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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028308/01646
 Material Information
Title: The Lake City reporter
Uniform Title: Lake City reporter (Lake City, Fla. 1967)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: John H. Perry
Place of Publication: Lake City Fla
Publication Date: 8/27/2011
Frequency: daily (monday through friday)[<1969>-]
weekly[ former 1967-<1968>]
daily
normalized irregular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Lake City (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Columbia County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Columbia -- Lake City
Coordinates: 30.189722 x -82.639722 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 95, no. 4 (Oct. 5, 1967)-
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000358016
oclc - 33283560
notis - ABZ6316
lccn - sn 95047175
sobekcm - UF00028308_01569
System ID: UF00028308:01646
 Related Items
Preceded by: Lake City reporter and Columbia gazette

Full Text





2 million Bachmann
Evacuations mount Let's take a look at
in anticipation minimum wage, tells
4^ 'In- jlax Beach crowd.
LIE 1o2i ****DIG1T 32 ;tory below
P0 PZ 117007 C 7
1, 7S 17- r 7
FL 326-1 1943


Lake ulty


Banned
Chinese censors
no fans of
Lady Gaga.
See story, 2A


Reporter


Saturday, August 27, 201 I www.lakecityreporter.com Vol. 137, No. 182 E 75 cents
i0


Lewis:


Guilty


on all


counts

Former school board
candidate convicted
of sex charges.

By TONY BRITT
tbritt@lakecityreporter.com
Grover Anthony Lewis, a for-
mer school board candidate
and a Columbia County NAACP
chapter first vice-president, wa!%
convicted of sexual activity with
Sa minor and
attempted sexual
activity with a
minor in circuit
court Friday:
A four-man,
two-woman, jury
tLewis deliberated for
I about 13 min-
ties before rendering its verdict.
The trial was held Friday* at the
Columbia County Courthouse.
Lewis was represented by attor-
ney Jeff Seigmeister.
Sexual activity with a minor
is a second-degree felony. Lewis
could face up to 15 years in state
prison and a $10,000 fine.
SThird Circuit Judge David W.
Fina presided over the case and
ordered a pre-sentence investiga-
tion, to be complete by Sept 26:
Fina ordered Lewis to the
custody of the Columbia County
Sheriff's Office where he will be
held pending sentencing.
"I anticipate that he will be sen-
tenced as a sex offender, which
would include all of the sanctions,
including having to register as. a
sex offender," said Skip Jarvis,
Third Circuit State Attorney.
Lewis, 47, was arrested and
charged in June 2010 following a
week-long investigation into alle-
gations that he had an inappropri-
ate relationship with a girl who
was 17 at the time.
According to Columbia County
sheriff's reports, CCSO Det.
Deborah Marszalek was assigned
to investigate the case on June 2,
2010, after the accusations were
first made by a family member of
the girl. During the investigation,
Marszalek reported that the girl
admitted to having a relationship
with Lewis.
Lewis was initially booked into
the Columbia County Detention
Facility on $15,000, but bonded
out later that afternoon.
In 2006, Lewis challenged
current school board member
Linard Johnson for a seat on the
Columbia County School Board.
"The law is clear," said Jarvis.
"We hold an adult responsible
and cannot condone their tak-
ing sexual advantage of a child.
t recognize that Mr. Lewis has
done a lot of good for the commu-
nity and his church, but we must
protect our children. Under the
law he must be held accountable.
There can be no other way."


~II I!II CALLUS:
(386)752-1293
SUBSCRIBE TO
THE REPORTER:
Voice: 755-S44S
66iJ,0iA- : i Fax: 7S2-9400





m*4sS^ ^^H


Moving day gone bad


ANTONIA ROBINSONI Lake City Reporter
A Budget rental moving truck driven by Ramon Ochoa, 57, of Orlando, overturned on the 1-75 South exit ramp Friday around noon. Ochoa was driv-
ing west on 1-10 and exited south onto 1-75 when the truck started drifting off the road, according to Lt. Mark Boatright of the Florida Highway Patrol.
Ochoa overcorrected and the truck turned over on its side. He was taken to Lake City Medical Center as a precaution.



2 million ordered to leave as


Irene takes aim at East Coast


By JENNIFER PELTZ and
MICHAEL BIESECKER
Associated Press
MOREHEAD CITY, N.C. Whipping
up trouble before ever reaching land,
Hurricane Irene zeroed in Friday for a
catastrophic run up the Eastern Seaboard.
More than 2 million people were told to
move to safer places, and New York City
ordered its entire network of subways
shut down for the first time because of a
natural disaster.
As the storm's outermost bands of
wind and rain began to lash the Outer


Banks of North Carolina, authorities in
points farther north begged people to
get out of harm's way. The hurricane lost
some strength but still packed 100 mph
winds, and officials in the Northeast, not
used to tropical weather, feared it could
wreak devastation.
"Don't wait. Don't delay," said President
Barack Obama, who decided to cut short
his summer vacation by a day and return
to Washington. "I cannot stress this high-
ly enough: If you are in the projected
path of this hurricane, you have to take
IRENE continued on 3A


Off to the races


Courtesy photo
A Goodyear blimp landed at the Lake City Gateway Airport for one night earlier this week as it attempted to stay
ahead of Hurricane Irene. The blimp was en route from Pompano Beach to Bristol Motor Speedway in Bristol,
Tenn., to take part in NASCAR's IRWIN Tools Night Race tonight.


98
T-Storm Chance
WEATHER, 2A


CV" Y\ Opinion ...
^ ~People ....
Obituaries
Advice & Comics
Puzzles


Travelers wait in line to board Amtrak's
Northeast Regional train to Boston at Union
Station in Washington on Friday.


Bachmann:
Minimum
wage worth
looking at

By BRENDAN FARRINGTON
AP Political Writer
JACKSONVILLE BEACH
Republican presiden-
tial candidate Michele
Bachmann said Friday she
wouldn't rule out changes
to the federal minimum
wage as a way to lower the
cost of doing business and
lure corporations back to
the United States.
The Minnesota congress-
woman told supporters at
WAGE continued on 3A

4 COMING
SUNDAY
in Evening up
the SCORE.


TODAY Ih
PEOPLE
The Kardashia
Kollection.


.. m ain.4
,.- .'" "' ,, :"t .. ;, '*- *


S"- : Click Now For Details!
*****.* uF, hon s i ;. .1,









LAKE CITY REPORTER DAILY BRIEFING SATURDAY. AUGUST 27, 2011


Celebrity Birthdays


CA$H 3 Friday:
Afternoon: 1-5-1
Evening: N/A


jpk y4H Friday:
Afternoon: 3-0-6-0
Evening: N/A


Eim~aki -
Thursday:
5-13-15-18-22


PEOPLE IN THE NEWS


Kris Jenner, Sheryl Underwood join 'Talk'


NEW YORK
A person familiar with the
CBS daytime show "The
Talk" has said the show
is adding two new faces
to its second season.
The person said Kris Jenner, real-
ity TV personality and mother of the
Kardashians, will fill in for Sharon
Osbourne for two weeks at the
start of the new season and could
be a regular fill-on for Osbourne.
The other newcomer will be come-
dian and radio personality Sheryl
Underwood. She will co-host the
show for the first two weeks and
- could stay on. The person was not
authorized to discuss the cast and
spoke on condition of anonymity.
S 'The Talk" debuts its second
season Sept. 6 with returning hosts
Osbourne, Julie Chen and Sara
Gilbert.
Leah Remini and Holly Robinson
Peete left the show after the first
season.
Jenner has also been lined up to
co-host the fourth hour of NBC's
"Today" for one morning alongside
host Hoda Kotb in October, accord-
ing to a network spokeswoman.
And Jenner's memoir is expected
in November, her representative
announced Friday. To be released
by Karen Hunter Publishing, an
imprint of Simon & Schuster, the
as-yet-untitled book will discuss her
family. (Jenner is the mother of real-
ity TV stars Kourtney, Kim, Khloe,
Robert Jr., Kendall and Kyle). It also
will deal with her work in television
(she is the executive producer of the
Kardashian shows).

China bars some Lady
Gaga hits from sites
BEIJING China's Ministry of
Culture has ordered music download
sites to delete songs by Lady Gaga,
Katy Perry, the Backstreet Boys and
other pop stars within two weeks or
face punishment.


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Khloe Kardashian (from left), Kylie Jenner, Kris Jenner, Kourtney Kardashian, Kim
Kardashian, and Kendall Jenner pose together at the Kardashian Kollection launch
party in Los Angeles Aug. 17.


The ministry post-
ed a list of 100 songs
including Lady
Gaga's "Judas" and
Perry's "Last Friday
Night" that had
to be purged from
Lady Gaga the Chinese web
because they had
never been submitted for mandatory
government screening.

Autopsy: 'Treme' actor
found in river drowned
NEW ORLEANS An autopsy
conducted on an,
actor from the HBO
series 'Treme,"
and whose body
was pulled from the
Mississippi River in
New Orleans, found
that he drowned.
Showers Michael Showers,


44, played a police officer in the
series. Authorities said his body was
found in the river on Wednesday
after it was spotted by the captain of
the riverboat Natchez.

Fleetwood Mac could
maybe tour, record again
LOS ANGELES Fleetwood Mac
could be back on the-road soon.
Lindsey Buckingham said the
band is considering another tour and
even recording a new album in the
near future.
The guitarist, songwriter and pro-
ducer said there have been "a lot of
rumblings" about another Fleetwood
Mac tour, but that nothing is on the
books yet. Stevie Nicks has also
hinted at future Fleetwood Mac con-
certs. The band reunited for an inter-
national tour in 2009. Buckingham is
set to begin a solo tour next month.
* Associated Press


* Author Antonia Fraser is
79.
* Bluegrass singer-musician
J.D. Crowe is 74.
* Ex-porn star Harry Reems
is 64.
* Country musician Jeff Cook
is 62.
* Country singer Jeffrey
Steele is 50.

Daily Scripture


* Gospel singer Yolanda
Adams is 49.
* Country singer Colt Ford
is 42.
* Actress Chandra Wilson
is 42.
* Rock musician Tony Kanal
(No Doubt) is 41.
* Rapper Mase is 34.
* Actor Aaron Paul is 32.


"So in Christ we, though many,
form one body, and each mem-
ber belongs to all the others."
Romans 12:5


Thought for Today
"Genuine tragedies


;in the


world are not conflicts between
right and wrong.They are con-
flicts between two rights."
Georg Wilhelm Friedrich Hegel,
German philosopher (1770-1831)

Lake City Reporter


HOW TO REACH US
Main number ........(386) 752-1293
Fax number .............752-9400
Circulation ..............755-5445
Online... www.lakecityreporter.com
The Lake City Reporter, an affiliate of
Community Newspapers Inc., is pub-
lished Tuesday through Sunday at 180
E. Duval St., Lake City, Fla. 32055.
Periodical postage paid at Lake City, Ra.
Member Audit Bureau of Circulation and
The Associated Press.
All material herein is property of the Lake
City Reporter. Reproduction in whole or
in part Is forbidden without the permis-
sion of the publisher. U.S. Postal Service
No. 310-880.
POSTMASTER: Send address changes
to Lake City Reporter, P.O. Box 1709,
Lake City, Ra. 32056.
Publisher Todd Wilson .....754-0418
(twilson@lakecityreporter.com)
NEWS
Editor Robert Bridges .....754-048
(rbridges@lakecityreporter.com)
ADVERTISING
Director Ashley Butcher .. .754-0417
(abutcher@lakecityreporter.com)
CLASSIFIED
To place a classified ad, call 755-5440


BUSINESS
Controller Sue Brannon... .754-0419
(sbrannon@lakecityreporter.com)
CIRCULATION
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Please call 386-755-5445 to report any
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In Columbia County, customers should
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In all other counties where home delivery
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Circulation ..............755-5445
(circulation@lakecityreporter.com)
Home delivery rates
(Tuesday through Sunday)
12 Weeks.................. $26.32
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Rates indude 7%/ sales tax.
Mail rates
12 Weeks.................. $41.40
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52 Weeks.................$179.40


CORRECTION


The Lake City Reporter corrects errors of fact in news
items. If you have a concern, question or suggestion, please
call the executive editor. Corrections and clarifications will run
in this space. And thanks for reading.


AROUND FLORIDA


Sexual battery
suspect dies
HOLLY HILL- A
police standoff with a sex
offender suspect ended
with the SWAT team found
the man dead inside his
central Florida home.
Authorities said the
situation began about 5:30
p.m. Thursday when police
arrived at the home to
arrest the man on a charge
of sexual battery on a
child. SWAT team mem-
bers found the man dead
ahnout 2 am Fridav


Riding the waves
Sheriff resigns to
Sheriff resigns to A surfer rides a wave at the beach
be with ailing wife the main gate at Patrick Air Force I
ST. PETERSBURG
- Pinellas County Sheriff office are trying to deter- we
Jim Coats, 67, said he mine the cause of the fire. br
will resign from office in No further details were on
November to take care of immediately available. Be
his ailing wife.
Coats had already Turtle nests are sc
announced he would not Irene casualty fig
seek re-election next year. a.C
On Thursday, he said he DAYTONA BEACH sto
plans to leave office Nov. Rough waves from de
7 to be with his wife; who Hurricane Irene have Hi
has breast cancer. washed away many sea
Cat Coats was diagnosed turtle nests along Florida's m
with breast cancer in June. central coast. th
She begins chemotherapy Volunteers surveyed the ed
next week. damage to the turtle nests an
The Coats have been Friday morning after or
married 37 years. 12-foot waves hit the shore pc
Coats joined the sher- overnight. sa
iff's office in 1971 and he There were about 300 in.
was elected sheriff in 2004. turtle nests in Volusia to
His resignation is effective County before Irene
Nov. 7. passed the Florida coast. Ti
about 200 miles offshore. fo
1 dead in South Sea turtles are among a
Tampa condo fire group of animals that are
protected by local govern- B(
TAMPA Fire officials ments along the central m
said one person died in a Florida coast, pc
fire at a South Tampa con- Volusia County has dc
dominium complex. prohibited driving on its Fl
Firefighters had the fire beaches for the past two
under control within 15 days because of Irene. But C(
minutes of arriving at the the ban is expected to be Fr
scene early Friday. lifted on Saturday. fu
Authorities said a body du
was found inside the 1 injured, arrested
condo. in school bus fight ac
Investigators with fire w(
rescue, Tampa police and RIVIERA BEACH sid
the state fire marshal's Authorities said police U


ASSOCIATED PRESS


Wednesday across from
Base.

ere called when a fight
roke out among students
a school bus in Riviera:
each.
Palm Beach County
hool officials said the
ght broke out around 7
m. Friday when the bus
opped to pick up stu-
ents on its way to Dwyer
igh School.
School district spokes-
an Nat Harrington said-
at one student was treat-
I for injuries to his face
nd another was arrested
charges of batter on a
police officer. Harrington
id he believes the
jured student was taken
a hospital.

urf war rule OKd
or universities
TALLAHASSEE A
board of Governors com-
ittee has approved a pro-
osed regulation to tamp
own turf battles among
orida's state universities.
The Strategic Planning
committee, though, on
riday recommended the
11 board re-advertise it
ue to significant changes.
They include removing
contention provision that
would divide the 11 univer-
ties into eight regions.
Associated Press


THE WEATHER


HOT HOT



HI LO HIsi LOi2




Vahlosta
98/71
Tallahassee Lake City.
: 99 73 -k 73
'Pensacola Gainesvil
c7 7 i Panama City Q 7
S94'75
9, 9


; Tampa
f 97 S(


HANCEOF HANCEOF
T-STORMS -STORMS


HI 93LO 72 HI 91 0 72


* Jacksonville
95 78


e Daytona Beach
97 78
Ocala *
;.i. 7e


l
)


FL Myei
95, SO


City
Cape Canaveral
Daytona Beach
Ft. Lauderdale
Fort Myers
Gainesville
Jacksonville


9 Key West
Orlando Cape Canaveral Key West
96 '30 94 ;9 Lake City
Miami
Naples
West Palm Beach Ocala
95 8) Orlando
* FL Lauderdale Panama City
rs 97 ',i0 Pensacola
0 Naples Tallahassee
93 80 Miami Tampa


Ke t 7 1 Valdosta
Key West W. Palm Beach


TEMPERATURES
High Friday
Low Friday
, Normal high
Normal low
Record high
Record low

PRECIPITATION
Friday
Month total
Year total
Normal month-to-date
Normal year-to-date


95
76
90
70
102 in 1915
62 in 1930


0.00"
3.17"
26.56"
5.63"
35.76"


92., 83


SUN
Sunrise today
Sunset today
Sunrise tom.
Sunset tom.

MOON
Moonrise today
Moonset today,
Moonrise tom.
Moonset tom.


* 7:04 a.m.
7:59 p.m.
7:05 a.m.
7:58 p.m.


5:23 a.m.
6:50 p.m.
6:29 a.m.
7:30 p.m.


0003
Aug. Sept. Sept. Sept.
27 4 12 20
New First Full Last


pl 7p la 6C


73


Saturday Sunday







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';- a --_. -.-.,:-,.. -/- ;.,-,".;-,, .--at--.; c,, -.a


10 niLeseto bu
Today's
ultra-violet
radiation risk
for the area on
a scale from 0
to 10+.


