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UFPKY NEH LSTA



The Lake City reporter
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028308/01620
 Material Information
Title: The Lake City reporter
Uniform Title: Lake City reporter (Lake City, Fla. 1967)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: John H. Perry
Place of Publication: Lake City Fla
Publication Date: 7/28/2011
Frequency: daily (monday through friday)[<1969>-]
weekly[ former 1967-<1968>]
daily
normalized irregular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Lake City (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Columbia County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Columbia -- Lake City
Coordinates: 30.189722 x -82.639722 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 95, no. 4 (Oct. 5, 1967)-
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000358016
oclc - 33283560
notis - ABZ6316
lccn - sn 95047175
sobekcm - UF00028308_01569
System ID: UF00028308:01620
 Related Items
Preceded by: Lake City reporter and Columbia gazette

Full Text






Walk-on
Gilliam set
to play in
Pensacola.
H ,' -
iL.L k-L 2.


No-hitter
Ervin Santana
tosses a beauty
for the Angels.
Sports, I B


To a long life
Local woman, 107,
hasn't lost
her wit.
Story below


Sd.aiie vy Reporter


Thursday, July 28, 201 I


www.lakecityreporter.com


Vol. 137, No. 156 M 75 cents


Home prices down 23%


Sales fall 26%
from June 2010
in area markets.

By TONY BRITT
tbritt@lakecityreporter.com
The single-family, existing homes
sales market is down 26 percent com-
pared to the same period last year,
according to the Florida Sales Report


for June 2011.
The good news for those trying to
break into the market, however, is that
home prices have fallen 23 percent.
According to the report, in the Lake
City Live Oak area, 33 homes were
sold in June 2011 compared to June
2010 when 45 homes were sold.
Dan Gherna, Lake City Board of
Realtors executive vice president, said
the Lake City Board of Realtors serves
Columbia, Suwannee and Hamilton


counties, but for purposes of the report
only lists Lake City Live Oak area
information.
"The main trend is that this year of
those 33 sales, 65 percent of them were
distressed sales meaning they were
foreclosures or short sales," Gherna
said. "Last year we had 45 sales and
only 14 of those sales were distressed
(sales)."
HOMES continued on 3A


A rainy, wreck-filled afternoon


JASON MAI lHW WALKIRILaKe uity Reporter
Alfredo Ponce (from left), Michael Ponce, 6, and Ruben Ponce, all of Deltona, speak with Florida Highway Patrol troopers Wednesday
after a Ford F-150 Ruben Ponce was driving flipped in the median at mile marker 303 on Interstate 10. Five separate crashes
- though no serious injuries were reported in Columbia County during a rainy afternoon.



No postal closings in Columbia


By LEANNE TYO
Ityo@lakecityreporter.com
While the U.S. Postal
Service is studying about
3,700 of its local offices,
branches and stations for
possible closing, Lake City's
and Fort White's post offices
are not on the list.
Of the 3,700, 34 are being
studied in Florida, with' the
Day post office .in Mayo
the closest to the Columbia


County area on the study list.
The U.S. Postal Service cur-
rently operates nearly 32,000
retail outlets nationally.
Stephen Seewoester, Postal
Service spokesperson for the
North Florida District, said
the Postal Service has been
experiencing economic chal-
lenges in the down economy.
According to The
Associated Press, Postal,
Service business has declined
with first-class mail moving


to the Internet. Advertising
mail also declined due to the
recession, and the agency
lost $8 billion last year.
Now, about 35 percent
of the Postal Service's rev-
enue comes from locations
like grocery stores, drug
stores and the USPS website,
Seewoester said.
"So we're taking a look at
all of our' retail structure to
see if we can provide retail
customer services in ways


that are convenient for our
customers," he said. "One of
the ways we're looking at it is
at some of the post offices."
As the Postal Services
studies these locations, clo-
sure is a definite possibility,
Seewoester said.
If a location is being
reviewed, it won't necessar-
ily close, according to AP Of
the 14,000 offices announced
CLOSINGS continued on 3A.


Love of animals

a key to longevity,

says woman, 107


By LEANNE TYO
Ityo@lakecityreporter.com
Phyliss Thompson Dabb, a
resident at The Health Center
of Lake City, has reached yet
another milestone in her life
- turning 107 years of age.
Dabb celebrated her 107th
birthday at the Health Center
Sunday.
"It felt good," Dabb said
Wednesday, about turning
another year older. "I'd like to
go back about 50 years."
Dabb was born July 24, 1904
and was raised by her parents
on a farm in Lincoln, .Ill with
her two sisters.
She married her husband,
Harry Dabb, when she was 24
and they were together until he
passed away in 1980.
Dabb said her favorite mem-
ory is of meeting her husband
for the first time in San Diego,
Calif., where his ship was


docked while he served as an
airman on a U.S. Navy aircraft
carrier.
"That was a marriage made
in Hehven," Dabb said. "I know
God had something to do with
it."
Dabb was married once and
has no children, but she said
other suitors have been inter-
ested.
'"Three men wanted to marry
me when I was 80, but they're
all dead now. Thafs what I do to
them," Dabb joked.
A long life has afforded her
plenty of memories, and Dabb
recounted stories of working as
a secretary and then a waitress
during World War II.
"It (waitressin-) was hard
on your feet," she said, "but I
loved it. I loved working with
people."
Dabb's past hobbies included
107 continued on 3A


COURTESY PHOTO
Columbia County resident Phyllis Thompson Dabb, who
on Sunday celebrated her 107th birthday.


Pair charged

with abuse

of emaciated

33-year-old

Man has mental
capacity of child,
say authorities.

By TONY BRITT
tbritt@lakecityreporter.com
Two Columbia County residents face abuse
charges for depriving a 33-year-old develop-
mentally challenged man of food and shelter,
. say authorities. Reports indicate the man is
autistic and has the mental capacity of a 4-year-
old.
Tracy Lowe Comstock, 54, 299 NW Colin
Court and her boyfriend, Kenneth Wayne
Stewart, 41,
of the same
address,
were arrested
Tuesday on
charges of
aggravated
abuse of a
Comsock Stewart disabled per-
son. Both are
being held without bond at the Columbia
County Detention Facility.
According to Columbia County Sheriff's
Office reports, around 1:50 p.m. Tuesday, dep-
uties were called to assist in a Department
of Children and Families welfare check on a
ARRESTS continued on 3A



Poultry maker

expands recall

to nuggets

GREELEY, Colo. (AP) A voluntary recall
of thousands of pounds of ready-to-eat chicken
was expanded over concerns that the meat
could be contaminated with bacteria that can
cause food poisoning.
Colorado-
based Pilgrim's
Pride said
Tuesday the
recall now.
includes about
7,000 pounds
of Pilgrim's
Pride Brand
Fully Cooked
ChickenBreast
Nuggets that
were shipped
to 57 Dollar
General
Market stores ASSOCIATED PRESS
in West This product photo provided
V i r g i n i a, by Pilgrim's Pride Corp. shows
Tennesse e, a package of Fully Cooked
Virginia, Ohio, Chicken Breast Nuggets.
Kentucky,
Indiana ,
Georgia, Florida and Alabama.
Dollar General spokeswoman Tawn Earnest
said smaller stores in the chain aren't affected.
The recall began last week over fears that
more than five'tons of ready-to-eat chicken was
potentially tainted by Listeria monocytogenes.
The Center for Disease Control classifies
listeriosis as a serious infection that primar-
ily affects older adults, pregnant women, new-
borns, and adults with weakened immune sys-
tems.
Pilgrim's Pride spokesman Gary Rhodes said
Wednesday that he wasn't aware of any ill-
nesses related to the recall.
The newly recalled product was sold in two-
pound bags and carries the best-by date of
June 2, 2012, and UPC number 77013 16224. It
was produced in the Pilgrim's plant in Mount
Pleasant, Texas. Pilgrim's officials say the com-
RECALL continued on 3A


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1 84264 U 0020 1


CALL US:
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94
T-Storm


C. 4an
Chance


WEATHER, 2A


O pinion ................
People..................
Obituaries ..............
Advice & Comics..........
Puzzles .................


1 i TODAY IN
PEOPLE
Si le :, itiln -r, to_. ,
slaont


COMING
FRIDAY
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LAKE CITY REPORTER DAILY BRIEFING THURSDAY, JULY 28, 2011


Wednesday:
-Afternoon: 1-9-3
Evening: N/A


Pr ay/4) Wednesday:
Afternoon: 6-5-1-8
Evening:N/A


,enatch.
: Tuesday:
5-6-7-10-17


PEOPLE IN THE NEWS


U2, Pitt, Clooney films head to Toronto


LOS ANGELES
One of the world's top film
showcases is starting on
a musical note as a doc-
umentary portrait of the
rock band U2 opens the
Toronto International Film Festival.
Organizers said the Canadian fes-
tival will launch Sept. 8 with "From
the Sky Down," a chronicle of the
Irish t]and led by singer Bono. The
film was made by "An Inconvenient
Truth" director Davis Guggenheim
and marks the first time in its 36-
year history that the Toronto festival
has opened with a documentary.
Guggenheim said the film
explores why "this band has endured
and thrived." The four-member-band
formed in 1978 and has been turning
out hit albums since the early 1980s,
including "War," "The Joshua Tree,"
"Achtung Baby" and "Zooropa."
"In the terrain of rock bands,
implosion or explosion is seemingly
inevitable. U2 has defied the gravita-
tional pull toward destruction," said
Guggenheim.
Other highlights for the 11-day
festival include Brad Pitt's baseball
tale "Moneyball"; Jennifer Garner,
Hugh Jackman and Olivia Wilde's
comic story "Butter"; Kristen
Wiig, Megan Fox and Jon Hamm's
parenthood comedy "Friends
with Kids"; and Keira Knightley's
Sigmund Freud-Carl Jung drama
"A Dangerous Method," directed
by David Cronenberg and featur-
ing Viggo Mortensen and Michael
Fassbender.
George Clooney has two films at
Toronto, directing and co-starring
alongside Ryan Gosling in the politi-
cal saga "The Ides of March."

Lauryn Hill: Marley not
father of 6th child
NEW YORK After the birth of
her sixth child, Lauryn Hill wants to
clear up two things: Rohan Marley
didn't abandon her while she was


Bono (right) and Adam Clayton, from the rock group U2, perform in concert as
part of U2's 360 Tour at the New Meadowlands Stadium in East Rutherford, N.J.
Toronto International Film Festival organizers said they will launch Sept. 8 with
'From the Sky Down,' a chronicle of the Irish band led by singer Bono.


pregnant, and he's
not the baby's father.
The blogosphere
has been abuzz after
word came last week
that the reclusive
Grammy winner had
Hill a baby boy. Marley,
the father of her five
other children, sent a message on
Twitter "forwarding all well wishes
to Ms. Hill on the birth of her new
son."

Glenn Beck said Norway
camp like 'Hitler Youth'
NEW YORK Radio talk show
host Glenn Beck
S said on his show that
the camp in Norway
where a gunman
opened fire on
young people sounds
"like Hitler Youth."
On his radio show
Beck Monday, the former


Fox News Channel host was discuss-
ing last week's attacks where at least
76 people were killed. In an aside, he
talked about the Utoya Island camp
run by the ruling Labor Party for
youngsters interested in politics.
The camp "sounds a little like the
Hitler Youth or whatever," Beck said.
"Who does a camp for kids that's all
about politics? Disturbing."

Winehouse's death lands
her back on the charts
NEW YORK Death has landed
Amy Winehouse back on the charts.
The British singer's "Back to
Black" album will re-enter the
Billboard album chart at No. 9, with
37,000 albums sold in the United
States in the past week. Those fig-
ures come from Nielsen SoundScan
data released late Tuesday. Her
debut album "Frank" sold 7,000 cop-
ies. All but a fraction of those sales
were digital downloads.
* Associated Press


,Celebrity Birthdays


* Movie director Andrew V.
McLaglen is 91.
* Rock musician Steve
Morse (Deep Purple) is 57.
* Actor Michael Hayden is
48.
* Actress Elizabeth Berkley

Daily Scripture


is 39.
* Country musician Todd
Anderson (Heartland) is 36.
* Actor Dustin Milligan is 26.
* Actor Nolan Gerard Funk
is 25.
* Rapper Soulja Boy is 21.


Lake City
HOW TO REACH US
Main number ........(386) 752-1293
Fax number .............752-9400
Circulation ...............755-5445
Online ... www.lakecityreporter.com
The Lake City Reporter, an affiliate of
Community Newspapers Inc., is pub-
lished Tuesday through Sunday at 180
E. Duval St., Lake City, Fla. 32055.
Periodical postage paid at Lake City, Fla.
Member Audit Bureau of Circulation and
The Associated Press.
.All material herein is property of the Lake
City Reporter. Reproduction in whole or
in part is forbidden without the permis-
sion of the publisher. U.S. Postal Service
No. 310-880.
POSTMASTER: Send address changes
to Lake City Reporter, P.O. Box 1709,
Lake City, Fla. 32056.
Publisher Todd Wilson .....754-0418
(twilson@lakecityreporter.com)
NEWS
Editor Robert Bridges .....754-0428
(rbridges@lakecityreporter.com)
ADVERTISING
Director Ashley Butcher ...754-0417
(abutcher@lakecityreporter.com)
CLASSIFIED
To place a classified ad, call 755-5440


Reporter

BUSINESS
Controller Sue Brannon... .754-0419
(sbrannon@lakecityreporter.com)
CIRCULATION
Home delivery of the Lake City Reporter
should be completed by 6:30 a.m.
Tuesday through Saturday, and by 7:30
a.m. on Sunday.
Please call 386-755-5445 to report any
problems with your delivery service.
In Columbia County, customers should
call before 10:30 a.m. to report a ser-
vice error for same day re-delivery. After
10:30 a.m., next day re-delivery or ser-
vice related credits will be issued.
In all other counties where home delivery
is available, next day re-delivery or ser-
vice related credits will be issued.
Circulation ... ...........755-5445
(circulation@lakecityreporter.com)
Home delivery rates
(Tuesday through Sunday)
12 Weeks...........:....... $26.32
24 Weeks.....*.!............$48.79
52 Weeks...................$83.46
Rates include 7% sales tax.
Mail rates
12 Weeks........... ..... $41.40
24 Weeks..................$82.80
52 Weeks...............$179.40


CORRECTION

The Lake City Reporter corrects errors of fact in news
items. If you have a concern, question or suggestion, please
call the executive editor. Corrections and clarifications will run
in this space. And thanks for reading.


Mayor denies
drugs are hers
OAK HILL Mayor
Mary Lee Cook, 84, said
someone tried to ruin her
reputation by planting mar-
ijuana on her property.
Cook defended herself
during an Oak Hill city
commission meeting
Monday after narcotics
agents found'pot growing
on her land.
Volusia County Sheriff's
* spokesman Gary Davidson
said Cook has not been
'charged. He said the inci-
, dent is under investigation
but investigators do not
believe the mayor knew
"the pot was there.
Cook said narcotics
agents came to her home
two weeks ago to check
out reports that she was
growing pot. The plants
were found near a kicked-
in section of fence near
her house.

Tourist dies while
diving for lobster
TAVERNIER Officials
said a tourist from
Massachusetts died while
diving for lobster off the
upper Florida Keys.
Monroe County Sheriff's
detective Mark Coleman
said Mark Fountain, 54,
died Wednesday, during
the first day of the two-day
sport lobster season.
Fountain, of
Montgomery, Mass., was
an experienced diver who
was on a private boat with
his 34-year-old son and the
son's girlfriend. They went
scuba diving but became
separated in the water.

Judge wants
change in law
ORLANDO The
judge in the Casey
Anthony trial is urging
the Legislature to change
Florida's liberal public
records law to exempt
jurors' names in high pro-


Lobster mini-season begins
Jared Stabb (from left), 19, of Weston; Eli Jordan, 20, of
Weston; and Shane White, 19, of Plantation, show off three
of the seven lobsters they caught during the Florida lobster
mini-season Wednesday in Dania Beach.


file cases from becoming
public.
Judge Belvin Perry said
in an order Tuesday that
releasing the names of
jurors "makes a mockery"
of Florida's privacy law,
especially in high-profile
cases where jurors' may
receive threats because of
their verdict
An official with a group
that advocates for Florida's
public records law said
Wednesday there are other
ways to protect jurors.

RNC: Scott won't
be factor in 2012
TALLAHASSEE -
Republican National
Committee Chairman
Reince Priebus said nei-
ther Gov. Rick Scotts low
approval rating nor the
immigration debate will
hurt the GOP as it tries
to carry crucial Florida
in next year's presidential
election.
He predicted, however,
that Sen. Marco Rubio's
political star status will
help Republicans with the
Hispanic vote.
Priebus talked about
Florida during a confer-
ence call with reporters,
saying it will play a major


role in deciding the next
president While Scott's
approval rating is below 30.
percent, Priebus said vot-
ers will focus on national
politics and not the gover-
nor.

Man questioned
in condo death
PENSACOLA BEACH
- Investigators in
Mississippi are question-
ing a man who was arrest-
ed with a car belonging to
a woman whose decom-
posing body was found in a
Florida condominium.
The body found
Saturday in Pensacola
Beach was tentatively iden-
tified as Caroline Ardis
Marbury-Smart, 53, a
member of the prominent
Marbury family of Ruston,
La., but positive ID and
cause of death would have
to await autopsy, Escambia
County sheriff's deputies
said.
Investigators believed
she had been dead for
days.
Officers arrested
Charles Douglas Boshell,
46, on Monday at a motel
in Ocean Springs, Miss.,
on a warrant.
* Associated Press


THE WEATHER



CHANCE ISOLATED CHANCE
TORMS T-STORMS TORMS


I I 94 L 74 HI 9510 LO74 I196 LO74


Tallahaee *
93/74 -.
Pensacola *
90,'7 7 Panama City
8T! / 76


SValdesta
95/74 *
Lake City
94/74
Gainesvile
\93/74
Ocala
^a-/"i


Tamipa.
94/77/


Ft Mye
95/76


City Friday
Jacksonville Cape Canaveral 8I ~7 pcC
93, 9 Daytona Beach 90, 75, pD
Daaynatona 9 Beach P


Daytona Beach
9V77


Ft. Lauderdale
Fort Myers
Gainesville
Jacksonville


Orlando Cape CanaveralL Key West
94/77 89/78 Lake City
Miami
Naples
West Pahn Beach Ocala
91/83 Orlando'
FtL LauderdalQ Panama City
t"s 92/84 Pensacola
Naples Tallahassee
195/79 Miani Tampa
'q r Valdosta


Key West,
92/84


TEMPERATURES
Hign Wednesday
Low Wednesday
Normal high
Normal low
Record high
Record low

PRECIPITATION
Wednesday
Month total
Year total .
Normal month-to-date
Normal year-to-date


89
75
91
71
101 in 1893
67 in 1989

0.00",
3.39"
23.28"
5.30"
29.33"


SUN
,Sunrise today
Sunset today
Sunrise torn.
Sunset torn.
MOON
Moonrise today
Moonset today
Moonrise tom.
Moonset tornm.


6:47 a.m.
8:27 p.m.
6:47 a.m.
8:26 p.m.

4:31 a.m.
6:49 p.m.
5:33 a.m.
7:35 p.m.


*o00
July Aug. Aug. Aug.
30 6 13 21
New First Full Last


7a lp 7p la 6a


Thursday


Friday


- Fomeastad teieratre


"Fesftesl ie" t e


W. Palm Beach


92/83/pc
96/76/pc
94/74/pc
92/79/pc
92/84/sh
95/74/t
91/83/pc
95/78/pc
94/74/pc
94/77/pc
89/79/t
92/79/t
94/76/t
95/76/pc
95/76/t
91/82/pc


Saturday
90'76 p:
92, i6, pc
91/83/s
95/76/t
95/74/t
94/79/t
92/84/sh
96/74/t
91/83/s
93/78/pc
94/74/t
95/77/t
91/79/t
92/78/t
97/75/t
95/76/t
97/75/t
89/82/s


An exclusive
1 service
brought to
ME our readers
10mstels tobn by
Today's
ultra-violet The Weather


radiation risk
for the area on
a scale from 0
to 10+.


