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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028308/01628
 Material Information
Title: The Lake City reporter
Uniform Title: Lake City reporter (Lake City, Fla. 1967)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: John H. Perry
Place of Publication: Lake City Fla
Publication Date: 8/6/2011
Frequency: daily (monday through friday)[<1969>-]
weekly[ former 1967-<1968>]
daily
normalized irregular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Lake City (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Columbia County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Columbia -- Lake City
Coordinates: 30.189722 x -82.639722 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 95, no. 4 (Oct. 5, 1967)-
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000358016
oclc - 33283560
notis - ABZ6316
lccn - sn 95047175
sobekcm - UF00028308_01569
System ID: UF00028308:01628
 Related Items
Preceded by: Lake City reporter and Columbia gazette

Full Text




To Jags fans Jobs report
Sports writer Numbers are
~ in on good enough to
LE OF- 1 DIGIT 325 -- Wall Street.
s 3 e, 3A
G,P-I I O F LORTIDZ._
-'!!-T~i! LE FL 2G1 -_I-9-4 3


Lake City


FAA deal
Partial two-week
shutdown comes
to an end.
Story below


Reporter


Saturday, August 6, 2011 www.lakecityreporter.com Vol. 137, No. 164 l 75 cents


County

to unveil

budget

Thursday

By TONY BRITT
tbritt@lakecityreporter.com
Columbia County officials will
unveil the 2011-12 budget during a
9 a.m. workshop Thursday at the
Columbia County School Board
Complex Auditorium, 372 W. Duval
St.
Dale Williams, county manager,
said the workshop will serve as the
first budget Workshop to include
county staff and the board of coun-
ty commissioners, during which a
presentation of the upcoming fiscal
year's floor budget will be included.
The floor budget is the budget that
would maintain the current level of
service now being provided by the
county, subject to any changes that
were approved by the county com-
missioners during the year.
"This is the same type of work-
shop that we have each year," he
said. "I will present a floor budget to
the county and there are also some
people who will speak regarding the
budget requests most of them
being outside agencies."
County staff hopes to present and
explain the budget, get feedback from
commissioners and use the respons-
es to make tweaks and adjustments
desired by commissioners.
"Ultimately we'll have a budget
that we'll advertise in anticipation of
the first budget hearing, which is in
September," Williams said.
Williams said he expects to make
additions and deletions to the bud-
get before the budget is eventually
adopted following a second public
hearing.
"This is workshop and the board
of county commissioners normally
doesn't receive any public com-
ments," Williams said. "This is their
opportunity to ask questions and
try to come to an understanding of
any problems and issues they may
have."


Contractor

pocketed

cash, say

authorities
From staff reports

LIVE OAK- ASuwannee County
contractor was arrested Thursday,
for allegedly using construction
funds to pay personal bills, accord-
ing to Suwannee sheriff's reports.
Matthew Steven Thomas, 31,
of O'Brien, was
charged with
grand theft and
booked into the
Suwannee County
Jail. He has since
been released.
According to
Thomas information from
the Suwannee
County Sheriff's
Office, Thomas was hired by the
victim to do some concrete work,
for which he was paid $200 for labor
and $405 for the concrete.
Thomas failed to pay for the con-
crete and he admitted to authorities
that h used some of the money to
pay his rent, reports said.


Puppy p

Detection dogs in
training socialized
by CARC clients.

By ANTONIA ROBINSON
arobinson@lakecityreporter.com
Puppy kisses and more
are soon coming to the
CARC Advocates for
Citizens with Disabilities
Inc. on a weekly basis.
The CARC is working with the
Lake City Correctional Facility,
Corrections Corporation of
America to help train future detec-
tion dogs who will ultimately work
with military, federal, state and
local law enforcement, said Amber
Baughman, CARC executive direc-
tor. Clients will get to participate in
the fun part of the program for a
few hours each week.
"Basically CARC's clients and
staff get to play with' the puppies
to increase their socialization," she
said.
Wesley Thomas, CCA program
manager, spoke about the program
to the clients and brought along
Ariat, a 4-and-a-half month old
chocolate Labrador, Friday.
CCA partnered with Auburn
University's Canine Detection
Research Institute for the Canine
Detection Development Program
in April. The program places pup-
pies in facilities such as CCA for
training and .socialization. CCA will
have a total of 18 Labradors and
German short haired pointers by .
next week.
Puppies are brought to the facili-
ty between 12 and 15 weeks old, he
said. The puppies stay in the cell
with inmates who work as handlers
and sitters. Handlers take care of
the puppies around the clock.
The inmates go through a series
of basic training steps with the pup-
pies during the process, Thomas
said. They are also taken to social-
ize with other groups outside the
facility.
CARC continued on 3A


- for a purpose


FAA up and running again


By JOAN LOWY
Associated Press


to work and hundreds of airport construction
projects to resume.
Employing the so-called "unanimous consent"


WASHINGTON The Senate approved leg- procedure which took less than 30 seconds,
isolation Friday ending a two-week partial shut- two senators were present to approve a House-
down of the Federal Aviation Administration and passed bill extending FAA's operating authority
President Barack Obama signed it into law, clear-
ing the way for thousands of employees to return FFA continued on 3A


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Sen. Barbara Boxer, D-Calif., right, points to a photo of a control tower being built in Palm Springs,
Calif., that suffered some damage while under construction, during a news conference on Capitol Hill in
Washington. With her from left are: House Minority Whip Steny Hoyer of Md., Sen. Jay Rockefeller, D-W.Va.,
and Sen. Charles Schumer, D-N.Y


ANTONIA R6BINSON/ Lake
City Reporter
ABOVE: Wesley
Thomas of CCA
holds Ariat for
Jenny Evely to
caress Friday at
the CARC group
home. LEFT:
Gordon Jackson
pets Ariat as
Michelle Murrey
and Thoma looks
on.


ccso

captain

to serve

on state

board
From staff reports

Columbia County
Sheriff's Office Capt.
Bennie G. Coleman has
been appointed to the state
Criminal Justice Standards
and Training Commission.
Coleman, appointed to
the com-
mission by
Gov. Rick
Scott, will
serveafour-
year term.
Coleman
is the
Coleman
Commanderofthe Columbia
County Detention Facility.
The mission of the
Criminal Justice Standards
and Training Commission
is to ensure that all citizens
CCSO continued on 3A


.-6


CALL US:
(386) 752-1293
SUBSCRIBE TO
THE REPORTER:
Voice: 755-5445
1 Fax: 752-9400


96
T-Storm


7 5
Chance


WEATHER, 2A


O pinion ................
People ..................
Advice & Comics........
Puzzles .................


TODAY IN
PEOPLE
Planet of the
Apes' prequel.


COMING
SUNDAY
Mission to
Ukraine.









LAKE CITY REPORTER DAILY BRIEFING SATURDAY. AUGUST 6, 2011


Celebrity Birthdays


Friday:
Afternoon: 3-9-6
Evening: N/A


layD Friday:
Afternoon: 6-5-2-3
S-.. Evening: N/A


smzatd
.. "" Thursday:
15-20-30-34-35


PEOPLE IN THE NEWS


Simians rise to next level in Apes' prequel


LOS ANGELES
There's no disputing the
evolution of Hollywood
apes since "King Kong"
first terrorized audiences
in 1933.
Back then, the king of the apes
was a fur-covered puppet In the old
"Planet of the Apes" tales, simians
were played by people in ape suits.
Today's movie apes have gone
,digital.
The prequel "Rise of the Planet
of the Apes," which opened in U.S.
theaters Friday, features chimpan-
zees, gorillas and orangutans crafted
.through performance-capture, in
,which the motions and features of
"human actors were recorded digital-
ly, then layered over with computer
animation to create photo-realistic
primates.
It's the same technology used for
the giant gorilla in Peter Jackson's
2005 "King Kong," with the same
actor who did Kong, Andy Serkis,
playing the lead chimp in the "Apes"
prequel.
Serkis said it greatly enhanced the
story's authenticity for him to be on
set and in character as chimpanzee
Caesar alongside James Franco,
Freida Pinto and other co-stars play-
ing the human roles. That's even
though he was dressed in a skintight
outfit covered with reference dots for
the digital cameras and wearing a rig
on his head to record facial expres-
sions.
He didn't look remotely like a
chimpanzee, but he had freedom of
movement and expression the actors
lacked on 1968's original "Planet of
the Apes," whose makeup earned
the film an honorary Academy
Award.

We still Love Lucy,
who would be 100
LOS ANGELES We loved Lucy
and we still do.
On the 100th anniversary of her'


* Jazz musician Charlie
Haden is 74.
* Actor-director Peter Bonerz
is 73.
* Actress Louise Sorel is 71.
* Actor Michael Anderson Jr.
is 68.
* Actor Ray Buktenica is 68.
* Actor Dorian Harewood is
61.
* Actress Catherine Hicks
is 60.
* Rock singer Pat


MacDonald (Timbuk 3) is 59.
* Country musician Mark
DuFresne (Confederate
Railroad) is 58.
* Actress Stepfanie Kramer
is 55.
* Actress Faith Prince is 54.
* Rhythm-and-blues singer
Randy DeBarge is 53.
* Actor Leland Orser is 51.
* Movie writer-director M.
Night Shyamalan is 41.
* Actress Vera Farmiga is 38.


Daily Scripture
"The unfolding of your words
gives light; it gives understand-
ing to the simple."
Psalm 119:130

Thought for Today


Caesar the chimp, a CG animal portrayed by Andy Serkis, and actor James
Franco are shown in a scene from 'Rise of the Planet of the Apes.' The prequel
features chimpanzees, gorillas and orangutans crafted through performance-cap-
ture, which is the same technology used for the giant gorilla in Peter Jackson's
2005 'King Kong.'


birth today and 60
years since "I Love
Lucy" first aired,
Lucille Ball's legacy
remains remarkable
and her talent
remarkably fresh
Ball and watchable.
B Consider other
popular sitcoms that aired alongside
Ball and Desi Arnaz's show during
its 1951-to-1957 life span on CBS.
"The Adventures of Ozzie & Harriet"
ana "Father Knows Best," among
others, are period Americana that
evoke sweet nostalgia far more than
laughs.

Idol finalist raises
disease awareness
CHICAGO "American Idol"
finalist Casey Abrams wants
Midwesterners with intestinal dis-
eases to join a national awareness
campaign. ,
Abrams has ulcerative colitis.
He's Working with the Crohn's and
Colitis Foundation of America to


inspire people living
with intestinal bowel
'diseases to live their
dreams.
The 20-year-old
singer finished sixth
on "American Idol"
Abrams during season 10. ,
Abrams He won a spot on
the summer tour. It's bringing him
Friday to Chicago, near where he
grew up in Wilmette.

Actress who played Cha
Cha in 'Grease' dies
LOS ANGELES Actress
Annette Charles, 63, perhaps best-
known for her role as Cha Cha
DiGregorio in "Grease," has died.
A longtime friend, Los Angeles
Councilman Tom LaBonge, said
she died Wednesday night in Los
Angeles after a battle with cancer.
Her death comes about two
months after the death of "Grease"
actor Jeff Conaway, whose character
Kenickie was Cha Cha's date.
m Associated Press


"The more things you do, the
more you can do."


Lucille Ball,
American actress (1911-1989)


Lake City Reporter


HOW TO REACH US
Main number ........(386) 752-1293
Fax number .............752-9400
Circulation ..............755-5445
Online... www.lakecityreporter.com
The Lake City Reporter, an affiliate of
Community Newspapers Inc., is pub-
lished Tuesday through Sunday at 180
E. Duval St., Lake City, Fla. 32055.
Periodical postage paid at Lake City, Fla.
Member Audit Bureau of Circulation and
The Associated Press.
All material herein is property of the Lake
City Reporter. Reproduction in whole or
in part is forbidden without the permis-
sion of the publisher. U.S. Postal Service
No. 310-880.
POSTMASTER: Send address changes
to Lake City Reporter, P.O. Box 1709,
Lake City, Fla. 32056.
Publisher Todd Wilson .....754-0418
(twilson@lakecityreporter.com)
NEWS
Editor Robert Bridges .....754-0428
(rbridges@lakecityreporter.com)
ADVERTISING
Director Ashler Butcher .. .754-0417
(abutcher@lakecityreporter.com)
CLASSIFIED
To place a classified ad, call 755-5440


BUSINESS
Controller Sue Brannon... .754-0419
(sbrannon@lakecityreporter.com)
CIRCULATION
Home delivery of the Lake City Reporter
should be completed by 6:30 a.m.
Tuesday through Saturday, and by 7.30
a.m. on Sunday.
Please call 386-755-5445 to report any
problems with your delivery service.
In Columbia County, customers should
call before 10:30 a.m. to report a ser-
vice error for same day re-delivery. After'
10:30 a.m., next day re-delivery or ser-
vice related credits will be issued.
In all other counties where home delivery
is available, next day re-delivery or ser-
vice related credits will be issued.
Circulation ...............755-5445
(circulation@lakecityreporter.com)
Home delivery rates
(Tuesday through Sunday)
12 Weeks.................: $26.32
24 Weeks................... $48.79
52 Weeks ................... $83.46
Rates include 7% sales tax.
Mail rates
12 Weeks.................. $41.40
24 Weeks....................$82.80
52 Weeks....... t.......... $179.40


CORRECTION

The Lake City Reporter corrects errors of fact in news
items. If you have a concern, .question or suggestion, please
call the executive editor. Corrections and clarifications will run
in this space. And thanks for reading.'


NASA: Spacecraft
on trip to Jupiter
CAPE CANAVERAL-
A sun-powered robotic
explorer named Juno rock- .
eted away Friday on a five-
year journey to Jupiter, the
solar system's most mas-
sive and ancient planet.
Hundreds of scientists
and their families and
friends watched from just
a few miles away, cheer-
ing and yelling, "Go Juno!"
as the NASA spacecraft
soared into a clear midday
.sky atop an unmanned
,rocket.
Juno is solar powered,
a first for a spacecraft
meant to roam so far from
:the sun. It has three huge
;solar panels that were
folded for launch. Once
,opened, they should each
stretch as long and wide as
,a tractor-trailer. Previous
spacecraft to the outer
:planets have relied on
'nuclear energy.

'Man accused of
:beating toddler
ORLANDO -
'Authorities said a
26-year-old Orlando man
faces first-degree murder
-charges for the beating
'death of his girlfriend's
-2-year-old son.
Orlando police arrested
Bosichell Radford was
arrested Thursday. They
said he beat Isaiah Shade
over several days in July
when the child's mother
left for work. He also faces
aggravated child abuse
charges.

Scott's popularity
improving slightly
TALLAHASSEE Gov.
Rick Scott still isn't the
most popular politician in
Florida these days, but his
numbers are looking up
a bit
A new Quinnipiac
(Conn.) University poll
released Friday shows


An Atlas V rocket with the Juno spacecraft lifts off from Space
Launch Complex-41 in Cape Canaveral on Friday. It was the
first step in Juno's 1.7 billion-mile voyage to the gas giant
Jupiter.


Scott's approval rating
improved 6 percentage
points since May. He now
has a job approval rating
of 35 percent Republicans
back Scott by a 61 percent
to 23 percent margin while
78 percent of Democrats
and half of all indepen-
dents don't like the way ,
the new governor is han-
dling his job.

Executives found
guilty of bribes
MIAMI A federal jury
in Miami has convicted
two former telecommuni-
cations executives for brib-
ing Haitian government
officials.
The jury deliberated
for five hours before con-
victing the former Terra
Telecommunications Corp.
executives Thursday after
a two-and-a-half week trial.
U.S. authorities said
the 'men bribed officials
at Haiti's state-owned tele-
communications company,
Haiti Teleco, to secure
more business for their
Miami-Dade County com-
pany.

