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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028308/01626
 Material Information
Title: The Lake City reporter
Uniform Title: Lake City reporter (Lake City, Fla. 1967)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: John H. Perry
Place of Publication: Lake City Fla
Publication Date: 8/4/2011
Frequency: daily (monday through friday)[<1969>-]
weekly[ former 1967-<1968>]
daily
normalized irregular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Lake City (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Columbia County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Columbia -- Lake City
Coordinates: 30.189722 x -82.639722 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 95, no. 4 (Oct. 5, 1967)-
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000358016
oclc - 33283560
notis - ABZ6316
lccn - sn 95047175
sobekcm - UF00028308_01569
System ID: UF00028308:01626
 Related Items
Preceded by: Lake City reporter and Columbia gazette

Full Text





Pairing up
Local duo to play


in Junior Team
Chamoionships.


Lake


Thursday, August 4, 201 I


Reuse


plant


could


bring


60 jobs


By TONY BRITT
tbritt@lakecityreporter.com
It's hoped a new industry that
will be associated with an envi-
ronmentally friendly reclamation
facility will bring at least 60 jobs
to the area.
Columbia. Technologies Inc.
will be located
north of Lake
City near the
Winfield Solid
Waste Landfill,
where the com-
pany will operate
a materials recla-
Williams mation facility.
"It's not the
kind of plant you might envi-
sion in your mind," said Dale
Williams, county manager.
"There is a tip floor and they
bring waste in and it's dumped
on the tip floor. Anything within
that waste that can be either
reused or repurposed is pulled
out. Materials that can be used
to make other products are sepa-
rated. They have markets that
they sell those goods to."
The waste can be medical
trash, household garbage or
other forms of refuse, depending
upon who CTI contracts with,
Williams said.
"The county commission has
entered into an agreement with
CTI and the county has the last
right of refusal as to the amount
and type of waste," Williams
said.
In addition CTI is developing
a "green park" (environmentally
friendly site), adjacent to the
Winfield Solid Waste facility.
"Their marketing strategy is
to market that area to companies
who use less energy than what
they produce," Williams said.
Williams said CTI has com-
pleted the appropriate paper-
work and is qualified to receive
Florida QTI (Qualified Target
Industry) funds, in addition to
other state funding. The QTI tax
refund program is designed to
help offset the cost of expansion
for a company.
"We received an Economic
Development Transportation
Trust Fund Grant to help them
and we're in the very early stag-
es of that," Williams said, noting
the grant is for about $300,000..
There is no way to determine
how many jobs CTI will bring
to the area, because businesses
with which CTI contracts will do
their own hiring.
CTI has purchased more
than 100 acres near the landfill
for its "green park" and is cur-
rently clearing the property. The
Department of Transportation is
working with local officials and
company representatives to pro-
vide a turn lane into the facility.
CTI has applied for a mixed
use development land permit.
County staff is in the process
of creating a mixed use devel-
opment category in its compre-
hensive land use plan. There
is currently no zoning for a
mixed used development per-
mit locally.


Dent's in
Ex-Bear wins
a spot in NFL
Hall of Fame.


Luny


The Chase
Race heats up
for 2 wild
card spots.
Sports, IB


Reporter


www.lakecityreporter.com


BACKPACKS GALORE


Photos by JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
TOP: Dana Huggins, Columbia County School District homeless liaison, organizes a group of backpacks for
elementary school children. A total of 300 backpacks will be distributed to elementary, middle and high school
students August 13 at the Richardson Community Center from 8 a.m. to noon, 'This is a fulfilling passion
of mine to help kids in need and to be able to help kids accomplish and succeed in school,' Huggins said.
ABOVE: Elishia Parker (from right), the AmeriCorps VISTA program director; Dorothy Spradley, school district
volunteer/education marketing coordinator and Nicole Smith, secretary for the Columbia County Recreation
Department, stuff school supplies in backpacks Wednesday for the 2011 Back to School Book Bag Bash.


COUNTY COMMISSION PREVIEW

Fire, waste fees aren't going up


By LEANNE TYO
Ityo@lakecityreporter.com
The county will soon be set-
ting its preliminary rates for solid
waste and fire protection services
for the upcoming fiscal year, rates
that have not increased.


Putnam Street

water plant

coming down

By LEANNE TYO
Ityo@lakecityreporter.com
Demolition has begun on Lake
City's old Putnam Street Water
Treatment Plant, a historic structure
whose site will soon come under
school district ownership.
The plant, at 928 SE Putnam
Street, sits adjacent to Melrose Park
Elementary and will become anoth-
er access point to the elementary
school, said Mike Null, Columbia
PUTNAM continued on 3A


"There are no proposed increas-
es in these rates for the coming
year," said Dale Williams, county
manager.
County Attorney Marlin
Feagle will present the resolu-
tions for the preliminary rates
to the Columbia County Board


of County Commissioners at its
regular meeting tonight.
For residences during fiscal
year 2011-12, which begins Oct.
1, the preliminary rate for solid
waste collection and disposal ser-
COUNTY continued on 3A


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
A demolition crew tears down a structure Tuesday at the Putnam Street
Water Treatment Plant, which is located adjacent to Melrose Park
Elementary School. The demolition, at a cost of more than $27,000, is
due to be completed in the next three weeks.


Vol. 137, No. 162 75 cents


CARC


store


will


reopen

By ANTONIA ROBINSON
arobinson@lakecityreporter.com
Lake City will soon see
the return of its oldest thrift
shop, but with a new name
and look.
T h e
Advocates
of Citizens
Disabilities
Inc. has
decided
Baughman to reopen
the House
of Bargains, said Amber
Baughman, executive direc-
tor. It initially closed June 4
after 28 years of business.
The tentative opening
date for the store is Oct. 1.
The community is invited to
provide new name sugges-
tions for the store.
"Our new store will have
more of a boutique feel,"
she said. "It will still be a
thrift store, just with nicer
merchandise and store lay-
out."
Several reasons led to
the store's reopening,
Baughman said. Several of
the clients in the Adult Day
Training program asked
if the CARC could reopen
the store on her. first day
as executive director. Also,
she received overwhelming
feedback from the commu-
nity about the store.
"Simply, the community
relies on us as much as we
rely on them," she said.
The CARC has the oppor-
tunity to start over with a
revamped environment
by renaming the store,
Baughman said.
"Re-naming the store
would allow us to continue to
bring in the community and
really have the community
take pride and ownership in
our organization," she said.
In preparation for the
reopening, A clearance sale
is 8 a.m.--4 p.m. Aug. 26- 27.
CARC is accepting donations,
such as gently used clothing,
housewares, lawn equipment
and sporting goods. Donors
are provided recipients for
the donations.
The CARC will also contin-
ue with online sales through
Ebay and Craigslist
"This is a new venture for
us and we are hoping to con-
tinue to provide this compo-
nent with our in-store mer-
chandise," Baughman said.
Send suggestions for
naming the store via e-
mail to Brittany Greek at
bgreek@lakecity-carc.
com or mail to the CARC
administrative office at 512
SW Sisters Welcome Road,
Lake City, FL 32055.
"Since we sale items
donated by the community
we will continue to rely on
the community to help our
cause," Baughman said.
"We of course are a not-for-
profit organization, so our
prices will be extremely
competitive to similar stores
that are for profit"


CALL US:
(386) 752-1293
SUBSCRIBE TO
THE REPORTER:
Voice: 755-5445
Fax: 752-9400


99
T-Storm Chance
WEATHER, 2A


Opinion ................
People..................
Obituaries ..............
Advice & Comics.........
Puzzles .................


TODAY IN
PEOPLE
Kutcher to
replace Sheen.


COMING
FRIDAY
BOCC meeting
coverage.


i 1 1... i u L 1


I


- .









LAKE CITY REPORTER DAILY BRIEFING THURSDAY. AUGUST 4, 2011


AH3 Wednesday:
Afternoon: 6-3-0
N/A


Play y4 A Wednesday:
Afternoon: 2-7-2-8
-, N/A


Tuesday:
8-12-24-29-31


PEOPLE IN THE NEWS


Kutcher will play Internet billionaire


BEVERLYHILLS
Ashton Kutcher will play
"an Internet billionaire
with a broken heart"
when he arrives as the
new star of "Two and a
Half Men" next month.
CBS Entertainment Nina Tassler
shared this tidbit about the much-
anticipated cast change for TV's
biggest sitcom during a session with
television reporters on Wednesday.
Kutcher, of course, will fill the void
left by Charlie Sheen, who made a
stormy exit from "Men" last season.
Kutcher's character will be named
Walden Schmidt, confided the CBS
boss, who added that Schmidt has
no family connection to the charac-
ters played by continuing stars Jon
Cryer and Angus T. Jones. They
portrayed the brother and nephew of
Sheen's departed character.
Tassler would not confirm or
deny reports that the new season
of "Men" begins with the death of
Sheen's character, Charlie Harper,
and a funeral.
"The mystery is part of the mar-
keting," she said.
"Men" begins its ninth season on
Sept 19 with the first of a two-part
kickoff that establishes Kutcher's
character.
Kutcher, she said, "is an extraor-
dinarily professional, talented, funny,
gifted actor who comes with a tre-
mendous amount of commitment
and enthusiasm."
"The show will be as irreverent as
it has ever been," she promised.

Singer, songwriter
Eugene McDaniels dies
KITTERY, Maine Gene
McDaniels, who recorded the 1961
hit "A Hundred Pounds of Clay" and
later wrote Roberta Flack's chart-top-
ping single "Feel Like Makin' Love,"
has died. He was 76.
McDaniels died Friday at his


Actors Jon .Cryer (from left), Ashton Kutcher and Angus T. Jones pose for a pho-
tograph. Kutcher will be replacing Charlie Sheen on the CBS comedy 'Two and
a Half Men.' Kutcher's character will be named Walden Schmidt and will be intro-
duced in the ninth season as Sheen's character will be killed off.


home in Kittery after
a brief illness.
"A Hundred
Pounds of Clay,"
McDaniels' first hit,
peaked at No. 3 on
the Billboard pop
McDaniels, chart in 1961, the
same year "Tower of
Strength" hit No. 5. He also record-
ed "Point of No Return," "Another
Tear Falls" and other hits.

Buchanan: No slur
intended with 'boy' quip
NEW YORK Pat Buchanan said
that he didn't mean.
to slur President
Barack Obama by
referring to him as
"your boy" during a
discussion with Al
Sharpton.
Buchanan The former.
GOP presidential
candidate and current MSNBC


analyst appeared on "Morning Joe"
Wednesday to explain remarks he
made on that network's Sharpton
show 12 hours earlier. They were
discussing Obama's political
strength' when Buchanan said that
"your boy" had caved in past negotia-
tions and was likely to do so in the
future.

911 dispatchers prep
for Batman-fueled calls
PITTSBURGH Emergency dis-
patchers in Pittsburgh are preparing
to take calls from residents who may
be unprepared for fake gun shots,
explosions and other mayhem while
the Batman movie 'The Dark Knight
Rises" films at various city locations.
"If you hear shots fired or a dis-
turbance or gunfire ... call 911 and
report it and well figure it out,"
said Allegheny County Deputy
Emergency Management Director
Raymond DeMichiei.
E Associated Press


,Celebrity Birthdays


* Actor Richard Belzer is 67.
* Actor-screenwriter Billy
Bob Thornton is 56.
* President Barack Obama
is 50.
Daily Scripture


* Actor Daniel Dae Kim is 43.
* Race car driver Jeff
Gordon is 40.
* Singer-actor Marques
Houston is 30.


"But the Lord said to Samuel,
'Do not consider his appear-
ance or his height, for I have
rejected him.The Lord does not
look at the things people look
at. People look at the outward
appearance, but the Lord looks
at the heart.'"
I Samuel 16:7
Thought for Today
"A man does' not know what he
is saying until he knows what he
is not saying."
G.K. Chesterton,
English poet-essayist (1874-1936)

Lake City Reporter
HOW TO REACH US
Main number ........(386) 752-1293 BUSINESS
Fax number ..............752-9400 Controller Sue Brannon... .754-0419
Circulation .......... 755-5445 (sbrannon@lakecityreporter.com)
Online... www.lakecityreporter.com CIRCULATION
The Lake City Reporter, an affiliate of
Community Newspapers Inc., is pub- Home delivery of the Lake City Reporfer
lished Tuesday through Sunday at 180 should be completed by 6-30 am.
E. Duval St, Lake City, Fla. 32055. Tuesday through Saturday, and by 730
Periodical postage paid at Lake City, Ra. am. on Sunday.
Member Audit Bureau of Circulation and Please call 386-755-5445 to report any
The Associated Press. problems with your delivery service.
All material herein is property of the Lake In Columbia County, customers should
City Reporter. Reproduction in whole or call before 10.30 a.m. to report a ser-
in part is forbidden ,without the permis- vice error for same day re-delivery. After
sion of the publisher. U.S. Postal Service 100 am., next day re-delvery or ser-
N0o. 3r010. r ne t da re-de r or ser-
No. 310-6.vice related credits will be Issued.
POSTMASTER: Send address changes In all other counties where home delivery
to Lake City Reporter, PO. Box 1709, is available, next day re-delivery or ser-
Lake City, Fla 32056. vice related credits will be Issued.
Publisher Todd Wilson .....754-0418
(twilson@lakectyreporter.com) Circulation ...............755-5445
(circulation@lakecityreporter.com)
NEWS Home delivery rates
Editor Robert Bridges .....754-0428 (Tuesday through Sunday)
(rbridges@lakecityreporter.com) 12 Weeks ................. $26.32
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CLASSIFIED 24 Weeks ..................$82.80
To place a classified ad, call 755-5440 52 Weeks ..................$179.40

CORRECTION

The Lake City Reporter corrects errors of fact in news
items. If you have a concern, question or suggestion, please
call the executive editor. Corrections and clarifications will run
in this space. And thanks for reading.


Man convicted
-of killing rival
VIERA- Keith
Batchelor, 23, has been
convicted of killing a man
who had been dating his
ex-girlfriend.
-" A Brevard County jury
found Batchelor guilty
Tuesday of second-degree
murder, false imprison-
ment, arson and abuse of a
dead human body.
Isiah Marks was found
dead in a burning vehicle
in Palm Bay in 2009. An
autopsy couldn't determine
a cause of death, but offi-
cials believe he was dead
before he was burned.
Prosecutors said cell
phone records and the cre-
ation of false alibis pointed
to Batchelor as the killer.

Man gets 60
years for rape
WEST PALM BEACH
- A man convicted in the
2007 gang rape of a West
Palm Beach woman and
the beating of her young
son has been resentenced
to 60 years in prison.
Nathan Walker's sen-
tencing Wednesday came
after a U.S. Supreme Court
ruling last year struck
down life sentences for
juveniles convicted of
anything other than mur-
der. He had initially been
given a life sentence in the
attack he took part in at
the age of 16.
Walker and three others
raped the woman repeat-
edly, then beat her then-
12-year-old son and forced
her to perform oral sex on
him. They then doused the
two in chemicals and left
when they could not find a
match.

Man hit by train
in Orlando, dies
ORLANDO -
Authorities said a man
died after being hit by
a train in downtown


Ci -OR] AT toTurdyAgp


Will work for jobs
Craig Glaser (right) joins other protesters during Gov. Rick
Scott's visit to Nicola's Donuts in Carrollwood Wednesday in
Tampa. It was the first of many planned "workdays," in which
Scott will spend time doing jobs with regular Floridians.


Orlando.
Police said the man was
apparently walking on the
tracks early Wednesday
morning when a CSX train
hit him. Officials believe
the man was homeless and
intoxicated.

Teen dies at
correction center
VERO BEACH -
Officials said a central
Florida teen died at the
Indian River County
Correctional Institute.
The Florida Department
of Corrections reports that
Demetrius L. Jordan, 17,
died Monday. Foul play
is not suspected, but an
autopsy will determine the
cause of death.
Records show that
Jordan shot at a man for
target practice in Brevard
County in 2008. The man
survived, and Jordan
pleaded guilty in 2009 to
attempted second-degree
murder. He was sentenced
to four years.

Small plane
crashes, 1 injured
ST. PETERSBURG -
Tampa Bay-area authori-


ties said one person was
injured when a small plane
skidded off the runway
during takeoff from the
Albert Whitted Airport
The twin engine plane
had five people aboard
Wednesday morning.
Pinellas County fire-rescue
officials said one person
was taken to a hospital in
stable condition, while the
other four were checked
by paramedics but
declined treatment

2 dogs shot after
attacking officer
ST. PETERSBURG -
Tampa Bay-area sheriff's
deputies said they shot two
dogs, killing one, after one
officer was attacked.
A man called authorities
Wednesday morning and
said three large dogs were
running loose in the neigh-
borhood and trying to get
inside the man's home.
Upon arrival, one
Pinellas County Sheriff's
deputy was attacked by
one dog and a second dep-
uty shot that dog. A sec-
ond canine then charged
a deputy and both officers
fired at the second dog.
* Associated Press


Tallahassee *
99/77
Pensacola ',
94, Panama City
92/80


teisau --
99/76 -
Lake City-
99/75
Gainesvie
-.,96/75
S Ocala
'96/75


Tamia',.
94/77,


City
SJacksonville Cape Canaveral
98/81 Daytona Beach
Ft. Lauderdale
Daytona Beach Fort Myers
, Galnesvlle
Jacksonville
Orlando Capk Canaveral KeyWest
96/79 91/79 Lake City
slpMiami
Nanle


FtLMyer
93/77


Key
91/


TEMPERATURES
High Wednesday
Low Wednesday
Normal high
Normal low
Record high
Record low

PRECIPITATION
Wednesday
Month total
Year total
Normal month-to-date
Normal year-to-date


95
72
91
71
99 in 1897
66 in 1939

0.00"
2.15"
25.54"
0.63"
30.76"


SUN
Sunrise today
Sunset today
Sunrise tom.
Sunset tom.

MOON


West Palm Beach Ocala
90/78 Orlando
FL Lauderdale Panama City
90/80 Pensacola
Naples Tallahassee
94/77 Miam Tampa
S 9q/80 Valdosta
est* W. Palm Beach
81,


6:51 a.m.
8:22 p.m.
6:52 a.m.
8:21 p.m.


Moonrise today 12:06 p.m.
Moonset today 11:30 p.m.
Moonrise tom. 1:13 p.m.
Moonset tom.