Channel.


weather.com
M,


a r Forecasts, data and
graphics 0 2011 Weather
1rT IIIV Central, LP, Madison, Wis.
weather J www.weatherpublisher.com

wa* SWh *


,H


"Therefore, since we are sur-
rounded by such a great cloud
of witnesses, let us throw off
everything that hinders and the
sin that so easily entangles.And
let us run with perseverance
the race marked out for us."
Hebrews 12:1

Thought for Today
"Beware of monotony; it's the
mother of all the deadly sins."
Edith Wharton,
American author (1862-1937)


AROUND FLORIDA


MY 'W I


'age Editor: Jason M. Walker, 754-0430


1M(38l)lr7lS-445


aij I \J


l











Page Editor: Robert Bridges, 754-0428 LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL THURSDAY, JULY 28, 2011


107: To longevity

Continued From Page 1A


CLOSINGS: None here

Continued From Page 1A


RECALL: Expanded

Continued From Page 1A


training dogs, garden-
ing and dancing.
Her secret to longev-
ity? Happiness and lov-
ing animals, Dabb said.
"Being happy, I think,"
she said, "and loving ani-
mals, most of all."
Alisha Robertson,
Health Center activities
director, said Dabb was
living on her own in
Fort White until about
two weeks ago, when
she came to the Center
to live.
"The couple weeks
that she's been here,
she has been awesome,"
Robertson said.


The first thing Dabb
wanted when she
arrived was a party
for her 107th birthday,
Robertson said.
"She's proud of it (her
age)," Robertson said.
Both the Health
Center staff and resi-
dents enjoy Dabb's sto-
ries, she said.
"It's amazing to listen
to her," Robertson said.
For Dabb, living a
long life means tak-
ing each day as it
comes.
"I just live each day at
a time," she said.


for possible closing by the post
office in January, 280 have been
closed and 200 finished the
review process with their doors
still open.
If an office is selected for
review, people using that
office will have 60 days to
file comments, AP said. If the
office does close, custom-
ers can appeal to the inde-
pendent Postal Regulatory
Commission.
Customers are also using
other avenues for Postal
Service business, Seewoester
said.
"Customers are doing busi-
ness in other ways than coming
to a post office," Seewoester


said, "so we're studying that at
this point."
According to a USPS news
release, a potential replace-
ment option for communities
that could be affected by pos-
sible closures would be the
Village Post Office. Village
Post Offices would be oper-
ated by local businesses like
pharmacies or grocery stores,
offering popular postal prod-
ucts and services such as
stamps and flat-rate packag-
ing.
More than 70,000 third-
party retailers Approved
Postal Providers currently
sell stamps and provide other'
postal products.


pany is working closely with
Dollar General to locate all
of the recalled product.
"Food safety is our top
priority and we take product
recalls very seriously," said
Kendra Waldbusser, senior
vice president of food safe-
ty and quality assurance for
Pilgrim's.
The U.S. Department of
Agriculture's Food Safety
and Inspection Service
announced the recall of two
of the company's products
Thursday.
The first was nearly 400
pounds of Fully-Cooked
Grilled Chicken Breast
Fillets with Rib Meat made
at Pilgrim's plant in Waco,


Texas, and distributed
through Columbus, Ohio.
Also recalled was
nearly 11,000 pounds of
Sweet Georgia Brand
Fully-Cooked Breaded
White Chicken Nuggets
Shaped Patties produced
at Pilgrim's plant in Mount
Pleasant and sent to dis-
tribution centers in New
Jersey and Texas.
The problem was discov-
ered during on-site interifal
testing at each plant.
Pilgrim's employs about
42,000 people in 12 U.S.
states, Puerto Rico and
Mexico.Consumers can
contact Pilgrim's at 1-800-
321-1470.


ARRESTS: Local couple charged with abuse of emaciated 33-year-old

Continued From Page 1A


developmentally disabled
adult at 299 NW Colin
Court
Sgt. Ed Seifert, Columbia
County Sheriff's Office pub-
lic information officer, said
the visit originated from an
anonymous tip.
"An anonymous com-
plaint alleged that the dis-
abled adult was kept out-
side of his home during the
day and was not being fed
properly," Siefert said in a
prepared statement.
Deputy Josh McCardle
arrived at the home with
the DCF caseworker and
found the victim sitting in a


chair in the yard.
"It was raining heavily
and the victim did not have
any shelter from the ele-
ments," Seifert said. '"The
victim was dirty and his
skin and clothes were dirty
and soiled."
Authorities called
Lifeguard Ambulance
Services to the scene to
evaluate the man's medical
condition.
"The victim repeatedly
stated to law enforcement
and paramedics that he'was
hungry," Seifert said.
The victim was taken to
a local medical facility for


evaluation and treatment
Reports said the man was
5'11" and weighed 119
pounds.
"He was emaciated for
his age and height when
transported to the hospi-
tal," Seifert said.
No adults or caretak-
ers were initially pres-
ent at the home and the
mother of the victim and
her boyfriend arrived as
deputies were preparing
to leave.
McCardle was able to
determine that the victim
was locked outside of the
residence for 8-14 hours at


a time.
"The victim was
not allowed to access
food in the house even
though the refrigerator
was stocked with food,"
Seifert said. "It has not
been determined exactly
how often he was locked
outside. However, his
emaciated condition has
occurred over a lengthy
.period of time. He was
initially standoffish with
Deputy McCardle and
the DCF investigator.
When they asked him if
he wanted to go to the
hospital and get some-


thing to eat, he could not
be more cooperative. The
mere mention of food
kept him at McCardle's
side until EMS arrived.
He was very coopera-
tive and was completely
focused on getting some-
thing to eat."
Siefert said the victim
was denied access to the
refrigerator because he ate
his mother's boyfriend's
food.
"His mother told depu-
ties that her son would eat
food from the fridge and
that Stewart would lock
him outside so the victim


would not eat (Stewart'.)
food," Seifert said. .,
The victim, whomi
authorities did not identify,
is in the care and custody
of the Florida Department
of Children and Families. "


HOMES: Median price is down 23 percent from last June

Continued From Page 1A


Of the 33 sales in June, Gherna
said 20 were distressed sales.
"We've got a lot of distressed
sales and inventory," he said. "That
seems to be the target for a lot of
buyers these days."
The report also shows that
the median sale price for a home
sold in the area in June 2011 was
$92,000, compared to $120,000 in
2010, a 23 percent drop.
Gherna noted the report is a


"snapshot" comparing June 2010
with June 2011.
"The distressed sale inventory
is up this year," he said.
Gherna noted that the last
time I checked, the sales from
MLS (multiple listing service)
which doesn't represent every
sale in Columbia or Suwannee
County, were in the upper 40
percent range for distressed
sales.


"Those sales are typically on
the lower end of the market
- $100,000 or less," he said.
"Of the higher end sales, this
year we only had two sales
that were over $200,000. Last
year in June we had five sales,
that were over $200,000. That
skews the numbers too on the
median price.
"The market is what it is," he
continued. "Lending has tight-


ened so it's harder for people
to get financed. We have almost
zero new home inventory. We
can only look up."
The Florida Sales Report,
coiipiled monthly by the
Florida Board of Realtors, is
based on a survey of Multiple
Listing Service home sales
from state Realtor boards "or
associations.


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LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL THURSDAY, JULY 28, 2011


Page Editor: Robert Bridges, 754-0428













OPINION


Thursday, July 28, 2011


www.lakecityreporter.com


AN
OPINION


AU.


S.


warship


in need


of saving

By rights, the USS
Olympia should be
one of our nation's
most-treasured,
best-cared-for naval
artifacts.
The Olympia was launched
in 1892. According to her web-
site, she is the world's oldest
floating steel warship and the
sole surviving naval ship of the
Spanish-American War.
It was from her bridge that
Adm. George Dewey issued
his famous order, "You may
fire when ready, Gridley," the
beginning of the U.S. Navy's
crushing defeat of Spain at the
battle of Manila Bay, a victory
that launched the U.S. into
the ranks of the world's naval
superpowers.
The Olympia's final official
naval mission was the return-
ing of the body of the Unknown
Soldier from France in 1921.
The Olympia is berthed at
the Independence Seaport
Museum in Philadelphia, but
the museum is no longer finan-
cially able to look after the
elderly warship. She needs $10
million in repairs to the hull
and deck; on top of the $5.4 mil-
lion the museum has already
spent, plus another $10 million
or so to build a new site for the
Olympia and to start an endow-
ment for future repairs.
This week, museum workers
bolted a temporary 16-foot patch
to a deteriorated portion of the
hull, but the patch is only meant
to buy time until the Olympia
can be taken to a dry dock. The
-Associated Press says the muse-
um is looking for a state, city or
charitable organization to take
ownership of the Olympia by the
end of next year.
, Our nomination would be
one of the U.S. Navy's own ship
museums, perhaps the one at
the Washington Navy Yard at
the foot of Capitol Hill.
The USS Olympia is a part of
.the Save America's Treasures
program, and this venerable
and historic warship is certainly
a treasure worth saving.
* Scripps Howard News Service


Lake City Reporter
Serving Columbia County
Since 1874
The Lake City Reporter is pub-
lished with pride for residents of
Columbia and surrounding counties by
Community Newspapers Inc.
We believe strong newspapers build
strong communities -"Newspapers
get things done!"
Our primary goal is to
publish distinguished and profitable
community-oriented newspapers.
This mission will be accomplished
through the teamwork of professionals
dedicated to truth, integrity and hard
work.
Todd Wilson, publisher ,
Robert Bridges, editor
Sue Brannon, controller
Dink NeSmith, president
Tom Wood, chairman

LETTERS
POLICY
Letters to the Editor should be
typed or neatly written and double
spaced. Letters should not exceed
400 words and will be edited for
length and libel. Letters must be
signed and include the writer's name,
address and telephone number for
verification. Writers can have two
letters per month published. Letters
and guest columns are the opinion of
the writers and not necessarily that of
the Lake City Reporter.
BY MAIL: Letters, P.O. Box 1709,
Lake City, FL 32056; or drop off at
180 E. Duval St. downtown.
BY FAX: (386) 752-9400.
BY E-MAIL:
news@lakecityreporter.com


Feeling guilty?


L ike thunder rumbling
through the moun-
tains, sometimes feel-
ings of guilt rumble
through our heads.
When we were just kids, we
picked up some messages from
parents or teachers, or from
somewhere, that still hang out
in the recesses of our brains.
We had lessons to learn about
what was right and wrong, and
learned things that needed to put
on our "don't even think about it"
lists. The strong emotions or
pain we felt from the correcting
messages, or from the associ-
ated punishment, probably were
successful in teaching us right
from wrong, and what behaviors
were unacceptable. But since
the lessons were so important,
and the emotions so powerful,
we probably also learned to feel
guilty along with learning the
lessons. Even after we corrected
our "evil ways," feelings of guilt
stayed in the back of our minds
as a driving force helping us to
stay out of trouble.
What is guilt? When we
receive harsh criticism, scorn,
shame, or punishment, we
may feel guilty. These guilty
feelings become associated, or
learned, with our wrongdoing,
and cause us to choose to do
the right thing to avoid those
guilty feelings. We choose to
avoid pain, by making better
choices. Long after we've made
the right choices, and developed
good behavior habits, the guilt
lingers there in the background,
to keep us headed in the right
direction.
So, what's the problem with
that? Old messages, and the
associated guilty feelings, can
stay long after they've outstayed
their welcome, and can keep


Robert Denny
Bob.Denny8@gmail.com


delivering pain to you that you
no longer need in order to
maintain your newly learned
good habits. Guilt, like so
many other bad feelings, bad
thoughts, and bad behaviors,
can be a harmful force in your
life: harmful to your relation-
ships with people close to you,
as well as with acquaintances,
co-workers, friends, and other
relationships. Feelings of guilt
can interfere with your job or
career, your growth, your suc-
cess, your happiness, and even
your health. When guilty feel-
ings interfere significantly with
your life, psychologists would
offer a professional opinion that
you have a "problem." To be a
fully happy, healthy, and fulfilled
adult, you need to have cour-
age, confidence, and strength to
face life's milestones, problems,
and challenges, and recognize
that challenges can be oppor-,
tunities presented by life from
which you can learn and grow.
Keeping guilty feelings with you
after they're no longer needed
is baggage that can hurt your
life.
As a successful, functioning
adult, you've pretty well learned
'good, workable values and mor-
als, and you have developed a
guiding conscience that helps
you know what's right and


wrong. Instead of being pushed
by guilt to do what's right, how
about replacing those feelings
of guilt you've been using as
a motivator, with using your
freedom to make a choice to be
pulled instead by your own mor-
als, values, dreams, and goals?
Your own values can help you
decide what's right for you, and
steer you in the right direction
in how to treat others. This
switch in motivators is a huge
step towards growth in personal
power, character, and spiritual-
ity.
So, if you find yourself some-
times beating yourself up by
holding onto outdated guilty
feelings, how about dropping
them? Instead you could con-
sider taking yourself by the
hand, and leading yourself
towards a happier, more mean-
ingful and more fulfilled life.
You can take more control of
your own life and govern your-
self, or someone else might
be happy to do that for you!
Psychologist and founder of the
Western Behavioral Sciences
Institute in La Jolla, California,
Carl Rogers, (who before
that, was a Christian minister)
professes that we all have the
potential for goodness;, growth
and self-development, and that
self-fulfillment comes naturally,
if we're only given the chance,
support and encouragement,
and the opportunity to be all we
can be. Build an even better,
happier life for yourself-you're
worth it!

E Robert Denny is a licensed
mental health therapist, and teach-
es psychology at Florida Gateway
College in Lake City. Comments
welcome at Bob.Denny8@gmail.
com.


Dale McFeatters
mcfeattersd@shns.com


A losing


offer for


young


jihad


recruits

o U n g
Americans
of Somali ori-
gin who are
consider-
ing answering a radical
Islamic group's appeals
to commit violent jihad
in Somalia might want to
first consider two points.
Frankly, this is an offer
that most sane people,
including their parents,
would find terribly unap-
pealing. Why did they
think their parents gladly
came here in the first
place?.And were willing
to wrestle with a vastly
different language, cus-
toms and culture to stay?
If sentiment won't sway
them, the young would-
be recruits might want to
think back to their high-
school math classes and
the problems of odds and
probability.
According to the House
Homeland Security
Committee, more than
40 Americans have been
recruited by the terror-
ist group al-Shabaab. Of
those, at least 15 have
been killed.
Of the 21 recruited
from Minnesota, site
of the nation's largest
Somali community, at
least four have been
confirmed dead and still
more are feared dead,
according to the commit-
tee.
These may be rea-
sonable chances in Las
Vegas, but not when
you're playing with your
life.


* Dale McFeatters is editorial
writer for Scripps Howard News
Service.


The baby craze: My story


all buzzing
around me one
day recently. I
finally cracked, as
I sometimes do, and offered a gen-
eral, "Oh, good grief Where did all
you people come from, anyway?"
To which one of my daughters
immediately responded, 'Well,
Mom, you see, when a man and
a woman love each other very
much ..."
Everyone's a comedian.
Studies show that, typi-
cally, women respond warmly to
babies whether or not they have
had their own. (Men, typically,
respond warmly to babies only
after they have their own.) Full
disclosure: Throughout my non-
baby life, I could look at a baby
and be entirely unmoved and
uninterested.
I'm not sure I've ever written
about the fact that until right
before I got pregnant with my
first, I didn't have any great desire
to have children.
SThere's a reason I'm sharing it
now. Stick with me.
I thought I eventually would have


children as part
of an obligation of
some sort True
enough. But the
prospect of a career
was far more inter-
esting to me than
babies. I would
not have chosen to Betsy Har
forgo children. I do betsysblogcom
sheepishly admit
that at one point in my 20s I actually
thought if somehow I were infertile,
I could at least close that door with-
out guilt
I married when I was 24 and
he was 29. I don't remember
ever once discussing thoughts
about children before our wed-
ding. Even several years into our .
marriage, I panicked when I had
a "pregnancy scare." At age 30,
I still had never been pregnant
Somewhere in there, I remember
that my then-husband and I had
church-nursery duty one day and
left congratulating ourselves that
we hadn't done that nonsense yet
But needless to say, when
I got pregnant eventually, it
just seemed like now or never -
everything changed. Everything.


At some point, I
realized that one
of the reasons
I had avoided
"that nonsense"
was because I
somehow knew
that having a child
rt would make me
vulnerable to the
world, and the
pain and even the joy it could
open me to, in a whole new way.
Suddenly, there was a chink in my
armor.
Eventually, there were four of
them.
My children know I wasn't
exactly the maternal type before I
got pregnant with my first I'm not
proud of that but in any event,
they don't care. They know that
I love them more than life itself.
And that I dread and I mean
dread the day fast approaching
when the first moves out.
All of this isn't about facing
unwanted or unexpected pregnan-
cies. It's about wanted, expected
pregnancies that don't happen.
You see, I was deeply moved as
I recently read about an unsuc-


cessful pursuit of a baby in "The
Baby Chase: Adventures in
Infertility" by Holly Finn (byliner.
com/Kindle), as excerpted in The
Wall Street Journal. Finn started
fertility treatment a few years ago
in her late 30s, and so far, no baby.
She accepts that it's unlikely there
will be one. She is heartbroken.
Women are too often left to
visions of celebrity mothers hav-
ing babies well into their 40s
(though it's frequently with bor-
rowed eggs), and often mistak-
enly think they themselves can
easily wait.
So much for knowledge is
power, and empowering women.
Well, back to my story and why
I'm sharing it now.
I just want such women to
know that I myself didn't "feel"
much at all like having children
before having them. My children
changed me in that regard. So
much.
Oh, and FYI: When I see a baby
now, I utterly fall to pieces. Every
time.
* Betsy Hart hosts the "It Takes a
Parent" radio show on WYLL-AM


4A









Page Editor: Brandon Finley, 754-0420


LAKE CITY REPORTER


NEWS


THURSDAY, JULY 28, 2011


Treatment


program


opens in


Lake City

from staff reports

Meridian Behavioral Healthcare opened the
doors to a new opioid treatment program at 439
SW Michigan St Tuesday. Meridian currently
operates an OTP in Gainesville and is excited to
open the doors to its second such program in
the area, expanding services in Lake City and
better serving the community.
"The new OTP center in Lake City
will make things easier for traveling
consumers," said Sara Mihlfeld, OTP- man,
ager. "The large majority of Meridian's OTP
consumers come from Lake City and surround-
ing areas."
Opioid treatment is also known as methadone
maintenance treatment. MMT
helps normalize your body's
neurological and hormonal functions that have
been impaired by the use .of heroin or other
short-acting opioids. These programs have been
proven to work and provide many benefits to the
users.
Opioid treatment services have given numer-
ous people a new chance at life, says Meridian.


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Dr. Margarita Labarta (center), president and CEO of Meridian Behavioral Healthcare Inc., speaks to a group of people Tuesday
during the ribbon cutting of the facility's new Opioid Treatment Program clinic. The clinic will provide methadone to chronic opiate
dependent people in addition to therapeutic services. 'Our vision is to offer choice, hope and recovery,' Labarta said.


Maid in Strauss-Kahn case


visits NYC prosecutors


By COLLEEN LONG and
JENNIFER PELTZ
Associated Press

NEW YORK. The
hotel maid who accused
Dominique Strauss-Kahn
of sex assault met with
prosecutors Wednesday
morning for the first time
since the district attorney's
office publicly announced
it had doubts about her,
credibility. .
Nafissatou Diallo arrived
at the Manhattan district
attorney's office with
her attorney Kenneth
Thompson and did not
speak to reporters. The
last meeting between
Diallo and prosecutors, in
June, ended with her in
tears as prosecutors asked
about inconsistencies they
had uncovered in her past,
her attorney has said.
The meeting came one
day after the district attor-
ney and Strauss-Kahn's
attorneys announced they
had agreed to postpone his
next court date to Aug. 23,
when prosecutors could
announce whether or not
they will go forward with
the case.