Panhandle jet to
get new home
PANAMA CITY An
Air Force F-101 Voodoo
jet that's been a land-


mark outside Gulf Coast
Community College for 34
years is moving to a new
home in central Florida.
Officials said the jet will
be moved to the Veteran's
Memorial Center at
Merritt Island. No moving
date has been set.
Gulf Coast officials said
it would have cost nearly
$100,000 to renovate the
plane. They had sought
help from nearby Tyndall
Air Force Base. But offi-
cials there declined, saying
they didn't have the funds
to maintain the jet

4 found dead
after house fire
OCAIA Two women
and two children have
been found dead after a
north Florida house fire.
The Marion County
Sheriff's Office said the
victims had other injuries
and that the fire was not
the cause of their deaths.
Firefighters said a quar-
ter of the house northwest
of Ocala was burning
when they arrived at
12:53 a.m. Friday. All four
victims were found dead
inside.
Three of the victims
identified were CorDarrian
Hill, 8, CorDerica Hill, 6,
and Jocalyn Gray, 27.
Associated Press


THE WEATHER


CHANCE C HANCECHA CHANCE CHANCE CHANCE
OFIT- TOF T- OFT- OFT- j OFT-
STORMS STORMS STORMS STORMS STORMS

IS9 L 9 L 7L0o7 i 96U5 195L075 .195 L0 75 195 Lo 75


Pensacola
93/78


Tam
93/


TEMPERATURES
High Friday
Low Friday
Normal high
Normal low
Record high
Record low
PRECIPITATION
Friday
Month total
Year total
Normal month-to-date
Normal year-to-date


96
78
91
71
99,in 1935
67 in 1920

0.00"
2.15"
25.54"
1.05"
31.18"


Sunday
90 79 1
93 78 i
91/80/t
93/77/t
95/75/pc
95/78/t
90/81/sh
96/75/pc
91/79/t
92/77/t
94/76/pc
94/77/t
92/79/t
92/79/pc
95/79/t
92/80/t
96/77/t
91/77/t


Monday
91';7 i6
92, 78 1
91/81/pc
93/78/pc
.94/75/pc
95/77/t
91/81/sh
95/75/t
92/80/t
92/77/pc
93/76/pc
94/77/pc
93/80/t
93/80/pc
96/77/t
93/81/pc
96/76/t
92/79/t


97/75 City
S7 Jacksonville Cape Canaveral
Tallahassee Lake City 95 Daytona Beach
97/76 96t 75 Ft. Lauderdale
', r Gainesvile Daytona Beach Fort Myers
Panama City ,95/75 93 78 Gainesville
92,79 O\ cala \ JacksonviHe
,95/75 0 Jacksonville
K Ge _West


i Oriando Cape Canaveral ....
94/77 92/78 Lae i
pa *\ Naples
80/ West Palm Beach Ocala
93/78 e Orlando
Ft. Lauderdale Panama City
Ft Myers. 92/80 Pensacola
94/77 Naples Tallahassee
"90/78 Miami Tampa
KW 93/79 Valdosta
KeyWest* W. Palm Beach
91/81


SUN
Sunrise today
Sunset today
Sunrise tom.
Sunset tom.

MOON
Moonnse today
Moonset today
Moonnse tornm.
Moonset torn.


6:52 a.m.
8:20 p.m.
6:53 a.m.
8:19 p.m.

2:18 p.m.
12:13 a.m.
3:22 p.m.
1:00 a.m.


Aug. Aug. Aug. Aug.
6 13 21 27
First Full Last New


An exclusive
service
brought to
MlB our readers
10nmbitestol by
Today's
ultra-violet The Weather
radiation risk Channel.
for the area on
to 10+.

weather.com

Forecasts, data and
w et h graphics 2011 Weather
l Y!IV central, LP, Madison, W.
weather www.weatherpubllsher.com


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Page Editor: Jason M. Walker, 754-0430


I













Jobs report is good enough to calm Wall Street


By CHRISTOPHER S. RUGABER
AP Economics Writer

WASHINGTON Better.
The job market beat expectations, and
the stock market managed a modest gain
- not great, but good enough after a tur-
bulent week.
The nation added 117,000 jobs in July,
the government said Friday far from
what happens in a healthy economy, and
only good for a reduction of one notch in
the unemployment rate, to 9.1 percent.
But the jobs number beat the forecast of
economists, who were expecting no more
than 90,000. And it was an overwhelming
relief for investors, who just lived through
two of the most brutal weeks in Wall Street
history.
"Nothing to pop Champagne corks
over," said Diafie Swonk, chief economist
at Mesirow Financial, "but a much-needed
shot in the arm for confidence at a time
when we have so little."
The Dow Jones industrial average fin-
ished with a gain of 60.93 points and
closed at 11,444.61. It made up only a small
fraction of the losses from Thursday, when
the Dow dropped 512, its worst since the
financial crisis of 2008.
Friday was not exactly quiet for the
market, either.
At the start of trading, investors were
thrilled with the unemployment report,
and the Dow rose 171. Ten minutes later,


the gains were gone. Investors focused
on Europe, which is struggling to keep
Italy and Spain from being consumed by
a growing financial crisis, and the Dow
fell 243.
"The fear was that they had no plan
to deal with the situation," said Randy
Warren, chief investment officer at Warren
Financial Service.
Later in the day, Italy promised to work
toward a constitutional amendment to bal-
ance its budget. It was trying to calm
investors around the world, who are wor-
ried that financial problems are spreading
in Europe.
The Dow's gain was only its second in
the past 11 trading sessions. The average
has lost about 10 percent of its value in
that time. The Standard & Poor's 500, a
broader measure of the market, finished
just under 1,200, down a fraction of a
point.
It was the Dow's worst week since
March 2009, down 5.8 percent The S&P,
down 7.2 percent, and the Nasdaq com-
posite index, down 8.1 percent, had their
worst weeks since November of that year.
The gain of 117,000 jobs for the U.S.
economy looked even better consider-
ing that 37,000 public jobs disappeared
during the month. Most of those were
from a temporary government shutdown
in Minnesota.
Subtracting those government layoffs,
the private sector added 154,000 jobs for


the month. And the economy added 56,000
more jobs than first thought in May and
June.
Workers were paid more, too. Average
hourly wages showed the biggest monthly
gain since 2008. More jobs and better pay
means people have more cash to spend,


helping the economy grow.
And manufacturing companies added
24,000 jobs, which suggests that the sup-
ply disruptions caused by the Japan earth-
quake may be almost over. Makers of
cars and other products found themselves
short of parts after the disaster.


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Job seeker Manfred A. Lynch, left, speaks with a recruiter at a job fair in Arlington, Va. The
Labor Department announced Friday that hiring picked up slightly in July and the unemploy-
ment rate dipped to 9.1 percent as employers added 117,000 jobs.


FFA: Deal ends 2-week partial shutdown, puts thousands back to work

Continued From Page 1A


through mid-September. Democratic Sen.
James Webb of Virginia stood up,. called
up the bill and asked that it be passed. Sen.
Ben Cardin, D-Md., the presiding officer,
agreed and it was done.
Other lawmakers had scattered earlier
this week for Congress' August recess. And
Friday's finishing-business vote was as low
key as Congress gets, in marked contrast
to the noisy, intemperate and enervating
debt-limit battle of recent weeks.
Obama's signature" means nearly 4,000
furloughed FAA employees can return to
work as soon as Monday. The shutdown
has cost -the government abdut $400 mil-
lion in uncollected airline ticket taxes and
idled thousands of construction workers.
"This impasse was an unnecessary
strain on local economies across the coun-
try at a time when we can't allow politics
to get in the way of our economic recov-
ery," Obama said in a statement "So I'm
glad that this stalemate has finally been
resolved."
A bipartisan compromise reached
Thursday cleared the way for Senate pas-
sage of the House bill, which includes a


At a year old, the puppies are returned
to Auburn for more intense training.
Socialization is important to ensure the
puppies are able to efficiently perform
their duties, Thomas said. The dogs could
become nervous in a situation if they are
not used to interacting with a variety of
people.
"If they're not friendly or used to seeing
different types of people, it does no good
when they're a year old," he said.
To participate in the program, an
inmate must have a GED or high school
diploma, as well as a trade, Thomas said.
The inmate cannot received disciplinary
reports for a year and must go through an
interview process.
The program ultimately benefits both
CARC clients and the puppies by improv-
ing morale and socialization for both


of Florida are served by criminal justice
officers who are ethical, qualified and
well-trained. The announcement was made
Wednesday.
"I am very honored to have even
been considered by the Governor,"
Coleman said. "The actual appoint-
ment to the CJSTC is very humbling
and I look forward to serving the law
enforcement and corrections commu-
nity. I believe that my experience in
the field of corrections will serve the
Commission well."
Coleman retired from the Florida
Department of Corrections after 25 years


provision eliminating $16.5 million in air
service subsidies to 13 rural communi-
ties. But the bill also includes language
that gives Transportation Secretary Ray
LaHood the authority to continue subsi-
dized service to the 13 communities if he
decides it's necessary
Republicans had insisted on the subsidy
cuts as their price for restoring the FAA to
full operation.
Democrats said they expect the admin-
istration to effectively waive or negate the
cuts, although that won't happen right
away. That's because the cuts don't kick
in until existing contracts with airlines for
the subsidized service expire. The length
of those contracts varies by community.
The shutdown began when much of
Washington was transfixed by the stale-
mate over increasing the government's
debt limit During that time, the FAA fur-
loughed some workers but kept air traffic
controllers and most safety inspectors on
the job. Forty airport safety inspectors
worked without pay, picking up their own
travel expenses. Some 70,000 workers,
on construction-related jobs on airport


groups, Baughman said.
Thomas said the same applies to the
inmates.
"The program has actually done good,"
he said. "I've seen a big different in
morale as far as the inmates go. They're
enjoying it."
CCA also brings puppies to The Robert
E Jenkins Veteran's Domiciliary and
Lowe's for socialization, Thomas said. The
facility is also looking for more places
to socialize the puppies. Contact him for
more information at wesley.thomas@cca.
com.
Puppies will star coming Aug. 25 every
week to the CARC, Baughman said.
"Otir clients enjoyed Officer Thomas'
presentation, but most of all they enjoyed
playing with Ariat," she said.


as an assistant warden. He joined the
Columbia County Sheriff's Office in April
2007.
Columbia County Sheriff Mark Hunter
promoted Coleman to captain in 2009 and
made him commander of the detention
facility.
The commission is composed of 19
members, including three sheriffs, three
police chiefs, five law enforcement officers
who are neither sheriffs or chiefs who are
the rank of sergeant or below, one person
in charge of a county correctional institu-
tion, two correctional officers, one training
center director, a Florida resident, the


projects from Palm Springs, Calif., to New
York City were idled as the FAA couldn't
pay for the work.
But airline passengers in the busy trav-
el season hardly noticed any changes.
Airlines continued to work as normal, but
they were no longer authorized to collect


federal ticket taxes at a rate of $30 million
a day. For a few lucky ticket buyers, prices
dropped. But for most, nothing changed
because airlines raised their base prices to
match the tax.
White Hbuse Correspondent Ben Feller
contributed to this report.


Score a Home Run with Peoples State Bank.

*
H .





I- II


Let us come to your home field for all your
banking needs. We'll bring our bank to your
business.

Call Heather Turbeville, Christina Summers,
Cessie Cothran or Laurie Evans .


46IS D puy D vi L akeC tF o i a I w o rlsc mI F ind u nfc b
/ I

A I


CARC: Puppy play, but for a purpose

Continued From Page 1A


.CCSO: Local captain selected

Continued From Page 1A


LAKE CITY REPORTER NEWS SATURDAY. AUGUST 6, 2011


Page Editor: Robert Bridges, 754-0428












OPINION


Saturday, August 6, 201 I


www.lakecityreporter.com


AN


AN
OPINION


A new

start for

Congress?


I Congressional leaders came to
their senses on Thursday. ,With
74,000 people out of work and
more than 200 construction proj-
ects shut down, Senate President
Harry Reid announced a deal to
extend funding for the Federal
Aviation Administration.
The agency has been in a
partial shutdown since Congress
recklessly let its funding lapse on
July 23.
Our relief over the deal is
tempered with exasperation and
anger.
For nearly two weeks, the
FAA has been unable to collect
air-travel taxes, losing millions of
dollars a day in revenues.
Our fragile economy took
an avoidable hit, while workers
suffered needless anxiety and
financial hardship. It costs extra
money to close projects, even
temporarily, and it will cost more
money to restart them, with
hassle and expenses that include
rescheduling contractors.
The U.S. went to the verge
of default over the debt ceil-,
ing, which Congress has raised
repeatedly. Obviously, there were
hew dynamics at work, includ-
ing the huge federal deficit and
the "tea party" influence. But for
the public, it was hard to fathom
why the deal couldn't have been
reached earlier and with less
damage to U.S. power and pres-
tige.
Congress has battled for
years over long-term funding
for the FAA rules for union
organizing are a big issue but
it has passed 20 short-term
funding bills since September
2007. There was no reason to
stall out over the 21st, especially
'when the consequences were so
severe.
In a galling footnote for travel-
ers, many airlines raised their
fares when the FAA stopped
collecting taxes, pocketing extra
bucks instead of letting passen-
gers save money. Fortunately,
many are now doing a U-turn
and planning refunds.
The FAA agreement offers a
glimmer of hope that Congress
will try to head off future dead-
locks. We see a shred of possibil-
ity that members will find more
common ground.

The Arizona Republic

Lake City Reporter
Serving Columbia County
Since 1874
The Lake City Reporter is pub-
lished with pride for residents of
Columbia and surrounding counties by
Community Newspapers Inc.
We believe strong newspapers build
strong communities -"Newspapers
get things done!"
Our primary goal is to
publish distinguished and profitable
community-oriented newspapers.
This mission will be accomplished
through the teamwork of professionals
dedicated to truth, integrity and hard
'work.
Todd Wilson, publisher
Robert Bridges, editor
Sue Brannon, controller
Dink NeSmith, president
Tom Wood, chairman

LETTERS
POLICY
Letters to the Editor should be
typed or neatly written and double
spaced. Letters should not exceed
400 words and will be edited for
length and libel. Letters must be
signed and include the writer's name,
address and telephone number for
verification. Writers can have two
letters per month published. Letters
and guest columns are the opinion of
the writers and not necessarily that of
the Lake City Reporter.
BY MAIL: Letters, P.O. Box 1709,


Lake City, FL 32056; or drop off at
180 E. Duval St. downtown.
BY FAX: (386) 752-9400.
BY E-MAIL:
news@lakecityreporter.com


AFTER POPD&tN"OgE ULLT COMESRS S MA< nRSTr COT


Debt deal does virtually nothing


There is plenty to dis-
like about the recent-
ly enacted bipartisan
deal to cut spend-
ing and reduce the
national debt.
For starters, it neither cuts
spending, nor reduces the
national debt After weeks of
federal hand-wringing, taxpay-
ers should hope that our mas-
ters in Washington become seri-
ous about slashing spending. If
not, this republic will implode,
not eventually on "the children,"
but soon atop today's struggling
adults.
"The budget deal doesn't
cut federal spending at all,"
Cato Institute analyst Chris
Edwards explains. "The 'cuts'
in the deal are only cuts from
the:Congressional Budget
Office's 'baseline,' which is a
Washington construct of ever-
rising spending ... The federal
government will still run a defi-
cit of $1 trillion next year. This
deal will 'cut' the 2012 budget of
$3.6 trillion by just $22 billion,
or less than 1 percent"
Edwards observes that
Washington's "cuts" rarely
reduce anything. President
Barack Obama, for instance,
proposed boosting the
Corporation for Public
Broadcasting from $432 million
this year to $451 million in FY
2012. However, handing CPB
$441 million would constitute a
$10 million "cut" In Washington
versus a $9 million increase in '
the real-world.
Thus, as Edwards vividly
illustrates at Cato's downsizing-
governmentorg website, these
budget "cuts" actually rIaise fed-
eral discretionary spending non-
stop for the next 10 years from
$1.04 trillion in Fiscal Year 2012
to $1.23 trillion in FY 2021.
As for red ink, Washington
just extended the federal credit
card's limit from $14.3 trillion


Deroy Murdock
deroy.murdock@gmail.com
to $16.7 trillion. In 2021, the
national debt is expected to
reach $22 trillion a figure 54
percent above $14.3 trillion.
What debt reduction?
Washington refuses to learn
what millions of overextended
Americans recognize daily: One
cannot escape debt by tunneling
ever deeper into it.
Fitch, Moody's, and Standard
& Poor's monitor all of this and
are weighing whether or not to
scrap America's sterling AAA
credit rating. A debt downgrade
would hammer national pres-
tige, hike interest rates, and
heap short-term agony on an
already achy nation. However,
such a startling development
may supply the face-down-
in-the-gutter moment that
Washington's bipartisan spen-
daholics desperately need to hit
rock bottom, grow up, and enter
rehab. Everything else has
failed during the Bush-Obama
era of the ever-expanding state.
Meanwhile, the Select
Committee that will spring from
the debt deal may generate
some good news amid these
shadows. As it seeks at least
$1.5 trillion in spending cuts
by November 23, it should act
boldly to improve America's fis-
cal outlook:
A staggering $703 bil-
lion in allocated but unspent
revenues languish in federal'
accounts. Several Republicans
have sponsored bills to shift
this K2 of cash from dust col-
lection to debt reduction. I


have addressed these forgotten
funds so often that my computer
keyboard hurts. Will the Select
Committee finally listen?
The Catalog of Federal
Domestic Assistance includes
the People's Garden Grant
Program, Appalachian
Development Highway System,
and 2,182 other federal subsidy
programs. Many of these should
be terminated rather than
trimmed, so they never return
to menace taxpayers.
The Select Committee
should padlock entire depart-
ments (Agriculture, Education,
and Housing, for starters),
privatize other agencies (FAA,
National Weather Service,
NPR), and devolve many more
to the states via block grants'
(Medicaid, Food Stamps).
The Select Committee
should raise and index the
Social Security eligibility age
from 67 to 68 for those born
in the 1960s, 69 for children of
the '70s, etc. Medicare's age-65
threshold similarly should be
modernized for these cohorts.
Old-age benefits should reflect
life expectancy today, not in the
1930s and '60s, when they were
concocted.
'"We are less than three years
away from where Greece had
its debt crisis as to where they
were from debt to GDP," former
U.S. Comptroller General David
Walker told CNBC Tuesday.
'We are not exempt from a debt
crisis," he added. "We have seri-
ous interest rate risk. We have
serious currency risk. We have
serious inflation risk over time.
If it happens, it will be sudden,
and it will be very painful."
* New York commentator
Deroy Murdook is a columnist
with the Scripps Howard News
Service and a media fellow with
the Hoover Institution on War,
Revolution and Peace at Stanford
University.