0031
Aug. Aug. Aug. Aug.
6 13 21 27
First Full Last New


7aBEm
10minmSIsbh
Today's
ultra-violet
radiation risk
for the area on
a scale from 0
to 1(1+


Friday
89 78'I
92 77/1
91/80/t
94/78/t
96/75/t
95/80/t
92/81/t
97/75/t
91/81/t
92/77/t
95/75/t
94/79/t
91/80/t
93/79/t
97/77/t
94/77/t
97/75/t
90/79/t


Saturday
38. 77'/
91/ 75/t
90/80/t
93/77/t
95/74/t
94/80/t
87/81/t
96/75/t
91/80/t
92/79/t
95/75/t
93/78/t
92/79/pc
90/79/t
96/76/t
95/78/t
97/74/t
91/79/t


An exclusive
service
brought to
our readers
by
The Weather
Channel.



weather.com


Av iv Forecasts, data and

weather J www.weathefpubllshewcoi


AROUND FLORIDA


THE WEATHER


I OLATED CHANCE CHANCE
T-STORMS -STORMS -STORMS


HI 99 L. 75 HI 97 LO 75 HI 96LO 75
wIiiimiiiti F 7w~i~-w-.v m-jiiii~ii i


" - - ' I [ r II IH 'ONO


iflilLBASB


Page Editor: Jason M. Walker, 754-0430


LtAK`E:':'CIT-Y-.AL-M'A'N-AC


'V= I Mil 233"
lE~~la l ~In n m hi ent a


(386) 755-5445









LAKE CITY REPORTER NEWS THURSDAY, AUGUST 4, 2011


Cargill recalling 36M pounds of ground turkey


By MARY CLARE JALONICK
Associated Press

WASHINGTON Meat giant
Cargill is recalling 36 million pounds
of ground turkey linked to a nation-
wide salmonella outbreak that has
killed one person in California and
sickened at least 76 others.
Illnesses in the outbreak date back
to March and have been reported in
26 states coast to coast
Cargill said Wednesday that it is
recalling fresh and frozen ground tur-
key products produced at the compa-
ny's Springdale, Ark., plant from Feb.
20 through Aug. 2 due to possible
contamination from the strain of sal-
monella linked to the illnesses.
Company officials said that all
ground turkey production has been
suspended at the plant until the com-
pany is able to determine the source
of the outbreak.


"Given our concern for what has
happened, and our desire to do what is
right for our consumers and customers,
we are voluntarily removing our ground
turkey products from the marketplace,"
said Steve Willardsen, president of
Cargfill's turkey processing business.
The Minnesota-based company said
it was initiating the recall after its own
internal investigation, an Agriculture
Department investigation and infor-
mation about the illnesses released by
the CDC this week.
All of the packages recalled include
the code "Est P-963" on the label,
according to. Cargill. The pack-
ages were labeled with many dif-
ferent brands, including Cargill's
Honeysuckle White.
The CDO said this week that cul-
tures of ground turkey from four retail
locations between March 7 and June
27 showed contamination with the
same strain of salmonella, though


those samples had not been specifi-
cally linked to the illnesses.
Achart on the CDC's website shows
cases have occurred every month
since early March, with spikes in May
and early June. The latest reported
cases were in mid-July, although the
CDC said some recent cases may not
have been reported yet
The states with the highest number
sickened were Michigan and Ohio, 10
illnesses each, while nine illnesses were
reported in Texas.' Illinois had seven,
California six and Pennsylvania five.
The remaining states have between
one and three reported illnesses
linked to the outbreak, according to
the CDC: Alabama, Arizona, Georgia,
Iowa, Indiana, Kentucky,- Louisiana,
Massachusetts, Minnesota, Missouri,
Mississippi, North Carolina, Nebraska,
Nevada, New York, Oklahoma,
Oregon, South Dakota, Tennessee
and Wisconsin.


ASSOCIATED PRES
U.S. Agriculture Secretary Tom Vilsack speaks to the
International Association for Food Protection Wednesday in
Milwaukee.


PUTNAM: Site of old water plant will be access point for elementary school

Continued From Page 1A


County School District pur-
chasing director.
"It's going to give us the
access from BayaAvenue all
the way to Putnam Street,"
Null said, "so it'll afford
the district an opportunity
to have improvements in
school access either for bus
or car riders...That will give
us access on all four sides
as opposed to three."
The Lake City City.
Council voted unanimously,
with Mayor Stephen Witt
absent, to begin demolition
of the city-owned plant at
its July 18 meeting with


vices will be $201 and the pre-
liminary rate for fire protection
services will be $77, pending board
approval.
Williams said the assessments
are non-ad valorem in nature.
While they are includedlofi ithe.
property tax bill, they are not, as
a matter of law, considered taxes,
he said.


the city bearing the $27,000
demolition cost
Both. Null and Steve
Roberts, city director of
water services, said the
Columbia County School
Board will then pay the city
half of the demolition cost
in exchange for the proper-
ty's title.
"They (the school board)
agreed to pay half the
demolition cost of what it
takes to demolish the site
and in exchange, the city
would deed that little .par-
cel to the school board,"
Roberts said. He estimated


the site to be a little more
than an acre.
The school board
approved the exchange in
its five-year work plan pro-
cess last year and in its ten-
tative Local Capital Outlay
Millage expenditures.
"Once the city has the
work completed and sub-
mits an invoice to us, then
we'll do a reimbursement,"
Null said. "And then their
legal department would
go through the process of
issuing title to the school
district, subject to any util-
ity easements they have to


'"They do come on your tax
bill and they are billed in accor-
dance with statute," Williams said.
'"They're collected just like pay-
ment or nonpayment for taxes are,
but legally they're not considered a
property tax." -'
Since the rates are preliminary,
they can only decrease, Williams
said.


maintain on that property."
The city is demolish-
ing three other old water
treatment plants, but the
Putnam Street plant is first
on the list because the start
of school is nearing, Robert
said.
"Putnam Street takes
priority because we want
them in and out before
school starts," he said. "We
don't want kids walking by
dump trucks and things of
that nature."
The Putnam Street Water
Treatment Plant was built
in the 1940s or 50s when


"These are preliminary rate res-
olutions," he said, "so once the
board establishes these rates, they
can always lower them, but they


Lake City's downtown area
was in need of clean, fresh
drinking water, Roberts
said.
It was turned into a
lime-softening facility in
the 1970s to deal with the
potential of bacteriological
problems in. the water as
Lake City grew, he said, but
was eventually converted
back to a basic water plant
when a critical component
in the lime-softening facil-
ity wore out in 1999.
The Putnam Street plant
was in operation until the
city's new plant, Price


assessments on their November
tax bill, Williams said.
The Columbia County Board of
County Commissioners will meet


cannot increase them." at 7 p.m. at the Co
Final rate resolutions for the School Board .
assessments will be voted on at Complex auditorium
the county's first budget hearing Street.
Sept 8. "" ""
Residents can expect to see the


lumbia County
Administrative,
a, 372 W Duval.
..wus" MU


Creek Water Treatment
Plant, replaced it in 2007,
Roberts said.


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COUNTY: .Fire, solid waste rates are not expected to change

Continued From Page 1A


Page Editor: Robert Bridges, 754-0428


www.woodstmiefforida.com
:, ow: 0













OPINION


Thursday, August 4, 201 I


www.lakecityreporter.com


AN OPINION


The hits


keep on


coming


W e had hoped that
Congress had
gotten the "my
way or the high-
way" approach
to legislating out of its system in
the run-up to the votes on raising
the debt ceiling.
Apparently not
Since July 23 a similar impasse,
although on a much smaller scale,
is costing the government rough-
ly $30 million a day in uncollected
taxes on airline tickets. With the
House taking its August recess
and the Senate preparing to leave,
the deadlock may not be broken
until September, costing the gov-
ernment meaning us over $1.2
billion in lost revenues.
This current mess is collat-
eral damage from a much larger
mess: the failure of Congress to
enact a new multiyear transporta-
tion-funding law to replace the
one that expired in 2007.
The Federal Aviation
Administration's operating
authority expired along with the
law, but Congress has kept it in
business through a series of 20
short-term extensions.
But Senate Democrats balked
at an extension approved by
the newly ascendant House
Republicans because it cut $16.5
million in subsidies for rural air
service and because they made
clear they were going to over-
turn a ruling by a federal labor
panel that the GOP believes
would make it easier for airline
and rail employees to unionize.
The upshot is that the FAA
furloughed 4,000 employees
the air-traffic controllers,
deemed essential to public
safety, have remained on the job
and work has stopped on over
200 airport construction proj-
ectsSo here's where it stands
now Senate Democrats are
blocking the House-passed FAA
extension because it includes
the cuts for rural air service;
Senate Republicans are blocking
the Senate Democrats' exten-
sion because it restores the cuts.
This stuff would actually be
funny if it weren't costing us
badly needed tax revenues and
delaying badly needed airport
improvements. As baseball's
Casey Stengel once said in a dif-
ferent contest "Can't anybody
here play this game?"
N Scripps Howard News Service

Lake City Reporter
Serving Columbia County
Since 1874
The Lake City Reporter is pub-
lished with pride for residents of
Columbia and surrounding counties by
Community Newspapers Inc.
We believe strong newspapers build
strong communities -"Newspapers
get things done!"
Our primary goal is to
publish distinguished and profitable
community-oriented newspapers.
This mission will be accomplished
through the teamwork of professionals
dedicated to truth, integrity and hard
work.
Todd Wilson, publisher
Robert Bridges, editor
Sue Brannon, controller
Dink NeSmith, president
Tom Wood, chairman

LETTERS
POLICY
Letters to the Editor should be
typed or neatly written and double
Spaced. Letters should not exceed
400 words and will be edited for
length and libel. Letters must be
signed and include the writer's name,
address and telephone number for
verification. Writers can have two
letters per month published. Letters
and guest columns are the opinion of
the writers and not necessarily that of
the Lake City Reporter.


BY MAIL: Letters, P.O. Box 1709,
Lake City, FL 32056; or drop off at
180 E. Duval St. downtown.
BY FAX: (386) 752-9400.
BY E-MAIL:
news@lakecityreporter.com


"Are we there yet?" "Why?"
"Will you marry me?" "Is that
what you're gonna wear today?"
How about, "Can you help me?"
Familiar questions. I think a
genuine question is an attempt
to get new information that
we need, in order to learn and
grow, and to have a level of suc-
cess in our lives.
Why ask a question? I
remember being on the high
school swimming team, and
swimming hard for a couple of
hours each day. The pool build-
ing had a high round metal roof,
with glass windows on all sides.
Sounds echoed off the hard
surfaces of the metal, glass,
and off the surface of the water.
Human voices were lost in all
the noise. Coach Zwolsman
walked briskly around the pool,
while shouting and gesturing
different swim strokes with his
arms. But I couldn't under-
stand a word he said. I earned
a couple of medals by the end
of the season, but in the last
swim match Ron Sori, from our
rival school, beat me by 4 yards
and went on to the Olympics.
The difference? If I'd talked
to the coach after practice and
asked questions, I might have
improved enough to go to the
Olympics.
Why ask a question? In
school, it's the best way to
learn, and clear up what you
don't understand. With friends


Robert Denny
Bob.Denny8@gmail.com


and family, it shows sensitiv-
ity to their problems. Ask,
"What do you need? How can
I help?" It makes your relation-
ship grow stronger. On your
job: "How am I doing? What
steps can I take to be even bet-
ter?" Questions can help you
meet life's challenges, solve
life's problems, and discover
opportunities that life presents
you. When people are asked
who they like the best, and who
are the best conversational-
ists, it's the one who asks the
most questions and listens to
the answers. When you ask, it
'shows interest in others.
How do we ask good ques-
tions?
Choose the right reasons
to ask your question. In the
"Blue Collar" movie, Bill sees
a guy who locked himself out
of his car, using a coat hanger
to reach through the window
crack to unlock the door. Bill
asks, "Lock yourself out?" The


answer: "No, I just want to
hang it up and get the wrinkles
out." Here's your sign! Don't
use questions thoughtlessly, or
for the wrong reasons. Have
you heard this: "Never ask a
question you don't already know
the answer to?" Don't do it just
to show how smart you are, or
to get attention.
Think about how your ques-
tion will be accepted by the
questionnee. Make your ques-
tion respectful, clear and short
Listen carefully to the answer,
and confirm it by putting it in
your own words. It's a good
idea to show appreciation for
the answer they give, and say
thanks.
Remember, if you have a
question, others in the group
probably would like to have the
answer too.
You may find that your skills
in asking questions can be a
most valuable tool in making
your life happier, more meaning-
ful and fulfilling, and in building
better relationships.
Practice makes perfect. What
do you think? Let me know at
Bob.Denny8@gmail.com.

E Robert Denny is a licensed
mental health therapist, and
teaches psychology at Florida
Gateway College in Lake City.
Comments welcome at Bob.
Denny8@gmail.com.


A mushy, malleable middle


To understand why
the president of the
United States, hav-
ing lost all other
vestiges of dig-
nity, is sitting around in his
undershorts as he celebrates
the settlement of the debt-ceil-
ing fiasco, it is necessary to
focus on two unrecognized fac-
tors that shaped the outcome:
Eustace Tilley and Chinese for-
tune cookies.
You may not know Eustace
Tilley but he often accom-
panies the better class of
person into finely appointed
bathrooms. Now, don't
go getting all nervous or
excited. Our man Eustace
is a most reputable gentle-
man and goes there only as a
reading companion.
He is the emblem of The
New Yorker magazine. In its
famous illustration, he is a
dandy in a top hat and high
collar who studies a butterfly
through a monocle in a most
superior way.
Although The New Yorker
is not NASCAR Illustrated and
therefore more likely the pre-
ferred reading of people who
are liberal if not Democratic, I
am thinking that Eustace is an
Independent
Perhaps Independents do
not all wear top hats or look at
life through monocles, prefer-
ring instead ball caps and sun-
glasses, but the heavy burden
of deciding American national
elections makes fellows like


Reg Henry
rhenry@post-gazette.com
Eustace rather full of them-
selves.
It is the same every election.
Reporters are constantly seek-
ing out Independents to find
out whom they favor. "Eustace,
Eustace, who will it be?" the
reporters ask, ignoring the rest
of us known to have settled
opinions that reflect a basic phi-
losophy lasting from one elec-
tion to the next.
But the Independents, in
their capricious, above-the-fray
way, are blissfully free of intel-
lectual continuity and just keep
watching that darned butterfly
in front of their aristocratic
noses. Sometimes it flits to the
left, sometimes it flits to the
right.
In 2008, the butterfly flitted
to the left and the Independents
helped make Barack Obama
president In 2010, the butter-
fly flitted to the right and they
helped Republicans take over
the House of Representatives.
That butterfly has a lot to
answer for. The Republicans
won the midterm election and
immediately thought it gave
them the right to run the whole
government


Any sober observer of this
political phenomenon might
hesitate to characterize last
year's election as the American
people speaking with one clear
and unequivocal voice, espe-
cially as a lot of peeved voters
stayed home.
Oddly, when Mr. Obama
won his historic presidential
election only two years ear-
lier, the Republicans did not
concede him a mandate at all.
While he won on the platform
of universal health care, they
refused to recognize that as
the will of the people. Instead,
some of them said the presi-
dent was born in Kenya. They
resisted him from minute one,
day one.
Why do Republican man-
dates count but Democratic
ones don't? For that answer,
we must consult the fortune
cookies. Here's one: "Man with
one leg stands little chance
in butt-kicking competition."
Yes, Republicans will kick any
Democratic mandate down the
street with both legs and then
claim the Dems don't have a leg
to stand on.
As for Eustace and his
Independent pals, they should
polish their monocles and ask
themselves: Would you trust
nuclear weapons to people who
in their arrogance would have
bankrupted the nation to get
their way?

E Reg Henry is a columnist for the
Pittsburgh Post-Gazette.


AN
OP


OTHER
INION


Ever-


greater


brutality


in Syria


S yrian dictator
Bashar al-Assad
celebrated the eve
of the Muslim holy
month of Ramadan
by sending tanks into the
rebellious cities of Hama and
Deir el-Zour and killing more
than 100 fellow countrymen.
Ramadan could be the
make-or-break month for the
four-month-long uprising.
Because of the dawn-to-dusk
fast and evening services
at mosques, the streets of
Syria's cities will be full of
people, and crowds have a
way of coalescing into anti-
regime demonstrations.
Assad's earlier strategy -
his family has been at this for
40 years of offering liberal-
ization and political reforms
failed. He never followed
through on similar promises
to quell earlier demonstra-
tions, and the Syrian people
figured, no doubt rightly, that
he wouldn't follow through
on these, either.
With his heavily armed
incursions into restive cities,
Assad seems to have settled
on a strategy of killing pro-
testers until they stop protest-'
ing. Assad is ruthless enough
to do it, too. So far, his secu-
rity forces have killed more
than 1,600. President Barack
Obama pretty much had it
right when he identified the
cornerstones of the regime
as "torture, corruption and
terror."
Unlike the Libyan upris-
ing, where NATO is playing a
useful role in support of the
insurgents, there is no enthu-
siasm for international inter-
vention in Syria. Chairman of
the Joint Chiefs Mike Mullen
said flatly, "There is no indi-
cation whatsoever that the
Americans, that we would get
directly involved with respect
to this."
International response has
been largely token and unco-
ordinated. There have been
any number of stern denun-
ciations of the regime and the
violence, but only token trav-
el sanctions imposed on lead-
ing members of the regime.
There is a fear that sanctions
would only hurt the Syrian,
people, not the regime.
Italy has recalled its ambas-
sador, but other European
Union nations have not,
arguing that their envoys are
among their only sources
of information about what's
going on in the country. Syria
has banned most foreigners
and all foreign journalists.
There is, however, some
indication that the interna-
tional community is trying to
get its act together. Secretary
of State Hillary Rodham
Clinton has met with U.S.-
based Syrian activists and
Obama is said to be taking a
second look at sanctions.
Russia, which has been
opposed to a U.N. Security
Council resolution on Syria,
now says it is open to a reso-
lution, but one without sanc-
tions. Meanwhile, the EU
may go ahead and apply them
on its own.
Some diplomats argue
that ousting the Assad fam-
ily Bashar's father, Hafez,
ruled with equal brutality
before him runs the risk
of a sectarian civil war that
may spread to neighboring
countries. Considering the
increasingly violent measures
Assad is taking to crush dis-
sent, that seems a risk worth
taking.


