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UFPKY NEH LSTA



The Lake City reporter
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028308/01623
 Material Information
Title: The Lake City reporter
Uniform Title: Lake City reporter (Lake City, Fla. 1967)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: John H. Perry
Place of Publication: Lake City Fla
Publication Date: 7/31/2011
Frequency: daily (monday through friday)[<1969>-]
weekly[ former 1967-<1968>]
daily
normalized irregular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Lake City (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Columbia County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Columbia -- Lake City
Coordinates: 30.189722 x -82.639722 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 95, no. 4 (Oct. 5, 1967)-
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000358016
oclc - 33283560
notis - ABZ6316
lccn - sn 95047175
sobekcm - UF00028308_01569
System ID: UF00028308:01623
 Related Items
Preceded by: Lake City reporter and Columbia gazette

Full Text











200 -- '-. .
-- -



La ke


HI


City


Reporter


Sunday, July 31,201 I www.lakecityreporter.com Vol. 137, No. 159 $ $1.00


Debt


fight a


test of


2 men

Obama, Boehner
face off in battle
of their careers.

Editor's note: A last-ditch
attempt to reach compromise
in the debate over raising the
federal debt limit had not
borne fruit as of press time.
By ERICA WERNER
Associated Press
WASHINGTON The
fight over the debt ceil-
ing has turned into a dra-
matic leadership test for
President Barack Obama
and House Speaker John *
Boehner, opponents in a
divided government who've
gone from negotiating in
secret to facing off in public
at a watershed moment for
the country and their own
political careers.
As 'the standoff enters
its .uncertain endgame, it's
unclear which of them will
come out ahead or if the
two leaders will rise or fall
together with days left to
strike a deal and stave off
a potentially catastrophic
default on U.S. financial
obligations.
After Boehner succeed-
ed in maneuvering Obama
to the sidelines and grab-
bing control of the debate,
the speaker's standing was
abruptly thrown into ques-
tion late Thursday when
he failed to muster the
necessary votes from tea
party-backed conservatives
to pass debt-ceiling legis-
lation opposed by Obama
and Senate Democrats.
Boehner revised the bill to
make it more palatable to
conservatives, but the delay
and disarray undercut the
speaker's claim to be the
responsible leader, giving
Obama another opening to
try to secure that mantle for
himself.
Obama quickly deployed
his unique bully pulpit, ask-
ing the public Friday to put
pressure on lawmakers. "If
you want to see a biparti-
san compromise a bill
that can pass both houses
of Congress and'that I can
sign let your members
of Congress know," Obama
exhorted. Congressional
phone lines were flooded.
Indeed throughout
the twists and turns of
the debate Obama and
Democrats have appeared to
come out on top politically,
with polls showing that the
public thinks Republicans
are being less reasonable
and need to compromise as
the 2012 presidential elec-
tion approaches.
Yet by most accounts,
Boehner and his
Republicans have already
won on policy, forcing a
national conversation about
debt and pushing Obama
to focus on historic spend-
ing cuts and drop demands
for new taxes. "If you're
DEBT continued on 5A


CALL US:
(386) 752-1293
SUBSCRIBE TO
THE REPORTER:
Voice: 755-5445
( 00.1 1 .1 8 Fax: 752-9400


TERROR, TRIUMPH


A local man's story of
survival during the Nazi
occupation of Holland.

By LEANNE TYO
Ityo@lakecityreporter.comrn

remarkable story Friday
that few can a story
of resistance and survival
while living in German-
occupied Holland during World War
II.
Hielco Kuypers, 91, spoke for a
group at the LifeStyle Enrichment
Center. His wife, Alida Kuypers, 89,
who also survived the Nazi invasion,
was in attendance at the program,
with three of their four daughters.
Both Hielco Kuypers and his wife
were born in Amsterdam in the
early 1920s. While Holland is a small
country,
its resi-
dentsa
never
stopped
working

Kuypers
Lake City resident Anita said,
Houston listens as her that led
father, Hielco Kuypers, to nation-
91, speaks Friday at the al growth
LifeStyle Enrichment and pros-
Center about his time in perity.
Nazi-occupied Holland "They
during World War II. never
gave up,"
he said.
"They keep on working and work-
ing."
However, that only made Holland
more desirableto the Germans,
Hielco Kuypers said.
"Everybody wanted that piece of
land," he said. "Everybody wanted it.
The Germans took it. No wonder."
On May 5, 1940, Hielco Kuypers
said he heard booms and saw air-
planes, signaling the start of the war
in Holland.
"The war started," he said, "and
the Germans came in."
At the beginning of the whr, Alida
Kuypers worked in a Jewish store
in Amsterdam, but "one day, all the
doors closed," Hielco Kuypers said.
German soldiers raided the store,
taking all its jewels, he said, while
the store owner, a Jewish man, posed
like a mannequin in the window to
TRIUMPH continued on 3A


Slow going on some

area roads this week


From staff reports

It'll be slow going
on some area roads
this week as the
Florida Department of
Transportation continues
work on some projects
and starts in on others.
Here's a county-by-
county rundown from
FDOT.
COLUMBIA
COUNTY
Interstate 10: No lane
closures expected this
week on a resurfacing
project between US
441 (Exit 303) and the
Suwannee County line
west of Interstate 75.
Crews will be working
on drainage culverts.
Interstate 75:

99 '"

T-Storm Chance
WEATHER, 2A


Nighttime lane clo-
sures beginning at 6
p.m. for northbound
traffic Sunday through
Thursday nights to
remove the top layers of
asphalt in the center and
inside lanes for about
two miles from south and
north of the northbound
rest area. One lane 'will
be closed beginning at
6 p.m. and two lanes will
be closed between 9 p.m.
and 6 a.m. Also, daytime
lane closures for south-
bound traffic between the
southbound rest area and
the Alachua County line
to sod along the paved
shoulders. The lighting
at the southbound rest
area is being replaced but
ROADS continued on 3A


TONY BRITT/Lake City Reporter
Leah Beaty (foreground) and Joshua Perry approach
the line.


O pinion ................ 4A
Business ................. IC
Obituaries .............. 5A
Advice & Comics ......... 3D
Puzzles ................. 2B


l-
IFK
zI lo;-i


`Lry~'


N'


TODAY
BUSINE
Brightway
giving bac


LEFT: Nazi inva-
sion-survivors Hielco
Kuypers and his
wife, Alida, 89, hold
old photographs of
themselves from
when they were
younger. BELOW:
'Chet Galbraith
(right), 86, listens
intently as Kuypers
tell his story about
the Nazi invasion of
Holland to a group
of people Friday at
LifeStyle Enrichment
Center. 'I'm amazed
at how they suffered.
They truly suffered,'
said Galbraith, who
served at Normandy
as a U.S. Navy
Seaman 1st Class.
'My grandmother
was from Holland.
They were a great,
industrious people. It
is truly a crime what
was done to them.'
Photos by
JASON MATTHEW WALKER/
Lake City Reporter


Bowlers

help out

seniors

By TONY BRITT
tbritt@lakecityreporter.com
The sound of falling bowling
pins equated to cash Saturday
for Columbia County Senior
Services.
Columbia County Senior
Services held its 17th Annual
Bowl-a-Thon fundraiser with
more than 100 people taking
part. The event also featured
a silent cake auction and sev-
eral raffles.
Nineteen teams took part
in the main fundraiser from
noon- 2 p.m. at Lake City
Bowl and at least three other
teams were scheduled to par-
ticipate from 2 -4 p.m. Each of
BOWLING continued on 3A

IN COMING
SS TUESDAY
As Complete city
:k. council coverage.


S, -'


IU~~3









LAKE CITY REPORTER SUNDAY REPORT SUNDAY, JULY 31, 2011


A w h. 3. IYW4$ 3WI ,; ()

Friday: Friday: Saturday: Saturday: Saturday: Saturday:
11-23-28-41 MB 13 3-4-12-23-24 Afternoon: 3-0-6 Afternoon: 2-8-7-8 unavailable unavailable
Evening: unavailable Evening: unavailable


AROUND FLORIDA



Weapons trial set for man suspected in kids' death


ASSOCIATED PRESS


WESTPALM BEACH '
A man suspected of killing ,
two children whose bodies
were found in suitcases in a
canal also confessed to kill- & Se
ing their mother, according
to new court documents.
Clem Beauchamp will go
on trial this week for an
unrelated weapons charge.
He is also suspected in the
death of Felicia Brown,
whose body was discov-
ered in a dump last sum-
mer. Beauchamp has been
in federal jail without bond
for illegally possession a
handgun and homemade
silencer, allowing authori-
ties to build their case in.
the children's death.
Brown disappeared just
after agreeing to cooperate
against Beauchamp in the
gun case, prosecutors said
in court documents filed
Friday. The South Florida
Sun Sentinel also reported
that Beauchamp confessed .
to killing Brown to another ASSOCIATED PRESS
detainee.after his arrest Cornerback Moses Jenkins strains while doing push-ups during the Gator Football Charity Challenge at Ben Hill Griffin
"Beauchamp confessed Stadium on Friday in Gainesville. The event collected food and clothes for the Salvation Army and allowed fans to watch the
to killing Felicia Brown team compete in a,variety of strength games.
while in the U.S. Marshals
Service cell block awaiting
court in West Palm Beach," shows Brown admitting silencer inside a bag with to block any references 1*1-r-old girl's'
prosecutors wrote. she bought the. gun for a knit hat and a Halloween during the trial from pros- disappearance
The bodies of Brown's Beauchamp and saying the mask. ecutors or their witnesses
children, Jermaine McNeil, silencer originated with Brown worried she that Brown was dead or CLEARWATER -
10, and Ju'tyra Allen, 6, him. would take the fall for the murdered as well as any Authorities have arrested a
were discovered in March, "It is a profoundly gun and the silencer. mention of the dead chil- man theysay abducted an
in Delray Beach, stuffed in damaging conversation," "I already said it was my dren. 11-y-old Clearwatergir.
luggage floating in a canal. said 'Robert Berube, gun. I did purchase it from But the judge sided with The Florida Department
A judge ruled Friday Beauchamp's attorney. "It this dude so then it's all prosecutors and agreed e
that prosecutors can play. is possibly the most dam- gonna come back' on me. jurorse',could be informed of Law Enforcemet had
a secretly recorded con- aging-piece of evidence the That's what I'm saying. that Brown was no longer issued an Amber Alert for
versation of Brown for government has. ." The, the, silencer, the gun. alive. the girl on Friday after she
jurors. A transcript of the The weapons charge Everythirig," according to left her home to go to a
conversation, which was dates to 2009, when offi- the transcripts. "movie.2She was found alive
made, by her. ex-husband, cers found a homemade Berube asked the judge Man charged in in an Orlando apartment


later that day.
On Saturday, Pinellas
County Sheriff's deputies
said Richie Urich had been
charged with lewd and las-
civious behavior. He also
has warrants for interfer-
ing with child custody and
traveling to meet a minor.
He is being held in
Orange County Jail with-
out bound. Additional
charges are pending.
Detectives said some-.
one introduced the girl to
Urich when she lived in
Texas. Her family moved
to Florida about three
months ago and she and
Urich maintained contact
off and on electronically.

2 killed in teen
house party
RIVERVIEW -
Authorities are investigat-
ing after two people were
fatally shot at a southwest
Florida house party.
Shortly after midnight,
Hillsborough County
- Sheriff's deputies respond-
ed to the house and saw
more than 100 teenagers
in the streets running
away.
Eighteen year-old
lesha Washington was
found dead at the scene.
Twenty-two year-old Craig
Thompson man was found
with gunshot wounds and
later died at the hospital.


PEOPLE IN THE NEWS


Bush details 9/11 memories for documentary


Associated Press "

NEW YORK Former President
.(eorge W. Bush says Sept 11 will
be marked on calendars like Pearl
Harbor Day a day never forgotten
by the people who lived through it
Bush offers recollections of the
2001 terrorist attacks in an exten-
sive interview that serves as the cepn-
terpiece for a National Geographic
Channel documentary. "George W.
Bush: The 9/11 Interview" will debut
on Aug. 28.
-Bush talks about learning of the
attack when the news was whispered
in his ear during a visit to a Florida
school, and weighing how he would
respond. Along with his responsi-
bilities as president, he had some
of the same worries as many other
Americans that day.
"One of my concerns, like the con-
cerns of other husbands and wives,
was, 'Was my spouse OK? Was Laura
OK? And my second concern was,
'Were our girls OK?"'
After leaving Florida, Bush and his,
aides flew around on Air Force One
and made two other stops before
heading to Washington, because
security officials were concerned
about the White House being a target'
of further attacks.
He described his visit to ground
zero after the attack. It looked like a
giant scar from the air, but when he
got to the site, "it was like walking
into hell," he said.
The two-day interview by the
National Geographic crew started the
day after President Barack Obama
announced the killing of 9/11 mas-
termind Osama bin Laden. Bush says
the news made him "grateful."
He says: "I didn't feel any great
sense of happiness or jubilation. I felt
a sense of closure. And I felt a sense
of gratitude that justice had been
done."

Snoop Dogg launches
youth football in Chicago
CHICAGO Snoop Dogg says
his youth football league isn't just


ASSOCIATED PRESS
In this Sept. 14, 2001 file photo, President George W. Bush puts his arm around
firefighter Bob Beckwith while standing in front of the World Trade Center in New
York during a tour of the devastation.


about teaching kids sports, but about
giving them a positive release for
their energy and introducing them to
role models.
The rapper and actor launched
the inaugural season of the Snoop.
Youth Football League in Chicago on
Saturday.
He danced and high-fived his way
through the crowd at the Chicago
Indoor Sports Facility and seemed


intent on meeting all of the 100 kids
who showed up.
Snoop Dogg says he started the
league to give kids, especially those
in high-crime neighborhoods, an out-
let. The league is open to youth ages
7 to 14.
The Chicago season will begin in
August. The Chicago chapter is a
division of the league Snoop Dogg
established in California in 2004.


" Actor Richard Griffiths is 64
" Actor Barry Van Dyke is 60
" Actor Alan Autry is 59
E Actor James Read is 58
" Actor Michael Biehn is 55
" Masssachusetts Gov. De-
val Patrick is 55
* Entrepreneur Mark Cuban
is 53
* Actor Wesley Snipes is 49

Daily Scripture


* Author J.K. Rowling is 46
* Actor Dean Cain is 45
* Country singer-musician
Zac Brown is 33
* Actor-producer-writer B.J.
Novak is 32
M Actor Eric Lively is 30
* Country singer Blaire
Stroud is 28
* Actor Rico Rodriguez is 13


"No discipline seems pleas-
ant at the time, but painful.
Later on, however, it produces
a harvest of righteousness and
peace for those who have been
trained by it.."

Hebrews 12:11


Lake City
HOW TO REACH US
Main number ....... (386) 752-1293
Fax number...............752-9400
Circulation ..............755-5445
Online... www.lakecityreporter.com
The Lake City Reporter, an affiliate of
Community Newspapers Inc., is pub-
lished Tuesday through Sunday at 180
E. Duval St, Lake City, Fla. 32055.
Periodical postage paid at Lake City, Fla.
Member Audit Bureau of Circulation and
The Associated Press.
All material herein is property of the Lake
City Reporter. Reproduction in whole or
in part is forbidden without .the permis-
sion of the publisher. U.S. Postal Service
No. 310-880.
POSTMASTER: Send address changes
to Lake City Reporter, P.O. Box 1709,
Lake City, Fla. 32056.
Publisher Todd Wilson .....754-0418
(twilson@lakecityreporter.com)
NEWS
Editor Robert Bridges .....754-0428
(rbridges@lakecityreporter.com)
ADVERTISING
Director Ashley Butcher ... 754-0417
(abutcher@lakecityreporter.com)
CLASSIFIED
To place a classified ad, call 755-5440


Reporter
BUSINESS
Controller Sue Brannon... .754-0419
(sbrannon@lakecityreporter.com)
CIRCULATION
Home delivery of the Lake City Reporter
should be completed by 630 a.m.
Tuesday through Saturday, and by 7:30
a.m. on Sunday.
Please call 386-755-5445 to report any
problems with your delivery service.
In Columbia County, customers should
call before 10:30 a.m. to report a ser-
vice error for same day re-delivery. After
1030 a.m., next day re-delivery or ser-
vice related credits will be issued.
In all other counties where home delivery
is available, next day re-delivery or ser-
vice related credits will be Issued.
Circulation ..............755-5445
(circulation@lakecityreporter.com)
Home delivery rates
(Tuesday through Sunday)
12 Weeks................ $26.32
24 Weeks...................$48.79
52 Weeks................... $83.46
Rates indude 7% sales tax
Mail rates
12 Weeks................ $41.40
24 Weeks...................$82.80
52 Weeks..................$179.40


CORRECTION

The Lake City Reporter corrects errors of fact in news
items. If you have a concern, question or suggestion,
please call the executive editor. Corrections and clarifica-
tions will run in this space. And thanks for reading.


Celebrity Birthdays


Page Editor: Brandon Finley, 754-0420












ROADS: Expect coiostruction delays in the coming week

Continued From Page 1A


crews should not impact
traffic. The speed limit is
reduced to 60 mph during
lane closures. No work is
allowed from 6 a.m. Friday
until 9 p.m. Sunday.
Northwest Lake City
Avenue: Daytime lane
closures after 8:15 a.m.
from US 90 to Northwest
Apple Lane to clear for the
construction of new side-
walks. Also, will affect NW
Archer Street from NW
Lake City Avenue to NW
Hall of Fame Drive, NW
Huntsboro Street from NW
Lake City Avenue to NW
Hall of Fame Drive and
NW Hall of Fame Drive
from NW Archer Street to
NW Huntsboro Street This
project will continue for the
next three months.
State Road 100: Daytime
lane closures to replace
the ditch concrete between
Baya Drive and Southeast
TimberwolfDrive (entrance
to Florida Gateway College)
Monday through Thursday


from 7 a.m. to 5 p.m.

SUWANNEE COUNTY
Interstate 10: Crews to
begin installing construc-
tion zone signs and will
be working alongside the
lanes between US 90 (Exit
275) and US 129 (Exit 283)
in preparation for resur-
facing. No lane closures
expected.

DIXIE COUNTY
US 19: Daytime lane clo-
sures after 7 a.m. just north
of the Levy County line to
add asphalt at the curves.

BAKER COUNTY
US 90: Crews are work-
ing off the south side of the
roadway between Baker
Correctional Institution
and just west of Interstate
10 to install sewer lines.
Watch for trucks entering
and leaving the roadway.
US 90: Crews will be
working on the side of the
road in Glen St. Mary to


videotape the underground
stormwater system, how-
ever, no lane closures are
expected.

GILCHRIST COUNTY
US 129: Crews will be
repainting the roadway
lines from the Levy County
to Suwannee County lines
which is a moving opera-
tion.

HAMILTON COUNTY
Interstate 75: Daytime
lane closures for north-
bound and southbound
traffic between US 129
(Exit 451) and State Road
6 (Exit 460) to repave the
shoulders and place sod.
Traffic on the southbound
exit ramp at the State Road
.6 interchange (Exit 460)
is shifted slightly to install
new light poles and sign
posts. No work is allowed
Friday through Sunday and
the speed limit is reduced
to 60 mph during lane clo-
sures.


Interstate 75: The south-
bound agricultural inspec-
tion station at mile marker
446 is closed until February
2012 while a new station is
built. All livestock is redi-


rected to the FDOT weigh
station at mile marker
451 which is north of the
closed agricultural inspec-
tion station.


the teams had at least five to go to the store to buy
members. their meals," Shanklin
Carol Shanklin, Columbia said. "That's the purpose
County Senior Services of this fundraiser because
public relations manager, there's never enough
said proceeds from the money and funding for
event will be used to fund meals. It's important to
the facility's Meals on have this fundraiser annu-
Wheels program for home ally to keep people aware
delivered meals. of what we do and to pro-
She estimated that 250- vide seniors with the home
300 meals are delivered delivered meals."
weekly to local seniors Charlene Brown, a
through the program. Columbia Bank employee,
"The meals are for peo- said this was the bank's
ple who are not able to first year participating.
stand to cook a meal and Columbia Bank fielded two
people who are not able teams.


UNION COUNTY
State Road 231: Daytime
lane closures from 8 a.m.
to 4 p.m. Monday through
Thursday south of Lake
Butler for ditch cleaning.


"Our Heritage Club
meets at the Lifestyle
Enrichment Center and we
just feel very comfortable
with helping them and help,
ing the seniors in our area
and to raise food for that
program. We think it's a
great opportunity to shine.'
Brown said.
Several teams were cop
tinuing to collect fund
as part of the fundraising
effort and totals for the
fundraising effort will not
be tallied until later in the
week, Shanklin said.


TRIUMPH: One local man's story of survival in Nazi-occupied Holland

Continued From Page 1A


escape notice. The man was caught later
and the Nazis cut his tongue out, Hielco
Kuypers said.
Hielco Kuypers recounted many such
stories of suffering under the Germans
and how the soldiers took everything
from the Dutch people, including their
food.
'"They were going to drain us to noth-
ing," he said.
When his father was sick with a large
boil on his back, and Hielco Kuypers
and Alida Kuypers took him to the doc-
tor, they learned he would only survive
if he could be given some food. Hielco
Kuypers said Alida Kuypers rode about
80 miles one-way on a bicycle with no"
wheels to make trades with farmers for
food, telling nobody she had left.
The journey took about two weeks,
he said. She had to wait until the
Germans bombed to cross a bridge
undetected and she hadn't eaten in
order to save the food for his father.
About seven miles from Amsterdam,
Alida Kuypers dropped her bike in
exhaustion, an some ,German soldiers
pointed her in the right direction to


BELK.COM


continue home, where she delivered the
food to Hielco Kuypers' father.
"After all these days, and not eating ,
food," Hielco Kuypers said, overcome
with tears.
Hielco Kuypers told stories of how he
and his brother, Henk, worked against
the Germans as part of the Underground
resistance. Henk Kuypers was an
Underground soldier and heavily involved
with the resistance.
The Germans wanted Hielco Kuypers
to work for them since he had an engi-
neering certificate, and after some delay,
he eventually did work for them. But he
would smuggle plans for German-devel-
oped bombs out of the plant where he
worked to deliver to Americans, hiding
the documents in his clothes to escape
detection.
Henk Kuypers would disengage
German missiles in their factories by
using his thumbnail to release its com-
pressed air or gas. His brother would
aid the Underground without his family
knowing his whereabouts or how to con-
tact him, Hielco Kuypers said.
"He just gave his life every day for his










MODERN. SOUTHERN. STYLE.


country," Hielco Kuypers said.
Stories of narrow escapes from the
Nazis were also told.
When Hielco Kuypers was 23, German
soldiers forced their way into his family's
home, looking to take random men. His
mother begged them not to take the mal-
nourished Hielco, who appeared younger
than he was. At the last minute, one of
the soldiers ordered the others to leave
him, Hielco Kuypers said.
"They let me go," he said. "I couldn't
believe it."
Anita Houston, one of Hielco Kuypers's
daughters, said her father had many close
calls with the Nazis.
"There were so many times that he
came so close to death in his life," she
said.
Hielco Kuypers also recalled the Battle
of Arnhem, when airborne troops tried to
secure a strategically important bridge.
Thousands of parachuters and gliders
came down, he said, and a horrible battle


ensued.
"It was the biggest slaughter of the
war," Hielco Kuypers said.
Houston said her father survived the -
war and married Alida Kuypers after.
They stayed in Amsterdam and started
their family, but moved to Canada before:.
coming to America and eventually Lake
City, she said.
Many innocent people suffered at
the cruel hands of the Nazis and were
killed, Hielco Kuypers said. If he could
have pushed button to destroy all of
Germany then, he would've done so, he
said.
'These people have never done any-
thing to them (the Germans)," he said.
"Why kill them?"
Despite his own suffering, Hielco
Kuypers said he felt compelled to tell his
story.
"I feel like I have a story that is so old,".
he said. '"There are not many people alive
to tell this story."
_; : .... a; s.. ',


Senior )Da


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excludes Red Dot, Earlybirds, Night Owls, Doorbusters, Bonus Buys, Everyday Values, Alegria, Assets, b.tempt'd, BCBG, Ladies' Better
Swimwear, Brighton, Buffalo, Burberry, Casio, Cosmetics/Fragrances, Coach, Dansko, designer sunglasses, Donna Karan/DKNY, Ed
Hardy, Eileen Fisher, Free People, Herend, Ice-Watch, Lacoste, Lucky, Ladies Designer & Contemporary Sportswear & Dresses, St John,
Stuart Weitzman, Citizens of Humanity, Cole Haan, Columbia, Donald J Pliner, Dooney & Bourke. Ferragamo, Furla, Joe's Jeans, Juicy
Couture, Kate Spade, Keen, Vineyard Vines, Joseph Abboud, Hanky Panky, Hugo Boss, Hickey Freeman, Hart Schaffner Marx, Austin
Reed, Levi's, Dockers, Lilly Pulitzer, Mattel, Merrell, Munro, Nautica, Original Penguin, Ben Sherman, Ralph Lauren/Polo, Seven For All
Mankind, Spanx, Thomas Dean, Tommy Bahama, Ugg, Wacoal; Ladies', Kids' and Men's Designer Shoes, Designer Handbags; Kitchen/
novelty electrics & coffee, Le Creuset, Fine Jewelry watches, gifts, trunk shows and service plans; non-merchandise depts., lease depts.
and Belk gift cards. Not valid on prior purchases, phone, special orders or on belk.com. Cannot be redeemed for cash, credit or refund,
used in combination with any other discount or coupon offer. Valid August 2, 2011.


Brenda Bagan lost a lot of weight after Bariatric Surgery at North Florida
Regional Medical Center. She chose the least invasive surgery,
outpatient gastric banding. The Lake City woman thinks often about
what she has lost. Nearly 200 pounds. And what she has gained. ,
A happier and healthier life.


Upcoming Information Session:

Thursday August 4 at 5.30 p.m.


S Lf-AKE CITY

"M R'ICAL CENTER

Presented in the Lake City Medical Center Classroom
Enter through Main Lobby


For information and registration, call Consult-A-Nurse.
1-800-611-6913
www.NFRMC.com


f7 CENTER FOR OBESITY

SURGERY AND TREATMENT

NORTH FLORIDA REGIONAL HEALTHCARE


BOWLING: Helping local seniors

Continued From Page 1A


LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL SUNDAY, JULY 31, 2011


Page Editor: Robert Bridges, 754-0428












OPINION


Sunday, July 31, 2011


OUR


OUR
OPINION



If we


build


fit...

D one wrong, or
for the wrong
reasons, a major
undertaking such
as the county is
now beginning to consider a
civic, or convention, center
- can wreak real havoc on
local governments' budgets
for years on end.
At least, that's the refrain
we've been hearing from
those wary of even consider-
ing such a project for Lake
City.
The real issue isn't just
construction costs though
formidable but keeping the
thing booked once it's built,
it's noted.
True enough..
But while caution is always
wise when spending public
money, let's not allow fear
to paralyze us into complete
inaction.
We're still in the consider-
ing stage now, and there's
plenty to consider.
How have other towns our
size fared in such ventures?
What did they do right or
wrong?
The learning process has
already begun, based on
Columbia County Tourist
Development Council analy-
ses of two such facilities in
Valdosta and Perry, Ga.
There's still plenty more
to learn, however, and we're
confident local officials will
pursue the matter with all
due diligence. We'll be there,
too, to report on their find-
ings.
Meanwhile, there is genu-
ine danger in a naive "if you
build it, they will come"
ipproch to a project like this.
, However, we haven't seen
t)e slightest hint of such
sentiment in discussions of
this matter with local offi-
cials to date.
. Columbia County has
weathered the current eco-
nomic storm better than
most of our sister counties- in
North Florida.
-'If we're to maintain that
advantage we need to stay
focused right where we are
now on the future.

Lake City Reporter
Serving Columbia County
Since 1874
The Lake City Reporter is pub-
lished with pride for residents of
Columbia and surrounding counties by
Community Newspapers Inc.
We believe strong newspapers build
strong communities--"Newspapers
get things done!"
Our primary goal is to
'publish distinguished and profitable
community-oriented newspapers.
This mission will be accomplished
through the teamwork of professionals
dedicated to truth, integrity and hard
work.
Todd Wilson, publisher
Robert Bridges, editor
Sue Brannon, controller
Dink NeSmith, president
Tom Wood, chairman

LETTERS
POLICY
Letters to the Editor should be
typed or neatly written and double
spaced. Letters should not exceed
400 words and will be edited for
length and libel. Letters must be'
signed and include the writer's name,
address and telephone number for
verification. Writers can have two
letters per month published. Letters
and guest columns are the opinion of
the writers and not necessarily that of
the Lake City Reporter.
BY MAIL: Letters, P.O. Box 1709,


Lake City, FL 32056; or drop off at
180 E. Duval St. downtown.
BY FAX: (386) 752-9400.
BY E-MAIL:
news@lakecityreporter.com


www.lakecityreporter.com


Why the poor are poor


from the Pew
Research Center
reporting a record
high wealth gap
between whites and blacks
should have been labeled "han-
dle with care."
Because care is needed to
examine the complex reality
behind the fact that "median
wealth of white households is
20 times that of black house-
holds...." And without care, this
information will be abused and
misused by those in the race
business as another excuse to
claim racism and demand exact-
ly what blacks, or any of us, do
not need more government
And, indeed, Al Sharpton has
already announced plans for
protest in Washington, along
with the statement "For those
who think we live in some sort
of post-racial society, I have
news for you: we're anything
but"
For one thing, "median
wealth" should not be confused
with "average wealth." "Median"
is simply the number right in
the middle there are an equal
number of households with
higher and an equal number
with lower wealth. Average
wealth accounts for the actual
wealth of those households and
reflects the fact, not reflected in
the median number, that there
are a good number of well-to-do
black households.
So whereas median white
household wealth is 20 times
higher than median black
household wealth, average'
white household wealth is 3
times higher than average black
household wealth.
The .racially tinged headline
obscures the deeper reality of
what is driving the growing


Star Parker
parker@urbancure.org
wealth gap. That is that over the
period of the study, 2005-09, the
gap between those with more
wealth and those with less has
increased for the whole country.
In fact, over this period, the
gap between the most wealthy
and least wealthy blacks became
more pronounced than the gap
between the most wealthy and
least wealthy whites.
In 2005, the top ten percent
wealthy black families repre-
sented 56 percent of overall
black wealth. By 2009, this top
ten percent represented 67 per-
cent of overall black wealth.
You have to wonder what
kind of racial claims Al Sharpton
will make about this.
All this is not to minimize
a genuine problem. Far more
important than where black
wealth stands relative to white
wealth is the fact that median,
or average, black wealth is far
less than it should be.
That 35 percent of all black
households have zero or nega-
tive wealth (net indebtedness)
is dismally sad.
What to do?
If there are any public policy
implications, it is not to expand
government, but to remove it
as obstacle to black wealth cre-
ation.
At the most basic level, black
children need to get better edu-
cation and this means giving
black parents choice to send


their children wherever they
want to school.
A better-educated black
population will mean a higher
income earning black popula-
tion. But income alone is a
limited tool for creating wealth.
Wealth is created through sav-
ings, investment, and entrepre-
neurship. And blacks lag far
behind in each category.
The Pew study shows that *
the major destruction of wealth
from 2005-09 resulted from
the collapse of housing prices.
Blacks suffered disproportion-
ately because black net worth
has been almost entirely in their
homes.
The idea of allowing of allow-
ing investment in a personal
retirement account rather than
paying the Social Security
payroll tax would be a boon to
building black wealth.
But when President Bush
suggested the personal retire-
ment account idea, NAACP
chairman Julian Bond said this
was asking blacks "to play the
lottery with their future."
A life of government guar-
antees and controls is not a
formula for building wealth.
Freedom and capital markets
are. Blacks need to decide
which they want.
And entrepreneurship must
become part of black culture.
Blacks need to get that poor
people are not poor because
rich people or rich.
The formula for more black
wealth: less government, more
ownership and initiative.

