.22 3.31
GenMot n ...
GenOn En. ...
Genworth ... ...
Gerdau .25 3.0
GlaxoSKIn 2.17 5.2
GoldFLtd .24 1.5
Goldcrp g .41 .8
GoldmanS 1.40 1.3
Goodyear ...
HCPInc 1.92 5.4
HSBC 1.90 4.6
Hallibrtn .36 .9
HartfdFn .40 2.3
HeclaM ... ...
Hertz ... ...
Hess .40 .7
HewlettP .48 1.9
HomeDp 1.00 2.9
HonwillntI 1.33 2.9
HostHots .12 1.1
Hunts(nn .40 3.3
iShGold
iSAstla 1.06 4.5
iShBraz 3.42 5.6
iShGer .67 3.3
iSh HK .42 2.5
iShJapn .17 1.8
iSTaiwn .29 ...
iShSilver ...
iShChina25 .85 2.3
iSSP500 2.45 2.1
iShEMkts .84 2.1
iShB20 T 4.02 3.7
iS Eafe 1.68 3.3
iSR1KG .77 1.4


Wkldy YTD Wkly
PE Chg %Chg Last
56 +.36 -31.7 11.75
15 +2.17 -9.1 42.89
13 +7.02 -8.5 76.03
14 -.09 -43.5 7.12
21 +.02 -24.1 14.49
... +.18 -45.4 4.36
-.19 -19.4 11.35
...-10.31 +1.6 47.59
...-10.06 +25.2 59.16
... +1.08 -48.5 21.28
...-2.60 -18.9 18.28
.. +1.73 -50.7 13.74
... +6.23 -41.4 42.47
... +6.78 -24.8 53.75
...+4.31 -24.4 44.21
8 +1.88 +33.8 24.79
14 +.55 -13.6 32.40
16 +.97 +13.4 48.46
12 +.56 -21.4 26.82
13 +.32 +4.2 18.56
55 -.26 -11.4 11.04
23 +1.33 -5.6 21.61
12 +2.33 -20.7 40.23
22 +6.27 +.8 50.80.
24 +.84 '+32.2 18.19
... -.02 +68.9 9.68
46 +.11 +5.0 19.50
15 +2.95 -20.6 45.41
53 +.93-16.5 24.32
... +1.11 +56.4 11.48
13 +.26 +.9 42.01
10 +2.84 -.7 72.64
40 +.37 -42.3 6.80
18 +.78 +14.9 42.53
1 +2.52 +3.5 20.31-
5 +.41 -38.1 10.40
13 -.93 -53.0 17.84
8 +2.59 -25.8 44.53
45 +.25 -25.8 7.22
8 +1.21 -.4 22.78
5 +.64 -29.2 10.69
9 +.59 -26.1 16.28
-.09 -15.8 13.04
14 +.87 +3.1 36.68
6 +.71 -38.0 22.87
... -.10 -24.9 2.86
... +.26 -50.5 6.51
... +.44 -40.9 8.27
... +1.09 4+6.9 41.91
2 -.56 -10.2 16.28
18 +,32 +13.0 51.97
11 -.01 -33.5 111.75
... +.93 -.3 11.81
30 +2.52 -2.8 35.75
... -.30 -18.8 41.46
16 +3.42 +1.5 41.46
4 -.53 -35.1 17.19
28 +.58 -31.8 7.68
14 +.35 -30.6 10.06
7 +1.41 -27.2 55.70
6 +1.22 -41.0 24.82
15 +2.12 -3.0 34.00
13 +3.29 -14.4 45.48
... -.16 -40.6 10.62
9 +.54 -21.4 12.27
-.24 +28.1 17.80
... +1.14 -7.7 23.47
... .+1.01 -20.8 61.32
... +.70 -15.1 20.32
... +.48 -10.1 17.00,
+.16 -12.1 9.59
... +.32 -15.7 13.17
... -1.27 +33.9 40.41
... +1.08 -14.2 36.96
... +5.30 -6.2 118.42
... +.84 -14.9 40.52
... -2.71 +15.3 108.49
... +1.52 -11.2 51.69
... +2.88 -4.2 54.86


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www.edwardjones.com Member SIPC


Wkly YTD Wkly
Name Div YId PE Chg %Chg Last


iShR2K .94 1.4
iShREst 2.09 3.8
ITW 1.44 3.2
IngerRd ,48 1.5
IBM 3.00 1.8
IntlGame .24 1.6
IntPap 1.05 4.1
Interpublic .24 3.0
Invesco; .49 2.9
InvMtgCap 3.94 23.1
ItauUnibH .84 5.0
JPMorgCh-1.00 2.8
JanusCap .20 3.0
JohnJn 2.28 3.5
JohnsnCtl .64 2.1
JnprNtwk ...
KB Home .25 4.3
Keycorp .12 1.9
KimbClk 2.80 4.1
Kimco .72 4.3
Kinross g .12 .7
Kraft 1.16 3.4
LDK Solar ...
LSICorp ... ...
LVSands ...
LennarA .16 1.2
LillyEli 1.96 5.5
Limited .80 2.2
LincNat .20 1.0
UoydBkg ...
LyonBas A .80 2.5
MEMC


.. +3.83
+1.66
12 +3.43
.+4.00
14+11.60
17 +.69
9 +2.01
15 +.34
11 +.97
4 +.06
... +.34
8 +1.86
7 +.90
14 +1.71
14 +1.42
20 +1.17
... +.27
7 +.44
16 +2.48
92 +.43
25 +.84
20 +.50
2 +.78
13 +.47
32 +2.44
26, +.86
8 +.76
14 +3.44
5 -.17
.,. +.09
... +3.87
21 +1.05


Name DIv YId
MFA Fncl 1.00 13.8
MGIC,
MGM Rsts .
Macys .40 '1.6
ManpwrGp .80 2.1
Manulifeg .52
MarathnO s .60 2.3
MarathP n .80 2.3
MktVGold .40 .6
MktVRus .18 .6
MktVJrGId 2.93 8.2
MarintA- .40 1.5
MarshM .88 3.0
Masco .30 3.7
Medtmic .97 2.8
Merck 1.52 4.8
MetUfe .74 2.4
MetroPCS ...
MitsuUFJ ... ...
Monsanto 1.20 1.7
MonstrWw ...
MorgStan .20 1.2
Mosaic 20 .3
MotrtaSol n .88 2.2
MotdaMo n ... ..
NCR Corp ...
NYSE Eur 1.20 4.4
Nabors
NatGdd 2.92 5.9
NOilVarco .44 .7
NatSemi .40 1.6
NY CmtyB 1.00 8.0


Wkly YTD Wkly
PE Chg %Chg Last
7 -.12 -11.4 7.23
+.56 -75.9 2.46
+.78 -30.8 10.28
10 +1.72 -1.6 24.90
+2.20 -39.1 38.23
+.34 -24.5 12.97
5 +,72 +15.2 25.89
... -.12 -10.6 34.87
..: +1.22 +1.6 62.48
... +1.40 -16.5 31.65
... +.71 -10.0 35.91
22 +1.28 -33.8 27.52
17 +1.76 +6.3 29.06
... +.49 -36.4 8.05
12 +2.76 -8.2 34.05
12 +.66 -11.4 31.92
9 +.33 -29.2 31.46
16 +.40 -15.5 10.67
... -.23 -20.5 4030
24 +4.68 +1.5 70.68
... +.28 -68.0 .7.55
36 +.61 -39.0 16.61
14 +6.36 -9.1 69.38
... +1.71 +6.3 40.43
... -.14 +29.6 37.72
11 +.93 +5.7 16.24
12 +1.90 -9.4 27.15
38 +1.27 -24.6 17.70
... +1.13 +12.2 49.81
16 +3.02 -5.2 63.73
21 +.10 +80.7 24.86
10 +.50 -33.7 12.50


Wkly YTD Wkly
Name Div YId PE Chg %Chg Last


NewmtM 1.20
NextEraEn 2.20
NiSource .92
NobleCorp .53
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OcciPet 1.84
OfficeDpt
OilSvHT 1.58
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PMI Grp
PNC 1.40
PPLCorp 1.40
PatriotCoal ...
PeabdyE .34
Penney .80
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PepsiCo 2.06
Petrohawk ...
PetrbrsA 1.34
Petrobras 1.28
Pfizer .80
PhilipMor .2.56
Potash s .28
PrinFncl .55
ProLogis 1.12
ProShtS&P...
PrUShS&P ...
PrUIShDow ...
ProUltQQQ ...
PrUShQQQ rs...
ProUltSP .35
ProUShL20 ...
ProUltFin .05
ProUltR2K .01
ProUSSP500...
PrUltSP500 s.05
ProUSSIv rs...
PrUltCrde rs...
ProUltSGId ...
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ProUSR2K rs..
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PulteGrp ...
QksilvRes ...
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Wkly YTD Wkly
Div YId PE Cho %Cha Last


SprintNex ..
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TollBros
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Nasdaq Most Active


AMEX Most Active *


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Name Div YId PE Chg %Chg Last


ATPO&G ..
AcmePkt ...
ActivsBliz .17 1.5
AdobeSy ...
AkamaT ... ...
AllscriptH ...
AlteraCp If .32 .9
Amazon
ACapAgy 5.60 20.0
AmCapLtd ...
Amgen 1.12 2.1
AmkorTIf ...
Apple Inc .
ApldMatl .32 2.9
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ArmHId .15 .6
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Atmel
Autodesk ...
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Baidu
BrigExp
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Celgene
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Cephin
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Clearwire .
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DIv YId PE Chg %Chg Last


Comcast .45
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Crocs
CypSemi .36
Dell Inc
Dndreon
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DryShips
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eBay
ElectArts ...
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ExpScripts ...
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FifthThird .24
Finisar
FstNiagara .64
Flextm
FocusMda ...
Fossil Inc
GTAdvTc ...
GileadSci ...
Google
GreenMIC ...
HercOffsh ...
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HumGen ...
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Intuit .60
JA Solar
JDS Uniph ...
JetBlue
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Name DIv
KLATnc 1.40
Level3
UbGlobA ...
UbtyMIntA ...
ULifeTech ...
UnearTch .96
lululemn gs ...
Magma
MarvellT ..
Mattel .92
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MelcoCrwn ...
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MicronT ..
Microsoft .64
NetApp
Netflix ...
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NewsCpB .19
NorTrst 1.12
Nvidia
OReillyAu ...
OmniVsn ...
OnSmcnd ...
Oracle .24
PMCSra ...
Paccar .48
PacEth rs ...
PacSunwr ...
PaetecHId ...
PattUTI .20
Paychex 1.24
PeopUtdF .63
Popular
Power-One...
PwShs QQQ.42
PriceTR 1.24
PrUPShQQQ...


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Wkly YTD
Div YId PE Chg %Chg


Qualcom .86
RF MicD ...
RschMoln ...
Riverbed s ..
SanDisk
SeagateT .72
SeattGen ..
Sina
SiriusXM ...
SkywksSol ...
SmartM
SodaStrmn n
Staples .40
StarScient ...
Starbucks .52
SilDynam .40
Symantec ...
TD Ameritr .20
Tellabs .08
TevaPhrm .87
TibcoSft ...
TiVo Inc ...
TriQuint
UtdTherap
UnivDisp ...
UrbanOut
VirgnMda h .16
Vodafone 1.45
WamerCh s8.50
WetSeal ...
Windstrm 1.00
Wynn 2.0Z
Xilinx .76
YRCrsh ...
Yahoo
ZionBco .04


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Wkly YTD Wkly
Name Div YId PE Chg %Chg Last
AbdAsPac .42 5.5 +.19 +12.6 7.60
Adventrx ... ... ... -.09 -66.3 .88
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Wkly. YTD Wkly
Name Div YId PE Chg %Chg Last


MdwGoldg ...
Minefndg ...
NeoStem ...
Neoprobe ...
Nevsun g .06
NwGoldg ...
NA Pall g ...
NDynMng ...
NthnO&G ...
NthgtMg ...
N8vaGd g ...
Oilsandsg ...
Oilsands rt .
OpkoHh ...
ParaG&S
PhrmAth
PionDrill ...
Quepasa ...
RareEe g ...
Rentech ...
Richmnt g ...
Rubicon g ...
SamsO&G ...
SeabGldg ...
TanzRy g ...
Taseko ...
TmsatlPet ...
TriValley ...
TriangPet ...
Ur-Energy ...
Uranerz
UraniumEn ...
VantageDr ...
VimetX
VistaGold ...


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WFAdvlncol.02 10.8 ... +.08 -22 9.42
YM Bio ... ... ... -.01 -22.3 1.81


STOCKS OF LOCAL INTERESTr


Currencies
Last Pvs Day
Australia .9471 .9591
Britain 1.6335 1.6281
Canada .9851 .9882
Euro .6904 .6960
Japan 76.66 77.55
Mexico 12.4795 12.5237
Switzerind .8078 .7939
British pound expressed in U.S. dollars. All oth-
ers show dollar in foreign currency.


I I__


I .