I


Sunday
91 '7T. p
96 76.1

96 77t
95 72 PC
92 7.6,prc
91 33 sn
':,7 72 pc
95 81

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96 73 1
97 65 .0
.1 8 '


Monday
90, 77 1
92, 76.'i
96'81 i
94 77,i
94.. 72., pc
91 76 pc
91.83 1
96 72 p:
95,'30 1
92, 79 s
94 73 1
93. 78,1
S9 78,pc
93 76 s
90 71 pi:
93, 76 i
95 71 pc
94.60 1


An exclusive
service
brought to
our readers
by
The Weather
Channel.



weather.com


Forecasts, data and
: yh~., graphics 0 2011 Weather
wet j w wCentral, LP, Madison, We.
weatherJ *'www.weatherpublisher.com


(386 75-5445Z~l~fl


Page Editor: Jason M. Walker, 754-0430


4


-, u












Page Editor: Robert Bridges, 754-0428 LAKE CITY REPORTER NEWS SATURDAY, AUGUST 27, 2011


IRENE: 2 million evacuated as storm nears

Continued From Page 1A


precautions now."
The National Hurricane Center
said the storm is unlikely to get
any stronger and may weaken
slightly before reaching land. It
said Irene could weaken into a
tropical storm before reaching
New England, but that even below
hurricane strength it would be a
powerful and potentially destruc-
tive storm.
Hurricane warnings were issued
from North Carolina to New York,
and watches were posted farther
north, on the islands of Nantucket and
Martha's Vineyard off Massachusetts.
Evacuation orders covered at least
2.3 million people, including 1 million
in New Jersey, 315,000 in Maryland,
300,000 in North Carolina, 200,000 in
Virginia and 100,000 in Delaware.
"This is probably the largest num-
ber of people that have been threat-
ened by a single hurricane in the
United States," said Jay Baker, a
geography professor at Florida State
University.
New York City ordered more than
300,000 people- who live in flood-
prone areas to leave, including
Battery Park City at the southern
tip of Manhattan, Coney Island and
the beachfront Rockaways. But it
was not clear how many would
do it, how they would get out or
where they would go. Most New
Yorkers don't have a car.
On top of that, the city said it
would shut down the subways and
buses at noon Saturday, only a few
hours after the first rain is expected
to fall. The transit system carries
about 5 million people on an aver-
age weekday, fewer on weekends.
It has been shut down several
times before, including during a
transit workers' strike in 2005 and
after the Sept. 11 attacks a decade
ago, but never for weather.
Mayor Michael Bloomberg said
there was little authorities could
do to force people to leave.
"We do not have the manpower to
go door-to-door and drag people out of
their homes," he said. "Nobody's going
to get fined. Nobody's going to go to
jail. But if you don't follow this, people
may die."
Shelters were opening Friday
afternoon, and the city was placed
under its first hurricane, warning
since 1985.
Transit systems in New Jersey
and Philadelphia also announced
plans to shut down, and Washington
declared a state of emergency.
Boisterous New Jersey Gov. Chris
Christie .demanded people "get the
hell off the beach" in Asbury Park
and said: "You're done. Do not waste
any more time working on your
tan."
Hundreds of thousands of airline
passengers were grounded for the
weekend. JetBlue Airways said itwas
scrubbing about 880 flights between
Saturday and Monday, most to and
from hub airports in New York and
Boston. Other airlines said they
were waiting to be more certain
about Irene's path before .announc-
ing more cancellations.
Thousands of people were already.
without power. In Charleston, S.C.,


Joe Maupin
Joe Maupin, 78, passed away on
August 24,2011 in High Springs,
'FL. He was a sergeant in the US
Air Force and a
member of Mt. f
Pleasant Bap-
tist Church. He .,
was preceded in
death by 2 sons,
Joseph Clarence Maupin, Jr. and
Charles Maupin. He is survived
by his wife, Bea Maupin; sons
Mike Maupin High Springs
and Lee Maupin, Knots Island,
NC; daughters, Mary Lynn Mau-
pin, Miami, FL, Joyce M. Slaga,
Miami, FL, -Cathy Lewis, Hick-
man, Tennessee, Lisa Garrett of
Branford, FL, Donna Walters of
High Springs; brothers, Patrick
Maupin, Lebanon, KY, Rich-
ard Maupin, New Palestine, IN,
Bill Maupin, Springfield, KY;
sisters, Veronica Hagan, Lou-
isville, KY, Margaret Fowler,
Louisville, KY; 13 grandchil-
dren and 5 great grandchildren.
A visitation will be held on Sat-
urday, Sept. 10, 2011 from 10 to
11 AM, followed by a memo-
rial service at 11, at Mt. Pleasant
Baptist Church in High Springs
with Rev. Eddie Blalock officiat-
ing. In lieu of flowers, donations
may be made to the Shriners
Crippled Children's Hospital.
Arrangements are under the
care of EVANS-CARTER
FUNERAL HOME
in High Springs.

Michael "Ricky" Moseley
Michael "Ricky" Moseley, 57,
of Wellborn, FL passed away on
Thursday, August 25, 2011 in his
home. The Live Oak, FI native


several people had to be rescued
after a tree fell on their car.
Defying the orders, hardy hold-
outs in North Carolina put plywood
on windows, gathered last-minute
supplies and tied down boats. More
than half the people who live on
two remote islands, Hatteras and
Ocracoke, had ignored orders to
leave, and as time to change their
minds ran short, officials ordered
dozens of body bags. The last ferry
from Ocracoke left at 4 p.m. Friday.
"I anticipate we're going to have
people floating on the streets, and
I don't want to leave them lying
there," said Richard Marlin, fire
chief for one of the seven villages
on Hatteras. "The Coast Guard will
either be pulling people off their
roofs like in Katrina or we'll be
scraping them out of their yards."
Officially, Irene was expected
to make landfall Saturday near
Morehead City, on the southern
end of the Outer Banks, the barrier
island chain. But long before the eye
'crossed the coastline, the blustery
winds and intermittent rains were
already raking the coast. By Friday
evening 50 mph winds were mea-
sured at Wrightsville Beach, N.C.
Some took to shelters for protec-
tion.
Susan Kinchen, her daughter and
5-month-old granddaughter came
to West Carteret High School with
about 50 others. She said they didn't
feel safe in their trailer, and the
Louisiana native was reminded of
how her old trailer lost its roof to
Hurricane Katrina.
'We live in a trailer with her," said
Kinchen, referring to the infant. "I'm
not taking any chances."
National Hurricane Center meteo-
rologist David Zelinsky said earlier
Friday that he expected the storm
to arrive as aCategory 2 or 3 hur-
ricane. Later in the day, other fore-
casts showed it would strike most of
the coast as a Category 1. The scale
runs from 1, barely stronger than a
tropical storm, to a monstrous 5.
On Friday afternoon, Irene was a
Category 2.
Regardless of how fierce the
storm is when it makes landfall,
the coast of North Carolina was
expected to get winds of more than
100 mph and waves perhaps as
high as 11 feet, Zelinsky said.
"This is a really large hur-
ricane and it is dangerous," he
said. "Whether it is a Category
2 or 3 at landfall, the effects are
still going to be strong. I would
encourage people to take it seri-
ously."
Officer Edward Mann was driv-
ing down the narrow streets of
Nags Head looking for cars in
driveways, a telltale sign of people
planning, to ride out the storm
against all advice.
Bucky Domanski, 71, was work-
ing in his garage when Mann walked
in. He told the officer he planned
to stay. Mann handed Domanski a
piece of paper with details about the
county's evacuation order. It warned
that hurricane force winds would
flood the roads and there might not
be power or water until well after the

OBITUARIES


was a life long resident of Well-
born, Fl, worked in maintenance
for P.C.S. of White Springs,
FI and was a -
member of the -
Wellborn Bap- -. i
tist Church.
He is survived '' -
by his wife:
Jean Mose-
ley, Wellborn, 4i
Fl; Two sons:
William "Bill" Jesse Mose-
ley, Lake City, Fl and Michael
"Mike" Neal Moseley, Wellborn,
Fl; One Sister: Phyllis Kroetsch,
North Carolina; Seven Grand-
children: Logan David Mose-
ley, Jonathan Michael Moseley,
Henry James Moseley, Dyllon
Turbeville, Bryson Turbeville,
Gregory Robinson and Hailey
Robinson. Funeral Services will
be held at 10:00 am Monday,
August 29, 2011 at the Wellborn
Baptist Church with Rev. Bobby
Law officiating. Interment will
follow in the Mt. Olive Baptist
Cemetery. Visitation will be held
Sunday, August 28 at Daniels Fu-
neral Home from 2:00-4:00 pm.
DANIELS FUNERAL
HOMES & CREMATORY,
INC., of Live Oak and Branford,
FL in charge of arrangements.

Walter Ralph Woodbridge
Rev. Walter Ralph Woodbridge,
80, of Lake City, FL, died Thurs-
day, August25, 25,011, at his home
after a lengthy .- a.
illness. Born
in Canton,
NY, he was
the son of the
late Ralph and
Ethel Pearson
Woodbridge.


storm.
"You understand we can't help
you during the storm," Mann said.
"I understand," Domanski
replied.
After the Outer Banks, the next
target for Irene was the Hampton
Roads region of southeast Virginia,
a jagged network of inlets and riv-
ers that floods easily. Emergency
officials have said the region is
more threatened by storm surge,
the high waves that accompany
a storm, than wind. Gas stations
there were low on fuel Friday, and
grocery stores scrambled to keep
water and bread on the shelves.
In Delaware, Gov. Jack Markell
ordered an evacuation of coastal
areas.
"We could be open tonight for
business, but there's a very fine
line between doing the right thing
and putting our staff at risk,"
said *Alex Heidenberger, owner
of Mango Mike's restaurant in
Bethany Beach, who expects to
lose $40,000 to $50,000 in business.
"It's not so much we're worried
about the storm coming tonight,
but we want to give them a chance
to get out of town and get their
affairs in order."
Officials at Walter Reed Army
Medical Center in Washington said
they were speeding the transfer of
their last remaining patients to the
National Naval Medical Center in
Bethesda, Md. The transfer had
been planned for Sunday.
In Baltimore's Fells Point
neighborhood, one of the city's
oldest waterfront neighborhoods,
people filled sandbags and placed
them at the entrances to build-
ings. A few miles away at the
Port of Baltimore, vehicles and
cranes continued to unload huge
cargo ships that were rushing to
offload ahd get away from the'
storm.
In New York, the Mets post-
poned games scheduled for
Saturday and Sunday with the vis-
iting Atlanta Braves, and the Jets
and Giants moved their preseason
NFL game up to 2 p.m. Saturday
from 7 p.m.
And in Atlantic City, N.J., all 11
casinos announced plans to shut
down Friday, only the third time
that has happened in the 33-year
history of legalized gambling in
that state.
"I like gambling, but you don't
play with this," Pearson Callender
said as he waited for a Greyhound
bus out of town. "People are say-
ing this is an act of God. I just
need to get home to be with my
'family."
Jennifer Peltz reported from New,
York. Associated Press writers con-
tributing to this report were Bruce
Shipkowski in Surf City, N.J.; Geoff
Mulvihill in Trenton, N.J.; Wayne
Perry in Atlantic City, N.J.; Eric
Tucker in Washington;. Martha
Waggoner in Raleigh, N.C.; Mitch
Weiss in Nags Head, .N.C.; Alex
Dominguez in Baltimore; Brock
Vergakis in Virginia Beach, Va.;
Jonathan Fahey in New York; and
Seth Borenstein in Washington.


He attended Eastern Nazarene
College in Quincy, MA and re-
ceived his master's degree from
St. Lawrence University in Can-
ton, NY. He was a pastor in up-
state New York for over 20 years.
After moving to Lake City, FL in
1977, he was a prison Chaplain
at Lake Butler and at Colum-
bia Correctional Institution. He
loved working with wood, tell-
ing jokes and talking about Je-
sus. He was preceded in death
by his first wife, June Thomas
Woodbridge, a son: David Wood-
bridge, and a sister: Inez Wilson.
Survivors include his wife: Mary
K. Woodbridge, Lake City, FL;
two sons: Tim Woodbridge (Cath-
leen), Allentown, PA and Donald
Woodbridge (Holly), Brockton,
MA; one daughter: Cindy Crof-
ford (David), Cincinnati, OH;
one stepson: Jayme Simmonds,
Savannah, GA; one daugh-
ter-in-law: Jerry Woodbridge,
Marion, IN; one sister: Leona
Woodbridge, Plattsburgh, NY.
Thirteen grandchildren and two
great grandchildren also survive.
Funeral services will be con-
ducted Monday, August 29,
2011, at 3:30 P.M. at the Lake
City Church of the Nazarene
with Rev. Craig Henderson offi-
ciating and assisted by Rev. Gary
Monk. Interment will follow in
Forest Lawn Memorial Gardens.
Visitation with the family will be
at the funeral home on Sunday,
August 28, 2011, from 4 P.M.
to 6 P.M. In lieu of flowers,
memorial contributions may be
made to Lake City Church of the
Nazarene, P. 0. Box 1063, Lake
City, FL, 32056. GATEWAY-
FOREST LAWN FUNERAL
HOME, 3596 S. US Hwy 441,
Lake City, FL 32025 (386-752-


1954)isinchargeofarrangements.
Please sign the guest book at
www. gatewayforestlawn. com.

Obituaries are paid advertise-
ments. For details, call the Lake
City Reporter's classified depart-
ment at 752-1293.


WAGE: Change possible

Continued From Page 1A


a packed sandwich shop
that the corporate income
tax needs to be reduced
because companies are
moving to other countries
to save money. She was
later asked by a reporter


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Republican presidential
candidate Rep. Michele
Bachmann, R-Minn., speaks
to supporters during a cam-
paign stop at Angie's Subs in
Jacksonville Beach on Friday.

whether changes to the
minimum wage should also
be considered to balance
the cost of labor here and
overseas.
"I'm not married to any-
thing. I'm not saying that's
where I'm going to go," she
said.
She did say she wants to
look at all aspects of doing
business; from regulations to
tax codes, and will consider
anything that will help create
jobs. The federal minimum
wage is $7.25 an hour.
'I want to bring advis-
ers in from labor and from
manufacturers and from the
service industry and finan-
cial services. I want to know


what they know, because
that's what we've been
missing from President
Obama. He has virtually
no one in his Cabinet with
private sector experience,"
Bachmann said. "I want
to bring people who know
how to create jobs into my
administration."
The stop at Angie's Subs
was the first in a three-day
tour of Florida, a state that's
hoping to play a major role
in the. primary. With 29
electoral votes, it also is
the largest prize among the
states that neither party can
take for granted in the 2012
general election.
Bachmann told the crowd
she knows Florida will play
an important role in the
election.
'"We will be back here
many, many, many, many,
many times in Jacksonville,
and we're going to be old
friends and neighbors by
the time this' is all done,"
she said.
Though at one point, she
forgot she was in a.local sub
shop while talking about
helping businesses.
"Can you imagine if good
businesses like Subway,"
she began before the crowd
drowned her out shouting,
"Angie's!"
She made up for it by start-
ing a chant of "Angie's Subs!"
at the end of her remarks.
While she clearly excited
the crowd,, Vicki Higbee,
54, of Jacksonville said, she
isn't completely sold on
Bachmann. She said that
she's committed to voting
for a conservative but that
she also likes Texas Gov.
Rick Perry.
"I'm here to see what she
has to say," said Higbee.
"I love her and I love her
positions, but I'm not com-
mitted."


Creation Research

Conference set


A free Creation Re-
search Conference is set.
for 9 a.m.-3 p.m. Aug.
27 and 9:15 and 10:30
a.m. and 6 p.m. Aug.
28 at Southside Baptist
Church. The even will
feature Institute for Cre-
ation Research speakers


Dr. John Morris and
Frank Sherwin. Confer-
ences include Dino-
saurs, The Fossil Record
and The Young Earth.
Call (386) 755-5553.
The church is located at
388 SE Baya Drive.


THE VINEYARD OF LAKE CITY IS MOVING'
A Southern Baptist Church is /
q anything but traditional.
Come join us in our new home
* on Sept. 4th at 10:30 a,m.
Casual dress, special music,
drama,, and a baptism at r
" .1 1832 SW Tomaka Terrace
S (Off SW Bascom Norris Dr) next to Fancy Dancers
Pastor Bo Hammock
(386) 623-0026 or (386) 965-7012


SSuwannee

Valley

Electric

Cooperative
Suwannee Valley Cooperative, Inc.
GIS/Mapping Data Specialist I
Suwannee Valley Electric Cooperative, Inc. has an immediate opening
for a GIS/Mapping Data Specialist position. This position reports to
the Director of Engineering and. Will be responsible for maintaining
Geographic Information System Maps for the Cooperative. A high
school diploma and an Associate of Science degree or work equivalent
experience with a minimum of 1 year experience with GIS Mapping in
the electric utility field is required.
Applications and job descriptions may be picked up at the Suwannee
Valley Electric administration building, 11340 100th St., Live Oak. The
job description can be viewed on www.svec-coop.com. Resumes and
applications can be turned in at the above address with Attn: Vicky
Talmadge, or emailed to vickyt@svec-coop.com. The deadline for
accepting applications is Tuesday, September 6, 2011.
SVEC is an equal opportunity employer.


