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The Lake City reporter
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028308/01637
 Material Information
Title: The Lake City reporter
Uniform Title: Lake City reporter (Lake City, Fla. 1967)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: John H. Perry
Place of Publication: Lake City Fla
Publication Date: 8/16/2011
Frequency: daily (monday through friday)[<1969>-]
weekly[ former 1967-<1968>]
daily
normalized irregular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Lake City (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Columbia County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Columbia -- Lake City
Coordinates: 30.189722 x -82.639722 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 95, no. 4 (Oct. 5, 1967)-
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000358016
oclc - 33283560
notis - ABZ6316
lccn - sn 95047175
sobekcm - UF00028308_01569
System ID: UF00028308:01637
 Related Items
Preceded by: Lake City reporter and Columbia gazette

Full Text





In concert
Easton Corbin
performs tonight
at FGC.
O0C015 120511 *x3-DIGI"
LIB OF FLORIDA HISTORY
PO BOX 117007
205 SMA UNIV OF FLORIDA
GAINESVILLE FL 32611-1943


Safety tips
CCSO, LCPD
talk about
back-to-school.
See below


aeK


U lty


Reporter


Wednesday, August 17, 2011 www.lakecityreporter.com Vol. 137, No. 173 0 75 cents



Suwannee goes wet with ease


By ANTONIA ROBINSON
arobinson@lakecityreporter.com
LIVE OAK Suwannee County
voters chose overwhelmingly
to go wet in an election here
Tuesday.


A total of 7,489 residents (67
percent) voted in favor of allow-
ing the sale of intoxicating liquors,
wines or beer containing more that
6.243 percent of alcohol by volume,
based on unofficial election results.
Just 3,612 (33 percent) voted no.


In addition, voters approved
the sale of liquor and wine by the
drink in restaurants and bars. A
total of 7,576 voters approved that
measure, compared to 2,790 in
favor of package sales only.
Official election results will be


certified today.
"The voters of Suwannee
County have spoken, and its a
great achievement that we can all
be proud of," said Clifford Gwinn,
Suwannee Yes! chairman.
The organization was the driv-


ing force behind the movement
to legalize liquor and wine.
"It was a long time coming,"
he said. "It's time for us to work
together and move forward."
VOTE continued on 3A


Training

copters

spot real

pot, say

police

By TONY BRITT
tbritt@lakecityreporter.com
Law enforcement training
exercises focusing on finding
marijuana has spurred a series
of local investigations.
"The investigations that were
opened are being investigated
by the Columbia County Multi-
Jurisdictional Task Force,"
said Sgt. Ed Seifert, Columbia
County Sheriff's Office Public
Information officer. 'These are
active- investigations and we'll
release more information when
we're able to."
Helicopters filled a significant
portion of Columbia County air
space last week during a train-
ing exercise for law enforce-
ment and Florida Army National
Guard/counter drug unit per-
sonnel.
As part of the Domestic
Marijuana Eradication and
Suppression Program helicop-
ters circled, hovered and land-
ed around local landmarks as
part of the training session at
the Columbia County Sheriff's
Office.
Seifert said 30 law enforce-
ment officers from federal,
state, county and local agencies
participated in the week-long
training event
'The training focused on the
aerial detection of marijuana in
rural areas," he said, noting the
Florida Army National Guard,
Counter Drug Unit, provided
aviation assets for the training.
"Several narcotics investigations
were initiated as a result of the
training flights."
The Domestic Marijuana
Eradication and Suppression
Program is administered by
the Florida Department of
Agriculture and Consumer
TRAINING'continued on 3A


Afternoon tune

^--KJ"


JASON MATTHEW WALKERILake City Reporter
Joshua Rolle, 18, braves the heat as he strolls along Lake DeSoto late last week
while playing an upbeat jazz piece on his alto saxophone. 'I was just bored and
I remembered how I used to be.in the bahd,' he said. 'I write music with it. It's
something I love.'


Bigger defense


cuts would be


devastating,


says Panetta


By ROBERT BURNS
AP National Security Writer
WASHINGTON Bigger
defense cuts triggered by
failed deficit reduction nego-
tiations would have "dev-
astating"
*effects on
the nation's
security,
Defense
Secretary
Leon
Panettasaid
Tuesday.
In a rare-
jointappear-
ance at the
National
Defense Secretary of St
University, listens as Defer
Panetta and
Secretary of speaks during
SetateHillry Defense Univer
StateHilary
Rodham
Clinton made their case for
limiting-their budgets' expo-
sure to the political battles
in Congress over identifying
additional, ways of reduce
future government spend-


ing.
Panetta said the Pentagon
is prepared to make $350
billion in cuts over the next
10 years, as -agreed by
Congress. But he warned
of dangers to the national


ASSOCIATED PRESS
ate Hillary Rodham Clinton
nse Secretary Leon Panetta
an event at the National
rsity in Washington Tuesday.

defense if bigger reductions
are required.
The deficit compromise
reached between the White
DEFENSE continued on 3A


School starts soon;

take care, stay safe
%* *. : ,, ;.* **1'-. .A.l -:-',


From staff reports


. Another school year
starts Monday in Columbia
County.
Children are at increased
risk of transportation-relat-
ed injuries, from pedes-
trian, bicycle, school bus
and motor vehicle crashes
during the beginning of
the school year, according
to the Columbia County
Sheriff's Office.
The communityis encour-


aged to keep in mind sev-
eral. health and safety tips
and be cautious as students
return to school.
When traveling to and
from school, parents
should review basic rules
with their children. School
walkers have several basic
rules.
In neighborhoods with
higher levels of traffic,
consider starting a "walk-
SAFETY continued on 3A


Santa Fe Swamp tract

'reopened after wildfire


From staff reports

LIVE OAK Though charred trees
and open space are a reminder of the
wildfire that swept through the Santa Fe
Swamp, new plant growth indicates the
area is in recovery.
Over the last few weeks, District land
managers and workers with Florida
Forest Service have worked to rehabili-
tate fire lines and make other repairs
to prepare for the District's property
within the swamp to reopen. The tract,
located in Alachua and Bradford coun-


ties, officially reopened to the public
August 11.
The District, which owns 5,708 acres
within the swamp, closed its portion
of the property after lightning sparked
a wildfire in early June. The fire was
declared out by FFS on July 19.
"Before reopening the tract, we
wanted to ensure that the hydrol-
ogy and public access in recreational
areas were restored back to condi-
tions prior to the fire," said Edwin
McCook, District land management
specialist.


In concert
Country music star
Easton Corbin, who
grew up in nearby
Trenton, performs
tonight at FGC.
Individual tickets for
the concert are $15
for FGC faculty and
students and $25 for
general admission.
Tickets are available at
fgcentertainment.com
or can be purchased
at the Performing Arts
Center box office. Call
754-4340 for more


CALL US:
(386) 752-1293
SUBSCRIBE TO
I THE REPORTER:
Voice: 755-5445
1 842640002 Fax: 752-9400


96
T-Storm Chance
WEATHER, 2A


Opinion ................ 4A
People.................. 2A
Obituaries .............. 5A
Advice & Comics..........4C
Puzzles ................. 2B


TODAY IN
PEOPLE
6' 1 I The
d~ id'7 1 r e,


COMING
THURSDAY
Local ne,.,
roundup


- 32 g6 i
NSIDE


~PII4~L~CbBBIOICCIIILB(ll~~~


^~t;.-. -.^.*ieM-'jSB-swsccKiBswese'oaea









LAKE CITY REPORTER DAILY BRIEFING WEDNESDAY AUGUST 17, 2011


Page Editor: Jason M. Walker, 754-0430


Celebrity Birthdays,


C $H 3 Tuesday:
SAfternoon: 0-2-1
Evening: N/A


Play4' Tuesday:
Afternoon: 9-8-5-8
SEvening: N/A


ez'naldi
Monday:
4-20-26-30-34


PEOPLE IN THE NEWS


9/11: Tragedy explored through the decade


NEW YORK

after 9/11 that TV would
emerge from this trauma
sadder but wiser. That
TV would be steeled with
higher sense of purpose than had
characterized it the previous half-
century.
'*Baloney. Soon enough, the flow of
TV programming, including scripted
drama and comedy with all their
distractions and excesses, defiantly
resumed with the rest of life's daily
routine. And yet, the events of 9/11
did play a part in TV storytelling in
the decade that would follow. Some
of it was cosmetic. Some, just grist
for the storytelling mill. And there
was some, occasionally, that was
meaningful.
The most enduring and often
penetrating look at life post-9/11 has
proven to be FX's "Rescue Me."
A drama with darkly funny over-
tones, it tells the story of troubled
New York City firefighter Tommy
Gavin in the aftermath of the terror-
ist attacks, when he lost many fellow
firefighters, including his cousin
and best friend, at the twin towers.
Tommy (played by series co-creator
and co-producer Denis Leary) is
haunted by survivor's guilt, which is
enhanced by his cousin's occasional
"visits" as an apparition that tries to
talk sense into him.
The message of "Rescue Me,"
reinforced through the seven-sea-
son run that concludes Sept. 7, has
always been: "Never forget" Tommy
Can't, and "Rescue Me" has been a
faithful reminder for viewers.


Actor Dennis Leary, who portrays Tommy Gavin, is shown on location during
filming for the television show 'Rescue Me' in New York. The most enduring and
penetrating look at life post-9/11 on television has been FX's 'Rescue Me.' Leary's
characters haunted by survivor's guilt, which is enhanced by his deceased fire-
fighter cousin's occasional "visits" as an apparition.


Gosselin


But TLC announced
Monday that its final
episode will air Sept.
12.
The show was
spun off from the
wildly popular "Jon
& Kate Plus 8,"
which co-starred the
L - T- fl o-.-


youngsters father, Jon Gosselin, at
their home in Wernersville, Pa. Their
marriage dissolved, and the couple
divorced in 2009.


obsessed with Hilton
and hisalleged.
actions gave the
hotel heiress good
B lJ', I reason to be afraid,
',i Superior Court
Judge Jessica Silvers
said.
Hilton sai
ilton "It's very clear
from all these incidents that you are
obsessed with Paris Hilton," Silvers
told Rainford.


Authorties:Rembrandt


TLC cancels 'Kate Plus Ma upce nHAn wrh$BKeo~e
8';las shw Spt.12MARINADEL REY, California -
LO)S ANGELETS -- A man who Investigatomnrs. saidr~ a $500(


" NEW YORK TLC said it is can-
deling "Kate Plus 8."
SThe reality specials focusing on
Kate Gosselin, her twin daughters
and set of sextuplets tmorphed into a
weekly series in its second season.


once asked Paris Hilton to marry
him and has been arrested twice out-
side homes owned by the socialite,
must stand trial for felony stalking, a
judge ruled Monday.
James Rainford appeared to be


Rembrandt print snatched from a
Southern California luxury hotel
lobby has been found in a San
Fernando church.
Nobody has been arrested.
1 Associated Press


* Actress Maureen O'Hara
is 91.
* Former Chinese president
Jiang Zemin is 85.
* Author V.S. Naipaul is 79.
* Actor Robert DeNiro is 68.
* Rock musician Sib Hashian
is 62.
* Actor Robert Joy is 60.


* Olympic gold medal figure
skater Robin Cousins is 54.
E Actor Sean Penn is 51.
0 Actor David Conrad is 44.
E Singer Donnie Wahlberg
is 42.
0 Rapper Posdnuos is 42.
E Actor Mark Sailing (TV:
"Glee") is 29.


HOW TO REACH US
Main number ........(386) 752-1293
Fax number ............752-9400
Circulation ...............755-5445
Online... www.lakecityreporter.com
The Lake City Reporter, an affiliate of
Community Newspapers Inc., is pub-
lished Tuesday through Sunday at 180
E. Duval St., Lake City, Fla. 32055.
PeriQdical postage paid at Lake City, Fla.
Member Audit Bureau of Circulation and
The Associated Press.
All material herein is property of the Lake
City Reporter. Reproduction'in whole or
in part is forbidden without the permis-
sion of the publisher. U.S. Postal Service
No. 310-880.
POSTMASTER: Send address changes
to Lake City Reporter, P.O. Box 1709,
Lake City, Fla. 32056.
Publisher Todd Wilson .....754-0418
(twilson@lakecityreporter.com)
NEWS
Editor Robert Bridges .....754-0428
(rbridges@lakecityreporter.com)
ADVERTISING
Director Ashley Butcher ...754-0417
(abutcher@lakecityreporter.com)
CLASSIFIED
To place a classified ad, call 755-5440


BUSINESS
Controller Sue Brannon....754-0419
(sbrannon@lakecityreporter.com)
CIRCULATION
Home delivery of the Lake City Reporter
should be completed by 6:30 a.m.
Tuesday through Saturday, and by 730
a.m. on Sunday.
Please call 386-755-5445 to report any
problems with your delivery service.
In Columbia County, customers should
call before 10:30 a.m. to report a ser-
vice error for same day re-delivery. After
10:30 a.m., next day re-delivery or ser-
vice related credits will be issued.
In all other counties where home delivery
is available, next day re-delivery or ser-
vice related credits will be issued.
Circulation ...............755-5445
(circulaton@lakecityreporter.com)
Home delivery rates
(Tuesday through Sunday)
12 Weeks ................. $26.32
24 Weeks ................. $48.79
52 Weeks ............. $83.46
Rates include 7% sales tax.
Mail rates
12 Weeks. ................ $41.40
24'Weeks .............. $82.80
52 Weeks....... ..........$179.40


CORRECTION

The Lake City Reporter corrects errors of fact in news
items. If you have a concern, question or suggestion, please
call the executive editor. Corrections and clarifications will run
in this space. And thanks for reading.


ARO

Felon charged
after shooting self
: .ORLANDO A con-
4icted felon faces charges
4ter central Florida
authorities said he shot
himself with a gun he
wasn't supposed to have.
Orlando police said
officers found Kevin
Deon Steplight, 22, at a
hbme Friday night with
a-gunshot wound to his'
abdomen. It wasn't clear
liowv or why he shot him-
sf6f. Steplight was initially
taken to an Orlando hospi-
tl for treatment He was
later taken to jail, where
ihe was being held without
,'b il.
Steplight was charged
with possession of a
firearm by a convicted
felon and possession of
ammunition by a convicted
felon. Records also show
Steplight had an active
Warrant for his arrest.

Meth lab explodes
in Jacksonville
.JACKSONVILLE -
About two dozen people
were evacuated from a
Jacksonville apartment
complex following what
police described as a meth
lab explosion.
Police and a hazard-
ous materials team from
Jacksonville Fire and
Rescue were called to
the Park Place at Beach
Boulevard apartments
about 7:16 p.m. Monday.
Police spokeswoman
Melissa Bujeda said 911
callers reported a blast.
She says no one was
injured in the blast.

Angry man crashes
into Waffle House
PANAMA CITY BEACH
SPolice said a man
crashed through the
Panama City Beach Waffle
House while trying to run
over his wife, who is a
Waitress at the restaurant.


UND FLORIDA


The sweet sound of success
Bees are seen in a honeycomb in Seffner on Aug. 1 as bee-
keepers Joyce Lang and Miles Carter collect honey.


Panama City Beach
police said Charles Patrick
O'Bryan called Waffle
House Monday evening
and told an employee he
was going to "run his
truck through the building
and kill everyone."
O'Bryan's wife, Danielle
Gibbons, was hit by the
vehicle and taken to a hos-
pital with what authorities
described as injuries that
are not life-threatening.
O'Bryan now faces
charges of attempted mur-
der and felony criminal
mischief.


been renamed to honor
three city police officers
killed in the line of duty
this year.
On Monday a section
of Fourth Street was des-
ignated the "Sgt. Thomas
J. Baitinger, Officer
Jeffrey A Yaslowitz and
Officer David S. Crawford
Memorial Highway."
Yaslowitz and Baitinger
were killed Jan. 24 in a
gun battle with a fugitive
hiding in an attic. A month
later, Crawford was fatally
shot while trying to ques-
tion a prowling suspect
downtown


rally ai uiem nH,
MIAMI Immigrants
in South Florida are join-
ing groups nationwide to
protest the Obama admin-
istration's decision to make
its Secure Communities
program mandatory.
Local activists rallied
Tuesday outside Miami
-Dade County Democratic
headquarters in Miami
Beach.
The Obama used exist-
ing federal databases to
identify those arrested for
crimes who can be deport-
ed. Immigrant advocates
said the program makes
people afraid to cooperate
with authorities.
* Associated Press


DAYTONA BEACH--
Police said two officers
who fired at a fleeing sus-
pect in Daytona Beach are
on administrative leave
pending an investigation.
Daytona Beach police
spokesman Jimmie 'Flynt
said the officers shot at
a vehicle after the driver
fled a hit-and-run arrest
Wednesday.
The two officers arrived
at the scene where a man
had been hit by a car.

Road named
for slain officers
ST. PETERSBURG -
Part of a main thorough-
fare in St. Petersburg has


THE WEATHER



PARTLY t CHANCE CHANCE CHANCE CHANCE

H, Lo I ; I O119,
| ...,CLOUDY : STORMS| |. TORMS | B STORMS IsTORMS


SHI I LO LO :! 954 73
;. .. .' .'; '.", .. . : m.- -:"
'-g '.N:N.:3 .,


Pensacola
S3 75


* aldosta
n- '71


City Thursday Frid y


'" Jacksonville Cape Canaveral
Tallahassee Lake City 93'3 Daytona Beach
96'7-1 1 Ft. Lauderdale
C Gainesville Daytona Beach Fort Myers
Panama City 9 '1 92e 76 Gainesville
90 ;5 Ocala Jacksonville
95 73 ey West
Orlando Cape Canaveral Key West
94 9] -; Lake City
Miami
Tampa Naples
'92 78 West Palm Bearh Ocala
Orlando
S FL Lauderdale Panama City
FL Myers 90 79 0 Pensacola
S Naples a Tallahassee
91 6 Miami Tampa
K't 1 78 Valdosta
ney West. W. Palm Beach


TEMPERATURES
H,,r, Tue..i,3 a
L,.*.'. T. i-,:-i 3%
H.-.rn'.l r,,gr
fjornmal Iuo,
Record high
Record low

PRECIPITATION
Tuesday
Month total
Year total
Normal month-to-date
Normal year-to-date


94
71
90
;1
97 in 1918
67 in 1938


0.00"
3.01"
26.40"
3.47"
33.60"


9i.i 51


SUN
Sunns Ic.-J .,
:.uri r 1, l.: ,
3unn-e IciTi
SuriseL Lorn.

MOON
Moonrise today
Moonset today
Moonrise tom.
Moonset tom.


6 59 a.nm
8 1':I p
6:59 a.m.
8.09 p.rrm,


10:05 p.m.
10:23 a.m.
10:37 p.m.
11:16 a.m.


(300
Aug. Aug. Sept. Sept.
21 27 4 12
Last New First Full


a lp 7p la 6
Wednesday Thursday






- j |
FWR te lemrern.Iire Feei &e' tLemeratre|


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An exclusive
service
brought to
--.- ---i..-


...r our readers
10niBtesto bum
Today's by
ultraviolet The Weather
for the area on
a scale from 0
to 10+.

weather.com

S Forecasts, data and
Graphics @ 2011 Weather
Central, LP, Madison, Wis.
weather J www.weatherpubllsher.com


'~i'. 'BY


S. r.. '1 ,
severe thunder-
tnrms rnllpd anrnss


New Jersey. Winds gC9
gusted to 92 mph at E-edition Online Access
Wrightstown, while Absolutely
a circus tent blew
down in Lavallette. F R E E

Call for login information.


2A
I *2


Daily Scripture
"Therefore, since we have these
promises, dear friends, let us
purify ourselves from every-
thing that contaminates body
and spirit, perfecting holiness
out of reverence for God."
2 Corinthians 7:1

Thought for Today
"It is not love that is blind, but
jealousy."
Lawrence Durrell,
British-bor author (1912-1990)

Lake City Reporter


2 cops on leave U......
following shooting Immigrants to


ff Iluoy I


-~ r~ ;.~~i~~Yh-~ .~~.-8..------~IY1II~-*~


S ,


I









LAKE CITY REPORTER NEWS WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 17, 2011


DEFENSE: Further cuts would be 'devastating,' says Defense Secretary

Continued From Page 1A


House and Congress set up a special
bipartisan committee to draft legislation
to find more government cuts. If the com-
mittee cannot agree on a deficit-reduction
plan by year's end or if Congress rejects its


proposal, it would trigger some $500 bil-
lion in additional reductions in projected
national security spending.
"This kind of massive cut across the board
- which would literally double the number


of cuts that we're confronting that would
have devastating effects on our national
defense; it would have devastating effects
on certainly the State Department," Panetta
said.


Clinton saidAmericans should understand
that in addition to preserving the nation's
military strength, it is in the nation's security
interests to maintain the State Department's
role in diplomacy and development


VOTE: Suwannee goes wet by a huge margin

Continued From Page 1A


Gwinn said economics was the
motivating force behind the vote.
"I feel that it will help to create
jobs here in the near future," he said.
"Businesses will be more willing to
locate in Suwannee County."
Brad Bailey, chairman of the oppo-
sition group Suwannee Dry, declined
comment
A total of 11,101 voters cast ballots,
said Supervisor of Elections Glenda
Williams. The county has a total of


25,119 registered voters, for a turnout
of 44 percent
'Tm pleased with voter turnout," she
said. We're just glad its over and done."
Voting went well at the various poll-
ing locations, Williams said.
"I was a great day," she said.
Now only four Florida counties
prohibit the sale of liquor and wine:
Lafayette, Liberty, Madison and
Washington.
Getting Suwannee County's dry sta-


tus off the books is an achievement for
the area, according to Gwinn.
"I thank everyone that has been
dedicated and worked so hard to
help make this historical moment in
Suwannee County happen," Gwinn
said. "We're proud and want peo-
ple, even those who opposed us,
to all understand we're all work-
ing together. We're all Suwannee
Countians and all want to move
forward."


TRAINING: Real busts

Continued From 1A


Services/Division of
Law Enforcement. The
U.S. Drug Enforcement
Administration provided
grant funding for the train-
ing program.
Seifert said several heli-
copters were utilized during
the training, which includ-
ed morning classroom ses-
,sions and afternoon flight
exercises.


"We were the training
center because we had
the available space and
we're a centralized loca-'
tion for North Florida,"
he said. "The Domestic
Marijuana Eradication
and Suppression program
is part of our continuing
efforts to combat the ille-
gal drug trade in Columbia
County."