III


Weekly Dow Jones

Dow Jones Industrials 37.00 322.11 143.95 -170.89 134.72
Close: 11,284.54 1 i t) /
1-week change: 466.89 (4.3%) MON TUES WED THUR FRI
13,000

12,500



11,500

11,000

10,500 M A M J J A



MUTUAL FUNDS
Total Assets Total Return/Rank Pct Min Init
Name Obj ($Mlns) NAV 4-wk 12-mo 5-year Load Invt
PIMCOTotRetIs CI 142,222 10.97 -0.64 +3.2/D +8.3/A NL 1,000,000
American Funds GrthAmA m LG 62,446 28.20 -12.6 +11.7/E +0.5/D 5.75 250
FidelityContra LG 61,125 65.08 -10.6 +16.6/C +3.5/B NL 2,500
Vanguard TotStldx LB 60,494 29.44 -12.3 +15.2/A +0.8/B NL 3,000
Vanguard Instldxl LB 59,225 108.02 -11.4 +14.613 +0.2/B NL 5,000,000
American Funds CaplncBuA m IH 58,091 48.77 -5.9 +9.7/C +2.2/C 5.75 250
American Funds CpWIdGriA m WS 53,019 32.41 -12.3 +6.9/D +1.2/C 5.75 250
American Funds IncAmerA m MA 52,940 16.18 -6.4 +11.0/A +2.2/C 5.75 250
Vanguard 500Adml LB 52,749 108.75 -11.4 +14.6/B +0.2/B NL 10,000
Vanguard TotStlAdm LB 50,380 29.46 -12.2 +15.4/A +0.9/B NL 10,000
American Funds InvCoAmA m LB 46,376 25.85 -11.3 +10.0/E -0.6/0D 5.75 250
Dodge& Cox IntlStk FV 44,787 31.13 -15.1 +5.1/C -0.4/A NL 2,500
Dodge& Cox Stock LV 41,787 97.35 -13.9 +11.8/B -3.1/D NL 2,500
American Funds WAMutlnvA m LV 38,653 26.42 -9.4 +15.2/A +0.2/A 5.75 250
American Funds EurPacGrA m FB 37,103 37.10 -14.5 +5.3/D +1.4/A 5.75 250
Vanguard InstPlus LB 36,525 108.02 -11.5 +14.6/B +0.3/B NL 200,000,000
FrankTemp-Franldin IncomeA m CA 36,264 2.05 -8.0 +7.1/C +3.3/C 4.25 1,000
Vanguard Totintl d FB 33,374 14.14 -14.1 +6.7/C -0.1/B NL 3,000
American Funds FnlnvA m LB 33,111 33.98 -12.5 +12.0/D +1.0/B 5.75 250
PIMCOTotRetAdm b CI 32,808 10.97 -0.6 +3.0/E +8.1/A NL 1,000,000
American Funds NewPerspA m WS 32,317 26.35 -12.5 +10.9/C +2.5/A 5.75 250
American Funds BalA m MA 31,690 17.52 -7.2 +11.4/A +2.8/B 5.75 250
Vanguard WelitnAdm MA 29,353 51.83 -7.2 +9.2/C +3.9/A NL 50,000
Vanguard 5001nv LB 29,272 108.73 -11.5 +14.5/B +0.1/B NL 3,000
Harbor Intllnstl d FB 29,056 54.98 -14.6 +10.6/A +2.5/A NL 50,000
Vanguard TotBdAdml Cl 29,001 10.96 +2.0 +4.4/C +6.6/B NL 10,000
Fidelity GrowCo LG 28,589 80.91 -13.5 +21.4/A +5.5/A NL 2,500
CA-Consevatve Alocati, Cl -ntennediate-Term Bond, ES -Europe Stock, FB -oreign Large Blend, FG Foreign LargeGrwth, FV Foin
LaValue, IH -Wod Alocauon, LB -Large Bend, LG -La: Growth, LV -Large Value, MA Modeale Adtocatim, MB .MtCap Bled, MY-
MKCapValue,SH -Spedflat5n, WSL -Wdd Stock, Retum: Chg in t dwithds reanvesed. a How r pere vs.
ohers with same d ve: A isin top 20%, E inboltorn 20%. Mm In Inv Minimum $ needed to inves fund. Source: Momistar.


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MAKING SENSE OF INVESTING ^^^


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Classified Department: 755-5440


IBUYIm


SEi~LL T


FImND 14


LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED SUNDAY, AUGUST 28. 2011

Lake City Reporter





CLASSIFIED


Take ADvantage of the
Reporter Classifieds!

755-5440


ADvantage


Legal

ADVERTISEMENT FOR BIDS
THE DISTRICT BOARD OF
TRUSTEES OF Florida Gateway
College WILL RECEIVE BIDS
FOR THE FOLLOWING:
Renovations and Reroof Building 1
Florida Gateway College
Lake City, Florida
FGC Bid No. 12-1-01
Architect's Project No. 1002
Date & Time for
Receiving Bids:
WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 21,
2011 AT 2:00 P.M.
Date, Time and Place for
Pre-Bid Conference: All
interested bidders are required to at-
tend the MANDATORY 'PRE-BID
CONFERENCE to be held at 10:00
A.M. local time on WEDNESDAY,
SEPTEMBER 14, 2011 on the main
campus of Florida Gateway College.
Conference will start in Room 001B,
Building 003 which is physically lo-
cated at 127 SE, Student Way, Lake
City, Florida 32025
Place for Receiving Bids: Bids may
be mailed as follows:
Florida Gateway College
Purchasing Department
149 S.E. College Place
Lake City, Florida 32025-8703
Hand delivered bids are to be pre-
sented to:
Florida Gateway College
Mail Room (Bldg 025)
149 S.E. College Place
Lake City, Florida 32025-8703
All bids must arrive and be date/time
stamped by a Mail Room representa-
tive prior to the specified bid open-
ing date/time. The College will not
be responsible for Postal or other de-
livery service delays that cause a bid
to arrive at Florida Gateway Col-
lege's Mail Room after the designat-
ed bid opening date/time. Bids 'that
are mailed must be clearly marked
on the outside of the envelope "BID
# 12-1-01 Building 1 RenovationS
AND REROOF, Florida Gateway
'College, BID OPENING WEDNES-
DAY, SEPTEMBER 21, 2011".
Bids will be opened in a public bid
opening in Room 001B, Building
003 which is physically located at
127 SE Student Way, Lake City,
Florida 32025.
Contractor's Prequalification: ALL
PRIME CONTRACTORS WISH-
ING TO BID THIS PROJECT
MUST BE PREQUALIFIED. Con-
tractors who wish to submit a bid on
this project must prequalify with
Florida Gateway College. To be con-
sidered for prequalification, contrac-
tors must request, complete and sub-
mit a prequalification package to the
College. Prequalification packages
may be obtained from the College's
Director of Purchasing, Bill Brown
at (386) 754-4360 or by email at
bill.brown@fgc.edu. COMPLETED
prequalification packages must be re-
turned to the College's Mail Room
which is located in Building 025 not
later than 1:00 PM local time Mon-
day, September 12, 2011. The Col-
lege will not be responsible for Post-
al or other delivery service delays
that cause a prequalification package
to arrive at the Mail Room after the
designated date/time.
Bid Documents Prepared By:
CRAIG SALLEY & ASSOCIATES,
ARCHITECTS
3911 Newberry Road, Suite D
Gainesville, FL 32607
(352) 372-8424, FAX (352) 377-
4945
Bid Documents
Available From:
http://www.csa-
architect.com/bid documents.htm
Project Description: The,
work includes, but is not limited to,
the complete renovation of the interi-
or and retrofit reroofing of Building
1, the Administratiqn Building on the
main campus of Florida Gateway
College in Lake City, Florida.
The work involves extensive demoli-
tion of the interior and new stud
walls, ceilings, flooring and related
work. Included is an addition for a
new mechanical room out of CMU
with stucco exterior finish. The ret-
rofit reroofing will have metal truss-
es on stud knee walls, metal decking
and rigid insulation with standing
seam metal roofing, gutters and
downspouts.
New mechanical and electrical sys-
tems are included in the renovation
work.
Right to Waive Irregularities and.
Technicalities: Florida Gateway Col-
lege reserves the right to waive mi-
nor irregularities and/or technicali-
ties associated with this solicitation.
The Director of Purchasing of Flori-
da Gateway College shall be the final
authority regarding waivers of irreg-
ularities and technicalities.
FOR THE DISTRICT BOARD OF
TRUSTEES OF Florida Gateway
College
Charles W. Hall, President

August 28, 2011
September 04, 11,2011







u.-, .*. ..1


Lake City Reporter







Lawn & Landscape Service

J&M LAWN Service & more for
all your outdoor needs. Don't
waste your time or weekend,
Free Estimate. 386-984-2187

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0 Legal

NOTICE OF PUBLIC MEETING
OF THE SCHOOL BOARD OF CO-
L.UMBIA COUNTY, FLORIDA
The School Board of Columbia
County, Florida announces that the
School Board will hold a public
meeting, to which all persons are in-
vited to attend, as follows: (the meet-
ing date has not changed, only the lo-
cation has changed)
DATE: Tuesday, September 27,
2011
TIME: 7:00 P.M.
PLACE: Fort White Middle School
Cafeteria
2253 SW Cook Street
Fort White, FL 32038
PURPOSE: To consider and act
upon business of the School Board.
A copy of the agenda may be ob-
tained no earlier than 7 days prior to
each meeting by writing to the Su-
perintendent of Schools at 372 W.
Duval Street, Lake City, Florida
32055 or by calling Mrs. Lynda
Croft at (386) 755-8003. A complete
agenda of each meeting will be avail-
able on the School District's website
at: www.columbia.kl2.fl.us
Pursuant to the provisions of the
American with Disabilities Act, any
person requiring special accommo-
dations to participate in the above
workshop is asked to advise the
School Board at least 48 hours be-
fore the workshop by contacting
Mrs. Lynda Croft at (386) 755-8003.
School Board of Columbia County,
Florida
By: Michael F. Millikin
Superintendent of Schools
Accredited System Wide by South-
ern Association of Colleges and
Schools
An Equal Opportunity Employer
Using Affirmative Action Guidelines

05527483
August 28, 2011
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
COLUMBIA COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File No. ll-211-CP
Division Probate
IN RE: ESTATE OF MELISSA B.
MACY A/K/A MELISSA MACY
Deceased
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
The administration of the estate of
Melissa B. Macy a/k/a Melissa Ma-
cy, deceased, whose date of death
was July 29, 2011, is pending in the
Circuit Court for Columbia County,
Florida, Probate Division, the ad-
dress of which if 173 NE Hernando
Avenue, Lake City, Florida. The
names and addresses of the personal
representatives and the personal rep-
resentatives' attorney are set forth
below. All creditors of the decedent
and other persons having claims or
demands against decedent's estate on
whom a copy of this notice is re-
quired to be served must file their
claims with this court WITHIN THE
LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER
THE TIME OF THE FIRST PUBLI-
CATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30
DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF
SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS
NOTICE ON THEM. All other cred-
itors of the decedent and other per-
sons having claims or demands
against decedent's estate must file
their claims with this court WITHIN
3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE
OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE. ALL CLAIMS NOT'
FILED WITHIN THE TIME PERI-
ODS SET FORTH IN SECTION
733.702 OF THE FLORIDA PRO-
BATE CODE WILL BE FOREVER
BARRED, NOTWITHSTANDING
THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH
ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED
TWO (2) YEARS OR MORE AF-'
TER THE DECEDENT'S DATE OF
DEATH IS BARRED. The date of
the first publication of this notice is
August 28, 2011.
Attorney for Personal Representa-
tives:
John J. Kendron
Attorney for Co-Personal Represen-
tatives
Florida Bar'Number: 0306850
Robinson, Kennon & Kendron, P.A.
PO Box 1178
Lake City, FL 32056-1178
Telephone: (386)755-1334
Facsimile: (386)755-1336
personal representatives:
By:/s/ Constance Anne Barnett Ash-
worth
999 Genito West Blvd.
Moseley, Virginia 23120-1150
By:/s/ Judith A. Smith Jones
961 S. Dobson Street
Burleson, Texas 76028

05527569
August 28, 2011
September 4, 2011
Registration of Fictitious Names
We the undersigned, being duly
sworn, do hereby declare under oath
that the names of all persons interest-
ed in the business or profession car-
ried on under the name of FIFTH
GENERATION FARMS at Lake
City, Columbia County, Florida.