LAKE CITY REPORTER NEWS SATURDAY, AUGUST 27, 2011


Page Editor: Robert Bridges, 754-0428













OPINION


Saturday, August 27, 2011


ONE ANOTHER


ONE
OPINION


Black

youth lead

decline in

smoking

Here's some good
news for a por-
tion o our society
that doesn't always
seem to get much:
From the 1970s to the mid-1990s
medical researchers report a
steep decline in smoking among
African American youth.
A report on the American
Journal of Public Health said that
in the early 1970s the smoking
prevalence among black and
white youth was about the same.
In 1976 smoking among both
groups began to decline but the
decline was much greater among
young blacks.
According to researcher from
Penn State and Rutgers universi-
ties, "By the early 1990s, white
students were more than four
times more likely to have report-
ed smoking cigarettes within
the previous 30 days than their
African American counterparts."
Some critics suggested that
young African Americans sim-
ply shifted to other different
forms of abuse other forms of
tobacco, alcohol and drugs. But
the researchers also reported
an overall decline in the use
of licit and illicit drugs among
black high school seniors dur-
ing the same period.
The decline in smoking had a
positive payoff Between 1992 and
2006 a marked decline in the inci-
dence of lung cancer and lung can-
cer deaths among 20-39 year olds
that the researchers attributed to
the decline in cigarette smoking
among young African Americans
10 to 20 years earlier.
The journal report argues
that the biggest reason for the
decrease was increased ciga-
rette prices and suggested that'
other social and economic fac-
tors were involved.-
All of these factors may
be true and many of them
would presumably true for
white youths but we would
like to give the young African
Americans the benefit of the
doubt. Perhaps they were
inherently quicker to grasp the
connection between cigarettes
and the death from lung cancer
of smokers not much older
than themselves.
* Scripps Howard News Service

Lake City Reporter
Serving Columbia County
Since 1874
The Lake City Reporter is pub-
lished with pride for residents of'
Columbia and surrounding counties by
Community Newspapers Inc.
We'believe strong newspapers build
strong communities -"Newspapers
get things done!"
Our primary goal is to
publish distinguished and profitable
community-oriented newspapers.
This mission will be accomplished
through the teamwork of professionals
dedicated to truth, integrity and hard
work.
Todd Wilson, publisher
Robert Bridges, editor
Sue Brannon, controller
Dink NeSmith, president
Tom Wood, chairman

LETTERS
POLICY
Letters to the Editor should be
typed or neatly written and double
spaced. Letters should not exceed
400 words and will be edited for
length and libel. Letters must be
signed and include the writer's name,
address and telephone number for
verification. Writers can have two
letters per month published. Letters
and guest columns are the opinion of
the writers and not necessarily that of
the Lake City Reporter.
BY MAIL: Letters, P.O. Box 1709,


Lake City, FL 32056; or drop off at
180 E. Duval St. downtown.
BY FAX: (386) 752-9400.
BY E-MAIL:
news@lakecityreporter.com


www.lakecityreporter.com


On Steve Jobs and MLK


Two names loom large
in today's news. Two
names that ordinar-
ily we wouldn't think
about together.
But, in the great struggle
now unfolding before us for
our nation's future, it seems
to me these two quintessential
Americans are worth thinking
about in light of each other.
One is Steve Jobs.
The other is Dr Martin
Luther King, Jr.
Jobs, of course, is in the head-
lines because of his decision
to step down and retire from
Apple Computer, the company
he co-founded, from which he
later got fired, and to which he.
subsequently returned and res-
urrected.
Dr. King is in the news
because of the opening of the
King monument in Washington,
D.C.
Other than being in the news
at the same time, why might we
think of these two very different
Americans together?
I think they are icons of,
two essential but different and
opposing aspects of American
life. One is the individual and
the other is our social reality.
It's these two aspects of
American life, the dignity and
potential of individuals living
free, and the social reality, the
rules by which we all agree to
live and to which we all submit,
that has always caused tension
in American life. And this ten-
sion is becoming particularly
acute today.
Jobs is, of course, the essence
of what so many see what
America is about. The rugged,
free and creative individual. The


Star Parker
parker@urbancure.org
intrepid entrepreneur.
His success story is a story of
bucking the establishment and
being his own man. As a college
dropout, he and his colleague'
Steve Wozniak, with whom he
started Apple, brought new
technology to the American peo-
ple that not only revolutionized
our lives, but also caused the
corporate giant that supposedly
controlled the computer busi-
ness, IBM, to change itself.
King, on the other hand, is
about America's social reality.
What are the rules we live by
and what are the contours of
the field of life on which rugged
American individualists share
and live their lives?
The American focus on the
individual sometimes causes us
to lose focus that man is a social
creature as well as an individual.
No man, in those famous words,
is an island.
When 20-year-old Jobs
labored in his garage, building
the personal computer, he was
building a product fo serve oth-
ers. And those whose lives he
made so much better as result
of his labor and creativity com-
pensated him and made him a
wealthy man.
As critical as it is for the indi-
vidual human spirit to be free
to create, that individual agrees
to live with others by rules in a


society that hopefully permits
this to happen.
American history has been
about the ongoing challenge of
refining our understanding and
acceptance of the eternal truths
that enable men and women
to live together freely and cre-
atively.
Dr. King played a critical role
in moving this nation along in
this process. He helped the
nation understand that these
truths remained blurred if
some, for bigoted reasons,
could not participate and con-
tribute. All suffer for the ?mis-
sion of even a few.
King pushed the nation to
turn its eyes to the heavens so
that truth might be perceived
more clearly and, as result, our
freedom enhanced.
This is our struggle in 2011.
How do we understand the :
truths, the rules, by which we
live better so that our social
reality our laws and our gov-
ernment enhances rather than
stifles our freedom and creativ-
ity?
And so we should also note
that Jobs was born to a college
student, an unwed mother, who
put him up for adoption. It was
1955, some 18 years before Roe
v Wade.
Let's us be thankful this
young woman brought her child
into the world. Where would we
be today if not?
We still have many rules to
fix.

* Star Parker is president of
CURE, Coalition
on Urban Renewal and Education,
(www.urbancure.org) and author of
three books.


Expand Arlington Cemetery?


The 620 acres of
America's most hal-
lowed ground are
all but filled up. The
passing of the World
War II generation, the aging of
the Korea and Vietnam vets, and
a decade of U.S. war 'dead from
Iraq and Afghanistan make it
likely that Arlington National
Cemetery will be closed to any
more burials in just 14 years.
An average of 20 funerals
a day are pushing the total of
graves in the ground and cre-
mated remains in columbaria
past 260,000, as more than 7,000
veterans qualified to rest at the
historic cemetery choose to do
so each year.
That is a pace that has Rep.
Jim Cooper, D-Tenn., sounding
the alarm that some solution
must be found soon. But he
says two options now being
weighed fall far short.
One plan is to clear out a
ravine and a small field on one
edge of the cemetery to add
another 32 acres.
The other plan is to move a
highway and tear down a Navy
complex that houses about 1
million square feet of office-
space overflow from the nearby
Pentagon.
The lawmaker says other
options should be considered:
estAlishing another Arlington-
caliber cemetery at Gettysburg,


Lisa Hoffman
lisahoffman@shns.com


West Point, Annapolis or even
somewhere on the West Coast,
so families in that part of the
country wouldn't have to cross
the continent to visit their loved
ones.
There are 131 national cem-
eteries across the country and
most of those still have space,
though they don't carry the
prestige of Arlington.

It's been seven months since
President Barack Obama signed
a law barring TV commercials
from blaring at a higher decibel
than the programs they are
interrupting. But wrangling con-
tinues over the measure.
Cable companies say it is
unfair to make them responsible
for the volume of commercials
on broadcast and other pro-
grams they do not originate but
simply transmit via their cable
systems.
They, and others unhap-
py with the Commercial
Advertisement Loudness


Mitigation, or CALM, Act,
had until Aug. 1 to submit
their concerns to the Federal
Communications Commission,
which will enforce the law when
its rules are final.
The American Cable
Association, which represents
small and medium-sized cable
providers, says the law will
impose undue costs on its mem-
bers to monitor and quiet ads
that they had nothing to do with
inserting into the programming.
The fight to tone down the
rules is likely to continue for
months.
00*
Every year, federal agencies
are required to submit reports
to Congress on hundreds, if
not thousands of plans and
programs under the agencies'
purview.
Then, more often than not,
the reports get shelved away,
drawing little or no note.
A bipartisan group of Senate
and House lawmakers considers
that a waste of money and time.
Led by Sens. Joe Lieberman,
I-Conn., and Tom Coburn, R-
Okla., and Rep. Mike Quigley,
D-Ill., the group wants Congress
to make public all the reports
except those that are classified
or confidential for privacy rea-
sons.

* Scripps Howard News Service


4A


ANOTHER
VIEW


Justice for

Gadhafi's

American

victims



has brokered a
deal at the United
Nations to thaw out
more than $1.5 bil-
lion in frozen Libyan assets.
The funds are to be given to
the rebel Transitional National
Council to help 'avoid a poten-
tial humanitarian crisis. This is
a fraction of total frozen Libyan
assets worldwide; the United
States alone holds $30 billion.
With Moammar Gadhafi's
regime functionally ending and
a new government starting to
take power, it is time to use
part of this money to bring jus-
tice to Col. Gadhafi's American
victims.
The Gadhafi regime was a
longtime state sponsor of ter-
rorism. The most notorious
Tripoli-backed terror attack
was the Dec. 21, 1988, bomb-
ing of Pan Am Flight 103 over
Lockerbie, Scotland. That
assault killed 270 people, of
whom 190 were American
citizens. The Libyan govern-
ment, however, was com-
plicit in numerous other terror
attacks resulting in American
casualties, such as the 1985
attacks at airports in Rome
and Vienna, the 1986 La Belle
discotheque bombing in West
Berlin, the 1986 hijacking of
Pan Am 'Flight 73, and the
Sept 19, 1989, bombing of
the French UTA flight 772, in
which seven Americans were
killed.
One of the victims of the UTA
attack was Margaret Schutzius,
who was traveling back home
to the United States from the
Republic of Congo after fulfilling
her Peace Corps commitment.
The plane was destroyed in
flight over the Sahara Desert
when a bomb exploded in the
cargo hold. All 156 passengers
and 15 crew members died.
In 1999, six Libyan operatives
were put on trial in absentia for
the bombing in the Paris Assize
Court and found guilty. Over the
years, more than 200 Americans
have been killed or wounded by
Gadhafi operatives.
Libya normalized relations
with the United States in 2006.
In 2008, Libya agreed to pay
$1.5 billion to settle claims by
Americans against the Gadhafi
regime for terrorist activity.
These cases are being assessed
by the Justice Department's
Foreign Claims Settlement
Commission (FCSC), but the
amount in the kitty is insuf-
ficient given the vast scope of
Col. Gadhafi's terrorist activities,
some of which are only now
being uncovered.
Even a small portion of the
$30 billion in frozen Libyan
assets held by the United
States could provide funds to
make up the projected short-
fall needed to settle claims
against the Gadhafi dictator-
ship. The cash also could
provide the United States with
leverage in negotiating with
whatever government suc-
ceeds Col. Gadhafi's to provide
access to regime intelligence
and other documents that will
paint a more complete picture
of Tripoli's terrorist activities.
Regime change doesn't
end U.S. focus on this North
African nation. The United
States has an interest in the
fate of convicted Lockerbie
bomber Abdelbaset Mohmed
Ali al-Megrahi, who was
released from a British prison
in 2009 on supposed humani-
tarian grounds after a faked
cancer diagnosis claimed he


had just weeks to live. Al-
Megrahi was last seen on July
26 at a pro-Gadhafi rally. The
murderer should not die in
freedom.
* The Washington Times














FAITH



Saturday, August 27, 201 I v


&


VALUES


vww.lakecityreporter.com


Counting the


loss or the cost


The church member said, "I
counted the loss rather than the
cost" in response to the preach-
er's question "Why do you do
bad things?" The member was
looking only at the present and
not the future. How his actions
would affect only him and not
those around him.
This type of attitude will
lead to many erroneous deci-
sions in one's life. It is saying
that if what I will lose is less
than what I


will gain, then
I will do it
regardless of
whether it is -
good or bad.
Everything
is put into a
business type
attitude.
. Jesus used
the examples
of a builder


BIBLICAL ME


Carlton M
carton_mc@msn.co


counting the
cost of building
a tower and a king counting
the cost of going into battle
against an enemy (Luke 14:25-
35) to say to the "great mul-
titude" that being a Christian
will cost something. Are we
willing to pay that cost?
The church member related
that as a little boy, he would
compare the "chewing" he
would get from his mother,
with getting to play with his
favorite toy, after his mother
had expressly stated he could
not play with it Or, the licks he
would receive from his father's
belt because he went against
the father's command.
As an adult, this same
church member would do
things which brought about
pleasure to him without think-


ing about the effect it would
have upon his family. The "nag-
ging" that he received from his
wife, because of his improper
behavior, was just part of the
'loss." He never thought about
the possibility that it would
eventually cost him his mar-
riage. He never thought about
the effects this behavior would
have upon his children.
What about our attitude
towards pleasing God? Which
is our attitude
DITATION towards the
punishment that
we will receive ,
from Him? Are
we even "count-
ing the cost"?
Are we saying
to ourselves, "It
will not be that
bad"?
IcPeak So what do
om we have to
lose? In this life,
maybe family,
friendship, prestige, money,
power. But what will it cost us
in eternity if we are not a fol-
lower of Jesus?
What effect will our decision
not to follow Jesus have on our
family? What effect will our
decision to follow Jesus have
on our family?
Seeing the ripple effect on
those around him, the church
member changed his thinking
from "what will be my loss" to
"what will it cost me?" It was
no longer just about him. His
actions cost something..

Carlton G. McPeak is an
evangelist working in the
Lake City, Florida area. All
Scriptural quotations are from
the New American Standard


NOTES
Today
Pretty Hdt Tea
The annual Pretty Hat Tea is 5
p.m. Aug. 27 at Olivet Missionary
Baptist Church Fellowship Hall. The
tea is sponsored by the women of
the church. A variety of teas, both
hot and cold, will be available in
addition to a discussion on "Growth:
In church membership, enhanced
discipleship and community out-
reach."

Creation
Research Conference
A free Creation Research
Conference is 9 a.m.-3 p.m. Aug.
27 and 9:15 and 10:30 a.m. and 6
p.m. Aug. 28 at Southside Baptist
Church. The even will feature
Institute for Creation Research
speakers Dr. John Morris and Frank
Sherwin. Conferences include
Dinosaurs, The Fossil Record and
The Young Earth. Call (386) 755-
5553. The church is located at 388
SE Baya Drive.

Prayer rally
A Stand with Israel prayer rally is'
1-3 p.m. Aug. 27 at Deese Park in
Fort White.

Sunday, Aug. 28
The Taylors, a brother and sis-
ter quartet from Lillington, N.C.
is performing 6 p.m. Aug. 28 at
First Baptist Church of Lake City.
Admission is free. A lover offering
will be collected. Call the church
office at (386) 752-5422.

Tuesday
Support group meeting
Faithful and True meetings are
7 p.m. every Tuesday at Christ
Central Church in Lake City. The
perils of pornography and other
addictive sexual behaviors are dis-
cussed. Men are taught how to live
in freedom consistently everyday.
The group is strictly anonymous,
,and meetings are held in small pri-
vate office just north of the main
church. Call Tom at (386) 965-6377.


The rock & the keys


Read Matthew 16:13-19 (KJV).
Verse 18 says: "And I say also
unto thee, that thou art Peter,
and upon this rock I will build
my church; and the gates of hell
shall not prevail against it. And
I will give unto thee the keys of
the kingdom of heaven: and what
soever thou shalt bind on earth
shall be bound in heaven: and
whatsoever thou shalt loose on
earth shall be loosed in heaven".
This is the first time the word
church is used in the Bible. It
is used two more times in Matt.
18:17. It is not used again in
any of the other
three Gospels. BIBLE STLI
The English word
"church" comes
from the Greek
kuriakos (belong-
ing to the Lord),
but it stands for
another Greek
word ekklesia
(denoting an ,
assembly). The Hugh S
word is used 115 ems-hugh43@
times in the New
Testament, mostly
in the book of Acts and by Paul in
the general epistles. At least 92
times it refers to the local assem-
bly. The other references are to
all believers everywhere. Church
does not refer to the Baptist
Church, the Methodist Church,
The Catholic Church, or any
other man made assembly. The
church was born at Pentecost,
but only until the apostle Paul's
conversion do we really under-
stand the workings of the church
and its real meaning. Jesus
statement to Peter "Upon this
Rock I will build My church" has
caused much confusion among
believers.
I have found that there are
three major views among profess-
ing Christians. First, there are
those who say the confession is


he
com


the rock. Second, there are those.
who teach that Peter is the rock.
That would mean that peter is the.
rock that the church is built on.
Third, are the ones (including '
myself) who teach that the rock -
is the Lord Jesus Christ There
are many scriptures that teach us,
that the rock is none other than -
Jesus Christ 1st Cor. 3:9-11: "For
we are labourers together with
God: ye are God's husbandry, ye
are God's building. According to
the grace of God which is given
unto me, as a wise master builder,
I have laid the foundation, and
another buildeth
IES thereon. But let
every man take
heed how he
buildeth there-
upon. For other
foundation can
no man lay than
that is laid, which
is Jesus Christ
(KJV)". 1st Cor.
errill Jr. 10:4 speaking of
ncostnet the rock in the


wilderness plain-
ly says that rock
was Jesus. Ephesians chapter 2
speaks of Jesus being the chief
cornerstone. 1st Peter 1:1-6 tells
us what Peter thought about the
rock. Then to close the thought,
we turn to Mr. Vine's Dictionary.
The word Peter used here is.
"Petros"; in the. Greek means a
small stone. The word rock is the
word "Petra" and means a large
rock. In other words, the verse
might read, you are a small stone,
Peter, but upon this big rock I will
build my church.
So one can see according to
the Bible, the church founda-
tion is no other than our Lord
and Savior Jesus Christ Do you
know Him?

Hugh Sherrill is a Bible teacher
at Eastside Baptist Church.


9

L~.


ADVENT CHRISTIAN
First Advent Christian
1881 SW McFarlane Ave.
386-752-3900


Sunday School:
Sunday Service:
Wednesday Service:


9:45AM
11:00AM
7:00PM


ASSEMBLY OF GOD
FIRSTASSEMBLY OF GOD
1571 E Duval Street
386-438-5127
Sunday Worship 10:30 AM.

GLAD TIDINGS ASSEMBLY OF GOD
993 NW Lake Jeffery Road
386-752-0620
Sunday Worship 10:30AM & 6PM
Wed. Fam. Bible Study 7:00PM
"A church where JESUS is Real".


