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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028308/01645
 Material Information
Title: The Lake City reporter
Uniform Title: Lake City reporter (Lake City, Fla. 1967)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: John H. Perry
Place of Publication: Lake City Fla
Publication Date: 8/26/2011
Frequency: daily (monday through friday)[<1969>-]
weekly[ former 1967-<1968>]
daily
normalized irregular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Lake City (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Columbia County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Columbia -- Lake City
Coordinates: 30.189722 x -82.639722 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 95, no. 4 (Oct. 5, 1967)-
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000358016
oclc - 33283560
notis - ABZ6316
lccn - sn 95047175
sobekcm - UF00028308_01569
System ID: UF00028308:01645
 Related Items
Preceded by: Lake City reporter and Columbia gazette

Full Text




In season
Fresh produce, plus
patriotism, at

2OB' S rS" ... r


Lake


Milestone
Local business
marks 60th year
with mixer.
See below


City


Stocks sink
Reversal ends
three-day rally
on Wall Street.
See story, 6A


Reporter


Friday, August 26, 201 I www.lakecityreporter.com Vol. 137, No. 181 75 cents


Irene


races


toward


coast

By MITCH WEISS and
SETH BORENSTEIN
Associated Press
Sqe related story, Page
5A.
BUXTON, N.C. -Amon-
strous Hurricane Irene tight-
ened its aim on the Eastern
Seaboard on Thursday,
threatening 65 million peo-
ple along a shore-hugging
path from North Carolina
to New England. One of the
nation's top experts called
it his "nightmare" scenario.
The Category 3 storm
with winds of 115 mph -
the threshold for a major
hurricane would be the
strongest
to strike
the East
Coast in
seven
years,
and peo-
ple were
already
getting
out of the WEATHER CHANNEL
way. Irene!s projected
T e n s path as of 5 p.m.
of thou- Thursday.
sands fled
North
Carolina beach towns, farm-
ers pulled up their crops,
and the Navy ordered ships
to sea so they could endure
the punishing wind and
waves in open water.
All eyes were on Irene's
projected path, which
showed .it bringing misery
to every city along the I-
95 corridor, including
Washington, New York and
Boston. The former chief
of the National Hurricane
Center called it one of his
three worst possible situa-
tions.
"One of my greatest
nightmares was having a
major hurricane go up the
whole Northeast Coast,"
Max Mayfield, the center's
retired director, told The
Associated Press.
He said the damage will
probably climb into billions
of dollars: "This is going
to have an impact on the
United States economy."
The head of the Federal
Emergency Management
Agency said damages could
exceed most previous
storms because so many
people live along the East
Coast and property values
are high.
"We've got a lot more
people that are potentially
in the path of this storm,"
FEMA Director Craig
Fugate said in an interview
with The Associated Press.
'This is one of the larg-
est populations that will be
impacted by one storm at
one time."
The storm would "have a
lot of impact well away from
the coastline," he added.
"A little bit of damage over
big areas with large popula-
tions can add up fast."

IRENE continued on 3At


Verdict: Manslaughter


Woman found
guilty in 2009
shooting death.

By TONY BRITT
tbritt@lakecityreporter.com
A Columbia County jury
o'n Thursday afternoon con-
victed Charlotte Lashonda
Owens of manslaughter
in the March 2009 shoot-
ing death of Jesse Devon
Johnson.
Prosecutors had been
seeking a first-degree mur-
der conviction in the case.
The four-day trial began
Monday morning with jury
selection and ended around
4 p.m. Thursday. The eight-
man, four-woman jury delib-
erated about 3 hours and 30
minutes before returning
the verdict to Third Circuit
Judge David W. Fina. The
jury was polled after the
verdict was read. Owens
displayed no emotion as the
verdict was read.
A sentencing hearing
for Owens has been sched-
uled for 9 a.m. Sept. 26
at the Columbia County
Courthouse. She faces a
maximum of 15 years in
prison.
Meanwhile, Owens will
be returned to the Columbia
County Detention Facility.
The jury could .have
found Owens guilty of first
or second-degree murder,
manslaughter or found her
not guilty.
Owens was represented
by attorneys Jimmy Hunt
and Lisa Schlitzkus. Her
attorneys have 30 days to
appeal the verdict once
Owens has been sen-
tenced.
"I respect the jury's deci-
sion. I'm disappointed,"
Hunt said moments after
the courtroom emptied. "I
was expecting a not guilty
verdict."
He did not say whether
he and Schlitzkus plan to
appeal the verdict.
"We haven't had a chance
to discuss that with our cli-
ent because the verdict was
just read," he said. "We
need to discuss it with her
then well determine what
to 'do."
"We have to respect the
jury's verdict and the appeal
is something we'll have to
look at," added Schlitzkus.
Johnson, 23, was found
at Georgia Avenue and
Gibson Lane on March 19,
2009 with a gunshot wound
to his chest.
Officers and EMS per-
sonnel responded shortly
after 10 a.m., and after
stabilizing Johnson trans-
ported him to Shands at
VERDICT continued on 3A.


JAOun mATI nI T WWArciLar'. IClly rep uOLei
Lake City resident Charlotte Lashonda Owens (right) and attorney Lisa Schlitzkus react to the verdict in Owens' first degree
murder trial Thursday. Owens was convicted of manslaughter in the March 2009 shooting death of Jesse Devon Johnson.


Charter review committee sets

ground rules for public comment


By ANTONIA ROBINSON
arobinson@lakecityreporter.com
The Columbia County Charter
Review Commission voted on chang-
es to its bylaws pertaining to citizen
participation at meetings Thursday
night.
Previously the bylaws in Rule 2
mandated that public comment be
heard on all "substantive agenda


items." The bylaws now allow public
comment on all matters "germane to
agenda items."
The change is subject to review
by'an attorney specializing in con-
stitutional law. The bylaws were last
amended Oct 4, 2005.
Making the changes to the bylaws
was a matter of being clear, said
Commission member Bettye Lane.
The commission also voted to


Major milestone


JASON MATTHEW WALKERILake City Reporter
Martha Jane Odom Carter (from left), Odom, Moses & Company L.L.P. partners
Cammy Scott, Tammy Hall, Patricia Stuart and senior partner Philip Moses Jr., and
Robert Turbeville chat Thursday at the Lake City-Columbia County Chamber of
Commerce mixer. The company celebrated its 60th anniversary on June 1.


change Rule 3 of the bylaws to
require that regular meetings of the
commission be held at a place to be
determined by the committee. The
rule originally required that meet-'
ings, be held at the Old Welcome
Center on Hall of Fame Drive.
In other business the commis-
sion voted to invite the Board of
CHARTER continued on 3A


Poll: 12%

approval

rating for

Congress

WASHINGTON (AP)
- Americans are plenty
angry at Congress in the
aftermath of the debt crisis
and Republicans could pay
the greatest price, a new
Associated Press-GfK 'poll
suggests.
The poll finds the tea
party has lost support,
Republican House Speaker
John Boehner is increas-
ingly unpopular and people
are warming to the idea
of not just cutting spend-
ing but also raising taxes
CONGRESS continued on 3A


Fresh produce with a dash of patriotism


By ANTONIA ROBINSON
arobinson@lakecityreporter.com
Fresh local produce won't be
the only thing available at the
Lake DeSoto Farmers Market this
weekend.
The market is honoring the
Alpha Company 53rd Brigade


Special Troops Battalion Florida
Army National Guard for its ser-
vice with live music, children's
bounce houses, food and more
from 8 a.m. to 12 p.m. Saturday.
Members of the battalion will
be present with displays of equip-
ment and recruitment information.
The unit recently returned from a


deployment to Kuwait in 2010.
This was its second deployment
since 2005 when the unit went to
Afghanistan.
The Columbia County Farm
Bureau is providing free samples
qf locally grown boiled peanuts for
the National Guard Appreciation
Day.


This is the second time the City
of Lake City has hosted an appre-
ciation day for the guard, said
Jackie Kite, redevelopment man-
ager. The unit initially was about
80 percent people from Lake City
and 20 percent from the rest of
MARKET continued on 3A


CALL US:
(386) 752-1293
SUBSCRIBETO
THE REPORTER:
Voice: 755-5445
Fax: 752-9400


9574
T-Storm Chance
WEATHER, 2A


Opinion ................
People .................
Obituaries ..............
Advice & Comics.........
Puzzles ...............


TODAY IN
PEOPLE
Apple looks to
the future.


COMING
SATURDAY
Local news
roundup.








LAKE CITY REPORTER DAILY BRIEFING FRIDAY. AUGUST 26, 2011


Piay,


Thursday:
Afternoon: 0-4-7
Evening: N/A


Thursday:
Afternoon: 6-6-2-0
Evening: N/A


SAN FRANCISCO
S' ince Steve Jobs' return
to Apple Inc. in 1997 as
CEO, the company has
been on an unparalleled
upswing, highlighted by
the immense popularity of the iPad
and iPhone.
Now, with Jobs no longer leading,
Apple will have to prove it can keep
its momentum. If the recent past is
any indication, the company will con-
ltinue to move forward.
Apple said late Wednesday that
Jobs, 56, resigned from the CEO
post, in a move that seems motivated
-' by his ongoing, yet still unspecified
'.health issues. Jobs had taken an
indefinite medical leave in January,
marking his third such leave in
seven years. Jobs, who co-founded
Apple in 1976, previously survived
Pancreatic cancer and received a
liver transplant.
Taking on,the role of board chair-
man, Jobs now passes the CEO role
Tim Cook, 50, the company's chief
operating officer. Cook had been act-
ing CEO since January. For years,
he has been running Apple's day-to-
day operations, and he has long been
seen as the natural successor. He
also served as Apple's leader for two
'months in 2004 while Jobs battled
cancer and again for five-and-a-half'
.months in 2009 when Jobs received
.a liver transplant The company has
thrived under Cook's leadership,
briefly becoming the most valuable
company in America earlier this
month.

Ben Stiller to receive
British comedy award
LOS ANGELES Ben Stiller is
being honored for his comedic con-
tributions by the British Academy of
Film and Television.
The group's Los Angeles branch
said Stiller will receive the Charlie
Chaplin Britannia Award for
Excellence in Comedy.



AROUND

Deputy didn't file
.-for OT, suspended
BRADENTON A
veteran Manatee County
SSheriff's lieutenant has
been suspended without
.,pay for three weeks for
failing to put in for over-
,time.
The recent suspension .
followed an internal affairs
;.investigation that found
,John Murrell "repeat-
w dly failed to properly
document his overtime
ours." Murrell oversees BOtt
8 school resource officers
I*-nd two sergeants. Jason Fi
Investigators said in Tampa
"Morrell failed to put in Spanish
for more than 52 hours of craft bee
overtime between January
2009 and May 2011. That year sai
equated to more than ering fo
$3,000 in pay. and kid
Sheriff Brad Steube said Henr
Morrell's actions exposed Jeremy
the department to a pos- plant wa
sible Fair Labor Standards Wednes
Act investigation. He sa
surgeon
Worker charged in Cassady'
food stamp scam pancrea
kidney.
MIAMI A former
state welfare worker has Fame
Been charged in a $1.3 turtl
million scam for stealing U-
personal information to get WES
'food stamps, which she A se.
traded for cash. nered a
Meera Khan's indict- lowing
ment on Thursday culmi- seemed
nhates a two-year investiga- and unc
.Ntion. She faces numerous rehabili
Charges including grand tive sur
theft and racketeering found d
which she allegedly com- after he
mitted while working Logg
with the Department of Center
Children and Families. was kn(
According to the indict- Wednes
ment, Khan used welfare Island.
victims' personal informa- conditi
tion to obtain food stamps, deter
An iden
Panhandle deputy firmed
gets transplant Andr
open ar
PENSACOLA The 2010 wi


d his son is recov-
lldwing, a pancreas
ney transplant
y Cassady said that.
Cassady's trans-
as completed late
sday.
aid two teams of
is operated on ,
v nne for fthe


therapy and orthodontics.
A spokeswoman for the
Marinelife Center said "the
scientific advancements we
made while rehabilitating
Andre are already being
applied in the treatment
of other threatened and
endangered sea turtles."
Andre was hbelipved t


S Wednesday:
4-11-18-33-34


PEOPLE IN THE NEWS

With Jobs out as CEO, Apple. looks to the future


om's up at Cigar City
romm pours beer samples at Cigar City Brewing Co.
a in August 20. Cigar City uses ingredients such as
cedar, guava, Cuban espresso and citrus woods to
ers that taste of Tampa's heritage.


father of an Escambia Veterinm
County Sheriff's deputy edge te
injured in a shooting last him, ini


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Apple CEO Steve Jobs holds up an Apple IPhone Jan. 9, 2007, at the MacWorld
Conference in San Francisco. Apple Inc. on Wednesday said Jobs is resigning as
CEO, effective immediately. He will be replaced by Tim Cook, who was the com-
pany's chief operating officer. It said Jobs has been elected as Apple's chairman.:


Veteran producer
I Nigel Lythgoe called
Stiller "a master of
comedy who, just
J like the legendary
filmmaker for whom,
this award is named,
Stiller embodies the
'remarkable multi-
hyphenate talents of actor, writer,
director and producer."
Stiller will receive the honor at the
Brittania Awards on Nov. 30, when
actress Helena Bonham Carter and
animator John Lasseter are also
being recognized, .

Wahlberg brothers pay
for NY 'burger' name
ROCHESTER, N.Y. Actor broth-
ers Donnie and Mark Wahlberg have
licensed the name of a hamburger
from a western New York chain of.
drive-in-style restaurants and plan



D FLORIDA


to use the name for
their new eatery.
The brothers from
U ,Boston have licensed
the Wahlburger ..
name from the com-
pany so they can
Wahlberg 'Use it when they
and another sibling,
Paul, open a burger joint named
Wahlburgers Restaurant in their
hometown.

Body pulled from river
that of 'Treme' actor
NEW ORLEANS The Orleans
Parish Coroner's Office said the
body of Michael Showers, an actor
in the HBO series "Treme," which
is filmed in New Orleans, was
pulled from the Mississippi River on
Wednesday. Authorities are not say-
ing if they think foul play is involved.
* Associated Press


S. 101174
Tallahassee Lake City
...... *100 76 95 74
79City 2/
93/78


Tam
92,


SCelebrity Birthdays


* Singer Vic Dana is 69.
* Rhythm-and-blues singer
Valerie Simpson is 65.
* Pop singer Bob Cowsill is
62.
* Actor Brett Cullen is 55.
* NBA coach Stan Van
Gundy is 52.
* Jazz musician Branford
Marsalis is 51.
* Country musician Jimmy
Olander (Diamond Rio) is 50.
* Actor Chris Burke is 46.


*Jacksonville
* c


* Actress-singer Shirley
Manson (Garbage) is 45.
* Rock musician Dan Vickrey
(Counting Crowes) is 45.
* TV writer-actress Riley
Weston is 45.
* Rock musician Adrian
Young (No Doubt) is 42.
* Latin pop singer Thalia is
40.
* Actor Macaulay Culkin is
31.
* Actor Chris Pine is 31.


Daily Scripture
"Great peace have those.who
love your law, and nothing can
make them stumble."
Psalm 119:165

Thought for Today
"While we read history we
make history."
George William Curtis,
American author-editor (1824-1892)

Lake City Reporter


HOW TO REACH US
Main number ........(386) 752-1293
Fax number .............752-9400
Circulation ..............755-5445
Online... www.lakecityreporter.com
The Lake City Reporter, an affiliate of
Community Newspapers Inc., is pbb-
lished Tuesday through Sunday at 180
E Duval St., Lake City, Ra. 32055.
Periodical postage paid at Lake City, Ra.
Member Audit Bureau of Circulation and
The Associated Press.
All material herein Is property of the Lake
City Reporter. Reproduction in whole or
in part is forbidden without the permis-
sion of the publisher. U.S. Postal Service
No. 310-880.
POSTMASTER: Send address changes
to Lake City Reporter, P.O. Box 1709,
Lake City, Ra. 32056.
Publisher ToddWilson.....754-0418
(twilson@lakecityreporter.com)
NEWS
Editor Robert Bridges .....754-0428
(rbridges@lakecityreporter.com)
ADVERTISING
Director Ashley Butcher .. .754-0417
(abutcher@lakecityreporter.com) *
CLASSIFIED
To place a classified ad, call 755-5440


BUSINESS
Controller Sue Brannon.... 754-0419
(sbrannon@lakecityreporter.com)
CIRCULATION
Home delivery of the Lake City Reporter
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Tuesday through Saturday, and by 730
a.m. on Sunday.
Please call 386-755-5445 to report any
problems with your delivery service.
In Columbia County, customers should
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vice error for same day re-delivery. After
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vice related credits will be issued.
In all other counties where home delivery
is available, next day re-delivery or ser-
vice related credits will be Issued.
Circulation ..............755-5445
(circulation@lakectyreporter.com)
Home delivery rates
(Tuesday through Sunday)
12 Weeks..................$26.32
24 Weeks...'. ............ $48.79
52 Weeks..................$83.46
Rates include 7% sales tax
Mail rates
S12Weeks.................. $41.40
24 Weeks................ $82.80
52 Weeks...................$179.40


CORRECTION

The Lake City Reporter corrects errors of fact in news
items. If you have a concern, question or suggestion, please
.call the executive editor. Corrections and clarifications will run
in this space. And thanks for reading.


THE WEATHER


City Saturday
Cape Canaveral 93/79't


S ,. 'U Daytona Beach
Ft. Lauderdale
de Dana Beach Fort Myers
(5 9Gainesville
Ocala \Jacksonville
S Orando Cap.Canaveral Key West
S /79 /80 Lake City
Miami
o \ ~Naples
81. West Paln BM Ocala
95/79 Orlando
FtL LauderdaIl Panama City
Ft. Myers 95/81 O Pensacola
93/80 Naples Tallahassee
92/81 Miami Tampa
K, .s"', 9$/82 Valdosta
9Key West* W. Palm Beach
90/83


LAE IT AMAA


is and one for the be about 25 years old. TEMPERATURES
L High Thursday
Abduction faked Low Thursday
US male Sea to get attention Normal high
o gntd art dIr ge t ; Normal low
P_ fni dpadu~


5T PALM BEACH
a turtle who gar-
worldwide fol-
for surviving what
d near-fatal injuries
dergoing a year of
station and innova-
geries has been
dead, three weeks
was released.
erhead Marinelife
said Andre, as he
own, was found
sday on Hutchinson
He was in such bad
on they couldn't
ine what killed him.
itification tag con-
it was him.
e was found split
ad stranded in June
th massive injuries.
arians used cutting-
chniques to save
eluding vacuum


MIAMI Police said a
Miami woman faked her
own kidnapping to get
attention from her boy-
friend.
On Wednesday, Rashell
Leeann Barfield, 21, was
charged with false report
of a crime and one count
of obstruction of justice.
She was booked into
the Women's Detention
Center.
According to an arrest
affidavit, Barfield and her
boyfriend fought Monday
evening because she
thought he only cared
about their son.
Barfield left home and
her boyfriend received a
text message from her a
little while later saying that
two mask-wearing men
had put her in a white van.
* Associated Press


Record high
Record low

PRECIPITATION
Thursday
Month total
Year total
Normal month-to-date
Normal year-to-date


-. 92
75
90
70
102 in 1915
62 in 1957

0.03"
3.17"
26.56"
5.42"
35.55"


SUN
Sunrise today
Sunset today
Sunrise torn.
Sunset tom.

