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The Lake City reporter
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028308/01605
 Material Information
Title: The Lake City reporter
Uniform Title: Lake City reporter (Lake City, Fla. 1967)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: John H. Perry
Place of Publication: Lake City Fla
Publication Date: 7/10/2011
Frequency: daily (monday through friday)[<1969>-]
weekly[ former 1967-<1968>]
daily
normalized irregular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Lake City (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Columbia County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Columbia -- Lake City
Coordinates: 30.189722 x -82.639722 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 95, no. 4 (Oct. 5, 1967)-
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000358016
oclc - 33283560
notis - ABZ6316
lccn - sn 95047175
sobekcm - UF00028308_01569
System ID: UF00028308:01605
 Related Items
Preceded by: Lake City reporter and Columbia gazette

Full Text





Forest life
Lake City kids
get a lesson
nno '- 1205 HS


The rematch
It's Lake City vs.


S3-DIGI1
STORY


r


oiVF FLORIDA
ULL OFL32611-1943


326 range Park
:day at 9.
)orts, I B


City


3,000 hits
Jeter goes
5 for 5 to reach
milestone.
Sports, I B


Reporter


Sunday, July 10,201 I www.lakecityreporter.com Vol. 137, No. 141 $1.00


What do

you think?

Do we need stricter
laws on reporting
missing children? -
In the wake of the Casey Anthony
verdict, politicians across America are
filing bills aimed at creating harsher
penalties for parents who don't report
a missing child right away. Anthony
was convicted of lying to police about
the whereabouts of her two-year-old
daughter she waited a month before
reporting her missing but acquitted
on more serious charges.
We asked staff writer Antonia
Robinson to see what local folks think
of various new proposals that would
make it a felony not to file missing child
reports promptly.


I would highly
support it.
Anything that
can help find
missing children
and police find
the true offender.
Kanoye Capps




That makes
sense. It's like
child abuse.
Laws that make
sense are a
good thing.
Julio Amparo





I don't know they
should make it a
felony. (Parents)
are in shock
when their child
goes missing.
Jessica
Howarth



I don't know
whether we
need to pro-
pose that. It's
common sense.
Normal parents
know that.
Emmanuel
Manuel



I'd be in favor
of it depending
on the details
of how soon
they have to
file a report in
general. The
devil's always in
the details.
George Revoir


Questions? Comments? Contact
Editor Robert Bridges at 754-0428.


CALL US:
(386) 752-1293
SUBSCRIBE TO
THE REPORTER:
Voice: 755-5445
3 Fax: 752-9400


COURTESY PHOTO
Rodney Dicks and Sons Farm of Columbia County was recognized at the 11th
annual CARES dinner recently. From left are Florida Agriculture Commissioner
Adam Putnam, Delve, Dicks, Rodney Dicks, Regal Dicks, and Florida Farm Bureau
President John Hoblick.



'Caretakers



of theland'


Dicks and Sons Farm
recognized as steward
of the environment.

By ANTONIA ROBINSON
arobinson@lake.cityreporter.com
F arming has been a fam-
ily tradition for the Rodney
Dicks and Sons Farm in
Columbia County for years.
"We've farmed all our
life," said Delvey Dicks.
The family has worked to protect
water quality and conserve water
from the beginning.
Rodney Dicks and Sons Farm
in Columbia County was among


19 farmersin the Suwannee and
Santa Fe river basins honored at
the llth Annual County Alliance
for Responsible Environmental
Stewardship dinner.
' "It felt great to be honored as
caretakers of the land," Delvey Dicks
said. "We agree with what they're
promoting."
The Florida Farm Bureau and the
Suwannee River Partnership created
CARES to honor farmers who have
been environmental stewards by use
of Best Management Practices.
"I think all farmers should be care-
takers of the environment," he said.
BMPs protect and save water
by helping farmers manage animal
STEWARDS continued on 3A


The great outdoors -

right in the classroom


Summer camp
kids learn a little
about forestry.
From staff reports
TALLAHASSEE More than
40 children from the Annie Mattox


Recreation Department Summer
Camp in Lake City were treated
to a new environmental education
program presented by AmeriCorps'
volunteers working for the Osceola
National Forest recently.
OUTDOORS continued on 3A


U.S. Forest Service photo by Susan Blake
U.S. Forest Service AmeriCorps volunteer Heather Grames conducts classroom
training at the Annie Mattox Summer Camp recently. The environmental education
program is designed to bring the great outdoors to the classroom with hands-on
activities.


9473
Clouds, T-Storms
WEATHER, 2A


Opinion ..........
Business .........
Obituaries ...
Life ........ .
Puzzles ......... ..


.. 6A
ID
.... 2B


Draft


plan is


sent for


springs

Funding for
future work
withdrawn.
By TONY BRITT
tbritt@lakecityreporter.com .

A draft restoration plan has been
completed and submitted to the
Florida Department of Environmental
Protection listing ways to protect
and improve water quality in the
Ichetucknee Springs Basin. Formation
of the plan was one of the final projects
completed by the Ichetucknee Springs
Working Group, which held its final
meeting earlier this week.
The project to create and implement
the plan was originally slated to be a
three-year project, with the draft to
be released during the first year and
work on finalizing and implementing
'the plan to continue for the next two
, years. However, due to a loss of funding
the project ended and the Ichetucknee
Working Group dissolved.
Ondine Wells, former coordinator of
the Ichetucknee Springs Basin Working
Group, laid the Springs Initiative
Section of the Florida Department of
Environmental Protection's Division
of Environmental Assessment and
Restoration accepted proposals from
qualified vendors to develop, monitor
and encourage the implementation
of a Spring Restoration Plan in four
different recharge basins including
Ichetucknee.
Wells said the restoration plan was
initially designed to be structured
through consensus and cooperation
among stakeholders in the Ichetucknee
Springs Working Group.
The restoration plan is designed to
utilize information obtained from prior
and ongoing research, monitoring, and
restoration activities conducted in the
spring system and the recharge basin.
"The plan will outline the ecological,
hydrological or biological causes of
impairment; set benchmarks for reduc-
ing the impairments; develop and set a
schedule for implementing restoration
projects for the Ichetucknee Springs
as well as a mechanism for tracking
project implementation,". Wells said.
"Stakeholders will be encouraged to
make significant inroads toward pro-
tection and restoration of the spring
ecosystem through actions within the
spring, the spring run and the recharge
basin."
Wells noted the plan outlines the
goals and actions that were identified
by the stakeholders.
'"The next step would be to prioritize
which of these goals are most impor-
tant and to address those first," she
said. "Many of the stakeholders are
already working towards some of these
goals."
According to Wells there was a clear
consensus among stakeholders that the
working group was critical to providing
an unbiased forum whereby diverse
parties could learn, meet and discuss
the science of the Ichetucknee.
"It also provided a very important
opportunity for stakeholders to share
what they are doing, network and build
collaborations," she said. "Thanks to
many years of leadership from Jim
Stevenson, the working group has a
strong core of stakeholders who repre-
sent a very diverse group.
She said the stakeholders also felt
SPRINGS continued on 3A


TODAY IN COMING
BUSINESS TUESDAY
Jobs, .."ater is ',.v'eekend
...e ,._I tut.jre ne.. S ... r.apup


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LAKE CITY REPORTER SUNDAY REPORT SUNDAY, JULY 10, 2011


(H 3. 4' FLORIDA

Friday: Friday: Saturday: Saturday: Saturday: Saturday:
7-8-21-28 MB 17 6-14-17-22-29 Afternoon: 7-5-0 Afternoon: 2-5-3-0 Unavailable Unavailable



PEOPLE IN THE NEWS



On 2nd day in U.S., Will to star in game of kings


By NOAKI SCHWARTZ and
THOMAS WATKINS
Associated Press

CARPINTERIA, Calif.
- The prince will duke it
out in the game of kings.
The Duke and Duchess
of Cambridge were sched-'
uled to make a recreation-
al detour on their busy
weekend business trip to
Los Angeles on Saturday,
when they will attend a
charity polo match near
the swanky seaside city of
Santa Barbara.
Both Prince William and
his brother, Prince Harry,
regularly play polo during
the summer months. The
horseback sport, some-
times referred to as the
game of kings, is known
for its fast pace, dangerous
maneuvers and exclusivity.
Saturday's match will
take place at the posh Santa
Barbara Polo & Racquet
Club, about 100 miles
northeast of Los Angeles.
For the price of a $4,000
ticket, guests can perhaps.
meet the prince and prin-
cess and watch William
lead his fellow polo play-
ers into competition. The
former Kate Middleton will
present the trophy to the
winning team.
Those who can't afford
to chow down with the
royal couple can purchase
a $400 ticket that will get
them admission to the.
grandstand, a box lunch
and a souvenir program.
Proceeds will go to charity.
By midmorning, men
in blazers and women in
brightly colored dresses'
and wide-brimmed .-hats
decorated with feathers


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Prince William, Duke of Cambridge, mingles with soccer player David Beckham at a private reception at the British
Consul-General's residence in Los Angeles, Friday.


and ribbons began to trick-
le onto the grassy areas
either side of the polo field.
The weather was unexpect-
edly overcast, with clouds
hanging low over the near-
by hills and a slight breeze
in the air.
White fences lined the
,field -- celebrities- and
other VIEs on'one side and
the spectators who paid
$400 a ticket on the other.


White tents and tables with
white tablecloths were
punctuated with sprays of
white flowers. Among the
celebrities expected to rub
shoulders with the roy-
als were Rob Lowe, Zoe
Saldana, Rosario Dawspn
and Nicollette Sheridan.
The duke and duch-
ess arrived in California
on Friday after a nine-day
trip to Canada, their first


foreign excursion since
getting married in April.
Within minutes of landing,
the couple headed to their
first event, a technology
summit in Beverly Hills
aimed at promoting U.S.
investment in British tech
firms.
After the polo game, the
duke and duchess will head
to downtown Los Angeles
to attend a black-tie at the


historic Belasco Theatre,
where they will be guests of
honor at a British Academy
of Film and Television Arts
dinner honoring 42 young
British filmmakers.
The list of celebrities
reportedly also attending
reads like a who's who of
Hollywood royalty: Tom
Hanks, Nicole Kidman,
Quentin Tarantino and
Judd Apatow.


William and Kate's arriv-
al in California has been a
lower-key affair compared
to the largely rapturous
welcomes they received as
they crisscrossed Canada,
though small crowds of
royal watchers waving
British and American flags
congregated outside the
British consul general's
home in Hancock Park and
elsewhere.
Friday's tech sum-
mit was set up to gener-
ate support for Tech City,
London's answer to Silicon
Valley. The area around
the trendy Old Street part
of east London is quickly
becoming a hub for tech-
nology and software firms.
Britain's royal family has
shown itself to be tech-
savvy in recent years and
maintains accounts on sev-
eral social media sites.
On Sunday, the royal
couple will watch a dance
at a nonprofit academy in
the gritty Skid Row area
of downtown then attend a
job fair for U.S. servicemen
and women transitioning to
civilian life.
"People just want a
glimpse of the duke and
duchess," said Los Angeles
resident Christian Kang.,
"There's so much com-
passion in both of them. I
know they're going to Skid
Row, and I think thafs very
good to see from someone
in his position."
Though Prince William
has been to America before,
it is Kate's first trip to the
U.S. William's late mother,
Princess Diana, who would
have turned 50 this month,
charmed Americans when
she visited in the 1980s.


Movie filmed as space
shuttle Atlantis took off

TITUSVILLE A movie starring
actor Jason Ritter was being filmed
as space shuttle Atlantis lifted off
from Kennedy Space Center.
"Atlantis" is being filmed in cen-
tral Florida. It's about strangers
who meet and fall in love during the
buildup to the final space shuttle
launch. Filming took place on a dock
at Space View Park while the shuttle
lifted off Friday in the background.
This was the first launch for Ritter
and actress Kate French. Ritter, son
of the late actor John Ritter, said it
was "an important moment in time to
capture."
Space Coast Film Commissioner
Bonnie King told Florida Today, she
was pleased that a film was being
shot locally that focused on the final
shuttle launch. King called it "a trib-
ute to the final shuttle launch."

7 charged in Fla.
:pharmacy pill mill case
FORT LAUDERDALE Seven
people are charged in South Florida
with supplying more than 1 million
tablets of oxycodone painkiller to
drug dealers and to fill pill mill doc-
*tor prescriptions.
Federal authorities say the group
,operated a Fort Lauderdale phar-
.macy that dispensed more than 28
times the national average for oxy-
codone between April 2009 and May
2010. Investigators also found almost
two-thirds of prescriptions on file
were counterfeit Some 66,000 pills
couldn't be accounted for.
The eight-count indictment
includes drug conspiracy, money
laundering and related charges.
U.S. Drug Enforcement
Administration officials say such
rogue pharmacies are another way
drug traffickers and addicts illegally
obtain large amounts of oxycodone
and other drugs.
Miami U.S. Attorney Wifredo
Ferrer says Florida prescribes 10
times more oxycodone pills than all
other states combined.

