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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028308/01612
 Material Information
Title: The Lake City reporter
Uniform Title: Lake City reporter (Lake City, Fla. 1967)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: John H. Perry
Place of Publication: Lake City Fla
Publication Date: 7/19/2011
Frequency: daily (monday through friday)[<1969>-]
weekly[ former 1967-<1968>]
daily
normalized irregular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Lake City (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Columbia County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Columbia -- Lake City
Coordinates: 30.189722 x -82.639722 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 95, no. 4 (Oct. 5, 1967)-
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000358016
oclc - 33283560
notis - ABZ6316
lccn - sn 95047175
sobekcm - UF00028308_01569
System ID: UF00028308:01612
 Related Items
Preceded by: Lake City reporter and Columbia gazette

Full Text





$47 million Down t(
Water management Rains have
district sets doused nearly
tentative 12ooo 0 51 ****3-DIGIT 326
tentative LIB OF FLORIDA HISTORY
st PO BOX 117007
ory 1205 SMA UNIV OF FLORIDA
GAINESVILLE FL 32611-1943




Lake City


Full circle
Clarke claims
British Open
championship.
Sports, I B


Reporter


Tuesday, July 19, 2011


www.lakecityreporter.com


Vol. 137, No. 148 M 75 cents


Former


fugitive's


flight

coming


to cable

Suwannee bank
robber's story is
on TV tonight
By TONY BRITT
tbritt@lakecityreporter.com

The criminal exploits and even-
tual capture of a Live Oak bank
robber who fled to Alaska and
worked on a crab boat to elude
law enforcement will be featured
on the cable show "I (Almost)
Got Away With It" on.Tuesday
night
The show, which airs its third
season finale, will be broadcast
at 9 p.m. tonight on Investigation
Discovery, channel 111 on the
local Comcast system.
The segment will feature
the story of Levy County resi-
dent Kenneth Scott "Speedy"
Raulerson, who was arrested
in Palatka nine years after rob-
bing the Dowling Park Barnett/
Nations Bank on May 18, 1998.
Reports said Raulerson worked
in Alaska for close to six months
before returning to North Florida
to began working under an alias
doing yard work. He was arrest-
ed June 1, 2006, when a police
dog bit and subdued him, after
authorities set up an undercover
operation with Raulerson the
target
Raulerson, 47, was charged
with two counts of robbery while
armed with a destructive device,
four counts of kidnapping while
armed, burglary while armed,
making or possessing a destruc-
tive device, two counts of grand
theft, burglary and petit theft in
relation to the case.
He was arrested on a
Suwannee County warrant
through a joint operation con-
ducted by the Putnam County
Sheriff's Office Drug and Vice
Unit, the United States Marshals
Service and the Levy County
Sheriff's Office, authorities said.
The show will feature inter-
views with Raulerson from
behind bars, as well as inter-
views with Mike Burns, a friend
of Raulerson; Jeff Cameron, a
Suwannee County Sheriff's Office
investigator; Ted Glass, the
retired Levy County sheriff; and
Jim Flournoy, a former Florida
Department of Law Enforcement
special agent.
According to reports, the
Dowling Park robbery occurred
at 9 a.m. May 18, 1998, when two
female bank employees opened
the bank for business that morn-
ing and the bank was immedi-
ately held up by two men. Two
customers walked into the bank
as it was being robbed.
One of the robbers, thought
to be Raulerson, reportedly
' wore a pinstriped tuxedo-style
suit during the robbery and told
everyone in the bank that he had
an explosive device strapped to
his chest. Both tellers and the
customers were forced into the
bank's vault and the door was
closed before the two men left
the bank. Thousands of dollars
TV continued on 3A


In what's become something of a tradition for shuttle crews and those of the
International Space Station expeditions, the Expedition 28 crew and the STS-135
Atlantis astronauts formed a microgravity circle for a portrait Friday aboard the orbiting
complex's Kibo laboratory of the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency in this image
provided by NASA.


Shuttle crew bids


historic goodbye


BY MARCIA DUNN
AP Aerospace Writer

CAPE CANAVERAL The astro-
nauts on NASA's final shuttle voyage
floated out of the International Space
Station for the last time Monday, leav-
ing behind a historic U.S. flag and a
commemorative shuttle model to mark
the end of a 30-year era.
Atlantis was set to undock from the
orbiting lab early Tuesday provid-
ing the last glimpses of a space shuttle
in flight before the fleet is retired.
As the hatches swung shut behind
the four crew members of Atlantis, it
closed "a chapter in the history of our
nation," space station astronaut Ronald
Garan Jr. noted in Monday's emotional
farewell ceremony.
He attached the small flag which
rocketed into orbit on the very first


shuttle flight in 1981 to the door
of the space station hatch before the
shuttle astronauts departed. Atlantis
has been parked at the space station
for over a week, unloading a year's
worth of supplies and packing up trash
and old equipment for the trip home.
Atlantis is due to land at Florida's
Kennedy Space Center just before sun-
rise Thursday.
It was a heartfelt goodbye for
the two crews, numbering 10 astro-
nauts in all from three countries.
They embraced one another. Sandra
Magnus wiped away tears.
Atlantis' commander, Christopher
Ferguson, presented the flag to the
space station crew, along with a small
model of a space shuttle. He said he
wishes he could have brought a monu-
ment to commemorate the 30-year

SHUTTLE continued on 3A


'No frills'


budget for


Lake City

Proposed millage rate
for fiscal 2011-12 is
the same as this year's.

By ANTONIA ROBINSON
arobinson@lakecityreporter.com
The Lake City City Council approved a pro-
posed millage rate of 3.9816 mills for the pro-
posed 2012 fiscal year during a meeting Monday
night.
The fiscal year is
Oct. 1 to Sept. 30.
The rate is the
same as the cur-
rent fiscal year.
Council also
approved the non
ad-valorem assess-


revenue was $2,891,346; but it is projected to
be $2,820,475 for the upcoming fiscal year, City
Manager Wendell Johnson said. Despite the
decrease in revenue the city would be able to
balance out.
Johnson said he was pleased to recommend
council keep the millage rate the same.
The current budget year is similar to the com-
ing one concerning revenue and expenses, he
said.
"It's a tight budget," he said. "There are no
thrills or frivolous spending."
City employees will not receive nerit increas-
es, he said. However, a big expense in the
budget is the general employee pension fund,
which city audits have found to be deficient in
contributions. Funding will come from reserves
to correct the problem.
The city has. adequate reserves and has not
made a habit of drawing from it, Johnson said.
The budget will be about $52 million in total,
he said.


MILLAGE continued on 3A


Rains help with fires, but drought persists


By TONY BRITT
tbritt@lakecityreporter.com
Recent rains have aided in local wildfire
containment efforts, reducing the num-
ber of wildfires in the Suwannee Forestry
Center to one, Forestry Service officials
said.
According to information from the Florida
Forest Service office at the Suwannee
County Forestry Center, there is only one


Water district

sets tentative

$47M budget
From staff reports

LIVE OAK The Suwannee River Water
Management District Governing Board has
approved a tentative fiscal year 2011-12 budget
of $47,124,589 and proposed millage rate of
0.4250. The tentative budget represents a 17
percent reduction over last year's budget and
the tentative millage rate reflects a 3 percent
reduction over last year's millage rate.
Under the proposed millage rate, those who
own property with a taxable value of $100,000
will pay $42.50 in property taxes to the District.
Owners of property with a taxable value of
$150,000 will pay $63.75 to the District

BUDGET continued on 3A


active blaze within the boundaries of the
Suwannee Forestry Center's six county
coverage area.
The active wildfire in the district is the
Santa Fe 11 fire in Bradford County. The
fire, active since June 6, is contained but has
consumed 5,679 acres.
Kurt Wisner, Florida Forest Service mit-
igation specialist and public information
officer, said additional rainfall is needed to
bring the area out of the drought.


"Seasonal thunderstorms and showers
during July have improved fire conditions int
the Suwannee District and throughout tlW
state, but significantly more rain is required
to recover from our extended drought," he
said.
Florida Forest Service records indicate in
June Columbia County received 5.34 inches
of rain, which is below the annual average
DROUGHT continued on 3A


Publix pitches in
I s .


Publix Supermarkets made a corporate contribution of $20,900 toward the United Way of
Suwannee Valley 2010-11 fundraising campaign. This corporate contribution coupled with
the employee pledges bring the local stores' support of United Way to $48,450. Pictured for
the presentation of the corporate contribution are, from left, Bo Bush, manager of the Live
Oak Publix; Rita Dopp, executive director of United Way of Suwannee Valley; Mike McKee,
volunteer/president of the United Way Board of Directors; and Larry Rossignol, manager of
the Lake City Publix.


CALL US:
(386) 752-1293
SUBSCRIBE TO
THE REPORTER:
Voice: 755-5445
SFax: 752-9400


95 69
Partly cloudy
WEATHER, 2A


O pinion .............. 4A
People............... .. 2A
Obituaries .............. 6A
Advice & Comics......... .4B
Puzzles .............. .. 2B


TODAY IN
PEOPLE
'Jerse., Shore'
OK for Jerse,


COMING
WEDNESDAY
crt 2,just
for ,ou.










. Page Editor: Jason M. Walker, 754-0430


LAKE CITY REPORTER DAILY BRIEFING TUESDAY, JULY 19, 2011


FLORIDA
lOa Saturday:
X"-iP 6-12-15-30-41-44
X2


SA$H3
: 3


' 4D


Monday:
Afternoon: 2-4-8
Evening: N/A


Monday:
Afternoon: 7-3-8-5
Evening: N/A


eznatchi.
Sunday:
3-14-15-32-34


PEOPLE IN THE NEWS


'Jersey Shore' not hurting state's image


SEASIDE HEIGHTS, N.J.
Here's the real situation:
It turns out MTV's
"Jersey Shore" isn't kill-
ing New Jersey's repu-
tation after all.
A new nationwide poll finds the
reality show about a group of hard-
drinking, foul-mouthed 20-some-
things at a beach house in Seaside
Heights, N.J., may even be helping a
bit by bringing attention to the real
Jersey shore.
The Fairleigh Dickinson
University PublicMind poll, released
Monday, found no statistical differ-
ence between those who have seen
the show and those who haven't
It also found that the series is
drawing attention to the state's 127
miles of beaches and generating
positive buzz for the Garden State as
a whole.
'The show isn't hurting the
nation's view of the state," said
Peter Woolley, director of the poll.
"In fact, it may be promoting one
of the state's best features not
Snooki, but the shore itself. It seems
to me viewers are looking past The
Situation to the shore scene itself."
The poll found that 43 percent of
those who have seen the show have
a favorable opinion of New Jersey,
while 41 percent who've never seen
it also think New Jersey is great
Michelle Diaz of Philadelphia was
strolling the Seaside Heights board-
walk Friday with two friends when
they happened upon Mike "The
Situation" Sorrentino during a break
from that day's taping of the show.
"A lot of people from other states
think Jersey is trashy, but when you
come here, it's a totally different
scene," she said.

Vanessa Minnillo and
Nick Lachey are married
LOS ANGELES After dating for
more than five years, Nick Lachey,
37, and Vanessa Minnillo, 30, are


Michael 'The Situation' Sorrentino speaks with RafaefKieliszelic (center) and
Daniel Sajewski, both of Toronto, Canada, on the boardwalk in Seaside Heights,
N.J., during a break in taping of an episode of the MTV series 'Jersey Shore,'
Friday. A new nationwide poll finds the show's depiction of a group of hard-drink-
ing, foul-mouthed 20-somethings has not hurt New Jersey's national image, .and
may help it in some small ways.


Lachey


married.
A spokeswoman
for Minnillo con-
firms that the couple
wed Friday.
The singer and
actress announced
their. engagement in
November. Lachey


was previously married to Jessica
Simpson.

Fans pack Dolly's 1st
Knoxville show in years


I.,



Pa. n
P on
Parton


.KNOXVILLE
- Dolly' Parton fans
have. something
to sing about after
packing a University
of Tennessee arena
for the star's first
Knoxville concert in
more than 25 years.


More than 8,600 tickets were
sold to Parton's show Sunday night
Proceeds are earmarked for her
Imagination Library project, which
distributes 700,000 books monthly
to preschoolers around the world.
Dollywood Foundation President
David Dotson estimated the show
raised around $200,000.

Ja, Rule faces sentencing
in tax return case
NEWARK, N.J. Rapper and
actor Ja Rule faces sentencing in fed-
eral court in New Jersey for failing
to file income tax returns.
The platinum-selling rapper,
whose real name is Jeffrey Atkins,
faces up to three years in prison at
his sentencing in Newark. He admit-
ted that he failed to pay taxes on
more than $3 million in income.
E Associated Press


, Celebrity Birthdays


* Former Sen. George
McGovern is 89.
* Actress Helen Gallagher
is 85.
* Country singer Sue
Thompson is 85.
* Country singer George
Hamilton IV is 74.
* Singer Vikki Carr is 71.
* Country singer-musician


Commander Cody is 67.
* Actor George Dzundza is
66.
* Rock singer-musician Alan
Gorrie (Average White Band)
is 65.
* Rock musician Brian May
is 64.
* Rock musician Bernie
Leadon is 64.


Daily Scripture
"I will praise you with an
upright heart as I learn your
righteous laws."
Psalm 119:7
Thought for Today
"'An optimist will tell you the
glass is half-full; the pessimist,
half-empty; and the engineer
will tell you the glass is twice
the size it needs to be."
Anonymous

Like City Reporter
HOW TO REACH US
Main number ....;...(386) 752-1293 BUSINESS
Fax number ...........752-9400 Controller Sue Brannon... .754-0419
Circulation ....." ...... 755-5445 (sbrannon@lakecityreporter.com)
Online... www.laklecityreporter.com CIRCULATION
The Lake CIty reporter, an affiliate of CIRCULATION
Community Newspaers Inc., is pub- Home delivery of the Lake City Reporter
lashedd Tuesday though Sunday at 180 should be completed by 6:30 a.m.
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Periodical postage paid at Lake City, Fla. a.m. on Sunday.
Member Audit Bureau of Circulation and Please call 386-755-5445 to report any
The Associpted Press, problems with your delivery service.
All material herein is property of the Lake In Columbia County, customers should
City Reporter. Reproduction in whole or call before 10:30 a.m. to report a ser-
in part is forbidden without the permis- vice error for same day re-delivery. After
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POSTMASTER: Send address changes In all other counties where home delivery
to Lake City Reporter, P.O. Box 1709, is available, next day re-delivery or ser-
Lake City, Ra. 32056. vice related credits will be issued.
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(twilson@lakecityreporter.com) Circulation ..............755-5445
(circulaton@lakecityreporter.com)
NEWS Home delivery rates
Editor Robert Bridges .....754-0428 (Tuesday through Sunday)
(rbridges@lakecityreporter.com) 12 Weeks..................$26.32
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(abutcher@lakecityreporter.com) 12 Weeks..................$41.40
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To place a classified ad, call 755-5440 52 Weeks......... $179.40

CORRECTION

The Lake City Reporter corrects errors of fact in news
items. If you have a concern, question or suggestion, please
call the executive editor. Corrections and clarifications will run
in this space. And thanks for reading.. - ... -


Judge removes
commandments
CROSS CITY A feder-
al judge said Dixie County
officials must remove a
granite monument of the
Ten Commandments from
the front of their court-
house.
SSenior District Judge
Maurice Paul gave the
north Florida county until
mid-August to remove the
monument in Cross City.
The decision Friday
resulted from a lawsuit
by the American Civil
Liberties Union of Florida
in 2007. The group argued
that an official government
display of a religious mon-
ument violates a clause in
the First Amendment that
prohibits government from
promoting religious mes-
sages. The county argued
that it didn't own the mon-
ument that was controlled
by a private citizen.

Child dies after
hit by dump truck
DAYTONA BEACH A
child has died after being
struck by a dump truck in
central Florida.
Florida Highway Patrol
Sgt Kim Montes said the
child was killed Monday
morning in Volusia County.
The child's age and gen-
der was not released.
Authorities are investi- "
gating the accident

Woman jailed
over $2 fight
JACKSONVILLE -
A Jacksonville woman
is behind bars after a man
saids he gave her $2, but
later took it back. He told
police she then ran him
over with the car.
Andrew Toby said he
gave Michele McGraw, 31,
the money in a restaurant
parking lot Friday. When
Toby took the money
back, he said McGraw
became angry and chased


A lesson with a star
Pop star Natasha Bedingfield (left) treats a Starwood
Preferred Guest Member to private singing lessons as part of
the SPG Moments program in Fort Lauderdale Monday.


him with the car.
Toby was taken to the
hospital with serious inju-
ries. Witnesses said they
saw a car hit Toby and
then crash. McGraw and a
passenger were allegedly
seen walking away from
the wreck.

Feds urged to
reject overhaul
MIAMI A group
of state Democratic
lawmakers are urging
federal health officials
not to expand a Medicaid
privatization program they
said has been plagued with,
problems.
According to a letter
sent Friday, Democratic
leaders said the state over-
haul builds on a failed pilot
program.
Representatives Mia
Jones, Mark Pafford,
Steve Perman, and Elaine
Schwartz also expressed
doubts in the state's ability
to oversee the program.

Storage bin taken
from space station
CAPE CANAVERAL -
NASA's orbiting astro-
nauts have detached a
huge storage bin from


the International Space
Station. Now they're work-
ing to place it aboard
Atlantis for the very last
shuttle ride back to Earth.
The astronauts used a
big robotic arm Monday to
move the canister, which
is the size of a bus. It's
stuffed with nearly 3 tons
of packing foam and other
space station trash.

Woman charged-
with shaking baby
DUNEDIN Gretchen
Gludovatz, 29, has been
arrested after witnesses
said she repeatedly
plucked a baby from its
.stroller and shook it vigor-
ously.
Witnesses said they saw
her shake the baby while
out for a walk Saturday.
Authorities tried to stop
Gludovatz. According to
an arrest report, an officer
touched her shoulder and
Gludovatz shoved the dep-
uty, striking her in the jaw.
Gludovatz was charged
with child abuse, battery
on a'law enforcement offi-
cer and resisting an officer
with violence. She was
released her on her own
recognizance.
T1 Associated Press


Pensacola
94/77


94, 73 --
Panama City
92'78


TEMPERATURES
High Monday
Low Monday
Normal high
Normal low
Record high
Record low

PRECIPITATION
Monday
Month total
Year total '
Normal month-to-date
Normal year-to-date


Ga
\.9


90
72
91.
71
100 in 1899
68 in 1929


0.00"
2.20"
22.09"
3.59"
27.62"


7a lp 7p la 6a
Tuesday Wednesday







| Forecasted temqnutre- i "Feels' e"tmpqrtur


City Wednesday
Cape Canaveral 90,77,pc


Daytona Beach


Ft. Lauderdale
inesville Daytona Beach Fort Myers
P2/69 8971 Gainesville
9\ cala Jacksonville
92/70 Key West
1 Orlando Capt Canaveral Lake City
93/74 85/73 Miami
Tania Ws \ Naples
92/7"4," West Pamn Beach Ocala
88/78 Orlando
\ Ft Lauderdale Panama City
Ft. Myers. 93/78 Pensacola
92/74 Naples Tallahassee
.90/76 Mianmi Tampa
.. \ 8q/79 Valdosta
9Key West* (" W. Palm Beach
S90/82


SUN
Sunrise today
Sunset today
Sunrise tom.
Sunset tom.

MOON
Moonrise today
Moonset today
Moonrise torn.
Moonset tom.


6:41 a.m.
8:32 p.m.
6:42 a.m.
8:32 p.m..

11:03 p.m.
10:46 a.m.
11:33 p.m.
11:39 a.m.


