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UFPKY NEH LSTA



The Lake City reporter
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028308/01619
 Material Information
Title: The Lake City reporter
Uniform Title: Lake City reporter (Lake City, Fla. 1967)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: John H. Perry
Place of Publication: Lake City Fla
Publication Date: 7/27/2011
Frequency: daily (monday through friday)[<1969>-]
weekly[ former 1967-<1968>]
daily
normalized irregular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Lake City (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Columbia County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Columbia -- Lake City
Coordinates: 30.189722 x -82.639722 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 95, no. 4 (Oct. 5, 1967)-
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000358016
oclc - 33283560
notis - ABZ6316
lccn - sn 95047175
sobekcm - UF00028308_01569
System ID: UF00028308:01619
 Related Items
Preceded by: Lake City reporter and Columbia gazette

Full Text





Olympic quest
Jackson scores


Ea.


national gold
in weightlifting.
000015 120511 ****3-DIG
LIB OF FLORIDA HISTORY
PO BOX 117007
205 SMA UNIV OF FLORIDA
GAINESVILLE FL 32611-1943


gle on No. 3
Ebert scores
second
of the week.
Snorts. 2B
-T 326


Helping hand
Operation Backpack
makes its 13th
appearance.
Story below


Lake Ulty


Reporter


Wednesday, July 27, 2011 www.lakecityreporter.com Vol. 137, No. 155 E 75 cents


A civic center for Lake City?


Officials consider what
it would take to fund,
operate such a facility.

By TONY BRITT
tbritt@lakecityreporter.comrn
County officials have high hopes that a
civic or convention center, built in the near
future, could be a major economic asset in
years to come. However, questions remain
about funding, the possibility of an annual


subsidy, construction designs, potential loca-
tions and whether it's even feasible to get
the project from the theoretical stage to the
planning and design stages in the relatively
near future.
Last week a fact-finding report was pre-
sented at a meeting of the Columbia County
Tourist Development Council, during which
officials discussed what kind of money it
would take to get the project off the ground,
as well as whether the proposed facility
would actually have an impact on the local
economy.


Rainy
day ride

A drenched
Kathy Freeman
bikes down U.S.
Highway 90 with
her daughter
Rachel, 10, after
a rainstorm had
passed through
Lake City Tuesday.
Kathy Freeman
said they were
caught in the
downpour while on
a shopping trip and
that the rain 'feels
good.'


The beginning
Harvey Campbell, Columbia County
Tourist Development Council director, said
county officials have been looking at the idea
of constructing a civic or convention center
for close to 20 years.
The concept was reawakened after Jody
DuPree, Cdlumbia County Commission
chairman, recently attended an out-of-town
event that drew an especially large crowd.
CMVI CENTER continued on 3A


PSC rejects power-saving proposals


FPL, Progress,
lose bid before
commission.

By BILL KACZOR
Associated Press
TALLAHASSEE Regulators
on Tuesday rejected plans by
the state's two largestpb6wer
companies to give more breaks
i


to customers who install high-
efficiency appliances and take
other conservation steps because
they think energy-saving goals
for Florida's electric utilities may
be too hard to achieve.
The Public Service
Commission also asked its staff
to begin the process of reconsid-
ering those goals for all five of
Florida's investor-owned utilities


School village

down 7 percent

By LEANNE TYO separate votes for each.
Ityo@lakecityreporter.com During the village's
public hearing, where no
The Columbia County residents spoke, board
School Board set a tenta- member Keith Hudson
tive total millage rate, a expressed concern that
rate that had decreased Capital Outlay millage
by more than 7 percent, monies were appropri-
for the 2011-12 fiscal year ated to buy only two
at its regular meeting school buses in the Motor
Tuesday. Vehicles Purchases cat-
Last fiscal year's total egory when the district
millage rate was set at has aging vehicles that will
7.912 mills, but the new need to be replaced more
,tentative total millage is at quickly.
7.615 mills. (That) really hurts us
The board arrived at as we go on," Hudson said,
that new total millage by "because our fleet's aging."
unanimously adopting a Mary Loughran, district
tentative Required Local finance director, said at
Effort of 5.35 mills, tenta- least two school buses are
tive Prior Period Funding included in those appropri-
Adjustment Millage of actions in case the district
,017 mills, tentative Basic is in a financial position to
Discretionary of .748 purchase them. In years
mills and tentative Capital
Outlay of 1.5 mills through BUDGET continued on 5A

CALLUS: A
(386)752-1293
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II | THE REPORTER:
S Voice: 755-5445
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as well as two large municipal
systems.
The commission unanimously
voted against staff recommen-
dations to approve beefed-up
demand-side conservation plans
for Florida Power & Light Co.,
which serves most of Lake City,
and Progress Energy Florida,
which supplies wholesale power
to Suwannee and other North


LEANNE TYOILake City Reporter
Mary Loughran, school district finance director,
answers millage rate questions from Columbia
County School Board members at the board's
meeting Tuesday at the Columbia County School
Board Administrative Complex Auditorium.


O pinion ................ 4A
People.................. 2A
Obituaries .............. 5A
Advice & Comics......... 4C
Puzzles ................. 2B


Florida counties.
Instead, it let both utilities
continue with existing programs
although they fail to meet con-
servation goals set by the panel
before four of the five commis-
sioners were replaced last year.
The new FPL plan would
have met its goal. The Progress
PSC continued on 3A


A helping

hand for

students

By LEANNE TYO
Ityo@lakecityreporter.com.
No child should go
to school without the
supplies they need and
thel3th Annual Operation
Backpack is here again to
help.
The event, which will
provide any Columbia
County student with the
necessary school supplies
and health exams free
of charge to start off the
school year, will be held
from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. Aug.
6 at the fairgrounds' ban-
quet hall.
"The kids can come
through and get every-
thing they need to start

BACKPACKS continued on 3A


TODAY IN
PEOPLE
laid to re-t


Arrest


made


in fatal


crash

FortWhite man
charged in death
of his passenger.

By TONY BRITT
tbritt@lakecityreporter.com
A Columbia County man
has been arrested and
faces multiple charges in a
January wreck in which he
was driving and one of his
passengers was killed and
the other severely injured.
Jesse Allan Ward, 31,
6745 SW Old Wire Road,
Fort White, was charged
with one count of DUI man-
slaughter and one count
of DUI with serious bodily
injury in connection with
the crash. He is has been
released from the Columbia
County Jail on $30,000 bond.
According to Florida
Highway Patrol reports, on
Jan. -10, Ward was driving
a 2005 Ford F-150 pickup
truck with Lee Posey, 30,
of Branford and Dennis
Fleming, 28, of Lake City as
his passengers. The three
men were traveling north
on southwest Old Wire
Road when Ward report-
edly lost control of the
truck on a curve. The truck
then traveled onto the west
shoulder and overturned
several'times. Both Posey
and Fleming were tossed
from the vehicle.
Fleming was pronounced
dead at the scene from
injuries he suffered in the
wreck. Reports said he was
not wearing a seatbelt.
Ward and Posey were
taken to Lake City Medical
Center with incapacitating
injuries, reports said.
According to the Florida
Highway Patrol arrest war-
rant, Ward was taken into
custody Monday. Authorities
did not immediately release
where Ward was arrested.
The report also detailed
findings made immediately
after the wreck.
"Scene evidence revealed
Ward was traveling north-
bound on SW Old Wire
Road and failed to negotiate
a right curve, leaving the
roadway to the left, traveling,
Sup the 18-inch embankment,
accelerating and over-cor-
recting his steering to the
right, which caused the
vehicle to violently roll over
a couple of times..." wrote
FHP Cpl. LN. Albritton.
Albritton noted that Ward
was allegedly driving the
truck 4045 mph on a posted
30 mph roadway; was driv-
ing with a blood alcohol
level reported to be .168 -
.169; and that tests revealed
trace elements of marijuana
in his body. According to
FHP, he never applied his
brakes, left the roadway,
traveled up the embank-
ment, accelerated and trav-
eled approximately 175 feet
before overcorrecting to the
right, causing the truck's left
side tires to dig into the soil
and send the vehicle into a
violent roll.
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COMING
THURSDAY
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LAKE CITY REPORTER DAILY BRIEFING WEDNESDAY, JULY 27, 2011


3 Tuesday:
Afternoon: 9-3-3
Evening: N/A


ly 4) Tuesday:
-, "* Afternoon: 3-3-0-3
Evening: N/A


Monday:
4-10-11-15-20


PEOPLE IN THE NEWS


Family, friends attend Winehouse funeral

LONDON


friends and fam-
ily said goodbye to Amy
Winehouse Tuesday with
prayers, tears, laughter
and song at a funeral cer-
1.,emony in London.
The singer's father, mother and
Brother and close friends, along
with band members and celebri-
,ties including producer Mark
'Ronson and media personality Kelly
,Osbourne, her hair piled beehive-
-high in an echo of the singer's trade-
Smark style were among several
'. hundred mourners attending the
Service at Edgwarebury Cemetery in
S,'north London.
The Jewish service was led by
a rabbi and included prayers in
English and Hebrew and reminis-
cences from Winehouse's father,
Mitch Winehouse. The cab driver
'and jazz singer, who helped fos-
ter his daughter's love of music,
ended his eulogy with the words
"Goodnight, my angel, sleep tight
Mummy and Daddy love you ever so
much."
It ended with a rendition of
Carole King's "So Far Away," one of
Winehouse's favorite songs.
"Mitch was funny, he told some
great stories from childhood about
how headstrong she was, and clearly
the family and friends recognized
the stories and laughed along," said
Family spokesman Chris Goodman.
,"He stressed so many times she
was happier now than she had ever
,. 'been and he spoke about her boy-
friend and paid tribute to a lot of
people in her life."

Sheryl Crow auctioning
off car to aid Joplin, Mo.
A SPRINGFIELD, Mo. Some
winning bidder will soon be cruis-
ing life's winding road in Sheryl
Crow's 1959 Mercedes-Benz 190SL
Roadster.
The Grammy award-winning


British singer Amy Winehouse's father Mitch (center) arrives at Golders Green
Crematorium for the funeral ceremony of his daughter in London Tuesday.
Winehouse, who had.battled alcohol and drug addiction, was found dead Saturday
at her London home. She was 27.


singer said Monday
that. she's auction-
ing off the classic
car next month and
that the proceeds
will go toward help-
oing rebuild the tor-
Crow nado-ravaged city of
Joplin in her native
stateof Missouri.
'Crow said she loves the car and
has had it for six years, but doesn't
drive it anymore.

Ex-Calif. gov. tweets son
'doing much better'
LOS ANGELES Former
California Gov. Arnold
Schwarzenegger said his son's condi-
tion is improving after a body-boArd-
ing accident at a Malibu beach.
Schwarzenegger tweeted his
appreciation to well-wishers Monday
night
In his post, Schwarzenegger


said 'IThanks for
all your support
for Christopher. It
means a lot to me &
to him. He's doing
much better & we'll
have him back at full
speed soon."
Watson The 13-year-old
son of Arnold Schwarzenegger and
Maria Shriver suffered a collapsed
lung and broken bones in the acci-
dent on July 17.

Wal-Mart offers video
streaming on website
NEW YORK The world's larg-
est retailer on Tuesday started
streaming many movies the same
day they come out on DVD, in a sec-
ond bid for a share of popular movie
rental and streaming website Netflix
Inc.'s business and just two weeks
after Netflix announced new prices.
* Associated Press


Celebrity Birthdays


* TV producer Norman Lear
is 89.
" Actor Jerry Van Dyke is 80.
" Sportscaster Irv Cross is
72.
" Actor John Pleshette is 69.
" Singer Bobbie Gentry is 67.
" Actress-director Betty
Thomas is 63.
* Olympic gold medal figure
skater Peggy Fleming is 63.
* Singer Maureen McGovern
is 62.
Daily Scripture


* Actress Janet Eilber is 60.
'N Actress Roxanne Hart is
57.
* Country musician Duncan
Cameron is 55.
* Comedian-actress-writer
Carol Leifer is 55.
* Comedian Bill Engvall is
54.
* Actor Julian McMahon is
43.
* Singer-songwriter Pete
Yorn is 37.


HOW TO REACH US
Main number ........(386) 752-1293
Fax number .............752-9400
Circulation ...............755-5445
Online... www.lakecityreporter.com
The Lake City Reporter, an affiliate of
Community Newspapers Inc., is pub-
lished Tuesday through Sunday at 180
E. Duval St., Lake City, Fla. 32055.
Periodical postage paid at Lake City, Fla.
Member Audit Bureau of Circulation and
The Associated Press.
All material herein is property of the Lake
City Reporter. Reproduction in whole or
in part is forbidden without the permis-
sion of the publisher. U.S. Postal Service
No. 310-880.
POSTMASTER: Send address changes
to Lake City Reporter, P.O. Box 1709;
Lake City, Fa. 32056.
Publisher Todd Wilson.....754-0418
(twilson@lakecityreporter.com)
NEWS.
Editor Robert Bridges .....754-0428
(rbridges@lakecityreporter.com)
ADVERTISING
Director Ashley Butcher ...754-0417
(abutcher@lakecityreporter.cdm)
CLASSIFIED
To place a classified ad, call 755-5440


BUSINESS
Controller Sue Brannon... .754-0419
(sbrannon@lakecityreporter.com)
CIRCULATION
Home delivery of the Lake City Reporter
should be completed by 6:30 a.m.
Tuesday through Saturday, and by 7.30
a.m. on Sunday.
Please call 386-755-5445 to report any
problems with your delivery service.
In Columbia County, customers should
call before 10:30 a.m. to report a ser-
vice error for same day re-delivery. After
10:30 am., next day re-delivery or ser-
vice related credits will be issued.
In allother counties where home delivery
is available, next day re-delivery or ser-
vice related credits will be issued.
Circulation ..............755-5445
(circulation@lakecityreporter.com)
Home delivery rates
(Tuesday through Sunday)
12 Weeks.................. $26.32
24 Weeks...................$48.79
52 Weeks................$... .46
Rates include 7% sales taLx.
Mail rates
12Weeks....'.......... $41.40
24 Weeks............ : ...... $82.80
52 Weeks...................$179.40


CORRECTION

The Lake City Reporter corrects errors of fact in news
'items. If you have a concern, question or suggestion, please
call the executive editor. Corrections and clarifications will run
jin this space.,And thanks for- reading....


Judge asked to lift
stay of execution
TALLAHASSEE -
Florida Attorney General
Pam Bondi has asked U.S.
Supreme Court Justice
Clarence Thomas to lift a
stay of execution ordered
by the state's highest
court
Bondi filed the request
after the Florida Supreme
Court on Monday ordered
a month-long stay for
Manuel Valle.
He was had been sched-
uled for execution Aug. 2
for killing a Coral Gables
police officer 33 years ago.
The state justices, in
a 4-3 ruling, ordered the
stay so a trial judge can
hold a fact-finding hearing
on whether Valle would
'feel pain from a new drug
Florida plans to use for
lethal injection.

, Hospital files
$9.2M claim
TAMPA Tampa
7-General Hospital has filed
. a $9.2 million claim against
,the estate of a woman
-'who died after spending
five years in the hospital,
according to Hillsborough
,,County court documents.
In court documents,
that's how much the hos-
pital said is owed for the
care of Tameka Jaqway
Campbell. She died at
age 29 two years ago of
progressive demyelinating
neuropathy, which occurs
-when the immune cells
attack the body's nerves.
It's unclear whether the
$9.2 million in hospital
charges is a record.

-Crime Stoppers
seeking tips
OCALA Crime
Stoppers of Marion County
hopes a game of cards can
help them solve some cold
cases.
They've recently started
giving inmates at the


Hurray for Hemingway
2009 Ernest Hemingway look-alike winner David Douglas
(left) plants a playful smooch on Matt Gineo Saturday after
Gineo was selected the 2011 'Papa' Hemingway Look-Alike
Contest winner at Sloppy Joe's Bar in Key West.


Marion County Jail decks
of playing cards that fea-
ture 46 unsolved murders,
three missing persons
and three armed robbery
cases.
Crime Stoppers execu-
tive director Robert Hauck
said inmates often have a
lot of information about
crimes. And they like to
play cards in jail. In return,
the group hopes inmates
will provide tips that will
help solve cases dating
back to the 1960s.

Details released
in crash probe
MIAMI Prosecutors
in Florida are releas-
ing new details of their
investigation into a South
Beach ATV crash involv-
ing an allegedly drunken
police officer who struck
and seriously injured two
people.
Two Miami Beach police
officers have already been
fired for allegedly drinking
on duty before the July
3 crash. Prosecutors on
Tuesday are expected to
detail potential criminal
charges.
The announcement
comes one day after Miami
Beach officials began steps


to fire two other police offi-
cers over the false arrest,
of a gay tourist who had
witnessed a police beat-
ing in March 2009. The
tourist and American Civil
Liberties Union have filed
a federal civil rights law-
suit against the city.

2 killed in
carjacking
MIAMI GARDENS A
young couple died in what
Miami Gardens police
called a "cold-blooded"
attack by carjackers who
were apparently after the
victims' souped-up 1997
Mustang.
The fatal shooting
happened early Monday
at a Miami Gardens
gas station. Police said
grainy surveillance video
shows three to four men
approaching Julian Soler,
23, as he was parked
beside a gas pump.
The video shows a man
tap on the window, flash-
ing a gun. Police said
when Soler got out of the
car with his hands up, the
man opened fire, killing
him. Another man fatally
shot Kennia Duran, 24, in
the chest
E Associated Press


THE WEATHER



tUNDER- CHANCE CHANCE
STORMS STORMS STORMS

I\ 94 LO 73 194LO74 A951.0 74


i :-


Pensacola
90, 77


Tallahas
91/7

Panan
90


Sildosta City
92/73 Jacksonville Cape Cana
see. Lake City 1,' 74 DaytonaB
5 94/73 Ft. Lauder
S Gainesvfle Daytona Beach Fort Myen
Ma Cty 92/73 9 77 Gainesville
6 Ocala* Jacksonvll
^93/73 ? Key West
93/76 9/78 Lake City
Miami
Tamlpa \. Naples


90/79/


,
Ft Myers
92/77


i.,, Il


West Palm Beach Ocala
90/80 Orlando
FLt Lauderdale Panama
90/81 Pensacol
1 Naples Tallahass
91/77 Miami Tampa
a q. 9/81 Valdosta


ey wjest \
92/84


LK, CI TY A *A A


TEMPERATURES
.High Tuesday
Low Tuesday
Normal high
Normal low
Record high
Record low

PRECIPITATION
Tuesday
Month total
Year total
Normal month-to-date
Normal year-to-date


88
73
91
71
100 in 1952
67 in 1988

0.23"
3.39"
23.28"
5.11"
29.14"


7a 1 p 7pt la 6a
Wednesday Thursday







, Fgweto e pwratnre 'Fee lRe* tspature


SUN
Sunrise today
Sunset today
Sunrise tom.
Sunset torn.

MOON
Moonrise today
Moonset today
Moonrise tom.
Moonset torn.