MOON
Moonrise today
Moonset today
Moondrise tom.
Moonset tom.


7:04 a.m.
8:00 p.m.
7:04 a.m.
7:59 p.m.


4:18 a.m.
6:09 p.m.
5:23 a.m.
6:50 p.m.


0003
Aug. Sept. Sept. Sept.
27 4 12 20
New First Full Last


7a lp 7p la 6a
Friday Saturday



iFecas pt '


1t


Today's
ultraviolet
radiation risk
for the area on
a scale from 0
to 10+.
I Ill'


95' 78'pc
97/ 83/pc.
95/78/pc
95/74/pc
97/76/pc
92/83/sh
98/73/pc
97/82/pc
93/79/pc
96/75/pc
95/78/pc
92/78/pc
96/73/s
100/73/pc
94/80/pc
100/71/pc
97/81/pc


Sunday
91 .' 78:1
94 76, pC
97, 83/pc
93/77/pc
95/72/pc
96/74/pc
91/83/sh
97/72/pc
97/82/pc
92/79/pc
96/73/pc
94/77/pc
92/78/pc
94/72/s
97/72/pc
92/79/pc
95/68/pc
97/81/pc


An exclusive
service
brought to
our readers
by
The Weather
Channel.



weather.com


4VI Forecasts, data and
, graphics 0 2011 Weather
ot1y C .a, LP, Madism, Wis.w
weather J '""*"www.weae"Mshecor


On this date in
1987, thunder-
storms drenched ;
northern Illinois dur- g| t
fil tha mrnimnf nrl I t


ing ien o in g alnu
afternoon hours,
pushing August
rainfall totals for
Chicago, Moline and
Peoria to new all-
time highs for any
month of the year.


n oi-eE- Online AcceSs
Absolutely

FREE

I_ Call for login information.


CA$H3


PARTLY MOSTLY MOSTLY MOSTLY CHANCE
CLOUDY SUNNY SUNNY SUNNY OF
S-STORMS
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Page Editor: Jason M. Walker, 754-0430


- .


i









LAKE CITY REPORTER NEWS FRIDAY, AUGUST 26, 2011 3A


CONGRESS: 12% approval rating

Continued From Page 1A


VERDICT: Manslaughter conviction

Continued From Page 1A


- anathema to the GOP
- just as both parties pre-
pare for another struggle
with deficit reduction.
To be sure, there is
plenty of discontent to
go around. The poll finds
more people are down
on their own member of
Congress, not just the insti-
tution, an unusual finding
in surveys and one bound
to make incumbents par-
ticularly nervous. In inter-
views, some people said the
debt standoff itself, which
caused a crisis of confi-
dence to ripple through
world markets, made them
wonder whether lawmakers
are able to govern at all.
"I guess I long for the
day back in the '70s and
'80s when we could dis-
agree but we could get a
compromise worked out,"
said Republican Scott
MacGregor, 45, a Windsor,
Conn., police detective.
"I don't think there's any
compromise anymore."
The results point to a


chilly autumn inWashington
as the divided Congress
returns to the same fiscal
issues that almost halted
other legislative business
and are certain to influence
the struggle for power in
the 2012 elections. They
suggest that politicians,
regardless of party, have
little to gain by prolong-
ing the nation's most con-
sequential policy debate.
And they highlight the gap
between the wider public's
wishes now and the tea
party's cut-it-or-shut-it phi-
losophy that helped propel
Republicans into the House
majority last year.
The survey, conducted
Aug. 18-22,' found that
approval of Congress has
dropped to its lowest level
in AP-GfK polling 12
percent That's down from
21 percent in June, before
the debt deal reached fever
pitch.
The results indicate, too,
that the question of trust
remains up for grabs a


sign that the government's
stewardship of the econo-
my over the next year will
weigh heavily on the for-
tunes of both parties in the
elections. Republicans and
Democrats statistically tied,
40 percent to 43 percent
respectively, when respon-
dents were asked which
party they trust more to
handle the federal budget
deficit Nearly a third of
independents said they
trust neither party on the
issue.
Much about the next
election hinges on indepen-
dent voters, the ever-grow-
ing group fiercely wooed
by campaigns for years.
These respondents, the poll
found, were the least forgiv-
ing toward incumbents and
shifted substantially toward
the need to raise taxes as
part of the deficit and debt
solution.
Among them, 65 per-
cent say they want their
own House representative
tossed out in 2012.


Shore Hospital. He was
later transported by heli-
copter to Shands at UF but
died soon after arrival.
Testimony during the
trial indicated that Johnson
and Owens, 42, were for-
mer acquaintances. Owens'
attorneys said she shot
Johnson in self defense.
Roberta Getzen, Third
Circuit assistant state attor-
ney, was lead prosecutor in
the case.
"This was a case that
we spent some time put-
ting together from the
very moment of the shoot-
ing until the verdict of
the jury came back," said
Skip Jarvis, Third Circuit
State attorney. "Ms. Getzen
worked tirelessly to deter-
mine the facts that were
needed to present to the
jury in this week's trial.
After hearing all of the facts
and even requesting clari-
fication of testimony while
they were deliberating, the
jury has now rendered a


verdict finding Charlotte
Owens guilty of the man-
slaughter death of Jesse
Johnson.
"I respect the verdict
of the jury in that they
weighed all of the evidence
presented before arriving at
their verdict," Jarvis contin-
ued. "My heart goes out to


the family of Jesse Johnson
over their loss. We'll return
before the court on Sept
26 to allow Judge Fina to
make the final decision
as to the sentence to be
imposed in this case. Jesse
didn't deserve to die and
Charlotte has been held
responsible."


CHARTER: Sets rules

Continued From Page 1A


Commissioners, County
Manager Dale Williams
and County Attorney
Marlin Feagle to speak at
a meeting and share any
suggestions for changes to
the charter. It also voted to
invite the five county con-
stitutional officers super-
visor of elections, tax col-
lector, property appraiser,
sheriff and clerk of court-
to offer input.
"It's prudent for us to


understand any sugges-
tions they have developed,"
said David Rountree,
Commission Chairman.
Hearing suggestions
from the officials will give
the commission a starting
point for the review pro-
cess,
Commission members
Glynnell Presley, John
Willis and David Morse
were absent from the meet-
ing.


IRENE: Bearing down on East Coast

Continued From Page 1A


MARKET: Fresh food and more Sat.


Continued From Page 1A


Irene was massive,
with tropical-force winds
extending almost twice as
far as normal, about the
same size as Katrina, which
devastated New Orleans in
2005.
"It's not going to be a
Katrina, but it's serious,"
said MIT meteorology
professor Kerry Emanuel.
"People have to take it seri-
ously."
The governors of
North Carolina, Virginia,
Maryland, Delaware, New
York and New Jersey
declared emergencies
to free up resources, and
authorities all the way to
New England urged resi-
dents in low-lying areas to
gather supplies and learn
the way to a safe location.
Irene was expected to
come ashore Saturday in
North Carolina with 115
mph winds and a storm
surge of 5 to 10 feet It
could dump a foot of rain,
with as much as 15 inch-
es falling in some places
along the coast and around
Chesapeake Bay.
With heavy rain and
storm surge predicted for
the nation's capital, orga-
nizers postponed Sunday's
dedication of the Martin
Luther King Jr. Memorial
on the National Mall.
Already in South Florida
near West Palm Beach,


authorities blame the rough
ocean churned up by the
outer bands of Irene caused
eight people to be injured
when a wave knocked them
off a jetty. Also, a man swim-
ming off Jupiter was swept
away by a large wave, but
later ended up ashore.
Scientists predict Irene
will then chug up the coast.
Some forecasts showed it
taking dead aim at New
York City, with its eye pass-
ing over Brooklyn and
Manhattan before weaken-
ing and trudging through
New England.
If tho storm strikes New
York, it will probably be a
Category 1 or 2, depending
on its exact track, hurricane
specialist John Cangialosi
said. .. ,
Hurricanes are rare in,,
the Northeast because the
region's cooler seas tend
to weaken storms as they
approach, and they have
to take a narrow track to
strike New York without
first hitting other parts of
the coast and weakening
there.
Still, strong storms have
been known to unleash
serious damage in an urban
environment already sur-
rounded by water.
A September 1821 hur-
ricane raised tides by 13
feet in an hour and flooded
all of Manhattan south of


SATURDAY, AUGUST 27
9:00-9:50 a.m. What Really Happened to the
Dinosaurs? Dr. John Morris
10:00-10:50 a.m. The Mighty, Wonderful
Oceans Mr. Frank Sherwin
11:00-11:50 a.m. The Fossil Record: A
Problem for Evolution Dr. John Morris
12:00-1:00 p.m. Lunch provided by
Southside Baptist Church
1:00-1:50 p.m. Scientific Evidences for
Creation Mr. Frank Sherwin
2:00-3:00 a.m. Mount St. Helens -
Dr. lohn Morris


INS TI'~AR
RS, I.ARCi


Canal Street an area that
now includes the nation's
financial capital. An infa-
mous 1938 storm dubbed
the Long Island Express
came ashore about 75 miles
east of the city and then hit
New England, killing 700
people and leaving 63,000
homeless.
On Thursday, Ocean
City, Md., officials ordered
thousands of residents and
tourists to abandon the
beach community. Earlier
in North Carolina, three
coastal counties issued
evacuation orders covering
more than 200,000 people,
including tourists and full-
time residents.
Dania Armstrong of New
York sat outside a motel
smoking a cigarette while
she ,waited for her family to
get ready. Armstrong, her
daughter and grandchildren
had already been ordered off
the island of Ocracoke and
planned to leave the town of
Buxton soon.
"I've been coming down
here for 50 years," she said.
"I know what's coming. It's
time to leave. You don't
want to be here when it
hits."
John Robeson, an accoun-
tant from New Jersey,
brought his wife and two
children down for a week,
but they were cutting the
trip short after three days.


SUNDAY, AUGUST 28
9:15 a.m. The Big Bang: What's the Big Idea?
Mr. Frank Sherwin
10:30 a.m. Reasons Why a Christian Shouldn't
Believe in Evolution Dr. John Morris
6:00 p.m. The Young Earth Dr. John Morris
7:15 p.m. Question and Answer Session
Dr. John Morris & Mr. Frank Sherwin
*Please note that a love offering will be taken each day.





1806 Royal Lane, Dallas Texas 75229 www.icr.org
DEMAND THE EVIDENCE


1), i n xi .,


the state.
The local unit wants to
become more active and
involved in the community,
she said.
"We thought this was a
good way to get them back
out into the community
and letthem know they are
here," Kite said.
Farmers market offer-
ings will include a bounty
of Florida-grown okra, pep-
pers, squash,' cantaloupe
and cucumbers; peaches
from Georgia and Carolina,
tomatoes from Tennessee
and Carolina, along with
local honey, goat milk,
cheese, free range eggs,
herbs, and organic mixed
greens for salads.
Homemade salsas, pick-
les and specialty sauces
along with herb infused
preserves are the latest
additions to the market.
There are also fruit
trees, grape vines, herbs
and native plants available
for your garden.
Local artists share space
with local farmers, beekeep-
ers, downtown merchants
such as Ruppert's Bakery
and local nonprofits.
Voices for Children of
the Suwannee Valley, Inc.,


which supports the Third
Circuit Guardian ad Litem
program, is .selling Nettles
sausage and hot dogs at the.
market All proceeds will
benefit the program, which
gives abused, abandoned
and neglected children
in Columbia, Suwannee,
Hamilton, Lafayette,
Madison, Taylor, and Dixie
Counties a voice in court
proceedings.
Terraplane Blues Band
is providing live .enter-
tainment at the market.
.The band originated in
Gainesville and has mem-
bers from all over North
Florida. It has performed
for more than 20 years
locally and regionally.
The band has per-
formed on stage with many
national acts including the
late Bo Diddley, Gregg
Allman, Marcia Ball, Rick
Derringer, Bobby Blue
Bland,' Pat Travers and
many others. It has toured
most of the Southeast and
have recorded three inde-
pendent CDs. The sound is
swinging blues with a hint
of upbeat jazz, great for lis-
tening and dancing. Visit
www.terraplanebluesband.
corn for more information.


"We have a lot going on
in our farmers market,"
Kite said. "We have a lot of
interesting items."
The Lake DeSoto
Farmers Market is open
every Saturday from 8 a.m.
to 12 p.m. in Wilson Park,
located along Lake DeSoto
between the Columbia
County Courthouse
and Shands Lakeshore
Hospital. Vendor space
is available for the mar-
ket. For more information
about the Lake DeSoto
Farmer Market call (386)
719-5766.
The Lake DeSoto
Farmers Market is the
place to go this week
with the family, Kite said.
Something will be avail-
able for all ages and the
community can support
not only the National
Guard but the local mar-
ket as well.
"I thinkit's good to honor
any of our men and women
that serve our country,"
she said. '"This unit 'has
been deployed several
times to the Middle East
It's good for us to show our
appreciation to them and
any other arm forces that
protect us."


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*Restrictions apply. Contract required. Dollar-a-day pricing reflects monthly
Accelerate service plan. Contact Main Street Broadband for full details.


CREATION, EVOLUTION, AND

INTELLIGENT DESIGN
FEATURING
DR. JOHN MORRIS & MR FRANK SHERWIN
Southside Baptist Church
388 S.E. Baya Drive Lake City, FL 32025 386.755.5553
Registration is $5 to cover the Saturday lunch and the conference materials.
For information on how to register, please contact Southside Baptist Church at: 386.755.5553


I


Ms -t Sh












OPINION


Friday, August 26, 201 I


ONE ANOTHER


ONE
OPINION


Jobs'

departure

a loss for

nation

T =he resignation of
Silicon Valley's rock
star CEO, Steve
Jobs, comes as no
surprise to the Apple
faithful who have been worrying
about his medical condition and
know how seriously he took his
duties.
Jobs' departure from the top
job at Apple is a loss for Silicon
Valley. But its also a loss for
the nation, which is in desper-
ate need of entrepreneurial
leadership to get us out of this
economic slump.
The iPhone isn't Dick Tracy
stuff Its way beyond what
anyone dreamed of even five
years before it was invented.
An attractive, sleek phone,
music player, book reader,
television, video library and so
much more in the palm of our
hands and at a price millions of
Americans could afford. This is
the very definition of genius.
And the iPhone isn't the only
device historians will recall
when Jobs' legacy is chroni-
cled. The iMac, iPod and iPad
are all equally innovative and
none may equal the beloved
Macintosh, invented with Steve
Wozniak, for pure creativity.
Jobs knew failure as well as
he did success. He was uncer-
emoniously removed as chair-
man of Apple in 1985. But he
learned from that failure and,
in true Silicon Valley fashion,
returned with a flourish, dream-
ing up product after cool prod-
uct that screamed to the world,
"Can you top this?"
And all of this genius hasn't
just improved the net worth
of Apple designers, or helped
harried office workers man-
age their lives. It's created
hundreds of thousands of jobs
maybe more for Apple store
salespeople and app developers,
at cell phone companies and
accessory manufacturers. Apple
has become its own industry.
Jobs closed his letter of
resignation to the Apple board
by saying, "I believe Apple's
brightest and most innovative
days' are ahead of it"
The Valley and the nation can
only hope that is true.
M San Jose Mercury News

Lake City Reporter
Serving Columbia County
Since 1874
The Lake City Reporter is pub-
lishid with pride for residents of
Columbia and surrounding counties by
Community Newspapers Inc.
We believe strong newspapers build
strong communities -"Newspapers
get things done!'
Our primary goal is to
publish distinguished and profitable
community-oriented newspapers.
This mission will be accomplished
through the teamwork of professionals
dedicated to truth, integrity and hard

Todd Wilson, publisher
Robert Bridges, editor
Sue Brannon, controller
Dink NeSmith, president
Tom Wood, chairman


LETT
POLl


ERS
C Y


Letters to the Editor should be
typed or neatly written and double
spaced. Letters should not exceed
400 words and will be edited for
length and libel. Letters must be
signed and include the writer's name,
address and telephone number for
verification. Writers can have two
letters per month published. Letters
and guest columns are the opinion of
the writers and not necessarily that of
the Lake City Reporter.
BY MAIL: Letters, P.O. Box 1709,
Lake City, FL 32056; or drop off at
180 E. Duval St. downtown.
BY FAX: (386) 752-9400.
BY E-MAIL:
news@lakecityreporter.com


As you might expect,
being on shaky
ground is familiar
territory to me.
Often critics will
write to say that my facts once
again have been in upheaval,
registering at least 5.8 on the
Ridiculous scale.
But the fact of the matter
was that Tuesday's shuddering
was different It was clearly an
earthquake, and in Pittsburgh
that is not something you
expect Great eruptions of
municipal incompetence, yes.
Tsunamis of excuses, quite
often. Great fissures appearing
in roadways, certainly (we know
them as potholes).
But actual earthquakes, not
so much.
Yet here we were at the
newspaper office in the early
afternoon, just sitting around
denouncing nefarious charac-
ters in powerful prose, and a
strange swaying started and
some of us hadn't even been to
the tavern for lunch.,
As a longtime member of
the Earth Moved Beneath Me
Club, I immediately knew what
we were dealing with and what
we should do: Don't panic, buy
insurance, say prayers, run
screaming into the street
In my excitement, I forgot
most of those steps, and in
the case of screaming into the
street that was probably just as
well.
A quick tour of the building
revealed no damage, although
it is possible that several people
woke up. One female colleague
said that her decorative wooden
flamingoes started to shake.
Of course, everybody in the
Third World knows that when
your flamingoes start to shake,
it is wise to take cover. But this
tremor lasted only a few seconds.
Before long, The Associated
Press reported that a 5.8 magni-
tude earthquake on the Richter
scale centered near Louisa,


LETTERS


Va., northwest of Richmond and
south of Washington, D.C. had
been felt on much of the East
Coast.
As earthquakes go, of course,
it was a lightweight But don't
say "ho-hum" to us in the for-
merly non-earthquake belt Like
residents of cities unfamiliar
with snow who think a white
dusting is a blizzard, some of us
will choose to believe that this
earthquake was the most exciting
thing to have happened since the
last Steelers game, a flamingo-
shaking event to be sure.
Years hence, grizzled veter-
ans of the Un-Big One will tell
little children about the day
Pittsburgh and the East Coast
rattled and nothing much hap-
pened.
Not me. I am not for scaring
little children with frivolous
tales. No, I am for scaring them
with substantial tales, such as
my experience during the Loma
Prieta earthquake of 1989,
which registered 6.9 and lasted
for 15 seconds on California's
central coast
As the editor of The Monterey
County Herald, I had a presti-
gious job coach of my son's
under-7 soccer team, coach
being a much more reverential
title in America than editor.
The earthquake struck during
afternoon practice, and the boys
kept playing despite the tradi-
tional freight train rumbling
and the visible shock wave that
moved through the field like a
swell in the sea. Six-year-olds
are tough.
They only stopped playing


when their moms arrived with
the news that part of the Bay
Bridge had collapsed. At that
moment, it dawned on me that
perhaps I should return to the
newspaper. When I arrived,
the office had no power, and it
stayed that way for 26 hours.
Rallying to cover the news
and get back into business was
a challenge, but it provided one
of the most exhilarating experi-
ences in my newspaper career.
We finally got an edition out
the next day with the help of
a country newspaper 50 miles
away, which lent us its press.
Touchingly, in the days
before iPhones, residents gath-
ered outside the newspaper
office to grab the first edition,
which they greeted as a sign
of the return of civilization and
normality, symbolized by such
things as the weather map and
the lottery numbers. Good thing
this latest earthquake wasn't
too bad; it would not have done
me good to see a crowd waiting
outside Starbucks for the latte
machine to be fired up.
Earthquakes seem to run in
the family now. In late 2004, my
son, Jim, was in a pool in a sea-
side resort in Phuket, Thailand,
when the terrible earthquake-
induced tsunami hit the shore.
The first wave broke over his
head, but then the bartender in
the tiki hut ran away, and if it's
one thing I always told the kids:
If the bartender runs away, you
run away. Jim reached safety
before the second wave hit
Earthquakes are psycho-
logically unnerving, because we
expect the crust of the Earth
to stay where it is and behave
itself. Now our certainty in
the solidity of things is forever
cracked just a little. But don't
panic. It could have been far
worse: The bartenders could
have run away.