Contact Phone Number: 386-2.43-
8335 and the extent of the interest of
each, is as follows:
Name: NORTH FLORIDA BLACK
ANGUS, INC
Extent of Interest: 100%
by:/s/ Cindy S. Dicks
As Vice President of
North Florida Natural Black Angus
Inc
STATE OF FLORIDA
COUNTY OF COLUMBIA
Sworn to and subscribed before me
this 25th day of August, A.D. 2011.
by:/s/ANDREA L. WALDEN
05527568
August 28, 2011
PUBLIC AUCTION
1999 FORD
VIN# 1FMZU32X5XUB99004
CREAMER'S WRECKER SERV-
ICE 290 NE SUNNYBROOK ST.
LAKE CITY, FL 32055
COLUMBIA COUNTY
386-752-2861
SALE DATE: September 13, 2011
8:00AM


05527592
August 28, 2011

REPORTER Classifieds

In Print and On Line


Legal

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT, THIRD
JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR
COLUMBIA COUNTY, FLORIDA
CASE NO. 11-106-CA
COLUMBIA BANK, f/k/a, CO-
LUMBIA COUNTY BANK,
Plaintiff,
vs.
K&S HOUSING, LLC, a Florida
limited liability' company, AARON
D. SIMQUE, and MICHAEL L.
KAUTZ,
Defendants
AMENDED NOTICE OF PUBLIC
SALE
Notice is hereby given that the fol-
lowing described real property: SEE
.SCHEDULE "A" ATTACHED
HERETO.
SCHEDULE A TO AMENDED
NOTICE OF PUBLIC SALE
'COLUMBIA BANK vs. K&S
HOUSING, LLC, et al
Lot 3, Block B; Lots 10, 19 and 20,
Block C; Lots 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9
and 10, Block D; and Lots 2, 3, 6, 7,
10, 11 and 15, Block E, Suwannee
Valley Estates, a subdivision accord-
ing to the plat thereof as recorded in
Plat Book 3, Page 87, public records
of COLUMBIA County, Florida.
AND
Lot 14, Block E, Suwannee Valley
Estates, a subdivision, according to
the plat thereof as recorded in Plat
Book 3, Page 87, public records,
COLUMBIA County, Florida. LESS
AND EXCEPT the following descri-
bed parcel:
That portion of Lot 14 lying East of a
line running NE from the SW comer
of Lot 14 to the SW comer of Lot 12
in Block E of Suwannee Valley Es-
tates, a subdivision according to the
plat thereof recorded in Plat Book 3,
Page 87, public records, COLUM-
BIA County, Florida.
AND
Lot 2, Block A; and Lot 1, Block E,
Suwannee Valley Estates, a subdivi-
sion according to the plat thereof as
recorded in. Plat Book 3, Page 87,
public records of COLUMBIA
County, Florida.
shall be sold by the Clerk of this
Court, at public sale, pursuant to the
Final Judgmerft in.this action dated
July 19, 2011, and also pursuant to
the subsequent Order Rescheduling
Public Sale in this action, at the Co-
lumbia County Courthouse in Lake
City, Columbia County, Florida, at
11:00 A.M., on Wednesday, Septem-
ber 21, 2011,to the best and highest
bidder for cash. Any person claiming
an interest in any surplus from the
sale, other than the property owner
as of the date of the notice of lis pen-
dens, must file a claim within 60
days after the sale.
WITNESS my hand and official seal
on the State and County aforesaid
this 24th day of August, 2011.
P. DEWITT CASON
Clerk of Court
By:/s/ B Scippio
Deputy Clerk

August 28,2011
September 4, 2011
PUBLIC NOTICE ON INVITA-
TION TO BID.
ITB-033-2011-
Sealed'bids will be accepted by the
City of Lake City, Florida, 205 N
Marion Avenue, Lake City, Florida
32055 until Thursday, September 22,
2011 at 11:00 A.M. All bids will be
opened and read aloud at 11:15 A.M.
in the City Council Chambers locat-
ed on the 2nd floor of City Hall, 205
N Marion Avenue, Lake City, Flori-
da.
BULK PEBBLE QUICKLIME AN-
NUAL CONTRACT
Documents may be obtained on the
City website
http://www.lcfla.com/purchasing.ht
m; by contacting
purchasing@lcfla.com. or by phone
(386) 719-5816 or (386) 719-5818.

05527566
August 28, 2011


FLORIDA
GATEWAY
COLLEGE

EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR, NURSING
AND HEALTH SERVICES
Position #: A99962
This is a professional classification
responsible for the development and
supervision of innovative and forward-
thinking programs. The primary
responsibilities are to implement and
maintain the Bachelor of Science
degree in Jursing, continue to expand
all program areas and resources,
provide effective leadership for
administration, faculty, and students,
manage multiple budgets, and an
understanding of strong personnel
management. The Executive Director
will have the responsibility of
developing and maintaining a premier
institute that will support Florida
Gateway College as it moves into the
baccalaureate degree program level.
rhe individual applying for this position
must hold a minimum of a master's
degree and be eligible for or hold a
Florida Nursing license or closely
related field, have at least five years of
progressive administrative experience,
a strong background in program
design and accreditation, and a valid
Florida driver's license. Desirable
Qualifications: Doctorate degree in
Nursing or health related field
preferred. Record of teaching at'
tenured professor level; experience in
business in conjunction with health
background. Experience in the
community college teaching/working
environment.
Salary: $58,750 annually, plus
benefits
Application Deadline: 9/23/11
Persons interested should provide
College application, vita, and
photocopies of transcripts. All foreign
transcripts must be submitted with
official translation and evaluation.
SPosition details and applications
available on web at: www.fgc.edu
Human Resources
Florida Gateway College
149 S.E. College Place
Lake City, FL 32025-2007


Phone (386) 754-4314
Fax (386) 754-4814
E-Mail: human fg4c.edu
FOC is accredilcu t b the Commission .i Colleges or
the Souther Association of Colleges and Schools.


Legal

Registration of Fictitious Names
We the undersigned, being duly
sworn, do hereby declare under oath
that the names of all persons interest-
ed in the business or profession car-
ried on under the name of AMERI-
KIDZ at 186 NW LAZY ACRE CT.,
LAKE CITY, FL., 32055

Contact Phone Number: 386-438-
8567 and the extent of the interest of
each, is as follows:
Name: G. ROBERT SCHALLER
Extent of Interest: 100%
by:/s/ G. Robert Schaller

STATE OF FLORIDA
COUNTY OF COLUMBIA
Sworn to and subscribed before me
this 26th day of August, A.D. 2011.
by:/s/ KATHLEEN A. RIOTTO

05527591
August 28, 2011


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT, THIRD
JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR
COLUMBIA COUNTY, FLORIDA
CASE NO. 11-84-CA
CAPITAL CITY BANK,
Plaintiff,
V.
CHARLES WAAS, et al,
Defendants.
NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE
SALE
NOTICE is hereby given that P.
DEWITT CASON, Clerk of the Cir-
cuit Court of Columbia County, Flor-
ida, will on the 14th day of SEP-
TEMBER, 2011, at 11:00 a.m. at the
Columbia County Courthouse in
Lake City, Florida, offer for sale and
sell at public outcry to the highest
and best bidder for cash, the follow-
ing described property situated in
Columbia County, Florida, to-wit:
Parcel I.D. #21-5S-17-09308-006
Parcel 6:
A part of the NE 1/4 of Section 21,
Township 5 South, Range 17 East
more particularly described as fol-


FLORIDA
GATEWAY
COLLEGE
* i* **
HEALTH INFORMATION
SPECIALIST (Grant Funded)
Develop schedules, recruit and
advise students, help with program
budgeting and planning, and hire
adjunct faculty. The specialist is
expected to allocate time for meetings
and recruitment events,, .office hours
during which the students may have
access for advising, and for planning,
support, and expansion of the
medical office programs and the
integration with existing college
programs as well as potential new
programs. Minimum Qualilications:
Bachelor's degree in a Business or
Health related field. Strong
management skills,. Valid Florida
driver's license, Desirable
Qualifications: Certified Medical
Coder. Experience in Business in
conjunction with Health related field.
Experience in the community college
teaching/working environment.
Salary: $37,500 annually, plus
benefits.
Application deadline: 9 711
Persons interested should provide
College application, vita, and
photocopies of transcripts. All foreign
transcripts must be submitted with
official translation and evaluation.
Position details and applications
available on web at ; www.fcedu
Human Resources
Florida Gateway College
149 S.E. College Place
Lake City, FL 32025-2007
Phone (386) 754-4314
Fax (386) 754-4814
E-Mail: humanrifqc.edu
VeP'Avt)An' 1'n Celneg q in --iuoaand
1-m.A"tim


Legal

lows: Commence at the NW corner
of the NE 1/4 of said Section 21, and
run S 01' 16' 20" E, 943.91 feet to
the Northeasterly right of way of In-
terstate #75, thence S 19' 55' 55" E,
along said right of way, 495.06 feet
for a Point of Beginning, thence N
88' 12' 24" E, 1242.70 feet, said
point being on a curve concave to the
West having a radius of 218.11 feet
and an included angle of 30' 09' 14",
thence Southerly along the arc of
said curve for a arc distance of
114.78 feet, thence S 09' 45' 15" E,
123.50 feet, thence S 04' 07' 02" W,
216.32 feet, thence S 88' 12' 24" W,
1137.17 feet to the said Easterly
right of way of Interstate #75, thence
N 19' 55' 55" W, along said right of
way, 465.00 feet to the Point of Be-
ginning. Columbia County, Florida.
Subject to an easement of ingress
and egress over and across the East-
erly 30.00 feet thereof.
Together with 60.0 foot ingress and
egress access lying 30.0 feet right
and 30.0 feet left of the following de-
scribed centerline more particularly
described as follows:
Commence at the radius point of the
cul-de-sac at the South end of
Churchill Road as shown on the plat
of "English Acres" as recorded in
Plat Book 4, Page 24 of the Public
Records of Columbia County, Flori-
da, and run S 88* 43' 13" W, on a
perpendicular to said centerline,
20.00 feet for a Point of Beginning
of said access; said point being the
point of curve of a curve concave to
the Northwest having a radius of
230.0 feet, an included angle of 74'
59' 43"; thence Southwesterly along
the arc of said' curve for an arc dis-
tance of 301.05 feet to a point of re-



FLORIDA
GATEWAY
'COLLEGE

INSTRUCTORICOORDINATOR.
EMERGENCY MEDICAL SERVICES
PROGRAMS
Full-time '
224 Day Tenure Track Position
Teaches and assists the Executive
Director of Nursing and Health
Services in various aspects of
program development, planning and
implementation of the EMT- Basic,
Paramedic, and EMS Associate
Degree programs. Coordinates
course schedules, clinical sites and
part-time faculty, and assists in
program expansion and student
recruitment: maintains state and
national program certifications.
MINIMUM QUALIFICATIONS:
Bachelor's degree in emergency
medical services or closely related
field. Paramedic certification either at
the state or national level. Three
years experience as a paramedic,
Must be able to establish and
maintain effective working
relationships with others.,
DESIRABLE QUALIFICATIONS:
Minimum three years teaching
experience at the technical school or
community college level. ACLS,
PALS, and PHTLS instructor
certification,
Salary: Based on Degree and
Experience
Application Deadline: 9123/11
Persons interested should provide
College application, vita, and
photocopies of transcripts. All foreign
transcripts must be submitted with
official translation and evaluation.
Position details and applications
available on web at: www.fqc.edu
Human Resources
Florida Gateway College
149 S.E. College Place
Lake City, FL 32025-2007
Phone (386) 754-4314
Fax (386) 754-4814
E-Mail ,rrur'.L.:. -
, .J .., .. ,, ., ,11
* i . ii .. .. I ..1 .. i

m-r-'m. n


Legal

verse curve whose radius is 230.0
feet, an included angle of 74' 53'
21"; thence Southwesterly along the
arc of said curve for an arc distance
of 300.62 feet; thence S 01" 10' 25"
E, 317.10 feet to an intersection of
centerline hereinafter referred to a
point "A", thence continue S 01' 10'
25" E, along said centerline, 560.90
feet to a point of curve of a curve to
the left having a radius of 194.41
feet, an included angle of 51" 12'
30"; thence Southeasterly along the
arc of said curve for an arc distance
of 177.15 feet to a point of reverse
curve having a radius of 218.11 feet,
an .included .angle of 43* 37' 40";
thence Southeasterly along the arc of
said curve for a arc distance of
166.08 feet; thence S 09' 45' 15" E,
123.50 feet; thence S 04* 07' 02" W,
466.25 feet; thence S 05' 53' 00" E,
286.42 feet to the end of said center-
line and the termination of said ac-
cess. Said point being the radius part
of a 50.0 foot cul-de-sac.
Also, begin at point "A" as afore-
mentioned and run S 88' 12' 24" W,
685.0 feet to the radius point of a
50.0 foot radius cul-de-sac to the
point of termination of this center-
line. Also; together with and subject
to a non-exclusive 60 foot ingress
and egress easement (Easement "B")
over and across the following descri-
bed parcel:
Commence at the Northwest comer
of said NE 1/4 and run S 01' 16' 20"
E, 943.91 feet to the Northeasterly
right of way line of Interstate #75;
thence S 19' 55' 55" E, along said
right of way, 960.06 feet; thence N
88* 12' 24" E, 598.36 feet to the


FLORIDA
o GATEWAY
,COLLEGE
*
TAKE STOCK IN CHILDREN
PROGRAM ASSISTANT
(Grant Funded)
Assist the executive director of The
Foundation for Florida Gateway.
College with the Take Stock in
Children program. The program
provides scholarships and mentors
for low income, first generation
college students in the five county -
college service area. Responsible for
ensuring program quality, must be
well organized, capable of operating
with a minimum of supervision and be
able to work effectively with a wide
variety of people including,
volunteers, students, parents and
other professionals. Must be willing to
travel within the district frequently and
periodically tovarious statewide
training programs. High school
graduate plus five years-office
management or accounting
experience. A high school
equivalency from Ihe State
Department of Education may be
substituted for high school
graduation. Associate df Arts or
comparable degree preferred. Good
working knowledge of Microsoft
Word, Excel, Access, or similar
software programs desirable.
Experience working with youth and
volunteers preferred. Salary: $25,018
annually, plus benefits.
Application deadline: 9/7/11
Persons interested should provide
College application, vita, and
photocopies of transcripts. All foreign
transcripts must be submitted with
official translation and evaluation.
Position details and applications.
available on web at: www.fqc.edu
Human Resources
Florida Gateway College
149 S.E. College Place
Lake City, FL 32025-2007
Phone (386) 754-4314
Fax (386) 754-4814
E-Mail: humanr@tfqtc,edu
vki' m A)h i ( tin.-ifso ,i 'tq hau .bnd
VP,'AOA I.A.1'OO4 t n Ik duaiWu aMi
*'"I ""l, --r


Suwannee


Valley


E electric


Cooperative

Suwannee Valley Cooperative, Inc.