BAPTIST
BEREA BAPTIST CHURCH
SR47 S 755-0900
Sunday School 9:30
Sunday Worship 10:45AM &6
Wednesday Eve. Service 7
Interim Pastor Kenneth Edenfield

EASTSIDE BAPTIST CHURCH
196 SE James Ave.* 386-752-2860
Sun. Bible Study 9:45
Sun. Worship 11AM & 6
Wed. Prayer Mtg/Bible Study 6
Rev. Brandon G.Witt


)AM
7PM
'PM


AM
iPM
iPM


FRST BAPTIST CHURCH
Sunday Bible Study 9:15AM
Sunday Worship 10:30AM & 6:00PM
Wed. 6:00PM Prayer Service, &
Children Ministry 6:15PM
Downtown Lake Citya 752-5422
Rev. Stephen Ahrens, Pastor

OUVET MISK)NARY BAPTIST CHURCH
541 N.E Davis Street
(386) 752-1990
Ronald V. Walters, Pastor
Sunday School 9:45AM
Sunday Morning Worship 11:00AM
Wed. Mid-Week Worship 6:00PM
"In God's Word, Will & Way"
-- '^ "


PINE GROVE BAPTIST CHURCH
1989 N US Hwy 441
386-752-2664
Sunday Bible Study 9:45AM
Sunday Worship 11AM & 6PM
Wed. Kids & Youth Ministry 6:30PM
Pastor: Ron Thompson

SALEM PRIMITIVE BAPTIST
Sunday Services 10:30 AM
Pastor Elder Herman Griffin
752-4198 i


SOUTHSIDE BAPTIST CHURCH
388 S.E. Baya Drive* 755-5553
Sunday:


Bible Study
Morning Worship
Evening Worship
Wednesday:
AWANA
Prayer & Bible Study


9:15 AM
10:30AM
6:15PM

5:45PM
6:15 PM


TABERNACLE BAPTIST CHURCH
(Independent Baptist)
144 SE Montrose Ave.* 752-4274


Sunday School
Sun. Mom. Worship
Sunday Eve.
Wed. Prayer Meeting
Pastor. Mike Norman


10AM
11AM
6 PM
7:30 PM


CATHOLIC
EPIPHANY CATHOUC CHURCH
1905 SW Epiphany Court- 752-4470
Saturday Vigil Mass 5:00 PM
Sunday Mass 8:15 AM, 10:30 AM,
5:00 PM (Spanish/English)
Sunday School/Religious Education
9:00 AM-10:15 AM

CHRISTIAN
CHRISTIAN SCIENCE SOCIETY
239 SE Baya Ave.
Sunday Service 11:00AM
Wednesday Evening Service 7:30 PM

LAKE CITY CHRISTIAN CHURCH
Hwy 247 S. 755-9436
Sunday School 9:30 AM
Sun. Mom. Worship 10:30 AM
Wed. Prayer Meeting 7 PM
I '. i o,"I


CHURCH OF CHRIST
NEW HORIZON
Church of Christ,
Directions & Times 386-623-7438
Jack Exum,Jr., Minister

CHURCH OF GOD
LAKE CITY CHURCH OF GOD
167 Ermine St 752-5965'
Sunday School 9:45 AM
Sun. Worship 10:30AM & 6:00PM
Wed. Family Night 7 PM
Wed. Youth Service 7 PM
Pastor: Carroll Lee

EVANGEL CHURCH OF GOD
370 SW Monitor Glen 755-1939
Sunday School 9:45 AM
Sunday Worship 10:50 & 6:30
Wed. Spiritual Enrichment 7PM
"Shock Youth Church"
Boys and Girls Clubs
Bible Study
Pastor: John R. Hathaway

EPISCOPAL
ST. JAMES EPISCOPAL CHURCH
2423 SW Bascom Norris Dr.,
Lake City, R 32025 -386-752-2218
Website: www.stjameslakecity.org
HOLY EUCHARIST -
Sun. 8 & 10AM
Wed. 6:00 PM
Priest The Rev. Michael Armstrong


LUTHERAN
OUR REDEEMER LUTHERAN CHURCH
LCMS
1 1/2 miles S. of 1-75 on SR 47
755-4299


Sunday Services
(Nursery Provided)
Christian Education Hour
For all ages at 10:45AM
Pastor Rev. Bruce Alkire


9:30AM


SPIRIT OF CHRIST LUTHERAN
Hwy 90,1.5 miles West of 1-75 752-3807
Sunday Worship 10:OOAM
Nursery Avail.
Wed. Pot Luck 6PM Worship 7PM
Vicar John David Bryant





Morrell's
Your Complete decorating and
home furnishings store
SW Deputy) Jeff Davis Lane formerlyy Pinenmount Rd )
752-3910Sor 1-800-597-3526
Mon.-Sat. 8:00-5:30 Closed Sunda)


METHODIST
Rrst United Methodist Church


973 S. Marion Ave.
386-752-4488
Sunday School.
Sunday Morning Worship
Casual Worship Service
Traditional Service


9:45AM

8:50AM
11:00AM


Program opportunities available in all areas
for all ages.
For a complete schedule
contact church office at
752-4488

WESLEY MEMORIAL UNITED
1272 SW McFarlane 752-3513
(Adjacent to Summers School)
Sunday School 9:00AM
Worship 10:OOAM
Nursery provided
Vacation Bible School
9am-noon July 11-15
Pastor: The Rev. J. Louie Mabrey
www.wesleymem.com

WATERTOWN CONGREGATIONAL
METHODIST CHURCH
U.S. 90 E. turn on Cortez (next to Quality
Ind.) right on Okinawa.
Sunday School 9:45 AM
Sun. Worship 11AM & 6 PM
Wed. Night Service 7 PM
Pastor, Randy Ogbum

NAZARENE
LAKE CITY CHURCH OF THE NAZARENE
Services:
Sunday School 9:45AM
Sunday Worship 10:45AM
Wednesday 6:30PM
Adult, Youth Ministry, Children's Ministry
Pastor: Craig Henderson
Nursery Provided
SW SR 47 and Azalea Park Place

PRESBYTERIAN
FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
697 SW Baya Drive 752-0670
Sunday School 9:00AM
Sunday Worship Service 10:00 AM
NURSERY PROVIDED
Pastor Dr. Roy A. Martin'
Director of Music: Bill Poplin


PENTECOSTAL
FIRST FULL GOSPEL CHURCH
NE Jones Way & NE Washington St
Sunday School 10:00 AM
Morning Worship 11:00 AM
Evangelistic Service 6:00 PM
Youth Services Wednesday 7:00PM
Mid-week Service Wednesday 7:00 PM
For info call.755-3408' Everyone Welcome
Pastor: Rev. Stan Ellis

NON-DENOMINATIONAL
CHRIST CENTRAL MINISTRIES
Leadership Services 9:00AM
Sunday Morning 11:00AM
Wednesday Service 7:00PM
217 Dyal Ave., from Hwy 90 take
Sisters Welcome Rd., go 5 miles, South,
church on left.* 755-2525
Lead Pastor: Lonnie Johns
"A Church on the Move"

CHRISTIAN HERITAGE CHURCH
Comer SR. 47 & Hudson Circle
Sunday Celebration 10:30 AM
Pastor Chris Jones 752-9119

FALLING CREEK CHAPEL
Falling Creek Road 755-0580
First and Third Sundays 9:30 AM.
Second and Fourth Sundays 3:00 RM.
Pastor: Rev. Cheryl R. Pingel

NEW BEGINNING CHURCH
Highway 242 E. of Branford Highway
Sunday School 10:OOAM
Morning Worship 11:00AM
Sunday Evening 6:00PM
Wednesday 7:00OPM
A Full Gospel Church Everyone Welcomed
(386)755-5197


Central States
Enterprises
Columbia County's Feed Headquarters
FEED PET SUPPLIES LAWN & GARDEN
ANIMAL HEALTH
668 NW Waldo St. 386-755-7445

MIKELLS POWER EQUIPMENT, INC.
Your Lawn & Garden Headquarters
MOWERS CHAIN SAWS TRIMMERS
1152 US 90 WEST LAKE CITY, FL.
386-752-8098




LAKE CITY
Srt .755-7050


BAYWAYjanitorial Services
FIRE & Water Restoration
Floor & Carpet Care
Residential & Commercial
755-6142

North Florida
IXAPharmacy
7 Locations to Serve You
Lake City, Ft. White, Branford,
Chiefland, Mayo & Keystone Heights


W. C.4I. Soi4.y J I



Supercenter
"LOWPRICES EVERYDAY"
US 90 WEST a55-24271

GWHunter, Inc.
cheon. Chevron Oil
W Jobber



Holly ectrc, Inc.
"Quality rk at a reasonable price"
We also do solar hook-ups
(386) 755-5944


FOOD STORES
Open 7 Das a Week
1036 1. I)uval St., Lake Cit FL
(386) 752-0067
Fresh Meat. Fresh Produce!
[ a, l thm hrough (Irut whch 0 tr ngthecu h me"
Philipp*an 4 13
, ,ll l ,
I ,' *\ OBSTETRICS & GYNECOLOGY
I Weight Loss 69 & Hair Removal :69
,' Accepting all Insurance, No Ins visit 150
(386) 466-1106
Located Shands Lake City & Live Oak


5A


Ilay Electric Cooperative, Inc.
Competitive rates, non-profit,
right here in your community.
Lake City District 386-752-7447
clayelectric.com


ANDERSON COLUMBIA CO., INC.
ASPHALT PAVING
COMMERCIAL .INDUSINIAL
Site Preparation Road Building Parking Lots
Grading & Drainage
752-7585
871 NW Guerdon St, Lake City


VB= HARRY'S
,.b.g.A Heating & Air Conditioning Inc
Harry Mosley, President

Puon 752-2308 -0


OF LAECT






LAKE CITY REPORTER ADVERTISEMENT SATURDAY, AUGUST 27, 2011


I SrLI S A A- ^ESr


Thank You
Lake City &
Surrounding
Areas for


YEARS


Locally Owned & Operated
Charles & Angie Neeley
1149 E. Baya Ave.

386-752-1449


Generations


ShandsL,_ckeSf iDre
Regional Medical Center

1911 -2011
368 NE Franklin Street, Lake City, FL 32055 386-292-8000
ShandsLakeShore.com


LAKE CITY
for voting us Best of the Best
Best Carpet Cleaners and
Best Janitorial cleaning service


B


The Bayway Group, LLC
AYWAY


Meeting The Needs Of Home And Industry
Celebrating 30 Years of Service to the Community
COMMERCIAL & RESIDENTIAL


* Janitorial Services
* Tile, Grout and General
Floor Maintenance
* Fire, Water and
Storm Restoration


* Upholstery Cleaning
* Emergency Water
Extraction & Dry Down
* Carpet & Rug Cleaning
* Odor Control


24 hours a day 7 days a
week emergency call out

(386) 362-2244
(386) 755-6142
1-888-849-8234


- - --. -


636 Helvenston St. SE,
Live Oak, Florida
www.baywayservlces.biz
The Bayway Group, LLC dba Bayway Services


Trusted for


IF U
WC~ANINO~~
IL-WA
IL RES~OAT~* a
-A
- I


Page Editor: Xxx, 754-xxxx









Lake City Reporter


Story ideas?

Contact
Tim Kirby
Sports Editor
754-0421


SPORTS


Saturday, August 27, 201 I


www.lakecityreporter.com


Section B


FROM THE SIDELINE


Brandon Finley
Phor- ,: -_ 754-0420 .
binley@lakecityreportercom

Tebow's

biased

judges

Go ahead
and call me
a Tebow
homer, but
there's never
been a more polarizing
figure in sports.
How else can the sway
of emotions toward Tim
Tebow be explained? I
may be slightly on the
right wing of Tebow love,
but that doesn't mean I'm
blind.
What I don't
understand is how he's
getting dogged so badly
by the media. Tebow
was never expected to
light the league on storm
his first season in the
NFL. He wasn't asked to
be the next Matt Ryan.
He was envisioned to
do something along
the lines of what Aaron
Rodgers did in Green
Bay.
As someone who
openly embraces his
faith, Tebow has becomer'
the Jesus of the NFL.
No, he isn't dying for all
players' sins, but there
are similarities between
the two.
Tebow isn't turning
water into wine. He
isn't healing the blind.
Instead, he's facing
the persecution that
Jesus faced without the
miracles.
Tebow just hasn't
been given the chance.
It seems that so many
out there want him to
fail despite his proven
record.
Let's use Cam Newton
as an example. While
many feel that he should
be the unquestioned
starter in Carolina,
his numbers fail in
comparison to Tebow's.
Yet, Tebow is being
downgraded by just
about anyone with an
opinion these days.
During Newton's best
year in college he threw
for 2,854 yards and 30
TDs while rushing for
1,473 yards. Tebow's *
best year in college he
accounted for 3,286
passing yards and 32
TDs through the air. He
rushed for another 895
yards and 23 TDs.
When the two came
out Tebow was projected
as a third-round pick by
most. Newton was taken
first overall.
Tebow accounted for
11 touchdowns and only
four turnovers in limited
action for Denver last
season. Newton went
6-of-19 passing for 75
yards while rushing for
49 yards in his preseason
start against Cincinnati
on Thursday.
While people continue
to say that Newton will
develop into a quality
quarterback in the NFL,
those same experts
continue to say Tebow
doesn't have a place in
this league. Maybe I see
through Tebow-shaded
lenses, but seriously?
* Brandon Finley covers
sports for the Lake City
Reporter.


Class

Atkinson gives
CHS go-ahead
score, Tigers win.
By BRANDON FINLEY
bfinley@lakecityreporter.com rn
ALACHUA Columbia
High coach BrianAllenwants
the Tigers to get better as
time goes on. The identity of
peaking late worked for the
Tigers in the classic as well
with Columbia going ahead
19-13 with 1:28 remaining in
a kickoff classic win against
Santa Fe High.
Columbia was outplayed
for much of the first half, only
scoring on two long plays.
The Tigers got down early
as Santa Fe marched 69
yards on three plays capped
by a 35 yard option keep-
er from quarterback D.L.
Powell with 10:59 remain-
ing in the first quarter.
Columbia quickly
answered with an' 80-yard
run from Ronald Timmons
on its first offensive play.
The Tigers werit cold for
the rest of the half, how-
ever, allowing the Raiders .,-
to control the game.
'Santa Fe scored on a ,
47-yard fumble return
from Damien Johnson
to go ahead 13-7 after a ...,. -
bad exchange fr6m' Nigel
Atkinson to Rakeem.Battle. .-
Atkinson would redeem '
himself on the final play
of the first half to tie the
game. The quarterback
found Trey Marshall on a
go-route and Marshall spun
around the defender for an
80-yard strike.
The score would stay tied
at 13 until Columbia took
over on the game-winning
drive with 5:19 remaining
in the contest at its own 11.
After six plays, Columbia
advanced to the Raiders' 34-
yard line. Columbia came
out in a 'WildTiger" for-
mation and Atkinson faked
the handoff to Battle before -
making a cutback on the
touchdown run.
The lead would stand
as Columbia defended two
passes into the end zone as
the clock ran out.
Quay Monismith stood, .
out for the defensive side
with two fumble recover- ..-r.-"'.,.
ies including a touchdown :
saver. ,_ .,__ :, _,.


c


is


Photos by JASON MATTHEW WALKER
Lake City Reporter


ABOVE: Columbia High's
Ronald Timmons breaks free
during a run in the Tigers'
19-13 win against Santa Fe
High on Friday.

LEFT: Columbia High's
Rakeem Battle tries to beat a
Santa Fe defender during a
run in the first half of Friday's
19-13 win over the Raiders.


Fisher says I..



