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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028308/01644
 Material Information
Title: The Lake City reporter
Uniform Title: Lake City reporter (Lake City, Fla. 1967)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: John H. Perry
Place of Publication: Lake City Fla
Publication Date: 8/25/2011
Frequency: daily (monday through friday)[<1969>-]
weekly[ former 1967-<1968>]
daily
normalized irregular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Lake City (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Columbia County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Columbia -- Lake City
Coordinates: 30.189722 x -82.639722 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 95, no. 4 (Oct. 5, 1967)-
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000358016
oclc - 33283560
notis - ABZ6316
lccn - sn 95047175
sobekcm - UF00028308_01569
System ID: UF00028308:01644
 Related Items
Preceded by: Lake City reporter and Columbia gazette

Full Text





Jobs quits
Apple CEO,

ks k-,
Sc 2o





Lake


Jobs lost
Budget proposal would
mean 5 positions
**', -.- at SRWMD.

o 3




City I


Match play
Blayne Barber
in U.S.Amateur
Championship.
Sports, 6B


Reporter


Thursday, August 25, 201 I


www.lakecityreporter.com


Vol. 137, No. 180 E 75 cents


Irene:


Local


threat


fades

East Coast
bracing
for impact.

By TONY BRITT
tbritt@lakecityreporter.com
See related story, Page 5A.
Hurricane Irene will soon
be skirting the East Coast
as a Category 3 hurricane, if
projections

in her sights.
According
totheNational
Hurricane
Ce nte r,
Hurricane
Irene has THE WEATHER CHANNEL
m ax i m u m Irene's projected
sustained pathas of5 p.m.
winds of 120 Wednesday.
mph and is
moving on a northwest path at
about 12 mph.
Although Florida is out of the
storm's predicted path, Shayne
Morgan, Columbia County
Emergency Management
Director, said he's still watch-
ing the storm carefully.
"At emergency management
we're still monitoring what
Irene does, but I don't antici-
pate activating the emergency
operation center," he said.
Like forecasters, Morgan, is
not certain where or when the
storm will make landfall, but he
said Columbia County probably
won't be hosting people seek-
ing shelter from the storm.
"With the direction the storm
is traveling landfall could be
anywhere from the Carolinas
to Maine and with that I don't
anticipate we'll bo hosting any-
body from Florida," he said. In
addition, "I don't see us being
a host for anybody from North
Carolina or Virginia, but people
could be coming this way."
Morgan said he does not
anticipate local impact from the








crash
From staff reports

A Columbia County woman
has died following a Monday
morning crash in which she
reportedly suffered critical
injuries. The Florida Highway
Patrol now reports she died of
a medical condition, and that
the medical condition caused
the crash.
Connie Hudson, 57, was pro-
nounced dead at 12:54 p.m.
Tuesday at Shands UF by Dr.
Armando Russell, according to
FHP.


Emergency responders tend to one of the injured following a crash on 1-10 Tuesday in Baker County. One Lake City man died in the accident while
another was critically hurt. Three other individuals suffered minor injuries.



1 killed, 4 hurt in crash


From staff reports
A Tuesday afternoon crash on Interstate 10
in Baker County left one Lake City man dead
and another hospitalized with critical injuries.
Three other men in the vehicle suffered
minor injuries.
Tommy Joe Robinson, 43, Lake City, was
killed.
Luis Danilo Quiros, 45, Lake City,. was


Jeb Bush

mailed

lessons

to Scott

By GARY FINEOUT
Associated Press
TALLAHASSEE -
Newly released documents
reveal thatJeb Bush offered
incoming Gov. Rick Scott a
long list of "lessons learned
through trial and. error"
that touched on everything
from how to deal with those
guarding his safety to tell-
ing him it was "OK to veto
stupid bills."
In emailed documents
obtAined by The Associated
Press after they had been
kept out of public view for
months, the former two-
term Florida governor
urged Scott prior to his
swearing-in to push for uni-
versal private school vouch-
ers, save money by releas-
ing elderly prisoners and
close down one of the state
pension plans.
Bush also suggested
that his fellow Republican
consider selling off the
state's virtual school,
eliminate state money for
some university programs
and look at taxing online
sales as part of a swap to
lower other taxes. Some of
the initiatives suggested
by Bush were passed by
the Republican-controlled
Florida Legislature this past
spring.
'Take them for what they
are...a desire that you suc-
SCOTT continued on 3A4


CALL US:
(386) 752-1293
SUBSCRIBE TO
THE REPORTER:
Voice: 755-5445
Fax: 752-9400


transported to Shands Jacksonville with criti-
cal injuries.
The driver of the vehicle; Marc L. Boucher,
37, of Lake City, suffered minor injuries, as
did passengers Jasper Eugene Futch, 55,
Live Oak, and Benjamin Leon Markham, 45,
Lulu.
The crash occurred at 2:20 p.m., about a
mile west of U.S. 90.


According to Florida Highway Patrol
reports,, Boucher was, westbound in a 1995
Ford van in the inside lane when, for unknown
reasons, the vehicle left the roadway, partially
entering the grass median.
Boucher steered to the right to reenter the
roadway, causing him to lose control of the
CRASh continued on 3A


ANTONIA ROBINSONI Lake City Reporter
Representatives of Columbia County, The Ichelucknee Partnership, Rotary Club of Lake City and the Wildlife
Foundation of Florida unveiled a new information kiosk at Alligator Lake Park about the Ichetucknee springshed
Tuesday.

Kiosk will help educate public on

importance of fresh water supply


By ANTONIA ROBINSON
arobinson@lakecityreporter.com
Columbia County residents
won't have to go far to learn about
the connection between Alligator
Lake and Ichetucknee Springs.
A new information kiosk dem-
onstrating that link was unveiled
at Alligator Lake Park Tuesday
morning.
The project cost about $2,300
and was partially funded by a grant
from the Wildlife Foundation of
Florida, said Cindy Johnson, The
Ichetucknee Partnership coordi-
nator. Funding was also provided


93
T-Storm Chance
WEATHER, 2A


by the Rotary Club of Lake City
and the Suwannee River Water
Management District.
"We thank all that contributed to
make this hard work a success,"
Johnson said.
Graphics on the kiosk were
designed by Deborah Parker.
Alligator Lake Park is a perfect
location for the kiosk, said John
Wheeler, TIP board member and
Rotary member. The lake is the
headwaters of Ichetucknee Springs.
The kiosk will help people under-
stand what is a spring and what is a
springshed and know what they have
to protect the waters, he said. Visitors

Opinion ................ 4A
People.......... ........ .2A
Obituaries .............. 5A
Advice & Comics ......... 3B
Puzzles ................. 2B


to the park will see the information
"and start connecting the dots."
The whole park is a means of
education, said Clint Pittman,
Columbia County parks and land-
scapes director. As the park has
grown it has been upgraded to
include educational elements, and
the kiosk will tie in with those.
There are a lot of challenges
today about clean water, said Tim
O'Neil, Wildlife Foundation of
Florida marketing director. The
goal of the foundation is to edu-
cate the next generation.
'This is a perfect example of a
great project," he said.


TODAY IN
PEOPLE
'Scarface' -
the legacy.


COMING
FRIDAY
Local news
roundup,


y'~ -~


l1 !-- J..! V!









LAKE CITY REPORTER DAILY BRIEFING THURSDAY, AUGUST 25, 2011


S(AII ; Wednesday:
Afternoon: 6-9-1
Evening: N/A


Wednesday:
Afternoon: 5-8-1-5
Evening: N/A


5-

Tuesday:
1-12-31-33-34


PEOPLE IN THE NEWS


Pacino, 'Scarface' cast celebrate legacy


LOS ANGELES
Al Pacino said he got
burned while making
"Scarface."
Literally, he grabbed
the hot barrel of a gun
that had just shot 30 rounds dur-
ing one of Tony Montana's violent
scenes.
"My hand stuck to that sucker,"
the 71-year-old actor recalled. He
couldn't work for two weeks.
Pacino relayed the experience
during a discussion with "Scarface"
co-stars Steven Bauer, Robert Loggia
and F Murray Abraham and pro-
ducer Martin Bregman at a party
Tuesday heralding the film's Blu-ray
release.
Part of the charm of the film,
Pacino said, is that it wasn't initially
a hit
"It's one of my favorites because
of its whole evolution," he said. "It
(was) sort of eviscerated after it
opened by the press. ... Nobody was
fond of it, except it had good audi-
ence participation."
He said "it's almost a miracle"
audiences continue to discover and
appreciate the film.
He wanted to make it after being
inspired by Paul Muni's performance
in the 1932 original. Sidney Lumet
suggested he make the main charac-
ter Cuban instead of Italian.
Pacino's "Scarface" is set in 1980s
Miami, and Tony Montana is an
ambitious immigrant who runs a
growing drug empire until he even-
tually collapses under greed and
addiction. Pacino's performance
as the gun-wielding, coke-snorting
Montana is among his most memo-
rable.

Winehouse album is
century's bestseller
LONDON Amy Winehouse is
still hitting music milestones after
her untimely death last month.
Britain's Official Charts Company


Actor Al Pacino arrives at the 'Scarface' Legacy Celebration Event in Los Angeles,
Tuesday. 'Scarface' will be released on Blu-ray September 6.


said Winehouse's
GrTmmy-award win-
ning "Back to Black"
has become the
best-selling'album in
the U.K. in the 21st
century.
Winehouse The company,
which tracks music
sales in the U.K., said Wednesday
that "Back to Black" overtook James
Blunt's 2005 debut album to claim
the title this week.

Paris Hilton's ex takes
plea deal in Vegas
LAS.VEGAS Paris Hilton's ex-
boyfriend was fined
$585 and ordered
Wednesday to stay
out of trouble as he
settled drug charges
stemming from a Las
Vegas Strip traffic
stop with the celebri-
Waits ty socialite last year.


Cy Waits, 35, was sentenced after
pleading no contest to misdemeanor
driving under the influence of drugs.
Felony and misdemeanor drug
charges were dropped.
Las Vegas Justice of the Peace
Bill Kephart ordered Waits to attend
DUI and "victim impact" classes,
gave him a 30-day suspended jail
sentence, and warned him not to
make the same mistake twice.

Chandler PSAs support
volunteer firefighters
AUSTIN, Texas Actor Kyle
Chandler has taped public service '
announcements for Texas volunteer
fire departments needing money
after an intense year of wildfires.
Chandler plays a West Texas
football coach on the series "Friday
Night Lights."
The Texas Wildfire Relief Fund is
meant to support about 1,400 volun-
teer departments.
* Associated Press


,Celebrity Birthdays


* Actor Sean Connery is 81.
* Talk show show host Regis
Philbin is 80.
* Rock singer-actor Gene
Simmons is 62.
* Movie director Tim Burton
is 53.
* Actor Christian LeBlanc is


53.
* Country singer Billy Ray
Cyrus is 50.
* Actor Blair Underwood is
47.
* Rap DJ Terminator X
(Public Enemy) is 45.
* Actress Blake Lively is 24.


HOW TO REACH US
Main number ........ (386) 752-1293
Fax nurnber ..............752-9400
Circulation ..............755-5445
Online... www.lakecityreporter.com
The Lake City Reporter, an affiliate of
Community Newspapers Inc., is pub-
lished Tuesday through Sunday at 180
E. Duval St., Lake City, Ra. 32055.
Periodical postage paid at Lake City, Ra.
Member Audit Bureau of Circulation and
The Associated Press.
All material herein is property of the Lake
City Reporter. Reproduction in whole or
In part is forbidden without the permis-
sion of the publisher. U.S. Postal Service
No. 310-880.
POSTMASTER: Send address changes
to Lake City Reporter, P.O. Box'1709,
Lake City, Fla. 32056.
Publisher Todd Wilson..... 754-0418
(twilson@lakecityreporter.com)
NEWS
Editor Robert Bridges .....754-0428
(rbridges@lakecityreporter.com)
ADVERTISING
Director Ashley Butcher ...754-0417
(abutcher@lakecityreporter.com)
CLASSIFIED
To place a classified ad, call 755-5440


BUSINESS
Controller Spe Brannon. .754-0419
(sbrannon@lakecrtyreporter.com)
CIRCULATION
Home delivery of the Lake City Reporter
should be completed by 6:30 a.m.
Tuesday through Saturday, and by 7:30
a.m. on Sunday.
Please call 386-755-5445 to report any
problems with your delivery service.
In Columbia County, customers should
call before 10.30 a.m. to report a ser-
vice error for same day re-delivery. After
10:30 am., next day re-delivery orser-
vice related credits will be issued.
In all other counties where home delivery
is available, next day re-delivery or ser-
vice related credits will be issued.
Circulation ..............755-5445
(circulation@lakecityreporter.com)
Home delivery rates
(Tuesday through Sunday)
12 Weeks............... $26.32
24 Weeks....................$48.79
52 Weeks..................$83.46
Rates indude 7% sales tax.
Mail rates
12 Weeks................ $41.40
24 Weeks..................$82.80
52 Weeks...................$179.40


CORRECTION

The Lake City Reporter corrects errors of fact in news
items. If you have a concern, question or suggestion, please
call the executive editor. Corrections and clarifications will run
in this space. And thanks for reading.


Alcohol may play
role in car crash
JACKSONVILLE -
Authorities said a uni-
formed Jacksonville police
officer smelled like alcohol
following a crash in his
patrol car.
The Florida Highway
Patrol reports that Officer
Michael E. Rolison was on
his way home from work
early Wednesday morning
when he crossed into an
oncoming lane and col-
lided with another vehicle.
FHP said no alcohol
containers were found in
the patrol car, but beer
was found spilled on the
floorboard. '
A state trooper who
went to the hospital
reported smelling alco-
hol on Rolison's breath.
The trooper asked for a
blood sample, but Rolison
refused.

Valle execution
set for Sept. 6
TALLAHASSEE -
Prison officials have
rescheduled the execution
of Manuel Valle, 61, for
Sept. 6.
The death row inmate
was convicted of killing
Coral Gables police officer
Louis Pena during a traffic
stop 33 years ago.
Officials rescheduled
his execution Wednesday,
a day after the Florida
Supreme Court lifted a
stay.
The justices rejected
Valle's claim that a new
lethal injection drug may
cause him to feel pain.

Judge awards
Cuban exile $2.8B
: MIAMI A Miami
judge has awarded a
Cuban exile $2.8 billion
in damages for the forced
suicide of his father after
Fidel Castro took power
during a revolution in
1959.


ASSOCIATED PRESS

Flying high in the eye
Hurricane Hunter co-pilot Lt. Commander Nicolas J. Toth (left)
and pilot, Commander Jeffery C. Hagan, make a last minute.:
check up in the cockpit of their Gulfstream IV-SP (G-IV) air-
craft at MacDill Air Force Base in Tampa Tuesday. The crew
of the aircraft fly to the eye of.hurricanes and gather data.


It's unlikely the plaintiff
will get to collect much of
that Cuba's government
has flatly refused to pay
similar damage awards in
the past, leaving lawyers
scrambling to find assets
linked to Havana around
the world they can attempt
to seize.

Armed robbers
point gun at baby
HOLLYWOOD -
Authorities in Broward
County are looking for
three gunmen who took
about $1 million in jew-
elry and cash from a
Hollywood jewelry store.
Hollywood police said
Wednesday the three sus-
pects fled in a black, newer
model SUV driven by a
fourth person. The rob-
bery happened Tuesday
morning while customers
were shopping at Koosh
Jewelers.
One suspect pointed a
handgun at an infant in
a stroller and threatened
to kill the child if their
demands were not met.
Anyone with information
about the robbery is asked
to call Hollywood Police at
954-967-4411.


Sansom denies
involvement
TALLAHASSEE -
Former Florida House
Speaker Ray Sansom said
he had nothing to do with
a private prison contract
being investigated by a
federal grand jury.
Sansom on Wednesday
said he never discussed
the project with Boca
Raton-based Geo Group,
which won a contract to
build and operate the pris-
on in the Panhandle near
Milton.

Gov. prays, storm's
path changes
TALIAHASSEE Can
Florida thank God and
former Gov. Charlie Crist
for Hurricane Irene's shift
away from the state?
Each year as gover-
nor, Crist either person-
ally placed or had a
friend place prayers in
Jerusalem's Western Wall
asking God to protect
Florida from hurricanes.
No major hurricanes hit
the state.
Now out of office, Crist
is continuing the tradition.
* Associated Press


THE WEATHER


[ ,-. ISO. ISO. ISO.
-STORMS -STORMSI IT-STORMS


HI 94LO 74 HI94L074 HI9610D74


95/78


Tallahassee Lake Ci
97/73 93/72
C Gaine
Panama City 92/
90/75


Ta
93


TEMPERATURES
High Wednesday
Low Wednesday
Normal high
Normal low
Record high
Record low

PRECIPITATION
Wednesday
Month total
Year total
Normal month-to-date
Normal year-to-date


93
68
90
70
101 in 1915
63 in 1930

0.00"
3.14"
26.53"
5.21'
35.34"


Jaksonvilep City
i aclsonile Cape Canaveral
8 9/78 Daytona Beach
Ft. Lauderdale
sville Daytona Beach Fort Myers
73 90 '79 Gainesville
Ocala Jacksonville
'91/74 C Key West
Orando Ca Cavera Lake Cityest
91/77 89/80 Lake City
SMiami
pa* \ Naples
West Pai Bead Ocala

\5 FL .LaualelW ,Panama City
SFL Myers 90/78 Pensacola
92/76 ) Napgles Tallahassee
\-92/81 MIani Tampa
S8/79 Valdosta
Key West W. Palm Beach
90/83


SUN
Sunrise today
Sunset today
Sunrise torn.
Sunset tom.

MOON
Moonrise today
Moonset today
Moonrise tom.
Moonset tom.


7:03
8:02
7:04
8:00

3:15
5:25
4:18
6:09


000
Aug. Sept. Sept.
27 4 12
New First Full


7a Ip 7p la 6a
Thursday Friday







FmWttcaesrtenture jFhIetap


Friday
97 81.sn
88/81/t
95/78/pc
92/77/pc
93/75/sh
91/78/t
90/82/sh
94/74/pc
95/80/pc
90/79/pc
92/76/sh
89/80/pc
92/79/pc
96/79/pc
98/76/pc
93/77/pc
98/74/pc
94/80/pc


Saturday
90 79 '
92/ 78/t
96/78/t
93/80/t
93/75/sh
92/78/sh
.91/82/sh
94/74/sh
95/80/t
91/79/s
93/75/sh
93/80/t
92/79/pc
95/74/s
97/75/.pc
93/79/t
97/74/pc
95/80/t


An exclusive
3a.m. l service
2 p.m. 10 brought to
a.m. VrW;IUt our readers
p.m. in luteston mrb
Today's by
ultra-violet The Weather
a.m. radiati on sk Channel.
5 p.m. for the area on
3.m. a scale from 0
am to 10+
p.m.

9 weather.com
Sept. Forecasts, data and
20 ^ rM graphics 20211 Weather
L ta Central, LP, Madison, Ws.
weather wher atherpublltser.com


On this date in
1987, the all-time
record for monthly
rainfall was set in
Chicago, Ill., when
a thunderstorm
brought the monthly
total up to 15.73
inches of rain.


