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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028308/01611
 Material Information
Title: The Lake City reporter
Uniform Title: Lake City reporter (Lake City, Fla. 1967)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: John H. Perry
Place of Publication: Lake City Fla
Publication Date: 7/17/2011
Frequency: daily (monday through friday)[<1969>-]
weekly[ former 1967-<1968>]
daily
normalized irregular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Lake City (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Columbia County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Columbia -- Lake City
Coordinates: 30.189722 x -82.639722 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 95, no. 4 (Oct. 5, 1967)-
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000358016
oclc - 33283560
notis - ABZ6316
lccn - sn 95047175
sobekcm - UF00028308_01569
System ID: UF00028308:01611
 Related Items
Preceded by: Lake City reporter and Columbia gazette

Full Text





The basics
Adee Farmer
teaches football
000014 120511 --D1G
LIB OF FLORIDA HISTORY
PO BOX 117007
205s MA UNIV IDO
GAINESVIE FLORID F
a 326111943





Lake


Clarke leads
Shoots
a 69 at British
Open Saturday.
Sports, I B


Lity


Open slots
EDD, IDA board
vacancies may
soon be filled.
Story below


Reporter


Sunday, July 17, 201 I www.lakecityreporter.com Vol. 137, No. 147 $ $1.00


A daughter's dream

Parents celebrate


her role in major
Hollywood release.

By ANTONIA ROBINSON
arobinson@lakecityreporter. cor

be on the mind of
Laurie and Mark
Thompson of Lake
City when they
attend the premiere of the movie
"Crazy, Stupid, Love" Tuesday
in New York seeing their
daughter, Caitlin Thompson, on
the big screen.
'We're very proud of
Caitlin," said Laurie Thompson.
"Acting is something she said
she wanted'to do since she was
a little girl."
"Crazy, Stupid, Love" opens
July 29 in theaters and stars
Steve Carell and Ryan Gosling.
It is the first major film for
Caitlin Thompson, 24, who
plays the role of Taylor. She
has also appeared in the ABC
Family TV series "Greek" as
Heather.
She first demonstrated her
acting skills as a child. -
"When she was a little girl
she would take the video
camera, go into her bedroom,
lock the door, put up curtains
and sheets and act in front
of the video camera," Mark
Thompson said. "She wrote
her own scripts as well."
Currently, Caitlin Thompson
is on location in Colorado film-
ing for an upcoming indepen-
dent movie, Laurie Thompson
said.
She was raised in Ohio and
right after high school went
to college at Arizona State
University.
The Thompsons, who moved
to Lake City about four years
ago, encouraged their daugh-
ter to have a backup plan,
Laurie Thompson said, so she
majored in marketing and
minored in theater.
After college, she begged
him to let her go to Hollywood
and try acting, Mark
Thompson said. He has always
been 'very cautious about
Hollywood and that kind of
environment.
"She was very persistent,"
he said. "She aaid, 'Dad, let me
give it a year, and if I don't get
any jobs maybe that's God's
way of telling me I need to do
something else.'"
The Thompsons offered
their daughter words of

FILM continued on 5A


JASON MATTHEW WALKERILake City Reporter
Dr. Mark Thompson and his wife, Laurie, of Lake City, recall when daughter Caitlin
would lock herself in her room and act out scenes by herself. They Will fly out to
New York City Tuesday for the premiere of her film, 'Crazy, Stupid, Love.' 'I'm
excited for her,' Laurie Thompson said. 'She's very determined. She surrounded
herself with good people and I think that has been a blessing for her. She just
never quit.'


'. ounesy prolo


Caitlin Thompson in a publicity still.


Bascom Norris bids 90 days away?


By TONY BRITT
tbritt@lakecityreporter.com
County officials hope to bid out
some of the construction work
associated with the final stage of
the Bascom Norris Connector
Road project within the next 90
days.
The fifth and final phase of the
roadway that is left to be complet-
ed is the portion of Bascom Norris
north of Walmart, just south of the
New Millennium Corp. building.
The final phase of construction
on the connector road project will
include a bridge over the CSX rail-
road right-of-way.
Funding for the Bascom Norris
Connector Road project has come


CALL US:
(386) 752-1293
SUBSCRIBETO
THE REPORTER:


from a multitude of sources.
One of the chief sources was a 5
cent gas tax that was imposed for
five years and ended in December
2005. State funding and interest
earnings on the gas-tax revenue
added to the coffers for the project.
The Bascom Norris Connector
Road is a multi-phase project.
The 5 cent gas tax generated
nearly $9.9 million of the total cost.
Approximately $6.5 million was
received from the state in the form
of grants.
Dale Williams, Columbia County
manager, said three major parcels
of land that need to be acquired
before the project can be com-
pleted.
County officials have given the


90
Set. T-Storms


Voice: 755-5445
Fax: 752-9400 WEATHER, 2A


Bu:
(Life
Ob
Pu


approval for one of the parcels to
be purchased and county officials
are waiting on the attorney to
verify that all the information has
been received the title search is
complete.
The purchase price of the prop-
erty has been listed in the range of
$1.6 million.
Obtaining the second parcel
will require the county to issue an
Order of Taking.
"The owner of the property is
not going to object to the Order
Of Taking," Williams said. "They
(property owners) agree that the
Order of Taking is needed and
believe that the right-of-way is
BIDS continued on 5A

pinion ... 4A
siness ... IC
e .... .. ID
bituaries. ......... 7A
zzles .... ... ... 2B


Richardson



bias claims



dismissed


But not everyone's
happy with findings
of federal probe.

By LEANNE TYO .; -
Ityo@lakecityreporter.com
A civil rights complaint
concerning Richardson
Middle School incltd-
ing a claim that the school's
ParentTeacher Organization
for the 2009-10 school year
was disbanded because of
its racial composition has
been dismissed by federal
investigators, according to
documents obtained by the
Lake City Reporter..
The U.S. Department of
Education's Office of Civil
Rights investigated the
complaints by reviewing
relevant documents and
conducting interviews with
the complainant and district
staff, according to an OCR
report The complaint was
dismissed due to insufficient
evidence the district was out
of compliance with Title VI of
the Civil Rights Act of 1964,
which prohibits discrimina-
tion on the basis of, race,
color or national origin.


Local school officials are
pleased with the decision."
Others are not
Bea Coker, 2009-10 PTO
past-president, said she was
one of a group of more than
10 RMS parents and teach.-".
ers who filed the federal civil
rights complaint
Coker said the investiga-
tion didnrot get to the bottom,
of things at Richardson.
"It just doesn't adequately
capture whatwas going on at
that time." she said.
The OCR report, dated
July 1, was received by
local school officials July
11. The complaint, lodged
in May 2010, contained five
separate claims.

Disbanding of PTO
On of those claims con-
cerned disbanding of the
'school's Parent Teacher
Organization.
The complaint alleged
the PTO was dissolved "as
a result of the majority black
racial composition of its
leadership," according to the
OCR report
BIAS continued on 3A


Open board slots

may soon be filled


By LEANNE TYO
Ityo@lakecityreporter.com
The county could present
a nominee to fill its open
position on the Economic
Development Department
and Industrial Deielopment
Authority boards by its
next meeting, officials said
Friday.
"It is my understand-
ing that at our next county
commission meeting, we're
going to have a nominee,"


said Dale Williams, county
manager.
The nominee, Stephen
Douglas, would replace
Suzanne Norris, who
served as an Economic
Development Department
board member and the
chairwoman of the IDA.
Norris tendered her res-
ignation effective June 30
because of work and family
commitments.
BOARDS continued on 5A


TONY BRITT/Lake City Reporter
Paula Naveau, a volunteer firefighter from Jacksonville,
counts donations collected for the families of fallen firefighters
Josh Burch and Brett Fulton during a fundraiser sponsored
by the White Springs Volunteer Fire Department Saturday.
Naveau collected more than $230 in donations in three hours,
she said.


TODAY IN
BUSINESS
She'E a
'BEEhe.er'


COMING
TUESDAY
Vjeekend rne.e s
roundup


I I842640 0 8













Seitc L$ 3. FLORIDA 0


Friday: Friday: Saturday: Saturday: Saturday: Saturday:
12-26-40-43 MB 15 3-9-14-20-21 Afternoon: 7-7-9 Afternoon:6-2-5-7 unavailable unavailable
Evening: unavailable Evening: unavailable


AROUND FLORIDA


On last day in jail, Anthony's future uncertain


MIKE SCHNEIDER
Associated Press

ORLANDO Casey
Anthony is spending her
last day in jail Saturday
preparing for an uncertain
future after nearly three
years behind bars.
Orange County Jail offi-
cials planned to release
Anthony sometime Sunday
under circumstances they
refused to disclose. Experts
have said she's likely to
be released in the dead
of night, and her defense
team will try to keep her
away from the glare of the
media spotlight.
That could be difficult:
More than a dozen televi-
sion trucks already were
outside the jail by noon
Saturday, though the facil-
ity was otherwise quiet.
Scores of reporters and
cameramen are expected
to be outside later on, and
local television stations
are going live with cover-
age starting late Saturday
night
One of her attorneys,
Cheney Mason, said Friday
that Anthony is scared to
leave jail, given numerous
threats on her life and the
scorn of a large segment of
the public that believes she
had something to do with
the death of her 2-year-old
daughter, Caylee.
Anthony was acquitted
of first-degree murder in
Caylee's death earlier this
month. She was found
guilty of four counts of
lying to police, but with
time served and good
behavior credits, she didn't
have to serve out her four-


Casey Anthony waits in the courtroom before the start of her sentencing hearing in Orlando.


year sentence.
Another attorney,
Charles Greene, said
Friday that Anthony was
"emotionally unstable" and
needed "a little breathing
room" after the draining
two-month trial.
That could be difficult,
given the vitriol directed at
Anthony. After the verdict,
anger spilled onto social
networks like Facebook and
Twitter from people who
had spent weeks watch-


ing the trial on local and
cable television networks.
On Friday, Anthony's legal
team said it had received an
emailed death threat with a
manipulated photo showing
the 25-year-old woman with
a bullet hole in her fore-
head. It has been forward-
ed to authorities. Officials
had said earlier this week
that they had not received
any credible threats, but
they did not return a phone
call about that email.


In Orlando and else-
Swhere, many remain con-
vinced Anthony isn't totally
innocent. David Waechter
recorded the. trial and
watched it at home with his
wife every day after work.
-He saidAnthony was guilty
of "something, for sure."
"I'm perplexed. You kow
there is something there,
but you don't know what,"
he said. "Yet she is getting
out."
"Most people I talk


ASSOCIATED PRESS


to, they're done with it,"
Mandy Williams, a 38-year-
old county parks employee,
said outside a busy grocery
story. "When it came out
she was not guilty, people
were ticked off."
Steven Klosterman, who
owns a property manage-
ment company, said if
Anthony. were to stay in
Orlando, "I think she'll
.wind up, like her daughter,"
given the threats she has
received.


"Good luck to her," said
Klosterman, 43. "She's
going to have a hard time."
Security experts have
said Anthony will need
to hole up inside a safe
house protected by body-
guards, perhaps for weeks,
in case someone tries to
make good on one of those
threats. Ideally, several
SUVs with tinted windows
will pull up to the jail to
whisk her away, probably in
the middle of the night, the
experts said. Jail officials
have not disclosed when
she will be released.
Exactly where she will
go also remains unclear.
It's unlikely she'll return to
the home she once shared
with her parents, as the
trial left her family frac-
tured. Defense attorney
Jose Baez argued during
the trial that Caylee acci-
dentally drowned in the
family pool and that Casey
Anthony's father, George,
covered it up to make it
look like a homicide. Baez
also argued that George
Anthony molested his
daughter when she was a
child which resulted in
psychological issues that
caused hei; to lie and act
without apparent remorse
after Caylee went missing.
"Most of the time you can
always go home, but she
doesn't have that option,"
said Daniel Meachum, an
Atlanta lawyer who has
represented football star
Michael Vick and actor
Wesley Snipes. "Baez has
to have somewhere for her
to go for her to get herself
together."


PEOPLE IN THE NEWS


Campbell's 1st show since Alzheimer's news


ASSOCIATED PRESS


Glen Campbell perforrs with members of his family at the IP Casino in Biloxi, Ms: on Friday.


CHRIS TALBOTT
Entertainment Writer

BILOXI, Glen Campbell leaned
over his blue electric guitar, plucked
a few strings and made a sour face.
"Dadgum it," he said.
Campbell, 75, fiddled a few; sec-
onds longer while standing backstage
Friday night at the IP Casino and
finally found a perfect D chord.
'There it is," he said, before turn-
ing on his heel and marching into the
spotlight. He launched into "Gentle
on my Mind" and without so much
as clearing his throat nailed it
'That first one is a doozey, ain't it?"
Campbell asked the crowd.
It was classic Glen Campbell.
Alzheimer's disease may have
changed a lot of things in the Country
Music Hall of Famer's life, but his
ability to create sounds that still reso-
nate in our shared memory with his
blue G&L Comanche on "By the
Time I Get to Phoenix" or his Hamer.
12-string on "Southern Nights" is vir-
tually untouched.


In the night's finest moment,
Campbell brought the crowd to its
feet after nailing the delicate runs
in the middle of his classic 'Wichita
Lineman."
SCampbell's first performance since
announcing he has Alzheimer's, the
degenerative brain disease that's
slowly robbing him of his memories
and abilities, was largely a triumph.
His family and road crew were wor-
ried he might be rusty after a long
layoff since his last performance.
Except for a few flubbed lyrics, quick-
ly corrected with the help of tele-
prompters, Campbell and his band
powered through a tight 22-song set
interspersed with self-deprecating
jokes.
"I tell you I'm happy to be here,"
Campbell said. "At my age I'm happy
to be anywhere. It seems like I've
been doing this since Hitler was a
corporal."
Fronting a band that includes
four of his children and close
friends, Campbell played favor-
ites like "Rhinestone Cowboy" and


"Galveston" and finished the evening
with two songs from his new album,
"Ghost on the Canvas," out Aug. 30
on Surfdog Records.
The album, which features guest
appearances and song contributions
from Paul Westerberg, Jakob Dylan,
Keith Urban, Billy Corgan, Brian
Setzer, Rick Nielsen and Dick Dale,
is Campbell's last studio album. He
plans a goodbye tour as well. Friday's
show was a one-off, an excuse to
gather his family around him and
have a little fun.
"When I get tired of playing golf I
do one of these," Campbell joked in
an interview earlier in the day.
Campbell was loose and easy-
going all day, joking his way through
rehearsal and posing for pictures with
fans before and after the show. Two
drove six hours and showed up with
homemade shirts that read "Glen
Campbell Fan." A couple flew in from
Seattle. Another fan noted he keeps
Campbell's music in heavy rotation
on his iPod.


Celebrity Birthdays


* Comedian Phyllis Diller is
94.
* Actor Donald Sutherland
is 76
* Actor David Hasselhoff is
59
* Actress Nancy Giles is 51
* Singer Regina Belle is 48
* Actor Andre Royo is 43
* Actress Bitty Schram is 43


Daily Scripture


* Actor Jason Clarke is 42
* Singer JC (PM Dawn) is 40

* Rapper Sole' is 38.
* Country singer Luke Bryan
is 35.
* Actor Eric Winter is 35
* Hockey player Marc Sa-
vard is 34.


"The LORD loves you."
Deuteronomy 7:8,


Lake City Reporter


HOW TO REACH US
Main number ........(386) 752-1293
Fax number ............. 752-9400
Circulation ...............755-5445
Online ... www.lakecityreporter.com
The Lake City Reporter, an affiliate of
Community Newspapers Inc., is pub-
lished Tuesday through Sunday at 180
E. Duval St., Lake City, Fla. 32055.
Periodical postage paid at Lake City, Fla.
Member Audit Bureau of Circulation and
The Associated Press.
All material herein is property of the Lake
City Reporter. Reproduction in whole or
in part is forbidden without the permis-
sion of the publisher. U.S. Postal Service
No. 310-880.
POSTMASTER: Send address changes
to Lake City Reporter, P.O. Box 1709,
Lake City, Fla. 32056.
Publisher Todd Wilson .....754-0418
(twilson@lakecityreporter.com)
NEWS
Editor Robert Bridges .....754-0428
(rbridges@lakecityreporter.com)
ADVERTISING
Director Ashley Butcher .754-0417
(abutcher@lakecityreporter.com)
CLASSIFIED
To place a classified ad, call 755-5440
BUSINESS
Controller Sue Brannon....754-0419
(sbrannon@lakecityreporter.com)


CIRCULATION


Home delivery of the Lake City Reporter
should be completed by 6:30 a.m.
Tuesday through Saturday, and by 730
a.m. on Sunday.
Please call 386-755-5445 to report any
problems with your delivery service.
In Columbia County, customers should
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vice error for same day re-delivery. After
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vice related credits will be issued.
In all other counties where home delivery
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vice related credits will be issued.

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CORRECTION

The Lake City Reporter corrects errors of fact in news
items. If you have a concern, question or suggestion,
please call the executive editor. Corrections and clarifica-
tions will run in this space. And thanks for reading.


Page Editor: Amber Hamilton, 754-0424


LAKE CITY REPORTER SUNDAY REPORT SUNDAY, JULY 17, 2011












BIAS: Federal investigation finds insufficient evidence to back claims

Continued From Page 1A


Keith Couey, district
director of Family and
Community Involvement,
was RMS principal at the
time of the complaint. Couey
disbanded the 2009-10 PTO
for reasons unrelated to
race, the report said.
The PTO's leadership con-
sisted of the complainant,
two black parents and two
white .parents," the report
said, "which is dispropor-
tionately black compared
with previous PTO leader-
ships."
However, the report con-
tinued, "The District provid-
ed reasons for the dissolu-
tion of the PTO because of
unsettlement at the school
among faculty, parents and
students over PTO activities;
numerous complaints from
parents about the lack of
accountingfor funds; and fail-
ure to follow the procedures
for the main fundraiser to
properly account for sale of
the discount cards," reports
said. "OCR determined that
the District proffered a legit-
imate, nondiscriminatory
reason for the action."
Allison Scott, who held the
post of past-treasurer for the
2009-10 PTO, said she still
believes the PTo was targeted
because of race.
"I think they (the district)
weretargetingus onthatissue,"
she said. "I think they had their
own hidden agenda."
Scott noted that the 2009-
10 PTO's black leadership ran
unopposed.
"When we went for office,
nobody wanted to go against
us, so it wasn't lke they'had to
choose," she said.
She also said that no mat-
ter what the PTO did, it was
always subject to undue scru-
tiny.
"Everything was always
questioned," Scott said.
"Instead of PTO being an
organization that always helps
kids, I felt like it was a time
to come and vent against us.
It,wasn't a time to come and
v:lare' ofhow to;tiakethings
1befte for kids at Richrdson,
it was a venting session
against the board. We were
constantly targeted."
Rebecca Frazier, 2009-10
PTO past-vice president, had
a different take.
She said the PTO was
disbanded not because of its
black leadership, but because
of issues involving the previ-
ous PTO board.
'I don't think it was disband-
ed because of the black mem-
bership," she said. "I think it.
was disbanded because we
were trying to go by some actu-
al rules and the FTO before
hadn't"
Coker said the 2009-10
FO met resistance because
it was following practices that
had not been strictly adhered
to in the past
She said the previous PTO
was in debt, which her PTO
took care of
Before the district imple-
mented specific policies for
FfOs and booster dubs, 'there
was- a great deal of bickering
between the two years' manage-
ment and the bills continuing
to come in to force the FPOs
to create separate accounts to
remove liabilities for bills we
could not substantiate," Coker
said.
School employees also
mismanaged PTO fundrais-
ing dollars, Coker claimed.
She also noted that the


2009-10 PTO increased
parent participation, cre-
ated opportunities for par-
ents and businesses to be
involved with fundraising
and held many activities
for students, like Movie
Madness at the end of each
nine weeks for honor roll
students, and appreciation
luncheons for teachers and
school staff.
Currently, RMS is with-
out a PTO, but has another
parent organization.

Concession
stand use

Another claim concerned
concession stands at school
basketball games.
It was alleged that during
the 2009-10 school year, "the
booster club of the boys' bas-
ketball team, which is major-
ity black, was forced to oper-
ate concession stands from a
broom closet to raise money
while the booster club of the
girls' basketball team, which is
majority white, operated from
the regular concession stand
area," the OCR report reads.
Evidence showed that
the girls' basketball team,
which was racially mixed,
had exclusive use of the con-
cession stand, where they
also stored their inventory,
reports said.
Couey and the basketball
coach stated the boys' team
had never sold concessions,
reports indicate. When the
decision was made to do so,
three options were given.
The complainant chose to
use a supply room that was
larger than the main conces-
sion stand area and Couey
provided school staff to help
operate the stand, reports
said.
-Coker, who was also the
booster club president, said
such options were never
offered.
'There were not options
'given to the basketball
team to be in the broom
closet," she said. "Mr.
(Superintendent Mike)
Millikin specifically told
Principal Couey to obtain
the key for the concession
to the boys' basketball
team and parents refused


to do so. The boys' bas-
ketball team operated out
of a broom closet, not by
choice, and the only option
was to not have a conces-
sion at all."
Reports said while there
were conflicting statements
as to the timeframe, boys'
team boosters were even-
tually able to use the girls'
team's stand.

Cash for
extra credit

Another claim con-
cerned a sixth-grade teach-
er at Richardson who sup-
posedly gave extra credit'
to students who contrib-
uted money for school
resources, "disadvantag-
ing black students who are
disproportionately of lower
income," the OCR report
said.
The teacher requested
the funds in order to offset
costs of a popular book stu-
dents wanted, reports said,
but Couey canceled the plan
before any funds were col-
lected.
Both Couey and.the teach-
er stated no money was col-
lected, reports indicate.
The lead complainafit,
unidentified in the report,
said a letter requesting
money was given to stu-
dents and such funds were
brought in. :
Coker said if the program
had merely been proposed,
parents would not have
known about it
Reports said the com-
plainant "did not provide any
evidence to support her alle-
gation that money was col-
lected for extra credit" nor
did the complainant provide
any additional information
to support the allegation.

Resources denied?

The complaintalso alleged
that "black Exceptional
Student Education teachers,
who teach the majority of
black ESE students, are denied
resources provided to white
ESE teachers. Specifically, the
Complainant alleged that black
ESE teachers requesting an


New College
tQNew
I' IShirts


BootsOKY

BOOtS WOLVERINE.





Thefamily/ of

Robert

Mershon
would like to thanlik
everyone for their
love and support
in the recent loss ,
of their father, on11,
brother and un hcle,
with a very. slpecil -
thanks to the Black
Pistons Bikers Club.


Elmo document reader did not
recieve one."
Coker said this was an issue
raised by RMS teachers.
For 2009-10, the district
received 20 Elmo readers,
reports said, which were
given to regular education
classrooms before ESE class-
rooms, because ESE class-
room Elmo readers were
purchased out of the ESE
department's budget
'The ESE classrooms did
receive Elmos by the end of
the 2009-2010 school year,"
reports said. "The distribu-
tions of the Elmos were not
determined by the race of
the teachers."

Booster Club costs

The final complaint"alleged
that black parents and stu-
dents of the girls' basketball
team were charged higher
amounts by the team booster
club for participation costs
(e.g., meals) than their white
counterparts," reports said.
Coker said a girls' basket-
ball team parent brought
the issue to the PTO board.
When Coker reviewed the
meal contract between the
meal provider and the girls'
basketball team booster
club president, she said she
found. some parents were
being charged a different
amount than the provider
was charging.
"The black parents and
students on the girls' bas-
ketball team were charged
higher amounts than the
white students," she said:
For the 2009-10 school year,
the girls' basketball team had
11 black and six white players,
reports said. Evidence showed
the booster club assesses all of


the players' $30 dues for away
game meals, the OCR report
said.
Payments received by
parents are on the honor
system and parents pay
what they can, reports said.
The booster club, coach
and principal pay the short-
fall.
Coker said the FIO worked
to create a program to alleviate
meal costs for athletic team par-
ents and students, but school
employees mishandled the
funds.
The complaint stated that
the district's explanations df
payment by parents was "not
true."
'Ihe Complainant failed to
provide any evidence to sup-
port the allegation," reports
said. 'The evidence shows
that there is no difference in
treatment, in that the dues
assessment is the same for
all students and the dues are
subsidized based solely upon
the ability of parents to make
the payment"
Couey said he is glad that
all the complaints were dis-
missed.
'I feel like we did every-
thing we did for the best
interest of children always at
Richardson," he said. "It (the
complaint) kind of caught me
off guard when it came out,
but Im glad that we're cleared
now.
"What Im really proud of is
thatwe do whafs rightfor chil-
dren," Couey said. I would've
done anything to make sure
the kids were taken care of
first That was my frist priority
every day as principal"
School board officials
expressed similar feelings.
'We're pleased that there
were no findings of wrongdo-
ing or findings that our pro-


grams were not running up to
the standards that any boost-
er club or parent organization
or athletic activity in the way
that it should be," said Linard
Johnson, Columbia County
School Board chairman.
Millikin agreed.
"Naturally, as a school
system in general and spe-
cifically for any school, we're
pleased at these findings," he
said. "We-go to great lengths
to ensure that we're provid-
ing the best education for all
of our children, regardless
of race, sex, background or
school that they attend."
'The allegations that the
school staff were discriminat-
ing against groups of individu-
als, in some cases minorities,
in some cases boys and girls
athletic groups, we felt just
didn't have any standing,"
Millikin said. 'We take pride in
all of our schools, particularly
the secondary schools that
have athletic programs where
boys and girls teams are treat-
ed with the same amount of
respect and enthusiasm."
Board Attorney Guy
Norris called the complaints
"silly."
"It wasted a lot of the
resources of the district to
defend it" he said. "But when
something like thafs brought,
thafs what we have to do and
we did so successfully, so it's a
good outcome."
"We. fully cooperated
with the Office for Civil
Rights, despite the fact
that we did not find the
complaint to .be with'any
merit at all," Norris said.
"We took it seriously and
responded to it seriously
and we investigated it seri-
ously and there was really
nothing to it. It was much
ado about nothing."


* INOW ;

t1p-air *

, Eyeglasses I

.Includes lenses & frames. :
Some Restrictions Apply.
S COUPON REQUIRED. EXPIRES JULY 31,2011
01 m i ., m ,i i i i


SIn/Memory of

Jerry Edwvcrc
The family ofJerry Edwards
would like to thank the VA.
Medical Center for the care that
was given to him over the years.
The exceptional medical care
that was given to him allowed
him to have a long and full life. '
The.doctors, nurses, food service,
custodians, and all the support
staff were very kind and caring.
Our beloved family member passed away while in the
Hospice unit at the V A. We would like to thank everyone in
the hospice unit for the care and compassion they showed,
not only to him, but to the family as well. Words cannot ex-
press how much you all meant to him, as well as his family.
May God bless you all,
The Edwards Family


I have a history of going to church
I joined the First Presbyterian Church when I was 12 years old.
' As a teenager, the church "taught me the way that I should go. As an adult, the church
... continues to help me, "grow in my faith."
S'. ". "' .. The church has always been an integral oart
.*"4'.",I "r .. ,, ... .

S -;~~~'u r, ,:,r.:- .. :.r un
.Be, i r ri .:F ao. ':.,,I- r r .: r




4 '--".-., " Piease come Sur aa. oir ames
SS ( and our fam-ly ior Surnaa Sen.ce
,, '-",

First Presbyterian Church
697 SW Baya Dr, Lake City, Florida WORSHIP
752-0670 fpclc@bellsouthnet Worship Service 10:00am
-www.fpclc.org Sunday School 9:00am


U
s!


i


S m I D


sef.vmic


IncldesSatrda







CONTACTS


EYE


LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL SUNDAY, JULY 17, 2011


Page Editor: Robert Bridges, 754-0428


^ '"r


,~














OPINION


I- -- -D's 5
OUR


Sunday. lulv 17 2011


OUR
OPINION



Who'll


fill the


void?
Everybody in the
Suwannee River
Valley should mourn
the passing of the
Ichetucknee Springs
Working Group, funding for
which was cut in this year's
state budget.
The group went far beyond
what was expected in fulfilling its
responsibilities to the springs
- and to the folks who relied
on the Ichetucknee, either for
fun or their livelihood.
The working group's out-
reach was constant. Bus tours
of the Ichetucknee Springs
Basin were scheduled frequent-
ly and always packed with inter-
ested citizens eager to hear
the narrative of how all living
things in our area are linked.
Meetings of the working
.group were legendary.
This wasn't just a bunch of
nature lovers rapping about the
wonder of the great outdoors.
These meetings were attended
by hydrologists, politicians and
concerned stakeholders from
all walks of life. The working
group had the ability to bring
agencies together in one set-
ting where they might not have
crossed paths otherwise.
They were often marathon
sessions with detailed agendas
exploring the ramifications of
various proposals that might
have effects more profound than
many might have imagined.
We can imagine them now.
Water, always the-widcard
among Florida's natural
resources, is of even greater
concern now, with Northeast
Florida's growing appetite for
the Floridan Aquifer.
With the loss of the working
group, who will take up the
challenge to preserve, protect
and defend our most precious
natural resource?
We've expressed the view
that private citizens can, and
should, take on the challenge.
We stand by those words.
For those up to the task,
the time is now to step up and
get involved. We all have a
responsibility to do our part to
make sure our water quality
and quantity is maintained for
future generations.

Lake City Reporter
Serving Columbia County
Since 1874
The Lake City Reporter is pub-
lished with pride for residents of
Columbia and surrounding counties by
Community Newspapers Inc.
We believe strong newspapers build
strong communities -"Newspapers
get things done!"
Our primary goal is to
publish distinguished and profitable
community-oriented newspapers.
SThis mission will be accomplished
through the teamwork of professionals
dedicated to truth, integrity and hard
work.
Todd Wilson, publisher
Robert Bridges, editor
*Sue Brannon, controller
Dink NeSmith, president
Tom Wood, chairman


LETTERS
POLICY
Letters to the Editor should be
typed or neatly written and double
spaced. Letters should not exceed
400 words and will be edited for
length and libel. Letters must be
signed and include the writer's name,
address and telephone number for
verification. Writers can have two
letters per month published. Letters
and guest columns are the opinion of
the writers and not necessarily that of
the Lake City Reporter.
BY MAIL: Letters, P.O. Box 1709,


Lake City, FL 32056; or drop off at
180 E. Duval St. downtown.
BY FAX: (386) 752-9400.
BY E-MAIL:
news@lakecityreporter.com


Why do blacks still let


Obama off the hook?
Chicag Sun Ti es


Chicago Sun Times
article, headlined
"The disappearing
black middle class,"
reports on the
disproportionate impact of these
hard economic times on blacks.
According to the data, taken
from the Washington-based
Economic Policy Institute,
median net worth of white
households fell from $134,280
in 2004 to $97,860 in 2009, while
over the same period median
black household net worth
went from $13, 450 to $2,170.
The national unemployment
rate stands at 9.2 percent, while
black unemployment is over 16
percent.
There's more, but you get the
picture. The nation has been hit
hard, but blacks much harder.
Which raises a point of
interest.
Approval rates for President
Barack Obama among whites
have dropped from 56 percent
in early 2009 after he became
president to 39 percent now
- a drop of 17 points. But over
this same period, Obama's
approval rating among blacks
has dropped just 8 points from
93 percent to 85 percent.
Many whites that initially
had supported our president
are now crediting him for our
current.misery. But blacks,
despite suffering far more, are
far less inclined to hang it on
Obama.
The message that massive
government spending and
borrowing does not grow the
economy has not reached
blacks. Rather, like our
president, they seem to believe
that the problem is we just
haven't yet dug the fiscal hole


Star Parker
parker@urbancure.org
deep enough.
Is this a racial thing? Whites
will jump off the ship run by a
black captain in a minute while
blacks will ride it out until it hits
the iceberg?
No, I don't think so. I think
it's both a liberal information
thing and a moral thing.
The liberal information thing
is that blacks overwhelmingly
get their information from
liberal sources.
Blacks watch CNN and
MSNBC, not Fox. They listen to
urban black radio.
They are not going to hear
from these sources that if you
look all over the world, nations
with the most prosperous
economies are the ones with
the most limited governments.
Liberal media refuses to get and
pass the word that socialism has
failed.
The major organizations that
supposedly represent black
interests are all on the left,
generously funded by big left
wing white foundations and by
our nation's corporations. The
former do it because they are
liberals and the latter do it to
show that they are not racist.
And, like the Economic Policy
Institute, that produced the
data reported in the Sun Times
article, they are supported by
unions.
But I think more corrosive is


the moral thing.
Almost a half-century since
the passage of the Civil Rights
Act, too many blacks still don't
want to be free and accept the
responsibilities that go with it.
Too many blacks still believe
that the condition of their lives
is caused by what someone else
does or has.
It is sad that this is true
despite the fact that blacks go to
church more often, pray more
often, and say religion plays a
central part in their life more
than any other ethnic group in
the nation.
Why do a people so inclined
to turn to God so readily violate
the Tenth Commandment's
prohibition on covetousness and
measure themselves in terms
of what others have? And then
use this sin to justify violating
the Eighth Commandment and
give government license to steal
what others have in order to
redistribute?
Perhaps most fundamentally,
how can a church going people
buy into the materialism of
socialism?
There is a solution to the
general travails of our nation
and the particular travails of our
black brothers and sisters.'
It is called every man
and woman taking personal
responsibility for their lives,
turning to government for.
protection of life and property
not redemption, and living
as free people according to
traditional biblical mores.