Has Obama become irrelevant?


Third strike and you're
out?
President Barack
Obama has now
caved to short-sight-
edness three times: He reluctantly
agreed to extend the Bush-era
tax cuts for the well-to-do last
December, an hour before a gov-
ernment shutdown, he agreed to
what he called the deepest spend-
ing cuts in U.S. budget history; in
August he avoided a government
default by agreeing to massive
spending cuts and no revenue
increases.
He has built a huge war chest
for his reelection campaign in 2012,
but many are increasingly wonder-
ing if while Obama has been hon-
ing his skills at compromise he has
become irrelevant in the governing
process.
I'm one of those who thought
Obama made a huge mistake in not
endorsing the plan to get a handle on
our huge national deficit- and $14 trial
lion debt-proposed by the bipartisan
Erkine Bowles (Democra)-Alan
Simpson (Republican) debt commis-
sion. Yes, it would have been painfi
medicine but it was a much more
carefullythoughtoutpresciption and
much fairer than the August agree-
ment thatkicks the can down the road.


Ann McFeatters
omcfeatters@notionalpress.com
True, Obama came into office at
a perilous time in history as Wall
Street did its bestto kill our econo-
my. He dealt with it using the best
and quickest tools he had. But the
White House made a terrible mis-
take in promising his actions would
bring the unemployment rate down
to eight percent. Ha
The vision of a second Camelot
has turned to a mirage. Obama
has seemed more like a Carter
milquetoast than a take-charge
Kennedy. He is neither beloved as
Ronald Reagan was on the right or
feared as Lyndon Johnson was on
the left. The rise of the tea party,
which has scorned all the rules on
Capitol Hill, has made a mockery
of Obama's intellectual, let's-all-get-
along style of governing.
The sad truth is that no U.S.
president has much control over
job creation. That mysterious
process involves business and con-


summer confidence, now very low.
Obama came into office handling
the bully-pulpit part of the job wel
But people have tired of listening
to him promise that infrastructure,
Pell grants and American-made
batteries will save, the day when
he can't even persuade Congress
to keep 70,000 construction work-
ers and 4,000 Federal Aviation
Administration employees from
being laid off
So he is going on a listening
tour of America. Well see how well
that works out for him. A few days
of hearing what the people really
think and his ears will be ringing.
The global economy changed
while our country became demor-
alized. We have yet to see anybody
on the scene able to make us snap
out of it with concrete solutions, the
ability to reason with tea partiers
and able to induce love in support-
ers and fear in opponents.
Obama has become a caretaker
in the White House, trying to keep
the roof from leaking and the walls
from crumbling. His performance
in the past six months has not
earned him reelection.
* Scripps Howard columnist
Ann McFeat'ers has covered
the White House and national
politics since 1986.


^T'AA rit Tlk


enforcement and counterter-
rorism budgets. This would
give the White House a way to
exploit the war on terrorism to
pay for Obamacare.

M The Washington Times


ANOTHER
VIEW



Health


care's role

in war on


terror?



plan to engage local
communities in the
fight against violent
extremism is a posi-
tive step because it finally admits
domestic Muslim radicalism is a
threat. The danger is that it may
lay the groundwork for expand-
ing liberal social programs at the
expense of law enforcement and
homeland security.
The eight-page document,
"Empowering Local Partners to
Prevent Violent Extremism in
the United States," was released
Wednesday with little fanfare.
The plan is noteworthy for its
emphasis on the domestic threat
posed by al Qaeda. "Al Qaeda
and its affiliates and adherents
represent the pre-eminent ter-
rorist threat to our country,"
the paper states. "The fact that
al Qaeda and its affiliates and
adherents are openly and spe-
cifically inciting Americans to
support or commit acts of vio-
lence ... poses an ongoing and
real threat"
The report notes that one of
al Qaeda's objectives is to cre-
ate a backlash against American
Muslims, which would hand "our
enemies a strategic victory by
turning our communities against
one another." Engagement with
local Muslims is a way to pre-
vent radicalizationn that leads to
violence." This is a far cry from
official documents issued in the
early years of the Obama admin-
istration, such as the Feb. 1, 2010,
Quadrennial Homeland Security
Review, that avoided any mention
of Islamic radicalism. The shift in
emphasis is most evident in the
cover letter signed by President
Obama, which mentions al Qaeda
links to domestic incidents,
"including the deadly attack two
years ago on our service mem-
bers at Fort Hood."
At the time of the Fort Hood
massacre, the Obama admin-
istration refused to link the
incident to al Qaeda or even
describe it as an act of domes-
tic terrorism. It was classified
originally as "violence in the
workplace," and the U.S. Army's
official force-protection review
avoided any reference to shoot-
ing suspect Maj. Nidal Malik
Hasan's.jihadist motives. A,
subsequent yearlong review by
the Senate Homeland Security
and Governmental Affairs
Committee concluded that the
Department of Defense and the
FBI "collectively had sufficient
information to have detected
Hasan's radicalization to violent
Islamist extremism but failed
both to understand and to act
on it"
The new blueprint is weak
on details about how the federal
government will engage local
communities, and those that are
listed don't inspire confidence.
The paper further instructs
that "the vast majority of our
engagement work relates to
issues outside the national-secu-
rity arena, such as jobs, educa-
tion, health and civil rights." The
problem is, the most violent and
dangerous extremists tend to
come from the more educated
classes, so access to health care
or other touchstones of the
liberal domestic policy agenda
aren't the most effective means
of dissuading terrorists.
It wouldn't be out of character
for the Obama administration to
use this scheme to underwrite
an expansion of social-service
programs on the backs of law


4A













FAITH



Saturday, August 6, 201 I


&


VALUES


vww.lakecityreporter.com


Wilderness


series, Part


You know the unsettling
feeling you have waking
up in a strange place? It's
funny how it takes a few
minutes to get your bear-
ings and
remember HEART MAT
where you
are! This
happened
to my new
daughter-
in-law a
few weeks
after get-
ting mar-
ried: she Angie La
had joined angieland3@wind
us at the
beach for
a few days of vacation, and
since my son was work-
ing, she slept in the room
with a twin bed. We all
had a good laugh when
she awoke the first morn-
ing, and thought she was
back at her parents' house
before the wedding! As
we join the Israelites for"
our journey through the
wilderness, we begin in
a place where they have
opened their eyes to the
same scenery for over four
hundred years... Egypt.
Understanding where
you begin your journey
is vital as we travel into
the wilderness. How did
the Israelites come to be
in Egypt? The book of
Genesis records God's
promise to Abraham. His
offspring would become
a great nation and God
would provide a land to call
their own. God also fore-


T


n
dstr


tells Abraham of the route
his descendants would
travel to inherit the land of
promise:
Then the Lord
said to him,
"ERS Know for
certain that
your descen-
dants will be
strangers in
a country not
their own,
and they will
be enslaved
and mis-
d treated for
ream.net four hundred
years. But I
will punish
the nation they serve as
slaves, and afterward they
will come out with great
possessions." (Genesis
15:13-14)
Stop and think
about that for a moment
At least five generations-
before the Israelites
became slaves in Egypt,
God shared this informa-
tion with Abraham. The
only conclusion I can draw
from this passage is being
in Egypt was no accident.
God had a plan for this
people, and He has one
for us. Not only is God
certain of where you are
today, He knows where.
you are headed and by
what route you will arrive.
King David was also con-
vinced of this truth:
"You know when I sit,
and when I rise; you per-

LAND continued on 6A


ADVENT CHRISTIAN
First Advent Christian
1881 SW McFarlane Ave.
386-752-3900


Sunday School:
Sunday Service:
Wednesday Service:


9:45AM
11:00AM
7:00PM


ASSEMBLY OF GOD
FIRST ASSEMBLY OF GOD
1571 E. Duval Street
386-438-5127
Sunday Worship 10:30 A.M.

GLAD TIDINGS ASSEMBLY OF GOD
993 NW Lake Jeffery Road.
386-752-0620
Sunday Worship 10:30AM & 6PM
Wed. Fam. Bible Study 7:00PM
"A church where JESUS is Real"

BAPTIST
BEREA BAPTIST CHURCH
SR47 S 755-0900
Sunday School 9:30AM
Sunday Worship 10:45AM & 6PM
Wednesday Eve. Service 7PM
Interim Pastor: Kenneth Edenfield

EASTSIDE BAPTIST CHURCH
196 SE James Ave. 386-752-2860
Sun. Bible Study 9:45AM
Sun. Worship 11AM & 6PM
Wed. Prayer Mtg/Bible Study 6PM
Rev. Brandon G. Witt

FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH
Sunday Bible Study 9:15AM
Sunday Worship 10:30AM & 6:00PM
Wed. 6:OOPM Prayer Service, &
Children Ministry 6:15PM
Downtown Lake City 752-5422
Rev. Stephen Ahrens, Pastor

OLUVET MISSIONARY BAPTIST CHURCH
541 N.E. Davis Street
(386) 752-1990
Ronald V. Walters, Pastor
Sunday School 9:45AM
Sunday Morning Worship 11:00AM
Wed. Mid-Week Worship 6:00PM
"In God's Word, Will & Way"


A Ilay Electric Cooperative, Inc.
Competitive rates, non-profit,
right here in your community.
Lake City District 386-752-7447
clayelectric.com


PINE GROVE BAPTIST CHURCH
1989 N US Hwy 441
386-752-2664
Sunday Bible Study 9:45AM
Sunday Worship 11AM & 6PM
Wed. Kids & Youth Ministry 6:30PM
Pastor: Ron Thompson

BAPTIST
SALEM PRIMITIVE BAPTIST
Sunday Services 10:30 AM
Pastor: Elder Herman Griffin
752-4198


SOUTHSIDE BAPTIST CHURCH
388 S.E. Baya Drive* 755-5553


Bible Study
Morning Worship
Evening Worship
Wednesday:
AWANA
Prayer & Bible Study


9:15AM
10:30AM
6:15PM

5:45PM
6:15 PM


TABERNACLE BAPTIST CHURCH
(Independent Baptist)
144 SE Montrose Ave. 752-4274


Sunday School
Sun. Mom. Worship
Sunday Eve.
Wed. Prayer Meeting
Pastor: Mike Norman


10AM
11AM
6PM
7:30 PM


CATHOLIC
EPIPHANY CATHOLIC CHURCH
1905 SW Epiphany Court- 752-4470
Saturday Vigil Mass 5:00 PM
Sunday Mass 8:15 AM, 10:30 AM,
5:00 PM (Spanish/English)'
Sunday School/Religious Education
9:00 AM-10:15 AM

CHRISTIAN
CHRISTIAN SCIENCE SOCIETY
239 SE Baya Ave.
Sunday Service 11:00 AM
Wednesday Evening Service 7:30 PM


LAKE CITY CHRISTIAN CHURCH
Hwy 247 S.* 755-9436
Sunday School 9:
Sun. Mom. Worship 10:
Wed. Prayer Meeting


30AM
30 AM
7PM


CHURCH NOTES


Today

Saints Night Out
Comedian Terry Harris is performing 7
p.m. Aug. 6 at Miracle Tabernacle Church.
The church is located at 1190 SW Sister
Welcome Road. Musical entertainment will
also be provided by group Universal Praise.
Come dressed to impress. Seating is limited
and tickets are $30 in advanced and $35 at
the door. Dinner is included. For tickets
see William Highland at Jazzy Cutz down-
town on Marion Street, or call Wanda Allen
Alston at (386) 344-3757. The church office
number is (386) 758-8452.

Yard sale
The Kids' Club of Lake City Church of
God is having a yard sale 7 a.m.-1 p.m.
Aug. 6 in the Family Life Center. The
church is located at 173 SE Ermine Ave.,
the corner of SE Duval Street, US Hwy. 90.

Sunday, Aug. 7

Homecoming celebration
A fiomecoming celebration is .11
a.m. and 3:30 p.m. Aug. 7 at Jerusalem
Missionary Baptist Church. The church
is located at 4637 NW Lake Jeffery Road.
The morning speaker is the Rev. W.W. '
Williams. The evening speaker is the Rev.
Willie James Lucas of Grace Holiness
Church.

Church revival
Evangelist Patrice Goodwin is the guest
speaker during the Holy Ghost Fire Revival
7 p.m. through Aug. 7 at Evangelistic
Deliverance Miracles Revival Center. The
hosting pastor is John H. Dye. The church
is located at 141 NE Webster Ave. Call (386)
755-7020 or (386) 365-7829.



Submit Church Notes by e-mail to arobin-
son@lakecityreportercpm, fax to (386) 752-
9400 or drop-off at 180 E. Duval St., Lake.
City. Call (386) 754-0425 with questions.
Church Notes run as space is available each


.... .




METHODIST
First United Methodist Church
973 S. Marion Ave,
386-752-4488
Sunday School 9:45AM
Sunday Morning Worship
Casual Worship Service 8:50AM
Traditional Service 11:00AM
Program opportunities available in all areas
for all ages.
For a complete schedule
contact church office at
752-4488

'WESLEY MEMORIAL UNITED
1272 SW McFarlane 752-3513
(Adjacent to Summers School)
Sunday School 9:00AM
'Worship 10:00AM
Nursery provided
Vacation Bible School
9am-noon July 11-15
Pastor: The Rev. J. Louie Mabrey
www.wesleymem.com

WATERTOWN CONGREGATIONAL
METHODIST CHURCH
U.S. 90 E. turn on Cortez (next to Quality
Ind.) right on Okinawa.
Sunday School 9:45 AM
Sun. Worship 11AM & 6 PM
Wed. Night Service 7 PM
Pastor, Randy Ogbum

NAZARENE
LAKE CITY CHURCH OF THE NAZARENE
Services:
Sunday School 9:45AM
Sunday Worship 10:45AM
Wednesday ; 6:30PM
Adult, Youth Ministry, Children's Ministry
Pastor: Craig Henderson
Nursery Provided
SW SR 47 and Azalea Park Place

PRESBYTERIAN
FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
697 SW Baya Drive 752-0670
Sunday School 9:00AM
Sunday Worship Service 10:00 AM
NURSERY PROVIDED
Pastor: Dr. Roy A. Martin
Director of Music: Bill Poplin


CHURCH OF CHRIST
NEW HORIZON
Church'of Christ
Directions & Times 386-623-7438
Jack Exum,Jr., Minister
CHURCH OF GOD
LAKE CITY CHURCH OF GOD
167 Ermine St. 752-5965
Sunday School 9:45 AM
Sun. Worship 10:30AM & 6:00PM
Wed. Family Night 7 PM
Wed, Youth Service 7 PM
Pastor: Carroll Lee

EVANGEL CHURCH OF GOD
370 SW Monitor Glen 755-1939
Sunday School 9:45 AM
Sunday Worship 10:50 & 6:30
Wed. Spiritual Enrichment 7PM
"Shock Youth Church"
Boys and Girls Clubs
Bible Study
Pastor: John R. Hathaway

EPISCOPAL
ST. JAMES EPISCOPAL CHURCH
2423 SW Bascom Norris Dr.,
Lake City, R 32025 -386-752-2218
Website: www.stjameslakecity.org
HOLY EUCHARIST
Sun. 8 & 10 AM
Wed. 6:00 PM
Priest The Rev. Michael Armstrong


LUTHERAN
OUR REDEEMER LUTHERAN CHURCH
LCMS
1 1/2 miles S. of 1-75 on SR 47
755-4299


Sunday Services
(Nursery Provided)
Christian Education Hour
For all ages at 10:45AM
Pastor: Rev. Bruce Alkire