@000
July July Aug. Aug.
23 30 6 13
Last New First Full


10nutestobt I
Today's
ultra-violet
radiation risk
for the area on
a scale from 0
to 10+.

vIl


92 76, pc
92/ 79/
94/77/t
95/73/pc
95/77/pc
90/82/s
97/74/pc
90/80/t
90/77/t
94/73/t
96/78/pc
94/79/pc
93/79/pc
96/75/pc
93/78/pc
96/74/pc
91/79/t


Thursday
90,'77 1
93, 75,'
92,80,/s
94/76/t
94/74/t
96/77/t
90/82/pc
95/74/t
90/80/s
90/77/s
94/74/t
94/78/t
91/79/t
93/79/t
97/73/t
93/77/t
96/74/t
90/79/s


weather.com
hoi mmmw


ti^ I Forecasts, data and
graphics 2011 Weather
the wwwtral.we er Maisonhe, Wr.com
we3ther0 www.weatherpubllsher.com


AROUND FLORIDA


THE WEATHER


PARTLY. ISOLATEDD -JSOLATED
CLOUDY STORMS STORMS


H195 LO69 1197LO74 1 5 LO ?I




SValdosta
95/72- Jacksonville
Tallahassee Lake City 92, 73


An exclusive
service
brought to
our readers
by
The Weather
Channel.


B9'flTV1:17


, 1. 2. I 1 3 1


(386 755544


it











Page EdItor: Robert, Bridges, 754-0428 LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL TUESDAY, JULY 19, 2011


SRWMD manager is outstanding forester


LIVE OAK Bob Heeke, of the
Suwannee River Water Management
District, is one of 11 foresters cho-
sen to receive the Presidential Field
Forester Award from the Society
of American Foresters. Heeke was
nominated and selected by his
peers from among all practicing
foresters within the SAFs south-
eastern region of Florida, Alabama,
and Georgia.
Heeke, who has a 31-year career
in the field of forestry, has worked
at the SRWMD since 1987. He
currently serves as the senior land
resources manager within the
Department of Land Acquisition
and Management where he over-
sees all land management activi-
ties on the District's 160,000 acres
of land. Heeke oversees projects
that facilitate the restoration of the
natural structure and function of
lands the SRWMD acquires and
manages for flood control and the


. protection of surface and ground-
water resources.
Some of Heeke's most note-
worthy accomplishments at the
SRWMD follow:
Established the land manage-
ment program.
Directed harvesting on more
than 15,000 acres for natural com-
munity restoration.
Developed and supervised the
prescribed burning program.
Supervised salvage operations
after the 2001 Mallory Swamp
wildfire.
Established an exotic plant con-
trol program.
Directed the implementation
of hydrologic mitigation projects
across the District.
"Heeke's heart and soul are in
the land. He has an unparalleled
understanding of the natural com-
munities on District lands and is
skilled at applying land manage-


Heeke


ment techniquties effectively and
efficiently," said Charlie Houder,
SRWMD assistant executive direc-
tor. "At the end of the day, our


water resources and public lands
are in better shape because of his
skill and professionalism."
The Presidential Field Forester
Award is given annually to one SAF
member from each of the 11 SAF
districts. Heeke, who has been
active in SAF since 1981, is a mem-
ber within SAF's District X, the
organization's southeastern region.
The nominees will be announced
and recognized at the 2011 SAF
National Convention in November.
Founded in 1900, the Society of
American Foresters is the national
scientific and educational organiza-
tion representing the forestry pro-
fession in the United States and is
the largest professional society for
foresters in the world. Members
of the Society include natural
resource professionals in public
and private settings, researchers,
CEOs, administrators, educators,
and students.


MILLAGE

Continued From Page 1A

The budget is tight, but
city staff worked to make
it balanced.
"It's a good budget,"
Johilson said.
The rate will be adver-
tised in Truth in Millage
notices, and the city
can not exceed that fig-
ure but can vote to go
under.
The council set bud-
get workshops for 6 p.m.
July 26-28.
Mayor Stephen Witt
was out of town and Vice
Mayor Melinda Moses
served in his place on
council.
The next council meet-
ing is 7 p.m. Aug. 1 at City
Hall.


SHUTTLE: Program's final touchdown scheduled for Thursday morning

Continued From Page 1A


shuttle program, but it
would not have fit
"We brought the best
monument we could pos-
sibly find, and that's a
space shuttle model," he
said.
The model, signed by
senior shuttle managers
and flight directors, was
also was hung near the
hatch.
"What you don't see
are the signatures of the
tens of thousands who
rose to orbit with us
over the past 30 years, if.
only in spirit," Ferguson
added.
Space station astronaut
Michael Fossum accepted
the model "as one of the
greatest testaments to
the shuttle's incredible
capability." Almost all
of NASA's space shuttle
flights since 1998 were
devoted to building and
maintaining the space sta-


tion in all, 37 missions.
"Ninety percent of the
world's population can
look out of their back-
yards at night and see us
going overhead," Fossum
added.
Emotions also welled
up, down at Mission
Control.
Lead flight director
Kwatsi Alibaruho has
one more shift remaining
before signing off forever
from shuttle Mission
Control in Houston. He
said he and his team vac-
illate "between intense
pride at how well this
mission has gone, and
sometimes being some-
what freaked out, for lack
of a more technical term."
Whenever he pauses to
think about the finality of
it all, "I get kind of freaked
out and have this sinking
feeling in my stomach that
lasts about five or 10 sec-


onds, and then I go back,
to doing an impersonation
of a steely eyed missile
man." he told reporters
Monday.
Atlantis will pull away
from the space station
early Tuesday. As a final
*salute, the space station "
will rotate 90 degrees to
provide a new angle for
pictures.
It will be some time
before there are so many
people aboard the space
station again. The Russian
Soyuz capsules the only
way to get astronauts to
the space station for at
least the next few years
- carry no more than
three.
New commercial .-space-
craft under development
for astronauts are still at
least three to five years
away from flying. The
first private spacecraft to
reach the space station


will retrieve the flag left
behind. It will fly again
on the massive rocket
that NASA plans to build
to send astronauts out of
low-Earth orbit, Ferguson
said. "Perhaps to a lunar
destination, perhaps to
Mars," he noted.
The retirement of
NASA's three remain-
ing shuttles has been in
the works since 2004,
barely a year after the
Columbia disaster. Then,
President George W.
Bush announced a new
exploration vision aimed
at returning astronauts
to the moon. President
Barack Obama nixed the
moon in favor of an aster-
oid and Mars. The target
launch dates: 2025 for
an asteroid and the mid-
2030s for the red planet.
Earlier Monday, the
astronauts removed a
huge storage bin from the


station and placed it back
aboard the shuttle. The
bus-size chamber holds
nearly 3 tons of packing
foam and other trash,
including old equip-
ment. NASA wanted to
stockpile the orbiting
lab with supplies in case
the private companies
get delayed in launching
their own cargo ships.
The first such sup-
ply run is expected by
year's end.
Atlantis will remain at
Kennedy Space Center
for retirement, going on


public display. Discovery
and Endeavour will be
transported to museums
in suburban Washington
and Los Angeles.
While many will
descend on Kennedy
for Thursday's 5:57 a.m.
touchdown, Alibaruho
will remain in Houston.
He debated whether to
be attend the final land-
ing by a space shuttle,
but decided to observe it
from Mission Control.
"It's home, so that's
where I'll be."


DROUGHT: Dry conditions abated some by rains

Continued From Page 1A


of June.
Records show that
Columbia County has
received more rain in the
first 17 days of July than
in the entire month of
June.
Thus far in July Columbia
County has received a total
of 5.47 inches of rain.


Wisner said Columbia
County remains in the
moderate-severe range for
the drought due to lack of
rainfall.
"The southern part
of the district, Bradford
County, has received
enough rain to have
dropped to the moder-


ate drought level, but the
remainder of the district
is still in the severe to
extreme range," he said.
"Although we have been
anticipating the begin-
ning of the tropical sea-
son, it does not appear
that Tropical Storm Brett
is going to do anything to


alleviate our drought."
In the Suwannee Forestry
District- Bradford, Baker,
Hamilton, Suwannee,
Columbia and Union coun-
ties the average rainfall
from July 1 July 18 is
3.38 inches, according to
records.


BUDGET: Tentatively set at $47 million for 2011-12

Continued From Page 1A


Taxes paid to the
District fund numerous
public services, including
protection of rivers and
springs, water monitoring
programs, water resource
development and water
supply planning. The

TV

Continued From Page 1A

was taken, authorities said.
A bomb threat was called
in to Suwannee County
High School at nearly the.
same time the robbery
took place a ploy author-
ities say Raulerson used to
better his chances of elud-
ing capture.
A car used in the
heist had been stolen
from a Live Oak used
car dealership the night
before the robbery and
parked overnight at
the Suwannee River.
Authorities said a boat
and motor stolen from
a nearby home sev-
eral days earlier were
believed to be used as a
get-away vehicle for the
water after the stolen
car was discarded in
bushes near the river.
Three other people
were charged in the
case.
Raulerson is currently
incarcerated at the
Cross City Correctional
institution. He is sched-
uled for release .on April
16, 20615.


tentative budget was
approved at the District's
July 12 meeting.
The District !will
hold two public hear-
ings Sept. 13 and
Sept. 27 before the
budget and millage


rate are adopted. Both
meetings will be held
at 5:30 p.m. at the
District's headquar-
ters in Live Oak at the
corner of U.S. 90 and
CR 49. The final bud-
get and millage rate


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Columbia County's Most Wanted
Jared Robert \ Johnny Dewayne
suggs Varnum
SDOB: 7/24/83 OB: 2/7/64
;W"W" Height 6' Height: 6'1"-Weight: 190 Ibs.
eight: 6'2" Hair: Brown Eyes: Blue
Weight: 230 lbs. Tattoo: Left Arm-Barbedwire; Right
SHair: Brown Upper Arm-Eagle with Anchor;
SEyes: Brown Back-Sherrie
Eyes: Brown Wanted For: VOP Possession of
Wanted For: Aggravated Controlled Substance, Possession of
Battery on Pregnant Person -. Drug Paraphernalia
WANTED AS OF 7/18/11
ANYONE WITH INFORMATION ON THE WHEREABOUTS OF THESE INDIVIDUALS IS ASKED TO CALL CRIME STOPPERS OF COLUMBIA COUNTY.
WE DO NOT WANT YOUR NAME, JUST YOUR INFORMATION!
The likeness of suspects is supplied by the Columbia County Sheriff's Office Warrants Division and/or other law enforcement agencies.
The cases are active at the time of publication unless otherwise noted. Crime Stoppers of Columbia County, Inc., and their volunteers
are jointly and individually exempt from any and all liability which might arise as a result of the publication of public records.

CALL (386) 754-7099 OR
SUBMIT A WEB TIP AT
F COLUMBIA COUNTY www.columbiacrimestoppers.net
Funded by the Crime Stoppers Trust Fund; Administered by the Office of the Attorney General


LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL TUESDAY, JULY 19, 2011


Page Editor: Robert, Bridges, 754-0428













OPINION


Tuesday, July 19,2011


AN
OPINION



No


more


DC


tricks

In Atlanta, the teachers
cheat on exams so the stu-
dents don't have to. It doesn't
raise the knowledge level of
our children but it gets the
school system past the next
exam even as the system con-
tinues its death spiral. We will
know the spiral has reached its
terminal station when there is
full unionized teacher employ-
ment and complete student
illiteracy.
Now, in this same spirit
of treating the symptoms at
the price of the patient's life,
Moody's credit rating agency,
according to Reuters, has pro-
posed that the United States
"should eliminate its statutory
limit on government debt to
reduce uncertainty among
bond holders."
It's true. Eliminating the
legal requirement that limits
debt issuance will assure (for
awhile) the continued issuance
of debt a classic example of
winning the battle and losing
the war.
Moody's helpfully offers
two alternative methods of
inducing fiscal responsibility
for the United States. One
would use "Maastricht criteria
which determines that for EU
member countries the ratio
of government debt to [gross
domestic product] should not
exceed 60 percent" Moody's
concedes that such a rule is
often breached by the govern-
ments: to wit Greece, Spain,
Portugal, Italy, Ireland and oth-
ers are approaching or exceed-
ing 100 percent of debt to GDP
- and are a growing threat to
induce a global financial and
economic crisis.
Moody's other suggested
alternative is to follow Chile's
fiscal management of its social
security system. But Chile has
no social security problem
because it privatized it 30 years
ago, so it is fiscally sound and
popular. But the Democrats
here in the United States
0 The Washington Times


Lake City Reporter
Serving Columbia County
Since 1874
The Lake City Reporter is pub-
lished with pride for residents of
Columbia and surrounding counties by
SCommunity Newspapers Inc.
Co We believe strong newspapers build
strong communities -"Newspapers
get things done!"
Our primary goal is to
publish distinguished and profitable
community-oriented newspapers. ,
This mission will be accomplished
through the teamwork of professionals
dedicated to truth, integrity and hard
work.
Todd Wilson, publisher
Robert Bridges, editor
Sue Brannon, controller
Dink NeSmith, president
Tom Wood, chairman

LETTERS
POLICY
Letters to the Editor should be
typed or neatly written and double
spaced. Letters should not exceed
400 words and will be edited for
length and libel. Letters must be
signed and include the writer's name,
address and telephone number for
verification. Writers can have two
letters per month published. Letters
and guest columns are the opinion of.
the writers and not necessarily that of
the Lake City Reporter.
BY MAIL: Letters, P.O. Box 1709,
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P Il a.aeli

ba1!IaI
A bnrTm,1f-I


/


UAiVERSAL UCCK i
EDSTEitlwK.COM


The honor of serving on a jury


I watched no more than
five minutes of the Casey
Anthony trial. As a father
of two and a grandfather
of five, I do not have the
stomach, or courage, to witness
public spectacles involving the
death of innocent young chil-
dren.
However, one aspect of the
trial, which was out of public
view, interests me: the jury
process. The Anthony trial, like
the media-hyped OJ. Simpson
trial that also produced a widely
unpopular not-guilty verdict,
underscores the major virtues
of America's jury system and
what the system means for jus-
tice in the United States.
I have served on two juries,
a case of second-degree mur-
der and one of involuntary
manslaughter. In the second-
degree murder case,,my fellow
jurors and I found the man not
guilty. My gut instinct was that
the defendant, a cuckold with
a violent temper and a sneer-
ing persona, was guilty, but
the prosecutor did not prove
his case "beyond a reasonable
doubt." The manslaughter case
ended with a guilty verdict
because the prosecution was
flawless.
In each case, I was hon-
ored to be a juror. A longtime
friend who was a prosecutor
in Broward County joked that
it was a miracle that I, a black
male, had not been perempto-
rily challenged and sent home.
I felt special not because I was
the lone black each time but
because I was permitted to per-
form what I considered to be a
vital duty as a U.S. citizen, no
matter my color.
I vividly recall the first
time I was summoned in Fort
Lauderdale, being in that hot


Bill Maxwell
maxwell@sptimes.com
room with nearly'50 other peo-
ple in the pool awaiting our fate.
Naive, I was surprised to hear
so many people discussing ways
to avoid serving. Some were
angry that they had to miss
work or could not find babysit-
ters or were too ill to be away
from the comforts of home.
One man said the government
did not have the right to force a
citizen to serve on a jury, espe-
cially for less than minimum
wage. He was dismissed on the
first day.
Details of the long-ago trial
elude me, but I still remember
the heated arguments in the
jury room. Two men almost
came to blows, but they settled
down after someone else calmly
introduced a clear line of logic
we all acknowledged.
I was impressed by the pro-
cess, by how ordinary people
sifted through complex legal
arguments to decide the fate
of a fellow citizen. I quickly
apprehended the wisdom of our
system. The man on trial had
a basic right to be judged by a
jury of his peers, and my fel-
low jurors and I had a duty to
protect the defendant's right of
fairness.
Indeed, I felt privileged to be
one who was upholding a fel-
low citizen's right. As we were
seated to deliver our verdict, I
recall looking at the defendant
and feeling deep down that he


was guilty. I also recalled the
judge's somber instructions,
his emphasis on the high bar
of "guilt beyond a reasonable
doubt" My fellow jurors and I,
including a mechanic, a long-
shoreman, a homemaker and a
college English teacher, made
our call based solely on the
evidence. The attorneys, the
media, the general public and
even the judge were bound by
our decision. As a body, we rep-
resented one of the checks and
balances that make U.S. justice
special in the world.
And now, here I am with
everyone else, in the wake of
the Casey Anthony verdict
Many of us are mired in the
jury-hating offal spewed by the
media and social network posts.
According to USA Today,
many Facebook pages, for
example, have targeted the
jury: "Casey Anthony is a
murderer no matter what 12
idiots say"; "The jurors in the
Casey Anthony Trial are an
Embarrassment to America";
and 'The JURY Failed
Caylee."
Some of the jurors, who
were all Pinellas County resi-
dents who spent six weeks in
Orange County for the trial, are
reported to have been physi-
cally threatened, and the judge
has been reluctant to reveal
their names. As one who has sat
through two trials as a juror, I
am disappointed that so many
of us misunderstand or discount
the essential role of the jury in
American justice. If I am ever
summoned again and selected
to serve as a juror, I will gladly
do so.
* Bill Maxwell is a columnist
and editorial writer for the
St. Petersburg Times.


U.S. shouldn't abandon Iraqi allies


The Iraq war may have
been the wrong war
fought for the wrong
reasons, but we can't
just walk away from
it under dishonorable circim-
stances.
Tens of thousands of Iraqis
who risked their lives to work
for the U.S. are still waiting
for promised visas-that mean
safety for themselves and their
families.
Even though time is running
out, the visa program never
very efficient to start with for
Iraqis who worked for the U.S.
military, especially the inter-
preters who were vital to our
efforts, U.S. contractors and
private U.S. firms, like the TV
networks, has ground to a vir-
tual halt
A special program started in
2008 by the George W. Bush
administration to issue 25,000
visas to Iraqis like the interpret-
ers has issued only 7,000.
Another program, aimed at
helping Iraqi refugees, admitted
18,000 in fiscal 2010, but will
have admitted just a projected
6,000 for the fiscal year ending
Sept 30. And it is slowing even


Dale McFeatters
mcfeattersd@shns.com
further, with no visas being
issued last month.
Meanwhile, the lives of the
Iraqis waiting to be admitted
are on hold.
If the U.S. departs Iraq
entirely at the end of this year
or leaves behind just a small
residual force, any Iraqi known
to have aided the U.S. will be
at risk. Both Shiite and Sunni
extremist groups have said that
once the Americans leave, they
will hunt down and kill collabo-
rators.
The New York Times notes:
"In 2006, after the British pulled
out of Basra, the southern Iraqi
port city, interpreters were
rounded up and killed."
The State Department blames
lack of personnel and secure
facilities to do interviews. And


nearly everyone blames most
of the delay on dew visa-vetting
procedures recently adopted by
the Department of Homeland
Security.
The case for more thorough
background checks got a boost
in May when two Iraqis in
Kentucky, admitted under the
refugees program, were charged
with trying to send cash, explo-
sives and missiles to Iraq.
This is a legitimate concern,
but an excess of caution, red
tape and Homeland Security's
notoriously cumbersome rules
and procedures should not be
an excuse to abrogate what,
after all, is a solemn obligation.
It is beyond belief that this
country, with all its resources
and talent, cannot make this.
program work and, moreover,
wrap it up by the end of 2011.
We are already fighting a
second war in another land
with unfamiliar languages and
culture, and it likely may not be
the last.

N Dale McFeatters is editorial
writer for Scripps Howard News
Service.


4A


ANOTHER


ANDJ IHE

DEBT

CEILING


two-thirds of any incremental
earnings.
* The Wall Street Journal


10"


f


ANOTHER
OPINION


Coming:


A 70%

marginal


tax rate?