SAFETY: Tips from CCSO on keeping kids safe as school approaches

Continued From Page 1A


ing school bus" where an
adult accompanies a group
of neighborhood children
walking to school.
Make sure your child's
walk to school follows a
safe route with well-trained
adult crossing guards at
every intersection.
Be realistic about your
child's pedestrian skills.
Because small children are
impulsive and less cautious
around traffic, carefully con-
sider whether your child is
ready to walk to school with-
out adult supervision.
If your child is young
or is walking to a new
school, walk with them the
first week to make sure
they know the route and,
can do it safely.
Brightly-colored cloth-,
ing will make your child
more visible to drivers.
Bike riders also have
rules to remember.
Always wear a bicy-
cle helmet, no matter how
short or long the ride.
Ride on the right, in
the same direction as auto-
mobile traffic.
Use appropriate hand
signals.
Respect traffic lights
and stop signs.
Wear brightly-color cloth-
ing to increase visibility.
Know the "rules of the
road."
School bus rules are
equally important for stu-
dent safety.
Make sure your child
uses a lap or shoulder seat
belt at all times when on
the bus.
Wait for the bus to stop
before approaching it from
the curb..
Do not move around
on the bus.
Check to see that no
other traffic is coming
before crossing the street.
Make sure to always
remain in clear view of the
bus driver.
Children should always
board and exit the bus at
designated locations that
provide safe access to the
bus or to the school build-
ing.
Motorists must be aware
of several tips during the
school year.
All passengers should
wear a seat belt and/or an
age- and size-appropriate
car safety seat or booster
seat.
Do not text or talk


on your cell phone while
driving.
Slow down and obey
all traffic laws and speed
limits.
Be alert for school
zones that have a reduced
speed limit at designated
times of the day.
Watch for school
buses. Red flashing lights
and an extended stop arm
indicate the school bus is
stopping to load or unload
children. State law requires
you to stop.
Keep an eye out for
children walking in the
street, especially where
there are no sidewalks.
Be alert for children
playing and gathering near
bus stops and for those who
may dart into the street
without looking for traffic.
When backing out
of a driveway or leaving
a garage, watch for chil-
dren walking or.biking to
school.
When driving in neigh-
borhoods or school zones,
watch for young people
who may be in a hurry to
get to or away from school
and may not be thinking
about getting there safely.
Parents must also set an
example for students dur-
ing the school year.
n Be a good role model.
Always buckle up in the
car, always wear a helmet
when biking and always fol-
low pedestrian safety rules.
Don't text or talk on your
cell phone while driving.
Supervise young chil-
dren as they are walking or
biking to school or as they
wait at the school bus stop.
Provide your children
with bright clothing so
motorists can easily see
them.
If your child is under
four years old and weighs
less than 40 pounds, make
sure the child is properly
buckled up in a weight-
appropriate child safety seat
in the back seat. Children,
ages 4 to 8, weighing over
40 pounds and measur-
ing four feet nine inches
or less should ride in a
booster seat. In addition,
safety experts advise that
all children under the age
of 12 should ride in the
back seat
Make sure that your
teen driver understands
and obeys all traffic laws.
Discourage them from tex-


ting or talking on a cell
phone while driving.
Also there are tips avail-
able for students.
Always buckle up when
riding in a car. Be sure to
remove your backpackbefore
getting in the vehicle. Never
buckle your safety belt with
your backpack on.
Always ride in the
back seat. It's the safest
place for young people.
Always wear a helmet
and follow traffic safety
rules when riding your
bike.
If you ride a school
bus, learn and practice the
safety rules for waiting at
the bus stop, getting on
and off the bus, and riding
the bus.
Never wait for the
school bus in the roadway.
If you walk to school,
learn and practice the safe-
ty rules for pedestrians.
It's extremely important
for you to use sidewalk
when available, look left-
right-left when crossing
the road, and always walk
facing traffic.
Always cross at cross
walks, obey all traffic signs,
traffic lights and crossing
guard instructions.
Cross railroad tracks
only at designated pedes-
trian or roadway crossings.
Observe and obey all warn-
ing signs and signals.
Do not walk, run or
ride your bicycle down rail-
road tracks. It's illegal and
dangerous.
Teen drivers should
avoid speeding and distrac-
tions while driving, such
as texting, talking on cell
phones, eating and adjust-
ing. the radio. Teens are
also reminded never to
overload their vehicle;
everyone riding in a vehi-
cle must use a safety belt.
Be a good role model
for your younger brothers,
sisters and friends, and
help them learn and follow

STAKE'S HOME & PATIO SHOW
2011
Everything for your home
Sept. 17-18, 2011
Sat. & Sun. 10am-5pm
Free Admission/Free Parking
Booth outside/inside
Spaces Still Available
Bradford County Fairgrounds
Starke, FL
North Florida Events Co.
(386) 344-2957


Columbia County's Most Wanted


Deinetrius Cusby
Eagles
DOB: 4/12/86
Height: 5'7"-Weight: 185 Ibs:
Hair: Black
Eyes: Brown
Tattoos: Left Arm-Maylee; Right
Arm-Wild Child, Both Ears Pierced
Wanted For: Felony Battery by
Strangulaton, Criminal Mischief


p


Keith Shelby
Rodriquez
DOB: 6/4/66
Height: 5' 9"
Weight: 158 Ibs.
Hair: Black
Eyes: Brown
Scar: 3" on Right Ankle; 1" on Face
Wanted For: VOP Dealing in Stolen
Property: Trafficking


WANTED AS OF 8/15/2011
ANYONE WITH INFORMATION ON THE WHEREABOUTS OF THESE INDIVIDUALS IS ASKED TO CALL CRIME STOPPERS OF COLUMBIA COUNTY.
WE DO NOT WANT YOUR NAME, JUST YOUR INFORMATION!
The likeness of suspects is supplied by the Columbia County Sheriff's Office Warrants Division and/or other law enforcement agencies.
The cases are active at the time of publication unless otherwise noted. Crime Stoppers of Columbia County, Inc., and their volunteers
are jointly and individually exempt from any and all liability which might arise as a result of the publication of public records.


CALL (386) 754-7099 OR
SUBMIT A WEB TIP AT
FCOLU IAC N www.columbiacrimestoppers.net
Funded by the Crime Stoppers Trust Fund; Administered by the Office of the Attorney General
LI


vehicle safety rules.
"We look forward
another great year


school children and school
staff," said Sgt. Ed Seifert,
CCSO public information


office. "And we hope this
year is just as safe as years
past"


NOTICE OF HEARING TO RE-IMPOSE AND PROVIDE
FOR COLLECTION OF FIRE PROTECTION SPECIAL
ASSESSMENTS

Notice is hereby given that the City Council of the City of Lake City will conduct a public
hearing to consider re-imposing fire protection special assessments for the provision of fire
protection services within the City of Lake City (see map of City below) for the Fiscal Year
beginning October 1,2011.
The hearing will be held at 6:30 p.m. on September 6, 2011, in the City Council Chambers
of City Hall, 205 North Marion Avenue, Lake City, Florida, for the purpose of receiving public
comment on the proposed assessments. All affected property owners have a right to appear
at the hearing and to file written objections with the City Council within 20 days of this notice. If
a person decides to appeal any decision made by the City Council with respect to any matter
considered at the hearing, such person will need a record of the proceedings and may need to
ensure that a verbatim record is made, including the testimony and evidence upon which the
appeal is to be made. In accordance with the Arericans with Disabilities Act, persons needing
a special accommodation or an interpreter to participate in this proceeding.should contact the
City Clerk's office at (386)719-5756, at least three (3) days prior to the date of the hearing.
The assessment for each parcel of property will be based upon each parcel's classification


and the total number of billing units attributed to that parcel.
proposed fire protection assessment schedule:


The following table reflects the


Residential Property Not to Exceed Notice Rates Proposed Rates for FY11-12
Category ._ _, ., ,,,

Single Family Rate Per Dwelling Unit $195.18 Rate Per Dwelling Unit $471.12
Mvul -ifamlnly "Rate Per Dwelling Unit $161.40 Rate Per Dwelling Unit $117.78

Nonresidential Property
catego Notto Exceed Notice Rates Proposed Rates for FY11-12

Hotel/Motel Rate Per Square Foot $0.0758 Rate Per Square Foot $0.0668

Commercial Rate Per Square Foot $0.1546 Rate Per Square Foot $0.1363

Industrial/Warehouse Rate Per Square Foot $0,0822 Rate Per Square Foot $0.0725

Vacant/Agricultural Rate Per Parcel $ 39.00 Rate Per Parcel $ 32.43
Copies of the Fire Protection Assessment Ordinance (Ordinance No. 2002-958), the Ini-
tial Assessment Resolution (Resolution No. 2002-055), as amended, the Final Assessment
Resolution (Resolution No. 2002-062), the Preliminary Rate Resolution initiating the annual
process of updating the Assessment Roll and re-imposing the Fire Protection Assessments for
the upcoming fiscal year, and the preliminary Assessment Roll for the upcoming fiscal year are
available for inspection at the City Clerk's office located at City Hall, 205 North Marion Avenue,
Lake City, Florida.
:The assessments will be collected on the ad valorem property tax bill which will be mailed
in November 2011, as authorized by section 197.3632, Florida Statutes. Failure to pay the
assessments will cause a tax certificate to be issued against the property which may result in
a loss of title.
If you have any questions, please contact the City Manager's Office at (386) 719 -5768,
Monday through Friday between 8:00 a.m. and 5:00 p.m.


p6i


City of Lake City


AUDREY SIKES CITY CLERK
CITY OF LAKE CITY


Page Editor: Robert Bridges, 754-0428












OPINION


Wednesday, August 17,201


www.lakecityreporter.com


"O


OUR
PINION


Let the



Court



decide

W hen a legisla-
tive interpreta-
tion is placed
in the hands
of the U.S.
Supreme Court, the outcome is'
a coin toss. The reality of such
a r'pquest Be careful what you
ask.for.
In the case of President
Obama's healthcare plan and
impending mandates on individu-
als requiring healthcare cover-
age, it may be the best option
to allow the Supreme Court to
decide whether it's constitutional
to force such a requirement on
the people.
A Federal Appeals Court in
Atlanta last week struck down
the mandate that citizens be
required to purchase health
insurance, which most assuredly
means an appeal will follow to
theU.S. Supreme Court
There are so many hidden
questions in this new health-
care plan that people from
the Beltway to the streets of
Columbia County are extremely
nervous to see how it all settles. ,
It is'an agonizing topic of discus-
sion among local business own-
ers here because they are unsure
of the impact on their business-
es, never mind the people just
trying to hang onto jobs.
Forced mandates that will put
more of the cost on the people
is the fear. President Obama's
healthcare mandate officially has
one strike against it It will be up.
to the high court to determine if
the mandate on Americans will
be allowed.


HIGHLIG HTS
IN HISTORY
Today's Highlight in History:

On Aug. 17, 1960, the newly
renamed Beatles (formerly the
Silver Beetles), consisting of
John Lennon, Paul McCartney,
George Harrison, Stuart
Sutcliffe and just-hired drum-
mer Pete Best, began their first
gigin Hamburg, West Germany
at the Indra Club


Lake City Reporter
SServing Columbia County
Since 1874
The Lake City Reporter is pub-
lished with pride for residents of
Columbia and surrounding counties by
Community Newspapers Inc.
We believe strong newspapers build
strong communities -"Newspapers
get'things done!"
Our primary goal is to
put lish distinguished and profitable
community-oriented newspapers.
This mission will be accomplished
through the teamwork of professionals
dedicated to truth, integrity and hard
work.
Todd Wilson, publisher
Robert Bridges, editor
Sue Brannon, controller
Dink NeSmith, president
Tom Wood, chairman

LETTERS
POLICY
Letters to the Editor should be
typed or neatly written and double
spaced. Letters should not exceed
400 words and will be edited for
length and libel. Letters must be
signed and include the writer's name,
address and telephone number for
verification. Writers can have two
letters per month published. Letters
and guest columns are the opinion of
the writers and not necessarily that of
the Lake City Reporter.
BY MAIL: Letters, P.O. Box 1709,
Lake City, FL 32056; or drop off at
180 E. Duval St. downtown.
BY FAX: (386) 752-9400.
BY E-MAIL:


news@lakecityreporter.com


RO\N TIW ?A\NLI FARDP IHM TIk E 10A\M SN FOLL




We should all serve


For the second time
during his presiden-
cy, Barack Obama
traveled to Dover Air
Force Base to salute
the remains of U.S. troops. This
time, the remains were those
of the 30 troops killed when
their helicopter was shot down
recently in Afghanistan. The
president's words, as they always
are at such times, were solemn
and full of praise, underscoring
the sacrifices and selflessness of
the dead warriors and the pain
their loved ones suffer.
These ceremonies are
impressive for their dignity, but
they always leave me feeling
empty, even a little angry. While
the sacrifices and selflessness
and pain of the dead and their
loved ones are lauded, no men-
tion is made of what the rest of
us owe these Americans who
volunteer to protect us.
What do we sacrifice for our
fallen troops and their families?
I take this issue personally. To
critics, let me point out that in
1966, as the Vietnam War raged,
I gave up deferment as a college
student to volunteer for the U.S.
Marine Corps. The nation had
the military draft at that time. I
volunteered because I believed I
had a duty to serve the nation. I
owed the United States.
I believe that our great free-
doms, which are the envy of
most other nations,-are not
free at all. They were, and are,
earned for us to enjoy. If we are
to keep these freedoms name
those important to you we
must work hard to protect and
nurture them.
I am not calling for reinstate-
ment of the draft. I am, how-
ever, calling for the implemen-


Bill Maxwell
maxwell@sptimes.com
station of mandatory national
service. This may never happen,
but it is a debate the nation
should have. Every able-bodied,
mentally fit American citizen
should be required to serve the
nation.in some capacity. I leave
the logistics to the experts.
Here is one idea: More than
a million young adults begin
attending four-year colleges
each year. As a condition of
admission to a public college
or to receive federal funds to
attend a private college, stu-
dents could be required to
serve their country for up to
two years, in civilian national
service programs such as
AmeriCorps or the Peace Corps
or homeland security efforts*
such as guarding nuclear plants
or in the military. Some would
choose the military, especially
if they were to receive more GI
Bill-type college-aid as a reward.
for more dangerous duty.
I know medical professionals,
lawyers, building contractors
. and journalists who financed
their educations with federal
loans, scholarships and fellow-
ships. As a condition of receiv-
ing these funds, they could be
required to perform two years
of national service. Doctors
could, for example, serve in
veteran's hospitals or agree to,
treat a specific number of vet-


erans in their private offices at
no cost This service would be a
boon to VA hospitals with long-
waiting lists.
Given the high number of
brain traumas resulting from
our current wars, thousands
of troops need and will need
critical care. Psychologists and
psychiatrists and social workers
can serve for two years.
Like health care profession-
als, lawyers who receive federal
funds could serve for two years
in many capacities. Each day,
the VA'attempts to deal with
thousands of troop benefit
claims. Lawyers who are doing
their two-year national service
could help streamline an other-
wise dysfunctional process.
Journalists can serve. We
tend to be patient researchers,
keen observers and writers of
clear prose. Countless federal
agencies could use our talents
for two years.
Again, all able-bodied, mental-
ly fit citizens could and should
serve. We should earn the right
to enjoy our great freedoms and
amenities that others have died
for and will continue to die for.
Inevitably, our president will,
return to Dover Air Force Base
to salute more flag-draped cases.
containing the remains of our
fallen warriors. The president
again will praise the sacrifices,
the selflessness and the coura-
geous service of our ~ead.
And again, the president will
not call on all Americans to
honor our warriors by sacrific-
ing and serving. As a people, we
should be ashamed.
9 Bill Maxwell is a columnist
and editorial writer for the
St. Petersburg Times.


Robert Bridges
rbridges@lakecityreportercom



A time



to heal


The wet/dry ques-
tion in Suwannee
has been decided.
Now itfs time for
some serious heal-
ing across the county line.
When, as editor of the
Suwannee Democrat, I resur-
rected this issue in the sum-
mer of 2009, I knew it would
be divisive.
The angry rhetoric only
escalated in the days and
weeks leading up to yester-
day's election.
Families, churches, whole
communities have been split
down the middle.
Still, it's a question that
needed to be raised. It was
once again time for the people
of Suwannee to have their say,
whatever the result.
As editor of the Lake City
Reporter, I've purposely stayed
out of this race. It's been given
even-handed coverage in our
news columns, but kept off the
editorial page.
Simply put, it's not our issue.
Having said that, we recog-
nize the wisdom of Columbia
County Tourist Development
Council director Harvey
Campbell, who noted in the
pages of this newspaper that
what's good for Suwannee
County is good for the whole
Suwannee River Valley.
Forget the global economy
let's talk about the regional
one. Suwannee's ability to
attract more visitors would
only benefit us by drawing
ever-greater numbers to North
Florida to experience first-hand
the many natural wonders we
have to offer.
Good luck and congratula-
tions to the winners. To the
losers welcome to the world
of hardball politics, as cruel
and unrelenting a pastime as
ever there was.
Now it's time to look ahead.
Let's get.on with the busi-
ness of building the future.

a Robert Bridges is editor of the
Lake City Reporter.


Why Obamacare won't control births


f you care about
Obamacare, you have to
care about all its possible
inflictions, many of which
were unknown when the
2,500-page act was passed amidst
Democratic horror at opposing
Republicans said to hate the sick
and want them dead.
More mildly, the Republicans
contended the disclosed parts
of the bill would increase the
debt, turn more of the economy
over to clumsy, harmful govern-
ment intervention, mangle health
care while hiking its costs, raise
taxes, abridge the Constitution
and'increase joblessness through
employer fears of outlays and
complications to come.
Also worrisome, some would
say, were the bits and pieces that
might emerge. We've just learned
of a new one. Within a year, the
law will require health insurance
companies to provide contracep-
tives free of any co-pay.
Sounds good, right? I mean,
distinguished investigators said
the provision will prevent mil-
lions of unwanted pregnancies,
saving money and making every-
one happy. Watch out, however,
because the facts do not get you
from here to there. What's more,
the underlying premise is that
intrusive, all-wise government is


a perfect sub-
stitute for com-
mon sense and
self-responsibil-
ity, and, as his-
tory has proved
repeatedly, itfs
not This new


provision is a Jay Ambro
brainchild that Speaktojay@aol.con
should never
have been
conceived. Understand, first
off, that the chief change of this
particular provision is elimination
of any co-payments, which will do
nothing to increase contraceptive
use. State regulators and courts
long ago mandated that insurance
companies provide birth control
coverage to anyone in need, as
the Associated Press reminds us.
And, a federally sponsored study
shows, just about everyone who
has any chance of getting preg-
nant already purchases or other-
wise obtains contraceptives.
Condoms these days can
pretty much be had for the ask-,
ing, depending on where you ask.
The insurance co-pay on generic
birth control pills is reported to
be $5 to $15 monthly, but some
generics can be had for $9 a
month even without insurance.
Intrauterine devices can be pur-
chased for as low as $175 and last


for as long as 12 years
($14.58 a year, or not
much more than $1
a month). Medicaid
takes care of the
impoverished.
Don't forget that, in
addition to modernity's


3s
M]


e technological break-
throughs, nature long
ago provided means to
avoid bringing babies
into the world, if thafs your wish -
the rhythm method for women with
regular menstrual cycles and the
withdrawal method; (coitus inter-
ruptus), which is, to be sure, an
imperfect methodology. Abstinence
is free and a perfect methodology -
teenagers ought to give it a try.
So with all of this available,
why any unwanted pregnancies?
Mainly, varied accounts tell us, it's
carelessness, as in not taking that
pill when you're supposed to, and
carelessness does not go away
with the elimination of copayment
assistance, as you would think
even a distinguished investigator
would deduce.
What will happen instead is that
everyone with health insurance
will get stuck with still more pre-
mium boosts, including those just
making ends meet, and every
woman in need will be eligible
for the benefits, including those


with millions and billions. Isn't it
interesting about liberals? They
want to tax the rich to penury
even as they extend welfare to
them maybe because they
think they will achieve their
penury wish?
You figure it out
The political style has conse-
quences for one and all. President
Barack Obama pledged that
Obamacare would lower health
premiums annually by $2,500.
An expert's article on this also
underlined that the Congressional
Budget Office said Obamacare
would actually raise annual premi-
ums by $2,100 a year.
There is one thing to be grate-
ful for, namely that we don't have
bedroom bureaucrats paid to tap
you on the shoulder at incon-
venient moments to find out if
sufficient precautions have been
taken. But don't be too sure
this innovation will never come
our way. There are still distin-
guished investigators out there
and still more bits and pieces of
Obamacare to get revealed.

Jay Ambrose, formerly
Washington director of editorial pol-
icy for Scripps Howard newspapers
and the editor of dailies in El Paso,
Texas, and Denver, is a columnist
living in Colorado.


4A


I _


*-
:








LAKE CITY REPORTER NATIONAL WEDNESDAY. AUGUST 17. 2011


Fans flock to Graceland to remember Elvis


By ADRIAN SAINZ
Associated Press
MEMPHIS, Tenn. Silent
mourners with heads bowed and
yellow-orange candlelight lead-
ing the way paid their respects
to Elvis Presley at his grave at
Graceland, his longtime Memphis
home, to remember the 34th anni-
versary of his sudden death.
Thousands of Elvis devotees,
candles in hand, walked in the
humid night to the graves of
Elvis and his relatives, some wip-
ing away tears as they filed past.
Flower arrangements and heart-
shaped wreaths decorated the
burial site as "If I Can Dream"
and other songs played softly in
the background.
The vigil was to extend past
midnight and into Tuesday morn-
ing, marking the anniversary of
the King's death on Aug. 16,
1977. The vigil is the main draw
of "Elvis Week," and some waited
hours outside the stately mansion
for the procession to start.
Paula Peina came with her
family from Campinas, Brazil,
for her sixth vigil. Penna, who
met her Brazilian husband in an
Elvis fan club, cried and hugged
him, her sister and aunt after pay-
ing her respects.
She said Elvis songs have
helped her family though good
and bad. All four have Elvis tat-
toos.
"Elvis music keeps the fam-
ily together," said Penna, who
also was born on Aug. 16 and
will celebrate her 27th birthday
Tuesday. "I promised to come
every year to pay tribute to Elvis
because he is very important to
the family life."
Fans like 60-year-old Joe
Makowski. who claims he
saw Elvis in concert 81 times
- and his girlfriend, Pamela
Hembree, were among the first
in line and waited for hours along
Graceland's outer brick wall. A
New Jersey native who owns four
of Elvis'. concert-worn scarves
and has attended several vigils,
he said it was time to introduce
Hembree to the Elvis Week
experience honoring the life and
career of the rock 'n' roll star.