GIS/Mapping Data Specialist 1
Suwannee Valley Electric Cooperative, Inc. has an immediate opening
for a GIS/Mapping Data Specialist position. This position reports to
the Director of Engineering and will be responsible for maintaining
Geographic Information System Maps for the. Cooperative. A high
school diploma and an Associate of Science degree or work equivalent
experience with a minimum of 1 year experience with GIS Mapping in
the electric utility field is required.
Applications and job descriptions may be picked up at the Suwannee
Valley Electric administration building, 11340 100th St., Live Oak. The,
job description can be viewed on www.svec-coop.com. Resumes and
applications can be turned in at the above address with Attn: Vicky
Talmadge, or emailed to vickyt@svec-coop.com. The deadline for
accepting applications is Tuesday, September 6, 2011.
SVEC is an equal opportunity employer.


DIVORCE, BANKRUPTCY,
RESUMES.
other court approved forms-
386-961-5896.


I










Classified Department: 755-5440


LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED SUNDAY, AUGUST 28, 2011


Legal

Point of Beginning; thence N 01' 47'
36" W, 30.00 feet; thence N 88' 12'
24" E, 510.76 feet; thence S 04" 07'
02" W, 60.32 feet; thence S 88' 12'
24" W, 504.54 feet; thence N 01' 47'
36" W, 30.00 feet to the Point of Be-
ginning. Columbia County, Florida.
pursuant to the Final Judgment of
Foreclosure entered in a case pend-
ing in said Court, the style of which
is as set out above, and the docket
number of which is 11-84-CA. Any
person claiming an interest in the
surplus from the sale, if any, other
than the property owner as of the
date of the lis pendens must file a
claim within sixty (60) days after the
sale.
WITNESS my hand and the official
seal of said Court, the llth day of
August, 2011.
P. DEWITT CASON
Clerk of the Circuit Court
Columbia County, Florida
By:/s/ B. Scippio
Deputy Clerk
05527343
August 21, 28, 2011


010 Announcements
Southside Baptist Church will
sponsor a free Creation Research
Conference Aug 27th & 28th,
featuring Institute for Creation
Research. Dr. John Morris & Mr.
Frank Sherwin. Conferences in-
clude Dinosaurs; The Fossil
Record; The Young Earth; &
more. Sat schedule: 9:a 3:p, &
Sun conferences 9:15 a-10:30a &
6:00p. 386-755-5553 to register.
388 SE Baya Drive, Lake City

060 Services
RESIDENTIAL
HOUSECLEANING
Excellent Work, Dependable,
Low Rates. Call 386-688-1018

n100 Job
10 Opportunities

05527357
ATTN: Wanted: 29 Serious .
People to Work From Home
using a Computer. Earn
Up to $l1,500-$5,000 PT/FT
954-708-2541
www.Ididitucan2.com

05527550
Full Time Receptionist
S & S Office is hiring A
full-time receptionist. Must be
proficient in Microsoft Excel
and Word, multi-line phones,
filing, typing and multi-tasking.
Benefits include: vacation, sick
leave, credit union, profit
sharing, dental, health and life
insurance. Drug Free Workplace
EOE. Apply in person at
S & S Office
134 SE Colbumrn Ave.,
Lake City, FL 32025

REPORTER Classifieds
In Print and On Line
www.lakecityreporter.com


100 Job
100 OOpportunities

05527553
Large Southeast Restaurant
chain is now accepting resumes
for Management positions for
several Florida markets.
Competitive wages,
Advancement opportunities,
Complete Training package,
Health, Dental and Life
Insurance Benefits available.
DFWP EOE
Pleasesend resumes to:
donni@heritagemanagement.net
or fax to: 352-387-0011.

05527554
Raymond James Financial
Services located at First Federal
Bank of Florida is currently
seeking a full-time Administra-
tive Assistant to support
financial advisors. Minimum
requirements include exception-
al interpersonal and organiza-
tional skills (attention to detail a
must); excellent computer,
grammar, and mathematical
abilities; and advanced
technolo-
gy skills including Word, Excel
and Web based software
programs. Previous knowledge
of investment services not
required. Send resumes to:
Human Resources, RJFS,
4424 NW American Lane, Ste
102, Lake City, FL 32055 or
email to: angie.oglesbv()rav-
mondiames.com.

05527564
Assistant Dietary Manager
Assist w/Menu planning, Food
Prep, & Supervision.
Management exp a must.
Certification preferred. FT
position requires some week-
ends. Please apply Baya Pointe
Nursing & Rehabilitation
Center, 587 SE Ermine Ave.,
Lake City, Fl 32025 or fax
resume to 386-752-7337.

05527588
NOW HIRING
Cashiers & Baggers for High
Springs fruit & gift stores.
Apply in Person at Florida
Citrus Center (Chevron)
18603 NW CR 236, High
Springs (exit 404 & 1-75)

05527593
Attn: Southeast
Regional Drivers
Tired of running to
the Northeast? '
Currently Hiring CO and I/C
to run in the Southeast
Home Weekly!!
Great Benefits!!
Must have 1 year T/T exp.
CDL-A Drivers;
Drivers Unload.
Ask about Dedicated
Opportunities in your area
EPES TRANSPORT
877-983-0202
www.epestransport.com


100 Opportunities
AVON!! Only $10 to start!
Earn bonus S up to S150+
1-800-275-9945 pin #4206
www.youravon.com/tdavies
CDL Driver 2 yrs exp clean MVR
for local company. Apply between
8am & Noon only. Deadline isn-
noon Sept 2. 247 NW Hillandale
Glen Lake City No phone calls
Hiring Locally This Week
Liberty National Life Insurance
Company. Full Training Provided
Potential. of $60K+ Annually.
401K, BCBS Insurance & Pension
for those who qualify.
Call 1-800-257-5500
to set up an interview.
Drivers: Teams: $6,000 Team
Sign-On Bonus when you team
drive for Werner Enterprises! Call
Now for details! 1-888-880-5902
Heavy Equipment Operator need-
ed. Must have mechanical skills &
experience in fencing. Serious
inquires only. 386-623.3200
Mechanic needed for Truck shop,
must have own tools, apply
Southern Specialized, 1812 NW
Main'Blvd., 386-752-9754
NEED CNC Machinist
Must have Metal Working
Machine Shop exp. Send resume,
Quality Mill, 3631 US Hwy. 90
East, Lake City, FL 32055.
05526800 '
Earn Extra Money
Deliver the new AT&T Real
Yellow Pages
in the Lake City area. FT/PT,
daily work, quick pay, must be
18 yrs+, have drivers
license & insured vehicle.
(800) 422-1955 Ext. 1
8:00A-4:30P Mon-Fri

Security Officers needed. Lake
City & Live Oak area, must have
current D Security Lic., Clear
background, Drivers Lic, phone,
Diploma/GED. Benefits,. DFWP
EEO Must Apply at:
www.dsisecurity.com MB1000084
Veterinarian Assist/Technician
needed. Exp desired. Must be able
to work flexible schedule & Sat.
mornings. Apply at Columbia
Animal Hospital 2418 S. Marion
Ave: Lake City. No phone calls.
Weekend Office Manager
Detailed and People oriented.
Excellent customer service &
phone skills. Duties include:'
Storage & UHaul Rentals. $9.00 -
$11.00/hr based on exp. Drop off
resume between 4pm & 6pm Mon
Fri @ Mini Storage & Record
Storage of Lake City. 442 SW
Saint Margaret Street, Lake City

120 Medical
1 Employment

05527328
LEARN TO DRAW BLOOD
Local Phlebotomy Course
offered in Lake City, FLA
Certificate program.
(9044566 -o1328


120 Medical
120 Employment

052:-S,>*-
Medical Office Assistant
Experience as a Medical
assistant or in Medical
billing required. Fax
resume: 386-758-5987 or email:
maJindmd, Trmriil ;1com






Meridian Behavioral
Healthcare Inc.
www.mbhci.org
Please visit our website to view
current open opportunities and
to apply online:
Meridian is an active partner
with the National Health
Service Corps
Therapists:
Program Manager ( Licensed )
Licensed, or Master's Level
in Outpatient
LCSW or Certified Behavioral
Therapists Preferred
Bachelor's-Level in Counselor
Support
Case Management
(adult & child)
Master's Therapist in
Methadone Clinic
Administration:
Medical Records
Client Relations Specialist
Medical Services
RN Nursing Manager DETOX
(Gville)
RN full-time Lake City CSU
PRN RN, LPN, C.N.A.
Recovery Specialist
(Direct Care)
To see our current openings in
Mental Health and to apply
online, please go to:
www.mbhci.org
EOE, DFWP, E-Verify

CLINICAL
RESOURCE MANAGER FT.
Qualifications, registered nurse
with min. of 3 years exp. Previous
homecare and coding experience.
preferred. Will providetraining for
.qualified applicant, contact
Jeff Tyre, Branch Director
386-628-9352 can fax resumes to
386-628-9364.

Counselor for substance abuse
program in Baker Correctional In-
stitution. BA w/2yrs exp., M-F day
shift F/T, $30,000 to start, E-mail
resume to sheliarand@aol.com.or
fax to 386-752-2387


1 Medical
120 Employment

Pharmacy Technician needed.
Must be Florida registered- Min. 1
year exp required. Preferably in a
retail environment. Excellent
computer & communication skills
needed. FT position. Competitive
pay. Send reply to Box 05074, C/O
The Lake City Reporter, P.O. Box
1709. Lake City, FL. 32056

240 Schools &
240 Education

05527283
Interested in a Medical Career?
Express Training offers
courses for beginners & exp
Nursing Assistant. $479
next class-08/22/10
Phlebotomy national certifica-
tion, $800 next class-10/10/11
Continuing education
Fees incl. books, supplies, exam
fees. Call 386-755-4401 or
expresstrainingservices.com


310 Pets & Supplies

FREE KITTENS
to good homes.
386-623-3202


PUBLISHER'S NOTE
Florida Law 828.29 requires dogs
and cats being sold to be at least 8
weeks old and have a health
certificate from a licensed
veterinarian documenting they
have mandatory shots and are
free from intestinal and external
parasites. Many species of wild-
life must be licensed by Florida
Fish and Wildlife. If you are
unsure, contact the local
office for information.


361 Farm Equipment

84 Ford 4610 Tractor.
2WD, Solid
2005 motor,$7,500. OBO
386-867-0005


402 Appliances

White Whirlpool Dishwasher
2008 used 3 months
$75 obo
386-963-3295


420 Wanted to Buy

K&H TIMBER
We Buy Pine Hardwood &
Cypress. Large or small tracts.
Call 386-961-1961.


RN/LPN needed Apply online Warted Jurnk Car,. Truck. \Van.
Www.3dstaffingnow.com or $275 & up CASH! Free Pick Lip!
call 3D Staffing 386-752-1244 NO title needed.!386-878-9260
322 S. Marion Ave. Lake City, FL After 5pm 386- 752-3648.


430 Garage Sales
PUBLISHER'S NOTE
All Yard Sale Ads
Must be Pre-Paid.


440 Miscellaneous

Stop gnat & Mosquito bites! Buy
Swamp Gator All natural insect re-
pellent. Family safe. Use head to
toe. Available at The Home Depot.
Summer Barbecue Special
Tow Behind
Grill/Smoker, $1.250 OBO.
386-719-4802

450 Good Things
Sto Eat
GREEN PEANUTS For.Sale
Graded and washed.
$30.00 a bushel.
386-752-3434

460 Firewood
Firewood for Sale. $65. per Truck
Load. Rick 386-867-1039 or Joey
965-0288 if no answer pls leave
message we will call you back.

6^3 Mobile Honies
J30 for Rent
2 OR 3 BEDROOMS
Clean, Quiet Park $475-$525.mo
Water, septic, garbage included
758-2280 References, NO PETS!
2&3 BR MH. $395 $650. mo.
plus deposit. Water & sewer fur-
nished. Cannon Creek MHP
386-752-6422
2/2 Units, clean, well maintained,
nice safe park setting, 2 miles to
downtown Lake City, $575 month
+ $575 sec dep, 386-984-8448
13th Month FREE!!
3/2 Large MH, small park, near
FGCC, Small pets ok, $500 dep
$575 mo w/12 mo lease
386-752-1971 or 352-281-2450
3/2.5 S of Lake City, (Branford
area) $600 mo plus security
386-590-0642 or 386-867-1833
www.suwanneevalleyproperties.com
Ft. White Country living.
3br/2ba Mobile Home
Very clean! 386-497-1116.

