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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028308/01617
 Material Information
Title: The Lake City reporter
Uniform Title: Lake City reporter (Lake City, Fla. 1967)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: John H. Perry
Place of Publication: Lake City Fla
Publication Date: 7/24/2011
Frequency: daily (monday through friday)[<1969>-]
weekly[ former 1967-<1968>]
daily
normalized irregular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Lake City (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Columbia County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Columbia -- Lake City
Coordinates: 30.189722 x -82.639722 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 95, no. 4 (Oct. 5, 1967)-
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000358016
oclc - 33283560
notis - ABZ6316
lccn - sn 95047175
sobekcm - UF00028308_01569
System ID: UF00028308:01617
 Related Items
Preceded by: Lake City reporter and Columbia gazette

Full Text





K-9 dies
Lake City PD
-00 1 -eniffin dog
000015 10511 ****3DIGIT 3
LIB OF FLORIDA HISTORy
PO BOX 117007
205 SMA UNIV OF FLORIDA
GAINESVILLE FL 32611-1943


Lake


School budget
Millage rate
going down,
26 --.- Millikin.
de, 3A


City


Pet project
Therapy dogs
help ease
suffering.
Life, ID


Reporter


Sunday, July 24,2011 www.lakecityreporter.com Vol. 137, No. 153 $ $ 1.00


TREE OF MEMORIES


A magnolia, green
year-round, will honor
two lost firefighters.

By LEANNE TYO
Ityo@lakecityreporter.com
Children in matching green
T-shirts knelt around a freshly
planted magnolia tree at Alligator
Lake Park Saturday, almost as if
they were praying.
Their small hands scooped and
smoothed the dirt around the tree,
filling it in for the tree to stand
strong and tall just like the men
it was meant to
honor.
The children,
about 20 in all,
belonged to the
Livestock 4-H
Club, and they
planted the young
Burch magnolia, which
year-round, in
memory of fire-
fighters Josh
Burch, 31, of Lake
City and Brett
Fulton, 52, of the
Fulton Springville com-
munity.
Both Brett Fulton and Josh.
Burch, Florida Forest Service
rangers, died June 20 while
fighting the Blue Ribbon fire in
Hamilton County.
Their wives, Margaret Fulton
and Danielle Burch, and the
Burches' sons, Jeremy and Jacob,
were present for the tree-plant-
ing, an event that was planned,
unknowlingly, for Josh Burch's
birthday. He would have been 32
today.
Florida Forest Service represen-
tatives and members of the com-
munity were also in attendance.
Casey Jones, Livestock 4-H
Club leader, said she originally
wanted the group to plant the tree
as a part of the 4-H Million Trees
community service project, a proj-
ect started by a 4-H member in
California in the hopes that a mil-
lion trees would be planted.
When Josh Burch and Brett
Fulton passed away, Jones said she
decided her club would still plant
the tree for the Million Trees proj-
ect, but would do so as a memorial
for the fallen firefighters.
Jones said the club planted the
tree to beautify the parks, give
back to the community, and, as
she was overcome with tears,
"most importantly to remember
the fallen heroes that we've lost."
Destinee Nash, 13, club presi-
dent, read a poem in honor of the
firefighters, and as the tree was
planted, Margaret Fulton and
Danielle Burch shoveled the first'
scoop of dirt.
"It is an honor for the 4-H Club
to plant a tree for our heroes,"
Margaret Fulton said. "And we can
always come and visit any time."
Danielle Burch agreed.
"It means a lot that so many
people have done so many things
to honor them," she said.
Prior to the tree-planting,
Charly Hornbrook, Florida Ride
Captain of the Patriot Guard
Riders, presented Margaret
Fulton and Danielle Burch with
plaques from the organization
to honor their husbands. The
Patriot Guard Riders performed
the flag lines at both firefighters'
funerals and did an escort to the
cemetery.
"These fellows are heroes just
as much as those in the service,"
Hornbrook said.
MAGNOLIA continued on 3A


LEANNE TYOILake City.Reporter
Members of the Livestock 4-H Club fill in the dirt around a young magnolia tree that they
planted at Alligator Lake Park Saturday in memory of firefighters Josh Burch, 31, of Lake City
and Brett Fulton, 52, of the Sprjngville community. Burch and Fulton, Florida Forest Service
rangers, died June 20 fighting the Blue Ribbon fire in Hamilton County.


'


LEANNE TYOILake City Reporter
Danielle Burch (second from left) and Margaret Fulton (right) stand with plaques presented to
them by Charly Hornbrook (center), Florida Ride Captain of the Patriot Guard Riders, in honor
of their husbands on behalf of the riding organization, who performed the flag lines at both
firefighters' funerals and provided an escort to the cemetery. Also pictured are the Burches'
children, Jeremy (left), 9, and Jacob, 5.


Is liquor


coming to


Live Oak?


Should Suwannee
go wet, what might
the effect be here?

By ANTONIA ROBINSON
arobinson@lakecityreporter.com
LIVE OAK Make no mistake, should
Suwannee County vote to go wet come
Aug. 16, the effect will be felt in Columbia.
"I don't think there's any doubt it will
affect Columbia County in some way, par-
ticularly businesses located near the county
line that benefit from sales to Suwannee
County residents that come over here
either for
hard liquor
or beer on
Sundays"
Said Harvey
Campbell,
executive
director of
the Columbia
County
Tourist
Development
Council.
Some of
these estab-
lishments are
"busy from
METRO CREATIVE CONNECTION the time they
A vote on legalizing the sale open," he
of liquor and wine in neigh- look at the
boring Suwannee County is license plates
license plates
set for Aug. 16. and see a fair-
ly significant
number of Suwannee tags."
Should Suwannee voters approve the sale
of liquor and wine only beer and wine
coolers with 6.243 percent alcohol or less
by volume are now legal there business
may fall off at such establishments.
However, there's the bigger picture to
consider, said Campbell.
Meaning tourism and the burgeon-
ing regional ecu.3my that is beginning
to develop around it. Canpbell notes the
economies of area counties are interdepen-
dent to an ever-increasing degree.
"Whatever is good for Suwannee County
UQUOR continued on 3A



Police dog

found dead,

says LCPD
From staff reports
The Lake City Police Department is con-
ducting an administrative investigation into
the death of one of its K-9 officer dogs that
died at home Friday from heat exhaustion
while off-duty in his kennel, according to
reports.
K-9 officer 'Trooper," a 7-year-old
Malinois certified in drugs and narcotics
detection, was discovered dead by handler
officer Kevin Johns after being left for less
than two hours, reports said.
Reports said LCPD officers responded to
the home after Johns reported the incident
Trooper was off-duty at his residence,
contained in his kennel and did not show
any abnormal behavior when Johns left the
residence at about 11:30 a.m., according to
reports. Johns returned at about 1:10 p.m.
and discovered Trooper was deceased,
reports said.
The dog was transported to the veterinar-
ian for an autopsy, which revealed the cause
of death as heat exhaustion, reports said.

K-9 continued on 3A


CALL US:
(386) 752-1293
SUBSCRIBETO
THE REPORTER:


98 -
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Voice: 755-5445
Fax: 752-9400 WEATHER, 6A


Opinion ................ 4A
Business ................ IC
Obituaries .............. 5A
Advice & Comics......... 3D
Puzzles ................. 2B


TODAY IN
BUSINESS
r\e.. r- i n frit at
tf3rri l'- nI lk.et


COMING
TUESDAY
.;'.1 eek ,nd r- e .'.
Loca3l r:ouridup


-41zrm""l-lzlw"OWM*www'ykvmvqAPA414009m


.IIIIUHII
' 'I
--.r-~- -r..










LAKE CITY REPORTER SUNDAY REPORT SUNDAY, JULY 24, 2011


SH eAm 4- FLORID

Friday: Friday: Saturday: Saturday: Saturday: Saturday:
9-15-21-36 MB 19 6-14-17-24-25 Afternoon: 0-5-2 Afternoon: 4-4-6-2 unavailable unavailable
Evening: unavailable Evening: unavailable



PEOPLE IN THE NEWS



Troubled diva Amy Winehouse dead at 27


By JILL LAWLESS
Associated Press

LONDON Few art-
ists summed up their own
career in a single song a
single line as well as
Amy Winehouse.
'They tried to make me
go to rehab," she sang on
her world-conquering 2006
single, "Rehab." "I said 'No,
no no."'
Occasionally, she said
yes, but to no avail: repeat-
ed stints in hospitals and
clinics couldn't stop alco-
hol and drugs scuttling the
career of a singer whose
distinctive voice, rich mix
of influences and heart-
on-her sleeve sensibility
seemed to promise great
things.
In her short lifetime,
Winehouse too often made
headlines because of drug
and alcohol abuse, eat-
ing disorders, destructive
relationships and abortive
performances. But it's her
small but powerful body of
recorded music that will be
her legacy.
The singer was found
dead Saturday by ambu-
lance crews called to her.
home in north London's
Camden area, a youth-
culture mecca known for
its music scene, its pubs
- and the availability of
illegal drugs.
The London Ambulance
Service said Winehouse
had died before
ambulance crews arrived at
the house in leafy Camden
Square. The cause of
death was not immediately
known.
It was not a complete


ASSOCIATED PRESS
In this Jan. 20, 2010 file photo, British singer Amy Winehouse (center) atrives at Magistrates Court in Milton Keynes, England.
Winehouse, the beehived soul-jazz diva whose self-destructive habits overshadowed a distinctive musical talent, was found
dead Saturday in her London home, police said. She was 27.


surprise, but the news was
still a huge shock for mil-
lions around the world.
The size of Winehouse's
appeal was reflected in
the extraordinary range
of people paying tribute
as they heard the news,
from Demi Moore who
tweeted 'Truly sad news
..May her troubled soul
find peace" to chefJamie
Oliver, who wrote "such a


waste, raw talent" on the
social networking site.
Tony Bennett, who
recorded the pop stan-
dard "Body And Soul"
with Winehouse at Abbey
Road Studios in London
in March for an upcoming
duets album, called her "an
artist of immense propor-
ti6ns."
"She was an extraordi-
nary musician with a rare


intuition as a vocalist and
I am truly devastated that
her exceptional talent has
come to such an early end,"
he said.
Rolling Stone Ronnie
Wood said he was dedi-
cating Saturday's reunion
performance of his band
The Faces to Winehouse.
"It's a very sad loss of a
very good friend I spent
many great times with," he


said.
Winehouse was some-
thing rare in an increas-
ingly homogenized music
business an outsized
personality and an unclas-
sifiable talent.
She shot to fame with
the album "Back to Black,"
whose blend of jazz, soul,
rock and classic pop
was a global hit. It won
five Grammys and made


Winehouse with her
black beehive hairdo and
old-fashioned sailor tattoos
- one of music's most rec-
ognizable stars.
"I didn't go out looking
to be famous," Winehouse
.told the Associated Press
when the album was
released. "I'm just a musi-
cian."
But in the end, the music
was overshadowed by
fame, and by Winehouse's
demons. Tabloids lapped
up the erratic stage appear-
ances, drunkenfights, stints
in hospital and rehab clin-
ics. Performances became
shambling, stumbling train
wrecks, watched around
the world on the Internet.
Last month, Winehouse
canceled her European
comeback tour after
she swayed and slurred
her way through bare-
ly recognizable songs
in her first show in the
Serbian capital of Belgrade.
Booed and jeered off
stage, she flew home and
her management said she
would take time off to
recover.
Fans who had kept the
faith waited in vain for a fol-
lowup to "Back to Black.";
Born in 1983 to taxi driv-
er Mitch Winehouse and
his pharmacist wife Janis,
Winehouse grew up in the
north London suburbs,
and was set on a show-
biz career from an early
age. When she was 10,
she and a friend formed a
rap group, Sweet 'n' Sour
- Winehouse was Sour
- that she later described
as "the little white Jewish
Salt 'n' Pepa."


AROUND FLORIDA


Scott: Florida would benefit from free-trade


TALLAHASSEE Gov. Rick Scott
says Florida would benefit more than
any other state from proposed free-
trade agreements with Panama and
Colombia.
The Republican governor said
Friday in his weekly radio address
that Florida stands to gain 6,400
jobs and $523 million in additional
exports.
Scott led a Florida trade mission to
Panama in March.
Approval of trade pacts with
Panama, Colombia and South Korea
have been stalled in Congress
because of concerns over U.S. job
losses.
A dozen Senate Republicans on
Friday said they have cleared the
way for passage of legislation aiding
workers displaced by foreign com-
petition to win approval of the trade
deals.
Their support, though, may be too
late to pass the agreements before
Congress leaves of its summer
recess on Aug. 6.

Off-duty NYPD detective shot in
Miami Beach

MIAMI BEACH -An off-duty New
York City police detective vacationing
in Miami Beach was shot at his hotel
Saturday, authorities said.
The incident happened at about 7.
a.m. Saturday. The detective, who has
not been identified, was involved in
an altercation in an outdoor corridor
area at the loft-style hotel where he
was staying, Miami Beach Police Det
Vivian Hernandez said. He was shot
and transported to Jackson Memorial
Hospital's trauma unit.
Hernandez said the detective exit-
ed surgery Saturday afternoon. His
exact condition was unknown.
Investigators had closed off two
blocks along Miami Beach's busy
Collins Avenue throughout the day
Saturday as they continued process-
ing the crime scene. Hernandez said
no arrests had been made, and the
exact nature of the confrontation
- and what triggered it were
unknown.
"It appears it is not work-related in


ASSOCIATED PRESS
In this March 28 file photo, Florida Gov. Rick Scott speaks at a news conference
in Tallahassee


any way," Hernandez said.
The incident happened at 1233
Lofts, which has hotel rooms and
longer-term rentals. There is a
gate leading into the open area with
palm trees where the detective was
shot.
"At this time I don't know what led
up to the incident," Hernandez said.
Guests and employees in La Flora
Hotel reported hearing multiple, con-
secutive gunshots that sounded as
though they had been fired from
the same weapon, the Miami Herald
reported.

2 paragliders collide

HUTCHINSON ISLAND -
Authorities say two paragliders col-
lided at a beach on Hutchinson Island
near Port St Lucie.
A spokesman for the Martin County
Fire Rescue says one of the paraglid-
ers fell about 50 to 60 feet and sus-
tained serious injuries. He was taken
to the Lawnwood Regional Medical
Center & Heart Institute. A second
paraglider sustained minor injuries


and was treated at the scene.
It was unclear what caused the
paragliders to collide.
Further details were not immedi-
ately available.

3 injured in small plane crash

PALM BAY Three people have
been injured after the small plane
they were flying in crashed in central
Florida.
City of Palm Bay officials say res-
cuers were called to the scene of
the crash at about 12:30 p.m. on
Saturday.
Three people were onboard the
plane. One woman was able to walk
from the crash and was assisted by
witnesses. Responding officers res-
cued a second womai from the air-
craft and emergency medical workers
cut a man who was piloting out of the
aircraft.
The two women were described as
being in stable condition. The man
was seriously injured.
All three were transported by
ambulance to an area hospital.


* Political cartoonist Pat
Oliphant is 76
* Actor Robert Hays is 64
* Actor Michael Richards is
62
* Actress Lynda Carter is 60
* Movie director Gus Van
.Sant is 59
* Country singer Pam Tillis


Daily Scripture


is 54
* Actress-singer Kristin Che-
noweth is 43
* Actress-singer Jennifer
Lopez is 42
* Basketball player-turned-
actor Rick Fox is 42
* Actress Rose Byrne is 32
* Actress Anna Paquin is 29


"Therefore, my dear brothers,
stand firm. Let nothing move
you.Always give yourselves
fully to the work of the Lord,
because you know that your
labor in the Lord is not in vain."

I Corinthians 15:58


Lake City Reporter


HOW TO REACH US
Main number ........(386) 752-1293
Fax number ..............752-9400
Circulation ...............755-5445
Online... www.lakecityreporter.com
The Lake City Reporter, an affiliate of
Community Newspapers Inc., is pub-
lished Tuesday through Sunday at 180
E. Duval St., Lake City, Fla. 32055.
Periodical postage paid at Lake City, Fla.
Member Audit Bureau of Circulation and
The Associated Press.
All material herein is property of the Lake
City Reporter. Reproduction in whole or
in part is forbidden without the permis-
sion of the publisher. U.S. Postal Service
No. 310-880.
POSTMASTER: Send address changes
to Lake Gity Reporter, P.O. Box 1709,
Lake City, Fla. 32056.
Publisher Todd Wilson .... .754-0418
(twilson@lakecityreporter.com)
NEWS
Editor Robert Bridges .....754-0428
(rbridges@lakecityreporter.com)
ADVERTISING
Director Ashley Butcher ...754-0417
(abutcher@lakecityreporter.com)
CLASSIFIED
To place a classified ad, call 755-5440


BUSINESS
Controller Sue Brannon... .754-0419
(sbrannon@lakecityreporter.com)
CIRCULATION
Home delivery of the Lake City Reporter
should be completed by 6:30 a.m.
Tuesday through Saturday, and by 7:30
a.m. on Sunday.
Please call 386-755-5445 to report any
problems with your delivery service.
In Columbia County, customers should
call before 10:30 a.m. to report a ser-
vice error for same day re-delivery. After
10:30 a.m., next day re-delivery or ser-
vice related credits will be issued.
In all other counties where home delivery
is available, next day re-delivery or ser-
vice related credits will be issued.
Circulation ..............755-5445
(circulation@lakecityreporter.com)
Home delivery rates
(Tuesday through Sunday)
12 Weeks. .. .............. $26.32
24 Weeks ................. $48.79
52 Weeks ................. $83.46
Rates indude 7% sales lax
Mall rates
12 Weeks ................ $41.40
24 Weeks ................... $82.80
52 Weeks. ... ............. $179.40


CORRECTION

The Lake City Reporter corrects errors of fact in news
items. If you have a concern, question or suggestion,
please call the executive editor. Corrections and clarifica-
tions will run in this space. And thanks for reading.


Celebrity Birthdays


Page Editor: Brandon Finley, 754-0420










LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL SUNDAY, JULY 24, 2011


School board looks to lower millage rate


By LEANNE TYO
Ityo@lakecityreporter.com
The Columbia County
School Board is set to adopt
a decreased tentative village
rate for the current fiscal
year, which runs July 1 to
June 30, at its regular meet-
ing Tuesday.
'The total millage for
schools is going down, so
we're happy about that
for the public," said Mike
Millikin, superintendent of
schools.
Total village for the previ-
ous fiscal year was at 7.912
mills, but the maximum
tentative total rate for this
fiscal year is dropping to
7.615 mills, pending board
approval.
The Required Local Effort
millage and the board's
Discretionary millage make
up the total millage rate.
Tentative RLE millage, of
which the state requires a
certain portion to be levied,
is set to be adopted at 5.35
mills, while last fiscal year it
was 5.414 mills.
On top of the RLE is
the tentative Prior Period
Funding Adjustment Millage


rate to be set at .017 mills,
an additional levy this year,
said Mary Loughran, district
finance director.
That millage is being
levied this year as required
by the Florida Department
of Education, she said, since
DOE found, after reviewing
the districts revenues, that
the tax base shifted and the
district didn't collect as much
as it should have over a
three-year period.
Loughran said even with
the additional PPFAM rate,
the RLE millage has still
decreased.
"Even with the Prior
Period Funding Adjustment,
we're still less than last year's
RLE," she said.
RLE is decreasing this
fiscal year because the state
adjusts the rate to reflect the
funding that they estimate
a district can operate on,
Loughran said.
'They adjust that rate
to reflect the total funding
stream that they project a
school district to run on," she
said.
That projection is based
on Florida Education Finance
Program's calculations, which


includes the districts student
base being lower, Loughran
said.
The other side of the
total millage is the board's
Discretionary mileage, which
was at 2.498 mills last fiscal
year, but is set to be adopted
at a tentative 2.248 mills this
fiscal year. Discretionary
village includes the tentative
Basic Discretionary miflage,
which will be set at.748 mills
pending board approval, and
tentative Local Capital Outlay
Improvement millage set to be
adopted at 1.5 mills.
The difference between last
year's Discretionary and this
year's tentative rate is .25 mills.
The board has levied that .25
Skills for the past two fiscal
years, Loughran said, but if it
wanted to this year, by law the
25 would've had to go before
the voters.
"After those two years,
the Legislature said that you
can levy it but you have to
go before the voters," she
said, "and so we did not elect
to put it on the ballot for last
November."
Money generated from all
village rates besides Capital
Outlay goes to the district's


general operating fund. Capital
Outlay village is put toward
various projects and purchas-
es, Loughran said, like land,
school buses, district-wide
maintenance and debt service
payments.
At its Tuesday meeting, the
board will also adopt its tenta-
tive budget
The total budget is more
than $80,000,000 but the new
tentative operating budget for
this fiscal year is at about $61.5
million, Millikin said, an operat-
ing budget deficit of about $8
million.
Loughran said the dis-
trict is down that $8 million
because $3 million in federal
stimulus funding ended this
fiscal year and the other $5
million is due to declining
enrollment and less money
from the state.
"Its going to be very
hard for us to.provide the
same level of services that
we have in the past because
there's been a significant
reduction in funds, quite
honestly from the state over
several years that we've
absorbed," Millikin said.
'There's a drastic cut from
last year to this year, but


we're going to do what we
always do, which is serve
children first and provide
the best education pos-
sible."
Millikin also noted that
the bulk of the district's
state funding is based on
Full Time Equivalency, the
number of students who
show up at school when
the school year begins. The
final budget will be adopted
when FTE dollars are
known, he said.
The final millage rates and
the final budget will be set by
the board Sept 13.
The board wil vote on the
tentative budget and milage
rates at 7 pm Tuesday afler a
public hearing is held. They will
meet at the Columbia County'


School Board Administrative
ComplcAuditorium, 372W
DuvalStreet



MAGNOLIA

Continued From Page 1A

Sam Leneave, Florida
Forest Service Suwannee
Forestry Center manager,,
said Florida Forest Service
representatives attended
the event for another
opportunity to pay tribute
to Brett.Fulton and Josh
Burch and their work.
"Itfs an opportunity for,
us to honor the folks who
have served so well doing.
the jobs that they do," he
said.


K-9: Succumbs to heat

Continued From Page 1A

Trooper served as an LCPD,K-9 Officer since January
2010 and was certified in drugs and narcotics detection
in October 2010, according to reports. Since his certifica-
tion, he had made numerous cases, reports said.
Reports said LCPD is conducting an administrative
Investigation on the incident based on Department poli-
cies and procedures.


LIQUOR: Suwannee voters will decide Aug. 16

Continued From Page 1A


is good for the Suwannee
River Valley," Campbell
said. "And for the over-
all economic health of
Suwannee County, it prob-
ably is not in their interest
to tie one hand behind
their back, which the dry
issue does."
Organizers of the wet
movement in Suwannee
agree.
"Growth in Suwannee
County will no doubt
benefit Columbia
County because of the
increase in tourism,"
Robin White, vice-chair
,of SuwanneeYes!,. said.
by email. 'This results
m more visitors to their
hotels, restaurants and
retail businesses. They
should not fear competi-
tion from Suwannee. We
have a great relation-
ship with businesses in
Columbia County and we
believe this initiative will
expand opportunities for
tourism"to thrive through-
out this region. With
our remarkable natural
resources and nature-
based outdoor recreational
activities, our region can,
working together become
a world class destination."
Mostly, though, the
effects of going wet will
be felt in Suwannee, White
said.
The group anticipates
both short- and long-term
benefits should the refer-
endum pass, White said.
"When the economy
begins to improve, we
expect to see a lot more
business development
relative to major chain res-
taurants and the creation
of new jobs with those
new businesses," she
said. "It will likely have
a domino effect in that
additional hotels and retail
stores will open up as well.
Expanding tourism oppor-
tunities by increasing the
service and retail sector
Af our local economy will
,o a long way toward sow-
ag the seeds for future
growth and development
1 Suwannee County."
The opposition group,
iwannee Dry, isn't buy-
g it.
First, the economy isn't
ing to spring to life
ernight with the legal-
tion of liquor, said local
;tor Brad Bailey, the
,up's chairman.
besides, Suwannee
Ready experiencing
wth with new compa-
; coming in, such as a
by's, that don't need
)r, he said.
Ve like growth," Bailey
"We just want it to be
ight kind."
ming wet could also
e new problems for
'ea, he said.
tould we invite more


problems with the sale of
hard liquor and increase
crime, domestic violence
and underage drinking?"
he asked. "Should we see
an increase in negative
areas we do not need?
Economically it's not going
to be an asset."
Bailey has also made
religious arguments
against legalized liquor.
Suwannee resident Eric
Musgrove, an expert on
the area's history, agrees
the economic impact of
going wet won't be as
immediate or pronounced
as some would hope.
Should it happen, "we'll
get a couple more restau-
rants, but it's not going to
be an explosion," he said.
In any case, Lake City
would continue to have an
advantage over Suwannee
because of the 1-75 corri-
dor, Musgrove said.
He, too, feared social
problems as a result of
going wet, noting that
underage drinking in
Suwannee is by some mea-
sures among the highest
in the state. According


to figures in the 2010
Florida Youth Substance
Abuse'Survey, published
by the state Department
of Children and Families,
Suwannee ranked eighth
among Florida' counties
in lifetime alcohol use by
children ages 10-17.
The numbers "are
already high enough,"
Musgrove said. "Why do
you want to make it easier
to get hold of alcohol?"
Musgrove has also
offered religious arguments
against going wet in locally-
published commentary.
SuwanneeYes! launched a
petition drive in March to get
the issue on the ballot The
Suwannee County Supervisor
of Elections office received
6,459 validated petitions for
its final count The group
needed 6,265, or 25 percent
of Suwannee's registered
voters.
The ballot will ask first
whether voters are in
favor of legalizing liquor
and wine sales generally..
If they say yes, they will
be asked whether sales
should be package only,


or if restaurants should
be allowed to serve liquor
and wine as well. Sunday
alcohol sales are under
control of the county com-
mission and would still be
prohibited if the referen-
dum passes.
"Allowing the sale by
package only will only
result in five new pack-
age licenses," White
said. "Allowing sales by
package and drink will
open opportunities for
existing businesses and
restaurants as well as the
five package licenses that
could go to Publix, Winn
Dixie or a new package
store."
Six attempts have been
made in recent decades to
overturn Suwannee's dry
status. Referenda failed in
1967, 1973, 1995 and 2000.
In. 1981 and 1982, peti-
tion drives were launched
but failed to gain enough
signatures to get the mea-
sure on the ballot.
Absentee voting is now
underway, according to
the Suwannee Supervisor
of Elections office.


f I



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Page Editor: Robert Bridges, 754-0428













OPINION


Sunday, July 24, 201 I


www.lakecityreporter.com


AN
OPINION


Humility


Sbut little


else in


the U.K.