Doubts about Diallo's
background which
included lying on her
asylum application that
she had been gang raped
and phone conversations
she had with a man in an
Arizona immigration pris-
on after the encounter with
Strauss-Kahn prompted
prosecutors to agree to
have the 62-year-old former
head of the International
Monetary Fund freed from
house arrest.
The relationship between
prosecutors and Diallo
deteriorated further after
the public announcement,
and her lawyer called for a
special prosecutor.
Diallo, a 32-year-old
widowed immigrant from
Guinea with a 15-year-
old daughter, broke her
silence in recent days with
interviews in Newsweek
and on a series of ABC
News programs. It's not
clear whether that further
widened the rift.
Neither the Manhattan
District Attorney's office
nor her attorney would
commerit.
Strauss-Kahn, a one-
time French presidential


contender, was arrested
May 14 after Diallo said he
forced her to perform oral
sex, manhandled her and
ripped her stockings in his
luxury suite at the Sofitel
Hotel near Manhattan's
Times Square. He has been
charged with attempted
rape and other crimes.
He has denied the accu-
sations. His attorneys are
seeking to have the case
dropped and say there is
no evidence to suggest the
encounter was forced.
Prosecutors con-
tinue to reassess evi-
dence, analyze the legal
framework surrounding
the case and gather new
information.
In one example, prosecu-
tors recently-met with a
lawyer for a French writer
who has accused Strauss-
Kahn of trying to rape
her in 2003, an allegation
Strauss-Kahn also denies.
While French authorities
explore her complaint,
Manhattan prosecutors
have asked about speak-
ing with the writer herself,
Tristane Banon, a person
familiar with the case has
said.


Thompson has reached
out to another French
woman who said she had
a relationship with Strauss-
Kahn and at times he
was rough with her. The
woman gave an interview
to a Swiss publication
where she said she would
speak with prosecutors but
she thought she would be
aiding Strauss-Kahn more
than Diallo.
In giving interviews
to ABC and Newsweek,
Diallo defied prosecutors'
conventional wisdom about
accusers speaking publicly
before trial. It's generally
seen as providing defense
lawyers material to mine
for contradictions and
questions.
Before Sunday, Diallo's
name had been reported
by some French media
outlets but not by major
U.S. media, which gener-
ally protect the identities
of people who say they've
been sexually assaulted.
The Associated Press does
not name people who say
they are victims of sexual
assault unless they come
forward publicly, as Diallo
has done.


Unmanned


Army blimp


brought down


By JOE MANDAK
Associated Press

PITTSBURGH A
remote-controlled,
unmanned reconnais-
sance blimp launched from'
Ohio by defense contrac-
tor Lockheed Martin was
brought down Wednesday
in a controlled descent in
the woods of southwest-
ern Pennsylvania after it
was unable to climb to the
desired altitude.
The HALE-D blimp was
designed to float above the
jet stream at 60,000 feet
(18,288 meters) and can be
used for reconnaissance,
intelligence and other pur-
poses often accomplished
by satellites, but at lower
cost. The blimp was being
tested as a communications
relay device as part of a con-
tract Lockheed Martin has
with the Army's Space and
Missile Defense Command
in Huntsville, Alabama,
Lockheed spokesman Keith
Little told The Associated
Press.
The blimp got to 32,000


feet (9,754 meters) but
couldn't climb higher, so
controllers in Akron, Ohio,
decided to bring it down
with a "controlled descent"
in a sparsely populated
area, some heavy woods
near New Freeport, about
45 miles (72 kilometers)
southeast of Pittsburgh.
The ship is 270 feet (82
meters) long, 70 feet (21
meters) indiameter and filled
with helium and air, which
were released gradually to
bring the ship to Earth.
'"There is no way for the
airship to come down with it
all filled," Little said. "That's
how we bring it down."
The ship was launched
from a former Goodyear
blimp air dock in Akron
that Lockheed bought years
ago. The defense contractor
has been making lighter-
than-air vehicles for more
than 80 years,; Little said.
Had the test craft per-
formed as desired, it would
have stayed in the air for
four to 10 days at the high-
est altitude, then never
flown again. .


OBITUARIES


Michael Stewart Logan
Mr. Michael Stewart Logan,
age 60, of Lake City, Fla. died
Wednesday, July 27, in the
Shands at University of Florida,
Cancer Center, Gainesville, Fla.
following a sudden illness. He
was a native of Lake Hurst, New
Jersey and had resided in Lake
City, Fla. for the past 40 years.
He was employed in the con-
struction and waste management
industry for many years. He was
a member of the Mt. Carmel Bap-
tist Church and played football
and was #40 on the 1967 Colum-
bia High School State Football
Championship Team. He also
enjoyed fishing and hunting. He
was preceded in death by his
mother Rita Mae Turner Walker.
He is survived by his son, Mi-
chael S. (Meagan) Logan, Jr. of
Lake City, Fla.: his father, Win-
ton W. "Bill" Walker of Lake
City, Fla.: his long term compan-
ion, Shirley Campbell of Lake
City, Fla.: one brother, Raymond
A. (Janice) Logan of Lake City,


Fla.: his grandson, Gage Logan
of Lake City, Fla.: one nephew,
Raymond A. Logan, II and one
niece, Brandy Womble, both of
Lake City, Fla. Funeral services
will be conducted at 11 A.M. Sat-
urday, July 30, in the Mt. Carmel
Baptist Church with Rev. Robert
Sullivan, Pastor, officiating. In-
terment will be in Mt. Carmel
Cemetery, Columbia County,
Fla. Visitation will be from 6 to 8
P.M. Friday, July 29, at GUER-
RY FUNERAL HOME, 2659
S.W. Main Blvd., Lake City. Fla.
www.guerryfuneralhome. net

Beatrice Flossie Slocum
Beatrice Flossie Slo-
cum, 93, a resident of Lake
City, e Florida passed away
July 26, 2011 at her home.
Mrs. Slocum was a native ofWin-
ston County, Alabama and had
resided in Lake City for the past
two years prior to living in Lake
City she had resided in Keystone
Heights for thirty years. She is
the daughter of the late Chel-


sea and Callie Tittle Mayfield.
She is preceded in death by her
husband of fifty-eight years,
Lee William Slocum. She was
a charter member of the Trinity
Baptist Church, Jacksonville, Fl.
and also attended the Hopeful
Baptist Church; Lake City, Fl.
she also was a member of the
Senior Ladies Sunday School
Class at Trinity Baptist Church.
Survivors include her daugh-
ter: Brenda (Bob) D'Augustine,
Bluffton, S.C. Two sons: Rich-
ard (Carol) Slocum, Lake City,


Fl. and Dennis (Vicki) Slocum,
Keystone Heights, Fl. One sister:
Louise Lester, Double Springs,
Alabama. Five Grandchildren,
Theresa Clay, Todd Weaver, Na-
thaniel Slocum, Jeremiah Slocum
and Jessica Lincoln, eight great
grandchildren, Chelsea, Cham-
bers, Amber, Alyssa, Ethan,
Ryan, Cameron and Morgan.
Funeral services for Mrs. Slo-
cum will be conducted Satur-
day, July 30,2011 at 11:00 A.M.
in the Chapel of Guerry Funeral
Home with the Rev. Rodney


Baker, officiating. Interment will
follow at 2:00 P.M. in the Jack-
sonville Memory Gardens Cem-
etery, Jacksonville, Florida. The
family will receive friends Sat-
urday, July 30, 2011 from 10:00-
11:00 just prior to the service.
GUERRY FUNERAL


HOME, 2659 SW. Main Blvd.
Lake City is in charge of ar-
rangements. 386-752-2414.
Obituaries are paid advertise-
ments. For details, call the Lake
City Reporter's classified depart-
ment at 752-1293.


1
- i 4


John W Burns III, Agent
234 SW Main Boulevard
Lake City, FL 32056
Bus: 386-752-5866
johln burns cnj5@statefarm corn


Total average savings of


$480*
Getting to know you and how
you drive helps me find all the
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Slate Farm Vi:;u,i Ajt.3Tiblle 1'^4ra-cii Ccmoaiiv State Farm IfJ&'r ifi/Co1 i. Bloomingtcn, 1L


Attention parents of

kindergarten students:
If you are interested in Public School Choice options
(transferring your child to a school that made adequately
yearly progress), you may request information from
your zoned school. Each school has Public School
Choice information available at registration. You must
first enroll your child in your zoned school to become
eligible for Choice options. If you have any questions,
please notify Yvette Hooper in the Federal Projects office
at 386.755.8033.
The last possible date to complete the request for transfer
is August 9th. Requests should be submitted by 5:00 pm
on Tuesday, August 9th to be considered for transfer.


-"


m%


*


B.















Acura's top car gets better


By ANN M. JOB
Associated Press

Acura's best-selling car,
the mid-size TL sedan, is
revised for 2012 with a new,
modern transmission, inte-
rior upgrades and a toned-
down grille design and rear
end that give a more attrac-
tive look.
Added to a lengthy list
of standard features that
include a power moonroof,
10-way power adjustable
driver seat and eight-way
power adjustable front pas-
senger seat, dual-zone,
automatic climate control
and eight-speaker stereo
with XM satellite radio and
Bluetooth phone connectiv-
ity, the changes make the
TL more competitive than
before.
And the TL already was
a "recommended buy" of
Consumer Reports maga-
zine.
Just remember that while
the TL is described as a five-
passenger sedan, the middle
person in the back seat has
to sit way up on a raised
cushion, so even someone 5
feet 4 gets her head pushed
up into the ceiling. Four
people in this car do much
better than five.
Starting manufacturer's
suggested retail price,
including destination
charge, for a 2012 TL sedan
is $36,490 with automatic
transmission, 280-horse-
power V-6 and all those
standard features.
This compares with the
$36,775 starting retail price
for a 2011 Mercedes-Benz
C300 sedan with automatic
transmission, 228-horse-
power V-6, but no moon- or
sunroof. The 2011 Hyundai
Genesis sedan with auto-'
matic transmission, 290-
horsepower V-6 and no sun-
roof has a starting MSRP,
including destination
charge, of $33,800.
The uplevel TL comes
with all-wheel @rive and
gets Acura's largest, most


ASSOCIATED PRESS


In this Feb. 9 file photo, the 2012 Acura TL is shown at the Chicago Auto Show.-


powerful V-6 offering 305
horses, too. Starting sticker
price for this 2012 TL is
$40,040. In comparison, all-
wheel drive can be added
to the base Mercedes C300
with 228 horsepower for an
additional $2,000. Hyundai's
Genesis does not offer all-
wheel drive.
The TL has Acura's own
Super-Handling All-Wheel-
Drive that not only shifts
power to -both front and
rear axles when slippery
road conditions require.
The system can apportion
power to the left- and right-
side wheels, thus ensuring
, precise, tablee cornering.
'Slotted between the entry,
Acura TSX sedan and the
full-size Acura RL sedan,
the mid-size TL posted


sales of 15,414 in the first
six months of this year.
The only Acura with more
sales is the MDX sport
utility vehicle with sales of
22,195.
The TL is an interesting
alternative to European-
branded luxury sedans
because it mixes technol-
ogy features in the interior
with surprising ease.
,While some drivers of a
BMW 3-Series blanche at
having to figure out the car's
complicated iDrive menu to
check car settings or find
fuel mileage statistics, the
information is much more
readily available in the TL.
In fact, even the presets
for the radio were easy to
figure out in the TL, since
real buttons labeled 1


through 6 are there below
the radio screen, while in
some other cars, these pre-
sets have to be located via a
digital screen.
I liked that I could eas-
ily find the day's weather
on a screen in the TL, and
it didn't take me five steps
to pull it up. And, via the
optional navigation system
database, I could access a
restaurant via its Zagat list-
ing in the TL.
In this summer's blis-
tering heat, I appreciated
the TL's fast-working air
conditioning. The tester's
Advance Package added
fans below, the ,front. seat
cushions that moved air in
that area to keep me cool
and refreshed.
Attractive, saddle-colored


leather on the test car seats
was pliable and believably
leather, not something that
could be confused with
high-grade vinyl. 'Seats had
both support and a bit of
cushion for comfortable
use. But I wish I sat up
higher in the TL. My pas-
sengers and I looked up at
people in a Toyota Corolla
in the lane next to .us.
The test TL rode quietly
much. of the time, with only
road noise from the 18-inch
tires coming in.
But the 3.7-liter, single
overhead cam V-6 came on
*strongly in power and in
confident, almost growling
sounds when the accel-
erator went firmly down.
Torque peaks at 273 foot-
pounds at 5,000 rpm, pro-


viding ample power for my
needs in city and highway
traffic.
In fact, a passenger asked
if the car was turbocharged,
because the "oomph" came
on with force when I had
the TL in "sport" mode.
There were paddle shifters,
too, on the steering wheel
for added sporty feel.
In comparison, the 2011
Genesis sedan with V-6 gen-
erates 264 foot-pounds of
torque at 4,500 rpm, while
the base C300 tops out at
.221 foot-pounds.
Fuel mileage in the TL
wasn't great. I averaged
20.1 miles a gallon in 50-
50 city/highway travel. The
federal government fuel
mileage rating, for this ver-
sion of TL is 18/26 mpg.
And, the TL requires pre-
mium gasoline, so a fillup
of the car's 18.5-gallon tank
can cost upwards of $72
these days.
Passengers in the tester
felt road bumps nearly all
the time. Even patched road
pavement was enough to
jiggle bodies in this sporty-
luxury sedan.
There are places where
the TL seems a bit cheap.
There is no power up or
power down for the rear,
windows and no power-
closing trunk lid. The mate-
rial that covers the inside of'
the trunk looks like it could
have come from a much
lower-priced car.
And I was surprised at
how high I had to lift items
to get them over the test
car's rear bumper and body
to get them into the 12.5-
cubic-foot trunk.
Still, I liked the attention
to detail. The textured ceil-
ing material looked good,
with no puckers, Every
body gap was well aligned.
The two-shelf glovebox was
nicely finished inside with
sound-deadening material.
'All safety features, includ-
ing curtain air bags, sta-
bility control and traction
control are standard.


Winehouse family, friends,


fans in mourning for singer


By JILL LAWLESS
Associated Press

LONDON' -- Wearing
dark suits, black dresses
and the occasional beehive
hairdo, friends and fam-
ily said goodbye to Arpy
Winehouse Tuesday with
prayers, tears, laughter
and song at an emotional
funeral ceremony.
"Amy was the greatest
daughter, family member
and friend you could ever
have," said her father,
Mitch Winehouse, in a sec-
tion of the eulogy released
by a family spokesman.
The singer's father,
mother and brother were
joined by Winehouse's
close friends, band mem-
bers and celebrities
including producer Mark
Ronson for the service at
Edgwarebury Cemetery in
north London. Media per-
sonality Kelly Osbourne
was one of several women
to wear their hair piled bee-
hive-high in an echo of the
singer's trademark style.
Fans and photographers
thronged the lane outside,
but the funeral was for sev-
eral hundred friends and
family only.
Mitch Winehouse told
mourners that his late
daughter had recently
found love and had beaten
her drug dependency three
years before her death,
but he admitted she was
still struggling to control
her drinking after several
weeks of abstinence.
"She said, 'Dad I've had
enough of drinking, I can't
stand the look on your and
the family's faces anymore."'
Mitch Winehouse said.
He said Amy had been


ASSOCIATED PRESS
A woman places candles amongst the flowers and tributes left for British singer Amy
Winehouse outside her home in London, Tuesday. The singer, who had struggled with drug
and alcohol abuse for years, was found dead Saturday at home by a member of her
security team, who called an ambulance. It arrived too late to save her.


playing her drums and
singing in the home the
night before her death.
"But knowing she wasn't
depressed, knowing she
passed away, knowing
she passed away happy,
it makes us all feel bet-
ter," he said, adding that
he hopes to set up an Amy
Winehouse Foundation
that would help people beat
substance abuse.
The cab driver and jazz
singer, who helped fos-
ter his daughter's love of
music, ended his eulogy
with the words "Goodnight,
my angel, sleep tight.
Mummy and Daddy love
you ever so much."
The Jewish service was led
byarabbiandincludedprayers
in English and Hebrew.


It ended with a rendition
of Carole King's "So Far
Away," one ofWinehouse's
favorite songs.
"Mitch was funny, he
told some great stories
from childhood about
how headstrong she was,
and clearly the family and.
friends recognized the sto-
ries and laughed along,"
said family spokesman
Chris Goodman.
"He stressed so many
times she was happier now
than she had ever been and
he spoke about her boy-
friend and paid tribute to a
lot of people in her life."
Family friend Alfie
Ezekiel, 55, said the service
had been a "joyful" celebra-
tion of the singer's life.
"Mitch gave a very good


eulogy and he managed to
get through it very well,
considering," he said.
Close family and friends
- including Winehouse's
recent boyfriend, Reg
Traviss moved
on to Golders Green
Crematorium, where the
singer was cremated.
Several mourners, includ-
ing Ronson who co-pro-
duced Winehouse's break-
through album "Back to
Black" looked emotional
as they left the red brick
structure, which has seen
the cremations of thousands
of ordinary Londoners and
many celebrities, including
psychoanalyst Sigmund
Freud, comedian Peter
Sellers and drummer Keith
Moon of The Who.


ASSOCIATED PRESS
In this July 5, photo shows a historic marker in front of the
childhood home of country singer Patsy Cline in Winchester, '
Va. The Patsy Cline Historic House is expected to open Aug.
2 as a memorial to the singer who recorded such classics as
"Crazy" and "I Fall to Pieces" before dying in a plane crash in
1963.


Patsy Cline's


restored house


opening in Va.


Associated Press

WINCHESTER, Va.
- Patsy Cline fans curious
about the early days of her
brief but highly acclaimed
country music career will
finally be able to do more
than just drive by her old
house in Winchester and
snap a picture.
The Patsy Cline Historic
House will open Aug. 2 as
a memorial to the singer
who recorded such clas-
sics as "Crazy" and "I Fall
to Pieces" before dying
in a plane crash in 1963.
Visitors will be able to step
through the door of 608
S. Kent St. and back in
time some six decades for
a glimpse of how Virginia
"Ginny" Patterson Hensley
lived from her mid-teens to


mid-20s, as she emerged
from small-town obscurity
to become one of music's
most enduring and influen-
,tial superstars.
"'The fact that her music
seems timeless brings a
whole new group in every
generation that keeps her
alive," said Cline's daughter,
Julie Fudge of Nashville. "Her
career was a small amount
of years, and she had lots of
accolades, but I don't think
she imagined the things that
would come after she died."
Cline's husband, Charlie
Dick of Nashville, said
Patsy's premature death at
age 30 and the question of
how much more she might
have accomplished is "part
of the mystique" that con-
tinues to fuel interest in her
life and career.


Page Editor: Brandon Finley, 754-0420


LAKE CITY REPORTER NEWS THURSDAY, JULY 28, 2011










Lake City Reporter





Health


& Wellness


Brought to you

ShandsLaki
Regional Med

-. - .