LG clean 3br's $450. -$650. mo. +
dep. Also, 2br mobile home's
available. No Pets.
5 Points area. 386-961-1482
Mobile Homes for rent in
White Springs, Lake City & Ft.
White. Contact 386-623-3404
or 386-397-2779
New 2br/2ba off Country Club. 1/2
ac. lot Front, back porch & storage
bldg. $650 mo. $650 sec. No Pets!
386-752-5911 or 466-2266


Make D



lain Or Ip2 eO iI ed i snt "-in afed







ShandsLive Oak

Regional Medical Center


#.M/l. Fm ",v.M


To place your
classified ad call

755-5440


wlmww-y












Classified Department: 755-5440


LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED SUNDAY, AUGUST 28, 2011


,640 Mobile Homes
640 for Sale

05527374
!!ATTENTION!!
We purchase used mobile
homes. Call North Pointe
Homes, Gainesville
352-872-5566

05527375 !!!LOOK!!!
Before you but a Mobile Home
check out North Pointe Homes
in Gainesville--Hugh Discounts!
credit Scores Don't matter. Call
for Free Approval! Jacobson
Homes Factory Outlet (352)872-
5566 or mrb3371(a)hotmail.com

0.5527376
NEW USED- REPO'S
Your Volume Giant! North
Pointe Homes. Millions to Lend,
Credit Scores 575 = 10% down.
Gainesville (352)872-5566 or
walker-david(live.com

Champion Home Inspections
Protect Your Investment
With A Professional
Inspection State Licensed
And Insured 386-344-5551
Palm Harbor Homes
4/2 From 499 Mo Loaded
3/2 From 399 Mo Loaded
Homes on Your Lot 0 Down
800-622-2832


705 Rooms for Rent

1 person, non-smoking ROOM
for Rent. $300. mo.
Includes utilities. 1st & last.
(970)903-5356

710 Unfurnished Apt.
7lv For Rent

05527089
SPRING HILL VILLAGE
Excellent High Springs location.
1, 2 & 3 bedroom floor-plans;
some with garages.
Call 386-454-1469
or visit our website:
www.springhillvillage.net








1BR APT.
Downtown Location, Clean.
$450 mo, plus Security.
NO PETS. Call 386-755-3456
2/2 w/garage & washer/dryer
hookups. West side of town,
Call for details
386-755-6867
2BR/1BA. Close to town.
$565.mo plus deposit.
Includes water & sewer.
386-965-2922
A Landlord You Can Love!
2 br Apts $575. & up + sec. Great
area. CH/A washer/dryer hookups:
386-758-9351/352-208-2421
Amber Wood Hills Apts.
Private Patio area. Beautiful yard.
Washer/dryer hkup. Free water &
sewer. 1/1, 2/1. Move in special.
386-754-1800. wwwmvflapts.com
Columbia Arms Apt. located 1/2
mi from V.A. & Winn Dixie. Pet
Friendly. Move in Special $.199.
Pool, laundry & balcony.
386-754-1800. www.mvflapts.com
Furnished or unfurnished 1 or 2
bedroom townhomes on the golf.
course. $625-$750. mo. + security.
Includes water. 386-752-9626
Great location W of 1-75, spacious
deluxe 2br apts., garage, W/D
hookup. patio. $600/700 & up, +
Sec, 386-965-5560 or 344-3715
Greentree Townhouse
Summer special. 2/1, 2/1.5. Free
water & sewer. Balcony & patio.
Laundry. Behind Kens on Hwy 90.
386-754-1800 wwwmyflapts.com

ONE 51 PLACE APTS
Alachua
MOVE IN SPECIALS
1, 2, & 3 bedrooms
Call TODAY 386-462-0656
or visit us at one51 place.com

Redwine Apartments. Move in
special $199. Limited time. Pets
welcome, with 5 complexes,
we have a home for you.
386-754-1800. www.myflapts.com
Summer Special! 12th mo Free
w/signed yr lease. Updated, w/tile
floors/fresh paint. Great area.
From $450.+sec. 386-752-9626
The Lakes Apts. Studios & IBr's
from $135/wk. Util. & cable incl.,
Sec 8 vouchers accepted, monthly
rates avail Call 386-752-2741
Unfurnished Apt Eastside
Village Realty, Inc .2 bedroom
1 bath Duplex must be 55+ yrs of
age Call Denise Bose @
386-752-5290
Wayne Manor Apts.
Move in $199. Summer special. '
2/1, washer/dryer. Behind Kens off
Hwy 90. 386-754-1800
www.myflapts.com
Windsor Arms Apartments.
Summer special $199. Move in!
2/1, 2/1.5, 2/2. Pet Friendy. Free
200 ch. Dish. Washer/dryer hkup.
386-754-1800. www.myflapts.com

720 Furnished Apts.
For Rent


Immaculate Studio Apt. Avail
9/1 $500. mo. $300. dep. Incl.
appliances, cable, internet, water.
Josen 386-965-9083 or 438-8190













38 -5285


720 Furnished Apts.
720 For Rent

Rooms for Rent. Hillcrest, Sands,
Columbia. All furnished. Electric,
cable, fridge, microwave. Weekly
or monthly rates. 1 person $135,
2 persons $150. weekly
386-752-5808

f730 Unfurnished
730 Home For Rent
'09 Executive Home for rent on 41
acres. 4br/3.5ba Available
October. Horses/outdoor pets ok.
$2000/mo but all terms negotiable
for right caretaker. 386-209-4610
2BR house $640.mo $640. dep.
Also, 2br apt. $550. mo $550 dep.
Close to shopping.
386-344-2972
2BR/1BA Kitchen and Den. on
Alachua. $500. mo.
First & security.
386-397-0602
/ 2/1 879 Poplar St. $600. mo.
/ 3/2 Highlands Loop $700.mo.
/ 2/1 442 Praire St $650.mo.
All require First and last...
386-755-3649
Please leave msg., Only in office
Tues Thur. 8am 4pm
3 br/2ba house, 1206 McFarlane
Avenue. Avail. 9/1/11. $850 mo
$400 sec dep. 904-376-0620 or
904-.813-8864 for appt. No pets!
3/2 by Westside Elementary,
custom built home
$1050.00 per month.
Scott 352-318-8117
3BR/1.5 BA Large lot. Very clean
with storage shed. Quiet area.
$850 mo. + $850. dep.
386-752-7578


4BR BRICK home.
Azalea Park. $750. mo.
$750. security.
386-397-2619 or 386-365-1243


4br/2ba CHA Brick, 1200 sqft
lac., Close to FGCC, CR.245A.
Ceramic tile/carpet, $800 mo $800
dep (904)708-8478 App. req'd


Brick 3br/2ba Large yard, garage,
CH/A. 189 Stanley Ct. Lake City.
$950. mo + $1000 dep.
Call 386-365-8543
Remodeled 3br/2ba Brick. In town
1750 sqft. Lg lot. Includes washer,
dryer, stove, & fridge. Quiet area
$985. mo.$985 dep. 386-752-7578

74 Furnished
74 Homes for Rent

Southern Oaks Country Club.
3br/2.5ba Aprox 3000 sqft. Split
floor plan, on the 9th.Fairway.
New AC, 2.5 car garage, sprinkler,
concrete drive. Furnished. Move in
ready w/all appliances. Avail. now
Yearly Lease.(305)872-7911 View
at www.lakecitygolfvilla.com

750 Business &
Office Rentals
FOR LEASE: Downtown office
space. Convenient to
Court-house..
*Call 3864755-3456

For, Lease: E Baya-Ave. Two -
1000 sqft office space units or
combined for 2000 sqft. 386-984-
0622 or weekends 386-497-4762
MIDTOWN COMMERCIAL
CENTER, brand new executive
suite & suite with warehouse
$600 monthly.
.Call Vicki or Joe 386-935-2832.
OFFICE SPACE for lease.
Qak-Hill Plaza. 900 sqft '
$675mo/$695'. sec dep.
Tom 386-961-1086 DCA Realtor
SUB SHOP for lease.
All Equip. Avail. Old Willy J's
Across from Wal-Mart
386-623-2244


790 Vacation Rentals

Horseshoe Beach RV Lot.
Nice comer Lot with shade trees.
$295. mo Water/electric included
. 386-235-3633 or 352-498-5986

Scalloping Horseshoe Beach Spcl
Gulf Front 2br, w/lg porch, dock,
fish sink. wkend $395./wk $895.
386-235-3633/352-498-5986
alwaysonvacation.com #419-181 .
"Florida's Last Frontier"


805 Lots for Sale

05527058
Must See, Prettiest 10ac Rolling
Pasture Lot in North Fla.
3 mi. W. of Col. City School.
Red. to $6,990 P/A, Financing,
386-752-1364 or 386-965-4340

Foreclosure! 59.98 Ac. Close to.
Suwannee River w/boat ramps &
Springs. Ideal parcel for your site
built or manuf. home. $139,000!
MLS# 78083 386-344-7662
Lots for Sale Eastside
Village Realty, Inc. buildable
vacant lot hight & dry in a estab-
lished neighbor priced @ $40,000.
Call Denise Bose @ 752-5290
Owner Financing. River comm &
nature lover's dream in Lee. 15
wooded ac by the Withlacoochee.
Property is already subdivided
MLS 75576 $48,000 623-6896


2007 Honda
Motorcycle VTX 1300
Pearl green, one owner,
8600 mi., perfect cond.
$4,995
Call
386-758-5805
386-365-0817


805 Lots for Sale
PUBLISHER'S NOTE
All real estate advertising in this
newspaper is subject to the fair
housing act which makes it illegal
to advertise "any preference.
limitation, or discrimination based
on race, color, religion, sex,
disability, familial status or nation-
al origin; or any intention to make
such preference, limitation or
discrimination." Familial status
includes children under the age of
18 living with parents or legal
custodians, pregnant women and
people securing custody of chil-
dren under the age of 18. This
newspaper will not knowingly
accept any advertising for real es-
tate which is in violation of the
law. Our readers are hereby in-
formed that all dwellings adver-
tised in this newspaper are availa-
ble on an equal opportunity basis.
To complain of discrimination call
HUD toll free at 1-800-669-9777,
the toll free
telephone number to the hearing
impaired is 1-800-927-9275.


810 Home for Sale
0.5 acre tract has 441 (4 lane)
frontage. 1/2 miles from Target
distribution. 2/1.5 currently zoned
residential. MLS#78506 $91,000
R.E.O. Realty Group 867-1271
2 Mobile homes on 5 ac. above
ground pool. (1)1800 sqft. &
(1)1500sqft.$235,000 $139,888
MLS 77552 Brittany Stoeckert
Results Realty 386-397-3473
/ Champion Home Inspections -
386-344-5551. Inspections
Starting At $ 249.00
Veterans Receive 10% Off
Full Inspection.


3/2 Brick Home w/1 car garage,
Metal roof, porch w/swing, detach
carport $96,000 MLS#77780
Jo Lytte Remax 386-365-2821
www.jolytte.florida-property-search.com


3/2 Split floor plan built in 2010
on 2 acres.. Master bath with large
tub & standing shower. Trey ceil-
ings MLS#78520, $114,900
R.E.O. Realty Group 867-1271
4/2 fenced yard,
2 car garage, Fairly new roof &
HVAC Shed, fenced back yard.
MLS#77602, $162,500, R.E.O.
Realty Group 867-1271
4/2 on 1 ac. Modular home. Im-
maculate cond. New carpet, roof,
AC. more. Barn/workshop
-$115,000 MLS 78833 Brittany
Results Realty 386-397-3473
Almost 17ac., spacious 3br/2ba
home, paved rd. Near Itchetucknee
Spgs. Pole barn, gated, fenced.
MLS76902 $164,900 Brodi Allred
623-0906. Westfield Realty Group
Awesome Find! 3br/2ba, 1844sf,
wood floors, French doors to scr
back porch, 40x60 bldg w/office &
workshop, 6.17ac comer lot, 3
sides fenced. #77427 $199,900
Brick Ranch 3/2 Fl room. Side en-
try garage & workshop. 2 sheds.
New AC apple & roof. MLS78442
$114,900'.aMiUard Gillen 365-7001
Westield Realty Group
Champion Home Inspections
SContact John 386-344-5551
State Licensed
And Insured
championhomeinspections.us
Charming 2br/2ba home. Gated
community. REDUCED to
$158,000 MLS78740 Teresa
Spradley 386-365-8343
Hallmark Real Estate
Clean Well maintained 3/2 brick
w/chain link fenced back yard
w/Garage. $120,K MLS78440.
Debbie King 386-365-3886
Hallmark Real Estate
Close to everything. Lg 3br/2ba
brick home. Close to VA & shop-
ping! $189,900 MLS78131 Carrie
Cason 386-623-2806
Westfield Realty Group
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
Neat & tidy 2/2, maybe 3/2. New
kitchen counters & tile. Open floor
plan. Mary Brown Whitehurst
965-0887 MLS# 77943 $99,000
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
10 acres w/well maintained brick
home. 2012 sqft. Open split floor
plan. Lori Giebeig Simpson
365-5678 MLS# 74447 $149,000
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
3br/3ba Spacious home in estab-
lished area. 2414 sqft. Private yard
& patio. Lori Giebeig Simpson
365-5678 MLS# 78175 $159,000
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
3br/2ba. 1590 sqft. Lori Giebeig
Simpson. 365-5678 or
Mary Brown Whitehurst
965-0887 MLS# 74542 $110,000
Country close to town 3/2 Brick, 3
ac. Grape arbor & fruit trees. pole
bam, workshop. Metal roof. MLS
78096 $129,900 Ginger Parker
365-2135 Hallmark Real Estate
Country Club Condo 4br/3ba.
Mega storage, roomy kit, 3 porch-
es. $165,000 MLS 78719 Paula
Lawrence 386-623-1973
Hallmark Real Estate.
Deer in your back yard. 3/2 HUD
w/16X48 wrap around scr. porch.
Clean, well maintained, 5 ac.
$72,000 MLS78687 Ginger Parker
365-2135 Hallmark Real Estate