Daily Scripture
"I love the Lord, for he heard
my voice; he heard my cry for
mercy. Because he turned.his
ear to me, I will call on him as
long as I live."
Psalm I 6:1-2

Thought for Today
"Tradition is what you resort to
when you don't have the time
or the money to do it right."
Kurt Herbert Adler,
Auslrian-bom conductor (1905-1988)

Lake City Reporter


AROUND FLORIDA


.:,Pl. vowgm-


ssI tLssz .~u~i


r2-BH~HUW~KBH


Page Editor: Jason M. Walker, 754-0430


[ SMSOEDBY I


(386)E 755!54








LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL & STATE THURSDAY. AUGUST 25, 2011


Jobs quitting Apple Cuts would mean loss of
b- I --i'tr a "-e r-m. gr


By JORDAN ROBERTSON and
RACHEL METZ
AP Technology Writers
SAN FRANCISCO Steve Jobs, the
mind behind the iPhone, iPad and other
devices that turned Apple Inc. into one
of the world's most powerful compa-
nies, resigned as the company's CEO on
Wednesday, saying he can no longer handle
the job.
The move appears to be the result of an
unspecified medical condition for which he
took an indefinite leave from his post in
January. Apple's chief operating officer, Tim
Cook, has been named CEO.
In a letter addressed to Apple's board and
the "Apple community," Jobs said he "always
said if there ever came a day when I could no
longer meet my duties and expectations as
Apple's CEO, I would be the first to let you
know. Unfortunately, that day has come."
Jobs' health has long been a concern for
Apple investors who see him as an industry
oracle who seems to know what consum-
ers want long before they do. After his
announcement, Apple stock quickly fell 5.4
percent in after-hours trading.
Earlier this month Apple became the most


valuable company in America, briefly sur-
passing Exxon Mobil At the market close
Wednesday its market value was $349 bil-
lion, just behind Exxon Mobil's $358 billion.
The company said Jobs gave the board his
resignation Wednesday and suggested Cook
be named the company's new leader. Apple
said Jobs was elected board chairman and
Cook is becoming a member of its board.
Jobs' hits seemed to grow bigger as
the years went on: After the colorful iMac
computer and the now-ubiquitous iPod, the
iPhone redefined the category of smart
phones and the iPad all but created the mar-
ket for tablet computers.
His own aura seemed part of the attrac-
tion. On stage at trade shows and company-
events in his uniform of jeans, sneakers and
black mock-turtlenecks, he'd entrance audi-
ences with new devices, new colors, new
software features, building up to a grand
finale he'd predictably preface by saying,
"One more thing."
Jobs, 56, shepherded Apple from a two-
man startup to Silicon Valley darling when
the Apple II, the first computer for regular'
people to really catch on, sent IBM Corp.
and others scrambling to get their own
PCs to market I


5 positions at SRWMD


By BILL KACZOR
Associated Press
TALLAHASSEE Gov.
Rick Scott praised Florida's
five water management
districts on Wednesday
for submitting tentative
budgets that would slash
their spending by more
than $700 million, or '40
percent, in response to his
prodding.
The Republican gover-
nor made cutting water
management spending
a top priority upon tak-
ing office in January. He
said the pending reduc-
tions "are just the first
steps in ensuring that
Florida's precious water
resources are protected
and managed in the most
fiscally responsible way
possible."


Scott requested, and
the GOP-controlled
Legislature approved, a
$210 million annual reduc-
tion in property taxes lev-
ied by four of the five
districts. The Northwest
Florida district's taxes
are already capped at
a rate much lower than
the others and were not
reduced.
The budget propos-
als, though, won praise
from Florida Everglades
Foundation CEO Kirk
Fordham, a frequent critic
of environmental spend-
ing cuts. Fordham said he
was pleasantly' surprised
because he doesn't believe
the reductions will jeop-
ardize Everglades restora-
tion.
The cuts would, though,
result in hundreds of


employees being laid off,
reduce salaries and ben-
efits for those who remain
and cancel plans for land
purchases and borrowing.
The districts will hold
hearings before sub-
mitting final budgets to
Scott and the Legislative
Budget Commission for
approval.
The Suwannee River dis-
trict would be left with a
$56.5 million budget after
$9.4 million in cuts includ-
ing elimination of five posi-
tions that would reduce its
staffing to 63.
In letters to the districts,
Scott called for additional
cuts of only $2.4 million,
including deferred com-
pensation payments. Scott'
also asked for more reduc-
tions in salaries and ben-
efits.


SCOTT: Got 'lessons learned through trial and error' from former governor
Continued From Page 1A


ceed," Bush wrote in one
email to Scott that was sent
around New Year's Day.
Scott, a former health care
executive who had never
. held office, was sworn-in
Jan. 4.
Scott didn't respond
immediately to calls for
comment Wednesday.
But records show that he
forwarded Bush's emails,
including two attached
memos, to his top transi-
tion adviser.
Bush's suggestions
.wee included in a batch of
emails recovered recently
by a member of Scott's
transition team. The private
company handling email for
Scott's transition office shut
down the email accounts
in January, but it wasn't
publicly known until this
month that the emails had
been deleted. Last week,
Scott ordered an investiga-


tion into why the accounts
were closed and whether
the state could recover
emails written by himself
and other members of his
senior -staff between the
time of his election and his
inauguration.
Bush, who was Florida's
governor from 1999 to 2007,
remains extremely popular,
particularly among state
Republicans. He emailed'
Scott two documents, one
called "Ideas for Governor
Scott'" and the other called
"Scott inauguration."
Showing a bit of candor
that he has avoided pub-
licly since leaving the gov-
ernor's office, Bush noted
that he tried to share simi-
lar advice with Gov. Charlie
Crist, who succeeded
Bush. Crist, who began his
terri as a Republiean, left
after one term to mount an
unsucceaafuLcampaign,for..


the U.S. Senate last year
as an independent after it
became clear he would lose
the GOP primary.
"You didn't ask for this,
but it is the 'standard enve-
lope in the desk of the new
guy,'" wrote Bush. 'To be
honest I did the same thing
for Goveroor Crist but he did
nothing I suggested, so with
the risk of being presumptu-
ous, I am trying again."
At the end of the list,
Bush added that if Scott
wanted to "seek counsel
from the old guy, I will
be there for you. If you
don't, I won't be offended.
If you do, you can ignore
my advice and likewise,
I won't be offended. My
commitment to you is that
whatever we speak about
will lfe confidential."
The "lessons" Bush
shared included a suggestion
that theonew governor work


* with the Florida Department
of Law Enforcement agents
guarding him. Bush, who
did not elaborate, said Crist
and the late Gov. Lawton
Chiles put the agents in "dif-
ficult positions by rejecting
their involvement in their
private lives."
Chiles was in the final,
days of his term as gov-
ernor when he died in.
December 1998 from an
abnormal heart beat while


exercising at the gover-
nor's mansion. His body
was not discovered for
several hours because he
was in a private recreation
area.
Crist told the .AP on
Wednesday that he did not
know what Bush was talk-
ing about He said that the
only time he did not have
FDLE agents with him was
on "occasions" when he
would go fishing.


CRASH: 1 killed, 4 hurt
Continued From Page 1A


vehicle, say reports.
The van then veered
left and began to spin. The
vehicle traveled sideways in.
the grass median and over-
turned several times, eject-
ing Robinson and Quiros,
neither of whom was wear-
ing a seatbelt


Boucher, Futch and
Markham suffered minor inju-
ries and were taken to a Baker
County hospital for treatment
Bucher and Futch were wear-
ing seatbelts. Markham was
not, according to FHE
.. .. No charges ,have been
filed, reports show.


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LEN'ER


Page Editor: Robert Bridges, 754-0428












OPINION


Thursday, August 25,2011


ONE
ANOTHER


ONE
OPINION


Already


hearing


footsteps

President Obama must
be really scared of
Texas Gov. Rick Perry
given that it is more
than a year before the
election and Perry isn't even the
Republican nominee. Why else
would the White House be just
making stuff up about him?
Consider Education
Secretary Arne Duncan's
claims against Texas schools.
According to Duncan, Texas'
school system has "really strug-
gled" during the 12 years that
Perry has been in office.
"Far too few of their high-
,school graduates are actually
prepared to go on to college,"
Duncan told Bloomberg's Al
Hunt "I feel very, very badly
for the children there."
Huh?
As education policy wonk
Andrew Rotherham pointed out
to Duncan in a previously sched-
uled interview, Texas is basically
average when it comes to test
scores and graduation rates.
'Texas students scored
right around the national aver-
ages in reading and math on
the National Assessment of
Educational Progress," he
wrote online.
'True, the national averages
aren't great, but Texas is right
there with the pack."
I Duncan had no real response
to the facts.
"I would hayeto look .at all
the details, but there are real
challenges'i'n exas," he said.
Does Duncan really.want to
put up Illinois against Texas in
terms of schools (or taxes, or
business climate or anything
else for that matter) ?
Minority students do better
in Texas than in Chicago, says
Rotherham who also points out,
"Chicago only graduates about
56 percent of all its students."
Now, in fairness, Duncan
probably didn't like Perry even
before the presidency came
into play, since Texas was one
of the few states that told Team'
Obama it can keep its "Race to
the Top" education money.
But slinging campaign mud
for his boss and doing a really
bad job of it is beneath the
education secretary's dignity.
pl New York Post

Lake City Reporter
Serving Columbia County
Since 1874
The Lake City Reporter is pub-
lished with pride for residents of
Columbia and surrounding counties by
.Community Newspapers Inc.
We believe strong newspapers build
strong communities--"Newspapers
get things done!"
Our primary goal is to
publish distinguished and profitable
,community-oriented newspapers.
This mission will be accomplished
through the teamwork of professionals
dedicated to truth, integrity and hard
work.
Todd Wilson, publisher
Robert Bridges, editor
Sue Brannon, controller
Dink NeSmith, president
Tom Wood, chairman

LETTERS
POLICY
Letters to the Editor should be
typed or neatly written and double
spaced. Letters should riot exceed
400 words and will be edited for
length and libel. Letters must be
signed and include the writer's name,
address and telephone number for
verification. Writers can have two
letters per month published. Letters
and guest columns are the opinion of
the writers and not necessarily that of
the Lake City Reporter.
BY MAIL: Letters, P.O. Box 1709,


Lake City, FL 32056; or drop off at
180 E. Duval St. downtown.
BY FAX: (386) 752-9400.
BY E-MAIL:
news@lakecityreporter.com


Compromise. It seems
that ift's always sug-
gested as a means of
arriving at an accept-
able resolution to any
conflict. But I don't like it; it
leaves a bad taste in my mouth.
I've wondered why.
The Google definition of
"compromise:" "An agreement
or a settlement of a dispute that
is reached by each side mak-
ing confessions." The most
negative definition I found came
from "Brainy Quote:" "A com-
mittal to something derogatory
or objectionable; a prejudicial
concession; a surrender..."
What's wrong with that?
Every definition uses the
word "concession," or giving
up something you value, for
the other party.: Allthe defini-
tions use negative words, like
"concession," "derogatory,"
"objectionable," prejudicial," and
"surrender."
These definitions all assume
that we have conflicts in our
relationships and our dealings
with others, and that what we
want or believe is right must be
compromised in order to make
the deal or the relationship
work. What's wrong with this
picture?
Iri our friendships, and our
families, and our marriages,
shouldn't we be on the same
side? Do we have to give
$ .


Robert Denny
Bob.Denny8@gmail.com


up what we believe, what we
want, because of our differ-
ences? If you love someone,
don't you want the best for
him or her? Do you want
them to have to give up, sur-
render, or reach derogatory or
objectionable terms so you can
be happy? .. ..
Instead of finding differences
or conflicts,how about searchW-
ing for ways for each to win?
Isn't a mutually happy satisfying
relationship more important
than getting your way?
When you find differences
with someone, why not look
for the best way to achieve
the solution that is best fo4r all
concerned? How about consid-
ering their goals, dreams, and
desires? I think it's a shame
that people believe they have to
give up something.
How does this work? If you
want to stay up late and read,
and they want to go' fq sleep,


can't you read in comfort, with
good light, in another.room? If
they want to go to the movies
and you want to play golf, can't
you each do what you'd like,
and find another time to get
together to do something you
both enjoy? Go dancing; or to
a party you both are excited
about?
Then there's politics.
Republicans, Democrats, and
even our president dig their
heels in and don't want the
other party to get their way
on issues like taxes, spending,
economics, or human rights.
Shouldn't we all want what's
best for the American people
and the country? Maybe we,
should make our legislators,
aware of what we believe is
, ,right for "we the.people." 1,,.:, .
We've had opportunities in
our lives to learn to work as
a team; work together for the
common good; instead of draw-
ing lines in the sand or refus-
ing to consider others' goals,
dreams, and happiness. Like
Rodney King said, "Why can't
we all just get'along?"

N Robert Denny is a licensed
mental health therapist, and
teaches psychology at Florida
Gateway College in Lake City.
Comments welcome at Bob.,
Denny8@gmail.com.


Jihadism vs. Islamism


Nearly ten years after
the 9/11 attacks,
many politicians,
diplomats, journal-
ists and academics
remain reluctant even to name
America's enemies. To take but
one example: John Brennan, head
of the White House homeland
security office, has argued that
America is only "at war with al
Qaeda" and its closest affiliates.
I understand the impulse to
frame the conflict as narrowly as
possible. Brennan and others do
not want to reinforce al-Qaeda's
message that Muslims from
Afghanistan to Iraq to Israel to
Paris to Detroit must choose
between the umma, the global
Islamic community, and the West
- to fight for one and against the
other.
But can we not say truthfully
and without playing into al-Qaeda's
hands that there are regimes and
groups within the Muslim world
that are implacably hostile to the
West? Can we not say that they
subscribe to a belief system called
Jihadism? The late Father Richard
John Neuhaus defined Jihadism
as a religiously inspired ideology
built on the teaching "that it is the
moral obligation of all Muslims to
employ whatever means necessary
in order to compel the world's sub-
mission to Islam."
I would contend that there is a
distinction, subtle but significant,
between Jihadism and Islamisnm.
Jihadists see warfare as the
divinely ordained path to Islamic
supremacy. Islamists may prefer


Cliff May


to utilize other means. Some may
even think terrorism ill-advised
because attacks like those carried
out in New York and Washington
- and London, Bali, Madrid and Ft
Hood have awakened many in
the West by no means all to the
seriousness of the threat we face.
Among the Jihadis and
Islamists there is variety and
diversity. To glimpse it, let me
suggest you page through
the American Foreign Policy
Council's just-completed World
Almanac of Islamism (almanac.
afpc.org). Among the morsels in
this cornucopia: Of more than
1,000 mosques in Spain, about
10 percent are believed to be
radical. Of the estimated 1,500
mosques in France, about 80 are
considered to be "at risk of radi-
calization" and 20 are under close
government surveillance.
In Russia, the Caucasus
Emirate "has ideologically and
politically allied itself with the
most virulent elements of the
global jihadist movement, includ-
ing al-Qaeda, the Taliban, Islamic
Jihad, Hezbollah, and others."
Albania has become the
first European member of the


Organization of the Islamic
Conference. One consequence:
There are no longer any visa
requirements for citizens of
Muslim countries, making
Albania an open door for terror-
ists who want to disappear into
Europe. When local authorities
in the northern Albanian, major-
ity-Catholic city of Shkoder .
announced that Mother Teresa
would be commemorated with a
statue, three Muslim NGOs pro-
tested calling that a "provoca-
tion" against Islam.
The Almanac reports that the
American public remains "largely
unaware of and/or uninterested in
Islamist groups in the U.S. unless
they can somehow be linked to
al-Qaeda and/or terrorist attacks
in the West Nor are civil society,
media institutions, and the public
Sat large generally informed about
Islamist groups in the U.S. and
Islamism generally, beyond the
occasional terrorist plots that are
routinely disrupted every year."
As noted above, that's also true
at the highest levels of govern-
ment, academia and the media.
John Brennan would be well
advised to spend a weekend with
the World Almanac of Islamism.
I think he'd find it a useful
resource from which he might
learn that al-Qaeda is only one of
the groups that ought to concern
him.
Clifford D. May is president of
the Foundation for the Defense
of Democracies, a policy institute
focusing on terrorism.


4A


ANOTHER
VIEW


The


coming


storm in


pensions


on the horizon.
Even though
taxpayers will
shell out at
least $250 billion to cover losses
from Fannie Mae and Freddie
Mac, there's another, much
less known federally chartered
corporation that's racking up
the red ink currently $23 bil-
lion worth. The Pension Benefit
Guaranty Corp. (PBGC) could
be the next to fall.
Established in 1974, PBGC
insures the traditional pen-
sions of more than 44 million
American employees. It col-
lects premiums from defined-
benefit retirement plans, and
.when private-sector companies
that offer the plans go belly-up,
PBGC assumes the pension
obligation. With the economy
faltering, more companies
have sought the protection of
bankruptcy, and pressure on
PBGCrnounts. The gift retailer
Harry & David recently exited
Chapter 11 bankruptcy orgahi-
zation after a judge agreed that
it could obtain a distressed
termination of its $45 million
pension plan. That was good.
news for Harry & David stock-
holders and employees. It's not
so good for the rest of us when
such claims begin to pile up.
Before Harry & David,
PBGC picked up the tab for
failed Alabama Aircraft, Circuit
City and Lehman Brothers,
among others. As General
Motors and Chrysler continue
to stay in the red, their pen-
sion plans potentially can add
$42 billion to PBGC's burdens.
Absorbing the problems of oth-
ers is the reason for PBGC's
existence, but the availability
of this gold-plated insurance
package presents a moral haz-
ard. It encourages employers.
to offer more lavish pension
plans, whether or not the com-
pany can afford them, secure
in the knowledge that the
PBGC will ultimately meet the
obligations.
Internal mismanagement
at PBGC increases the dan-
ger. A recent Government
Accountability Office (GAO)
report identified weak internal
procedures, including criti-
cally the PBGC's investment
strategy. Since 1990, the agency
has swung five times between
conservative and aggressive
approaches. These changes
have resulted in transaction
costs of $74.8 million since
2008 alone. The GAO report
condemned this as "an undisci-
plined approach to investing."
When putting money away
for retirement, the key to suc-
cess is discipline and adher-
ence to a long-term plan, goals
that the PBGC, charged with
protecting the pension funds of
tens of millions Americans, has
woefully failed to meet
The PBGC has the cash to
meet its short-term obliga-
tions, so it poses no immediate
threat That means the oppor-
tunity for reform is now. The
agency is running a deficit this
year; waiting to address seri-
ous structural flaws will only
make the problems harder to
solve down the road. PBGC
does not have the explicit
backing of the full faith and
credit of the U.S. government,
but then again, neither did
Fannie or Freddie. The PBGC
needs to stay independent and
self-funded and not expect
taxpayers to give it a handout
We've been down that road


before, and all it got us was
trillions of dollars in debt and a
stalled economy.