Star Parker is president of,
CURE, Coalition
on Urban Renewal and Education
(www.urbancure.org) and author of
three books.


Options dwindle in debt debate


By botching their
attempt to lift the
federal debt ceiling,
House Republicans
may find themselves
forced to accept a Senate version,
as drawn up by Democratic leader
Harry Reid and tweaked by GOP
leader Mitch McConnell.
President Barack Obama had
threatened a veto, and the House
bill had no chance of passage in
the Senate, but that wasn't what
doomed it House Republican
leader, surprisingly unified for
a change, were forced into an
embarrassing retreat by the
extremists in their own ranks,
some of whom seem secretly
delighted by the prospect of a
U.S. default
The House Republican response
seemed to be to come up with an
even more objectionable bill.
The first stage of this plan
involve raising the $14.3 trillion
debt limit by $900 billion and cut-
ting $917 billion in spending.
However, the whole debt-ceil-
ing fight would have to be fought
all over again during the presi-
dential-election campaign, a fight


Republicans would like to have for
political purposes. But it is a fight
the country is heartily sick of-
The second and truly objection-
able stage of the plan, involving an
additional $1.6 trillion in borrowing
authority, would require the Senate
to enact a balanced-budget amend-
ment to the Constitution, an idea
so bad it would be a poison pill to a
second increase in the borrowing
limit
What is bizarre about this fight
is why Congress, and especially
the GOP is having it at all Raising
the debt ceiling the amount the
government is legally allowed
to borrow is a routine piece of
legislation. Since March 1962, the
ceiling has been raised 74 times, 10
times since 2001.
The debt-ceiling stalemate is
already causing real economic
harm to the country.
It is clear that businesses are
holding off hiring and investing
until the debt issue resolves itself
The Treasury says that Tuesday
is the deadline to act After that it
will have to selectively stop paying
its bills and, if the impasse goes on
long enough, stop paying most of


them altogether.
Even without a brief technical
default, the credit-rating agencies
may downgrade the nation's triple-
A credit rating, which top Wall
. Street executives have said would
be a tremendous blow to business
and investor confidence.
Even the Chinese, our largest
bondholders, are calling Congress'
internecine warfare over the debt
"dangerously irresponsible."
The House Republican radicals
may have to shelve their grand
plans to remake government in
their image by blackmailing the
country and, instead, settle for
possibly the quickest and easiest
solution Reid's bill providing for
$2.7 trillion in additional borrowing
authority combined with $2.2 tril-
lion in savings.
Admittedly, Reid's measure rests
on the happy assumption that the'
wars in Iraq and Afghanistan will
be over. But whether his bill is
overly optimistic or not, the House
has fooled around so long that
Reid's bill or some variation may be
the only option on the table.

Scripps Howard News Service


4A


Todd Wilson
twilson@lakecityreportercom


Scaffs'

history

preserved

n August, S&S Food
Stores will mark its 50th
anniversary with a cel-
ebration on Saturday,
Aug. 13, at the Columbia
County Fairgrounds. The event
is free to the public and will fea-
ture live music most of the day,
plus free food and beverages
for those who attend.
To mark the occasion, it was
our great honor and privilege
to partner with S&S Food
Stores to compile and publish
a 50th anniversary commemo-
rative magazine for the compa-
ny. Copies of this magazine will
be distributed in Wednesday's
Lake City Reporter.
During the research and
compilation of this magazine,
we spent hours interview-
ing long-time employees and
managers and talked about
everything from'business
principles and philosophies to
work ethic. *
S&S, owned by founders
Lester and Anne Scaff, is a
unique company in that so
many of its employees have,
worked for the organization
more than 20 years. There
are several who have 30 years
with the company and a few
who have topped 35 years
on the payroll. The Seaffs
have an eye for talent in
the fact that literally dozens
of employees we met have
worked their way up the cor-
porate ladder from entry level
positions.
When we began the
project of retelling the
company's history, we were
given full access to the S&S
company "archives," an
amazing collection of photos
and scrapbooks that docu-
ment the company's growth
through the decades.
There were old ads from the
Lake City Reporter. In 1964,
S&S and the BAR J.C. ranch
combined for an "All Night
Beef Sale to give housewives
price and quality and move
feeders bought locally and
raised locally." In the ad, beef
ribs were 55 cents per pound
and lean ground beef was
three pounds for $1.
On April 16, 1981, a distur-
bance over a game of pinball
at Store No. 3, where the
corporate office now stands,
resulted in buckshot flying
through the store's window.
Some of the buckshot is
taped on its own page in one
of the scrapbooks.
Lester Scaff was named
Outstanding Businessman
in 1988 by the Lake City/
Columbia County Chamber
of Commerce. In 1995,
S&S earned the Governor's
Leadership Award for busi-
ness. There are dozens of
other award announcements.
Personal notes of congratula-
tion through the years also
were preserved in scrapbooks,
as well as a poorly made coun-
terfeit $10 bill and a few notes
of foreign currency passed
through the years.
Mr. and Mrs. Scaff and the
S&S Food Stores family have
a very honorable history as
great community partners
for Lake City and Columbia
County. The Scaffs have always
been quick to give back to the
community that supports their
businesses.
We salute them on their 50th
anniversary and wish them
many years of continued suc-
cess.

Todd Wilson is publisher of the
Lake City Reporter.









LAKE CITY REPORTER NATIONAL SUNDAY, JULY 31, 2011


DEBT: Fight pits Obama against Boehner in battle of their careers


spending inore money
than you're taking in, you
need to spend less of it,"
Boehner said.
Now the question is how
it ends.
Boehner could be forced
to swallow a compromise
opposed by enough tea
party conservatives to pose
a threat to his speaker-
ship., Meanwhile, Obama
is holding out for his one
remaining criterion, a com-
promise that ensures the
debt ceiling will be raised
until 2013.
A last-minute crisis-avert-
ing deal could prove a bit-
ter victory at best.
If they don't pull it off,
though, Obama could go
down as the president who
lost the country' triple-A
credit rating, and Boehner
as the House speaker who
let it happen.
The consequential devel-
opmefits have played out
around a first-term presi-
dent and newly elected
speaker who've forged
a solid if not particularly
warm working relationship,.
shot through with moments
of deep frustration.
Personally, the two have
little in common. Boehner,
61, is a laid-back, some-'
times emotional small-busi-
ness owner from .Ohio;
Obama, 49, a cerebral and
aloof law professor from
Chicago. Their off-the-
clock socializing to date
started and ended with a
game of golfin June.
The two 'men achieved
one major legislative
win together when they
reached a deal to stave off
a government shutdown in
April. They have a ways to
go before they forge'a rela-'
tionship to rival the storied
pairings of predecessors
such as President Ronald
Reagan and Speaker Tip


O'Neill.
But aides to both men
note that they trust each
other enough to have
begun working together on
a so-called grand bargain
of historic spending cuts,
Medicare reform and tax
increases, although aides
differ about whose idea
it was. Boehner's camp
says the speaker pushed
the president toward the
big deal in a conversation
during their game of golf,
while White House aides
say Obama already wanted
to go in that direction.
Although each blamed
the other when the deal sub-
sequently went south, the
fact that they couldn't pull
it off had little if anything
to do with their personal
relationship, analysts said.
Boehner was contending
with a tea party-influenced
caucus ready to revolt over
tax increases, while Obama
held out for a major pack-
age that could dramatically
impact the deficit while
taking the debt ceiling off
the table through the 2012
presidential election.
"By the time we got to
June, it could have been
Jesus in the White House
and Buddha leading the
House. of Representatives
and it's not clear to me
that talks would have
reached a substantially
different conclusion,"
said Bill Galston, a senior
fellow at the Brookings
Institution.
That hasn't kept the ups
and downs of their rela-
tionship from being ana-
lyzed like a celebrity sum-
mer romance, a narrative
Obama himself played into
earlier this month after
Boehner pulled out qf talks
with him for the second
time.
Obama complained


President Barack Obama meets with House Speaker John Boehner of Ohio, left, in the Cabinet Room of the White House
Saturday in Washington, to discuss the debt.


that Boehner hadn't been
returning his calls and
added wryly, "I've been left
at the altar now a couple of
times."
For his part, Boehner
said that Obama had
"moved the goal posts" by
putting more taxes on the
table, and contended that
negotiating with the White
House was like dealing
"with Jell-O."
At times the mutual
recriminations have been
strikingly similar.
"The question is, What
can you say yes to?"
Obama asked of House
Republicans.
"The president would
not take yes for an.answer,"
Boehner complained.
The conflict peaked
Monday, when Obama
delivered a prime-time
address on the debt and
Boehner, having decided


not to let Obama's appear-
ances go unanswered,
requested and got televi-
sion time to follow him.
That presented a spectacle
usually seen only on the
evening of the State of the
Union address, when the
president addresses the
nation and a member of
the opposition party rebuts
him.
But as Boehner walked
away from the micro-
phones, he made a com-
ment not meant to be
overheard by reporters: "I
didn't sign up for going
mano a mano with the
president." 'Aides said it
wvas an expression of the
speaker's humility and
the surreal nature of the
events unfolding. But a
pitched rivalry with the
House speaker might not
be exactly what Obama
signed up for, either.


FBI, Police going high-tech to fight crime


By LYNN DeBRUIN on the smallest pieces
Associated Presh of evidence, some bits
no bigger than a finger-
SALT LAKE CITY nail-sized microchip, the
Khalid Ouazzani owned FBI's Regional Computer
a Kansas City, Mo., used Forensics Laboratories
auto parts store. by day are fast becoming crucial
but was secretly support- law enforcement tools.
ing al-Qaida by night. Last year, the agency's
Using covert commu- 14 labs and their 244
nications more complex examiners, including 155,
than mere encryption, from state and local agen-
Ouazzani assumed he was cies, processed more than
eluding federal authori- 3,000 terabytes of infor-
ties, hiding his dealings mation the equivalent
behind a veil of virtual of 3 million copies of the
invisible ink. While the Encyclopedia Britannica.
FBI won't reveal details, They also examined more
agents say he used a form than 75,000 pieces of digi-
of steganography, the art tal media, including 339
of hiding messages within smart phones, 248 digital
other messages. cameras and more than
But it was no match 57;000 hard drives. Agents
for the agency's digital have even found child
forensics specialists, pornography hidden on
who cracked Ouazzani's Xbox 360 game devices.
code. "Our entire lives
He pleaded guilty last are digitally connect-
year to conspiring to ed. Everything we do
help a terrorist network involves a computer," said
and faces up to 65 years John Dziedzic, director
in federal prison.' of the FBI's Chicago lab.
Elsewhere, FBI digi- "Everything you can pos-
tal evidence specialists sibly think of is record-
proved a truck driver ing some type of data."
was streaming por- And he said practically
nography on his laptop everyonethesedays, even
. when he plowed into a criminals, uses some sort
car on a New York free- of digital media, be it a
Way, killing a woman, smart phone, a computer
They also helped convict or digital camera, and
high-profile defendants destroying the device
like former Illinois Gov. often does nothing to
Rod Blagojevich and top get rid of evidence. FBI
Enron executives., examiners have success-
In an age when the big- fully retrieved crucial
gest cases can often hinge data from computers that


fbrs)tihan. Pritage llur


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OBITUARIES


Robert "Bob" Stanley Byrd
Robert "Bob" Stanley Byrd age
75, a Caney area resident. He
was born on September 12, 1935,
to Winston and
Mary (Wil-
liams) Byrd ,?
at Jasper, Fl.
Bob passed
away on July
28, 2011, at
Caney, Ok. .
Hegraduatedin .
Lake City, Fl.
Bob was an Electrical Engineer
for RCA before he became an
Insurance Agent for State Farm
Insurance. He trained and
served in the National Guard.
Bob married Marjorie
Dawn (Famell) on August
14, 1955, at Lake City, Fl.
He was a member of the Atoka
First United Methodist Church, a
longtime member of the Wesley
United Methodist in Greenville,
Tx. Bob enjoyed woodwork-
ing, old cars, and model planes.
Bob is survived by his
wife: Marjorie (Famell) Byrd
of the home in Caney, Ok.
Daughters: Dawn Fowler and
husband Randy of Caney, Ok.,
and Debbie Gabriel and hus-
band Gary of Murrells Inlet, SC.
His Grandchildren: Mandy
Vandevander and husband
Jimmy of Caney, Ok., Ash-
ley Rice and Anthony Jenkins


of Mead, Ok., Samantha Ga-
briel of Murrells Inlet, SC.
Great Grandchildren: Kay-
lee Burt of Caney, Ok., Seth
Vandevander of Caney, Ok., Al-
exa Swilling of Mead, Ok.,Ethan
Vandevander of Cahey, Ok.,
Lily Jenkins of Mead, Ok.
Along with numerous nieces,
nephews, cousins, other rela-
tives and many loved friends.
Bob is preceded in death by his
-parents: Winston and Mary
(Williams) Byrd, brother: Win-
ston Earl Byrd and Grand-
daughter: Brandy Lynn Henson
Services will be held on Sun-
day, July 31, 2011 at 3pm at
Brown's Funeral Service with
Bro. Daniel Ramey. Interment
will be at Memoryland Memo-
rial Park in Greenville, Tx. on
Monday, August 1, 2011 at 10am
CONDOLENCES MAY BE
SENT. TO THE FAMILY BY
EMAIL TO: BROWNS@
ATOKA.NET. PLEASE
REFERENCE THE NAME
OF THE DECEASED IN
YOUR CORRESPONDENCE
Viewing will be held Saturday 6-8
Services under the direction of
BROWN'S FUNERAL
SERVICE ATOKA, OK


Obituaries are paid advertise-
ments. For details, call the Lake
City Reporter's classified depart-
ment at 752-1293.


CASE KNIVES
GUY HARVEY
T-SHIRTS
TERVIS MUGS
SALT LIFE
REEF SANDALS


Mercy Medical
Urgent Care.
9 am-8 pm '
We accept
BCBS PPO United Heathcare AvMed Medicare
Self Pay & Out of Network
We charge the Medicare Rates

305 East Duval Street, Lake City, FL 32055
Phone: (386) 758-294f Fax: (386) 758-9822


In loving Memory
Bertha Marie Black
Born July 25, 1924
Died July 22, 2011
Se' /'as gone home, pray for her.


Memorial Service
for Bertha Black will be held on
Tuesday, August 2, 2011
2pm at Epiphany Catholic Church
S.W Epiphany Court, Lake City, FL
Located at the east end of Bascom Norris road
between South Main and South Marion.
No flowers please, donations can be made to
the Humane Society. She loved animals. '
, For information call Vernon Black, (386) 758-8848


Attention parents of

kindergarten students:
If you are interested in Public School Choice options
(transferring your child to a school that made adequately
yearly progress), you may request information from
your zoned school. Each school has 'Public School
Choice information available at registration. You must
first enroll your child in your zoned school to become
eligible for Choice options. If you have any questions,
please notify Yvette Hooper in the Federal Projects office
at 386755.8033.
The last possible date to complete the request for transfer
is August 9th. Requests should be submitted by 5:00 pm
on Tuesday, August 9th to be considered for transfer.





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The family is now saying thanks to
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'a.


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The "JONES" Family
Vernelle, Mervin Jr., Marion,


.i -Me
S '


!on & Mi


chael f


S, /
r


Page Editor: Robert Bridges, 754-0428


r;TZI












Bush to attend 10th anniversary of 9/11


By COLLEEN LONG
Associated Press
NEW YORK The cer-
emony at the World Trade
Center site marking the
10th anniversary of the
terrorist attacks will be a
solemn but stately event
that will include President
Barack Obama and a
chance for victims' families
to view the names of loved
ones etched into the new
memorial, Mayor Michael
Bloomberg said.
President Barack
Obama and Bloomberg
will be joined by the lead-
ers in charge during the
2001 attacks, including
former President George
W. Bush, former Mayor
Rudolph Giuliani and
former New York Gov.
George Pataki. Current
New York Gov. Andrew
Cuomo and New Jersey
Gov. Chris Christie will
also be there, he said.
Speaking on his week-
ly radio show Friday on
WOR-AM, Bloomberg said
the lawmakers will read
short poems or quotes. No
speeches will be given.
"This cannot be politi-
cal," he said. "So that's why
there's a poem or a quote
or something that each
of the readers will read.
No speeches, whatsoever.
That's not an appropriate
thing." .
The mayor also revealed
a few more details for
the ceremony on Sunday,
Sept. 11, It will be held
on .the highway to the
west of the site, and only
relatives will be allowed
inside the memorial to
look for the names of
their loved ones, etched
into the railings at two
huge waterfalls built in,
the footprint of the World
Trade Center. The falls
descend from street level
down into a void.
The names of the nearly
3,000 victims -' includ-


ing those who died at the
Pentagon and aboard United
Flight 93 that went down in
Shanksville, Pennsylvania
- will be read aloud for
the first time.
The public will be allowed
into the space, still a major
construction site, the day
after the ceremony but only
with tickets. Bloomberg
said limiting the number
of people is a safety precau-
tion as the work continues
on 1 World Trade Center,
the PATH commuter rail.
station and museum.
He said there have been
a couple of hundred thou-
sand reservations already,
and a few days are already
booked solid. He estimated
that a million people annu-
ally will visit the site.
The museum is still
under construction and
is scheduled to open next
year. Artifacts from the ter-
rorist attacks are slowly
being accumulated foi the
space, including a steel T-
beam shaped like a cross
that was discovered by a
construction worker in
the smoldering rubble. A
national atheist group sued
over the inclusion of the
cross in the museum. It
says all beliefs should be
included, or none.
Bloomberg said on his
radio show that the group
had a right to sue, but the
cross had a right to be
there.
'This clearly influenced
people," he said. "It gave
them strength. In a muse-
um you want to show things
that impacted people's
behavior back then, even if
you don't think it was right.
It's history. Museums are
for history."
Bloomberg said other
religious relics would be
in the museum -- a Star
of David .cut from World
Trade Center steel, a Bible
found during the recovery
effort and a Jewish prayer
shawl.


-'. .. -". : >* :. ... ? -- ..:.. . ..- .. - .. ., : ; '-...*..*. -- ^ * -
. ... .*:*-"< -^ ."4 ..: .* ,, .. ,. . .. .- "' ,' .^ .
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Work continues on the National September 11 Memorial at the World Trade Center site in New York. The memorial will be
dedicated in a ceremony on September 11, 2011, the tenth anniversary of the terrorist.attacks. One World Trade Center, cen-,
ter, rises above the site. -


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Transportation Security Administration officer Carolyn Lee views a steel beam from the World Trade Center being transported.
from New York City while in Swanton, Ohio. The 12-foot beam, salvaged from the Twin Towers' rubble, was transported in a
procession of emergency vehicles to Wauseon, Ohio where it will be on display until a permanent memorial to the Sept. 11;
2001, terrorist attacks is erected at the Fulton County Fairgrounds.


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LAKE CITY REPORTER NATIONAL SUNDAY, JULY 31, 2011


Page Editor: Robert Bridges, 754-0428


'lSw ..

.Aht


W4













9/11: Mystery surrounds loss of records, art


By CRISTIAN SALAZAR and
RANDY HERSCHAF
Associated Press

NEW YORK Letters written by
Helen Keller. Forty-thousand photo-
graphic negatives of John F Kennedy
taken by the president's personal cam-
eraman. Sculptures by Alexander Calder
and Auguste Rodin. The 1921 agreement
that created the agency that built the
World Trade Center.
Besides ending nearly .3,000 lives,
destroying planes and reducing build-
ings to tons of rubble and ash, the Sept.
11, 2001, attacks destroyed tens of thou-
sands of records, irreplaceable historical
documents and art.
In some cases, the inventories were
destroyed along with the records. And
the loss of human life at the time over-
shadowed the search for lost paper. A
decade later, dozens of agencies and
archivists say they're still not completely
sure what they lost or foufid, leaving
them without much of a guide to piece
together missing history.
"You can't get the picture back,
because critical pieces are missing,"
said Kathleen D. Roe, operations direc-
tor at the New York State Archives
and co-chairwoman of the World Trade
Center Documentation Project. "And so
you can't know what the whole picture
looks like."
The picture starts in the seven-build-
ing trade center complex. Hijackers flew
jetliners into the twin towers on Sept.
11, 2001, which collapsed onto the rest
of the complex; which included three
smaller office buildings, a Marriott hotel
and U.S. Customs. 7 World Trade Center,
a-skyscraper just north of the twin tow-
ers, collapsed that afternoon.
-.The trade center was home to
niore than 430 companies, including
law firms, manufacturers and finan-
cial institutions. Twenty-one librar-
ies were destroyed, including that of
The Journal of Commerce. Dozens of
federal, state and local government
agencies were at the site, including
the Equal Employment Opportunity.
Commission and the Securities and
Exchange Commission.
The Central Intelligence Agency had
a clandestine office on the 25th floor
of 7 World Trade Center, which also
housed the city's emergency command
center and an outpost of the U.S. Secret
Service.
The first tangible losses beyond death


were obvious, and massive.
The Cantor Fitzgerald brokerage,
where more than 650 employees were
killed, owned a trove of drawings and
sculptures that included a cast of Rodin's
"The Thinker" which resurfaced brief-
ly after the attacks before mysteriously
disappearing again. Fragments of other
sculptures also were recovered.
The Ferdinand Gallozzi Library of
U.S. Customs Service in 6 World Trade
Center held a collection of documents
related to U.S. trade dating back to at
least the 1840s. And in the same building
were nearly 900,000 objects excavated
from the Five Points neighborhood of
lower Manhattan, a famous working-'
class slum of the 19th century.
The Kennedy negatives, by photog-
rapher Jacques Lowe, had been stowed
away in a fireproof vault at 5 World Trade
Center, a nine-story building in the com-
plex. Helen Keller International, whose
offices burned up when its building, a
block from the trade center, was struck
by debris, lost a modest archive.
Classified and confidential documents
also disappeared at the Pentagon, where
American Airlines Flight 77 slammed
into it on 9/11.
A private disaster response company,
BMS CAT, was hired to help recover
materials in the library, where the jet
plane's nose came to rest. The company
claimed it saved all but 100 volumes. But
the recovery limited access to informa-
tion related to the Soviet invasion of
Afghanistan in the 1980s, as the U.S. pre-
pared to launch an attack a month later.
In New York, CIA and Secret Service
personnel sifted through debris carted
from the trade center to a Staten Island
landfill for lost documents, hard drives
with classified information and intelli-
gence reports.
Two weeks after the attacks, archivists
and librarians gathered at New York
University to discuss how to document
what was lost, forming the World Trade
Center Documentation Task Force. But
they received only a handful of respons-
es to survey questions about damaged or
destroyed records.
"The current atmosphere of litigation,
politics and overall distrust surround-&
ing the 9/11 attacks has made informa-
tion sharing and compilation a complex
task," said the final 2005 report of the
project.
Federal agencies are required by law
to report the destruction of records to
the U.S. National Archives and Records


ASSOCIATED PRESS,
In this undated photo provided by the National September 11 Memorial & Museum, a dam-
aged photographer's proof sheet, with photos of William DeCosta, the aviation Director of the
Port Authority of New York and New Jersey is shown. The document was found by a recovery
worker a few blocks away from ground zero and he eventually traced it to DeCosta, who con-
tinued to work for the Port Authority until his death about 2 years ago. Besides ending nearly
3,000 lives, destroying planes and reducing buildings to tons of rubble and ash, the Sept. 11,
2001, attacks destroyed tens of thousands of records, irreplaceable historical documents and
art


ering stored case files kept had been
damaged by mold and water.
The EEOC had to reconstruct 1,500
discrimination case files, said Elizabeth
Grossman, supervisory trial attorney
for the agency in 2001 at the time of the
attacks. Cases were delayed for months.
Computers had been backed up only as
of Aug. 31, 2001. Witness interviews had
to be conducted all over again.
The Port Authority of New York and
New Jersey, which owns the region's
airports, bridges and the World Trade
Center, had much, of its archives and
library in the building.
But a decade later, it only has "a
general idea" of what documents were
destroyed, Port Authority spokesman


One photo contact sheet a picture
of the Port Authority's aviation director
- was discovered by a recovery worker
two days after the attacks. It was given to
the Sept. 11. museum, along with office
IDs, letters and other bits of paper that
were recovered in the rubble in the days
and weeks afterward.

Jan Ramirez, the curator of the National
September 11 Memorial & Museum,
said there was no historical conscious-
ness surrounding the site, before it was
destroyed.
"It was modern, it was dynamic. It was
not in peril. It was not something that
needed to be preserved," she said.
"Now we know better."


ASSOCIATED PRESS
A hot air balloon that made an emergency landing on a ramp leading from the department's
Auburn, Mass., maintenance area onto the Massachusetts Turnpike, barely visible at left rear.
None of the seven passengers was injured.


Hot air balloon lands


off Mass. Turnpike


AUBURN, Mass (AP)
- It was unusual sight for
rush hour motorists on the
Massachusetts Turnpike:
an emergency landing by a
hot air balloon.
State police say the bal-
loon carrying seven people
touched down at about 7:30
a.m. Thursday on a ramp
leading to a highway main-
tenance area in Auburn.
No one is injured.
Police say the pilot told
officials he was having
trouble controlling the bal-
loon and wanted to bring it
down before it reached a
crowded urban area, such
as nearby Worcester.


The balloon was removed It's not known from where
within about 30 minutes, the balloon had taken off.
and the ramp is reopened.

I %Nged pAethodist Chbjr1
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Page Editor: Robert Bridges, 754-0428


LAKE CITY REPORTER NATIONAL SUNDAY; JULY 31, 2011











LAKE CITY REPORTER WEATHER SUNDAY, JULY 31, 2011


THE WEATHER
.. ..--. ., --*... ..



S. CHANCE CHANCE CHANCE CHANCE' CHANCE
T-STORMS -STORMS T-STORMS T-STORMS T-STORMS



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". ."'.- .C.S- ,% .-. -J:-... "' : -" "C a -'j.. .x.S X .S ,", AJ'arr.- ,*-Zt.L ".





99/77 City Monday Tuesday.
99/77 Jacksonville Cape Canaveral '-i 7 7 1
Tallahassee* LakeCit 96 6 Daytona Beach ?91 6 i 92 6.
98'77 99'/' Ft. Lauderdale 9'0 81 i 9I1 0 p ,
SPensaola Gainesville Daytona Beach Fort Myers 93 71 I 9J 7 r
95, 78 Panama City 97 '* 7 Gainesville 91 74 i 94 p7.
92,' 78 Ocala Jacksonville 92 76 1 93 ? .: j
09 7 ana Key West 92 ,2 in 92 52 -r,
Orando Cape Canaveral Lake City 91 74 94 4 p
11 Miami i1 801 92 79
Tampa Naples 93 7i I 7, p.
9 9 West Palm Beach Ocala 92 74 J9 7J p:
92 82 Orlando 'J 77 94A7,r,
F FL Lauderdale Panama City 91i SO 90 .u pi:.
FL Myer 91 5 Pensacola 93 78 94 79 p:
S95, 77 Naples Tallahassee 94 75 9% 76 pr:
94,' 78 Miami Tampa 9- 179 93 79 ls
92,82 Valdosta 94 741 96 74 p.
Key West* W. Palm Beach 90 79 I 91 78 i
r1 -r 8m: ... w-* w bi m*~.- -,I a'(H!..- .i.* O' n u > *e 9 B>ar*Brii.I-. -ES .a ..ra


TEMPERATURES


High Saturday
LOa Saturda,
Normal high
Normal low
Record high
Record low

PRECIPITATION
Saturday
Month total
Year total
Normal month-to-date
Normal year-to-date


96
74
91
71
100 in 1896
62 in 1924


0.00"
3.39"
23.28"
5.90"
29.93"


SUN
Sunrnse today
Sunise- LOda,
Sunnrse torm.
Sunsei-t ton

MOON
Moonrise today
Moonset today
Moonrise tom.
Moonset torn.


6-49 a.m.
8.25 p.n,
6.49 a.m.
8 24 p.mr


7:43 a.m.
8:57 p.m.
8:49 a.m.
9:35 p.m.


10 mutes b bum
Today's
ultra-violet
radiation risk
for the area on
a scale from 0
to 10+.

..


service
br..O.1pf1 to
our me' r .
h0


Theathei.





weather.com


First Full Last New AV& Forecasts, data and graph-
& l5 Ics @ 20:1 Weather
Aug 6 Aug 13 Aug 21. Aug 28 A V Central, LP, Madison, Wis.
weatherti www.weatherpubllsher.com


NATIONAL FORECAST: High pressure will provide sunshine and pleasant conditions from the
Ohio Valley into much of the Northeast today. Behind the high, a frontal boundary will trigger
a few showers and thunderstorms over the western Great Lakes. Meanwhile, a moist and
unstable air mass will remain in place, fueling thunderstorms over the Southeast.


