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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028308/01608
 Material Information
Title: The Lake City reporter
Uniform Title: Lake City reporter (Lake City, Fla. 1967)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: John H. Perry
Place of Publication: Lake City Fla
Publication Date: 7/14/2011
Frequency: daily (monday through friday)[<1969>-]
weekly[ former 1967-<1968>]
daily
normalized irregular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Lake City (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Columbia County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Columbia -- Lake City
Coordinates: 30.189722 x -82.639722 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 95, no. 4 (Oct. 5, 1967)-
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000358016
oclc - 33283560
notis - ABZ6316
lccn - sn 95047175
sobekcm - UF00028308_01569
System ID: UF00028308:01608
 Related Items
Preceded by: Lake City reporter and Columbia gazette

Full Text





World Cup
U.S., Japan
secure spots
in finals.


'00013 120511 ****3-DIGIT 326
LIB OF FLORIDA HISTORY
PO BOX 117007
-05 SMA UNIV OF FLORIDA
-AINESVILLE FL 32611-1943


Summer catch


CHS, Fort White
looking for
spring answers.
ts, I B


Windy test
British Open
unlike any
other major.
Sports, 6B


aRe nuty


Reporter


Thursday, July 14,2011


www.lakecityreporter.com


Vol. 137, No. 144 0 75 cents


CARC


has a

new

chief

Baughman will
replace Belle as
executive director.

By ANTONIA ROBINSON
arobinson@lakecityreporter.com
Amber Baughman has
been hired as the new exec-
utive director of CARC -
Advocates for Citizens with
Disabilities
Inc. Her
start date
is July 25.
"I'm real-
ly excited
about this
new oppor-
Baughman t with
the CARC," she said.
The former execu-
tive director, Mike Belle,
resigned from the position
June 21.
Baughman has worked
as the activities director for
the Robert H. Jenkins Jr.
Veterans Domiciliary Home
of Florida for. more than a
year and a half.
Her background includes
working as a mental health
counselor. Baughman has
previous experience work-
ing with people with dis-
BAUGHMAN continued on 3A


Helping

clubs,

brick by

brick

By LEANNE TYO
Ityo@lakecityreporter.com
Memorialize yourself.
The Woman's Club of
Lake City and the Lake City
Garden Club are offering
community members the
chance to forever be a part
of their Club House's new
facade through their Buy
a Brick Program, allow-
ing people to purchase an
engravable brick for either
the building's new front
porch or new sidewalk.
Money raised from the
brick purchases will be put
toward the Club House's
exterior renovation.
"The bricks are to
pay that bill," said Kay
Poltorak, Woman's Club
president.
The Club House is locat-
ed at 257 SE Hernando
Ave. Poltorak said its reno-
vation consists of a new
porch, adding a roof over
the porch, an air condition-
ing system in the kitchen,
exterior vinyl siding and
the whole exterior facelift
in general.
Other enhancements
include square columns on
either side of the porch's
stairway and a porch rail-
BRICKS continued on 3A/


Chamber marks a milestone

S.." .

',, 1'


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
More than 150 people attended the Lake City-Columbia County Chamber of Commerce's 90th anniversary
celebration Wednesday at Gulf Coast Financial in downtown Lake City.



90 years strong


By ANTONIA ROBINSON
arobinson@lakecityreporter.com
It was an evening of celebrating and
reminiscing for the Lake City-Columbia
County Chamber of Commerce.
The chamber held its 90th anniversa-
ry celebration Wednesday at Gulf Coast
Financial.
"It's an amazing accomplishment, not just


for chamber members but the community as a
whole," said Dennille Folsom, executive direc-
tor.
More than 150 people were estimated in
attendance at the event.
"We had a packed house," she said.
"Everybody enjoyed visiting with each other.
We thank everybody that came out and cel-

CHAMBER continued on 3A


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Dennille Folsom, Lake City-Columbia County Chamber of Commerce executive director, is pictured with
past president Dr. Peter Lord (left)and past executive director Ray Kirkland Wednesday while perusing the
1946-19,47 Chamber directory. The Chamber celebrated its 90th anniversary at Gulf Coast Financial.


SWAT team in action


JASON MATTHEW WALKERILake City Reporter
Columbia County Sheriff's Office SWAT team members at a residence atCamp Street and Baker Avenue,
where a multi-jurisdictional task force search warrant was executed late Wednesday afternoon. Further
details were not available at press time.


Bias


claims


may go


to court

Unadvertised school
administrative post
from 2007 is at issue.

By TONY BRITT
tbritt@lakecityreporter.com
After nearly four years, a discrimina-
tion complaint against the Columbia
County School District could be headed
to federal court.
Glynnell Presley, a retired Columbia
County educator, filed the complaint
against the school board alleging he
was not able to apply for the district's
assistant superintendent of instruction
post back in 2007 because it was not
advertised and because he is black.
Grady "Sam" Markham was superin-
tendent when the complaint was filed.
The documents were filed after Markham
hired Lex Carswell as assistant superin-
tendent for school operations, budgeting
and secondary education, following LC.
Bradley's resignation amid allegations
he forged a school district diploma and
three other documents.
On June 21 the Equal Employment
Opportunity Commission informed
Presley by letter that the agency was
not able to successfully conciliate the
charge and has ended its administra-
tive processing. Presley had agreed to
mediation but the district had not
The letter noted that the file will now
be forwarded to the U.S. Department of
Justice to determine whether the federal
government will file a suit on Presley's
behalf.
If the Department of Justice decides
not to file suit, it will issue Presley a
Notice of Right-to-Sue, which will enable
him file suit in Federal District Court
should he so choose. Presley has 90
days to file the suit after he receives
notification from the Department of
Justice.
Presley said he plans to go forward
with a lawsuit against the school dis-
trict.
"If the Justice Department refuses
to take the case, definitely, I plan to file
suit" he said. "I wish this could have
been settled through mediation because
this way it's going to be costly to the
school district"
Guy Norris, Columbia County School
Board attorney, confirmed the school
board did not agree to mediation in this
case.
The complaint was originally received
by the Equal Employment Opportunity
Commission and the Florida Commission
On Human Relations on Dec. 28, 2007.
The discrimination charges were dually
filed with the EEOC and the Florida
Commission on Human Relations
(FCHR). The EEOC handles federal
workplace discrimination allegations
while the FCHR handles discrimination
charges on the state level.
Presley's complaint alleges that on
Nov. 13, 2007, he was denied an oppor-
tunity to apply for the school district's
assistant superintendent of instruction
position because the post was not adver-
tised.
Presley said then-superintendent
Markham made a public statement that,
per the school district's manual, he was
not required to advertise for the posi-
tion.
"I believe that I was discriminated
against on the basis of my race, black, in
violation of Title VII of the Civil Rights
Act of 1964, as amended," Presley wrote.
"I also believe that black applicants, as
a class, are being discriminated against
BIAS continued on 3A


(386) 752-1293
SUBSCRIBE TO
THE REPORTER:
Voice: 755-5445
S... 1 Fax: 752-9400


93
T-Storm Chance
WEATHER, 2A


Opinion ................ 4A
People.................. 2A
Obituaries .............. 5A
Advice & Comics.......... 3B
Puzzles ................. 5B


I-r


TODAY IN
PEOPLE
Teen mornms in
juggling act.


COMING
FRIDAY
Local news
roundup.


14










LAKE CITY REPORTER DAILY BRIEFING THURSDAY, JULY 14, 2011


nH 3. Wednesday:
SAfternoon: 3-6-7
Evening: 2-5-8


y4\ Wednesday:
Afternoon: 6-4-4-7
Evening: 1-8-2-4


.Tuesday:
1-17-25-30-35


PEOPLE IN THE NEWS

Teen moms juggle toddlers, tabloid attention


NEW YORK

19-year-old Maci Bookout
"If I go grocery shop-
ping or something it's
not that bad but on the
weekends that Bentley's dad has him
and me and my friends go out... to
a club or something I can tell that
people are like watching to see'how
I'm going to act or what I'm going to
do," said Bookout, of Chattanooga,
Tenn., mother of a 2-year-old named
Bentley and one of the stars of
MTV's 'Teen Mom," a reality show
about kids with kids.
Bookout and her co-stars, Farrah
Abraham, Amber Portwood and
Catelynn Lowell, first made their TV
debut on another MTV reality show,
"16 and Pregnant" The series was so
successful that the network tapped
them to star in the 'Teen Mom"
spin-off. Nielsen reports some 3.65
million viewers tuned in to its third
season premiere on July 5.
Viewers watched Lowell and her
boyfriend Tyler grieve over the
daughter they gave up for adoption
(they maintain they made the right
decision), Abraham's ups and downs
vith her mother (one altercation
between the two led to her mom
being charged with assault) and
Bookout navigate co-parenting with
her ex-fiance Ryan.
Motherhood has made the teens
instant celebrities, with tabloids and
bloggers hot on their trail at every
change or rumor in their lives.
"Like moving or marriage or are
we pregnant again," said Abraham,
20, who has a 2-year-old daughter
named Sophia. "You know those
things, I guess, are attention-grab-
bers so it's understandable why that
would happen."

Judge grants Halle Berry
restraining order
LOS ANGELES A judge has
ordered a man arrested outside.


Maci Bookout (left) Fariah Abrahams and Catelynn Lowell of MTV's 'Teen Mom,'
pose for photos in New York, Monday. The stars of the family reality series juggle


raising toddlers with tabloid attention.
SHalle Berry's home
to stay at least 100
yards away from
Sthe Oscar-winning
actress and her
Daughter.
Los Angeles
Berry Superior Court
Judge Carol
Goodson issued the order Tuesday,
hours after police arrested Richard
Franco for climbing over a locked.
security gate at Berry's Hollywood
Hills home Monday night

, Danson joins 'CSI: Crime
Scene Investigation'
NEW YORK It's a long way
from running a bar on the sit-
com "Cheers," but this fall Ted
Danson will join the cast of "CSI:
Crime Scene Investigation," CBS
announced late Tuesday.
... Danson will play the new super-


Danson


visor for the Las
Vegas CSI team. It's
the position origi-
nally held by William
Petersen and then
filled by Laurence
Fishburne, who had
been on the show
since its 2008-09


season.

Cheney to get Louisa
Swain Award in Wyoming
JACKSON, Wyo. A Wyoming
foundation named for the woman
who was the first to vote there is
honoring Lynne Cheney, the wife of
former Vice President Dick Cheney.
Cheney is scheduled to receive
the Louisa Swain Award Wednesday
evening in Jackson. Wyoming Gov.
Matt Mead is among those expected
to attend the ceremony.
I Associated Press .


Celebrity Birthdays


M Actor Dale Robertson is 88.
E Actor Harry Dean Stanton
is 85.
0 Actress Nancy Olson is,83.
0 Actress Polly Bergen is 81.
M Former football player and
actor Rosey Grier is 79.
* Actor Vincent Pastore is
65.
* Former music company
executive Tommy Mottola is.
62.


* Actor Jerry Houser is 59.
* Actor-director Eric
Laneuville is 59.
* Actor Stan Shaw is 59.
* Country musician Ray
Herndon (McBride and the
Ride) is 51.
* Actress Jane Lynch (TV:
"Glee") is 51.
* Actor Jackie Earle Haley
is 50.
M Actor Matthew Fox is 45.


HOW TO REACH US
Main number ........(386) 752-1293
Fax number ....,.......752-9400
Circulation ...............755-5445
Online... wwW.lakecityreportercom
The Lake City Reporter, an affiliate of
Community Newspapers Inc., Is pub-
lished Tuesday through Sunday at 180
E. Duval St., Lake City, Fla. 32055.
Periodical postage paid at Lake City, Ra.
Member Audit Bureau of Circulation and
The Associated Press.
All material herein is property of the Lake
City Reporter. Reproduction in whole or
in part is forbidden without the permis-
sion of the publisher. U.S. Postal Service
No. 310-880.
POSTMASTER: Send address changes
to Lake City Reporter, RO. Box 1709,
Lake City, Fla. 32056.
PublisherTodd Wilson .....754-0418
(twilson@lakecityreporter.com)
NEWS
Editor Robert Bridges .....754-0428
(rbfidgesqlakecityreporter.com)
ADVERTISING
Director Ashley Butcher ...754-0417
(abutcher@lakecityreporter.com)
CLASSIFIED
To place a classified ad, call 755-5440


BUSINESS
Controller Sue Brannon... .754-0419
(sbrannon@lakecityreporter.com).
CIRCULATION
Home delivery of the Lake City Reporter
should be completed by 6:30 a.m.
Tuesday through Saturday, and by 730
a.m. on Sunday.
Please call 386-755-5445 to report any
problems with your delivery service.
In Columbia County, customers should
call before 10:30 a.m. to report a ser-
vice error for same day re-delivery. After
10:30 a.m., next day re-delivery or ser-
vice related credits will be issued.
In all other counties where home delivery
Is available, next day re-delivery or ser-
ice related credits will be issued.
Circulation ...............755-5445
(circulation@lakecityreporter.com)
Home delivery rates
(Tuesday through Sunday)
12 Weeks..........t.;.:.... $26:32'
24 Weeks....... ..........$48.7
52 Weeks ................ $83.46
Rates indude 7% sales tax
Mail rates
12 Weeks ................. $41.40
24 Weeks...................$82.80
52 Weeks.......... ......$179.40


CLARIFICATION
KrisAnne Hall was not "awarded" $22,000 in the settlement
of a civil lawsuit against Third Circuit State Attorney Skip
Jarvis, as stated in an article in Wednesday's paper. Rather,
the parties came upon this figure as a matter of mutual con-
sent,.in exchange for her.agreement to drop the suit.


M.D.'s ask judge to
block gun gag law
MIAMI- Organizations
represefiting thousands
of Florida doctors are ask-
ing a Miami federal judge
to block enforcement of
a first-in-the-nation law
restricting what physicians
can discuss about firearms
'with patients.
The doctors said the law
violates free speech and is
constitutionaln. The state
:contends the doctors are
.misreading the law and
that it fully complies with
Ithe Constitution.
SThe law went into effect
'June 2. Doctors said it
bans them from practicing
,preventative care regard-
ing potential hazards in the
:homes, including guns.

Police: Sitter tried
to smother baby
GAINESVILLE Police
arrested a 21-year-old
"babysitter after the infant's
mother said she came
home early and found her
-smothering the child with
a pillow.
Authorities said Tiffany
Long faces aggravated
,child abuse charges. She is
being held in the Alachua
County Jail.
Gainesville police
spokesman Mike
Schibucla said Long ran
from the home but was
,later located and arrested.
Details about the baby's
condition were not imme-
diately available. The name
of the child's mother was
not released.

New charges
in bribery scam
MIAMI U.S. pros-
ecutors said they have
filed new charges in an
investigation of an alleged
bribery scheme involving
former Haitian govern-
ment officials and Florida
telecommunications execu-
tives.


Getting it squeaky clean
Randy Spears, 37, of Bay Area Window Cleaning, washes
the windows of the Dali Museum's Glass Enigma, Tuesday in
St. Petersburg. This is the first time the windows have been
cleaned since the museum's January opening.


Prosecutors said a
Miami-Dade County com-
pany paid more than $1.4
million to shell companies
to be used for bribes to
officials at Haiti's state-
owned Haiti Teleco from
2001 through 2006.
Two former Haiti Teleco
officials, two executives
from a different Miami-
Dade telecom company
and the president of a con-
sulting firm were indicted
in the alleged scheme in
2009.

Child found dead
outside daycare'
HOMESTEAD -
Authorities are investigat-
ing the death of a young
boy found dead outside
a South Florida daycare
center.
Homestead police said
paramedics found
18-month-old Dominicue
Andrews near a van
parked at Jomiba Learning
Center around 3:30 p.m.
Tuesday. Because it was
an unexplained death,
Miami-Dade police took
over the investigation.
Officials said the boy
lived with his grandmother
and father, Rashaad
Easterly, 17. The grand-
mother said the child had


been picked up by the
daycare's van at 7:35 a.m.
Tuesday.

Milanes excited
about Miami gig
MIAMI Cuban musi-
cian Pablo Milanes chose
to play in Miami this
August because it is home
to so many Cubans and
Latin Americans..
Yet for years, that's pre-
cisely what's kept the two-
time Grammy winner from
playing there. Milanes said
Wednesday this is the first
time he's been invited to
play in Florida.
Milanes is one the most
well-known Cuban art-
ists outside the island.
He helped found the
Cuban musical movement
known as Nuevo Trova,
folk music linked to Fidel
Castro's revolution and to
protest movements across
the hemisphere.
He has criticized Cuban
policies even as he main-
tains support for the
government. Milanes said
socialism is more humane
than capitalism but that
the ways it "has been
conducted until now have
demonstrated the oppo-
site."
E Associated Press


THE WEATHER



CHANCE CHANCE CHANCE
TORMS RMS" RMS


193wLO74 1L92 LO7 1192LO 3


Tallahassee Lake
93,76 93/
Pensacola Ga
95 i8 Panama City 9
91/79.