9:30AM


SPIRIT OF CHRIST LUTHERAN
Hwy 90,1.5 miles West of 1-75 752-3807
Sunday Worship 10:OOAM
Nursery Avail.
Wed. Pot Luck 6PM Worship 7PM
Vicar John David Bryant


It's time to get


back to basics


"....always learning and
never able to come to the
knowledge of the truth"
(2nd Tim 3:7). Please read
2nd Tim 3:1-5.
The
church BIBLE STUD
is cursed
today with
minis-
ters and
religious
leaders
who have i: i.
allowed
education
to turn Hugh She
them from ems-hugh43@con
many simple
truths. The
Bible tells us that the fear
of the Lord is the begin-
ning of knowledge and
preachers who fears God
will not preach salvation
save through the blood of
the Lord Jesus.
There are more edu-
cated preachers today
than this world has every
known; preachers who
have attended the institute
of higher learning yet
have never come to the
knowledge of truth. If you
doubt what I am saying,
read the last copy of The
Baptist Witness. These
surveys were taken from
all evangelical churches.
We are in the age of
computers. Anything
we wish to research is at
our fingertips. One can
receive a degree in many
professions online. But I
wonder are we really truly
learning what we need to


j OBSTETRICS GYNECOLOGY

(386)466-1106



PENTECOSTAL
FIRST FULL GOSPEL CHURCH
NE Jones Way & NE Washington St.
Sunday School 10:00 AM
Morning Worship 11:00 AM
Evangelistic Service 6:00 PM
Youth Services Wednesday 7:00PM
Mid-Week Service Wednesday 7:00 PM
For info call 755-3408@ Everyone Welcome
Pastor: Rev. Stan Ellis

NON-DENOMINATIONAL
CHRIST CENTRAL MINISTRIES
Leadership Services 9:00AM
Sunday Morning 11:00AM
Wednesday Service 7:00PM
217 Dyal Ave., from Hwy 90 take
Sisters Welcome Rd., go 5 miles, South,
church on left 755-2525
Lead Pastor: Lonnie Johns
"A Church on the Move"

CHRISTIAN HERITAGE CHURCH
Comer SR. 47 & Hudson Circle
Sunday Celebration 10:30AM
Pastor Chris Jones *752-9119

FALLING CREEK CHAPEL
Falling Creek Road 755-0580
First and Third Sundays 9:30 AM.
Second and Fourth Sundays 3:00 P.M.
Pastor Rev. Cheryl R. Pingel

NEW BEGINNING CHURCH,
Highway 242 E. of Branford Highway
Sunday School 10:00AM
Morning Worship 11:00AM
Sunday Evening 6:00PM
Wednesday 7:00PM
A Full Gospel Church Everyone Welcomed
(386) 755-5197


IE


er
TOC


know. Webster defines
learning as "to get knowl-
edge of, -to get to know."
The Greek word means to
increase one's knowledge.
Knowledge
S in the Greek
means to "


Have we .
got so caught
up in trying,
;.,., to under-
.f stand the
mind of God
rrill Jr. that we miss
astnet the simplic-.
ity of The
Gospel? The
apostle Paul was a very *
educated man. Acts 22:3
"I am indeed a Jew, born
in Tarsus of Cilicia, but ,
brought up in the city at
the feet of Gamaliel, taught
according to the strictness
of our fathers' law and was
zealous toward God as you
all are today." Gamaliel
was a Pharisee and emi-
nent doctor of the law. Yet
Paul knew that the Gospel
had to be presented in
such a way that a child
could understand it
When Paul wrote his .
first letter to the church
at Corinth, he stated "And
I, brethren, when I came
to you, did not come with.
the excellence of speech
or wisdom declaring to ,
you the testimony of God..
For I determined not to
know anything among you

SHERRILL continued on 6A

Central States
Enterprises,
Columbia County's Feed Headquarters
FEED PET SUPPLIES LAWN & GARDEN
ANIMAL HEALTH
668 NW Waldo St.' 386-755-7445

MIKELLS POWER EQUIPMENT, INC.
Your Lawn & Garden Headquarters
MOWERS CHAIN SAWS TRIMMERS
1152 US 90 WEST LAKE CITY, FL.
386-752-8098




LAKE CITY
11 755-7050


BAYWAYjan.torial Services
FIRE & Water Restoration
Floor & Carpet Care
Residential & Commercial
755-6142

SNorth Florida
Pharmacy
7 Locations to Serve You
Lake City, Ft. White, Brartford,
Chiefland, Mayo & Keystone Heights


Supercenter
"LOW PRICES EVERYDAY"
US 90 WEST 755-2427

GW Hunter, Inc.
Chevron Chevron Oil
w Jobber



Holly ectnc, Iac.
Quality /work at a reasonable price'
We also do solar hook-ups
(386) 755-5944


FOOD STORES
Open 7 Days a Week
1036 E. Duval St.. Lake City FL.
(386) 752-0067
Fresh Meat. Fresh Produce!
"1 a do all thm.g Ihnmgh ( r Il whi. h se nkhncth me" ,
Ph 4lpiani 1 13

To Advertise in
this Directory
Call Mary or Bridget
755-5440


5A


'.1 *-'* e .'.,~, ,l4. ~ n.55et~8~.l*>....~ -5
~ -

.5-. .,v" '. I.' pah. Jr
I ,~
~ !%e.C'&. .esesA.
~**~-s~.l. 5eaWIS~ N ,~ sr~ie~y~i~ P5.il V


AYMION


Tires for every need.
US 90 West across from Wal-Mart
752-0054


Morrell's
Your Complete decorating and
S home furnishings store
SW Dcput) Jeff DaNs Lane s fonrmefl Pincmoum Rd.)
752-3910 or 1-80(0597-3526
Mon.-Sat 8'00-5 30 Closed Sundai


S ANDERSON COLUMBIA CO., INC.
ASPHALT PAVING
COMMERCIAL .INDUSTRIAL
Site Preparation Road Building Parking Lots
Grading & Drainage
752-7585
871 NW Guerdon St., Lake City


S HARRY'S
ftg .. "S Heating & Air Conditioning Inc
Harry Mosley President

Aim 752-2308 f9-"









LAKE CITY REPORTER NEWS SATURDAY, AUGUST 6, 2011 Page Editor: Antonia Robinson, 754-0425


COMMUNITY CALENDAR


* To submit your Community
Calendar item, contact Antonia
Robinson at 754-0425 or by
e-mail at arobinson@
lakecityreporter., com.


Today

Coffee House
The next Coffee House
event is 7- 9 p.m. Aug.
6 at Stephen Foster Folk
Culture Center State
Park Auditorium in White
Springs. Hosted by Sonny
and Fran Lyons, the
event invites the audience
onstage for 10 minutes to
perform a talent A des-
sert table will have items
for sale. Admission is free.
Contact Park Ranger Larry
Hoover at (386) 397-2733
or for more information
visit www.floridastateparks.
org/stephenfoster.

Yard sake
The Voices for Children
of the Suwannee Valley Inc.
is holding a gigantic yard
sale 8 a.m.-1 p.m. Aug. 6
at 368 SW Sisters Welcome
Road.

Rotary guest speaker
Adnan Barqawi is speak-
ing 5 p.m. Aug. 6 at the
Columbia County School
board Auditorium. He was
appointed to the Office of
the Virginia Secrietary of
Education as a Governor's
Fellow and will speak about
several topics. He will also
receive a "Paul Harris
Fellow." The event is free.
Seating will be on a first-
come, first-serve basis.

Sunday

Family reunion
The Allbritton family is
having its annual reunion
12:30 p.m. Aug. 7 at Deep
Creek Community Center.
The center is on U.S. Hwy.
441 N. Bring a covered
dish. Call Dessi Meeks at
752-1473.

Class meeting
The Class of 1973 is
meeting 5 p.m. Aug. 7 at
Richardson Community
Center. All class members
are invited to attend.

Anniversary celebration
The pastor's anniversary
celebration for the Rev.
Fred Scippio is 4 p.m. Aug.
7 at Sweet Home Baptist
Church. The church is in
White Springs located on
CR. 25A.The guest speaker
is the Rev. Vic Givens. The
Mount Tabor Male Chorus
will perform.


ceive my thoughts from
afar. You discern my going
out and my lying down; you
are familiar with all my ways.
All the days ordained for me
were written in your book
before one of them came to
be."(Psalm 139:2-3,16)
This makes me wonder...
if God had spoken to my
great-grandparents about
my life, what would He


except Jesus Christ and Him cruci-
fied" (I Cor. 2:1-2 NKJ).
I realize the importance of search-
ing the depth of God's word, but the
depth to the unsaved means nothing.
The simple Gospel means every-
thing (1st Cor. 15:14). There is
nothing wrong with knowledge until
it starts to question the simple truths
of the Bible. Simple truths like the


Aug. 8-11 at Columbia
High School. The follow-
ing documents must be
provided: birth certifi-
cate, Social Security card,
Florida physical examina-
tion, current immunization
records, proof of residency
in Columbia County. Call
755-8080 ext. 146.

Cancer support group
The Women's Cancer
Support Group of Lake City
is meeting 5:30-6:30 p.m.
Aug. 8 at Baya Pharmacy
East, 780 SE Baya Drive.
Call (386) 752-4198 or (386)
755-0522.

AARP driving course
An AARP Driving Course
is 9 a.m. 3 p.m. Aug. 8 at
the LifeStyle Enrichment
Center. Contact Ann
George to sign up at 752-
9061. The center is located
at 628 SE Allison Court.

Tuesday


Craft project

A placemats craft proj-
ect is 1 p.m. Aug. 9 in the
dining hall at the LifeStyle
Enrichment Center. The
center is located at 628 SE
Allison Court.

Hospice volunteers
Hospice of the Nature
Coast is conducting a gen-
eral orientation for volun-
teers 10:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m.
Aug. 9 at the Columbia
.County Public Library
West Branch. The library
is located at 435 NW Hall
of Fame Drive. Contact
Volunteer Manager Ronnie
Richardson at 386-935-4520
or e-mail rlrichardson@
hospiceofthenaturecoast.
org. Walk-ins are welcome
but space is limited.

Girls mentoring
Welcome to Womanhood
mentoring program for
middle and high school
girls is 5-8 p.m. Aug. 9 at
532 Marion St. Dinner is
included. Contact Sandra
Price at (386) 867-1601.

Sheriff's meeting
The Columbia County
Sheriff's Department is
having a community meet-
ing 6-8 p.m. Aug. 9 at the
Shrine Club on Brown
Road.


Wednesday


Monday


CHS registration
Registration for new
students in ninth through
12th grade is 8 a.m.-4 p.m.


Program registration
The Boys Club of
Columbia County is now
registering for its fall pro-
gram which runs Aug. 22-
Dec. 1. Fees for the session


have said? Would He men-
tion the lessons I had to
learn the hard way, or the
sin that led me into places
I didn't want to be? Or
would He share that I would
learn those lessons, make
it through the wilderness,
and take possession of the
life God has planned for
me.. .my land of promise?
I want so much for that to


are $150 which includes
transportation from all
elementary and middle
schools. Activities include
sports, arts and crafts and
a homework program. Call
752-4184 or visit the club
on Jones Way.

Thursday


Tea Party Meeting

The next North Central
Florida Team Party meet-
ing is 7 p.m. Aug. 11 at the
Taylor Building. Retired
Colonel Mike McCalister
is the guest speaker. He
is running for the U.S.
Senate against Bill Nelson.
Tickets for the fundraiser,
information on a straw
poll to be conducting at
the September meeting
and information about the
upcoming Conservative
Countdown Oct 22 will be
available. Call John (386)
935-0126, Sharon (386) 935-
0821 or go to: www.north-
centralfloridateaparty.org .
Visit the Facebook page for
pictures of the last event
The building is located at
128 SW Birley Ave.

Lake City Newcomers
The regular meeting of
the Lake City Newcomers
and Friends is 11 a.m. Aug.
11 at the First Presbyterian
Church in the Social Hall.
The address is 697 SW
Baya Drive. Luncheon cost
is $10. The program this
month is the Newcomers
Hee Haw Extravaganza.
Plan to dress in your most
Hillbilly type clothes. All
members, guests and
friends, along with any
newcomers to the area, are
welcome. Call (386) 752-
4552 or (386) 7554051.

Pottery class
A beginning wheel
throwing pottery class
is 2-5 p.m. Aug. 11, 18
and 25. The class ,meets
for three hours and costs
$85. Students make four
vessels and learn to glaze
and fire them. To register,
please call the park Gift
Shop at (386) 397-1920 or
visit www.stephenfoster-
CSO.org.To learn more
about the park, visit www.
FloridaStateParks.org/ste-
phenfoster.


Friday


The youth production
of "Beauty and the Beast"
7 p.m. Aug. 12, 13, 19' 20
and 2 p.m. Aug. 14 and 21
at High Springs Theater.
The theater is located at
S130 NE First Ave. in High
Springs. Tickets are $5 and
available at The Framery in


be true in my own life, and
in yours. This week, think
about where you begin this
journey: your Egypt How
did you get here.. .and are
you ready to see your wil-
derness as a time of learn-
ing, growing and chang-
ing? It won't be an easy
journey, but remember the
Promised Land lies on the
other side... and that every


Bible account of the Creation in
Genesis 1 and 2. So many today
are trying to prove the account of
the Creation of Genesis 1 and 2; it
was not given to us to prove but to
believe. The Bible is about having
faith. Hebrews 11:1 says "Faith is
the substance of things hoped for,
the evidence of things not seen".
In other words faith is believing as


Lake City, and the Coffee
Clutch in High Springs.

Saturday, Aug. 13


Sock Hop

Christian Service Center
is hosting its annual Sock
Hop 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Aug. 13
at Lake City Mall. Names
and shoe sizes will be avail-
able at the event for commu-
nity members to purchase
tennis shoes and socks for
children in need. Donations
can also be brought ahead
of time. Age groups are
from Kindergarten to 12th
grade only. Call CSC 755-
1770.

Horse show
The Columbia County
Riding Club is hosting a
Open Pleasure Horse
Show 9 a.m. Aug. 13 at the
Columbia Resource Rodeo
Arena located. behind
Roundtree Moore Ford.
Gates will open at 8 a.m.
Contact Tamarra (386)292-
2753 or CCRC (386)758-
5902. The website is www.
columbiacountyridingclub.
com.

Sunday, Aug. 14


Ubrary program

Barbara Hines, Outreach
Coordinator for the North
Central Region of the
FloridaPublic Archaeology
Network, is speaking at the
Columbia County Public
Library main branch 2 p.m.
Aug. 14. She is present-
ing "Native Plants, Native
Peoples," a program about
the native plants and peo-
ple of Florida. It discusses
how native plants have been
used by different groups
of people here in Florida
throughout history.

Monday, Aug. 15

Financial literacy class
The Greater Lake
Community Development
Corporation is hosting
financial literacy money
smart training classes
with certified mortgage
planner Candy Edson
starting 6-8 p.m. Aug. 15.
Call (386) 752-9785 or e-
mail greaterlakecitycdc@
hotmail.com. The CDC
is located at 363 NW
Bascom Norris Drive.


Diabetes workshop

The next community
diabetes workshop is 9:30
a.m. Aug. 16 at the Lake
Shore Authority Board
building. The topic is


heart matters!
Blessings, Angie
* Heart Matters is a weekly
column written by Angie
Land, director of the Family
Life Ministries of the Lafayette
Baptist Association, where
she teaches bible studies,
leads marriage and family
conferences, and offers bibli-
cal counseling to individuals,
couples and families.


though you saw without seeing.
Many of the so called scholars
today have missed God's simple plan
of salvation. Ephesians teaches us
that we are saved by grace through
faith, and not of works (Ephesians
2:8-9).
Hugh Sherrill
Bible teacher at Eastside Baptist,
Church


"Diabetes 4nd eye care,"
and Dr. Bodendorfer is the
speaker. The building is
located at 259 NE Franklin
Street Call Wendy Fisher
at (386) 292-7815 for ques-
tions. Classes are free of
charge and no pre-registra-
tion is necessary.

LEC events
A Spelling Bee is 1 p.m.
Aug. 16 in the Reading
Room at the LifeStyle
Enrichment Center. The
center is located at 628 SE
Allison Court

Wednesday, Aug. 17


LEC events

Sonny Hartley performs
11 a.m. Aug. 17 in the Din-
ing Hall at the LifeStyle
Enrichment Center. The
center is located at 628 SE
Allison Court-

Thursday, Aug. 18


LEC activities


Chair Exercise is 1
p.m. in the dining hall at
the LifeStyle Enrichment
Center. The center is locat-
ed at 628 SE Allison Court
I
LCMS orientation
The Lake City Middle
School Orientation for all
students IS 10 a.m. and 6
p.m. Aug. 18 in the gym-
nasium.