Elvis fans from all over the world gather at the gates of Graceland for a candlelight vigil marking the 34th anniversary of the death of Elvis Presley


Monday in Memphis, Tenn.

"I get to meet new fans and
meet new people, so that's why.
I line up here early in the day,"
said Makowski, who went to Las
Vegas twice a year between 1971
and 1976 to see Elvis perform.
'The biggest thing I get out of
it is seeing the young fans that
weren't even born until years
after he passed away."
Makowski said he admires
Elvis because of his singing and
performing prowess, of course,
but also for what he called the
singer's overall coolness.
"He helped me break out of
my shell because I was kind of a
shy kid," said Makowski, an actor
who now lives in Palm Harbor,
Fla.
Visitors came from Japan,


England, Germany and other
countries. Some wore full Elvis
outfits, others just his trademark
sunglasses or sideburns.
Patrick Lucas sported side-
burns and pompadour going as
he walked to the vigil with the
rest of the Elvis Presley Fans of
Alabama, a club he joined on the
Internet. Hunter, 22, came from
Ehlange-Mess, Luxembourg, for
the vigil.
"I try to be like him, in the ways
that he was nice to people and
how he treated people," Lucas
said. "He was a giving person."
Temperatures were in the high
80s much of the d#y, sharply down
from the suffocating 100-degree
heat that greeted Elvis fans last
August. About 15,000 to 20,000


people attended, according
to estimates by police and an
Elvis Presley Enterprises spokes-
man nothing near the 75,000-
strong crowd that's expected to
flock to Graceland in 2012 for the
35th anniversary of the singer's
death.
The annual vigil began when
some Elvis fans traveled to
Graceland the year their idol
died. It grew into an organized
event in 1982.
This year, fans have some-
thing else to commemorate. It
was 55 years ago 1956 -
when the first two Elvis albums
were released. That year alone,
Elvis sold 10 million singles and
800,000 LPs.
Glenys Sites said she still


remembers watching Elvis per-
form "Love Me Tender" for the
first time.
"He's got everything stage
presence, charisma; he was sexy,
great voice," Sites said. "There's
never been anybody like him. I
don't think he'll ever die."
Many still remember where
they were when they found out
the. singer was dead.
Debbie Moller says she was
seated on her couch when her
sister called that August day in
1977 at the mansion. She didn't
believe her sister at first, so she
turned on the radio.
"I was bawling non-stop," said
Moller, who makes Elvis T-shirts
and is now attending her 15th
vigil.


THURS ,UG: 1 4-pii8 p.m.


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Page Editor: Robert Bridges, 754-0428


[SAVE MUDRIEDS1


'Z '':

1 :
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"'








6A LAKE CITY REPORTER CALENDAR WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 17. 2011


COMMUNITY CALENDAR


* Submit Community Calendar
announcements by mail or drop
off at the Reporter office located at
180 E. Duval St., via fax to (386)
752-9400 or e-mail arobinson@
lakecityreporter. com.


Today


Saturday


Easton Corbin concert
Country music star
Easton Corbin performs 7
p.m. today at the Howard
Conference Center as part
of the FGC Entertainment
series. Tickets can be
reserved at fgcentertain-
nfentcom or purchased at
the Performing Arts Center
box office. Call 754-4340 for
more information.

LEC events
Sonny Hartley per-
forms 11 a.m. today in the
Dining Hall at the LifeStyle
Enrichment Center. The
center is located at 628 SE
Allison Court

Five Points registration
'Registration for the
2011-2012 school year is
from 8 a.m.-4 p.m. today
and Thursday at Five
Points Elementary School.
Please bring proof of res-
idency for the school dis-
trict Also bring a picture
ID to obtain registration
packet

Thursday


CHS orientation
School orientation for
10th 12th grade is 5:30
p.m. Aug. 18 at Columbia
High School.

LEC activities
Chair exercise is 1
p.m. in the dining hall at
the LifeStyle Enrichment
Center. The center is locat-
:ed at 628 SE Allison Court

LCMS orientation
The Lake City Middle
School Orientation for all
students is 10 a.m. and 6
p,m. Aug. 18 in the gym-
nasium.

Meet your Teacher
*"Meet Your Teacher
Day" is 11 a.m.-1 p.m. and
5-7 p.m. Aug. 18 for first
fifth grade at Five Points
Elementary School.


Siday


SDSMP performances
-Mike Mullis is per-
forming with Southern
Rock group "Aunt Jackie"
Friday at the Spirit of the
Suwannee music park.
Music begins at 8 p.m. A
$5 cover charge can be
used as a meal voucher.
For complete details con-
tact (386)364-1703 and
(386)364-1683

Donors wanted
LifeSouth Bloodmobile
is seeking donors 2-8
p.m. Aug. 19 at Domino's
across from Lake City
Mall. Donors receive a free
medium one topping pizza
and a recognition item.

LEC activities
A Participant Advisory
Meeting is 11:30 a.m.-12
p.m. in the Dining Hall at
the LifeStyle Enrichment
Center. The center is locat-
ed at 628 SE Allison Court.


Farmers Market
The Lake DeSoto
Farmers Market is open
from 8 am. to 12 p.m.
Saturday in Wilson Park,
located along Lake DeSoto
between the Columbia
County Courthouse
and Shands Lakeshore
Hospital. The Columbia
Cheer Association is hold-
ing cheerleader registra-
tion for the 2011 Football
Season at the farmers mar-
ket from 8:30 am. 12 p.m.
Girls who attended the
cheer clinic sponsored by
Richardson Middle School
Cheerleaders will perform
a cheer, chant, and dance
at 9 and 10 am. CCA will
also have a Bake Sale and
Boiled Peanut Sale as a
fundraiser. Gainesville's
own, Ted Wright, who
plays acoustic folk/coun-
try music will provide live
entertainment. For more
information about the Lake
DeSoto Farmer Market call
(386) 719-5766.

Back to School Bash
A Back to School Bash is
4-6:30 p.m. Aug. 20 at First
Presbyterian Church. The
church is located at 697 SW
BayaAve. Contact Natasha
Faucher at (386) 752-0670
or Natasha@fpclc.org. The
event is a fun day for kids
going back to school. Join
the church for carnival
games, school supplies,
prizes, face painting, a
bounce house, Christian
fellowship, door prizes
and food. Please donate
individually packaged food
for the Backpack Project
for admission to the bash.
Cash donations for food
will cover costs. Visit
http://wwwi.fpclc.org.

Fashion expo
The Mom & Me
Pampering and Fashion
Expo is 2-6 p.m. Aug. 20 at
Lake City Mall. Admission
is $10 per person. Register
in person at the mall office,
call 697-6075 or via web
at www.itsaboutmyefforts.
org/pampering. Pajamas
or comfortable attire are
encouraged.

Sunday

Flag football
registration
The Boys Club of
Columbia Couity is now
registering for its 2011
Flag Football Program.
The program is for ages
6-8. An 8-year-old must
weigh 65 lbs. or less.
Practices are twice a week
at the club, and all games
are on Saturdays. Fees for
the program are $40. Call
7524184.

Monday


Casting call
Auditions for the com-
edy "Moon Over Buffalo"
is 7 p.m. Aug, 22-23 at
High Springs Community
Theater located at 130 NE
First Ave in High Springs.
Leroy Clark, is the direc-
tor. The production needs
for men and women ages
20-60. Openings are also
available for Stage man-
ager, props manager and a


New College
-Shirts


TIAOSCKY
WOLVERINE.
SOOTS A SHOIS SINCI 1113


Boots


Wilsn' Otfttr


lighting designer. Training
is available. The play is
about a stage actor and
actress with a chance to
star in a feature film.

Boys mentoring
Building Strong Bonds
mentoring program for
middle and high school
boys is 5-8 p.m. at 532
Marion Street Contact Al
Nelson at (386) 867-1601.
Dinner included.

Tuesday


LEC events
A documentary showing
is 1 p.m. in the Reading
Room at the LifeStyle
Enrichment Center. The
center is located at 628 SE
Allison Court

Sheriff's meeting
The next Columbia
County Sheriff's
Department meeting is
6-8 p.m. at Deep Creek
Community Center.

Wednesday, Aug. 24


will be shared by Ramona
Dewees, Quilt Show
Coordinator, and Loretta
Kissner, Boutique Chair,
on the upcoming 23rd
Annual Quilt Show enti-
tled "Fostering a Legacy
of Quilting." The show
is Oct 21-12 at Stephen
Foster Folk Culture Center
in White Springs. For
meeting details contact
President Loretta Kissner,
(386) 754-9330 or vice-pres-
ident Sunny Nadort, (386)
658-1555.

LEC events
Pearl Reed performs 11-
11:45 a.m. in the Dining
Hall at the LifeStyle
Enrichment Center. The
center is located at 628 SE
Allison Court.

Thursday, Aug. 25


LEC events


Lake City -Fire
Department Fire Safety
Presentation is 11 a.m.
Aug., 25 in the Dining Hall
at the LifeStyle Enrichment
Center. The center is locat-
ed at 628 SE Allison Court.


g gd m Saturday, Aug. 27
Quilting guild meeting


The Lady of the Lake
Quilting Guild is meeting
9:30 a.m. Aug. 24 at Teen
Town, 533 NW DeSoto
St Important information


Pastoral breakfast
The Northeast Florida
Leadership Council is


IS


, I,


//


LONGEST HOURS *


hosting its First Pastoral
Breakfast, 9 a.m. Aug. 27
at Richardson Community
Center Cafeteria. All pas-
tors and clergy staff are
invited to attend. The
breakfast will discuss the
ministerial component of
the Rev. Martin Luther
King Celebration. For any
additional information call
Rev. Wyndell Wallace at
(386) 697-9111.

Blackout event
Gold Standard Chapter
#48 is hosting a Blackout
event 7 p.m. -1 a.m. Aug.
27 at Winfield Community
Center. For any additional
information, please contact
Bro. Carlos Brown at (386)
288-6235, Sis. Marva Udell
at (386) 234-1615 or Sis.
Angela Woody at (386) 965-
8000.

Sunday, Aug. 28


Meet the author
The Friends of the
Library is hosting author
Maria Geraci 2 p.m. Aug. 28
at the Main Library. Geraci,
author of "The Boyfriend
of the Month Club" and
"Bunco Babes Gone Wild,"
grew up in Melbourne and
now lives in Tallahassee.
She draws inspiration from
her monthly Bunco nights,
writing what she calls "fun,
romantic women's fiction"
that's set in places such


as, Daytona Beach and the
fictional Whispering Bay in
North Florida.

Wednesday, Aug. 31


Entrepreneur of the
Year
NominationsforSCORE's
Entrepreneur of the Year
close Aug. 31. Nominate a
local small business owner
who is innovative, has sur-
mounted difficulties, orwho
contributes to our commu-
nity. E-mail scorelakecity@
gmail.com for a form or
click on "SCORE" at www.
northfloridanow.com to
nominate on-line. Call 752-
2000.

LEC events
Shirley Bethel per-
forms 11-11:45 a.m. in the
Dining Hall at the LifeStyle
Enrichment Center. The
center is located at 628 SE
Allison Court

Thursday, Sept. 1


Volunteer fair
A volunteer fair is 9 a.m.
- noon at the LifeStyle
Enrichment Center. Learn
about the Various Volunteer
Opportunities in Columbia
County. The LEC is located
at 628 SE Allison Courtnext
to Baya Pharmacy East.


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Lake City Reporter


Story ideas?

Contact
Tim Kirby
Sports Editor
754-0421


SPORTS


Wednesday,August 17, 20 I1


www.lakecityreporter.com


Section B-


BRIEFS

POP WARNER FOOTBALL
Scrimmage at
Memorial Stadium
Lake City Pop Warner
Football has four
scrimmage games for
fundraising at Memorial
Stadium on Thursday.
Admission is $2.
Game schedule:
6:30 p.m. Tiny
Mites, Lake City vs.
Santa Fe;.
7:15 p.m. Mitey
Mites, Lake City-vs.
Santa Fe;
8 p.m. Jr. Pee
Wees, Lake City vs. Santa
Fe;
8:45 p.m. Pee
Wees, Lake City vs.
Bradford.
FALCONS VOLLEYBALL
Tryouts planned
for Tuesday
Lake City Middle
School volleyball has
tryouts set for 3:30 p.m.
Tuesday in the school
gym. Players must have
a current physical, drug
testing and parent
consent forms on file.
For details, call coach
Haley Dicks at 965-7500.
INDIANS VOLLEYBALL
Middle school
tryouts Tuesday
Fort White High
volleyball has middle
school tryouts
immediately after school
on Tuesday in the high
school gym. Players
must have a current
physical and parent
consent forms on file.
For details, call Doug
Wohlstein at 497-5952.
LCMS FOOTBALL
Fundraiser at
Kazbor's Sunday
Lake City Middle
School football has a
fundraiser from
4:30-7:30 p.m. Sunday at
Kazbor's Grille. Cost is
$8 per plate for a
hamburger, fries and a
drink.'
For details, call Billy
Jennings at 758-4800.
FORT WHITE FOOTBALL
Kickoff event
at Deese Park
The Fort White
Quarterback Club is
hosting the annual
kickoff celebration at
Deese Park on State
Road 47 in Fort White
from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m.
Saturday. There will be
live music with a DJ.
Fort White's 2011
football teams,
cheerleaders and dance
teams will be introduced.
For details, call Shayne
Morgan at 397-4954.
YOUTH BASEBALL
9-under travel
team tryouts
Tryouts for a 9-under
travel baseball team are
5 p.m. today at Southside
Sports Complex.
For details, call Todd
Green at 365-5161.

North Florida
Blaze tryouts
The North Florida
Blaze 11-under baseball
travel team has
tryouts at 2 p.m.
Saturday at Southside
Sports Complex.
For details, call Tim
Williamson at 234-0423.


* From staff reports


A&M faces


lengthy


road to SEC


Realignment
process a long
one for Aggies.
By KRISTIE RIEKEN
Associated Press
COLLEGE STATION,
Texas Stay or go? Texas
A&M plans to take a while
before making a decision on
its conference affiliation.
School President R.
Bowen Loftin offered his
first detailed comments
Monday on the Aggies'
rather public interest in
joining the Southeastern


Columbia goes
into final week
before classic.,
By BRANDON FINLEY
bfinley@lakecityreporter.com
As Columbia High goes
through the final week of
practice before the Kickoff
Classic against Santa Fe
High, the Tigers attempt to
fine tune a summer's worth
of work.
'We're trying to get guys
healed and making sure
guys are sharp," Columbia
head coach Brian Allen
said. 'We have to make sure
that we're communicating
on offense and defense. We
have to make sure we're
working together. We have.
to make sure we're paying
attention to detail."
,The Tigers split squads
into varsity and junior varsi-
ty this week allowing Allen
to focus in on the groups.
He expects things to be
about review for the rest
of this week before game
week begins Monday.
"Things will totally
change," he said. "Monday
and Tuesday will be tough
practices. Wednesday
will be down specific and
Thursday will be review
before the game Friday."


Conference a move that
almost surely would set off
another round of confer-
ence realignment.
"We've made no deci-
sion about terminating our
relationship with the Big
12," Loftin said. 'This is all
about what is best for Texas
A&M, along with... visibility
for us and our athletes and
financial resources. That's
what it's all about. I think
anybody in my shoes would
have exactly the same kinds
of concerns."
He said there is no time-
A&M continued on 3B


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Texas A&M president R. Bowen Loftin addresses members of state and national media in the
A&M Board of Regents room in College Station Texas Monday. Loftin says A&M has no plans
to switch conferences at this time, but A&M regents voted Monday to give Loftin permission to
continue talks with SEC officials concerning future dealings between the two entities.


Columbia High's Barnabus Madison (left) and Felix Woods tangle during practice during the spring.


Thome bolsters Hall


case with HR No. 600


Unnoticed player
gains respect after
hitting milestone.
By NOAH TRISTER
Associated Press
DETROIT When Jim
Thome came to the plate,
needing one home run for
600, the opposing pitcher
wasn't even aware how
close he was to the mile-
stone. -
Then Thome sent a tow-
ering fly ball over the fence
in left field. The scoreboard
flashed a congratulatory
message, rival fans stood
and applauded, and the
Minnesota Twins came out
of the dugout to greet their
slugger.


After reaching No. 600 in
grand style Monday night
- with two home runs in
back-to-back innings dur-
ing a 9-6 win over Detroit
- Thome finally earned
some appreciation follow-
ing a pursuit that seemed
to go unnoticed for much of
the season.
The 40-year-old became
the eighth player to reach
the mark, and only Babe
Ruth did it in fewer at-bats.
Next stop, Cooperstown?
"I don't know. That's not
for me to decide," Thome
said. "That would be a
dream. It's pretty special.
I don't think it's really hit
home. To be mentioned and
have the Hall of Fame men-
tioned, that's just very, very
special. That's just really


cool."
Fighting injuries dur-
ing a frustrating season in
Minnesota, Thome didn't
receive nearly the amount
of national publicity that
his predecessors who
reached 600 homers did.
Even Derek Jeter's accom-
plishment of 3,000 hits ear-
lier this season dwarfed the
attention Thome received
for an accomplishment far
more rare.
There were reasons for
that, of course. Jeter is one
of the game's icons, playing
for its most famous team
- and perhaps on some
level, fans became numb
to sky-high power numbers
after so many of Thome's
THOME continued on 2B


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Minnesota Twins' Jim Thome swings for his 600th career :
home run during the seventh inning of a baseball game *.
against the Detroit Tigers Monday in Detroit. -


~











LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 17. 2011


SCOREBOARD


GOLF REPORTS


TELEVISION

TV sports

Today
LITTLE LEAGUE SOFTBALL
7 p.m.
ESPN2 -World Series, championship
game, at Portland, Ore.
MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL
2 p.m.
WGN Chicago Cubs at Houston
7 p.m.
ESPN -Arizona at Philadelphia
SOCCER
2:30 p.m.
FSN UEFA Champions League,
Villarreal at Odense
8 p.m.
FSN UEFA Champions League,
Zurich at Bayern Munich (same-day tape)

BOWLING

League reports

Results of league bowling at Lake
City Bowl:
MONDAY NIGHT MAVERICKS
TRIO
Team standings: I.Team 4 (105-55); 2.
P-Balls (95-65); 3. Lake City Bowl (92-68).
High scratch game: 1. Brian Meek 266;
2. Dan Adel 258; 3. Danny Phelps 255.
High scratch series: I. Zech Strohl
692; 2. Curtis Gutzmer 691; 3. Bobby
Smith 686.
High handicap game: I. Mike Sopezak
289; 2. Brian Meek 284; 3a Dan Adel 280.
High handicap series: I. Bobby Smith
-782; 2. Curtis Gutzamer .736; 3. Mike
Sopezak 720.
High average: 1. Zech Strohl 223.14;
2. Dale Coleman 207.75; 3. Robert Stone
207.13.
(results from July 25)

BASEBALL

AL standings


Boston
New York


East Division
W L
73 46
73 46


Tampa Bay 64 55 .538 9
Toronto 61 .60 .504 13
Baltimore 47 72 .395 26
Central Division
W L Pct GB
Detroit 64 57 .529 -
Cleveland 60 57 .513 2
Chicago 60 60 .500 3'A
Minnesota 53 67 .442 10h
Kansas City 50 72 .410 14 A
West Division
W L Pct GB
Texas 70 52 .574 -
Los Angeles 65 57 .533 5
Seattle 53 67 .442 16
Oakland 53 68 .438 16'
Monday's Games
Minnesota 9, Detroit 6
N.Y.Yankees 7, Kansas City 4
Baltimore 6, Oakland 2
Texas 8, LA.Angels 4
Seattle 6,Toronto 5
Tuesday's Games
Boston 3,Tampa Bay I, Ist game
Minnesota at Detroit (n)
Tampa Bay at Boston, 2nd game (n)
Cleveland at ChicagoWhite Sox (n)
N.Y.Yankees at Kansas City (n)
SBaltimore at Oakland (n)
Texas at LA.Angels (n)
Toronto at Seattle (n)
Today's Games
Tampa Bay (Price 10-10) at Boston
(Lackey 11-8), 1:35 p.m.
Baltimore (Simon 3-5) at Oakland
(McCarthy 5-6), 3:35 p.m.
Minnesota (Pavano 6-9) at Detroit
(Penny 8-9), 7:05 p.m.
Cleveland (Carmona 5-12) at Chicago
SWhite Sox (Buehrle 10-5), 8:10 p.m.
N.Y. Yankees (Colon 8-6) at Kansas
City (Chen 7-5), 8:10 p.m.
Texas (C.Wilson 11-5) at LA.Angels
(E.Santana 9-8), 10:05 p.m.
Toronto (Morrow 8-7) at Seattle
'(Beavan 3-3), 10:10 p.m.
Thursday's Games
Boston at Kansas City, 8:10 p.m.
Cleveland at Chicago White Sox,
.8:10 p.m.
N.Y.Yankees at Minnesota, 8:10 p.m.
Texas at LA.Angels, 10:05 p.m.
Toronto at Oakland, 10:05 p.m.