President Obama has
been using the debt-ceil-
ing debate and bipartisan
calls for deficit reduction to
demand higher taxes. With
unemployment stuck at 9.2%
and a vigorous economic
"recovery" appearing more
and more elusive, his timing
couldn't be worse.
Two problems arise when
marginal tax rates are raised.
First, as college students
learn in Econ 101, higher
marginal rates cause,real
economic harm. The com-
bined marginal rate from all
taxes is a vital metric, since
it heavily influences incen-
tives in the economy-work-
ers and employers, savers
and investors base decisions
on after-tax returns. Thus tax
rates need to be kept as low
as possible, on the broad-
est possible base, consistent
with financing necessary
government spending.
Second, as tax rates rise,
the tax base shrinks and
ultimately, as Art Laffer has
long argued, tax rates can,
become so prohibitive that
raising them further reduces
revenue-not to mention
damaging the economy. That
is where U.S. tax rates are
headed if we do not control
spending soon.
The current top federal
rate of 35% is scheduled to
rise to 39.6% in 2013 (plus
one-to-two points .from the
phase-out of itemized deduc-
tions for singles making
above $200,000 and couples
earning above $250,000).
The payroll tax is 12.4%
for Social Security (capped
at $106,000), and 2.9% for
Medicare (no income cap).
While the payroll tax is
theoretically split between
employers and employees,
the employers' share is ulti-
mately shifted to workers in
the form of lower wages.
But there are also state
income taxes that need to
be kept in mind. They con-
tribute to the burden. The
top state personal rate in
California, for example, is
now about 10.5%. Thus the'
marginal tax rate paid on
wages combining all these
taxes is 44.1%. (This is a net
figure because state income
taxes paid are deducted
from federal income.)
So, for a family inhigh-
cost California taxed at the
top federal rate, the expira-
tion of the Bush tax cuts
in 2013, the 0.9% increase
in payroll taxes to fund
ObamaCare, and the pres-
ident's proposal to eventu-
ally uncap Social Security
payroll taxes would lift its
combined marginal tax rate
to a stunning 58.4%.
But wait, things get worse.
As Milton Friedman taught
decades ago, the true burden
on taxpayers today is govern-
ment spending; government
borrowing requires future
interest payments out of
future taxes. To cover the
Congressional Budget Office
projection of Mr. Obama's
$841 billion deficit in 2016
requires a 31.7% increase
in all income tax rates (and
that's assuming the Social
Security income cap is
removed). This raises the top
rate to 52.2% and brings the
total combined marginal tax
rate to 68.8%. Government,
in short, would take over











Page EdItor: Jason M. Walker, 754-0430LAKE CITY REPORTER NEWS TUESDAY, JULY 19, 2011


US study: Brain injury


raises dementia risk


By MARILYNN MARCHIONE
Associated Press

PARIS A large study
in older veterans raises
fresh concern about mild
brain injuries that hun-
dreds of thousands of
troops have suffered from
explosions in recent wars.
Even concussions seem to
raise the risk of develop-
ing Alzheimer's disease or
other dementia later in life,
researchers found.
Closed-head, traumatic
brain injuries are a legacy
of the Afghanistan and
Iraq wars. Body armor
is helping troops survive
bomb blasts, but the long-
term effects of their head
injuries are unknown.
Other research found a
possibly high rate of mild
cognitive impairment, or
"pre-Alzheimer's," in some
retired pro-football players,
who take many hits to the
head in their careers.
The studies, reported
Monday at the Alzheimer's,
Association International
Conference in France,
challenge the current view
that only moderate or
severe brain injuries pre-
dispose people to demen-
tia.
"Even a concussion or a
mild brain injury can put
you at risk," said Laurie
Ryan, a neuropsychia-
trist who used to work at
Walter Reed Army Medical
Center and now oversees
Alzheimer's grants at the
U.S. National Institute on
Aging.
Don't panic this
doesn't mean that every
soldier or student athlete
who has had a concussion
is in danger. Pro-football
players and boxers "are
almost a different species
from us" in terms of the
repeated blows they take
to the head, said William'
Thies, the Alzheimer's
Association's scientific
director.
It does mean yott should
try to avoid one, by fall-
proofing your home and
wearing helmets and seat
belts, he said. About 1.7
million brain injuries occur
each year in the U.S.
Troops also need to
prevent any further harm,
said Dr. David Cifu,
national director of physi-
cal medicine and reha-
bilitation for the Veterans
Health Administration.
"What the people who
have had a head injury
and read this should do is
to exercise and eat right
and take their medicines
and take their aspirin and
do meditation to reduce
stress reduce risk fac-
tors that are modifiable,"
.he said. The new study is
"a great start," but limita-
tions in its methods mean
that it can't prove a brain
injury-dementia link, he
said. More definitive stud-
ies are starting now but
will take many years to
give results.
The veterans study was
led by Dr. Kristine Yaffe,
a University of California
professor and director of
the Memory Disorders
Clinic at the San Francisco
VA Medical Center. The





)i~~ y^wf
rr d


Li a I 46 ti


New Fal catlo in


Ryan Lamke posses for a photograph in Washington on
Thursday. Lamke was a corporal in the Marine Corps and
served as an infantry assault man in Iraq. While in Fallujah,
Iraq, in 2005, he sustained traumatic brain injury, orthopedic
injuries to his left arm and post traumatic stress disorder.


Department of Defense
and the National Institutes
of Health paid for the
work.


"It's by far the largest"
study of brain injury and
dementia risk, she said.
"It's never been looked at


in veterans specifically."
Researchers reviewed
medical records on
281,540 veterans who got
care at Veterans Health
Administration hospitals
from 1997 to 2000 and
had at least one follow-
up visit from 2001-2007.
All were at least 55 and
none had been diagnosed
with dementia when
the study began. This
older group was chosen
because dementia grows
more common with age,
and researchers needed
enough cases to compare
those with and without
brain injuries.
Records showed that
4,902 of the veterans
had suffered a traumatic
brain injury, or TBI,
ranging from concus-
sions to skull fractures.
Researchers don't know
how long ago the injuries
occurred.


Oil loses about 2 percent on dollar


By CHRIS KAHN
Associated Press
NEW YORK Oil
dropped about 2 percent
Monday as the dollar
strengthened against
other currencies.
Benchmark West
Texas, Intermediate
crude for August deliv-
ery gave up $1.89 at
$95.35 per barrel on the
New York Mercantile
Exchange. In London,
Brent crude lost $1.65 at
$115.61 per barrel on the
ICE Futures Exchange.
Oil fell as the dollar
rose against the euro and
other major currencies.
Oil, which is priced in
dollars, tends to drop as
the greenback strength-
ens and makes oil more
expensive for investors
-holding foreign, cur-
rency..........
Traders have been
rattled by concern that
Greece's debt crisis
could spread to other
European countries
and further undermine
already weak economic
growth.
In Washington law-
makers have yet to agree
on a government spend-
ing two weeks ahead of


Traders work in the crude oil
and natural gas options pit
at the New York Mercantile
Exchange in New York,
Wednesday. Benchmark
crude hit $95.21 per barrel
Wednesday on the New York
Mercantile Exchange.
a deadline to raise the
nation's debt ceiling.
Ratings agencies have
put the U.S. credit rating
on downgrade watch as
a result. While seen as
unlikely, a U.S. default on
its debt would have seri-


ous repercussions on the
global economy.
Meanwhile gaso-
line pump prices were
unchanged at $3.676
per gallon, according to
AAA, Wright Express
and Oil Price Information
Service. A gallon of gaso-
line is 31 cents cheaper
than peak levels set ear-
lier in May, but it's still
95.3 cents more expen-
sive than the same time
last year.
In other Nymex trad-
ing for August contracts,.
heating oil fell 4 cents to
$3.0765 per gallon and
gasoline futures lost 5
cents at $3.0816 per gal-
lon. Natural gas added 4
cents at $4.563 per 1,000
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Inquiry casts shadow

over Rivera fundraising


By LAURA WIDES-MUNOZ
Associated Press

MIAMI More than
six months after state
prosecutors confirmed
they were investigating
U.S. Rep. David Rivera's
campaign and personal
finances, the South Florida
congressman appears to
be weathering the legal
storm, but is struggling to
raise money for his 2012
campaign. ,
Rivera saw his contribu-
tions drop by more than
half during this year's
second quarter-, to $33,000
from $75,000 in the first
quarter, as he faces ques-
tions on a range of issues,
including unexplained
campaign reimbursements
he made to himself and a
secret contract with a casi-
no he arranged through
his mother's public rela-
tions company to represent
it during a local gambling,
referendum. House
Speaker John Boehner
has said that while he is
concerned about the alle-
gations, he will wait to see
how they play out
The Miami-Dade County
State Attorney's Office
said the investigation is
ongoing, but one veteran
prosecutor was reassigned
from the case and the chief
of the public corruption
unit recently announced he
is leaving.'
Asked about the inves-
tigation, Rivera responded


through an email from
his campaign, writing:
"Congressman Rivera feels
great about 2012. He is
staying focused on creat-
ing jobs, balancing the
budget and improving the
economy."
Rivera enjoys a plum
assignment on the Foreign
Affairs Committee and
has one of the Congress'
most robust public rela-
tions machines, which
often sends out.daily
press releases detailing
his actions though
staff rarely publicizes his
appearances beforehand.
South Florida real estate
developer and Republican
National Committee Board
Member Stanley Tate said
he remains supportive of,
Rivera.
"He's been meeting with
constituents. I can attest ,
to that," Tate said, adding
that he would withhold
judgment until Rivera "has
the opportunity to defend
himself against specific
charges."
Former Florida GOP
Executive Director Jamie
Miller said corruption
investigations can often
take a year if not longer.
"Where people have
real problems is once they
are indicted," Miller said.
"But if it doesn't reach that
level, my guess is David
will be fine."
Yet Rivera no longer
exercises the same influ-
ence in South Florida.


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132 Southwest Columbia Avenue, Suite 101
386.754.6711


LAKE CITY REPORTER NEWS TUESDAY, JULY 19, 2011


Page Editor: Jason M. Walker, 754-0430










LAKE CITY REPORTER NEWS TUESDAY, JULY 19, 2011


COMMUNITY CALENDAR


* To submit your Community
Calendar item, contact Antonia
Robinson at 754-0425 or by
e-mail at arobinson @
lakecityreporter.com.


Today

NARFE monthly meeting
The National Active and
Retired Federal Employees
meeting is 1 p.m. July 19 at
the lifeStyle Enrichment
Center. The LEC is located
at 628 SE Allison Court
The District Two vice
president, Richard Carroll,
is the guest speaker.
Contact Miriam Stanford
at 755-0907 or Jim Purvis
at 752-8570.

Slders fundraiser
The Lake City Sliders
16U Softball Team will
be in front of Walmart 10
a.m.-7 p.m. July 19 raising
funds.

Historical Society
The Columbia County
Historical Society is meet-
ing 7 p.m. July 19 at the
Columbia County Public
library Main Branch.
Guest speaker is Judge
Leandra Johnson. The
meeting is free and open
to the public. For more
information contact Dr.
Sean McMahon at 754-
4293.


July 19 at the Lake Shore
Authority Board Building.
The topic is protecting
your feet from infection,
and Charron Gilbert
RN is the speaker. The
building is located at 259
NE Franklin Street. Call
Wendy Fisher at 386-292-
7815 for questions. Classes
are free of charge and no
pre-registration is neces-
sary.


Thursday

Donors wanted
The LifeSouth
Bloodmobile is seeking
donors 12-7 p.m. July 21 at
Panda Moni Yum. Donors
receive 200 free sweep-
stakes credits, a pair of
sunglasses and lunch,

Youth dance class
Agape Dance Company
hosts a kids African
Aerobics Class 7-8
p.m. every Thursday at
Richardson Community
Center. Learn various
dance styles of West and
Central Africa. Wear com-
fortable clothes and bring
water and $5 for the class.
The center is located at
255 NE Coach Anders
Lane. Call (813) 506-1134.


Documentary showing


A documentary show-
ing is 1 p.m. July 19 at
the LifeStyle Enrichment
Center. The center is,
located at 628 SE Allison
Court

Diabetes class
The next community
diabetes class is 9:30 a.m.


ualrueingi wour KnUop
A workshop on "Attract
Wildlife with Native
Plants" is 5:50-7 p.m. April
21 at the Columbia County
Public Library Fort White
Branch. The workshop is
free and presented by UF/
IFAS Master Gardeners.
All participants will
receive a Free Wildflower


DVD from the Florida
Wildflower Foundation

Camera club meeting
The Branford Camera
Club meets 7 p.m. July
21, at the Branford Public
Library. Humberto
Castellanos will review
Picasa basics and begin an
excursion into editing pho-
tos using Picasa. Contact
Carolyn Hogue, Program
Chair, 386-935-2044;
Dick Madden, Technical
Consultant, 386-935-0296;
Skip Weigel, Technical
Consultant, 386-935-1382.

Spelling bee
A spelling bee is 1
p.m. at the LifeStyle
Enrichment Center. The
center is located at 628 SE
Allison Court.


Friday


Talent showcase
Mike Mullis is host-
ing Kids 18 and Under
Talent Night Showcase 8
p.m. July 22 at the Spirit
of the Suwannee Music
Hall. Performances can
include singing, dancing
and more. Admission is
$5 and it can be used as
a meal voucher. Time
slots are limited so please
contact the Music Hall to
register at (386)364-1703
or (386)364-1683


Saturday


Swim day
Gold Standard Lodge
#167/OES #48 is hav-


ing its annual swim day
10 a.m.-1 p.m. July 23 at
the Columbia Aquatics
Complex. Children 1-15
enter free, with parental
supervision. Free food will
be available. Call Dennis
Murphy at (386) 697-3739
or Al Nelson at 623-4127.

Donors wanted
The LifeSouth
Bloodmobile is seeking
donors 12-6 p.m. July 23
at Allied Veterans. Donors
receive 500 free sweep-
stakes credits and a pair of
sunglasses.

WhooWheee performs
Mike Mullis and his
band, WhooWheee, will
be performing hits from
the 1950s 8 p.m. July 23.
Wear your favorite 50s
costume and come relive
the classic hits of yester-
day. Admission is $5 and
reservations for this event
are recommended. For
details and reservations
contact the Music Hall at
(386)364-1703.

Collectibles Day
Antique Arts and
Collectibles Day is 10 a.m.
to 4 p.m. July 23 Stephen
Foster Folk Culture
Center State Park. If you
are interested in display-
ing your special collec-
tion or antiques, please
contact Pat Cromer at
386-397-4408.call the park
at (386) 397-4408 or (877)
623-3655. To learn more,
about the park, visit www.
FloridaStateParks.org/ste-
phenfoster.


OBITUARIES.


David D. Huyck
David D. Huyck 76, resident of
Lake City, Fl, died at his home
Saturday, July 16, 2011 after an
extended illness.
He was a native of Michigan and
had made his home in Tampa, Fl,
Zephyrhills, Fl, Cedar Key, Fl,
Gainesville, Fl and Lake City, FI
for the past 50 years.
David was a survivor of Cerebral
Palsy and Spastic muscles since
birth. He started life being fed
with a medicine dropper.
He lived his life determined to
be self-sufficient and not a bur-
den to anyone. Even though lim-
ited physically which made his
speech hard to be understood, he
was fortunate to have had a good
mind and an optimistic personal-
ity. He had been denied a pub-
lic school education because
of his handicaps but was home
schooled by his mother and fa-
ther who had been schoolteach-
ers who gave him a good basic
education. David continued his
education throughout his life ap-
prising himself with going-on in
the, world as well as becoming
a food student of the Bible. For
several years he volunteered his
services to Gainesville Universi-
ty in some programs, which they
were providing in connection
with special education.
He started coming to Florida
with his parents when they semi
retired from farming in 1946 and
settled here permanently in 1980.
While he still lived in Michigan
he helped his dad farm, finding
ways to do the various farm tasks
even though physically limited.
Survivors; Two brothers, Robert
Dan Huyck of Lake Odessa, MI
and Wildwood, Fl., and Walter
Calvin Huyck of Sand Lake,
MI. Loving caregivers, Gail and
Frank Burres of Lake City, dear
friends, Theon and Bill Burke &
Bill and Shirley Mc Manus also
survive.
Funeral Services will be con-
ducted at 11 A.M. Wednesday,
July 20, 2011 at Gateway-For-
est Lawn Funeral, Lake City,
and Fl, with Rev. David Hunt-
ley officiating. Visitation will be
held 30 minutes prior to service.
GATEWAY-FOREST LAWN
FUNERAL HOME, 3596 S. U.S.
Highway 441, Lake City, Fl, is
in charge of all arrangements.
Please sigh the guest book at
www.gatewayforestlawn.com

Gwendolyn "Gwen"
Douglass
Mrs. Gwendolyn "Gwen" Dou-
glass, 70, died Sunday July 10,
2011 at the Suwannee Valley
Care Center in Lake City after
an extended illness. She was


a member of the Presbyterian
Church. She had lived in Miami
for twenty-five years and the last
forty years in Lake City. She is
preceded in death by her father
Cecil Myron Miller.
She enjoyed Crochet stitching,
collecting antiques, spending
time with her grandchildren,
and making theatrical props. Her
greatest success in gardening
was growing an Aloe Plant.
She is survived by her husband
of forty-nine years Larry Dou-
glass, Lake City, FL; mother
Gwendolyn Miller, Lake City,
FL; her two daughters Brenda
Douglass, Laurie Douglass-Barr
both of Lake City, FL; one broth-
er Cecil Myron Miller, Pyatt,
AK; two grandchildren Brittney
Douglass, Savannah Barr, both
of Lake City, FL;
Memorial services will be held
Wednesday July 20, 2011 at
10:00 A.M.'in the Dees-Parrish
Family Funeral Home Chapel
with Pastor Louie Mabrey, and
Pastor Cagney Tanner, official
ing. In lieu of flowers family ask
that donations be made to Haven
Hospice 6037 US 90 West lake
City, FL; 32055 or the American
Cancer Society.
Dees-Parrish Family Funeral
Home is in charge of all arrange-
ments. 458 South Marion Avenue
Lake City, FL; 32025 (386) 752-
1234. Please sign guest book at
www.parrishfamilyfuneralhome.
com.

H. Muriel Spiess
Mrs. H.Muriel Spiess, 90 of
Lake City passed away on
Saturday, July 16, 2011 at her
daughters home in Live Oak. A
native of Patterson, New Jersey,
Mrs. Spiess had lived in Lake
City since 1996 having moved
here from Venice, Florida. She
was a daughter to the late Arthur
and Hazel Reader Cronk and
was of the Presbyterian faith.
Mrs. Spiess had previously
volunteered at the Lake City
Medical Center, was a member
of the Lake City Newcomers
Club and a lifetime member of
the American Legion Auxiliary.
When able she enjoyed cooking,
growing flowers and spending
time with her family and friends.
Mrs. Spiess was preceded in
death by two husbands, James T.
Corrigan, 1966 and Ira Spiess,
2002, one daughter, Joyce lan-
nacone, 2005 and her sister, Val-
erie Hanson.
Mrs Spiess is survived by one
daughter, Sharon Corrigan, Live
Oak, two son in laws, Tino lan-
nacone, New Jersey and Tommy
D. Daniels, Live Oak, three
grandchildren, Tina Jenkins and


Jennifer DeHart both of New
Jersey and Delayna Daniels,
Live Oak, one nephew, Larry
Hanson, Nokomis and four great
grandchildren.
Funeral services for Mrs. Spiess
will be conducted on Wednesday,
July 20, 2011 at 11:00 AM in the
Chapel of Guerry Funeral Home
in Lake City. Interment will fol-
low at Forest Lawn Memorial
Gardens Cemetery. Visitation
with the family will be from 6-
8:00 P.M. Tuesday evening at
the funeral home. Arrangements
are under direction of GUERRY
Funeral Home, 2659 SW Main
Blvd., Lake City. Please sign the
guestbook at www.guerryfuner-
alhome.net

Kimberly Robinson
Giddens
Kimberly Robinson Giddens,
50, passed away peacefully with
family by her side after a coura-'
geous battle with cancer on July
16, 2011. She is survived by her
husband of
23 years, Ja-
mie, daughter .
Megan, son
Christopher,'
mother Twila
Robinson,
sisters .Di-
ane (Marlin)
Feagle, Cindy (Jimmy) Kelly,
mother-in-law June Giddens,
sister-in-law Michelle (Gary)
Yates, her faithful doxie Molly,
many nieces, nephews, aunts,
cousins and a host of friends and
colleagues. Kim was preceded in


death by her father Daniel Rob-
inson and great nieces Britton &
Rylan Kelly-Dunn.
Born and raised in Jacksonville
she was a graduate of Forest
High School and the Univer-
sity of North Florida. Kim had a
successful Marketing and Sales
career in the pharmaceutical
and healthcare field. She was of
the Catholic faith.
Kim loved people, never met a
stranger, and always made peo-
ple feel welcomed. She fought
this wicked disease with great
courage and strength and was
such an inspiration. Kim was
our ray of sunshine each day,
her great smile and wonderful
laugh will always be remem-
bered. We on earth have lost a
wonderful woman, but heaven
has gained an amazing angel.
A private family burial will be
held. Friends are invited to at-
tend her Celebration of Life
on July 20, 2011 at The Coun-
try Club of Orange Park, 2525
Country Club Blvd, Orange
Park, FL from 2pm-4pm.
In lieu offlowers, Kim requested
memorial contributions be made
to Dreams Come True, 6803
Southpoint Parkway, Jackson-
ville, FL 32216. Arrangements
by Jacksonville Memory Gar-
dens Funeral Home, Orange
Park, FL.

