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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028308/01629
 Material Information
Title: The Lake City reporter
Uniform Title: Lake City reporter (Lake City, Fla. 1967)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: John H. Perry
Place of Publication: Lake City Fla
Publication Date: 8/7/2011
Frequency: daily (monday through friday)[<1969>-]
weekly[ former 1967-<1968>]
daily
normalized irregular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Lake City (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Columbia County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Columbia -- Lake City
Coordinates: 30.189722 x -82.639722 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 95, no. 4 (Oct. 5, 1967)-
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000358016
oclc - 33283560
notis - ABZ6316
lccn - sn 95047175
sobekcm - UF00028308_01569
System ID: UF00028308:01629
 Related Items
Preceded by: Lake City reporter and Columbia gazette

Full Text



Inside this edition:


In training
CHS, Fort White
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Faulk's in
Running back
inducted into NFL
Hall of Fame.
Sports, I B


Lake


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Reporter


Sunday, August 7, 201 I www.lakecityreporter.com Vol. 137, No. 165 E $ 1.00


Teaching


English,


and more,


in Ukraine

Father-daughter
team take on special
overseas mission.

By LEANNE TYO
ltyo@lakecityreporter.comrn

devoted two weeks of their summer
to a special overseas mission.
For seven years, Greg Johnson of
Lake City, who pastors Fellowship
Church, has been traveling to the Ukraine to
present the Christian gospel to Ukranian people
while teaching them English.
This year, he didn't go alone, but took his fif-
teen-year-old daughter, Rachel, on the adventure
with him her first trip abroad.


COURTESY PHOTO
Greg Johnson (left) of Lake
City, pastor of Fellowship
Church, teaches English to a
group of Ukranian students in
Zhitomir, Ukraine.


"Dad had gone
several times
before and it
sounded really,
really cool," Rachel
Johnson said.
"When we got over
there, it met my
expectations and
more."
Together, they
embarked on a
two-week journey
with Michael
Gott International
Evangelism to
Zhitomir, Ukraine,
joining a team of
Christians from
across the U.S. to
teach conversa-


tional English to more than 450 Ukranian uni-
versity students and white-collar professionals
like doctors, university professors and accoun-
tants in need of learning English for their jobs.
"It's an English school with an evangelism
purpose," Greg Johnson said. "We go over there
to lead people to Christ, but we teach interna-
tional ESL or EFL English as a second lan-
guage or English as a foreign language."
Almost 90 percent of the country is Russian
Orthodox by heritage, Greg Johnson said,
and the school's students speak Ukranian and
Russian.
At the start of school, which was housed in
a Baptist church, the team focused on building
friendly teacher-student relationships, relation-.
ships that are countercultural since Ukranian
students and teachers usually never interact,
Greg Johnson said.
"Right away we begin building bridges of
friendship with them," he said.
Each team member would teach four English
classes a day Monday through Friday, each with
one hour of classroom instruction and one hour
of singing songs in English together as an entire
school. While Christianity was never taught in
the classroom, Greg Johnson said, it was eventu-
MISSION continued on 3A


Rachel Johnson (third from right), 15, of Lake City
poses for a photograph with some of her Ukranian
students after they received their certificates on
graduation day for learning English. Johnson, who
was on her first mission trip abroad, cotaught four
different English classes with her cousin, Meredith
Nichols (left) of Anna, Texas.


1 CALL US:
S(386)752-1293
SUBSCRIBETO
11 THE REPORTER:
Voice: 755-5445
1 000218 Fax: 752-9400


Inaugural Pow Wow



fest draws lOK-plus


Fans from all
over U.S. show
in Suwannee.
BRANDON FINLEY
bfinley@lakecityreporter.com
LIVE OAK- Quickly
becoming the premier
spot for outdoor festivals
in North Florida, the Spirit
of the Suwannee Music
Park hosted the inaugural
311 Pow Wow Festival this
weekend.
311, a reggae-inspired
jam band, hosted the Live
Nation event for which they
brought in other notable
acts such as Sublime,
Deftones. G-Love & Special
Sauce, SOJA and the Dirty
Heads. Real Big Fish was
originally slated to perform
as well, but canceled due to
illness. Festival organizer
311 was not going to let
their audience down, how-
ever, as they performed four
sets on Friday and Saturday,
playing late into the night
In an unusual move, 311
played its album Transistor
in its entirety.
"It was the best time I've
had at a festival ih Florida,"
said festival attendee
Tanner Sharman.
Known more for its
Suwannee River Jam coun-
try concert festival and
the Wanee Music Festival,
* which is hosted by the
Alman Brothers, the Spirit
of the Suwannee expanded
its audience with the inau-
gural Pow Wow.
"It's a brand new crowd,"
said Spirit of the Suwannee
Marketing Director Teena
Peavey. "You can see that in
311 continued on 3A


BRANDON FINLEYILa-e ,:ry Peporer
Lead singer Justin Watson of The Dirty Heads performs during the band's set Friday at the 311
Pow Wow Festival at the Spirit Of the Suwannee Music Park in Live Oak.


Festival attendees
Jonathan King (center)
and Tanner Sharman
purchase a beverage
from one of the local
vendors at the 311
Pow Wow Festival.
"This is a great expe-
rience," said King.
"North Florida needs
more events like this
to bring in more for the
local economy."


Soon it'll be back to the books


By LEANNE TYO
Ityo@lakecityreporter.com
The Columbia County School District
has been keeping busy during the sum-


96 7
T-Storm Chance
WEATHER, 6A


mer vacation preparing to welcome
students back to school Aug. 22.
Mike Millikin, superintendent of
schools, said the break is an opportu-
nity to do basic upkeep at the schools,


Opinion ................ 4A
Life .................... I D
Obituaries .............. 5A
Advice & Comics......... 3D
Puzzles ................. 2B


like redoing floors, painting and work-
ing on the athletic fields.
"Summer is when we do much of our
BOOKS continued on 3A


Adnan Barqawi (center),
a Governor's Fellow for
the Office of the Virginia
Secretary of Education,
spoke Saturday after-
noon at the Columbia
County School Board
Auditorium. From left are
Perley Richardson, John
Kuykendall, Barqawi, Gene
Sherro,n and Ed Philman.
Sherron, Past District
Governor of Rotary District
6940, made Barqawi a
Paul Harris Fellow after
his presentation. While the
honor was 'extremely flat-
tering,' Barqawi said, 'it's
not about me. It's about
the children I serve.'


ERGISpecial to the Reporter

TODAY IN COMING
BUSINESS TUESDAY
Local attorney Weekend news
goes solo. roundup.








LAKE CITY REPORTER SUNDAY REPORT SUNDAY AUGUST 7. 2011


(ASH13) FLORIDA
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Friday: Friday: Saturday: Saturday: Saturday: Saturday:
17-21-22-24 MB 20 1-5-18-27-36 Afternoon: 2-0-2 Afternoon: 4-9-4-7 --
Evening: -- Evening: ----


AROUND FLORIDA



Navy program aims to get its vets civilian jobs


By MEUSSA NELSON
Associated Press

CORRY STATION
NAVY BASE The presi-
dent and some members
of Congress want tax
breaks, expensive studies
and even a "reverse boot
camp" to tackle the unem-
ployment rate among vet-
erans, which runs higher
than the national average.
Another option the Navy
would like to see: Expand
a program that has helped
tens of thousands of soon-
to-be-ex-sailors get certi-
fied to use their skills
outside the military -
medics leave ready for
health care jobs, cooks
are trained for restaurant
work and so on.
The Credentialing
Opportunities On-Line
program aims to ensure
that expensive military
training isn't mothballed
once a sailor hangs up
the uniform. More than
45,000 sailors have
obtained certifications or
licenses paid for by the
Navy to help them quali-
fy for jobs as everything
from pharmaceutical
technicians to welders,
police officers or restau-
rant chefs.
Program leaders say it
could be a piece of the
solution to curbing alarm-
ingly high unemployment
rates, particularly among
younger vets. A March
report from the Bureau
of Labor Statistics showed
that more than 20 percent
of Iraq and Afghanistan
veterans were unemployed
last year, while the civilian
unemployment rate for the


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Master-At-Arms First Class (EXM) Kris Thompson, of Saginaw, Mich., puts Marco, a Belgian Malinois, through a training exer-
cise on board Naval Air Station Pensacola.


same 18-to-24 age group
was 17.3 percent For Iraq
and Afghanistan veterans
of all .ages, the unemploy-
ment rate last year was 11.5
percent compared with a
national jobless rate of 9.4
percent
With the military draw-
down in Afghanistan and
Iraq and the economy still
wobbly, the problem is
expected to 'get worse.
On Friday, President
SBarack Obama proposed.


$120 million worth of tax
credits to help companies
hire the nation's 1 mil-
lion out-of-work veterans.
He also called on private
employers to hire or train
100,000 veterans by the
end of 2013.
But often the transition
to the civilian workforce
gets held up because
qualified veterans lack
the right paperwork. A
Navy corpsman might
... wrk. in., a.:. pharmacy ..ar-


hospital on a military
base or in a war zone, but
frequently has to com-
plete extensive outside
training courses to do
similar civilian jobs.
"A machinist mate can
run a nuclear power plant
on a ship without any cer-
tifications or licensing,
but as soon as they get
off that ship, they cannot
go to the TVA (Tennessee
Valley Authority) and run
a nuclea...power..plant,,"


said Keith Boring, who
directs the certifica-
tion program headquar-
tered at Corry Station
near Naval Air Station
Pensacola, in the Florida
'Panhandle.
A veteran with experi-
ence on a nuclear sub
would be "at the top
of the agency's hiring
list," TVA spokeswoman
Barbara Martocci said.
"But that would not
streamline any. of. the


training. There may be
some things that are
redundant but a subma-
rine is a different job
than a civilian nuclear
plant," she said.
That's where the
Navy's program comes in.
Launched in 2006, it paid
for certification tests for
13,818 sailors last fiscal
year at a cost of $3.7 mil-
lion, getting them a step
closer to walking directly
into another job.
Among those who have
benefited from it is Navy
Chief Ron Clement, an
electronics and informa-
tion technology special-
ist who faced mandatory.
retirement in 2009 after a
23-year career.
"I was scared, very
scared. I don't think it
hit me until I got out just
how bad it was going to
be," said Clement, who
was 41 at the time.
He quickly found work
as an investigator for a
private company doing
background checks, a
job he got partly because
he had earned the certifi-
cations that qualified him
to work as a Department
of Homeland Security
contractor long before
he was discharged.
Thousands of veter-
ans seek employment
through Military.cori, an
offshoot of thejob website
Monster.com that caters
to veterans. But Military.
come's CEO, retired Adm.
T. L. McCreary, said state
government licensing rules
often prevent veterans
from finding good jobs that
are equal to their military
..skills.


PEOPLE IN THE NEWS


Woman charged with stalking Cotillard


NEW YORK (AP) A New York
City woman faces charges that she
sent threatening emails afid videos
to a website dedicated to the French
actress Marion Cotillard.
FBI agents say in a court filing
that Teresa Yuan sent a series of
spooky messages in July that includ-
ed ramblings about wanting to play
Russian Roulette with the actress.
In another video she says she
would feel no regret "after it hap-
pens" because "that's apparently
how it feels to be a killer." On one
recording, she hisses and growls at
the camera.
Yuan faces a charge of inter-
state stalking. Her lawyer, Michael
Schneider, tells The New York Daily
News (http://nydn.us/r7CO2B) he
wouldn't comment on the case.
Cotillard won an Oscar for her role
as Edith Piaf in "La Vie en Rose."

Amy Winehouse's
goddaughter performs
EASTNOR CASTLE DEER PARK,
England 9APO Amy Winehouse's
15-year-old goddaughter performed
an outstanding set at the Big Chill
music festival, mirroring her late
mentor by closing her show with
a cover of Winehouse's "Love Is a
Losing Game."
Dionne Bromfield got teary-eyed
when she performed the song,
barely able to sing its last few words,
though the crowd cheered 'her on.
"She was an amazing singer,"
Bromfield said. "She was not only
my godmother, but she was my men-
tor and my boss as well."
The big-voiced singer sang with
ease during her 30-minute perfor-
mance on Saturday, the second day
of the U.K music festival.
Bromfield was a reminder of
Winehouse: She stood close to the
mic while belting lyrics, with her big
hair and tiny build.
She was backed by a 5-piece band
and dancers, performing songs from
her two albums and singing mainly
about boys and relationship troubles.
Her scratchy voice was top-notch
as she sang soul songs with pop


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ASSOCIATED PRESS
Singer Dionne Bromfield, goddaughter of Amy Winehouse, center, views trib-
utes outside the late singer's north London home July 26. British singer Amy
Winehouse's last public appearance came three day's before ier death, when
she briefly joined her goddaughter, singer Dionne Bromfield, on stage at The


flavors, especially on the old-school
sounding "Remember Our Love" and
the up-tempo "Yeah Right." She also
performed covers of Cee Lo Green's
smash "Forget You" "and the
Shirelles' "Mama Said," Bromfield's
first single.
Winehouse, who had struggled
with drug and alcohol addiction, was
found dead of unknown causes at
her London home on July 23.
Bromfield is signed to
Wilehouse's label, Lioness Records.


Rapper Big Sean
charged after concert

NIAGARA FALLS, N.Y. (AP)
- Rapper Big Sean faces charges
in upstate New York after a woman
complained she was sexually assault-


ed during a concert
State park police charged the
23-year-old Detroit rapper with mis-
demeanor counts of forcible touch-
ing, unlawful imprisonment and sex
abuse. Another Detroit man, Willie
Hansbro, faces the same charges.
Police received the complaint
Thursday at Artpark State Park in
Lewiston, downriver from Niagara
Falls. Anderson was performing
there with rapper Wiz Khalifa.
Authorities won't elaborate on the
complaint
Big Sean and Hansbro were given
Sept. 6 court dates for Niagara
County Court and released on $500
bail.
Big Sean's real name is Sean
Anderson. Scott Leemon, a lawyer
for both men, said they "vehemently
deny" the charges. He said he's
confident they will be cleared after
further investigation.


Aug. 7: Actress
Verna Bloom ("Animal
House") is 72.
Humorist Garrison
Keillor is 69. Singer
B.J. Thomas is 69.
Singer Harold Hudson
of The Commodores
is 62. Country singer
Rodney Crowell is 61.
Actor Wayne Knight
is 56. Singer Bruce


HOW TO REACH US
Main number ........(386) 752-1293
Fax number .............752-9400
Circulation ...............755-5445
Online ... www.lakecityreporter.com
The Lake City Reporter, an affiliate .of
Community Newspapers Inc., is pub-
lished Tuesday through Sunday at 180
E. Duval St, Lake City, Fla. 32055.
Periodical postage paid at Lake City, Fa.
Member Audit Bureau of Circulation and
The Associated Press.
All material herein is property of the Lake
City Reporter. Reproduction in whole or
in part is forbidden without the permis-
sion of the publisher. U.S. Postal Service
No. 310-880.
'POSTMASTER: Send address changes
to Lake City Reporter, P.O. Box 1709,
Lake City, Fla. 32056.
PublisherTodd Wilson .....754-0418
(twilson@lakecityreporter.com)
NEWS
Editor Robert Bridges .....754-0428
bridgess @lakecityreporter.com)
ADVERTISING
Director Ashley Butcher ...754-0417
(abutcher@lakecityreporter.com)
CLASSIFIED
To place a classified ad, call 755-5440


Dickinson of Iron
Maiden is 53. Actor
David Duchovny is
51. Actress Delane
Matthews ("Dave's
World") is 50. Actor
Harold Perrineau
("Lost," "Oz") is 48.
Country singer Raul
Malo (The Mavericks)
is 46. Actress Charlize
Theron is 36.


BUSINESS
Controller Sue Brannon....754-0419
(sbrannon@lakecityreporter.com)
CIRCULATION
Home delivery of the Lake City Reporter
should be completed by 6:30 a.m.
Tuesday through Saturday, and by 730
a.m. on Sunday.
Please call 386-755-5445 to report any
problems with your delivery service.
In Columbia County, customers should
call before 1030 am. to report a ser-
vice error for same day re-delivery. After
10.30 am., next day re-delivery or ser-
vice related credits will be issued.
In all other counties where home delivery
is available, next day re-delivery or ser-
vice related credits will be issued.
Circulation ............. 755-5445
(circulation@lakecityreporter.com)
Home delivery rates
(Tuesday through Sunday)
12 Weeks. .. .............. $26.32
24 Weeks .................. $48.79
52 Weeks .................. $83.46
Rates indude 7% sales tax
Mail rates
12 Weeks.. .............. $41.40
24 Weeks ...................$82.80
52 Weeks. ............. $179.40


CORRECTION


The Lake City Reporter corrects errors of fact in news
items. If you have a concern, question or suggestion,
please call the executive editor. Corrections and clarifica-
tions will run in this space. And thanks for reading.


Celebrity Birthdays


Daily Scripture


"All your words are true; all
your righteous laws are eter-
nal." Psalm 119:160 NIV.


Lake City Reporter


--


Page Editor: Robert Bridges, 754-0428


's











Page Editor: Robert Bridges, 754-0428 LAKE CITY REPORTER NEWS SUNDAY, AUGUST 7, 2011


MISSION: Father, daughter travel to Ukraine

Continued From Page 1A


ally introduced to the students by
allowing them to ask questions
on response cards in large group
session, questions that Gott, the
main missionary, answered at
a special Sunday service called
"Super Sunday" held for all the
students and anyone they wanted
to invite.*
"That is when the evange-
lism starts," Greg Johnson said.
"Hopefully the bridge of the rela-
tionship is strong enough to bear
the weight of the gospel at that
point."
Gott would answer many ques-
tions at that service that the
students had written down,
Greg Johnson said, and would
introduce the gospel, something
the students had never heard
before.
"You begin working the gospel
in with stages and he chooses
the questions particularly in
how they can have a personal
relationship with God," Greg
Johnson said, "because that
is not something that eastern
mysticism or Russian Orthodox
teaches."
Throughout the second week
of school, only English was pre-
sented in the classroom, but in
the large group sessions, Gott
would speak about sin, God's
forgiveness and how God wants
to make changes in the students'
lives in a step-by-step process
for the students to understand,
Greg Johnson said.
On the last day of school,
students who attended enough
school hours received cer-
tificates, which can be used at


major eastern European univer-
sities for English credit and help
students either keep their jobs
or get hired, Greg Johnson said.
"We are recognized for the
quality of English school that
we do," he said. "This is a very
valuable English diploma."
"When you teach them
English, you're kind of helping
them change their lives," Rachel
Johnson said.
Students also have a chance
to write down their responses
to the gospel on graduation day,
responses that have kept Greg
Johnson returning for seven years
and investing his money in the
trips. This year, 77 percent of
the school's students said they
became "heart-friends" with
Christ, a translatable, understand-
able term for Christian, he said.
"As a Christian, not as a pas-
tor," Greg Johnson said, "as a
serious follower of Jesus Christ,
how can I not go? And this is
the seventh year I've seen this
continued result. That is what
makes it what I call 'spiritually
addicting."'.
Team members spent long
days teaching and working hard
with little rest, Greg Johnson
said, and Rachel Johnson said
she learned to rely on God for
strength.
"I became closer to God
because I was depending on him
to give me strength to make it
through each day just because
you're going and going and you
get tired, but with him, you get
through it all," she said. "And
every day, I found I had enough


strength."
Rachel Johnson co-taught a
class with her cousin, Meredith,
who both experienced illness on
the trip and who had a student,
Vita, that was hit by a car dur-
ing the trip, breaking both her
legs and causing bleeding in her
brain.
"She's on the road to recov-
ery right now," Rachel Johnson
said, "but I saw how God works
through that. He helped me
and my cousin get through our
classes every day and through
our experiences with Vita, we
became really close with our
fourth session (class), because
she was in that fourth session."
While Greg Johnson said he
was renewed on the trip and
reminded that Christianity
will always be global, Rachel
Johnson said the experience was
a realization.
"It really opens you up and
lets you see how important it
is for the Ukranians to learn
English," she said, "and it really
lets you see how many of them
really need God...Through the
experience, I got a lot of new
brothers and sisters in Christ."
Rachel Johnson said being
on the trip allowed her to see
her father differently, and Greg
Johnson said he got to see his
daughter participate in a mission
that's close to his heart, even
when she suffered and had to
remain strong for her students.
"She became a strong woman
spiritually through this," he
said, "just amazing through this.
I'm so proud of her."


Sheriff's meeting

set for Tuesday


From staff reports
The Columbia County
Sheriffs Office will host an
informational meeting next
week as part of its commu-
nity outreach series.
The meeting has been
scheduled for 6 p.m. on


Aug. 9 at the Shrine Club
on Brown Road.
The sheriff's office will
provide a meal of Nettles
sausage. The final meet-
ing will take place at the
Deep Creek Community
Center Aug. 23.


BOOKS: Back to school

Continued From Page 1A


work on facilities with
upkeep and maintenance,"
he said. "We have crews
working and doing remod-
eling and maintenance at
pretty much all of our cam-
puses in some respect"
Currently, the district's
biggest remodel project
is at Fort White Middle
School, Millikin said,
where the dining area is
being expanded.
Teachers and admin-
istrators work on profes-
sional development in the
summer, Millikin said,
attending. workshops on
scheduling, new technol-
ogy, curriculum planning
and how to work with
students who have dif-
ficulty achieving.
Principals and their
staff also use the sum-
mer to schedule students
in classes and to hire
teachers and support
staff, Millikin said.
"As you get closer to


school starting, you begin
to get a clearer picture of
what staff you need, both
expected vacancies and
unexpected vacancies,"
he said. "And we have
our principals and their
staff working every day
on that as we speak."
School districts won't
know how many students
it will have or how many
teachers it will need
until the first few days
of school have passed,
Millikin noted.
'That requires a sec-
ond round of adjustments
and we ask people to be
patient with us," he said,
"and we do the best we
can with less money this
year than we had last year
due to state budget cuts."
For any information
regarding transportation,
hours of operation or
which schools children
should attend, visit www.
columbia.kl2.fl.us.


311: Inaugural festival draws a crowd of 10,000 to Spirit of the Suwannee

Continued From Page 1A


the people coming in."
The festival was marketed toward the
under-30 crowd, which is primarily the
audience that grew up listening to the
band's music.
'The crowd is young," Peavey said. "I
would say the average age was around 25."
And the festival did a lot to bring in out-
of-state tourist to boost Live Oak's local


economy.
"I saw tags from Ney York, Nebraska,
Wisconsin and Michigan," Peavey said.
"I talked to some people at Val-Mart and
they were ecstatic about the people com-
ing in."
Folks started rolling into town on
Wednesday and Peavey estimated more
than 4,000 people showed up a day early


to the three-day festival, more than the
usual early arrivals to the park. The over-
all crowd easily exceeded 10,000 by most
estimates.
"The people were here and they were
mostly from out of town, which has
helped out the local economy," Peavey
said.
The paik is hoping the festival


becomes an annual attraction after its
inaugural success.
"Live Nation liked the venue after
already having used it for Wanee," Peavey'
said. "They like the atmosphere, the river
and the fact that it's so close to the inter-
state. We haven't booked it again for next
year yet, but that's what we're hoping
for."


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LAKE CITY REPORTER NEWS SUNDAY, AUGUST 7, 2011


Page Editor: Robert Bridges, 754-0428












OPINION


Sunday,August 7, 201 I


AN


A N
OPINION



U.S.


treading

water


on job


creation

There are two good
things that can be
said about July's
unemployment rate
of 9.1 percent It's
lower than June's 9.2 percent and
it allayed, perhaps only temporar-
ily, market fears of a double-dip
recession.
But reading behind the figures
reveals a disturbing fact about
job creation since we officially
came out of the recession in July
2009: We're pretty much stuck
Only twice since then has the
rate fallen below 9 percent
The July figure showed
improvement only because the
workforce shrank by 38,000 and
perhaps as many as a million
simply quit looking for work
and thus weren't counted in the
unemployment figures.
Private employers added
117,000 jobs, and thats good.
But the economy needs to add
125,000 jobs a month just to
stay even with the demand for
work The total number of job-
less dropped over the month
-from 14.1 million to 13.9 million,
but that's still almost double the
number before the recession.
To put a serious dent in that
number we need to create 250,000,
jobs a month, and that requires
serious economic growth.
The underemployment rate,
which some feel is a more accu-
rate picture of how the average
person experiences the job
market, fell only one-tenth of a
point, to 16.1 percent That rate
combines part-timers who want
full-time work and those who are
so discouraged that they're not
even looking for work
President Barack Obama has
proposed extending a one-year
Social Security tax cut that would
benefit the average worker by
$1,000 to $2,000 and renewing the
emergency unemployment bene-
fits that now cover up to 99 weeks.
But these are Band-Aids. More
serious action is required, but,
sadly, this feckless Congress is
likely incapable of providing it

Scripps Howard News Service

Lake City Reporter
Serving Columbia County
Since 1874
The Lake City Reporter is pub-
lished with pride for residents of
Columbia and surrounding counties by
Community Newspapers Inc.
We believe strong newspapers build
strong communities -"Newspapers
get things done!"
Our primary goal is to
publish distinguished and profitable
community-oriented newspapers.
This mission will be accomplished
through the teamwork of professionals
dedicated to truth, integrity and hard
work.
Todd Wilson, publisher
Robert Bridges, editor
Sue Brannon, controller
Dink NeSmith, president
Tom Wood, chairman

LETTERS
POLICY
Letters to the Editor should be
typed or neatly written and double
spaced. Letters should not exceed
400 words and will be edited for
length and libel. Letters must be
signed and include the writer's name,
address and telephone number for
verification. Writers can have two
letters per month published. Letters
and guest columns are the opinion of
the writers and not necessarily that of
the Lake City Reporter.
BY MAIL: Letters, P.O. Box 1709,


Lake City, FL 32056; or drop off at
180 E. Duval St. downtown.
BY FAX: (386) 752-9400.
BY E-MAIL:
news@lakecityreporter.com


www.lakecityreporter.com


New violations of personal


liberty, courtesy Obamacare


get that rare
moment of hon-
esty during the
campaign 'to
pass Obamacare when Nancy
Pelosi said "We have to pass the
bill in order for you to find out
whats in it"?
Now we have it and almost
daily there are new revelations
about the staggering extent
to which our private lives and
individual freedoms have been
stomped on.
We learn now that free birth
control in the form of contracep-
tives, morning after pills, and
sterilization is part of the grand
Obamacare socialist dream-
come-true.
The health insurance that
Obamacare mandates that all
employers provide and that all
citizens acquire must pay 100
percent for these birth control
products and services, with no
deductible or co-pays. Birth
control gets more preferential
treatment than cancer or heart
disease.
Liberals say government
should be kept out of your bed-
room. What they mean by this
is that it shouldn't interfere with
what you do there, not that it
shouldn't force taxpayers to pay
for it.
The provision mandat-
ing "preventive services" for
women was grafted onto the
thousand plus page bill, as it
passed through the Senate, by
Maryland Democrat Barbara
Mikulski.
After Obamacare became law,
Health and Human Services
Secretary Kathleen Sebelius
farmed out this general direc-
tive to the Institute of Medicine
to determine what such "pre-
ventive services" should be.
This is cast as an arms
length objective procedure.


Star Parker
parker@urbancure.org
But in Washington, nothing is
objective. There are only inter-
ests.
The Institute of Medicine's
website says its "an indepen-
dent non-profit organization that-
works outside of government to
provide unbiased and authorita-
tive advice to decision makers
and the public."
But this "independent"
organization gets 55 percent
of its funding from the federal
government And it also gets
hundreds of thousands of dol-
lars from the pharmaceutical
industry.
So, after months of lobby-
ing by Planned Parenthood,
financed in part by the $300
million dollars it gets each year
from us taxpayers, the Institute
of Medicine offered its "unbi-
ased" recommendations that
"preventive services" for women
include birth control pills and
morning after pills.
Obamacare is a masterpiece
in its achievement of leaving no
corner of our personal freedoms
unviolated. It hijacks our pock-
etbook, our autonomy of action,
and our conscience.
The result is to leave us eco-
nomically and.morally impover-
ished.
A tiny and narrow exemption
is carved out so that non-profits
with a defined religious mission,
whose employees and target
audience shares those same
values, are not forced.to provide
insurance that includes free


birth control services.
Liberals are committed
to religious freedom as long as
those religious values do not
conflict with their liberal values.
Which, practically, means all
religion.
Meanwhile, what we have
is another.in a vast universe
of mandated new health care
entitlements that is Obamacare.
It is the convoluted logic of the
liberal mind to use government
power to mandate and subsidize
free goodies, to sever all links
between individual behavior
and its consequences, and then
claim this will lead to lower
costs and more efficiency.
It is no wonder that the
financial markets have been
tanking since the passage of the
debt-ceiling bill. That-bill simply
slaps a band-aid on a fiscal rup-
ture that will start gushing red
ink as soon as Obamacare kicks
in full tilt in 2014.
The perverse truth is that
Obamacare, sold by our
president and congressional
Democrats as fiscally respon-
sible, is exactly the opposite.
The Congressional Budget
Office forecasts huge deficits
and growing debt, double what
they are today, driven primarily
by health care spending, fueled
by Obamacare mandated entitle-
ments.
Michele Bachmann was onto
something by demanding repeal
of Obamacare as a condition for
increasing the debt limit
Americans need to sober up.
The challenges facing us are
formidable.
Repeal of Obamacare is on a
growing and most challenging
list of things to do.
* Star Parker is president of
CURE, Coalition
on Urban Renewal and Education
(www.urbancure.org) and author of
three books.