Star Parker is president of
CURE, Coalition
on Urban Renewal and Education
(www.urbancure.org) and author
of three books.


ANOTHER OPINION


Washcall: National Mall sprawl?


The Smithsonian's
National Museum
of the American
Indian occupies a
prime piece of real
estate on the National Mall. A
few blocks away, construction
of the National Museum of
African-American History and
Culture is scheduled to begin
next year.
Earlier this year, a presiden-
tial commission recommended
that the Smithsonian's National
Museum of the American
Latino be established down the
hill from the U.S. Capitol. And,
last month, lobbyists flocked to
the Hill to press Congress to
support creating the National
Women's History Museum.
Now come Rep. James
Moran, D-Va., 11 bipartisan
House cosponsors and more
than 130 ethnic and minor-


ity groups with plans for the
Museum of the American
People, which they want to
build on yet another corner of
the capital's prime ceremonial
real estate.
To those who note'that the
Smithsonian's 47-year-old
National Museum of American
History packed with 3 million
national treasures and which
draws 4 million visitors a year
to its central Mall location -
- ably tells the nation's story,
Moran says it does not do jus-
tice to the "melting pot" that is
America.
Moran sees such a new
museum as a "national pilgrim-
age destination" as well as
a way to curb the trend of
building more narrow-interest
museums on the increasingly
crowded Mall.
The Federal Trade


Commission is considering
fiddling with those little clean-
ing-instruction tags attached to
your clothes.
With a wryness rarely found
in a regulatory agency, the
FTC refers to its long-standing
"care labeling rule" as "clothes
captioning." But it takes its
responsibilities very seriously,
weighing with painstaking
deliberation what the definition
of, for instance, "cold," "warm"
and "hot" should be.
Since 1971, the rule has been
amended three times, most
significantly in 1997, when the
FTC gave the nod to stick sym-
bols signifying whether using
bleach is OK, whether the gar-
ment should be dry-cleaned or
hand-washed, and how it should
be dried.
M Scripps Howard News Service


4A


Todd Wilson
twilson@Jakecityreportercom


Freedom


reigns


supreme

A few weeks ago the U.S.
Supreme Court tossed the
keys to me and every other
parent in America and put us
in the driver's seat The mes-
sage is clear: Freedom rules.
The people are in control, not'
the government
The Justices were consid-
ering whether regulations
should be imposed on video
game companies as to how
much violence will be toler-
ated in their programming as
they market their product to
children. Groups had protested
the graphic violence in many
video games as escalating out-
of-control, California passed a
state law regulating the sale of
these games to minors, and,
naturally, litigation followed
challenging the California law
at the federal level.
The Supreme Court ruled
that levels of video game
violence were wide open,
protected by the Constitution,
and could not be restrained by
any law. Video game content
is a creative work and has the
same protection under the
Constitution as any published
written work, movie, state-
ment or thought. As long as
'the'images and actions are not
pornographic, brutal violence
is acceptable and has a right to
exist in a video game marketed
to anyone, the Justices said.
"Postal," "Grand Theft Auto"
and "Mortal Combat" video
games get the same uncen-
sored protection, under law, as
the Holy Bible.
Sometimes, freedom can be
a booger.
Video games have come
a long way from the Atari
"Combat," the game that arrived
with the 2600 model console
back in the late 1970s. It was
one on-screen "tank" versus
another then, but they looked
like a pair of one-dimensional
Lego blocks moving around on
the screen. It was pretty mild.
Now, the estimated 100
million gamers out there in
America alone, can make real-
istic eye-contact with the real-
istic "people" involved in these
games. The blood and guts
and violence is realistic, too.
In no way do I condone vio-
lence and I certainly don't want
it to be marketed to children,
but the Supreme Court made
a wise decision to avoid any
type of censorship imposed
by the government. If that
door gets opened, what's next?
Outlawing content in books or
on Web sites or in the media?
Free speech? We've seen other
democracies crumble in these
situations. No thanks.
Ill stand with freedom, even
when it protects elements that
make me feel uncomfortable.
rm OK with shouldering the
responsibility to be a strong
parent who polices what my
child is doing, or in this instance
what video games we come in
contact with. The same goes for
other pockets of evil that chal-
lenge the foundation of society.
Individually, we either allow evil
to chip away at what we know to
be right, or we stop it cold.
These violent video games in
question cost around $50 each,
so adults are coughing up the
cash for these purchases.
The real challenge facing
our country is can adults be


adults, step up and be stronger
parents who protect their chil-
dren.
M Todd Wilson is publisher of the
Lake City Reporter.


www.lakecityreporter.com











PaeEio:Rbr rde,7402 AECTYRPRE O A T T UDY UY1,21


Nationally

acclaimed

documentary

to screen in

Gainesville

From staff reports
GAINESVILLE After being diag-
nosed with a rare and potentially dead-
ly case of lymphoma, Pulitzer Prize-
winning photographer and University
of Florida journalism professor John
Kaplan turned the lens on himself
to create the nationally acclaimed
documentary, Not As I Pictured. Join
Kaplan August 2 at 7:30 p.m. at the
Squitieri Studio Theatre for a showing
of his film, a panel discussion and a
free copy of the DVD.
"When suddenly faced with a life-
threatening illness, Ihad no idea
that so many positive things could
come forth from such devastating
news," Kaplan said. "Fortunately,
this has been at the core of my
motivation to make Not As I
Pictured."
With the help of his family, doc-
tors, a rock star and even Mother
Teresa, Kaplan chronicles his
ultimately successful cancer battle
through photography and video.
"Despite the serious topic, Not As
I Pictured is easy to watch, and even
humorous at times," Kaplan said.
"Universally, cancer patients and
their families tell us they feel better'
after watching it"
Not As I Pictured has garnered
more than 20 honors, including two
CINE Golden Eagle Awards and sev-
eral best documentary film festival
accolades.
Several well-known musicians
donated musical rightstto the award-
winning film soundtrack, including
Michael Stipe and R.E.M.; Chris'
Martin of Coldplay; David Bowie;
will.i.am of the Black Eyed Peas;
Justin Timberlake; Pantera; and
Maria Carter.,
Not As I Pictured is part of the
Chords of Color for a Cause summer
series which will also feature The
Fab Faux July 22; Hippiefest Aug. 24;
and Barbara Padilla Sept 23.


COURTESY PH(
University of Florida journalism professor John
Kaplan turned the lens on himself to create his
film, Not As I Pictured. The film will be shown
August 2 at 7:30 p.m. at the Squitieri Studio
Theatre.


FILM: Couple's daughter has role


wisdom to help her man-
age in the acting industry.
"Itfs such an inditstry
that can lead you in the
wrong direction," Laurie
Thompson said.
Before she left for
Hollywood, he wrote her a
two-page letter with words
of encouragement, Mark
Thompson said. It said to
not take it personally were
she rejected for a part,
among other tidbits.
"I told Caitlin,
Hollywood is a fickle
place," he said. "Hollywood
will have an opinion of you,
but you have to have a
strong opinion of yourself."
Caitlin Thompson was
determined to find suc-
cess as an actress, Laurie
Thompson said.
"She got a job to pay for
her own acting classes,"
Laurie Thompson said. "It
was a' desire and dream of
hers always she pursued in
her own way. We're seeing'
the fruit of her labor."
Last year Caitlin
Thompson joined the
Screen Actor's Guild.
"It was a big step for her
as a young actress," Mark
Thompson said. "You have
to be invited into that"
Appearing in the movie
is another big step for
their daughter, he said.
The couple knew about
a year and a half ago she
had landed the part
"They shoot so long ago,
but you don't know when
it's coming out" Mark
Thompson said.
The upcoming premiere
is causing excitement for
the family.


"That'll be exciting to be
at the red carpet event,"
he said. "It will be my first
experience for that sort of
thing."
Their daughter is
not star stuck when it
comes to working along-
side big names, such as
Gosling and Carell, Laurie
Thompson said.
"She treats this as a
business," she said. "She
loves meeting these tal-
ented people but is not into
the celebrity part of it She
looks at is as her career.
It's exciting to meet big
name stars, but she takes
it all in strides."
Caitlin Thompson has.
been in Los Angeles for
two years now, Laurie
Thompson said. She has
surrounded herself both
personally, and. profession-
ally with positive people.
Her daughter's success
is an encouragement to
other young people want-
ing to pursue their dreams
and make them a reality,
Laurie Thompson said.
"Dreams, they really
can come true," she said.
"She's doing it"
Not once has her
daughter given up, Laurie
Thompson said. Much of
her work she has done on
her own.
"Her determination has
been something for us as
parents to look back at and
stand with great admira-
tion," she said.
As a back-up Caitlin
Thompson is also gravi-
tating toward writing for
Hollywood.
"She feels is she doesn't


have a major role in a
TV series or movie by
26, then itfs probably nc
going to happen because
there are so many taler
people out there," Marl
Thompson said.,
Ultimately, the couple
want their daughter to 1
happy about her career
"She's passionate ab(
it and we're here to sup
port her keep her very
anced," he said. "We're
very proud of her. If sh
happy to do it, we're ha
to support her."


OTO


BIDS: May be sought within 90 days

Continued From Page 1A


needed by the county
in order to construct
the road. They are in
disagreement with the
price we are offering.,
This provides us of a
means where we can
go ahead and access
the right-of-way to
start construction and
while we're doing that
we'll 'have to' discuss
the actual purchase
price."
The purchase price
is question is listed
at approximately
$398,000.
..The third parcel
needed for completion
of the project is owned
by Lowe's and com-
pany officials want to
make sure that none of
the improvements will
hamper the ingress
and egress they need
to operate the busi-
ness.
Williams said engi-
neers from Lowe's


made some sugges-
tions for changes to'
the county's engineers
and the engineers
agreed to the sugge's-
tions.
"The only issue left
with Lowe's is the
compensation issue,"
he said.
Once, road construc-
tion begins, there will
likely be additional
road improvements
from U.S. Highway
90 to Lowe's, as well
as a road constructed
on the north side of
Walmart, between
Real Road and Bascom
Norris Drive.
S"The county attor-
ney estimated 90 days
to get the legalities,
Order Of Taking, etc.,'
so we're looking at
about 90 days before
we believe we have
land rights and at that
time we'll bid the proj-
ect," Williams said.


The final portion of
the work to .complete
the road construc-
tion of the Bascom
Norris Connector
Road is approximately
seven-tenths of a
mile, according to
the county's previous.
plan. The costs of the'
construction work is .
listed at $7 million,
right-of-way acquisi-
tion totals are approx-
imately $3 million and*
the estimated engi-
neering costs have
not yet been tallied.
Columbia County
officials initially
took on the Bascom
Norris Connector
Road project from the
Florida Department of '
Transportation years
ago and Williams esti-
mated that the county
is in its seventh year
of work associated
with the project.


BOARDS: Slots may soon be filled


Continued From Page UA

Commissioner Rusty,
DePratter may discuss
the replacement at the
next meeting, which will.
be held July 21, Williams
said.
"I was told by (assis-
tant county manager
Lisa Roberts) when we
were reviewing next
week's agenda that they
were going to discuss it
and that a commission-
er had a candidate," he
said. "So this is coming
from a commissioner,
not from staff."
Williams said jf


Douglas is indeed
approved to sit on
the boards, he would
.be present for the
Economic Development
Department's next
board meeting Aug. 3.
The two boards are
composed 'of the same
members. When the
Economic Development
Department board acts
as the IDA, it is minus
the two commissioners
who sit on the board -
DePratter, board chair-
man, and Commissioner
Stephen Bailey.


The Economic
D e ve 1 o p m e n't
Department board
is an advisory board
.members of which
make recommenda-
tions on how the coun-
ty can best attract new
businesses and pro-
grams that can assist
existing businesses,'
Williams said. The
IDA, whose duties are
outlined by state stat
ute, primarily works
on issuing industrial
revenue bonds.


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LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL & STATE SUNDAY, JULY 17, 2011


Page Editor: Robert Bridges, 754-0428











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SUNDAY, JULY 17, 2011


Page Editor: Xxx, 754-xxxx


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0


Reader's Choice


Herndon
14 mos.
Mother Jessica Herndon
Father Andy Herndon
IGrandparentsl Harold &
Linda Herndon
Teresa McCullough
iGreat grandparents Loule &
Jean Goble


Mason Bryson
10 mos.
Mother: Crystal Bryson
Father: Matthew Bryson
M-Gran'dparents:
Jimmy & Janice Davis


Parker Case CrappS,
16 mos.
Mother. Stacy Allbrltton
Fathen Maston Crapps


P-Grandparents:
Russell & Marty Bryson


Joel Glover
20 mos.
Mother: Katie Glover
Father; Philip Glover
S t.1 -Giandparent
Terry, Millikin & Mike Millikin
P-Grandparents
Bill Glover & Sandy Glover


Rylan Chase Moses
17 mos.
Mother: Amanda Hunt Moses
S Father: Chase Moses
M.-Grandparents
Darrell & Kathy Hunt

P-Grandparerit
Jim & Salls Moses


Walker Drew Witt
17 mos.
Mother l'eie VArt
Father: Brandon Witt
M-Grandparents:
Rick & Donna Kennington
Great Grandparents:
Mary Davis,
Mattie Kennington


Seth Liberty
12 mos.
Mother. Rachel Liberty
Father: Gary Liberty .Ir


M-Grandparents
Tony & Renay Talbert
P-Grandparents
Gary & Tammy Liberty Sr


Charlie Cothran I
10 mos.
Mother Cessie Cothran
Father Charlie Cothran

M-Grandparents.
Roger & Margaret Li:otte
P-Grandparents
Donna & Bo Cothran


Peyton Levi Lizott-e
7 mos.
Mother: Lisa Lizotte
Father: Jered Lizotte
M-Grandparents:
Richard & Linda Hardwick
P-Grandparents:
Roger & Margaret Lizotte


Austin Cole Lumpkin
20 mos.
Mother: Pilar Lumpkin
Father: Christopher Lumpkin
M-Grandparents:
Pilar & Fabio Montes

P-Grandparents: Darla &Tony
Petty


I11
Cole Madison Terry
23 mos.
Mother: Karen T.Terry
Father: Wayne M.Terry
M-Grandparents:
WC & Louise Thomas
P-Grandparents: James &
Carol Terry


faston Alexander
Hetu
13 mos.
Mother: Lyndsey Hetu
Father: Joey Hetu
M-Grandparents:
Gina Busscher, Ronny &
Rhonda Busscher
P-Grandparents:
Terry & Dianne Walker
i ri i


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Bentley James
Sheppard
71/2 mos.
Mother: Lyndsay
Father: Brad


B14
Dawson Ellis
8 mos.
Mother: Caitlin Howell
Father: Chad Ellis


M-Grandparents:
Donna Reese & Tony Reese
P-Grandparents:
Jjmes & Van E'.a Sheppard


framers


U:.


New

Location!


of Lake City, Inc. Custom Picture Framing
Art Framed & Unframed
Matting Glass Home Decor Gifts
Picture Hanging Services
Home & Office Consultations
341 S. Marion Ave. 754-2780

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B !
Harley Edward Dudley
12 mos.
Mother: Amanda Dudley
Father: William Dudley
M-Grandparents:
Johnny & Veronica Thomas
P-Grandparents:
John &Candis Nicely
I *i i


I, Ya


C IV
F


BL


Wyatt Brian
Delariey Galloway
10 mos.
Mother: Ashley Gourley
Father: Chris Galloway |i
M-Grandparents:
Peggy & Billy Gourley
P-Grandparents: Ladonna
Galloway & Kevin Galiowav -


Ryals W. Blanton
22 mos.
Other: Ashley R. Blanton
:ather:W.Wayne Blanton
M-Grandparents:
Rocky & Valerie Ryals
P-Grandparents:
uddy & Sara Lynn Blanton


. ..' 0"


i


r. rcl 119
i ILi~rr~L












Page EdItor: Amber Hamilton, 754-0424 LAKE CITY REPORTER NEWS SUNDAY, JULY 17, 2011


Astronauts fix haul gear


MARCIA DUNN
Aerospace Writer

CAPE CANAVERAL, -
Astronauts kept busy fixing
and hauling gear aboard
the linked Atlantis and
International Space Station
on Saturday, as the last
shuttle flight drew closer
to an end.
Atlantis' pilots got a
jammed storage locker open
and retrieved air purifiers
for the space station.


Mebelen Adams Holloway
Mrs. Mebelen Adams Holloway,
85, of Lake City, passed away
peacefully on Friday evening
July 15, 2011 in The Health
Center of Lake City following
an extended illness. A native of
Miami, Florida, Mrs. Holloway
had been a resident of Lake City
since 1963 having moved here
from Lake Worth, Florida. Mrs.
Holloway was a homemaker
and she enjoyed crocheting, doll
'making and weaving pine needle
baskets, a talent she taught at the
Stephen Foster Memorial State
Park. Mrs. Holloway was a mem-
ber of the Siloam United Meth-
odist Church. She was preceded
'in death by her husband, John F.
Holloway Sr..
Mrs. Holloway is survived by
her children, John F. "Bud" Hol-
loway Jr. and his wife, Janice;
Leeloma Cone and her husband
Troy all of Lake City; her sis-
ter, Thelma Albritton of Albany,
Georgia; and five grandchildren,
Lisa Vinci; Shelia Feagle (Cline);
Karen Odom (Sammy); Bubba
Cone and Kim Thompson. Ten
great-grandchildren and two
.great-great grandchildren also
-survive.


In more good news,
they brought back online
a computer that abruptly
stopped working two days
earlier, the second computer
failure in five days aboard
Atlantis. NASA wants to run
more diagnostic testing, but
so far the computer seems
to be working fine, officials
said.
Engineers have yet
to figure out why the
computer shut down
Thursday; cosmic radiation


OBITUARIES


Funeral services for Mrs. Hollo-
way will be conducted at 10:00
A.M. on Monday, July 18, 2011
in the Siloam United Methodist
Church with Rev. Bill Peeler of-
ficiating. Interment will follow in
the church cemetery. The family
will receive friends from 5:00-
7:00 Sunday evening (tonight) at
the funeral home. In lieu of flow-
ers the family requests that me-
morial donations be made to the
Siloam Cemetery Association,
8842 S.W. SR 247, Lake City, FL
32024. Arrangements are under
the direction of the DEES-PAR-
RISH FAMILY FUNERAL
HOME, 458 South Marion Ave.,
Lake City, FL 32025. (386)752-
1234 please sign our online fam-
ily guestbook at parrishfamilyfu-
neralhome. com


Raymond "Bubba" Allen
Eubanks
Raymond "Bubba" Allen Eu-
banks, 51, of Lake City, died
Friday, July 15, 2011. Bubba was
a life long resident of Lake City;
he was a construction worker and
attended First Full Gospel of Wa-
tertown. Bubba loved to fish and
loved his mother dearly.


is suspected. The first
computer failure was traced
to a bad switch throw and
quickly fixed.
Atlantis has five of these
main computers, each one
critical for the trip back to
Earth.
Over on the space station,
astronauts fixed a treadmill
and carried more supplies
back and forth.
Atlantis delivered several
tons of food, clothes and
other household items.


Bubba is survived by his mother,
Margaret Sanders of Lake City
Fl., his son, Raymond "Little
Bubba" Everette Eubanks ,of
Branford, Fl., his half sister,
Debra Robinson of Jacksonville,
Fl., and several cousins, aunts,
and uncles.
Bubba is preceded in death by his
father Everette Sanders, and his
half brother Robert Eubanks.
Funeral services for Bubba will
be conducted at 2:00 P.M. Tues-
day, July 19, 2011 at the Gateway
- Lawn Forest Funeral Home Cha-
pel with Rev. Earl Green Jr. offi-
ciating. Interment will follow at
Forest Lawn Memorial Gardens.
The Family will receive friends
form 1:00 P.M. 2:00 P.M. Tues-
day, July 19, 2011 at the funeral
home. Arrangements are under
the direction of GATEWAY-
FOREST LAWN FUNERAL
HOME, 3596 S.HWY441, Lake
City. 386-752-1954. Please sign
the guest book at www.gateway-
forestlawn.corn


Obituaries are paid advertise-
ments. For details, call the Lake
City Reporter's classified depart-
ment at 752-1293.


Oil spill cleanup turns

up trove of Indian relics


CAIN BUREAU
Associated Press

CAMINADA HEADLAND, Cleanup
after the BP oil spill has turned up dozens
of sites where archaeologists are finding
human and animal bones, pottery and
primitive weapons left behind by pre-
historic Indian settlements a trove of
new clues about the Gulf Coast's mound
dwellers more than 1,300 years ago.
But they also fear the remains could be
damaged by oil or lost to erosion before
they can be fully studied.
So far, teams of archaeologists hired
by the oil giant have visited more than
100 sites and sent back a growing list of
finds to labs for radiocarbon dating and
other tests, though extensive excavations
haven't been done. Scholars have also
accompanied cleanup crews to make sure
they don't unwittingly throw away relics.
The disaster that began when the
Deepwater Horizon exploded in April of
2010 has highlighted the urgent need
to protect the sites, but a government
scientist says neither their discovery -
nor the money to study them would
have come as quickly without the spill.
"We're filling in gaps. There is some
pioneering archaeological work going
on as a result of the oil spill," said Larry
Murphy, lead archeologist for a council
of government agencies and trustees
overseeing the oil cleanup.
He said uncovering the sites, many of
them prehistoric, represents "a great leap
in cumulative knowledge" about Native
Americans in coastal Louisiana, who have
been less studied than their counterparts
in other regions.
Still, the oil represents an added threat
to an area that already was under siege
from land loss and rising sea levels.
Oil has contaminated some artifacts and
can interfere with radiocarbon dating, a
primary technique for determining the


age of an object. Many shores are still
scattered with tar balls.
Louisiana's state archaeologist, Charles
McGimsey, said the extent of the oil
damage to artifacts isn't known, but he
doesn't expect it to be disastrous.
The Associated Press was given a rare
glimpse of several sites in June during a
guided tour of the Caminada Headland by
land warden and amateur archaeologist
Forrest Travirca III. The beaches are
closed to the public, and the locations
of archaeological sites are being closely
guarded to prevent looting.
Prehistoric artifacts had been found
and recorded on the headland before
the spill, but not to the extent now being
done. Travirca began finding more of
them while keeping watch for BP's black
oil last summer on a remote stretch of
beach that looks onto the silhouettes of
oil rigs and platforms. The headland was
one of the hardest-hit spots.
"I was walking on marine shell, rangia
clam shell, walking out on a point I know,
when I looked down, found a pot sherd,
and then I started finding more and
more," Tavirca recalled.
Travirca, of coastal Louisiana Indian
heritage himself, works for the Wisner
Foundation, a New Orleans-based public
land trust that owns vast tracts of the
headland. He's also a member of the
Louisiana Archeological Society, and has
submitted his research to it.
Travirca believes many artifacts he's
finding come from middens, or mounds
where families lived and buried their
dead. Perhaps, he says, some of the
dwellings were built along a meandering
bayou that's been lost to sea level rise
and land loss. Many artifacts appear to
be washing in.
Archaeologists say the sites date
to around 700 AD., well before the
earliest known European contact in the
1500s.


Reader's Choice


CUTEST BABY


CONTEST


". ,.-V







Brinslee Adalynn Gracelyn Carter Brooklynn Monroe Aspen Elizabeth War
Stalnaker McGee 18 Smos. 2 mos
12 mOS. 8 mos. Mother- Jennifer Johnson Mother. Jei sica Ward
S Mother: Megan Hewett Mother: Brittney McGee Father Berry Monroe Father Chris Ward
Father: Brian Stalnaker Father:Travis McGee
i M-Grandparents- i MmGrandparents
M-Grandparents: M-Grandparents: Joann Jerry Mike Nelson. Brenda Nelso
Chris & Brenna Hewett Alan & Caroline Parrish
i P-Grandparents: P-Grandparents P-Grandparents
S P-Grandparents: Tommy & Darlene Bailey The late Buddy Monroe & I Jonathan L.Ward Sr., Linda
Bob & Kedra Mello r-j Lola Mae Monroe ... Green
I- .-
.. ... -.. i . . .: . .
.. . . . ' . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. .


L
bun
L


i4
d


n

a
i


G5
Madysen Danielle
Parrish
2 mos
Mother Shannon Parrish
Father Dustin Parrish

M-Grandparents.
Teresa Tompkins &
Coreg Harden
P-Grandparents.
Marilyn & Bobby Parrish


GI'

i Kelee Pitts
5 mos
Mother Shanna Pitns
Father Dillon Pitts





, ,
I I .-


I-I


Darien Cooper
4 mos
Mother Carrie Cooper
Father. Robert Cooper

M-Grardparents
Gail Lttle. Mark Ltle

P-Grandparents
Pam Fo & David Craft


si


V ting
67
Riley Coody I
10 mos I
Mother Ashley Coody
Father Stephen Coody I

M-Grandparents:
Debbib Bedenbaugh

SP-Grandparents
Steve & Barbara Coody

"~ ~ ~ ~~ _...... .I


j ......-.....


inun 1
6G1
Patricia Spradley
7 mos
Mother Chelsey Spradley
Father Joshua Spradley


*


M-Grandparents
Barbara Waters & Donnie
Waters
P-Grandparents
Kathy & Shep Spradley


i18
Blayre Mikal Slanker
I 44 mos
S Mother: Sangia Cothran
I Father: Chad Slanker

S M-Grandparents:
Sabra & MarkTaylor, William
Dees, Jr.

S P-Grandparents: Michael&
Diane Slanker
I. -- 1-- i


H









Ii


0 4 mos
Mother Carrie Skinner
Father Thomas Skinner Jr.

M-Grandparents
Wayne & Judy Sapp

P-Grandparents'
Marie Skinner & Tommy
SkInner


Sara Gardner
9 mos
Mother. Dinyada Anderson

y i -
II~ ~ ~ j; 9mo
ohr _3,ad Anero


.I


I .







Aaliyah Cailynn
Fasnacht
11 mos
SMother. Chrysten Hudson
Father-Kamron Fasnacht
S M-Grandparents-
George H Hudson Jr
Rhonda Hudson
S P-Grandparents
SKen Fasnacht. Cindy Fasnacht


Ms. MuSTER COsMtO OStOlj
s e. 35 YEarS Experitisc

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SHa rcutslN
SMondAy, WEdNEsdAy, ThursdAy & Fridy- 8:OAMd5:IOPM
3 86-758-7760 V
SCell: 386-365-7117 .U,.
FlAT Tops -' FAdst TrAdiriowals Skc4.i Z B DwiwOS P
YOU GROW IT... WE CUr IT1 i hY90Et
APPOINTMENTS & WALK-INS WELCOME! V


rumbe,
610
Bryanna Faith Terry
7 mos
Mother: Genovese Terry
S Father Ryan A. Terry

M-Grandparents.
Julia Rivera &Jesus Ruiz

P-Grandparents
Wanda Terry & Keith Terry
S.L..
L.~~-- -i-.-,- -- -- --


.... ....... . ..







G15 G 6
Grace Marie Zoe Hansen
Buchanan 22 mos
S15 mos Mother. Megan Hansen
Mother. Michelle Buchanan Father James Hansen
Father Travis Buchanan
M-Grandparents
M-Grandparents: i Lauren & Patti Markham
I Geralyn Ward &Vincent Alarid j |
P-Grandparents: P-Grandparents
Debbie Hunt & Bruce Tom & Sandy Hansen
| Buchanan ti

Reader's Choice '

I CUTEST BABY VOTE
CONTEST Entry Form
m Lake City Reporter


m Girl's Name Boy's Name

Voting # (G-?) Voting # (B-?)
INSTRUCTIONS AND OFFICIAL RULES
SEntries must be submitted on official entry ballot. Photocopies and carbon not ac-
cepted. Must be 18 years of age to enter. The Lake City Reporter reserves the right
to verify all entries. Entries must be Post marked by July 23,2011 and mailed to:
I Baby Contest, Lake City Reporter, P.O. Box 1709, Lake City, FL 32056. No Purchase
Required. The Reporter will not be responsible for lost, late, misdirected, damaged
or otherwise undeliverable mail. All entries become the property of the Lake City
SReporter. Contest coordinator will not enter into any written or oral discussion about
the contest judge's or awarding of the prize. Employees of the Lake City Reporter
(and their immediate families and members of their household) are not eligible.
L N- .


Page Editor: Amber Hamilton, 754-0424


__I


LAKE CITY REPORTER NEWS SUNDAY, JULY 17, 2011


!












LAKE CITY REPORTER WEATHER SUNDAY, JULY 17, 2011


Page Editor: Robert Bridges, 754-0428


THE WEATHER


4I I" ,
SCT. SCT. SCT. SCT.' SCT.
n o -STRO f iRMSl l T-STORMS
STORMS -STORMS STORMS T-STORMS II T- RM



HI90 LO H92 HI 94 LO HI 96 LO HI 4 LO


1i1 0 ~ .... . -. .
....-.," : ...-: . ;:-. 5~Z:-":'-
",' ;: =.! ;, /'*,;:-#; g," : "# J ; .


Tallahassee
90/72 ..
Pensacola
86/75 Panma City
87/75


* Valdsta
90,' 1 *Jacksonville
Lake City, 88 ;3
90/71
Gainesville Daytona Beach
90/71 86 74
Ocala *
-1... a


Tampa 0
91/75


Ft Myei
91/75


Key West .I g ,-7 ...a os. a
ey Wes W. Palm Beach
-'. e: 190 81 -
a-uus*~r;-rror~y o Pt tartr t.f...,.m ..i... .J..aJ~nr-.f
''*a 'a^ tv i'V C~f~^jiaf i:^".wfn^^ llJ^*^t'~.*t~ll''*f**^*"-*Ifr ^fy~c-'i.wB-tL~f >Ei.~ffl~Mi>a~f.-^'itW-i&t'-ici


4 TEMPERATURES SUN
High Saturday 87 Sunrise today 6:40 a.m.
Low Saturday 73 Sunsettoday 8:33 p.m.
Normal high 91 Sunrise tom. 6:41 a.m.
Normal low 71 Sunset tom. 8:32 p.m.


Record high
Record low

PRECIPITATION
Saturday
Month total
Year total
Normal month-to-date'
Normal year-to-date


100 in 1893
64 in 1967


0.00"
2.20"
22.09"
3.21"
27.24"


MOON
Moonrise today 10:02 p.m.
Moonset today 8:56 a.m.
Moonrise tom. 10:33 p.m.
Moonset tom. 9:52 a.m.



July July Aug. Aug.
23 30 6 13
Last New First Full


City
Cape Canaveral
Daytona Beach
Ft. Lauderdale
Fort Myers
Galnesvllle
Jacksonville


Monday
899 76 I
90 75 i.
91/79/t
92/75/t
91/72/t
90/75/t
90/82/sh
92/71/t
90/79/t
89/76/t
91/73/t
91/77/t
89/76/t
91/76/t
92/71/t
91/76/t
91/71/t
90/79/t


Tuesday
38 76 i
9'0 75 I
90/79/s
93/76/t
92/72/t
92/76/t
90/82/pc
94/72/t
iO ;7 I
90/76 i
91/73 i
92/77/t
90/78/t
92/78/pc
95/72/t
93/76/t
92/72/t
90/79/t


| | Si'- i S

HM r hlt d:i tO


10 miles to Dm |
Today's J
ultraviolet lle Willl llef
radiation risk I:ll.qi.liil
for the area on
a scale from 0
to 10+. .

weather, com


FL Forecasts, data and
graphics 2011 Weather
T j Central, LP, Madison, WIs.
weather www.weatherpublasher.com


NATIONAL FORECAST: Showers and thunderstorms are expected across portions of the
Southeast today, some of which could contain heavy rain. Strong thunderstorms are possible
in the northern portions of the Midwest, as well. In the Northwest, an upper level storm sys-
tem will bring a chance of rain to the region.