ITYAMAN4


TEMPERATURES
High Wednesday
Low Wednesday
Normal high
Normal low
Record high
Record low

PRECIPITATION
Wednesday
Month total
Year total .
Normal month-to-date
Normal year-to-date


91
77
91
71
98 in 1946
65 in 1922

0.01",
1.99"
21.88"
2.64"
26.67"


Friday
90, 7;,'t
91:76 I
90/ 81 /p
94/77/pc
93/74/pc
92/75/t
89/81/pc
92/74/t
91/80/pc
92/77/pc
94/74/pc
94/76/t
90/78/t
92/79/t
92/75/t
92/79/t
93/74/t
90/79/pc


Saturday
88, 77,'t
89 75,. I
89/81/pc
94/75/pc
91/73/t
90/74/t
89/81/sh
92/73/t
91/80/t
92/77/pc
91/73/t
93/75/pc
92/77/t
90/79/t
94/75/t
93/78/pc
93/73/t
90/78/t


An exclusive
service
brought to
our readers
by
The Weather
Channel.



weather.com


SUN
Sunnse today
Sunset today
Sunrise tornm
Sunset tom.


6:39 a.m.
8:34 p.m.
6:39 a.m.
8:34 p.m.


MOON
Moonrisetoday 8:10 p.m.
Moonset today 5:57 a.m.
Mdonrise tom. 8:52 p.m.
Moonset tom. 6:58 a.m.

obIOI


12
EBIME
10 aes to bun
Today's
ultra-violet
radiation risk
for the area on
a scale from 0
to 10+.


July. July July Aug. Z Vj4 Forecasts, data and
1F 23 30 6Nw st graphics 2011 Weather
Full Last New First Central, LP, Madison, Ws.
weatfieJ www.weatherpubltsher.com


On this date in
1934, New Mexico
set it's all time
record high tempera-
ture with a reading
of 116 degrees at
Oragrande.


g e t '
E-edition Online Access


FREE

Call for login information,


Daily Scripture
"Therefore God exalted him to
the highest place and gave him
the name that is above every
name."
Philippians 2:9

Thought for Today
"The willing contemplation of
vice is vice"
Arabic proverb

Lake City Reporter


-'AROUND FLORIDA


City
Jacklnvle Cape Canaveral
City, '94/75 Daytona Beach
S7Ft. Lauderdale
inesvile Datna ach Fort Myers
'2/74 976 ainesville
7 Ocala Jacksonville
93'74 0 f
Key West
Orand CapCanaveral Key West
94/76 /V76 Lae iy
; Miami
Tampa Naples
91/78 West Palm Bach Ocala
90/78 Orlando
FtLIauderlal 'Panama City
94/76 e Naples Tallahassee
90/76 Mmii Tampa
KeWest Y 99/79 Valdosta
Wes892 /" W. Palm Beach
89/82


:-- : ~ -


V IlNDEX


o.. 1 [" . .. .. WH OM.. .


Page Editor: Jason M. Walker, 754-0430


LWEAHERRY.-HI-OUR -a


'''









LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL NEWS THURSDAY, JULY 14, 2011


BAUGHMAN: Starts July 25
Continued From Page 1A

abilities.
"(The new position) gives me the opportunity to put my
passion and degree to work,'2 she said.
Her qualifications and background made Baughman a
good fit for the organization, said Herb McClelland, CARC
Board- of Directors president
"We've very excited about her coming on board," he
said.
CARC wants to move forward to bigger things with
Baughman at the helm, McClelland said.
"She's very excited and we're excited about her," he
said.
Baughman said she wants to use her rapport with the
residents at the domiciliary to start a program in which
they volunteer at CARC.
"I'm deeply going to miss my residents at the domicili-
ary," she said. 'The volunteer program is the perfect way
to (promote both groups)."
Promoting community involvement and support for the
CARC is one of her goals, Baughman said. She also wants
to increase awareness about the organization in the com-
munity.
"I know a lot of people have heard of the CARC, but they
may not know exactly what it does for people with dis-
abilities," she said. "I want to promote the CARC to bring
more awareness."
Baughman was hired July 8.


Lions install

new officers
Lake City lions Club held their installa-
tion of officers on June 28 at the Country
Club at Lake City. One hundred percent
of the money raised by The Lake City
lions Club is donated to the various pro-
grams and charities that they support
The Lake City lions club has contrib-
uted over $7,000 in 2011 to sight assis-
tance for 66 Columbia County Residents,
Columbia County School Vision Program,
The Christmas Dream Machine and other
Columbia County Charities. Additionally,
The Lake City lions Club created $25,000
scholarship endowment for sight impaired
students at The Florida Gateway College.


COURTESY PHOTO
New Lake City Lions Club officers are, from left: Claude Ste. Marie, George
Anderson, Dan Adel, Norbie Ronsonet, Wade Reynolds, Trevor Bradbourne, Joe
Drummond, Charles Snipes, Incoming President George Revoir, Ron Foreman,
Outgoing President Gary Laxton, Jim Burke and Tim Carson.


BIAS: Suit may be filed over unadvertised school job
Continued From Page 1A


because of (the) policy,
not to advertise open posi-
tions."
Norris said the school
board had done nothing
wrong.
"We deny any wrong-


doing," he said. "It's a
pending matter, so we
won't comment in any
great deal about the
matter."
While. the complaint
was originally filed in


2007, Presley said he is
not worried about how
long it's taking the case
to proceed.
"We've dealt with the
EEOC before and these
types of things take time,"


he said. "They don't rush
through them. It's not a
hurry-up thing as far as
I'm concerned, however.
Justice delayed is justice
denied."


CHAMBER: Celebrates 90th anniversaryWednesday at Gulf Coast Financial
Continued From Page 1A


ebrated."
Gulf Coast Financial
holds historical signifi-
cance for the Chamber.
The Chamber was ini-
tially formed at the State
Exchange Bank build-
ing, which is now Gulf
Coast Financial.
"What is so fantastic
about it is this is where
the first meeting was held


ing' with concrete balus-
trades.
"The whole building is
now going to take on more
of the characteristics of
some of the houses in the
neighborhood," Poltorak
said.
The two clubs are host-
ing the brick fundraiser
for the Club House's reno-
vation to help preserve the


90 years ago," said Bill
Haley, Chamber presi-
dent.
It was wonderful to see
so many people attending
the celebration, he said.
"This was very excit-
ing," Haley said.
Various Chamber mem-
bers were called on the
help provide services for
the event, said Melanie


building for the communi-
ty's use, Poltorak said.
She-noted that it's often
been used for signifi-'
cant events like wedding
receptions or proms. In
the past, it served as the
community's first library
-and was used for United
Service Organizations
dances during the war,
Poltorak said.


Cosentino, Gulf Coast
Financial marketing and
business development.
Gulf Coast was really
happy to sponsor the
event.
The Chamber offers a
central place for business-
es to gain more education
and find out information
on enhancing their prod-
ucts and services, she


"It's in the center of
town and it's an essential
part of the history of the
city," she said.
Bricks to be placed on
the new front porch can
be purchased for $50 and
bricks for the new front
porch sidewalk cost $100.
"Those (sidewalk
bricks) will be the first
thing you see as soon as


said.
"Under Dennille,
they're doing really great
things," Cosentino said.
The Lake City-
Columbia County
Chamber is one of the
oldest in the state, said
Jim Poole, former execu-
tive director.
"It's been very fortu-
nate to continue oper-


you step out of your car,"
Poltorak said. "The last
bricks you see before you
enter the building will be
the $50 bricks that will be
laid onto the porch itself."
.For brick order forms,
call the Club House by at
(386) 755-0347 or Marilyn
Ham at (386) 752-4688.
Order forms are due by
August 1.


ating," he said. "It's
changed a lot from the
early days."
Folsom said the
Chamber is referring to
the milestone as the first
90 years.
"We're looking forward
to 90 more," she said.
"This is the beginning of
a long and prosperous
future.


Buying a brick will make
the purchaser's name a
part of the building for
years to come, Poltorak
said.
"Particularly if you're a
native of this area, it's sort
of that piece that stays
here forever," she said.
"You're a part of keeping
that authenticity of that
era anl that building."


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BRICKS: Helping Lake City Woman's Club, Garden Club
Continued From Page 1A


Page Editor: Robert Bridges, 754-0428


/.


N I


rto
r~pan,













OPINION


Thursday, July 14, 2011


ANI


A N
OPINION


The


test for

teachers

School's out for the
summer, but school
reform is suddenly
heating up like a
Georgia peanut farm
in July.
A scorching July 5 report
released by Georgia Gov.
Nathan Deal revealed that
almost 80 percent of Atlanta's
elementary and middle schools
showed signs of cheating by
teachers on statewide-man-
dated performance tests,
called the Criterion-Referenced
Competency Tests. Teachers
have admitted to changing test
papers to improve scores in
their schools. At least six top
educators in the Atlanta system
have been asked to step down
by interim school superinten-
dent Erroll Davis.
Scandals involving students
who cheat, while always seri-
ous, are nothing new. But wide-
spread cheating by those hired
to teach children represents a
different, and equally disturb-
ing, development
In 2002, the federal No Child
Left Behind Act launched a
trend toward greater account-
ability in education, increas-
ing the importance placed on
standardized tests as a way to
benchmark success.
Now it appears that the
demands to see test scores rise
are giving way to a temptation
to cheat
Teachers.can often earn
bonuses for showing improve-
ment on tests by their students.
At the same time, they may
fear sometimes with good
cause that their jobs will be
at stake if their students don't,
test better. They also may feel
pressure not to let down fellow
teachers and administrators.
Unfortunately, Atlanta is
not facing this problem alone.
Reports of other instances of
cheating continue to be heard
around the United States. In
Massachusetts, for example,
education officials had to invali-
date 74 math exams taken at an
elementary school in Somerset
'ast year because they showed
a "disturbing pattern" of stu-
dlent answers, indicating teach-
er tampering.

N Christian Science Monitor

Lake City Reporter
Serving Columbia County
Since 1874
The Lake City Reporter is pub-
lished with pride for residents of
Columbia and surrounding counties by
Community Newspapers Inc.
We believe strong newspapers build
strong communities -"Newspapers
.get things done!"
Our primary goal is to
publish distinguished and profitable
community-oriented newspapers.
This mission will be accomplished
through the teamwork of professionals
dedicated to truth, integrity and hard
work.
Todd Wilson, publisher
Robert Bridges, editor
Sue Brannon, controller
Dink NeSmith, president
Tom Wood, chairman

LETTERS
POLICY
Letters to the Editor should be
typed or neatly written and double
spaced. Letters should not exceed
400 words and will be edited for
length and libel. Letters must be
signed and include the writer's name,
address and telephone number for
verification. Writers can have two
letters per month published. Letters
and guest columns are the opinion of
the writers and not necessarily that of
the Lake City Reporter.
BY MAIL: Letters, P.O. Box 1709,


Lake City, FL 32056; or drop off at
180 E. Duval St. downtown.
BY FAX: (386) 752-9400.
BY E-MAIL:
news@lakecityreporter.com


To the Editor:
Lake City, as much as
any community in Florida,
knows the crucial role
our Forestry Firefighters
play in keeping our com-
munities safe. Three
weeks ago, the Lake City
Community mourned the
loss of Forestry Rangers
Josh Burch and Brett
Fulton. As I met with
the friends and families
of Josh and Brett, I was
touched by the outpour-
ing of community support


www.lakecityreporter.com


Obama treating




treaties badly


president, right? You
still think Barack
Obama, if not exactly
the saint you once
venerated, is way ahead of the
Republicans, which is to say,
you have missed the kiss-the-
unions joke of tying highly
needed trade treaties to a job-
training boondoggle.
Consider, first off, that the
Obama administration has
sat oh these treaties'for two
years, tinkering with them
while saying, yawn, there's no
hurry and only lately seeming
to get it that, wow, they will
bring $13 billion in exports and
250,000 jobs to this beleaguered
economy..
A special nudge to reality
came in a report that
unemployment is up to 9.2
percent Not only is this a
terrible tragedy for millions of
families, it could also have dire
consequences for Obama and
friends in the 2012 elections.
So, says an awakened Obama
to Congress, pass these treaties
with Columbia, South Korea
and Panama.and pass them now.
There was little need for urging.
Both parties are more than
ready to go.
SBut Obama is up to
something else. He is not
going to send the treaties over
for ratification until Congress
first renews Trade Adjustment
Assistance, and some
Republicans have said wait a
second, we want to consider
that program separately.
Obama replied there they go
again, trying to halt economic
progress.
The purpose of this training
program is to help people who
lose their jobs because of trade


LETTERS


Jay Ambrose
SpeaktoJay@ool.com
(as opposed to new technology,
unsupportable union demands
and other reasons), and
maybe you love that idea. You
shouldn't Costing a billion
dollars a year, the program adds
to spending that must go down
- and it doesn't work.
How do we know? One
way is to read a Wall Street
Journal story that tells how the
slumping venture was revamped
in 2002 with the understanding
that a comprehensive study
would demonstrate new vivacity.
The study was due four years
ago, but incredibly doesn't exist
My theory is that department
probers, who have in factbeen
tracking outcomes at a cost to
date of $8.9 million, found it as
disappointing as ever,and their
bosses have not come up with
a way to make the numbers say
what they don't say. Call me
cynical, but as a Cato Institute
study showed, much of the
history of failed job-training
programs has been to marry
them off to "statistical shams."
Why, then, would we get such
a move by Obama? Because it
is also crucial to him to please
unions. They hate trade, which
can hurt some businesses even
as it boosts many more, spurs
entrepreneurship and saves the
average consumer thousands a
year.
According to the Wall Street


Journal, half those who get the
training are union members
while just a third of those
eligible are in unions. The
jobless not in the program
are limited to 99 weeks of
unemployment benefits. Those
in it get as much as 156 weeks.
But if jobs are what you want,
you ought to visit analyses
showing the president is
scaring businesses away from
expansion with regulatory
overkill, EPA's energy-
diminishing phantom chasing,
the Obama-snare health plan
and a berserk National Labor
Relations Board now headed by
a wild-eyed radical.
None of that produces jobs,
and neither will imperiling the
economy with too much federal
debt Although Obama now says
he will go along with genuine
austerity goals if he can get
recession-reviving tax hikes,
he has lately been pushing for
an unaffordable high-speed rail
system. It would come on top
of such other inanities as an
original budget this year that
hiked the debt over the next
decade by $10 trillion, enough
money to reach to the moon
and back and then halfway up
again if stacked as $1 bills. Do
they make debt ceilings that
high?
Obama finally seemed to be
coming through on trade, but
not really, not when he insisted
on linking the vote to the job-
training con. I hope the public is
paying attention.

* Jay Ambrose, formerly
Washington director of editorial
policy for Scripps Howard news-
papers and the editor of dailies in
El Paso, Texas, and Denver, is a
columnist living in Colorado.