Jobs: Time to put up or shut up


fts time for Congress and
President Barack Obama
to put up or shut up on
creating jobs.
Maybe Thursday's
scary stock market plunge will
finally break the logjam. A big
dent in your 401(k) or invest-
ment portfolio tends to get
your attention, even if you're
in the tea party.
The potential for a devastat-
ing double-dip recession is real
- and it will only grow the lon-
ger there's inaction and a lack
of confidence in Washington.
The national debt and federal
deficits have to be tackled, but
right now, the anemic recov-
ery should be the priority.
Friday's better-than-
expected employment report
- 117,000 net jobs added last
month is encouraging, but
nowhere near enough. It will
take many more months of
even bigger gains to make
up for the estimated 8 mil-
lion jobs lost during the Great
Recession.


The federal government can
create some jobs on its own
with construction projects and
the like. It can encourage even
more hiring through tax policy
and regulatory reform. And
it can ease the pain for strug-
gling families.
There is no shortage of
ideas. Surely, there ought
to be some that make good
economic sense and that can
win bipartisan support even
in today's bitterly divided
Washington.
To avoid backsliding, one fix
is to extend the payroll tax cut
that is increasing take-home
pay by more than $1,000 this
year for many workers. Obama
called Friday for continuing
that tax break, set to expire
at the end of the year. Some
economists are suggesting
a similar payroll tax cut for
businesses, but only for new
employees they hire.
The uncertain jobs picture is
depressing the confidence of
consumers and investors alike.


The bellwether Dow Jones
industrial average had a small
uptick Friday after plummeting
513 points on Thursday, the
biggest one-day drop since the
global financial crisis in 2008.
It's also clear there's little
faith that Washington will do
anything to significantly boost
economic growth.
There's no better way for
Washington to begin earning
back trust than getting serious
about jobs.
When Congress returns to
work after Labor Day bet-
ter yet, it should cut short its
August recess Democrats
and Republicans alike need to
move past the politics and plat-
itudes and break the gridlock
on pro-jobs measures. The
president should lead the way
and have a robust jobs agenda
ready for lawmakers to review.
How much longer do they
have to wait for their elected
representatives to do their job?

* The Sacramento Bee


AN
OP


4A


OTHER
INION


Fright


night in


world


markets

That was a quick
breath of ease,
the one that fol-
lowed the on-dead-
line raising of the
United States' debt ceiling. Yes,
after a nasty ideological fight in
Congress, the debt-ceiling deal
proved to be insignificant in the
context of what happened next,
a global meltdown at week's end
of financial markets responding
to nervousness in Europe over
the shaky state of the Italian
and Spanish economies, and
also to Americans' ongoing
worries about stagnant growth
and continued high unemploy-
ment rates.
The unease in Europe
may have been the trigger,
but these days, so many
economies theworld over are
troubled that it's hard to say.
Analysts are all over the block,
but in news reports, some say
the U.S. can take the bumps
better than it could at the
onset of the Great Recession,
and that in some ways there
are positive signs, such as '
better earnings reports. That
may help stem events such as
Thursday's 512-point drop in
the Dow. (That index recov-
ered slightly Friday.)
In the United States, mem-
bers of Congress have cre-
ated a "supercommittee,"
which when appointed will
have six Democrats and six
Republicans, charged with for-
mulating long-term policies to
reduce the country's crippling
debt It is not a coveted post
If the committee turns
into an ideological stale-
mate and does nothing by
Thanksgiving, autoinatic cuts
in defense and domestic pro-
grams will go into effect after
the first of the year. The idea
is to find an additional $1.5
trillion in savings.
Here is what we already
know: Federal spending cuts
alone will not stimulate the
economy to rebound com-
pletely. Further spending,
whether paid for with addi-
tional revenues or via bor-
rowing at low interest rates,
helps to preserve and create
jobs and boosts the revenue
stream. Republicans have
cast it as a great evil, but to
reject it out of hand would be
foolish.
Committee members would
do well to listen to former
University of North Carolina
President Erskine Bowles and
former Republican U.S. Sen.
Alan Simpson of Wyoming.
They chaired a commission
that served up some hard
truth on deficit reduction,
including the need for changes
in the tax code, in entitle-
ments, in defense spending, all
aimed at reducing a debt load
the commission said would
overwhelm the country just
based on interest payments
alone.
Bowles and Simpson, in an
article published Thursday,
reiterated some of those
points. They said, and one
supposes this could be inter-
preted as a positive note, that
now is the time to get busy. "If
our government," they wrote,
"cannot address these terribly
tough issues at a time when
the public's attention is fully
on them, when will we ever be
able to?"
Precisely. The response of
Congress to these latest devel-
opments should be: Message
received. Otherwise, America
is in for many more nervous
days ahead.


a Raleigh News & Observer













S&P downgrade: 'We must do better,WH says


By MARK S. SMITH
Associated Press

WASHINGTON -
President Barack Obama
sought to distance himself
Saturday from the bad news
of the nation's first-ever
credit-rating downgrade,
but lawmakers and presi-
dential candidates showed
no such reticence trad-
ing salvos over who's at
fault and why.
The president, spend-
ing the weekend at Camp
David, left it to press secre-
tary Jay Carney to say it's
clear Washington "must do
better" in tackling soaring
deficits and other econom-
ic woes.
A statement from Carney
said talks that produced
Tuesday's $2 trillion com-
promise on raising the U.S.
borrowing limit had been
too drawn-out and "divi-
sive."
But the statement didn't
directly address Friday's
move by Standard & Poor's
to drop U.S. government
debt from AAA to AA+, the
next level down.
While telegraphed


by S&P last month, the
downgrade still delivered
a potentially serious blow
to the nation's struggling
recovery raising the
prospect of higher inter-
est rates and fresh falls in
stocks after the big selloff
of the last two weeks.
S&P told investors the
deficit accord "falls short
of what, in our view, would
be necessary to stabilize
the government's medium-
term debt dynamics."
However, administration
.officials sharply disputed
S&P's judgment and chal-
lenged its numbers, say-
ing the deal's deficit-cutting
value had been drastically
understated. They charged
the company's analysis was
rushed and faulty.
But S&P stood by its
finding. In a conference call
with reporters on Saturday,
S&P officials said the com-
pany's carefully reasoned
conclusion is that political
gridlock in Washington has
made the nation increas-
ingly unable to control its
debt.
House Speaker John
Boehner, R-Ohio, asserted


the downgrade "is the lat-
est consequence of the out-
of-control spending that has
taken place in Washington
for decades."
But Senate Majority
Leader Harry Reid, D-
Nev., said it "reaffirms
the need for a balanced
approach to deficit reduc-
tion" including not just
spending cuts but higher
revenues from ending tax
breaks for big corpora-
tions and the rich.
Another Democrat,
California Rep. George
Miller, vented his anger at a
"reckless extortionist legis-
lative strategy" by the GOP
Making deep cuts a condi-
tion of paying the nation's
bills "has clearly done more
to sow deep anxiety and
uncertainty over the econ-
omy than nearly any other
set of events," he said.
At least one senator,
Republican Mark Kirk of
Illinois, called for the presi-
dentto bring Congress back
from its August recess to
try and address the issues
raised by S&P's report
Outside Washington,
presidential hopefuls found


fresh ammunition in the
ratings setback.
Former Massachusetts
governor and GOP front-
runner Mitt Romney wrote,
"America's creditworthi-
ness just became the lat-
est casualty in President
Obama's failed record of
leadership."
Said former Minnesota
Gov. Tim Pawlenty: "What
we should be talking about
is downgrading Barack
Obama from president
of the United States."
Campaigning Saturday in
Grinnell, Iowa, Pawlenty
said, "We need to have a
president who understands
what it means to put our
full faith and credit in the
American people."
Also inIowa, Rep. Michele
Bachmann, R-Minn., called
for Treasury Secretary
Timothy Geithner's oust-
er. Bachman, who voted
against the debt deal, told
a Fox News interview-
er, "This president has
destroyed the credit rat-
ing of the United States
through ... his inability to
control government spend-
ing."


U.S. law enforcement sites hacked


By NOMAAN MERCHANT and
RAPHAEL G. SATTER
Associated Press

LONDON The group known
as Anonymous said Saturday it
has hacked into some 70 mostly
rural law enforcement websites in
the United States, a data breach
that one local police chief said had
leaked information about an ongo-
ing investigation.
The loose-knit international hack-
ing collective posted a cache of
data to the Web early Saturday,
including emails stolen from offi-
cers; tips which appeared to come
from members of the public, credit
card numbers and other sensitive
information.
Anonymous said it had stolen 10
gigabytes worth of data in all.
Tim Mayfield, a police chief in
small-town Gassville, Ark., told The
Associated Press that some of fhe
material posted online pictures
of teenage girls in their swimsuits


- related to an ongoing investiga-
tion, which he declined to discuss
further.
Mayfield's comments were the first
indication that the hack might be
serious. Since news that some kind
of an attack first filtered out earlier
this week, various police officials dis-
missed it as nothing to worry about
"We've not lost any information,"
was one typical response, given by
McMinn County Sheriff Joe Guy to
WDEF-TV in Tennessee on Tuesday.
But many of Guy's emails were
.among those leaked to the Web on
Saturday, and others seen by The
Associated Press carried sensitive
information, including tips about sus-
pected crimes, profiles of gang mem-
bers, and security training.
The emails were mainly from sher-
iffs' offices in places such as Arkansas,
Kansas, Louisiana, Missouri, and
Mississippi. Most, if not all, of their
websites were either unavailable or
had been wiped clean of content
Anonymous said in a statement


that it was leaking "a massive amount
of confidential information that is
sure to (embarrass), discredit and
incriminate police officers across the
US." The group added that it hoped
the disclosures would "demonstrate
the inherently corrupt nature of law
enforcement using their own words"
and "disrupt and sabotage their abili-
ty to communicate and terrorize com-
munities."
The group also posted five credit
card numbers it said it used to make
"involuntary donations." At least
four of the names and other person-
al details published to the Internet
appeared genuine, although those
contacted by The Associated Press
said they did not know whether their'
financial information had been com-
promised.
Many calls to various sheriffs'
offices across the country 'went
unanswered or weren't returned.
Saturday, but several others con-
firmed that a cyberattack had taken
place.


OBITUARIES


Stephen Dale Barbee
Stephen Dale Barbee, 54, a resi-
dent of Lake City, Florida passed
away July 29, 2011 at his home.
Mr. Barbee was a lifelong resi-
dent of Lake City, Florida and is
of the catholic faith. He is the
son of the late
Teresa Dale
Stephens. He
is preceded in
death by his
sister, Edith
Barbee. Mr.
Barbee was a
self employed
mechanic.
Survivors include his wife: Ja-
net Bryant Barbee, Lake City,
Fl., One daughter: Stephanie
(Brock) Sherrod, Lake City, Fl.
Two sons: Charles Ward, Ft.
Lauderdale, Fl. and Michael
(Amanda) Ford, Las Vegas, Ne-
vada. One sister: Camelia Bar-
bee, Ft. White, Fl. Two brothers:
William Barbee, Lake City, FI.
-and Charles Barbee, Jessup, Ga.
Threegrandchildren,AustinFord,
Hunter Ford and Paige Ward.
Funeral services for Mr. Bar-
bee will be conducted Tues-
day, August 9, 2011 at 11:00
A.M. in the Chapel of Guerry
Funeral Home with the Rev.
Jim Messer, officiating. Inter-
ment will follow in the family
cemetery of Barbee-Stephens
Cemetery, Lake City, Flori-
da. The family will receive
friends Monday, August 8,
2011 from 6:00-8:00 P.M. at
the funeral home. GUERRY
FUNERAL HOME 2659
SW. Main Blvd. Lake City is
in charge of all arrangements.

Francis D. Manucy
Mr. Francis D. Manucy. 88.
of Lake City, Fl died Thurs-
day, August 4, 2011 in Avalon
Healthcare Facility. Lake City,
Fl. following a long illness. He
was a native of Jacksonville, Fl
and resided in Lake City for 29
years, then retired to Wellborn.
Fl. He moved back to Lake City
in 2007 due to bad health, to be
tended to by his family. He and
his late wife were the original
owners of Manucy's Gas & Gro-
cery in Lake City for 20 years.
He was a veteran of WWII, serv-
ing in Europe and participated
in the Normandy Invasion and
the Battle of the Buldge. He was
wounded in' Carentaun, France


and received the Purple Heart.'
He was preceded in death by
his wife of 59 years, Lucile; one
son Mike and three brothers.
Survivors include his son Bil-
ly (Sandra) Manucy of Lake
City; two daughters, Pat Was-
ley, Lake City and Marty (Bill)
Sanders; Live Oak, Fl.: One
brother, Sanford (Jodi) Manucy,
Monica, Ga: One sister, Lou-
vennia Rodgers, Raiford, Fl.
Seven grandchildren, Robin
Gottschalk, Betty Campbell,
Barbara Waters, Ricky Flake,
Amanda Patanow, Gwen Wesley,
Timmy Eden-
field: Nine
great grand-
children: Su-
san, Brittany,
Chelsey, Hal-
ey, Makayla,
Tyler, Maya,
Kaitlyn and
great great
grandchild,
Patricia. .
Numerous
nieces and nephews.
Funeral services will be con-
ducted at 10:00 AM, Wednes-
day, August 10, 2011.in the
chapel of Guerry Funeral Home.
Interment will be Graveside are
2:00 PM, Wednesday, August
10, 2011 in Riverside Memorial
Park Cemetery, Normandy Blvd
& 1-295 In Jacksonville, Fl.
Visitation with the family will
be from 6-8 Tuesday, August
9, 2011 at GUERRY FU-
NERAL HOME. In lieu of
flowers the family request do-
nations made in his memory
to Haven Hospice, 6037 US
90 West, Lake City, Fl. 32055

Olan J. Price
Mr. Olan J. Price, 71, a resi-
dent of Lake City, died Friday,
August 5, 2011 at his residence
following a brief illness. A
native of Fargo, Georgia, Mr.
Price had been a resident of
Lake City for the past three
years having moved here from
Sun City, Florida. The son of
the late Albert & Annie Rea
Johnson Price, Mr. Price had
been a truck driver for gro-
cery stores for more than thirty
years prior to retiring. He very
much enjoyed dancing, watch-
ing NASCAR races, especially
Jeff Gordon, but first and fore-
most was a #1 grand-dad. He


was a Christian.
Mr. Price is survived by his
daughter, Renae Collins (Ron-
nie) of Lake City, Florida; his
twin brother, Nolan "Terry"
Price (Mary) Brandon, FL; his
step brother, Gene Perry of
Brandon, Florida; his half-sis-
ters, Patricia Newman of Val
Rico, Florida and Peaches New-
man of Apollo Beach, Florida;
and his beloved grandchildren,
Cody Ray Collins, Noah Mason
Collins and Aidan Tommy
Collins.
Funeral services for Mr. Price
will be conducted at 11:00 AM
on Tuesday, August 9, 2011
in the Dees-Parrish Funeral
Home Chapel with the Rev.


Gary Lambyrth officiating.
The burial will follow in
Fargo Memorial Cemetery in
Fargo, Georgia. The family will
receive friends from 6:00-8:00
Monday evening in the chapel
of the funeral home. Arrange-
ments are under the direction of
the DEES-PARRISH FAM-
ILY FUNERAL HOME, 458
South Marion Ave., Lake City,
FL 32025. (386)752-1234
please sign our online family
guestbook at parrishfamilyfu-
neralhome.com

Obituaries are paid advertise-
ments. For details, call the Lake
City Reporter's classified depart-
ment at 752-1293.


BAC


GET READY FOR
"BACK TO SCHOOL


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Sec. of Treasury Tim Geithner, left,,partially blocked by his
Secret Service agent, walks down the West Wing Colonnade
of the White House towards the Oval Office to meet with
President Barack Obama, Friday in Washington. Obama met
with Geithner prior to his'departure for the presidential retreat
at Camp David, Md. Credit rating agency Standard & Poor's
on Friday lowered the nation's AAA rating for the first time
since granting it in 1917.



S7 First ssenmblg ofGod
B is hosting a

ABack to School '
SCHOOL SCHOOL
SUPPLIES SUPPLIES

V Bash

FREE back-to-school

physical provided by


ot a Physician.
FREE back-to-school S

SACO backpacks and supplies. :SooAL
SCHOOL and 1HOOL
SUPPLIES SUPPLIES
-- Saturday, August 13th


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'_. :: .. _


r.... -


Tired of Diets -

That Don't

Work? IFR
DON'TGIVE usan.
Lost 37 Ilbs
& 50112Inches
UP! WE CAN Dropped 6 Sim


SNEW : .m. E I S.

Wisosutites -mat e


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/.


S Thanks to allourfriendsandrelatiesfor the praiers,fburs,
S cards, food, viits, calls, and hugs you all so lovingly gave to us
during this most difflt and sad time in our lives.
Thanks to ltaNorris, fiendand caretaker Billy Dou son-in-
/ law and caretaker, Donna Nardine, RN and all the staff at Haven
Hospicefor taking such good care of our mother while she was
ill It uas a vr trying timefor a of us, and ue miss hergreatly.
y but uV can say without a doubt that she is with our Savioresus
Christ in Heavenandnot inpain anymore.
S Thanks to Sheriff Mark Hunter and the Columbia County
Sheriffs Office & Captain Bennie Coleman and the Detention
Facility Staff, to First Federal Bank Staff, to Mt. Carmel Churcb,
and to Deba and Chris and Dees-Parrish Funeral Home Staff
S Thanks to Rev Elmer Creus, Rev. Randy Ogbum and our dear
'and special friend Ray Walker Your kindness will alums be


remembered
We woudd also like to thank Janie Ritch, The Watertouwn
SCongregationaMethodist Church and Dr Richard Wrght & staff
May God Bless each of you always.
The Family of Pauline P. Tompkins


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LAKE CITY REPORTER NATIONAL SUNDAY. AUGUST 7. 2011


Page Editor: Robert Bridges, 754-0428


-, k.


1\


KPACKS .


.E c~nM irs bd~as ~dd~qbypo










LAKE CITY REPORTER WEATHER SUNDAY, AUGUST 7. 2011


THE WEATHER



S CHCOF CHC OF CHCOF
TORMS STORMSTORMS



196W075 1951075 "' 196ILO


CHC OF CHC OF
STORMS STORMS



1195LO 1950


NATIONAL FORECAST: Showers and thunderstorms may produce heavy rain as a storm sys-
tem traverses the Northeast today. Expect scattered showers and thunderstorms across the
Ohio Valley and Southeast, as ..ehi Strong to severe thunderstorms will be possible over the
Intermountain West and Central Plains, but the remainder of the West will enjoy tranquil con-
ditions.


I T: :- ..


Westa
97/77

Talahassee LakeCi
95 78 96
SCaines
Paaa City 96 7
90, 79


Tam
93.


City
Jacksoile Cape Canaveral
7 80 Daytona Beach
Ft. Lauderdale
vile Daytona Beach Fort Myers
16 04 7 Galnesvllle
Ocala Jacksonville
976 Key West
Oriando Cape Canaveral LaK
94 7 3 Lake City
Miami
Ipa Naples
77 West Palm Beach Ocala
90 79 Orlando
Ft Lauderdale Panama City
FL Myers 93 78 Pensacola
94 77 *Naples Tallahassee
90, 78 Miami Tampa
90 79 Valdosta
Key West W. Palm Beach


Monday
91 '
92 ;i.,



96 j9 1
9*1 ;1 1I
95 7-. I
91 i,

9J ,6 i
9'4 7.




'-l" -"U i
92 l t
96 77 7

97 76 1
'90 79 I
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Tuesday
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95 7F 1
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Orlando
9a 94,7 ? Warm Fronl

90 79 slalTonar-,
a Fronl


YESTERDAY'S NATIONAL EXTREMES


High: 109", Lawton, Okla.


Low: 340, Truckee, Calif.


Saturday Today


TEMPERATURES
High Saturday
Low Saturday
Normal high
Normal low
Record high
Record low

PRECIPITATION
Saturday
Month total
Year total
Normal month-to-date
Normal year-to-date


93
75
91
71
98 in 1899
66 in 1926


0.00"
2.15"
25.54"
1.27"
31.40"


SUN
Sunrise today
Sunset today
Sunrise torn.
Sunset tom.

MOON
Moonrise today.
Moonset today
Moonrise torm.
Moonset tom.


6:53 a.m.
8:19 p.m.
6:53 a.m.
8:19 p.m.


3:22 p.m.
1:00 a.m.
4:22 p.m.
1:53 a.m.


c)cbrm


12 5
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for the area on
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Vffi .isi,., i. Sa QS ,-i^ :.,ar t..,-..,: .^,--.,.-_ a "


Aug. Aug. Aug. Sept. 4V4 Forecasts, data and
13 21 27 4 graphics 2011 Weather
Full Last New First Central, LP, Madison, Wis.
weather 'om www.weatherpublisher.com


CITY
Albany NY
Albuquerque
Anchorage
Atlanta
Baltimore
Billings
Birmingham
Bismarck
Bolse
Boston
Buffalo
Charleston SC
Charleston WV
Charlotte
Cheyenne
Chicago
Cincinnati
Cleveland
Columbia SC
Dallas
Daytona Beach
Denver


HI/Lo/Pcp.
79/71/0
89/68/0
56/47/0
92/73/0
88/69/0
80/56/0
90/75/0
70/63/0
87/66/0
87/71/0
81/72/0
93/76/.03
83/75/.77
90/75/0
84/54/0
84/72/.18
89/73/0
88/71/0
90/73/0
102/84/0
91/76/0
90/60/0


HI/Lo/W
83/65/t
99/65/pc
59/48/sh
93/75/t
91/77/t
89/59/t
94/76/t
83/61/pc
91/56/t
77/68/t
82/70/t
95/79/t
89/72/t
95/76/t
90/56/pc
89/67/t
91/71/t
85/70/pc
98/77/t
104/83/pc
94/76/t
93/60/pc


CITY ,
Des Moines
Detroit
El Paso
Fairbanks
Greensboro
Hartford
Honolulu
Houston
Indianapolis
Jackson MS
Jacksonville
Kansas City
Las Vegas
Uttle Rock
Los Angeles
Memphis
Miami
Minneapolis
Mobile
New Orleans
New York
Oklahoma City


Saturday Today
HI/Lo/Pcp. H/Lo/W
82/73/0 88/66/s
'-87/72/0 89/70/pc
0. 75. 103/79/pc
53/44/0 57/41/c
88/75/.01 94/73/t
83/71/0 81/69/t
81/75/0 88/73/s
97/81/0 99/80/pc
88/73/0 93/70/t
95/77/0 98/77/t
94/75/0 97/80/t
87/74/0 97/74/t
97/77/0 103/80/s
104/81/0 102/80/t
70/62/0 74/62/pc
97/76/0 99/82/t
95/83/.01 90/79/t
85/75/0 79/65/s
94/79/0 92/79/t
93/78/0 93/80/t
85/72/0 85/75/t
106/81/0 108/83/t


CITY
Omaha
Orlando
Philadelphia
Phoenix
Pittsburgh
Portland ME
Portland OR
Raleigh
Rapid City
Reno
Richmond
Sacramento
St. Louis
Salt Lake City
San Antonio
San Diego
San Francisco
Seattle
Spokane
Tampa
Tucson
Washington


Saturday Today
HI/Lo/Pcp. HI/Lo/W
99/72/0 86/67/s
94/78/0 94/77/t
86/70/0 88/75/t
104/87/0 109/87/pc
85/75/.05 87/69/pc
80/62/0 74/64/t
65/60/0 78/57/pc
85/73/4.31 94/75/t
79/55/0 86/62/t
84/59/0 90/56/s
90/68/0 96/74/t
78/58/0 89/58/s
94/75/.02 97/77/t
90/61/0 90/67/s
95/78/0 101/77/pc
70/64/0 75/65/pc
69/55/0 66/53/pc
66/57/0 72/57/pc
75/56/0 88/56/s
92/81/0 93/77/t
93/81/0 102/79/pc
91/73/0 92/76/t


, 7 Nli 5


7a 1p 7p 1 6a
SSunday Monday 6









w-mmFuecastfftlan ese"tniperatur
Freao temerathwems Fe7rDs Iv'trqeralwe


On this date inn
1986. New England
saw .5 rare ou'lrrea'
of 7 tornadoes.
After going 12 &ears.
without reporting a
lorrado in tne stale.
Rhode Islandr sa~
three touch Down in
24 nouJrs


SetConnected


CITY
Acapulco
SAmsterdam
SAthens
Auckland
Beliing
Berlin
Buenos Aires
Cairo
Geneva.
Havana
Helsinki
Hong Kong
Kingston


Saturday Today Saturday Today Satur
HI/Lo/Pcp. HI/Lo/W CITY HI/Lo/Pcp. HI/Lo/W CITY HI/Lo/
90/79/0 87/77/t La Paz 57/25/0 58/30/sh Rio 79/5!
73/59/0 67/55/sh Uma 63/59/0 67/62/pc Rome 82/61
86/77/0 89/73/s London 68/57/0 66/55/sh St. Thomas VI 90/8:
59/43/0 55/44/sh Madrid 91/63/0 94/64/pc San Juan PR 88/81
84/73/0 83/72/t Mexico City 73/59/0 72/55/t Santiago 52/4:
82/63/0 69/59/sh Montreal 86/66/0 79/66/sh Seoul 91/77
68/41/0 63/48/pc Moscow 79/54/0 74/57/pc Singapore 90/8:
95/75/0 95/75/s Nairobi 75/55/0 75/55/sh Sydney- 75/5:
77/61/0 70/58/r Nassau 84/79/0 92/81/t Tel Aviv 88/7!
91/73/0 90/73/t New Delhi 90/81/0 91/80/t Tokyo 90/7!
73/52/.04 ,70/58/pc Oslo 72/59/0 65 54 i Toronto 84/61
95/82/0 93/82/t Panama 88/79/0 88/75/t Vienna 81/61
8 81,u 86.77,p Paris 7b lO610 ...69 54 ,n ljwrsaw i,, 9 57
KEY TO CONDITIONS- h-cr.rdyd "ir-1iT6e.l-'ft'l.-l 1- h-fij" '\ .' . r-rain, s-sunny,
:h -'hM'r. ,nr..=;,nc.r, S lw, t n=1i3r,,ir rmr .^-= ,,-id/. '
-'- .... ... '.. ,.., -. ..... ,-L -. r


day
'Pcp
9/0
3/0
1/0
1/0
1/0
7/0
1/0
2/0
5/0
9/0
3/0
3/0
14


,... . : .:..:. ,











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So far, teM V:iaPItwo :feit *rk at Shand s .


Pesacla
92''79


Today
. HI/Lo/W
82/67/pc
88/68/pc
89/80/t
87/76/t
61/41/sh
87/76/t
86/78/t
63/53/sh
89/78/s
88/75/t
84/68/c -
78/63/sh
.81/62/sh


LAKE C17Y ALMANAC


\J 1' JI
I- I--rc--le -u~u-rurs~rY~aYlu,~r~~~a-jc-c.~.l~~~~~


I '


Page Editor: Robert Bridges, 754-0428


SI J


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- :' .": -7 .... + 1.. .










Story ideas?