Obituaries are paid advertise-
ments. For details, call the Lake
City Reporter's classified depart-
ment at 752-1293.


7 %il L aeI,, 1-


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July 25

Pet therapy info session
Haven Hospice is host-
ing an information session
for people interested in
volunteering for its pet
therapy program 12-2 p.m.
July 25. The care center
is located at 6037 W. US
Hwy. 90. The session is
free and open to the pub-
lic. Lunch will be served.
Contact Carolyn Long with
Haven Hospice at (386)
752-9191.

Mentoring program
Building Strong Bonds
mentoring program is


meeting 5-8 p.m. July 25 at
Hanging at the Zone, 532
Marion Street Contact Al
Nelson at (386) 867-1601.
Dinner is included.

Adult dance class
Agape Dance
Company hosts an adult
African Aerobics Class
7-8 p.m. every Monday at
Richardson Community
Center. Learn various
dance styles of West and
Central Africa. Wear com-
fortable clothes and bring
water and $5 for the class.
The center is located at
255 NE Coach Anders
Lane. Call (813) 506-1134.


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Lawyer: Elaborate plans made

to keep Casey Anthony safe
___-WiW I- '.?-U A~il .


By MIKE SCHNEIDER and
MATT SEDENSKY
Associated Press

ORLANDO Casey
Anthony's whereabouts
for her first week of
freedom were a closely
guarded secret Monday,
known only to a select few
as she tries to start a new
life after being acquitted
of killing her daughter.
;One of her lawyers said
an elaborate plan was
made to protect her from
people with "the lynch-
mob mentality."
Her options for start-
ing a new life could
be limited by lawsuits
pending against her, the
scorn of multitudes who
think she,was guilty of
the killing and a criminal
record from her convic-
tions for lying to police.
She walked out of jail on
Sunday, shortly after mid-
night.
Her attorney Cheney
Mason told NBC's Today
Show on Monday that he's
confident in Anthony's
safety, but declined to
answer questions about
where she was.
"She's gone, she's safe
and elaborate plans had
to be made to keep the
people away from her,"
Mason said. "Her life is
going to be very difficult
for a very long time as
long as there are so many
people of the lynch-mob
mentality."
Asked about how
Anthony was paying for
her fresh start, Mason
replied that many volun-
teers have offered their
help.
Her notoriety could


U"u
U u


Casey Anthony (center) walks out of the Orange County Jail with her attorney Jose Baez dur-
ing her release in Orlando early Sunday. Anthony was acquitted last week of murder in the
death of her daughter, Caylee.


also help her earn money.
Experts who have helped
other notorious defen-
dants through rough
times said she will have
opportunities, but it won't
be easy for the 25-year-
old, who was found not
guilty of killing her 2-year-
old daughter, Caylee, but
convicted of lying to, inves-
tigators.
In response to a ques-
tion about whether
Anthony planned to cash
in on her fame, her lead
attorney Jose Baez told
Fox News Channel late
*Sunday that she has "cer-
tain rights as an individual
in this country." Attorneys
planned to handle
Anthony's affairs in a "dig-
nified manner," he said.
"If she decides she
wants to speak publicly
about it, she'll make that
decision," he said.


Baez and other attor-
neys didn't respond
Sunday to email and
phone messages left by
The Associated Press, nor
did a lawyer representing
her father and mother.
And in the Fox News
interview, Baez declined
to talk about his client's
whereabouts or state of
mind.
Another former
Anthony lawyer, Terry
Lenamon, said he had
no clue where she was
headed, and that probably
only a few people close to
her knew.
"I wouldn't want any-
one to know," he said.
"I think she needs to go
underground and I.think


she needs to spend some
time to get her life back
together."
Anthony's July 5 acquit-
tal shocked and enraged
many around the country
who had been following'
the case since Caylee's
2008 disappearance.
Anger has spilled onto
social media sites and
elsewhere. Her legal
team said on Friday it
had received an emailed
death threat.
Anthony did not report
her daughter's disappear-
ance for a month and was
arrested after telling a
string of lies about the
case to police. Caylee's
remains were found in
December 2008.


FBI: Couple kidnapped

Israeli to force divorce


By JOSH LEDERMAN
Associated Press

TRENTON, N.J. A
New Jersey rabbi and his
wife surrendered to the
FBI Monday on charges
they abducted an Israeli
man, beat him and
threatened to bury him
alive if he didn't give his
wife a religious divorce.
The case against
David and Judy Wax in
U.S. federal court marks
a strange twist in a chain
of events that started'
with a divorce dispute
in Israel's Rabbinical
Court over the victim's
refusal to give his wife
a "get," an Orthodox
Jewish divorce docu-
ment permitting a wife
to remarry.
The victim, who is not
identified in court docu-
ments, apparently fled
Israel after refusing to
grant a divorce. Israeli
media reports at the


time said the Rabbinical
Court had shunned him
and put him on a wanted
list, and appeals for his
whereabouts appeared in
religious publications.
A call placed after-
hours to the Rabbinical
Court in Jerusalem
was not immediately
returned.
According to the FBI
complaint, the victim
was lured to the Wax's
home to discuss oppor-
tunities for the victim
to work on a book the
rabbi was writing about
the Talmud. Once in the
home, the victim was
allegedly bound, robbed,
shown a body bag and
told he'd be buried alive
in Pennsylvania's Pocono
Mountains if he didn't
agree to the divorce.
David Wax is also
accused of threaten-
ing to have the victim's
father killed if he didn't
pay the wife $100,000.


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Wednesday

July 20, 2011
(Limit 1 per person)


Page Editor: Jason M. Walker, 754-0430


..


I


k










Story ideas?

Contact
Tim Kirby
Sports Editor
754-0421
tkirby@lakecityreporter.com


Tuesday. lulv 19. 201 I


Lake City Reporter





SPORTS


www.lakecityreporter.com


BRIEFS

YOUTH SOFTBALL
16U fundraiser
today at Walmart
The Lake City Sliders
16-under Babe Ruth
All-Stars team will be
asking for donations at
Walmart from 10 a.m. to
7 p.m. today. An account
also has been set up in
the team's name at First
Federal Bank for
donations.
For details, call Wendy
Dohrn at 623-3641.
CHS SOCCER
Moe's fundraiser
planned today
Columbia High's
soccer teams will host a
Moe's Night fundraiser
from 4-8 p.m. today at
Moe's Southwest Grill on
U.S. Highway 90 west in
Lake City.
For details, call
365-1877.
SWIMMING
Lessons sign-ups
on Wednesday
Youth and adult
swimming lessons are
offered at the Columbia
Aquatic Complex.
Classes meet for two
weeks and six daily times
are offered. The next,
session is July 25-Aug. 5.
Cost is $50 per person.
Registration is 5-7 p.m.
Wednesday and all day
Thursday and Friday at
the pool.
CHS VOLLEYBALL
College day
camp on July 28
Central Florida State
College volleyball
coaches and players
will conduct a one-day
camp for girls entering
middle school from
9 a.m. to noon July 28
at Columbia High. Cost
of the camp is $35 with
registration Monday
through Thursday at the
CHS front office. The
camp is limited to 30
participants.
For details, call Casie
McCallister at 365-3158.
YOUTH BASEBALL
Fort White sets
board elections
Fort White Youth
Baseball has board
elections set for 7 p.m.
Aug. 5 in the building
at the back of the South
Columbia Sports Park.
For details, call
Tammy Sharpe at
867-3825. .
CHS FOOTBALL
Tickets on sale
at McDuffie's
Columbia High football
season tickets are on sale
at McDuffie's Marine &
Sporting Goods. Paid-up
Tiger Boosters can pick
up tickets, parking
passes and their gift.
For details, call
McDuffie's at 752-2500.
FORT WHITE VOLLEYBALL
High school
tryouts Aug. 8
Fort White High has
volleyball tryouts for
varsity and junior varsity
set for 4-6 p.m. Aug. 8.
Participants must have
a current physical and a
parent consent form on
file.
For details, call Doug
Wohlstein at 497-5952.
From staff reports


Full circle


Clarke wins British

Open championship


By PAUL NEWBERRY
Associated Press
SANDWICH, England
-Darren Clarke had every
reason to lose hope.
It had been a full decade
since he contended for a
major championship, his
best swings seemingly
behind him as a new genera-
tion from Northern Ireland
seized the spotlight. He was
graying on top and pudgy
around the waist, shoved
, aside to the role of lovable
geezer with a fondness for
smoke and drink.
That wasn't !even the
worst of it.
Not even close.
Five years ago, Clarke
lost wife Heather to breast
cancer,. a disease she had
seemingly beat until it came
back with a vengeance. He
buried his spouse and faced
life as a single father with
two young boys to raise,
a guy who'd had it all but
suddenly found himself ask-
ing why life was so unfair.
"It's been a long, bumpy
road," Clarke said Sunday
evening. "I've had a few bad
things happen to me."


These days, life is
looking a whole lot better.
Clarke is planning to
marry again, and he can
bring along a neat little
trinket to the wedding.
The claret jug.
A career heck, a life
- came full circle at Royal
St, George's, where Clarke
crafted a triumph that no
one saw coming except
himself. He won the British
Open by a comfortable three
strokes, but only because
he never lost faith.
"I always believed I would
get myself back up here,"
he said before heading out
to the 18th green to collect
the oldest trophy in golf.
"I always believed I had
enough talent to challenge
and win one."
He teared up a bit as he
thought about the one who
wasn't there to share the
moment, his late wife.
"In terms of what's going
through my heart, there's
obviously somebody who
is watching down from up
above there, and I know
she'd be very. proud of
OPEN continued on 3B


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Northern Ireland's Darren Clarke celebrates on the 18th green after winning the British Open.
Golf Championship at Royal St. George's golf course in Sandwich, England, on Sunday:


Rea dy for regionals


4-J
. . . . ...
Fps .,,



,'^ "iB- .


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Lake City Sliders catcher Hollianne Dohrn, 15, (left) tags Leslie Ann Ronsonet, 14, as she attempts to slide home at practice
Monday. The Sliders are playing in the Babe Ruth Softball Regional Tournament in Richmond, Va., beginning Thursday.


Lake City softball
all-star team will
play in Virginia.
By TIM KIRBY
tkirby@lakecityreporter.com
Lake City Babe Ruth
Softball's 16-under all-
star team will carry its
state championship title to
Virginia this week.
The Sliders are playing
in the Babe Ruth Softball
Regional Tournament,
hosted by Varina Youth
Sports in Richmond, Va.
Sliders captains Lauren
Eaker and Hollianne Dohrn
played as freshmen for
Columbia High this season.
"Coach said we have to
play our ball," Dohrn said.
"We don't play at their
level; we have to play at our
level."
As members of the dis-
trict champion Lady Tigers,
who advanced to the third
round in the playoffs, the
quality of play was high.
"High school had-me at
an advanced level and you
have to catch up and get
SUDERS continued on 3B


Japan stuns U.S.


in World Cup final t


Americans twice give
up late leads, then
lose in PK shootout.
By NANCY ARMOUR
Associated Press
FRANKFURT, Germany -
No matter how improbable the
circumstances, the Americans
always managed to find a way
- or the will to win.
Beating Italy in a playoff to get
the last spot at the World Cup
following an upset in regional
qualifying. Abby Wambach


scoring in the 122nd against Brazil
to tie the game. Wambach scoring
again to break a tense tie against
France in the semifinals.
When they needed it most,
however, the resilience that had
carried them so far and captivated
their country disappeared.
"It's a small difference between
success and not success," U.S.
coach Pia Sundhage said.
In this case, mere minutes.
Homare Sawa scored in the
117th minute to tie it at 2, and
Japan beat the Americans 3-1 in
CUP continued on 3B


F! '
ASSOCIATED PRESS
Abby Wambach gestures to the crowd after the U.S. lost the Women's Soccer
World Cup final to Japan in Frankfurt, Germany, on Sunday.


Section B










LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS TUESDAY, JULY 19, 2011


TELEVISION

TV sports

Today
CYCLING
8 an.
VERSUS Tour de France, stage 16,
.Saint-Paul-Trois-Chateaux to Gap, France
MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL
8 p.m.
MLB Regional coverage, Philadelphia
at Chicago Cubs or Atlanta at Colorado
(8:30 p.m. start)
WNBA BASKETBALL
7 p.m.
ESPN2 Seattle at Chicago

BOWLING

League reports

Results of league bowling at Lake
City Bowl:
MONDAY NIGHT MAVERICKS
TRIO
Team standings: I. Lake City Bowl (45-
15); 2.Team 13 (37-23); 3.Team 8 (36-24).
High scratch game: I. Robert Stone
269; 2. Zech Strohl 249; 3. GeorgeWalters
245.
High scratch series: 1. Robert Stone
655; 2.Teo Parra 653; 3. Brian Meek 648.
High handicap game: I. Robert Stone
278; 2. George Walters 270; 3. Danny
King 268.
High handicap series: I. (tie) Teo Parra,
Danny King 734; 3. Jason Howell 707;
4. Bill Price 696.
High average: I. Zech Strohl 227.44;
2. Robert Stone 212; 3. Curtis Gutzmer
209.
(results from June 20)

BASEBALL

AL standings

East Division
W L Pct GB
Boston 57 36 .613 -
NewYork 55 37 .598 I'A
Tampa Bay 50 43 .538 7
'Toronto 47 49 .490 II'Ah
Baltimore 38 54 .413 18'A
Central Division
W L Pct GB
Cleveland 50 44 .532 -
Detroit 50 45 .526 'A
Chicago 46 49 .484 4'h
Minnesota 44 .50 .468 6
Kansas City 38 57 .400 12'A
West Division-
W L Pct GB
Texas 55 41 .573 -
Los Angeles 51 45 .531 4
Seattle 43 52 .453 I'IA
Oakland 42 54 .438 13
Sunday's Games
Detroit 4, Chicago White Sox 3
N.Y.Yankees 7,Toronto 2
Baltimore 8, Cleveland 3
Minnesota 4, Kansas City 3
Oakland 9,LA.Angels I
Texas 3, Seattle I
Bston I,tampa Ba 16 innings
Monday's Games
Cleveland 5, Minnesota 2, 1st game
Boston at Baltimore (n)
N.Y.Yankees atTampa Bay (n)
Chicago White Sox at Kansas City (n)
Cleveland at Minnesota, 2nd game (n)
Today's Games
Boston (Weiland 0-0) at Baltimore
(Guthrie 3-13),7:05 p.m.
Oakland (Moscoso 3-4) at Detroit
(Porcello 8-6), 7:05 p.m.,
Seattle (Pineda 8-6) at Toronto (Cecil
2-4), 7:07 p.m.
N.Y.Yankees (Colon 6-5) at Tampa Bay
(Hellickson 8-7), 7:10 p.m.
Chicago White Sox (Peavy 4-3) at
Kansas City (Duffy I-4),8:10 p.m.
Cleveland (Masterson 8-6) at
Minnesota (Liriano 6-7), 8:10 p.m.
I Texas (Ogando 9-3) at LA. Angels
(Chatwood 5-5), 10:05 p.m.
Wednesday's Games
Boston at Baltimore, 12:35 p.m.
Cleveland at Minnesota, 1:10 p.m.
Oakland at Detroit, 7:05 p.m.
Seattle at Toronto, 7:07 p.m.
N.Y.Yankees at Tampa Bay, 7:10 p.m.
Chicago White Sox at Kansas City,
.-'8:10 p.m.
Texas at LA.Angels, 10:05 p.m.

.NL standings

East Division
W L Pct GB
-Philadelphia 59 35 -.628 -
S Atlanta 56 39 .589 3'A
,NewYork 47 47 .500 12
.Washington 47 48 .495 12'A
Florida 46 49 .484 13'A
Central Division.
W L Pct GB
Milwaukee 51 45 .531 -
Pittsburgh 49 44 .527 'A
St. Louis 50 45 .526 'A
Cincinnati 47 48 .495 3'A
Chicago 38 58 .396 13
Houston 31 64 .326 19'A
West Division
W L Pct GB
San Francisco 55 41 .573 -
Arizona I 51 44 .537 3'A
Colorado 45 50 .474 9'A
Los Angeles 42 53 .442 12'A
San Diego 41 55 .427 14
Sunday's Games
Philadelphia 8, N.Y. Mets 5
Cincinnati 3, St. Louis I
Atlanta 9,Washington 8
Pittsburgh 7, Houston 5. II innings
Florida 7, Chicago Cubs 5
Milwaukee 4, Colorado 3
San Francisco 4, San Diego 3, II
innings
Arizona 4, LA. Dodgers I
Monday's Games
Cincinnati at Pittsburgh (n)
Florida at N.Y. Mets (n)


Philadelphia at Chicago Cubs (n)
Washington at Houston (n)
Atlanta at Colorado (n)
Milwaukee at Arizona (n)
LA. Dodgers at San Francisco (n)
Today's Games
Cincinnati (Leake 8-4) at Pittsburgh
(Ja.McDonald 5-4), 7:05 p.m.
San Diego (Stauffer 5-6) at Florida
(Ani.Sanchez 6-2), 7:10 p.m.
St. Louis (Lohse 8-6) at N.Y. Mets
(Gee 8-3), 7:10 p.m.
Philadelphia (CI.Lee 9-6) at Chicago


Cubs (Garza 4-7), 8:05 p.m.
Washington (ZImmermann 6-7) at
Houston (Happ 3- I1),8:05 p.m.
Atlanta (Beachy 3-1) at Colorado
(jimenez 5-8)., 8:40 p.m.
Milwaukee (Gallardo 10-6) at Arizona
(Enright 1-3), 9:40 p.m.
LA. Dodgers (R.De La Rosa 3-4) at San
Francisco (Bumgamer 4-9), 10:15 p.m.
Wednesday's Games
Cincinnati at Pittsburgh, 12-35 p.m.
Washington at Houston, 2:05 p.m.
Philadelphia at Chicago Cubs, 2:20 p.m.
L.A. Dodgers at San Francisco,
3:45 p.m.
San Diego at Florida, 7:10 p.m.
St. Louis at N.Y. Mets, 7:10 p.m.
Atlanta at Colorado, 8:40 p.m.
Milwaukee atArizona,9:40 p.m.

BASKETBALL

WNBA schedule

Saturday's Games
Atlanta 76, Chicago 68
Minnesota 69, Seattle 62
Sunday's Games
NewYork 88,Tulsa 57
Connecticut 76, Indiana 71
Washington 89, Los Angeles 85, OT
Monday's Games
San Antonio at Los Angeles (n)
Today's Games
Indiana at Atlanta, 12 p.m.
Seattle at Chicago, 7 p.m.
New York at Connecticut, 7:30 p.m.
Wednesday's Games
Atlanta at Washington, 11:30 a.m.
Minnesota at Phoenix, 3:30 p.m.