Meet your Teacher
"Meet Your Teacher
Day" is 11 a.m.-1 p.m. and
5-7 p.m. Aug. 18 for first
- fifth grade at Five Points
Elementary School.


Friday, Aug. 19


LEC activities
A Participant Advisory
Meeting is 11:30 a.m.-12
p.m. in the Dining Hall at
.the LifeStyle Enrichment
Center. The center is locat-


ed at 628 SE Allison Court.

Saturday, Aug. 20
Fashion expo
The Mom & Me
Pampering and Fashion
Expo is 2-6 p.m. Aug. 20 at
Lale City Mall. Admission
is $10 per person. Register
in person at the mall office,
call 697-6075 or via web
at www.itsaboutmyeffots.
org/pampering. Pajamas
or comfortable attire are
encouraged.

Monday, Aug. 22


Boys mentoring

Building Strong Bonds
mentoring program for mid-
dle and high school boys
is 5-8 p.m. at 532 Marion
Street Contact Al Nelson
at (386) 867-1601. Dinner
included. Transportation
can be provided if contact-
ed one week in advance.

Tuesday, Aug. 23


LEC events

A documentary showing
is 1 p.m. in the Reading
Room at the LifeStyle
Enrichment Center. The
center is located at 628 SE
Allison Court.

Sheriff's meeting
The next Columbia
County Sheriff's
Department meeting is
6-8 p.m. at Deep Creek
Community Center.

Wednesday, Aug. 24


LEC events

Pearl Reed performs 11-
11:45 a.m. in the Dining
Hall at the LifeStyle
Enrichment Center. The
center is located at 628 SE
Allison Court


Reverse Mortgage

.- INCOME FOR LIFE



MCELHANEY'S
FrankMcElhaney, GMA MORTGAGE SERVICES
PrincipalBroker Your Local Mortgage Connection
291 SW Sisters Welcome Rd. NAMDB


United Distributors Inc. (UDI) will be conducting its annual complimentary water test
program for the property owners of Columbia County, FL. We're proud to serve 60,000
families in the Southeast. Your water provider does a great job in providing water to
meet water quality standards. However, if you are a property owner interested in learning
about the state of the art in residential water improvement, you'll receive a complimen-
tary $25 VISA gift card just for allowing us to test your water and leave you information.
There is no cost whatsoever. Look for your friendly UDI representatives in the coming
weeks for details. Find out why Water Technology magazine called us Tops in Water
Treatment in the US.


A- Rated
bbb.org


C O E -


Beauty and the Beast Tuesday, Aug. 16


LAND: Wilderness series, Part 2

Continued From Page 1A


,at. United Distributors


SHERRILL: Time to get back to basics

Continued From Page 5A


First iesembi of God
,fB" is hosting a

'BACK 2 Back to School
SUBasIES
Bash


V, 9
SCHOOL
Sul>LIeS
v


FREE back-to-school

physical provided by

a Physician.
FREE back-to-school IUq
SAC 2'AC 2
SObackpacks and supplies. sCHO
5u??UES 5L SOLICS
SSaturday, August 13th

Sam-noon
1571 E. Duval Street


LAKE CITY REPORTER NEWS SATURDAY, AUGUST 6, 2011


Page Editor: Antonia Robinson, 754-0425











Story ideas?

Contact
Tim Kirby
Sports Editor
754-0421
tjrb/y akecityreporter.com


Lake City Reporter






SPORTS


Saturday, August 6, 201 I


www.lakecityreporter.com


Page 7A


SCOREBOARD


TELEVISION

TV sports
Today
AUTO RACING
9:30 a.m.
SPEED NASCAR,Truck Series, pole
qualifying for Good Sam RV Emergency
Road Service 125, at Long Pond, Pa.
10:30 a.m.
ESPN2 NASCAR. Sprint Cup, pole
qualifying for Good Sam RV Insurance 500,
at Long Pond, Pa.
I p.m.
SPEED NASCAR, Truck Series,
Good Sam RV Emergency Road Service
125, at Long Pond, Pa.
3 p.m.
SPEED --ARCA, Pennsylvania 125, at
Long Pond, Pa.
6 p.m.
ESPN2 NHRA, qualifying for
Northwest Nationals, at Kent, Wash.
(same-day tape)
VERSUS IRL, IndyCar, pole
qualifying for Honda Indy 200, at Lexington,
Ohio (same-day tape)
7:30 p.m.
ESPN2 NASCAR, Nationwide
Series, U.S. Cellular 250, at Newton, Iowa
FOOTBALL
7 p.m.
ESPN Ceremony, Pro Football Hall
of Fame Induction, at Canton, Ohio
GOLF
Noon
TGC PGA Tour/WGC, Bridgestone
Invitational, third round, at Akron, Ohio
2 p.m.
CBS PGA Tour/WGC, Bridgestone
Invitational, third round, at Akron, Ohio
TGC Nationwide Tour, Cox Classic,
third round, at Omaha, Neb.
4 p.m.
TGC Champions Tour, 3M
Championship, second round, at Blaine,
Minn.
6:30 p.m.
TGC PGA Tour, Reno-Tahoe Open,
third round, at Reno, Nev.
HORSE RACING
3 p.m.
NBC Standardbreds, Hambletonian,
at East Rutherford, N.J.
5 p.m.
VERSUS NTRA, Test Stakes and
Whitney Handicap, at Saratoga Springs,
N.Y.
MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL
4 p.m.
FOX Regional coverage, N.Y.
Yankees at Boston or Philadelphia at San
Francisco
7 p.m.
MLB Regional coverage, Atlanta at
N.Y. Mets or San Diego at Pittsburgh
WGN Chicago White Sox at
Minnesota
RODEO
8 p.m.
VERSUS PBR, Stanley Tools and
Security Invitational, at Billings, Mont.
SOCCER
4 p.m.
ESPN Spanish/Mexican Primera
Division, World Football Challenge,
Barcelona vs. Club America, at Arlington,
Texas
TENNIS
3 p.m.
ESPN2 ATP, Legg Mason Classic,
semifinal, at Washington
10 p.m.
ESPN2 WTA Tour, Mercury
Insurance Open, semifinal, at Carlsbad,
Calif.

BASEBALL

AL schedule
Thursday's Games
Tampa Bay 7,Toronto 6, 12 innings
Texas 5. Detroit 2
Cleveland 7, Boston 3
Kansas City 9, Baltimore 4
N.Y.Yankees 7, Chicago White Sox 2
LA.Angels 7, Minnesota I
Today's Games
N.Y.Yankees (Sabathia 16-5) at Boston
(Lackey 9-8), 4:10 p.m.
Toronto (Morrow 8-5) at Baltimore
(Tillman 2-4), 7:05 p.m.
Chicago White Sox (Peavy 4-5) at
Minnesota (Pavano 6-8), 7:10 p.m.
Detroit (Verlander 15-5) at Kansas
City (Duffy 3-4), 7:10 p.m.
Oakland (McCarthy 4-5) at Tampa Bay
(Cobb 3-1), 7:10 p.m.
Cleveland (Carmona 5-1 I) at Texas
(C.Wilson 10-5), 8:05 p.m.
Seattle (Beavan 2-2) at LA. Angels
(Chatwood.6-7), 9:05 p.m.
NL schedule,

Thursday's Games
Chicago Cubs 7, Pittsburgh 6
St. Louis 7, Florida 4
Colorado 6,Washington 3
Philadelphia 3, San Francisco 0
Friday's Game
Chicago Cubs 4, Cincinnati 3
Today's Games
Cincinnati (Cueto 7-4) at Chicago
Cubs (Zambrano 8-6), 1:05 p.m.
Philadelphia (Hamels 12-6) at San
Francisco (Cain 9-7),4:10 p.m.
Milwaukee (Narveson 7-6) at Houston
(Myers 3-I1),7:05 p.m.
San Diego (Luebke 3-6) at Pittsburgh
(Maholm 6-1I), 7:05 p.m.
Atlanta (Hanson 11-6) at N.Y. Mers
(Niese 10-8), 7:10 p.m.
St. Louis (C.Carpenter 6-8) at Florida
(Nolasco 8-7), 7:10 p.m.
L.A. Dodgers (Kershaw 13-4) at
Arizona (J.Saunders 8-8), 8:10 p.m.
Washington (LHernandez 6-10) at
Colorado (Chacin 8-8), 8:10 p.m.


(All other AL, NL Friday scores late)


Old guard gets its due


Richter, Sabol,
Hanburger join
Hall of Fame.
Associated Press

WASHINGTON As
someone who worked for
the Washington Redskins
for 37 years, Bubba Tyer
is full of stories about the
"Over The Hill Gang," "The
Hogs," and franchise leg-
ends such as George Allen'
and Joe Gibbs.
When it comes to a Chris
Hanburger, the stories take
a totally different tone.
"He didn't go in for a lot
of frills," Tyer said. "He
didn't go in for a lot of
camaraderie. He certainly
had friends, but to say he'd
come over and hang out
and shoot the bull with
you, he didn't do that. He
went home."
Hanburger had the same
no-nonsense approach
as the on-field leader of
the Redskins defense. An
18th-round draft pick in
1965, he was a mainstay in
Washington through 1978
and was voted to nine Pro
Bowls. He had the poten-
tially daunting responsibil-
ity of calling the plays for
Allen a demanding, per-
fectionist coach who valued
defense first and foremost
"I wouldn't call it daunt-
ing if 'you knew the
system, which we did,"


ASSOCIATED PRESS
In this Dec. 17, 1977 file photo, Washington Redskins linebacker Chris Hanburger (55)
chases Los Angeles Rams quarterback Pat Haden (11) as Rams center Rich Saul grabs


his foot during a game in Washington.

Hanburger said. "What for rug
made it work for us, we had of play
mature players who under- eight
stood what everybody did ... Also
in every defense." second
ing six
Les Richter
Ed Sa
1954-1962 Los Angeles
Rams.... Nine seasons, 112 Fou
games. Chain
Rams waited two years 1964-1
while Richter served in mil- Mar
itary.... Upon return signed Films.
with Rams and embarked maker
on nine-season career that hatched
earned him reputation as Blair
one of the best lineback- compa
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gged, punishing style
r. ... Was selected to
straight Pro Bowls.
o named a first- or
d-team All-NFL dur-
:-year span, -1955-60.

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inder/President/
man NFL Films.
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behind idea of NFL
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ed idea of forming
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tacted NFL Commissioner
Pete Rozelle with offer
to double $1,500 bid for
rights to film 1962 NFL
Championship Game. ...
Rozelle accepted. ... From
start, incorporated unique
creative angles. ... Rather
than single camera locat-
ed high in stadium, Sabol
added sideline camera to
catch intensity of players.
... Blair Productions con-
tinued to shoot NFL action
for next two years before
Sabol convinced NFL it
needed own motion picture
company.... With that, NFL
Films was born.


Four tied

for lead;

Tiger 7

behind
Associated Press

AKRON, Ohio Rickie '
Fowler had eight birdies'
and holed outfrom the fair-
way for eagle in his round
of 64 to share Friday'-
second-round lead at
8-under with Adam Scott,
Keegan Bradley and
Ryan Moore in the WGC-'
Bridgestone Invitational. :
Tiger Woods took a step
back, only it had nothing
to do with his leg. There
was no limping. -:i
Woods was a little
sloppy at times with his
short game, a sign of rust'
from having not played
a tournament in nearly
three months, and fell'
back to the middle of th&e
pact at Firestone with A
1-over 71.
He missed a 2-foot putt
for par.
A bunker shot from just'
below the green on the
par-5 second hole barely
got to the fringe. A shot
from the rough that cov,-
ered the flag took a hard
hop over the green and
led to a double bogey.
"I didn't putt as well
as I did .yesterday, and
consequently, I just never
got the round going,"-
Woods said.


Jawing away with Jaguars fans


Now that I've
got your
attention ...
Seriously, I
wasn't aware
that there were so many
Jacksonville Jaguars fans
in Lake City and the
surrounding areas, but
your voices have been
heard.
I've never received so
many e-mails as I did
following last week's
column, so I figured why
not respond to them.
A lot of you were very
critical of my ... um ...
criticism of the Jaguars'
franchise. I don't back off
my statements, but let's
get a few things straight
I never meant that Tim
Tebow is going to be the
greatest quarterback to
play professional football.
There's a good
possibility he may never
even be mediocre.
My statements were
more about Jacksonville's
decisions. A year ago,
Tebow could have been
had for a lot less than
what was given up to draft
Blaine Gabbert this
season. Gabbert could end
up being the answer that
Jacksonville has needed at
the position for years, but
then again, he could fail.
Drafting players is as
much of a crap shoot as
playing the lottery in many
occasions, but my column
wasn't about Jacksonville's
draft success. It was about
the Jaguars' personnel
decisions in general.
Jacksonville has made
some good decisions in
the draft under Gene
Smith. In fact, they have
been leaps and bounds
better than his
predecessor, Shaq Harris.
He's made a couple of
steals late in the draft
(Terrance Knighton and
Derek Cox come to mind)
and he hasn't completely
busted on his first-round
picks.


FROM THE SIDELINE


Brandon Finley
Phone: (386) 754-0420
bfinleyaJokecityreporter.com
The Tebow statement
wasn't to say that Tyson
Alualu isn't a good player.
It was to say that given
the ability to hit and miss
on quarterbacks in the
NFL, with the position the
Jaguars were given, Tebow
was worth the gamble.
Gabbert may develop into
a great NFL quarterback,
but Jacksonville may never
even see him in their
city. Let's hope that three
prime time games helps
bring some exposure to
the team.
The real fans are going
to be there, but let's face
it, the real fans haven't
been filling the seats.
Two things fill seats.
The first is the most
obvious winning. If
Jacksonville's picks pan
out over the next couple of
years and they turn
into a perennial wild card
team (or better), seats will
sell. But ask yourself, what
if they don't?
If Gabbert is a bust,
will people come to watch
Jacksonville? It's a simple
answer. If Tebow was a
bust, would people have,
come to watch him? It's
also a simple answer.
Still, I have said, this
isn't about Tebow. Let's
talk about the team's hold
on mediocrity.
Many e-mailers
squawked at me when I
said that the Jaguars don't
make the big splash in
free agency. These e-mails,
I presume, are from the
guys that are going to be
in the seats either way. For


others, names like Paul
Posluszny simply don't
mean a thing. For me, it
means plenty.
Many of you have
accused me of not doing
my homework, but I'm
here to tell you, I've hit
the books. I watch every
NFL game, every Sunday.
During the week, I watch
the replays. There aren't
marty days where you
won't catch me engulfed in
football.
Some of you laughed
when I didn't name Aaron
Kampman, but he was
coming off injury and had
seen his stats go down
in recent years. He went
from 15.5 sacks in 2006,
to 12 in 2008 and finished
his last healthy season in
Green Bay with 9.5.
I'll give that he fits
better into Jacksonville's
4-3 defense than the 3-4
that the Packers played
over his final two seasons,
but defensive end stats
generally peak in their
first five or six years in the
league. What Jacksonville
received was an overpriced
player on the downward
end of his career.
So what does this year's
free-agent crop bring to
the table? I can tell you
that Posluszny was a key
loss for the Buffalo Bills,
but he's not the player
that's going to put the
Jaguars over the top.
Jacksonville has two
glaring needs in my
opinion. The first is in
the secondary, where
Jacksonville was putrid
last season. For those that
like numbers, Jacksonville
ranked 28th in pass
defense.
But, that doesn't really
mean a thing to me,
because I like to look at
a team's scoring defense.
Again, Jacksonville was
horrible in this category,
ranking 27th.
The Bills offered
Posluszny a contract to


stay, but guess what,
the Bills weren't a good
defense either. Buffalo
was 24th in the NFL.
Where Posluszny will be
counted on the most is in
the running game. Want
to guess where Buffalo
ranked there?
.1 don't care how many
tackles you make after a
running back gains five
yards. Posluzny is a classic
example of a player that
gains a lot of stats without
doing much. Look at his
big plays since coming
into the league. He's had
four interceptions.in four
years and three sacks.,
Given, he's not counted
upon to grab a lot of sacks,
but he's not going to make
Jacksonville elite.
Clint Sessions came
over from Indianapolis,
which Jacksonville has
shredded in the running
game for years. Do you
really think he's going to
bolster up the defense?
His stats aren't even
comparable to Posluzny,
but many e-mails thought
he was another answer to
Jacksonville's problems.
The one signing that I
can give slight credibility
to is Dawan Landry, who
started every game for
the Baltimore Ravens last
year. The Ravens weren'tt a
good passing defense and
that was obvious from the
eye test, but some of you
do like numbers so I'll give
them. Baltimore ranked
21st in passing defense.
Where the Ravens were
considerably better is
against the run and in the
red zone. Baltimore was
third in scoring defense.
Landry, to me, is someone
who benefited from
having other great players
around him.
Again, these aren't
names that I expect to put
Jacksonville from
fighting for a playoff spot
into the Super Bowl.
Instead, they're names that


might help them pick up
one more win.
Jacksonville's other
glaring weakness is in the
passing game. There's
,two main reasons for that.
Garrard isn't the
quarterback needed to
make average receivers
good and good receivers
great, and Jacksonville
doesn't even have average
receivers.
The Jaguars receiver
with the best upside
and overall talent was
Mike Sims-Walker, but
Jacksonville let him go
when he could have been
had. What's worse, is they.-,,
haven't tried to address
this area in free agency.
Do you feel confident
about your team with .4
Mike Thomas as your
No. 1 receiver going into -
the season? What has he
accomplished besides the
most miraculous
game-winning catch of the
2010 NFL. season. '
There were names out
there that I would have
liked to seen Jacksonville
attempt to bring it The
first name on that list
would have been Sidney
Rice, who went to Seattle.
He could have fit in
their budget and is still
relatively young. Perhaps
Jacksonville was scared
off by his hip injury last
season, but if that's the
case there are a half dozen'
other receivers the team
could target
Jacksonville addressed
the quarterback issue in -.
the draft, but I don't think
he'll get his chance to lead
the team in his first
professional season. Jack
Del Rio won't let go of
his man crush of Garrard
even if the Jaguars falter. ,
Then again, Del Rio is
another part of the
problem. But that's.
another story.
Brandon Finley covers
sports for the Lake City
Reporter.