Saturday Today


CITY
Albany NY
Albuquerque
Anchorage '
Atlanta
Baltimore
Billings
Birmingham
Bismarck
Boise
Boston
Buffalo
Charleston SC
Charleston WV
Charlotte
Cheyenne
Chicago
Cincinnati
Cleveland
Columbia SC
Dallas
Daytona Beach
Denver


CITY
Acapulco
Amsterdam
Athens
Auckland
Belling
Berlin
Buenos Aires
Cairo
Geneva
.Havana
Helslnkl
Hong Kong
Kingston


HI/Lo/Pcp.
87/57/0
93/74/0
65/54/0
82/64/.04
86/60/0
85/60/0
82/72/0
86/66/0
S83/60/0
84/65/0
89/63/0
86/73/0
78/64/0
79/66/0
85/61/0
87/71/0
88/71/0
87/67/0
88/73/0
100/80/0
86/73/0
87/58/0


S ta dr T


Saturday
HI/Lo/Pcp.
84/75/0
68/57/0
91/82/0
57/45/0
90/70/0
77/52/0
63/46/0
95/73/0
81/52/0
90/73/0
70/59/0
84/79/0
St. ; 7 0


HI/Lo/W
91/70/pc
95/68/pc
63/53/c
87/70/pc
91/75/pc
97/66/pc
88/70/t
97/74/pc
93/57/pc
91/74/pc
82/73/pc
87/72/pc
91/66/t
88/66/pc
91/62/pc
91/76/pc
91/70/t
89/74/pc
90/68/pc
101/79/pc
86/74/t
97/64/pc


Tloay
HI/Lo/W
87/78/t
64/55/sh
91/79/s
59/46/s
86/72/t
81/57/t
63/44/pc
98/73/s
68/52/r
86/73/c
77/55/sh
87/82/t
88/77/t


KEY TO CONDITIONS: c


CITY
Des Moines
Detroit
E Paso
Fairbanks
Greensboro
Hartford
Honolulu
Houston
Indianapolis
Jackson MS
Jacksonville
Kansas City
Las Vegas
Uttle Rock
Los Angeles
Memphis
Miami
Minneapolis
Mobile
New Orleans
New York
Oklahoma City


CITY
La Paz
Lima
London
Madrid
Mexico City
Montreal
Moscow
Nairobi
Nassau
New Delhi
Oslo
Panama
Paris


Saturday Today
HI/Lo/Pcp. HI/Lo/W CITY
91/77/.04 94/77/pc Omah
87/67/0 91/75/pc Odani
95/79/0 97/76/pc Phllac
57/51/.42 69/50/pc Phoer
77/69/0 87/66/pc Pittsb
88/63/0 92/69/pc Portli
82/75/0 88/74/sh Portia
85/81/.06 96/80/t Ralell
89/68/0 92 3 ,.: Rapid
90/74/0 88/73/t 'Reno
79/73/.84 88/73/t Rlchn
92/77/0 99/80/s Sacra
92/76/0 !03 ,93 St. Lc
96/78/0 96/76/pc Salt L
7u. f.2 0 72/64/s San A
90/78/0 92/75/pc San D
93 ;9 1) 90/79/t San F
3- 1. I 08 96/80/pc Seatt
82/76/1.29 86/73/t Spoke
90/77/0 89/78/t Tamp
90/70/0 '90/70/pc Tucs
99/79/0 103/80/s Wash


Saturday
HI/Lo/Pcp.
57/27/0
68/63/0
66/59/0
97/63/0
66/57/0
82/64/0
90/72/0
77/50/0
91/81/0
91/79/0
7:, .8 r0
86/79/0
70/61/0


Today
HI/Lo/W
57/24/s
65/61/pc
64/52/sh
86/57/s
70/56/t
90/75/pc
81/63/t
81/61/pc
91/79/t
85/79/t
66/55/r
86/75/t
66/55/sh


a
do
lelphla
nix
burgh
and ME
nd OR
gh
City

mond
amento
auls
Lake City
Lntonlo
Diego
Franclsco
Ile
ane
a
on
ington


CITY
Rio
Rome
St. Thomas VI
San Juan PR
Santiago
Seoul
Singapore
Sydney
Tel Alv
Tokyo
Toronto
Vienna
Warsaw


Saturday Today
HI/Lo/Pcp. HI/Lo/W
91/75/0 97/78/pc
89/73/0 89/75/t
87/68/0 90/71/pc
99/79/0 112/89/pc
84/63/0 90/69/pc
86/61/0 87/66/pc
65/59/.09 73/59/sh
88/63/0 89/65/pc'
.95/66/0 99/72/pc
74/56/0 84/54/pc
84/62/0 89/68/pc
72/57/0 82/56/pc
91/74/0 96/76/pc-
88/62/0 96/73/s
94/78/0 9?.;6 e
70/65/0 75/65/s
66/56/0 64/52/pc
62/57/.35 70/55/sh
75/56/0 86/56/jc
89/79/0 91/75/t
96/72/0 106/77/pc
85/67/0 90/73/pc


auuluray
HI'Lo. Pcp.
86 61J 0
81/61/0
87/78/0
88/77/0
50/41/0
75/70/0
84/75/0
61/48/0
86/75/0
90/79/0
84/63/0
79/61/0
72/55/0


HI/Lo/W
77/66/s
86/72/s
87/79/t
85/79/t
49/29/s
84/74/t
89/78/t
66/50/sh
87/75/s
91/78/s
91/75/pc
86/63/s
79/63/c


cloudy, dr-drizzle, f-fair, fg-fog, h-hazy, i-ice, pc-partly cloudy, r-rain, s-sunny,
sh-showers, sn-snow, ts-thunderstorms, w-windy.


CAR SALE ""


THREE DAYS ONLY JULY 28,29 & 30


F ~Shop at-Em power Park*with fourdeia ersos


r Park!
JonesVille


$500 VISA gift card
with purchase!


$200 cash bonus with
purchase and no dealer fee!


BIBUICK i OrMICr
Two years of free maintenance3
with vehicle purchase! GM supplier
pricing on new vehicles!


'" i GAINESVILLE
^^ NISSAN

One year of free oil changes
with purchase!


New & Used
vehicle financing
as low as


$2,500v
d.2
CLCW Poyn wfC


only when you buy with a
CAMPUS Pre-Approved Loan Draft
at the sale.


Lake Cty 183 WBascom Norris Dr. G'vlle- E. Campus 1200 SW 5th Ave. W. Campus 1900 SW 34th St. Jonesville 107 NW 140th Terrace Hunter's Walk 5115 NW 43rd St Tower Square 5725 SW 75th St.
Shandsat UF Robm H-1 Springhills Commons 9200 NW 39th Ave Ocala 3097 SW College Rd. East Ocala 2444 E Silver Springs Blvd. West Marion 11115 SW 93rd Court Rd. Summerfield 17950 US Hwy.441


Membership is open to everyone in Columbia County!'
OFFER NOT AVAILABLE Oh1 E'15T IG CAMPUS LOANS OFFER IS FOR NE'.V LOA.i L'NL IMA' aNOT BE COMBIrNED WITH ANi O CTHEiOFFLER 1 Crd.l[ ppioal requrlei-d v.u. ..i mJ t,0e highe ba'e .edn credlcr o,ehle.. h.e hand j tem oflion For
example. a 520000 loan wit no moneo dcn 3a 1.75% for 60 month, wouldd require -9 monthly payments of 5151 08 and a final payment of 341 70 finance charge or 5,84 rlow a total of payments of 521.055 42 The amount financed is 520.070.70
The APR Is 1.902% APR = Annual Percentage Rile 2 No purchase rnecetar and doing so wII not Increasiouli chance oi winniln Entries will be accepted at The Emp.wer Palik Car Sale from 10 am.uly 28 2011 to 5 pm July 30.2011 Only one entry
per person MusT be a legal US resent 18 18ea or older to lin EmpIple: ard heir .c mmej.ii farrlles apd n ouse.eold r not eligiLle Wrnner will be randomly seleciod on Augu:t 1 2011 and will have [30 .v to redeem their pnre Winner Is
responsible for any ta-es'. 3'.,olatd w1nm ir.r innring 3 Two ye 3rC o. rfre n,.ilrlie.r3r,.:e .; f., 0 changec: and ..: I lr.l r,.-r3 4 cr approval and inilald n 5 del p5 depj:i required Mezrwon th. ad And we II vare hie l 5 nt.1 n.memberrhp lee


K Key West
Orlando Cape Canaveral Lake City
89/75 86/75 Miami
Naples
West Palm Beach Ocala
90/79 Orlando
' Ft Lauderdale Panama City
is 91/78 0 Pensacola
Naples Tallahassee
89/77 Miami Tampa'


F


*M4


A.r^\
r^ ^'
v~ -L^


LENDER


------~-~ ~-I ------~-------- --


----~~ ~-~----~"-- -~ `-II-


LieCiyieooe


90/72


1







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i_- U-A ---Z


I







Lake City Reporter


Story ideas?

Contact
Tim Kirby
Sports Editor
754-0421
tkirby@lakecityreportercom


SPORTS


www.lakecityreporter.com


Sunda Jul I7 20 II


.-y-,7, y,--I m - -


Section B


BRIEFS
COLUMBIA FOOTBALL
TCKEIS
On sale Tuesday
Sales for the 2011
Columbia High Tigers
football season will go on
sale Tuesday. Paid Tiger
Boosters can pick up
tickets as well as parking
passes and a Tiger gift at
McDuffies.
FORT WHITE VOLLEYBALL
High school
tryouts Aug. 8
Fort White High has
volleyball tryouts for
varsity and junior varsity
set for 4-6 p.m. Aug. 8.
Participants must have
a current physical and a
parent consent form on
file.
For details, call coach
Doug Wohlstein at 497-
5952.
YOUTH SOFBALL
16U fundraisers
at Moe's,
Walmart
The Lake City Sliders
16-under Babe Ruth
All-Stars team is raising
money to go to regional
competition in Richmond,
Va. The team is asking
for donations at Walmart
from 10 a.m. to 7 p.m.
Tuesday. An account has
been set up in the team's.
name at First Federal
Bank for donations.
For details, call Wendy
Dohrn at 623-3641.
FORT WHITE FOOTBALL
Q-back Club
meeting Monday
The Fort White
Quarterback Club will
meet at 7 p.m. Monday
in the teacher's lounge
at the high school. The
club will meet every
Monday through the end
of the season. Anyone
interested in'joining the
club or learning more
about the quarterback
club is encouraged
to attend. Fort White
football season tickets
are being sold. Returning
season ticket holders will
have their seats held until
Aug. 1. Ticket renewal
information has been sent
out
For details,.call Shayne
Morgan at (386)
397-4954.
CHS SOCCER
Moe's fundraiser
on Tuesday
Columbia High's
soccer teams will host a
Moe's Night fundraiser
from 4-8 p.m. Tuesday
at Moe's Southwest Grill
on U.S. Highway 90 west
in Lake City. The soccer
program will receive a
percentage of sales.
For details, call 365-
,1877..
YOUTH FOOTBALL
Free camp with
Brian Allen
The Columbia Courity
Recreation Department is
sponsoring a free football
camp featuring Columbia
High head coach Brian
Alien from 8 a.m. to noon
Aug. 2 at CHS. The camp
is open to boys and girls
ages 5-13 (as of Sept.
1). A pre-registration
waiver form is required.
Forms are available at
Richardson Community
Center from 9 a.m. to
5 p.m. beginning Monday.
For details, call Adee
Farmer at 754-7095.


* From staff reports


Gaining


exposure


SBRANDON FINLEY/Lake City Reporter
,Participants of the Lake City Exposure football camp practice running the 40-yard dash at Richardson Community Center on Tuesday.


Farmer teaching

fundamentals of

football at camp


By BRANDON FINLEY
bfinley@lakecityreporter.com
Adee Farmer is giving
Lake City's youth its first
chance to become exposed
to the game of football. His
Lake City Exposure organi-
zation has been hosting a
twice-a-week football camp
at Richardson Community
Center throughout the
summer.
For children ages 5-13,
it's a chance to learn the
fundamentals of the game
before moving up to the
middle school and high
school levels.
"This is the first year
we've done it," Farmer said.
"We wanted something to
offer kids. We're doing it
all without cost and we've
had coach Brian Allen
(Columbia High) helping
out several times. We've


had volunteers, Allen's
pointers and we're trying to
just teach them basic foot-
ball skills."
In many ways, the camp
resembles a football prac-
tice with many of the basic
setups that high schools
use.
'We've got tires, ropes
and we're working at mul-
tiple stations," Farmer said.
"We're trying to teach all
the positions. We want to
expose them to everything.
At this age, everyone wants
to be a quarterback or run-
ning back, but we want to
make sure that they know
what its like to get in a
three-point stance."
Allen was in attendance
at Tuesday's camp and
brought in players from the
Tigers to talk to the youth
CAMP continued on 2B Teon Dollard,


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Northern Ireland's Darren Clarke walks up to the 18th green during the third day of the
British Open Golf Championship at Royal St George's golf course Sandwich, England on
Saturday.

Clarke leads heading

to final round of Open


Johnson,
Fowler among
contenders.
By PAUL NEWBERRY
Associated Press
SANDWICH, England
- A day that began with
howling rain and wind


ended in bright sunshine,
a turn of meteorological
fortune that helped sort
out a bunched-up field at
the British Open.
Darren Clarke was
among those catching
a break with the weath-
er, shooting a 1-under 69
Saturday for a one-stroke
lead heading to the final


round and putting little
Northern Ireland in posi-
tion to claim its third major
championship in a little
over a year.
"If somebody had given
me 69 before I was going
out to play, I would have
bitten their hand off for it,"
OPEN continued on 4B


BRANDON FINLEY/Lake City Reporter
12, performs the rope drill during football camp on Tuesday.


ASSOCIATED PRESS
United States goalkeeper Hope Solo makes a save during
a training session in preparation for the final match against
Japan during the Women's Soccer World Cup in Frankfurt,
Germany on Friday.

U.S. prepared for World
Cup Championship


Team won't see
same Japan it beat
2 months ago.
By NANCY ARMOUR
Associated Press
FRANKFURT, Germany
- What a difference a few


weeks make.
The U.S. beat Japan
twice over a five-day span
in mid-May, by identical 2-0
scores. Two months later,
the teams will play again on
Sunday in the Women's
World Cup final.
CUP continued on 2B


r
i.


lk










LAKE CITY REPORTER


SPORTS


SUNDAY, JULY 17, 2011


Page Editor: Brandon Finley, 754-0420


SCOREBOARD


TELEVISION

TV sports

Today
AUTO RACING
I p.m.
TNT NASCAR. Sprint Cup, Lenox
Industrial Tools 301. at Loudon, N.H.
CYCLING
8 a.m.
VERSUS -Tour de France, stage 15,
Limoux to Montepellier, France
GOLF
6 a.m.
ESPN British Open Championship.
final round, at Sandwich, England
2 p.m.
TGC Nationwide Tour, Chiquita
Classic, final round, at Maineville, Ohio
4 p.m.
TGC PGA Tour Viking Classic, final
round, at Madison, Miss.
MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL
I p.m.
TBS Philadelphia at N.Y. Mets
WGN Chicago White Sox at
Detroit
8 p.m.
ESPN Boston at Tampa Bay
MOTORSPORTS
8 am.
SPEED MotoGP World
Championship, German Grand Prix, at
Hohenstein, Germany
S5 p.m.
SPEED MotoGP Moto2, German
Grand Prix, at Hohenstein, Germany
(same-day tape)
SOCCER
2 p.m.
ESPN FIFA, Women's World Cup,
championship match, Japan vs. United
States, at Frankfurt, Germany
ESPN Women's World Cup,
round robin, Czech Republic vs. U.S., at
Oklahoma City
Monday
MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL
7 p.m.
WGN Chicago White Sox at
Cleveland
9 p.m.
MLB Regional coverage, Milwaukee
at San Francisco or Colorado at Arizona
(8 p.m. start)

BASEBALL

AL standings

East Division
W L Pct GB
Boston 55 36 .604 -
NewYork 53 37 .589 I'h
Tampa Bay 50 41 .549 5
Toronto 47 47 .500 9'h
Baltimore 36 54 .400 18'
SCentral Division
W L Pct GB
Cleveland 49 42 .538 -
Detroit 49 44 .527 I
Chicago 45 48 .484 5
Minnesota 42 49 .462 7
Kansas City 38 -55- .409 12
West Division
W L Pct GB
Texas 53 41 .564 -
Los Angeles 50 43 .538 2'A
Seattle 43 50 .462 9'
Oakland 40 53 .430 12'A

Friday's Games
Chicago White Sox 8, Detroit 2
Cleveland 6, Baltimore 5
Toronto 7, N.Y.Yankees I
Tampa Bay 9, Boston 6
Kansas City 2, Minnesota I
Oakland 5, LA.Angels 3
Texas 4, Seattle 0
Saturday's Games
N.Y.Yankees 4,Toronto I
Boston at'Tampa Bay (n)
Chicago White Sox'at Detroit (n)
LA.Angels at Oakland, Ist game (n)
Cleveland at Baltimore (n)
Kansas City at Minnesota (n)
LA.Angels at Oakland (n)
Texas at Seattle (n)
Today's Games
Chicago White Sox (Humber 8-5) at
Detroit (Penny 6-6), 1:05p.m.
N.Y.Yankees (PHughes 0-2) atToronto
(C.Villanueva 5-I), 1:07 p.m.
Cleveland (J.Gomez 0-1) at Baltimore
(Atkins 0-0), 1:35 p.m.
Kansas City (F.Paulino 1-2) at
Minnesota (Duensing 6-7), 2:10 p.m.
LA. Angels (Pineiro 5-3) at Oakland
(G.Gonzalez 8-6), 4:05 p.m.
Texas (M.Harrison 7-7) at Seattle
(Beavan 1-0), 4:10 p.m.
SBoston (Beckett 8-3) at Tampa Bay
(Niemann 4-4), 8:05 p.m.
Monday's Games
Cleveland at Minnesota, 1:10 p.m.,
1st game
Boston at Baltimore, 7:05 p.m.
N.Y.Yankees at Tampa Bay, 7:10 p.m.
Chicago White Sox at Kansas City,
8:10 p.m.
Cleveland at Minnesota, 8:10 p.m.,
2nd game

NL standings


East Division
W L
Philadelphia 58 34
Atlanta 55 38
New York 46 46
Washington 46 47
Florida 44 49
Central Division
W L
Pittsburgh 48 43
St. Louis 49 44
Milwaukee 49 45
Cincinnati 46 47
Chicago 38 56
Houston 30 63
West Division
W L
San Francisco 54 40
Arizona 49 44
Colorado 45 48
Los Angeles 42 51
San Diego 40 54

Friday's Games
Chicago Cubs 2, Florida I
Philadelphia 7, N.Y. Mets 2
Cincinnati 6, St. Louis 5
Atlanta IIWashington I
Pittsburgh 4, Houston 0
Colorado 4, Milwaukee 0
LA. Dodgers 6,Arizona 4


San Francisco 6, San Diego I
Saturday's Games
Florida 13, Chicago Cubs 3
Philadelphia at N.Y. Mets (n)
Pittsburgh at Houston (n)
St. Louis at Cincinnati (n)
Washington at Atlanta (n)
LA. Dodgers at Arizon (n)
Milwaukee at Colorado (n)
San Francisco at San Diego (n)
Today's Games
Philadelphia (K.Kendrick 4-4) at N.Y.
Mets (Pelfrey 5,8), 1:10 p.m.
St. Louis J.Garcia 9-3) at Cincinnati
(H.Bailey 3-4), 1:10 p.m.
Washington (Gorzelanny 2-6) at
Atlanta (urrjens 12-3), 1:35 p.m.
Pittsburgh (Correia 11-7) at Houston
(WRodriguez 6-6), 2:05 p.m.
Florida (Volstad 5-8) at Chicago Cubs
(R.Wells I-3), 2:20 p.m.
Milwaukee (Marcum 7-3) at Colorado
(Cook 0-4), 3:10 p.m.
San Francisco (Cain 8-5) at San Diego
(Latos 5-10), 4:05 p.m.
LA. Dodgers (Lilly 6-9) at Arizona
(D.Hudson 9-5), 4:10 p.m.
Monday's Games
Cincinnati at Pittsburgh, 7:05 p.m.
Florida at N.Y. Mets, 7:10 p.m.
Philadelphia at Chicago Cubs, 8:05
p.m.
Washington at Houston, 8:05 p.m.
Atlanta at Colorado, 8:40 p.m.
Milwaukee at Arizona, 9:40 p.m.
LA. Dodgers at San Francisco, 10:15
p.m.

BASKETBALL

WNBA schedule

Today's Games
Minnesota 80, Indiana 70
Connecticut 68, NewYork 59
Los Angeles 79,Tulsa 74
Phoenix 78,Washington 64
Saturday's Games
Chicago at Atlanta (n)
Seattle at Minnesota (n)
Today's Games
Tulsa at New York, 4 p.m.
Indiana at Connecticut, 5 p.m.
Washington at Los Angeles, 8:30 p.m.
Monday's Games
San Antonio at Los Angeles, 10:30
p.m.

AUTO RACING

Race week

NASCAR"
LENOX INDUSTRIAL TOOLS 301
Site: Loudon, N.H.-
Schedule: Today, race, I p.m. (TNT,
noon-4:30 p.m.).
Track: New Hampshire Motor
Speedway (oval, 1.058 miles).
Race distance: 318.46 miles, 301 laps.

GOLF

-British Open Par Scores

At Royal St. George's Golf Club
Sandwich, England
Purse: $7.97 million
Yardage: 7,211; Par: 70
(a-amateur)
Third Round
Darren Clarke68-68-69 -205 -5
Dustin Johnson70-68-68 206 -4
Rickie Fowler70-70-68-208 -2
Thomas Bjorn65-72-71 -208 -2
Miguel Angel Jimenez66-71-72-209 -1
Lucas Glover66-70-73-209 -I
'Anthony Kim72-68-70--210 E
Phil Mickelson70-69-71 -210 E
Anders Hansen69-69-72--210 E
George Coetzee69-69-72-210 E
Davis Love 11170-68-72-210 E
Martin Kaymer68-69-73 -210 E
Zachjphnson72-68-71-211 + 1
Ryan Palmer68-71-72-21 + I
Tom Lehman71-67-73-211. + I
Chad Campbell69-68-74-211 + I
Raphael Jacquelin74-67-71-212 + 2
Simon Dyson68-72-72-212 + 2
Webb Simpson66-74-72 -212 + 2
Steve Stricker69-71-72-212' + 2
Adam Scott69-70-73- 212 + 2
Fredrik Jacobson70-70-73-213 + 3
Y.E.Yang 71-69-73 -213 + 3
Charl Schwartzel71-67-75-213 + 3
Tom Watson72-70-72-214 + 4
Trevor lmmelman70-72-72-214 + 4
Charles Howell 11171-70-73-214 + 4
Richard Green70-71-73 -214..' + 4
Sergio Garcia70-70-74-214 + 4
Rory Mcllroy7-69-74-214 + 4
Robert Rock69-71-74-214 + 4
Pablo Larrazabal68-70-76-214 + 4
BoVanPelt73-69-73-215 + 5
BubbaWatson69-72-74 -215 + 5
Yuta lkeda69-71-75 -215 + 5
a-Tom Lewis65-74-76-215 ,+ 5
Louis Oosthuizen72-70-74-216 + 6
Richard McEvoy69-72-75--216 + 6
Seung-Yul Noh69-72-75 -216 + 6
RobertAllenby69-72-75 -216 + 6
GaryWoodland75-68-74-217 + 7
a-Peter Uihlein71-71-75 -217 + 7
Mark Wilson74-68-75-217 + 7
Gary Boyd71-70-76 -217 + 7
Jason Day71-70-76 -217 + 7
Kyle Stanley68-72-77-217 + 7
Jeff Overton68-71-78-217 + 7
K.J.Choi 71-72-75 -218 + 8
Henrik Stenson72-71-75-218 + 8
Jim Furyk72-70-76 -218 + 8
Kenneth Ferrie71-71-76 -218 + 8
Stewart Cink70-71-77-218 + 8
Stephen Gallacher70-71-77-218 + 8
Rory Sabbatini71-70-77 -218 + 8
Ryan Moore69-74-76-219 + 9
Floris DeVries70-73-76 -219 + 9
Edoardo Molinari69-74-76-219 + 9
Harrison Frazar72-70-77-219 + 9
Gregory Bourdy73-70-77-220 + 10
Simon Khan71-72-77-220 + 10
FredrikAndersson Hed68-75-77 -


220 + 10
Ricky Barnes68-74-78-220 + 10
Paul Casey74-69-78 -221 + II
Gregory Havret72-71-78--221 + II
Bill Haas 72-70-79 -221 + II
Justin Rose72-70-79--221 + II
Joost Luiten73-69-79-22I + I I
Spencer Levin72-69-81-222 + 12
Matthew Millar71-72-80 -223 + 13
Paul Lawrie73-70-81 -224 + 14
Jung-Gon Hwang68-74-83-225 + 15

SOCCER


Women's World Cup

THIRD PLACE
Saturday
At Sinsheim, Germany
Sweden 2, France I
CHAMPIONSHIP
Today
At Frankfurt
United States vs.Japan, 2:45 p.m.

Women'sWorld Cup Finals
2007 Germany 2, Brazil 0
2003 Germany 2, Sweden I, OT
1999 United States 0, China 0,
United States won 5-4 on penalty kicks
1995 Norway 2, Germany 0
1991 United States 2, Norway I

CYCLING

Tour de France stages

July 2 Stage I: Passage du Gois
La Barre-de-Monts-Mont des Alouettes
Les Herbiers, flat, 191.5 kilometers (119
miles) (Stage: Philippe Gilbert, Belgium;
Yellow Jersey: Gilbert)
July 3 Stage 2: Les Essarts, team
time trial, 23 (14.3) (Garmin-Cervelo;
Thor Hushovd, Norway)
July 4 Stage 3: Olonne-sur-Mer-
Redon, flat, 198 (123.0) (Tyler Farrar,
United States; Hushovd)
July 5 Stage 4: Lorient-Mur-de-
Bretagne, flat, 172.5(107.2) (Cadel Evans,
Australia; Hushovd)
July 6 Stage 5: Carhalx-Cap
Frehel,flat, 164.5 (102.2) (Mark Cavendish,
Britain; Hushovd)
July 7 Stage 6: Dinan-Lisleux, flat,
226.5 (140.7) (Edvald Boasson Hagen,
Norway; Hushovd)
July 8 Stage 7: Le Mans-
Chateauroux, flat,218 (135.5) (Cavendish;
Hushovd)
July 9 Stage 8: Aigurande-Super-
Besse Sancy, medium mountain, 189
(117.4) (Rui Alberto Costa, Portugal;
Hushovd)
July 10- Stage 9: Issoire-Saint-Flour,
medium mountain, 208 (129.2) (Luis Leon
Sanchez, Spain;Thomas Voeckler, France)
July II Rest day in Le Uoran
Cantal.
July 12-Stage lOAurillac-Carmaux,
flat, 158 (98.2) (Andre Grelpel, Germany;
Voeckler)
July 13 Stage 1: Blaye-les-Mines--
Lavaur, flat, 167.5 (104.1) (Cavendish;
Voeckler)
July 14 Stage 12: Cugnaux-Luz-
Ardiden, high mountain, 211 (131.1)
(Samuel Sanchez, Spain;Voeckler)
July 15 Stage 13: Pau-Lourdes,
high mountain, 152.5 (94.8) (Hushovd;
Voeckler)
July 16 Stage 14: Saint-Gaudens-
Plateau de Beille, high mountain, 168.5
(104.7) (Jelle Vanendert, Belgium;
Voeckler)
July 17 Stage 15: Limoux-
Montpellier, flat, 192.5 (119.6)
July 18 Rest day in the Drome
region. -
July 19 Stage 16: Saint-Paul-Trois-
Cfateaux-Gap, medium mountain,
162.5 (101)
July 20 Stage 17: Gap-Pinerolo,
Italy, high mountain, 179 (111.2)
July 21 Stage 18: Pinerolo-
Galibier Serre-Chevalier, high mountain,
200.5 (124.6)
July 22- Stage 19: ModaneValfrejus-
Alpe-d'Huez, high mountain, 109.5 (68.0)
July 23 Stage 20: Grenoble, indi-
vidual time trial,42.5 (26.4)
July 24 Stage 21: Creteil-Paris
Champs-Elysees, flat, 95 (59)
Total 3,430 (2,131.2)

Saturday
At Plateau de Beille, France
14th Stage.
104.7 miles in the Pyrenees from
Saint-Gaudens to Plateau de Beille, with
Categories I climbs up Col de la Core
and Col d'Agnes and ending with a
nearly 10-mile, Hors Categorie climb to
Plateau de Beille
I. Jelle Vanendert, Belgium, Omega
Pharma-Lotto, 5 hours, 13 minutes, 25
seconds.
2. Samuel Sanchez, Spain, Euskaltel-
Euskadi, 21 seconds behind.
3. Andy Schleck, Luxembourg,
Leopard-Trek, :46.
4. Cadel Evans,Australia, BMC, :48.
5. Rigoberto Uran, Colombia, Sky
Procycling, same time.

Overall Standings
(After 14 stages)
I.Thomas Voeckler, France, Europcar,
61 hours,4 minutes, 10 seconds.
2. Frank Schleck, Luxembourg,
Leopard-Trek, 1:49.
3. Cadel Evans,Australla, BMC, 2:06.
4. Andy Schleck, Luxembourg,
Leopard-Trek, 2:15.
5. Ivan Basso, Italy, Liquigas-
Cannondale, 3:16.
6. Samuel Sanchez, Spain, Euskaltel-
Euskadi, 3:44.
7.Alberto Contador, Spain, Saxo Bank
Sungard, 4:00.
8. Damlano Cunego, Italy, Lampre-
ISD, 4:01.
9. Tom Danielson, United States,
Garmin-Cervelo, 5:46.
10. Kevin De Weert, Belgium, Quick
Step, 6:18.

NFL

NFL Calendar
Aug. 6 Pro Football Hall of Fame
inductions, Canton. Ohio
Aug. 7 Hall of Fame game, Chicago
vs. St. Louis at Canton
Aug. 11-15 First weekend of
preseason
Sept. 2 Preseason concludes
Sept. 8 Opening game, New
Orleans at Green Bay
Sept 11-12 Opening weekend


ASSOCIATED PRESS
United States' (from left) Abby Wambach, Carli Lloyd, Alex Morgan and Megan Rapinoe go
through drills during a training session in preparation for the final match against Japan during
the Women's Soccer World Cup in Frankfurt, Germany on Friday.


CUP: U.S. goes for championship

Continued From Page 1B


'When we played in May,
the U.S. team was already
in regular shape, good con-
dition while the Japanese
team had just assembled,"
coach Norio Sasaki said on
Saturday through a transla-
tor. "The team has devel-
oped game by game and
become better and better."
Japan is playing in the
first final of a major tour-
nament after stunning two-
time defending World Cup
champion Germany, the
pre-tournament favorite, in
extra time in the quarterfi-
nals. The Nadeshiko then
made easy work of Sweden
in the semifinals.
But a final is much differ-
ent than any other game.
The pressure increases,
and so do the nerves.
"It is the biggest match
of my career," said Homare
Sawa, who is playing in her
fifth World Cup.
The Nadeshiko have
never beaten the Americans,
with draws in 2000, 2003 and
2004 the best they've been
able to manage in 25 games.
They have three losses
this year alone to the U.S.,
including that pair of defeats
in warm-up games a month
before the World Cup.
But the victories over


Germany and Sweden have
given Japan confidence. Japan
had never beaten Germany
before the World Cup. It
hadn't had a lot of success
against Sweden, either.
"Why shouldn't we be
confident?" Sawa asked. "If
you look that, we have plen-
ty of chances tomorrow."
The Americans will have
a significant height advan-
tage on Japan, with five of
the expected starters taller
than the 1.71-meter Saki
Kumagai, Japan's tallest
player. But the Japanese
had no problems challeng-
ing bigger and stronger
Germany, getting whis-
tled for four yellow cards
- the only yellows they've
received this tournament.
Japan's ball-handling skills
are exquisite, drawing com-
parisons to Barcelona for its
lightning quick passes and
slick combination play.
'They have some good
players, regardless how
tall or short they are, and
they do it together," U.S.
coach Pia Sundhage said.
"Everybody praises them
for the way they attack,
keep possession. It's a pret-
ty good way to defend. They
are very organized, and get
numbers behind the ball."