AUTO RACING

Lenox Tools 301

At New Hampshire Motor Speedway
Loudon,N.H. t
Sunday
(Start position in parentheses)
I. (I) Ryan Newman, Chevrolet, 301
laps, 140.2 rating, 48 points, $268,050.
2. (2) Tony Stewart, Chevrolet, 301,
127.1,43, $210,633.
3. (14) Denny Hamlin, Toyota, 301,
100.4,41,$170,675.
4. (16) Joey Logano, Toyota, 301, 99.5,
41, $119,025.
5. (28) Jimmie Johnson, Chevrolet, 301,
93.7,40, $151,236.
6.(10) Kasey Kahne,Toyota, 301, 110.3,
39, $122,158.
7. (23) Bobby Labonte, Toyota, 30,1,
69.4,37, $126,945.
'8. (13) Martin Truex Jr., Toyota, 301,
88.2,36, $95,350.
9. (22) Marcos Ambrose, Ford, 301,
74.9,36, $121,541.
' 10. (4) Kurt Busch, Dodge. 301, 118,
35,$128,125.
II. (7) Jeff Gordon, Chevrolet, 301,
110.3,34, $126,286.
12. (17) A J AIlmendlnger, Ford, 301,
74.2,32,$120,411.
13. (15) Carl'Edwardsr Ford 301,94. 1,
32, $125,291. ; r
14. (26), pavyd Ragan, Ford 301, ,70.7.
30, $88,875.
15. (27) Dale Earnhardt Jr., Chevrolet,
301,66.3,29, $87,425.
16. (6) Jeff Burton, Chevrolet, 301, 100,
28, $88,300.
17. (12) Clint Bowyer, Chevrolet, 301,
74,28,$118,708.
18. (20) Greg Biffle, Ford, 301, 83.1,
27, $92,900.
19. (3) David Reutlmann, Toyota, 301,
88,25,$107,158. ,
20. (30) Matt Kenseth,,Ford, 301, 60.4,
24, $115,911.
S,21. (18) Kevin Harvick, thevrolet, 301,
73.3,23, $122,436. '
22. (24) Mark Martin, Chevrolet, 301,
66.8,23, $84,850.
23. (38) J.J.Yeley, Ford, 301, 53.1, 21,
$93,983.
24. (9) Paul Menard, Chevrolet, 301,
70.3,20, $84,225.
25. (34) David Gilliland, Ford, 301,49.7,
19, $90,608.
26. (32) Landon Cassill, Chevrolet, 300,
49.4,0, $87,283.
27. (42) Scott Wimmer, Dodge, 300,
40,0, $84,947.
28. (43) Andy Lally, Ford, 300, 39.2,
17, $85,200.
29. (37) Dave Blaney, Chevrolet, 300,
42.5, 15, $71,925.
30. (8) Juan Pablo Montoy, Chevrolet,
300,74,14,$114,208.
31. (25) Jamie McMurray, Chevrolet,
300,72.4,14,$110,089.
32. (41) Mike Bliss, Ford, 299, 44.7, 0,
$71,200.
33. (I I) Regan Smith, Chevrolet, 298,
75.3, I I, $97,345.
34. (21) Brian Vickers, Toyota, 283,
80.7, 10, $98,014.
35. (5) Brad Keselowski, Dodge, 257,
59.5,9, $79,550.
36. (19) Kyle Busch, Toyota, 224,49.9,
8,$118,216.



Unscramble these four Jumbles,
one letter to each square,
to form four ordinary words. |
I -^ I S


37. (29) David Stremme. Chevrolet,
engine, 159, 33.1, 0, $70,175.
38. (31) Casey Mears, Toyota, brakes,
83,36,6, $69,975.
39. (40) Erik Darnell, Chevrolet,
brakes, 72,29.8,0, $69,850.
40. (33) Michael McDowell, Toyota,
brakes, 46, 32,4, $69,700.
41. (35) Joe Nemechek, Toyota, brakes,
37,28.4,0, $69,525.
42. (39) Mike Skinner, Toyota,
electrical, 17,29.9,0, $69,400.
43. (36) Jeff Green, Ford, brakes, I I,
28.8,0, $69,767.
Race Statistics
Average Speed of Race Winner:
104.100 mph.
Time of Race: 3 hours, 3 minutes, 33
seconds.
Margin of Victory: 0.773 seconds.
Caution Flags: 10 for 44 laps.
Lead Changes: 21 among 14 drivers.
Top 12 in Points: I. C.Edwards,
652; 2. J.Johnson, 645; 3. Ku.Busch, 641;
4. K.Harvick, 637; 5. Ky.Busch, 632;
6. M.Kenseth, 626; 7. J.Gordon, 587;
8. R.Newman, 586; 9. D.Earnhardt Jr.,
577; 10. D.Hamlin, 570; I I.T.Stewart, 570;
12. C.Bowyern542.

SOCCER


Women's World Cup

CHAMPIONSHIP
At Frankfurt
Japan 0 I 0 I 2
United States 0 I I 0 2
Japan won 3-I on penalty kicks
First half-None.
Second half-I, United States, Morgan
2 (Rapinoe), 69th minute. 2,Japan, Miyama
2,81st minute.
First Overtime-3, United States,
Wambach 4 (Morgan), 104th minute.
Second Overtime--4, Japan, Sawa 5
(Mlyama), 117th minute.
Penalty kicks-United States I (Boxx
SV, Uoyd NG, Heith SV, Wambach G);
Japan 3 (Miyama G, Nagasato SV, Sakaguchl
G, Kumagai G)
Yellow Card-M-yama. Japan, 97th.
Red Card-Iwashimizu, Japan, 120th+I.
Referee-Biblana Steinhaus, Germany.
Assistant Referees-Ma.-ina Wozniak,
Germany;, Katrin Rafalski, Germany.
A--48,817.
Uneups
Japan-Ayumi Kaihor;Aya Sameshima,
Said Kumagai, Azusa Iwashlmlzu, Yukarl
Kinga; Homare Sawa, MIzuho Sakaguchi,
Aya Miyama, Shinobu Ohno (Karina
Maruyama, 66th; Mana Iwabuchl, 119th);
Nahomi Kawasuml, Kozue Ando (Yugi
Nagasato, 66th)
United States-Hope Solo;AlI Krieger,
Rachel Buehler, Christie Rampone, Amy
LePeilbet; Heather O'Reilly, Shannon
Boxx, Carli Uoyd, Lauren Cheney, Megan
Rapinoe (Tobin Heath, 114th); Lauren
Cheney' (Alex Morgan, 46th), Abby
Wambach

CYCLING

Tour de France stages

July 15 Stage 13: Pau-Lourdes,
high mountain, 152.5 (94.8) (Hushovd;
Voeckler)
July 16 Stage 14: Saint-Gaudens-
Plateau de Beille, high mountain, 168.5
(104.7) (jelle Vanendert, Belgium;
Voecklder)
July 17 Stage 15: Limoux-
Montpelller, flat, 192.5 (119.6) (Cavendish;
Voeckler)
July 18 Rest day in the Drome
region.
July 19 Stage 16: Saint-Paul-Trols-
Chateaux--Gap, medium mountain, 162.5
(101)
July 20 Stage 17: Gap-Pinerolo.
Italy, high mountain, 179 (111.2)
July 21 Stage 18: Pinerolo-Galibier.
Serre-Chevaller, high mountain, 200.5
(124.6)
July 22 Stage 19: ModaneValfrejus-
Alpe-d'Huez, high mountain, 109.5 (68.0)
July 23 Stage 20: Grenoble, Indi-
vidual time trial, 42.5 (26.4)
July 24 Stage 21: Creteil-Paris'
Champs-Elysees, flat, 95 (59)
Overall Standings
I. Thomas Voeckler, France, Europcar,
65 hours, 24 minutes, 34 seconds.
2. Frank Schleck, Luxembourg,
Leopard-Trek, 1:49.
3. Cadel Evans, Australia., BMC, 2:06,
4.Andy Schleck, Luxembourg, Leopard-
Trek, 2:15.
5. Ivan Basso, Italy, Liquigas-Cannondale,
3:16.
6. Samuel Sanchez, Spaig, Euskaltel-
Euskadl, 3:44.
7.Alberto Contador, Spain, Saxo Bank
Sungard,4:00.
8. Damlano Cunego, Italy, Lampre-
ISD, 4:01.
9. Tom Danlelson, United States,
Garmin-Cervelo, 5:46.

THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME
by David L. Hoyt and Jeff Knurek


S Lr Now arrange the circled letters
to form the surprise answer, as
Suggested by the above cartoon.

Answer: AN L I I I
(Answers tomorrow)
Y Jumbles: BENCH GRUMP BIGWIG ADDING
erdays Answer: The damage caused by the termites was
really BUGGING HIM


NORTH FLORIDA SPEEDWAY



Hall gets open wheel win


By JEFF BEAN
Special to the Reporter

Donnie Hall was the
winner in the Open Wheel
Modified feature event at
North Florida Speedway on
Saturday.
David Crews was second
with Dave Wansley third.
In the Pure Stock
division, it was Nevin
Gainey taking the win over


Jerry Fortner and Shawn
Creech.
Harold Matthews was
the winner in Florida Mini
Sprint Association competi-
tion, over Eddie Moss and
Eddie Moss Jr.
Brandon Spradley was
victorious in Sportsman
action with Kevin Davis
second and Wayne O'Neal
third.
Kevin Underwood drove


to his second straight win
in the Box Stock Division.
John Windham was
second with Corey Crews
third.
North Florida Speedway
will not run this Saturday,
but will return for a two-day
show July 29-30.
For more information on
the track, call 754-8800 or
visit www.northfloridaspeed
way.com.


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Race winner Ryan Newman makes a pit stop during the NASCAR Sprint, Cup Series auto
race at New Hampshire Motor Speedway in Loudon, N.H., on Sunday.



Newman, Stewart take



1-2 status all the way


By DAN GELSTON
Associated Press

LOUDON, N.H. Ryan
Newman and Tony Stewart
delivered quite the 1-2
punch in New Hampshire.
Newman and Stewart
started first and second.
'They crossed the finish
line that way, too.
Not a bad way to stamp
Stewart-Haas Racing as an
organization that intends to
be in the hunt for Chase
spots.
NewmanheldoffStewart,
his boss and teammate,
Sunday at New Hampshire
Motor Speedway for his
first victory of the season.
"Well relish this moment
and figure out what we did
right so we can keep doing


ACROSS


Kind of mail
Prank
Oak leaf part
Alcott girl
By word
of mouth
Libra's stone
"Big Blue"
Nile wader
Grand Ole -
Matures
In addition
Siamese, now
Advance
Nibbled
Goddess
of dawn
Biology topic
Hippie's digs
Well-aware of
Suits to -
Joule fraction
Versatile vehi-
cles
Butter serving
Pro
Test tube sites


it," Newman said.
Newman and Stewart
made it the first front-row
start for SHR in qualifying
Friday and they followed
up with first- and second-
place finishes for the first
time on race day.
It was a banner weekend
for SHR, and Newman and
Stewart have jostled them-
selves in position to qualify
for the Chase for the Sprint
Cup championship.
Even the usually gruff
Stewart enjoyed this
celebration.
"It was a perfect day for
the organization for sure,"
Stewart said.
It was needed, too.
Newman won for the
first time since April 2010
in Phoenix and Stewart


44 Ocean
predator
47 Elvis' daughter
49 Flashes
51 Goo
53 do for now!
55 Python or wrap
56 Luxuriant
tresses
57 Wry face
58 Common
Web suffix
59 Sorority
member
60 Canary's
dinner
61 Kind of bag

DOWN

1 Livestock
show
2 Boundary
3 Tree sprite
4 Participate
(2 wds.)
5 Moons
or planets
6 Chiang -shek


earned only his second top-
five of the season. It was a
pair of near-flawless runs
for the drivers as they gear
up for a championship run.
Stewart joked that, he
asked for just one day
where something didn't go
wrong with the race teams.
They got it on a day when.
"It's no secret we've
been struggling this year,"
Stewart said. "But it really
shows me the depth of the
people we got in our orga-
nization. Ifs been one of
the weirdest years as far as
weird things and bad luck
happening to both of us."
Newman became the
13th driver to win in Sprint
Cup this year, matching the
total from last season after
only 19 of 36 races.


Answer to Previous Puzzle

ULNA COT ELMO
FOUL E VA REAR
0--L- V- AB-i E
OSLO LIBERACE
ELOPED NAPES
FEB SSN
Y L A LOUDER

GRA Y MOPE ROO


AGASS I SCENE
RAT MOA
CHECK MALLET

LETHARGY DIAL
A LA UMA EA RIE
MDSE MTN DELI


7 Famed lioness
8 Unfettered
9 Rival
10 Happy hour site
11 England's Isle
of-


19 Aerie builder
21 DA's degree
24 Be too fond
26 Triangle tip
27 Buckle, as
lumber
28 Sidle past
30 Distress call
31 Tam
32 Footnote abbr.
(2 wds.)
33 Not bother
(2 wds.)
35 Unconven-
tional
40 Hairpin curve
41 Pitched, as a
ship
43 One on two
feet
45 New World
explorer
46 Love in
Venice
48 Targets
49 Paste
50 Long story
51 Truck mfr.
52 Mekong native
54 Single digit


2011 UFS, Dist. by Univ. Uclick for UFS


7-19


SCOREBOARD


Want more puzzles?
Check out the "Just Right Crossword Puzzles" books
at QulllDriverBooks.com


Page Editor: Tim Kirby, 754-0421











Page Editor: Tim Kirby, 754-0421 LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS TUESDAY, JULY 19, 2011


Fort White all-stars come up

short in state tournament


From staff reports

Fort White's under-
15 "A" All-Stars made the
championship round in the
Florida Babe Ruth North
State Tournament in Live
Oak, but fell in the semifi-
nals on Sunday.
Tallahassee won the state
championship, beating
Suwannee 13-3 in the final.
Suwannee beat Fort


White 4-1. in one semifi-
nal, while Tallahassee beat
Jacksonville Beach 5-1 in
the other.
Fort White represented
at state as District 6 cham-
pions and were pooled in
the American Division with
Tallahassee, Sans Souci and
Bradford.
Fort White defeated Sans
Souci, 12-4, and Bradford,
5-1, and lost to Tallahassee,


16-10.
Fort White, Tallahassee
and Sans Souci were all 2-
1 in pool play, and Sans
Souci was eliminated in the
tiebreaker.
Likewise, in the National
Division, Suwannee,
Jacksonville Beach and Clay
County were 2-1 and Clay
County lost the tiebreaker.
Dinsmore was the fourth
team in the division.


SLIDERS: Bracket play on Thursday


Continued From Page 11
back to where you were,"
Dohrn said. "We have to
step it up a little bit We
have got to have our 'A'
game. We can't be laid back
at any moment."
Eaker paid tribute to the
heart of any fast pitch team
- the pitchers.
"I want to thank Katie
Dooley and Leslie Ann
Ronsonet," Eaker said.
"They are. awesome
pitchers."
In winning district and
state, the Sliders played
some familiar teams. They
will not have that luxury
this week.
"This will give us more'
of a challenge because we
don't know what we will
face," Eaker said. "We have
to pull together as a team.
and be strong. We have'
gotten ourselves in some
tough positions and pulled
through."
Eaker has played with
many of her teammates for
several summers and takes
her job as captain seriously.
"I .encourage every-
body to do their best,"
Eaker said. "If they make a
mistake, I pick them up. I
try to be a role model at
practice, in games and on


the outside."
Eaker noted that pitching
at regional will be, a notch'
or two better than what the
Sliders are used to.
"We have not been seeing
a variety of pitches and we
will have to adjust," Eaker
said.
Jessica Shimmel has
been swinging a hot bat
and is taking Eaker's advice
to heart.
'"We have been practicing
hitting off faster pitching,"
Shimmel said. "I think we
have a really good chance;
we are a really good team."
The 16-under division
has 10 teams divided into
two brackets for pool play.
Lake City is in the
National Bracket along with
Wilson, Cashie, New Kent
and the host Varina team.
The American Bracket
teams are Madison,
Henderson-Vance, Glen
Allen, Greene County and.
Marshall County.
Pool play begins
Thursday and continues
through Saturday morn-
ing. The championship
round, which pits the top
two teams in each bracket,
has its semifinal games atf
1 p.m. and 3 p.m. Saturday.


The championship final
is scheduled for 2 p.m.
Sunday.
The Sliders, playing
for the first season under
Lake City Babe Ruth, were
District 4 champions in
the tournament hosted by
Newberry and played at
Diamond Sports Park in
Gainesville.
Lake City qualified for
regionals by winning the
Florida State Championship
in Ponte Vedra.
The pool games on the
regional Website has a
skewed schedule for Lake
City with three games
on. Thursday and one on
Saturday.
The Sliders will petition
to get that changed, but as
it stands Monday:
.' Thursday, 11 a.m. -
Lake City vs. New Kent;
M Thursday, 1 p.m. -
Lake City vs. Cashie;
Thursday, 7 p.m. -
Lake City vs. Wilson;
Saturday, 11 a.m. -
Lake City vs. Varina.
Shimmel summed up the
next step for the Sliders.
"We want to win and go
to Colorado for the (Babe
Ruth) World Series," she
said.


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Stephanie Pillars, 16, takes a swing during a drill Monday.. 'I think I'm doing good,' Pillars said.
'I think we are going to do very well in Virginia.'



CUP: First final appearance since '99


Continued From Page 1B
a penalty shootout at the
Women's World Cup final
Sunday night
Shannon Boxx, Carli
Lloyd and Tobin Heath
all failed to convert pen-
alty kicks, a week after
the Americans beat Brazil
in similar, nerve-wracking
fashion.
When Saki Kumagai
buried Japan's last shot to
seal their historic win -
Japan is the first Asian team
to win the World Cup the
Americans stood frozen, as
if in shock.
They never imagined they
would lose. Never imagined
they could lose.
"There are really no


words," Wambach said. 'We
were so close."
It has been 12 years since
the U.S. teamin 1999 wonthe
World Cup. The U.S. hadn't
even made it to the final this
century until Sunday night.
But this squad was
certain it could turn it
around, driven by unshak-
able faith in each other and
a refusal to quit until the
final whistle blew.
' "It's devastating," Megan
Rapinoe said. "Just to get
to the final and not win it is
devastating."
Even when they went to
penaltykicks, theAmericans
still never doubted them-
selves.


But the Americans lost
this game as much as Japan
won it. Their struggles to
finish cost them big.
In the first 35 minutes
alone, Lauren Cleney
came up short three times,
Wambach shook the cross-
bar and Rapinoe banged
one off the near post.
The Americans finally
broke through' in the 69th
minute. But with just 10
minutes to go, Rachel
Buehler tied to clear the
ball right in front of the
goal and knocked it to Ali
Krieger, who botched her
clearance, too. The ball fell
to Aya Miyama, who poked
it in to tie it


Kirk scores first tour win


Associated Press

MADISON, Miss. Chris Kirk woti
his first PGA Tour event, shooting a
4-under 68 to beat Tom Pernice Jr. and
George McNeill by one stroke.
The 26-year-old rookie tied the tourna-
ment record by finishing 22 under, taking
advantage of Annandale Golf Club's soft
greens and fairway. He broke a tie with
McNeill on No. 17, hitting a 140-yard
approach over water to within five feet of
the hole for an easy birdie putt.
The 51-year-old Pernice fell just short
in his attempt to become the second-
oldest winner in tour history, missing a
birdie putt on No. 18.
Kirk is the fifth rookie to win this sea-
son only the second time that's hap-
pened since 1970.

American Century Celebrity
STATELII E, Nev. -Actor Jack Wagner
earned his second title at the American
SCentury Celebrity Golf Championship,
holding off a late-charging Tony Romo
with a 10-foot birdie putt on the 17th liole
and overcoming a 'shot into the pond
,.guarding the 18th. I
Romo eagled No. 11 after he drove the
green on the 315-yard par 4. The Dallas
quarterback, birdied No. i3 to pull within
two points in the modified Stableford
scoring format that puts a premium on
eagles and birdies.,

Chiquita Classic
MAINEVILLE, Ohio Russell
Knox shot a 6-under 66 to earn his first
Nationwide Tour victory, beating Billy
Hurley by tree strokes. '.
The Scot began- the day with a one-
stroke lead and was never challenged at
TPC-River's Bend, finishing at 25-under
263. He moved from No. 27 to No. 5 on
the season money list.