NL standings

East Division
W L Pct GB
'.Philadelphia 78 41 .655 -
Atlanta 71 51 .582 8h
New York 59 62 .488 20
Washington 57 62 .479 21
Florida 56 65 .463 23
Central Division
W L Pct GB
Milwaukee 71 51 .582 -
St. Louis 65 57 .533 6
Cincinnati 59 62 .488 II'
Pittsburgh 57 63 .475 13
Chicago- 54 68 .443 17
Houston 38 84 .311 33
West Division
W L Pet GB
Arizona 68 53 .562 -
San Francisco 66 56 .541 2h
Colorado 57 66 .463 12
Los Angeles 55 65 .458 12'i
San Diego 54 69 .439 15
Monday's Games
Atlanta 5. San Francisco 4
Pittsburgh 6. St. Louis 2
Chicago Cubs 4, Houston 3
Milwaukee 3, LA. Dodgers 0
Colorado 7, Florida 4
N.Y. Mets 5, San Diego 4, 10 innings
Tuesday's Games
Arizona at Philadelphia (n)
Cincinnati atWashington (n)
St. Louis at Pittsburgh (n)
San Francisco at Atlanta (n)
Chicago Cubs at Houston (n)
LA. Dodgers at Milwaukee (n)
Florida at Colorado (n)
N.Y. Mets at San Diego (n)
Today's Games
Chicago Cubs (C.Coleman 2-4) at
Houston (Norris 5-8), 2:05 p.m.
N.Y. Mets (Gee 10-4) at San Diego
(Latos 6-1 ),6:35 p.m.
Arizona (.Saunders 8-9) at Philadelphia
(CI.Lee 12-7), 7:05 p.m.
Cincinnati (Cueto 8-5) at Washington


(Detwiler 1-2), 7:05 p.m.
St Louis (Lohse 10-7) at Pittsburgh
(Maholm 6-13), 7:05 p.m.
San Francisco (Cain 9-9) at Atlanta
(Jurriens 12-4), 7:10 p.m.
L 2A. Dodgers (Eovaldi 1-0) at
Milwaukee (Greinke 11-4),8:10 p.m.
Florida (Nolasco 9-8) at Colorado
(A.Cook 2-7), 8:40 p.m.
Thursday's Games
LA. Dodgers at Milwaukee, 2:10 p.m.
Arizona at Philadelphia, 7.05 p.m.
Cincinnati at Washington, 7:05 p.m.
San Francisco at Atlanta, 7:10 p.m.
Florida at San Diego, 10:05 p.m.

500 home runs


(x-active)
Player
I. Barry Bonds
2. Hank Aaron
3. Babe Ruth
4.Willie Mays
5. Ken GriffeyJr.
6. x-Alex Rodriguez
7. Sammy Sosa
8. x-jim Thome
9. Frank Robinson
10. Mark McGwire
II. Harmon Killebrew
12. Rafael Palmeiro
13. Reggie Jackson
14. Manny Ramirez
14. Mike Schmidt
16. Mickey Mantle
17.Jimmie Foxx
18. Frank Thomas
18.Willie McCovey
18.Ted Williams
21. Ernie Banks
21.Eddie Mathews
23. Mel Ott
24. Gary Sheffield
25. Eddie Murray


300 saves

Career save leaders since 1969, when
saves became an official major league
statistic (x-active):
I.Trevor Hoffman 601
2. x-Mariano Rivera 590
3. Lee Smith 478
4.John Franco 424
5. Billy Wagner 422
6. Dennis Eckersley 390
7.JeffReardon 367
8.Troy Percival 358
9. Randy Myers 347
10. Rollie Fingers 341
I .John Wetteland 330
12. Roberto Hernandez 326
13. Jose Mesa 321
14.ToddJones 319
15.RickAguilera 318
16.RobbNen 314
17. x-Francisco Cordero 313
18.Tom Henke 311
S19. Rich Gossage 310
20.Jeff Montgomery 304
21.DougJones 303
22. Bruce Sutter 300
22. x-Jason Isringhausen 300

Baseball calendar

Sept I Active rosters expand to
40 players.
Sept. 30 or Oct. I Playoffs begin.
Oct. 19 -World Series begins, city of
NL champion.

FOOTBALL

NFL preseason

Monday
Houston 20, N.Y.Jets 16
Thursday
New England at Tampa Bay, 7:30 p.m.
Philadelphia at- Pittsburgh, 8 p.m.
(FOX)
Friday.
Washington at Indianapolis, 7 p.m.
Kansas City at Baltimore, 7:30 p.m.
Detroit at Cleveland, 7:30 p.m.
Carolina at Miami, 7:30 p.m.
Arizona at Green Bay, 8 p.m.
Atlanta at Jacksonville, 8 p.m. (FOX)
Saturday
New Orleans at Houston, 8 p.m.
Tennessee at St. Louis, 8 p.m.
Oakland at San Francisco, 8 p,m.
Buffalo at Denver, 8:30 p.m.
Minnesota at Seattle, 10 p.m.
Sunday
Cincinnati at N.Y.Jets, 7 p.m.
San Diego at Dallas, 8 p.m.
Monday, Aug. 22
Chicago at N.Y. Giants, 8 p.m. (ESPN)
WEEK 3
Thursday, Aug. 25
Carolina at Cincinnati, 7 p.m.
Cleveland at Philadelphia, 7:30 p.m.
Washington at Baltimore, 8 p.m.
(ESPN)
Friday,Aug. 26
St. Louis at Kansas City, 8 p.m.
Green Bay at Indianapolis, 8 p.m. (CBS)
Saturday, Aug. 27
Jacksonville at Buffalo, 7 p.m.
N.Y.Jets at N.Y. Giants, 7 p.m.
Atlanta at Pittsburgh, 7:30 p.m.



Unscramble these four Jumbles,
one letter to each square,
to form four ordinary words.

SHITGF I


Miami atTampa Bay, 7:30 p.m.
New England at Detroit, 8 p.m. (CBS)
Dallas at Minnesota. 8 pm.
Houston at San Francisco. 8 p.m.
Chicago atTennessee, 8 p.m.
Seattle at Denver, 9 p.m.
San Diego at Arizona, 10 p.m.
Sunday, Aug. 28
New Orleans at Oakland, 8 p.m.
(NBC)
WEEK 4
Thursday, Sept. I
Detroit at Buffalo, 6:30 p.m.
Indianapolis at Cincinnati, 7 p.m.
Baltimore at Atlanta 7:30 p.m.
St Louis at Jacksonville, 7:30 p.m.
Dallas at Miami, 7:30 p.m.
N.Y. Giants at New England, 7:30 p.m.
Philadelphia at N.Y. Jets, 7:30 p.m.
Tampa Bay atWashington, 7:30 p.m.
Pittsburgh at Carolina, 8 p.m.
Cleveland at Chicago, 8 p.m.
Kansas City at Green Bay, 8 p.m.
Houston at Minnesota, 8 p.m.
Tennessee at New Orleans, 8 p.m.
Denver at Arizona, 10 p.m.
San Francisco at San Diego, 10 p.m.
Friday, Sept. 2
Oakland at Seattle, 10-30 p.m.

BASKETBALL

WNBA schedule

Tuesday's Games
Washington at.NewYork (n)
Minnesota at Connecticut (n)
Indiana at San Antonio (n)
Seattle at Phoenix (n)
Atlanta at Los Angeles (n)
Thursday's Games
Connecticut at NewYork, 7 p.m.
Minnesota at Washington, 7 p.m.
Indiana at Los Angeles, 10:30 p.m.

GOLF

Golf week

PGATOUR
WYNDHAM CHAMPIONSHIP
Site: Greensboro, N.C.
Schedule:Thursday-Sunday.
Course: Sedgefield Country Club
(7,117 yards, par 70).
,Purse: $5.2 million. Winner's share:
$926,000.
Television: Golf Channel (Thursday-
Friday, 3-6 p.m.; Saturday-Sunday,
I-2:30 p.m.) and CBS (Saturday-Sunday,
3-6 p.m.).
Online: http://www.pgotour.com
LPGATOUR
SAFEWAY CLASSIC
Site: North Plains, Ore.
Schedule: Friday-Sunday.
Course: Pumpkin Ridge Golf Club,
Ghost Creek Golf Course (6,512 yards,
par 71).
Purse: $1.5 million. Winner's share:
$225,000.
Television: Golf Channel (Friday-
Saturday, 6:30-8:30 p.m.; Sunday,
7-9:30 p.m.).
Online: http://www.lpgo.com
CHAMPIONS TOUR
SENIOR PLAYERS
CHAMPIONSHIP
Site: Harrison, N.Y.
Schedule:Thursday-Sunday.
Course: Westchester Country Club,
West Course (6,980 yards, par 70).
Purse: $2.7 million. Winner's share:
$405,000.
Television: Golf Channel (Thursday-
Friday, 12:30-3 p.m.; Saturday-Sunday,
3-6 p.m.).
EUROPEAN TOUR
CZECH OPEN
Site: Celadna, Czech Republic.
Schedule:Thursday-Sunday.
SCourse: Prosper Golf Resort (7,452
yards, par 72).
Purse: $2.16 million. Winner's share:
$360,000.
Television: Golf Channel (Thursday-
Friday, 9 a.m.-noon; Saturday-Sunday, 8:30-
11:30 a.m.).
Online: http://www.europeantour.com
NATIONWIDE TOUR
MIDWEST CLASSIC
Site: Overland Park, Kan.
Schedule:Thursday-Sunday.
Course: Nicklaus Golf Club at
LionsGate (7,237 yards, par 71)
Purse: $550,000. Winner's share:
$99,000.
Television: None.

U.S.Women's Amateur

At Rhode Island Country Club
Barrington, R.I.
Championship
Danielle Kang, Westlake Village, Calif.
(144) def. Moriya Jutanugarn, Thailand
(137), 6 and 5.
Semifinals
Danielle Kang, Westlake Village, Calif.
(144), def. Brooke Pancake, Chattanooga,
Tenn. (144), I-up.
Moriya Jutanugarn,Thailand (137), def.
Austin Ernst, Seneca, S.C. (142), I-up.

THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME
by David L. Hoyt and Jeff Knurek


I 'i I I I I WITH Two ALMOST
SIDENT1IAL DRAWINGS, TOPAY'
RVGOEN I JJBLE PUZZLE 1 THS.
1 Now arrange the circled letters
to form the surprise answer, as
suggested by the above cartoon.

Answer here: I T
(Answers tomorrow)
Yesterday's Jumbles: PIVOT TOXIC LETHAL ASSIGN
Answer: After missing the spare that could have won
them the game, the bowler wanted TO SPLIT


Rivers wins LGA net event


The LGA staged a net
score event with players
using their full handicaps.
Several players traded
the lead before Sally Rivers
took control and nailed
down the win with a net
70.
Dottie Rogers' late surge
gave her second place with
a 72. Anita West finished
another shot back in third.
Dennis Crawford rolled
in five birdies for an impres-
sive 67 and +8 points to
win the Wednesday blitz.
Donald Roberts was hot on
Crawford's heels in second
place with a +7.
Cory DePratter, Steve
Patterson and Jerry West
gave the winners a good
fight, as all tied for third
at +6 en route to a third
place tie.
Jordan Hale matched
Crawford with two win-
ners in the skins game.
Buddy Slay eagled No. 16


COUNTRY CLUB
at LAKE CITY
Ed Goff,

to join Don Combs, Mike
McCranie and Roberts with
one skin each.
Bruce Gibson doubled up
on his nearest competitors
with +10 points for a run-
away victory in the Saturday
blitz. Shayne Edge, Terry
Hunter and Keith Shaw
tied for second place with
+5 points.
Robbie Kirby and Edge
picked up a nice payoff in
the skins game as the only
two winners.
Match 1 provided most
of the excitement in Good
Old Boys play this week.
Competing teams ended
regulation play in a 6-6
deadlock and went to the
scorecards for a tiebreaker.
After four holes of regres-
sion, Monty Montgomery,


.Bobby Simmons, Tom
Elmore and Dave Bernheim
took the win over Marc
Risk, Eli Witt and Dave
Cannon.
There was no doubt
about the winners in Match
2. Ed Snow, Jim Bell, Paul
Davis and Dan Stephens
took an early lead and fin-
ished with an 8-3 win over
Stan Woolbert, Dennis
Hendershot, Jim Stevens
and Howard Whitaker.
Risk was a shot over
par at 36-37-73 for medal-
ist honors. Montgomery
made it close with a 37-37-
74. Bell 38-39-77, and Snow
3840-78 posted the other
top scores.
An MGA tournament will
be played on Aug. 27, with
format and starting times
to be announced.
The Club Championship
tournament is Sept 17-18.
Men's, Women's and Senior
titles will be awarded.


Continued From Page 11

contemporaries reached
600 before him.
Thome is the fifth player
since 2002 to enter that
club, beginning with Barry
Bonds nine years ago. Alex
Rodriguez was the most
recent to achieve the mile-
stone, last August.
Unlike Bonds and
Rodriguez, Thome has
largely eluded suspicion of
using performance-enhanc-
ing drugs. His country-
strong physique was never
chiseled like some of the
hulking sluggers who pro-
liferated his generation.
'You look at how long
he's played in the game
and when you're able to
do something like that, it's
preparation, taking care of
yourself," Twins manager
Ron Gardenhire said. "If
you watch him come to the
ballpark very early every
day and prepare himself
to get'his body motivated,
which we all know as you
get a little older, its not that
easy. But to watch him get
himself motivated and get
himself up to be able to do
these things, hopefully a lot
of our guys can learn a lot"
This season has been a
struggle for Thome. He's


ACROSS

1 Chilly
6 Raising,
as a question
12 This or that
14 it (walked)
15 Countenance
16 Musical works
17 Barracks off.
18 Salt means.
19 "The Raven"
author
211 love (Lat.)
23 "Big Blue"
26 Zig's opposite
27 Before, in com-
bos
28 Spine-tingling
30 Well output
31 Put 2 and 2
together
32 Trick
33 Cager Shaq
35 Textile colorer
37 Ms. Grafton
38 Play the guitar
39 Rumor, per-
haps


been bothered by injuries
to his toe, oblique and
quadriceps. His milestone
homer was only his 11th
of the year in his 185th
at-bat, and he admitted on
Monday night that he was
wondering if it was ever
going to happen.
It did all right.
Just as Jeter reached hit
No. 3,000 in dramatic fash-
ion during a five-hit game
last month, Thome arrived
at his milestone with flair.
His two-run homer in the
sixth gave him 599, then he
harnessed the power again
in that pure left-handed
swing, lifting a 2-1 pitch
from Daniel Schlereth in
the seventh over the fence
in left field.
"I wasn't really aware of
it. I knew he was close to
600, but I .didn't know if
that was going to be the
one," Schlereth said. "I'm
not exactly happy about it,
but he's a great player, and
I'm a huge fan of his. He did
a great thing tonight, and...
I felt kind of awkward, I
didn't know whether to clap
or what."
By the time Thome
touched home, Detroit's
fans were well aware of


40 Ave. crossers
41 Former JFK
arrival
42 Geese
formation
43 Mate's
comeback
44 Wear and tear
46 Kind of PC
screen
48 Mel Gibson
role (2 wds.)
51 Gadget
55 Popsicle
flavor
56 Evening party
57 Overlooked
58 Like healthy
fur

DOWN


Carson City
loc.
Grandson,
maybe
Qt. parts.
Aspect
Safecracker


the accomplishment and
showed their appreciation.
The celebration at the plate
included Thome's father,
wife and children, but
it didn't delay the game
much.
"Obviously when you're
on the road, the game has
to move on," Thome said.
'To stop there and cher-
ish that moment in the
visiting park they give you
a standing ovation is
really cool. Throughout
the years, there's been a
little bit of heckling here,
through the years, for the
good. To watch them stand
up and cheer is very, very
special."
It was perhaps fitting
that Thome reached No.
600 in a matchup of AL
Central rivals. He hit 334
home runs with Cleveland
and 134 with the Chicago
White Sox.
Ruth reached No. 600 in
6,921 at-bats. Thome need-
ed 8,167.
Only seven hitters have
hit more home runs than
the burly Thome: Bonds,
Hank .Aaron, Ruth, Willie
Mays, Ken Griffey Jr.,
Rodriguez and Sammy
Sosa.


Answer to Previous Puzzle







ROAN CELL
EBBIT FIG
GENTLI E AET S IS


SI UEIH D
SRTA GLEE



AMES DIPS D E E
PIDS ED AM ER


6 Kind of ID
7 Uh-oh!
8 Thicker, as fog
9 Contingencies
10 Once called
11 Mdse.


Want more puzzles?
Check out the "Just Right Crossword Puzzles" books
at QuillDriverBooks.com


13 Slow down
19 Wields
a brush
20 Gawkers
22 Stick one's
oar in
24 Loud and rude
25 Jiffy
26 Monkey
havens
27 It may be read
28 Dueler's weap-
on
29 Really skimps
34 Falls
36 Investors'
concerns
42 Miffed
43 Tylenol rival
45 Poultry herb
47 Business VIPs
48 Female parent
49 Jackie's
tycoon
50 They pros-
ecute perps
52 Fury
53 Passing grade
54 Response to a
rodent


8-17 2011 UFS, Dist. by Univ. Uclick for UFS


THOME: Joins elite company


Page Editor: Tim Kirby, 754-0421









Page Editor: Brandon Finley, 754-0420


LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS WEDNESDAY. AUGUST 17. 2011 3B


As NCAA probes, Miami

coach says mistakes made


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Keegan Bradley celebrates on the 18th green after winning a three-hole playoff against
Jason Dufner at the PGA Championship golf tournament Sunday at the Atlanta Athletic
Club in Johns Creek, Ga.

Bradley should be a


lock for Presidents Cup


By DOUG FERGUSON
Associated Press

:JOHNS CREEK, Ga.
- Until winning the PGA
Championship, the coolest
thing in golf that happened
to Keegan.Bradley during
his amazing rookie season
was getting a phone call
from Fred Couples in May
after he won his first PGA
Tour event.
But if he doesn't get
another phone call from
Couples next month, that
would be just cold.
Bradley's second win of
the year moved him up to
No. 18 in the Presidents
Cup standings, giving him
three more tournaments
- all of them with $8 mil-
lion purses to try to
move into the top 10 and
become the first tour rook-
ie to qualify for a U.S. team.
If not, Couples makes two
captain's picks on Sept. 26.
Except the way Couples
is talking, he only has one
pick. The other already is
set aside for Tiger Woods.
"He doesn't have to
prove a lot to any captain, I
don't think," Couples said
at the Memorial, when
Woods was in the middle
of his three-month break


from golf to heal injuries in
his left leg.
Even when Woods
returned to competition
two weeks ago at Firestone,
Couples again suggested
that Woods only had to
indicate his desire to play
for him to be added to the
Presidents Cup team.
"As far as I'm concerned,
if he is not in the top 10 ...
he will be on our team, no
doubt," Couples told The
Golf Channel.
That would mean
Couples is willing to spend
a captain's pick on a guy
who has played two full
tournaments since the
Masters, breaking par only
once in eight rounds.
It means he will pick
a player who might have
competed only once in
about three months before
the Presidents Cup. Woods
is under contract to play
in the Australian Open
in Sydney on Nov. 10-13,
which is one week before
the matches at Royal
Melbourne.
And it will mean taking
a guy who not only hasn't
won in 21 months, but who
has finished within three
shots of the lead in just one
of his last 19 stroke-play


events on the PGA Tour.
This wasn't a problem
last year for Ryder Cup
captain Corey Pavin. When
it was time to make his
four selections, Woods had
shown signs of turning his
game around with consec-
utive finishes in the top 15
against two of the stron-
gest PGA Tour fields of the
year. Plus, there were no
other Americans who had
distinguished themselves
as logical picks.
This year is different.
Among those outside
the top 10 in the standings
going into the final month
of qualifying are Rickie
Fowler, who won his last
four holes to keep alive
U.S. hopes in the Ryder
Cup last year, and Gary
Woodland, a winner this
year and an intimidating
player in match play with
his length .
And then there's
Bradley.
It is not unprecedented
'for a player to win a major
and get left off a Presidents
Cup and Ryder Cup team in
the same year. Ben Curtis
and Shaun -Micheel won
the last two majors of 2003,
and Jack Nicklaus didn't
pick either one.


By STEVEN WINE
Associated Press

MIAMI Miami
Hurricanes coach Al Golden
says some of his player
may have made mistakes
that prompted an NCAA
investigation into convict-
ed Ponzi schemer Nevin
Shapiro's role with the pro-
gram.
Golden, preparing for
his first season with the
Hurricanes, said he just
became aware of the inves-
tigation into allegations
that Shapiro gave more
.than a dozen former or.
current players gifts and
services.
"We're not going to let
this knock us backward,"
Golden said Tuesday before


a morning practice. "We
have great kids on this team
to the extent that they may
have made a mistake. OK,
that's fine. But that's also
part of growing up. What
we have to teach them now
is if something did occur,
let's be honest and move
forward."
NCAA investigators vis-
ited the campus Monday
in the wake of Shapiro's
allegations that he provided
players with the use of a
yacht and other favors, said
his attorney, Maria Elena
Perez. Shapiro and Perez
have been talking with the
NCAA about the matter for
a couple of months and pro-
vided documentation, she
said.
Golden said athletic direc-


tor Shawn Eichorst and
president Donna Shalala
were meeting with investi-
gators, but the coach didn't
expect to be included in
those discussions.
"It's hard for me to stand
up here and defend some-
thing that occurred three,
four, five, six years ago,"
Golden said. "I don't know
the extent of it. We're going
to look at it We're disap-
pointed, but we're not dis-
couraged."
Shapiro's relationship
with the program dates
back about a decade. Some
of the alleged incidents
occurred in the past four
years, which would be
within the NCAA's statute
of limitations regarding
violations.


A&M: Question of stay or go
Continued From Page 1B


table for any decision and
any realignment by Texas.
A&M will take place after
a "lengthy" process. He
acknowledged that Texas
A&M had approached the
SEC, which has won the last
five BCS championships in
football but on:Sunday reaf-
firmed its 12-school mem-
bership while leaving the
door open to expansion.
'There is no bid," Loftin
said. 'There has never been
a bid to invite us into the
SEC at any time in the past
and if it were to occur in the
future, we would certainly
want to evaluate that."
The latest batch of con-
ference talk has drawn
the attention of :the
NCAA. Vice President of
Communications ; Bob
Williams said in a state-
ment Monday night that
President Mark Emmert
"has had conversations with
a number of presidents and


commissioners related to
recent conference realign-
ment issues and these dis';
cussions mirror many of
the topics raised last week
during the DI (Division I)
presidential meetings."
Loftin met with report-
ers shortly after receiving
authority from the board of
regents to take any action
he deems necessary in
terms of realignment. He
said Texas A&M is looking
only at the SEC right now,
but didn't rule out other
possibilities.
"It's not so much what's
wrong with the Big 12, it's
what's right for Texas A&M
and where we want to go in
time," he said.
The Big 12 will begin
the football season in a few
weeks with 10 teams after
Nebraska (Big Ten) and
Colorado (Pac-12) left in
July, a year after a seismic
shift in conference align-


ment. The Big 12 did not
respond to requests for
comment Monday, though
Commissioner Dan Beebe
told USA Today on Sunday
that the Big 12 was interest-
ed in maintaining 10 mem-
ber schools.
"We're just working
hard to try to figure out
how they can stay with us
because of the value that
institution has and the qual-
ity academic and 'athletic
programs it offers," Beebe
told the newspaper. "We'll
see. We've seen the odds
stackedagainst us before."
Loftin said he began
discussing Texas A&M's
'interest in the SEC with
Commissioner Mike Slive
on July-21. A&l's depar-
ture would' cast doubt on
the future of the Big 12,
and Loftin said lie would
consider the ramifications
for the conference before
doing anything.