Page Editor: Robert Brdges, 754-0428


LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL & STATE THURSDAY, JULY 28, 2011


ON HEALTH






Dr. Peter Gott



Getting


it right

DEAR DR. GO'IT: I have
been told I have fibromyal-
gia. From the information
I have found, it seems like
this is a diagnosis when it
isn't known what is wrong.
When I wake in the morn-
ing, I feel like I have been
in an auto accident. I hurt
from top to bottom. After I
get moving, it gets little
better, but the muscles
mostly in my legs, arms
and hands hurt all the time.
I have lots of headaches
and sadness, and I just feel
tired.
I was put on Lyrica, and
after about two weeks I did
have a few better days, but
now not so many.
My dad and two of his
sisters had Huntington's
disease. Not a lot is known
about Huntington's, and
most doctors have never
heard of it. I am 53. My
father passed away at the
age of 50, and both his
sisters passed away in their
late 60s to early 70s.
My doctor, whom I
have always trusted, said
from what she knows that
Huntington's cannot be
passed from the father,
only the mother, so any
information you can help
me with would be great.
DEARREADER:
Huntington's is an inher-
ited neurodegenerative dis-
order caused by a genetic
defect on chromosome No.
4 that causes specific nerve
cells in the brain to dete-
iorate. This defect causes
a: portion of DNA, called a
CAG repeat, to occur more
frequently than it normally
should. The number of
CAG repeats may deter-
mine the severity of the
disorder. With lower num-
bers, mild abnormal move-
ments may occur later in
life and slow the progres-
sion of the disease, while
those with larger numbers
may suffer more severe
complications. As the gene
passes from one generation
to the next, that number
enlarges. The larger the
number of repeats, the
greater your chances are
of developing symptoms at
a younger age. To the best
of my knowledge, it can be
passed on by either parent.
There are two forms of
Huntington's: adult onset,
which reveals symptoms
when a person is in his or
her mid-30s and 40s; or an
early-onset form that is less
common and can begin in
childhood.
If one of your par-
ents has or did have
Huntington's, you have
a 50 percent chance of
acquiring the gene for
the disease. You can also
pass it on to your children.
Without the gene, you can-
not pass it on.
Common symptoms that
may precede any problems
with movement include irri-
tability, paranoia and hal-
lucinations. Unsteady gait,
grimacing of facial muscles,
uncontrolled movements,
difficulty swallowing and
speech impairment may
follow.
Diagnosis should begin


GOTT continued on 8A


For some, hypnosis eases



pain, recovery of surgery


MARIA CHENG
AP Medical Writer
LONDON As the
surgeons cut into her
neck, Marianne Marquis
was thinking of the
beach.
As she heard the doc-
tors' voices, she was
imagining her toes in the
sand, the water lapping.
Marquis had been
hypnotized before sur-
gery to have her thyroid
removed. She's among a
growing number of surgi-
cal patients at the Belgian
hospital, Cliniques
Universitaires St. Luc in
Brussels, who choose
hypnosis and a' local
anesthetic to avoid the
groggy knockout effect
of general anesthesia.
These patients are
sedated but aware, and
doctors say their recov-
ery time is faster and
their need for painkillers
reduced. This method is
feasible for only certain
types of operations.
In her case, Marquis,
53, imagined herself
in a field near a beach
which her anesthetist
began describing by
whispering into her ear
about 10 minutes before
surgery. She remembers
hearing the doctors talk
to her, but said it was as
if they were far away.
"I was imagining
squishing my toes in the
sand and feeling water
come up over them,"
Marquis said. She felt
a little pressure on her
neck with the first inci-
-sion but said it wasn't
painful.-
Since doctors began
offering hypnosis at the
hospital in 2003, hun-
dreds of patients have
chosen it. At another
' Belgian hospital, more
than 8,000.surgeries have
been done this way since
1992.
Doctors say nearly any
surgery usually done


with a local anesthetic
could work with hypnosis
and less pain medicine.
Proponents say hypnosis
can dull patients' sense of
pain and that it also cuts
down on the need for
anesthetic.
That means patients
recover faster and hospi-
tals save money, accord-
ing to some studies. But
it may require doctors
to spend more time with
patients beforehand to
do the hypnosis and they
may need more careful
monitoring during sur-
gery.
The technique has
become increasingly
popular in France and
Belgium in recent years.
Some plastic and facial
surgeons in Germany
also use hypnosis, as well
as some British dental
surgeons.
The French Society
of Anesthesiologists
describes hypnosis as a
*valid way to supplement
anesthesia to reduce
stress, anxiety and pain
but neither the Belgian
nor British anesthesiol-
ogy groups offer spe-
cific hypnosis advice.
Because of demand,
the French Society of
Anesthesiologists created
a special hypnosis branch
in their organization last
year.
There are no figures
on how widely hypnosis
is used across Europe.
In several of the nearly
dozen French hospitals
in Rennes, a northwest
city of about 200,000 peo-
ple, it's used in about half
of all operations, says
Claude Virot, a psychia-
trist and director of the
Institute of Research ani
Training in Therapeutic
Communication there.
Virot helps organize h3p-
nosis training and said
about 500 health profes-
sionals get it every yeir
in France.
Dr. Fabienne Roelaits,


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Anesthesiologists Fabienne Roelarts, center, and
Christine Watremez, left, stand next to patient Christel
Place moments after her thyroid surgery performed under
hypnosis at Cliniques Universitaires St. Luc Hospital in
Brussels. At the hospital, one third of all surgeries to
remove thyroids and one quarter of all breast cancer sur-
geries are performed using hypnosis and local anesthetic
rather than full anesthesia.


Marquis' anesthetist,
described hypnosis as
a modified state of con-
sciousness. "The patient's
mind goes to a pleasant.
place, blt the body stays
in the operating room."
At Roe.ants' hospital,
one-third of all surgeries
to remove thyroids and
one-qtarter of all breast
cancer surgeries, includ-
ing bipsies and mas-
tectonies, use hypnosis
and local anesthetic. She
and colleaguess hope to
expaid the technique to
procedures like hernias,
knee arthroscopies and
plastic surgeries.
Roelants said if
patimts feel any pain dur-
ing ihe procedure, anes-
theists immediately give
then a painkiller shot.
During a recent proce-
du!e in Brussels where
Chlistel Place, 43, had
he' thyroid removed,
sle furrowed. her brow
a ;ouple of times to
simal to Roelants she
nreded more drugs. In a
g-een-lit room that helps
rlax the patients, Place
pctured herself hiking
h the French Alps while
surgeons sliced her neck
)pen.
The thyroid is a small
gland at the bottom of
the neck and makes
hormones to control the
body's metabolism. It
is sometimes removed
when it becomes
enlarged, overactive or
cancerous. The surgery
can be done either with
local or general anes-
thesia and is considered
low-risk.
Place said waking up
from the surgery was
more abrupt than she'd
expected. "It was like I
was really in the moun-
tains and then 'poof,' it
was over," Place said,
laughing.
Other experts caution
that hypnosis would be
HYPNOSIS continued on 8A


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Anesthesiologist Fabienne Roelarts, right, monitors hypno-
tized patient Christel Place during thyroid surgery in the oper-
ating theater of the Cliniques Universitaires St. Luc Hospital
in Brussels on Friday, July 15, 2011. At the hospital, one
third of all surgeries to remove thyroids and one quarter of all
breast cancer surgeries are performed using hypnosis and
local anesthetic.


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Story ideas?

Contact
Robert Bridges
Editor
754-0428


Lake City Reporter





Health

W XeIllness


Brought to you by

Shands.lth- D ,r
Regional Medical Center

i1. Ng
~j~ -


r8A wwI.-w.r.akecityreporte .com Thursday, uly 28, 20
8A _www.lakecityreporter.com Thursday, July 28, 201 I


HYPNOSIS: Easing surgical pain
Continued From Page 1A


impossible in major opera-
tions involving the heart
or other internal organs
because the pain would be
unbearable.
"If hypnosis doesn't
work and you've got
somebody's abdomen or
chest open, then you're
in big trouble," said
George Lewith, a profes-
sor of health research at
Southampton University.
"You need to be able to
switch to another option
immediately," he said.
. Consistency is also
an issue. "It's not used
routinely because it's not
effective in everyone and
it takes a while," said Dr,
Mark Warner, president
of the American Society of,
Anesthesiologists. He said
doctors would need extra
time to conduct hypnosis


and would need to work
more closely with sur-
geons.
Some experts said hyp-
nosis is a hard sell because
no one really profits from
it.
"The problem is the
money doesn't really
go into anyone's hands,
and the only person who
really benefits from it is
the patient," said Guy
Montgomery, an associate
professor at the Mount
Sinai Medical Center in
New York, who led a study
published in the Journal
of the National Cancer
Institute in 2007.
In that research,
Montgomery and col-
leagues randomly assigned
200 patients in the U.S.
having a breast biopsy
or lumpectomy to either


get hypnosis or a brief
session with a-psycholo-
gist beforehand. They
found hypnotized patients
needed fewer painkillers
and sedatives and required
less time in surgery. On
average, each hypnotized
patient cost the hospital
about $770 less than those
who weren't hypnotized.
Marquis recommends
hypnosis to patients who
want to avoid anesthesia,
but warned it isn't for
everyone.
"You have to be in the
right mental frame of
mind for this, be properly
prepared and trust the
medical staff to take care
of you," she said. "If you're
very skeptical of hypnosis
and freaked out about
whether it's going to work,
it probably won't."


ASSOCIATED PIESS
Anesthesiologist Fabienne Roelarts, left, hypnotizes.patient Christel Place prior to her thyrdd
surgery in the operating theater of the Cliniques Universitaires St. Luc Hospital in Brussels.
on Friday, July 15, 2011. At the hospital, one third of all surgeries to remove thyroids and
one quarter of all breast cancer surgeries are performed using hypnosis and local anestheti:
rather than full anesthesia.


GOTI: Getting the diagnosis right
Continued From Page 1A


SOUTHERN


ting New Patients
-: S . .'g in adult medical care including:
' * tnij re *" "Arthritis
R* Hi Bdloon jaure Backache Evaluation
Heart D1isease and Treatment


with a complete examina-
tion. A visual exam may
reveal abnormal reflexes,
dementia or difficulties
with speech. An EEG
might be ordered if a per-
son has had one or more
seizures. A PET scan of
the brain can reveal struc-
tural changes in specific
areas of the brain affected
by Huntington's; however,
those changes'are not
always clear-early on in
the disease. Genetic test-
ipg may be performed for
confirmation particularly
if your father and aunts
didn't undergo that proce-
dure.
i The course of
Huntington's cannot be
altered, but specific medi-
cations can reduce symp-
toms related to movement
and any psychiatric disor-
ders. Medications to sup-
press involuntary jerking
motions, muscle rigidity
and anxiety are available,
as are antidepressants and
mood-stabilizing drugs for
bipolar conditions. Then
there are speech, physical
and occupational therapies,
and support groups to help
a person cope.
After all this, I am not
sure your symptoms are
indicative of Huntington's.
Your muscle pain, head-
aches, sadness and fatigue
might lead me to agree
with your physician, and I
would investigate arthritis,
fibromyalgia and perhaps
some neurological disor-
ders.


Fibromyalgia is poorly.
understood, but can be
identified by a patient
as widespread pain of
muscles and ligaments,
with tingling, numbness,
exhaustion, fatigue, joint
stiffness, sleep distur-
bances, headaches and
depression among a whole
host of symptoms. The
condition can be difficult
to diagnose and treat, but
once accomplished, there
is a great deal that can be
done to control the pain
and stress involved.
My recommenda-
tion would be to have
genetic testing performed
to confirm or rule out
Huntington's. Then, if you
haven't had recent blood
work, speak with your phy-
sician to rule out various
types of arthritis or vitamin
deficiencies. Do this inves-
tigation so you can put
your mind at ease and get
on with your life.
Readers who would
like further informa-
tion on fibromyalgia can
order my Health Report
"Fibromyalgia" by send-
ing a self-addressed,
stamped No. 10 envelope
and a $2 U.S. check or
money order for each
report to Dr. Peter Gott,
P.O. Box 433, Lakeville,
CT 06039. Be sure to
mention the title (s), or
print an order form from
my website's direct link:
www.AskDrGottMD.com/
orderform.pdf.


* Dr. Peter Gott is a retired
physician and the author of
the book "Dr. Gott's No Flour,
No Sugar Diet," a. liable at
most chaih and independent
bookstores, and the recently
published "Dr. Gott's No
Flour, No Sugar Cookbook."


I PRIMARY
r CARE
fIMEDICINE


* Preventative Care
* Physicals
* Geriatric Care
* Women's Health
* Diabetes
Management

386.754.DOCS (3627)
www.primarycaremedi.com


Nv-wftmB ARXV
Best of
the Best
k',t 4 Years


i ., ,.


Acceptingewatin


.-:'..~ ~
.4 ~1~* 'Bs"
~.
~UiEEE~
S. _______________


LAKECITY


* MRI
* Ultrasound
* X-Ray
* CT-64- Slice Scanner
* Digital Mammography
* Bone Density
386.487.3970


* Physical Therapy
* Hand Therapy/
Splinting
* Osteoporosis Program
* Balance Disorders

386.755.3164


Saturday, August 13
10am- Opm at the Columbia County Fair Grounds

SN tI SLIDES-PRIZES
e BOUNCE HOUSE GAMES
IFUNZONE BRINGTHEKIDS


I Mo sta o t n wt n 4 o s


-Y~I--~iilC---~g I









Lake City Reporter


Story ideas?

Contact
Tim Kirby
Sports Editor
754-0421
tkirby@aokeatyreportercom


SPORTS


Thursday, July 28, 201 I


www.lakecityreporter.com


Section B


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Columbia High's J.T. Gilliam (left) waits to make a tag in a game played last season. Gilliam
will attend Pensacola State College to play for the Pirates.



Preferred position


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Los Angeles Angels' pitcher Ervin Santana hugs his catcher Bobby Wilson after pitching a
no-hitter'against the Cleveland Indians in a baseball game Wednesday in Cleveland. The
Angels won 3-1. Shortstop Erick Aybar (left) and first baseman Mark Trumbo (44) join in the
celebration.

Santana pitches no-hitter


Associated Press

CLEVELAND Ervin
Santana pitched the first
solo no-hitter for the Angels
in nearly 27 years, strik-
ing opt 10 and leading Los
Angeles over the Cleveland


Indians 3-1 Wednesday.
Santana allowed only
two runners there was'
an error on the leadoff bat-
ter in the first inning and a
walk in the eighth.
Santana (6-8) was in com-
plete control while throwing


the Angels' first complete-
game no-litter since Mike',
Witt pitched a perfect game.
on Sept 30, 1984, against'
Texas. Mark Langston (7
innings) and Witt (2 innings)
combined to hold Seattle hit-
less on April 11, 1990.


Gilliam set to play
for Pensacola
State College.
By BRANDON FINLEY
bfinley@lakecityreporter.com
It's the little things that
mean the most to Columbia
High's J.T. Gilliam. That's
why earning a spot as a pre-
ferred walk-on at Pensacola


State College means so
much.
Gilliam will .have the
chance to continue to work
toward his dream' while
working on his education
at Pensacola State College,
but he'll never forget his
time as a Tiger.
"Looking back, it's mostly
the little things like finally
being able to play with all
my friends like I did when


we were younger," he said.
"Any day that you get to go
play is a blessing."
Gilliam played for four dif-
ferent coaches at Columbia,
but the members of those
teams remained the same.
During his junior year, the
Tigers came together to win
a district championship.
"Like any team, we knew
GILLIAM continued on 6B


COURTESY PHOTO
The Lake City Sliders under-16 Babe Ruth All-Stars were district and state champions, but,
came up short in the Babe Ruth Softball Southeast Regional Tournament in Richmond, Va.,

Rough regional for Sliders


Lake City 16U
all-star team goes
1-3 at tournament.
From staff reports

The Lake City Sliders
under-16 Babe Ruth
All-Stars returned from
regional play in Virginia
with a 1-3 record.
The Babe Ruth Softball
Southeast Regional
Tournament was last week
at Varina Youth. Sports in
Richmond, Va.
Lake City was placed in
the National Bracket and
stumbled at the start.
The Sliders lost to New


Kent, 10-0, in their open-
ing game after the teams
started with four score-
less innings. In the second
game on Thursday, Lake
City led Cashie 1-0 in the
fifth inning, but eventually
lost, 6-1.
In the first two games the
Sliders had to deal with a
pitching rubber three feet
shorter than their norm,
and a field with no tem-
porary softball fence. The
425-feet fence was a factor
in the loss to Cashie when
a ball got by -a fielder and
three runs scored.
Lake City settled down
for its final two games. One
was a 1-0 loss to Wilson,


a team that went 4-0 in
division play and won the
overall championship.
In the final game, the
Sliders run-ruled the host
Varina team, 10-0, as every
player contributed at least
one hit..
Cashie was 3-1 in the
National Bracket, while
Lake City, New Kent and
Varina all finished 1-3.
Madison went 4-0 to win
the American Bracket and
Henderson-Vance was run-
ner-up at 3-1. In the cham-
pionship semifinals, Wilson
beat Henderson-Vance and
Madison beat Cashie.
Wilson won the champ-
ionship game, 4-3.


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Pre-registration is encouraged by calling 888.681.6388

Provided by:

COMMUNITY
CANCER CENTER
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4520 W US Highway 90 Lake City 386.755.0601
More details at www.cccnf.com

Partners in the project:
Dr. J. Anthony Trott CMSMG Dermatology


I


I II


- --













LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS THURSDAY, JULY 28, 2011


SCOREBOARD


TELEVISION

TV sports

Today
AUTO RACING
8 p.m.
SPEED ARCA, Ansell Protective
Gloves 200, at Clermont, Ind. (same-day,
tape)
EXTREME SPORTS
7 p.m.
ESPN X Games, at Los Angeles
2a.m.
ESPN2 X Games, at Los Angeles
(delayed tape)
GOLF
9 a.m.
ESPN Women's British Open, first
round, at Angus, Scotland
TGC European PGA Tour, Irish
Open, first round, at Kerry, Ireland
3 p.m.
ESPN2 USGA, U.S. Senior Open
Championship, first round, at Toledo,
Ohio
TGC PGA Tour, The Greenbrier
Classic, first round, at White Sulphur
SpringsW.Va.
6:30 p.m.
TGC Nationwide Tour, Utah
Championship, first round, at Sandy, Utah
MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL
12:30 p.m.
MLB Regional coverage, N.Y. Mets
at Cincinnati or Florida at Washington
2 p.m.
WGN Chicago Cubs at Milwaukee
7 p.m.
MLB Regional coverage, San
Francisco at Philadelphia or Pittsburgh
at Atlanta
SOCCER
S8 p.m.
ESPN2 Serie A/Mexican Primera
Division, World Football Challenge,
Juventus vs. Guadalajara, at Raleigh, N.C.


BASEBALL

AL standings


Boston
New York


East Division
W L
63 38
61 40


Pct GB
.624 -
.604 2


Tampa Bay 53 49 .520 10'.
Toronto 5I 52 .495 13
Baltimore 41 58 .414 21
Central Division
W L Pct GB
Detroit 55 48 .534 -
Cleveland 52 50 .510 2,.
Chicago 50 52 .490 4',
Minnesota 48 55 .466 7
Kansas City 43 60 .417 12
West Division
W L Pct GB
Texas 59 45 .567 -
Los Angeles 57 48 .543 2A'/
Oakland 46 57 .447 12'A
Seattle 43 60 .417 15'I
Tuesday's Games
LAAngels 2, Cleveland I
N.Y.Yankees 4, Seattle I
Baltimore 12,Toronto 4
Boston 13, Kansas City 9
Minnesota 9,Texas 8
Detroit 5, Chicago White Sox 4
Oakland 6,Tampa Bay I
Wednesday's Games
LAAngels 3, Cleveland I
Seattle 9, N.Y.Yankees 2
Chicago White Sox 2, Detroit I
Baltimore at Toronto (n)
Kansas City at Boston (n)
Minnesota at Texas (n)
Tampa Bay at Oakland (n)
Today's Games
L.A. Angels (Pineiro 5-5) at Detroit
(Penny 7-7), 1:05 p.m.
Kansas City (Hochevar 6-8) at Boston
(Beckett 9-3), 1:35 p.m.
Tampa Bay (W.Davis 7-7) at Oakland
(Harden 2-1), 3:35 p.m.
Baltimore (Bergesen 2-6) at Toronto
(C.Villanueva 5-2), 7:07 p.m.
Minnesota (S.Baker 8-5) at Texas
(M.Harrison 8-7), 8:05 p.m.
Friday's Games
Baltimore at N.Y.Yankees, 7:05 p.m.
Kansas City at Cleveland, 7:05 p.m.
LAAngels at Detroit, 7:05 p.m.
Texas at Toronto, 7:07 p.m.
Boston at Chicago White Sox,
8:10 p.m.
Minnesota at Oakland, 10:05 p.m.
Tampa Bay at Seattle, 10:10 p.m.