F or many, .the most
fitting symbol
from Tuesday's
Parliamentary hear-
ings on Britain's jour-
nalism sandal was News Corp.
leader Rupert Murdoch getting
hit with a pie.
I ff so, that's regrettable. Because
a-more appropriate metaphor is
that of a layer cake, which is what
Britain's stacked system of media,
government and law enforcement
ldoks like.
The too-cozy relationships
between Fleet Street, Parliament,
No. 10 Downing Street and
Scotland Yard that were revealed
at the hearing are a cautionary
tale for Americans on the dan-
gers of irresponsible journalism
and excessive partisanship.
While U.S. news media outlets
are far from perfect, the journalism
niodel this country's news orga-
nizations adhere to would reject
the tabloid tactics used by many
U.K papers. And while critics of
our system'regard the construct
of objectivity as dated, it too is far
superior to shoddy journalism in
which ideological bias pervades
news coverage.
As for Murdoch, he seemed
to want to have it both ways
Tuesday. Defiantly denying he
was considering stepping down,
he testified that he was "the best
person to clean this up."
- If thafts true, he should have
been the best person toreent
the alleged phone hacking and
bribery in the first place. And
he should have been the best
person to stop the alleged abuses
when they were first uncovered
years ago.
Murdoch did neither.
lJltimately, as News Corp.'s leader,
he's responsible for the perverse
culture that infected his nqws oper-
ations. But so far he's only been
illing to blame underlings.
'The people of England, the
Lnited States and other countries
iriwhich hehas a mediainterest
deserve a full and completely
transparent accounting of the
a uses that occurred on his watch,
a well as guarantees that they
pn't happen again.

d Minneapolis Star Tribune

'Lake City Reporter
Serving Columbia County
S Since 1874
hThe Lake.City Reporter is pub-
lished with pride for residents of
columbia and surrounding counties by
Community Newspapers Inc.
We believe strong newspapers build
strong communities -"Newspapers
pet things done!'
SOur primary goal is to
publish distinguished and profitable
ommunity-oriented newspapers.
i This mission will be accomplished
trough the teamwork of professionals
dedicated to truth, integrity and hard
tork.
Todd Wilson, publisher
Robert Bridges, editor
Sue .Brannon, controller
Dink NeSmith, president
Tom Wood, chairman

LETTERS
POLICY
,'Letters to the Editor should be
typed or neatly written and double
spaced. Letters should not exceed
400 words and will be edited for
leIgth and libel. Letters must be
signed and include the writer's name,
address and telephone number for
verification. Writers can have two
letters per month published. Letters
and guest columns are the opinion of
the writers and not necessarily that of
the Lake City Reporter.
BY MAIL: Letters, P.O. Box 1709,
Lake City, FL 32056; or drop off at
180 E. Duval St. downtown.
BY FAX: (386) 752-9400.
BY E-MAIL:


news@lakecityreporter.com


West's gentlemanly behavior


loridaCongresswoman
ebbie Wasserman
Schultz, who is also
Democratic National
Committee chair, sug-
gested that the nasty email she
got from her state's Republican
counterpart Allen West, respond-
ing to her attack on him in the
House of Representatives, result-
ed from him being "under pres-
sure."
Of course, Allen West is
under pressure.
As is every freedom loving
American, as we watch our
great country sink:
In two and a half years; a left
wing Democrat president along
with a left wing Democrat con-
gress, controlled by the likes of
Rep. Wasserinan Schultz, have
changed thiscountry so funda-
mentally it is not clear at all-to
what extent we can recover.
In just two and half years,
they've increased federal
spending a trillion dollars. It
took George W. Bush, the larg-
est spender since President
Johnson, eight years to accom-
plish this.
. The national.debt stood at
$10.6 trillion when Barack
Obama became president Now,
two and a half years later, it's
at $14.3 trillion a 40-percent
increase.
SObamacare has nationalized
one sixth of the economy. The
Dodd-Frank financial services
.law brings unprecedented gov-
ernment control over our bank-
ing and financial services sector.
The bailout of General
Motors changed the American
auto industry forever, opening
the door to corporations becom-
ing a subsidiary of the U.S. gov-
ernment
Now in that spirit the Obama
administration is trying to pre-
vent Boeing from- relocating


Star Parker
parker@urbancure.org
plane production from the state
of Washington, where unions
are crippling its business, to
South Carolina, a right to work
state.
The Congressional Budget
Office now projects that debt
will equal 100 percent of our
GDP in 10 years.
Even if Republicans succeed
in extracting several trillion dol-
lars in spending cuts from our
president in exchange for rais-
ing the debt limit, this barely
dents the massive new debt
build-up.
Republicans, like Allen West,
who were elected in the 2010
electoral backlash, are trying
to do something to save our
future. One is the Cut, Cap, and
Balance bill that the House just
passed, which was the focus of
Wasserman Schultz's attack on
West.
Wasserman Schultz got on.
West for supporting this bill,
calling this a platform for cut-
ting Medicare for the seniors in
his district
Let's get things straight.
The threat to seniors is
Obamacare.
It cuts $500 billion out of
Medicare to pay for its new
socialized medicine regime.
Here's the Kaiser Family
Foundation and the Washington
Post on this:
"Medicare's chief actuary,
Rick Foster; estimated that the
law (Obamacare) could reduce
projected Medicare spending by


more than $575 billion over 10
years."
And contrary to the grand lie
under which Obamacare was
sold, that it will save money and
cut the deficit, CBO now proj-
ects that health care spending
under this regime will double
by 2035.
Every senior in the nation
should be trembling about what
Wasserman Schultz has helped
make law of this land.
What should we expect? 'We
have turned.our lives, health,
and pocketbooks over to the
same humble geniuses who told
us that $850 billion in stimulus
spending would create 4 million
jobs and prevent unemployment
from going over 8 percent
Today 1.5 million less
Americans are working than
when Barack Obama became
president and unemployment
stands at 9.2 percent
West explained the vitriol of
the left toward him, one of two
black Republicans in the House,
as stemming from his "being
the guy that got off their 21st
century plantation."
It's more. They are also
obsessed with getting the
whole nation on it. And
Wasserman Schultz and her
left wing friends in govern-
ment are succeeding.
Of course Allen West feels
pressure. Every American who
cares about their job, their
future, and their children's
-future is stressed out
Given the damage inflicted
by Wasserman Schultz and
her party to our nation, Allen
West has been quite the
gentleman.
Star Parker is president of
CURE, Coalition
on Urban Renewal and Education
(www.urbancure.org) and author of
three books.


Europe agrees on Greek rescue plan


The Greek economic
crisis was 18 months
in coming, and the
pace to disaster only
accelerated after an
initial $160 billion bailout proved
inadequate.
With Greece only days away
from economic collapse, one
that would probably have taken
the government with it, the 16
other nations of the eurozone led
by Germany and France proved
that they could act, and act big,
when the situation demanded.
After the necessary prelimi-
nary squabbling, the eurozone
nations agreed to $157 billion in
new loans to Greece, which is
staggering under a $400 billion
debt equivalent to 150 percent
of the nation's gross domestic
product
A separate $70 billion fund will
allow private investors to swap
their current bonds for 30-year,
3.5-percent bonds; the bondhold-
ers have little choice but to make
the swap if they want any hope
of ever seeing their money. This
eases the Greek government's
cash outflow, but technically


Dale McFeatters
mcfeottersd@shns.com
amounts to "selective default"
because some creditors will be
treated better than others.
In turn, the Greek govern-
ment is expected to keep up the
austerity measures that have led
to general strikes, riots and an
unemployment rate of over 16
percent
One purpose of the eurozone's
dramatic last-minute rescue
package was to erect a financial
"firewall" to stop a spreading
contagion that threatened other
countries, notably Spain and
Italy.
The other weak sisters,
Ireland and Portugal, are
already under a European
Union-International Monetary
Fund rescue plan and will


be offered a deal similar to
Greece's if their finances reach
that point And leaders of the
eurozone made it clear they were
ready to step in to prop up other
tottering governments and banks,
but the hope was that the bailout
for Greece would be clearly "an
exceptional and unique solution."
There is no guarantee this
second Greek bailout will work.
If it doesn't there is a pool of res-
cue money called the European
Financial Stability Facility with
$600 billion in ready funds.
A single currency was one of
the great creations of the EU,
but the crisis precipitated by the
recklessness of a member nation
suggests that the EU may have to
go beyond a common currency to
common fiscal policy and uniform
financial institutions.
There's a lesson in this
for the United States: If the
Europeans can reach agreement
on Greece's debt, surely we can
reach agreement on our own.

* Dale McF6atters is editorial
writer for Scripps Howard News
Service.


Todd Wilson
twilson@lakecityreportercom


As for

murals,

writing's

on the

wall

Two years ago, Lake
City was poised
to have its second
mural painted in the;;
downtown area, but
the artist disappeared, the spon-,
soring group disbanded and the
wall art that had been planned tor,
commemorate Lake City's ses-;
quicentennial never got beyond[;
the planning stages.
On the heels of the 2008
Ichetucknee mural project suc-
cess on the north face of the
Kuykendall building downtown,
the now-disbanded Downtown
Action Corporation carried the ,
torch to make the second piece ofi
artwork a reality in the downtown.
area. The location was the north i;
face of City Hall and the DAC was
spearheading the project.
The total estimated price of
the City Hall mural was around
$35,000. The Ichetucknee mural,
cost $20,000 with Lake City
resident James Mongtomery
stroking a check for $18,000 to ;
underwrite the project DAC
paid the rest
The plan to fund the City Hall
.muralwas to seek donations of
all amounts from the private sec-
tor to cover the costs, plus use
proceeds from the city's 150th
anniversary celebration. Keith
Goodson, the artist who created&
and painted the Ichetucknee
mural scene, was commissioned..
also to paint Lake City's second t;
work of art
What killed the project accord-
ing to reports, was a collection of
unfortunate occurrences.
Goodson relocated then dis-
appeared. The DAC disbanded !
and rolled into the Chamber of
Commerce, and the Columbia (
County economy continued to
slide.,
Had the mural taken shape,
the theme was the connection I
roads have made throughout
Lake City's history. A meander-
ing path would have connected
several time periods in Lake
City history. A special one-way
screen application was planned t
over the windows of the build-
ing and prominent people from
throughout local history would
be painted as if appearing in the,
windows.
The plan was in place and
Goodson was paid $500 to work
up a rendition, which is a small
scale painting of the mural. The
agreement called for another $500
to be paid to Goodson when the
rendition was finalized.
"He took the money and never
got back to us," said Harvey
Campbell, who coordinated the
project as part of the DAC. "We
sent two registered letters to his
address and they were returned. I
was shocked he did this."
Goodson, an accomplished
muralist, lived in Pensacola
in 2008. He was given minor
celebrity status and welcomed
by locals during the months
he spent in Lake City painting.
His last known whereabouts was
in the Winter Haven area. He
still has his art Web site, but
attempts to contact him, via
email and phone, have been
unsuccessful, Campbell said.
When the DAC disbanded,
the mural concept went with it
Campbell said future discussions
about a mural, if any, would need
to restart from the beginning,


but it doesn't seem realistic in the
near future.

N Todd Wilson is publisher of the
Lake City Reporter.


4Ak
r(,











Page EdItor: Robert Bridges, 754-0428LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL SUNDAY, JULY 24, 2011


Move afoot to

memorialize

Richardson High


By TONY BRITT
tbritt@lakecityreporter. corn
Richardson High
School was a cultural
icon for the local black
community during the
age of segregation,
when blacks and whites
attended different
schools.
In the southern por-
tion of the country,
schools were built for
blacks and whites based
on the "separate but
equal" doctrine of the
day.
During that time
Richardson High School
became a symbol of
pride, education and
social importance in the
local black community.
Years ago many of the
Richardson High School
buildings were demol-
ished, but some former
students have started a
movement to memorial-
ize the school and have
launched a fundraiser
to reach their goals.
The move to establish
the "Richardson Walk"
is being led by the
Richardson High School
Class of 1971.
Lucious George, a
former Richardson High
School student, said
everyone that attended
school there can have
their name engraved
in a brick that will be
laid on the "Richardson
Walk" as part of the
fundraiser.
George said the
bricks will be a symbol
to memorialize the for-
mer students time at
the school.
The engraved bricks
are $55 each.
A "Richardson Walk"
sign was erected
Thursday and will be
featured during the


Sr Richardson
'Round-up,
a school
reunion
event
where
former
students,
TONY BRrrteach-
Lake City Reporter ers, Staff
Lynda members,
Caldwell, a friends and
Richardson families
High School gather to
Class of 1971 remiisce
alumna, with time at their
two of the time at the
two of the school. A
commemora- Powerpoint
tive bricks presenta-
being sold tion will
as a fund- has been
raiser for the scheduled
county's for- during
mer black high the school
school. reunion to
give former
students
additional information
about the fundraiser
and its importance.
Phase 1 of the proj-
ect was erecting the
"Richardson Walk"
sign and organizers
need $3,000 before
they can begin Phase 2
of the project pour-
ing the concrete under
the sign to place the
commemorative bricks.
When approximately
500 bricks are pur-
chased, organizers will
begin laying the com-
memorative bricks near
the old school site.
"What we need is
support, financially and
morally," George said.

For additional info,
call:
Lucious George at
623-2643;
Lynda Caldwell at
867-6600; or
Mario Coppock at
.754-7095.


COURTESY PHOTO
Columbia County Commissioner Ron Williams (on ladder), a former Richardson High School student, and Lucious George,
make adjustments to the "Richardson Walk of Fame" sign which was recently erected at the former school site.



DISCOUNTS AT THIS STORE ONLY

SL2AKE CITY

Se rs2724 W. US Highway 90
06e


Student Orientation

set for Thurs. at FGC


From staff reports
Students beginning at
Florida Gateway College
this fall will have a chance
to meet other students,
introduce themselves to
their professors and get
a preview of what it's
like to be an FGC stu-
dent Thursday.
The college will be
hosting its fall New
Student Orientation
from 9 a.m. to 11 a.m.
at the Levy Performing
Arts Center on campus.
Recently-admitted
and re-admitted stu-
dents to the college
are encouraged to
attend the orienta-
tion, where they can
meet faculty and staff,
mingle with other


students, learn about
being a student at
FGC, take a campus
tour and more.
Information about
campus resources will
be provided, as well as
information significant
to a student's success at
the college.
Students attend-
ing the orientation
for the first time are
encouraged to bring
parents, guardians or
others who have sup-
ported their educational
endeavors.
To RSVP for the event,
call the FGC Recruiter's
office at (386) 754-4246.
FGC's fall semester
application deadline is Aug.
16. Call (386) 754-4396.


OBITUARIES


Eldon R. "Bobby" Richardson
Mr. Eldon R. "Bobby" Richard-
son, 80, of Lake City, passed
away peacefully on Friday July
22, 2011 at his home following
an extended illness. A native of
Jacksonville, Florida, he had
been a resident of Lake City
since 1967. Mr. Richardson was
retired from the United States
Army and then went on to have
a career as a plumber, work for
Orange State Pipe and Supply
and finally retire from working
as a security guard with Wells-
Fargo. Mr. Richardson was an
avid fisherman and enjoyed
listening to old country music.
He was of the Baptist faith.
Mr. Richardson is survived by
his wife, Lula Mae Richardson;
sons, Duane Richardson (Zena)
of Lake City and David Rich-
ardson of Key West, Florida;
daughters, Debra Law; Denise
Dodson (Don) and Donna
Richardson all of Lake City;
step-sons, Freddie Whitcomb
(Darla) of Lake City and Rod-
ney Stalvey (Sarah) ofMacon,
Georgia. Numerous grandchil-
dren and great grandchildren


also survive.
Funeral services for Mr.
Richardson will be conducted
at 9:00 A.M. on Wednesday,
July 27, 2011 in the.Corinth
Cemetery with Rev. Randy
.Ogbum officiating. Interment
will immediately follow. The
family will receive friends from
5:00-7:00 Tuesday evening in
the chapel of the Dees-Parrish
Family Funeral Home. In lieu
of flowers the family requests
that memorial donations be
made to the Haven Hospice of
the Suwannee Valley, 6037 US
Highway 90 West, Lake City, Fl
32055. Arrangements are under
the direction of the DEES-PAR-
RISH FAMILY FUNERAL
HOME, 458 South Marion Ave.,
Lake City, FL 32025. (386)752-
1234 please sign our online
family guestbook at parrishfami-
lyfuneralhome.com


Obituaries are paid advertise-
ments. For details, call the Lake
City Reporter's classified depart-
ment at 752-1293.


STORE FIXTURES FOR SALE! I
ALL SALES FINAL, NO REFUNDS OR EXCHANGES. OPEN DAILY REGULAR HOURS. WE ACCEPT VISA, MASTERCARD, DISCOVER, AMERICAN
EXPRESS AND SEARS CARD. WE ACCEPT SEARS GIFT CARDS. DISCOUNTS DO NOT APPLY TO PREPAID GIFT CARDS. INVENTORY IS LIMITED
TO STOCK ON HAND. THIS STORE IS NOT PARTICIPATING IN CURRENT SEARS CIRCULARS. THIS EVENT EXCLUDES ELECTROLUX.


~ORe


LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL SUNDAY, JULY 24, 2011


Page Editor: Robert Bridges, 754-0428












LAKE CITY REPORTER WEATHER SUNDAY, JULY 24, 2011


Page Editor: Robert Bridges, 754-0428t


THE WEATHER




ISOLATED ISOLATED CHANCE ,_' CHANCEi CHANCE
STORMS TORS c TORMS STORMS TORMS1 STORMS



H198M 74 HI98 194 L0 195L0 i 94 L0

r.m'e.e w, ,. r -N w Uonc.taiU1.f............ ......*~


Vidosta
97;74
-L ,0:9-


SJacksonville


City Monday
Cape Canaveral 911 7; p ,


Tallahassee Lake City '7 Daytona Beach
96 74 Ft. Lauderdale
Gainesville Daytona Beach Fort Myers
Panama City 9'7 i ; Galnesville
89'76 Ocala Jacksonville
96 74 0
96 7 ey West
Olando Cape Canaveral Key West
95 76 90 76 Lake City
Miami
Tampa Naples
9.3 79 West Palm Beach Ocala
'91.80u Orlando
FL Lauderdale Panama City
Ft Myers 92 83 0 Pensacola
94 76 Naples Tallahassee
91, 79 Miami Tampa
1 8I1 Valdosta


TEMPERATURES
High Saturday
Low Saturday
Normal high
Normal low
Record high
Record low


PRECIPITATION
Saturday
Month total
Year total
Normal month-to-date
Normal year-to-date


93
72
91
71
100 in 1893
62 in 1965


0.00"
2.93"
22.82"
4.54"
28.57"


Key West
91 83


W. Palm Beach


9'3 ;'7

96 76 pD:
91 .*2 pc
94 75. pL
92 81 1
9,3 ,;7

94 77 p5:
C4 77 1
92 77 p,
96 ;6 pI:
91 8'0 pi"
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SUN
Sunrise today -6:44 a.m.
Sunset today 8:29 p.m. ):i, .1.
Sunrise tom. 6:45 a.m. EXIMIE ,, ,
Sunset tom. 8:29 p.m. 10liniutestolnb
Today's '
MOON ultra-violet. -, ';
Moonrise today 1:13 a.m. radiation risk ,
Mooniset today 3:14 p.m. for the area on
Moonsettoday 3:14 p,m. asle fr O.
Moonrise tom. 1:54 a.m. a scae fm
Moonset tom. 4:10 p.m. .

1 weathercom

July Aug. Aug. Aug. Jg L. Forecasts, data and
30 6 13 21 graphics 2011 Weather
New First Full Last l j Central. LP. Madison. WIs.


NATIONAL FORECAST: Hot and humid conditions will be widespread once again over much o
Sthe Mid-Atlantic, the Southeast, and the central and southern Plains today. In the West, high
pressure will leave most locations dry, but with hot temperatures. A low pressure system will
trigger thunderstorms from the Northeast and the Great Lakes to the central Plains.


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YESTERDAY'S NATIONAL EXTREMES


Saturday Today
HI/Lo/Pcp. HI/Lo/W CITY


Albany NY 93/71/.09
Albuquerque 88/71/0
Anchorage 65/55/0
Atlanta 90/74/0
Baltimore 99/78/,06
Billings 77/58/0
Birmingham 89/76/0
Bismarck 77/62/.38
Bolse 81/55/0
Boston 91/72/.11
Buffalo 86/77/0
Charleston SC 96/76/0
Charleston WV 88/71/.33
Charlotte 97/74/0
Cheyenne 83/57/0
Chicago 80/70/4.58
Cincinnati 90/73/.19
Cleveland 87/72/.35
Columbia SC 100/79/0
Dallas 98/81/0
Daytona Beach 91/71/0
Denver 91/64/0


84/61/pc
91/71/t
62/51/r
92/75/pc
96/75/t
92/60/s
92/74/t
82/61/s
97/60/s
84/64/s
83/69/pc
96/80/s
92/73/t
98/74/t
84/60/pc
90/68/t
91/76/t
85/72/t
99/77/s
101/81/t
92/75/pc
90/64/t


High: 106', Franklin, Va. Low: 26, Stanley, Idaho


Des Molnes
Detroit
E Paso
Fairbanks
Greensboro
Hartford
Honolulu
Houston
Indianapolls
Jackson MS
Jacksonville
Kansas City
Las Vegas
Uttle Rock
Los Angeles
Memphis
Miami
Minneapolis
Mobile
New Orleans
New York
Oklahoma Cty


Saturday Today
HI/Lo/Pcp. HI/Lo/W
89/75/.15 85/65/t
89/73/.01 90/71/t
89'73.'0 ,93176/7t
61, 5 'I, 73 52, 1
96/75/0 96/76/t
92/72/.01 88/62/pc
80/75/0 89/73/s
97/77/0 98/78/t
95/79/0 94/75/t
91/75/.01 93/76/t
94/73/0 97/75/pc
98/78/0 94/74/t
98/81/0 102/84/pc
97/77/0 96/76/t
71/63/0 74/64/pc
93/76/0 .95/78/t
92/79/0 91/81/t
82/68/.04 81/62/s
88/76/0 88/73/t
88/78/.02 90/77/t
100/83/0 91/70/t
98/77/0 102/79/t


CITY
Omaha
Orlando
Philadelphia
Phoenix
Pittsburgh
Portland ME
Portland OR
Raleigh
Rapid City
Reno
Richmond
Sacramento
St. Louis
Salt Lake City
San Antonio
San Diego
San Francisco
Seattle
Spokane
Tampa
Tucson
Washington


Saturday Today
HI/Lo/Pcp. H/Lo/i
88/79/0 86, 68, :
92/73/0 95/76/t
100/83/0 94/74/tl
97/86/0 105. 85 oc
88/71/0 88/71/tt
94/71/0 81 55' s,
70/55/0 85 59, s
101/78/0 101 76 P:
76/62/0 86 67 'p.
86/62/0 9 60 4
101/79/0 96. 76'pc
77/59/0 95 58',s
98/83/0 97.74, ..
S84/62/0 94, ;1 i
96/79/0 100,' 77, pc
71/64/0 74/66/pc
66/55/0 69/54/pc
68/54/0 82/56/s
72/50/0 89'60, s
92/76/0 93 79 I
91/79/0 95 76,'
101/84/0 97, ;7,1


www.weatherpublisher.com


FAcapulco
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Athens
Auckland
bBeijing
Bedln
Buenos Aires
Cairo
Geneva
Havana
S Helsinki
Hong Kong
Kingston

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Saturday,
HI/Lo/Pcp.
88/79/0
63/54/0
na/na/na
64/54/0
91/79/0
66/54/0
.63/48/0
93/75/0
72/57/0
91/75/0
82/72/0
91/82/0
PR8 9.0


Today
HI/LO/W
89/79/t
63/57/r
90/81/s
55/46/r
85/75/t
64/54/pc
67/53/s
90/73/s
64/50/sh
90/73/pc
72/55/sh
93/82/s
io 7? i


CITY
La Paz
Uma
London
Madrid
Mexico City
Montreal
Moscow
Nairobi
Nassau
New Delhi
Oslo
Panama
Paris


Saturday
Hi/Lo/Pcp.
55/28/0
64/61/0
66/52/0
90/61/0
73/54/0
90/73/0
90/66/0
81/52/0
93/82/0
90/81/0
73/59/0
91/79/0
66/55/0


Today
HI/Lo/W
55/26/s
65/61/pc
72/50/pc
86/59/pc
73/56/t
81/63/
90/64/t
80/62/pc
91/79/t
86/79/pc
66/48/sh
90/77/t
65/52/pc


CITY
Rio
Rome
St. Thomas VI
San Juan PR
Santiago
Seoul
Singapore
Sydney
Tel Aviv
Tokyo
Toronto.
Vienna
Warsaw


Saturday
HI/Lo/Pcp.
75/68/0
77/70/0
89/80/.04
88/78/.42
70/34/0
86/73/0
90/77/0
57/48/0
86/75/0
79/68/0
91/73/0
66/57/0
64/54/0


KEYTO CONDITIONS: C=-.:'l'0',, .I -,.-I, f-fair, fg-fog, h-hazy, i-ice, pc-partly cloudy, r-rain, s-sunny,
:r,= ir:.. -. :,n-snow, ts-thunderstorms, w-windy.


S ptm w Prw fud lsni
Ls* s *


Lake City 183 SW Bascom Norris Dr. G'ville- E. Campus 1200 SW 5th Ave. W. Campus 1900 SW 34th St. Jonesville 107 NW 140th Terrace Hunter's Walk 5115 NW 43rd St Tower Square 5725 SW 75th St.
Shands at UF Room H-1 Springhills Commons 9200 NW 39th Ave. Ocala 3097 SW College Rd. East Ocala 2444 E. Silver Spnngs Blvd. West Marion 11115 SW 93rd Court Rd. Summerfled 17950 US Hwy. 441


Membership is open to everyone in Columbia County!4
OFFER NOT AVAILABLE ON EI'STING CAMPUS LOANS OFFEr 1 S FOR NEV LOArYiCIN OL I NOi T BE COMBINED WiTH AN OTHER OFFER 1i CI -redit acprovai l requie?.'l our ,rae ma, be higher based on .red..O. rTinPe= .enicle and term of loan For
example, a S20.00 lo.3n wh no money down t 1.75% for 60 ronrhs An jid i.ull Si mrc.nthl pa!.mnt of; n 5I 08 arid a ir. 31i n yrrient o1 S I 70 finance crarje i .0 '-Si2 r .Ia to1 lo p.,nmenr of 21 05542 The a3muni financed Is S20.070 70
The APR is 1.902% APR = Annual Percentage Rare 2. No purchase necea' vrand oror.g so aill not cicreaM3 our chan.:e of linlning. E.lrin-. ill be. ac.eptd at rte En-pc,..r Park I r i ,le from 10 am July 28 011 Io 5 pm Jul, 30 2011 Onny one entry
per person Must be a leail US resident 18 yea ior older to win EmploiEE,. jnd Ihe.r immeid.ile families and nou ,hila. are r.roe 9gible ilnne r will be randc.nol, iele-e.3 c.r. Augu,.i u20l I and will hae 30 da-. I0 redeem their pruze Winner is
responsiblle or any, ai e-a;Moaiatled aitlh .r winning s 3 Two yeari ui Ir. m.,ni, ,n : i. fe oal changes rid Ii t.," r.:.'irr,:,n J Cre'j appr,:..al and .nrial. Si C J-p.:. requir.'-pj .1 '.n ni ad and we Ir 1ar.e ihe S I new membership fee


LENDER


Pensacola
90. 76


Tonay
HI/Lo/W'
72/68/sh
81/66/s
86/80/t
86/79/t
61/32/s
83/73/t
89/78/t
63/48/s
88/77/s
85/75/pc
82/70/pc
68/54/sh
70/54/t


1~


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Lake City Reporter


Story ideas?

Contact
Tim Kirby
Sports Editor
754-0421
tkirby@lakecityreportercom


SPORTS


Sunday, July 24, 201 I


www.lakecityreporter.com


Section B


BRIEFS

CHS FOOTBALL
Tickets on sale
at McDuffie's
Columbia High football
season tickets are on sale
at McDuffie's Marine &
Sporting Goods. Paid-up
Tiger Boosters can pick
up tickets, parking passes
and their Tiger gift.
FORT WHITE VOLLEYBALL
High school
tryouts Aug. 8
Fort White High has
volleyball tryouts for
varsity and junior varsity
set for 4-6 p.m. Aug. 8.
Participants must have
a current physical and
a parent consent form
on file. For details, call
coach Doug Wohlstein at
497-5952.
FORT WHITE FOOTBALL
Q-back Club
meeting Monday
The Fort White
Quarterback Club's
weekly meeting is
7 p.m. Monday in the
teacher's lounge at the
high school. Anyone
interested in joining the
club or learning more
about the quarterback
club is encouraged
to attend. Fort White
football season tickets
are on sale. Returning
season ticket holders
will have their seats
held until Aug. 1. Ticket
renewal information
has been sent out. For
details, call Shayne
Morgan at (386) 397-4954.