* Scripps Howard News Service


4A


Questions


-














Earth's 2 moons? So says latest theory


By SETH BORENSTEIN
AP Science Writer
WASHINGTON In a
spectacle that might have
beguiled poets, lovers and
songwriters if only they
had been around to see it,
Earth once had two moons,
astronomers now think. But
the smaller one smashed
into the other in what is
being called the "big splat"
The result: Our plan-
et was left with a single
bulked-up and ever-so-
slightly lopsided moon.
The astronomers came
up with the scenario to
explain why the moon's far
side is so much more hilly
than the one that is always
facing Earth.
The theory, outlined
Wednesday in the journal
Nature, comes complete
with computer model runs
showing how it might have
happened and an illustra-
tion that looks like the big-
ger moon getting a pie in
the face.
Outside experts said the
idea makes sense, but they
aren't completely sold yet
This all supposedly hap-
pened about 4.4,billion years
ago, long before there was
any. life on Earth to gaze up
and see the strange sight
of dual moons. The moons
themselves were young,
formed about 100 million
years earlier when a giant
planet smashed into Earth.
They both orbited Earth
and sort of rose in the sky
together, the smaller one
trailing a few steps behind
like a little sister in tow.
The smaller one was a
planetary lightweight The
other was three times wider
and 25 times heavier, its
gravity so strong that the
smaller one just couldn't
resist, even though it was
parked a good bit away.
"They're destined to col-
lide. There's no way out ...
This big splat is a low-veloc-
ity collision," said' study
co-author .Erik Asphaug, a
planetary scientist at the
University of California,
Santa Cruz.
What Asphaug calls a
slow crash is relative: It
happened at more than
5,000 mph, but that's about
as slow as. possible when
you are talking planetary
smashups. It's slow enough
that the rocks didn't melt
And because the smaller
moon was more than 600
miles wide, the crash took
a while to finish even at
5,000 mph. Asphaug lik-


ened the smaller moon to a
rifle bullet and said, "People
would be bored looking
at it because it's taking 10
minutes just for the bullet
to bury itself in the moon.
This is an event if you were
looking at, you'd need a big
bag of popcorn."
The rocks and crust from
the smaller moon would
have spread over and
around the bigger moon
without creating a crater, as
a faster crash would have
done.
' "The physics is really
surprisingly similar to a pie
in the face," Asphaug said.
And about a day later,
everything was settled and
the near and far sides of
the moon looked different,
Asphaug said.
Co-author Martin Jutzi of
the University of Bern in
Switzerland said the study
was an attempt to explain
the odd crust and mountain-
ous terrain of the moon's
far side. Asphaug noticed it
looked as if something had
been added to the surface,
so the duo started running
computer simulations of
cosmic crashes.
Earth had always been
an oddball in the solar
system as the only planet
with a single moon. While
Venus and Mercury have
no moons, Mars has two,
while Saturn and Jupiter
have more than 60 each.
Even tiny Pluto, which was
demoted to dwarf status,
has four moons.
The theory was the buzz
this week in Woods Hole,
Mass., ataconference of sci-
entists working on NASA's
next robotic mission to the
moon, said H. Jay Melosh
of Purdue University.
"We can't find anything
wrong with it," Melosh
said. "It may or may not be
right"
Planetary scientist Alan
Stern, former NASA asso-
ciate administrator for sci-
ence, said it is a "very clev-
er new idea," but one that,
is not easily tested to learn
whether it is right.
A second moon isn't just
an astronomical matter.
The moon plays a big role
in literature and song. And
poet Todd Davis, a profes-
sor of literature at Penn
State University, said this
idea of two moons one
essentially swallowing the
other will capture the
literary imagination.
"I'll probably, be dream-
ing about it and trying to .
work on a poem," he said.


Okla. woman claims

hijacker is her uncle


OKLAHOMA CITY (AP)
- An Oklahoma woman
claims an uncle who planned
something "very mischie-
vous" over the holidays in
1971 was D.B. Cooper, the
never-captured hijacker who
jumped out of a plane with
$200,000.
Marla Cooper of Oklahoma
City who was 8 years old
at the time of the hijacking -
toldABC News in an interview
broadcast Wednesday that
she is certain her uncle Lynn
Doyle Cooper leaped from a
Northwest Orient plane not
far from her grandmother's
home in Sisters, Ore. She said
she made the connection after
piecing together remarks
made by her father in 1995
and her mother in 2009. She
did not say why she chose to
speak out now.
"My two uncles, who I only
saw at holiday time, were
planning something very.
mischievous. I was watching
them using some very expen-


sive walkie-talkies that they
had purchased," she said on
"Good Morning America."
When contacted later
Wednesday, Marla Cooper
referred an Associated Press
reporter to family friend who
is scheduling interviews.
FBI agent Fred Gutt said
Monday that the agency was
following up on a "credible"
new lead in the unsolved D.B.
Cooper case. Gutt declined
Wednesday to say whether
Maria Cooper was connected
to that lead, which focuses on
a suspect who died more than
10 years ago. Marla Cooper
did not say in her ABC inter-
view when her uncle died.
"It is an unsolved crime
and we are obligated to*
address that if new, credible
information comes to us,"
Gutt said. "But it's definitely
a low-priority matter because
we primary have ongoing
criminal activity today that
has real threat to the com-
munity today."


This artist's rendering provided by Martin Jutzi and Erik Asphaug, University of California, Santa Cruz via Nature shows a ,
simulation of a collision between the Moon and a companion moon, four percent of the lunar mass, about 4 billion years ago.
Earth once had a second moon, until it made the fatal mistake of smacking its big sister, some astronomers now theorize. For
a while when the Earth was young, it had a big moon, the one you see now, and a smaller "companion moon" orbiting above!
Then one day that smaller moon collided into the bigger one in what astronomers are calling the "big splat."


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LAKE CITY REPORTER NEWS THURSDAY, AUGUST 4. 2011


Page Editor: Robert Bridges, 754-0428










LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL THURSDAY, AUGUST 4, 2011


COMMUNITY CALENDAR


* To submit your Community
Calendar item, contact Antonia
Robinson at 754-0425 or by
e-mail At arobinson@
lakecityreporter.com.


Today

Builders Luncheon

The Columbia County
Builders' Association is
having its General Council
luncheon 11:30 a.m. Aug.
4 at the Holiday Inn. The
speaker is Brian Allen,
Columbia High School foot-
ball coach. Tickets are $10
for members and $15 for
non-members. Call (386)
867-1998 or e-mail colcoun-
tybuild@comcast.net for res-
ervations.

LEC activities

A North Florida Animal
Rescue presentation is 11
a.m. Aug. 4 in the dining hall
at the LifeStyle Enrichment
Center. Chair exercise is 1
p.m. in the dining hall. The
center is located at 628 SE
Allison Court

Forestry workshop

A workshop on
"Maximizing Profits by
Extending Pine Rotations"
is 9 a.m.-1 p.m. Aug. 4 at the
Columbia County Extension
Office, 164 SW Mary Ethel
Lane. This program is free
but you must pre-register.
Contact the Florida Forest


Services Senior Forester's
Office at (386) 758-5713 or
e-mail: stanley.shepard@
freshfromflorida.com to pre-
register. Space is limited.



Friday

Magic Show
A magic show is 1 p.m.
Aug. 5 in the dining hall
at the LifeStyle Enrichment
Center. The center is located
at 628 SE Allison Court

Art show voting

The community is invited
to vote on the art on dis-
play at the Columbia County
Public Library West Branch
until Aug. 5 during regular
library hours. The vote will
determine the winning art-
ist for the Patron's Award.
There will be a drawing from
those who voted with the
winner receiving an original
painting.

Saturday

Yard sake

The Voices for Children of
the Suwannee Valley Inc. is
holding a gigantic yard sale
8a.m.-1 p.m. Aug. 6 at 368


SW Sisters Welcome Road.


Coffee House

The next Coffee House
event is 7- 9 p.m. Aug. 6
at Stephen Foster Folk
Culture Center State Park
Auditorium in White Springs.
Hosted by Sonny and Fran
Lyons, the event invites the
audience onstage for 10
minutes to perform. A des-
sert table will have items for
sale. Admission is free to the
event Contact Park Ranger
Larry Hoover at (386) 397-
2733 or for more information
visit www.floridastateparks.
org/stephenfoster.


Rotary guest speaker

Adnan Barqawi is speak-
ing 5 p.m. Aug. 6 at the
Columbia County School
board Auditorium. He was
appointed to the Office of
the Virginia Secretary of
Education as a Governor's
Fellow and will be awarded
a "Paul Harris Fellow." The
event is free. Seating will be
on a first-come, first-serve
basis.

Sunday


Family reunion

The Allbritton family is
having its annual reunion
12:30 p.m. Aug. 7 at
Deep Creek Community
Center. The center is on
U.S. Hwy. 441 N. Bring a
covered dish. Call Dessi
Meeks at 752-1473.

Class meeting

The Class of 1973 is
meeting 5 p.m. Aug. 7 at
Richardson Community
Center. All class members
are invited to attend.

Monday

Cancer support
group
The Women's Cancer
Support Group of Lake
City is meeting 5:30-
6:30 p.m. Aug. 8 at Baya
Pharmacy East, 780 SE
Baya Drive. Call (386)
752-4198 or (386) 755-
0522.



CHS registration

Registration for
new students in ninth
through 12th grade


is 8 a.m.-4 p.m. Aug.
8-11 at Columbia High
School. The following
documents must be pro-
vided: birth certificate,
Social Security card,
Florida physical exami-
nation, current immuni-
zation records, proof of
residency in Columbia
County. Call 755-8080
ext. 146.


AARP driving course

An AARP Driving
Course is 9 a.m. 3 p.m.
Aug. 8 at the LifeStyle
Enrichment Center.
Contact Ann George to
sign up at 752-9061. The
center is located at 628
SE Allison Court.

Tuesday

Craft project

A placemats craft
project is 1 p.m. Aug. 9
in the dining hall at the
LifeStyle Enrichment
Center. The center is
located at 628 SE Allison
Court.

Hospice volunteers

Hospice of the Nature


Coast is conducting a
general orientation for
volunteers 10:30 a.m.-
12:30 p.m. Aug. 9 at
the Columbia County
Public Library West
Branch. The library is
located at 435 NW Hall
of Fame Drive. Contact
Volunteer Manager
Ronnie Richardson at
386-935-4520 or e-mail
rlrichardson@hospic-
eofthenaturecoast.org.
Walk-ins are welcome
but space is limited.

Girls mentoring

Welcome t6
Womanhood mentor-
ing program for middle
and high school girls
is 5-8 p.m. Aug. 9 at
532 Marion St. Dinner
is included. Contact
Sandra Price at (386)
867-1601.

Sheriff's meeting

The Co4umbia County.
Sheriff's Department,
is having a community
meeting 6-8 p.m. Aug,
9 at the Shrine Club on,
Brown Road.


OBITUARIES


Jimmy Lee Bell, Sr.
Mr. Jimmy Lee Bell, Sr., 76, for-
merly of Lake City, FL passed
away Thursday, July 28, 2011
after an extended illness. He
resided in Lake City most of
his adult life and later moved to
Riviera Beach, FL. He drove cab
for many years, worked at U and
Me Transfer Company for 10
years and Goodwill for 5 years.
Left to cherish fond memories:
a .devoted wife, Elizabeth Bell;
daughters, Linda Taylor, Lake
City, FL, Sonya Felton, Killeen,
TX., Deidra, Lisa, Easter, Ester,
Riviera Beach, FL.; sons, Shawn
Brown, Lake City, FL; Kenneth
and Jimmie Lee Bell, Jr., Riv-
iera Beach, FL; sisters, Myrtis
and Ann of Riviera Beach, Fl.
Funeral services for Mr. Bell
will be held at Hill Top Baptist
of Riviera on Saturday, August
6, 2011 at 1:00 P.M. The fam-
ily will receive friends on Fri-
day from 5 8 pm at Hill Top
Baptist Church. Arrangements
are rendered by Siders Funeral
Home of West Palm Beach, FL.
Announcement courtesy of
COMBS FUNERAL HOME,
"the Caring Professionals"

William Clemmons
William "Bill" Clemmons, 31
died unexpectedly on July 22,
2011 in O'Brien, FL., he had
lived in Lake City for the past
four years after moving here
from Jupiter, FL., he was a
Christian, and enjoyed spending
time with his family, talking on
the phone, musci and drawing.
He is survived by his parents
William and Kathryn Clemmons,
Lake City, FL.; one sister Maria
Clemmons Drake, Jupiter, FL.;
his fraternal grandmother Mary
Stapf, Melbourne, FL., mater-
nal grandmother Melba Hopkins
Lewisburg, TN.; one niece and
nephew Cierra, and John Drake.
Many beloved aunts, uncles, and
cousins also survive. Services
will be held at a later date. Cre-
mation arrangements are under
the direction DEES-PARRISH
FAMILY FUNERAL HOME,
Lake City, FL. 458 South Mar-
ion Street, Lake City, FL. 32055
Please sign the guest book at
iw.vparrishfamnilyfuneralhome.com

Rhonda Lashun Ellis
Rhonda Lashun Ellis, age 37 res-
ident of Lake City, Fla. died Sat-
urday, July 23, 2011 at Shands
@ University of Florida termi-
nating an extended illness. Born
in Miami, Fl she was the daugh-
ter of Joyce Tillman and Rodney
Lee. She attended the public
schools of Columbia County
and was a graduate of Colum-
bia High School class 1993.
Survivors include her mother,
Joyce Tillman, one brother, Mi-
chael Richardson, Jr.; two sis-
ters, Trameka Tillman and Cati-
na Tillman; three aunts, Albertha
Tillman, Laverne Douglas and
Kathy Tillman; two uncles, Wil-
lie Tillman and James Tillman,
Jr.; a host of nieces, nephews,
cousins and friends also survive.
Memorial services for Rhonda
Lashun Ellis, will be 11:00
a.m. Saturday, August 6, 2011
at The Community Reviv-
al Center, with Elder Clyde
Douglas, pastor officiating.
Arrangements entrusted to COO-
PER FUNERAL HOME, 251
N.E. Washington Street, Lake
City, FL. Willis 0. Cooper, L.F.D.


Rosa Lee Jones George
Mrs. Rosa Lee Jones .George,
age 66 resident of Wellborn, Fl.
passed away on Monday, Au-
gust 1, 2011
at North Flor-
ida Regional
Gainesville,
ing a lengthy
,illness. ,Born
in Columbia
County she was the daughter
of the late Robert L. Jones and
Mary Crusaw Jones. She at-
tended the public schools of Co-
lumbia County and was a gradu-
ate of Richardson High Class
of 1962. She was a life-long
resident of Philadelphia Baptist
Church until her health failed.
Survivors include two daughters,
Lisa George and Karen Carter,
Wellborn, FL.; two soris, Mar-
cus Carter and Kenneth (Pearl)
Jones, Sr., Lake City, Fl.; one
brother, Lorenzo (Faye) Jones-.
Four sisters, Gussie (Billy) Jones,
Rolene Williams, Ernie Deloris
(Terry) Gaddis, Wellborn, Fl.,
Dorothy (Freddie) Wilson, Lake
City. Special Grandson, Jarvious
George; special Granddaughter,
MiChelle Cray; three Uncles,
John Crusaw, Jr., Henry Crusaw
and O.C. Ciusaw of Wellborn, Fl.
Six aunts, Bertha Wright, Well-
born, Fl., Minnie Jones, Lizzie
Jackson, Elmira Cray, Deaster
Gaddis, Lake City, Fl. Annie Bell
Lewis of Sebring, Fl, A close
and dear friend, Emma Jean
Clark. A host of nieces, neph-
ews, other relatives and friends.
Funeral services for Mrs. Rosa
Lee Jones George, will be 2:00
pm, Saturday, August 6, 2011 at
Philadelphia Baptist Church with
Rev. Isadore Williams, pastor,
officiating. Interment will follow
in the Crusaw Family Cemetery.
The family will receive friends
on Friday, August 5, 2011' at
Cooper Funeral Home, Chapel
from 7:00 pm until 8:00 pm.
Arrangements by COOPER
FUNERAL HOME, 251 N.E.
Washington Street, Lake City,
Fl. Willis 0. Cooper, L.F.D.

Leonard Henderson
Leonard "Snake" Henderson,
resident of Lake City, Florida
departed this life July 30, 2011
in Shands UF, Gainesville, FL.
Leonard was
born July 14, f-'
1954 to the
late Lilly Pearl -
Green and
John Lee Hen-
derson. He
attended pub-
lic schools in L
Columbia County. He worked
for many years as a Brick Layer
in the Construction Industry.
Leonard was very talented; he
could "free-hand" draw any-
thing. He is preceded in death
by his parents; four brothers,
Willie Green "Sonny", Herman
Lee Green, Jessie Lee "Pete"
Green and D.J. Henderson.
Left to cherish memories: wife,
Debra Pam Henderson; two chil-
dren, Katina Jones, Mario Coo-
per; sisters, Grace Willis, Johnny
Mae Henderson; brothers, Leroy
Green, Levern Henderson, Larry
Henderson; aunts, Cora Lawton,
Lucille Kelly, all of Lake City,
FL., Julie B. Griffin, Starke, FL.;
mother and father-in-law, Willie
and Flora Berry; nieces and neph-
ews, William Lindsey Green and
Vivian Willis Monroe, Sylvo-
nia, Jody, Demarious, Pee-Wee,
Tee, Jackie, San, Lisha, Toya,
NeNe, Stacy, Risa, Rasha, Ben,


KeKe, Tony, Deronta, Rorinetta;
special friends, Pebbles and
Priscilla Berry; numerous cous-
ins, other relatives and friends.
Funeral services for Mr. Hen-
derson will be 11:00 A.M. Sat-
urday, August 6, 2011 at Sal-
vation Holiness Church. 212
NE Jem Street, Lake City, FL.
Visitation with the fam-
ily will be from 5-7:00
P.M. at the funeral home.
Arrangements entrusted to
COMBS FUNERAL HOME.
292 NE Washington Street.
Lake City, FL. (386) 752-4366.
Marq Combs-Turner, L.F.D.
"The Caring Professionals"