NL standings


Philadelphia


East Division
W L
65 37


Pct GB
.637 -


Atlanta 60 44 .577 6
New York 52 51 .505 13'n
Florida 50 53 .485 15';
Washington 49 53 .480 16
Central Division
W L Pct GB
St. Louis 55 48 .534 -
Milwaukee 55 49 .529 '4
Pittsburgh 53 48 .525 1
Cincinnati 50 53 .485 5
Chicago 42 61 .408 13
Houston 33 70 .320 22
West Division
W L Pct GB
San Francisco 59 44 .573 -
Arizona 56 47 .544 3
Colorado 48 56 .462 II'n
Los Angeles 47 56 .456 12
San Diego 45 59 .433 14'b
Tuesday's Games
Florida 1II,Washington 2
Philadelphia 7, San Francisco 2
N.Y. Mets 8, Cincinnati 6.
Atlanta 4, Pittsburgh 3, 19 innings
Milwaukee 3, Chicago Cubs 2
St. Louis 3, Houston I
Arizona 6, San Diego I
L.A. Dodgers 3, Colorado 2
Wednesday's Games
Florida atWashington (n)
San Francisco at Philadelphia (n)
N.Y. Mets at Cincinnati (n)
Pittsburgh at Atlanta (n)
Chicago Cubs at Milwaukee (n)
Houston at St. Louis (n)
Arizona at San Diego (n)
Colorado at L.A. Dodgers (n)
Today's Games
Florida (Hensley 1-2) at Washington
(Lannan 7-6), 12:35 p.m.
N.Y. Mets (Capuano 8-10) at Cincinnati
(H.Bailey 5-4), 12:35 p.m.
Chicago Cubs (R.Wells 2-3) at
Milwaukee (Marcum 9-3), 2:10 p.m.
Arizona (D.Hudson 10-6) at San Diego
(Latos 5-10), 3:35 p'm. 1
San Francisco (Lincecum 8-8) at
Philadelphia (K.Kendrick 5-4), 7:05 p.m.


Pittsburgh (Correia 11-8) at Atlanta
(D.Lowe 6-8), 7:10 p.m.
Houston (WRodriguez 6-7) at St.
Louis (J.Garcia 10-4), 8:15 p.m.
Friday's Games
N.Y. Mets at Washington, 7:05 p.m.
Pittsburgh at Philadelphia, 7:05 p.m.
San Francisco at Cincinnati, 7:10 p.m.
Florida at Atlanta, 7:35 p.m.
Houston at Milwaukee, 8:10 p.m.
Chicago Cubs at St. Louis, 8:15 p.m.
Colorado at San Diego, 10:05 p.m.
Arizona at LA Dodgers, 10:10 p.m.


FOOTBALL

NFL preseason

WEEK I
Thursday, Aug. 11
Baltimore at Philadelphia, 7:30 p.m.
Jacksonville at New England, 7:30 p.m.
Seattle at San Diego, 8 p.m. (ESPN)
Denver at Dallas, 8:30 p.m.
Arizona at Oakland, 10 p.m.
Friday,Aug. 12
Cincinnati at Detroit, 7:30 p.m.
Miami atAtlanta, 7:30 p.m.
Pittsburgh at Washington, 7:30 p.m.
San Francisco at New Orleans, 8 p.m.
Tampa Bay at Kansas City, 8 p.m.
(FOX)
Saturday,Aug. 13

Green Bay at Cleveland, 7:30 p.m.
Buffalo at Chicago, 8 p.m.
Indianapolis at St Louis, 8 p.m.
Minnesota at Tennessee, 8 p.m.
N.Y. Giants at Carolina, 8 p.m.
IMonday,Aug. 15
N.Y. Jets at Houston, 8 p.m. (ESPN)

Arena League playoffs

First Round
National Conference
Friday


Dallas at Chicago, 8:30 p.m.
Spokane at Arizona Rattlers, 10 p.m.
American Conference
Friday
Orlando at Jacksonville, 8 p.m.


BASKETBALL

WNBA schedule

Tuesday's Games
San Antonio 73,WVashington 67
Connecticut 77, Chicago 66
Minnesota 85, Los Angeles 72
Atlanta 76,Tulsa 68
Seattle 83, Phoenix 77
Today's Games
Phoenix at San Antonio, 12:30 p.m.
Los Angeles at Atlanta, 7 p.m.
Washington at New York, 7 p.m.
Indiana at Connecticut, 7:30 p.m.
Chicago at Tulsa, 8 p.m.
Friday's Games
Indiana at Washington, 7 p.m.
Seattle at Minnesota, 8 p.m.


AUTO RACING

Race week

NASCAR
SPRINT CUP
BRICKYARD 400
Site: Indianapolis.
Schedule: Friday, practice (Speed,
1-4:30 p.m.); Saturday, practice (ESPN2,
10-1 1:30 a.m.), qualifying (ESPN2,
2-4:30 p.m.); Sunday, race, I p.m. (ESPN,
noon-S p.m.).
Track: Indianapolis Motor Speedway
(oval, 2.5 miles).
Race distance: 400 miles, 160 laps.
Next race: Pennsylvania 500, Aug. 7,
Pocono Raceway, Long Pond, Pa.
Online: http://www.nascar.com
NATIONWIDE


KROGER 200
Site: Clermont, Ind.
Schedule: Saturday, practice (ESPN2,
11:30 a.m.-I p.m.), qualifying (ESPN2,4:30-
5:30 p.m.), race, 7:30 p.m. (ESPN, 7-10
p.m.).
Track: Lucas Oil Raceway (oval, 0.686
'miles).
Race distance: 137.2 miles, 200 laps.
Next race: U.S. Cellular 250. Aug. 6,
Iowa Speedway, Newton, Iowa.
CAMPING WORLD TRUCKS
AAA INSURANCE 200
Site: Clermont, Ind.
Schedule: Friday, practice, qualifying
(Speed, 4:30-5:30 p.m.), race, 7:30 p.m.
(Speed, 7-10 p.m.).
Track Lucas Oil Raceway.
Race distance: 137.2 miles, 200 laps.
Next race: Pocono Mountains 125,
Aug. 6, Pocono Raceway, Long Pond, Pa.
FORMULA ONE
HUNGARIAN GRAND PRIX
Site: Budapest, Hungary.
Schedule: Friday, practice (Speed,
8-9:30 a.m.), Saturday, practice, qualifying
(Speed, 8-9:30 a.m.); Sunday, race, 8 a.m.
(Speed, 7:30 a.m.-10 a.m., 4:30-7 p.m.).
Trackl Hungaroring (road course, 2.72
miles).
Race distance: 190.53 miles, 70 laps.
Next race: Belgian Grand Prix,Aug. 28,
Spa-Francorchamps, Spa-Francorchamps,
Belgium.
Online: http://www.formulal.com
NHRA FULLTHROTTLE
FRAM-AUTOLITE NHRA
NATIONALS
Site: Sonoma, Calif.
Schedule: Friday, qualifying; Saturday,
qualifying (ESPN2, 5:30-7 p.m.); Sunday,
final eliminations (ESPN2, II p.m.-
1:30 a.m.).
Track: Infineon Raceway.
Next event: O'Reilly Auto Parts
NHRA Northwest Nationals, Aug. 5-7,
Pacific Raceways, Kent, Wash.
Online: http://www.nhro.com


THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME
by David L. Hoyt and Jeff Knurek


Unscramble these four Jumbles,
one letter to each square,
to form four ordinary words.


WHERE THE YANKEF WENT
-I II TO GET A REPLACEMENT
FOR PART OF HIS5
TNEJKU UNIFORM.
r Now arrange the circled letters
to form the surprise answer, as
SI L I suggested by the above cartoon.

Answer here: f L I1 -

(Answers tomorrow)
Yesterday's Jumbles: BATTY MINTS HAGGLE ANNUAL
Answer: When Mr. and Mrs. Albacore had a baby,
they played this NAME THAT "TUNA"


NEA Crossword Puzzle


ACROSS 47 Way Answer to Previous Puzzle
of Lao-tzu TEpASE FISTO0P
1 House cat 50 Distant TARPON HACK ER
6 Watch's planet SK RILLS ASHORE
face 52 Electrical I _
10 Let out line unit K OE E T
12 Pacific 54 Happy SIA X Y
Ocean 58 Tidy up LL G E
sighter 59Sitting ALE AM GO CPL
14 Mix up Bull's MIL TABOO ASP
15 Jaguar kin territory BEECH RANT
16 Director 60 Toboggan OUCH NIL ROOM
Stone 61 "Dallas" ISALVE
18 Barely setting RESCUE BOI LER
scrape by E R R A N T I RE
19 Gas main DOWN LE|AS|E A ET
21 Do a laun-
dry chore 1 Give a good 17 Old 41 Telescope
23 Chow mein yank record lens
additive 2 Miscellany player 44 Nest builder
24 Holiday mo. 3 Subzero 19 Church 46 Honshu
26 Bolt holders comment reading port
29 Yarn 4 Kind 20 Ice dwelling 47 Beige
31 Inc. cousin of jazz 22 Microwave 48 "Mister Ed"
33 Hull part 5 Gave 23 Geol. actor
35 Neatnik a holler formations 49 Libra's
opposite 6 Wash-and- 25 Shade tree stone
36 Hosp. scan wear fabric 27 firma 61 Jarrett of
37 Syllogism 7 Henri's .28 "Love NASCAR
word landmass Story" 53 Bastille Day
38 Zoo barrier 8 Fully author season
40 She loved qualified 30 Online 55 Freight
Lennon 9 Gaze at auction weight
42 Cleaning 11 Luau 32 Huge racket 56 List ender,
cloth welcome 34 Captain's sometimes
43 Long, 12 Afrikaner journal 57 Dit
dismal cry 13 Corroded, 39 Globe- opposite
45 Fossil fuel as acid trotted

Want more puzzles?
Check out the "Just Right Crossword Puzzles" books
at QuillDriverBooks.com


STORE FIXTURES FOR SALE!
ALL SALES FINAL, NO REFUNDS OR EXCHANGES. OPEN DAILY REGULAR HOURS. WE ACCEPT VISA, MASTERCARD, DISCOVER, AMERICAN
EXPRESS AND SEARS CARD. WE ACCEPT SEARS GIFT CARDS. DISCOUNTS DO NOT APPLY TO PREPAID GIFT CARDS. INVENTORY IS LIMITED
TO STOCK ON HAND. THIS STORE IS NOT PARTICIPATING IN CURRENT SEARS CIRCULARS. THIS EVENT EXCLUDES ELECTROLUX.


7-28 2011 UFS, Dist. by Univ Uclick for UFS


e DISCOUNTS AT THIS STORE ONLY




ears .AKEUS CITY

2724 W. US Highway 90


Page Editor: Tim Kirby, 754-0421


I FAF:WL 1










PageEdior:EmoeneGrahm, 54-415 LAK CIY REPORT AVIC & OMIS THRSDY, ULY28,201


DILBERT


BABY BLUES


BLONDIE


BEETLE BAILEY


HAGARTHE HORRIBLE
P ?4WP t, 6 & 6 N1 9-/C/ 7 9/ "', / p, P/ ..e//,j r



-P //,,i Ctft 9),
0sN U K 'S M y/IT Sc ANY %




SNUFFY SMITH


ZITS


J0FEMI I'MqIMPREGSEPAT
flE4 LEV.LOFTRESFQNMIITY'
oU'RESOWING WITfH 4
yotuRPWCI4eC'!
'flcwJ-4V -


GARFIELD


B.C.


FRANK & ERNEST


DEAR ABBY


Readers shed light on tilting

blinds to thwart prying eyes


DEAR ABBY: "In the
Dark in Texas" (May 27)
was wondering about the
correct way to tilt blinds.
Light coming in through a
window should not be the
deciding factor for which
way the blinds close.
Privacy should be of high-
est importance.
After years of living
in apartments, I have
learned the direction of a
blind's slats should change
depending on the location
of the window.
If the window is on the
ground floor, the blind
should be closed slats up.
Otherwise, people can see
in from the floors above.
This information is particu-
larly useful in multistory
neighborhoods and apart-
ment complexes.
If, however, you are on
an upper floor and the slats
are up, anyone can see in
from the ground floor. For
that reason blinds on an
upper floor should close
slats down.
If you live in the
middle, your best bet is
curtains. AZALIAH IN
WASHINGTON STATE
DEAR AZALIAH:
Readers' views on this
subject came from vary-
ing perspectives privacy,
light, heat, etc. But the
general consensus was the
same. Read on:
DEAR ABBY: "In
the Dark" asked whether


Abigail Van Buren
www.deorabby.com
blinds should be closed
with the slats up or down.
As you said, its a matter
of personal preference.
However, as a former
apartment manager, I can
say from experience that
closing them with the slats
in a downward position will
allow in enough sunlight to
fade carpets, furniture and
drapes. I close mine with
the slats up for privacy
and to prevent the fading
of items near the window.
- FORMER APARTMENT
MANAGER IN TEXAS
DEAR ABBY: My hus-
band had a window treat-
ment store years ago and
this is what we learned:
If you are upstairs, the
slats go down. If you are
downstairs, they go up. To
check this out, after dark
with the .lights on inside,
go outside and look inside.
You will be able to see
clearly what is going on
in the house. Follow this
rule to keep Peeping Toms
at bay. SHANNON IN
OLYMPIA, WASH.
DEARABBY: It
is common knowledge (I


thought) that slats tilted
up deflect both heat and
light Blinds tilted down let
light in from above as well
as heat in the summer and
cold in the winter.
Like toilet paper rolls,
toothpaste tube squeezing
and thermostat setting,
this is yet another bone
of contention in marriage.
- COOLING DOWN IN
SOUTH CAROLINA

DEAR ABBY: Dust and
clothing have started to
build up in my bedroom. I
have told my mom and she
doesn't do anything about
it, and I'm tired of telling
her! The mess makes it
hard to live in. I think she
does not love me since she
will not do anything about
the mess. What should I
do? UNLOVED GIRL IN
SPOKANE, WASH.
DEAR UNLOVED GIRL:
Your mother does love
you, What she's doing is
trying to teach you how
to be independent The
first thing you should do
is pick up, the clothes that
are lying around in your
bedroom. Once that's done
you will need to clean any
surfaces that are dusty,
including under the bed.
If you don't know how, ask
your mother to show you.
* Write Dear Abby at
www.DearAbby.com or
P.O. Box 69440, Los
Angeles, CA 90069.


HOROSCOPES


ARIES (March 21-April
19): You'll be far too emo-
tional to, hang around the
house. Get your respon-
sibilities out of the way
quickly and move on to
more pleasurable pas-
tiries. Avoid anyone who
pufs pressure on you.**
TAURUS (April 20-May
20): Plan to do something
out of the ordinary or to
sign up for an interesting
course. Keep your distance
from anyone who is likely
to complain or burden you
with chores. Short trips
that allow you to experi-
ence something new will
help you expand your
awareness. ****
GEMINI (May 21-June
20): Put pressure on any-
one who owes you a favor.
Discuss anything that you
feel is holding you back.
Express your position and
how you wish to proceed.
Good fortune can be yours
if you handle your current
situation with confidence.
An innovative idea will
bring in extra cash. ***
CANCER (June 21-July
22): An impulsive decision,
move or statement will
cause problems. Putting
pressure on others will
backfire. Keep your com-
plaints to yourself, and
honor any promises you
made. Someone from your
past will disrupt your life
if you are too quick to for-
give and forget ***
LEO (July 23-Aug. 22):


THE LAST WORD
Eugenia Last
Ifs important that you
recognize who is on your
side. Stick to the people
you have always been able i
to count on and avoid any-
one who is requesting too
much for too little. Change
is good, but too much of
anything isn't ***
VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept
22): Looking the part is
half the battle when you
are trying to get ahead.
Expand your horizons as
well as your skills and you
will have better luck find-
ing opportunities that fit
your lifestyle and goals.

LIBRA (Sept 23-Oct
22): You can make a wise
investment if you don't let
your emotions intervene.
Postpone a trip or any
dealing you have with insti-
tutions or agencies. Time
is on your side, and tak-
ing longer to prepare will
pay off. A problem with a
friend or relative can be
expected.**
SCORPIO (Oct 23-Nov.
21): Your high creative
energy will help you com-
plete your projects and put
your ideas into motion.
Don't be surprised if you
receive interest from
someone who can help
you develop something
you have been struggling
with. Protect your heart


SAGITTARIUS (Nov.
22-Dec. 21): Invest in what
you know and do best You
can make extra cash if you
start your own small enter-
prise. Consider buying or
selling something that will
helpyotr-in-the future. Put
more effort into partner-
ships. ***
CAPRICORN (Dec.
22-Jan. 19): You'll be emo-
tional regarding partner-
ships. Don't let the past
stand in the way of a bright
new future. A change of
residence or buying and
selling investments will
turn out well. A creative
but forceful approach to
business and workingwith
others will give you an
edge. ***
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-
Feb. 18): Put your energy
into moneymaking invest-
ments and increasing your
circle of friends. The more
you interact with others,
the greater your chance
of finding someone who
can contribute to your life.

PISCES (Feb. 19-March
20): Don't bother get-
ting angry, upset or emo-
tional regarding domestic
changes. Acceptance is the
quickest way to win favors
in return and to make
whatever situation you face
work to your advantage.
Enjoy socializing late in
the day with someone who
shares your sentiments.
*****


CELEBRITY CIPHER

by Luis Campos
Celebrity Cipher cryptograms are created from quotations by famous people, past and present.
Each letter in the cipher stands for another.
TODAY'S CLUE: K equals P
"BHJHDFH ADTL HDFHDOHBM
JCATHDWH, DAP WTIBCPL IDO PB SH
KHIWH. C PZCDX TCEHBIPCAD RSMP


WARH NBAR YCPZC D .


MI D B I


WCMDHBAM
PREVIOUS SOLUTION: "No woman has to be a victim of physical abuse.
Women have to feel like they are not alone." Salma Hayek


(c) 2011 by NEA, Inc. 7-28


FOR BETTER OR WORSE
MY DRDOy. PF DETiSfl MICHFI
you FTiRNG U--THose LODKwl
FOToeflS? Is sHe- FOR


56->


CLASSIC PEANUTS


LPRAKINGOFTRAT
R2oIoU HAvANripA I
W\K ANIIOFTM4 P
ANrF'll-F11A I


LAKE CITY REPORTER ADVICE & COMICS THURSDAY, JULY 28, 2011


Page Editor: Emogene Graham, 754-0415










Classified Department: 755-5440


Ui-iT"


SELLIaii


iiFtIND 1


LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED THURSDAY, JULY 28, 2011

Lake City Reporter





CLASSIFIED


Take ADvantage of the
Reporter Classifieds!

755-5440


* ADvantage


Legal

CITY OF LAKE CITY
PUBLIC NOTICE
Notice is hereby given that meetings
of the Code Enforcement Board and
Contractor's Board of Examiners and
Appeals of the City of Lake City,
Florida will be conducted on the 2nd
Thursday of each month, as needed.
As of September 2011, said meetings
will commence at 5:30 P.M. at City
Hall, 205 N
Marion Avenue, Lake City, Florida.