YOUTH FOOTBALL
Free camp with
Brian Allen
The Columbia County
Recreation Department
is sponsoring a free
football camp featuring
Columbia High head
coach Brian Allen from
8 a.m. to noon Aug. 2
at CHS. the camp will
feature a tour of the
facilities and low-key
drills. The camp is open
to boys and girls ages 5-
13 (as of Sept. 1). A pre-
registration waiver form
is required. Form's are
available at Richardson
Community Center from
9 a.m. to 5 p.m. For
details, call Adee Farmer
at 754-7095.
YOUTH GOLF
Camps offered
at Quail Heights
The final Junior
Summer Camp for ages
5-16 at Quail Heights
Country Club is 8:30-
11:30 a.m. July 25-29 at
a cost of $65. There is a
10'percent discount for
more than one child in a
family, or participation in
more than one camp.
For details, call the pro
shop at 752-3339.

Clinics offered
by Carl
Ste-Marie
The fourth of five
Junior Golf Clinic at The
Country Club at Lake
City is 8-11 a.m. July
25-29 at a cost of $65 for
club members and $75
for non-members. Drinks
and snacks are provided.
Clinics are limited to 24
golfers.
Registration is at The
Country Club at Lake
City and Brian's Sports.
For details, call Ste-Marie
at 752-2266 or 623-2833.


* From staff reports


Three tied for


Senior British lead


Calcavecchia,
Frost Cochran all
at 7-under.
By STEVE DOUGLAS
Associated Press
WALTON ON THE
HILL, England Mark
Calcavecchia surrendered
a three-shot cushion to
end the third round of the
Senior British Open on
Saturday tied for the lead
with fellow American Russ
Cochran and South Africa's
/ David Frost.
Calcavecchia, the co-
leader after the first and
second rounds at Walton
Heath, was in cruise control
ASSOCIATED PRESS at 10 under with"six holes
Mark Calcavecchia reacts to his shot on the 8th hole remaining before implod-
during the third round of Senior British Open Championship ing when his accuracy off
at Walton Heath Golf Club in Walton On The Hill, England, the tee deserted him.
Saturday. A disastrous triple-bogey


7 at No. 13 after driving
into the heather beside the
fairway was followed by
another dropped shot on
No. 16, although the 1989
British Open champion sal-
vaged something from his
round with a neat birdie at
the final hole.
Calcavecchia,- bidding
to become the fourth play-
er to capture the British
Open double, shot 72 to
put him at 7-under 209, His
stumble gave a bunched-
up field renewed hope in
the Champions Tour's third
major of the year.
Frost shot a bogey-free
66, tied for lowest round
of the week on the park-
land course just south of
London, while Cochran's 67
included a double-bogey 6
on No. 14.
Corey Pavin, the United
States' 2010 Ryder Cup cap-


tain, and England's Barry
Lane each shot 69 and were
a shot off the lead, with
three more Americans -
Chip Beck, Mike Goodes
and Lee Rinker at 5
under.
Three-time winner Tom
Watson was one of four play-
ers a further stroke behind
after a 69 in a third round
played in overcast condi-
tions with a light breeze.
Calcavecchia, who has
been in a three-way share
of the lead after every
round' this tournament,
described his errant driving
on the back nine as "army
golf," because it alternated
between going left and'right
off the tee.
'Today was exactly what's
been happening to me all
year," said Calcavecchia,
who is without a tourna-
ment victory in 2011."


Bleeding football


Jackson says he
shares bond with
new CHS coach.
By BRANDON FINLEY
bfinley@lakecityreporter com rn
The Fellowship of
Christian Athletes Football
Camp is about more than
just the game. It's about
coming together and Fort
White High coach Demetric
Jackson feels the camp has
given the Indians a chance
to do just that.
With 12 of the state's top
programs competing, the
Indians have stacked up
well against the competition
this week. Jackson feels the A "
team is molding and he
likes what he has seen.
"Some of the young guys
like Jacob Covington and
Cameron White have really
stood out," he said. "Andrew
Baker has progressed from
year onie, but he's battling
behind a new offensive line
and some great defensive
fronts."
And the wide receiving
core is solid as well accord-
ing to Jackson .with A.J.
Legree, Trey Marshall and
Soron Williams all playing
well.
But the big thing about
the FCA camp is bonding -JASON MATTHEW WALKERILake City Reportr
INDIANS continued on 2B Fort White High's Andrew Baker makes his way around a block during a game against Newberry High last season.


NFL preseason, when it begins, could look ragged


Players yet to schedule
a vote that would end
league's lockout.
By BARRY WILNER
Associated Press
NEW YORK As lawyers for
NFL players and owners spend the
weekend trying to put the lockout
to rest, many fans wonder when
pro football will return. And when
it does, just how ragged will the
preseason look?
So ragged that the league and
its 32 teams are considering ways
to placate fans once a labor agree-
ment is completed.
The Broncos said Saturday they
plan to open Invesco Field for prac-
tice on Aug. 6. Vikings spokes-
man Jeff Anderson said the team is
"considering a variety of ideas."
The Hall of Fame game on Aug.
7 is already a casualty. Now, the
hall will hold its annual pregame


tailgate party and have Hall of
Famers on hand for a meet and
greet. That is one of 18 hall events
scheduled for the weekend, includ-
ing the Aug. 6 inductions.
'To be frank, there's isn't much
you can do other than to do what we
have, which is offer full refunds,"
Hall of Fame vice president Joe
Horrigan said. 'The schedule of
events is so full, there's no reason
to add another event. There's no
opportunity to use the stadium for
any other thing."
The players have yet to schedule
a vote on an owner-approved pro-
posal that would put the league back
in business. NFL Commissioner
Roger Goodell and NFLPA exec-
utive director DeMaurice Smith
spoke Saturday, and Smith has
been directly involved in work on
the legal language of the proposal.
Exhibition games rarely feature
star players for more than cameo
appearances. Now, with no offsea-
son training at team facilities, no


minicamps and perhaps delayed
camp openings, the big names
could be on the bench until ...
September.
That would make many pre-
season games more like scrimmag-
es, although they would provide
increased opportunities for rook-
ies and fringe players. The Bradys
and Polamalus and Urlachers
of the league might not see the
field until the fourth and final
exhibition, games the regulars usu-
ally skip.
"It would be smart of the league
and the players to do something
special for the fans for the first
preseason game or two, at least
one serving each team's home
fans," said Marc Ganis, president of
Chicago-based sports business con-
sulting firm Sportscorp Ltd. "That
could be free or discounted conces-
sions or merchandise, free parking,
photo and autograph opportunities
with players especially those
who will not be dressing for the


game and other fan friendly
marketing and interaction." '
There's also enhanced concern
about injuries. Few players are
likely to be close to football shape
when they report whenever that
is.
'The lack of offseason will seri-
ously affect those that have not
prepared on their own or at a facil-
ity," said Brian Martin, CEO of
TEST Sports Clubs in Florida and
New Jersey, places where dozens
of NFL players train. "Based on
working with over 60 active NFL
guys, I believe it is roughly 50-
50 with those that are workers
and those who are not. Many rely
on natural gifts, and they will be
affected with the lack of mandatory
conditioning."
Trainers and coaching staffs,
therefore, will have to keep a sharp
eye on which players were dil-
igent about working out during
the lockout and which ones were
not.


I










LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS SUNDAY, JULY 24, 2011


TELEVISION

TV sports

AUTO RACING
Noon
FOX Formula One, Grand Prix of
Germany, at Nuerburg. Germany (same-
day tape)
I p.m.
SPEED Rolex Sports Car Series,
American Red Cross 250 at Millville, N.J.
2 p.m.
VERSUS IRL, IndyCar, at Edmonton,
Alberta
7 p.m.
ESPN2 NHRA, Mile-High Nationals,
at Morrison, Colo. (same-day tape)
10 p.m.
ESPN2 American Le Mans Series,
Grand Prix of Mosport, at Bowmanville,
Ontario (same-day tape)
CYCLING
8 a.m.
VERSUS -Tour de France, final stage,
Creteil, France to Paris
2 p.m.
CBS Tour de France, final stage,
Creteil, France to Paris (same-day tape)
EXTREME SPORTS
4:30 p.m.
NBC Dew Tour, Pantech Open, at
Ocean City, Md.
GOLF
7:30 am.
TGC European PGA Tour, Nordea
Masters, final round, at Stockholm
Noon
ESPN The Senior British Open
Championship, final round, at Surrey,
England -
I p.m.
TGC LPGA, Evian Masters, final
round, at Evian-les-Bains, France (same-
day tape)
3 p.m.
CBS- PGATourCanadian Open,final
round, atVancouver, British Columbia
7 p.m.
TGC Nationwide Tour, Children's
Hospital Invitational, final round, at
Columbus, Ohio (same-day tape)
MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL
i 1:30 p.m.
TBS Seattle at Boston
2:10 p.m.
WGN Houston at Chicago Cubs
8 p.m.
ESPN -Atlanta at Cincinnati
MOTORSPORTS
5 p.m..
SPEED MotoGP World
Championship, U.S. Grand Prix, at Salinas,
Calif.
II p.m.
SPEED -AMA Pro Racing, at Salinas,
Calif. (same-day tape)
SOCCER
4 p.m.
ESPN -'MLS/Premier League, World
Football Challenge, Manchester City at
- Los Angeles
SOFTBALL,
5 p.m.
ESPN2 -Women's World Cup, round
robin, Britain vs. U. 'aOklahona-City-
TENNIS

ESPN2 -ATRAdanta Championships,
championship match, at Norcross, Ga.

BASEBALL

AL standings


East Division
W L
Boston 60 37
NewYork 58 39
Tampa Bay 52 46
Toronto 50 50
Baltmore 39 57
Central Division


'Pct. GB'
.619 -
.598 2
.531. 8W
.500 Ih
.406 20'A


W L Pct GB
Detroit 53 46 .535 -
Cleveland 51 47 .520 -1
Chicago 48 51 .485 5
Minnesota 46 53 .465 7
Kansas City 41 58 .414 12
West Division
W L Pct GB
Tex's 57 43 .570 -
LosAngeles 54 46 .540 3
OaKland 43 56 .434 13'A
Seattle 43 '56 .434 13A
Friday's Games
Qhicago White Sox 3, Cleveland 0
LA.Angels 6, Baltimore I
X.Y.Yankees 17, Oakland 7
goston 7, Seattle 4
xas 12,Toront6 2
detroit 8, Minnesota 2
kansas City l0,Tampa Bay 4
Saturday's Games
Oakland at N.Y.Yankees (n)
Detroit at Minnesota (n)
Chicago White Sox at Cleveland (n)
LA.Angels at Baltimore (n)
Seattle at Boston (n)
Tampa Bay at Kansas City (n)
Toronto atTexas (n)
Today's Games
Chicago White Sox (Humber 8-6) at
Cleveland (Masterson 8-6), 1:05 p.m.



INDIANS

From Page 1B

and Jackson feels the two
Columbia County schools
are closer than ever.
"We're in the same dorm
as Columbia, but we're
keeping to ourselves," he
said. "There isn't as much
animosity as in the past with
us both being Columbia
graduates. It's more cordial.
We're working together
since we're not fighting for
the same title. It doesn't
feel like they think they're
above us. I talk to coach
(Brian) Allen at least once
a week and it's good that
we're bringing it back to
basics and having good
competition against them to
help both schools."


Oakland (G.Gonzalez 9-6) at N.Y.
Yankees (Colon 6-6), 1:05 p.m.
L.A. Angels (Chatwood 5-6) at
Baltimore (Guthrie 4-13). 1:35 p.m.
Seattle (Pineda 8-6) at Boston
(Wakefield 5-3), 1:35 p.m.
Tampa Bay (Cobb 2-0) at Kansas City
(F.Paulino 1-3), 2:10 p.m.
Detroit (Porcello 9-6) at Minnesota
(Liriano 6-7), 4:10 p.m.
Toronto (Cecil 2-4) atTexas (Ogando
10-3), 8:05 p.m.
Monday's Games
LAAngels at Cleveland, 7:05 p.m.
Seattle at N.Y.Yankees, 7:05 p.m.
Kansas City at Boston, 7:10 p.m.
Minnesota at Texas, 8:05 p.m.
Detroit at Chicago White Sox, 8:10
p.m.
Tampa Bay at Oakland, 10:05 p.m.

NL standings

East Division
W L Pct GB
Philadelphia. 62 36 .633 -
Atlanta 59 41 .590 4
NewYork 50 49 .505 12'A
Washington 49 50 .495 13'
Florida 47 53 .470 16
Central Division
W L Pct GB
Milwaukee 54 47 .535 -
Pittsburgh 51 46 .526 I
St. Louis 52 47 .525 I
Cincinnati 48 51 .485 5
Chicago 40 60 .400 13'A
Houston 33 66 .333 20
West Division
W L Pct GB
San Francisco 57 43 .570 -
Arizona 53 47 .530 4
Colorado 48 52 .480 9
San Diego 44 56 .440 13
Los Angeles 43 56 .434 13'h
Friday's Games
Chicago tubs 4, Houston 2
Philadelphia 3, San Diego I
St. Louis 6, Pittsburgh 4
Atlanta 6, Cincinnati 4
N.Y. Mets 7, Florida 6
Colorado 8,Arizona 4
Washington 7, LA. Dodgers 2
Milwaukee 4, San Francisco 2
Saturday's Games
Chicago Cubs 5, Houston I
Atlanta at Cincinnati (n)
San Diego at Philadelphia (n)
St. Louis at Pittsburgh (n)
N.Y. Mets at Florida (n)
Colorado at Arizona (n)
Milwaukee at San Francisco (n)
'Vashington at LA. Dodgers (n)
Today's Games
N.Y. Mets (Gee 9-3) at Florida (Ani.
Sanchez 6-3), 1:10 p.m.
San Diego (Stauffer 6-6) at Philadelphia
(Halladay 1-4), 1:35 p.m.
St. Louis. (Lohse 8-7) at Pittsburgh
(Morton 8-5), 1:35 p.m.
Houston (Lyles 0-5) at Chicago Cubs
(Garza 4-7), 2:20 p.m.
Milwaukee (Gallardo 11-6) at. San
Francisco (Bumgarner 5-9), 4:05 p.m.
Colorado (Jimenez 6-8) at Arizona
- (Owings 3-0). 4: 10 p.m.
Washington (Marquis 8-4) at LA.
Dodgers (Billingsley 8-8), 4:10 p.m.
Atlanta (Beachy 3-2) at Cincinnati
(Willis 0-I), 8:05 p.m.
Monday's Games
San Diego at Philadelphia, 1:05 p.m.
N.Y. Mets at Cincinnati, 7:10 p.m.
Pittsburgh at Atlanta, 7:10 p.m.
Houston at St. Louis, 8:15 p.m.
Colorado at LA. Dodgers, 10:10 p.m.
CYCLING

Tour de France stages

July 2 Stage 1: Passage du Gois
La Barre-de-Monts-Mont des Alouettes
Les Herbiers, flat, 191.5 kilometers (119
miles)
July 3 Stage 2: Les Essarts, team
time trial, 23 (14.3) (Garmin-Cervelo;
,Thor Hushovd, Norway)
July 4 Stage 3: Olonne-sur-Mer-
Redon, fiat, 198 (123.0) (Tyler Farrar,
United States; Hushovd)
July 5 Stage 4: Lorient-Mur-de-
Bretagne,flat, 172.5 (107.2) (Cadel Evans,
Australia; Hushovd)
July 6 Stage 5:' Carhaix-Cap
Frehel,flat, 164.5 (102.2) (Mark Cavendish,
Britain; Hushovd)
July 7 Stage 6: Dinan-Lisieux, flat,
'226.5 (140.7) (Edvald Boasson Hagen,
Norway; Hushovd)
July 8 Stage 7: Le Mans-
Chateauroux,flat,218 (135.5) (Cavendish;
Hushovd) .
July 9 Stage 8: Aigurande-Super-
Besse Sancy, medium mountain, 189
(117.4) (Rui Alberto Costa, Portugal;
Hushovd)
July 10 Stage 9: Issoire-Saint-Flour,
medium mountain, 208 (129.2) (Luis Leon
Sanchez, Spain;Thomas Voeckler, France)
July II Rest day in Le Lioran
Cantal.
July 12-Stage 0lAurillac-Carmaux,
flat, 158 (98.2) (Andre Greipel, Germany;




Unscramble these four Jumbles,


Voeckler)
July 13 Stage I : Blaye-les-Mines-
Lavaur, flat, 167.5 (104.1) (Cavendish;
Voeckler)
July 14 Stage 12: Cugnaux-Luz-
Ardiden, high mountain, 211 (131.1)
(Samuel Sanchez, Spain;Voeckler)
July j5 Stage 13: Pau-Lourdes,
high mountain, 152.5 (94.8) (Hushovd;
Voeckler)
July 16 Stage 14: Saint-Gaudens-
Plateau de Beille, high mountain, 168.5
(104.7) (Jelle Vanendert, Belgium;
Voeckler)
July 17 Stage 15: Limoux-
Montpellier,flat, 192.5 (119.6) (Cavendish;
Voeckler)
July 18 Rest day in the Drome
region.
July 19 Stage 16: Saint-Paul-Trois-
Chateaux-Gap, medium mountain, 162.5
(101)(Hushovd;Voeckler)
July 20 Stage 17: Gap-Pinerolo,
Italy, high mountain, 179 (111.2) (Boasson
Hagen;Voeckler)
July 21 Stage 18: Pinerolo-Galibier
Serre-Chevalier, high mountain, 200.5
(124.6) (Andy Schleck, Luxembourg;
Voeckler)
July 22- Stage 19: ModaneValfrejus-
Alpe-d'Huez, high mountain, 109.5 (68.0)
(Pierre Rolland, France; Schleck)
July 23 Stage 20: Grenoble, Indi-
vidual time trial, 42.5 (26.4) (Tony Martin,
Germany; Evans)
July 24 Stage 21: Creteil-Paris
Champs-Elysees, flat, 95 (59)
Total 3,430 (2,131.2)

Saturday
At Grenoble, France
20th Stage
A 24.6-mile individual time trial
beginning and ending in Grenoble
I. Tony Martin, Germany, HTC-
Highroad, 55 minutes, 33 seconds.
2. Cadel Evans, Australia, BMC, 7 sec-
onds behind.
3.Alberto Contador, Spain, Saxo Bank
Sungard, 1:06.
4. Thomas De Gendt, Belgium,
Vacansoleil-DCM, 1:29.
5. Richie Porte, Australia, Saxo Bank
Sungard, 1:30.
6. Jean-Christophe Peraud, France,
AG2R La Mondiale, 1:33.
7. Samuel Sanchez, Spain, Euskaltel-
Euskadi, 1:37.
8. Fabian Cancellara. Switzerland,
Leopard-Trek, 1:42.
9. PeterVelits, Slovakia, HTC-Highroad,
2:03.
10. Rein Taaramae, Estonia, Cofidis,
same time.
II. Tom Danielson, United States,
Garmin-Cervelo, 2:08.
12. Edvald Boasson Hagen, Norway,
Sky Procycling, 2:10.
13.Thomas Voeckler, France, Europcar,
2:14.
14. Maxime Monfort, Belgium,
Leopard-Trek, 2:36.
15. Kristjan Koren, Slovenia, Liqulgas-
Cannondale, same time.
16. Adriano Malori, Italy, Lampre-ISD,
2:38.
17. Andy Schleck, Luxembourg,
Leopard-Trek, same time.
18. Lieuwe Westra, Netherlands,
Vacansoleil-DCM, 2:39.
19. Christophe Riblon, France. AG2R
La Mondiale, same time.
20. Frank Schleck, Luxembourg,
Leopard-Trek, 2:41.
Overall Standings
(After 20 stages)
I. Cadel Evans, Australia, BMC, 83
hours, 45 minutes, 20 seconds.
2.Andy Schleck Luxembourg, Leopard-
Trek, I minute, 34 seconds behind.
3. Frank Schleck, Luxembourg,
Leopard-Trek, 2:30.
4.Thomas Voeckler, France, Europcar,
3:20.
5.Alberto Contador, Spain, Saxo Bank
Sungard, 3:57.
6. Samuel Sanchez, Spain, Euskaltel-
Euskadi, 4:55.
7. Damiano Cunego, Italy, Lampre-
ISD, 6:05.
8. Ivan Basso, Italy, Liquigas-
Carnnondale, 7:23.
9. Tom Danielson, United States,
Garmin-Cervelo, 8:15.
10. Jean-Christophe Peraud, France,
AG2RLa Mondiale, 10:11.
II. Pierre Rolland, France, Europcar,
10:43.
12 Rein Taaamae, Estonia, Cofidis, 1 129.
13. Kevin De Weert, Belgium, Quick
Step, 16:29.
14. Jerome Coppel, France, Saur-
Sojasun, 18:36.
I5.1 Arnold Jeannesson, France,'
Francaise des Jeux, 21:20.
16. Haimar Zubeldia, Spain,
RadioShack, 26:23.

States, Garmin-Cervelo, 27:12.
18. Ryder Hesjedal, Canada, Garmin-
Cervelo, 27:14.
19. Peter Velits, Slovakia, HTC-
Highroad, 28:54.
20. Jelle Vanendert, Belgium, Omega
Pharma-Lotto, 31:42.

THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME
by David L. Hoyt and Jeff Knurek

C 'mnn. Thisan I


Now arrange the circled letters
to form the surprise answer, as
suggested by the above cartoon.

A:

(Answers tomorrow)
Saturday's Jumbles: PRAWN STRUM PEELED COUNTY
Answer: Having this made it possible for Hemingway
to upgrade his house "ERNEST" MONEY


Colts owner expects Manning


to be ready for training camp


By MICHAEL MAROT
Associated Press

Jim Irsay isn't worried
about Peyton Manning's
health yet.
He's just not entirely
sure when Manning will
start throwing to his team-
mates. The Colts owner
told reporters Thursday in
Atlanta he doesn't expect
offseason neck surgery to
prevent Indianapolis' fran-
chise player from playing at
his usfially high level.
"My sense is that he's
doing well," Irsay said at the
league's owner meetings.
'We've been through (his
neck) surgery before. So I
anticipate him being ready."
Manning also had neck
surgery in March 2010.
The comments come one
day after The Indianapolis
Star reported that Manning
would not be ready to par-
ticipate at the start of train-
ing camp. Irsay did not
elaborate on when Manning
would start practicing.
But there are indications
Manning's recovery from
May surgery has not gone
smoothly.
Archie Manning, the long-
time NFL quarterback and
father of the league's first
family, said in early June
that his son's rehab wasn't
going as quickly as expected.
Two weeks ago at the fami-
ly's annual football camp in
Louisiana, Manning acknowl-
edged he's taken a cautious
approach to rehab because
he was unable to work with
the Colts trainers during the
four-month lockout Manning
also limited his throws to
short tosses at the camp.
Not surprisingly, that has
led to speculation he won't
be ready to practice when
training camp is scheduled
to open Aug. 1. Players
are scheduled to report


A k


ASSOCIA
This July 8, 2011 file I
shows Peyton Mannir
during a news confer
at the Manning Passil
Academy at Nicholls
University, in Thiboda
Indianapolis Colts ow
Jim Irsay believes Pe
Manning's neck surge
not slow down the lea
only four-time MVP th
season.

to Anderson Uni
about 40 miles norti
Indianapolis on July
Even agent Tom
can't say for sure
Manning will be in u
"Everybody
Peyton is going thro
rehab and I'd be wa
place commenting o
Condon said Wedne
Irsay, however, 1
the cornerstone of 1
chise will not only b
for another big
but will live up to 1
of highest-paid pl;
league history. Ton
currently holds the
after signing a fo
deal worth $72 mi
record average of
lion annually, in Sep
Irsay has said
already made an


TED PRESS
photo
ng
ence
ng


top Brady's and he expects
a five or six-year deal to
be completed shortly after
players and owners ratify
a new collective bargain-
ing agreement The lock-
out prevented Condon and
the Colts from negotiating
during the work stoppage,
and the Colts have put the
franchise tag on Manning,
a move that could cost
Irsay about $23 million if
Manning signs the tender.
That's not what Irsay
wants.
"I'm optimistic that we
can get a long-term contract
done and he'll be ready to
go," Irsay said.
On Tuesday, Condon
said he wouldn't comment
on how quickly something


State could get wrapped up
ux, La. because of the uncertainty
ner surrounding the labor deal.
yton Still, there are potential
ry will obstacles. Manning is one
ague's of the players involved in
S an antitrust suit against the
NFL, and some reports indi-
S cated those players wanted
a settlement that only allows
diversity, them to be given the fran-
heast of chise tag once during, their
31. careers. Indy used the tag on
Condon Manning in 2004. He eventu-
e when ally signed a seven-year, $98
miform. million deal that allowed the
knows Colts to rescind the tag.
ugh the Condon has repeatedly
y out of denied the assertion that
in that," Manning is looking for any
;sday. special treatment because
believes of the lawsuit.
his fran- Manning's impact on the
)e ready Colts has been clear.
season When he arrived, Indy was
the title coming off a 3-13 season and
ayer in not a regular contender.
i Brady Since being selected with
crown the No. 1 overall pick in
ur-year 1998, Manning has led the
million, a Colts to 11 playoff appear-
$18 mil- ances, eight division titles,
tember. two AFC championships
d he's and the 2006 Super Bowl
offer to crown.


Alabama, SC picked as SEC favorites


Associated Press


HOOVER, Ala. -
Alabama's the favorite
to win the Southeastern
Conference title.
The Crimson Tide was
the pick of media covering
SEC media days to beat
South Carolina in the league
championship game.


1 -
4
8
11

13
14
15

16
18
20 I
21


Alabama received 111
votes to win the West fol-
lowedbyLSU (30),Arkansas
(23), Mississippi State (1)
and Auburn. Mississippi
was picked to finish last but
got two first-place votes.
In the East, South
Carolina got 114 votes to
repeat as SEC East champi-
ons. The Gamecocks were


ACROSS 37 Pines
39 Feminine side
- -relief 40 Austin hrs.
Fathomless 41 Moo goo pan
Cadillac mfr. 42 Lysol target
Face-to-face 45 Marina sight
exam 49 Witness
Relaxation 53 Marx or Benz
Go, team! 54 Autumn mo.
Breezy greet- 55 Rover's pal
ng 56 Portico
Garden crop 57 Econ. indicator
Skillful 58 Calendar
Kan. neighbor squares
Almost grads 59 Pigpen


22 Baking pan
24 Fillets a fish
27 Bearded flow-
ers
30 Quite similar
31 Mountain
range near
China
32 Arith. term
34 Cowpoke's
sweetie
35 In a proper
manner
36 Kublai -


DOWN

'1 Raton, Fla.
2 Like the
Kalahari
3 German coal
region
4 IOUs
5 Auricle
6 That, in
Sonora
7 Delt neighbor
8 Empathize


followed by Georgia (38),
Florida (12), Tennessee
(2),, Kentucky (1) and
Vanderbilt.
Alabama was the pick to
win the overall SEC title on
98 ballots, compared to 29 for
LSU, 18 for Arkansas and 14
for South Carolina. Georgia
got four votes and Florida and
Ole Miss both got two.