-Page Editor: Emogene Graham, 754-0415 LAKE CITY REPORTER ADVICE & COMICS SATURDAY, AUGUST 6, 2011


DILBERT

WELCOME TO THE
MONTHLY MEETING OF
"THE SOCIETY FOR THE
PRESERVATION OF
EVIL IDEAS."/
Eli


BABY BLUES


SNUFFY SMITH


ZITS



L


B.C.


FRANK & ERNEST


DEAR ABBY


Bride-to-be wants a do-over

on groom's marriage proposal


8 OUR GOAL FOR THE
COMING YEAR IS TO
CONVINCE COMPANIES
I TO FILE ABSURDLY
BROAD PATENTS AND
ISSUE EACH OTHER FOR
INFRINGING.

r ^


HO J BEATS ME.
DOI JE I1 JUST
S!MCAKE HERE TO
ONEY EMBEZZLE
FROM YOUR DUES.
THAT?
Io
I; jZ
IPa ~


DEAR ABBY: My fian-
cee, "Vanessa," and I have
been engaged almost a
year. We're to be married
in three months. When
I popped the question,
I took her to one of her
favorite spots in the Smoky
Mountains. When I pro-
posed, she was overcome
with emotion but not
the kind I would have
thought She said yes, but
she wasn't at all happy
about being surprised. She
doesn't like surprises.
At the time, I was sure
she had an inkling about
my intentions. We had dis-
cussed becoming engaged
several times. Now, as the
wedding draws near, she
wants me to "re-propose."
It makes me feel like my
first wasn't good enough,
and it is really upsetting
me. I only intended to do
it once in my life. What
would you recommend?
- QUESTIONED-OUT IN
OHIO
DEAR QUESTIONED-
OUT: I recommend you
clear the air with Vanessa
ASAP. Tell her you
intended to propose only
once in your life, and that
her request has hurt your
feelings. If she still insists
on a second proposal, ask
for a script so you won't
disappoint her again. Then
be prepared to have her
provide you with them
regularly, because unless


HOROSCOPES


ARIES (March 21-April
19): Trouble will prevail
if you are difficult to get
along with. Avoid argu-
ments and aggressive
behavior. Focus on hav-
ing fun, being attentive
and, most of all, being
agreeable. Some simple
changes to your looks or
attitude will turn out well.

TAURUS (April 20-May
20): Your emotions may
lead you down a slippery
slope. Think before you
do something that will not
go over well with someone
you love. Overspending or
overindulging will bring
poor results. Concentrate
on learning and improve-
ments that will benefit you
professionally. ***-
GEMINI (May 21-June
20): Get your chores out
of the way. You don't want
to upset anyone you live
with or anyone to whom
you have made a promise.
Don't let a work or finan-
cial problem ruin your day.

CANCER (June 21-July
22): Focus on having
fun. Energizing activities
should be on your agenda.
Express yourself in a novel
way and you will attract
interest in something
you want to pursue. Join
a club or group and you
will make new friends.

LEO (July 23-Aug. 22):
Troubles at home will pre-


THE LAST WORD
Eugenia Last

vail if you let little things
bother you. Someone is
likely to disagree with
what you think or. do.
Concentrate on self-
improvement instead of
trying to change someone
else. **
VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept.
22): Opportunity knocks
and must be taken advan-
tage of. You have some
great ideas that need to
be shared for you to get
ahead. Action must be
taken with regard to your
future and how you can
use your knowledge aid
talents to the maximum.

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct
22): You may want to
change your life, but don't
be too hasty. Before jump-
ing into unfamiliar terri-
tory, find out what's actu-
ally being offered. Instead
of chasing change, help
someone you like. You will
enhance your relationship
and avoid making a costly
and irreversible mistake.

SCORPIO (Oct 23-Nov.
21): Emotions will well up,
causirig personal complica-
tions. Accept the inevitable
and realize that something
good can be taken out of
every difficult situation
you face. Don't put restric-
tions on others, and you
will avoid having them put


on you. ***
SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-
Dec. 21): Changes at home
will turn out splendidly. A
moneymaking deal or gift
is heading your way. Don't
spend foolishly trying to
impress someone who
is just there for the ride.
Consider how you can
avoid letting someone take
advantage of your generos-
ity.***
CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-
Jan. 19): A new investment
or project will entice you.
Make sure you know what
you are getting into before
you make any promises.
Hidden costs are likely to
materialize. A last-minute
alteration will leave you
feeling uneasy and angry.

AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-
Feb. 18): Do your own
research rather than tak-
ing someone else's word.
Deception among peers,
partners or relatives is
present and must not /
be allowed to take over.
Honesty is the best policy
and will enable you to be
the one who comes out on
top. **
PISCES (Feb. 19-March
20): Your mind will be
in overdrive and your
ideas will be superb. Take
advantage of any oppor-
tunity you get to plan for
the future, especially if it
has to do with a sideline
business that can bring in
extra cash. *****


CELEBRITY CIPHER

by Luis Campos
Celebrity Cipher cryptograms are created from quotations by famous people, past and present.
Each letter in the cipher stands for another.
TODAY'S CLUE: R equals G
"LYH BCZHT'G ZCEHZHTL DCZXMHLHMN
DYSTRHJ SLLWLKJHG SMM CEHV LYH
BCVMJ WT BSNG BH'MM THEHV OH


SOMH LC DCKTL."


- YCMMN THSV


Previous solution: "Give me problems..- give me the most abstruse
cryptogram... I crave for mental exaltation." Arthur C. Doyle
(c) 2011 by NEA, Dist. by Universal Uclick 8-6


FOR BETTER OR WORSE


Abigail Van Buren
www.dearobby.com
you're a mind reader, it's
the only way you'll live up
to her fantasies.

DEAR ABBY: We stand
in line for movie tickets,
sporting events, Black
Friday shopping, etc. Am
I being overly sensitive
when I have stood in line
and the person in front of
me allows family or friends
to cut in? It irks me no end
when I have spent any-
where from 30. minutes to
several hours waiting and
someone butts in front of
me.
How can I tactfully
address this without being
confrontational? Or should
I just bite my tongue and
move on? STANDING IN
LINE
DEAR STANDING: It's
one thing when a person
lets a spouse or one other
person in and quite
another when it's half a
dozen people. However,
folks this rude can be
hypersensitive when chal-
lenged and cause an alter-
cation, so I don't recom-
mend taking them on.


..............................


I


An exception to this
would be Black Friday,
or a store event in which
only a certain number of
shoppers will be allowed
in. In a case like that, secu-
rity should be notified if a
large number of people are
cutting in line.
** ** **
DEAR ABBY: How can
I get my stepsons to show
some compassion and love
for their father? They seem
to forget that they have
him, and that he labored
to help them become suc-
cessful citizens. He's a
kind and sensitive main
who should be cherished.
He has Alzheimer's dis-
ease and needs their love
now more than ever.
They live in other states,
but could call more than
once a year. My husband
doesn't say much about
them anymore. He did
when we first married six
years ago. We keep busy,
but I cry for him. He has
no family. His first wife
lived for her sons only and
probably forgot about her
relationship with my hus-
band. Perhaps this attitude
was passed on to his sons.
How do others in my situ-
ation cope? CRYING IN
.WISCONSIN
DEAR CRYING:
Write Dear Abby at
www.DearAbby.com or
P.O. Box 69440, Los
Angeles, CA 90069.


! Page Editor: Emogene Graham, 754-0415 LAKE CITY REPORTER


CLASSIC PEANUTS


ADVICE & COMICS SATURDAY, AUGUST 6, 2011











Classified Department: 755-5440


LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED SATURDAY. AUGUST 6. 2011

Lake City Reporter





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CM = UTT77TTir-M


Services

DIVORCE, BANKRUPTCY,
RESUMES.
other court approved forms-
386-961-5896.




Unscramble these four Jumbles,
one letter to each square,
to form four ordinary words.

I OHDNU


Legal

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
COLUMBIA COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File No. 11-178-CP
Division: Probate
IN RE: ESTATE OF JOHN V.
DOW
Deceased.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
The administration of the estate of
John V. Dow, deceased, whose date
of death was January 14, 2011 and
whose Social Security Number is
XXX-XX-1681 is pending in the
Circuit Court for Columbia County,
Florida, Probate Division, the ad-
dress of which is 173 NE Hemando
Avenue, Lake City, FL 32055. The
names and the Petitioner and Peti-
tioner's attorney are set forth below.
All creditors of the decedent and oth-
er persons having claims or demands
against decedent's estate, including
unmatured, contingent of unliquidat-
ed claims on whom a copy of this
notice is served must file their claims
with this court WITHIN THE LAT-
ER OF THREE (3) MONTHS AF-
TER THE DATE OF THE FIRST
PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE
OR THIRTY (30) DAYS AFTER
THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A
COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON
THEM.
All other creditors of the decedent
and other persons having claims or
demands against decedent's estate,
including unmatured, contingent or
unliquidated claims must file their
claims with this court WITHIN
THREE (3) MONTHS AFTER THE
DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICA-
TION OF THIS NOTICE.
ALL CLAIMS NOT SO FILED
WILL BE FOREVER BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME
PERIOD SET FORTH ABOVE,
ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2)
YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE
DECEDENT'S DATE OF DEATH
IS BARRED.
The date of first publication of this
Notice is July 29, 2011.
Attorney for Petitioner:
Elaine McGinnis
' Florida Bar No. 725250
UAW Legal Services Plan
2454 McMullen Booth Road, Bldg.
B Suite 425
Clearwater, FL 33759
(727) 669-5319 or (877) 309-1787
Petitioner:
Janet A. Dow
394 SW Legacy Glen
Lake City, FL 32025
05526885
July 30, 2011
August 6, 2011

Registration of Fictitious Names
We the undersigned, being duly
sworn, do hereby declare under oath
that the names of all persons interest-
ed in the business or profession car-
ried on under the name of MORGAN
& ASSOCIATES INVESTIGATIVE
SERVICE at 729 SE MONROE ST..
LAKE CITY, FL., 32025

Contact Phone Number: 386-288-
6006 and the extent of the interest of
each, is as follows:
Name: TIMOTHY MORGAN
Extent of Interest: 100%
by:/s/ Timothy Morgan

STATE OF FLORIDA
COUNTY OF COLUMBIA
Sworn to and subscribed before me
this 26th day of July, A.D. 2011.
by:/s/ KATHLEEN A. RIOTTO
05526899
August 6, 2011

NOTICE OF PUBLIC SALE:
FORT WHITE AUTOMOTIVE
gives Notice of Foreclosure of Lien
and intent to sell these vehicles on
08/119/2011, 8:00 am at 8493 SW
US Hwy 27, Fort White, Fl. 32038,
pursuant to subjection 713.78 of the
Florida Statutes. FORT WHITE AU-
TOMOTIVE reserves the right to ac-
cept or reject and and/or all bids.
1GCCT14R8G8184893
1986 CHEVROLET

05527119
August 6, 2011


IHOPEFUL-L.Y HE WANT ---
NITEIG /
--7 ]1/ -- *1 [ Now arrange the circled letters
to form the surprise answer, as
suggested by the above cartoon.

A:

(Answers Monday)
Yesterday's Jumbles: BLURT SIXTH GOBBLE MAYHEM
I Answer: What the Amazon explorer and the Amazon
River had in common A BIG MOUTH


Legal

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
COLUMBIA COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number 11-184-CP
IN RE: ESTATE OF ELIZABETH
H. THOMAS
Deceased
NOTICE OF ADMINISTRATION
The Administration of the estate of
ELIZABETH H. THOMAS de-
ceased, File Number 11-184-CP. is
pending in the Circuit Court for Co-
lumbia County. Florida, Probate Di-
vision, the address of which *is 173
NE Hemando Avenue, Lake City,
FL 32055. The estate is estate and
the date of the decedent's Will is
September 26, 2003. The names and
addresses of the personal representa-
tive's attorney are set forth below.
Any interested persons on whom a
copy of the Notice of Administration
is served must object to the validity
of the will (or any codicil), qualifica-
tions of the personal representative,
venue, or jurisdiction of the Court,
by filing a petition or other pleading
requesting relief in accordance with
the Florida Probate Rules, WITHIN
THE THREE MONTHS AFTER
THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A
COPY OF THE NOTICE ON THE
OBJECTING PERSON, OR THOSE
OBJECTIONS ARE FOREVER
BARRED.
Any person entitled to exempt prop-
erty is required for file a petition for
determination of exempt property
WITHIN THE TIME PROVIDED
BY LAW OR THE RIGHT TO EX-
EMPT PROPERTY IS DEEMED
WAIVED. Any person entitled to
elective share is required to file an
election to take elective share
WITHIN THE TIME PROVIDED
BY LAW OR THE RIGHT TO
CLAIM AN ELECI;IVE SHARE IS
DEEMED WAIVED.
By:/s/ TERRY MCDAVID
TERRY MCDAVID
Post Office Box 1328
Lake City, FL 32056-1328
Telephone (386) 752-1896
Florida Bar No. 052454
Attorney for Personal Representative
By:/s/ DALE ROBERTS THOMAS
Personal Representative
287 NE Buckmaster Gin
Lake City, FL 32055
05526925.
July 30, 2011
August 06, 2011
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
THIRD JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN
AND FOR COLUMBIA COUNTY,
FLORIDA
CASE NO.: 09-337-CA
AMERICAN GENERAL HOME
EQUITY, INC.,
Plaintiff
V.
ROSA PADILLA AND CHARLES
B. BROWN, I, et al.
Defendant(s).
CLERK'S NOTICE OF SALE UN-
DER F.S. CHAPTER 45
NOTICE IS GIVEN that, in accord-
ance with the Order Granting Motion
to Reschedule Foreclosure Sale, dat-
ed July 26, 2011, in the above-styled
cause, I will sell the property descri-
bed below to the highest and best
-bidder for cash, on August 24, 2011,
at 11:00 a.m. at Columbia County
Courthouse Courtroom One
Property described as:
LOT 27, BLOCK A, COLUMBIA
ESTATES SUBDIVISION, A SUB-
DIVISION AS RECORDED IN
PLAT BOOK 5, PAGES 112 AND
122A, PUBLIC RECORDS OF CO-
LUMBIA COUNTY, FLORIDA.
TOGETHER WITH A 1997 GEN-
ERAL ADMIRAL MOBILE HOME
SITUATED THEREON WHICH IS
AFFIXED TO THE AFOREMEN-
TIONED REAL PROPERTY AND
INCORPORATED THEREIN,
IDENTIFICATION #'S:
GMHGA1319611963A AND
GMHGA1319611963B
The highest bidder shall immediately
post with the clerk, a deposit equal to
5% of the final bid. The deposit must
be cash or cashier's check payable to
Clerk of Court. Final payment must
be made on or before 5:00 p.m. on
the day of the sale by cash or cash-
ier's check.
Any person claiming an interest in
the surplus from the sale, if any, oth-
er than the property owner as of the
date of the lis pendens must file a
claim within 60 days after the sale.
Dated: July 26, 2011
Columbia County. Clerk of Court
By: /s/ B. Scippio
Deputy Clerk
05526916
July 30, 2011
August 6, 2011

