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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028308/01614
 Material Information
Title: The Lake City reporter
Uniform Title: Lake City reporter (Lake City, Fla. 1967)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: John H. Perry
Place of Publication: Lake City Fla
Publication Date: 7/21/2011
Frequency: daily (monday through friday)[<1969>-]
weekly[ former 1967-<1968>]
daily
normalized irregular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Lake City (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Columbia County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Columbia -- Lake City
Coordinates: 30.189722 x -82.639722 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 95, no. 4 (Oct. 5, 1967)-
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000358016
oclc - 33283560
notis - ABZ6316
lccn - sn 95047175
sobekcm - UF00028308_01569
System ID: UF00028308:01614
 Related Items
Preceded by: Lake City reporter and Columbia gazette

Full Text






On the rise
Local golfer
to compete in
Nationwide event.
0oo5 12 norts, IlB

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Muschamp
blends old,
new at UF
Sports, I B


No vote
All 32 teams
in discussion on
NFL lockout.
Sports, B


Reporter


Thursday, July 21, 2011


www.lakecityreporter.com


Vol. 137, No. 150 75 cents


Reporter


claims 4

national


awards

Local newspaper
wins for writing,
photography.

From staff reports
The Lake City Reporter
earned four awards in
the National Newspaper
Association's 2011 Better
Newspaper Contest.
Jeff Faren, NNA Contest
chairman, made
the announce-
ment in a notifi-
cation e-mail.
According to
the NNAs web-
site, the Better
Britt Newspaper
Contest is an
annual competition that honors
the best in community journal-
ism.
For the 2011 contest, more
than 2,000 entries were submit-
ted.
The high-
est-placing
award earned
by the Lake
City Reporter
this year
Kirby went to staff
Kirby writer Tony
Britt. Britt won second place
for Best Health Story in the
Daily Division with his piece,
"Shortage Coral snake anti-
venom vanish-
ing," which was
published June
20, 2010.
Sports editor
Tim Kirby took
third place for
WaBest Serious
Walker Column in the
Daily Division
for his column, "All alone,"
which ran in the newspaper
May 7, 2010.
An honorable mention went
to staff photographer Jason

REPORTER continued on 3A



City policy

addresses

leaky pipes

By ANTONIA ROBINSON
arobinson@lakecityreporter. com
City of Lake City utility cus-
tomers won't have to pay full
price if an unexpected leak
occurs thanks to a new policy.
The City
Council
approved a
water and
wastewater
bill adjust-
ment policy
Johnson at its meeting
Monday night.
The policy is effective Oct. 1.
Resident or commercial
unusually high utility bills can
qualify for a 50 percent credit
of charges due to unexpected

LEAKS continued on 3A


CALL US:
I (386) 752-1293
SUBSCRIBE TO T-S
THE REPORTER:
Voice: 755-5445 r
1 84264 00201 Fax: 752-9400 VW E


TDC talking up civic center


By TONY BRITT
tbritt@lakecityreporter.com

Columbia County officials are mulling
the possibility of constructing a civic center
or assembly/events building that could be
used to draw more visitors to the area and
stimulate the local economy.
Officials and members of the Tourist
Development Council spent close to an hour


discussing the potential impact finan-
cial and cultural that the facility could
have during the Columbia County Tourist
Development Council meeting Wednesday.
The events building was discussed during
a report given by county manager Dale
Williams.
The report chronicled visits by a seven-
member TDC Fact Finding Committee
that visited the national fairground's site in
Perry, Ga., earlier in the month and then


visited a similar facility in Valdosta, Ga.
The report noted: "Local officials believe
the county has a need for a large assem-
bly facility. The facility's mission could be
expanded to include bringing events to the
county that would generate additional hotel,
restaurant and gas revenues."
Local officials have been using the facility
TDC continued on 3A


m |. Sports


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter

History lesson come to life
At the Lake City/Columbia County Historical Museum Wednesday, Amanda Dickey (left) explains to Grace'
Neagle how women in the 1800s used spinning wheels. Neagle was part of about a dozen Dudley Farm
Historic State Park volunteers to tour the museum. 'I think this is so exciting to see that people still care about
history,' Neagle said.


Religious

funding ban

repeal faces

challenge

Voucher program is really
about money, says Columbia
teachers union president.
By BILL KACZOR and LEANNE TYO
TALLAHASSEE The state-
wide teachers union, public school
leaders and clergymen Wednesday
challenged a 2012 ballot proposal to
repeal Florida's ban on using public
money to aid churches and other
religious organizations.
It's the latest in a series of law-
suits against measures passed
by the Republican-dominated
Legislature this year.
The Florida Education
Association and other plaintiffs say
the proposed state constitutional
amendment would clear a poten-
tial obstacle to expanding voucher
programs that let students attend
religious and other private schools
at taxpayer expense.
The lawsuit alleges Amendment
7's ballot summary and title -
"Religious Freedom" are mislead-
ing. State law requires they be clear,
unambiguous and accurately reflect
an amendment's effect.
"This is designed to open up the
state treasury to voucher schools,
but that's not what the title of the
amendment and the ballot summary
say," said union president Andy
VOUCHERS continued on 5A


6tor
torm


Chance


ATHER, 2A


Opinion
People
Obitua
Advice
Puzzle


J -
fa" *


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Practice laps
Tyler Harding, 14, of the Columbia Swim Team, practices the
'roly poly freestyle' backstroke Tuesday at the Columbia Aquatic
Complex. The team will have its last swim meet on Saturday at noon
in Live Oak.

on ............... 4A TODA
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& Comics.. ...... 3B .-.-
s ................. 4B ,.r


SI


complex:

Major

upgrade

coming?

Tournaments
rake in revenue
from visitors.

By TONY BRITT
tbritt@lakecityreporter.com
Columbia County offi-
cials and the local Tourist
Development Council may
provide close to $4 million
for upgrades at Southside
Sports Complex. Tourist
Development Council
members are considering
increasing the local bed tax
to generate additional rev-
enues that could be used to
make improvements at the
facility.
During a Columbia
County Tourist
Development Council
meeting Wednesday, Dale
Williams, county manager,
gave a report from the
TDC fact finding commit-
tee reviewing local tourna-
ment promotions. Tourist
Development Council
funds invested in the sports
complex have resulted in
increased tournament play,
which have generated addi-
tional hotel, restaurant and
gas revenues.
The report indicated
the facility is capable of
handling 100-team tourna-
ments, but noted that "large
events may have an issue
with hotel room availability."
The facility recently
hosted a 72-team softball
"showcase" utilizing eight
women's softball fields,
and event promoters have
expressed interest in
expanding future showcases
at the local facility.
The report suggested
converting the T-ball fields
into mixed-use fields for
additional availability and
noted that the adult softball
fields can be converted or
portable fencing installed to
provide additional playing
space.
While "stadium" or
"championship" fields are
not required to host large
tournaments, improvements
to existing facilities are
required, the report said.
Complaints about the
facility focused on acces-
sibility, availability and
convenience of restrooms
and concession stands and

SPORTS continued on 3A


IN COMING
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LAKE CITY REPORTER DAILY BRIEFING THURSDAY, JULY 21, 2011


3 Wednesday:
Afternoon: 7-9-9
Evening: N/A


Iayi4) Wednesday:
Afternoon: 4-5-7-3
t ,, Evening: N/A


2T Tuesday:
w 22-24-26-29-34


PEOPLE IN THE NEWS

Comic-Con starts with fans, flicks, costumes


LOS ANGELES

zombies, space aliens,
comic-book lovers and
kids of all ages: Comic-
Con is here.
The pop-culture convention,
which annually draws thousands of
costumed fans to San Diego, begins
today, but the die-hards (and those
with weekend-long passes) will get a
peek at the colorful convention floor
on Wednesday night
Hundreds of exhibitors and more
than 130,000 guests are expected
to pack the San Diego Convention
Center for the sold out, four-day
event
"The people who go through
those doors, most of them are film
fans and fans of pop culture, be it
video games or movies or television
shows; T-shirts or comic books, it's
all part of this big cultural stew," said
filmmaker Jon Favreau, who will
premiere his latest flick, "Cowboys
& Aliens," at Comic-Con. 'These are
people who normally interact with
one another through the Internet
... Then when you finally open it up
to meeting in person, it just concen-
trates that experience."
'The blogosphere is already abuzz
about some of the offerings at this
year's Comic-Con, where Hollywood
continues to command a headlining
presence.
"Captain America" will play in San
Diego for a full day before its nation-
wide opening Friday, and star Chris
Evans is set to introduce the earliest
screening. "Cowboys & Aliens" will
hold its world premiere at Comic-
Con on Saturday a festival first

R. Kelly has emergency
surgery on tonsil
CHICAGO A spokesman for .
R Kelly said the R&B singer is in
the hospital after emergency throat
surgery.
-Kelly publicist Allan Mayer said


Comic-Con attendees dressed in Star Wars costumes cross the street in downtown
San Diego outside of Comic-Con International in San Diego. The 2011 Comic Con
International opens today.


Wednesday that
doctors drained
an abscess on one
of Kelly's tonsils
on Tuesday and
that the singer will
be "laid upsindefi-
Kelly nitely" at Chicago's
Northwestern,


raise money for charities that help
sick children.
Verret, who's from Austin, said he
intends to line up corporate sponsors
to fund the tour.
He purchased the jacket for $1.8
million last month at a Beverly Hills,
California, auction.


Memorial Hospital. Roku to sell 'Angry Birds'

Jackson's 'Thriller' jacket streaming box for $100


to go on tour for charity
AUSTIN, Texas A famed red-
and-black calfskin jacket Michael
Jackson wore in
the groundbreak-
ing,"Thriller" music
video is going on
tour.
The jacket's new
owner, Texas com-
Jackson modities broker
Jackson Milton Verret, said
Tuesday he plans to take the classic
Sclothingitem around the world to


SAN FRANCISCO Roku is
ready to hatch the'popular "Angry
Birds" video game on a new ver-
sion of its set-top box for streaming
online entertainment to TVs.
The addictive game and a con-
troller will be included on a Rokiu
box that will sell for $100. Prices
for boxes that don't include "Angry.
Birds" and the game controller will
range from $60 to $80.
Roku Inc. announced the prices
for its next generation of players
Wednesday.
* Associated Press. -,


, Celebrity Birthdays


* Singer Kay Starr is 89.
* Movie director Norman
Jewison is 85.
* Former Attorney General
Janet Reno is 73.
* Actress Patricia Elliott is
69.


0 Actor David Downing is 68.
N Actor Edward Herrmann
is 68.
N Actor Leigh Lawson is 66.
N Actor Wendell Burton is 64.
0 Actor Art Hindle is 63.
N Comedian Jon Lovitz is 54.


Lake City
HOW TO REACH US
Main number ........(386) 752-1293
Fax number ..............752-9400
Circulation ..............755-5445
Online... www.lakecityreporter.com
The Lake City Reporter, an affiliate of
Community Newspapers Inc., is pub-
lished Tuesday through Sunday at 180
E. Duval St, Lake City, Fla. 32055.
Periodical postage paid at Lake City, Ra.
Member Audit Bureau of Circulation and
The Associated Press.
All material herein is property of the Lake
City Reporter. Reproduction in whole or
in part is forbidden without the permis-
sion of the publisher. U.S. Postal Service
No. 310-880.
POSTMASTER: Send address changes
to Lake City Reporter, P.O. Box 1709,
Lake City, Fa 32056.
Publisher'odd Wilson .....754-0418
(twilson@lakecityreporter.com)
NEWS
Editor Robert Bridges .....754-0428
(rbridges@lakecityreporter.com)
ADVERTISING
Director Ashley Butcher .. .754-0417
(abutcher@lakecityreporter.com)
CLASSIFIED
To place a classified ad, call 755-5440


Reporter

BUSINESS
Controller Sue Brannon.... 754-0419
(sbrannon@lakecityreporter.com)
CIRCULATION
Home delivery of the Lake City Reporter
should be completed by 6:30 a.m.
Tuesday through Saturday, and by 7.30
a.m. on Sunday.
Please call 386-755-5445 to report any
problems with your delivery service.
In Columbia County, customers should
call before 10.30 a.m. to report a ser-
vice error for same day re-delivery. After
10:30 a.m., next day re-delivery or ser-
vice related credits will be issued.
In all other counties where home delivery
is available, next day re-delivery or ser-
vice related credits will be issued.
Circulation ...............755-5445
(clrculation@lakecityreporter.conm)
Home delivery rates
(Tuesday through Sunday)
12 Weeks................... $26.32
24 Weeks....................$48.79
52 Weeks................... $83.46
Rates inside 7% sales tax.
Mail rates
12 Weeks................ $41.40
24 Weeks..................$82.80
52 Weeks.:.................$179.40


CORRECTION

The Lake City Reporter corrects errors of fact in news
items. If you have a concern, question or suggestion, please
call the executive editor. Corrections and clarifications will run
in this space6Aid thanks for reading.


Fire chief to run
for 25th District
MIAMI It's offi-
cial. Democratic State
Representative Luis
Garcia is challenging GOP
U.S. Rep. David Rivera
for South Florida's 25th
Congressional District
Garcia is a former
Miami Beach fire chief. He
announced his candidacy
Wednesday before several
dozen supporters at a local
recreation center.
Rivera is under investi-
gation over his personal
and campaign finances
and struggling to fund-
raise. Nearly a third of
the $35,000 he raised last
quarter came from his
mother and a family friend.
That makes him a prime
target for Democrats, who
hope to gain a Florida seat

Moon camera
credited as gift
MIAMI -Former astro-
naut Edgar Mitchell, 80,
said a camera he brought
back from the Apollo 14
moon mission was given
to him by NASA despite
the space agency's lawsuit
seeking its return.
Court papers filed in
Florida federal court urge
a judge to dismiss NASA's
claims for the camera.
Mitchell said he unbolted
the camera from the lunar
module before the astro-
nauts returned to earth to
preserve the tape inside.
Mitchell said NASA later
told him he could keep it
NASA sued earlier this
month contending it has
no record that the cam-
era was transferred to
Mitchell.

Anthony computer
expert backs off
ORLANDO A com-
puter expert who testified
in the Casey Anthony trial
is refusing to comment
on media reports that evi-


Reform school for boys closes
Former Arthur G. Dozier School for boys employees Lloyd ,
Mills (left)-and Donald Mears stand outside a job center:July
13 in Marianna. The closing of a reform school in this small
Panhandle town is casting a sense of dread in the commu-
nity.


dence offered about exten-
sive chloroform searches
on the family's computer
was inaccurate.
In a statement released
Wednesday, a Michigan
attorney representing com-
puter software designer
John:Bradley said his cli-
ent disputes "erroneous
media reports" that claim
he insinuated any.wrong-
doing on the part of pros-.
ecutors.

Teen, 13, dies in
dirt bike crash
NORTH FORT MYERS
- Lee County Sheriff's
deputies said Ronald
Koger, 13, was riding his
bike in North Fort Myers
Tuesday afternoon when
he collided with an ATV
driven by Matthew Buldo,
28. Both victims are from
Cape Coral.
Deputies said Baldo was
taken to a hospital, where
he is being treated for
head injuries.
The sheriff's office is
investigating the crash.

Ashes returned 2
weeks after theft
BRADENTON Lori
Reek was devastated when


a thief stole a safe that con-
tained her son's ashes.
She said she cried
Monday when the
Manatee County Sheriff's
Office informed her that
Nikolas Reek's ashes had
been returned by someone
who dropped them off
after seeing her story on
local television.
Manatee County
Sheriff's spokesman Dave
Bristow said the anony-
mous person did not take
the ashes and should be
"applauded" for returning
them.

Racehorse pulled
from pool
MELBOURNE -
Brevard County officials
said three teenage boys
were swimming Tuesday
when the horse nosed its
way into a screened-in
enclosure in a neighbor-
hood of equestrian estates.
The boys tried to lead
the horse away, but it got
spooked and backed into
the pool. Brevard County
firefighters, trained in ani-
mal-rescue, used a wreck-
er and straps and lifted the
animal out of the water.


THE WEATHER


9C


- 3. City Friday Saturday
*i Jadlsonvil Cape Canaveral 90, 77,t 89 76,1t
L C_-_ -- I P il 93/176 -.7- --. ....... ....I


Daytona Beach


7a z \ a Ft. Lauderdale
nesle* Daytona Beach Fort Myers
35/72 9j75 Gainesville
5/73ca N Jacksonville
i Oliando Cape Canaveal Key West
S 95/78 89/76 Lake City
a Miami
Naples
92l/7r' West Palm Bed* Ocala
90/79 Orlando
\;i Ft. Lauderdal Panama City
Ft. Myer. 91/79 6 Pensacola
93/76 Naples Tallahassee
\\90/76 Mfan Tampa
Key eW \. 90/80 Valdosta
S91/83 W. Palm Beach
91/0


91/ /b/t


90/79/t
94/76/t
93/74/t
92/76/t
91/83/s
95/74/t
90/79/t
91/77/t
93/75/t
94/78/t
90/78/t
89/78/pc
94/73/t
93/77/t
97/72/t
89/80/t


92/ 4/t
91/80/s
94/76/t
94/74/t
92/76/t
91/83/s
95/74/t
88/81/s
92/78/sh
93/75/t
94/77/t
89/79/t
91/77/t
95/73/t
93/77/t
94/73/t
89/80/s


laTanassee a aT
96/74 96
maco 0 f t
1/78 PannaCity "'
88/76


LKE Y ALMANAC


TEMPERATURES
High Wednesday
Low Wednesday
Normal high
Normal low
Record high
Record low

PRECIPITATION
Wednesday
Month total
Year total
Normal month-to-date
Normal year-to-date


94
71
91
71
100 in 1942
67 in 1967

0.00"
2.20"
22.09"
3.97"
28.00"


* Associated Press


SUN
Sunrise today
Sunset today
Sunrise torn.
Sunset tom.

MOON
Moonrise today
Moonset today
Moonrise tom.
Moonset tom.


6:43 a.m.
8:31 p.m.
6:43 a.m.
8:31 p.m.


12:32 p.m.
12:04 am.
1:25 p.m.


0o00o
July July Aug. Aug.
23 30 6 13
Last New First Full


-


r 2 1 An exclusive
service
brought to
EiXllW our readers
lOnIikebs 11MI
Today's by
ultra-violet The Weather
radiation risk Channel.
for the area on
a scale from 0 "
to 10+.

m

* graphics 02011 Weather
w t lYJ Central, LP, Madison, Ws.
wetherJ www.weatherpubllsher.com


Daily Scripture
"But if we walk in the light, as
he is in the light, we have fel-
lowship with one another, and ,
the blood of Jesus, his Son, puri-
fies us from all.sin."
I John 1:7

Thought for Today
"We have too many high-
sounding words, and too few
actions that correspond with
them."
Abigail Adams,
American first lady (1744-1818)


AROUND FLORIDA


- I onwomwommummo


! iL! ] i i J, Uli ir VII;
,


Page Editor: Jason M. Walker, 754-0430


I SPOSOREDBY


/72 .