Contact
Tim Kirby
Sports Editor
754-0421
, ,r7 ,, --' ". "


Lake City Reporter





SPORTS


Sunday,August 7, 201 I


www.lakecityreporter.com


Section B


BRIEFS

CHS VOLLEYBALL
Columbia High
tryouts Monday
Columbia High
volleyball varsity tryouts
are 9-11 am. Monday at
the school. Junior varsity
tryouts are 5:30-7 p.m.
Aug. 15. A current
physical and permission
forms are required.
For details, call
Rebecca Golden at
755-8080.
FORT WHITE VOLLEYBALL
High school
tryouts Monday
Fort White High has
volleyball tryouts
for varsity and junior
varsity teams from
3:30-5:30 p.m. Monday.
Participants must have
a current physical and a
parent consent form on
file.
For details, call Doug
Wohlstein at 497-5952.
CHS SWIMMING
Conditioning
begins Monday
The Columbia High
swim team returns to the
water from 4:15-6:15 p.m.
Monday for conditioning.
All new and returning
swimmers must have
paper work completed.
WOLVES VOLLEYBALL
Meeting planned
for Monday
Richardson Middle
School has a volleyball
informational meeting at
3:30 p.m. Monday at the
school gym.
For details, call
DeShazo Wilkinson at
(407) 235-5178.
FORT WHITE FOOTBALL
Q-back Club
meeting Monday
The Fort White
Quarterback Club's
weekly meeting is
7 p.m. Monday in the
teacher's lounge at the
high school.
For details, call Shayne
Morgan at 397-4954.
CHS FOOTBALL
Meetings set for
Monday, Tuesday
The Columbia County
Quarterback Club will
meet at 6 p.m. Monday in
the Jones Fieldhouse.
There is a parents
meeting at 6 p.m.
Tuesday in the CHS
auditorium.
SWIMMING
CPR class
offered Aug. 15
The Columbia Aquatic
Complex will conduct
an American Red Cross
CPR class at 6:30 p.m.
Aug. 15. Cost is $50.
Registration is at the pool
and space is limited.
For details, call Brandy
or Dan at 755-8195.
YOUTH SOFTBALL
Lightning 10U
tryouts Saturday
The Lake City
Lightning 10-under
fast pitch softball travel
team has tryouts for the
upcoming season at
9 a.m. Saturday at the
Girls Softball Complex
on Bascon Norris Drive.
For details, call Butch
Lee at 965-6002.


* From staff reports


Training


campers


CHS, Fort White start football practice Monday


Reporter fiMe photos
ABOVE: Columbia High's Rakeem Battle (3) tries to get around the corner during the Tigers' 38-13 victory over Brooks
County High (Ga.) on Sept. 3 in Lake City.

BELOW: Fort White quarterback Andrew Baker (12) attempts to cut in front of Bradford High's Xavier Riles (10) on a
quarterback keeper in a game on Nov. 5.


By BRANDON FNLEY
bfinley@lakecityreporter. cor
Columbia County's foot-
ball teams are going NFL
style with training camps
beginning Monday, as
Columbia and Fort White
high schools prepare for
the 2011 season.
Fresh off the FCA camp
and summer workouts,
coaches Brian Allen and
Demetric Jackson are ready
to lock down their teams in
an effort to cram as much
football knowledge into one
week as possible.
"It's going to be a little
different than what the pre-
vious staff did," Allen said.
"We want to treat it like a
training-camp atmosphere.
We're going to get away
from the normal routine. I
think itwill be advantageous
to the program, because in
two weeks we'll be playing
a football gatpe."
For Jackson, it's a chance
to take players out of their
norm.
"It's easier for us with
so many players living in
different areas that can't
get a ride or are late to
practice," he said. "We'll
lock down the campus, take
away the phones and con-
centrate on football. Players
won't be able to sleep in
their own bed. They won't
have the privacy of their
own shower. We find you
learn a lot more about a
person when they're out of
their normal routine."
It's also an opportunity
for the coaches to be around
their teams 120 straight
hours. That's a lot of time to
talk football.
"We'll only practice twice
a day," Jackson said. "There
will be a lot of film study.
We'll have chances to go in
the weight room and really
do some chalk talk (draw-
ing plays on a chalkboard).
I find it really helps with our
success."
With FCA not far in the
rear view mirror, Allen sees
this camp as a chance to
keep moving forward, not
as a starting point.
'The best benefit is we're
just coming back from
CAMP continued on 2B


Faulk's brilliant

mind took him

to Hall of Fame


Rams running
back one of seven
inducted Saturday.
By MICHAEL MAROT
Associated Press
INDIANAPOLIS Kurt
Warner understood what
made the Greatest Show on
Turf work.
It wasn't his strong, accu-
rate arm or those speedy
receivers who stretched
defenses to the limit. No,
the Rams' secret weapon
was Marshall Faulk's
uncanny mind.
"He was designing
plays and coming up with
thoughts that would make
our team better, not just
make him better," Warner
said of the newest Rams
inductee into the Pro
Football Hall of Fame.


"Mike Martz allowed all
of us to have some input in
what was happening, and
Marshall always had ideas
about how certain things
could be better, how to run
routes, how to do this or
that. You never knew where
it came from, but I knew he
was a big part of helping
develop that offense."
Faulk always saw things
differently on and off the
field.
He left the tough streets
of New Orleans' ninth ward
for the sunny skies of San
Diego because he was
determined to play running
back in college. Still, he
never forgot about his roots
in the impoverished Desire
housing project where he
grew up.
And while others
FAULK continued on 3B


ASSOCIATED PRESS
In this Jan. 27, 2002 file photo, St. Louis Rams running back Marshall Faulk is chased by
Philadelphia Eagles defenders Brandon Whiting (98), Troy Vincent (23) and Corey Simon (90)
during the NFC Championship game in St. Louis. Faulk was inducted into the Pro Football
Hall of Fame on Saturday.


, c


. v











LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS SUNDAY, AUGUST 7, 2011


TELEVISION

TV sports

Tod -
AUTO RACING
Ip.A.
ESPN NASCAR Sprint Cup, Good
am RV Insurance s500, at Long Pond. Pa.
2 pxL
VERSUS IP, IndyCar, Honda Indy
200, at LednglonOhio
7 p..
ESPN2 NHRA, Northwest
Nationals, at KntWash. (sane-day tape)
GOLF

TGC PGATour/WGC, Bridgetone
Inviatonal, Anal round, at Akron, Ohio
2 p.m.
CBS PGATour/WGCBridgestone
Invtational. Anal round. at Akron Oho
TGC NaonwideTour,Cox C classic,
flnal round, at Omaha Neb.
4p.m.
TGC Champions Tour, 3M
Championship, final round, at Blake,
Minn.
7 Pm.
TGC PGA Tour, Reno-Tahoe Open,
final round. at Reno, Neo
HORSE RACING
sp.m.
VERSUS NTRA, Honorable Miss
and Alfred G. V Ha ndicap, at
Saratoga Springs N.Y.
MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL
Ip.m.
TBS -Atlanta at N.Y. Mets
2p.m.
WGN Chicago White Sox at
Minnesota
a p.m.
ESPN N.Y.Yankes at Boston
RODEO
*p.m.
VERSUS PmR. Stanley Tools and
Security Invitational, at Billings, Mont.

TENNIS
3 pm.
ESPN2 ATP, Leg Mason Cassic,
championship match atWVashngton
5 p.n.
ESPN2 WTA Tour, Mercury
Insurance Open. championship atmht at
Carlsbad, Calif.

NP-AW
MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL
7 p.m.
ESPN Boston at Minnesota
10p.m.
MLB Regional coverage, Pittsburgh
t San Francisco or Phdephia at LA.
Dodgers

BOWLING

league e reports

Results of league bowling at Lake
City Bowl:
MONDAY NIGHT MAVERICKS
TRIO
Team standings: I. Team 8 (80-40);
2.Team 4 (79-41); 3. Lucky You (73-47).
High scratch game: I. Danny Phelps
256; 2. (tie) BID Duncan, Wally Howard
247; 4. Dale Coleman 245.
High scratch series: I. Dale Coleman
683; 2. Bobby Trunnell 648; 3. Teo Parra

High handicap game: I. Danny Phelps
2%; 2 Wally Howard 266; 3. (tie) Bill
Duncan, David Adel, George Mulligan
263.
High handicap series: 1. Danny Phelps
'746; 2. Bobby Trunnell 732; 3. Dale
.Coleman 728.
' High average: I. Zech Strohl 216.6;
2. Robert Stone 212.28; 3. Dale Coleman
206.17.
resultss from July II)

AUTO RACING

Race week
NASCAR
SPRINT CUP
GOOD SAM RV INSURANCE 500
Site Long Pond, Pa.
Schedule: Today, race, I p.m. (ESPN,
-noon-5 p.m.).
' Track Pocono Raceway (triangle,
:2.5 miles).
Race distance: 500 miles, 200 laps.
INDYCAR
HONDA INDY 200
Site: Lexington, Ohio.
ScheduleToday, race, 2:50 p.m. (Versus,
2-5 p.m.).
Track Mid-Ohio Sports Car Course
(road course, 2.258 miles).
Race distance: 191.25 miles, 85 laps.
NHRA FULL THROTTLE
NHRA NORTHWEST
NATIONALS
SitKemnWash.
Schedule: Today, final eliminations
(ESPN2.7-10 p.m.).
Trackde Pacific Raceways.

Good Sam qualifying

Ac Pocono Raceway
Long Pond Pa.
(Car number In parentheses)
I. (20) Joey Logano.Teyota, 172.055.
2.(4) Kasey Kahne,Toyota 171.648.
3. (56) Martin Truex Jr., Toyota,
171.494.
4.(99) Carl Edwards, Ford, 171.474.
5. (22) Kurt Busch, Dodge, 171.468.
6.(I I) Denny Hamlin,Toyota 171.448.
7. (27) Paul Menard. Chevrolet,
171.37.
8. (31) Jeff Burton, Chevrolet.


RF,_IT _
MM MUmN


I-edto


171367.
9. (16) Greg Biille, Ford, 171.171.
10. (29) Kevin Harvick. Chevrolet,
171.122.
I i.(18) Kyle Busch,Toyota, 171.08.
12. (39) Ryan Newman, Chevrolet,
170.788.
13. (2) Brad Keselowski, Dodge,
170.652.
14. (33) Clint Bowyer, Chevrolet,
170.619.
15.(6) David Ragan, Ford, 170.619.
16. (I).Jamie McMurray, Chevrolet,
170.59.
17. (78) Regan Smith, Chevrolet.
170.558.
18. (48) Jimmie Johnson, Chevrolet,
170.539.
19. (88) Dale Earnhardt Jr., Chevrolet,
170.506.
20.(17) Matt Kenseth, Ford, 170.438.
21. (36) Dave Blaney, Chevrolet,
170.309.
22. (47) Bobby Labonte, Toyota,
170.28.
23.(42) Juan Pablo Montoya, Chevrolet,
170.161.
24. (34) David Gilliland, Ford, 170.068.
25. (5) Mark Martin, Chevrolet,
170.042..
26.(83) Brian VickersToyota, 169.991.
27. (9) Marcos Ambrose, Ford,
169.875.
28. (14) Tony Stewart, Chevrolet,
169.734.
29. (43) A J AlImendinger, Ford,
169.629.
30.(66) Todd Bodine,Toyota, 169.393.
31.. (24) Jeff Gordon, Chevrolet,
169.358.
32. (13) Casey MearsToyota, 169.338.
33. (00) David Reutimann, Toyota,
169.335.
34. (55) J.J.Yeley, Ford, 168.909.
35. (46) Erik Darnell, Ford, 168.631.
36. (51) Landon Cassill, Chevrolet,
168.508.
37. (30) David Stremme, Chevrolet,
167.892.
38. (7) Robby Gordon, Dodge,
167.795.
39. (38) Travis Kvapll, Ford, 167:604.
40. (37) Scott Speed, Ford, 167.42.
41. (32) Jason White, Ford, Owner
Points.
42. (71) Andy Lally, Ford, Owner
Points.
43. (87) Joe Nemechek, Toyota,
167.268.
Failed to Qualify
44. (35) Geoff Bodine, Chevrolet,
167.218.
45. (50) T.J. Bell, Chevrolet, 167.072.
46. (60) Mike SkinnerToyota, 166.156.

BASEBALL

AL standings


East Division
W L
New York 69 42
Boston 68 43
Tampa Bay 59 52
Toronto 57 55
Baltimore 43 66
Central Division
; W L
Detroit .60 52
Cleveland 55 55
Chicago 53 58
Minnesota 51 61
Kansas City 48 64
West Division
W L
Texas 63 50
Los Angeles 62 5 I
Oakland 49 63
Seattle 48 63


Pct GB
.622 -
.613 I
.532 10
.509 12'
.394 25,


Pct GB
.558 -
.549 I
.438 13'A
.432 14


Friday's Games
Toronto 5, Baltimore 4
N.Y.Yankees 3, Boston 2
Tampa Bay 8, Oakland 4
Texas 8, Cleveland 7, I Innings
Chicago White Sox 5, Minnesota 3
Detroit 4, Kansas City 3, 10 Innings
LA.Angels I,Seattle 0, 10 innings
Saturday's Games
N.Y.Yankees at Boston (n)"
Toronto at Baltimore (n)
Chicago White Sox at Minnesota (n)
Detroit at Kansas City (n)
Oakland at Tampa Bay (n)
Cleveland at Texas (n)
Seattle at LA.Angels (n)
Today's Games
Toronto (R.Romero 9-9) at Baltimore
(Simon 3-4), 1:35 p.m.
Oakland (CahIll 9-10) at Tampa Bay
(Price 9-10), 1:40 p.m.
Chicago White Sox (Peavy 4-5) at
Minnesota (Duensing 8-9), 2:10 p.m.
Detroit (Scherzer 11-6) at Kansas
City (Chen 5-5), 2:10 p.m.
Seattle (F.Hernandez 10-9) at LA.
Angels (E.Santana 7-8), 3:35 p.m.
Cleveland (Tomlin 11-5) at Texas
(C.Lewls 10-8), 8:05 p.m.
N.Y.Yankees (F.Garcia 10-7) at Boston
(Beckett 9-4), 8:05 p.m.
Monday's Games
Chicago White Sox at Baltimore,
7:05 p.m.
. Boston at Minnesota, 7:10 p.m.
Kansas City at Tampa Bay, 7:10 p.m.



Unscramble these four Jumbles,
one letter to each square,
to form four ordinary words.

SBRTU


Seattle at Texas 8-05 pum.

NL standings

East Division
W L
Philadelphia 73 39
Atlanta 65 48
New York 55 56
Florida 55 57
Washington 54 58
Central Division
W L
Milwaukee 63 50
St. Louis 60 53
Pittsburgh 54 57
Cincinnati 54 59
Chicago 49 65
Houston 37 75
West Division
W L
San Francisco 62 51
Arizona 6 5 I
Colorado 52 61


Pet GB
.558 -
.531 3
.486 8
.478 9
.430 14%
.330 25'A


Los Angeles 51 60 .459 10
San Diego 49 64 .434 13
Friday's Games
Chicago Cubs 4, Cincinnati 3
San Diego I5, Pittsburgh 5
Atlanta 4, N.Y. Mets I
St. Louis 3, Florida 2
Milwaukee 8, Houston I
Washington 5, Colorado 3
LA. Dodgers 7,Arizona 4
Philadelphia 9, San Francisco 2
Saturday's Games
Chicago Cubs I I, Cincinnati 4
Philadelphia at San Francisco (n)
Milwaukee at Houston (n)
San Diego at Pittsburgh (n)
Atlanta at N.Y. Mets (n)
St. Louis at Florida (n)
LA. Dodgers at Arizona (n)
Washington at Colorado (n)
Today's Games
Atlanta (Minor 1-2) at N.Y. Mets (Gee
10-3), 1l:10 p.m.
St. Louis (j.Garcia 10-5) at Florida
(Vazquez 7-9), 1:10 p.m.
San Diego (Latos 5-11) at Pittsburgh
(Correia 12-9), 1:35 p.m.
Milwaukee (Grelnke 9-4) at Houston
(Norris 5-7), 2:05 p.m.
Cincinnati (Arroyo 7-9) at Chicago
Cubs (R.Wells 3-4), 2:20 p.m.
Washington (Lannan 8-7) at Colorado
(A.Cook 2-6), 3:I0 p.m.
Philadelphia (Oswalt 4-6) at San
Francisco (Uncecum 9-9), 4:05 p.m.
LA. Dodgers (Kershaw 13-4) at
Arizona (I.Kennedy 13-3), 4:10 p.m.
Monday's Games
Atlanta at Florida, 7:10 p.m.
Colorado at Cincinnati, 7:10 p.m.
San Diego at N.Y. Mets, 7:10 p.m.
Washington at Chicago Cubs,
8:05 p.m.
Houston at Arizona, 9:40 p.m.
Philadelphia at L.A. Dodgers,
10:10 p.m.
Pittsburgh at San Francisco, 10:15 p.m.

FOOTBALL

NFL preseason

Thursday
Baltimore at Philadelphia, 7:30 p.m.
Jacksonville at New England, 7i30 p.m.
Seattle at San Diego, 8 p.m. (ESPN)
Denver at Dallas, 8:30 p.m.
Arizona at Oakland, 10 p.m.
Friday
Cincinnati at Detroit, 7:30 p.m.
Miami at Atlanta, 7:30 p.m.
Pittsburgh atWashington, 7:30 p.m.
San Francisco at New Orleans, 8 p.m.
Tampa Bay at Kansas City, 8 p.m. (FOX)
Saturday
Green Bay at Cleveland, 7:30 p.m.
Buffalo at Chicago, 8 p.m.
Indianapolis at St. Louis, 8 p.m.
Minnesota at Tennessee, 8 p.m.
N.Y. Giants at Carolina, 8 p.m.
Aug.15
N.Y. jets at Houston, 8 p.m. (ESPN)

Arena Football League

'Conference Championships
Saturday
Chicago at Arizona (n)
Monday
Georgia at Jacksonville, 8 p.m.

BASKETBALL

WNBA schedule

Thursday's Games
New York 59, Chicago 49
Minnesota 62, San Antonio 60
Friday's Games
Indiana 85,Tulsa 65
Seattle 81, Connecticut 79
Saturday's Games
"NewYork at Washington (n)
Tulsa at San Antonio (n)
Today's Games
Seattle atAtlanta, 3 p.m.
Connecticut at Phoenix, 6 p.m.
Indiana at Chicago, 7 p.m.
Minnesota at Los Angeles, 8:30 p.m.
THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME
by David L. Hoyt and Jeff Knurek


WHEN HE ASKEP
TO RAISE THE STAKES,
SHIS OPPONENT SAIP THIS-1,
Now arrange the circled letters
to form the surprise answer, as
suggested by the above cartoon.


Print your answer here: I IT
(Answers tomorrow)
Saturday's Jumbles: HOUND JOINT TICKET, IGNITE
Answer: He wanted to get 100 on his math test, but
hopefully he wasn't COUNTING ON IT


Scott leads by 1


By DOUG FERGUSON
Associated Press

AKRON, Ohio Adam
Scott was losing ground
Saturday at Firestone
when he decided to stick
with what was working.
Four birdies later, he had
a 4-under 66 and a one-shot
lead in the Bridgestone.
Invitational.
On a day when seven
players had a share of the
lead at one point, Scott
went back to a left-to-right
shape off the tee and
surged through the back
nine to take a one-shot lead
over Jason Day and Ryo
Ishikawa, the 19-year-old
from Japan who will try to
become the youngest win-
ner of a PGA Tour event in
100 years.
Scott was at 12-under
198, the lost 54-hole score
at Firestone in 10 years.
About the only thing
Tiger Woods can now get
out of this week are four
rounds and some points
to help him qualify for


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Cadcie Steve Williams (left) talks with Adam Scott of
Australia on the 18th fairway during the third round of the
Bridgestone Invitational golf tournament at Firestone
Country Club in Akron, Ohio on Saturday.


the FedEx Cup playoffs
at the end of the month.
Woods, a seven-time win-
ner at Firestone who hasn't
played in nearly three
months, struggled again
with his putting and had a
72. He was 13 shots behind
in a tie for 38th in the
76-man field.
"I've just got to put
together a good round and


let it build," Woods said.
Scott htop the leader-
board is compelling, espe-
cially with Woods back
to golf. It was only two
weeks ago when Woods
announced he had fired his
caddie, and Scott picked
him up on a full-time basis.
Ishikawa opened with
three birdies on the front
nine on the way to a 64.


CAMP: Bonding part of the process


Continued From Page 11

camp," Allen said. "It was
good for team-building
character. We should be
ahead of schedule with the
core guys."
Still, there will be basics.
'Well review the funda-
mentals," Allen said. "We'll
build from that We want
to sharpen the blade and
hone our craft. We're also
hoping to have some of the
young guys from middle
school show up."
Allen isn't making room
for the older students who
skipped summer practice.
"We don't want the high
school kids to pop in after
missing the summer," he
said. "I won't allow it. I want
kids that are invested in the
team-concept"
The first three days .of
the camp will be more fun-
damentals, but the real fun
starts Thursday.
"Once the pads go on,
we have to make sure to
take care of our' bodies,"
Jackson -said. "We don't
have as many guys as we're
use to from last year, so we
can't kill ourselves."


ACROSS

Simply
Gift ribbon
Mineral spring
Pink-slipped
Jai -
PC monitor,
once
People
who roam
Use crosshairs
Watered silk
Church
readings
Tarzan's title
Disentangle
Places
for flowers
Be a party to
All-purpose
truck
Unfair (hyph.)
Stayed even
(2 wds.)
Actor Beatty
One in
a million
Birds' bills


Jackson also saw things
at the FCA camp where
he feels the Indians need
work.
"We got a jump on look-
ing at things at the FCA,"
he said. "One area that
we need to improve is our
blocking. We need to do a
better job recognizing dif-
ferent schemes and know-
ing who to block in differ-
ent fronts. There will be a
lot of that during the first
three days."
Jackson didn't just pick
on the linemen.
"The defense has to rec-
ognize sets as well," he said.
"We saw a lot of formations
at camp. We have to know
where we're vulnerable. It
will .be more teaching and
back to the basics."
Allen shares a little of
Jackson's. frustration
with his offensive line at,
Columbia.
"We need to be able to
make the proper adjust-
ments on the offensive
line," he said.
And Allen also intends
to do a little attitude adjust-


41 Elevator
pioneer
43 Veer out
of control
45 Mystical cards
47 Golf score
50 Call - day
51 Pictures
mentally
54'Barn color
55 Cafe au -
56 Buffalo's lake
57 Sooner than
anon
58 Nonsense!
59 Ferris wheel

DOWN

1 Gullet
2 Midterm or
final
3 Vegas
alternative
4 Swirled
5 More empty
6 Bullfight cheer
7 Lumber flaw
8 Heat to boiling


ment for the Tigers.
"We need to receive
coaching around the
board," Allen said. "I have
seen too many guys throw-
ing their heads back. We're
going to start the matu-
ration process and accept
coaching. Ifs one thing to
hear it, but another to get it
done. I've called out a few
players already individu-
ally. We can't always have
a comeback or reason that
we did things wrong. We
have to mature as a unit"
Allen said the Tigers will
also spend time away from
the football field watching
movies about football.
Jackson's unit takes time
recreating their favorite
movies.
"We do a thing we call
entertainment night and
we find it really funny,"
Jackson said. 'We had a
group of lineman that we
thought were shy act out
one of their favorite scenes
from a movie and it was
great. It's a fun thing and
something we look forward
to."


Answer to Previous Puzzle







AU RJ I N|BN Y^W L

BL URUIE L EOA


RATA BAR AL F

IST ATM IGOR

NATURE DUELED

SWAMI TREE


First-rate
They need a PIN
Hot topics.
Cenozoic and
others
Opposed


22 Knights'
weapons
24 Hearty laugh
25 Wolfed down
26 Good name,
for short
28 Quilting social
30 Dory mover
31 Spiral mol-
ecule
32 Mouse alert
33 Tooth fixer's
deg.
35 Small combo
36 Light color
39 Dressmaker's
cut
40 More nervous
41 Lone Ranger
movie
42 Exchange
44 Actor
Carradine
45 Get pooped
out
46 Crackle
48 Loughlin or
Petty
49 Wife of
Geraint
52 Itinerary word
53 Use one's
eyes


2011 UFS, Dist. by Univ. Uclick for UFS


SCOREBOARD


Want more puzzles?
Check out the "Just Right Crossword Puzzles" books
at QuillDriverBooks.com


Page Editor: Tim Kirby, 754-0421


UEONCP
-- 0--
__s ^_*











Page EdItor: Tim Kirby, 754-0421 LAKE CITY REPORTER FOOTBALL SUNDAY, AUGUST 7, 2011


Low expectations, high



motivation for Gators


By MARK LONG
Associated Press

'GAINESVILLE-Florida
has a new coach, a new
offense, a new defense and
plenty of new starters.
The Gators also have
some new motivation. It
stems from relatively low
expectations.
For the first time in eight
years, maybe even lon-
ger, Florida has little pre-
season hype. No Heisman
Trophy hopefuls. No play-
ers on the All-Southeastern
Conference first team.
And the Gators are widely
picked to finish third in the
Eastern Division.
First-year head coach
Will Muschamp, the former
coach-in-waiting at Texas,
believes the lack of atten-
tion might be a good thing.
His players, though, insist
they will use it as fuel while
preparing for the Sept. 3
season opener against
Florida Atlantic.
"It is motivating when
these guys are saying we're
not good enough, we don't
have enough star power,
we don't have enough
this and that," guard Ian
Silberman said. "Maybe we
don't. But there have been
some great teams win with-
out star power, without a
great quarterback, without
a great receiver. As long
as we come together as a
team and play to our ability,
I don't think there's anyone
who can touch us." ,
The Gators opened fall
practice Saturday amid
all sorts of questions.,
Muschamp kicked his
best defender, cornerback
Janoris Jenkins, off the
team in April following his
third arrest in less than two
years. Florida also lost a
linebacker, a punter, both
safeties, two defensive line-
men and. three offensive
linemen. Throw in a new
coaching staff and about 70
players on scholarship, and
there's legitimate reason
for doubt.
"We did lose a lot of key
players, but we have great
talent here," safety Josh
Shaw said. "We know what
people are saying about us.


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Cornerback Moses Jenkins strains while doing push-ups during the Gator Football Charity
Challenge at Ben Hill Griffin Stadium in Gainesville on July 29.


We talk about it, but we
don't let it get the best of us.
At the end, ift's about what
you're doing, how' you're
progressing and what you
show on the field." ;
Muschamp does have
one thing in his favor: The
element of surprise.
Muschamp close spring
practice for the first time in
school history, so outside
the two-hour glimpse into
Florida's revamped offense
and defense provided by the
spring game, media, fans,
and most importantly, fans
don't know what to expect.
"No one' knows what
we're doing, what we're
going through, so I think
we can surprise a lot of
people," Shaw said.
Florida hasn't been -in
this position very often, at
least not in recent years.
The Gators have been
a perennial favorite, in
'the SEC and have landed
numerous players on the
preseason All-SEC team.
But most believe this will
be a rebuilding year for the
Gators.
Urban Meyer stepped
down after six years and two
national championships.


Florida took a chance by
hiring Muschamp, who had
no previous head coaching
experiencing. He respond-
ed by filling his staff with
experienced coaches, many
of whom have years of NFL
experience.
But how quickly can they
turn things around.
The Gators. finished 8-5
last season, with most of the
problems coming because
quarterback John Brantley
was misfit inri the spread
offense. It didn't help that
ruining back Jeff Demps
missed several games
because of a foot injury and
running back Chris Rainey
was suspended five games.
But Brantley got the
brunt of the blame. He
completed 61 percent of his
passes for 2,061 yards, with
nine touchdowns and 10
interceptions. He, became
the first player to lead the
team in passing and throw
more INTs than TDs since
Kyle Morris in 1988.
Brantley considered
transferring following the
coaching change, but decid-
ed to stick around when
Muschamp hired former
Notre Dame head coach


Charlie Weis to run the
offense.
"My confidence is a lot
higher now since the new
coaches arrived," Brantley
said. "When the new
coaching staff got here, it
was all new to me. Now
that I have spring football
under my belt and have
had all summer to study the
playbook, I think as a team
we're ready to go."
That remains to be seen.
The one spot that seems
ready to carry the Gators
is the defensive line. With
Sharrif Floyd, Ronald
Powell, Dominique Easley,
Omar Hunter, Jaye Howard
and William Green, the
Gators have the talent and
the numbers to dominate
the line of scrimmage. That
certainly raises expecta-
tions on the defensive side
of the ball.
But it does little to
change Florida's overall
perception.
"Everybody's doubting
us," Silberman said. "We
don't have enough experi-
ence, we're too small. As
long as we can put it togeth-,
er on the field, we'll be all
right."