Sundhage has tried to
implement a more posses-
sion-oriented style with the
Americans, wanting plays
to develop through the
midfield rather than simply
sending long balls up to the
forwards. But it remains a
work in progress, and the
U.S. resorted to its old ways
after falling behind Sweden.
It got bogged down in the
midfield against France until
Sundhage brought Megan
Rapinoe on, putting her on
the left flank and moving
Lauren Cheney inside.
The move gave the
Americans more flow and
creativity, perfectly illustrat-
ed by their third goal, when
Rapinoe found a streaking
Alex Morgan with a cross
that was placed perfectly
behind the defense.
'We are disappointed in
the kind of soccer played
in last few games. It's just
not the kind of soccer we
want to play," said Abby
Wambach, who has scored
on headers in each of the
United States' last two
games. "Sometimes games
turn into what games turn
into and you have to deal
with what you've got and
somehow find a way and
figure it out."


CAMP: Farmer brings exposure


Continued From Pa


including Shaq John
Nate Ayers and
Webber.
"I kind of busted
butts in practice today
those guys were wi

ACROSS


1 Arm bone
5 Fold-up bed
8 Bert's pal
12 Disgusting
13 A Gabor
14 Raise
15 Peace Prize
city
16 Glitzy pianist
18 Split to join
20 Where hackles
rise
21 Groundhog mo.
22 FICA id
23 Eric Clapton
classic
26 Noisier
29 Cloudy
30 Have the blues
31 Pooh's pal
33 Half of zwei
34 Toe-stubber's
cry
.35 Give a high-five
36 Andre of tennis
38 Vista
39 Informer


ge 1B


nson, to show up on a volunteer
Alex basis," Allen said. "They're
showing the kids a taste
their of things that they'll see at
, but the varsity level. They'll see
killing the things that they'll grow

40 Extinct bird
41 Endorsed item Answe
44 Croquet stick
47 Sluggishness VI B F
49 Watch's face A H E M
51 Jai- M-R
52 "Pulp Fiction" M
name PA-N N
53 Old barge canal R E D
54 Dept. store
inventory S
55 Natural elev. GI S
56 Lox vendor D RU B

DOWN S K E W

1 Sci-fi ship
2 Come CH N
in second H ARA
3 and void AVA
4 In a cool
manner PEIN
5 "People"
person 11 Sourdoug
6 Classical poet strikes
7. Typewriter key 17 Follow
8 Quick trip 19 "Snow" vi
9 Frog step 22 Coll. stude
10 Knight's weapon 23 Size abov


into."
Farmer only has one
regret about the camp.
"I wish we had more
kids," he said. "That's what
it's all about, exposure."


r to Previous Puzzle

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Want more puzzles?
Check out the "Just Right Crossword Puzzles" books
at QuillDriverBooks.comI


games
Jan. 1, 2012 Regular season con-
cludes
Jan. 7-8 -Wild-card playoffs
Jan. 14-15 Division-round playoffs
Jan. 21-22 Conference champion-
ships
Feb. 5, 2012 Super Bowl,
Indianapolis


24 Diva's melody
25 Masculine
principle
26 Focal points
27 Mr. Gardner
28 Horse color
30 Necessary
thing
32 Unfold,
to a poet
34 Port near
Kyoto
35 Heated to the
boil
37 Comic-strip
teen
38 Note before la
40 Pyramid build-
er
41 Chowder tidbit
42 Believed
43 Depot info
44 The brass,
for short
45 Limerick
locale,
46 Mouse
appendage
48 Molasses-
based drink
50 Garland


2011 UFS, Dist. by Univ. Uclick for UFS










Paqe Editor: Brandon Finley, 754-0420 LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS SUNDAY, JULY 17, 2011


Bowyer moves on from


New Hampshire penalty


By DAN GELSTON
Associated Press

LOUDON, N.H. Clint
Bowyer put the trophy from
last year's victory at New
Hampshire in his house.
The rest of his memories
from that weekend, well,
they're not so good.
Bowyer's winning car in
the Chase opener flunked
inspection and NASCAR
levied crippling penalties
that ended his Sprint Cup
championship hopes days
after he had positioned
himself as a top contender.
The 150-point penalty
from his September infrac-
tion was so devastating that
not even another Chase
race victory at Talladega
could budge him out of last
place in the 12-driver field.
But that trying episode is
far from Bowyer's focus in
his New Harmpshire return
this weekend -. even as
he's pestered with remind-
ers of his fantastic-to-flop
tale.
Bowyer is stuck in
12th place again, a spot
that, thanks to NASCAR's
revamped points system,
puts him outside the Chase
field.
'This is a crucial time for
us," Bowyer said. "We're
still within reaching dis-
tance of the cars in front of
us, so this is a good time to
get things pointed back in


NASCAR driver Clint Bowyer finishes practice at New
Hampshire Motor Speedway in Loudon, N.H. Saturday.


the right direction points-
wise."
There are eight races
remaining until the Chase
field is set, giving Bowyer
time to make a move.
For 10 races, Bowyer
was inside the top 10 and
a string of five straight top-
10 finishes made it look
as if he put the crushing
end to last year behind him
and was poised to stay in
contention. But consecu-
tive poor finishes (36th at
Daytona, 35th last week at
Kentucky) knocked him
out of the Chase field and
behind: 11th-place driver
Tony Stewart
Like any slumping driv-


er, Bowyer and his Richard
Childress Racing team
have huddled at the shop
for solutions.
"Everybody across the
board, driver, crew chief,
the pit crew, over the wall
guys; it can very easily
become a negative and spi-
ral out of control," Bowyer
said. "But there are so
many positives about our
season. We've run well and
that's what has put us in
this situation."
The 32-year-old Bowyer,
who is eligible for free
agency at the end of this
season, hits a milestone
Sunday when he makes
his 200th career Cup start.


He's led more than 400
laps at New Hampshire
and has two wins.
"He just has a kind of
unique feel and setup for;
this particular race track'
as to what he likes in
the caR,' RCR teammate
Kevin Harvick said.
It'sthe, car that got' im
in trouble last year. "
He entered the race
as the last seed ini. the
field, then led a race-high
177 laps and stretched
his final tank of gas 92
laps to win the race when
Stewart ran out of fuel
right before the final lap.
s The victory snapped an
88-race winless streak for
Bowyer.
His celebration seemed
to last only slightly longer
than, the race. NASCAR
said the No. 33 Chevrolet
had been altered and did
not meet its strict specifica-
tions.
Bowyer was penalized
150 points. NASCAR also
fined crew chief Shane
Wilson $150,000, and sus-
pended him for six Cup
races. Car chief Chad
Haney also was suspended
for six races, and Childress
was docked 150 owner
points.
When he rolled
into Dover the next
week, Bowyer gave a
defiant defense of his
team.


Hammarstrom


sends Sweden


past France 2-1


Associated Press


SINSHEIM, Germany
- Marie Hammarstrom
scored in the 82nd minute
Satitrday, 'giving short-
handed Sweden a 2-1 victo-
ry over France in the third-
place game at the Women's
World Cup.
Down a player for almost
15 minutes after Josefine
Oqvist was sent off for kick-
ing Sonia Bompastor in the
chest Sweden won a corner
kick that the French man-.
aged to clear at the near
post. But the ball popped
out to Hammarstrom, who
faked out a defender with
a small side-volley, touched
the ball a second time and
then let fly with a thunder-
ous left-footed strike from
the edge of the box.
It was Hammarstrom's
first-ever goal for Sweden,
and it allowed the Swedes
to do the hippity-hoppity
dance that's become their
trademark one last time.
Lotta Schelin staked
Sweden to an early lead,
scoring her second goal-
of the tournament in the
29th minute. Sara Larsson
booted the ball from about
midfield and Schelin, run-
ning at a dead sprint, caught
up to it at the edge of the
box. As4French goalkeeper
Berangere Sapowiczrushed


. ,


Belgium's Vanendert

wins 14th stage of

Tour de France


By JEROME PUGMIRE
Associated Press

PLATEAU DE BEILLE,
France French cyclist
Thomas Voeckler retained
the lead of the Tour de
France on Saturday after the
last stage in the Pyrenees,
which was won by Jelle
Vanendert of Belgium and
failed to be as significant
as expected for the main
contenders.
Vanendert clinched the
14th stage the first Tour
stage win of his career -
after finishing 21 seconds
ahead of Samuel Sanc4ez
of Spain and 46 seconds
in front of third-place Andy
Schleck of Luxembourg.
"I never imagined this
would happen to me on
my first Tour de France,"
Vanendert said. "I have
been feeling good in the
mountains."
The contenders were
expected to launch attacks
in the most grueling stage
of the Pyrenees so far -
which featured a 10-mile
climb to Plateau de Beille
but Schleck only gained
2 seconds on defending
champion Alberto Contador
and Cadel Evans despite
several attempts from the
two-time runner-up.
Evans crossed the line
fourth ahead of Colombia's
Rigoberto Uran and
Contador. They all were 48



Unscramble these four Jumbles,
one letter to each square,
to form four ordinary words.
I ECBHN I


seconds behind Vanendert
"It wasn't possible to
make a big difference, I
need a. steeper stage than
this," said Schleck, who
rides for the Leopard Trek
team with his older brother
Frank. "We worked hard,
we climbed well. But when
you attacked today, you
could only get 50 meters
ahead because there was a
bit of wind. But still, I got a
few seconds at the end."
Voeckler is 1 minute, 49
seconds ahead of Frank
Schleck, 2:06 clear of
Evans, 2:15 ahead of Andy
Schleck and 4:00 in front of
Contador, who is seventh
behind Sanchez and Italy's
Ivan Basso.
"I'm not interested who
is stronger than who,"
Voeckler said. "My objec-
tive was to keep the jer-
sey."
Voeckler keeps predict-
ing he will lose the yellow
jersey and is stunned by his
impressive form.
"It's hard for me to believe
that I'm in yellow after the
Pyrenees," he said. "It's like
a dream."
Contador praised
Voeckler, but does not
expect him to keep going at
this rate for much longer.
"We know he's a great
rider, but if he ever
cracks one day he will really
lose a lot of time," Contador
said.

THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME
by David L. Hoyt and Jeff Knurek


I I I -I 5 1 I -nE DAMAGE CAUSED
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s Jumbles: BAGGY PIANO COMMIT NOVICE
Saturday's Answer: Vacationing was fun, but this wasn't -
VACATING


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Find all 17 of the 'Ice Cream' words hidden in the word search
above. Words can bi found in the banners on the ads shown her.
Complete the puzzle and retum it to the Lake City Reporter, 180 E.
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Deadline is Wednesday, July 20, 2011
Lake City Reporter
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LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS SUNDAY, JULY 17, 2011


Page Editor: Brandon Finley, 754-0420


v


out to try and smother the
ball, Schelin deftly flicked it
into the net.

Five North Koreans
positive at women's
World Cup

FRANKFURT, Germany
- FIFA said Saturday that
a total of five North Korean
players have tested positive
for steroids at the women's
World Cup, football's biggest
doping scandal at a major
tournament in 17 years.
FIFA President Sepp
Blatter said that after two
players were caught during
the tournament earlier this
month, FIFA tested the rest
of the North Korean squad
and found that three more
tested positive.
'This is a shock,"' Blatter
told a news conference.
"You can hear this emotion
in my voice."
The last doping case at a
major event came at the men's
1994 World Cup in the United
States, when Diego Maradona
was kicked out after testing
positive for stimulants.
Colombia's reserve goal-
keeper Yineth Varon has
meanwhile been suspended
for failing an out-of-competi-
tion testjust before the World
Cup in the wake of undergo-
ing hormonal treatment


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LAKE CITY REPORTER BRITISH OPEN SUNDAY, JULY 17, 2011


Why the best golf fans are in Britain


By DOUG FERGUSON
Associated Press

SANDWICH, England
- Gary Woodland was in
the right rough on the 13th
hole as he stared at the
green, trying to figure out
how to play his next shot.
Then he broke into a big
smile, and it had nothing to
do with anything at Royal
St. George's on Saturday.
Beyond the green is a
fence, and on the other side
is Prince's Golf Club.
It.was pouring rain. The
gusts topped 30 mph. And
the club next door was
filled with players in every
fairway. Woodland smiled
at the idea that while those
competing at the British
Open were suffering, these
people were finding plea-
sure.
"I was shocked," he said.
'There's no way back home
people would be playing
today. And it was packed
over there."
Even more impressive
were the number of fans on
such a.miserable day.
Matt Millar was the
first to play, in the worst
of the weather, yet he was
followed around by fans
who took their hands off
the umbrella long enough
to applaud whatever good
shots they saw.


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Spectators shelter under umbrellas as they watch play on the third day of the British Open Golf Championship at Royal St
George's golf course Sandwich, England on Saturday.


"I just can't believe how
many volunteers, specta-
tors, people who were just
so encouraging. Would you
spend your free weekend
out there on this weather?
There's nowhere like it in
the world, that I've seen,"
Millar said. "That made it a
lot easier to keep your head
up and keep battling on."
Most telling was
Woodland's adventure on
the 14th hole. *
After hitting his first
tee shot out-of-bounds,
Woodland's next one went
50 yards to the left in grass
so high that not even spec-
tators walked there. A
search party of nearly 40


people scoured the rough
until they found the ball.
That begged this ques-
tion: For an American who
is not well known in these
parts, who barely made the
cut and was in the fourth
group out, on the farthest
end of Royal St. George's,
why were there that many
people following him in the
first place?
"These fans are unbeliev-
able," Woodland said. "For
them to be out there watch-
ing, it was good to see."

Keeping dry
Ryan Moore started out
with six small towels and


one big towel. After 18
holes, all of them were wet
Defending champion Louis
Oosthuizen didn't wear
any extra layers except for
his rain suit, and he kept
his towels to four for the
round.
That was the trick'for the
players who faced the worst
of the weather in the morn-
ing staying warm and
staying dry.
'That'swhy justlaughed,
because I've never played
in it like this," Oosthuizen
said. "Whenever you have
social rounds and it just
starts raining a little bit,
you say, 'I'm out of here,
boys.' But I couldn't do that


today."
Oosthuizen shot 74.

Woodland's ride
For a 25-hole stretch,
Gary Woodland said it was
the best golf he played all
year.
It would be difficult to
disagree.
Woodland appeared to
be headed home early on
Friday when he was 7 over
at the British Open through
four holes of the second
round, and the wind was
getting stronger by the
minute. He made four bird-
ies and no bogeys the rest
of the way for a 68 to make


the cut on the number, then
looked even better Saturday
morning in whipping wind
and lashing rain.
Woodland was 2 under
through 11 holes of the
third round in the worst of
the weather, five shots out
of the lead. Then came a
few bogeys, which was no
shame on this day.
"The tee shot on 14 was
the toughest shot out there
for me today," he said.
It turned out to be his
undoing. His drive started
some 30 yards left and rode
the wind to the right out-of-
bounds. Then came a tee
shot into rough so deep
that Woodland took a lob
wedge and "swung as hard
as I could" to get back to
the fairway.
He did well to make a
triple bogey, then came
back on the next hole with
another superb shot, this
a 3-iron into the wind that
bounded onto the green
and touched the left edge of
the cup as the gallery rose
in the grandstands, think-
ing it might see an eagle.
From 7 over early Friday,
Woodland played that 25-
hole stretch in 6 under
with no bogeys. On the last
seven holes Saturday, he
was 6 over and right back
where he had started. He
wound up with a 74.


OPEN: Clarke leading after 3rd round


Continued From Page 11

Clarke said.
Then, the persnickety
weather along the English
seaside took a sudden turn
for the better.
"We did get very fortu-
nate with the draw," Clarke
conceded. "Sometimes to
win any tournament the
draw can make a big dif-
ference, but in the Open
championship it makes a
huge difference. We got
very lucky."
Clarke doesn't have
it locked up yet. Dustin
Johnson and Rickie Fowler
led an Americhn charge
up the board, looking to
end the country's longest
drought without a major
title in the modern Grand
Slam era.
The Ulsterman was at
5-under 205, with Johnson
just one shot behind after
his second straight 68.
Fowler posted a matching
68 and was at 208, tied with
first-round leader Thomas
Bjorn, still in position to
erase the memory of his
meltdown at Royal St.
George's in 2003.
Through lunchtime,
heavy showers and winds
gusting over 30 mph forced
players to don bulky,
oven-style mitts between
shots, huddle under flap-
ping umbrellas and try to
find a' way to get around
the course without giving
up too many shots to par
Saturday.
"It was playing stupidly
difficult," said Edoardo
Molinari, who sloshed to a
76. "Some holes were just
'a joke."
SBut the foul weather
eased up in time for those
with late tee times to start
putting up red numbers. It
sure sorted out the 71-play-
er field, which had been
separated by only seven
strokes going into the day.
Now, the margin from top
to bottom is 20, with only
11 players within five shots
of the lead.
Clarke posted his third
straight round in the 60s,
suddenly a contender for
his first major champion-
ship after coming into the
Open as a 42-year-old after-
thought
He used to be the face
of Northern Ireland golf,
only to get left in the
background by two of his
younger countrymen. First,
Graeme McDowell won the
2009 U.S. Open. Then, Rory
McIlroy romped to an eight-
stroke win in that same
championship last month at
Congressional.
Now, all eyes are on


Clarke. McIlroy faded from
contention with a 74, his
round ruined by a double-
bogey at the 14th where he
drove it out of bounds. The
22-year-old is now a stag-
gering nine strokes behind
Clarke, with little hope of
claiming the claret jug on
Sunday.
Clarke climbed into the
top spot all by himself with
a birdie at the 12th, then
coasted to the clubhouse
with six straight pars under
skies that had turned from
gloomy to sunny.
Johnson kept up the
strong play that began with
a hole-in-one on Thursday,
briefly claiming a share of
the lead before a bogey
at the 13th knocked him
back. .
At the start, he looked
like a guy. who might miss
the cut when he played
the first 12 holes at 4 over.
But that ace on the 16th
hole seemed to turn things
around. He finished with a
70 Thursday, then put up
consecutive 68s.
'The ace," he said, "really
kind of got me going."
Johnson has shown he
can contend in majors, lead-
ing last year at both the U.S.
Open (where he played mis-
erably on the final day) and
the PGA Championship (a
much-debated penalty cost
him a spot in a playoff).
Now, he wants to show he
can finish.
"I've been in this situation
a few times, so I think the
more and more you can put
yourself in a situation, the
more comfortable you get,"
Johnson said. "I'm going to
be pretty comfortable out
there (Sunday) because
I know what to expect, I
know how to approach it,
and I know what I do in
those situations."
The 22-year-old Fowler,
playing with McIlroy, teed
off about the time the
worst of the rain lashed the
course.' But the American
:phefiom held it together
better than his partner, and
birdied three holes down
,thestretch after the weath-
er improved.
,-. "I had quite a bit of fun
out there," Fowler said.
"Obviously, it wasn't the
best of conditions. But you
knew it was going to be
tough, and you just had to
make the best of it"
Another American, 2009
U.S. Open champion Lucas
Glover, started the day tied
with Clarke but struggled
in the final group with a 73.
He'll have some work to do
to win a second major title,


four shots back at 209 and
tied with Spain's Miguel
Angel Jimenez.
The group at 210 includ-
ed Phil Mickelson, who's
never played especially
well in the British Open
but seems to be approach-
ing links golf with a better
attitude. He carved out a 71
to stay in contention.
Lefty is the last of the
Americans to win a major,
taking the 2010 Masters.
Since then, they've gone
five straight without a title,
but they'll have plenty
of. challengers to send at
Clarke on Sunday. Anthony
Kim and Davis Love III also
were within five strokes.
"The European Tour
guys have been playing
well," Johnson said. "But
we've got a good shot at
getting one."
Mcllroy was kicking him-
self for one terrible shot,
the blunder at No. 14 which
likely ended any shot he
had of winning a second
straight major.
"You've done so well for
13 holes to keep yourself
in it," he said. "You've got
half of Kent on your left and
you hit it right It was a bit
disappointing."
Early on, the weather was
downright brutal.
Umbrellas snapped. Bo
Van Pelt went through
eight gloves trying to keep
his hands dry. Some golf-
ers turned around their
caps when putting so they
wouldn't have to deal with
rain dripping off the bill.
The 495-yard 14th, which
played into the teeth of the
wind, was an absolute beast.
The 71 players posted a
65-over total at that hole,
averaging nearly a stroke
above par. There were only
18 pars, and not one player
managed a birdie.
"Whenever you have
social rounds and it starts
raining a little bit, you say,
'I'm outta here boys,"' said
defending Open champion
Louis Oosthuizen, who
wasn't too upset about a 74.
"I couldn't do tht today."
Five-time Opein'..cham-
pion Tom Watson played
in the worst of the weather
and still managed a 72. The
61-year-old showed those
youngsters how it's done.
"The conditions are both-
ersome, but you just try
to do the best you can to
keep your grips dry and
your wits about you and go
about your business to try
to make pars out there,"
Watson said. "Par is a great
score out there, obviously.
But it's a struggle."


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Rickie Fowler of the U.S. plays a shot off the 5th tee during the third day of the British
Open Golf Championship at Royal St George's golf course Sandwich, England,: Sturday.



Fowler hopes to be


a sight in orange


By TIM DAHLBERG
Associated Press

SANDWICH, England
- He'll come out in his
Sunday best, decked out in
orange from head to toe.
Thats what Rickie Fowler
does, though so far his
fashion has been better
than his golf when it really
counts.
On Saturday, his outfit
was more muted, though
Fowler still stuck out amid
the grayness as hard, side-
ways rain led to an early exit
for some steely British golf
fans. The ones who stayed
surely appreciated Fowler
more for the way he fought
through the conditions to
post a dazzling 68 than his
cream-colored rainsuit with
pink polka dots.
It was good enough to
beat playing partner Rory
McIlroy by six strokes in
a friendly rivalry of 22-
year-old stars to be. Good
enough, too, to get Fowler
the next-to-last tee time
Sunday, when the British
Open will be decided.
That's where it gets a bit
tricky. Because, up until
now, it's been more form
-than substance for Fowler.
He's not been able to
close a show yet. And now
he's asking himself to do
it coming from behind at a
major championship.
Tiger Woods always won
in red. Can Fowler do it in
orange?
"I'd love for my first win
to be a major," Fowler said.


"And I'd love for it to be
here. "
Watch Fowler make
his way around a golf
course and it's easy to
see he doesn't-lack confi-
dence. Not in his choice of
clothes, and certainly not
in his game.
Listen to him talk,
though, and you begin to
get an idea that there's
something very real
behind the hype that pre-
maturely anointed him the
next great American player
when he came out on the
PGA Tour.
Get past the gaudy outfits,
and the kid's got game.
"He's such a natural
player and he's got such
good feel," McIlroy said
after their round. "A 68 out
there in those conditions is
very impressive."
The few fans who hadn't
fled the wet grandstands
surrounding the ,18th
green certainly thought
so, cheering Fowler as he
finished a round played in
brutal conditions. Onerman
chanted "USA, USA," giv-
ing it up quickly after he
realized the English crowd
wasn't going to join in.
The round got Fowler to
2 under and a tie for third,
just three shots behind
leader Darren Clarke. The
position is more impressive
when you consider Fowler
got the worst part of the
draw very day when it
came to the weather condi-
tions.
So far, though, the only


time Fowler has finished
anything was in the Ryder
Cup last year when he
birdied the last four holes
to get a singles draw with
Edoardo Molinari. For the
year his final-round scor-
ing average is a fat 71.8,
132nd on the PGA Tour.
That includes the AT&T
National earlier this month
when he entered the final
round tied for the lead only
to shoot 74.
'The only thing was I
just really couldn't get any
putts to fall," Fowler said
of that loss. "I felt really
good where I was at in that
position. Obviously this is
a little bit bigger stage and
a major, but I'm ready to go
out and have some fun and
play well."
Having fun seems to be
a recurrent theme for the
son of dirt bike racer who
likes nothing better than
to get a little air himself,
too. That was his mindset
going out Saturday in con-
ditions so miserable there
was little hope of keep-
ing clubs or player dry.
Embracing the moment,
Fowler made par after par
before back-to-back bird-
ies on 15 and 16 put him in
red numbers.
Credit some of that to
Tom Watson, who went
out before Fowler on his
way to a 72. Fowler's cad-
die noticed Watson was
making the most of the
moment, smiling as he
went along despite the
lousy weather.


Page Editor: Brandon Finley, 754-0420








Lake City Reporter


Story ideas?

Robert Bridges
Editor
754-0428
crisok@lakeityreporter.com


BUSINESS


Sunday, July 17, 2011


www.lakecityreporter.com


Section C


COUNTY TOURISM


Harvey Campbell
386-758-1397


A sense

of place

Have you ever been to
Clark County, Nevada?
Do you know what Horry
County, South Carolina
is famous for? Probably
not, but Clark County,
Nevada is home to Las
Vegas and Horry County,
South Carolina is home to
Myrtle Beach. If you're in
Atlanta, Georgia and you
see an ad for Columbia
County, Florida, you are
probably going to skip the
ad because it doesn't tell
you where it is people
just don't pay any atten-
tion to county names or
county lines. Even on the
Florida State Map you
have to look very closely
to see the county names,
while cities and towns are
in bold print if they are of
consequence.
And that brings us to
Lake City over half. of
all the states have a Lake
City, some nice some
not so nice what will
the visitor think of when
CAMPBELL cont. on 2C


Local Mary Kay sales director going strong


By LEANNE TYO
Ityo@lakecityreporter.com
Growing her busi-
ness through motiva-
tion, dedication and
leadership was the
driving force behind
Connie Naiman's new
ride a silver 2011
Chevrolet Equinox
Crossover, embla-
zoned with the Mary
Kay Inc. logo.
Naiman, a Mary
Kay independent sales
director in Lake City,
earned the vehicle
through the Mary Kay
Career Car Program
for her achievements
in her business.
"I love driving free,"
Naiman said. "I mean,
who couldn't? They
pay all the tax, title and
most of the insurance,
so all I have to do is
put gas in there."
Mary Kay, which
sells skin care and
color cosmetic prod-
ucts, was founded in
1963 with the goal
of helping women
achieve personal
growth and financial
success. Its Career
Car Program began
in 1969 and there
are currently more
than 5,600 Mary Kay
career cars on the


JASON MATTHEW WALKER.L i,- ,'. i:.ner
Connie Naiman, a local Mary Kay independent sales director, stands next to a silver 2011 Chevrolet Equinox Crossover, her fourth,
car earned since she started working for Mary Kay in 2002. 'I think of it as a rolling trophy,' said Naiman, a retired Columbia High
School art teacher. 'Mary Kay is a phenomenal company. They give women the opportunity to increase their own exposure in the
business world.'


road nationwide.
Naiman picked
up her vehicle at
the Rountree-Moore
Chevrolet Cadillac
dealership. It is the
fourth vehicle she's


earned in six years
through the Career
Car Program, and the
pearlized pink Cadillac
- the highest in the
Career Car Program
- is the next step.


As an independent
sales director, Naiman
oversees a unit of
more than 65 active
independent beauty
consultants. Naiman
named her unit


"Connie's BEElievers"
after a bumblebee, a
Mary Kay motivation-
al symbol.
"The body is too
heavy, it's not sup-
posed to be able to


fly, and it's wings are
too frail, but it flies
anyway," Naiman said.
"So it's kind of the
'can-do' spirit."
NAIMAN cont. on 2C


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I "', ** 7 1
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FREE
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Move this to the top of your list:



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Saturday m July 30th 9 a.m. Noon

Pre-registration is encouraged by calling 888.681.6388

Provided by:

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More details at www.cccnf.com

Partners in the project:
Dr. J. Anthony Trott a CMSMG Dermatology


I -












LAKE C Y EE, 2-0


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CAMPBELb There's only one Suwannee River, and it runs here

Continued From Page 1C


they hear that name? But
there is only one Suwannee
River and it runs through
Columbia, Hamilton and
Sutwannee counties on its
way to the Gulf of Mexico.
Several years ago, we real-
ized that we were working
for the same purpose as
our neighboring counties
- to bring people to our
area to enjoy our natural
resources and festivals
ard events. That's why
we have joined with those
counties, and branded
our counties as Florida's
Sdwannee River Valley.
The name gives us a sense
of place, a landmark that
ine river tells our story.
Our story is about our
way of life, our history
which we have preserved
6or our children and the
natural resources we trea-
sure, enjoy and protect.
We show this in our muse-
ums, parks, and outdoor
recreation. By marketing
together our presence is
larger and our budgets
go farther. Now when
that person from Atlanta
see our ad for Florida's
Suwannee River Valley -


they know who we are and
where we are and maybe
they'll visit our website
and find out what we have
to offer perhaps they'll
plan to make us their next
destination.
We are lucky enough to
have several of Florida's
incredible state parks' with.
scenic rivers, hiking trails
and campgrounds, charm-
ing towns, museums and
numerous outdoor activi-
ties. It is within the valley
that families, couples and
individuals will find a per-
fect and non-stressful way
to re-connect with nature
and explore northern
Florida's greatest natural
treasures. This is why we
have choseri to call our-
selves, Florida's Suwannee
River Valley because Lake
City and Columbia County
truly are the heart of the
valley.
You will see over the next
few months more evidence
of Florida's Suwannee River
Valley branding with two
new brochures that will be
coming out in the fall of
2011. The new logo will
be available for use by the


end of the month and we
will be using it on these
new brochures. If you're
interested in being a part of
our regional tourism team,
please call our office, 386-
758-1312.
Visit Florida Unveils
their 2011-2012 Marketing
Plan
As the official destina-
tion marketing organiza-
tion charged with promot-
ing Florida as a leisure
travel and meetings des-
tination, VISIT FLORIDA
plans and implements a
wide variety of sales and
marketing initiatives.
The goal is to deliver the
right message, through
the right medium, to the
right audience, at the
right time, in order to
maximize the economic
impact of travel to the
Sunshine State. This stra-
tegic marketing plan is
the roadmap that guides
all VISIT FLORIDA sales
and marketing efforts
for the 2011-12 year. The
plan was developed by
VISIT FLORIDA staff
based on guidance,
input and insight from


the Florida tourism
industry as represented
by members 'of VISIT
FLORIDA's marketing
committees, including: *
Advertising and Internet
* Communications *
Culture, Heritage, Rural
and Nature Industry
Relations International
* Promotions Sales
* Visitor Services. The
2011 2012 Marketing
Plan is now available
at www.visitflorida.
org. Visit Florida has
made membership very
affordable, from a Small
Business Partner to a
basis web listing. Prices
range from $95.00 to
$395.00 per year. Now is
the perfect time to join.
Holiday Inn & Suites
takes Part in the National
Campaign Give Kids the
World Village
Continuing their com-
mitment again the year
on Saturday, July 30, 2011
from 10:00 a.m. 2:00
p.m. the Holiday Inn &
Suites in Lake City, FL is
taking part in "Ice Cream
for Breakfast," the national
fundraising and awareness


campaign for .Give Kids
the World Village, by hold-
ing an ice cream social to
benefit children with life-
threatening illnesses. In
exchange for a donation
of $5 or more, attendees
are encouraged to tap into
their childhood desires
and indulge in a make-
your-own sundae bar while
celebrating life -with mem-
bers of their community.
For more information and
sponsorship opportunities,
call Theresa Westberry at
386-487-1078.
Busy Weekend for sports
tournaments
This past weekend
Lake City hosted a Babe
Ruth Tournament and
the Jacksonville Storm
Showcase Softball
Tournaments both held
on July 7- 11. The CCTDC
was at the Southside
Complex over the week-
end and gave out surveys
to those attending. This
gives us an opportunity
to find out how the visi-
tors feel about the sports
complex and our hospital-
ity industry, results will
be posted in next month's


newsletter. I cannot say
enough aboutthe Columbia
County Landscapes and
Parks Department and
the job they do to prepare
for these tournaments.
Director Clint Pittman and
his staff do an outstanding
maintaining the playing
fields, restrooms, parking
lots and garbage collec-
tion and the continued job
they do during the tour-
nament. They our fields
and facilities look good
and that makes a positive
impression on our visitors
and participants in these
tournaments.
New maps from
the hotels to the Sport
Complex were handed out
prior to the weekend, if
you need more, please let
us know. A complete list
of these tournaments can
be obtained by contacting
Brenda Clemente at 386-
758-1312.


* Harvey Campbell is the
executive director of the
Columbia County Tourist
Development Council. He can
be reached at 386-758-1397.