. Falls














Cold Front

Orlando W F n F iont

Miami Front
'9282 _


. YESTERDAY'S NATIONAL EXTREMES .
YESTERDAY'S NATIONAL EXTREMES


Saturday Today


CITY HI/Lo/Pcp.
Albany NY 86/71/0
Albuquerque 84/69/0
Anchorage 61/53/0
Atlanta 95/75/0
Baltimore 95/76/0
Billings 86/62/0
Birmingham 93/76/0
Bismarck 83/62/.62
Boise 95/65/0
Boston 89/73/0
Buffalo 85/66/0
Charleston SC 97/80/0
Charleston WV 88/74/.12
Charlotte 97/73/0
Cheyenne 88/56/0
Chicago 88/67/0
Cincinnati 90/73/.02
Cleveland 87/70/0
Columbia SC 99/77/0
Dallas 95/79/0
Daytona Beach 94/74/0
Denver 93/65/0


HI/Lo/W
86/65/s
91/70/pc
62/51/r
92/75/t
92/71/s
99/64/pc
92/75/t
93/69/pc
93/60/pc
83/69/s
85/70/pc
95/77/t
89/63/pc'
88/71/t
88/61/pc
91/74/pc
91/69/s
84/76/pc
96/75/t
103/81/s
93/77/t
97/67/pc


CITY
Des Moines
Detroit
El Paso
Fairbanks
Greensboro
Hartford
Honolulu
Houston
Indianapolis
Jackson MS
Jacksonville
Kansas City
Las Vegas
Uttle Rock
Los Angeles
Memphis
Miami
Minneapolis
Mobile
New Orleans
New York-
Oklahoma City


High: 1040, Mesa, Ariz. Low: 36, Stanley, Idaho


Saturday Today
HI/Lo/Pcp. HI/Lo/W CITY
88/71/0 92/74/pc Omah
88/69/0 90/74/pc Orland
92/72/0 93/73/pc Philac
58/52/.05 64/46/r Phoer
96/78/0 89/71/t Pittsb
89/75/0 88/64/s Portla
81/74/.03 88/73/s Portla
92/77/.16 100/78/s Raleli
87/73/.05 91/71/s Rapid
94/73/0 97/76/t Reno
95/73/0 96/76/t Richn
86/74/0 96/78/pc Sacra
96/88/0 97/84/pc St. Lo
97/75/0 95/77/pc Salt L
70/64/0 77/66/pc San A
94/76/0 95/79/pc San D
92/81/0 92/82/t San F
88/73/0 89/71/pc Seatt
93/74/0 95/76/t Spoke
,92/76/0 95/79/pc Tampa
91/74/0 88/70/s Tucso
100/78/0 105/81/pc Wash


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do
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lix
lurgh
nd ME
nd OR
gh
City

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mento
>uls
ake City
Antonio
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Franclsco
le
ane
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ington


Saturday Today
HI/Lo/Pcp. Hi/Lo/W
100/73/0 93/76/pc
92/74/0 95/76/t
93/77/0 91/72/s
102/$7/0 107/87/pc
87/69/0 87/66/s
85/67/.48 80/60/s
70/58/0 77/56/pc
99/76/0 90/73/t
92/58/0 96/74/pc
88/64/0 91/64/t
94/79/0 91/70/t
76/59/0 93/63/s
85/76/.13 95/76/pc
89/71/0 87/71/t
93/77/.02 100/77/s
70/68/0 75/66/pc
67/57/0 70/55/pc
69/56/0 71/55/sh
82/58/0 86/57/s
92/80/0 94/79/t
96/81/0 99/79/t-
96/81/0 93/73/pc


^^(j^^^^^^^^T,^^I^^IffiRMfl


Saturday Today
HI/Lo/Pcp. HI/Lo/W
88/75/0 90/78/t
61/55/0 64/52/c
93/78/0 90/79/s
46/43/0 57/44/s
88/70/0 91/74/,s
64/57/0 64/57/sh
48 32 0 i 56/39/c
97/75/0 89/67/s
15 54J 75/46/pb
90. .3, 90/75/t
77/66/0 75/64/c
91/81/0 89/82/t
v 7 s ? '


KEY TO CONDIII1


ONS: ., i-.I.u, -..a lfr= f1 l 1 ii r-i, ;, r,-ha:3;,. -i: p.: s -p cloudy, r=
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- - *- -


I CITY
SAcapulco
Amsterdam
Athens
Auckland
Beijing
Berlin
Buenos Aires
Cairo
Geneva
Havana
Helsinki
Hong Kong
Kingston'


CITY
La Paz
Uma
London
Madrid
Mexico City.
Montreal
Moscow
Nairobi
Nassau
New Delhi
Oslo
Panama
Paris


Saturday
HI/Lo/Pcp.
54/19/0
68/61/0
S725. 0
97. 70, 0
68 59 0
81/64/0
84'61 0
75/50/0
93/82/0
93/82/0
79/63/0
75/73/0
.j :


Today
HI/Lo/W
59/27/pc
65/60/pc
75/61/pc
95/70/s
72/56/t
84/70/pc
81/57/t
80/56/pc
92/82/pc
91/81/t
73/59/t
86/75/t
.2 I


CITY
Rio
Rome
St. Thomas
San Juan P
Santiago
Seoul
Singapore
Sydney
Tel Aviv
Tokyo
Toronto
Vienna
Warsaw


Saturday
HV/Lo/Pcp.
90/77/0
81/63/0
s VI 91/78/0
R 88/77/.19
46/43/0
88/75/0
88/81/0,
70/45/0
91/77/0
84/75/0
86/66/0
70/61/0
63/54/0
rain, s=sunny,


Today
HI/Lo/W
84/67/s
81/63/c
86/79/t
86/78/t
49/31/pc
82/74/t
89/78/t
68/49/pc
92/78/s
80/73/t
90/66/pc
70/61/c
68/63/sh


o u


Page Editor: Robert Bridges, 754-0428


: 1...


Bcac~~B,










Story ideas?

Contact
Tim Kirby
Sports Editor
754-0421
tkirby@lakeotyreporter.com


Lake City Reporter





SPORTS


Sunday. luly 31,2011


www.lakecityreporter.com


Section B


BRIEFS

CuS GOLF
Meeting planned
for Monday
A meeting for players
interested in trying out for
the Columbia High golf
team is 10 a.m. Monday at
the CHS auditorium.
For details, call coach
Steve Smithy at 3654436.

YOUTH FOOTBALL
Free camp with
coach Brian Allen
The Columbia County
Recreation Department is
sponsoring a free football
camp featuring Columbia
High head coach Brian
Allen from 8 a.m. to noon
Tuesday at CHS. The camp
will feature a tour of the
facilities and low-key drills.
The camp is open to boys
and girls ages 5-13 (as of
Sept. 1). A pre-registration
waiver form is required.
Forms are available at
Richardson Community
Center from 9 a.m. to
5 p.m.
For details, call Adee
Farmer at 754-7095.

Little League
registration set
Lake City Parks and
Recreation Department's
youth football (ages 8-13)
registration is set for 8 a.m.
to 5 p.m. Aug. 13,
Aug. 20 and Aug. 27 at
Teen Town Recreation
Center. A parent or
guardian must accompany
the child and a birth
certificate or copy is
required. Cost is $40 per
player and two groups are
offered: Junior Midget
(8-10 with some Weight
restrictions) and Midget
(10-13 with some weight
restrictions).
For details, call Heyward
Christie at 75'4-3607.

POP WARNER FOOTBALL
Sign-up extended
through Aug. 15
Lake City Pop Warner
football has extended
registration through
Aug. 15 for the
following groups: ages 7-9,
45-90 pounds; ages 8-10,
60-105 pounds; age 11,
60-85 pounds; ages 9-11,
75-120 pounds; age 12,
75-100 pounds. Registration
is 3-6 p.m. weekdays at
Richardson Community
Center. Cost is $80.
For details, call Mario
Coppock or Nicole Smith at
754-7095 or 754-7096.

YOUTH CHEERLEADING
Registration,
clinic on Aug. 13
Little League
Cheerleading has
registration for the fall
from 8:30 a.m. to noon
Aug. 13 at Richardson
Middle School. Cost is $30
plus uniform (if needed).
A clinic is planned during
registration at a cost of $10.
Sign-up begins at 8 a.m.
For details, call 288-1892.


Fort White sets
board elections
Fort White Youth
Baseball has board
elections set for 7 p.m.
Aug. 5 in the building
. at the back of the South
Columbia Sports Park.
For details, call Tammy
Sharpe at 867-3825.


* From staff reports


Ochocinco says he can

change to Patriots' way


Star receiver
promises to tone
down his act.
By JIMMY GOLEN
Associated Press
FOXBOROUGH, Mass.
- Chad Ochocinco prom-
ised to tone down his
antics now that he's in New
England, where coach Bill
Belichick likes his play-
ers to be seen and rarely
heard.
That lasted all of five
minutes.
After calling himself a
chameleon who can "blend
in and do it the Patriot way,"
Ochocinco riffed on riding


the wave and soaring with
his angel wings. Then, by
way of introduction to the
crush of media surround-
ing him for his first avail-
ability in New England, he
asked for a group hug.
"It is going to be a little
quiet. You won't get the
same Chad you are used
to, and I probably won't be
talking to the media.much,
probably not at all, really.
I just want to play ball and
ride the wave," he said after
practice on Saturday.
"I will always be me. It
has been a part of my game
to always be me, but there
is a certain way the Patriots
do it. It's easy for me. I've
always been a chameleon,


Lake


so I am going to blend in
and do it the Patriot way,
which is win. We had our
talk, and without him
(Belichick) even having to
saying anything. there
is no need for some of the
stuff I did before. There's
no need for it."
The Patriots were among
the biggest newsmakers in
the league coming out of
the lockout, agreeing to
trades for Ochocinco and
Redskins defensive lineman
Albert Haynesworth short-
ly after the NFL reopened
for business.
What's most unusual:
Neither player is what's
PATS continued on 2B


City'S


ASSOCIATED PRESS
New England Patriots receiver Chad Ochocinco hauls
in a pass during NFL footballtraining camp practice in
Foxborough, Mass. on Saturday.


Open


...x ----":---








Quail Heights superintendent Todd Carter walks to the green at Quail Heights where the final round of the 2011 Lake. City Open will be played on Aug. 7.


Country Club, Quail to host tournament


By BRANDON FINLEY
bfinley@lakecityreporter.com
For the 32nd year, the
Lake City Open will
bring golf's toughest
challenge to Columbia
County. Open to
professionals, amateurs and
seniors, the Open will take place
Aug. 6-7 at The Country Club
at Lake City and Quail Heights
Country Club.
The first round will be played
on Saturday at The Country Club
at Lake City and Quail Heights


Country Club will host the final
round on Sunday. The tournament
is open to all members for $90,
$100 for non-members and $125
for professionals.
The tournament is a 36-hole
stroke play for all divisions, which
are pre-flighted by handicap. The
last flight and seniors will use a
handicap system. Entries are due
by Thursday.
"The tournament started as
a way to find out who is the
best golfer in Lake City," said
The Country Club at Lake City


professional Carl Ste-Marie. "A
lot of the guys would only play at
one course, and this was a way to
find out who was the best Then
we started bringing in guys from
Jacksonville and Gainesville.
It's one of the most respected
tournaments in North Florida."
The tournament could see up
to 100 players according to Ste-
Marie.
"Historically, we always had
about 100 players," he said. "It
went down a couple of years, but
we had 68 last year."


Ste-Marie said the course is in
excellent condition for the first
round of play. Professionals and
the championship flight will play
the course from 6,858 yards.
Amateurs will play the blue tees
from 6,364 yards and seniors will
play from the white tees which
measure 5,896 yards.
"This is a chance for amateurs
to see how they stand in
tournament play," Ste-Marie said.
"A lot of guys will never get to


OPEN continued on 2B


AP source: NFL players on board to recertify union


Labor
negotiations
nearly complete.
By JOHN WAWROW
Associated Press
NFL players are on board
to recertify the union,
meaning talks can reopen
with the league to com-
plete the labor agreement,
a person familiar with the
number of votes cast told
The Associated Press on
Saturday.
The person spoke on
the condition of anonymity
because the union has not
made an announcement.


The person added talks
with the NFL could restart
even though players from
all NFL teams have not
had a chance to vote yet.
The union, however, had
enough votes to recertify
as of Saturday morning.
Players from at least 11
teams have already voted
overwhelmingly in favor of
recertification the past few
days as they reported for
training camp.
Reconstituting the union
was a condition to conclud-
ing the collective bargain-
ing agreement that was
reached last week. The
union would be required
to negotiate with the NFL


several outstanding items,
such as drug testing, play-
er discipline, disability and
pension programs.
The pact requires those
issues be resolved and a
full CBA done by Aug. 4,
a deadline both sides are
confident will be reached.
"Everybody signed the
ballot in favor of recertifica-
tion," Buffalo Bills safety
and player representa-
tive George Wilson said
in announcing his team's
vote Saturday. Wilson said
the union hopes to have all
team votes in by the end
of the day and have the
union recertified before the
weekend ends.


Though the lockout has
been lifted and teams have
been in the process of open-
ing camps and signing both
rookies and veteran free
agents, the labor deal is still
not completed.
Once completed, veter-
an free agents who have
signed new contracts start-
ing Friday night will be
allowed to practice with
their teams. Those play-
ers are currently allowed
to attend team meetings,
work out individually and
watch but not participate
- in practice.
"It's frustrating," Buffalo
Bills receiver/quarterback
Brad Smith said after watch-


ing the team's first walk-
through of training camp
in suburban Rochester on
Saturday. "It's good. I can
sit here and watch the guys
go through the plays and
learn the system. It hurts a
little bit But it's a positive
opportunity."
The former New York
Jets multipurpose offen-
sive star signed a four-year
contract with the Bills on
Friday, a day after agreeing
to the deal.
Aside from the Bills,
players from the Patriots,
Chiefs, Broncos, Bengals,
Cowboys, Jaguars, Browns,
UNION continued on 2B












LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTSSUNDAY, JULY31, 2011 Page Editor: Brandon Finley, 754-0420


SCOREBOARD


TELEVISION

TV sports
Today
AUTO RACING
7:30 a.m.
SPEED Formula One, Hungarian
Grand Prix, at Budapest, Hungary
I p.m.
ESPN NASCAR, Sprint Cup,
Brickyard 400, at Indianapolis
II p.m.
ESPN2 NHRA, Fram-Autolite
Nationals, at Sonoma, Calif. ,(same-day
tape)
EXTREME SPORTS
5 p.m.
ESPN X Games, at Los Angeles
7 p.m.
ESPN2 X Games, at Los Angeles
2:30 a.m.
ESPN2 X Games, at Los Angeles
(delayed tape)
GOLF
8 a.m.
TGC European PGA Tour, Irish
Open, final round, at Kerry, Ireland
9a.m.
ESPN -'Women's British Open, final
round, at Angus, Scotland
I p.m.
TGC PGA Tour, The Greenbrier
Classic, final round, at White Sulphur
Springs,WVa.
3 p.m.
CBS PGA Tour, The Greenbrier
Classic, final round, at White Sulphur
Springs,W.Va.
NBC USGA, U.S. Senior Open
Championship, final round, at Toledo,
Ohio
7 p.m.
TGC Nationwide Tour, Utah
Championship, final round, at "Sandy, Utah
(same-day tape)
HORSE RACING
5 p.m.
ABC NTRA, Haskell Invitational, at
Oceanport, N.J.
MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL
2 p.m.
TBS Boston at Chicago White Sox
8 p.m.
ESPN Chicago Cubs at St. Louis
MOTORSPORTS
2 p.m.
SPEED.- FIM World Superbike, at
Silverstone, England (same-day tape)
TENNIS
3 p.m.
ESPN2 WTA Tour, Barik of the
West Classic, championship match, at
Palo Alto, Calif.
5 p.m.
ESPN2 -ATP, Farmers Classic, cham-
pionship match, at Los Angeles
Monday
MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL
7 p.m.
ESPN Cleveland at Boston
SOCCER
8:45 p.m.
ESPN2 FIFA, U-20 World Cup,
Group F.Argentina vs. England, at Medellin,
Colombia

BASEBALL

AL standings


East Division
W L
Boston 64 40
NewYork 62 42 .
Tampa Bay 55 50 .
Toronto 54 53 .
Baltimore 42 61
Central Division
W L
Detroit 56 50 .
Cleveland 52 51 .
Chicago 52 52 .
Minnesota 50 56 .
Kansas City 45 61 .
West Divisionr
W L
Texas 61 47 .
Los Angeles 58 49 .
Oakland 47 59 .
Seattle 44 61 .
Thursday's Games
LA.Angels 12, Detroit 7
Kansas City 4, Boston 3


Pct GB
615 -
596 2
524 9h
505 I11
408 21'


Tampa Bay 10, Oakland 8
Toronto 8, Baltimore S
Texas 4, Minnesota I
Friday's Games
Baltimore 4, N.Y.Yankees 2
Kansas City 12, Cleveland 0
Detroit 12, LA. Angels 2
Toronto 3,Texas 2
Chicago White Sox 3, Boston I
Minnesota 9, Oakland 5
Tampa Bay 8, Seattle 0
Saturday's Games
N.Y.Yankees 8, Baltimore 3, 1st game
Texas 3,Toronto 0
LA.Angels at Detroit (n)
Tampa Bay at Seattle (n)
Baltimore at N.Y.Yankees (n)
Kansas City at Cleveland (n)
Boston at Chicago White Sox (n)
Minnesota at Oakland (n)
Sunday's Games
Baltimore (Arrieta 10-7) at N.Y.
Yankees (F.Garcla 9-7), 1:05 p.m.
Kansas City (Davies 1-9) at Cleveland
(Carmona 5-1 0), 1:05 p.m.
LA.Angels (Weaver 14-4) at Detroit
(Verlander 14-5), 1:05 p.m.
Texas (C.WIIson 10-4) at Toronto
(Morrow 7-5), 1:07p.m.
Boston .(A.Miller 4-1) at Chicago
White Sox (Buehrie 8-5), 2:10 p.m.
Minnesota (Pavano 6-7) at Oakland
(McCarthy 3-5), 405 p.m.
Tampa Bay (Hellickson 9-7) at Seattle
(Vargas 6-9), 4-10 p.m.
Monday's Games
Cleveland at Boston, 7:10 p.m.
N.Y. Yankees at Chicago White Sox,
8:10 p.m.
O8 land at Seattle, 10:10 p.m.

NL standings


East Division
W L
Philadelphia 66 39
Atlanta 62 45
New York 55 51
Florida 52 54
Washington 49 56
Central Division
W L
Milwaukee 58 49
St. Louis 56 50
Pittsburgh 54 50
Cincinnati 51 55
Chicago 42 64
Houston 35 71
West Division


Pct GB
.542 -
.528 I
.519 2h
.481 6A
.396 1'5h
.330 22'h


W L Pct GB
San Francisco 61 45 .575 --
Arizona 57 49 .538 4
Colorado 50 56 .472 II
Los Angeles 48 57 .457 12'A
San Diego 46 61 .430 15'A
Thursday's Games
Florida 5,.Washington 2
N.Y. Mets 10, Cincinnati 9
Milwaukee 4, Chicago Cubs 2
San Diego 4,Arlzona 3
San Francisco 4, Philadelphia I
Pittsburgh 5,Atlanta 2
SHouston 5, St. Louis 3
Friday's.Games
N.Y. Mets 8,Washington 5
Philadelphia 10, Pittsburgh 3
Cincinnati 4, San Francisco 3, 13
innings
Atlanta 5, Florida 0
Milwaukee 4, Houston 0
St. Louis 9, Chicago Cubs 2
Colorado 3, San Diego 2
LA Dodgers 9,Arizona 5
Saturday's Games
Chicago Cubs at St. Louis (n)
N.Y. Mets at Washington (n)
Pittsburgh at Philadelphia (n)
Florida atAtlanta (n)
Houston at Milwaukee (n)
San Francisco at Cincinnati (n)
Colorado at San Diego (n)
Arizona at L.A. Dodgers (n)
Today's Games
San Francisco (Zito 3-3) at Cincinnati
(Cueto 6-4), 1:10 p.m.
Florida (Nolasco 7-7) at Atlanta
(Hanson 11-5), 1:35 p.m.
N.Y. Mets (Niese 10-8) at Washington
(Zimmermann 6-9), 1:35 p.m.
Pittsburgh (Karstens 8-5) at
Philadelphia (Worley 7-1), 1:35 p.m.
Houston (Myers 3-11 ) at Milwaukee
(Narveson 7-6), 2:16 p.m.
Colorado (Nicasio 4-3) at San Diego
(Moseley 3-10),4:05 p.m.
Arizona U.Saunders 7-8) at LA.
Dodgers (R.De La Rosa 4-4), 4:10 p.m.


Chicago Cubs (Dempster 7-8) at St.
Louis (Westbrook 9-4), 8:05 p.m.
Monday's Games
Atlanta at Washington, 7:05 p.m.
Chicago Cubs at Pittsburgh, 7:05 p.m.
Florida at N.Y. Mets, 7:10 p.m.
Cincinnati at Houston, 8:05 p.m.
St. Louis at Milwaukee, 8:10 p.m.
Philadelphia at Colorado, 8:40 p.m.
LA. Dodgers at San Diego, 10:05 p.m.
Arizona at San Francisco, 10:15 p.m.

FOOTBALL

NFL preseason
WEEK I
Thursday, Aug. II
Baltimore at Philadelphia, 7:30 p.m.
Jacksonville at New England, 7:30 p.m.
Seattle at San Diego, 8 p.m. (ESPN)
Denver at Dallas, 8:30 p.m.
Arizona at Oakland, 10 p.m.
Friday,Aug. 12
Cincinnati at Detroit, 7:30 p.m.
Miami at Atlanta, 7:30 p.m.
Pittsburgh atWashington, 7:30 p.m.
San Francisco at New Orleans, 8 p.m.
Tampa Bay at Kansas City, 8 p.m.
(FOX)
Saturday, Aug. 13
Green Bay at Cleveland, 7:30 p.m.
Buffalo at Chicago, 8 p.m.
Indianapolis at St. Louis, 8 p.m.
Minnesota at Tennessee, 8. p.m.
N.Y. Giants at Carolina, 8 p.m.
Monday,Aug. 15
N.Y.Jets at Houston, 8 p.m. (ESPN)

Arena Football League

PLAYOFFS
First Round
National Conference
Friday
Chicago 54, Dallas 51
Spokane 57, Arizona 49
American Conference
Friday
Orlando 73, Jacksonville 69
Saturday
Georgia at Cleveland (n)

BASKETBALL

WNBA schedule

Thursday's Games
San Antonio 102, Phoenix 91
Atlanta 89, Los Angeles 80
NewYork 75,Washington 71
Indiana 69, Connecticut 58
Chicago 64,Tulsa 55
.cFriday's Games
Indiana 61,Washington 59
Minnesota 92, Seattle 67
Saturday's Games
Phoenix at New'York (n)
Los Angeles at Chicago (n)
Seattle at Tulsa (n)
Today's Games
Minnesota at San Antonio, 3 p.m.
Atlanta at Connecticut, 5 p.m.
Los Angeles at Indiana, 6 p.m.

AUTO RACING

Race week

NASCAR
SPRINT CUP
BRICKYARD 400
Site: Indianapolis.
Schedule: Today, race, I p.m. (ESPN,
noon-5 p.m.).
Track: Indianapolis Motor Speedway
(oval, 2.5 miles).
Race distance: 400 miles, 160 laps.

FORMULA ONE
HUNGARIAN GRAND PRIX
Site: Budapest, Hungary.
Schedule: Today, race, 8 a.m. (Speed,
7:30 a.m.-10 a.m., 4:30-7 p.m.).
Track: Hungaroring (road course,
2.72 miles).
Race distance: 190.53 miles, 70 laps.
NHRA FULL THROTTLE
FRAM-AUTOLITE NHRA
NATIONALS
Site: Sonoma, Calif.
Schedule: Today final eliminations
(ESPN2, II p.m.-l:30 a.m.).
Track: Infineon Raceway.


UNION: Players near end of deal

Continued From Page 1B


Saints and Steelers have
all voted in favor of recer-
tification. Titans, Redskins
and, Dolphins players
were set to vote later
Saturday.
The Vikings aren't
scheduled to report to
camp until Sunday, and it's
unclear when or if they
have already voted.
Union officials did not
immediately return mes-
sages left with them seek-
ing clarification as to how
many teams have voted


to recertify, and when the
union could potentially
recertify.
"It was an easy sell,"
Denver safety and play-
er representative Brian
Dawkins told the AP
regarding the Broncos'
vote.
Dawkins explained that
the union sends advocates
to each team to explain
recertification. An advo-
cate was not required to
meet with the Broncos
because Dawkins is a


member of the union's
executive committee.
Cautioning that the deal
is not yet done, Dawkins is
confident the final issues
will be settled.
"De and those guys will
continue to hash those
things out," he said, refer-
ring to NFLPA executive
director DeMaurice Smith.
"We have nothing but 100
percent trust in De. He
knows what we want. He
knows .what obviously we
need."


OPEN: Tournament on Aug. 6-7


Continued From Page 1B

play in tournaments like
me or Blayne (Barber), so
this is that chance to see
how they stack up."
Quail Heights
superintendent Todd
Carter says that Quail'will
play as hard as it possibly
can for the final round.
"It's as tough as it gets,"
he said. "We'll tuck the
pins behind bunkers. We'll


double roll the greens
like the PGA Tour does
to make them as fast as
possible. The tee boxes will
be at their farthest points.
Golfers will have to bring
their A-game and be up for
a challenge."
Professionals and the top
flight will play the course
from 6,492 yards during
the final round. Amateurs


will play the blue tees from
6,124 yards and seniors will
play the white tees from
5,745 yards.
"We've been preparing
for the final round for the
last three months," Carter
said. "My crew and I have
went the extra mile to set
the course up. It's in
great shape for tourney
play."


Panthers ink Newton


By PETE IACOBELLI
Associated Press

SPARTANBURG, S.C.
- No. 1 draft pick Cam
Newton has signed with the
Carolina Panthers and has
arrived at training camp.
The team announced
Friday evening that he
had signed a deal and was
attending team meetings.
The Panthers also said on
Twitter that the quarter-
back "had officially signed
on the dotted line."
According to several
media reports, Newton
agreed to a four-year, $22
million deal. The office for
Newton's agent, Bus Cook,
would .not comment on the
terms of the deal.
Newton was seen Friday
evening driving into the
back lot of the Richardson
Physical Activities Building
and entering the offices that
serve as team headquarters
for Carolina's training camp
at Wofford College.
Panthers coach Ron
Rivera had said earlier Friday
that he expected the former
Auburn quarterback to be
at Wofford when Carolina
held its first practice ses-,
sion on Saturday. Also ear-
lier Friday, general manager
Marty Hurney said the sides
were making good progress
on an agreement
The Heisman Trophy
winner may be the biggest


financial casualty of the
NFL lockout.
The new collective bar-
gaining agreement sets a
rookie wage scale for first-
year players. Last year's
No. 1 draft pick, Oklahoma
quarterback Sam Bradford,
signed a six-year, $78 mil-
lion contract with the St.
Louis Rams last summer.
Newton would've been in
for a likely even better pay-
day if not for the lockout.
At Auburn, Newton took
snaps out of the shotgun
in a spread offense where
he had opportunities to
run and pass for big yard-
age. He threw for 30 touch-
downs and rushed for 20
more in the Tigers' 14-0
title-winning season.
Newton will have to move
under center and scramble
less in offensive coordinator
Rob Chudzinski's offense
"I don't think it's going to
be a problem for me. I think
it's just timing more than
anything," Newton said last
May. "Just repetition as far
as me knowing what I have
to do, knowing the assign-
ment, the alignment and
what everybody's doing on
that particular play."
Newton has had
Chudzinski's playbook
since April 29, when a
judge temporarily lifted the
lockout. Panthers receiver
Steve Smith said he was
impressed with Newton's


skills he saw during pri-
vate workouts the two have
had before labor peace was
reached.
Another Panthers rook-
ie from Auburn, receiver
Darvin Adams, called
Newton a "natural born
leader."
Newton will be looked at
to bring stability to a posi-
tion where the Panthers
struggled greatly last sea-
.son. Carolina was last in
several NFL categories and
finished with the fewest
points in team history.
Rivera said Newton
would battle for the start-
ing job with the quarter-
backs in camp, last year's
starter Jimmy Clausen and
Tony Pike. General man-
ager Marty Hurney didn't
rule out bringing a veteran
quarterback to add depth
during camp.
Newton was the focus of
an NCAA investigation. The
governing body ruled that
his father, Cecil, had sought
money from Mississippi
State when Cam Newton
was being recruited out of
junior college. The quarter-
back signed with Auburn
and was deemed eligible
after a one-day suspension
when the NCAA's reinstate-
ment staff found he didn't
know about the pay-for-play
scheme. He was cleared to
play in the SEC and national
championship games.


Ragan wins pole at Indianapolis


By JENNA FRYER
Associated Press

INDIANAPOLIS. -
David Ragan has won the
pole for the Brickyard
400 at Indianapolis Motor
Speedway.
Ragan was one of the last
drivers to make a qualifying
run Saturday and turned a


lap at 182.994 mph to bump
Jimmie Johnson from the
pole. It is the second pole of
Ragan's career. The other
came at Texas in April.
Kasey Kahne then made
his qualifying run and his
lap of 182.927 grabbed
the second spot Johnson
dropped to third after hold-
ing down the top spot on


the leaderboard for most of
the qualifying session.
Penske Racing team-
mates Kurt Busch and Brad
Keselowski qualified fourth
and fifth for Sunday's race.
AJ Allmendinger, Juan
Pablo Montoya, Jeff
Gordon, Matt Kenseth and
Carl Edwards rounded out
the top 10.


PATS: Ochocinco has 66 career TDs

Continued From Page 1B


thought of as the usual type
for Belichick, who prefers
the quiet and businesslike
to the guys who make head-
lines off the field.
"I think every player on
this team, every person on
this team, has their own
individual personality,"


1
4
8
11 I
12[
13 I

14
16

17 i

18 I
20 I
21 ,
22 I


Belichick said. "None us
are the same, so that's prob-
ably a good thing."
Ochocinco, who was orig-
inally Chad Johnson, has
caught 751 passes for 10,783
yards and 66 touchdowns
in his 10-year career. But
he is perhaps better known


ACROSS 38 Glue down
39 IRS month
Business suff. 40 Am - time?
Disfigure 41 Crest
Channels 2-13 44 Botany, e.g.
Dory need 48 Ms. Sumac of
Decided on song
Item in a poker 49 Gladiator's
pot arena
Alluring 51 Bonfire
Wintertime remains
sound 52 "Soapdish"
Deep-sea deni- actor
zen 53 Uris hero
Portents 54 CPA forte
Ball belle 55 Adjusts a
Joule fraction watch
Made hav 56 Endorse


25 Tiny tabbies
29 Pickling ingre-
dient
30 Ms. Curry
31 Bandleader
Lombardo
32 Nonsense!
33 Diner coffee
34 Connect
35 Lumber cutter
(2 wds.)


DOWN

1 Trademark
2 Powder base
3 Confound it!
4 Rose bush
5 Pigeon talk
6 Tempe sch.
7, Luxury hotel
8 Intuition


for his tQuchdown celebra-
tions, for changing his legal
name to the Spanish words
for 8 and 5 to match his uni-
form number, and for his
prolific tweeting almost
30,000 messages to more
than 2.4 million Twitter
followers.