* The Washington Times -


www.lakecityreporter.com


Compromise?









LAKE CITY REPORTER NATIONAL THURSDAY, AUGUST 25, 2011


Evacuations begin in N.C. ahead of Irene


By MARTHA WAGGONER
Associated Press

HATTERAS, N.C. -
Tourists began evacuating
from a tiny barrier island
off North Carolina on
Wednesday as Hurricane
Irene strengthened to a
major Category 3 storm
over the Bahamas with the
East Coast in its sights.
So far, things were going
smoothly, said Tommy
Hutcherson, owner of the
Ocracoke Variety Store on
Ocracoke Island. Cars had
lined up at gas pumps to
top off before leaving ahead
of Irene, which had winds
near 120 mph (193 kph)
as of Wednesday afternoon.
Irene is expected to get
stronger over warm ocean
waters and could become
a Category 4 storm with
winds of at least 131 mph
(211 kph) by Thursday.
The evacuation was a
test of whether people in
the crosshairs of the first
major hurricane along the
East Coast in years would
heed orders to get out of
the way. As Irene churned
in the Caribbean, tour-
ists scurried from hotels
in the Bahamian capital of
Nassau to catch flights off
the island before the air-
port's expected afternoon
closure. Officials as far
north as Rhode Island and
Massachusetts in the U.S.
also were getting ready for
Irene. '
The first ferry to leave
Ocracoke Island in North
Carolina arrived just before
5:30 a.m. in nearby Hatteras
with around a dozen cars
on board.
The 16-mile-long barrier
island is accessible only
by boats that can carry no
more than 50 cars at a time.
It is home to about 800 year-
round residents and a tour-
ist population that swells
into the thousands when
vacationers rent rooms and
cottages. Tourists were told
to evacuate Wednesday.
Island residents were told
to get out on Thursday.
It wasn't clear how many
people on the first arriving
ferry Wednesday morning
were tourists, but the first
two cars to drive off had
New York and New Jersey
plates.
Getting off the next ferry
about an hour later was a
family that included newly-
wed Jennifer Zaharek, 23,


", A
-- . : .' . -. ....- -








4 .



.f _. . ... ~ ,'


a ~. A


Sa-sd. -: ~ .


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Beachgoers sunbathe at Cape Hatteras. N.C. Wednesday. Evacuations of tourists began on Ocracoke Island off North Carolina as Hurricane Irene strength-
ened to a major Category 3 storm over the Bahamas on Wednesday with the East Coast in its sights.


of Torrington, Conn. She
and her husband, Andrew,
were married Monday and
planned to spend their hon-
eymoon on the island.
"We just got to spend
one day on the beach and
then we went to bed early
to get up for the evacua-
tion," she said.
State workers questioned
people who tried taking
the ferry to the island and
turned a few cars around.
In addition to the ferry line
to Hatteras, there were two
other ferry lines that went
to and from the island.
Federal officials have
warned Irene could cause
flooding, power outages or
worse all along the East
Coast as far north as Maine,
even if it stays offshore. The
projected path has gradu-
ally shifted to the east, and
Irene could make land-
fall anywhere from South
Carolina to Massachusetts
over the weekend.
As of 2 p.m. EDT
Wednesday, Irene was
centered about 250 miles


(402 kilometers)., southeast
of Nassau in the Bahamas
and was moving northwest
near 12 mph (19 kph).
. Speaking Wednesday
on ABC's "Good Morning
America," Craig Fugate,
head of the Federal
Emergency Management
Agency,, said people as
far north as New England.
should be ready for the
storm. When asked about
concerns preparing, the
Northeast for a hurricane,
which is uncommon in
that part of the country,
Fugate cited Tuesday's
earthquake that rattled
the East Coast.
"It's a reminder that we.
don't always get to pick the
next disaster," Fugate said.
Ocracoke is part of North
Carolina's Outer Banks, a
roughly 200-mile stretch of
fragile barrier islands off
the state's coast Pristine
beaches and wild mustangs
attract thousands of tour-
ists each year. Aside from
Ocracoke, the other islands
are accessible by bridges


to the mainland and fer-
ries. The limited access can
make the evacuation par-
ticularly tense. Officials in
counties covering the rest
of the Outer Banks' were
to decide later Wednesday
or Thursday whether to
evacuate.
All the barrier islands
have the geographic weak-
ness of jutting out into the
Atlantic like the side-view
mirror of a car, a loca-
tion that's frequently been
in the path of destructive
storms over the decades.
In 1999, Hurricane
Floyd made landfall as
a Category 2 storm'and
caused a storm surge that
wiped out scores of hous-
es and other properties on
the Outer Banks.
Irene had already
wrought destruction across
the Caribbean, giving a
glimpse of what the storm
might bring to the Eastern
Seaboard. In Puerto Rico,
tens of thousands were
without power, and one
woman died after trying to


cross a swollen river in her
car. Thousands were evacu-
ated because of flooding in
the Dominican Republic. In
Cuba, the storm sent waves
crashing over a seawall in
Baracoa, causing ankle-
deep flooding in parts and
damaging some sidewalks.
Hurricane conditions
were already present in
the southeastern Bahamas,
forecasters said. The capi-
tal of Nassau buzzed with,
preparations Wednesday,
as the' government and
some resorts set up emer-
gency shelters. Many visi-
tors scrambled to get off
the island, waiting in long'
lines to catch planes before
the airport closed.
"I've been through one
hurricane and I don't want
to see another," said Susan
Hooper of Paris, Illinois,
who was cutting short a trip
with her husband, Marvin,
to celebrate their 23rd wed-
ding anniversary.
It's been more than
seven years since a major
hurricane, considered


a Category 3 with 'winds
of at least 111 mph (179
kph), hit the East Coast
Hurricane Jeanne came
ashore on Florida's east
coast in 2004.
People were keeping an
eye on the storm farther
,north. At the Breakers
Resort Inn in Virginia
Beach, Va., manager Jimmy
Capps said some custom-
ers have canceled, but
he's urging most to wait
until Thursday, when the
storm's path will be more
certain than it is now. He
said the 56-room inn is still
about 80 percent booked
'for the Weekend:' ..
In Massachusetts; coun-
try music star Kenny
Chesney bumped a con-
cert ahead two days to miss
Irene, and state officials
were making sure com-
munications systems were
working and sandbags
were stocked. In Rhode
Island, officials stockpiled
sandbags and cleared
storm drains to prepare for
possible flooding.


OBITUARIES


Orbra Warthen Harrell
Orbra Warthen Harrell, 96,
passed away August 22, 2011 in
Ft. White, FL. He was a retired
chief engineer ,,
for public tele- t
vision. He was
charter member -
of the Kiwanis
in Brandon, FL., a Mason, sub-
lime degree of Master Mason,
Brandon Lodge #114 with 25
years of service. He was a ham
operator since 1932, (W4BIN),
a veteran of World War II in
the US Navy; Son of the Con-
federacy; First Families of
Florida; and a private pilot. He
attended Ft. White Schools. He
was preceded in death by his
wife, Mary Agnes Henry Har-
rell; brother, Ben David Harrell
and sister, Lucy Harrell Wood.
He is survived by 2 sons; Orbra
W. (Belinda) Harrell, Jr. of Aus-
tin, TX and Lee H. (Denise) Har-
rell of Ft. White, FL.; daughter,
Karen (Jim) Lewis of Ft. White
and Birmingham, AL.; 11 grand-
children and 12 great-grandchil-
dren. Great-grandchildren; Jar-
ed, Caleb, Lydia, Blake, Ireland,
Meridith, Morgan, Spencer,
Miel, Tristan, Kendall and Owen.
Visitation will be held on Fri-
day, August 26, 2011, from 6
to 8 PM at EVANS-CARTER
FUNERAL HOME in High
Springs, FL. A funeral service
will be held Saturday, August
27, 2011 at 11:00 AM at the
First United Methodist Church
in High Springs, with Rev.
Benton Mangueira officiating.
Flowers are welcome but those
who wish may Make donations
to the Florida United Method-
ist Childrens' Home, 51 Main
Street, Enterprise, FL., 32725.

Loretta Barker Jarvis
Loretta Barker Jarvis, 75, a resi-
dent of Wellborn, FL passed
away early Tuesday morning,
August 23, 2011 at The Health
Center of Lake City, FL after an
extended illness. She was born


in Madison, FL April 29, 1936.
She moved from Madison, FL
to Lake City, FL in 1959'and
later moved to Wellborn, FL in
1963 and had been a resident
there for 48 years. She was the
daughter of the late Emory and
Helen Barker. She was a caring
wife, mother, grandmother, great
grandmother and foster mother.
She loved to sew, read, travel
and spend time with her fam-
ily. She was an excellent cook
and loved to serve big meals to
her family & friends. Everyone
loved her coconut cake. She
held several jobs outside the
home. In the late seventies she
started providing childcare in
her home until 1991 when she
retired. She and her husband are
still referred to as Granny and
Papa Jarvis by several of them.
She and her husband were foster
parents from 1967 until 1978.
During this time they provided a
loving home and care to approxi-
mately 35 children of whom sev-
eral continue to be an extended
part of their family. Caring for
children was her passion. She
was a Christian and a member
of Wellborn Baptist Church for
48 years. During this t ime she
volunteered for many positions
in the church. She was Sunday
School Director, Vacation Bible
School Director, Nursery work-
er for the bed babies as well
as Sunday School Teacher and
Awana Worker. She received
her 10 year Awana pin for leader
of the Sparky Club. She and her
husband were trained in disaster
relief through the Florida Baptist
Convention. They participated
in several relief missions in
South Florida after hurricanes in
2004 & 2005. She worked with
the meal programs. She also par-
ticipated in the Suwannee Bap-
tist Association mission trips in
2006 & 2007 to West Virginia.
She was preceded in death by
her daughter Debra Jarvis Hutto
and her brother Howard Barker.
Survivors include her loving
husband of almost 57 years,
Walter Pasco Jarvis of Wellborn,
FL; son, Wendell Scott Jarvis of
Wellborn, FL; daughters, Suel-
len Jarvis Skinner(Ronnie) and


Lori Jarvis Mercer(Leroy)of
Live Oak, FL; Tracy Jarvis Os-
bum (Jeff) of Lake City, FL. and
her extended family of foster
children; Linda Batten Schmidt
(Richard) of Macclenny, FL;
Velma Batten Spruell (Jim) of
Gresham, OR; Brenda Johnson
Bagan (Toby) of Lake City, FL;
Brian Johnson of St. Augus-
tine, FL and Bruce Johnson o4
Layton,. UT; two sisters, Ann
Barker Brooks of Greenville,
FL and Joan Barker Johnson
(Frank) of Navarre, FL.. She is
also survived by 19' grandchil-
dren and 9 great-grandchildren.
Funeral services will be held
11:00 am Friday, August 25,
2011 at the Wellborn Baptist
Church with Rev. Dori Minshew
and Rev. Virgil Lovett officiat-
ing. Interment will follow at
2:30 pm in the Concord Baptist
Cemetery, Madison, Fl. Visita-
tion will be held 6 to 8 pm Thurs-
day evening at the funeral home.
In lieu of flowers family wishes
donations to the Children's Min-
istry at Wellborn Baptist Church.
DANIELS FUNERAL HOME
AND CREMATORY, INC.,
Live Oak, and Branford, Fl is
in charge of all arrangements.


TC Miller
TC Miller, 70, passed away on
August 23, 2011 at his
home in Ft. White, FL.
He was retired as owner/opera-
tor of Glass Enclosures, was of
the Church of
God faith and '
served with the
US Army. He *
was preceded
in death by his
wife, Peggy Annette Miller.
He is survived by one son, Lance
Miller of Ft. White; two daugh-
ters, Kathy (Bill) Hanley of
Gainesville and Karen M. (Bar-
ney) Williams of Ft. White; one
brother, Rudy Miller of Scott-
sdale, AZ; One sister, Micki
Bradley of Eldorado, Arkansas;
Three grandchildren,
Joe(Amanda), Stephane and Pat-
rick; one great-grandchild, Keira.
Agravesideservicewillbeheldon
Friday, August 26, 2011 at 11:00
AM at the Ft. White Cemetery,
conducted by Bro. Fred McCray.
Arrangements are under the
care of EVANS-CARTER
FUNERAL HOME
in High Springs.


In Loving Memory of the late
SMrs. Alma Teresa Camiel
I feel a warmth around me
like your presence is so near,
And I close my eyes to visualize
your face when you were here,
I endure the times we spent together
and they are locked inside my heart,
For as long as I have those memories
we will never be apart,
Even though we cannot speak no more
my voice is always there,
Because every night before I sleep
Ihave you in my prayer
Love, Your Family


Tommy Joe Robinson, Jr.
Mr. Tommy Joe "Joey" Rob-
inson, Jr., 43, Died August 23,
2011, after injuries sustained
an automobile accident. A.
full obituary will run in Fri-
day's edition of the paper.
Funeral services for Mr. Robin-
son will be held 2:00 PM Sun-
day, August28, 2011 intheDees-
Parrish Family Funeral Home
Chapel. The family will recieve
friends at the funeral home from
6:00-8:00 PM Saturday evening.
Arrangements are under the di-.
rection of the DEES-PARRISH
FAMILY FUNERAL HOME,
458 S. Marion Ave., Lake City,
FL 32025 752-1234 please sign
our on-line family guestbook at
parrishfamilyfuneralhome. com


Vergie Marie Whigum
Vergie Whigham was born in
Milton, Florida, September 30,
1953 to the late Rev. Henry and
Bertha Whigum. She gradu-
ated from Milton High School
and continued her education at
Lake City Community College
in Lake City, FL. She leaves
to cherish her memory; her
children; brothers and sister,
Gwendolyn Whigum (former
resident of Lake City); other
relatives and friends. Funeral
services for Ms. Whigum was
held Friday, August 19, 2011.
Announcement courtesy of
COMBS FUNERAL HOME.
292 NE Washington Street.
Lake City, FL. (386) 752-4366.
"The Caring Professionals"

Obituaries are paid advertise-
ments. For details, call the Lake
City Reporter's classified depart-
ment at 752-1293.


TAKE THE H&R BLOCK

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LAKE CITY REPORTER NATIONAL THURSDAY, AUGUST 25, 2011


Deficit at $1.28T; red ink continues


By STEPHEN OHLEMACHER
Associated Press

WASHINGTON After
months of unrelieved gloom
and discord, Congress and
President Barack Obama
are starting to make a dent
in the federal budget defi-
cit. It's projected to shrink
slightly to $1.28 trillion this
year, and bigger savings
from this month's debt ceil-
ing deal are forecast over
the next decade.
, No one's, celebrating.
There will be plenty of red
iqk for years to come.
The nonpartisan
Congressional Budget
Office projectedWednesday
tliat annual budget deficits
will be reduced by a total of
$3.3 trillion over the next
decade, largely because of
thle deficit reduction pack-
age passed by Congress
earlier this month. The
office also forecast persis-
tently high unemployment,
a troubling political pros-
pect for President Barack
Obama in the crucial
months of his campaign to
win a second term.
Even with the anticipat-
ed big savings, annual bud-
get deficits are expected


to total nearly $3.5 trillion
over the next decade and
much more if Bush-era tax
cuts scheduled to expire
at the end of next year are
extended. In all, nearly $8.5
trillion would be added to
the national debt over the
next 10 years if the tax cuts
and certain spending pro-
grams are kept in place, the
budget office report said.
The national debt now
stands at more than $14.6
trillion.
The numbers help illus-
trate the urgency facing
a new joint committee in
Congress that is charged
with finding $1.2 trillion to
$1.5 trillion in budget sav-
ings over the next decade.
Some lawmakers are calling
for an even bigger package,
a tall order given the bitter
debate that produced this
month's debt deal.
"CBO's report is yet
more evidence that
Congress faces a twin
challenge of a sluggish
near-term economy and
a still very serious long-
term debt threat," said
Sen. Kent Conrad, D-N.D.,
chairman of the Senate
Budget Committee.
"Congress cannot afford


to ignore either chal-
lenge."
Most of the improvement
in this year's deficit picture
comes from higher than
anticipated tax collections
from 2010 returns filed in
the spring. Over the longer
term, the belt-tightening
required in the new defi-
cit reduction law will mean
even bigger savings, the
report says.
Deficits could end up
larger if CBO's economic
forecast, which is more
optimistic than private pro-.
jections, proves to be too
rosy. The agency doesn't
foresee another reces-
sion but modest economic
growth over the next few
years. And it expects the
unemployment rate to fall
only slightly, to 8.5 percent
in the last three months of
2012, and staying above 8
percent through the follow-
ing year.
"A great deal of the pain
of this economic downturn
still lies ahead of us," said
CBO Director Douglas W.
Elmendorf.
Democratic leaders say
the report shows the need
for programs and policies
aimed at creating jobs.


Republicans say the report
is an indictment of Obama's
economic policies.
."A slight decrease in the
projected deficit is nothing
to celebrate, particularly
when it is accompanied by
the grim news that CBO
expects the national unem-
ployment rate to continue
to exceed 8 percent well
past next year," said House
Speaker John Boehner, R-
Ohio. "The president's poli-
cies were supposed to keep
that from happening."
There is good news
for the more than 50 mil-
lion people who get Social
Security benefits. After two
years without a cost-of-liv-
ing adjustment, the agency
now projects a 2.8 percent
COLA for 2012. That's
up from the 1.1 percent
increase the agency previ-
ously projected. The actual
increase for 2012 will be
announced in October. It
is based on a measure of
inflation.
At $1.28 trillion, this
year's budget deficit would
be the third highest, sur-
passed only by those of the
past two years. The budget
year runs through the end
of September.


U.S. Sen. Lisa Murkowski, R-Alaska, speaks about past
and future federal budget deliberations in a speech to
Commonwealth North on Tuesday at the Dena'ina Center in
Anchorage, Alaska.