NAIMAN: Local Mary Kay independent sales director going strong

Continued From Page 1C


Naiman earned her vehicle based on
her unit's production and can keep the car
for two years.
"It's a great program," she said. "If you
just figure the value of car payments for
six years (how long she's been earning
cars), that's not bad."
Naiman first signed her agreement as
a Mary Kay independent beauty consul-
tant in 2002 when she was teaching art at
Columbia High School.
"Originally, I just loved the product and
wanted to get my product cheaper," she
said. 'That was the original reason, never
intending to sell anything ever."
As retirement neared, Naiman decid-
ed to grow her Mary Kay business
for more income and began selling in
2005.


"I decided I would make it a business
instead of just a hobby," she said. "I set
goals and by 2006, I was an independent
sales director."
She .was able to prosper her business
through advice from a mentor, Naiman
said.
"My director at that time was my mentor
and she basically shared with me the best
practices in order to grow my business
and I listened and did what they recom-
mended," Naiman said. "So consequently,
my business grew."
Each consultant has the potential to
earn a Mary Kay career car, Naiman
said.
"I think the most exciting thing to me is
that it's something that every consultant
has the potential that they can do," she


said. "When I actually started selling in
'05, I had my first car in a year and a half.
So it's very doable."
Naiman retired from teaching in 2010,
but has continued working with Mary Kay
because of the company and its people.
"I love the women," she said. "I love the
philosophy of the company of God first,
family second, career third. I love the
unlimited potential, that I'm the only one
that limits what I can do in this company.
There isn't anything I've found that I don't
like about it."
She said she especially likes how Mary
Kay trains its consultants in a wide range
of areas, such as administering facials or
teaching classes.
"If you're trainable and teachable, any-
body can do this business," Naiman said,


"if they're willing to put the work in and
the commitment"
Earning her fourth career car is a sym-
bol of both her own success and the
company's, Naiman said, successes she is
excited to be a part of.
"Mary Kay is a phenomenal company,"
she said. "They're very dedicated to their
consultants and the grassroots and enrich-
ing women's lives and the whole concept of
giving women the opportunity to increase
their own exposure in the business world,
to be their own boss and to add income to
their family."
Naiman said she doesn't see herself
quitting Mary Kay and her next goal is
.earning the pink Cadillac.
"We're already working on it," she said.
"We're not stopping."


Knrow the ansn er? Send it to us with Foolish Trivia on the top and N to Fool@fool.com or via regular mail c/o this newspaper, attn: The .
you II be entered into a drawingfor a nifty prize! Motley Fool. Sorry, we can providee individual financial advice. .
8 2011 THE MOTLEY Foo0L/DI. BY UNIVERSAL UCUCK (FOR RELEASE 7/14/2011)


I As theFool IT


LAKE CITY REPORTER BUSINESS SUNDAY, JULY 17, 2011


Page Editor: Robert Bridges, 754-0428


.


Cisco Undervalued
Looking for a good performer for
your portfolio? Consider Cisco Sys-
tems (Nasdaq: CSCO).
Some think the company is in
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much of Cisco's revenues, the com-
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tage of other key areas of networking
growth such as WAN optimization.
Yes, Cisco took its eye off the
ball, delving into consumer markets
and letting small upstarts get in the
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edging its mistakes.
In its recent quarterly report, man-
agement asserted that it will "divest
or exit underperforming operations"
- and it has killed its Flip video
recorder. Management vowed to
refocus on core businesses: routing,
switching, and other services (cloud,
virtualization and mobility solutions).
Meanwhile, the market is pricing
Cisco as if it will undergo a total
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its stock price seems cheap, with a
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cash flow every year and offers a
1.6 percent dividend yield, as well.
(Motley Fool newsletters have
recommended buying options and
shares of Cisco Systems.)












Page Editor: Robert Bridges, 754-0428


LAKE CITY REPORTER BUSINESS & HOME SUNDAY, JULY 17, 2011


THE WEEK IN REVIEW THE WEEK IN REVIEW *THE WEEK IN REVIEW THE WEEK IN REVIEW THE WEEK IN REVIEW


S ,3" ,_ -- --,-]r -,
. .. = .. .. ', ,- _i -" : ; ;. : .,:E ; F ','.: !_+ = = ..'/ --, .... t- ci~i:i ~~~ ,., , ;


I I'


SNYSE Amex Nasdaq
227.04 -183.15 2,405.19 -17.01 2,789.80 -70.01


Gainers ($2 or more)
Name Last Chg %Chg
Lentuon 5.84 +2.42 +70.8
Petrohawk 38.17+13.60 +55.4
CSVS2xVxS21.01 +4.64 +28.4
Taomeen 13.39 +2.92 +27.9
Orbit 3.15 +.66 +26.5
C-TrCVQL 29.02 +5.41 +22.9
iPSER2K 27.01 +4.84 +21.8
Blyth 62.00 +9.93 +19.1
DSOXBrrs 73.27+11.40 +18.4
Thermonn 14.91 +2.20 +17.3

Losers ($2 or more)
Name Last Chg %Cho
StllwbrM 17.28 -6.44 -27.2
Fabrinet 18.68 -5.16 -21.6
InvTech 11.00 -2.80 -20.3
Trex 20.39 -4.49 -18.0
MarineP 5.45 -1.13 -17.2
OrxSOXBII 39.06 -7.84 -16.7
CapOnewt 18.98 -3.73 -16.4
E-House 7.97 -1.53 -16.1
ProUSSIvrs14.22 -2.63 -15.6
VlyNBwtl8 2.18 -.38 -14.8

Most Active ($1 or more)
Name Vol(00) Last Chg
S&P500ETF9290210131.69-2.71
BkofAm 7729138 10.00 -.70
SPDR Fnd4504519 14.85 -.61
iShR2K 3358019 82.81 -2.32
FordM 2488876 13.09 -.79
GenElec 2434158 18.41 -.58
iShEMkts 2426453 46.66-1.27
Petrohawk2384953 38.17+13.60
Ciigrs 2189637 38.38-3.65
Annaly 2143470 17.96 -.56

Diary
Advanced 846
Declined 2,325
New Highs 166,
New Lows 89
Total issues 3,213
Unchanged 42
Volume 18,378,214,401


Gainers ($2 or more)
Name Last Chg %Chg
MdwGoldg 2.69 +.63 +30.6
AmLorain 2.12 +.48 +29.3
GoldStrg 2.98 +.56 +23.1
Medgenicn 5.04 +.85 +20.3
ProlorBio 6.10 +1.03 +20.3
WellsGard 219 +.36 +19.7
FieldPnt 2.86 +.38 +15.3
NewEnSys 2.34 +.30 +14.7
TrioTch 3.89 +.49 +14.4
NthgtMg 3.14 +.38 +13.8

Losers ($2 or more)
Name Last Chg %Chg
SoCTBcp 2.70 -.49 -15.4
ChinaPhH 2.15 -.36 -14.3
PhrmAth 2.67 -.37 -12.2
ExtorreGg 12.50 -1.62 -11.5
Bacterin 2.32 -.28 -10.8
ChinaShen 2.90 -.35 -10.8
Crexendo 4.03 -.48 -10.6
HaderaPap 63.96 -7.34 -10.3
QuestRMg 5.49 -.61 -10.0
PHC Inc 2.85 -.29 -9.1

Most Active ($1 or morel
Name Vol(00) Last Chg
GoldSrg 284485 2.98 +.56
NthgtMg 259660 3.14 +.38
NAPallg 246220 4.72 +.54
NovaGldg 185319 10.03 +.10
TmsatlPet 181817 1.69 +.02
Adventrx 165806 3.33 -.23
NwGoldg 153313 10.95 +.31
KodiakOg 149338 6.58 +.18
ChenierEn138895 9.97 +.42
CFCdag 123850 23.46+1.92

Diary
Advanced 237
Declined 276
New Highs 22
New Lows 15
Total issues 537
Unchanged 24
Volume 596,001,048


Gainers ($2 or more)
Name Last Chg %Chg
Shenglnno 2.63 +1.22 +86.5
SinoClnEn 2.03 +.66 +48.2
CleanDslrs 6.07 +1.57 +34.9
RadntSys 28.88 +6.93 +31.6
UghtPath 2.00 +.46 +29.9
Icagenrs 7.43 +1.57 +26.8
GufRes 3.82 +.78 +25.7
FstUtdCp 5.10 +1.00 +24.4
SGOCOn 4.40 +.82 +22.9
Zagg 15.32 +2.61 +20.5

Losers ($2 or more)
Name Last Chg %Chg
TransceptP 4.87 -3.11 -39.0
StemCellrs 4.50 -1.58 -26.0
CoffeeH 19.79--6.93 -25.9
BioLase 3.89 -1.33 .-25.5
TOP Ship rs 3.00 -1.00 -25.0
Powawav 2.21 -.64 -22.5
SemiLeds n 5.24 -1.49 -22.1
Delcath 5.06 -1.28 -20.2
Medtox 14.75 -3.73 -20.2
ASM Int 31.08 -7.40 -9 2

Most Active (si or more)
Name Vol (00) Last Chg
SiriusXM 5362890 2.33 l 1
NewsCpA 5065742 15.64 -1 11
PwShs QQQ367855257.85 18
Cisco 2772602 15.E 15
Microsoft 2250083 26.78 -.14
Intel 2237396 22.37 -.72
Oracle 1503078 32.09-1.85
MicronT 1361712 7.41 -.27
Level3 1294391 2.35-.24
ApldMatl 1122815 12.45 -.65

Diary
Advanced 807
Declined 1,915
New Highs 169
New Lows 93
Total issues 2,782
Unchanged 60
Volume 9,474,070,863


STOCKS OF LOCAL INTEREST I Weekly Dow Jones


Wkly Wkly YTD Wkiy Wkly YTD
Name Ex Dlv Last Chg %Chg %Chg Name Ex Dlv Last Chg %Chg %Chg


AT&Tlnc NY 1.72 30.31 -.83 -2.7 +3.2
AMD NY ... 6.43 -.52 -7.5 -21.4
AlcatelLuc NY ... 5.09 -.79 -13.4 +72.0
Alcoa NY .12 15.48 -.90 -5.5 +.6
Annaly NY 2.59 17.96 -.56 -3.0 +.2
AutoZone NY .. 297.28 -1.00 -0.3 +9.1
BkofAm NY .04 10.00 -.70 -6.5 -25.0
BariPVixrsNY ... 23.16 +2.81 +13.8 -38.4
BobEvans Nasd .80 35.60 -.40 -1.1 +8.0
CNBFnPANasd .66 13.74 -.39 -2.8 -7.2
CSXs NY .48 25.32 -1.30 -4.9 +17.6
Chevron NY 3.12 106.19 +.30 +0.3 +16.4
Cisco Nasd .24 15.59 -.15 -1.0 -22.9
Citigrprs NY .04 38.38 -3.65 -8.7 -18.9
CocaCola NY 1.88 67.53 -1.15 -1.7 +2.7
ConocPhilNY 2.64 76.42 +.51 +0.7 +12.2
Delhaize NY 2.45 70.02 -1.80 -2.5 -5.0
FamilyDIr NY .72 52.40 -2.09 -3.8 +5.4
FordM NY ... 13.09 -.79 -5.7 -22.0
GenElec NY .60 18.41 -.58 -3.1 +.7
HomeDp,.NY 1.00 35.91 -.71 -1.9 +2.4
iShJapn NY .17 10.66 +.08 +0.8 -2.3
iShSilver NY ... 38.24 +2.49 +7.0 +26.7
iShEMkts NY .84 46.66 -1.27 -2.6 -2.1
iShR2K NY .94 82.81 .-2.32 -2.7 +5.8
Intel Nasd .84 22.37 -.72 -3.1 +6.4
JPMorgChNY 1.00 39.98 -.76 -1.9 -5.8
Level Nasd ... 2.35 -.24 -9.3+139.8


Lowes NY .56'
MGM Rsts NY
McDnlds NY 2.44
MicronT Nasd ...
Microsoft Nasd .64
NY Times NY
NewsCpA Nasd .15
NextEraEnNY 2.20
NobilityH Nasd ..
NokiaCp NY .55
OcciPet NY 1.84
Oracle Nasd .24
Penney NY .80
PepsiCo NY 2.06
PetrohawkNY
Pfizer NY .80
Potash s NY .28
PwShsQQQNasd .42
Ryder NY 1.08
S&P500ETFNY 2.44
SearsHIdgsNasd .
SiriusXM Nasd
SouthnCo NY 1.89
SprintNex NY
SPDRFndNY .18
TimeWam NY .94
WalMart NY 1.46.
WellsFargo NY .48


22.86 -.75 -3.2 -8.9
14.93 -.03 -0.2 +.5
85.48 ,-.12 -0.1 +11.4
7.41 -.27 -3.5 -7.6
26.78 -.14 -0.5 -4.0
8.67 -.31 -3.5-11.5
15.64 -1.11 -.6 +7.4
56.80 -.90 -1.6 +9.3
7.53 -.31 -4.0 -7.2
5.54 -.68 -10.9 -46.3
105.34 -.93 -0.9 +7.4
32.09 -1.85 -5.5 +2.5
31.57 -1.39 -4.2 -2.3
68.53 -1.40 -2.0 t4.9
38.17+13.60 +55.4+109.2
19.75 -.41 -2.0 +12.8
59.20 +.08 +0.1 +14.7
57.85 -1.18 -2.0 +6.2
57.02 -1.06 -1.8 +8.3
131.69 -2.71 -2.0 44.7
74.23 -.45 -0.6 +.7
2.33 +.11 +4.9 +42.9
40.22 -.09 -0.2 +5.2
5.35 -.14 -2.6 +26.5
14.85 -.61 -3.9 -6.9
35.63 -1.01 -2.8 +10.8
53.63 -.45 -0.8 -.6
27.18 -1.12 -4.0 -12.3


Stock Footnotes. g = Dreudends ana earrida in Canaandia ars n l n =Doai.T meal onrnued-istflng siandardE
If I Le 1 b ite ling SEC r Ne w in pas 62 weeks pi = Prafelred r Slack rh i undergon a reverse siock spin
oD aS le 150 percent er.n mIe past year n Rign t to abuy seunWy al secified price s = Siock rus ipin by at
least 20 percMnm wlhin me Ilas yaear un Unin v] In bankruplcy or reclvervanip ad = W en ialsntbuled *I
Wlheniz ubd at = Warranti
Mutual Fund Footnote: o = Fee covenng market coals a paid from fund asreL a Deferred sales charge or
redamplionr fee I, front load (sale charges mn Muluple fees are charged NA nbl available p prevlous day s
nal ase 1 value a = lred split shares Oauing in. week = rund paJi a dislnbulion during Ime *t GOanear and
Losen musl De WAorns a 16at 52 fo De IiwedI Inlre lae a left Most Actives muel ms wortn al leasi SI volume in
hundreds ol shares. Source. Tne Aasocatle Proas Salas figures am unotfca


Money Rates-
Last Pvs Week


3.25 3.25
0.75 0.75
s Rate .00-.25 .00-25


3-month 0.01 u.a3
6-month. 0.05 0.06
5-year 1.43 .1.56
10-year 2.90 3.01
30-year 4.25 4.27


Currencies
Last Pvs Day
Australia .9411 .9340
Britain 1.6123 1.6127
Canada .9557 .9604
Euro .7074 .7075
Japan 79.11 79.11
Mexico 11.7483 11.7373
Switzerlnd .8141 .8173
British pound expressed In U.S. dollars. All oth-
ers show dollar in foreign currency.


Dow Jones Industrials -151.44 -58.88 44.73 -54.49 42.61
Close:12,479.73 T) ". S *
1-week change: -177.47 (-1.4%) MON TUES WED THUR FRI
13,000 **T.




1 1 ,500 .... ............... ......... ....... ...... ..... .... ...... .... ........ ......... .... ......
12,500 : .................



12,000


11,500 ... ............ .... ...... .......
J F M A .... ......................j j ,


.
MUTUAL FUNDS i
Total Assets Total ReturnRank Pet Mn Inlt
Name Obj ($Mlns) NAV 4-wk 12-mo 5-year Load Invt


PIMCO TotRetls CI
American Funds GrthAmA m LG
Vanguard TotStldx LB
Rdelity Contra LG
Vanguard Insftdxl LB
Aerican Funds CaplncBuA m IH
Amencar. Fundi, CpWloGdA m WS
Arerinans Funds InArcerA m MA
Vang uad 50Adml LB
Variguard TOISlAom LB
Arraen.an Funds Iri.CoAmA m LB
Dodqa & C;l Ir0%Si FV
Ddge & Co, Selck LV
Amnrr ard Funld WAMulnvA m LV
Areriran Funds EurPacGrA m FB
vanguard In.Plus LB
Frank Tip-FrarUin Income A m CA
Amnrrian Fundi FrilrnA im LB
Valrguud Toillt d FB
American Funds NewPerspA m WS
PIMCOTotRetAdm b CI
American Funds BalA m MA
Vanguard 5001nv LB
Vanguard WelltnAdm MA
Harbor lntllnstl d FB
Fidelity GrowCo LG
Vanguard TotBdAdml Cl


142,222


142,222
64,340
62,404
61,672
60,307
59,351
55,045
54,204
54,186
51,740
48,030
46,279
43,847
40,086
38,377
37,510
36,555
34,455
34,163
33,308
32,808
32,184
30,461
29,812
29,804
29,343
28,544


+6.018
+19.7/E
+24.4/A
+23.5/D
+22.4/B
+14.7/D
+16.4/E
+17.1/B
+22.4/B
+24.6/A
+16.6/E
+17.2/C
+19.1/C
+23.3/A
+17.0/D
+22.4/B
+15.5/A
+21.3/C
+18.6/C
+19.5/C
+5.8/C
+17.2/B
+223/B
+14.7/D
*+21.0/B
+34.2/A
+4.4/D


NL 1,000,000;
5.75 250
NL 3,000
NL. 2500'
NL 5,000,000
5.75 250
5.75 250.
5.75 250t
NL 10,000.
NL 10,000
5.75 250
NL 2,500
NL 2,500
5.75 250
5.75 250
NL 200,000,000
4.25 1,000
5.75 250,
NL 3,000:
5.75 250,
NL .1,000,000.
5.75 250
NL 3,000
NL 50,000
NL 50,000
NL 2,500
NL 10,000


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L Value, IH -WoddAlaoctal, LB -ameS BndL G 4a-e o LV 4.ae Vaue, l -ModerateAlcfio MB A 8n, M
p Value, SH -Speciall~ a, WS d Sck T Reum: Chng rAV w widends mkve Ranm Hev fund pelned v
olhersilh same obj* e:A b in top 20 E n ttbolm 20%. Min Inttnum $ need hienestab I af Sour :Mnkgt
-!


Wkly YTD Wkly
Name Div YId PE Chg %Chg Last
ABBLtd 1.12 4.4 ... -.82 +13.7 25.52
AESCorp ... ... 15 -.52 +3.0 12.54
AFLAC 1.20 2.6 9 -1.16 -19.6 45.35
AKSteel .20 1.3 ... -.67 -5.0 15.55
AMR ... ...... -.49 -35.7 5.01
AT&Tlnc 1.72 5.7 9 -.83 +3.2 30.31,
AbtLab 1.92 3.6 14 +.19 +10.7 53.04
Accenture .90 1.5 21 -2.73 +25.2 60.70
AMD ... ... 7 -.52 -21.4 6.43
Aetna .60 1.4 10 -.79 +42.1 43.36
Agilent ... ... 20 -3.15 +13.6 47.08
AlcatelLuc ... ....:. -.79 +72.0 5.09
Alcoa .12 .8 17 -.90 +.6 15.48
Allstate .84 2.9 12-1.07 -7.6 29.47
AlphaNRs .. ... 42 +.26 -24.1 45.55
Altria 1.52 5.7 14 -.20 +8.4 26.69
AMovilLs .41 1.6 15 -81 -8.9-26.11
AEagleOit .44 3.2 17 -.20 -6.5 13.68
AEP 1.84 4.9 15 -.87 +4.2 37.48
AmExp .72 1.4 14 -1.26 +20.7 51.81
AmlntlGrp ... ... 2 -1.71' -41.5 28.23
Anadarko .36 .4 ... +.85 +5.3 80.19
AnalogDev1.00 2.8 12 -3.85 -5.0 35.77
Ann Inc ... ... 21 -.91 -2.7 26.65
Annaly '2.59 14.4 7 -.56 +.2 17.96
ArcelorMit .75 2.3 15 -2.20 -15.6 32.20
ArchCoal .44 1.7 19 -.19 -24.4 26.50'
ArchDan .64 2.1 9 -.74 +.7 30.30
ATMOS 1.36 4.0 15 -.08 +8.6 33.87
BB&TCp .64 2.5 21 -.77 -3.7 25.32
BRFBrasil .35 1.9 ... +2.47 ,i+f2.6 '19.00
BakrHu .60 .8 '31. +.42 +32.0 ..75.49
BcBilVArg .59 5.8 ... -.54 +.3 10.20
BcoBrades .80 4.3 ... -1.50 -8.9 18.49
BcoSantSA .82 8.0 ... -.50 -3.5 10.28
BcoSBrasil 1.65 16.4 ... -1.04 -25.8 10.09
BkofAm .04 .4 18 -.70 -25.0 10.00
Bklrelnd ... ... ... +.18 -53.2 1.24
BkNYMel .52 2.1' 12 -.70 -16.9 25.10
Barclay .36 2.5 ... -1.29 -12.2 14:51
BariPVixrs .. ......+2.81 -38.4 23.16
BarrickG .48 1.0 14'+2.07 -9.2 48.31
Baxter .1.24 2.0 17 -.12 +20.1 60.80
BerkHB ... 17 -1.54 -5.9 75.36
BestBuy .64 2.2 10 -2.21 -13.6 29.61
Blackstone .40 2.5 .... -1.11 +12.4 15.90
Boeing 1.68 2.4 16 -3.79 +9.2 71.28
BostonSci ...... 20 -.16-7.4 7.01
BrMySq 1.32. 4.6 15 -.15 +9,4 28.97
CBREIlis ...... 32-1.99 +13.7 23.29
CBSB .40 1.4 22 -1.02 +45.1 27.65
CSXs .48 1.9 17 -1.30 +17.6 25.32
CVSCare .50 1.4 15 -1.28 +5.9 36.82
Calpine ... ....... +.05 +23.6 16.49
Cameron ... 22 -.54 -.2 50.61
CampSp 1.16 3.4 14 -.25 -2.4 33.92
CdnNRsgs .36 ...... -.38 -6.2 41.65
CapOne .20 .4 7 -5.21 +14.0 48.50
Carnival 1.00 2.8 15 -2.19 -23.7: 35.19
Caterpillar 1.84 1.7 19 -1.05 +16.8 109:36
Cemex ......... -.54 -24.0 7.83
CenterPnt .79 4.1 17 -.36 +23.3 19.39
CntryUnk 2.90 7.5 12 -1.89 -16.8 38.42
ChesEng .35 1.1 11 +2.38 +27.2 32.96
Chevron 3.12 2.9 10 +.30 +16,4 106.19
Chimera .62 19.1 5 -.27 -20.9 3.25
Citigrprs .04 ,.1 12-3.65 -18.9' 38.38
Clorox 2.40 3.2 17 +6.43 +17.8 74.55
CocaCola 1.88 2,8 13 -1.15 +2.7 67.53
CocaCE '52 1.8 15 -.82 +12.5 28.17
Coeur ... ... ... +2.46 +2.8 28.08
ConAgra .92 3.5 14 +.06 +16.8 26.37
ConocPhil 2.64 3.5 11 +.51 +12.2 76.42
ConsolEngy.40 .8 26 +2.09 +7.4 52.34
ConEd 2.40 4.5 15 -.31 +7.4 53.25
ConstellEn .96 2.5 17 -.07 +26.5 38.75
Coming .20 1.2 8 -1.12 -13.4 16.74
CSVS2xVxS... ... .+4.64 -87.5 21.01
CSVellVSts... ...... -2.42 +37.8 16.47



Wkly YTD Wkly
Name Div YId PE Chg %Chg Last


APACC
ASMLHjd .58
Abraxas
ActivsBliz .17
AdobeSy ...
Adtran .36
AkamalT ...
AllscriptH ..
AlteraCplf .24
Amazon
ACapAgy 5.60
AmCapLtd ...
Amgen
Amylin
ApolloGrp ...
Apple Inc .
ApldMatl .32
AriadP
ArmHId .13
ArubaNt ...
Atmel
Autodesk ...
Baidu
BioSante .
Blkboard ...
BrigExp ...
Broadcom .36
BrcdeCm ...
CAInc .20
Cadence ...
CpstnTrbh ...
Cephln
ChkPolnt .
CienaCorp ...
Cirrus
Ciscd .24
CitrixSys ...
CleanDslrs ...


20 +.04 +39.5 8.47
.... -3.12 -10.5 34.32
... -.02 -2.2 4.47
28 -.16 -4.3 11.91
16 -2.25 -4.8-29.29
17 -6:63 -2.5 35.32
32 -1.81 -36.6 29.85
...-1.56 -3.1 18.67
16 -4.17 +19.9 42.67
92 -5.41 +18.3 212.87
4 -.93 +1.8 29.27
3 -.29 +29.8 9.81
11 -2.59 +.3 55.05
... -1.39 -12.8 12.83
17 +.74 +25.7 49.62
17 +5.21 +13.1 364.92
10 -.65 -11.4 12.45
20 +.42+146.7 12.58
... -2.22 +32.8 27.56
... -2.69 +33.4 27.85
13 -1.55 +4.7 12.90
35 -3.97 -5.4 36.15
83 -.85 +52.2 146.93
... +.04 +122.0 3.64
..-.15 +6.8 44.10
.. +1.23 +19.0 32.41
17 -1.35 -23.6 33.27
22 -.44 +19.3 6.31
14 -1.20 -10.1 21.98
14 -.70 +19.6 9.88
... -.10 +60.4 1.54
12 -.19 +29.6 79.99
25 -1.86 +22.3 56.58
... -1.24 -22.7 16.27
6 +.39 +3.1 16.48
12 -.15 -22.9 15.59
48 -6.51 +11.8 76.47
... +1.57 -36.0 6.07


Name DIv
Cummins 1,60
CurEuro .16
DRHorton .15
DTE 2.35
Danaher .08
Deere 1.64
DeltaAir ...
DenburyR ...
DrSCBrrs ...
DirFnBr rs ...
DrxEnBear ...
DrxFnBull ...
DirxSCBull ....
DirxEnBull .
Discover .24
Disney .40
DomRescs 1.97
DowChm 1.00
DukeEngy 1.00
ECDangn ...
EMCCp ..
EOG Res .64
Eatons 1.36
EIPasoCp .04
Elan
EldorGld g .10
EmersonEl 1.38
EnCanag .80
EndvSilvg ..
ENSCO 1.40
ExcoRes .16
Exelon 2.10M
ExxonMbl 1.88
FairchdS ...
FstHorizon .04
RrstEngy 2.20
FordM
ForestOil
FMCGs 1.00
FrontlerCm .75
Frontline 1.20 1
GafisaSA .29
GameStop ...
Gannett .16
Gap .45
GenGrPrn .40
GenMills 1.22
GenMot n
GenOn En ..
Genworth
Gerdau .27
GoldFUd .19
Goldcrp g .41
GoldmanS 1.40
Goodyear
HCP nc 1.92
Hallibrtn .36
HartfdFn .40
HeclaM ..
Hess .40
HewlettP .48
HomeDp 1.00,
HonwIllntl 1.33.
HostHofls .12
ING
IShGold ...
ISAstla 1.06
iShBraz 3.42
IShGer .67
IShHK .42
IShJapn .17
iSTaiwn .29
iShSilver
IShChina25 .85
iShEMkts .84
IShB20 T 4.02
iSEafe 1.68
IShR2K .94
iShREst 2.09


Wkly YTD Wkly
Yld PE Chg %Chg Last
1.5 17 -2.09 -4.8 104.68
... -1.09 +5.9 140.95
1.3 60 -.50 -3.8 11.48
4.7 15 -.04 +11.1 50.33
.2 19 -1.92 +11.6 52.62
2.0 14 -4.42 -1.6 81.69
..13 -.94 -33.3 8.41
... 54 -.35 +2.2 19.51
... +2.55 -27.3 34.04
... .. +4.73 +1.1 47.78
... ... -.27 -40.5 13.42
... -2.81 -15.3 23.58
..... -7.42 +13.2 82.02
+.67 +34.3 78.50
.9 8-1.69 +37.2 25.43
1.0 17 -.64 +4.7 39.27
4.1 16 -.17 +13.4 48.46
2.9 18 -1.43 +2.4 34.95
5.3 13 -.24 +5.8 18.85
... ... -1.83 -56.3 11.84
... 29 -1.06 +17.1 26.81
.6 ... -.57 +10.7 101.19
2.6 17-1.20 +1.1 51.33
.2 28 -.08 +46.3 20.13
.+.08+110.6 12.07
46 +1.87 -3.7 17.88
2.5. 19-1.82 -3.1 55.37
2.6 88 +.31 +5.9 30.83
... +.58 +44.1 10.58
2.7 16 -1.05 .-2.4 52.08
1.0 ... +.57 -15.4 16.42
4.8 144--26- +4.2 43.37.
2.3. 12 +.58 +13.5 83.00
12 -.96 +5.7 16.50
.4 ... +.18 -18.5 9.60
5.1 15 -1.36 +16.9 43.28
... 6 -.79 -22.0 13.09
..18 +1.19 -34.3 24.93
1.8 11 +.47 -7.8 55.34
9.7 55 -.49 -20.8 7.71
0.2 9 -1.54 -53.5 11.79
3.5 ... -.49 -42.3 8.39
.. 9 -3.26 +3.1 23.59
1.2 6 -.70 -10.7 13.48
2.4 10 -.07 -14.2 18.91
2.4 ,. -.73 +6.2 16.44
3.2 14 +.94 +6.1 37.75
7 -1.82 -19.3 29.76
.....-.03 +7.6 4.10
49 -.67 -25.3 9.81
2.8 ... -1.14 -32.2'9.49
1.2 2 +.82 -14.8 15.45
.8 17 +3.68 +17.7 54.13
1.1 14 -3.92 -22.6 130.16
...... +.61 +50.5 17,84
5.1 41 -.74 +1.8 37.46
.7 22 -.96+30.0 53.08
1.6 6 -1.89 -8.0' 24.38
... 39 +.19 -27.3 8.19
.5 10-1.75 -4.7 72.93
1.4 9 -1.34 -16.7 35,09
2.8 17 -.71 +2.4 35.91
2.3 19 -2.29 +7.7 57.25
.7 ... -.65 -6.0 16.80
.. ... -1.28 +9.6 10.73
... +.49 +11.9 15.56
4.3 ...-1.10 -2.3 24.85
4.9 ... -2.55 -10.1 69.60
2.6 ... -.95 +7.3 25.69
2.3 ... -.51 -4.4 18.09
1.6 ... +.08 -2.3 10.66
-.30 -4.7 14.88
... +2.49 +26.7 38.24
2.1 ... -.94 -4.1 41.33
1.8 ... -1.27 -2.1 46.66
4.2 .:: +.80 +2.2 96.17
2.9 ...-1.65 -.1 58.18
1.1 ... -2.32 +5.8 82.81
3.4 ... -1.51 +9.3 61.19


New York Stock Exchange


WITH SO MANY CHOICES,

WHY WOULD YOU CHOOSE



TO PAY TAXES?





1.99% TO 5.57% *

* Yield effective 07/13/2011, subject to availability. Yield and market value may fluctuate if
sold prior to maturity and the amount you receive from the sale of these-securities may be less
than, equal to, or more than the amount originally invested. Bond investments are subject to
interest rate risk such that when interest rates rise, the prices of bonds can decrease and the
investor can lose principal value. Any bond called prior to maturity results in reinvestment
risk for the owner of the bond. May be subject to alternative minimum tax. Municipal bonds
may have original issue discount.

Some of the available issues of bonds are callable. Contact your local Edward Jones financial
advisor for more information about maturity dates and applicable call provisions.