2007 Coach House
Platinum 272XL, 15K
miles, may consider partial
trade for Class B.
$110,000
Call
386-754-8505


810 Home for Sale

Foreclosure! 3/2 D/WAMH boasts
a large kitchen. M/B w/ garden
tub. shower & dbl sinks-New car-
pet-fpl & more-Only 569,995
MLS# 76920. 386-344-7662
Foreclosure! Newer 3/2 DWMH.
Le rooms, kitchen island, lots of
wdws, master w/garden tub & sep-
arate shower. S74,995
MLS# 74218 386-344-7662
Great 3/2 home w/2346 sq ft
under roof on .67 ac., Creekside
S/D. Big back yard w/plenty of
shade trees. On a cul-de-sac, MLS
77385 $169,900 623-6896
Home for Sale Eastside Village
Realty, Inc. 2 bedroom, 2 bath site
built home with screen porch,
large carport priced just right Call
Denise Bose @ 752-5290
Home in Lake City Country Club.
4/3, renovated. Great for entertain-
ing. Glass doors open to back yard.
MLS#78637 $184,900
R.E.O. Realty Group 867-1271
JASPER! 4BR/2.5BA 1,890 SqFt
mfg home on 1 acre where
wildlife is abundant $39,900
DANIEL CRAPPS AGENCY,
INC. 755-5110 #77922
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
Suwannee Co. 115 ac. Fenced &
cross Fenced. Pasture land, paved
rd. ElaineK. Tolar 386-752-4211
MLS# 77081 $345,000
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
.97 ac. Centrally located to Lake
City & G'ville. Fenced, planted
pines, pasture. Elaine K. Tolar
752-4211 MLS# 73879 $291,030
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
New home in May Fair. Super area
comer lot. 4br split plan. Versatile
colors. Elaine K. Tolar
755-6488 MLS# 76919 $199,900
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
240 ac. Farm. Rolling Meadows.
Paved road, great access to Lake
City & G'ville. Elaine K. Tolar
386-752-4211 MLS# 70453
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
Suwannee Co. 115 ac. Fenced &
cross fenced. 10 & 20 ac'parcels
avail. Elaine K. Tolar 386-752-
4211 MLS# 67766 $448,500
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
Brick home in town on lake front.
3br/2ba. New roof & hardwoods.
Glass room w/view Elaine Tolar
755-6488 MLS# 78092 $249,900
Lake front 3/2 custom Western Ce-
dar. Lots of storage space. Private
dock $229,900. MLS# 74681
Jo Lytte-Remax 386-365-2821
www.jolytte.florida-property-search.com
Large Home in the Country on
3.66 acres,; fireplace, 2 outbldgs,
MLS#76471, $89,900
Jo Lytte, Remax 386-365-2821
jolytte@remaxnfl.com
LEASE/OPTION BUY
3br/2ba Home 2010 w/garage
on 1/2 acre. Owner Financing
386-623-2244
LOCATION! CONDITION!
PRICE! 3BR/2BA w/open floor
plan; freshly painted $96,000
DANIEL CRAPPS AGENCY,
INC. 755-5110 #78278
Lofty home on Itclietucknee River,
Wrap around covered decks on
two levels.MustSEE! $375,000
MLS#77006 Jo Lytte
Remax 386-365-2821
Luxury home. 3br/2ba, 20 ac lot.
Cherry cabinets & SS appliances.
Jacuzzi in master.br. MLS 78190
$ 374,900 Roger Lovelady 365-
7039. Westfield Realty Group
Motivated Seller; Country area,
paved rd. 3br/2ba manuf home.
New AC & upgraded wdows.
MLS 78027 $84K. Brodie Allred.
623-0906 Westfield Realty Group
MOVE-IN READY! 3BR/2BA in
pristine condition on 1.39 acres
$89,900 DANIEL CRAPPS
AGENCY, INC.
755-5110 #78345
New Reduced. 4br/2ba plus of-
fice. 2 living & dinig areas. cov-
ered porch. FI rm. Triple garage.
MLS77685 Charlie Sparks 755-
0808 Westfield Realty Group
Nice, large 4/2 on 1 acre
w/florida room, granite floors,
wrap around front porch, $139,900
Brittany Stoeckert Results Realty
386-397-3473 MLS 77292
Owner Financing. 2br/3ba country
home w/wrap around porches, 5ac.
Garage w/workshop. MLS77005
$179,900 Roger Lovelady 365-
7039 Westfield Realty Group
PRICE REDUCTION. 3/2 plus
pool house w/half bath, 2.25
fenced ac. Freshly painted. Split
plan, Large rear deck MLS 78103
$179,900 386-623-6896


810 Home for Sale

PRICED TO SELL! 3BR/2BA
w/2.012 SqFt w/living rm & fami-
ly rm $57,000 DANIEL CRAPPS
AGENCY, INC.
755-5110 #78680
Private 2 ac parcel away from it
all. Hunting w/no restrictions.
Make an offer on this 1764 sqft
home that need some TLC.
$109,900, MLS78331. Jay Sears.
867-1613 Hallmark Real Estate
Reduced Price! 3br/1.5 ba. Re-
modeled. Nice area close to VA.
MLS 77599 $69K. Estate Sale,
bring all offers. Josh Grecian 466-
2517 Westfield Realty Group
Remax Professionals Motivated
seller. Spacious brick w/many up-
grades. Newer roof, windows &
fixtures. Fenced back yard. MKS
78168 $119,900 Missy Zecher @
623-0237 www.missyzecher.com
Remax Professionals Ranch style
home on 10 ac w/barn & horse
stalls. 4 Ig bedrm + bonus rm. 2
car gar. MLS 77403 $325K.
Missy Zecher @ 386-623-0237
www.missyzecher.com
Rolling Meadows. 4 or 3br/2ba.
Over 1700 sqft. and 1/2 ac lot.
MLS77284 $154,900 Carrie Cason
386-623-2806
Westfield Realty Group
Something for Everyone! 3br/2ba,
2706sf, 4.02ac, island kitchen,
Corian counters, det garage, Koi
pond, fish house, green house,
fenced & more. #76255 $247,000
SPECTACULAR VIEW!
2BR/1BA, 1200sf, .65ac, scr front
porch, steps t.o deck/dock on Suw.
river, under house parking/storage,
shed'& more. #77242 $194,900
Suwannee River Front
granite counters, covered patio,
deck & dock, $349,000
MLS#76336 Jo Lytte at Remax
Professionals. 386-365-2821
WELL-CARED FOR 4BR/2.5BA
mfg home w/formnal LR plus fami-
ly rm $84,000 DANIEL CRAPPS
AGENCY, INC.
755-5110 #78585
WHITE SPRINGS! Sturdy block
3BR/1BA home in city limits,
fenced yd $49,000 DANIEL
CRAPPS AGENCY, INC.
755-5110 #78603

820 Farms &
820 Acreage

10-ac lot. Well/septic/pp. Owner
financing $300 dn, $663 mo 8.9%,
25 yrs. Deas Bullard Properties
386-752-4339 www.landnfl.com
4 1/2 acre lot. Lake Jeffery Road.
Gorgeous Oaks!Paved Rd
Owner Financing! NO DOWN!
$59,900. $525mo 352-215-1018.
www.LandOwnerFinancing.com
4 acres, Wellborn, New Well
installed, Beautifully wooded
w/cleared Home Site, owner fin,
no down, $39,900, $410 mon
Call 352-215-101,8
www.LandOwnerFinaiicig.com
6.45 ac river front property in
White Springs dcloe to Big Shoals.
Covered shelter for entertaining.
MLS# 77417 $104,900 386-867-
1271 R.E.O. Realty Group, Inc
FARM- 7 stall barn.
17+ acres, pasture, cross fenced.
Close in $500. mo.
386-961-10.86


Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
61 ac. Parcel. SR 27 & 1-75 inter-
change. Great potential, fenced &.
cross fenced. Elaine K. Totar
752-4211 MLS# 758060 $368,040
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
40 ac.Parcel. Less then 2 mi from
city limits. Fenced road frontage
on US Hwy 441. Elaine K. Tolar
752-4211 MLS# 62092 $194K

83O Commercial
Property

788 S. Marion Comm'l bldg on
highway frontage. Across from the
VA & near downtown. $49,900.
MLS 78129 Scott Stewart 867-
3499 Westfield Realty Group
Commercial. High traffic location
w/I-75 exposure. 2-story custom
log home. MLS77949
Josh Grecian 386-466-2517
Westfield Realty Group
Prime Commercial Location.
Just across from a plaza. Frontage
on Baya w/2 curbcuts. $350,000
MLS# 77485 Call 386-867-1271
R.E.O.Realty Group, Inc
Remax Professionals Commercial
Property. Located on expanding
west side of Lake City. Professio-
nal service or restaurant. MLS
77436 $575k Missy Zecher 386-
623-0237 www.missvzecher.com


Professional Office Space For Lease
11,728 S.F.
Excellent location just east of 1-75


Abundant free parking
Immediate occupancy


PROCACCI
DEVELOPMENT CORPORATION


830 fCommercial
8 Property

Wellborn Commercial lot. 1.84
acres w/34' of Hwy frontage near
the new Dollar General. \MLS
72381 Scott Stewart 386-867-3498
Westfield Realty Group

o60 Investment
O60 Property
Rustic Fishing camp in Suwannee
Minutes to boat launch.
MLS#78709 S59.900
Jo Lytte/Remax 386-365-2821
www.jolyle.florida-properly-search.com


950 Cars for Sale.
FORD MUSTANG 2009
V-6. Auto., Silver.
40k miles Loaded. $17.500.
386-752-4850


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Lake City Reporter
has to offer:
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Story ideas?

Contact
Robert Bridges
Editor
754-0428


Lake City Reporter






LIFE


Sunday, August 28, 201 I


www.lakecityreporter.com


Section D


GARDEN TALK







Nichelle Demorest



Building

healthy

roots


right tree for
your yard
can be quite
a task, even
after you have decided
on the kind of tree you
want. A high qual-
ity tree is more likely
to withstand the strong
winds of hurricanes and
tropical storms, events
that are on our minds
this time of year.
There are three main
methods for produc-
ing a tree for sale: in
containers, field balled-
in-burlap (B&B), or
as bare rooted stock.
Container trees are
grown and sold in
plastic, metal, wood, or
fabric containers. B&B
trees are grown in field
soil, and they are usual-'
ly machine dug with the
soil ball secured in bur-
lap. Occasionally small
trees are sold bare root
in the dormant season.
Not all soils and
locations are created
equally. The soil drain-
ing characteristics can
be totally different from
one end of your prop-
erty to the other. The
type and size of the root
ball are important con-
siderations when choos-
ing just the right plant
for the location.
In soils that are com-
pacted or that drain
poorly, it is better to
plant a tree with a wide,
squat root ball. Or you
may wish to choose a'
smaller tree with a shal-
low root ball for that
location. Either way,
the goal is to start the
tree out with few roots
located low enough to
become submerged
often in water.
On the other hand, if
fhe site drains quickly
and irrigation may be
irregular, the success
rate will be higher with
a tall root ball. The
deeper roots will be
able to retain moisture a
little longer.
If little follow-up care
will be given, plant a
young tree. Smaller
trees become estab-
lished more quickly
because the roots bal-
ance the top growth
within the first year.
After a tree becomes
established, it is less
likely to die from
drought conditions. A
six inch caliper tree can
take up to three years
to become established,
and it will require sup-
plemental watering for
that entire time.
Choose the right
plant for the right place,
and then choose the
best size for establish-
ment. Call the UF
Extension Office and
the Master Gardeners
with your gardening
questions, 752-5384.

* D. Nichelle Demorest
is a horticulture agent
with the Columbia County
Extension of the University
of Florida Institute of Food


and Agricultural Sciences.


Diabetes: Facing down the threat


Class gives tips
on managing
the disease.


By ANTONIA ROBINSON
arobinson@lakecityreporter.com
diabetes
doesn't have
to be unman-
ageable for
citizens in
Columbia and Suwannee
counties.
The UF/IFAS
Columbia County
Extension and UF/IFAS
Suwannee County
Extension is hosting
'Take Charge of Your
Diabetes" classes 9 to
11 a.m. every Friday
from Sept. 9 until Nov. 4.
This session of classes
will take place at the
Suwannee County
Extension office.
The educational pro-
.gram is geared toward
adults with type 2 dia-
betes and teaches them
how to control their
blood sugar to reduce
health complications, said
Jenny Jump, Columbia
County Extension family
and consumer science/4-
H agent This is the third
series of classes the
extension offices have
offered for the program.
"In order to take
care of the citizens of
Columbia and Suwannee
County, we want to offer
programs to help them
be able to manage their
diabetes," she said.
'During the nine-week
program students will
learn from health profes-
sionals, Extension staff
and have a personal
consultation with a regis-
tered dietitian.
The rate of people diag-
nosed with diabetes is
going up, Jump said. The
Extension offices are also
working on a program in
the future that will deal
with preventing diabetes.
More than one tenth of
all health care expendi-
tures in the United States
in 2007 were attributable
to diabetes, according to
the American Diabetes
Association.
The number of
Americans diagnosed
with diabetes has risen
steadily from 10 million
in 1994, to 14 million
in 2000, to 19 million
in 2007. In Suwannee
County in 2006-2008 29
percent of deaths were a
result of diabetes
In Columbia County
diabetes is the sixth
leading cause of death,
according to the
American Diabetes
Association. The onset of
type 2 diabetes can often
be prolonged or even
prevented with a healthy
eating and exercise regi-
men.
Past participants in the
program have been able
to lower their amount of
insulin or get rid of some
medication relating to
diabetes, she said.
'"That's not going to be
the case for every one
but it gives a better living
situation," Jump said.
Part of the mission of
Extension offices it to be
able to take and deliver
research based informa-
tion to the community?
Jump said. Offices take
the latest research avail-
able to help its citizens
live and adapt to a better
life.
"The idea of the pro-
gram is to help people
live with less complica-

CLASS continued on 2D


. . I ....'