School bus overturns


ASSOCIATED PRESS
The space shuttle Atlantis lifts off from the Kennedy Space Center Friday in Cape
Canaveral. Atlantis is the 135th and final space shuttle launch for NASA.


on 1-4
TAVARES Authorities say a cen-
tral Florida school bus carrying two
adults and a special-needs student
overturned on Interstate 4.
Florida Highway Patrol reports
that no one was injured in Friday
afternoon's crash.
FHP says the bus hydroplaned, hit
a guard rail and rolled onto its side.
The rear left wheel caught the guard
rail, keeping it from going down an
embankment
Lake County school officials say
the bus was taking the student home
from the Princeton House Charter
School when the crash occurred.
The driver of the bus, 66-year-old


Lucille Deramus, was cited with driv-
ing too fast for conditions.

Bomb threat causes
backup on expressway
MIAMI Authorities have shut
down a stretch of expressway in
Miami-Dade County as they investi-
gate a possible bomb threat.
The Palmetto Expressway was
shut down in both directions Friday
afternoon.
Miami Gardens Police Capt. Ralph
Suarez says officers found an aban-
doned silver hearse on a street that
ran beneath the expressway. When ,
'the officers looked inside, they saw
some firearms or other weapons.


Celebrity Birthdays


* Former boxer Jake
LaMotta is 90.
* Former New York City
Mayor David N. Dinkins is 84.
* Singer Mavis Staples is 72.
* Banjo player Bela Fleck is
53.
* Country singer Gary LeVox
(Rascal Flatts) is 41.


* Actress So.fia'Vergara is
39. -
* Actor Adrian Grenier is 35.
* Actor Thomas lan Nicholas
is 31.
* Singer-actress Jessica
Simpson is 31.
* Rock musician John Spiker
is 30.


Daily Scripture


"There is a way that seems
right to a man, but in the end it
leads to death."

--Proverbs 16:25,
NIV.


CORRECTION

The Lake City Reporter corrects errors of fact in news
items. If you have a concern, question or suggestion,
please call the executive editor. Corrections and clarifica-
tions will run in this space. And thanks for reading.


AROUND FLORIDA


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Page Editor: Brandon Finley, 754-0420











Page.Editor: Robert Bridges, 754-0428 LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL & STATE SUNDAY, JULY 10, 2011


Atlantis' 1st full day in



orbit nearly perfect


By SETH BORENSTEIN
Associated Press

CAPE CANAVERAL -
The space shuttle Atlantis
hasn't performed like a
ship ready for retirement
The first full day
of the final flight of the
aging space shuttle fleet
- the most complicated
machines ever built was
practically flawless.
NASA officials say the
unusually small four-
person crew of Atlantis
worked through lunch
Saturday and finished
their tasks in near-record
time. After Friday's launch
they inspected the shut-
tie's heat shield for launch
damage and prepared for
Sunday morning's dock-
ing with the International
Space Station.
So far Atlantis doesn't
even have minor glitches.
The worst problem is that
the crew could not find an
eye chart for a vision test,
something that caused a
chuckle among ground
controllers.
"We couldn't be more
happy with what we've
seen from the crew and
Atlantis," Flight Director
Kwatsi Alibaruho said.
Often the first full day in
orbit for shuttles has "little
nuisance-type" glitches in
setting up life in space and


ASSOCIATED PRESS
The STS-135 crew, clockwise: Sandra Magnus, mission
specialist; Rex Walheim, mission specialist; Chris Ferguson,
commander ahd Doug Hurley, pilot are seen in the Astrovan
. as they ride to launch pad 39A to board space shuttle Atlantis
on Friday at the Kennedy Space Center in Cape Canaveral.
Atlantis is the 135th and final space shuttle launch for NASA.


is usually one of the most
difficult days in a flight, said
shuttle mission manage-
ment team chairman LeRoy
Cain. He said hard work
and good luck have paid off
for Atlantis this time.
And yet when Atlantis
lands later this month it will
join sister ships Discovery
and Endeavour as muse-
um pieces. The 30-year-old
space shuttle program is
ending as NASA hands
over the task of flying astro-


nauts to the space station
to Russia and private U.S.
companies. NASA will shift
its efforts to deep space
missions t9 an asteroid and
eventually Mars.
"Instead of focusing' on
the irony, I tend to look at
the opportunity on this, the
last shuttle mission of the
program," Alibaruho said.
"I'm very grateful the shut-
tle is finishing as it is."
Cain said mission man-
agers focused on "finish-


ing strong."
'We wanted the last
flight to be the safest
flight that we fly. We want-
ed the performance of the
vehicle to be the best it's
ever been," Cain said. "I
think you're seeing it play
out,"
The great condition
the shuttle is in "helps us
enjoy the mission more"
because flight controllers
don't have to worry as
much about little glitches,
Alibaruho said Saturday
in a press conference.
It also keeps the crew
from having to divert
from their tasks to fix
problems, he said.
Another big factor is
'that the four astronauts
are all space veterans who
know what they are doing,
Alibaruho said. With four
astronauts instead of the
normal seven, there "are
fewer bodies for the crew
to trip over" and there is
less heat inside the shuttle,
making it more comfort-
able, he said.
The veteran astronauts
felt so good that they can-
celed their normally sched-
uled private conferences
with mission control's doc-
tors, Cain said. The crew
was able to inspect their
heat shield and prepare
for Sunday in an hour less
time than planned.


STEWARDS: Dicks & Sons
Continued From Page 1A


wastes, irrigation, and fer-
tilizer more efficiently.
Delvey Dicks said his
father first began farming
in high school more than
50 years ago. He and his
brother began working
at the farm full-time after
they graduated from high
school.
The family started off
as tobacco, cattle and hog
farmers, he said. Today
they focus on cattle, hay,
corn and soybeans.
They use BMPs such as:
GPS technology, retrofits
to irrigation systems, fertil-
izing in split applications,
recommended irrigation
and fertilization rates for
specific crops, rotational
grazing and wetlands pro-
tection.
Using BMPs helps avoid
wasting chemicals or fertil-
izers that can get in the
streams and lakes under-
ground, and reduces water
overuse, Delvey Dicks


said.
The Suwannee River
Partnership assists farmers
in implementing BMPs by
providing technical assis-
tance and cost-share fund-
ing, when available, to pur-
chase tools and equipment.
The tools and techniques
help farmers manage ani-
mal wastes, irrigation, and
fertilizer more efficiently
in order to protect water .
quality and quantity.
Delvey Dicks said the
program is a very good
partnership between the.
farming community and
the SRP. It allows both
groups to work together to
protect the environment.
Using BMPs would ,
benefit everyone who uses
them, he said. ,
' "We're getting more peor
pie using up more of our ,.-
natural resources," Delvey'
Dicks said. "We need to ,"
take as good a care of it as
possible."


OUTDOORS: Local kids get a lesson in ecology

Continued From Page 1A


The program was
developed by AmeriCorps
volunteer Heather Grames
and was selected and
funded under the Secure
Rural Schools and Self
.Determination Act of 2008;
This legislation provides
funding for counties hav- .
ing National Forest lands
within their boundaries.
Those counties elect to set
aside a percentage of their
payments to fund projects
approved by the National
Forests in Florida.
'We initially submitted
a request for a few dollars
to cover the cost of doing
some educational outreach
at the campground. They
liked the whole project and
asked if we could expand
the educational component
to include more kids. We
said we could, and they
gave us additional funding
to expand our outreach
to groups of local kids .
in Baker and Columbia
Counties," said Osceola
National Forest Recreation
Manager Debra Stucki.
After being selected,
Grames researched area
schools to present her
newly developed program
with a focus on children
from pre-k through junior
high.
"Annie Mattox Summer
Camp seemed to be very
active. They provide learn-
ing opportunities and activ-


SPRINGS
From Page 1A

that the restoration plan
provided valuable structure
and direction to the many
efforts going on in the
basin.
"They expressed an
interest in continuing to
use and finalize the plan,
although they have not
identified a 'leader' to take
this on yet," Wells said,
noting one of the stake-
holders has volunteered
to organize a 'next steps'
meeting to identify how the
working group may con-
tinue its efforts.
Wells noted that part of
implementing the plan will
encompass securing new
funding sources.
"A number of groups are
currently exploring fund-
ing opportunities for their
individual efforts," she


ities for children through-
out the area," said Grames.
"So, naturally I contacted
the school to see if they
would be interested."
When Grames contacted
Reverend Jan Harrison of
the camp she welcomed the
program enthusiastically.
The program provided a
unique hands-on oppor-
tunity for the children to
explore issues related to the
forests that surround them.
Fresh in their minds,
the children and staff at
the camp could relate to
the subject matter. Smoke
recently billowed over the
area from wildfires burn-
ing in the nearby Osceola
National Forest, which
now have been contained.


"We're so grateful to
the firefighters. We're not
firefighters, but if there is
anything we can do to help
please let us know," said
one Annie Mattox staffer.
The- daylong program
consisted of various activi-
ties, which included a GPS
scavenger hunt, responsible
camper Bear Awareness,
and fire feelings, a discus-
sion of the forest ecosystem
and the difference between
prescribed burns and wild-
fires.
"I thought the event was
wonderful," said Grames.
'The children showed
enthusiastic participa-
tion throughout the day.
I believe they especially
enjoyed the hands oi por-


tion where we used GPS
units to find messages
left by Smokey Bear and
Woodsy Owl."
After a day of classroom
and outdoor activities, the
.children were presented
with Woodsy Owl tee
shirts to remind them of
their responsibility to be
good stewards of their for-
ests and the environment.
"They're still talking
about it. They're looking.
forward to going out to the
forests. A lot of these kids
have never been exposed
to this ... to learn about
tress and nature. I hope
we have an opportunity to
do this again," said Grover
Lewis, president of Annie
Mattox Summer Camp.


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LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL & STATE SUNDAY, JULY 10, 2011


PageEditor: Robert Bridges, 754-0428


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OPINION


Sunday, July 10, 2011


AN


AN
OPINION


The

Obama

economy

resident Obama
rammed his so-called
stimulus bill through
a Democratic
Congress less than
a month after taking office
in 2009. According to the
Congressional Budget Office,.
the American Recovery and
Reinvestment Act (ARRA)
will cost Americans $840 bil-
lion. Unfortunately, this mas-.
sive sum has failed to buy
Americans any respite from
economic woe. It has done little
more than bury Americans
under yet more debt and
lengthen lines at the unemploy-
ment office. The nation's job-
less rate climbed to 9.2 percent
last month, according to figures
released Friday. We're headed
in the wrong direction.
Mr. Obama's top advisers
would have us believe other-
wise. In its Seventh Quarterly
Report, issued July 1, the
President's Council of Economic
Advisers concluded that $666
billion spent through the third
quarter of last year resulted in
"creating'or saving" about 2.4
million jobs. Accepting the claim
at face value, that works out to
$277,500 per job. It would have
been cheaper to cut a $100,000
check to each "job" holder and
pocket the $426 billion differ-
ence. The unemployment rate
has gone up, not down, since
then.
Stanford University econo-
mist John Taylor followed the
billions and documented how
the concept was flawed from
the start The presidents give-
away scheme had three parts:
tax credits and transfer pay-
ments, which went to house-
holds; direct federal spending;
and grants to state and local
bureaucracies.
The overall reason for the
stimulus failure was that people
are, for the most part, rational.
They do not change their con-
sumption behavior in response
to temporary changes in dis-
posable income- especially
when they are aware that the
bill will come due soon in the
form of higher taxes. It's a pity
Congress and the president
didn't figure this out $840 bil-
lion ago.
* Washington Times

Lake City Reporter
Serving Columbia County
Since 1874
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Columbia and surrounding counties by
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Our primary goal is to
publish distinguished and profitable
community-oriented newspapers.
This mission will be accomplished
through the teamwork of professionals
dedicated to truth, integrity and hard
work.
Todd Wilson, publisher
Robert Bridges, editor
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Tom Wood, chairman

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A few rich libertarians


undermine freedom


The New York
Magazine headline
reads: "You Can
Thank a Few Rich
Libertarians for Gay
Marriage."
The story is that a $1-
million contribution by several
rich Republican hedge fund
operators, inclined to see
the issue as one of personal
freedom, consistent with their
libertarian'views," was key
to legalization of same sex
marriage in New York.
One of these men, Paul
Singer, also happens to be
chairman of the Manhattan
Institute, the libertarian leaning
think tank in New York City that
describes its mission "to foster
greater economic choice and
personal responsibility."
But these latest efforts of
Singer and his colleagues.
undermine that mission and
aspirations toward keeping
this a free nation with limited
government
Why?
Their willingness to dismiss
the meaning and relevance of
a pillar of traditional values -
- marriage makes clear that
in no way do they see our free
nation rooted in God-given
truths. They must opt, then,
for the only other alternative.
Human design. They'll decide
what is relevant and not, what is
true and false.
So despite talk about
freedom, they share an awful
lot of common ground with
socialists. They think they're'
clever enough to understand the
whole world and design how we
should live. They depart from
socialists in their formula, not in
their approach.
\ Certainly, when John Adams
talked about a nation of "laws