TO THE EDITOR


you showed. Many people
turned out to honor Josh
and Brett, some took time
to prepare a meal, some
took time to console and
comfort the families, and
some even stood in the hot
sun in a patriotic salute as
Josh and Brett were being
interred.
While only a short time
has passed since this
incredible tragedy struck
your commumty and
our collective hearts, my
solemn prayer that is we
never forget the sacrifice


of these two young men,
and the love and support
the families should forever
receive.
For your thoughtful
expressions to the families
of Josh and Brett I simply
say Thank You. Thank you
for supporting your Forestry
staff and for your faithful
service to honor these two
outstanding heroes.
Sincerely,
Adam H. Putnam
Commissioner
of Agriculture


4A


Reg Henry
rhenry@post-gozette.cpm


Pledging

fealty to

Norquist

B eware of making
too many prom-
ises that is
my advice to you
today.
That advice comes a little
late for the promise-promiscu-
ous Republicans in Congress,
who are currently negotiating
with Democrats on extend-
ing the debt ceiling so that
American exceptionalism does
not turn out to mean excep-
tionally broke bums whose
word of honor means nothing.
When I say negotiating, I
don't mean actually indulg-
ing in' give and take, but just
putting on a bit of a show,
foolishly dancing around the
economic, abyss, Kabuki the-
ater, American style, only with
untalented actors.
The Democrats are not guilt-
less in the continuing farce, of
course, because their first love
is spending. But at least they
have not plighted their troth
to their money-mad mistress.
They can, if they choose, be
flexible.
The same cannot be said of
the Republicans, who come to
the table promised to another.
They have taken someone
called Grover Norquist for
their awfully wedded wife -
strictly for political purposes,
of course promising to love,
honor and obey his pledge of
no new taxes.
Nearly all the Republicans
in Congress have signed this
pledge, making compromise
on this issue unlikely if not
impossible.
Just about everybody sane
realizes that a fair deal on
the debt ceiling will require a
mixture of spending cuts and
new revenue, i.e., taxes the
despised word of the hour. But
sanity has nothing to do with
it Nor does respect for our
system of government
Republicans make a great
show of venerating the wis-
dom of the Founding Fathers,
but the system so wisely
bequeathed to us demands
compromise otherwise
deadlock is certain, and soon
enough disaster.
With.a debt default deadline
of Aug. 2, disaster beckons,
thanks to the fealty promised
to Mr. Norquist, the founder
and president of Americans for
Tax Reform, who once famous-
ly said: "I don't want to abolish
government I simply want to
reduce it to the size where I
can drag it into the bathroom
and drown it in the bathtub."
With the vast majority of
congressional Republicans
pledged to do the plumbing
work, good luck finding your
Medicare and Social Security
in the bathtub now being
installed. They'll be going
down the drain.
In playing chicken with
national economic disaster
perhaps world disaster,
because if little bankrupt
Greece can threaten interna-
tional markets, so can America
the Republican anti-tax
promise-keepers have forgot-
ten their other promise.
That would be their congres-
sional oath of office, which
includes that old-fashioned
stuff about bearing true
faith and allegiance to the
Constitution and well and faith-
fully discharging the duties of
the office all of which will
be proved idle promises if the
nation defaults for want of a
way to pay its debts.

U Reg Henry is a columnist for
the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette.


Thanks for honoring


two local heroes










LAKE CITY REPORTER NEWS THURSDAY, JULY 14, 2011


Citizens Insurance

to be privatized?


ASSOCIATED PRESS
In this March 28 file photo, Florida Gov. Rick Scott speaks at
a news conference in Tallahassee.


BRENT KALLESTAD,
Associated Press

TALLAHASSEE Gov.
RickScottquicklyembraced
a suggestion Wednesday
by the board chairman of
the state-backed 'Citizens
Property Insurance Corp.
to consider privatizing
Florida's largest insurer of
business and homes. .
Citizens has roughly 1.4
million policies in force and
is growing by more than
5,000 new policies each
week. But their rates have
remained below what many
feel are realistically sound
levels. Florida citizens
would be liable to make
up losses if the company
became insolvent after a,
major hurricane or a series
of destructive storms.
If privatizing Citizens
would help drive down the
cost of insurance, Scott.said
Wednesday, "I want to look
at it very closely."
Naples entrepreneur Jim
Malone, who was chosen
three years ago to chair the
board overseeing Citizens'
operations, told the insurers'
board of directors on a con-
ference call that selling all or
part of Citizens might be the



OBITUARIES

Kelton Ficklin, Sr.
Mr. Kelton Ficklin, Sr., 69, resi-
dent of Lake City, Florida passed
away July 9, 2011 at Haven
Hospice Cen-
ter, Lake City. .
Mr. Ficklin,
affectionately
known as
"Tommy" and
"Dick" was a
native of Ches-
ter, Georgia.
Survivors include his loving
wife, Joyce Ficklin; sons, Kelton
(Lena) Ficklin, Jr., Lake City, FL.,
& Fenton, LA; Cosmos Ficklin,
Tallahassee, FL., Darron (Tasha)
Kennedy, Lake City, FL., Tim
(Tracy) Kennedy, Omaha, NE,
Roosevelt (Donna) Lake, Lake
City, FL, Derrick (Tiffanie) Ken-
nedy, Jacksonville, FL; daughter,
Amanda Luke, Lake City, FL;
brother, Charles Ficklin, Chester,
GA; sisters, Effie King, Philadel-
phia, PN, Stella Walker, Chester,
GA, Nellie Bracewell, Irvin, NY,
Ida Tinsley, Chester, GA; mother-
in-law, Lewifinie Williams, Ob-
rien, FL; brothers-in-law, Michael
(Debbie) Williams, Jacksonville,
FL, James (Wendy) Williams,
Daytona Beach, FL; sister-in-law,
Beverly (Tim) Jones,. Hinesville,
GA, 17 grandchildren, 5 great-
grandchildren; hosts of nieces,
nephews, and friends; goddaugh-
ter, Judith "Judy" Pierce; special.
friends, Willie Charles (Helen)
Jackson, Bellville, GA., Johnny
Epps, Sanderson, FL, Theo-
dore "Sonny" Merrick, Lake
City, FL, Ike (Mamie) Gregory,
Lucious (Janie)Washington,
Gary "Buster" Carter, Arnold
"Gib" Gibson, Harry Paul Lee.
Funeral services for Mr. Kelton
Ficklin, Sr. will be held 11:00
A.M. Saturday, July 16, 2011
at New Bethel Missionary Bap-
tist Church, 550 NE Martin Lu-
ther King Street, Lake City, FL.
The family will receive friends
Friday, July 15, 2011 from 6:00
- 8:00 P.M. at Philadelphia
Missionary Baptist Church.
Highway 242, Lake. City, FL.
Arrangements entrusted to
COMBS FUNERAL HOME.
292 NE Washington Street.
Lake City, FL. (386) 752-4366.
Marq Combs-Turner, L.F.D.
"The Caring Professionals"

Obituaries are paid advertise-
ments. For details, call the Lake
City Reporter's classified depart-
ment at 752-1293.


best option for all parties.
"My experience would
say that any organization
that has 1,400,000 custom-
ers, that has a premium
revenue stream of close to
$3 billion a year and a nice
chunk of liquidity sitting on
its balance sheet potentially
has some value to the pri-
vate world," Malone said.
"We owe it to the state to
see if its a viable option."
Malone's suggestion also
drew initial support from
a key legislator, Senate
Banking and Insurance
Committee chairman
Garrett Richter of Naples,
who said Wednesday he
agrees that Citizens would
be a good target for a pri-
vate entity because of its
existing book of business.
It would also relieve the
state of a giant liability.
"One would think a com-
pany that is growing and
has that many policyhold-
ers, would be attractive
to somebody to come in
and take it over, but you'd
have to be able to charge-
an actuarially sound pre-
mium," Richter said. "It's
been my objective and
desire to return Citizens to
the insurer of last resort."


Pablo Milanes looks


forward to first Miami gig


LAURA WIDES-MUNOZ,
Associated Press

MIAMI Cuban musician Pablo Milanes says he
chose to play in Miami this summer for the first time
because it is home to so many Cubans and Latin
Americans. Yet for years, he had stayed away from the
city for precisely the same reason.
Miami is a hub for exiles critical of Cuban artists who
receive the backing of their government as Milanes
has, because money from their tours goes to support
the Cuban government's coffers, and because the gov-
ernment exerts strict control over who is allowed to
perform outside the island.
He has performed many times in the U.S. during his
5-decade career but never in Florida.
While Milanes acknowledged plenty of folks in Miami
might still oppose his performance on Aug. 27, he
believes times are changing.
"Many have also demonstrated that they want to
hear Cuban artists, just as we want the exchange with
Cuban artists there," he told The Associated Press from
Madrid, where he is currently touring.
Milanes said he was invited to play anywhere in
Florida, but he chose Miami.
"I thought it would be more interesting," he said. "It's
the first time I go. I really don't have any idea what going
to happen."
Milanes' Miami concert is part of a larger U.S. tour
beginning in Washington on Aug. 25. Other stops are
Puerto Rico, New York and San Francisco.
In April, a South Florida concert featuring Cuban


performers was canceled following complaints by Cuban
exiles, but Milanes said he was not worried.
Milanes is one of the founders of the Cuban musical
movement known as Nuevo Trova, a folk music that
came of age in the late 1960s and 1970s that is linked to
Fidel Castro's Cuban revolution and protest movements
across Latin America. He has recorded dozens of albums
and counts millions of fans across the globe, making him
one of Cuba's most famous musicians abroad.
The two-time Grammy winner has often criticized
Cuban policies even as he maintains support for the
1959 revolution and the island's government He reiter-
ated Wednesday that Cubans' freedom of expression is
limited and that he believes public criticism of the politi-
cal system should be encouraged, not stifled, in order to
improve it.
Milanes also acknowledged that other Cuban artists
self-censor for fear of reprisal from the government,
although he said he has never done so.
Milanes said he continues to believe socialism is a
more humane and just system than capitalism.
"However, the defects of socialism as it has been
conducted until now have demonstrated the opposite,"
he said.
Asked what inspires his music these days, the 68-year-
old Milanes was blase.
"Over the years, inspiration becomes linked to the job,
and when one can balance the muse, the spiritual and
the work, the job becomes much easier," he said.
What does still inspire Milanes is his audience.
'To interact with an audience is the maximum," he
said. "That is my dream, to never stop performing."


Oil up as supplies drop, Bernanke talks stimulus


By CHRIS KAHN
Associated Press

NEW YORK An unex-
pected drop in U.S. crude
supplies boosted oil prices
Wednesday, and more gov-
ernment stimulus spend-
ing could help push oil
even higher this year.
Benchmark West Texas
Intermediate crude for
August delivery rose 62
cents to settle at $98.05 per
barrel on the New York
Mercantile Exchange. WTI
got as high as $99.21 before
easing back. Brent crude,
which is used to price
many foreign oil varieties,
gained 91 cents to settle at
$117.85 per barrel on the
ICE Futures exchange in
London.


Retail gasoline pric-
es rose a penny on
Wednesday to a national
average of $3.645 per gal-
lon.
Oil jumped after the
Energy Information
Administration said that
the nation's crude sup-
plies fell by 3.1 million
barrels last week, a mil-
lion barrels more than the
decline that analysts fore-
cast in a survey by Platts,
the energy-information
arm of McGraw Hill Cos.
The drop was due in large
part to lower imports of
foreign oil. The EIA also
said that oil and gasoline
demand fell.
The price of oil got an
extra boost from Federal
Reserve Chairman


Ben Bernanke, who said
Wednesday that the central
bank is looking for ways
to reinvigorate the slug-
gish American economy.
Bernanke said in his semi-
annual report to Congress
that the Fed is consider-


ing a few options, including
another round of Treasury
bond buying.
While that would drive
down long-term interest
rates, it also could weak-
en the dollar and drive up
energy costs.


- -


- .. .......7 dP I --- ,,,- `
Reader's Choice


CUTEST BABY



CONTEST
1"s,2" & 3RD Place Prizes to be Awarded for Boys & Girls!

AGES 0-24 MONTHS
Send in the most adorable photograph of your child,
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TO ENTER:
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WANT TO ENTER ONULNE?
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DEADLINE:
July 14th, 2011

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Page Editor: Amber Hamilton, 754-0424


I









LAKE CITY REPORTER STATE THURSDAY, JULY 14, 2011


Scott keeps promises, loses popularity


BRENDAN FARRINGTON
Associated Press

TALLAHASSEE In
office just six months,
Gov. Rick Scott has kept
his campaign promises and
then some: cutting corpo-
rate taxes, reducing the
size of government, drug
testing welfare recipients,
making government work-
ers pay into their pensions,
and privatizing Medicaid.
Yet the conservative
Republican is one of the
country's least popular gov-
ernors, with only 29 per-
cent of voters saying in one
recent nonpartisan poll that
he's doing a good job.
It's a woefully low job
performance rating for
a governor in office less
than a year, much less a
Republican governor in
charge of a swing-voting
state that will be critical to
President Barack Obama's
re-election chances.
It could be that voters
didn't consider the details
of how Scott 'would follow
through on his promises.
There also are new anti-
abortion rights and pro-
gun laws that weren't part


of the campaign message
and that may be turning
off Democrats and some
independents. Or maybe
his opponents are doing a
better job of defining Scott
than Scott is defining him-
self.
"What I ran on is what
I personally believe, and
that's what I'm going to
do. People think that being
governor is a popularity
contest. No. Your job is to
be the governor," Scott told
The Associated Press in a
recent interview, insisting
that polls don't matter and
arguing that he is think-
ing about the future rather
than trying to please people
now.
He insisted that he's
working, to -improve the
state's economy and cre-
ate jobs by making Florida
more business friendly and
streamlining government,
and said: "If you look at all
things that we did ... it's
going to be the things that
pay.off long term."
Others have a different
view.
"He's governing very far
to the right, and that's alien-
ating everyone who's not


very far to the right," says
state Sen. Paula Dockery, a
Republican who argues that
the poll numbers reflect
as much. She argues that
he's not kept his biggest
promise: "The one and only
reason that they voted for
him and the one and only
reason that he said he was
running was to create jobs
and I don't think people see
those jobs yet."
Scott, a leading oppo-
nent of Obama's health
care plan and a chief
executive Columbia/HCA
in the 1990s, narrowly beat
DeAiocrat Alex Sink last fall
by presenting himself as
a "conservative outsider,"
highlighting his credentials
as a successful business-
man, and tapping into voter
anger at the Obama-led
federal government. The
victory kept an important
state in Republican hands.
His campaign mantras
were "Let's get to work!"
and "jobs, jobs, jobs."
Yet, since Scott's been in
office, he's been criticized
more for the jobs that have
been lost than for jobs that
have been created on his
watch.


About 1,700 layoff
notices have gone out to
state workers with more
than 2,500 still expected.
Education cuts mean
teachers and other school
employees will lose jobs
across the state. That,
along with his decision
to reject $2.4 billion in
federal money for a
high-speed rail project that
supporters say would
have created 24,000 jobs,,
has allowed Democrats to
label him as a job-killing
governor.
Florida has had job;
growth each month Scott'fs
been in office. But many
plans to expand or move
businesses to the state were
already in motion before he;
became governor.
That hasn't stopped Scott,
from trying to promote:
his jobs record; he's told
voters about his efforts,
on jobs -- he's -gone,
on two trade missions
and says he cold-calls:
companies to encour-
age them to move to
Florida through
automated phone calls paid
for by the state Republican
Party.


Florida Gov. Rick Scott speaks in Fort Lauderdale on May 18.
In office just six months, Scott has kept his campaign promis-
es: cutting corporate taxes, reducing the size of government,
drug testing welfare recipients, making government workers
pay into their pensions,.and privatizing Medicaid.



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STATE OF FLORIDA DEPARTMENT OF ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION

NOTICE OF CONSENT ORDER


The Department of Environmental Protection ("Department") gives notice of agency action of entering into a
Consent Order (OGC File No.: 11-0808) with City of Lake City pursuant to section 120.57(4), Florida Statutes. The
Consent Order addresses activities necessary to achieve compliance with the requirements of Chapter 62-640, Florida
Administrative Code (F.A.C.), for the City of Lake City's Branford Road Biosolids land application site located at the
intersection ( S.W. State Road 247 and County Road 242, Lake City, Florida 32055, in Columbia County. The Consent
Order is available forpublic inspection during normal business hours, 800 a.m. to 5:00 p.m., Monday through Friday,
except legal holidays, at the Department of Environmental Protection, Northeast District Office,7825 Baymeadows
Way, Suite B200, Jacksonville, Florida 32256. .
Persons who are not parties to this Consent Order, but whose substantial interests are affected by it, have a
right to petition for an administrative hearing under sections 120.569 and 120.57, Florida Statutes. Because the
administrative hearing process is designed to formulate final agency action, the filing of a petition concerning this.
Consent Order means that the Department's final action may be different from the position it has taken in the Consent
Order.
The petition for administrative hearing must contain all of the following information:
a) The OGC Number assigned to this Consent Order;

b) The name, address, and telephone number of each petitioner; the name, address, and telephone number
of the petitioner's representative, if any, which shall be the address for service purposes during the course
of the proceeding;

c) An explanation of how the petitioner's substantial interests will be affected by the Consent Order;

d) A statement of when and how the petitioner received notice of the Consent Order;

e) Either a statement of all material facts disputed by the petitioner or a statement that the petitioner does
not dispute any material facts;

f) A statement of the specific facts the petitioner contends warrant reversal or modification of the Consent
Order;

g) A statement of the rules or statutes the petitioner contends require reversal or modification of the Consent
Order; and

h) A statement of the relief sought by the petitioner, stating precisely the action petitioner wishes the
Department to take with respect to the Consent Order.