6:46 a.m.
8:28 p.m.
6:47 a.m.
8:27 p.m.


3:33 a.m.
5:58 p.m.
4:31 a.m.
6:49 p.m.


July Aug. Aug. Aug.
30 6 13 21
New First Full Last


averal
Beach
dale

ls
Ie


City
a
see


Thursday
90 77,1
91/76/t
90/83/pc
94/77/t
92/75/pc
94/76/t
91/84/sh
94/74/t
91/83/pc
92/77/t
94/74/pc
94/76/t
90/77/t
91/78/t
92/74/t
93/79/t
94/74/t


W. Palm Beach 91/82/pc


Ill'imtulE


12

10minuiteste tob
Today's
ultra-violet
radiation risk
for the area on
a scale from 0
to 10+.


Friday
89: 7 pi:
91/75/pc
91/83/pc
96/76/pc
94/74/pc
94/75/pc
91/84/sh
95/74/pc
92/82/pc
95/78/pc
94/74/pc
94/76/pc
90/79/pc
93/79/pc
94/76/pc
94/79/pc
95/76/pc
91/81/pc


An exclusive
service
brought to
our readers
by
The Weather
Channel.



weather.com


"Now faith is confidence in
what we hope for and assurance
about what we do not see."


Hebrews 11:1

Thought for Today
"A minority may be right, and.a
majority is always wrong."
Henrik Ibsen,
Norwegian dramatist and poet (1828-1906)


Lake City Reporter


AROUND FLORIDA


f = Forecasts, data and
^ t graphics 2011 Weather
water Ce wtrawel, L Madison, Wis.
weatherY www.weatherpublteher.com


r~------ll-rPIIUUPr~P~-----~~--Y----- I


Page Editor: Jason M. Walker, 754-0430


M. F3 5 1 ."n


(386)755-5i4


l










Page Editor: Robert Bridges, 754-0428 LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL WEDNESDAY, JULY 27, 2011


PSC: Plans rejected

Continued From Page 1A


proposal still would have
fallen short although com-
ing closer than the present
program.
The rejected propos-
als would have slightly
increased overall rates but
given customers a chance
to reduce their power bills
by participating in new
programs such as energy
surveys and financial
incentives for weatheriza-
tion and buying more
efficient appliances and air
conditioners.
The 10-year goals
adopted in 2009 were sig-
nificantly stronger than the
utilities had proposed but
weaker than what environ-
mentalists sought
Commissioner Ronald
Brise, who was a state
representative when the
Legislature passed a law
requiring the goals in
2008, said lawmakers had
expected solar power and
other renewable energy
sources to be major play-
ers in the state's energy
policy, but that hasn't hap-
pened.
"It's almost unfair to look
at this from the perspective
of we are going to achieve
all of this efficiency strictly
through" demand-side con-'
servation, Brise said.
Commissioner Eduardo
Balbis said delaying the need
for new power plants for two
years in the case of Progress
Energy wasn't worth the cost
of the conservation program
to consumers.
The Progress Energy
plan was expected increase
its current monthly conser-
vation fee by $1.49 to $4.73
for a home using 1,200
kilowatt hours, which is
about average. The charge
would have increased to
$6.13 in 2014.
FPL's proposal would
have increased its conser-


ovation fee by $1.44 to $3.70
per month for 1,200 kilo-
watt hours. It would have
topped out at $4.11 in 2014.
Progress Energy lawyer
Dianne Triplett told the
commissioners the utility's
proposal would have
resulted in some custom-
ers subsidizing others.
"The problem of setting
a goal that's too high is
that you're going to have
to offer programs that not
everybody can take advan-
tage of," Triplett said. "A
lot of our customers don't
have pools so they can't
take advantage of a pool
pump yet they may be pay-
ing for that"
Representatives of the
Southern Alliance for
Clean Energy questioned
why Progress Energy's
proposal cost more than
other utilities' plans yet it
still wouldn't have met the
company's goal. Triplett
said the cost was greater
because the commis-
sion set a higher goal for
Progress.
Alliance lawyer Leon
Jacobs said setting the goals
was controversial and recon-
sidering them "would not be
a simple process."
Public Counsel J.R.
Kelly, the state's consumer
advocate for utility mat-
ters, took no position. He
said some consumers favor
more conservation and are
willing to pay for it while
others say they cannot
afford to pay a dime more.
Vicki Kaufman, a lawyer
for the Florida Industrial
Power Users Group, said
the proposals would have
added thousands of dol-
lars and in some cases
hundreds of thousands of
dollars to the bills of her
members including NASA,
hospitals and grocery
stores.


Scholarship winner


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
The Shands LakeShore Regional Medical Center Auxiliary Inc. presented a cheqk for $500 to Clanitra Kelsey as a part
of the Continuing Education Scholarship. Kelsey, who is a full-time nurse at the hospital, is currently enrolled in the RN
program at Florida Gateway College. Pictured are Auxiliary treasurer Dale Stadler (from left), Kelsey, Nursing Supervisor
Kathy Wooley and Auxiliary vice president Harold Hunziker.
*[


BACKPACKS: School supplies for everyone

Continued From Page 1A


the school year off," said Leilani
Dagley, event organizer.
Hosting the event is Christ
Central Ministries, Church on the
Way, Parkview Baptist Church and
Christian Heritage Church.
All students must attend with
their parents or guardians.
The first 300 students in atten-
dance will receive a JanSport
Superbreak backpack- with a
lifetime warranty stuffed with
school supplies. All students after
those will still receive the school
supplies.
At the event, children can get
immunizations needed for school
from the Columbia County


Health Department, have their
hair cut, get fingerprinted by' the
Columbia County Sheriff's Office
and get back-to-school physical
and eye exams from local doctors,
Certified Nurse Assistants and
Physician Assistants.
Other items children can
receive include year-long vouchers
for vitamins from North Florida
Pharmacy and bike helmets from
the IHealth Department.
Hot dogs and drinks will be
available and Sunday Rain, a
Christ Central music group, will
provide live entertainment.
No child attending the event
will go back to school without


what he or she needs, Dagley
said.
"We've got everything cov-
ered," she said.
Organizers continue to offer
the event to provide for Columbia
County's children, Dagley said.
,"All you have to do is just come
out on the other end and watch the
kids come up with their smiling
faces and their backpacks on and it
makes it worth it," she said.
Operation Backpack still needs
more hairdressers to give hair-
cuts and CNAs to help give phys-
icals and eye exams. Call Christ
Central Ministries at (386) 755-
2525.


CIVIC CENTER: Local officials look at what it would take to build, run one

Continued From Page 1A


"I wondered what could
we do, especially with
Interstate 10 and Interstate
75 with the logistics and
the demographics that we
have," DuPree said.
Campbell said he
believes officials like the
concept because it has the
potential to capitalize on
the county's location -
near two major interstates.
"That's makes us almost
a natural to host meet-
ings," he said. "There is an
element of quality of life in
the community of enter-
tainment"
Campbell said a venue
for entertainment like
wrestling, gun and knife
shows and even family
reunions and weddings
would be an asset for
Columbia County.
"We really are lacking
anything with significant'
size that fits more than
250 people. We really
don't have a facility that
can house that," Campbell
said. "It think it's viewed
as a need that our area,
right now, does not fulfill."
DuPree touted the
economic benefits such a
facility could bring to the
county.
"It brings people into the
community for starters,
where they buy gas, stay
in the motels or go shop-
ping and they're spending
money in the community,
which helps us provide
services because we col-
lect taxes dollars," he
said. "That's a thing as an
economic development
initiative and it gives us
another tool to showcase
Columbia County and,to
show businesses there are
other things to do here
and it will position us bet-
ter to be more attractive
for businesses to come to
Columbia County."

Funding
The TDC fact-finding
report, which did not
make any recommenda-
tions, indicated that sever-


al assembly/events build-
ings in Georgia were ben-
eficiaries of state funding
- funding local officials
don't think the Florida
Legislature would provide.
An estimate of $3 $10 mil-
lion has been suggested
as an initial capital outlay
for the project, exclud-
ing a subsidy that county
officials and the fact-find-
ing report said would be
virtually mandatory for the
project to succeed.DuPree
said officials don't yet have
a clear idea how much
funding it would take to
start the process.'"There'
are a few things that have
to be determined before
we .delve into this," he
said. "In other words, how.
far do we go in the begin-
ning? Can you do it for $6
million or'do you go ahead
and try to cover the initia-
tive with $10 million on
it I think there are some
other dynamics that have
to be figured in like the
size of the land that we
need for today, and where
do we locate it? I think
there are several aspects
of that which have to be'
defined a little better to
determine what the budget
is going to be."Campbell
said it's a double-edged
sword when considering
what kind of impact the
facility could have on the
local economy."Our abil-
ity to market and bring
in larger and additional
events, obviously is a
plus," he said. "On the
other side, you have to
weigh what is the initial
capital outlay. Almost
without exception these
facilities have to be subsi-
dized, because they don't
make a profit on their own
operation. You have to
weigh those two elements
and see whether it makes
financial sense."Despite
the financial concerns,
Campbell said he believes
the project is viable."The
potential makes the proj-
ect at least worthwhile to
take a look at," Campbell


said. '"We certainly are
not at a decision making
point there still is an
awful lot of research and
a lot more discussion that
needs to take place before
you commit to spending
what has got to be at the
very least probably $3 $6
million. Where does that
money come from because
there is no precedent in
Florida that the legislature:
is going to fund such a
project."DuPree said he
believes once the overall
cost is determined, offi-
cials will determine how to
pay for it
He said the county has
money in the bank and is
financially strong, but the
county is not earning any
interest on those funds. He
said officials will have to
decide whether the county
will choose to fund the proj-
ect without using borrowed
funds to eliminate potential
debt service costs once the
operating costs have been
determined.
"I think once you deter-
mine here's how much of
the apple we can bite, the
subsidy will be what it is
and over time it will stabi-
lize and then the subsidy
will go down," DuPree
said, noting that as the
facility is used it will come
to claim its own share of
the market "At the end
of the day I think that
amount that you stabilize
for the facility is relative
to what the return on the
investment would be."
He said they would have
to make a determination
of the subsidy level based
on what income the
facility is brining into the
county in other areas such
as bed tax and sales tax.


Why now?
DuPree said local eco-
nomic development has
been one of his primary
objectives as a county
commissioner and he
believes now is as good


a time as any to consider
such a project.
"With the economy the
way it is, you really have to
pay attention to what you
can do to enhance your
community and figure how
to bring jobs to the com-
munity," he said.
He said he received
positive feedback when
he initially discussed
the concept and decided
to bring the idea to the
Columbia County Tourist
Development Council.
A seven-member fact-
finding committee was
later formed and tasked
with researching the con-
cept.
"A fact finding commit-
tee was formed where it
was studied and we looked
at every piece of it about
what it would take to do it,
if it was'the right location
to do it and the impact it
would have on the com-
munity and that's where
we're at now," DuPree
said.

The next step
DuPree said he thinks
the next step will be to
determine whether the


county commission thinks
there is a need for the
building/facility.
"Once they do, I think
the board is going to have
to authorize some funds to
be set aside to begin due
diligence on finding the
right piece of property,"
he said. "I think they will
also have to spend some
money to develop a 'foot-
print' for the site, the type
of building, the configura-
tion of the building. I think
once the board accepts
this project as an initiative,
the basic due diligence will
be the next step. Hopefully
that shouldn't take that
long. When the due dili-
gence is done, then we can
move forward with the
project."


Officials were also
prompted to think about
land acquisition which
may be associated with the
project
The TDC fact-finding
committee emphasized
that interstate frontage is
critical to successful cen-
ters.
Officials want to secure
property, near an inter-
state, which has enough
space for the initial
building purposes, but
also have enough room
for future expansion.
Multiple locations would
have to be considered
and officials have not
indicated whether the
land acquisition costs
would be in the project's
general budget.


MEW \Wfoziie

SANDALS OI TtEES
Bj lTEE'S &
i SHORTS
STEE'S &
MEANS WOMES SHORTS


Columbia County's Most Wanted
Shelley Sue Brock Shawn Patrick
DOB: 8/5/88 arr n
Height: 5'0" -Weight: 107 lbs. ,. MllSOn
Hair: Brown Eyes: Hazel _DOB: 2/24/82
Tattoos: Stomach and Back Height: 6'2"
Wanted For: VOP Possession of Weight. 195 Ibs.
Controlled Substance, Possession Hair Blonde Eyes: Blue
of 20 Grams of of Cannabis Tattoo: SPL on Top of Back on
or Less, Possession of Drug Right Forearm
Paraphernalia; VOP Burglary of a Wanted For Sale of Subatance in
Dwelling, Grand Theft III Lieu of Controlled Substance
WANTED AS OF 7/25/11
ANYONE WITH INFORMATION ON THE WHEREABOUTS OF THESE INDIVIDUALS IS ASKED TO CALL CRIME STOPPERS OF COLUMBIA COUNTY.
WE DO NOT WANT YOUR NAME, JUST YOUR INFORMATION
The likeness of suspects is supplied by the Columbia County Sheriff's Office Warrants Division and/or other law enforcement agencies.
The cases are active at the time of publication unless otherwise noted. Crime Stoppers of Columbia County, Inc., and their volunteers
are jointly and individually exempt from any and all liability which might arise as a result of the publication of public records.


.CALL (386) 754-7099 OR
SUBMIT A WEB TIP AT
LUMBIA CONTY www.columbiacrimestoppers.net
Funded by the Crime Stoppers Trust Fund; Administered by the Office of the Attorney General


LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL WEDNESDAY, JULY 27, 2011


Page Editor: Robert Bridges, 754-0428












OPINION


Wednesday, July 27,2011


ANr


AN
OPINION


Ways to


deter a


madman
Our sympathy for the peo-
ple of Norway comes with the
terrible depth of shared expe-
rience. The grief, the rage,
the questions, the blame,
the searching for a rational
response to an irrational act
The slaughter of so many
innocent people eight in
the Oslo bombing.and, by
the count at press time, 68 in
the shooting spree on Utoya
Island is tragically incompre-
hensible.
In cases like this, where
the twisted logic makes sense
only to the perpetrator, society
must guard against overreact-
ing.
Anders Behring Breivik,
who is accused of the ram-
page, wrote a 1,500-page
manifesto, a vile stew of neo-
Nazi, anti-immigrant and anti-
Muslim ramblings. While he
claimed to be part of a larger
network, his attacks appear
to be the work of a loner with
long-nourished grievances
- reminiscent of Timothy
McVeigh's Oklahoma City
bombing.
The urge to look for les-
sons, to find a way to prevent
another bloodbath, is power-
ful. Breivik's rhetoric echoes
that of far-right nationalist
parties in Europe (which,
however, condemned his
crime). Their rising popu-
larity is reason for concern
on its own, and Norway
will undoubtedly monitor
them more closely; But they
weren't the key to stopping
this attack.
Controls over fertilizer,
which Breivik used in his
bomb, will certainly be
stepped up. With phony com-
panies set up to justify his
purchases, however, he would
have been hard to detect.
Norway can make improve-
ments at the margins, such as
improving police response.
But a free society can only
.go so far without undermin-
ing its basic principles. In
the end, there is no sure
protection to prevent a single
disturbed individual from
going on a devastating kill-
ing spree.
* The Arizona Republic


Lake City Reporter
Serving Columbia County
: Since 1874
The Lake City Reporter is pub-
)ished with pride for residents of
-Columbia and surrounding counties by
*Community Newspapers Inc.
We believe strong newspapers build
,strong communities -"Newspapers
,get things done!'
Our primary goal is to
-publish distinguished and profitable
,community-oriented newspapers.
This mission will be accomplished
through the teamwork of professionals'
dedicated to truth, integrity and hard
,work.
o Todd Wilson, publisher
Robert Bridges, editor
Sue Brannon, controller
Dink NeSmith, president
Tom Wood, chairman

LETTEkS
POLICY
Letters to the Editor should be
typed or neatly written and double
spaced. Letters should not exceed
400 words and will be edited for
length and libel. Letters must be
signed and include the writer's name,
address and telephone number for
verification. Writers can have two
titters per month published. Letters
and guest columns are the opinion of
the writers and not necessarily that of
the Lake City Reporter.
BY MAIL: Letters, P.O. Box 1709,


Lake City, FL 32056; or drop off at
180 E. Duval St. downtown.
BY FAX: (386) 752-9400.
BY E-MAIL:
news@lakecityreporter.com


www.lakecityreporter.com


THE
CHALLENGE
UNDERSTANDING
AN EXTREF.IiST
MONSTER
ENTER HERE


The rt hd threate debt


Some years back,
I went to work in
Washington D.C.,
not so sure I would
like the city, but ulti-
mately finding it fascinating.
It hums with intellect, and,
by some calculations, is the
center of the world. You learn
a great deal there, such as
how that intellect is often put'
to ill use by people unbearably
self-important. When you live
in the center of the world, you
get that way.
Lunches those days were
usually at a Chinese cafeteria
around the corner from the
building where I worked.
The place could get crowd-
e;a;nd you might have to
share a table with strangers.
Politeness consisted of pre-
tending not to hear what was
said, and that's what I failed
to do one day when several
regulators were plotting more
regulation.
These federal employees
could not have been long
out of college. I do not
remember the specifics of
their conversation, just the
gist of it. They were talking
about successes in cracking
down on several industries,
and then, one young woman
chirped that she now wanted
to pursue some really tough,
hard-hitting regulations for
another industry, thereby
triggering my own interven-
tionist spirit,
"Why don't you just leave
them alone?" I asked.
You've heard of hell's fury,
I guess, and I got a taste of it
as the young woman advised
me that she served the good
of the country, conferred
widely, studied hard and was
attentively observant of her
agency's legal parameters.
I nodded my head and left,
and I belatedly apologized


LETTERS


-, ; -. --
Jay Ambrose
Speaktojay@aol com
for my rudeness. But I do not
apologize to an administrative
state that betrays rule of law,
reaches beyond obviously
needed regulations, bollixes
up businesses, makes us bil-
lions poorer, plays havoc with
our liberties and sometimes
increases dangers.
I do not apologize to a
Congress that has abdicated
its own responsibilities
by voting in favor of good
intentions and leaving it to
bureaucrats to fill in the
blanks, and I do not apolo-
gize to a Supreme Court
that has let agencies get
away with this dictatorial
adventure.
I certainly do not apologize
to presidents who, thinking
you can wisely supervise the
lives of 300 million people,
happily advocate depart-
ments, agencies and commis-
sions while increasing their
power. This project, which
started in the late 19th cen-
tury, got a blunderbuss boost
in the New Deal and has
never slowed down much.
If anyone thought it might
retreat, they weren't counting
on President Barack Obama,
Obamacare and the army
of new regulations for Wall
Street that substitute quantity
for quality. The only blessing
is that no one will ever make
sense of them sufficiently to
execute all their likely harm.
This administrative state
and the laws backing it lie


behind the current wrangle
over the national debt. It
itself could be ruinous but is
a symptom the real disease
better understood by visit-
ing for a second with Jeffrey
Tucker, editorial vice presi-
dent of the Ludwig von Mises
Institute. In a recent piece,
he writes about the U.S. code
that contains all the laws the
government administers,
some 356,000 pages "as elab-
orate and detailed as any set
of laws that have ever gov-
erned any society in 'the his-
tory of the world." Nothing
escapes their purview, not
mattresses, not funeral
homes they are on your
case from womb to tomb, no
matter where you go, no mat-
ter what you do.
Cures suggested by think
tanks and others include laws
that leave nothing to bureau-
crats, formal public proce-
dures on each and every new
regulation, a review of old
laws that erase some of them
and congressional approval of
anything sweeping.
One writer argues our
administrative state has some
pretty dastardly company,
including the Chinese man-
darins, European monarchs
of yesteryear, Bolsheviks and
Nazis. Our practitioners may
be perfectly nice, maybe just
a well-intended young woman
sitting across from you at
lunch, but the system is scar-
ily out of whack and needs
reform soon.