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WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 17, 2011


LAKE CITY REPORTER


Back to school time in Columbia County


is running
high for the
start of a new
school year in
Columbia County.
"We're always excited
when a new year kicks
off," said Mike Millikin,
Columbia County School
District superintendent.
"It's nice to see the
students come back as
well as the teachers and
staff."
The district has made
some improvements over
the summer, he said.
This year there was little
going on in maintenance
and construction due to
a lack of state funding.
However, one proj-
ect was the complete
standalone middle
school campus for sixth
through eighth grade at
Fort White High School,
Millikin said. It will be
ready for the first day of
school, Millikin said.
"It's always a good feel-
ing to see it come togeth-
er before the school year
stars," he said.
A kitchen expansion
project at Fort White
has been delayed, but
it should be finished by
October, Millikin said.
The expansion will allow
the school to stop having
to satellite and transport
meals to the main cam-
pus.


Some minor painting
and renovation repairs
took place at many of
the campuses around
the district.
"Summer is the time
of the year we try to
do those few things," he
said. "We're wrapping it
up now.
Currently the district
is in pre-planning at all
the schools, Millikin
said.
Schools are having
faculty meetings and
there are also district
meetings this week
depending on the sub-
ject.
Two county-wide meet-
ings are also planned, he
said.
Some schools will see
differences in the cur-
riculum or scheduling
this year.
At Richardson Middle
School, students are
switching to block
scheduling similar to
what is in place at Lake
City Middle School,
Millikin said. The switch
will provide students an
easier transition to high
school.
There are also changes
in the high school grad-
uation requirements, he
said.
"This is the year full
range of End of Course
test in addition to the
FCAT," Millikin said.


.;, *-.~
I-1.


Richardson Middle School sixth-grade math and science teacher Kimberly Biehl (right) answers questions from Justin
Thomas (from left), Dylan Thomas and Michelle Thomas last school year.


The first phase of EOC
testing will require stu-
dents to pass algebra 1,
biology and geometry,
he said. Other subjects,
such as U.S. History and
a civics course in middle
school, will be added in
the future.
Tests are taken in the
natural progression of
when students are in a
course.
The tests are not


administered with paper
and pencil but taken
online, Millikin said.
The state is going to
allow multiple retakes
with the. EOC like the
FCAT.
Parents are encour-
aged to go to school
orientation or contact
their student's guidance
counselor to learn more
about'the new require-
ments, he-said.


For the first couple
days of school parents
can send their students
with just the basic mate-
rials and then see what
other items are required,
Millikin said.
Parent involvement in
key in creating a suc-
cessful school year.
"I want to encourage
all parents to become
involved in their child's
education," he said.


"That's the single big-
gest difference they can
make for us."
Involvement can range
from helping an elemen-
tary school teacher host
reward parties to serv-
ing on the school adviso-
ry council, Millikin said.
"There are any num-
ber of ways to stay tuned
in with what's happen
in your child's life," he
said.


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Classified Department: 755-5440


LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED WEDNESDAY. AUGUST 17. 2011


Lake City Reporter





CLASSIFIED


ADvantage


Take ADvantage of the
Reporter Classifieds!

755-5440


Legal

IN TIlE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
THIRD JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN
AND I-OR COLUMBIA COUNTY,
FLORIDA
CIVIL ACTION
CASE NO.: 12-2009-CA-000243
DIVISION:
BANK OF AMERICA, N.A..
Plaintiff,
vs.
CHRIS RINGENBERG, et al
Defendantss.
NOTICE OF RESCHEDULED
FORECLOSURE SALE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pur-
suant to an Order Rescheduling
Foreclosure Sale dated August 2,
2011 and entered in Case NO. 12-
2009-CA-000243 of the Circuit
Court of the THIRD Judicial Circuit
in and for COLUMBIA County,
Florida wherein BANK OF AMERI-
CA, N.A., is the Plaintiff and CHRIS
RINGENBERG; STEPHANIE RE-
ESE; UNITED GUARANTY RESI-
DENTIAL INSURANCE COMPA-
NY OF NORTH CAROLINA; are
the Defendants, The Clerk of the
Court will sell to the highest and best
bidder for' cash at FRONT STEPS
OF THE COLUMBIA COUNTY
COURTHOUSE at 11:00 AM, on
the 7th day of September, 2011, the
following described property as set
forth in said Final Judgment:
LOT 12, WESTER WOODS, A
SUBDIVISION ACCORDING TO
THE PLAT THEREOF AS RE-
CORDED IN PLAT BOOK 7, PA-
GES 36 AND 37 OF THE PUBLIC
RECORDS OF COLUMBIA
COUNTY, FLORIDA.
A/K/A 261 SW NIGHTSHADE,
LAKE CITY, FL 32024
Any person claiming an interest in
the surplus from the sale, if any, oth-
er than the property owner as of the
date of the Lis Pendens must file a
claim within sixty (60) days after the
sale.
WITNESS MY HAND and the seal
of this Court on February 11, 2011.
P DeWitt Cason
_Ie f. ittl. Circui Court .
b ,,/B Sclppio .
Deputy- lek. .. . ':
If you are a person with a disability ,
who needs any accommodation in
'order to participate in this proceedJ
ing, you are entitled, at no cost to
you, to the provision of certain assis-
tance. Please contact Carrina Cooper,
Court Administration at 173 NE Her-
nando Avenue, Room 408, Lake
City, Florida 32055, 386-758-2163 at
least 7 days before your scheduled
court appearance, or immediately
upon receiving this notification if the
time before the scheduled appear-
ance is less than 7 days; if you are
hearing or voice impaired, call 711.
Florida Default Law Group, P.L.
P.O. Box 25018


Legal

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT IN AND
FOR COLUMBIA COUNTY,
FLORIDA
CASE NO.: 09-000836-CA
JP MORGAN CHASE BANK, N.A.
Plaintiff,
vs.
RALPH OMALEY A/K/A RALPH
A. O'MALLEY; JANET OMALEY
A/K/A JANET O'MALEY; UN-
KNOWN TENANT I; UNKNOWN
TENANT II, and any unknown heirs,
devisees, grantees, creditors, and
other unknown persons or unknown
spouses claiming by, through and un-
der any of the above-named defend-
ants,
Defendants.
AMENDED NOTICE OF FORE-
CLOSURE SALE
NOTICE is hereby give that the un-
dersigned Clerk of the Circuit Court
of Columbia County, Florida, will on
the 24 day of August, 2011, at 11:00
AM at the third floor of the Colum-
bia County Courthouse at 173 N.E.
Hemando Avenue, Lake City, Flori-
da., offer for sale and sell at public
outcry to the highest and best bidder
for cash, the following-described
property situate in Columbia County,
Florida:
Lots 3 and 4, Block 3, PINEMOUNT
VILLAGE, according to the map or
plat thereof as recorded in Plat Book
3, Page 78, of the Public Records of
Columbia County, Florida.
pursuant to the Final Judgment en-
tered in a case pending is said Court,
the style of which is indicated above.
Any person or entity claiming an in-
terest in the surplus, if any, resulting
from the foreclosure sale, other than
the property owner as of the date of
the Lis Pendens, must file a claim on
same with the Clerk of Court within
60 days after the foreclosure sale.
WITNESS my hand and official seal
of said Court this 2nd day of August
2011.
In accordance with the Americans
with Disabilities Act, persons with
disabilities needing a special accom-
modation, to participate in this pro-
..edJmg should contact the Court Ad-
mlnisuaior .1 P.O. Box 2069, Lake
C'li, FlonlIj 32056-1965, telephone
,1:h.l) -" 5 .4 11:10 Ext. 250, not late
than seven (7) days prior to the pro-
ceeding. If hearing impaired, (TDD)
1-800-955-8771, or Voice (V) 1-
800-955-8770, via Florida Relay
Service.
P. DeWitt Cason
CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT
By: /s/B. Scippio
Deputy Clerk
ATTORNEY FOR PLAINTIFF
J aquin A. Barinas
Bter & Hosch, P.A.
3185 S. Conway Rd., Ste. E.
Orlando, Florida 32812
(407) 381-5200


lampa, rionaa ijo32-501t 05527133
F09037263 BANK OF AMERICA2-
SPECFNMA August 10, 17, 2011
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT, THIRD
05527210 JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR
August 10, 17, 2011 COLUMBIA COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
CASE NO. 11-185 CP
NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR IN RE: The Estate of WILLIAM
TAX DEED RAYTHOMAS
Sec. 197.241 F.S. DeceasedY
Notice is hereby given that the NOTICE TO CREDITORS
Plymouth Park Tax Services LLC of The administration of the estate of
the following certificate has filed WILLIAM. RAY THOMAS, de-
said certificate for a Tax Deed to be ceased, whoe djat of death was
issued thereon. The certificate nu- May 18, 2011, and whose SocialSe-
ber and year of issuance, the descrip- curity Number is XXX-XX-2412, is
tion of the property and name i pending in the Circuit Court for Co-
which it was assessed is as follows:
lumbia County, Fl~rida,. Probate Di-
Certificate Number: 2263 vision, the address of which is Co-
Year of Issuance: 2009
DYear of Issuance: 29 lumbia County Courthouse, Post Of-
Description of Property: SEC 19 fice Box 2069, Lake City, Florida
BER 09699-000 32056-2069. The names and address-
ALL OF THE FOLLOWING ONLY es of the personal representative and
AS LIES E OF SW TUSTENUG- the personal representative's attorney
are set forth below.
GEE AVE: SW 1/4 OF SE 1/4 & SE All creditors of Decedent and other
1/4 OF SE 1/4 EX 3.5 AC OFF E persons having claims or demands
SIDE & RD & EX N 352.25 FT !
EX S 308 FT OF N 1/2 OF SE 1/4 against Decedent's estate, on whom a
OF SE 1 /WOF CR 131, EX 29 47 copy of this notice is required to be
OF SE 1/4 W OF CR 131,EX 29.47 served must file their claims with
AC DESC ORB 917-238, & EX 4.29 this court WITHIN THE LATER OF
AC DESC ORB 918-2063 & EX THREE MONTHS AFTER THE
4.28 AC DESC ORB 923-1194. DATE OF TIME OF THE FIRST
ORB 898-345, DC FOR LUKE PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE
DEWEY (LD) HENERSON IN OR THIRTY DAYS AFTER THE
ORB 954-1392 DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY
Name in which assessed: JAMES OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM.
HENDERSON II All other creditors of Decedent and
All of said property being in the other persons having claims or de-
County of Columbia, State of Flonri- mands against Decedent's. estate,
da. Uness said certificate shallbe re- must file their claims or demands
deemed according to law, the proper- against Decedent's estate, must file
ty described in such certificate will their claims with this Court WITHIN
be sold to the highest bidder at the THREE MONTHS AFTER THE
Courthouse on Monday the 12th day DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICA-
of September, 2011, at 11:00 A.M. TION OF THIS NOTICE.
. DEWITT CASON ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITH-
CLERK OF COURTS IN IN THE TIME PERIODS SET
AMERICANS WITH DISABILI- FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF
TIES ACT: If you are a person with THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE
a disability who needs any accom- WILL BE FOREVER' BARRED.
modation in order to participate in NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME
this proceeding, you are entitled, at PERIODS SET FORTH ABOVE,
no cost to you, to the provision of ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2)
certain assistance. Persons with a YEARS OR MORE AFTER DECE-
disability who need any accommoda- DENT'S DATE OF DEATH IS
tion to participate should contact the BARRED.
ADA Coordinator, P.O. Box 1569, The date o fr t
Lake City, FL 32056, 386-719-7428, notice is July 5of 2 11f
within two (2) working days of your PHYLLIS T SHULL,
receipt of this notice; if you are hear- Personal Representative
ing impaired call (800) 955-8771; if 252SWFemdalePlace
you are voice impaired call (800) Lake City, Florida 32025
955-8770. MORGAN LAW CENTER FOR
0552 1 ESTATE & LEGACY PLANNING,
05526871 PLLC
August 3. 10, 17.24,2011 Teresa Byrd Morgan
Teresa Byrd Morgan
Florida Bar No..Q698954
234 East Duval'Street
Lake City, Florida 32055
386/755-1977-(office) .
386/755-8781 facsimilee)
386.755.44 Attorney for Personal Representative


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DIVORCE, BANKRUPTCY,
RESUMES.
other court approved forms-
386-961-5896.


05527206
August 10, 17, 2011
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT, THIRD
JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR
COLUMBIA COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
CASE NO. 11-201-CP
IN RE: ESTATE OF
DOYLE C. LESLIE,
deceased.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
The administration of the estate of
DOYLE C. LESLIE, deceased,
whose date of death was May 9,
2011: File Number 11-201-CP, is
pending in the Circuit Court for Co-
lumbia County, Florida, Probate Di-
vision, the address of which is 173
NE Hemando Avenue, Lake City.
Florida 32055. The names and ad-


Legal

dresses of the personal representative
and the personal representative's at-
torney are set forth below.
All creditors of the decedent and oth-
er persons having claims or demands
against decedent's estate, on whom a
copy of this notice is required to be
served, must file their claims with
this court WITHIN THE LATER OF
3 MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AF-
TER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF
A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON
THEM.
All other creditors of the decedent
:and other persons having claims or
demands against decedent's estate
must file their claims with this court
WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER THE
DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICA-
TION OF THIS NOTICE.
ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITH-
IN THE TIME PERIODS SET
FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF
THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE
WILL BE FOREVER BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME
PERIOD SET FORTH ABOVE,
ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2)
YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE
DECEDENT'S DATE OF DEATH
IS BARRED.
The date of first publication of this
notice is: August 17, 2011:
Personal Representative:
/s/ Dawn Renee Leslie
DAWN RENEE LESLIE
336 SW Alamo Drive
Lake City, Florida 32025.
Attorneys for Personal Representa-
tive:
FEAGLE & FEAGLE, ATTOR-
NEYS, PA.
By: /s/ Marlin M. Feagle
Marlin M. Feagle
Florida Bar No. 0173248
Attorneys for Personal Representa-
tive
153 NE Madison Street
Post Office Box 1653
Lake City, Florida 32056-1653
386/752-7191

05527335
August 17,24,2011
NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR
TAX DEED
Sec. 197.241 FS.
Notice is hereby given that the
Plymouth Park Tax Services LLC of
the following certificate has filed
said certificate for a Tax Deed to be
issued thereon. The certificate num-
ber and year of issuance, the descrip-
tion of the property and name in
which it was assessed is as follows:
Certificate Number: 2786
Year of Issuance: 2009
Description of Property: SEC 22
TWN 6S RNG 17 PARCEL NUM-
BER 09736-110
LOTS 10, 11, 12 & 'J3.PINE OAK
HAMMOCK S-D ;:'Ui-4. 848-
1807, 849-857, .S -1.i
Name in which assessed: JOHN
ROY SR
All of said property being in the
County of Columbia, State of Flori-
da. Unless said certificate shall be re-
deemed according to law, the proper-
ty described in such certificate will
be sold to the highest bidder at the
Courthouse on Monday the 12th day
of September, 2011, at 11:00 A.M.
P. DEWIIT CASON
CLERK OF COURTS
AMERICANS WITH DISABILI-
TIES ACT: If you are a person with
a disability who needs any accom-
modation in order to participate in
this proceeding, you are entitled, at
no cost to you, to the provision of
certain assistance. Persons with a
disability who need any accommoda-
tion to participate should contact the
ADA Coordinator, P.O. Box 1569,
Lake City, FL 32056, 386-719-7428;
within two (2) working days of your
receipt of this notice; if you are hear-
ing impaired call (800) 955-8771; if
you are voice impaired call (800)
955-8770.

05526873
August 3, 10, 17, 24, 2011

NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR
TAX DEED
Sec. 197.241 FS.
Notice is hereby given that the
Plymouth Park Tax Services LLC of
the following certificate has filed
said certificate for a Tax Deed to be
issued thereon. The certificate num-
ber and year of issuance, the descrip-
tion of the property and name in
which it was assessed is as follows:
Certificate Number: 3464
Year of Issuance: 2009
Description of Property: SEC 00
TWN 00 RNG 00 PARCEL NUM-
BER 13202-000
E DIV: COMM 190 FT W OF SE
COR, RUN N 12.15 FT TO N R/W
DUVAL ST FOR POB, CONT N
337.85 FT, W 100 FT, S 348.85 FT
TO N R/W DUVAL ST, E ALONG
R/W 100.25 FT TO POB EX R/W
FOR CIRCLE DR. BLOCK 247.
ORB 774-1819, 789-2444, PORB
#99-39 CP, ORB 877-1394 THRU
1401, DC 877-1398
Name in which assessed: JOYCE
TUNSIL
All of said property being in the
County of Columbia, State of Flori-
.da. Unless said certificate shall be re-
deemed acurIr, g to law, the proper-
ty described.-in such certificate will
be sold to the highest bidder at the
Courthouse on Monday the 12th day
of September, 2011, at 11:00 A.M.
P. DEWITT CASON
CLERK OF COURTS
AMERICANS WITH DISABILI-
TIES ACT: If you a person with
a disability who needs any accom-
modation in order to participate in
this proceeding. you are entitled, at
no cost to you, to the provision of
certain assistance. Persons with a
disability who need any accommoda-
tion to participate should contact the
ADA Coordinator, P.O. Box 1569,
Lake City, FL 32056, 386-719-7428.
within two (2) working days of your


receipt of this notice; if you are hear-
ing impaired call (800) 955-8771; if
you are voice impaired call (800)
955-8770.

05526874
August 3, 10, 17, 24, 2011


Legal

NOTICE OF PUBLIC SALE: JIM'S
AUTO SERVICE gives Notice of
Foreclosure of Lien and intent to sell
these vehicles on 08/30/2011, 08:30
am at 2550 SW MAIN BLVD.
LAKE CITY, FL 32025, pursuant to
subsection 713.78 of the Florida
Statutes.
JIM'S AUTO SERVICE reserves the
right to accept or reject any
and/or all bids.
VIN# 1FDEE14H3SHB26608
1995 FORD
VIN# 1FTCR10A7TUD34881
1996 FORD
VIN# 4A3AJ56G8RE032808
1994 MITSUBISHI

05527351
August 17, 2011
NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR
TAX DEED
Sec. 197.241 ES.
Notice is hereby given that the
Plymouth Park Tax Services LLC of
the following certificate has filed
said certificate for a Tax Deed to be
issued thereon. The certificate num-
ber and year of issuance, the descrip-
tion of the property and name in
which it was assessed is as follows:
Certificate Number: 3403' .
Year of Issuance: 2009
Description of Property: SEC 00
TWN 00 RNG 00 PARCEL NUM-
BER 12638-000
C DIV: S 1/2 BLOCK 6 EX R/W.
ORB 720-518, 910-2100, 945-2037
Name in which assessed: ROBERT
& JOANNA ELLIS
All 'of said property being in the
County of Columbia, State of Flori-
da. Unless said certificate shall be re-
deemed according to law, the proper-
ty described in such certificate will
be sold to the highest bidder at the
Courthouse on Monday the 12th day
of September, 2011, at 11:00 A.M.
P. DEWITT CASON
CLERK OF COURTS
AMERICANS WITH DISABILI-
TIES ACT: If you are a person with
a disability who needs any accom-
modation in order to participate in
this proceeding, you are entitled, at
no cost to you, to the provision of
certain assistance. Persons with a
disability who need any accommoda-
tion to participate should contact the
ADA Coordinator, P.O. Box 1569,
Lake City, FL 32056, 386-719-7428,
within two (2) working days of your
receipt of this notice; if you are hear-
ing impaired call (800) 955-8771; if
you are voice impaired call (800)
955-8770.

05526875
August 3, 10, 17, 24, 2011

NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR
TAX DEED
Sec. 197.241 F.S.
Notice is hereby given that the
Janes Strickland of the following
certificate has filed said certificate
for a Tax Deed to be issued thereon.
The certificate number and year of.
issuance, the description of the prop-
erty and name in which it was as-
sessed is as follows:
Certificate Number: 1879
Year of Issuance: 2004
Description of Property: SEC 17
TWN 4S RNG 17 PARCEL NUM-
BER 08404-009
THE E 90 FT OF: COMM SW COR
OF E 1/2 OF SE 1/4 OF S\% I,1 OF
SW 1/4, RUN E 187 FT, N 4,3 FT
FOR POB, CONT N 214.90 FT,. E
1027.34 FT, S 210 FT, W 1023.74'.
FT TO POB. ORB 656-535;768-165
Name in which assessed: SECURI-
TY PACIFIC HOUSING. SERV-
ICES INC
All of said property being in the
County of Columbia, State of Flori-
da. Unless said certificate shall be re-
deemed according to law, the proper-
ty described in such certificate will
be sold to the highest bidder at the
Courthouse on Monday the 12th day
of September, 2011, at 11:00 A.M.
P. DEWITT CASON
CLERK OF COURTS
AMERICANS WITH DISABILI-
TIES ACT: If you are a person with
a disability who needs any accom-
modation in order to participate in
this proceeding, you are entitled, at
no cost to you, to the provision of
certain assistance. Persons with a
disability who needany accommoda-
tion to participate should contact the
ADA Coordinator, P.O. Box 1569,
Lake City, FL 32056, 386-719-7428,
within two (2) working days of your
receipt of this notice; if you are hear-
ing impaired call (800) 955-8771; if
you are voice impaired call (800)
955-8770.