Page Editor: Robert Bridges, 754-0428 LAKE CITY REPORTER NEWS THURSDAY, JULY 21, 2011


TDC: Civic center discussed


Continued From Page 1A


REPORTER
Continued From Page 1A


County commission

may set millage rate


in Perry, Ga., as their model.
The initial facility there was
constructed more than 20 years
ago on 628 acres of land. The cur-
rently facility has approximately
$30 million worth of buildings and
structures on 1,180 acres.
The annual operations budget
for the Perry site is around $7
million with monthly expendi-
tures estimated at $340,000. The
Georgia National Fair site in Perry
generates more than 50 percent of
its revenue during the week that
event takes place at the facility.
A study showed the Perry site
attracted 175,000 people from with-
in a 40-mile radius, while Columbia
County could attract 350,000 peo-
ple from within the same distance.
The report also noted that inter-
state frontage is critical to success-
ful centers because it creates a
presence and an awareness of the
facility.
Event site facilities also need to
be designed to be multi-purpose
event locations and not be limited
to a conference or convention
center.
If the events center concept is
adopted by local officials, they
realize it would have to be subsi-
dized.
"The most successful facilities
utilized fairs to generate a large
portion of their annual revenue,"
Williams said, noting funding
from the Georgia legislature was


used in the facility at Perry. 'The
best management only provided
75-85 percent return on operating
expenses."
County Commissioner Ron
Williams said local officials have
been talking about building a con-
vention center for 20-25 years.
"We know that we can't go as ,
large as the Perry or Valdosta,
Ga. location, because of state
involvement when it comes to
state revenues," Ron Williams
said, noting he would like the
Tourist Development Council to
put together a blueprint for such a
project.
Local hotel owner and Tourist
Development Council board
member Nick Patel said the board
needs to define its financial limita-
tions before going any further.
He suggested officials refine
the scope and structure of the
proposed facility and then define
more precise goals.
Patel said officials need to deter-
mine how much money they want
to invest and where the invest-
ments would come from in the
planning stages of the project.
Members of the TDC board and
county officials agreed that poten-
tial locations for the events build-
ing need to be selected and land
acquired for the project
"If you don't get it now, you mray
not be able to but it later," Patel
said.


Matthew Walker for Best Sports
Photo in the Daily Division. His
winning photograph, "State-bound
Showdown," was published June 19,
2010.
C.J. Risak, former assistant editor,
also earned an honorable mention in
the category of Best Feature Story
in the Daily Division for his piece,
"Fantasy to reality," that ran Dec. 19,
2010.
"Our news staff works very hard
every day to compile the best veri-
fied local news report in Columbia
County," said Todd Wilson, Lake
City Reporter publisher. "I'm excited
their hard work has been recog-
nized at the national level. I con-
gratulatethem for these outstanding
awards."


From staff reports

County officials hope to set
the maximum millage rate
for the 2011-12 fiscal budget
during tonight's county com-
mission meeting.
The meeting will take
place 7 p.m. tonight at the
Columbia County School
Board Administrative
Complex Auditorium, 372 W.
Street
The proposed maximum
rate, which will be the same
as last year's maximum mill-
age rate, will be 8.015, which
includes the economic devel-


opment office budget.
During the last fiscal year,
the same millage rate gener-
ated $19,607,910.
In other business, the com-
mission is scheduled to:
Listen to a financial
report presentation detailing,
the county's finances from
Oct. 1, 2009 Sept. 30, 2010;,
Receive a Payment In '
Lieu of Taxes check from
the Suwannee River Water
Management District; and
Set preliminary Solid
Waste and Disposal Services'"
assessment and the Fire '-
Protection assessment. -
;;r'


LEAKS: City announces new policy


Continued From Page 1A
leaks under the new policy.
"We give some and
they give some," said City.
Manager Wendell Johnson.
"It's very fair."
The city had a higher than
normal number of leaks
reported at the beginning of
the year, he said.
Throughout the state, cities
that provide utility services
have policies relating to leaks,
Johnson noted. Previously, no
such provision was in place in
Lake City, however.


The city's policy was mod-
eled after similar existing
ones for communities of com-
parable size.
"I think it's a good
policy long overdue," said'
Councilman George Ward,
during the meeting.
A few months ago his moth-
er experienced an unexpected
leak which ran up her water
bill, he said. The bill would
have been over $400.
Citizens confronted with an
unexpected leak should be


pleased with the new policy,
Johnson said.
"They will not be respon-
sible for the entire bill," he "
said. "The new policy gives '
citizens the benefit to share iir
the cost of a leak."
3r


SPORTS: Visiting teams a boon to local restaurants, hotels

'Continued From Page 1A


noted that the facilities
need to be located near
the bleaches and dugouts.
Clint Pittman, Columbia
County Landscapes and
Parks director, told offi-
cials that the upgrades
would cost around $3.4
million and officials sur-
mised that $4 million
would be a likely budget
for the project.
.The,lpgrades at the
facility would include
shade structures over
seating areas, safety
netting, correcting light-
ing issues, providing


ADA compliant access,
upgrades to restrooms
and concession stands,
and improvements to cur-
rent infrastructure.
The improvements
would also address park-
ing issues.
Pittman said if officials
approved the upgrades
and work began as soon
as possible, it would take
about two years to com-
, plete all the upgrades..,
He said the project
would require that much
time because the various
infrastructures are from


all different companies
and present a variety of
project needs.
"Literally, if you flipped
the switch on it you could
start tomorrow, with
three or four companies
working simultaneously,"
Pittman said.
Columbia County
Commissioner Ron
Williams, chairman of
the Tourist Development
Council, said Southside
Sports Complex is the
"jewel" that promotes
Lake City and Columbia'
County.


"It really helps the
hotels, motels and res-
taurants and that's where
the bed tax is gener-
ated," he said, noting the
importance of making the
upgrades at facility. "I'm
going to ask the board of
county commissioners,
as chairman of the TDC,
to make this the county's
number one priority. It will
rank right up there with
-,economic development."
Officials plan to hold
a meeting next week at
which they will discuss
funding options and ask


the Tourist Development
Council to make a finan-
cial commitment towards
the upgrades at Southside
Sports Complex.
"A member of the TDC
board, who is a local motel
owner, said they (hotel
owners) are willing to use
the bed tax to contribute
to the improvements of
the Southside Complex,"
Williams said. "It will
be a joint funding effort
between the board of
county commissioners and
the TDC to make those
improvements."


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LAKE CITY REPORTER NEWS THURSDAY, JULY 21, 2011


Page Editor: Robert Bridges, 754-0428


wwwwodstovefloidacom


/t I














OPINION


Thursday, July 21,2011


AN
OPINION



Show


us the


money


If you're wondering why
American consumers are
still flat on their backs,
rendering the economy
similarly supine, the
answer is both fundamental
and simple: It's not just that so
many of them are unemployed.
The ones who are employed
are also underpaid.
Don't take my word for it -
take that of Michael Cembalest,
the chief investment officer of
J.E Morgan Chase. He asserted
in the July 11 edition of "Eye
on the Market," the bank's
regular report to its private
banking clients, that "US
labor compensation is now at
a 50-year low relative to both,
company sales and US GDPE"
The primary subject of
Cembalest's report isn't wages.
It's profits specifically,
the fact that profit margins,
(the share of a company's
revenue that goes to profits)
of the Standard & Poor's 500
companies are at their highest
levels since the mid-1960s,
despite the burdens of health-
care costs, environmental
compliance and other
regulations that are presumably
weighing down these large
companies.
How can that be? To find the
answer, Cembalest studied the
rise in profit margins "from
peak to peakl" that is, from
their high point in 2000, just
before the dot-com bust, to
their high point in 2007, just
before the financial crisis.
In those seven years, profit
margins rose from just under
11 percent of the S&P 500's
revenue to just over 12 percent
Why the increase? "'There
are a lot of moving parts in the
margin equation," Cembalest
writes, but "reductions in
wages and benefits explain
the majority of the net
improvement in margins."
This decline in wages and
benefits, Cembalest calculates,
is responsible for about 75
percent of the increase in
our major corporations' profit
margins.

I*Washington Post

Lake City Reporter
Serving Columbia County
Since 1874
The Lake City Reporter is pub-
lished with pride for residents of
'Columbia and surrounding counties by
SCommunity Newspapers Inc.
We believe strong newspapers build
strong communities -"Newspapers
get things done!"
Our primary goal is to
publish distinguished and profitable
community-oriented newspapers.
This mission will be accomplished
through the teamwork of professionals
dedicated to truth, integrity and hard
work.
Todd Wilson, publisher
Robert Bridges, editor
Sue Brannon, controller
Dink NeSmith, president
Tom Wood, chairman

LETTERS
POLICY
Letters to the Editor should be
typed or neatly written and double
spaced. Letters should not exceed
400 words and will be edited for
length and libel. Letters must be
signed and include the writer's name,
address and telephone number for
verification. Writers can have two
letters per month published. Letters
and guest columns are the opinion of
the writers and not necessarily that of
the Lake City Reporter.
BY MAIL: Letters, P.O. Box 1709,


Lake City, FL 32056; or drop off at
180 E. Duval St. downtown.
BY FAX: (386) 752-9400.
BY E-MAIL:
news@lakecityreporter.com


Leftist babble makes debt


crisis even worse


"Narrow-minded, book ban-
ning, truth censoring, mean
spirited; ungenerous envious,
intolerant, afraid; chicken, bul-
lying; trivially moral, falsely
patriotic; family cheapening,
flag cheapening, God cheapen-
ing; the common man, shallow,
small, sanctimonious."
Henry Fairlie, journalist,
describing Republicans in 1980
H arold Meyerson is.
just about the only
socialist in pun-
ditry land who calls
himself a socialist,
and for that he deserves a tip of
the hat, but not for the Fairlie-
like bigotry he exhibits toward
the grassroots folks he suppos-
edly adores.
Scout around on the Internet
to see what people have been
saying about the debt-ceiling
fracas, and maybe you will
bump into a column this edi-
tor of The American Prospect
wrote for the Washington Post
He tells us that the House
Republicans, in their opposition
to new taxes, are at war with


LETTERS


Jay Ambrose
Speaktojoy@aol.com
government and that market
capitalism is malfunctioning. He
is pretty put out that President
Obamaactually indicated he
would consider entitlement cuts.,
Sorry, but wrong, wrong and
oh, please shut up, would you?
The House Republicans are
at war, not with government,
but with government abuses,
including an irresponsibly accu-
mulated bipartisan federal debt
that could spell ruination. That's
not just the Tea Party talking,
but top thinkers at institutions
like Harvard.
One of the things abused
is market capitalism As a
new book called "Reckless
Endangerment" shows, it was
government along with Wall
Street that caused the financial


crisis. What's now thwarting
business expansion as much
as anything is fear of the debt,
inflation, bureaucratic battering
and legislative overkill.
Concerning entitlements
- mainly Medicare and Social
Security the amount we owe
on them beyond revenue pro-
jections is $61.6 trillion, and
you couldn't pay that off if you
confiscated all the income and
wealth of every rich person out
there. Try to borrow our way
out of it, and you'd have to give
China the United States as col-
lateral.
But those Meyerson goofs,
plus a misunderstanding of
the mutual advantages of trade
and the rising of compensa-
tion before the recession, are
Mickey Mouse stuff compared
to his reach for deep insight
into the conservative psyche.

* Jay Ambrose, formerly
Washington,director of editorial
policy for Scripps Howard news-
papers and the editor of dailies in
El Paso, Texas, and Denver, is a
columnist living in Colorado.


TO THE EDITOR


Nothing comes for free


To the Editor.

Regarding today's headline,
"City's Pension Fund down
$477K":
When the State mandated
that city employee's contribute
a whopping 3% to their own
pension funds, the City Manger
decided to "assist" the employ-
ees by giving them a temporary
raise of 3% saying that is would
not cost the city anything. That
is impossible, as nothing is free.
Now the city's pension fund
is down a mere $477K Folks,
that's almost one half of a mil-
lion dollars. To me, that's real
money and it's going to come
out of each department's bud-
get Read this as meaning there
will be a decrease in the service
provided by the city or there
will be an increase in the cost
of services. Which one of these
solutions do you think will hap-
pen?
Have you noticed the number
of empty store fronts'lately?
Tax Assessor stated that prop-
erty values in Columbia County
are down 3%. Have your taxes '
gone down that much? Real
estate and home values have
dropped 20 30% here and more
than 40% in some locations. If
we were being taxed on the
Actual Value of real estate now,
our local governments would
be Broke, as in out of money,
which is our money that is
being taken from us and given


back in the form of services.
Government must live within
its income. Stop spending
money that it doesn't have!
Times are tough now and will
remain so for many years to
come, even if government does
cut back on spending. Everyone
needs a realistic budget to guide
them, especially government
I'll share a story with you ,
that illustrates the situation our
Federal Government is in at
present, which means, that you
and me are in that situation, as
we are the government's money
source.
Let's say you have brother-in-
law that was doing well finan-
cially several years ago and he
purchased a large home, think-
ing that the real estate market
would just keep on going up
and up and his salary would go
up also. Now, it's back to real-
ity, his home has dropped in
value by 20-30%. His equity has
dropped so much that he now
has negative equity, meaning
he is upside down in his house.
He owes more than it's worth
and is 2 months behind on his
payments. Recently, his wife
needs a new car and he can't
get one without a co-signer and
calls you for assistance. Are
you going to co-sign a car loan
for him for 60-72 months?
This is what the Federal
Government is asking us to do
for them, with the following dif-
ference. Our grandchildren and


great-grandchildren will be pay-
ing back this loan, not us.
Remember, there is no free
lunch. Someone always has to
pay for it.
To quote Thomas Sowell,
"Just how much of my hard
earned money, is your fair
share?"

Joseph N. Persons
Lake City

Why are we above average?

To the Editor:

Where is the "Oil Price Lose"
in Columbia County? Amazing,
simply amazing. The national
average at the pump for regular
gasoline is $3.676 per gal-
lon but in Columbia county the
price
for regular is running at $3.75-
$3.79 per gallon! Did the
county sneak in that tax on
fuel behind our back while we
were sleeping? It jumped 10
cent per gallon over one day!!
Why Just returned from
RVng to upper NY state and the
highest price for diesel was in
NY state followed by You
guessed it Columbia County,
Florida. Guess it goes with the
political season in this county
that roughly follows the Federal
level of competency!!

Manuel Enos
Lake City


4A


Sharon Randall
* www.sharonrandall.com


The great

outdoors, if

one's lucky,

a rock-solid

companion

In the same way the Blue
Ridge Mountains left
their mark on my soul,
Yosemite National Park
lent a formative hand to
the rearing of my children.
I will forever be indebted to
rocks and rivers and dirt
When I was a child in the
Carolinas, a lifetime ago, peo-
ple did not go camping. If they
did, they didn't talk about it.
I cannot imagine my mother
pitching a tent in the dirt. I
can't even imagine anyone hav-
ing the nerve to suggest she
should.
But we never needed to
leave home to spend time with
Mother Nature. We lived all
year round in her backyard.
Like other Southern chil-
dren, I grew up running bare-
foot through-cow pastures and
corn fields and a snake-infest-
ed forest called "the woods"
that doubled as my playground
and my mother's salvation.
"Get out of here," she'd say,
"turn off that TV and go play in
the woods!"
SAnd so I did, summer, win-
ter, spring or fall. My earliest
memories are of moments I
spent watching the sun melt
like butter over Hogback
Mountain; moonlight rippling
on the creek at my grand-
parents' farm; thunderheads
billowing, lightning flashing;
Leaves changing colors, red
and yellow, gold and brown,
dancing on the wind as I
would, if I could.
Children need to be fed
- body, mind and soul. My
childhood was far from idyllic.
But thanks to those mountains,
it was a visual and mental and
spiritual feast
My children grew up in a
different world, but one that
was just as beautiful as the one
I had known. On the rocky
coast of California's foggy
Monterey Peninsula, they
waded in tide pools, laughed at
sea lions and turned deep blue
building sand castles on the
beach.
But it was in Yosemite, I sus-
pect, where they came to know
what Wendell Berry called
"The Peace of Wild Things."
Their father, a fifth-gen-
eration Californian, grew up
camping in the park with his
family every summer, and
he insisted that his children
would know it and love it in
the same way that he did.
So we camped there for a
week every summer, plus an
occasional weekend in spring
or fall, for almost 25 years.
The summer after he died
of cancer, my children and I
camped in the park on the res-
ervation he'd booked for us a
few months before he died.
While we were there, my
youngest celebrated his 21st
birthday and got a job that
would allow him to spend the
next year in the park, cleaning
campground bathrooms and,
finally, running the ski shop.
In that year, he "grew up"
to be the kind of man who
would make his dad and his
mom very proud. Yosemite,
I believe, helped to heal him of
his loss.
When he left home to
work in the park, I rented a
lake house in the Blue Ridge
Mountains and spent a month
reconnecting with the land I
first called home.
* Sharon Randall can be con-
tacted at P.O. Box 777394,
Henderson, NV 89077.


www.lakecityreporter.com
















VOUCHERS: Repeal of religious ban challenged by state teachers union

Continued From Page 1A


Ford.
The leader of Columbia
County's teachers union, an FEA
affiliate, agreed.
"There's so many reasons why
this lawsuit was necessary," said
Kevin Doyle, Columbia Teachers
Association president, "and
one is that the language is very
misleading. It's really not about
religious freedom, it's about
taking more money away
from public schools. And the
reason being is that public
schools are expensive for
the state and the Legislature
would rather not fund public
schools."
Some Florida teaching
requirements, like holding
a teacher certification, are
not mandatory for teaching
at private schools, Doyle
said, which goes against the
Florida constitution's require-
ment of a "uniform" school
system.
"(That) does not apply to
someone in private school
that would receive a voucher,"
he said. "In some cases, (pri-
vate) schools do not have.
certified teachers and those
,students aren't required to
take the FCAT, so it's not a
uniform standard for educa-
tion, which is required for the
(state) constitution."
Doyle said the proposed
amendment is about money.
"It's all about money," he
said. "It's about saving money.
The Legislature would rather
not have teachers getting pen-
sions or benefits. They would
prefer that they pass out
vouchers and that way they
don't have to pay for facilities,


they don't have to pay for pen-
sions. Their long-term goal
would be to have a cheaper
education, not necessarily
what's best for the children of
Florida."
Chris Cate, a spokesman
for Secretary of State Kurt
Browning, the defendant,
said only that the lawsuit was
under review, but the amend-
ment's sponsors disputed its
allegations.
"They are trying to paint a
picture that if this is repealed
that the state is going to put
a million dollar check'in the
offering of the Baptist Church
and that is simply them being
untruthful," said Rep. Scott
Plakon, R-Longwood. "All this
does is make sure that our
constitution does not treat
people of faith differently than
any others."
Besides vouchers, the
amendment would affect faith-
based hospitals, social service
organizations and other enti-
ties that now get taxpayer
funds to provide public servic-
es as long as they don't pro-
mote their religious beliefs.
It would replace the ban
with a new provision prohibit-
ing government agencies from
denying "the benefits of any
program, funding, or other
support on the basis of reli-
gious identity'or belief." Like
other amendments, it would
require 60 percent approval to
pass.
The measure's opponents
say that language would not
only allow but require taxpay-
er funding of religious activi-
ties, which is not reflected in


the summary.
"It's not just about vouch-
ers and not about religious
freedom, but rather religious
coercion, coercing every
Floridian to support reli-
gious organizations that are
antithetical to their own,"
said Rabbi Merrill Shapiro of
Temple Shalom in Deltona.
Shapiro, one of six Jewish
and Christian clergy par-
ticipating in the suit, also
is national board president
of Americans United for
Separation of Church and
State.
Other are Florida School
Boards Association.President
Lee Swift of Punta Gorda and
Florida Association of School
Administrators President Susan
Summers-Persis of Ormond
Beach.
"Amendment 7 would lead to
chaos in our public schools,"
said Swift,- a Charlotte County
School Board member. "It
would allow the Legislature
to approve a vouchers-for-all
scheme that has been pro-
moted by Gov. (Rick) Scott
and many leaders of the
Legislature."
The opponents' legal team
includes lawyers from the
National Education Association,
Anti-Defamation League and
American Civil Liberties Union
Foundation of Florida.
The lawsuit alleges the sum-
mary is misleading because it
says the amendment is "consis-
tent with" the U.S. Constitution
although the federal docu-
ment's First Amendment lacks
a provision specifically prohibit-
ing government agencies from


denying funds on the basis of
religious identity or belief.
Plakon said the oppo-
nents are wrong because the
amendment, like the First
Amendment, doesn't force gov-
ernment funding of religious
activities.
The lawsuit says "Religious
Freedom" is a misleading
title because the amendment
decreases rather than increas-
es religious liberty. Plakon said
it's accurate because that's the
title of an existing provision,
which would be amended.
Florida courts can remove
amendments from the ballot
due to defective summaries or
titles. That's what they did to
three amendments proposed by
the Legislature last year.
It was the last straw for
most Republican legislators
who responded with a new law
requiring the attorney general
to fix defective titles and sum-
maries as an alternative to
removal.
The lawsuit also challenges
that law, contending it violates
the constitutional separation of
powers between the legislative
and executive branches as only
lawmakers have the power to
put amendments on the ballot.
Sen. Thad Altman, a Viera
Republican who sponsored
the amendment in the Senate,
said he agreed with the oppo-
nents on that issue. Altman
also said he saw no harm in
the lawsuit because even if
they win on both issues the
Legislature has plenty of time
to pass a revised amendment
before the November 2012
election.