05526853
July 28, 2011

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
COLUMBIA COUNTY, FLORIDA
Probate Division
File No. 11-146-CP
IN RE: ESTATE OF
GLENN W. AESCHLIMAN
a/k/a GLENN WILLARD AES-
CHLIMAN
Deceased
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
(Summary Administration)
TO ALL PERSONS HAVING
CLAIMS OR DEMANDS
AGAINST THE ABOVE ESTATE:
You are hereby notified that an Or-
der of Summary Administration has
been entered in the estate of GLENN
W. AESCHLIMAN a/k/a WILL-
ARD AESCHLIMAN, deceased,.
File No. 11-146-CP, by the Circuit
'Court for Columbia County, Florida,
Probate Division, the address of
which is 173 NE Hemrnando Avenue,
Lake City, Florida 32055; that the to-
tal cash value of the estate is
$34,960.00 and that the names and
addresses of those to whom it has
been assigned by such order are:
NAME:
Patricia Scully
ADDRESS:
947 Pond St., Apt. 403, Syracuse,
NY 13208
NAME:
Donald Sievers
ADDRESS:
22295 135th Court, O'Brien, FL
32071
ALL INTEREST PERSONS ARE
NOTIFIED THAT:
All creditors of the decedent and oth-
er persons having claims or demands
against decedent's estate on whom a
copy of this notice is served within
three months after the date of the
first publication of this notice must
file their claims with this Court
WITHIN THE LATER OF THREE
(3) MONTHS AFTER THE DATE
OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE OR THIRTY (30)
DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF
SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS
NOTICE ON THEM.
All other creditors of the decedent
and persons having claims or de-
mands against the estate of the dece-
dent must file their claims with this
Court WITHIN THREE MONTHS
AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST
PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE.
ALL CLAIMS AND DEMANDS
NOT SO FILED WILL BE FOREV-
ER BARRED.
The date of the first publication of
this Notice is July 28, 2011

Attorney for Person Giving Notice
/s/ Terry McDavid
TERRY MCDAVID
Post Office Box 1328
Lake City, FL 32056-1328
Telephone (386) 752-1896
Florida Bar No. 052454

Person giving Notice:
/s/ Donald Sievers
222959 135th Court
O'Brien, FL 32071

05526839
July 28, 2011
August 4, 2011
NOTICE OF BOARD MEETING
TO WHOM IT MAY CONCERN
The District Board of Trustees, Flori-
da Gateway College, will hold a pub-
lic meeting at 4:00 p.m. on Tuesday,
August 09, 2011, in the Board Room
of the Administration Building,
(Building 001) of Florida Gateway
College.
Topics of consideration will be rou-
tine college business. Any person
wishing to be heard on any agenda
matter will be provided an opportu-
nity to do so by appearing before the
Board in the Board Room of the Ad-
ministration Building of Florida
Gateway College.
All objections to this notice and pro-
priety of the scheduled meeting
should be filed with Florida Gateway
College prior to noon, Thursday, Au-
gust 4, 2011. All legal issues should
be brought to the Trustees' attention
and an attempt made to resolve them
prior to the meeting.
Please notify the President's Office
immediately if you require accom-
modation for participation in the
meeting.
A reception will be held at 3:30 p.m.
in the lobby of the Administration
Building prior to the regular Board
meeting.

05526895
July 28, 2011

To place your
classified ad call

755-5440









Land Clearing

Back Hoe, Dozer, Chopping, root
raking, bush hog, seeding, sod,
disking, site prep, ponds &
irrigation. Free Est! 386-623-3200


Services

DIVORCE, BANKRUPTCY,
RESUMES.
other court approved forms-
386-961-5896.


Legal

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
COLUMBIA COUNTY, FLORIDA
Probate Division
File No. 11-164-CP
IN RE: ESTATE OF
EDNA C. SUMMERS
a/k/a EDNA LEE SUMMERS
Deceased
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
The administration of the estate of
EDNA C. SUMMERS, a/k/a EDNA
LEE SUMMERS, deceased, whose
date of death was June 9, 2011; is
pending in the Circuit Court for Co-
lumbia County, Florida, Probate Di-
vision; File Number 11-164-CP; the
address of which is 173 NE Heman-
do Avenue, Lake City, Florida
32055. The names and addresses of
the personal representative and the
personal representative's attorney are
set forth below.
All creditors of the decedent and oth-
er persons, who have claims or de-
mands against decedent's estate, in-
cluding unmatured, contingent or un-
liquidated claims, and who have
been served a copy of this notice,
must file their claims with this Court
WITHIN THE LATER OF THREE
(3) MONTHS AFTER THE DATE
OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE OR THIRTY (30)
DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF
SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS
NOTICE ON THEM.
All other creditors of the decedent
and other persons who have claims
or demands against the decedent's
estate, including unmatured, contin-
gentor unliquidated claims, must file
their claims with this Court WITHIN
THREE (3) MONTHS AFTER THE
DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICA-
TION OF THIS NOTICE.'
ALL CLAIMS NOT SO FILED
WILL BE FOREVER BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME
PERIODS SET FORTH ABOVE,
ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2)
YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE
DECEDENTS DATE OF DEATH
IS BARRED.
THE DATE OF FIRST PUBLICA-
TION OF THIS NOTICE IS July 28,
2011.

/s/ Terry McDgvid
TERRY MCDAVID
Post Office Box 1328
Lake City, FL 32056-1328
Telephone (386) 752-1896
Florida Bar No. 052454
Attorney for Personal Representative

/s/ JANET RIVERS
Personal Representative
P.O. Box 3353
Lake City, FL 32056

05526842
July 28, 2011
August 4,,2011
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
COLUMBIA COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number 11-164-CP
IN RE: ESTATE OF EDNA C.
SUMMERS a/k/a EDNA LEE SUM-
MERS
Deceased
NOTICE OF ADMINISTRATION
The Administration of the estate of
EDNA C. SUMMERS a/k/a EDNA
LEE SUMMERS deceased, File
Number 11-164-CP, is pending in
the Circuit Court for Columbia
County, Florida, Probate Division,'
the address of which is 173 NE Her-
nando Avenue, Lake City, FL 32055.
The estate is testate and the date of
the decedent's Will is September 26,
2003. The names and addresses of
the personal representative's attorney
are set forth below.
Any interested persons on whom a
copy of the Notice of Administration
is served must object to the validity
of the will (or any codicil), qualifica-
tions of the personal representative,
venue, or jurisdiction of the Court,
by filing a petition or other pleading
requesting relief in accordance with
the Florida Probate Rules, WITHIN
THE THREE MONTHS AFTER
THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A
COPY OF THE NOTICE ON THE
OBJECTING PERSON, OR THOSE
OBJECTIONS ARE FOREVER
BARRED.
Any person entitled to exempt prop-
erty is required for file a petition for
determination of exempt property
WITHIN THE TIME PROVIDED
BY LAW OR THE RIGHT TO EX-
EMPT PROPERTY IS DEEMED
WAIVED. Any person entitled to
elective share is required to file an
election to take elective share
WITHIN THE TIME PROVIDED
BY LAW OR THE RIGHT TO
CLAIM AN ELECTIVE SHARE IS
DEEMED WAIVED.
By:/s/ TERRY MCDAVID
TERRY MCDAVID
Post Office Box 1328
Lake City, FL 32056-1328
Telephone (386) 752-1896
Florida Bar No. 052454
Attorney for Personal Representative
By:/s/JANET S. RIVERS'
Personal Representative
P.O. Box 3353
Lake City, FL 32056

05526841
July 28, 2011
August 4, 2011
Registration of Fictitious Names
We the undersigned, being duly
sworn, do hereby declare under oath
that the names of all persons interest-
ed in the business or profession car-
ried on under the name of MORGAN
& ASSOCIATES INVESTIGATIVE
at 729 SE MONROE ST.. LAKE
CITY, FL., 32025


Contact Phone Number: 386-288-
6006 and the extent of the interest of
each, is as follows:
Name: TIMOTHY MORGAN
Extent of Interest: 100%
by:/s/Timothy Morgan

STATE OF FLORIDA


COUNTY OF COLUMBIA
Sworn to and subscribed before me
this 26th day of July, A.D. 2011.
by:/s/ KATHLEEN A. RIOTTO

05526899
July 28, 2011


Legal

IN THE COUNTY COURT IN
AND FOR COLUMBIA COUNTY,
FLORIDA
CASE NO. 11-630-SC
ALICE D. ANDERSON
Plaintiff
VS.
TONI R. DRUMMOND
Defendant *
A law suit has been filed to deter-
mine ownership and title of a certain
vehicle described as a 1995 Regal
Buick with Serial #
2G4WB12M4S1473946 located in
Lake City, Columbia County, Flori-
da.
The following persons) may claim
some right title or interest therein:
Alice D. Anderson. If you have
claim, interest, or defense in this
clause, you must file your written an-
swer or objection with the Clerk of
this Court of Columbia County with-
in 10 days.
(seal)
CLERK OF COURTS
By:/s/ Debbie Watkins
Deputy Clerk

05526640
July 14,21,28,2011
August 4, 2011
Registration of Fictitious Names
We the undersigned, being duly
sworn, do hereby declare under oath
that the names of all persons interest-
ed in the business or profession car-
ried on under the name of DAZ-
ZLING EXTREMES at 161 SW
MIRACLE CT., LAKE CITY, FL.,
32024

Contact Phone Number: 386-984-
1032 and the extent of the interest of
each, is as follows:
Name: BECKY SCHAFER
Extent of Interest: 100%
by:/s/ Becky Schafer

STATE OF FLORIDA
COUNTY OF COLUMBIA
Sworn to and subscribed before me
this 25th day of July, A.D. 2011.
by:/s/ KATHLEEN A. RIOTTO

05526862
July 28, 2011

PUBLIC AUCTION
1996 PONT
VIN# 1G2JB624XT7581146
CREAMER'S WRECKER SERV-
ICE 290 NE SUNNYBROOK ST.
LAKE CITY, FL 32055
COLUMBIA COUNTY
386-752-2861
SALE DATE: August 15, 2'011
8:00AM

05526882
July 28, 2011
Public Auction
Will be held by Gainey Automotive,
Inc, in Columbia County at 3468
S.W. CR 138, Fort White, Fl. 32038
Date 08/09/2011
Time: 8:00 A.M.
1992 FORD
VIN# 1FACP5249NA122157

05526864
July 28, 2011
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
COLUMBIA COUNTY, FLORIDA
Case No. 11-237-CA
JOEL S. NIBLACK,
Plaintiff,
vs.
JAMES T. BROWN III,
Defendant.
CLERK'S NOTICE OF SALE UN-
DER F.S. CHAPTER 45
NOTICE IS GIVEN that, in accord-
ance with the Final-Judgment of
Foreclosure dated July 19, 2011, in
the above-styled cause, I will sell to
the highest and best bidder for cash
on the ; lobby at the door of the Co-
lumbia County Courthouse in Lake
City, Columbia County, Florida, at
11 a.m. on August 24, 2011, CR-
One, the following described proper-
ty:
See Exhibit "A" attached hereto and
made a part hereof

EXHIBITT"

PARCEL #7
A TRACT OF LAND SITUATED
IN SECTION 6, -TOWNSHIP 7
SOUTH, RANGE 17 EAST, CO-
LUMBIA COUNTY, FLORIDA,
HEREINAFTER BEING REFER-
RED TO AS "OLD NIBLACK
FARMS" AN UNRECORDED
SUBDIVISION AS SURVEYED
BY ALACHUA COUNTY LAND
SURVEYORS, SAID TRACT OF
LAND BEING MORE PARTICU-
LARLY DESCRIBED AS FOL-
LOWS:

COMMENCE AT A CONCRETE
MONUMENT AT THE NORTH-
WEST CORNER OF THE SOUTH
1/2 OF THE NORTHWEST 1/4 OF
SECTION 6, TOWNSHIP 7
SOUTH, RANGE 17 EAST FOR A
POINT OF REFERENCE THENCE
RUN SOO"07'23"E, A DISTANCE
OF 51.14 FEET TO A CONCRETE
MONUMENT AT THE NORTH-
EAST CORNER OF THE SOUTH-
EAST 1/4 OF THE NORTHEAST
1/4 OF THE AFOREMENTIONED
SECTION 1, TOWNSHIP 7
SOUTH, RANGE 16 EAST;
THENCE CONTINUE SOO'07'23"E,
A DISTANCE OF 505.39 FEET TO
A STEEL ROD AND CAP;
THENCE CONTINUE S0007'23"E,
A DISTANCE OF 714.14 FEET TO
A CONCRETE MONUMENT AT
THE NORTHWEST CORNER OF
THE SOUTHWEST 1/4 OF THE
AFOREMENTIONED SECTION 6,
TOWNSHIP 7 SOUTH, RANGE 17
EAST; THENCE RUN SOO'07'23"E,
A DISTANCE OF 102.40 FEET TO
A CONCRETE MONUMENT AT
THE SOUTHEAST CORNER OF
THE NORTHEAST 1/4 OF THE
AFOREMENTIONED SECTION 1,
TOWNSHIP 7 SOUTH, RANGE 16
EAST; THENCE RUN
SOO'l0'43"W, ALONG THE WEST
LINE OF SECTION 6, TOWNSHIP
7 SOUTH, RANGE 17 EAST, A
DISTANCE OF 562.26 FEET TO A


STEEL ROD AND CAP; THENCE
CONTINUE S00'l0'43"W, ALONG
SAID WEST LINE A DISTANCE
OF 554.56 FEET TO A STEEL
ROD AND CAP AND THE TRUE
POINT OF BEGINNING; THENCE
CONTINUE SOO10'43"W, A DIS-


Legal

TANCE OF 475.95 FEET TO A
STEEL ROD AND CAP; THENCE
RUN N89034'00"E, A DISTANCE
OF 915.37 FEET TO A STEEL
ROD AND CAP; THENCE RUN
N0010'43"E, A DISTANCE OF
475.95 FEET TO A STEEL ROD
AND CAP; THENCE RUN
S89034'00"W, A DISTANCE OF
915.37 FEET TO A STEEL ROD
AND CAP AND THE TRUE
POINT OF BEGINNING.

AN EASEMENT FOR INGRESS,
EGRESS AND PUBLIC UTILITIES
OVER, UNDER AND ACROSS A
60 FOOT WIDE STRIP OF LAND.
SAID STRIP OF LAND LOCATED
WITHIN 30 FEET OF AND ON
BOTH SIDES OF THE FOLLOW-
ING DESCRIBED CENTERLINE:

COMMENCE AT A CONCRETE
MONUMENT AT THE NORTH-
WEST CORNER OF THE SOUTH
1/2 OF THE NORTHWEST 1/4 OF
SECTION 6, TOWNSHIP 7
SOUTH, RANGE 17 EAST, CO-
LUMBIA COUNTY, FLORIDA
FOR THE POINT OF REFERENCE
AND RUN S0007'23" E, A DIS-
TANCE OF 51.14 FEET TO A
CONCRETE MONUMENT AT
THE NORTHEAST CORNER OF
THE SOUTHEAST 1/4 OF THE
NORTHEAST 1/4 OF SECTION 1,
TOWNSHIP 7 SOUTH, RANGE 16
EAST, COLUMBIA COUNTY,
FLORIDA; THENCE RUN
S89033'21" W, ALONG THE
NORTH LINE OF SAID SOUTH-
EAST 1/4 OF THE NORTHEAST
1/4 OF SECTION 1, A DISTANCE
OF 1318.64 FEET TO A CON-
CRETE MONUMENT AT THE
NORTHWEST CORNER OF SAID
SOUTHEAST 1/4 OF THE
NORTHEAST 1/4 OF SECTION 1;
THENCE RUN S0005'46" E,
ALONG THE WEST LINE OF THE
EAST 1/4 OF SAID SECTION 1, A
DISTANCE OF 30.00 FEET TO
THE TRUE POINT OF BEGIN-
NING OF SAID EASEMENT CEN-
TERLINE, EASEMENT LINES
WILL BE LENGTHENED OR
SHORTENED TO BEGIN ON
SAID WEST LINE OF THE EAST
1/4 OF SECTION 1; THENCE RUN
N 89033'21" E, PARALLEL WITH
AND 30.00 FEET SOUTH OF THE
AFOREMENTIONED NORTH
LINE OF THE SOUTHEAST 1/4
OF THE NORTHEAST 1/4 OF
SECTION 1, A DISTANCE OF
378.74 FEET TO THE BEGINNING
OF A CURVE CONCAVE SOUTH-
WESTERLY, SAID CURVE HAV-
ING A RADIUS OF 200.00 FEET;
THENCE RUN SOUTHEASTER-
LY, ALONG SAID CENTERLINE
AND WITH SAID CURVE
THROUGH AN ARC ANGLE OF
9023'04", AN ARC DISTANCE OF
315.50 FEET (CHORD BEARING
AND DISTANCE OF S 45015'07"
E, 283.79 FEET RESPECTIVELY)
TO THE END OF SAID CURVE;
THENCE RUN S 00003'35" E, A
DISTANCE OF 274.04 FEET TO
THE BEGINNING OF A CURVE
CONCAVE EASTERLY, SAID
CURVE HAVING A RADIUS OF
200.00 FEET; THENCE RUN
SOUTHEASTERLY, ALONG
SAID CENTERLINE AND WITH
SAID CURVE, THROUGH AN
ARC ANGLE OF 24010'32", AN
ARC DISTANCE OF 84.39 FEET
(CHORD BEARING AND DIS-
TANCE OF S 12008'51" E, 83.76
FEET RESPECTIVELY) TO THE
END OF SAID CURVE; THENCE
RUN S 24014'07" E, A DISTANCE
OF 91.92 FEET TO THE BEGIN-
NING OF A CURVE CONCAVE
WESTERLY, SAID CURVE HAV-
ING A RADIUS OF 200.00 FEET;
THENCE RUN SOUTHEASTERLY
ALONG SAID CENTERLINE.AND
WITH SAID CURVE, THROUGH
AN ARC ANGLE OF 24010'32",
AN ARC DISTANCE OF 84.39
FEET (CHORD BEARING AND
DISTANCE OF S 12008'51" E,
83.76 FEET RESPECTIVELY) TO
THE END OF SAID CURVE;
THENCE RUN S 00003'35" E, A
DISTANCE OF 915.87 FEET TO
THE BEGINNING OF A CURVE
CONCAVE NORTHEASTERLY,
SAID CURVE HAVING A RADI-
US OF 200.00 FEET; THENCE
RUN SOUTHEASTERLY, ALONG
SAID CENTERLINE AND WITH
SAID CURVE, THROUGH AN
ARC ANGLE OF 90023'04", AN
ARC DISTANCE OF 315.50 FEET
(CHORD BEARING AND DIS-
TANCE OF S 45015'07" E, 283.79
FEET, RESPECTIVELY) TO THE
END OF SAID CURVE; THENCE
RUN N 89033'21" E, A DISTANCE
OF 398.52 FEET TO THE BEGIN-
NING OF A CURVE CONCAVE
SOUTHERLY, SAID CURVE
HAVING A RADIUS OF 200.00
FEET; THENCE RUN SOUTH-
EASTERLY, ALONG SAID CEN-
TERLINE AND WITH SAID
CURVE, THROUGH AN ARC AN-
GLE OF 35003'28" AN ARC DIS-
TANCE OF 122.38 FEET (CHORD
BEARING AND DISTANCE OF S
72054'54" E, 120.48 FEET, RE-
SPECTIVELY) TO THE INTER-
SECTION OF SAID CURVE WITH
THE EAST LINE OF THE AFORE-
MENTIONED SECTION 1;
THENCE CONTINUE SOUTH-
EASTERLY, WITH SAID CURVE,
THROUGH AN ARC ANGLE OF
1357'21", AN ARC DISTANCE OF
48.71 FEET (CHORD BEARING
AND DISTANCE OF S 62021'50"
E, 48.59 FEET, RESPECTIVELY)
TO THE END OF SAID CURVE;
THENCE RUN S 5523'10" E, A
DISTANCE OF 33.92 FEET TO
THE BEGINNING OF A CURVE
CONCAVE NORTHERLY, SAID
CURVE HAVING A RADIUS OF
200.00 FEET; THENCE RUN
SOUTHEASTERLY, ALONG
SAID CENTERLINE AND WITH
SAID CURVE, THROUGH AN
ARC ANGLE OF 35002'50" AN
ARC DISTANCE OF 122.34 FEET
(CHORD BEARING AND DIS-
TANCE OF S 7254'35" E, 120.44
FEET, RESPECTIVELY) TO THE
END OF SAID CURVE; THENCE


RUN N 89034'00" E, A DISTANCE
OF 729.04 FEET TO A POINT
DESIGNATED AS POINT "A" TO
BE REFERRED TO LATER;
THENCE RUN S 00'10'43" W, A
DISTANCE OF 817.43 FEET TO A


Legal

POINT DESIGNATED AS POINT
"B" TO BE REFERRED TO LAT-
ER; THENCE CONTINUE
S00010'43" W, A DISTANCE OF
630.14 FEET TO A TERMINUS OF
SAID CENTERLINE; THENCE
RETURN TO THE AFOREMEN-
TIONED POINT "B" AND RUN N
89034'00" E, A DISTANCE OF
802.08 FEET TO A POINT DESIG-
NATED AS POINT "C" TO BE RE-
FERRED TO LATER; THENCE
CONTINUE N 89034'00" E, A DIS-
TANCE OF 283.87 FEET TO A
TERMINUS OF SAID CENTER-
LINE; THENCE RETURN TO THE
AFOREMENTIONED POINT "C"
AND RUN S 000 10'43".W, A DIS-
TANCE OF 563.18 FEET TO A
TERMINUS OF SAID CENTER-
LINE; THENCE RETURN TO THE
AFOREMENTIONED POINT "A"
AND RUN N 00010'43" E, A DIS-
TANCE OF 1182.88 FEET TO A
POINT DESIGNATED AS POINT
"D" TO BE REFERRED TO LAT-
ER; THENCE CONTINUE N
00010'43" E, A DISTANCE OF
350.08 FEET TO A TERMINUS OF
SAID CENTERLINE; THENCE
RETURN TO THE AFOREMEN-
TIONED POINT "D" AND RUN N
89037'58" E, A DISTANCE OF
796.39 FEET TO A POINT DESIG-
NATED AS POINT "E" TO BE RE-
FERRED TO LATER; THENCE
CONTINUE N 89037'58" E, A DIS-
TANCE OF 282.19 FEET TO A
TERMINUS OF SAID CENTER-
LINE; THENCE RETURN TO THE
AFOREMENTIONED POINT "E"
AND RUN S 00010'43" W, A DIS-
TANCE OF 610.98 FEET TO THE
TERMINUS OF SAID CENTER-
LINE.