FSU has talent

to win tiles


Seminoles,
poised for run at
championships.
By BRENT KALLESTAD
Associated Press
TALLAHASSEE -
Florida State coach Jim
Fisher told 1,400 title-hun-
gry fans Friday that the
sixth-ranked Seminoles
have plenty of talent to win
a championship.
Fisher told boosters at
the alumni association's
annual kickoff luncheon
that he wouldn't trade
Florida State's talent for
anyone and that his team
is ready to make a cham-
pionship run if they stay
focused and play up to their
ability.
"There's plenty 'of talent
back there to win a cham-


pionship," the second-year
head coach said in refer-
ence to his players seated
in the audience. "We want
to win a championship."
Florida State's last
national championship was
in 1999 when the Seminoles
finished 12-0 in the school's
only perfect season and its
second national title in six
years. They haven't won an
Atlantic Coast Conference
title since 2005, but are a
heavy preseason favorite to
end that brief drought this
season.
Fisher has eight starters
back on both offense and
defense from a team that
finished 10-4 last season.
The Seminoles also return
nearly all of a special teams
unit that was among the
nation's best last year in
FSU continued on 6B


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Florida State's Chris Thompson (right) looks for a block against the University of Florida in the
Seminoles' win last season in Tallahassee.


m











LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS SATURDAY, AUGUST 27. 2011


TELEVISION

TV sports

Today
AUTO RACING
8 a.m.
SPEED Formula One, qualifying for
Grand Prix of Belgium, at Francorchamps,
Belgium
6 p.m.
VERSUS IRL, IndyCar, qualifying for
Indy Grand Prix of Sonoma, at Sonoma,
Calif.
7:30 p.m.
ABC NASCAR, Sprint Cup, Irwin
Tools Night Race, at Bristol,Tenn.
BOXING
10:30 p.m.
HBO Heavyweights. Seth Mitchell
(22-0-1) vs. Mike Mollo (20-3-1); Robert
Guerrero (29-1-1) vs. Marcos Maidana
(30-2-0), for interim WBA super
lightweight title, at San Jose, Calif.
CYCLING
4 p.m.
VERSUS USA Pro Challenge, stage 5,
Steamboat Springs to Breckenridge, Colo.
GOLF
9 a.m.
TGC European PGA Tour, Johnnie
Walker Championship, third round, at
Perthshire, Scotland
I p.m.
TGC- PGA Tour,The Barclays, third
round, at Edison, N.J.
3 p.m.
CBS PGA Tour, The Barclays, third
round, at Edison, N.J.
NBC USGA, U.S. Amateur
Championship, semifinal matches, at Erin,
Wis.
TGC LPGA, Canadian Women's
Open, third round, at Mirabel, Quebec
6:30 p.m.
TGC Champions Tour, Boeing
Classic, second round, at Snoqualmle,
Wash. (same-day tape)
HORSE RACING
5 p.m.
NBC NTRA, King's Bishop Stakes
and Travers Stakes, at Saratoga Springs,
N.Y.
LITTLE LEAGUE BASEBALL
Noon
ABC Little League World Series,
International championship game, Mexicall,
Mexico vs. Hamamatsu City, Japan, at
South Williamsport, Pa.
3 p.m.
ABC ULittle League World Series,
U.S. Championship game, Billings, Mont.
vs. Clinton County, Pa.-Huntington Beach,
Calif. winner, at South Williamsport, Pa.
MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL
4 p.m.
FOX Regional coverage, Detroit at
Minnesota, Colorado at LA. Dodgers, or
Pittsburgh at St Louis
7 p.m.
WGN Chicago Cubs at Milwaukee
8 p.m.
MLB Regional coverage, LA.Angels
atTexas or San Diego atArizona
r"MAjOR LEAGUE LtACROSSE
A,. Noon
ESPN2 Playoffs, semifinal,
Chesapeake vs. Boston, at Annapolis, Md.
2:30 p.m.
ESPN2 Playoffs, semifinal, Hamilton
vs. Denver, at Annapolis, Md.
MOTORSPORTS
9 p.m.
SPEED -AMA Pro Motocross 450, at
Southwick, Mass. (same-day tape)
10 p.m.
SPEED -AMA Pro Motocross 250, at
, Southwick, Mass. (same-day tape)
II p.m.
SPEED MotoGP World
Championship qualifying, at Indianapolis
(same-day tape)
NFL FOOTBALL
8 p.m.
CBS New England at Detroit
PREP FOOTBALL
Noon
ESPN St. Thomas Aquinas vs.
Prattville (Ala.), at HooverAla.
3:30 p.m.
ESPN South Panola (Miss.) at
Hoover (Ala.)
7 p.m.
ESPN Sulphur Springs (Texas) at
Denton Ryan (Texas)
10 p.m.
ESPN2 Pleasant Grove (Calif.) at
Monterey Trail (Calif.)
SOCCER
7 a.m.
Premier League, Wolverhampton at
Aston Villa
.4 p.m.
FSN WPS, playoffs, championship
match atWestern NewYork
TENNIS
12:30 p.m.
CBS ATP World Tour, Winston-
Salem Open, championship match, at
Winston-Salem, N.C.
5 p.m.
ESPN2 WTA, New Haven Open,
championship match, at New Haven,
Conn.

BASEBALL

AL standings


East Division
W L I
Boston 80 50 .6
NewYork 78 50 .6
Tampa Bay 70 59 .5
Toronto 66 64 .5
Baltimore 51 77 .3
Central Division
W L I
Detroit 71 59 .5
Cleveland 63 64 .4
Chicago 63 65 .4
Minnesota 55 75 .4
Kansas City 54 77 .4
West Division
W L I
Texas 74 58 .54
Los Angeles 71 59 .5
Oakland 59 71 .4
Seattle 56 73 .4
Thursday's Games
N.Y.Yankees 22, Oakland 9
Baltimore 6, Minnesota I
Detroit 2,Tampa Bay 0
Kansas City 9,Toronto 6
Boston 6,Texas 0
Friday's Games
Kansas City at Cleveland (n)
N.Y.Yankees at Baltimore (n)


Tampa Bay at Toronto (n)
Oakland 'at Boston (n)
LA.Angels at Texas (n)
Detroit at Minnesota (n)
Chicago White Sox at Seattle (n)
Today's Games
Oakland (Moscoso 6-7) at Boston
(Lester 13-6), 12:05 p.m., Ist game
N.Y.Yankees (Nova 13-4) at Baltimore
(Matusz 1-6), 1:05 p.m., Ist game
Tampa Bay (Niemann 8-5) at Toronto
(LPerez 3-2), 1:07 p.m.
Detroit (Verlander 19-5) at Minnesota
(Pavano 6-10),4:10 p.m.
Oakland (Godfrey I-I) at Boston
(Bedard 4-9), 5:05 p.m., 2nd game
Kansas City (Duffy 3-8) at Cleveland
(Carmona 6-12), 7:05 p.m.
N.Y. Yankees (F.Garcla 10-7) at
Baltimore (Matusz 1-6), 7:05 p.m., 2nd
game
LA Angels (E.Santana 9-9) at Texas
(C.Wilson 13-5), 8:05 p.m.
Chicago White Sox (Danks 5-9) at
Seattle (Pineda 9-7), 10:10 p.m.
Sunday's Games
Kansas City at Clevelank, 1:05 p.m.
Tampa Bay at Toronto, 1:07 p.m.
N.Y.Yankees at Baltimore, 1:35 p.m.
Oakland at Boston, ppd., hurricane
threat
Detroit at Minnesota, 2:10 p.m.
Chicago White Sox at Seattle,
4:10 p.m.
LA Angels at Texas, 8:05 p.m.

NL standings

East Division
W L Pct GB
Philadelphia 83 45 .648" -
Atlanta 79 53 .598 6
Washington 61 67 .481 21 'A
NewYork 61 68 .473 22%'
Florida 58 72 .446 26
Central Division
W L Pct GB
Milwaukee 78 54 .591 -
St. Louis 68 63 .519 9%'
Cincinnati 64 66 .492 13
Pittsburgh 61 69 .469 16
Chicago 57 74 .435 20'/
Houston 43 88 .328 34%h
West Division
W L Pct GB
Arizona 72 59 .550 -
San Francisco 69 62 .527 3
Colorado 63 68 .481 9
Los Angeles 60 69 .465 II
San Diego 60 71 .458 12
Thursday's Games
Atlanta 8, Chicago Cubs 3
Arizona 8,Washington I
Cincinnati at Florida, ppd., rain
St. Louis 8, Pittsburgh 4
Houston 3, San Francisco I
Friday's Games
, Florida at Philadelphia (n)
Atlanta at N.Y. Mets (n)
Washington at Cincinnati (n)
Chicago Cubs at Milwaukee (n)
Pittsburgh at St Louis (n)
San Diego at Arizona (n)
Colorado at LA. Dodgers (n)
Houston at San Francisco (n)
Today's Games
Atlanta at New York, ppd., rain
Florida (Ani.Sanchez 7-6) at
Philadelphia (Halladay 15-5), 1:05 p.m.,
Ist game
Colorado (Millwood I-1) at L.A:
Dodgers (Billingsley 10-10),4:10 p.m.
Pittsburgh (Lincoln 0-0) at St. Louis
(C.Carpenter 8-8), 4:10 p.m.
Florida (Undecided) at Philadelphia
(CI.Lee 14-7), 7:05 p.m., 2nd game
Chicago Cubs (Dempster 10-9) at
Milwaukee (Gallardo 14-8), 7; 10 p.m.
Washington (Detwiler 2-3) at
Cincinnati (Leake 10-8), 7:10 p.m.
San Diego (Harang 12-3) at Arizona
(J.Saunders 8-11), 8: 10 p.m.
Houston (Myers 3-13) at San Francisco
(Runzler I-2), 9:05 p.m.
Sunday's Games
Atlanta at NewYork, ppd., rain
Florida at Philadelphia, ppd., hurricane
threat
Washington at Cincinnati, 1:10 p.m.
Chicago Cubs at Milwaukee, 2:10 p.m.
Pittsburgh at St. Louis, 2:15 p.m.
Houston at San Francisco, 4:05 p.m.
Colorado at LA. Dodgers, 4:10 p.m.
San Diego at Arizona, 4:10 p.m.

Little League

WORLD SERIES
Thursday
Hamamatsu City, Japan 9, Maracay,
Venezuela 6, Maracay eliminated
Huntington Beach, Calif. 2, Clinton'
County, Pa. 0, Clinton County eliminated
Today
International championship -
Mexicali, Mexico vs. Hamamatsu City,
Japan, Noon
U.S. championship, Billings, Mont. vs.
Huntington Beach, Calif.,3 p.m.

FOOTBALL

NFL preseason games

Thursday
Cincinnati 24, Carolina 13
Philadelphia 24, Cleveland 14
Baltimore 34,Washington 31
Friday
St. Louis at Kansas City (n)
Green Bay at Indianapolis (n)
Today
Jacksonville at Buffalo, 7 p.m.
N.Y.Jets at N.Y. Giants, 7 p.m.
Atlanta at Pittsburgh, 7:30 p.m.
Miami atTampa Bay, 7:30 p.m.
New England at Detroit, 8 p.m. (CBS)
Dallas at Minnesota, 8 p.m.
Houston at San Francisco, 8 p.m.
Chicago at Tennessee, 8 p.m.
Seattle at Denver, 9 p.m.
San Diego at Arizona, 10 p.m.
Sunday
New Orleans at Oakland, 8 p.m.
(NBC)


BASKETBALL

WNBA schedule

Thursday's Game
Seattle 74,Tulsa 57
Friday's Games
Phoenix at Connecticut (n)
San Antonio at Minnesota (n)
Washington at Chicago (n)
Tulsa at Los Angeles (n)
Today's Game


Atlanta at Indiana, 7 p.m.

GOLF

U.S.Amateur

Second round
Upper Bracket
Bobby Leopold. Cranston, RFI. (142).
def. Harris English, Thomasville, Ga. (142).
4 and 3
Jordan Russell, College Station, Texas
(140), def. Bryson Dechambeau, Clovis,
Calif. (141), 5 and 3
Peter Uihlein, Orlando (137), def.
Dylan Frittelli, South Africa (140), 5 and 4
Scott Langley, St. Louis (137), def.
Mitch Sutton, Canada (140),4 and 3
John Peterson, Fort Worth, Texas
(139), def. Stephan Jaeger, Germany (142),
I up
Max Buckley, Rye, N.Y. (141), def. Chris
Williams, Moscow, Idaho (139), I up
Patrick Cantlay, Los Alamitos, Calif.
(140), def. Russell Henley, Macon, Ga.
(135),21 holes
Tom Lewis, England (139), def. Cory
Whitsett, Houston (137), 19 holes
Lower Bracket
Blake Biddle, St. Charles, III. (134). def.
Peter Williamson, Hanover, N.H. (140),
2 up
Kelly Kraft, Denton, Texas (141), def.
Andrew Putnam, University Place, Wash.
(138), 3 and 2
Patrick Rodgers, Avon, Ind. (136), def.
Jonathan Garrick, Atherton, Calif. (139),
6 and 4
Sunil Jung, Korea (137), def. Tim
Madigan, Rio Rancho, N.M. (140), 5 and 4
John Hahn, Las Vegas (19), def. Beau
Hossler, Mission Viejo, Calif. (135), 2 up
Jack Senior, England (140), def. Justin
Thomas, Goshen, Ky. (138), 4 and 3
Ben Geyer,Arbuckle, Calif. (135), def.
Chase Wright, Muncie, Ind. (139), 4 and 3
Jordan Spieth, Dallas (137), def. Lee
Bedford, Cary, N.C. (140), 2 and I
First round
Stephan Jaeger, Gerrmany (142) def.
Blayne Barber, Lake City, (135), 3 and 2

AUTO RACING

Race week

SPRINT CUP
IRWIN TOOLS NIGHT RACE
Site: Bristol (Tenn.) Motor Speedway
Schedule:Today, race, 7:30 p.m. (ABC,
7-10 p.m.).
Race distance: 500 laps, 266.5 miles..
INDYCAR
INDY GRAND PRIX OF SONOMA
Site: Sonomi, Calif.
Schedule: Today, practice, qualifying
(Versus, 6-7 p.m.); Supday, race, 4:45 p.m.
(Versus, 4-7 p.m.).
Track: Infineon Raceway (road course,
2.303.railes).
Race distance; 172.725 miles,.75 laps.
FORMULA ONE
BELGIAN GRAND PRIX.
Site: Spa-Francorchamps, Belgium.
Schedule: Today, practice, qualifying
(Speed, 8-9:30 a.m.); Sunday, race, 8 a.m.
(Speed, 7:30-10 a.m., 3:30-7 p.m.).
Track: Spa-Francorchamps (road
course, 4.35 miles)..
Race distance: 191.415 miles, 44 laps.

Irwin Tools qualifying

At Bristol (Tenn.) Motor Speedway
Friday qualifying; race today
(Car number in parentheses)
I. (39) Ryan Newman, Chevrolet,
122.811 mph.
2. (99) Carl Edwards, Ford, 122.67.
3. (17) Matt Kenseth, Ford, 122.662.
4. (24) Jeff Gordon, Chevrolet,
122.576.
5. (5) Mark Martin, Chevrolet, 122.544.
6. (I) Jamie McMurray, Chevrolet,
122.537. .
7. (27) Paul Menard, Chevrolet,
122.404.
8. (2) Brad. KeselowAki, Dodge,
122.349.
9. (20) Joey Logano,Toyota, 122.31.
10. (22) Kurt Busch, Dodge, 122.224.
I1. (9) Marcos Ambrose, Ford, 122.1.
12. (78) Regan Smith, Chevrolet,
122.053.
13. (48) Jimmie Johrison, Chevrolet,
122.022.
14. (16) Greg Biffle, Ford, 122.022.
15. (29) Kevin Harvick, Chevrolet,
122.007.
16. (33) Clint Bowyer, Chevrolet,
122.007.
17. (34) David Gilliland, Ford, 121.937.
18. (43) A J Allmendinger, Ford,
121.921.
19. (42) Juan Pablo Montoya, Chevrolet,
121.79.
20. (II) Denny Hamlin, Toyota,
121.751.
21. (31) Jeff Burton, Chevrolet,
121.713.
22. (88) Dale Earnhardt Jr., Chevrolet,
121.635.
23.(18) Kyle Busch,Toyota, 121.558.
24. (6) David Ragan, Ford, 121.543.
25. (4) Kasey Kahne,Toyota, 121.497.
26. (83) Brian Vickers,Toyota, 121.29.
27. (56) Martin Truex Jr., Toyota,
121.274.
28. (87) Joe Nemechek. Toyota,
121.175.
29.(13) Casey Mears,Toyota, 121.144.
30. (47) Bobby Labonte, Toyota,
121.113.
31. (30) David Stremme, Chevrolet,
120.869.
32. (66) Michael McDowell, Toyota,
120.839.
33. (38) Travis Kvapil, Ford, 120.725.
34. (00) David Reutimann, Toyota,
120.672.
35. (36) Dave Blaney, Chevrolet,
120.452.
36. (46) Scott Speed, Ford, 120.308.
37. (95) David Starr, Ford, 120.15.


38. (71) Andy Lally, Ford, I 19.835.
39. (7) Robby Gordon, Dodge,
119.835.
40. (51) Mike Bliss, Chevrolet,
119.559.
41. (32) Terry Labonte, Ford, owner
points.
42. (14) Tony Stewart, Chevrolet,
owner points.
43. (60) Mike Skinner,Toyota, 119.262.
Failed to Qualify
44. (50) TJ. Bell, Chevrolet, I 19.158.
45. (55) J.J.Yeley, Ford, 119.062.
46. (37) Jeff Green, Ford, 1 17.703.


Lake City Columbia
County Youth Baseball has
an open meeting at*
7 p.m. Monday at
Southside Sports Complex.
League position will be
filled at the meeting.
For details, call Tad
Cervantes at 365-4810.


Fort White

registration set

Fort White Youth
Baseball has fall
registration from 4-7 p.m.
Thursday and Sept. 7, and
10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Sept. 10
at the concession stand
at South Columbia Sports
Park.
For details, call Millissa
Blakley at 365-4133.


ACROSS

I Enclosure
5 Nouveau
8 Shortfall
12 Vibrate
13 On behalf of
14 Bard's river
15 Roman Stoic
16 Motel locale
18 Humiliate
20 Aunts and
uncles
21 Notch shape
22 Conference
25 Date regularly
28 Paris streets
29 "Annie- Get -
Gun"
33 Hothouse
flower
35 King-size
spoon
36 Jibe with
37 A Ryder
38 Upswept hair-
do
39 Pyramid build-
er


BRIEFS


YOUTH FOOTBALL

Uttle League

registration today

Lake City Parks and
Recreation Department's
youth football (ages 8-13)
registration is 8 a.m. to
5 p.m. today at Teen Town
Recreation Center. A
parent or guardian must
accompany the child and
a birth certificate or copy
is required. Cost is $40
per player and two groups
are offered: Junior Midget
(8-10 with some weight
restrictions) and Midget
(10-13 with some weight
restrictions).
For details, call Heyward
Christie at 754-3607. *


YOUTH CHEERLEADING

Association final

registration today

The Columbia Cheer
Association has
registration from 8:30 to
2 p.m. today at the Lake
City Girls Club.
For details, contact
Wilda Drawdy at 965-1377.


club or learning more
about the quarterback club
is encouraged to attend.
Fort White football season
tickets are on sale.
For details, call club
president Shayne Morgan
at (386) 3974954.

CHS FOOTBALL

Q-back Club

meets Monday

The Columbia County
Quarterback Club meets
at 7 p.m. Monday in the
Jones Fieldhouse.
For details, call club
president Blake Lunde at
867-0296.

SEMINOLES

Club gathering

on Thursday

The Lake City Seminole
Club has its 2011
kickoff gathering at 6 p.m.
Thursday at Tailgators
on U.S. Highway 90 west,
across from Tractor
Supply.
For details, call Norbie
Ronsonet at 752-2.180.


guest speaker. Dinner
will be provided by the
club. All Gator fans are
invited to the social. The
Gator Club is raffling off
two season tickets for the
upcoming season. Chances
are $50 with all proceeds
going to the UF s
scholarship fund.
For details, call Angela
at 961-1766 or Ian at
(352) 316-4305.