That's due to another part
of the new election law, which
is not being challenged. It
requires such lawsuits to be
filed within 30 days of when
an amendment is submitted to
the secretary of state, which
was July 1 in this case.
The push to repeal the no-
aid provision began after it '
was cited by the. 1st District
Court of Appeal in a 2004
decision against then-Gov. Jeb.
Bush's voucher program for -!
students from failing public '
schools.
The Florida Supreme Court
also.ruled the Bush program f
was unconstitutional but based-
its decision on another provi-
sion that requires a uniform
system of public schools.
Since then Florida has
launched two other voucher
programs for disabled and low-
income children, but neither -
has yet been challenged. .
Unions also have sued
against a new law that requires'
teachers and other public -
employees to contribute 3 per-.'
cent of their pay to the Florida
Retirement System. Doctors
are challenging a law that
prohibits them from asking
patients about gun ownership -
in some cases and a union
representing guards is suing
against a budget provision
that calls for privatizing prison-
facilities.
Another likely target is a law
linking teacher pay to student
test results and eliminating
tenure for new hires. Union
lawyer Ron Meyer said "stay
tuned" when asked if a suit
will be filed.


OBITUARIES


Rudolph Dorsett, Sr.
Mr. Rudolph Dorsett, Sr. age
81, resident of 1376 NW Lake
Jeffery Rd., died Monday, July
18, 2011 at the
V.A. Medical
Center Ter-
minating an
extended ill-
ness. Born in
Miami, Fl., he
was the son
the late James
Dorsett, Sr. and
Justina DI Sey-
mour. He attend- ,.. .,
ed the public -
schools of Dade
County and retired as a Internal
Revenue Auditor with 30 plus
years of service. He was an hon-
orable discharges Navy Veteran
serving during World War II.
Survivors include; his wife
Mrs. Glovene Cobb-Dorsett;
one daughter: Sandra Dorsett;
two sons: Vincent Dorsett,
and Rudolph Dorsett, Jr.,
three step-daughters: April
Cobb, Clara Cobb 'and Ve-
ronica Cobb; two-step-sons:
Allen Cobb and Kinte Cobb.
Funeral services for the late
Mr. Rudolph Dorsett, Sr. will
he 1:00 pm Sunday, July 24,
2011 at Macedonia Seventh
Day Adventist Church with
Pastor, Michael Ross, officiat-
ing. Interment will follow in
the Gardens of Rest Cemetery.
Arrangements .entrusted to
COOPER FUNERAL
HOME 251 NE Washington
Street, Lake City, Fl. 32055
Willis 0. Cooper, L.F.D.

Desi Latrell Johnson
Desi Latrell Johnson, 48, passed
away July 18, 2011 in Shands at
the University of Florida Hospi-
tal, Gainesville, Florida. Desi,
the youngest child of Inez Shaw
Johnson, was born January 16,
1963 in Lake City, FL. He was
educated in the public schools


of Columbia County, graduating
with the Co-
lumbia High "
School Class
of 1981. He
was a mem-
ber of Ne I
Bethel Mis-
sionary Bap-
tist Church.
Brother, Gary
Johnson preceded him in death.
His memory will be cherished
by his mother, Inez Shaw John-
son; his son, Tomondrek Moore
siblings, Sandra Johnson-Prid-
gen (David), Albert Johnson,
Jr. (Tracy), Linard Johnson
(Bernadine), Petronia Johnson
and Tony Johnson (Brenda);
nieces, nephews, aunts,, uncles,
other relatives and friends.
Funeral services for Desi La-
trell Johnson will be 10:00
A.M. Saturday, July 23, 2011
at New Bethel Missionary Bap-
tist Church. 550 NE.Martin Lu-
ther King Street. Lake City, FL.
Visitation with the fam-
ily will be Friday, Friday,
July 22, 2011, 7:00 P.M. at
Combs Funeral Home Chapel.
Arrangements entrusted to
COMBS FUNERAL HOME.
292 NE Washington Street.
Lake City, FL. (386) 752-4366.
Marq Combs-Turner, L.F.D.
"The Caring Professionals"

Lillie M. Pearson
Ms. Lillie M. Pearson, 84, life
long resident of Lake City, Flor-
ida, passed July 13, 2011 after
an extended
illness. Ms.
Pearson was
born Decem-
ber 16, 1926
in Lake City
to the parent-
age of Joe and
Florence Pear-
son. Both pre-
ceded her in death. Ms. Pearson
was a life long member of Olivet
Baptist Church, joining under


the pastorate of Rev. Jones. She
was a member in good standing,
serving in many capacities, rely-
ing on her faith and Christian be-
liefs to sustain her. Olivet, being
"My Church", she served until
her 'health failed. She received
her Elementary and High School
education at Richardson High.
School, graduating in 1945. Ms.
Pearson continued her educa-
tion at The Alabama State Col-
lege for Negros in Montgomery,
Alabama, earning a Bachelor of
Science degree in Secondary Ed-
ucation in 1950. She enhanced
her educational skills with ad-
vanced courses from FAMU
and Bethune Cookman College.
Ms. Pearson taught school in
Sanderson, FL. and Lake City,
FL. At Richardson High in Lake
City, she taught Science and
Physical Educatipn and was the
Coach of the girls Basketball
team. To comply with the Laws
of integration, Ms. Pearson was
transferred to Lake City Jr. High
School. She retired from Lake
City Jr. High East in 1984 after
31 years of employment. Ms.
Pearson was the first Black Girls
Scout leader in Lake City, serv-
ing from late 1940 to.early 1950.
Involved with Guardian Ad Li-
tem, she brought into her home
young people from distressed
homes and raised them from tod-
dlers to young adults. She was
an inspiration to all of her family
members and was a good neigh-
bor and friend to all. She will
be greatly missed in this com-
munity. Others preceding her
in death; sisters, Susanna Pear-
son, Mattie Pearson, Blanche
Pearson, Daisy Pearson, Annie
Belle Pearson; brothers, James
Pearson and Joe Pearson, Jr.
Cherishing memories: children,
Rise' Pearson, MeShane Stew-
art, Edward Stewart, Susie (Oli-


ver) Tyson, Bill Rivers, Verber
Rivers; sister-in-law, Junavee
Pearson; nephew, Joe (Rose)
Pearson; niece, Bernice Pear-
son; grandchildren; other nieces,
nephews, relatives and friends.
Funeral services for Ms. Pearson
will be held 11:00 A.M. Sat-
urday, July 23, 2011 at Olivet
Missionary Baptist Church. 901
NE Davis Street. Lake City, FL.
The family will receive friends
Friday, July 22, 2011 from 5-
7:0,0 P.M. at the funeral home.
Arrangements entrusted to
COMBS FUNERAL HOME.
.292 NE Washington Street.
Lake City, -Fl. (386) 752-4366.
Marq Combs-Turner, L.F.D.
"The Caring Professionals"

Trinise Sarya Surrency
Trinise Sarya Surrency of Mac-
clenny, Florida departed this
life, Friday July 15, 2011. She
was a 15 year old student at
Baker County
High School.
Trinise was
a dedicated
member of
Faith Taber-
nacle Church,
Baldwin, FL.,
serving faith-
fully and dutifully as an usher,
praise team member and nurs-
ery worker. Her smile and pret-
ty face brought much joy to all
who came in contact with her.
She was a wonderful daughter,
sister, aunt, cousin and friend.
Trinise will be dearly missed by
her parents, Theodore and Vick-
ey, Surrency; sisters, Teria and
Darkeea Surrency; niece and
nephew, laryonna and Bryce
Wyche;uncles, aunts and friends.
A celebration of Trinise life
will be held 2:00 P.M. Sat-


7a


If tears could build a stairway
And memories were a lane
I'd walk right up to heaven
And bring you back again.
No fareware words were spoken
No time to say good bye
You were gone before I knew it
And only God knows why.
My heart still aches in sadness
And secret tears will flow
What it meant to lose you
No one will ever know.
But now I know you want me
To mourn for you no more
To remember all of the happy times
Life still has much in store.
Since you'll never be forgotten
I pledge to you today
A hallowed place within my heart
Is where you'll always stay.


Loving &6 Missing You Always
Sam, Russ & Families


urday, July 23, 2011 at The
Baker County Middle School
Auditorium. 211 E. Jonathan
Street, Macclenny, Florida. Pas-
tor Charles Wilson, Officiating.
The family will receive friends
from 5-7 P.M. Friday; July 22,
2011, at Emmanuel Church
of God In Christ. 850 S.
Eighth Street, Macclenny, FL.
Arrangements entrusted to
COMBS FUNERAL HOME.


292 NE Washington Street.
Lake City, FL. (386) 752-4366.
Marq Combs-Turner, L.F.D.
"The Caring Professionals"



Obituaries are paid advertise-
ments. For details, call the Lake
City Reporter's classified depart-
ment at 752-1293.


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LAKE CITY REPORTER NEWS THURSDAY, JULY 21, 2011


Page Editor: Brandon Finley, 754-0420










LAKE CITY REPORTER NEWS THURSDAY, JULY 21, 2011


Fresh talks set for debt negotiators


By ANDREW TAYLOR
Associated Press

WASHINGTON President Barack
Obama summoned top Democratic law-
makers to the White House Wednesday
to resume negotiations on averting a
potentially crippling government default,
as attention focused on a new bipartisan
budget plan emerging in the Senate.
Republicans expected to come, too, sepa-
rately.
The White House also indicated
Obama would be willing to sign a short-
term debt limit increase something
he's opposed if it's merely a stop-gap
measure to allow time for a broader plan
to be put into place. It's unlikely a broad
deficit-cutting measure could be finished
by the Aug. 2 deadline to increase the
government's borrowing limit
The meeting with House and Senate
Democratic leaders, planned for mid-
afternoon Wednesday, marked a partial
resumption of talks that ended last week
after five days of Obama huddling with
lawmakers from both parties, with little
progress to show. Republican officials
said they expected a meeting between
GOP leaders and the president later in
the day.
The announcement Tuesday of a pos-
sible agreement by the Senate "Gang
of Six" on a budget plan was seized by
'Obama as a possible breakthrough. Now
the job for the president, if he is to build
momentum behind the plan, includes
overcoming GOP opposition to tax hikes
involved and selling members of his own
party on the cuts to entitlement pro-
grams that the plan embraces.
"We are in the 11th hour," said White
House press secretary Jay Carney,
repeating what Obama had said Tuesday.
'We need to meet, talk, consult and nar-
row down in fairly short order what train
we're riding into the station."
Carney also indicated that the presi-
dent would be willing to support a short-
term extension as a stop-gapl measure.
Carney said.Obama would not support a
short-term extension "absent an agree-
ment on a larger deal."
"If both sides agree on something signifi-
cant we will support the measures neces-
sary to finalize the details," Carney said.
The plan by the Gang of Six senators,
three from each party, is probably far
too complicated and contentious to be
approved before the Aug. 2 deadline to.


avoid a default that Treasury Secretary
Timothy Geithner and other experts
warn would drive up interest rates and
threaten to take the country back into a
recession. But the plan's authors clearly
hope it could serve as a template for a
"grand bargain" later in the year that
could erase perhaps $4 trillion from the
deficit over the coming decade.
It includes tax hikes that are opposed
by Republicans and cuts to Medicare and
other entitlements that many Democrats
are against
"This is a unique opportunity and we
ought to seize it," Carney said, even
while saying the White House still want-
ed to keep working on a less ambitious
"Plan B" measure to increase the debt
limit even if no big plan can be reached.
That was a sign administration officials
were acutely aware of the obstacles that
remain to a major deal, perhaps par-
ticularly from House conservatives who
adamantly oppose any new taxes. Carney
said Obama spoke by phone Tuesday
evening to the top four Democratic and
Republican congressional leaders.
Even among Democrats, Rep. Chris
Van Hollen, senior Democrat on the
House Budget Committee, said lawmak-
ers had too few details about the Gang
of Six plan. He said that until they have a
chance to see the fine print, it will be dif-
ficult to get their caucus to focus on it.
The top Democrat in the House,
Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi, reacted
positively Wednesday to the new plan,
saying it "has some good principles in
it" At the same time, a top House GOP
military hawk said it would cut defense
too much.
House Armed Services Committee
Chairman Howard "Buck" McKeon, R-
Calif., blasted the Gang of Six plan in a
missive to his panel members, saying it
would cut the Pentagon way too deeply
and would unfairly curb military health
and retirement benefits.
"This proposal raises serious implica-
tions for defense and would not allow us
to perform our constitutional responsibil-
ity to provide for the safety and security
of our country," McKeon wrote in a
memo to panel Republicans.
Speaking on the Senate floor
Wednesday morning, Democratic leader
Harry Reid said he was confident Obama
and congressional negotiators could
avoid a government default, but he also
said the Senate still needed to hear from
the House.


ASSOCIATED PRESS,,
Sen. Tom Harkin, D-lowa, pauses as he participates in a news conference to denounce the
House Republicans "Cut, Cap, and Balance Act" Wednesday in Washington.



Heat 'dome' traps much


of US in pressure cooker.


By TAMMY WEBBER
Associated Press
CHICAGO For millions of people
enduring this week's extreme heat and
humidity, it feels like they're living in a
pressure cooker. And in a sense, they are.
Much of the United States is trapped
under a heat "dome" caused by a huge
area of high pressure that's compressing
hot, moist air beneath it, leading to miser-
able temperatures in the nmid-90s fto low
100s and heat-index levels well above 100
degrees.


"It's hot no matter what you're doing
or where you are,".said Tim Prader, a
50-year-old construction worker who was
taking a break Tuesday at a job site in St
Louis. Although his huge Caterpillar exca-,
vator has air conditioning, he couldn't
entirely escape. "When you're done for
the day, you're ready to eat, drink and hit
the couch."
The oppressive conditions extend from
the northern Plains states to Texas and
from Nebraska to the Ohio Valley. And
they're expanding eastward.


"After 2 weeks my blood sugar went from 180 to 112 and stayed there!"



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Page Editor: Robert Bridges, 754-0428


LAKE CITY REPORTER NEWS THURSDAY, JULY 21, 2011


Obesity hits boomers especially hard


LAURAN NEERGAARD
AP Medical Writer

WASHINGTON Cancer and memo-
ry loss are baby boomers' biggest health
fears. Given their weight, maybe heart
disease and diabetes should be.
Boomers are more obese than other
generations, a new poll finds, setting
them up for unhealthy senior years.
And for all the talk of "60 is the new
50" and active aging, even those who
aren't obese need to do more to stay
fit, according to the Associated Press-
LifeGoesStrong.com poll.
Most baby boomers say they get some
aerobic exercise, the kind that revs up
your heart rate, at least once a week.
But most adults are supposed to get 2?
hours a week of moderate-intensity aero-
bic activity things like a brisk walk, a
dance class, pushing a lawn mower. Only
about a quarter of boomers polled report
working up a sweat four or five times a
week, what the average person needs to
reach that goal.
Worse, 37 percent never do any of the
strength training so crucial to fighting the
muscle loss that comes with aging.
Walking is their most frequent form of
exercise The good news: Walk enough
and the benefits add up.
"I have more energy, and my knees
don't hurt anymore," says Maggie
Sanders, 61, of Abbeville, S.C. She has
lost 15 pounds by walking 4 miles, three
times a week, over the past few months,
and eating better.
More boomers need to heed that


feel-good benefit. Based on calculation
of body mass index from self-reported
height and weight, roughly a third of the
baby boomers polled are obese, com-
pared with about a quarter of both older
and younger responders. Only half of the
obese boomers say they are regularly
exercising.
An additional 36 percent of boomers
are overweight, though not obese.
The nation has been bracing for a
surge in Medicare costs as the 77 million
baby boomers, the post-war generation
born from 1946 to 1964, begin turning 65.
Obesity with its extra risk of heart dis-
ease, diabetes, high blood pressure and
arthritis will further fuel those bills.
"They're going to be expensive if they
don't get their act together," says Jeff
Levi of the nonprofit Trust for America's
Health. He points to a study that found
Medicare pays 34 percent more on an
obese senior than one who's a healthy
weight
About 60 percent of boomers polled say
they're dieting to lose weight, and slightly
more are eating more fruits and vegeta-
bles or cutting cholesterol and salt
But it takes physical activity, not just
dieting, to. shed pounds. That's especially
important as people start to age and diet-
ing alone could cost them precious mus-
cle in addition to fat, says Jack Rejeski
of Wake Forest University, a specialist in
exercise and aging.
Whether you're overweight or just the
right size, physical activity can help stave
off the mobility problems that too often
sneak up on the sedentary as they age.
Muscles gradually become flabbier until


people can find themselves on the verge
of disability and loss of independence,
like a canoe that floats peacefully until
it gets too near a waterfall to pull back,
Rejeski says.
He led a study that found a modest
weight loss plus walking 2 1/2 hours a
week helped people 60 and older signifi-
cantly improve their mobility. Even those
who didn't walk that much got some
benefit. Try walking 10 minutes at a time
two or three times a day, he suggests, and
don't wait to start.
"I don't think there's any question the
earlier you get started, the better," says
Rejeski, who at 63 has given up running
in favor of walking, and gets in 30 miles
a week. "If you allow your mobility to
decline, you pay for it in terms of the
quality of your own life."
When it comes to diseases, nearly half
of boomers polled worry most about
cancer. The second-leading killer, cancer
does become more common with aging.
"It's the unknown nature, that it can
come up without warning," says Harry
Forsha, 64, of Clearwater, Fla., and Mill
Spring, N.C.
Heart disease is the nation's No. 1
killer, but it's third in line on the boom-
ers' worry list. Memory loss is a bigger
concern.
"On a scale of one to 10, seven or
eight," is how Barry Harding, 61, of Glen
Burnie, Md., puts it. "It's more talked
about now, Alzheimer's and dementia."
In fact, more than half of boomers
polled say they regularly do mental exer-
cises such as crossword puzzles.
After Harding retires, he plans to take


classes to keep mentally active. For now,
he's doing the physical exercise that's
important for brain health, too. He also
takes fish oil, a type of fatty acid that
some studies suggest might help prevent
mental decline.
In Warren, Pa., Colleen Witmer says
she works hard to maintain her weight
and her health: The 52-year-old walks or
rides her bike daily, plus does a more for-'
mal exercise program three or four times
a week.
"I maintain my annual visits to the doc-
tor's office and follow his advice whether
I like it or not," she says. "And I refuse to
admit I am my age, and keep going as if I
weren't."
The AP-LifeGoesStrong.com poll was
conducted from June 3-12 by Knowledge
Networks of Menlo Park, Calif., and
involved online interviews with 1,416
adults, including 1,078 baby boomers
born between 1946 and 1964. The margin
of sampling error for results from the
full sample is plus or minus 4.4 percent-
age points; for the boomers, it is plus or
minus 3.3 percentage points.
Knowledge Networks used traditional
telephone and mail sampling methods
to randomly recruit respondents. People
selected who had no Internet access were
given it free.
Lauran Neergaard covers health
and medical issues for The Associated
Press in Washington. AP writer Stacy A.
Anderson, AP Polling Director Trevor
Tompson, Deputy Polling Director
Jennifer Agiesta and News Survey
Specialist Dennis Junius contributed to
this report