Miami opens camp under Golden


By TIM REYNOLDS
Associated Press

CORAL GABLES Al
Golden has told his Miami
Hurricanes plenty about
the pace he'lIdemand from
them during training camp.
And in their first practice
together, .he showed them
what he meant
Roaming from spot to
spot during various drills,
stopping every so often for
a few words with players
before moving on to see
another -group in a frenetic
opening practice, a sweat-
drenched Golden was 'in
constant motion Saturday
morning when Miami
formally opened its first
training camp under tie
new coach.
Golden's plan is simple:
He wants the Hurricanes to
set the tone for the season
quickly, stressing condi-
tioning and tempo.
"There's urgency,"
Golden said. "There's a
sense of urgency in the
building. I think the guys
know we've got to get a lot
done in a short period of
time. We're excited about
that. I know personally I
am, just to get back on the
field and get around the
guys."
The scene for Golden's
opening camp practice
at Miami surely paled to
anything he dealt with at
Temple, where he turned
around a program that
hadn't won consistently
in decades. He became a
prime candidate for plenty
of jobs around the nation -
including the one leading
the Hurricanes, who turned


ASSOCIATED PRESS
University of Miami quarterback Stephen Morris runs a.drill
during the team's first football practice of the season in
Coral Gables on Saturday.


to him after firing Randy
Shannon following the 2010
regular season.
A couple of dozen pho-
tographers and that many
reporters showed up for
Day 1, some inadvertently
in the coach's way during
one of the first drills. Golden
wanted a portable lift used
for videotaping moved to a
different angle and didn't
want to delay work for even
a few seconds during that
process.
"Sorry, but we've got to
get this done," Golden said,
politely and quickly. "Rfght
now."


Miami's fan base feels
the same way.
The Hurricanes are
entering their eighth
season in the Atlantic Coast
Conference, and a program
that dominated the Big East
and won five national cham-
pionships between 1983 and
2001 have yet to capture a
single title since switching
leagues. This year's group
- as did all the teams that
preceded them say this
season will be different-
"The first day's always
exciting," center Tyler
Horn said before prac-
tice. "It's football. You


prepare for eight months,
nine months, just to get to
Aug.. 6, the first day 'of
camp. Everyone's really,
really excited."
Even as the sun was
rising over Coral Gables
around 6:30 a.m., there
was a clear buzz among the
players as they emerged
in small groups from the
locker room and headed to
a nearby dining hall.
Most wore T-shirts with
"Uphold The Legacy" a
Golden touch written on
the back along with Miami's
distinct "U" logo.
"We've got to take care of
Miami first," Golden said.
He has been preaching
unity, and its showing.
A few guys skipped
through the parking lot
slapping anyone's hands
they could reach, while a.
few others clearly were in
favor of a little more sleep
and some stayed silent,
lost in the music blaring
through their headphones.
Jacory Harris and Stephen
Morris the prime candi-
dates for the starting quar-
terback job walked to
breakfast together, chatting
the whole way.
Harris and Morris say
they want to help the
other guy along the way as
they vie for the starting
position.
"We don't worry about it,"
Morris said. "We just get on
the field and execute. That's
the most important thing ...
Competitiort only brings out
the best in you. We're good
friends, so it's going to be
healthy competition."
Maryland is the
Hurricanes' first opponent.


UCF looks to

build on last


season's success


By FRED GOODALL
Associated Press

ORLANDO Central
Florida coach George
O'Leary says the Knights
are not resting on the
laurels of the best football
season in school history.
The defending
Conference' USA champi-
ons won a program-best
11 games in 2010, capped
by an eye-opening 10-6
victory over Georgia in the
Liberty Bowl.
This year's schedule fea-
tures early nonconference
games at home against
Boston College and on the
road at Brigham Young.
Those dates will give soph-
omore quarterback Jeff
Godfrey greater exposure,
and winning both could
thrust the entire program
into the national spotlight.
O'Leary is beginning
his eighth season at UCE
He likes the heightened
expectations that come
with winning the Knight's
, second conference title in
four years and finishing
with a bowl victory for the
first time.
"I'd rather be where
we're sitting now than
where we were when
we got here," O'Leary,
who went 0-11 in his first
season with the Knights
in 2004, said Friday
during the team's pre-
season media day.
"I think expectation
levels are higher. I think
the. team has to react to
that. I know the coaches
do," the coach said, add-
ing he'd rather have fans
excited about the prospect
of another conference title
and perhaps even a shot at
a BCS bowl berth, rather
than entering the season.


"hoping and wishing that
things happen right"
Godfrey was one of the
nation's top dual-threat
quarterbacks as a fresh-
man, throwing for 2,159
yards and 13 touchdowns
and rushing for 566 yards
and 10 TDs after beginning
the season as a reserve.
The Knights also return
three running backs who
ran for more than 600
yards last season, includ-
ing 1,000-yard rusher
Brynn Harvey.
The tailbacks have a
nose for the end zone, too,
with Harvey scoring 14
TDs rushing and Rounie
Weaver and Latavius
Murray each scoring 11
TDs.
While the Knights lost
some key players from
one of Conference USA's
top defenses, O'Leary is
confident he has capa-
ble replacements. With
Godfrey a year older, the
coach thinks the offense
will be better, too.
The coach said one topic
he discussed with players
when the team convened
to begin preparation *for
the Sept 3 season open-
er against Charleston
Southern was the need
.to focus on what's ahead
- not the impressive way
the Knights finished last
season by winning nine of
their last 10 games.
"We need to move from
that victory in the Liberty
Bowl. I told them it's a new
year, a new season ,and
you're going to be judged
by what's done this year,
riot last year," O'Leary
said. "But I do think it.
helps from a confidence
level, just that if they do
things right, good things
can happen."


FAULK: College great


Continued From Page 1
touted his incredible skills,
Faulk never thought the
NFL was a real possibility
until his freshman season
at San Diego State. The
thought of being a part of
football's greatest shrine
was incomprehensible.
That's how Faulk viewed
football, as a small part of
life.
"There is a celebration
aspect to it," he said of
Saturday's induction cer-
emony in Canton, Ohio..
"But going in is really more
of an acknowledgment that
kids in poverty, in their
situations, can get out of it,
and it doesn't always come'
from sports."
" Football was Faulk's
escape, but it was the les-
sons he learned in New
Orleans that propelled him
to stardom. He believed in
himself.
So when the big schools
questioned whether the kid
from George Washington
Carver High School could
play running back in col-
lege, Faulk followed his
heart to the one the school
that would give him a
chance. It didn't take long
to prove himself.
In his second college
game, Faulk ran for a mind-
blowing 386 yards and
seven touchdowns against
the University of Pacific.
He finished his freshman
season with 1,429 yards,
21 touchdowns and an
average of 7.1 yards per
carry. He was ninth in the
Heisman Trophy voting.
Itwas no fluke. As a soph-
omore, Faulk produced
1,758 yards from scrim-
mage, 15 total touchdowns
and was the Heisman
runner-up. A year later, he
ran for 1,530 yards and 21
TDs and caught 47 pass-
es. He finished with 2,174
yards from scrimmage
that season and was fourth
in the Heisman voting.
Current Colts owner Jim
Irsay loved what he saw in
Faulk, who changed the
game with his nifty cuts,


'sheer quickness and abil-
ity to catch the ball out of
the backfield.
"He was such a smart
football player," said Irsay,
who insists he will always
consider Faulk a Colt even'
though he'll be inducted as
a Ram. "We really looked
at him as a coach on the
field. He knows the game
so well, its incredible."
Indianapolis liked Faulk
so much it used the No. 2
overall pick on Faulk, who
brought immediate star
power to a team in need
of a new image. But it was
his brain that allowed him
to excel.
He won the 1994
Offensive Rookie of the
Year Award, topped 1,000
yards four times, made
three Pro Bowls and led
the Colts to back-to-back
playoff appearances for
the first time in nearly two
decade. Then, in 1998, he
started mentoring another
New Orleans native, rook-
ie quarterback Peyton
Manning.
Pairing the mind of
Marshall with the mind
of Manning seemed, like a
perfect match.
Though Faulk played
pranks on the rookie, they
were all business when it
mattered. Faulk said 'he
taught Manning how to
deal with the media, how
to adapt to the NFL game
and, together, they read
defenses. In fact, Faulk
lined up deeper in the
backfield just to see the
defenses better.
"Marshall's ability
to read defenses was as
good as any quarterback,"
Manning said. "He was a
tremendous presence for
me, and I always will be
graieftl to him for helping
me that year. I loved watch-
ing him play, and it is only
right that he is taking his
place in Canton among the
greatest players who have
played the game. Therd
will never be another like
him."


LAKE CITY REPORTER FOOTBALL SUNDAY, AUGUST 7, 2011


Page Editor: Tim Kirby, 754-0421








LAKE CITY REPORTER AUTO RACING SL NDAY AUGUST 7. 2011


I.Ar ,w.-


',. .
- (,.= ,; ,


M TOWN

DEALER


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ASSOCIATED PRESS
Carl Edwards (left) talks with crew chief Bob Osborne during practice at Daytona International
Speedway in Daytona Beach on June 30. Edwards spurned an offer from Joe Gibbs Racing
and signed a multi-year contract extension with his current team, Roush Fenway Racing. The
deal was announced Thursday.

Edwards says Roush offers

best chance at Cup title


By DAN GELSTON
Associated Press
LONG POND, Pa. -The
one phone call from his
boss that meant the most to
Carl Edwards wasn't a pitch
to stay at Roush Fenway
Racing.
Jack Roush simply told
his star driver and
the hottest free agent in
NASCAR to make the
decision based on what was
best for Edwards.
"He said those words
to me, and that meant
the world," Edwards said
Friday at Pocono Raceway.
"It meant that I didn't have
the pressure to do some-
thing for any reason other
than what I thought was
best."
In the end, Edwards
decided what was best
was sticking with the only
organization he's called
home in his Cup career.
Edwards signed a multi-
year contract extension
with RFR this week because
he believed the resources,
sponsors, crew and car give


him the best chance to win
championships.
"Whenever I'd start feel-
ing that pressure start
creeping in from the out-
side I'd think, 'OK, let's get
back to the basics here,'" he
said. "Where can I win the
most championships? And
what would I do if other
people's opinions weren't a
factor?"
There were plenty of
opinions around the garage
from fellow drivers to
the media speculating on
his future. Greg Biffle,
his teammate, intimated
Edwards was leaving the
organization. Four-time Cup
champion Jeff Gordon said
lingering contract negotia-
tions were a distraction to
Edwards as he chased his
first career championship.
Edwards enters Sunday's
Sprint Cup race in ,first
place, a spot he's held in the
No. 99 Ford for the majority
of the season.
"I still think it got them a
little bit behind, but this will
allow them to get back on
track," Gordon said.


Edwards, who acted as
his own agent, said the
end of negotiations were a
big relief. He kept details
private, though he was
courtedbyJoe Gibbs Racing,
and insisted money was not
an issue. Hard to believe,
but Roush said money was
never discussed. Edwards
had more pressing ques-
tions about how the orga-
nization is run and what's
ahead for his team.
Roush did the equiva-
lent of opening the books,
letting Edwards in on the
secrets of every nook of the
organization.
"If Carl had made the
decision not to come back, I
was going to feel really stu-
pid for having shown him all
these things," Roush said.
Edwards refused to say
how close he was to sign-
ing with another team or
how many teams showed
interest. Once Edwards
was back in the fold, Roush
started sponsorship discus-
sions for the No. 99, and he
said there's no shortage of
interested suitors.
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Page Editor: Tim Kirby, 754-0421


I









Lake City Reporter


Story ideas?

Robert Bridges
Editor
754-0428
ribrdge s rake/!reporr comr


BUSINESS


Sunday, August 7, 2011


www.lakecityreporter.com


Section C


Former prosecutor goes solo


After 12 years with the .
state, local attorney
opens her own office.

By TONY BRITT
tbritt@lakecityreporter.com

F rom serving as a coach
for the Columbia High
School Mock Trial
Team, to working count-
less volunteer hours for
Three Rivers Legal Services, Tina
Seifert has proven she's an attor-
ney who believes in giving back to
the community.
Seifert, 42, has been a prac-
ticing attorney for 16 years
and recently opened her own
practice Seifert's Law Firm,
PA. Her office is at 248 North
Marion Avenue.
Seifert, who was admitted to
the Florida Bar in April 1995,
opened her practice in May.
,"It's been exciting," she said.
"It's been a lot of hard work and
spending a lot of time at the Christina Nieto Seifert
ofe" Christina Nieto Seifert,
office."
The focus of Seifert's practice downtown Lake City.
is family law, criminal defense,
personal injury and general civil practice.
"I was looking forward to being my own boss and
being able to focus on those cases that I felt were


, a practicing attorney for 16 years, has opened her own practice, S

important," she said. "I feel I'll be a benefit to the
community because of the areas of law that I prac-
tice in. I've been focusing on formal law primarily
and it covers so many areas dealing with not only


dissolutions of marriages, but
child custody, issues surrounding
paternity and step-parent adop-
tions and those kinds of things. I
think the area I'm going to focus
on is one that will touch many
people's lives."
Seifert also worked close to 12
years with the State Attorney's Office
-as a prosecutor and said that experi-
ence will help her.
"I believe I have the knowledge
and insight to be able to assist people
in making sure their rights are pro-
tected during a criminal defense
case," she said.
In addition to her regular work
as an attorney, Seifert has been
active in doing pro bono work as
a volunteer for Three Rivers Legal
Services and other agencies to
assist people who can't afford an
attorney.
Seifert also contributes to the com-
munity by volunteering with several
other agencies.
She currently serves as trea-
surer for the Third Circuit Judicial
SWALKER/LakeCity Reporter Bar Association; vice president
Seifert Law Firm in of the.Third Circuit Association
of Women Lawyers; is a member
of the Third Circuit Grievance
Committee (the board oversee-
ing complaints for attorneys in the Third Judicial
.Circuit) and is a member of the Voluntary Bar
Association Committee.


Obama proposes tax credits to hire jobless vets


By JULIE PACE
Associated Press
WASHINGTON -
President Barack Obama
proposed tax credits,
Friday to help companies
hire America's 1 million
unemployed military vet-
erans and vowdd to press
Congress harder this fall
for legislation to provide
more jobs for all.
Citing the nation's still
wobbly economy and a new
report showing unemploy-
ment remaining at over 9
percent, Obama told an
audience at Washington's
Navy Yard: "We are going
to get through this. Things
will get better. And we're
going to get there togeth-
er."
Obama's proposals were
part of his efforts to return
to a focus on jobs after
spending weeks mired in
the contentious debt-limit
debate.
"My singular focus is the
American people. Getting
the unemployed back on
the job, lifting their wages,"
he said.
Obama challenged
Congress upon its return to
get to work at once on legis-
lation to extend for another
year an expiring tax break
on Social Security payroll
taxes, to further extend
unemployment insurance
and a program for "put-
ting construction workers


back to work rebuilding
America."
Obama spoke after the
Labor Department report-
ed that the economy added
117,000 jobs in July while
the jobless rate ticked
down to 9.1 percent from
9.2 percent in June.
While the report was
better than economists had
expected, the jobless rate
has now topped 9 percent
in every month except two
since the recession official-
ly ended in June 2009.
Obama said that mem-
bers of the military return-
ing to civilian life have a
particularly hard time find-
ing work in such a difficult
environment.
Among the 1 million
unemployed veterans,
260,000 are former service
members who joined the
military after the Sept. 11
attacks.
The long acrimonious
battle over raising the gov-
ernment's debt limit "was
divisive, it was delayed,"
Obama said. He said if busi-
nesses are expected to get
cash off the sidelines and
to invest and hire "we've
got to do better than that."
The government, says
the unemployment rate for
the post-Sept. 11 service
members is 13.3 percent
Obama's proposal would
offer two tax credits for
.companies that hire unem-
ployed veterans:


A "Returning Heroes"
credit for 2012-2013.
Companies that hire unem-
ployed veterans would
receive a $2,400 tax credit.
It would increase to $4,800
if the veteran has been
unemployed for six months
or more.
A two-year extension
of the "Wounded Warriors"
tax credit, which gives
companies that hire vet-
erans with service-relat-
ed disabilities a $4,800
credit If the veteran has
been unemployed for six
months or more, the credit
increases to $9,600.
The tax credits would
require congressional
approval. The administra-
tion estimated the cost of
the tax credits at $120 mil-
lion.
During his remarks,
Obama also challenged
private companies to hire
or train 100,000 veterans
by the end of 2013. He
is expected to name some
companies that already
have committed to taking
part in that effort.
The president also
announced a joint initiative
between the Defense and
Veterans Affairs departments
to come up with a "reverse
boot camp" program that
would help train service
members for the transition
to the civilian work force as
they wind down their time in
the military.


ASSOCIATED PRESS
President Barack Obama is greeted by Joint Chiefs Chairman Adm. Mike Mullen, at the
Washington Navy Yard in Washington Friday prior to speaking about efforts to prepare veter-
ans for the workforce.


Obama welcomed the lat-
est unemployment report,
noting that it reflected the
17th month of job growth


in the private sector. '"The
unemployment rate went
down, not up," he added.
Still, he said, "we have


to create more jobs than
that to make up for the 8
million jobs the recession
claimed."


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-, 2C


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The Basics of Buybacks
According to a Birinyi Associates
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Look for increasing earnings and
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I sold my first tickets to an Elec-
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I -Th e M t, F,


Not So Clever Urging Railroads Come Back


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With oil prices so steep, many
investors interested in transporta-
tion are turning from the trucking
industry to railroads, which are
more energy-efficient. Surprisingly,
the biggest factor driving railroad
growth right now is. the resurgence
of the auto industry. According to
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30, auto carloads were up 9.6 per-
cent over the same time last year.
Revenue from shipping cars var-
ies, but it usually makes up about 7
percent of the bottom line for major
railroads. CSX, for example, derives
about 8 percent of its annual revenue
from handling automobiles, touching
close to one out of every three autos
produced in the United States.
We're not just talking about
Detroit's Big Three, either. Volks-
wagen recently opened a $1 billion
plant in Chattanooga, Tenn., with the
intention of shipping 85 percent of
the automobiles it produces by rail.
CSX and Norfolk Southern are posi-
tioned to benefit from that.
Meanwhile, after Union Pacific
watched its automobile loads shrink
50 percent in 2009, it instituted a
series of changes, including develop-
ing a special adjustable automotive
railcar that can hold various sizes
of vehicles. Auto traffic climbed
37 percent in 2010, and now Union
Pacific is marketing the train car to
other railroad companies.
If cars sell well in the United
States, railroads will reap the ben-
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LAST WEEK'S TRIVIA ANSWER
Founded in 1961 and based in Milan, Italy, I'm a global leader in eyewear.
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\^>. Fool@fool.com or via regular mail c/o this newspaper, attn: The
" Motley Fool. Sorry, we can't provide individual financial advice.


*


. BY VERSAL CCK (FO ELEASE 8/.......................4/2011)
i 4Y NIVR C (FOR RELEASE 81412011)


For 35 years now,
KC's Produce has pro-'
S"vided fresh fruits and veg-
tables to the residents of Lake
,. City and Columbia County.
b The business, which is celebrating
its 35th year in busi-
ness, was founded in
1976 and is currently
owned by Charles and
Angle Neeley. While .|
Neeley himself has
only owned the busi-
-F ness since 1991 it


worked there since the '-
beginning, working
in the fields, farming
watermelon, canta- ,


loupes, okra and corn. LeRa 10rngnr: rn
Aftergraduating from Randal, Dylan
high school and a stint
in the U.S. Army, Neeley attended
Lake City Community College and
began working again for his father,
part-time at KC's Produce, eventually
buying the business.
"To this day, I still love my line of


work," Neeley said. "With the trying
economy, I've had to go back on the
road more in search of new farms
and farmers. This allows me to offer
a fresher and larger selection of pro-
duce at a better price."


0o
(I


Produce also carries fresh white and
brown eggs, farm fresh milk, country
syrup, jellies, jarlas and preserves.
"To me, the best part of my job over
the years has been meeting all the
wonderful customers," Neeley said. "1
have become quite
attached to them. It's
funny to see a cus-
S- ;tomer I used to give
strawberries to when
they were little now
bring in little ones of
their own."
Neeley said with-
out the support of cus-


tomers and employ-
l ees, the 35-year
d mmilestone wouldn't
-' be possible.
nt row) Achs'ah, Wendy, Charles (owner), Jason W., Robyn, "I would also like
Back Row) Jeffery, Robbie, Krishton, Jason S., Kaleb, Dom to thank my wife,
Angie, and my three
Neeley said he likes to support sons, Blaiyze,- Krishton, and Cross,
local farmers as much as possible, for being patient over the years. I
and many of the vegetables can look forward to many more years of
be found in the store the same day the produce business and someday
they are picked. In addition to a full hope to turn it over to one of my
line of fruits and vegetables, KC's sons."


3 SSP o

149Est BagaA Ave.(3 6)75 m 449


: re &Age N8* Oner


o S .. B'_- 6s-- -pm


* / K .'' a''.i' Send it to us with Foolish Trivia on the top and you'll
k* w i, u ,,',.' .,a dawing for a nifty prize!
0 2011 THE MOTLEY FOOL/DI


I I


------------


I sk3SSeFZolM


Page Editor: Robert Bridges, 754-0428


0














Page Editor: Robert Bridges, 754-0428


LAKE CITY REPORTER BUSINESS & HOME SUNDAY, AUGUST 7, 2011


THE WEEK IN REVIEW THE WEEK IN REVIEW THE WEEK IN REVIEW THE WEEK IN REVIEW THE WEEK IN REVIEW


u-. ~ --; .. ~- :' .. .- ~ "- "r- Z.4. '
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Name Vol (00) Last Chg
S&P500ETF19736629120.08 -9.25
BkofAm 13355595 8.17-1.54
SPDR Fnd6462249 13.43-1.37
FordM 5830926 10.84-1.37
iShR2K 5684193 71.33-8.41
GenElec 4901119 16.51 -1.40
iShEMkts 4708054 42.58 -4.53
SprintNex 4528343 3.72 -.51
Pfizer 3829057 17.49-1.56
Bar iPVixrs3498865 30.31 +6.90

Diary
Advanced 387
Declined 2,808
New Highs 68
New Lows 881
Total issues 3,218
Unchanged 23
Volume 31,384,630,508


Y Amex
2,245.68 -119.30


Gainers (2 or more)
Name Last Chg %Cihg
Argan 11.47 +1.10 +10.6
EVCAMu 12.26 +81 +7.1
SwGAFn- 801 +.50 +6.7
Aeroontry 13.80 +.78 +6.0
BlkPaStr 13.80 +70 +5.3
GoldRsvg 2.50 +.12 +5.0
Crexendo 3.76 +16 +4.4
PacGE pfG 23.25 +.95 +4.3
PacBkrM g 9.41 +.36 +4.0
BIdkMunvst 9.45 +.34 +3.7

Losers (S2 or more)
Name Last Chg %Chg
Accelr8 2.76 -1.13 -29.0
VimetX 22.16 -8.25 -27.1
NHtcre 35.09-1248 -26.2
CheniereEn 7.83 -2.47 -24.0
B&HO 3.50 -1.05 -23.1
ChinNEPet 2.56 -.76 -22.9
Express-1 3.02 -.88 -22.6
BreezeE 8.60 -2.50 -22.5
AvalRare n 4.30 -1.20 -21.8
InstFnMkts 2.42 -.67 -21.7

Most Active ($1 or more)
Name Vol (00) Last Chg
CheniereEn214129 7.83-2.47
NwGold g 208061 9.96 -.84
GoldSr g 198409 2.29 -.24
NovaGIdg 188649 9.04 -.98
GrtBasGg 181902 1.87 -.14
CFCdag 180319 23.93 +.09
NtiigtMg 168498 3.04 -.18
VantageDrl 161011 1.35 -.28
NAPallIg 155458 3.54 -.65
VimetX 124403 22.16-8.25

Diary
Advanced 137
Declined 386
New Highs 9
New Lows 67
Total issues 536
Unchanged 13
Volume 641,164,039


2,532.41 -223.97


Gainers (S2 or more)
Name Last Chg %Chg
Web.com 11.94 +325 +37.4
PrUItSNBio 50.43+11.35 +29.0
ReconTech 2.05 +.42 +25.8
GlobTcAdv 3.98 +.78 +24.4
PrUPShQQQ28.45+5.29 +22.8
GlobiTraff 13.96 +2.17 +18.4
CaribouC 15.48 +227 +17.2
StaarSur 5.33 +.78 +17.1
FBusnFn 16.00 +1.99 +14.2
NaturesSun 18.98 +2.29 +13.7

Losers ($2 or more)
Name Last Chg %Chg
Dndreon 12.56-24.34 -66.0
Insmed rs 4.01 -7.48 -65.1
ImperiSgr 9.44-13.64 -59.1
Gentivah 7.78-10.21 -56.8
SunHith n 3.29 -3.71 -53.0
L.eapWirlss 6.45 -7.01 -52.1
Foster 18.72-16.03 -46.1
MIPSTech 4.12 -3.06 -42.6
PacBioscin 6.50 -4.51 -41.0
CogoGrp 2.88 -1.83 -38.9

Most Active ($1 or more)
Name Vol (00) Last Chg
SiriusXM 6440760 1.89 -.22
PwShs QQQ595179353.83-4.17
Cisco 3988882 14.94-1.03
Microsoft 3912711 25.68-1.72
Intel 3609124 20.79-1.33
Oracle 2533516 28.35-2.23
MicronT 2324703 6.31 -1.06
NewsCpA 2200986 14.67 -1.35
Level3 1676795 1.95 -.23
Yahoo 1639378 11.74-1.36


Diary
Advanced
Declined 2,
New Highs
New Lows
Total issues 2,
Unchanged
Volume 14,265,319


314
444
82
524
791
33
,370


STocKs oF LOCAL bITEREST


WlyW y YTD
Name Ex Div Last Chg%Chg%Chg
AT&T Inc NY 1.72 28.93 -.33 -1.1 -1.5
A lcatellucNY 3.57 -.48-11.9 +20.6
utoZone NY ... 278.74 -6.71 -2.4 +2
BkoAmn NY .04 8.17 -1.54 -15.9 -38.8
BariPVixrsNY .- 30.31 +6.90 +29.5 -19.4
BobEvansNasd .80 31.12 -3.42 -9.9 -5.6
NBFnPA Nasd .66 13.09 -.72 -5.2 -11.6
CSXs NY .48 21.97 -2.60-10.6 +2.0
Chemon NY 3.12 97.61 -6.41 -6.2 +7.0
Cisco Nasd .24 14.94 -1.03 -6.4 -26.1
itigrprs NY .04 33.44 -4.90-12.8 -29.3
CocaCola NY 1.88 66.77 -1.24 -1.8 +1.5
Delhaize NY 2.45 65.48 -7.04 -9.7 -11.2
DrxFnBull NY ... 1722 -5.72 -24.9 -38.2
EMCCp NY 22.99 -3.09-11.8 +.4
FawnyDIr NY .72 48.53 -4.58 -8.6 -2.4
FordM NY ... 10.84 -1.37 -11.2 -35.4
GenElec NY .60 16.51 -1.40 -7.8 -9.7
HomeDp NY 1.00 30.74 -4.19 -12.0 -12.3
iShJapn NY .17 9.99 -.72 -6.7 -8.4
iShSiver NY ... 37.32 -1.53 -3.9 +23.7
iShEMkts NY .84 42.58 -4.53 -9.6 -10.6
iShR2K NY .94 71.33-&41 -10.5 -8.8
Intel Nasd .84 20.79 -1.33 -6.0 -1.1
JPMorgChNY 1.00 37.60 -2.85 -7.0 -11.4
Lowes NY .56 20.15 -1.43 -6.6 -19.7T
McDnlds NY 2.44 85.08 -1.40 -1.6 +10.8
MicronT Nasd ... 6.31 -1.06 -14.4 -21.3


W'y WEy YTD
Name Ex DY Last Chg%Chg%Ch9g


Microsoft Nasd .64
NY Trmes NY
NewsCpA Nasd .15
NextEraEnNY 220
Nob Nasd ...