Star Parker
parker@urbancure.org


and not men," he was thinking
about the importance in a free
nation to have law grounded in
truth, shielding citizens from
capricious rule Supreme Court
Justice Antonin Scalia, in a talk
he gave at Singer's Manhattan
Institute a number of years ago,
referred to "the hateful phrase,
the Living Constitution." He is
an originalistt" who believes
that words have meaning and
that to have a functioning
constitution the essential
meaning of its words cannot
change with the latest iPod
model..
I Would guess these
libertarian Republicans share
Justice Scalia's sentiments
about the importance of the
integrity of the language of
our constitution and that they
probably see its degradation as
a liberal scourge.
Whether Obamacare goes
forward, with its unprecedented
new intrusions by government
into our private lives, rides on
courts accepting its reinvention
of the meaning of the words
"tax" and "commerce."
Yet these same libertarians,
who accept the gravity of
changing the meaning of words
.in a document several hundred
years old, in a blink of an eye
use money and political power
to change the meaning of a
word thousands of years old.
Not just any word. A word


- marriage central to human
social reality.
Loving v. Virginia, in which
prohibition of interracial
marriage was found
unconstitutional, is brought up
as a precedent to justify same
sex marriage.
But Loving was about the
right of any man and woman to
marry. The same sex marriage
issue is about the right to
redefine what marriage is. I
defend the former. I reject the
latter.
Rosa Parks was not trying
to redefine what a bus is. She
was asserting her right to sit
wherever she wanted on it.
Preservation of language as
.a vessel for underlying truths
has always been central to racial
justice in our nation. As Lincoln
made clear at Gettysburg, we
wound up with over a half a .
million dead fighting over the
integrity of the word "equal."
A free country depends not
on clever individuals usurping
power and designing our world
according to their tastes. It
depends on transmission of
prior truths and the humility to
accept and live by them.
Check on the quality of
freedom in our inner cities
today, where young black men
and women have the same
regard for marriage as do these
hedge fund managers.
It's been said that when
words lose their meaning,
people lose their liberty. It's
something all of us, even
wealthy libertarians, should
keep in mind.
* Star Parker is president of
CURE, Coalition on Urban
Renewal and Education
(www.urbancure.org) and author of
three books.


Call it a great wall
posting. News
reports say China
wants to buy a
chunk of Facebook.
If these two giants do end up
collaborating, it would be quite a
change in relationship status for
both of them. In sheer numbers,
Facebook users will soon equal
the population of China.
For now, the sale of any
Facebook stock to China's
official investment arm remains
speculative. Still, it is worth
speculating on why China
might even want an inside
track on one of America's most
innovative companies.
Is it an admission that China's


effort to create an "innovation
oriented society" by 2020 is failing
and that it still needs the talent
and ideas of other nations to keep
its busy-bee economy going?
That is not Washington's
perspective. Ask high-level
Pentagon officials what is
their greatest concern about
the future and you'll likely
hear about China's massive
investment in science and
technology.
For more than 15 years,
China's ruling Communist Party
has pushed the importance of
"indigenous innovation" and
the need to "leapfrog" over
Japan and the West in research
frontiers. It cites a worrisome


dependence on foreign
technology, even as it still
unabashedly extracts know-how
from outside companies wishing
to invest in China.
China knows it will soon
need its own discoveries
and innovations to maintain
competitiveness. Many of its
sophisticated tech companies
have reached world-class
levels and now must beef up
their R&D efforts and stoke
creativeness out of their
staff. And the rest of world is
becoming defensive toward
China's ways of gaining access
to labs and intellectual property.

* Christian Science Monitor


4A


Todd Wilson
twilson@lakecityreportercom


Sad to see

spaceflight

leave us

T he thing that stung
me the most about
the final space
shuttle launchon
Friday was the
fact that outside Florida,
federal government officials
didn't seem to care much
about it.
I felt like our country's
leadership showed the world
that we really don't put too
much importance on seeing
Atlantis blast off safely on such
an historic day in American
spaceflight history.
The perception was
there that spaceflight is
an afterthought in the
Washington mind. Certainly,
it's the end of an era and one
I thought was a moment of
national pride and
importance, something our
top leadership should have
devoted more attention to on
launch day.
With thick clouds hanging
over Lake City all morning
Friday, our only option to
see the shuttle launch was
the Internet or television.
The launch was set for 11:26
a.m. and scheduled weeks in
advance.
At about 11:05 a.m.,
President Obama spoke to the
media outside at the White
House to talk about the poor
economic news released on
Friday morning. On many
networks, the live feed from
Cape Canaveral, 20 minutes
before an iffy launch,
switched from Launch Pad 39A
to the president explaining
sluggish job creation in June.
This live statement could have
waited. I would have preferred
a little more reverence to what
was happening on the Space
Coast.
The space shuttle program
deserved to be the center of
attention on its final launch.
Instead, the White House
posted a two-sentence blog.
One point praised the bravery
of the Atlantis crew. The other
called for NASA to break
new boundaries and send an
American crew to Mars. The
president did pause to watch
the launch on a monitor.
I miss the days when the
president and members of
Congress outside Florida
seemed to be space nuts like
most of the rest of us. I want
my high-ranking
government officials to show
me publicly they are excited
by such a majestic event We
saw some of this Friday, but
not enough.
Spaceflight is a challenge
Congress and the president
have abandoned and the
private sector must tackle. In
the interim, we are reliant on
the Russians to cart us to and
from space. My fingers buckle
as I type that sentence.
President Obama did not
mothball the shuttle program.
That move was in place long
before he campaigned for
the job. President Bush had
a limited vision for NASA's
direction, too, so it's not a
party-line problem.
Launching a manned
spacecraft into orbit is
the most impressive, non-
aggressive military action we
do as a country. It bruises my
patriotic pride to see that our
government doesn't seem to
have the spirit of exploration
in its soul any more. As a
country, it bothers me that


we're no longer, literally,
reaching for the stars.
* Todd Wilson is publisher of the
Lake City Reporter.


ANOTHER OPINION

China buying up Facebook?

Which one really needs innovation?












Page Editor: Brandon Finley, 754-0420LAKE CITY REPORTER NEWS SUNDAY, JULY 10, 2011


Fort Hood suspect's



defense has few options


By ANGELA K. BROWN
Associated Press

FORT WORTH, Texas
- More than two dozen
soldiers have testified about
the day they were shot in a
crowded Fort Hood build-
ing in November 2009.
Some told of looking the
gunman in the eye as he
fired. A Senate investigation
has announced its findings
about the suspect: before
the rampage, the Army
psychiatrist had become
an Islamic extremist and a
"ticking time bomb."
Now the defense team
for Maj. Nidal Hasan, who
is charged with 13 counts
of premeditated murder
and 32 counts of attempted
premeditated murder, faces
what seems like an impos-
sible task of preventing a
conviction and potential
death sentence in one of
the highest profile cases in
military history.
Hasan, 40, who remains
jailed and was paralyzed
after police shot him that
day, could go to trial later
this year at Fort Hood, the
Texas Army post about 125
miles south of Fort Worth.
On Wednesday, Fort Hood's
commander ordered Hasan
to stand trial after reviewing
documents from last fall's
evidentiary hearing.
For the defense lawyers,
"there are huge challenges
in this case challenges
that may not be present in
other capital cases," said
Richard Stevens, a military
defense attorney who is not
involved in the case.
John Galligan, the lead
defense attorney, has ,said
little about the strategies he
is considering for the trial.
But experts in military law
say his choices are limited:
hope that Hasan's mental


ASSOCIATED PRESS
In this April 9, 2010 file photo provided by the Bell County'
Sheriffs Department, U.S. Maj. Nidal Hasan sits at the San
Antonio to Bell County Jail in Belton, Texas. Fort Hood's
commanding general announced Wednesday that Hasan,
charged in the deadly Fort Hood rampage in Texas, will be
court-martialed and face the death penalty.


state would prompt a jury
to opt for a life sentence,
or watch for legal errors
or complications that could
cause a conviction or death
sentence to be overturned.
Galligan is clearly mind-
ful of the reversible-error
prospect, and can be
expected to challenge every
legal decision in the trial
that could be used for an
appeal. Galligan said 80 per-
cent of the military's death
sentences have been com-
muited to life in prison with-
out parole since the mili-
tary reinstated the death
penalty in 1984. No military
convict has been executed
since 1961 because of the
lengthy appeals process.
"The reversal rate and
length of time since an exe-
cution shdw that the mili-
tary's death penalty system
isn't working and shouldn't
be used," Galligan told The


Associated Press. "The
Army here is more inter-
ested in getting a capital
case and getting a death
sentence and moving on,
even if it sits there for 20
years."
Eight death sentences
have been commuted since
1984 because of procedural
or evidentiary errors in
trial.
The president must
approve any execution in
the military court system.
In 2008 President George
W. Bush signed an execu-
tion order for a former
'Army cook convicted of
several rapes and murders
in the 1980s, but a federal
judge has stayed that order
to allow for a new round of
appeals in federal court.
Despite what could be
a lengthy process, many
affected by the Fort Hood
rampage believe death is


the only appropriate pun-
ishment if Hasan is con-
victed in the worst mass
shooting on a U.S: military
installation.
"People will want to hear
the other side during the
court-martial, but what
could he possibly say in
his defense?" said Staff Sgt
Jeannette Juroff, who was
working in a nearby build-
ing that day and helped
wounded soldiers.
Galligan initially said he
was considering an insanity
defense, but then backed
off after a mental evalua-
tion of Hasan last year by
a three-member military
mental health panel.
Galligan has refused to
disclose the panel's find-
ing, but indications are
that the evaluation would
not support a contention
that Hasan suffered from a
severe mental illness that
prevented him from know-
ing, during the rampage,
that his alleged actions
were wrong the legal
definition of insanity.
Several military law
experts said they doubt
Hasan will plead innocent
by reason of insanity. Fewer
than 10 soldiers were
found not guilty by reason
of insanity in more than
21,000 military trials from
1990 to 2006, according to
an Army study.
But Hasan's defense
team could argue that he
has mental illness with-
out using an insanity
defense.


Betty Ford helped

pave road to

recovery for stars


By ANTHONY McCARTNEY
Associated Press

LOS ANGELES Long
before it became reality
show fodder, Betty Ford
helped create the original
celebrity rehab.
The center that bears
her name has a legacy of
rehabbing Hollywood's
elite. In the process it
became a household
name, a punchline, but
- above all a highly
respected addiction treat-
ment center.
Since its opening in
Rancho Mirage, Calif.,
in 1982, stars such as
Elizabeth Taylor, Johnny
Cash and, most recently,
Lindsay Lohan have been
among the more than
90,000 people who have
received treatment at the
center.
Taylormetoneofherhus-
bands, Larry Fortensky,
while in treatment. Kelsey
Grammer credited his stay
there with saving his life.
So too did Oscar-winner
Marlee Matlin, who paid
tribute to the former first
lady on social networking
site Twitter on Friday eve-
ning.
"She & Betty Ford
Center helped me beat
my addiction & she
was an angel to many,"
Matlin wrote. Betty Ford
died Friday at the near-
by Eisenhower Medical
Center at the age 93.
Located in the desert
about two hours east of


Hollywood, the Betty Ford
Center is by no means
the closest place offer-
ing addiction treatment.
But its association with
entertainment industry
came from its reputation
as a place where addicts
- famous or not could
get top-notch care.
"One Day at a Time"
actress Mackenzie Phillips,
another Betty Ford alum-
na, wrote on the site, "RIP
Betty Ford. A pioneer in
treatment of addicts. We
owe Mrs. Ford our grati-
tude and prayers. And
love. She was one classy
woman."
Ali McGraw, who was
treated at the center ini
1986, said in a statement
Friday that she is grateful
for what Ford has done
for her.
"She changed so many
of our lives with her cour-
age and. intelligence, he?
honesty and humility, and
her deep grace," McGraw
said. "Her vision impacted
my own life as few people
have."
Taylor's first stay at the
center came in 1983 and
provided another high'
profile face to those strug-
gling with addiction.
Cash soon became
a patient after' he broke
five ribs and relapsed into
abuse of painkillers. "I
ended up in the Betty Ford
Center for 43 days," Cash
told The Associated Press
in 1986. "I've had no drugs
since then."