Answer to Previous Puzzle

MAST MGM ASHE
ELMO PLY PEEL
SOOT HANDBALL
HUGER NA Y LPS


TIP F|EES HALE
HA UNTM RUMOR




TELT ALE S LY
B R TC KRD I DE
S ID EGEEMNORA
PESO ENEFTSIAR


9 Fearsome cape
10 Ermine and
sable
12 Held one's own
15 Computer
device


Want more puzzles?
Check out the "Just Right Crossword Puzzles" books
at QuillDriverBooks.com


19 Execs
21 One, in
Dresden
22 Fishhook part
23 Matty or Felipe
24 Skater's jump
25 Be informed
26 They often
clash
27 Soir follower
28 "Auld Lang -"
30 Partly open
34 Russell and
Pauley
36 Zig's opposite
37 Dust particles
38 Self-confi-
dence
40 Images
41 Meg or Nolan
42 - hungry I
could ...
43 Telegraph syl-
lables
44 Gill opening
45 "Hud" Oscar-
winner
46 Make well
47 Give off
50 Pamplona
cheer


8-1 2011 UFS, Dist. by Univ. Uclick for UFS


LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS SUNDAY, JULY 31, 2011


Page Editor: Brandon Finley, 754-0420















1 U.S. hires Klinsmann to


coach men's national team


ASSOCIATED PRESS
This May 12, 2011, file photo, shows Tiger Woods pause
on the sixth fairway during the first round of The Players
Championship golf tournament, from which he withdrew after
nine holes, in Ponte Vedra Beach.


It's back to work


for Tiger Woods


By DOUG FERGUSON
Associated Press

JACKSONVILLE -
Tiger Woods returns to golf
under a new set of circum-
stances.
He no longer has the cad-
die he employed for the last
12 years, having fired Steve
Williams a month ago. He
no longer is among the top
20 in the world, his lowest
ranking since Allen Iverson
was an NBA rookie. And he
might not even be eligible
to play on the PGA Tour
after a couple of weeks.
After missing two majors
during an 11-week break
to make sure his left leg
was fully healed, Woods
announced Thursday eve-
ning on Twitter and on
his website that he would
return next week at the
Bridgestone Invitational.
i "Feeling fit and ready to
tee it up at Firestone next
week. Excited to get back
out there!" he tweeted.
By missing three months
- but only four tourna-
ments he would typically
play Woods has gone
from No. 81 to No. 133 in
he FedEx Cup standings.
Only the top 125 players
qualify for the opening
round of the playoffs at
The Barclays, likely leaving
him only the Bridgestone
Invitational and the PGA
Championship next week
to make up ground.
Otherwise, he would have
at least five weeks, off with-
out being able to play on
the PGA Tour.
This was the third-lon-
gest layoff of his career,
and there is as much uncer-
tainty as ever about his
future. He has gone more
than 20 months without
winning, and was last seen'
in golf shoes on May 12 at
The Players Championship
when he hobbled off the
course after a 6-over 42 on



Unscramble these four Jumbles,
one letter to each square,
to form four ordinary words. 8
GSITH I

2011 Tribune Media Services, Inc.
All Rights Reserved.
HICRA /



: SMLOYT



ICCNIP
L / L /


the front nine and with-
drew.
He already has had four
surgeries on his left knee,
and the left Achilles' gave
him just as much trouble.
He hurt both of them dur-
ing the third round of the
Masters, although the
injuries were described as
"minor" when he first men-
tioned the pain in May.
Along with his health,
there has been change off
the golf course. Woods
left IMG when the con-
tract of longtime agent
Mark Steinberg was not
renewed. The only endorse-
ment deal for Woods
since he returned from a
devastating sex scandal
was .with a Japanese com-
pany to promote a heat
rub.
Then came the firing of
Williams, who caddied for
Adam Scottatthe U.S. Open,
then angered his boss- by
working for the Australian
again at the AT&T National
without seeking permis-
sion.
The Golf Channel
reported Thursday; night
that Bryon Bell, a child-:
hood, friend and president
of Tiger Woods Design,
would caddie for him at the
Bridgestone Invitational.
Bell has caddied for Woods
three times a win at the
1999 Buick Invitational, a
tie for second at the Buick
Invitational when Woods.
gave him a chance to help
defend, and a tie for sec-'
ond in 2003 at the Disney
Classic when Woods
gave Williams the week
off for a car race in New
Zealand.
Steinberg declined to
confirm Bell would be on
the bag, saying in a text
message that "no long term
been discussed yet as he
just decided tonight he was
fit and ready to go next
week."

THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME
by David L. Hoyt and Jeff Knurek


F1THE LJTTLE- LEAGUFR
STU&GLE-Fc AT HIS NEW
POSITION AT RFR5T, BUT
LATER HE WOUL-tP --
Now arrange the circled letters
to form the surprise answer, as
suggested by the above cartoon.


Your answer here:
(Answers tomorrow)
Saturday's Jumbles: DIVOT GULCH FONDLY SALARY
Answer: The road down to the shoreline was perfect
for this COASTING


By CHRIS JENKINS
Associated Press

Now that the U.S.
Soccer federation's
perennial coach-in-wait-
ing finally has the job,
Juergen Klinsmann will
be expected to kick-start
a stagnant men's national
team.
The USSF moved
quickly Friday in hiring
Klinsmann a day after the
firing of Bob Bradley. .
The. former standout
player and coach for the
German national team
will be a familiar name to
American fans. The U.S.
almost hired Klinsmann
twice first. after the
2006 World Cup and again
last year before giving
Bradley what turned out
to be a short-lived contract
extension.
"I am proud and hon-
ored to be named the head
coach of the U.S. men's
national team," Klinsmann
said. "I would like to thank
the U.S. Soccer Federation
for the opportunity, and I'm
excited about the challenge
ahead. I am looking for-
ward to bringing the team
together for our upcom-


ASSOCIATED PRESS
In this March 7, 2009 file photo, Bayern Munich head coach
Juergen Klinsmann reacts after his team scored during
a German first division Bundesliga soccer match against
Hanover 96 in Munich, southern Germany. U.S. Soccer
moved quickly to nar'e a replacement for fired coach Bob
Bradley, announcing Klinsmann's hiring Friday.


ing match against Mexico
and starting on the road
toward qualifying for the
2014 FIFA World Cup."
Klinsmann will be intro-
duced Monday at a news
conference in New York.
His first game as U.S. coach
is Aug. 10 against archrival
Mexico in an exhibition in
Philadelphia
Qualifying for the 2014
World Cup in Brazil begins


next June.
"He is a highly accom-
plished player and coach
with the experience and
knowledge to advance the
program," USSF President
Sunil Gulati said. "Juergen
has had' success in many
different areas of the game,
and we look forward to the
leadership he will provide
on and off the field."
Former U.S. defender


Alexi Lalas, who worked
alongside Klinsmann for
ESPN at last year's World
Cup, expects him to inject
energy, but notes he's not
a miracle worker. '
"It's not as if all of sud--
den because Juergen
Klinsmann is coach that
we're going to have an
American Lionel Messi
drop into our laps," Lalas
said. "The players are what
they are. It's up to him
to make sure he has the
correct mix of players and
to motivate them, to coach
them up. For the experi-
enced veterans that are
part of the national team
setup, this will be a source
of motivation and maybe
a kick in the pants."
Although the federation
has discussed the job with
Klinsmann in the past, the
coach's desire for wide-
ranging authority over the
entire U.S. program became,
a point of contention.
"When you look at'
where we are and where
we should be, Juergen is
coming in with a full-blown
plan," said former U.S. for-
ward Eric Wynalda, now
a commentator for Fox
Soccer.


UNC turns to Withers to lead program


By AARON BEARD
Associated Press

CHAPEL HILL, N.C.
- Everett Withers won't
dwell on the mixed emo-
tions of becoming a head
coach for the first time after
the firing of Butch Davis at
North Carolina. The inter-
im coach just doesn't have
time with preseason prac-
tice only a week away for
the troubled program.
"I told our assistant


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coaches this morning that I
want to have fun," Withers
said Friday at a news con-
ference. "I don't want. to
stress. Our kids deserve
an experience that's fun for
them. Last summer wasn't
a whole lot of fun for them.
I want them to have some
fun. We're going to have a
good time, but we're going
to work hard."
Withers had spent the
past three seasons as defen-
sive coordinator 'and'"sec-


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- ,-,--". ,a -


F


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the Lake City Reporter, 180
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3rd 5:00pm, for your chance
towin!


Deadline is Wednesday, August 3, 2011

Lake City Reporter


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The first step: Reaching
out to his players. Withers
said he has spoken to
about 40 of them and that
they're excited to get back
to football. The Tar Heels
report 'for preseason camp
Thursday, then start prac-
tice the following day.
Withers a Charlotte
native and the son of a
postman, and teacher -
played as a defensive back
at Appalachian State in the
1980sg

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LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS SUNDAY, JULY 31, 2011


Page Editor: Brandon Finley, 754-0420


i









LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS SUNDAY, JULY 31, 2011


NFL teams with new coaches dispute disadvantage


By ARNIE STAPLETON
Associated Press
ENGLEWOOD, Colo.
The compacted training
camps and abridged free
agency are challenges for
everyone. They could be
doubly difficult for the eight
NFL teams with new head
coaches installing their
schemes on the fly and get-
ting their first real look at
their rosters following the
136-day lockout
A quarter of the league's
32 teams are rolling out a
new coach this year: the
Cowboys, 49ers, Panthers
and Vikings in the NFC
and the Broncos, Browns,
Raiders and Titans in the
AFC.
In many ways, those eight
,franchises are behind the
proverbial 8-ball, but they
all insist they're in much
the same situation as every-
one else navigating the free
agency fire drill and training
camp cramming sessions.
"I'm not going to say that
we're going to be as even
as a team that has the same


playbook and has the same
players," Denver linebacker
Joe Mays said. "I'm just say-
ing that we're not going to
be too far behind."
Two of the new coaches
- Dallas' Jason Garrett
and Minnesota's Leslie
Frazier shed their inter-
im titles this offseason and
may have gotten a little bit
of a head-start, and two
teams promoted assistants
- Hue Jackson in Oakland
and Mike Munchak in
Tennessee, so there's some
continuity there.
Richard Seymour
led some three dozen of
his Raiders teammates
through a week's worth of
detailed workouts in sub-
urban Atlanta, but other
teams with new coaches
weren't really able to hold
what amounted to coach-
less minicamps during the
lockout like Drew Brees
did with the New Orleans
Saints.
They simply didn't have
the experienced rosters,
established staffs and
entrenched systems and


were left to work out in a
more rudimentary, haphaz-
ard fashion with pockets of
players getting together to
lift, run, stretch and deci-
pher the circulating play-
books.
"Hopefully training camp
catches us up," Raiders
safety Tyvon Branch said.
"You probably know as
much about the defense as
I do right now."
He's lost but certainly
not alone.
"Everybody's trying to
play catch-up right now,"
said Broncos backup quar-
terback Brady Quinn.
"Without a doubt, the rook-
ies have it the hardest. So,
kudos to them if they can
get in the playbook and get
on the field early. Because
that woujd be quite a feat."
Teams might decide to
hold back their veterans
when preseason games
begin, especially the free
agent additions who aren't
even allowed to practice
with their new teams until
next Thursday.
That could make for some


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Dallas Cowboys coach Jason Garrett (left) talks with Tony Romo (9) during NFL football
training camp on Friday in San Antonio.


ugly football early on.
"Do you ever not see
bad football from younger
guys?". said Broncos safety
Brian Dawkins.
Frazier and Garrett got
their first head coaching
gigs with teams that fal-
tered last year amid high
expectations. Munchak
took over for Jeff Fisher
in Tennessee, and Jackson
was promoted from offen-
sive coordinator in Oakland,
replacing Tom Cable.
John Fox left Carolina
for Denver, replaced by
Ron Rivera. Jim Harbaugh
left Stanford to take over
for Mike Singletary in San
Francisco and Pat Shurmur
supplanted Eric Mangini in
Cleveland.
* Haribaugh said earlier
this week he was excited
to finally, meet his players:
"I can't tell you how good
it's going to be having those
guys in the building, face to
face, knee to knee, smelling
their breath, just getting to
know them, let them get to
know me," he said.
With all the turnover
going on across the league,
the new coaches don't think
they're at quite the disad-
vantage one might think.
"Something I think is
important to remember is
when you start a new year
it's a new football team,"
Garrett said. "The dynam-
ics are different, the chem-
istry is different You have
to develop those things."
That goes for everyone.
"It was -a different off-
season," Garrett said. "We
didn't have our OTAs and
minicamps and we haven't
seen our players since the
first week in March. So
each of us has to adjust
accordingly."
Still, some are lamenting
the lockout's detrimental
effect
"You look at any team
across the league, I think
we're one of the few that


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Denver Broncos head coach John Fox walks the field as
his players stretch during NFL football training camp in
Englewood, Colo., on Thursday.


needs every ounce of time
that we can get," Browns
quarterback Colt McCoy
said. 'That's no excuse.
We're not trying to find
excuses, but with a new
offense, a new defense, new
systems on both sides of
.the ball, we need time."
Time isn't on anybody's
side.
'"That's the way it is.
There is nothing that we
can do about that so we're
not going to make excus-
es," Rivera said. 'Those are
the facts of the NFL."
Coaches, new or not,
won't get a great feel for
their teams until the vet-
eran free agents can start
practicing next Thursday,
with just a few practices to.
spare before the preseason
games begin.
"A week out on the field
and a week without your
.whole team; it does kind
df put you behind already,"
49ers wide receiver Josh
Morgan said. "You're
behind already because of
the lockout and the new
coach. We're not really
looking for excuses. We're


looking for solutions."
While they may not be in
"football shape," some play-
ers say they're readier than
ever for training camp.
"We've spefit a lot of
time this summer work-
ing together," McCoy said.
"We've, done what we can
do, we've. worked hard ..
Now, ifs time to get a little
coaching."
Or, in some cases, a lot!
Like new teachers greet-
ing students back to school
from summer vacation,
many coaches are putting
faces to names right now.
Broncos defensive tackle
ke'vinVickerson said the lock-
out may actually have worked
in the favor of teams that
changed coaches because
the other teams didn't get any
offseason instruction, either,
leveling the playing field for
everyone.
"It's a learning curve
for everybody," Vickerson
said. "If you knew it from
last year, you still have to
refresh it in your mind. If
you're in college, coming in
as a rookie, you still have to
learn the schemes."


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Page Editor: Brandon Finley, 754-0420













Story ideas?

Robert Bridges
Editor
754-0428
rbndges@Sakecityreporter.com

Sunday, July 31, 201 I


Lake City Reporter





BUSINESS


www.lakecityreporter.com


Brightway's giving something back


Insurance firm's local
office participating in
charitable program.

By TONY BRITT
tbritt@lakecityreporter.com

A local insurance office is tak-
ing part in a national campaign
designed to give funds back to
the community and help local
charities.
Brightway Insurance has
introduced its "Brightway Gives
Back" program, a campaign that
allows nonprofit organizations,
sports teams and community
groups to raise funds without
buying goods or selling items.
As part of the promotion
organizations in need of fund-
raising may contact their local
Brightway office to enroll in the
Brightway Gives Back program.
For every member or friend of
the organization who receives
an insurance quote, Brightway
Insurance's local office will
donate $10 to that organization.
There is no participation fee
for the Brightway Gives Back
program and no purchase is
necessary to receive the $10
donation.
Vance Cox, the Lake City
Brightway agency owner, said
the Brightway Gives Back pro-
gram is beneficial to community
organizations.
"It provides awareness of the
important role that non-profit
organizations play in our com-

BRIGHTWAY continued on 2C


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Vance Cox, owner and agent of Brightway Insurance in Lake City, speaks with Sheryll Walker, executive director of Happy House, about the
'Brightway Gives Back' campaign.


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LAKE CITY REPORTER BUSINESS SUNDAY, JULY 31, 2011


Laddering CDs
Gives Flexibility
Q What does "laddering" CDs
involve? Is it a good idea?
O.M., Opelika, Ala.
Alt's an investing strategy
that's especially attractive
if you expect interest rates to rise.
Imagine that you want to park
$25,000 of your long-term money
in CDs, but you're dismayed by
today's low rates. So instead of
dooming your $25,000 to low rates
for, say, five years, you can put
$5,000 in a one-year CD, $5,000 in
a two-year CD, and so on.
Each year one of them will
mature and you can reinvest that
money in a fresh CD, which may
be paying a higher rate by then.
This way, you're not locked into
low rates for a long time.
If you're pretty sure rates will
fall over the coming years, consider
locking in current rates by buying
long-term CDs.

Q What are "current" and "quick"
ratios? CJ., Richmond, Va.
A They're numbers calculated
A from a company's balance
sheet that give you an idea of
the company's debt levels.
Dividing a company's current
assets by its current liabilities gives
you its '"current ratio," which shows
whether it has sufficient resources
(such as cash and expected
payments) to pay its bills over the
corning year.
The "quick ratio." which
subtracts inventories from current
assets before dividing by current
liabilities, is a bit more meaningful.
In both cases, a number above
I Ls good. and above 1.5 is bet-
ter. though a too-high number can
reflect unproductive asset hoarding.
Remember that such numbers
vary by industry, so compare a
company only with its peers -
or with itself Over time, examining
developing trends. A declining cur-
rent ratio, for example, can be a red
flag. Learn more at wwr.fool.com/
how-to-invest.

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Management Quality
When evaluating a company as a
possible investment, you want it to
show strong numbers on its finan-
cial statements and also to be run by
talented management. It might seem
that the first is a quantitative matter
and the second a qualitative one,
but you can actually tell a lot about
management by examining financial
statements. Well-run companies
tend to display strong numbers.
In a company's annual report or
latest earnings report, look at the
balance sheet. Is there more long-
term debt than cash? Many compa-
nies carry a lot of debt successfully,
but others borrow more than they
can pay. (You'll often find the inter-
est rates on the debt in footnotes -
the lower the rates, the better.)
Review the income statement (aka
the statement of operations) and
compare numbers over the past few
years. Have sales and earnings been
growing consistently? A smooth
upward trend suggests that manage-
ment has been planning well.
Growing profit margins are another
. . .


good sign. To boost margins, man-
agement must run its business more
efficiently, decreasing expenses.
Rising operating margins show that
the firm is wringing more profit from
each dollar of sales. In a period of
slowing sales growth, savvy manag-
ers might maintain earnings growth
momentum by increasing margins.
Another good barometer of man-
agement excellence is a company's
return on equity (ROE), measuring
how well the company is using
its reinvested earnings to generate
additional income. You'll find ROE
via stock data sites such as at http://
quote.fool.com and http://finance.
yahoo.com. ROE varies by industry,
so compare a firm's ROE with those
of its peers. And review several
years' worth, as one good year does
not a great company make. Note,
too, that high debt can inflate ROE.
You might also look for execu-
tives who own big stakes of the
company stock, and access com-,
pany communications, to get a feel
for how candid the bigwigs are.
Invest in companies only after
you're sure that their highly com-
pensated executives are earning
their keep.
. * * ** S S S * *


,,. Name That Company
S P;//, # Founded in 1961 and based in
"' Milan, Italy, I'm a global leader in
eyewear. I make prescription frames,
I sunglasses and lenses, and sell
through more than 6,000 retail loca-
tions. In 2010,1 produced about 57 mil-
lion units. My brands include Ray-Ban
(which I bought in 1999), Oakley (2007),
Sunglass Hut (2002), LensCrafters (1995)
and Pearle Vision (2004). My licensed brands
include Prada, Dolce & Gabbana, Tiffany and,
soon, Coach. I'm also a major managed vision-
care operator in the United States, through
EyeMed. I rake. in close to 6 billion euros annually
and employ about 62,000 people. Who am I?
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2011 THE MOTLEY Foo


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I was burned twice, investing in
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I learned two lessons: Be wary of
free advice, and check the auditors.
- A.L., via e-mail
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Canada's natural gas specialist
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them yet to be developed, things do
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r
e,


L/DisT. BY UNIVERSAL UCLICK (FOR RElEASE 7/28/2011)


Parts shortage hurts sales of Ford Focus


By TOM KRISHER
AP Auto Writer

DETROIT Ford can't
make enough Focus cars
to keep up with rising
demand because of equip-
ment problems that have
caused a shortage of dash-
boards, two people familiar
with the situation told The
Associated Press.
Machinery that makes
the skin that covers dash-
boards at a Ford parts fac-
tory outside Detroit works
intermittently. That is forc-
ing the company to take the
unusual and costly step of
flying in parts from Europe
to keep its assembly lines
moving, the people said.
Despite those efforts, the
Focus plant near Detroit
can't run at full speed, they
said.
The problem comes at a
time when high gas prices
and shortages of Japanese
small cars have driven up
demand for the Focus.
Dealers say they're having
trouble getting the newly
redesigned compacts, and
they've been forced to put
customers on waiting lists.
The people, who didn't
want to be identified
because they're not autho-
rized to speak about the
matter, said Ford is work-
ing to fix the equipment
problem at the parts plant
in Saline, Mich., but so far
the company hasn't found
a solution.
Ford spokesman Todd
Nissen said company policy
is not to comment on inter-


nal workings at its plants.
But he said the Saline fac-
tory continues to make
dashboards for the Focus.
Despite the problem,
Ford sold more than 21,000
Focuses last month, mak-
ing it the company's top-
selling passenger car. But
its sales were 3,500 below
rival General Motors'
Chevrolet Cruze compact.
The Cruze is made at a fac-
tory in Lordstown, Ohio,
that is operating three
shifts around the clock
to meet demand. Ford's
assembly plant in Wayne,
Mich., where the Focus is
made, is running on two
shifts.
GM has been better able
to capitalize on small-car
shortages at Honda and
Toyota, which have had to
slow their factories due to
parts shortages caused by'
the March earthquake in
Japan. GM and Ford have
been largely unaffected by
earthquake-related prob-
lems.
It's unclear just how
long it will take to fix the
problem and whether Ford
will raise Focus produc-
tion. Mark Fields, Ford's
president for the Americas,
wouldn't comment last
week but said the Focus
plant is producing at a rate
the company expected.
"For the most part,
whenever you have a (new
model) launch there are
always some launch issues
that you deal with," he said.
"I won't say it's been flaw-
less, but the good news is


ASSOCIATED PRESS
In this March 17 file photo, a line worker assembles a 2012 Ford Focus at the Michigan Assembly Plant in Wayne, Mich. Ford
Motor Co. can't build as many hot-selling Focus compacts as it wants to because of equipment problems, at a parts factory,
say two people familiar with the matter.


there's a lot of demand for
it and we'll continue to get
those cars out."
Jim Gillette, an ana-
lyst with the firm IHS
Automotive who advises
auto parts suppliers, said
the problem could hit
Ford's bottom line because
it's expensive to fly in the
parts. He said it is relatively
rare to have such an equip-
ment problem, and there


would be a lot of pressure
on the equipment maker to
fix it quickly.
The five-seat Focus,
which hit showrooms in
March, has a starting price
of $16,500 and can run
more than $27,000 depend-
ing on how it's equipped.
With an automatic trans-
mission, most models get
28 miles per gallon in the
city and 38 on the highway.


Dealers report selling them
at sticker price.
Sam Pack, owner of four
Ford dealerships in the
Dallas-Fort Worth metro
area, said he has been told
by Ford executives that
he can't get full orders of
Focuses because the fac-
tory has run into shortages
of several parts.
"I know they're work-
ing 24/7 trying to address


whatever component issues
they have," Pack said. "It's
a high-visibility issue with
Ford Motor Co., and senior
management is very con-
cerned and very involved."
Pack, like many dealers
across the country, said all
the Focuses he has are spo-
ken for, and it takes about
60 days to get one for a cus-
tomer who's on the waiting
list.


BRIGHTWAY: Giving something back to the local community


Continued From Page 1C
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nomic times. This program, Brightway
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Cox said it's important to have pro-
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needed services to the community.
When a company, such as Brightway
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In addition to receiving a competitive
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Inventory Kit to document household
property and valuables.


I Ask heTi~


Page Editor: Robert Bridges, 754-0428













Page Editor: Robert Bridges, 754-0428


LAKE CITY REPORTER BUSINESS & HOME SUNDAY, JULY 31, 2011


THE WEEK IN REVIEW *THE WEEK IN REVIEW *THE WEEK IN REVIEW THE WEEK IN REVIEW THE WEEK IN REVIEW


The Week in Review


S KCOTS OF LOCAL INTERE T


McDnlds NY 2.44
MicronT Nasd
Microsoft Nasd .64
NY Times NY ;..
NewsCpA Nasd .15
NextEraEnNY "2.20
NobilityH Nasd
NokiaCp NY .55
OcciPet NY 1.84
Oracle Nasd .24
Penney NY .80
PepsiCo NY 2.06
Pfizer NY .80
Potash s NY .28
PwShs QQQNasd .42
PrUShS&PNY
Ryder NY 1.16
S&PSOOETFNY 2.44
SearsHldgsNasd ...
SiriusXM Nasd
SouthnCo NY 1.89
SprinlNex NY
SPDRFnclNY .18
SP Inds NY .67
TimeWam NY .94
WalMart NY 1.46
WellsFargo NY .48
Yahoo Nasd ...


86.48 -2.08
7.37 -.72
27.40 -.13
8.58 -.47
16.02 -.40
55.25 -2.21
7.90 +.18
5.80 -.06
98.18 -9.70
30.58 -1.97
30.76 -.66
64.04 -1.72
19.25 -.82
57.81 -3.83
58.00 -1.60
21.35 +1.60
56.32 -2.31
129,33 -5.25
69.67 -6.43
2.11 -.05
39.54 -.56
4.23 -.93
14.80 -.53
34.68 -2.15
35.16 -1.54
52.71 -1.81
27.94 -1.20
13.10 -.88


Weekly Dow Jones


Uee ijy oWvc a " 1|--- ---.---... g*_ g_ ___ g0%uv WVWNvi _ _


SNYSE
8,079.44 -328.76


Gainers ($2 or more)
Name Last Chg %Chg
iP SER2K 33.19 +8.85 +36.4
CSVS2xVxS21.16 +4.41 +26.3
iPSXR1K 33.11 +6.60 +24.9
iP SESPX 34.26 +6.64 +24.0
TALEdn 12.75 +2.09 +19.6
BarcShtC 38.42 +6.10 +18.9
C-TrCVOL 28.26 +4.42 +18.5
XuedaEd n 8.88 +1.37 +18.2
DrSCBrrs 37.64 +5.29 +16.4
Emdeon 15.50 +2.17 +16.3

Losers ($2 or more)
Name Last Chg %Chg
Sequans n 8.19 -7.18 -46.7
MillerEnR 4.41 -3.11 -41.4
ImaxCorp 18.96 -9.63 -33.7
GolUnhas 7.76 -3.40 -30.5
Inphi n 12.69 -4.68 -26.9
JnprNtwk 23.39 -7.88 -25.2
Amerigrp 55.00-17.71 -24.4
PatriotCoal 18.91 -5.97 -24.0
AK Steel 12.15 -3.66 -23.1
HCA HId n 26.68 -7.93 -22.9

Most Active ($1 or more)
Name V6ol (00) Last Chg
S&P500ETF9000932129.33-5.25
BkofAm 6934351 9.71 -.42
SPDR Fnd4173574 14.80 -.53
SprintNex 4035690 4.23 -.93
FordM 3943686 12.21 -1.10
iShR2K 3285053 79.74 -4.31
GenElec 3064855 17.91-1.13
AlcatelLuc 2482557 4.05-1.14
Pfizer 2379221 19.25 -.82
iShEMkts 2005922 47.11 -.54

Diary
Advanced 315
Declined 2,870
New Highs 131
New Lows 230
Total issues 3,205
Unchanged .20
Volume 20,490,413,421


Amex
2,364.99 -85.02


Gainers ($2 or more)
Name Last Chg %Chg
MastlechH 4.45 +.95 +27.1
Rubicong 4.20 +.83 +24.6
Gastargrs 4.75 +.67 +16.4
HelxBio g 3.05 +.35 +13.0
Sifce 18.49 +1.65 +9.8
SparkNet 3.73 +.33 +9.7
MetroHlt 5.66 +.34 +86.4
KodiakO g 6.79 +.39 +6.1
SynergyRs 3.55 +.20 +6.0
Accelr8 3.89 +.20 +5.4

Losers ($2 or more)
Name Last ,Chg %Chg
B&HO 4.55 -1.22 -21.2
GoldenMin 14.54 -3.24 -18.2
OrsusXelr 2.56 -.49 -16.1
AlmadnMg 3.30 -.61 -15.6
SagaComm32.52 -15.5
AvalRaren 5.50 -1.00 -15.4
Banrowlt 2.14 -.38 -15.1
VimetX 30.41 -5.26 -14.7
GtPanSilvg 3.36 -.56 -14.3
StreamGSv 3.26 -.52 -13.8

Most Active ($1 or more)
Name Vol (00) Last Chg
KodiakOg 273445 6.79 +.39
ChniereEnl195874 10.30 -.29
AvalRaren 194534 5.50-1.00
NAPallg 180975 4.19 -.56
NthgtMg 142114 3.22 -.15
NovaGldg 139695 10.02 -.22
GoldStrg 133202 2.653 -.30
NwGoldg 115738 10.80 -.26
Rubicong 115111 4.20 +.83
DenisnMg 113839 2.11 -.04

Diary
Advanced 88
Declined 427
New Highs 14
New Lows 20
Total issues 531
Unchanged 16
Volume 539,078,154


Nasdaq
S2,756.38 -102.45


Gainers ($2 or more)
Name Last Chg %Chg
OceanFt rs 16.86 +9.80 +138.8
MarshEdw 2.17 +.92 +73.6
USecBcAL 6.55 +2.54 +63.3
SevArts rs 2.08 +.74 +565.2
AlldHIthcr 3.82 +1.34 +53.7
NeurogX 2.39 +.72 +43.1
SI Corp 9.40 +2.36 +33.5
Tegal rs 3.48 +.78 +28.9
Compcred 2.99 +.66 +28.3
Trunkbwn 3.34 +71 +27.0

LoserS ($2 or more)
Name Last Chg %Chg
TeleNav 10.03-11.37 -53.1
STEC 10.17 -7.86 -43.6
Exceed un 6.01 -4.24 -41.4
SwstBc 6.20 -4.38 -41.4
VistaPrI 26.70-18.77 -41.3
IstaPh 4.97 -3.05 -38.0
Stratasys 25.50-13.84 -35.2
Hollysys 6.97 -3.59 -34.0
SpanBdc rs 4.61 -2.23 -32.6
upipon cT, 322 -1 37. -48 S