REPORTER Classifieds
In Print and On Line
www.Iakecityreporter.com

THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME
by David L. Hoyt and Jeff Knurek


Public Auction
1991 CHEV
VIN#1G1BN53E7MR142032 "
To be held 08/16/2011, 8:00am
Bryant's Tire and Towing
1165 East Duval St. Lake City I
32055
05527126
August 06, 2011


REPORTER Classifieds

In Print and On Line

www.lakecityreporter.com


ACROSS 39 Un1
42 Is,
1 Barking noises 45 24-
' 5 Upholstery 46 Bon
choice 50 Wa
10 Parka 53 Hire
12 Surroundings 55 The
13 Gulf port 56 For
14 Container with swi
a spout 57 Tur
15 Annexes 58 Oal
16 Medico mo
18 Diamond state
19 Type of experi- D
ence (hyph.)
23 Happy - clam 1 Ind
26 Converted 2 Wa
sofa 3 Col
27 Minn. neighbor ies
30 Out of focus 4 Jaz
32 Get rid of men
34 Knickknacks 5 Clo
35 Sewing kit item 6 Sic
36 Pro- (in pro- 7 Am
portion) 8 Sin
37 Cakelike cook- orb


ie
38 Politico
Landon


Pal
mo
Hoi


Legal

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
COLUMBIA COUNTY. FLORIDA
Probate Division
File No. 11-184-CP
IN RE: ESTATE OF
ELIZABETH H. THOMAS
Deceased
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
The administration of the estate of
ELIZABETH H. THOMAS, de-
ceased, whose date of death was
May 18, 2011; is pending in the Cir-
cuit Court for Columbia County,
Florida, Probate Division; File Num-
ber 11-184-CP; the address of which
is 173 NE Hemando Avenue, Lake
City, Florida 32055. The names and
addresses of the personal representa-
tive and the personal representative's
attorney are set forth below.
All creditors of the decedent and oth-
er persons, who have claims or de-
mands against decedent's estate, in-
cluding unmatured, contingent or un-
liquidated claims, and who have
been served a copy of this notice,
must file their claims with this Court
WITHIN THE LATER OF THREE
(3) MONTHS AFTER THE DATE
OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE OR THIRTY (30)
DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF
SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS
NOTICE ON THEM. -
All other creditors of the decedent
and other persons who have claims
or demands against the decedent's
estate, including unmatured, contin-
gent or unliquidated claims, must file
their claims with this Court WITHIN
THREE (3) MONTHS AFTER THE
DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICA-
TION OF THIS NOTICE.
ALL CLAIMS NOT SO FILED
WILL BE FOREVER BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME
PERIODS SET FORTH ABOVE,
ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2)
YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE
DECEDENT'S DATE OF DEATH
IS BARRED.
THE DATE OF FIRST PUBLICA-
TION OF THIS NOTICE IS July 30,
2011.

/s/ Terry McDavid
TERRY MCDAVID
Post Office Box 1328
Lake City, FL 32056-1328
Telephone (386) 752-1896
Florida Bar No. 052454
Attorney for Personal Representative
/s/ DALE ROBERTS THOMAS
Personal Representative
287 NE Buckmaster Gin
Lake City, FL 32055
05526927
July 30, 2011
August 06, 2011


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Legal

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
THIRD JUDICIAL CIRCUIT. IN
AND FOR COLUMBIA COUNTY,
FLORIDA
Case No. 09000193 CA
HSBC BANK USA NATIONAL
ASSOCIATION, AS TRUSTEE
FOR THE HOLDERS OF DEUT-
SCHE ALT-B SECURITIES
MORTGAGE LOAN TRUST, SER-
IES 2006-AB3 MORTGAGE PASS-
THROUGH CERTIFICATES,
PLAINTIFF
vs.'
DANIEL D. GOOS,.ET AL.
DEFENDANT
NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE
SALE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pur-
suant to an Order of Final Summary
Judgment of Foreclosure dated the
18th day of November, 2009, and en-
tered in Case No. 09000193CA, of
the Circuit Court of the Thlird Judi-
cial Circuit in and for Columbia
County, Florida. I will sell to the
highest and best bidder for cash on
the third floor of the Columbia
County Courthouse, 173 N.E. Her-
,nando Avenue, Lake City, FL 32055,
at 11 A.M. on the 17th day of Au-
gust, 2011, the following described
property a set forth in said Final
Judgment, to wit:
LOT 26, SOUTHWOOD MEAD-
OWS, A SUBDIVISION ACCORD-
ING TO THE PLAT THEREOF,
RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 6,
PAGE(S) 49 OF THE PUBLIC RE-
CORDS OF COLUMBIA COUN-
TY, FLORIDA.
Any person claiming an interest in
,the surplus from the sale, if any, oth-
er than the property owner as of the
date of the lis pendens, must file a
claim within 60 days after the sale.
If you are a person with a disability
who needs any accommodation in
order to participate in this proceed-
ing, you are entitled, at no cost to
you, to the provision of certain assis-
tance. Persons with a disability who
need any accommodation to partici-
pate should call the ADA Coordina-
tor, Jacquetta Bradley, P.O. Box
1569, Lake City, FL 32056, 386-
719-7428, within two (2) working
days of your receipt of this notice; if
you are hearing impaired call
(800)955-8771; if you are voice im-
paired call (800)955-8770.
Dated this 15th day of July, 2011
P. DeWitt Cason
Clerk of The Circuit Court
By:/s/ B. Scippio
Deputy Clerk
05526774
July 30, 2011
August 06, 2011

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
3rd JUDICIAL. CIRCUIT OF
FLORIDA, IN AND FOR COLUM-
. BIA COUNTY
Case #: 2009-CA-000632
Division #:
Deutsche Bank National Trust Com-
pany formerly known as Bankers
Trust Company of California, N.A.,
as Trustee for Long Beach Mortgage
Loan Trust 2001-1
Plaintiff,
vs.
Patricia A. Shuler, Individually and
as Personal Representative of the Es-
tate of Ethel L. Barbaree, Deceased;
Tammy Christina Bundrant; Un-
known Heirs, Devisees, grantees,
Assignees, creditors, Lienors and
Trustees of the Estate of Ethel L.
Barbaree, Deceased, and all other


Answer to Previous Puzzle

F E ELS WARD
DRYING AHCHOO
ARENAS LEMONS


DJS L BEL LAP
E ATI ITI MUSSE
A GAINISPN T G C K


RING TERRIER
FARRAH T I RAS



AMOUNT ENRICO

BINGOGA E


11
12
17
20
21
22


Chili beans
Beaded shoes
Not even
On the loose
Deed holders
Giza's river


Want more puzzles?
Check out the "Just Right Crossword Puzzles" books
at QuillDriverBooks.com


23 Kindergarten
trio
24 Put-down
25 Mystique
28 Kind of crack-
er
29 Lead a square
dance
31 Beatles' meter
maid
32 Defenseless
33 Phone button
37 Put money on
40 Bud holder
41 Alpine peak
42 Holm and
Woosnam
43 Popular side
dish
44 Cheerio!
(hyph.)
47 Peril at sea
48 Kind of mold-
ing
49 Autumn color
51 Pirate's quaff
52 CAT scan rela-
tive
54 Pecan, for
instance


@ 2011 UFS, Dist. by Univ. Uclick for UFS


ADvantage


Legal

Persons Claiming By, Through, Un-
der and Against the Named Defend-
ant(s); Unknown Parties in Posses-
sion #1: If living, and all Unknown
Parties claiming by, through, under
and against the above named De-
fendant(s) who are not know to be
dead or alive, whether said Unknown
Parties may claim an interest as
Spouse, Heirs, Devisees, Grantees,
or Other Claimants
Defendant(s)
NOTICE OF SALE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pur-
suant to an Order of Final Judgment
of Foreclosure date July 21, 2011,
entered in Civil Case No. 2009-CA-
000632 of the Circuit Court of the
3rd Judicial Circuit in and for Co-
lumbia County, Florida, wherein
Deutsche Bank National Trust Com-
pany formerly known as Bankers
Trust Company of California, N.A.,
as Trustee for Long Beach Mortgage
Loan trust 2001-1, Plaintiff and Pat-
ricia A. Shuler, Individually and as
Personal Representative of the Estate
of Ethel L. Barbaree, Deceased are
defendantss). I will sell to the high-
est and best bidder for cash AT THE
WEST FRONT DOOR OF THE
COLUMBIA COUNTY COURT-
HOUSE, LOCATED AT 145 HER-
NANDO STREET, LAKE CITY,
COLUMBIA COUNTY, FLORIDA,
AT 11:00 A.M. on August 24, 2011,
the following described property as
set forth in said Final Judgment, to-
wit:
LOT 16, SUZANNE SUBDIVI-
SION, UNIT 2, ACCORDING TO
THE MAP OR PLAT THEREOF,
RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 4,
PAGE 92, OF THE PUBLIC RE-
CORDS OF COLUMBIA COUN-
TY, FLORIDA. TOGETHER WITH
THAT CERTAIN YEAR: 1985,
MAKE: SANDPIPER, VIN #:
FLFL2AE367905629 AND VIN #:
FLFL2BE367905629, MANUFAC-
TURED HOME, WHICH IS PER-
MANENTLY AFFIXED TO THE
ABOVE DESCRIBED LANDS. AS
SUCH IT IS DEEMED TO BE A
FIXTURE AND A PART OF THE
REAL ESTATE.
ANY PERSON CLAIMING AN IN-'
TEREST IN THE SURPLUS FROM
THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER
THAN THE PROPERTY OWNER
AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS
PENDENS MUST FILE'A CLAIM
WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE
SALE.
P. DEWITT CASON
CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT
Columbia County, Florida
/s/ B. Scippio
DEPUTY CLERK OF COURT
Submitted By: ATTORNEY FOR
PLAINTIFF:
SHAPIRO, FISHMAN & GACHE,
.LLP.,
4630 Woodland Corporate Blvd.
Suite 100
Tampa, FL 33614
(813) 880-8888
,(813) 880-8800
05526883
July 29, 2011
August 6, 2011


To place your
classified ad call

755-5440


it
L










LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED SATURDAY. AUGUST 6, 2011


Classified Department: 755-5440


Legal

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
3RD JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND
FOR COLUMBIA COUNTY,
FLORIDA
CASE NO. 2010-CA-000427
Division No.
Section
BRANCH BANKING AND TRUST
COMPANY
Plaintiffs)
vs.
JOSEPH G. PURCELL, et al
Defendants)
NOTICE OF SALE
PURSUANT TO CHAPTER 45
NOTICE IS GIVEN pursuant to an
Order or Final Judgment of Foreclo-
sure dated July 25, 2011, and entered
in Case No. 2010-CA-000427 of the
Circuit Court of the 3RD Judicial
Circuit in and for COLUMBIA
County, Florida, wherein BRANCH
BANKING AND TRUST COMPA-
NY is the Plaintiff and JOSEPH G.
PURCELL and NORMA M. PUR-
CELL A/K/A NORA PURCELL are
the Defendants, I will sell the high-
est and best bidder for cash at the
front steps of the Columbia County
Courthouse, 145 North Hernando
Street, Lake City, Florida, at 11:00
a.m. on the 31st day of August,
2011, the following described prop-
erty as set forth in said Order of Fi-
nal Judgment, to wit:
Lot 16, BLACKBERRY FARMS
SUBDIVISION, a subdivision ac-
cording to the plat thereof as record-
ed to the plat, thereof as recorded in
PRRD book 1, pages 4-12 public re-
cords of Columbia County, Florida.
LESS AND EXCEPT a part of
BLACKBERRY FARMS, as per plat
thereof recorded in PRRD Book 1,
pages 4-12 of the public records of
Columbia County, Florida being
more particularly described as fol-
lows:
commence at a P.R.M. marking the
SW Comer of said Lot 16 and run N'
00 deg. 34'40" w, along the west line
thereof, 113.54 feet to the point of
Beginning; thence N 59 deg. 41 '56"
E, 641.92 feet; thence N 39 deg.
09'40" E, 242.77 feet to a point on
the westerly right of way line of NW
Blackberry Circle, said point being
in a curve concave to the Northeast,
having a radius of 320.00 feet and an
included angle of 16 deg. 37'24";
thence run in a Northwesterly direc-
tion along the arc of said curve and
arc distance of 92.84 feet to the
Northeasterly most comer of said lot
16; thence S 56 deg. 38'34" w, along
tile Northerly line of said Lot 16,
782.95 feet to the Northwesterly cor-
ner of said Lot 16; thence s 00
34'40" E, along the west line of said
Lot 16, 155.90 feet to the point of
Beginning.
and commonly known as: 1097 NW
BLACKBERRY CIR., LAKE CITY,
FL 32055
IF YOU ARE A PERSON CLAIM-
ING A RIGHT TO FUNDS RE-
MAINING AFTER THE SALE,
YOU MUST FILE A CLAIM WITH
THE CLERK OF COURT NO LAT-
ER THAN 60 DAYS AFTER THE
SALE. IF YOU FAIL TO FILE A
CLAIM, YOU WILL NOT BE EN-
TITLED TO ANY REMAINING
FUNDS. AFTER 60 DAYS, ONLY
THE OWNER OF RECORD AS OF
THE DATE OF THE LIS PEN-
DENS MAY CLAIM THE SUR-
PLUS.
DATED at COLUMBIA County,
Florida, this 26 day of July, 2011.
P. DEWITT CASON, Clerk
COLUMBIA County, Florida
By:/s/ B. Scippio
Deputy Clerk
Michelle Garcia Gilbert, Esq.
Florida Bar# 549452
Amy McGrotty, Esq.
Florida Bar # 829544
GILBERT McGROTTY GROUP
Attorney for Plaintiff(s)
3200 Henderson Blvd, Suite 100
Tampa, FL 33609
(813)443-5087
05526914
July 30, 2011
August 6, 2011

Registration of Fictitious Names
We the .undersigned, being duly
sworn, do hereby declare under oath
that the names of all persons interest-
ed in the business or profession car-
ried on under the name of LITTLE
DIAMOND MODELS at 1393 SW
BOBCAT DR., FORT WHITE, FL.,
32038

Contact Phone Number: (352)318-
0113 and the extent of the interest of
each, is as follows:
Name: CARRIE L. BOLTON
Extent of Interest: 100%
by:/s/ Carrie L. Bolton
STATE OF FLORIDA
COUNTY OF COLUMBIA
Sworn to and subscribed before me
this 4th day of August, A.D. 2007.
by:/s/ KATHLEEN A. RIOTTO
05527139
August 6, 2011


020 Lost & Found
Dachshund (Weiner Dog). Black
& Tan answers to Oscar. Around
SE High Falls Rd. on 8/01. Do not
call. We FOUND him!!!

100 J0b
1 Opportunities

05527109
RECEPTIONIST/OFFICE
ASSISTANT
White Springs, Florida
seeking a personable and cheer-
ful individual to join our team.
Verifiable job history. Strong
computer skills. Good commu-
nication skills. Able to operate
fax, copier and scanner
machines. Able to complete
duties without constant


supervision. Must be flexible
and team player. POSITION
NEEDS TO BE FILLED
IMMEDIATELY. Please email
resume to: hr(speced.org

Accounting firm seeks full-time
qualified accountant. Ideal
candidate will have experience in
general accounting tax
accounting, tax return preparation
and use of QuickBooks and
Microsoft Office. Send reply to
Box 05067, C/O The Lake City
Reporter, P.O. Box 1709, Lake
City, FL, 32056
Busy Family practice office. has
front office position available.
Experience preferred.
Fax resume to: 386-719-9494
Giebeig Family Medicine


100 Job
100 Opportunities
INSURANCE AGENCY
Looking for a highly motivated
individual. Licensed 4-40 CSR is
desired but not required. Must
have excellent computer & people
skills benefits avail. Send reply to
Box 05071, C/O The Lake City
Reporter, P.O. Box 1709,
Lake City, FL, 32056 or
fax to: 386-752-2102
Physical laborer needed. CDL
license req'd. Must have respect
for electricity & ability to work in
water & mud. Must be able to pass
drug test. Call 386-752-1854
Sales Position available for moti-
vated individual Rountree -Moore
Toyota, Great benefits, paid train-
ing/vacation. Exp. a plus but not
necessary. Call Anthony Cosentino
386-623-7442
Security Officers
needed Lake City Area, must have
current D Security Lic., Clear
background, Drivers Lic, phone,
Diploma/GED. Benefits, DFWP
EEO Must Apply at:
www.dsisecurity.com MB 1000084
Sewing Machine Operator
with experience,
Good hourly rate
Call Hafners 386-755-6481
VPK Teacher & Pre K3 teacher
needed. Experience reqd. CDA/AS
Degree preferred. Apply in person
at Wee Care in Columbia City
Westside Barber Shop is looking
for a lead experienced Barber/styl-
ist. Highest pd commission. Busy
shop. 386-623-5156 or 755-7733

1 Medical
120 Employment

05527079
MEDICAL ASSISTANT
Requirements: Phlebotomy
certified with min.
1 yr experience.
Please email resume to:
jpapesht cancercarenorthflori-
da.com

05527112
Medical Office Assistant
Experience as a Medical
assistant or in Medical
billing required. Fax
resume: 386-758-5987 or email:
mafaisalmd@gmail.com

Certified Medical Assistant
Full time, exp preferred in
Pediatrics and/or Family Practice.
Experience in injections & taking
accurate vital signs. Excellent
communication and
documentation, organizational
and assessment skills.
Fax Resume: 386-758-5628
Faculty Position: Registered
Nurse (BSN) wanted at North
Florida Community College.
See www.nfcc.edu for details.