N Reg Henry is a columnist for
the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette.


TO THE EDITOR


Problems with block scheduling


To the Editor.
After attending Open House
at Fort White Middle School
last Thursday, I was left con-
fused by the new "Modified
Block Scheduling." The new
schedule alternates Monday and
Wednesday; 1st, 2nd, 3rd and
7th "block" with Tuesday and
Thursday; 4th, 5th, 6th and 7th
"block" with students attending
all seven classes on Friday. (The
one day of the week when stu-
dents will be attending all seven
classes just happens to be the
day of the week when most pep
rallies will be scheduled). For
my daughter, the added seventh
"block" is a third elective class.
Confused? Not only my daugh-
ter and I but also the teachers
seemed confused. I kept asking
myself "Why would anyone
do this to a child"? My line
of questioning led me to the
Assistant Superintendent for
School Operations, Budgeting


and Secondary Education, Alex
Carswell, Jr.
I began to ask the "why's"
and who's" surrounding my con-
fusion about the schedule. Mr.
Carswell found there to be no
confusion with the new schedul-
ing and assured me it had been
approved by the school board as
well as himself. He also stated
that this particular schedule
had been used in other districts.
When I asked which other
school districts use this sched-
ule, his reply was "I don't think
I can answer any more of your
questions. I am afraid you may
be recording this conversation."
I was not only shocked, but infu-
riated. I simply wanted to know
what districts and whether this
particular block schedule had
been effective. I thought this
question was the logical follow-
up. Why couldn't he answer
me?
All three middle schools in
Columbia County this year are


using different forms of block
scheduling. After doing my own
research, I've learned that sev-
eral subjects, including math,
suffer in block scheduling. It
has been proven that subjects
requiring repetition are more
difficult for students to compre-
hend when not attended daily.
Middle school age children
have short attention spans and
longer class times usually do
not equal more learning.
My concern is that my child
and all students are in the best
possible learning environment
If research results are avail-
able that prove modified block
scheduling is not effective, why
are Columbia County schools
using it? Why, when there are
so many outside events confus-
ing our children would a school
board decide to further confuse
them?
Laurie Douglass
Lake City


4A


ANOTHER
VIEW


$360M

Afghan


ripoff not


that bad

T he Associated Press
reported last week
that a military
task force looking
into contracting in
Afghanistan has concluded that .
some $360 million in U.S. com-
bat support and reconstruction
aid has wound up in the hands
of criminals, corrupt politicians
or the Taliban itself.
If it's "only" $360 million, it's
good news. That would represent
only a little more than 1 percent
of the $31 billion in current con-
tracts reviewed by the Pentagon's
'Task Force 2010." If you can
do business in Afghanistan
and see only 1 percent of your
money raked off by the bad guys
("malign actors," the military
calls them), you're doing pretty
well.
Bribery is a way of life in
Afghanistan, a built-in cost of
doing business, and today's
trusted warlord may be
tomorrow's malign actor. Nor
is it just warlords and power
brokers who cash in. Anthony
Cordesman of the Center for
Strategic and International
Studies reported last year that
in Afghanistan, "the military
and police have long taken
bribes or charged illegal fees.
Like at least two-thirds of the
countries in the world, this long
has been the way the Afghan
government and economy oper-
ate."
Task Force 2010 was formed
by Gen. David H. Petraeus, the
U.S. commander in Afghanistan
before he was appointed to
head the CIA. Part of its job
was to try to separate the bribes
paid to malign actors with
those paid to benign actors.
In Afghanistan, the trick is to
make sure you're not bribing
the wrong people.
The Task Force estimates
that a very small share of the
$360 million paid to malign
actors went to the people
who actually are fighting U.S.
forces. The Taliban doesn't
actually need much money; it
is made up of guerrilla fight-
ers who fight close.to home.
The Pentagon estimates that it
costs the United States about
$500,000 a year to keep a sol-
dier or Marine in the field;
other estimates are twice that
high. A rough estimate is that it
costs the Taliban about $2,600 a
year for'each fighter.
The high cost of keeping a
U.S. soldier armed and supplied
is a big reason "malign actors"
were able to rip off U.S. taxpay-
ers for $360 million. The logistics
of moving fuel, ammunition,
food, water and other supplies to
96,000 troops scattered through-
out a heavily mountainous nation
are enormously difficult
In Afghanistan, the United
States decided to try to promote
local businesses and gave a
big transportation contract to
something called Host Nation
Trucking. Host Nation hired
eight subcontractors. They,
in turn, hired dozens of sub-
contractors. Task Force 2010
reports that about half of the
$360 million that was spent on
bad actors went to people work-
ing under or demanding
bribes from the Host Nation
Trucking contract
A new trucking contract
worth nearly $1 billion was
signed early this month. It
did not include Host Nation's
subcontractors. Even so, it can
be assumed that some of that
billion dollars will be paid in


bribes, in some cases to people
who don't like us.
That's the way it works there.
We should have known that
going in. Instead, we're figuring
it out only on the way out
* St. Louis Post-Dispatch


www.lakecityreporter.com


Quakes aren't always


worth cracking up over








LAKE CITY REPORTER NATIONAL FRIDAY, AUGUST 26, 2011


Thousands leave N.C. as Irene looms


By MARTHA WAGGONER and
MITCH WEISS
Associated Press


BUXTON, N.C. -
Thousands were fleeing an
exposed strip, of coastal vil-
lages and beaches off North
Carolina on Thursday as
Irene approached, threat-
ening to become the most
powerful hurricane to hit
the East Coast in seven
years.
Hours after a hurricane
watch was issued for much
of the state's coast, emer-
gency officials expand-
ed evacuation orders to
include hundreds of thou-
sands of tourists and locals
iii four coastal counties.
The areas include the bar-
rier island chain known as
the Outer Banks, which is
expected to take the brunt
of Irene's first hit over the
weekend.
The storm was pound-
ing the Bahamas with wide-
spread damage reported
on at least two southern
islands but no immediate
reports of major injuries
or deaths. A settlement
known as Lovely Bay was
destroyed while at least
40 homes were badly
damaged on the island of
Mayaguana, emergency
officials said.
Irene was a powerful
Category 3 hurricane with
winds at 115 mph (185
kph). An afternoon hurri-
cane center advisory said
some strengthening was
expected, but forecasters
didn't expect the storm to
reach Category 4 strength.
The last Category 3 hur-
ricane to hit the East
Coast was 2004's Jeanne,
which crossed Florida and
drenched the Southeast.
The governors of
North. Carolina, Virginia,
Maryland and New Jersey


SASOCIATuDP RU Encoo
Members of the crew of the guided missile destroyer Mason man the rails as the ship pulls away from.Pier 5 at the Norfolk Naval Station Thursday morning
with other Navy ships from the Norfolk Naval Station ahead of approaching Hurricane Irene. The U.S. Navy ordered more than 60 ships out to safer waters
Thursday so they could better weather the storm.


made emergency declara-
tions to free up resources,
while the Navy began mov-
ing dozens of ships in Irene's
path out to sea. And emer-
gency officials all the way to
New England were urging
residents in low-lying areas
to gather supplies and learn
the way to a safe location.
The storm is expected to
come ashore Saturday in
North Carolina with winds
of around 115 mph (185
kph). Forecasters predict it
will then chug up the East
Coast, dumping rain froni
Virginia to New York City
before a much-weakened
form trudges through New
England.
As the sun rose over North
Carolina's barrier islands,
tourists loaded suitcases


in their cars, while locals
stocked up on food, water
and gas. Traffic was moving
briskly on the two-lane high-
way that cuts through many
of the coastal communities,
but many feared that would
change.
"Ifs going to be a mess,"
66-year-old Buxton resi-
dent Leon Reasor said as
he stood inside a local bait
shop. "Anyone who tells you
they're not worried is a liar."
Four counties along North
Carolina's coast Carteret,
Currituck, Dare and Hyde
- ordered tourists to leave.
Dare and Hyde also told per-
manent residents to move
inland. Carteret ordered
evacuations for residents of
a barrier island that includes
the Atlantic Beach and


Emerald Isle resorts.
"It wouldn't behoove any-
one to stay in these circum-
stances," Dare County emer-
gency management spokes-
woman Sharon Sullivan said.
"Businesses are boarding
up. Nobody can guarantee
their safety."
The head of the Federal
Emergency Management
Agency said residents in the
hurricane's path should pay
attention to local broadcast-
ers for instructions from
local officials. Among the
most important tasks, he
said, was for evacuees to fig-
ure out a safe place to go
before hitting the road..
"When you evacuate, you
want to know where you're
going and make sure you
have somewhere to go, not


just get on the road with
everybody else and hope
you find some place," FEMA
administrator Craig Fugate
said Thursday on CBS's
"The Early Show."
All along the East Coast,
officials were calculating
what they needed to do as
Irene continued its march
across the Caribbean toward
the U.S. The Navy ordered
many of its ships to leave
Norfolk and other Virginia
ports, saying they can better
weather the storm at sea.
The vessels include an air-
craft carrier, destroyers and
submarines.
Airlines began to cancel
flights and get planes out
of the way as Hurricane
Irene barreled toward the
U.S. mainland on Thursday.


The storm will likely force
hundreds of flights to be.
cancelled through this
weekend and create delays
that c9uld ripple across the'
country.
New York City Mayor
Michael Bloomberg urged
residents living in low-lying-
areas on Thursday to line'
up a place to stay on high
ground ahead of possible
evacuations. He said he
would make a decision by
late Friday on whether to
evacuate neighborhoods
along the water in several
boroughs.
Even without hurricane-
force winds, northeastern
states already drenched
from a rainy August could
see flooding and fallen
trees from Irene.


OBITUARIES


Dixie June Harris
Dixie June Harris, 67, died on
Saturday, August 20, 2011 at
the Suwannee Valley Care Cen-
ter. She was born in Petersburg,
Illinois to the late Carl & Ora
Boyer Wilson. She had lived ih
Lake City for the past eleven
years, having moved here from
Orlando, Florida. She was a
loving wife, mother, and grand-
mother, who enjoyed sewing,
making arts & crafts, working
in the garden and spoiling her
grandchildren. She was a faith-
ful member of Wesley Memo-
rial United Methodist Church
in Lake City. She is preceded in
death by her brother, Larry Wil-
son and her caring husband of
forty-three years Richard Harris.
Survivors include her sons, Jeff
(Jennifer) Harris of Franklin,
TN, Tyler (Monica) Harris of
Lake City, FL, & Michael Har-
ris of Ocoee, FL; daughters,
Angie (Doug) Byers of Win-
ter Park, FL, & Jennifer Arnett
of Ocoee, FL; brothers, Dan
(Mary) Wilson of Petersburg,
IL, Dennis (Becky) Wilson of
Athens, IL; sisters, Clara Tay-
lor & Helen Barbee both of
Petersburg, IL; 11 grandchil-
dren, a host of nieces, nephews,
and many friends also survive.
Memorial services will be
conducted on Saturday, Au-
gust 27, 2011 at 3:00 p.m. in
the chapel of Gateway-Forest
Lawn Funeral Home with Pas-
tor Louie Mabrey officiating.
In lieu of flowers the family
asks that donations be made to
the Suwannee Valley Care Cen-
ter (Haven Hospice), 6037 U.S.
Hwy 90 West, Lake City, FL
32055, in appreciation for the
kindness and comfort The Care
Center provided for their mother.
GATEWAY-FOREST LAWN
FUNERAL HOME, 3596
South U.S. Hwy 441, Lake
City, FL 32025, (386) 752-1954
is in charge of arrangements.

William Daniel Lang
William Daniel Lang, age 60,
of Wellborn, FL passed away
Tuesday, August 23, 2011 at his
home following a brief illness.


SHangOn
a minute .

Our customers receive
a Complimentary
copy of the
Lake City Reporter
when they drop off &
pickup their cleaning
S\ While Suinlies Last


The West Palm Beach, FL na-
tive moved to Wellborn in 1969
from West. Palm' Beach. He
owned and operated. Chef Wil-
lie's Restaurant in Lake City and
enjoyed music, stained glass,
. gardening and Gator football.
He was predeceased by his par-
ents, Wilfred Joseph and Theresa
Irene Lang and a sister,Ann Barry.
Survivors include three sons,
TravIs Lang, Oviedo, FL; Wil-
liam Daniel "Blue" Lang, Jr.,
Mountain View, CA; Luke E.
Lang, Ft. White, FL; one daugh-
ter, Irene T. Lang, Deland, FL;
three brothers, John Lang, Lake
Worth, FL; Tom Lang, Los Al-
tos, CA; Wilfred "Bud" Lang,
Panama City, FL; two sisters,
Patricia Stewart, Panama City,
FL; Mary Hamlin, West Palm
Beach, FL; an uncle, Rev. Jo-
seph Lang, M.M.; Five grand-
children; several nieces, neph-
ews and great nieces & nephews.
Services will be held, 12:00
AM, Saturday, August 27,
2011 in the St. Francis Xavier
Catholic Church, 928 Howard
St., Live Oak, FL with Father
Andy Mitera officiating. Inter-
ment will be held in the McClel-
lan Cemetery in Wellborn, FL.
Please sign the guestbook at
www. harrisfuneralhomeinc, net.
HARRIS FUNERAL HOME
& CREMATIONS, Inc., Live
Oak, FL, 386-364-5115 is in
charge of all arrangements.

Lawrence D. Law
Mr. Lawrence D. "Larry" Law,
75, a lifelong resident of Lake
City, passed away peacefully at
his daughters'
residence fol-
lowing an ex-
tended illness. %
The son of the "w,
* late Max Melvin Law and Olivia
Vernia Hutcherson Law, Mr. Law
served in the United States Army
prior to returning to Lake City.
Together with his wife June Mil-
ton Law, he owned and operated
Law's Seafood Market in down-
town Lake City for many years.
He was an active member of the
Parkview Baptist Church where
he enjoyed singing in the church
choir. In his spare time Mr. Law


enjoyed spending time with his
family, singing gospel music and
will forever be remembered as a
great husband, father and the best
I of grandfathers ever. Preceded in
death by a brother Hyatt Law.
Mr. LavQ is survived by his wife
of 46 years, June Milton Law;
. his sons Coby Law (Julia) of
Lake City; Max Law of Lake
City; his daughters, Tracy Law
Markham (Nathan) and Wendy
Law Bannister (Derrick) both of
Lake City; and his sister Wanna
Jane Williams, Willston, FL.;
S11 grandchildren. also survive.
Funeral services for Mr. Law
will be conducted at 11:00 A.M.
on Monday, August 29, 2011 in
the Parkview Baptist Church
with Pastor Mike Tatem officiat-
ing. Interment will.immediately
follow in the Scott Cemetery (lo-
cated on Hwy 441 North of Deep
Creek)! The family will receive
friends in the chapel of the Dees-
Parrish Family Funeral Home
from 5:00-7:00 Sunday evening.
Arrangements are under the
direction of the DEES-PAR-
RISH FAMILY FUNERAL
HOME, 458 S. Marion Ave.,
Lake City, FL 32025. (386)752-
1234 Please sign our on-
line family guestbook at
parrishfamilyfuneralhome. com

Tommy Joe Robinson, Jr.
Mr. Tommy "Joey". Joe Robin-
son, Jr. 43, died August 23, 2011
after injuries sustained in an au-
tomobile accident. He has lived
in Lake City all his life, he was of
the Baptist faith, and enjoyed tat-
toos, fishing, and the beach, Troy
Springs, and playing Xbox Live.
He is survived by his wife of
twenty-three years Sybil Robin-
son, Lake City, three- daughters
Chelsea, Courtney, and Cassie
Robinson all of Lake City, FL.,
his father Tommy Joe Robinson,
Sr. and his mother Linda Moore,
Two brothers Roy Robinson,
and Robert Mulkey of Lake
City, FL. One sister Angela Bry-
ant, Lake City, FL. one grandson
Aris Carfagno, Lake City, FL.