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Chris Kirk chips to the ninth green during
the final round of the Viking Classic golf
tournament inMadison, Miss., on Sunday.,

-Hurley had six birdies on the back nine
for a 64 and a career best finish.

Canadian Tour

WINNIPEG, Manitoba American
Tom Hoge shot a bogey-free 5-under 66
to win the Players Cup.
Hoge is the first player to go through a
Monday qualifier and then win the event
since the Canadian Tour's inception in
1986.
Benjamin Alvarado of Chile had a 66 to
finish second.


GOLF: Mickelson, Johnson are 2nd.


Continued From Page 11
me," Clarke said. "She'd
probably be saying, 'I told
you so.'"
Indeed, this was
overdue.
No one had ever gone
more than 15 starts in
the, British Open before
winning, and this was the
20thi try for Clarke. He
hardly seemed, on top of-
his game, having dropped
,out of top 100 in the world
and not even eligible for
the last three majors.
'Talk about persever-
ance.
"All worth it, most defi-
nitely," he said. "It's been
a long journey to get here.
I'm 42 and I'm not get-
ting any younger. But I got
here in the end. It may
be the only major that I
win, it may not be the only
major I win. But at least
I've gone out there and did
my best, and my best was
good enough to win."
Then, it was time to
celebrate. Ohhhh, what a
celebration it was. When
Clarke returned to the
course Monday morning
for a few more interviews
and some picture-taking on
the 18th green, the red,
bleary eyes told it all.
"I've not been to bed
yet," he said. "I probably.
won't get any sleep until
tomorrow. You have to
enjoy it while you can.",
Clarke was solid from
start to finish, holding off


Phil Mickelson and Dustin
Jolinson. '
Three straight days in
the 60s sent him to the
final round with a one-shot
lead. He didn't get flustered
when Mickelson ripped
through the front side with
a 5-under 30 despite relent-
less wind, in wacky con-
ditions' that kept flipping
back and forth between
pounding rain and bright
sunshine.
At one hole, Clarke teed
off only after scrambling
for his rain gear and
could've used sunglasses
by the, time he got to the
green.
Mickelson rolled in a
25-footer for eagle at the
seventh to claim a share
of the; lead. Clarke came
along four groups later and
knocked down a 20-foot
eagle ,of his own, stretch-
ing his advantage back to
two strokes.
With a cigarette curled
under his fingers as he
barreled down the fair-
ways, Clarke never looked
back.
Lefty had a last-gasp
birdie at the 10th, but his
putter suddenly went cold.
He lipped out a 2-footer
for his first bogey at 11,
the wind ripped from his
sails. "A stupid mistake,"
he called it "There was
nothing to it"
His shoulders sagged,
as if he sensed his come-


British Open final scores
At Royal St. George's Golf Club
Sandwich, England
(a-amateur)
barren Clarke, $1,451,83068-68-69-M0 275
Phil Mickelson, $689,61770-69-71-68 278
Dustin Johnson, $689,61770-68-68-72 278
Thomas Bjorn, $419,41665-72 -711 279
Chad Campbell, $293,05469-68-74-69 280
Anthony Kim, $293,05472-68-70-70 280
Rickie Fowler, $293,05470-70-68-72 280
Raphael Jacquelin, $209,70874-67-71-69 281
Sergio Garcia, $168,30470-70-74-68 282
Simon Dyson, $168,30468-72-72-70 282
Davis Love III, $168,30470-68-72-72 282
Steve Stricker,$ 126,36269-71-72-71 ;83
Martin Kaymer, $126,36268-69-73-7,3 283
Lucas Glover, $126,36266-70-73-74 283
George Coetzee, $109,69469-69-72-74 284
Richard Green, $90,33670-71-73-71 285
Charl Schwartzel, $90,33671-67-75-72 .85
Y.E.Yang, $90,33671-69-73-72 285
Fredrik Jacobson, $90,33670-70-73-72 285
Webb Simpson, $90,33666-74-72-73 285
Zach Johnson, $90,33672-68-71-74 285
Tom Watson, $72,05472-70-72-72 286
Tom Lehman, $72,05471-67-73-75 J '286
Anders Hansen, $72,05469-69-72-76 286
Rory Mcllroy, $62,91371-69-74-73 287
Adam Scott, $62,91369-70-73-75 287
MiguelA.Jimenez,$62,91366-71-72-78 287
Ryan Moore, $56,86369-74-76-69 288
Charles Howell 111I,$56,86371-70-73-74 288
Stewart Cink, $47,12670-71-77-71 289
Jason Day, $47,12671-70-76-72 289
Gary Woodland, $47,12675-68-74-72 289
Seung-Yul Noh, $47,12669-72-75-73 289


back was over. He made
three more bogeys com-
ing in and even yanked his
approach at the 18th into
the grandstands.
Clarke had one more
Yank to hold off. Actually,
he merely had to watch
while Dustin Johnson made
another hugd bluhidd? on
the final day of a major.
Johnson, also playing
in the final group, birdied
the 10th and the 12th to
get within two strokes of
the lead. At the par-5 14th,
Johnson drove it in the fair-
way, then eyed the flag and
pulled out a 2-iron.
"Definitely a go situa-
tion," he said.
Instead, he went out of
bounds.
Johnson wound up with
a double bogey instead of
the birdie he needed, turn-
ing the final four holes into
nothing more than a vic-
tory lap for Clarke, a man
of the people.
"I'm a bit of a normal
bloke, aren't I?" Clarke
said, the claret jug at his
side. "I like to go to the pub
and have a pint, fly home,
buy everybody a drink, just
normal. There's not many
airs and graces about m'e.
I was a little bit 'more dif-
ficult to deal with in my
earlier years, and I've mel-
lowed some. Just a little
bit But I'm just a normal
guy playing golf, having a
bit of fun."


a-Tom Lewis65-74-76-74
Bubba Watson, $47,12669-72-74-74
Pablo Larrazabal, $47,12668-70-76-75
Ryan Palmer, $47,12668-71-72-78
Simon Khan, $36.29671-72-77-70
Jeff Overton, $36,29668-71-78-73
Gary Boyd, $36,29671-70-76-73.
Yuta Ikeda, $36,29669-71-75-75
' Robert Rock, $36,29669-71-74-76
Trevor Immelman, $36,29670-72-72-76
Spencer Levin, $28,53372-69-81-69
Justin Rose, $28,53372-70-79-79
K.J. Choi, $28,53371-72-75-73
Kyle Stanley, $28,53368-72-77-74
Gregory Bourdy, $23,55273-70-77-72
Floris DeVries, $23,55270-73-76-73
Jim Furyk. $23,55272-70-76-74
a-Peter Uihlein71-71-75-75
Robert Allenby., $23,55269-72-75-76
Richard McEvoy, $23,55269-72-75-76
Paul Casey, $21,45574-69-78-72
Rory Sabbatini, $21,45571-70-77-75
Louis Oosthuizen, $21,45572-70-74-77
Bill Haas, $20,56872-70-79-73
Gregory Havret, $20,56872-71-78-73
Ricky Barnes, $20,56868-74-78-74
Fr.Andersson Hed, $20,56868-75-77-74
Stephen Gallacher, $20,56870-71-77-76
Bo Van Pelt, $20,56873-69-73-79
Matthew Millar, $19,84271-72-80-73
Joost Luiten, $19,84273-69-79-75
Mark Wilson, $19,84274-68-75-79
Paul Lawrie, $19,43873-70-81-73
Edoardo Molinari, $19,43869-74-76-78
Henrik Stenson, $19,19672-71-75-80
Harrison Frazar, $19,03572-70-77-80
Kenneth Ferrie, $18,87471-71-76-83
Jung-Gon Hwang. $18,71268-74-83-79


LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS TUESDAY, JULY 19, 2011


Page Editor: Tim Kirby, 754-0421









Page Editor: Emogene Graham, 754-0415


4B


LAKE CITY REPORTER ADVICE & COMICS TUESDAY, JULY 19, 2011


DEAR ABBY


Southerners rise in force

to defend their 'y'alls'


DEAR ABBY: "Keep-
ing It Real in Laguna
Beach, Calif." (May
27), who is embar-
rassed by the dialects
of his Southern rela-
tives, should learn some
Southern hospitality!
Yes, we may say "Ma
and Pa," "y'all," "yon-
der" and "I reckon,"
but we would not laugh
or be embarrassed if a
California relative came
to visit. We'd be over-
joyed and welcoming.
"K.I.R.," get off your
high horse and get over
yourself! If you visited,
we'd show you around'
town, take you to see
friends and relatives,
and smother you with
affection. We'd have
big family gatherings,
sit on the front porch
and drink lemonade. We
would never ridicule
your different accent.


Abigail Van Buren
www.deorabby.com
Come spend some time
with us "hicks." We
welcome everyone and
are glad to have you.
We'll serve you white
gravy and homemade
buttermilk biscuits,
pecan pie and sweet tea.
And when you leave,
we'll give you a big,
air-constricting hug and
some "sugar" (South-
ern slang for kisses)
and say, "Y'all come
back now, ya hear?" --
GEORGIA GIRL
DEAR GEORGIA
GIRL: To heck with
"K.I.R." -- invite me!
You'll be pleased to
know your fellow


Southerners came out in
force against "K.I.R.'s"
uppity attitude. Read
on:
Why would "K.I.R."
assume that because his
Southern family doesn't
live in an "uneducated"
area, their accents are
"fake"? His generaliza-
tions show how little
he knows about the rich
and varied Southern
culture. He should read
Tennessee Williams,
Eudora Welty or Tru-
man Capote, or watch a
documentary about the
South. In other words,
educate HIMSELF to
keep from coming off as
embarrassingly shallow
in front of his relatives.
-- SOUTHERN YAN-
KEE IN TEXAS

* Write Dear Abby at
www.DearAbby.com or
P.O. Box 69440, Los
Angeles, CA 90069.


HAGARTHE HORRIBLE


SNUFFY SMITH


ZITS


HOROSCOPES


B.C.


FRANK & ERNEST


FOR BETTER OR WORSE
FHIL,YOU VMe-GCONNEI YouCFlM1
mRI-FLYLy LFPT y T... 'To tMO'rp
/OU ORLY LORDr- HER P, ND UE
R QUr'LE OF- f KF
-ri -TMFS -. xf 1: ^


ri-~ vo~,v OF ~lL.~'lC-~.


wwwJohnHartStudios.com


^, ARIES (March 21-April
19): Unpredictable behav-
ior will lead to controversy
and an obvious emotional
c response. Let anyone who
will be affected by your
choices know in advance
what you are going to do.
Secondhand information
kie5..a.,ur will not turn out to be ac-
curate. ***
OR ( TAURUS (April 20-May
20): You can throw your
weight around and get
results. You will learn plenty
from an individual who has
experience in an area you
are lacking. Good fortune
will core if you conduct
your business cordially.

GEMINI (May 21-June
20): Someone will ques-
tion you if you exaggerate.
Stick to what you know
and stand behind your
promises. Home improve-
ments can change your
emotional well-being. A
rTH new acquaintance will
an 0 make an unexpected offer.

I CANCER (June 21-July
22): React from the'heart
and you will find out
exactly what you need to
know to make the right de-
cision regarding your per-
) sonal life. Don't wait until
you are forced to make a
move. An innovative ap-
proach to making money


"M
UD
D 0
HN


THE LAST WORD
Eugenia Last

will pay off. *****
LEO (July 23-Aug. 22):
You can make wise money
moves if you invest in
something innovative. A
job that interests you may
not turn out to be as good
as it sounds. Love and ro-
mance will bring you good
fortune.***
VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept
22): You'll be pulled in
different directions person-
ally and emotionally. Tr6
your best not to get angry.
Make special plans late in
the day with someone you
love.***
LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct 22):
Don't slow down when
you should be moving full
speed ahead. A change that
is happening at work may
upset you. Don't react too
quickly; you don't have all
the facts. ***
SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov.
21): Communications
regarding money can help
you sort out what you need
to do in the future. Don't
overspend on something
you don't really need.
Sharing your thoughts
and plans with someone
you've known a long time
will help you put things in
perspective. Love is in the
stars. **-***
SAGITTARIUS (Nov.


22-Dec. 21): Don't give
in to treats or bribery.
You have to make it clear
what you can and can-
not contribute. Problems
with friends, relatives
or neighbors can be
expected. Taking care
of your health will be
important and can change
the outcome of a pending
problem. **
CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-
Jan. 19): Don't let your
emotions cause you to do
or say something foolish
at work. You don't want
to upset anyone who can
influence your position.
Good fortune regarding
real estate and investments
is evident ****
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb.
18): You have the strength,
courage and discipline to
make a commitment and to
change your life. An honest
assessment will help you
realize what you want to
do next and how you can
go about making it happen.
Don't try to do everything at
once. *** PISCES
(Feb. 19-March 20): Take
a break, go on a vacation or
just spend more time with
the people you love most
An opportunity to get in-
volved in an interest or goal
you used to have will catch
your interest. Offer your ser-
vices and get started. ***


CELEBRITY CIPHER


by Luis Campos
Celebrity Cipher cryptograms are created from quotations by famous people, past and present.
Each letter In the cipher stands for another.
TODAY'S CLUE: X equals P
'V ODG NSIS GD XRG ADFO VSO,
A CD Z S GNSV WOA M'V VWIIMSA GD
S, PRG M AD GNMOJ GNSL WIS VDIS
WCCDF." -HNWIDO UCSHH


Previous solution "Yes, you can lose somebody overnight... life is short. It can
come and go like a feather in the wind." Shania Twain
(c) 2011 by NEA, Inc. 7-19
CLASSIC PEANUTS


DILBERT


BLONDIE


BEETLE BAILEY










Classified Department: 755-5440


BYI-
S E L L T


FINDII'4


LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED TUESDAY, JULY 19, 2011

Lake City Reporter





CLASSIFIED


Take ADvantage of the
Reporter Classifieds!

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- ADvantage I


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personal merchandise totalling $100 or less.
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oEar, ,ta-usl inle a pWllass
r Tn'.I I a non ,ela ia rPa",6


days 50
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Limited to service type advertis-
ing only.
4 lines, one montr.,,.92.00, --
$10.80 each additional line
Includes an additional $2.00 per,
ad for each Wednesday insertion.


a1
You can call us at 755-5440, .
Monday through Friday from 8:00
a.m. to 5:00 p.m.
Some people prefer to place their
classified ads in person, and some
ad categories will require prepay-
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East Dutal Street.
You can also fax or email your ad
copy to the Reporter.
FAX: 386-752-9400 Please
direct your copy to the Classified
Department.
EMAIL: classifieds@lakecityre-
porter.comrn





AdistoAppea: Call by: FaxrEmail by:
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only the charge for the ad space
in error. Please call 755-5440
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tion and billing adjustments.
Cancellations- Normal advertising
deadlines apply for cancellation.
Billing Inquiries- Call 755-5440.
Should further information be
required regarding payments or.
credit limits, your call will be trans-
ferred to the accounting depart-
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Advertising copy is subject to
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reserves the right to edit, reject,
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appropriate headings. Copy should
be checked for errors by the
advertiser on the first day of pub-
lication. Credit for published errors
will be allowed for the first insertion
for that portion of the advertisement
which was incorrect. Further, the
Publisher shall not be liable for any
omission of advertisements ordered
to be published, nor for any general,
special or consequential damages.
Advertising language must comply
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regarding the prohibition of discrimi-
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In Print and Online
www.lakecityreporter.com


Legal

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
THIRD JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN
AND FOR COLUMBIA COUNTY,
FLORIDA
CASE NO. 07-000195-CA
UNITED STATES OF AMERICA,
RURAL HOUSING SERVICE, US-
DA
Plaintiff,
v.
SHEQUETTE L. GRIFFIN and
__ UNKNOWN SPOUSE
OF SHEQUETTE L. GRIFFIN; and
all unknown parties claiming by,
through, under or against the herein
named Defendants, who are not
known to be dead or alive, whether
said unknown parties claim as heirs,
devisees, grantees, assignees, lienors,
creditors, trustees, spouses, or other
claimants; TENANT #1 and TEN-
ANT #2, the parties intended to ac-
count for the persons in possession;
COLUMBIA COUNTY, FLORIDA,
a Political Subdivision of the State of
Florida
Defendants.
NOTICE OF SALE
Notice is hereby given that, pursuant
to the Final Judgment of Foreclosure
dated June 28, 2011, in this cause, I
will sell the property situated in CO-
LUMBIA County, Florida, described
as:
LOT 4,' SUZANNE SUBDIVISION,
UNIT 1, A SUBDIVISION AC-
CORDING TO THE PLAT THERE-
OF AS RECORDED IN PLAT
BOOK 4, PAGE 100 OF THE PUB-
LIC RECORDS OF COLUMBIA
COUNTY, FLORIDA.
a/k/a 122 SE Scarlett Way, Lake
City, Florida 32025
at public sale, to the highest and best
bidder, for cash, at the Columbia
county Courthouse, 173 NW Her-
nando Ave. Lake City, Florida, at
11:00 o'clock a.m., on September
28,2011.,
Any person claiming an interest in
the surplus from the sale, if any, oth-
er than the property owner as of the
date of the lis pendens must file a
claim within 60 days after the sale.
Dated at Lake City, Florida, this 30
day of June, 2011.
P. DeWitt Cason
Clerk of the Circuit Court
By:/s/ B. Scippio
Deputy Clerk
NOTICE TO PERSONS WITH DIS-
ABILITIES:
IF YOU ARE A PERSON WITH A
DISABILITY WHO NEEDS ANY
ACCOMMODATION IN ORDER
TO PARTICIPATE IN THIS PRO-
CEEDING, YOU ARE ENTITLED,
AT NO COST TO YOU, TO THE
PROVISION OF CERTAIN ASSIS-
TANCE. PLEASE CONTACT
NANCY NYDAM AT ROOM 205,
COLUMBIA COUNTY COURT-
HOUSE, P.O. BOX 1569, LAKE
CITY, FL 32056, '(904)758-2163;
SUNCOM -83.9-2163, WITHIN' .2
WORKING DAYS OF YOUR RE-
CEIPT OF THIS NOTICE. IF YOU
ARE HEARING OR VOICE IM-
PAIRED, CALL 904758-2139
05526476
July 12, 19, 2011

NOTICE OF INTENT TO ADOPT
ORDINANCE
TO WHOM IT MAY CONCERN:
The Board of County Commissioners
of Columbia County, Florida will at
its regular meeting on Thursday, Au-
gust 4, 2011, in the Columbia Coun-
ty School Board Administration.
Building, 372 West Duval Street,
Lake City, Florida at 7:00 p.m. con-
sider the adoption of an ordinance
entitled:
AN ORDINANCE RELATING TO
BOATING RESTRICTED AREAS;
PROVIDING FOR A PURPOSE;
PROVIDING DEFINITIONS; ES-
TABLISHING BOATING .RE-
STRICTED AREAS, PENALTIES
AND PROVIDING FOR AN EF-
FECTIVE DATE.
The substance of the above-named
ordinance is as provided in its name.
Copies of the proposed ordinance are
available for inspection at the office
of the County Manager located in the
County Administration Complex,
135 NE Hernando Avenue, Lake
City, Florida, between the hours of
8:00 a.m. and 5:00 p.m., Mondry
through Friday. Any interested party
may appear and be heard at this pub-
lic hearing.
In the event any person decides to
appeal any decision by the Board of
County Commissioners with respect
to any matter relating to the consid-
eration of the ordinance at the above-
referenced public hearing, a record
of the proceeding may be needed and
in such event, such person may need
to ensure that a verbatim record of
the public hearing is made, which re-
cord includes the testimony and evi-
dence on which the appeal is to be
based.
In accordance with the Americans
With Disabilities Act, a person need-
ing special accommodations or an in-
terpreter to participate in this pro-
ceeding should contact Lisa Roberts
386/752-1006 or T.D. Services
386/758-2139, at least seven (7) days
prior to the date of the hearing.
DATED this 12th day of July, 2011.
/s/ P. DeWitt Cason by PA Perry
P. DEWITT CASON
Clerk of Court
05526632
July 19, 2011


Land Clearing

Back Hoe, Dozer, Chopping, root
raking, bush hog, seeding, sod,
disking, site prep, ponds &
irrigation. Free Est! 386-623-3200


Services

DIVORCE, BANKRUPTCY,
RESUMES.
other court approved forms-
386-961-5896.