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Page Editor: Brandon Finley, 754-0420










LAKE CITY REPORTER NEWS SUNDAY, JULY 10, 2011


Fishermen recount surviving


Sea of Cortez boat sinking


By PAUL EULIAS
Associated Press

SAN FRANCISCO By
Friday, ,most of the survi-
vors of a Sea of Cortez fish-
ing trip that turned deadly
had straggled home to
Northern California, carry-
ing harrowing tales of being
lost at sea for hours.
"It is something I will
never forget," said Gary
Wong of Berkeley. Wong
spent more than 15 hours
floating on a safety ring and
paddling to shore after the
.105-foot (32-meter) fishing
boat Erik sank after getting
hit by two big waves dur-
ing a violent storm early
Sunday morning.
In all, 19 U.S. fishermen
mostly from Northern
California on an annual
Fourth of July trip and
16 Mexican crew members
made it safely to dry land.
One man,- Leslie Yee of
.Ceres was found drowned
on a remote island beach
and seven other Americans
remain missing.
Pius "Pete" Zuger of
Novato said the trouble
began at 10 p.m. Saturday,
several hours after the
fishermen boarded for the
weeklong fishing excursion.
That's when the weather
began to turn nasty and
the wind began to blow
hard from the southeast.
The locals call it "El Torito"
- little bull because the
storm packs such a power-
ful punch.
Zuger said he was awak-
ened around 2:30 a.m. by
cabin mate Jim Miller'who
was screaming, "The boat
is sinking, get out!"
Zuger, 73, jumped out of
the top bunk as the ship
listed dramatically. He con-
sidered putting on his pants
with money in a water proof
wallet, but put on his swim
suit instead.
"I had no doubt that there
was going to be swimming
involved," Zuger said.
His cabin was on the
ship's deck, and Zuger wast-
ed little time jumping into
the 80-degree Fahrenheit
(26-degree, Celsius) water
of the Sea of Cortez.
Zuger was floating on
an ice chest when one of
the Erik's smaller fishing
boats known as a panga
appeared, listing badly and
partially submerged. But
Zuger clambered aboard


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Mexican navy personnel unload scuba diving cylinders at the Punta Bufeo beach in Mexico,
Wednesday. Seven U.S. tourists are still missing three days after the fishing vessel they were
on capsized off Mexico's coast. The Mexican. Navy and the U.S. Coast Guard expanded their'
search in the Gulf of California, holding out hope that the missing were able to survive in the
Gulf's balmy waters.


with another fisherman, Joe
Beeler. Then they bailed out
the powerless 20-foot (six-
meter) -boat, which would
prove to be the salvation of
13 castaways.
Their best chance for
quick rescue was if the
crew managed to transmit
a distress signal before the
Erik sank. But Zuger and
Beeler hoped for the best
and prepared for the worst,
collecting seaweed for fish-
ing line and stowing tiny
crabs found on the plants.
'"The first thing we said
to each other after settling
in is that we are together.
We made a pact to stay
together," Zuger said in
a phone interview Friday
from his Novato home.
-"'When" dawhi broke Land:
there were .no helicopters.
in the air or boats on the
horizon, the pair knew no
signal had been given. The
captain and crew said later
that they had no time to
send an SOS because the
boat had sunk so quickly
after getting knocked on its
side by a big wave. A sec-
ond wave knocked the ship
completely over.
Mexican officials said
the cause of the capsizing
is under investigation, and
a report on the accident


should be ready in about
10 days.
'"We're reviewing the
records-of the ship, but I can
tell you it had a steel hull,
and it had been operating for
years in this area," said Jose
Luis Rios Hernandez, Port
Captain in Ensenada who is
helping with the investigation.
"The truth is that the weather
conditions (the Erik faced)
could have done the same to
any boat of that size."
Zuger, who spent six
years as a machinist in the
Swiss merchant marine in
the 1960s, and other fish-
ermen complained that
the crew didn't alert the
passengers to the sinking
and that al,4 the crew had
life vests :but most of the
passe igers had to fend for
themselves..
.Baja Sportsfishing Inc.,
which owns the Erik, didn't
respond to phone and email
messages Friday. Crew
members told investigators
that the boat sank too fast
to sufficiently warn all the
passengers.
Alejandro Bermudez, 32,
an assistant cook on the
boat, said the crew assisted
passengers.
'The first thing we did
was to open the tourists'
cabins and shout that


they needed to get out,"
Bermudez said. "We helped
some of them put their life
vests on; others already had
them on because they were
woken up when the boat
got on its side."
Zuger went into the water
without a vest. So did Gary
Wong of Berkeley, who said
his brother woke him up to
the peril.
Unlike Zuger, the four
Wong brothers' berth was
in the bottom of the Erik
and they were among the
last to leave the ship.
With the port side sinking
fast, Wong made it to the
deck. He grabbed a rail on
the starboard side and held
tight as the water rose.
"Help me, help me,"
Wong heard from the bot-
tom of the increasingly
sloped deck. He could see
a fellow fisherman pinned
between two cabinets,
unable to move.
And then, just like that,
Wong was washed into
the Sea of Cortez. "I can't
believe I'm going to die
a day after retiring," said
Wong, a Berkeley resident
who retired July 1 from
his job as a senior water
treatment operator for the
East Bay Municipal Utility
District.


No free pass


for Medicare


recipients in


debt talks


By RICARDO ALONSO-
ZALDIVAR
Associated Press

WASHINGTON A
debt-busting deal on
the scale that President
Barack Obama and House
Speaker John Boehner are
seeking all but guarantees
that people on Medicare
would feel at least some of
the pain'.
Low-income people on
Medicaid wouldn't escape
totally, either. If a deal
ultimately leads to over-
hauling taxes, workers
and their families could
be on the hook also, fac-
ing potential limits on the
tax-free status of job-based
health insurance.
Health care is a main
ingredient on both the
spending and tax sides of
the elusive agreement that
Obama and Boehner, R-
Ohio, are trying to reach.
The president has
scheduled a meeting
Sunday with congressio-
nal leaders to keep push-
ing for a compromise that
would reduce future defi-
cits in exchange for lifting
the $14.3 trillion cap on
the national debt. Action
is needed so the govern-
ment can keep paying its
bills beyond Aug. 2.
No decisions have been
made. With Congress
politically polarized and
skittish about next year's
elections, it's unclear
whether there's any com-
bination of Democratic
and Republican votes to
pass major deficit reduc-
tion that cuts benefit pro-


ROUTRE6OOE 31SWstUSHw.9


Geraldine Ann Yonitis
Mrs. Geraldine Ann Yonitis,
70, of Lake City, FL passed
away on July 8 of an extend-
ed illness at Haven Hospice.
Mrs. Yonitis was born Oct. 3, 1940
in Holbropk, MA. She moved to
Orlando, FL in 1969. In 1987, she
and her family moved to Winter
Gardens,' FL. In 2000, she and
her husband became residents
of Lake City. She made lifelong
friends where ever she resided.
She is survived by her husband of
48 years, John B. Yonitis, daugh-
ters, Suzy Jones and Linda Hun-
ziker, three grandchildren, Nate
Hunziker, Erin and Lauren Jones.
A service is to be held at Wellborn
Paptist Church on July 16 offici-
,ed by Dr. Donald Minshew.
In lieu of flowers, please make a
donation to the Wellborn Baptist
church to be used for a new pulpit.
"God saw her getting tried and
a. cure wasn't meant to be, so
he put his arms around her and
whispered, 'Come with me.'
With tear filled eyes we watched.
We watcher her go in peace.
Although we loved her dearly,
it was best to let her go. For all
the pain and suffering, she'll no
longer know. Her loving heart
stopped beating, two loving arms
at rest. Our hearts are now bro-
ken, but only God takes the best."
Thelda June Brannan
Thelda June Brannan, 62, died
Thursday, July 7, 2011 at North
Florida Regional Medical Cen-
ter after a recent illness. She was
the daughter of the late L.C. and
Martha Thompson Brannon. She
was born in Lake City and has
lived here all her life, the past
twenty-eight years of which she
has been faithfully delivering
the mail for the United States
Postal Service. She was a loving
wife, mother, and grandmother
who was a great cook, enjoyed
camping, loved shopping on
the QVC Channel, and spend-
ing time with her family, espe-
cially spoiling the grandchildren.


OBITUARIES

Survivors include her devoted
husband pf forty-six years, Man-
uel Brannan Sr. of Lake City,
FL.; son, Mike (Christa) Bran-
nan' daughter, Connie Black-
well; mother in law, Merle Koon;
sister, 'Becky Gardner; brother,
Laymon C. (Ellen) Brannon;
grandchildren, Dalton, Dillon, &
Devon Brannan and Kelsey, Kris-
ta, & Austin Blackwell; several
nieces and nephews also survive.,
Funeral services will be con-
ducted at, Fellowship Baptist
Church 17077 25th Road, Lake
City, FL 32024, on Monday,
July 11, 2011 at 4:00 p.m. with
Pastqr Dale Brannon officiating.
Visitation with the family will
be held Sunday, July 10, 2011
from 4:00 pm until 6:00 p.m. at
the funeral home. Gateway-For-
est Lawn Funeral Home 3596
South U.S. Hwy 441, Lake City,
Florida 32025, (386) 752-1954
is in charge of arrangements.
Please sign our guestbook at
www.gatewayforestlawn.com

Virginia Little Ciuffreda
Virginia Little Ciuffreda, 80, a
resident of Lake City, Florida
passed away July 8, 2011 at
the Lake City Medical Center
following an extended illness.
Mrs. Ciuffreda was a lifelong
resident of Lake City, Florida
and was a waitress and a home-
maker. She.was employed with
Fat Mans Bar-B-Q for twenty
one years. She is preceded in
death by her husband Mike Ci-
uffreda, One son, Mickey Lord-
and one daughter, Rhonda Lord.
Survivors include two daugh-
ters: Tami (Bruce) Hankin and
Tonia Lord both of Lake City,
Florida. Four Sons: Danny (Pa-
tricia) Lord, Lulu, Fl., Zack Lord,
Kerry Lord and Michael Ciuf-
freda all of Lake City, Fl. Thir-
teen grandchildren and nineteen
great grandchildren also survive.
Funeral services for Mrs. Ciuf-
freda will be conducted Tuesday,
July 12,2011 at 11:00 A.M. in the
Chapel of Guerry Funeral Home


with the Rev. James Steele, of-
ficiating. Interment will follow
in the Memorial Cemetery. The
family will receive friends Mon-
day July 11, 2011 from 6:00-
8:00 P.M. at the funeral home.
Guerry Funbral Home Lake City,
Fl. is in charge of all arrange-
ments. Please sign the guest-
book at guerryfuneralhome.net

Truman William Jones
Truman William Jones, 76, of
Lake City passed away peace-
fully at his home in Lake City on
July 8. He was born in Somer-
set, Ky. He lived in Lake Butler
before moving to Lake City two
years ago. He was the son of the
late Schuyler Jones and Clara
Flynn Jones. he was a factory
worker until ill health forced his
retirement. He is of Baptist faith.
He is survived by his loving
wife of 56 years, Annie Francis
Jones; daughters Keaitra' Cook
(Peter), Smyrna, Tenn. and Gin-
ger Poe (Jimmy) of Marvin, Ind.;
sons Ricky W. Jones Sr. (Glo-
ria) of.Jacksonville, Fla., Robert
A. Jones (Cindy) of Lake City,
and Allen Jones (Heather) of
Starke; sisters Faye Jacobs of
Arizona and Shirley Olejarz of
Pittsburgh, Pa.; seven grandchil-
dren and six great-grandchildren.
Funeral services will be Wednes-
day, July 13 at 11 a.m. in, the
chapel of Archer Funeral Home
pf Lake Butler. Visitation will be
Tuesday evening from 6-8 p.m.
Burial will follow at a later date.
In lieu of flowers the family re-
quests that donations be made to
Haven Hospice Nature Coast, 906
N.W. Drane St., NBranford, Fla.,
32008. Arrangements are under
the care of Archer Funeral Home
of Lake Butler, 386-496-2008.


Obituaries are paid advertise-
ments. For details, call the Lake
City Reporter's classified depart-
ment at 752-1293.


""The Lake City Reporter has
helped our advertising by leaps and
bounds. Jeff and his team hcive been
a tremendous asset advertising our
community events and promotions.
Thank you for all that you do!""


FOR.HOME DEPOT


Success through EPcin
consistent marketing PANCES
and promoting
community events in the
Lake City Reporter.





Find out more by
calling 752-1293. ROPAN





Lake City Reporter
lakecityreporter.com *CURRENTS Magazine


~~"111-- 11111~- ----~--- -----


I


Page Editor: Brandon Finley, 754-0420


grams and raises revenue.
'"This is a Rubik's cube
that we haven't quite
worked out yet," Boehner-
said.
But many of the health
care options that negotia-
tors are considering have'
been available for months.
Proposals have come from
the Obama administra-'
tion, congressional advis-
ers and bipartisan groups,
such as Obama's debt
commission.
For Medicare, possibili-
ties include higher pre-
miums for upper-income
retirees and new copay-
ments -and deductibles
that affect all but the poor.
For example, seniors do
not currently face a copay-
ment for home care. That
might change if there's a
deal.
"It's difficult to imag-
ine a $4 trillion-plus bud-
get package that doesn't
include significant mea-
sures affecting benefi-
ciaries," said economist
Robert Reischauer, one of
two public trustees who
help oversee Medicare and
Social Security finances.
Obama's health care
law already cut about $500
billion from projected
payments to providers,
and some experts say
there's not much fat left
there.
"It might mean more
individual responsibility or
a restriction of choices,"
said Sen. Mark Warner,.
D-Va., a member of a small
bipartisan group that has
been dealing with spend-
ing and taxes.