AARP: Families provide $450

billion worth of unpaid care


By EILEEN AJ CONNELLY
AP Personal Finance Writer

NEW YORK How do
you put a value on caring
for family members who
are chronically ill or dis-
abled?
AARP estimates it at
about $450 billion a year.
Thafs how much it
might cost for the unpaid
care that roughly one in
every four adults provide;
helping loved ones get
dressed, take medications,
and myriad other tasks.
-The advocacy group
released a report Monday
that estimates the eco-
nomic value of family
caregiving in 2009. The
total was up 20 percent,
from $375 billion in 2007,
with the increase reflect-
ing both an increase in
the number of family care-
givers and in the hours
of care they provide.
Given the continued rise
in health-care costs, it's
likely the estimate would
be higher today.
AARP said about 42.1
million individuals are
caring for relatives and
close friends at any time
during the year but
about 61.6 million provide
care at some point during
the year. They put in an
average of 18.4 hours of
care per week, up 9 per-
cent from its prior study.
The organization arrived
at its dollar value estimate
by assuming the work of
caregivers is worth an
average $11.16 per hour.
'Today, families remain
the most important
source of support to older
adults," the study said.
"Many individuals who
provide assistance and
support to a loved one
with chronic illness or
disability do not identify
themselves as 'caregiv-
ers' but rather describe
what they do.in terms of
their relationship with
the other person: as a
husband, wife, partner,
daughter, daughter-in-law,


son, grandson, niece, or
close friend, for example."
Beyond handling
simple household chores
or taking care of the bills
and insurance paperwork,
AARP noted that care-
giving is getting more
medically involved, due to
factors like shorter hospi-
tal stays and more home-
based medical technolo-
gies. Caregivers "often
have little training or
preparation for perform-
ing these tasks, which.
include bandaging and
wound care, tube feed-
ings, managing catheters,
giving injections, or oper-
ating medical equipment"
And caregivers typically
work full time as well.
The study found that the
average individual is a 49-
year-old woman with an
outside job, who spends
nearly 20 hours per week
caring for her mother for
nearly five years. That's
one of the reasons the
hidden costs for caregiv-
ing are increasing as well.
The study found that
family care can have nega-
tive effects on the caregiv-
ers' own financial situa-
tion, retirement security,
physical and emotional
health and careers. "The
impact is particularly
severe for caregivers of '
individuals who have.
complex chronic health
conditions and both


.,


functional and cognitive
impairments," it said. For
caregivers over 50 years
old who leave the work-
force to care for a parent,
lost wages, income and
pension benefits average
$283,716 for men and
$324,044 for women.
Another impact comes
in the workplace, through
lost productivity and
higher health care costs
for employers. The study
notes that caregivers
themselves frequently
have higher medical
costs, which can be borne
by employers.
The situation got worse
amid the economic down-
turn, AARP found, with
agencies that provide care-
giver support services see-
ing a 67 percent increase
in requests for help from
late 2007 to 2009. But gov-
ernment budget problems
often mean that even when
demand rises, less money
is available through gov-
ernment programs and
grants.
AARP noted that demo-
graphics show that when
health care providers
include caregivers in plan-
ning and decision making,
the results are positive.
Involving caregivers in
planning when a patent is
discharged from a hospi-
tal, for instance, can help
prevent readmission to
the hospital.


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disabled people he cares
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physician at Providence
ElderPlace, a program
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housing and other ser-
vices for older adults.


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754-0428


Lake City Reporter





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8A www.lakecityreporter.com Thursday, July 21,201 I






PREVENTION




A new approach to primary care


By TOM MURPHY
AP Business Writer
INDIANAPOLIS A
budding model for primary
care that encourages the
family doctor to act as a
health coach who focuses
as much on preventing ill-
ness as on treating it has
shown promising results
and saved insurers mil-
lions of dollars.
Growth in emergency
room visits and hospital
admissions slowed and
prescription drug costs
have been tamed with this
approach, known in the
industry as patient-cen-
tered medical homes, or
just medical homes.
The current health care
system pays doctors to
see patients and largely
attend to their immediate
needs. Patients may get
treatment, advice, a pre-
scription and a follow-up
appointment.
Patient-centered medi-
cal homes focus on keep-
ing patients healthy,
which saves money by
reducing hospital visits,
especially for chronic
conditions such as diabt-
tes.
WellPoint Inc.,
UnitedHealth Group Inc.,
and other insurers have
pilot projects around the
country testing this con-
cept. The departments
of Defense and Veterans
Affairs are making plans
to use medical homes,
and more than a million
Medicare recipients are
involved in another test.
All told, an estimated
40,000 primary care doc-
tors work in practices
set up as patient-cen-
tered medical homes,
according to the Patient
Centered Primary Care
Collaborative. That
amounts to about 13 per-
cent of all doctors and
pediatricians.
Michigan's largest
insurer says it saved $65
million to $70 million last
year through its medical-
homes program. But the
idea requires big chang-
es to traditional pri-
mary care, and experts
say that may slow its
growth.
Patients say they like
the greater involvement
of their doctors.
Richard Smith of
Vidor, Texas, who has
multiple sclerosis and
knee and ankle prob-
lems, once struggled
to walk to his mailbox.
Now, he walks three to
four miles a day. He's
dropped 40 pounds in
two years, and his blood
pressure and cholesterol
are down.
He credits Dr. James
Holly and a medical home
practice. Holly ordered
braces for Smith's legs,
encouraged him to exer-
cise and introduced him
to a dietician. And the
doctor called Smith once
in a while to check in.
"He really touches base
on everything, my health,
any kind of problems I
have," he says. "He's wor-
ried about my whole life."
Under the medical
home approach, doctors
use electronic records to
track patients between
visits and act as the central
point of communication


between specialists, nutri-
tionists and others. They
monitor blood pressure,
blood sugar and other
tests and whether patients
are exercising and taking
their medication. They
also exchange emails with
patients.
Instead of simply telling
someone to exercise or ,
stop smoking, a doctor or
member of the patient's
care team might devise a
plan with the patient and
then check to see that he
sticks to it.
Patient-centered medical
homes started in the late
1960s to help children with
complex medical prob-
lems. The concept took
off in primary care a few
years ago, as insurers and
doctors looked for alterna-
tives to a system with soar-
ing costs.
"The irony of medical
care is that people are
their own doctor 99 per-
cent of the time, and what
we don't do well is help
that person be the best
doctor they can be," says
Dr. Dave Lynch, whose
Bellingham, Wash., family
practice has,operated as ,
a medical home since the
late 1990s.
The concept depends
on doctors and other care
providers doing more
than they normally might
in primary care. Don
Jacoby of Cincinnati, for
example, woke up the
day after knee surgery in
January to find his prima-
ry-care doctor standing
next to his hospital bed.
The doctor had set up
Jacoby's appointment
with an orthopedic sur-
geon and then visited
afterward to see how he
was doing. It reminded
Jacoby, 67, a retired
teacher, of the family doc-
tors he knew growing up
in a small Pennsylvania
town.
"He knows you. It's not
like you're a name on a
chart," Jacoby says.
Doctors running these
medical homes generally
receive an extra or bigger
payment from insurers
to manage a patient's
health. The amount varies
depending on the plan.
When it started a medi-
cal-home program in 2009,
Blue Cross Blue Shield of
Michigan increased office
visit reimbursements. The
extra pay amounted to
about $7,500 more per doc-
tor annually.
All told, the insurer
spends about $35 million
a year to support patient-
centered medical homes
that now care for around 2
million people. In return,
it estimates that it saved
between $65 million and
$70 million last year alone.
Growth in hospital
admissions and emergency
room visits slowed for
patients treated in these
medical homes. Electronic
prescribing helped doctors
use generic drugs more
because they could see
lists of covered medicines
and co-payments charged
to the patient
The insurer's annual
medical costs are about
$9 billion, so the medical
homes offer a relatively
small slice of savings. Still,
Dr. Thomas Simmer, the
chief medical officer, is


encouraged.
"All of us who are vexed
by high health care costs
are impatient to find
something that's really
going to be the answer
to it," he says. "You can't
be impatient. You have
to realize you're talking
about human beings and
patients' health."
It takes a heavy dose
of patience to transform
a practice into a medical
home. The process can
take a couple of years and
has to be done while the
practice is still functioning.
'"The metaphor we fre-
quently talk about is rede-
signing the plane while
you're flying," said Dr. Bob
Graham, a former CEO
of the American Academy
of Family Physicians who
has helped set up medical
homes.
Patients must also be
willing to work more
with their doctor or be
comfortable seeing other
members of a care team
instead of just the physi-
cian. Primary-care doc-
tors also need to foster
cooperation from special-
ists, who may not receive
extra reimbursement to
do so.
Money is an issue, too.
Lynch's practice, which
has 58 family doctors,
spent about $500,000 in
2003 to switch to elec-
tronic medical records,
a must for quick and
efficient file-sharing with
other providers. The prac-
tice has since spent more
on upgrades and train-
ing, but Lynch says it
recouped the investment
in part by becoming more
efficient and eliminating
the clerical work those
paper files required.
Despite the challenges,
Simmer and others who
work with patient-cen-
tered medical homes
expect the concept to
grow. ,'' ':
"I absolutely expect
it to be the norm in pri-
mary care because it's
just plain better primary
care," Simmer says.


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Richard Smith poses for a photo with his dog Willie at his home in Vidor, Texas. Smith, who
has multiple sclerosis and knee and ankle problems, once struggled to walk to his mailbox.
Now, he walks three to four miles a day. He's dropped 40 pounds in two years, and his blood
pressure and cholesterol have lowered.


.r % T Tr T'T.T T


INTERNAL MEDICINE
Accepting New Patients
Specializing in adult medical care including:


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* Diabetes
Management

386.754.DOCS (3627)
www.primarycaremedic.com


Newnun,. ARNP
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PHYSICIANS
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* MRI
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Story ideas?


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Contact
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Sports Editor
754-042 .
tkirby@olakecityreporter.com


Lake City Reporter





SPORTS


Thursday. July 21, 2011


www.lakecityreporter.com


Section B


BRIEFS

CHS VOLLEYBALL
College day
camp planned
July 28
Central Florida State
College volleyball
coaches and players
will conduct a one-day
camp for girls entering
middle school from 9
a.m. to noon on July 28
at Columbia High. Cost
of the camp is $35 with
registration Monday
through Thursday at the
CHS front office. The
camp is limited to 30
participants.
For details, call Casie
McCallister at 365-3158.
YOUTH BASEBALL
Fort White sets
board elections
Fort White Youth
Baseball has board
elections set for 7 p.m.
Aug. 5 in the building.
at the back of the South
Columbia Sports Park.
For details, call
Tammy Sharpe at 867-
3825.
CHS FOOTBALL
Tickets on sale
at McDuffie's
Columbia High football,
season tickets are on sale
at McDuffie's Marine &
Sporting Goods. Paid-up
Tiger Boosters can pick
up tickets, parking passes
and their Tiger fift.
For details, call
McDuffie's-at 752-2500 .
POP WARNER FOOTBALL
Sign-up extended
through Aug. 15
Lake City Pop Warner
football has extended
registration through
Aug. 15 for the following
groups: ages 7-9, 45-90
pounds; ages 8-10, 60-105
pounds; age 11, 60-85
pounds; ages 9-11, 75-120
pounds; age 12, 75-100
pounds. Registration is
3-6 p.m. weekdays at
Richardson Community
Center. Cost is $80.
For details, call Mario
Coppock or Nicole Smith
at 754-7095 or 754-7096.
RUNNING
Chomp Cancer
Run on Oct. 15
Chomp Cancer
Foundation is hosting
the Chomp Cancer Run/
Walk at the Fort White
Community Center on
Oct 15. Cost for the 5K -,
is $25. and there will be
food, music and a silent
auction. Sponsorship
opportunities are
offered. All proceeds will
benefit the UF & Shands
Cancer Center. Online
registration is available
at http://www.active. com
keyword Chomp Cancer.
For details, e-mail
Lauren Valentine at
chompcancer@gmail. com r'
or visit www.chompcancer.
cornm.
* From staff reports


Barber 's


star rising


Local golfer to compete

in Nationwide event


COURTESY PHOTO
Local golfer Blayne Barber competes in an event for the
University of Auburn last season. .


From staff reports

Lake City product and
current Auburn junior
Blayne Barber was selected
to compete as an amateur
at the Nationwide Tour's
Children's Hospital
Invitational held today
through Sunday at
the Scarlett Course in
Columbus, Ohio.
"I've never played the
course before," said Barber.
"It looks to be a typical
northern course. You have
to hit it straight The greens
are steep and undulating.
I got the call last Sunday
that I had been invited to
attend. This is my first time
competing at a professional
event so, needless to say,
I'm very excited about the
opportunity."
Barber doesn't have any
plans to turn pro, but is
seeing his amateur ranking
continue to climb.
Barber currently ranks
as the No. 7 amateur in
the world following a pair
of top-five showings at the
Northeast and Southern
Amateurs. Barber had a
70.91 scoring average in his
first season with the Tigers,
second all-time-at Auburn


behind Buddy Gardner's
70.90 in 1976 and the lowest
for any Auburn golfer in 34
years.
His 13 rounds in the
60s season tie him for the
most in a single season
with former Tiger Patton
Kizzire during his 2007 SEC
Championship run.
The 2010-11 First
Team All-SEC selection
also moved into third
all-time at Auburn with
16 sub-par rounds in
2010-11.
Barber will tee off the
front nine at 9:50 a.m. with
Diego Velasquez and Sam
Saunders.
Barber also earned his
second top-five finish of the
summer Saturday, firing
a final round 67 to take
fifth in the 2011 Southern
Amateur at the Innisbroook
Resort in Tampa.
Barberentered Saturday's
action tied for eighth
before carding five final-
round birdies and only one
bogey.
"The course is
fantastic," said Barber of
Irinisbrook. "You have
to drive the ball well.
The fairways are pretty
tight. -The field was good


as always and I was
happy to 'see the
result"
Barber was at. 1-under
for the day through .13
before rattling off three-
clutch birdies on the home
stretch.
A pitch to within 10 feet
on the par-5, 14th, set up
a birdie and got the ball
rolling.
"I just 'went out today
'with the mindset that I
wanted to go as low as I
could," said Barber. "I was
comfortable all day today. I
was struggling with putts
the first three days. I was
even par on the front nine
but the putts started going
my way as the day went
on."
A birdie, on 18 moved
Barber to four-under, giving
him sole possession of fifth
place.
"On 18, I hit my
drive just before a
lightning delay kicked
in," said Barber. "They
pulled us off the course
for about 45 minutes.
When we got back out,
I hit my approach to
around 15 feet and was
able to make that putt for
birdie."


No player vote


Wednesday


S'& on NFLdeal


Florida coach Will Muschamp talks with reporters during Southeastern
Media Days in Birmingham, Ala. on Wednesday.


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Conference Football


Muschamp mixes old

with new at Florida


Gators set stage at
SEC Media Days
on Wednesday.
By DAVID BRANDT
Associated Press
HOOVER, Ala. The
typical formula for a -new
college football coach is
simple: Break down the
program, implement new
philosophies and then


hope those changes turn
into newfound success.
For Will Muschamp,
there's one problem with
that blueprint: He didn't
take over the typical col-
lege football program.
The 39-year-old first-
time head coach grabbed
one of the sport's plum
jobs when he was hired to
lead Florida. Though the
Gators finished with a 8-
5 record last season, they


won two out of the past six
national championships
under Urban Meyer, and
still have plenty 'of talent
on the roster.
"If it's not broke, don't
fix it," Muschamp said
at SEC Media Days on
Wednesday. "Urban did a
phenomenal job, he and
his staff. They did some
great things that we're
GATORS continued on 2B


Representatives
of all 32 teams
discuss lockout.
By HOWARD FENDRICH and
BARRY WILNER
Associated Press
WASHINGTON A
person familiar with the
NFL negotiations told The
Associated Press that players
would not vote Wednesday
on a deal to end the lock-
out
The person said there
remained work to do to
finalize an agreement
between owners and play-
ers. The person spoke to
the AP on condition of ano-
nymity because the process
was supposed to remain
confidential.
The NFL Players
Association's executive
committee and representa-
tives of all 32 teams met
Wednesday in Washington,
but some participants left in
the afternoon after review-
ing portions of a tentative
deal. A second person told
the AP on condition of ano-
nymity that players were
going to relay information
to teammates.
It's possible players will


vote Thursday.
Early Wednesday, NFLPA
president Kevin Mawae
cautioned not to assume
the lockout will be over by
the Weekend, saying that
his group was "not tied" to
a deadline for getting a deal
done in the next 24 hours.
"We want to go back to
work," Mawae said outside
NFLPA headquarters in the
morning, "but we will not
agree to a deal unless it's
the best deal for the play-
ers."
If the four-month lock-
out the NFL's first work
stoppage since 1987 is
going to end in time to keep
the preseason completely
intact, the players and own-
ers almost certainly must
ratify the deal by Thursday.
The St. Louis Rams and
Chicago Bears are sched-
uled to open the preseason
Aug. 7 in the Hall of Fame
game.
"Our goal today is to see
what is on the table and
discuss outlying issues,"
Mawae said. "The players
are not tied to a July 21
timeline. Our timeline is
that which gives us thejbest
deal for the players today,
NFL continued on 6B


Saturday, August 13
10am-10pm

f NeSt SLIDES PRIZES,
FFUNZONE BOUNCE HOUSE-GAMES,
FUNZONE BRING THE KIDS I)











LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS THURSDAY, JULY 21 2011


TELEVISION

TV sports

Today
CYCLING
8 a.m.
VERSUS Tour de France, stage 18,
Pinerolo, Italy to Galibier Serre-Chevalier,
France
GOLF
9 a.m.
TGC European PGA Tour, Nordea
Masters, first round, at Stockholm
Noon
ESPN2 The Senior British Open
Championship, first round, at Surrey,
England
12:30 p.m.
TGC Nationwide Tour, Children's
.' Hospital Invitational, first round, at
Columbus, Ohio
3 p.m.
TGC PGA Tour, Canadian Open,
first round, atVancouver, British Columbia
6:30 p.m.
TGC LPGA, Evian Masters, first
round, at Evian-les-Bains, France (same-
day tape)
MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL
Noon
MLB Regional coverage, St. Louis at
N.Y. Mets or San Diego at Florida
7 p.m.
MLB- Regional coverage, N.Y.Yankees
at Tampa Bay or Detroit at Minnesota (8
p.m. start)
SOFTBALL
8 p.m.
ESPN Women's World Cup,
round robin, Czech Republic vs. U.S., at
Oklahoma City


BASEBALL

AL standings

East Division
W L Pct GB
Boston 59 37 .615 -
NewYork 56 38 .596 2
Tampa Bay 51 44 .537 7hA
Toronto 48 49 .495 I1'
Baltimore 39 56 .411 19'A
Central Division
W L Pct GB
Detroit 51 45 .531 -
Cleveland 51 46 .526 A'
Chicago 47 50 .485 4%
Minnesota 46 51 .474 5'h
Kansas City 39 58 .402 12'h
West Division
W L Pct GB
Texas 56 41 .577 -
Los Angeles 51 46 .526 5
Seattle 43 53 .448 12'A
Oakland 42 55' .433 14
Tuesday's Games
Baltimore 6, Boston 2
Detroit 8, Oakland 3
Toronto 6, Seattle 5, 14 innings
Tampa Bay 3, N.Y.Yankees 2
Kansas City, 4, Chicago White Sox 2
Minnesota 2, Cleveland I
Texas 7, LA.Angels 0 ;* ''
Wednesday's Games
Boston 4, Baltimore 0
Minnesota 7, Cleveland 5
Oakland at Detroit (n)
Seattle atToronto (n)
N.Y.Yankees at Tampa Bay (n)
Chicago White Sox at Kansas City (n)
Texas at LA.Angels (n)
Today's Games
'Seattle (Fister 3-11) at Toronto
(R.Romero 7-9), 12:37 p.m. .
Texas (C.Wilson, 10-3) at LA. Angels
(Weaver 12-4), 3:35 p.m.
N.Y.Yankees (Sabathia 14-4) at Tampa
Bay (Shields 8-8), 7:10 p.m.
Detroit (Verlander 12-5) at Minnesota
(Pavano 6-6), 8:10 p.m.