The petition must be filed (received) at the Department's Office of General Counsel, 3900 Commonwealth
Boulevard, MS# 35, Tallahassee, Florida 32399-3000 within 21 days of receipt of this notice. A copy of the petition must
also be mailed at the time of filing to the Department's Northeast District Office at 7825 Baymeadows Way, Suite B200,
Jacksonville, Florida 32256. Failure to file a petition within the 21-day period constitutes a person's waiver of the right
to request an administrative hearing and to participate as a party to this proceeding under sections 120.569 and 120.57,
Florida Statutes. Before the deadline for filing a petition, a person whose substantial interests are affected by this
Consent Order may choose to pursue mediation as an alternative remedy under section 120.573, Florida Statutes.
Choosing mediation will not adversely affect such person's right to request an administrative hearing if mediation
does not result in a settlement. Additional information about mediation is provided in section 120.573, Florida Statutes
and Rule 62-110.106(12), Florida Adrtinistrative Code.



AUDREY E SIKES
City Clerk


.......;~ ,~s~


Page Editor: Amber Hamilton, 754-0424









LAKE CITY REPORTER HEALTH THURSDAY, JULY 14, 2011


Taking the sting out of sunburn


Headache
remedies might
be place to start.

By LAURAN NEERGAARD
AP Medical Writer

WASHINGTON If
you've hit the beach,
chances are you've expe-
rienced an unfortunate
rite of summer: The sun-
burn. Skin so swollen it
hurts to bend. The heat
that rises from reddened
shoulders. The "ow, ow,
ow" from the shower
after you'd thought the
pain had faded.
For all the creams
that promise to soothe,
there aren't super treat-
ments for a sunburn.
Dermatologists say the
best bet: Some of the
same pills you pop for a
headache like the ibu-
profen found in Motrin
and Advil, or naproxen
brands such as Aleve.
If that sounds too sim-
ple, well, scientists don't
know exactly what causes
this kind of touch-sensi-
tive pain. But research
is getting them closer.to-
some answers.
British scientists found.
a clue in some healthy
people who volunteered
to be sunburned: for
science. Don't worry
they controlled the
beams of ultraviolet light
so that only a small patch
of the volunteers' arms
got a medium burn, just
enough for a unique kind
of testing.
One reason sunburns
are so common is that
by the time you see pink
and head indoors, more
damage already is brew-
ing. Unlike an immediate
burn from, say, touching
a hot stove, a sunburn's
pain is delayed as the red
darkens over the next 24
to 48 hours.
Researchers froni
Kings College .London
tracked how their vol-
unteers' sunburned skin
became more sensitive.
At the peak of pain, they
cut away a small bit of
damaged skin to ana-
lyze all the biochemical
changes inside and
found a protein that's
responsible for trigger-
ing the cascade of pain
and redness.
The protein summons
inflammation-causing
immune cells to the dam-
aged spot as sunburned
skin cells die off. Its
activity increased more
than did other pain-
related chemicals as the
sunburn worsened, the
researchers reported last
week the journal Science
Translational Medicine.
It took further experi-
ments with rats to show
the molecule, named
CXCL5, was a key cul-
prit. Most intriguing,
injecting rats' sunburned
feet with a substance that
tamped down the pro-
tein also tamped down
the pain, a finding that
might lead to new medi-
cations. The researchers
will next study whether
the protein plays a role in
more long-lasting types
of pain.
What about today's
sunburns? About a third
of adults get one each
year, and two-thirds of
them have more than one,
according to the Centers
for Disease Control and
Prevention. That's a big-
ger problem than pain
- sunburns are believed
to increase risk of the
most serious type of skin
cancer, melanoma. There
aren't good figures on
how often children get
sunburned, but their ten-


der skin can burn espe-
cially easily.
While water and
sand reflect UV rays to
increase exposure, it's
not just the beachgoer
who's at risk. A sunburn
Can sneak up on anyone,
from the kids playing T-


ASSOCIATED PRESS
In this May 27file photb,, people sit in the sun on Jenkin's Beach in Point Pleasant Beach, N.J. If you've hit the beach, chances are you've experienced an
unfortunate rite of summer: The sunburn. Skin so swollen it hurts to bend. The heat that rises from reddened shoulders. The "ow, ow, ow" from the shower
after you'd thought the pain had faded. For all the creams that promise-to soothe, there aren't super treatments for a sunburn. Dermatologists say the best
bet: Some of the same pills you pop for a headache like the ibuprofen found in Motrin and Advil, or Aleve and other brands of naproxen.


ball and their watching
families to the afternoon
gardener.
First-degree sunburns
tend to peel in a few
days. But more severe
second-degree burns can
blister and even require
a doctor's care, espe-
cially if they cover large
areas or come with fever
and chills, says Dr. Roger
Ceilley of the American
Academy of Dermatology
and the University of
Iowa. A bad burn hinders
howv well youri-'bbdy 'cools
itself, so it's important
to cool down and keep
hydrated.
To self-treat the pain,
take ibuprofen or similar
over-the-counter painkill-
ers known as NSAIDs
within ,a few hours of
reddening skin, Ceilley
advises. Those pills fight
various kinds of inflam-
mation. While they may
not directly block the
pain-causing protein the
British researchers dis-
covered, they do act on
related pain chemicals, he
notes.
But don't use those
pills before going in the,
sun; they're among a
host of medicines that
can make your skin more
sun-sensitive.
Cool compresses can
soothe, and some patients
find relief from aloe. But
"you don't want to put a
lot of heavy ointments
on," Ceilley cautions.
They can trap in heat.
At Wake Forest
University, dermatol-
ogy professor Dr. Steven
Feldman also advises
anesthetic sprays to
numb the area, and for
more serious burns a
hydrocortisone cream.
But more important,
"Don't get a sunburn,"
Feldman stresses. The
advice:
-Stay out of direct sun
when it's most intense,
between 10 a.m. and 4
p.m.


-When you are out,
wear sun-protective
clothing and seek shade
such as beach umbrellas.
Feldman likes to tell of
the dermatologists' con-
vention in Hawaii where
beachgoers wore long-
sleeved swim cover-ups
and big hats.
-Don't forget the sun-
screen, especially on the
face, hands and arms that
are exposed to sun just
about every day,
Sunscreen isn't a sub-
stitute for the first two
tips,. Feldman warns,
because it doesn't guar-
antee protection if you
stay out too long, use too
little or miss a spot.
Still, picking a sun-
screen should get less
confusing next summer
when new government
regulations kick in. Those
rules will prohibit claims
like "waterproof' you
do need to reapply after
swimming or sweating -
and will assure protection
against both types of skin-
damaging UV rays.
Lauran Neergaard cov-
ers health and medical
issues for The Associated
Press in Washington..


Custody
battle?
.- A -


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Stormy Bradley, right, and
her daughter Maya, 14, walk
their dog Bubbles in their
neighborhood in Atlanta.
Maya is part of an anti-obe-
sity ad campaign in Georgia.
See story, Page 8A.


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ASSOCIATED PRESS
In this June 21 file photo, sun umbrellas are seen on the first day of summer at Seattle's
Alki Beach Park. If you've hit the beach, chances are you've experienced an unfortunate
rite of summer: The sunburn. Skin so swollen it hurts to bend. The heat that rises from red-
dened shoulders. The "ow, ow, ow" from the shower after you'd thought the pain had faded.
For all the creams that promise to soothe, there aren't super treatments for a sunburn.
Dermatologists say the best bet: Some of the same pills you pop for a headache like the
ibuprofen found in Motrin and Advil, orAleve and other brands of naproxen.


S0DA PAIN AD IREHABILI ACTION CENTER
Si Formerly Compr t ie Pain Managem ft of North Florida
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aluation


S' -I nanement
SUltrasound guided joint
ic injections
iZhu '.Fluorosopy-guided spin
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and.neuro gist '.'


Page Editor: Amber Hamilton, 754-0424












Story ideas?


Contact
Robert Bridges
Editor-
754-0428


Lake City Reporter





Health

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Brought to you by

ShndsRegional Medical Center
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8A www.lakecityreporter.com Thursday, July 14,201


Should parents lose custody of super obese kids?


LINDSEY TANNER
AP Medical Writer
CHICAGO Should
parents of extremely
obese children lose cus-
tody for not controlling
their kids' weight? A pro-
vocative commentary in
one of the nation's most
distinguished medi-
cal journals argues yes,
and its authors are join-
ing a quiet chorus of
advocates who say the
government should be
allowed to intervene in
extreme cases.
It has happened a
few times in the U.S.,
and the opinion piece in
Wednesday's Journal of
the American Medical
Association says putting
children temporarily in fos-
ter care is in some cases
more ethical than obesity
surgery.
Dr. David Ludwig, an obe-
sity specialist at Harvard-
affiliated Children's
Hospital Boston, said the
point isn't to blame par-
ents, but rather to act in
children's best interest and
get them help that for what-
ever reason their parents
can't provide.
State intervention "ide-
ally will support not just the
child but:the whole family,
with the goal of reuniting
child and family as soon as
possible. That may require
instruction on parenting,"
said Ludwig, who wrote
the article with Lindsey
Murtagh, a lawyer and a'
researcher at Harvard's
School of Public Health.
"Despite the discomfort
posed by state intervention,
it may sometimes be nec-
essary to protect a child,"
Murtagh said.
But University of
Pennsylvania bioethi-
cist Art Caplan said he
worries thatthe debate risks
putting too much blame on
parents. Obese children
are victims of advertising,
marketing, peer pressure
and bullying things a


parent can't control, he
said.
"If you're going to change
a child's weight, you're
going to have to change all
of them," Caplan said.
Roughly 2 million U.S.
children are extremely
obese. Most are not in
imminent danger, Ludwig
said. But some have obe-
sity-related conditions
such as Type 2 diabetes,
breathing difficulties and
liver problems that could
kill them by age 30. It is
these kids for whom state
intervention, including
education, parent train-
ing, and temporary protec-
tive custody in the most
extreme cases, should be
considered, Ludwig said.
While some doctors
promote weight-loss
surgery for severely obese
teens, Ludwig said it hasn't
been used for very long in
adolescents and can have
serious, sometimes life-
threatening complications.
"We don't know the
long-term safety and
effectiveness of these
procedures done at an early
age," he said.
Ludwig said he starting
thinking about the issue
after a 90-pound 3-year-old
girl came to his obesity
clinic several years ago.
Her parents had physical
disabilities, little money
and difficulty controlling
her weight Last year, at
age 12, she weighed 400
pounds and had developed
diabetes, cholesterol prob-
lems. high blood pressure
and sleep apnea.
"Out of medical concern,
the state placed this girl
in foster care, where she
simply received three
balanced meals a day
and a snack or two and
moderate physical activity,"
he said. After a year, she
lost 130 pounds. Though
she is still obese, her diabe-
tes and apnea disappeared;
she remains in foster care,
he said.
In a commentary in the


medical journal BMJ last
year, London pediatrician
Dr. Russell Viner and col-
leagues said obesity was
a factor in several child
protection cases in Britain.
They argued that child
protection services should
be considered if parents
are neglectful or actively
reject efforts to control an
extremely obese child's
weight
A 2009 opinion
article in Pediatrics made
similar arguments.
Its authors said
temporary removal
from the home would be
warranted "when
all reasonable
al t e r n a t i v e
options have been
exhausted."


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ASSOCIATED PRESS
Stormy Bradley, left, and her daughter Maya, 14, are seen, in Atlanta. Maya, who is 5'4" tall
and weighs about 200 Ibs., is part of an anti-obesity ad campaign in Georgia. A provocative
article in a prominent medical journal argues that parents of extremely obese children should
lose custody because they can't control their kids' weight.


PHYSICIANS
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Story ideas?

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Tim Kirby
Sports Editor
754-0421
tkirby@akecityreporter.com


Lake City Reporter





SPORTS


Thursday, luly 14.2011


www.lakecityreporter.com


Section B


BRIEFS


16u fundraiser
at Walmart
The Lake City Sliders
16-under Babe Ruth
All-Stars team is
raising money to go to
regional competition
in Richmond, Va. The
team will be accepting
donations at Walmart on
Tuesday. An account also
has been set up in the
team's name at
First Federal Bank for
donations.
For details, call Wendy
Dohrn at 623-3641.


Florida-Georgia
game Saturday
The Lake City Falcons
semi-pro football team is
hosting a Florida-Georgia
all-star game at the '
Annie Mattox Park field
on Saturday. Admission
is $5 for adults and $3
for seniors and military.
Children ages 8 and
younger are free. Bring
folding chairs and
canopies.
For details, call Luis
Santiago at 2924138.


Moe's fundraiser
set for Tuesday
Columbia High's
soccer teamswill host a
Moe's Night fundraiser
from 4-8 p.m. Tuesday
at Moe's Southwest Grill
on U.S. Highway 90 west
in Lake City. The soccer
program will receive a
percentage of sales.
For details, call
365-1877.


Next lessons
begin July 25
Youth and adult
swimming lessons are
offered at the Columbia
Aquatic Complex.
Classes meet for two
weeks and six daily times
are offered, plus there
are two daily mom and
tot classes. Two sessions
remain with the next
session July 25-Aug. 5.
Cost is $50 per person.
Registration is 5-7 p.m.
Wednesday and all day
July 21-22 at the pool.
YWTh TEBTWIS
Johnny Young
offers camps
Johnny Young's Tennis
Camps are offered at The
Country Club at Lake
City. Camps are
8-11 a.m. Monday
through Friday at a cost
of $65 for club members
and $75 for
non-members. Remaining
clinic dates are
July 18-22, Aug. 1-5 and
Aug. 15-19. Drinks and
snacks will be provided.
Clinics are limited to 24
players.
For details, call Young
at 365-3827.


* From staff reports


BRANDON FINLEY/Lake City Reporter
Columbia High's Jake Bates shows the umpire the ball after tagging out Fort White High's Steven Giardina in a play at home during a summer exhibition
game:in FortWVhite Wednesday.


ummier


tch


CHS, Fort White looking
now for spring answers


By BRANDON FNLEY
b tinley@lakecityreporter.comr
For most high school stu-
dents, the summer is about
vacation. For Columbia and
Fort White baseball play-
ers, its about finding a way
to get better.
"It's a chance to try
players out at a position
they might not be use to,"
Columbia coach J.T. Clark
said. "It's really more of an
instructional game where
players can gain experi-
ence."
New Fort White coach
Mike Rizzi considers him-
self fortunate to have this
time to install a new phi-
losophy.
"We're very luckyto field
two teams," he said. "We've


had about 20 guys out here
consistently all summer. It's
been good to help with a
change of culture."
One area that both teams
are looking for experience
at is on the mound.
"Pitching is one spot and
we're trying some guys out
there to get use to the posi-
tion," Clark said. "For oth-
ers, ifs a chance to crack
the lineup. A guy like Trey
Lee, who didn't play a lot
last year, has had an excep-
tional summer and we're
trying to find a spot for him
in the lineup."
Rizzi has also found some
players for the Indians.
"Zach Gaskins has played
on both of the teams we
SUMMER continued on 6B


BRANDON FINLEY/Lake City Reporter'
Columbia High's Jimmy Blakely throws out the first pitch in an exhibition Wednesday.


U.S., Japan

secure spots in

World Cup final


ASSOCIATED PRESS
U.S. players celebrate winning 3-1 the semifinal match between France and the United States
at the Women's Soccer World Cup in Moenchengladbach, Germany on Wednesday.


Championship
match set
for Sunday.
By RAF CASERT
Associated Press
FRANKFURT, Germany
- Both call teamwork the
highest good and both are
in the final of the World
Cup after 3-1 victories. Yet
few teams could be as dif-
ferent as the United States
and Japan.
The U.S. team again fed


off the emotional high of
overcoming fatigue and set-
backs to find exhilarating.
unity and late goals to beat
France.
Japan, meanwhile, prided
itself on an inner calm when
it trailed Sweden early and
stuck tightly to coaching
instructions to methodically
fight back and win.
It leaves the U.S., a peren-'
nial power, to face the first-,
time finalist in Sunday's title!
match at the three-week
CUP continued on 2B.