* Jay Ambrose, formerly
Washington director of editorial
policy for Scripps Howard news-
papers and the editor of dailies in
El Paso, Texas, and Denver, is a
columnist living in Colorado.


TO THE EDITOR


Roadway safety issue needs addressing


To the Editor:
I read with interest the
two artickes in the Reporter,
regarding all the road work
being done in the county
(May 31, 2011, Pg. 1; "Traffic
signal replacement..." and,
"Road work will affect traf-
fic..."). Apparently, there is a
lot of road work being done,
but in my opinion, the fol-
lowing safety concern still
remains:
On March 5, 2010, I wrote
a letter to the 3rd District
Commissioner, Mr. Jody
DupPree, complimenting him
on the completion of painting
new center lines, shoulder
lines, and adding "reflector-
ized dots" on Lake Jeffery
Rd. (C-250), from U.S. 90 to
the railroad tracks, and from
wedt of the 1-75 overpass to
the Suwannee County line.


In addition, I asked him
when were the traffic lines
and reflectorizedd dots"
going to 'be completed for
the remaining 7.6 miles, from
the railroad tracks to the
east side of the 1-75 overpass.
The reason for my concern
was, and still is, that during a
hard rain it is akmost impos-
sible to see the traffic lines
- a definite safety hazard!
Shortly after sending the
letter, a lady did call from his
office and said that the "mat-
ter had been referred to the
engineering department for
study."
On August 23, 2010, I
wrote Mr. DuPree that the
matter was in the engineer-
ing department's hands "fpr
study," but nothing had been
done. A gentleman did call
a few days later and said, "It
would be put on his list for


painting." But, after almost
101/2 months after that call,
I have not seen any results
of improvements on Lake
Jeffery Rd.
IOn March 1, 2011, almost
one (1) year after my first
letter, I wrote Mr. DuPree
again. To date, I have not
received a response to my
letter, nor seen any road
improvements to lake Jeffery
Rd. In my opinion, the poten-
tial safety hazard of Lake
Jeffery Rd. still remains
- especially at night during a
hard rain like the storm of
April 28, 2011. I had to take
an alternate, lengthy, route
to safely return home,
I hope there will be a rem-
edy soon.

Don Willen
Lake City


4A


Robert Bridges
rbridges@akecityreportercom


On civic


center,


sports

upgrades


T ravel league soft-
ball and soccer
teams don't play for
money, but they do
bring plenty of it to
the towns they visit for all-star
tournaments and such.
That was the case here
recently when a 72-team
"showcase" filled eight local
softball fields and every hotel
room in sight
These aren't just players,
coaches and parents. Whole
families come to watch the
action. Every one of them
spends money during their
time away from home.
During this recent event,
some of these folks had to be'
shuttled to Live Oak and sur-
rounding towns. Same with
restaurants, and other estab-
lishments that cater 'to visitors
as well as local folk.
Granted, foresters and oth-
ers from around the state were
staying here too while putting
down that terrible spate of "=
wildfires. That contributed to
the supercharged occupancy
rates. Still, the tourney gave us
more business than we could
handle.
To which we say: Give us ''
more.
Of course, we'll have to bet-
ter prepare ourselves if we ,
want to make this a regular
thing.
That's why it's impor-
tant we do what it takes to
generate the $4 million for
necessary upgrades to the '
Southside Sports Complex.
Improvements are needed in
the areas of concession stands,
parking, restrqoms, lighting
and more.
It's all.worth it, if it keeps
these young athletes and their
entourages coming back.
Let's not stop there, though.
Many decades hence, folks
will look back with pride on
the foresight of those who are
now calling for Lake City to .
start thinking hard about build-
ing a civic center somewhere
along 1-75.
We don't yet know the cost
and we don't yet know where
all the money will come from.
We do know this is some-
thing that, done right, could
establish our town as a real
contender in the North Florida
tourism trade, which appears
to be the wave of the future.
Good job, those who are
looking far enough down the
road to see what that future
holds for us.
Robert Bridges is editor of the
Lake City Reporter.

HIGHLIGHTS
IN HISTORY
Today is Friday, July 27, the
208th day of 2011. There are 157
days eft in the year.
On this date:
In 1953, the Korean War armi-
stice was signed at Panmunjornm,
ending three years of fighting.
In 1974, the House Judiciary
Committee voted 27-11 to recom-
mend President Nixon's impeach-
ment on a charge that he had
personally engaged in a "course
of conduct" designed to obstruct
justice in the Watergate case.
In 1980, on day 267 of the
Iranian hostage crisis, the deposed
Shah of Iran died at a military
hospital outside Cairo, Egypt, at
age 60.


.










LAKE CITY REPORTER NEWS WEDNESDAY, JULY 27, 2011


Consumer confidence



on the rise during July


By MAE ANDERSON
AP Retail Writer

NEW YORK Two
years into the recovery,
Americans' confidence in
the economy continues its
rollercoaster ride.
As their short-term out-
look on jobs and income
eased somewhat amid a
mix of optimistic and bad
economic news, U.S. con-
sumers' confidence rose
slightly to 59.5 in July,
according to a survey
released Tuesday by a pri-
vate research group.
That's up from a revised
57.6 in June which
marked a seven-month low
in the measure but
still well below the read-
ing of 90 that signals a
healthy economy on the
Conference Board's
Consumer Confidence
Iddex. It hasn't approached
that level since the reces-
sion began in December
2007..
Brian Reardon, a 29-
year-old insurance consul-
tant from New York, says
there's a reason consumers
aren't confident He's been
cutting back on spend-
ing because all the recent
unemployment and hous-
ing data has been mixed,
making him uneasy about
the economy.
"One day it's good news,"
he says, "and the. next day
you hear some company is
downsizing."
Economists carefully
monitor consumer confi-
dence because consumer
spending accounts for 70


ASSOCIATED PRESS
In this July 15 photo, workers put a' new surface on the
outside of a retail store at a shopping plaza in Mayfield
Hts., Ohio. A private research group is reporting that
U.S. consumers' confidence rose slightly in July as their
concerns about jobs and income eased somewhat.


percent of economic activ-
ity. But consumer confi-
dence has changed like the
wind during the economic
recovery, fluctuating up
and down as consumers
react to the stock markets,
corporate news and world
events. And while confi-
dence had rebounded by
now during the last reces-
sion -- which ended in
2001- it remains shaky
two years into the current
recovery.


Earlier in the year on
the index, which measures
how Americans feel about
business conditions, the
job market and the next six
months, Americans were
more optimistic that the
economy was on track for
a recovery. But consumer
confidence has fallen since
reaching a three-year high
in February of 72. A shift of
less than five points is gen-
erally discarded by econo-
mists as insignificant


"Overall, consumers
remain apprehensive
about the future, but some
of the concern expressed
last month has abated,"
said Lynn Franco, direc-
tor of The Conference
Board Consumer Research
Center.
Even the data of differ-
ent consumer confidence
surveys don't agree on just
how concerned Americans'
are. Last week, for instance,
a Thomson Reuters/
University of Michigan
survey that also tracks con-
sumer confidence showed
the measure fell in July
to its lowest level in more
than two years.
Paul Dales, senior
U.S. economist with
Capital Economics.,
said the increase in
Consumer Confidence
Index this month is "a bit
bizarre given that all the
other measures of confi-
dence have recently fallen."
"Nonetheless, it remains
at a level consistent with
only modest consumption
growth," Dales said.
The Consumer
Confidence Indexreadingis
"a reflection thatAmericans
are coping with their cir-
cumstances and hoping
it doesn't get any worse,"
said C. Britt Beemer, chair-
man of America's Research
Group.
The weak job market,
for one, has weighed on
consumers. The economy
added only 18,000 net jobs
in June, which was the
second straight month of
scant hiring.


BUDGET: Tentatively set at $80,000,000


Continued From Page 1A
past, school bus purchases have
been higher, she said, but have
dwindled down because of funds
and other obligations the district
has to meet, like debt service pay-
ments, with Capital Outlay millage.
In public comments, Kevin Doyle,
Columbia Teachers Association
president, addressed the school bus
issue. He said parents need to know
that the aging fleet is a result of
reduced state funding.
"You have 100 buses and the state
only gives you enough funding to
replace two per year, then you're
going to have safety issues," Doyle
said, "and if the state doesn't pro-


vide that moiiey, there's o way to
fik thht problem."
Loughran said the
Transportation Maintenance
Department works hard to make
sure the buses are safe, taking
measures like verifying compli-
ance with tire tread and changing
routes to condense the number of
buses needed.
The board also unanimously
adopted its tentative budget for
the 2011-12 fiscal year, of which its
general operating fund is down by
about $8 million due to the loss of
federal stimulus dollars, declining
enrollment and less state funding.


The tentative total budget is more
than $80,000,000 while the tentative
operating budget is about $61.5 mil-
lion. No residents spoke during the
public budget hearing.
Loughran said despite budget
cuts, the district is in a "healthy
position" to start the year.
The final budget and final millage
rates will be adopted by the board
Sept 13.
Millages are not expected to
change before that time, Loughran
said, and can not increase.
"They can go down but they
cannot go up," she said. "That is in
statutes."


Georgia mom gets


probation in son's


jaywalking death


By GREG BLUESTEIN
Associated Press

MARIETTA, Ga. A
Georgia woman received
a year of probation on
Tuesday in the jaywalk-
ing death of her 4-year-
old son, but the judge
also made the unusual
move of offering her a
chance to clear her name
at a new trial. The moth-
er of two surviving chil-
dren says she's satisfied
with the outcome of the
hearing.
Raquel Nelson was con-
victed by a jury this month
of vehicular homicide for
crossing a busy street out-
side the crosswalk with
her children in April. She
could have received as
many as three years in
prison which would
have been a much longer
sentence than the one for
the hit-and-run driver who
struck the boy. There has
been outcry over Nelson's
charges and conviction.
Nelson appeared happy
as she left the court and
thanked those who had
helped and supported her.
"I'm ready to go home,"
she said, adding: "I'm
walking out of here. I don't


feel like I can be more
satisfied."
Judge Kathryn Tanksley
gave the 30-year-old
woman a sentence that also
includes 40 hours of com-
munity service, but she
made the surprising offer
of a new trial. If Nelson
is found innocent, her
record would be cleared.
Her attorney David Savoy
,said they plan to take the
judge up on the offer.
The death happened as
Nelson was attempting
to cross a busy five-lanr
street in Cobb County to
get to her apartment after
getting off a local bus,
Savoy said. i
The stop is about one-
third of a mile from the
nearest crosswalk, so
Nelson and her, family rou-
tinely' crossed the middle
of the street She led her
family to a median in the
middle of the road and as
they waited for traffic to die
down, her daughter bolted
across the street and her
son followed. She chased
after them when a van
struck.
The driver, Jerry Guy,
served a six-month prison
sentence after pleading
guilty to hit-and-run.


Oil rises as debt

talks continue


By SANDY SHORE
Associated Press

Oil rose Tuesday as law-
makers labored to strike an
agreement on the nation's
debt limit and the dollar
weakened on, ncertainty
about the economy.
While congresgional lead-
ers bickered over spending
and raising the borrowing
limit ahead of anl Aug. 2
deadline, oil traders took
their cues for buying and
selling contracts from other
financial markets instead of
supply-and-demand basics.
The dollar fell sharply
against the euro and other
currencies on Tuesday.
That tends to raise the price
of oil, since crude is priced
in dollars and a weaker dol-
lar makes oil more of a bar-


gain for traders using other
currencies.
Oil's gains were held in
check by drooping stock
markets and more evi-
dence of sluggish eco-
nomic growth. New homes
sales fell 1 percent in.June,
According to the govern-
,ment; :U.S.. consumer
confidence improved a
little in July but remained
weak overall, according to
a monthly survey by The
Conference Board. And two
companies considered eco-
nomic bellwethers, 3M Co.
and UPS, spoke cautiously
about current economic
conditions when reporting
quarterly earnings.
Benchmark West Texas
Intermediate crude for
September delivery rose 39
cents to settle at $99.59.


Carl G. Bodendorfer
Carl G. Bodendorfer passed
away at his home on Satur-
day, July 23, 2011. He was 69.
Carl was born
in Erie, PA, i
where he spent
most of his
life. Early in
his life, he was
a G.E. appren-
tice alumnus,
after which he
put himself through college at
night, while working full-time,
and being a full-time husband
and father. He later became
the Director of Operations with
Erie Press Systems, and retired
in 2004 after 29 years of ser-
vice. His favorite past-times
were golfing, woodworking,
and taking care of his fam-
ily and friends. He also made
golf clubs for his loved ones.
He was preceded in death by
his parents, Albert anrd Lucille
Bodendorfer. He is survived by
his loving wife of 43 years, Rose
Marie "Tina" Bodendorfer; his
sons Karl Bodendorfer (Brenda),
Eric Bodendorfer (Molly), and
Scott Bodendorfer; his sister
Beverly Mulkins (Kevin); broth-
er-in-law Frank Tuttoilmondo
(Diane); granddaughter Elaine
Bodendorfer; and a grandchild
dn the way. The family will re-
ceive friends at the Milam Fu-
neral Home on Wednesday from
6:00-8:00PM. A celebration of
his life will be held Thursday at
the Milam Chapel at 10:00AM.
ARRANGEMENTS UNDER
THE CARE OF MILAM
FUNERAL AND
CREMATION SERVICES, 311
S. MAIN ST, GAINESVILLE,
FL 32601. 352-376-5361

Elaine Ann Dutton
Elaine Ann Dutton (Duh Dut-
ton), age 44, of Olustee. Florida
passed away July 24, 2011. She
was born in Columbus, Ohio to


OBITUARIES

Lewis Edward Morgan and Mar-"
ianne Madeline Messer Morgan
on November 1, 1966. She was,
a resident of Baker County since
2006 after moving from Long
Island, New
York. Elaine
made Christ
the center of
her life and
her daughter,
Theresa, was
her world. She
loved to play
'cards and dice games and en-
joyed going to the beach in the
evenings to watch the sunset.
Survivors include her parents:
Lewis Edward Morgan and.
Marianne' Madeline Messer
Morgan; her loving husband of
19 years, Harry S. Dutton, II of
Olustee, FL; her daughter: The-
resa Ashley Dutton of Olustee,
FL; her brothers: Eddie Morgan
of Lake City, FL and Michael
(Tammy) Morgan of Olustee,
FL; her sisters: Helen Sims of
Long Island, NY, Missy Mor-
gan of Gainesville, FL & Billie
Jean (Tom) Fink of Olustee, FL;
numerous nieces and nephews.
*Funeral services will be held on
Wednesday July 27, 2011 at 2:00
pm at Gateway Baptist Church in
Lake City, FL with Pastors Rick
McCall & Mike Williams of-
ficiating. Interment will follow
in Olustee Cemetery in Olustee,
FL. The family will receive
friends on Wednesday July 27,
2011 from noon to 1:30 pm at
the church. The arrangements
are under the care and direc-
tion of V. TODD FERREIRA
FUNERAL SERVICES, 250
North Lowder Street, Mac-
clenny, FL 32063 (904)259-
5700. Visit www.ferreira-
funeralservices.com to sign
the family's guest book.

Jeanne Marie Watson
Jeanne Marie Watson, 61, passed
away on July 25, 2011, at her
home surrounded by her loving


family. She was born in Brook-
lyn, New York but lived in Mi-
ami, Florida, until 2005 when
she moved to Columbia County.
She was the daughter of the late
Jerome G. and
Grace W. Cun- .f'
dy, Sr. She
was a twenty-
year employee
with Publix
Supermarkets,
working in
the Seafood
Department. Jeanne loved rid-
ing motorcycles for fun and par-
ticipating in charity event rides
to help those in need. She was
a loving sister, mother, grand-
mother, and friend to many.
Survivors include her husband
of 25 years, William Joyceof Ft.
White, FL; daughter, Michelle
Watson of Lake City, FL; broth-
er, Jerome G. Cundy Jr. of Wood-
stock, GA; sisters, Janice Cundy
& Jennifer Treadwell (Warren)
both of Apopka, FL and Jackie
Abdon-Strait (Barry), also of
Woodstock, GA, mother-in-law,
Jackie Sumrier of Okeechobee,
FL; grandchildren, Destiny,
Anna, Christina; and numerous
extended family and friends.
Memorial services will be con-
ducted at 1:00 p.m. on Thursday,
July 28, 2011, in the Gateway-
Forest Lawn Memorial Chapel.
GATEWAY-FOREST LAWN
FUNERAL HOME, 3596 South
U.S. Hawy 441, Lake City,
Florida, 32025, (386) 752-1954.
In lieu of flowers, the family
asks that donations be made in
her name to the Suwannee Val-
ley Care Center (Haven Hos-
pice), 6037 U.S. Hwy 90 West,
Lake City, Florida, 32055.
Please sign our guestbook at
www.gatewayforestlawn. conm.


Obituaries are paid advertise-
ments. For details, call the Lake
City Reporter's classified depart-
ment at 752-1293.


a m Day
servoice














EX~AM

by Iependent Opomtis

REMEMBER,
YORFE LNISURANEH J



COER EYECARE


Page Editor: Brandon Finley, 754-0420










LAKE CITY REPORTER ADVERTISEMENT WEDNESDAY, JULY 27, 2011


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WEDNESDAY, JULY 27, 2011


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Story ideas?

Contact
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Sports Editor
754-0421
tkhby@Cokeotyreportercom


Lake City Reporter





SPORTS


Wednesday, July 27, 201 I


www.lakecityreporter.com


Section B


Another Olympic quest


Lake City's Jackson
scores national
weightlifting gold.
By TIM KIRBY
tkirby@lakecityreporter.com
Jamia Jackson's quest is to
qualify for the Olympics in a
second sport
The Lake City native took
a step in that direction by
winning a gold medal in her
weight class at the National
Weightlifting Championships
last weekend in Council Bluff,
Iowa.
Competing in the 75 kg
division, Jackson had a snatch
of 87kg and a clean and jerk
of 111kg for a 188kg total.