0- Rountree Moore
Chevrolet Cadillac
Nissan would like
to welcome
Tony Camiel
to our sales team.











Page Editor: Brandon Finley, 754-0420 LAKE CITY REPORTER NEWS SUNDAY, JULY 10, 2011


Police say wearing video


cameras offers protection


By TERRY COLLINS
Associated Press

OAKLAND,' Calif. -
Before hitting the streets,
Oakland police officer Huy
Nuygen's routine usually
goes something like this:
Gun ready? Check.
Bulletproof vest strapped?
Check.
Body camera secured?
Check.
Wait, body camera?
"It feels uncomfort-
able when I don't have it,"
Nuygen said of the video
camera that is smaller than
a smartphone -and is worn
on his chest "You can never
be too safe."
Oakland and hundreds
of other police departments
across the country are
equipping officers with tiny
body cameras to record
anything from a traffic stop
to a hot vehicle pursuit to
an unfolding'violent crime.
The mini cameras have
even spawned a new cable
reality TV series, Police
POV, .which uses police
video from Cincinnati,
Chattanooga and Fort
Smith, Ark.
Whether attached to shirt
lapels or small headsets,
the cameras are intended to
provide more transparency
and security to officers on
the, street and to reduce
the number of misconduct
complaints and potential
lawsuits.
"First and foremost,
it protects the officers, it
'protects the citizens and it
can help with an investiga-
tion and it shows what hap-
pened," said Steve Tidwell,
executive director of the
FBI National Academy
Associates in Quantico, Va.
"It can level the playing
field, instead of getting just
one or two versions. It's all
there in living color, so to
speak."
- In Oakland, where the
department is still under
federal supervision because
of a case in which four offi-
cers were caught planting
drugs on suspects a decade
ago, the 'cameras are like
another set of eyes, said
Capt Ed Tracey.
Last year the department
began a pilot program with
about a dozen patrol offi-
cers wearing the VIEVU
body camera, and how offi-
cials hope to equip at least
350 officers by the end of
summer.
Tracey said the cameras
,are proving helpful to a bud-
get-strapped police force
that has reduced staff while
covering what is still one
of the country's most dan-
gerous cities, even though
overall crime has trended
downward.
: The cameras, which run


Dr. Dorothy
Walbey
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Surgery of the
Foot and Ankle

Ankle Sprains
Arthritis
Bunions
Blisters
Cellulitis
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Diseases of the Ski
Flat Feet
Foot or Ankle Injur
Foot Orthoses/Sho
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Hammertoes


You don't have to live with foot pain, call for an
appointment today. ACCEPTING NEW PATIENTS


Jacksonville Northside
2255 Dunn Avenue
Jacksonville; Florida 32218

(904) 982-8841'OFFICE


Lake City
Family Medical Center
1226 SW Main Blvd
Lake City, Florida 32056
(904) 766-7414 FAX


Most major health insurance accepted


ASSOCIATED PRESS
In this file photo from June 16 Oakland Police officer Huy
Nguyen shows a video camera worn by some officers in
Oakland, Calif. Oakland and dozens of other police
departments across the country are equipping officers with
tiny body cameras to record anything from a traffic stop to
a hot vehicle pursuit to a violent crime in progress. The mini
cameras have even spawned a new cable reality TV series,
.showing using video in Cincinnati, Chattanooga and Fort
Smith, Ark.


abotit $125 apiece, were
brought instead of purchas-
ing video equipment for
squad cars, he said, noting
that the smaller devices can
also be. mounted on a patrol
car dashboard.
Officers are required to
turn on their cameras for
calls including traffic stops
and possible searches.
They are also required to
download their video with-
in a day and they are not
allowed to edit or manipu-
late it. The video can be
stored up to, five years.
However, Tracey
acknowledges some offi-
cers have had a hard time
adjusting to the cameras.
"I commend the officers
for their adaptability and
professionalism. If they
fight it or resist it, then
our jobs become harder."
Tracey said. "It's not an
easy sell, and I get some
resistance, but others see
the value in them and won't
go on the street without it"
Turning on the camera
has become second nature,
Nguyen said. "If the sus-
pect takes off, the camera
is on to capture it," he said.
"You have to train yourself


to remember, 'Lights on,
camera on."'
Camera footage came in
handy last year, Nguyen
said, after a man com-
plained that he and another
officer were rude after pull-
ing him over.
"We summoned a super-
visor to the scene and
took the man's complaint
Internal Affairs reviewed
the video," the officer
said. "The complaint was
dropped."
Police officials from
Seattle and Queensland,
Australia, have recently
visited Oakland to check
out the cameras, which
are used. by more than
700 departments in the
United States alone,
said Heidi Travero, a
business development
director for the Seattle-
based VIEVU.
"I think other .law
enforcement agencies will
continue to look to Oakland
to see how they manage the


video," said Travero, a for-
mer Seattle police officer.
Across the Bay Bridge,
San Francisco police said
they are considering using.
the cameras after a recent
series of surveillance vid-
eos raised allegations of
misconduct during raids
and drug busts.
"Enough is enough. I
need to protect the hard-
working men and women
of the San Francisco Police
Department," said Police
Chief Greg Suhr before
attending a recent forum
with Public Defender Jeff
Adachi who released the
videos.
Suhr said the idea for
equipping his officers.
with cameras came from
Oakland.
"We give them bullet-
proof vests to protect them
from the lethal force, but
when your character is
under attack, its just as
damaging and I think these
cameras would go a long
way," Suhr said.
A San Francisco police
spokesman said discus-
sions about acquiring cam-
eras are preliminary.
Law enforcement agen-
cies ,using body cameras
need to have very clear and,
consistent objectives, said
Michael Risher, an attorney
with the ACLU of Northern,
California.
"It can't be the case
where they turn them on
and off and record what
they want to, because all
objectivity will be lost,"
he said. "Otherwise,
these cameras should
greatly improve relations
between the police and the
community. If it's done
right."
Such cameras were intro-
duced several years ago.
Another popular one is
Scottsdale, Ariz.-based
Taser International's ear-
mounted AXON, which
allows the police camera to
be placed at eye-level.
About 16 law enforce-
ment agencies have brought
the cameras, and about 100
departments are testing
them, said Taser spokes-
man Steve Tuttle.
San Jose police used the
AXON cameras on a trial
basis in 2009, but the cash-
strapped department could
not afford to buy them, said
a police spokesman, Officer
Jose Garcia.
The AXON cameras are
co-stars in the new TruTV
reality show, Police POV,
featuring actual footage
captured by officers.


At least 40 killed

in Mexico in

24-hour period


By NACHA CATTAN
Associated Press

MEXICO CITY -
Battles between the vicious
Zetas gang and other drug
cartels killed more than 40
people in a 24-hour span,
a government official said
Saturday.
*At least 20 people were
killed when gunmen
opened fire in a bar late
Friday in the northern city
of Monterrey, where, the
gang is fighting its former
ally, the Gulf Cartel, said
federal security spokes-
man Alejandro Poire.
Eleven bodies shot with
high-powered rifles were
found earlier Friday, piled
near a water well on the
outskirts of Mexico City,
where the gang is fight-
ing the Knights Templar,
Poire said. That is an off-
shoot of the La Familia
gang that has terrorized
. its home state of
Michoacan.
He said another 10 peo-
ple were found dead early
Saturday in various parts.
of the northern city of
Torreon, where the gang
is fighting the Sinaloa car-
tel headed by Joaquin "El
Chapo" Guzman.
"The violence is a prod-
uct of this .criminal rivalry
... surrounding the intent
to control illegal activities
in a community, and not
the only the earnings that
come with it, but 'also with
transporting drugs to the
United States," Poire said
in a news conference.
He repeated the govern-
ment insistence that the
criminals, not the govern-
ment's crackdown on orga-
nized crime, are causing
the violence. More than
35,000 people have died
since President Felipe
Calderon stepped up the
attack on organized crime
in 2006, according to offi-
cial figures.. Some groups
put the number at more


than 40,000.
"The violence won't stop
if we stop battling crimi-
nals," Poire said. "The vio-
lence will diminish as we
accelerate our capacity to
debilitate the gangs that
produce it"
Federal authori-
ties apprehended La
Familia's alleged leader
in late June, claiming the
arrest was a debilitating
blow to the gang. lose
de Jesus Mendez.Vargas
was alleged to be the last
remaining head of the car-
tel, whose splinter group,
the Knights Templar, con-
tinues to fight for control
of areas La Familia once
dominated.
Mexican authori-
ties also arrested Jesus.
Enrique Rejon Aguilar, a
co-founder of the Zetas.
drug cartel who is sus-
pected of involvement in
the February killing of a
U.S. customs agent
Poire provided no more
details on the killings in
Torreon in the border
state of Coahuila.
In Monterrey, 16 people
died at the Sabino Gordo
bar in the worst mass
killing in memory in the
northern industrial city,
where violence has spiked
since the Gulf and Zetas'
broke their alliance early
last year. Four others died
later at the hospital and five
were injured, said Jorge
Domene, security spokes-
man for the state of Nuevo
Leon, where Monterrey is
located.
Other downtown busi-
nesses closed earlier than
usual after news of the
massacre broke.
In Valle de Chalco, a
working class suburb
southeast of Mexico City,
a man was found .alive
among the dumped bodies
and was taken to a hospi-
tal, said Antonio Ortega, a
spokesman for the Mexico
State police.


^* Tf C t."1 r^ ltr~,qmr. rm "- " al4i..m U., i 1 .nan C.JAw.aa.1 fWJ f 2 u bj, Ij AP hd00, kC*l


R epo.... rt...er,....ou... t.. .


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If you have pain or discomfort in your
feet, ankles or legs, then see a Podiatrist.
Podiatrists, commonly called Foot Doc-
tors, are specifically trained to recognize
and treat abnormal conditions in this area
of your body. Don't live with foot pain; let
Dr. Walbey ease your discomfort. You can
feel confident that she will understand
your problem and spend the time it takes
for proper treatment. Dr. Walbey has the
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Dr. Walbey treats a wide variety of feet,
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-- -- -----;;;;i' -


LAKE CITY REPORTER NEWS SUNDAY, JULY 10, 2011


Page Editor: Brandon Finley, 754-0420


. I


I


V>|7H .I~


Wuftwwma r.l w,.itlwr.w.MB.












LAKE CITY REPORTER WEATHER SUNDAY, JULY 10, 2011


THE WEATHER



PARTLY PARTLY CHANCE
CLOUDY, CLOUDY, STORMS
T-STORMS T-STORMS

H194L71 H1940 73 Hl95 N


ft; I s 6' 40/s1^^' i 'ow


Taahassaee .
Q95, 7


Pensacla
941/81


95,

Lake
941


Panama City
88/ 77


TEMPERATURES
High Saturday
Low Saturday
Normal high
Normal low
Record high
Record low

PRECIPITATION'
Saturday
Month total
Year total
Normal month-to-date
Normal year-to-date


7a un lp
Sunday


88
75
91
71
99 In 1932
61 in 2006


0.81"
1.45"
21.34"
1.87"
25.90"


Ist. City
74 Jacsonle Cape Canaveral
e Cty* 92.' 77 Daytona Beach
3 -Ft. Lauderdale
ainesvle Daytona Beach Fort Myers
9273 9e 76- Gainesville
Ocala Jacksonville
92 74 KKey West
Orlando Cape Canaveral Lake t
94,8 88' 76 Lake City
Miami
Tampa Naples
92.78 West Palm Beach Ocala
88, 79 Orlando
Ft. Lauderdale Panama City
FL Myers 90, 78 Pensacola
91. 78 Naples Tallahassee
92,77 Miami Tampa
89'78 Valdosta
Key West* W. Palm Beach
90 .81


SUN
Sunrise today 6:37 a.m.
Sunset today 8:35 p.m.
Sunrise tom. 6:37 a.m. 1XBIE
Sunset tom. 8:35 p.m. 10mleOit blsm
Today' s
MOON ulutra-violet
Moonrise today 4:25 p.m. radiation risk
Moonset today 2:13 a.m. for the area on
Moonsettoday 2:13 a.m. a scale from 0
Moonrise tom. 5129 p.m. to 10+
Moonset tom. 3:03 a.m.



July July July Aug. F, ore
15 23 30 6 0 o grapl
Full Last New First stu r Cent
wmh7 www


7p aonday6a


* -,, -,-./
." ," t...


hm 6 .


On this date rn
1911. Maine
records it nottest
temperature ever
with a reading of
105 degrees at
North Bridgton.