NYPD moving covertly in Muslim areas


By ADAM GOLDMAN and
MATT APUZZO
Associated Press

NEW YORK- Since the
Sept. 11 terrorist attacks,
the New York Police
Department has become
one of the nation's most
aggressive domestic intel-
ligence agencies, targeting
ethnic communities in ways
that would run afoul of civil
liberties rules if practiced
by the federal government,
an Associated 'Press'inves-
tigation has found.
These operations have
benefited from unprec-
edented help from the
CIA, a partnership that has
blurred the line between
foreign and domestic spy-
ing.
The department has dis-
patched undercover offi-
cers, known as rakerss,"
into minority neighbor-
hoods as part of a human
mapping program, accord-
ing to officials directly


involved in the program.
They've monitored daily
life in bookstores, bars,
cafes and nightclubs. Police
have also used informants,
known as "mosque crawl-
ers," to monitor, sermons,
even when there's no evi-
dence of wrongdoing.
Neither the city council,
which finances the depart-
ment, nor the federal gov-
ernment, which has given
NYPD more than $1.6
billion since 9/11, is told
exactly what's going on.
Many of these opera-
tions were built with help
from the CIA, which is
prohibited from spying on
Americans but was instru-
mental in transforming the
NYPD's intelligence unit.
A veteran CIA officer,
while still on the agency's
payroll, was the architect
of the NYPD's intelligence
programs. The -CIA trained
a police detective at the
Farm, the agency's spy
school in Virginia, then


returned him to New York,
where he put his new espi-
onage skills to work inside
the United States.
And just last month, the
CIA sent a senior officer
to work as a clandestine
operative inside police
headquarters.
In response to the story,
the Council on American-
Islamic Relations, a leading
Muslim civil rights organi-
zation, called on the Justice
Department to investigate.
The J'is6fie' Ijrifient
had no immediate com-
ment
'"This is potentially ille-
gal what they're doing,"
said Gadeir Abbas, a staff
attorney with the organiza-
tion.
The NYPD denied that
it trolls ethnic neighbor-
hoods and said it only fol-
lows leads. Police opera-
tions have disrupted ter-
rorist plots and put several
would-be killers in prison.
'"The New York Police


IM__NOm


ASSOCIATED PRESS
People pass below a New York Police Department security camera, upper left, which is above
a mosque on Fulton St., in the Brooklyn neighborhood of Bedford-Stuyvesant in New York.
After the attacks of Sept. 11, the New York Police has dispatched teams of undercover offi-
cers into minority neighborhoods and used informants to monitor sermons at mosques, even
when there's no evidence of wrongdoing.


Department is doing every-
thing it can to make sure
there's not another 9/11
here and that more inno-
cent New Yorkers are not
killed by terrorists," NYPD
spokesman Paul Browne
said. "And we have. noth-
ing to apologize for in that
regard."
AP's investigation is
based on documents and
interviews with more than
40 current and former New
York Police Department
and federal officials. Many
were directly.,involved in


planning and carrying out
these secret operations for
the department. Though
most said the tactics were
appropriate and made' the
city safer, many insisted on
anonymity, because they
were not authorized to
speak with reporters about
security matters.
Injusttwo episodes show-
ing how widely the NYPD
cast its net, the department
sought a rundo~yn from the
taxi commission~ of every
Pakistani cah driver in
the city, and produced an.


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analytical report on every.
mosque within 100 miles,.
officials said.
One of the enduring ques-
tions of the past decade.
is whether being safe
requires giving p some lib-
erty and privacy. The focus
of that debate has primarily
been federal programs like
wiretapping and indefinite
detention. The question
has received less attention
in New York, where resi-
dents do not know for sure
what, if anything, they have
given up.


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Page Editor: Robert Bridges, 754-0428









Lake City Reporter





Health


& Wellness


rWjonM


Page Editor: Robert Bridges, 754-0428


LAKE CITY REPORTER HEALTH THURSDAY, AUGUST 25, 2011


More employers ending health coverage


By TOM MURPHY
AP Business Writer

INDIANAPOLIS Nearly one of every
10 midsized or big employers expects to
step offering health coverage to workers
once federal insurance exchanges start
in 2014, according to a new survey from a
large benefits consultant.
Towers Watson also found in a survey
completed last month that an additional 20
percent of the companies are unsure about
what they will do.
Another big benefits consultant, Mercer,
found in a June survey of large and smaller
employers that 8 percent are either "likely"


or "very likely" to end health benefits once
the exchanges start
Employer-sponsored health insurance
has long been the backbone of the nation's
health insurance system. But the studies
suggest that some employers, especially
retailers or those offering low wages, feel
they will be better off paying fines and
taxes than continuing to provide benefits
that eat up a growing portion of their bud-
get every year.
The exchanges, which were devised
under the health care overhaul, may offer
an alternative for their workers. These
exchanges aim to provide a marketplace
for people to buy insurance that can be


subsidized by the government based on
income levels.
A large majority of employers in both
studies said they expect to continue
offering benefits once the exchanges
start But former insurance executive
Bob Laszewski said he was surprised
that as many as 8 or 9 percent of com-
panies already expect to drop coverage
a couple of years before the exchanges
start.
Such a move comes with potential
payroll-tax headaches, and could subject
firms to fines. It also would give their
employees a steep compensation cut if
companies don't raise pay in exchange


for ending coverage.
"Dropping coverage is going to be
very difficult for these (companies) to
do," said Laszewski, a consultant who
was not involved with the studies.
Towers Watson's Randall Abbott
said the survey results should be seen
as a snapshot of how companies are
thinking now. They can't be viewed as
a final decision because there are still
many unresolved variables. No one
knows what the exchanges will be
like or whether consumers will accept
them, and companies may change their
thinking once they learn more about
the overhaul.


Social Security disability


on verge of insolvency


By STEPHEN OHLEMACHER
Associated Press

WASHINGTON Laid-
off workers and aging baby
boomers are flooding Social
Security's disability pro-
gram with benefit claims,
pushing the financially
strapped system toward the
brink of insolvency.
Applications are up
nearly. 50 percent over a
decade ago as people with
disabilities lose their jobs
and can't find new ones in
an economy that has shed
nearly 7 million jobs.
The stampede for ben-
efits is adding to a grow-
ing backlog of applicants
- many wait two years or
more before their cases are
resolved and worsening
the financial problems of a
program that's been run-
ning in the red for years.
New congressional esti-
mates say the trustfund that
supports Social Security
disability Will run out of
money by 2017, leaving the
program unable.to pay full
benefits, unless Congress
acts. About two decades
later, Social Security's
much larger retirement
fund is projected to run
dry as well.
Much of the focus in
Washington has been on fix-
ing Social Security's retire-
ment system. Proposals
range from raising the
retirement age to means-
testing benefits for wealthy
retirees. But the .disability
system is in much worse
shape and its problems
defy easy solutions.
The trustees who over-
see Social Security are urg-
ing Congress to shore up
the disability system by
reallocating money from
the retirement program,
just as lawmakers did in
1994. That would provide
only short-term relief at the
expense of weakening the
retirement program.
Claims for disability ben-
efits typically increase in a
bad economy because many
disabled people get laid off
and can't find a new job.
This year, about 3.3 million
people are expected to apply
for federal disability benefits.
That's 700,000 more than
in 2008 and 1 million more
than a decade ago.
"It's primarily economic
desperation," Social Security
Commissioner Michael
Astrue said in an interview.
"People on the margins who
get bad news in terms of
a layoff and have no other
place to go and they take a
shot at disability,"
The disability program
is also being hit by an
aging population disabil-
ity rates rise as people get
older as well as a system
that encourages people to
apply for more generous
disability benefits rather
than waiting until they


qualify for retirement
Retirees can get full Social
Security benefits at age 66,
a threshold gradually ris-
ing to 67. Early retirees can
get reduced benefits at 62.
However, if you qualify for
disability, you can get full
benefits, based on your work
history, even before 62.
Also, people who qualify
for Social Security disability
automatically get Medicare
after two years, even if they
are younger than 65, the age
when other retirees quali-
fy for .the government-run
health insurance program.
Congress tried to rein in
the disability program in
the late 1970s by making it
tougher to qualify. The num-
ber of people receiving ben-
efits declined for a few years,
even during a recession in
the early 1980s. Congress,
however, reversed course
and loosened the criteria,
and the rolls were growing
again by 1984.
The disability program
"gotinto trouble first because
of liberalization of eligibility
standards in the 1980s," said
Charles Blahous, one of the
public trustees who oversee
Social Security. "Then it got
another shove into bigger
trouble during the recent
recession."
Today, about 13.6 mil-
lion people receive disabil-
ity benefits through Social
Security or Supplemental
Security Income. Social
Security is for people with
substantial work histo-
ries, and monthly disabil-
ity payments average $927.
Supplemental Security
Income does not require
a work history but it has
strict limits on income and
assets. Monthly SSI pay-
ments average $500.
As policymakers work to
improve the disability sys-
tem, they are faced with two
major issues: Legitimate
applicants often have to
wait years to get benefits
while many others get pay-
ments they don't deserve.
Last year, Social Security
detected $1.4 billion in
overpayments to disabil-
ity beneficiaries, mostly
to people who got jobs
and no longer qualified,


according to a recent
report by the Government
Accountability Office,
the investigative arm of
Congress.
Congress is targeting
overpayments.
The deficit reduc-
tion package enacted
this month would allow
Congress to boost Social
Security's budget by about
$4 billion over the next
decade to invest in pro-
grams that identify people
who no longer qualify for
disability benefits. The
Congressional Budget
Office estimates that
increased enforcement
would save nearly $12 bil-
lion over the next decade.
At the' same time, the
application process can
be a nightmare for legiti-
mate applicants. About
two-thirds of initial appli-
cations are rejected. Most
of these people drop their
claims, but for those will-
ing go through an appeals
process that can take two
years or more, chances are
good they eventually will
get benefits.
Patricia L. Foster said
she was working as a nurse
in a hospital in Columbia,
S.C., in 2005 when she
was attacked by a patient
who was suffering from a
mental illness. Foster, 64,
said she injured her neck
so bad she had a plate
inserted. She said she also
suffers from post-traumat-
ic stress disorder.
Foster was turned down
twice for Social Security
disability benefits before
finally getting them in 2009,
after hiring an Illinois-
based company, Allsup,
to represent her. She said
she was awarded retroac-
tive benefits, though the
process was demeaning.
"I have to tell you, when
you're told you cannot
return to nursing because
of your disability, you don't
know how long I cried
about that," Foster said.
"And then Social Security
says, 'Oh no, you don't
qualify.' You don't know
.what that does to you
emotionally. You have no
idea."


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8A www.lakecityreporter.com Thursday, August 25, 2011


Study: Hospitals giving faster heart care


By MARILYNN MARCHIONE
AP Medical Writer
In a spectacular turnabout, hospitals
are treating almost all major heart attack
patients within the recommended 90 min-
utes of arrival, a new study finds. Just five
years ago, less than half of them got their
clogged arteries opened that fast.
The time it took to treat such patients
plunged from a median of 96 minutes in
2005 to only 64 minutes last year, research-
ers found.
Some hospitals are moving at warp
speed: Linda Tisch was treated in a mere
16 minutes after she was stricken while
visiting relatives near Yale-New Haven
Hospital in Connecticut this month.
Emergency responders called ahead to
mobilize a team of heart specialists.
Once she arrived, "they had a brief
conversation and I went straight into the
OR. My family was absolutely flabber-
gasted," said Tisch, 58, who went home to
Westerly, RI., two days later.
Tisch wasn't a fluke. The hospital took
26 minutes on another case on Thursday.
"Americans who have heart attacks can
now be confident that they're going to be
treated rapidly in virtually every hospital
of the country," said Yale cardiologist
Dr. Harlan Krumholz. He led the study,
published online Monday by an American
Heart Association journal, Circulation.
What is remarkable about this improve-
ment, Krumholz said, is that it occurred.
without money incentives or threat of pun-
ishment. Instead, the government and a'
host of private groups led research on how
to shorten treatment times and started
campaigns to persuade hospitals that this
was the right thing to do.


"It's amazing and ifs very gratifying. I'm
surprised that we were able to achieve that
type of dramatic improvement" so quickly,
said Dr. John Brush, a cardiologist at Eastern
Virginia Medical School in Norfolk, Va., who
helped the American College of Cardiology
design its campaign, which involved more
than 1,000 hospitals.
Heart attacks are caused by clogged
arteries that prevent enough oxygen and
blood from reaching the heart. Each year,
about 250,000 people in the United States
and more than 3 million worldwide suffer
a major one, where a main artery is com-
pletely blocked.
The best remedy is angioplasty, in which
doctors push a tube through an artery to
the clog, inflate a tiny balloon to flatten it,
and place a mesh prop called a stent to
keep the artery open.
The period from hospital arrival to angio-
plasty is called "door-to-balloon" time, and
guidelines say this should be 90 minutes or
less. Any delay means more heart damage,
and the risk of dying goes up 42 percent if
care is delayed even half an hour.
Not all hospitals have the capability to
do angioplasty around the clock, so part
of the effort to speed care involved setting
rules for who has to be consulted before
deciding to do the procedure.
The study involved more than 300,000
patients who had an emergency angio-
plasty at hospitals that get Medicare reim-
bursements. The researchers looked at
records from 2005, just before campaigns
to shorten treatment times were launched,
through September 2010.
Only 44 percent were treated in the rec-
ommended time in 2005, but by last year
it was 91 percent.
The National Heart, Lung and Blood


SOUTHERN
N. J ,.ft _'(AN .
Accepting ew patients
Specializing in adult medical car including:


Institute and the Centers for Medicare and
Medicaid Services paid for the study.
"It's not an exaggeration to say that care
of heart attacks in the United States has
been transformed by this improvement,"
said Dr. Christopher Granger, a Duke
University Medical Center cardiologist


who led a Heart Association program to
improve care.
"We've made very important progress
but there still is a lot of unfinished work in
improving heart attack care," such as what
happens before people get to a hospital
where angioplasty is done, he said.


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Story ideas?

Contact
Tim Kirby
Sports Editor
754-0421


Lake City Reporter





SPORTS


Thursday,August 25, 2011


www.lakecityreporter.com


Section B


BRIEFS

YOUTH BASEBALL
Diamond Extreme
tryouts begin
The Diamond Extreme
14-under baseball team
has tryouts set for
6-8 p.m. today, Friday,
Monday and Tuesday
at Southside Recreation
Complex.
For details, call Ros
Golden 288-2920 or
Tracie Brinkley 965-8600.
YOUTH CHEERLEADING
Sign-up today
in Fort White
The Columbia Cheer
Association has
registration from
5:30-7 p.m. today at Fort
White Elementary.
For details, call Wilda
Drawdy at 965-1377.
CHS SWIMMING
Purple/Gold meet
invites alumni
Columbia High's
swim team is hosting
a Purple/Gold swim
meet Saturday and all
alumni are invited to
swim. The public also
is invited to see current
and former swimmers in
action. Warm-ups are at
8:30 a.m., and the meet
begins at 9 a.m.
For details, call
Stephanie Polhamus at
344-7796.-
YOUTH FOOTBALL
Little League
sign-up, camp
Lake City Parks and
Recreation Department's
youth football (ages 8-13)
registration is 8 a.m. to
5 p.m. Saturday at Teen
Town Recreation Center.
A parent or guardian
must accompany the
child and a birth
certificate or copy is
required. Cost is $40
per player and two age
groups are offered:
Junior Midget (8-10) and
Midget (10-13).
Lake City and
Columbia Youth Football
Association are
sponsoring a free
football camp at
Memorial Stadium from
9 a.m. to noon Saturday.
All boys and girls ages
7-14 are eligible to
attend. Lunch will be
provided and each child
will receive a T-shirt.
Registration is 8 a.m.
to 5 p.m. at Teen Town
Recreation Center.
For details, call
Heyward.Christie at
754-3607.
* From staff reports

GAMES

Thursday
Fort White High
football in preseason
game at Episcopal School
of Jacksonville, 7 p.m.
Friday
Columbia High
football in preseason
game at Santa Fe High,
7:30 p.m.


Tigers on for Friday


Columbia faces
Santa Fe in
kickoff classic.
By BRANDON FINLEY
bfinley@lakecityreporter.com
Finally it's go time for"
the Columbia High football
team as the Tigers prepare
to face Santa Fe High at 7:30
p.m. Friday in the annual
kickoff classic.
The two teams-will send
their varsity squads to
action for three quarters
of work before handing off
to the junior varsity in the
final quarter. For Columbia


coach Brian Allen it will be
the first chance to gauge
his Tigers against a team
he's sure will offer a good
measuring stick.
"They bring in Newberry
coach Tommy Keeler and
they'll play very similar to
what we seen in Dunnellon
during the spring game,"
Allen said. "They don't
throw a lot, but they'll run
some bootleg. They'll throw
the go route. They'll run the
toss sweep and they'll mix
in a trick play off that. It's
the same kids they've had,
but in a different system.
Santa Fe has been a little
down, but they might say


we've been a little down.
It should be a good evalu-
ation."
Weather could play a
role in the game as there
were thoughts of moving
the game to today due to
Hurricane Irene off the east
coast. Those thoughts were
squashed and the game will
go on as scheduled.
"There was conversation
about moving it, but we're a
go for Friday," Allen said.
The coach believes it
could be a good opportu-
nity to practice using ele-
ments that might face the
CHS continued on 6B


Bagging


Wolfe's Colorado
hunt for buffalo
to be televised.
By TIM KIRBY
tkirby@lakecityreporter.com
ebecca Wolfe
grew up
hunting, but
she had never
bagged anything
this big.
Wolfe brought down a
1,900-poubd XpRbison
with a single shot at a hunt
in Fairplay, Colo., near
Colorado Springs.
The hunt was sponsored
by High Plains Adventure
Outfitters and will be
featured on the television
series "Primal Instincts."
The show Wilson Bison
Hunt will air at 11:30
a.m. today on the Versus
network and will be
replayed at 9 a.m. Sunday.
Wolfe, 24, lives in Old
Town with her husband,
Brannon Spradley, who is
from Lake City. Wolfe was
born in South Florida and
moved to this area when
.she was 11. She attended
Bell Elementary and
graduated from Melody
Christian Academy in Live
Oak.
Wolfe comes from
a hunting family. Her
BISON continued on 6B


a


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Columbia High's Rakeem Battle (27) finds a hole during a
practice scrimmage on Aug. 9.


bison


COURTESY PHOTO
Rebecca Wolfe shows the bull bison that weighed almost a ton that she killed during a hunt in Colorado. Her hunt will be
featured on the show 'Primal Instincts' at 11:30 a.m. today and 9 a.m. Sunday on Versus network.


Indians kick off tonight


Fort White travels
to Jacksonville to
face Episcopal.
By TIM KIRBY
tkirby@lakecityreporter. corn
FORT WHITE In
what both coaches called
a see-where-we're-at situ-
ation, Fort White High
travels to Episcopal School
of Jacksonville today for a
kickoff classic game.
Kickoff is 7 p.m. for the
game originally scheduled
for Friday.


The teams will play a reg-
ular game with varsity play-
ers, but will go only three
quarters.
The game was moved up
with Hurricane Irene eas-
ing north off the coast of
Florida.
"We're ready to get
started and I'm sure coach
(Demetric Jackson) feels
the same way on the other
side," Episcopal head coach
David Hess said
Hess is entering his sev-
enth year with the Eagles.
His team made the state
playoffs in 2007-08 before


spending the last two
years in a tough district.
Episcopal is now grouped
with Bishop Snyder High,
Providence School and
Trinity Christian Academy
in Jacksonville.
"We're looking forward
to this year," Hess said.
"Alignment helped us and
we have a better opportu-
nity in district."
Dry weather will be a
plus for the Eagles, who air
it out.
"We like to throw it,"
INDIANS continued on 6B


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Fort White High quarterback Andrew Baker hands off the ball
to Terry Calloway during practice on Aug. 11 in Fort White.











LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS THURSDAY, AUGUST 25, 2011


SCOREBOARD


TELEVISION

TV sports

Today
BOXING
II p.m.
FSN Lightweights. Hector Serrano
(13-2-0) vs. Juan Garcia (14-3-0), at Los
Angeles
CYCUNG
4 p.m.
VERSUS -.USA Pro Challenge, sage
3, atVail, Colo.
GOLF
9:30 a.m.
TGC European PGA Tour, Johnnie
Walker =Championship, first round, at
Perthshire, Scotland
I p.m.
TGC USGA, U.S. Amateur
Championship, round of 32 matches, at
rErin,Wls.
3 p.m.
TGC PGA Tour,The Barclays, first
round, at Edison, N.J.
6:30 p.m.
TGC LPGA, Canadian Women's
Open, first- round, at Mirabel, Quebec
'(same-day tape)
LITTLE LEAGUE BASEBALL
4p.m.
ESPN World Series, double
elimination, Hamamatsu City, Japan vs.
Maracay,Venezuela-Mexicall, Mexico loser,
at South Williamsport, Pa.
8 p.m.
ESPN2 -.World Series, double
elimination, Clinton County, Pa. vs. Billings,
Mont.-Huntington Beach, Calif. loser, at
South Willlamsport, Pa.
MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL
I p.m.
MLB Regional coverage, Oakland at
N.Y.Yankees or Detroit at Tampa Bay
2:10 p.m.
WGN -Atlanta at Chicago Cubs
8 p.m.
,MLB -Regional coverage, Boston at
Texas or Pittsburgh at St. Louis
NFL FOOTBALL
8 p.m.
ESPN Preseason, Washington at
Baltimore
PREP FOOTBALL
7 p.m.
FSN Avon Lake (Ohio) at Avon
(Ohio)
TENNIS
I p.m.
ESPN2 ATP World Tour,.Winston-
Salem Open, quarterfinal, at WInston-
Salem, N.C .
3 p.m. I
ESPN2 WTA, New Haven Open,
quarterfinal, at New, Haven, Conn.
12 Midnight
ESPN2 ATP World Tour, Winston-
Salem Open, quartertfinal, at Winston-
Salem, N.C. (same-day tape).

FOOTBALL

NL preseason games'


Carolina at Cincinnati 7 p.m.. -
Cleveland at Philadelphia, 7:30 p.m.
Washington at Baltimore, '8 p.m.
(ES P N ) . ..* --
..' Friday .
St. Louis atKansas Cty, 8 p.m.
Green j3ay at lhdianapolls, 8 'p.m.
(CBS)" s., ,
S Saturday
Jacksonville at Buffalo, 7 p.m,
N.Y. Jets at N.Y. Giants, 7 p.m.
Atlanta at Pittsburgh, 7:30 p.m.
Miami at Tampa Bay, 7:30 p.m.'
New England at Detrolt, 8 p.m. (CBS)
Dallas at Minnesota, 8 p.m.
Houston at San Francisco, 8 p.m..
Chicago atTennessee, 8 p.m.
Seattle at Denver, 9 p.m.
San Diego atArizona, 10 p.m.
Sunday
New Orleans at Oakland, 8 p.m.
(NBC)
WEEK 4
Sept.1
Detroit at Buffalo, 6:30 p.m.
Indianapolis at Cincinnati, 7 p.m.
Baltimore at Atlanta, 7:30 p.m.
St. Louis at Jacksonville, 7:30 p.m.
Dallas at Miami, 7:30 p.m.
SN.Y. Giants at New England, 7:30 p.m.
Philadelphia at N.Y. Jets, 7:30 p.m.
Tampa Bay atWashington, 7:30 p.m.
Pittsburgh at Carolina, 8 p.m.
Cleveland at Chicago, 8 p.m.
Kansas City at Green Bay, 8 p.m.
H ouston at Minnesota, 8 p.m.
Tennessee at New Orleans, 8 p.m.
Denver at Arizona, 10 p.m.
San Francisco at San Diego, 10 p.m.

Oakland at Seattle, 10:30 p.m.

BASEBALL

AL standings.

East Division
W L Pct GB
NewYork 77 49 .611 -
Boston 78 50 .609 -
Tampa Bay 69 58 .543 8'i
Toronto 65 63 .508 13
Baltimore 49 77 .389 28
Central. DMuion
W L Pct GB
Detroit 70 9 .547 -
Cleveland 63 63 .500 6
Chicago 63 64 .496 6'A
Minnesota 55 73 .430 15
Kansas City 53 76 .41 17'.
West Division
W L Pct GB
Texas 74 56 .569 -
Los Angeles 70 59 .543 3/i
Oakland 58 70 .453 15
Seattle 55 73 .430 18
Tuesday's Games
Cleveland 7, Seattle 5. Ist game


Oakland 6, N.Y.Yankees 5
Seattle 12, Cleveland 7,2nd game
KansasCity 6.Toronto 4
Detroit 2,Tampa Bay I
Boston I I,Texas 5
Baltimore 8, Minnesota I
LA.Angels 5, Chicago White Sox 4
Wednesday Games
Seattle 9, Cleveland 2
Boston at Texas (n)
Oakland at N.Y.Yankees (n)
Kansas City atToronto (n)
'Detroit at Tampa Bay (n)


Baltimore at Minnesota (n)
Chicago White Sox at LA.Angels (n)
Today's Games
Oakland (Harden 4-2) at N.YYankees
(RHughes 4-4), 1-05 p.m.
Baltimore (Jo-.Reyes 6-10) at
Minnesota (Uriano 9-9), 1:10 p.m.
Detroit (Fister 5-13) at Tampa Bay
(Hellickson 11-8), 1:10 p.m.
Kansas City (Francis 4-14) at Toronto
(Cecil 4-6), 707 p.m.
Boston (A.Miller 5-1) at Texas
(Ogando 12-5), 8-05 p.m.
Friday's Games
Kansas City at Cleveland, 7:05 p.m.
N.Y.Yankees at Baltimore, 7:05 p.m.
Tampa Bay atToronto, 7:07 p.m.
Oakland at Boston, 7:10 p.m.
LA.Angels at Texas, 8:05 p.m.
Detroit at Minnesota, 8:10 p.m.


Chicago White Sox
10.10 p.m.

NL standings


at Seattle,


East Division
W L Pct GB
Philadelphia 83 44 .654 -
Atlanta 78 52 .600 6%'
Washington 62 65 .488 21
NewYork 60 68 .469 23'A
Florida 57 7i .445 26'%
Central Division
W L Pct GB
Milwaukee 78 53 .595 -
St. Louis 67 62 .519, 10
Cincinnati 63 65 .492 13 i
Pittsburgh 60 68 .469 16'h
Chicago 56 73 .434 21
Houston 42 87 .326 35
West Division
W L Pct GB
Arizona 70 59 .543 -
San Francisco 68 61 .527 2
Colorado 62 68 .477 8'A
San Diego 60 70 .462 10i'
Los Angeles 59 69 .461 10M
Tuesday's Games
Arizona 2,Washington 0
Milwaukee I I,Pittsburgh 4
Philadelphia 9, N.Y.Mets 4
Cincinnati 8, Florida 6
Atlanta 5, Chicago Cubs 4
LA. Dodgers 13, St Louis 2
Colorado 8, Houston 6
San Diego 7, San Francisco 5
Wednesday's Games
Pittsburgh 2, Milwaukee 0
N.Y. Mets 7, Philadelphia 4
LA. Dodgers 9, St. Louis 4
Colorado 7, Houston 6,10 Innings
Cincinnati at Florida, I st game (n)
Arizdna atWashington (n)
Cincinnati at Florida, 2nd game (n)
Atlanta at Chicago Cubs (n)
San Diego at San Francisco (n)
Today's Games
Atlanta (Beachy 6-2) at Chicago Cubs
(Garza 6-9), 2:20 p.m. ,
Arizona (Miley 0-1) at Washington
(Lannan 8-9), 7:05 p.m.
Cincinnati at Florida, ppd., rain
Pittsburgh (Morton 9-6) at St. Louis
(EJackson 2-2),.8:15 p.m. ,
Houston (Sosa 0-2) at San Firancisco

S L Friday's Games ..
Florida at Philadelphia, 7:05 p.m.
Atlanta at N.Y. Mets; 7:10 p.m. '
Washington' at Cincinnati, 7:10 p.m.n
Chicago Cubsat Milwaukee,8:10 p.m..
Pittsburgh at St. Louis, 8:15 p.m.
San Diego at Arizona, 9:40. p.m.
Colorado at LA. Dodgers,"10: 10 p.m.
Houston at San Francisco;.10:I5 p.m.

Hit leaders


Through Tuesday
(x-active y-played-prior to 1901)


Player
I. Pete Rose
2.Ty Cobb
3. Hank ,aron
4. Stan Muslal
5.Tris Speaker
6. CarlYastr iskl
7. y-CapAnson-
8. y-Honus Wagner
S9Paul Molitor
10. Eddie Collins
I I.Willie Mays -
12. Eddie Murray
13. y-NapLtajoie'
14. Cal Ripken
15. George Brett
16. Paul Waner
17. Robin Yount
18.Tony Gwynn
19. Dave Winfield
20. Craig Biggio
21. Rickey Henderson
22. Rod Carew
22.x-Derek jeter
' 24. Lou Brock
25. Rafael Palmeiro
26.Wade Boggs.


Hits
4,256
4,191
3,771
3,630
3,514
3,419
3,418
3,415
3,319.
3,315
3,283'
3,255
3,242
3,184
3,154
3,152
3,142
3,141
3,110
3,060
3,055
3,053
3,053
3,023
3,020
3,010


Baseball calendar

Sept. I Active rosters expand to
40 players.
Sept. 30 or Oct. I Playoffs begin.




Unscramble these four Jumbles,
one letter to each square,
to form four ordinary words. _




@2011 Tribune Media Services, Inc. 'E
All Rights Reserved.

SAFHL-



U.
RNWIYE




RDAAEP _
TT7 ? *~*
__ __^^ ^S^ ._


Oct. 19 -World Series begins, city of
NL champion.

Little League

WORLD SERIES
At S6uth Williamsport, Pa.
UNITED STATES
GREAT LAKES, LaGrange, Kent.; MID-
ATLANTIC,ClintonCounty.Pa.;MIDWEST,
Rapid City, S.D.; NEW ENGLAND,
Cumberland, R.I.; NORTHWEST, Billings,
Mont.; SOUTHEAST, Warner Robins,
Ga.; SOUTHWEST, Lafayette, La. WEST,
Huntington Beach, Calif.
INTERNATIONAL *
ASIA-PACIFIC, Kaohsiung. Taiwan;
CANADA, Langley, British Columbia;
CARIBBEAN, Oranjestad, Aruba;
EUROPE, Rotterdam, Netherlands;JAPAN,
Hamamatsu City; LATIN AMERICA,
Maracay,Vepezuela; MEA, Dhahran, Saudi
Arabia; MEXICO, Mexicali.
Tuesday
Cumberland, R.I. 8, Rotterdam,
Netherlands 7
Hamamatsu City, Japan 4, Langley,
British Columbia 0, Langley eliminated
Clinton County, Pa. 7,Warner Robins,
Ga. 5,Warner Robins eliminated
Wednesday
Game 23 Maracay, Venezuela vs.
Mexicali, Mexico (n)
Game 24 Billings, Mont. vs.
Huntington Beach, Calif. (n)
Today
Game 25 Hamamatsu City, Japan vs.
Game 23 loser, 4 p.m.
,Game 26 Clinton County, Pa. vs.
Game 24 loser, 8 p.m.


BASKETBALL

WNBA schedule

Tuesday's Games
Los Angeles 86,Washington 82, OT
Atlanta 83, Chicago 80
Minnesota 78,Tulsa 72
New York 74, Phoenix 70
Seattle 63,.San Antonio 55
Thursday's Gaime
Tulsa at Seattle, 10 p.m.
Friday's Games
Phoenix at Connecticut, 7:30 p.m.
San Antonio at Minnesota, 8 p.m.
Washington at Chicago, 8:30 p.m.
Tulsa at Los Angeles, 10:30 p.m.

AUTO RACING

Race week

NASCAR
SPRINT CUP
IRWIN TOOLS NIGHT RACE
Site: Bristol,Tenn.
Schedule: Friday, practice (Speed,
noon-3:30' p.m.), qualifying (ESPN,
5-6:30 p.m); Saturday, race, 7:30 p.m.
(ABC,7-10p.m.. m ,
Track .B-istol Motor Spedway (oval,,
0,533 rniles(: ..
-thface.distance:600 lapst266.5niileas. S
Next face: AdvoCare 500, Sept. 4,
Atlanta Motor Speedway, Hampton, Ga.
Online: http://www.noscar.com
-NATIONWIDE
FOORCITY 250 .
SSite: Bristor.Tenn..'
.Schedule: Friday, practice (Speed, 9:30-
11 .:30 a.m.), qualifying(Speed, 3:30-5 p.m.),
Srace, 7:30 p.m. (ESPN, 7-10 p.m.).
Track Bristol Motor. Speedway.
Race distance: 250 laps, 133.25 miles.
Next race: Great Clips 300, Sept. 3,
Atlanta Motor Speedway, Hampton, Ga.
CAMPING WORLD TRUCKS
Next race:Atla 200, Sept 2,Aanta
Motor Speedway, Hampton, Ga.
INDYCAR
INDY GRAND PRIX OF SONOMA
Site: Sonoma, Calif.
Schedule: Friday, practice; Saturday,
practice, qualifying (Versus, 6-7 p.m.);
Sunday, race, 4:45 p.m. (Versus, 4-7 p.m.).
Track Infineon Raceway (road course,
2.303 miles).
Race distance: 172.725-miles,.75 laps.
Next race: Baltimore Grand Prix, Sept.
4, Streets of Baltimore, Baltimore.
Online: http://www.indycor.com
FORMULA ONE
BELGIAN GRAND PRIX
Site: Spa-Francorchamps, Belgium.
Schedule: Friday, practice (Speed,
8-9:30 a.m.), Saturday, practice, qualifying
(Speed, 8-9:30 a.m.); Sunday, race, 8 a.m.
(Speed, 7:30-10 a.m., 3:30-7 p.m.).
Track: Spa-Francorchamps (road
course, 4.35 miles).
Race distance: 191.415 miles, 44 laps.
Next race: Italian Grand Prix, Sept. II,
Autodromo Nazionale di Monza, Monza,
Italy.
Online: http://www.formulao I.com
NHRA FULL THROTTLE
Next event U.S. Nationals, Aug. 31-
Sept. 5, Lucas Oil Raceway, Clermont, Ind.
Online: http://www.nhm.com

THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME
by David L. Hoyt and Jeff Knurek


PE5PTFE WHAT THEY
LOOK LIKE, CURTANS5
IN JUMLE CARTOONS
ARE THS.
Now arrange the circled letters
to form the surprise answer, as
suggested by the above cartoon.


Ans:' 111 IL11 11

(Answers tomorrow)
Yesterday's Jumbles: CLIMB DRAFT GOSSIP GOALIE
I Answer: The Olympic runner liked to remember the --
GOOD TIMES


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Florida State fans cheer on the Seminoles against the University of Florida last season.




Seminoles gearing down


for opener to stay healthy


By BRENT KALLESTAD junior EJ Manuel at quar-
Associated Press terback, but several start-
ing positions including
TALLAHASSEE running back and tight end
Florida State coach Jimbo' were still unsettled after
Fisher switched. his atten- Tuesday's final scrimmage.
tion Wednesday to the Freshman Nick O'Leary
season's first opponent was pushing the veterans at
after one final glance at his tight end before being idled
team's last scrimmage of with a shoulder injury.
the preseason, With last year's leading,
Fisher and the sixth- rusher Chris Thompson.
ranked Seminoles could missing most of the pre-
.be without their lead- season preparation with
'ing rusher and possibly back issues, seniors
a veteran -offensive line- Jermaine Thomas and Ty
man or two for the Sept. 3 Jones are likely to share
opener against Louisiana- most of the load at tailback
'Moiroe. to start the season.
"It's game week now," Both are veterans and
Fisher said after the Thomas was the starter
Seminoles: finished their before an injury slowed
second team scrimmage. him enough for Thompson
"It's time togo." to grab the starting assign-
Most. starting positions ment last season. Thomas;
have been .1oked, up, bai.t-~owever,, ranks niinth all-
injuries cold lead to a cou-.. time, at Florida State with
pl.e of changes. 1. .. i8 rushing touchdowns and
"There are guys 'that is 13th on the career charts
we'll have to .bring along with 1,804 rushing yards.
as.Ve go for depth,"'Fisher Jones has produced 877
said, adding that the. last yards and 11 touchdowns.
scrimmage would help Freshmen James Wilder
give him "a pretty good and Devonta Freeman are
indication" of wh4 would in the wings..
be ready to help against And then there's a chance
Louisiana-Monroe, : Thompson improves
The' .second-year head enough to return.
coach '!J.ng ago settled on "He's a tough kid," Fisher


ACRGOS$ 37 Dividing point
n' a - Answerr


1 Laugh pro-
voker
6 .Arizona city
10 Sizzling (hyph.)
12 Solitude enjoy-
ers
14 Think
15 Deep blue
16 Surrounded
18 Clark or
Orbison
19 Polish
21 "The Clan of
the Cave Bear"
author
23 Knows how
24 "Westworld"
name
26 Posterior
29 St. Louis land-
mark
31 West (life
vest)
.33 Years and
years
35 Lox locale i
36 Email senders


38 Earl Biggers
40 Scot's cap
42 'Light beam
43 Garr or
Hatcher
45 Slippery - eel
47 UPS units
50 Lacking occu-
pants
52 Condor nests
54 Tiara
58 Short snooze
59 Glamour
60 Salt, to a
chemist
61 Put on guard

DOWN

1 Dernier -
2 Went first
3 Pindar forte
4 Quay.
5 Inform
6 Over-there
7 Sturm Drang
8 Israel's Golda


said. "It's a matter of how
much pain can he take."
Senior left tackle Andrew
Datko, one of the nation's
top pass protectors, played
through a shoulder injury
much of last season and is
expected to be ready for
the opener despite missing
some practice time.
"We can't play without
Datko," Fisher said about
his prized tackle. "We'll
give him some rest I mean,
what's he got to prove out
here?"
The Seminoles, who fin-
ished 10-4 last year, have
also taken it easy with senior
guard David Spurlock, who
has been troubled with
concussions, and senior
right tackle Zebrie Sanders
(groin pull) during much of
their August drills.
"You -ain't helping the
cause if you're playing
them when they're hurt,"
Fisher said.
The depth on the offen-
sive line ,was reduced
at the beginning of fall
practice when tight end
Tank Sessions, guard
Blake Snider and tackle
Rhonne Sanderson, were
declared medically ineli-
gible with career-ending
injuries.


to Previous Puzzle


H7AP Y "BOLLS
GAL OREE WETTER
UNOPEN ANODES





R EOX 1 E RUT
ELI MT LANOM S
RAME IC EE
E I IN AT


LE L KAL I


9 Medea sailed on
her
11 Decimal base
12 In of
13 Sauce in a wok
17 Interstellar


Want more puzzles?
Check out the "Just Right Crossword Puzzles" books
at QuillDriverBooks.com


8-25


19 Unveiled
20 Cousin's dad
22 Lettuce piece
23 Two-timer
25 Foul-ball caller
27 Socrates'
hangout
28 Broadcast
again
30 Al the trum-
peter
32 NASA coun-
terpart
34 Where to see
stars
39 Bring to light
41 Kind of folder
44 Grate upon
46 Horse's digs
47 Fond du -
48 Burrito morsel
49 Mex. miss
51 Oklahoma
town
53 Corporate
ending
55 Up for pay-
ment
56 Do the wrong
thing
57 Was intro-
duced to


2011 UFS, Dist. by Univ. Uclick for UFS


Page Editor: Brandon Finley, 754-0420


I lllw I









Page Editor: Emogene Graham, 754-0415 LAKE CITY REPORTER ADVICE & COMICS THURSDAY, AUGUST 25, 2011 3B


DILBERT
CUSTOMER MEETING


BABY BLUES


BLONDIE


BEETLE BAILEY


HAGAR THE HORRIBLE


DEAR ABBY


Modern brides' trip to alter

is crowded with relatives


IF I MAY CORRECT |
WHAT DILBERT JUST
SAID, I'M SURE IT
WOULD BE EASY TO
MAKE THOSE CHANGES.