Answer to Previous Puzzle

ASH TDS MODE|
LOU |CH IA ER IN
PURORTS AERO
PLE B E KN O
WE V VEE
A -M I I IWGISEIUR
RAIMEBU Y S THAN
FILOW READ URE
KOAILIAS AAHED
VIOL HGT
FLEX AGENA
J IA L J UIVIE I L E
FREE ITE RG EL
K ENT IBAN HIE M


Shopping center
Health-food
seed
Unlace
Pros and -
DC tax org.


Want more puzzles?
Check out the "Just Right Crossword Puzzles" books
at QuillDriverBooks.com


22 Room service
item
23 Square root
of IX
24 Tote, e.g.
25 Thumbs-up
26 Nefertiti's river
27 Pandora's
boxful
28 Grades 1-12
29 Telemarketing
danger
31 Dad's sister
33 Genetic
material
35 AMA members
36 New York
cagers
38 Summit
39 Bond rating
41 Pita sandwich-
es
42 Pagoda
feature
43 Black, in verse
44 Host's request
46 Millinery
47 Jogging pace
48 Leave laugh-
ing
50 Country addr.
51 Airline ticket
word
52 Ben & Jerry
rival


7-25 2011 UFS, Dist. by Univ. Uclick for UFS


SCOREBOARD


Page Editor: Brandon Finley, 754-0420














As NFL lockout drags on, who's the bad guy?


By BARRY WILNER
Associated Press

NFL fans want their foot-
ball. Some believe the own-
ers tried to give it back to
them, only to have the play-
ers balk.
When owners approved
a tentative labor deal on
Thursday, fans, like NFL
Commissioner Roger
Goodell thought itwas "time
to get back to football." Not
quite. Players have yet to
ratify the agreement, and
that has surprised and
enraged many.
Former pro quarter-
back Jim Miller hosted a
four-hour show Friday on
SiriusXM NFL Radio and
estimated at least 60 per-
cent of the callers were
angry with the players.
"People are somewhat
shocked the players haven't
approved this deal as well,"
Miller said. "I think there
is definite anger (toward
the players). The callers
feel everything was negoti-
ated and this deal should
be done.
"But when the informa-
tion gets out there that
the players are just trying
to make sure it is a fair
deal, maybe some of the
fans will temper that anger.
Frustration certainly has
set in, though."
So was Friday's nonvote
by the players a public
relations gaffe, or prudent
strategy?
"For the players to come
out and say that they were


ASSOCIATED PRESS
NFL Commissioner Roger Goodell announces that NFL owners have agreed to a tentative agreement that would end the
lockout, pending player approval, on Thursdayin College Park, Ga. Carolina Panthers owner Jerry Richardson looks on in the


background.
just handed a deal yester-
day, and they didn't know
what was in it, I think that's
a bunch of junk," said Rick
Kaplan, an investment
manager in Houston who's
been a Texans season tick-
et holder since 2002, the
team's inaugural year. "If
they've been negotiating,
then they should know 99
percent of what's in the
deal. For all this hoopla
coming out, like, 'Oh, we


Next decade


of NFL labor


peace at hand


By TIM DAHLBERG
Associated Press

Splitting up $9 billion
with the hired help can't
be an easy thing to do, so
maybe NFL owners weren't
entirely out of line when
they voted to approve a new
agreement with players and
summarily declared labor
peace was finally at hand.
That it seemed to come
as a surprise to the play-
ers themselves soon will
become a moot point.
Despite tough talk to the
contrary, there's no way
players who are about to
begin missing some sub-
stantial paychecks will vote
down a contract nowhere
near as draconian as
was feared when owners
first put up padlocks and
declared they would change
the way the league does
business.
Millionaire players will
still get their millions,
though Cam Newton and
other rookies will take a.
haircut in their contracts.
There's an attractive injury
protection clause and the
prospect of guaranteed
medical coverage for life.
The idea of an 18-game
regular season schedule
has been put aside for
now. And, perhaps best of
all, players will get more
time off during the offsea-
son.
Aside from getting guar-
anteed contracts some-
thing the owners would
rather shut down the league
than offer the players
didn't come out too badly.
The percentage of revenue
they get will go down slight-
ly but the brunt of that will
be in contracts for rookies
not even in the league yet,
and new television deals
will help grow the overall
pot anyway.
The owners, though,
might have done even bet-
ter. That's why they were in
a big rush to vote, and an
even bigger rush to let fans
know what they voted for.
They're getting a contract
unprecedented in length,
buying themselves labor
peace for the next decade
with terms that almost
ensure they make money


- and lots of it. The deal
allows them to save many
millions in salaries for
unproven rookies, locks up
draft picks for at least four
years and includes strong
rules against contract hold-
outs.
More importantly, it
includes a hard salary cap
based on revenue percent-
ages that will keep free-
spending owners in line
while allowing smaller mar-
ket teams to compete with
those in major markets.
That's a competition model
that has helped make the
NFL by far the nation's
favorite sport.
Little wonder that 31
billionaires who probably
couldn't agree on where to
go to dinner all voted in
favor of the proposed deal.
The only abstention came
from Al Davis, the Raiders'
owner who doesn't really
count anyway because he
seldom goes along with
anything his fellow owners
like.
Declaring it a done deal
on Thursday was the own-
ers' way of making sure
they get a deal. They even
offered to open training
facilities to players under
contract on Saturday if the
NFL Players Association's
executive committee rec-
ommends approval to the
1,900 players who will have
the final say on the pro-
posed pact
Smart moves both, mak-
ing sure that the onus
is now on players who
undoubtedly were grow-
ing increasingly anxious
as the time for opening
training camps grew ever
closer. NFLPA leaders said
they were studying the
written proposal Friday, but
it's now basically take it or
leave it.
Packers president Mark
Murphy told local report-
ers oi .a conference call
Thursday night that the
league not only is confident
it has a deal, but is done
negotiating.
"We've put our pens
down," Murphy said.
"We've negotiated in good
faith with the union. We've
reached an agreement on
all the key points."


haven't seen it,' thats just
showmanship on. the play-
ers' side."
Or, according to Ken
Crippen of Warminster, Pa.,
a Bills fans since 1969:
"Let me get this straight,
players. You were able to
plan decertification well in
advance, but were unable
to plan recertification in
advance? I'm not buying it
They just want to miss a few
weeks of training camp."


CHIPS


But those who make a
living molding images and
dealing with crisis manage-
ment say, there's no rea-
son to Cpme down on the
NFLPA for taking time to
make sure the 10-year deal
is a fair one.
"I don't think it's a real
big PR hit for the play-
ers, and I don't think they
are being portrayed as
bad guys, nor the owners
as the good guys," said


H GW
E N W
L F D
I U S
U S E
B H T
Z S I
ZSI
SG N K
IP Z L
SI B W
X H P
D D Y
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I T N
U 0 A
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J
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P I
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G K Y
V Y Q
S 1M S


John Totaro, president of
New York-based Totaro
Communications. "I think
that the fans are disgusted
with the total situation and
just want football to start on
time. They see the whole
situation as bad.
"The constant percep-
tion that has been prevalent
throughout the lockout is
billionaire owners having
a dispute with millionaire
players. The average per-


*---------------------------1
W A R Z C GW E
D T L T G J S J
S 0 H S T P U B
Y O J Z K I G Z
K F H R ,R D A Q
M M C F B R J
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S M D D S X R E


Y E A G I V A E
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F T K K L 11 D C
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MARY T. SLAY i '
Agency Owner
13861 '55.6801
67 SW Bascom orrms Dr.. r 101 Find all 16 of the 'Junk foodwords hidden in the word search above.
Lake Clty FL 32025 Words can be found in the banners on the ads shown here. Corn-
L I HEiih I Au,:. I H.:..r,1~ i H plete the puzzle and return it to the Lake City Reporter, 180 E. Duval
Street, Lake City, FL by Wednesday, July 27th 5:00pm, for yo'ir
S T ~~' chance to win
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I. -


son cannot relate to that
and just wants the football
season to be played."
And it could get worse,
according to Pete Webb, a
Denver-based public rela-
tions specialist.
"(Although) itfs hard to
engender sympathy for
management, the longer.
the players drag this out,
the more public relations
muck they're into," Webb
said. "If fans aren't going to
get their fall appetite of foot .
ball, ifs not only the fans
that are going to be the los-
ers but the players' images
are going to take a hit."
Social media have blown
up with negative coni-
ments directed at the play-
ers, which prompted some
defensive tweets. And-
Cardinals star receiver
Larry Fitzgerald, using
good, old fashioned talk,
had this to say: "I heard
one of the guys from the
PA say, The NFL is a big
machine. They can get the
media machine spinning
and turn public opinion,,
and what you hear is not
always factual.' We've got
to wait for the real facts to
come out"
Those facts are simple,
according to Rick Burton,
former chief marketing
officer of the U.S. Olympic
Committee and a sports
marketing professor at
Syracuse University. What
the players are doing, he
said, is being thorough,
regardless of the immedi-
ate backlash.














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LAKE CITY REPORTER FOOTBALL SUNDAY, JULY 24, 2011











LAKEk- TR SP mUN"D A 1R"0Pag


V...A
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S-"I j' .- B-"- c'
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Photos by JENNIFER CHASTEEN/Special to the Reporter
ABOVE: Columbia Swim Team member Nick Smith, 12, competes in the 100 yard free style
against Live Oak and Marianna during the Live Oak Swim Meet at Billy Jernigan Aquatic
Facility in Live Oak Saturday.

BELOW: Reece Chasteen, 9, practices backstroke during warmups before competing against
Live Oak and Marianna on Saturday.


-~ -'44~~ -in-- I


JENNIFER CHASTEEN/Special to the Reporter

Pulling in the win
CST swimmer Skye McCollum, 11, pulls in first place in the Girls 11-12 100 Yard Freestyle.


Jecessary X-rays
Y,i


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ASSOCIATED PRESS
New overall leader Cadel Evans of Australia greets spectators on the podium of the 20th
stage of the Tour de France cycling race, an individual time trial over 42.5 kilometers (26.4
miles) starting and finishing in Grenoble, Alps region, France on Saturday.


Cadel Evans set to become

first Aussie to win Tour


By JAMEY KEATEN
Associated Press

GRENOBLE, France
- Cadel Evans seized the
Tour de France yellow jer-
sey in the next-to-last stage
Saturday, all but giving
Australia its first victory in
cycling's showpiece event
'and capping one of the most
dramatic races in years.
The two-time runner-up
took the overall lead by
overcoming a 57-second
deficit to Andy Schleck of
Luxembourg in the time
trial.
A red-eyed Evans choked
up on the victory podium,
holding back tears before
hurling the winner's bou-
quet into the crowd.
, :"I really can't quite
Believe it right now," the
34-year-old Aussie said. "I
have been concentrating on
one event for so long."
Although there is one
more stage Sunday's
ceremonial finish along the
Champs-Elysees in Paris
- the leader after the time
trial is almost certain to
be the winner. Launching
a successful attack during
that flat ride is virtually
impossible.
This year's edition of the
108-year-old race was tense
all the way a riveting fin-
ish and without a serious
doping blight that marred
past Tours.
The Schleck brothers,
knowing they had lost,
embraced after the finish
line of the 26-mile time trial.
Evans leads Andy Schleck


by 1:34, and Frank Schleck
by 2:30.
The 20th stage was won
byTony Martin of Germany.
Evans finished second in
the stage seven seconds
behind and was 2:31 fast-
er than Andy Schleck.
The riders set off
Saturday in reverse order
of the standings. Andy
Schleck had the benefit of
riding last, and said before-
hand that he'd have the
added inspiration of wear-
ing yellow.
By the first intermediate
time check at the 9.3-mile
mark, Evans had already
erased 36 seconds of his
deficit to Andy Schleck and
was 34 seconds faster than
the elder Schleck.
At the second, at 17.1
miles, Andy Schleck's lead
had vanished Evans
was 1:32 faster. The
Luxembourg rider wasn't
even among the 10 fastest
riders who had crossed that
point. Evans then kept gain-
ing as the stage progressed
to the finish.
The looming victory for
Evans, the BMC team lead-
er, culminated a stellar and
methodical three weeks of
riding. Unlike defend ng
champion Alberto Contador
and other main contenders,
Evans was spared crashes.
His only real problem was
mechanical trouble Friday,
but he recovered without
any lost time.
Evans will have won the
Tour without having- won
a stage. But his triumph
attests to his diligent prepa-


ration as he eyed a title
he has narrowly missed for
years.
'Today, we went through
the process, like we had the
plan every day and the
plan every day was A, B, C,
D," he said.
Evans' psychological
toughness had been ques-
tioned, but he showed a
veteran's skill and savvy
to take cycling's greatest
prize.
'This is the victory of a
complete rider," Tour direc-
tor Christian Prudhomme
said. "Is the consecration of
a career."
Evans had been regard-
ed as a perennial under-
achiever until he became a
world champion two years
ago. And he enjoyed a solid
build-up to the Tour, racing
less than usual so he would
peak at the right moment.
The parallels between
Andy Schleck and Evans
are considerable. Both are
two-time runners-up. and
both have been second to
Contador Evans 6nce
and Schleck twice. Both also
know what it's like to just
miss out on victory. Evans
was second to Contador by
23 seconds in 2007; Schleck
was 39 seconds behind the
Spaniard last year two of
the closest finishes in race
history.
The Schlecks whichev-
er one were vying to be
the first from Luxembourg
to capture the Tour since
Charly Gaul became the
country's only winner in
1958.


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LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS SUNDAY, JULY 24, 2011


Page Editor: Brandon Finley, 754-0420


.

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Story ideas?

Robert Bridges
Editor
754-0428
crisak@lakecityreporter.com
Sunday, July 24, 201 I


Lake City Reporter




BUSINESS


www.lakecityreporter.com


A great way for the community to grow'

New managers see farmers
market as more than just a good .
place to buy fruit, vegetables.


By ANTONIA ROBINSON
arobinson@lakecityreporter.com
Almost every Saturday
has been dedicated to
visiting the Lake DeSoto
Farmers Market for Melissa
and Brian Gollery of Lake
City since it opened in May.
"I thing that it's a great
way for the community to
get together on a Saturday
morning," she said.
The Gollerys were
recently named market
managers for the weekly
community happening.
They are now taking
suggestions from vendors
and the public and working
to turn them into realities,
Brian Gollery said. The
couple had the opportunity
to talk to all the vendors
their first week on the job
and get feedback.
'The vendors and public
are excited to see the direc-
tion the market is going,"
he said. "In unison they are
wanting to see the market
grow and be a staple of the
community."
One of their main goals
as market managers is
reaching out to local farm-
ers and growers for more
participation in the market,
Brian Gollery said. The
more vendors available help
create a better market.


"We are looking for
more vendors," he said.
"We would love to have
more variety of fruit and
vegetable vendors. People
are really drawn to fruit and
vegetables."
Produce vendors are not
the only people the market
wants to reach. Vendors can
also sell baked goods at the
market.
The recently passed
Cottage Food Law allows
vendors to sell items such
as breads, jams and other
baked goods made in an
unlicensed home kitchen at
the market, Brian Gollery
said. Previously, a state cer-
tified kitchen was required
for selling to the public.
Customers at the market
are able to talk to a vendor
about produce that was
freshly picked or made the
day before, he said.
'The market is a great
way for the community to
grow," he said. "Ifs a great
way for downtown to revital-
ize itself."
Melissa Gollery said the
market provides an avenue
for the community to get
together on a Saturday
morning
"Its great for local farms
to be able to make a little
MARHET continued on 2C


JASON MATTHEW WALKERILake City Reporter
Melissa Gollery and her husband, Brian, are the new managers of the Lake DeSoto Farmers Market, which is held in
downtown Lake City at Wilson Park. The market, which is open to the public every Saturday from 8 a.m. to noon, features
fresh produce, plants, food, local art and live music. 'We are just growing the Farmers Market to get more vendors and
the public interested, but vendors are the.key,' Melissa Gollery said.


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James Murdoch under threat as scandal spreads


By CASSANDRA VINOGRAD
and RAPHAEL SATTER
Associated Press
LONDON Media scion James
Murdoch, his father's heir apparent, was
under fire Friday over claims by former
newspaper executives that he misled law-
makers about what he knew, and when,
fabolt Britain's phone-hacking scandal.
The allegation raises questions not
only about his succession to the helm of
the media empire but what he may have
relayed to Rupert Murdoch, the CEO and
controlling shareholder.
The younger Murdoch told a par-
liamentary committee that he was not
aware of evidence that eavesdropping at
the News of the World went beyond a
jailed rogue reporter. But in a sign that
,executives are starting to turn against the
company, two former top staffers said late
Thursday they told him years ago about
an email that suggested wrongdoing at
the paper was more widespread than the
company let on.
The claim brings more trouble for the
embattled James Murdoch, who heads
the Europe and Asia operations of his
father's News Corp., as his family fights a
scandal that has already cost it one of its
British tabloids, two top executives and
a $12 billion bid for control of a lucrative
,satellite broadcaster.
Deliberately misleading Parliament is
a crime in Britain, and Prime Minister
David Cameron has joined opposition
lawmakers in saying James Murdoch has
questions to answer.
Tom Watson, a legislator from the
opposition Labour Party, called for
Scotland Yard to investigate the allegation
and said it "marks a major step forward in
getting to the facts of this case."
"If their version of events is accurate,


it doesn't just mean that Parliament has
been misled, it means police have another
investigation on their hands," Watson told
the BBC.
Jhmes Murdoch, who was not testifying
under oath at Tuesday's parliamentary
hearing, could face sanction if it becomes
clear he deliberately misled lawmakers
- but the prospect is highly unlikely. The
last time the House of Commons fined
anyone was in 1666.
The House of Commons no longer has
the power to imprison a nonmember, but
it could refer a case to the Metropolitan
Police.
News International, News Corp.'s
British newspaper division, said James
Murdoch stood by his testimony to parlia-
ment
The scandal exploded earlier this
month with revelations journalists at
the News of the World tabloid hacked
the phone of a 13-year-old murder
victim while police were still search-
ing for her and broadened to include
claims reporters paid police for infor-
mation.
That set off a firestorm that has hit at
the highest reaches of British society. It
forced Rupert Murdoch to shutter News
of the World, prompting a spate of high-
profile resignations and departures at
News Corp. and delivering the 80-year-old
media baron and his son to be grilled
before lawmakers.
The scandal continued its seemingly
inexorable spread Friday, with Scottish
police.saying they were opening their
own perjury and corruption investigations
related to the phone hacking one that
has the potential to further taint ex-News
of the World editor Andy Coulson, who
served as Cameron's top media aide.
Cameron, who's under pressure over
his decision to hire Coulson, continued


to distance himself from a once-cozy rela-
tionship with the Murdochs.
"Clearly James Murdoch has got ques-
tions to answer in Parliament and I am
sure that he will do that," Cameron said
Friday, adding the Murdochs had "a mess
to clear up."
In his testimony before parliament,
James Murdoch batted away claims he
knew the full extent of the illegal espio-
nage at the News of the World when he
approved a $1.1 million (700,000 pound)
payout in 2008 to soccer players' asso-
ciation chief Gordon Taylor, one of the
phone hacking victims.
News International had long main-
tained the eavesdropping was limited to
a single rogue reporter, Clive Goodman,
and the private investigator he was work-
ing with to break into voice mails of mem-
bers of the royal household.
But an email uncovered during legal
proceedings seemed to cast doubt on that
claim. It contained a transcript of an ille-
gally obtained conversation, drawn up by
a junior reporter and marked "for Neville"
- an apparent reference to the News
of the World's chief reporter, Neville
Thurlbeck.
Because it seemed to implicate oth-
ers in the hacking, the email had the
potential to blow a hole through News
International's fiercely held contention
that one reporter alone had engaged in
hacking. If James Murdoch knew about
the email --- and was aware of its implica-
tion it would lend weight to the sug-
gestion he'd approved the payoff in an '
effort to bury the scandal.
James Murdoch told lawmakers he was
not aware of the email at the time, but
former legal adviser Tom Crone and ex-
editor Colin Myler contradicted him.
"We would like to point out that James
Murdoch's recollection of what he was


told when agreeing to settle the Gordon
Taylor litigation was mistaken,' they said.
"In fact, we did inform him of the 'for
Neville' email which had been produced
to us by Gordon Taylor's lawyers."
The Conservative lawmaker
who heads the committee, James
Whittingdale, said James Murdoch
would be asked in writing to clarify his
testimony, but would not be recalled
before the committee.
Murdoch's News Corp. is trying to
keep the damage from spreading to its
more lucrative U.S. holdings, including
the Fox network, 20th Century Fox and
the Wall Street Journal.
British politicians have felt the heat
too, with the country's top two party
leaders falling over each other to dis-
tance themselves from papers they once
courted assiduously.
Cameron's former communications
director Murdoch newspapers veteran
Andy Coulson came under fresh scru-
tiny Thursday after it was reported that
he did not have a top-level security clear-
ance, which spared him from the most
stringent type of vetting.
The former News of the World-editor
was arrested this month in connection
with allegations that reporters at the
tabloid intercepted voice mails. Victims
included celebrities, crime victims and
politicians.
Lawyers could also have been targeted,
according to The Law Society. It said
solicitors had been warned by police that
their phones may have been hacked by
the paper.
Scotland Yard, accused of failing to
properly investigate the scandal for years,
lias also been asked to investigate anoth-
er explosive claim: That journalists bribed
officers to locate people by tracking their
cell phone signals.


MARKET: More than just a good place to buy fresh fruit and vegetables

Continued From Page 1C


money," she said. "It's an easier way to
get fresh produce in my opinion."
Entertainment and special events are
tied into the market each month.
"Pretty much every week is some-
thing different," Brian Gollery said. "We
want to get to the point its a community
event. We want everybody to come out
and have fun."
The farmers market is just another
way the city is redeveloping itself, he


said.
"A lot of people come downtown and
there's not much' to do downtown,"
Brian Gollery said. "It's a way to come
out and interact with each other. It's
a way for people living in the city who
aren't really exposed to that kind of
produce to come out and get a different
experience."
Vendors can come to a market on a
Saturday morning between 7:30 and 8


a.m. and sell that day.
"It's really in the stage people can
just show up and be in the market that
day," Brian Gollery said.
The vendor fee is $10 a week to set
up and sale at the farmers market, he
said. The market already has the crowd
coming each week as well as marketing
techniques employed to attract custom-
ers.
"The vendors need the people, and


the people need the vendors," Brian
Gollery said. "We try to get both."
Contact the Gollerys for more infor-
mation at (386) 288-4864 or e-mail
msgollery@gmail.com.
The community is encouraged to sup-
port the market, which is open 8 a.m. to
12 p.m. every Saturday in Wilson Park,
Melissa Gollery said.
"I'm excited," she said. "I want to see
this market grow."
I


I I L


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Page Editor: Robert Bridges, 754-0428






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LAKE CITY REPORTER BUSINESS & HOME SUNDAY, JULY 24, 2011


THE WEEK IN REVIEW THE WEEK IN REVIEW THE WEEK IN REVIEW THE WEEK IN REVIEW THE WEEK IN REVIEW


A NYSE
8,408.20 +181.16


Gainers ($2 or more)
Name Last Chg %Chg
SFNGrp 13.92 +4.73 +51.5
NalcoHId 36,69 +7.91 +27.5
NetQin n 6.80 +1.39 +25.7
MedcoHlth 65.96+11.96 +22.1
Hyperdyn 5.45 +.97 +21.7
AMD 7.75 +1.32 +20.5
ConsEP 3.15 +.52 +19.8
ZaleCp 6.81 +1.10 +19.3
Cohen&Slr 40.55 +6.40 +18.7
WalterEn 131.71+20.77 +18.7

Losers ($2 or more)
Name Last Chg %Chg
MGIC 4.17 -1.83 -30.5
CSVS2xVxS16.75-4.26 -20.3
RadianGrp 3.31 -.75 -18.5
C-TrCVOL 23.84 -5.18 -17.8
AegeanMP 5.53 -1.17 -17.5
ConcdMed 3.50 -.74 -17.5
AMCOL 31.09 -6.49 -17.3
SemiMfg 3.28 -.64 -16.3
Endvrintrs 13.79 -2.60 -15.9
GIbShipLs 4.13 -.74 -15.2

Most Active ($s or more)
Name Vol (00) Last Chg
BkofAm 11433688 10.13 +.13
S&P500ETF7549924134.58+2.89
SPDR Fncl5022282 15.32 +.47
GenElec 2762874 19.04 +.63
WellsFargo2287797.29.14 +1.96
iShSilver 2260824 39.07 +.83
iShR2K 2243196 84.05+1.24
FordM 222182513.31 +.22
SpnntNex 1933079 5.16 -.19
Citigrp rs 1893770 40.26+1.88

Diary '
Advanced 2,153
Declined 1,003
New Highs 249
New Lows 124
Total issues 3,204
Unchanged 48
Volume 18,487,535,693


AAmex Nsdaq
2,450.01 +44.82 2,858.83 +69.03


Gainers ($2 or more)
Name Last Chg %Chg
B&HO 5.77 +2.02 +54.0
NewEnSys 3.47 +1.13 +48.3
Banrowt 2.52 +79 +45.7
Quepasa 9.33 +2.06 +28.3
LoncorRs g 3.24 +.63 +24.1
DGSE 9.96 +1.88 +23.3
Express-1 4.23 +.77 +22.3
VoyagerOG 3.49 +.57 +19.5
Banrog 4.64 +.67 +16.9
SunLink 2.13 +.26 +13.9

Losers ($2 or more)
Name Last Chg %Chg
OrsusXel rs 3.05 -1.22 -28.6
eMagin 4.88 -.99 -16.9
.T3Motnrs 2.00 -.33 -14.2
SwGA Fn 7.40 -1.20 -14.0
HstnAEn 17.37 -2.13 -10.9
Neoprobe 2.86 -.33 -10.3
Accelr8 3.69 -.36 -8.9
Augusta g 5.00 -.46 -8.4
SondeR grs 2.91 -.25 -7.9
Crexendo 3.72 -.31 -7.7

Most Active ($1 or more)
Name Vol (00) Last Chg
KodiakOg 398246 6.40 -.18
NthgtMg 264186 3.37 +.23
CheniereEn209441 10.59 +.62
GoldStrg 183315 2.83 -.15
NovaGldg .145677 10.24 +.21
NAPallg 134187 4.75 +.03
NwGoldg 123689 11.06 +.11
CFCdag 114130 23.72 +.26
NewEnSys 107153 3.47+1.13
VantageDrl 104204 1.69 +.02

Diary _
Advanced 320
Declined 192
New Highs 28
New Lows 14
Total issues 534
Unchanged 22
Volume 581,976,373


Gainers ($2 or more)
Name Last Chg %Chg
SinoGlobal 6.75 +5.29 +362.3
Wowjoint 2.68 +1.23 +84.8
Wowjntun 3.18 +1.44 +62.8
InterOig 72.96+29.95 +69.6
TeamStaf 2.65 +1.00 +60.6
SCmtyllpf 5.40 +1.85 +52.1
KandiTech 3.07 +1.01 +49.0
Seanrgyrs 5.50 +1.67 +43.6
Jingwei s 2.09 +.63 +43.2
Datalink 9.35 +2.43 +35.1

Losers ($2 or more)
Name Last Chg %Chg
NABI Bio 2.07 -3.56 -63.2
GeneticTh 7.07 -3.23 -31.4
AvidTch 13.74 -6.26 -31.3
SifyTech 4.42 -1.67 -27.4
Travelzoo 59.40-17.69 -22.9
AnpioPhm 6.14 -1.81 -22.8
Fortinets 21.09 -5.76 -21.5
WebMD 36.62 -9.86 -21.2
Icagenrs 5.98 -i 4. -196
Riverbeds 32.12 -,45 -168