Her total was 10kg better than
second place. Jackson was
successful in all three attempts
for both of her lifts.
Jackson was a member of
the U.S. Bobsled & Skeleton
Association and her interest
in weightlifting was an off-
shoot of that training.
"I competed in Arizona
and enjoyed it," Jackson said
Tuesday, while leading her
class at the University of
Minnesota. "It was something
I did on the side for bobsled
training and I picked it back
up."
Jackson placed in an
Olympic weightlifting while at
Northern Arizona University
in Flagstaff, and the win in
the national competition will


propel her toward a possible
spot on the U.S. Olympic team
for 2012. She now trains with
Roger Sadecki.
"I will continue with Olympic
lifting and compete in local
meets to prepare for the U.S.
Nationals and Olympic try-
outs," Jackson said. "China
and .Russian are the tops in
the field. Compared to the
world, we have a lot of work
to do." .
Breaking barriers is nothing
new for Jackson, who gradu-
ated from Columbia High
in 2000. She ran track and
was on the early weightlifting
teams for the Lady Tigers.
Jackson graduated from
South Florida where she was
on the track team. While in


Tampa the U.S. Bobsled &
Skeleton Association made a
recruitment trip to the area
and Jackson was invited to
camp at the Olympic Training
Center in Lake Placid, N.Y.
Jackson made the grade
in bobsledding and com-
peted in the America's Cup,
Europa Cup and World Cup
from 2005-2010. Her travels
with the team took Jackson
all over the United States and
Europe.
"I was an alternate to
the team for the Vancouver
Olympics," Jackson said.
"They took the top three and
I was No. 4. Because I was
an alternate, I kept training
JACKSON continued on 4B


COURTESY PHOTO
Jamia Jackson completes a successful clean
and jerk in winning a gold medal at the National
Weightlifting Championships in Council Bluff, Iowa.


BRIEFS


CHS SWIMMING
Purple/Gold meet
invites alumni
Columbia High's swim
team is hosting a Purple/
Gold swim meet on
Aug. 27 and all almnni are
invited. The public also is
invited to see current and
former swimmers in action.
Warm-ups are at 8:30 a.m.
and the meet begins at
9 a.m.
For.details, call
Stephanie Polhamus at
344-7796.
YOUTH SOCCER
Coerver Soccer
Camp planned
Columbia Youth Soccer
Association is hosting a
Coerver Soccer Camp for
ages 4-18 on Aug. 8-11.
Coerver is a highly
recognized provider of
training for all ages and
skill levels of soccer
players. Fees are $65 for
Mighty Mites (ages
4-6); $110 for Recreational
Player Skills Camp (ages
6-12); $125 for Advanced
Intense Skills Camp (ages
8-18).
For details, visit colum
biayouthsoccerassociation.
com or coerver com, or call
Scott Everett at 288-2504.
LAKE CITY OPEN
Tournament set
for Aug. 6-7
The Lake City Open will
take place Aug. 6-7 at The
Country Club at Lake City
.and Quail Heights Country
Club. The first round will
be played at The Country
Club at Lake City and the
final round will be played
at Quail Heights Country
Club. Entry fee. is $90 for
members, $100 for
non-members and $125 for
professionals. Anyone that
pays before Sunday will
receive a $10 discount.
Fos details, call Carl
Ste-Marie at 752-2266.
CHS VOLLEYBALL
College day camp
planned Thursday
Central Florida State
College volleyball coaches
and players will conduct


a one-day camp for girls
entering middle school
from 9 a.m. to noon
Thursday at Columbia
High. Cost of the camp is
$35 with registration at
the CHS front office. The
camp is limited to 30
participants.
For details, call Casie
McCallister at 365-3158.
YOUTH BASEBALL
Fort White sets
board elections
Fort White Youth
Baseball has board
elections set for 7 p.m.
Aug. 5 in the building
at the back of the South
Columbia Sports Park.
For details, call Tammy
Sharpe at 867-3825.
CHS FOOTBALL
Tickets on sale at
McDuffie Marine
Columbia High football
season tickets are on sale
at McDuffie's Marine &
Sporting Goods. Paid-up
Tiger Boosters can pick up
tickets, parking passes and
their Tiger gift.
For details, call
McDuffie's at 752-2500.
FORT WHITE VOLLEYBALL
High school
tryouts Aug. 8
Fort White High has
volleyball tryouts for
varsity and junior varsity
set for 4-6 p.m. Aug. 8.
Participants must have a
current physical and a
parent consent form on file.
For details, call Doug
Wohlstein at 497-5952.
FORT WHITE FOOTBALL
Quarterback Club
meeting Monday
The Fort White
Quarterback Club's weekly
meeting is 7 p.m. Monday
in the teacher's lounge
at the high school. Fort
White season tickets are
on sale. Returning season
ticket holders will have
their seats held until
Monday.
For details, call Shayne
Morgan at (386) 397-4954.
* From staff reports


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LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS WEDNESDAY, JULY 27, 2011


SCOREBOARD


TELEVISION

TV sports
Today
MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL
7 p.m.
ESPN San Francisco at Philadelphia
SOCCER
8:30 p.m.
ESPN2 MLS, All-Star Game, MLS
All-Stars vs. Manchester United, at
Harrison, N.J.

BOWLING

League reports .

Results of league bowling at Lake
City Bowl:
MONDAY NIGHT MAVERICKS
TRIO
Team standings: I. Wolfpack (52-28);
2. Team 8 (51-29); 3. Lake City Bowl
(48-32).
High scratch game: I. Dale Coleman
259; 2. Bill Duncan 256; 3. Ron Bias 255.
High scratch series: I. Dale Coleman
699; 2. Robert Stone 656; 3. Leonard
Randall 646.
High handicap game: I. Ron Bias 298;
2. Dale Coleman 288; 3. Dan Adel 277.
High handicap series: I. Dale Coleman
786; 2. Ron Bias 729; 3. Leonard Randall
727.
High average: I. Zech Strohl 218.58; 2.
Robert Stone 213.67; 3. D.J. Suhl 205.83.
(results from june 27)

BASEBALL

AL standings

East Division
W L Pct GB
Boston 62 38 .620 -
New York 60 40 .600 2
Tampa Bay 53 48 .525 9'A
Toronto 51 51 .500 12
Baltimore 40 58 .408 21
Central Division
W L Pct GB
Detroit 54 48 .529 -
Cleveland 52 48 .520 I
Chicago 50 51 .495 3'A
Minnesota 47 55 .461 7
Kansas City 43 59 .422 II
West DMsion
W L Pct GB
Texas 59 44 .573 -
Los Angeles 55 48 .534 4
Oakland 45 37 .441 M13'
Seattle 43 59 .422 15l
Monday's Games
Cleveland 3, LA.Angels 2
N.Y.Yankees 10, Seattle 3
Kansas City 3, Boston I, 14 innings
Texas 20, Minnescta 6
Chicago White Sox 6, Detroit 3
Oakland 7,Tampa Bay 5
Tuesday's Games .:
L.A.Angels at Cleveland (n)
Settle at N.Y.Yankees (n)
Baltimore at Toronto (n)
Kansas City at Boston (n). ,
Minnesota at Texas (n)
Detroit at Chicago White Sox (n)
Tampa Bay at Oakland (n)
Today's Games
LA.Angels (E.Santana 5-8) at Cleveland
(D.Huff 1-0), 12:05 p.m.
Seattle (F.Hernandez 8-9) at N.Y.
Yankees (P.Hughes 1-2), 1:05- p.m.
Detroit (Scherzer 11-5) at Chicago
White Sox (Danks 3-8), 2:1.0 p.m.
Baltimore (Simon 2-3) at Toronto
(R.Romero 7-9), 7:07 p.m.
Kansas City (Chen 5-3) at Boston
(Lackey 8-8), 7:10 p.m.
Minnesota (Duensing 7-8) at Texas
(C.Lewis 10-7), 8:05 p.m.
Tampa Bay (Shields 9-8) at Oakland
(Cahill 8-9), 10:05 p.m.
Thursday's Games
LA.Angels it Detroit, 1:05 p.m.
Kansas City at Boston, 1:35 p.m.
Tampa Bay at Oakland, 3:35 p.m.


Baltimore at Toronto, 7:07 p.m.
Minnesota at Texas, 8:05 p.m.

NL standings


E
Philadelphia
Atlanta
New York
Washington
Florida
Cei
Pittsburgh
St. Louis
Milwaukee
Cincinnati
Chicago
Houston
W

San Francisco
Arizona
Colorado


ast Division
W L
64 37
59 44
51 51
49 52
.49 53
ntral Division
W L
53 47
54 48
54 49
50 52
42 60
33 69
Vest Division
W L
.59 43
55 47
48 55


Los Angeles 46 56 .451 13
San Diego 45 58 .437 14'A
Monday's Games
San Diego 5, Philadelphia 4
N.Y Mets 4, Cincinnati 2
Pittsburgh 3,Atlanta I,
St. Louis 10, Houston 5
LA. Dodgers 8, Colorado 5
Tuesday's Games
Florida at Washington (n)
San Francisco at Philadelphia (n)
N.Y. Mets at Cincinnati (n)
Pittsburgh atAtlanta (n)
Chicago Cubs at Milwaukee (n)
Houston at St. Louis (n)
Arizona at San Diego (n)
Colorado at LA. Dodgers (n)
Today's Games
Florida (Vazquez 6-9) at Washington
(LHernandez 5-9), 7:05 p.m.
San Francisco (Zito 3-2) at Philadelphia
(Hamels 12-5), 7:05 p.m.
N.Y. Mets (Pelfrey 5-9) at Cincinnati
(Arroyo 7-8), 7:10 p.m.
Pittsburgh (Maholm 6-10) at Atlanta
(Jurrjens 12-3), 7:10 p.m.
Chicago Cubs (Zambrano 7-5) at
Milwaukee (Greinke 7-4), 8;.10 p.m. ,
Houston (Norris 5-7) at St. Louis
(C.Carpenter 6-7), 8:15 p.m.
Arizona (I.Kennedy 11-3) at San Diego
(Luebke 3-4), 10:05 p.m .
Colorado (A.Cook 1-5) at L.A.
Dodgers (Kuroda 6-12), 10:10 p.m.
Thursday's Games
Florida atWashington, 12:35 p.m.
N.Y. Mets at Cincinnati, 12:35 p.m.
Chicago Cubs at Milwaukee, 2:10 p.m.
Arizona at'San'Diego 3:35 p.m. \
San Francisco at Philadelphia, 7:05 p.m.
Pittsburgh at Atlanta, 7:10 p.m.
Houston at St. Louis, 8:15 p.m.

FOOTBALL

NFL preseason week I
Aug. II
Baltimore at Philadelphia, 7:30 p.m.
Jacki;iville at New England, 7:30 p.m.,
Seattle at San Diego, 8 p.m. (ESPN)
Denver at Dallas, 8:30 p.m.
Arizona at Oakland, 10 p.m.
Aug. 12
Cincinnati at Detroit, 7:30 p.m.
Miami at Atlanta, 7:30 p.m.
Pittsburgh atWashington, 7:30 p.m.
San Francisco at New Orleans, 8 p.m.
Tampa Bay at Kansas City, 8 p.m.
(FOX)
Aug. 13"
Green Bay at Cleveland, 7:30 p.m.
Buffalo at Chicago, 8 p.m.
Indianapolis at St. Louis, 8 p.m.
Minnesota at Tennessee, 8 p.m.
N.Y. Giants at Carolina, 8 p.m.
Aug, 15
N.Y.Jets at Houston, 8 p.m. (ESPN)

Arena Football League

PLAYOFFS
First Round


National Conference
Friday
Dallas at Chicago, 8:30 p.m.
Spokane at Arizona Rattlers, 10 p.m.
American Conference
Friday
Orlando at Jacksonville, 8 p.m.
Sunday
Georgia at Cleveland, 3 p.m.

BASKETBALL

WNBA schedule

Tuesday's Games
San Antonio at Washington (n)
Connecticut at Chicago (n)
Los Angeles at Minnesota (n)
Atlanta at Tulsa (n)
Seattle at Phoenix (n)
Thursday's Games
Phoenix at San Antonio, 12:30 p.m.
Los Angeles at Atlanta, 7 p.m.
Washington at New York, 7 p.m.
Indiana at Connecticut, 7:30 p.m.
Chicago at Tulsa, 8 p.m.

GOLF

Golf week
LPGATOUR/
LADIES' GOLF UNION
WOMEN'S BRITISH OPEN
Site: Carnoustie, Scotland.
Schedule:Thursday-Sunday.
Course: Carnoustle Golf Links (6,490
yards, par 72).
Purse: $2.5 million. Winner's share:
$408,700.
Television: ESPN (Thursday-Friday,
9 a.m.-noon; Saturday, 10 a.m.-I p.m.;
Sunday, 8:45 a.m.-noon).
On the Net: http://www.ricoh
womensbritishopen.com
LPGA Tour site: http://www.lpga.com
Ladies' Golf Union site: http://www.
Igu.org
Ladies European Tour site:http://www.
ladieseuropeantour.com
PGATOUR
GREENBRIER CLASSIC
Site:White Sulphur Springs,W.Va.
Schedule:Thursday-Sunday.
Course: The Greenbrier, Old White
Course (7,274 yards, par 70).
Purse: $6 million. Winner's share:
$1.08 million.
Television: Golf Channel (Thursday-'
Friday, .3-6 p.m.; Saturday-Sunday'
1-2:30 p.m.) and CBS (Saturday-Sunday,'
3-6 p.m.).,
Online: http://www.pgotour.com
U.S. GOLF ASSOCIATION
U.S. SENIOR OPEN
Site:Toledo, Ohio.
Sciedule:Thursday-Sunday.
Course: Inverness Club (7,143 yards,
par 71).
Purse: TBA ($2.6 million in 2010).
Winner's share:TBA ($470,000 in 2010).
Television: ESPN2 (Thursday-Friday,
3-7 p.m.) apd NBC (Saturd4y-Sunday,
3-6 p.m.).
Online: http://www.usgo.org
EUROPEAN TOUR
IRISH OPEN
Site: Killarney, Ireland.
,Schedule:Thursday-Sunday.
Course: Killarney Golf & Fishing Club,
Killeen Course (7.161 yards, par 71).
Purse: $2.18 million. Winner's share:
$361,850.
Television: Golf Channel (Thursday-
Friday, 9 a.m.-I p.m.; Saturday, 8:30 a.m.-.
12:30 p.m.; Sunday, 8 a.m.-noon).
Online: http:/www.europeantour.com
NATIONWIDE TOUR
UTAH CHAMPIONSHIP
Site: Sandy, Utah.
Schedule:Thursday-Sunday.
Course:Willow Creek Country Club
(,104 yards, par 71).
Purse: $550,000. Winner's share:
$99,000.
Television: Golf Channel (Thursday-
Friday, 6:30-8:30 p.m.; Saturday, 6:30-
9:30 p.m., Sunday, 7-9:30 p.m.).


Tebow an early arrial


for voluntary workouts


By PAT GRAHAM
Associated Press

ENGLEWOOD, Colo.
- Eager to get back to
work, Broncos quarterback
Tim Tebow beat just about
everyone to the team's
practice facility.
The veteran he's trying
to replace wasn't as ambi-
tious.
His future with the team
uncertain, Kyle Orton didn't
show up at Dove Valley on
Tuesday, the first day play-
ers were allowed to volun-
tarily report following the 4
1/2-month lockout
Training camp opens
Wednesday with the first
full workout slated for
Thursday.
Tebow was one of the
first players to roll in for
voluntary strength and con-
ditioning, driving through
the gates at 7:40 a.m., just
behind offensive lineman
Jeff Byers.
This soon could be
Tebow's team, especially
with speculation swirling
that Orton's days in Denver
are numbered.
Orton has started the
last two seasons for Denver,
posting career-best pass-
ing numbers to go with 41


touchdowns and 21 inter-
ceptions. But with the
Broncos looking for a fresh
start-following a franchise-
worst 4-12 season, Orton
might be more valuable on
the trade market, paving
the way for Tebow to be
the starter for new coach
John Fox.
Teams are allowed to
orchestrate trades Tuesday
and Orton's name keeps
surfacing. He is due more
than $8 million this season,.
a hefty price tag with Tebow
and Brady Quinn waiting in
the wings.
There were more than
'two dozen players who
arrived at the facility over
the course of the day,
including Brian Dawkins
and Robert Ayers.
"This lockout has been a
long time," defensive tack-
le Kevin Vickerson said.
"Football is back."
The Broncos spent the
day negotiating with their
draft picks, including No. 2
overall selection Von Miller,
who said he planned to
be ready to practice when
training camp starts.
"I want to come in and
just learn. I don't want to
put myself anymore behind
than I already am," Miller


said.
Miller stands to make.
much less money in the
new labor accord, with-a -
four-year deal likely worth
about $25 million or so,
some $45 million less than
he could have gotten under
the old setup.
'Tve been playing'football
all my life f6r free. So, what-
ever it is, whatever my con-
tract m be, I'm good with
whatever," Miller, said. "You
really can't be possessive over
something you didn't have."
On top of that, Miller fig-
ures he will simply make it
up during' his career.
"I plan on getting three,
four, five contracts," Miller
said, smiling. "I don't plan
on just getting this one.
"I just want to play foot-
ball. I'm not really worried
about all that other stuff."
In his standout career at
Texas A&M, Miller donned
No. 40. But since lineback-
ers/defensive ends aren't
permitted to wear that
jersey on this level, he's
switching to No. 58. Ifs
also a way to honor the late
Derrick Thomas, whom he
patterned his game after.
"I enjoyed the way he
played the game," Miller
said.


GOLF REPORTS



Ebert has eagle on No. 3


Kurt Ebert had the
second eagle of the week.
He holed a 5-iron to score a
rare two on the tough par 4
third hole.
Dennis Crawford
brought out his "A" game
to take first place in the
Wednesday blitz with a +7.
Crawford also cashed in
one of only two winning
birdies in the skins game.
Donald Roberts picked
up second place in the
blitz at +5. The trio of Don
Combs, Keith Shaw and
Charlie Timmons finished
in a three-way tie for third.
Jordan Hale had the
other winning skin. Both
pot holes carried over.
Four players fought it out
in the Saturday blitz without
finding a solo winner.
Alan Moody, Steve
Peters, D.onnie Thomas
and Steve Thomas all
finished play at +4 to split
the prize money.
None of the blitz lead-
ers had any luck in the
skins game. Four other


COUNTRY CLUB
at LAKE CITY
Ed Goff

players Nick Slay, Andy
Peterson, Bob Randall and.
Dave .Mehl each had
one skin.
The LGA chose a
scramble format for its
weekly match.
The three-player team of
Cathy Steen, Dottie Rogers
and Nicole St'e-Marie
outplayed several four-
member teams to finish with
a net 70 for the victory.
Natalie Bryant, Faye
Bowling-Warren, Jan Davis
and Ann Bormolini took
second with a net 74.
Match 1 in Good Old
Boys play was a shoot-out
from beginning to end with
two teams combining to put
22 points on the board.
Monty Montgomery,
Terry Mick, Jim Stevens
and Dan. Stephens finally
got the better of Marc Risk,
Dave Cannon and Jim Bell


by a 12-10 margin.
Match 2 scoring was the
opposite, with three teams
managing a total of only
seven points.
Ed Snow, Mack Reeder,
Joe Persons and Tom
Elmore emerged victorious,
4-2, over Eli Witt, Bobby
Simmons, Nick Whitehurst
and Jerry Snowberger.
Stan Woolbert, Dennis
Hendershot, Tony Branch
and Mike Spencer were
another point back.
Good individual scoring
abounded.
Risk led the pack with
a three under par 33-36-
69 that included an eagle
on the par 5 ninth hole.
Montgomery (74), B1ll
(77), Woolbert (77), Snow
.(78), Spencer (79) and
Persons (79) all had good
rounds.
In nine-hole play,
Stephens (38) took a one-
stroke win on the front
side over Witt and Cannon.
Simmons took the back
nine with a 39.