I __ ^^^ 8


8
S YOU IGNORANT,
BACKSTABBING
z fSON OF A BEACH
E ^- BALL.


_________________1-CI9I-


HOROSCOPES


SNUFFY SMITH


ZITS


GARFIELD


B.C.


FRANK & ERNEST


I. fOUNp THOv/WING YOUR~EF ON
/ TH M~~T Y OF TH6 ,
COURT t>O6N'T
GTYOUOUT
S OF JURY
/ An DUTY!. i


ARIES (MARCH 21-
APRIL 19): Don't make
unnecessary alterations
in your life. Ifs important
to keep things flowing.
Problems at home will
escalate if you get into a
shouting match. Do what-
ever you can to ensure that
the job you do leaves no
room for criticism. **
TAURUS (April 20-May
20): Do something that will
mellow you out or make
you feel good about your-
self. Romance is in a high
cycle. If you are single,
engage in activities condu-
cive to meeting someone
special. If you are in a rela-
tionship, make plans for
two. ****
GEMINI (May 21-June
20): Get in touch with'
someone who has been on
your mind. Ifs best to find
out firsthand whether you
should be dwelling on the
past instead of moving for-
ward. Attending a reunion
or revisiting old ideas,
places or friends will help
you rethink your future.

CANCER (June 21-July
22): Emotions will sur-
face, and sensitivity will
mount Don't let anything
or anyone get to you. It's
all about focus and refus-
ing to let the little things
.bother you. Helping others
will allow you to view your
own situation with greater
objectivity. ***


THE LAST WORD
Eugenia Last

LEO (July 23-Aug. 22):
Changes dueto situations
beyond your control must
be looked at carefully. You
may need an outsider's
advice. You can make
professional gains if you
are practical and realistic.
A new direction will be a
refreshing change. ***
VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept
22): Getting together with
familiar faces will lead to
benefits and renewed feel-
ings, plans and expecta-
tions. Changes with regard
to your current living
arrangements are appar-
ent Do the right thing and
avoid opposition. ****
LIBRA (Sept 23-Oct.
22): Proceed with caution,
Don't let your emotions
overwhelm you at work.
You can make promises as
long as they are realistic
and easy for you to honor.
Once you have reached
your goals, you will be able
to help others. **
SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov.
21): Your drive, determina-
tion and convincing way
of dealing with others will
help you get your way.
A trip that allows you to
talk to someone face-to-
face will help your project
move along much faster.
Set aside time to celebrate
your gains with someone
special. *****


SAGITTARIUS (Nov.
22-Dec. 21): A stubborn
attitude will not help you
get your way. You will
have..tohe upfront about
the way you feel and, our

will be in jeopardy if you
try to avoid issues or go
behind his or her back.
Take care of old business
before you start some-
thing new. ***
CAPRICORN (Dec.
22-Jan. 19): Don't procras-
tinate. A contract or settle-
ment can lead to greater
financial freedom. Take a
closer look at a partner-
ship that has the potential
to help you achieve your
personal or professional
goals. Love is in the stars.

AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-
Feb. 18): You need to
stimulate your mind and
be creative. A change at
home will help you devel-
op a way to increase your
assets. Make a deal, and
you will be able to stabilize
your situation and build a
better future. ***
PISCES (Feb. 19-March
20): Accommodating oth-
ers doesn't have to mean
giving in. Stipulate what
you want in return, and
you can build an equal
partnership that can
benefit all involved. Love
and romance should be
included in your agenda.
4*4**4*


CELEBRITY CIPHER


by Luis Campos
Celebrity Cipher cryptograms are created from quotations by famous people, past and present.
Each letter in the cipher stands for another.
TODAY'S CLUE: I equals G
"GBJGKN RPUGZ GAR, NYSSE YMIYUP
EYGA KSD TASJ KSD OGA RS... EPK
ES VU VUEEUP EYGA KSDPNUBW."
- J M B B M GZ WGDBTAUP

PREVIOUS SOLUTION: "I love giving gifts... if it's a really good gift, I love
receiving it, like jewels, small islands." Gina Gershon

(c) 2011 by NEA, Inc. 8-25


FOR BETTER OR WORSE
| I( S E3 LHErUIRN FE...[ YF_.yoU PUT RLOi/
Slaa O UFF yto _AGq L) N
M RDFi MIFID nn~uRFIGIN ANYWAfY
Iu I YCLEANOFMY E Y F
K d /DL)MBFWOM! YEA"


CLASSIC PEANUTS


ARE YOU
SAYING
SOME-
THING
INSIDENO
YOUR .
HEAD? DIE


DEAR ABBY: A young
bride-to-be who signed her
letter "Touchy Decision
in Ohio" (June 18) pre-
fers her stepdad walk her
down the aisle at her wed-
ding, but is worried about
what her biological father
(whom she sees once or
twice a year) and other
relatives might think.
In my many decades
on this earth, especially
during the last 10 or 15
years, I have seen all sorts
of changes in wedding
etiquette, including the
customs governing who
walks down the aisle. In
addition to fathers escort-
ing daughters, I've seen
brothers escort sisters and
children walk their mother
to the altar. In "Ohio's" case,
the logical solution, and the
more appropriate one, to
me, would be to have both
gentlemen escort her down
the aisle, one on either side.
What could be lovelier?
The bride-to-be should
consider that the hurt feel-
ings that often crop up on
sensitive occasions such
as this, if not attended to
beforehand, can tarnish
the memory of the event
in the minds of loved ones
forever. BARB H. IN
SPRINGFIELD, MASS.
DEAR BARB: Thank you
for your response. Opinions
regarding "Ohio's" letter
are numerous and varied.
A majority of those I heard
from agree with your sugges-
tion that both dads share the


Abigail Van Buren
www.dearabby.com
task. However, others viewed
it differently. My newspaper
readers' comment
DEAR ABBY: If the bio-
logical father wanted to be
a part of his daughter's life
he should have made more
of an effort to be there
for her. The stepdad no
doubt put up with all the
growing pains associated
with raising a teenager
as well as other parent-
ing challenges. These
are the prerequisites for
walking a daughter down
the aisle. Although most
males can father a child,
not all of them can truly be
a FATHER. STEPDAD
TO A WONDERFUL
DAUGHTER
DEAR ABBY: I can't
believe how ignorant,
uncaring and selfish a bride
would be to dump her dad
on her wedding day.
Ladies, unless your father
is a total loser who was
absent, a drunk, a jailbird,
an addict or a deadbeat,
walking you down the aisle
is HIS privilege no one
else's. It also shouldn't be
based on how much money
he was able or willing to
fork over for the wedding.


This is the day a real man
and father has looked for-
ward to since the day you
were born.
And to any man who is
asked to escort a bride
down the aisle: Before
agreeing, ask what her
situation is with her father.
You may be taking a
spot you don't deserve. -
MARY IN OHIO
* DEAR ABBY: My
daughter wanted her step-
father AND her biological
father to be part of her
wedding. So her stepdad
(my husband) walked her
down the aisle to where I
was sitting in the first row.
I stood up, gave her my
handkerchief and kissed
her cheek. Then her father
stepped out from the row
behind me, and her step-
dad handed her over to
her father, who walked her
the rest of the way to the
altar and gave her away.
Everyone was happy with
this amicable solution. -
JOYCE IN ALABAMA
DEARABBY: I was in
the same situation at my
wedding, My solution was
to have my stepfather walk
me down the aisle and
my father do the father/
daughter dance. That way
both men were acknowl-
edged and each one given
his special time. KATHY
IN NEW ENGLAND
* Write Dear Abby at
www.DearAbby.com or
P.O. Box 69440, Los
Angeles, CA 90069.











LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED THURSDAY. AUGUST 25, 2011

Lake City Reporter





CLASSIFIED


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Classified Department: 755-5440


Take ADvantage of the
Reporter Classifieds!

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[proa Mrhnis7


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ing only. -
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You can call us at 755-5440,
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a.m, to 5:00 p.m.
Some people prefer to place their
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ad categories will require prepay-
ment. Our office is located at 180
East Duval Street. *
You can also fax or email your ad
copy to the Reporter. ,
FAX: 386-752-9400 Please
direct your copy to the Classified
Department.
EMAIL: classifieds@lakecityre-
porter.com'





Ad s toApo a Call by: Fax/Emall by:
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Thursday Wed., 1H &a.m. Wed., 00 a.m.
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These deadlines are subject to change without notice.




Ad Errors- Please read your ad
on the first day of publication.
We accept responsibility for only
the first Incorrect Insertion, and
only the charge for the ad space
In error. Please call 755-5440
Immediately for prompt correc-
tion and billing adjustments.
Cancellations- Normal advertising
deadlines apply for cancellation.
Billing Inquiries- Call 755-5440.
Should further information be
required regarding payments or
credit limits, your call will be trans-
ferred to the accounting depart-
ment.


Advertising copy is subject to
approval by the Publisher who
reserves the right to edit, reject,
or classify all advertisements under
appropriate headings. Copy should
be checked for errors by the
advertiser on the first day of pub-
lication. Credit for published errors
will be allowed for the first insertion
for that portion of the advertisement
which was incorrect. Further, the
Publisher shall not be liable for any
omission of advertisements ordered
to be published, nor for any general,
special or consequential damages.
Advertising language must comply
with Federal, State or local laws
regarding the prohibition of discrimi-
nation in employment, housing and
public accommodations. Standard
abbreviations are acceptable; how-
ever, the first word of each ad may
not be abbreviated.

In Print and Online
www.lakecityreporter.com


Legal

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE 3RD JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN
AND FOR COLUMBIA COUNTY,
FLORIDA
CIVIL DIVISION
CASE NO.: 11-243-CA
RONALD D. POOLE
Plaintiff,
vs.
LUCYS N. PORRO,
ANY AND ALL UNKNOWN PAR-
TIES CLAIMING BY, THROUGH,
UNDER, AND AGAINST THE
HEREIN NAMED
DEFENDANTS) WHO ARE NOT
KNOWN TO BE DEAD OR
ALIVE, WHETHER SAID UN-
KNOWN PARTIES MAY CLAIM
AN INTEREST AS SPOUSES,
HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES
OR OTHER CLAIMANTS
Defendant
NOTICE OF ACTION
TO: LUCYS N. PORRO, and any
and all unknown parties claiming
by,, through, under, and against the
herein named defendants) who are
not known to be dead or alive,
whether said unknown parties may
claim an interest as spouses, heirs,
devisees, grantees or other claimants.
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action
for Foreclosure of Mortgage on the
following described property: THE
NORTH 1/2 OF THE NORTH 1/2
OF THE SOUTH 1/2 OF THE
SOUTHWEST 1/4 OF THE
SOUTHWEST 1/4 OF SECTION
21, TOWNSHIP 2 SOUTH, RANGE
16 EAST, PUBLIC RECORDS OF
COLUMBIA COUNTY, FLORIDA.
has been filed against you and you
are required to serve a copy of your
defenses, if any, to it on Branden
Strickland, Strickland Law Firm, PL,
3132 Ponce De Leon Blvd, Coral
Gables, FL 33134, within thirty days
after the first publication of this no-
tice and file the original with the
Clerk of this Court either before
service on Plaintiff's attorney or im-
mediately thereafter; otherwise a de-
fault will be entered against you for
the relief demanded in the complaint.
WITNESS my hand and the seal of
this Court this 17 day of August,
2011.
P. DeWitt Cason
As Clerk of the Circuit Court
By:/s/ B. Scippio
As Deputy Clerk
05527443
August 25, 2011
September 1, 2011
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
THIRD JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN
AND FOR COLUMBIA COUNTY,
FLORIDA
Case No.: 2011-768-DR
Division:
KAREN JOY NELMES,
Petitioner .
and
TIMOTHY M. NELMES,
Respondent
NOTICE OF ACTION FOR PUBLI-
CATION
TO: Timothy M. Nelmes
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action
for Dissolution of Marriage, includ-
ing claims for dissolution of mar-
riage, payment of debts, division of
real and personal property, and for
payments of support, has been filed
against you. You are required to
serve a copy of your written defens-
es, if any, to this action on Stephen
M. Witt, Petitioner's attorney, whose
address is PO Box 2064, Lake City,
Florida 32056, on or before Septem-
ber 8, 2011, and file the original with
the clerk of this court at Columbia
County Courthouse, 135 N. Hernan-
do St., Lake City, Florida 32055, ei-
ther before service on Petitioner's at-
torney or immediately thereafter,
otherwise a default will be entered
against you for the relief demanded
* in the petition.
WARNING: Rule 12.285, Florida
Family Law Rules of Procedure, re-
quired certain automatic disclosure
of documents and information. Fail-
ure to comply can result in sanctions,
including dismissal or striking of
pleadings.
DATED this 10th day of August,
2011
CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT
By:/s/ Trish Brewington
Deputy Clerk
(seal)
05527320
August 18, 25, 2011
September 1, 8, 2011
Registration of Fictitious Names
We the undersigned, being duly
sworn, do hereby declare under oath
that the names of all persons interest-
ed in the business or profession car-
ried on under the name of MR. TAXI
at 566 ARLINGTON BLVD. SUITE
105., LAKE CITY, FL., 32055

Contact Phone Number: 386-984-
0101 and the extent of the interest of
each, is as follows:
Name: Mayfields Empirer, Inc.
Extent of Interest: 100%
by:/s/ DARLENE STEWART
STATE OF FLORIDA
COUNTY OF COLUMBIA
Sworn to and subscribed before me
this 22nd day of August, A.D. 2011.
by:/s/ KATHLEEN A. RIOTTO

05527463
August 25, 2011








Lawn & Landscape Service

J&M LAWN Service & more for
all your outdoor needs. Don't
waste your time or weekend,
Free Estimate. 386-984-2187

Services


Legal


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT, THI
JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND F
COLUMBIA COUNTY, FLORID
CASE NO. 10-470-CA
ELLISVILLE INVESTMENT
INC.,
Plaintiff,
vs.
NKRP, INC., a Florida corporate(
KUSH B. PATHAK and NIMISH
PATHAK,. Husband and Wife, S,
KALCHAND S. PATEL, and LI
ECHEVERRI, EXECUTIVE
RECTOR, DEPARTMENT
REVENUE, STATE OF FLORID.
Defendants.
CLERK'S NOTICE OF SALE U1
DER F.S. CHAPTER 45
NOTICE IS GIVEN that, in accc
ance with the Summary Final Ju
ment of Foreclosure dated Aug
18, 2011, in the above-styled cause
will sell to the highest and best 1
der for cash at the Columbia Cou
Courthouse, Courtroom 1,
Northeast Hemrnando Avenue, L
City, Florida 32055 at 11:00 a.m.
September 21, 2011, the follow
described property:
TOWNSHIP 6 SOUTH RAN
17 EAST
SECTION 3: COMMENCE
THE NORTHEAST CORNER
SECTION 3, TOWNSHIP
SOUTH, RANGE 17 EAST,- (
LUMBIA COUNTY, FLORID
AND RUN THENCE S 0"52'01
ALONG THE EAST LINE
SAID SECTION 3, 1748.50 FEE
THENCE S 55"17'59" W, 1515
FEET TO THE EAST RIGHT-(
WAY LINE OF STATE ROAD N
25 (U.S. HWY. 41 AND 44
THENCE N 0'56'01" W ALO:
SAID EAST RIGHT-OF-W
LINE, 12.97 FEET TO THE POI
OF BEGINNING; THENCE CC
TINUE N 0'56'01" W ALO:
SAID EAST RIGHT-OF-W
LINE, 147.00 FEET; THENCE
89'03'59" E, 200.00 FE
THENCE N 0'56'01" W 453
FEET; THENCE S 84-56'31"
480.60 FEET TO THE POINT
CURVE OF A CURVE CONCA
TO THE RIGHT HAVING A R
DIUS OF 1577.0 FEET AND A 1
TAL. CENTRAL ANGLE
9'23'21"; THENCE SOUTHEA
TERLY ALONG THE ARC
SAID CURVE 221.39 FEET, SA
ARC HAVING A CHORD. D
ANCE OF 221.20 FEET AND
CHORD BEARING OF S 81 "02'0
E; THENCE S 5517'59" W 494
FEET; THENCE S 0' 56'01"
237.35 FEET; THENCE S
03'59" W 485.0 FEET TO T
POINT OF BEGINNING.
ALSO: A NON-EXCLUSIVE PI
PETUAL EASEMENT OVER A]
ACROSS A 20-FOOT DRIVE
AS MORE PARTICULARLY I
SCRIBED AS FOLLOWS:
TOWNSHIP 6 SOUTH RAN
17 EAST
SECTION 3: COMMENCE
THE NORTHEAST CORNER
SECTION 3, TOWNSHIP
SOUTH, RANGE 17 EAST, ,(
LUMBIA COUNTY, FLORIE
AND RUN THENCE S 0'52'01'
ALONG THE EAST LINE
SAID SECTION 3, 1748.50 FE]
THENCE S 55'17'59" W, 1515
FEET TO THE EAST RIGHT-(
WAY LINE OF STATE ROAD I'
25 (U.S. HWY. 41 AND 44
THENCE N 0'56'01" W ALO]
SAID EAST RIGHT-OF-W
LINE, 12.97 FEET; THENCE CC
TINUE N 056'01" W ALO]
SAID EAST RIGHT-OF-W
LINE, 147.00 FEET; THENCE
89-03'59" E, 20.00 FEET TO T
POINT OF BEGINNING; THEN
N 0'56'01" W 110.98 FE]
THENCE S 89'03'59" W 20.0 FE
TO THE EAST RIGHT-OF-W
LINE OF U.S. 441; THENCE
0"56'01" W ALONG SAID EA
RIGHT-OF-WAY LINE 20.0 FE]
THENCE N 89'03'59" E 40.0 FE]
THENCE S 0'56'01" E 130
FEET; THENCE S 8903'59"
20.00 FEET TO THE POINT
BEGINNING.
ANY PERSON CLAIMING AN:
TEREST IN THE SURPLUS FR(
THE SALE, IF ANY, OTH
THAN THE PROPERTY OWN
AS OF THE DATE OF THE I
PENDENS MUST FILE A CLA
WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER T
SALE.
Dated August 19, 2011
P. DeWitt Cason
Clerk of Court
By:/s/ P.A. Perry
Deputy Clerk
05527438
August 25, 2011
September 1, 2011


060 Services

RESIDENTIAL
HOUSECLEANING
Excellent Work, Dependable,
Low Rates. Call 386-688-1018

100 Job
100 Opportunities

05527437
The Third Judicial Circuit
currently has the following
position available:
User Support Analyst,
Lake City
For more information go to:
www.jud3.flcourts.org
AVON!! Only $10 to start!
Earn bonus $ up to $150+
1-800-275-9945 pin #4206
www.youravon.com/tdavies

Crew Leader Small engine
experience & Class A CDL.
Mechanical skills helpful.
EEO Employer, Benefits offered,
Call Katie 386-755-4328
Florist needed! Looking for a part
time employee who has previously
worked in a flower shop & knows
the day to day routine. 755-8798
Green Acres Learning Center
seeking childcare employee with
CDA, Apply in person 1126 SW
Main Blvd. No Phone Calls!!