Ocdet NY 1.84
Orade Nasd 24
Pemey NY .80
PepsiCo NY 2.06
Pfize NY .80
Potashs NY 28
PwShsQQQNasd .42
PrJShS&PNY ...
Regions-nNY .04
Ryder NY 1.16
S&P50OETFNY 2.44
SeasHidgsNasd ...
ariusXM Nasd
SoutnCo NY 1.89
SprintNex NY
SPEngy NY 1.06
SPDRFndNY .18
SPinds NY .67
TimeWam NY .94
VangEmg NY .82
WalMart NY 1.46
WelsFargoNY .48


25.68 -1.72 -6.3 -8.0
7.57 -1.01 -11.8 -22.8
14.67 -1.35 -4 +.8
52.81 -2.44 -4.4 +1.6
8.15 +25 +32 +.5
525 -.55 -9.5 -49.1
87.34-10.84 -11.0 -11.0
28.35 -2.23 -7.3 -9.4
28.35 -2.41 -7.8 -12.3
64.67 +.63 +1.0 -1.0
17.49 -1.56 -8.2 -.1
53.09 -4.72 -8.2 +2.9
53.83 -4.17 -72 -12
24.58 +323+15.1 +3.5
5.10 -.99 -16.3 -27.1
48.46 -7.86 -14.0 -7.9
120.08 -925 -72 -44
67.00 -2.67 -3.8 -92
1.89 -22 -10.4 +16.0
39.87 +.33 +0.8 +4.3
3.72 -.51 -12.1 -12.1
68.07 -8.38 -11.0 -.3
13.43 -1.37 -9.2-15.8
31.76 -2.92 -8.4 -8.9
31.74 -3.42 -9.7 -1.3
43.65 -4.67 -9.7 -9.3
50.85 -1.86 -3.5 -5.7
25.21 -2.61 -9.4 -18.7


Money Rates
Last Pva Week
Prime Rate 3.25 3.25
Discount Rate 0.75 0.75
Federal Funds Rate .00-.25 .00-25
Treasuries
3-month 0.01 0.09
6-month 0.04 0.16
5-year 1.24 1.33
10-year 2.55 2.80
30-year 3.82 4.13


Currencies
Last Pvs Day
Australia .9552 .9525
Britain 1.6362 1.6287
Canada .9796 .9788
Euro .7010 .7075
Japan 78.34 79.02
Mexico 12.0237 11.9876


Switzerind .7666 .7677
British pound expressed-in U.S. dollars. All oth-
ers show dollar in foreign currency.


~11, -


I Weekly Dow Jones


Dow Jones Industrials
Close: 11,444.61
1-week change: -698.63 (-5.8%)
13,000


12,500


12,000


11,500


11,000


-10.75


MON


-265.87 29.82


TUES WED


-512.76 60.93

TUR FR
THUR FRI


F .. M . A M . .J J .. A


tMmuJAL FUNDS
Total Assets Total Return/Rank Pct Min InK
Name Ob) ($Mlns) NAV 4-wk 12-mo 5-year Load Invt


PIMCOTotRetls Cl
3 American Funds GrthAmA m LG
Fidelity Contra LG
Vanguard TotStdx LB
7 Vanguard Instdxl LB
American Funds CaplncBuA m IH
. American Funds CpWIdGrdA m WS
* American Funds IncAmerA m MA
at Vanguard 500Adml LB
= Vanguard TotStlAdm LB
American Funds InvCoAmA m LB
r Dodge & Cox IntlStk FV
s Dodge & Cox Stock LV
n Aerican Funds WAMutinvA m LV
American Funds EurPacGrA m FIB
Vanguard InstPlus LB
F.alrT.en-Franri;r, lrInmeA m CA
Varguara Taulnrd ] FB
Arrwncan Furina, FnlrrA m LB
PIMCOTotRetAdm b Cl
American Funds NewPerspA m WS
American Funds BalA m MA
Vanguard WelltnAdm MA
Vanguard 5001nv LB
Harbor Intllosti d FB
Vanguard TotBdAdml Cl
Fideftv GrowCo LG


142,222
62,446
61,125
60,494
59,225
58,091
53,019
52,940
52,749
50,380
46,376
44,787
41,787
38,653
37,103
36,525
36,264
33,374
33,111
32,808
32,317
31,690
29,353
29,272
29,056
29,001
28,589


11.08 +0.9
28.73 -11.0
65.90 -8.5
29.99 -11.2
109.90 -10.2
48.87 -5.9
33.35 -10.6
16.22 -6.5
110.65 -10.2
30.00 -11.2
26.42 -9.7
32.70 -11.7
100.13 -12.8
26.59 -9.6
38.86 -10.9
109.91 -10.2
2.10 -5.8
14.66 -11.0
34.45 -12.1
11.08 +0.9
26.96 -10.6
17.65 -6.3
52.60 -6.2
110.64 -10.2
57.32 -12.4
10.91 +2.1
82.44 -11.8


+5.4/C
+6.1/E
+11.9/B
+9.2/A
+8.6/B
+6.6/C
+2.9/D
+8.1/A
+8.6/B
+9.4/A
+4.9/E
+2.5/C
+5.9/C
+9.8/A
+3.5/C
+8.7/B
+7.1/B
+3.4/C
+6.3/D
+5.1/C
+6.2/C
+8.2/A
+6.3/C
+8.5/B
+6.1/A
+5.1/C
+16.7/A


+8.7/A NL 1,000,000
+1.1/D 5.75 250
+3.8/B NL 2,500
+1.4/B NL 3,000
+0.9/B NL 5,000,000
+2.3/C 5.75 250
+2.0/C 5.75 250
+2.4/C 5.75 250
+0.9/B NL 10,000
+1.5/B NL 10,000
0.0/D 5.75 250
+0.6/A NL 2,500
-2.5/1 NL 2,500
+0.5/B 5.75 250
+2.5/A 5.75 250
+0.9/B NL 200,000,000
+3.9/C 4.25 1,000
+0.7/B NL 3,000
+1.4/B 5.75 250
+8.4/A NL 1,000,000
+3.3/A 5.75 250
+3.2/B 5.75 250
44.4/A NL 50,000
+0.8/B NL 3,000
+3.5/A NL 50,000
+6.6/B NL 10,000
+6.2/A NL 2,500


CA -Cnma Alocals, Cl -IarmdalleTenm Bond, ES -Europe Stock FB Foreign Lae Bled, FG -foreign LargeGow, FV-Fot
L uge te, 9-Wold Alocatim, LB -Lge Bland, LG rge rof, LV -Lae Vaka, MA .odee oa. M iCap td,
Value, SH -Spalyeaali WS ddSto r : isiN V wil ttids rees Re H ur ed
oalhwitih same cjectve: A Is in top 20%, E bo 20%. iEn inilIu nimum $ needed i to i esei n d : Movniaslar.


New York Stock Exchange


Wkly YTD Wkly
Name Div YId PE Chg %Chg Last


ABB Ltd .64 3.0
AESCorp ...
AFLAC 1.20 2.9
AK Steel .20 2.2
AMR
AT&T Inc 1.72 5.9
AbtLab 1.92 3.8
Accenture .90 1.6
AMD
Aeropostl ...
Aetna .60 1.6
Agilent
AlcatelLuc ...
Alcoa .12 .9
Allstate .84 3.2
AlphaNRs ...
Altria 1.52 5.9
AMovilLs .41 1.7
AEagleOut .44 3.7
AEP 1.84 5.1
AmExp .72 1.5
AmlntlGrp ...
AmTower ...
AmeriBrgn .42 1.1
"Anadarko .36 .5
AnalogDev 1.00 3.2
Annaly 2.59 14.8
ArcelorMit .75 2.9
ArchCoal .44 2.1
ArchDan .64 2.2
ATMOS 1.36 4.3
Avon .92 4.0
BB&TCp .64 2.7
BHPBilILt 1.82 2.3
BakrHl .60 .9
BcBilVArg .59 4.2
BcoBrades .80 4.5
BcoSanISA .82 8.7
BcoSBrasil 1.65 18.3
BkofAm .04 .5
Bklrelnd ...
BkNYMel .52 2.3
Barclay .36 2.9
Bar iPVixrs ...
BarrickG .48 1.0
Baxter 1.24 2.3
BerkH B ...
BestBuy .64 2.5
Blackstone .40 2.9
Boeing 1.68 2.7
BostonSci ...
BrMySq 1.32 4.8
CB REllis ...
CBS B .40 1.7
CIGNA .04 .1
CMS Eng .84 4.6
CSX s .48 2.2
CVSCare .50 1.5
Cameron
CapOne .20 .5
CapitlSrce .04 .7
Carnival 1.00 3.1
Caterpillar 1.84 2.0
Cemex
CenterPnt .79 4.3
CntryUnk 2.90 8.6
ChesEng .35 1.1
Chevron 3.12 3.2
Chimera .62 20.6
Citigrp rs .04 .1
Coach .90 1.6
CocaCola 1.88 2.8
CocaCE .52 2.0
ConocPhil 2.64 3.9
ConsolEngy.40 1.0
ConEd 2.40 4.5
ConstellEn .96 2.6
Coming .20 1.4
Covidien .80 1.7


... -2.35 -3.8
13 -1.49 -11.2
9 -4.34 -26.1
... -3.03 -44.3
... -.61 -53.4
9 -.33 -1.5
13 -1.09 +4.8
19 -1.93 +18.0
6 -.78 -19.8
5 -4.10 -48.3.
8 -4.07 +22.6
16 -5.57 -11.7
... -.48 +20.6
14 -1.91 -16.9
11 -1.43 -17.5
79-10.40 -46.2
16 -.41 +5.2
'14 -2.16 -17.5
15 -1.15 -18.0
12 -.62 +.7
12 -2.83 +10.0
... -3.60 -48.0
52 -2.55 -3.2
15 -1.50 +7.9
43-11.05 -6.1
11 -2.90 -16.4
6 +.75 -2.2
12 -5.63 -33.1
15 -4.31 -39.3
9 -1.74 -4.8
14 -2.10 +.4
14 -3.02 -20.1
17 -2.37 -11.3
...-12.41 -14.8
20-12.69 +12.9
... -.91 -6.5
... -1.56 -13.0
.. -.82 -11.8
... -.28 -33.8
... -1.54 -38.8
-.21 -53.6
11 -2.32 -24.5
... -2.09 -24.5
.. +6.90 -19.4
12 -1.71 -13.8
14 -4.58 +5.9
16 -2.92 -11.1
8 -2.08 -25.6
76 -3.01 -3.9
13 -7.72 -3.8
17 -.67 -14.3
14 -1.23 +3.6
24 -3.53 -10.8
15 -3.61 +24.7
8 -4.58 +23.3
12 -.66 --1.8
14 -2.60 +2.0
14 -2.20 -1.8
21 -8.05 -5.6
6 -5.00 +.6
17 -.91 -21.8
14 -1.08 -30.1
15 -7.80 -2.9
... -1.26 -43.9
15 -1.04 +17.9
12 -3.39 -27.0
11 -3.67 +18.4
9 -6.41 +7.0
5 -.07 -26.8
10 -4.90 -29.3
19 -7.60 +3.0
13 -1.24 +1.5
14 -1.93 +4.6
9 -4.24 -.5
17-12.01 -14.7
15 +.67 +7.5
17 -2.43 +18.8
7 -1.59 -25.9
14 -4.42 +1.6


Wkly YTD Wkly
Name Div Yid PE Chg %Chg Last


ASMLHId .58 1.7
ActivsBliz -.17 1.4
AdobeSy ...
AgFeed
AkamaT ... ...
AllscriptH ...
AlteraCp If .32 .9
Amarin
Amazon
ACapAgy 5.60 19.8
AmCapLtd ...
Amgen 1.12 2.1
AmkorT If ...
A123 Sys ...
Apple Inc ...
ApIdMatl .32 2.8
ArenaPhm ...
AriadP
ArmHid .13 .5
ArubaNet ...
Atmel
Autodesk ...
AutoData 1.44 3.0
AvisBudg ...
BMCSft ...
Baidu
BedBath ...
BioSante ...
BrigExp ....
Broadcom .36 1.1
BrcdeCm ...
CA Inc .20 1.0
Cadence ...
CpstnTrb h ....
Celgene
CentEuro .
dephin
CienaCorp ...


...-2.23
21 -.41
14 -2.09
... -.85
23 -1.63
... -1.34
13 -4.46
... -2.30
89-19.82
4 +.43
3 -1.18
11 -2.58
7 -.69
... -1.26
15-16.86
10 -.88
... -.23
... -3.30
... -4.15
... -2.28
8 -2.26
*30 -3.48
19 -3.09
13 -1.60
16 -3.05
80-16.08
16 -5.59
... -.58
96 -4.85
19 -3.20
12 -1.96
13 -1.85
12 -1.19
... -.17
25 -3.78
... -2.95
12 -1.04
... -2.71


-12.8 33.42
-8.1 11.43
-16.8 25.62
-63.9 1.06
-52.0 22.59
-12.8 16.81
+2.4 36.42
+37.1 11.24
+12.6 202.70
-1.4 28.35
+12.3 8.49
-5.1 52.12
-37.2 4.65
-59.4 3.87
+15.8 373.62
-18.6 11.44
-19.8 1.38
+68.4 8.59
+18.7 24.64
-1.0 20.67
-20.1 9.84
-19.1 30.92
+4.6 48.40
-13.2 13.51
-14.8 40.17
+46.1 140.99
+7.6 52.90
+44.5 2.37
-1.1 26.95
-22.2 33.87
-33.5 3.52
-16.3 20.45
+10.7 9.14
+33.3 1.28
-6.1 55.52
-70.6 6.73
+27.8 78.90
-39.4 12.75


Name DIv
CSVS2xVxS...
CSVellVSts...
Cummins 1.60
DR Horton .15
DTE 2.35
DanaHIdg ...
Danaher .08
DeanFds ...
Deere 1.64
DeltaAir ...
DenburyR ...
DevonE .68
DrSCBrrs ...
DirFnBrrs ...
DirLCBr rs ...
DrxFnBull ...
DirxSCBull .
Discover .24
Disney .40
DomRescs 1.97
DowChm 1.00
DukeEngy 1.00
EMC Cp ...
Eaton s 1.36
Ecolab .70
ElPasoCp .04
Elan
EldorGldg .12
EmersonEl 1.38
EnCanag .80
Exelon 2.10
ExxonMbl 1.88
FirstEngy 2.20
FordM
ForestOil ...
FMCG s 1.00
FrontierCm .75
Gafisa SA .29
GameStop ...
Gannett .32
Gap .45
GenGrPr n .40
GenMills 1.22
GenMotn ...
GenOnEn...
Genworth ..
Gerdau .27
GoldFLtd .19
Goldcrp g .41
GoldmanS 1.40
Goodyear ...
HCA HIdn ...
HCP Inc 1.92
HSBC 1.90
Hallibrtn .36
HartfdFn .40
HItMgmt ...
HeclaM
Hertz
Hess .40
HewlettP .48
HomeDp 1.00
HonwIllntI 1.33
HostHotls .12
Huntsmn .40
ING
ION Geoph ...
iShGold
iSAstla 1.06
iShBraz 3.42
iShGer .67
iSh HK .42
iShJapn .17
iSh Kor .50
iSTaiwn .29
iSh UK .48
iShSilver ...
iShChina25 .85
iSSP500 2.45




Name Div
Cisco .24
CitrixSys ...
Clearwire
CognizTech
Comcast .45
Comec spcl .45
Costco .96
Cree Inc
Crocs
Ctrip.com ...
CypSemi .36
Dell Inc
Dndreon
DirecTV A ...
DiscCmA ...
DishNetwk ...
DonlleyRR 1.04
DryShips ...
E-Trade ...
eBay
ElectArts
EntropCom
EricsnTel .37
Expedia .28
Expdinti .50
ExpScripts ...
F5 Netwks ...
Fastenal s .52
FifthThird .24
Finisar
FstNiagara .64
Flextm ...
FosterWhl ...
GT Solar ...
GileadSci ...
Google
GreenMtC ...
HercOffsh ...


Wkly YTD Wkly
Yld PE Chg %Chg Last
... ...+13.26 -46.8 34.42
... ...-4.27 -2.0 11.71
1.7 12-12.62 -16.1 92.26
1.4 87 -1.46 -12.7 10.42
5.0 11 -2.71 +4.0 47.13
... 63 -3.34' -22.5 13.33
.2 16 -4.61 -5.7 44.50
... 27 -1.96 +2.5 9.06
2.3 12 -5.85 -12.5 72.66
... 14 -.92 -44.7 6.97
... 24 -3.29 -16.0 16.03
1.0 5 -8.80 -11.0 69.90
... ...+13.36 +8.9 51.00
......+13.95 +32.0 62.37
... ... +8.95 +3.4 45.32
... .... -5.72 -38.2 17.22
... ...-21.52 -29.3 51.19
1.1 8 -2.78 +23.2 22.83
1.1 15 -3.44 -6.2 35.18
4.1 16 +.14 +13.7 48.59
3.3 14 -4.65 -11.5 30.22
5.5 13 -.48 +1.7 18.12
... 24 -3'.09 -+.4 22.99
3.2 12 -5.26 -16.6 42.35
1.5 21 -2.22 -5.2 47.78
.2 24 -2.62 +30.3 17.93
... ... -1.62 +64.7 9.44
41 +.05 -6.7 17.32
3.0 15 -3.70 -20.6 45.39
3.1. 56 -3.71 -12.2 25.58
5.0 13 -2.09 +.8 41.98
2.5 10 -4.97 +2.3 74.82
5.3 17 -2.74 +11.7 41:36
.. 5 -1.37 -35.4 10.84
... 15 -4.85 -44.3 21.1.5
2.2' 8 -6.97 -23.4 45.99
11.1 42 -.73 -30.5 6.76
3.4 ... -.97 -40.8 8.60
... 8 -1.45 -3.3 22.13
3.0 5 -1.96 -28.4 10.80
2.7 9 -2.54 -24.0 16.75
2.9 ... -3.01 -10.9 13.80
3.3 14 -.87 +2.5 36.48
.. 7-1.37 -28.6 26.31
... ... -.44 -9.4 3.45
... ... -1.54 -48.4 6.78
3.4 ... -1.25 -43.7 7.87
1.3 2 -.79 -18.4 14.80
.9 16 -1.47 +.8 46.34
1.1 12 -9.79 -25.6 125.18
... ... -2.62 +14.3 13.55
... ... -4.69 -29.1 21.99
6.0 27 -4.24 -13.0 '32.01
4.1 ... -2.79 -9.7 46.08
. .8 18 -7.64 +15.3 47.09
1.9 5 -2.85 -22.3 20.57
... 11 -1.78 -19.1 7.72
... 34 -.61 -36.4 7.16
... 16 -2.28 -18.6 11.79
.7 7 -8.70 -21.8 59.86
1.5 8 -2.54 -22.5 32.63
3.3 15 -.4.19 -12.3 30.74
2.8 14 -5.12. -9.7 47.98
.9 ... -2.32 -24.3 13.53
3.1 10 -6.40 -18.6 12.70
-1.16 -2.1 9.58
25 -4.30 -31.1 5.84
+.35 +16.7 16.22
4.8 ... -2.93 -12.4 22.28
5.4 ... -7.74 -18.8 62.83
3.0 ... -3.08 -5.4 22.64
2.4 ... -1.49 -8.6 17.30
1.7 ... -.72 -8.4 9.99
.9 ... -7.31 -4.6 58.37
... ...-1.48 -12.4 13.68
3.0 ... -1.55 -6.8 16.19
... ... -1.53 +23.7 37.32
2.2 ... -3.60 -10.0 38.76
2.0 ... -9.38 -4.6 120.43


Markets Change.

Are You Prepared?

When you stop and look, back at what's happened
in the markets, it's. easy to realize how quickly
things can change. That's why we should schedule
some time to discuss how the market can impact
your financial goals. We can also conduct a free
portfolio review to help you decide if you should
make changes to your investments and whether
you're on track to reach your goals.


Stop by or call today to schedule your free review.

Steve Jones, CFP
Financial Advisor

2929 West U S Highway 90
Suite 114
Lake City, FL 32055
.386-752-3847

www.edwardjones.com Member SIPC
_i/ IIII^^^^


Name DIv YId PE


iShEMkts .84
iShB20 T 4.02
iS Eafe 1.68
iSR1KG .77
iShR2K .94
iShREst 2.09
ITW 1.36
IngerRd .48
IBM 3.00
IntlGame .24,
IntPap 1.05
Interpublic .24
Invesco .49
ItauUnibH .84
JPMorgCh 1.00
Jabil .28
JanusCap .20
JohnJn 2.28
JohnsnCII .64
JnprNtwk ...
Keycorp .12
Kimco .72
Kinross g .10
KodiakOg ...
Kohls 1.00
Kraft 1.16
LSI Corp ...
LVSands ...
LennarA .16
UllyEli 1.96
Limited .80
LincNat .20


Nasdaq Most Active


Wldy YTD Wkly
YId PE Chg %Chg Last
1.6 12 -1.03 -26.1 14.94
... 37 -7.63 -5.8 64.41
... ... -.37 -65.0 1.80
... 26 -1.93 -7.3 67.94
2.1 15 -2.14 ... 21.88
2.1 16 -2.11 +2.5 21.23
1.3 24 -1.27 +6.3 76.74
18 -3.87 -56.0 28.98
27 -2.69 +67.3 28.64
... 36 -7.66 -5.0 38.44
2.0 26 -2.69 -3.7 17.89
9 -1.18 +11.1 15.06
...-24.34 -64.0 12.56
... 15 -5.29 +13.7 45.29
... 17 -2.56 -10.7 37.24
9 -4.51 +27.8 25.12
6.7 11 -2.93 -10.5 15.63
5 -.86 -47.4 2.89
... 52 -3.29 -21.3 12.59
... 22 -3.45 +5.3 29.30
.. ... -2.25 +22.1 20.00
5 -2.44 -64.9 4.24
3.2 ... -1.03 -.5 11.47
1.0 18 -3.11 +13.9 28.58
1.1 25 -3.86 -19.7 43.86
... 21 -4.69 -8.3 49.57
... 31-10.54 -36.3 82.94
1.6 32 -2.06 +5.5 31.59
2.1 11 -1.39 -23.3 11.26
... 15 -2.41 -50.7 14.63
5.8 15 -1.03 -20.9 11.06
... 8 -.79 -27.9 5.66
... 18 -2.90 -29.9 24.20
... 8 -1.86 +29.2 11.78
...11 -4.60 +4.2 37.76
... 20-24.65 -2.5 579.04
... 93 -7.96 +192.1 95.99
... ... -1.05 +4.9 3.65


Widy YTD Wkly
DIv Yld PE Chg %Chg Last I Name


Hologic ...
HudsCity .32
HumGen
Illumina
IntgDv
Intel .84
Intuit ..
JA Solar ...
JDSUniph ...
JetBlue
KLA Tnc 1.40
Kulicke
LamResrch ...
LeapWiriss ...
Level3
LibtyMintA ...
LifeTech ...
UnearTch .96
lululemn gs ...
MarvellT ...
Mattel .92
MaximIntg .88
MeicoCwn ...
Microchp 1.39
MicronT ...
Microsoft .64
NXP Sem n ...
NetApp
Netflix
NewsCpA .15
NewsCpB .15
Nvidia
OnSmcnd ...
Oracle .24
PMC Sra ...
Paccar .48
PaetecHid ...
PattUTI .20


.. -1.69
-.81
-5.20
62 -8.87
12 -1.19
9 -1.33
21 -3.10
2 -.76
42 -1.78
14 -.61
8 -3.62
3 -.60
6 -3.68
.. -7.01
-.23
14 -2.49
21 -3.12
11 -2.22
57 -6.97
10 -1.80
13 -2.16
13 -1.34
... -2.59
14 -2.57
10 -1.06
10 -1.72
.. -4.86
24 -5.65
61-24.88
13 -1.35
14 -1.33
32 -.88
11 -1.46
17 -2.23
40 -.95
20 -3.61
... +.56
18 -5.73


-10.3 16.88
-42.2 7.36
-33.8 15.81
-15.4 53.58
-15.2 5.65
-1.1 20.79
-11.6 43.60
-41.6 4.04
-21.5 11.37
-36.8 4.18
-6.3 36.20
+19.4 8.60
-28.2 37.20
-47.4 6.45
+99.0 1.95
-11.8 13.91
-24.5 41.91
-21.7 27.08
+56.6 53.57
-29.8 13.02
-3.7 24.50
-8.5 21.62
+97.2 12.54
-8.9 31.18
-21.3 6.31
-8.0 25.68
-28.7 14.92
-23.8 41.87
+37.2 241.11
+.8 14.67
-7.6 15.17
-15.9 12.95
-26.8 7.23
-9.4 28.35
-29.7 6.04
-31.6 39.20
+33.2 4.98
+24.4 26.80


Wk YTD
Div YId PE Chg %Chg


Paychex 1.24
PeopUtdF .63
Polycom s ..
Popular ..
PwShsQQQ.42
QIAGEN *...
Qualcom .86
RF MicD ...
RschMotn
Riverbed s
STEC
SanDisk ...
SeagateT .72
Sina
SiriusXM ..
SkywksSol ...
Sonus
Staples .40
Starbucks .52
StIDynam .40
SunHfth n ...
Symantec ...
TD Ameritr .20
Tellabs .08
TevaPhrm .88
TboSfl ...
TriQuint
UrbanOut ...
Verisign 5.75
VirgnMdah .16
Vodafone 1.45
WamerCh s8.50
Windstrm 1.00
Xilinx .76
Yahoo ...
ZionBcp .04


19 -1.14
25 -.89
38 -2.65
6 -.11
...-4.17
30 -1.16
22 -3.76
16 -.78
4 -1.61
81 -2.62
9 -.68
7 -3.21
5 -1.65
...-17.10
63 -.22
19 -4.63
... -.24
12 -1.72
24 -3.37
13 -2.10
5 -3.71
22 -1.96
16 -1.71
... -.21
12 -5.68
46 -1.46
6 -.53
19 -3.15
6 -2.28
... -2.85
... -.78
29 -2.71
20 -.61
13 -2.17
13 -1.36
... -2.77


Name
Last IName


Wkldy YTD Wkly
Cha %Cha Last


-4.53
+4.73
-4.97
-4.53
.. -8.41
-6.82
12 -3.47
... -5.56
14 -8.87
19 -2.40
9 -4.15
16 -1.44
13 -2.62
... -2.48
8 -2.85
11 -2.77
7 -1.09
14 -2.08
15 -3.80
21 -1.16
7 -.79
89 -2.94
23 -.68
83 -.97
13 -7.41
20 +.49
13 -.57
31 -5.31
29 -2.26
8 -2.06
14 -3.12
7 -2.97


Name


DIv YId PE


UoydBkg
LyonBasA .80 2.4
MEMO ...
MF Global ...
MFAFncI 1.00 13.9
MGIC
MGM Rsts .
Macys .40 1.5
ManpwrGp .80 1.9
MarathnO s .60 2.3
MarathPn .80 2.1
MktVGold .40 .7
MktVRus .18 .5
MarlntA .40 1.4
MarshM .88 3.1
Masco .30 3.3
McDrmlnt ... ...
McGrwH 1.00 2.4
MedcoHth ... ...
Medtmic .97 2.9
Merck 1.52 4.8
MetLife .74 2.0
MetroPCS ... ...
Molycorp ...
Monsanto 1.20 1.8
MonstrWw ...
MorgStan .20 1.0
Mosaic .20 .3
MotriaSol n .88 2.1
MottlaMon ... ...
NCR Corp ...
NV Energy .48 3.6


Wkly YTD
Cha' %Chg


-.57
-6.35
17 -1.88
... -1.05
7 -.27
... -.80
-2.45
12 -2.33
... -7.32
5 -4.85
... -6.48
... -1.47
... -4.27
24 -3.00
16 -1.22
... -1.37
13 -5.34
15 +.12
16 -7.40
12 -2.74
12 -2.42
10 -4.86
15 -6.75
... -9.48
23 -6.33
... -1.68
44 -2.23
13 -7.08
... -2.76
+.16
12 -2.42
15 -1.41