George W. Hunter
George W. Hunter, 81, passed
away at home, August 2,
2011 after a brief illness.
He was the son of the late John
and Cora Hunter and graduated
from Sneads High School, Class
of 1947. Mr. Hunter who grew
up in Chattahoochee, Florida be-
gan working for the Standard Oil
Company in Tallahassee, Flor-
ida in 1956. He was promoted
to district salesman in 1963 and
then transferred to Lake City,
Florida in 1966 covering several
North Florida counties. He was
district salesman' for this area
for 6 years. In June 1972, Mr.
Hunter became the agent for the
Standard Oil Bulk Plant, replac-
ing C.C. Shepard who retired.
In August 1975, Mr. Hunter in-
corporated the company naming
it G.W. Hunter, Inc. He was a
member of the Lake City Shrine
Club, Masonic Lodge No. 27
of the F&A.M., Royal Order
of Jesters, Court No. 194, York
Rite and member of the Marzuq
Temple of the Shrine. He was a
loving husband, father, 'grandfa-
ther and great grandfather who
enjoyed fishing and spending
time with his family. He was a
faithful,Deacon and member of
the First Baptist Church of Lake
City. He is preceded in death by
his grandson Brad Hunter-2003.
Survivors include his loving wife
of 60 years, Elga Hunter; sons,
George (Brenda) Hunter, Terry
(Jill) Hunter & John Hunter all
of Lake City, FL; grandchildren,
Kyle & Chad Hunter of Lake
City, FL, Ashley (Greg) Sum-
mers of Lake City, FL, Mallory
(Justin) Klum of Orlando, FL;
great grandson, Logan Summers
of Lake City, FL also survive.
Funeral services will be con-
ducted at 11:30 A.M., on Satur-
day, August 6, 2011 at the First
Baptist Church of Lake City with
Rev. Stephen Ahrens-Pastor of
First Baptist Church of Lake City
and Rev. Joe Butler- Director of
Missions-Black Creek Baptist
Association, Orange Park, of-
ficiating. Interment will follow
in Forest Lawn Memorial Gar-
dens. Visitation with the family
will be from 5:00 until 7:00, Fri-
day evening, August 5, 2011 in
the FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH
FELLOWSHIP HALL. In lieu
of flowers the family asks that
donations be made to the First
Baptist Church of Lake City
182 NE Justice Street, Lake
City, FL 32055 or to the Suwan-
nee Valley Care Center (Haven
Hospice) 6037 U.S. Hwy 90
West, Lake City, Florida 32055.
GATEWAY-FOREST LAWN
FUNERAL HOME 3596
South U.S. Hwy 441, Lake City,
Florida 32025. (386) 752-1954.
Is in charge of arrangements.
Please sign our guestbook at
www. gatewayforestlawn. com


Emory Johnson
Mr. Emory "Scapper" Johnson,
age 83, resident of Lake City, Fl.
departed this life July 29, 2011
Nursing and
Rehab. Center
terminating
an extended
illness. Born
in Columbic
County,. he
was the son
of the late Jay and Louise John-
son. He received his education
in the public school of Colum-
bia County and was a member
of Philadelphia Baptist Church.
Survivors include his wife; Mrs:-"
Wyla Jonson; twos-ons' 'Mi-
chael (Debra) Johnson and Du-
juan (Jessie) Ayers;4three'daugh-
ters, Pamelia (Phillip) Young,


Judi Carter and Bridgett (How-
ard) Ray; Five sisters, Creasy
Brady, Joella Johnson, Thelma
Morris, Florida Mae (Clarence)
Haynes and Hazel (Marcus)
Shivers. Devoted granddaugh-
ter and grandson, Vilinda and
Phillip Rossin and Marwan Wil-
liams. Seventeen grandchildren,
forty great grandchildren, nine
great great grandchildren, two
god daughters, Treveda and
Shameria, two special friends,
Deacon Herbert and Linda
Carter. A host of nieces, neph-
ews and Daddy's Baby Rocky.
Funeral services for Mr. Emory
"Scapper" Johnson, will be
11:00 am, Saturday, August 6,
2011! at. )Philadelphia:; Baptist
Church wit,.Rev. Isadoo, i,/,
liams, officiating. Interm'ent will
follow in memorial Gardens-
Cemetery. The family will re-


ceive friends, Friday August, 5,
2011 at Cooper Funeral Home
Chapel from 6:00 pm to 7:00 prm:
Arrangements entrusted to
COOPER FUNERAL HOME,
251 N.E. Washington Street, Lake
City, Fl. Willis 0. Cooper, L.F.D:.
Alexander Rossin
Alexander Rossin passed away,
August 3, 2011. Funeral an-[
nouncement will be pub-
lished Friday, August 5, 2011L
Arrangements entrusted to
COMBS FUNERAL HOME,
292 NE Washington Street.
Lake City, FL. (386) 752-4366
"The .Caring Professionals'.

Obituaries are paid advertise-,
ments. For details, call the Lake
City Reporter's classified depart-,
ment at 752-1293. ,


cJ4 tKe^ WE BELIEVE

EVERYONE DESERVES COMPASSION,

CARE AND COMFORT.


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Page Editor: Antonia Robinson, 754-0425









Lake City Reporter


H ABrought to ]


7 Health Wna


& Wellness


Page Editor: Robert Bridges, 754-0428


ON HEALTH


LAKE CITY REPORTER HEALTH THURSDAY, AUGUST 4, 2011


For refugees, no food to break fast


Dr. Peter Gott

Some side

effects of

cholesterol

medicines

DEAR DR. GOIT: I
read your article about
station drugs and their
side effects. I have been
on cholesterol medica-
tion for the last couple of
years. The side effects
are killing me pain in
both of my forearm mus-
cles, calf muscles, and
numbness in my fingers.
The medicines I was on
causing the same side
effects were pravastatin
20 mg and simvastatin
20 mg.
My doctor suggested I
reduce the dosage to 10
mg and then to 5, which
hasn't stopped my pain.
He currently has me
on Lipitor/atorvastatin
5 mg, but the problem
persists. My recent lipid
panel showed the follow-
ing: cholesterol 172 HDL
33; LDL 105, triglycer-
ides 177 and AIC 6.7.
These drugs are not
cheap. I can't keep trying
this and trying that, so
what should I do?
DEAR READER: It
would certainly help me
to know your medical
background because
without a cause other
than your cholesterol
(such as cardiovascular
disease or diabetes),
your readings are within
normal limits with the
exception of your AIC.
The American Diabetes
Association recommends
an A1C of less than 7.0,
while the American
Association of Clinical
Endocrinologists rec-
ommends 6.5 or lower.
The risk of heart attack
increases with higher
readings.
Your physician appar-
ently prescribed station
drugs to both lower your
cholesterol levels and
reduce the risk of stroke
or heart attack, However,
as you point out, the side
effects can be mighty
frustrating, with muscle
pain heading the list.
Less common issues
include nausea, gas, diar-
rhea and constipation.
The use of station drugs
also requires periodic
blood testing to check
for liver damage. Statins
cause the liver to abnor-
mally increase its pro-
duction of enzymes. An
elevation could prompt
your physician to recom-
mend you stop taking
the drug for a period of
time until your levels fall
within the normal range.
I am concerned about
your numb fingers. Are
you a smoker? Could
something else be going
on that you are blaming
station drugs for? I sug-
gest a complete physical
examination and if
necessary referral to a

EFFECTS continued on 8A

* Dr. Peter Gott is a retired
physician and the author
of the book "Dr. Gott's No
Flour, No Sugar Diet," avail-
able at most chain and
independent bookstores,
and the recently published
"Dr. Gott's No Flour, No
Sugar Cookbook."


Sundown usually
a time to feast
during Ramadan.

By ABDI GULED and
MALKHADIR M. MUHAMED
Associated Press

DADAAB, Kenya As
the Islamic holy month of
Ramadan begins, Faduma
Aden is fasting all day even
though she doesn't have
enough food to celebrate
with a sundown feast The
Somali mother of three,
who fled starvation in her
homeland, says she fasts
because she fears God.
Muslims around the
world mark sundown dur-
ing Ramadan with extrava-
gant dinners after not eating
from sunrise to sundown.
That kind of nighttime cel-
ebration is unthinkable this
year for most Somalis, who
are enduring the worst fam-
ine in a generation.
And even though Islam
allows the ailing to eat, for
many Somalis it's a mat-
ter of faith to participate in
Ramadan's fast.
"It hard for me to fast, but
I did fast for fear of God,"
said Aden, who is among
tens of thousands who have
made the arduous journey,
often on foot, to this refu-
gee camp in neighboring
Kenya.
Others, like Mohamed
Mohamud Abdulle, are,
ashamed they don't have
food "to console the soul"


at sundown after fasting all
day.
"How will I fast when I
don't have something to
break it?" asked Abdulle.
"All my family are hungry
and I have nothing to feed
them. I feel the hunger that
forced me from my home
has doubled here."
For much of the Muslim
world, Ramadan this year
falls at a time of political
upheaval. Food prices
typically spike during the
Muslim religious month,
and the elaborate dinners
many in the Middle East
put on to break the daily
fast drive a deep hole in
household budgets.
Fleeing Somalis say they
have already been forced
by famine to fast for weeks
or months, without the end-
of-day meal to regain their
strength.
"I cannot fast because I
cannot get food to break it
and eat before the morn-
ing," said Nur Ahmed, a
father of six at a camp for
displaced people in the
Somali capital, Mogadishu,
whose wife died last year
during childbirth.
Sheik Ali Sheik Hussein,
a -mosque leader in
Mogadishu, called it "wor-
rying" that many Somalis
cannot fast because they
are already weak from hun-
ger and don't have food to
regain their strength after
sundown.
',We have asked all'
SOMAUS continued on 8A


An elderly woman waits inside a food distribution center after being registered as a refugee in
Dadaab, Kenya on Monday. Dadaab, a camp designed for 90,000 people now houses around
440,000 refugees.


ASSOCIATED
A malnourished child from southern Somalia on a bed at Banadir hospital in Mogadishu,
Somalia on Monday.


Dyslexia makes recognizing voices harder


By LAURAN NEERGAARD
AP Medical Writer

WASHINGTON Pick
up the phone and hear,
"Hey, what's up?" Chances
are,. those few words are
enough to recognize who's
speaking perhaps unless
you have dyslexia.
In a surprise discovery,
researchers found adults
with that reading disorder
also have a hard time rec-
ognizing voices.
The work isn't just a curi-
osity. It fits with research
to uncover the building
blocks of literacy and how
they can go wrong. The
eventual goal: To spot, at-
risk youngsters even before
they open "Go, Dog, Go!"
in kindergarten instead
of diagnosing dyslexia in a
struggling second-grader.
"Everybody is interested
in understanding the root
cause of dyslexia, so we
can intervene early and do
something about it," says
Massachusetts Institute of
Technology cognitive neu-
roscientist John Gabrieli,
senior author of the study
published last week in the
journal Science.
Dyslexia is thought to
affect 8 percent to 15 per-


cent of Americans, who
can have great difficulty
reading and writing. It's
not a problem with intel-
ligence or vision. Instead,
it's language-based. The
brain struggles with what's
called "phonological pro-
cessing" being able to
distinguish and manipu-
late sounds, like "bah" and
"pah," that eventually have
to be linked to written let-
ters and words.
A graduate student in
Gabrieli's lab wondered
if dyslexia would impair
voice recognition as well.
After all, subtle differences
in pronunciation help dis-
tinguish people.
How to test that?"
Previous studies have
shown it's easier to recog-
nize voices if they're speak-
ing your own language. So
the researchers recruited
English-speaking college
students and young adults,
half with dyslexia, half
without They watched ani-
mated characters like
a clown, a mechanic, a
soccer player speaking
either English or Chinese,
to get familiar with how
they sounded.
Then came the test, to
match a voice to its charac-
ter. The volunteers correct-


ly identified the Chinese
speakers only about half the
time, regardless of wheth-
er they had dyslexia. But
when they heard English
speakers, people with dys-
lexia still were right only
half the time while the
non-dyslexics did far better,
identifying 70 percent of
the voices correctly.
That provides further
evidence of dyslexia's
strong link to phonological


impairment
Perhaps more important-
ly, it's a cleverly designed
project that begs the ques-
tion of whether voice rec-
ognition is a problem in
young children, too, says
Florida State University
psychology professor
Richard Wagner, who stud-
ies how to identify dyslexia
early.
Gabrieli says he plans to
test 5-year-olds.


Today, researchers know
that children who are more
phonologically aware when
they enter kindergarten
have a better shot at easy
reading. One way to check
that: See how they're able to
delete sounds from words
- ask therh to quickly
say "cowboy" without the
"boy." Wagner says a child
who answers such tasks
DYSLEXIA continued on 8A


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8A www.lakecityreporter.com Thursday, August 4, 201 I



SOMALIS: In the grip of famine, "
Continued From Page 7A .
Muslims to donate to help those dying Some in the communities around the ,.
from hunger," he said. "Muslims should Dadaab refugee camp are stepping for- "
not be silent on this situation, so we shall ward to help. At the Dagahaley refugee
help if Allah wills." camp, part of the larger Dadaab camps, :
At a hospital run by the International three distribution centers run by local
Committee of the Red Cross in the Dadaab elders provide food and money each day
camp, clinician Muhammed Hussein for more than 1,000 families and individu-
breaks away from examining a patient als.
to note that his Ramadan fast gives him Moved by tragic scenes of haggard
greater understanding of the suffering of mothers and emaciated children, Somalis
famine victims. in the diaspora are wiring hundreds of dol-
"It gives you a lot of sympathy when you lars to community leaders so they can buy
yourself feel hungry, you will understand food and clothes for the new arrivals.
the pain of someone who has not eaten... 'The hunger and suffering faced by the
With this kind of severe malnutrition, new arrivals have moved us into action,"
people have no energy to walk, they have said Hussein Sheik Mohamed, part of a
been walking from Kismayo in Somalia to team of volunteers who accepts donations
this place. It gives you that heart to feel from Somalis around the world and distrib-
mercy for the people who are suffering." utes aid.
In a Ramadan statement Monday, The Dadaab initiative started with peo-
President Barack Obama said fasting can ple at nearby mosques who wanted to
be used to "increase spirituality, disci- respond to the needs of refugees pouring
pline, and consciousness of God's mercy." into the camp. They called former refu-
Obama said now is a time 1for 'the world gees to help new arrivals with whatever
to come together to support famine relief they can find: Food, money, clothing and
efforts. mattresses were donated.
'The heartbreaking accounts of lost The U.N. says more than 11 million
lives and the images of families and chil- people in the Horn of Africa need food aid, ASTP
dren in Somalia and the Horn of Africa but 2.2 million are in peril in a region of ASSOCIATED PRESS
struggling to survive remind us of our south-central Somalia controlled by the al- A man from southern Somalia holds his malnourished child a a camp in Mogadishu, Somalia
common humanity and compel us to act," Qaida-linked militant group al-Shabab that on Monday. Tens of thousands of famine-stricken Somali refugees were cold and drenched
Obama said.' is largely inaccessible to aid groups. after torrential rains overnight pounded their makeshift structures.


DYSLEXIA: Has effect on ability to hear and properly recognize voices
Continued From Page 7A


correctly probably is devel-
oping fine. One who fails
doesn't necessarily have
problems but merely could
have misunderstood or not
wanted to play along. He
ay.s more clefti-thf meth-
ods are neede9.R9T ini,,. P~-'
Differences in brain-
processing show up even
in infants, says Patricia
Kuhl of the 'University of
Washington, "who stud-
ies how babies learn lan-
guage.
A colleague in her lab
tested how well babies


could distinguish "ah" and
"ee" sounds between ages
7 months and 11 months
of age. Those who did
best wound up with big-
ger vocabularies and bet-
ter pre-reading skills, such
as''- rhyning,' by their tifth
birthdays. That doesn't:
mean they'll go on to expe-
rience dyslexia, but it does
show how very ea ly devel-
opment can play. a role in
reading-readiness.
But Kuhl says the voice-
recognition study has
broader implications for


brain science. It shows that
for split-second recognition,
the brain's social-oriented
right side works together
with the speech-perception
region of the left brain.
People with dyslexia appar-
ently are missing outif on
. some of that interaction.
That interaction, too,
begins to appear early. At
age 7 months, babies listen-
ing to recordings of their
native language can recog-
nize if there's, a change in
speakers, but they miss that
speaker change if they're


listening to a foreign lan-
guage, she says. Scientists
now have to figure out that


neural wiring to learn how it
goes awry.
Lauran Neergaard covers


health and medical issues
for The Associated Press in
Washington.


EFFECTS: Cholesterol medications
Continued From Page 7A


vascular specialist. I may
be jumping to incorrect
conclusions, but I want
you to cover all the bases
in this instance.
Ask your physician to
switch to a non-statin drug
for control of your choles-
terol. Over-the-counters
include products with
plant sterols and stanols,
cinnamon sprinkled on
your food, niacin (vitamin
B3), omega-3 fish oil and
flaxseed. They may not be
as effective as expensive
prescription drugs, so
it's a matter of the risks
outweighing the benefits
in this case. It's a situation
best discussed with your
doctor.
Readers who would
like related information
can order my Health
Reports "Understanding
Cholesterol" and
"Compelling Home
Remedies" by sending a
self-addressed, stamped
No. 10 envelope and a
$2 U.S. check or money
order for each report
to Dr. Peter Gott, P.O.
Box 433, Lakeville, CT
06019. Be sure to men-
tion the titless, or print
an order form from my
website's direct link: www.
AskDrGottMD.com/
orderform.pdf.
** ** **
DEAR DR. GOTT: I
recently went to my doc-
tor for a checkup. When
he listened to my chest,
he mentioned I had PACs.
What is this all about,
and is there something
I should be concerned
about?
DEAR READER: PACs
stand for "premature


atrial contractions," an
irregular rhythm of the
heartbeat. As a general
rule, PACs are harmless
and occur in many people
at some stage. The
condition may go unde-
tected and not. cause any
symptoms at all. When
symptoms do occur, they
may feel like a flutter or
skipped heartbeat.
Your premature beats
may not relate to any form
of heart disease but may
result from anemia, exces-
sive caffeine, nicotine or
physical exercise.
If you are generally
healthy, it is likely no
treatment will even be
required. If you have
heart disease, treatment
may be necessary. While
you don't mention your
age, a baseline electrocar-
diogram (EKG) is often
a good reference point
to have on file. The saf-
est initial step, therefore,
is to have an EKG per-
formed. If your physician
remains suspicious and
deems it appropriate, he
or she can follow up with
more sophisticated test-
ing to rule out any pos-
sible coronary problems.
Readers who would
like related information
can order my Health
Report "Coronary Artery
Disease" by sending a self-
addressed, stamped No.
10 envelope and a $2 U.S.
check or money order to
Dr. Peter Gott, P.O. Box
433, Lakeville, CT 06039.
Be sure to mention the
title, or print an order form
from my website's direct
link: www.AskDrGottMD.
com/order_form.pdf.


** ** **
Dr. Peter H. Gott is a
retired physician and the
author of several books,
including "Live Longer,
Live Better," "Dr. Gott's No
Flour, No Sugar Diet" and
"Dr. Gott's No Flour, No
Sugar Cookbook," which
are available at most book-
stores or online. His web-
site is wwwAskDrGottMD.
com.


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Story ideas?

Contact
Tim Kirby
Sports Editor
754-0421


Lake City Reporter





SPORTS


Thursday, August 4, 2011


www.lakecityreporter.com


Section B


BRIEFS
LAIME MY OPEN
Registration
ends today
Final registration for
the Lake City Open is
today. The tournament
is Saturday and Sunday
at The Country Club at
Lake City (first round)
and Quail Heights
Country Club (final
round). Entry fee is $90
for members, $100 for
non-members and $125
for professionals.
For details, call Carl
Ste-Marie at 752-2266.