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LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS THURSDAY, JULY 14, 2011


TELEVISION

TV sports
Today
CYCLING
6:30 a.m.
VERSUS Tour de France, stage 12,
SCugnaux to Luz-Ardiden, France
GOLF
S44 a.m.
iS, ESPN British Open, first round, at
Sandwich, England
2 p.m.
TGC Nationwide Tour, Chiquita
Classic, first round, at Maineville, Ohio
1, .* 4 p.m.
STGC PGA Tour,Viking Classic, first
round, at Madison, Miss.
MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL
7 p.m.
I MLB- Regional coverage,N.Y.Yankees
.i at Toronto or Cleveland at Baltimore
WNBA BASKETBALL
9 p.m.
ESPN2 Seattle at San Antonio

AUTO RACING

SRace week
S"g NASCAR
.. LENOX INDUSTRIALTOOLS 301
lj Site: Loudon, N.H.
Schedule: Friday, practice (Speed,
1:30 a.m.- p.m.), qualifying (Speed,
'3-5 p.m.); Saturday, practice (Speed, 9:30-
10 30 a m. 11:30 a.m.-l p.m.); Sunday, race,
C'. I p.m. (TNT, noon-4:30 p.m.).
,!i' Track: New Hampshire Motor
Speedway (oval, 1.058 miles).
Race distance: 318.46 miles, 301 laps.
Next race: Brickyard 400,
"July 31, Indianapolis Motor Speedway,
%.Indianapolis.
Online: http://www.noscar.com
NATIONWIDE
NEW ENGLAND 200
Site: Loudon, N.H.
Schedule: Friday, practice (Speed, 1;30-
3 p.m.); Saturday, qualifying (Speed, 10:30-
11:30 a.m.), race, 3:30 p.m. (ESPN, 2:30-
6 pm.).
Track: New Hampshire Motor
Speedway.
Race distance: 211.6 miles, 200 laps.
Next race: Federated Auto Parts 300,
July 23, Nashville Superspeedway, Lebanon,
Tenn.
CAMPING WORLD TRUCKS
COCA-COLA 200
Site: Newton, Iowa.
Schedule: Friday, practice; Saturday,
qualifying; race, 8 p.m. (Speed, 7:30-
10:30 p.m.).
Track: Iowa Speedway (oval, 0.875
miles).
Race distance: 175 miles, 200 laps.
Next race: Lucas Deep Clean 200, July
22, Nashville Superspeedway, Lebanon,
Tenn.
INDYCAR
Next race Edmonmon Indy. July 24,
E. Edmrcron C.gy .entnapirportEdmnton,T
Alberta. ,
Online htEp liv 'nki ndO orcom
FORMULA ONE
Next race: German Grand Prix,July 24,
Nuerburgring, Nuerburg, Germany.
Online: http://www.formulal.com
NHRA FULL THROTTLE
Next event Mopar Mile-High NHRA
Nationals,July 22-24, Bandimere Speedway,
:,Morrison, Colo.
Online: http://wlw.nhra.com

BASEBALL

.:,AL standings

East Division
W L Pct GB
. "Boston 55 35 .611 -
l:-,NewYork 53 35 .602 I
-'vITampa Bay 49 41 .544 6
_- Toronto 45 47 .489 11
',Baltimore 36 52 .409 18
Central Division
W L Pct GB
[ Detroit 49 43 .533 -
,L-Cleveland 47 42 .528 'h
i,.Chicago 44 48 .478 5
S Minnesota 41 48 .461 6/'
"' 'Kansas City 37 54 .407 11
S' West Division
W L Pct GB
7i Texas 51 41 .554 -
-, LosAngeles 50 42 .543 I
S ,'Seattle 43 48 .473 7'h
"j'Oakland 39. 53 .424. 12
I.' Tuesday's Game
-. NLAII-Stars 5,ALAIl-Stars I
Wednesday's Games
S No games scheduled
Today's Games
,,'- Cleveland (Masterson 7-6) at Baltimore
'(Guthrie 3-12), 7:05 p.m.
N.Y. Yankees (Colon 6-4) at Toronto
(Jo-.Reyes 4-7), 7:07 p.m.
Kansas City (Chen 5-2) at Minnesota
(Liriano 5-7), 8:10 p.m.
Texas (D.Holland 7-4) at Seattle
(Vargas 6-6), 10:10 p.m.
Friday's Games
Chicago White Sox at Detroit,
7:05 p.m.
Cleveland at Baltimore, 7:05 p.m.
N.Y.Yankees at Toronto, 7:07 p.m.
Boston atTampa Bay. 7:10 p.m.
Kansas City at Minnesota, 8:10 p.m.
LA.Angels at Oakland, 10:05 p.m.
Texas at Seattle, 10:10 p.m.

,NL standings


Philadelph
Atlanta
New York
Washingto
Florida


Milwaukee
St. Louis
Pittsburgh
Cincinnati
Chicago
Houston

San Franci
Arizona
Colorado
Los Angele
San Diego


East Division
W L
ia 57 34
54 38
46 45
on 46 46
43 48
Central Division
W L
49 43
49 43
47 43
45 47
37 55
30 62
West Division
W L
sco 52 40
49 43
43 48
es 41 51
40 52


Tuesday's Game
NL All-Stars 5AL All-Stars I
Wednesday's Games
No games scheduled
Today's Games
Florida (Ani.Sanchez 6-2) at Chicago
Cubs (Garza 4-7), 8:05 p.m.
Milwaukee (Gallardo 10-5) at Colorado
(Jimenez 4-8), 8:40 p.m.
San Francisco (Bumgarner 4-9) at San
Diego (Harang 7-2), 10:05 p.m.
Friday's Games
Florida at Chicago Cubs, 2:20 p.m.
Philadelphia at N.Y. Mets, 7:10 p.m.
St. Louis at Cincinnati, 7:10 p.m.
Washington atAtlanta. 7:35 p.m.
Pittsburgh at Houston, 8:05 p.m.
Milwaukee at Colorado, 8:40 p.m.
LA. Dodgers at Arizona, 9:40 p.m.
San Francisco at San Diego, 10:05 p.m.

Baseball calendar

July 24 Hall of Fame induction,
Cooperstown, N.Y.
July 31 Last day to trade a player
without securing waivers.
Aug. 15 Last day to sign selections
from 2011 amateur draft who have not
exhausted college eligibility.
Aug. 17-18 Owners' meetings,
Cooperstown, N.Y.
Sept I Active rosters expand to
40 players.
Sept. 30 or Oct. I Playoffs begin.
Oct. 19- World Series begins.

BASKETBALL

WNBA schedule

Tuesday's Games
Seattle 79,Washington 71
Los Angeles 84, San Antonio 74
Wednesday's Games
NewYork 91,Atlanta 69'
'Chicago 72,Tulsa 54
Phoenix 112, Minnesota 105
Indiana 90. Connecticut 78
Today's Game
Seattle at San Antonio, 9 p.m.
Friday's Games
Minnesota at Indiana, 7 p.m.
Connecticut at New York, 7 p.m.
Los Angeles atTulsa, 8 p.m.
Washington at Phoenix, 10 p.m.

SOCCER

Women's World Cup

SEMIFINALS
Wednesday
United States 3, France I
Japan 3,.Sweden I
THIRD PLACE
Saturday
At Sinsheim, Germany
France vs. Sweden, 11:30 am..
CHAMPIONSHIP
Sunday
At Frankfurt .'
United States vs. Japan, 2:45 p.m.

CYCLING

Tour de France stages

July 2 Stage I: Passage du Gols
La Barre-de-Monts-Mont des Alouettes
Les Herbiers, flat, 191.5 kilometers (119
miles)
July 3 Stage 2: Les Essarts, team time
trial, 23 (14.3) (Garmin-Cervelo; Thor
Hushovd, Norway)
July 4 Stage 3: Olonne-sur-Mer-
Redon, flat, 198 (123.0) (Tyler Farrar,
United States; Hushovd)
July 5 Stage 4: Lorient-Mur-de-
Bretagne, flat, 172.5 (107.2) (Cadel Evans,
Australia; Hushovd)
July 6- Stage 5: Carhaix-Cap Frehel,
flat, 164.5 (102.2) (Mark Cavendish, Britain;
Hushovd)
July 7 Stage 6: Dinan-Lisieux, flat,
226.5 (140.7) (Edvald Boasson Hagen,
Norway; Hushovd)
July 8 Stage 7: .Le Mans-
Chateauroux, flat, 218 (135.5) (Cavendish;
Hushovd)
July 9 Stage 8: Aigurande-Super-
BesseSancy,medium mountain, 189(1 17.4)
(Rui Alberto Costa, Portugal; Hushovd)
July 10 Stage 9: Issoire-Saint-Flour,
medium mountain, 208 (129.2) (Luls Leon
Sanchez, Spain;Thomas Voeckler, France)
July I1 Rest day in Le Lioran
Cantal.
July 12-Stage 10:Aurillac-Carmaux,
flat, 158 (98.2) (Andre Greipel, Germany;
*Voeckler)
July 13 Stage I1: Blaye-les-Mines-
Lavaur, flat, 167.5 (104.1). (Cavendish;
Voeckler)
July 14 Stage 12: Cugnaux-Luz-
Ardiden, high mountain, 211 (131.1)
July 15-Stage 13:Pau-Lourdes, high
mountain, 152.5 (94.8)
July 16 Stage 14: Saint-Gaudens-
Plateau de Beille, high mountain, 168.5
(104.7)
July 17 Stage 15: Limoux-
Montpellier, fiat, 192.5 (119.6)
July 18 Rest day in the Drome
region.
July 19 Stage 16: Saint-Paul-Trois-
Chateaux-Gap, medium mountain, 162.5
(101)
July 20 Stage 17: Gap-Pinerolo,
Italy, high mountain, 179 ( 11.2)
July 21 Stage 18: Pinerolo-Galibier
Serre-Chevalier, high mountain, 200.5
(124.6)
I Ith Stage
(A 104.1-mile ride in the rain from Blaye-
les-Mines to Lavaur, with a couple of
minor hills but no major difficulties)
I. Mark Cavendish, Britain, HTC-
Highroad, 3 hours, 46 minutes, 7 seconds.
2. Andre Greipel, Germany, Omega
Pharma-Lotto, same time.
3.Tyler Farrar, United States, Garmin-
Cervelo, same time.
4. Denis Galimzyanov, Russia, Katusha,


same time.
5. Edvald Boasson Hagen, Norway, Sky
Procycling, same time.
6. Remain Feillu, France, Vacansoleil-
DCM, same time.
7. Jose Joaquin Rojas, Spain, Movistar,
same time.
8. Sebastien Turgot, France, Europcar,
same time.
9. Francisco Ventoso, Spain, Movistar,
same time.
10. William Bonnet, France, Francaise
des Jeux, same time.


Injuries to stars mar 1st half of baseball season


By JON KRAWCZYNSKI
Associated Press

From Derek Jeter
to Albert Pujols and Joe
Mauer, you could put
together an All-Star team
just from the guys who
have been stuck on the dis-
abled list this season. As it
stands, the National League
beat the American League,
5-1 on Tuesday.
If 2010 was the Year of the
Pitcher, 2011 might just be
the Year of the Injury. David


Wright, Buster Posey and
Zack Greinke have missed
big chunks of time as well,
and the rash of injured stars
may be one of the biggest
reasons that all six division
races are so close heading
into the unofficial second
half of the season.
With so many teams
playing short-handed, no
one has been able to break
away from the pack yet and
take command of the pen-
nant race, setting up a 2 1/2
month sprint to the finish.


Jeter spent 21 days on
the shelf with a calf injury
that slowed his pursuit of
3,000 hits, Pujols stunned
everyone by coming back
from a broken forearm after
just two weeks and Mauer's
seemingly unimpeachable
image in his home state
of Minnesota took a big
hit when he spent most of
the first two months of the
season rehabbing a myste-
rious leg injury.
The current disabled
list is chock full of stars


- Johan Santana, Jon
Lester, Roy Oswalt, Carl
Crawford, Josh Johnson,
Justin Morneau. And many
of the trips haven't been
quick ones. Wright has
been on the list since May
16 with a stress fracture in
his lower back, Morneau
is not expected back until
mid-August after having
neck surgery and Johnson
was placed on the 60-day
disabled list with right
shoulder inflammation on
May 17.


CUP: United States to meet Japan in finals

Continued From Page 1B


tournament
'These wins, we can't do
it alone. We know a whole
nation is cheering us on,"
said U.S. forward Wambach
after scoring the go-ahead
goal late in the match. "We
believe in ourselves and
we're in the final."
After their spectacular
escape against Brazil in a
quarterfinal ending in a pen-
alty shootout, the semifinal
was bound to be a letdown
in comparison. Victory
though, gave the Americans
their first final since win-


ning the title in 1999.
"We didn't play well
today," U.S. coach Pia
Sundhage said. "However,
we find a way to win and
that's a credit to the play-
ers' hearts."
Wambach broke a tense
1-1 deadlockwith a big head-
er from Lauren Cheney's
corner kick in the 79th min-
ute. Cheney delivered the
ball perfectly to the far post,
and Wambach jumped over
the scrum and French goal-
keeper Berangere Sapowicz
to put it in the empty net It


was Wambach's third goal
of the tournament and 12th
of her career, putting her
level with fellow American
Michelle Akers for third on
the all-time World Cup scor-
ing list
Alex Morgan added an
insurance goal in the 82nd,
the first for the World Cup
rookie.
Despite the loss, the
World Cup was a resound-
ing success for the French,
who made their first appear-
ance in the semifinals and
qualified for next summer's


London Olympics.
The Americans had only
two days' rest following the
.Brazil game, their quickest
turnaround of the tourna-
ment, and there had been
concern thatfatigue or emo-
tions might get the best of
them. But Wambach, who
has been playing with an
Achilles' tendon so sore it
often keeps her out of prac-
tice, again kept going till
the difference was made.
"In the end, we're in the
finals," Wambach said, "and
that's all that matters."


S.a s DISCOUNTS AT THIS STORE ONLY



Sais24 AKE UCITY
2724 W. US Highway 90








STORE CLING


All Tractors & Riding 0

Lawn Mowers,

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All Lawn Tractor Attachments 40% OFF 0 F F


STORE FIXTURES FOR SALE!
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TO STOCK ON HAND. THIS STORE IS NOT PARTICIPATING IN CURRENT SEARS CIRCULARS. THIS EVENT EXCLUDES ELECTROLUX.

I Ai A li ftl l'1 I I 1 1 I


SCOREBOARD


, Page Editor: Brandon Finley, 754-0420











Page Editor: Emogene Graham, 754-0415 LAKE CITY REPORTER ADVICE & COMICS THURSDAY, JULY 14, 2011


HAVE YOU MET
THE NEW ENGINEER?
HE'S A GIGANTIC
DORK. YOU TWO
WOULD GET ALONG
GREAT.



I


h


BABY BLUES


BLONDE


BEETLE BAILEY


HAGARTHE HORRIBLE


SNUFFY SMITH


ZITS


B.C.


FRANK & ERNEST


I'LL E-MAIL HIM TO
SET UP A DATE WITH
YOU. IS TOMORROW
GOOD?


DEAR ABBY


Widowed Mom's ugly behavior

is a sign that she needs help


DEAR ABBY: I agree
with your advice to
"Driven Away in Georgia"
(May 26), whose widowed
mother has become so bit-
ter, all eight of her chil-
dren avoid her. As a clini-
cal neuropsychologist who
works with people with
dementia and other aging-
related problems, I'd like
to share my thoughts.
When a spouse dies,
previously undetected
early-stage dementia
can become apparent to
others. If the surviving
spouse had pre-existing
cognitive deficits, they
may have been concealed
by the competency of the
other spouse. After the
spouse dies, the structure
and functional support
once provided is suddenly
removed. Symptoms then
become apparent to fam-
ily members. Another
diagnostic option might
be depression, which can
often resemble dementia
in elderly people.
There are medications
that can help manage and
even slow down the pro-
gression of dementia, and
early intervention may
partially stabilize her at a
higher level of function-
ing. You were right to
recommend that family
members become more
involved rather than back
away since this woman


Abigail Van Buren
www.deorabby.com
clearly needs either psy-
chiatric or neurological
intervention, or both.
Thank you for shedding
light on a very common
problem that can touch
any family. RICHARD
FULBRIGHT, Ph.D.,
DALLAS
DEAR DR.
FULBRIGHT: Thank you
for sharing your expertise
and raising awareness for
those with family mem-
bers who are also strug-
gling with similar issues.
Read on:
DEAR ABBY: In addi-
tion to concerns about
dementia, the mother may.
be overwhelmed with liv-
ing life as a widow. The
eight surviving children
should try to arrange for
part-time hired help for
her household chores
that build up. If Mom is
living on limited income,
she may be crushed with
financial stress. Perhaps
it's time for her to down-
size to a more manageable
home.
Instead of avoiding her,


these "kids" need to find
out exactly what problems-
are overwhelming their
mother and get her help. -
- CONCERNED SON IN
LAUREL, MD.
DEAR ABBY: "Driven"
and her siblings could offer
more by getting together,
taking potluck dishes and
meeting at Mom's house
over a weekend to split
up her chore list. My own
mom would say, "Many
hands make labor light"
- and laughter makes the
time pass quickly. If they
can do this two or three
times a year, Mom might
feel more secure and
relaxed.
Her children also
should take turns taking
Mom out to dinner and
a movie once a month. It
will give her something
to look'forward to. When
you lose someone who
was involved in your daily
life, it gets lonely.
Atip to the kids: Imagine
yourselves in your mom's
shoes instead of thinking
about how much you have
to do. Even a person with
dementia, if this is the
case, can be happy with
the right help. NANCY
IN PAYSON, ARIZ.