240A Schools &
S Education

055266 '
Interested in a Medical Career?
Express Training offers
courses for beginners & exp
Nursing Assistant, $479
next class-07/25/10
Phlebotomy national certifica-
tion, $800 next class-08/08/11

Continuing education
Fees incl. books, supplies, exam
fees. Call 386-755-4401 or
expresstrainingservices.com



310 Pets & Supplies
Free to good home only.
3 adorable long haired kittens.
Call for more information.
386-623-5156
Mice & Rats
now available at '
WW Feeds in Fort White.
386-497-1376
PUBLISHER'S NOTE
Florida Law 828.29 requires dogs
and cats being sold to be at least 8
weeks old and have a health
certificate from a licensed
veterinarian documenting they
have mandatory shots and are
free from intestinal and external
parasites. Many species of wild-
life must be licensed by Florida
Fish and Wildlife. If you are
unsure, contact the local
office for information.


361 Farm Equipment
84 Ford 4610 Tractor.
2WD, Solid
2005 motor,$7,500. OBO
386-867-0005


407 Computers
HP Computer,
$80.00
386-755-9984 or
386-292-2170


420 Wanted to Buy
Wanted Junk Cars, Trucks, Vans.
$250 & up CASH! Free Pick Up!
NO title needed !386-878-9260
After 5pm 386- 752-3648.


430 Garage Sales
Huge Sale Fri & Sat. 8-3 RAIN or
SHINE Household, Kids toy's &
clothes, Fum., etc. 5188 North US
Hwy 441 Lake City 386-438-7254
HUGH SALE Sat. 7-?
Westerwoods off Hwy 47.
Look for signs. Furniture,
electronics, toys, clothes, etc.
Mikesville Club Community. Sat.
8/6, 7-? Indoor/outdoor. 296 SE
Clubhouse Ln. 41 S. about 3mi S
of Ellisville. Bright pink signs.
Extra space avail. 352-226-2100
MOVING SALE
Sat. 8a-4p.
493 SW Angela Terr.
Everything must go!!!!


430 Garage Sales
MOVNG SALE 8/6.7-12.
135 SW Buldawg Gin. Lake City.
Branford Hwy. 1.5 W of 252B.
fum.. tools, piano., washer. etc.
Multi Family Sat. 8-1. Hwv 18.
Thomwood S/D in Ft. White.
Desks/chair. book cases. shelving
units & more. 386-365-5742
PUBLISHER'S NOTE
All Yard Sale Ads
Must be Pre-Paid.

YARD SALE Sat. 7-?
262 SW Greenwood Terr.
Off CR 18. Fort White. FL.
Variety of everything.
Yard Sale- Whistle Loop (off of
252 by high school) look for signs
clothes, kitchen & home goods,
linens etc. Sat, Aug 6, 8am-12pm


440 Miscellaneous

CUB CADET Self Propelled
Mower.
Like New
Asking $180 OBO, 386-984-7510
Stop gnat & Mosquito bites! Buy
Swamp Gator All natural insect re-
pellent. Family safe. Use head to
toe. Available at The Home Depot.
Summer Barbecue Special
Tow Behind
Grill/Smoker, $1,250 OBO.
386-719-4802

450 Good Things
45 to Eat
GREEN PEANUTS For Sale
Valencia. Graded and washed.
$30.00 a bushel.
386-752-3434

630 Mobile Homes
630 for Rent
14 Wide, 2/2-$475. mo. + dep.
Clean, Quiet Country Park
Water, septic, garbage incl. NO
PETS! 386-758-2280 References,
2 br/2 full bath SWMH
ready to rent Ft White
$600.mo
386-497-1464 or 365-1705
2&3 BR MH. $395 $650. mo.
plus deposit. Water & sewer fur-
nished. Cannon Creek MHP
386-752-6422
2/1 Mobile Homes in a park.
$400.00 and $450.00 per month
plus security deposit.
Call 386-965-5530
2/1 S of Lake City, (Branford area)
$500 month plus security
386-590-0642 or 386-867-1833
www.suwanneevalleyproperties.com
2/2 Units, clean, well maintained,
nice safe park setting, 2 miles to
downtown Lake City, $575 month
+ $575 sec dep, 386-984-8448
13th Month FREE!!
3/2, on 1 acre lot
386-623-2203 or
386-623-5410

LG clean 3br's $450. -$650. mo. +
dep. Also, 2br mobile home's
available. No Pets.
5 Points area. 386-961-1482
Mobile Homes for rent in
White Springs, Lake City & Ft.
White Contact 386-623-3404
ir 386-397-2779
Private 3b/2ba w/carport. 3 miles
west Lake City. $700 month.
$300 security. 386-758-3657
References required. NO Pets!

i640 Mobile Homes
640 for Sale

Handy man special, 94 Fleetwood
DWMH. 3/2 on 5 acres in Ft.
White. Owner Fin. $3,000 dn.
$850mo. $99,900 352-215-1018
www.LandOwnerFinancing.com
Palm Harbor Homes
"DIVORCE"
SAVE On This Short Sale
800-622-2832 ext. 210

705 Rooms for Rent

New furnished bedroom apt in a
home, private entrance & bath, in-
cludes utilities, trash, cable, frig &
pest control. $450 mo + dep. Avail
8/1. 386-752-2020 SW Lake City
Room w/private bath. Microwave,
fridge, laundry, internet, private
entrance. Convenient.
386-755-9059 for information

71 Unfurnished Apt.
7 For Rent








05527089
SPRING HILL VILLAGE
Excellent High Springs location.
1, 2 & 3 bedroom floor-plans;
some with garages.
Call 386-454-1469
or visit our website:
www.springhillvillage.net


I- -I- 7
2000 Hummer
Army green, leather
interior, pristine cond.
31,148 miles.

$52,000
Call
Pictures available.


Unfurnished Apt. 730 Unfurnished
710 For Rent 730 Home For Rent


IBR APT.
Downtown Location. Clean.
S450 mo. plus Security.
NO PETS. Call 386-755-3456
I 1 Unfurnished Apt for Rent
Water & Electric furnished
SSOO mo. plus $300 security
Deposit. Call 386-752-2384
2/1 w/garage & washer/dryer
hookups. East side of town.
Call for details
386-755-6867
2BR/1.5BA w/garage
5 minutes from VA hospital.
Call for details.
386-755-4590 or 365-5150
2BR/1BA. Close to town.
S565.mo plus deposit.
Includes water & sewer.
386-965-2922
A Landlord You Can Love!
2 br Apts $575. & up + sec. Great
area. CH/A washer/dryer hookups.
386-758-9351/352-208-2421
Beautiful Apt. Large 1 bdrm,
w/inground pool. CHA, details at
bigfloridahome.com
$650/mo + dep 386-344-3261
Furnished or unfurnished 1 or 2
bedroom townhomes on the golf
course. $625-$750. mo. + security.
Includes water. 386-752-9626

ONE 51 PLACE APTS
Alachua
MOVE IN SPECIALS
1, 2, & 3 bedrooms
Call TODAY 386-462-0656
or visit us at one51 place.com

Summer Special! 12th mo Free
w/signed yr lease. Updated, w/tile
floors/fresh paint. Great area.
From $450.+sec. 386-752-9626
The Lakes Apts. Studios & IBr's
from $135/wk. Util. & cable incl.,
Sec 8 vouchers accepted, monthly
rates avail Call 386-752-2741

720 Furnished Apts.
2W For Rent

Rooms for ent, Hillcrest, Sands,
Columbia. All furnished. Electric,
cable, fridge, microwave. Weekly.
or monthly rates. 1 person $135,
2 persons $150. weekly
386-752-5808

Unfurnished
730 Home For Rent

05527022
LAKE CITY
2BR/1.5BA, 975SF $725. mo
4BR/3BA, 2139SF $1500. mo

4BR/2BA, 1248SF $695. mo
2 AVAILABLE

3BR/2BA 1258SF $925. mo

3BR/2BA 1582SF $900. mo
3BR/2BA 1246SF $700. mo
2BR/1BA 700SF $495. mo
2 AVAILABLE

3BR/1.5BA 1040SF $825

FT WHITE

3BR/2BA 1512SF $850. mo

LAKE BUTLER

4BR/2BA 1560SF $750 mo

MADISON

2BR/1BA JUST REMODELED
$450. mo. 2 AVAILABLE

Mike Foster 386-288-3596
Mitchell Lee 386-867-1155
1688 SE Baya Dr., Suite 105
Lake City, FL 32025
www.NorthFloridahomeandland.com
Accredited Real Estate is a'Full
Service Real Estate Office.
We do: Rentals
Property Management
P S Property Sales.


1/1 Cottage pool access, no pets,
country setting, $675 mo includes
utlilities & cable. $300 sec. Near
SR 47 & 75 386-719-5616
3 br/2ba house, 1206 McFarlane
Avenue. Avail. 91/11. $950 mo
$400 sec dep. 904-376-0620 or
904-813-8864 for appointment,
3/2, family rm, 2 car garage,
$750 mo. +
$750 security deposit
Call 386-752-2384
3/2, Ir, dr, fam rm w/ fp, 2-car
garage, fenced bk yd.
1792 sqft. $1050 mo. Martha Jo
Khachigan, Realtor 623-2848
3BR/1.5 BA Large lot. Very clean
with storage shed. Quiet area.
$850 mo. + $850. dep.
386-752-7578
3BR/2BA CB home Carport hard-
wood floors. CH/A Fenced yard.
Good area. $750 mo plus security.
386-752-0118 or 623-1698
3br/2ba Nice Brick home 1700 sf
for rent corner of Baya &
Defender. $850. mo. $850. dep.
386-344-5065


1996 Chrysler Town
& Country LXi
2nd owner, very clean
inside & out, cold AC, new
tire, loaded, 110K.
$3,200 OBO
Call
386-963-2271
386-249-2723


3br/2ba. 1100 sqft. 5 ac. Huge
oaks. 1 mi west of 1-75 & US 90.
Appliances, shed, water, sewer &
lawn care. $700mo $1100 dep.
386-984-9992/(904)571-5001
4br/2ba CHA Brick, 1200 sqft
lac., Close to FGCC, CR 245A.
Ceramic tile/carpet, $800 mo $800
dep (904)708-8478 App. req'd
House for rent in town.
Please call for more
information. NO PETS!
386-758-0057
Remodeled 3br/2ba Brick. In town
1750 sqft. Lg lot. Includes washer,
dryer, stove, & fridge. Quiet area
$985. mo $985 dep. 386-752-7578
Unfurnished 2 bedroom/I bath
house on 5 acres. $700.00 per
month. First, last and security
Firm. 386-590-5333

750 Business&
SOffice Rentals
Commercial property. 2100 sqft
bldg. on 1 acre. CH/A. Close to
college and Timco. Call for more
information. 386-867-1190
FOR LEASE: Downtown office
space. Convenient to
Court house.
Call 386-755-3456
For Lease: E Baya Ave. Two -
1000 sqft office space units or
combined for 2000 sqft. 386-984-
0622 or weekends 386-497-4762
OFFICE SPACE for lease.
Oak Hill Plaza. 900 sqft
$675mo/$695. sec dep.
Tom 386-961-1086 DCA Realtor

790 Vacation Rentals

Horseshoe Beach RV Lot.
Nice comer Lot with shade trees.
$295. mo Water/electric included
386-235-3633 or 352-498-5986
Scalloping Horseshoe Beach Spcl
Gulf Front 2br, w/lg porch, dock,
fish sink. wkend $395./wk $895.
386-235-3633/352-498-5986
alwaysonvacation.com #419-181
"Florida's Last Frontier"


805 Lots for Sale
North Fla Land. 1/2 80 Ac w/Fin.
Counties Columbia, Suwannee,
Gilchrist, Baker, Glades, Polk.
Call for brochure and terms. 7
Days 7 to 7. 386-752-5035 X 3111
A Bar Sales, Inc.
PUBLISHER'S NOTE,
All real estate advertising in this
newspaper is subject to the fair
housing act which makes it illegal
to advertise "any preference,
limitation, or discrimination based
on race, color, religion, sex,
disability, familial status or nation-
al origin; or any intention to make
such preference, limitation or
discrimination." Familial status
includes children under the age of
18 living with parents or legal
custodians, pregnant women and
people securing custody of chil-
dren under the age of 18. This
newspaper will not knowingly
accept any advertising for real es-
tate which is in violation of the
law. Our readers are hereby in-
formed that all dwellings adver-
tised in this newspaper are availa-
ble on an equal opportunity basis.
To complain of discrimination call
HUD toll free at 1-800-669-9777,
the toll free
telephone number to the hearing
impaired is 1-800-927-9275.


810 Home for Sale
Close ti everything. Lg 3br/2ba
brick home. Close to VA & shop-
ping! $189,900 MLS78131 Carrie
Cason 386-623-2806
Westfield Realty Group
Luxury home. 3br/2ba, 20 ac lot.
Cherry cabinets & SS appliances.
Jacuzzi in master br. MLS 78190
$ 374,900 Roger Lovelady 365-
7039. Westfield Realty Group
Owner Financing Avail. with
down pmt. 3br/2ba 2 story brick.
4.6 ac. in ground pool. Lg. work-
shop &2 wells. $150,000.00 obo
Old Wire Rd. (850)728-0782

82O Farms &
Acreage

05527058
Must See, Prettiest Rolling
Pasture Lot in North Fla.
3 mi. W. of Col. City School.
Red. to $6,990 P/A, Financing,
386-752-1364 or 386-965-4340

10 ac. Ft. White $39,995,
$995 Down, $273.16 mo.
Seller fin. vargasrealty.com
352-472-3154
10-ac lot. Well/septic/pp. Owner
financing $300 dn, $663 mo 8.9%,
25 yrs. Deas Bullard Properties
386-752-4339 www.landnfl.com
4 1/2 acre lot Lake Jeffery Road.
Gorgeous Oaks!Paved Rd
Owner Financing! NO DOWN!
$59,900. $525mo 352-215-1018.
www.LandOwnerFinancing.com
FARM- 7 stall barn.
17+ acres, pasture, cross fenced.
Close in $500. mo.
386-961-1086


2007 Coach House
Platinum 272XL, 15K
miles, may consider partial
trade for Class B.
$110,000
Call
386-754-8505


shelves/ladder rack,
60K miles, exc. cond.

$10,500
Call
386-555-5555
If you don't sell your vehicle
during the first 10 days, you
can run the same vehicle ad
for 10 additional days for
only $15.00
Terms and conditions remain the
same for the additional run.



To Get You


820 Farms &
820 Acreage
4 acres. Wellborn, New Well
installed. Beautifully wooded
w/cleared Home Site, owner fin,
no down, $39,900, $410 mon
Call 352-215-1018
www.LandOwnerFinancing.com

870 Real Estate
70 Wanted

I Buy Houses
CASH!
Quick Sale Fair Price
386-269-0605

930 Motorcycles

2001 KAWASAKI KLR250,
excellent condition, 2,193 miles.
combination street legal/off road.
$1,995 386-623-4376
2002 SUZUKI Intruder
1500cc. Fully dressed.
$3,500. SELL OR TRADE.
386-832-7005
Motorcycles Sales/Service,
We Service and do minor repairs.
Motorcycles for sale
Terry 386-209-4412 or
Carl 407-687-2186


950 Cars for Sale
1974 Corvette Stingray.
350 engine with 4 speed transmis-
sion. Call for more info. $3,500.
386-397-6717 or 752-8157

9 Recreational
951 Vehicles
2007 Coach House
Platinum 272XL, 15K miles. May
consider partial trade for Class B.
$110,000. 386-754-8505




IContact usT


at the paper,








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386-755-5440



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386-755-5445


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386-752-1293
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