Final lessons
begin Monday
Final swimming
lessons are Aug. 8-19 at
the Columbia Aquatic
Complex. Six daily times
are offered for classes.
Cost is $50 per person.
Registration is today
and Friday at the pool.
YOUH BASEBALL
Young Guns 9U
tryouts Friday
The Columbia Young
Guns 9-under travel
baseball team is having
a tryout at 6 p.m. Friday
at the Southside Sports
Complex practice fields.
For details, call David
Williams at 697-0764 or
Todd Yaxley at 623-4539.

Fort White sets
board elections
Fort White Youth
Baseball has board
elections set for 7 p.m.
Friday in the building
at the back of the South
Columbia Sports Park.
For details, call
Tammy Sharpe at
867-3825.

9-under travel
team tryouts
Tryouts for a 9-under
travel baseball team are
3 p.m. Aug. 14 and 5 p.m.
Aug. 17 at Southside
Sports Complex.
-For details, call Todd
Green at 365-5161.
FORT WTE VOILEYB.A
High school
tryouts Monday
Fort White High has
volleyball tryouts for
varsity and junior
varsity from
3:30-5:30 p.m. Monday.
Participants must have
a current physical and a
consent form on file.
For details, call Doug
Wohlstein at 497-5952.
CaS SWIMG
Conditioning
begins Monday
The Columbia High
swim team returns to the
water from 4:15-6:15 p.m.
Monday for conditioning.
Swimmers must have
paper work completed.
* From staff reports


Local duo in Junior



Team Championships

Soucinek and
Jones to compete
for Gainesville.
By TIM KIRBY
tkirby@lakecityreporter.comr
Lake City is on the out- ,
skirts of the Gainesville ,-.': ...
Junior Golf Tour, but locals ..
Dean Soucinek and Nick .
Jones are in the middle of
the action this week.
The two local golfers
were chosen to represent -
the Gainesville Junior .
Tour at the Junior Team
Championships. Both are
members of three-player
teams that will compete in
the event
The two-day tournament,
sponsored by the Florida
State Golf Association, will
be played at Sandridge
Golf Club in Vero Beach on
Saturday and Sunday. The
FSGA is keeping its eye on
Tropical Storm Emily and
will make a further determi-
nation today on the event
"We were selected by the
Gainesville Junior Tour and
manager Frank Anderson,"
Jones said. '"They took the
top people in scoring and
placing the best, and the
most consistent" .. TIM KIRBY/Lake City Reporter
Local golfers Dean Soucinek (left) and Nick Jones are representing the Gainesville Junior Tour in the Junior Team
GOLF continued on 2B Championships at Sandridge Golf Club in Vero Beach this weekend.


Dent finally gets his

Hall of Fame moment


Former Bear
joins teammates
in Canton.
By ANDREW ELIGMAN
Associated 'Press
CHICAGO Richard
Dent had just joined the
Chicago Bears, and Dan
Hampton was a little less
than impressed.
He saw a player who
was scrawny even a bit
lazy and when Buddy
Ryan asked about two
weeks into practices what
he thought of the' rookie,
well, the "Danimal" couldn't
be restrained, using a few
choice words to describe
him.
"I said, 'Why, you like
him?"' Hampton recalled.
"And Buddy said, 'Watch
him. He never makes a
bad decision, and that's the
essence of being a defen-
sive lineman."'
What a defensive end he
turned out to be. And now,
after some near misses,
Dent's long wait for a spot
in the Hall of Fame is just
about over.
Dent will finally become
the third member of thatleg-
endary 1985 Chicago Bears
DENT continued on 2B


ASSOCIATED PRESS
In this Oct. 24, 2010 file photo, former Chicago Bears
player Richard Dent carries the Vince Lombardi Trophy as
the 1985 Bears' Super Bowl team was honored during half
time of an NFL football game between the Chicago Bears
and the Washington Redskins in Chicago. Dent will finally,
become the third member of that legendary 1985 Chicago
Bears defense to be inducted into the Hall of Fame on
Saturday when he joins fellow "Monsters of the Midway"
Dan Hampton and Mike Singletary, an honor that his
teammates and coaches say is long overdue.


Race heats up for

2 wild-card spots

in the Chase


New format
brings excitement
to NASCAR.
By JENNA FRYER
Associated Press
CHARLOTTE, N.C. -
Raise your hand, please, if
you picked Paul Menard
to make the Chase for the
Sprint Cup championship.
Chances are Menard
wasn't on many lists outside
of those made at Richard
Childress Racing. But he's
a very real threat now,
thanks to his win Sunday at
IndianapolisMotorSpeedway
and NASCAR's change to the
qualifying rules.
The 12-driver field this
year will include "wild
cards" awarded to the two
drivers outside the top 10
but among the top 20 in
points who have the most
victories. Menard is now
one of them.
But holding on to one of
the wild cards isn't expected
to be easy as drivers have
just six races remaining to
lock up a spot in the Chase.
It could set the stage for
the most aggressive rac-
ing in recent memory, as
teams take huge chances


to put themselves in posi-
tion for a win. Menard and
crew chief Slugger Labbe
essentially did that Sunday
at Indianapolis, where they
used fuel strategy to give
Menard his first career Cup
victory. Labbe had laid it out
in a team meeting before
they even arrived at Indy.
"I said, 'Look, guys, if
we're going to make the
Chase, we're going to
have to get risky,' Labbe
recalled. "Seems to be a
trend in the Cup Series,
that people take gambles
on pit road. It was our
turn to get aggressive. I
told Paul he had to support
me. He supported me 100
percent Three times he
had an occasion where he
could have said, 'No, I don't
want to do that' But he did.
Fortunately it worked out"
As the series shifts
this weekend to Pocono
Raceway, everyone will be
watching to see who rolls
the dice with a different
setup, gutsy strategy or on-
track aggression.
Denny Hamlin is cur-
rently ranked 11th in the
standings, but because he's
got one win this season he's
presently holding down the
other wild card.


10am-10pm at the Columbia Cu.y i rw Grounds


WeIe OU--r :. S1 GAMES
FUN ZONE Q ..- m.s











LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS THURSDAY. AUGUST 4. 2011


TELEVISION

TV sports

Today
GOLF
I1:30 a.m.
TGC Nationwide Tour, Cox Classic,
first round, at Omaha, Neb.
2 p.m.
TGC PGATour/WGC. Bridgestone
Invitational, first round, at Akron. Ohio
6:30 p.m.
TGC PGA Tour, Reno-Tahoe Open,
first round, at Reno, Nev.
MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL
I p.m.
MLB -Texas at Detroit
7 p.m.
MLB Regional coverage, Cleveland
at Boston or Chicago Cubs at Pittsburgh
8 p.m.
WGN N.Y. Yankees at Chicago
White Sox

BASEBALL

AL standings

East Division
W L Pct GB
Boston 67 41 .620 -
NewYork 66 42 .611 I
TampaBay 56 52 .519 II
Toronto 56 53 .514 lII'
Baltimore 43 63 .406 23
Central Division
W L Pet GB
Detroit 58 51 .532 -
Cleveland 54 53 .505 3
Chicago 52 56 .481 5Si
Minnesota 50 59 .459 8
Kansas City 46 63 .422 12
West Division
W L Pct GB
Texas 61 49 .555 -
Los Angeles 60 50 .545 I
Oakland 49 61 .445 12
Seattle 47 62 .431 13A
Tuesday's Games
Detroit 6,Texas 5
Boston 3, Cleveland 2
Toronto 3,Tampa Bay I
Baltimore 8, Kansas City 2
N.Y. Yankees 6, Chicago White Sox 0,
7 innings
LA. Angels 5, Minnesota I
Seattle 4, Oakland 2
Wednesday's Games
Oakland at Seattle (n)
Texas at Detroit (n)
Cleveland at Boston (n)
Toronto atTampa Bay (n)
Baltimore at Kansas City (n)
N.YYankees at Chicago White Sox (n),
Minnesota at LA.Angels (n)
Today's Games
Toronto (Cecil 4-4) at Tampa Bay
(W.Davis 8-7); 12:10 p.m.
Texas (Ogando 10-5) at Detroit (Penny
7-8), 1:05 p.m.
Cleveland (Masterson.8-7) at Boston

Baliintore-(Fir.rtodr :.8) ifksnssCity
(Frazffi .4,,ll 10,m
N.Y. Yankees (Nova 9-4) at Chicago
White Sox (Humber 8-7), 8:10 p.m.
Minnesota (Uriano 7-8) at LA.Angels
(Chatwood 6-7), 10:05 p.m.
Friday's Games
Toronto at Baltimore, 7:05 p.m.
N.Y.Yankees at Boston, 7:10 p.m.
Oakland at Tampa Bay, 7:10 p.m. '
Cleveland at Texas, 8:05 p.m.
Chicago White Sox at Minnesota,
8:10 p.m.
Detroit at Kansas City, 8:10 p.m.
Seattle at L.A.Angels, 10:05 p.m.

NL standings

East Division
W L Pct GB
Philadelphia 70 39 .642 -
Atlanta 63 48 .568 8
Florida 55 55 .500 15'/
NewYork 55 55 .500 151'
Washington 5.3 56 .486 17
Central Division
W L Pct GB
Milwaukee 61 50 .550 -
!St. Louis 58 52 .527 2'h
Pittsburgh 54 54 .500 5S'
Cincinnati 54 56 .491 6'k
Chicago 45 65 .409 15 '
Houston 36 74 .327 24h
West Division
W L Pct GB
Arizona 61 49 .555 -
San Francisco 61 49 .555 -
Colorado 51 59 .464 10
Los Angeles 50 59 .459 10'A
San Diego 47 64 .423 14'A
Tuesday's Games
Washington 9,Atlanta 3
Chicago Cubs I 1, Pittsburgh 6
Florida 4, N.Y. Mets 3
Cincinnati 5, Houston I
St. Louis 8, Milwaukee 7, II innings
Philadelphia 5, Colorado 0
LA. Dodgers I, San Diego 0
Arizona 6, San Francisco I
Wednesday's Games
Atlanta 6,Washington 4
Milwaukee 10, St. Louis 5
Philadelphia at Colorado (n)
Arizona at San Francisco (n)
Chicago Cubs at Pittsburgh (n)
Florida at N.Y. Mets (n)
Cincinnati at Houston (n)
LA. Dodgers at San Diego (n)
Today's Games
Chicago Cubs (R.Lopez 2-3) at
Pittsburgh (|a.McDonald 7-5), 7:05 p.m.
St. Louis (Lohse 9-7) at Florida (Ani.
Sanchez 6-4).7:10 p.m.
Washington (Detwiler I-0) at
Colorado (Rogers 4-1). 8:40 p.m.
Philadelphia (CI.Lee 10-7) at San
Francisco (Bumgarner 6-10), 10:15 p.m.
Friday's Games
Cincinnati at Chicago Cubs, 2:20 p.m.
San Diego at Pittsburgh, 7:05 p.m.
Atlanta at N.Y. Mets, 7:10 p.m.
St. Louis at Florida, 7:10 p.m.


Milwaukee at Houston, 8:05 p.m.
Washington at Colorado, 8:40 p.m.
LA Dodgers at Arizona, 9:40 p.m.
Philadelphia at San Francisco.
10:15 p.m.


FOOTB,

NFL preseason

WEEK I
I Aug. 11


ALL


Baltimore at Philadelphia, 7:30 p.m.
Jacksonville at New England, 7:30 pm.
Seattle at San Diego, 8 p.m. (ESPN)
Denver at Dallas, 8:30 p.m.
Arizona at Oakland, 10 p.m.
Aug. 12
Cincinnati at Detroit, 7:30 p.m.
Miami at Atlanta, 7:30 p.m.
Pittsburgh at Washington,. 7:30 p.m.
San Francisco at New Orleans, 8 p.m.
Tampa Bay at Kansas City, 8 p.m.
(FOX)
Aug. 13
Green Bay at Cleveland, 7:30 p.m.
Buffalo at Chicago, 8 p.m.
Indianapolis at St. Louis, 8 p.m.
Minnesota at Tennessee, 8 p.m.
N.Y. Giants at Carolina, 8 p.m.
Aug.15
N.Y. Jets at Houston, 8 p.m. (ESPN)
WEEK 2
Aug.18
New England at Tampa Bay, 7:30 p.m.
Philadelphia at Pittsburgh, 8 p.m. (FOX)
Aug. 19
Washington at Indianapolis, 7 p.m.
Kansas City at Baltimore, 7:30 p.m.
Detroit at Cleveland, 7:30 p.m.-
Carolina at Miami, 7:30 p.m.
Arizona at Green Bay, 8 p.m.
Atlanta at Jacksonville, 8 p.m. (FOX)
Aug. 20
New Orleans at Houston, 8 p.m.
Tennessee at St. Louis, 8 p.m.
Oakland at San Francisco, 8 p.m.
Buffalo at Denver, 8:30 p.m.
Minnesota at Seattle, 10 p.m.
Aug.21
Cincinnati at N.Y. ets, 7 p.m.
San Diego at Dallas, 8 p.m.
Aug.22
Chicago at N.Y. Giants, 8 p.m. (ESPN)

Arena Football League

PLAYOFFS
Conference Championships
Saturday
National
Chicago at Arizona, 10 p.m.
Monday
American
Georgia at Jacksonville, 8 p.m.

ArenaBowl
Friday,Aug. 12
Chicago-Arizona winner vs. Georgia-
Jacksonville winner, 8 p.m.

BASKETBALL

WNBA schedule

Tuesday's Games
New York 85,Atlanta.75
Minnesota 90, Phoenix 73
Seattle 78, San Antonio 64
Wednesday's Game
Connecticut at Los Angeles (n)
Today's Games
Chicago at New York, 12 p.m.
San Antonio at Minnesota, 8 p.m.
Friday's Games
l,,d;ar. -a .Taki.8 p .t
C o, ',re ct h:u t it Si a nt e IO p .m "

AUTO RACING

Race week

NASCAR
SPRINT CUP
GOOD SAM RV INSURANCE 500
Site: Long Pond, Pa.
Schedule: Friday, practice (Speed, noon-
1:30 p.m., 4-5:30 p.m.); Saturday, qualifying
(ESPN2, 10:30 a.m.-noon); Sunday, race,
I p.m. (ESPN, nobn-5 p.m.).
Track: Pocono Raceway (triangle,
2.5 miles). .
Race distance: 500 miles, 200 laps.
Next race: Heluva Good! Sour Cream
Dips at. the Glen, Aug. 14,Watkins Glen
International,Watkins Glen. N.Y.
Online: http://www.nascar.com
NATIONWIDE
U.S. CELLULAR 250
Site: Newton, Iowa.
Schedule: Friday, practice; Saturday,
qualifying, race, 7:30 p.m. (ESPN2,
7-10 p.m.).
Track: Iowa Speedway (oval, 0.875
miles).
Race distance: 218.75 miles, 250 laps.
Next race: Zippo 200 at the Glen,Aug.
13, Watkins Glen International, Watkins
Glen. N.Y.
CAMPING WORLD TRUCKS
GOOD SAM RV EMERGENCY
ROAD SERVICE 125
Site: Long Pond, Pa.
Schedule: Friday, practice (Speed,
2-3:30 p.m.); Saturday, qualifying (Speed,
9:30-10:30 a.m.), race; I p.m. (Speed,
12:30-3 p.m.).
Track Pocono Raceway.
Race distance: 125 miles, 50 laps.
Next race:VFW 200,Aug. 20, Michigan
International Speedway, Brooklyn, Mich.
INDYCAR
HONDA INDY 200
Site: Lexington, Ohio.
Schedule: Friday, practice; Saturday,
practice, qualifying (Versus, 6-7 p.m.);
Sunday, race, 2:50 p.m. (Versus, 2-5 p.m.).
Track: Mid-Ohio Sports Car Course
(road course, 2.258 miles).
SRace distance: 191.25 miles, 85 laps.
Next race: MoveThatBlock.com Indy
225, Aug. 14, New Hampshire Motor
Speedway, Loudon, N.H.
Online: http://www.indycor.com
NHRA FULLTHROTTLE
NHRA NORTHWEST NATIONALS
Site: Kent,Wash.
Schedule: Friday, qualifying; Saturday,
qualifying (ESPN2, 6-7 p.m.); Sunday, final
eliminations (ESPN2,7-10 p.m.).
Track: Pacific Raceways.
Next event Lucas Oil NHRA Nationals,
Aug. 18-21,Brainerd International Raceway,
Brainerd, Minn.
Online: http://www.nhra.com
FORMULA ONE
Next race: Belgian Grand Prix,Aug. 28,


Spa-Francorchamps, Spa-Francorchamps,
Belgium.
Online: http://www.formulol.com
OTHER RACES
ARCA RACING SERIES: Pennsylvania
ARCA 125, Saturday (Speed, 3-5 p.m.),
Pocono Raceway, Long Pond, Pa. Online:
http://www.arcarcing.com
AMERICAN LE MANS SERIES: Mid-
Ohio Sports Car Challenge, Saturday
(ESPN2, Sunday. 10 p.m.-midnight), Mid-
Ohio Sports Car Course, Lexington, Ohio.
Online: http://www.americanlemans.com


Fixing interception issues



Miami's top QB priority


By TIM REYNOLDS
Associated Press

CORAL GABLES -
Jacory Harris and Stephen
Morris both want to be
picked.
Miami wants them to
stop getting picked off.
That essentially sums up
the state of the race to be
the Hurricanes' starting
quarterback this fall.
Miami led the nation by
throwing 27 interceptions
last season, continuing a
trend that the Hurricanes
have simply been unable
to shake. Since the start of
2008, the Hurricanes have
thrown 64 interceptions as
a team, by far the most
in the country. And 39 of
those have been tossed by
Harris, tying him for the
most of any active quarter-
back entering this season.
"Jacor y and Stephen, I
think, are really compet-
ing," Miami coach Al
Golden said. "I think the
team has accepted the
competition and the chal-
lenge there, and I think the
team as well as the coaches


respect and appreciate the
way those two kids have
embraced the competi-
tion and have not made it
personal or anything like
that. The net benefit is for
the team and the program,
and I'm excited to see what
those guys are going to do.
I grade the film."
Since 1996, when Miami
throws even two intercep-
tions, its record is just
32-27. With one or fewer
picks, the Hurricanes are
99-28. From 2000 through
2002, Miami had a total of
27 interceptions match-
ing what the 'Canes tossed
last season alone.
Big difference, and the
quarterbacks understand
the stakes.
"You learn from your
past," Harris said Tuesday,
five days before Miami
opens fall camp. "You learn
from your mistakes. Now
I can learn, 'OK, don't go
here, don't do this, don't do
that.' Even though it's been
a year and a half of inter-
ceptions, from the middle
of my sophomore year to
all of last year, it's been a


learning process. And I'm
glad that happened."
Golden expects the deci-
sion on a Week 1 starter to
be made after the second
scrimmage of fall camp,
sometime between Aug.
19-22.
With the then-newly
hired Golden watching
from a suite high above the
chilly field, Harris didn't
exactly make the best first
impression on his coach at
last year's Sun .Bowl, a 33-
17 loss to Notre Dame that
capped a 7-6 season.
On one hand, all of
Harris' seven passes that
day were caught
Problem was, three of
them were caught by the
Fighting Irish.
Morris entered in relief
and threw two fourth-quar-
ter touchdowns, which
made the margin more
respectable plus gave the
one-time understudy a heap
of newfound confidence.
"I knew I still had to go
out and work hard and try
to get that spot," Morris
said. "Learning a whole
new offense and going


through spring with that,
it was a little different, but
it worked out for the bet-
ter and I know it's going to
help us this year."
New Miami offensive
coordinator Jedd Fisch
said he has "a 'real clear
idea" of where Harris and
Morris were at the end of
spring practice. But the
Hurricanes haven't been on
a field together since April
16, and the way Fisch sees
it, what the quarterbacks
learned in the last four
months away from spring
ball will be on display start-
ing Saturday.
"We've tried to give them
a road map of what it takes
to' be successful and give
them an opportunity to
drive the car and follow
that path," Fisch said. "I
don't think myself, nor
coach Golden, has said,
'Here's the keys.' But what
we've said is, 'Here's where
you want to go.' And I think
what the guys have really
appreciated ... is the fact
that they felt everything we
were doing was going to
help them succeed."