100 Job
S Opportunities
Heavy Equipment Operator need-
ed. Must have mechanical skills &
experience in fencing. Serious
inquires only. 386-623.3200
Mechanic needed for Truck shop,
must have own tools, apply
Southern Specialized, 1812 NW
Main Blvd., 386-752-9754
NEED CNC Machinist
Must have Metal Working
Machine Shop exp. Send resume,
Quality Mill, 3631 US Hwy. 90
East, Lake City, FL 32055.
05526800
Earn Extra Money
Deliver the new AT&T Real
Yellow Pages
in the Lake City area. FT/PT,
daily work, quick pay, must be
18 yrs+, have drivers
license & insured vehicle.
(800) 422-1955 Ext. 1
8:OOA-4:30P Mon-Fri

Security Officers needed. Lake
City & Live Oak area, must have
current D Security Lic., Clear
background, Drivers Lic, phone,
Diploma/GED. Benefits, DFWP
EEO Must Apply at:
www.dsisecurity.com MB 1000084
TWO EXPERIENCED Drivers
from Lake City to
Augusta, Maine.
Call 386-719-8872
Veterinarian Assist/Technician
needed. Exp desired. Must be able
to work flexible schedule & Sat.
mornings. Apply at Columbia
Animal Hospital 2418 S. Marion
Ave. Lake City. No phone calls.
Weekend Office Manager
Detailed and People oriented.
Excellent customer service &
phone skills. Duties include:
Storage & UHaul Rentals. $9.00 -
$11.00/hr based on exp. Drop off
resume between 4pm & 6pm Mon
Fri @,Mini Storage & Record
Storage of Lake City. 442 SW
Saint Margaret Street, Lake City

120 Medi"
120 Employment

05527328
LEARN TO DRAW BLOOD
Local Phlebotomy Course
offered in Lake City, FLA
Certificate program.
(904)566-1328

CLINICAL
RESOURCE MANAGER FT.
Qualifications, registered nurse
With min. of 3 years exp. Previous
homecare and coding experience.
preferred. Will provide training for
qualified applicant, contact -
Jeff Tyre, Branch Director
386-628-9352 can fax resumes to
386-628-9364.
Counselor for substance abuse
program in Baker Correctional In-
stitution. BA w/2yrs exp., M-F day
shift F/T, $30,000 to start, E-mail
resume to sheliarand@aol.com.or
fax to 386-752-2387
RN/LPN needed Apply online
wWw.3dstaffmngnow.com or
call 3D Staffing 386-752-1244
322 S. Marion Ave. Lake City, FL
RN's needed, Med Surg/Psych
Exp. to work in local hospitals.
Immediate work, instant pay,
$300 sign-on bonus.
Call 352-336-0964.
www.suwanneemedical.com

2400 Schools &
240 Education

05527283
Interested in a Medical Career?
Express Training offers
courses for beginners & exp
Nursing Assistant, $479
next class-08/22/10

Phlebotomy national certifica-
tion, $800 next class-10/10/11

Continuing education
Fees incl. books, supplies, exam
fees. Call 386-755-4401 or
expresstrainingservices.com


310 Pets & Supplies


FREE KITTENS
to good homes.
386-623-3202

PERSIAN KITTEN
8 week old. Pure white male.
$400. negotiable.
386-935-1888
PUBLISHER'S NOTE
Florida Law 828.29 requires dogs
and cats being sold to be at least 8
weeks old and have a health
certificate from a licensed
veterinarian documenting they
have mandatory shots and are
free from intestinal and external
parasites. Many species of wild-
life must be licensed by Florida
Fish and Wildlife. If you are
unsure, contact the local
office for information.


361 Farm Equipment

84 Ford 4610 Tractor.
2WD, Solid
2005 motor,$7,500. OBO
386-867-0005


402 Appliances

FROST FREE refrigerator.
Very clean. Works good. White,
18cuft. $175. obo.
386-292-3927
Glo Warm Gas heater.
25,000 BTU. 26"x28"
$175. obo
386-292-3927


407 Computers

HP Computer,
$80.00
386-755-9984 or
386-292-2170


420 Wanted to Buy

K&H TIMBER
We Buy Pine Hardwood &
Cypress. Large or small tracts.
Call 386-961-1961.

Wanted Junk Cars, Trucks, Vans.
$275 & up CASH! Free Pick Up!
NO title needed !386-878-9260
After 5pm 386- 752-3648.


430 Garage Sales

PUBLISHER'S NOTE
All Yard Sale Ads
Must be Pre-Paid.


SAT. 8/27, 8-?, 194 S.W.
Callaway Dr., off CR 247, furni-
ture, appliances, household items,
clothes, books, lots of misc.


440 Miscellaneous

AC Window unit.
$85. obo
386-292-3927


Life Span R2 peddling exercise
machine w/computer. Comfy large
seat. (expensive machine) $75.00.
386-292-3927


Microwave.
$25.00
386-292-3927


Stop gnat & Mosquito bites! Buy
Swamp Gator All natural insect re-
pellent. Family safe. Use head to
toe. Available at The Home Depot.
Summer Barbecue Special
Tow Behind
Grill/Smoker, $1,250 OBO.
386-719-4802

450 Good Things
450 toEat
GREEN PEANUTS For Sale
Valencia. Graded and washed.
$30.00 a bushel.
386-752-3434


460 Firewood
Firewood for Sale. $65. per Truck
Load. Rick 386-867-1039 or Joey
965-0288 if no answer pls leave
message we will call you .back.

630h Mobile Homes
630 for Rent
2&3 BR MH. $395 $650. mo..
plus deposit. Water & sewer fur-
nished. Cannon Creek MHP
386-752-6422

2/2 Units, clean, well maintained,
nice safe park setting, 2 miles to
downtown Lake City, $575 month
+ $575 sec dep, 386-984-8448
13th Month FREE!!

3/2 Large MH, small park, near
FGCC, Small pets ok, $500 dep
$575 mo w/12 mo lease
386-752-1971 or 352-281-2450
3/2.5 S of Lake City, (Branford
area) $600 rho plus security
386-590-0642 or 386-867-1833
www.suwanneevalleyproperties.com
LG clean 3br's $450. -$650. mo. +
dep. Also, 2br mobile home's
available. No Pets.
5 Points area. 386-961-1482
Mobile Homes for rent in
White Springs, Lake City & Ft.
White. Contact 386-623-3404
or 386-397-2779
New 2br/2ba off Country Club. 1/2
ac. lot Ffont, back porch & storage
bldg. $650 mo. $650 sec. No Pets!
386-752-5911 or 466-2266

6A4 Mobile Homes
640 for Sale

05527374
!!ATTENTION!!
We purchase used mobile
homes. Call North Pointe
Homes, Gainesville
352-872-5566

05527375 !!!LOOK!!!
Before you but a Mobile Home
check out North Pointe Homes
in Gainesville--Hugh Discounts!
credit Scores Don't matter. Call
for Free Approval! Jacobson
Homes Factory Outlet (352)872-
5566 or mrb337 1()hotmail.com

05527376
NEW USED- REPO'S
Your Volume Giant! North
Pointe Homes. Millions to Lend.
Credit Scores 575 = 10% down.
Gainesville (352)872-5566 or
walker-david@h)live.com

Champion Home Inspections
Protect Your Investment
With A Professional
Inspection State Licensed
And Insured 386-344-5551
Handy man special, 94 Fleetwood
DWMH. 3/2 on 5 acres in Ft.
White. Owner Fin. $3,000 dn.
$850mo. $99,900 352-215-1018
www.LandOwnerFinancing.com
Palm Harbor Homes
Has 3 Modular Homes
Available at HUGE Savings
Over 40K Off
800-622-2832


710 ?Unfurnished Apt.
710 For Rent

05527089
SPRING HILL VILLAGE
Excellent High Springs location.
1, 2 & 3 bedroom floor-plans;
some with garages.
Call 386-454-1469
or visit our website:
www.springhillvillage.net








IBR APT.
Downtown Location, Clean.
$450 mo, plus Security.
NO PETS. Call 386-755-3456
2/2 w/garage & washer/dryer
hookups. West side of town,
Call for details
386-755-6867
2br/l ba, 1 car garage,
W/D hook up, $525 month,
no pets 1 month sec,
386-961-8075
2BR/1.5 BA duplex w/garage.
Near 1-75. Clean, quiet. No Pets.
Security dep. Credit report req'd
386-755-3179 Leave message
2BR/1BA. Close to town.
$565.mo plus deposit.
Includes water & sewer.
386-965-2922
Amber Wood Hills Apts.
Private Patio area. Beautiful yard.
Washer/dryer hkup. Free water &
sewer. 1/1, 2/1. Move in special.
386-754-1800. wwwmyflapts.corm
Columbia Arms Apt. located 1/2
mi from V.A. & Winn Dixie. Pet
Friendly. Move in Special $199.
Pool, laundry & balcony.
386-754-1800. www.mvflapts.com
Furnished or unfurnished 1 or 2
bedroom townhomes on the golf
course. $625-$750. mo. + security.
Includes water. 386-752-9626
Great location W of 1-75, spacious
deluxe 2br apts., garage, W/D
hookup. patio. $600/700 & up, +
Sec, 386-965-5560 or 344-3715
Greentree Townhouse
Summer special 2/1, 2/1.5. Free
water & sewer. Balcony & patio.
Laundry. Behind Kens on Hwy 90.
386-754-1800 wwwmyflapts.com

ONE 51 PLACE APTS
Alachua
MQVE IN SPECIALS
1, 2, & 3 bedrooms
Call TODAY 386-462-0656
or visit us at one51place.com

Redwine Apartments. Move in
special $199. Limited time. Pets
welcome, with 5 complexes,
we have a home for you.
386-754-1800. www.myflapts.com
Summer Special! 12th mo Free
w/signed yr lease. Updated, w/tile
floors/fresh paint. Great area.
From $450.+sec. 386-752-9626
The Lakes Apts. Studios & lBr's
from $135/wk. Util. & cable incl.,
Sec 8 vouchers accepted, monthly
rates avail Call 386-752-2741
Unfurnished Apt Eastside
Village Realty, Inc .2 bedroom
1 bath Duplex must be 55+ yrs of
age Call Denise Bose @
386-752-5290
Wayne Manor Apts.
Move in $199. Summer special.
2/1, washer/dryer. Behind Kens off
Hwy 90. 386-754-1800
www.mvflapts.com
Windsor Arms Apartments.
Summer special $199. Move in!
2/1, 2/1.5, 2/2. Pet Friendy. Free
200 ch. Dish. Washer/dryer hkup.
386-754-1800. www.myflapts.com

7^A0 Furnished Apts.
720 For Rent

Immaculate Studio Apt. Avail
9/1 $500. mo. $300. dep. Incl.
appliances, cable, internet, water.
Josen 386-965-9083 or 438-8190
Rooms for Rent. Hillcrest, Sands,
Columbia. All furnished. Electric,
cable, fridge, microwave. Weekly
or monthly rates. 1 person $135,
2 persons $150. weekly
386-752-5808
Studio Apt. Private. Rent incl util-
ities, Satellite TV, appliances,
(washer/dryer). No pets 386-963-
4767 or 292-0385 Available 9/1

730 Unfurnished
7 Home For Rent
09 Executive Home for rent on 41
acres. 4br/3.5ba Available
October. Horses/outdoor pets ok.
$2000/mo but all terms negotiable
for right caretaker. 386-209-4610
2BR house $640.mo $640. dep.
Also, 2br apt. $550. mo $550 dep.
Close to shopping.
386-344-2972
2BR/1BA Kitchen and Den. on
Alachua. $500. mo.
First & security.
386-397-0602
/ 2/1 879 Poplar St. $600. mo.
/ 3/2 Highlands Loop $700.mo.
/ 2/1 -442 Praire St $650.mo.
All require First and last...
386-755-3649
Please leave msg., Only in office
Tues Thur. 8am 4pm
3 br/2ba house, 1206 McFarlane


Avenue. Avail. 9/1/11. $850 mo
$400 sec dep. 904-376-0620 or
904-813-8864 for appt. No pets!
3/2 by Westside Elementary,
custom built home
$1050.00 per month.
Scott 352-318-8117


DIVORCE, BANKRUPTCY,
RESUMES.
other court approved forms-
386-961-5896.


BUY IT


SL~iL T


FnIND TI











C, LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED THURSDAY. AUGUST 25. 2011


73 Unfurnished
730 Home For Rent
3BR/1.5 BA Large lot. Very clean
with storage shed. Quiet area.
$850 mo. + $850. dep.
386-752-7578
4BR BRICK home.
Azalea Park. $750. mo.
$750. security .
" 386-397-2619 or 386-365-1243.
4br/2ba CHA Brick, 1200 sqft
lac., Close to FGCC, CR 245A.
Ceramic tile/carpet, $800 mo $800
dep (904)708-8478 App. req'd
rickk 3br/2ba Large yard, garage,
CH/A. 189 Stanley Ct. Lake City.
$950. mo + $1000 dep.
Call 386-365-8543
SRemodeled 3br/2ba Brick. In town
1750 sqft. Lg lot. Includes washer,
dryer, stove, & fridge. Quiet area
$985. mo $985 dep. 386-752-7578

750 Business &
SOffice Rentals
, Commercial property. 2100 sqft
bldg. on 1 acre. CH/A. Close to
college and Timco. Call for more
information. 386-867-1190
FOR LEASE: Downtown office
space. Convenient to
Court house.
Call 386-755-3456
For Lease: E Baya Ave. Two -
1000 sqft office space units or
combined.fpr 2000 sqft. 386-984-
0622 or weekends 386-497-4762
OFFICE SPACE for lease.
Oak Hill Plaza. 900 sqft
$675mo/$695. sec dep.
Tom 386-961-1086 DCA Realtor
SUB SHOP for lease.
All Equip. Avail. Old Willy J's
Across from Wal-Mart
386-623-2244

790 Vacation Rentals
Horseshoe Beach RV Lot.
Nice comer Lot with shade trees.
$295. mo Water/electric included
386-235-3633 or 352-498-5986
Scalloping Horseshoe Beach Spcl
rGulf Front 2br, w/lg porch; dock,
fish sink. wkend $395./wk $895.
386-235-3633/352-498-5986
alwaysonvacation.com #419-181
"Florida's Last Frontier"

805 Lots for Sale

05527058
Must See, Prettiest 10ac Rolling
Pasture Lot in North Fla.
3 mi. W. of Col. City School.
Red. to $6,990 P/A, Financing,
386-752-1364 or 386-965-4340

Foreclosure! 59.98 Ac. Close to
Suwannee River w/boat ramps &
Springs. Ideal parcel for your site
built or manuf. home. $139,000!
MLS# 78083 386-344-7662
Lots for Sale Eastside
Village Realty, Inc. buildable
vacant lot hight- &dry in-a 'estab-
lished neighbor priced @ $40,000.
Call Denise Bose @ 752-5290
Owner Financing. River comm &
nature lover's dream in Lee. 15
wooded ac by the Withlacoochee.
Property is already subdivided
MLS 75576 $48,000 623-6896
PUBLISHER'S NOTE
r All real estate advertising in this
newspaper is subject to the fair
housing act which makes it illegal
to advertise "any preference,
limitation, or discrimination based
on race, color, religion, sex,
disability, familial status or nation-
,al origin; or any intention to make
Such preference, limitation or
discrimination." Familial status
includes children under the age of
18 living, with parents or legal
custodians, pregnant women and
people securing custody of chil-
dien under the age of 18. This
newspaper will not knowingly
accept any advertising for real es-
tate which is in violation of the
t law. Our readers are hereby in-
formed that all dwellings adver-
tised in this newspaper are availa-
ble on an equal opportunity basis.
To complain of discrimination call
HUD toll free at 1-800-669-9777,
the toll free
telephone number to the hearing
impaired is 1-800-927-9275.