Most Active (i1 or more)
Name Vol(00) Last Chg
Microsoft 3355686,2753 .75
Cisco 3023554 lb4t. *87
SiriusXM 2970304 2 ,1 1
Intel 2792160 2j13 '6
PwShs QQQ274097459.60 +1..5
NewsCpA 2470229 16.42 +.78
MicronT 1897004 8.09 +.68
Yahoo 1774522 13.98 -.71
HuntBnk 1200860 6.14
Oracle 1197831 32.55 +.46

Diary


Advanced
Declined
New Highs
New Lows
Total issues
Unchanged
Volume


1,626
1,093
196
122
2,773
54
9,377,391,109


Wkly Wkly YTD
Name Ex DIv Last Chg%Ch %Chg
AT&TInc NY 1.72 30.32 +.01 ... +3.2
AMD NY ... 7.75 +1.32 +20.5 -5.3
AkatelLuc NY ... 5.19 +.10 +2.0 +75.3
AppleInc Nasd ... 393.30+28.38 +7.8 +21.9
AutoZone NY ... 295.85 -1.43 -0.5 +8.5
BkofAm NY ..04 10.13 +.13 +1.3 -24.1
BariPVirsNY ... 20.73 -2.43 -10.5 -44.9
BobEvans Nasd .80 36.51 +.91 +2.6 +10.8
CNBFnPANasd .66 14.18 +.44 +3.2 -4.3
CSXs NY .48 25.38 +.06 +0.2 +17.8
hevron NY 3.12 108.97 +2.78 +2.6 +19.4
Cisco Nasd .24 16.46 +.87 +5.6-18.6
Ciitgrprs NY .04 40.26 +1.88 +4.9 -14.9
CocaCola NY 1.88 69.73 +2.20 +3.3 +6.0
Delhaize NY 2.45 72.65 +2.63 +3.8 -1.4
Dell Inc Nasd ... 17.04 +.07 +0.4 +25.8
DxFnBull NY ... 25.51 +1.93 +8.2 -8.4
FamilyDIr NY .72 54.14 +1.74 +3.3 +0.9
FordM NY ... 13.31 +.22 +1.7-20.7
GenElec NY .60 19.04 +.63 +3.4 +4.1
HomeDp NY 1.00 36.52 +.61 +1.7 +4.2
HuntBnk Nasd .16 6.14 ... ...-10.6
iShSilver NY '... 39.07 +.83 +2.2 +29.5
iShEMkts NY .84 47.65 +.99 +2.1
iShR2K NY .94 84.05 +1.24 +1.5 +7.4
Intel Nasd .84 23.13. +.76 +3.4 +10.0
JPMorgCh.NY 1.00 42.19 +2.21 +5.5 -.5
Lowes NY .56 22.62 -.10 -0.4 -9.8


Wke Ex DW YTD
Name Ex Dlv Last Chg%Chg%Chg


McDnlds NY 2.44 88.56 +3.08 +3.6 +15.4
MicronT Nasd ... 8.09 +.68 +9.2 +.9
Microsoft Nasd .64 27.53 +.75 +2.8 -1.4
MorgStan NY .20 23.90 +2.81 +13.3 -12.2
NY Times NY ... 9.05 +.38 +4.4 -7.;
NewsCpA Nasd .15 16.42 +.78 +5.0 +12.8
NextEraEnNY 2.20 57.46 +.66 +1.2 +10.1
NobilityH Nasd 7.72 +.19 +2.5 -4.8
NokiaCp NY .55 5.86 +.32 +5.8 -43.;
OcciPet NY 1.84 107.88 +2.54 +2.4 +10.(
Oracle Nasd .24 32.55 +.46 +1.4 +4.C
Penney NY .80 31.42 -.15 -0.5 -2.
PepsiCo NY 2.06 65.76 -2.77 -4.0 +.7
PetrohawkNY ... 38.24 +.07 +0.2+109.5
Pflzer NY .80 20.07 +.32 +1.6 +14.1
Potash s NY .28 61.64 +2.44 +4.1 +19.4
PwShsQQQNasd .42 59.60 +1.75 +3.0 +9.
Ryder NY 1.16 58.63 +1.61 +2.8 +11.4
S&P500EIFNY 2.44 134.58 +2.89 +2.2 +7.1
SearsHldgsNasd ... 76.10 +1.87 +2.5 -32
SiriusXM Nasd ... 2.16 -.17 -7.3 +.3
SouthnCo NY 1.89 40.58 +.36 +0.9 +6.1
SprintNex NY ... 5.16 -.19 -3.6 +22.C
SPDRFndNY .18 15.32 +.47 +3.2 -3.9
TimeWam NY .94 36.70 +1.07 +3.0 +14.1
WalMart NY 1.46 54.52 +.89 +1.7 +1.1
WellsFargoNY .48 29.14 +1.96 +7.2 -6.C
Yahoo Nasd ... 13.98 -.71 -4.8 -15.9


Stock Footnotes: g = DM.den le nd eainirg6 in Candiaen dollars n Does n,1l meet contrnuea-isour.g standards
0 : Lave Iir inrm SEC n = iNw in past 52 wee6s pt= Preferrd rs = Sntoc nas undergone a reverse slock spin
ol at least 50 rcerI ni tn Ure p&t yea n = R=ilg 1M uy ecunry al a spvOaid prOe s = SI m tas npill y at
leael 20 pein c r Irn Ie last year un = Unts v In Dariknrl=cy or receinirsnip ad = When darirtleud wl ;
Wnri, 6audd zi Wanants
Mutual Fund Footnoles: b Fee covenng ma~et costs is paid from fund asses. a = Defened sales charge. or
raOer&ptini'fti I Irr h loat luites ciargein m= MuDmp tee i are unagled NA -ino bfillilr,1 p pirOuS dly'l
nrI asea value sfund s an snare j odurg Ine week lurind paid a alt Bulon during ihe weekGalners and
Losers music Db norm at lea $28 0 Dob 11 In tales a leftl Mos Actives must be worth at leasi S1. Vlurme in
hundreds of shares Source: Tf. Associated Pi Sales figures are unolfita


Money Rates
Last Pvs Week
Prime Rate 3.25 3.25
Discount Rate 0.75 .0.75
Federal Funds Rate .00-25 .00-25
Treasuries
3-month 0.04 0.01
6-month 0.08 0.05
5-year 1.50 1.43
10-year 2.96 2.90
30-year 4.26 4.25


Australia


Britain 1.6308 1.6307
Canada .9492 .9445
Euro .6960 .6940


78.43 78.43


11.6339 11.6007


Mexico


all81


British pound expressed In U.S. dollars. All oth-
ers show dollar in foreign currency.


A61mC


.Inan


Weekly Dow Jones

Dow Jones Industrials -94.57 202.26 -15.51 152.50 -43.25
Close:12,681.16 *
1-week change: 201.43 (1.6%) MON TUES WED THUR FRI
13 ,000 ..... ..... ..... .. ........







2.5.. ...00



11,500.
J- F M A M J J


MUTUAL FUNDS
Total Assets Total Return/Rank Pct MinInit
0 Name ObI ($Mins) NAV 4-wk 12-mo 5-year Load Invt
PIMCOTotRetls CI 142,222' 11.05 +0.6 +5.8/8 +8.8/A NL 1,000,000
AmericanFunds GrthAmA m LG 64,340 32.47 +5.2 +22.8/E +4.1/D 5.75 250
Vanguard TotStldx LB 62,404 33.92 +4.7 +27.2/A +4.6/8 NL 3,000
Fidelity Contra LG 61,672 73.22 +7.2 +26.8/C +6.7/8 NL 2,500
Vanguard Instldxl LB 60,307 123.18 +4.6 +25.4/B +3.8/8 NL 5,000,000
Ameriarn FurlS CpilrcBuA m IH 59,351 51.88 +1.5 +16.2/D +4.2/D 5.75 250
1 Arrienc.:r, Funa pfWidaGrIA m WS 55,045 37.01 +2.2 +19.3/E +5.01B 5.75 250
a Air.n.:an Funds IrniArnerA m MA 54,204 17.34 +1.9 +18.3/B +4.4/C 5.75 250
S Vanguri 500AdlOrr LB 54,186 124.02 +4.6 +25.4/B +3.8/B NL 10,000
an u.JualT. lSilAdmr LB 51,740 33.93 +4.7 +27.4/A +4.7/8 NL 10,000
ATenrr,. Fur.lr rC.)AArrA m LB 48,030, 29.34 +3.5 +19.4/E +2.7/D 5.75 250
O' Dlge & Co, InlS FV 46,279 36.51 +2.6 +19.8/D +3.9/A' NL 2,500
D.a:rjey Co, SIl.. LV 43,847 113.60 +2.8 +22.8/C +0.6/D NL 2,500
Arr.enar, Furd. WAMullnvA m LV 40,086 29.44 +3.6 +24.9/A +3.1/B 5.75 250
Amerear, Furls EurPa.GrA m FB 38,377 43.29 +3.1 +20.0/D +5.8/A 5.75 250
S Vaiuard InslPluM LB 37,510 123.19 +4.6 +25.5/B +3.9/B NL 200,000,000
FianiTei-Fradpir irrcor, Am CA 36,555 2.25 +2.3 +16.5/A +5.9/B 4.25 1,000
Ami-ran Funds Fr.lnvA m LB 34,455 39.07 +3.9 +24.3/C +4.7/B 5.75 250
Va guard Toinil r d FB 34,163 16.47 +3.9 +21.7/C +4.2/B NL 3,000
American Funds NewPerspA m WS 33,308 30.15 +4.0 +22.8/C +6.5/A 5.75 .250
PIMCOTotRetAdm b CI 32,808 11.05 +0.6 +5.5/C +8.6/A NL 1,000,000
American Funds BalA m MA 32,184 18.97 +3.4 +19.2/A +5.1/B 5.75 250
Vanguard 5001nv LB 30,461 124.01 +4.6 +25.3/B +3.7/B NL 3,000
Vanguard WelltnAdm MA 29,812 56.16 +2.4 +16.5/D +6.3/A NL 50,000
Harbor Intllnsti d FB 29,804 64.29 +2.8 +24.1/B +7.2/A NL 50,000
Fidelity GrowCo LG 29,343 94.57 +7.8 +37.3/A +9.8/A NL 2,500
Vanguard TotBdAdml Cl 28,544 10.77 +0.3 +4.0/D +6.6/B NL 10,000


CA onsevaliveAlocadion, Cl -nteredialeTenn Bond, ES-Europe Stc FB -oreign Lae Bend, FG -ForignLaLrgeGro, FV Foreig
Large Vaue, IH -wodAlocalion, La B 1 Bd, LG arg4 e Growth, LV -Lags V VaeMA -Moda Me ca, MB-C Ble Mv -
Md.CpVa lue, SH .Spedialy-hea WS -Wodd Slock TuRedam: cu in V with divideinds nvesed. Rak Hoow tund peinos
ole with amee cdice:Abl In top 2%, E bottomn20%. MnIInnt lvl:r imum $ needed Io iinnd rc:Mmslar.


Name Div Yld PE


ABBLtd 1.12 4.6 ... -.95
AESCorp ..... 16 +.14
AFLAC 1.20 2.6 9 +.86
AK Steel .20 1.3 ... +.26
AMR ......... -.65
AT&T Inc 1.72 5.7 9 +.01
AbtLab 1.92 3.6 13 -.09
Accenture .90 1.5 21 +.58
AMD ... ... 7 +1.32
Aetna .60 1.4 10 -.02
Agilent ... ... 20 -.19
AlcatelLuc ... ... ... +.10
Alcoa .12 .8 18 +.35
AllegTch .72 1.1 59 -.70
Allstate .84 2.9 12 -.78
AlphaNRs ... ... 43 +1.51
Altria .1.52 5.8 16 -.33
AMovilLs .41 1.6 15 +.02
AEP-. 1.84 4.9 15 +.23
AmExp .72 1.4 14 +.43
AmrntlGp ...... 3 +.86
AmeriBrgn .42 1.0 17 -1.47
Anadarko .36 .4 ... +3.11
AnalogDev1.00 2.7 13 +1.29
Annaly 2.59 14.4 7 +.06
ArcelorMit .75 2.3 15 +.84
ArchCoal .44 1.5 21 +2.11
ArchDan .64 2.0 10 +1.82
ATMOS 1.36 4.0 15 +.30
AveryD 1.00 3.0 11 -4.72
Avon .92 3.2 18 +.58
BB&TCp .64 2.4 19 +.86
BHPBillLt 1.82 1.9 ... +3.05
BakrHu .60 .8 32-+4.41.
BcBilVArg" .59 5.3 ... +.'94
'BcoBrades .80 4.2 ... +.75
BcoSantSA .82 7.3 ... +.96
BcoSBrasil1.65 16.1 ... +.16
BkofAm .04 .4 ... +.13
Bklrelnd ......... -.08
BkNYMel .52 2.0 12 +.66
Barclay .36 2.3.... +1.09
Bar iPVix rs ... .. ...-2.43
BarrickG .48 -1.0 14 +1.94
Baxter 1.24 2.0 16 .+.99
BerkHB ...... 18 +1.69
BestBuy .64 2.2 10 -.05
.Blackstone .40 2.3 98 +1.73
Boeing 1.68 2.3 16 +1.39
BostonSci ... ...21 +.20
BrMySq 1.32 4.5 15 +.52
CB REllis ......33 +.48
CBSB .40 1.4 23 +1.89
CSXs .48 1.9 .16 +.06
CVSCare .50 1.3 15 +.66
Cameron ...... 24 +2.33
CdnNRsgs .36 .. ... +2.12
CapOne .20 .4 7 +1.14
CapitlSrce .04 .6 19 +.49
CardnlHIth .86 1.9 16 -.24
Carnival 1.00 2.7 15 +1.36
Caterpillar 1.84 1.7 19 -3.75
Cemex ... ...... -.33
'CenterPnt .79 3.9 18 +.87
CntryLink 2.90 7.5 12 +.24
ChesEng .35 1.0 12 +1.43
Chevron 3.12 2.9 11 +2.78
Chimera .62 18.6 5 +.08
Cihigrprs .04 .1 13 +1:88
Clorox 2.40 3.2 17 -.19
CocaCola 1.88 2.7 14 +2.20
CocaCE .52 1.7 16 +1:65
Comerica .40 1.2 17 +1.19
CompPrdS... ... 25 +3.37
ConAgra .92 -3.5 14 +.15
ConocPhil 2.64 3.5 11 -.50
ConsolEngy.40 .7 27 +2.48
ConEd 2.40 4.5 15 +.33
ConstellEn .96 2.5 17 +.19


Name Div
ASML Hid .58
Abraxas
AcmePkt
ActivsBliz .17
AdobeSy
AdvBattery ...
AgFeed
AkamaiT
AllosThera ...
AlteraCplf .32
Amazon
ACapAgy 5.60
AmCapLtd ...
Amgen
Apple Inc ...
ApldMatl .32
AresCap 1.40
AriadP
ArmHId .13
ArubaNet .
Atmel
Autodesk ...
Baidu
BrigExp
Broadcom .36
BrcdeCm ...
CA Inc .20
CpstnTrbh ...
Celgene
ChkPoint ...
CienaCorp ...
Cintas .49
Cirrus
Cisco .24
Clearwire ...
Comcast .45
Come spcl .45
Compuwre ...


Wkly YTD Wkly
Cha %Chu Last


+9.4 24.57
+4.1 12.68
-18.1 46.21
-3.4 15.81
-44.0 4.36
+3.2 30.32
+10.5 52.95
+26.4 61.28
-5.3 7.75
+42.1 .43.34
+13.2 46.89
+75.3 5.19
+2.9 15.83
+18.9 65.60
-10.0 28.69
-21.6 47.06
+7.1 26.36
-9.4 25.97
+4.8 37.71
+21.7 52.24
-39.7 29.09
+18.8 40.52
+9.4 83.30
-1.6 37.06
+.6 18.02
-13.3 33.04
-18.4 28.61
+6.8 32.12
+9.5 34.17
-20.4 33.69
-1.3 28.69
1 -4 26.18
+1.3., 94.13
+39.8 79.90
+9.5 11.14
-5.2 19.24
+5.5 11.24
-24.6 10.25
-24.1 10.13
-56.2 1.16
-14.7 25.76
-5.6 15.60
-44.9 20.73
-5.5 50.25
+22.1 61.79
-3.8 77.05
-13,8 29.56
+24.6 17.63
+11.4 72.67
-4.8 7.21
+11.4 29.49
+16.1 23.77
+55.1 29.54
+17.8 25.38
+7.4 37.35
+4.4 52.94
-1.5 43.77
+16.6 49.64
-10.0 6.39
+20.2 46.04
-20.7 36.55
+12.3 105.15
-27.2 7.50
+28.9 20.26
-16.3 38.66
+32.7 34.39
+19.4 108.97
-19.0 3.33
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+8.1 53.58
+27.T 38.94


Wkly YTD Wkly
YId PE Chg %Chg Last
1.5 ... +3.45 -1.5 37.77
... ... +.61 +11.2 5.08
88 -.20 +23.6 65.70
1.4 28 +.08 -3.6 11.99
.. 16 +.43 -3.4 29.72
... 2 +.41 -61.0 1.50
. ... ... +.35 -38.1 1.82
32 +.52 -35.5 30.37
-.20 -61.0 1.80
.8 15 -.37 +18.9 42.30
... 94 +3.65 +20.3 216.52
18.9 4 +.41 +3.3 29.68
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... 11 +.17 +.6 55.22
... 16+28.38 +21.9 393.30
2.4 11 +.70 -6.4 13.15
8.6 8 +.61 -1.5 16.24
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... ... -2.92 +19.4 24.93
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1.0 18 +2.20 -18.6 35.47
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... -.23 -41.2 3.03
1.8 18 +.72 +13.6 24.85
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... 20 +.62 -13.8 10.06


Wkly YTD Wkly
Name Div YId PE Chg %Chg Last
Coming .20 1.2 8 +.40 -11.3 17.14
Covidien .80 1.5 16 -.25 +13.6 51.89
CSVellVSts... ..... +1.74 +52.3 18.21,
CredSuiss 1.40 3.7 ... +.76 -6.9 37.62
DCTIndl .28 5.0 ... +.20 +4.5 5.55
DRHorton .15 1.2 64 +.60 +1.3 12.08
DTE 2.35 4.6 15 +.90 +13.0 51.23
Danaher .08 .2 18 -.93 +9.6 51.69
DeanFds ... ... 27 +.65 +38.2 12.22
Deere 1.64 2.0 14 -.45 -2.2 81.24
DetaAir ... ... 13 -.31 -35.7 8.10
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Disney .40 1.0 18 +1.38 +8.4 40.65
DomRescs1.97 4.0 16 +1.32 +16.5 49.78
DowChm 1.00 2.8 19 +.63 +4.2 35.58
DukeEngy 1.00 5.3 13 +.10 +6:4. 18.95
ECDangn ... ... ... -.64 -58.6 11.20
EMCCp ...... 29 +.95 +21.2 27.76
Ecolab '.70 1.3 23 -2,67 +5.2 53.05
EIPasoCp .04 .2 29 +.59 +50.6 20.72
Elan ... .. ... +.27+115.4 12.34
EldorGldg .10 ... 47 +.55 -.8 18.43
EmersonEll.38 .2.5 19 -.27 -3.6 55.10
EnCanag .80 2.6 66 -.34 +4.7 30.49
EndvSilv g .... ...... .+.34.,+48.8 10.92
lJSCO 1.4P.,2,6., 1.+1,1, ,.-3,,. 53.23
.-... .16, 1.0 +.11 -14.9 16.53
Exelon 2 1., I8 1 +.33 '., 43.70
ExxonMbl 1.88 2.2 12 +2.22 +16.5 85.22
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FTREIT .40 2.4 ... +.50 +14.4 16.76
FirstEngy 2.20 5.0 16 +1.08 +19.8 44.36
FordM ... ... 6 +.22 -20.7 13.31
ForestLab ... ... 9 +.07 +20.5 38.53
ForestOil ... ... 19 +2.07 -28.9 27.00
FMCGs 1.00 1.8 9 +.33 -7.3 55.67
FrontierCm .75 9.6 56 +.14 -19.3 7.85
GafisaSA .29 2.9 ... +1.48 -32.1 9.87
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Gannett .32 2.3 6 +.18 -9.5 13.66
Gap .45 2.3 11 +.75 -10.8 19.66
GenMills 1.22 3.2 14 +.07 +6.3 37.82
GenMotn ... ... 7 +.34-18.3 30.10
GenOnEn ... ...... -.09 +5.2 4.01
Genworlh ... ... 45 -.88 -32.0 8.93
Gerdau .27 2.8 ... +A14 -31.2 9.63
GoldFLtd .19 1. 2 ... -14.8 15.45
Goldcrpg..41 .8 17 +.10 +17.9 54.23
GoldmanS-1.40 1.0 13 +5.33 -19.4 135.49
Goodyear ......... +.05 +51.0 17.89
HSBC 1.80 3.6 ... +1.47 -22 49.90
Hallibrtn .36 .6 21 +4.12 +40.1 57.20
HareyD .50 1.1 30 +4.07 +32.4 45.91
HartfdFn .40 1.7 6 -.51 -9.9 23.87
HItMgmt ... ... 15 -.16 +7.8 10.28
HeclaM ... ... 40 +.15 -25.9 8.34
Hertz ... ... 26 +.80 +8.2 15.68
HewlettP .48 1.3 9 +1.61 -12.8 36.70
HomeDp 1.00 2.7 .18 +.61 +4.2' 36.52
Honwllntl 1.33 2.4 19 -.85 +6.1 56.40
HostHotls .12 .7 ... +.17 -5.0 16.97
Hyperdyn ... .......+.97 +9.9 5.45
ING .. .. +.85 +18.3 11.58
iShGold ......... +.09 +12.6 15.65
iSAstla 1.06 4.1 ... +1.23 +2.5 26.08
iShBraz 3.42 4.8 ... +1.74 -7.8 71.34
iShGer .67 2.5 ... +.78 +10.6 26.47
iShHK .42 2.3 ... +.46 -2.0 18.55
iShJapn .17 1.6 ... +.22 -.3 10.88
iSMalas .39 2.6 ... -.04 +5.6 '15.18
iSTaiwn .29 ...... +.49 -1.6 15.37
iSh UK .48 2.7 ... +.58 +4.1 18.08
iShSilver ... ... ... +.83 +29.5 39.07


New York Stock Exchange


Wkly YTD Wkly
Name Dlv YId PE Chg %Chg Last


S www.edwardjones.com Member SIPC


S ^^^ illli^


WMy YTD Wkly
Name DIv Yld PE Chg %Chg Last


iShChina25 .85' 2.0
iShEMkts .84 1.8
iShB20T 4.02 4.2
iSEafe 1.68 2.8
iSR1KG .77 1.2
iShR2K .94 1.1
iShREst 2.09 3.3
IngerRd .48 1.2
IBM 3.00 1.6
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IntPap 1.05 3.4
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JPMorgCh 1.00 2.4
Jabil .28 1.4
JanusCap .20 2.2
JohnJn 2.28 3.4
JohnsnCtl .64 1.6
JnprNtwk ...
KB Home .25 2.7
Keycorp .12 1.4
Kimco .72 3.5
Kinrossg .10 .6
Kraft 1.16 3.3
LDK Solar ...
LSI Corp ... ...
LVSands ...
LennarA .16 .9
illyEli 1.96 5.1
Limited .80 2.0
UncNat .20 .7


... +1.11
+.99
S-.12
... +2.00
... +1.35
... +1.24
... +1.68
... -4.37
15 +9.64
21 +.24
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14 +.47
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18 -.84
29 +.64
.. +.07
9 +.48
... +.95'
26 +.18
21 +.06
2 +.73
... +.02
57 +1.63
35 +.86
9 +.37
16 +.34
10 +.63


-1.5 42.44
47.65
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-28.4 7.25
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-.8 18.60
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-.1 27.79


Nasdaq Most Active


Wkly YTD Wkly
Name Div YId PE Chg %Chg Last


Cree Inc
CypSemi .36
Dell Inc
DirecTV A ...
DryShips ...
Dynavax
E-Trade ...
eBay
ElectArts ...
Enerl
EntropCom ...
EricsnTel .37
Expedia .28
ExpScripts...
F5 Netwks ...
FifthThird .24
Finisar
FstNiagara .64
TNDXTc .16
Flextm
Fortinet s
Francescn ...
GT Solar ...
GileadSci
Google
HansenMed...
Hasbro 1.20
HercOffsh ...
HudsCity .32
HumGen ...
Informant
Intel .84
InterDig .40
Intuit
JA Solar
JDS Uniph ...
JetBlue
KLATnc 1.40


21 +2.72 -48.7 33.83
33 +1.36 +20.2 22.34
10 +.07 +25.8 17.04
19 +.20 +31.1 52.35
7 -.11 -28.4 3.93
... -.47 -20.3 2.55
65 +2.73 -2.3 15.64
25 +.69 +20.4 33.50
.. +.33 +46.1 23.93
... +.16 -74.9 .95
9 -.49 -33.2 8.07
... -.66 +14.3 13.18
21 -.21 +19.8 30.05.
25 +5.34 +6.0 57.30
38-12.74 -22.2 101.20
13 +.76 -12.7 12.81
19 +2.04 -35.3 19.21
18 -.21 -7.7 12.90
... +.53 +.3 25.79
9 +.87 -10.7 7.01
59 -5.76 +30.4 21.09
... 27.65
12 +.04 +66.4 15.18
14 +2.21 +19.2 43.21
21+20.61 +4.11 618.23
... +.27+226.8 4.87
15 -.87 -14.2 40.50
... -.20 +38.2 4.81
... +.08 -34.6 8.33
...-1.70 -10.0 21.50
58 +1.72 +25.5 55.25
10 +.76 +10.0 23.13
26+29.95 +75.2 72.96
23 -1.39 -2.7 47.96
3 +.43 -27.5, 5.02
57 +.43 +5.9 15.34
17 -.19 -18.0 5.42
11 +3.16 +14.2 44.11


Name Div
Level
LibtyMlntA ...
Lincare .80
LinearTch .96
lululemngs ...
MarinaBlo ...
Marvel ...
Mattel .92
Maximlntg .84
MelcoCrwn...
Microchp 1.38
MicronT
Microsoft .64
Move Inc
NABI Bio
NXPSemn...
NetApp
Netflix
NewsCpA .15
NewsCpB .15
NorTrst 1.12
Nvidia
OnSmcnd..
Oncothyr ...
Oracle .24
PMCSra ...
Paccar .48
Parkrvsnh ...
PattUTI .20
Paychex 1.24
PeopUtdF .63
PharmPdt .60
Polycoms ...
Popular
PwShs QQQ .42
Powrwav
Qualcom .86
RF MicD ...