Funeral 'services for Mr. Robin-
son are Sunday August 28, 2011
at 2:00 P.M. the Dees-Parrish
Family funeral home Chapel in-
terment will follow at Memorial
Cemetery.With Reverend Steve
Shaw officiating. Visitation with
the family will be Saturday from
6:00 P.M until 8:00 P.M. at the
funeral home. Arrangements
are under the direction of the
DEES-PARRISH FAMILY
FUNERAL HOME, 458 S.
Marion Ave., Lake City, FL
32025. 752-1234 please sign
our on-line family guestbook at
parrishfamilyfuneralhome. corn

Burell Harley Waters
Burell Harley Waters, 63, died
unexpectedly, Sunday, August
21, 2011. He was born in Jack-
sonville, Florida, the son of the
late George & Lula Mae Hudson


Waters. He has been a resident
of Lake City for the past thirty
years. He was a loving father
and grand father that tried to
spend as much time outdoors
as he could, hunting, fishing,
or gardening, but staying at
home spoiling his grandbabies
was what he loved the most.
He worked a number of years
operating heavy equipment in
White Springs for PCS Phos-
phate Mining. He was pre-
ceded in death in February by
his wife, Milla Jean Waters.
Survivors included his son, Har-
ley (Wendy) Waters Jr. of Lake
City, Florida; daughters, Kim-
berly Waters of Lake City, FL,
Lori (Brian) Schichler of Ger-
many, Misty (John) Harvey of
-Lake City, FL; brothers, George
Waters of Florida, Claude Wa-
ters of North Carolina & Dale
(Ninke) Waters of Georgia;
sisters, Sandy Cuppett, Myrtle


Norman both of Florida & Peggy
Stanfield of Georgia; 13 grand-
children and numerous other'
family and friends also survive..
Funeral services will be con-
ducted at 11:00 a.m., Saturday,
August 27, 2011 in the chapel of
Gateway-Forest Lawn Funeral
Home with Pastor Randy Og-,.
bum officiating. Interment will
follow in the Friendship Bap-
tist Church Cemetery in Live'
Oak, Florida. Visitation with'
the family will be held Friday,,
August 26, 2011 from 5:00 p.m,..
until 7:00 p.m. at the funeral
home. GATEWAY-FOREST
LAWN FUNERAL HOME,'
3596 South U.S. Hwy 441..
Lake City, FL 32025(386) 752-.
1954, please sign our guestbook.'
at www.gatewayforestlawn.com,.

Obituaries are paid advertise-"
ments. For details, call the Lake
City Reporter's classified depantt-
ment at 752-1293.


Ssee what


sunday

- has in store

yt c C Take Back Your Weekend!
HrELP,- ^ .. Managing your weekend can often be like
-' --- running a marathon at a sprinter's pace.
Check out these six ways to say goodbye to
\ chaos and get back your free time.

Intelligence Report: The
Dream Lives On
-- L The Mart.i Luther King Jr. National Memorial
in Washington, D.C., is set to be dedicated on
the 48th anniversary of King's "I Have a Dream"
----speech. Find out what went into making the
memorial and who will be there on big day.

Sunday with ... Peter Frampton
The guitar hero on '70s fashion, getting sober, and becoming a U.S. Citizen.

Views: The Empty Nest x 3
The relationship expert Dr. Drew Pinsky talks about the bittersweet joy of
sending his triplets off to college.




SUNDAY, August 28, 2011 A

Lake City Reporter www.parade.com


Page Editor: Robert Bridges, 754-0428








6A LAKE CITY REPORTER NATIONAL FRIDAY. AUGUST 26. 2011




Stocks sink, ending three-day rally


By MATTHEW CRAFT
AP Business Writer

NEW YORK Stock
indexes fell sharply soon
after trading began
Thursday and then bounced
around near their bottoms
the rest of the day, ending a
three-day rally.
Indexes in both the U.S.
and Europe sank after
Germany's main stock
index, the DAX, suddenly
dipped 4 percent. Traders
truIL'L'ld to explain the
dive. The Dow Jones indus-
trial average closed down
170.89 points, or 1.5 per-
cent, to close at 11,149.82.
It had been up 85 points the
first few minutes of trading.

Bank of America Corp.
jumped 9 percent on news
that Warren Buffett will
invest $5 billion in the trou-
bled bank. BofA had lost
half its value this year as
investors worried about its
need to raise capital and its
growing liabilities related to
subprime mortgages. BofA
stock was up 26 percent
early, to $8.80, and closed at
$7.65, up 66 cents.
Other banks also rose
after the billionaire inves-
tor gave his backing to
Bank of America. Morgan
Stanley gained 2.7 percent
and Citigroup Inc. 4.8 per-
cent. BofA and American
Express Co. were the only
two of the 30 companies in
the Dow to rise.
This week's trading has
been marked by a series
of sudden reversals. Robert
Stein, a money manager
responsible for $1.2 billion
at Astor Asset Management,
said questions about the
economy have made inves-
tors uncertain and the stock
market more volatile. Gains
made one day have disap-
peared the next, or even in
the same day.
"We're not seeing anything
that's convincingly bearish
enough to call another reces-
sion, but nothing optimistic
enough to suggest that a
recovery is going to regener-
ate," Stein said.
Friday could be another
day of big swings as Federal
Reserve Chairman Ben
Bernanke gives a highly
anticipated speech at a con-
ference in Jackson Hole,
Wyo. Bernanke speaks at
10 a.m. EDT.
Earlier Thursday, the
government reported an
increase in the number of
people applying for unem-
ployment benefits last week.
The Labor Department said
applications rose to 417,000,
the highest in five weeks,
but the figure was inflated
by a strike at Verizon that
earlier this week.
The S&P 500 index fell
18.33 points, or 1.6 percent,
to 1,159.27. The Nasdaq fell
48.06 points, or 1.9 percent,
to 2,419.63.
The S&P, the benchmark
for most money managers,
has gained -3 percent this
week but is still down 10
percent for the month.


Specialist Donald Himpele Jr., left, directs trading in shares of Bank of America on the floor of the New York Stock Exchange Thursday.



Report: NASA made right call on shuttles


By SETH BORENSTEIN
AP Science Writer

WASHINGTON NASA
acted properly when it
picked new homes for the
retired space shuttles, the
space agency's watchdog said
Thursday
The shuttles were award-
ed in April to museums in
suburban Washington, Los
Angeles, Cape Canaveral.
Fla., and New York, based on
recommendations by a special
NASA team and a dt. vision by
NASA Administrator Charles
Bolden, a former shuttle com-
mander.
Congressional and local
officials for two of the losing
cities Houston and Dayton
- had asked for an investi-
gation, alleging political influ-
ences in the bidding process.
"We found no evidence that
the team's recommendation
or the administrator's deci-
sion were tainted by political
influence of any other improp-
er consideration," Inspector
General Paul Martin wrote in
the report released Thursday.
"Moreover; we found no
attempt by White House offi-
cials to direct or influence
Bolden's decision making."
The decision was based on
attendance, population, fund-
ing and the facility. NASA said
13 of the bidders met their
requirements and rated those
on several categories, giving
them a numerical score.
There was a scoring error
for the Air Force Museum
in Dayton and it should have
tied with Cape Canaveral and


New York, the inspector gen-
eral found. But NASA chief
Bolden told investigators he
still would have picked the
same cities because they had
bigger populations and more
international visitors. Also
Dayton museum officials told
him they might not be able to
raise enough money.
Sen. Sherrod Brown, D-
Ohio, one of the officialswho'd
asked for the investigation,
said in a statement Thursday
that while NASA may have
followed the rules in selecting
the sites, it showed "incredibly
bad judgment" The selection
criteria gave more weight to
international visitors than to
geographic diversity ofshuttle
locations, he said.
"It is outrageous that easy
access for foreign visitors
was deemed more important
than access for visitors from
America's heartland," Brown
said.
In a statement Thursday,
NASA defended its selec-
tions.
"The report from the Office
of Inspector General vali-
dates the conclusions NASA
reached in determining the
locations where the space
shuttle orbiters will be dis-
'played. NASA firmly stands
by its decisions."
Space Center Houston,
next door to Johnson Space
* Center, ranked near the
bottom of the list It scored
low for attendance, inter-
national visitors, museum
accreditation and difficulty
transporting a shuttle there.
Museums in Chicago,


Seattle, Riverside, Calif., San
Diego and McMinnville,
Ore., all scored higher than
Houston.
Bolden, who lived in
Houston for many years as
an astronaut and Marine and
still has a home there, told
investigators that personally,
"I would have loved to .have
placed an Orbiter in Houston,"
but that it had lower atten-
dance and fewer international
visitors than the winners.
After the report was
released, Rep. Kevin Brady, R-
Texas, criticized the selection
process.
"Its clear to me this was
rigged from the beginning and
, it was pretty clear Houston
would not receive the orbiter,"
he said.
The 30-year space shuttle
program ended with the last
flight in July..
The Smithsonian Air and
Space Museum had already
been promised one shuttle
for its hangar iin Dulles, Va.
It will get Discovery, and
give up the Enterprise,,
a test vehicle that never
flew in orbit. That will be
shipped to the Intrepid Sea
Air and Space Museum in
New York City. Atlantim will
stay in Cape Canaveral and
go to the Kennedy Space
Center Visitor Complex.
Endeavour will go to the
California Science Center
in Los Angeles.
Associated Press writers
Lisa Cornwell in Cincinnati
and Ramit Plushnick-Masti
in Houston contributed to
this report.


' .Ivl
Aft-


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Space Shuttle Atlantis is toAved to the Orbitor Processing :;'
facility for decommissioning at the Kennedy Space Center at",
Cape Canaveral on July 21.


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Lake City Reporter


Story ideas?

Contact
Tim Kirby
Sports Editor
754-0421


SPORTS


Friday.August 26, 201 I


www.lakecityreporter.com


Section B


CHEAP SEATS


Tim Kirby
Phone:(386) 754-0421


Finding

esteem

through

football
High school
football
begins this
week with
kickoff
classic games. Preseason
is a time of hope and
promise.
Fort White has an
interesting situation,
ending up in a two-team
district after Williston
and one other school
opted out. The Indians
have already made the
playoffs, as both district
champion and runner-up
advanced.
-Coach Demetric
Jackson and players say
it will make no
difference. Every game
is important with the
goal being to peak for
the district showdown
with Trinity Catholic on
Nov. 4. There is a
mixture ofid rivals and
new teams scheduled.
Cdlunmbia High will
compete in a six-team
district that has old,
old foes (Leon, Orange
Park), more recent rivals
(Middleburg, Ridgeview)
and newcomer Oakleaf.
For its 100th year of
football, Columbia has
turned the reins over
to one of its own. Brian
Allen is a CHS
graduate who went on to
play at Florida State and
in the NFL. He answered
the call to return to his
hometown and resurrect
a program that fell victim
to good intentions gone
wrong.
For the last 20 years,
Columbia football has
often defined itself by
what big-name coach it
can attract
Allen is promising no
state titles, only that he
will work hard to field a
team that will make fans
proud.
Perhaps in looking
back over the last
century, Columbia
followers will remember
what football used to
mean to the school and
community. Back when
that "Winningest
program in the state" tag,
if it is still true, was a
badge of honor and not a
sign to let rot
For this, Columbia can
learn frqm Fort White,
which has an
outlookth'at once
defined the Tigers.
Two Fort White
seniors put it well.
A.J. Legree "Playing
here is like a family.
Everybody is so close.
We sit around and joke
with each other and
nobody gets mad. That
is one of the great things
for us."
Jonathan Dupree
- "We want to make our
administration proud of
our football team. At Fort
White we are looked up
to and that is the kind
of reputation we want to
keep."

* Tim Kirby Is sports editor
of the Lake City Reporter.


Classic

Errors the key .
to Fort White's
42-27 loss.

By TIM KIRBY
tkirby@lakecityreporter.com
JACKSONVILLE
Kickoff classic games are
to expose mistakes and
Fort White High made a
mountain of them.
Most glaring were two
kickoff returns by the
Eagles that proved to be
the margin in Episcopal
School of Jacksonville's
42-27 win on Thursday.
After Shakeel Rashad ran
back the opening kickoff
for a score, Fort White
had the next two touch-
downs to take a 14-7
lead.
Episcopal scored three
unanswered touchdowns
two on long bombs fol-
lowing Fort White fum-
bles.
Fort White scored again
late in the half, but gave
the points back on another
kickoff return.
Fort White made a final
surge in the third quar-
ter with Andrew Baker's
second touchdown pass to
A.J. Legree. However, two
interceptions followed by
ball-control drives from the
Eagles kept Fort White's
offense off the field.
It was a passing exhibi- l-
tion. Baker was 14-of-18 for
223 yards and three touch-
downs. Legree had nine
catches for 170 yards. Trey
Phillips had a touchdown
catch and Soron Williams
scored on a one-yard run.
Nathan Escalante kicked
the extra points.
Episocpal's Luke Del
Rio was 15-of-30 for 259
yards and two touch-
downs. He also scored
a touchdown rushing. e
Aaron Burroughs scored
on a kickoff return and a
pass reception. Daniel
McCarthy had a touch-
down run.
"Hopefully we can
shore up some things,"
Fort White head coach
Demetric Jackson said.
"We were facing a team
with a heck of a passing
game and we made too
many mistakes."


kickoff


Photos by BRANDON FINLEY
Lake City Reporter

ABOVE: Fort White High's
A.J. Legree (left) and
Kevin Dupree (right) lead
the Indians onto the field
during the kickoff classic
against Episcopal High
on Thursday. LEFT: Fort
White High's Kevin Dupree
lays a block on Episcopal
High's Kennan Stanley dur-
ing the kickoff classic on
Thursday in Jacksonville.


Tigers take


field tonight


Columbia travels
to Santa Fe High
at 7:30 p.m.
By BRANDON FINLEY
bfinley@lakecityreporter. corn
It begins today. No more
talk. No more self evalua-
tion. It's time for football.
Columbia High takes to
the road in the kickoff clas-
sic against Santa Fe High at
7:30 p.m. today.
Though the game won't
count on the official season
record, it's a start point for
coach Brian Allen in his first
year as the Tigers' leader.
Santa Fe will also bring in
a new coach with Tommy
Keeler and a unique defen-
sive style.
"They play .a five-man
front," Allen said. 'They'll
send five every time. It's
not a sound defense and


will lend itself to curls in the
flat. They'll overload one
side. It's like a 5-2 or almost
a 5-3 since they invert the
safety down."
For Columbia, it's about
getting back some of the
projected starters and see-
ing how they can stack up.
"I hope to have all five
of our offensive linemen in
tact," Allen said. "The back-
ups have hit their stride, but
we hope to have Thomas
Holmes, John Sweat and
Donta6 Crumitie back in
the mix. We want to see
if the offensive line can
mesh."
Allen also wants to see
improvement out of one of
the team's senior standouts
in Dequan Ivory.
"I want to see him run
the right scheme on the
bull-rush," Allen said.
CHS continued on 2B


JASON MATTHEW WALKERPLake City Reporter
Columbia High's Dalvin Kelly (43) and Ronald Williams (23) chase down Ronald Timmons as
he rns during a drill at practice on Aug. 9.


.*014












2B LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS FRIDAY, AUGUST 26, 2011 Page Editor: Tim Kirby, 754-0421


' TELEVISION

TV sports

Today
AUTO RACING
8 a.m.
SPEED Formula One, practice for
Grand Prix of Belgium, at Francorchamps,
Belgium
9:30 a.m.
SPEED NASCAR, Nationwide
Series, final practice for Food City 250, at
Bristol,Tenn. (same-day tape)
Noon
'. SPEED NASCAR, Sprint Cup,
practice for Irwin Tools Night Race, at
Bristol,Tenn.
2:30 p.m.
SPEED NASCAR, Sprint Cup,
"Happy Hour Series," final practice for
Irwin Tools Night Race, at Bristol,Tenn.
3:30 p.m.
SPEED NASCAR, Nationwide
Series, pole qualifying for Food City 250,
at Bristol,Tenn.
5 p.m.
SPEED NASCAR, Sprint Cup, pole
qualifying for Irwin Tools Night Race, at
Bristol,Tenn.
7:30 p.m.
ESPN NASCAR, Nationwide Series,
Food City 250, at Bristol,Tenn.
CYCLING
4 p.m.
VERSUS USA Prp Challenge, stage
4, Avon to Steamboat Springs, Colo.
GOLF
9:30 a.m.
TGC European PGA Tour, Johnnie
'Walker Championship, second round, at
Perthshire, Scotland
I p.m.
TGC USGA, U.S. Amateur
Championship, round of 32 and round of
8 matches at ErinWis.
3 p.m.
TGC PGA Tour, The Barclays,
second round, at Edison, N.J.
6:30 p.m.
TGC Champions Tour, Boeing
Classic, first round, at Snoqualmle,Wash.
12 Midnight
TGC LPGA, Canadian Women's
Open, second round, at Mirabel, Quebec
(sarne-day tape)
MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL
8 p.m.
MLB Regional coverage, LA.Angels
atTexas or Pittsburgh at St. Louis
WGN Chicago Cubs at Milwaukee
NFL FOOTBALL
8 p.m.
CBS Preseason, Green Bay at
Indianapolis
PREP FOOTBALL
9 p.m.
ESPN2 Armwood at Bishop
Georman (Nev.)
TENNIS
Noon
ESPN2 ATP World Tour, Winston-
Salem Open, semifinal, at Winston-Salem,
N.C.
.. ... .. 2 p.m .. . ..
ESPN2 WTA, New Haven, Open,
semifinal, at New Haven, Conn.
7 p.m.
ESPN2 WTA, New Haven Open,
semifinal, at New Haven, Conn.

BASEBALL

AL standings

East Division
W L Pct GB
Boston 79 50 .612 -
NewYork 77 50 .606 I
'Tampa Bay 70 58 .547 8h
i-Toronto 66 63 .512 13
.Baltimore 51 77 .398 27'A
Central Division
W L Pct GB
Detroit 70 59 .543 -
Cleveland 63 64 .496 6
Chicago 63 65 .492 6'A
.Minnesota 55 75 .423 15%S
Kansas City 53 77 .408 17'A
West Division
W L Pct GB
Texas 74 57 .565 -
SLos Angeles 71 59 .546 2'b
Oakland 59 70 .457 14
Seattle 56 73 .434 17
Wednesday's Games
S Seattle 9, Cleveland 2
Boston 13,Texas2
Oakland 6, N.Y.Yankees 4, 10 innings
Toronto 4, Kansas City 3
Tampa Bay 3, Detroit 2, 10 innings
Baltimore 6, Minnesota I
LAAngels 8, Chicago White Sox 0
Thursday's Games
Baltimore 6, Minnesota I
Detroit 2,Tampa Bay 0
Oakland at N.Y.Yankees (n)
S Kansas City at Toronto (n)
', Boston at Texas (n)
Today's Games
Kansas City (F.Paulino 2-5) at
Cleveland (Jimenez I-I), 7:05 p.m.
N.Y. Yankees (AJ.Burnett 9-10) at
Baltimore (Tom.Hunter 2-2). 7:05 p.m.
Tampa Bay (Shields I1-10) atToronto
(HAlvarez 0-1), 7:07 p.m.
Oakland (G.Gonzalez 10-1 1) at
Boston (Wakefield 6-5). 7:10 p.m.
LA. Angels (Haren 13-6) at Texas
(D.Holland I 1-5), 8:05 p.m.
Detroit (Porcello 11-8) at Minnesota
(Swarzak 3-3), 8:10 p.m.
Chicago White Sox (Peavy 5-6) at
Seattle (Furbush 3-5), 10:10 p.m.
Saturday's Games
N.Y. .Yankees at Baltimore, DH-
1:05 p.m., Ist game;7:05 p.m.,2nd game
Tampa Bay at Toronto, 1:07 p.m.
Oakland at Boston, 1:10 p.m.
Detroit at Minnesota, 4:10 p.m.
Kansas City at Cleveland, 7:05 p.m.
LA.Angels at Texas, 8:05 p.m.
Chicago White Sox at Seattle,
10:10 p.m.