COURTESY PHOTO


National stage soccer

The Columbia Youth Soccer Association Stingers under-14 girls team will compete in the
3v3 Challenge National Championship at the ESPN Wild World of Sports Complex at
Disney World on July 28-31. Team'members include (front row, from left) Jessica Birchard,
Audrey Angstadt and Emma Sambey. Back row (from left) are coach Alexis Angstadt,
Kyrsten Giebeig, Sabrie Stamper and Alix Lloyd.


1

1


1

'*1
1


1
6 ,
(I







1
12 H

13 J




4


:17
18
19
23
25
26
29
31
32

33
34


ACROSS 35 Gray-barked.
tree
Fluff, as hair 37 Scream and
35mm setting shout
(hyph.) 39 Ow!
Atlantic game 40 None at all
fish 41 Hotel offering
High-tech 45 Unlucky time
nvader for Caesar
Job require- 47 Healing
ments ointment
On solid 48 Save from
ground disaster
Tea variety 51 Water
Feminine heater
suffix' 52 Chore
Yul's film realm 53 Whole
Tomahawk 54 Rental-
Boggy agreement
Cotton pod 55 Stock or bond


Wish granter
Malt beverage
Juan's friend
Noncom
$1,000,000,
slangily
Strictly verboten
Cleopatra's
snake


DOWN

1 Sulu
of "Star Trek"
2 Slezak
of soaps
3 Poise
4 amandine


Answer to Previous Puzzle

PBS SST BELL
AUK TERI ASEA
PRIMECUT WAND
ARDENT ALLUDE
LOS LYE
LAMBS BINDER
S T KOAN G UM

SA ARUNR ONE

ISM WES
MONGOL ADLIlBS
UTAH INSEAOSN
STMT NOTE EAU
HOES GEM ERZG


5 Coast Guard off.
6 Speedy
7 Connive
8 Sugar Ray stat
9 Not neathh
10 Before, in combos


Want more puzzles?
Check out the "Just Right Crossword Puzzles" books
at QuillDriverBooks.com
1 12 1 IS 14 15 7 17 18 19 110 I


11 Bakers' meas.
12 Loathe
16 Bookplate
phrase
(2 wds.)
18 mater
20 Cuzco founder
21 Splits open
22 Shrill bark
24 Vow
25 Hired muscle
26 Pulpit
27 "Instead oi"
word
28 Mo. expense
30 Touchdown
36 Girls from
Baja
38 Character-
istics
40 Must have
42 Dragon
puppet
43 Plain as day
44 Only
46 Sand ridge
47 Dads, to
granddads
48 CSA
monogram
49 Prior to
50 Tijuana "Mrs."
51 Maude
portrayer


Page Editor: Brandon Finley, 754-0420


1














Jaguars know they have a


lot of work ahead of them


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Miami Dolphins running back Daniel Thomas walks to the
Dolphins football training facility, Tuesday in Davie.


Henne, Long

among-Dolphins

to report first


Associated Press

DAVIE Lots of players
showed up at the Miami
Dolphins' practice facility
Tuesday morning, includ-
ing a very punctual quar-
terback.
Chad Henne arrived
right at 10 a.m., the exact
time players were allowed
to return to after Monday's
announcement the lockout
was over.
After Henne, left tackle
Jake Long, the three-
time Pro Bowl selection
and one of the team cap-
tains, showed up. So did
wide receiver Brandon
Marshall, whose offseason
included being stabbed
by his wife, Pro Bowl'
defensive end Randy
Starks, outspoken line-
backer Channing Crowder,
starting cornerbacks
Vontae Davis and Sean
Smith.
Defensive end Jared
Odrick, the 2010 first-round
pick whose season was
practically wiped out by foot
and leg injuries, also was on
hand.
* They all showed up
before noon, ready to get
back to work.
Rookie running, back
Daniel Thomas came, too
- on foot. 1"
"I don't know where I
parked," he said.
The second-round
pick from Kansas State
thought he parked his care
somewhere on the cam-
pus of neighboring Nova
Southeastern University.
He knew he was supposed
to be at the facility between
12:30 and 1 p.m., and was



Unscramble these four Jumbles,
one letter to each square,
to form four ordinary words.
I TABYT I


Associated Press

JACKSONVILLE Jaguars gen-
eral manager Gene Smith knows he's
not going to have a lot of free time in
the next few days.
Not with draft picks to sign, free
agents to court, and contracts to
negotiate now that the NFL lockout
is over. It'll be a whirlwind week for
Smith and GMs across the league
- as he tries to add 30 players to fill
out the 90-man roster at the same.
time in which the Jaguars are begin-"
ning training camp.
'"There's a lot in a very short win-
dow, but I feel very confident in
our preparation," Smith said Monday,
evening during a press conference
inside the Jaguars' locker room at
EverBank Field. "We have our own
(veteran and drafted) players to
take care of and we want to make
sure we do that. We've got to get
them signed and into camp. We've
got pro free agents that we're tar-
geting and we'll be active in that
area. We have undrafted rookies that
we're going after, a large number of
them.
'"This is unique in many ways.
We're usually going into training
camp with the roster set."
The Jaguars have 60 players under'
contract and could begin signing
their five draft picks including


first-round pick Blaine Gabbert --
and rookie free agents beginning
Tuesday. On the same day, Smith
can begin negotiating with Jaguars-
or other teams' free agents and fran-
chise players, but those players can-
not sign contracts until Friday.
Three pf the players the Jaguars
are hoping to sign quickly are tight
end Marcedes, Lewis, whom, the
team franchised just before the
lockout began in March, and punter
Adam Podlesh and linebacker Kirk
Morrison, both of whom are unre-
stricted free agents.
The Jaguars are $35 million under
the salary cap, giving them plen-
ty of room to re-sign Podlesh and
Morrison, work out a long-term deal
with Lewis, and pursue several free.
agents on defense.
"I think ift's a good advantage (to
be that far under the cap) because
'with no (offseason) to have a veteran
come in, they can learn it quicker,
they know the players in the league
better," Smiths aid. "You can have an
opportunity to acquire some starters
that you can plug into your defense
because that's what our focus is
going to be."
The Jaguars likely will address
safety and linebacker in free agen-
cy. Among the possibilities at safety
are Eric Weddle, Michael Huff and
Donte Whitner. Paul Posluszny, Clint


Sessions and Barrett Ruud are poten-
tial targets at linebackers.
Jaguars coach Jack Del Rio, how-
ever, is more worried about what he's
going to see when the Jaguars open
training camp on Wednesday and
have their first practice on Thursday.
With no offseason conditioning, mini-
camps, or OTAs, many players have
participated in loosely organized
workouts with teammates, but Del
Rio wonders what kind of shape his
players will be in when they report.
"I am concerned about it," he said.
"I know that several of our guys have
been working hard. So I've heard
good reports but I haven't been able
to get my hands on our guys. 1.
haven't been able to see them my self.
Our trainers haven't seen our guys.
So there's a little bit of an unknown."
As there is with the ticket situation.
Ticket sales were sluggish during
the lockout and the team still needs
to sell 17,000 non-premium seats
to avoid blacking out home games,
although owner Wayne Weaver
anticipates 7,000 of those tickets to
come via group sales. The team is
extending hours at the ticket office
and having several select-your-seat
events at EverBank Field to boost
sales.
. The lockout "really kind of dimmed
the enthusiasm for what we built
upon last year," Weaver said.


DISCOUNTS AT THIS STORE ONLY


Sears LAKE CITY
2724 W. US Highway 90


determined to be there on
time.
"It feels.like the first day
of class, college, whatever
you want to call it," he said.
"I'm pretty nervous, but it's
time to work now."
Thomas could end up
replacing last year's starter,
Ronnie Brown.
Both Brown and Ricky
Williams are free agents,
although both. have said
they're open to return-
ing. Last week,, .defen-
sive end Jason Taylor, a
longtime Dolphins great
who played last season
with the Jets, hinted
he might be open to
returning to Miami, say-
ing "no ships have sailed,
no bridges have been
burned."
Miami, 7-9, last season
under coach Tony Sparano,
could use help more on
offense than defense. It fin-
ished 21st in total offense
and sixth in total defense
in 2010.
And the Dolphins could.
feel the pinch of the lock-
out more than, other teams.
Miami has a host of new
coaches, including offensive
coordinator Brian Daboll,
formerly of Cleveland. He's
installing a new offense
during a training camp that
won't have two-a-day prac-
tices.
Free agency began
Tuesday, although players
can't be signed until Friday.
Miami's primary free agent
targets are believed to
be a veteran quarterback
to challenge Henne; a
running back; and a pass-
rushing defensive end/line-
backer.

THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME
by David L. Hoyt and Jeff Knurek


GLHAEG i n ''_" 'W

SWHENM. ANP MRS.
AL CACORE HAD A BABY,
UNAALN ___ I .wy^ ^ rs.
Now arrange the circled letters
to'form the surprise answer, as
suggested by the above cartoon.
A:
(Answers tomorrow)
Yesterday's Jumbles: FRAME BLUFF TOPPED WETTER
I Answer: When his guitar string broke during the
performance, he did this FRETTED


STORE FIXTURES FOR SALE!
ALL SALES FINAL, NO REFUNDS OR EXCHANGES. OPEN DAILY REGULAR HOURS. WE ACCEPT VISA, MASTERCARD, DISCOVER, AMERICAN
EXPRESS AND SEARS CARD. WE ACCEPT SEARS GIFT CARDS. DISCOUNTS DO NOT APPLY TO PREPAID GIFT CARDS. INVENTORY IS LIMITED
TO STOCK ON HAND. THIS STORE IS NOT PARTICIPATING IN CURRENT SEARS CIRCULARS. THIS EVENT EXCLUDES ELECTROLUX.

a y ; J J; f~r l l~


LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS WEDNESDAY, JULY 27, 2011


Page Editor: Brandon Finley, 754-0420









LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS WEDNESDAY, JULY 27, 2011


-NFLs free-agent frenzy:

lt b wild times in football


COURTESY PHOTO
Lake City native Jamia Jackson stands atop the winner's platform for the 75kg division at the
National Weightlifting Championships in Council Bluff, Iowa, on Sunday.


By BARRY WILNER
Associated Press
The free agency free-for-
all has begun, mostly with
obscure names from the
college ranks.
It will get wilder.
Contract negotiations
for free agents and draft
picks started Tuesday,
with draftees able to
sign right away. The big
names among veterans
- Nnamdi Asomugha,
Santonio Holmes, Matt
Hasselbeck can't sign
until Thursday, but their
agents are negotiating
deals right now.
Throw in dozens of play-
ers who will be cut, such
as Dallas receiver Roy
Williams and Baltimore
tight end Todd Heap,


which officially can't hap-
pen until Thursday, and it's
"organized chaos," accord-
ing to Colts general man-
ager Chris Polian.
"It's a lot of stress, work,
preparation. But it's what
we all look forward to.
It's our playoffs and our
Super Bowl," agent Peter
Schaffer said.
Indeed, .several agents
said they didn't expect to
sleep Tuesday as the NFL
reopened for business
after 41 months. In addi-
tion to their clients already
in the league who are unre-
stricted or restricted free
agents, they will have vet-
erans released. And they
are trying to set up young-
sters, such as college start-
ers safety Winston Venable
of Boise State (Chicago)


and quarterback Jerrod
Johnson of Texas A&M
(Philadelphia), with teams
after they were passed
over in April's draft.
"I always- have a lot of
guys in that category, and
it's been absolutely nuts,"
said agent Joe Linta, who
placed Michigan State
tight end Charlie Gantt
with the Chiefs and Cal
receiver Jeremy Ross with
the Patriots on Tuesday.
He also fielded calls from
a dozen teams for Utah
defensive tackle Sealver
Siliga before he signed
with San Francisco.
"There are times when
you are fielding four or five
calls at once," added Linta.
The math adds up to
hundreds of transactions
in a few days.


c-~c~ *.


JACKSON
From Page 1B
and when it was all over I
started my job search."
Jackson interned at
the National Strength
and Conditioning Human
Performance Center in
Colorado Springs, Colo.,
where she was reunited
with former weightlifting
coach John Carlock.
She later served a brief
stint as a graduate assis-
tant at the University of
Missouri.
During this time Jackson
began seeing Karl Erickson,
a seven-time All-American
at Minnesota in discus and
shot put At a crossroads,
the couple were deciding,
on living in his home state
of Minnesota or moving to
Florida.
Jackson landed her job
at Minnesota and the deci-
sion was made. She is the
strength coach for the
women's sports of cross
country, track, tennis,
gymnastics and soccer.
Jackson's dad and mom,
Zearah and Betty Jackson,
live in Lake City and she
has a sister, Ina Jackson
who graduated from CHS
in 1996.
, "I don't get back as much
as I like to," Jackson said.
"I try to come home for the
holidays and a lot of times
my family will meet me half
way."
'Even half way would be
quite a journey in keeping
up with Jackson.


Bengals

won't

trade

Palmer
By JOE KAY
Associated Press
, CINCINNATI Bengals
wner Mike Brown insisted
tn Tuesday that he won't
trade quarterback Carson
.Palmer, who wants to leave
one of the NFL's least-suc-
cessful franchises.
Palmer, who has four
years left on his contract,
told the team in January
that he would retire if he's
not traded. The Bengals
have only twvo winning sea-
sons in the last 20 years,
one of the worst stretches
of futility in league history.
Brown said the club will
move on without its fran-
chise quarterback. The
Bengals plan to hold their
first training camp workout
Saturday in Georgetown,
Ky.
"I honestly like Carson
Palmer," Brown said. "He
was a splendid player for
us. He's a good person. I
wish him well. And he is
retired. That is his choice.
... I'm not expecting him to
be back."
Asked why he wouldn't
trade Palmer and get some
draft picks in return, Brown
said it was a matter of
'principle.


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I














olumbia

Your marketplace source for Lake City and


Columbia County


WEDNESDAY, JULY 27, 2011


LAKE CITY REPORTER


Shayne Morgan: Playing it safe


Should a hurricane make its way to
Lake City, officials say Columbia County
is ready to deal with the disaster, as well
as others.
"We plan for disasters whether they're
man-made or natural disasters," said
Shayne Morgan, Columbia County
Emergency Management director. 'We
try to make sure all of our responders
are prepared to the best of their ability
should something like that happen to
help the public in the best amount of time
that we can."
Morgan, whose office is housed in the
county's 911 Combined Communication
Center, was hired as Emergency
Management director in January after
Ronnie McCardle, former director,
retired. Morgan has been working for
the county since 2002 as both a 911 dis-
patcher and an Emergency Management
specialist.
Florida is currently in hurricane sea-
son, which began June 1 and ends Nov.
30.
'"That being said, we're just now in the
early stages of when hurricane formation
is at its greatest," Morgan said.
In the event that a disaster occurred
in Columbia County, the county
would employ the County Emergency
Management Plan, Morgan said, an all-
hazards plan. *
"What's written in the plan can be
adapted to whatever the situation is,"
he said. "If it's a weather event, if it's a
hazmat spill, there's different guidelines
that we follow that we can use in any situ-
ation."
For a hurricane in particular, the
county keeps constant watch on reports
from the National Weather Service and
the National Hurricane Center as hur-
ricanes form on surrounding bodies of
water, Morgan said. Department heads
will be contacted if the storm is headed in
the county's direction, he said, and local
officials are kept abreast of the situa-
tion.
"We're usually doing that two or three
days before a sLorm is scheduled to
make landfall so we can have all of our


ducks in a row and be prepared person-
ally and so we can professionally be
ready to go should we be impacted,"
Morgan said.
The county would then begin its
activations, Morgan said, which
activates the Emergency Operations
Center and gathers together rep-
resentatives from its partnering
agencies like law enforcement,
the City of Lake City and the health
department to meet at the EOC
to communicate with their respec-
tive field units during a disaster. The
EOC operates on different levels, he
said, with level one being a full activa-
tion and level three being the lowest,
which is the level the county holds on
a daily basis.
The County Commission would
also meet to vote on a Local State of
Emergency, which is good for seven
. days if passed and allows the county to
start taking emergency actions, Morgan
said.
That includes opening up shelters,
whether they are risk shelters shelters
for-residents when a disaster is on its way
that meet a certain criteria for hurricane
winds determined by the American Red
Cross or host shelters shelters
opened up after an event has passed that
houses evacuees from coastal counties
fleeing an impacted or potentially impact-
ed area, Morgan said.
Risk shelters are Westside
Elementary, Pinemount Elementary
and Fort White High School. Westside
Elementary also doubles as a special
needs shelter, which offers more pri- .
vacy for those on the county's,special
needs database a databased main-
tained by the Emergency Management
Department of residents with special
medical needs.
Morgan stressed that shelters of any
kind are to be a last resort during a disas-
ter.
"If you have friends or family else-
where than you can stay with, we encour-
age you to do that," he said, "because in
our shelters, we'll have a cot and hopeful-


Shayne Morgan, Columbia County emergency management director, stands in front of a pho-
tograph of a Lake City home turned on its side during a tornado that struck the area March
7, 2008. 'Each disaster has its own characteristics,' Morgan said. 'We have to adapt to each
situation. Every event presents an opportunity for us to learn different things and to improve
our plan.'


ly a blanket for you, but we can't promise
that So we really want to make sure that
shelter spaces are a last resort because
you have very little privacy."
When the disaster is over and its safe,
Morgan said damage assessment teams
will survey damaged areas to see if the
county would qualify for state or federal
assistance money.
"And then it's rebuilding and recover-
ing and trying to get everybody back on
their feet," he said.
If a disaster occurs, the public
should pay attention to the Emergency
Management Department's information
and press, releases, Morgan said.


"The public should listen to the infor-
mation we put out through press releas-
es with the most up-to-date information
. as we have in the EOC," he said.
"It will be on an event-by-event basis
with what we'd be dealing with and how
we'd respond to it," Morgan said.
While the county's plan isn't perfect, as
each disaster has its own characteristics,
it is a reliable plan, Morgan said.
"I don't want to say it's 100 percent safe
or that the plan is bullet-proof," he said,
"but I think the plan is a solid plan to do
the best that it can between it and the
responders responding to make sure citi-
zens are safe."