SUBJECT TO: EASEMENT TO,
CLAY ELECTRIC COOPERA-
TIVE, INC., RECORDED IN OFFI-
CIAL RECORDS BOOK 970,
PAGE 364, OF THE PUBLIC RE-
CORDS OF COLUMBIA COUN-
TY, FLORIDA.
Any person claiming an interest in
the surplus from the sale, if any, oth-
er than the property owner as of the
date of the lis pendens must file a
claim within 60 days after the sale.
dated: July 19,2011
P. DeWitt Cason
Clerk of Court
By: /s/ B. Scippio
Deputy Clerk
CERTIFICATE OF SERVICE
I CERTIFY that a true and correct
copy of the foregoing Notice of Sale
under F.S. Chapter 45 has been fur-
nished by United States Mail on July
19, 2011, to each of the following:
James T. Brown II, 265 S. 1480 E.
Spanish Fork, UT 84660-6304 and
Frederic D. Kaufman, KAUFMAN
ATTORNEYS, P.A., 1330 NW 6
Street, Suite D, Gainesville, FL
32601, attorneys for Joel S. Niblack,
1220 SW Bethlehem Avenue, Fort
White, FL 32038-5133
By:/s/ B. Scippio
Court Clerk

05526766
July 21, 28, 2011

NOTICE OF FORFEITURE OF
UNCLAIMED MONIES
TO: ANY PERSONS,FIRMS, OR
CORPORATIONS LISTEDBELOV\
CLAIMING ANY INTERESTON
UNCLAIMED MONIES:
James Steichen $ 1.90
Martiquis Douglas 0.13
Donald Smith 0.79
Kelly Lewis 0.29
Jeffery Plummer 0.51
John Doe $17.20
Crystal Johnson' $3.99
Glenn Slater 0.08
Anthony White 0.14
Derrick Thomas 0.07
Robert Crosby $11.39
Bruce Harris $7.00
Jermaine Fulton $4.00
Charles Debroslavic $1.00
Jason Pettigrew 0.58
Roy Bryden 0.31
Jeremy Wilkerson 0.60
Walter McCoskili $10.20
Chancie Teeples 0.57
Debra Bussey $6.00
Daniel Groves .030
Christopher Williams 0.08
Mark Sweitzer 0.29
Richard Griffis 0.37
Harold Stamper 0.45
Jennifer Zwart 0.23
Nathaniel Lucas 0.02
David Medico 0.16
Henry Geiger 0.15
Elmer Thomas 0.43
John Jones 0.14
Timothy Madred 0.02
Charles Davis 0.23
Eric Baskin 0.15
Antonio Gibson 0.09
Orlando Avalos 0.60
Cesar Garcia $1.44
John Bergenbush 0.77
Torrey Wilcoxson 0.71
Larry Forester 0.13
Horace Powell $7.46
James Baker 0.57
Linda Feagle $5.37
Nicholas Cason .037
Curtis Myers 0.54
Allen Camejo 0.31
Daniel Duffey $19.00
Patricia Hildebrand 0.62
Michael Murphy 0.25
Walter Hayes 0.52
Jeffery Norris $1.50
Ronnie Thornton 0.37
Richard Strickland 0.37
Edward Reese 0.05
Carlos Torres 0.39
Kaci Cothran 0.80
Jerry Depratter 0.02
Steven Ross 0.46
Brian Lawson 0.49
Holland Bowman $6.25
Jeffery Davis 0.34
Timothy Madrid $1.00
Justin Culbreath $2.27
William Concepcion $12.07
Eddie Hill 0.26
Dante Baker 0.21
Jorge Arata 0.41
Thomas Rocks 0.49
Shane Doyle 0.76
Charles Reyes 0.21
Shannon Dees $1.05
Patrick Pate 0.34


Karman Taylor 0.19
Michael Baker 0.58
Samuel Bellamy 0.07
Louise Williamson 0.54
William Gomillion 0.54
Krystal Reno $2.31
William Lockwood 0.17


Legal

Casey Ruise $1.75
Jeffery Roberts 0.26
Lori Strickland 0.06
Mario Mendoza 0.50
John Davis $2.98
Shawn Lawton 0.26
Crystal Presnell 0.29
Danny Bright 0.07
Jason Dawkins 0.06
Christooher Pearce 0.03
Sonja Baldwin $3.00
Vince Mosby-Cromier 0.60
Jason Turner 0.21
Garland Baker 0.80
Reginald Gamble 0.04
Paul Ott 0.09
Sean Wilson 0.16
Cristie Cook 0.87
Cesar Garcia 0.33
Randall Thomas 0.16
Carlile Johnson $3.13
Anna Ussery 0.42
Derick Lewis 0.28
Joseph Barrs 0.53
James Cox $3.54
Michael Murray $44.93 .
Pamela Turgean $4.35
Johnny Robinson $2.35
Christopher Boyle 0.66
Kari Silcox 0.32
Paul Harris $1.19
William Brown $32.00
Irving White $1.58
Walter Taylor 0.19
Michael Gibbons 0.60
Alvin Roberson $5.15
Shaw Mason 0.29
Kristopher Cheser $1.59
Corey Griffin 0.69
Herman Butler 0.04
Harley Steedley $1.54
David Gaskins .089
Edward Welch $11.47
Christopher Casteel 0.63
Eric Jablonski $1.29
Rodney Harvey 0.60
Christopher Wminko 0.28
Enoch Jonas $2.40
Bryce Hickerson 0.59
Hammond.Browne $1.00
Antonio Thomas 0.05
Christine Lewis 0.44
Andrew Wright $5.00
Shilo Stamper 0.23
Kenneth Presnell 0.03
Kiambi Staples $1.87
Jeffery Roberts $1.19
Christian Norton $3.90
Lucas Filywa 2.00
Linda Jones $400.00
James Marcum 0.33
Jonathan Prouty 0.23
Frank Burpee 0.04
Antonio Ortiz-Escalante 0.05
James Rossin 0.79
Russell White 0.52
Britany Dortly $4.00
Mark Lieupo 0.55
Elena Lane 0.33
Maurice Jackson 0.16
Dale Banett 0.23
Annabelle Garcia $1.00
Tandra Graham 0.19
Daniel Riggs 0.27
Joss Garrick 0.67
David Cooper 0.52
David Vames $6.00
Daniel Faris $1.19
Jimmy Spears 0.80
Martin Leggett 0.43
Antwan Lewis $2.00
Jeremy Prince 0.44
James Wilson '0.93
Keith Helms 0.58
Stephanie IDixon 0.31
James Phillips $11.80
Travis Brown $27.00
James Nelson 0.79
Edward Pybas 0.06
Jamison Manker $15.77
Duane Dallas 0.10
Michael Oosterho $9.65
Dominic Brantley 0.38
William Boswell 0.47
Dwayne Taylor 0.71
Cheriann Chrishion 0.53
Donald Phillips 0.29
Francisco Ramirez 0.05
John Law 1.74
Joseph Lumpkin 0.41
William Belcher $1.03
Christopher Mangrum 0.53
Travis Brown 0.12
Corey Scippio $10.20
Kelly Lewis 0.39
Demetrious McGowan 0.02
Kirsten Sconiers 2.00
Alphonso Hughes 0.08
Terrance Tolbert $12.76
Vimecia Scippio $2.68
Jarrard Valentine $1.22
Jack Brown $3.83
Michael Bames 0.31
Celeste Shemwell 0.23
Robert Waldron 0.17
Amanda Ratliff $3.62
Patrick McCall 0.14
Colt Snowden 0.16
Robert St. Claire $1.09
Alvin Fulton 0.96
Travis Lockwood 0.56
Michael Colon 0.20
Kiambi Staples $1.80
Jamar Banks 0.78
Johnnie Collins $300.83
Marquis McKinnie $1.87
Carmen Arlootta 0.50
Bobby Fregia 0.27
William Rouse 0.03
Harley Steedley 0.24
Johnny Thomas 0.23
Terry Kravec 0.13
Robert Ware 0.24
James Norris 0.07
Douglas Driscoll $1.84
David Morris 0.73
David Glover 0.34
Timothy Watson 0.30
Byron Smith 0.15
Robyn Eckhoff $1.41
Cliff Boone $5.69
Nicholas Martinez $2.00
Heather Hall 0.02
Autumn Whitney $15.00
Shawn Wilson 0.21
Jonathan Prouty 0.14
Alicia Walker $5.34
Russell White 0.01
Emily Wilson 0.01
Trumain Howard $2.00
Sergio Martinez $10.00
Christopher Mangrum 0.29
John Nash $2.03
Tony Ford 0.08
Modesty Adams $117.00
Amanda Langford $113.12
Thomas Davenport $31.00
Linda Harrington $15.05
$1,460.14
YOU ARE HEREBYNOTIFIED
that the above described monies have


been collected, under and by virtue
of Florida Statutes, and are currently
in the possession of the Columbia
County Detention Center, and you
are further notified that a petition has
been filed in and for Columbia
County, Florida, seeking the forfei-











LAKE CITY REPORTER 'CLASSIFIED THURSDAY, JULY 28, 2011


Legal

ture of said monies, and you are
hereby directed and required to file
any claim you might have and show
cause why such monies should not
be forfeited on or before September
1st, 2011. You are hereby notified to
v make such response within twenty
(20) days from the date of this publi-
cation. Unless such monies are
- claimed on or before the aforemen-
tioned date, the same shall be de-
clared forfeited to Columbia County
Board of County Commissioners.
'Persons having or claiming any in-
terest in such funds or any portion of
them shall file written claims with
the Sheriff of Columbia County
within the time specified, and shall
make sufficient proof to the Sheriff
of his/her ownership, and upon doing
so shall be entitled to receive any
part of the monies so claims.
Unless claim is filed within such a
time aforesaid, all claims in refer-
ence thereto are forever barred.
WITNESS MY HAND AND SEAL-
on this 25th day of July 2011, at Co-
lumbia
County, Florida.
MARK HUNTER,
SHERIFF
BY: SHARON PARKER
COLUMBIA COUNTY DETEN-
TION CENTER
05526846
July 28, 2011


100 Job
Opportunities

05526905
CUSTOMER SERVICE
Ideal Candidate with customer
service experience, telephone
skills, excellent computer skills
and be able to perform in a fast
pace environment.
Please fax resume to
386-758-0984 or email to
greatiobs(SLCjobs.info

CDL Class A Truck Driver.
Flatbed exp. for F/T SE area.
3 years exp or more. Medical
benefits offered. Contact
Melissa or Mary @ 386-935-2773
Dishwasher & Prep Person. .
Experienced preferred. Apply in
person Chasteen's Downtown.
204 N. Marion.
Experienced Breakfast
Grill Cook
Needed
386-867-4242
HOUSEKEEPER.
Come in-then live in.
Check it out.
386-719-8872
INSURANCE AGENCY
Seeking a career minded'&
motivated individual for a fast
paced insurance agency. Individual
must posses a 4-40 CSR License.
Must have excellent computer &
people skills. Benefits available.
Send reply to Box 05065, C/O The
Lake City Reporter, P.O. Box
1709, Lake City, FL, 32056
or fax to: 386-752-2102
My name is James. I'm an inde-
pendant distributer with Zija Inter-
national. Looking for motivated
people who would like to start
their own business in Network
Marketing. Please call me at
386-697-6386 for more info.
Registration of Fictitious Names
We the undersigned, being duly
sworn, do hereby declare under oath
that the names of all persons interest-,
ed in the business or profession car-
ried on under the name of NORTH
FLORIDA AUTO AGENCY
(NFAA) at 1518 W. US HWY 90.,
LAKE CITY, FL, 32055

Contact Phone Number: 386-487-
0055 and the extent of the interest of
each, is as follows:
Name: Rountree Moore Motors
Extent of Interest: 100%
by:/s/ Rountree Moore Motors
STATE OF FLORIDA
COUNTY OF COLUMBIA
Sworn to and subscribed before me
this 25th day of July, A.D. 2011.
by:/s/ KATHLEEN A. RIQTTO
05526901
July 28, 2011


Roofing co. looking for Repair
tech. Must have Drivers license
and be Drug free.-Exp in all roof
types. Call 1-877-957-7663.

ROOTS HAIR STUDIO
Needs an energetic Stylist.
Please call 386-752-9091
Sales Position available for moti-
vated individual Rountree -Moore
Toyota, Great benefits, paid train-
ing/vacation. Exp. a plus but not

386-623-7442
VPK Teacher & Pre K3 teacher
needed. Experience reqd. CDA/AS
Degree preferred. Apply in person
at Wee Care in Columbia City

120 Medical
2 Employment

Busy outpatient surgery center has
immediate opening for a LPN.
PRN position. Please
email resume to
administration@lcsurgerycenter.com
or fax to 386-487-3935.
Full Time Physicians Assistant or
ARNP needed for very busy
paperless Family Practice. Must be
highly motivated, multi-tasking
and patient centric. Intergy IEHR
experience a plus. Please fax
resume to: 386-961-9541
Lisc. Respiratory Therapist and
Lisc. RPSGT needed PDM
for medical office in LC.
Fax resume (386) 754-1712


Faculty Position: Registered
Nurse (BSN) wanted at North
Florida Community College.
See www.nfcc.edu for details.




et Connected



,, rc, wo


240 Schools &
240 Education

0552664M8
Interested in a Medical Career?
Express Training offers
courses for beginners & exp
Nursing Assistant, $479
next class-07/25/10

* Phlebotomy national certifica-
tion, $800 next class-08/08/11

* Continuing education
Fees incl. books, supplies, exam
fees. Call 386-755-4401 or
expresstrainingservices.com



310 Pets & Supplies
PUBLISHER'S NOTE
Florida Law 828.29 requires dogs
and cats being sold to be at least 8
weeks old and have a health
certificate from a licensed
veterinarian documenting they
have mandatory shots and are
free from intestinal and external

life must be licensed by Florida
Fish and Wildlife. If you are
unsure, contact the local
office for information.

361 Farm Equipment

84 Ford 4610 Tractor.
2WD, Solid
2005 motor,$7,500. OBO
386-867-0005

John Deere Tractor 30-38E. Only
72 hrs. used 4 wheel Dr. Equipped
w/305 loader. 5 ft finishing & 5 ft
box blade. $15,500. 386-365-0704


402 Appliances

2006 WHIRLPOOL
Calypso Washer & Dryer.
$375 for both.
386-867-2155

FRIGIDAIRE 18CU fridge.
$275. 7 months old, white, like
new. (863)840-4262
Please leave message.
GE 25cuft Refrigerator/Freezer
side by side 6 yrs old
Excellent condition.
$350. 386-752-8227


407 Computers

Compaq Computer, Many extras.
Complete Computer
$80.00
386-755-9984 or 386-292-2170


420 Wanted to Buy

Wanted Junk Cars, Trucks, Vans.
$250 & up CASH! Free Pick Up!
NO title needed !386-878-9260
After 5pm 386- 752-3648.

430 Garage Sales
2 Family Sat 7/30 8-12
household items, toys, clothes
and more 41 S & Michigan '
@ Southland Golf Cars

PUBLISHER'S NOTE
All Yard Sale Ads
Must be Pre-Paid.

SAT. 8-4. 1185 SW Dekle Rd. Off
Pinemount. Look for signs. Furni-
ture clothing toys, books & more.
Also, German Sheppard puppy.


440 Miscellaneous

2-NEW, Still in box
5500 watt portable generators.
$1000. will negotiate.
Call for info. 386-365-0704

Stop gnat & Mosquito bites! Buy
Swamp Gator All natural insect re-
pellent. Family safe. Use head to
toe. Available at The Home Depot.,
Summer Barbecue Special
Tow Behind
Grill/Smoker, $1,250 OBO.
386-719-4802


520 Boats for Sale
1985 BONITA 90 HP Mercury,
Practivally new Trolling motor.
Good condition. $2,300.
(904)504-2620 after 5pm.