Wkly YTD Wkly
YId PE Chg %Chg Last
...... +.08+148.0 2.43
... 17 -.18 +7.6 16.97
3.0 14 -2.66 -2.0 26.28
3.1 13 +.79 -9.6 31.27
.68 +2.90 +85.4 63.44
... ... +.05 -83.9 .25
... 12 +.46 -17.4 15.33
3.4 14 -.28 +6.2 27.01
3.5 17 +.24 +.5 23.74
.. ...+1.26+147.3 15.73
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... 13 +.68 +.9 8.09
2.3 10 +.75 -1.4 27.53
.+.12 -13.2 2.23
... -3.56 -64.2 2.07
.. ...+1.05 +8.6 22.74
... 30 +.42 -7.1 51.08
... 79-10.35 +57.4 276.58
.9 15 +.78 +12.8 16.42
.9 15 +.76 +2.6 16.85
2.4 18 +1.63 -17.1 45.92
... 37 +.90 -2.6 15.00
... 12 -.04 -6.0 9.29
...... +1.59+197.2 9.69
.7 19 +.46 +4.0 32.55
... 51 +.45 -11.6 7.59
1.0 32 +.94 -12.4 50.22
... ... +.61 +165.8 1.22
.6 28 +.23 +56.5 33.73
4.1 21 -.18 -3.3 29.89
4.7 28 -.28 -5.2 13.28
2.0 25 +2.84 +13.1 30.70
.48 -.33 +57.5 30.69
6 -.10 -22.0 2.45
.7 ... +1.75 +9.4 59.60
... 33 +.12 -8.3 2.33
1.5 25 +2.50 +16.1 57.46
15 +.47 -11.7 6.49


Widy YTD Wly
Name Div Yld PE Chg %Chg Last
LizClaib ......... +.58 -20.1 5.72
UoydBkg ... ... +.19 -26.5 3.02
LyonBasA .10 .3 .+1.45 +14.9 39.54
MBIA ... ... 5 -.36 -17.9 9.84
MEMC ... 47 +.45 -28.3 8.07
MFAFncl 1.00 12.8 9 +.03 -4.2 7.82
MGIC .... ..... -1.83 -59.1 4.17
MGMRsts .. ...... +.87 +6.4 15.80
Macys .40 1.3 14 +.52 +20.6 30.50
MagHRes......... +.31 +5.6 7.60
ManpwrGp .80 1.5 +.98 -14.3 53.77
MarathnOsl.00 3.1 7 +.33 +42.4 32.01
MarathPn ... ... ...+1.41 +4.0 40.57
MktVGold .40 .7 ...+1.04 -1.2 60.76
MarintA .40 1.1 28 +.17 -15.5 35.11
Masco .30 2.6 ... +.05 -9.8 11.42
McDrmlnts ... ... 18 +1.46 +4.0 21.51
MedcoHith .. ... 19+11.96 +7.7 65.96
Medtmic .97 2.6 13 -.05 -.1 37.07
Merck 1.52. 4.2 16 +.16 +.1 36.09
MetLife .74 1.8 12 +.17 -6.1 41.74
MetroPCS... ... 27 +.24 +36.4 17.23
Molycorpn ........ +8.07 +20.9 60.33
Monsanto 1.12 1.5 26 +1.35 +8.3 75.41
MorgStan .20 .8 52 +2.81 -12.2 23.90
Mosaic .20 .3 14 +6.13 -4.6 72.88
MotraSol n .. ...... +.81 +17.7 44.77
MotlaMon ... ...... +3.49 -15.4 '24.61
NCRCorp .. ... 14 +1.76 +35.5 20.83
Nabors ... 59 +1.25 +17.5 27.57
NalcoHId .14 .4 25 +7.91 +14.9 36.69
NBkGreece.29 ...... +.26-11.9 1.48




Wkly YTD Wkly,
Name Div YId. PE Chg %Chg Last
RschMotn ... ... 4 +.39 -52.0 27.91
Riverbeds ... ... ...-7.45 -8.7 32.12
SanDisk. ...... 9 +3.95 -8.6 45.57
Sanofirt ... ...... -.13 -15.3 1.99
Satconh ... ...... +.09-53.3 2.10
SeagateT .72 4.9 6 -2.24 -3.1 14.57
SifyTech .. .. -1.67 +95.6 4.42
Sina ... ...... -2.95 +66.0 114.22
SinoClnEn ... .. 1 +.24 -65.7 2.27
SirlusXM ... ...... -.17+32.5 2.16
Skullcdyn ... ...... ... -1.5 19.69
SkywksSol... ... 25 +4.30 -5.8 26.98
Sonus ... ... +.18 +22.1 3.26
Staples .40 2.5 13 +.54 -30.9 15.74
StarBulk .20 12.1 3 -.34 -37.9 1.66
Starbucks .52 1.3 28 +.55 +25.6 40.35
StIDynam .40 2.4 16 +.81 -9.6 16.54
Symantec ... ... 25 +.09 +13.9 19.06
TDAmeritr .20 1.0 19 +1.59 +3.3 19.61
Tellabs .08 1.8 21 +.21 -36.1 4.33
TevaPhrm .83 1.7 14 -.21 -8.4 47.76
TibcoSft ... ... 52 -.25 +39.2 27.44
Travelzoo ... ... ...-17.69 +43.6 59.40
TriQuint ... 9 +.90 -8.9 10.65
VarianSemi... .. 18 -.88 +63.9 60.59
VirgnMdah .16 .6 ... +.68 +3.5 28.20
Vodafone 1.44 5.3 ...+1.25 +2.2 27.02
WebMD ... ... 29 -9.86 -28.3 36.62'
Windstrm 1.00 7.9 22 +.10 -8.9 12.70
Wynn 2.00 1.2 55 +2.63 +59.1 165.25
Xilinx .76 2.3 14 +.18 +16.1 33.66
YRC Wwrs ... ...... -.28 -72.3 1.03
Yahoo ... 16 -.71 -15.9 13.98
Zagg ... ... 32 +.88+112.6 16.20
Zhongpin ... ... 6-1.58 -52.6 9.66
ZionBc .04 .2 ... +.27 -3.3 23.44


NatGrid 2.92
NOilVarco .44
NatSemi .40
NYCmtyB 1.00
NY Times ..
NewellRub .32
NewmtM .80
Nexen g .20
NextEraEn 2.20
NiSource .92
NikeB 1.24
NobleCorp 1.06
NokiaCp .55
NorflkSo 1.60
Nucor 1.45
OcciPet 1.84
OfficeDpt
OilSvHT 1.73
PG&E Cp 1.82
PMI Grp .
PNC 1.40
PPLCorp 1.40
PatriotCoal ...
PeabdyE .34
Penney .80
PepsiCo 2.06
Petrohawk ...
PetbrsA 1.34
Petrobras 1.28
Pfizer .80
PhilipMor 2.56
Potash s .28
PS USDBull...
PrUShS&P...
PrOShQQ rs...
ProUISP .35
ProUShL20 ...
PmUSSP500..
ProUSSlv rs..
ProgsvCp 1.40
ProUSR2K rs...
Prudentl 1.15
PulteGrp ...
OstDiag .40
RadianGrp .01
RangeRs .16
Raytheon 1.72
RegionsFn .04
ReneSola ...
Renren n
ReynAm s 2.12
RiteAid
RobtHalf .56
RoyDShllA 3.36
SFNGrp
SLM Cp .40
SpdirDJIA 3.08
SpdrGold ...
S&P500ETF2.44
SpdrHome .31
SpdrKbwBk .20
SpdrRetl .46
SpdrOGEx .47
SpdrMetM .42
Safeway .58
StJude .84
SandRdge ...
Sanofi 1.82
SaraLee .46
Schlmbrg 1.00
Schwab .24
SemiHTr .61
SideruNac .81
SilvWhtng .12
SilvrcpMg .08
SouthnCo 1.89
SoUnCo .60
SwstAirl .02
SwstnEngy ...


Name Div YId PE
AbdAsPac .42 5.4 ...
Adventrx ... ...
AlexcoRg ... ... ..t
AlidNevG ... ...
AntaresP ... ...
ArcadiaRs... ....
Augustag ... ..
Aurizong .
AvalRaren ... ....
Banrog ... ...
BarcGSOil ... ...
Brigusgrs ... ... ..
CelSci ... ...
CFCdag .01 ...
ChaniereEn... ......
ChinaShen... .....
CrystalRk ... ... 5
DejourEg ... ... ..
DenisnMg ... .....
eMagin ... ... 11
ExeterRgs ... ... ...
Express-1 ... ... 28
GabGldNR1.68 9.0 .
GascoEngy ... ......
Gastargrs ... .....
GenMoly
GoldStrg .
GranTrrag ... .....
GrtBasGg ... .....
GtPanSilv g ... ... 4
Hemisphrx ... ... ..
KimberRg ... .....
KodiakOg ... .....
LongweiPI ... ... 2
LucasEngy ... ...
MadCatzg ... ... 7
MetroHfth ... ... 8
MdwGold ... .....


... +1.11 +12.5 49.94
21 +4.75 +23.9 83.31
21 -.08 +79.8 24.74
12 -.67 -23.4 14.43
.. +.38 -7.7 9.05
14 -.13 -16.1 15.25
13 +1.28 -4.5 58.66
... +.87 +8.1 24.75
14 +.66 +10.5 57.46
20 +.62 +19.5 21.06
21 +.01 +7.4 91.71
21 +.68 +6.4 38.07
... +.32 -43.2 5.86
18 +2.30 +21.3 76.21
28 +1.61 -6.2 41.10
17 +2.54 +10.0 107.88
.. -.16 -33.3 3.60
... +7.87 +14.9 161.53
16 +.58 -10.6 42.76
... -.24 -68.8 1.03
8 -.23 -6.8 56.59-
12 +.23 +6.4 28.01
... +1.40 +28.4 24.88
18 +1.76 -4.1 61.37
18 -.15 -2.8 31.42
17 -2.77 +.7 65.76
... +.07+109.5 38.24
... +.40 -11.9 30.09
+.54 -12.0 33.30
19 +.32 +14.6 20.07
17 +5.18 +23.2 72.11
26 +2.44 +19.4 61.64
-.30 -7.0 21.13
-.90 -16.9 19.75
.. -2.98 -21.2 45.83
... +2.28 '+14.2 54.88
... -11.6 32.73
...-1.01 -25.2 14.51
... -.83 -65.9 13.39
12 +.41 +3.0 20.47
... -1.34 -20.4 39.98
9 +.17 +3.8 60.93
... +.25 -2.4 7.34
14 -1.07 +5.6 56.99
... -.75 -59.0 3.31
... +2.65 +43.2 64.43
8 +.69 +1.7 46.74
... +.21 -11.4 6.20
2 +.39 -44.2 4.88
... -.10 -43.6 10.16
15 -.92 +11.2 36.26
... +.03 +48.4 1.31
40 +3.97 -4.1 29.35
19 +2.23 +11.0 74.13
37 +4.73 +42.6 13.92
12 +.66 +32.7 16.71
-. +2.04 +9.5 126.60
+.92 +12.5 156.12
...+2.89 +7.0 134.58
... +.12 +1.8 17.70
... +.70 -8.3 23.77
... +.65 +13.6 54.95
... +3.06 +23.6 65.21
... +2.66 +4.4 71.80
13 -2.82 -6.9 20.93
17 +3.50 +15.6 49.42
... +.91 -+65.4 12.11
... +.47 +23.1 39.68
27 +.09 +11.9 19.59
26 +5.82 +12.3 93.81
26 +.43 -9.8 15.44
... +1.21 +3.9 33.79
... +.08 -32.4 11.27
38 +.71 +1.2 39.51
30 +.07 -10.8 11.45
18 +.36 +6.1 40.58
22 +.86 +83.8 44.25
17 -.30 -19.7 10.42
30 +1.47 +30.9' 49.00


Name Div
SprintNex ..
SP Matls 1.30
SPHlthC .63
SPCnSt .83
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Tesoro
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TwoHrblnv1.59 15.3
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AMEX Most Active

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Minfndg ...
NeoStem ...
Neoprobe ...
NewEnSys ...
NwGold g ...
NA Pall g ...
NDynMng ...
NthnO&G ...
NthgtMg ...
NovaGdg ...
Oilsandsg ...
OpkoHIth
OrsysXel rs ...
ParaG&S
PhrmAth
PionDrill
Protalix ...
Quaterrag ...
Quepasa
RareEle g ...
Rentech ...
RexahnPh...
Rubicong ...
SamsO&G ...
Senesco ...
SinoHub ...
Taseko
TmsalPet ...
TriangPet ...
Ur-Energy ...
Uranerz
UraniumEn ...
VantageDr ...
VimetX
VistaGold ...
VoyagerOG...
YM Bio ...


... +.14 +36.1
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... -.09 +15.5


Weekly Stock Exchange Highlights


STOCKS OF LOCAL INTEREST


Currencies
Last Pvs Day
.9208 .9224


,)d tul .


-----------------------------------


Page Editor: Robert Bridges, 754-0428


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Classified Department: 755-5440


LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED SUNDAY, JULY 24, 2011

Lake City Reporter




CLASSIFIED


Take ADvantage of the
Reporter Classifieds!

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Includes an additional $2.00 per
ad for each Wednesday insertion.'



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Monday to through Friday from 8:00
FAXm. to 5:00 p.m. 386-752-9400 Please
Some people prefer to place their
EMAIL: classified person, and some
ad categories will require prepay-
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These deadlines are suright to change without reete.























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ever, the first word of each ad may
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In Print and Online


Legal

SUWANNEE RIVER WATER
MANAGEMENT DISTRICT
PUBLIC NOTICE OF APPLICA-
TION
Notice is hereby given that pursuant
to Chapter 373, Florida Statutes, the
following application for permit was
received on July 12, 2011:
Bascom Norris Drive Mitigation
Modification, Columbia County
Board of Commissioners, PO Box
1529, Lake City, FL 32056, has sub-
mitted an application for an Environ-
mental Resource Permit Number 98-
0459M8, for a total project area of
68.23 acres with 2.9 acres of work
in, on, or over wetlands or other sur-
face waters. The project is located in
Township 3 South, Range 16 East,
and Sections 25, 35 and 36, in Co-
lumbia County.
Interested persons may comment
upon the application or submit a
written request for a staff report con-
taining proposed agency action re-
garding the application by writing to
the Suwannee River Water Manage-
ment District, Attn: Resource Man-
agement, 9225 C.R. 49, Live Oak,
Florida 32060. Such comments or
requests must be received by 5:00
PM within 21 days from the date of
publication.
No further public notice will be pro-
vided regarding this application. A
copy of the staff report must be re-
quested in order to remain advised of
further proceedings. Substantially
affected persons are entitled to re-
quest an administrative hearing, pur-
suant to Title 28, Florida Administra-
tive Code, regarding the proposed
agency action by submitting a writ-
ten request after reviewing the staff
report.
05526814
July 24, 2011,
100 Job
Opportunities,

05526712
Human Resources
Coordinator
Individual to manage human
resource functions in a fast
paced organization with 150
employees.
Functions: Administration,
Employment /Recruitment,
Orientation /Training / Profes-
sional Development, Benefits,
Communications,'
Compensation, Employee
Relations, Employee Assistance,
Performance Management.
Qualifications: B.S./B.A. in
Human Resources, Business
Administration or related field
preferred; minimidm 3-5 years
recent human resource related
experience (minimum 7-9
years exper. w/out degree);
minimum 3 years supervisory
experience; knowledge of HR
principles and.employment law;
excellent written/oral
communication skills; proficient.
in Microsoft computer
applications Outlook, Word
and Excel; database manage-
ment and recordkeeping skills;
organizational, detail and
time.management skills;
conflict resolution, mediation
and team building skills.
All applicants must pass
physical & DCF background
screenings. Excellent Benefits,
Paid Holidays, Sick/Annual
Leave, Health/Dental Insurance,
and more.
Deadline to apply: July 29,
2011, 4:00 p.m.
Apply at 236 SW Columbia
Ave, Lake City, FL
or Send resume to:
employment(@sv4cs.org
Fax (386) 754-2220
or Call 754-2233 EOE

05526753
Heavy Duty Fleet Mechanic
Needed for tractor-trailer fleet.
Looking for experience mechan-
ics to work at our Lake Butler
Facility. Must have own tools.
Competitive compensation
package w/benefits.
Apply in person at
1050 SE 6th St., Lake Butler.
or online at
www.pritdhetttrucking.com
No phone calls please.





INSURANCE AGENCY
Seeking a career minded &
motivated individual for a fast
paced insurance agency. Individual
must posses a 4-40 CSR License.
Must have excellent computer &
people skills. Benefits available.
Send reply to Box 05065, C/O The
Lake City Reporter, P.O. Box
1709, Lake City, FL, 32056
or fax to: 386-752-2102

VPK Teacher & Pre K3 teacher
needed. Experience reqd. CDA/AS
Degree preferred. Apply in person
at Wee Care in Columbia City






Land Clearing

Back Hoe, Dozer, Chopping, root
raking, bush hog, seeding, sod,
disking, site prep, ponds &
irrigation. Free Est! 386-623-3200


Services


o100 Opportunities

05526764




Florida Sheriffs Boys Ranch
Secondary Classroom/Science
Teacher
Preference will be given to
individuals that have a
bachelor's degree in education
and certification in middle
school integrated curriculum
and/or related certifications.
Consideration will also be given
to applicants with a bachelor's
degree and are eligible to
become certified and have a
background in working with
at-risk youth. We offer small
class sizes, multidisciplinary
team support and competitive
compensation. For more infor-
mation contact Susan Moffat,
Director of Education
(smoffat@youthranches.org)
386/842-5555 EOE/DFWP


05526809
$$$ OTR DRIVERS$$$
LOOKING FOR THAT JOB
THAT GETS YOU HOME



Our Name Says it All....
BONUS OPPORTUNITIES
ASK FOR MORE INFO!
Excellent Home Time
Great Benefit Package
Paid Vacation & Holidays
Class A CDL Required.
1-888-454-7995 or
www.superservicelc.com

05526824
Meridian Behavioral
Healthcare Inc.
www.mbhci.org
Please visit our website to view
current open opportunities and
to apply online :
Meridian is an active partner
with the National Health Service
Corps
Therapists:
Program Manager (Licensed)
Licensed, or Master's Level
in Outpatient
Bachelor's-Level in
.. Counselor Support
Case NManagemeqit ..
(hdult & child?
Master's Therapist in '
Methadone Clinic
Administration:
Medical Records
Client Relations Specialist
Medical Services
RN Nursing Manager DETOX
(Gville)
PRN RN, LPN, C.N.A.
Recovery Specialist
(Direct Care)
Facilities:
Maintenance
To see our current openings in
Mental Health and to apply
online, please go to:
www.mbhci.org
EOE, DFWP, E-Verify





CDL Class A Truck Driver.
Flatbed expi for F/T SE area.
3 years exp or more. Medical
benefits offered. Contact
Melissa or Mary @ 386-935-2773
Hiring Locally This Week
Liberty National Life
Insurance Company
Full Training Provided Potential
of $60K+ Annually. 401K, BCBS
Insurance & Pension for those who
qualify. Call 1-800-257-5500 to
set up an interview.
General Office/Bookkeeping
Must know QuickBooks &
Microsoft Programs. Punctual.
Please send resume & salary
requirements to: PO BOX 830,
Lake City, Florida 32056

ROOTS HAIR STUDIO
Needs an energetic Stylist.
Please call 386-752-9091
Sales Position available for moti-
vated individual Rountree -Moore
Toyota, Great benefits, paid train-
ing/vacation. Exp. a plus but not
necessary. Call Anthony Cosentino
386-623-7442
TRUCK DRIVER needed to go
from Jacksonville to Lake City
with layover in Lake City.
Prefer driver from Lake City.
Call (229)300-1744

120n Medical
11A Employment

05526649
Gainesville Women's Center
For Radiology
Arlene Weinshelbaum, M.D.


120\ Medical
120 Employment


05526742
College of Public
Health and Health
F Professions
F OC Department of
Speech Language
and Hearing. Sciences
Position Vacancy
Clinical Pediatric Audiologist
The Department of Speech Lan-
guage and Hearing Sciences has
initiated a search for a clinical
faculty member in audiology.
The department is a clinical/
educational/research unit within
the College of Public Health and
Health Professions at the
University of Florida Health
Science Center. This is a
12-month non-tenure clinical
faculty position. We are
seeking a dynamic personality to
fill a full time position in
pediatric audiology to serve a
uniquely diverse population.
Preference will be given to
applicants with clinical experi-
ence in a medical setting, having
expertise in pediatric diagnos-
tics, pediatric hearing aid fitting,
Auditory Processing Disorders
evaluation and management and
electrophysiology. Applicants
must have an AuD, be eligible
for a Florida license and the
ASHA CCC-A. Interested ap-
plicants should submit a letter of
interest referencing position title
Clinical Assistant Professor and
PeopleSoft position number
00020470, curriculum vitae, and
three letters of recommendation
to: Dana L. Ulmer, AuD, Chair
Search Committee, Department
of Speech Language and Hear-
ing Sciences Box 100174
UFHSC, Gainesville, FL 32610-
0174 USA. (Phone 352-273-
5315 fax 352-273-5301).
Email: dlulmer@phhp.ufl.edu.
Deadline for applications is Au-
gust 12, 2011. The University
of Florida is An Equal Opportu-
nity Employer. Individuals with
minority and/or disability status
are encouraged to apply. If an
accommodation due to a disabil-
ity is needed to apply for this
position please call 352-392-
2477 or the Florida Relay Sys-
tem at 800-955-8771 (TDD).

05526751
Very busy Medical office needs
experienced only in the
following areas:
* Authoriamtions and referrels
* Scheduling & collections
* Receptionist.
Must multi task and be a
dependable team player.
Fax resume to: Attn Cheryl
386-754-3657 or e-mail:
to office manager: at
primarycaremedic.com

05526754
Insurance Verifier
High volume Medical facility
seeking an Insurance Verifier.
Duties include Verify insurance
for limits and parameters of
policy, data entry, Gather
appropriate documentation, fill
out necessary forms and submit
authorization requests.
Maintain reports.
High school graduate,
knowledge of different types of
private health insurance plans
including managed care
arrangements.
Please send resume to
jpapesh@cancercarenorthflori-
da.com or fax to 386-628-9231.

05526767
Occupational Therapist
Avalon Healthcare Center is
currently accepting applications
for the full time position of
Occupational Therapist.
Competitive Salary and
Excellent benefit package as
well as A sign on bonus is
being offered.
Please contact Jennie Cruce
director of Rehab.
dor(iavalonhrc.com
Avalon Healthcare and Rehab
1270 S.W. Main Blvd.
Lake City, Florida 32025,
or fax resume to 386-752-8556
386-752-7900 EOE

Full Time Medical Assistant
needed for very busy paperless
Family Practice. Must be highly
motivated, multi-tasking and
patient centric. Intergy IEHR
experience a plus. Please fax
resume to: 386-961-9541

Lisc. Respiratory Therapist and
Lisc. RPSGT needed PDM
Sfor medical office in LC.
Fax resume (386) 754-1712

Faculty Position: Registered
Nurse (BSN) wanted at North
Florida Community College.
See www.nfcc.edu for details.


1 Medical
120 Employment

05526772
Advent Christian Village
call 658-5627or visit
www.acvillage.net
24 hrs/day, 7 days/week
Be your BEST,
Among the BEST
FT COTA FL -
LTC & Outpatient

FT certified occupational thera-
py assistarlt to assist with occu-
pational therapy/rehabilitation
and related activities in long-
term care and outpatient care
settings. Valid/unrestricted Flor-
ida certification required. Prior
experience preferred. Must be
committed to personalized, com-
passionate care. Will consider
PT work schedule as needed.
Onsite daycare and fitness
facilities. Apply in person at
Personnel Office Monday
through Fridayfrom 9:00 a.m.
until 4:00 p.m., or fax
resume/credentials to
(386)658-5160.,
EOE/DFW/Criminal
background checks required.


240 Schools &
240 Education

05526648
Interested in a Medical Career?
Express Training offers
courses for beginners & exp
Nursing Assistant, $479
next class-07/25/10

Phlebotomy national certifica-
tion, $800 next class-08/08/11

Continuing education
Fees incl. books, supplies, exam
fees. Call 386-755-4401 o'r
expresstrainingservices.com



310 Pets & Supplies
FREE/TRADE 1 yr old Pug.
Beautiful, register fawn colored
male w/black mask. Will trade for
a baby Pug. 386-752-6993
Mini Schnauzers. AKC.
Salt &Pepper Raised in home
$250.00 ea.. POP
386-288-5412 or 386-963-4324
PUBLISHER'S NOTE
Florida Law 828.29 requires dogs
and cats being sold to be at least 8
weeks old and have a health
certificate from a licensed
veterinarian documenting they
have mandatory shots and are
free from intestinal and external
parasites. Many species of wild-
life must be licensed by Florida
Fish and Wildlife. If you are
unsure, contact the local
office for information.


361 Farm Equipment
84 Ford 4610 Tractor.
2WD, Solid
2005 motor,$7,500. OBO
386-867-0005


402 Appliances
Emerson Quiet Cool. Heat &
Cool window unit. $135. obo
386-292-3927 or
386-755-5331.
FROST FREE Kenmore
refrigerator. Very clean. $250. obo
386-292-3927 or
386-755-5331.
GE 25cuft Refrigerator/Freezer
side by side 6 yrs old
Excellent condition.
$350. 386-752-8227
MAGIC CHEF GAS STOVE.
WHITE. $100.
386-292-3927 or
,386-755-5331.
Whirlpool Washer & Dryer.
Large capacity. Works great.
$285. for both.
386-292-3927 or 386-755-5331.


407 Computers
Compaq Computer, Many extras.
Complete Computer
$80.00
386-755-9984 or 386-292-2170


408 Furniture
Good sitting Love seat.
$35. obo386-292-3927 or
386-755-5331.

Table with 6 chairs.
$75. obo 386-292-3927 or
386-755-5331.


REPORTER Classifieds

In Print and On Line
www.lakecityreporter.com


420 Wanted to Buy
Wanted Junk Cars, Trucks, Vans.
$250 & up CASH! Free Pick Up!
NO title needed !386-878-9260
After 5pm 386- 752-3648.


430 Garage Sales

PUBLISHER'S NOTE
All Yard Sale Ads
Must be Pre-Paid.


440 Miscellaneous

Stop gnat & Mosquito bites! Buy
Swamp Gator All natural insect re-
pellent. Family safe. Use head to
toe. Available at The Home Depot.
Summer Barbecue Special
Tow Behind
Grill/Smoker, $1,250 OBO.
386-719-4802


520 Boats for Sale
1985 BONITA 90 HP Mercury,
Practivally new Trolling motor.
Good condition. $2,300.
(904)504-2620 after 5pin.

630t Mobile Homes
630 for Rent
2&3 BR MH. $395 $650. mo.
plus deposit. Water & sewer fur-
nished. Cannon Creek MHP
386-752-6422
2/2 Units, clean, well maintained,
nice safe park setting, 2 miles to
downtown Lake City, $575 month
+ $575 sec dep, 386-984-8448
13th Month FREE!!
3/2 S of Lake City, (Branford area)
S$575 month plus security
386-590-0642 or 386-867-1833
www.suwanneevalleyproperties.com
3br/2ba newly renovated MH on
1/2 ac. private property. Close to
college $700.mo. 1st. mo.+ Sec.
dep. Ref's. No Pets. Non smoking
environment 904-626-5700
LG clean 3br's $450. -$650. mo. +
dep..Also, 2br mobile home's
available. No Pets.
5 Points area. 386-961-1482
Mobile Homes for rent in
White Springs, Lake City & Ft.
White Contact 386-623-3404
or 386-365-1919
SWMH 1BR/IBA. Kit, LR.
No Pets. $450. mo $200 sec. dep.
In Ft. White Call for more
info. 386-497-3088. Lv message
X-Clean 2/2 SW, 8 mi NW of VA.
Clean acre lot, nice area. $500. mo
+ dep No dogs Non-smoking
environment.386-961-9181

Mobile Homes
640 for Sale
Handy man special, 94 Fleetwood
DWMH. 3/2 on 5 acres in Ft.
White. Owner Fin. $3,000 dn.
$850mo. $99,900 352-215-1018
www.LandOwnerFinancing.com
PALM HARBOR Homes Has 3
Modular Homes. Available at
HUGH Savings. Over 40K Off.
Call Today! 800-622-2832

Mobile Home
650 & Land
67.5 ac.Ranch, fenced & cross
fenced. Spacious moblie home
w/large front deck & RV hookup
MLS 75607 $299,000. Access
Realty. Patti Taylor. 386-623-6896

.705 Rooms for Rent

ROOMMATE NEEDED.
3br/2ba.' Quiet & cozy.
Call anytime and leave, message.
386-688-2777

710 Unfurnished Apt.
710 For Rent








05526481
SPRING HILL VILLAGE
Excellent High Springs location.
1, 2 & 3 bedroom floor-plans;
some with garages.
Call 386-454-1469
or visit our website:
www.springhillvillage.net

1BR APT.
Downtown Location, Clean.
$450 mo, plus Security.
NO PETS. Call 386-755-3456
2 bedroom Apartment
$600. mo
plus security deposit.
386-344-3715
2/1 w/garage & washer/dryer
hookups. East side of town,
Call for details
386-755-6867


DIVORCE, BANKRUPTCY,
RESUMES.
other court approved forms-
386-961-5896.