* i .1 .

* .1 |,|1 I .i



* i II .111.1

WON


. y Ext
*, ......."3 8 .

- It,


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Jenny Jump, UF/IFAS Columbia County Extension family and consumer science/4-H agent, speaks about how important diet
is to diabetics. She said a big concern for most diabetics is counting carbohydrates. 'Being aware of carbs is a big hang-up
for diabetics,' Jump said. 'People should be aware of the portion sizes and types of carbs and to have (any type of food) on
hand. It's different for each diabetic.'



Adidas launches barefoot shoe


By SARAH SKIDMORE
AP Business Writer


PORTLAND, Ore. -
Adidas is g6ing barefoot.
Theworld's second-largest
athletic company unveiled its
first "barefoot" training shoe
Tuesday, which is designed
to mimic the experience of
exercising barefoot while
providing the protection,
traction and durability of a
shoe. The Adipure Trainer,
which is a cross between a
glove for the feet and a tradi-
tional shoe, hits U.S. stores
in November priced at $90.
The barefoot shoe is part
of a strategy by Adidas,
which is based in Germany,
to expand into the U.S.
where rival Nike dominates.
Adidas joins a list of athletic
makers trying to tap into the
small but burgeoning U.S.
market of fanatical runners
and gym-goers who swear
by shoes designed with as
little material between the
wearer and the ground as
possible.
"People who believe bare-
foot is the way to go...are
very emphatic about it," said
Matt Powell, an analyst with
industry research organi-
zation SportsOneSource
Group. "They want to spread
the message. It sounds reli-
gious but some of them are
evangelical about it"
The athletic shoe and
clothing business has been


ASSOCIATED PRESS
In this product Image provided by Adidas, the Adipure Trainer W, in intense blue and metallic
silver, is shown. Adidas is trying to tap into the growing niche U.S. market of people who want
to run in shoes that mimic the experience of running barefoot, but offer the protection, traction
and durability of traditional athletic shoes.


fairly resilient during the
U.S. economic downturn, but
it is an industry that thrives
almost entirely on new
products. When it comes to
shoes, the latest and great-
est captures the U.S. cus-
tomer: While barefoot shoes
make up a tiny fraction of the
$22 billion U.S. athletic shoe
industry, it is one of the fast-
growing categories. Sales
have more than doubled
in the past year to roughly
$750 million, according to
SportsOneSource.
The barefoot shoe move-
ment has been fueled by
the barefoot running cul-
ture, which has long had
proponents, but caught on
more widely in 2009 after


Christopher McDougall's
book "Born to Run" explored
the history and benefits of it
The theory is that running
barefoot enables the body to
move naturally and optimal-
ly, while traditional shoes
inhibit that
The movement gained
more traction last year when
Harvard biologist and run-
ner Daniel Lieberman pub-
lished a paper in the journal
Nature that concluded that
running barefoot seems
to be better, for the feet,
producing far less impact
stress compared to those in
traditional running shoes.
The practice of run-
ning in barefoot has been
a somewhat controversial


topic, though. The odd
appearance of the shoes
sometimes causes heads to
turn in parks. Some races
across the country will
not allow people to run in
them. And some barefoot
shoe wearers themselves
have reported injuries after
using them.
Shoemakers and health
professionals say many of
the injuries are a result
of people using the shoes
too quickly. They suggest
people trying to make the
switch from traditional
shoes to barefoot ones do
so gradually increasing
distance over time to let
the body adjust to how it
naturally is meant to move.


Burger King adds oatmeal to menu


By SARAH SKIDMORE
AP Food Industry Writer

PORTLAND, Ore. -
Oatmeal is the new burger.
Burger King, the world's
second-largest hamburger
chain, added oatmeal to its
breakfast menu this week,
joining a slew of other
chains, that have brought
the hot cereal out of the
cupboard and into restau-
rants and drive-thrus.
Burger King says it is
trying to offer customers a
healthier breakfast option
beyond its sausage crois-
sant sandwiches and french
toast dipping sticks. It's also
an attempt by the strug-
gling chain to catch up to
competitors and boost sag-
OATMEAL continued on 2D


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Burger King is adding oatmeal to its breakfast menu as the struggling fast-food chain tries to
reinvent itself. The world's second-largest burger chain says the move balances out its menu
to offer customers a healthier breakfast option.









LAKE CITY REPORTER LIFE SUNDAY, AUGUST 28, 2011


'Hi' from your community college!


Lake City is a very diverse town,
and includes farmers, laborers,
small businesses, office work-
ers, and .professional people.
The populace is made up of
multiple races and ethnic groups, as well
as people of all ages. And like Lake City,
your college is a community college, with
a diverse population.
I teach psychology at Florida Gateway
College, which for the last half century
was a community college named Lake
City Community College. This year the
college has expanded by including four-
year degree programs like nursing and
agriculture. It's still a "community" col-
lege, because of efforts to be a good citi-
zen in the community. It's responsive to
educational and career needs of citizens
it serves, and it serves as a convention
center, a center for performing arts, and a'
community resource offering a variety of
services and providing volunteers to the
community.
FGC today makes an effort to have


"something for every-
one," and to meet more
than just the educational
needs of the community.
The curriculum includes
not only academic and
career courses, but
also arts and programs
like agriculture, nurs-
ing, CDL trucking, golf Robert De
course management, Bob.Denny8@gmai
and technology and
computers.
A large new and improved library is
under construction, and the existing
library building is being converted into
a multipurpose student center. It will
have computers available for students,
cozy study areas, and even recreational
facilities for informal fun and meetings.
There's a computer lab, which helps stu-
dents with developmental needs in math
and writing, languages, and for assistance
in writing term papers. ,Video games and
other resources are planned for the stu-
dent center.


in
.COI


Students typically report
that they really enjoy
the Human Growth and
Development classes.
^ Like the town and the
college, the classes are
diverse. Unlike the past,
these days at FGC we
emphasize and encourage
iny teenage students, young
mn and middle adult students,
and older adults interest-
ed in returning to school.
There's a special emphasis on including
and recruiting "nontraditional students,"
those who are not the traditional college
age young people.
In modern times, we sometimes miss
having close contacts with people of all
ages and backgrounds. In human growth
and development class, we study the
unique psychology of each age group-
newborn infants, preschoolers, middle
school kids, teenagers, young and middle
adults, and late adults or seniors. For
most of my students, its their first time


to learn about scientific research and
psychology. In a variety of class activi-
ties; they learn how to develop and carry
out research plans, and actually bring in
subjects of different age groups and carry
out their own research plans. We typi-
cally find that everyone has a story, and
something we can learn from.
Every age group passes through mile-
stones associated with that age, problems,,
challenges, and opportunities. Students
report that there is so much to learn from
every age group, and that they'enjoy the
opportunity to work with and to get to
know these folks.
Check us out! Call the FGC switch-
board at (386) 752-1822, or check out our
web site at FGC.edu. We'd love to hear
from you.
Robert Denny is a licensed mental
health therapist in Florida, retired from
counseling troubled youth and families
for 15 years, volunteered at the Lake
City Veterans' Hospital and hospice, and
served as Coordinator for Gilchrist County
Community Emergency Response Team.


Matrimonial news OATMEAL: Burger King's latest breakfast offering


Continued From Page 1D


going sales by appealing to
customers beyond its base
of burgers-and-fries fans.
"We are definitely look-
ing to broaden our target
and our audience," said
Leo Leon, vice president
of global innovation for
Burger King Corp.
Breakfast is becoming
the most important meal
of the day for restaurants
- accounting for nearly 60 per-
cent of traffic growth between
2005 and 2010 and oatmeal
is the latest battleground. Its
low-cost, easily prepared and
doesn't spoil quickly. It also
appeals to consumers who
want quick, affordable food
that they perceive as health-
ier than' the. typical fast-food
breakfast fare.
StarbucksCorp.,theworld's
biggest .coffee chain, said its
$2.49 oatmeal has become its
most popular, breakfast item
since -it began offering it in
2008. Last year, McDonald
Corp., the world's largest
burger chain, added $2.99
oatmeal to its menu. Fast food
chain Chik-fil-A and Denny's
casual dining restaurants also
offer oatmeal, for $2.49-$2.85
and 3.49-$4.49, respectively.
Burger King's oatmeal, at
$1.99, is the cheapest of the
group.
Restaurants are trying to
capitalize on oatmeal's good-
for you reputation. But some
industry. experts say it's
not a good fit for fast-food
chains.
McDonald's has faced
scrutiny for its oatmeal's
4.5 grams of fat and 260 to
290 calories. Thafs roughly


equal to the number of calo-
ries in its own hamburger
or cheeseburger respective-
ly. By comparison, Burger
King's oatmeal, which was
created by Quaker Oats Co.,
has 110 to 270 calories and 1
to 4 grams of fat.
Still, Steve West, an ana-
lyst at Stifel Nicolaus, said:
"People don't go to Burger
King or McDonald's for
their oatmeal ... they go for
an Egg McMuffin."
For Burger King, oatmeal
is part of a larger strategy.
It's critical for the chain to
find a convenient new break-
fast option. Burger King said
about 10 to 15 percent of its
customer visit during break-
fast. And the fast-food chain
sells the majority of its food
to-go or at the drive-thru.
The company also is
eager to replicate the suc-
cess of McDonald's, which
has reinvented itself as a
more hip and healthy place
to eat remodeling stores,
offering wireless access
and introducing new salads,
smoothies and fancy coffee
drinks. Thats helped it bring
in higher-income customers
rather than just the young
males that fast-food chains
typically depend on a
demographic hit particularly
hard by unemployment in
the weak economy.
Burger King, based in
Miami, has a lot of catching
up to do. McDonald's brought
in more' than $32 billion in
U.S. sales lastyear, nearly four
times Burger King's $8.7 bif
lion, according to research
firm Technomic. That was


a 4.4 percent increase for
McDonald's, and a 2.5 per-
cent decline for Burger King.
In the second quarter,
Burger King's profit fell 13
percent and its revenue fell
4 percent to $596.2 million,
due in large part to its weak-
ness in its North American
operations. McDonald's
profit rose 15 percent and
revenue grew 16 percent to
$6.9 billion during its compa-
rable period.
Ifs going to take more
than a hot meal to turn
Burger King's business
around. Industry experts
say the company has let its
product lineup grow stale
and the quality of its stores


has deteriorated.
"You can sell all the oat-
meal and lattes and smooth-
ies you want," said West,
the analyst. "But they've
got to remodel the stores
- for the most part Burger
King stores are very old
and rundown."
Burger King, which has
been reevaluating its busi-
ness since it was acquired
by investment firm 3G
Capital last year, recently
made other changes to
boost its business. The
chain said Friday that it
was retiring its mascot
"The King" and launching
a new campaign focused
more on food.


CLASS: Diabetes


Continued From Page If)
Stion," she said. "'You're not ,-
going to get rid of diabetes
but you can have less com-
plications."
The deadline to register
for 'Take Charge of Your
Diabetes" is Sept. 7. Call
Jump at the Columbia
Extension office at (386) 752-
5384 or Cathy Rogers at the
Suwannee County Extension
office at (386) 362-2771
The class costs $75 and
the program fee includes
program materials, recipes,
health assessments and a
private session with a regis-
tered dietitian, she said.
Participants are also
encouraged to bring a
support member,. such


t


sas a spouse or child, at
no additional cost to the
classes, Jump said. Support
members are able to learn
how they can better aid in
the participant managing
diabetes.
'"We've had couples in
there with one person say 'I
never realized I was inhibit-
ing change,'" she said.
If enough people are
interested in the class but
can't make it to Suwannee
County another one will be
offered in Columbia County.
"We've seen results with
this one program," Jump
said. "I stand behind it I've
seen it change lives not in
just small ways."


China, Crystal,
Flatware and Gifts
Couples registered:
Jessica Stalnaker
Travis. Melgaard
September 10, 2011


Ashley Cloninger
Justin Brimmer
September 24, 2011


Jill Peck
Bryson Johnson
September 24, 2011
We know exactly what
they want in a wedding
or shower gift, We update
their list as gifts are
purchased, and gift wrap.

WARD'S
JEWELRY & GIFTS
156 N. Marion Ave.
Lake City
752-5470


Dorrie Alyssa Sloan
of Lake City and James
Michael Albritton Jr. of
Lake City were united in
marriage April 2 at The
Country Club at Lake City.
The bride is the daugh-
ter of Don and Debra Sloan
of Lake City. The groom is
the son of Jamie and Kim
Albritton of Lake City and
James and Sonya Edgley
of Lake Butler.
The bride was given in
marriage by her father and
mother. The Rev. Wilbur
Regar, grandfather of the
groom, officiated the cer-
emony.
Virginia Barnett was the
flower girl. Dyanna Sloan
was the made of honor.
Bridesmaids were Lindsie
Albritton, Laurie Little and
Jamie Crews. Junior brides-
maid -kasELacey Edgley. .
Lane Albrittomn was
the ringbearer. 'Jamie
Albritton was the best
man. Groomsmen were


Drew Sloan, Scott Cassady
and Ronnie Crews. Junior.
groomsman was Rob
Barnett. -
Martha Johns Williams
and Linda Nettles were the
wedding directors. Music
was provided by D.J. Scott
Carroll.
The reception was held
at The Country Club at
Lake City.
The bride graduated
from Columbia High
School in 2005 and Lake
City Community College
School of Cosmetology
in .2006. She is currently
employed at Hot Spot Hair
Studio as a hair stylist.
The groom graduated
from Columbia High
School in 2007 and First
Coast Technical College,
fire college, in 2007. He is
currently employed with
the Columbia County Fire
Department.
The couple will live in
Lake City.