E Write Dear Abby at
www.DearAbby.com or
P.O. Box 69440, Los
Angeles, CA 90069.


HOROSCOPES


ARIES (March 21-
April 19): You may not
like what you encounter at
work or at home; but how
you handle it will count in
the end. Make sure you
play -by- the rules.-Youe will
rise above the obstacles if
you stick to your beliefs.

TAURUS (April 20-
May 20): You will surpass
everyone's expectations if
you follow through with
your plans and make a big
splash. Going overboard
isnnt something you do
often, but now is a good
time to surprise everyone
by doing so. *****
GEMINI (May 21-June
20): This is not the day to
lend or donate to a cause
you know little about Keep
your money in a safe place,
remembering that char-
ity begins at home. Self-
improvement projects will
pay off. 3 stars
CANCER (June 21-
July 22): Let your intuition
guide you when dealing
with people from different
backgrounds or with a phi-
losophy that is new to you.
Networking or getting out
with that special someone
in the evening hours will
enhance your personal life.

LEO (July 23-Aug.,
22): Whatever you do that
is unique will pay off big-
time. By entertaining the


THE LAST WORD
Eugenia Last

people you want to do busi-
ness with or by forming a
partnership, you will gain.
insight into how you can
get w hat you "want more
quickly and easily. ***
VIRGO (Aug. 23-
Sept. 22): Everything is
changing quickly, but that
doesn't mean you need to
act fast. Let things settle
down before you make a
decision. Social events will
bring you in contact with
someone who can lead you
in a prosperous direction.

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct.
22): Watch what you say.
Someone will be looking
for information that can be
used against you. Donxt
name-drop or exaggerate
if you want someone to
like you. Don't pretend you
know more than you do.

SCORPIO (Oct. 23-
Nov. 21): There is a lot
happening that isnat vis-
ible just yet, so it is best
to take a wait-and-see
approach. A social event
will take a surprising turn.
Consider what you always
wanted to do for a living
and discuss how to make
it happen. ****
SAGITTARIUS (Nov.
22-Dec.. 21): Research


what you must do to reach
your objectives. A sudden
change in your personal life
may confuse you, but you
eventually will realize that
the- change is in- your best
interest Your quick wit will
keep you in front of the
competition. ***
CAPRICORN (Dec.
22-Jan. 19): You may
have a hard time keep-
ing a lid on your thoughts
and an even more difficult
time trying not to take
over to ensure things are
done to your specifica-
tions. A chance meeting
with someone from your
past can open up ideas for
the future. ***
AQUARIUS (Jan.
20-Feb. 18): You will
be pulled in many direc-
tions, and it will be impor-
tant to recognize where
each path leads. It may
be difficult to be logical
about personal issues,
but you will have to put
aside your emotions and
do what's right. ***
PISCES (Feb. 19-March
20): Getting involved in
a neighborhood event will
help you understand what
everyone else wants and
how you can make it hap-
pen. An effort to improve
your environment will lead
to social opportunities that
will enhance your love life.
****


CELEBRITY CIPHER

by Luis Campos
Celebrity Cipher cryptograms are created from quotations by famous people, past and present.
Each letter In the cipher stands for another.
TODAY Y'S CLUE: L equals G
"T YOBTOMO FZVF VR GPDZ VR XIP
FVUO, XIP ZVMO FI LTMO YVDU. TF'R
TGSIHFVJF JIF FI WIDPR IJ XIPHROBW
FI I GPDZ." '- JTDIBO UTNGVJ
PREVIOUS SOLUTION: "When I heard his first songs, Dylan was answering
certain questions that I had all my life been asking myself." Nana Mouskouri

(c) 2011 by NEA, Inc. 7-14


CLASSIC PEANUTS


DILBERT


I


....... 1111 ...... ............ -


...


Page Editor: Ernogene Graham, 754-0415


f
c.


LAKE CITY REPORTER ADVICE & COMICS THURSDAY, JULY 14, 2011











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Legal

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
COLUMBIA COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File No. 11-152-CP
Division Probate
IN RE: ESTATE OF
JACK OWEN CRAFT A/K/A
JACK O. CRAFT
Deceased,
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
The administration of the estate of
Jack Owen Craft a/k/a Jack O. Craft,
deceased, whose date of death was
April 24, 2011, is pending in the Cir-
cuit Court for Columbia County,
Florida, Probate Division, the ad-
dress of which is 173 NE Hernando
Avenue, Lake City, Florida 32055.
The names and addresses of the per-
sonal representative and the personal
representative's attorney are set forth
below. All creditors of the decedent
and other persons having claims or
demands against decedent's estate on
whom a copy of this notice is re-
quired to be served must file their
claims with this court WITHIN THE
LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER
THE TIME OF THE FIRST PUBLI-'
CATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30
DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF
SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS
NOTICE ON THEM. All other cred-
itors of the decedent and other per-
sons having claims or demands
against decedent's estate must file
their claims with this court WITHIN
3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE
OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE. ALL CLAIMS NOT
FILED WITHIN THE TIME PERI-
ODS SET FORTH IN SECTION
733.702 OF THE FLORIDA PRO-
BATE CODE WILL BE FOREVER
BARRED. NOTWITHSTANDING
THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH
ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED
TWO (2) YEARS OR MORE AF-
TER THE DECEDENT'S DATE OF
DEATH IS BARRED. The date of
first publication of this notice is June
17, 2011.
Attorney for Personal Representative
/s/ John J. Kendron
Attorney for Robert Bruce Craft
a/k/a Bruce Craft
Florida Bar Number 0306850
Robinson, Kennon & Kendron, P.A.
PO Box 1178
Lake City, FL 32056-1178
Telephone: (386) 755-1334
Personal Representative:
/s/: Robert Bruce Craft a/k/a Bruce
Craft
121 NE Semester Place
Lake City, Florida 32055
05526386'
July 7, 14, 2011

SECTION 00100
ADVERTISEMENT FOR BID
PROJECT: 2011 Roadway Improve-
ment Program
OWNER: City of High Springs_
110 NW 1st Avenue
High Springs, Florida 32643-1000
ENGINEER: Jones Edmunds & As-
sociates, Inc:
730 NE Waldo Road
Gainesville, Florida 32641
Telephone: (352) 377-5821
1.0 WORK DESCRIPTION
The Project is located at 13 different
project sites within the city limits.
The Work is generally described as
repairing and rehabilitating existing
roadways and constructing a segment
of new roadway..
All work shall be in accordance with
the construction drawings, specifica-
tions, and contract documents.
2.0 RECEIPT OF BIDS
Bidding and Contract Documents
may be examined at 110 NW 1st
Avenue, High Springs, Florida
32643-1000.
To ensure that Bidders receive all ad-
denda and or clarifications to the
Bidding Documents in a timely man-
ner, it is mandatory that all bidders
obtain at least one set of Bidding
Documents from the Engineer to be
eligible to bid on this project. Copies
of the documents may be obtained at
the Engineer's office for $100.00 per
set, which constitutes the cost for re-
production and handling. Checks
shall be payable to Engineer. Pay-
ment is non-refundable. Call Carly
Roach at (352) 377-5821, ext. 1296
for further details to obtain a set of
Contract Documents.
Bids shall be completed on the en-
closed Bid Form as set forth in the
Instructions to Bidders and otherwise
be in compliance with the Bidding
Documents. Sealed bids will be re-
ceived at 110 NW 1st Avenue, High
Springs, Florida 32643-1000 until,
2:00 P.M. (local time) on August 10,
2011, at which'time and place all
bids will be opened. Any Bids re-
ceived after the specified time and
date will not be considered.
A non-mandatory pre-bid conference
will be held on July 27, 2011 at 2:00
pm at 110 NW 1st Avenue, High
Springs, Florida 32643-1000
For further information or clarifica-
tion, contact Carly Roach at Engi-
neer's office.
05526591
July 14, 2011


Land Clearing

Back Hoe, Dozer, Chopping, root
raking, bush hog, seeding, sod,
disking, site prep, ponds &
irrigation. Free Est! 386-623-3200


Services

DIVORCE, BANKRUPTCY,
RESUMES.
other court approved forms-
386-961-5896.


We come to you! Auto Detailing:
Wash, wax & vaccum. Pressure
Wash: Houses, mobile homes,
driveways, decks. 386-697-2224


Legal

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT, THIRD
JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR
COLUMBIA COUNTY, FLORIDA
CASE NO.: 11-12-CA
COLUMBIA TIMBERLANDS,
LTD.,
a Florida limited partnership,
Plaintiff,
vs.
DENNIS L. WILLIAMS; KERRY
L. WILLIAMS, his wife; YVONNE
A. JUNEAU; MARTA ROSAS-
GUYON; APALACHEE TRACE
HOMEOWNERS' ASSOCIATION,
INC, a not-for-profit Florida corpo-
ration,
Defendants,
NOTICE OF JUDICIAL SALE BY
THE CLERK
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that
pursuant to an Order or Final Judg-
ment entered in the above-styled
cause now pending in said court, that
I will sell to the highest and best bid-
der for cash on the third floor of the
Columbia County Courthouse, 173
N.E. Hemando Avenue, Lake City,
Florida 32055, at 11:00 o'clock, a.m.
on August 10, 2011, the following
property described in.Exhibit "A" at-
tached hereto:
file# 8332
Lot 7, Appalachie Trace:
Commence at the Southwest comer
of the Northeast 1/4 of Section 3,
Township 6 South, Range 16 East,
Columbia County, Florida and run
North 01 deg 18'41" West along the
West line of said Northeast 1/4 a dis-
tance of 521.27 feet to the point of
beginning; thence continue North 01
deg 18'41" West still along said
West line 540.00 feet; thence South
80 deg 38'29" East 1067.33 feet to a
point on the Westerly line of a pri-
vate road; thence South 13 deg
09'18" West along said Westerly
line .335.00 feet; thence South 87 deg
37'11" West 965.35 feet to the point
of beginning.
Subject to: An easement for utilities
across the East 15.00 feet thereof.
TOGETHER WITH AN EASE-
MENT FOR INGRESS AND
EGRESS OVER AND- ACROSS
THE FOLLOWING DESCRIBED
LANDS:
EASEMENT
Begin at the Southeast corer of Sec-
tion 3, Township 6 South, Range 16
East, Columbia County, Florida and
run South 87 deg 37'11" West along
the South line of said Section 3 a dis-
tance of 1738.09 feet to the POINT
OF BEGINNING. Thence continue
South 87 deg 37'11" West still along
said South line 60.01 feet; thence
North 01 deg 18'41" West 1538.67
feet; thence North 16 deg 59'28"
West 584.29 feet; thence North 13
deg 09'18" East 550.69 feet.to -a
point on the South line of the North-
east 1/4 of said Section 3; thence
continue North 13 deg 09'18 East
876.90 feet; thence North 20
degl7'38" East 723.23 feet; thence
North 77 deg 08'31" West 847.33
feet; thence North 12 deg 51'29"
East 60.00 feet; thence South 77 deg
08'31" East 855.16 feet; thence
North 20 deg 17'38" East 403.70
feet; thence North 01 deg 18'53"
West 233.58 feet; thence North 88
deg 41'07" East 60.00 feet; thence
South 01 deg 18'53" East 245.03
feet; thence South 20 deg 17'38"
West 1195.15 feet; thence South 13
deg 09'18" West 101.23 feet; thence
South 78 deg 07'14" East 1153.18
feet; thence South 65 deg 42'05"
East 67.64 feet; thence South 24 deg
17'55" West 60.00 feet; thence
North 65 deg 42'05' West 61.11
feet; thence North 78 deg 07'14"
West 1147.98 feet; thence South 13
deg 09'18" West 695.30 feet to a
Point on the North line of the South-
east 1/4 of said Section 3, thence
coritinue South 13 deg 09'18" West
551.14 feet; thence South 16 deg
59'28" East 556.03 feet; thence
North 87 deg 37'11" East 1223.08
feet; thence South 02 deg 22'49"
East 60.00; thence South 87 deg
37'11" West 1218.70 feet; thence
South 01 deg 18'41" East 1505.52
feet to the POINT OF BEGINNING.
Said sale will be made pursuant to
and in order to satisfy the terms of
said Summary Final Judgment of
Foreclosure. Any person claiming an
interest in the surplus from the sale,
if any, other than the property owner
as of the date of the lis pendens must
file a claim within 60 days after the
sale.
Dated: June 30, 2011
P. DEWITT CASON, Clerk of the
Court
By /s/B. Scippio
Deputy Clerk
05526470
July 14,21, 2011


IN THE COUNTY COURT IN
AND FOR COLUMBIA COUNTY,
FLORIDA
CASE NO. 11-630-SC
ALICE D. ANDERSON
Plaintiff
VS.
TONIR. DRUMMOND
Defendant
A law suit has been filed to deter-
mine ownership and title of a certain
vehicle described as a 1995 Regal
Buick with Serial #
2G4WB12M4S1473946 located in
Lake City, Columbia County, Flori-
da.
The following persons) may claim
some right title or interest therein:
Alice D. Anderson. If you have
claim, interest, or defense in this
clause, you must file your written an-
swer or objection with the Clerk of
this Court of Columbia County with-
in 10 days.
(seal)
CLERK OF COURTS
By:/s/ Debbie Watkins
Deputy Clerk
05526640
July 14,21, 28, 2011
August 4, 2011


Public Auction
1991 LINCOLN
VIN# 1LNCM81W1MY791192
To be held 07/30/2011, 8:00am at
Bryant's Tire and Towing
1165 East Duval St. Lake City FL
32055
05526595
July 14,2011


Legal

Public Auction
2000 FORD
VIN# 1FAFP53U1YA108558
To be held 07/15/2011, 8:00am at
Bryant's Tire and Towing
1165 East Duval St. Lake City FL
32055
05526596
July 14, 2011

Registration of Fictitious Names
We the undersigned, being duly
sworn, do hereby declare under oath
that the names of all persons interest-
ed in the business or profession car-
ried on under the name of OUT-
DOOR INNOVATIONS PHOTOG-
RAPHY at 615 NW ZACK DR..,
LAKE CITY, FL., 32055

Contact Phone Number: 386-
(904)655-8698 and the extent of the
interest of each, is as follows:
Name: HEATHER BENNETT
Extent of Interest: 100%
by:/s/ Heather Bennett
STATE OF FLORIDA
COUNTY OF COLUMBIA
Sworn to and subscribed before me
this 12th day of July, A.D. 2011.
by:/s/ JARODANNE RENTZ
05526633
July 14, 2011


020 Lost & Found

LOST BILLFOLD: July 4th
weekend. Black double zippered.
aprox 6 in long. Small Reward.
Call 386-438-5278 Iv. message.

100 Job
Opportunities

05526543


I" i
Holiday inn

Lake City's only full service
hotel is seeking the following:
Cafe Manager
Experience required. Apply
in person. Mon-Fri 12-5pm
213 SW Commerce Dr.
EOE/DFWP.

05526594
OPS Park Ranger
Stephen Foster State Park
White Springs, Florida
Stephen Foster Folk Culture
Center State Park is seeking an
OPS Park Ranger to provide
maintenance of facilities,
equipment and grounds,
mowing, operate cash registers,
greet the public, answer phones,
setup and produce numerous
special events. Must be willing
to work rotating shifts including
weekends and holidays. Basic
Knowledge of maintenance
including plumbing, electrical
and carpentry are required.
Excellent people skills and
working with a team are
required. This position works in
all outdoor conditions. An OPS
classified position is a position
which does not have pension
benefits or health insurance
unless purchased. This is a
good entry level job into a future
career service position within
the Florida Park Service.
Mail or Fax. State of Florida
Employment Application by
Friday July 22nd to:
Stephen Foster State Park
Ben Faure Park Manager
P.O. Box G
White Springs, FL 32096
Fax (386) 397-4262
Applications are available
online at https://peoplefirst.my-
florida.com. Resumes are not
accepted unless accompanied
with a State of Florida
Employment Application.
DEP only hires US Citizens or
authorized aliens and is an EEO
/ ADA/ VP employer. Section
110.128, ES. prohibits the em-
ployment of any male required
to register with Selective Serv-
ice System under the US Milita-
ry Selective Service Act.