Most Active si1 or more)
Name Vol (00) Last Chg
Mkroln 41682970 2'?0 -13
Sr.u:'M 3-57974 2 11 -05r
PWSrr. 000303935558 00&- 6)
Coc 2969446 1597 -a,9
Intel 2319&53 22.33 -.80
MicronT 1662069 7.37 -.72
Oracle 1621587 30.58-1.97
Yahoo 1385919 13.10 -.88
NewsCpA 1335611 16.02 -.40
Level3 1201291 2.18 -.25

Diary
Advanced 519
Declined 2,209
New Highs 106
New Lows 197
Total Issues 2,783
Unchanged 55
Volume 10,040,584,157


Wkly Wkly TID
Name Ex Div Last Chg %Chg%Chg
AT&T Inc NY 1.72 29.26 -1.06 -3.5 -.4
AlcatelLuc NY ... 4.05 -1.14 -22.0 +36.8
Annaly NY 2.59 16.78 -1.24 -6.9 -6.4
AutoZone NY ... 285.45-10.40 -3.5 +4.7
BkofAm NY .04 9.71 -.42 -4.1 -27.2
BariPVixrsNY ... 23.41 +2.68 +12.9 -37.8
BobEvans Nasd .80 34.54 -1.97 -5.4 +4.8
BostonSci NY ... 7.16 -.05 -0.7 -5.4
CNBFnPA Nasd .66 13.81 -.37 -2.6 -6.8
CSXs NY .48 24.57 -.81 -3.2 +14.1
Chevron NY 3.12 104.02 -4.95 -4.5 +14.0
Cisco Nasd .24 15.97 -.49 -3.0 -21.1
Citigrp rs NY .04 38.34 -1.91 -4.7 -18.9
CocaCola NY 1.88 68.01 -1.72 -2.5 +3.4
Delhaize NY 2.45 72.52 -.13 -0.2 -1.6
DrxFnBull NY ... 22.94 -10.1 -17.6
FamilyDIr NY .72 53.11 -1.03 -1.9 +6.8
FordM NY 12.21 -1.10 -8.3 -27.3
GenElec NY .60 17.91 -1.13 -5.9 -2.1
HomeDp NY 1.00 34.93 -1.59 -4.4 -.4
iShSilver NY ... 38.85 -.22 -0.6 +28.7
iShEMkts NY .84 '47.11 -.54 -1.1 -1.1
iShR2K NY, .94 79.74 -4.31 -5.1 +1.9
Intel Nasd .84 22.33 -.80 -3.5 +6.2
JPMorgCh NY 1.00 40.45 -1.74 -4.1 -4.6
JnprNtwk NY ... 23.39 -7.88 -25.2 -36.6
Level3 Nasd ... 2.18 -.25 -10.3+122.4
Lowes NY .56 21.58 -1.04 -4.6 -14.0


-2.3 +12.7
-8.9 -8.1
-0.5 -1.8
-5.2 -12.4
-2.4 +10.0
-3.8 +6.3
+2.3 -2.6
-1.0 -43.8
-9.0 +.1
-6.1 -2.3
-2.1 -4.8
-2.6 -2.0
-4.1 +9.9
-6.2 +12.0
-2.7 +6.5
+8.1 -10.1
-3.9 +7.0
-3.9 +2.8
-8.4 -5.5
-2.3 -294
-1.4 .34
-18.0
-3.4 -7.2
-5.8 -.5
-4.2 +9.3
-3.3 -2.3
-4.1 -9.8
-6.3 -21.2


Stock Footnotes. q = Dvidends and earringin Canraian liarss n Des no rroel cor ioued-liting srindar.a
if Lare riling with SEC 1 = New i pasr ,52 weae pl Preiirrsld rs h.4 r.as unj rgor.e a reverse g ocMt pi,1
of at lasi 50 proer.i .elrnhid ie oasI if ir RhjnR 10 Duy scurly at a mpefirled 'rse 5 = loK r3,s msfin Doy ai
leas 20 preni dih la.n IBse I to r rur, = Ur.U i I' ,Ikrupicy or rvuablarcip w Wren d'iinDufed *1 =
wh*er, ssued wi WananibA
Mutual Fund Footnotes: ri Fee csrenr,) rrlrkt cciii." I paill Trm lul' aisjaa. d = Delerred alai merge or
rederrtprln lee I: irfOr lead l le asOa.gehi. =T Mu= P i~ule iari ire r.arid I f nA r ot avalaDlo. p = preiouus day6
ril awsel valur i =fun,1 spi 1161, 6i duung ihe *, f o -ur. pa. & a isi ltullon during ir.e mK Galnerea nd
Losra musl tDe orM dal lea- $20 Ibe IISII0 0 in ale ai i;l l Most Actlves mustl Wbrtn ar ital Si volume -n A
nurwares uI srhams Source: mne Assocufawd Pie.s. 5al. ;fiquf are urerficul Aal


Money Rates
Last PvsWeek
Prime Rate 3.25 3.25
Discount Rate 0.75 0.75
Federal Funds Rate .00-.25 .00-25
Treasuries
3-month 0.09 0.04
6-month 0.16 0.08
5-year 1.33 1.50
10-year 2.80 2.96
30-year 4.13 4.26


Dow Jones Industrials -8-36 *91,50 -198.75
Close: 12,143.24 /
1-week change: -537.92 (-4.2%) MON TUES WED
13,000 .................. ..... ... ....... .....


-62.44 -9.87


THUR FRI


12,500


12,000..........



11,500 F M A M



MUTUAL ,S ,.. R...-. .:.
Total Assets Total Rtum/Rank Pct Min Int
Name Obi ($Min) NAV 4-wk 12-mo Spear Load ivt


PIMCO TotReIIs Cl
Amerincan Funds GnhAmA m 'LG
Vanguard TotSldx LB
RFdelity Contra LG
Vanguard Instldxl LB
American Funds CaplncBuA m IH
American Funds CpWIGrdA m WS
Amerrcan Fundsi IncAmerA m MA
Van.uarO 500Aarri LB
vanguard TloSIluAar LB
Arrmermw n Funds In.CoAmA m LB
Dodge & Co inn05. FV
Dodge & Co, Siuo LV
Arrencr, rFuras WAMullr.A m LV
Ameriencan Funds EurPacGrA m FB
var uard InslPlus LB
FParlTemp-Franldin Income A m CA
Amencan Funds FnPnvA m LB
Varguard Totlntl d FB
American Funds NewPerspA m WS
PIMCOTotRetAdm b Cl
American Funds BalA m MA
Vanguard 5001nv LB
Vanguard WelltnAdm MA
Harbor InflinsII d FB
Rdelity GrowCo LG
Vanguard TotBdAdml CI


142,222
64,340
. 62,404
61,672
60,307
59,351
55,045
54,204
54,186
51,740
48,030
46,279
43,847
40,086
38,377
37,510
36,555
34,455.
34,163
33,308
32,808
32,184
30,461
29,812
29,804
29,343'
28,544


+6.0/B
+18.7/E
+21.1/A
+22.9/C
+19.6/B
+13.4/0
+14.4/E
+14.7/B
+19.6/B
+21.2/A
+14.8/E
+15.3/C
+17./BB
+19.2/A
+15.5/D
+19.6/B
+13.3/A
+18.7/C
+16.4/C
+18.5/C
+5.8/C
+15.8/A
+19.5/B
+13.3/D
+19.7/A
+31.3/A
+4.6/D


NL 1,000,000
5.75 250
NL 3,000
NL 2,500
NL 5,000,000
5.75 250
5.75 250
5.75 250
NL 10,000
NL 10,000
5.75 250
NL 2,500
NL 2,500
5.75 250
5.75 250
NL 200,000,000
4.25 1,000
5.75 250
NL 3,000
5.75 250
NL 1,000,000
5.75 250
NL 3,000
NL 50,000
NL 50,000
NL 2,500
NL 10,000


CAaavakle, N.ouA kuele, 10.-tags Silet. .130+ Orwoe8s Lvd ~tFag kse, M -aplrI dGraleA~o 1i9455.04 IeldM


Wkly YTD Wkly
Name Div YId PE Chg %Chg Last
ABB Ltd 1.12 4.7- ... -.63 +6.6 23.94
.AESCorp ...... 15 -.37 +1.1 12.31
AFLAC 1.20 2.6 10 -.15 -18.4 46.06
AK Steel .20 1.6 ... -3.66 -25.8 12.15
AMR ... ... ... -.12 -45.6 4.24
AT&TInc 1.72 5.9 9 -1.06 -.4 29.26
AUOptron .14 2.5 ... -.74 -47.1 5.51
AbtLab 1.92 3.7 13 -1.63 +7.1 51.32
Accenture .90 1.5 20 -2.14 +22.0 59.14
AMD ... ... 7 -.41 -10.3 7.34
Aetna .60 1.4 9 -1.85 +36.0 41.49
Agilent .... ... 18 -4.73 +1.8 42.16
AlcatelLuc .. ... -1.14 +36.8 4.05
Alcoa .12 .8 16 -1.10 -4.3 14.73
Allstate .84 3.0 11 -.97 -13.0 27:72
AlphaNRs ... ... 39 -4.35 -28.9 42.71
Altria 1.52 5.8 16 -.06 +6.8 26.30
AmBevs 1.43 4.8 ... -1.95 -3.3 30.02
AMovilLs ..41 1.6 15 -.17 -10.0 25.80
AEagleOut .44 3.3 17 -.86 -10.2 13.14
AEP 1.84, 5.0 .15 -.85- +2.4 36.86
AmExp .72 1.4 13 -2.20 +16.6 50.04
AmlntlGrp ... ... 2 -.39 -40.5 28.70
AmeriBrgn .42 1.1 15 -2.21 +12.3 38.31
Anadarko .36 .4 49 -.74 +8.4 82.56
AnalogDev1.00 2.9 12 -2.66 -8.7 34.40
Annaly 2.59 15.4 7 -1.24 -6.4 16.78
Anworth 1.00 14.4 8 -.41 -1.0 6.93
ArcelorMit .75 2.4 14 -1..89 -18.3 31.15
ArchCoal .44 1.7 18 -3.01 -27.0 25.60
ArchDan .64 2.1 9 -1.74 +1.0 30.38
ArmourRsdl.44 19.9 10 -.33 -7.3 7.24
ATMOS 1.36 4.1 15 -.74 +7.1 33.43
Avon .92 3.5 16 -2.46 -9.7 26.23
BB&TCp .64 2.5 19 -.50 -2.3 25.68
BakrHu .60 .8 24 -2.52 +35.4 77.38
BcBilVArg .59 5.7 ..; -.72 +2.5 10.42
BcoBrades .80 4.2 ... -.01 -5.2 19.23
BcoSantSA .82 8.0 ... -.83 -4.1 10.21
BcoSBrasil 1.65 17.8 ... -.97 -31.8 9.28
BkofAm .04 .4 ... -.42 -27.2 9.71
Bklreind ... ... ... +.28 -45.7 1.44
BkNYMel .52 2.1 12 -.52 -16.9 *425.11
Barclay .36 2.5 ... -1.04 -11.9 14.56
Bar iPVix rs... ...... +2.68 -37.8 23.41
BarrickG .48 {.0 12 -2.68 -10.5 47.57
Baxter 1.24 2.1 15 -3.62 +14.9 58.17
BerkHB ... ... 17 -2.88 -7.4 74.17
BestBuy .64 2.3 9 -1.96 -19.5 27.60
Blackstone .40 2.4 92 -1.02 +17.4 16.61
Boeing 1.68 2.4 15 -2.20 +8.0 70.47
BostonSci ... ... 18 -.05 -5.4 7.16
BrMySq 1.32 4.6 15 -.83 +8.2 28.66
CB REllis ... ... 29 -1.97 +6.4 21.80
CBSB .40 1.5 22 -2.17 +43.7 27.37
CMSEng .84 4.4 13 -.79 +2.9 19.14
CSXs .48 2.0 16 -.81 +14.1 24.57
CVSCare .50 1.4 15 -1.00 +4.5 36.35
Calpine ... ...... +.06 +21.8 16.25
Cameron ... ...24 +3.00 +10.3 55.94
CapOne .20 .4 6 -1.84 +12.3 47,80
Carnival 1.00 3.0 14 -3.25 -27.8 33.30
Caterpillar 1.84 1.9 16 -6.36 +5.5 98.79
Cemex ... ... ... -.46. -31.6 7.04
CenterPnt .79 4.0 17 -.68 +24.6 19.58
CntryLink 2.90 7.8 11 -1.55 -19.6 37.11
ChesEng .35 1.0 12 -.04 +32.6 34.35
Chevron 3.12 3.0 10 -4.95 +14.0 104.02
Chimera .62 20.1 5 -.25 -25.1 3.08
Citigrp rs .04 .1 12 -1.91 -18.9 38.34
CliffsNRs 1.12 1.2 8-10.04 +15.1 89.82
CocaCola 1.88 2.8 13 -1.72 +3.4 68.01
CocaCE .52 1.8 15 -1.71 +12.3 28.11
Comerica .40 1.2 16 -1.75 -24.2 32.03
ConAgra .92 3.6 14 -.68 +13.4 25.61
CopocPhil 2.64 3.7 9 -3.27 +5.7 71.99
ConsolEngy .40 .7 21 -1.22 +10.0 53.60
ConEd 2.40 4.6 15 -.98 +6.1 52.60
ConstellEn .96 2.5 17 -.11 +26.8 38.83



Wkly YTD Wkly
Name Div YId PE Chg %Chg Last


ASML Hid .58 1.6
AcmePkt ...
ActivsBliz .17 1.4
AdobeSy ...
AkamaiT ...
AlldHIthcr ... ...
AlteraCp i .32 .8
Amazon
ACapAgy 5.60 20.1
AmCapLtd ...
Amgen 1.12 2.0
AmkorTIf ...
ApolloGrp ...
Apple Inc ...
ApldMatl .32 2.6
ArenaPhm ...
AriadP
ArmHId .13 .5
ArubaNet ...
Atmel
Autodesk ...
AutoData 1.44 2.8
AvagoTch .36 1.1
AvanirPhm ...
BMC Sft ... ...
Baidu ... ...
BioSante ...
Broadcom .36 1.0
BrcdeCm ...
CA Inc .20 .9
Cadence ...
CpstnTrbh ...
Celgene
CienaCorp ...
Cirrus
Cisco .24 1.5
CitrixSys ... ...
Clearwire ...


...-2.12 -7.0 35.65
79 -6.78 +10.8 58.92
28 -.15 -4.8 11.84
15 -2.01 -10.0 27.71
24 -6.15 -48.5 24.22
21 +1.34 +51.6 3.82
15 -1.42 +14.9 40.88
98 +6.00 +23.6 222.52
4 -1.76 -2.9 27.92
3 -.54 +27.9 9.67
11 -.52 -.4 54.70
8 -.54 -28.0 5.34
17 -1.10 +28.7 50.83
15 -2.82 +21.1 390.48
10 -.83 -12.3 12.32
... +.04 -6.4 1.61
19 -1.45 +133.1 11.89
...-1.42 +38.7 28.79
...-1.98 +9.9 22.95
12 -1.26 -1.8 12.10
33 -2.67 -9.9 34.40
21 -1.74 +11.3 51.49
15 -3.44 +18.4 33.63
... -.15 -8.1 3.75
17 -9.16 -8.3 43.22
89 +3.07 +62.7 157.07
... -.63 +79.9 2.95
21 +1.60 -14.9 37.07
19 -.51 +3.6 5.48
14 -.47 -8.8 22.30
14 +.35 +25.1 10.33
... -.22 +51.0 1.45
27 -1.88 +.3 59.30
... -2.20 -26.6 15.46
6 -1.05 -5.0 15.18
13 -.49 -21.1 15.97
41 -3.23 +5.3 72.04
... -.86 -57.9 2.17


Wkly YTD Wkly
Name Div YId PE Chg %Chg Last
Coming .20 1.3 8 -1.23 -17.7 15.91
Covidien .80 1.6 15 -.90 +11.2 50.79
CSVS2xVxS... ...... +4.41 -67.3 21.16
CSVellVSts... ...... -2.23 +33.7 15.98
Cummins 1.60 1.5 14 -1.90 -4.7 104.88
DRHorton .15 1.3 99 -.20 -.4 11.88
DTE 2.35 4.7 12 -1.39 +10.0 49.84
DanaHldg ... ... 79 -1.81 -3.1 16.67
Danaher .08 .2 18 -2.58 +4.1 49.11
DeanFds 24 -1.20 +24.7 11.02
Deere 1.64 2.1 .13 -2.73 -5.5 78.51
DetaAir ... ... 15 -.21 -37.4 7.89
DenbuyR ... ... 54 -1.41 +1.2 19.32
DevonE .68 .9 9 -5.65 +.2 78.70
DrSCBrrs ... ...... +5.29 -19.6 37.64
DirFnBrrs ... ...... +4.62 +2.5 48.42
DirLCBrrs ... .... ... +4.07 -17.1 36.37
DrxFnBull ... ...... -2.57 -17.6 22.94
DirxSCBull ... ... ...-12.75 +.4 72.71
Discover .24 .9 8 -.36 +38.2 25.61
Disney .40 1.0 17 -2.03 +3.0' 38.62
DomRescs1.97 4.1 16 -1.33 +13.4 48.45
DowChm 1.00 2.9 16 -.71 +2.1 34.87
DukeEngy 1.00 5.4 13 -.35 +4.4 18.60
ECDangn ... ...... +.10 -58.3 11.30
EMCCp ... ... 27 -1.68 +13.9 26.08
Eaton s 1.36 12.8 14 -3.21 -5.5 47.95
Ecolab .70 1.4 22 -3.05 -.8 50.00
EIPasoCp .04 .2 29 -.17 +49.3 20.55
Elan ... ... ... -1.28 +93.0 11.06
Eldorild g .12 ... 44 -1.16 -7.0 17.27
EmersonElI1.38 2.8 17 -6.01 -14.1 49.09
EnCana g .80 2.7 64 -1.20 +.6 29.29
ENSCO 1.40 2.6 17 +.02 -.2 53.25
Exelon 2.10 4.8 13 +.37 +5.8 44.07
ExxonMbl 1.88 2.4 10 -5.43 +9.1 79.79
FedExCp .52 .6 19 -5.91 -6.6 86.88.
FdlNFin .48 2.9. 11 +.34 +19.2 16.30
FstHorizon .04 .4 53 -.53 -23.7 8.99
FirstEngy 2.20 4.9 16 +.29 +20.6 44.65
FlagstBcp ... ... ... -.52 -55.2 .73
FordM ... ... 6 -1.10 -27.3 12.21
FMCG s 1.00 1.9 9 -2.71 -11.8 52.96
FrontierCm .75 10.0 54 -.36 -23.0 7.49
GafisaSA .29 3.0 ... -.30 -34.1 9.57
GameStop ... .. 9 +.11 +3.1 23.58
Gannett .32 2.5 6 -.90 -15.4 12.76
Gap .45 2.3 10 -.37 -12.5 19.29
GenMills 1.22 3.3 '14 -.47. +4.9 37.35
GenMotn ... ... 7 -2.42 -24.9 27.68
GenOn En ... ...... -.12 +2.1 3.89
Genworth ... ...... -.61 -36.7 8.32
Gerdaus .27 3.0 ... -.51 -34.8 9.12
GlaxoSKIn 2.17 4.9 ... +.67 +13.3 44.42
GolUnhas .12 1.5 ...-3.40 -49.5 7.76
GoldFLtd .19 1.2 2 +.14 -14.0 15.59
Goldcrpg .41 .9 16 -6.42 +4.0 47.81
GoldmanS 1.40 1.0 13 -.52 -19.7 134.97
Goodyear ... ...... -1.72 +36.5 16.17
HCAHIdn ... ...... -7.93 -114.0 26.68
Hallibrtn .36 .7 20 -2.47 +34.0 54.73
HartfdFn .40 1.7 6 -.45 -11.6 23.42
HItMgmt ... ... 13 -.78 -.4 9.50
HeclaM ... ... 37 -.57 -31.0 7.77
HelixEn ... ... 49 +1.01 +61.3 19.58
Hertz .. 23 -1.61 -2.9 14.07
Hess .40 .6 8 -5.81 -10.4 68.56
HewlettP .48 1.4 9 -1.53 -16.5 35.17
HomeDp 1.00 2.9 17 -1.59 -.4 34.93
Honwlllnti 1.33 2.5 16 -3.30 -.1 53.10
HostHotis .12 .8 ...-1.12 -11.3 15.85
iShGold ... ...... +.22 +14.2 15.87
iSAstla 1.06 4.2 -.87 -.9 25.21
iShBraz 3.42 4.8 -.77 -8.8 70.57
iShGer .67 2.6 ... -.75 +7.4 25.72
iShHK .42 2.2 ... +.24 -.7 18.79
iShJapn .17 1.6 .., -.17 -1.8 10.71
iSTaiwn .29 -.21 -2.9 15.16
iShSilver ... ... ... -.22 +28.7 38.85


New York Stock Exchange
II


Markets Change.

Are You Prepared?

When you stop and look back at what's happened
in the markets, it's easy to realize how quickly
things can change. That's why we should schedule
some time to discuss how the market can impact
your financial goals. We can also conduct a free
portfolio review to help you decide if you should
make changes to your investments and whether
you're on track to reach your goals.,


Stop by or call today to s

Steve J
Financial

2929 W
Suite 11
Lake Cit
386-752


Wkly YTD Wkly
Name Div YId PE Chg %Chg Last
iShChina25 .85 2.0 ... -.08 -1.7 42.36
iShEMkts .84 1.8 ... -.54 -1.1 47.11
iShB20T 4.02 4.1 ... +1.87 +4.0 97.92
iS Eafe 1.68 2.9 ... -1.47 +.8 58.71
iShR2K '.94 1.2 ...-4.31 +1.9 79.74
iShREst 2.09 -3.5 ... -2.44 +8.0 60.43
ITW 1.36 2.7 13 -7.17 -6.7 49.80
Imax Corp ... 17 -9.63 -32.5 18.96
IngerRd .48 1.3 ... -2.96 -20.5 37.42
IBM 3.00 1.6 15 -3.33 +23.9 181.85
IntlGame .24 1.3 22 +.34 +5.1 18.59
IntPap 1.05 3.5 10 -1.16 +9.0 29.70
Interpublic .24 2.4 19 -2.85 -7.6 9.81
Invesco .49 2.2 14 -.53 -7.8 22.18
InvMtgCap 3.94 20.1 5 -1.62 -10.3 19.58
ItauUnlbH .67 3.3 ... -.97 -14.8 20.37
JPMorgCh 1.00 2.5 9 -1.74 -4.6 40.45
Jabil .28 1.5 12 -1.95 -8.9 18.31
JanusCap .20 2.4 8 -.67 -34.9 8.44
JohnJn 2.28 3.5 14 -1.93 +4.8 64.79
JohnsnCtl .64 1.7 16 -3.06 -3.3 36.95
JonesGrp .20 1.5 56 +1.35 -16.7 12.94
JnprNtwk ... ... 22 -7.88 -36.6 23.39
KB Home .25 2.9 ... -.93 -37.1 8.49
Keycorp .12 1.5 8 -.37 -9.2 8.04
Kimco .72 3.8 ... -1.27 +5.5 19.03
Kinross g .10 .6 24 -1.24 -13.8 16.34
Kraft 1.16 3.4 20 -1.05 +9.1 34.38
LDK Solar ... ... 2 -.51 -33.4 6.74
LSI Corp ... ...14 +.65 +22.9 7.36
LVSands ... ... 34 +.55 +2,7 47.18
LennarA .16 .9 33 -.91 -5.7 17.69


Nasdaq Most Active


Name


Wkly YTD Wkly
DIv YId PE Cha %Chg Last


CognizTech...
Comcast .45
Comc spd .45
Cree Inc
Crocs
CypSemi .36
CytRxh ...
Dell Inc
DirecTVA ...
DonlleyRR 1.04
DryShips ...
Dunkin n
Dynavax ...
E-Trade ..
eBay
ErthUnk .20
ElectArts ...
EntropCom ...
EricsnTel .37
Expedia .28
ExpScripts ...
F5 Netwks ...
FifthThird .24
Finisar
FstNiagara .64
extrn ....
Fortinets ...
GT Solar ...
GileadSci ...
Google ...
GreenMtC ...
HercOffsh ...
Hologic
HudsCity .32
HumGen ...
Illumina
Intel .84
InterDil .40


27 -3.90 -4.7 69.87
18 -.83 +9.8 24.02
17 -.73 +12.7 23.34
20 -.98 -50.1 32.85
29 +3.09 +83.0 31.33
30 -1.76 +10.8 20.58
... -.27 -56.5 .44
10 -.80 +19.9 16V24
19 -1.67 +26.9 50.68
14 -.82 +7.7 18.81
7 -.18 -31.7 3.75
... +3.9 28.93
... +.25 -12.5 2.80
66 +.24 -.8 15.88
25 -.75 +17.7 32.75
17 +.40 -6.5 8.04
.... -1.68 +35.8 22.25
8 -1.39 -44.7 6.68
... -.68 +8.4 12.50
20 +1.64 +26.3 31.69
23 -3.04 +.4 54.26
35 -7.72 -28.2 93.48
13 -.16 -13.8 12.65
17 -2.17 -42.6 17.04
17 -.65 -12.4 12.25
9 -.56 -17.8 6.45
56 -.77 +25.6 20.32
11 -1.54 +49.6 13.64
13 -.85 +16.9 42.36
21-14.54 +1.6 603.69
...+11.24+216.3 103.95
... -.11 +35.1 4.70
...-2.11 -1.3 18.57
... -.08 -35.2 8.25
... -.49 -12.1 21.01
72-12.02 -1.4 62.45
10 -.80 +6.2 22.33
28 -4.71 +63.9 68.25


schedulee your free review.

ones, CFP
al Advisor
est U S Highway 90
4
y, FL 32055
2-3847

www.edwardjones.com Member SIPC


j Jones
.-1,, orINVESTING


Willy YTD Willy


W:y YTD Wky
Name Div YId PE Chg %Chg Last
Lexmark' 8 +3.83 -3.6 33.57
UllyEII 1.96 5.1 9 -.40 +9.3 38.30
ULimited .80 2.1 15 -2.32 +23.2 37.86
UncNat .20 .8 10 -1.29 -4.7 26.50
UzClaib ... ....... +.68 -10.6 6.40
UoydBkg ... ... ... -.24 -32.4 I 2.78
LyonBas A .10 .3 ... -.08 +14.7 39.46
MEMC .... ... 44 '-.65 -34.1 7.42
MFGlobal .. ...... -35 -11.8 7.37
MFAFnci 1.00 13.4 8 -.33 -8.2 7.49
MGIC ... ......-.19 -60.9 3.98
MGMRsts ... .. -.69 +1.8 15.11
Macys .40t 1.4 13 -1.63 +14.1 28.87
Manitowoc .08 .6 ... -2.00 +6.7 13.99
ManpwrGp .80 1.6 ... -3.25 -19.5 50.52
MarathnO s .60 1.9 7 -1.04 +37.8 30.97
MarathP n .80 f.8 ... +3.22 +12.3 43.79
MktVGold .40 .7 ... -3.87 -7.5 56.89
MktVRus .18 .5, ... -.21 +4.2 39.50
MarlntA .40 1.2 26 -2.61 -21.8 32.50
MarshM .88 3.0 18 -.30 +7.9 29.49
Masco .30 2.8 .... -.87 -16.7 10.55
McKesson .80 1.0 17 -1.19 +15.3 81.12
MedcoHIth ... ... 18 -3.08 +2.6 62.88
Medtmic .97 2.7 13 -1.02 -2.8 36.05
Merck 1.52 4.5 15 -1.96 -5.3 34.13
MetUfe .74 1.8 11 -.53 -7.3 41.21
MillerEnR ... ... ...-3.11 -15.2 4.41
Molycorp .. ...... +3.30 +27.5 63.63
Monsanto 1.12 1.5 25 -1.93 +5.5 73.48
MonstrWw ... ... -1.78 -50.3 11.74
Moodys .56 1.6 13 -1.56 +34.2 35.61


Wly YTD Wly
Name Div YId PE Chg %Chg Lat


MorgStan .20 .9 48 -1.60 -18.2 22.25
Mosaic. .20 .3 14 -2.16 -7.4 70.72
MotdaSoln .88 2.0 ... +.12 +18.0 44.89
MotriaMon ... ... ...-2.23 -23.1 22.38
NCRCorp ... ... 14 -.88 +29.8 19,95
Nabors ... ... 56 -1.16 +12.6 26.41
NalcoHId .14 .4 24 -1.34 +10.7 35.35
NatGrid 2.92 5.9 ... -.75 +10.8 49.19
NOilVarco .44 .5 20 -2.74 +19.8 80.57
NatSemi .40 1.6 21 -.02 +79.7 24.72
NYCmtyB 1.00 7.4 11 -.90 -28.2 13.53
NewellRub .02 2.1 15 +.27 -14.6 15.52
NewmtM 1.20 2.2 12 -3.05 -9.5 55.61
NextEraEn 2.20 4.0 13 -2.21 +6.3 55.25
NiSource .92 4.6 19 -.70 +14.2 20.13
NokiaCp .55 9.5 ... -.06 -43.8 5.80
NorltkSo 1.72 2.3 17 -.51 +20.5 75.70
Nucor 1.45 3.7 26 -2.21 -11.3 38.89
OcciPqt 1.84 1.9 14 -9.70 +.1 98.18
OfficeDpt ... ...... +.18 -30.0 3.78
OshkoshCp ... i ... 6 -5.27 -29.6 24.82
Owenslll ... ...... -3.64 -24.5 23.17
PG&ECp 1.82 4.4, 16 -1.33 -13.4 41.43
PMIGrp ... ...' ... -.03 -69.7 1.00
PNC 1.40 2.6 8 -2.30 -10.6 54.29
PPLCorp 1.40 5.0 12 -.11 +6.0 27.90
PatriotCoa ... ... .:. -5.97 -2.4 18.91
PeabdyE .34 .6 17 -3.90 -10.2 57.47
Penny .80 2.6 18 -.669 -4.8 30.76
PepsiCo 2.06 3.2 16 -1.72 -2.0 64.04
Petrohawk ... ...... -.05+109.3 38.19
PetrbrsA 1.34 4.4 ... +.64 -10.1 30.73
Petrobras 1.28 3.8 ... +.67 -10.2 33.97
Pfizer .80 4.2 18 -.82 +9.9 19.25
PhilipMor 2.56. 3.6 16 -.94 +21.6 71.17
PitnyBw 1.48 '6.9 10 -.86 -10.9 21.55
Potash s .28 .5 25 -3.83 +12.0 57.81
PS USDBull... ...... -.10 -7.4 21.03
ProLogis 1.12 3.1 ... -.22 +12.4 35.63
ProShtS&P ... ...... +1.61 -5.0 41.66
PrUShS&P ... ...... +1.60 -10.1 21.35,
ProUtQQQ ... ...... -5.22 +11.9 91.11
PrUShQQQ rs... ...... +2.46 -17.0 48.29
ProUltSP .35 .7 ... -4.22 +5.4 50.66
ProUShL20 ... ...... -1.28 -15.1 31.46
ProUSSPO00... ...... +1.78 -16.1 16.29
ProUSSIvrs... ...... +.10 -65.7 13.49
ProgsvCp 1.40' 2.0 11 -.79 -1.0 19.68
ProUSR2K r......... +4.30 -11.9 44.28
PmndentI 1.15 2.0 9 -2.25 -.1 58.68
PSEG 1.37 4.2 10 -.06 +3.0 32.75
PulteGrp ... .. ... -.47 -8.6 6.87
QntmDSS ... ...... -.54 -29.3 2.63
RadianGrp .01 .3 ... -.14 -60.7 3.17
RadioShk .25 1.8 10 +.81 -24.7 13.92
Raytheon 1.72 3.8 8 -2.01 -2.7 44.73
RegalEnt .84 6.6 26 +.75 +8.9 12.79
RegionsFn .04 .7 ... -.11 -13.0 6.09
Renrenn ... ...... +.67 -39.9 10.63
RepubSvc .80 2.8 18 -1.24 -2.8 29.03
ReynAm s 2.12 6.0 14 -1.06 +7.9 35.20
RiteAd ... ...... -.01 +47.2 1.30
RylCarb .40 1.3 12 -5.87 -34.9 30.62
SLMCp .40 2.6 11 -1.12 +23.8 15.59
SpdrDJIA 3.08 2.5 ... -5.47 +4.8 121.13
SpdrGold ... ... ...+2.17 +14.1 158.29
S&P500ETF2.44 1.9 ... -5.25 +2.8 129.33
SpdrHome .31 1.8 ... -.92 -3.5 16.78
SpdrKbwBk .20 .9 ... -.89 -11.7 22.88
SpdrRetl .46 .9 ... -1.69 +10.1 53.26
SpdrOGEx .47 .8 ... -3.01 +17.9 62.20
SpdrMetM .42 .6 ... -5.20 -3.2 66.60
STMicro .40 5.1 8 -1.42 -24.2 7.91
Safeway .58 2.9 12 -.76 -10.3 20.17
SandRdge ... -.59 +57.4 11.52
SaraLee .46 2.4 27 -.48 +9.1 19.11
Schlmbrg 1.00 1.1 24 -3.44 +8.2 90.37
Schwab .24 1.6 25 -.51 -12.7 14.93
SemiHTr .61 1.9 ... -1.70 -1.4 32.07