NL standings

East Division
W L Pct GB
Philadelphia 60 36 .625 -
Atlanta 57 40 .588 3'A
NewYork 48 48 .500 12
Washington 48 49 .495 12'h
Florida 47 50 .485 13'h
Central Division
W L Pct GB
Pittsburgh 51 45 .531 -
Milwaukee 52 46 .531 -
St. Louis 50 46 .521 I
Cincinnati 48 50 .490 4
Chicago 39 59 .398 13
Houston 32 65 .330 19'A
West Division
W L Pct GB
San Francisco 57 41 .582 -
Arizona 52 45 .536 4h'
Colorado 46 51 .474 10'A
Los Angeles 42 55' .433 14'/
San Diego 42 55 .433 14'k
Tuesday's Games
Pittsburgh I, Cincinnati 0
San Diego 4, Florida 0
N.Y. Mets 4, St. Louis 2
Philadelphia 4, Chicago Cubs 2
Houston 7,Washington 6
Colorado 12,Atlanta 3
Milwaukee I I,Arizona 3
San Francisco 5, LA. Dodgers 3
Wednesday's Games
Cincinnati 3, Pittsburgh I
Philadelphia 9, Chicago Cubs I
Washington at Houston (n)
LA. Dodgers at San Francisco (n)
San Diego at Florida (n)
StuLouis at N.Y. Mets (n)
Atlanta at Colorado (n)
Milwaukee at Arizona (n)
Today's Games
San Diego (Moseley 2-9) at Florida
(Vazquez 6-8), 12:10 p.m.
St. Louis (Westbrook 7-4) at N.Y. Mets
(Niese 9-7), 12:10 p.m.
Atlanta (Hanson 10-5) at Colorado
(Chacin 8-7), 3:10 p.m.
Milwaukee (Greinke 7-3) at Arizona
(I.Kennedy 10-3), 9:40 p.m.


MLB calendar

July 24 Hall of Fame induction,
SCooperstown,'N.Y.
July 31 Last day to trade a player
without securing waivers.
Aug. 15 Last day to sign selections
from 2011 amateur, draft. who have not
exhausted college eligibility.
Aug. 17-18 Owners' meetings,
Cooperstown, N.Y.


Sept. I Active rosters expand to
40 players.
Sept. 30 or Oct. I Playoffs begin.
Oct. 19 -World Series begins, city of,
NL champion.

BASKETBALL

WNBA schedule

EASTERN CONFERENCE
W L Pct GB
Connecticut 9 5 .643 -
Indiana 10 6 .625 -
New York 9 7 .563 1
Chicago 8 8 .500 2
Atlanta 6 9 .400 3'
Washington 3 II .214 6
WESTERN CONFERENCE


Phoenix
Minnesota
San Antonio
Seattle
Los-Angeles
Tulsa


W L
10 4
9 4
9 4
7 7
6 8
I .14


Tuesday's Games
Atlanta 84, Indiana 74
Chicago 78, Seattle 69
Connecticut 85, New York 79
Wednesday's Games
Atlanta 86,Washington 79
Minnesota at Phoenix (n)
Today's Games
Chicago at Indiana, 7 p.m.
San Antonio at Seattle, 10 p.m.

CYCLING

Tour de France stages

July 2 Stage I: Passage du Gois La
Barre-de-Monts-Mont des Alouettes Les
Herbiers, flat, 191.5 kilometers (119 miles)
(Stage: Philippe Gilbert, Belgium; Yellow
Jersey: Gilbert)
July 3 Stage 2: Les Essarts, team
time trial, 23 (14.3) (Garmin-Cervelo;
Thor Hushovd, Norway)
July 4 Stage 3: Olonne-sur-Mer-
Redon, flat, 198 (123.0) (Tyler Farrar,
United States; Hushovd)
July 5 Stage 4: Lorient-Mur-de-
Bretagne, flat, 172.5 (107.2) (Cadel Evans,
Australia; Hushovd)
July 6 Stage 5: Carhaix-Cap
Frehel,flat, 164.5 (102.2) (Mark Cavendish,
Britain; Hushovd)
July 7 Stage 6: Dinan-Lisieux, flat,
226.5 (140.7) (Edvald Boasson Hagen,
Norway; Hushovd)
July. 8 Stage 7: Le Mans-
Chateauroux, flat, 218 (135.5) (Cavendish;
Hushovd)
July 9 Stage 8: Aigurande-Super-
Besse Sancy, medium mountain, 189
(117.4) (Rui Alberto Costa, Portugal;
Hushovd)
July 10 Stage 9: Issoire-Saint-
Flour, medium mountain, 208 (129.2)
(Luis Leon Sanchez, Spain; Thomas
Voeckler, France)
July II Rest day in Le Lioran
Cantal.
July 12 Stage 10: Aurillac-
Carmaux, flat, 158 (98.2) (Andre Greipel,
Germany;Voeckler)
July 13 Stage I 11: Blaye-les-Mines-
Lavaur, flat, 167.5 (104.1) (Cavendish;
Voeckler)
July 14 Stage 12: Cugnaux-Luz-
Ardiden, high mountain, 211 (131.1)
(Samuel Sanchez, Spain;Voeckler)
July 15 Stage 13: Pau--Lourdes,
high mountain, 152.5 (94.8) (Hushovd;
Voeckler) .
July 16 Stage 14: Saint-Gaudens-
Plateau de Beille, high mountain, 168.5
(104.7) (jelle Vanendert, Belgium;
Voeckler)
July 17 Stage 15: Limoux-
Montpellier,flat, 192.5 (1 19.6) (Cavendish;
Voeckler)
July 18 Rest day in the Drome
region.
July 19 Stage 16: Saint-Paul-Trois-
Chateaux-Gap, medium mountain,
162.5 (101) (Hushovd;Voeckler)
July 20 Stage 17: Gap-Pinerolo,
Italy, high mountain, 179 (111.2) (Boasson
Hagen;Voeckler)
July 21 Stage 18: Pinerolo-
Galibier Serre-Chevalier, high mountain,
200.5 (124.6)
July 22 Stage 19: Modane
Valfrejus-Alp'e-d'Huez, high mountain,
109.5 (68.0)
July 23 Stage 20: Grenoble, indi-
vidual time trial, 42.5 (26.4)
July 24 Stage 21: Creteil-Paris
Champs-Elysees, flat, 95 (59)
Total -3,430 (2,131.2)
17th Stage
111.2 miles in the Alps from Gap
to Pinerolo, Italy, with five climbs,
including a Categorie I climb to
the ski resort of Sestriere, Italy
and Categorie 2 climbs before and
after
1. Edvald Boasson Hagen, Norway,
Sky Procycling, 4 hours, 18 minutes, 0
seconds.
2. Bauke Mollema, Netherlands,
Rabobank, 40 seconds behind.
3. Sandy Casar, France, Francaise des
Jeux, :50.
4. Julien El Fares, France, Cofidis,
same time.
5. Sylvain Chavanel, France, Quick
Step, same time.
6. Dmitriy Fofonov, Kazakhstan,
Astana, 1:10.
7. Maciej Paterski, Poland, Liquigas-
Cannondale, same time.
8. Dmitriy Muravyev, Kazakhstan,
RadioShack, same time.
9. Jonathan Hivert, France, Saur-
Sojasun, 1:15.
10. Borut Bozic, Slovenia, Vacansoleil-
DCM, 2:20.
Overall Standings
I. Thomas Voeckler, France, Europcar,
73 hours, 23 minutes, 49 seconds.
2. Cadel Evans,Australia, BMC, 1:18.
3. Frank Schleck, Luxembourg,
Leopard-Trek, 1:22.
4. Andy Schleck, Luxembourg,
Lebpard-Trek, 2:36.
5. Samuel Sanchez, Spain, Euskaltel-
Euskadi, 2:59.
6.Alberto Contador, Spain, Saxo Bank
Sungard, 3:15.
7. Damiano Cunego, Italy, Lampre-
ISD, 3:34.
8. Ivan Basso, Italy, Liquigas-
Cannondale, 3:49.
9. Tom Danielson, United States,
Garmin-Cervelo, 6:04


GATORS: Muschamp takes over plenty of talent

Continued From Page 1B


going to continue to do.
Why change 'em if they're
working?"
While Muschamp had
plenty of praise for Meyer,
he brings his own philoso-
phy. The former defensive
coordinator is making that
side of the ball his own,
tweaking the things he
sees necessary. He's also
hired former Notre Dame
coach and NFL coordina-
tor Charlie Weis to oversee
the offense.
Muschamp spent most
of the past decade as defen-
sive coordinator at LSU,
Auburn and Texas, and
intends to keep most of
his focus on stopping the
other team. His intensity
and demonstrative nature
on the sidelines has been
well documented with'
television cameras some-
times showing him chest-
bumping players after a
particularly big play.
"The worst thing you
can do in a leadership posi-
tion is be something you're
not..." Muschamp said. "I
hired Charlie to run the
offense. I've got great con-
fidence in what he's going
to do and what we want to
be offensively."
Muschamp was quick
to say that senior John


Brantley would be the
team's quarterback.
Brantley's junior sea-
son was mixed at best
- in an offense that never
seemed to fit him comfort-
ably. He completed 60.8
percent of his passes for
2,061 yards, nine touch-
downs and 10 intercep-
tions, but Meyer's lack of
confidence was obvious
as Brantley's playing time
diminished toward the end
of the season.
Muschamp and Weis
don't seem to have the
same issues.
"With. the new coach-
ing staff, everyone's got a
clean slate," Brantley said.
"Personally, it's been good
foFme."
Weis specializes in run-
ning a pro-style offense,
having success as offen-
sive coordinator of the New
England Patriots and later
the Kansas City Chiefs. At
Notre Dame, Weis helped
Brady Quinn and Jimmy
Clausen develop into NFL
draft picks. That jibes well
with Brantley, who at 6-
foot-3 and 220 pounds is
the prototype for a drop-
back passer.
He'll be helped by the;
return of running back
Jeff Demps and receiver


Deonte Thompson. Demps
led the Gators with 551
rushing yards last season
while Thompson led the
team with 570 receiving
yards.
Brantley said Weis. has
done a good job of keeping
the offense simple.
"You look at it the first
day and you say 'I'm
never going to learn this,'"
Brantley said. "But a few
days into it, you pick up
the new verbiage, and
then everything goes from
there. It gets a lot easier."
Considering Florida's
recent success, there
hasn't been much hype
about the Gators over the
offseason. South Carolina
knocked off Florida for the
SEC Eastern Division title
last season, and few expect
the Gators to have any
shot at a national champi-
onship.
The Gators do have
legitimate problems, most
notably on the offensive
and defensive'lines where
there's a noticeable lack of
depth.
But Muschamp knows
that in the brutal world of
SEC football, nobody is
going "to feel sorry for the
Gators."
The good news for


Muschamp is that a mas-
sive rebuilding project isn't
needed at Florida. He's just
trying to put his own stamp
on a program that's been
among the nation's elite for
more than a decade.
"I told our guys in our
first meeting, change is
inevitable and growth is
optional," Muschamp said.
"You grow with us or not.
We're going to move for-
ward with the guys that are
willing to do that."

Slive: College sports
loses benefit of the
doubt


HOOVER, Ala. SEC
Commissioner Mike Slive
said recent headlines
across the country have
laid bare the darker side
of major college sports so
much that they have "lost
the benefit of the doubt"
With that in mind, Slive
opened Southeastern
Conference media days
Wednesday by outlin-
ing some proposals for
change across the NCAA
in everything from raising
academic requirements for
incoming freshmen to pay-
ing athletes the full cost of
scholarships.


Sears,


All Tractors & Riding 25

Lawn Mowers,

All Push Mowers

~ All Lawn Tractor Attachments 40% OFF O F F


STORE FIXTURES FOR SALE!
ALL SALES FINAL, NO REFUNDS OR EXCHANGES. OPEN DAILY REGULAR HOURS. WE ACCEPT VISA, MASTERCARD, DISCOVER, AMERICAN
EXPRESS AND SEARS CARD. WE ACCEPT SEARS GIFT CARDS. DISCOUNTS DO NOT APPLY TO PREPAID GIFT CARDS. INVENTORY IS LIMITED
TO STOCK ON HAND. THIS STORE IS NOT PARTICIPATING IN CURRENT SEARS CIRCULARS. THIS EVENT EXCLUDES ELECTROLUX.


SCOREBOARD


Page Editor: Brandon Finley, 754-0420












Page Editor: Emogene Graham, 754-0415 LAKE CITY REPORTER ADVICE & COMICS THURSDAY, JULY 21, 2011 3B


DILBERT


BABY BLUES


BLONDIE


BEETLE BAILEY


HAGAR THE HORRIBLE


DEAR ABBY


Dessert adds a sour ending

to dinners with girlfriends


DEARABBY: When
I go out to eat with my
girlfriends, I usually enjoy
myself until it comes time
for dessert. Then I get grief
if I don't order any and
they do. They'll say, "Oh,
you're so tiny. You can eat
it" Conversely, if I do order
something, they tell me,
"Well, I'd love some but my
metabolism isn't as high as
yours."
I have never made com-
ments to them about calorie
counting, needing to work
out or concern about my
weight I feel fitness is a
private matter, and I'm not
comfortable with mine
being the topic of discus-
sion. Is there any way to
respectfully and tactfully
respond to their comments
or redirect the conversa-
tion? -TAKES'HIE CAKE IN
FIAGSrAFF, ARIZ.
DEARTAKES'THE CAKE:
The way you said it in
your letter is perfect: "I
feel fitness is a private
matter and I'm not com-
fortable with mine being
the topic of discussion."
Either state it when they
comment on what you
have ordered, or say it
privately to each of your
friends when you're away
from a restaurant. If they
are friends, they'll respect
your feelings.
** ** **
DEAR ABBY: Is it weird
to not want to sleep in the
same bed with my hus-
band? We have an amaz-
ing, caring, fun relation-
ship but when it comes


Abigail Van Buren
www.dearabby.com
to sleep, I need my space
while he prefers to cuddle
all night I always end up
trying to push him over
to his side, or telling him
to please move. I know he
gets offended because he's
just trying to be close.
Abby, when I'm in bed
with him I hardly get any
sleep! He's always on my
side and I can't move. It
bothers me so much I end
up sleeping on the couch.
Is this a bad sign for our
marriage? Should I just
stick it out for his sake?
Our marriage is pretty
close to perfect except for
this one thing. NEEDS
MY SPACE IN WEST
VALLEY, UTAH
DEAR NEEDS YOUR
SPACE: If you haven't
already done it, you and
your husband should have
a calm discussion about
this when you're both wide
awake and rested. Sleep'
deprivation can cause any
number of problems slow
reaction time behind the
wheel of a car, inefficiency
at work, and serious health
problems. If your marriage
is amazing, caring, fun and
sexually satisfying for both
of you, then sleeping sepa-
rately isn't a "bad sign." Ifs
the solution.


** ** **
DEARABBY: I am a 54-
year-old woman who, after a
long marriage and unavoid-
able divorce, is ready to date.
I work out daily, am active in
my church, take classes, and
socialize with women and
married couples. rm in excel-
lent shape and am told rm
attractive and fun. There are
few available men my age (or
a little younger or older) and
almost all of them seem to be
looking for women in their
40s, 30s or even 20s.
Why are men my age so
unwilling to date women
their age? We're past the
drama years, are secure
in who we are, and have a
lot to offer. Am I destined
to spend my life without
romance? Im an upbeat
person but have lately
started feeling angry at
how I'm being marginal-
ized. MISSING OUT IN
WYOMING
DEAR MISSING OUT:
I can't speak for "all" older
men, but many of them in
our youth-obsessed culture
look for women consider-
ably younger because it
helps them fool themselves
into thinking they are
younger than their years.
You are physically, socially
and intellectually active, so
stop allowing yourself to
be marginalized and con-
sider dating men who are
younger. It worked for Demi
Moore.

* Write Dear Abby at
wWw.DearAbby.com or
P.O. Box 69440, Los
Angeles, CA 90069.


HOROSCOPES


SNUFFY SMITH


ZITS


GARFIELD


B.C.