SCOREBOARD


DISCOUNTS AT THIS STORE ONLY



2724 W. US Highway 90



W. US


THURSDAY


STORE FIXTURES FOR SALE!
ALL SALES FINAL, NO REFUNDS OR EXCHANGES. OPEN DAILY REGULAR HOURS. WE ACCEPT VISA, MASTERCARD, DISCOVER, AMERICAN
EXPRESS AND SEARS CARD. WE ACCEPT SEARS GIFT CARDS. DISCOUNTS DO NOT APPLY TO PREPAID GIFT CARDS. INVENTORY IS UNITED
TO STOCK ON HAND. THIS STORE IS NOT PARTICIPATING IN CURRENT SEARS CIRCULARS. THIS EVENT EXCLUDES ELECTROLUX.
S U E J J ; S JR E A ;*RA J A J A A A TA HE J A


Page Editor: Brandon Finley, 754-0420


r










754-0415 LAKE CITY REPORTER ADVICE & COMICS THURSDAY, AUGUST 4, 2011


DILBERT
EVERYTHING YOU
SAID IS RIGHT, BUT
I HAVE A REFLEXIVE
URGE TO DISAGREE
WITH YOU.


BABY BLUES


BLONDIE
I'M NOT SO SURE \I THOUGHT YOU
I LIKE THESE NEW/. MIGHT ENJOY A
PAJAMAS UTTLSE CHANGE
OF PACE, DEAR


,,,

-( \lj


BEETLE BAILEY


HAGARTHE HORRIBLE


SNUFFY SMITH


UT' I LIKE MY PLEASE,
PACE! I DON'T JUST IVE
WANNA CHANGE ITA TRV!
S MVCE'V 7G ~, ,
-"
v~r ~"y^-1?


OKAY,
BUT
DON'T BE
CREEPY
ABOUT
IT.


SOFTWARE
CANT BE
CHANGED.
AHHH._
THAT'S
GOOD


YOU NEVER KNOW! GOO T
SOMETHING LIKE SLEEP,
THIS COULD THROW DEAR!
OPP MV ENTIRE NAP
I' C/CLE ARTWORK
. TOMORROW!


On iL ^c '^ i's


ZITS


GARFIELD


B.C.


FRANK & ERNEST


1l4N WW rPN'T WU JUT PUT
PA WErToWo-Lo-OVRIOUR
HlE ANP CPRWL TOWARP
T1M NEAREST FXIT? J


MOMF MAPAWTEFOR
OFFErRING L.PFJL-
APVICf.


DEAR ABBY


Neighbor's crude advances

demand a swift response


IF YOU DON'T MrIND,
I?' GOING TO MAKE A
RIDICULOUS COUNTER-
POINT JUST TO GET IT
OUT OF M~Y SYSTEM.

10o ~


HOROSCOPES


ARIES (March 21-April
19): Too much idle time
can result in a mishap.
Focus on love and creativ-
ity; as well as keeping the
peace and getting things
accomplished. A careless
act will be difficult to over-
corpe. Rely on past experi-
ence to help you get ahead
now. ***
TAURUS (April
20-May 20): Use what you
know and can do to your
advantage. You can take
on anyone and be proud of
what you offer. Satisfaction
will be yours, and triumph
is within reach. Don't let
love get in your way. ***
GEMINI (May 21-June 20):
Begin a personal project
to get you back on track
physically and mentally.
Plan to network with peo-
ple who can contribute to
your plans. Love is on the
rise, and whether it's with
someone new or someone
you've been with awhile,
aim to enhance your rela-
tionship. *****
CANCER (June 21-July
22): Don't get bogged
down with someone else's
responsibilities. An unusu-
al event or activity will
bring you in contact with
an unusual individual who
can offer many alterna-
tives. **
LEO (July 23-Aug. 22):
Go directly to the source,
mentally or physically. Talk


THE LAST WORD
Eugenia Last

face-to-face or research
information until you have
a clear view of what you
are up against. You can
win, but you have to be
prepared. Love is high-
lighted, and time to enjoy
the company of someone
special must be taken.

VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept.
22): Secrets must be kept
if you want to get ahead.
An unusual way to make
extra money will develop.
Change is upon you, but
you must be willing to
make a move. ***
LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct.
22): Indecisiveness and
impulsiveness will lead to
double trouble. If you are
feeling pressured, back
away. Focus on fun and
personal relationships, not
making a promise that will
leave you indebted finan-
cially. Don't be reluctant to
ask for help. ***
SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov.
21): Don't give in to pres-
sure from someone you
are attached to physically
or emotionally. Follow your
intuition. You will make
the right decision as long
as you don't let anyone
interfere. Take control,
show your talent, do your
own thing. ***


SAGITTARIUS (Nov.
22-Dec. 21): Do something
to make your space user-
friendly or more comfort-
-able. Don't let someone
meddle in what you are
trying to accomplish or
your plans may not turn
out the way you envi-
sion. Love is highlighted,
but don't overspend to
impress. ****
CAPRICORN (Dec.
22-Jan. 19): Don't be sur-
prised if someone you are
emotionally attached to
lets you down. You have to
look beyond your current
situation. There is no point
in making a big fuss when
what's required is patience
and tolerance. **
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-
Feb. 18): Interacting
with people will lead to
a proposition. Revisit an
old friendship; you will
discover that you still have
plenty in common and can
work together as a team.
Suggest a new and updat-
ed spin on an old idea and
forge ahead. *****
PISCES (Feb. 19-March
20): Concentrate on put-
ting all your skills and
talents to work for you and
relentlessly strive for per-
fection and a cost-efficient
result. Doing as much
as you can for as little as
possible will impress the
people who can help you
get ahead. ***


CELEBRITY CIPHER

by Luis Campos
Celebrity Cipher cryptograms are created from quotations by famous people; past and present.
Each letter in the cipher stands for another.
TODAY'S CLUE: V equals C
"OFWOTF RFFJ GWSEXBSEWR SW JW


BRDSAERP. E JWR'S S,AERH


A I G B R


KFERPY TFBLR BRDSAERP NESAWIS


J FY OFL BSEW R."


ZEG VBLLFD


Previous solution: "I do benefits... there's so many people out there that needs
help that I can't say I won't help them." John Lee Hooker

(c) 2011 by NEA, Dist. by Universal Uclick 8-4


FOR BETTER OR WORSE


DEAR ABBY: This
is embarrassing to say,
but yesterday my sister
wanted to go tanning, so
our neighbor's father took
us. After she got out of the
car, he started to touch me
inappropriately and say
nasty things.
I told him to stop and that
I didn't like it, but he kept
on. Should I tell the police?
Or my old social worker? I
don't know what to do. My
sister and I stay home a lot
because our parents work,
and I'm afraid hell do some-
thing worse.
Please don't print my
name or location. I don't
want my parents to know
just yet. I'm 20 and.don't
know how the law works
for this type of assault
This is considered an
assault, right? Please
answer soon. SCARED
ON THE EAST COAST
DEAR SCARED: NO
ONE has the right to put
his hands on you without
your permission! While
what your neighbor's
father did may not have
been an assault, it could
be considered sexual bat-
tery. You should definitely
inform your social worker.
right away. A man who
would do this to you is
completely capable of
doing it to a minor. Your
social worker will know
how to handle the details.

DEAR ABBY: My boy-
friend was laid off 11
months ago and hasn't


I TRIP TO CATCH FORTY v/INK ,
/ . IUT ALl IDIP lWA$
_--"N\n T0$$ AND TURN!


job that offers the same
wages and/or benefits as
the one he lost Remind him
that his unemployment ben-
efits are finite they're not
going to last forever.
He needs to
understand that when
that happens, you are not
going to support him. He
may be depressed, but
the longer he sits around,
the longer it'll take him to
become motivated. Even
if he can't find work right
now, he can seek further
job training. He can also
do volunteer work, which
would get him out and
circulating and help him to
make more contacts that
could lead to permanent
employment.

DEAR ABBY: Lets say
you made arrangements
with a friend and then
forgot about them, so you
made other arrangements
with someone else. When
you discover your mistake,
should you honor the first
commitment? NEEDS
AN ANSWER SOON
DEAR NEEDS AN
ANSWER: Yes, you
should. To cancel the
original plans would be
rude. And when you make
other arrangements with,
the "someone else," you
should apologize and
explain that you had previ-
ous plans.
* Write Dear Abby at
www.DearAbby.com or
P.O. Box 69440, Los
Angeles, CA 90069.


Abigail Van Buren
www.dearabby.com
been able to find another
job since. My problem
is, he isn't seriously look-
ing for one. Every time
I suggest he get one he
becomes angry, or if I sug-
gest a specific job he gives
me some reason why he
won't take it such as the
pay is too low. He has no
college education and no
other formal schooling.
What does he expect?
I love him, and other
than this our relationship
is pretty great. But lately
this is causing a major
strain because I want more
for him. I hold two jobs
and will be continuing my
B.S. in psychology next
year. I have tried being
nice, being rude, and dis-
cussing it with him. He
just doesn't "get" that I'm
losing respect for the man
I once admired. How can I
make him see he needs to
do more with his life than
collect unemployment?
- STRIVING HIGHER IN
CALIFORNIA
DEAR STRIVING
HIGHER. With today's job
market what it is, it's pos-
sible that without further
training your boyfriend may'
not be able to find another


MiL


l


Page Editor: Emogene Graham,


CLASSIC PEANUTS











LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED THURSDAY, AUGUST 4, 2011

Lake City Reporter




CLASSIFIED


Classified Department: 755-5440


Take ADvantage of the
Reporter Classifieds!

755-5440


ADvantage


- I -


Limited to service type advertis-
ing only.
4 lines, one month.:...'92.10 -'
$10.80 each additional line
Includes an additional $2.00 per
ad for each Wednesday insertion.



You can call us at 755-5440,
Monday through Friday from 8:00
a.m. to 5:00 p.m.
Some people prefer to place their
classified ads in person, and some
ad categories will require prepay-
ment. Our office is located 'at 180
East Duval Street.
You can also fax or email your ad
copy to the Reporter.
FAX: 386-752-9400 Please
direct your copy to the Classified
Department.
EMAIL: classifieds@lakecityre-
porter.com





AdIstoApWea Call by: Fax/Emallby:
Tuesday Mon., 100am. Mon., 9:00 a.m.
Wednesday MOn.,10:00a.m. Mon., 9:00 a.m.
Thursday Wed.,10:00a.m. Wed.;00a.int
Friday Thurs., 10:00 am. Thurs.,00 a.m.
Saturday Fri.,10:00a.m. Fri.,9:00 am.
Sunday Fri.,10:00a.m. F, 9:00 a.m.
These deadlines are subject to change without notice.




Ad Errors- Please read your ad
on the first day of publication.
We accept responsibility for only
the first incorrect insertion, and
only the charge for the ad space
In error. Please call 755-5440
immediately for prompt correc-
tion and billing adjustments.
Cancellations- Normal advertising
deadlines apply for cancellation.
Billing Inquiries- Call 755-5440.
Should further 'information be
required regarding payments or
credit limits, your call will be trans-
ferred to the accounting depart-
ment.


Advertising copy is subject to
approval by the Publisher who
reserves the right to edit, reject,
or classify all advertisements under
appropriate headings. Copy should
be checked for errors by the
advertiser on the first day of pub-
lication. Credit for published errors
will be allowed for the first insertion
for that portion of the advertisement
which was incorrect. Further, the
Publisher shall not be liable for any
omission of advertisements ordered
to be published, nor for any general,
special or consequential damages.
Advertising language must comply
with Federal, State or local laws
regarding the prohibition of discrimi-
nation in employment, housing and
public accommodations. Standard
abbreviations are acceptable; how-
ever, the first word of each ad may
not be abbreviated.

In Print and Online
www.lakecityreporter.com


Legal

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
COLUMBIA COUNTY, FLORIDA
Probate Division
File No. 11-146-CP -
IN RE: ESTATE OF
GLENN W. AESCHLIMAN
a/k/a GLENN WILLARD AES-
CHLIMAN
Deceased
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
(Summary Administration)
TO ALL PERSONS HAVING
CLAIMS OR DEMANDS
AGAINST THE ABOVE ESTATE:
You are hereby notified that an Or-
der of Summary Administration has
been entered in the estate of GLENN
W. AESCHLIMAN a/k/a WILL-
ARD AESCHLIMAN, deceased,
File No. 11-146-CP, by the Circuit
Court for Columbia County, Florida,
Probate Division, the address of
which is 173 NE Hemando Avenue,
Lake City, Florida 32055; that the to-
tal cash value of the estate is
$34,960.00 and that the names and
addresses of those to whom it has
been assigned by such order are:
NAME:
Patricia Scully
ADDRESS:
947 Pond St., Apt. 403, Syracuse,
NY 13208
NAME:
Donald Sievers
ADDRESS:
22295 135th Court, O'Brien, FL
32071
ALL INTEREST PERSONS ARE
NOTIFIED THAT:
All creditors of the decedent and oth-
er persons having claims or demands
against decedent's estate on whom a
copy of this notice is served within
three months after the date of the
first publication of this notice must
file their claims with this Court
WITHIN THE LATER OF THREE
(3). MONTHS AFTER THE DATE
OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION dF
THIS NOTICE OR THIRTY (30)
DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF
SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS
NOTICE ON THEM.
All other creditors of the decedent
and persons having claims or de-
mands against the estate of the dece-
dent must file their claims with this
Court WITHIN THREE .MONTHS
AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST
PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE.
ALL CLAIMS AND DEMANDS
NOT SO FILED WILL BE FOREV-
ER BARRED.
The date of the first publication of
this Notice is July 28, 2011
Attorney for Person Giving Notice
/s/ Terry McDavid
TERRY MCDAVID
Post Office Box 1328
Lake City, FL 32056-1328
-T htpnh-iin(38675221896 9 -
Florida Bar No. 052454
Person Giving Notice:
S/s/ Donald Sievers
222959 135th Court
O'Brien, FL 32071
05526839
July 28, 2011
August 4,2011
Notice is hereby given per Florida
Statue 98.075(2):
Last known address of:
Felipe D Arteaga
9798 SW SR 47
Lake City, FL. 32024
Terry Hall
P.O. Box 1145
Lake City, Fl 32056-1145
is potentially ineligible to be regis-
tered to vote. Please respond within
30 days of publication of this notice
by contacting the Supervisor of Elec-
tions Office at the address or phone
number below. If no response is re-
ceived within 30 days of this publi-
cation, it may result in determination
of ineligibility by the supervisor and
removal of the registered voter's
name from the statewide voter regis-
tration system.
Published one time in the Lake City
Reporter
Elizabeth "Liz" P. Home
Columbia County Supervisor of
Elections
971 W. Duval Street, Suite 102,
Lake City, FL 32055
(386) 758-1026
05527042
August 4, 2011
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
COLUMBIA COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number 11-164-CP
IN RE: ESTATE OF EDNA C.
SUMMERS a/k/a EDNA LEE SUM-
MERS
Deceased
NOTICE OF ADMINISTRATION
The Administration of the estate of
EDNA C. SUMMERS a/k/a EDNA
LEE SUMMERS deceased, File
Number 11-164-CP, is pending in
the Circuit Court for Columbia
County, Florida, Probate Division,
the address of which is 173 NE Her-
nando Avenue, Lake City, FL 32055.
The estate is testate and the date of
the decedent's Will is September 26,
2003. The names and addresses of
the personal representative's attorney
are set forth below.
Any interested persons on whom a
copy of the Notice of Administration







Land Clearing

Back Hoe, Dozer, Chopping, root
raking, bush hog, seeding, sod,
disking, site prep, ponds &
irrigation. Free Est! 386-623-3200


Services

DIVORCE, BANKRUPTCY,
RESUMES.
other court approved forms-
386-961-5896.