To invest in tax-free bonds, call or visit your local
financial advisor today.
a ; Steve Jones, CFP. ..
Financial Advisor*
2929 West U S Highway 90
Suite 114
Lake City, FL 32055
386-752-3847 www.edwardjones.com Member SIPC


Wkly YTD Wkly
Name Dlv YId PE Chg %Chg Last


IngerRd .48
IBM 3.00
IntlGame .24
IntPap 1.05
Interpublic .24
Invesco .49
ItauUnibH .67
JPMorgCh 1.00
Jabil .28
JanusCap .20
Johndn 2.28
JohnsnCt .64
JnprNtwk
KB Home .25
KKR .73
KeyEngy
Keycorp .12
Kimco .72
KineticC
Kinrossg .10
Kohls 1.00
Kraft 1.16
LDK Solar
LSICorp .
LVSands .
LennarA .16
UllyEli 1.96
Umited .80
UncNat .20
UzClalb
UoydBkg
MBIA


... -1.27 -5.0 44.75
15 -.95 +19.6 175.54
21 -.26 +1.8 18.01
11 -.39 +9.7 29.87
25 -.60 +14.1 12.12
14 -1.38 -7.8 22.19
.. -2.10 -14.4 20.46
9 -.76 -5.8 39.98
13 -1.56 -1.5 19.79
9 -.95 -31.5 8.88
15 -.12 +9.1 67.45
18 -1.62 +6.9 40.85
28 -1.43 -17.0 30.63
.-.41 -30.7 9.35
9 +.01 +10.1 15.64
26 +.08.+50.4 19.52
11 -.33 -10.4 7.93
-.15 +7.3 19.35
17 +3.06 +62.5 68.05
26. +.73 -8.2 17.40.
15 +.57 +2.6. 55.75
21 -.34 +12.3 35.37
2 -.19 -35.6 6.52
... -.58 +11.7 6.69
55-1.01 -2.1 45.00
33 -1.11 -5.4 17.74
8 +.62 +9.4 38.33
16 -.78 +29.6 39.84
10 -1.37 -2.3 27.16
-.05 -28.2 5.14
.-.12 -31.1 2.83
6 +1.23 -14.9 10.20


SNasdaq Mott Active


Wkly YTD Wkly
Name Div Yld PE Chg %Chg Last


CleanEngy ...
Clearwire
CoffeeH .12
CognizTech...
Comcast .45
Comcspcl .45
Compuwre ...
Cree Inc
CypSemi .36
Dell Inc ...
DirecTVA .
DryShips ...
E-Trade ...
eBay ...
ectArts ...
Enerl
Entegris ..
EricsnTel .37
Expedia .28
ExpScripts ...
Fastenals ..52
FithThird .24
Fnisar
Flextr
FuelCell ...
GT Solar ...
GileadS ...
GluMobile ...
Google
GreenMIC .
GrifolsSAn ...
HansenMed...
Hasbro 1.20
HercOffsh.
Hologic ...
HudsCity .32
Immucor
Infosys 1.85


73 +2.71 +15.6 16.00
... -.54 -36.7 326
33 -6.93+432.0 19.79
29 -2.32 +1.1 74.06
18 -1.38 +10.3 24.13
17 -1.12 +12.8 23.36
20 -.72 -19.1 9.44
19 -1.12 -52.8 31.11
36 -2.25 +12.9 20.98
10 -.17 +25.2 16.97
19 -.93 +30.6 52.15
7 -.10 -26.4 4.04
... -.89 -19.3 12.91
23 -.61 +17.9 32.81
... -1.45, +44.1 23.60
... -.18 -79.2 .79
12 -1.30 +13.1 8.45
... -.37 +20.0 13.84
21 -.42 +20.6 30.26
22 -2.61 -3.9 51.96
35 -2.33 +14.5 34.30
15 -51 -17.9 12.05
17 -1.17 -42.2 17.17
8 -.45 -21.8 6.14
... -.12 -43.7 1.30
12 -1.37 +66.0 15.14
13 -1.44 +13.1 41.00
... +.26+181.6 5.83
20+65.63 +.6 597.62
... -6.14+174.1 90.06
... +.04 +.5 7.69
... +.01+208.7 4.60
17 -3.28 -12.3 41.37
... -.47 +44.0 5.01
.. -.34 +7.2 20.18
... -.03 -35.2 8.25
22 -.06 +35.5 26.87
24 -5.82 -19.3 61.39


Name DIv
Intel .84
Intuit
JA Solar
JDS Uniph ...
JetBlue
JoyGlbl .70
KLATnc 1.40'
Kulicke ..
LamRejrch
Level'
UbtyMlntA ...
LinearTch .96
lululemngs ...
MarinaB rs ...
MarvelT ...
Mattel .92
Maximlntg .84
MelcoCrwn...
Microchp 1.38
MicronT
Microsoft .64
NetApp
Netflix
NewsCpA .15
NewsCpB .15
Novlus
Nvidia
OnSmcnd ...
Oracle .24
PDLBlo .60
Paccar .48
PattUTI .20
Paychex 1.24
PeopUtdF .63
Popular
PwShsQQQ.42
Powrwav ...
Qualcom .86


Wkly YTD
YId PE Chg %Chg


10 -.72 +6.4
24 -2.34 +.1
3 -.32 -33.6
55 -1.03 +3.0
18 -.44 -15.1
19 +.06 +12.2
11 -1.30 +6.0
4 -1.74 +33.3
7 -2.11 -18.8
.. -.24+139.8
17 -.59 +8.8
13 -2.60 -11.9
65 +.42 +77.0
... -.04' -87.3
12 -.54 -19.8
15 -.36 +7.3
17 -2.31 -.5
.. +.49+127.5
15 -5.53 -5.5
12 -.27 -7.6
7 -.14 -4.0
30 -2.82 -7.8
82 -8.21 +63.3
14 -1.11 +7.4
14 -1.24 -2.0
9 -4.08 -1:3
34 -1.33 -8.4
12 -1.17 -5.6
19 -1.85 +2.5
10 +.51 +.5
31 -2.97 -14.1
28 +1.13 +55.5
21 -1.26 -2.7
33 -.10 -3.2
.. -.21 -18.8
-1.18 +6.2
32 -.64 -13.0
24 -4.40 +11.1


Wkly
Last Name


22.37
49.35
4.59
14.91
5,61
97.31
40.95
9.60
42.06
2.35
17.15
30.48
60.54
.20
14.87
27.29
23.50
14.47
32.34
7.41
26.78
50.66
286.93
15.64
16.09
31.89
14.10
9.33
32.09
6.26
49.28
33.50
30.07
13.58
2.55
57.85
2,21
54.96


Wkly YTD Wky
DIv Yld PE Chg %Ch Last


RFMicD
RadntSys
RschMotn ..
Rivereds ...
SanDisk
Sanofi rt
Satcon h
Sawls
SeagateT .72
SeaftGen
Slcnware .28
Slna
SinoClnEn ..
SiriusXM ...
SkywksSol ...
Sohu.cm ...
Sonus
Staples .40
Starbucks .52
StlDynam .40
Symantec ...
TD Ameritr .20
Tellabs .08
TevaPhrm .83
TibcoSft
TrQulnt ...
UrtanOut .
VarianSem ...
VirgnMdah .16
Vodafone 1.44
Wlndstrm 1.00
Xllinx ,76
YRC Wwra .,
Yahoo
Zagg
ZlonBco ,04


14 -.58 -18.1 6.02
43 +6.93 +47.6 28.88
4 -1.46 -52.7 27.52
... -1.56 +12.5 39.57
8 -1.42 -16.5 41.62
-.42 -9.8 2.12
... -.02 -55.3 2.01
... -.31 +54.8 39.50
7 -.13 +11.8 16.81
... -2.21 +26.2 18.87
18 -.25 -8.4 5.45
... +3.59 +70.3 117.17
1 +.66 -69.3 2.03
+.11 +42.9 2.33
22 -2.04 -20.8 22,68
21 +2.42 +27.0 80.65
-.30 +15.4 3,08
12 -.37 -33.2 15,20
28 -.55 +23.9 39,80
19 -.50 -14,0 15.73
25 -.76 +13,3 16,97
17 -.91 -5,1 18,02
20 -.33 -39,9 4,12
14 -1.50 =0,0 47,7
52 -3,00 t40, 6 21,6
9 -,M1 -100 ,75
21 =-.8 -1, 8 31 41
18 -.08 +0 1 0.47
..-1 .0 +10 ?1. ,7
41 =98 45 ,t 17

14 -270 1t.11 33,48
1, =04,0 1,31
17 =0--8117 14,69
30 46,1 t1010 15,32
... -4 2317


Name Div
MEMO
MFA Fncl 1.00
MGIC
MGM Rsts ...
Macys .40
ManpwrGp .80
MarathnO sl.00
MarathPn ...
MktVGold .40
MktVRus .18
MktVJrGId 2.93.
MarlntA .40
Masco .30
MedcoHlth ... :
Medicis .32
Medtmic .97
Merck 1.52
MetUife .74
,MetroPCS ...
Molycorpn...
Monsanto 1.12
Moodys .56
MorgStan .20
Mosaic .20
MotraSoln ...
MotrlaMon ...
NCRCorp ...
NRGEgy .
NYSE Eur 1.20
Nabors
NBkGreece .29
NatGrid 2.92


YId PE


Wkly YTD Wldy
Chg %Chg' Last


..45 -.42 -32.3
12.8 9 -.30 -4.5
-.61 -41.1
-.03 +.5
1.3 14 -.44 +18.5
1.5 ... -3.34 -15.9
3.2 -7 -.99- +40.9
...... -2.25 +.4
.7 ... +3.43 -2.8
65 ... -.71 +2.0
7.7 ... +1.62 -4.6
1.1 28 -2.23 .-15.9
2.6 ... -.55 -10.2
16 -1.26 -11.9
.8 19 -.96 +45.8
2.6 13 -.88 +.1
4.2 16 -.19 -.3
1.8, 12 -1.95 -6.5
.. 27 -.41 +34.5
......-4.29 +4.7
1.5 26 -1.11 +6.3
1.5 16 -2.95 +37.3
.9 11 -1.21 -22.5
.3 13 -3.83 -12.6
....-1.12 +15.5
-.52 -27.4
.. 14 -.38 +24.1
.44 +.10 +24.4
3.5 15 -1.09 +14.6
... 56 +1.89 +12.2
... -.08 -27.4
6.0 ... -.70 +10.0


Name DIv


NOilVarca .44 .6
NatSemi .40 1.6
NewmtM .80 1.4
Nexeng .20 ...
NextEraEn2.20 3.9
NiSource .92 4.5
NobleCorp 1.06 2.8
NoldaCp .55 9.9
NorfkSo 1.60 2.2
OcciPet 1.84 1.7
.OfficeDpt ...
OilSvHT 1.73 .8
PG&ECp 1.82 4.3
PMIGrp.. ...
PNC 1.40 2.5
PPLCorp 1.40 5.0
PaioCoal .,. ..
PeabdyE .34 .6
Penney .80 2.5
PepsiCo 2.06 3.0
Petrohawk ...
PetbrsA 1.34 4:5
Petrobras 1.28 3.9
Pfizer .80 4.1
PhilipMor 2.56 3.8
PlainsEx ...
Potashs' .28 .5
PSAgri
PS USDBull...
ProLogis 1.12 3.2
PrUShS&P ...
ProUlvQQ ...
PUShQQQ rs...
ProUItSP .35 .7
ProUShL20 ... .
ProUSSP500...
ProUSSIv rs...
PrUItCrde rs...
ProUShEuro...
ProgsvCp 1.40 2.0
ProUSR2K rs...
Prudent! 1.15 1.9
PulteGrp ..
QksilvRes ...
RangeRs .16 .3
Raytheon 1.72 3.7
RegalEnt .84 7.2
ReglonsFn .04 .7
ReneSola
Renren n ...
RiteAd ...
RoyDShllA 3.36 4.7
SK Tlcm ...
SLM Cp .40 2.5
SpdrDJIA 3.08 2.5
SpdrGold
S&P500ETF244 1.9
SpdrHqme .31 .1.8
SpdrKbwBk .20 .9
SpdrLehHY4.35 10.1
SpdrReif .46 .8
SpdrOGEx .47 .8
SpdrMetM .42 .6
Safeway .58 2.4
StJude .84 1.8
SandRdge ...
Sanofi 1.82 4.6
SaraLee .46 2.4
Schlmbrg 1.00 1.1
Schwab .24 1.6
SemlHTr .61 1.9
SiderurNac .81 7.2
SilvWhtng .12 .3
SilvrcpMg .08 ...
SouthnCo 1.89 4.7
SthnCopperl.94 5.4
SoUnCo .60 1.4
SwstAir .02 .2
SwstnEngy ...


Wkly YTD WMky Wky YTD Wkly
Yld PE Chg %Chg Last Name Dlv YId PE Chg %Chg Last


20 -1.65 +16.8 78.56
21 +.04 +80.4 24.82
13 +2.62 -6.6 57.38
... +1.05 +4.3 23.88
14 -.90 +9.3 56.80
19 -.16 +16.0 20.44,
21 +.05 +4.5 37.39
S-.68 -46.3 5.54
18 -1.7 +17.7' 73.91
17 -.93 +7.4 105.34
... -.48 -30.4 3.76
.. -.86 +9.3 153.66
16 -.25 -11.8 42.18
... -.24 -61.5 1.27
9 -2.66 -6.4 56.82
12 -.24 +5.5 27.78
... +.50 +21.2 23.48
19 -.34 -6.8 59.61
19 -.1.39 -2.3 31.57
18 -1.40 +4.9 68.53
...+13.60+109.2 38.17
..-.84 -13.1 29.69
.. -.97 -13.4 32.76
19 -.41 +12.8 19.75
16 -2.48 +14.4 66.93
50 +1.81 +25.6 40.36
25 +.08 +14.7 59.20
.+.18 +1.5 32.82
+.01 -5.6 21.43-
.-1.99 +9.7 34.79
+.79 -13.1 20.65
... -3'1 +11.5 90.80
+1.82 -16.1 48.81
... -2.24 +9.5 52.60
.. -.65 -11.6 32.73
+.87 -20.0 15.52
... -2.63 -63.8 14.22
... +.67 -11.9 44.01
... +.26 -13.5 17.56
11 -1.38 +1.0 20.06
... +2.12 -17.8 41.32
9 -3.62 +3.5 60.76
... -.8 -5.7 7.09
7 -.16 -5.2 13.98
... +5.63 +37.36 61.78
8 -2.57 +.2 46.05
42 -.01 -.1 11.73
..-.16 -14.4 5.99
2 -.28 -48.6 4.49
... 65 -430 10.26
... -.02 +45.0 1.28
19 -1.13 +7.7 71.90
...-.40 -16.4 15.57
9 -.65 +27.5 16.05
...-1.71 +7.7 124.56
+495 +11.9 155.20
.-2.71 +4.7 131.69
-.72 +1.1 17.58
-.96 -11.0 23.07
-.24 +1.0 40.11
...-1.61 +12.3 54.30
... +1.47 +17.8 62.15
...-1.28 +.5 69.14
15 +.29 +5.6 23.75
16 -1.57 +7.4 45.92
+.37 +53.0 11.20
-.56 +21.7 39.21
27 -.12 +11.4 19.50
24 -1.97 +5.4 87.99
26 -.59 -12.3 15.01
... -2.07 +.2 32.58
...-1.22 -32.9 11.19
37 +2.55 -.6 38.80
30 +.61 -11.3 11.38
18 -.09 +5.2 40.22
19 4.94 -26.2 35.99
21 +1.24 +80.3 43.39
18 -.66 -17.4 10.72
29 +3.62 +27.0 47.53


SprintNex-...
SPMatls 1.30 3.3
SP HIthC .63 1.8
SPCnSt .83 2.6
SP Consum .59 1.5
SPEngy 1.06 1.4
SPDRFncI .18 1.2
SPInds .67 1.8
SPTech .35 1.4'
SPUtil 1.33 4.0
StarwdHt .30 .5
StateStr .72 1.6
StillwirM
Suncorgs .44
SunTrst .04 .2
Supvalu .35 3.9
Synovus .04 1.9
TJX .76 1.4
TaiwSemi .52 4.3
TalismE g .27 ...
Target 1.20 2.3
TeckResg .60 ...
TelefEsp s 1.98 *9.0
Templelnld .52 1.7
TenetHlth
Teradyn .
Tesoro
Texinst .52 1.7
Textron .08 .4
3MCo-" 2.20 '2:3'
TimeWam .94 2.6
Total SA 3.16 5.8
Transocn .79 1.3
Travelers 1.64 2.8
TrinaSolar ...
TwoHrblnv 1.59 15.5
Tycolntl 1.00 2.
UBSAG ...
UDR .80 3.1
USAirwy ...
US Gold
UtdContl
UtdMicro .19 7.9
UPS B 2.08 2.8
USBancrp .50 2.0
USNGsrs ...
US OilFd ..
USSteel .20 .5
UtdhlthGp .65 1.3
ValeSA .90 2.8
ValeSApf .90 3.1
ValeroE .20 .8
VangEmg .82 1.7
VangEur 2.31 4.5
VerizonCm 1.95 5.3
ViacomB 1.00 2.0
VimpelCm .80 6.7
Visa .60 .7
Walgrn .90 2.1
WsteMInc 1.36 3.8
Weathfln ... ...
WellPoint 1.00 1.3
WellsFargo .48 1.8
WendysCo .08 1.5
WstnRefin ...
WstnUnlon .32 1.7
Weyerh .60 2.8
WmsCos .50 1.6
XLGrp .44 2.1
Xerox .17 1.7
Yamanag .18 1.4
YingliGm ...
Youku n
YumBmds 1.00 1.8


... -.14 +26.5 5.35
..-.66 +3.0 39.57
.-.59 +11.7 35.19
... -.38 +7.0 31.36
...-1.08 +7.7 40.29
... -.03 +12.6 76.86
.-.61 -6.9 14.85
... -1.28 +4.8 36.54
-.55 +2.9 25.92
-.40 +6.4 33.36
22 -2.27 -8.1 55.86
14 -2.51 -5.4 43.83
24 -6.44 -19.1 17.28
21 -1.04 +4.1 39.85
68 -1.03 -16.5 24.64
... -.52 -6.7 8.98,
... -.01 -22.0 2.06
17 +.10 +24.5 55.26
... -.40 -2.6 12.22
... -.67 -12.3 19.47
12 -.05 -15.0 51.09
.. +.14 -15.2 52.42,
... 1.01 -3.1 22.11
18 +.44 +48.0 31.43
3 -.28 -10.0 6.02
7 -1.22 -2.5 13.69
13 -.96 +26.6 23.48
12 -2.06 -5.2 30.82
53 -1.49 -7.7 21.81
16":-2:15 -"f06 95.47
15 -1.01 +10.8 35.63
... -3.06 +1.3 54.19
34 +.97 -9.4 62.98
8 -.76 +3.9 57.90
4 -2.06 -21.2 18.45
9 -.70 +4.5 10.23
16 -2.25 +14.6 47.49
... -.84 +2.0 16.80
.... +.40 +10.5 25.98
4 -.77 -25.7 7.44
... +.56 -17.3 6.67
15 -2.01 -12.5 20.85
7 -.13 -24.1 2.40
19 -1.49 +.7 73.08
13 -.61 -8.3 24:74
+.83 -4.5 .11.44
+.33 -2.2 38:13
... -2.05 -26.4 43.01
12 -.11 +43.9 51.97
... -.69 -6.2 32.44
..-.49 -2.6 29.43
30 -.92 +9.3 25.26
..,-1.27 -.9 47.73
...-1.95 +3.5 50.79
22 -.66 +2.9 36.82
16 -1.48 +27.9 50.6?
8 -.96 -20.9 1189
20 -.98 +26.1 88.75
16 -2.14 +7.6 41.93
18 -1.58 -1.9 36.16
...-.20 -18.7 18.53
10 -3.10 +31.7 7490
11 -1.12 -12.3 27.18
... -.19 +15.2 5.32
73 +.52 +99.7- 21.13
14 -.68 +2.8 19.09
.. -.45 +14.4 21.65
23 +.79 +22.9 30.3t
34 -.92 -2.9 21.19
21 -.65 -13.1 10.01
18 +.70 +2.3 13.19
5 -.72 -27.1 7.20
... -4.03 -1.3 34.56
21 +.15 +13.2 55.51


AMEX Most Active


Name DIv
AbdAsPac .42
Adventrx ...
AlexcoRg ...
AldNevG .
AlmadnMg ...
AmApparel ...
AntaresP
ArcadlaRs.
Augusta g ...
Aurizong
AvalRaren ...
BarcGSO ...
Brigus rs ...
CAMACEn ...
CFCdag .01
ChenlereEn...
CrystalRk ...
DeourEg ..
DenlsnMg ...
ExlerR gs ...
Express-1 ...
ExtorreGg ...
GabGldNR 1.68
GaacoEngy ...
Gastargrs ...
GenMoly ...
GooGloblR ...
GoldResrc .48
GoldStg ...
GranTrrag ...
GrtBasGg ...
GtPanSilvg ...
InovtoPhm ..
InlTowerg ..
IsoRay
KodiakOg ..
LadThalFn ...
LucasEngy ...


YId PE


Wmy YTD Wkly"
C %Chg Last


5.5 ... +.15 +12.6 7.60
.-.23 .+27.6 3.33
.+.38 +3.1 8.44
... ... +.62 +47.2 38.73
... ... +.10 -17.5 3.90
... ... +.06 -31.9 1.13
... -.05 +37.6 2.34
... -.01 -79.7 .06
... +.49 +43.3 5.46
... ... +.51 -14.2 6.28
... ... -.28 +1.6 6.34
+.25 -2.0 25.09
... ... +.11 -10.5 1.88
... ... +.01 -35.7 1.28
...... +1.92 +13.2 23.46
... +.42 +80.6 9.97.
6 -.12 +58.8 1.08
... +.03 +6.3 .34
..-.05 -44.2 1.91
+.23 -25.8 4.61
..23 -.32 +35.2 3.46
.-1.62 +84.9 12.50
9.3 ... -.06 -6.4 18.04
+02 -25.7 .26
+.34 -9.8 3.88
... .. -.06 -31.3 4.45
... -.11 -63.3 .29
1.9 ... +2.12 -14.6 25.10
... ... +.56 -35.1 2.98
.. -.17 -18.9 6.53
... +16 -26.4 2.18
4 +.20 +39.9 3.93
-.12 -39.1 .70
+.23 -20.1 8.05
+.05 +1.3 1.15
+.18 -.3 6.58
-.18 +18.8 1.39
+.10 +25.3 2.92


Wkly YTD Wkdy
Name Div YId PE Chg %Chg Las
MadCatzg ... ... 8 -.10 +35.3 .1,38
MdwGodg .. ... +.63+220.2 2.69
Minefndg ... .. ...+1.16 +34.9 14.89
Neoprbe ... ...... -.25 +54.9 3.19
Nevsung .06 .9 ... +.01-15.3 6.38
NewEnSys... ... 2 +.30 -69.7 2.34
NwGddg ... ...... +.31 +12.2 10.95
NAPallg ... ...... +.54 -32.0 4.72
NDynMn .. ...... 4.21 -26.9 10.45
NthnO&G ...... ... -.61 -16.2 22.80
NIhgtMg ... ... 45 +.38 -1.9 3.14
NovaGdg ... ...... +.10 -29.7 10.03
Ollsandsg ... ...... +.03 -22.4 .33
OpkoHfth ... ...... +.24 +17.2 4.30
Palatinrs ... ... ... -.04 -22.2 1.05
ParaG&S ... ... 12 -.03 -16.3 3.34
PhrmAth ... ... ... -.37 -36.9 2.67
PionDnll ... ...... -.07 +79.0 15.77
PodyMetg ... ...' ... -.03 -22.6 1.85
Protalix '... ... ... +.11 -32.0 6.79
Quepasa ... ...... -.16 -37.9 7.27
RareEleg ... ...... -.40 -37.4 10.05
Rentech ... ... ... -.02 -12.3 1.07
RexahnPh ... ... .. +.04 +125 1.26
Richmntg ... ...... +.68 +65.2 8.44
Rubicon g ... ... ... ... -39.9 3.43
SamsO&G... ...... -.03+118.9 2.89
Taseko ... ... ... -.19 -10.1 4.72
TimberdnR ... ...... -.03 -34.0 .79
TmsatlPet ... ... 8 +.02 -49.2 1.69
TriangPet ... ... ... -.17 +7.2 6.97
Ur-Energy ......... -.07 -47.5 1.57
Uranerz ... ...... +.01 -24.6 3.01
UraniumEn .. ...... +.27 -37.9 3.75
VantageDrl ... ... ... -.16 -17.7 1.67
VimetX ... ... 25 -2.52+144.9 36.37
VistaGold ... ...... +.08 +42.3 3.40


Weekly Stock Exchange Highlights


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Classified Department: 755-5440


LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED SUNDAY, JULY 17, 2011

Lake City Reporter





CLASSIFIED


ADvantage


Take ADvantage of the
Reporter Classifieds!

755-5440


cer
One item per ad $ J, ...
4 lines 6 days ch itional



| Rate applies to private Individuials selling
personal merchandise totalling $50 or less.
Each i t Include price.








One Iem per ad c |
4 lines 6 days ch additional




personal merchandise totalling $1,00 orlea. s
Each tem must Include a price.




S A lin se ism s at6 Each additional
4 lines days line $1.45
Rat applies to private Individuals selling






personal merchandise totalng $2,500 or le0 ,
Each em must Include a price.



One item per ad
4 lines 6 days ch additional
Rate applies to private individuals selling
personal merchandise totalling $,00 or less.
This is a non-refundable rat.





One Item per ad i27d


4 lines 6 da Each additional



linine $ is
Rate applies tt private Individuals selling
personal merchandise totallin $6,000 or less.



SEach Item must include a price.
This is anon-refundable rate.











OnLime ited to service type advertis-ad
$10.80 linesach 6 additional line
Ratseppiles to private Individuals seling
persona mean addi total $6,2.00 r less








ad for each tWednesday insertion.
This isa refundable rate.






4Youcan call us at 755-5440,
3Mondays through Friday from 8:00
Some people prefer o place their



Limited to service type advertis-
ing only.
4 lines, one month....$92.00

Includes an additional $2.00 per
ad for each Wednesday insertion.



You can call us at 755-5440,
Monday through Friday from 8:00'
a.m, to 5:00 p.m. P
Some people prefer to place their
classified ads in person, and some
ad categories will require prepay-
ment. Our office is located at 180
East Duval Street.
You can also fax or email your ad
copy to the Reporter.
FAX: 386-752-9400 Please
direct your copy to the Classified

EMAIL: classifieds@lakecityre-
porter.com





Ad istoAppear: Call by: Fax/Emall by:
Tuesday Mon.,10:00a. Mon.,9:0Aa.m.
Wednesday Mon., 10:00a.m. Mon, 9:00 a.m.
Thursday Wed., 10:00am. Wed.,9:00 a.m.
Friday Thurs., 10:00 a.m. Thurs.,9:00a.m.
Saturday Fr., 10:00a:m. Fri.,9:0 a.m.
Sunday Fri., 10:00 m. Fd.,9:00 a.m. .
These deadlines are subject to change without notice.




Ad Errors- Please read your ad
on the first day of publication.
We accept responsibility for only
the first incorrect Insertion, and
only the charge for the ad space
in error. Please call 755-5440
immediately for prompt correc-
tion and billing adjustments.
Cancellations- Normal advertising
deadlines apply for cancellation.
Billing Inquiries- Call 755-5440.
Should further information be
required regarding payments or
credit limits, your call will be trans-
ferred to the accounting depart-
ment.


Advertising copy is subject to
approval by the Publisher who
reserves the right to edit, reject,
or classify all advertisements under
appropriate headings. Copy should
be checked for errors by the
advertiser on the first day of pub-
lication. Credit for published errors
will be allowed for the first insertion
for that portion of the advertisement
which was incorrect. Further, the
Publisher shall not be liable for any
omission of advertisements ordered
to be published, nor for any general,
special or consequential damages.
Advertising language must comply
with Federal, State or local laws
regarding the prohibition of discrimi-
nation in employment, housing and
public accommodations. Standard
abbreviations are acceptable; how-


ever, the first word of each ad may
not be abbreviated.

in Print and Online
www.lakecityrcporter.com


020 Lost & Found

LOST BILLFOLD: July 4th
weekend. Black double zippered.
aprox 6 in long. Small Reward.
Call 386-438-5278 Iv. message.

100nn Job
10U Opportunities

05526543



Hohdca, d;.',!
Lake City's only full service
hotel is seeking the following:
Cafe Manager
Kitchen Manager
Experience required. Apply
in person. Mon-Fri 12-5pm
213 SW Commerce Dr.
EOE/DFWP.
05526594
.OPS Park Ranger
Stephen Foster State Park
White Springs, Florida
Stephen Foster Folk Culture
Center State Park is seeking an
OPS Park Ranger to provide
maintenance of facilities,
equipment and grounds,
mowing, operate cash registers,
greet the public, answer phones,
setup and produce numerous
special events. Must be willing
to work rotating shifts including
weekends and holidays. Basic
Knowledge of maintenance
including plumbing, electrical
and carpentry are required.
Excellent people skills ihd
working with a team are
required. This position works in
all outdoor conditions. An OPS
classified position is a position
which does not have.pension
benefits or health insurance
unless purchased. This is a
good entry level job into a future
career service position within
the Florida Park Service.
Mail or Fax. State of Florida
Employment Application by
Friday July 22nd to:
Stephen Foster State Park
Ben Faure Park Manager
P.O. Box G
White Springs, FL 32096
Fax (386) 397-4262

Applications are available
online at https://peoplefirst.my-
florida.com. Resumes are not
accepted unless accompanied
with a State of Florida
Employment Application.
DEP only hires US Citizens or
authorized'aliens and is an EEO
/ ADA / VP employer. Section
110.128, ES. prohibits the em-
ployment of any male required
to register with Selective Serv-
ice System under the US Milita-
ry Selective Service Act.


FLORIDA
4 GATEWAY
COLLEGE
(Formerly Lake City Community College)
NETWORK ANALYST
MAINTENANCE TECHNICIAN
This is highly technical work with
responsibility for analyzing,
maintenance, repair and
advancement of the college's network
infrastructure. It requires a good
understanding of networking'
structure, basic and advanced
-protocols, routers, switches and
operating systems and the ability to
troubleshoot network problems. Also
responsible for helping to maintain.
the college network backbone and all
of its components, and provide
assistance to users with regard to the
network structure. Work closely with
the network administrator and the
Manager, Network and Security to
assure that all required network
functions are working as designed at
all times. A.S. in computer science
including courses in network
administration or a related degree or
minimum of five years work
experience with Pre computer
systems required. Minimum of three
years experience required, combining
the following areas: Evaluation,
installation, and maintenance of PC
computer systems; analysis of office
systems; technical writing or editing;
computer education or training. A
minimum of two years of experience
in network support required. Salary:
$35,204 annually, plus benefits.
Application deadline: 7129/11t
Persons interested should provide
College application, vita, and
photocopies of transcripts. All foreign
transcripts must be submitted with
official translation and evaluation,
Position details and applications
available on web at: www.fac.edu
Human Resources
Florida Gateway College
149 S.E. College Place
Lake City FL 32925-2007
Phone (386) 754-4314
Fax (386) 754-4814
E-Mail: humanffoc.adu
sKitairndd no l ccus.s ,wo ,,H
Itthe Anw', s .,i ' ,It.' e!,!^c hs !s,

-III





Land Clearing

Back Hoe, Dozer, Chopping, root
raking, bush hog, seeding, sod,
disking, site prep, ponds &
irrigation. Free Est! 386-623-3200


Services


100 Job
100 Opportunities

05526597
Housekeeper
Part-time, days and weekends.
Please apply Baya Point'e
Nursing & Rehabilitation Center
587 SE Ermine Ave.,
Lake City, FL 32025

05526686100
FT Position- Medical Office
Medical Patient Care
Coordinator needed for front
desk position in busy Audiology
practice. AA degree required
Microsoft Office with
experience creating EXCEL
spreadsheets. Excellent oral &
written communication skills
Strong customer service skills
Excellent organizational skills
Ability to manage multiple task
and handle multiple phone lines
Outstanding personality
Competitive salary
and benefits available
FAX RESUME TO:
386-758-3101

05526710
Meridian Behavioral
Healthcare Inc.
www.mbhci.org
Please visit our website to view
current open opportunities and
to apply online :,
Meridian is an active partner
with the National Health .Service
Corps
Therapists:
Program Manager (Licensed)
Licensed, or Master's Level
in Outpatient
Bachelor's-Level in
Counselor Support
Case Management
(adult & child)
Master's Therapist in
Methadone Clinic
Administration:
Medical Records
Client Relations Specialist
Medical Services
RN Nursing Manager DETOX
(Gville)
PRN RN, LPN, C.N.A.
Recovery Specialist
(Direct Care)
Facilities:
Maintenance
To see our current openings in
Mental Health and to apply
online, please go to:
www.mbhci.org
EOE, DFWP, E-Verify
0


05526711
Apprentices
TAW is searching for an
Apprentice Mechanic &
Apprentice Winder in Lake
City, FL. Will learn to trouble
shoot & repair AC/DC motors.
Mechanical aptitude desired.
Apply to www.tawinc.com or
email resumes to
ellen.donegan(5tawinc.com; or
fax 217-8076. AA/EOE: DFWP.