FRANK & ERNEST


ARIES (March 21-April
19): Impulsive spending
must be avoided. If you
have to spend, invest in
something that will help
you obtain more skills and
follow a more lucrative
path. Opportunities are
readily available, but you
have to reach out and grab
them.***
TAURUS (April 20-May
20): Keep your thoughts a
secret for the time being.
You have nothing to gain
by displaying anger or
.upset Putting time. and
energy into travel, learn-
ing and revamping your
personal philosophy will
bring greater wisdom and
interesting plans. ***
GEMINI (May 21-June
20): You'll be busy, with
plenty to discuss and to
suggest. Before you get
too involved, be conscious
that not everyone within
earshot is interested in
your plans or wants to
work with you. Hand-pick
the people to whom you
entrust your ideas. ****
CANCER June 21-July
22): Let your imagination
wander and your interac-
tion with other people feed
your mind with new pos-
sibilities. You can accom-
plish anything you set your
mind to if you don't have a
defeatist attitude. **
LEO (July 23-Aug. 22):


THE LAST WORD
Eugenia Last

Strategize and play it safe.
"Know your limits and how
to make the most of your
assets. There is plenty of
opportunity to make criti-
cal changes that will alter
your life if you make the
right choices. *****
VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept
22): Take a mental health
day or plan for an evening
out with friends or some-
one you love. You will have
an epiphany regarding
your lifestyle and how you
want it to unfold. Lots of
changes are heading in
your direction.***
LIBRA (Sept 23-Oct
22): You may be called
upon for your expertise.
Problems at home or with
a responsibility that is
dumped on you must not
stop you from following
through with your plans.

SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov.
21): Focus on your accom-
plishments and what you
learn from the experience
you have with others.
Communication will be of
utmost importance. Your
ideas are excellent; now all
you have to do is put your
plans into motion. ***
SAGITTARIUS (Nov.
22-Dec. 21): Get out and


do your thing, but don't
exaggerate or make prom-
ises you will not keep.
"'Cdiiftaite 'on your, home
and how you can make
your surroundings more
comfortable. Don't rule out
any proposition that comes
your way. *****
CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-
Jan. 19): Don't worry too
much about what others
think or say. Let bygones
be bygones and go about
your business. Love is in
the stars, and any chance
you get to spend with
someone you care for must
be taken. **
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-
Feb. 18): Keep a secret
if you must Giving out
too much information will
work against you or hold
you back. Someone you
trust will let you down. A
chance to increase your
income is apparent if you
are willing to take action
and sign up for what's
required. ****
PISCES (Feb. 19-March
20): You will benefit the
most if you socialize and
network with people who
have expertise in an area
you want to learn more
about Romance is high-
lighted, and time spent
with people who share
your interests will lead to
love. Self-improvement
projects will pay off. ***


CELEBRITY CIPHER,

by Luis Campos
Celebrity Cipher cryptograms are created from quotations by famous people, past and present.
Each letter In the cipher stands for another.
TODAY'S CLUE: U equals G
"X'L ANZ BA KAURXJFLBA, X GBJ
AKHKW BA KAURXJFLBA, BAE X'ENA'Z
"K H KW GBAZ ZN SK NAK. X B L B


J ONZJ LB A I"


JKBA ONAAKWT


Previous solution Wednesday, July 20, 2011: "The high road is always
respected. Honesty and Integrity are always rewarded." Scott Hamilton


(c) 2011 by NEA, Inc. 7-21


FOR BETTER OR WORSE


CLASSIC PEANUTS


0U NO ONE EVER KIE5
ME ON THE NOSE!






7-21 50,z2


S3B


Page Editor: Emogene Graham, 754-0415


LAKE CITY REPORTER ADVICE & COMICS THURSDAY, JULY 21, 2011











LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED THURSDAY, JULY 21, 2011

Lake City Reporter




CLASSIFIED


Classified Department: 755-5440


Take ADvantage of the
Reporter Classifieds!

755-5440


* ADvantage


Legal

Public Auction to be held
August 27, 2011 at 8AM at
Ozzie's Towing & Auto, LLC 2492
SE Baya Ave. Lake City FL, 32025.
(386)719-5608
Following Vin Numbers:
87 Yugo
Vim # VX1BA1211HK355052
05526758
July 21, 2011


Legal

IN THE COUNTY COURT IN
AND FOR COLUMBIA COUNTY,
FLORIDA
CASE NO. 11-630-SC
ALICE D. ANDERSON
Plaintiff
VS.
TONI R. DRUMMOND
Defendant
A law suit has been filed to deter-
mine ownership and title of a certain
vehicle described as a 1995 Reeal


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT, THIRD Buick w
JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR 2G4WB 12M4
COLUMBIA COUNTY, FLORIDA Lake City, Cc
CASE NO.: 11-12-CA da.
COLUMBIA TIMBERLANDS, The following
LTD., some right til
a Florida limited partnership, Alice D. An
Plaintiff, claim, interest
vs. clause you m
DENNIS L. WILLIAMS; KERRY swer'or object
L. WILLIAMS, his wife; YVONNE this Court of C
A. JUNEAU; MARTA ROSAS- in 10 days.
GUYON; .APALACHEE TRACE (seal)
HOMEOWNERS' ASSOCIATION, CLERK OF C
INC, a not-for-profit Florida corpo- By:/s/ Debbie'
ration, Deputy Clerk
Defendants,
NOTICE OF JUDICIAL SALE BY 05526640
THE CLERK July 14, 21, 28
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that August 4, 2011
pursuant to an Order or Final Judg-
ment entered in the above-styled Public Notice
cause now pending in said court, that The Florida St
I will sell to the highest and best bid- table Campail
der for cash on the third floor of the Committee foi
Columbia County Courthouse, 173 Lafayette and
N.E. Hemando Avenue, Lake City, will meet Aug
Florida 32055, at 11:00 o'clock, a.m. Tier 2 allocate
on August 10, 2011, the following undesignated
property described in Exhibit "A" at- will begin pro
tached hereto: the FDOT Dis
file# 8332 Marion Ave., L
Lot 7, Appalachie Trace: Training for 2
Commence at the Southwest comer tors will be hi
of the Northeast 1/4 of Section 3, a.m. at the DO
Township 6 South, Range 16 East, 710 NW Lak
Columbia County, Florida and run City.
North 01 deg 18'41" West along the Future FSECC
West line of said Northeast 1/4 a dis- meetings will 1
tance of 521.27 feet to the point of ber 13 and No'
beginning; thence continue North 01 gin at 9 a.m.
deg 18'41" West still along said held at the FI
West line 540.00 feet; thence South 1109 S. Mariol
80 deg 38'29" East 1067.33 feet to a Pursuant to F]
point on the Westerly line of a pri- .(1) this notice
vate road; thence South 13 deg fy the public
09'18" West along said' Westerly ule. For mor
line 335.00 feet; thence South 87 deg contact the Su'
37'11" West 965.35 feet to the point Fiscal Agent
of beginning. 752-5604.
Subject to: An easement for utilities
across the East 15.00 feet thereof. 05526747
TOGETHER WITH AN EASE- July 21,2011
MENT FOR INGRESS AND Public Auction
EGRESS OVER AND ACROSS August 20, 201
THE FOLLOWING DESCRIBED Ozzie's.Towin
LASEMENTDS: SE BayaAve.
EASEMENT (386)719-5608
Begin at the Southeast comer of Sec- Following Vin-
tion 3, Township 6 South, Range 16 2004 Dodge
East, Columbia County, Florida and Vinm # 1D7HAl
run South 87 deg 37'11" West along- 2001 Ford
the South line of said Section 3 a dis- Vin# 1F MYU6
tance of 1738.09 feet to the POINT
OF BEGINNING. Thence continue 05526739
South 87 deg 37'11" West still along July 21, 2011
said South line 60.01 feet; thence IN THE CIR
North 01 deg 18'41" West 1538.67 NCOLUMBIAC
feet; thence North 16 deg 59'28" CaseNo. 11-2
West 584.29 feet; thence North 13 aOEL S. NIBL
deg 09'18" East 550.69 feet to a Plaintiff,
point on the South line of the North- .
east 1/4 of said Section 3; thence AMvs. T BR
continue North 13 deg 09'18 East Defendant.
876.90 feet; thence North 20 CLERK'S NO
degl7'38" East 723.23 feet; thence DER F.S. CHA
North 77 deg 08'31" West 847.33 NOTICE IS G
feet; thence North 12 deg 51'29" ance with th
East 60.00 feet; thence South 77 deg Foreclosure da
08'31" East 855.16 feet; thence the above-styl
North 20 deg 17'38" East 403.70 the highestyl
feet; thence North 01 deg 18'53" on the; lobby
West 233.58 feet; thence North 88 lumbia County
deg 41'07" East 60.00 feet; thence ub Coun
South 01 deg 18'53" East 245.03 City, Columb
feet; thence South 20 deg 1738" One, the follow
West 1195.15 feet; thence South 13 t e
deg 09'18" West 101.23 feet; thence See Exhibit "A
South 78 deg 07'14" East 1153.18 madeaparther
feet; thence South 65 deg 42'05" mepath
East 67.64 feet; thence South 24 deg "EXHIBITA"
17'55" West 60.00 feet; thence
North 65 deg 42'05' West 61.11 PARCEL #7
feet; thence North 78 deg 07'14" A TRACT O]
West 1147.98 feet; thence South 13 IN SECTION
deg 09'18" West 695.30 feet to a SOUTH, RAN
Point on the North line of the South- LUMBIA C(
east 1/4 of said Section 3, thence HEREINAFTE
continue South 13 deg 09'18" West RED TO AS
551.14 feet; thence South 16 deg FARMS" A
59'28" East 556.03 feet; thence SUBDRMSIOt
North 87 deg 37'11" East 1223.08 BY ALACHU
feet; thence South 02 deg 22'49" SURVEYORSA
East 60.00; thence South 87 deg LAND BEIN(
37'11" West 1218.70 feet; thence LARLY DES
South 01 deg 18'41" East 1505.52 LOWS:
feet to the POINT OF BEGINNING. LW
Said sale will be made pursuant to COMMENCE
and in order to satisfy the terms of MONUMENT
said Summary Final Judgment of WEST CORN
Foreclosure. Any person claiming an 1/2 OF THE N
interest in the surplus from the sale, SECftION .
if any, other than the property owner SOUTH, RAN
as of the date of the lis pendens must POINT OF RE
file a claim within 60 days after the RUN SOO07'"
sale. OF 51.14 FEE
Dated: June 30, 2011 -MONUMENT
P. DEWITT CASON, Clerk of the EAST CORNER
Court EAST 1/4 OF
By /s/ B. Scippio 1/4 OF TIHE
Deputy Clerk v F'r(c'N I 1


05526470
July 14, 21, 2011


To place your
classified ad call










Land Clearing

Back Hoe, Dozer, Chopping, root
raking, bush hog, seeding, sod,
disking, site prep, ponds &
irrigation. Free Est! 386-623-3200

Services

DIVORCE, BANKRUPTCY,
RESUMES.
other court approved forms-
386-961-5896.


ith Ser
S 1473946 1
ilumbia Cou
g persons) n
tle or interest
derson. If
t, or defense
iust file your
tion with the
Columbia Co

COURTS
Watkins


, 2011
1

tate Employe
gn (FSECC)
r Columbia,
1 Suwannee
ust 11 and d
ion of the
funds. The
imptly at 9:0
strict 2 office
Lake City.
011 FSECC
eld on Augus
T Maintenan
e Jeffery R(
C Steering C
be September
member 10 an
These meeting
DOT District
n Ave., Lake
lorida Statuti
is being posted
of the meet
re information
wannee Valle
Coordinator



to be held
11 at 8AM at
g & Auto, L
Lake City FL
Numbers:
6D44J19696
50E71UA431


CUIT COU
COUNTY, FL
17-CA
ACK,

OWN II,
TICE OF S.
.PTER 45
IVEN that, i
e Final-Judg
ated July 19,
ed cause, I w
d best bidder
at the door o
y Courthouse
a County, F
ugust 24, 2
ving describe
A" attached I
reof



F LAND SI
K 6, TOWI
NGE 17 EA
COUNTY, FI
ER BEING
S "OLD N
N UNRE(
V AS SU
NA COUNT'
, SAID TR
G MORE P
CRIBED A

AT A CO
AT THE
ER OF THE
NORTHWEST
6, TOWNE
eGE 17 EAS
iFERENCEI
23"E, A DI
T TO A CO
AT THE
ER OF THE
F THE NOR
FOREMEN


I IUHUI 1, AuViH l, l
SOUTH, RANGE 16
THENCE CONTINUE SOC
A DISTANCE OF 505.39 ]
A STEEL ROD ANE
THENCE CONTINUE SOO
A DISTANCE OF 714.14 1
A CONCRETE MONUM
THE NORTHWEST COR
THE SOUTHWEST 1/4
AFOREMENTIONED SEC
TOWNSHIP 7 SOUTH, R
EAST; THENCE RUN SOO
A DISTANCE OF 102.40
A CONCRETE MONUM
THE SOUTHEAST COR
THE NORTHEAST 1/4
AFOREMENTIONED SEC
TOWNSHIP 7 SOUTH, R
EAST; THENCE
SOO1l0'43"W, ALONG TH
LINE OF SECTION 6, TO
7 SOUTH, RANGE 17
DISTANCE OF 562.26 FE
STEEL ROD AND CAP;
CONTINUE S00'0'43"W,
SAID WEST LINE A DI
OF 554.56 FEET TO A
ROD AND CAP AND TH
POINT OF BEGINNING;
CONTINUE S00'10'43"W,
TANCE OF ..475.95 FEE
STEEL ROD AND CAP;
RUN N89034'00"E, A DI
OF 915.37 FEET TO A
ROD AND CAP; THEN(
N0010'43"E, A DISTAI


ial #
ocated in
nty, Flori-


Legal

475.95 FEET TO A STEEL ROD
AND CAP; THENCE RUN
S89034'00"W, A DISTANCE OF
915.37 FEET TO A STEEL ROD
AND CAP AND THE TRUE
POINT OF BEGINNING.
AN EASEMENT FOR INGRESS,
EGRESS AND PUBLIC UTILITIES
OVER, UNDER AND ACROSS A
60 FOOT WIDE STRIP OF LAND.
SAID STRIP OF LAND LOCATED
WITHIN 30 FEET OF AND ON
BOTH SIDES OF THE FOLLOW-
ING DESCRIBED CENTERLINE:


may claim COMMENCE, AT A CONCRETE
st therein: MONUMENT AT THE NORTH-
you have WEST CORNER OF THE SOUTH
se in this 1/2 OF THE NORTHWEST 1/4 OF
written an- SECTION 6, TOWNSHIP 7
e Clerk of SOUTH, RANGE 17 EAST, CO-
unty with- LUMBIA COUNTY, FLORIDA
FOR THE POINT OF REFERENCE
AND RUN S00007'23" E, A DIS-
TANCE OF 51.14 FEET TO A
CONCRETE MONUMENT AT
THE NORTHEAST CORNER OF
THE SOUTHEAST 1/4 OF THE
NORTHEAST 1/4 OF SECTION 1,
TOWNSHIP 7 SOUTH, RANGE 16
EAST, COLUMBIA COUNTY,
FLORIDA; THENCE RUN
S89033'21" W, ALONG THE
ees' Chari- NORTH LINE OF SAID SOUTH-
) Steering EAST 1/4 OF THE NORTHEAST
Hamilton, 1/4 OF SECTION 1, A DISTANCE
counties OF 1318.64 FEET TO A CON-
.iscuss the CREATE MONUMENT AT THE
remaining NORTHWEST CORNER OF SAID
meeting SOUTHEAST 1/4 OF THE
0 a.m. at NORTHEAST 1/4 OF SECTION 1;
e, 1109 S. THENCE RUN S00005'46" E,
ALONG THE WEST LINE OF THE
coordina- EAST 1/4 OF SAID SECTION 1, A
st 25 at 9 DISTANCE OF 30.00 FEET TO
ce Office, ,THE TRUE POINT OF BEGIN-
oad, Lake NING OF SAID EASEMENT CEN-
TERLINE, EASEMENT LINES
committeee WILL BE LENGTHENED OR
r 8, Octo- SHORTENED TO BEGIN ON
ad will be- SAID WEST LINE OF THE EAST
gs will be 1/4 OF SECTION 1; THENCE RUN
t2 office, N 89033'21" E, PARALLEL WITH
City. AND 30.00 FEET SOUTH OF THE
e 286.011 AFOREMENTIONED NORTH
ed to noti- LINE OF THE SOUTHEAST 1/4
ng sched- OF THE NORTHEAST 1/4 OF
on please SECTION 1, A DISTANCE OF
y FSECC 378.74 FEET TO THE BEGINNING
at 386- OF A CURVE CONCAVE SOUTH-
WESTERLY, SAID CURVE HAV-
ING A RADIUS OF 200.00 FEET;
THENCE RUN SOUTHEASTER-
LY, ALONG SAID CENTERLINE
AND WITH SAID CURVE
THROUGH AN ARC ANGLE OF
LLC 2492 90023'04", AN ARC DISTANCE OF
, 32025. 315.50 FEET (CHORD BEARING
AND DISTANCE OF S 45015'07"
E, 283.79 FEET RESPECTIVELY)
TO THE END OF SAID CURVE;
56 THENCE RUN S 00003'35" E, A
DISTANCE OF 274.04 FEET TO
33. THE BEGINNING OF A CURVE
CONCAVE EASTERLY, SAID
CURVE HAVING A RADIUS OF
200.00 FEET; THENCE RUN
RT FOR SOUTHEASTERLY, ALONG
.ORIDA SAID CENTERLINE AND WITH
SAID CURVE, THROUGH AN
ARC ANGLE OF 24010'32", AN
ARC DISTANCE OF 84.39 FEET
(CHORD BEARING AND DIS-
TANCE OF S 12008'51" E, 83.76
FEET RESPECTIVELY) TO THE
ALE UN- END OF SAID CURVE; THENCE
RUN S 24014'07" E, A DISTANCE
n accord- OF 91.92 FEET TO THE BEGIN-
gment of NING OF A CURVE CONCAVE
2011, in WESTERLY, SAID CURVE HAV-
rill sell to ING A RADIUS OF 200.00 FEET;,
r for cash THENCE RUN SOUTHEASTERLY
of the Co- ALONG SAID CENTERLINE AND
e in Lake WITH SAID CURVE, THROUGH
lorida, at AN ARC ANGLE OF 2410'32",
o011, CR- AN ARC DISTANCE OF 84.39
ed proper- FEET (CHORD BEARING AND
DISTANCE OF S 12008'51" E,
hereto and 83.76 FEET RESPECTIVELY) TO
THE END OF SAID CURVE;
THENCE RUN S 0003'35" E, A
DISTANCE OF 915.87 FEET TO
THE BEGINNING OF A CURVE
CONCAVE NORTHEASTERLY,
TUATED SAID CURVE HAVING A RADI-
NSHIP 7 US OF 200.00 FEET; THENCE
LST, CO- RUN SOUTHEASTERLY, ALONG
LORIDA, SAID CENTERLINE AND WITH
REFER- SAID CURVE, THROUGH AN
qIBLACK ARC ANGLE OF 90023'04", AN
CORDED ARC DISTANCE OF 315.50 FEET
RVEYED (CHORD BEARING AND DIS-
Y LAND TANCE OF S 45015'07" E, 283.79
ACT OF FEET, RESPECTIVELY) TO THE
ARTICU- END OF SAID CURVE; THENCE
kS FOL- RUN N 89033'21" E, A DISTANCE
OF 398.52 FEET TO THE BEGIN-
NING OF A CURVE CONCAVE
NCRETE SOUTHERLY, SAID CURVE
NORTH- HAVING A RADIUS OF 200.00
i SOUTH FEET; THENCE RUN. SOUTH-
T 1/4 OF EASTERLY, ALONG SAID CEN-
SHIP 7 TERLINE AND WITH SAID
T FOR A CURVE, THROUGH AN ARC AN-
THENCE GLE OF 35003'28" AN ARC DIS-
ISTANCE TANCE OF 122.38 FEET (CHORD
NCRETE BEARING AND DISTANCE OF S
NORTH- 72054'54" E, 120.48 FEET, RE-
SOUTH- SPECTIVELY) TO THE INTER-
.THEAST SECTION OF SAID CURVE WITH
TIONED THE EAST LINE OF THE AFORE-
SHIP 7 MENTIONED SECTION 1;
EAST; THENCE CONTINUE SOUTH-
)'07'23"E, EASTERLY, WITH SAID CURVE,
FEET TO THROUGH AN ARC ANGLE OF
D CAP; 13057'21", AN ARC DISTANCE OF
'07'23"E, 48.71 FEET (CHORD BEARING
FEET TO AND DISTANCE OF S 62021'50"
ENT AT E, 48.59 FEET, RESPECTIVELY)
NER OF TO THE END OF SAID CURVE;
OF THE THENCE RUN S 55023'10" E, A
ACTION 6, DISTANCE OF 33.92 FEET TO
RANGE 17 THE BEGINNING OF A CURVE
'07'23"E, CONCAVE NORTHERLY, SAID
FEET TO CURVE HAVING A RADIUS OF
fENT AT 200.00 FEET; THENCE RUN
NER OF SOUTHEASTERLY, ALONG
OF THE SAID CENTERLINE AND WITH
ACTION 1, SAID CURVE, THROUGH AN
RANGE If ARC ANGLE OF 35002'50" AN
RUN ARC DISTANCE OF 122.34 FEET
E WEST (CHORD BEARING AND DIS-
WNSHIP TANCE OF S 72054'35" E, 120.44
EAST, A FEET, RESPECTIVELY) TO THE
ET TO A END OF SAID CURVE; THENCE
THENCE RUN N 89034'00" E, A DISTANCE
ALONG OF 729.04 FEET TO A POINT
STANCE DESIGNATED AS POINT "A" TO
STEEL BE REFERRED TO LATER;
tE TRUE THENCE RUN S 00010'43" W, A
THENCE DISTANCE OF 817.43 FEET TO A
A DIS- POINT DESIGNATED AS POINT
T TO A "B" TO BE REFERRED TO LAT-
THENCE ER; THENCE CONTINUE
STANCE S0010'43" W, A DISTANCE OF
STEEL 630.14 FEET TO A TERMINUS OF
CE RUN SAID CENTERLINE; THENCE
NICE OF