05526868
August 3, 10, 17, 24, 2011

NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR
TAX DEED
Sec. 197.241 F.S.
Notice is hereby given that the
Mary Wynne or Victoria Davis, of
the following certificate has filed
said certificate for a Tax Deed to be
issued thereon. The certificate num-
ber and year of issuance, the descrip-
tion of the property and name in
which it was assessed is as follows: ,.
Certificate Number: 1723
Year of Issuance: 2004
Description of Property: SEC 06
TWN 4S RNG 17 PARCEL NUM-'
BER 08028-107 LOT 7 CYPRESS
LANDING S/D .
Name in which assessed: SHERRY
KING
All of said property being in the
County of Columbia, State of Flori-.
da. Unless said certificate shall be re-
deemed according to law, the proper-
ty described in such certificate will


Legal

be sold to the highest bidder at the
Courthouse on Monday the 12th day
of September, 2011, at 11:00 A.M.
P. DEWITT CASON
CLERK OF COURTS
AMERICANS WITH DISABILI-
TIES ACT: If you are a person with
a disability who needs any accom-
modation in order to participate in
this proceeding, you are entitled, at
no cost to you, to the provision of
certain assistance. Persons with a
disability who need any accommoda-
tion to participate should contact the
ADA Coordinator, P.O. Box 1569,
Lake City, FL 32056, 386-719-7428,
within two (2) working days of your
receipt of this notice; if you are hear-
ing impaired call (800) 955-8771; if
you are voice impaired call (800)
955-8770.

05526867
August 3 10, 17, 24, 2011


NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR
TAX DEED
Sec. 197.241 F.S.
Notice is hereby given that the
Fell Enterprises LLC of the follow-
ing certificate has filed said certifi-
cate for a Tax Deed to be issued
thereon. The certificate number and
year of issuance, the description of
the property and name in which it
was assessed is as follows:
Certificate Number: 1603
Year of Issuance: 2004
Description of Property: SEC 33
TWN 3S RNG 17 PARCEL NUM-
BER 06869-019
COMM474.25 FT E OF NW COR
GOLF MANOR S/D FOR POB,
RUN N 121.60 FT TO S R/W
BAYA AVE, E ALONG R/W
BAYA AVE. 163.94 FT, S 138.55
FT TO N LINE GOLF CLUB MAN-
OR S/D, W 160.25 FT TO POB.
PARCEL #7 ORB 362-254.
Name in which assessed: SUSAN K.
BURKE
All of said property being in the
County of Columbia, State of Flori-
da. Unless said certificate shall be re-
deemed according to law, the proper-
ty described in such certificate will
be sold to the highest bidder at the
Courthouse on Monday the 12th day
of September, 2011, at 11:00A.M.
P. DEWITT CASON
CLERK OF COURTS
AMERICANS WITH DISABILI-
TIES ACT: If you are a person with
a disability who needs any accom-
modation in order to participate in
this proceeding, you are entitled, at
no cost to you, to the provision of
certain assistance. Persons with a
disability who need any accommoda-
tion to participate should contact the
ADA Coordinator, P.O. Box 1569,
Lake City, FL 32056, 386-719-7428,
within two (2) working days of your
receipt of this notice; if you are hear-"
ing impaired call (800) 955-8771; if
you are voice impaired call (800)
955-8770.

05526869
August 3, 10, 17, 24, 2011

NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR
TAX DEED
Sec. 197.241 F.S.
Notice is hereby given that the
Plymouth Park Tax Services LLC of
the following certificate has filed
said certificate for a Tax Deed to be
issued.thereon: The certificate num-
berpand year of issuance, the descrip-
tion. of the property and name in
.which it was assessed is as follows:
Certificate Number: 2970
Year of Issuance: 2009
Description of Property: SEC 30
TWN 7S RNG 17 PARCEL NUM-
BER 10068-033
LOTS 33 & 34 SASSAFRAS
ACRES EX 0.09 AC OF LOT 34
DESC ORB 766-126. ORB 656-035,
679-112, 699-174, 701-188
Name in which assessed: VANCE
LOUNSBURY JR
All of said property being in the
County of Columbia, State of Flori-
da. Unless said certificate shall be re-
deemed according to law, the proper-
ty described in such certificate will
be sold to the highest bidder at the
Courthouse on Monday the 12th day
of September, 2011, at 11:00 A.M.
P. DEWITT CASON
CLERK OF COURTS
AMERICANS WITH DISABILI-
TIES, ACT: If you are a person with
a disability who needs any accom-
modation in order to participate in
this proceeding, you are entitled, at
no cost to' you, to the provision of
certain assistance. Persons with a
disability who need any accommoda-
tion to participate should contact the
ADA Coordinator, P.O. Box 1569,
Lake City, FL 32056, 386-719-7428,
within two (2) working days of your
receipt of this notice; if you are hear-
ing impaired call (800) 955-8771; if
you are voice impaired call (800)
955-8770.

05526870
August 3, 10, 17, 24, 2011



020 Lost & Found

LOST: SMALL FEMALE_
GOAT. Black & White. Near
Bingo Station on SR 47.
Barbara Bullard 386-752-3284

REPORTER Classifieds

In Print and On Line

www.lakecityreportercom


100 Job
0 Opportunities

055:72SO
Teller FT- Florida Credit
Union Lake City Branch
Florida Credit Union has a FT
teller position available at our
Lake City branch.
Experience with high volume
cash handling, maintaining cash
drawer, balancing, cross-selling
ability, and customer service
expertise is required. Prior credit
union/bank experience is a plus.
We offer competitive salary,
incentives, and excellent
benefits. Stop by our branch at
583 West Duval Street to
complete an application or send
resume to Florida Credit Union,
Attn: HR/TLR, P.O. Box 5549,
Gainesville, Fl 32627.
Fax: 352-264-2661 E-mail:
krose@flcu.org M/F/D/V EOE
Drug Free Workplace

05527330

FI-ACKd

Managers and Assistant
Managers
Join a team of managers in the
Convenience store business.
Now accepting applications for
qualified people for Lake City.
We offer a competitive salary,
weekly pay, bonus, incentives,
paid holidays, and vacation.
Must have retail experience
and willing to work a
flexible schedule.

Apply at the Lake City
Fast Track Location on
Highway 90 or
Call: 352-494-7549
Fax Resume to: 352-333-1161
Email:
tsimmons(dafasttrackstores.com

05527345
Suwannee Valley Grassing, Inc.
is accepting applications for
TRUCK DRIVER. Must have
a valid Class A CDL. Must be
able to work weekends as req'd.
Normal work week is Mon- Fri.
Some out of town work. Apply
in person: 3100 Hwy 441N &
Cason Rd; north of Five Points.
Approx. 0.5 mi south of I-10,
across from the Target Distribu-
tion Center. All applicants must
pass a pre-employment drug
screen. Females are encouraged
to apply. Applications accepted
until position is filled.
EEO & DFWP

05527348
THE COLUMBIA COUNTY
SHERIFF'S OFFICE
Is now accepting applications
for the 2011-2012 Rotation
Wrecker List and for the Annual
CCSO Fleet Towing Contract.
Application packets may be
picked up between 8-5 Mon-Fri
at the CCSO Operations Center
located at 4917 U.S. Hwy 90
East, Lake City, Florida. All
applications must be received by
5pm September 2rd 2011.

AVON!! Only $10 to start!
Earn bonus $ up to $150+
1-800-275-9945 pin #4206
www.youravon.com/tdavies

Drivers: Teams: $6,000 Team
Sign-On Bonus when you team
drive for Werner Enterprises! Call
Now for details! 1-888-880-5902

Green Acres Learning Center
seeking childcare employee with
CDA, Apply in person 1126 SW
Main Blvd. No Phone Calls!!

Mechanic needed for Truck shop,
must have own tools, apply
Southern Specialized, 1812 NW
Main Blvd., 386-752-9754

Medical Front Office Help with
Experience: Part Time,
M,W,F 8-5. Deliver resume to
1140 Bascom Norris Drive #104
Lake City 32025 or Email to
ginaab4()vahoo.com.
05526800
Earn Extra Money
Deliver the new AT&T Real
Yellow Pages
in the Lake City area. FT/PT,
daily work, quick pay, must be
18 yrs+, have drivers
license & insured vehicle.
(800) 422-1955 Ext. 1
8:OOA-4:30P Mon-Fri

05527081
Lincare, leading national
respiratory company seeks
friendly, attentive Customer
Service Representative. Phone
skills that provide warm
customer interactions a must.
Maintain patient files, process
doctors' orders, manage
computer data and filing.
Growth opportunities are
excellent. Please fax resume to:
Center Manager (386)754-2795.
Drug-free workplace. EOE.

StarTech Computer Center
needs help.
Tech & Sales, FT & PT. Exp
only. email bdj@startech.cc


et your sig .hts

on something


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'.- ?


FIND 174








LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED WEDNESDAY. AUGUST 17. 2011


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We do favors for:
Weddings. Baby Showers
and any occasion
iS Soaps
Dog Mechanic
s Coffee e8' Monogramed
Silk Arranernments
275 N. Marion Avenue
(386) 243-8298
DoNilulin n Ojp~l- Tuseiay-Salurday
!hlirr. I1 d,'- tL -ntr ,. ,


USDA


Notice of

Limited Time

Availability

The USDA Loan Program provides homeownership opportunity
to residents of North Florida. Those who qualify can enjoy


I


SI'

I


'I


. . ..." -" -.I '




Buy a C&G Mobile Home
financed through the
USDA Guaranteed Loan Program
and receive your
choice of one of
the following forFREE


*An AK-4


* 100% Financing with Zero Down
* Low USDA Interest Rates
* Low Closing Cost
* Easy Credit Qualifying
* Low Income Requirements

For additional information, contact the
approved housing provider listed below:


Remember, the bitterness of poor quality
remains long after the low price is forgotten.
2 LOCATIONS TO SERVE YOU BETTER


Payment


i .I

SII

* '.'. I, :.' ._.| r : r.,r,. .. I .. ,.:[. i .r,,i, -rl ". "


Remember; the bitterness of poor quality
remains long after the low price is forgotten.
2 LOCATIONS TO SERVE YOU BETTER


Hwy 90 West
Across from Wal-Mart
(386) 752-3743


Deputy Jeff Davis Road
Old Pinemount Road
(386) 755-8885


Hwy 90 West
Across from Wal-Mart
(386) 752-3743


' Deputy Jeff Davis Road
Old Pinemount Road
(386) 755-8885


Rural i
Development


voW I OMES-


* 70 channels
* No contract


~i~m~~ii~oo











Page EdItor: Emogene Graham, 754-0415 LAKE CITY REPORTER ADVICE & COMICS WEDNESDAY. AUGUST 17, 2011


DILBERT


BABY BLUES


BLONDE


BEETLE BAILEY


HAGARTHE HORRIBLE


SNUFFY SMITH


ZITS


GARFIELD


B.C.


S(





C2011John L. HartFLP .-
FRANK & ERNEST


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st. byCreatorsSyndicate


DEAR ABBY


Woman with husband, lover

wants one big, happy family


DEAR ABBY: Sometime
ago, you printed a letter
from one of your readers
who was upset over her
son's polyamorbus rela-
tionship. I didn't respond
then, but now that my triad
is ready to come out to
my boyfriend's family (we
are out to mine and to my
husband's6family), I feel
the need to address this
lifestyle in your column
and ask your advice.
My husband and I have
been together 10 years.
We started out as swing-
ers. When we met my
now-boyfriend, it became
apparent that it was going
to be more serious than
"play" partners. Our par-
ticular arrangement is a
'V" triad, meaning I am
involved with two (hus-
band and boyfriend), but
they are not involved with
each other.
My boyfriend is
extremely important to us
in every way. We all work
together to make a very
smooth-running, loving
household.
I want you and your
readers to know that this
IS a viable relationship
with love, respect and,
most important, open com-
munication. This kind of
relationship or any, for
that matter is doomed
without it
An estimated half-million
people in the United States
are part of polyamorous
relationships. We're not
freaks in need of counsel-
ing, but people who realize


Abigail Van Buren
www.deorabby.com
that love can grow and that
there is an alternative to
monogamy.
Abby, I would like to get
some tips from someone
who doesn't readily accept
this life or even know it's
out there. My boyfriend's
family is conservative and
they know he lives with a
married couple. We've all
spent time together, and
I think they like me. Of
course, they don't know
I'm romantically involved
with their son.
What's the best way to
tell them about our triad?
We want them to know this
isn't the end of the world
and that I love him very
much. I'd appreciate any
advice from you or your
readers on this. Until we're
out of the closet, please
sign me ... NOWHERE
AND EVERYWHERE
DEAR N AND E:
Because you're looking for
input from someone who
"doesn't readily accept this
life," you have come to the
right place. You didn't say
how long your boyfriend
has been living with you
and your husband, but if
it has been any length of
time and his parents know
he isn't involved with any-


HOROSCOPES


ARIES (March 21-April
19): Push harder and
pursue an event that you
find challenging. You are
up for a good time and
must surround yourself
with friends, fans and lov-
ers. Boredom will be your
enemy, so plan a fun-filled
day. ***
TAURUS (April 20-May
20): If you don't under-
stand something, open
up a conversation that
will allow you to see the
big picture. Jumping into
something unaware of the
consequences will be your
downfall. Good fortune
doesn't necessarily mean
more money. '***
GEMINI (May 21-June
20): It's what you do for
others that will count now.
Helping a friend, relative
or your community will
enhance your reputation
and lead to an interesting
proposal. Promote your
creativity. Making your
place a warm and welcome
haven will enhance inti-
macy. ****
CANCER (June 21-July
22): Don't feel pressured
to make a decision. Take
your time and make sure
that whatever you do, it
is right for you. Emotions
will escalate and conflict is
likely if you aren't adamant
about what you do and do
not want **
LEO (July 23-Aug. 22):


THE LAST WORD
Eugenia Last

Divide your day carefully.
Focus on what you do for
a living and how you can
enhance your skills and
income. listening will help
you gather information,
putting you in a power-
ful position to negotiate.
*****
VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept
22): Go over your personal
papers and make sure you
have, everything in order.
A financial problem will
occur if you spend too
much on your home and
family. Restrictions and
discipline can be a good
thing. ***
LIBRA (Sept 23-Oct
22): Don't argue when
there is so much to do.
Develop your ideas and
creative skills so you can
put them to better use. A
change in the way you feel
about someone can alter a
decision you need to make.
Favors will be granted if
you ask. ***
SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov.
21): Changes are good
only if you make them for
the right reason. Ulterior
motives can be expected.
Rethink your plans until
they suit your needs.
Where there is a will,
there is a way. ***
SAGITTARIUS (Nov.


one else, it's possible they
already have some suspi-
cions.
Because they are con-
servative, if I were you I
wouldn't shatter their illu-
sions. I can almost guar- .
antee they won't embrace
you for it If you feel you
MUST disclose the infor-
mation, then do it in the
same way that you have
explained it to Ine. But
don't expect them to jump
for joy.

DEAR ABBY: At what
age does a person become
a senior citizen? There
has been much discussion
about this in our family. I
looked forward to turning
50 and becoming a "semi-
sexy senior." AARP starts
asking us to join BEFORE
50. BILL IN ARKANSAS
DEAR BILL: Yes, it
does. It's called recruit-
ing. Eligibility for senior
discounts varies depending
upon the establishment
offering them, and there's
no limit to the age one can
be "semi-sexy" as long as
you are healthy, willing
and able.
When I was invited to
join the AARP, I decided to
defer becoming a senior
citizen as long as possible.
With the retirement age
now approaching 70, it
appears the government is
taking its lead from me.

* Write Dear Abby at
www.DearAbby.com or
P.O. Box 69440, Los
Angeles, CA 90069.



22-Dec. 21): News of
someone or something
that interests you will take
you by surprise and moti-
vate you to follow suit A
romantic adventure will
do you good and help you
make some pressing and
vital decisions. *****
CAPRICORN (Dec.
22-Jan. 19): You'll have to
jump through hoops to get
what you want Dealing
with a contractor or mak-
ing alterations to your
home will result in prob-
lems. It is best to do the
work yourself. A change
in your relationship with
a friend, neighbor or rela-
tive will result if you argue.
**
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-
Feb. 18): You can change
your life if you learn from
your past If you have
learned your lessons well,
you should be able to
move forward with greater
confidence and a better
idea of whom you should
have in your life. Love is
highlighted. ****
PISCES (Feb. 19-March
20): Rethink your priori-
ties. You may have to take
a different approach to
partnerships and to how
you are going to deal with
colleagues. Look for alter-
natives if someone gives
you a hard time, but don't
waste time arguing. ***


CELEBRITY CIPHER

by Luis, Campos
Celebrity Cipher cryptograms are created from quotations by famous people, past and present.
Each letter in the cipher stands for another.
TODAY'S CLUE: J equals M
"PY JNO SY XW KZY VFIG XD N
DFKFBY PZMVZ VXFCH GBXRMHY N
KBYJYWHXFI CYNG DXBPNBH DXB


ZFJNWMKO.K "


- TYBYJO BMDLMW


PREVIOUS SOLUTION: "It's difficult to understand why people don't realize
that pets are gifts to mankind." Linda Blair


(c) 2011 by NEA, Inc. 8-17


FOR BETTER OR WORSE


Page Editor: Emogene Graham, 754-0415 LAKE CITY REPORTER


CLASSIC PEANUTS


ADVICE & COMICS WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 17, 2011









LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 17, 2011


100 Job
SOpportunities
Southside Baptist Church Two
Positions Available
PT Secretary Must be proficient
in Microsoft Word &
Microsoft Publisher.
Nursery Worker Hours are dur-
ing church services and functions.
Please apply at Southside Baptist
Church, for info 386-755-5553.
Wanted energetic, friendly.
sales people to sell Florida
Gateway Resort Memberships.
Please call 386-792-2692
We are seeking a hard working,
self motivated team player to join
our Bryant's Towing & Recovery
team. We are a family business.
You will be Towingllight-heavy
duty, performing service calls.
Must work nights & weekends.
Salary depends on experience.
Please call. 386-752-7799

120 Medical
120 Employment

05527328
LEARN TO DRAW BLOOD
Local Phlebotomy Course
offered in Lake City, FLA
Certificate program.
(904)566-1328

05527341
RN/LPN FT/PT, with IV access
experience. MUST have
IV certification.
Fax resume to: Attn Cheryl
386-754-3657 or email
to office manager: at
primarvcaremedic.com

Full Time Medical Assistant
needed for very busy paperless
Family Practice. Must be highly
motivated, multi-tasking and
patient centric. Intergy IEHR
experience a plus. Please fax
resume to: 386-961-9541

240 Schools &
SEducation

05527283
Interested in a Medical Career?
Express Training offers
courses for beginners & exp
Nursing Assistant, $479
next class-08/22/10

Phlebotomy national certifica-
tion, $800 next class-10/10/11,

Continuing education
Fees incl. books, supplies, exam
fees. Call 386-755-4401 or
expresstrainingservices.com



310 Pets & Supplies


Free to good home only.
3 adorable long haired kittens.
Call for more information.
386-623-5156


PUBLISHER'S NOTE
Florida Law 828.29 requires dogs
and cats being sold to be at least 8
weeks old and have a health
certificate from a licensed
veterinarian.documfienting they .
have mandatory shots and aret;.
free from intestinal ad- et~eal ..
parasites. Many species ot Yd-'"
life must be licensed by Florida
Fish and Wildlife. If you are;
unsure, contact the local
office for information.

330 Livestock &
330 Supplies
PIG FOR SALE.
Yorkshire/Hampshire
$45.00.
386-752-1811


440 Miscellaneous
2 Forest Lawn Cemetery sites.
$1100. each. Call for more
information. 386-755-9333 til 4
or 755-7773 after 6p
Stop gnat & Mosquito bites! Buy
Swamp Gator All natural insect re-
pellent. Family safe. Use head to
toe. Available at The Home Depot.
Summer Barbecue Special
Tow Behind
Grill/Smoker, $1,250 OBO.
386-719-4802

450 Good Things
5 to Eat
GREEN PEANUTS For Sale
Valencia. Graded and washed.
$30.00 a bushel.
386-752-3434


460 Firewood

Firewood for Sale. $65. per Truck
Load. Rick 386-867-1039 or Joey
965-0288 if no answer pls leave
message we will call you back.


520 Boats for Sale
1996 SEARAY 175 Bow Rider
1/0. Model 3.0 LX 135 H.P.
Mercruiser. Very low hrs.
W/trailer. $5,995. 386-758-9847

Mobile Home
610 Lots for Rent
Beautiful 3/2 DW, 1 ac, new car-
pet/paint, fenced back yard, double
carport, near college & shopping,
$850 mo 386-697-1013/697-1900

Mobile Homes
630 for Rent
14 Wide, 3/2-$525. mo. + dep.
Clean, Quiet Country Park
Water, septic, garbage incl. NO
PETS! 386-758-2280 References,


2&3 BR MH. $395 $650. mo.
plus deposit. Water & sewer fur-
nished. Cannon Creek MHP
386-752-6422 .
2/2 Units, clean, well maintained,
nice safe park setting, 2 miles to
downtown Lake City, $575 month
+ $575 sec dep, 386-984-8448
13th Month FREE!!
3/2 MH 1064 sq ft,remodeled, in
small/quiet park, near FGC, Small
pets ok, $500 dep $550 mo
386-752-1971 or 352-281-2450
3/2, on 1 acre lot
386-623-2203 or
386-623-5410,

3br/2ba newly renovated MH on-
1/2 ac. private prQperty. Closeto'
college $700.mo'. 1st; mo.+ Sec.
dep. Ref's. No Pets. Non smoking
environment 904-626-5700
Mobile Homes for rent in
White Springs, Lake City & Ft.
White. Contact 386-623-3404
or 386-397-2779


640 fMobile Homes
U for Sale,

Protect.Your Investmen
With A Professional
Inspection State License
And Insured 386-344-55


Handy man special, 94 Fleetwood
DWMH. 3/2 on 5 acres in Ft.
White. Owner Fin. $3,000 dn.
$850mo. $99,900 352-215-1018
www.LandOwnerFinancing.com
Palm Harbor Homes
Red Tag.Sale
Over 10 Stock Units Must Go
Save.Up To 35K!
800-622-2832'


361 Farm Equipment ,
705 Rooms for Rent
OA l __-i AZ/-I "r _^_T.- .-_


84or d 4610 Tractor.
2WD, Solid
2005 motor,$7,500. OBO
386-867-0005


403 Auctions

04543140
ESTATE AUCTION
Sat, August 20, 9:00AM.
291 Pompano Ct. Lake City.
94 American Eagle 38ft Motor
Coach, 01 Dodge 3500 ext cab
4wd dually diesel, tools, garage
equip., 14x30 storage shed/insu-
lated & AC, mowers. Houseful
of museum quality antiques, 30
cookie jars, McCoy pieces, 20
antique clocks, big screen TV,
air compressor. TOO MUCH
MORE TO LIST. Terms: Cash,
Checks, VISA/MC, 10% buyer
premium. Directions from US
90: go West 6 miles on Lake
Jeffery Rd to Brinkley (2nd
Rolling Oak entrance) Left on
Brinkley to 1st street on Right.
Elrod Auctions
904-699-7067 AB 1698


407 Computers

HP Computer,
$80.00
386-755-9984 or
386-292-2170


408 Furniture

QUEEN BED w/Steel frame.
Box spring, mattress, Sauder
Bookcase headboard. Like new.
$75.00 386-754-1595


420 Wanted to Buy

Wanted Junk Cars, Trucks, Vans.
$250 & up CASH! Free Pick Up!
NO title needed !386-878-9260
After 5pm 386- 752-3648.