MAMMOGRAPHY TECH
wanted full time for private
Radiology office.ARRT &
Mammography certification req.
Fax resume to:
Tracy: (352)331-2044


* ADvantage








LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED SUNDAY JULY 24, 2011 Classified Department: 755-5440


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Charles & Angie Neeley
1149 E. Baya Ave.
386-752-1449


Thank You

Lake City &

Surrounding

Areas for


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SBuy any entree, get second entree at
FISTI equal or lesser value for

FREE!
It's our Offer Expires 8/15/11.
bi* Not valid with any other offers.
g J. birthday! ------------------
'^ rCome in and 313 NW Commons Loop, Ste. 119
help US 9 Lake City 386-754-1444
help us 9700 Deer Lake Ct., 13770 Beach Blvd, 1615 CR 220
celebrate all ste. 5 Ste. 9 #180
3' y Jacksonville Jacksonville Orange Park
S this month! 904-564-2377 904-821-4440 904-278-6055


LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED SUNDAY, JULY 24, 2011


Classified Department: 755-5440


11:'


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LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED SUNDAY, JULY 24, 2011


710 Unfurnished Apt.
710 For Rent
2BR/1.5BA w/garage
5 minutes from VA hospital.
Call for details.
386-755-4590 or 365-5150
A Landlord You Can Love!
2 br Apts $575. & up + sec. Great
area. CH/A washer/dryer hookups.
386-758-9351/352-208-2421
Amber Wood Hills Apts.
Private Patio area. Beautiful yard.
Washer/dryer hkup. Free water &
sewer. 1/1, 2/1. Move in special.
386-754-1800. wwwmvflapts.com
Beautiful Apt, Large 1 bdrm,
w/inground pool, CHA, details at
bigfloridahome.com
$650/mo + dep 386-344-3261
Columbia Arms Apt. located 1/2
mi from V.A. & Winn Dixie. Pet
Friendly. Move in Special $199.
Pool, laundry & balcony.
386-754-1800. www.myflapts.com
Furnished or unfurnished
Townhomes on the golf course.
$750. mo. plus security. Includes
water. 386-752-9626
Greentree Townhouse
Summer special. 2/1, 2/1.5. Free
water & sewer. Balcony & patio.
Laundry. Behind Kens on Hwy 90.
386-754-1800 wwwmvflapts.com
Large & clean. lbr/lba apt.
CH/A Ig walk in closet. Close to
town. $395. mo and $350. dep.
(904)563-6208









Redwine Apartments. Move in
special $199. Limited time. Pets
welcome, with 5 complexes,
we have a home for you.
386-754-1800. www.mvflapts.com
Summer Special! 12th mo Free
w/signed yr lease. Updated, w/tile
floors/fresh paint. Great area.
From $450.+sec. 386-752-9626
The Lakes Apts. Studios & 1Br's
from $135/wk. Util. & cable incl.,,
Sec 8 vouchers accepted, monthly
rates avail Call 386-752-2741
Unfumished Apt'- Eastside
Village Realty, Inc .2 bedroom
1 bath Duplex must be 55+ yrs of
age Call Denise Bose @
386-752-5290
Wayne Manor Apts.
Move in $199. Summer special.
2/1, washer/dryer. Behind Kens off
Hwy 90. 386-754-1800
www.mvflapts.com
Windsor Arms Apartments.
Summer special $199. Move in!
2/1, 2/1.5, 2/2. Pet Friendy. Free
200 ch. Dish. Washer/dryer hkup.
386-754-1800. www.mvflapts.com


720 Furnished Apts.
2 For Rent
Rooms for Rent. Hillcre$t.g.ans,
Columbia. All furnished. Electric,
cable, fridge, microwave. Weekly
or monthly rates; 1 person $135,
2 persons $150. weekly
*386-752-5808


Unfurnished
730 Home For Rent


05526822
LAKE CITY
2BR/1BA, Mobile Home
$495mo
2BR/1.5BA, 975SF $725. mo
4BR/3BA, 2139SF $1500. mo
4BR/2BA, 1248SF$695. mo
2 AVAILABLE
3BR/2BA 1258SF $925. mo
3BR/2BA 1582SF $900. mo
3BR/2BA 1246SF $700. mo
2BR/1BA 700SF $495. mo
2 AVAILABLE
3BR/1.5BA 1040SF $825

FT WHITE

3BR/2BA 1512SF $850. mo
LAKE BUTLER

4BR/2BA 1560SF $750 mo

MADISON

2BR/1BA JUST REMODELED
$450. mo. 2 AVAILABLE

Mike Foster 386-288-3596
Mitchell Lee 386-867-1155
1688 SE Baya Dr., Suite 105
Lake City, FL 32025
www.NorthFloridahomeandland.com
Accredited Real Estate is a Full
Service Real Estate Office.
We do: Rentals
Property Management
Property Sales.


3/2, Ir, dr, fam rm w/fp, 2-car
garage, fenced bk yd.
1792 sq ft. $1050.mo. Martha Jo
Khachigan, Realtor 623-2848
A TRUE FAMILY HOME
3br/2ba Newly remodeled.
Large Yard & Porch. Call for more
details 386-867-9231
Completely remodeled Brick.
3br/2ba 1750 sqft. Lg lot. Includes
washer, dryer, stove, & fridge.
$985. mo $985 dep. 386-752-7578
Lg 2300 + sf home. 3 or 4 br/2 ba
on Ig lot in cul de sac. Family
room w/fireplace. Enclosed patio,
Ig workshop/garage. Security sys-
tem and more. Available Now! for
info call 386-697-6534.
Quiet & private country home.
2br/lba. New energy efficient
appliances. New Central A/C.
$695. mo. 386-752-1444
SWMH 2/2 in Wellborn,
$625 mo, and
$625 security.
386-365-1243 or 397-2619


7 Unfurnished
730 Home For Rent
Unfurnished 2 bedroom/I bath
house. $700.00 per month.
First, last and security Firm.
386-590-5333

7 Business&
750 Office Rentals
For Lease: E Baya Ave. Two -
1000 sqft office space units or
combined for 2000 sqft. 386-984-
0622 or.weekends 386-497-4762
OFFICE SPACE for lease.
Oak Hill Plaza. 900 sqft
$675mo/$695. sec dep.
Tom 386-961-1086 DCA Realtor

790 Vacation Rentals
Horseshoe Beach RV Lot.
Nice cmrer Lot with shade trees.
$295. mo Water/electric included
386-235-3633 or 352-498-5986
Scalloping Horseshoe Beach Spcl
Gulf Front 2br, w/lg porch, dock,
fish sink. wkend $395./wk $895.
386-235-3633/352-498-5986
alwaysonvacation.com #419-181
"Florida's Last Frontier"

805 Lots for Sale
Lots for Sale Eastside
Village Realty, Inc. buildable
vacant lot hight & dry in a estab-
lished neighbor priced @ $40,000.
Call Denise Bose @ 752-5290


PUBLISHER'S NUt'IE
All real estate advertising in this
newspaper is subject to the fair
housing act which makes it illegal
to advertise "any preference,
limitation, or discrimination based
on race, color, religion, sex,
disability, familial status or nation-
al origin; or any intention to make
such preference, limitation or
discrimination." Familial status
includes children under the age of
'18 living with parents or legal
custodians, pregnant women and
people securing custody of chil-
dren under the age of 18. This
newspaper will not knowingly
accept any advertising for real es-
tate which is in violation of the
law. Our readers are hereby in-
formed that all dwellings adver-
tised in this newspaper are availa-
ble on an equal opportunity basis.
To complain of discrimination call
HUD toll free at 1-800-669-9777,
the toll free
telephone number to the hearing
impaired is 1-800-927-9275.

810 Home for Sale
2/1 completely updated, screened
back porch, large utility room,
MLS#77413 $52,900 Call Nancy
Rogers R.E.O. Realty
386-867-1271


810 Home for Sale
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
New home in Mayfair. 4 bedroom
on comer lot. Covered Porch.
Elaine K. Tolar 386-755-6488
MLS# 76919 $209,900
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
Remodeled 2/2 (could be 3/2).
Split floor plan. Home Owner
Warranty. Mary Brown Whitehurst
965-0887 MLS# 77943 $99,000
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
MH in Eastside Village a 55+
retirement community. Well main-
tained. Bruce Dicks 386-365-3784
MLS# 78350 $59,900
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
Brick home on Suwannee River
$329,900 Elaine K. Tolar 386-755-
6488 or Lori G. Simpson 365-5678
MLS# 70790 $329,900
DESIRABLE GWEN LAKE area!
Nice 3BR/2BA home on corer lot
REDUCED TO $95,000 DANIEL
CRAPPS AGENCY, INC.
755-5110 #77307
Hallmark Real Estate. 3/2
Doiblewide on 1 acre. $58,000.
Not far to college & airport.
MLS# 78308
Ginger Parker 386-365-2135
Hallmark Real Estate. 35 High &
Dry acres. open pasture w/scat-
tered trees. Older site built home.
Needs some TLC.
MLS#76186 Jay Sears 719-0382
Hallmark Real Estate. Beautiful
lot in Woodborough; has well
maintained 3/2 brick home.
Affordable price!MLS#75413
Sherry Willis 386-365-8095
Hallmark Real Estate. Lakefront
in town on, 1 ac. Majestic oaks &
Magnolias. Hardwood floors,
fireplace & basement.
MLS#78385 Jay Sears 719-0382
Hallmark Real Estate. Pool &
Patio. 3br/2ba. brick home on
1.69 ac. Workshop &
SWMH on property. MLS#78117
Tanya Shaffer 386-397-4766
Hallmark Real Estate. Time to go
to the River. Stilt home w/covered
decking. Floating dock,out bldgs
& covered RV parking. $188K.
MLS#72068 Janet Creel 719-0382
Handyman Special
Off Turner Rd. 2br/1.5ba.
Half acre fenced lot w/shed.
Asking $55,000. (352)335-8330


HANDYMAN SPECIAL!
4BR/2BAmfg home in great lbca-
tion close to many amenities
$39,500 DANIEL CRAPPS
AGENCY, INC. 755-5110 #77852
Home for Sale Eastside Village
Realty, Inc. 2 bedroom, 2 bath site
built home with screen porch,
large carport priced just right Call
Denise Bose @ 752-5290
Home on 15 ac. w/over 2,500 sqft
home.Very Ig bedrooms w/private
baths. 24x24 workshop $235,000
MLS 77552 Brittany Stoeckert


3/2 1056 sqft Brick home in town. Resmts Ieary Jo3-J,/-J3/J
Fenced back yar4,w/!2x12 work L c, ,4 3 filyVh e. 16 20
shop Just RecdtddI 99009 W screened porchW W-dfl 4p. 45 ac.
, AMLS# 77414 Call 386-24 3-8227, fenced/cross fencedMILS 74339
R.E.O.Realty Group, Inc $229,900. N Fla Homeland Real-
r, n tn ty Darlene Hart 386-288-2878
'4~ A19 9I ) L on5 areYecan


./11 JuuJ j. Tm v. on: a cre rec anu-
gular lot w/tons'of potential.
MLS#77568 $79,900 Call Nancy
@ R.E.O. Realty 386-867-1271
nancytrogers@msn.com
3/2 home on .67 ac. Creekside S/D
SFenced back yard,/lots of trees.
Split floor plan on cul-de-sac
MLS 77385 Access Realty.
Patti Taylor $169,900 623-6896
4/2 on 10.5 acres w/ detached
Garage, patio, above ground pool,
MLS# 77410 $189,888
R.E.O. Realty Group, Inc
386-243-8227
4/2 with 1000 sq ft workshop,
fenced yard, 2 car garage, Fairly
new roof & HVAC MLS#77602,
Bring Offers! $164,900,
R.E.O. Realty Group 243-8227
4br brick on .51 ac. comer lot. For-
mal dining and a large open floor
plan. Brick patio. $139,888
MLS 76763 Brittany Stoeckerit
Results Realty 386-397-3473
Access Realty Stylish 3/2 + pool
house w/1/2 bath on 2.25 acres.
Rear deck, 2 car garage & carport.
MLS 78103 $189,900.
Patti Taylor.623-6896
BEAUTIFUL Lake Front home!
1 ac lot within the city limits.
Close to town. 1800 heated sq. ft.
$144,900 MLS# 78385
Call Jay Sears. 386-867-1613
Brick 3/1 family home, 4.43 acres.
S w/metal roof. MLS# 77415
Short sale acceptance w/lenders
approval. $89,000. 386-243-8227
R.E.O. Realty Group, Inc
CLEAN & READY! 3BR/2BA
mfg home on .97-acre south of Ft.
White on paved road $59,000
DANIEL CRAPPS AGENCY,
INC. 755-5110 #78007
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
3/2 brick home in Woodcrest. Lg
lot completely fenced. Easy access
to amenities. Elaine K. Tolar 386-
755-6488 MLS# 78148 $129,900
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
3/3 in beautiful area. 2414sqft.
Private yard & patio with storage
bldg. Lori G Simpson 386-365-
5678 MLS# 78175 $159,900


Mayfair S/D, nice fenced in back
yard w/small lake behind property.
Very nice. $99,888
MLS 77092 Brittany Stoeckert
Results Realty 386-397-3473
Neat as a pin! Split floor plan
w/well manicured lawn. 10x12
storage shed. $129K MLS 77932
Darlene Hart 386-288-2878
N Fla Homeland Realty
QUALITY HOME. Very private,
yet in the city. Comes with mobile
home park that generates revenue.
$695,000. MLS# 77920
Call Jay Sears. 386-867-1613
REDUCED! Custom 2,061 SqFt
home with open floor plan,
3BR/2.5BA, in-ground pool
DANIEL CRAPPS AGENCY,
INC. 755-5110 #75442
RUSSWOOD EST! 3BR/2BA
w/2,337 SqFt; open floor plan,
climatized sun porch $219,900
DANIEL CRAPPS AGENCY,
INC. 755-5110 #77633
Southern Oaks Country Club.
3br/2.5baAprox 3000 sqft. Split
floor plan: on the 9th Fairway.
New AC, 2.5 car garage. sprinkler,
concrete drive. Avail. furnished or
unfurnished. Move in ready w/all
appliances. Avail. now Built in
1992. Open to serious offers.
(305)872-7911 View at
www.lakecitygolfvilla.com
Spacious 4/2 home on 1 ac. Split
floor plan. Great neighborhood.
Easy access to 1-75 $220K MLS
77859 N Fla Homeland Realty
Darlene Hart 386-288-2878
WELLBORN! 4BR/2BA mfg
home w/2,280 SqFt, FP, & 5
ACRES only $74,900
DANIEL CRAPPS AGENCY,
INC. 755-5110 #78317

820 Farms&
O v Acreage
10 ac. Ft. White $39,995,
$995 Down, $273.16 nrro.
Seller fin. vargasrealty.com
352-472-3154
10-ac lot. Well/septic/pp. Owner
financing $300 dn, $663 mo 8.9%,
25 yrs. Deas Bullard Properties
386-752-4339 www.landtfl.com


Private Estate
Within the city limits. Beautiful old- -
er home with mature landscaping
and lake views, 6 Br., 3.5 baths,
3 fireplaces, private paved drive.
39.7 acres of property included
with home. $994,000 or $3,000
mo. for rent or home plus 2 acres
only $495,000. Call for additional
information and showings.

Listing Agent Mary Brown Whitehurst

(386) 965-0887

S or co-owner (386)397-5131


820 Farms &
2 Acreage
2+ ACRES ON HWY 47
by 1-75 interchange. More than
200 ft of frontage $149,900
Call 386-243-8227
R.E.O. Realty Group, Inc
20.02 acres ready for your site
built home. Has 2 wells & 2 power
poles w/a 24x30 slab $132,000
MLS# 78126 Call 386-243-8227
R.E.O.Realty Group, Inc
4 1/2 acre lot. Lake Jeffery Road.
Gorgeous Oaks!Paved Rd
Owner Financing! NO DOWN!
$59,900. $525mo 352-215-1018.
www.LandOwnerFinancing.com
4 acres, Wellborn, New Well
installed, Beautifully wooded
w/cleared Home Site, owner fin,
no down, $39,900, $410 mon
Call 352-215-101.8
www.LandOwnerFinancing.com
FARM- 7 stall barn.
17+ acres, pasture, cross fenced.
Close in $500. mo.
386-961-1086
Paved hard road in front of 5 ac.
tract. Comes with: power pole,
well & septic. Cleared in back.
Also, 20X25 carport. $39,900
MLS# 76347. Jay 386-867-1613

S Commercial
830 Property

05526409
FOR SALE LAKE CITY
FORMER 84 LUMBER Zoned
Commercial Intensive on
4.2 +/- Acres with an 18,300
S.F. main building at 1824 W.
US Highway 90; contact
Crystal 724 228-3636 x 1349

Prime Commercial Location.
Just across from plaza. Frontage
on Baya w/2 curbcuts. $350,000
MLS# 77485 Call 386-243-8227
R.E.O.Realty Group, Inc

870 Real Estate
870 Wanted
I Buy Houses
CASH!
Quick Sale Fair Price
386-269-0605



Contact us


at the paper.






.? ,ClASSIFIED ADS
S 386-755-5440


SUBSCRIPTION
386-755-5445


ALL OTHER DEPARTMENTS
386-752-1293


IE ECTRONIC ADS SEND TO
'aIds@akecityreportercom

Mon.-FrL: 8 am.- 5:00p.m."

1ZtSWOIpTR WORKS fmr YOUR
PM.


l Eastr DuvalS
Lake City, Fida


Professional Office Space For Lease
11,728 S.F.
Excellent location just east of 1-75
Abundant free parking
Immediate occupancy PROCACCI
DEVELOPMENT CORPORATION









ON WHEELS & WATERCRAFT -


2010 Ford Fusion
SEL
V6, auto, leather, loaded,
7,000 mi., showroom cond.

$18,500
Call
386-752-8227


2009 Jamboree
31M
Ford V-10, 2 slides w/32
in. HDTV, satellite.
Av. retail $81,500.
Now $67,000
Call
386-719-6833


To place your


classified ad call



755-5440


4 E I


1$ 1


*,Ad runs 10 consecutive days
with a description and photo in the
newspaper and online E-edition.
* Ad runs 10 consecutive days as a
classified line ad online.
* You must include vehicle price.
* All ads are prepaid.
* Private party only.
I .:. MlK'._,- _. i


$10,500
Call
386-555-5555
If you don't sell your vehicle
during the first 10 days, you
can run the same vehicle ad
for 10 additional days for
only $15.00
Terms and conditions remain the
same for the additional run.



Ca l


i *386-, *55_


mmmmmmmmmmmmmm


Classified Department: 755-5440


.


I





















CHRISTMAS IN JULY D

'CAsH s A ND
NEIGHBOR To NE IGHBOR
Just a Few Minutes East and Worth the Drive!

RL -

C ~m E~E* R LYCHEVY 2011 SILVIERADO








2011 CAMARO














CHE VROLET
273 E. Macclenny Ave, Macclenny, FL (904) 259-6117
119 South Sixt St., Macclenny, FL (904) 259-5796
World Class Service Before, During and after the Sale.


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Story ideas?

Contact
Robert Bridges
Editor
754-0428
*t 'r ,~,1- 2".j :- r .'


Lake City Reporter





LIFE


Sunday, July 24, 2011


www.lakecityreporter.com


Section D


GARDEN TALK
7-


g
Nichelle Demorest
dndemorest@ufl.edu


Growing

food

for the

family


reasons for
growing a home
vegetable gar-
den. Growing
food for the table is just
the beginning. Some peo-
ple garden as a hobby, for
exercise, or for the love of
working outdoors. There's
a trend toward growing
chemical-free food that we
know is safe. We all know
that fresh just tastes better.
And it couldn't hurt to save
money while we are enjoy-
ing all these other benefits.
When planning a new
garden, how much should
you plant for a family of
four? That depends on
so many factors. Are you
going to just eat fresh food
or will you preserve some?
There are some vegetable
plants that can be grown
in succession so that
every two to three weeks
there's a fresh crop to eat
Companion planting makes
it possible to get more use
of space by planting differ-
ent crops together.
Vegetable gardening
isn't always a bowlful of
cherry tomatoes: In fact,
many people have called
with tomato problems
this year. The plants have
grown well, looked healthy,
bloomed, but failed to pro-
duce a crop. Squash plants
without pr6per bee pol-
lination show similar crop
failure.
The tomato crop failure
is likely due to high night
time temperatures we
experienced earlier this
summer. We often have
a tendency to over water
and over fertilize to solve
plant problems, but in this
case, these actions would
only make this problem
worse. Yes, we deal with
more than our share of
pests and weather prob-
lems in our Florida veg-
etable gardens.
Growing food for the
table, however, can be
a very rewarding family
project. I have wonderful
memories of my little boy
carefully plucking black-
berries from a thorny
vine, gently planting a
bean plant that he grew at
school, and happily shar-
ing his just-picked water-
melon as we sat beneath
the shade tree.
Get 'Back to Basics'
this fall by growing a
garden with your family.
The University of Florida
Extension is offering
an eight session course
on 'Home Vegetable
Gardening.' Sessions are
offered in both Fort White
and Lake City and-will
cover a variety of topics.
Call the office at 752-5384
for more information.
Sessions will be held on
Tuesday beginning July
26.

* D. Nichelle Demorest is
a horticulture agent with the
Columbia County Extension
of the University of Florida
Institute of Food and
Agricultural Sciences.


By LEANNE TYO
Ityo@lakecityreporter. com
Helping the sick focus on
something other than their pain,
even just for a moment, has
become Diane West's life work.
West, 74, of Lake City, doesn't
do that work alone.
Alongside her are her two
German shepherd dogs, Saaba
and Emmitt, who help West vol-
unteer at local agencies for pet
therapy.
West has been practicing pet
therapy for almost four years.
She first started at the Robert H.
Jenkins Jr. Veterans' Domiciliary
Home of Florida in Lake City
about a year after she got Saaba,
her first dog.
"I had to go to training so I
would know how to handle her,"
West said. "About a year later, I
thought I ought to do something
useful with the dog."
West would take Saaba in for
casual visits with the Domiciliary
veterans and then added the
Lake City VA Medical Center to
her visitation list
Rules for bringing pets to visit
patients began to change, West
said, so she acquired a Canine
Good Citizen certification from
the American Kennel Club, a
test she and Saaba had to pass
together to continue doing pet
therapy.
According to the AKC website,
the CGC requires a dog to pass
various tests, like accepting a
friendly stranger, sitting politely
for petting, and reacting well to
distractions as well as to other
dogs.
When she got her second dog,
Emmitt, she also got him trained
and CGC certified.
"A lot of places won't take an
animal unless it has that certifi-
cate," West said.
With the CGCs, West started
taking her dogs to visit patients
at Haven Hospice in Lake City
and soon she became Haven
Hospice's pet therapy liaison.
West also had to undergo other
training herself, like patient and
family training at Haven Hospice,
to continue as a pet therapy vol-
unteer.
Now, West and her dogs see
patients at Haven Hospice almost
every day and West is work-
ing on the pet therapy program
there. When she and her pets
aren't at Haven Hospice visiting,
they still go to visit the veterans
at the Domiciliary and the VA
Medical Center.
West, a self-proclaimed animal
lover, also has three Maine Coon
cats and pet fish at home. She
chose to use her animals to help
other people because she was
taught how to handle them.
"I'm not good at helping
people myself," West said, "but
the animals, I'm good with. I
was taught to be. It's something
you can learn, because I learned
it and look at how old I am. I
learned it late in life."
Saaba and Emmitt are trained
how to behave around patients,
West said, and they are soft for
the patients to pet and touch.
They are also sensitive to the
patients' needs and level of sick-
ness, West said.
"She (Saaba) can tell just how
bad anybody is," West said. "And
she'll be just like that (lying
down). She knows when to go
up and she knows when to stay
away. They have a sixth sense.
So I follow her lead. I really do."
Having a pet visit patients
makes them smile, or even
laugh, West said, and it almost
always makes them forget about


~,k.*


ABOVE: Diane West, 74, of
Lake City, is devoted to helping
those with illnesses forget their
troubles if only for a short
time through pet therapy.
West and her two German
shepherd dogs Saaba, 6, and
Emmitt, 3, visit residents at the
Robert H. Jenkins Jr. Veterans'
Domiciliary Home of Florida,
the Lake City VA Medical
Center, and Haven Hospice
patients. LEFT: Saaba rests
her head on West's lap in her
backyard. BELOW: Emmitt, the
youngest of her German shep-
herds, enjoys a rub behind the
ears. West said that he likes
small children so much that he
has allowed them to jump on
his back for a quick ride.
Photos by JASON MATTHEW WALKER/
Lake City Reporter


PETS continued on 4D


PET PROJECT


Diane West's therapy dogs help the siic

forget their pain if only for a moment .











LAKE CITY REPORTER LIFE SUNDAY, JULY 24, 2011 Page Editor: Robert Bridges~ 754-0428


Need


a job?


Get a


skill!