Cross Canyon provides a unique .
sound to, not only the best cover
songs, but to their many originals as
well. They deliver an exciting show
to audiences wishing to have fun and
dance the night away.


MONDAY
Karaoke
w/Teddy Mac
Doors Open 5pm
All You Can Eat
Whole Catfish


THURSDAY
Karaoke
w/Teddy Mac
Doors Open 5pm.
All You Can Eat
Spaghetti & Meat
Sauce


FRIDAY
Mike Mullis
Variety Show
8pmr
Doors Open 5pm
All You Can Eat
Sirloin Steak


SATURD
Live Mu
8pm
Doors Open
Prime Ri


Proudly, we welcome Dr. Edwin Gonzalez to Shands Lake Shore Surgical Specialists.
His career as a distinguished general surgeon includes numerous awards and
pioneering accomplishments in laparoscopic surgery. For the latest techniques and
procedures, and for more treatment options and reduced recovery times, you can
count on our team of experts at Shands Lake Shore Surgical Specialists.

-* 'I .. .


For an appointment,
call 386-755-7788.


Regional Medical Center


Shands Lake Shore Surgical Specialists
755 SW State Road 47 Lake City, FL 32025


Ask About Our Cabin Rentals
r or Stay the Night In Our Famous Tree House!
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jppi ~1 *'w w *^^ vg'anafii









LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED WEDNESDAY, JULY 27, 2011

Lake City Reporter





CLASSIFIED


S


Classified Department: 755-5440


Take ADvantage of the
Reporter Classifieds!

755-5440


SADvantage H


Legal


personal merchandise totalling S100 or less.
t< Each item must include a price.
This Is a non-refundable rate. .




One item per ad additional
4 linesne $1.10
Rate applies to private Indivduas ng
Personal merchandIse totaling $500 or less.
Each item must clude a price.
This Ia a non-refundable rate. .








LO item per ad dv s
I4 lines 6 days ch additional
ad for each Wedne y line $1.15
Rate applies to private Individuals seeing
'H personal merchandise totalling $1,000 or less.




l This Is a non-refundable ra mte.








ad categ per wl rqi p
4 lines 6 dayS Ea.additional
Rate applies to private Individuals selling
personal merchandise totallin $2,500 or less.
o' Each it e must Include a price.
Thi Is a non-refundable rate.





4 lines 6 days s additions l
| Rate applies to private individuals selling
r Each item must include a price.l a








S nday s -refundable rate.
A rond merro release read your ad
n lines t days Each additional
S es line $1. 65
Rate applies to private individuals selling
personal merchandise totalling $6,000 or less.
Each item must include a price.









IntilddeS2 S tig"s E 3011106.,il hle' l65



Limited to service type advertis-
ing only.
-.4 iHis.nre r, orre h 92.00 o .,-
$14 80 Adh aidditiehaliined b"
Includes an additional $2.00 pert
ad for each Wednesday insertion.



You can call us at 755-5440,
Monday through Fridaity from 8:00
a.m. to 5:00 p.m.
Some people prefer to place their
classified ads in person, and some
ad categories will require prepay-
ment. Our office is located at 180
East Duval Street.
You can also fax or email your ad
copy-to the aporter.i
FAX: 386-752-9400 Please
Jreci y,)ur copy to the Classified
epar3menti
EMAIL: classifieds@lakecityre
porter.com





Ad isto Appear: Call by: Fax/Email by:
.Tuesday Mon., 10:00 a.m. Mon., 9:00 am.
SWednesday Mon.,10:00a.m. Mon., 9:00a.m.
Thursday Wed., 10:00 m. Wed., 9:00 am.
Friday Thurs., 10:00 a.m. Turs.,9:00 m.
SSaturday Fri., 10:00 am. Fri.,9:00a.m.
Sunday Fri., 10:00 am.' .Fri., 90 a.m.
These deadlines are subject to change without notice.




Ad Errors- Please read your ad
on the first day of publication.,


only the charge for the ad space
iq, ,eior.. Please call. 755-5440
immediately for prompt correc-"
tion and billing adjustments.
Cancellations- Normal advertising
deadlines apply for cancellation.
Billing Inquiries- Call 755-5440.
Should further information be
required regarding payments or
credit limits, your call will be trans-
ferred to the accounting depart-
ment.


SAdvertising co is subject to
approval by the Publisher who

or classify all advertisements under
appropriate headings. Copy should
be checked for errors by the
advertiser on the first day of pub-
lication. Credit for published errors
will be allowed for the first insertion


Publisher shacl not be liable for any
omission of advertisements ordered
to be published, nor for any general,
special or consequential damages.
Advertising language must comply
with Federal, State or local laws
regarding the prohibition of discrimi-
nation in employment, housing and
public accommodations. Standard
abbreviations are acceptable; how-
ever, the first word of each ad may
not be abbreviated.


"r ... P Online
. . .' r 0


IN THE COUNTY COURT, IN
AND FOR COLUMBIA COUNTY,
FLORIDA.
CASE NO. 11-276-CC
LENVIL H. DICKS, as Trustee of
the LENVIL H. DICKS LIVING
TRUST,
Plaintiff,
VS.
TIMOTHY L. YOUNG
Defendant.
NOTICE OF PUBLIC SALE
Notice is hereby given that the fol-
lowing described real property:
Lot 11, Block A, Perry Place, a sub-
division as recorded in Plat Book 6,
Page 195, Columbia County, Florida.
shall be sold by the Clerk of this
Court, at public sale, pursuant to the
Final Judgment in the above styled
action dated July 14, 2011, at the Co-
lumbia County Courthouse in Lake
'City, Columbia County, Florida, at
11:00 AM., on Wednesday, August
10, 2011, to the best and highest bid-
der for cash. Any person claiming an
interest in any surplus from the sale,
other than the property owner as of
the date of the notice of lis pendens,
must file a claim within 60 days after
the sale.
WITNESS my hand and official seal
in the State and County aforesaid this
14th day of July, 2011.
P. DEWIMTCASON,
Clerk of Court
By: /s/B. Scippio
Deputy Clerk

05526726
July 20, 27, 2011

IN THE COUNTY' COURT, IN
AND FOR COLUMBIA COUNTY,
FLORIDA.
CASE NO. 11-1290-CC
COLUMBIA BANK, f/k/a COLUM-
BIA COUNTY BANK,
Plaintiff,
vs.
JOSE GARCIA and DAYMI SO-
CORRO .
Defendants
NOTICE OF PUBLIC SALE
Notice is hereby given that the fol-
lowing described real property:
SEE ATTACHED "A" ATTACHED
HERETO
SCHEDULE "A" TO NOTICE OF
PUBLIC SALE COLUMBIA BANK
vs. GARCIA & SOCORRO
Lot 16, KAL-WAY SUBDIVISION,
UNIT 1, UNRECORDED,
A parcel of land lying in the NW 1/4
of NW 1/4 of Section 32, Township'
3 South, Range 16 East, Columbia
County, Florida, said parcel being
more particularly described as fol-
lows: Commence at the NW comer
of said Section 32 and run N 89 deg.
02'56" East, along the Northerly
boundary thereof, 700.66 feet to the
NE corer of the W l/1,of NW 1/4
.of NW 1/4i thence.S 05 deg. 34'10"
S"West along- the Easterly boundary of,
said W 1P12, distance of 233.87 feet
to the POINT OF BEGINNING,
From POINT OF BEGINNING thus
described run S 05 deg. 34'10" West,
along said Easterly boundary 234.28\
feet to the Northerly boundary of the
right of way of a 60 foot roadway;
thence S 89 deg. 39'00" West, along
last said Northerly boundary, 183.31
feet; thence N 04 deg 23'04" East,
233.83 feet; thence N 89 deg 39'00"
East, parallel & ith last said Northerly
boundary, 188.17 feet to the POINT
OF BEGINNING., "
TOGETHER WIW a right of in-
greos and egress Aaqutilities over the
following described&parcel. A parcel
lying in the NW 1/4 of the NW 1/4
of land of Section 32, Township 3
South, :Range 16 East, Columbia.
County, Florida, said parcel being
more particularly described as fol-
lows; Commqnce at the NW comer
of said Section 32 and run N 89 deg.
02'56" East, along the Northerly
boundary thereof, 12.00 feet to the
Easterly boundary of the right of way.
of a county maintained road; thence
S 04 deg. 23'04" West along said
Easterly, 460.14 feet to the POINT
OF BEGINNING; from' POINT OF
BEGINNING thus described, run N
89 deg. 39'00" East,-.678.31 feet to
the Easterly boundary of the W 1/2
of said NW 1/4 of NW 1/4; thence S
05,deg. 34'10" West, along last said
Easterly boundary 60.44 feet; thence
S ,89 deg. 39'00" West, 677.05 feet
to the aforesaid Easterly boundary of
the right of way of a county main-
tained road; thence N 04 deg. 23'04"
East, along last said Easterly boun-
dary, .60.00 feet to the POINT OF
BEGINNING.
shall be .sold by the Clerk of this
Court, at public sale, pursuant to the
Final 'Judgment in the above styled
action dated-July 14, 2011, At the Co-
Slumbia County Courthouse in Lake
City, Columbia County, Florida, at
11:00 A.M,, on Wednesday, August
.10, 2011, to the best and highest bid-
der for cash. Any person claiming an
interest in any surplus from the sale,
other than the property owner as of
the date of the notice of lis pendens,
must fife a claim within 60 days after
the sale.
WITNESS my hand and official seal
in the State and County aforesaid this
14th day of July, 2011.
P. DEWIT CASON,
Clerk of Court
By:/s/B. Scippio
Deputy Clerk

05526727
July 20, 27, 2011


Land Clearing

Back Hoe, Dozer, Chopping, root
raking, bush hog, seeding, sod,
disking, site prep, ponds &
irrigation. Free Est! 386-623-3200


Services

DIVORCE, BANKRUPTCY,
RESUMES.
other court approved forms-
386-961-5896.


~$I~"S~k~4~t~aai~uLUulY' -'~--


NOTICE OF SECOND PUBLIC
HEARING AND STATEMENT OF
PROPOSED COMMUNITY DE-
VELOPMENT BLOCK GRANT
PROJECT
The City of Lake City is applying to
the Florida Department of Communi-
ty Affairs for a grant under the
Neighborhood Revitalization catego-
ry in the amount of $750,000 under
the Small Cities Community Devel-
opment Block Grant Program. At
least 70% of the funds must be for
activities that benefit low- and mod-
erate-income persons.
The cost and percentage of low- and
moderate-income persons benefitting
from each project activity is as fol-
lows. The cost for the Flood Control
- and Drainage Improvement Facilities
is $617,000 with-51;01% low- and
moderate-jncome persons benefitting
from this activity. The cost for the
Engineering activity is $73,000.'The
cost for the Administration activity is
$60,000. The total Community De-
velopment Block Grant cost for this
project is $750.000 with at 1.-asi
51,01%. lo' and moderate -i omer
persons benefittig from thius project
Thesplan to minimize displacement
of persons 'as a result of planned
Community Development Block
,Grant funded aciuvitdes is to develop
a Community Development Block
Grantm project which will ot cause
displacemnent of persons The pro-
posed Fiscal Year 2011 Comnunity
SDevelopment Block Grant project
will not permanently displace any
persons. .
If for any reason persons are perma-
nently displaced as a result of Com-
munity Development Block Grant
funded activities, assistance will be
provided to displaced persons as re-
quired 'under 24 Code of Federal
Regulations 42," United States De-
partment of Hpusing and Urban De-
velopment regulations that imple-
ment the Uniform Relocation Assis-
tance and Real Property Acquisition
Policies Act of 1970.
A Statement of the proposed -Fiscal
Year 2011 CommunltyDevelopment
Block Grant project application is as
follows: '
The Community Development Block
Grant project is a Neighborhood Re-
vitalization program. The City will
reconstruct'roads in order to improve
stormwater, drainage; The total cost
of the project is estimated at
$750,000 .and 51,;01 percent of the
project beneficiaries will be 16w- to.
moderate-income persons.
A public hearing l1 pro% ide citizens
an opportunity to 'comment on the
application will b"'held in the City
Council Meeting Room, City Hall lo-
cated at 205 North Marion Avenue,
Lake City, Florida on August 1, 2011
at 7:00 p.m., or as soon thereafter as
the matter can be'.heard. A summary
of the application will be available
for review at City Hall located at 205
North Marion Avehue, Lake City,
Florida, telephone number (386)
752-2031.
The public hearing is being conduct-
ed in a handicapped accessible loca-
tion. Any handicapped person re-
quiring an interpreter for the hearing
impaired or. the visually' impaired
should contact Larry Lee at least five
calendar days prior to the public
hearing and .an interpreter will be
provided. Any non English speaking
person wishing to attend the public
hearing should contact Larry Lee at
least five calendar days prior to the
public hearing and a language inter-
preter will be provided. Any handi-
capped person requiring special ac-
commodation at this meeting should
contact Larry Lee at least five calen-
dar days prior to the public hearing.
To access a Te communication De-
vice for Deaf (TDD) please call
(800) 955-8771'-;'
A training session on Fair Housing
and unlawful or discriminatory hous-
ing practices will be held immediate-
ly preceding the public hearing to be
held on August 1 at 7:00 p.m., or as
soon thereafter as the matter can be
heard, in the City 'Council Meeting
Room, City Hall located at 205
North Marion Avenue, Lake City,
Florida.
The following disclosures have been
made pursuant to Section 102 of the
HUD Reform Act of 1989.
The disclosures are available at City


Legal

INVITATION TO BID
REPAIR & REBUILD WORK ON
2003 CATERPILLAR D6-M
BID NO. 2011-P
Please be advised that Columbia
County desires to accept bids on the
above referenced project. Bids will
be accepted through 2:00 P.M. on
, August 3, 2011. All bids submitted
shall be on the form provided.
Specifications and bid forms may be
obtained by contacting the office of
the Board of County Commissioners,
Columbia County, 135 NE Hemando
Avenue Room 203, Post Office Box
1529 Lake City, Florida 32056-1529
or by calling 386-719-2028. Colum-
bia County reserves the right to re-
ject any and/or all bids and to accept
the bid in the county's best interest..
Dated this 20th day of July 2011
Columbia County Board of,
County Commissioners
Jody Dupree, Chairman

.05526724
July 19, 27, 2011
REQUEST FOR PROPOSALS
2011-Q
EMPLOYEE RENTAL UNIFORMS
Please be advised that Columbia
County desires to accept proposals
on the above referenced item. Pro-
posals will be accepted through
11:00 A.M. on August 12, 2011.
Specifications and proposal forms
may be obtained by contacting the
office of the Board of County Com-
missioners, Columbia County, 135
NE Hernando Avenue, Post Office
Box 1529, Lake City, Florida 32056-
1529 or by. calling (386)719-2028.
Columbia County reserves the right
to reject any and/or all proposals and
to accept the proposal in the county's
best interest.
Dated this 27th day of July 2011.
Columbia County Board of
County Commissioners
Jody Dupree, Chairman
05526749
July 27, 2011
August 3, 2011


Legal.

Hall located at 205 North Marion
Avenue, Lake City, Florida. These
disclosures will be available on and
after August 15, 2011. and shall con-
tinue to be available for a minimum
period of sixyears.
Other government (federal, state, and
local) assistance to the project in the
form of a gift, grant, loan, guarantee,
insurance payment, rebate, subsidy,
credit tax benefit, or any other form
of direct or indirect benefit by source
and amount;
2. The identities and pecuniary inter-
ests of all developers, contractors, or
consultants involved in the applica-
tion for assistance or in the planning
or development of the project or ac-
tivity;
3. The identities and pecuniary inter-
ests of any other persons with a pe-
cuniary interest in the project that
can reasonably be expected to ex-
ceed $50,000 or 10% of the grant re-
quest (whichever is lower);
4. For those developers, contractors,
consultants, property owners, or oth-
ers listed in two (2) or three (3)
above which are corporations, or oth-
er entities, the identification and pe-
cuniary interests by corporation or
entity of each officer, director, prin-
cipal stockholder, or other official of
the entity;
5. The expected sources of all funds
to be provided to the project by each
of the providers of those funds and
the amount provided; and
6. The expected uses of all funds by
activity and amount.
A FAIR HOUSING/EQUAL OP-
PORTUNITY/HANDICAPPED AC-
CESSIBLE JURISDICTION

05526856
July 27, 2011


NOTICE OF SECOND PUBLIC to be provided to thme project oy each
HEARING AND STATEMENT OF of the providers of those funds and
PROPOSED COMMUNITY DE- the amount provided; snd
VELOPMENT BLOCK GRANT 6. The expected uses of all funds by
HOUSING PROJECT activity and amount.
The City of Lake City is applying to A 'FAIR HOUSING/EQUAL OP-
the Florida Department of Communi- PORTUNITY/HANDICAPPED AC-
ty Affairs for a grant under the Com- CESSIBLE JURISDICTION
mercial Revitalization category in
the amount of $750,000 under the 05526857
Small Cities Community Develop- July 27,2011
ment Block Grant Program. At least
70% of the funds must be for activi- Job
ties that benefit low- and moderate- rl
income persons. / Opportunities
The cost and percentage of low- and
moderate-income persons benefitting 05526860
from each project activity is as fol- REEFER DRIVERS
lows. The cost for the Construction NEEDED!
activity for Parking Facilities is More Freight = Top Earnings!
$617,000 with 51.0% low- and mod- Paid CDL Training
erate-income persons benefitting Available & Benefits
from this activity. The cost for the 877-491-1112 or
Engineering activity is $73,000. The www.primeinc.com
cost for the Administration activity is
$60,000. The total Community De- CDL Class A Truck Driver.
development Block Grant cost for this Flatbed ex for FiT SD area
project is $750,000 with at least Flatbed exp. for F SE area
51.0% low- and moderate-income 3 years exp or more. Medical
persons benefitting from this project. benefits offered. Contact
The plan to minimize displacement' Melissa or Mary @ 386-935-2773
of persons assa result 'of planned Experienced Breakfast
Community Development. Block Experiencedreakf
Grant funded activities is to develop GrillCook
a Community Development' Block Needed
Grant project which, will not cause 386-867-4242
displaernent of persons.. The pro- .' ,NSURAniCE AGENCY
posed F-iscal Year 20i.Colnmarnmiy Seeking a ca.eer.rrn.ded&
D e elo m e nt B L c k G' t p rlpro e c i .e r "
Dekt nt B r,: t for a fast

person lieiru-u aeQ, viduu
If fdi any re.:son persons. amperm.. must posses ap 4-4CSR License.
nently displaced as a result of orn- Must have excellent computer &,
munity Developmeqt Block Grint 'people skills. -Bnefits a ailable
funded activities, assistance"'will Ibe Send replytb Box 05065, C/O The
provided to displaced persons as re- Lake City Reporter, P.O. Box
quired under 24 Code of Federal 1709, Lake City4FL32056 ,
Regulations 42, United States De- or fax to: 386-752-2102


apartment of Housing .and Urban De-
velopment regulations that imple-
ment the Uniform Relocation Assis-
tance and Real Property Acquisition,
Policies Act of 1970.
A Statement of the proposed Fiscal
Year 2011 Community Development
Block Grant project application is as
follows:
The Communimty Development Block
Grant project is a. Commercial Revi-
talization program. The City will ac-
quire property and construct a park-
ing garage in the Commercial Revi-
talization Area. The total cost of the
project is estimated at $750,000 and
51.0 percent of the project beneficia-
ries will be low- to moderate-income
persons.
A public hearing to provide citizens
an opportunity to comment on the
application will be held in the City
Council Meeting Room, City Hall lo-
cated at 205 North Marion Avenue,
Lake City, Florida on August 1, 2011
at 7:00 p.m., or as soon thereafter as
the matter can be heard. A summary
of the application will be available
for review at City Hall located at 205
North Mariop Avenue, Lake City,
Florida, telephone number (386)
752-2031.
The public hearing is being conduct-
ed in a handicapped accessible loca-
tion. Any handicapped person re-
quiring an interpreter for the hearing
impaired or the visually impaired
should contact Larry Lee at least five
calendar days prior to the public
hearing and an interpreter will be
provided. Any non English speaking
person wishing to attend the public
hearing should contact Larry Lee at
least five calendar days prior to the
public hearing and a language inter-
preter will be provided. Any handi-
capped person requiring special ac-
commodation' at this meeting should
contact Larry Lee at least five calen-
dar days prior to the public hearing.
To access a Telecommunication De-
vice for Deaf (TDD) please call
(800) 955-8771.
A training session on Fair Housing
and unlawful or discriminatory hous-