430 Garage Sales

PUBLISHER'S NOTE
All Yard Sale Ads
Must be Pre-Paid.

REPORTER Classifieds
In Print and On Line
www.lakecityreporter.com


New furnished bedroom apt in a
home, private entrance & bath, in-
cludes utilities, trash, cable, frig &
pest control. $450 mo + dep. Avail
Now. 386-752-2020 SW Lake City

Unfurnished Apt.
710 ForRent








05527089
SPRING HILL VILLAGE
Excellent High Springs location.
1, 2 & 3 bedroom floor-plans;
some with garages.
Call 386-454-1469
or visit our website:n
www.springhillvillage.net

1BR APT.
Downtown Location, Clean.
$450 mo, plus Security.
NO PETS. Call 386-755-3456
2/2 w/garage & washer/dryer
hookups. West side of town,
Call for details
.386-755-6867
2BR/1BA. Close to town.
$565.mo plus deposit. :-
Includes water & sewer.
386-965-2922
Amber Wood Hills Apts.
Private Patio area. Beautiful yard.
Washer/dryerhkup. Free water &
sewer. 1/1, 2/1. Move in special.
386-754-1800. wwwmvflapts.com
Beautiful Apt, Large 1 bdrm,
w/inground pool, CHA, details at
bigfloridahome.com
$650/mo + dep 386-344-3261
Columbia Arms Apt. located 1/2
mi from V.A. & Winn Dixie. Pet
Friendly. Move in Special $199.
Pool, laundry & balcony.
386-754-1800. www.mvflapts.com
Furnished or unfurnished 1 or 2
bedroom townhomes on the golf
course. $625-$750. mo. + security.
Includes water. 386-752-9626
Great location W of 1-75, spacious
deluxe 2br apts., garage, W/D
hookup, patio. $600/700 & up, +
Sec, 386-965-5560 or 344-3715
Summer Special! 12th mo Free
w/signed yr lease. Updated, w/tile
floors/fresh paint. Great aite.
From $450.+sec. 386-752-9626


710 Unfurnished Apt.
7 For Rent
Greentree Townhouse
Summer special. 2/1, 2/1.5. Free
water & sewer. Balcony & patio.
Laundry. Behind Kens on Hwy 90.
386-754-1800 wwwmvflapts.com

ONE 51 PLACE APTS
Alachua
MOVE IN SPECIALS
1,2, & 3 bedrooms
Call TODAY 386-462-0656
or visit us at one51place.com

Redwine Apartments. Move in
special $199. Limited time. Pets
welcome. with 5 complexes,
we have a home for you.
386-754-1800. www.mvflapts.com
The Lakes Apts. Studios & 1Br's
from $135/wk. Util. & cable incl.,
Sec 8 vouchers accepted, monthly
rates avail Call 386-752-2741
Unfurnished Apt Eastside
Village Realty, Inc .2 bedroom
1 bath Duplex must be 55+ yrs of
age Call Denise Bose @
386-752-5290
Wayne Manor Apts.
Move in $199. Summer special.
2/1, washer/dryer. Behind Kens off
Hwy 90. 386-754-1800
www.myflapts.com
Windsor Arms Apartments.
Summer special $199. Move in!
2/1, 2/1.5, 2/2. Pet Friendy. Free
200 ch. Dish. Washer/dryer hkup.
386-754-1800. www.mvflapts.com

720 Furnished Apts.
7 0 For Rent

Rooms for.Rent. Hillcrest, Sands,
Columbia. All furnished.'Electric,
cable, fridge, microwave. Weekly
or monthly rates. 1 person $135,
2 persons $150. weekly
386-752-5808


Studio Apt. Private. Rent incl util-
ities, Satellite TV, appliances,
(washer/dryer). No pets 386-963-
4767 or 292-0385 Available 9/1

730 Unfurnished
730 Home For, Rent

1/1 Cottage, pool access, no pets,
country setting, $675 mo includes
utlilities & cable. $300 sec. Near
SR 47 & 75 386-719-5616
2BR/1BA Kitchen and Den. on
Alachua. $500. mo.
First, security.
386-397-0602
/ 2/1 879 Poplar St. $600. mo.
/ 3/2 Highlands Loop $700mo.
/ 2/1- 442 Praire St $650.mo.
All require First and last...
386-755-3649
Please leave msg., Only in office
Tues Thur. 8am 4pm
3 BEDROOM house
Close to shopping.
$685.mo $685. dep.
386-344-2972 .


805 Lots for Sale
Lots for Sale Eastside
Village Realty, Inc. buildable
vacant lot hight & dry in a estab-
lished neighbor priced @ $40.000.
Call Denise Bose @ 752-5290
North Fla Land. 1/2 80 Ac w/Fin.
Counties Columbia. Suwannee,
Gilchrist, Baker. Glades, Polk.
Call for brochure and terms. 7
Days 7 to 7. 386-752-5035 X 3111
A Bar Sales, Inc.
Owner Financing. River comm &
nature lover's dream in Lee. 15
wooded ac by the Withlacoochee.
Property is already subdivided
* MLS 75576 $48,000 623-6896
PUBLISHER'S NOTE
All real estate advertising in this
newspaper is subject to the fair
housing act which makes it illegal
to advertise "any preference,
limitation, or discrimination based
on race, color, religion, sex,
disability, familial status or nation-
al origin; or any intention to make
such preference, limitation or
discrimination." Familial status
includes children under the age of
18 living with parents or legal
custodians, pregnant women and
people securing custody of chil-
dren under the age of 18. This
newspaper will not knowingly
accept any advertising for real es-
-tate which is in violation of the
law. Our readers are hereby in-
formed that all dwellings adver-
tised in this newspaper are availa-
ble on an equal opportunity basis.
To complain of discrimination call
HUD toll free at 1-800-669-9777,
the toll free
telephone number to the hearing
impaired is 1-800-927-9275.


810 Home for Sale

0.5 acre tract has 441 (4 lane)
frontage. 1/2 miles from Target
distribution. 2/1.5 currently zoned
residential. MLS#78506 $91,000
R.E.O. Realty Group 867-1271
2 Mobile homes on 5 ac. above
ground pool. (1)1800 sqft. &
(l)150.osqft.$235,000 $139,888
MLS 77552 Brittany Stoeckert
Results Realty 386-397-3473
/ Champion Home Inspections
386-344-5551. Inspections
Starting At $ 249.00
Veterans Receive 10% Off
Full Inspection.
3/2 Brick Home w/1 car garage,
Metal roof, porch w/swing, detach
carport $96,000 MLS#77780
Jo Lytte Remax 386-365-2821
www.jolytte.florida-property-search.com
3/2 Split floor plan built in 2010
on 2 acres.. Master bath with large
tub & standing shower. Trey ceil-
ings MLS#78520, $114,900
R.E.O. Realty Group 867-1271
4/2 fenced yard,
2 car garage, Fairly new roof &
HVAC Shed, fenced back yard.
MLS#77602, $162,500, R.E.O.
Realty Group 867-1271


3 br/2ba house, 1206 McFarlane Almost 17ac., spacious 3br/2ba
Avenup, ayl. 911/11.-$850 mo ,. hope, .pved.rd. Near-Jtchetucknee
i- $400 s$-ep,9 Q-.7 620 o g. Pole-bamrn. ated. fenced.--
iosl : 904-813-8864 fof.appt:No pets! i 1 S 7690 1~ o-l 'ii Brodi Allred
it 3BR/l.A'Large'?ot' Very clean '6_.-.ll!testticld Reay Gr


ed
;51


with storage shed. Quiet area.
$850mo. + $850. dep.
.386-752-7578


3br/2ba, on 1 ac, Lake City 2,300
sf, Ig bonus room & detached
garage/wkshop. Quiet, near Ele.
.school. $1,150 mo. Pets ok w/dep.
386-965-0525/941-240-6151 Appt.
4br/2ba CHA Brick, 1200 sqft
lac., Close to FGCC, CR 245A.
Ceramic tile/carpet, $800 mo $800
dep (904)708-8478 App. req'd
Remodeled 3br/2ba Brick. In town
1750 sqft. Lg lot. Includes washer,
dryer, stove, & fiidge. Quiet area
$985. mo $985 dep. 386-752-7578
Small 2/1 newly remodeled, near
school, $500 month, + deposit, no
pets!, pls leave message 386-365-
1920 or 386454-7764 after 6pm
Unfurnished 2 bedroom/1 bath
house on 5 acres. $700.00 per
month. First, last and security
Firm. 386-590-5333

750 Business &
75 Office Rentals

Commercial property. 2100 sqft
bldg. on 1 acre. CH/A. Close to
college and Timco. Call for more
information. 386-867-1190
Downtown comer office space
across from the Courthouse avail.
2000 sqft Newly remodeled.
Excellent condition 386-961-8466
FOR LEASE: Downtown office
space. Convenient to
Court house.
Call 386-755-3456
For Lease: E Baya Ave. Two -
1000 sqft office space units or
combined for 2000 sqft. 386-984-
0622 or weekends 386-497-4762
OFFICE SPACE for lease.
Oak Hill Plaza. 900 sqft
S$675mo/$695. sec dep.
Tom 386-961-1086 DCA Realtor


790 Vacation Rentals

Horseshoe Beach RV Lot.
Nice comer Lot with ahade trees.
$295. mo Water/electric included
386-235-3633 or 352-498-5986
Scalloping Horseshoe Beach Spcl
Gulf Front 2br, w/lg porch, dock,
fish sink. wkend $395./wk $895.
386-235-3633/352-498-5986
alwaysonvacation.com #419-181
"Florida's Last Frontier"


805 Lots for Sale

05527058
Must See, Prettiest 10ac Rolling
Pasture-Lot in North Fla.
3 mi. W. of Col. City School.
Red. to $6,990 P/A, Financing,
386-752-1364 or 386-9654340

Foreclosure! 59.98 Ac. Close to
Suwannee River w/boat ramps &
Springs. Ideal parcel for your site
built or manuf. home. $139,000!
MLS# 78083 386-344-7662


810 Home for Sale
Charming 2br/2ba home. Gated
community. REDUCED to
5158.000 MLS78740 Teresa
Spradley 386-365-8343
Hallmark Real Estate
Clean Well maintained 3/2 brick
w/chain link fenced back yard
w/Garage. S120,K MLS78440.
Debbie King 386-365-3886
Hallmark Real Estate
Close to everything. Lg 3br/2ba
brick home. Close to VA & shop-
ping! $189,900 MLS78131 Carrie
Cason 386-623-2806
Westfield Realty Group
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
Neat & tidy 2/2, maybe 3/2. New
kitchen counters & tile. Open floor
plan. Mary Brown Whitehurst
965-0887 MLS# 77943 $99,000
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
10 acres w/well maintained brick
home. 2012 sqft. Open split floor
plan. Lori Giebeig Simpson
365-5678 MLS# 74447 $149,000
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
3br/3ba Spacious home in estab-
lished area. 2414 sqft. Private yard
& patio. Lori Giebeig Simpson
365-5678 MLS# 78175 $159,000
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
3br/2ba. 1590 sqft. Lori Giebeig
Simpson. 365-5678 or
Mary Brown Whitehurst
965-0887 MLS# 74542 $110,000
Country close 4o town 3/2 Brick, 3
ac. Grape arbor & fruit trees. pole
barn, workshop..Metal roof. MLS
78096 $129,900 Ginger Parker
365-2135 Hallmark Real Estate
Country Club Condo 4br/3ba.
Mega storage, roomy kit, 3 porch-
es. $165,000 MLS 78719 Paula
Lawrence 386-623-1973
Hallmark Real Estate.
Deer in your back yard. 3/2 HUD
w/16X48 wrap around scr. porch.
Clean, well maintained, 5 ac.
$72,000 MLS78687 Ginger Parker
365-2135 Hallmark Real Estate
Foreclosure! 3/2 D/WMH boasts
a large kitchen. M/B w/ garden
tub, shower & dbl sinks-New car-
pet-fpl & more-Only $69,995
MLS# 76920. 386-344-7662
Foreclosure! Newer 3/2 DWMH.
Lg rooms, kitchen island, lots of
wdws, master w/garden tub & sep-
arate shower. $74,995
MLS# 74218 386-344-7662
Great 3/2 home w/2346 sq ft
under roof on .67 ac., Creekside
S/D. Big back yard w/plenty of
shade trees. On a cul-de-sac, MLS
77385 $169,900 623-6896
Home for Sale Eastside Village
Realty, Inc. 2 bedroom, 2 bath site
built home with screen porch,
large carport priced just right Call
Denise Bose @ 752-5290


Home in Lake City Country Club.
4/3, renovated. Great for entertain-
ing. Glass doors open to back yard.
MLS#78637 $184,900
R.E.O. Realty Grouo 867-1271


810 Home for Sale
Home on 15 ac. w/over 2.500 sqft
home.Very lg bedrooms w/private
baths. 24x24 workshop $235,000
MLS 77552 Brittany Stoeckert
Results Realty 386-397-3473
JASPER! 4BR/2.5BA 1.890 SqFt
mfg home on I acre where
wildlife is abundant $39,900
DANIEL CRAPPS AGENCY,
INC. 755-5110 #77922
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
Suwannee Co. 115 ac. Fenced &
cross Fenced. Pasture land, paved
rd. Elaine K. Tolar 386-752-4211
MLS# 77081 $345.000
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
.97 ac. Centrally located to Lake
City & G'ville. Fenced, planted
pines, pasture. Elaine K. Tolar
752-4211 MLS# 73879 $291,030
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
New home in May Fair. Super area
comer lot. 4br split plan. Versatile
colors. Elaine K. Tolar
755-6488 MLS# 76919 $199,900
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
240 ac. Farm. Rolling Meadows.
Paved road, great access to Lake
City & G'ville. Elaine K. Tolar
386-752-4211 MLS# 70453
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
Suwannee Co. 115 ac. Fenced &
cross fenced. 10 & 20 ac parcels
avail. Elaine K. Tolar 386-752-
4211 MLS# 67766 $448,500
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
Brick home in town on lake front.
3br/2ba. New roof & hardwoods.
Glass room w/view Elaine Tolar
755-6488 MLS# 78092 $249,900
Lake front 3/2 custom Western Ce-
dar. Lots of storage space. Private
dock $229,900. MLS# 74681
Jo Lytte-Remax 386-365-2821
www.jolytte.florida-property-search.com
Large Home in the Country on
3.66 acres, fireplace, 2 outbldgs,
MLS#76471, $89,900
Jo Lytte, Remax 386-365-2821
jolytte@remaxnfl.com
LOCATION! CONDITION!
PRICE! 3BR/2BA w/open floor
plan; freshly painted $96,000
DANIEL CRAPPS AGENCY,
INC. 755-5110 #78278
Lofty home on Itchetucknee River,
Wrap around covered decks on
two levels.MustSEE! $375,000
MLS#77006 Jo Lytte
Remax 386-365-2821
Luxury home. 3br/2ba, 20 ac lot.
Cherry cabinets & SS appliances.
Jacuzzi in master br. MLS 78190
$ 374,900 Roger Lovelady 365-
7039. Westfield Realty Group
Mom's gone and House must go.
2 BR/2B, FL rm, deck, 1 car
garage, Eastside Village. $42K
All serious offers will be
considered. (386)454-7197
Motivated Seller. Country area,
paved rd. 3br/2ba manuf home.
New AC & upgraded wdows.
MLS 78027 $84K. Brodie Allred.
623-0906 Westfield Realty Group


Awesome Find! 3br/2ba, 1844sf,
wood floors, French doors to scr
back porch, 40x60 bldg w/office &
workshop, 6.17ac corer lot, 3
sides fenced. #77427 $199,900
Brick Ranch 3/2 Fl room. Side en-
try garage & workshop. 2 sheds.
New AC apple & roof. MLS78442
$114,900. Millard Gillen 365-7001
Westfield Realty Group
Champion Home Inspections
Contact John 386-344-5551
State Licensed
And Insured .
championhomeinspections.us


Bring the picture in or
we will take it for you!
* Ad-runs 10 consecutive days
with a description and photo in the
newspaper and online E-edition.
*'Ad runs 10 consecutive days as a
classified line ad online.
* You must include vehicle price.
* All ads are prepaid.
* Private party only.

*11



2006 EF250
Ford Van
f 3/4 ton, metal work
shelves/ladder rack,
60K miles, exc. cond.
$10,500
Call
386-555-5555
If you don't sell your vehicle
during the first 10 days, you
can run the same vehicle ad
for 10 additional days for
only $15.00
Terms and conditions remain the
same for the additional run.





(386)7.5.-544


Professional Office Space For Lease
11,728 S.F.
Excellent location just east of 1-75
Abundant free parking
Immediate occupancy PROCACCI
DEVELOPMENT CORPORATION



dkreI- las ^prccacci. A


LS & WATERCRAFT r -l-


2007 Coach House
Platinum 272XL, 15K
miles, may consider partial
trade for Class B.
$110,000
Call
386-754-8505


1996 Chrysler Town
& Country LXi
2nd owner, very clean
inside & out, cold AC, new
tire, loaded, 110 K.
$3,200 OBO
Call
386-963-2271
386-249-2723


2007 Honda
Motorcycle VTX 1300
Pearl green, one owner,
8600 mi., perfect cond.
$5,895
Call
386-758-5805
386-365-0817








1996 Sea-Ray
175 Bow Rider 1/0.
Model 3.0 LX 135 H.P.
Mercruiser. Very low hrs.
W/trailer.

$5,995
Call
386-758-9847


Classified Department: 755-5440







Classified Department: 755-5440


LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED WEDNESDAY. AUGUST 17. 2011


810 Home for Sale
MOVE-IN READY! 3BR/2BA in
pristine condition on 1.39 acres
$89.900 DANIEL CRAPPS
AGENCY, INC.
755-5110 #78345
New Reduced. 4br/2ba plus of-
fice. 2 living & dinig areas. cov-
ered porch. Fl rm. Triple garage.
MLS77685 Charlie Sparks 755-
0808 Westfield Realty Group
Nice, large 4/2 on 1 acre
w/florida room, granite floors,
wrap around front porch, $139,900
Brittany Stoeckert Results Realty
386-397-3473 MLS 77292
Owner Financing Avail. with
down pmt. 3br/2ba 2 story brick.
4.6 ac. in ground pool. Lg. work-
shop &2 wells. $150,000.00 obo
Old Wire Rd. (850)728-0782
Owner Financing. 2br/3ba country
home w/wrap around porches, 5ac.
Garage w/workshop. MLS77005
$179,900 Roger Lovelady 365-
7039 Westfield Realty Group
PRICE REDUCTION. 3/2 plus
pool house w/half bath, 2.25
fenced ac. Freshly painted. Split
plan, Large rear deck MLS 78103
$179,900 386-623-6896
PRICED TO SELL! 3BR/2BA
w/2,012 SqFt w/living rm & fami-
ly rm $57,000 DANIEL CRAPPS
AGENCY, INC.
755-5110 #78680
Private 2 ac parcel away from it
all. Hunting w/no restrictions.
Make an offer on this 1764 sqft
home that need some TLC.
$109,900, MLS78331. Jay Sears.
867-1613 Hallmark Real Estate
Reduced Price! 3br/1.5 ba. Re-
modeled. Nice area close to VA.
MLS 77599 $69K. Estate Sale,
bring all offers. Josh Grecian 466-
2517 Westfield Realty Group
Remax Professionals Motivated
seller. Spacious brick w/many up-
grades. Newer roof, windows &
fixtures. Fenced back yard. MKS
78168 $119,900 Missy Zecher @
623-0237 www.missyzecher.com
Remax Professionals Ranch style
home on 10 ac w/barn & horse
stalls. 4 Ig bedrm + bonus rm. 2
car gar. MLS 77403 $325K.
Missy Zecher @ 386-623-0237
www.missyzecher.com
Rolling Meadows. 4 or 3br/2ba.
Over1700 sqft. and 1/2 ac lot.
MLS77284 $154,900 Carrie Cason
386-623-2806
Westfield Realty Group
Something for Everyone! 3br/2ba,
2706sf, 4.02ac, island kitchen,
Corian counters, det garage, Koi
pond; fish house, green house,
fenced & more. #76255 $247,000
SPECTACULAR VIEW!
2BR/1BA, 1200sf, .65ac, scr front
porch, steps to deck/dock on Suw.
river, under house parking/storage,
shed & more. #77242' $194,900


810 Home for Sale
WELL-CARED FOR 4BR/2.5BA
mfg home w/formal LR plus fami-
ly rm $84,000 DANIEL CRAPPS
AGENCY, INC.
755-5110 #78585
WHITE SPRINGS! Sturdy block
3BR/IBA home in city limits.
fenced yd $49,000 DANIEL
CRAPPS AGENCY, INC.
755-5. 11 I:1 3-.nl I

820 Farms &
SAcreage
10-ac lot. Well/septic/pp. Owner
financing $300 dn, $663 mo 8.9%,
25 yrs. Deas Bullard Properties
386-752-4339 www.landnfl.com
4 1/2 acre lot. Lake Jeffery Road.
Gorgeous Oaks!Paved Rd
Owner Financing! NO DOWN!
$59,900. $525mo 352-215-1018.
www.LandOwnerFinancing.com
4 acres, Wellborn, New Well
installed, Beautifully wooded
w/cleared Home Site, owner fin,
no down, $39,900, $410 mon
Call 352-215-1018
www.LandOwnerFinancing.com
6.45 ac river front property in
White Springs, doe to Big Shoals.
Covered shelter for entertaining.
MLS# 77417 $104,900 386-867-
1271 R.E.O. Realty Group, Inc
FARM- 7 stall barn.
.17+ acres, pasture cross fenced.
Close in $500. mo.
386-961-1086
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
61 ac. Parcel. SR 27 & 1-75 inter-
change. Great potential, fenced &
cross fenced. Elaine K. Tolar
752-4211 MLS# 758060 $368,040-
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
40 ac.Parcel. Less then 2 mi from
city limits. Fenced road frontage
on US Hwy 441. Elaine K. Tolar
752-4211 MLS# 62092 $194K

830 nCommercial
830 Property
788 S. Marion Comm'l bldg on
highway frontage. Across from the
VA & near downtown. $49,900.
MLS 78129 Scott Stewart 867-
3498 Westfield Realty Group
Commercial. High traffic location
w/I-75 exposure. 2-story custom
log home. MLS77949'
JoshlGrecian 386-466-2517
Westfield Realty Group
Prime Commercial Location.
Just across from a plaza. Frontage
on Baya w/2 curbcuts. $350,000
MLS# 77485 Call 386-867-1271
R.E.O.Realty Group, Inc
Remax Professionals Commercial
Property. Located on expanding
west side of Lake City. Professio-
nal service or restaurant. MLS
77436 $575k Missy Zecher 386-
623-0237 www.riissyzecher.com .