Legal

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
THIRD JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF
FLORIDA IN AND FOR COLUM-
BIA COUNTY
CIVIL ACTION
CASE NO. 2010-000101-CA
UNITED STATES OF AMERICA,
acting through Rural Development,
formerly Farmers Home Administra-
tion (FmHA), United States Depart-
ment of Agriculture (USDA),
Plaintiff,
vs.
TERESA L. HOLLIE; JACK A.
AMBROSINE,
Defendants
NOTICE OF SALE
NOTICE IS HEREBY given that
pursuant to a Summary Final Judg-
ment of Foreclosure entered on June
30, 2011, by the above entitled Court
in the above entitled cause the under-
signed Clerk of Court or any of his
duly authorized deputies, will sell the
property located in Columbia Coun-
ty, Florida, being specifically descri-
bed as follows:
Lot 3, Block A, EVERGREEN SUB-
DIVISION, according to the map or
plat thereof recorded in Plat Book' 6,
Page 130, Public Records of Colum-
bia County, Florida.
at public outcry to the highest and
best bidder for cash on August 3,
2011, at the Columbia County Court-
house, on the third floor, 173 NE
Hemando Avenue, Lake City, FL
32055, subject to all ad valorem tax-
es and assessments for the real prop-
erty described above.
ANY PERSON CLAIMING AN IN-
TEREST IN THE SALE, IF ANY,
OTHER THAN THE- PROPERTY
OWNER AS OF THE DATE OF
THE LIS PENDENS MUST FILE A
CLAIM WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER
THE SALE.
IN. ACCORDANCE WITH THE
AMERICANS WITH DISABILI-
TIES ACT, PERSONS WITH DIS-
ABILITIES NEEDING A SPECIAL
ACCOMMODATION TO PARTIC-
IPATE IN THIS PROCEEDING
SHOULD CONTACT THE OFFICE
OF THE COURT ADMINISTRA-
TOR, 145 N. HERNANDO
STREET, 2ND FLOOR, Lake City,
FL 32055. TELEPHONE (386)758-
2163, WITHIN TWO (2) WORK-
ING DAYS OF YOUR RECEIPT
OF THIS NOTICE. IF HEARING
IMPAIRED, (TDD) 1-800-955-
8771, OR VOICE (V) 1-800-955-
8770, VIA FLORIDA RELAY
SERVICE.
DATED on June 30, 2011.
(seal)
P. DEWITT CASON
Clerk of Circuit Court
Post Office drawer 2069
Lake City, FL 32056-2069
By:/s/B. Scippio
Deputy Clerk
05526478 .
July 12, 19,2011
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
THIRD JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF
FLORIDA, IN AND FOR COLUM-
BIA COUNTY CIVIL DIVISION
Case No. 12-2009-CA-000419
Division
WACHOVIA MORTGAGE, FSB.
f.k.a WORLD SAVINGS BANK,
FSB
Plaintiff,
vs.
CRISTINO HERNANDEZ AND
UNKNOWN TENANTS/OWNERS,
Defendants.
NOTICE OF SALE
Notice is hereby given, pursuant to a
Final Judgment of Foreclosure for
Plaintiff entered in this cause on
April 6, 2010, in the Circuit Court of
Columbia County, Florida, I will sell
the property situated in Columbia
County, Florida described as:
LOT 96, CALLAWAY, PHASE IIl,
A SUBDIVISION ACCORDING
TO THE. PLAT THEREOF AS RE-
CORDED IN PLAT BOOK 7, PA-
GES 145 AND 146, PUBLIC RE-
CORDS OF COLUMBIA COUN-
TY, FLORIDA.
and commonly known as: 281 SW
WILSHIRE DR., LAKE CITY, FL
32024; including the building, appur-
tenances, and fixtures located there-
in, at public sale, to the highest and
best bidder, for cash, AT THE
FRONT DOOR OF THE COLUM-
BIA COUNTY COURTHOUSE,
145 N. HERNANDO STREET,
LAKE CITY, FLORIDA, on August
3, 2011 at 11:00 a.m.
Any persons claiming an interest in
the surplus from the sale, if any, oth-
er than the property owner as of the
date of the lis pendens must file a
claim within 60 days after the sale.
Dated this 5th day of July, 2011.
Clerk o'f the Circuit Court
B,: Mendy E. Warner
Deputy Clerk

05526489
July 19, 21, 2011
IN THE COUNTY COURT IN
AND FOR COLUMBIA COUNTY,
FLORIDA
CASE NO. 11-563-SC
ROBERT SWEAT
9670.135TH LN
LIVE OAK, FL 32060
Plaintiff
vs.
JIMMY MARCUM
1334 NW TIPPLE RUN RI),
LAKE CITY, FL 32055
Defendant
A law suit has been filed to deter-
mine ownership and title of a certain
vehicle described as a 1988 Corvette
with serial #1GlYYZ186J5114349
located in Lake City, Columbia
County, Florida.
The following persons) may chllir
some right title or interest therein:
ROBERT SWEAT
If you have a claim, interest, or de-
fense in this clause, you must file
your written response answer or ob-
jection with the Clerk of Court Co-
lumbia County within 10 days.
CLERK OF COURTS
By:/s/ D. Robinson
Deputy Clerk

05526331
June 28, 2011


July 5, 12, 19, 2011


Legal

INVITATION TO BID
REPAIR & REBUILD WORK ON
2003 CATERPILLAR D6-M
BID NO. 2011-P
Please be advised that Columbia
County desires to accept bids on the
above referenced project. Bids will
be accepted through 2:00 P.M. on
August 3, 2011. All bids submitted
shall be on the form provided.
Specifications and bid forms may be
obtained by contacting the office of
the Board of County Commissioners,
Columbia County, 135 NE Hemando
Avenue Room 203, Post Office Box
1529 Lake City, Florida 32056-1529
or by calling 386-719-2028. Colum-
bia County reserves the right to re-
ject any and/or all bids and to accept
the bid in the county's best interest.
Dated this 20th day of July 2011
Columbia County Board 9f
County Commissioners
Jody Dupree, Chairman
05526724
July 20, 27, 2011
Notice is hereby given per Florida
Statue 98.075(2):
Last known address of:
Henry D Rogers
10637 Cr 248
Branford, FL. 32008
Karen Kravec
1418 SW Wayne S Place
Lake City, Florida 32025
Allocco, Marcus A.
163 SW High St. Apt. 102
Lake City, FL 32025
Tina R. Wolfe
149 NW Doe Run Glenn
Lake City, Florida 32055
Shaconda Tillman
839 SW Gigi Ct.
Lake City, Florida 32025
James Hicks, JR.
1858 Monroe Street
Lake City, FL 32055
Adrian P. Hemerson
521 Peerless Ct.
Lehigh Acre, FL 33974
is potentially ineligible to be regis-
tered to vote. Please respond within
30 days of publication of this notice
by contacting the Supervisor of Elec-
tions Office at the address or phone
number below. If no response is re-
ceived within 30 days of this publi-
cation, it may result in determination
of ineligibility by the supervisor and
removal of the registered voter's
name from the statewide voter regis-
tration system.
Published one time in the Lake City
Reporter
Elizabeth "Liz" P. Home
Columbia County Supervisor of
Elections
971 W. Duval Street, Suite 102
Lake City, FL 32055
(386) 758-1026
05526458
June 19, 2011
NOTICE OF PUBLIC MEETING
The North Florida Broadband Ati-
thority ("NFBA") announces a public
meeting to which all interested per-
sons are invited. The NFBA is a le-
gal entity and public body created
pursuant to the provisions of Section
163.01, Florida Statutes, and an In-
terlocal Agreement among; Baker,
Bradford, Columbia, Gilchrist, Ham-
ilton, Jefferson, Lafayette, Levy,
Madison, Putnam, Suwannee, Tay-
lor, Union and Wakulla Counties and
municipalities of Cedar Key, Cross
City, Lake City, Live Oak, Monticel-
lo, Perry, White Springs and Wor-
thington Springs, Florida. The spe-
cial meeting will be held at 2:00 p.m.
on Wednesday, July 27, 2011 at the
Suwannee River Water Management
District, Suwannee Room, 9225
County Road 49, Live Oak, Florida
32060. The meeting agenda will be
posted to the NFBA website
www.nfba-fl.org at least 48 hours
prior to the scheduled meeting. The
NFBA Board will address general
operating issues of the NFBA. If a
person decides to appeal any deci-
sion made by the NFBA with respect
to any matter considered at the meet-
ing, such person will need a record
of the proceedings and may need to
ensure that a verbatim record is
made, including the testimony and
evidence upon which the appeal is to
be made. In accordance with the
Americans with Disabilities Act, per-
sons needing special accommoda-
tions or an interpreter to participate
in this proceeding, or if you have any
questions regarding this meeting,
please contact the Clerk to the NFBA
Board at (877) 552-3482, at least two
business days prior to the date of the
meeting.
05526725
July 19, 2011
Public Auction to be held
Augustl3, 2011 at 8AM at
Ozzie's Towing & Auto, 2492 SE
Baya Ave. Lake City FL, 32025.
(386)719-5608
Following Vin Numbers:
93 Honda
Vin # 1HGEG8552PLO28266
05526721
July 19, 2011
Public Auction to be held
July 30,2011 at 8AM at
Ozzie's Towing & Auto, 2492 SE
Baya Ave. Lake City FL, 32025.
(386)719-5608
Following Vin Numbers:
90 Holiday Camper
Vin # 46GEDO41XL2041929
05526722
July 19,2011


020 Lost & Found

LOST BILLFOLD: July 4th
weekend. Black double zippered.


aprox 6 in long. Small Reward.
Call 386-438-5278 Iv. message.


100t Job
100 Opportunities

05526594
OPS Park Ranger
Stephen Foster State Park
White Springs, Florida
Stephen Foster Folk Culture
Center State Park is seeking an
OPS Park Ranger to provide
maintenance of facilities,
equipment and grounds,
mowing, operate cash registers,
greet the public, answer phones,
setup and produce numerous
special events. Must be willing
to work rotating shifts including
weekends and holidays. Basic
Knowledge of maintenance
including plumbing, electrical
and carpentry are required.
Excellent people skills and
working with a team are
required. This position works in
all outdoor conditions. An OPS
classified position is a position
which does not have pension
benefits or health insurance
unless purchased. This is a
good entry level job into a future
career service position within
the Florida Park Service.
Mail or Fax. State of Florida
Employment Application by
Friday July 22nd to:
Stephen Foster State Park
Ben Faure Park Manager
P.O. Box G
White Springs, FL 32096
Fax (386) 397-4262
Applications are available
online at https;//peoplefirst.my-
florida.com. Resumes are not
accepted unless accompanied
with a State of Florida
Employment Application.
DEP only hires US Citizens or
authorized aliens and is an EEO
/ ADA / VP employer. Section
110.128, F.S. prohibits the em-
ployment of any male required
to register with Selective Serv-
ice System under the US Milita-
ry Selective Service Act.

05526686
FT Position- Medical Office
Medical Patient Care.
Coordinator needed for front
desk position in busy Audiology
practice. AA degree required
Microsoft Office with
experience creating EXCEL
spreadsheets. Excellent oral &
written communication skills
Strong customer service skills
Excellent organizational skills
Ability to manage multiple task
and handle multiple phone lines
Outstanding personality
Competitive salary
and benefits available
FAX RESUME TO:
386-758-3101

05526712
Human Resources
Coordinator
Individual to manage human
resource functions in a fast
paced organization with 150
employees.
Functions: Administration,
Employment /Recruitment,.
Orientation Training / Profes-
sional Development, Benefits,
Communications,
Compensation, Employee
Relations, Employee Assistance,
Performance Management.
Qualifications: B.S./B.A. in
Human Resources, Business
Administration or related field
preferred; minimum 3-5' years
recent human resource related
experience (minimum 7-9 '
years exper. w/out degree);
minimum 3 years supervisory
experience; knowledge of HR
principles and employment law;
excellent written/oral
communication skills; proficient
in Microsoft computer
applications Outlook, Word
and Excel; database manage-
ment and recordkeeping skills;
organizational, detail and
time management skills;
conflict resolution, mediation
and team building skills.
All applicants must pass
physical & DCF background.
screenings. Excellent Benefits,
Paid Holidays, Sick/Annual
Leave, Health/Dental Insurance,
and more.
Deadline to apply: July 29,
2011,4:00 p.m.
Apply at 236 SW Columbia
Ave, Lake City, FL
or Send resume to:
employment(alsv4cs.org
Fax (386) 754-2220
or Call 754-2233 EOE


CDL Class A Truck Driver.
Flatbed exp. for F/T SE area.
3 years exp or more. Medical
benefits offered. Contact
Melissa or Mary @ 386 -935-2773
Experienced part-time esthetician
needed for new MediSpa. Please
fax resume to 386-719-9488 or
mail to 125 SW Midtown Place,
Suite 101, Lake City, Fl. 32025.
General Office/Bookkeeping
Must know QuickBooks &
Microsoft Programs. Punctual.
Please send resume & salary
requirements to: PO BOX 830,
Lake City, Florida 32056
Sales Position available for moti-
vated individual Rountree -Moore
Toyota, Great benefits, paid train-
ing/vacation. Exp. a plus but not
necessary. Call Anthony Cosentino
386-623-7442
Sales/Marketing Professional and
CNC Machine Operator(s)
needed for an aftermarket auto
parts mnfg company. Experience
a must! Remit Cv and Resume to
Sales Position PO BOX 425,
Lake City,FL 32056 or Email:
aapositions(fgmail.com.


too Job
100 Opportunities

Small local company is looking for
AUTO MECHANIC
Must have own tools. Hourly rate.
386-755-6481

StarTech Computer Center
needs help.
Tech & Sales, FT & PT. Exp
only. email bdj@startech.cc
Stylist wanted: Salon with old
fashion charm has openings for 2
stylist with following. Reasonable
chair rent Please call Sharon at
365-8402 or 752-1777 or come by
694 SW Main Blvd.
VPK Teacher & Pre K3 teacher
needed. Experience reqd. CDA/AS
Degree preferred. Apply in person
at Wee Care in Columbja City

120 Medical
1 Employment

05526506
Occupational Therapist
Avalon Healthcare Center is
currently accepting applications
for the full time position of
Occupational Therapist.
Competitive Salary and
Excellent benefit package as
well as A sign on bonus is
being offered.
Please contact Jennie Cruce
director of Rehab.
dorIavalonhrc.com
Avalon Healthcare and Rehab
1270 S.W. Main Blvd.
Lake City, Florida 32025
or fax resume to 386-752-8556
386-752-7900 EOE

Busy outpatient surgery center has
immediate opening for a LPN.
PRN position. Please
email resume to
administratibn@lcsurgerycenter.com
or fax.to 386-487-3935.
RN's& LPN's needed to work in
the North Florida area corrections.
Immediate work, instant pay,
$300 sign-on bonus.
Call 352-336-0964.
www.suwanneemedical.com

240 Schools &
240 Education

05526648
Interested in a Medical Career?
Express Training offers
courses for beginners & exp
Nursing Assistant, $479
next class-07/25/10

Phlebotomy national certifica-.
tion, $800 next class-08/08/11

Continuing education
Fees incl. books, supplies, exam
fees. Call 386-755-4401 or
expresstrainingservices.com



310 Pets & Supplies

FREE/TRADE 1 yr old Pug.
Beautiful, register fawn colored
male w/black mask. Will trade for
a baby Pug. 386-752-6993

PUBLISHER'S NOTE
Florida Law 828.29 requires dogs
and cats being sold to be at least 8
weeks old and have a health
certificate from a licensed
veterinarian documenting they
have mandatory shots and are
free from intestinal and external
parasites. Many species of wild-
life must be licensed by Florida
Fish and Wildlife. If you are
unsure, contact the local
office for information.

330 Livestock &
SSupplies

Black Angus Cows & Heifers
Prices Vary
Registered & Commercial
386-719-4802


361 Farm Equipment

84 Ford 4610 Tractor.
2WD, Solid
2005 motor,$7,500. OBO
386-867-0005


402 Appliances


Craftsman 19HP Rider Mower.
42 inch cut. Runs great. $465. obo
386-292-3927 or
386-755-5331.

FRIGIDAIRE 18CU fridge.
$300. 7 months old, white, like
new. (863)840-4262
Please leave message.
FROST FREE Kenmore
refrigerator. Very clean. $200
386-292-3927 or
386-755-5331.
GE Dishwasher
$100. obo
386-292-3927 or
386-755-5331.
White GE Dryer.
Works great, looks good.
$125.
386-292-3927 or 386-755-5331.


407 Computers

Compaq Computer, Many extras.
Complete Computer
$80.00
386-755-9984 or 386-292-2170


420 Wanted to Buy

Wanted Junk Cars, Trucks, Vans.
$250 & up CASH! Free Pick Up!
NO title needed !386-878-9260
After 5pm 386- 752-3648.