Wkly YTD Wkly
Name Div PE Chg %Chg Last
SiderurNac .81 7.6 ... -.65 -38.3 10.62
SilvWhIng .12 .3 35 -3.43 -7.6 36.08
SouthnCo 1.89 4.8 17 -.56 +3.4 39.64
SwstAid .02 .2 16 -.46 -23.3 9.96
SwstnEngy ... ... 25 -4.44 +19.0 44.56
SpectraEn 1.04 3.8 17 -.63 +8.1 27.02
SprintNex ... ... ...-.93 ... 4.23
SPMats 1.30 3.4 ... -1.94 -1.0 38.01
SPHIthC .63 1.8 ... -1.47 +8.3 34.12
SPCnSt .83 2.7 ... -.91 +5.2 30.83
SPConsum.59 1.5 ... -1.44 +6.0 39.65
SPEngy 1.06 1.4 ... -3.28 +12.0 76.45
SPDRFnd .18 1.2 ... -.53 -7.2 14.80
SPInds .67 1.9 ... -2.15 -.5 34.68
SPTech .35 1.4 ., -.91 +2.5 25.81
SPUtil 1.33 4.0 ... -.65 +5.8 33.17
StateStr .72 1.7 13 -1.15 -10.5 41.47
StilwtiM ... ..22 -1.43 -28.3 15.30
Suncorgs .44 ... 18 -3.08 -.2 38.22
SunTrst .04 .2 30 -1.46 -17.0 24.49
Supvalu .35 4.1 ... -.17 -10.7 8.60
Synovus .04 2.2 ... -.23 -30.7 1.83
TE Connect .72 2.1 13 -1.98 -2.7 34.43
TaiwSemi, .52 4.2 ... -.62 -1.4 12.36
TalisniEg .27 '.. ..--2.36 -17.8 18.25
Target 1.20 2.3 13 -.32 -14.4 51.49
TeckResg .60 ... -3.35 -20.0 49.44
TelefEsp s 1.98 8.9 ... -1.13 -2.1 22.32
TenetHth .. ... 3, -.70 -16.9 5.56
Teradyn ... ... 7-1.20 -3.9 13.49
Tesoro ... ... 14 -.08 +31.0 24.29
TexInst .52 1.7 11 -1.90 -8.5 29.75
Textron .08 .3 54 -1.63 ,.2.2 23.13
ThermoFis ... ... 18 -4.84 +8.5 60.09
3MCo 2.20 2.5 15 -8.24 +1.0 87.14
TimeWam .94 2.7 15 -1.54 +9.3 35.16
Transocn .79 1.3 33 -2.88 -11.4 61.56
Travelers 1.64 3.0 11 -2.45 -1.0 55.13
TwoHrblnv 1.59 16.2 9 -.57 +.1 9.80
Tycolnti 1.00 2.3 15 -2.84 +6.9 44.29
Tyson .16 .9 7 -.69 +2.0 17.56
UBSAG ........-1.03 +.1 16.48
US Airwy ... ... 5 -.56 -37.7 6.24
UtdContl ... ...11 -1.83 -23.9 18.12
UtdMicro .19 8.3 7 -.08 -27.2 2.30
UPS B 2.08 3.0 17 -4.94 -4.6 69.22
US Bancrp .50 1.9 13 -.85 -3.4 26.06
US NGsrs ... ......-.55 -12.4 10.50
US OilFd ... ......-1.51 -4.1 37.42
USSteel .20 .5 .. -4.82 -31.5 39.99
UtdhthGp .65 1.3 11 -3.12 +37.4 49.63
ValeSA .90 2.8 ... -.94 -6.2 32.44
ValeSApf .90 3.0 ... -.54 -2.3 29.52
ValeroE .20 .8 20 -1.59 +8.7 25.12
VangEmg .82 1.7 ... -.36 +.4 48.32
VerizonCm1.95 5.5 15 -1.45 -1.4 35.29
VImpelCm .80 6.5 8 +.06 -17.6 12.40
Visa .60 .7 18 -3.98 +21.5 85.54
Walgm .90 2.3 15 -.98 +2 39.04
WsteMInc 1.36 4.3 16 -4.48 -14.6 31.49
Weathflnt ... ... ... +2.10 -3.9 21.92
WellPoint 1.00 1.5 9 -6.86 +18.8 67.55
WeflsFargo .48 1.7 11 -1.20 -9.8 27.94
Wendys Co .08 1.5 ... -.25 +14.1 5.27
WDgital ... ...11 -3.58 +1.7 34.46
WstnUnion .32 1.6 13 +.04 +4.5 19.41
Weyerh .60 3.0 .. -2.19 +5.6 19.99
WhitngPts .. 21-3.66 ... 58.60
WmsCos .80 2.5 24 +.61 +28.2 31.70
XLGrp .44 2.1 33 -1.05 -6.0 20.52
Xerox .17 1.8 17 -.75 -19.0 9.33
Yamanag .18 1.4 18 -.44 +1.4 12.98
Youkun ... .... +2.81 +5.4 36.91
YumBmds 1.00 1.9 20 -1.75 +7.7 52.82


AMEX Most Active


Wkly YTD Wkly
Name Div YId PE Chg %Chg Last
Intersil .48 4.0 16 -.90 -21.1 12.05
Intuit ... ... 23 -1.26 -5.3 46.70
JA Solar 3 -.22 -30.6 4.80
JDS Uniph ... ... 49 -2.19 -9.2 13.15
JetBlue ... ... 16 -.63 -27.5 4.79
KLATnc 1.40 3.5 10 -4.29 +3.1 39.82
LamResrch... ... 7 -3.38 -21.1 40.88
Level3 -... ... ... .25+122.4 2.18
UbtyMintA .. .... 16 -.57 +4.0 16.40
ULifeTech .-. ... 23 -6.60 -18.9 45.03
UnearTch .96 3.3 12 -1.97 -15.3 29.30
MarshEdw ... ...... +.92 +123.7 2.17
MarvellT ... ... 12 -.51 -20.1 14.82
Mattel .92 3.5 14 -.35 +4.8 26.66
Maximlntg .88 3.8 17 -.78 -2.8 22.96
MelcoCrwn ... ...... -.60 +137.9 15.13
Microchp *1.38 4.1 16 -.36 -1.3 33.75
MicronT ... ... 12 -.72 -8.1 7.37
Microsoft .64 2.3 10 -.13 -1.8 27.40
NXP Semn ... ...... -2.96 -5.5 19.78
NetApp ... 28 -3.56 -13.5 47.52
Netflix ... ... 68-10.59 +51.4 265.99
NewsCpA .15 .9 14 -.40 +10.0 16.02
NewsCpB .15 .9 15 -.35 +.5 16.50
Nvidia ... 34 -1.17 -10.2 13.83
OnSmcnd ... ... 11 -.60 -12.0 8.69
Oncothyr ... ... ...-1.68 +145.7 8.01
Oracle .24 .8 18 -1.97 -2.3 30.58
PDLBio .60 9.7 9 -.16 -.6 6.19
PMCSra ...... 47 -.60 -18.6 6.99
Paccar .48 1.1 22 -7.41 -25.3 42.81
PattUTI .20 .6 27 -1.20 +51.0 32.53
Paychex 1.24 4.4 20 -1.35 -8.7 28.23
PeopUtdF .63 5.0 27 -.44 -9.5 12.68
Polycoms ... ... 43 -3.66 +38.7 27.03
Popular ... ... 6 -.05 -23.6 2.40
Power-One ... ... 6 -.16 -29.3 7.21
PwShsQQQ.42 .7 ... -1.60 +6.5 58.00


Name DIv
PriceTR 1.24
QIAGEN ...
Qualcom .86
Questcor
RF MicD ..
RschMotn ...
Riverbeds ...
S1 Corp
STEC
SanDisk
Sanofirt ...
SeagateT .72.
Sina
SiriusXM
SkywksSol
Sonus
Staples .40
Starbucks .52
StlDynam .40
Symantec ...
TD Ameritr .20
Tellabs .08
TevaPhrm .88
TibcoSit ...
TriQuint ...
UrbanOut ...
Verisign 5.75
VirgnMdah .16
VistaPrt
Vodafone 1.45
WholeFd .40
Windstrm 1.00
Xilinx .76
YRCWw rs...
Yahoo
ZionBcp .04


Wkly YTD Wkly
YId PE Chg %Chg Last
2.2 20 -3.52 -12.0 56.80
... 33 -.94 -13.4 16.94
1.6 23 -2.68 +10.7 54.78
46 +3.77+110.8 31.05
.. 18 +.26 -8.2 6.75
... 4 -2.91 -57.0 25.00
89 -3.49 -18.6 28.63
... ... +2.36 +36.2 9.40
... 11 -7.86 -42.4 10.17
... 8 -3.04 -14.7 42.53
-.83 -50.6 1.16
5.2 6 -.68 -7.6 13.89
... ... -6.13 +57.1 108.09
-.05 +29.4 2.11
23 -1.67 -11.6 25.31
... ... -.30 +10.9 2.96
2.5 13 +.32 -29.5 16.06
1.3 28 -.26 +24.8 40.09
2.6 15 -.92 -14.6 15.62
... 24 ... +13.9 19.06
1.1 18 -1.20 -3.3 18.36
1.9 ... -.19 -38.9 4.14
1.9 14 -1.12 -10.5 46.64
... 49 -1.40 +32.1 26.04
... 7 -3.13 -35.7 7.52
... 21 -.02 -9.1 32.54
... 7 -2.56 -4.5 31.21
.6 ... -1.74 -2.9 26.46
... 15-18.77 -42.0 26.70
5.2 ... +1.08 +6.3 28.10
.6 39 +.57 +31.8 66.70
8.2 21 -.49 -12.4 12.21
2.4 14 -1.56 +10.8 32.10
... ... -.11 -75.3 .92
15 -.88 -21.2 13.10
.2 ... -1.54 -9.6 21.90


Name DIv Yd PE Chg %Cg Last
AbdAsPac .42 5.5 ... -.12 +13.0 7.63
Adventrx ... ......-.47 +13.0 2.95
AlexcoR g ... ...... -1.14 -9.2 7.44
AlldNevG ... ...... -2.86 +44.8 38.10
AmApparel ... ... ... ... -37.3 1.04
AntaresP ... ......-.25 +36.5 2.32
ArcadiaRs ... ... ...-.00 -85.0 .05
Aurizong ... ......-.34 -19.4 5.90
AvalRaren ... ...... -1.00 -11.9 5.50
BarcUBS36... ... .-.70 ... 49.13
BarcGSOil ... ... ...-1.06 -3.9 24.60
Brigus grs ... ... ...-.09 -20.0 1.68
CardiumTh ... ... ...-.03 -43.5 .22
CelSci ... ... ... -.01 -40.0 .49
CFCdag .01 +.12 +15.0 23.84
CheniereEn ... ... ... -.29 +86.6 10.30
ChinaShen ... ...... -.09 -64.2 3.01
CrSuiHiY .32 10.4 ... -.11 +62 3.07
CrystalRk ... ... 5 -.07 +27.9 .87
DejourE g ... ... ... -.02 -2.2 .31
DenisnMg ... ... ... -.04 -38.3 2.11
EVLtdDur 1.25 7.7 ... -.31 +.7 16.17
Express-1 ... ... 26 -.33 +52.3 3.90
GabGIdNR1.68 9.3 ... -.54 -6.1 18.10
GascoEngy ... ......-.05 -20.0 .28
Gastargrs .... ... +.67 +10.5 4.75
GenMoly ... ......-.15 -29.5 4.57
GoldStrg ... ... ... -.30 -44.9 2.53
GranTrrag ... ...... -.25 -13.7 6.95
GrtBasGg ... ...... -.14 -32.1 2.01
GtPanSilv g... ... 3 -.56 +19.6 3.36
HooperH ... ... 53 +.12 +51.4 1.06
ImpOil gs .44 ...... -2.65 +8.7 44.03
InovioPhm ... ...... -.04 +44.3 .64
KodiakO g ... ...... +.39 +2.9 6.79
MadCatzg ... ... 6 -.15 +13.7 1.16
Metalico ... ... 12 -.39 -6.8 5.48
MetroHIth ... ...9 +.34 +26.6 5.66


NWka YT W ly
Name Dtv YId PE Chg %Ch9 L.t


MdwGoldg ..
Minefndg ...
NeoStem ...
Neoprobe ...
NewEnSys ..
NwGoldg ...
NAPaig ...
NDynMng ...
NthnO&G ...
NthgtMg ...
NovaGldg ...
Oilsandsg ...
OpkoHih ...
ParaG&S ...
PhrmAth ...
PinndDI ...
PionDrill ..
uepasa ...
QuestRMg ...
RareEle g
Rentech .
RexahnPh
Rubicon g ...
SamsO&G
Taseko
TmsatlPet ...
TriValley .
USGeoth
Ur-Energy ...
Uranerz
UraniumEn ...
VantageDr ...
VimetX
VistaGold ...
Vringo
Waterinv 2.00
YMBoq ...


-.12+183.3
-.42 +32.3
-.20 -39.7
+.01 +39.3
-.44 -60.8
-.26 +10.7
-.56 -39.6
-.16 -26.0
-2.28 -18.6
-.15 +.6
-.22 -29.8
-.01 -40.0
-.05 +18.5
-.12 -24.6
-.25 -37.4
+.23 +24.8
-.84 +84.7
-.88 -27.8
-.64 -3.0
-.51 -34.1
-.07 -23.0
-.07 +7.1
+.83 -26.4
-25+113.6
-.28 -152
-.10 -58.6
-.09 -15.8
-.14 -49.6
... -44.1
-.25 -24.6
-.37 -44.4
-.06 -19.7
-526+104.8
-.31 +29.3
+.29 -29.4
-3.39 +34.8
-.34 +.9


W kl St k Exchan e Hi hl s


Wkly Wkiy YTD
Name Ex Div Last Chg%Chg%Chg


Currencies
Last Pvs Day
Australia .9095 .9099
Britain 1.6431 1.6344
Canada .9554 .9506
Euro .6960 .6988
Japan 77.10 77.88
Mexico 11.7280 11.7149
Switzerind .7884 .8016
British'pound expressed in U.S. dollars. All oth-
ers show dollar in foreign currency.


I


-I


I










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LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED SUNDAY, JULY 31, 2011

Lake City Reporter





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Legal

NOTICE OF INTENT BY THE
SCHOOL BOARD OF COLUMBIA
COUNTY TO ADOPT RULE AND
SET PUBLIC HEARING
The School Board of Columbia
County will hold a public hearing on
Tuesday, September 13, 2011 at 7:00
p.m., at the School Board Adminis-
trative Complex, 372 West Duval
Street, Lake City, Florida, on pro-
posed amendments to rules, regula-
tions and procedures for the opera-
tion of the Columbia County School
System. The public is invited to at-
tend. Action is anticipated at this
meeting.
Persons with disabilities who require
assistance to participate in the public
hearing are requested to notify the
Office of the Superintendent at 755-
8000 at least 48 hours in advance so
that their needs can be accommodat-
ed.
TITLE: Policy 5.10 Zero Toler-
ance for School Related Crimes
PURPOSE AND EFFECT: Adher-
ing to State Board Rule.
SPECIFIC LEGAL AUTHORITY:
1001.41; 1001.42; 1001.43;
120.57(1); 775.08; 784.081; 985.04;
1001.54; 1003.31; 1006.07; 1006.08;
1006.09; 1006.13; 1006.135;
1006.14; 1012.28; 790.162; 790.163,
Florida Statutes
TITLE: Policy 5.11 Student Ill-
ness
PURPOSE AND EFFECT: Ana-
phylaxis Emergency Plan.
SPECIFIC LEGAL AUTHORITY:
1001.41; 1001.42, 1001.43; 1000.21;
1002.20; 1002.22; 1006.062;
1011.62, Florida Statutes
TITLE: Policy 8.331 Technolo-
gy Use
PURPOSE AND EFFECT: Revi-
sions regarding proper usage of the
Area Network to be consistent with
the educational purposes of the Co-
lumbia County School District, in-
cluding Social Media.
SPECIFIC LEGAL AUTHORITY:
1001.41; 1001.42; 1001.43, Florida
Statutes
TITLE: Policy 8.32 Tobacco
Use in District Facilities
PURPOSE AND EFFECT: Tobac-
co on school. grounds.
SPECIFIC LEGAL AUTHORITY:
1001:41; 1001.42; 1001.43; 386.201-
386.209, Florida Statutes .
A complete text of the proposed
amended rules, regulations and pro-
cedures can be obtained at the Office
of the Superintendent of Schools,
372 W. Duval St., Lake City, FI,, be-
tween the hours of 7:30 a.m. and
5:00 p.m. Monday Thursday.
Starting August 15, 2011 between
the hours of 8:00 a.m. and 4:00 p.m.
Monday Friday. Eqpnomic impact
. statements, where applicable, are on
file in the Office of Superintendent at
the above listed address.'
DATED THIS 26TH DAY OF JU-
LY, 2011.
SCHOOL BOARD OF COLUMBIA
COUNTY
BY: Linard Johnson, Chairman
ATTEST: Michael F. Millikin, Su-
perintendent
05526918
July 31, 2011


NOTICE OF INTENT BY THE
SCHOOL BOARD OF COLUMBIA
COUNTY TO ADOPT RULE AND
SET PUBLIC HEARING
The School Board of Columbia
County will hold a public hearing on
Tuesday, September 13, 2011,
at 7:00 p.m., at the School Board Ad-
ministrative Complex, 372 West
Duval Street, Lake City, Florida, on
proposed amendments to rules, regu-
lations and procedures for the opera-
tion of the Columbia County School
District. The public is invited to at-
tend. Action is anticipated at this
meeting.
Persons with disabilities who require
assistance to participate in the public
hearing are requested to notify the
Office of the Superintendent at 755-
8000 at least 48 hours in advance so
that their needs can be accommodat-
ed.
TITLE: 2011 2012 Student Pro-
gression Plan
PURPOSE AND EFFECT:
Var-
'ious revisions are being made in or-
der to comply with district policy,
Florida Statutes and State Board of
Education Rules.
Elementary Section: Align statement
on Grade Appeals and Grievance
Procedures with those in Code of
Student Conduct. Change Honor
Roll exclusion from "N" and "U" in
Conduct and Work Habits to only
"U". Add civics education and com-
puter literacy to program instruction
in Curriculum.
Middle School Section: Align state-
ment on Grade Appeals and Griev-
ance Procedures with those in Code
of Student Conduct. Add End of
Course (EOC) assessment informa-
tion for credit in Algebra I and for
calculation of Civics grade in 2013-
2014.
High School Section: Align state-
ment on Grade Appeals and Griev-
ance Procedures with those in Code
of Student Conduct. Add language
on transfer of Algebra I credit and
EOC requirement:
High School Graduation Require-
ments: oInsert for students entering
ninth grade in the 2011-2012 school
year.
oAmend language in requirements
for students who entered in 2009-
2010, 2008-
2009, to reflect state assessment re-
quirements. Add language to allow
for Drop Out Prevention students to
be reclassified at end of grading peri-
od if promotion requirements are
met. Change Bright Futures require-
ments to include recent legislation
related to application, community
service and standardized test scores.
Exceptional Student Education Sec-
tion: Update middle school and
graduation requirements to reflect
changes in legislation, to include End
of Course (EOC) assessment require-
ments. Change maximum age of edu-
cation to 22. Revised promotion cri-
teria for students receiving instruc-
tion in a functional classroom. De-
fine Level 1 courses with respect to
meeting graduation requirements.
SPECIFIC LEGAL AUTHORITY:
1001.41; 1001.42; 1001.43; 1008.25;
230.23,


Legal

Florida Statutes
TITLE: 2011 2012 Code of
Stu-
dent Conduct
PURPOSE AND EFFECT:
Var-
ious revisions are being made in or-
der to comply with district policy,
Florida Statutes and State Board of
Education Rules.
SPECIFIC LEGAL AUTHORITY:
1001.41; 1001.42; 1001.43; 1006.07;
1008.25,
Florida Statutes
A complete text of the proposed
amended rules, regulations and pro-
cedures'can be obtained at the Office
of the Superintendent of Schools,
372 W. Duval St., Lake City, FL, be-
tween the hours of 7:30 a.m. and
5:00 p.m. Monday Thursday.
Starting August 15, 2011 between
the hours of 8:00 a.m. and 4:00 p.m.
Monday Friday. Economic impact
statements, where applicable, are on
file in the Office of the Superintend-
ent at the above listed address.
DATED THIS 26th DAY OF July
2011.
SCHOOL BOARD OF COLUMBIA
COUNTY
BY Linard Johnson, Chairman
ATTEST Michael F. Millikin, Super-
intendent
05526919
July 31, 2011


020 Lost & Found


Lost Yorkie Dog
coloring: tan/grey brindle
Please bring Kota home to
his loving family. Call anytime
365-0480 or 365-2671.
Reward $ Offered&

100 Job

Opportunities

05526896
The University of Michigan is
seeking Field Interviewers in the
Columbia County, FL area to
conduct social research
interviews for the National
Survey of Family Growth
(NSFG). As a Field Interview-
er, you will conduct interviews
in-person in the homes of survey
respondents. This is a part time
temporary position with a
project commitment of one-year
requiring 30 flexible hrs/week
primarily during afternoon,
evenings and weekend hours.
Pay rate for the Columbia
County, FL area is $11.75/hr;
higher rates may be possible for
those with in-person data collec-
tion interviewing experience or
bilingual in English and Span-
ish. Selected candidates for
field interviewer positions will
be female as required by the fed-
eral contract for the NSFG.
Male candidates are invited to
apply for work on other projects.
For qualifications, requirements,
job information, and how
to apply, go to our website
TODAY at
https://recruit.isr.umich.edu.
The University of Michigan is
an affirmative action/6qual
opportunity employer.

05526905
CUSTOMER SERVICE
Ideal Candidate with customer
service experience, telephone
skills, excellent computer skills
and be able to perform in a fast
pace environment.
Please fax resume to
386-758-0984 or email to
greatiobst(5LCjobs.info

05526920
ATTN: Wanted: 29 Serious
People to Work From Home
using a Computer. Earn
Up to $1,500-$5,000 PT/FT
954-708-2541
www.Ididitucan2.com

05526993
Need 1 Honda Technician
for growing Service Dept.
Must be experienced in
quick service.
Apply in person:
2018 SW Main Blvd.
Jim Gallagher
Sunbelt Honda
8:30-5pm Mon.-Fri.

05527021
Assistant Dietary Manager
To assist in menu planning, food
prep and supervision.
Must have Serv-Safe certifica-
tion & management experience.
Please apply Baya Pointe
Nursing & Rehabilitation Center
587 SE Ermine Ave.,
Lake City, Fl 32025


o100 Opportunities


05527030
Suwannee Valley 4Cs, area
grantee for nationally
recognized high-quality early
childhood program seeks
applicants interested in a
teaching career in a professional
work environment.
LEAD TEACHER
(3-5 yr olds Lake City)
Associate or Bachelor Degree
in Early Childhood Education or
related field required
$11.01 $14.90 per hour
3 yrs classroom exp w/relevant
age children, Current 1st
Aid/CPR, Bi-lingual
(English/Spanish) preferred
All applicants must pass
physical & DCF
background screenings.
Excellent Benefits, Paid
Holidays, Sick & Annual Leave,
Health/Dental Insurance,
Training/Scholarship
Opportunities and more.
Apply in person at:
236 SW Columbia Ave,
Lake City. 386-754-2222
Or send resume:
E-mail: employment(sv4cs.org
Fax (386) 754-2220 EOE


05527032
Meridian Behavioral
Healthcare Inc.
www.mbhci.org
Please visit our website to view
current open opportunities and
to apply online :
Meridian is an active partner
with the National Health Service
Corps
Therapists:
Program Manager (Licensed)
Licensed, or Master's Level
in Outpatient
Bachelor's-Level in
Counselor Support
Case Management
(adult & child)
Master's Therapist in
Methadone Clinic
Administration:.
* Medical Records
* Client Relations Specialist
Medical Services
* RN Nursing Manager DETOX
(Gville)
* PRN RN, LPN, C.N.A.

* Recovery Specialist
(Direct Care)
Facilities:
* Maintenance
To see our current openings in
Mental Health and to apply
online, please go to:
www.mbhci.org
EOE, DFWP, E-Verify






FLORIDA
** .**
ADJUNCT INSTRUCTORS
FALL 2011
NURSING CLINICAL
BSN Required, Master's degree in nursing
preferred. At least two years of recent clinical
experience required,. Contact Mattie Jones at
386-754-4368 or mattie.ionesifaoc.edl.
HEALTH CAREER CORE
Bachelor's degree in a health related field
required. Contact Mattle Jones at 386-754-4368
or mattle.tonesi50fqc.edu,
BODY STRUCTURE AND FUNCTION
Bachelor's degree in a health related field or
Biological Science. Master's degree preferred.
Contact Mattie Jones at 386-754-4368 or
matte.ionesgifQc edu.a
PHARMACOLOGY
MSN required. Doctorate In Nursing preferred.
Contact Mattie Jones at 386-754-4368 or
mnattie .ionesfQc.edu
NUTRITION
MSN required. Doctorate In Nursing preferred.
Contact Mattie Jones at 386-754-4368 or
matte.ionesSofac.edu
COMMERCIAL DRIVERS LICENSE (CDL)
PROGRAM
CDL instructors needed for growing COL
program at Florida Gateway College. Qualified
individuals must hold a COL and have at least
four years of driving experience with a clean
driving record. Prefer individuals with teaching
experience in a truck driving school setting. Email
resumes to Stephanie Glenn at
stepharie.n oennl'fgcedu or call the Banner
Center for Global Logistics at 386-754-4492 for
more information.
LOGISTICS AND SUPPLY CHAIN
MANAGEMENT
The Banner Center for Global Logistics is
seeking fall adjunct instructors for the Logistics
and Supply Chain Management online courses. A
Master's degree with at least 18 credits in
Operations Management, Logistics, Supply Chain
or related held is required. Email resumes
to Stephanie Glenn at aleh.i. ginniaLgifpc du
or call the Banner Center for Global Logistics at
386-754-4492 for more information,
(nllrenr aniculmi aii ctna1 neof transcrinii
with a truwlation uaind vdaluaton. Application
availabc at www flr.ci
e<;r.;iuag t41'lSjuh agit>KJ sjn u obc il luj


100 Jb0
100 'Opportunities

Accounting firm seeks full-time
qualified accountant. Ideal
candidate will have experience in
general accounting, tax
accounting, tax return preparation
and use of QuickBooks and
Microsoft Office. Send reply to
Box 05067, C/O The Lake City
Reporter, P.O. Box 1709, Lake
City, FL, 32056
Busy Family practice office. has
front office position available.
Experience preferred.
Fax resume to: 386-719-9494
Giebeig Family Medicine
CDL Class A Truck Driver.
Flatbed exp. for F/T SE area.
3 years exp or more. Medical
benefits offered. Contact
Melissa or Mary @ 386-935-2773
Hiring Locally This Week
Liberty National Life
Insurance Company
Full Training Provided Potential
of $60K+ Annually. 401K, BCBS
Insurance & Pension for those who
qualify. Call 1-800-257-5500 to
set up an interview.
Experienced Breakfast
Grill Cook
Needed
386-867-4242
F/T clerical and nursing
positions available in busy medical
office. Mon Fri. Email to:
dac.lc22 yahoo.com
INSURANCE AGENCY
Looking for a highly motivated
individual. Licensed 4-40 CSR is
desired but not required. Must
have excellent computer & people
skills benefits avail. Send reply to
Box 05071, C/O The Lake City
Reporter, P.O. Box 1709,
Lake City, FL, 32056 or
fax to: 386-752-2102
LEGAL ASSISTANT
Need full time assistant with good
phone skills, organization and
typing experience, must be
computer literate and good at multi
tasking. Send reply to Box 05070,
C/O The Lake City Reporter, P.O.
Box 1709, Lake City, FL, 32056
Physical laborer needed. CDL
license req'd. Must have respect.
for electricity & ability to work in
water & mud. Must be able to pass
drug test. Call 386-752-1854
Receptionist/AR Assistant
Previous experience as a
receptionist/admin asst. w/basic
knowledge of MS Office is
required.
Must be able to answer com-
pany phones, assist visitors, dis-
tribute mail, handle office sup-
plies, input invoices/cash re-
ceipts, monitor lien reqirqments,
filing/administrative support.
Previous experience in
accounting dept. is desirable.
Send reply to Box 05068, C/O
The Lake City Reporter, P.O. Box
1709, Lake City, FL, 32056
Roofing co. looking for Repair
tech. Must have Drivers license
and be Drug free. Exp in all roof
types. Call 1-877-957-7663.
Sales Position available for moti-
vated individual Rountree -Moore
Toyota, Great benefits, paid train-
ing/vacation. Exp. a plus but not
necessary. Call Anthony Cosentino
386-623-7442
05527017
Commercial Processor
Seeking experienced individual
to order bids for appraisals and
issue Appraisal Engagement .
letters; title searches, reviewing
appraisals, title commitments,
HUD, etc.
Apply at:
Columbia Bank Website:
www.columbiabankflorida.com
Resume's should be sent to
jobs@columbiabankflorida.com
EOE/M/F/D/V

05527016
Commercial bank
credit analyst
Seeking experienced credit
analyst, strong analytical and
communication skills using
loan analysis software.
Business degree, and specialized
ABA/RMA credit training
preferred.
Apply at:
Columbia Bank Website:
www.columbiabankflorida.com
Resume's should be sent to
iobs( )columbiabankflorida.com
EOE/M/F/D/V

VPK Teacher & Pre K3 teacher
needed. Experience reqd. CDA/AS
Degree preferred. Apply in person
at Wee Care in Columbia City

1 ^AMedical
120 Employment

Busy outpatient surgery center has
immediate opening for a LPN.
PRN position. Please
mail resume to
administration@lcsurgerycenter.com
or fax to 386-487-3935.
Lisc. Respiratory Therapist and
Lisc. RPSGT needed PDM
for medical office in LC.
Fax resume (386) 754-1712


bI-


120 Medical
120 Employment

F/T RN for nurse mgr position
needed for busy medical practice
in Lake City. Recovery room or
critical care exp. a plus. M-F.
Email resumes to:
dac.lc22(lyahoo.com
Full Time Physicians Assistant or
ARNP needed for very busy,
paperless Family Practice. Must be
highly motivated, multi-tasking
and patient centric. Intergy IEHR
experience a plus. Please fax
resume to: 386-961-9541
Faculty Position: Registered
Nurse (BSN) wanted at Noith
Florida Community College.
See www.nfcc.edu for details.