Cincinnati 64 66 .492 13
Pittsburgh 61 68 .473 5I',
Chicago 57 73 .438 20
Houston 42 88 .323 35
West Division
W L Pct GB
Arizona 71 59 .546 -
San Francisco 69 61 .531 2
Colorado 63 68 .481 8'
Los Angeles 60 69 .465 10'
San Diego 60 71' .458 I1'1
Wednesday's Games
Pittsburgh 2, Milwaukee 0
N.Y. Mets 7, Philadelphia 4
LA Dodgers 9, St Louis 4
Colorado 7, Houston 6, 10 innings
Florida 6, Cincinnati 5, I st game
Arizona 4,Washington 2
Cincinnati 3, Florida 2, 2nd game
Chicago Cubs 3,Atlanta 2
San Francisco 2, San Diego I
Thursday's Games
Atlanta at Chicago Cubs (n)
Arizona at Washington (n)
Cincinnati at Florida, ppd., rain
Pittsburgh at St. Louis (n)
Houston at San Francisco (n)
Today's Games
Florida (Hensley 1-5) at Philadelphia
1Oswait 6-7), 705 p.m.
Atlanta (T.Hudson 13-7) at N.Y. Mets
(Capuano 9-1 1),7:10 p.m.
Washington (Wang 2-2) at Cincinnati
(Willis 0-3),7:10 p.m.
Chicago Cubs (R.Lopez 4-4) at
Milwaukee (Wolf 10-8), 8:10 p.m.
Pittsburgh (Ja.McDonald '8-6) at St.
Louis (Westbrook 10-7), 8:15 p.m. '
San Diego (LeBlanc 2-2) at Arizona
(Collmenter 7-8), 9:40 p.m.
Colorado (Rogers 6-2) at LA. Dodgers
(Lilly 7-13), 1IQ:IO p.m. -
Houston (Happ 4-14) at San Francisco,
(Bumgarner 7-12), 10:15 p.m.
Saturday's Games
Atlanta at N.Y. Mets, 4:10 p.m.
Colorado at LA. Dodgers, 4:10 p.m.
Pittsburgh at St Louis, 4:10 p.m.
Florida at Philadelphia, 7:05 p.m.
Chicag Cubs at Milwaukee, 7:10 p.m.
Washington at Cincinnati, 7:10 p.m.
San Diego at Arizona, 8:10 p.m.
Houston at San Francisco, 9:05 p.m.

Little League

WORLD SERIES.
At South Williamsport, Pa.
Wednesday
Mexicali, Mexico 2, Maracay,Venezuela
1,9 innings
Billings, Mont. I, Huntington Beach,
Calif. 0, 7 innings
Thursday
Game 25- Hamamatsu City,Japan vs.
Maracay,Venezuela, 4 p.m.
Game 26 Clinton County, Pa. vs.
Huntington Beach, Calif., 8 p.m..
Today
Rain day, no games scheduled.

FOOTBALL

NFL preseason games

Thursday
Carolina at Cincinnati (n)
Cleveland at Philadelphia (n)
Washington at Baltimore (n)
Today
St. Louis at Kansas City, 8 p.m.
Green Bay at Indianapolis, 8 p.m. (CBS)
SSaturday
Jacksonville at Buffalo, 7 p.m.
N.Y.Jets at'N.Y. Giants, 7 p.m.
Atlanta at Pittsburgh, 7:30 p.m.
Miami at Tampa Bay, 7:30 p.m.
New England at Detroit, 8 p.m. (CBS)
Dallas at Minnesota, 8 p.m.
Houston at San Francisco, 8 p.m.
Chicago at Tennessee, 8 p.m.
Seattle at Denver, 9 p.m.
San Diego at Arizona, 10 p.m.
Sunday
New Orleans at Oakland, 8 p.m.
(NBC) .
Sept. I
Detroit at Buffalo, 6:30 p.m.
Indianapolis at Cincinnati, 7 p.m.
Baltimore at Atlanta, 7:30 p.m.
St. Louis at Jacksonville, 7:30 p.m.
Dallas at Miami, 7:30 p.m.
N.Y. Giants at New England, 7:30 p.m.
Philadelphia at N.Y.Jets, 7:30 p.m.
Tampa Bay atWashington, 7:30 p.m.
Pittsburgh at Carolina, 8 p.m.
Cleveland at Chicago, 8 p.m.
Kansas City at Green Bay, 8 p.m.
Houston at Minnesota, 8 p.m.
Tennessee at New Orleans, 8 p.m.
Denver at Arizona, 10 p.m.
San Francisco at San Diego, 10 p.m.
Sept. 2
Oakland at Seattle, 10:30 p.m.

BASKETBALL

WNBA schedule

Thursday's Game
Tulsa at Seattle (n)
Today's Games
Phoenix at Connecticut, 7:30 p.m.




Unscramble these four Jumbles,
one letter to each square,
to form four ordinary words.

CSAFR -I


@2011 Tribune Media Services, Inc
All Rights Reserved.

MUAES I




ATRTWH I


NL standings


East Division
W L
Philadelphia 83 45
Atlanta 78 53
Washington 62 66
New York 61 68
Florida 58 72
Central Division
W L
Milwaukee 78 54
St. Louis 67 63


DUPITN _

1I0


Pct GB
.648 -
.595 6h'
.484 21
.473 22'A
.446 26

Pct GB
.591 -
.515 10


San Antonio at Minnesota, 8 p.m.
Washington at Chicago. 8:30 p.m.
Tulsa at Los Angeles. 10:30 p.m.
Saturday's Game
Atlanta at Indiana, 7 p.m.

AUTO RACING

Race week

NASCAR
SPRINT CUP
IRWIN TOOLS NIGHT RACE
Site: Bristol,Tenn.
Schedule; Today, practice (Speed,
noon-3:30 p.m.). qualifying (ESPN,
5-6:30 p.m.); Saturday, race, 7:30 p.m.
(ABC, 7-I0 p.m.).
Track Bristol Motor Speedway (oval,
0.533 miles).
Race distance: 500 laps, 266.5 miles.
NATIONWIDE
FOODCITY 250
Ske: Bristol,Tenn.
Schedule:Today, practice (Speed, 9:30-
11:30 a.m.), qualifying (Speed, 3:30-5 p.m.),
race, 7:30 p.m. (ESPN, 7-10 p.m.).
Track: Bristol Motor Speedway.
Race distance: 250 laps, 133.25 miles.
INDYCAR
INDY GRAND PRIX OF SONOMA
Site: Sonoma, Calif.
Schedule: Today, practice; Saturday,
practice, qualifying (Versus, 6J7 p.m.);
Sunday,,race, 4:45 p.m. (Versus, 4-7 p.m.).
Tiack: Infineon Raceway (road course,.
2.3Q3 miles).
Race distance: 172.725 miles, 75 laps:.
FORMULA ONE
BELGIAN GRAND PRIX
Site: Spa-Francorchamps, Belgium.
Schedule: Today, practice (Speed,
8-9:30 a.m.), Saturday, practice, qualifying
(Speed, 8-9:30 a.m.); Sunday, race, 8 a.m.
(Speed, 7:30- 10 a.m., 3:30-7 p.m,).
Track: Spa-Francorchamps (road
course, 4.35 miles).
Race distance: 191.415 miles, 44 laps.

TENNIS

U.S. Open Seeds

At The Billie Jean King USTA National
Tennis Center
NewYork
(Monday through Sept. II)
Men
I. Novak Djokovic, Serbia
2. Rafael Nadal, Spain .
3. Roger Federer, Switzerland
4.Andy Murray, Britain
5. David Ferrer, Spain
6. I~obin Soderling, Sweden
7. Gael Monfils, Fran'ce
8. Mardy Fish, United States
'9.Tomas Berdych, Czech Republic
10. Nicolas Almagro, Spain .
I I.jo-Wilfried Tsonga, France
12. Gilles Simon, France
13. Richard Gasquet, France
14. Stanislas Wawrinka, Switzerland
15.Viktor Troicki, Serbia
16. Mikhail Youzhny, Russia
17.Jurgen MelzerAustria
18. Juan Martin del Potro,Argentina
19. Fernando Verdasco, Spain
20. Janko Tipsarevic, Serbia
21.Andy Roddick, United States
22.Alexandr Dolgopolov, Ukraine
23. Radek Stepanek, Czech Republic
24.Juan Ignacio Chela Argentina
25. Feliciano Lopez, Spain'
26. Florian Mayer, Germany
27. Marin CIic, Croatia
28.John Isner, United States-
29; Michael Llodra, France
30; Ivan Ljubicic, Croatia
31. Marcel Granollers, Spain .
32. Ivan Dodig, Croatia
Women
I. Caroline Wozniacki, Denmark
2.Vera Zvonareva, Russia
3. Maria Sharapova, Russia
4.Victoria Azirenka, Belarus
5. Petra Kvitova, Czech Republic
6. Li Na, China
7. Francesca Schiavone, Italy
8. Marion Bartoli, France
9. Sam StosurAustralia
10.Andrea Petkovic, Germany
I I.Jelena Jankovic, Serbia
12.Agnieszka Radwanska, Poland
13. Peng Shuai, China .
'14. Dominika Cibulkova, Slovakia
15. Svetlana Kuznetsova, Russia
16.Ana Ivanovic, Serbia
17.Anastasia Pavlyuchenkova, Russia.
18. RobertaVinci, Italy '
19. Julia Goerges, Germany
20.YaninaWickmayer, Belgium
21. Daniela Hantuchova, Slovakia
22. Sabine Lisicki, Germany
23. Shahar Peer, Israel
24. Nadia Petrova, Russia.
25. Maria Kirilenko, Russia
26. Flavia Pennetta, Italy
27. Lucie Safarova, Czech Republic
28. Serena Williams, United States
29. Jarmila GajdosovaAustralia
30.Anabel Medina Garrigues, Spain
31. Kaia Kanepi, Estonia
32. Maria Jose Martinez Sanchez,'
Spain

THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME
by David L. Hoyt and Jeff Knurek
e


Your answer here:
(Answers tomorrow)
Yesterday'sI Jumbles: WALTZ FLASH WINERY PARADE
I Answer: Despite what they look like, curtains in Jumble
cartoons are this ALWAYS DRAWN


BRIEFS


YOUTH FOOTBALL For details, call Tad
Little League Cervantes at 365-4810.

sign-up Saturday YOUTH CHEERLEADING
X--...i=AJ: -_


Lake City Parks and
Recreation Department's
youth football (ages 8-13)
registration is 8 a.m. to
5 p.m. Saturday at Teen
Town Recreation Center.
A parent or guardian must
accompany the child and a
birth certificate or copy is
required. Cost is $40 per
player. Junior Midget and
Midget ages are offered.
Lake City and Columbia
Youth Football Association
are sponsoring a free
football camp at Memorial
Stadium from 9 a.m. to
noon Saturday. All boys
and girls ages 7-14 are
eligibleto attend. Lunch
will be provided and each
child will receive a T-shirt.
The Columbia High coach-
ing staff is.conducting
the camp. Registration is
8 a.m. to 5 p.m. today at
Teen Town.
For details, call Heyward
Christie at 754-3607.

YOUTH:BASEBALL

Diamond Extreme

tryouts continue
The Diamond Extreme
14-under baseball team
tryouts continue from
6-8 p.m. today, Monday
and Tuesday at Southside
Recreation Complex.
For details, call Ros
Golden 288-2920 or Tracie
Brinkley 965-8600.


Association
sign-up Saturday


LaKe Ctiy plans
open meeting WOMEN'S SOFTBALL

Lake City Columbia League seeking
County Youth Baseball has players, sponsors


an open meeting at
7 p.m. Monday at
Southside Sports Complex.


Columbia County
Women's Softball is


CHS: Allen explains keys to team


Continued From Page' l

Allen feels the most
important units for the
Tigers are up front.
"You hear me talk a lot
ab6ut the offensive and
defensive lines, because I
think well be as good as
those two groups," he said.
"We have to initiate a good
push. I'll definitely be look-
ing at that"
Allen will also look at


ACROSS

1 Record, as
mileage
4 Do horoscopes
8 Mineral spring
11 Withstand
12 Always
13 Coal alterna-
tive
14 Blouse part
15 Contacts
17 Tried
19 Fund-raising
game
20 Close kin
21 Season-ticket
holder
22 Rams and
lambs
25 Finest quality
28 Highest point
29 Planted
31 Night crawler
33 Heavy hydro-
gen discoverer
35 Worker's pay
37 Fall behind
38 Just about


the receiving core, not just
catching the ball, but in the
run game.
"That's one unit we have
to get better," he said. "We
don't just have to be good
in the passing game, but
we've got to get better at
blocking and running good
routes when the ball isn't
thrown that way."
And as a team, Allen


40 Not relevant
42 Home tel.
13 Swimsuit half
14 Unpaid
47 Santa's ride
51 Yodeler's
range
53 Booty
54 Ill temper
55 Secluded spot
56 Jazzy
Fitzgerald
57 -Mex cuisine
58 Enter data
59 Banned bug
spray

DOWN

1 Many August
people
2 Grown acorns
3 Lubricate
4 Glitterati mem-
ber
5 Eager
0 Most of the
earth
7 Primitive, often


wants to see chemistry.
"Can we contain our
actions before the game,"
Allen said. "Will we
be consistent? Will we
come together on the
field? I want to see us
celebrate 'as a team. It's
something I see good
teams do across the coun-.
try. It's something I want to
emphasize."


Answer to Previous Puzzle

LOW N yUMA
RED HOT LONERS
IDEATE INDIGO
RID ROY
BUFF AUEL
CAN YUL REAR
ARCH MAE AGES
DELT PCS FORK
DERR TAM RAY
TERI ASAN
LBS VACANT
AERIES D.1 ADEM
CATNAP ALLURE
NACL ALERT


In a jiffy
Sonar signal
Part of aka
Casual farewell
Tendon
Puppy noises


Want more puzzles?
Check out the "Just Right Crossword Puzzles" books
at QuillDriverBooks.com


21 shui
22 Good name
for a cook?
23 Fearsome
cape
24 Rapier
25 Influence
26 Burger mate
27 Sink part
30 Night hunters
32 Co. honchos
34 Sailors' tales
36 Blarney Stone
site
39 University offi-
cial
41 Put up boards
43 London chap
44 Never heard

45 Pottery
46 Holly shrub
47 Pause
48 Winner's
medal
49 Author
Victoria -
50 RR terminal
52 Miniature


2011 UFS, Dist. by Univ. Uclick for UFS


SCOREBOARD


LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS FRIDAY, AUGUST 26, 2011


Page Editor: Tim Kirby, 754-0421


2B


The Columbia Cheer
Association has
registration from 8:30 to
2 p.m. Saturday at the
Lake City Girls Club.
For details, contact
Wilda Drawdy at 965-1377.

CHS SWIMMING
Purple/Gold meet

on Saturday
Columbia High's swim
team is hosting a Purple/
Gold swim meet Saturday
and all alumni are invited
to swim. The public also is
invited. The meet begins
at 9 a.m.
For details, call
Stephanie Polhamus at
344-7796.

AUTO RACING

Mud drags at

Labor Day bash

The Huddle House
Labor Day Kickoff Bash
featuring Jimmie VanZant's
Rock the Nation tour will
have mud drag
exhibition races, as part of
the festivities at Lake City
Motorsports Park. Gates
open at 2 p.m. Sept 3.
Advanced general
admission is $15 and there
is a $45 VIP package.
For details, visit concert.
myprivatemall.com.


seeking players, coaches,
and sponsors for the fall.
For details, call
Casandra Wheeler at
365-2168.

SEMI-PRO FOOTBALL

Lake City team
seeking players
The Lake City Falcons
men's semi-pro football
team is seeking new play-
ers and veterans for the
upcoming season. Players
must be 18 years old or
older.
For details, call Luis
Santiago at 292-4138 or
Elaine Harden at 292-3039.

RUNNING
Breast Cancer

Awareness run
Cancer Care of North
Florida and Dr. Khan have
a 5K run/walk planned
for 8 a.m. Oct 1 at Wilson
Park in downtown Lake
City. Entry fee is $25 ($30
day of run, 6:30-7:30 a.m.'
registration).
. For details, call Shannon
Thomas at 288-4692 or
Donnie Feagle at 365-1191.


Chomp Cancer

Run on Oct. 15

Chomp Cancer
Foundation is hosting
the Chomp Cancer Run/
Walk at the Fort White
Community Center on
Oct 15. Cost for the 5K is
$25, and there will be food,
music and a silent auction.
Sponsorship opportunities
are offered' Online.
registration is available.at
www.active.com, keyword"
Chomp Cancer.
For details, e-mail
Lauren Valentine at chomp
cancer@gmail.com.


1 -1I_- ou1- --_1-









LAKE CITY REPORTER ADVICE & COMICS FRIDAY. AUGUST 26. 2011


DILBERT


BABY BLUES


BLONDIE
YOU'RE 6TH IN LINE...VOUR CALL IS
VERY IMPORTANT TO US!

Yi You OwusP
( POSITION

TREYTALLY ...


BEETLE BAILEY


SNUFFY SMITH


ZITS


GARFIELD


B.C.


FRANK & ERNEST


DEAR ABBY


Hot car and frozen chicken

a dangerous combination


DEAR ABBY: My hus-
band purchased a bag of
individually wrapped fro-
zen chicken breasts dur-
ing his lunch break. After
work, we took our kids to
a concert and didn't return
home until 8 p.m. The bag
of chicken was in his trunk
for seven hours on a hot
summer day.
My husband thought
it was OK to refreeze the
meat and feed this to our
kids, ages 6 and 2. I ada-
mantly disagreed. What
are your thoughts? We've
had this argument before.
- NO WAY! IN SAN JOSE
DEAR NO WAY!: Your
husband is SERIOUSLY
off base. According to
the U.S. Department of
Agriculture, "cold food"
- such as chicken, fish,
raw meat should be
purchased just before
leaving the market and
the shopper should plan
to drive directly home.,
Always refrigerate perish-
able food within two hours,
and when the tempera-
ture is above'90 degrees
Fahrenheit, it should be
refrigerated within one
hour! Food left in the car
for the length of time your
husband did is no longer
fit for human consumption
and could have made your
children seriously ill.
Readers, for the answers
to food safety questions,
the USDA can be con-
tacted on the Internet at
AskKaren.gov. Submit
a question there and it


Abigail Van Buren
www.dearabby.com
will be answered. The
USDA also has a Meat
and Poultry Hotline, (888)
674-6854, which is open
10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Monday
through Friday.