I.,.. SOFTBALL

League seeking

players, sponsors

Columbia County
Women's Softball is
seeking players, coaches,
and sponsors for the fall.
For details, call
Casandra Wheeler at
365-2168 or e-mail john_
casandra@lhotmnail. com.

.. f-j-

Lake City team

seeking players

The Lake City Falcons
men's semi-pro football
team is seeking new
players and veterans for
the upcoming season.
Players must be 18 years
old or older, and able to
commit to the team and
come to practice. The
website is ballcharts.com/
lakecityfalcons.
For details, call Luis
Santiago at 292-4138.

From staff reports

THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME
by David L. Hoyt and Jeff Knurek


HE COUL-PN T KEEP THE
FACT THAT HE WAS A
ZOMBIE A SECRET
BECAUSE HE WAS A ---
Now arrange the circled letters
to form the surprise answer, as
suggested by the above cartoon.


The North Florida Gator
Club has its annual kickoff
social planned at-the. home
of John and Betty Norris
at 6 p.m. Thursday. Chris
Price of TV-20 will be the




Unscramble these four Jumbles,
one letter to each square,
to form four ordinary words.

I EVAWE I


A:
(Answers Monday)
Yesterday's Jumbles: SCARF AMUSE THWART PUNDIT
Answer: When the dealer lowered the prices on the
sports cars, they WENT FAST


Answer to Previous Puzzle

LO01G C A SIT SPA A
BEAR EVER OI L
YOKE LA I A SONS
AES S ED BI IN G
SIB FAN
SHEEP SELECT
TOP SO WN WORM
URE Y WAGE LAG
NEARLY INAPT
RES BRA
OWING SLEI G HS
FALSETTONL OOT
I RE NOOKNE L L

T EfX TY|pE DD TT


41 Plow into
42 Mild quakes
45 Cry of dismay
48 Miscellany
49 Icy rain
53 Skipping over
56 Ricelike pasta
57 Firms up
58 Bother
59 Foal's parent
50 Poker stake
51 Chocolate-
colored dog
62 Lettuce buy

DOWN

1 Youth org.
2 Melville cap-
tain
3 Beatles' meter
maid
4 Smelting
waste
5 Carthage loc.
6 Beginner
7 Travel choices
8 Refrain syl-
lables


9 Tel -
10 Dits and dahs
11 Deep bend
17 Spiral molecule
19 Ghostly
23 Beauty pack


Want more puzzles?
Check out the "Just Right Crossword Puzzles" books
at QuillDriverBooks.com


24 Meg or Nolan
25 Ivory or Dove
26 Consequently
27 Neutral shade
30 Hound's track
31 Arm bone
32 Paper unit
34 Weighty feel
35 False wit-
nesses
37 Cheyenne's
St.
39 Lackey
40 Mr. Spock's
mother
43 Ship deserter
44 Wade
45 Gentle exer-
cise
46 Bad or good
sign
47 Droop
50 Ontario neigh-
bor
51 Philanthropist
Cornell
52 Nailed
obliquely
54 Mao -tung
55 Sailor


8-27 2011 UFS. Dist by Univ. Uclick for UFS


SCOREBOARD


YOUTH BASEBALL ACTORS

Lake City open Gator Club kickoff

meeting Monday social Thursday


FORT WHITE FOOTBALL

Q-back Club. D OSDYH

meeting Monday ]


The Fort White
Quarterback Club's weekly
meeting is 7 p.m. Monday
in the teacher's lounge at
the high school. Anyone
interested in joining the


Page Editor: Tim Kirby. 754-0421


RAIGCL
7 ^ ,\ , .. _ ^ --









Page Editor: Emogene Graham, 754-0415 LAKE CITY REPORTER ADVICE & COMICS SATURDAY. AUGUST 27, 2011 3B


DILBERT


BABY BLUES


BLONDIE


BEETLE BAILEY


HAGARTHE HORRIBLE


7dE.f ECEnTL Y LOw- Fi/eV
POIVN6 ANL ?PLA57 LJ-S f
rWENfY-FIVE A4 VtF o MAl
i nJy /


DEAR ABBY


Engaged couple's differences

are cause for needed pause


AND
THEN HE
STARTED
BITING HIS BARK
E. IS LWJORSE.


DEAR ABBY: "Seth"
and I have been going out
for almost three years. We
have been engaged for a
year and I love him, but
every time he talks about
living together or getting
married, I get so nervous
and scared that I suffer
anxiety attacks.
We have differences
when it comes to han-
dling money, keeping the
house in order and hav-
ing pets. We also argued
about a pre-nup agree-
ment. Seth won't change
his position on it and I'm
still resentful. I'm worried
that if we live together
I'll end up with his debts.
If things don't work out,
I don't want to start all
over again.
We're both divorced
with kids. We have a good
relationship except for
my fear of going to the
next level. SKITISH IN
CANADA
DEAR SKITTISH: You
and Seth have significant
areas of disagreement,
and they are ones that
could affect the outcome
of your relationship.
That's why it is impor-
tant for you to seek pre-
marital counseling to see
if they can be worked
out. If they can't be,
then you and Seth need
to find different part-
ners, because the issues
upon which you differ
are deal-breakers, and
the last thing either of
you -- or your children --
need is another divorce.
k** ** **


Abigail Van Buren
www.deorobby.com
DEAR ABBY: I have
always had a close relation-
ship with my mother. She
is smart, wonderful and
sweet, but she can also be
naive.
In the past Mom has
trusted people who turned
out to be not very nice.
When she began this rela-
tionship with the "perfect
man," I was curious. I
inquired about his prior
relationships and his-
tory in general. He openly
shared details about his
past except for one thing
I later discovered on my
own. He has served an
extensive stint in prison for
being a child predator and
is still on parole.
I don't want him around
my children or any of my
mom's other grandchil-
dren. Mom says he's a
reformed person now. He
may be, but I don't know
him well. Mom is welcome
to see my children any-
time, but not with him. She
thinks I'm being unreason-
able, and I'm uncomfort-
able about the way she is
pressing the issue. What
should I do? CANT
BACK DOWN ON THIS
ONE
DEAR CANT BACK
DOWN: Stand firm in your


HOROSCOPES


B.C.


FRANK & ERNEST


E-mal:ThavesOne@ao corn
2011 Thaves Dist by Unv/Uclick for UFS, inc.


ARIES (March-21-April
19): Do your homework
so. you arewell informed
before you enter into a
conversation that could
become heated. A change
in your personal status is
apparent, and the only way
to ensure that it turns out
in your favor is to be pre-
pared. *****
TAURUS (April 20-
May 20): You'll be caught
in the middle. Put pressure
where it is needed to help
alleviate your own stress,
overhead or responsibility.
Engage in an activity that-
will enable you to enjoy
family, friends or your
lover. You'll find a bargain
if you go shopping. **
GEMINI (May 21-June
20): Try not to over- or
underestimate others. It is
best not to meddle or get
involved in situations that
can lead to a loss of friend-
ship. Speak from the heart,
opeq and honestly. ****
CANCER (June 21-July
22): Helping is fine, but
don't let anyone take you
for granted. Know ahead
of time how much you are
willing to contribute and
when to say no. As long
as you maintain balance
and control, you will gain
respect. ***
LEO (July 23-Aug. 22):
Emotions will swell and


THE LAST WORD
Eugenia Last,

problems will rult if you
cannot contain your feel-
ings. Limit what you share
verbally or you will end
up having to apologize or
living with regret. Don't
let stubbornness be your
downfall. ***
VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept.
22): A change of fortune
is apparent. You will reap
rewards and experience
loss. You have to wager
the pros and cons of every
situation and communicate
openly and honestly to be
well informed. Avoid gossip.

LIBRA (Sept 23-Oct
22): Network and socialize
as much as possible. Take
action and get things done,
and you will impress some-
one who has a position or
proposal that will benefit
you in the future. Love and
romance are highlighted.

SCORPIO (Oct 23-Nov.
21): Reconsider what you
can do with your skills and
knowledge, and you will
find a path that suits you
in this economic climate.
Reinventing how you pres-
ent yourself will enable you
to interest a new group of
clients. You are long over-


due for a change. **
SAGIITARIUS (Nov.
22-Dec. 21): Work hard
.at-home to make things
right You have to face the
music; accept what isn't
working and make the
necessary changes that will
allow everyone the free-
dom to carry on. Ifs time
to be more self-sufficient

CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-
Jan. 19): Do what you can
to fix up your digs. Buying
and selling possessions can
help your financial situation.
Making a move or signing
an agreement will bring you
greater power and financial
gains. ***
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb.
18): Don't jump to conclu-
sions or get involved in a
group or situation before
you have the lowdown on
what's going on. Go to the
source and determine if it
is a wise move for you. It
is best to move forward
alone. ***
PISCES (Feb. 19-March
20): Use your charm to get
others to help you accom-
plish your goals. Taking an
active role in a project that
interests you will bring you
in contact with people who
have something to offer.
Don't ask for too much,
and you will end up getting
more than you need. ***


CELEBRITY CIPHER


by Luis Campos
Celebrity Cipher cryptograms are created from quotations by famous people, past and present.
Each letter in the cipher stands Tor another.
TODAY'S CLUE: B equals U
"ORFLHX L W FMV SVJZVRF LILCF'W
SJCZVWWLCH... OW ZCJ UV, S J L K V W
OJV H-CFMLHX. UP SJLKV L W UP
NCJE." EOFMOJLHV MVSGBJH

PREVIOUS SOLUTION: "Normal is in the eye of the beholder... normal is
nothing more than a cycle on a washing machine." Whoopi Goldberg

(c) 201 1 by NEA, Inc. 8-27


FOR BETTER OR WORSE
Eu-y'/, fs GOING&-o T s 1
COST u So MucH FOR
GAS3, SO MUCH FR ,K
Dn/CA.E-- FND

f3^ M
'4ODN^^ i -r

fl jj 5i 2'


CLASSIC PEANUTS


resolve until such time
as YOU are convinced
the "perfect man" will not
offend again. Your mother
is emotional about him and
is not thinking clearly. If
he had leveled about the
fact he's on parole and for
what, that would be one
thing. But he didn't, and
that is cause for worry.

DEAR ABBY: I am a
man who has tried to lose
weight for my health and
failed. I am trying again
now and have lost 40
pounds. A couple of years
ago I did the same thing,
and then before I knew
it I gained it all back. I'm
really trying to keep it off
this time.
A co-worker said,
"You look good with the
weight loss, but do you
think you'll be able to
keep it off this time?"
I had no idea what to
say. I told him we all
have our vices, but I am
trying. Abby, the com-
ment hurt my feelings.
How would you suggest
handling the situation?
- SMALLER IN NEW
HAMPSHIRE
DEAR SMALLER.
Your co-worker's comment
was thoughtless. But if
he brings up the subject
again, tell him how it made
you feel the first time he
did, and that your weight
problem is really none of
his business.
* Write Dear Abby at
www.DearAbby.com or
P.O. Box 69440, Los
Angeles, CA 90069.


SNUFFY SMITH


ZITS


GARFIELD










LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED SATURDAY, AUGUST 27, 2011

Lake City Reporter




CLASSIFIED


Classified Department: 755-5440


Take ADvantage of the
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Limited to service type advertis-
ing only.
4 lines, one month....s92.00
$10.80 each additional line
Includes an additional $2.00 per
ad for each Wednesday insertion.



You can call us at 755-5440,
Monday through Friday from 8:00
a.m. to 5:00 p.m.
Some people prefer to place their'
classified ads in person, and some
ad categories will require prepay-
ment. Our office is located at 180
East Duval Street.
You can also fax or email your ad
copy to the Reporter.
FAX: 386-752-9400 Please
direct your copy to the Classified
Department.
EMAIL: classifieds@lakecityre-
porter.com





Ad is to Appear: Call by: Fax/Email by:
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These deadlines are subject to change without notice.




Ad Errors- Please read your ad
on the first day of publication.
We accept responsibility for only
the first incorrect Insertion, and
only the charge for the ad space
in error. Please call 755-5440
immediately for prompt correc-
tion and billing adjustments.
Cancellations- Normal advertising
deadlines apply for cancellation.
Billing Inquiries- Call 755-5440.
Should further information be
required regarding payments or
credit limits, your call will be trans-
ferred to the accounting depart-
ment.


Advertising copy is subject to
approval by the Publisher who
reserves the right to edit, reject,
or classify all advertisements under
appropriate headings. Copy should
be checked for errors by the
advertiser on the first day of pub-
lication. Credit for published errors
will be allowed for the first insertion
for that portion of the advertisement
which was incorrect. Further, the
Publisher shall not be liable for any
omission of advertisements ordered
to be published, nor for any general.
special or consequential damages.
Advertising language must comply
with Federal, State or local, laws
regarding the prohibition of discrimi-
nation in employment, housing and
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not be abbreviated.

in Print and Online
t www.ahkedityreporter.com


Legal

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
COLUMBIA COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File No. 11-207-CP
Division Probate
IN RE: ESTATE OF MARGUER-
ITE MARTIN COBB, A/K/A MAR-
GUERITE M. COBB
Deceased.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
The administration of the estate of
Marguerite Martin Cobb, a/k/a Mar-
guerite M. Cobb, deceased, whose
date of death, was July 11, 2011, is
pending in the Circuit Court for Co-
lumbia County, Florida, Probate Di-
vision, the address of which is 173
NE Hemando Avenue, Lake City,
Florida 32055. The names and ad-
dresses of the personal representa-
tives and the personal representati-
ves' attorney are set forth below.
All creditors of the decedent and oth-
er persons having claims or demands
against decedent's estate on whom a
copy of this notice is required to be
served must file their claims with
this court WITHIN THE LATER OF
3 MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AF-
TER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF
A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON
THEM.
All other creditors of the decedent
and other persons having claims or
demands against decedent's estate
must file their claims with this court
WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER THE
DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICA-
TION OF THIS NOTICE.
ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITH-
IN THE TIME. PERIODS SET
FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF
THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE
WILL BE FOREVER BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME
PERIODS SET FORTH ABOVE,
ANY CLAIM 'FILED TWO (2)
YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE
DECEDENT'S DATE OF DEATH
IS BARRED.
The date of the first publication of
this notice is August 20, 2011.
Law Offices of:
COOKE & MEUX, P.A.
A. Hamilton Cooke
Florida Bar Number: 110757
Joseph Clay Meux, Jr.
Florida Bar Number 041114 *
Richard K. Britton
Florida Bar Number: 480339
501 Riverside Avenue, Suite 903
Jacksonville, Florida 32202
Telephone: (904)396-5101
Fax: (904) 399-1030'
E-Mail: hcooke@cookemeux.com
Personal Representatives:
By:/s/ Janice M. Cobb
525 16th Avenue, South
Jacksonville Beach, Florida 32250
By:/s/James M. Cobb, Sr.
2042 Sussex Drive, South
Orange Park, Florida 32073
05527402 ""
August 20, 27, 2011

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT IN AND
FOR COLUMBIA COUNTY,
FLORIDA
CASE NO. 11-751-SC
Robert A. Jones
243 SE Eloise St.
Lake City, FL 32025
Plaintiff
VS.
Denise Jones
171 SW Lasso
Lake City, FL. 32024
Defendant
A law suit has been filed to deter-
mine ownership and title of a certain
vehicle described as a 2001 Oldsmo-
bile with serial #
1G3WH52H91F198112 located in
Lake City, Columbia County, Flori-
da.
The following persons) may claim
some right title or interest therein:
Robert A. Jones
If you have a claim, interest, or de-
fense in this clause, you must file
your written answer or objection
with the Clerk of Court of Columbia
County within 10 days
(seal)
CLERK OF COURTS
BY: B. Scippio
Deputy Clerk
05527327
August 20, 27, 2011
September 3, 10, 2011


010 Announcements

Southside Baptist Church will
sponsor a free Creation Research
Conference Aug 27th & 28th,
featuring Institute for Creation
Research. Dr. John Morris & Mr.
Frank Sherwin. Conferences in-
elude Dinosaurs; The Fossil
Record; The Young Earth; &
more. Sat schedule: 9:a 3:p, &
Sun conferences 9:15 a-10:30a &
6:00p. 386-755-5553 to register.
388 SE Baya Drive, Lake City.


060 Services

RESIDENTIAL
HOUSECLEANING
Excellent Work, Dependable,
Low Rates. Call 386-688-1018







Lawn & Landscape Service


J&M LAWN Service & more for "
all your outdoor needs. Don't
waste your time or weekend,
Free Estimate. 386-984-2187


Services

DIVORCE, BANKRUPTCY,
RESUMES.
other court approved forms-
386-961-5896.


100 Job
100 Opportunities

05527553
Large Southeast Restaurant
chain is now accepting resumes
for Management positions for
several Florida markets.
Competitive wages,
Advancement opportunities,
Complete Training package,
Health, Dental and Life
Insurance Benefits available.
DFWP EOE
Please send resumes to:
donni@heritagemanagement.net
or fax to: 352-387-0011.

05527564
Assistant Dietary Manager
Assist w/Menu planning, Food
Prep, & Supervision.
Management exp a must.
Certification preferred. Fr
position requires some week-
ends. Please apply Baya Pointe
Nursing & Rehabilitation
Center, 587 SE Ermine Ave.,
Lake City, FI 32025 or fax
resume to 386-752-7337.