Starcraft Aluminum Jon Boat.
13'9" 6hp. Evinrude. 2 hummin-
bird fish finders. 1 trolling motor,
trailer. $500 Firm. 386-269-3056


Mobile Homes
630 for Rento

14 Wide, 2/2-$475. mo. + dep.
Clean, Quiet Country Park
Water, septic, garbage incl. NO
PETS! 386-758-2280 References,

2&3 BR MH. $395 $650. mo.
plus deposit. Water & sewer fur-
nished. Cannon Creek MHP
.386-752-6422
2/2 Units, clean, well maintained,
nice safe park setting, 2 miles to
downtown Lake City, $575 month
+ $575 sec dep, 386-984-8448
13th Month FREE!!
3b/2ba private & fenced lot.
Carport 3 miles west Lake City.
$700 month. $300 security.
386-758-3657
3br/2ba newly renovated MH on
1/2 ac. private property. Close t
college $700.mo. 1st. mo.+ Sec.
dep. Ref's. No Pets. Non smoking
environment 904-626-5700
LG clean 3br's $450. -$650. mo. +
dep. Also, 2br mobile home's
available. No Pets.
5 Points area. 386-961-1482
Mobile Homes for rent in
White Springs, Lake City & Ft.
White. Contact 386-623-3404
or 386-365-1919


640 Mobile Homes
6 for Sale
Handy man special, 94 Fleetwood
DWMH. 3/2 on 5 acres in Ft.
White. Owner Fin. $3,000 dn.
$850mo. $99,900 352-215-1018
www.LandOwnerFinancing.com
PALM HARBOR Homes Has 3
Modular Homes. Available at
HUGH Savings. Over 40K Off.
Call Today! 800-622-2832

650 Mobile Home
& Land
67.5 ac.Ranch, fenced & cross
fenced. Spacious moblie home
w/large front deck & RV hookup
MLS 75607 $299,000. Access
Realty. Patti Taylor. 386-623-6896

705 Rooms for Rent


New furnished bedroom apt in a
home, private entrance & bath, in-
cludes utilities, trash, cable, frig &
pest control. $450 mo + dep. Avail
8/1. 386-752-2020 SW Lake City

710 Unfurnished Apt.
710 For Rent

05526481
SPRING HILL VILLAGE
Excellent High Springs location.
1, 2 & 3 bedroom floor-plans;

Call 386-454-1469
or visit our website:
www.springhiillvillage.net









Downtown Location, Clean.
$450 mo, plus Security.
NO PETS. Call 386-755-3456
2 bedroom Apartment
$600. mo
plus security deposit.
386-344-3715
2/1 w/garage & washer/dryer
hookups. East side of town, t
Call for details
386-755-6867
2BR/1.5BA w/garage
5 minutes from VA hospital.
Call for details.
386-755-4590 or 365-5150.
Amber Wood Hills Apts.
Private Patio area. Beautiful yard.
Washer/dryer hkup. Free water &
sewer. 1/1, 2/1. Move in special.
386-754-1800. wwwmyflapts.com
Beautiful Apt, Large 1 bdrm,
w/inground pool, CHA, details at
bigfloridahome.com
$650/mo + dep 386-344-3261
Columbia Arms Apt. located1/2 .
mi from V.A. & Winn Dixie. Pet
Friendly. Move in Special $199:
Pool, laundry & balcony.
386-754-1800. www.mvflapts.com
Furnished or unfurnished
Townhomes on the golf course.
$750. mo. plus security. Includes
waten 386-752-9626
Greentree Townhouse
Summer special. 2/1, 2/1.5. Free
water & sewer. Balcony & patio.
Laundry. Behind Kens on Hwy 90.
386-754-1800 wwwmyflapts.com
Large & clean. lbr/lba apt.
CH/A Ig walk in closet. Close to
town. $395. mo and $350. dep.
(904)563-6208
Redwine Apartments. Move in
special $199. Limited time. Pets
welcome. with 5 complexes,
we have a home for you.
386-754-1800. www.mvflapts.com
Summer Special! 12th mo Free
w/signed yr lease. Updated, w/tile
floors/fresh paint. Great area.
From $450.+sec. 386-752-9626
The Lakes Apts. Studios & IBr's
from $135/wk. Util. & cable incl.,
Sec 8 vouchers accepted, monthly
rates avail Call 386-752-2741
Unfurnished Apt Eastside
Village Realty, Inc .2 bedroom
1 bath Duplex must be 55+ yrs of
age Call Denise Bose @
386-752-5290
Wayne Manor Apts.
Move in $199. Summer special.
2/1, washer/dryer. Behind Kens off
Hwy 90. 386-754-1800
www.myflapts.com
Windsor Arms Apartments.
Summer special $199. Move in!
2/1, 2/1.5, 2/2. Pet Friendy. Free
200 ch. Dish. Washer/dryer hkup.
386-754-1800. www.myflapts.com

720 Furnished Apts.
72v For Rent

Rooms for Rent. Hillcrest, Sands,
Columbia. All furnished. Electric,
cable, fridge, microwave. Weekly
or monthly rates. 1 person $135,
2 persons $150. weekly
386-752-5808
Unfurnished
730 Home For Rent

3/2, lr, dr, fam rm w/ fp, 2-car
garage, fenced bk yd.
1792 sq ft. $1050 mo. Martha Jo
Khachigan, Realtor 623-2848
Completely remodeled Brick.
3br/2ba 1750 sqft. Lg lot. Includes
washer, dryer, stove, & fridge.
$985. mo $985 dep. 386-752-7578
Quiet & private country home.
2br/lba. New energy efficient
appliances. New Central A/C.
$695. mo. 386-752-1444
Unfurnished 2 bedroom/1 bath
house. $700.00 per month.
First, last and security Firm.
386-590-5333


730 furnished
IJ0 Home For Rent

05526822
LAKE CITY
2BR/1BA, Mobile Home
$495mo


2BR/1.5BA, 975SF $725. mo
4BR/3BA, 2139SF $1500. mo

4BR/2BA, 1248SF $695. mo
2 AVAILABLE

3BR/2BA 1258SF $925. mo

3BR/2BA 1582SF $900. mo

3BR/2BA 1246SF $700. mo

2BR/1BA 700SF $495. mo
2 AVAILABLE

3BR/1.5BA 1040SF $825

FT WHITE

3BR/2BA 1512SF $850. mo

LAKE BUTLER

4BR/2BA 1560SF $750 mo

MADISON

2BR/1BA JUST REMODELED
$450. mo. 2 AVAILABLE

Mike Foster 386-288-3596
Mitchell Lee 386-867-1155
1688 SE Baya Dr., Suite 105
Lake City, FL 32025
www.NorthFloridahomeandland.com
Accredited Real Estate is a Full
Service Real Estate Office.
We do: Rentals
Property Management
Property Sales.



7 0 Business &
75 Office Rentals

FOR LEASE: Downtown office
space. Convenient to
Court house.
Call 386-755-3456

For Lease: E B.aya Ave. Two -
1000 sqft office space units or
combined for 20Q0 sqft. 386-984-
0622 or weekends 386-497-4762
OFFICE SPACE for lease.
Oak Hill Plaza. 900 sqft
$675mo/$695. sec dep.
Tom 386-961-1086 DCA Realtor

790 Vacation Rentals

Horseshoe Beach RV Lof.
Nice comer Lot with shade trees.
$295. mo Water/electric included
386-235-3633 or 352-498-5986

Scalloping Horseshoe Besch Spcl
Gulf Front 2br, w/lg porch, dock,
,fish sink. wkend $395./wk $895.
L 386-235-3633/352-498-5986
alwaysonvacation.com #419-181
"Florida's Last Frontier"


805 Lots for Sale
Lots for Sale Eastside
Village Realty, Inc. buildable
vacant lot hight & dry in a estab-
lished neighbor priced @ $40,000.
Call Denise Bose @ 752-5290
North Fla Land. 1/2 80 Ac w/Fin.
Counties Columbia, Suwannee,
Gilchrist, Baker, Glades, Polk.
Call for brochure and terms. 7
Days 7 to 7. 386-752-5035 X 3111
A Bar Sales, Inc.
PUBLISHER'S NOTE
All real estate advertising in this
newspaper is subject to the fair
housing act which makes it illegal
to advertise "any preference,
limitation, or discrimination based
on race, color,'religion, sex,
disability, familial status or nation-
al origin; or any intention to make
such preference, limitation or
discrimination." Familial status
includes children under the age of
18 living with parents or legal
custodians, pregnant women and
people securing custody of chil-
dren under the age of 18. This
newspaper will not knowingly
accept any advertising for real es-
tate which is in violation of the
law. Our readers are hereby in-
formed that all dwellings adver-
tised in this newspaper are availa-
ble on an equal opportunity basis.
To complain of discrimination call
HUD toll free at 1-800-669-9777,
the toll free
telephone number to the hearing
impaired is 1-800-927-9275.

810 Home for Sale

2/1 completely updated, screened
back porch, large utility room,
MLS#77413 $52,900 Call Nancy
Rogers R.E.O. Realty
386-867-1271
3/2 1056 sqft Brick home in town.
Fenced back yard w/12xl2 work-
shop Just Reduced! $79,900
MLS# 77414 Call 386-243-8227
R.E.O.Realty Group, Inc
3/2 2003 DWMH on 5 acre rectan-
gulai- lot w/tons of potential.
MLS#77568 $79,900 Call Nancy
@ R.E.O. Realty 386-867-1271
nancytrogers@msn.com
3/2 home on .67 ac. Creekside S/D
Fenced back yard, lots of trees.
Split floor plan on cul-de-sac
MLS 77385 Access Realty.
Patti Taylor $169,900 623-6896
4/2 on 10.5 acres w/ detached
garage, patio, above ground pool,
MLS# 77410 $189,888
R.E.O. Realty Group, Inc
386-243-8227


4/2 with 1000 sq ft workshop,
fenced yard, 2 car garage, Fairly
new roof & HVAC MLS#77602,
Bring Offers! $164,900,
R.E.O. Realty Group 243-8227
4br brick on .51 ac. comer lot. For-
mal dining and a large open floor
plan. Brick patio. $139,888
MLS 76763 Brittany Stoeckert
Results Realty 386-397-3473


Classified Department: 755-5440


IM- --- un m- I






2009 Jamboree
31M
Ford V-10, 2 slides w/32
in. HDTV, satellite.
Av. retail $81,500.
Now $67,000
Call
386-719-6833


810 Home for Sale
Access Realty Stylish 3/2 + pool
house w/1/2 bath on 2.25 acres.
Rear deck, 2 car garage & carport.
MLS 78103 $189,900.
Patti Taylor.623-6896
BEAUTIFUL Lake Front home!
I ac lot within the city limits.
Close to town. 1800 heated sq. ft.
$144,900 MLS# 78385
Call Jay Sears. 386-867-1613
Brick 3/1 family home, 4.43 acres.
w/metal roof. MLS# 77415
Short sale acceptance w/lenders
approval. $89,000. 386-243-8227
R.E.O. Realty Group, Inc
CLEAN & READY! 3BR/2BA
mfg home on .97-acre south of Ft.
White on paved road $59,000
DANIEL CRAPPS AGENCY,
INC. 755-5110 #78007
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
3/2 brick home in Woodcrest. Lg
lot completely fenced. Easy access
to amenities. Elaine K. Tolar 386-
755-6488 MLS# 78148 $129,900
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
3/3 in beautiful area. 2414sqft.
Private yard & patio with storage
bldg. Lori G Simpson 386-365-
5678 MLS# 78175 $159,900
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
New home in Mayfair. 4 bedroom
Son comer lot. Covered Porch.
Elaine K. Tolar 386-755-6488
MLS# 76919 $209,900
Coldwell Banker/iishop Realty
Remodeled 2/2 (could be 3/2).
Split floor plan. Home Owner
Warranty. Mary Brown Whitehurst
965-0887 MLS# 77943 $99,000
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
MH in Eastside Village a 55+
retirement community. Well main-
tained. Bruce Dicks 386-365-3784
MLS# 78350 $59,900
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
Brick home on Suwannee River
$329,900 Elaine If. Tolar 386-755-
6488 or Lori G. Simpson 365-5678
MLS# 70790 $329,900
DESIRABLE GWEN LAKE area!
Nice 3BR/2BA home on comer lot
REDUCED TO $95,000 DANIEL
CRAPPS AGENCY, INC.
755-5110 #77307
Hallmark Real Estate. 3/2
Doublewide on 1 acre. $58,000.
Not far to college & airport.
MLS# 78308
Ginger Parker 386-365-2135
Hallmark Real Estate. 35 High &
Dry acres. open pasture w/scat-
tered trees. Older site built home.
Needs some TLC.
MLS#76186 Jay Sears 719-0382
Hallmark .Real Estate. Beautiful
lot in Woodborough, has well
maintained 3/2 brick home.
Affordable price!MLS#75413
Sherry Willis 386-365-8095
Hallmark Real Estate. Lakefront
in town on 1 ac. Majestic oaks &
Magnolias. Hardwood floors,
fireplace & basement.
MLS#78385 Jay Searsi719-0382
Hallmark Real Estate. Pool &
Patio. 3br/2ba. brick home on
1.69 ac. Workshop &
SWMH on property. MLS#78117
Tanya Shaffer 386-397-4766
Hallmark Real Estate. Time to go
to the River. Stilt home w/covered
decking. Floating dock,out bldgs
& covered RV parking. $188K.
MLS#72068 Janet Creel 719-0382
Handyman Special
Off Turner Rd. 2br/1.5ba.
Half acre fenced lot w/shed.
Asking $55,000. (352)335-8330
HANDYMAN SPECIAL!
4BR/2BA mfg home in great loca-
tion close to many amenities
$39,500 DANIEL CRAPPS
AGENCY, INC. 755-5110 #77852
Home for Sale Eastside Village
Realty, Inc. 2 bedroom, 2 bath site
built home with screen porch,
large carport priced just right Call
Denise Bose @ 752-5290
Home on 15 ac. w/over 2,500 sqft
home.Very Ig bedrooms w/private
baths. 24x24 workshop $235,000
MLS 77552 Brittany Stoeckert
Results Realty 386-397-3473
Lg. 4/3 family home. 16x20
screened porch, workshop. 4.5 ac.
fenced/cross fenced MLS 74339
$229,900. N Fnla Homeland Real-
ty Darlene Hart 386-288-2878
Mayfair S/D, nice fenced in back
yard w/small lake behind property.
Very nice. $99,888
MLS 77092 Brittany Stoeckert
Results Realty 386-397-3473
Neat as a pin! Split floor plan
w/well manicured lawn. 10x12
storage shed. $129K MLS 77932
Darlene Hart 386-288-2878
N Fin Homeland Realty
QUALITY HOME. Very private,
yet in the city. Comes with mobile
home park that generates revenue.
$695,000. MLS# 77920
Call Jay Sears. 386-867-1613
REDUCED! Custom 2,061 SqFt
home with open floor plan,
3BR/2.5BA, in-ground pool
DANIEL CRAPPS AGENCY,
INC. 755-5110 #75442
RUSSWOOD EST! 3BR/2BA
w/2,337 SqFt, open floor plan,
climatized sun porch $219,900
DANIEL CRAPPS AGENCY,
INC. 755-5110 #77633


& WATERCRAFT






2000 Hummer
Army green, leather
interior, pristine cond.
31,148 miles.

$52,000
Call
Pictures available.


X-Clean 2/2 SW, 8 mi NW of VA.
Clean acre lot, nice area. $500. mo
+ dep No dogs Non-smoking
environment.386-961-9181


RECYCLE YOUR
Lake City Reporter


-A


I -


810 Home for Sale
Spacious 4/2 home on 1 ac. Split
floor plan. Great neighborhood.
Easy access to 1-75 $220K MI,.S
77859 N Fla Homeland Realty
Darlene Hart 386-288-2878
WELLBORN! 4BR/2BA mfg
home w/2,280 SqFt, FP, & 5
ACRES only $74,900
DANIEL CRAPPS AGENCY,
INC. 755-5110#78317

820 Farms &
2U Acreage
10 ac. Ft. Whit $39,995,
$995 Down, $273.16 mo.
Seller fin. vargasrealty.com
352-472-3154

10-ac lot. Well/septic/pp. Owner
financing $300 dn, $663 mo 8.9%,
25 yrs. Deas Bullard Properties
386-752-4339 www.landnfl.corn
2+ ACRES ON HWY 47
by 1-75 interchange. More than
200 ft of frontage $149,900
Call 386-243-8227 .:
R.E.O. Realty Group, Inc-
20.02 acres ready for your sitd
built home. Has 2 wells & 2 power
poles w/a 24x30 slab $132,000
MLS# 78126 Call 386-243-8227
R.E.O.Realty Group, Inc ,
FARM- 7 stall barn.
17+ acres, pasture, cross fenced.
Close in $500. mo.
386-961-1086
Paved hard road in front of 5 ac.
tract. Comes with: power pole,
well & septic. Cleared in back
Also, 20X25 carport. $39,900
MLS# 76347. Jay 386-867-1613

830 Commercial
.Property

05526409
FOR SALE LAKE CITY
FORMER 84 LUMBER Zoned
Commercial Intensive on
4.2 +/- Acres with an 18,300
S.F. main building at 1824 W.
US Highway 90; contact
Crystal 724 228-3636 x 1349,
Prime Commercial Location.
Just across from plaza. Frontage'
on Baya w/2 curbcuts. $350,000
MLS# 77485 Call 386-243-8227
R.E.O.Realty Group, Inc

870 Real Estate
870 Wanted

I Buy Houses -
CASH!
Quick Sale Fair Price
386-269-0605

952 Vans & Sport
Util. Vehicles

2000 HUMMER Army Green,
Leather Interior, Pristine cond.
31,148 miles. $52,000. Call
386-487-1409 Pictures available.








"ON WHEELS & WATEfCHARF '
-,--.-









Bring the picture in or,
we will take it for you!"
Ad runs 10 consecutive days
with a descOiption and photo in the
newspaper and online E-edition. "
Ad runs 10 consecutive days as A
classified line ad online.
You must include vehicle price.'
All ads are prepaid.
Private party only.





2006 EF250
Ford Van
3/4 ton metal wok
shelves/ladder rack,
60K miles, exc. cond.
$10,500
Call
386-555-5555
If you don't sell your vehicle
during the first 10 days, you
can run the same vehicle ad
for 10 additional days for
only $15.00
Terms and conditions remain the
same for the additional run.


-- *ru









LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS THURSDAY, JULY 28, 2011


BRIEFS

CHS GOLF
Meeting planned
for Monday
A meeting for players
interested in trying out for
the Columbia High golf
team is 10 a.m. Monday at
the CHS auditorium.
For details, call coach
Steve Smithy at 365-4436.
YOUTH FOOTBALL
Free camp with
coach Brian Allen
The Columbia County
Recreation Department is
sponsoring a free football
camp featuring Columbia
High head coach Brian
Allen from 8 a.m. to noon
Tuesday at CHS. The camp
will feature a tour of the
facilities and low-key drills.
The camp is open to boys
and girls ages 5-13 (as of
Sept. 1). A pre-registration
waiver form is required.
Forms are available at
Richardson Community
Center from 9 a.m. to
5 p.m.
For details, call Adee
Farmer at 754-7095.

Little League
registration set
Lake City Parks and
Recreation Department's
youth football (ages 8-13)
registration is set for 8 a.m.
to 5 p.m. Aug. 13,
Aug. 20 and Aug. 27 at
Teen Town Recreation
Center. A parent or
guardian must accompany
the child and a birth
certificate or copy is
required. Cost is $40 per
player and two groups are *
offered: Junior Midget
(8-10 with some weight
restrictions) and Midget
(10-13 with some weight
restrictions).
For details, call Heyward
Christie at 754-3607.
POP WARNER FOOTBALL
Sign-up extended
through Aug. 15
Lake City Pop Warner
football has extended
registration through
Aug. 15 for the
following groups: ages 7-9,
45-90 pounds; ages 8-10,
60-105 pounds; age 11,
60-85 pounds; ages 9-11,
75-120 pounds; age 12,
75-100 pounds. Registration
is 3-6 p.m. weekdays at
Richardson Community
Center. Cost is $80.
For details, call Mario
Coppock or Nicole Smith at
754-7095 or 754-7096.

YOUTH CHEERLEADING
Registration,
clinic on Aug. 13
Little League
Cheerleading has
registration for the fall
from 8:30 a.m. to noon
Aug. 13 at Richardson
Middle School. Cost is $30
plus uniform (if needed).
A clinic is planned during
registration at a cost of $10.
Sign-up begins at 8 a.m.
For details, call 288-1892.

YOUTH BASEBALL
Fort White sets
board elections
Fort White Youth
Baseball has board
elections set for 7 p.m.
Aug. 5 in the building
at the back of the South
Columbia Sports Park.
For details, call Tammy
Sharpe at 867-3825.

SEMI-PRO FOOTBALL
Lake City team
seeking players


The Lake City Falcons
men's semi-pro football
team is seeking new
players and veterans for
the upcoming season.
Players must be 18 years
old or older, and able to
commit to the team and
come to practice.
For details, call Luis
Santiago at 292-4138 or
Elaine Harden at 292-3039.

* From staff reports


GILLIAM: Carries dream with him to Pensacola State College
Continued From Page 1B


we had lots of talents, but
at first we were focused
on the me, me, me instead
of team," he said. "Once
we figured out how to play
together, we got things
rolling. Unfortunately, we
didn't go much further,
because I. think we, had
what it took to contend for
state."
On an individual basis,
Gilliam credits his four


coaches as well as his par-
ents with molding him into
the player he is.
"The first coach I had was
Richard Collins, who I've
known since playing travel
ball," he said. "I think him
for everything he's done.
Andy Bennett, I've also
known since I was little.
He's one that influenced
me to come out and never
promised me anything. He


gave me a chance to prac-
tice with the bigger guys.
Coach (Greg) Gillman was
fun to be around, even
though I only knew him for
one season and coach (J.T.)
Clark, I'm glad got the job.
I've known his since I was
six or seven and attending
his father's camps at the
college. We think the same
way, and there's never a
dull moment around him."


But his father may have
put in more hours than any-
one.
"If it wasn't for my par-
ents (Tim and Tiffany), I
wouldn't be in this situa-
tion," he said. "We've trav-
elled so many miles, up as
far as Iowa. Dad has spent
countless hours working
with me, because he knows
it's been my dream to make
it to the big leagues."


'Jeep


Now, Gilliam carries on
that dream. He'll put on the
cleates once again this fall
under coach Keith Little.
"He's the type of guy
that knows how to have
fun, but takes it seriously
at the same time," Gilliam
said. "As long as you're
doing what you're suppose
to do in the classroom, he's
going to make the game
fun."


C 30 Y S LI R


2011 CHynSLR00




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LAKE C.-, A


SUMMER


Page Editor: Brandon Finley, 754-0420