DEAR ABBY: My ex-
husband and I divorced
seven years ago. He has
remarried, and I also
recently married again.
He is still bitter toward
me. His emotional abuse
was partly to blame for
our split, although I was
not entirely without fault. I
made mistakes, too, which
I regret.
Two of my children hold
me responsible for the
divorce and continually
throw my mistakes back
in my face. I walk on egg-
shells around them. I have
apologized repeatedly and
asked their forgiveness.
I'm afraid of losing contact
with my grandchildren
every time one of my kids
becomes upset about the
past.
I have been to counsel-
ing, but was told I just
have to be happy with me.
Is there a way my children
can finally forgive me for
the past? I'm not a bad


person, just a flawed one.
- HUMAN IN ONTARIO,
CANADA
DEAR HUMAN: We're
all flawed, including your
children. If they are deter-
mined that blame for the
divorce falls solely on you,
while absolving your emo-
tionally abusive husband,
nothing you or I can do
will change their minds.
You have paid your
therapist good money for
the sensible advice you
received, so please heed it.
The longer you continue
to walk on eggshells and
tolerate the treatment you
are receiving, the longer it
will continue. Concentrate
on your own life, and far
more happiness will result
than what you're experi-
encing now.

DEAR ABBY: The heart is
ungovernable, but people
do have absolute control
over using birth control
and getting married. What
percentage of women's
problems do you think
could be avoided if, for
the first year of dating
someone, they used birth
control 100 percent of the
time and didn't rush to get
married? PERPLEXED
IN PEORIA
DEAR PERPLEXED: I'd
say about 50 percent but
I may be underestimating
by a long shot
* Write Dear Abby at
www.DearAbby.com or
P.O. Box 69440, Los
Angeles, CA 90069.


HOROSCOPES


ARIES (March 21-April
19): Plan to socialize with
friends or colleagues.
Problems at home will
escalate if you don't
include family in your
plans or if you try to make
personal changes related
to your living arrange-
ments. Don't limit what
you can do because some-
one gives you a hard time.

TAURUS (April 20-May
20): Let your emotions
lead the way. It will help
you get past a festering
problem. Once you share
your thoughts and your
desires, you will be able to
move forward. Love and
romance are highlighted,
and personal changes can
be made that will alter
your future.**
GEMINI (May 21-June
20): Invest in you. A finan-
cial gain is apparent due to
a settlement, reimburse-
ment, winning or rebate.
Consider what you have to
offer and how you can turn
that asset into a money-
making endeavor. ****
CANCER (June 21-July
22): Look at your situa-
tion honestly. You stand to
benefit if you are true to
yourself and refuse to let
anyone take advantage of
you. Love is highlighted if
you are open to someone
making an advance. ***
LEO (July 23-Aug.
22): Look at the practical


THE LAST WORD
Eugenia Last

aspects of a situation that
can affect your.profes-
sional or personal future.
Knowing what you want
so that you can act quickly
will be half the battle.
Don't limit your chance to
get ahead because you fear
how someone will respond
to your decision. ***
VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept.
22): Helping others will
make you feel good and
bring surprising rewards.
Offering what you can in
a practical way will make
an impression on someone
special. Romance is high-
lighted. ****
LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct.
22): Before you become
upset over nothing, give
change a chance. There
are profits to be made if
you lend a helping hand
or get involved in a project
that promises growth and
a better future. Love and
romance are featured late
in the day.**
SCORPIO (Oct. 23-
Nov. 21): Less talk and
more action will bring
better results. A partner-
ship with someone spe-
cial has far more to offer
than you realize. Don't
be too proud to accept
help or suggestions. You
can take control and still
be gracious. *****


SAGITTARIUS (Nov.
22-Dec. 21): Good ideas
will bring unexpected
profits that will allow
you to make changes
to your home and fam-
ily. Don't let a past
partner cost you emo-
tionally or financially.
Stick to the truth and
take care of any loose
ends that could be used
against you. *****
CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-
Jan. 19): Your practical
and subtle way of deal-
ing with money matters
will enable you to get
ahead. Settlements and
contracts should be put
' to rest. Don't be afraid
to apply a little pressure
if necessary. ***
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-
Feb. 18): Rely on your
knowledge and experience
to help you when deal-
ing with others. You can
develop a good working
relationship with someone
as long as you don't take
on or promise too much.
Handle people the way you
want to be treated and you
will be successful. ***
PISCES (Feb. 19-March
20): Keep everything out
in the open and you will be
successful. Once you have
everyone on the same
page, you can include your
own needs and finish what
you start. An unusual con-
nection will motivate you.
***


CELEBRITY CIPHER


by Luis Campos
Celebrity Cipher cryptograms are created from quotations by famous people, past and present.
Each letter in the cipher stands for another.
TODAY'S CLUE: T equals F
"DEBOZI HU H-D YJG GFG ET YJG
AGJEIRGB... DEBOZI H-U DEYJIH DW
OEBG YJZD Z XFXIG ED Z PZUJHDW
OZXJ H-DG." PJEEMIH WEIRAGBW

PREVIOUS SOLUTION: "Always dream and shoot higher than you know you
can do... try to be better than yourself." William Faulkner

(c) 2011 by NEA, Inc. 8-26


FOR BETTER OR WORSE
HrtT.sy -FHeReFs A
X'-~lERDUlrI- /^ PIBE. Tb DO fl
) LIz- INPLRY\ Svnt-iCaUMN
CAE so FOgl-e:
& I cA- LOC19L
ySW EEiK.^',
j TVME '.. nND...l
h~vF(


CLASSIC PEANUTS


YOU'RE 5TH IN LINE...YOUR CALL
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Page Editor: Emogene Graham, 754-0415











LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED -FRIDAY, AUGUST 26, 2011

Lake City Reporter





CLASSIFIED


Classified Department: 755-5440


Take ADvantage of the
Reporter Classifieds!

755-5440


a


Legal

ATTENTION COMCAST CABLE
CUSTOMERS
On September 27, 2011, Comcast
will add DIY Network HD, channel
362, Cooking Channel HD, channel
363, BBC America HD, channel 364,'
The Hub HD, channel 382, National
Geographic WILD HD, channel 385,
and Ovation HD, channel 522, to the
HD Digital Preferred tier.
On the same day, Comcast will add
Bloomberg HD, channel 359, and
GSN HD, channel 361 to the HD
Digital Starter Tier. C-SPAN HD,
channel 383, will be added to the HD
Digital Starter tier and the iHD Digi-
tal Economy Tier.
These channel moves affect current
and new residential and commercial
subscribers in Lake City and Live
Oak. A free preview of these serv-
ices may be seen by customers who
subscribe to appropriate tier prior to
the effective date.
A digital-ready television set and/or
digital equipment may be required to
view some channels. Additional
service charges may apply. Sub-
scription to High-Definition televi-
sion .required to receive HD chan-
nels. Services not available in all
areas, restrictions apply.
For more information, please call 1-
800-934-6489.
05527466
August 26, 2011


Limited to service type advertis-
ing oly .. .
4 lines, ope month....'92.0.6
$10.80 each additional line'
Includes an additional $2.00 per
ad for each Wednesday insertion.



You can call us at 755-5440,
Monday through Friday from 8:00
a.m.'to 5:00 p.m.
Some people prefer to place their
classified ads in person, and some
ad categories will require prepay-
merit. Our office is located at 180
East Duval Street.
You can also fax or email your ad
copy to the Reporter.
FAX: 386-752-9400 Please
direct your copy to the Classified
Department.
EMAIL: classifieds@lakecityre-
porter.com





Ad is toAppea Call by: Fax/Email by:
Tuesday Mon:, 10:00a.m. Mon., 9:00 am.
Wednesday Mon.,10:00a.m. Mon.,9:00a.m.
Thursday Wed., 1000a.m. .Wed.,9t00am.
Friday Thurs.,10:00a.m. Thurs., 9:00 a.m.
, Saturday Fri., 10:00a.m. Ri., o00 am.
Sunday Fri., 10:00 am. Fi., 9:00a.m.
These deadlines are subject to change without notice.




Ad Errors- Please read your ad
on the first day of publication.
We accept responsibility for only
the first incorrect Insertion, and
only the charge for the ad space
in error. Please call 755-5440
Immediately for prompt correc-
tion and billing adjustments.
Cancellations- Normal advertising
deadlines apply for cancellation.
Billing Inquiries- Call 755-5440.
Should further information be
required regarding payments or
credit limits, your call will be trans-
ferred to the accounting depart-
ment.


Advertising copy is subject to
approval by the Publisher who
reserves the right to edit, reject,
or classify all advertisements under
appropriate headings. Copy should
be checked for errors by the
advertiser on the first day of pub-
lication. Credit for published errors
will be allowed for the first insertion
for that portion of the advertisement
which was incorrect. Further, the
Publisher shall not be liable for any
omission of advertisements ordered
to be published, nor for any general,
special or consequential damages.
Advertising language must comply
with Federal, State or local laws
regarding the prohibition of discrimi-
nation in employment, housing and
public accommodations. Standard
abbreviations are acceptable; how-
ever, the first word of each ad may
not be abbreviated.

In Print and Online
www.iadiecityreporter.comn


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
3RD JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF
FLORIDA, IN AND FOR COLUM-
BIA COUNTY
Case#: 2011-CA-000015
Division #
PHH Mortgage Corporation d/b/a
PHH Mortgage Services f/k/a Cen-
dant Mortgage Services Corporation
Plaintiff,
vs..
William C. Myers and Jessica L..
Myers, Husband and Wife; Colum-
bia Bank f/k/a Columbia County
Bank; Southwood Acres Owners As-
sociation, Inc.; Unknown Tenants in
Possession #1; Unknown Tenants in-
Possession #2; If living, and all Un-
known Parties claiming by, through,
under and against the above named
Defendant(s) who are not known to
be dead or alive, whether said Urin-
known Parties may claim an interest
as Spouse, Heirs, Devisees, Grant-
ees, or Other Claimants.
Defendantss.
NOTICE OF SALE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pur-
suant to an Order of Final Judgment
of Foreclosure dated August 11,
2011, entered in Civil Case No.
2011-CA-000015 of the Circuit
Court of the 3rd Judicial Circuit in
and for Columbia County, Florida,
wherein PHH Mortgage Corporation
..d/b/a PHI-N-Mortgage Services f/k/a
Cendant Mortgage Services Corpora-
tion, Plaintiff- and William C. Myers
and Jessica L. Myers, Husband and
Wife are defendantss, I will sell to
the highest and best bidder for cash
AT THE WEST FRONT DOOR OF
THE COLUMBIA COUNTY
COURTHOUSE, LOCATED AT
145 HERNANDO STREET, LAKE
CITY, COLUMBIA COUNTY,
FLORIDA, AT 11:00 A.M. on Sep-
tember 14, 2011, the following de-
scribed property as set forth in said
Final Judgment, to wit:
LOT 8, SOUTHWOOD ACRES,
UNIT "3, A SUBDIVISION AC-
CORDING TO THE PLAT THERE-
OF RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK
3, PAGE 91 OF THE PUBLIC RE-
CORDS OF COLUMBIA COUN-
TY, FLORIDA.
ANY PERSON CLAIMING AN IN-
TEREST IN THE SURPLUS FROM
THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER
THAN THE PROPERTY OWNER
AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS
PENDENS MUST FILE A CLAIM
WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE
SALE.
P. DEWITT CASON '
CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT
Columbia County, Florida
/s/ B. Scippio
DEPUTY CLERK OF COURT
ATTORNEY FOR PLAINTIFF:
SHAPIRO, FISHMAN & GACHE,
LLP
4630 Woodland Corporate Blvd.
Suite 100
Tampa, FL 33614
(813) 880-8888
(813) 880-8800
05527344
August 19, 26, 2011
Notice
Columbia County will submit the'
Annual Report required by the State
Housing Initiatives Partnership Pro-
gram for fiscal years 2008/2009,
2009/2010 and 2010/2011 by Sep-
tember 15, 2011. Copies of the re-
ports are available for public inspec-
tion and comment at the Office of
the. Chairman of the Columbia Coun-
ty Board of Commissioners, Lake
City, Florida.

05527473
August 26, 2011

To place your
classified ad call

755-5440









Lawn & Landscape Service

J&M LAWN Service & more for
all your outdoor needs. Don't
waste your time or weekend,
Free Estimate. 386-984-2187


Services

DIVORCE, BANKRUPTCY,
RESUMES.
other court approved forms-
386-961-5896.


[personal Merchandise71


Containing 1.24 acre, more or less.
All total lands containing 3.52 acres,
more or less.
The public hearings may be contin-
ued to one or more future date. Any
interested party shall be advised that
0


Legal

IN THE COUNTY COURT IN
AND FOR COLUMBIA COUNTY,
FLORIDA
CASE NO. 11-563-SC
ROBERT SWEAT
9670 135TH LN
LIVE OAK, FL 32060
Plaintiff
vs.
JIMMY MARCUM
1334 NW TRIPLE RUN RD.
LAKE CITY, FL 32055
Defendant
A law suit has been filed to deter-
mine ownership and title of a certain
vehicle described as a 1988 Corvette
with serial #1G1YY2186J5114349
located in Lake City, Columbia
County, Florida.
The following persons) may claim
some right tide or interest therein:
ROBERT SWEAT
If you have a claim, interest, or de-
fense in this clause, you must file
your written response answer or ob-
jection with the Clerk of Court Co-
lumbia County within 10 days.
CLERK OF COURTS
By:/s/ D. Robinson
Deputy Clerk
05527366
August 19, 26, 2011
September 2, 9, 2011
NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARINGS
CONCERNING AMENDMENTS
TO THE CITY OF LAKE CITY
LAND DEVELOPMENT REGU-
LATIONS BY THE PLANNING
AND ZONING BOARD OF CITY
OF LAKE CITY, FLORIDA,
SERVING ALSO AS THE LOCAL
PLANNING AGENCY OF THE
CITY OF LAKE CITY, FLORIDA,
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that,
pursuant to Sections 163.3161
through 163.3215, Florida Statutes,
as amended, and the City of Lake
City Land Development Regulations,
as amended, hereinafter referred to
as the Land Development Regula-
tions, objections, recommendations
and comments concerning the
amendments, as described below,
will be heard by the Planning and
Zoning Board of the City of Lake
City, Florida, serving also as the Lo-
cal Planning Agency of the City of
Lake City, Florida, at public hearings
on September 7, 2011 at 6:30 p.m. or
as soon thereafter as the matters can
be heard, in the City Hall located at
205 North Marion Avenue, Lake
City, Florida.
(1) LDR 11-02, an application by
Florida Pest Control & Chemical
Company, as agent for Clifton W.
Wilson, Jr., to amend the Official
Zoning Atlas of the Land Develop-
ment Regulations by changing the
zoning district from RESIDENTIAL
OFFICE (RO) to COMMERCIAL,
GENERAL (CG) on property descri-
bed, as follows:
A parcel of land lying within Section
32, Township 3 South, Range 17
East, Columbia County, Florida. Be-
ing more particularly described, as
follows: Begin at the Northeast cor-
ner of Lot 11 of the Leslie's Subdivi-
sion, as recorded in the Public Re-
cords of Columbia County, Florida;
thence South 8919'21" West 14.32
feet; thence South 01043'01" East
97.02 feet; thence North 89"10'07"
East 84.32 feet; thence North
1502'26" -West 5.16 feet; thence
North 8910'08" East 25.00 feet;
thence North 0053'21" West 91.72
feet to. the South right-of-way line of
Baya Avenue (State Road .10A);
thence South 8919'21" West 95.14
.feet, along the South right-of-way
line of said Baya Avenue (State
Road 10A) and the Point of Begin-
ning.
Containing 0.24 acre, more or less.
(2) LDR 11-03, an application by
Norbie J. Ronsonet and Martha Ann
Ronsonet, to amend the Official Zon-
ing Atlas of the Land Development
Regulations by changing the zoning
district from RESIDENTIAL, SIN-
GLE FAMILY -3 (RSF-3) and RES-
IDENTIAL OFFICE (RO) to COM-
MERCIAL, INTENSIVE (CI) on
property described, as follows:
From RESIDENTIAL, SINGLE
FAMILY -3 (RSF-3) to COMMER-
CIAL, INTENSIVE (CI):,
A parcel of land lying within Section
32, Township 3 South, Range 17
East, Columbia County, Florida. Be-
ing more particularly described, as
follows: Being more particularly de-
scribed, as follows: Lots 1, 2, 3 and
the West 85.00 feet of Lot 6 R.G.
Cornwall Subdivision, located in the
Eastern Division, of the City of Lake
City, as recorded in the Public Re-
cords of Columbia County, Florida.,
Containing 0.55 acre, more or less.
AND
A parcel of land lying within Section
32, Township 3 South, Range 17
East, Columbia County, Florida. Be-
ing more particularly described, as
follows: Being more particularly de-
scribed, as follows: Block 265 and
Block 266 of the Eastern Division, of
the City of Lake City, as recorded in
the Public Records of Columbia
County, Florida.
Containing 1.47 acre, more or less.
AND
A parcel of land lying within Section
32, Township 3 South, Range 17
East, Columbia County, Florida. Be-
ing more particularly described, as
follows: Being more particularly de-
scribed, as follows: Lots 1, 2 and 3
of Thompson Subdivision, located in
the Eastern Division of the City of
Lake City, as recorded in the Public
Records of Columbia County, Flori-
da.
Containing 0.26 acre, more or less.
All said lands containing 2.28 acres,
more or less.
From COMMERCIAL, GENERAL
(CG) to COMMERCIAL, INTEN-
SIVE (CI):
A parcel of land lying within Section
32, Township 3 South, Range 17
East, Columbia County, Florida. Be-
ing more particularly described, as
follows: Being more particularly de-
scribed, as follows: Blocks 257 and
258 of the Eastern Division, of the
City of Lake City, as recorded in the
Public Records of Columbia County,
Florida.