REPORTER Classifieds In Print and On Line
www.lakecityreporter.com









Classified Department: 755-5440


LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED TUESDAY, JULY 19, 2011


430 Garage Sales
PUBLISHER'S NOTE
All Yard Sale Ads
Must be Pre-Paid.


440 Miscellaneous
Craftsman High Wheel push
mower. Runs good. $95. obo
386-292-3927 or
386-755-5331.
Stop gnat & Mosquito bites! Buy
Swamp Gator All natural insect re-
pellent. Family safe. Use head to
toe. Available at The Home Depot.
Summer Barbecue Special
Tow Behind
Grill/Smoker, $1,250 OBO.
3c,6-719-4802

630 Mobile Homes
for Rent
2&3 BR MH. $395 $650. mo.
plus deposit. Water & sewer fur-
nished. Cannon Creek MHP
386-752-6422
2/2 Units, clean, well maintained,
nice safe park setting, 2 miles to
downtown Lake City, $575 month
+ $575 sec dep, 386-984-8448
13th Month FREE!!
3/2 DWMH, 1/2 ac. Shaded lot.
Paved Rd, 2 porches, 50'X50'
fenced small dog run. $600. mo +
$750 dep. References Req'd.
386-758-7184 or 984-0954
3/2 S of Lake City, (Branford area)
$575 month plus security
386-590-0642 or 386-867-1833
www.suwanneevalleyproperties.com
4 bedroom Den, w/d hook up. In
Ft., White. Appliance included.
$800. mo. $500. sec. Call Billie
386-754-6970 or 404-849-8277
LG clean 3br's $450. -$650. mo. +
dep. Also, 2br mobile home's
available. No Pets.
5 Points area. 386-961-1482
Mobile Homes for rent in
White Springs, Lake City & Ft.
White Contact 386-623-3404
or 386-365-1919
X-Clean 2/2 SW, 8 mi NW of VA.
Clean acre lot, nice area. $500. mo
+ dep No dogs Non-smoking
environment.386-961-9181

640 Mobile Homes
640 for Sale
Handy man special, 94 Fleetwood
DWMH. 3/2 on 5 acres in Ft.
White. Owner Fin. $3,000 dn.
$850mo. $99,900 352-215-1018
www.LandOwnerFinancing.com
PALM HARBOR Homes Has
Red Tag Sale
Over 10 Stock Units Must Go
Save Up To 35K!
Call Today! 800-622-2832

650 Mobile Home
& Land
67.5 ac.Ranch, fenced & cross
fenced. Spacious moblie home
Sw/large front deck & RV hookup
MLS 75607 $299,000. Access
Realty. Patti Taylor. 386-623-6896

'7107 Unfurnished Apt.
For Rent







05526481
SPRING HILL VILLAGE
Excellent High Springs location.
1, 2 & 3 bedroom floor-plans;
some with garages.
Call 386-454-1469
or visit our website:
www.springhillvillage.net

1 bedroom Apartment. Quiet,
Private street. $400. mo
plus security deposit.
386-344-3715
1BR APT.
Downtown Location, Clean.
$450 mo, plus Security.-a
NO PETS. Call 386-755-3456
2/1 w/garage & washer/dryer
hookups. East side of town,
Call for details
386-755-6867 "
2BR/1.5BA w/garage
5 minutes from VA hospital.
Call for details.
386-755-4590 or 365-5150
Amber Wood Hills Apts.
Private Patio area. Beautiful yard.
Washer/dryer hkup. Free water &
sewer. 1/1, 2/1. Move in special.
386-754-180.0. wwwmyflapts.com
Columbia Arms Apt. located 1/2
mi from V.A. & Winn Dixie. Pet
Friendly. Move in Special $199.
Pool, laundry & balcony.
386-754-1800. www.myflapts.com
Furnished or unfurnished
Townhomes on the golf course.
$750. mo. plus security. Includes
water. 386-752-9626
Greentree Townhouse
Summer special. 2/1, 2/1.5. Free
water & sewer. Balcony & patio.
Laundry. Behind Kens on Hwy 90.
386-754-1800 wwwmvflapts.com
NICE Apt Downtown. Remodeled
1 bedroom. Kitchen, dining, living
room. $450. mo plus sec.
RENTED


Redwine Apartments. Move in
special $199. Limited time. Pets
welcome. with 5 complexes,
we have a home for you.
386-754-1800. www.myflapts.com


Summer Special! 12th mo Free
w/signed yr lease. Updated, w/tile
floors/fresh paint. Great area.
From $450.+sec. 386-752-9626


710 fUnfurnished Apt.
710 For Rent
Wayne Manor Apts.
Move in $199. Summer special.
2/1, washer/dryer. Behind Kens off
Hwy 90. 386-754-1800
www.myflapts.com
Windsor Arms Apartments.
Summer special $199. Move in!
2/1, 2/1.5, 2/2. Pet Friendy. Free
200 ch. Dish. Washer/dryer hkup.
386-754-1800. www.myflapts.com

720 Furnished Apts.
SFor Rent
Rooms for Rent. Hillcrest, Sands,
Columbia. All furnished. Electric,
cable, fridge, microwave. Weekly
Sor monthly rates. 1 person $135,
2 persons $150. weekly
386-752-5808

Unfurnished
730 Home For Rent

05526651
LAKE CITY
2BR/1BA, Mobile Home
$495mo
2BR/1.5BA, 975SF $725, mo
4BR/3BA, 2139SF $1500. mo
4BR/2BA, 1248SF $695. mo
2 AVAILABLE
3BR/2BA 1258SF $925. mo
3BR/2BA 1582SF $900. mo
3BR/2BA 1246SF $700. mo

2BR/1BA 700SF $495. mo
2 AVAILABLE
3BR/1.5BA 1040SF $825,
FT WHITE
3BR/2BA 1512SF $850. mo
LAKE BUTLER
4BR/2BA 1560SF $825 mo

MADISON

2BR/1BA JUST REMODELED
$450. mo. 2 AVAILABLE
3BR/1.5BA REMODELED
$550. mo

Mike Foster 386-288-3596
Mitchell Lee 386-867-1155
1688 SE Baya Dr., Suite 105
Lake City, FL 32025
www.NorthFloridahomeandland.com
Accredited Real Estate is a Full
Service Real Estate Office.
We do: Rentals
ft Property Management [3
SruS Property Sales. .

3BR/2BA Newly remodeled.
Large Yard & Porch
Call for more details
386-867-9231
Completely remodeled Brick.
3br/2ba 1750 sqft. Lg lot. Includes
washer, dryer, stove, & fridge.
$985. mo $985 dep. 386-752-7578
Family Home 3/2, Ir, dr, fam rm
w/ fp,garage, fenced Lick yd.
Nice area. $1100 mo + dep Martha
Jo Khachigan, Realtor 623-2848
SWMH 2/2 in Wellborn,
$625 mo, and
$625 security.
386-365-1243 or 397-2619
Unfurnished 2 bedroom/1 bath
house. $700.00 per month.
First, last and security Firm.
386-590-5333

750 Business &
SOffice Rentals
For Lease: E Baya Ave. Two -
1000 sqft office space units or
combined for 2000 soft. 386-984-
0622 or weekends 386-497-4762
OFFICE SPACE for lease.
Oak Hill Plaza. 900 sqft
$675mo/$695. sec dep.
Tom 386-961-1086 D6A Realtor

790 Vacation Rentals
Horseshoe Beach RV Lot.
Nice corner Lot with shade trees.
$295. mo Water/electric included
386-235-3633 or 352-498-5986
Scalloping Horseshoe Beach Spcl
Gulf Front 2br, w/lg porch, dock,
fish sink. wkend $395./wk $895.
386-235-3633/352-498-5986
alwaysonvacation.com #419-181
"Florida's Last Frontier"

805 Lots for Sale
PUBLISHER'S NOTE
All real estate advertising in this
newspaper is subject to the fair
housing act which makes it illegal
to advertise "any preference,
limitation, or discrimination based
on race, color, religion, sex,
disability, familial status or nation-
al origin; or any intention to make
such preference, limitation or
discrimination." Familial status
includes children under the age of
18 living with parents or legal
custodians, pregnant women and
people securing custody of chil-
dren under the age of 18. This
newspaper will not knowingly
accept any advertising for real es-
tate which is in violation of the


law. Our readers are hereby in-
formed that all dwellings adver-
tised in this newspaper are availa-
ble on an equal opportunity basis.
To complain of discrimination call
HUD toll free at 1-800-669-9777,
the toll free
telephone number to the hearing
impaired is 1-800-927-9275.

810 Home for Sale
2/1 completely updated, screened
back porch, large utility room,
MLS#77413 $52,900 Call Nancy
Rogers R.E.O. Realty
386-867-1271
3/2 1056 sqft Brick home in town.
Fenced back yard w/12x12 work-
shop Just Reduced! $79,900
MLS# 77414 Call 386-243-8227
R.E.O.Realty Group, Inc


810 Home for Sale
3/2 2003 DWMH on 5 acre rectan-
gular lot w/tons of potential.
MLS#77568 $79,900 Call Nancy
@ R.E.O. Realty 386-867-1271
nancytrogers@msn.com
3/2 home on .67 ac. Creekside S/D
Fenced back yard, lots of trees.
Split floor plan on cul-de-sac
MLS 77385 Access Realty.
Patti Taylor $169,900 623-6896
4/2 on 10.5 acres w/ detached
garage, patio, above ground pool,
MLS#77410 $189,888
R.E.O. Realty Group, Inc
386-243-8227
4/2 with 1000 sq ft workshop,
fenced yard, 2 car garage, Fairly
new roof & HVAC MLS#77602,
Bring Offers! $164,900,
R.E.O. Realty Group 243-8227
4br brick on .51 ac. comer lot. For-
mal dining and a large open floor
plan. Brick patio. $139,888
MLS 6763 Brittany Stoeckert
Results Realty 386-397-3473
. Access Realty Stylish 3/2 + pool
house w/1/2 bath on 2.25 acres.
Rear deck, 2 car garage & carport.
MLS 78103 $189,900.
Patti Taylor.623-6896
BEAUTIFUL Lake Front home!
1 ac lot within the city limits.
Close to town. 1800 heated sq. ft.
$144,900 MLS# 78385
Call Jay Sears. 386-867-1613
Brick 3/1 family home, 4.43 acres.
w/metal roof. MLS# 77415
Short sale acceptance w/lenders
approval. $89,000. 386-243-8227
R.E.O. Realty Group, Inc
CLEAN & READY! 3BR/2BA
mfg home on .97-acre south of Ft.
White on paved road $59,000
DANIEL CRAPPS AGENCY,
INC. 755-5110 #78007
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
3/2 brick home in Woodcrest.,Lg
lot completely fenced. Easy access
to amenities. Elaine K. Tolar 386-
755-6488 MLS# 78148 $129,900
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
3/3 in beautiful area. 2414sqft.
Private yard & patio with storage
bldg. Lori G Simpson 386-365-
5678 MLS# 78175 $159,900
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
New home in Mayfair. 4 bedroom
on comer lot. Covered Porch.
Elaine K. Tolar 386-755-6488
MLS# 76919 $209,900
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
Remodeled 2/2 (could be 3/2).
Split floor plan. Great home, great
price. Mary Brown Whitehurst
965-0887 MLS# 77943 $105,000
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
MH in Eastside Village a 55+
retirement community. Well main-
tained. Bruce Dicks 386-365-3784
MLS# 78350 $59,900 '
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
Brick home on Suwannee River
$329,900 Elaine K. Tolar 386-755-
6488 or Lori G. Simpson 365-5678
MLS# 70790 $329,900
DESIRABLE GWEN LAKE area!
Nice 3BR/2BA home on corner lot
REDUCED TO $95,000 DANIEL
CRAPPS AGENCY, INC.
755-5110 #77307
Hallmark Real Estate. 3/2
Doublewide on 1 acre. $58,000.
Not far to college & airport.
MLS# 78308
Ginger Parker 386-365-2135
Hallmark Real Estate. 35 High &
Dry acres, open pasture w/scat-
tered trees. Older site built home.
Needs some TLC.
MLS#76186 Jay Sears 719-0382
Hallmark Real Estate. Beautiful
lot in Woodborough, has well
maintained 3/2 brick home.
Affordable price!MLS#75413
Sherry Willis 386-365-8095




-S --














Bring the picture in or
we will take it for you!
Ad runs 10 consecutive days
with a description and photo in the
newspaper and online E-edition.
Ad runs 10 consecutive days as a
classified line ad online.
You must include vehicle price.
All ads are prepaid.
Private party only.


2006 EF250
Ford Van
3/4 ton, metal work
shelves/ladder rack,
60K miles, exc. cond.

$10,500
Call
386-555-5555
If you don't sell your vehicle
during the first 10 days, you
can run the.same vehicle ad
for 10 additional days for
only $15.00
Terms and conditions remain the
same for the additional run.

To GetY-our
Vehicle Sold, Call
May r rige


810 Home for Sale

Hallmark Real Estate. Lakefront
in town on 1 ac. Majestic oaks &
Magnolias. Hardwood floors,
fireplace & basement.
MLS#78385 Jay Sears 719-0382
Hallmark Real Estate. Pool &
Patio. 3br/2ba. brick home on
1.69 ac. Workshop &
SWMH on property. MLS#78117
Tanya Shaffer 386-397-4766
Hallmark Real Estate. Time to go
to the River. Stilt home w/covered
decking. Floating dock,out bldgs
& covered RV parking. $188K.
MLS#72068 Janet Creel 719-0382
Handyman Special'
Off Turner Rd. 2br/1.5ba.
Half acre fenced lot w/shed.
Asking $55,000. (352)335-8330
HANDYMAN SPECIAL!
4BR/2BA mfg home in great loca-
tion close to many amenities
$39,500 DANIEL CRAPPS
AGENCY, INC. 755-5110 #77852
Home on 15 ac. w/over 2,500 sqft
home.Very Ig bedrooms w/private
baths. 24x24 workshop $235,000
MLS 77552 Brittany Stoeckert
Results Realty 386-397-3473
Lg. 4/3 family home. 16x20
screened porch, workshop. 4.5 ac.
fenced/cross fenced MLS 74339
$229,900. N Fla Homeland Real-
ty Darlene Hart 386-288-2878
Mayfair S/D, nice fenced in back
yard w/small lake behind property.
Very nice. $99,888
MLS 77092 Brittany Stoeckert
Results Realty 386-397-3473
Neat as a pin! Split floor plan
w/well manicured lawn. 10xa12
storage shed. $129K MLS 77932
Darlene Hart 386-288-2878
N Fla Homeland Realty
QUALITY HOME. Very private,
yet in the city. Comes with mobile
home park that generates revenue.
$695,000. MLS# 77920
Call Jay.Sears. 386-867-1613
REDUCED! Custom 2,061 SqFt
home with open floor plan,
3BR/2.5BA, in-ground pool
DANIEL CRAPPS AGENCY,
INC. 755-5110 #75442,
RUSSWOOD EST! 3BR/2BA
w/2,337 SqFt, open floor plan,
climatized sun porch $219,900
DANIEL CRAPPS AGENCY,
INC. 755-5110 #77633
Southern Oaks Country Club.
3br/2.5ba Aprox 3000 sqft. Split
floor plan. on the 9th Fairway.
New AC, 2.5 car garage. sprinkler,
concrete drive. Avail. furnished or
unfurnished. Move in ready w/all
appliances. Avail. now Built in
1992. Open to serious offers.
(305)872-7911 View at
www.lakecitvgolfvilla.com
Spacious 4/2 home on 1 ac. Split
floor plan. Great neighborhood.
Easy access to 1-75 $220K MLS
77859 N Fla Homeland Realty.
Darlene Hart 386-288-2878
WELLBORN! 4BR/2BA mfg
home w/2,280 SqFt, FP, & 5
ACRES only $74,900
DANIEL CRAPPS AGENCY,
INC. 755-5110 #78317


820 Farms &
S Acreage
10 ac. Ft. White $39,995,
$995 Down, $273.16 mo.
Seller fin. vargasrealty.com
352-472-3154
10-ac lot. Well/septic/pp. Owner
financing $300 dn, $663 mo 8.9%,
25 yrs. Deas Bullard Properties
386-752-4339 www.landnfl.com
2+ ACRES ON HWY 47
by 1-75 interchange. More than
200 ft of frontage $149,900
Call 386-243-8227
R.E.O. Realty Group, Inc
20.02 acres ready for your site
built home. Has 2 wells & 2 power
poles w/a 24x30 slab $132,000
MLS# 78126 Call 386-243-8227
R.E.O.Realty Group, Inc
4 1/2 acre lot. Lake Jeffery Road.
Gorgeous Oaks!Paved Rd
Owner Financing! NO DOWN!
$59,900. $525mo 352-215-1018.
www.LandOwnerFinancing.com
4 acres, Wellborn, New Well
installed, Beautifully wooded
w/cleared Home Site, owner fin,
no down, $39,900, $410 mon
Call 352-215-1018
www.LandOwnerFinancing.com
FARM- 7 stall barn, Apt.
17+ acres cross fenced.
Close in $895. mo.
386-961-1086
Paved hard road in front of 5 ac.
tract. Comes with: power pole,
well & septic. Cleared in back.
Also, 20X25 carport. $39,900
MLS# 76347. Jay 386-867-1613

830 Commercial
O8 0 Property
05526409
FOR SALE LAKE CITY
FORMER 84 LUMBER Zoned
Commercial Intensive on
4.2 +/- Acres with an 18,300
S.F. main building at 1824 W.
US Highway 90; contact
Crystal 724 228-3636 x 1349

4 UNIT Apt. Bldg. All 1/1/ w/ex-
tra rooms. Clean, good tenants and
remodeled. Downtown. $160,000.
386-362-8075 or 754-2951

REPORTER Classifieds
In Print and On Line
www.lakecityreporter.com


Announcements


NOTICE: Calling this number will subject
you to HUGE savings on statewide advertising
in over 100 newspapers. Advertising Networks of
Florida, Put us to work for You! (866)742-1373
www.florida-classifieds.com.


Business Opportunities


THINK CHRISTMAS, START NOW!
-OWN A RED HOT! DOLLAR, DOLLAR
PLUS, MAILBOX OR DISCOUNT PARTY
STORE FROM $51,900 WORLDWIDE! 100%
TURNKEY (800)518-3064 WWW.DRSS20.
COM


Education


ALLIED HEALTH career training-Attend
college 100% online. Job placement assistance.
Computer available. Financial Aid if qualified.
SCHEV certified. Call (800)481-9409 www.
CenturaOnline.com


Employment


JUST GRADUATE? Play in Vegas, Hang in
LA, Jet to New York! Hiring 18-24 girls/guys.
$400-$800 wkly. Paid expenses. Signing Bonus.
Call (877)259-6983

Financial Services

$$$ACCESS LAWSUIT CASH NOW!!! $$$
As seen- on TV.$$$ Injury Lawsuit Dragging?
Need $500-$500,000++within 48/hrs? Low rates
APPLY NOW BY PHONE! Call Today! Toll-
Free: (800)568-8321 www.lawcapital.com

Help Wanted

Apply Now, 12 Drivers Needed Top 5% Pay
Great Equipment & Benefits 2 Mos. CDL Class
A Driving Exp (877)258-8782 www.meltontruck.
corn

Driver- Great Miles! Great Pay! $1000 Sign-on
for Experienced CO's & $1500 Incentives for O/
O's. Driver Academy Refresher Course available.
recruit@ffex.net. (855)356-7121

Driver- Drive KNIGHT in 2011! Daily or Weekly
Pay; Top Equipment, 27 Service Centers; Van and
Refrigerated. CDL-A w/3 mos OTR experience.
k=________


830 Commercial
830 Property

Prime Commencial Location.
Just across from plaza. Frontage
on Baya w/2 curbcuts. $350,000
MLS# 77485 Call 386-243-8227
R.E.O.Realty Group, Inc

870 Real Estate
70 Wanted

I Buy Houses
CASH!
Quick Sale Fair Price
386-269-0605


940 Trucks

2000 Chevy S-10 4X4 Extended
Cab Truck. 149,000 miles $5000
OBO 386-269-0831 or
386-365-3736


950 Cars for Sale

2010 FORD Fusion SEL V6,
Auto, Leather, Loaded. 7,000 mi.
Showroom condition. $18,500.
386-752-8227

Recreational
951 Vehicles

2009 Jamboree 31M, Ford V-10,
2 slides, with 32 in. HDTV,
satellite. Av. retail $81,500.
Now $67,000. 386-719-6833


ADVERTISE YOUR
Job Opportunities in the
Lake City Reporter
Classifieds.
Enhance Your Ad with
Your Individual Logo
For just pennies a day.

Call today,
755-5440.


2010 Ford Fusion 2 a
2009 Jamboree
V6, auto, leather, loaded, 3 10,
7,000 mi., showroom cond. Ford V-10, 2 slides w/32
3 5in. HDT3V, satellite.
Av. retail $81,500.
Ca$18ll500 Now $67,000
Ca8 2 Call
386-752-8227 386-719-6833


(800)414-9569. www.driveknight.com

Drivers CDL-A Start up to 45 per mile!!
SIGN-ON BONUS!! GREAT HOME TIME!!!
Lease purchase available. Experience Req'd.
'(800)441-4271 x FL-100 HomadyTransportation.
corn

Frac Sand Haulers with complete bulk
pneumatic rigs only. Relocate to Texas for Tons
of work. Great company/pay. Gas cards/Quick
Pay available. (800)491-9029


Miscellaneous


AIRLINES ARE HIRING Train for high
paying Aviation Maintenance Career. FAA
approved program. Financial aid if qualified -
Housing available. CALL Aviation Institute of
Maintenance (866)314-3769.

ATTEND COLLEGE ONLINE from Home.
*Medical, *Business, *Paralegal, *Accounting,
*Criminal Justice. Job placement assistance.
Computer available. Financial Aid if qualified.
Call (888)203-3179, www.CenturaOnline.com

Real Estate

North Carolina Mountain Lakefront lots. New
gated waterfront community. Dockable lots with
up to 300' of shoreline, Low insurance, Low
property tax. Call Now (800)709-5253

Schools & Instruction

Heat & Air JOBS Ready to work? 3 week
accelerated program. Hands on environment.
Nationwide certifications and Local Job Placement
Assistance! (877)994-9904

Receive quality Class A CDL training from an
accredited and PTDI certified trucking school.
21+, job placement, financial aid and housing
available. Contact Jamie (515)574-1964.




ANF
ADVERTISING NETWORKS or Fl(ORID.

Col .. i D.'. .., I M io Daily



Week of July 18, 2011
^________---_ J ^


The Lakes Apts. Studios & lBr's
from $135/wk. Util. & cable incl.,
Sec 8 vouchers accepted, monthly
rates avail Call 386-752-2741