240 Schools &
240 Education

05526648
Interested in a Medical Career?
Express Training offers
courses for beginners & exp
Nursing Assistant, $479
next class-07/25/10

Phlebotomy national certifica-
tion, $800 next class-08/08/11

Continuing education
Fees incl. books, supplies, exam
fees. Call 386-755-4401 or
expresstrainingservices.comt



310 Pets & Supplies

BORDER COLLIE Pure
Unregistered 9wks old
All Shots. $250
904-716-2700
PUBLISHER'S NOTE '
Florida Law 828.29 requires dqgs
and cats being sold to be at least 8
weeks old and have a health'
certificate from a licensed '
veterinarian documenting they-
have mandatory shots and are
free from intestinal and external
parasites. Many species of will-
life must be licensed by Florida
Fish and Wildlife. If you are,
unsure, contact the local
office for information.


361 Farm Equipment

84|Ford 4610 Tractor.
2WD, Solid
2005 motor,$7,500. OBO
386-867-0005
John Deere Tractor 30-38E. Only
72 hrs. used 4 wheel Dr. Equipped
/305 loader. 5 ft finishing & 5
box blade. $15,500. 386-365-07q4


402 Appliances

2006 WHIRLPOOL'
Calypso Washer & Dryer.
$375 for both.
386-867-2155
FRIGIDAIRE 18CU fridge
$275. 7 months old, white, lil4
new. (863)840-4262
Please leave message.


407 Computers

HP Computer,
$80.00
386-755-9984 or
386-292-2170


420 Wanted to Buy

Wanted Junk Cars, Trucks, Vans.
$250 & up CASH! Free Pick Up!
NO title needed !386-878-9260
After 5pm 386- 752-3648.


430 Garage Sales

PUBLISHER'S NOTE
All Yard Sale Ads
Must be Pre-Paid.



440 Miscellaneous

2-NEW, Still in box
5500 watt portable generators.
$1000. will negotiate.
Call for info. 386-365-0704
Bowflex Extreme
with extras
$350.00
386-758-6782
GOLDS GYM
Exercise Unit.
$250. obo
386-758-6782
Stop gnat & Mosquito bites! Buy
Swamp Gator All natural insect re-
pellent. Family safe. Use head to
toe. Available at The Home Depot.
Summer Barbecue Special
Tow Behind
Grill/Smoker, $1,250 OBO.
386-719-4802

450 Good Things
to Eat
GREEN PEANUTS For Sale
Valencia. Graded and washed.
$30.00 a bushel.
386-752-3434


520 Boats for Sale

Starcraft Aluminum Jon Boat.
13'9" 6hp. Evinrude. 2 hummin-
bird fish finders. 1 trolling motor,
trailer. $500 Firm. 386-269-3056


To place your
classified ad call
755-5440










LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED SUNDAY, JULY 31, 2011


630 Mobile Homes
3 for Rent
14 Wide, 2/2-$475. mo. + dep.
Clean, Quiet Country Park
Water, septic, garbage incl. NO
PETS! 386-758-2280 References,
2&3 BR MH. $395 $650. mo.
plus deposit. Water & sewer fur-
nished. Cannon Creek MHP
386-752-6422
S 2/1 Mobile Homes in a park.
$400.00 and $450.00 per month
plus security deposit.
Call 386-965-5530
1/2 Units, clean, well maintained,
nice safe park setting, 2 miles to
downtown Lake City, $575 month
+ $575 sec dep, 386-984-8448
13th Month FREE!!
2BR/1BA, Extra clean, on private
landscaped ac. Carport, deck,
patio, W&D, adult area, small pet
ok, $500 mo. 1st + $200 dep.,NO
UTILITY DEP. 386-752-7027.
Available August 5th.
2BR/2BA on 2 acres, 10 mins
from Lake City. Safe & Quiet
area! Washer/Dryer included.
$600/mth Amanda 386-365-6493.
3b/2ba private & fenced lot.
Carport 3 miles west Lake City.
$700 month. $300 security.
386-758-3657
TEG clean 3br's $450. -$650. mo. +
dep. Also, 2br mobile home's
S available. No Pets.
5 Points area. 386-961-1482
S Mobile Homes for rent in
White Springs, Lake City & Ft.
SWhite. Contact 386-623-3404
S. or 386-365-4919
X-Clean 2/2 SW, 8 mi NW of VA.
Clean acre lot, nice area. $500. mo
+ dep No dogs Non-smoking
environment.386-961-9181

i A4 Mobile Homes
L,,4 for Sale
Handy man special, 94 Fleetwood
DWMH. 3/2 on 5 acres in Ft.
White. Owner Fin. $3,000 dn.
'"$850mo. $99,900 352-215-1018
www.LandOwnerFinancing.com
Palm Harbor Homes
"DIVORCE"
SAVE On This Short Sale
800-622-2832 ext. 210

6503 Mobile Home
50U & Land
67.5 ac.Ranch, fenced & cross
fenced. Spacious moblie home
w/large front deck & RV hookup
MLS 75607 $299,000. Access
Realty. Patti Taylor. 386-623-6896

705 Rooms for Rent
New furnished bedroom apt in a
home, private entrance & bath, in-
"cludes utilities, trash, cable, frig &
pest control. $450 mo + dep. Avail
8/1. 386-752-2020 SW Lake City
10n7 Unfurnished Apt.
1 For Rent*- -

S05526481
SPRING HILL VILLAGE
Excellent High Springs location.
1, 2 & 3 bedroom floor-plans;
some with garages.
Call 386-454-1469
or visit our website:
www.springhillvillage.net







1BR APT.
- Downtown'Location, Clean.
$450 mo, plus Security.
NO PETS. Call 386-755-3456
2 bedroom Apartment
$600. mo
plus security deposit.
386-344-3715
n, 2/1 w/garage & washer/dryer
hookups. East side of town,
Call for details
386-755-6867
2BR/1.5BA w/garage
5 minutes from VA hospital.
Call'for details.
386-755-4590 or 365-5150
2BR/1BA. Close to town.
$565.mo plus deposit.
Includes water & sewer.
386-965-2922
A Landlord You Can Love!
2 br Apts $575. & up + sec. Great
area. CH/A washer/dryer hookups.
"' 386-758-9351/352-208-2421
Amber Wood Hills Apts.
Private Patio area. Beautiful yard.
Washer/dryer hkup. Free water &
sewer. 1/1, 2/1. Move in special.
386-754-1800. wwwmyflapts.com
Beautiful Apt, Large I bdrm,
w/inmground pool, CHA, details at
bigfloridahome.com
$650/mo + dep 386-344 3261
Columbia Arms Apt. located 1/2
mi from V.A. & Winn Dixie. Pet
.Friendly. Move in Special $199.
Pool, laundry & balcony.
.386-754-1800. www.mvflapts.com
SFurnished or unfurnished 1 or 2
bedroom townhomes on the golf
course. $625-$750. mo. + security.
Includes water. 386-752-9626
Greentree Townhouse
Summer special. 2/1,2/1.5. Free
water & sewer. Balcony & patio.


Laundry. Behind Kens on Hwy 90.
"'386-754-1800 wwwmyflapts.com
Large & clean. lbr/lba apt.
CH/A lg walk in closet. Close to
town. $395. mo and $350. dep.
(904)563-6208

ONE 51 PLACE APTS
Alachua
MOVE IN SPECIALS
1, 2, & 3 bedrooms
Call TODAY 386-462-0656
or visit as at one51place.com

Redwine Apartments. Move in
special $199. Limited time. Pets
welcome. with 5 complexes,
we have a home for you.
386-754-1800. www.myflapts.com


710 Unfurnished Apt. 730 Unfurnished
1 For Rent Home For Rent


Summer Special! 12th mo Free
w/signed yr lease. Updated, w/tile
floors/fresh paint. Great area.
From $450.+sec. 386-752-9626
The Lakes Apts. Studios & IBr's
from $135/wk. Util. & cable incl.,
Sec 8 vouchers accepted, monthly
rates avail Call 386-752-2741
Unfurnished Apt Eastside
Village Realty, Inc .2 bedroom
1 bath Duplex must be 55+ yrs of
age Call Denise Bose @
386-752-5290
Wayne Manor Apts.
Move in $199. Summer special.
2/1, washer/dryer. Behind Kens off
Hwy 90. 386-754-1800
www.myflapts.com
Windsor Arms Apartments.
Summer special $199. Move in!
2/1, 2/1.5, 2/2. Pet Friendy. Free
200 ch. Dish. Washeye/dryer hkup.
386-754-1800. www.myflapts.com

720 Furnished Apts.
7 0 For Rent
Rooms for Rent. Hillcrest, Sands,
Columbia. All furnished. Electric,
cable, fridge, microwave. Weekly
or monthly rates. 1 person $135,
2 persons $150. weekly
386-752-5808

'730 Unfurnished
730v Home For Rent

05526997
Only 3 homes available If you
need a residential property
manager, we need your
inventory! We offer both full
and limited property
management services.
Lake City
v 385 SE Tribble St. 3BR
1.5 BA home with large family
room, double carport and
single carport. A lot of home
for the money at $750./mo
v 527 Alamo Dr.- Very nice
remodeled 3 BR 2BA spacious
home near downtown. Too
many features to list, so call
today for your showing.
Great deal at $975./mo
Ft. White
v 451 SW Riverside Ave.-
Walk out your front door to
float or swim! 3BR 2BA with
1900 sf. Remodeled interior
features family room with
fireplace, new kitchen, large
master and much more! Even
a place to park your RV.
Entertain under the oversized
pole barn. Fun in the sun for
only $1,000./mo

Century 21 The Darby
Rogers Co.
BJ Federico 386-365-5884
Kayla Carbono 386623-9650


LAKE CITY
2BR/1.5BA, 975SF $725. mo
4BR/3BA, 2139SF $1500. mo
4BR/2BA, 1248SF $695. mo
2 AVAILABLE
3BR/2BA 1258SF $925. mo
3BR/2BA 1582SF $900. mo
3BR/2BA 1246SF $700. mo
2BR/1BA 700SF $495. mo
2 AVAILABLE

3BR/1.5BA 1040SF $825

FT WHITE

3BR/2BA 1512SF $850. mo
LAKE BUTLER

4BR/2BA 1560SF $750 mo

MADISON

2BR/1BA JUST REMODELED
$450. mo. 2 AVAILABLE

Mike Foster 386-288-3596
Mitchell Lee 386-867-1155
1688 SE Baya Dr., Suite 105
Lake City, FL 32025
www.NorthFloridahomeandland.com
Accredited Real Estate is a Full
Service Real Estate Office.
We do: Rentals
Property Management
<< Property Sales. mr


3 br/lba. $550. mo.
on Nassau Street
386-697-9950

Completely remodeled Brick.
3br/2ba 1750 sqft. Lg lot. Includes
washer, dryer, stove, & fridge.
$985. mo $985 dep. 386-752-7578
House for rent in town.
Please call for more
information
386-758-0057
Quiet & private country home.
2br/lba. New energy efficient
appliances. New Central A/C.
$695. mo. 386-752-1444
Unfurnished 2 bedroom/1 bath
house. $700.00 per month.
First, last and security Firm.
386-590-5333

750 Business &
50 Office Rentals
Commercial property. 2100 sqft
bldg. on 1 acre.'CH/A. Close to
college and Timco. Call for more
information. 386-867-1190
FOR LEASE: Downtown office
space. Convenient to
Court house.
Call 386-755-3456
For Lease: E Baya Ave. Two -
1000 sqft office space units or
combined for 2000 sqft. 386-984-
0622 or weekends 386-497-4762
OFFICE SPACE for lease.
Oak Hill Plaza. 900 sqft
$675mo/$695. sec dep.
Tom 386-961-1086 DCA Realtor


790 Vication Rentals
Horseshoe Beach RV Lot.
Nice comer Lot with shade trees.
$295. mo Water/electric included
386-235-3633 or 352-498-5986
Scalloping Horseshoe Beach Spcl
Gulf Front 2br, w/lg porch, dock,
fish sink. wkend $395./wk $895.
386-235-3633/352-498-5986
alwaysonvacation.com #419-f81
"Florida's Last Frontier"


805 Lots for Sale
Lots for Sale Eastside
Village Realty, Inc. buildable
vacant lot hight & dry in a estab-
lished neighbor priced @ $40,000.
Call Denise Bose @ 752-5290
North Fla Land. 1/2 80 Ac w/Fin.
Counties Columbia, Suwannee,
Gilchrist, Baker, Glades, Polk.
Call for brochure and terms. 7'
Days 7 to 7. 386-752-5035 X 3111
.A Bar Sales, Inc.
PUBLISHER'S NOTE
All real estate advertising in this
newspaper is subject to the fair
housing act which makes it illegal
to advertise "any preference,
limitation, or discrimination based
on race, color, religion, sex,
disability, familial status or nation-
al origin; or any intention to make
such preference, limitation or
discrimination." Familial status
includes children under the age of
18 living with parents or legal
custodians, pregnant women and
people securing custody of chil-
dren under the age of 18. This
newspaper will not knowingly
accept any advertising for real es-
tate which is in violation of the
law. Our readers are hereby in-
formed that all dwellings adver-
tised in this newspaper are availa-
ble on an equal opportunity basis.
To complain of discrimination call
HUD toll free at 1-800-669-9777,
the toll free
telephone number to the hearing
impaired is 1-800-927-9275.

810 Home for Sale
2/1 completely updated, screened
back porch, large utility room,
MLS#77413 $52,900 Call Nancy
Rogers R.E.O. Realty
386-867-1271
3/2 1056 sqft Brick home in town.
Fenced back yard w/12x12 work-
shop Just Reduced! $79,900
MLS# 77414 Call 386-243-8227
R.E.O.Realty Group, Inc
3/2 2003 DWMH on 5 acre rectan-
gular lot w/tons of potential.
MLS#77568 $79,900 Call Nancy
@ R.E.O. Realty 386-867-1271
nancytrogers@msn.com
3/2 home on .67 ac. Creekside S/D
Fenced back yard, lots of trees.
Split floor plan on cul-de-sac
MLS 77385 Access Realty.
Patti Taylor $169,900 623-6896


IFop ITTgIloTR


Private Estate
Within the city limits. Beautiful old-
er home with mature landscaping
and lake views, 6 Br., 3.5 baths,
3 fireplaces, private paved drive.
39.7 acres of property included
with home. $994,000 or $3,000
mo. for rent or home plus 2 acres
only $495,000. Call for additional
information and showings.


Listing Agent Mary Brown Whitehurst

(386) 965-0887

I.MLS or co-owner (386)397-5131





ON WHEELS & WATERCRAFTr -


Professional Office Space For Lease
11,728 S.F.
Excellent location just east of 1-75
Abundant free parking
Immediate occupancy PROCACCI
DEVELOPMENT CORPORATION

ClDb rb- s 6-416-1422
^^^^^^dkremlasproaccms^^^


2000 Hummer
Army green, leather
interior, pristine cond.
31,148 miles.

$52,000
Call
Pictures available.


810 Home for Sale
4/2 on 10.5 acres w/ detached
garage, patio, above ground pool,
MLS# 77410 $189,888
R.E.O. Realty Group, Inc
386-243-8227
4/2 with 1000 sq ft workshop,
fenced yard, 2 car garage, Fairly
new roof & HVAC MLS#77602,
Bring Offers! $164,900,
R.E.O. Realty Group 243-8227
4br brick on .51 ac. corner lot. For-
mal dining and a large open floor
plan. Brick patio. $139,888
MLS 76763 Brittany Stoeckert
Results Realty 386-397-3473
Access Realty Stylish 3/2 + pool
house w/1/2 bath on 2.25 acres.
Rear deck, 2 car garage & carport'.
MLS 78103 $189,900.
Patti Taylor.623-6896
BEAUTIFUL Lake Front home!
1 ac lot within the city limits.
Close to town. 1800 heated sq. ft.
$144,900 MLS# 78385
Call Jay Sears. 386-867-1613
Brick 3/1 family home, 4.43 acres.
w/metal roof. MLS# 77415
Short sale acceptance w/lenders
approval. $89,000. 386-243-8227
R.E.O. Realty Group, Inc
CLEAN & READY! 3BR/2BA
mfg home on .97-acre south of Ft.
White on paved road $59,000
DANIEL CRAPPS AGENCY,
INC. 755-5110 #78007
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
3/2 brick home in Woodcrest. Lg
lot completely fenced. Easy access
to amenities. Elaine K. Tolar 386-
755-6488 MLS# 78148 $129,900
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
3/3 in beautiful area. 2414sqft.
Private yard & patio with storage
bldg. Lori G Simpson 386-365-
5678 MLS# 78175 $159,900'
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
New home in Mayfair. 4 bedroom
on comer lot. Covered Porch.
Elaine K. Tolar 386-755-6488
MLS# 76919 $209,900
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
Remodeled 2/2 (could be 3/2).
Split floor plan. Home Owner
Warranty. Mary Brown Whitehurst
965-0887 MLS# 77943 $99,000
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
MH in Eastside Village a 55+
retirement community. Well main-
tained. Bruce Dicks 386-365-3784
MLS# 78350 $59,900
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
Brick home on Suwannee River
$329,900 Elaine K. Tolar 386-755-
6488 or Lori G. Simpson 365-5678
MLS# 70790 $329,900
DESIRABLE GWEN LAKE area!
Nice 3BR/2BA home on comer lot
REDUCED TO $95,000 DANIEL
CRAPPS AGENCY, INC.
755-5110 #77307
Hallmark Real Estate. 3/2
Doublewide on 1 acre. $58,000.
Not far to college & airport.
MLS# 78'308
Ginger, Parker 386-365-2135
Hallmark-Real Estate. 35 High &
Dry acres, open pasture w/scat-
tered trees. Older site built home.
Needs some TLC.
MLS#76186 Jay Sears 719-0382
Hallmark Real Estate. Beautiful
lot in Woodborough, has well
maintained 3/2 brick home.
Affordable price!MLS#75413
Sherry Willis 386-365-8095
Hallmark Real Estate. Lakefront
in town on 1 ac. Majestic oaks &
Magnolias. Hardwood floors,
fireplace & basement.
MLS#78385 Jay Sears 719-0382
Hallmark Real Estate. Pool &
Patio. 3br/2ba. brick home on
1.69 ac. Workshop &
SWMH on property. MLS#78117
Tanya Shaffer 386-397-4766
Hallmark Real Estate. Time to go
to the River. Stilt home w/covered
decking. Floating dock,out bldgs
& covered RV parking. $188K.
MLS#72068 Janet Creel 719-0382
HANDYMAN SPECIAL!
4BR/2BA mfg home in great loca-
tion close to many amenities
$39,500 DANIEL CRAPPS
AGENCY, INC. 755-5110 #77852
Home for Sale Eastside Village
Realty, Inc. 2 bedroom, 2-bath site
built home with screen porch,
large carport priced just right Call
Denise Bose @ 752-5290


810 Home for Sale
Home on 15 ac. w/over 2,500 sqft
home.Very Ig bedrooms w/private
baths. 24x24 workshop $235,000
MLS 77552 Brittany Stoeckert
Results Realty 386-397-3473
Lg. 4/3 family home. 16x20
screened porch, workshop. 4.5 ac.
fenced/cross fenced MLS 74339
$229,900. N Fla Homeland Real-
ty Darlene Hart 386-288-2878
Mayfair S/D, nice fenced in back
yard w/small lake behind property.
Very nice. $99,888
MLS 77092 Brittany Stoeckert
Results Realty 386-397-3473
Neat as a pin! Split floor plan
w/well manicured lawn. 10x12
storage shed. $129K MLS 77932
Darlene Hart 386-288-2878
N Fla Homeland Realty
Owner Financing Avail. with
down prrt. 3br/2ba 2 story brick.
4.6 ac. in ground pool. Lg. work-
shop &2 wells. $150,000.00 obo
Old Wire Rd. (850)728-0782
QUALITY HOME. Very private,
yet in the city. Comes with mobile
home park that generates revenue.
$695,000. MLS# 77920
Call Jay Sears. 386-867-1613
REDUCED! Custom 2,061 SqFt
home with open floor plan,
3BR/2.5BA, in-ground pool
DANIEL CRAPPS AGENCY,
INC. 755-5110 #75442
RUSSWOOD EST! 3BR/2BA
w/2,337 SqFt, open floor plan,
climatized sun porch $219,900
DANIEL CRAPPS AGENCY,
INC. 755-5110 #77633
Southern Oaks Country Club.
3br/2.5ba Aprox 3000 sqft. Split
floor plan. on the 9th Fairway.
New AC, 2.5 car garage. sprinkler,
concrete drive. Avail, furnished or
unfurnished. Move in ready wall
appliances. Avail. now Built in
1992. Open to serious offers.
(305)872-7911 View at
www.lakecitygolfvilla.com
Spacious 4/2 home. on 1 ac. Split
floor plan. Great neighborhood.
Easy access to 1-75 $220K MLS
77859 N Fla Homeland Realty
Darlene Hart 386-288-2878
WELLBORN! 4BR/2BA mfg
home w/2,280 SqFt, FP, & 5
ACRES only $74,900
DANIEL CRAPPS AGENCY,
INC. 755-5110 #78317

82O Farms &
82 Acreage
10 ac. ,Ft. White $39,995,
$995 Down, $273.16 mo.
Seller fin. vargasrealty.com
352-472-3154
10-ac lot. Well/septic/pp. Owner
financing $300 dn, $663 mo 8.9%,
25 yrs. Deas Bullard Properties
386-752-4339 www.landnfl.com
2+ ACRES ON HWY 47
by 1-75 interchange: More than
200 ft of frontage $149,900
Call 386-243-8227
R.E.O. Realty Group,-Inc
20.02 acres ready for your site
built home. Has 2 wells & 2 power
poles w/a 24x30 slab $132,000
MLS# 78126 Call 386-243-8227
R.E.O.Realty Group, Inc
4 1/2 acre lot. Lake Jeffery Road.
Gorgeous Oaks!Paved Rd
Owner Financing! NO DOWN!
$59,900. $525mo 352-215-1018.
www.LandOwnerFinancing.com
4 acres, Wellborn, New Well
installed, Beautifully wooded
w/cleared Home Site, owner fin,
no down, $39,900, $410 mon
Call 352-215-1018
www.LandOwnerFinancing.com
FARM- 7 stall barn..
17+ acres, pasture, cross fenced.
Close in $500. mo.
386-961-1086
Paved hard road in front of 5 ac.
tract. Comes with: power pole,
well & septic. Cleared in back.
Also, 20X25 carport. $39,900
MLS# 76347. Jay 386-867-1613

O83 Commercial
OJ0 Property
Prime Commercial Location.
Just across from plaza. Frontage
on Baya w/2 curbcuts. $350,000
MLS# 77485 Call 386-243-8227-
R.E.O.Realty Group, Inc


-t --0








Bring the picture in or
we will take it for you!
* Ad runs 10 consecutive days
with a description and photo in the
newspaper and online E-edition.
* Ad runs 10 consecutive days as a
classified line ad online.
* You must include vehicle price.
* All ads are prepaid.
* Private party only.


2006 EF250
Ford Van
3/4 ton, metal work
shelves/ladder rack,
60K miles, exc. cond.
$10,500
Call
386-555-5555
If you don't sell your vehicle
during the first 1 p days, you
can run the same vehicle ad
for 10 additional days for
only $15.00
T"rms and conditions remain the
same for the additional run.


To GetYour*l


VeiceSod


Classified Department: 755-5440


and ake sn W
d sc caCs$h

ADVERTISE YOUR

GARAGE SALE
WITH THE
LAKE CITY REPORTER
Only

$1750

4 LINES 3 DAYS
2 FREE SIGNS!

(386) 755-5440


.-.-w-m I


850 Waterfront.
850 Property

Suwannee Completely remodeled.
Town of Suwannee. On a deep
fresh water canal w/new seawall.
Owner finance. Must see! $15k dn,
$1,500./mo. 352-949-0447

870 Real Estate
SWanted

I Buy Houses
CASH!
Quick Sale Fair Price
386-269-0605


950 Cars for Sale

My Mothers Car. One owner.
2005 Nissan Altima. 4 cyl. 4 dr.
Black. Auto, AC, 41k mi $10,000
FIRM. 386-623-2819 or 755-6187

952 Vans & Sport
S Util. Vehicles
2000 HUMMER Army Green,
Leather Interior, Pristine cond.
31,148 miles. $52,000. Call
386-487-1409 Pictures available.

96 Chrysler Town & Country LXi.
2nd owner. Clean inside/out, cold
AC, new tires, loaded. $3200. obo
110k mi 386-963-2271 249-2723







LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED SUNDAY, JULY 31, 2011


ma Epa e.:: 7.1.



_eii .




I sm
... . ... .. ...


JUST ARRIVED! i
New 6 Pc.
Bedroom Suites

$699
Timceiess memomres
4 Drawer Chest $69.95 FMlwrmus Atrroqus CoLAuTMXsea
386-466-1888
1034 SW MAIN BLVD., LAKE CITY, FL 32055
Rountree Moore Toyota Bucks Rountree Moore Toyota Bucks
Qt)TOYOTA Zpi1MI 11 1P11
Please present Rountree zV 1 e rr
Moore Toyota Bucks at Get $10 off your next
time of purchase No cash conventional Oil, Lube
ialue No reproductions iteCn.
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Not valid with any other Tires. Or or any other
coupon One coupon per service over $50.00.
customer Fees t ax. serviceover$5000
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Expires July 31, 011


Locally Owned & Operated
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1149 E. BayawAv-e
386-752-1449


.. www.aspeonlakecity.com
Attention
Senior Citizens
Every Tuesday
is yourday at
KC's Produce.
eooff
entire produce purchase


I have a toothache,

and need to see

a dentist right away!

Give us a call.

We will see you today or tomorrow.


,-. We are now a Cigna
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V I Savings Provider

We are now a
MetLife PPO Provider


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Dr. Rameek McNair


A ASP EC IA W C INGIFTIIIIYO


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Diagnosis (if needed)


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TO THE ADVERTISEMENT FOR THE FREE DISCOUNTED FEE, XyAMINATION OR TREATMENT.


ASPEN

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Lllllli 13 ii I I IL Il II I -I: L _


Classified Department: 755-5440


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I











Story ideas?


Contact
Robert Bridges
Editor
754-0428
rbridges@lakecityreporter.com


Lake City Reporter





LIFE


Sunday, July 31, 201 I


www.lakecityreporter.com


Section D


GARDEN TALK


Nichelle Demorest


How

is an

antique

like a

rose?

A strong similarity
exists between fine col-
lectible antiques and heir-
loom roses. These once
treasured beauties were
discarded and replaced
with contemporary 'new
and improved' items. But
as the saying goes, 'What
goes around, comes around.'
Antiques are'again enjoyed
for the enduring qualities
that were once all but forgot-
ten.
How is an antique like
a rose? An heirloom or
antique rose, according to
the American Rose Society,
was introduced before 1867,
when modern Hybrid Tea
Roses were first introduced.
Many avid rose gardeners
also consider a rose to be
'old' if it has survived 75
years or more.
At one time in the past,
good old rose bushes were
grown as flowering shrubs
in landscapes and borders.
They were leafy and full,
had interesting forms, and
the blossoms had the heady
rose scent that we recognize
from a perfume bottle. The
blossom colors were of soft
pastels that fit harmoniously
into southern gardens. There
were still some pest problems,
but noone needed special
sprays or pruning techniques
to keep roses alive and thriv-
ing.
And then came hybridizing
for longer stems, larger blos-
soms, brighter colors, pretty
bud shapes, and a longer vase
life. Growing roses became a
passion for many gardeners,
antd still is. The pleasure is in
the flower, the blossom, the
Rose. Unfortunately, these
hybridized rose bushes are
much more difficult to grow,
especially in our sandy soils
and humid climate.
Generally, antique roses
need far less care than
newer hybrids. Florida
humidity contributes to the
problematic fungal disease
called blackspot 'Old' roses
are either listed as resistant
to blackspot, or they will
rapidly renew foliage lost
to infection. Pruning can
be limited to dead cane and
twiggy growth removal.
And once established,
these roses are much more
drought tolerant than the
hybrids.
Mainstream these beau-
ties iqto your landscapes
and let good old roses be
'flowering bushes' again.
What goes around, comes
around. Enjoy antique
roses for the enduring
qualities that were once all
but forgotten.
For information on grow-
ing roses in Florida, go to
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/
ep339. Call the UF Master
Gardeners at 752-5384
or come to the Ft. White
Library on Wednesdays
from 1:00-4:00.
* D. Nichelle Demorest is
a horticulture agent with the
Columbia County Extension
of the University of Florida
Institute of Food and
Agricultural Sciences.