Legal

the date, time and place of any con-
tinuation of the public hearings shall
be announced during the public hear-
ings and that no further notice con-
cerning the matters will be publish-
ed, unless said continuation exceeds
six calendar weeks from the date of
the above referenced public hearings.
At the aforementioned public hear-
ings, all interested parties may ap-
pear to be heard with respect to the
amendments.
A copy of the amendments are avail-
able for public inspection at the Of-
fice of Growth Management, City
Hall located, at 205 North Marion
Avenue, Lake City, Florida, during
regular business hours.
All persons are advised that if they
decide to appeal any decision made
at the above referenced public hear-
ings, they will need a record of the
proceedings, and that, for such pur-
pose, they may need to ensure that a
verbatim record of the proceedings is
made, which record includes the tes-
timony and evidence upon which the
appeal is to be based.
Persons with disabilities requesting
reasonable accommodations to par-
ticipate in this proceeding should
contact 352.463.3169 (Voice &
TDD) or via Florida Relay Service
800.955.8771.
05527471
August 26,2011

NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARINGS
CONCERNING AMENDMENTS
TO THE CITY OF LAKE CITY
COMPREHENSIVE PLAN BY.
THE PLANNING AND ZONING
BOARD OF THE CITY OF LAKE
CITY, FLORIDA, SERVING ALSO
AS THE LOCAL. PLANNING
AGENCY OF THE CITY OF LAKE
CITY, FLORIDA, NOTICE IS
HEREBY GIVEN that, pursuant to
Section 163.3161 through 163.3215,
Florida Statutes, as amended, and the
City of Lake City Land Development
Regulations, as amended, hereinafter
referred to as the Land Development
Regulations, objections, recommen-
dations and comments concerning
the amendments, as described below,
will be heard by the Planning and
Zoning -Board of the City of Lake
City, Florida, serving also as the Lo-
cal Planning Agency of the City of
Lake City, Florida, at public hearings
on September 7, 2011 at 6:30 p.m.,
or as soon thereafter as the matters
can .be heard, in City Hall located at
205 North Marion Avenue, Lake
City, Florida. : '
(1) CPA 11-02, an application by
Florida Pest Control & Chemical
Company, as agept for Clifton W.
Wilson, Jr., to amend the Future
Land Use Plan Map of the Compre-
hensive Plan by changing the future
land use classification from RESI-
DENTIAL, MEDIUM DENSITY
(less than of 'equal to 8 dwelling
units per acre) to COMMERCIAL
on property described, as follows:
A parcel.of land lying within Section
32, Township 3 South, Range 17
East, Columbia County, Florida. Be-'
ing more particularly described, as
follows: Begin at the.Northeast cor-
ner of Lot 11 of the Leslie's Subdivi-
sion, as recorded in the. Public Re-
cords of Columbia County, Florida;
thence South 8919'21" West 14.32
feet; thence South 0143'01'" East
97.02 feet; thence North 89010'07"
East 84.32 feet; thence ,North
15902'26" West 5.16 .feet; thence
North 89010'08" East 25.00 feet;
thence North 00053'21" West 91.72
feet to the South right-of-way line of
Baya Avenue (State Road 10A);
thence South 8919'21" West 95.14
feet, along the South right-of-way
line of said Baya Avenue (State
Road 10A) and the Point of Begin-
ning.
Containing 0.24 acre, more or less.
(2) CPA 11-03, an application by
Norbie J. Ronsonet and Martha Ann
Ronsonet, to amend the Future Land
Use Plan Map of the Comprehensive
Plan by changing the future land use
classification from RESIDENTIAL,
MEDIUM DENSITY (less than or
equal to 8 dwelling units per acre) to
COMMERCIAL on property descri-
bed, as follows:
A parcel of land lying within Section
32, Township 3 South, Range 17
East, Columbia County, Florida. Be-
ing more particularly described, as
follows: Being more particularly de-
scribed, as follows: Lots 1, 2, 3 and
the West 85.00 feet of Lot 6, R.G.
Cornwall Subdivision, located in the
Eastern Division, of the City of Lake
City, as recorded in the Public Re-
cords of Columbia County, Florida.
Containing 0.55 acre, more or less.


010 Announcements

Southside Baptist Church will
sponsor a free Creation Research
Conference Aug 27th & 28th.
/ featunpg [nstituie for Creation
Research Dr John Morns & Mr.
Frank Sherwin. Conferences in-
clude Dinosaurs; The Fossil
Record; The Young Earth; &
more. Sat schedule: 9:a 3:p, &
Sun conferences 9:15 a-10:30a &
6:00p. 386-755-5553 to register:
388 SE Baya Drive, Lake-City .


060 Services

RESIDENTIAL
HOUSECLEANING
Excellent Work- Dependable,
Low Rates. Call386-688-1018

100 Job
100 Opportunities

AVON!!.Only $10 to start!.
Earn bonus $ up to $150+
1-800-275-9945 pin #4206
www.youravon.com/tdavies
Crew Leader Small engine
experience & Class A CDL.
Mechanical skills helpful.
EEO Employer, Benefits offered,
Call Katie 386-755-4328
Heavy Equipment Operator need-
ed. Must have mechanical skills &
experience in fencing. Serious
inquires only. 386-623.3200
Mechanic needed for Truck shop,
must have own tools, apply
Southern Specialized, 1812 NW
Main Blvd., 386-752-9754
NEED CNC Machinist
Must have Metal Working
Machine Shop exp. Send resume,
Quality Mill, 3631 US Hwy. 90
East, Lake City, FL 32055.


Legal

AND
A parcel of land lying within Section
32, Township 3 South, Range 17
East, Columbia County, Florida. Be-
ing more particularly described, as
follows: Being more particularly de-
scribed, as follows: Block 265 and
Block 266 of the Eastern Division, of
the City of Lake City, as recorded in
the Public Records of Columbia
County, Florida.
Containing 1.47 acre, more or less.
AND
A parcel of land lying within Section
32, Township 3 South, Range 17
East, Columbia County, Florida. Be-
ing more particularly described, as
follows: Being more particularly de-
scribed, as follows: Lots 1, 2 and 3
of Thompson Subdivision, located in
the Eastern Division of the City of
Lake City, as recorded in the Public
Records of Columbia County, Flori-
da.
Containing 0.26 acre, more or less.
All said lands containing 2.28 acres,
more or less.
The public hearings may be contin-
ued to one or more future date. Any
interested party shall be advised that
the date, time and. place of any con-
tinuation of the public hearings shall
be announced during the public hear-
ings and that no further notice con-
cerning the matters will be publish-
ed, unless said continuation exceeds
six calendar weeks from the date of
the above referenced public hearings.
At the aforementioned public hear-
ings, all interested parties may ap-
pear to be: heard with respect to the
amendments."
Copies of the amendments are avail-
able for public inspection at the Of-
fice of Growth Management, City
Hall located at 205 North Marion
Avenue, Lake City, Florida, during
regular business hours.
All persons are advised that if they
.decide to appeal any decision made
at the above referenced public hear-
ings, they will need a record of the
proceedings, and that, for such pur-
pose, they may need to ensure that a
* verbatim record of the proceedings is
made, which record includes the tes-
timony and evidence upon which the
appeal is to be based.
Persons with disabilities requesting
reasonable accommodations to par-
ticipate in this proceeding should
contact 352.463.3169 '(Voice &
TDD) or via Florida Relay Service,
800.955.877f.
05527472
August 26, 2011


Suwannee

.Valley


Electric


Cooperative

Suwannee Valley Cooperative, Inc.

GIS/Mapping Data Specialist 1
Suwannee Valley Electric Cooperative, Inc. has an immediate opening
for a GIS/Mapping Data Specialist position. This position reports to
the Director of .Engineering and will be responsible for maintaining
Geographic Information System Maps for the Cooperative. A high
school diploma and an Associate of Science degree or work equivalent
experience with d minimum of 1 year experience with GIS Mapping in
the electric utility field is required.
Applications and job descriptions may be picked up at the Suwannee
Valley Electric administration building, 11340 100t St., Live Oak. The
job description can be viewed on www.svec-coop.com. Resumes and
applications can be turned in at the above address .with Attn: Vicky
Talmadge, or emailed to vickyt@svec-coop.com. The deadline for
accepting applications is Tuesday, September 6, 2011.
SVEC is an equal opportunity employer.


BUY IT^


SEiLL 11


FIND IT


100 Job
S Opportunities

05526800
Earn Extra Money
Deliver the new AT&T Real
Yellow Pages
in the Lake City area. FT/PT,
daily work, quick pay, must be
18 yrs+, have drivers
license & insured vehicle.
(800) 422-1955 Ext. 1
8:00A-4:30P Mon-Fri

Security Officers needed. Lake
City & Live Oak area, must have
current D Security Lie., Clear
background, Drivers Lie, phone,
Diploma/GED. Benefits, DFWP
EEO Must Apply at:
www.dsisecurity.com MB 1000084

TWO EXPERIENCED Drivers
from Lake City to
Augusta, Maine.
Call 386-719-8872

Veterinarian Assist/Technician
needed. Exp desired. Must be able
to work flexible schedule & Sat.
mornings. Apply at Columbia
Animal Hospital 2418 S. Marion
Ave. Lake City. No phone calls.

Weekend Office Manager
Detailed and People oriented.
Excellent customer service &
Phone skils..Duties include:
Storage & UHaul Rentals. $9.00 -
$11.00/hr based on exp. Drop off
resume between 4pm & 6pm Mon
Fri @ Mini Storage & Record
Storage of Lake City. 442 SW
Saint Margaret Street, Lake City

12 Medical
20 Employment

05527328
LEARN TO DRAW. BLOOD
Local Phlebotomy Course
offered in Lake City, FLA
Certificate program.
(904)566-1328

05527494,
Medical Office Assistant
SExperience as a Medical
assistant or in Medical
billing required. Fax
resume: 386-758-5987 or email:
mafaisalmd@gmail.com

CLINICAL
RESOURCE MANAGER FT.
Qualifications, registered nurse
with min. of 3 years exp. Previous
homecare and coding experience.
preferred. Will provide training for
qualified applicant, contact
leff Tyre, Branch Director
3S6-62b-9352 can t.\ resumes to.
386-028-936-o

Counselor for substance abuse
program in Baker Correctional In-
stitution. BA w/2yrs exp., M-F day
shift F/T, $30,000 to start, E-mail-
resume to sheliarand@aol.com.or
fax to'386-752-2387

RN/LPN needed Apply online
www.3dstaffingnow.com or
call 3D Staffing 386-752-1244
322 S. Marion Ave. Lake City, FL

A2 Schools &
24 Education

05527283
Interested in a Medical Career?
Express Training offers
courses for beginners & exp
Nursing Assistant, $479
next class-08/22/10

Phlebotomy national certifica-
tion, $800 next class-10/10/11

Continuing education
Fees incl. books, supplies, exam
fees. Call 386-755-4401 or
expresstrainingservices.com



310 Pets & Supplies

FREE KITTENS
to good homes.
386-623-3202


PERSIAN KITTEN
8 week old. Pure white male.
$400. negotiable.
386-235-1888


* ADvantage











LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED FRIDAY, AUGUST 26, 2011


310 Pets & Supplies
PUBLISHER'S NOTE
Florida Law 828.29 requires dogs
and cats being sold to be at least 8
weeks old and have a health
certificate from a licensed
veterinarian documenting they
have mandatory shots and are
free from intestinal and external
parasites. Many species of wild-
life must be licensed by Florida
Fish and Wildlife. If you are
unsure, contact the local
office for information.


361 Farm Equipment
84 Ford 4610 Tractor.
2WD, Solid
2005 motor,$7,500. OBO
386-867-0005

402 Appliances
FROST FREE refrigerator.
Very clean. Works good. White,
18cuft. $175. obo.
386-292-3927
Glo Warm Gas heater.
25,000 BTU. 26"x28"
$175. obo
386-292-3927

407 Computers
HP Computer, .
$80.00.
386-755-9984,or
386-292-2170-

420 Wanted to Buy
K&H TIMBER
We Buy Pine Hardwood &
Cypress. Large or small tracts.
Call 386-961-1961.
Wanted Junk Cars, Trucks, Vans.
$275 & up CASH! Free Pick Up!
NO title needed 386-878-9260
After 5pm 386- 752-3648.

430 Garage Sales
PUBLISHER'S NOTE
All Yard Sale Ads
Must be Pre-Paid.

Sat. 8-? Creekside Sub.-Sisters
Welcome Rd. King bed, patio set,
TV, rugs, linens, furn, DVDs Jew-
elry, ladies clothes, shoes, mis.
SAT. 8/27, 8-?, 194 S.W.
Callaway Dr., off CR 247, fumrni-
ture, appliances, household items,
clothes, books, lots of misc.

440 Miscellaneous,


AC Window unit.
$85. obo
386-292-3927

Life Span R2 peddling exercise
machine w/computer. Coinfy large
seat. (expensive machine) $75.00."
386-292-3927
Microwave.
$25.00
386-292-3927

Stop gnat & Mosquito bites! Buy
Swamp Gator All natural insect re-
pellent. Family safe. Use head to
toe. Available at The Home Depot.
Summer Barbecue Special
T6w Behind
Grill/Smoker, $1,250 OBO.
386-719-4802

450. Good Things
45 to Eat
GREEN PEANUTS For Sale
Valencia. Graded and washed.
$30.00 a bushel.
386-752-3434

460 Firewood
Firewood for Sale. $65. per Truck
Load. Rick 386-867-1039 or Joey
965-0288 if no answer pls leave
message we will call you back:

63 Mobile Homes
630 for Rent
2 OR 3 BEDROOMS
Clean, Quiet Park $475-$525.mo
Water, septic, garbage included
758-2280 References, NO PETS!
2&3 BR MH. $395 $650. mo.
plus deposit. Water & sewer fur-
nished. Cannon Creek MHP
386-752-6422
2/2 Units, clean, well maintained,
nice safe park setting, 2 miles to
downtown Lake City, $575 month
+ $575 sec dep, 386-984-8448
13th Month FREE!!
3/2 Large MH, small park, near
FGCC, Small pets ok, $500 dep
$575 mo w/12 mo lease
386-752-1971 or 352-281-2450
3/2.5 S of Lake City, (Branford
area) $600 mo plus security
386-590-0642 or 386-867-1833
www.suwanneevalleyproperties.com
Ft. White Country living.
3br/2ba Mobile Home
Very clean! 386-49.7-1116.


630 Mobile Homes
630 for Rent
LG clean 3br's $450. -$650. mo. +
dep. Also, 2br mobile home's
available. No Pets.
5 Points area. 386-961-1482
Mobile Homes for rent in
White Springs, Lake City & Ft.
White Contact 386-623-3404
or 386-397-2779
New 2br/2ba off Country Club. 1/2
ac. lot Front, back porch & storage
bldg. $650 mo. $650 sec. No Pets!
386-752-5911 or 466-2266

Mobile Homes
640 for Sale

05527374
!!ATTENTION!!
We purchase used mobile
homes. Call North Pointe
Homes, Gainesville
352-872-5566

05527375 !!!LOOK!!!
Before you but a Mobile Home
check out North Pointe Homes
in Gainesville-Hugh Discounts!
credit Scores Don't matter. Call
for Free Approval! Jacobson
Homes Factory Outlet (352)872-
5566 or mrb3371()hotmail.com

05527376
NEW USED- REPO'S
Your Volume Giant! North
Pointe Homes. Millions to Lend.
Credit Scores 575 = 10% down.
Gainesville (352)872-5566 or
walker-david(@live.com

Champion Home Inspections
Protect Your Investment
With A Professional
Inspection State Licensed
And Insured 386-344-5551
Handy man special, 94 Fleetwood .
DWMH. 3/2 on 5 acres. in Ft.
White. Owner Fin. $3,000 dn.
$850mo. $99,900 352-215-1018
www.LandOwnerFinancing.com


. Palm Harbor Homes
Has 3 Modular Homes
Available at HUGE Savings
Overi40KOff' .
800-,622-2832' :


705 Rooms for Rent
1 person, non-smoking ROOM
for Rent. $300. mo.
Includes utilities. 1st & last.
(970)903-5356

710 Unfurnished Apt
710 For Rent

SPRING rILL VILLAGE
Excellentt igh Springs location.
1, 2 & 3 bedroom floor-plans:
some v. iLh garage.s
Call 386-454-1469
or visit our website:
iww.springhillvillage.net







1BRAPT.
Downtown Location, Clean.
$450 mo, plus Security.
NO PETS. Call 386-755-3456
2/2 w/garage & washer/dryer
hookups. West side of town,
Call for details
386-755-6867
2BR/1BA. Close to town.
$565.mo plus deposit.
Includes water & sewer.
386-965-2922


A Landlord You Can Love!:
2 br Apts $575. & up + sec. Great
area. CH/A washer/dryer hookups.
386-758-9351/352-208-2421
Amber Wood Hills Apts.
Private Patio area. Beautiful yard.
Washer/dryer hktp. Free water &
sewer. 1/1, 2/1. Move in special.
386-754-1800. wwwmyflapts.com
Columbia Arms Apt. located 1/2
mi from V.A. & Winn Dixip. Pet
Friendly. Move in Special $199.
Pool, laundry & balcony.
386-754-1800. www.myflapts.com


710 Unfurnished Apt.
7 For Rent
Summer Special! 12th mo Free
w/signed yr lease. Updated, w/tile
floors/fresh paint- Great area.
From $450.+sec. 386-752-9626
The Lakes Apts. Studios & lBr's
from $135/wk. Util. & cable incl..
Sec 8 vouchers accepted, monthly
rates avail Call 386-752-2741
Unfurnished Apt Eastside
Village Realty, Inc .2 bedroom
1 bath Duplex must be 55+ yrs of
age Call Denise Bose @
386-752-5290
Wayne Manor Apts.
Move in $199. Summer special.
2/1, washer/dryer. Behind Kens off
Hwy 90. 386-754-1800
www.myflapts.com
Windsor Arms Apartments.
Summer special $199. Move in!
2/1, 2/1.5, 2/2. Pet Friendy. Free
200 ch. Dish. Washer/dryer hkup.
386-754-1800. www.myflapts.com

720 Furnished Apts.
12 For Rent
Immaculate Studio Apt. Avail
9/1 $500. mo. $300. dep. Incl.
appliances, cable, internet, water.
Josen 386-965-9083 or 438-8190
Rooms for Rent. Hillcrest, Sands,
Columbia. All furnished. Electric,
cable, fridge, microwave. Weekly
or monthly rates. 1 person $135,
2 persons $150. weekly
386-752-5808
Studio Apt. Private. Rent'incl util-
.ities, Satellite TV, appliances,
(washer/dryer). No pets 386-963-
4767 or 292-0385 Available 9/1

7T.3o Unfurnished
73 Home For Rent,
'09'Executive Home for rent on 41
acres. 4br/3,5ba Available
October. Horses/outdoor pets ok.
$2000/mo but all terms negotiable
for right caretaker. 386-209-4610


2BR house $640.mo $640. dep.
Also, 2br apt. $550. mo,$550 dep.
S Close to shopping.
S 386-344-2972


.2BR/1BA Kitchen and Den. on
Alachua. $500. mo.
First & security;
386-397-0602
.v 2/1 879 Poplar St. $600. mo.
/ 3/2 -Highlands Lqop $700.mo.
v 2/1 442 Praire St $650.mo.
All require First and last...
. . 386-755-3649
Please leave msg., Only in office
Tues -.Thur. 8am- 4pmi
3 br/iba house, 1206 McFarlane
Avenue. Avail. 9/1/11.'$850 mo
$400 sec dep. 904-376-0620 or
904-813-8864 for appt. No pets!
3/2 by Westside Elementary,
custom built home
$1050.00 per month.
Scott 352-318-8117
3BR/1.5 BA Large lot. Very clean
with storage shed. Quiet area.
$850 mo, + $850. dep.
.386-752-7578
4BR BRICK home.
-'Azalea Paik, $750. mo.
'$750. security.
386-397-2619 or 386-365-1243
4br/2ba CHA Brick, 1200 sqft '
lac., Close to FGCC, CR 245A.
Ceramic tile/carpet, $800 mo $800
Sdep (904)708-8478 App. req'd
Brick/3br/2ba Large yard, garage,
CH/A. 189 Stanley. Ct. Lake City.
$950. mo+ $1000 dep.
Call 386-365-8543
, Remodeled 3br/2ba Brick. In town
1750 sqft. Lg lot. Includes washer,
dryer, sfove; & fridge. Quiet,area
$985. mo $985 dep. 386-752-7578