ATTN: Team Drivers needed for
dedicated acct. contracted by
Swift, CDL required, Six months
exp., Call Shawn 904-517-4620


CDL Class A Truck Driver.
Flatbed exp. for F/T SE area.
3 years exp or more. Medical
benefits offered. Contact
Melissa or Mary @ 386-935-2773


2006 Toyota Scion
XB
41,000 mi.
Paid over $24,000 new.
$13,000
Call
386-752-1313
904-718-6747


100 Job
Opportunities
Clerical/Data Entry, full to part
time. Experience with Microsoft
Word & Excel required, and
Quicken/QuickBooks preferred.
386-719-2200, Leave message.
Experienced part-time esthetician
needed for new MediSpa. Please
fax resume to 386-719-9488 or
mail to 125 SW Midtown Place,
Suite 101, Lake City, Fl. 32025.
General Office/Bookkeeping
Must know QuickBooks &
Microsoft Programs. Punctual.
Please send resume to: PO BOX
830, Lake City, Florida 32056
Part Time position for light
housekeeping and driving for
elderly gentleman in Lake City.
ALREADY FILLED
05526490
LINCARE, leading national
respiratory company seeks
results driven Sale
Representative. Create working
relationships with MD's, nurses,
social workers and articulate our
excellent patient care with
attentive listening skills.
Competitive Base + un-capped
commission. Drug-free
workplace. EOE.
Fax resume to center manager
(386)754-2795


Sales Position available for moti-
vated individual Rountree -Moore
Toyota, Great benefits, paid train-
ing/vacation. Exp. a plus but not
necessary. Call Anthony Cosentino
386-623-7442
Sales/Marketing Professional and
CNC Machine Operator(s)
needed for an aftermarket auto
parts mnfg company. Experience
a must! Remit Cv and Resume to
Sales Position PO BOX 425,
Lake City,FL 32056 or Email:
aapositi6ns0(gmail.com.

120 Medical
S Employment
p4


05526506 1
Occupational Therapist
Avalon Healthcare Center is
currently accepting applications
for the full time position of
Occupational Therapist.
Competitive Salary and
Excellent benefit package as
well as A sign on bonus is
being offered.
Please contact Jennie Cruce
director of Rehab.
dor~iavalonhrc.com
Avalon Healthcare and Rehab
1270 S.W. Main Blvd.
Lake City, Florida 32025
or fax resume to 386-752-8556
386-752-7900 EOE

Low volume Medically oriented
office seeks part time front
desk/receptionist. Experience
preferred. Send reply to Box
05064, C/O The Lake City
Reporter, P.O. Box 1709, Lake
City, FL, 32056

240 Schools &
S Education

05526648
Interested in a Medical Career?
Express Training offers
courses for beginners & exp
Nursing Assistant, $479
next class-07/25/10

Phlebotomy national certifica-
tion, $800 next class-08/08/11

Continuing education
Fees incl. books, supplies, exam
fees. Call 386-755-4401 or
expresstrainingservices.com



310 Pets & Supplies

FREE TO Good Home. I Golden
Lab. 1 Chichuahua/JRT Mix.
4 kittens, 8 weeks old and 1 young
mama cat. (352)283-2488
PUBLISHER'S NOTE
Florida Law 828.29 requires dogs
and cats being sold to be at least 8
weeks old and have a health
certificate from a licensed
veterinarian documenting they
have mandatory shots and are
free from intestinal and external
parasites. Many species of wild-
life must be licensed by Florida
Fish and Wildlife. If you are
unsure, contact the local
office for information.

330 Livestock &
3 Supplies

Black Angus Cows & Heifers
Prices Vary
Registered & Commercial
386-719-4802


1986 Chevy Monte
Carlo SS
78k miles, one owner.
All original.
$10,000
Call
386-752-1313
904-718-6747


361 Farm Equipment

84 Ford 4610 Tractor.
2WD, Solid
2005 motor,$7,500. OBO
386-867-0005


402 Appliances

Craftsman 19HP Rider Mower.
42 inch cut. Runs great. $465. obo
386-292-3927 or
386-755-5331.
FROST FREE Kenmore
refrigerator. Very clean. $200
386-292-3927 or
386-755-5331.
GE Dishwasher
$100. obo
386-292-3927 or
386-755-5331.


White GE Dryer.
Works great, looks good.
$125.
386-292-3927 or 386-755-5331.


407 Computers

Compaq Computer, Many extras.
Complete Computer
$80.00
386-755-9984 or 386-292-2170


420 Wanted to Buy

Wanted Junk Cars, Trucks, Vans.
$250 & up CASH! Free Pick Up!
NO title needed !386-878-9260
After 5pm 386- 752-3648.


430 Garage Sales

BIG Multi Family sale. Too
much to list. 412 SE Lehigh be-
hind Southside Baptist Church.
Sat. 8-1pm No early birds.
ESTATE SALE. Sat only.
July 16. 9am-?
1169 SW Central Ter
386-497-2808
GIANT 2 FAMILY 7-noon.
Clothes, household items,
Christmas, Jewelry. Hwy 247 -
3 mi. from Hwy 90. Jazlynn Place.
Huge Sale: Furniture, dishes,
baby items, knick-knacks,
electronics & more. Comer of
Franklin/Columbia Sat/Sun 7-til


PUBLISHER'S NOTE
All Yard Sale Ads
Must be Pre-Paid.

GIANT INDOOR yard sale. Sat.
7-? In the gym at Christ Central.
Sisters Welcome to Dyal Rd. on
.the right. Toys, nice pool tables,
furm.,. clothes, appli., much more.


440 Miscellaneous

Craftsman High Wheel push
mower. Runs good. $95. obo
386-292-3927 or
386-755-5331.
PRIDE GOGO Ultra, Scooter.
Used for 1 year. 2 batteries
and a charger. $600.
386-752-2201 Iv message
Stop gnat & Mosquito bites! Buy
Swamp Gator All natural insect re-
pellent. Family safe. Use head to
toe. Available at The Home Depot.
Summer Barbecue Special
Tow Behind
Grill/Smoker, $1,250 OBO.
386-719-4802

630 Mobile Homes
630 for Rent

2&3 BR MH. $395 $650. mo.
plus deposit. Water & sewer fur-
nished. Cannon Creek MHP
386-752-6422
2/2 Units, clean, well maintained,
nice safe park setting, 2 miles to
downtown Lake City, $575 month
+ $575 sec dep, 386-984-8448
13th Month FREE!!
3/2 DWMH, 1/2 ac. Shaded lot.
Paved Rd, 2 porches, 50'X50'
fenced small dog run. $600. mo +
$750 dep. References Req'd.
386-758-7184 or 984-0954
3/2 S of Lake City, (Branford area)
$575 month plus security
386-590-0642 or 386-867-1833
www.suwanneevalleyproperties.com
LG clean 3br's $450. -$650. mo. +
dep. Also, 2br mobile home's
available. No Pets.
5 Points area. 386-961-1482
Mobile Homes for rent in
White Springs, Lake City & Ft.
White Contact 386-623-3404
or 386-365-1919
X-Clean 2/2 SW, 8 mi NW of VA.
Clean'acre lot, nice area. $500. mo
+ dep No dogs Non-smoking
environment.386-961-9181


2010 Ford Fusion
SEL
V6, auto, leather, loaded,
7,000 mi., showroom cond.

$18,500
Call
386-752-8227


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LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED THURSDAY, JULY 14, 2011


640 Mobile Homes
6 for Sale
Handy man special, 94 Fleetwood
DWMH. 3/2 on 5 acres in Ft.
White. Owner Fin. $3,000 dn.
$850mo. $99,900 352-215-1018
www.LandOwnerFinancing.com
PALM HARBOR Homes
Repo's/Used Homes /Short Sales
3 or 4 Bedroom Doublewides
Wont Last!! 3,500-50K
Call Today! 800-622-2832

650 Mobile Home
650 & Land
67.5 ac.Ranch, fenced & cross
fenced. Spacious moblie home
w/large front deck & RV hookup
MLS 75607 $299,000. Access
Realty. Patti Taylor. 386-623-6896

705 Rooms for Rent
New furnished bedroom apt in a
home, private entrance & bath, in-
cludes utilities, trash, cable, frig &
pest control. $450 mo + dep. Avail
8/1. 386-752-2020 SW Lake City

710 Unfurnished Apt.
7 0 For Rent

---- XDSO*^--G APT ---
VwedBst Of^^he Be^^t^ga^n.
2/2S475~g~
31 S550]rfl ^^ ^


- 2/1 completely updated, screened
back porch, large utility room,
MLS#77413 $52,900 Call Nancy
05526481 Rogers R.E.O. Realty
SPRING HILL VILLAGE 386-867-1271
Excellent High Springs location. 3/2 1056 sqft Brick home in town.
1, 2 & 3 bedroom floor-plans; Fenced back yard w/12x12 work-
some with garages shop Just Reduced! $79,900
Call 386-454-1469 MLS# 77414 Call 386-243-8227
or visit our website: R.E.O.Realty Group, Inc
www.springhillvillage.net R. y G ,
3/2 2003 DWMH on 5 acre rectan-
I bedroom Apartment. Quiet, gular lot w/tons of potential.
Private'street. $400. mo MLS#77568 $79,900 Call Nancy
plus security deposit. @ R.E.O. Realty 386-867-1271
386-344-3715 nancytrogers@msn.com
2/1 w/garage & washer/dryer 3/2 home on .67 ac. Creekside S/D
hookups. East side of town, Fenced back yard, lots of trees.
Call for details Split floor plan on cul-de-sac
386-755-6867 MLS 77385 Access Realty.
3BR2BA Newlyremodeled. Patti Taylor $169,900 623-6896
Large Yard & Porch 4/2 on 10.5 acres w/ detached
Call for more details garage, patio, above ground pool,
386-867-9231 MLS# 77410 $189,888
h R.E.O. Realty Group, Inc,
Furnished or unfurnished 386-243-8227.
Townhomes on the golf course.
$750. mo. plus security. Includes 4/2.with 1000 sq ft workshop,
water. 386-752-9626 fenced yard, 2 car garage, Fairly'
.new roof & HVAC MLS#77602,
NICE APT Downtown. Remod BringOffers! $164,900
eled 1 bedroom. Kitchen, dining, R.RealtyGrup 243-8227
living room. $450. mo plus sec. R.O.Realtyroup 243-8227
386-362-8075 or 386-754-2951' 4br brick on .51ac. comer lot. For-
mal dining and a large open floor
O in GEAt plan. Brick patio. $139,888
lMLS 76763 Brittany Stoeckert
Results Realty 386-397-3473
AccesS Really St) hsh 3/2 + pool
house al//2 bath on 2.25 acres.
lRear deck, 2 car garage & carport.
rom $ l&lei MLS 78103 $189,900.
Patti Taylor.623-6896.
.BEAUTIFUL Lake Front home!
Summer Special! 12th mo Free 1. lac lot within the city limits.
wisigned yrlease .Ipdat~,i kwii/ C (lose to:town. 1800 heated sq. ft.
floors/fresh paint. Great area: $1244,900 MLS# 78385
From $450.+sec. 386-752-9626 Call Jay Sears. 386-867-1613
The Lakes Apts. Studios & 1Br's Brick 3/1 family home, 4.43 acres.
from $135/wk. Util. & cable incl., w/metal roof. MLS# 7741.5.
Sec. 8 vouchers accepted, monthly Short sale acceptance w/lenders
ratbs avaf Call 386-752-2741 approval. $89.000 386-243-8227'
.- R.E.O. Realty Group, Inc
720 FurbishedApts. CLEAN & READY! 3BR/2BA
F2rtRent mfg home on .97-acre south of Ft.
Rooms for RetHillcrest, Sads White on paved road $59,000
Roomsfor Rent'Hillcrest, SadsEL CRAPPS AGENCY
Columbia. Afurimished. Electric, DANIEL CRAPPS AGENCY,
cable, fridge,'microwave. Weekly INC 755-5110 #7800
or monthly rates. 1 person $135, Coldwell Banker/Bishop, Realty
2 persons $150. weekly 3/2 brick home in Woodcrest. Lg '.
386-752-5808 lot completely fenced. Easy access;I
. 1 6. to amenities. Elaine K. Tolar 386-
73 Unfurnished 755-6488 MLS# 78148 $129,900
Home For Rent Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
/. Co,- C 3t4 in beautiful area. 2414sqft.
lbr/1.5ba Country Cottage, Cathe- ate yard & pato with storage, .
dral ceilings. bnck fireplace. Private yard & patio with storage.
dral cerlIgs. bncek fd, pace, ash- s bldg Lon 0 Sunpson 386-365-
e r. ec, p ale, some .5678 ILS# 78175 $159.900
pets, lease. set, last. sec. ref. Lake 8-6:
Cin area $650mo. 352-494-1989 Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
lbr/Iba Fr in mi New-home'in Mayfair 4 bedroom
1 bL r Freed. Ulne. n 5mon on corner lot. Covered Porch
S. Lake City. $ dep. $375mo. Elaine K. Tolar 386-75-6488
386-590-0642 of 386-867-1833 Elae 7691Tolar 3$-29
www.suwanneevalleyproperties.com
2br Pr e Cunty Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
2br Private Country Remodeled 2/2 (could be 3/ ).
rHome. Remodeled, Split floor plan. Great home, great
everything is new. Large yard. pce. Mary Brown Whitehurst
RENTED price,. Mary Brown Whitehurst
.. R D.______ 965-0887 MLS# 77943 $105,000
3/2 House, pet-friendly, $850 mo. Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
Broker-Owner, Detailsrat MH in Eastside Village a 55+
putnw.johnstand.c. 36 retirement community. Well main-
Dutnanhtml. 386-755-5936 trained. Bruce Dicks 386-365-3784
Completely remodeled Brick. MLS# 78350 $59,900
3br/2ba 1750 sqft. Lg lot. Includes
washer, dryer, stove, & fridge Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
$985. mo $985 dep. 386-752-7578 Brick home on Suwannee River
$$329,900 Elaine K. Tolar 386-755-
Family Home 3/2, Ir, dr, fam rm 6488 or Lori G. Simpson 365-5678
w/ fp,garage, fenced back yd. MLS# 70790 $329,900
Nice area. $1100 mo + dep Martha ERA GWEN A r
Jo Ktiachigan, Realtor 623-2848 DESIRABLE GWEN LAKE area!
___________________ Nice 3BR/2BA'home on comer lot
SWMH 2/2 in Wellborn, REDUCED TO $95,000 DANIEL
$625 mo, and CRAPPS AGENCY, INC.
$625 security. 755-5110 #77307
386-365-1243 or 397-2619allmark Real Estate. 3
Hallmark Real Estate. 3/2
Unfurnished 2.bedroom/l bath Doublewide'on 1 acre. $58,000.
house. $700.00 per month. Not far to college & airport.
First, last and security Firm. MLS# 78308
386-590-5333 Ginger Parker 386-365-2135
//, Business & Hallmark Real Estate. 35 High &
0 usinessDry acres. open pasture w/scat-
Office Rentals tered trees. Older site built home.
FOR LEASE: Downtown office Needs some TLC.
space. Convenient to 'MLS#76186 Jay Sears 119-0382
Court house. Hallmark Real Estate. Beautiful
Call 386-755-3456 lot in Woodborough, has well
-' maintained 3/2 brick home.
For Lease: E Baya Ave. Two Affordable price!MLS#75413
1000 sqft office space units or Sherry Willis 386-365-8095'
combined for 2000 sqft. 386-984-
0622 or weekends 386-4974762 Hallmark Real Estate. Lakefront
in town on 1 ac. Majestic oaks &
OFFICE SPACE for lease. Magnolias. Hardwood floors,
Oak Hill Plaza. 900 sqft fireplace & basement.
$675mo/$695. sec dep. MLS#78385 Jay Sears 719-0382
Tom 386-961-1086 DCA Realtor
Hallmark Real Estate. Pool &
7 0 Patio. 3br/2ba. brick home on
790 Vacation Rentals 1.69 ac. Workshop &
SWMH on property. MLS#78117
Horseshoe Beach RV Lot. Tanya Shaffer 386-397-4766
Nice comer Lot with shade trees. Hallmark Real Estate. Time to go,
$295. mo Water/electric included .to the River. Stilt home w/covered
386-235-3633 or 352-498-5986 decking. Floating dock,out bldgs
Scalloping Horseshoe Beach Spcl MS#72068 Janet Creel719-0382:
Gulf Front 2br, w/lg porch, dock,
fish sink. wkend $395./wk $895. Handyman Special
386-235-3633/352-498-5986 Off Turner Rd. 2br/1.5ba.
alwaysonvacation.com #419-181 Half acre fenced lot w/shed.
"Florida's Last Frontier" Asking $55,000. (352)335-8330


805 Lots for Sale
1/4 acre, new well, septic and
power, paved rd, owner fin, no
down pym't, $24,900,
($256 month) 352-215-1018
www.LandOwnerFinancing.com
PUBLISHER'S NOTE
All real estate advertising in this
newspaper is subject to the fair
housing act which makes it illegal
to advertise "any preference,
limitation, or discrimination based
on race, color, religion, sex,
disability, familial status or nation-
al origin; or any intention to make
such preference, limitation or
discrimination." Familial status
includes children under the age of
18 living with parents or legal
custodians, pregnant women and
people securing custody of chil-
dren under the age of 18. This
newspaper will not knowingly
accept any advertising for real es-
tate which is in violation of the
law. Opr readers are hereby in-
formed that all dwellings adver-
tised in this newspaper are availa-
ble on an equal opportunity basis.
To complain of discrimination call
HUD toll free at 1-800-669-9777,
the toll free
telephone number to the hearing
impaired is 1-800-927-9275.