Name


WMdy YTD Widy
DIv Yid PE Chg %Chg Last


Nabors
NalcoHId .14 .4
NBkGreece .29 ...
NatGrid 2.92 6.0
NOilVarco .44 .7
NatSemi .40 1.6
NY CmtyB 1.00 7.9
NewellRub .32 2.4
NewmtM 1.20 2.2
NextEraEn 2.20 4.2
NiSource .92 4.7
NobleCorp .53 1.7
NokiaCp .55 10.5
Nordstrm .92 2.1
NorflkSo 1.72 2:5
OcciPet 1.84 2.1
OfflceDpt...
OfficeMax ...
OilSvHT 1.73 .9
PG&ECp 1.82 4.3
PMI Grp ...
PNC 1.40 2.7
PPL Corp 1.40 5.3
PatriotCoal ..
PeabdyE .34 .7
Penney .80 2.8
PepsiCo 2.06 3.2
Petrohawk ...
PetrbrsA 1:34" 5.2
Petrobras 1.28 4.4
Pfizer .80 4.6
PhilipMor 2.56 3.7
PitnyBw 1.48 7.4
Potash s .28 .5
PS USDBull...
ProLogis 1.12 3.9
ProShtS&P ...
PrUShS&P.
PrUlShDow.
ProUltQQQ ...
PrUShQQQ rs..
ProUltSP .35 .8
ProUShL20 ... ...
ProUSSP500... ...
ProUSSIv rs..
ProgsvCp 1.40 2.2
ProUSR2K rs... ...
Prudentl 1.15 2.1
PulteGrp ...
RadianGrp .01 ,4
RadloShk .25 f.9
Raytheon 1.72 4.2
RegionsFn .04 .8
RiteAid
RylCarb .40 1.5
RoyDShIlA 3.36 5.2
SLM Cp .40 2.8
SpdrDJIA 3.08 2.7
SpdrGold ...
SPMid 1.65 1.1
S&P500ETF2.44 2.0
SpdrHome .31 2.1
SpdrKbwBk .20 1.0
SpdrLehHY4.28 10.4
SpdrRetl .46 .9
SpdrOGEx .47 .9
SpdrMetM .42 .7
STMicro .40 5.7
Safeway .58 3.1
SandRdge ...
Sanofi 1.82 5.1
SaraLee .46 2.5
,Schlmbrg 1.00 1.2
Schwab .24 1.8
SemiHTr .61 2.1
SiderurNac .81 8.8
SilvWhtn g .12 .4
SouthnCo 1.89 4.7
SwstAirl .02 .2


44 -5.58 -11.2 20.83
21 -2.53 +2.8 32.82
... -.15 -31.0 1.16
... -.50 +9.7 48.69
16-13.09 +.3 67.48
20 -.17 +78.4 24.55
11 -.64 -32.9 12.64
12 -2.36 -27.6 13.16
12 -1.20 -11.4 54.41
13 -2.44 +1.6 52.81
18 -.58 +11.0 19.55
17 -5.61 -13.0 31.13
... ,-.55 -49.1 5.25
15 -5.85 +4.6 44.31
15 -6.08 +10.1 69.19
12-10.84 -11.0 87.34
... -.54 -40,0 3.24
12 -.16 -60.9 6.92
..-22.03 -3.4 135.82
16 .+.53 -12.3 41.96
... -.75 -92.3 .26
8 -3.11 -15.7 51.18
12 -1.34 +.9 26.56
... -4.71 -26.7 14.20
14-10.51 -26.7 46.87
17 -2.41 -12.3 28.35
16 +.63 -1.0 64.67
... -.05+109.0 38.14.
.. 4.46 -23.9 2601'-
... -4.64 -23.2 29.07
12 -1.56 -.1 17.49
16 -1.83 +18.5 69.34
10 -1.53 -17.2 20:02
23 -4.72 +2.9 53.09
... +.19 -6.6 21.22
... -6.87 -9.3 28.76
... +3.11 +2.1 44.77
+3.23 +3.5 24.58
+2.10 -4.0 19.87
...-12.88 -3.9 78.23
... +7.22 -4.6 55.51
... -7.23 -9.6 43.43
-3.05 -23.3 28.41
.. +3.77 +3.3 20.06
+.84 -63.5 14.33
10 -1.20 -7.0 18.48
...+10.17 +8.4 54.45
8 -4.69 -8.0 53.99
...-1.59 -29.8 5.28
... -.41 -65.8 2.76
9 -.74 -28.7 13.18
7 -3.43 -10.1 41.30
... -.99 -27.1 5.10
... -.10 +35.9 1.20
10 -3.62 -42.6 27.00
17 -8.32 -3.6 64.40
10 -1.54 +11.6 14.05
.. -6.88 -1.2 114.25
... +3.46 +16.6 161.75
...-17.96 -6.9.153.35
... -9.25 -4.5 120.08
...-1.94 -14.7 14.84
... -2.26 -20.4 20.62
... -1.66 -3.5 38.34
... -4.57 +.7 48.69
.. -9.09 +.7 53.11
... -9.88 -17.5 56.72
7 -.95 -33.3 6.96
11 -1.25 -15.9 18.92
... -3.73 +6.4 7.79
... -2.99 +11.0 35.76
26 -.62 +5.6 18.49
21 -9.49 -3.1 80.88
23 -1.27 -202 13.66
...-2.60 -9.6 29.40
...-1.40 -44.7 9.22
33 -1.93 -12.5 34.15
17 +.33 +4.3 39.87
13 -1.49 -34.7 8.47


Name Dlv
SwstnEngy ...
SpectraEn 1.04
SprintNex ...
SP Matis 1.30
SPHIthC .63
SP CnSt .83
SP Consum .59
SPEngy 1.06
SPDR FncI .18
SP Inds .67
SP Tech .35
SPUtil 1.33
StdPac .
StarwdHtl .30
StateStr .72
StillwtrM ...
Suncorgs .44
SunTrst .04
Supvalu .35
Synovus .04
TaiwSemi .52
TalismE g .27
Target 1.20
TeckResg 9.60
TelefEsp s 1.98
TelMexL .83
TenetHith ...
Teradyn
Tesoro
Texinst .52
Textron .08
3M Co 2.20
TimeWam .94
Total SA 3.16
Transocn .79
Travelers 1.64'
Tycolntl 1.00
UBSAG
USAirwy
UnilevNV 1.17
UnionPac 1.90
UtdContl ...
UtdMicro .19
UPS B 2.08
USJBancrp .50
US NGsrs ...
USOilFd ...
USSteel .20
UtdhlthGp .65
Vale SA 1.14
Vale SApf 1.14
ValeantPh .38
ValeroE .20
VangTSM 1.31
VangEmg .82
VerizonCm 1.95
ViacomB 1,00
Visa .60
Walgm .90
WalterEn .50
WsteMInc 1.36
Weathflntl ...
WellPoint 1.00
WellsFargo .48
Wendys Co .08
WstnRefin
WstnUnion .32
Weyerh .60
WmsCos .80
XLGrp .44
Xerox .17
Yamanag .18
YingliGm ...
YumBmds 1.00


Wkly YTD Wkly
YId PE Chg %Chg Last
... 21 -6.86 +.7 37.70
4.2 14 -2.18 -.6 24.84
... ... -.51 -12.1 3.72
3.8 ... -3.69 -10.6 34.32
2.0 ... -2.31 +1.0 31.81
2.8 ... -.92 +2.0 29.91
1.6 ... -3.31 -2.9 36.34
1.6 ... -8.38 -.3 68.07
1.3 ...-1.37 -15.8 13.43
24 ... -2.92 -8.9 31.76
1.4 ..-1.48 -3.4 24.33
4.2 ... -1.28 +1.8 :31.89
...... -.34 -45.2 2.52
.6 18 -8.12 -22.9 46.84
1.9 12 -2.73 -16.4 38.(4
... 14 -1.74 -36.5 13.56
15 -5.20 -13.8 33.02
.2 27'-2.98 -27.1 .21.51
4.6 ... -.93 -20.4 7.67
2.6 ... -.32 -42.8 1.51
4.5 ... -.80 -7.8 11.56
...... -1.23 -23.3 :17.02
2.5 12 -2.84 -19.1 48.65
S-6.98 -31.3 42.46
9.3 ... -.99 -6.5 21.33
4.7 ... +1.38 +8.7 17.54
... 2 -.61 -26.0 4.95
... 7 -1.60 -15.3 11,89
7 -2.81 +15.9 21.48
1.9 10 -2.56 -16.3 27.19
.4 43 -4.54 -21.4 18.59
2.7 14 -4.39 -4.1 82.75
3.0 13 -3.42 -1.3 31.74
6.4 ... -4.71 -7.7 49.36
1.4 29.-6.81 -21.2 54.75
3.1 10 -2.56 -5.6 '52.57
2.4 14 -2.91 -.1 41.38
-1.80 -10.9 14.68
4 -.72 -44.9 5.52
3.5 ... +.48 +5.0 .32.96
2.1 15-10.01 -.2 92.47
... 11 -1.30 -29.4 '16.82
9.4 6 -.27 -35.8 2.03
3.2 16 -3.53 -9.5 '65.64
2.1 12 -2.34 -12.1 23.72
...... -.54 -16.9 9.96
...... -3.47 -12.9 3a.95
.6 ... -6.75 -43.1 33.24
1.4 10 -4.07 +26.2 45.56
4.1 ... -4.46 -19.1 27.98
4.4 ... -3.81 -14.9 25.71
1.0 ...-16.12 +37.5' 38.91
1.0 17 -4.41 -10.4 20.71
2.1 ... -5.23 -5.1 61.62
1.9 ... -4.67 -9.3 43.65
5.6 15 -.24 -2.0 35.05
2.2 14 -3.49 +13.4 44.93
.7 17 -2.13 +18.5 83.41
2.4 14 -2.01 -5.0 37.03
.7 9-49.27 -42.7 73.30
4.5 15 -1.12 -17.6 30.37
...... -3.72 -20.2 18.20
1.6 8 -5.60 +9.0 '61.95
1.9 10 -2.61 -18.7 25.21
1.6 ... -.38 +5.8 4.89
14- -5.60 +40.2 14.83
1.8 12 -1.57 -3.9 17.84
3.4 4 -2.12 -5.6 17.87
3.0 19 -4.65 +9.4 27.05
2.2 32 -,56 -8.5 19.96
2.0 16 -.80 -26.0 8.53
1.4 16 +.24 +3.3 13.22
... 4 -1.56 -42.5 5.68
2.0 19 -2.11 +3.4 50.71


AMEX Most Active


Wv Yd PE YTD
Div YId PE Chg %Chg


AbdAsPac .42 5.8
Adventrx ... ...
AlexcoR g ...
AllIdNevG ...
AmApparel...
AntaresP ...
ArcadiaRs ...
Aurizon g ...
AvalRaren ...
BarcUBS36 ...
BarcGSOil ... ...
Brigus grs ...
BritATob 3.86 4.3
CAMAC En .:.
CardiumTh ...
CelSci
CFCdag .01 ...
CheniereEn...
ClaudeRg ...
CrSuiHiY .32 10.8
DejourE g ...
DenisnMg ...
ExeterR gs ...
Express-1 ...
FrkStPrp .76 6.4
GabGldNR1.68 10.0
GascoEngy ...
Gastargrs ...
GenMoly ...
GoldStrg ...
GranTrrag ...
GrtBasGg ...
GtParnSilvg ...
ImpOil gs .44 ...
inovioPhm ...
MadCatzg ...
Metalico ...
MetroHIth ...


-.39 +7.3
-.49 -5.7
-.55 -15.9
-2.74 +34.4
-.10 -43.4
-.24 +22.4
+.01 -82.4
-.26 -23.0
-1.20 -31.1
-2.14 -4.3
-2.31 -13.0
-.22 -30.5
-1.48 +15.8
-.17 -49.7
+.00 -42.7
-.03 -44.0
+.09 +15.4
-2.47 +41.8
-.22 -28.3
-.13 +1.7
-.01 -6.3
-.51 -53.2
-.11 -34.3
-.88 +18.0
-.77 -16.9
-1.34 -13.0
-.05 -33.7
-.69 -5.6
-.58 -38.4
-.24 -50.1
-.85 -24.2
-.14 -36.8
-.14 +14.6
-3.84 -.8
-.04 -47.6
-.43 -28.4
-.77 -19.9
-.68 +11.4


WY
Last Name DIv YId
7.24 MdwGoldg ...
2.46 Minefndg ... 9 ...
6.89 NeoStem ...
35.36 Neoprobe ...
.94 Nevsung .06 1.1
2.08 NwGoldg ...
.05 NA Pallg ...
5.64 NDynMng ...
4.30 NthnO&G ...
46.99 NthgtMg ... ...
22.29 NovaGd g ...
1.46 Oilsandsg ...
89.94 OpkoHith ... ...
1.00 Palatin s ...
.23 ParaG&S ...
.46 PhrmAth ... ...
23.93 PionDrill ......
7.83 Quepasa ... ...
2.94 QuestRMg .
30 RareBelg
1.60 Rentech
4.08 RexahnPh .
3.02 Rubicon g ...
11.84 SamsO&G.
16.76 Taseko
.23 TsaPet ...
4.06 TravelCtrs ...
3.99 TriangPet ...
2.29 Ur-Energy ...
6.10 Uranerz
1.87 UraniumEn ...
3.22 VantageDrl ...
40.19 VimetX
.60 VistaGold ...
.73 Vdngo
4.71 WTrDrfChn .15 ...
4.98 YMBioq ...


Wky YTD Wdy
PE Chg %Chg Last
... -.22+157.1 2.16
... -.35 +29.2 14.26
... -.19 -52.8 .67
... -.58 +11.2 2.29
... -.42 -29.7 5.29
... -.84 +2.0 9:96
... -.65 -49.0 3.54
...-2.06 -40.4 8.52
96 -3.98 -33.3 18.16
43 -.18 -5.0 3.04
... -.98 -36.7 9.04
... -.05 -51.4 .20
... -.42 +7.1 3.93
... -.19 -36.3 .86
9 -.55 -38.3 2.46
... -.55 -50.4 2.10
... -3.19 +48.5 13.08
...-1.41 -39.8 7.04
-1.12 -22.9 4.35
-1.56 -43.8 9.02
+.04 -19.7 .98
-.18 -8.9 1.02
-.62 -37.3 3.58
-.57 +70.5 2.25
-.57 -26.1 3.88
5 -.33 -68.5 1.05
... -.63 +22.5 4.62
... -1.36 -6.2 6.10
... -.34 -55.5 1.33
... -.60 -39.6 2.41
... -.33 -49.8 3.03
.. -.28 -33.5 1.35
15 -8.25 +49.2 22.16
... -.29 +17.2 2.80
... -.05 -31.5 1.63
... -.08 +.2 .25.43
... -.43 -17.6 1.92


I Weekly Stock Exchange Highlights


Stock Footnos: g dividendss and hearing in Canoiadolam.h=Doesnodmeeconinued-liststandard
If = Late ing with SEC. n= New in pat 2 weeks. p = Prefered. rs= Sock has undegne a reverse stock sp
of at leasr 50 percent wi# tye past year. rt = RiM to buy securay at a speckled prie, a = Stock has spit by
lest 20perceatwiftin te est year. un=Uns. vi=Inbanuplyorrecrivernm wd=Whenisldriuted. wi
When issued, wt= .Wnans.
Mutual Fund Foobtolte b = Fee coveing market costs is paid from fund assets. d Defeired sales charge,
redenpton fee. f = ton oad (sakte di gan). m = M i fees ae W ed NA= not avale. p= previous da
net asset value s a= fund Wpt ares dug l0e week. x =fKWd paid a d te.W .n during the week.Gane an
Loses uast be worth at least $2 to be listed in tables at le MostAcv must be worth a east $1. Volume i
hundreds ol shares. SourceTheAssocialedPreai. Sales figures are unotital.


11.1 ... ... ..-. -. ___' _.- .v --- I


2


3
8











LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED SUNDAY, AUGUST 7, 2011

Lake City Reporter





CLASSIFIED


Classified Department: 755-5440


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r, 7, M M, -


020 Lost & Found

Dachshund (Weiner Dog). Black
& Tan answers to Oscar. Around
SE High Falls Rd. on 8/01. Do not
call. We FOUND him!!!

100. Job
Opportunities

05527080
Wanted-part time sous chef,
kitchen help & cook.
Apply in person, Cerveny
Conference Center at Camp
Weed, 11057 Camp Weed Place,
Live Oak Florida 32060

05527109
RECEPTIONIST/OFFICE
ASSISTANT
White Springs, Florida
seeking a personable and cheer-
ful individual to join our team.
Verifiable job history. Strong
computer skills. Good commu-
nication skills. Able to operate
fax, 'copier and scanner
machines. Able to complete
duties without constant
supervision. Must be flexible
and team player. POSITION
NEEDS TO BE FILLED
IMMEDIATELY. Please email
resume to: hr(@speced.org

05527130




Meridian Behavioral
Healthcare Inc.
www.mbhci.org
Please visit our website to view
current open opportunities
and to apply online :
Meridian is an active partner
with the National Health Service
Corps
Therapists:
Program Manager ( Licensed)
Licensed, or Master's Level
in Outpatient
LCSW or Certified Behavioral
Therapists
Preferred
Bachelor's-Level in
Counselor Support
Case Management
(adult & child)
Master's Therapist in
Methadone Clinic
Administration:
Medical Records
Client Relations Specialist

Medical Services
RN Nursing Manager DETOX
(Gville )
PRN RN, LPN, C.N.A.
Recovery Specialist
(Direct Care)
Facilities:
Maintenance
To see our current openings in
Mental Health and to apply
online, please go to:
www.mbhci.ore
EOE, DFWP, E-Verify







Services

DIVORCE, BANKRUPTCY,
RESUMES.
other court approved forms-
386-961-5896.


Legal

NOTICE OF PUBLIC MEETING
AND BUDGET HEARINGs
NORTH FLORIDA BROADBAND
AUTHORITY
The North Florida Broadband Au-
thority ("NFBA") announces a meet-
ing and public hearing for the accept-
ance and adoption of the final FY11-
12 Budget that all interested persons
are invited to attend. The NFBA is a
legal entity and public body created
pursuant to the provisions of Section
163.01, Florida Statutes, and an In-
terlocal Agreement among Baker,
Bradford, Columbia, Dixie, Gil-
christ, Hamilton, Jefferson, Lafay-
ette, Levy, Madison, Putnam, Su-
wannee, Taylor, Union and Wakulla
Counties and municipalities of Cedar
Key, Cross City, Lake City, Live
Oak, Monticello, Perry, White
Springs and Worthington Springs,
Florida. The NFBA meeting will be
to conduct general business and to
conduct the public hearing to consid-
er the annual budget. The ptiblic
hearing to adopt the final NFBA an-
nual budget will be held at 2:00 p.m.
on Wednesday, September 14, 2011;
at the Suwannee River Water Man-
agement District, Board Room, 9225
CR49, Live Oak, Florida. If a person
decides to appeal any decision made
by the NFBA with respect to any
matter considered at the meeting,
such person will need a record of the
proceedings and may need to ensure
that a verbatim record is made, in-
cluding the testimony and evidence
upon which the appeal is to be made.
In accordance with the Americans
with Disabilities Act, persons need-
ing special accommodation or an in-
terpreter to participate in this pro-
ceeding or have any questions please
contact Faith Doyle, Clerk to the
NFBA Board at (877) 552-3482 or
(407) 629-6900 at least one (1) busi-
ness day prior to the date of the
meeting.
05527072
August 7, 14, 2011


310 Pets & Supplies
Free to good home only.
3 adorable long haired kittens.
Call for more information.
386-623-5156


100 J0ob
100 Opportunities

Os527IN )

TIMCO
aviation services

Buyer
Requires general knowledge of
purchasing functions and
undergraduate degree or 2 yrs
procurement experience.
Must be able to work
evenings and weekends.
Apply online at www.timco.aero
AAP / EEO Employer

05527161
REEFER & FLATBED
DRIVERS NEEDED!
More Freight = Top Earnings!
Paid CDL Training
Available & Benefits
800-446-4782 or
www.primeinc.com

05527162
$2500 SIGN ON FOR OTR
DRIVERS!!
LOOKING FOR THAT JOB
THAT GETS YOU HOME



Our Name Says it All....
Visit us at the GATS show in
Dallas Aug 25.27 Booth
#20150
Excellent Home Time
Great Benefit Package
Paid Vacation & Holidays
Class A CDL Required.
1-888-454-7995 or
www.superservicelc.com

Hiring Locally This Week
Liberty National Life Insurance
Company..Full Trainifg Provided
Potential. of $60K+ Annually.
401K, BCBS Insurance & Pension
for those who qualify.
Call 1-800-257-5500
to set up an interview.
INSURANCE AGENCY
Looking for a highly motivated
individual. Licensed 4-40 CSR is
desired but not required. Must
have excellent computer & people
skills benefits-avail. Send reply to
Box 05071, C/O The Lake City
Reporter, P.O. Box 1709,.
Lake City, FL, 32056 or
fax to: 386-752-2102
Physical laborer needed. CDL
license req'd. Must have respect
for electricity & ability to work in
water & mud. Must be able to pass
drug test. Call 386-752-1854
Sales Position available for moti-
vated individual Rountree -Moore
Toyota, Great benefits, paid train-
ing/vacation. Exp. a plus but not
necessary. Call Anthony Cosentino
386-623-7442
Security Officers
needed Lake City Area, must have
current D Security Li,., Clear
background, Drivers Lic, phone,
Diploma/GED. Benefits, DFWP
EEO Must Apply at:
www.dsisecurity.com MB 1000084
Sewing Machine Operator
with experience,
Good hourly rate
Call Hafners 386-755-6481
VPK Teacher & Pre K3 teacher
needed. Experience reqd. CDA/AS
Degree preferred. Apply.in person
at Wee Care in Columbia City
Westside Barber Shop is looking
for a lead experienced Barber/styl-
ist. Highest pd commission. Busy
shop. 386-623-5156 or 755-7733

120 AMedical
120 Employment

05527079
MEDICAL ASSISTANT
Requirements: Phlebotomy
certified with min.
1 yr experience.
Please email resume to:
jpapesh(S cancercarenorthflori-
da.com

05527112
Medical Office Assistant
Experience as a Medical
assistant or in Medical
billing required. Fax
resume: 386-758-5987 or email:
mafaisalmd@gmail.com

Certified Medical Assistant
Full time, exp preferred in .
Pediatrics and/or Family Practice.
Experience in injections & taking
accurate vital signs. Excellent
communication and
documentation, organizational
and assessment skills.
Fax Resume: 386-758-5628

240 Schools &
240 Education

05526648
Interested in a Medical Career?
Express Training offers
courses for beginners & exp
Nursing Assistant, $479
next class-07/25/10
Phlebotomy national certifica-
tion. $800 next class-08/08/11
Continuing education
Fees incl. books, supplies, exam
fees. Call 386-755-4401 or
expresstraininegservices.com


2/1 S of Lake City, (Branford area)
$500 month plus security ,
386-590-0642 or 386-867-1833
www.suwanneevalleyproperties.com.
2/2 Units, clean, well maintained,
nice safe park setting, 2 miles to
downtown Lake City, $575 month
+ $575 sec dep, 386-984-8448
13th Month FREE!!
3/2, on 1 acre lot
386-623-2203 or
386-623-5410

LG clean 3br's $450. -$650. mo. +
dep. Also, 2br mobile home's
available. No Pets.
5 Points area. 386-961-1482
Mobile Homes for rent in
White Springs, Lake City & Ft.
White. Contact 386-623-3404
or 386-397-2779
Private 3b/2ba w/carport. 3 miles
west Lake City. $700 month.
$300 security. 386-758-3657
References required. NO Pets!

640n Mobile Homes
6t40 for Sale
Handy man special, 94 Fleetwood
DWMH. 3/2 on 5 acres in Ft.
White. Owner Fin. $3,000 dn.
$850mo. $99,900 352-215-1018
www.LandOwnerFinancing.com
Palm Harbor Homes
Cash for Clunkers
5K For Your Used Mobile Home -
Any Condition
800-622-2832 ext. 210


310 Pets & Supplies
Mice & Rats
now available at
WW Feeds in Fort White.
386-497-1376
PUBLISHER'S NOTE
Florida Law 828.29 requires dogs
and cats being sold to be at least 8
weeks old and have a health
certificate from a licensed
veterinarian documenting they
have mandatory shots and are
free from intestinal and external
parasites.. Many species of wild-
life must be licensed by Florida
Fish and Wildlife. If you are
unsure, contact the local
office for information.


361 Farm Equipment
84 Ford 4610 Tractor.
2WD, Solid
2005 motor,$7,500. OBO
386-867-0005


407 Computers
HP Computer,
$80.00
386-755-9984 or
386-292-2170


420 Wanted to Buy

Wanted Junk Cars, Trucks, Vans.
$250 & up CASH! Free Pick Up!
NO title needed !386-878-9260
After 5pm 386- 752-3648.


430 Garage Sales
PUBLISHER'S NOTE
All Yard Sale Ads
Must be.Pre-Paid.


440 Miscellaneous
CUB CADET Self Propelled
Mower.
Like New
Asking $180 OBO, 386-984-7510
Stop gnat & Mosquito bites!, Buy
Swamp Gator All natural insect re-
pellent. Family safe. Use head to
toe. Available at The Home Depot.
Summer Barbecue Special
Tow Behind
Grill/Smoker, $1,250 OBO..
386-719-4802

450 Good Things
45 to Eat ..
GREEN PEANUTS For Sale
Valencia. Graded and washed.
$30.00 a bushel.
386-752-3434

Mobile Homes
630 for Rent
14 Wide, 2/2-$475. mo. + dep.
Clean, Quiet Country Park
Water, septic, garbage incl. NO
PETS! 386-758-2280 References,
2 br/2 full bath SWMH
ready to rent Ft White
$600.mo
386-497-1464 or 365-1705
2&3 BR MH. $395 $650. mo.
plus deposit. Water & sewer fur-
nished. Cannon Creek MHP
386-752-6422
2/1 Mobile Homes in a park.
$400.00 and $450.00 per month
plus security deposit.
Call 386-965-5530


ONE 51 PLACE APTS
Alachua
MOVE IN SPECIALS,
1, 2, & 3 bedrooms
Call TODAY 386-462-0656
or visit us at one51 place.com
(ji)


Redwine Apartments. Move in
special $199. Limited time. Pets
welcome. with 5 complexes,
we have a home for you.
386-754-1800. www.myflapts.com
Summer Special! 12th mo Free
w/signed yr lease. Updated, w/tile
floors/fresh paint. Great area.
From $450.+sec. 386-752-9626
The Lakes Apts. Studios & 1Br's
from $135/wk. Util. & cable inc.,
Sec 8 vouchers accepted, monthly
rates avail Call 386-752-2741
Unfurnished Apt Eastside
Village Realty, Inc .2 bedroom
L bath Duplex must be 55+ yrs of
age Call Denise Bose @
386-752-5290
Wayne Manor Apts.
Move in $199. Summer special.
2/1, washer/dryer. Behind Kens off
Hwy 90. 386-754-1800
www.myflapts.com
Windsor Arms Apartments.
Summer special $199. Move in!
2/1, 2/1.5, 2/2. Pet Friendy. Free
200 ch. Dish. Washer/dryer hkup.
386-754-1800. www.myflapts.com

720 Furnished Apts.
2U For Rent
Rooms for Rent. Hillcrest, Sands,
Columbia. All furnished. Electric,
cable, fridge, microwave. Weekly
or monthly rates. 1 person $135,
2 persons $150. weekly
386-752-5808

730i Unfurnished
U30 Home For Rent
1/1 Cottage pool access, no pets,
country setting, $675 mo includes
utlilities & cable. $300 sec. Near
SR 47 & 75 386-719-5616


. 705 Rooms for Rent
New furnished bedroom apt in a
home, private entrance & bath, in-
cludes utilities, trash, cable, frig &.
pest control. $450 mo + dep. Avail
8/1. 386-752-2020 SW Lake City
Room w/private bath. Microwave,
fridge, laundry, internet, private
entrance. Convenient.
386-755-9059 for information

710 Unfurnished Apt.
710 For Rent








SPRING HILL VILLAGE
Excellent High Springs location.
1, 2 & 3 bedroom floor-plans;
some with garages.
Call 386-454-1469
or visit our website:
www.springhillvillage.net

1BR APT.
Downtown Location, Clean.
$450 mo, plus Security.
NO PETS. Call 386-755-3456
2/1 Unfurnished Apt for Rent
Water & Electric furnished
$800 mo. plus $300 security
Deposit. Call 386-752-2384
2/1 w/garage & washer/dryer
hookups. East side of town,
Call for details
386-755-6867
2BR/1.5BA w/garage
5 minutes from VA hospital.
Call for details.
386-755-4590 or 365-5150
2BR/1BA. Close to town.
$565.mo plus deposit.
Includes water & sewer.
386-965-2922
A Landlord You Can Love!
2 brApts $575. & up + sec. Great
area. CH/A washer/dryer hookups.
386-758-9351/352-208-2421
Amber Wood Hills Apts.
Private Patio area. Beautiful yard.
Washer/dryer hkup. Free water &
sewer. 1/1, 2/1. Move in special.
386-754-1800. wwwmyflapts.com
Beautiful Apt, Large 1 bdrm,
w/inground pool, CHA, details at
bigfloridahome.com
$650/mo + dep 386-344-3261
Columbia Arms Apt. located 1/2
mi from V.A. & Winn Dixie. Pet
Friendly. Moyv in Special $199.
Pool, laundry & balcony.
386-754-1800. www.myflapts.com
Furnished or unfurnished 1 or 2
bedroom townhomes on the golf
course. $625-$750. mo. + security.
Includes water. 386-752-9626
Greentree Townhouse
Summer special. 2/1, 2/1.5. Free
water & sewer. Balcony & patio.
Laundry. Behind Kens on Hwy 90.
386-754-1800 wwwmyflapts.com