Dorrie Alyssa Sloan and James Michael Albritton Jr.


Hughes-Conroy
L.G.HughesofTexasand the son of Sharon and the
Wanda Opry of Wellborn late John Conroy of Lake
announce the engagement City.
and approaching mar- The wedding is planned
riage of their daughter, for 3 p.m. Saturday, Sept.
Shelia Elaine Hughes of 10 at O'Leno ,State Park.
Lake City, to Bi-iai Joseph A reception will follow at
Conroy of Lake City. He is VFW Post 2206.


Shelia Elaine Hughes and Brian Joseph Conroy.


Sloan-Albritton


Page Editor: Robert Bridges, 754-0428










LAKE CITY REPORTER ADVICE & CROSSWORD SUNDAY, AUGUST 28, 2011


DEAR ABBY


Wife in middle of family


feud faces painful choice


DEAR ABBY: I'm an only
child. My parents moved
three miles from my husband
and me after our first daugh-
ter was born. They were
determined not to miss a min-
ute of her life.
Mom's life has always
been centered around Dad,
my daughters and me. She
has never approved of my
husband because'he didn't
finish college and enlisted in
the military, unlike Dad, who
has two master's degrees
and retired from the Navy
as a lieutenant commander.
She regards my husband as
the "sperm donor," and that's
about all the credit he gets.

My husband now refuses
to set foot in my parents'
home, and I dread the next
event that will put them
together in the same place.
I have asked them to agree
to disagree for my sake and
my girls, but both feeI'justi-
fied" in their feelings. I feel asg
though I must make a choice
between the two. Please help.
-TORN IN TWO
DEAR TORN: Since you
must make a choice, choose
your husband. If you don't,
you stand a good chance of
being a divorced mother of
two with overbearing parents
judging every move you and
your daughters make for the
foreseeable future. Your par-
ents owe you and your hus-
band an apology for the way
they have treated him, and
frankly, you need to distance


Abigail Van Buren
www.dearabby.com

yourself from them until you
are strong enough to estab-
lish some adult boundaries.
** ** **
DEAR ABBY:. I was recent-
ly diagnosed with cancer. The
support I have received from
friends and family has been
wonderful. However, I have a
challenge.
A friend from work who
is a cancer survivor has
solicited money from other
co-workers on my behalf. I
didn't know she had done it,
but if I had, I certainly would
not have condoned it My
husband and I are well-off,
and my company's health
insurance is adequate for my
medical expenses.
My friend keeps trying
to find ways to spend the
collected money on me.
Unfortunately, she buys
things I neither want nor
need. I'm so uncomfortable
with this entire situation
that I don't know what to do.
How would you handle this?
- EMBARRASSED BY THE
ATTENTION .
DEAR EMBARRASSED.
I'd askthe friend for a list of


the names of the people who
contributed so I could thank
them for their thoughtfulness
and generosity. And when I
got it, I would NICELY tell
her that, while I appreciate
her collecting the money, I
do not need it and I want it
returned to the donors. Then
I would write each of the
donors a short, personal note
explaining the situation and
expressing my gratitude.

DEAR ABBY: Sometimes my
secretary says things like, "I
could just kill myself or, "Just
shoot me!" Abby, my son took
his life by shooting himself
two years ago. She knows
what happened because we
live in a small town.
I don't know what to say
when I hear her utter those
phrases, but it feels like some-
one has reached in and torn
a piece of my heart out Have
you any advice for me? S1IL1
GRIEVING FOR MY SON
DEAR STILL
GRIEVING: Your secretary's
level of insensitivity is astonish-
ing. Since it appears she hasn't
a due, the next time she says it
and she will tell her emphat-
ically not to do it again because
of the tragedy your family has
experienced firsthand involving
guns and suicide. If that doesn't
shame her into watching her
mouth, nothing will.

M Write Dear Abby at
www.DearAbby.com or
P.O. Box 69440, Los
',Angeles, CA 90069.


HOROSCOPES


ARIES (March 21-April
19): Take a look at your cur-
rent professional direction.
You can make changes to
raise your earning potential.
Dig deep and you'll find
something you have over-
looked that you can offer to
others at a premium. ***
TAURUS (April 20-May
20): Don't turn down any
invitations to socialize. Love
is highlighted, and having
fun should be penciled into
your agenda. Whether it's
visiting a spa or enjoying a
day trip, it's important that
you interact with people you
find inspiring.*****
GEMINI (May 21-June
20): Take baby steps. You are
likely to meet with opposition
no matter what you do or say.
Problems will result if you
overindulge. Rethink your
plans and consider sticking
closer to home and working
on projects that will help you
improve your current personal
situation. **
CANCER Gune 21-July 22):
Home, friends and family will
have its rewards. Open your
doors and listen to what's
being.said; your suggestions
-- -A * 1 1 --


THE LAST WORD
Eugenia Word

When you need encourage-
ment or help, what you do
for others now will be repaid.

LEO (July 23-Aug. 22):.
Don't let moodiness ruin your
day. The less you react or take
what others say seriously, the
better off you'll be. You are
in control, so don't let anyone
tell you otherwise or goad you
into a debate that you cannot
win. ***
VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept 22):
Get your facts and figures
straight before you take
action. Plan a day trip or
attend an event that will allow
you to engage in something
you enjoy or want to learn.
Love is highlighted, so include
someone special in your plans.

LIBRA (Sept. 23Oct 22): The
people you interact with now
will have interesting financial
prospects to share with you that
you should consider. Offering a
unique skill that you possess will
interest someone who sees its
value. **** .
SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov.


and advice wm oe appreciated.

CELEBRITY CIPHER
by Luis Campos
Celebrity Cipher cryptograms are created from quotations by famous people. past and present.
Each letter in the cipher stands for another.
TODA YdS CLUE: S equals C
"G B UMYYTL J KTLT VBP MLT XG HXNT,
GB UMYYTL KB J AMF XY BTYZ ... VBP
SM'G MHJ MVZ YPLG XY MLBPGF." ---
ZYTCT EPYYTGATLE

PREVIOUS SOLUTION: "Acting is the perfect idiot's profession ... as for me,
prizes are nothing. My prize Is'my work." Kathlrine Hepburn
(c) 2011 by NEA, Inc. 8-29


21): Make a subtle move
and you will do much better.
Opposition is sure to develop
if you are pushy in any way.
Put love first and enjoy the
company of someone who
understands you and can help
you turn your ideas into real-
ity. Physical activity will ease
your stress. **
SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-
Dec. 21): Tread carefully if you
want to bypass interference.
A problem with a friend, lover
or relative is apparent, and
avoidance at this point is prob-
ably a good idea. You need
to regroup and rethink your
strategy. **
CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan.
19): Making a physical move
or buying or selling real estate
is highlighted. Investments
will bring a good return, and
signing contracts will lead to
beneficial results. Sharing with
someone you love should be
on your agenda. *****
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb.
18): Honestly assess your
situation before you make
a decision. You will gain.
greater stability if you focus
on home and family. Making
others happy will in turn
make you feel good about
your future. ***
PISCES (Feb. 19-March
20): Don't venture from the
truth. You will not get away
with anything and must be very
explicit in how you express your
thoughts and feelings. Love can
go either way, depending on
how you present what you want
The past will play an important
role in the present andin the
future. **


SUNDAY CROSSWORD


UNDERWATER SEARCH By Alan Arbesfeld / Edited by Will Shortz 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 7 18

WHEN THIS PUZZLE IS DONE, LOOK FOR A NAME (HINTED AT B,Y 37-DOwN) HIDDEN 17 TIMES IN THE 19 20 21 22
GRID, EACH READING FORWARD, BACKWARD, DOWN, UP OR DIAGONALLY, WORD SEARCH-STYLE. 23 I 25 26
Across. 56 Sight near a 110 Prepared for 15 Notes to pick up .
1 One going into an drain YouTube, say o? 27 28 29 30


outlet,
6 Sonata movement
11 Org. for Lt.
Columbo ..
15 331/3 and others
19 Buzz
20 Huge quantity
21 Cross letters
22 la Douce"
23 Again
25 "I before E
except after C"
and others
27 Tampa-to-
Orlando dir.
28 Swelling of the
head
30 Carry illicitly
31 Modern: Ger.
33 Old Turkish
V.I.P.'s
34 "Now you ___

35 Skippy
alternative
38 Attachment
points under the
hood
42 Finnish city near
the Arctic Circle
46 Oodles
48 Street on old TV
49 Racketeer's
activity?
51 "Ideas for life"
sloganeer
53 Skips on water
55 "The Canterburi
Tales" pilgrim
For any three answers,
call from'a touch-tone
phone: 1-900-285-5656,
1.49 each minute; or,
with a credit card, 1-800-
814-5554.


57 Also 113 Tyson nickname 16 Self-righteous
61, Dpespapyer: ; 116 .uffix with, sort
Abb'r." plhaet '' 1i'7 Mid 22nd-
62 Mark Twain, j.g.i,-:1.19: "J.usta,sec" ". century'year
religiously 121 Hillary Clinton 18 Ed.'s
,.. speaking. ,,. and Nancy Pelosi convenience
64"Sp. miss 124 "Fargo" director. 24 French island
65 Human, e.g., 125 "This ___!" WSW of
foodwise 126 Inner tube- Mauritius
67 Salad orderer's shaped 26 Non's opposite
request 127 Perplexed 29 Tryster with
70 Mercedes 128 Objectives Tristan
competitor 129 Firm partAbbr. 32 Slippery ones
73 Bothered 13 Bag of 34 Awake suddenly
74 Attractive maybe 35 Teased
77 Mother of Horus, 131 Unlocked? 36 "Have --


in gyptian mytn
79 "Mona Lisa"'
feature
82 Prince Valiant's
son
83 Part of the Hindu
Godhead
88 Summer hangout
89 Italian 10
91 Organic
compound
92 Rights of passage
94 1936 Loretta
Young title role
96 Pioneering
computer
99 Back end of a
time estimate
100'Carolina
university
101 Terminology
104 ___ Banos,
Calif.
105 Skipping
syllables
107 Edible Andean
tubers
108 Cousin on "The
Addams Family"


Down
1 Maven
2-Bit of Viking
writing
3 Sign
4 Ladies' club
restriction
5 Miracle-___
6 Nicolas who
directed "The
Man Who Fell to
Earth"
7 Twice tetra-
8 Big name in
upscale retail
9 Cracked or torn
10 What Rihanna or
Prince uses
11 City of the Kings
12 Former Texas
governor
Richards
13 Like the alarm on
many alarm
clocks
14 Least hopeful


y


myself clear?'
37 2003 Pixar film
39 further..."
40 U.S.A. or U.K.
41 ___ Bator,
Mongolia
43 Stoic
44 Occasional
ingredient in
turkey dressing
45 1972 Bill Withers
hit
47 Applies, as paint
50 Banks and Pyle
52 PC key
54 Lower layer of
the earth's crust
58 Suffix with Capri
59 Magazine with an
annual Hot 100
60 Neighbor of Que.
63 Stood like a
pigeon
66 Improvised
musically
68 "Lord, is _-?"
69 In concert
71 Hope grp.


72 Spot
74 One concerned
with el nifio
75 Sans-serif
typeface
76 Field of stars?
78 Will of the Bible
80 Pick 6, e.g.
81 Someone _
84 Zero
85 "Sense and
Sensibility"
sister


86 Wood sawed
wood" (old
tongue-twister)
87 Hears again, as a
case
90 Treats with scorn
93 It often has
dashes
95 Fatigue may be a
symptom of it:
Var.
97 Approaches
boldly


98 O.K. Corral
gunfighter
102 Senior
103 Capital of
Eritrea
106 Little hopper?
109 Crown holder
110 Viva
111 Home
112 One may be
good or dirty
113 Wee, informally


114 Suffix with
arthr-
115 Sergeant in
"The Thin Red
Line"
117 "___ sorry!"
118 One of them
does?
120 Annual b-ball
event
122 Has been
123 Palindromic
girl's-name


Answers to last Sunday's Crossword.
HI P O STEM ATTARI R DAL I
ALAIN T ITO AHA I ELAN
S L I C E I N T EB E R T G I G A
NOTENOUGHTORET I REON
ASK OA ETU I DENSE

ELLIOT AFL DILATE FAX

GA A AR OLLTA IO
A C EA .,-J I L E N
P E ROT LOW RA D RMA

LET T L IA HA K S
FIN ALL OTI D U A I T

REE REPUTE RAN FACTOR

SALES FLAW OOP NNE
THAT H A S NT BEE NWA SHED
Y ETI LIESL AM I N ACI DS
E D N AN|ES T S RED N T 0 R


9 5 6 8 1


3 96 5


7 4 9


74 92 56


1 2


4 8


3 4


2 7 5


8 3 1 7


Z L L.6L 6L89 9


8 1 9 8 LL L 6 7


6 V 9 8 Z 9 L L


L 8 L 9 16 S 6 1


7 6 LL 9 c 89


9 9 Z 6 8 7 LL


c 9 6 79LZL 8


S 18 L 96L VlC


L L 7 8 9 9 6


Page Editor: Emogene Graham 754-0415







4D LAKE CITY REPORTER ADVERTISEMENT SUNDAY, AUGUST 28, 2011



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