Hiring Locally This Week
Liberty National Life,
Insurance Company
Full Training Provided Potential
of $60K+ Annually. 401K, BCBS
Insurance & Pension for those who
qualify. Call 1-800-257-5500 to.
set up an interview.

Sales/Marketing Professional and
CNC Machine Operator(s)
needed for an aftermarket auto
parts mnfg company. Experience
a must! Remit Cv and Resume to
Sales Position PO BOX 425,
Lake City,FL 32056 or Email:
aapositions(f gmail.com.

General Office/Bookkeeping
Must know QuickBooks &
Microsoft Programs. Punctual.
Please send resume & salary
requirements to: PO BOX 830,
Lake City, Florida 32056

Sales Position available for moti-
vated individual Rountree -Moore
Toyota, Great benefits, paid train-
ing/vacation. Exp. a plus but not
necessary. Call Anthony Cosentino
386-623-7442

Stylist wanted: Salon with old
fashion charm has openings for 2
stylist with following. Reasonable
chair rent Please call Sharon at
365-8402 or 752-1777 or come by
694 SW Main Blvd.


100 Opportunities

05526712
Human Resources
Coordinator
Individual to manage human
resource functions in a fast
paced organization with 150
employees.
Functions: Administration,
Employment /Recruitment,
Orientation/Training / Profes-
sional Development, Benefits,
Communications,
Compensation, Employee
Relations, Employee Assistance,
Performance Management.
Qualifications: B.S./B.A. in
Human Resources, Business
Administration or related field
preferred; minimum 3-5 years
recent human resource related
experience (minimum 7-9
years exper. w/out degree);
minimum 3 years supervisory
experience; knowledge of HR
principles and employment law;
excellent written/oral
communication skills; proficient
in Microsoft computer
applications Outlook, Word
and Excel; database manage-
ment and recordkeeping skills;
organizational, detail and
time management skills;
conflict resolution, mediation
and team building skills.
All applicants must pass
physical & DCF background
screenings. Excellent Benefits,
Paid Holidays, Sick/Annual
Leave, Health/Dental Insurance,
and more.
Deadline to apply: July 29,
2011, 4:00 p.m..
Apply at 236 SW Columbia
Ave, Lake City, FL
or Send resume to:
employment(@sv4cs.org
Fax (386) 754-2220
or Call 754-2233 EOE

CDL Class A Truck Driver.
Flatbed exp. for F/T SE area.
3 years exp or more. Medical
benefits offered. Contact
Melissa or Mary @ 386-935-2773
Clerical/Data Entry, full to part
time. Experience with Microsoft
Word & Excel required, and
Quicken/QuickBooks preferred.
386-719-2200, Leave message.
Experienced part-time esthetician
needed for new MediSpa. Please
fax resume to 386-719-9488 or
mail to 125 SW Midtown Place,
Suite 101, Lake City, Fl. 32025.
FT Help Needed, Gen
Maintenance, yard work, driving
etc. Good references & clean driv-
ing record. Bryant @ 755-0277
Sewing Machine Operator
with experience,
Good hourly rate
Call Hafners 386-755-6481
'Small local company is looking for
AUTO MECHANIC
Must have own tools. Hourly rate.
386-755-6481
StarTech Computer Center
needs help.
Tech & Sales, FT & PT. Exp
only. email bdj@startech.cc


1 Medical
120Employment

05526506
Occupational Therapist
Avalon Healthcare Center is
currently accepting applications
for the full time position of
Occupational Therapist.
Competitive Salary and
Excellent benefit package as
well as A sign on bonus is
being offered.
Please contact Jennie Cruce
director 6f Rehab.
doriavalonhrc.com
Avalon Healthcare and Rehab
1270 S.W. Main Blvd.
Lake City, Florida 32025
or fax resume to 386-752-8556
386-752-7900 EOE

05526649
Gainesville Women's Center
For Radiology
Arlene Weinshelbaum, M.D.
MAMMOGRAPHY TECH
wanted full time for private
Radiology office.ARRT &
Mammography certification recf
Fax resume to: '
Tracy: (352)331V-2044


Busy outpatient surgery center has
immediate opening for a LPN.
PRN position. Please
email resume to
administration@lcsurgerycenter.com
or fax to 386-487-3935.
Low volume Medically oriented
office seeks part time front
desk/receptionist. Experience
preferred. Send reply to Box
05064, C/O The Lake City
Reporter, P.O. Box 1709, Lake
City, FL, 32056
RN's& LPN's needed to work in
the North Florida area corrections.
Immediate work, instant pay,
$300 sign-on bonus.
Call 352-336-0964.
www.suwanneemedical.com


240 Schools &
Education

05526648
Interested in a Medical Career?
Express Training offers
courses for beginners & exp
* Nursing Assistant, $479
next class-07/25/10

* Phlebotomy national certifica-
tion, $800 next class-08/08/11

* Continuing education
Fees incl. books, supplies, exam
fees. Call 386-755-4401 or
expresstrainingservices.com



310 Pets & Supplies
PUBLISHER'S NOTE
Florida Law 828.29 requires dogs
and cats being sold to be at least 8
weeks old and have a health
certificate from a licensed
veterinarian documenting they
have mandatory shots and are
free from intestinal and external
parasites. Many species of wild-
life must be licensed by Florida
Fish and Wildlife. If you are
unsure, contact the local
office for information.

3 0 Livestock &
330 Supplies

Black Angus Cows & Heifers
Prices Vary
Registered & Commercial
386-719-4802


361 Farm Equipment

84 Ford 4610 Tractor.
2WD, Solid
2005 motor,$7,500. OBO
386-867-0005


402 Appliances
Craftsman 19HP Rider Mower.
42 inch cut. Runs great. $465. obo
386-292-3927 or
386-755-5331.
FRIGIDAIRE 18CU fridge.
$300. 7 months old, white, like
new. (863)840-4262
Please leave message.
FROST FREE Kenmore
refrigerator. Very clean. $200
386-292-3927 or
386-755-5331.
GE Dishwasher
$100.obo
386-292-3927 or
386-755-5331.
White GE Dryer.
Works great, looks good.
$125.
386-292-3927 or 3.86-755-5331.


407 Computers

Compaq Computer, Many extras.
Complete Computer
$80.00
386-755-9984 or 386-292-2170


420 Wanted to Buy
Wanted Junk Cars, Trucks, Vans.
$250 & up CASH! Free Pick Up!
NO title needed !386-878-9260
After 5pm 386- 752-3648.

430 Garage Sales

PUBLISHER'S NOTE
All Yard Sale Ads
Must be Pre-Paid.


440 Miscellaneous
Craftsman High Wheel push
mower. Runs good. $95. obo
386-292-3927 or
386-755-5331.
PRIDE GOGO Ultra, Scooter.
Used for 1 year. 2 batteries
and a charger. $600.
386-752-2201 Iv message
Stop gnat & Mosquito bites! Buy
Swamp Gator All natural insect re-
pellent. Family safe. Use head to
toe. Available at The Home Depot.'
Summer Barbecue Special
Tow Behind
Grill/Smoker, $1,250 OBO.
386-719-4802

630 Mobile Homes
6J3 for Rent
2&3 BR MH. $395 $650. mo.
plus deposit. Water & sewer fur-
nished. Cannon Creek MHP
386-752-6422
2/2 Units, clean, well maintained,
nice safe park setting, 2 miles to
downtown Lake City, $575 month
+ $575 sec dep, 386-984-8448
13th Month FREE!!
3/2 DWMH, 1/2 ac. Shaded lot.
Paved Rd, 2 porches, 50'X50'
fenced small dog run. $600. mo +
$750 dep. References Req'd.
386-758-7184 or 984-0954


630 fMobile Homes
6 for Rent

3/2 S of Lake City, (Branford area)
$575 month plus security
386-590-0642 or 386-867-1833
www.suwanneevalleyproperties.com
4 bedroom Den, w/d hook up. In
Ft. White. Appliance included.
$800. mo. $500. sec. Call Billie
386-754-6970 or 404-849-8277
LG clean 3br's $450. -$650. mo. +
dep. Also, 2br mobile home's
available. No Pets.
5 Points area. 386-961-1482
Mobile Homes for rent in
White Springs, Lake City & Ft.
White Contact 386-623-3404
or 386-365-1919
X-Clean 2/2 SW, 8 mi NW of VA.
Clean acre lot, nice area. $500. mo
+ dep No dogs Non-smoking
environment.386-961-9181

640^ Mobile Homes
640 1for Sale
Handy man special, 94 Fleetwood
DWMH. 3/2 on 5 acres in Ft.
White. Owner Fin. $3,000 dn.
$850mo. $99,900 352-215-1018
www.LandOwnerFinancing.com
PALM HARBOR Homes Has
Red Tag Sale
Over 10 Stock Units Must Go
Save Up To 35K!
Call Today! 800-622-2832

Mobile Home
650 & Land
67.5 ac.Ranch, fenced & cross .
fenced. Spacious moblie home
w/large front deck & RV hookup
MLS 75607 $299,000. Access
Realty. Patti Taylor. 386-623-6896

705 Rooms for Rent

New furnished bedroom apt in a
home, private entrance & bath, in-
cludes utilities, trash, cable, frig &
pest control. $450 mo + dep. Avail
8/1. 386-752-2020 SW Lake City

'710 Unfurnished Apt.
710 For Rent








05526481
SPRING HILL VILLAGE
Excellent High Springs location.
1, 2 & 3 bedroom floor-plans;
some with garages.
Call 386-454-1469
or visit our website:
www.springhillvillage.net

1 bedroom Apartment. Quiet,
Private street. $400. mo
plus security deposit.
386-344-3715
1BR APT.
Downtown Location, Clean.
$450 mo, plus Security.
NO PETS. Call 386-755-3456
2/1 w/garage & washer/dryer
hookups. East side of town,
Call for details
386-755-6867
2BR/1.5BA w/garage
5 minutes from VA hospital.
Call for details.
386-755-4590 or 365-5150
A Landlord You Can Love!
2 br Apts $575. & up + sec. Great
area. CH/A washer/dryer hookups.
386-758-9351/352-208-2421
Amber Wood Hills Apts.
Private Patio area. Beautiful yard.
Washer/dryer hkup. Free water &
sewer. 1/1, 2/1. Move in special.
386-754-1800. wwwmyflapts.com
Columbia Arms Apt. located 1/2
mi from V.A. & Winn Dixie. Pet
Friendly. Move in Special $199.
Pool, laundry & balcony.
386-754-1800. www.mvflapts.com
Furnished or unfurnished
Townhomes on the golf course.
$750. mo. plus security. Includes
water. 386-752-9626
Greentree Townhouse
Summer special. 2/1, 2/1.5. Free
water & sewer. Balcony & patio.
Laundry. Behind Kens on Hwy 90.
386-754-1800 wwwmyflapts.com
NICE Apt Downtown. Remodeled
1 bedroom. Kitchen, dining, living
room. $450. mo plus sec.
RENTED










Redwine Apartments. Move in
special $199. Limited time. Pets
welcome, with 5 complexes,
we have a home for you.
386-754-1800. www.myflapts.com
Summer Special! 12th mo Free
w/signed yr lease. Updated, w/tile
floors/fresh paint. Great area.
From $450.+sec. 386-752-9626
The Lakes Apts. Studios & IBr's
from $135/wk. Util. & cable incl.,
Sec 8 vouchers accepted, monthly
rates avail Call 386-752-2741
Wayne Manor Apts.
Move in $199. Summer special.
2/1, washer/dryer & patio. Behind
Kens off Hwy 90. 386-754-1800
wwwmvflapts.com


Windsor Arms Apartments.
Summer special $199. Move in!
2/1. 2/1.5, 2/2. Pet Friendy. Free
220 ch. dish. Washer/dryer hkup.
386-754-1800. www.myflpts.com


I


DIVORCE, BANKRUPTCY,
RESUMES.
other court approved forms-
386-961-5896.


[BUYIrai

ELL ssmuvsJsT^

FIND IT


*j










LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED SUNDAY, JULY 17, 2011


720 Furnished Apts.
2 For Rent
Rooms for Rent. Hillcrest, Sands,
Columbia. All furnished. Electric,
cable, fridge, microwave. Weekly
or monthly rates. I person $135,
2 persons $150. weekly
386-752-5808

730 Unfurnished
730 Home For Rent

05526651
LAKE CITY
2BR/1BA, Mobile Home
$495mo
2BR/1.5BA, 975SF $725. mo
4BR/3BA, 2139SF $1500. mo
4BR/2BA, 1248SF $695. mo
2 AVAILABLE
3BR/2BA 1258SF $925. mo
3BR/2BA 1582SF $900. mo
3BR/2BA 1246SF $700. mo

2BR/1BA 700SF $495. mo
2 AVAILABLE
3BR/1.5BA 1040SF $825

FT WHITE

3BR/2BA 1512SF $850. mo

LAKE BUTLER
4BR/2BA 1560SF $825 mo

MADISON
2BR/1BA JUST REMODELED
$450. mo. 2 AVAILABLE
3BR/1.5BA REMODELED
$550. mo

Mike Foster 386-288-3596
Mitchell Lee 386-867-1155
1688 SE Baya Dr., Suite 105
Lake City, FL 32025
www.NorthFloridahomeandland.com
Accredited Real Estate is a Full
Service Real Estate Office.
We do: Rentals
I Property Management J]
ram Property Sales. -

lbr/1.5ba Country Cottage, Cathe-
dral ceilings, brick fireplace, wash-
er/dryer,1. ac fenced, private, some
pets, lease. 1st, last, sec, ref. Lake
City area $650mo. 352-494-1989
lbr/lba Free ele. Utilities incl. 4mi
S. Lake City. $300dep. $375mo.
386-590-0642 or 386-867-1833
www.sujwanneevalleyproperties.com
3BR/2BA Newly remodeled.-
Large Yard & Porch
Call for more details
386-867-9231
Completely remodeled Brick.
3br/2ba 1750 sqft. Lg lot. Includes,
washer, dryer, stove, & fridge.
$985. mo $985 dep. 386-752-7578
Family Home 3/2; lr, dr, fam rm
w/ fp,garage, fenced back yd.
Nice area. $1100 mo + dep Martha
Jo Khachigan, Realtor 623-2848
SWMH 2/2 in Wellborn,
$625 mo, and
$625 security.
386-365-1243 or 397-261'9
Unfurnished 2 bedroom/1 bath
house. $700.00 per month.
First, last and security Firm.
386-590-5333

57 0 Business &
SOffice Rentals
For Lease: E Baya Ave. Two -
1000 sqft office space units or
combined for 2000 sqft. 386-984-
0622 or weekends 386-497-4762
OFFIICESPACE for lease.
Oak Hill Plaza. 900 sqft
$675mo/$695. sec dep.
Tom 386-961-1086 DCA Realtor

790 Vacation Rentals

Horseshoe Beach RV Lot.
Nice comer Lot with shade trees.
$295. mo Water/electric included
386-235-3633 or 352-498-5986
Scalloping Horseshoe Beach Spcl
Gulf Front 2br, w/lg porch, dock,
fish sink. wkend $395./wk $895.
386-235-3633/352-498-5986
alwaysonvacation.com #419-181
"Florida's Last Frontier"

805 Lots for Sale

1/4 acre, new well, septic and
power, paved rd, owner fin, no
down pym't, $24,900,
($256 month) 352-215-1018
www.LandOwnerFinancing.com
PUBLISHER'S NOTE
All real estate advertising in this
newspaper is subject to the fair
housing act which makes it illegal
to advertise "any preference,
limitation, or discrimination based
on race, color, religion, sex,
disability, familial status or nation-
al origin; or any intention to make
such preference, limitation or
discrimination. Familial status
includes children under the age of
18 living with parents or legal
custodians, pregnant women and
people securing custody of chil-
dren under the age of 18. This
newspaper will not knowingly
accept any advertising for real es-
tate which is in violation of the
law. Our readers are hereby in-


formed that all dwellings adver-
tised in this newspaper are availa-
ble on an equal opportunity basis.
To complain of discrimination call
HUD toll free at 1-800-669-9777,
the toll free
telephone number to the hearing
impaired is 1-800-927-9275.


810 Home for Sale
3/2 1056 sqft Brick home in town.
Fenced back yard w/12x12 work-
shop Just Reduced! $79.900
MLS# 77414 Call 386-243-8227
R.E.O.Realty Group, Inc
3/2 2003 DWMH on 5 acre rectan-
gular lot w/tons of potential.
MLS#77568 $79,900 Call Nancy
@ R.E.O. Realty 386-867-1271
nancytrogers@msn.com
3/2 home on .67 ac. Creekside S/D
. Fenced back yard, lots of trees.
Split floor plan on cul-de-sac
MLS 77385 Access Realty.
Patti Taylor $169,900 623-6896
4/2 on 10.5 acres w/ detached
garage, patio, above ground pool,
MLS# 77410 $189,888
R.E.O. Realty Group, Inc
386-243-8227
4/2 with 1000 sq ft workshop,
fenced yard, 2 car garage, Fairly
new roof & HVAC MLS#77602,
Bring Offers! $164,900,
R.E.O. Realty Group 243-8227
4br brick on .51 ac, comer lot. For-
mal dining and a large open floor
plan. Brick patio. $139,888
MLS 76763 Brittany Stoeckert
Results Realty 386-397-3473
Access Realty Stylish 3/2 + pool
house w/1/2 bath on 2.25 acres.
Rear deck, 2 car garage & carport.
MLS 78103 $189,900.
Patti Taylor.623-6896
BEAUTIFUL Lake Front home!
1 ac lot within the city limits.
Close to town. 1800 heated sq. ft.
$144,900 MLS# 78385
Call Jay Sears. 386-867-1613
Brick 3/1 family home, 4.43 acres.
w/metal roof. MLS# 77415
Short sale acceptance w/lenders
approval. $89,000. 386-243-8227
R.E.O. Realty Group, Inc
CLEAN & READY! 3BR/2BA
mfg home on .97-acre south of Ft.
White on paved road $59,000
DANIEL CRAPPS AGENCY,
INC. 755-5110 #78007
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
3/2 brick home in Woodcrest. Lg
lot completely fenced. Easy access
to amenities. Elaine K. Tolar 386-
755-6488 MLS# 78148 $129,900
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
3/3 in beautiful area. 2414sqft.
Private yard & patio with storage
bldg. Lori G Simpson 386-365-
5678 MLS# 78175 $159,900
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
New home in Mayfair. 4 bedroom
on comer lot. Covered Porch.
Elaine K. Tolar 386-755-6488
MLS# 76919 $209,900
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
Remodeled 2/2 could be 3/2).
'Splitfloor plan. Great home, great
price. Mary Brown Whitehurst
965-0887 MLS# 77943 $105,000
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
MH in Eastside Village a 55+ .
retirement community. Well main-
tained. Bruce Dicks 386-365-3784
MLS# 78350 $59,900
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
Brick home on Suwannee River
$329,900 Elaine K. Tolar 386-755-
6488 or Lori G. Simpson 365-5678
MLS# 70790 $329,900
DESIRABLE GWEN LAKE area!
Nice 3BR/2BA home on comer lot
REDUCED TO $95,000 DANIEL
CRAPPS AGENCY, INC.
755-5110 #77307
Hallmark Real Estate. 3/2
Doublewide on 1 acre. $58,000.
Not far to college & airport.
MLS# 78308
Ginger Parker 386-365-2135
Hallmark Real Estate. 35 High &
Dry acres, open pasture w/scat-
tered trees. Older site built home.
Needs some TLC.
MLS#76186 Jay Sears 719-0382
Hallmark Real Estate. Beautiful
lot in Wqodborough, has well
maintained 3/2 brick home.
Affordable price!MLS#75413
Sherry Willis 386-365-8095


Hallmark Real Estate. Lakefront
in town on 1 ac. Majestic oaks &
Magnolias. Hardwood floors,
fireplace & basement.
MLS#78385 Jay Sears 719-0382


Hallmark Real Estate. Pool &
Patio. 3br/2ba. brick home on
1.69 ac. Workshop &
SWMH on property. MLS#78117
Tanya Shaffer 386-397-4766
Open House, Sun. 7/17, 2-4 pm.
Come see 3bd-2ba home with the
"WOW" factor. 331 NW Kensing-
ton Ln, Lake City 386-754-1595


810 Home for Sale
Hallmark Real Estate. Time to go
to the River. Stilt home w/covered
decking. Floating dock,out bldgs
& covered RV parking. $188K.
MLS#72068 Janet Creel 719-0382
HANDYMAN SPECIAL!
4BR/2BA mfg home in great loca-
tion close to many amenities
$39,500 DANIEL CRAPPS
AGENCY, INC. 755-5110 #77852
Home on 15 ac. w/over 2,500 sqft
home.Very Ig bedrooms w/private
baths. 24x24 workshop $235,000
MLS 77552 Brittany Stoeckert
Results Realty 386-397-3473
Lg. 4/3 family home. 16x20
screened porch, workshop. 4.5 ac.
fenced/cross fenced MLS 74339
$229,900. N Fla Homeland Real-
ty Darlene Hart 386-288-2878
Mayfair S/D, nice fenced in back
yard w/small lake behind property.
Very nice. $99,888
MLS 77092 Brittany Stoeckert
Results Realty 386-397-3473
Neat as a pin! Split floor plan
w/well manicured lawn. 10x12
storage shed. $129K MLS 77932
Darlene Hart 386-288-2878
N Fla Homeland Realty
QUALITY HOME. Very private,
yet in the city. Comes with mobile
. home park that generates revenue.
$695,000. MLS# 77920
Call Jay Sears. 386-867-1613
REDUCED! Custom 2,061 SqFt
home with open floor plan,
3BR/2.5BA, in-ground pool
DANIEL CRAPPS AGENCY,
INC. 755-5110 #75442
RUSSWOOD EST! 3BR/2BA
w/2,337 SqFt, open floor plan,
climatized sun porch $219,900
DANIEL CRAPPS AGENCY,
INC. 755-5110 #77633
Southern Oaks Country Club.
3br/2.5ba Aprox 3000 sqft. Split
floor plan. on the 9th Fairway.
New AC, 2.5 car garage. sprinkler,
concrete drive. Avail. furnished or
unfurnished. Move in ready wall
appliances. Avail, now Built in
1992. Open to serious offers.
(305)872-7911 View at
www.lakecityvolfvilla.com
Spacious 4/2 home on 1 ac. Split
floor plan. Great neighborhood.
Easy access to 1-75 $220K MLS
77859 N Fla Homeland Realty
Darlene Hart 386-288-2878
WELLBORN! 4BR/2BA mfg
home w/2,280 SqFt, FP, & 5
ACRES only $74,900
DANIEL CRAPPS AGENCY,
INC. 755-5110 #78317

820 Farms &
820 Acreage
10 ac. Ft. White $39,995,
$995 Down, $273.16 mo.
Seller fin. vargasrealtv.com
352-472-3154
10-ac lot. Well/septic/pp. Owner
financing $300 dn, $663 mo 8.9%,
25 yrs. Deas Bullard Properties
386-752-4339 www.landnfl.com
2+ ACRES ON HWY 47 ..
by 1-75 interchange, More than
200 ft of frontage $149,900
Call 386-243-8227
R.E.O. Realty Group, Inc
20.02 acres ready for your site
built home. Has 2 wells & 2 power
poles w/a 24x30 slab $132,000
MLS# 78126 Call 386-243-8227
R.E.O.Realty Group, Inc
4 1/2 acre lot. Lake Jeffery Road.
Gorgeous Oaks!Paved Rd
Owner Financing! NO DOWN!
$59,900. $525mo 352-215-1018.
www.LandOwnerFinancing.com
4 acres, Wellborn, New Well
installed, Beautifully wooded
w/cleared Home Site, owner fin,
no down, $39,900, $410 mon
Call 352-215-1018
www.LandOwnerFinancing.com
FARM- 7 stall barn, Apt.
17+ acres cross fenced.
Close in $895. mo.
386-961-1086
Paved hard road in front of 5 ac.
tract. Comes with: power pole,
well & septic. Cleared in back.
Also, 20X25 carport. $39,900
MLS# 76347. Jay 386-867-1613

830 Commercial
O8J3 Property
4 UNIT Apt. Bldg. All 1/1/ w/ex-
tha rooms. Clean, good tenants and
remodeled. Downtown. $160,000.
386-362-8075 or 754-2951


Private Estate
Within the city limits. Beautiful old- -'
er home with mature landscaping
and lake views, 6 Br., 3.5 baths, q 1
3 fireplaces, private paved drive.
39.7 acres of property included
with home. $994,000 or $3,000
mo. for rent or home plus 2 acres
only $495,000. Call for additional
information and showings.

Listing Agent Mary Brown Whitehurst

S(386) 965-0887
-ui i2 or co-owner (386)397-5131


830 Commercial
830 oProperty

05526409
FOR SALE LAKE CITY
FORMER 84 LUMBER Zoned
Commercial Intensive on
4.2 +/- Acres with an 18,300
S.F. main building at 1824 W.
US Highway 90; contact
Crystal 724 228-3636 x 1349

Prime Commercial Location.
Just across from plaza. Frontage
on Baya w/2 curbcuts. $350,000
MLS# 77485 Call 386-243-8227
R.E.O.Realty Group, Inc

870 Real Estate
70 Wanted
I Buy Houses
CASH!
Quick Sale Fair Price
386-269-0605


940 Trucks
2000 Chevy S-10 4X4 Extended
Cab Truck. 149,000 miles $5000
OBO 386-269-0831 or
386-365-3736


950 Cars for Sale
2010 FORD Fusion SEL V6,
Auto, Leather, Loaded. 7,000 mi.
Showroom condition. $18,500.
386-752-8227

951 JRecreational
J95 Vehicles

2009 Jamboree 31M, Ford V-10,
2 slides, with 32 in. HDTV,
satellite. Av. retail $81,500.
Now $67,000. 386-719-6833


'C,


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B B C S I

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A+ EyeCare

I B E glasses

?* l.xams
Sunglasses


'l -5 5

555-5555


F F J W T
F S H S

B A Q U

I Y H C

L Y L W

E G L S E

B I G V TI
Lake City
Reporter's
popular weekly
word search is
a great way to
get attention
with a fun new
puzzle every
week at a price
any business
can afford.


S .

= Fr or ifomaio-cll(3675-5440


810 Home for Sale
2/1 completely updated, screened
back porch, large utility room,
MLS#77413 $52,900 Call Nancy
Rogers R.E.O. Realty
386-867-1271
Handyman Special
Off Turner Rd. 2br/1.5ba.
Half acre fenced lot w/shed.
Asking $55,000. (352)335-8330


Classified Department: 755-5440







LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED SUNDAY, JULY 17, 2011


j Husqvarna
YTH21K46

$2,59995
Kohler/Courage
.*23 hp
46" cutting width
36 Equal
as Payment-
SNo Interest
Mrre Models Available


'., '. .. www.aspenlakecity.com

ANTIQUE SALE
DOUBLE BOW FRONT, 5 DRAWER OAK CHEST
1885 WASH STAND PERFECT CONDITION
QUEEN ANN SOFA AND LOVE SEAT
So much more to choose from
and more coming in.
Timrncss memoRies
irble Top Dresser only $89 PURnmrrIT ANIrnQ COLLECTIBLES
386-466-1888
1034 SW MAIN BLVD., BLVD CITY, FL 32055 .e


Rountree Moore ToyotaBucks ountree Moore Toyota Bucks.


ForI on A c
Domestic &.,House Only Di 6-f B ~il


Have You Won

any of our


Cash Yet?


We're a lot
closer than Vegas or
Biloxi. Thousands of
dollars are paid out
in cash every month
right here inLake
City. If you haven't
yet tried your luck at
Sweepstakes, we'll be
happy to show you
how easy it is to play.


------- --- ------ ----- ----- - --- -
SWith this coupon and your purchase
of $20 or more in internet time.
5 Limit 1 per person per day. May not be

crIiI IW *Expires 7/25/2011
L ---------------- --'----*-,-'- ------- -- ---- -------------------------

;-- -- ------ --------------------------------
S, With this coupon and your purchase
of $10 or more in internet time.
S0 Limit 1 per person per day. May not be
r combined with any other promotional offer.
i re it Expires 7/25/2011
L --------------------------------------------


2888 W Hwy 90 Lake City Across from Appkbee's 386-438-5200



THN'S50 MAY lEDEEI\I R P R Ol i][IZS AT NO MORE H O)T ]t[OkHAN $50 iB- DAY.MUSTBE 8YASO LE 15TO ENiFRR 'ST BE I yIIARS()! R
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5 Buy any tree, get second entree at I
S equa or lesser value for

.FREE
It'S Our Qffer Expires 8/1/15.
bIthd.! ; Not vild with any oter offers. '
Adbirthday! ..t t ^0 ,-
n& and 313 NW Commons Loop, Ste. 119
O Come in and
,,h elpusLake City 386-754-1444
Se p9700 Deer Lake Ct., 13770 Beach Blvd, 1615 CR 220
r celebrate all Ste. 5 Ste. 9 #180
Sn Jacksonville Jacksonville Orange Park
fA,, this month! ri 904-564-2377 904-821-4440 904-278-6055


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Classified Department: 755-5440


Askl, abo our
"Gadad"o a ril


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Story ideas?


Contact
Robert Bridges
Editor
754-0428
rbridges@lakectyreportercom


Lake City Reporter





LIFE


Sunday, july 17, 2011


www.lakecityreporter.com


Section D


GARDEN TALK


Nichelle Demorest
dndemorest@ufl.edu

Powderpuff

mimosa is

no wimp

Low growing, mat-
forming plants
that fill in areas
where turf grass
won't grow are
considered to be ground
covers. The powderpuff
mimosa, also known as
sunshine mimosa, fits that
description with some addi-
tional favorable character-
istics.
This Florida native,
Mimosa strigillosa, is a rap-
idly spreading plant with
fine textured foliage and
pink 'powder puff' ball flow-
ers.
The flowers appear from
spring throughout the sum-
mer and are held up sev-
eral inches above the low
spreading mat of bright
green.
Even though the leaves
look fragile, this plant is
tough enough to take some
foot traffic.
After becoming estab-
lished, the powderpuff
mimosa needs no additional
water and holds up well
through drought condi-
tions. -
It prefers nutrient poor
sandy soil in full sun or part
shade.
Four or five newly planted
mimosas can quickly cover
a 200 to 300 square foot
area in less than one year.
In 2008, this plant was
named one of the "Plants
of the Year" by the Florida
Nursery, Growers &
Landscape Association.
Before that date, these
plants were specialty plants
only grown by a few native
plant growers.
As the plant increased in
popularity and demand, pro-
duction improved and the
powderpuff mimosa is read-
ily available now at most
garden centers.
Once established, pow-
derpuff mimosa aids in ero-
sion control with its deep
root system. As stems grow
along the ground, they take
root to help form that dense
mat.
As a legume, the ntimosa
has root nodules which con-
tain bacteria that change
nitrogen into a form that
plants can use. So another
function of the plant is add-
ing usable nitrogen to the
soil.
I have mentioned quite
a few favorable character-
istics of this little cheery
ground cover.
I am welcomed home
every evening by the pink
puffs blooming in our native
garden.
What a lovely turf replace-
ment this plant would be
except for one thing. It dies
down in the winter.
Powderpuff mimosa is
also a larval host for the
little sulfur butterfly.
Learn more about
"Attracting Wildlife with
Native Plants" 5:30 p.m.
Thursday, July 21. This free
class will be offered at the
Columbia County Public
Library Fort White .Branch.
And visit the new display
garden at the library.
D. Nichelle Demorest is
a horticulture agent with the
Columbia County Extension
of the University of Florida
Institute of Food and
Agricultural Sciences.