Legal

is served must object to the validity
of the will (or any codicil), qualifica-
tions of the personal representative,
venue: or jurisdiction of the Court,
by filing a petition or other pleading
requesting relief in accordance with
the Florida Probate Rules, WITHIN
THE THREE MONTHS AFTER
THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A
COPY OF THE NOTICE ON THE
OBJECTING PERSON, OR THOSE
OBJECTIONS ARE FOREVER
BARRED.
Any person entitled to exempt prop-
erty is required for file a petition for
determination of exempt property
WITHIN THE TIME PROVIDED
BY LAW OR THE RIGHT TO EX-
EMPT PROPERTY IS DEEMED
WAIVED. Any person entitled to
elective share is required to file an
election to take elective share
WITHIN THE TIME PROVIDED
BY LAW OR THE RIGHT TO
CLAIM AN ELECTIVE SHARE IS
DEEMED WAIVED.
By:/s/ TERRY MCDAVID
TERRY MCDAVID
Post Office Box 1328
Lake City, FL 32056-1328
Telephone (386) 752-1896
Florida Bar No. 052454
Attorney for Personal Representative
By:/s/ JANET S. RIVERS
Personal Representative
P.O. Box 3353
Lake City, FL 32056
05526841
July 28, 2011
August 4, 2011
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
COLUMBIA COUNTY, FLORIDA
Probate Division
File No. 11-164-CP
IN RE: ESTATE OF
EDNA C. SUMMERS
a/k/a EDNA LEE SUMMERS
Deceased
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
The administration of the estate of
EDNA C. SUMMERS, a/k/a EDNA
LEE SUMMERS, deceased, whose
date of death was June 9, 2011; is
pending in the Circuit Court for Co-
lumbia County, Florida, Probate Di-
vision; File Number 11-164-CP; the
address of which is 173 NE Heman-
do Avenue, Lake City, Florida
32055. The names and addresses of
the personal representative and the
personal representative's attorney are
set forth below.
All creditors of the decedent and oth-
er persons, who have claims or de-
' mands against decedent's estate, in-
cluding unmatured, contingent or un-
liquidated claims, and who have
been served a copy of this notice,
must file their claims with this Court
WITHIN THE LATER OF THREE
(3) MONTHS AFTER THE DATE
OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE OR THIRTY (30)
DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF
SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS
NOTICE ON THEM.
All other creditors of the decadent
and other persons who have claims
or demands against the decedent's
estate, including unmatured, contin-
gent or unliquidated claims, must file
their claims, with this Court WITHIN
THREE (3) MONTHS AFTER THE
DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICA-
TION OF THIS NOTICE.
ALL CLAIMS NOT SO FILED
WILL BE FOREVER BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME
PERIODS SET FORTH ABOVE,
ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2)
YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE
DECEDENTS DATE OF DEATH
IS BARRED.
THE DATE OF FIRST PUBLICA-
TION OF THIS NOTICE IS July 28,
2011.
/s/ Terry McDavid
TERRY MCDAVID
Post Office Box 1328
Lake City, FL 32056-1328
Telephone (386) 752-1896
Florida Bar No. 052454
Attorney fof Personal Representative
/s/JANET RIVERS
Personal Representative
P.O. Box 3353
Lake City, FL 32056
05526842
July 28, 2011
August 4, 2011


IN THE COUNTY COURT IN
AND FOR COLUMBIA COUNTY,
FLORIDA.
CASE NO. 11-630-SC
ALICE D. ANDERSON
Plaintiff
VS.
TONI R. DRUMMOND
Defendant
A law suit has been filed to deter-
mine ownership and title of-a certain
vehicle described as a 1995 Regal
Buick with Serial #
2G4WB12M4S1473946 located in
Lake City, Columbia County, Flori-
da.
The following persons) may claim
some right title or interest therein:
Alice D. Anderson. If you have
claim, interest, or defense in this
clause, you must file your written an-
swer or objection with the Clerk of
this Court of Columbia County with-
in 10 days.
(seal)
CLERK OF COURTS
By:/s/ Debbie Watkins
Deputy Clerk
05526640
July 14, 21, 28, 2011
August 4, 2011

020 Lost & Found'

05526994







FOUND
Silky Terrier, Male 11 pounds
Silver with tan face. Was wear-
ing a blue and brown polka dot
collar. Please bring Kota home
to his loving family.
Call 365-0480 or 365-2671


020 Lost & Found
Missing Dachshund (Weiner Dog).
Black & Tan answers to Oscar.
Around SE High Falls Rd. on 8/01.
Price Creek area. 386-466-7996

100 Job
100 Opportunities
Accounting firm seeks full-time
qualified accountant. Ideal
candidate will have experience in
general accounting, tax
accounting, tax return preparation
and use of QuickBooks and
Microsoft Office. Send reply to
Box 05067, C/O The Lake City
Reporter, P.O. Box 1709, Lake
City, FL, 32056
Busy Family practice office. has
front office position available.
Experience preferred. -
Fax resume to: 386-719-9494
Giebeig Family Medicine
F/T clerical and nursing
positions available in busy medical
office. Mon Fri. Email to:
dac.lc22()yahoo.com


INSURANCE AGENCY
Looking for a highly motivated
individual. Licensed 4-40 CSR is
desired but not required. Must
have excellent computer & people
skills benefits avail. Send reply to
Box 05071, C/O The Lake City
Reporter, P.O. Box 1709,
Lake City, FL, 32056 or
fax to: 386-752-2102


LEGAL ASSISTANT
Need full time assistant with good
phone skills, organization and
typing experience, must be
computer literate and good at multi
tasking. Send reply to Box 05070,
C/O The Lake City Reporter, P.O.
Box 1709, Lake City, FL, 32056
My name is James. I'm an inde-
pendant distributer with Zija Inter-
national. Looking for motivated
people who would like to start
their own business in Network
Marketing. Please. call me at
386-697-6386 for more info.
Physical laborer needed. CDL
license req'd. Must have respect
for electricity & ability to work in
water & mud. Must be able to pass
drug test. Call 386-752-1854
Sales Position available for moti-
vated individual Rountree -Moore
Toyota, Great benefits, paid train-
ing/vacation. Exp. a plus but not
necessary. Call Anthony Cosentino
38'-623-7442d


120 Medical
120 Employment
Lisc. Respiratory Therapist and
Lisc. RPSGT needed PDM
for medical office in LC.
Fax resume (386) 754-1712
Faculty Position: Registered
Nurse (BSN) wanted at North
Florida Community College,
See www.nfcc.edu for details.

240 Schools &
S Education
05526648
Interested in a Medical Career?
Express Training offers
courses for beginners & exp
* Nursing Assistant, $479
next class-07/25/10
* Phlebotomy national certifica-
tion, $800 next class-08/08/11
* Continuing education
Fees incl. books, supplies, exam
fees. Call 386-755-4401 or
expresstrainingservices.com


ers -
Grassy expanse
Funny Bombeck
Mamie's man
Was friendly
Squishy


310 Pets & Supplies
BORDER COLLIE Pure
Unregistered 9wks old
All Shots. $250
904-716-2700
Free to good home only. ,
3 adorable long haired kittens.
Call fqr more information.
386-623-5156
PUBLISHER'S NOTE
Florida Law 828.29 requires dogs
and cats being sold to be at least 8
weeks old and have a health
certificate from a licensed
veterinarian documenting they
have mandatory shots and are
free from intestinal and external
parasites. Many species of wild-
life must be licensed by Florida
Fish and Wildlife. If you are
unsure, contact the local
office for information.
To place your
classified ad call
755-5.O
1jzzWE- M


Facilities Coordinator Position
Sitel in Lake City is looking for an experienced Facilities Coordinator
who will be responsible for the overall maintenance and appearance
of our facility.
Previous experience in a similar role is required as is the ability to
communicate both internally and with outside vendors and agencies.
Working knowledge of basic carpentry, plumbing and electrical
required, as is basic computer knowledge.
Criminal background investigation and drug screen will be
required.
Apply at 1152 SW Business Point Drive or online at HYPERLINK
"http://www.sitel.com" www.sitel.com
Equal Opportunity Employer

THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME'
by David L. Hoyt and Jeff Knurek
Unscramble these four Jumbles, They are really
one letter to each square, putting on a good
to form four ordinary words. 'C show today.


1 Medical '
120 Employmenty
r. -


032/U/70
MEDICAL ASSISTANT
Requirements: Phlebotomy
certified with min.
1 yr experience .
Please email resume to:
ipapesh(a cancercarenorthflori-
da.com

F/T'RN for nurse mgr position
needed for busy medical practice
in Lake City. Recovery room or
critical care exp. a plus. M-F.
Email resumes to:
dac.lc22(@yahoo.com


ACROSS

1 Old crone
4 Stage tele-
phone
8 Cello kin
12 Vane dir.
13 Dublin's land
14 Razor feature
15 Saturate
17 Ibsen heroine
18 Thin
19 Move crabwise
21 Peat-
23 Show affec-
tion
24 Amazon, for
one
27 Bearing
29 Flock member
30 Among
32 Hockey score
36 Football eleven
38 Jai -
40 Itinerary word
41 Belgian river
43 All set
45 Shore roar.
47 Wee drink


--D I Now arrange the circled letters
to form the surprise answer, as
suggested by the above cartoon.

Answer here:
(Answers tomorrow)
Yesterday's I Jumbles: BLOOM SNIFF HOODED REVOLT
Answer: What they were able to make when the role of 007
passed from Sean to Roger "MOORE" BONDS


49 Rubbish
51 Recital pieces
55 High desert of
Asia
56 Stickum
58 Physiologist
Pavlov
59 Scoundrel
60 Tender pod
61 Autry of oat-
ers
62 Multitude
63 Sonic-boom
maker

DOWN

1 Chops down
2 PDQ
3 Japanese clog
4 non grata
5 Rubs the
wrong way
6 Sierra Madre
gold
7 Tent holders
8 Selling
9 Artifacts
10 People devour-


11
16
20
22
24


25 Have a mort-
gage
26 Drop - line
28 Ms. Lupino
31 Kettle and
Bell
33 Biologist's
eggs
34 Provide help
35 Install tile
37 Glacial depos-
it
39 Angrily
42 Maybes
44 Flightless
birds
45 Kitchen appli-
ance
46 Of cities
48 Adjust the
length
50 Tee-hee cous-
in (hyph.)
52 Dunks
53 Nights, in
want ads
54 Bench or has-
sock
55 Rock band
booking
57 "The", to
Wolfgang


2011 UFS, Dist. by Univ. Uclick for UFS


Answer to Previous Puzzle

FRAU DST BOLT
BURN ANA LIED
ISLA FORTUNES
KOWTOW ARKS
AWE DIT
ZEBRA PULSED
EP E TICS Z7EE




I T M E IT


ROORM AN 1-E-TNA
IN NS TSER-ODE


Want more puzzles?
Check out the "Just Right Crossword Puzzles" books
at QuillDrlverBooks.com


BUY I^


SEiLL IT



FIND 14


i


Z-1











LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED THURSDAY, AUGUST 4. 2011


361 Farm Equipment
84 Ford 4610 Tractor.
2WD, Solid
2005 motor,57,500. OBO
386-867-0005

407 Computers
HP Computer,
$80.00
386-755-9984 or
386-292-2170

420 Wanted to Buy
Wanted Junk Cars, Trucks, Vans.
$250 & up CASH! Free Pick Up!
NO title needed !386-878-9260
After 5pmr 386- 752-3648.


430 Garage Sales

Huge Sale Fri & Sat. 8-3 RAIN or
SHINE Household, Kids toy's &
clothes, Fum., etc. 5188 North US
Hwy 441 Lake City 386-438-7254
Mikesville Club Community. Sat.
8/6, 7-? Indoor/outdoor. 296 SE
Clubhouse Ln. 41 S. about 3mi S
of Ellisville. Bright pink signs.
Extra space avail. 352-226-2100
MOVNG SALE 8/6, 7-12,
135 SW Buldawg Gin. Lake City,
Branford Hwy, 1.5 W of 252B,
fum., t6ols, piano, washer, etc.
Multi Family Sat. 8-1. Hwy 18,
Thornwood S/D in Ft. White.
Desks/chair, book cases, shelving
units & more. 386-365-5742
PUBLISHER'S NOTE
All Yard Sale Ads
Must be Pre-Paid.


440 Miscellaneous
Bowflex Extreme
with extras
$350.00'
386-758-6782
CUB CADET Self Propelled
Mower.
Like New
Asking $180 OBO, 386-984-7510
GOLDS GYM
Exercise Unit.
$250. obo
386-758-6782
Stop gnat & Mosquito bites! Buy
Swamp Gator All natural insect re-
pellent. Family safe. Use head to
toe. Available at The Home Depot.
Summer Barbecue Special
Tow Behind
Grill/Smoker, $1,250 OBO.
386-719-4802


450 Good Things
to Eat
GREEN PEANUTS For Sale
Valencia. Graded and washed.
$30.00 a bushel.
386-752-3434

630 Mobile Homes
630 for Rent
14 Wide, 2/2-$475. mo. + dep.
Clean, Quiet Country Park
Water, septic, garbage incl. NO
PETS! 386-758-2280 References,
2&3 BR MH. $395 $650. mo.
plus-deposit. Water & sewer fur-
nished. Cannon Creek MHP
386-752-6422
2/1 Mobile Homes in a park.
$400.00 and $450.00 per month
plus security deposit.
Call 386-965-5530
2/1 S of Lake City, (Branford area)
$500 month plus security
386-590-0642 or 386-867-1833
www.suwanneevalleyproperties.com
2/1 S/W, front kitchen, CH/A
$385. mo. plus
$200. dep
386-752-2254
2/2 Units, clean, well maintained,
nice safe park setting, 2 miles to
downtown Lake City, $575 month
+ $575 sec dep, 386-984-8448
13th Month FREE!!
LG clean 3br's $450. -$650. mo. +
dep. Also, 2br mobile home's
available. No Pets.
5 Points area. 386-961-1482
Mobile Homes for rent in
White Springs, Lake City & Ft.
White Contact 386-623-3404
or 386-365-1919
r6A Mobile Homes
V for Sale
Handy man special, 94 Fleetwood
DWMH. 3/2 on 5 acres in Ft.
White. Owner Fin. $3,000 dn.
$850mo. $99,900 352-215-1018
www.LandOwnerFinancing.com
Palm Harbor Homes
"DIVORCE"
SAVE On This Short Sale
800-622-2832 ext. 210

Mobile Home
650 & Land

67.5 ac.Ranch, fenced & cross
fenced. Spacious moblie home
w/large front deck & RV hookup
MLS 75607 $299,000. Access
Realty. Patti Taylor. 386-623-6896

705 Rooms for Rent
New furnished bedroom apt in a
home, private entrance & bath, in-


eludes utilities, trash, cable, frig &
pest control. $450 mo + dep. Avail
8/1. 386-752-2020 SW Lake City

710 Unfurnished Apt.
For Rent








05527089
SPRING HILL VILLAGE
Excellent High Springs location.
1, 2 & 3 bedroom floor-plans;
some with garages.
Call 386-454-1469
or visit our website:
www.springhillvillage.net


710 Unfurnished Apt. 730 Hme For Rent
For For Rent


1BR APT.
Downtown Location, Clean.
$450 mo, plus Security.
NO PETS. Call 386-755-3456
2 bedroom Apartment
$600. mo
plus security deposit.
386-344-3715
2/1 Unfurnished Apt for Rent
Water & Electric furnished
$800 mo. plus $300 security
Deposit. Call 386-752-2384
2BR/1.5BA w/garage
5 minutes from VA hospital.
Call for details.
386-755-4590 or 365-5150
2BR/1BA. Close to town.
$565.mo plus deposit.
Includes water & sewer.
386-965-2922
Amber Wood Hills Apts.
Private Patio area. Beautiful yard.
Washer/dryer hkup. Free water &
sewer. 1/1, 2/1. Move in special.
386-754-1800. wwwmyflapts.com
Beautiful Apt, Large 1 bdrm,
w/inground pool, CHA, details at
bigfloridahome.com
$650/mo + dep 386-344-3261
Columbia Arms Apt. located 1/2
mi from V.A. & Winn Dixie. Pet
Friendly. Move in Special $199.
Pool, laundry & balcony.
386-754-1800. www.myflapts.com
Furnished or unfurnished 1 or 2
bedroom townhomes on the golf
course. $625-$750. mo. + security.
Includes water. 386-752-9626
Greentree Townhouse
Summer special. 2/1, 2/1.5. Free
water & sewer. Balcony & patio.
Laundry. Behind Kens on Hwy 90.
386-754-1800 wwwmyflapts.com
Large & clean. lbr/lba apt.
CH/A Ig walk in closet. Close to
town. $395. mo and $350. dep.
(904)563-6208

ONE 51 PLACE APTS
Alachua
MOVE IN SPECIALS
1, 2, & 3 bedrooms
Call TODAY 386-462-0656
or visit us at one51 place.com

Redwine Apartments. Move in
special $199. Limited time. Pets
welcome, with 5 complexes,
we have a home for you.
386-754-1800. www.myflapts.com
Summer Special! 12th mo Free
w/signed yr lease. Updated, w/tile
floors/fresh paint. Great area.
From $450.+sec. 386-752-9626
The Lakes Apts. Studios & lBr's
from $135/wk. Util. & cable incl.,
Sec 8 vouchers accepted, monthly
rates avail Call 386-752-2741
Unfurnished Apt Eastside
Village Realty, Inc .2 bedroom
1 bath Duplex must be 55+ yrs of
age Call Denise Bose @
386-752-5290
Wayne Manor Apts.
Move in$199' S ummer'special.
2/1, washer/dryer. Behind Kens off
SHwy 90. 386-754-1800 '
www.myflapts.com
Windsor Arms Apartments.
Summer special $199. Move in!
2/1, 2/1.5, 2/2. Pet Friendy. Free
200 ch. Dish. Washer/dryer hkup.
386-754-1800. www.myflapts.com

7 0 Furnished Apts.
720 For Rent
Rooms for Rent. Hillcrest, Sands,
Columbia. All furnished. Electric,
cable, fridge, microwave. Weekly
or monthly rates. 1 person $135,
2 persons $150. weekly
386-752-5808

7 8 Unfurnished
730 Home For Rent

05526997
Only 3 homes available If you
need a residential property
manager, we need your
inventory! We offer both full
Sand limited property
management services.
Lake City
385 SE Tribble St. 3BR
1.5 BA home with large family
room, double carport and
single carport. A lot of home.
for the money at $750./mo
& 527 Alamo Dr.- Very nice
remodeled 3 BR 2BA spacious
home near downtown. Too
many features to list, so call
today for your showing.
Great deal at $975./mo
Ft. White
451 SW Riverside Ave.-
Walk out your front door to
float or swim! 3BR 2BA with
1900 sf. Remodeled interior
features family room with
fireplace, new kitchen, large
master and much more! Even
a place to park your RV.
Entertain under the oversized
pole bam. Fun in the sun for
only $1,000./mo
Century 21 The Darby
Rogers Co.
BJ Federico 386-365-5884
Kayla Carbono 386-623-9650

3 br/2ba house, 1206 McFarlane
Avenue. Avail. 9/1/11. $950 mo
$400 sec dep. 904-376-0620 or
904-813-8864 for appointment,


3/2, family rm, 2 car garage,
$750 mo. +
$750 security deposit
Call 386-752-2384
3/2. Ir, dr, fam rm w/ fp, 2-car
garage, fenced bk yd.
1792 sqft. $1050mo. Martha Jo
Khachigan, Realtor 623-2848
3BR/2BA CB home Carport hard-
wood floors. CH/A Fenced yard.
Good area. $750 mo plus security.
386-752-0118 or 623-1698
Completely remodeled Brick.
3br/2ba 1750 sqft. Lg lot. Includes
washer, dryer, stove, & fridge.
$985. mo $985 dep. 386-752-7578
House for rent in town.
Please call for more
information. NO PETS!
386-758-0057