810 Home for Sale


Paved hard road in front of 5 ac.
tract. Comes with: power pole,
well & septic. Cleared in back.
Also, 20X25 carport. $39,900
MLS# 76347. Jay 386-867-1613


Bring the picture in or
we will take it for youl
* Ad runs 10 consecutive days
with a description and photo in the
newspaper and online E-edition..
* Ad runs 10Oconsecutive days as a:
classified line ad online.
* You must include vehicle price.
* All ads are prepaid.
* Private party only.


2006 EF250
Ford Van
3/4 ton, metal work
shelves/ladder rack,
60K miles, exc; cond.
$10,500
Call
386-555-5555
If you don't sell your vehicle
during the first 10 days, you
can run the same vehicle ad
for 10 additional days for
only $1 5.00
Terms and conditions remain the
same for the additional run.


Vehicle S Cal
MaryorBridge
(386 755544


810 Home for Sale
HANDYMAN SPECIAL!
4BR/2BA mfg home in great loca-
tion close to many amenities
$39,500 DANIEL CRAPPS
AGENCY, INC. 755-5110 #77852
Home on 15 ac. w/over 2,500 sqft
home.Very Ig bedrooms w/private
baths. 24x24 workshop $235,000
MLS 77552 Brittany Stoeckert
Results Realty 386-397-3473
Lg. 4/3 family home. 16x20
screened porch, workshop. 4.5 ac.
fenced/cross fenced MLS 74339
$229,900. N Fla Homeland Real-
ty Darlene Hart 386-288-2878
Mayfair S/D, nice fenced in back
yard w/small lake behind property.
Very nice. $99,888
MLS 77092 Brittany Stoeckert
Results Realty 386-397-3473
Neat as a pin! Split floor plan
w/well manicured lawn. 10x12.
storage shed. $129K MLS 77932
Darlene Hart 386-288-2878
N Fla Homeland Realty
Open House, Sun. 7/17, 2-4 pm.
Come see 3bd-2ba home with the
"WOW" factor. 331 NW Kensing-
ton Ln, Lake City 386-754-1595
QUALITY HOME. Very private,
yet in the city. Comes with mobile
home park that generates revenue.
$695,000. MLS# 77920
Call Jay Sears. 386-867-1613
REDUCED! Custom 2,061 SqFt
home with open floor plan,
3BR/2.5BA, in-ground pool
DANIEL CRAPPS AGENCY,
INC. 755-5110 #77505
RUSSWOOD EST! 3BR/2BA
w/2,337 SqFt, open floor plan,
climatized sun porch $219,900
DANIEL CRAPPS AGENCY,
INC. 755-5110 #77633
Spacious 4/2 home on 1 ac. Split
floor plan. Great neighborhood.
Easy access to 1-75 $220K MLS
77859 N Fla Homeland Realty
Darlene Hart 386-288-2878
WELLBORN! 4BR/2BA mfg
home w/2,280 SqFt, FP, & 5
ACRES only $74,900
DANIEL CRAPPS AGENCY,
INC. 755-5110 #78317.

820 Farms&
Acreage
10 ac. Ft. White $39,995,
$995 Down,$273.16 mo.
Seller fin. vargasrealty.com
352-472-3154
10-ac lot. Well/septic/pp, Owner
financing $300 dn, $663 mo 8.9%,
25 yrs. Deas Bullard Properties
386-752-4339 www.landnfl.cimn
2+ ACRES ONHWY 47
by 1-75 interchange. More than
200 ft of frontage $149,900
Call 386-243-8227
R..O. Realty Group, Inc ,
20.02 acres ready for your site
built home. Has 2 wells & 2 power
poles w/a 24x30slab $132,000
MLS# 78126 Call 386-243-8127
R.E.O.Realty Group, Inc
41/2 acre lot. Lake Jeffery Road.
Gorgeous Oaks!Paved Rd
Owner Financing! NO DOWN!
$59,900. $525mo 352-215-1018.
www.LandOwnerFinancing.com
.4 acres, Wellbom, New Well
':.installed, Beautifully wooded
W/cleared Home Site, owner fin,
no down, $39,900, $410 mon
Call 352-215-1018
www.LandOwnterFinancing.com
:: FARM- 7 stall bafn, Apt.
1.'.7+ acres cross fenced.
SClose in $895. mo.
.386-961-1086


ACROSS

1 Footrest'
6 Holland'
export
11t- de Havilland
i12, Montana capi-"
tal
13 Impolitely
14 Pranks
15 Tractor pio-
neer
16 Glasnost ini-
tials
17 Adroit
19 Nerve cell part
23 Youth org.
26 Kind of rage
28 Santa winds
29 Baseball's
Iron Man
31 More helpful
33 Greenspan
and Alda
34 Classified (2
wds.)
35 Mr. Chaney
36 Totter
39 Earth's star


830 Commercial
830J Property

05526409
FOR SALE LAKE CITY
FORMER 84 LUMBER Zoned
Commercial Intensive on
4.2 +- Acres with an 18,300
S.F main building at 1824 W.
US Highway 90; contact
Crystal 724 228-3636 x 1349
4 UNIT Apt. Bldg. All 1/1/ w/ex-
tra rooms. Clean, good tenants and
remodeled. Downtown. $160,000.
386-362-8075 or 754-2951

Prime Commercial Location.
Just across from plaza. Frontage
on Baya w/2 curbcuts. $350,000
MLS# 77485 Call 386-243-8227
R.E.O.Realty Group, Inc

870 Real Estate
S Wanted

I Buy Houses
CASH!
Quick Sale Fair Price
386-269-0605


950 Cars for Sale

2010 FORD Fusion SEL V6,
Auto, Leather, Loaded. 7,000 mi.
Showroom condition. $18,500.
386-752-8227




Contact us


at the paper,





-~ mm.


CLASSIFIED AD

386-755-5440



SUBSCRIPTION

386-755-544S


ALL OTHER DEPARTMENTS

L 386-752-1293
.-Y

EECTRONIC ADS SEND TIO

adsOlakecityreporter.comn
W in,, -,D,_;i 6";- i ,, .-0 : i i.
, r a -( .. -
us IN, :4 ~2Wvt : 'l4,


SA THFIR PAY AT
STHE BEACH
I- iTHIS.
DRURDE
Now arrange the circled letters.
to form the surprise answer, as
Suggested by the above cartoon.

Answer:
(Answers tomorrow)
Yesterday Jumbles: SILKY THICK BAFFLE PUDDLE
Answer: When they were upgraded at check-in, they
Considered it this A "SUITE" DEAL,


Answer to Previous Puzzle

G1O1BI I WIVES I VE
ALLURE VEINEE
SULLEN ATIK IN
H.E A'L G"ENISLY
SIRE IIS

PRE Y S ROMEJO
AIMEE UIMIAK

ALSLES FERN

BET ROID RICA
ORDEAL DRIVEL
NINETY SPEED'"S
SCANT MDcSzE


12 la vista!
16 Roswell crash-
er
18 Joule fraction
20 Craft knife
(hyph.)


Want more puzzles?
Check out the "Just Right Crossword Puzzles" books
at QuillDriverBooks.com


21 Ryan or
Tatum
22 Ancient oint-
ment
23 Farther down
24 Oater classic
25 Prince Val's
son
27 Spiral mol-
ecule
29 Benefit, often
30 Shuttle's des-
tination
32 Advantages
34 Colo. neigh-
bor
37 Uses a blow-
torch
38 In days gone
by
41 English poet
43 Take a vow
45 Burn the sur-
face
47 Juno, in
Athens
48 Absent
49 Sports
"zebras"
50 Tuition
51 Thai temple
52 "Exodus"
name
53 Civil War sol-
dier
54 Interest amt.


2011 UFS, Dist. by Univ. Uclick for UFS


and mates- CaJ



ADVERTISE YOUR


GARAGE SALE

WITH THE
LAKE CITY REPORTER

Only






S4 LINES 3 DAYS
2 FREE SIGNS!



(386) -755-5440


THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME
by David L. Hoyt and Jeff Knurek
Unscramble these four Jumbles, Ilke it.
one letter to each square, seemed like the
to form four ordinary words. ce.

SHBMTUi


40 Floored
42 "l" problems
.44 Nobel Prize
city
46 Pier
51 Cautioned
54 Teeny-tiny .
55 Hippodromes
56 Wine server
57 Caesar's river
58 Shallow con-
tainers .

DOWN

1 Veer off-
course
2 Ocean motion
3 Done with
4 Fixed the
squeak
5 Produce eggs
6 Wallet stuffers
7 Infra opposite
8 Wahine's wel-
come
9 Financial mag
10 Faux -
11 California fort


Classified Department: 755-5440













LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS THURSDAY, JI4LY 14, 2011 Page Editor: Brandon Finley, 754-0420


Royal St. George's

SANDWICH, England A hole-by-
hole look at Royal St. George's:
No. I, 444 yards, par 4:The opening
tee shot is so demanding that only 30
percent of the field hit the fairway in 2003.
The fairway since has been widened by 12
yards. The carry over a valley called "The
Kitchen" is 250 yards.The approach must
avoid three bunkers front.and left of a
large green.
No. 2,417 yards, par 4:The hole moves
from right to left toward the coast. Two
bunkers on the inside corner of the dogleg
require a 250-yard carry, giving players an
option of trying to shorten the hole.The
approach is a short iron to a raised green,
and anything missing the target will run
away from the putting surface and leave a
delicate pitch.
No. 3, 240 yards, par 3: A new tee
added 30 yards to the championship tees.
Dunes to the right and behind the green
will push balls onto a two-tiered putting
surface. The green is 43 yards deep, and
par is difficult with a front hole location.
This was the third-hardest hole in 1993,
but its rank was only 13th in 2003.
No. 4,495 yards, par 4:This hole is two
yards shorter, yet now plays as a par 4
for this Open.The tee shot is intimidating
because of a towering bunker set into a
50-foot hill to the right. Once in play, the
approach must get over a deep depression
in the front-left quadrant of the green.
Anything long brings the out-of-bounds
fence into play.The average score in 2003
was 4.6.
No. 5,419 yards, par 4:This hole bends
sharply to the left, wth five bunkers and
several dune ridges guarding the left side
and often leaving a blind approach.The far-
thest dune is 320 yards from the tee.With
the wind at their backs, several players hit
driver over the dune. More birdies were
made, however, by playing conservatively
off the tee.There are no bunkers around
the relatively flat green.
No. 6, 178 yards, par 3:The long, two-
tiered green is set at a 45-degree angle
from the tee.The green is surrounded by
four bunkers that collect any shot that
misses the putting surface.
No. 7, 564 yards, par 5: This ranked
as the easiest hole in 2003, although a
new tee adds 32 yards. The crest of hill,
which hides the fairway from view, is 280
yards from the tee, and a bad bounce can
send the ball into the rough.The fairway
turns to the left toward a green with two
bunkers to the right and to the left.There
were 20 eagles in 2003, and the hole
played to an average of 4.52.
No. 8, 453 yards, par 4:This played as
the most difficult hole in 2003, and it starts
with a daunting tee shot uphill and usually
into the wind.The approach can be blind,
over 80 yards of rough to an undulating
green. Two fairway bunkers on the right
force tee shots to the left side, making
the approach slightly longer. There are
bunkers short and left, and to the right
of the green.
No. 9, 412 yards, par 4: The tee has
been shifted to the left and lengthened
24 yards to help improve visibility of the
fairway.A bunker on the right called "The
Corsets" tightens the landing area, and
mounds in the fairways can send tee shots
out of the short grass.The best approach
is from the right, playing away from the
indentation to the right of the undulating
green that is guarded by four bunkers.
No. 10, 415 yards, par 4:The hole is
defined by an elevated green that falls away
sharply on all sides.,The easier up-and-
down will come from short of the green.
Two small bunkers to the left and one
large bunker to the right collect anything
that misses the green. Hole ranked sixth-
hardest in 2003.
No. 11, 243 yards, par 3:The longest
of the par 3s played as the most difficult
of the short holes in 2003, although a
prevailing wind should mean a mid-iron for
most players to a large green. Five bunkers
guard the left and right corners of the put-
ting surface.The green is one of the most
difficult to read on the course.
No. 12, 381 yards, par 4:The shortest
of the par 4s played as the easiest par 4 in
2003, although it can cause problems.The
dogleg right hides eight bunkers that catch
any tee shot struck too aggressively. The
green can be difficult when putting from
the wrong spot.
No. 13, 459 yards, par 4: The narrow
fairway is littered with seven bunkers
that start pinching the fairway at about
260 yards off the tee. The approach must
be exact because of a ridge that runs
the length of the 40-yard green, and the
putting surface is protected by bunkers
in front on the left and right An out-of-
bounds fence is just beyond the green.
No. 14, 547 yards, par 5: The out-of-
bounds fence runs down the right side
of the fairway, and Davis Love III caught
an enormous break in 2003 when his tee
shot bounced off a white stake. Players
also, have to deal with "The Suez Canal"'
that crosses the fairway at about 330
yards. The approach has been softened
slightly, but there is risk going for the
green in two because of two bunkers
protecting the left side of a green the
drops away on the right toward the out-
of-bounds fence.
No. 15,496 yards, par 4:A brutal finish
starts here three of the last four holes
were ranked no worse than No. 5 in dif-
ficulty.The tee shot must avoid five punish-
ing fairway bunkers, leaving an approach to
a relatively small green that must reach'on
the fly to avoid three bunkers across the
.entrance of the putting surface.The green
falls away to the right.
No. 16, 163 yards, par 3:This hole might
forever be known for costing Thomas
Bjorn the title in 2003, when he took
three shots to escape a bunker right of the
green. It's supposed to be a brief respite
from the closing stretch, but the green is
surrounded by seven bunkers. Played as
the easiest of the par 3s in 2003.
No. 17, 426 yards, par 4:This is one of


the toughest fairways to find because of
the severe humps and swales that often
send tee shots into the rough.The fairway
has been widened by about six yards for
this year's championship. The approach is
to a green that sits on a plateau and is pro-
tected by bunkers left and right.Anything
short will roll back off the green and leave
a challenging chip.
No. 18, 459 yards, par 4: The hole is
about the same distance as 2003, although
it has been revamped. The fairway has
been moved to the right, and there are
more bunkers in the landing areas. The
three bunkers that once crossed the
fairway are now two, and they have been
raised. The bunker short and left of the
green has been moved closer to the put-
ting surface.


A windy test awaits at


Sandwich for British Open


By DOUG FERGUSON
Associated Press

SANDWICH, England
- Steve Stricker can
appreciate better than
most how the British Open
is unlike any other major.
One day after winning
the John Deere Classic
with a birdie-birdie finish
on the green, manicured


fairways of a TPC course
in America's heartland,
Stricker "was trying to
stand upright on the lunar
links of Royal St. George's.
The yardage book was
more of a guide than the
gospel.
It was tough to control
his golf ball through the
air, even harder when it
was bouncing along the


ground.
That short time was
all he. needed, however,
to learn what most oth-
ers have about this links
course in the southeast of
England. It's a strong test
for golf's oldest champion-
ship on a mild day. When
the wind is up, which it
has been all week, it can
be a beast.


SUMMER: Teams play


Continued From Page 1B



field," he said. "He pitches
and plays right field and
he's really athletic. He's a
good team player and he's
only a sophomore."
Both coaches continue
to push fundamentals, but
it's especially important to
Rizzi as he enters his first
season since returning as
Fort White's head coach.
'That's where it all



lIz"I"


starts," Rizzi said. "I'm a
big believer in the mental
side of the game."
Clark is glad to have his
players gain experience
where they can find it
"We have guys that are
also doing travel ball," he
said. "The problem is those
teams only play about twice
a month, so we're glad to
have them here too."


Page Editor: Brandon Finley, 754-0420


^SUMMER C?~iiLEARANCE EVNTh


LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS THURSDAY, JQLY 14, 2011