810 Home for Sale
0.5 acre tract has 441 (4 lane)
frontage. 1/2 miles from Target
distribution. 2/1.5 currently zoned
residential. MLS#78506 $91,000
R.E.O. Realty Group-867-1271
2 Mobile homes on 5 ac. above
ground pool. (1)1800 sqft. &
(1)1500sqft.$235,000 $139,888
MLS 77552 Brittany Stoeckert
Results Realty 386-397-3473
/ Champion Home Inspections
386-344-5551. Inspections
Starting At $ 249.00
Veterans Receive 10% Off
Full Inspection.
3/2 Brick Home w/1 car garage,
,Metal roof, porch w/swing, detach
carport $96,000 MLS#77780
Jo Lytte Remax 386,365-2821
www.jolytte.florida-property-search.com
3/2 Split floor plan built in 2010
on 2 acres.. Master bath with large
tub & standing shower. Trey ceil-
ings MLS#78520, $114,900
R.E.O. Realty Group 867-1271
4/2 fenced yard,
2 car garage, Fairly new roof &
HVAC Shed, fenced back yard.
MLS#77602, $162,500, R.E.O.
Realty Group 867-1271
Almost 17ac., spacious 3br/2ba
home, paved rd. Near Itchetucknee
Spgs. Pole barn, gated, fenced.
MLS76902 $164,900 Brodi Allred
623-0906. Westfield Realty Group
Awesome Find! 3br/2ba, 1844sf,
wood floors, French doors to scr
back porch, 40x60 bldg w/office &
workshop, 6.17ac comer lot, 3
sides fenced. #77427 $199.900
Brick Ranch 3/2 Fl room. Side en-
try garage &-workshop. 2 sheds.
New AC apple & roof. MLS78442
$114,900. Millard Gillen 365-7001
Westfield Realty Group


810 Home for Sale
Champion Home Inspections
Contact John 386-344-5551
State Licensed
And Insured
championhomeinspections.us
Charming 2br/2ba home. Gated
community. REDUCED to
$158,000 MLS78740 Teresa
Spradley 386-365-8343
Hallmark Real Estate
Clean Well maintained 3/2 brick
w/chain link fenced back yard
w/Garage. $120,K MLS78440.
.Debbie King 386-365-3886
Hallmark Real Estate
Close to everything. Lg 3br/2ba
brick home. Close to VA & shop-
ping! $189,900 MLS78131 Carrie
Cason 386-623-2806
Westfield Realty Group
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
Neat & tidy 2/2, maybe 3/2. New
kitchen counters & tile. Open floor
plan. Mary Brown Whitehurst
965-0887 MLS# 77943 $99,000
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
10 acres w/well maintained brick
home. 2012 sqft. Open split floor
plan. Lori Giebeig Simpson
365-5678 MLS# 74447 $149,000
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
3br/3ba Spacious home in estab-
lished area. 2414 sqft. Private yard
& patio. Lori Giebeig Simpson
365-5678 MLS# 78175 $159,000
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
3br/2ba. 1590 sqft. Lori Giebeig
Simpson. 365-567.8 or
Mary Brown Whitehurst
965-0887 MLS# 74542 $110,000
Country close to town 3/2 Brick., 3
ac. Grape arbor & fruit trees, pole
barn, workshop. Metal roof. MLS
78096 $129,900 Ginger Parker
365-2135 Hallmark Real Estate
Country Club Condo 4br/3ba.
Mega storage, roomy kit, 3 porch-.
es. $165,000 MLS 78719 Paula
Lawrence 386-623-1973
Hallmark'Real Estate.
Deer in your back yard. 3/2 HUD
w/16X48 wrap around scr. porch.
Clean, well maintained, 5 ac.
$72,000 MLS78687 Ginger Parker
365-2135 Hallmark Real Estate
Foreclosure! 3/2 D/WMH boasts
a large kitchen. M/B w/ garden
tub, shower & dbl sinks-New car-
pet-fpl & more-Only $69,995
MLS# 76920. 386-344-7662
Foreclosure! Newer 3/2 DWMH.
Lg rooms, kitchen island, lots of
wdws, master w/garden tub & sep-
arate shower. $74,995
MLS# 74218 386-344-7662
Great 3/2 home w/2346 sq ft
under roof on .67 ac., Creekside
S/D. Big back yard w/plenty of
shade trees. On a cul-de-sac, MLS
77385 $169,900 623-6896
Home for Sale Eastside Village
Realty, Inc. 2 bedroom, 2 bath site
built home with screen porch,
large carport priced just right Call
Denise Bose @ 752-5290
Home in LalfGy C6ountry'etCbU.
74/3, renovated.Great for entertain'-
ing. Glass doors op6n to back yard.
MLS#78637 $184,900
R.E.O. Realty Group 867-1271
Home on 15 ac. w/over 2,500 sqft
home.Very Ig bedrooms w/private
baths. 24x24 workshop $235,000
MLS 77552 Brittany Stoeckert
Results Realty 386-397-3473
JASPER! 4BR/2.5BA 1,890 SqFt
mfg home on 1 acre where
wildlife is abundant $39,900
DANIEL CRAPPS AGENCY,
INC. 755-5110 #77922
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
Suwannee Co.115 ac. Fenced &
cross Fenced. Pasture land, paved
rd. Elaine K. Tolar 386-752-4211
MLS# 77081 $345,000
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
.97 ac. Centrally located to Lake
City & G'ville. Fenced, planted
pines, pasture. Elaine K. Tolar
752-4211 MLS# 73879 $291,030
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
New home in May Fair. Super area
comer. lot. 4br split plan. Versatile
colors. Elaine K. Tolar
755-6488 MLS# 76919 $199,900
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
240 ac. Farm. Rolling Meadows.
Paved road, great access to Lake
City & G'ville. Elaine K. Tolar
386-752-4211 MLS# 70453


Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
Suwannee Co.115 ac. Fenced &
cross fenced. 10 & 20 ac parcels
avail. Elaine K. Tolar 386-752-
4211 MLS# 67766 $448,500
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
Brick home in town on lake front.
3br/2ba. New roof & hardwoods.
Glass room w/view Elaine Tolar
755-6488 MLS# 78092 $249,900
Lake frofit 3/2 custom Western Ce-
dar. Lots of storage space. Private
dock $229,900. MLS# 74681
Jo Lytte-Remax 386-365-2821
www.jolytte.florida-property-search.com
' Large Home in the Country on
3.66 acres, fireplace, 2 outbldgs,
MLS#76471, $89,900
Jo Lytte, Remax 386-365-2821
jolytte@remaxnfl.com
LEASE/OPTION BUY
3br/2ba Home 2010 w/garage
on 1/2 acre. Owner Financing
386-623-2244
LOCATION! CONDITION!
PRICE! 3BR/2BA w/open floor
plan; freshly painted $96,000
DANIEL CRAPPS AGENCY,
INC. 755-5110 #78278
Lofty home on Itchetucknee River,
Wrap around covered decks on
two levels.MtustSEE! $375,000
MLS#77006 Jo Lytte
Remax 386-365-2821

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inMgoia ill f

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bahwt aae ra


Classified Department: 755-5440


Suwannee River Front
granite counters, covered patio,
deck & dock, $349,000
MLS#76336 Jo Lytte at Remax
Professionals. 386-365-2821
WELL-CARED FOR 4BR/2.5BA
mfg home w/formal LR plus fami-
ly rm $84,000 DANIEL CRAPPS
AGENCY, INC.
755-5110 #78585
WHITE SPRINGS! Sturdy block
3BR/lBA home in city limits,
fenced yd $49,000 DANIEL
CRAPPS AGENCY, INC.
755-5110 #78603


Bring the picture in or
we will take it for you!
* Ad runs 10 consecutive days
with a description and photo in the
newspaper and online E-edition.
* Ad runs 10 consecutive days as a
classified line ad online.
* You must include vehicle price.
* All ads are prepaid.
* Private party only.
A2MMM -



2006 EF250
Ford Van.
3/4 ton, metal work
shelves/ladder rack,
60K miles, exc. cond.
$10,500
Call
386-555-5555
If you don't sell your vehicle
during the first 10 days, you
can run the same vehicle ad
for 10 additional days for
only $15.00
Terms and conditions remain the
same for the additional run.


To1Get Your

Vehile old


810 Home for Sale
Luxury home. 3br/2ba. 20 ac lot.
Cherry cabinets & SS appliances.
Jacuzzi in master br. MLS 78190
S 374,900 Roger Lovelady 365-
7039. Westfield Realty Group
Motivated Seller. Country area.
paved rd. 3br/2ba manuf home.
New AC & upgraded wdows.
MLS 78027 S84K. Brodie Allred.
623-0906 Westfield Realty Group
MOVE-IN READY! 3BR/2BA in
pristine condition on 1.39 acres
$89,900 DANIEL CRAPPS
AGENCY, INC.
755-5110 #78345
New Reduced. 4br/2ba plus of-
fice. 2 living & dinig areas, cov-
ered porch. F1 rm. Triple garage.
MLS77685 Charlie Sparks 755-
0808 Westfield Realty Group
Nice, large 4/2 on 1 acre
w/florida room, granite floors,
wrap around front porch, $139,900
Brittany Stoeckert Results Realty
386-397-3473 MLS 77292
Owner Financing Avail. with
down pint. 3br/2ba 2 story brick.
4.6 ac. in ground pool. Lg. work-
shop &2 wells. $150,000.00 obo
Old Wire Rd. (850)728-0782
Owner Financing. 2br/3ba country.
home w/wrap around porches, 5ac.
Garage w/workshop. MLS77005
* $179,900 Roger Lovelady 365-
7039 Westfield Realty Group
PRICE REDUCTION: 3/2 plus
pool house w/half bath, 2.25
fenced ac. Freshly painted. Split
plan, Large rear deck MLS 78103
$179,900 386-623-6896
PRICED TO SELL! 3BR/2BA
w/2,012 SqFt w/living rm & fami-
ly rm $57,000 DANIEL CRAPPS
AGENCY, INC.
755-5110 #78680
Private 2 ac parcel away from it
all Hunting w/no restrictions.
Make an offer on this 1764 sqft
home that need some TLC.
$109,900, MLS78331. Jay Sears.
867-1613 Hallmark Real Estate
Reduced Price! 3br/1.5 ba. Re-
modeled. Nice area close to. VA.
MLS 77599 $69K. Estate Sale,
bring all offers. Josh Grecian 466-
2517 Westfield Realty Group
Remax Professionals Motivated
seller. Spacious brick w/many up-
grades. Newer roof, windows &
fixtures. Fenced back yard. MKS
78168 $119,900 Missy Zecher @
623-0237 www.missyzecher.com
Remax Professionals Ranch style
home on 10 ac w/barn & horse
stalls. 4 Ig bedrm + bonus rm. 2
car gar. MLS 77403 $325K.
Missy Zecher @ 386-623-0237
www.missyzecher.com
Rolling Meadows. 4 or 3br/2ba.
Over 1700 sqft. and 1/2 and 1/2 ac lot.
MLS77284 $154,900 Carrie Cason
386-623-2806
Westfield Realty Group
Something for Everyone! 3br/2ba,
2706sf, 4.02ac, island kitchen,
Corian counters, det garage, Koi
pond, fish house, green house,
feiced & rore. .#76255 $247,000
SPECTACULAR VIEW!
2BR/1BA, 1200sf, .65ac, scr front
porch, steps to deck/dock on Suw.
river, under house parking/storage,
shed & more. #77242 $194,900


930 Motorcycles
2007 HONDA VTX 1300 Pearl
Green. 1 owner. 8600 mi. Side &
extra bags. Motorcycle jack.
$4995. 386-758-5805 or 365-0817 o ke eo m CU E T ag i

9 eS1 Recreational
95 Vehicles
2007 Coach House
Platinum 272XL, 15K miles. May
consider partial trade for Class B.
$110,000. 386-754-8505


NEED HELP!


Let Us Write

Your
ClaSsified Ad


ON WHEELS & WATERCRAFT

^^,\ B|^f6

w .ti W


Suwannee




E electric


Cooperative

Suwannee Valley Cooperative, Inc.
GIS/Mapping Data Specialist 1
Suwannee Valley Electric Cooperative, Inc. has an immediate opening
for a GIS/Mapping Data Specialist position. This position reports to
the Director of Engineering and will be responsible for maintaining
Geographic Information System Maps for the Cooperative. A high
school diploma and an Associate of Science degree or work equivalent
experience with a minimum of 1 year experience with GIS Mapping in
the electric utility field is required.
Applications and job descriptions may be picked up at the Suwannee
Valley Electric administration building, 11340 100th St., Live Oak. The
lob description can be viewed on www.svec-coop.com. Resumes and
applications can be turned in at the above address with Attn: Vicky
Talmadge, or emailed to vickyt@svec-coop.com. The deadline for
accepting applications is Tuesday, September 6, 2011.
SVEC is an equal opportunity employer.


820 Farms &
820 Acreage
10-ac lot. Well/septic/pp. Owner
financing S300 dn, $663 mo 8.9%c.
25 yrs. Deas Bullard Properties
386-752-4339 N ww.landnfl.com
4 1/2 acre lot. Lake Jeffery Road.
Gorgeous Oaks!Paved Rd
Owner Financing' NO DOWN!
S59.900. S525mo 352-215-1018.
ww w.LandOwnerFinancineg.com
4 acres. Wellborn. New Well
installed. Beautifully wooded
w/cleared Home Site, owner fin.
no down. $39,900. S410 mon
Call 352-215-1018
Nvww.LandOwnerFinancing.com
6.45 ac river front property in
White Springs, cloe to Big Shoals.
Covered shelter for entertaining.
MLS# 77417 $104,900 386-867-
1271 R.E.O. Realty Group, Inc
FARM- 7 stall barn.
17+ acres, pasture, cross fenced.
Close in $500. mo.
386-961-1086
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
61 ac. Parcel. SR 27 & 1-75 inter-
change. Great potential, fenced &
cross fenced. Elaine K. Tolar
752-4211 MLS# 758060 $368,040
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
40 ac.Parcel. Less then 2 mi from
city limits. Fenced road frontage
on US Hwy 441. Elaine K. Tolar
752-4211 MLS# 62092 $194K

Commercial
830 Property
788 S. Marion Comm'l bldg on
highway frofltage. Across from the
VA & near downtown. $49,900.
MLS. 78129 Scott Stewart 867-
3498 Westfield Realty Group.
Commercial. High traffic location
w/I-75 exposure. 2-story custom
log home. MLS77949
Josh Grecian 386-466-2517
Westfield Realty Group
Prime Commercial Location.
Just across from a plaza. Frontage
Son Baya w/2 curbcuts. $350,000
MLS# 77485 Call 386-867-1271
R.E.O.Realty Group, Inc
Remax Professionals Commercial
Property. Located on expanding
west side of Lake City. Professio-
nal service or restaurant. MLS
77436 $575k Missy Zecher 386-
623-0237 www.missyzecher.com
Wellborn Commercial lot. 1.84
acres w/34' of Hwy frontage.near
the new Dollar General. MLS
72381 Scott Stewart 386-867-3498
Westfield Realty Group
SInvestment
860 Property
Rustic Fishing camp in Suwannee
Minutes to boat launch.
MLS#78709 $59,900
Jo Lytte/Remax 386-365-2821
www.jolytte.florida-property-search.com

Q870 Real Estate
870 Wanted
I Buy Houses
CASH!
Quick Sale Fair Price
386-269-0605


,!


WMK-.









LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS THURSDAY, AUGUST 25. 2011


COURTESY PHOTO

Barber in U.S. Amateur match play
Lake City native Blayne Barber began match play at the United States Amateur
Championship in Hartford, Wisc. on Wednesday. Due to a delay, Barber had a late tee
time during the first round of match play. He was set to play Stephan Jaeger of Germany.
Barber finished in a tie for third in the stroke play and was awarded the No. 4 seed. Jaeger
entered as the No. 61 seed.


INDIANS: Face Del Rio's son tonight


Continued From Page 11
Hess said. "We are one of.
those teams that use the
pass to set up the run. We
start out in the spring and
are big on 7-on-7 during
the summer. We are not
going to pound it down
your throat"
Hess said the Eagles
have a good receiving
group, led by 6-7 Eric
Snider who has commit-
ted to Duke. Episcopal
won a 7-on-7 competition


in Tallahassee and Hess
said Seminoles head
coach Jimbo Fisher was
impressed with Snider.
"Eric is 230 pounds and
runs a 4.6 40," Hess said.
"You can't coach 6-7."
Luke Del Rio, son of
Jaguars head coach Jack
Del Rio, transferred to
Episcopal in February and
joins Zach Smith in the
quarterback rotation.
Hess said he has a cou-


ple of defensive linemen
with good size arid middle
linebacker Shakeel Rashad
has committed to North
Carolina.
Directions: Take
Interstate 10 to Interstate
95 south in Jacksonville;
exit on Atlantic Boulevard
and look for the school on
the left immediately after
passing the entrance to the
Hart Bridge (4455 Atlantic
Blvd.).


COURTESY PHOTO
Rebecca Wolfe and husband, Brannon Spradley, offer hog hunting trips through B&R
Outfitters.

BISON: Family offers hog hunting


Continued From Page 1B

grandfather, Bud Wolfe,
is a Sporting Clays hall
of fame member and has
an annual tournament
named in his honor in Fort
Lauderdale. She hunted
with her parents and her
dad owned property in
North Florida, which
brought the family to this
area.
"I have been hunting
my whole life," Wolfe
said. "I have been in the '
promotional end since
I was 18. I have ideas
about a clothing line and
would like to have my own
hunting show. I've had
some offers, but not what
I'm looking for yet"


It was a promotional
event in Pennsylvania
where Wolfe met show
host Wilson Reynolds.
He also went on the
bison hunt with Wolfe
and Spradley and guide
Brandon McCullough. The
hunt was in February.
Wolfe used a 300
Magnum rifle from 120
yards for the kill... ,
"It was in th low 20s
and very winfdy," Wolfe
said. "Sometimes the
wind works in your favor,
and the hunt was a lot of
walking. It was a one-shot
drop."
Wolfe's portfolio of game
taken includes turkey, deer,


small game, alligators and
. even stingray, using guns
or bowhunting. She is a
pro staffer for Bust a Buck
Deer Lures and Custom
Gun Stocks.
"I do a lot of outdoor
promotional things and
modeling," Wolfe said. "I
have modeled for different
boutiques and done some
swimsuit modeling."
Wolfe and Spradley
operate B&R Outfitters,
where they offer hunts for
wild boar using hog dogs. ,
One of their hunts was |
featured on television.
For details, e-mail the
couple at bnroutfitters@
yahoo. com.


CHS: Columbia High travels to face Santa Fe High in kickoff classic
Continued From Page 1B


Tigers during the fall.
"We can't let the weather effect us," Allen
said. "If this were the playoffs, we'd want to be
prepared to play if its wet We won't change our


style. We'll put our hand in the dirt, come off
the ball and that's not going to change whether
it is good or bad weather,"
In fact, Allen believes nasty weather


could play into the Tigers' favor.
"It could help the defense to create turn-
overs," he said. 'If we're flying and swarming to
the ball, the second and third hitter could knock


the ball out If we're playing for a district chamn
onship and ifs wet we want to be able to do the
things we do. This week will help for a game we
might face like that during the season."


5th AvnwuIal

"coiwe to the River"
HFfealUn Arts Cay
-~sposored bUy shaInd of LiJve oe-

SepteMvber 3, o.0 L 0-4
"The Nature of H-eciLth avnld HI-ea'1g"
The waters of the spring on the bales of the
Swwan-vee, nwow home to stetphein Foster
state parole, have been a gather-iy pLace of
heaLing for mainj owLt.res. Throwgho.t the
years the water and its surrouw-vondig woods
have ourishe(d both body avnd svpivt.jooi uvS
for a dra flLLedo wLth Adscovern.g wajus to a
better wivd, body and heaLthy LifestULe.
EducATioNAl SEMINARS FREE Admission to ThE


HEAlTh SCREENINqS
ARTS ANd CRAfTS
Music, Food ANd MORE..;


EVENT wiTh pAid ENTRANCE
INTO ThE pARk.
($5 pER CAR up To 8 peoplE)


FOR MORE INfORMATiON CAIl 386-397-1920
I 1016 LilliAN SAUNdERs DR. WhiTE SpRiNqs, FL 3 2096


Specials in effect
thru Labor Day!







All Regular Size
Candy Bars
Nestle M&M/Mars Hershey


v9 *m2
or $1.19ea


YOOHOO
Chocolate Drink
12oz cans

12 pack2 for $10 ,.'j .i. '
or $5.99ea


All King Size
CandyBars
Nestle M&M/Mars Hershey


Gallon Milk
o 9 $ 99
or $i1 69ea I


b




T--
4-.
h-


NABISCO
Single Serve
'Fig Newton Snackwell Creme
iSandwich Oreo- Nutter Butter
U )r


KELLOGG'S
.. Cereals
Frosted Flakes
t ""-v Rice Krispies
S& more
2 FOR 7or$3.5Oea


Page Editor: Brandon Finley, 754-0420


I


6aOx -


40-11 /=)cl(>