Horseshoe Beach RV Lot.
Nice comer Lot with shade trees.
$295. mo Water/electric included
386-235-3633 or 352-498-5986


Scalloping Horseshoe Beach Spcl
Gulf Front 2br, w/lg porch, dock,
fish sink. wkend $395./wk $895.
386-235-3633/352-498-5986
alwaysonvacation.com #419-181
"Florida's Last Frontier"


805 Lots for Sale
Foreclosure! 59.98 Ac. Close to
Suwannee River w/boat ramps &
Springs. Ideal parcel for your site
built or manuf. home. $139,000!
MLS# 78083 386-344-7662
Lots for Sale Eastside .
Village Realty, Inc. buildable
vacant lot hight & dry in' a estab-
lished neighbor priced @ $40,000.
Call Denise Bose @ 752-5290
North Fla Land. 1/2 80 Ac w/Fin.
Counties Columbia, Suwannee,
Gilchrist, Baker, Glades, Polk.
Call for brochure and terms. 7
Days 7 to 7.3.86-752-5035 X 3111
A Bar Sales, Inc.
Owner Financing. River comm &
nature lover's dream in Lee. 15
wooded ac by the Withlacoochee.
Property is already subdivided
MLS 75576 $48,000 623-6896
PUBLISHER'S NOTE
All real estate advertising in this
newspaper is subject to the fair
housing act which makes it illegal
to advertise "any preference,
limitation, or discrimination based
on race, color, religion, sex,
disability, familial status or nation-
al origin: or any intention to make
such preference, limitation or
discrimination." Familial status
includes children under the age of
18 living with parents or legal
custodians, pregnant women and
people securing custody of chil-
dren under the age of 18. This
newspaper will not knowingly
accept any advertising for real es-
tate which is in violation of the


*1h.5V2SWi


l! ITlq


~ICTB"4

SELL ITc


730 UUnfurnished
730 Home For Rent -
2BR/1.5 BA duplex w/garage.
Near 1-75. Clean, quiet. No Pets.
-Security dep. Credit report req'd ,
386-755-3179 Leave message ;
3 br/2ba house, 1206 McFarlane
Avenue. Avail. 9/1/11. $950 mo
$400 sec dep. 904-376-0620 or
904-813-8864 for appointment,
3/2, family rm, 2 car garage.
$750 mo. +
$750 security deposit
Call 386-752-2384
3/2, Ir, dr, fam rm w/ fp, 2-car
garage, fenced bk yd.
1792 sq ft. $1050 mo. Martha Jo
Khachigan, Realtor 623-2848
3BR/1.5 BA Large lot. Very clean
with storage shed. Quiet area.
$850 mo. + $850. dep..
386-752-7578
3BR/2BA CB home Carport hard-'
wood floors. CH/A Fenced yard.
Good area. $750 mo plus security..
386-752-0118 or 623-1698
3br/2ba Nice Brick home 1700 sf
for rent comer of Baya &
Defender. $850. mo. $850. dep.
386-344-5065
3br/2ba. 1100 sqft. 5 ac. Huge
oaks. I mi west of 1-75 & US 90..'
Appliances, shed, water, sewer &
lawn care. $700mo $1100 dep.
386-984-9992/(904)571-5001 '
4br/2ba CHA Brick, 1200 sqft
lac., Close to FGCC, CR 245A.
Ceramic tile/carpet, $800 mo $800
dep (904)708-8478 App. req'd -
House for rent in town.
Please call for more
information. NO PETS!
386-758-0057
Remodeled 3br/2ba Brick. In town
1750 sqft. Lg lot. Includes washer,
dryer, stove, & fridge. Quiet area
$985. mo $985 dep. 386-752-7578
Unfurnished 2 bedroom/I bath -
house on 5 acres. $700.00 per
month. First, last and security
Firm. 386-590-5333

750 Business&
Office Rentals
Commercial property. 2100 sqft
bldg. on 1 acre. CH/A. Close to
college and Timco. Call for more
information. 386-867-1190
FOR LEASE: Downtown office
space. Convenient to
Court house.
Call 386-755-3456
For Lease: E Baya Ave. Two -
1000 sqft office space units or
combined for 2000 sqft. 386-984-
0622.or weekends 386-497-4762
OFFICE SPACE for lease.
Oak Hill Plaza. 900 sqft
$675mo/$695. sec dep.
Tom 386-961-1086 DCA Realtor

790 Vacation Rentals











LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED SUNDAY. AUGUST 7. 2011


805 Lots for Sale
law. Our readers are hereby in-
formed that all dwellings adver-
tised in this newspaper are availa-
ble on an equal opportunity basis.
To complain of discrimination call
HUD toll free at 1-800-669-9777,
the toll free
telephone number to the hearing
impaired is 1-800-927-9275.

810 Home for Sale
0.5 acre tract has 441 (4 lane)
frontage. 1/2 miles from Target
distribution. 2/1.5 currently zoned
residential. MLS#78506 $91,000
R.E.O. Realty Group 243-8227
2 Mobile homes on 5 ac. above
ground pool. (1)1800 sqft. &
(1) 1500sqft.$235,000 $139,888
MLS 77552 Brittany Stoeckert
Results Realty 386-397-3473
3/2 Brick Home w/l car garage,
Metal roof, porch w/swing, detach
carport $96,000 MLS#77780
Jo Lytte a'Remax 386-365-2821
www.jolytte.florida-propeny-search.com
3/2 Split floor plan built in 2010
on 2 acres.. Master bath with large
tub & standing shower. Trey ceil-
ings MLS#78520, $114,900
R.E.O. Realty Group 243-8227
Almost 17ac., spacious 3br/2ba
home, paved rd. Near Itchetucknee
Spgs. Pole barn, gated, fenced.
MLS76902 $164,900 Brodi Allred
623-0906. Westfield Realty Group
Awesome Find! 3br/2ba, 1844sf,
wood floors, French doors to scr
back porch, 40x60 bldg w/office &
workshop, 6.17ac comer lot, 3
sides fenced. #77427 $199,900
Brick Ranch 3/2 Fl room. Side en-
try garage & workshop: 2 sheds.
New AC apple & roof. MLS78442
$114,900. Millard Gillen 365-7001
Westfield Realty Group
Charming 2br/2ba home. Gated
community. REDUCED to
$158,000 MLS78740 Teresa
Spradley 386-365-8343
Hallmark Real Estate
Clean Well maintained 3/2 brick
w/chain link fenced back yard
w/Garage. $120,K MLS78440.
Debbie King 386-365-3886
Hallmark Real Estate
Close to everything. Lg 3br/2ba
brick home. Close to VA & shop-
ping! $189,900 MLS78131 Carrie
Cason 386-623-2806
Westfield Realty Group
Country close to town 3/2 Brick 3
ac. Grape arbor & fruit trees, pole
barn, workshop. Metal roof. MLS
78096$129,900 Ginger Parker
365-2135 Hallmark Real Estate
Country Club Condo 4br/3ba.
Mega storage, roomy kit, 3 porch-
es. $165,000 MLS 78719 Paula
Lawrence 386-623-1973
Hallmark Real Estate.
Deer in your back yard. 3/2 HUD
w/16X48 wrap around scr. porch.
Clean, well maintained, 5 ac.
$72,000 MLS78687 Ginger Parker
365-2135 Hallmark Real Estate
Foreclosure! 3/2 D/WMH boasts
a large kitchen. M/B w/ garden
tub, shower & dbl sinks-New car-
pet-fpl & more-Only $69,995
MLS# 76920. 386-344-7662
Foreclosure! Newer 3/2 DWMH.
Lg rooms, kitchen island, lots of
wdws, master w/garden tub & sep-
arate shower. $74,995 '
MLS# 74218 386-344-7662


810 Home for Sale
Great 3/2 home w/2346 sq ft
under roof on .67 ac., Creekside
S/D. Big back yard w/plenty of
shade trees. On a cul-de-sac, MLS
77385 $169,900 623-6896
Home for Sale Eastside Village
Realty, Inc. 2 bedroom, 2 bath site
built home with screen porch,
large carport priced just right Call
Denise Bose @ 752-5290
Home in Lake City Country Club.
4/3, renovated. Great for entertain-
ing. Glass doors open to back yard.
MLS#78637 $184,900
R.E.O. Realty Group 243-8227
Home on 15 ac. w/over 2,500 sqft
home.Very.Ig bedrooms w/private
baths. 24x24 workshop $235,000
MLS 77552 Brittany Stoeckert
Results Realty 386-397-3473
JASPER! 4BR/2.5BA 1,890 SqFt
mfg home on 1 acre where
wildlife is abundant $39,900
DANIEL CRAPPS AGENCY,
INC. 755-5110 #77922
Lake front 3/2 custom Western Ce-
dar. Lots of storage space. Private
dock $229,900. MLS# 74681
Jo Lytte-Remax 386-365-2821
www.jolytte.florida-property-search.com
Large Home in the Country on
3.66 acres, fireplace, 2 outbldgs,
MLS#76471, $89,900
Jo Lytte, Remax 386-365-2821
jolytte@remaxnfl.com
LOCATION! CONDITION!
PRICE! 3BR/2BA w/open floor
plan; freshly painted $96,000
DANIEL CRAPPS AGENCY,
INC. 755-5110 #78278
Lofty home on Itchetucknee River,
Wrap around covered decks on
two levels.MustSEE! $375,000
MLS#77006 Jo Lytte
Remax 386-365-2821
Luxury home. 3br/2ba, 20 ac lot.
Cherry cabinets & SS appliances.
Jacuzzi in master br. MLS 78190
$ 374,900 Roger Lovelady 365-
7039. Westfield Realty Group
Motivated Seller. Country area,
paved rd. 3br/2ba manuf home.
New AC & upgraded wdows.
MLS 78027 $84K. Brodie Allred.
623-0906 Westfield Realty Group
MOVE-IN READY! 3BR/2BA in
pristine condition on 1.39 acres
$89,900 DANIEL CRAPPS
AGENCY, INC.
755-5110 #78345
New Reduced. 4br/2ba plus of-
fice. 2 living & dinig areas, cov-
ered porch. Fl rm. Triple garage.
MLS77685 Charlie Sparks 755-
0808 Westfield Realty Group
Nice, large 4/2 on 1 acre
w/florida room, granite floors,
wrap around front porch, $139,900
Brittany Stoeckert Results Realty
386-397-3473 MLS 77292
Owner Financing Avail. with
down pmt. 3br/2ba 2 story brick.
4.6 ac. in ground pool. Lg. work-
I shop &2 wells. $150,000.00 obo
Old Wire Rd. (850)728-0782
Owner Financing. 2br/3ba country
home w/wrap around porches, 5ac.
Garage w/workshop. MLS77005
$179,900 Roger Lovelady 365-
7039 Westfield Realty Group
PRICE REDUCTION. 3/2 plus
pool house w/half bath, 2.25
fenced ac. Freshly painted. Split
plan, Large rear deck MLS 78103
$179,900 386-623-6896


810 Home for Sale
PRICED TO SELL! 3BR/2BA
w/2,012 SqFt w/living rm & fami-
ly rm S57.000 DANIEL CRAPPS
AGENCY, INC.
755-5110 #78680
Private 2 ac parcel away from it
alt. Hunting w/no restrictions.
Make an offer on this 1764 sqft
home that need some TLC.
S109,900, MLS78331. Jay Sears.
867-1613 Hallmark Real Estate
Reduced Price! 3br/1.5 ba. Re-
modeled. Nice area close to VA.
MLS 77599 S69K. Estate Sale.
bring all offers. Josh Grecian 466-
2517 Westfield Realty Group
Remax Professionals Motivated
seller. Spacious brick w/many up-
grades. Newer roof, windows &
fixtures. Fenced back yard. MKS
78168 $119,900 Missy Zecher@
623-0237 www.missyzecher.com
Remax Professionals Ranch style
home on 10 ac w/bam & horse
stalls. 4 Ig bedrm + bonus rm. 2
car gar. MLS 77403 $325K.
Missy Zecher @ 386-623-0237
www.missvzecher.com
Rolling Meadows. 4 or 3br/2ba.
Over 1700 sqft. and 1/2 ac lot.
MLS77284 $154,900 Carrie Cason
386-623-2806
Westfield Realty Group
Something for Everyone! 3br/2ba,
2706sf, 4.02ac, island kitchen,
Corian counters, det garage, Koi
pond, fish house, green house,
fenced & more. #76255 $247,000
SPECTACULAR VIEW!
2BR/1BA, 1200sf, .65ac, scr front
porch, steps to deck/dock on Suw.
river, under house parking/storage,
shed & more. #77242 $194,900
Suwannee River Front
granite counters, covered patio,
deck & dock,, $349,000
MLS#76336 Jo Lytte at Remax
Professionals. 386-365-2821
WELL-CARED FOR 4BR/2.5BA
mfg home w/formal LR plus fami-
ly rm $84,000 DANIEL CRAPPS
AGENCY, INC.
755-5110 #78585
WHITE SPRINGS! Sturdy block
3BR/IBA home in city limit,
fenced yd $49,000 DANIEL
CRAPPS AGENCY, INC.
755-5110 #78603

82O Farms &
Acreage

05527058
Must See, Prettiest Rolling
Pasture Lot in North Fla.
3 mi. W. of Col. City School.
Red. to $6,990 P/A, Financing,
386-752-1364 or 386-965-4340

10 ac. Ft. White $39,995,
$995 Down, $273.16 mo.
Seller fin. vargasrealty.com
352-472-3154
10-ac lot. Well/septic/pp. Owner
financing $300 dn, $663 mo 8.9%,
25 yrs. Deas Bullard Properties
386-752-4339 www.landnfl.com
4 1/2 acre lot. Lake Jeffery Road.--
Gorgeous Oaks!Paved Rd
Owner Financing! NO DOWN!
$59,900. $525mo 352-215-1018.
www.LandOwnerFinancing.com
4 acres, Wellborn, New Well
installed, Beautifully wooded
w/cleared Home Site, owner fin,
no down, $39,900, $410 mon
Call 352-215-1018
www.LandOwnerFinancing.com


~




1





p


3 I


820 Farms &
SAcreage
6.45 ac ri. er front property in
White Springs. cloe to Big Shoals.
Covered shelter for enterta.ning.
MLS= 77417 S104.900 386-243-
8227 R.E.O. Realty Group. Inc
FARM- 7 stall barn.
17+ acres, pasture, cross fenced.
Close in S500. mo.
386-961-1086

~830 Commercial
8 Property
788 S. Marion Comm'l bldg on
highway frontage. Across from the
VA & near downtown. S49.900.
MLS 78129 Scott Stewart 867-
3498 Westfield Realty Group
Commercial. High traffic location
w/I-75 exposure. 2-story custom
log home. MLS77949
Josh Grecian 386-466-2517
Westfield Realty Group
Prime Commercial Location.
Just across from plaza. Frontage
on Baya w/2 curbcuts. $350.000
MLS# 77485 Call 386-243-8227
R.E.O.Realty Group, Inc
Remax Professionals Commercial
Property. Located on expanding
west side of Lake City.. Professio-
nal service or restaurant. MLS
77436 $575k Missy Zecher 386-
623-0237 .www.missyzecher.com
Wellborn Commercial lot. 1.84
acres w/34' of Hwy frontage near
the new Dollar General. MLS
72381 Scott Stewart 386-867-3498
Westfield Realty Group

860 Investment
Property
Rustic Fishing camp in Suwannee'
Minutes to boat launch.
MLS#78709 $59,900
Jo Lytte/Remax 386-365-2821
www.jolytte.florida-property-searchli.com

Q8 0 Real Estate
870 Wanted
I Buy Houses
CASH!
Quick Sale Fair Price
386-269-0605

930 Motorcycles
2001 KAWASAKI KLR250,
excellent condition, 2,193 miles,
combination street legal/off road.
$1,995 386-623-4376
2002 SUZUKI Intruder
1500cc. Fully dressed.
$3,500. SELL OR TRADE.
S 386-832-7005
Motorcycles Sales/Service
We Service and do minor repairs.
Motorcycles for sale
Terry 386-209-4412 or
Carl 407-687-2186

950 Cars for Sale
1974 Corvette Stingray.
350 engine with 4 speed transmis-
sion. Call for more info. $3,500.
386-397-6717 or 752-8157

C51 Recreational
J95i Vehicles
2007 Coach House
Platinum 272XL, 15K miles. May
consider partial trade for Class B.
$110,000. 386-754-8505


2000 Hummer
Army green, leather
interior, pristine cond.
31,148 miles.

$52,000
Call
Pictures available.


Fp SaeIoIpimRent


Private Estate
Within the city limits. Beautiful old-
er home with mature landscaping
and lake views, 6 Br., 3.5 baths,
3 fireplaces, private paved drive.
39.7 acres of property included
with home. $994,000 or $3,000
mo. for rent or home plus 2 acres
only S495,000. Call for additional
information and showings.


Listing Agent Mary Brown Whitehurst

(386) 965-0887

Sor co-owner (386)397-5131


Beautiful Home in Beautiful Location


Professional Office Space For Lease
.11,728 S.F.

Excellent location just east of 1-75
Abundant free parking'
Immediate occupancy PROCACCI
DEVELOPMENT CORPORATION


S 65 *OOlasg proca0ci.


1996 Chrysler Town
& Country LXi
2nd owner. very clean
inside & out, cold AC, new
tire, loaded, 110K.
$3,200 OBO
Call
386-963-2271
386-249-2723


2007 Coach House
Platinum 272XL, 15K
miles, may consider partial
trade for Class B.
$110,000
Call
386-754-8505


,;," ." ..-.. 72 :













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4 BR, 3 1/2 Bath 3 story, 3500sf heated, 4000sf under roof, w/gourtnet kitchen, living
room w/ gas fireplace, Formal Dining room, Media room, Computer room, Large
playroom, Deluxe moldings thru-out, Large wrap-around Porch, Walkout Dormers,
Open oak stairwell. Oversized 2 car garage w/ work space, cabinets and tops and it is
floored upstairs for storage or additional living. It has full irrigation system with septic
and water well. Located 1.5 miles off 1-75 on paved road on 5 wooded acres with 5
addtl. acres avail. This home would be perfect for commuting to Gainesville. It is super
energy efficient with spray foam insulation and was built in 2006. Home looks as if was
just built. It is 2 minutes off 1-75 neat Lake City. $345,000 (386) 365-7086


Have you read the newspaper today7


6 days a week you'll find it here...
Lake City Reporter


getyifprteWrco. U.-rCN. uRNT
386-752.12Q3
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Classified Department: 755-5440


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T 7. 20 11 Classified Department: 755-5440


MCAI i i E'R" S '
ye, lSL lK v


It's our
birthday!
Come in and
help us
celebrate all
this month!


itrs


J uJ


Be


BAQCK-IO-S IOOL

1 HUGE SAVINGS!
SALE BARN OPEN!

ARA SMITI 3u TY'S 586) 755-B00
A I WESTERN STORE US HWY 90 LAKE CITY, FL (3 MILES OFF .S)


q. t' 1 /
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A


uB,\ ui\ olr'?e, -et second t-niu'n :i
P--------------------------
::qILal or lesser 'Lldue o, '
FREE!
flter E.pirt.-e S'!i.l 11.
N- ) Wi wnj ii' -1 oiher dtrr. o.
313 NW Commons Loop, Ste. 119
Lake City 386-754-1444
9700 Deer LakeCt. 1 I, 0 Beach Bhd. 1615CR22)0
Jacksonille c Jacksonville Oratige Park
r()-5(6-2 3- 90-i821--H40 0--8-.05


30 Frigranii-s of Soaps
(ask iiir your favorite scent)


by design
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We do rfavors for:
WVcddin.-.. Baby Show%%-rs
and tiny 6 O4(tvifln
M'-clhalnic Soaps
Silk Arraiq,,iinnt
75 N. clarion Aveniue
(38(>) 243-8208
Downtown (next to Iowans)
o Ipe'n l I l\-Sainrday
Don...I. Ih,\, Owner


High Speed Internet
$29.99
a month
* No credit check
* No credit card required
(386) 344-2957

9 mainstreet


I2
DIRECT.
SATeLLITE TELEVISION
ST50 channels for s29"
* FREE installation
* FREE movies
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* We finance your deposit
* Get TV TODAY!
(407) 460-9225
#1 Dealer in Town


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a-7-. .-4-.-. .- "..' - .*.'-:;* .-,-; ,'* --*.' .....".-'* . :..:. ,


-1. ..J.nJ


TimErn s Il55 rnoRIEs
wer Chest S69.95 FUJIT -eR AAimQus CoLLtcrmIEs
386-466-1888
1034 SW MAIN BLVD., LAKE ., FL 32C55 e`


^


2













Story ideas?

Contact
Robert Bridges
Editor
754-0428


Lake City Reporter





LIFE


Sunday, August 7, 2011


www.lakecityreporter.com


Section D


GARDEN TALK


'Even when no one is around'


Nichelle Demorest


Making

the fruit

harvest

last

While plan-
ning your
fall edible
garden
this year,
you may want to consider
some of the many trees
and shrubs that can extend
your fruit harvest well into
the fall months. Fall and
winter are excellent times
to install your fruit and nut
trees such as apple, pecan,
and fig. Planting during
the dormant season will
allow the soil to settle and
roots to become estab-
lished before the spring
growth starts.
When selecting your
plants, be sure to choose
recommended variet-
ies for North Florida.
Homeowners who fail to
select the right plant for
the location will likely
fail and give up on fruit
growing. For more
information on growing a
variety of fruits at home,
read the UF publication,
'Deciduous Fruits for the
Home Gardner in North
Florida.' (http://edis.
ifas.ufl.edu/pdffiles/MG/
MG21100.pdf)
The common persim-
mon makes a beautiful
small to medium sized
dooryard-tree. In addi-
tion to being easy to grow,
this native tree has an
irregular,.natural shape
and bright red fall foli-
age. If that isn't enough
to tempt you, consider the
fall fruits that are nutri-
tious and a great source of
vitamin A
There are several vari-
eties of cold-hardy tanger-
ine and orange trees that
are lovely in the yard all
year with their evergreen
foliage. Just make sure
you are buying research-
recommended varieties
for our area. Kumquats
are one of the hardiest
citrus trees with delicious
fruit and wonderful orna-
mental qualities.
Peaches, nectarines,
and plums don't fruit
in the fall but you may
still want to plant a few.
These are called stone
fruits because the seed
is in a heavy pit or stone.
Certain cultivars of these
fruits can be grown suc-
cessfully in Florida.
Apple, pear, and may-
haw are examples of
pome fruits that will grow
in North Florida when the
right selections are made.
A couple nut trees worth
considering because of
their nutty ornamental
appeal are Chinese chest-
nuts and pecans.
If an additional tree is
in your fall plans, consider
the value of extra fresh
fruit as well as beauty
and shade. Call the UF
Master Gardeners with
your questions. 752-5384.
Or call for their "visiting"
hours.
* D. Nichelle Demorest is
a horticulture agent with the
Columbia County Extension
of the University of Florida
Institute of Food and
Agricultural Sciences.


Camp teaches kids that
character counts, whether
anyone's looking or not.


By LEANNE TYO
Ityo@lakecityreporter.comrn
"Character is how you
present yourself even
when no one is around."
That's what
Kyla Wilson, 10, of
Jacksonville said she
has been
learning at
a special
summer
day-camp
in Lake
City.
Twenty-
seven JASON MATTHEWV
young Casharo Thoi
boys and for the Young
girls in the Women of Ch
community (from right) te
have been Jonas, 12, Ar
attending 11 andArse
the camp 11, and Arse
at Olivet basics of car
Missionary including check
Baptist the oil and oti
Church changing a tir
since


VWA
ma
Me
hard
each
iton
nio
ma
ckir
her
re.


July the Young Men
and Young Women of
Character camp.
"This is a camp to
basically teach these
young men and women
how to interact within
today's society and have
appropriate actions and
learn to be law-abiding,
productive citizens,"
said Casharo Thomas,
camp director. "I named
it as character because I
think it's very important
for the young men and
young women to know
that character really is
who you are when no
one is looking. And if you
have appropriate charac-
ter in society, that takes
you a long way."
Thomas, who teaches
the camp's 18 boys,


co-directs with Sharon
Montgomery, who pro-
vides instruction for the
camp's nine girls.
The camp is in its
second year and was
originally started just
for young men, Thomas
said, but
grew to

Sthe young
women.
"There
needs
to be a
positive
LKER/Lake City Reporter female
s, camp director role
en and Young model
acter camp helping
hes Kaylon the young
nio Williams women of
Perry, 12, the the com-
intenance, muaity,
ng and replacing as thwell
vital fluids, and males,"
he said.

Children learn daily
living and life skills at
camp, such as how to tie
a tie, make a dinner dish,
change a tire or fill out a
job application.
"There are just basic
skills for women that
they need to learn for
the household entity."
Thomas said, "and for
men, if something tears
up with the car, you
need to know what to do.
They're simple life les-
sons."
Those lessons pre-
pare children to care
for their future families,
Montgomery said.
"They're going to be
the head of the family
some day," she said.

CAMP continued on 4D


JASON MATTHEW WALKERIL ie 'i rPfp.:.nr
Casharo Thomas, camp director for the Young Men and Young Women of Character camp,
watches as Kelvin Jonas (right), 15, teaches Sirr Rollins, 12, how to tie a necktie while attend-
ing the summer day-camp held at Olivet Missionary Baptist Church.