FORCE OF NATURE


Middle school teacher will use magnetism

to demonstrate the wonders of science

By LEANNE TYO ,. ..'
Ityo@lakecityreporter.com
acqueline Norris,
a seventh-grade ."
science teacher at ,
Lake City Middle '
School, used mag-
netic fdrce this summer
to jump-start her way into
a new school year lit-
Norris returned July
22 from a six-week pro-.,
gram at the National
High Magnetic Field
Laboratory at Florida
State University in
Tallahassee, where she F,!
spent her summer vaca- ., .
tion working alongside '.
a mentor scientist as
they studied niobium, a
rare metal used to make
superconducting mag-
nets.
And Norris didn't *
leave all her work at the
Magnetic Lab. 4
She returned with
various:lessons and
labs that she is looking
forward to incorporat-
ing into her classroom
for the upcoming school
year.
"My experiences there
in the Lab, I'll be able
to bring back into my .
classroom and hopefully .
my students will get all
excited about science," l .
Norris said.
Norris was one of
15 teachers out of
more than 60 appli-
cants accepted into the
Research Experiences
for Teachers program
at the Magnetic Lab,
which.offers a range of
research experiences T L 'k
in physics, chemistry, TOP: Lake City Middle
biological sciences, geo- seventh-grade science
chemistry, materials sci- Jacqueline Norris uses
ence and magnet science to lift iron filings from t
and engineering, accord- of her hand. LEFT: Nc
ing to a Laboratory news on, ,f 15 teachers ac
release. the Research Experiel
Teachers are matched Teachers program at t
with mentor scientists ,' High Magnetic Field L
and given the opportu- at Florida State Univel
nity to explore materi-.Fi Tallahasse BELOW:
als and phenomena at
extreme magnetic fields, shows the effects of a
pressures and tempera- a common compass.
tures by working closely "-- I
with their mentors on ..RON MATLTHEW WALKER


LAB continued on 2D


r
,s
/' ^,


I -- -


e~a~lYo~i~. ~I










LAECT EOTR LIE SNAJL3,201Pg dtr oer rde,7402


A new


way to


EXCEL


at FGC

By Carrie Rodesiler
I remember my first
semester of commu-
nity college fairly well.
Having just graduated
from high school, my
mother drove me to
campus



the firstll
out an
applica-
tion and
take the
enrolling in college
entrance
Rodesiler exam,
the first
steps, she explained, to
enrolling in college..I
was a bit nervous get-
ting out of the car, but
stepping foot on that
campus represented
new and exciting things:
a personal sense of
freedom in deciding my
career path, and a new-
found responsibility for
my educational choices.
I didn't understand it at
the time, but my perfor-
mance on the entrance
exam determined my
placement in classes and
impacted my entire col-
lege experience.
After taking the test
and waiting in line to see
an advisor, I left campus
with my schedule in
hand. I was pleased that
I placed into Freshman
Composition because
English was my favorite
subject in high school,
but my mathematics
score placed me into
MATH 107: Introductory
Algebra; in other words,
I had placed into reme-
dial math. I remember
feeling discouraged -.
anca disappointed when
I coffpareddcniedules '
with my friends.
When classes began,
I felt a bit lost in the
hallways and just gen-
erally lost in college.
Things worked so dif-
ferently: studying for
college courses was
more demanding than
high school, I rarely got
individualized attention
from my instructors,
and I had a hard time
feeling "at home" or
comfortable on campus
and longed for a familiar
face. I wasn't required to
see an adviser to regis-
ter for classes after my
initial visit, so I didn't
It wasn't until I took my
first college-level math
course that I discov-
ered the math lab and
other tutors on campus.
Although I think back
fondly on my memories
of college now, I remem-
ber my first couple of
semesters, an important
transitional time, as
being particularly chal-
lenging.
Nearly 15 years later,
I'm now the Director
of Developmental'
Education at Florida
Gateway College, serv-
ing students who need a
refresher in basic skills
before entering college-
level coursework, as I
did. My experience in
college, and specifically
remedial math (now
commonly referred to
as developmental edu-
cation), was not at all
unusual; in fact, I think it
was the norm. However,
I can't help but think we
can do better.
And we are. In


October 2009, Florida
Gateway College
received a grant from
the U.S. Department
of Education worth 1.9
million dollars called
Title III: Strengthening
Institutions. Recognizing
the crucial role that it
plays in students' lives,
FGC made developmen-
tal education the focus of


FGC continued on 4D


Is rural U.S.


Population share
is lowest ever,
Census shows.

By HOPE YEN
Associated Press

WASHINGTON Rural
America now accounts for
just 16 percent of the nation's
population, the lowest ever.
The latest 2010 census
numbers hint at an emerg-
ing America where, by
midcentury, city boundar-
ies become indistinct and
rural areas grow ever less
relevant Many communi-
ties could shrink to virtual
ghost towns as they shutter
businesses and close down
schools, demographers 'say.
More metro areas are
booming into sprawling
megalopolises. Barring fresh
investment that could bring
jobs, however, large swaths
of the Great Plains and
Appalachia, along with parts
of Arkansas, Mississippi and
North Texas, could face sig-
nificant population declines.
These places posted some
of the biggest losses over
the past decade as young
adults left and the people
who stayed got older, mov-
ing past childbearing years.
For instance in' West
Virginia, now with a medi-
an age of 41.3, the share of
Americans 65 and older is
now nearly double that of
young adults 18-24 -- 16 per-
cent compared to 9 percent,
according to census figures
released Thursday. In 1970,
the shares of the two groups
were roughly equal at 12 per-
cent
"This place ain't dead yet,
but it's got about half a foot in
the grave," said Bob Frees,
61, of Moundsville, W.Va.,
which now has a population
of just over 9,000. "'The big-
money jobs are all gone. We
used to--have the big mills
['and the rolling plants and.
stuff Ueat, and you could
walk out of high school when
you were 16 or 17 and get a
$15-an-hourjob."
Demographers put it a bit
more formally.
"Some of the most isolat-
ed rural areas face a major
uphill battle, with a broad
area of -the country empty-


ing out," said Mark Mather,
associate vice president of
the Population Reference
Bureau, a research group
in Washington, D.C. "Many
rural areas can't attract work-
ers because there aren't any
jobs, and businesses won't
relocate there because there
aren't enough qualified work-
ers. So they are caught in a
downward spiral."
Rural towns are scram-
bling to attract new resi-
dents and stave off heavy
funding cuts from financially
strapped federal and state
governments.
Delta Air Lines recently
announced itwould end flight
service to 24 small airports,
several of them in the Great
Plains, and the U.S. Postal
Service is mulling plans to
close thousands of branches
in mostly rural areas of the
country. The University of
Kansas this month opened
a new medical school with
a class of eight in Salina, a
regional hub of nearly 50,000
people, in hopes of support-
ing nearby rural communi-
ties that have no doctors at
all.
In North Dakota, col-
leges are seeking to draw
in young adults by charg-,
ing low tuition and fees. It's
part of a broader trend in
which many slow-growing
rural states are touting rec-
reational scenic landscapes
or extending tuition breaks
to out-of-state residents who
typically are charged more.
Many rural areas, the
Great Plains in particular,
have ,been steadily losing
population since the 1930s
with few signs of the trend
slowing in coming decades,
according to census figures.
The share ofpeopleinrural
areas over the past decade
fell to 16 percent, passing the
previous low of 20 percent
in 2000. The rural share is
expected to drop further as
the U.S. population balloons
from 309 million to 400 mil-
lion by midcentury, leading
people to crowd cities and
suburbs and fill in the open
spaces around them.
In 1910, the population
share of. rural America
was 72 percent Such areas
RURAL continued on 4D


LAB: FSU program

Continued From Page 1D


their research, the release
said. They also attend
weekly seminars and con-
ferences to continue learn-
ing about diverse Magnet
Lab research.
Norris said she applied
to the program to broaden
her understanding of phys-
ical science and how she
could apply it, since she'll
be switching from teaching
Earth and space science
to physical science as she
starts her eighth year at
LCMS.
"I wanted to see what
was out there .in physical
science," she said. "I want-
ed to find out and collect
and get something to use
in the classroom for dem-
onstrations and for labs."
As she worked and"
studied with her mentor,
Norris said her concept of a
. scientist's work completely
changed because she expe-'
rienced the hands-on facets
of his research and got
to help partially prove his
hypothesis.
"He doesn't just sit
there and work," Norris
said, "but he goes all over.
There's so many aspects to
the science."
Norris said her expecta-
tions'about the program were
more than met because she
learned how scientists actu-
ally work and also learned
more about how to teach
inquiry-based science in the
classroom where students
ask questions for themselves
and explore different ways to
solve a problem while Norris
facilitates.
Specific lab lessons
Norris did herself and


brought back with her
include working with
magnets and the magnetic
field, building magnets,
demonstration of force and
motion with pulleys and
possibly making ice cream
with nitrogen, if she can
get the nitrogen.
"The students will actu-
ally learn it by having fun
with doing the activities
and learning science on
their own," she said. "I'm
really excited about the
hands-on and inquiry-
based learning with the
students."
Her students had to
complete surveys pn their
knowledge of the scientific
method before she entered
the program and will have
to complete follow-up sur-
veys after Norris teaches
her new lessons.
"Hopefully from what
I've learned and brought
back to my classroom, my
students will show a bet-
ter understanding of the
scientific method and how
scientists work," Norris
said. "It'll open the world
of science in a more inter-
esting way. I hope to open
their eyes to what an actual
scientist really does."
"I want to open the
world of science up to my
students in a way that's
not just textbook," Norris
said. "It's actually hands-
on work and real-world
experiences in science. I'm
very motivated in sharing
it with my students and I'm
bringing it back so they
can see that science is any-
thing in the national world
that they can learn."


disappearing?


Lipthrott, Brown to be wed

Bill and Kim Lipthrott
of Lake City announce the
engagement and approach-
ing marriage of their daugh-
ter, Haley Page Lipthrott of
Lake City, to James Thomas
Brown of Pontotoc, Miss.
He is the son of George
Brown and Diane Walton.
*The bride-elect is a 2008
Columbia High School '
graduate. She also gradu-
ated from Florida Gateway
College in 2009 and the
University of Florida in 2011 -
with a B.S. degree in health
science.
The future groom is a 1999
graduate of South Pontotoc
High School in Pontotoc,
Miss. He also graduated
from Memphis School of
preaching in Memphis,
Tenn. in 2006 and Amridge '
University in Montgomery, .
Ala. in 2010 with a B.S.
degree in human develop-
ment. He is employed with .
Georgia Christian School in .
Dasher, Ga.
The wedding is planned '
for 6 p.m. Saturday, Aug. 6 at "
Lake City Church of Christ. ... '
The church is located at 656 ',
SW S.R 47. A reception will "
follow at The Country Club COURTSY PHOl
at Lake City. All friends and Haley Page Lipthrott and James Thomas Brown.


~d


LAKE CITY REPORTER LIFE SUNDAY, JULY'31, 2011


Page Editor: Robert Bridges, 754-0428


ASSOCIATED PRESS
The closed Hott Spot Grill, along with a couple of other businesses that remain on Main
Street is seen in downtown Hugo, Colo. Rural places account for just 16 percent of the
nation's population, the lowest share ever, while metro areas are booming into sprawling
megalopolises


Engagement announcement


ro










Page Editor: Emogene Graham 754-0415 LAKE CITY REPORTER ADVICE & CROSSWORD SUNDAY, JULY 31, 2011 3D


DEAR ABBY


Mother's death interrupts


progress
DEAR ABBY: I'm a 47-
year-old woman who started
dating "Earl" about three
weeks ago. We had gotten off
to a great start We talk easily,
we're comfortable with each
other and we seem to share
similar values.
., Last week, Earl's mom '
passed away, which has made
continuing the relationship
difficult He was close to her
and, understandably, is going
through a rough time.
I'm willing to stick by him
and go through this painful
process with him. I have been
through it myself Earl said
he still wants to see me, but
because of what he's dealing
with, if someone else comes
along, I should take that
opportunity.
Abby, I don't want to look
for anyone else. I already care
a lot for Earl, but I'm con-
fused about what to do. I have
had enough hurt to last me
the rest of me life, and I know
Earl could tell me at any time
that he can no longer handle
this because of his situation.
Please tell me what I should
do. LADY IN WAITING
DEAR LADY IN WAITING:
You seem like a nice, but needy
lady. You have known Earl a
grand total of three weeks,
which is not long enough for
either of you to make serious
plans. Right now Earl needs
your support and friend-
ship more than he needs a
romance, so slow down.
. Be there if he needs to
talk. Offer to cook him dinner


of new romance


Abigail Van Buren
www.dearabby.com

once a week. But do NOT
pressure him or he will be
history.

DEAR ABBY: I have found
my soul mate. We have a
newborn son and are very
happy. We plan to be married
next year, after we have saved
enough for the wedding.
I have been hiding a secret
from him. I have had bulimia
for 20 years. Should I tell him
before we marry? I am terri-
fied it will harm our relation-
ship. How can I tell him, with-
out hurting him? I'm afraid he
won't understand what it will
take for nie to heal myself.
He will be worried about my
health. Please advise, Abby. -
KEEPING IT TO MYSELF
DEAR KEEPING IT TO
YOURSELF: You should
absolutely tell him before you
marry. You should also be
prepared to honestly answer
any questions he may ask
- about your eating disorder.
What would hurt him and
harm your relationship would
be to marry him without his
knowing the facts about your
illness. If he is truly your soul


mate, he won't run away. He
will stand by you and sup-
port you any way he can to
become well again.
** ** **
DEAR ABBY: Is it OK for a
married woman to physically
touch someone of the oppo-
site sex? When we were in a
restaurant, my wife reached
toward the waiter and put her
hand on his arm.
At a football game, she
leaned over and touched a kid
on his shoulders with both
hands to express her feelings
about one of our grandsons
scoring a touchdown.
She also has a habit of call-
ing other males "Hon." Is this
normal? I have told my wife
a number of times that she
should stop it, but she says
I don't "own" her and she
can do whatever she wants.
- ANNOYED HUSBAND IN
ILLINOIS
DEAR ANNOYED
HUSBAND: It appears you
married a toucherr." That's
someone who needs to make
physical contact with another
person in order to feel she
has "connected." It is harm-
less, arid you should not feel
threatened by it As to her
calling other men "Hon," it's
possible she does it because
she can't remember the per-
son's name. Lighten up, and
she may respond by being
less defensive.
* Write Dear Abby at
www.DearAbby.com or
P.O. Box 69440, Los
Angeles, CA 90069.


HOROSCOPES


ARIES (March 21-April 19):
Attend social events and show
how much you have to offer.
You will enjoy lavish forms of
entertainment and showing
off Love is in the stars, and
whether you are single or in a
relationship, you can enhance
your romantic life. Self-improve-
ment projects will turn out
well.*****
TAURUS (April 20-May
20): Problems will.escalate.
Don't start an argument or
upset someone you care about
Taking on too much will back-
fire and cause problems with
loved ones. Keep an open mind
and be willing to compromise
if you want to avoid disruptions
that will spoil your day. **
GEMINI (May 21-June 20):
Getting away, changing your
surroundings and spending time
with people who share your inter-
ests should be on your agenda.
You can update your image or
come up with great ideas that will
lead to self-improvements. Don't
rely on information that doesn't
come from a well-known source.

CANCER (June 21-July 22):
Someone from your past will
cause you problems. Pay-back
may seem like a good idea, but


THE LAST WORD
Eugenia Word

it's likely to backfire if you aren't
prepared for a long, drawn-out
encounter. It's best to concen-
trate on finding ways to pamper
and please you.***
LEO (July 23-Aug.
22): You'll find it difficult to
sit still. Make sure you have
plenty of activities arranged.
Idle time will lead to trouble.
Overreacting, overspending and
overindulging must be moni-
torednd minimized. A change
will do you good. ***
VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept 22):
Problems with children or
acquaintances can be expected.
Dishonesty and secrets will not
bode well when dealing with
peers, children or anyone who
depends on you. Let others
make their own mistakes; med-
dling will cause friction.***
LIBRA (Sept.23-Oct. 22):
Enjoy getting involved in a
cause or joining a group that
can offer you personal and
emotional support The more
you interact with others, the bet-
ter you will feel about yourself.
You don't have to overspend to
impress. ****


CELEBRITY CIPHER
by Luis Campos
Celebrity Cipher cryptograms are created from quotations by famous people, past and present.'
Each letter In the cipher stands for another.
TODAY'S CLUE: S equals H
-WVGZRPGZW FVO S H U Z RV YZR
RV TMVJ WVGZVMZ EZHXXF JZXX
RV EZHXPBZ FVO'EZ EZHXXF
WREHMYZEW." G HEF RF.XZE GVVEZ
Previous solution: "I've learned one important thing about God's gifts what we
'do with them is our gift to him." Robert Wagner
(c) 2011 by NEA, Dist. by Universal UclIick 8-1


SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov.
21): Honesty will be your only
recourse. A problem with
friends, relatives, neighbors and
even your lover has the poten-
tial to develop if you don't get
approval before you begin. You
will be judged by your actions
and the reactions you have.**
SAGIITARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec.
21): Follow your heart, even if it
leads you in a direction different
from what others expect Don't
avoid the inevitable. You have to
let everyone know where you
stand and what your plans are.
If you are honest, you will come
out on top. *****
CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan.
19): Protect your valuables.
Too much temptation is a bad
thing for you, as well as for oth-
ers. Additional responsibility
will enable you to show how
efficient and compassionate
you can be, as well as bring you
rewards you least expect Love
can take an unexpected change.

AQUARIUS (Jan.20-Feb.
18): Do your best to spend time
with people who share your *
interests. You can stabilize your
finances if you invest in improv-
ing or adding to what yop have
to offer professionally. Good
fortune is within reach and can
come to you through a settle-
ment, winning, gift or contract

PISCES (Feb. 19-March
20): You'll be sensitive to the
thoughts and actions of others.
Question anyone who offers
you something that sounds too
good to be true. You have to be
reasonable when it comes to
sharing and getting along with
friends and family. ***


SUNDAY CROSSWORD


NINE OF DIAMONDS By Kurt Mueller / Edited by Will Shortz 1 2 4 15 16. 7 8 19 10 112 1 13 T 14 115 16. 1i 1


Across
1 Crackerjack
,4 Org. fighting.
pirates?
9 Pink.shade
14 Wyle and

19 Man of mystery
20 Stylish-
21 Mountain ridge
22 Hit TV show that
ended in 201i
23. Cuts in a
cardboard
container?
25 American-born
Japanese
,26 Prefix with meter
or methylene
,27 Tax lawyer's find
,28 Heel
'29 7'1" former
N.B.A. star
30 Feminine suffix
31 Yelled initially?
34 Nursery noise
36 Empty
37 26 of the 44 U.S.
presidents: Abbr.
38 Instruction part.
40 Beach site,
maybe
42 It might be
skipped
44 So-so formal
dance?
46 Went far too
slowly during
the 10K?
For any three answers,
call from a touch-tone
hone: 1-900-285-5656,
1.49 each minute; or,
with a credit card, 1-800-
814-5554.


54 State symbols of
North Dakota
and
Massachusetts.
55 Leader who said -
"All
reactionaries are
'paper tigers"
56 Slight
57 "Use the Force,

58 Arizona is the
only state to
have one
59 Attach to
61 "Rocks"
62 Certain
1 helicopter.
63 Piece of black-
market
playground
equipment?
69. Cousin of
kerplunk ,
71 ___ for life
72 Purple shade
73 Press
76 It comes out in
the wash
77 Northernmost
borough of
London
81 Freud's one
82 Antlered animal
83 Wool or cotton
purchase
request?
85 Disgusting
advice?
87 Way out
88 24 hrs. ago
90 Isle of the Inner
Hebrides
91 Brown-___
94 New York's
historic __
Library


97 Top of a ladder?:
Abbr.
98 Whiskey bottle
dregs?
103 Courtroom entry
107 Corporate.
shake-up, for
short
108 Beyond ___
109 People whose
jobs include
giving tours
111 To have, in Le
Havre
112 "I don't give
!"
113 Nobleman after
a banquet?
114 Rita Hayworth's
f~mme fatale
title role of 1946
115 Effects of many
waterfalls
116 Felt bad
117 Bind
118 Toothpaste
brand once
advertised as
having the secret
*ingredient GL-70
119 Not settled
120 Hits and runs
121 Rev.'s address

Down
1 Mosey
2 Perform Hawaiian
music, say
3 Shell alternative
4 "Uncle Moses"
novelist Sholem
5 Smack
6 French first lady
SBruni-
Sarkozy
7 Staggering
8 Game tally: Abbr.
9 It was invaded in
the War of 1812


10 Prayer
11 Airlift, maybe
12 Really bugged
13 Orphan girl in
Byron's "Don
Juan"
14 Seldom
15 Urging at a
birthday party
16 1-5 through Los
Angeles, .e.g.
17 Heckle, e.g.
18 Thou follower?
24 Some volcanoes
28 Doesn't stop, in a
way
32 Pitcher part
33 Animal with a
snout
35 Urgent
transmission, for
short
38 Result of a pitch,
perhaps
39 Schedule opening
40 Trolley sound
41 Distant
42 Side in checkers
.43 Metered praise
44 Tasseled topper
45 Leader exiled in
1979
47 Not much
48 Nobelist Walesa
49 Queen's request,
maybe
50 Skin cream
ingredient
51 Adds insult to
injury, say
52 Land on the Sea
of Azov: Abbr.
53 Cultural org.
59 Stomach area
60 Deferential
denial
62 Junk bond rating.
64 Something on a
I hog?
65 Stalk by a stream
66 Feudal lands


67 Ex-governor
Spitzer of New
York
68 When repeated, a
TV sign-off
69 Kind of story
70 Hi-tech organizer
74 Sonoma neighbor
75 Metric wts.
77 Vast, in verse
78 Vietnam's ___
Dinh Diem
79 "What ___?"
80 Towel


82 Reach at a lower
level
84 Emoticon, e.g.
86 See 102-Down
89 "_ tu" (Verdi
aria)
91 Words following
see, hear and
speak
92 1972 Best Actor
nominee for
"The Ruling
Class"
93 Winning length
in a horse race


94 Finally
95 Side in a pickup
game
96 Minute
97 Swiss quarters?
98 Confederate
general,who won
at Chickamauga
99 Noted 1991
Harvard Law
grad
100 Supplied, as
data


101 Slot machine
symbols, often
102 With 86-Down,
what Washington
purportedly
could not do
104 Boors
105 Banks who was
known as Mr.
Cub
106 Late bloomer
110 Some notebook
screens, for
short
113 Fourth notes


Answers to last Sunday's Crossword.
JAB OPALS OLDAG)E ADDLE
USE NOR AH CO L I T LAU ER
N LEPLA C ESTOGOPEOPLETO
GALPAL SPEAKSUP GHETTO


HI PPO OARS K U A AI MAR AT


SSR SHOCKER MAE KRAKEN


JAGUAR ODA HARVARD TAN

BESTOFLUCKTO P K ATPAR
ESSEN ISAAC TELE NADIJA
STY HE A LTHYWE ALTH AND

M T WI T I S T N U CN I0
BOIL SEP L H IN SEIN R

ANNAN MINOR D I LE R A Y
HOSTS G I N K G O W E BER SEX


7 9


6 2 3 8


3 1 7 2


1 5 9 6 7


6 1


8 3 9


8 5 4 7


6 4 1 5


4 7 3 9


LZ L 9 L9 6 9 8


8 EL 9 L 9V 6



L 8 9 6V 6 8 9 L






6Z 9 L 6 8 L 8 I
L 8 9 6 V L 6 9


6 ]E 8 L 9 9 Z 8 L









LAKE CITY REPORTER LIFE SUNDAY, JULY 31, 2011 Page Editor: Robert Bridges, 754-0428


RURAL: Population falling
Continued From Page 1D


remained home to a major-
ity of Americans until 1950,
amid post-World War II eco-
nomic expansion and the
baby boom.
Among the strug-
gling rural areas are vast
stretches of West Virginia
in Appalachia. Several of
the state's counties over the
past decade have lost large
chunks of their population
following the collapse of log-
ging and coal-mining indus-
tries during the 1960s.
In Moundsville, Frees
describes his town, which
sits in the northern pan-
handle along the edge
of Pennsylvania near
Pittsburgh, as appealing in
some regards because of its
low cost of living and friendly
atmosphere in which "peo-
ple talk to each other." But
opportunities are few for the
area's young adults other
than perhaps the $7 or $8-
an-hour jobs at the nearby
Wal-Mart store.
"The young kids today are
fleeing the area," Frees said.
"They get the education and
then they leave because
there's nothing here for
them."
Other rural U.S. coun-
ties suffering big declines
include Issaquena, Jefferson
and Sharkey in Mississippi;
Sheridan and Towner
in North Dakota; Kiowa
in Kansas; Cimarron in
Oklahoma; Tensas Parish
in Louisiana; Monroe in
Arkansas and Cottle, King
and Culberson in Texas. All
had percentage losses of 20
percent or more over the
past decade.
The numbers are based
partly on an analysis by
the Population Reference
Bureau. The data were sup-
plemented with calculations
by Robert Lang, a sociology
professor at the University
of Nevada-Las Vegas, and
William H. Frey, a demog-
rapher at the Brookings
Institution. "Rural" is gen-
erally defined as nonmet-
ropolitan areas with fewer
than 50,000 people.
While rural America
shrinks, larger U.S. metro
areas have enjoyed double-
digit percentage gains in
population over the past
several decades. Since 2000,
metros grew overall by 11
percent with the biggest
gains in suburbs or small-
or medium-sized cities. In
fact, of the 10 fastest-grow-
ing places, all were small
cities incorporated into the
suburbs of expanding metro
areas, mostly in California,
Arizona and Texas.
In all, the share of
Americans living in suburbs
has climbed to an all-time
high of 51 .percent. Despite
sharp declines in big cities in


the Northeast and Midwest
since 2000 due to the reces-
sion, U.S. cities increased
their share by 3 percentage
points to 33 percent.
"These new patterns
suggest that there will be
a blurring of boundaries as
regions expand well beyond
official government-defined
definitions," Frey said.
"People like to 'have it all'
- affordable housing in a
smaller-town setting but in
close proximity to jobs and
big-city amenities such as
specialized shopping, cultur-
al events and major sports
and entertainment venues."
"Many moderate-sized
metro areas can fulfill all of
these needs," he said.
The Census Bureau will
soon begin to define new
"combined statistical areas"
-oftenreferredtobydemog-
raphers as megapolitan areas
or megalopolises based
on growth and overlapping
commuter traffic. Some
analysts point to a merger
of areas between Austin
and San Antonio, between
Tampa and Orlando and
possibly between Phoenix
and Tucson, with the
Washington-Baltimore
region extending south-
ward to Richmond, Va.
These new megalopolises
could help spur corporate
and government invest-
ment in major cities and
the growing small towns in
between.
"Fewer and fewer people
live in the deeply rural plac-
es, and for most people in
smaller towns, a big regional
hospital or a Wal-Mart or
strip mall is not too far away,"
he said.
He and other demog-
raphers believe that rural
areas will remain viable,
although many will be swal-
lowed up by booming met-
ropolitan areas and linked
into sprawling megalopo-
lises. Far-flung rural coun-
ties boasting vacation and
outdoor recreation also will
continue as popular des-
tination points for young
couples, retirees and empty
nesters.
Lang said he hoped the
growing convergence of
major metro areas and
smaller towns in between -
will promote better regional
planning and cooperation
rather than leading to indi-
vidual cities acting as rivals
for new investment He said
such collaboration might
mean development of more
roads or regional high-speed
rail, or new approaches to
water and energy conserva-
tion in the Mountain West.
Associated Press writerJohn
Raby in Moundsville, W.Va.,
contributed to this report.


FGC: Project EXCEL
Continued From Page 1D


this grant. The name of the
initiative is Project EXCEL.
Project EXCEL is a free
program that is specially
designed to assist students
who place into develop-
mental coursework. There
are three main subject
areas into which a student
may place: math, reading,
and English. Students may
place into multiple subject
areas, which is often the
case when returning to
school after being away
for many years. When
students register for their
developmental course,
they also enroll in Student
Success; it is designed
to introduce them to the
resources available on
campus and to help them
develop study skills need-
ed for college.
There are three main
components to Project
EXCEL: classroom instruc-
tion, supplemental instruc-
tion, and advising. Faculty
form the foundation of
the program by providing
classroom instruction that
accommodates diverse
learners and engages
students with the course
content. Writing and math
specialists provide one-on-
one tutoring and supple-


ment the work students
do in the classroom by
facilitating weekly study
groups. Lastly, advising
plays an important role
in Project EXCEL. The
program's advisor works
almost exclusively with stu-
dents taking developmen-
tal courses and is familiar
with the challenges these
students face whether they
are transitioning from high
school or returning to con-
tinue their education.
The main goal of Project
EXCEL is to support stu-
dents as they complete
their developmental cours-
es and to prepare them
to meet their educational
goals. When students join
the program, they are sup-
ported by not only FGC
faculty and staff but by an
entire learning community,
including other students
who are facing the same
challenges. By taking
advantage of the free
services offered through
Project EXCEL, it is our
hope that FGC's students
will have a smooth transi-
tion into college and, one
day, look back fondly on
their experience in our
developmental education
program.


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Washington police block traffic on Massachusetts and North Capitol Street in Washington. Rural places account for just 16
percent of the nation's population, the lowest share ever, while metro areas are booming into sprawling megalopolises.
M I


Sears


DISCOUNTS AT THIS STORE ONLY

LAKE CITY

2724 W. US Highway 90


*3 0


SUN-TUES





EVERYTHING





WEDRTHURS





EVERYTHING


ENTITIES LAST


-41

STORE FIXTURES FOR SALE!
ALL SALES FINAL, NO REFUNDS OR EXCHANGES. OPEN DAILY REGULAR HOURS. WE ACCEPT VISA, MASTERCARD, DISCOVER, AMERICAN
EXPRESS AND SEARS CARD. WE ACCEPT SEARS GIFT CARDS. DISCOUNTS DO NOT APPLY TO PREPAID GIFT CARDS. INVENTORY IS LIMITED
TO STOCK ON HAND. THIS STORE IS NOT PARTICIPATING IN CURRENT SEARS CIRCULARS. THIS EVENT EXCLUDES ELECTROLUX.


SHOPOUROTHR AEA ions I I I' IAPGRATVAUS HA AEHEETIS


LAKE CITY REPORTER LIFE SUNDAY, JULY 31, 2011


Page Editor: Robert Bridges, 754-0428


I