A


sister's


Country star's
sibling pleased
with his success.
4

By ANTONIA ROBINSON
arobinson@lakecityreporter.com
E aston Corbin may be
a rising country music
star to the rest of the
nation, but to his big
sister, Deanna Prescott
of Wellborn, "He's still my brother.
He's still Easton to me."
' Corbin, who is from Trenton,
kicks off the Florida Gateway
College Entertainment season
with a concert 7 p.m.. Aug. 17 at
the Howard Conference Center.
Headlining sponsors are Ronsonet
GMC-Buick, Saint Leo University
and Allergy & Urgent Care.
"I'm really excited about it, just
for him to be back near his home-
town roots," Prescott said.
Prescott, who is also a part-time
student at FGC, got a call from the
school when it was initially work-
ing to have Corbin perform. She
later learned he was officially part
of the season's schedule.
Prescott is office manager at
Allergy & Urgent Care in Lake City.
Their mother, Delinda Bennett,
also works at the office part-time
as a LPN.
The office staff, which also
includes Bill Sanders, owner, and
Denise Cone, billing manager,
have known Corbin since he'was
about 11.
"We thought it would be a
great opportunity (to sponsor the
event)," she said. "We're proud to
do it."
Sanders once had the oppor-
tunity to jam on the guitar with
Corbin when he was in a local
band, Prescott said. A bandmate
was out sick and he helped fill in
during a practice session.
"He loves telling people that
story," she said.
Music has always been in her
brother, Prescott said. He started
playing the guitar and taking music
lessons at 14.
"My mom has a couple pictures
of Easton 2 or 3 years old playing
a guitar," she said. That's one of
the baby pictures she put in the


support


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
One of the biggest fans.of country music singer Easton Corbin happens to be his older sister.. Deanna Prescott, of
Wellborn, an office manager at Allergy & Urgent Care in Lake City, is happily advertising the star's newest concert,
set for Aug. 17 at 7 p.m. the Howard Conference Center at Florida Gateway College.


yearbook of him."
The siblings are more than seven
years apart, but she can remember
driving him back and forth to T-
ball practice, Prescott said. He was
also in her wedding when she was
20 and he was 12. She later was in
his wedding in 2006.
The siblings are close despite
the age gap and keep in contact
with each other, she said. Before
and after the concert Prescott
will spend time hanging with her
brother.
'The Clay County Fair, April 9, is
the last time I saw him," Prescott
said.
Stardom hasn't changed her
brother, she said. To Corbin, no
one is a stranger.
"He's really the same person,"
Prescott said. "He's no different."
His story of success is inspir-
ing for so many people, she said.
Corbin came from a small town
but was determined and went for
SIBLING continued on 2D


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Prescott laughs' as she recalls.a story about her and her brother during his
childhood.


USDA seeks ways to boost farm-to-school programs


BY STEVE KARNOWSK
Associated Press
MINNEAPOLIS The popular-
ity of farm-to-school programs that
put locally grown food on cafeteria
trays has exploded in recent years
- so much so that the federal
agency in charge of school lunches
is giving them a new stamp of
approval.
Deputy Agriculture Secretary
Kathleen Merrigan said the pro-
grams have become so popular
so fast that her agency doesn't
have solid figures on how many
schools are serving their students
vegetables, fruits and meat grown
by local farmers.
"We know it's just snowballing,"
Merrigan said in an interview with
The Associated Press before her
appearance Tuesday at the School
Nutrition Association convention
in Nashville, Tenn.
The U.S. Department of
Agriculture used the convention
to release a new report on what
works in farm-to-school programs,
what doesn't and what the agency
can do to help them work better.
The report was put together by
a USDA team that traveled to 15
school districts across the country
and comes as officials, including
first lady Michelle Obama, are pro-
moting the importance of healthier
food for kids.
"First, it is about bringing fresh
locally grown food into school caf-
eterias," Merrigan said. "So there's


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Recent Ashland graduate Sophie Javna, 17, weeds a bed of cabbage in an organic garden at Ashland High School
in Ashland, Ore. The organic garden has taken root at Ashland High School to boost local and sustainable lunchtime
cafeteria options for students next academic year.


the yummy factor, the good nutri-
tion factor. ... Number two, we
believe it provides good market
opportunities for local producers,
particular those midsize farmers
that are struggling to make a go


of it. This is a real opportunity
for them to increase the bottom
line in their farming operations. So
it's about rural economic develop-
ment."
Third, she said, farm-to-school


programs help connect people with
where their food comes from, how
it's produced and by whom.
"We know that children are very

USDA continued on 2D










Page Editor: Antonia Robinson, 754-0425


2D LAKE CITY REPORTER LIFE SUNDAY, JULY 17, 2011


ALS awareness important for the community


By CATHY WOGAMON
Special to the reporter
myotro -
phic Lateral
Sclerosis, bet-
ter known as
ALS or Lou
Gehrig's disease, is a crip-
pling illness that leaves it's
victims a prisoner in their
own bodies. It is not known
specifically what causes
ALS but some speculate
that a head injury or expo-
sure to certain chemicals
or vaccines may, be pos-
sible risk factors.
ALS victims come from
all walks of life and many
of them have been physi-
cally fit individuals who
have had few, if any major
illnesses.
ALS affects the upper or
lower neurons that control
muscle movement in the
body, eventually causing
death to the nerves which
leaves the victim paralyzed.
ALS usually begins by
either affecting the limbs
(legs and arms) or the


speech of the individual.
Although the victims start
with differing symptoms,
they usually end up with
the same prognosis.
Most ALS victims die
within two to five years
after diagnosis. The age
of onset can be anywhere
from 40-70, although many
victims are in the younger
range. There is no cure
for ALS although currently
there are many research
studies being conducted to
search for a cure. There is
no single test for ALS. ALS
is usually diagnosed by a
neurologist who rules out
other 'diseases and disor-
ders.
I first became acquainted
with ALS when I was 19-
years-old when my father
was diagnosed with the
traumatic disease.
At the time, there was
little known about ALS and
few to no support systems
for ALS sufferers or their
families. My family and I
learned by trial and error
what worked and did not


work while watching my
father deteriorate at an
alarming rate.
The problem that many
ALS patient and caregivers
encounter is that by the
time solutions have been
discovered for the current
problem, the patient dete-
riorates and another prob-
lem arises.
Today there are many
resources available to the
ALS patient and caregiver.
The ALS Association based
in California was developed
to create ALS awareness
and provide resources for
the ALS patient and care-
giver.
ALS TDI is a renown
research organization
dedicated solely to ALS
research. Both organiza-
tions provide some of the
most promising research
regarding ALS in this coun-
try.
The ALS Association also
provides support groups
for patients, caregivers and
survivors to provide assis-
tance and support. The


MDA has an ALS division
which also provides sup-
port to these patients and
caregivers.
There are also private
organizations and chat
areas for those who wish
to share their experiences
and trials. Mayo Clinic in
Jacksonville and Emory
University in Georgia pro-
vide ALS clinics for ALS
patients. These clinics also
conduct research studies
related to ALS. Both facili-
ties house experts in the
field of ALS treatment and
research.
ALS is one of the disabili-
ties that has the two year
waiting period waived for
Social Security disability
benefits. If a patient is diag-
nosed with ALS, the patient
can file for benefits after
he or she stops working. It
takes a couple months to
receive full benefits but it
is much better than the two
year waiting period with
other disabilities.
The military has claimed
that veterans of foreign


wars who are diagnosed
with ALS may be eligible
for 100% service con-
nected disability benefits.
Survivors of these vets
may also be eligible. The
patient can check with
the VA benefits division if
they feel they may qualify.
The Paralyzed Veterans of
America have been at the
forefront of assisting these
veterans to receive their
benefits.
There are many ways
you can learn about ALS
and support ALS research.
The month of May has
been designated as ALS
Awareness month in the
state of Florida.
Many major league
baseball' teams support
ALS awareness at select-
ed games throughout the*
year. There are walks con-
ducted throughout the
nation to raise funds for
ALS research ard ALS
awareness.
There is also a federal
registry for ALS patients.
FSU's baseball team con-


ducted a fundraiser/aware-
ness night this year for
ALS.
All the above mentioned
organizations have web-
sites with valuable informa-
tion on ALS and also ways
to support ALS research
financially.
Some celebrities who
were or are diagnosed
with ALS include Stephen
Hawking, David Niven,
Jim "Catfish" Hunter,
Henry Wallace, Huddie
"Leadbelly" Ledbetter and
of course Lou Gehrig.
ALS is a crippling disease
that leaves one trapped
inside their own body. It
is time to eradicate this
disease.
You can help by increas-
ing your awareness of
ALS and supporting the
research organizations
financially.

m Cathy Wogamon is an
associate professor, LPN at
Florida Gateway College.


USDA: Farm-to-School

Continued from Page 1D


Ecotrust; a Portland,
Ore., conservation and
economic development
group that organized- a
pilot program that gave
the Portland and Gervais
school districts an extra 7
cents per meal in 2008-09
to spend on local foods.
An Ecotrust study com-
ing out soon found even
such a small sum could
have a big impact every
dollar the two districts
spent on local food gen-
erated $1.86 in economic
activity, Kane said. And, for
each job directly created
by their purchase of local
food, another 1.43 jobs
were created indirectly.
Kane was invited to
the White House last
week to brief President
Barack Obama on anoth-
er Ecotrust initiative, a
USDA-backed online ser-
vice called FoodHub that
helps connect family farms
with schools and other
urban buyers. The site
covers partsof the Pacific
NorthWest now and aims
to go national next year.
The USDA's 76-page
report said team mem-
bers learned in their trav-
els that communities with
farm-to-school ,initiatives
are passionate about them
and work hard to over-
come the challenges they
face, but success depends
on good communications
among schools, farmers


and others invested in the
programs.
And it said money is
needed to support these
programs, particularly for
food service staff training,
equipment and facilities.
to process and store local
produce, and to develop
educational activities for
students.
In an age when many
districts do little more
than heat up prepackaged
foods, the report noted
that schools often lack
people trained to clean, cut
and cook fresh fruit and
vegetables. They may not
even have enough knives
and other basic equipment
to do the job.
The USDA pledged
in the report to step up
efforts to connect schools
with farmers, includ-
ing increasing collabora-
tion with nonprofits and
expanding outreach and
awareness initiatives.
Merrigan also
announced a pilot program
that will give Michigan and
Florida schools more flex-
ibility to use federal school
lunch money to buy locally,
grown produce for their
students, removing one
obstacle.
It's difficult under cur-
rent rules for schools to
direct their federal food
money to local farmers,
she said.
The goal of the project


is to work out the kinks in
procurement systems and
rules so the program can
be expanded nationwide.
While various farm-
to-school programs are
operating in every state,
Merrigan said, the USDA
has relied on advocacy
groups for data and their
numbers are often limit-
ed or old. So she asked
officials at the convention
to participate in a USDA
survey to determine what
schools across the nation
are doing.
"This thing is growing
beyond our ability to track
it, and we really need a
systemized way to get this
data," s~i said.
- -The National Farm to
School Network estimates
there are over 2,500 pro-
grams involving more than
10,000 schools around
country, up from about
400 programs in 22 states
in 2004, but spokeswom-
an Chelsea Simpson said
those numbers aren't cer-
tain.
The network is hoping
the USDA survey gives
everyone a better picture
of how many students are
benefiting, she said.
"It's a tricky thing to fig-
ure out because the beau-
tiful thing about farm-to-
school is it's such a grass-
roots initiative," Simpson
said.


Companies propose curbing


junk food ads for kids


By MARY CLARE JALONICK
Associated Press

WASHINGTON The
nation's largest food
companies say they will
cut back on marketing
unhealthy foods to chil-
dren, proposing their own
set of advertising stan-
dards after rejecting simi-
lar guidelines proposed by
the federal government.
A coalition of food com-
panies- including General
Mills, ConAgra Foods and
Kellogg announced the
guidelines Thursday. The
companies said the effort
will vastly change what is
advertised, forcing them '
to curb advertising on one
.out of three products cur-
rently marketed to chil-
dren.
The new standards,
which will allow compa-
nies to advertise food and
.beverage products to chil-
dren if they meet certain
nutritional criteria, could
force some brands, to
change recipes to include
less sodium, fat, sugars
and calories. While many
companies have trum-
peted their own efforts to
market healthier foods to
kids, the agreement would
apply the same standards
to all of the participating
companies.
"Now foods from dif-


ferent companies, such as
cereals or canned pastas,
will meet the same nutri-
tion criteria, rather than
similar but slightly differ-
ent company-specific cri-
teria," said Elaine Kolish
of the Children's Food
and Beverage Advertising
Initiative, a group formed
by the industry to address
marketing issues. ,
The group's proposal
was pushed along by a gov-
ernment effort to do the
same thing. The Federal
Trade Commission and
several other government
agencies were directed
by Congress to come up
with voluntary guidelines
for marketing junk food to
children, and those were
issued earlier this year.
The industry balked at
that proposal, saying the
voluntary standards were
too broad and would limit
marketing of almost all of
the nation's favorite foods,
including some yogurts
and many children's cere-
als.
Not surprisingly, the
proposal issued by the
government is stricter
than the standards the
companies are pushing
for themselves. Still, FTC
Chairman Jon Leibowitz
praised the industry guide-
lines Thursday. He said
the government would


consider the food compa-
nies' initiative as the gov-
ernment develops its own
standards.
"The industry's uniform
standards are a significant
advance, and are exactly
the type of initiative the
commission had in mind
when we started pushing
for self-regulation more
than five years ago ... we
applaud industry for mak-
ing healthy progress," he
said.
While the government
proposal put broad limits
on fats, sugars and sodi-
um that would apply to
marketing of all foods, the
industry has suggested
different guidelines for dif-
ferent foods, saying that is
a more practical approach.
The industry guidelines
for children's cereals, for
example, would allow them
to be advertised if they
have around 10 grams of
sugar a serving, while the
formula used by the gov-
ernment would discourage
advertising for cereals that
have 8 grams of sugars
in an equivalent serving.
That would mean General
Mills would still be able
to advertise 'Honey Nut
Cheerios cereal under
the industry guidelines
but would be discouraged
under the voluntary gov-
ernment guidelines.


Sibling: Brother is a star

Continued from Page 1D


COURTESY PHOTO
Easton Corbin is known for his hits 'I Can't Love You Back,' 'A Little More Country than That,'
and 'Roll With It' off of his self-titled album.


his dream.
' "He dreamed big and it
happened," Prescott said.
"People are touched by his
story of making it."
Prescott is proud of her
brother's success.
"I've got posters and tell


everybody to come see my said. Seeing him perform
brother," she said. "I'm tell- is always an amazing expe-
ing everybody that comes rience.
in the office." "It's going to be an awe-
When Corbin takes the some show," she said. "He
stage in Lake City, she will really gets into his concert.
be sitting with their fam- He's doing what he loves
ily in VIP seats, Prescott to do."


SSweetwater Brac
8- .0 5 95 -77606 .



,. .. .. *..,


'" .,
L 7.-.











Page Editor: Emogene Graham 754-0415 LAKE CITY REPORTER ADVICE & CROSSWORD SUNDAY, JULY 17, 2011 3D


DEAR ABBY



Woman frowns at sisters'


passion for plastic surgery


DEAR ABBY: I dislike the
prevalence of plastic surgery
and Botox in today's society.
It sends young people a bad
message on body image.
My friend "Liz's" step-
mother loudly discussed her
own daughter's nose job, chin
implant and "boob job" with
Liz's teenage daughter while
at dinner in a public restaurant
where everyone could hear.
My sister "Beth" told her
son and daughter she'd gladly
pay for new noses for them.
They were offended because
they are happy with their looks.
(At least, they i'ere until their
mother denigrated them.)
Bqth' of my sisters have had
plastic surgery! They can afford
it and that's their business. But
they make. it our business by
publicly -congratulating each
other on bow well they have
"aged." *
What do you think about
this, Abby? Am I right?' -
- NATURAL WOMAN IN
CALIFORNIA
DEAR, NATURAL WOM-
AN: Plastic surgery has been
a blessing to many people
because it has lifted not only
drooping flesh but sagging
self-esteem.' I see nothing
wrong with someone getting
a nose job if it will help the.
person feel more confident.
Your sister's, offer to pay for
her children's rhinoplasty may
have had more to do with her-
own insecurity than either of


Abigail Van. Buren
www.dearobby.com

her children's..
- Cosmetic surgery' and Bo-
tox are facts of life in our so-
ciety for those who can afford
it. Botox is comunon for both
men and women who want to
lessen 6i avoid signs of aging.
I think what's upsetting you is
your sisters' dishonesty. When
they publicly congratulate
each other on hdw well they
have aged, they're hot only ly-
ing to whoever overhears them
-- they're also lying to them-
selves.
DEAR ABBY: My daughter
and granddaughter are going to
be in a wedding scheduled for
the summer of 2012. The bride
seems to have watched too
many wedding shows on TV,
because she keeps scheduling
bridesmaids luncheons and
has required her attendants to
go to many bridal expos with
her -- even though the vendors
have all- been booked.. The
:hop where the bridesmaids
are buying their dresses is very
expensive.
I understand the bride wants
it to be a special day, but it's


more than a year away and
my daughter is a stay-at-home
mother of two. She doesn't
have the time or money to
continue participating in these
events. She asked me if she
should back out now or level
With the bride that some of her
requests are a little over the
top.
My daughter wants to sup-
port her friend, and doesn't
want her to think she's trying
to run the show by suggesting
alternate places to look for less
expensive dresses, since she'll
have to purchase two. What do
I tell her? -- MOTHER OF
THE BRIDESMAID
DEAR MOTHER: Friends
should be, able' to level with
each other -- otherwise they
aren'tfriends, they are acquain-
tances. If the bride's schedule
of events is more than your
daughter can handle, she needs
to speak up. If the dresses will
cause financial hardship, the
bride needs to know so she can
either scale back the cost or
find replacements for whom-
ever is supposed to wear them.
If this is not agreeable for the
bride, your daughter can "sup-
,port" her friend with the rest of
the wedding guests. She does
not have to be a member of the
wedding party to do that.

a Write Dear Abby at
www.DearAbby.com or
P.O. Box 69440, Los
Angeles, CA 90069.


HOROSCOPES


ARIES (March 21-April
19): Everything is falling into
place. Your input will be greatly
appreciated and will lead to
opportunities. Travel and com-
munication are favored. Donxt
let matters in your personal life
slow you down. ****
TAURUS (April 20-May
20): Helping may be a nice
thing to do, but you are likely
to be taken advantage of if you
do. Keep in mind that charity
begins at home. Put pressure on
the people youi need something
from and you will speed up
the process of getting what you
want. **
GEMINI (May 21-June 20):
Taking your place in the spot-
light will attract the attention
of someone who can help-you
get ahead:. se your, home as a;,
place to hone,your skills, and to
put together. an .offer that will.
allow you, to make additional
income, Someone may 'try to
stand in your way; stay in con-
trol. *****
CANCER (June 21-July 22):
Do a little daydreaming: You
may not relish change, but trav-
eling somewhere you've never
been or getting involved in
something new will open your
eyes to possibilities you never


THE LAST WORD
EugeniaWord

considered. Love and romance
are highlighted. ***
LEO (July 23-Aug. 22):
Good fortune and luck are in
your corer. You can close a
deal with convincing facts and
figures that will be impressive
and difficult to dispute. Getting
laughs will be easy, but having a
gracious attitude will make the
difference. ***'
VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept.
22): Your practical nature will
elude you, confusing the people
who know you well. Impulsive
action or spending. to impress
someone is a reason for con-
cern. Find out the facts before
you promise to take part in
something that could lead to
financial loss. "Ar
LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22):
You can have whatever you
want if you go about it the right
way. A partner, friend or relative
may not agree with your plans.
Be ready to deal with any oppo-
sition you face. "AAA*
SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov.
21): Step into the spotlight.
The more you do to entertain
others, the more interest you


CELEBRITY CIPHER
by Luis Campos
Celebrity Cipher cryptograms are created from quotations by famous people. past and present.
Each letter In the cipher stands or another.
TODAY CLUE: G equals B
"OXR, OHT BCD IHRX RHPXGHUO
HMXJDNSLA... INEX NR R L H J A. NA
BCD BHPX CDU SH INFX C E.XCALXJ ND
ALX VN'DU.. RLCDNC AVCND

Previous solution "The rockets and the satellites, spaceships that we're
creating now. we're pollinating the universe." Neil Young
(c) 2011 by NEA, Inc. 7-18


will receive. Personal and pro-
fessional opportunities will
develop if you network, travel
or develop something that you
can offer others for a monetary
return. Romance is in the stars.
**
SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-
Dec. 21): Look at your options
and consider what you have
to do to get your way. Making
changes at home or planning
a move should be highlighted.
An emotional situation with a
friend or lover should be han-
dled openly. k***
CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-
Jan. 19): Younll have a lot on
your mind. Try not to put added
pressure on yourself because of
what someone else wants from
you. Good fortune is within
reach. Follow your instincts and
win. "A**
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb.
18): Emotions will surface if
you or someone you are deal-
ing with isnit honest. Use any
leverage you have to make the
changes you want at home. A
good idea can help to stabilize
your financial future. *k*
PISCES (Feb. 19-March
20): Know your limits. Stick to
your plan. You mustnmt allow
anyone to lead you astray or
to take over something you are
pursuing. Love and romance are
in the stars, and socializing will
bring you closer to someone
who understands and supports
you. '**


SUNDAY CROSSWORD


BODY ENHANCEMENT By Ben Pall and David Kahn / Edited by Will Shortz 1-2 134 5 i6 l 78- 18 0 l 11 12 13 14 15 16 1 11
I I I 1


Across
'1 Meaningless
7 Dolt
11 Reached
19 Symphony whose
second ,,. /
movement is
marked "Marcia
'funebre. Adagio
assaii"
20 Ring bearer
21 Dew, e.g.
22 What a
poltergeist.
investigator
does?
4. 1862 invasion
battle site
25 Mount for the
god Neptune
:26 Monopoly
purchases: Abb'r.
27 TV show whose:
name precedes a"
colon
28 See 49-Across
,30 What the tired
waiter provided?
'33 Worry
34 Totals
36 "Interesting ..."
37 Noted explorer
traveling with a
monkey
39. London's locale:
Abbr.
40 Fruit for
lagomorphs?:.
46 Shows worry, in
a way
49 Old French 28-
SAcross

For any three answers,
call from a touch-tone
phone: 1-900-285-5656,
1.49 each minute; or,
with a credit card, 1-800-
814-5554.


50 Some people
have funny ones
51 Lighten (up)
53 Mauna __
54 Livens (up)'
,,5.6 Disorderly
poultry workers?
62 Opera
65 Practices
66 Sweetheart
67 Wistful remark'
70 Result of a bad
swing, maybe
71 There may be
many in' a family
72 Got around
73 __ law (old
Germanic legal
code)
74 Detectives' aids
'75 Attempts to
climb a mountain
.:range?
78 "Monk" org.
82'Noshed
83 Snick and ___
84 Van Susteren of
Fox News
87 Mass of eggs
88 10,000 61-Down.
90 Sad sports
headline in a
Providence
paper?
95 Verdi's tu"
96 Actress Gershon
98' Sweetheart
99 Estate total
101 Billy who sang
."Rebel Yell"
103 Dusting onfthe
side of a cut
gem?
109 Point in the
right direction?
110 Friend of
Eeyore


111 Bronze, e.g.
112 Like some
sabbaticals
114 Point to
116 Churchgoers,
sometimes?
120 Didn't just.spit
121 Senders of some
Christmas gifts
122 Excels
123 Roasters,
essentially
124 "Why don't
we?!"
125 Get dark?

Down
1 "___ Ramsey"
(1970s western)
2 Prize at the
Barcelona
O.Qlympics
3 Botching
4 Bedding,
5 Numerical prefix
6 Basketful, maybe
7 Like some air and
dollar bills-
8 Snaps.
9 A famous one
begins "Thou
still unravish'd
bride of
quietness"
10 Buns, e.g.
11 One instrumental
in music history?
12 Vodka___
13 Like a lord or
lady,
1.4 Undisturbed'
15 Follower of
Israel?
16 Hinged
implements
17 Take off
18 Abdicate


20 Mold
23 will not"
26 Eye layer
28 Peeping Tom,
e.g.
29 Little bit
31 Help in making a
prediction,
maybe
32 Riddle-me-_
33 Monk's title
35 Numerical prefix
38 Unrestricted, as a
mutual fund
41 Tom Sawyer's
crush
42 Scornful replies
43 "Woe ___"
(grammar guide)
44 TKO callers
45;Paolantonio of
S.' ESPN
47 Like things that
go bump in the
night.
48 MS. enclosures
52 "Love Me Do"
vis-a-vis "P.S. I
Love You"
55 Actress Lena
Olin, e.g., by
birth
57 Easter Island is
part of it
58 "Born on the
Fourth of July"
hero Ron
.59 Great-
'grandfather of .
Noah .
60 Web
61 See 88-Across
63 Certain Black
Sea dweller
64 It's a gas
67 Taking place in
68 Ellipsoidal


69 Fulfills
70 Morse T
.71 "The Balcony"
playwright
73 Suffix'with hip'
or tip
74 Stale Italian
bread?
76 Neighbor of
Colo.
77 Golden __,
79'One who's been
released?


80 Wires may
'connect to them
81'Voltaire or Adam
Smith
.85 Maintaining
'on.e's
.composure, say
86 Tor F: Abbr.
89 Rapper ___
Wayne
91 Follow
92 &' 93 Picnic
amenity


94 Cheerful
97 Wide, as the
nostrils
100 Submit
101 Like Guinness
102 "Pearly Shells"
singer
104 Change
105 Ole Miss
misses, e.g.
106 Bad marks?
107 Blocks
108 Drop the ball


111 Taiwan-based
computer maker
113 Home of 102-
Down
115 ___ Jima
116 "Be a ___!"
117 Not settle, say
118 Stephen of
"Interview With
the Vampire"
119 Govt. ID


Answers to last Sunday's Crossword"
EA AICDT GET N A
OK LAO MAH U I E
BE ATA BROW COW S
ELTZ WATER CA T E
DOAGAS SAYSOS EIN
PIUIR 'L P A T L. K REA



L TAWA YHS
ANE AU M D V I HEI IMS
RASH LA Y SET SOBA
G EED N
FLEXI I L TRAW NTI CA W
A L, O I N C A AW

L IX N
I LEX S I VO IING
E T I Kp Ic O
O E Lr 1111 E PIOIR T


AINIEIN


8 i 1 2


7 56 8


5 9 .3


1 7 5
932

9 3 2


6 7 1


34 6 1


832 64


9 1 4 2


Z.18V L 19 L 6


6 1; 9 L, 8 9s L


9 L L 6 9 8 9 8Z


L69I,-69


V- 8 L 9 L Z C 6 9


9 9 6 8 EZ L L


9 1 Z 6 L 8 9


8 6 P 9 9 LZ LL



IZL^968 _^^_


OIRIK













Kennedy family divided over Mass. family compound


By DAVID KLEPPER
Associated Press

HYANNIS PORT, Mass.'
- For the Kennedys, the
family compound has long
been a place to relax, to
celebrate and to grieve.
Members of America's
most glamorous political
dynasty played touch foot-
ball on the lawn, walked
the beach and sailed the
sound.
The cluster of white-
clapboard homes on Cape
Cod served as the summer
White House when Jack
was president.
It was there that the
family retreated after his
assassination. And it was
there that Caroline held
her wedding reception and
Ted spent his final days.
Now, as the Kennedys
gather for another wed-
ding there, the family is
divided over the future of
the compound.
On Friday, Patrick
Kennedy, a former eight-
term congressman from
Rhode Island and the son
of the late Sen. Edward
Kennedy, will marry New
Jersey schoolteacher Amy
Petitgout in a small, pri-
vate ceremony presided
over by Supreme Court
Justice Stephen Breyer.
At the same time, the
Kennedys are split over
what is to become of this
Camelot-by-the sea.
Sen. Edward Kennedy's
widow, Vicki Kennedy,
and his three children
plan to transfer the main
house at the compound to
the Edward M. Kennedy
Institute for the United
States Senate, perhaps for
use as a scholarly retreat
or a museum.
Some Kennedys have
raised concerns about
those plans, according to a
family'associate who spoke
on condition of anonymity
because he was not autho-
rized to speak publicly.
They are worried about
protecting the privacy of
family members who will
continue to live on the
grounds, maintaining the
overall character of the
compound and ensuring
access to the beachfront
property, the family associ-
ate said.
Family members are
discussing the concerns
in hopes of resolving the
issue before the property
changes hands, the family
associate said..
A statement onThursday
from the Edward M.
Kennedy Institute, of
which Vicki Kennedy is
a co-founder and trustee,
said the compound's future
use will be in line with
what the senator wished
for the property.
"SenatorKennedyunder-
stood the historical impor-
tance of the family home,
as well as its cherished
place in a small residen-
tial community," the state-
ment said. "He addressed
all of those.issues in giving
his immediate family the
rights to the property for
their lives and a remainder
interest in the property to
the Edward M. Kennedy
Institute for the United
States .Senate.
"Any future plans for
the family' home will be
consistent with the wish-
es of Senator Kennedy.
However, no changes are
imminent," it added.
Patrick Kennedy
declined to comment.
Whatever becomes of it,
the compound remains a
link to the Kennedy leg-
acy.
Here is where John E.
Kennedy learned to sail
and played football with
his brothers.
Just down the road is
where he delivered his
first speech after winning


the White House.
It was here, 12 years
ago next week, that the
Kennedy clan retreated to
mourn the death of John
E Kennedy Jr. in a plane
crash. And it is here where
Edward Kennedy suc-
cumbed to brain cancer
in 2009.
'This was their get-


away," said Jessica Sylver,
chief executive at the
Hyannis Area Chamber of
Commerce, which oper-
ates the John E Kennedy
Hyannis Museum. 'This
was where the family came
to be together, to escape."
Just as the Kennedys
made a mark on America,
the Cape made its mark
on them.
"I always come back to
the Cape and walk on the
beach when I have a tough
decision to make," JFK
once said. "The Cape is
the one place I can think,
and be alone."
The homes that make
up the Kennedy compound
are not open to the public.
According to the National
Park Service, the main
house contains nearly two-
dozen rooms, including
seven bedrooms for resi-
dents and guests and four
rooms for servants.
The basement holds a
movie theater and sauna.
The grounds feature
an enclosed pool, a ten-
nis court and a four-car
garage.
The Kennedys' pres-
ence here began in 1926
when Joseph Kennedy Sr.
and his wife, Rose, rented
a summer cottage with
sweeping ocean views.
A few years later, the
Kennedy patriarch pur-
chased the property and
expanded it to suit his
growing family. Twenty
.years after that, JFK and
his brother Robert expand-
ed the family footprint
when they bought homes
nearby. Edward Kennedy
made the main house his
home for decades.
Ethel Kennedy, Robert's
widow, still keeps a house
next to the main resi-
dence.
The dense collection of
white clapboard houses
blends seamlessly into the
wealthy neighborhood.
Signs remind visitors
that the compound is pri-
vate, hidden largely away
by fences, driveways and
the green sea of Nantucket
Sound. Still, sightseers
try their best to spy a
glimpse.
"I've heard about it all
my life," said Sarah Buck
of Mechanicsville, Va.,
who stopped by the com-
pound Thursday with
three friends.
Buck, 29, was on the
Cape for a friends' wedding
and wanted to see what
she could of the Kennedy
home.
'They're an American
institution," she said.
The best views of the
compound are from the
sea. And Hyannis Port
boat operators are happy
to oblige.
"We used to carry 1,500
people a day or more in
60s and '70s," said Murray
Scudder, whose father
helped found a tour boat
business after JFK was
elected president. "Now
it's a couple of hundred. It
doesn't have the cachet it
once did."
Still, to the many
Americans who .lived
through the Kennedy era,
the compound and Hyannis
are a place where ghosts
whisper in the salt spray.
Photos in the Hyannis
museum show Kennedy
arriving in a Marine helicop-
ter; welcoming the Canadian
prime minister to his fam-
ily's home; being inter-
viewed on the manicured
lawn by Walter Cronkite;
learning that his brother
Ted had won a Senate seat;
sailing with Jackie just after
their marriage; playing with
John Jr.
"It's still emotional to
me," said Marcia Diamant,
visiting Hyannis from New
York.
Standing outside the


Kennedy museum, she
fought back tears as she
remembered JFK's 1963
assassination.
"I was in high school.
I was on a bus, and they
announced it," she said.
"No one could believe it.
It's something Ill never for-
get"


ASSOCIATED PRESS
In this July 15, 1990 file photo, descendants of Rose Kennedy pose with their families outside her house in Hyannis Port,
Mass., after a party in advance of her 100th birthday on July 22. While it has been mostly unused since Sen. Edward
Kennedy died in 2009, the Kennedys gathered again at the house Friday for the wedding of former Rhode Island Rep! Patrick
Kennedy. The senator's will said he wanted the property turned over to the Edward M. Kennedy Institute for the United States
Senate, which has caused a division among family members over its fate.





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4D LAKE CITY REPORTER LIFE SUNDAY, JULY 17, 2011


Page Editor: Antonia Robinson, 754-0425