Legal

RETURN TO THE AFOREMEN-
TIONED POINT "B" AND RUN N
89034'00" E, A DISTANCE OF
802.08 FEET TO A POINT DESIG-
NATED AS POINT "C" TO BE RE-
FERRED TO LATER; THENCE
CONTINUE N 89034'00" E, A DIS-
TANCE OF 283.87 FEET TO A
TERMINUS OF SAID CENTER-
LINE; THENCE RETURN TO THE
AFOREMENTIONED POINT "C"
AND RUN S 000 10'43" W, A DIS-
TANCE OF 563.18 FEET TO A
TERMINUS OF SAID CENTER-
LINE; THENCE RETURN TO THE
AFOREMENTIONED POINT "A"
AND RUN N 00010'43" E, A DIS-
TANCE OF 1182.88 FEET TO A
POINT DESIGNATED AS POINT
"D" TO BE REFERRED TO LAT-
ER; THENCE CONTINUE N
00010'43" E, A DISTANCE OF
350:08 FEET TO A TERMINUS OF
SAID CENTERLINE; THENCE
RETURN TO THE AFOREMEN-
TIONED POINT "D" AND RUN N
89037'58" E, A DISTANCE OF
796.39 FEET TO A POINT DESIG-
NATED AS POINT "E" TO BE RE-
FERRED TO LATER; THENCE
CONTINUE N 89037'58" E, A DIS-
TANCE OF 282.19 FEET TO A
TERMINUS OF SAID CENTER-
LINE; THENCE RETURN TO THE
AFOREMENTIONED POINT "E"
AND RUN S 00010'43" W, A DIS-
TANCE OF 610.98 FEET TO THE
TERMINUS OF SAID CENTER-
LINE.
SUBJECT TO: EASEMENT TO
CLAY ELECTRIC COOPERA-
TIVE, INC., RECORDED IN OFFI-
CIAL RECORDS BOOK 970,
PAGE 364, OF THE PUBLIC RE-
CORDS OF COLUMBIA COUN-
TY, FLORIDA. '
Any person claiming an interest in
the surplus from the sale, if any, oth-
er than the property owner as of the
date of the lis pendens must file a
claim within 60 days after the sale.
dated: July 19, 2011
P. DeWitt Cason
Clerk of Court
By: /s/ B. Scippio
Deputy Clerk
CERTIFICATE OF SERVICE
I CERTIFY that a true and correct
copy of the foregoing Notice of Sale
under ES. Chapter 45 has been fur-
nished by United States Mail on July
19, 2011, to each of the following:
James T. Brown Ill, 265 S. 1480 E.
Spanish Fork, UT 84660-6304 and
Frederic D. Kaufman, KAUFMAN
ATTORNEYS, P.A., 1330 NW 6
Street, Suite D, Gainesville, FL
32601, attorneys for Joel S. Niblack,
1220 SW Bethlehem Avenue, Fort
White, FL 32038-5133
By:/s/ B. Scippio
Court Clerk
05526766
July 21, 28, 2011
100 Job
Opportunities
StarTech Computer Center
needs help.
Tech &'Sales, FT & PT. Exp
only. email bdj@startech.cc
CDL Class A Truck Driver.
Flatbed exp. for F/T SE area.
3 years exp or more. Medical
benefits offered. Contact
Melissa or Mary @ 386-935-2773


1

6
11
12
13

15'*
161
18
19


ioo Job
100 OOpportunities.

05526745
Accounts Payable Clerk
needed for local company.
Knowledge of Excel a plus,
must be able to start
immediately. Send resume to:
wassontt(andersoncolumbia.com,
fax to 386-755-9132, mail to
Anderson Columbia PO Box
1829, Lake City, FL 32056 or
fill out an application at 871
NW Guerdon St., Lake City, FL
32055. You may also download
an application at www.ander-
soncolumbia.com. We are an
Equal Opportunity Employer.

05526753
Heavy Duty Fleet Mechanic
Needed for tractor-trailer fleet.
Looking for experience mechan-
ics to work at our Lake Butler
Facility. Must have own tools.
Competitive compensation
package w/benefits.
Apply in person at
1050 SE 6th St., Lake Butler.
or online at
www.pritchetttrucking.com
No phone calls please.


General Office/Bookkeeping
Must know QuickBooks &
Microsoft Programs. Punctual.
Please send resume & salary,
requirements to: PO BOX 830,
Lake City, Florida 32056

REPORTER Classifieds
In Print and On Line



Unscramble these four Jumbles,
one letter to each square,
to form four ordinary words. |

I YFTAF I


100 jOpportunities

My name is James. I'm an inde-
pendant distributer with Zija Inter-
national. Looking for motivated
people who would like to start
their own business in Network
Marketing. Please call me at
386-697-6386 for more info.

Sales Position available for moti-
vated individual Rountree -Moore
Toyota, Great benefits, paid train-
ing/vacation. Exp. a plus but not
necessary. Call Anthony Cosentino
386-623-7442

Stylist wanted: Salon with old
fashion charm has openings for 2
stylist with following. Reasonable
chair rent Please call Sharon at
365-8402 or 752-1777 or come by
694 SW Main Blvd.

VPK Teacher & Pre K3 teacher
needed. Experience reqd. CDA/AS
Degree preferred. Apply in person
at Wee Care in Columbia City

120 Medical
0 Employment

05526751
Very busy Medical office needs
experienced only in the
following areas:
Authorizations and referrels
Scheduling & collections
Receptionist.
Must multi task and be a
dependable team player.
Fax resume to: Attn Cheryl
386-754-3657 or email:
to office manager: at "
primarycaremedic.com

THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME
by David L. Hoyt and Jeff Knurek


SHE:: WOULPL9 HAVE TROUBLEC-F
S g, T-TN& TO HI5 BOAT
S A5 A FSUL-T
LEWFOL OF IT BING THIS.
S --Now arrange the circled letters
to form the surprise answer, as
suggested by the above cartoon.

Answer here: n
(Answers tomorrow)
Yesterday's Jumbles: GLORY TENTH FINISH INSIST
Yesterday Answer: When she asked the flight attendant to change
seats, she was told to do this SIT TIGHT


ACROSS 38 Hepburn
nickname
Wild West 40 Observance
show 41 After taxes
Set jewels, e.g. 42 Pacino and Hirt
Maintains 43 Regret deeply
Tibet's Lama 46 Sufi or St.
You bet! in Francis
Bonn 48 Artist's rental
Time wasters 50 Short sock
Delicate 54 Like the flu
Checkout scan 55 Hull bottoms
Sundial 56 Trudges
numeral 57 Flower stem


21 Give-- break!
22 Shabby
23 Many, in com-
bos
25 Also
28 Melancholy
poem
30 PBS
"Science Guy"
31 Floor covering
32 Gentle bear
33 Cool -
cucumber
35 Humiliate
37 Compass pt.


DOWN


1 British rule in
India
2 Caviar
3 Beads on
grass


Answer to Previous Puzzle

RO.N RILNS
RASPED U TURN
DEST R Y REPAS
E ON MT


MENEHMM SALO'
OFT OOP LLAMA
I R E EPA RI I
SL ACKD AB K El
LPSCE E MEIR
TE AN A
UNAID NOOSES
SIESTA SUREST
SPR YEIRM N I EC


4 Blowing away
5 Job-safety org. 10 DVD player
6 Dust devil need
7 de mer 14 Like a dishrag
8 Roquefort hue 15 Austria
9 Legendary neighbor
marshal 17 Newborns


Want more puzzles?
Check out the "Just Right Crossword Puzzles" books
at QulllDrlverBooks.com


19 Meadow
rodents
20 Peace
goddess
22 Fly catchers
24 Roll-call vote
25 Shadow
26 Topples from
power
27 Pointed arch
29 Talk, talk, talk
34 Hitachi rival
36 Shelf support
39 Sundance
Kid's girl
43 Invitation
addendum
44 Mo. expense
45 EEC currency
46 Wire
thicknesses
47 Pen fillers
49 Informal
parent
51 Grassy
expanse
52 Measure
of length
53 Impatient
chuck


2011 UFS, Dist. by Univ. Uclick for UFS


BUY2IT


SE~LL T


FND IT^











LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED THURSDAY, JULY 21, 2011


120 j Medical
120 Employment

05526754
Insurance Verifier
High volume Medical facility
seeking an Insurance Verifier.
Duties include Verify insurance
for limits and parameters of
policy, data entry, Gather
appropriate documentation, fill
out necessary forms and submit
authorization requests.
Maintain reports.
High school graduate,
knowledge of different types of
private health insurance plans
including managed care
arrangements.
Please send resume to
jpapesh@cancercarenorthflori-
da.com or fax to 386-628-9231.

05526767
Occupational Therapist
Avalon Healthcare Center is
currently accepting applications
for the full time position of
Occupational Therapist.
Competitive Salary and
Excellent benefit package as
well as A sign on bonus is
being offered.
Please contact Jennie Cruce
director of Rehab.
dor(@)avalonhrc.com
Avalon Healthcare and Rehab
1270 S.W. Main Blvd.
Lake City, Florida 32025
or fax resume to 386-752-8556
386-752-7900 EOE

05526772
Advent Christian Village
call 658-5627 or visit
www.acvillage.net
24 hrs/day, 7 days/week
Be your BEST,
Among the BEST
FT COTAFL-
LTC & Outpatient.
FT certified occupational thera-
py assistant to assist with occu-
pational'therapy/rehabilitation
and related activities in long-
term care and outpatient care
settings. Valid/unrestricted Flor-
ida certification required. Prior,
experience preferred. Must be
committed to personalized, com-
passionate care. Will consider
PT work schedule as needed.
Onsite daycare and fitness
facilities. Apply in person at
Personnel Office Monday
through Friday from 9:00 a.m.
until 4:00 p.m., or fax
resume/credentials to
(386)658-5160.
EOE/DFW /Criminal
background checks required.

Busy outpatient surgery centerhas
immediate opening for a LPN.
PRN position; Please
email resume to
administration@lcsurgerycenter.com
or fax to 386-487-3935,
Full Time Medical Assistant
,needed for very busy paperless
Family Practice. Must be highly
motivated, multi-taslkng ard'
patient centric. Intergy IEIR
experience a plus. Please fax
resume to: 386-961-9541
Lisc. Respiratory Therapist and '
Lisc. RPSGT needed PDM
for medical office in LC.
Fax resume:(386) 754-1712
RN's& LPN's needed to work in
the North Florida area corrections.
Immediate work, instant pay,
$300 sign-on.bonus.
Call 352-336-0964.
www.suwanneemedical.com

240 Schools &
2 Education


05526648
Interested in a Medical Career?
Express Training offers
courses for beginners & exp
Nursing Assistant, $479
next class-07/25/10
Phlebotomy national certifica-
tion, $800 next class-08/08/11
Continuing education
Fees incl. books, supplies, exam
fees.Call 386-755-4401 or
expresstrainingservices.com


310 Pets & Supplies
FREE/TRADE 1 yr old Pug.
Beautiful, register fawn colored
male w/black mask. Will trade for
a baby Pug. 386-752-6993 .
Mini Schnauzers. AKC.
Salt &Pepper Raised in home
$250.00 ea.. POP
386-288-5412 or 386-963-4324
PUBLISHER'S NOTE
Florida Law 828.29 requires dogs
and cats being sold to be at least 8
weeks old and have a health
certificate from a licensed
veterinarian documenting they
have mandatory shots and are
free from intestinal and external
parasites. Many species of wild-
life must be licensed by Florida
Fish and Wildlife. If you are'
unsure, contact the local
office for information.


361 Farm Equipment
84 Ford 4610 Tractor.
2WD, Solid
2005 motor,$7,500. OBO
386-867-0005


402 Appliances
Emerson Quiet Cool. Heat &
Cool window unit. $135. obo
386-292-3927 or
386-755-5331.
FRIGIDAIRE 18CU fridge.
$300. 7 months old, white, like
new. (863)840-4262
Please leave message.
FROST FREE Kenmore'
refrigerator. Very clean. $250. obo
386-292-3927 or
386-755-5331.


402 Appliances
MAGIC CHEF GAS STOVE.
WHITE. $100.
386-292-3927 or
386-755-5331.
Whirlpool Washer & Dryer.
Large capacity. Works great.
$285. for both.
386-292-3927 or 386-755-5331.

407 Computers


Compaq Computer, Many extras.
Complete Computer
$80.00
386-755-9984 or 386-292-2170


408 Furniture
Good sitting'Love seat.
$35. obo386-292-3927 or
386-755-5331.


Table with 6 chairs.
$75. obo 386-292-3927 or
386-755-5331.


420 Wanted to Buy
Wanted Junk Cars, Trucks, Vans.
$250 & up CASH! Free Pick Up!
NO title needed !386-878-9260
After 5pm 386- 752-3648.

430 Garage Sales
LeavingUSA teacher's materials,
household items, washer/dryer,
antique bed & medicine cabinet,
linens, & more. 3743 NW
Huntsboro St. Apt 102, Lake City.
9:00 1:00 -352-222-2223
MOVING SALE All must GO!
Sat. 8-7 1048 SW Yorktown Glen.
Grandview Viallage.
Furniture, bed, misc.
MOVING SALE. Sat. & Sun 8:?
758 NW Ridgewood Ave. Off hwy
90 by ABC. Furniture, household,
antiques, much much more.
PUBLISHER'S:NOTE
All Yard Sale Ads
Must be Pre-Paid.


440 Miscellaneous
Stop gnat & Mosquito bites! Buy
Swamp Gator All natural insect re-
pellent. Family safe. Use head to
toe. Available at The Home Depot.


Summer Barbecue Special
Tow Behind
Grill/Smoker, $1,250 OBO.
386-719-4802


Mobile Home
3 for Rent


2&3 BR MH. $395.- $650. mo.
plus deposit Water & sewer fur
nished. Cannon Creek MHP
386-752-6422

washer/dryer, Dep & referrences
Includes, cable, water & gsrb.
For more info. 386-965-3477


2/2 Units, clean, well maintained,
nice safe park setting, 2 miles to
downtown Lake City, $575 month
+ $575 sec dep, 386-984-8448
13th Month FREE!!
3/2 DWMH, 1/2 ac. Shaded lot.
Paved Rd, 2 porches, 50'X50'
fenced small dog rut. $600. mo +
$750 dep. References Req'd.
386-758-7184 or 984-0954 ,
3/2 S of Lake City, (Branford area)
$575 month plus security
386-590-0642 or 386-867-1833
www.suwanneevalleyproperties.com
LG clean 3br's $450. -$650. mo. +
dep..Also, 2br mobile home's
available. No Pets.
.5 Points area. 386-961-1482
Mobile Homes for rent in
White Springs, Lake City & Ft.
White. Contact 386-623-3404
or 386-365-1919


X-Clein 2/2 SW, 8 mi NW of VA.
Clean acre lot, nice area. $500.-mo
+,dep No dogs Non-smoking
en' ironmeni.386-961-9181
11 '14Mobile Homes
6 0'for Sale
Handy man Special, 94 Fleetwood
DWMH. 3/2 on 5 acres in Ft.
Whiite. Owner Fin. $3,000 dn.
$850mo. $99,900 352-215-1018
www.LandOwnerFinancing.com
PALM HARBOR Homes Has
'RedTag Sale
Over 10 Stock Units Must Go
Saye Up To 35Ki
Call Today! 800-622-2832

Mobile Home
650' &Land .
67.5' ac.Ranch, fenced & cross
fenced. Spacious moblie home
w/large front deck & RV hookup
MLS 75607 $299,000. Access
Realty. Patti Taylor. 386-623-6896
710 Unfurnished Apt.
710 For Rent







05526481
SPRING HILL VILLAGE
Excellent High Springs location:
1, 2 & 3 bedroom floor-plans;
some with garages.
Call 386-454-1469
or visit our website:
www.springhillvillage.net
1 bedroom Apartment. Quiet,
Private street. $400. mo
plus security deposit.
386-344-3715
lBR APT.
Downtown Location, Clean.
$450 mo, plus Security.
NO PETS. Call 386-755-3456
2/1 w/garage & washer/dryer
hookups. East side of town,
Call for details
386-755-6867


710 Unfurnished Apt.
7 For Rent
2BR/1.5BA w/garage
5 minutes from VA hospital.
Call for details.
386-755-4590 or 365-5150
2br/lba duplex, NW Georgia
Ave. Renovated & energy effi-
cient. Tile floors, W/D, $475/Mo.
$300 Dep. 386-755-1937
Amber Wood Hills Apts.
Private Patio area. Beautiful yard.
Washer/dryer hkup. Free water &
sewer. 1/1, 2/1. Move in special.
386-754-1800. wwwmyflapts.com
Columbia Arms Apt. located 1/2
mi from V.A. & Winn Dixie. Pet
Friendly. Move in Special $199.
Pool, laundry & balcony.
386-754-1800. www.myflapts.com
Furnished or unfurnished
Townhomes on the golf course..
$750. mo. plus security. Includes
water. 386-752-9626
Greentree Townhouse
Summer special. 2/1, 2/1.5. Free
water & sewer. Balcony & patio.
Laundry. Behind Kens on Hwy 90.
386-754-1800 wwwmyflapts.com
Large & clean. lbr/lba apt.
CH/A Ig walk in closet. Close to
town. $395. mo and $350. dep.
(904)563-6208














Summer Special! 12th mo Free
w/sigmnd yr lease. Updated, w/tilet
floors/fresh partment. MovGreat area.in



Special $450.+sec. 386-752-9626Limited time. Pets
The Lakes Apts. Studios & IBr's
from $135/wk. Util. & cable inel.,
Sec 8 vouchers accepted, monthly
rates avail Call 386-75www.myflapts2-2741
Unfurnished Apt Eastside
Village Realty, Inc .2 bedroom
1 bath Duplex must be 55+ yrs of


Wayne Manor Apts.
Move in $199. Summer special.
2/1, washer/dryer. BehinGrKens off
Hwy 90. 386-754-1800
www.myflapts.com
Windsor Arms Apartments.
Summer special $199. Move inc
2/1, 2/1.5,2/2. Pet Friendy. Free
S200 ch. Dish. Washer/dryer hkup.
386-754-1800. www.myflapts.com

7' u .Furnished Apts.ide
Wayne Manor Apts



720 .For Rent.