05527588
NOW HIRING -
Cashiers & Baggers for High
Springs fruit & gift stores.
Apply in Person at Florida
Citrus Center (Chevron)
18603 NW CR 236, High
Springs (exit 404 & 1-75)

AVON!! Only $10 to start!
Earn bonus $ up to $150+
1-800-275-9945 pin #4206
www.youravon.com/tdavies

CDL Driver 2 yrs exp clean MVR
for local company. Apply between
8am & Noon only. Deadline isn-.
noon Sept 2. 247 NW Hillandale
Glen Lake City No phone calls

Heavy Equipment Operator need-
ed. Must have mechanical skills &
experience in fencing. Serious
inquires only. 38,6-623.3200

Mechanic needed for Truck shop,
must have own tools, apply
Southern Specialized, 1812 NW
Main Blvd., 386-752-9754

NEED CNC Machinist
Must have Metal Working
Machine Shop exp. Send resume,
Quality Mill, 3631 US Hwy. 90
East, Lake City, FL 32055.

05526800
Earn Extra Money
Deliver the new AT&T Real
Yellow Pages
in the Lake City area. FT/PT,
daily work, quick pay, must be
18 yrs+, have drivers
license & insured vehicle.
.(800) 422-1955 Ext. 1
8:OOA-4:30P Mon-Fri

Security Officers needed. Lake
City & Live Oak area, must have
current D Security Lic., Clear
background, Drivers Lic, phone,
Diploma/GED. Benefits, DFWP
EEO Must Apply at:
www.dsisecurity.com MB 1000084

TWO EXPERIENCED Drivers.
from Lake City to
Augusta, Maine.
Call 386-719-8872


100 Job
100 'OOpportunities

Veterinarian Assist/Technician
needed. Exp desired. Must be able
to work flexible schedule & Sat.
mornings. Apply at Columbia
Animal Hospital 2418 S. Marion
Ave. Lake City. No phone calls.

Weekend Office Manager
Detailed and People oriented.
Excellent customer service &
phone skills. Duties include:
Storage & UHaul Rentals. $9.00 -
$11.00/hr based on exp. Drop off
resume between 4pm & 6pm Mon
- Fri @ Mini Storage & Record
Storage of Lake City. 442 SW
Saint Margaret Street, Lake City

120 Medical
1 Employment


05527328
LEARN TO DRAW BLOOD
Local Phlebotomy Course
offered in Lake City, FLA
Certificate program.
(904)566-1328


05527494
Medical Office Assistant
Experiences a Medical
assistant or in Medical
billing required. Fax
resume: 386-758-5987 or email:
mafaisalmd@gmail.com

CLINICAL
RESOURCE MANAGER FT.
Qualifications, registered nurse
with min. of 3 years exp. Previous
homecare and coding experience.
preferred. Will provide training for
,qualified applicant, contact
Jeff Tyre, Branch Director,
386-628-9352 can fax resumes to
386-628-9364.


Counselor for substance abuse
program in Baker Correctional In-
stitution. BA w/2yrs exp., M-F day
shift F/T, $30,000 to start, E-mail
resume to sheliarand@aol.com.or
fax to 386-752-2387


Pharmacy Technician needed.
Must be Florida registered. Min. 1
year exp required. Preferably in a,
retail environment. Excellent
computer & communication skills
needed. FT position. Competitive
pay. Send reply to Box 05074, C/O
The Lake City Reporter, P.O. Box
1709, Lake City, FL, 32056
RN/LPN needed Apply online
www.3dstaffmgnow.com or
call 3D Staffing 386-752-1244
322 S. Marion Ave, Lake City, FL

2 Schools &
240 Education

05527283
Interested in a Medical Career?
Express Training offers
courses for beginners & exp
SNursing Assistant, $479
next class-08/22/10
Phlebotomy national certifica-
tion, $800 next class-10/10/11
Continuing education
Fees incl. books, supplies, exam
fees. Call 386-755-4401 or
expresstrainingservices.com .


310 Pets & Supplies
FREE KITTENS
to good homes.
386-623-3202

PUBLISHER'S NOTE
Florida Law 828.29 requires dogs
and cats being sold to be at least 8
weeks old and have a health
certificate from a licensed
veterinarian documenting they
have mandatory shots and are
free from intestinal and external
parasites. Many species of wild-
life must be licensed by Florida
Fish and Wildlife. If you are
unsure, contact the local
office for information.

361 Farm Equipment


84 Ford 4610 Tractor.


2WU, Solid
2005 motor,$7,500. OBO
386-867-0005


402 Appliances


White Whirlpool Dishwasher
2008 used 3 months
$75 obo
386-963-3295

420 Wanted to Buy
K&H TIMBER
We Buy Pine Hardwood &
Cypress. Large or small tracts.
Call 386-961-1961.
Wanted Junk Cars, Trucks, Vans.
$275 & up CASH! Free Pick Up!
NO title needed !386-878-9260
After 5pm 386- 752-3648.

430 Garage Sales
PUBLISHER'S NOTE
All Yard Sale Ads
Must be Pre-Paid.


Sat. 8-? Creekside Sub.-Sisters
Welcome Rd. King bed, patio set,
TV, rugs, linens, fum, DVDs Jew-
elry, ladies clothes, shoes, mis.
SAT. 8/27, 8-?, 194 S.W.
Callaway Dr., off CR 247, furni-
ture, appliances, household items,
clothes, books, lots of misc.

440 Miscellaneous
Stop gnat & Mosquito bites! Buy
Swamp Gator All natural insect re-
pellent. Family safe. Use head to
toe. Available at The Home Depot.
Summer Barbecue Special
Tow Behind
Grill/Smoker, $1,250 OBO.
386-719-4802
Good Things
450 to Eat
GREEN PEANUTS For Sale
Valencia. Graded and washed.
$30.00 a bushel.
386-752-3434

REPORTER Classifieds
In Print and On Line
www.iakecityreporter.com


460 Firewood
Firewood for Sale. $65. per Truck
Load. Rick 386-867-1039 or Joey
965-0288 if no answer pls leave
message we will call you back.

630 Mobile Homes
for Rent
2 OR 3 BEDROOMS
Clean, Quiet Park $475-$525.mo
Water, septic, garbage included
758-2280 References, NO PETS!
2&3 BR MH. $395 $650. mo.
plus deposit. Water & sewer fur-
nished. Cannon Creek MHP
386-752-6422
2/2 Units,, clean, well maintained,
nice safe park setting, 2 miles to
downtown Lake City, $575 month
+ $575 sec dep, 386-984-8448
13th Month FREE!!
3/2 Large MH, small park, near
FGCC, Small pets ok, $500 dep
$575 mo w/12 mo lease
386-752-1971 or 352-281-2450
3/2.5 S of Lake City, (Branford
area) $600 mo plus security
386-590-0642 or 386-867-1833,
www.suwanneevalleyproperties.com
Ft. White Country living.
3br/2ba Mobile Home
Very clean! 386-497-1116.,

LG clean 3br's $450. -$650. mo. +
dep. Also, 2br mobile home's
available. No Pets.
5 Points area. 386-961-1482
Mobile Homes for rent in
White Springs, Lake City & Ft.
White. Contact 386-623-3404
or 386-397-2779
New 2br/2ba off Country Club. 1/2
ac. lot Front, back porch & storage
bldg. $650 mo. $650 sec. No Pets!
38,6-752-5911 or 466-2266

Mobile Homes
640 for Sale m

05527374
!!05527374 ATTENTION!!
We purchase used mobile
homes. Call North Pointe
Homes, Gainesville
352-872-5566

05527375 '!!LOOK!!!
Before you but a Mobile Home
check out North Pointe Homes
in Gainesville--Hugh Discounts!
credit Scores Don't matter. Call
for Free Approval! Jacobson
.Homes Factory Outlet (352)872-
5566 or mrb337 l()hotmail.com

05527376
NEW USED- REPO'S
Your Volume Giant! North
Pointe Homes. Millions to Lend.
Credit Scores 575 = 10% down.
Gainesville (352)872-5566 or
walker-david(llive.com

Champion Home Inspections
Protect Your Investment
With A Professional
Inspection State Licensed
And Insured 386-344-5551
Handy man special, 94 Fleetwood
DWMH. 3/2 on 5 acres in Ft.
White. Owner Fin. $3,000 dn.
$850mo. $99,900 352-215-1018
www.LandOwnerFinancing.com


One Month Free Subscription!




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LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED SATURDAY, AUGUST 27, 2011


l640 Mobile Homes
6 for Sale
Palm Harbor Homes
Has 3 Modular Homes
Available at HUGE Savings
Over 40K Off
800-622-2832


705 Rooms for Rent
1 person, non-smoking ROOM
for Rent. $300. mo.
Includes utilities. 1st & last.
(970)903-535P

710 Unfurnished Apt.
710 For Rent

05527089
SPRING HILL VILLAGE
. Excellent High Springs location.
1, 2 & 3 bedroom floor-plans;
some with garages.
Call 386-454-1469.
or visit our website:
www.springhillvillage.nel








1BR APT.
Downtown Location, Clean.
$450 mo, plus Security.
NO PETS. Call 386-755-3456
2/2 w/garage & washer/dryer
hookups. West side of town,
Call for details
386-755-6867
2BR/1BA. Close to town.
$565.mo plus deposit.
Includes water & sewer.
386-965-2922
A Landlord You Can Love!
2 br Apts $575. & up + sec. Great
area. CH/A washer/dryer hookups.
386-758-9351/352-208-2421
Amber Wood Hills Apts.
Private Patio area. Beautiful yard.
Washer/dryer hkup. Free water &
sewer. 1/1, 2/1. Move in special.
386-754-1800. wwwmyflapts.com
Columbia Arms Apt. located 1/2
mi from V.A. & Winn Dixie. Pet
Friendly. Move in Special $199.
Pool, laundry & balcony.
386-754-1800. www.mvflapts.com
Furnished or unfurnished 1 or 2
bedroom townhomes on the golf
course. $625-$750. mo. + security.
Includes water. 386-752-9626
Great location W of 1-75, spacious
deluxe 2br apts., garage, W/D
hookup, patio. $600/700 & up, +
Sec, 386-965-5560 or 344-3715
Greentree Townhouse
Summer special. 2/1, 2/1.5. Free
water & sewer. Balcony & patio.
Laundry. Behind Kens on Hwy 90.
386-754-1800 wwwmyflapts.com

ONE 51 PLACE APTS
Alachua
MOVE IN SPECIALS
1, 2, & 3-bedrooms. '
..Call"TODAY 386-462-0656
or visit us at one51 place.com

Redwine Apartments. Move in,
special $199. Limited time. Pets
welcome. with 5 complexes,
we have a home for you.
386-754-1800. www.myflapts.com
Summer Special! 12th mo Free
w/signed yr lease. Updated, w/tile
floors/fresh paint. Great area.
From $450.+sec. 386-752-9626
The Lakes Apts. Studios & IBr's
from $135/wk. Util. & cable incl.,
Sec 8 vouchers accepted, monthly
rates avail Call 386-752-2141
Unfurnished Apt Eastside
Village Realty, Inc .2 bedroom
1 bath Duplex must be 55+ yrs of
age Call Denise Bose @
386-752-5290
Wayne Manor Apts.
Move in $199. Summer special.
2/1, washer/dryer. Behind Kens off
Hwy 90. 386-754-1800
www.myflapts.com
Windsor Arms Apartments.
Summer special $199. Move in!
2/1, 2/1.5, 2/2. Pet Friendy. Free
200 ch. Dish. Washer/dryer hkup.
386-754-1800. www.myflapts.com

720 Furnished Apts.
For Rent
Immaculate Studio Apt. Avail
9/1 $500. mo. $300. dep. Incl.
appliances, cable, internet, water.
Josen 386-965-9083 or 438-8190
Rooms for Rent. Hillcrest, Sands,
Columbia. All furnished. Electric,
cable, fridge, microwave. Weekly
or monthly rates. 1 person $135,
2 persons $150. weekly
386-752-5808

730 Unfurnished
J Home For Rent
'09 Executive Home for rent on 41
acres. 4br/3.5ba Available
October. Horses/outdoor pets ok.
$2000/mo but all terms negotiable
for right caretaker. 386-209-4610
2BR house $640.mo $640. dep.
Also, 2br apt. $550. mo $550 dep.
Close to shopping.
386-344-2972
2BR/1BA Kitchen and Den. on
Alachua. $500. mo.
First & security.
386-397-0602


/ 2/1 879 Poplar St. $600: mo.
/ 3/2 Highlands Loop $700.mo.
/ 2/1 442 Praire St $650.mo.
All require First and last...
386-755-3649
Please leave msg., Only in office
Tues Thur. 8am 4pm
3 br/2ba house, 1206 McFarlane
Avenue. Avail. 9/1/11. $850 mo
$400 sec dep. 904-376-0620 or
904-813-8864 for appt. No pets!
3/2 by Westside Elementary,
custom built home
$1050.00 per month.
Scott 352-318-8117
3BR/1.5 BA Large lot. Very clean
with storage shed. Quiet area.
$850 mo. + $850. dep.
386-752-7578


73 Unfurnished
730 Home For Rent
4BR BRICK home.
Azalea Park. $750. mo.
$750. security .
386-397-2619 or 386-365-1243
4br/2ba CHA Brick, 1200 sqft
lac., Close to FGCC, CR 245A.
Ceramic tile/carpet, $800 mo $800
dep (904)708-8478 App. req'd
Brick 3br/2ba Large yard, garage,
CH/A. 189 Stanley Ct. Lake City.
$950. mo + $1000 dep.
Call 386-365-8543
Remodeled 3br/2ba Brick. In town
1750 sqft. Lg lot. Includes washer,
dryer, stove, & fridge. Quiet area
$985. mo,$985 dep. 386-752-7578

750 Business &
5 Office Rentals
FOR LEASE: Downtown office
space. Convenient to
Court house.
Call 386-755-3456
For Lease: E Baya Ave. Two -
1000 sqft office space units or
combined for 2000 sqft. 386-984-
0622 or weekends 386-497-4762
MIDTOWN COMMERCIAL
CENTER, brand new executive
suite & suite with warehouse
,$600 monthly.
Call Vicki or Joe 386-935-2832.
OFFICE SPACE for lease.
Oak Hill Plaza. 900 sqft
$675mo/$695. sec dep.
Tom 386-961-1086 DCA Realtor
SUB SHOP for lease.
All Equip. Avail. Old Willy J's
Across from Wal-Mart
386-623-2244


790 Vacation Rentals

Horseshoe Beach RV Lot.
Nice comer Lot with shade trees.
$295. mo Water/electric included
386-235-3633 or 352-498-5986
Scalloping Horseshoe Beach Spcl
Gulf Front 2br, w/lg porch, dock,
fish sink. wkend $395./wk $895.
386-235-3633/352-498-5986
alwaysonvacation.com #419-181
"Florida's Last Frontier"


805 Lots for Sale

05527058
Must See, Prettiest 10ac Rolling
Pasture Lot in North Fla.
3 mi. W. of Col. City School.
Red. to $6,990 P/A, Financing,
386-752-1364 or 386-965-4340

Foreclosure! 59.98 Ac. Close to
Suwannee River w/boat ramps &
Springs. Ideal parcel for your site
built or manuf. home. $139,000!
MLS# 78083 386-344-7662
Lots for Sale Eastside
Village Realty, Inc. buildable
vacant lot hight & dry in a estdb-
lished neighbor priced @ $40,000..
Call Denise Bose @ 752-5290
.Owner Financing. River comm &
' nature lover's dream in Lee:-15
wooded ac by the Withlacobchee.
Property is already subdivided
MLS 75576 $48,000.623-6896
PUBLISHER'S NOTE
All real estate advertising in this
newspaper is subject to the fair
housing act which makes it illegal
to advertise "any preference,
limitation, or discrimination based
on race, color, religion, sex,
disability, familial status or nation-
al origin; or any intention to make
such preference, limitation or
discrimination." Familial status
includes children under the age of
18 living with parents or legal
custodians, pregnant women and
people securing custody of chil-
dren under the age of 18. This
newspaper will not knowingly
accept any advertising for real es-
tate which is in violation of the
law. Our readers are hereby in-
formed that all dwellings adver-
tised in this newspaper are availa-
ble on an equal opportunity basis.
To complain of discrimination call
HUD toll free at 1-800,669-9777,
the toll free
telephone number to thM hearing
impaired is 1-800-927-9275.