By CARL ROMANO
Coordinator, Industrial
Technology, Florida Gateway
College
Florida Gateway
College is registering
now for fall classes, which
start August 22. If you
like to work with your
hands
and mind
we have
two great
programs
for you,
which
will not
Romano be out-
sourced in our Global
Economy.
The programs I am
writing about are Welding
and HVAC-Commercial
Refrigeration. These are
two highly skilled crafts
which are needed in our
country as our skilled
workforce is getting gray
and needs new blood.
The Welding and HVAC
programs here at Florida
Gateway College use a
system of learning called
competency-based educa-
tion (CBE). These com-
petency-based programs
are centered on teaching
specific job skills required
in industry. CBE is a per-
sonalized teaching system
that has the following
characteristics: Ongoing
program, open entry-open
exit, credit granted for
work completed, fixed
content in each course
and a variety of student
levels served in each
class.,,
This 'competeficy-'"
based program has
several very important
benefits for you. You will
be given a list of the skills
and knowledge needed
to complete the program
successfully. Performance
will not be compared to
that of other students, but
to a fixed standard which
has been set for the pro-
gram. If you have already
acquired certain skills
required for this program
you may simply demon-
strate this and focus your
attention on new skills.
You will be able to review
learning materials several
times in order to attain
the skill or knowledge.
If you are able to attain
the skills easily, you may
progress through the
program faster than the
average person may.
What's required of you,
for this to work? You will
be expected to assume
the responsibility for
your own learning. Your
instructor will give you
assistance, but the actual
responsibility for learning
rests with you, the stu-
dent. Utilize the materials
provided for you. The
program's resources have
been carefully chosen and
developed to help you
: learn. Devote your energy
* to attaining the skills and
: knowledge required for
your program.
The instructor's role in
* our programs is to work
With students individually
and guide them through
the learning process with
the help of many differ-
ent learning resources. It
is this type of team work
that will create success
for everyone.
Core and HVAC Level


1 curriculum. The Core
covers basic safety, tools
and their uses, construc-
tion drawings, trade
math and communica-
tion skills. HVAC Level 1
includes an introduction
to the HVAC&R trade, to
electricity, to heating and
cooling as wells as sol-
SKILLS continued on 4D


In heat wave, wintry states



wishing for some December


By CHRIS WILLAMS
and COUN FLY
Associated Press

MINNEAPOIUS In the
land of giant ice castles, where
auto makers test their vehicles
against extreme cold and peo-
ple play hockey year-round, ifs
not uncommon to hear some
griping about the weather.
The Upper Midwest is
accustomed to extreme tem-
peratures. Just not in the cur-
rent direction.
Parts of the region are suf-
fering through the worst heat
wave in more than a decade,
leaving residents who usu-
ally eagerly await a too-short
summer longing for a taste
of December. The heat index
topped 119 degrees Tuesday
in Minneapolis. And it felt like
105 degrees in Madison, Wis.
Even at the Minnesota Zoo,
known for displaying north-
ern-latitude animals, workers
say the heat can make some
animals like people "real-
ly crabby." But they're keeping
thick-furred tigers happy with
"bloodsicles."
"Ifs kind of gross, butthey
like it," said Diana Weinhardt,
who supervises theNorthern
Trails exhibit She spent 15
years at'the zoo in Houston,
and admitted the heat was
even rough on her.
'This is very, very Texas-
esque weather and ifs hard,
especially if you're not used
to it In Texas we all kind of
grew hardened to it, but here
-ugh."
In Minneapolis, some
employees of The Olsen Fish
Company which bills itself
as the world's largest producer
of the Scandinavian delicacy
lutefisk have refused to
go outside on break Instead,
Stheyre.hanging out in the 44-
degregrpor where pickled ',
herrint is processed, company
president Chris Dorff said.
When they do venture out-
side; they get plenty of space
Son the commuter train home
because "when you work in
a herring and lutefisk facility,
you have this, this odor," Dorff
said.
Lutefisk is dried cod soaked
in lye, rinsed and boiled, and
mix those scents with a little
sun and sweat, and "we all
leave a little more odiferous,
thafs for sure," he said.
Generations of Bachman's
Floral Giftsand Gardens
employees have worked to
protect the company's plants
from the winter, but this week
they're trying to keep the
Christmas crop of poinsettias
from baking. Their greenhous-
es south of Minneapolis
run 10 to-15 degrees
warmer than the outside
air, and the heat has threat-
ened to wilt bothworkers
and the young plants try-
ing to grow roots.
"They are just trying
to survive, I guess, like
we are," said Jack Geyan,
SBachman's production
manager who admits the
heat is making him nostal-
gic for winter. "Some guys
in the nursery asked me
if I would rather have 30
below or this temperature.
Arid I said, 'well, 30 below
is a little cold, but maybe
20 below."'
University of Minnesota
meteorologist Mark Seeley
said the number of days
with temperatures in the
high 90s or 100s hasn't
really increased, but the
amount of days with soar-
ing humidity have.
"We have had far more
dew point-driven heat
waves in recent decades
than any time in the past,"
he said.
Ifs been at least 12 years
since Minnesota has seen
such heat indexes, day
after day, like those this
week.
The brutal heat in
Wisconsin forced Josh
Martinez, operations man-


ager ofAll-State Roofing
in Madison, to pull in his
crews this week "Its a
whole lot better and safer


Phil Zietlow, 69, of Medina, Minn., waits his turn to hit the ice,during a cool break from the upper-90-degree heat outdoors,.
at his weekly hockey game at the Bloomington Ice Garden in Bloomington, Minn., Tuesday. The Minnesota Old Timers
comprises a loose group of 55 and older men who gather weekly to play pickup hockey. Workers and residents are con-
tending with highest temperatures of the summer season as a prolonged stretch of hot, humid weather takes hold on the
upper midwest region of the United States.


for us just to not do a job," he
said. "We figure its better to be
safe than sorry."
In Minnesota, where hockey
players venture to indoor rinks
when the lakes thaw, one
indoor rink struggling to keep
its ice intact fired up cooling
equipment for the first time
in a decade and is expect-
ing a $10,000 spike in this
month's utility bill.
"Ihere's equipment that
we haven't run in 10 years,
we actually turned it on, just
so we could stay ahead of the
heat," said Andy Baltgalvis,
manager of the Bloomington
Ice Garden south of
Minneapolis.
It hasn't just been people
struggling in the heat
The Minnesota Zoo, in a
suburb south of Minneapolis,
prides itself on displaying
caribou, musk oxen, moose
and other northern animals
who have been kept cool this
week with extra water and
fans.
Zookeepers do what they
can for animals with thick
fur. The Amur tigers from
north Asia are being treated
to the frozen runoff from meat
fed to the zoo's carnivores.
Weinhardt said ifs a hot-weath-
er tool that seems to work.
"Just like us, some animals
can get really crabby in hot
weather," Weinhardt said.


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Andy Baltgalvis, manager of the Bloomington Ice Garden, stands in the building's
refrigeration room, where a unit that keeps one of the ice rinks frozen is using about 30
percent more electricity than usual to deal with the heat wave, in Bloomington, Minn.,
this month because of the heat wave.


I


: ii

Ilf


, 1*




::


China, Crystal,
Flatware and Gifts
Couples registered:
Haley Lipthrott
JT Brown
August 6, 2011

Jessica Stalnaker
Travis Melgaard
September 10, 2011

Ashley Cloninger
Justin Brimmer
September 24, 2011

Jill Peck
Bryson Johnson
September 24, 2011
We know exactly what
they want in a wedding
or shower gift. We update
their list as gifts are
purchased, and gift wrap.

r WARD'S
JEWELRY & GIFTS
156 N. Marion Ave.
Lake City
752-5470


LAKE CITY REPORTER LIFE SUNDAY, JULY 24, 2011


Page Editor: Robert Bridges, 754-0428











Page Editor: Emogebe Graham 754-0415 LAKE CITY REPORTER ADVICE & CROSSWORD SUNDAY, JULY 24, 2011 3D


DEAR ABBY



Mom's open door policies


make her an easy target


DEAR ABBY: At age 60 my
mother ignores basic safety
rules. She drives her older
model car with the doors
unlocked. I have tried explain-
ing that she's making it easy
for a carjacker to gain entry,
but she insists "that won't
happen to me."
Mom walks her dog alone
at night and leaves her front
door unlocked, claiming, "If
anyone tried to get in, I'd see
them." Not true. She goes for
long walks, and while she's
walking, she chats on her cell
phone, completely oblivious .
to what's going on around
her.
She actually nailed a key
ring with the key to her back
door (labeled as such) out-
side next to the door. Anyone
could scale the short fence
and walk right in. She also
leaves the key to her front
door under the mat on her
front porch for anyone to find.
Mom makes me crazy with
worry. I don't know if she's
aware of the risks she's tak-
ing. I have begged her to lock
her door and hide the keys,
but she says I am "paranoid"
and that nothing could ever
happen.
SNow she has bought a gun
and claims it will keep her
safe. I say it's better to exer-
cise common sense and pre-
vent the break-in and possible
assault in the first place.
At age 301 feel like I'M the
parent. Am I being unreason-
able? WORRIED SICK IN


Abigail Van Buren
www.dearabby.com

DALLAS
DEAR WORRIED
SICK: Your mother appears
to be incredibly naive and in a
state of complete denial. The
first rule of personal safety is
to remember that criminals
seek easy targets so the
more difficult it is for them to
make you a victim, the lower
your risk for becoming one.
Contact your police
department (or your mother's
neighborhood watch pro-
gram) and ask if they have
any personal safety literature
you can give your mother.
The life you save may be her
own.
** ** **
DEAR ABBY: What do
you do when your husband
doesn'tlike your best girl-
friend? She keeps asking us
to go on double dates and
vacations. Should I be hon-
est and tell'her he doesn't
like her, or continue to make
excuses? It really gets on my
nerves. IN A PICKLE IN
OHIO
DEAR IN A PICKLE:
When someone continually
makes suggestions about get-


ting together socially, even
when those suggestions are
consistently deflected, it's
time to level. The next time it
happens, tell her that it isn't
going to happen. You don't
have to tell her your husband
"doesn't like her." Say he
"isn't comfortable" double
dating or taking vacations as a
foursome and that you would
like to keep things just as
they are, ladies only.

DEAR ABBY: My daugh-
ter watches TV sitcoms
along with her precocious
4-year-old son who is being
exposed to many "adult"
themes, terms and politically
incorrect infractions. She
doesn't see the harm. Do
you? NOT A TV FAN
DEAR NOT ATV FAN:,I
do. Your daughter's parent-
ing skills leave something to
be desired. At a time when
she should be entertaining
and enriching her son, she's
entertaining herself. There
are books she could read
with him aid programs they
could view together that
would expand both their
intellects. It's a shame she's
not availing herself of them.
Will this harm the boy?
Maybe not, But she's not
helping her son grow intel-
lectually and creatively,
either.

* Write Dear Abby at
www.DearAbby.com or
P.O. Box 69440, Los
Angeles, CA 90069.


HOROSCOPES


ARIES (March 21-April
19): A change in pace and
place will motivate you to
follow a path that will ensure
success. Your curiosity
about someone you haven't
seen for a long time should
prompt you to make an effort
to reunite. Good fortune
will come from an unusual
source.***
TAURUS (April 20-May
20): Do whatever it takes
to get moving in a positive
direction. Staying at home
or having too much idle time
will lead to discontent and an
unfortunate misunderstand-
ing. ***
GEMINI (May 21-June
20): Discuss plans for home
improvements or call in
someone who can advise
you of the possibilities. You
will be able to make a wise
investment if you look at an
opportunity to' put money
into something that is long-
term. r**
CANCER (June 21-July
22): Nothing will go accord-
ing to plan, so don't set your-
self up for disappointment. If
you can go with the flow, you
will find that you can sail past
problems. Working quietly


THE LAST WORD
Eugenia Word

behind the scenes to finish
a home improvement proj-
ect will bring good results.

LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): You
can step into the limelight
and take on controversial top-
ics, but be ready to defend
your principles against some
tough and stubborn.competi-
tion. Keep things simple. **
VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22):
Don't be upset by something
going on at work. You have
to live in the moment and
do your best to put your
energy into something you
find interesting. A new proj-
ect will open your eyes to
possibilities you never con-
sidered. Love is in the stars.
*****
LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22):
Don't hide when you should
be out sharing your thoughts
and expertise. Participate
in activities that are:geared
toward helping organizations
that share your sentiments.'
Consider a personal invest-
ment *** .
SCORPIO (Oct 23-Nov.


CELEBRITY CIPHER
by Luis Campos .
Celebrity Cipher cryptograms are created rmrn quotations by famous people. past and p(antl
E- ech letter In the cipher stands fr other. ,
TODAY'S CLUE: F equals 0D
" xv Xz. ZB xUR L.YMGY NBL R-TBRR HT
MY M V PGE MET YB AT -GIX YTF Y B
TUALMST SHMZZXS'M.H UPZXS MGF.
BRTLM." HPSXMGB RMIMLBYYX
PREVIOUS SOLUTION: "When I sing, trouble can sit right on my shoulder and
I don't even notice." Sarah Vaughan ,

(c) 2011 by NEA. Inc. 7-25


21): Follow your heart, not
what others tell you to do.
Get rid of things you no lon-
ger use. A real estate deal
looks lucrative, and winnings
are a possibility. Don't argue
a moot point with someone
who likes to take control.

SAGITTARIUS (Nov.
22-Dec. 21): Any indication
that you may be avoiding
something will be cause for
suspicion. You are best to
go about your business and
refrain from getting involved
in idle conversations with
anyone who may not approve
of your current plans or situ-
ation. ***
CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan.
19): Avoid getting involved in
other people's affairs. Don't
overspend on a job you need
done at home. You may be
better off doing the work
yourself. Love is on the rise.

AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb.
18): Don't be too quick to
think that someone else has
more to offer than you. Put
some effort into personal
changes that will boost your
confidence and help you proj-
ect a better self-image. You'll
be in demand once your tal-
ent is recognized. **
PISCES (Feb. 19-March
20): You'll have different
options to consider with
regartdto how you earn your
living. A chance to get into
something more stable and
less obscure will lead to
greater security. Don't make
changes at home until you
are sure you can afford to do
so properly. ****


SUNDAY CROSSWORD


THE END IS IN SIGHT By Daniel A. ,Finan / Edited by Will Shortz 1 2 3 4 15 67 8 ,9 [10 11 1 113 14 115 16 117 18 19


Across
1 Punch
4 Birthstdnes whose
name starts with
"the same letter
as their month
S'Senesence
15 Puzzle
20 Advantage
21 "Chasing
Pirates" singer
Jones
22 "Stop that!"
23 Matt in the
morning
24 It means nothing
25 Parting words
from the busy
type
28 Whom a guy
might hang with
when he's not
with the guys
30 Isn't shy with an
opinion
31 Area in a 1969
Elvis Presley hit
'32 "The Chosen"
author Chaim
34 Cabinet dept.
since 1965
35 Pottery base
36 Hans Christian.
Andersen story;
43 Kind of shot
46 Critter with foot-
long teeth
47 Dipped sticks?
48Island known for
having "the
wettest spot on
Earth" (450+" of
rain per year)
49 French
Revolution
figure

For any three answers,
call from a touch-tone
phone: 1-900-285-5656,
1.49 each minute; or,
with a credit card, 1-800-
814-5554.


51 Adrien of
cosmetics
52 Iraq war subj.
53 Hardly breaking,
a sweat
S55 Goldenrod, e.g.
56 Article for Lil
Wayne
57 Eastern sect
58 Appears
gradually on the
screen
59 One of 15, once:
Abbr.
60 Major upset, say
62 See 72-Across
65' Monster of Norse
myth
66 En'd of a
command at the
Battle of Bunker
Hill
69 Symbol of
strength, to the
Maya
72 With 62-Across,
Whoopi's
"Ghost" role
73 Granter of an
honorary degree
to George
Washington in
1776
74 Farmer's ___
77 Where K-I-S-S-I-
N-G happens
79 Hydroxide, e.g.
80 C.I.A. forerunner
81 Palm variety
82 "Godspeed!"
86 Water __
(dental product
company)
87'How some stock
is purchased
88 City on the Ruhr
89 Pianist Alb6niz
90 TV part
91 Gymnast
Comaneci
92 Place with snorts


93 End of a
Benjamin
Franklin
aphorism
96 Bring to a ___
98 9/
99 Pacifist's protest
100 The Jackson 5's
first major label
103 Most clueless
108 Papal legate
111 2009 fantasy
film based on a
best-selling book
114 Goof
115 Former U.N.
leader Kofi
116 Key of the
"Odense"
Symphony
117 "Swan Lake"
maiden
118 Arm of a
starfish
119 Has over
120 Tree with fan-
shaped leaves
'121 Grill brand
122 Cause for a TV-
MA rating

Down
1 Contemporary of
Freud
2 See 96-Down
3 Vegetable on a
vine
4 Cruising the beat
5 Hoi
6 Coach Parseghian
7 Varnish resins
8 Jesus, to
Christians
9'Quarterfinal
groups, e.g.
10 "The way I see it
11 See 15-Ddwn
12 Jestis, for one
13 Notre Dame
football legend


14 Time to enjoy le
soleil
15 With 11-Down,
* leaders
16 Chicago mayor
before Emanuel
17 Number with two
18 Riga resident
19 Switch ending
26 Creator of
Thidwick the
Big-Hearted
S Moose
27 Watch on the
beach, maybe
29 Like bubble gum
and questions
33 Skills
35 Main
36 D6tentes
37 Classic root beer
brand
38 1980s
Lightweight
boxing champ
39 Of the same sort
40 D.C. baseballer
41 "Ya think?!"
42 Stuff in a pit
43 Give a body
check
44 "C'est ___"
45 Vol's' school
49 Where Julio
Iglesias was
born
50 Ramppaging, after
/ "on"
53 Had been
54 They moved from
Minnesota to Los
Angeles.in 1960
56 1994 Denis
Leary/Kevin
Spacey flick
57 Sorority letter
60 Stone in
Hollywood
61 Word repeated in
"I ___ I _!"
62 Bellyache
63 Home of the 46-
Across: Abbr.


64 "Ta-da!"
66 "Cosi fan
67 "B'uzz off!"
68 Eddie on "Leave
It to Beaver"
69 Dovetails
70 Emily Dickinson
poem "For Every
Bird
71 Bombastic
74 Some clickers
75 Over
76 Military group
headquartered in
Colo. Spgs.


78 Architect
Saarinen
79 Hankering
81 "___ Alive"
83 Today preceder
84 "Silent" one
85 Krazy ___
86 Something to
watch when
there's nothing
on?
87 Big name in
brewing
90 Modern update
93 Clue


94 San ___, Calif.
95 Little thrill
96 2006 comedy
title character
from western 2-
Down
97 Buck in the
Country Music
Hall of Fame
100 [Kiss]
101 "Yikes!"
102 Perfect
specimens
103 Half: Prefix


104 Cry after hitting
a jackpot
105 "Peter Pan"
fairy, for short
106 Struggle
(through)
107 Surfer's
concern
109 "Dies
110 Serengeti
antelope
'112 Witch
113 Point of
writing?


Answers to last Sunday's Crossword.
HOLLOW CLOD ATTAIN ED
EROICA FiRODO MO ISTURE
COUNTSNOIS|ES ANTIEAM
SEAHORSE UT ILS CS I
COI N LIMPSERVI CE FRET
RUNSTO I SEE DORA
ENG A B B TEARS ACES
E CU ID|DE|AS E ASE KJEA
PIE S ICKENFL I NGEIRIS
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Volcano darkens Argentine tourism outlook


By ALEXANDER WILSON
and FEDERICO
QUILODRAN
Associated Press

SANTIAGO, Chile
- The 100 million
tons of pyroclastic
ash and rock spewed
by an Andean volcano
has meant hundreds of
millions of dollars in
losses for communities
more accustomed to
profiting from the dra-
matic mountain land-
scape.
The Cordon Caulle
volcano opened a new
gash along a ridge just
across the border and
upwind from Argentina.
For six weeks now, it
has been belching ash
into the sky, grounding
flights across the lower
third of South America
for most of the winter
tourist season. Lodges
and restaurants have
been ghostly at resorts
normally filled with ski-
ers. Airport runways,
Andean slopes and
sheep and cattle ranches
are coated in thick, abra-
sive volcanic material.
"Every time the
wind blows, no matter
the direction, we get
ash and sand," Villa
La Angostura Mayor
Ricardo Alonso said.
In his town, a lake-
side Andean jewel just
northeast of the volcano,
only 62 of the town's 152
hotels are operating,
and many of the visi-
tors aren't high-paying
skiers but volunteers
helping to shovel out the
mess, Tourism Secretary
Juan Jose Fioranelli said,
adding that officials are
still tallying the losses.
Still mostly missing in
the neighboring resort
city of Bariloche are
big-spending Brazilians,
usually so numerous
that Argentines jok-
ingly refer to the city as
"Braziloche." Bariloche's
population of 140,000
usually hosts 250,000
tourists this time of
year, including 40,000
Brazilians. The munici-
pal government this
week estimated losses at
$150 million.
Since the eruption
began June 4, the vol-
cano has released ener-
gy equal to 70 atomic
bombs, or t percent of
the world's electricity
capacity, during the
first week alone, sci-
entists at Argentina's
National University of
Rio Negro calculated.
The ash has blown
around the Southern
Hemisphere several
times, grounding jets


ASSOCIATED PRESS
This June 7 file photo shows a grounded plane dusted in volcanic ash at the airport in San Carlos de Bariloche, southern Argentina. The volcano's eruption
resulted in grounded flights across the lower third of South America for most of the winter tourist season. Lodges and restaurants in Bariloche and Villa La
Angostura normally filled with skiers, are empty. With airport runways, Andean slopes and sheep and cattle ranches coated in ash, the local economy.has


been devastated.

as far away as Australia
and New Zealand.
Airline industry
losses could total $50
million, said Helane
Becker, an airlines ana-
lyst with Dahlman Rose
& Company. Carriers
with many routes in
Argentina, such as
state-owned Aerolineas
Argentina and Chile-
based LAN Air Lines,
will suffer most, but U.S.
and European carriers
also have been affected,
she said.
Aerolineas is still fly-
ing a vastly reduced
schedule, with 30 flights
canceled and more
than a dozen postponed
on Thursday alone
due to the continuing
ash cloud, which can
severely damage jets
in flight. All flights to
Bariloche remain sus-
pended until at least
Tuesday,,and flights to
two other regional air-
ports through the end of
(the month.
Argentine agriculture
also has suffered. In
the hardest-hit province
of Rio Negro, which is
dotted with sheep and
cattle ranches, farm


losses total $24 million,
said Adolfo Sarmiento,
an agricultural engineer
at Argentina's National
Institute of Agricultural
Technology. Wool pro-
ducers have lost as
much as $3.8 million,
he said, with ash mak-
ing grazing difficult for
1,400 operations that
manage hundreds of
thousands of sheep,
cows and goats.
Geologists say the.
eruption has diminished
considerably from its
peak in June, when
the plume rose 6 miles
(10 kilometers) and
stretched across the
continent. Chile's gov-
ernment has allowed
about 3,500 evacuees,
most of them small farm-
ers living below the vol-
cano, to return home.
But a NASA satellite
photo this week showed
the volcano still spew-
ing ash nearly 2 miles
(3 kilometers) high in
a column that stretched
for 50 miles (80 kilome-
ters) over Argentina,
adding to the gritty lay-
ers of snow and ash,
Experts have esti-
mated that in Villa La


Angostura alone, 5
million cubic meters
of volcanic sand must
be removed, Fioranelli
said. That's roughly
equivalent to cover-
ing the entire island of
Manhattan in 2 inches
of the grit. Hundreds of
people who started with
snow shovels now have
heavy equipment help-
ing them dump the mess
into nearby quarries.
Chile's National
Geology and Mines
Service remained on
"red alert" Thursday,
saying the eruption
isn't done yet. There is
still a chance of more
outbursts, and small
earthquakes from
underground volcanic
activity still rattle the
area. Lava and toxic
gases still spew from
the crater, creating
a nightly light show
extending about 1,600
feet (500 meters) above
the volcano.
Argentine President
Cristina Fernandez has
declared a regional
economic emergency,
doubling assistance to
poor families and post-
poning tax payments


for restaurants, hotels
and other tourism busi-
nesses that don't lay off
workers.
Aerolineas has
arranged buses so peo-
ple can reach Patagonian
resorts such as
Bariloche, where more
than 500 hotels and
hundreds of restaurants
depend on the brief June
through August ski sea-
son. Airports are closed
just when Argentines
usually take advantage
of school holidays to
explore the trails above
Nahuel Huapi lake.
"I can't say the winter
season is lost, but it is
going to be very difficult
to overcome the situa-
tion because it has been
catastrophic," Mayor
Alonso said.
Local businesses have
lost about half their
annual earnings, said
Sergio Rossi, who runs
Villa La Angostura's
hotel and restaurant
association.
Hotel owner Santiago
Perrota's property can
sleep 90. Now the hotel
is completely empty.
"We're going to lose
the winter months any-


way, because the erup-
tion is still going on.
The ash is still flying,"
Perrota said. "And we
don't want to have peo-
ple remember us in this
situation. We don't want
people to remember us
without happiness."
Daniel Garcia, who
runs the Bariloche tour-
ism chamber, said some
vacationing students and
tourists have been arriv-
ing by bus from Buenos
Aires, a road trip of
more than 20 hours.
The airport that
serves both Bariloche
and Villa La Angostura
remains officially
closed, but it received
its first jet in 44 days on
Sunday, a charter flight
from Brazil that was
diverted by weather
from Esquel, more than
180 miles (300 kilo-
meters) to the south.
Tourism officials hoped
it would show the air-
port is operable, but for
now travelers are still
being flown to Esquel
and bused for hours
through the Patagonian
desert to reach the
slopes.


PETS: Therapy dogs bring relief, however temporary, to the sick


Continued From Page 1D
their pain.
"(A patient) took one look
at that dog, and went, 'Oh my
gosh,' and he forgot about his
pain," West said. "I mean, I know
he could still feel it, but he for-
got about it. He reached over
and was petting the dog and he
was so enthused. I don't under-
stand it. It was so remarkable
that an animal can do that."
Bringing an animal to visit
helps patients express them-
selves emotionally, West said,


and they often tell stories, which
she likes to listen to.
"A lot of times people will be
in there and will be depressed,"
West said, "or they're not good
at opening up to anybody. All of
a sudden, you come in with an
animal, and they've opened up.
And they might stay that way for
a while."
"It gives them something else
to talk about besides their pain,
for right then," she said.
West noted that taking her


dogs to spend time with patients
can also be a relief for the fami-
lies who are visiting their sick
loved ones.
"Animals just do wonderful
things for people," she said.
Volunteering through pet
therapy gives her life purpose,
West said.
"For one thing, it makes me
get up in the morning," she said.
"I have a reason to get up."
"I just feel like everybody
should have a purpose in their


life," West said, "and this gives
me a purpose. Otherwise, what
would I do?"
West said she'll continue with
pet therapy, and is preparing
Saaba for a higher level of pet
therapy testing through Therapy
Dogs International.
West is also hosting an infor-
mational pet therapy session
for Haven Hospice from 12 p.m.
to 2 p.m. Monday at Haven
Hospice in Lake City, 6037 W
U.S. Highway 90. Lunch will be


provided and pets should be left
at home.
Call Carolyn Long at (386)
752-9191 to register.
"(Pet therapy) gives you such
a good sense that you're helping
and that you're doing something
for somebody else," West said.
"I truly believe that everybody
was put here for a purpose, and
if you love animals, it seems to
me you'd love doing something
like this."


SKILLS: Learn a new trade through program at Florida Gateway College

Continued From Page 1D


during and brazing. Semester 2
covers 14 chapters ranging from
commercial airside systems to
troubleshooting gas heating, air
conditioning and heat pumps.
Semester 3 drills down into
compressors, metering devices,
refrigerants and oils as well as
electronic control, oil heat and
heat pump troubleshooting.
Additionally, during the third
semester you will have an oppor-
tunity to prepare for and take
the EPA 608 exam which, when
passed, will grant you the cer-
tification required to purchase


and handle refrigerants. The
final semester includes topics
on construction drawings and
specifications, system balanc-
ing, system design and indus-
trial and commercial refrigera-
tion system. The NCCER cre-
dentials you will receive upon
completion of each semester
are portable nationwide.
At Florida Gateway
College we have a welding
program that will help to
meet the shortage of skilled
craftsmen. Skills you will
acquire while attending our


Applied Welding Technology
Certificate Program are
Thermal cutting, Oxy-
Acetylene Welding-Brazing-
Cutting, Shield "Stick" Metal
Arc Welding (SMAW), Gas
Metal Arc Welding (GMAW),
Flux Cored Arc Welding
(FCAW) and Gas Tungsten
Arc Welding (GTAW). The
program will also offer the
students extensive hands-on
laboratory experience needed
to become a skilled crafts-
men. Other topics to be cov-
ered are Safety, Blue Print


Reading, Fabrication, Layout,
Equipment and Metallurgy.
Welder Certification Testing
will also be available at Florida
Gateway College. Testing con-
ducted at FGC is done by an
independent testing agency in
compliance with AWS or ASME
Codes. This includes pipe and
plate testing. The NCCER cre-
dentials you will receive upon
completion each semester are
portable nationwide.
If you would like to learn
the fundamentals of weld-
ing join us for our Saturday


welding class this fall and if
you like it become a full time
student. We also have dual
enrollment with our local
high schools and help these
students on the path to early
success.
This country of ours was built
with the skills of our craftsmen
and it is a proud tradition we
need to continue. If you have any
questions about our programs
please call me, Carl Romano
(386) 754-4214, Florida Gateway
College.


LAKE CITY REPORTER LIFE SUNDAY, JULY 24, 2011


Page Editor: Robert Bridges, 754-0428