Rooms for Rent. Hillcrest, Sands,
Columbia. All furnished. Electric,
cable, fridge, microwave. Weekly
- or monthly rates. 1 person $135,
s' 2 persons $150. weekly
386-752-5808


730 Unfurnished
730 Home For Rent

05526651,
LAKE CITY
2BR/1BA, Mobile Home
$495mo
2BR/1.5BA, 975SF $725. mo
4BR/3BA, 2139SF $1500. moe
4BR/2BA, 1248SF $695. mo
2 AVAILABLE
3BR/2BA 1258SF $925. mo
3BR/2BA 1582SF $900. mo
3BR/2BA 1246SF $700. mo
2BR/1BA 700SF $495. mo
2 AVAILABLE
3BR/1.5BA 1040SF,$825
FT WHITE

3BR/2BA 1512SF $850. mo
LAKE BUTLER
4BR/2BA 1560SF $825 mo

MADISON

2BR/1BA JUST REMODELED
$450. mo. 2 AVAILABLE
3BR/1.5BA REMODELED
$550. mo
Mike Foster 386-288-3596
Mitchell Lee 386-867-1155
1688 SE Baya Dr., Suite'105
Lake City, FL 32025
www.NorthFloridahomeandland.com
Accredited Real Estate is a Full
Service Real Estate Office.
We do: Rentals
1Sf Property Management [0
tM1 Property Sales. --.

3/2, Ir, dr, fam rm w/ fp, 2-car'
garage, fenced bk yd.
1792 sq ft. $1050 mo. Martha Jo
Khachigan, Realtor 623-2848
A TRUE FAMILY HOME
3br/2ba Newly remodeled.
Large Yard & Porch. Call for more
details 386-867-9231
Completely remodeled Brick.
3br/2ba 1750 sqft. Lg lot. Includes
washer, dryer, stove, & fridge.
$985. mo $985 dep. 386-752-7578
SWMH 2/2 in Wellborn,
$625 mo, and
$625 security.
386-365-1243 or 397-2619
Unfurnished 2 bedroom/1 bath
house. $700.00 per month.
First, last and security Firm.
386-590-5333

750 Business &
5J5 Office Rentals
For Lease: E Baya Ave. Two -
1000 sqft office space units or
combined for 2000 sqft. 386-984-
0622 or weekends 386-497-4762


DESIRABLE GWEN LAKE area!
Nice 3BR/2BA home on comer lot
REDUCED TO $95,000 DANIEL
CRAPPS AGENCY, INC.
755-5110 #77307
Hallniark Real Estate. 3/2
Doublewide on 1 acre. $58,000.
Not far to college & airport.
MLS# 78308
Ginger Parker 386-365-2135
Hallmark Real Estate. 35 High &
Dry acres, open pasture w/scat-
tered trees. Older site built home.
Needs some TLC.
MLS#76186 Jay Sears 719-0382'
Handyman Special
Off Turner Rd. 2br/1.5ba.
Half acre fenced lot w/shed.
Asking $55,000. (352)335-8330


750 Business &
5 Office Rentals
OFFICE SPACE for lease.
Oak Hill Plaza. 900 sqft
$675mo/$695. sec dep.
Tom 386-961-1086 DCA Realtor


790 Vacation Rentals

Horseshoe Beach RV Lot.
Nice comer Lot with shade trees.
$295. mo Water/electric included
386-235-3633 or 352-498-5986
Scalloping Horseshoe Beach Spcl
Gulf Front 2br, w/lg porch, dock,
fish sink. wkend $395./wk $895.
386-235-3633/352-498-5986
alwaysonvacation.com #419-181
"Florida's Last Frontier"

805 Lots for Sale
Lots for Sale Eastside
Village Realty, Inc. buildable
vacant lot hight & dry in a estab-
lished neighbor priced @ $40,000.
Call Denise Bose @ 752-5290
PUBLISHER'S NOTE
All real estate advertising in this
newspaper is subject to the fair
housing act which makes it illegal
to advertise "any preference,
limitation, or discrimination based
on race, color, religion, sex,
disability, familial status or nation-
al origin; or any intention to, make
such preference, limitation or
discrimination." Familial status
includes children under the age of
18 living with parents or legal
custodians, pregnant women and
people securing custody of chil-
dren under the age of 18. This
newspaper will not knowingly
accept-any advertising for real es-
tate which is in violation of the
law. Our readers are hereby in-
formed that all dwellings adver-
tised in this newspaper are availa-
ble on an equal opportunity basis.
To complain of discrimination call
HUD toll free at 1-800-669-9777,
the toll free',
telephone number to the hearing
impaired is 1-800-927-9275.

810 Home for Sale
2/1 completely updated, screened
back porch; large utility room,
MLS#77413 $52,900 Call Nancy
Rogers R.E.O. Realty
386-867-1271
3/2 1056 sqft Brick home in town.
Fenced back yard w/12x12 work-
shop Just Reduced! $79,900
MLS# 77414 Call 386-243-8227
R.E.O.Realty Group, Inc "
3/2 2003 DWMH on 5 acre rectan-
gular lot w/tons of potential.
MLS#77568 $79,900 Call Nancy ,
@ R.E.O. Realty 386-867-1271
nancytrogers@msn.com
.3/2 home on .67 ac. Creekside S/D
Fenced backyard, lots of trees.
Split floor plan on cul-de-sac
MLS 77385 Access Realty.
Patti Taylor $169,900 623-6896
4/2 on .105 acres w/detached
garage, patio, above ground pool,,
MLS#77410 $189,888 .
R.E.O. Realty Group, Inc
386-243-8227
4/2 with 1000 sq ft workshop,
fenced yard, 2 car garage, Fairly
new roof &'HVAC MLS#77602,
Bring Offers! $164,900,.
R.E.O. Realty Group 243-8227
4br brick on .51 ac. corner lot. For-
mal dining and a large open floor
plan. Brick patio. $139,888
MLS 76763 Brittany Stoeckert
Results Realty 386-397-3473
Access Realty Stylish 3/2 + pool"
house w/1/2 bath on 2.25 acres.
Rear deck, 2.car garage & carport.
MLS 78103 $189,900.
Patti Taylor.623-6896
BEAUTIFUL Lake Front home!
1 ac lot within the city limits.
Close to town. 1800 heated sq. ft.
.$144,900 MLS# 78385
Call Jay Seats. 386-867-1613
Brick 3/1 family home, 4.43 acres.
w/metal roof. MLS# 77415
Short sale acceptance w/lenders
approval. $89,000. 386-243-8227
R.E.O. Realty Group, Inc
CLEAN & READY! 3BR/2BA
mfg home 6n .97-acre south of Ft.
White on paved road $59,000
DANIEL CRAPPS AGENCY,
INC. 755-5110 #78007
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
3/2 brick home in Woodcrest. Lg
lot completely fenced. Easy access
to amenities. Elaine K. Tolar 386-
755-6488 MLS# 78148 $129,900
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
3/3 in beautiful area. 2414sqft.
Private yard & patio with storage
bldg. Lori G Simpson 386-365-
5678 MLS# 78175 $159,900
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
New home in Mayfair. 4 bedroom
on comer lot. Covered Porch.
Elaine K. Tolar 386-755-6488
MLS# 76919 $209,900 .
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
Remodeled 2/2 (could be'3/2).
Split floor plan. Home Owner
Warranty. Mary Brown Whitehurst
965-0887 MLS# 77943 $99,000'
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
MH in Eastside Village a 55+
retirement community.,Well main-
tained. Bruce Dicks 386-365-3784
MLS# 78350 $59,900
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
Brick home on Suwannee River
$329,900 Elaine K. Tolar 386-755-
6488 or Lori G. Simpson 365-5678
MLS# 70790 $329,900


Classified Department: 755-5440


810 Home for Sale
Hallmark Real Estate. Beautiful
lot in Woodborough, has well
maintained 3/2 brick home.
Affordable price!MLS#75413
Sherry Willis 386-365-8095
Hallmark Real Estate. Lakefront
in town on 1 ac. Majestic oaks &
Magnolias. Hardwood floors,
fireplace & basement.
MLS#78385 Jay Sears 719-0382
Hallmark Real Estate. Pool ,&
Patio. 3br/2ba. brick home on
1.69 ac. Workshop &
SWMH on property. MLS#78117
Tanya Shaffer 386-397-4766
Hallmark Real Estate. Time to go
to the River. Stilt home w/covered
decking. Floating dock,out bldgs
& covered RV parking. $188K.
MLS#72068 Janet Creel 719-0382
HANDYMAN SPECIAL!
4BR/2BA mfg home in great loca-
tion close to many amenities
$39,500 DANIEL CRAPPS
AGENCY, INC. 755-5110 #77852
Home for Sale Eastside Village
Realty, Inc. 2 bedroom, 2 bath site
built home with screen porch,
large carport priced just right Call
Denise Bose @ 752-5290
Home on 15 ac. w/over 2,500 sqft
home.Very Ig bedrooms w/private
baths. 24x24 workshop $235,000
MLS 77552 Brittany Stoeckert
Results Realty 386-397-3473
Lg. 4/3 family home. 16x20
screened porch, workshop. 4.5 ac.
fenced/cross fenced MLS 74339
$229,900. N Fla Homeland Real-
ty Darlene Hart 386-288-2878
Mayfair S/D, nice fenced in back
yard w/small lake behind property.
Very nice. $99,888
MLS 77092 Brittany Stoeckert
Results Realty 386-397-3473
Neat as a pin! Split floor plan
w/well manicured lawn. 10x12
storage shed. $129K MLS 77932
SDarlene Hart 386-288-2878
N Fla Homeland Realty
QUALITY HOME, Very private,
yet in the city. Comes with mobile
home park that generates revenue.
$695,000. MLS# 77920
Call Jay Sears. 386-867-1613
REDUCED! Custom 2,061 SqFt
home with'open floorplan,
3BR/2.5BA, in-ground pool
DANIEL CRAPPS AGENCY,
INC.'755-5110 #75442, .
RUSSWOOD EST! 3BR/2BA
w/2,337 SqFi. open floor plan.
climatized sun porch $219,900
DANIEL CRAPPS AGENCY,
INC.755-5110 #77633 .
Spacious 4/2 home on 1 ac.'Split
floor plan. Great neighborhood.
Easy access to 1-75 $220K MLS
77859 N-Fla Homeland Realty
Darlene Hart 386-288-2818
WELLBORN! 4BR/2BA mfg
home w/2,280 SqFt, FP, & 5
ACRES qnly $74,900'
DANIEL CRAPPS AGENCY,
INC. 755-5110 #78317

0 Farms &
8O1 Acreage
S 0 ac. Ft. White $39,995,
;$99 Down, $273.16 mo.
Seller fin. vargasrealty.com
352-472-3154
10-ac lot. Well/septic/pp. Owner
financing $300 dh, $663 mo 8.9%,
25 yis. Deas Bullard Properties
386-752-4339 www.landnfl.com
2+ ACRES ON HWY 47
by 1-75 interchange. More than
200 ft of frontage $149,900
Call 386-243-8227 '
R.E.O. Realty Group, Inc
20.02 acres ready for your site
built home. Has 2 wells & 2 power
poles w/a 24x30 slab $132;000
MLS# 78126 Call 386-243-8227
R.E.O.Realty Group, Inc
4 1/2 acre lot. Lake Jeffery Road.
Gorgeous Oaks!Paved Rd
Owner Financing! NO DOWN!
$59,900. $525mo 352-215-1018.
www.LandOwnerFinancing.com
4 acres, Wellborn, New Well
installed, Beautifully wooded
w/cleared Home Site, owner fin,
no down, $39,900, $410 mon
Call 352-215-1018
www.LandOwnerFinancing.com
FARM- 7 stall barn.
17+ acres, pasture, cross fenced.
Close in $500. mo.
386-961-1086
Paved hard road in front of 5 ac.
tract.Comes with: power pole,
well & septic. Cleared in back.
Also, 20X25 carport. $39,900
MLS# 76347; Jay 386-867-1613

830 Commercial.
Property

05526409 '
FOR SALE LAKE CITY
FORMER 84 LUMBER Zoned
Commercial Intensive on
4.2 +/- Acres with an 18,300
S.F. main building at 1824 W.
US Highway 90; contact
Crystal 724 228-3636 x 1349

Prime Commercial Location.
Just across from plaza. Frontage
on Baya w/2 curbcuts. $350,000
MLS# 77485 Call 386-243-8227
R.E.O.Realty Group, Inc


386-755-5440



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with a description and photo in the
newspaper and online E-edition.
* Ad runs 10 consecutive days as a
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* You must include vehicle price.
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2006 EF250
Ford Van
3/4 ton, metal work
shelves/ladder rack,
60K miles, exc. cond.
$10,500
Call
386-555-5555
If you don't sell your vehicle
during the first 10 days, you
can run the same vehicle ad
for 10 additional days for
only $15.00
Terms and conditions remain the
same for the additional run.


To Ge You


ON WHEELS & WATERCRAFT


2010 Ford Fusion
SEL
V6, auto, leather, loaded,
7,000 mi., showroom cond.

$18,500
Call ,
386-752-8227


2009 Jamboree
31 M
Ford V-10,2 slides w/32
Sin. HDTV, satellite.
Av. retail $81,500.
Now $67,000
Call
386-719-6833


870 Real Estate
870 Wanted

I Buy Houses
CASH!
Quick Sale Fair Price
386-269-0605

951 Recreational
951 Vehicles
2009 Jamboree 31M, Ford V-10,
2 slides, with 32 in. HDTV,
satellite. Av. retail $81,500.
Now $67,000. 386-719-6833

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LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS THURSDAY, JULY 21, 2011


Woods

splits

way with

Caddie
By DOUG FERGUSON
Associated Press
JACKSONVILLE-Tiger
Woods fired caddie Steve
Williams on Wednesday,
ending a 12-year relation-
ship in which he won 72
times worldwide and 13
majors.
"I want to express my
deepest gratitude to Stevie
for all his help, but I think
it's time for a change,"
Woods said on his website.
"Stevie is an outstanding
caddie and a friend and has
been instrumental in many
of my accomplishments. I
wish him great success in
the future."
Woods did not say who
would replace Williams or
when he would return to
golf.
Williams, who previ-
ously worked for Raymond
Floyd and Greg Norman,
had worked the last three
tournaments with Adam
Scott. That included the last
two majors, which Woods
skipped while trying to
recover from injuries to his
left leg.
When asked over the
weekend at the British Open
if he was still working for
Woods, Williams grinned
and said, "Why would you
ask a question like that?"
He never answered the
question but gave no indi-
cation that he would not
caddie for Woods when he
did return.
Williams could not
immediately be reached
Wednesday afternoon,
although he posted a state-
ment on his website con-
firming he had been fired.
"Needlessto saythiscame
as a shock," Williams said.
"Given the circumstances
of the past 18 months work-
ing through Tiger's scan-
dal, a new coach and with it
a major swing change and
Tiger battling through inju-
ries, I am very disappointed
to end our very successful
partnership at this time."
Williams said he would
continue working for Scott.
More than a caddie,
Woods and Williams had
been close friends. Both
got engaged while on safari
after The Presidents Cup in
South Africa, and they were
in each other's weddings.
Woods played the New
Zealand Open and even
took part in Williams' other
job as a race car driver.
The relationship began
showing signs of strain
after Woods crashed his car
on Thanksgiving night, fol-
lowed by stunning revela-
tions of multiple extramari-
tal affairs that led to Woods
getting divorced. Woods'
ex-wife and Williams' wife
were close friends.
In recent months,
Williams was feeling out of
touch during Woods' reha-
bilitation. He was not aware
that Woods did not plan to
compete in the U.S. Open
until after flying to the
States from New Zealand,
where Williams lives most
of the year.
Williams has been labeled
a bully over the years while
working for Woods amid a
constant circus, once toss-
ing a camera into the pond
at a Skins Game when the
photographer snapped a
picture in the middle of
Woods' swing on the last
hole, another time taking
the camera from a fan at
the 2004 U.S. Open that
belonged to an off-duty


policeman.
The only caddies Woods
has used in his 14-year
career on the PGA Tour
are Mike "Fluff' Cowan and
Williams. His childhood
friend, Byron Bell, caddied
for Woods when he won
the Buick Invitational in
1999 and 2000, and Billy
Foster caddied for Woods at
the Presidents Cup in 2005
when Williams was home
for the birth of his son.
Foster now works for Lee
Westwood.


NFL: Meet Wednesday


Continued From Page L
tomorrow or whatever it
might be."
NFL Commissioner
Roger Goodell and nine
of the 10 members of the
owners' labor committee
arrived at a hotel near
the Atlanta airport on
Wednesday, so they could
decide whether to recom-
mend a finalized proposal
to all club owners, who are
due to be there Thursday
New England Patriots


owner Robert Kraft, who
is on the labor committee,
wasn't expected to partici-
pate because his wife died
Wednesday, at age 68, after
a battle with cancer.
If owners do vote
Thursday, at least 24 would
need to OK the deal. If
it's passed by both sides,
team executives would be
schooled later that day and
Friday in Atlanta in the
guidelines.


Sp urrier: Garcia

likely back for camp


By JOHN ZENOR
Associated Press
HOOVER, Ala. South
Carolina coach Steve
Spurrier says quarterback
Stephen Garcia will "in all
likelihood" rejoin the team
for preseason camp.
Will he start? Maybe
not.


SpurriersaidWednesday
at Southeastern
Conference media days
that Garcia has done every-
thing he's been asked to
do since he was suspended
for the fifth time in the
spring.
But the coach says
Garcia will have to com-
pete with sophomore


WMAJee
RA m"amm-


Connor Shaw to keep his
starting job.
He says he has probably
the most talented roster
of his seven-year tenure.
Spurrier says he thinks
running back Marcus
Lattimore and wide receiv-,
er Alshon Jeffery are
the nation's best at their
position.


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Page Editor: Brandon Finley, 754-0420