055270:2
LAKE CITY
2BR/1.5BA, 975SF S725. mo
4BR/3BA, 2139SF S1500. mo
4BR/2BA. 1248SF $695. mo
2 AVAILABLE
3BR/2BA 1258SF $925. mo
3BR/2BA 1582SF S900. mo

3BR/2BA 1246SF 5S700. mo
2BR/1BA 700SF 5495. mo
2 AVAILABLE

3BR/1.5BA 1040SF $825 "

FT WHITE

3BR/2BA 1512SF $850. mo

LAKE BUTLER

4BR/2BA 1560SF $750 mo

MADISON

2BR/1BA JUST REMODELED
$450. mo. 2 AVAILABLE

Mike Foster 386-288-3596
Mitchell Lee 386-867-1155
1688 SE Baya Dr., Suite 105
Lake City, FL 32025
www.NorthFloridahomeandland.com
Accredited Real Estate is a Full
Service ReAl Estate Office.
We do: Rentals
Property Management
o Property Sales.
M IR -,
Unfurnished 2 bedroom/1 bath
house. $700.00 per month.
First, last and security Firm.
386-590-5333

750 Business &
Office Rentals
Commercial property. 2100 sqft
bldg. on 1 acre. CH/A. Close to
college and Timco. Call for more
information. 386-867-1190
FOR LEASE: Downtown office
space. Convenient to
Court house.
Call 386-755-3456
For Lease: E Baya Ave. Two -
1000 sqft office space units or
combined for 2000 sqft. 386-984-
0622 or weekends 386-497-4762
OFFICE SPACE for lease.
Oak Hill Plaza. 900 sqft
$675mo/$695. sec dep.
Tom 386-961-1086 DCA Realtor


790 Vacation Rentals
Horseshoe Beach RV Lot.
Nice comer Lot with shade trees.
$295. mo Water/electric included
386-235-3633 or 352-498-5986
Scalloping Horseshoe Beach Spcl
Gulf Front 2br, w/lg porch, dock,
fish sink. wkend $395./wk $895.
386-235-3633/352-498-5986
alwaysonvacation.com #419-181
"Florida's Last Frontier"


805 Lots for Sale
Lots for Sale Eastside
Village Realty, Inc. buildable
vacant lot hight & dry in a estab-
lished neighbor priced @ $40,000.
Call Denise Bose @ 752-5290
North Fla Land. 1/2 80 Ac w/Fin.
Counties Columbia, Suwannee,
Gilchrist, Baker, Glades, Polk.
Call for brochure and terms. 7
Days 7 to 7. 386-752-5035 X 3111
A Bar Sales, Inc.
PUBLISHER'S NOTE
All real estate advertising in this
newspaper is subject to the fair
housing act which makes it illegal
to advertise "any preference,
limitation, or discrimination based
on race, color, religion, sex,
disability, familial status or nation-
al origin; or any intention to make
such preference, limitation or
discrimination." Familial status
includes children under the age of
18 living with parents or legal
custodians, pregnant women and
people securing custody of chil-
dren under the age of 18. This
newspaper will not knowingly
accept any advertising for real es-
State which is in violation of the
law. Our readers are hereby in-
formed that all dwellings adver-
tised in this newspaper are availa-
ble on an equal opportunity basis.
To complain of discrimination call
HUD toll free at 1-800-669-9777,
the toll free
telephone number to the hearing
impaired is 1-800-927-9275.


810 Home for Sale
2/1 completely updated, screened
back porch, large utility room,
MLS#77413 $52,900 Call Nancy
Rogers R.E.O. Realty
386-867-1271
3/2 1056 sqft Brick home in town.
Fenced back yard w/12x12 work-
shop Just Reduced! $79,900
MLS# 77414 Call 386-243-8227
R.E.O.Realty Group, Inc
3/2 2003 DWMH on 5 acre rectan-
gular lot w/tons of potential.
MLS#77568 $79,900 Call Nancy
@ R.E.O. Realty 386-867-1271


nancytrogers@msn.com
3/2 home on .67 ac. Creekside S/D
. Fenced back yard. lots of trees.
Split floor plan on cul-de-sac
MLS 77385 Access Realty.
Patti Taylor $169,900 623-6896
4/2,on 10.5 acres w/'detached
garage, patio, above ground pool,
MLS# 77410 $189,888
R.E.O. Realty Group, Inc
386-243-8227
4/2 with 1000 sq ft workshop,
fenced yard, 2 car garage, Fairly
new roof & HVAC MLS#77602,
Bring Offers! $164,900,
R.E.O. Realty Group 243-8227


u N.... .





2000 Hummer
Army green, leather
interior, pristine cond.
31,148 miles.

$52,000
Call
Pictures available.


810 Home for Sale

4br brick on .51 ac. comer lot. For-
mal dining and a large open floor
plan. Brick patio. S 139.888
NLS 76763 Brittanv Stoeckert
Results Realty 386-397-3473
Access Realty Stylish 3/2 + pool
house w/1/2 bath on 2.25 acres.
Rear deck. 2 car garage & carport.
MLS 78103 S189.900.
Pa i Taylor.623-6896
BEAUTIFUL Lake Front home!
1 ac lot within the city limits.
Close to town. 1800 heated sq. ft.
S 1-14.900 MLS# 78385
Call Jay Sears. 386-867-1613
Brick 3/1 family home, 4.43 acres.
w/metal roof. MLS# 77415
Short sale acceptance w/lenders.
approval. $89,000. 386-243-8227
R.E.O. Realty Group, Inc
CLEAN & READY! 3BR/2BA
mfg home on .97-acre south of Ft.
White on paved road $59,000
DANIEL CRAPPS AGENCY,
INC. 755-5110 #78007
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
3/2 brick home in Woodcrest. Lg
lot completely fenced. Easy access
to amenities. Elaine K. Tolar 386-
755-6488 MLS# 78148 $129,900
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
3/3 in beautiful area. 2414sqft.
Private yard & patio with storage
bldg. Lori G Simpson 386-365-
5678 MLS# 78175 $159,900
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
New home in Mayfair. 4 bedroom
on comer lot. Covered Porch.
Elaine K. Tolar 386-755-6488
MLS# 76919 $209,900
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
Remodeled 2/2 (could be 3/2).
Split floor plan. Home Owner
Warranty. Mary Brown Whitehurst
965-0887 MLS# 77943 $99,000
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
MH in Eastside Village a 55+
retirement community. Well main-
tained. Bruce Dicks 386-365-3784
MLS# 78350 $59,900
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
Brick home on Suwannee River
$329,900 Elaine K. Tolar 386-755-
6488 or Lori G. Simpson 365-5678
MLS# 70790 $329,900
DESIRABLE GWEN LAKE area!
Nice 3BR/2BA home on comer lot
REDUCED TO $95,000 DANIEL
CRAPPS AGENCY, INC.
755-5110 #77307
Hallmark Real Estate. 3/2
Doublewide on 1 acre. $58,000.
Not far to college & airport.
MLS# 78308
Ginger Parker 386-365-2135
Hallmark Real Estate. 35 High &
Dry acres. open pasture w/scat-
tered trees. Older site built home.
Needs some TLC.
MLS#76186 Jay Sears 719-0382
Hallmark Real Estate. Beautiful
lot in Woodborough, has well
maintained 3/2 brick home.
Affordable price!MLS#75413
., Shery Wl.lis38c.-83O5-. .io .
Hallmark Real Etatie Lpkefront.
in town on 1 ac, Majestic oaks &
Magnolias. Hardwood floors,
fireplace & basement.
MLS#78385 Jay Sears 719-0382
Hallmark Real Estate. Pool &
Patio. 3br/2ba. brick home on
1.69 ac. Workshop &
SWMH on property. MLS#78117
Tanya Shaffer 386-397-4766
Hallmark Real Estate. Time to go
to the River. Stilt home w/covered
decking. Floating dock,out bldgs
& covered RV parking. $188K.
MLS#72068 Janet Creel 719-0382
HANDYMAN SPECIAL!
4BR/2BA mfg home in great loca-
tion close to many amenities
$39,500 DANIEL CRAPPS
AGENCY, INC. 755-5110 #77852
Home for Sale Eastside Village
Realty, Inc. 2 bedroom, 2 bath site
built home with screen porch,
large carport priced just right Call
Denise Bose @ 752-5290
Home on 15 ac. w/over 2,500 sqft
home.Very Ig bedrooms w/private
baths. 24x24 workshop $235,000
MLS 77552 Brittany Stoeckert
Results Realty 386-397-3473
Lg. 4/3 family home. 16x20
screened porch, workshop. 4.5 ac.
fenced/cross fenced MLS 74339
$229,900. N Fla Homeland Real-
ty Darlene Hart 386-288-2878
Mayfair S/D, nice fenced in back
yard w/small lake behind property.
Very nice. $99,888
MLS 77092 Brittany Stoeckert
Results Realty 386-397-3473
Neat as a pin! Split floor plan
w/well manicured lawn. 10x12
storage shed. $129K MLS 77932
Darlene Hart 386-288-2878
N Fla Homeland Realty
Owner Financing Avail. with
down pmt. 3br/2ba 2 story brick.
4.6 ac. in ground pool. Lg. work-
shop &2 wells. $150,000.00 obo
Old Wire Rd. (850)728-0782
QUALITY HOME. Very private,
yet in.the city. Comes with mobile
home park that generates revenue.
$695,000. MLS# 77920
Call Jay Sears. 386-867-1613
REDUCED! Custom 2,061 SqFt
home with open floor plan,
3BR/2.5BA, in-ground pool
DANIEL CRAPPS AGENCY,
INC. 755-5110 #75442


10-ac lot. Well/septic/pp. Owner
financing $300 dn, $663 mo 8.9%,
25,yrs. Deas Bullard Properties
386-752-4339 www.landnfl.com
2+ ACRES ON HWY 47
by 1-75 interchange. More than
200 ft of frontage $149,900
Call 386-243-8227
R.E.O. Realty Group, Inc
20.02 acres ready for your site
built home. Has 2 wells & 2 power
poles w/a 24x30 slab $132,000
MLS# 78126 Call 386-243-8227
R.E.O.Realty Group, Inc
4 1/2 acre lot. Lake Jeffery Road.
Gorgeous Oaks!Paved Rd
Owner Financing! NO DOWN!
$59,900. $525mo 352-215-1018.
www.LandOwnerFinancing.com
4 acres, Wellborn, New Well
installed, Beautifully wooded
w/cleared Home Site, owner fin,
no down, $39,900, $410 mon
Call 352-215-1018
www.LandOwnerFinancing.com
FARM- 7 stall barn.
17+ acres, pasture, cross fenced.
Close in $500. mo.
386-961-1086
Paved hard road in front of 5 ac.
tract. Comes with: power pole,
well & septic. Cleared in back.
Also, 20X25 carport. $39,900
MLS# 76347. Jay 386-867-1613

Commercial
830 Property
Prime Commercial Location.
Just across from plaza. Frontage
. on Baya w/2 curbcuts. $350,000
MLS# 77485 Call 386-243-8227
R.E.O.Realty Group, Inc

850 Waterfront
8O0 Property-
Suwannee Completely remodeled.
Town of Suwannee. On a deep
fresh water canal w/new seawall.
Owner finance. Must see! $15k dn,
$1,500./mo. 352-949-0447

870 Real Estate
S Wanted
I Buy Houses
CASH!
Quick Sale Fair Price
386-269-0605


930 Motorcycles
2001 KAWASAKI KLR250,
excellent condition, 2,193 miles,
combination street legal/off road.
$1,995 386-623-4376


950 Cars for Sale
1974 Corvette Stingray.
350 engine with 4 speed transmis-
sion. Call for more info. $3,500.
386-397-6717 or 752-8157
2004 BUICK Lasabre Limited
sedan 4 dr. 86k miles. Cold AC
runs great all leather, auto. $8,300.
386-344-2107. Book value $89K

952 Vans & Sport
S Util. Vehicles
96 Chrysler Town & Country LXi.
2nd owner. Clean inside/out, cold
AC, new tires, loaded. $3200. obo
110k mi 386-963-2271 249-2723


Lake City Reporter


1996 Chrysler Town
& Country LXi
2nd owner, very clean
inside & out, cold AC, new
tire, loaded, 110K.
$3,200 OBO
Call
386-963-2271
386-249-2723


810 Home for Sale
RUSSWOOD EST! 3BR/2BA
w/2.337 SqFt. open floor plan,
climatized sun porch S219.900
DANIEL CRAPPS AGENCY,
INC. 755-5110 #77633
Spacious 4/2 home on I ac. Split
floor plan. Great neighborhood.
Easyv access to 1-75 S220K MLS
77859 N Fla Homeland Realty
Darlene Hart 386-288-2878
WELLBORN! 4BR/2BA mfg
home w/2,280 SqFt. FP, & 5
ACRES only $74.900
DANIEL CRAPPS AGENCY,
INC. 755-5110 #78317

820 Farms &
Acreage

05527058
Must See, Prettiest Rolling
Pasture Lot in North Fla.
3 mi. W. of Col. City School.
Red. to $6,990 P/A, Financing,
386-752-1364 or 386-965-4340.


2006 EF250
Ford Van
3/4 ton, metal work
shelves/ladder rack,
60K miles, exc. cond.

$10,500
Call
386-555-5555
If you don't sell your vehicle
during the first 10 days, you
can run the same vehicle ad
for 10 additional days for
only $15.00
Terms and conditions remain the
same for the additional run.


...to never miss a day's
worth of all the
Lake City Reporter
has to offer:
Home delivery.
To subscribe call
755-5445


ON WHEELS & WATERCRAFT" a7










Bring the picture in or
we will take it for you!;

* Ad runs 10 consecutive days
with a description and photo in the
newspaper and online E-edition.
* Ad runs 10 consecutive days as a,
classified line ad online.
* You must include vehicle price.
* All ads are prepaid.
* Private party only.


10 ac. Ft. White $39,995,
$995 Down, $273.16 mo.
Seller fin. vareasrealty.com
352-472-3154


I


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LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS THURSDAY. AUGUST 4, 2011


DENT
From Page 1B

defense to be inducted into
the Hall on Saturday, when
he joins fellow "Monsters
of the Midway" Hampton
and Mike Singletary. It's an
honor that his teammates
and coaches say is long
overdue.
Who can forget the man-
gled mess of opponents
that group left behind while
shuffling all the way to a
championship? Whether it
was the crunching hits or
Dent bursting past the tack-
le and stripping the ball as
he sacked the quarterback,
few teams made offenses
wilt the way that one did.
He will go in as part of a
class that includes Shannon
Sharpe, Marshall Faulk,
Chris Hanburger, Les
Richter, Ed Sabol and Deion
Sanders. Hell be presented
by Joe Gilliam Sr., his old
coach at Tennessee State,
who, like Hampton, was far
from impressed at first.
"I didn't worry about the
day coming," Dent said. "I
more or less worried about
the people who I wanted to
thank, make sure they were
living. I lost my high school
coach who just died a cou-
ple years ago. My mother
passed in '89, and I think
the last guy living here that
played a big part of it was
Coach Gilliam."
A four-timePro Bowl pick
and MVP of the Super Bowl
during the 1985 champion-
ship season, Dent played 15
years and is tied for sixth
with John Randle on the
NFL's all-time sacks list
with 137'1. He set a team
record with 17' in 1984, led
the NFL with 17 sacks a
year later and finished with
10 or more eight times in
his career.
Now, after missing out
as a finalist six of the previ-
ous seven years, he's finally
going into the Hall.
Not bad for a guy who
barely made his college
team.


GOLF
From Page 1B

Soucinek won back-to-
back tournaments on the
Gainesville Junior Tour this
summer. He winning scores
were 71 at the University
of Florida course and 72
at Quail, Heights Country
Club.
Jones won on the tour at
Ironwood Golf Club and had
four second-place finishes.
, Soucinek is a member of
the 16-18 age group team
and will play at the Sand
Ridge Dunes course. His
teammates are Pureun Kim
and Trace Rucarean.
"I have known Trace for
a while," Soucinek said. "He
plays at Buchholz. I just met
Pureun this year. He came
over 4-5 months ago from
Korea to play golf."
Jones is in the 13-15 age
group with Tyler Allen
and Brian Stockman. Their
tournament is on the Lakes
course.
"I have known Tyler
(Buchholz player) for
years," Jones said. "Brian
will be a freshman and is
going to St. Francis. I have
been able to get to know
him better this year. We
have played a lot together
since we were selected to
play on the team."
Soucinek and Jones are
members of the Columbia
High golf team. They both
have been serious about
golf for six years, and are
entering their second sea-
son as Tigers. Last year,
both qualified for region
play based on their indi-
vidual scores in the district


tournament.
"My goal is to stay No.
1 on the high school team
for my last two years,"
Soucinek said. "I want to
keep my high school career
going well."
"I want to continue to
progress with my game,"
Jones said. "I would like
to keep playing well and
for us to make state my
last three years. Maybe I
could go to college on a golf
scholarship."


E aes DT Patterson has seizure; alert at hospital


Associated Press

BETHLEHEM, Pa.
- Eagles defensive tackle
Mike Patterson was alert,
stable and joking at a hos-
pital after suffering a sei-
zure at training camp at
Lehigh University, trainer
Rick Burkholder said
Wednesday.
Patterson dropped to
the ground between plays


during a morning prac-
tice, and the player began
violently shaking. He was
immediately tended to by
Burkholder and his staff,
with assistance from rook-
ie offensive lineman Danny
Watkins, a trained firefight-
er.
Burkholder said the 6-
foot-1, 300-pound Patterson
was undergoing further
tests at Lehigh Valley


Hospital.
"He's absolutely alert,
stable, totally communi-
cating with everybody,
even joking a little bit,"
Burkholder said. "We won't
speculate what happened
to him, other than he had
a seizure. It could be any-
thing. We don't even want
to speculate what might
have happened."
Patterson's agent JR


Ricket said in a statement
that the player is "in no
pain and doing well."
"We are very grateful
for everyone's prayers and
support," he added. "Mike
will be back at practice as
soon as the doctors clear
him."
Burkholder said the sei-
zure lasted about four min-
utes, and that Patterson lost
consciousness at one point


as he was on the ground.
As players kneeled near-
by, holding hands and pray-
ing, an ambulance arrived
and Patterson was placed
on a stretcher and lifted
into,the ambulance.
The linemen resumed
practice after about 15
minutes. The skill position
players did 7-on-7 drills
on another fiqed while
Patterson was down.


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