Suwannee River Front Wellborn Commercial lot. 1.84
granite counters, covered patio, acres w/34' of Hwy frontage near
deck & dock, $349,000 the new Dollar General. MLS
MLS#76336 Jo Lytte at Remax 72381 Scott Stewart 386-867-3498
Professionals. 386-365-2821 Westfield Realty Group


860 Investment
Property
Rustic Fishing camp in Suwannee
Minutes to boat launch.
MLSf78709 559.900
Jo LyttewRemax 386-365-2821
wv., .join .florida-propert -ser-h.com
870 Real Estate
870 Wanted
I Buv Houses
CASH:
Quick Sale Fair Price
386-269-0605
952 Vans & Sport
S Util. Vehicles
96 Chrysler Town & Country LXi.
2nd owner. Clean inside/out, cold
AC, new tires, loaded. $3200. obo
110k mi 386-963-2271 249-2723


ADVERTISE YOUR
GARAGE SALE
WITH THE
LAKE CITY REPORTER
SOnly
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Lake City Reporter
lakecityreporter.com CURRENTS magazine
Subscribe Today
386-755-5445


I~b






























Wednesday, August 17, 2011 www.lakecityreporter.com


Take care
of your
lungs 2D


ID


Still in service to his country


Vietnam vet plays
vital role volunteering
at Lake CityVA.

By TONY BRITT
tbritt@lakecityreporter.com

s a younger man,
Peter Buckley made
a decision to fight for
his country and put
his life on the line in
the name of freedom.
Now as a senior citizen,
Buckley has made another deci-
sion to support his country, but
this time he is showing his patrio-
tism as a volunteer at the Lake
City VA Medical Center.
Buckley works in the Lake City
VA Medical Center's Voluntary
Service as an escort, transporting
patients back and forth to medical
appointments in the hospital.
"I like volunteering because
I'm with my own," he said. "I
kind of had a hole in my life and
I just miss being around military
people and we heard about the
VA Center and I came over here I
got involved. I just really feel that
I'm back with my own kind again.
I enjoy the folks that are in here.
This place and the people in it are
living history books. They have.
so much to offer and so many
stories to tell and be heard... I just
enjoy it"
Buckley, a Vietnam War vet-
eran, served in the United States
Air Force for 26 years before
retiring from the military in 1989.
Now the 68-year-old veteran lives
in Live Oak, after residing in sev-
eral other states and countries.
As a member of Voluntary
Service, Buckley can often be
seen walking through different
areas of the hospital accompany-
ing or pushing patients in wheel-
chairs or beds, to their medical
appointments in various parts of
the hospital.
"Sometimes you have people
that just can't get around and we
just help them get to where they
have to go," he said.
Buckley has worked as a volun-
teer with the VA for close to five
months. He volunteers two days a
week, 5-6 hours each day.
Buckley said he started volun-
teering at the VA Medical Center
because he felt a longing to help
fellow veterans.
"I like being around military
people and this was my oppor-
tunity to get back with my own
kind," he said. "It's quite a broth-
erhood and it just gives me a lot
of self satisfaction. I just flat enjoy
being around these people. These
guys are full of knowledge and
things you can learn. This is peo-
ple living history. It's an honor
being here with these people."
Volunteers at the Lake City VA
Medical Center gave 48,531 hours
to the facility in 2010. The Lake
City VA Medical Center has 550
volunteers and three of the volun-
teers are 90 or older.
Julie Baker, Lake City
VA Medical Center Chief of
Voluntary Service, said volunteers
are an important part of opera-
tions at the facility.
"Volunteers mean that we have
people here working at no cost to
the government who are provid-
ing some extra special things to
our patients that they might not
get from employees," she said.
She said it's hard to place a
value on what kind of impact vol-
unteers make at the facility.
'The volunteers make a heck
of a lot of difference," she said.
'"Throughout our North Florida/


.EVT



L -


TONY BRITTnaL -.i:r, R .:.n,
Peter Buckley, a Lake City VA Medical Center volunteer escort, takes Karl Hinkle to his medical appointment at the Lake City VA Medical Center.
Buckley volunteers at the local facility two days a week.


VA continued on 2D


TONY BRITTILake City
Reporter
Buckley takes a
stack of news-
letters from
Janet Baldeon,
Lake City VA
Medical Center
secretary of
Voluntary
Service.
Buckley has
been volunteer-
ing at the facil-
ity for nearly
five months.













Tips for keeping your lungs in shape


When your
lungs
are out
of shape,
your
whole body suffers. Simple
daily activities like walking
can be difficult. And certain
lung diseases, such as asth-
ma and chronic obstructive
pulmonary disease (COPD),
can gradually reduce lung
capacity.
Here are some tips to
deal with or help prevent
the most common types of
lung ailments.
Stop smoking
Smoking harms nearly
every organ of the body
and causes many diseases.
COPD the third lead-
ing cause of death in the
United States occurs
predominately in cigarette
smokers. All smokers
should speak with their
doctors to discuss smoking
cessation options as soon
as possible.
"It is imperative that all
individuals with COPD stop
smoking to prevent pro-
gression of the disease,"
said Dr. Virginia Hood,
president of the American
College of Physicians
(ACP), a national organiza-
tion of internal medicine
physicians. "Of course,
smokers without COPD
should quit not only to
decrease the risk of COPD,
but also the risk of other
serious potential coinplica-
tions of smoking, including
lung cancer, cardiovascular
disease and chronic kidney
disease. It's never too late
to stop."
Get checked
.Individuals with coughing
(with or without phlegm),
wheezing or shortness of
breath that lasts more than
two weeks should see a doc-
tor, such as a pulmonologist,
trained to diagnose respira-
tory illnesses.
If individuals have respi-
ratory symptoms, the new
guideline recommends that
physicians use a breathing
test called spirometry to
make a diagnosis of airflow
obstruction. Patients may
be treated with medications
that help relax the airways
of the lungs and drugs that
decrease inflammation. For
patients with COPD who
have very low blood oxy-
gen levels, physicians may
prescribe continuous oxy-
gen therapy. In addition,
pulmonary rehabilitation,
which typically includes
an exercise regimen as
an important component,
is also helpful. For more
information, visit www.
acponline.org.
Get exercise
For healthy lungs, try
to get 30 minutes of car-
diovascular exercise at
least three times weekly.
If that's too much to start,.
begin slowly by alternating
a few minutes of walking
and running. Also, breathe
deeply as you exercise.
Many times, people work-
ing out take short shallow
breaths, good for getting
you oxygen, but not for
building lung capacity.
StatePoint


/


-'/-


Fotolia.com


Doctors have new guidelines for treating a chronic breathing problem.


Volatile weeks ahead for uncertain investors?


By TOM KRISHER
AP Business Writer

DETROIT-Alittle good
news could bring some sta-
bility back to Wall Street
this week as investors look
for bargains amid chaos.
Then again, bad news
.could lead to continued
volatility. It all depends on
the news of the day.
The Dow Jones indus-
,trial average swung more
than 400 points four days
in a row last week, and jit-
tery investors are looking
,to economic data for clues
about where it's headed
next.
Coming up this week
are a raft of earnings from
retailers, statistics on hous-
-ing starts, jobless claims
and industrial production,
and a meeting between
German and French leaders
on worries about European
government debt
Wal-Mart Stores Inc.
and Target Corp., report
earnings on Tuesday and
Wednesday and could
provide a healing balm
to investors. The 'retail
chain results will be a
key indicator because the
stock market has fright-
ened consumers and their
spending is essential for
the economy to recover,
said Mark Luschini, chief
investment strategist with
Janney Montgomery Scott
in Philadelphia.
"(Those results) will be
telling as to whether the
consumer is in a position
to help power the economy
forward," he said.
The recent sharp decline


in the market means there
are bargains to be had.
Since the market's highs of
April 29, the Dow is down
12 percent The Standard
& Poor's 500 index has
fallen 9 percent since Aug.
1, mostly on worries about
the U.S. economy and debt
crisis in Europe.
Market pros likely will
be hunting for bargains
on Monday, especially in
stocks that pay relatively
high dividends since the
Federal Reserve has said
interest rates will stay low
for the next two years,'
Luschini said.
Frank Pare, a financial
planner with P.E Wealth
Management Group in
Oakland, Calif., is telling
his clients to hang on. Their
portfolios are diversified
between equities and fixed
income investments, but
they should still be ready
for more volatility, he said.
Pare is also advising
them not to follow the
movements hour by hour.'
"The first thing to do is
turn off your television," he
said. "If you're an investor,
you really don't want to get
caught up in the day-to-day
because it will drive you
crazy."
Even so, financial ana-
lysts say these are some of
next week's most critical
reports:
Wal-Mart's Earnings
Wal-Mart's second-quar-
ter report will give inves-
tors a look at consumer
spending. Its sales from
stores open at least a year,
the standard for measuring
a retailer's strength, have


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fallen for eight straight
quarters in the U.S.
Analysts have said the
declines resulted in part
from mistakes it made in
pricing' and merchandis-
ing. Sales also ha.vefaltered
because the main custom-
ers of Walmart stores are
continuing to limit their
spending and shift to online
rivals or dollar stores,
which offer convenience
and good bargains.
Wal-Mart is considered
the single most impor-
tant bellwether of con-
sumer spending because
it accounts for nearly 10
percent of all nonautomo-
tive retail dollars spent in


the U.S.
Housing Starts
The housing market got
some good news in June:
Single-family home con-
struction rose 9.4 percent.
It was the biggest increase'
since June 2009, when the
recession officially ended.
But analysts said the pace
of 453,000 homes per year
was still too depressed to
signal a turnaround in the
market.
The July number isn't
expected to be as high, but
economists say it will show
the building industry is
improving.
Although new homes
represent just 20 percent


of the overall housing mar-
ket, they have a significant
impact on the economy.
Each home built creates an
average of three jobs for a
year and generates about
$90,000 in taxes, according
to the National Association
of Home Builders.
European Debt
Investors will get a
reading on Spain's eco-
nomic health on Tuesday.
Europe's fourth-largest
economy grew at an annual
rate of 0.3 percent in the
first quarter. It likely stayed
sluggish in the April-June
period. Spain's unemploy-
MARKET continued on 3D


VA: Volunteer lends important aid

Continued From Page 1D


South Georgia (health system) we have
over 1,000 volunteers," Baker said. 'They
make the workload easier for our employ-
ees and they put the special touches on
the delivery of care coming from a volun-
teer it means a lot to our patients."
Buckley's compassion and sense of
dedication to veterans does not stop with
his volunteer work at the VA medical cen-
ter.
He has ridden a motorcycle with


Rolling Thunder, a veterans' motor-
cycle organization, to the Vietnam War
Memorial Wall in Washington, D.C.
"Its important to me to be a volunteer
because it's a part of who I am and what I
am," he said. "I'm a Vietnam veteran and
I just like being around these soldiers
- guys who sacrificed so much for love
of country and family. To me volunteering
is just self-satisfaction and it's an honor to
me to be with these people."


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LAKE CITY REPORTER


if













Eyecare helps avoid future health problems


Did you know that every-
one needs a regular eye
exam-even someone who
doesn't wear glasses?
Most people assume
an annual eye exam only
checks a lens prescrip-
tion, but your eye doc-
tor is also checking to
make sure your eyes are
healthy. The eyes are the
only unobstructed, non-
invasive view of blood ves-
sels in the body, and they
can tell a lot about your
overall health.
Through comprehensive
eye exams, eye doctors
can see eye conditions
like glaucoma and macu-
lar degeneration, as well
as signs of diseases like
diabetes, high blood pres-
sure and high cholesterol.
Eye doctors can even iden-
tify signs of diabetes up
to seven years before a
patient would typically
show symptoms and be
diagnosed by a primary
care physician. People are
three times more likely to
get an eye exam than a rou-
tine physical, so eye exams
are a great way to identify
the early warning signs of
many diseases.
"With healthcare costs
skyrocketing, it's more
important than ever to
diagnose and treat medi-
cal conditions as soon
as possible-before they
become a true burden on
a patient's body and wal-
let," says Jonathan Stein,
O.D., a VSP Vision Care
provider in Manhattan
Beach, Calif. "And with
diseases as prevalent as
diabetes, hypertension
and high cholesterol, reg-
ular eye exams become a
critical part of managing a
patient's overall health."
One condition an eye
doctor checks for during a
comprehensive eye exam
is diabetic retinopathy.
The condition is marked
by damage to the blood
vessels in the retina and
can lead to blindness if not
treated early. However,
with annual eye examina-
tions and proper follow-up
care, 90 percent of all dia-
betes-related blindness can
be prevented.
High cholesterol is
another condition eye doc-
tors can detect by looking
for waxy, yellowish buildup
in the blood vessels of the
eyes. In fact, 65 percent
of time, eyecare providers,
detect high cholesterol
before any other provider,
according to a recent study
commissioned by VSP
Vision Care, the nation's
largest not-for-profit vision
benefits company.
By getting annual com-
prehensive eye exams,
families and individuals
alike can save hundreds if
not thousands of dollars on
medical costs. Proper pre-
ventive care can help avoid
costly medical procedures
in the future.
For more information on
the benefit of eye exams
and their role in overall
health, visit www.seemuch-
more.com.
StatePoint


Statepoint
Eye exams can tell you a lot about your health.



Sale of gold up on eBay amid market turmoil


By RACHEL METZ
ByAP Technology Writer

SAN FRANCISCO For
gold sellers on eBay, the
recent stock market turmoil
has been a boon for busi-
ness.
Gold and silver sales on
eBay had already been rising
steadily over the past sev-
eral years so much so that
eBay Inc. created a special
area in May to make it easier
for buyers to find sellers.
Now, activity on that
part of the site, the Bullion
Center, is intensifying as
consumers unnerved by the
economic uncertainty flock
to gold in hopes it will be a
stable investment
"When people are com-
ing down to the question,
'Do they want to have cash
in the'bank or gold in their
hands?' the answer is they'd
rather have gold or silver,"
said Jacob Chandler, CEO
of Great Southern Coins,


the largest seller of precious
metals on eBay.
According to the most
recent data available from
eBay, sales of 1-ounce gold
American Eagle coins and 1-
ounce gold Pamp Suisse bars
rose steadily from Aug. 5 to
last Wednesday, before dip-
ping slightly or Thursday.
"With all the turmoil in
the markets, this is seen
as a way to diversify," said
Anthony Delvecchio, eBay's
vice, president of business
management and strategy
for eBay's North America
business.
Daniel Hirsch; a New
York-based statistician who
recently purchased more
than a dozen gold coins on
eBay from Great Southern
Coinis, said he started buy-
ing gold less than a year ago
in an effort to expand his
investment portfolio.
"Its kind of a safe haven
and a hedge against low
interest rates," he said.


Buyer Davis Hardgrove looks over a gold chain as his seller stacks silver coins also brought
in to sell at a coin shop in Seattle.


MARKET: Investors may face volatility in the weeks ahead

Continued From Page 1D


ment rate is the highest in the
region at nearly 21 percent.
Still overhanging the markets is
concern that Europe's debt crisis
will spread through the U.S. finan-
cial system. There are worries that
Italy and Spain, two of Europe's big-
gest economies, might be unable
to pay all their debts.

If they couldn't, big European
banks that hold huge amounts of


government debt would be at risk
of failure. That possibility, in turn,
could harm many large U.S. banks
with close relationships with their
European counterparts.
Also on Tuesday, German
Chancellor Angela Merkel and
French President Nicolas Sarkozy
will be meeting in an emergency
session to discuss joint propos-
als on governance of the euro-
zone amid market worries about


Europe's debt
Unemployment Benefits
The weekly jobs report can cause
big swings in the stock market. On
Thursday, the Dow rose 423 points
after the government said applica-
tions for benefits fell to 395,000.
They had been at or above 400,000
for the previous 17 weeks.
The report cheered Wall Street
traders, who were hungry for good
economic news after jitters about


U.S. growth and the financial cri-
sis in Europe caused a string of
market routs. Stock futures surged
when the data were released.
Yet the outlook remains cloudy.
The number of applications remains
above the 375,000 level that ana-
lysts say would signal healthy job
growth. And other recent data
on economic growth, consumer
spending and manufacturing out-
put have been weak.


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LAKE CITY REPORTER ACT2 WEDNESDAY. AUGUST 17. 2011


Page Editor: Robert Bridges, 754-0428








LAKE CITY REPORTER ACT2 WEDNESDAY. AUGUST 17. 2011


379-year-old farm gets new farmers


By KATHY McCORMACK
Associated Press

DOVER, N.H It's a good season for
the beloved sweet corn on the 379-year-
old Tuttle Farm. It also looks good for
the crops that weren't there a year ago,
produced by a group of visiting young
farmers eggplant, peppers, pumpkins
and sunflowers.
The New Hampshire farm, one of
the oldest continuously operated fam-
ily farms in America, raised a lot of
interest and emotion a year ago
when members of the 11th generation
of Tuttles announced they were put-
ting it up for sale. Faced with debt and
their own mortality, they said the 12th
generation is either too young or too
entrenched in other careers. A bit of
history and tradition was drawing to a
close.
Today, the 135-acre farm is still on the
market. While the Tuttles wait, a new
group of farmers unrelated to the family
is helping to keep the operation going,
trying a variety of crops, livestock and
organic farming practices, and may
even stay on after it's sold. They receive
coaching and equipment from a non-
profit group that acts as a business incu-
bator for farmers.
The enterprise is a first for New
Hampshire but is a type of organiza-
tion that has caught on throughout
the country in recent years, from
North Carolina to California. New
Hampshire's was inspired in part by
the Intervale Center in Burlington,
Vt., which leases equipment, land,
greenhouses and storage areas to
small, independent farms.
"We need to grow some more farmers
here," said Suzanne Brown, founder of
the 2-year-old New Hampshire Institute
of Agriculture and Forestry, who used
to live on a small farm in Chester. "The
average age is 56, and two-thirds of our
farmers lose money." .
She said the Tuttles' story is a
familiar one "farmers getting to a
place where they want to retire, they
can't, they just can't keep up pace with
what's happening with the markets.
They would want to transition over to
family members but there's nobody
there."
The small group of resident farmers,
apprentices and interns started a cam-
paign this year to "Grow Tuttle's Farm."
Jameson Small and Patrick Gale of
Rollinsford, both 23, worked for the
Tuttles last year, weeding and harvest-
ing and following orders. This year, they
are resident farmers, so they have more
autonomy.
"I'm not learning to farm; I am farm-
ing," Small said. "That's really the big
thing that hit us wow, we're farmers
now. ... If something goes bad, it's our
mistake. If something goes great, it's
A III .M


our glory. "
One of their highlights is a big patch
of sunflowers. They plan to produce
sunflower oil for cooking, which Small
thinks he'd like to specialize in, eventu-
ally. It's not commonly produced in New
England.
The Tuttles siblings Becky, Will
and Lucy range in age from 59 to 66.
They are happy to see the young farm-
ers.
With the exception of a cousin, Becky
said, she never knew a young farmer
while growing up. Today, she's seeing
more of them at farmers' markets. "It's
just such a great, great trend because I
really did used to wonder, 'Who's going
to grow the food? There isn't anybody
learning how to grow food in the next
generation.'"
"It's such a wonderful solution," Lucy
Tuttle said. "Where the farm has always
been kind of a losing proposition on the
retail side of the business, a nonprofit
can absorb that."
While it's not unusual for a farm to be
on the market after a year, the Tuttles
think it's a bit of a mystery, even with
the uncertain economy. The asking
price has dropped from $3.35 million to
$2.55 million.
Dover, a few miles from Maine, has
grown and developed around the prop-
erty, designated as conservation land
since 2006, meaning the land itself
can't be developed into strip malls or
condos.
"One of the unique things about this
farm other than the history is that a
22,000-car-a-day road goes right through
the middle of it," Will Tuttle said. "Most
farms you've got to work to get
there."
The farm began in 1632 when John
Tuttle arrived from England to a settle-
ment, using a small land grant from
King Charles I to start his enterprise.
The Tuttles' grandfather, William Penn
Tuttle, built the original 20-acre parcel
to about 200 acres. Their father, Hugh
Tuttle, was profiled in 1971 by Life
magazine as the last of a dying breed of
family farmers.
Two investors who've expressed inter-
est in the land want to continue to keep
an organic farm operation, said Dan
Barufaldi, the city's economic develop-
ment director. They also want to find
someone who can manage a possible
on-site restaurant in the barn serving
the locally grown food and branding the
Tuttle name on products such as tomato
sauce made from the farm's tomatoes
and pesto from its basil.
"This is something that's very
important to the city of Dover, not only
because it's an icon," Barufaldi said. "It
also is going to add a tourism attraction,
it's going to be an educational attrac-
tion, it's going to be a wonderful to have
a source for locally grown organic veg-
etables."


- -----.-i-F


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Jameson Small uses a late 1800s seeder to plant lettuce in Dover, N.H.


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Farmer looks over the crop at Tuttles Farm in Dover, N.H.




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