:5 4~~~i..lxi~r~


Monday
88 77
9176 1
90 79 1
93 78
93.'73
92 77 t
89 82 sri
94 73 I
90 19 I
93 77 1
93 74 1
94 78 I
92 80 I
94 T9 1
95 77, L
93 ?7 1
97 76.1
88. 80 1


Tuesday
90 77 I
93 76 1
91 7h l
92 77
94 74 I
93 7 I
90. 52 1
95 74 1
90 78 I
92 77 1
94, 74 I
94 78 I
90 so 1
94 79 I
95 77.,
93 77
967 I7
8S, 80 1


An edxcusive


brojgV. to
our' f e -ers
by

rhe Weather



w !



casts, data and
hics 0 2011 Weather
ral, LP, Madison, Wis.
w.weatherpubllisher.com


Get connected

I^^^^ '*"
m~y^M^^^^


NATIONAL FORECAST: Widespread showers and thunderstorms will stretch across the
United States today. Look for scattered storms in the Southwest, extending northward into
the Intermountain West. A series of frontal boundaries in the. northern and central Plains will
contribute to the chance of storms extending across the Midwest and into the Great Lakes.









7









Iocnh lea






Miami Front

Front


YESTERDAY'S NATIONAL EXTREMES


CITY
Albany NY
Albuquerque
Anchorage
Atlanta
Baltimore
Billings
Birmingham
Bismarck
Bolse
Boston
Buffalo"
. Charleston SC
Charleston WV
Charlotte
Cheyenne
Chicago
Cincinnati
Cleveland -
Columbia SC
Dallas
Daytona Beach
Denver


CITY
Acapulco
Amsterdam
Athens
Auckland
Beljing
Berlin
Buenos Aires
Cairo
Geneva
Havana
Helsinki,
Hong Kong
Kingston


Saturday Today
HI/Lo/Pcp. HI/Lo/W CITY
82/64/0 84 62 pc Des i
91/68/0 95/68/t Detro
58/48/0 63/50/sh E o Pas
90/73/0 93/74/t Falrba
89/68/0 91/70/sl Green
79/55/0 85/58/s Hartff
95/76/.01 97/76/t Honol
79/64/0 85/58/pc Houst
81/52/0 89/56/s Indian
85/67/.13 81/66/pc Jacks
81/64/0 85 72 ~o. Jacks
90/77/.89 89/76/t Kansa
83/68/0 90/69/pc Las Vi
88/70/0 92/71/pc Uttle
79/58/0 8 56 1 Los A
-89/61/0 91/75/t Memp
86 6E,. 0 91 68 Pc Miam
86/59/0 88/70/pc Minne
93/78/0 95' 7-1 L Mobil
97/84/0 103/81/pc New 0
90/74/0 91/76/t New Y
84/64/0 91/63/t Oklah


Saturday
HI/Lo/Pcp.
84/77/0
68/59/0
na/na/na
61/54/0
95/66/0
84/57/0
66/50/0
97/75/0
86/59/0
88/73/0
84/59/0
95/81/0
88/79/0


Today
HI/Lo/W
88/77/t
70/54/pc
88/75/s
59/54/s
91/74/pc
79/61/pc
65/52/s
92/69/s
82/57/1
88/75/pc
79/63/pc
88/83/t
86/77/t


Molnes
It

inks
isboro
ord
ulu
on
iapolls
on MS
onvllle0
1s City
egas
Rock
ngeles
ihls
I i
iapolls
e
Orleans
York
oma City


CITY
La Paz
Uma
London
Madrid
Mexico City
Montreal
Moscow
Nairobi
Nassau
New Delhi
Oslo
Panama
Paris


-High: 110, Lawton, Okla.


Saturday Today
HI/Lo/Pcp. HI/Lo/W
85/70/0 91/72/t
88/67/0 88/73/pc
96/77/0 98/76/pc
67/57/0 77/54/sh
83/71/.09 91/69/s
87/69/.02 84/63/pc
80/72/0 89/74/s
93/80/0 95/77/pc
87, 69 0 91/71/pc
7 739 ,i 100/76/pc
91 7.5 0 92 T 77
87/68/0 98/78/t
94 ':. 102/83/pc
93/75/0 100/77/pc
71/64/0 71/63/s
92/75/0 99/81/pc
88/79/L59 718
87/76/0 89/73/t
94/77/0 96/79/t
94/79/0 93/79/t
86 66 0 85/71/s
106/75/0 100/77/pc


Saturday
HI/Lo/Pcp.
54/30/0
68/63/0
72/55/0
91/63/0
73/59/0
75/59/0
75/63/0
70/55/0
93/82/0
90/81/0
68/55/0
90/79/0
70/59/0


Today.
HI/Lo/W
56/27/s
67/62/pc
73/53/pc
93/64/s
70/57/t
82/66/pc
3 61 c
78/59/pc
88/79/pc
, 89/80/t
64/52/pc
88/75/t
77/54/pc


Low 240. Stanley, l idah

Saturday Today


CITY
Omaha
Orlando
Philadelphia
Phoenix
Pittsburgh
Portland ME
Portland OR:
Raleigh
Rapid City
Reno
Richmond
Sacramento
St. Louis /
Salt Lake City
San Antonio
San Diego
San Francisco
Seattle
Spokane*
Tampa
Tucson
Washington


CITY
Rio
Rome
St. Thomas VI
San Juan PR
Santiago
Seoul
Singapore
Sydney
Tel Aviv
Tokyo
Toronto
Vienna
Warsaw


HI/Lo/Pcp.
86/73/0
90/72/0
S90/69/0
111n 5,.
86/60/0
81/62/0
67/52/0
87/73/.09
7 ., 6 '.
84/57/0
88/72/.01
75/58/0
89/69/0
85/64/0
93/76/0
75/67/0
64/52/0
66/52/0
67/47/0
88/77/0
97/81/0
91/72/0


Saturday
HI/Lo/Pcp.
na/na/na
90/66/0
87/80/0
89/79/0 ,
63/37/0
84/72/0
90/81/0
63/43/0
83 7.5 0
88/79/0
T5 E.6?
91/59/0
A1 6! 0


HI/Lo/W
93/71/t
94/78/t
.89/72/s
108/86/t
89/64/pc
78/58/pc
76/57/pc
93/68/s,
6, 61 r
90/55/s
92/70/s
90/56/s
91, 77/t
90/69/t.
95/75/pc
74/66/s
66/52/s

85 52
92/78/t
99 '9 I
91/71/s


Today
HI/Lo/W
76/63/s -
91/70/s
86/79/t
85/78/t
63/42/pc
82/72/t
89/78/t
62/46/s
91/76/s
85/77/t
88/73/pc
86/68/oc
r.i 6311


KEYTO CONDITIONS: c-clc;i. *, .it- dr-=Il ff f f,. =fr. h-h3, -..-., -,..., "i.,.... .-., ,s-sunny,
ri=,:r,,1-,.cr- :- A- .'I.:. l =Lri -ljr-n ofr[l' .T w = .-.,j


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Story ideas?

Contact
Tim Kirby
Sports Editor
754-0421
- ,t / .)f,:,;.jL .') .F, -,, :,-,, '


Lake City Reporter




SPORTS


Sunday, July 10, 2011


www.lakecityreporter.com


Section B


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Lake City's 9-under All-Star's Grayson Martin (4) is ruled out at second after Jack Swantek tags him out in a game on Thursday. Lake City lost, 8-4, to Orange Park on Saturday. The
All-Stars will play for the championship at 9 a.m.


OW


BUT


OT


OUT


Rematch today


for championship


By TIM KIRBY
tkirby@lakecityreporter.com
The Lake City under-9 All-Stars have
qualified for regional play, but winning the
championship in the Cal Ripken North
Florida State Tournament will take more
work.
Orange Park continued its surge
through the loser's bracket with an 8-4
win over Lake City on Saturday.
It was Lake City that sent the Crush
into elimination mode with a win on
Thursday. Since then, Orange Park has
beaten Jax Beach and Julington Creek,
and now forced an if-necessary game
against Lake City.
Lake City and Orange Park will play
for the championship at 9 a.m. today at
Southside Sports Park.
Lake City was sluggish most of the day,
as Zack Mercer pitched the Crush to an


8-1 lead. Lake City rallied with three runs
in the bottom of the sixth inning before'
Evan Agostini relieved and got the final
two outs.
Tyler Shelnut doubled to lead off the
third inning for Lake City and scored on
a ground ball by Lance Minson. Hunter
Shoup's one-out single in the fourth
inning was Lake City's only other hit until
the sixth inning.
Cal Gilliam was hit by a pitch to start
the rally. Grayson Martin reached on a
fielder's choice and Shoup walked to load
the bases. Garrett Fennell was hit to bring
in one run and Mikah Gustavson singled
for another run. Shelnut walked with the
bases loaded for the final run.
Shelnut started on the mound for Lake
City and pitched four innings. Shoup
pitched two innings.
ALL-STARS continued on 4B


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Lance Minson (13) looks into the sky as Zane van Staden (2) runs to third base after a Jax
Beach hitter is walked to first.


I Mr. 3000 and


ASSOCIATED PRESS
New York Yankees' Derek Jeter follows through on a solo home run for his 3,000 career hit
during the third inning of a baseball game against the Tampa Bay Rays Saturday at Yankee
Stadium in New York. Rays catcher John Jaso, pitcher David Price (left) and umpire Jim Wolf
look on.


Jeter hits
homer to reach
milestone in win.
By BEN WALKER
Associated Press
NEW YORK Mobbed
by 'his pinstriped pals after
the ball sailed .into the
left-field seats, showered
by ovations from his fans,
Derek Jeter stood alone -
the first New York Yankees
player to reach 3,000 hits.
A fitting crown for the
captain, on a sunny after-
noon when it seemed he
could do anything he want-
ed.
He lined his first home
run of the year at Yankee
Stadium. He tied a career
high going 5 for 5. He sin-
gled home the go-ahead
run in the eighth inning.
And, for good measure, he
stole a base.


"Something I will
ber for the rest of r
Jeter said.
With a swift swing
shiny black bat, Jet
himself into historic
ny, hitting a solo hc
off Tampa Bay ac
Price in the third
Saturday. He beca
28th major league
.the mark and joined
teammate Wade. B
the only players t
with a home run.
Jeter watched t
fly as he left the
box and gave a I
as he rounded fir.
Rays first baseman
Kotchman was the
salute Jeter, doffing
as Jeter passed by.
"Hitting a home
the last thing I was t
about," Jeter said.
By then, all of
teammates were
celebrating in the


still going"

,remem- raising their arms almost
my life," in unison. A special time
for No. 2 his second hit
.g of his of the game, and right at
er jolted 2 p.m.
compa- Plus, a win, 5-4 over the
ome run rival Rays.
e David He looked every bit like a
inning spry 27-year-old with those
ume the bright green eyes and a4
r to hit even brighter future, rather
d former than a 37-year-old shortstop
oggs as with his best days behind
to do it him.
The ball, one of the spe-
the ball cially marked ones put in
batter's play for the occasion, disr
big clap appeared into a cluster of
st base. fans a few rows beyond tho
n Casey wall. Christian Lopez of
first to Highland Park, N.Y., sitting
Y his cap in Section 236, emerged
with the valuable prize. He
run was gladly gave the ball back
thinking to the Yankees so Jeter can
have the memento, and the
Jeter's Yankees rewarded him with
a1 -e A


aireaay
dugout,


JETER continued on 2B











LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS SUNDAY, JULY 10, 2011


SCOREBOARD


TELEVISION

TV sports

Today
AUTO RACING
Noon
FOX Formula One, British Grand
Prix, at Northamptonshire, England
(same-day tape)
VERSUS IRL, IndyLights, at Toronto
2 p.m.
VERSUS IRL, IndyCar, Honda Indy
Toronto
9 p.m.
ESPN2 NHRA, Route 66 Nationals,
at Joliet, Ill. (same-day tape)
CYCLING
8 am.
VERSUS -.Tour de France, stage 9,
Issoire to Saint-Flour, France
GOLF
8:30 a.m.
TGC European PGA Tour, Scottish
Open, final round, at Inverness, Scotland
3 p.m.
CBS PGATour,John Deere Classic,
final round, at Silvis, III.
NBC USGA, U.S. Women's Open
Championship, final round, at Colorado
Springs.
7 p.m.
TGC Champions Tour, First Tee
Open, final round, at Pebble Beach, Calif.
MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL
1:30 p.m.
TBS -Atlanta at Philadelphia
WGN Chicago Cubs at Pittsburgh
8 p.m.
ESPN N.Y. Mets at San Francisco
MINOR LEAGUE BASEBALL
6 p.m.
ESPN2 All-Star Futures Game, at
Phoenix
MOTORSPORTS
2 p.m.
SPEED FIM World Superbike, at
Bmo, Czech Republic (same-day tape)
12 Midnight
SPEED AMA Pro Racing, at
Lexington, Ohio (same-day tape)
SOCCER
6:30 a.m.
ESPN FIFA, Women's World Cup,
quarterfinal, Sweden vs. Australia, at
Augsburg, Germany
II a.m.
ESPN FIFA, Women's World Cup,
quarterfinal, Brazil vs. United States, at
Dresden, Germany
4 p.m.
ESPN MLS, Seattle at Portland

Monday
MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL
8 p.m.
ESPN Exhibition, Home Run Derby,
at Phoenix