75O Business &
SOffice Rentals
FOR LEASE: Downtown office
space. Convenient to
Court house.
Call 386-755-3456
For Lease: E Baya Ave. Two -
'1000 sqft office space units or
combined for 2000 sqft. 386-984-
0622 or weekends 386-497-4762


Furnished or unfurnished I or 2
bedroom townhomes on the golf MIDTOWN COMMERCIAL
course. $625-$750 mo. + security. CENTER, brand ney.executive
- Includes water. 386-752-9626 .; suite & sulte with warehouse
S $600 monthly.
Great location W of r-75, spacious Call Vicki or Joe 386-935-2832.
deluxe 2br apts., garage, W/D
hookup. patio. $600/700 & up, + OFFICE SPACE for lease.
Sec, 386-965-5560 or 344-3715 Oak Hill Plaza. 900 sqft
Greentree Townhouse $675mo/$695. sec dep.
Greentree Townhouse Tom 386-961-1086 DCA Realtor
Summer special. 2/1, 2/1.5. Free 3
water & sewer. Balcony & patio. SUB SHOP for lease.
Laundry. Behind Kens on Hwy90. All Equip. Avail. Old Willy J's
386-754-1800 wwwmyflapts.com Across from Wal-Mart
386-623-2244


ONE 51 PLACE APTS
S' Alachtia
MOVE IN SPECIALS
1, 2, & 3 bedrooms
Call TODAY 386-462-0656
or visit us at one51 lplace.com

Redwine Apartments. Move in
special $199. Limited time. Pets
welcome, with 5 complexes,
we have a home for you.
386-754-1800. www.myflapts.com


790 Vacation Rentals
Horseshoe Beach RV Lot.
Nice comer Lot with shade trees.
$295. mo Water/electric included
386-235-3633 or 352-498-5986
.Scalloping Horseshoe Beach Spcl
Gulf Front 2br, w/lg porch, dock,
fish sink. wkend $395./wk $895.
386-235-3633/352-498-5986
alwaysonvacation.com #419-181
"Florida's Last Frontier"


805 Lots for Sale

Must See. Prettiest 10ac Rolling
Pasture Lot in North Fla.
3 mi. W. of Col. City School.
Red. to $6.990 P/A, Financing.
386-752-1364 or 386-965-4340

Foreclosure! 59.98 Ac. Close to
Suwannee River w/boat ramps &
Springs. Ideal parcel for your site
built or manuf. home. $139,000!
MLS# 78083 386-344-7662
Lots for Sale Eastside
Village Realty, Inc. buildable
vacant lot hight & dry in a estab-
lished neighbor priced @ $40,000.
Call Denise Bose @ 752-5290
Owner Financing. River comm &
nature lover's dream in Lee. 15
wooded ac by the Withlacoochee.
Property is already subdivided
MLS 75576 $48,000 623-6896
PUBLISHER'S NOTE
All real estate advertising in this
newspaper is subject to the fair
housing act which makes it illegal
to advertise "any preference,
limitation, or discrimination based
on race, color, religion, sex,
disability, familial status or nation-
al origin; or any intention to make
such preference, limitation or
discrimination." Farifflial status
includes children under the age of
18 living with parents or legal
custodians, pregnant women and
people securing custody of chil-
dren under the age of 18. This
newspaper will not knowingly
accept any advertising for real es-
tate which is in violation of the
law. Our readers are hereby in-
formed that all dwellings adver-
tised in this newspaper are availa-
ble on an equal opportunity basis.
To complain of discrimination call
HUD toll free at 1-800-669-9777,
the toll free
telephone number to the hearing
impaired is 1-800-927-9275.

810 Home for Sale


810 Home for Sale
Country close to town 3/2 Brick 3
ac. Grape arbor & fruit trees. pole
barn. workshop. Metal roof. MLS
78096 S129.900 Ginger Parker
365-2135 Hallmark Real Estate
Country Club Condo 4br/3ba.
Mega storage, roomy kit, 3 porch-
es. $165,000 MLS 78719'Paula
Lawrence 386-623-1973
Hallmark Real Estate.
Deer in your back yard. 3/2 HUD
w/16X48 wrap around scr. porch.
Clean, well maintained, 5 ac.
$72,000 MLS78687 Ginger Parker
365-2135 Hallmark Real Estate
Foreclosure! 3/2 D/WMH boasts
a large kitchen. M/B w/ garden
tub, shower & dbl sinks-New car-
pet-fpl & more-Only $69,995
MLS# 76920. 386-344-7662
Foreclosure! Newer 3/2 DWMH.
Lg rooms, kitchen island, lots of
wdws, master w/garden tub & sep-
arate shower. $74,995
MLS# 74218 386-344-7662
Great 3/2 home w/2346 sq ft
under roof on .67 ac., Creekside
S/D. Big back yard w/plenty of
shade trees. On a cul-de-sac, MLS
77385 $169,900 623-6896
Home for Sale Eastside Village
Realty, Inc. 2 bedroom, 2 bath site
built home with screen porch,
large carport priced just right Call
Denise Bose @ 752-5290
Home in Lake City Country Club.
4/3, renovated. Great for entertain-
ing. Glass doors open to back yard.'
MLS#78637 $184,900
R.E.O. Realty Group 867-1271
Home on 15 ac. w/over 2,500 sqft
home.Very Ig bedrooms w/private
baths. 24x24 workshop $235,000
MLS 77552 Brittany Stoeckert
Results Realty 386-397-3473
JASPER! 4BR/2.5BA 1,890 SqFt
mfg home on 1 acre where
wildlife is abundant $39,900
DANIEL CRAPPS AGENCY,
INC. 755-5110 #77922


0.5 acre tract has 441 (4 lane) Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
frontage. 1/2 miles from Target Suwarnnee Co. 115 ac. Fenced &
* distribution. 2/1.5 currently zoned cross Fenced. Pasture land, paved
residential. MLS#78506 $91,000 rd. Elaine K. Tolar 386-752-4211
R.E.O. Realty Group 867-1271 MLS# 77081 $345,000
2 Mobile homes on 5 ac. above Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
ground pool. (1)1800 sqft. & .97 ac. Centrally located to Lake
(1)1500sqft.$235,000 $139,888 City & G'ville..Fenced, planted
MLS 77552 Brittany Stoeckert pines, pasture. Elaine K. Tolar,
Results Realty 386-397-3473 752-4211 MLS# 73879 $291,030
/ Champion Home Inspections Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
386-344-5551. Inspections New home in May Fair. Super area
Starting At.$ 249.00 corner lot. 4br split plan. Versatile
Veterans Receive 10% Off colors. Elaine K. Tolar
Full Inspection. 755-6488.MLS# 76919 $199,900
3/2 Brick Home w/1 car garage, Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
Metal roof, porch w/swing, detach 240 ac. Farm. Rolling Meadows.
carport $96,000 MLS#77780 Paved road, great access to Lake
Jo Lytte Remax 386-365-2821 City & G'ville. Elaine K. Tolar
www.jolytte.florida-property-search.com 386-752-4211 MLS# 70453
3/2 Split floor plan built in 2010 Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
o 2 acres.:.Master bath with large SuWannee Co.115 ac. 'Fenced &
tub & standing shower. Trey ceil- cross fenced. 10 & 20 ac parcels
wings MLS#78520, $114,900 avail. Elaine K. Tolar 386-752-
R.E.O. Realty Group 867-1271 4211 MLS# 67766 $448,500
S 4/2 fenced yard,o Coldwell Banker/Bishopi Realty
2 car garage, Fairly new toof & Brick home in town on lakefront.
HVAC Shed, fenced back yard. 3br/2ba. New roof & hard goods.
MLS#77602, $162,500, R.E.O. Glas room W/view Ejaine Tolar
Realty GrOup 867-1271 755-6488 MLS# 78092 $249,900 .
Almost 17ac., spacious 3br/2ba
home, paved rd. Near Itchetucknee Lake front 3/2 custom Western Ce-
Spgs. Pole barn, gated, fenced. :. dar. Lots of storage space.Private
MLS76902 $164,900 Brodi Allred dock $229,900. MLS# 74681
623-0906. Westfield Realty Grodp Jo Lytte-Remax 386-365-2821
623_006.estfeldRaltyGrou .www.jolytte.florida-property-search.com
Awesome Find! 3br/2ba, 1844sf, Large Home in the Country on
wood floors, French doors to scr 3.66 acres, fireplace, 2 outbldgs,
back porch, 40x60 bldg w/office & MLS#76471, $89,900
workshop, 6.17ac comer lot, 3 Jo Lytte, Remax 386-365-2821
sides fenced. #77427 $199,900 jolytte@remaxnfl.com
Brick Ranch 3/2 Fl room. Side en- LEASE/OPTION BUY
try garage & workshop. 2 sheds. 3br/2ba Home 2010 w/garage
New AC apple & roof. MLS78442 3br/2ba Home 2010 w/garage
$114,900. Millard Gillen 365-7001 on 1/2 acre. Owner Financing
Westfield Realty Group 386-623-2244
LOCATION! CONDITION
Champion Home Inspections. LOCETION! CONDITION
Contact John 386-344-5551 PRICE! 3BR/2BA w/open floor
State Licensed plan; freshly painted $96,000
And Insured DANIEL CRAPPS AGENCY,
championhomeinspections.us INC. 755-5110 #78278
Charming 2br/2ba home. Gated Lofty home on Itchetucknee River,
community. REDUCED to Wrap around covered decks on.
$158,000 MLS78740 Teresa. two levels.MustSEE! $375,000
Spradley 386-365-8343 'MLS477006 Jo Lytte
Hallmark Real Estate Remax 386-365-2821
Clean Well maintained 3/2 brick Luxury home. 3br/2ba, 20 ac lot.
w/chain link fenced back yard Cherry cabinet. & SS appliances.
w/Garage. $120,K MLS78440. Jacuzzi in master br.: MLS 78190
Debbie King 386-365-3886 $ 374,900 Roger Lovelady 365-
Hallmark Real Estate 7039. Westfield Realty Group
Close to everything. Lg 3br/2ba Motivated Seller. Country area,
brick home. Close to VA & shop- paved rd. 3br/2ba manuf home.
ping! $189,900 MLS78131 Carrie New AC &,upgraded wdows.
Cason 386-623-2806 MLS 78027 $84K. Brodie Allred.
Westfield Realty Group 623-0906 Westfield Realty Group
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty MOVE-IN READY! 3BR/2BA in
Neat & tidy 2/2, maybe 3/2. New pristine condition on 1.39. acres
kitchen- counters & tile. Open fldor $89,900 DANIEL CRAPPS
plan. Mary Brown Whitehurst AGENCY, INC.
965-0887 MLS# 77943 $99,000 755-5110 #78345
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
10 acres w/well maintained brick
home. 2012 sqft. Open split floor
plan. Lori Giebeig Simpson in MagoliaHill- of
365-5678 MLS# 74447 $149,000
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
3br/3ba Spacious home in estab- ba w tha g ge
lished area. 2414 sqft. Private yard
& patio. Lori Giebeig Simpson lllalopt
365-5678 MLS# 78175 $159,000-


Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
3br/2ba. 1590 sqft. Lori Giebeig
Simpson. 365-5678 or
Mary Brown Whitehurst
965-0887 MLS# 74542 $110,000


,7 Im y/ MP*LIK
Clse t twn


810 Home for Sale
New Reduced. 4br/2ba plus of-
fice. 2 living & dinig areas. cov-
ered porch. Fl rm. Triple garage.
MLS77685 Charlie Sparks 755-
0808 Westfield Realty Group
Nice, large 4/2 on 1 acre
w/florida room, granite floors,
wrap around front porch, $139.900
Brittany Stoeckert Results Realty
386-397-3473 MLS 77292
Owner Financing. 2br/3ba country
home w/wrap around porches, 5ac.
Garage w/workshop. MLS77005
$179,900 Roger Lovelady 365-
7039 Westfield Realty Group
PRICE REDUCTION. 3/2 plus
pool house w/half bath, 2.25
fenced ac. Freshly painted. Split
plan, Large rear deck MLS 78103
$179,900 386-623-6896
PRICED TO SELL! 3BR/2BA
w/2,012 SqFt w/living rm & fami-
ly rm $57,000 DANIEL CRAPPS
AGENCY, INC.
755-5110 #78680
Private 2 ac parcel away from it
all. Hunting w/no restrictions.
Make an offer on this 1764 sqft
home that need some TLC.
$109,900, MLS78331. Jay Sears.
867-1613 Hallmark Real Estate
Reduced Price! 3br/1.5 ba. Re-
modeled. Nice area close to VA.
MLS 77599 $69K. Estate Sale,
bring all offers. Josh Grecian 466-
2517 Westfield Realty Group
Remax Professionals Motivated
seller. Spacious brick w/many up-
grades. Newer roof, windows &
fixtures. Fenced back yard. MKS
78168 $119,900 Missy Zecher @
623-0237 www.missyzecher.com
Remax Professionals Ranch style
home on 10 ac w/bam & horse
stalls. 4 Ig bedrm + bonus rm. 2
car gar. MLS 77403 $325K.
Missy Zpcher @ 386-623-0237
www.missyzecher.com
Rolling Meadows. 4 or 3br/2ba.
Over 1700 sqft. and 1/2 ac lot.
MLS77284 $154,900 Carrie Cason
386-623-2806
Westfield Realty Group
Something for Everyone! 3br/2ba,
2706sf, 4.02ac, island kitchen,
Corian counters, det garage, Koi
pond, fish house, green, house,
fenced & more. #76255 $247,000
SPECTACULAR VIEW!
2BR/1BA, 1200sf, .65ac, scr front
porch, steps to deck/dock on Suw.
river, under house parking/storage,
shed & more. #77242 $194,900
Suwannee Rifer Front
granite counters, covered patio,
deck & dock, $349,000
MLS#76336 Jo Lytte at Remax
Professionals. 386-365-2821
WELL-CARED FOR 4BR/2.5BA
mfg home w/formal LR plus fami-
ly rm $84,000 DANIEL CRAPPS
AGENCY, INC.
755-5110 #78585


Bring the picture in or
we will take it for you!
* Ad runs 10 consecutive days
with a description and photo in the
newspaper and online E-edition.
* Ad runs 10 consecutive days ps a
classified line ad online.
* You must include vehicle price.
* All ads are prepaid.
* Private party only.





2006 EF250
Ford Van
34 ton, metal work
shelves/ladder rack,
60K miles, exc. cond.
$10,500
Call
386-555-5555
If you don't sell your vehicle
during the first 10 days, you
can run the salne vehicle ad
for 10 additional days for
only $15.00
Terms and conditions remain the
same for the additional run.







E m')75-54


Have you read the newspaper today ,


6 a w k you'Iin it e...
Lake City qReporter

l.... .it vcmpor 1 Q .lITS mp ._


1996 Sea-Ray
175 Bow Rider 1/0.
Model 3.0 LX 135 H.P.
Mercruiser. Very low hrs.
W/trailer.

$5,995
Call
386-758-9847


zuuI nonoa
Motorcycle VTX 1300
Pearl green, one owner,
8600 mi., perfect cond.
$5,895
Call
386-758-5805
386-365-0817


2007 Coach House
Platinum 272XL, 15K .
miles, may consider partial
trade for Class B.
$110,000
Call
386-754-8505


Classified Department: 755-5440







Classified Department: 755-5440


LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED FRIDAY, AUGUST 26, 2011


810 Home for Sale
WHITE SPRINGS! Sturdy block
3BR/IBA home in city limits,
fenced yd $49,000 DANIEL
CRAPPS AGENCY, INC.
755-5110 #78603

820 Farms &
S Acreage
10-ac lot. Well/septic/pp. Owner
financing $300 dn, $663 mo 8.9%,
25 yrs. Deas Bullard Properties
386-752-4339 www.landnfl.com
4 1/2 acre lot. Lake Jeffery Road.
Gorgeous Oaks!Paved Rd
Owner Financing! NO DOWN!
$59,900. $525mo 352-215-1018.
www.LandOwnerFinancing.com
4 acres, Wellborn, New Well
installed, Beautifully wooded
w/cleared Home Site, owner fin,
no down, $39,900, $410 mon
Call 352-215-1018
www.LandOwnerFinancing.com
FARM- 7 stall barn.
17+ acres, pasture, cross fenced.
Close in $500. mo.
386-961-1086


820 Farms &
820 Acreage
6.45 ac river front property in
White Springs, cloe to Big Shoals.
Covered shelter for entertaining.
MLS# 77417 $104,900 386-867-
1271 R.E.O. Realty Group, Inc
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
61 ac. Parcel. SR 27 & 1-75 inter-
change. Great potential, fenced &
cross fenced. Elaine K. Tolar
752-4211 MLS# 758060 $368,040
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
40 ac.Parcel. Less then 2 mi from
city limits. Fenced road frontage
on US Hwy 441. Elaine K. Tolar
752-4211 MLS# 62092 $194K
830 Commercial
8 Property
788 S. Marion Comm'l bldg on
highway frontage. Across from the
VA & near downtown. $49,900.
MLS 78129 Scott Stewart 867-
3498 Westfield Realty Group
Commercial. High traffic location
w/I-75 exposure. 2-story custom
log home. MLS77949
Josh Grecian 386-466-2517
Westfield Realty Group


i830 Commercial
830 Property
Prime Commercial Location.
Just across from a plaza. Frontage
on Baya w/2 curbcuts. S350,000
MLS# 77485 Call 386-867-1271
R.E.O.Realty Group, Inc
Remax Professionals Commercial
Property. Located on expanding
west side of Lake City. Professio-
nal service or restaurant_ MLS
77436 $575k Missy Zecher 386-
623-0237 www.missyzecher.com
Wellborn Commercial lot 1.84
acres w/34' of Hwy frontage near
the new Dollar General. MLS
72381 Scott Stewart 386-867-3498
Westfield Realty Group
86o Investment
Property
Rustic Fishing camp in Suwannee
Minutes to boat launch.
MLS#78709 $59,900
Jo Lytte/Remax 386-365-2821
www.jolytte.florida-property-search.com
REPORTER Classifieds
In Print and On Line
www.lakecityreporter.com


YOUR HOMETOWN

NISSAN DEALER


WHY DRIVE OUT


OF TOW H:

When you can g .,f.

'SMOKIN' hot deals right I


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here


@Bottom


2012
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& Sentra


NUW IN
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YEAR-END
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A a detud3 586.755.5445


10 AT THIS


PRICE. 2011 NISSAN
t $2,999 down
for 24 month.. ALTIMAt
S 0% for 60 months or
S1,250 Factory Rebate
or Lease a 2011 Nissan
Altima for 6189 mo.
Code 131111 VIN 146535 | VIN 106893


1.0 AT THIS PRICE
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ShandslPeSho
It Regional Medical Center
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2011