My name is James I'm an inde-
pendant dit4rbuter itLh Zila Inter-
-nationai. Lookihg for motn ared
people who would like to start
their own business in Network
Marketing. Please call me at
386-697-6386 for more info:
Roofing co. looking for Repair
tech. Must have Drivers license
and be Drug free. Exp in all roof
types. Call 1-877-957-7663

ROOTS HAIR STUDIO
Needs an energetic Stylist.
Please call 386-752-9091
Sales Position available for moti-
,vated individual Rountree -Moore
Toyota, Great benefits, paid train-
ing/vacation. Exp: a plus but not
necessary. Call Anthony Cosentino
386-623-7442
55 TEMP Farmworker needed
7/25/11 10/10/11. Workers will
cultivate & harvest sweet potatoes.
Random drug testing at employer's
expense. Guaranteed 3/4 of
contract hours. Tools provided at
no cost. Free housingprovided for
non-commuting workers.
Transportation & subsistence
reimbursed to worker upon
*completion of 50% Of contract, or
earlier. $9.12/hr. Worksites in
Baldwin Co. AL. Report or send a
resume to nearest local FL
Agency of Workforce Innovation
office & reference job # AL
694235. South Potato Harvesting,
LLC Daphne, AL
TRUCK DRIVER needed to go
from Jacksonville to Lake City
with layover in Lake City.
Prefer driver from Lake City.
Call (229)300-1744
VPK Teacher & Pre K3 teacher
needed. Experience reqd. CDA/AS
Degree preferred. Apply in person
at Wee Care in Columbia City


Legal

ing practices will be held immediate-
ly preceding' the public hearing to be
held on August 1 at 7:00 p.m., or as
soon thereafter as the matter can .be
heard, in the City Council Meeting
Room, City Hall located at 205
North Marion Avenue, Lake City,
Florida.
The following disclosures have been
made pursuant to Section 102 of the
HUD Reform Act of 1989.
The disclosures are available at City
Hall located at 205 North Marion
Avenue, Lake City, Florida. These
disclosures will be available on and
after August 15, 2011 and shall con-
tinue to be available for a minimum
period of sixyears.
1. Other government (federal, state,
and local) assistance to the project in
the form of a gift, grant, loan, guar-
antee, insurance payment, rebate,
subsidy, credit tax benefit, or any
other form of direct or indirect bene-
fit by source and amount;
2. The identities and pecuniary inter-
ests of all developers, contractors, or
consultants involved in the applica-
tion for assistance or in the planning
or development of the project or ac-
tivity;
3. The identities' and pecuniary inter-
ests of any other persons with a pe-
cuniary, interest in the project that
can reasonably be expected to ex-
ceed $50,000 or 10% of the grant re-
quest (whichever is lower);
4. For those developers, contractors,
consultants, property owners, or oth-
ers listed in two (2) or three (3)
above which are corporations, or oth-
er entities, the identification and pe-
icuniary interests by corporation or
entity of each officer, director, prin-
cipal stockholder, or other official of
the entity;
5. The expected sources of all funds
- I- J A lh ...;-f 1- ....,


,'240 Schools &
240 Education

05526648
Interested in a-Medical Career?
Express Training offers
courses for beginners & exp
Nursing Assistant, $479
next class-07/25/10

Phlebotomy national certifica-
tion; $800 next class-08/08/11

Continuing education
Fees incl. books, supplies, exam
fees. Call 386-755-4401 or
expresstrainingservices.com



310 Pets & Supplies

Mini Schnauzers. AKC.
Salt &Pepper Raised in home
$250.00 ea.. POP
386-288-5412 or 386-963-4324.

S PUBLISHER'S NOTE
Florida Law 828.29 requires dogs
and cats being sold to be at least 8
weeks old and have a health
certificate from a licensed
veterinarian documenting they
have mandatory shots and are
free from intestinal and external
parasites. Many species of wild-
life must be licensed by Florida
Fish and Wildlife. If you are
unsure, contact the local
office for information.


361 Farm Equipment

84 Ford 4610 Tractor.
2WD, Solid
2005 motor,$7,5,00. OBO
386-867-0005


IFIND -17T:


120 Medical
120 Employment

05526649
Gainesville Women's Center
For Radiology
Arlene Weinshelbaum, M.D.
MAMMOGRAPHY TECH
wanted full time for private
Radiology office.ARRT &
Mammography certification req.
Fax resume to:
Tracy: (352)331-2044

05526767
Occupational Therapist
Avalon Healthcare Center is
currently accepting applications
for the full time position of
Occupational Therapist.
Competitive Salary and
Excellent benefit package as
well as A sign on bonus is
being offered.
Please contact Jennie Cruce
director of Rehab.
dor() avalonhrc.com
Avalon Healthcare and Rehab
1270 S.W. Main Blvd.
Lake City, Florida 32025
or fax resume to 386-752-8556
386-752-7900 EOE

05526772
Advent Christian Village
call 658-5627 or visit
www.acvillage.net
24 hrs/day, 7 days/week

Be your BEST,
Among the BEST
FT COTA FL -
LTC & Outpatient

FT certified occupational thera-
py assistant to assist with occu-
pational therapy/rehabilitation
and related activities in long-
term care and outpatient care
settings. Valid/unrestricted Flor-,
ida certification required. Prior
experience preferred. Must be
committed to personalized, com-
passionate care. Will consider
PT work schedule as needed.
Onsite daycare and fitness
facilities. Apply in person at
Personnel Office Monday
through Friday from 9:00 a.m.
until 4:00 p.m., or fax
resume/credentials to
(386)658-5160.
EOE/DFW /Criminal
background checks required.

Busy outpatient surgery center has
immediate opening for a LPN.
PRN position. Please
email resume to
administration@lcsurgerycenter.com
or fax to 386-487-3935.

Full Time Physicians Assistant or
ARNP needed for very busy
paperless Family Practice. Must be
, highly motivated, multi-tasking
and patient centric. Intergy IEHR
.experience a plus. Please fax
S .resume to; 386-961-9541

Lise. Respiratory Therapist and
L'L. R.SQT needed PDM
for medical office m LC.
SFax resume (386) 754-1712

Faculty P6sition: Registered
Nurse (BSN) wantedat North
Florida Community College.
See www.nfcc.edu for details.


9ltYIT N


il -











LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED WEDNESDAY, JULY 27, 2011


402 Appliances
2006 WHIRLPOOL
Calypso Washer & Dryer.
$375 for both.
386-867-2155
Emerson Quiet Cool. Heat &
Cool window unit. $135. obo
386-292-3927 or
386-755-5331.
FRIGIDAIRE 18CU fridge.
$275. 7 months old, white, like
new. (863)840-4262
Please leave message.
FROST FREE Kenmore
refrigerator. Very clean. $250. obo
386-292-3927 or
386-755-5331.
GE 25cuft Refrigerator/Freezer
side by side 6 yrs old
Excellent condition.
$350. 386-752-8227
MAGIC CHEF GAS STOVE.
WHITE. $100.
386-292-3927 or
386-755-5331.
Whirlpool Washer & Dryer.
Large capacity. Works great.
$285. for both.
386-292-3927 or 386-755-5331.

407 Computers
Compaq Computer, Many extras.
Complete Computer
$80.00
386-755-9984 or 386-292-2170

408 Furniture
Good sitting Love seat.
$35. obo386-292-3927 or
386-755-5331.


Table with 6 chairs.
$75. obo 386-292-3927 or
386-755-5331.


420 Wanted to Buy

Wanted Junk Cars, Trucks, Vans.
$250 & up CASH! Free Pick Up!
NO title needed !386-878-9260
After 5pm 386- 752-3648.


430 Garage Sales
PUBLISHER'S NOTE
All Yard Sale Ads
Must be Pre-Paid.


440 Miscellaneous
Stop gnat & Mosquito bites! Buy
Swamp Gator All natural insect re-
pellent. Family safe. Use head to
toe. Available at The Home Depot.
Summer Barbecue Special
Tow Behind
Grill/Smoker, $1,250 OBO.
386-719-4802

520 Boats for Sale
1985 BONITA 90 HP Mercury,
Practivally new Trolling motor.
Good condition. $2,300.
(904)504-2620 after 5pm.
Starcraft Aluminum Jon Boat.
13'9" 6hp. Evinrude. 2 hummin-
bird fish finders. I trolling motor,
trailer. $500 Firm. 386-269-3056
630 Mobile Homes
Sfor Rent
2&3 BR MH. $395 -,$650. mo.
plus deposit. Water c sewer fur-
nished. Cannon Creek MHP
386-752-6422
2/2 Units, clean, well maintained,
nice safe park setting, 2 miles to
downtown Lake City, $575 month
+ $575 sec dep, 386-984-8448
13th Month FREE!!
3/2 S of Lake City, (Branford area)
$575 month plus security
386-590-0642 or 386-867-1833
www:suwanneevalleyproperties.com
3br/2ba newly renovated MH on
1/2 ac. private property. Close to
college $700.mo. 1st. mo.+ Sec.
dep. Ref's. No Pets. Non smoking
environment 904-626-5700
LG clean 3br's $450. -$650. mo. +,
dep. Also, 2br mobile home's
available. No Pets.
5 Points area. 386-961-1482
Mobile Homes for rent in
White Springs, Lake City & Ft.
White Contact 386-623-3404
or 386-365-1919


3 Mobile Homes
630 for Rent
X-Clean 2/2 SW, 8 mi NW of VA.
Clean acre lot, nice area. $500. mo
+ dep No dogs Non-smoking
environment.386-961-9181

640 Mobile Homes
640 for Sale
Handy man special, 94 Fleetwood
DWMH. 3/2 on 5 acres in Ft.
White. Owner Fin. $3,000 dn.
$850mo. $99,900 352-215-1018
www.LandOwnerFinancing.com
PALM HARBOR Homes Has 3
Modular Homes. Available at
HUGH Savings. Over 40K Off.
Call Today! 800-622-2832
650 Mobile Home
650 &Land
67.5 ac.Ranch, fenced & cross
fenced. Spacious moblie home
w/large front deck & RV hookup
MLS 75607 $299,000. Access
Realty. Patti Taylor. 386-623-6896
710 Unfurnished Apt.
For Rent







05526481
SPRING HILL VILLAGE
Excellent High Springs location.
1,2 & 3 bedroom floor-plans;
some with garages.
Call 386-454-1469
or visit our website:
www.springhillvillage.net
1BR APT.
Downtown Location, Clean.
$450 mo, plus Security.
NO PETS. Call 386-755-3456
2 bedroom Apartment
$600. mo
plus security deposit.
386-344-3715
2/1 w/garage & washer/dryer
hookups. East side of town,
Call for details
386-755-6867


70 Unfurnished Apt. 71 Unfurnished Apt.
710 For Rent 710 For Rent


2BR/1.5BA w/garage
5 minutes from VA hospital.
Call for details.
386-755-4590 or 365-5150
Amber Wood Hills Apts.
PrivPae Patio area. Beautiful yard.
Washer/dryer hkup. Free water &
sewer. 1/1, 2/1. Move in special.
386-754-1800. wwwmyflapts.com
Beautiful Apt, Large 1 bdrm,
w/inground pool, CHA, details at
bigfloridahome.com
$650/mo + dep 386-344-3261
Columbia Arms Apt. located 1/2
mi from V.A. & Winn Dixie. Pet
Friendly. Move in Special $199.
Pool, laundry & balcony.
386-754-1800. www.myflapts.com
Furnished or unfurnished
Townhomes on the golf course.
$750. mo. plus security. Includes
water. 386-752-9626
Greentree Townhouse
Summer special. 2/1,2/1.5. Free
water & sewer. Balcony & patio.
Laundry. Behind Kens on Hwy 90.
386-754-1800 wwwmyflapts.com
Large & clean. lbr/lba apt.
CH/A Ig walk in closet. Close to
town. $395. mo and $350. dep.
(904)563-6208
Redwine Apartments. Move in
special $199. Limited time. Pets
welcome, with 5 complexes,
we have a home for you.
386-754-1800. www.myflapts.com.
Summer Special! 12th mo Free
w/signed yr lease. Updated, w/tile
floors/fresh paint. Great area.
From $450.+sec. 386-752-9626
The Lakes Apts. Studios & lBr's
from $135/wk. Util. & cable incl.,
Sec 8 vouchers accepted, monthly
rates avail Call 386-752-2741
Unfurnished Apt Eastside
Village Realty, Inc .2 bedroom
1 bath Duplex must be 55+ yrs of
age Call Denise Bose @
386-752-5290
Wayne Manor Apts.
Move in $199. Summer special.
2/1, washer/dryer. Behind Kens off
Hwy 90. 386-754-1800
www.myflapts.com


Windsor Arms Apartments.
Summer special $199. Move in!
2/1, 2/1.5, 2/2. Pet Friendy. Free
200 ch. Dish. Washer/dryer hkup.
386-754-1800. www.myflapts.com

720 Furnished Apts.
0 For Rent
Rooms for Rent. Hillcrest, Sands,
Columbia. All furnished. Electric,
cable, fridge, microwave. Weekly
or monthly rates. 1 person $135,
2 persons $150. weekly
386-752-5808
Unfurnished
730 Home For Rent
3/2, lr, dr, fam rm w/ fp, 2-car
garage, fenced bk yd.
1792 sq ft. $1050 mo. Martha Jo
Khachigan, Realtor 623-2848
Lg 2300 + sf home. 3 or 4 br/2 ba
on Ig lot in cul de sac. Family
room w/fireplace. Enclosed patio,
Ig workshop/garage. Security sys-
tem and more. Available Now! for
info call 386-697-6534.
Completely remodeled Brick.
3br/2ba 1750 sqft. Lg lot. Includes
washer, dryer, stove, & fridge.
$985. mo $985 dep. 386-752-7578
Quiet & private country home.
2br/lba. New energy efficient
appliances. New Central A/C.
$695. mo. 386-752-1444
SWMH 2/2 in Wellborn,
$625 mo, and
$625 security.
386-365-1243 or 397-2619
Unfurnished 2 bedroom/1 bath
house. $700.00 per month.
First, last and security Firm.
386-590-5333

RECYCLE
YOUR
PAPER


730 Unfurnished
730 Home For Rent
05526822
LAKE CITY
2BR/1BA, Mobile Home
$495mo
2BR/1.5BA, 975SF $725. mo
4BR/3BA, 2139SF $1500. mo
4BR/2BA, 1248SF $695. mo
2 AVAILABLE
3BR/2BA 1258SF $925. mo
3BR/2BA 1582SF $900. mo
3BR/2BA 1246SF $700. mo
2BR/1BA 700SF $495. mo
2 AVAILABLE
3BR/1.5BA 1040SF $825
FTWHITE
3BR/2BA 1512SF $850. mo
LAKE BUTLER
4BR/2BA 1560SF $750 mo
MADISON
2BR/1BA JUST REMODELED
$450. mo. 2 AVAILABLE

Mike Foster 386-288-3596
Mitchell Lee 386-867-1155
1688 SE Baya Dr., Suite 105
Lake City, FL 32025
www.NorthFloridahomeandldnd.com
Accredited Real Estate is a Full
Service Real Estate Office.
We do: Rentals
Property Management
Property Sales.



750 Business &
5 Office Rentals
FOR LEASE: Downtown office
space. Convenient to
Court house.
Call 386-755-3456


"Any -.n.oru Jre, ? h, n .fe' qI.. '.r. nc 1,.,c;1, re ,' i. .1r.. ,-,.a a .. a S '. Hor 3bons pc rchobe a ege rd Br 2 bon p hign hton
$idt, c l $ ,,o r r, e...e o $W1", a a t .-- ..... :I. 6r.., : .- j r, .-b s ra, l.a I.jqoge or.d br.glkr. men esnf. L.mted o irocnxk on hand


rlHusqvarna

TRACTORS

YTH21K46



21 hp Kohler
*46" cutting width
36 Eql






Thank You


SLake City &


Surrounding
Ott.


Locally Owned & Operated
Charles & Angie Neeley
1149 E. Baya Ave.

386-752-1449


Areas for



35 years


It's our

'birthday! i
Come in and
help us *
celebrate all to
this month!


9700 Deer Lake C:,
Ste. 5
Jacksonville
904-564-2377


JUST ARRIVED!

New 6 Pc.

Bedroom Suites




Timecss lsmones
4 Drawer Chest $69.95 FunmrB A*Ano Es Co"rCTIBES
386-466-1888
1034 SW MAIN BLVD., LAE CITY, FL 32055
BL........T..




i d MCi y ixccasif r
") l, II rdii Zll C~;,td t~l j


'r~a ~t ..Ih IIX 10L at


(A,


13I nw Lommons Loop, ate. 115
Lake City 386-754-1444


13770 Beach Blvd,
Ste. 9
Jacksonville
904-821-4440


1615 CR 220
#180
Orange Park
904-278-6055


L I


I


Classified Department: 755-5440










4C LAKE CITY REPORTER ADVICE & COMICS WEDNESDAY, JULY 27, 2011 Page Editor: Emogene Graham, 754-0415


DILBERT


BABY BLUES


BLONDIE


BEETLE BAILEY


HAGARTHE HORRIBLE


SNUFFY SMITH


ZITS


GARFIELD


B.C.