810 Home for Sale
0.5 acre tract has 441 (4 lane)
frontage. 1/2 miles from Target
distribution. 2/1.5 currently zoned
residential. MLS#78506 $91,000
R.E.O. Realty Group 867-1271
2 Mobile homes on 5 ac. above
ground pool. (1)1800 sqft. &
(l)1500sqft.$235,000 $139,888
MLS 77552 Brittany Stoeckert
Results Realty 386-397-3473
/ Champion Home Inspections
386-344-5551. Inspections
Starting At $249.00
Veterans Receive 10% Off
Full Inspection.
3/2 Brick Home-w/1 car garage,
Metal roof, porch w/swing, detach
carport $96,000 MLS#77780
Jo Lytte Remax 386-365-2821
www.jolytte.florida-property-search.com
3/2 Split floor plan built in 2010
on 2 acres.. Master bath with large
tub & standing shower. Trey ceil-
ings MLS#78520, $114,900
R.E.O. Realty Group 867-1271.
4/2 fenced yard,
2 car garage, Fairly new roof &
HVAC Shed, fenced back yard.
MLS#77602, $162,500, R.E.O.
Realty Group 867-1271
4/2 on 1 ac. Modular home. Iam-


maculate cond. New carpet, roof,
AC. more. Barn/workshop
$115,000 MLS 78833 Brittany
Results Realty 386-397-3473
Almost 17ac., spacious 3br/2ba
home, paved rd. Near Itchetucknee
Spgs. Pole bam, gated, fenced.
MLS76902 $164,900 Brodi Allred
623-0906. Westfield Realty Group
Awesome Find! 3br/2ba, 1844sf,
wood floors, French doors to scr
back porch, 40x60 bldg w/office &
workshop, 6.17ac comer lot, 3
sides fenced. #77427 $199,900
Brick Ranch 3/2 Fl room. Side en-
try garage & workshop. 2 sheds.
New AC appl & roof. MLS78442
$114,900. Millard Gillen 365-7001
Westfield Realty Group


810 Home for Sale
Champion Home Inspections
Contact John 386-344-5551
State Licensed
And Insured
championhomeinspections.us
Charming 2br/2ba home. Gated
community. REDUCED to
$158,000 MLS78740 Teresa
Spradley 386-365-8343
Hallmark Real Estate
Clean Well maintained 3/2 brick
w/chain link fenced back yard
w/Garage. $120,K MLS78440.
Debbie King 386-365-3886
Hallmark Real Estate
Close to everything. Lg 3br/2ba
brick home. Close to VA & shop-
ping! $189,900 MLS78131 Carrie
Cason 386-623-2806
Westfield Realty Group
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
Neat & tidy 2/2, maybe 3/2. New
kitchen counters & tile. Open floor
plan. Mary Brown Whitehurst
965-0887 MLS# 77943 $99,000
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
10 acres w/well maintained brick
home. 2012 sqft. Open split floor
plan. Lori Giebeig Simpson
365-5678 MLS# 74447 $149,000
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
3br/3ba Spacious home in estab-
lished area. 2414 sqft. Private yard
& patio. Lori Giebeig Simpson
365-5678 MLS# 78175 $159,000
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
3br/2ba. 1590 sqft. Lori Giebeig
Simpson. 365-5678 or
Mary Brown Whitehurst
965-0887 MLS# 74542 $110,000
Country close to town 3/2 Brick, 3
ac. Grape arbor & fruit trees. pole
barn, workshop. Metal roof. MLS
78096 $129,900 Ginger Parker
365-2135 Hallmark Real Estate
Country Club Condo 4br/3ba.
Mega storage, roomy kit, 3 porch-
es. $165,000 MLS 78719 Paula
Lawrence 386-623-1973
Hallmark Real Estate.
Deer in your back yard. 3/2 HUD
w/16X48 wrap around scr. porch.
Clean, well maintained, 5 ac.
$72,000 MLS78687 Ginger Parker
365-2135 Hallmark Real Estate
Foreclosure! 3/2 D/WMH boasts
a large kitchen. M/B w/ garden
tub, shower & dbl sinks-New car-
pet-fpl & more-Only $69,995
MLS# 76920. 386-344-7662
Foreclosure! Newer 3/2 DWMH.
Lg rooms, kitchen island, lots of
wdws, master w/garden tub & sep-
arate shower. $74",995
MLS# 74218 386-344-7662
Great 3/2 home w/2346 sq ft
under roof on .67 ac., Creekside
S/D. Big back yard w/plenty of
shade trees. On a cul-de-sac, MLS
77385 $169,900 623-6896
Home for Sale Eastside Village
Realty, Inc. 2 bedroom, 2 bath site
built home with screen porch,
large carport priced just right Call
Denise Bose @ 752-5290
Home in Lake City Country Club.
4/3, renovated. Great for entertain-
ing. Glass doors open to back yard.
MLS#78637 $184,900
R.E.O. Realty Group 867-1271
JASPER! 4BR/2.5BA 1,890 SqFt
mfg home on 1 acre where
wildlife is abundant $39,900
DANIEL CRAPPS AGENCY,
INC. 755-5110 #77922
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
Suwannee Co. 115 ac. Fenced &
cross Fenced. Pasture land, paved
rd. Elaine K. Tolar 386-752-4211
MLS# 77081 $345,000
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
.97 ac. Centrally located to Lake
City & G'ville. Fenced, planted
pines, pasture. Elaine K. Tolar
752-4211 MLS# 73879 $291,030
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
New home in May Fair. Super area
Scorer lot. 4br split plan. Versatile
colors. Elaine K. Tolar
755-6488 MLS# 76919 $199,900
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
240 ac. Farm. Rolling Meadows.
Paved road, great access to Lake
City & G'ville. Elaine K. Tolar
386-752-4211 MLS# 70453
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
Suwannee Co.115 ac. Fenced &
cross'fenced. 10 & 20 ac parcels
avail. Elaine K. Tolar 386-752-
4211 MLS# 67766 $448,500
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
Brick home in town on lake front.
3br/2ba. New roof & hardwoods.
Glass room w/view Elaine Tolar
755-6488 MLS# 78092 $249,900
Lake front 3/2 custom Western Ce-
dar. Lots of storage space. Private
dock $229,900. MLS# 74681
Jo Lytte-Remax 386-365-2821
www.jolytte.florida-property-search.com
Large Home in the Country on
3.66 acres, fireplace, 2 outbldgs,
MLS#76471, $89,900
Jo Lytte, Remax 386-365-2821
jolytte@remaxnfl.com
LEASE/OPTION BUY
3br/2ba Home 2010 w/garage
on 1/2 acre. Owner Financing
386-623-2244


810 Home for Sale
LOCATION! CONDITION!
PRICE! 3BR/2BA w/open floor
plan: freshly painted S96.000
DANIEL CRAPPS AGENCY,
INC. 755-5110 #78278
Lofty home on Itchetucknee River,
Wrap around covered decks on
two levels.MustSEE! S375,000
MLS#77006 Jo Lytte
Remax 386-365-2821
Luxury home. 3br/2ba, 20 ac lot.
Cherry cabinets & SS appliances.
Jacuzzi in master br. MLS 78190
$ 374,900 Roger Lovelady 365-
7039. Westfield Realty Group
Motivated Seller. Country area,
paved rd. 3br/2ba manuf home.
New AC & upgraded wdows.
MLS 78027 $84K. Brodie Allred.
623-0906 Westfield Realty Group
MOVE-IN READY! 3BR/2BA in
pristine condition on 1.39 acres
$89,900 DANIEL CRAPPS
AGENCY, INC.
755-5110 #78345
New Reduced. 4br/2ba plus of-
fice. 2 living & dinig areas, cov-
ered porch. Fl rm. Triple garage.
MLS77685 Charlie Sparks 755-
0808 Westfield Realty Group
Nice, large 4/2 on 1 acre
w/florida room, granite floors,
wrap around front porch, $139,900
Brittany Stoeckert Results Realty
386-397-3473 MLS 77292
Owner Financing. 2br/3ba country
home w/wrap around porches, 5ac.
* Garage w/workshop. MLS77005
$179,900 Roger Lovelady 365-
7039 Westfield Realty Group
)PRICE REDUCTION. 3/2 plus
pool house w/half bath, 2.25
fenced ac. Freshly painted. Split
plan, Large rear deck MLS 78103
$179,900 386-623-6896
PRICED TO SELL! 3BR/2BA
w/2,012 SqFt w/living rm & fami-
ly rm $57,000 DANIEL CRAPPS
AGENCY, INC.
755-5110 #78680
Private 2 ac parcel away from it
all. Hunting w/no restrictions.
Make an offer on this 1764 sqft
home that need some TLC.
$109,900, MLS78331. Jay Sears.
867-1613 Hallmark Real Estate
Reduced Price! 3br/1.5 ba. Re-
modeled. Nice area close to VA.
MLS 77599 $69K. Estate Sale,
bring all offers. Josh Grecian 466-
2517 Westfield Realty Group
Remax Professionals Motivated
seller. Spacious brick w/many up-
grades. Newer roof, windows &
fixtures. Fenced back yard. MKS
78168 $119,900 Missy Zecher @
623-0237 www.missyzecher.com
Remax Professionals Ranch style
home on 10 ac w/bam & horse
stalls. 4 lg bedrm + bonus rm. 2
car gar. MLS 77403 $325K.
Missy Zecher @ 386-623-0237
www.missyzecher.com
Rolling Meadows. 4 or 3br/2ba.
Over 1700 sqft. and 1/2 ac lot.
MLS77284 $154,900 Carrie Cason
386-623-2806
Westfield Realty Group
Something for Everyone! 3br/2ba,
2706sf, 4 02ac, island kitchen,
Corian counters, det garage, Koi
pond, fish house, green house,
fenced & more. #76255 $247,000
SPECTACULAR VIEW!
2BR/1BA; 1200sf, .65ac, scr front
porch, steps to deck/dock on Suw.
river, under house parking/storage,
shed & more. #77242 $194,900
Suwannee River Front
granite counters, covered patio,
deck & dock, $349,000
MLS#76336 Jo Lytte at Remax
Professionals. 386-365-2821
WELL-CARED FOR 4BR/2.5BA
mfg home w/formal LR plus fami-
ly rm $84,000 DANIEL CRAPPS
AGENCY, INC.
755-5110 #78585
WHITE SPRINGS! Sturdy block
3BR/1BA home in city limits,
fenced yd $49,000 DANIEL
CRAPPS AGENCY, INC.
755-5110 #78603


820 Farms &
2 Acreage ;
10-ac lot. Well/septic/pp. Owner
financing S300 dn, S663 mo 8.9%,
25 yrs. Deas Bullard Properties
386-752-4339 www.landnfl.com
4 1V2 acre lot Lake Jeffery Road.
Gorgeous Oaks!Paved Rd
Owner Financing! NO DOWN!
$59,900. $525mo 352-215-1018.
www.LandOwnerFinancing.com
4 acres, Wellborn, New Well
installed, Beautifully wooded
w/cl8ared Home Site, owner fin,
no down, $39,900, $410 mon
Call 352-215-1018
www.LandOwnerFinancing.com
6.45 ac river front property in
White Springs, cloe to Big Shoals.
Covered shelter for entertaining.
MLS# 77417 $104,900 386-867-
1271 R.E.O. Realty Group, Inc
FARM- 7 stall barn.
17+ acres, pasture, cross fenced.
Close in $500. mo.
386-961-1086
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
61 ac. Parcel, SR 27 & 1-75 inter-
change. Great potential, fenced &
cross fenced. Elaine K. Tolar
752-4211 MLS# 758060 $368,040
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
40 ac.Parcel. Less then 2 mi from
city limits. Fenced road frontage
on US Hwy 441. Elaine K. Tolar
752-4211 MLS# 62092 $194K

830 Commercial
O830 Property
788 S. Marion Comm'l bldg on
highway frontage. Across from the
VA & near downtown. $49,900.
MLS 78129 Scott Stewart 867-
3498 Westfield Realty Group
Commercial. High traffic location
w/I-75 exposure. 2-story custom
log home. MLS77949
Josh Grecian 386-466-2517
Westfield Realty Group
Prime Commercial Location.
Just across from a plaza. Frontage
on Baya w/2 curbcuts. $350,000
MLS# 77485 Call 386-867-1271
R.E.O.Realty Group, Inc
Remax Professionals Commercial
Property. Located on expanding
west side of Lake City. Professio-
nal service or restaurant. MLS
77436 $575k Missy Zecher 386-
623-0237 www.missyzecher.com
Wellborn Commercial lot. 1.84
acres w/34' of Hwy frontage near
the new Dollar General. MLS
72381 ScottStewart 386-867-3498
S.Westfield Realty Group

Q86 Investment
860 Property
Rustic Fishing camp in Suwannee
Minutes to boat launch.
MLS#78709 $59,900
Jo Lytte/Remax 386-365-2821
www.jolytte.florida-property-search.com


950 Cars for Sale
FORD MUSTANG,2009
V-6, Auto., Silver.
40k miles Loaded. $17.500.
386-752-4850






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LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS SATURDAY. AUGUST 27. 2011


Indians air it out in .classic


By TIM KIRBY
tkirby@lakecityreporter.com

JACKSONVILLE Fort
White High made its living
running the ball last year.
Now, when forced to go
to the air, the Indians can
sling it with the best.
In Thursday's kickoff
classic between Fort White
and Episcopal School of
Jacksonville, won by the
Eagles 42-27, the teams
combined for 500 yards
through the air. And that
was in three quarters.
Indians quarterback
Andrew Baker connected
with AJ. Legree nine times
for 190 yards and two
touchdowns. Baker had
another five completions
for 33 yards. Trey Phillips
caught a touchdown pass
and Soron Williams had a
rushing touchdown.
Baker and Legree sig-
naled a special night when
they hooked up on Fort
White's first play for a
34-yard gain. A pass inter-
ference call and five run-
ning plays put the ball in
the end zone.
After an exchange of
punts, Phillips intercepted
a pass on the Indians 13.
Baker got the Indians out
of the hole with a 20-yard
completion to Legree and
the two added completions
of 13 yards (on a fourth-
and-2) and 30 yards. Baker
hit Phillips from five yards
out for the touchdown and
Nathan Escalante's PAT put
Fort White on top, 14-7.
Episcopal answered
with a quick 65-yard
scoring drive, then took


BRANDON FINLEY/Lake City Reporter
Fort White High seniors A.J. Legree (3), Zach Cormier (28), Markeius Coffee (52) and Jonathan Dupree (51) lead the Indians
onto the field for their kickoff classic game at Episcopal School of Jacksonville on Thursday.


advantage of Fort White
errors to score 21 points
in three minutes. Following
lost-fumbles, Eagles quar-
terback Luke Del Rio hit
Aaron Burroughs on a
53-yard touchdown pass
and added a 59-yard scor-
ing pass to Kyle Taylor.
Fort White steadied the
ship with a six-play, 55-yard
scoring drive, with Baker
hitting Legree from 26
yards out.


However, the Indians
allowed a second kickoff
return for a touchdown and
Fort White was again down
by 14 points.
Fort White went 59 yards
in five plays to open the third
quarter. Legree hauled in a
lob for the score.
The Indians defense
forced a three-and-out,
but Shakeel Rashad, who
has committed to North
Carolina, picked off a pass.


Episcopal turned it into an
eight-play drive for a touch-
down with 3:57 left to play.
Fort White's kickoff
problems continued, as the
Eagles came up with an
onside kick and used up
some more clock. A long
heave by Baker was picked
off to put the game away.
Fort White's defense shut
down the run. Helped by a
20-yard loss on a lateral, the
Indians held Episcopal to


net-1 yard on the ground.
Joseph Chatman had a
sack, good for a 14-yard
loss, and Terry Calloway
got to the quarterback for a
five-yard loss.
Tavaris Williams had a
30-yard run on a reverse.
Jomar Gainer was a bright
spot on kickoffs with a
26-yard return, and gained
13 yards on his one carry.
Melton Sanders threw to
Shayne Newman for 18


yards late in the game.
"Our passing game was
pretty effective," coach
Demetric Jackson said.
"We have some positives to
build on and some things
to shore up. That's why
we needed to play a game.
Thank God it was a classic.
We don't have to dwell on it
too much."

Episcopal 7 28 7 42,
Fort White 7 14 6 27
(Three quarters played)
First Quarter
E-Rashad 72 kickoff return (Raymond
kick), 11:49
FW--Williams I run (Escalante kick),
9:16
Second Quarter
FW-Phillips 5 pass from Baker
(Escalante kick), 11:18
E-McCarthy I run (Raymond kick),
8:11
E-Burroughs 53 pass from Del Rio
(Raymond kick), 7:39
E-Taylor 59 pass from Del Rio
(Raymond kick), 5:21
FW-Legree 26 pass from Baker
(Escalante kick), 2:31 I
E-Burroughs 75 kickoff return
(Raymond kick), 2:16
Third Quarter
FW-Legree 4 pass from Baker (kick
failed), 9:25
E--Del Rio 7 run (Raymond kick),
3:57
Episcopal FortWhite
First downs 10 13
Rushes-yards 20-1 22-96
Passing 259 241
Comp-Att-Int 15-3-1 15-19-2
Punts-Avg. 3-38 1-18
Fumbles-Lost 2-1 3-2
Penalties-Yards 2-20 4-20
INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS -
RUSHING-Episcopal, Smith 7-19,
McCarthy 8-10, Del Rio 5-(-28). Fort
White, T. Williams 1-30, Cormier 6-28,
S.Williams 12-20, Gainer I -10, Baker 2-8.
PASSING-Episcopal, Del Rio 14-25-
261-1, Smith I-5-(-2)-0. Fort White, Baker
1- 18-223-2, Sanders I-1 18-0.
RECEIVING-Episcopal, Schneider 5-57,
Smith 4-55, Taylor 3-78, Burroughs 3-69.
Fort White, Legree 9-190, Phillips 3-15,
Newman 1-18,Pitts 1-12, S.Williams 1-.6.


FSU
From Page 1B
addition to landing one
of the country's premier
recruiting classes.
The most noticeable
change in Florida State's
lineup is at quarterback,
where junior EJ Manuel has
replaced Christian Ponder.
The 6-5, 245-pound
Manuel is three inches tall-
er and 20 pounds bigger
than Ponder, yet appears
just as fast and mobile as
his predecessor. -
"When it comes to read-
ing the defense, throwing
the ball, they're on the same
page," junior fullback Lonnie
Pryor said. "EJ learned lot
from Ponder."
Fisher said the 'August
workouts have his players
thirsting for the Sept. 3
opener against Louisiana-
Monroe.
"There's no doubt that
we're ready," Fisher said.
The Seminoles fin-
ished two-a-day practices
Thursday and turned their
focus on the start of classes
on Monday and their open-
ing opponent.
Fisher said he expects
both starting offensive
tackles, Zebrie Sanders
(groin) and Andrew Datko
(shoulder), to be ready to
go for the opener. The two
veterans have been held
out of practice to get extra
time to heal. Junior run-
ning back Chris Thompson,
the team's leading rusher a
year ago with 845 yards, has
also practiced little.
Fisher, who claims no one
is looking ahead to the Sept
17 visit from top-ranked
Oklahoma, did his best to
build up Louisiana-Monroe.
The Warhawks finished
with a 5-7 record last year,
but Fisher said they can
present problems for the
Semninoles, especially with
an unorthodox defense that
he said could confuse for
his offense.
Florida State will host
lower-division Charleston
Southern on Sept. 10 before
getting to the Sooners and
then their ACC schedule.
Fisher tried to assure
boosters that his players
and coaches weren't looking
past their first two games
and said Florida State would
be ready for the Sooners
this year after a 47-17
pummeling in Norman,
Okla., last September.


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