BASEBALL

AL standings

4" East Division
W L Pct GB
Boston 53 35 .602 -
NewYork 52 35 .598 'A
Tampa Bay 49 40 .551 4'A
Toronto 43 47 .478, II
Baltimore 36. 50 .419 16
Central Division
W L Pet GB
Cleveland 47 40 .540 -
Detroit 48 42 .533 'A
Chicago 43 47 .478 SA
Minnesota 40 47 .460 7
Kansas City 36 53 i.404 12
West Division
W L Pct GB
Texas 49 41 .544 -
Los Angeles 48 42 .533 I
Seattle 43 ;46 ,483 SA
Oakland 39 51 .433 10
Friday's Games
Toronto I I, Cleveland 7
Tampa Bay at NewYork, ppd., rain
Boston 10, Baltimore 3
Texas 8, Oakland 5
Detroit 6, Kansas City 4
Minnesota 8, Chicago White Sox 5
LA.Angels 4, Seattle 3
Saturday's Games
N.Y.Yankees 5,Tampa Bay 4
Minnesota it Chicago White Sox (n)
Toronto at Cleveland (n)
Baltimore at Boston (n)
.Detroit at Kansas City (n)
Oakland at Texas (n)
Seattle at LA.Angels (n)
Today's Games
Tampa Bay (Shields 8-6) at N.Y.Yankees
. (Sabathia 12-4), 1:05 p.m.
Toronto (Cecil 1-4) at Cleveland
(C.Carrasco 8-5), 1:05 p.m.
Baltimore (Atkins 0-0) at Boston

City (Francis 3-9), 2:10 p.m.
Minnesota (Swarzak 1-2) at Chicago
White Sox (Peavy 4-2), 2:10 p.m.
Oakland (Cahill 8-6) at Texas
(M.Harrison 6-7), 3:05 p.m.
Seattle (F.Hernandez 8-7) at L.A.
Angels (Haren 9-5), 3:35 p.m.
Monday's Games
No games scheduled
Tuesday's Game
AII-Star Game at Phoenix, Ariz.,
8:05 p.m.


NL standings


East Division
W L Pct GB
Philadelphia 56 33 .629 -
Atlanta 53 37 .589 3'h
New York 46 43 .517 10
Washington 45 45 .500 II '
Florida 41 48 .461 15
Central Division
W L Pct GB
Milwaukee 48 42 .533 -
Pittsburgh 46 +2 .523 I
St. Louis 47 43 .522 I
Cincinnati 44 46 .489 4
Chicago 36 54 .400 12
Houston 30 60 .333 18
West Division
W L Pct GB
San Francisco 50 40 .556 -
Arizona 49 41 .544 I
Colorado 42 47 .472 7'
San Diego 40 50 .444 10
Los Angeles 39 51 .433 II
Friday's Games
Philadelphia 3,Atlanta 2, 10 innings
Pittsburgh 7, Chicago Cubs 4
Colorado 3,Washington 2
Florida 6, Houston 3
Milwaukee 8, Cincinnati 7
Arizona 7, St. Louis 6
LA. Dodgers 1, San Diego 0
N.Y. Mets 5, San Francisco 2
Saturday's Games
Atlanta at Philadelphia (n)
San Diego at LA. Dodgers (n)
Chicago Cubs at Pittsburgh (n)
Colorado at Washington (n)
Cincinnati at Milwaukee (n)
Houston at Florida (n)
Arizona at St. Louis (n)
N.Y. Mets at San Francisco (n)
Today's Games
Houston (W.Rodriguez 6-5) at Florida
(Volstad4-8), 1:10 p.m.
Atlanta (D.Lowe 5-6) at Philadelphia
(Hamels 10-4), 1:35 p.m.
Chicago Cubs (R.Ortiz 0-1) at
Pittsburgh (Maholm 5-9), 4:35 p.m.
Colorado (Chacin 8-6) at Washington
(Zimmermann 5-7), 1:35 p.m.
Cincinnati (Willis 0-0) at Milwaukee
(Wolf 6-6), 2:10 p.m.
Arizona (Duke 2-3) at St. Louis
(j.Garcla 8-3),2:15 p.m.
San Diego (Stauffer 5-5) at LA.
Dodgers (Lilly 5-9), 4:10 p.m.
N.Y. Mets (Pelfrey 5-7) at San Francisco
(Cain 7-5), 8:05 p.m. .
Monday's Games
No games scheduled
Tuesday's Game
All-Star Game at Phoenix, Ariz.,
8:05 p.m.

All-Star rosters

At Chase Field
Phoenix
(s-starter, elected by fans; m-managers
pick; p-players'. selection; i-injured, will
not play; r-injury replacement; f-Final Vote
selection)
American League
PITCHERS p-Josh Beckett, Boston;
m-Aaron Crow, Kansas City; m-Glo
Gonzalez, Oakland; p-Felix Hernandez,
Seattle; p-Brandon League, Seattle; p-
Chris Perez, Cleveland; m-David Price,
Tampa Bay; pl-Mariano Rivera, N.Y.
Yankees; p-James Shields, Tampa Bay, m-
Jose Valverde, Detroit; p-Justin Verlander,
Detroit; r-Jordan Walden, LA. Angeles;
p-JeredWeaver, LA.Angels; m-C.J.WIlson,
Texas.
CATCHERS s-Alex Avila, Detroit;
p-Russell Martin, N.Y. Yankees; m-Matt
Wieters, Baltimore.
INFIELDERS p-Adrian Beltre,Texas;
p-Asdrubal Cabrera, Cleveland; p-Miguel
Cabrera, Detroit; s-Robinson Cano, N.Y.
Yankees; s-Adrian Gonzalez, Boston;
si-Derek Jeter, N.Y. Yankees; p-Howie
Kendrick, LA. Angels; f-Paul Konerko,
Chicago White Sox; r-Jhonny Peralta,
Detroit Tigers; si-Alex Rodriguez, N.Y.
Yankees; r-Kevin Youkldis, Boston Red Sox.
OUTFIELDERS s-Jose Bautista,
Toronto; m-Michael Cuddyer, Minnesota;
p-Jacoby Ellsbury, Boston; s-Curtis
Granderion, N.Y.Yankees;s-Josh Hamilton,
Texas; p-Matt Joyce, Tampa Bay; p-Carlos
Quentin, Chicago White Sox.
DESIGNATED HITTERS s-David
Ortiz, Boston; p-MichaelYoung, Texas.
National League
PITCHERS .- m-Heath Bell, San
Diego Padres; m-Matt Cain, San Francisco;
m-Tyler Clippard, Washington; p-Roy
Halladay, Philadelphia; p-Cole Hamels,
Philadelphia; p-Joel Hanrahan, Pittsburgh;
p-Jair JurrjensAtlanta; p-Clayton Kershaw,
LA. Dodgers; p-Cliff Lee, Philadelphia;
m-Tim Uncecum, San Francisco; p-Jonny
Venters, Atlanta; m-Ryan Vogelsong, San
Francisco; p-Brian Wilson, San Francisco.
CATCHERS s-Brian McCann,
Atlanta; p-Yadler Molina, St. Louis.
INFIELDERS m-Starlin Castro,
Chicago; s-Prince Fielder, Milwaukee; p-
Chipper JonesAtlanta; p-Brandon Phillips,
' Cincinnati; s-Placldo Polanco, Philadelphia;
s-Jose Reyes, N.Y. Mets; m-Gaby Sanchez,
Florida; p-Troy Tulowitzki, Colorado; p-
Joey Votto, Cincinnati; s-Rickie Weeks,
Milwaukee. '
OUTFIELDERS m-Carlos Beltran,
N.Y. Mets; s-Lance Berkman, St. Louis;
s-Ryan Braun, Milwaukee; p-Jay Bruce,
Cincinnati; r-Andre Ethier, LA. Dodgers; p-


Matt Holliday, St. Louis; s-Matt Kemp, L.A.
Dodgers; p-Hunter Pence, Houston; m-
Justin Upton, Arizona; fi-Shane Victorino,
Philadelphia.

BASKETBALL

WNBA schedule

Friday's Games
New York 76, San Antonio 73
Phoenix 86,Tulsa 78
Saturday's Games
Washington at Indiana (n)
Atlanta at Chicago (n)
Connecticut at Minnesota (n)
Los Angeles at Seattle (n)
Today's Games
Chicago at New York, 4 p.m.
Tulsa at Phoenix, 6 p.m.

AUTO RACING

Race week
INDYCAR
HONDA INDY TORONTO
Site:Toronto.
Schedule:Today, race, 2:50 p.m. (Versus,
2-5 p.m.).
Track: Streets of Toronto (street
course, 1.755 miles).
Race distance: 149.175 miles, 85 laps.
FORMULA ONE
BRITISH GRAND PRIX
Site: Silverstone, England.
Schedule: Today, race, 8 a.m. (FOX,
noon-2 p.m.).
Track:Silverstone Circuit (road course,
3.667 miles).
Race distance: 190.6 miles, 52 laps.
NHRA FULL THROTTLE
ROUTE 66 NHRA NATIONALS
Site: $jliet, III.
Schedule: Today, final eliminations
(ESPN2, 9 p.m.-midnight). *
Track: Route 66 Raceway.

SOCCER

Women's World Cup

QUARTERFINALS
Saturday
England I, France I, ET (France wins
4-3 on penalties)
Germany vs. Japan
Today
Sweden vs.Australia, 7 a.m.
Brazil vs. USA, 11:30 a.m.

CYCLING

Tour de France stages

July 2 Stage I: Passage du Gois
La Barre-de-Monse-Mont des Alouettes
Les Herbiers, flat, 191.5 kilometers (119
miles)
July 3 Stage 2: Les Essarts, team
time trial, 23 (14.3) (Garmin-Cervelo;
Thor Hushovd, Norway)
July 4 Stage 3: Olonne-sur-Mer-
Redon, flat, 198 (123.0) (Tyler Farrar,
United States;H-usbovd) '
. July 5 Stage 4: Lorient-Mur-de-
Bretagne, flat, 172.5 (107.2) (Cadel Evans,
Australia; Hushoyd)
July 6 Stage 5: Carhaix-Cap Frehel,
flat, 164.5'(102.2)
July 7- Stage 6: Dinan-Lisleux, flat,
226.5. (140.7) (Edvald Boasson Hagen,
Norway; Hushovd).
S July 8 Stage 7: Le Mans-
Chateauroux,flat, 218 (135.5)
July 9 Stage 81 Aigurande-Super-
Besse Sancy, medium 'mountain, 189
(117.4) (Rui Alberto Costa, Portugal;
Hushovd)
July 10 Stage 9: issoire-Saint-Flour,
medium mountain, 208 (129.2)
July II Rest day in Le Lioran
Cantal.
July 12-Stage 10:Aurillac-Carmaux,
flat, 158 (98.2)
July 13 Stage I : Blaye-les-Mines-
Lavaur,flat, 167.5 (104.1)
July 14 Stage 12: Cugnaux-Luz-
Ardiden, high mountain, 211 (131.1)
July 15 Stage 13: Pau-1-Lourdes,
high mountain, 152.5 (94.8)

Eighth Stage
(A 117.4-mile medium-mountain
ride from Algurande to Super-Besse,
with a Category 2 climb followed by a
Category 3 climb to the finish)
l.RulAlberto Costa, Portugal,Movistar,
4 hours, 36 minutes, 46 seconds.
2. Philippe Gilbert, Belgium, Omega
Pharma-Lotto, 12 seconds behind.
3. Cadel Evans,Australia, BMC, :15.
4. Samuel Sanchez, Spain, Euskaltel-
Euskadi, same time.
5. PeterVelits, Slovakia, HTC-Highroad,
same time.
6. Dries Devenyns, Belgium, Quick
Step, same time.
7. Damiano Cunego, Italy, Lampre-ISD,
same time.
8.Alberto Contador, Spain, Saxo Bank
Sungard, same time.
9.Andy Schleck, Luxembourg, Leopard-
Trek, same time.
10. Frank Schleck, Luxembourg,
Leopard-Trek, same time.


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Tennis great Andre Agassi waves to the crowd with his plaque after being inducted to the
International Tennis Hall of Fame in Newport, R.I. Saturday.