FRANK & ERNEST


v/4'RE SUPPO


If^


DEAR ABBY


Neighborhood shrew

should be object of pity


DEAR ABBY: There's a
venomous old woman who
roams through our neigh-
borhood looking for vic-
tims to embarrass, humili-
ate or annoy. She told a
neighbor's 11-year-old
granddaughter she looked
like a slut because she was
wearing shorts currently in
fashion for the young. She
habitually cuts in front of peo-
ple in line at the supermarket,
puts 25 items on the 15-item
service line, etc.
A new neighbor thought
she should be treated with a
little kindness. She had her,
opportunity recently when
we were out to breakfast at a
restaurant The harridan sat
alone (her husband refuses
to be seen in public with her),
and my friend commented to
her on the beautiful day. Her
response? "Don't waste my
time with meaningless inani-
ties!" She then proceeded to
abuse the server by repeat-
edly sending her plate back,
each time becoming more
unpleasant The girl ended up
in tears.
At that point, my friend
walked over and said qui-
etly, "I hope you don't think
your advanced age justifies
your meanness." The witch
accused my friend of "slan-
dering" her andleft vowing
never to return. This elicited
a round of applause from the
customers and staff
Why do some go through
life behaving so outrageous-
ly? How can she derive satis-
faction from being so hateful?.
- PUZZLED IN SAN DIEGO.


Abigail Van Buren
www.dearabby.com
DEAR PUZZLED: Ruling
out the idea that the person
you have described may be
mentally disturbed, ifs pos-
sible she may be so unhappy
in her personal life that she's
trying to make herself feel
better by abusing others.
She's a sad case. Fd like to
think that when the other din-
ers applauded, it was directed
in support of your friend
rather than at the disagree-
able woman as she left the
restaurant

DEARABBY: I am a 34-
year-old man, I have been
divorced for a couple of years
and have no children. I have
been dating an incredible
woman, "Nikki," who is a
bit older than I am. She has
three children.
The elephant in the room
has always been whether or
not Nikki would want more
children. We finally discussed
it, and she confirmed that
she does not She said she's
looking forward to the next
phase of her life as her kids
get older, which I understand.
That conversation has led to
a break in our relationship.
We haven't spoken for the,
past two weeks, and it seems
like two years.


I am struggling with
what to do. I have always
wanted to be a dad. Would
being a stepdad be as fulfill-
ing for me? Is being in a good
relationship more important?
Having kids doesn't auto-
matically make things great,
right? Could I find someone
as wonderful as Nikki, but
who wants to have a kid?
Abby, Fm conflicted,
and you're the only one I
could think of for advice.
- JUMBLED IN NEW
HAMPSHIRE
DEARJUMBLED: Only
you can decide whether
being a stepfather to Nilkki's
children would be enough for
you. For some men, it would
be. For others, it wouldn't
be enough. Of course, the
primary relationship must be
between the husband and
wife. Children grow up,
leave and establish lives
of their own. And you're
right, having kids doesn't
"automatically" make
things great if there is
trouble in the relationship.
While there are
no guarantees you will find
someone as wonderful as
Nikki, the odds are very
good that you will meet a
woman or more than one
- whose goals are similar
to yours and who would
love to have a family with
you. But it wdn't happen
until you firmly decide
exactly what you want
E Write Dear Abby at
www.DearAbby.com or
P.O. Box 69440, Los
Angeles, CA 90069.


HOROSCOPES


)5EP TO fAT FROM THK
FOOD. Cip.C IT'S
! gWPLACING THf
FOOD PYRAMID.
> IT'5 A LOT MOR FUN>
, kx TO EAT FOM
;- TH FOOP CON! |
SE-mail: ThaesOne@aol.com %dAVE5F 7-27


ARIES (March 21-April
19): Don't let anyone push
you into making a wrong
move. Impulsive action may
bring temporary relief, but
in the end you will prob-
ably have to backtrack.
Focus more on what you
can accomplish by going
directly to the source. Make
your moves based on facts
and figures. **
TAURUS (Aprl 20-May
20): The past can be your
ticket to the future. Rely
on whom you know and
the experience you have to
guide you to a better posi-
tion at work and at home.
Don't overreact or under-
estimate. ***
GEMINI (May 21-June
20): Take initiative and
decide what you want.
Your versatility has led you
in many directions in the
past, but now you must be
more precise in executing
your plans. Think about
what you enjoy doing most
and incorporate it into
your plans.***
CANCER -(June 21-July
22): Put greater effort
into your creative ideas.
A hobby or a skill will
turn into a viable source
of income. Don't hem and
haw over trivial decisions
when it's important that
you show everyone how
capable you are of making
a good decision.***
LEO (July 23-Aug. 22):
Rely on your bravado as


THE LAST WORD
Eugenia Last

well as your intuition and
you will make some excel-
lent choices. Helping others
will pay off and introduce
you to people who can
contribute to your advance-
ment Work on the premise
that less is more. ****
VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept
22): Proceed with caution.
Not everyone who is being
nice to you is on your
side. Showing emotion
will be a sign. of weakness,
making you vulnerable to
underhandedness. Learn
from your experiences so
you are better prepared
to handle whatever comes
your way.**
LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct
22): Plenty of options will
crop up if you interact
with people from differ-
ent walks of life. Getting
involved in groups that
are working toward the
same goals you are will
help you move forward
quicker. Collect an old
debt*****
SCORPIO (Oct 23-Nov..
21): Ifs important to use
what you have instead of
hoarding. Keep everything
moving, and you will find
that opportunities will
open up. Use your vision
and you will have a clear-
cut idea what you can turn
into an asset and what you


should discard. ***
SAGITTARIUS (Nov.
22-Dec. 21): Follow your
heart, act on impulse and,
whatever you do, don't
let a good deal or oppor-
tunity get away. Make
whatever changes are
necessary based on what
you see, hear and experi-
ence. You're in the driver's
.seat.***
CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-
Jan. 19): Don't,lose sight
of your goals. Keep your
financial matters a secret,
.and handle documents
with discretion. A contract
you've been working on
will take a little extra care.
Don't let emotions get
in your way. ***
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb.
18): You are making head-
. way. Your insightfulness
can be put to good use,
especially when deal-
ing with people who can
help you. Partnerships
look good, and changes
that affect your personal
life will turn out well.
, 44***
PISCES (Feb. 19-March
20): A problem at home
will take your undivided
attention. A practical
approach to whatever
needs doing will help you
stay within budget and
impress onlookers.
Keeping up with the times
will make what you have
to offer more appealing.


CELEBRITY CIPHER

by Luis Campos
Celebrity Cipher cryptograms are created from quotations by famous people, past and present.
Each letter in the cipher stands for another.
TODAY'S CLUE: X equals Y
"BK FKG YB NYI EK JR Y LOVEOG KU
CNXIOVYH YJPIR. FKGRB NYLR EK
UR.RH HOAR ENRX YTR BKE YHKBR."
- IYHGY NYXRA

PREVIOUS SOLUTION: "Kids shouldn't see all the violence they do these
days. But the industry just doesn't care." Linda Blair


(c) 2011 by NEA, Inc. 7-27


FOR BETTER OR WORSE
DO L '-. H 1 |MI GoTTfAGO
DMDN ( C L.


CLASSIC PEANUTS


YES, THAT'S TRUE...LUT
I REAO THE BLLURBS ON
"THE ACK COVER.!--" /



Iii,,.IJ


I









LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED WEDNESDAY, JULY 27, 2011


750 Business &
SOffice Rentals
For Lease: E Baya Ave. Two -
1000 sqft office space units or
combined for 2000 sqft. 386-984-
0622 or weekends 386-497-4762
OFFICE SPACE for lease.
Oak Hill Plaza. 900 sqft
$675mo/$695. sec dep.
Tom 386-961-1086 DCA Realtor

790 Vacation Rentals
Horseshoe Beach RV Lot.
Nice comer Lot with shade trees.
$295. mo Water/electric included
386-235-3633 or 352-498-5986
Scalloping Horseshoe Beach Spcl
Gulf Front 2br, w/lg porch, dock,
fish sink. wkend $395./wk $895.
386-235-3633/352-498-5986
alwaysonvacation.com #419-181
"Florida's Last Frontier"

805 Lots for Sale
Lots for Sale Eastside
Village Realty, Inc. buildable
vacant lot hight & dry in a estab-
lished neighbor priced @ $40,000.
Call Denise Bose @ 752-5290


PUBLISHER'S NOTE
All real estate advertising in this
newspaper is subject to the fair
housing act which makes it illegal
to advertise "any preference,
limitation, or discrimination based
on race;,color, religion, sex,
disability, familial status or nation-
al origin; or any intention to make
such preference, limitation or
discrimination." Familial status
includes children under the age of
18 living with parents or legal
custodians, pregnant women and
people securing custody of chil-
dren under the age of 18. This
newspaper will not knowingly
accept any advertising for real es-
tate which is in violation of the
law. Our readers are hereby in-
formed that all dwellings adver-
tised in this newspaper are availa-
ble on an equal opportunity basis.
To complain of discrimination call
,IHUD toll free at 1-800-669-9777,
the toll free
telephone number to the hearing
impaired is 1-800-927-9275. -


810 Home for Sale


2/1 completely updated, screened
. back porch, large utility room,
MLS#77413 $52,900 Call Nancy
Rogers R.E.O. Realty
386-867-1271,


312 1056 sqft Brick horpe in town.it
Fenced backyard w/12x12 work-
shop Just Reduced! $79,900
MLS# 77414 Call 386-243-8227
R.E.O.Realty Group, Inc
3/2 2003 DWMH on 5 acre rectan-
Sgular lot w/tons of potential.
MLS#7"7568 $79,900 Call Nancy
@ R.E.O. Realty 386-867-1271
.nancytrogers@msn.com
3/2 home dh .67 ac. Creekside S/D
. Fenced back yard, lots of trends.
Split floor plan on .i l-d cI)t,
MLI 77385 Access Realty., .
Patti Jay lpt, 1$ 69.900 62 3.-6' 0


S4/2 on 1.5 acres w/ detached,
garage, patio. above ground pool,
SMLS* 77410 $189,888
'. R.E.O. Realty Groupn .c
386-243-8227 .
4/2 with 1000 sq ft workshop,
fenced yard, 2 car garage, Fairly
new roof & HVAC MLS#77602,
Bring Offers! $164.900,
R.E.O. Realty Group 243-8227
4br bridklon .51 ac.corner lot. For-
mal dining and'a large open floor-
plan. Brick pauo, $139.888
NLS 76763 Brittan, Stoeckert
Results Realty 386-397-3473
Access Really Stlish 3/2 + pool
house w/1/2 bath on 2.25 acres.
Rear deck, 2 car garage & carport
MLS 7S103 $I10,900
Patti Taylor.623-6896
BEAIt'IFUL Lake Front home!.
1 ac lot within the city limits.
Close to town. 1800 heated sq. ft.
$144,900 MLS# 78385
Call Jay Sears. 386-867-1613
Brick 3/1 family home, 4.43 acres.
w/metal roof. MLS# 77415
Short sale acceptance w/lenders
Approval. $89,000. 386-243-8227
R.E.O. Realty Group, Inc
CLEAN & READY! 3BR/2BA
mfg home on .97-acre south of Ft.
White on paved road $59,000
DANIEL CRAPPS AGENCY,
INC. 755-5110 #78007
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
3/2 brick home in Woodcrest. Lg
lot completely fenced. Easy access
to amenities. Elaine K. Tolar 386-
755-6488 MLS# 78148 $129,900
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
3/3 in beautiful area. 2414sqft.
Private yard & patio with storage
bldg. Lori G Simpson 386-365-
5678 MLS# 78175 $159,900
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
New home in Mayfair. 4 bedroom
on corner lot. Covered Porch.
Elaine K. Tolar 386-755-6488
MLS# 76919 $209,900
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
Remodeled 2/2 (could be 3/2).
Split floor plan. Home Owner
Warranty. Mary Brown Whitehurst
965-0887 MLS# 77943 $99,000
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
MH in Eastside Village a 55+
retirement community. Well main-
tained. Bruce Dicks 386-365-3784
MLS# 78350 $59,900
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
Brick home on Suwannee River
$329,900 Elaine K. Tolar 386-755-
6488 or Lori G. Simpson 365-5678
MLS# 70790 $329,900
DESIRABLE GWEN LAKE area!
Nice 3BR/2BA home on comer lot
REDUCED TO $95,000 DANIEL
CRAPPS AGENCY, INC.
755-5110 #77307
Hallmark Real Estate. 3/2
Doublewide on 1 acre. $58,000.
Not far to college & airport.
MLS# 78308
Ginger Parker 386-365-2135
Hallmark Real Estate. 35 High &
Dry acres. open pasture w/scat-
tered trees. Older site built home.
Needs some TLC.
MLS#76186 Jay Sears 719-0382


810 Home for Sale
Hallmark Real Estate. Beautiful
lot in Woodborough. has well
maintained 3/2 brick home.
Affordable price!MLS#75413
Sherry Willis 386-365-8095
Hallmark Real Estate. Lakefront
in town on I ac. Majestic oaks &
Magnolias. Hardwood floors,
fireplace & basement.
MLS#78385 Jay Sears 719-0382
Hallmark Real Estate. Pool &
Patio. 3br/2ba. brick home on
1.69 ac. Workshop &
SWMH on property. MLS#78117
Tanya Shaffer 386-397-4766
Hallmark Real Estate. Time to go
to the River. Stilt home w/covered
decking. Floating dock,out bldgs
& covered RV parking. $188K.
MLS#72068 Janet Creel 719-0382
Handyman' Special
Off Turner Rd. 2br/1.5ba.
Half acre fenced lot w/shed.
Asking $55,000. (352)335-8330
HANDYMAN SPECIAL!
4BR/2BA mfg home in great loca-
tion close to many amenities
$39,500 DANIEL CRAPPS
AGENCY, INC. 755-5110 #77852
Home for Sale Eastside Village
Realty, Inc. 2 bedroom, 2 bath site
built home with screen porch,
large carport priced just right Call
Denise Bose @ 752-5290
Home on 15 ac. w/over 2,500 sqft
home.Very Ig bedrooms iv/private
baths. 24x24 workshop $235,000
MLS 77552 Brittany Stoeckert
Results Realty 386-397-3473
Lg. 4/3 family home. 16x20
screened porch, workshop. 4.5 ac.
fenced/cross fenced MLS 74339
$229,900. N Fla Homeland Real-
ty Darlene H4rt 386-288-2876
*Mayfair S/D, nice fenced in back
yard w/small lake behind property.
Very nice. $99,888
MLS 77092 Brittany Stoeckert
Results Realty 386-397-3473
Neat as a pin! Split floor plan
w/well manicured lawn. 10x12
storage shed. $129K MLS 77932
Darlene Hart 386-288-2878
N Fla Homeland Realty


QUALITY HOME. Very private,
yet in the city. Comes with mobile
home park that generates revenue.
.$695,000. MLS# 77920
Call Jay Sears. 386-867-1613


REDUCED! Custom 2,061 SqFt,
home with open floor plan,.
3BR/2.5BA, in-ground pool
DANIEL CRAPPS AGENCY,
INC. 755-5110 #75442
RUSSWOOD EST! 3BR/2BA
Sw/2,337 SqFt, open floor plan,
climatized sun porch $219,900
DANIEL CRAPPS AGENCY,
INC. 755-5110 #77633
Southern Oaks Country Club.
3br/2.5ba Aprox 3000 sqft. Split
floor plan. on the 9th Fairway.
New AC, 2.5 car garage. sprinkler,
concrete drive: Avail, furnished or
unfurnished. Move in ready w/all
p, tince, .A'%il now BuLnI in
S 0 .'.En-.,' 'cn 'ou i .r rter "
- 43-..5 2-?' 7 \1 Vie 'at '
; .V'* ts w1alct.iatotivililaicomnr ,:


Spacious 4/2 home on 1 ac. Split
floor plan. Great neighborhood.
Easy access to I-5 $220K MLS
77859 N Fla Homeland Realty
' Darlene Hart 386-288-2878
WELLBORN! 4BR/2BA mfg
home w/2,280 SqFt, FP, & 5
ACRES only $74,900
DANIEL CRAPPS AGENCY,
INC. 755-5110 #78317

82o Farms &
o'v Acreage ;
10 ac. Ft, White $39,995,
$995 Down, $.73.16 mo.
Seller fi .' vargasrealty.com
352-472-3154


820 Farms&
SAcreage
10-ac lot. Well/septic/pp. Owner
financing $300 dn, $663 mo 8.9%,
25 yrs. Deas Bullard Properties
386-752-4339 www.landnfl.com
2+ ACRES ON HWY 47
by 1-75 interchange. More than
200 ft of frontage $149,900
Call 386-243-8227
R.E.O. Realty Group, Inc
20.02 acres ready for your site
built home. Has 2 wells & 2 power
poles w/a 24x30 slab $132,000
MLS# 78126 Call 386-243-8227
R.E.O.Realty Group, Inc
4 1/2 acre lot. Lake Jeffery Road.
Gorgeous Oaks!Paved Rd
Owner Financing! NO DOWN!
$59,900. $525mo 352-215-1018.
www.LandOwnerFinancing.com
4 acres, Wellborn, New Well
installed, Beautifully wooded
w/cleared Home Site, owner fin,
no down, $39,900, $410 mon
Call 352-215-1018
www.LandOwnerFinancing.com
FARM- 7 stall barn.
17+ acres, pasture, cross fenced.
Close in $500. mo. -
386-961-1086
Paved hard road in front of 5 ac.
tract. Comes with: power pole,
.well & septic. Cleared in back.
Also, 20X25 carport. $39,900
MLS# 76347. Jay 386-867-1613

Commercial
830 Property

05526409
FOR SALE LAKE CITY
FORMER 84 LUMBER Zoned
Commercial Intensive on
4.2 +/- Acres with an 18,300
S.F. main building at 1824 W.
US Highway 90; contact
Crystal 724 228-3636 x 1349
: Prime Commercial Location.
Just across from plaza. Frontage
on Baya w/2 curbcuts. $350,000
MLS# 77485'Call 386-243-8227
R.E.O.Realty Group, Inc

870 Real Estate
8 Wanted
I Buy Houses
CASH!
Quick Sale Fair Price
386-269-0605

952 Vans & Sport
S952Util. Vehicles
2000 HUMMER Army Gieen,
Leather Interior, Pristine cond.
31,148 miles. $52,000. Call
386-487-1409 Pictures available.


and sme ca$h

ADVERTISE YOUR

GARAGE SALE
WITH. THE '
LAKE CITY- REPORTER
$l75y


4 LINES 3 "'DAYS
.2 FREE SIGNS

(3861)755-5440


Professional Office Space For Lease
11,728 S.F.
Excellent location just east of 1-75
Abundant free parking
Immediate occupancy PROCACCI
DEVELOPMENT CORPORATION

Cal D -a- 5-41-1422
^^^^dkiremblasnprocacci^u


/- ON WHEELS & WATERCRAFT





2009 Jamboree
31M
Ford V-10, 2 slides w/32
in. HDTV, satellite.
Av. retail $81,500.
Now $67,000
Call
386-719-6833


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Classified Department: 755-5440


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Classified Department: 755-5440


6C LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED WEDNESDAY, JULY27, 2011


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