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Volunteer Latearra Jackson (right) helps Kyla Wilson, 10, as she prepares lunch for the camp-
ers. All of the campers learn various life skills as well as how to conduct themselves in public. -


Healthy eating means spending more


By DONNA GORDON
BLANKINSHIP
Associated Press
SEATTLE A'
healthy diet is expen-
sive and could
make it difficult for
Americans to meet
new U.S. nutritional
guidelines, according
to a study published
Thursday that says
the government
should do more to
help consumers eat
healthier.
An update of what
used to be known
as a food pyramid
in 2010 had called
on Americans to
eat more foods con-
taining potassium,
dietary fiber, vitamin
D and calcium. But
if they did that, the
study authors said,
they would add hun-
dreds more dollars to
their annual grocery
bill.
Inexpensive ways
to add these nutri-
ents to a person's
diet include potatoes
and beans for potas-
sium and dietary
fiber. But the study
found introducing
more potassium in a
diet is likely to add
$380 per year to the
average consumer's
food costs, said
lead researcher
Pablo Monsivais, an
assistant professor
in the Department


-- 1 -, ,


ASSOCIATED PR
In this Nov. 12, 2009 file photo, a vendor hands over a sample of produce to a potential customer at the historic Pike Place
Market in Seattle. A healthy diet is expensive and could make it difficult for Americans to meet new U.S. nutritional guidelines,
according to a study published Thursday that says the government should do more to help consumers eat healthier.


of Epidemiology
and the School of
Public Health at
the University of
Washington.
"We know more
than ever about the
science of nutrition,
and yet we have
not yet been able to
move the needle on
healthful eating," he
said. The govern-
ment should provide
help for meeting the


nutritional guidelines
in an affordable way.
He criticized some
of the marketing for
a healthy diet for
example, the image
of a plate of salmon,
leafy greens and
maybe some rice
pilaf and said a
meal like that is not
affordable for many
Americans.
Food-assistance
programs are helping


people make healthi-
er choices by provid-
ing coupons to buy
fruits and vegetables,
Monsivais said, but
some also put stum-
bling blocks in front
of the poor.
He mentioned,
as an example, a
Washington state
policy making it dif-
ficult to buy potatoes
with food assistance
coupons for women


with children, even
though potatoes
are one of the least
expensive ways to
add potassium to a
diet.
The study, pub-
lished in the journal
Health Affairs, was
based on a random
telephone survey of
about 2,000 adults in
King County, Wash.,
followed by a printed
questionnaire that


was returned by
about 1,300 people.
They noted what
food they ate, which
was analyzed for
nutrient content and
estimated cost.
People who spend
the most on food
tend to get the clos-
est to meeting the
federal guidelines for
potassium, dietary
HEALTHY cont. on 2D











LAKE CITY REPORTER LIFE SUNDAY, AUGUST 7, 2011 Page Editor: Robert Bridges, 754-0428


Celebrate, celebrate. Dance


to the ... new school year


Liz Cobb
elizabeth.cobb@fgc.edu.com


I love holidays, and I'll be
honest with you. Halloween is
my favorite celebration. The
season of autumn is magical
enough-the idea of a-bountiful
return after long months of work
seems somehow romantic to me
even though very few of us expe-
rience a genuine harvest in the
21st century. I also love to dress
up and have been known to plan
my costume a couple of months
in advance. One holiday that has
never captured my imagination,
however, is New Year's. Staying
up until midnight to watch-
fireworks and toast in another
year of getting older somehow
doesn't appeal to me. I would
enjoy a champagne toast more
around 5:00 or 6:00-Happy


Hour, if you will, and I can gen-
erate New Year's resolutions
anytime.
I think one of the reasons for
my lack of appreciation of New
Year's is that I'm a teacher, and
for me, the New Year begins in
August Ever since I was a little
girl I have gotten excited about a
new school year. I loved choos-
ing school supplies and new
school clothes. More impor-
tantly, however, was the idea of
a new teacher, the potential for
new friends, and the prospect of
learning.
Now, as a teacher, I enjoy
creating course material. I
am always excited about new
classes--new students. At the
college level, we are in the midst
of so much potential all the time.
Students' futures stretch so far
in front of them that it's fun to
dream a little with them. Of
course, I always look forward to
seeing all of my colleagues again
after a couple of months away
from campus.
Similarly, for many of our'
students at FGC fall term rep-
resents the beginning steps on
the road to a better life., The


students who have recently
graduated from high school look
forward to a more flexible and
stimulating academic environ-
ment. Some students are return-
ing after a lapse from attending
classes and have resolved to
follow through with a degree. .
Some are looking to re-tool
after losing their jobs or becom-
ing disenchanted with them.
There's a sense of excitement
about learning because entering
college students can begin to
see where they want to go with
a career.
Along with all that good
energy, though, come anxious
feelings. "Will I be able to
handle college-level work? How
will I juggle school, family, and
work? With the added expense
of school, will I still be able to
pay all of my bills? How do I
organize-my life to maximize my
productivity and effectiveness?"
While some of this anxiety can-
not be resolved until classes
begin, there is a lot students can
do proactively to mitigate their
fears. They can:
*Purchase textbooks early
if possible and skim through


them to become familiar with
their layout. Read the first one
or two chapters and try taking
notes. Many textbooks have
resources such as glossaries
and graphic organizers in the
back.
Check out Google calendar
at www.google.com and set up
a calendar in order to stay orga-
nized or use the small planner
that we give students. Plug in
the "critical dates" as found on
the FGC website: www.fgc.edu
*Students can set up their
college "wolves" e-mail account
Directions for this can be
obtained through a link on the
college website www.fgc.edu
Most professors expect students
to check their wolves accounts
regularly if not daily.
*Log onto Blackboard from
the college website at www.fgc.
edu starting the week before
school starts to see if professors
have made their courses avail-
able yet. If so, read all the perti-
nent information, especially ally
announcements.
' *Visit campus the week
before classes begin. Check
out our library, take a tour, and


introduce themselves to the
librarians. Visit the Collegewide
Learning Lab and learn from
our excellent staff what services
they offer.
Students should try to
think ahead and develop Plans
A, B, and C for such factors as
transportation, child care, com-
puter needs, and study times.
If life is very busy outside of
school, for example, students
would do well to try to build in
some study time on campus.
They should avoid scheduling
classes so tightly that there will
be no extra time on campus to
study.
In taking this proactive
approach to school, chances
are entering students will be
more successful. And this will
most certainly be cause for a
New (School) Year's celebra-
tion. Well...maybe not as fes-
tive but definitely more produc-
tive!

* Liz Cobb is an Associate
Professor of English at Florida
Gateway College. Contact her
at elizabeth.cobb@fgc.edu or by
phone at her office: 386-754-4359.


50th anniversary


Janice Ellen Benning of
Chamblee, Ga. and William
Joseph "Bill" Wheeler of
Lake City, were united in
marriage Aug. 12, 1961 at
First Methodist Church in
Chamblee, Ga.
They will commemorate
their 50th anniversary from
12-3 p.m. Sunday, Aug. 14
with a celebration in their


honor given by their chil-
dren.
The couple have two
children, Blaine and Brad
(Lorrie), and four grandchil-
dren.
They have lived in Lake
City for more than 45 years.
All friends and family are
invited to attend the celebra-
tion. No gifts please.


Engagements


Beach-Gordon

Jim and Gina Beach of Lake City announce the
engagement and approaching marriage of their
daughter, Whitney Beach of Wake Forest, N.C.. to
Jesse Gordon, of Wake Forest N.C. He is the son
of Jim and Ginnelle Gordon and Andrea Boyd of
Seminole, Okla.
The bride-elect received a bachelor of arts degree
in history from Florida State University in December
2009.
The future groom received a bachelor of arts
degree in communication from East Central
University in Ada, Okla. He is presently pursing
a masters of divinity degree from Southeastern
Ba1tist Theological Seminary.
The wedding is planned for 2:30 p.m. Sunday,
Aug. 14 at The Cotton Company, Wake Forest. N.C.
A reception will follow at the same location.


Hanna-Mershon

Britney'Hanna of Lake City and Thomas
Mershon of Lake City announce their engagement
and approaching marriage.
He is the son of Jimmie and Melissa Mershon.
The wedding is planned for 4 p.m. Saturday, Aug.
13 at the home of Jimmie and Melissa Mershon,
located at 7860 Hwy. 90 West, next to the Islamic
Center. A reception will follow at the same location.
All friends and family are invited to attend.

Please submit news of weddings, engagements
or anniversaries to Antonia Robinson at arobinson@
lakecityreporter.com.


HEALTHY: High costs

Continued From Page 1D


fiber, vitamin D and cal-
cium, the study found.
Those who spend the least
have the lowest intakes
of the four recommended
nutrients and the highest
consumption of saturated
fat and added sugar.
Hilary Seligman, assis-
tant professor of medi-
cine at the University of
California, San Francisco,
said Monsivais' research is
an interesting addition to
the debate about healthy
eating and food insecurity,
her area of expertise.
A lot of people assume
the poor eat cheap-food
because it tastes good, but
they would make better
choices if they could afford
to, said Seligman, who was
not involved in the study.
"Almost 15 percent of
households in America say
they don't have enough
money to eat the way they
want to eat," Seligman
said. Recent estimates
show 49 million Americans
make food decisions based
on cost she added.
"Right now, a huge
chunk of America just isn't
able to adhere to these
guidelines," she said.
But Monsivais may
have oversimplified the
problem, according to
]another professor who


does research in this area.
Parke Wilde, associated
professor at the Friedman,
School of Nutrition
Science and Policy at Tufts
University, said it's not
expensive to get all the
nutrients a body needs to
meet the federal guide-
lines.
What is expensive, in
Wilde's opinion, are the
choices Americans make
while getting those nutri-
ents.
He said diets get more
and more expensive
depending on how many
rules a person applies to
himself, such as eating
organic or seeking local
sources for food or eating
vegetables out of season.
"The longer your list
gets, the more expensive
your list will be," he said.
Seligman said her
list can get longer than
Wilde's, but not everything
is a choice. Adding to the
cost of buying healthful
food could be how far away
from home a person needs
to travel to get to a grocery
store that sells a variety of
fresh fruits and vegetables.
The government also
affects food prices through
the subsidies offered to
farmers growing certain
crops, she added.


i. ', .-- -,

China, Crystal,
Flatware and Gifts
Couples registered:
Haley Lipthrott
JT Brown
August 6, 2011

Jessica. Stalnaker
Travis Melgaard
September 10, 2011

Ashley Cloninger
Justin Brimmer
September 24, 2011

Jill Peck
Bryson Johnson
September 24, 2011
We know exactly what
they want in a wedding
or shower gift. We update
their list as gifts are
purchased, and gift wrap.

WARD'S
JEWELRY & GIFTS
156 N. Marion Ave.
Lake City
752-5470


LAKE CITY REPORTER LIFE SUNDAY, AUGUST 7, 2011


Page Editor: Robert Bridges, 754-0428











LAKE CITY REPORTER ADVICE & CROSSWORD SUNDAY. AUGUST 7, 2011


DEAR ABBY


Man is reluctant to show his


baby face in wedding photos


DEAR ABBY: I am a 40-
year-old man with a baby face.
It makes me appear much
younger than I am so much
so that I have been carded
when buying alcohol or lot-
tery tickets. People also seem
to relate to me based on the
age they perceive me to be.
Four months ago I grew a
beard, which makes me look
more my age. I'm an actor,
and in the past audiences
had difficulty accepting me
in certain roles because of
my youthful appearance. My
beard solved that problem.
, My sister-in-law is get-
ting married this summer
and insists I shave my beard
for the ceremony and wed-
ding photos. I keep it well-
groomed, and it gives me
more confidence when deal-
ing with people. I don't want
to shave it
My sister-in-law is recover-
ing from cancer, and my wife
thinks I'll look like a jerk if I
refuse to comply. I'm not part
of the wedding party, but I am
the head usher and will be
in many of the family photos.
Is her request appropriate?
My father-in-law has a beard,
but he hasn't been asked to
shave it CONFLICTED IN
CANADA
DEAR CONFLICTED:
Your letter reminds me of
the ones I have printed about
brides who don't want anyone
associated with their wedding
to be overweight, tattooed
or have an unusual hairdo.
They're so preoccupied with


Abigail Van Buren
www.dearobby.com

how things will look that
they forget there are people,
not mannequins or puppets,
involved.
You should not have to
shave your beard in order to
be an usher. Offer your sister-
in-law a choice: Either you
can remain as you are, or she
can find someone else to steer
her guests to their seats. Do
not be confrontational about
it The choice will be hers.
** ** **
DEAR ABBY: You often
advise readers who have the
time to reach out and volun-
teer. There's a little-known
program in every state that
was mandated by a 1978
amendment to the "Older
Americans Act." It's the Long
Term Care Ombudsman
Program. Its goal is to help
assure that long-term care
facility residents live harmoni-
ously and with dignity, feeling
free to voice complaints or
concerns without reprisal.
There's a need nationwide
for volunteers to make this
program work. The ultimate
goal is to have one volun-
teer in each nursing home.


After training is completed,
volunteers spend eight to 16
hours a month visiting their
assigned nursing homes.
They talk with the residents
and observe conditions. If
there's a complaint, they take
it to their regional ombuds-
man for resolution.
Once residents get to
know and trust you, they will
share wonderful life stories.
Some of them have no one to
talk to, no visitors or family.
A volunteer ombudsman is
the voice for those who have
none, and helps to make each
community a better place to
live for all its residents.
The nursing homes like to
have volunteer ombudsmen
visit their facilities because
they want to provide the
best care possible for their
residents. JILL IN VAN
BUREN, ARK.
DEAR JILL: Forgive me if
this seems cynical, but soine
do and some don't which
is exactly why it's so impor-
tant that there are trained
observers willing to regularly
visit nursing home patients
to ensure they are properly
'cared for. Readers, this is
important work. If you are
interested in volunteering,
contact your local social ser-
vices agency, Department of
Aging or search online for the
word "ombudsman" and the,
state in which you reside.
* Write Dear Abby at
www.DearAbby.com or
P.O. Box 69440, Los
Angeles, CA 90069.


HOROSCOPES


ARIES (March 21-April 19):
A little ingenuity. coupled x ith
luck. will result in a financial
gain. Getting out with friends
or taking part in activities con-
ducixe to networking will bring
about a good connection to
someone who has as much to
offer as Nou. *****r
TAURUS (April 20-May 20):
Common sense and practical
application will be required.
Avoid anyone who wants
something for nothing or who
is playing mind games. The
best place to invest your cash
is in you. Sign up for a course
that will help you get ahead.

GEMINI (May 21-June 20):
Focus on pampering, shop-
ping or updating your image.
You need a break that will
allow you to live, love and
laugh. A change will encour-
age you to take on new adven-
tures. Include the things you
enjoy most in your itinerary.
Romance is. highlighted.

CANCER (June 21-July 22):
Don't get caught up in other
people's problems when you
should be spending time
doing what makes you happy.
Entertaining friends will set


THE LAST WORD
Eugenia Word

the mood for a fun time and
enhance your relationship
with someone you cherish.
A creative hobby will bring
pleasure. *****
LEO (July 23-Aug. 22):
Don't give in to emotional
blackmail. Keep on top of all
your expenditures or you may
overpay for something you
really don't need. Before you
travel down a path you know
little about, do your research.
Mistakes will be difficult to
reverse. ***
VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22):
Participate in an activity that
interests you and you will get
a better handle on what you
can do to improve your life.
If you have to overspend to
impress someone, reconsider
the relationship. k****
LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22):
Not everyone will be happy
with your choices, but you
have to satisfy your own needs
first. Concentrate on being
unique and expanding your
expertise and skills. A change
of plans will allow you to do
something you've wanted to


CELEBRITY CIPHER
by Luis Campos
Celebrity Cipher cryplogramsa re atetd ro quotlalons by famous people, past and present
Each tter in the ciphor .tands for another.
TODAY YS CLUE: S equals V
"OM OVNNVTP V N LT EXWSX HX F VPR
OX LFX DVPR TI VOAGXNNVTP LFWL
Y, VEE OWDX VL XWNVXG ITG LFTNX
YFT ITEETY." OWGVWP WPRXG N'TP
PREVIOUS SOLUTION: "The women's movement completely changed
attitudes all over the world in ways we'll never be able to count." Holly Near

(c) 2011 by NEA, Inc. 8-8


do for a long time. ***
SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov.
21): Size up your situation
and consider your profession-
al alternatives. You can get
ahead, but you may have to
change the way you present
what you have to offer. Don't
be fooled into thinking you
can get something for noth-
ing. Prepare to do your fair
share. ***
SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-
Dec. 21): It will be difficult to
hide your emotions. Honesty
will help you stay out of trou-
ble. A love relationship can
be enhanced if you make the
changes necessary to accom-
modate someone you feel is
special. Plan a day trip that
will allow you to express your
intentions. ***
CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan.
19): You may have second
thoughts about how to improve
your financial situation. Getting
rid of some of your overhead
will be a good place to begin.
Once you feel secure, you will
be able to commit to someone
or something you feel strongly
about. ***
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb.
18): You can reinvent what
you have to offer, apply for
a new position or redo your
resume to better suit the
changing economic climate.
Strive for greater security in
your personal life. ****
PISCES (Feb. 19-March
20): Fix up your living space
or use what you have at home
to create additional income
opportunities. Come up with
ideas that combine your skills
and experience to create a
prosperous service. **


SUNDAY CROSSWORD


SEPARATE CHECKS By Pamela Klawitter / Edited by Will Shortz l192 13 405I67 8 11(12-13 14 15 1 6 617-


Across
1 When repeated,
advantageous to
.' both sides
'4 71 atrswers in this
puzzle
9 Get used to it
14 Several CBS
dramas
18 ".__ Story: A
Journey of
Hope" (Jenna
Bush best seller)
20 Expect
21 French toast
piece?
22 It might be
pulled
23 Pompeii, e.g.
24 Bride in "The
Gondoliers"
25 "What the Butler
Saw"
playwright, 1969
26 Noted diamond
family name
27 See circled
letters in 76-
/109-Down
30 Restless walker
32 Title character in
a 2009 Sandra
Bullock
crossword film
33 "Well, I'll be!"
34 "Told ya so!"
looks
36 "Fear is pain
rising from the
anticipation of
": Aristotle
39 Wampum, e.g.
41 Endangered

For any three answers,
call from a touch-tone
hone: 1-900-285-5656,
1.49 each minute; or,
with a credit card, 1-800-
814-5554.


44 ... in 119-1120-
Across
48 Sweetheart
50 Sweetheart
51 Part bfa pack?
52 Panamanians and
Peruvians
53 1960 Olympics
host
54 Duel tool
55 Radii, e.g.
57 Cut
58 Some drink
garnishes
59 Place for some
animal baiting
60 Sharpness
62 Bit of physics
63 Hostess's
Balls
64 ... in 216-1117-
Across
67 Summer letters
70 Enter, for one
72 Give a hard time
73 Check, as one's
numbers
76 Huntee in a game
79 Mounted
80 Authorizes
81 "Of thee"
follower
82 Michael Jordan,
e.g.
83 Conservative
side
85 Comparison's
middle
86 T. S. of literature
87 Neither more nor
less, in France
88 ... in 39-/60-
Down
90 Item in a
restaurant basket
92 Virus named for
a river
94 French CD holder


95 Enemy of a
Medici
97Composition of
many a cask
-98 Techie's hangout,
102 It may have
sand in it
103 ... in 17-143-
Down
109 User-edited Web
site
S110 Words on a
sandwich board
112 Emerson's "
Beauty"
113 "The
Neverending
Story" writer
114 Upper class?
115 First woman to
teach at the
Sorbonne
116 "Think" or
"Think
different".
117 They're
stranded, briefly
118 Times past
119 Best ___
120 Rear's rear?
121 Radiator sound

Down
1 Hospital wings
2 Language akin to
Kalaallisut
3 Like Gomer Pyle
4 See
5 Had a balance
6 Dry's partner
7 Not yet final, at
law
8 Leaves a crooked
trail
9 Owned up to
10 ___ Marquez,
Nickelodeon
cartoon girl


11 ___-at-law: Abbr.
12 Master
13 Game with a
setter
I14'... in 1-14-Across
15 Pitcher's place
16 out?"
(poker query)
17 Merchandise ID
19 Cowardly sound
28 Unfold
29 Miami squad
31 Dada figure
35 Tightfisted sort
37 Silliness
38 Missing, as the
start of a party
39 The U.N.'s
Ki-moon
40 Definitely not
Felix Unger
types
42 Pastore"
(Mozart opera)
43 Honorary law
degs.
44 Inches for
pinches
45 Buenos
46 Lake ___,
Switzerl nd/Fran
ce separator
47 Some tails, for
short
49 Add to, perhaps
53 Uncle ___
54 Brief word of
caution
56 ... in 12-135-
Down
57 Pulitzer-winning
Sheehan
60 France from
France
61 "Do You Hear
What I Hear?,"
e.g.


62 "In case you
didn't hear me

65 1970s TV spinoff
66 Wrap for a queen
68 Big bargain
69 Ankle supports
71 Piece of work?
-74 Even chances
75 A perfect score
on it is 180:
Abbr.
76 Daily weather
datum


77 Aoki of the
World Golf Hall
of Fame
78 Off-road
specialist
79 2003
Affleck/Lopez
flick
80 Century 21
competitor
83 "I'm listening"
84 ___ leash
87 "View of Toledo"
artist


88 U.K. carrier,
once
89 Word with cherry
or cotton
91 Rush igniter
93 Offshore
accommodations
96 Actors' grp.
99 Sally ___
teacakess)
100 Show-biz father
and son
101 Graceful word?


102 Program
coordinator?
104 Vituperate
105 Japanese noodle
106 Part of AARP:
Abbr.
107 Small: Suffix
108 Outlet
109 Mode
111 Strauss's
"Ariadne
Naxos"


Answers to last Sunday's Crossword.
ACE ASCAP CORAL NOAHS
MRX E SMART ARETE T 0E P R A H
BOXSCORES INISEI T E T R A
L 0 0 P HOLE RASCAL 0 N E A L

ENN CALLEDOUTATF I RST

E T E C P R10 1P E
I A M A 015 L E N DRK A R E

E NI G F0 R E F E 0N C B

5 P LT 5 ETTLILACI N K
ST G F T EST T




Io s SA IT O R C -O N
S 0 T TI MI ETH E I F T HI P L E
R E 0 R IE L IIIEIF R E A L T 0 R S
A V 0 I A D A RN FU L L C0 U N T
G I L D A M I S T S A I L E T I E
G L E E M A N T S Y S ST A T.S N S E R


57 9 2 8


8 6 4


6 28 7 5


2 1 3 9


7 9 5


1 9 7


3 5 1


4 6


32 45


L 9 L 8 6 L 9 Z

6 8 9 1L 9S1 L



L Z 9 91 L8 6


SE L 6 L 9 8 9 V


9 1v LzE 8 9 6 86L


9 6 8 l7 L 9 Z


S L 9 L I 8 1Z6 9

V L 6 9 9 8 L 8



8 9 ZLS 6 17 L 9


Page Editor: Emogene Graham, 754-0415









Page Editor: Robert Bridges, 754-0428


4D LAKE CITY F, E PC -:-E- LIFE SL '.',AY, AUGUST 7. 2011


Unemployment apps tick down to 400K


By CHRISTOPHER S.
RUGABER
AP Economics Writer

WASHINGTON The
number of people seeking
unemployment benefits
dipped last week, a sign the
job market may be improv-
ing slowly.
Weekly applications for
unemployment benefits
edged down 1,000 to a sea-
sonally adjusted 400,000,
the Labor Department said
Thursday. That's the low-
est level in four months.
The previous week's figure
was revised upward from
398,000 to 401,000.
The four-week average, a
less volatile figure, dropped
for the fifth straight week
to 407,750. That suggests
there is a downward trend
in layoffs.
Applications "have been
grinding lower, and this
week's result is at least not
bad news, which at this
point feels pretty good,"
said Robert Kavcic, an
economist at BMO Capital
markets, in an email.
Stocks fell sharply in
morning trading as inves-
tors continued to worry
about the struggling econo-
mies in Europe and slow
growth in the U.S. The
Dow Jones industrial aver-
age dropped more than 208
points. Broader indexes
also fell.
Unemployment benefit
applications have been at or
above 400,000 for 17 weeks.
They fell in February to
375,000, a level that signals
healthy job growth. They
stayed below 400,000 for
two months. But applica-
tions then surged to an
eight-month high of 478,000
in April and have declined
slowly since then.
A key question is wheth-
er applications can keep
declining. Companies
announced more layoffs
in July, according to out-
placement firm Challenger,
Gray & Christmas, push-
ing planned job cuts to a
16-month high. That could
mean benefit applica-
tions will climb in coming
months.
The report comes a day
before the government will
release the July employ-
ment figures. Economists
forecast that Friday's report
will show that employers
added a net total of 90,000
jobs. The unemployment
rate is expected to remain
unchanged at 9.2 percent.
That would be an
improvement from June,
when the economy added
just 18,000 the fewest in
nine months. But at least
three times as many new
jobs are needed to substan-
tially reduce the unemploy-
ment rate.
Many large companies
have cut jobs in recent
weeks. Cisco Systems Inc.,


the world's largest maker of
computer-networking gear,
last month said it is elimi-
nating 6,500 positions, or
about 9 percent of its world-
wide work force of 73,000.
And Lockheed Martin said
in June that it will cut 2,700
jobs.
Employers are pulling
back as the economy strug-
gles.
The economy grew at an
annual rate of only 1.3 per-
cent in the April-June peri-
od after barely expanded
in the first three months of
this year. Growth was less
than 1 percent in the first
half of the year, the weakest
stretch since the recession
officially ended.
Manufacturers expand-
ed at their slowest pace in
two years in July, a private
trade group said Monday.
The Institute for Supply
Management also said that
expansion among retailers,
restaurants, financial ser-
vices and service industries
slowed to a 17-month low
in July.
Much of the slowdown
stems from a spike in gas
prices since last year. That
has limited what consumers
can spend on discretionary
goods, such as furniture,
electronics, and appliances.
Spending on those catego-
ries has fallen for three
straight months.
Manufacturing output
has also been hit by sup-
ply disruptions that result-
ed from Japan's March 11
earthquake. Those disrup-
tions caused auto compa-
nies in the U.S. to reduce
production.
Economists had predict-
ed the economy would turn
around in the second half of
the year once those tempo-
rary factors began to fade.
But many are now more
pessimistic. about the
second half of this year.
Goldman Sachs recently
cut its estimate for growth.
in the July-September peri-
od to 2.5 percent from 3.25
percent. JPMorgan, mean-
while, has reduced its esti-
mate to 1.5 percent, from
as high as 3 percent several
weeks ago.
Growth of about 2.5 per-
cent is barely enough to
reduce the unemployment
rate. The economy would
need to grow 5 percent for
a whole year to bring down
the rate by one percentage
point.
The number of people
receiving benefits rose
10,000 to 3.73 million. But
that doesn't include mil-
lions of additional unem-
ployed workers receiving
extended benefits under
emergency programs
enacted during the reces-
sion. All told, 7.6 million
people received unem-
ployed benefits in the
week ending July 16, the
latest data available.


Halliburton human resource associates Heather Hopkins, left, and Sonja Franks, center rear, meet with attendees at a
National Career Fairs job fair July 13 in Dallas. Fewer people sought unemployment benefits last week, an encouraging sign
the job market may be slowly improving.


i ASSOCIATED PRESS
Job seeker Pamela Salyers, right, discusses her job search with David Serrell, a supervisor at the Texas Workforce
Commission, during her visit to the Workforce Solutions of Greater Dallas job resource center in Richardson, Texas. The num-
ber of people seeking unemployment benefits dipped last week, a sign the job market may be improving slowly.


CAMP: Helping build character

Continued From Page 1D


Campers also learn public speaking, do
devotional and Bible reading, learn about
black history and about making healthy
life choices. Other activities include wash-
ing cars for the elderly, touring both
Florida Gateway College and Edward
Waters College and eating at Gondolier
Italian Restaurant and Pizza to learn and
practice table manners and etiquette.
"We just want our kids to know how
to behave when they're going out,"
Montgomery said. "We love kids so we
want our kids to be better citizens."
"If no one takes the time to mentor
them and teach them and role model for
them, then their actions become unpre-
dictable," Thomas said.
The overall lesson is building charac-
ter so children are ready for the choices
they'll be faced with in life, Thomas said.
"I think if you have positive character,
you're going to be able to separate your-
self from the inappropriate actions," he
said.
Arsenio Perry, 12, of Lake City is in his
second year of camp. He said learning
about character helps to become a better
person.
"It's important because if you have
character, people will respect you and you
can make a good person of yourself," he
said.
Antonio Williams, 11, of Lake city


agreed.
"When you get older, you'll be educated
in those things and you'll become a better
person as you grow," Williams said.
Children can also influence each other
with what they've learned, Thomas said.
"If you go through a camp like this, you
might be able to pull that person aside
and say, 'Look, you're doing this wrong,
let's try it this way. I've been taught to
do this another way,'" Thomas said. "A
peer sometimes listens better to another
peer than they do to an adult authority at
times, especially when they're angry."
Both Thomas and Montgomery said
they have already seen how the camp has
helped children change, as they'll over-
hear campers correcting each other or
changing their own behavior in attitude
and conversation.
"When my back is turned, they say,
'What is character?'" Thomas said. "Then
that lets me know they're listening to
what is being taught to them."
Hopefully what children learn at camp
will help them stay focused in future
endeavors, Thomas said, like going to col-
lege.
"I think one day when they get ready
to go to college, they'll see what we're
trying to tell them and it'll actually set in,"
he said. "I think we've laid that foundation
for them."


Lewis, MDA mum on


reasons for his leaving


By OSKAR GARCIA
Associated Press

LAS VEGAS Comedian Jerry Lewis.
and the Muscular Dystrophy Association
aren't saying why they're fully parting
ways after 45 years and raising more
than $1 billion for the nonprofit through
its annual telethon.
But the 85-year-old comedian told
reporters last week that he plans to hold
a press conference the day after this
year's telethon to talk about what he
thinks is important. When pressed by a
reporter about his role with the telethon,
Lewis said: '"It's none of your business."
The association announcedWednesday
that was no longer its national chairman
and he would not appear on the telethon
this year. Candi Cazau, a Las Vegas-based
publicist for Lewis, declined comment to
The Associated Press on Thursday, say-
ing Lewis was traveling outside Nevada,
his home state.
Jim Brown, spokesman for the
Tuscon, Ariz.-based Muscular Dystrophy
Association, declined to say what prompt-
ed the announcement.
In May, Lewis said in a statement
issued through the association that he


would make his final appearance on the
telethon this year and sing "You'll Never
Walk Alone" during a six-hour primetime
broadcast scheduled for Sept. 4.
But during a session with report-
ers last week at a Television Critics
Association press tour to promote an
upcoming TV documentary, "Method
to the Madness of Jerry Lewis," Lewis
hinted that his involvement in raising
money for muscular dystrophy research
wasn't finished.
"Who told you that?" Lewis asked a report-
er who asked him how he felt about this year
being his last telethon. "I never read it."
"Do you remember when the New
York Times printed, 'Dewey wins'? I rest
my case, pal," Lewis said. "Anything you
read, read it twice."
Lewis also harshly criticized real-
ity television shows that include heavy
involvement from telethon co-hosts Nigel
Lythgoe and Alison Sweeney. Lythgoe is
executive producer of "American Idol,"
which Lewis called a singing competi-
tion of "McDonald's wipeouts," while
Sweeney hosts weight-loss show "The
Biggest Loser."
Associated Press writerJacques Billeaud
in Phoenix contributed to this report.