Agassi took his own path


to tennis Hall of Fame


By JIMMY GOLEN
Associated Press

NEWPORT, RI. (AP) -
Walk through the museum
at the International Tennis
Hall of Fame, past the walls
of wooden rackets with
their yellowing, natural gut
strings, past the pictures of
women in full-length dress-
es and men in pressed
white slacks, and you come
to the room honoring new
inductee Andre Agassi.'
Suddenly, everything
goes from black and white
to Technicolor.
The blue denim shorts
are there, beneath pictures
of Agassi with a goatee
and a purple bandanna.
There is a shot of him as


a towheaded 9-year-old
meeting Bjorn Borg, and
others with the flowing,
highlighted hair that twice
shocked the tennis world.
In a Plexiglas case, treated
with the reverence usually
reserved for crystal bowls
and silver trophies, is a pair
of autographed hair clip-
pers Agassi used to switch
to the stubble-headed look
he still sports today.
"What I hope is that
I brought in that tent, I
opened the sport up to peo-
ple who might otherwise
not have been interested,"
Agassi said in an interview
with The Associated Press.
"I hope I brought people to
the game. I hope I inspired
kids who are out there now


doing it better than I ever
did it."
An eight-time Grand Slam
champion and Olympic gold
medalist who'was the No. 1
player in the world for 101
straight weeks, Agassi was
inducted into the Hall of
Fame on Saturday along with
former WTA executive Fern
"Peachy" Kellmeyer. Agassi
joins wife Steffi Graf, who
was inducted into the Hall in
2004, and dozens of men with
handlebar mustaches who
would, frankly, be shocked at
his inclusion among them.
"I think they would get
shocked at the state of the
world all the way around
- including me being in
the Hall of Fame," Agassi
corrected, with a laugh.


JETER: Reaches 3,000 career hits

Continued From Page 1B


four tickets to every game
for the rest of the season
and autographed memora-
bilia.
"He earned it," the 23-
year-old Lopez told the YES
Network. "I'm not going to
be the person to take that
away from him."
Jeter 3K merchandise,
meanwhile, began flying off
the shelves at the souvenir
stands. Hats, pins, shirts
and more, all commemorat-
ing No. 3,000, hadn't gone
on sale until it occurred.


1
5 1

8 '

11
12 I

14
15 -

16
17 I
18 I

20'


True to his nature of stay-
ing focused on the game,
Jeter briskly rounded the
bases. When Boggs got his
3,000th, he knelt down and
kissed home plate.
Not Jeter's style. But
there was no way this
moment was would pass
without plenty of fanfare.
Good buddy Jorge
Posada greeted Jeter with
a bear-hug after he crossed
the plate. Mariano Rivera
and the rest of the Yankees
were right behind, swallow-


ACROSS 37 and yang
38 Haik wearer
Jetty 39 Mug with a lid
Monsieur's 41 Meditation
wine guide
"Ben-Hur" stu- 43 Potpie veggie
dio 44 Greeted warm-
Coat rack ly
Boulevard lin- 46 Scratchy
ers 49 Ms. Longoria
Job-ad letters 50 Cut, as logs
- Lee of cake- 52 Hull bottom
dom 54 Journey stage
Get dizzy 55 Horse's gait
Large vat 56 Thus
Parliament 57 -game show
members 58 Afternoon
"Kubla Khan" social
ocale 59 Hounds


22 Mauna,-
23 Kinks' tune
24'Is on the team
27 Plow through
29 "2001" com-
puter
30 Roy G. Biv is
one
34 TV, slangily (2
wds.)


DOWN


Milk qtys.
Europe-Asia
range
Flight prefix
Annually
Vice -
Seine vista


ing up Jeter before he could
reach the dugout. The bull-
pen gate swung open, too,
as New York's relievers
came pouring in.
Jeter, still in the midst of a
most difficult season, waved
to the crowd several times,
then clenched his fist and
pointed up to the box where
his dad and steady girl-
friend, actress Minka Kelly,
were sitting. His dad was in
attendance his mom and
sister were absent, attend-
ing a christening.


Answer to Previous Puzzle

GAS FAST J UN K
ALE ELSE EELIE
DOCTRINE A NA


E R A EM L A N
BRANSE AOSY








MH-E O GED KR K


M HOS HONG SPA


7 Taos loc.
8 Refinery output
9 Dutch cheese
10 Bill of fare
13 Zigzag course
19 Old PC acronym


Want more puzzles?
Check out the "Just Right Crossword Puzzles" books
at QuillDriverBooks.com .,


BRIEFS


FORT WHITE FOOTBALL


For details, call Shayne
AS ----- 4- fQor 107 A O A


Q-back Club M organat

meeting Monday YOUTH GOLF


The Fort White
Quarterback Club has
an executive committee
meeting at 7 p.m. Monday
in the teacher's lounge at
the high school. All board
members are urged to
attend. The program
committee will meet at
6:30 p.m. prior to the
executive committee
meeting. All those helping
with the 2011 program are
asked to attend.


Junior tour

in Louisiana

The Arrowhead Junior
Golf Tour has a
tournament July 18-19 in
New Orleans. The
36-hole event for ages 12-18
is ranked by the National
Junior Golf Scoreboard.
Tournament fee is $235.
Registration deadline
is Monday. To enter, call
(318) 402-2446 or go online


at www.arrowheadjgt.com.

ADULT BASKETBALL

Men's games

at Richardson

Open basketball games
for men 18 and older are
played at Richardson
Community Center from
5-8 p.m. on Sundays. Cost
is $3 per session.
For details, call John
Henry Young Jr. at
623-4817 or Mario Coppock
at 754-7095.

* From staff reports


7-11


21 Dud, to NASA
(hyph.)
24 Sweater letter
25 Fictional col-
lie
26 Ms. MacGraw
27 Uppity one
28 Superman foe
Luthor
30 CEO degree
31 Louis or
Carrie
32 Grandson,
perhaps
33 News network
35 Thole fillers
36 Most accurate
39 Jell
40 Basted
41 Philanthropist
42 Custom
43 Ship of 1492
44 Edible sea-
weed
45 Pub missile
47 Medal recipi-
ent
48 Safecracker
51 Misfortune
53 Part of UCLA


2011 UFS, Dist. by Univ. Uclick for UFS


Page Editor: Brandon Finley, 754-0420


) 68 397-4954.









LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS SUNDAY, JULY 10, 2011


U.S. trying to stave off


early elimination vs. Brazil
-%l 'at"


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Rui Alberto Costa of Portugal clenches his fist as he crosses
the finish line to win the 8th stage of the Tour de France
cycling race over 189 kilometers (117.5 miles) starting in
Aigurande and finishing in Super Besse Sancy, central
France on Saturday.


Rui Alberto Costa

wins 8th stage of

Tour de France
By JEROME PUGMIRE miles) from the end, I really
Associated Press worked hard and managed
. to reach my objective."
SUPER-BESSE, France Costa paid tribute to
- Portuguese rider Rui Spanish cyclist Xavier
Alberto Costa won the Tondo, who died in May
eighth stage of the Tour de in a freak accident after he
France after .withstanding was crushed between his
a late attack from Philippe car and a garage door.
Gilbert in the final climb "I want to dedicate this
on Saturday, while Thor win to all the people who
Hushovd kept the overall believed in me and support-
leader's yellow jersey. ed me," Costa said. To my
Costa waved his hands in family, my teammates, to
delight and punched the air Xavier Tondo."
as he crossed the line in .4 The race entered the
hours, 36 minutes, .46 sec- mountains for the first time
onds to clinch the first Tour in the 117-mile trek from
stage win of his career. Aigurande to Super-Besse,
"I knew I could get in the featuring a sharp category-
breakaway today. The team 2 climb up Col de la Croix
put me in the best position," and a final climb of 1 mile.
Costa said. "I was lucky that Gilbert of Belgium made up
I managed to hold on until a huge amount of time before
the end. I'm very happy crossing 12 seconds adrift, with
with this win. Australian cyclist Cadel Evans
"I attacked on my own finishing 15 seconds behind
at the end. I saw that my Costa in third place.
legs were good and that I "I needed a few more
could hold it alone: When hundred meters," Gilbert
it got to two kilometers (1.2 said.



Steelers' Hines

Ward arrested,

on drink charge


Associated Press

DECATUR, Georgia
- Pittsburgh Steelers star
wide receiver Hines Ward
was arrested early Saturday
in Georgia on a drunken
driving charge, sheriff's
officials said.
The former Super
Bowl MVP and reigning
"Dancing With the Stars"


Unscramble these four Jumbles,
one letter to each square,
to form four ordinary words. -
AAUGV


champ was booked into
the DeKalb County jail just
outside Atlanta at 3:41 am.
and charged with driving
under the influence. He was
released on $1,300 bond.
The sheriff's office said it
had turned over paperwork
to the courts and couldn't
release any further infor-
mation about the player's
arrest.
THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME
by David L. Hoyt and Jeff Knurek

c jI.e rcSI Um~ni \ ____
|,' v Li -


Now arrange the circled letters
to form the surprise answer, as
suggested by the above cartoon.


Print your answer here: I I I
(Answers tomorrow)
Saturday's Jumbles: ABHOR SUSHI MADCAP ENROLL
Answer: Putting a 30-second time limit on today's puzzle
would cause you to do this SCRAMBLE


By NANCY ARMOUR
Associated Press

DRESDEN, Germany
- The U.S. is the No. 1
team in the world, a two-
time World Cup champion
and three-time Olympic
gold medalist.
The only number that
matters right now, how-
ever, is zero.
As in, the number of
World Cups the current
team has won.
"I take it personally that
I haven't won one," Abby
Wambach said Saturday,
"and I'll be heartbroken
if we walk away without
one."
The Americans bet-
ter get into gear then.
After losing a group stage
match for the first time
at the World Cup, they
must play old foe Brazil in
the quarterfinals Sunday,
a matchup most had pen-
ciled in for next weekend's
final. Lose, and not only
will the Americans be
going empty-handed again,
it will be their earliest exit
ever at the World Cup, a
tournament they last won
in 1999.
The United States is the
only team that's made the
semifinals at each of the
previous five World Cups.
'We have the confidence
and the faith in each other
as a team. We believe that if


ASSOCIATED PRESS
United States' Heather O'Reilly (left) passes to Abby
Wambach during a training session in preparation for a
quarterfinal match against Brazil during the Women's Soccer
World Cup in Dresden, Germany on Saturday.


we do this together, we can
beat anybody," Wambach
said. "We have our hands
full. But I still believe, in
'the end, we have the best
chance of winning."
History would seem to
back that up. You have to go
back more than a decade,
to the Algarve Cup in the
spring of 2001, to find the
last time the United States
lost back-to-back games.
It's been more than four
years just since they failed


to win consecutive games.
The U.S. has been
uncharacteristically incon-
sistent of late, however,
losing four games since
November alone. Granted,
goalkeeper Hope Solo
started only one of those
losses, and not even Iker
Casillas would have stood
much of a chance against
Lisa Dahlkvist's penalty or
Nilla Fischer's deflected
free kick in the 2-1 loss
to Sweden on Wednesday


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Find all 18 of the "Picnic' words hidden in the word search above.
Words can be found in the banners on the ads shown here. Com-
plete the puzzle and return it to the Lake City Reporter. 180 E. Duval
Street Lake City, FL by Wednesday, July 13th 5:00pm, for your
chance to win!
Deadline is Wednesday, July 13, 2011
Lake City Reporter
1al ciri. r,,e .- .,i' r ,:.:,:,I ,.- 1_1 V P [ N isr i ,i,, rl,'


night.
But the Americans don't
do losses. They usually go
years without a single one
like the two year-plus
unbeaten streak they had
going before being stunned
by Mexico in regional qual-
. ifying.
"It doesn't matter if
the U.S. has had some
bad results in the last
six months," said Marta,
Brazil's dazzling playmak-
er. "Ifs Brazil-U.S., a big
game. It's special."
Just like its men's team,
Brazil's squad is loaded
with spectacular players.
Marta, the FIFA player of
the year five times run-
ning, is so gifted with the'<
ball it looks as if she's got it
on a string, creating goals,-
out of thin air. Cristiane
has scored twice so far,
once from the penalty spot.
Brazil's unique 3-5-2 forma-
tion presents all kinds of
challenges.
For all their star power,
though, the Brazilians have,
never won the title at a major
tournament They lost to the
Americans in the last two
Olympic finals, and were
runners-up to Germany at
the 2007 World Cup.
And their track record
against the Americans is
less, than impressive. The.
U.S. is 23-2-2 all-time against,
Brazil, with only one loss
since January 1998.













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SCENES FROM SPORTS


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter


Brock Edge (11) watches the ball fly into his glove Thursday as Mike Petit (13) slides back into first base after attempting to steal second.


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Noah Tuten (1) tags Mike Petit (13) during a game on Thursday.


ALL-STARS: Championship game at 9 a.m. today


Continued From Page 1B
Logan Morris went
4-for-4 for the Crush with a
pair of doubles, a triple and
a single. He had two RBIs
and scored a run.
Jack Hodges was 3-for-3
with an RBI-double and
three runs scored. Agostini


had an RBI-double and
scored two runs. Layton
Perry had a pair of RBIs.
The under-11/60 divi-
sion championship was
decided late Friday when
Tallahassee Meridian Park
nipped Orange Park, 5-4.


The under-11/70 division
is down to three teams.
Tallahassee Myers Park
stands alone in the win-
ner's bracket after defeat-
ing Wakulla on Saturday.
Julington Creek elimi-
nated Jax Beach late Friday


,Townsend triumphs
and was in turn eliminated Tiffany Townsend, who was born in Lake City and has family
by Orange Park. Orange living here, sprints to the win the women's 200 meters at the
Park and Wakulla played Znamensky Brothers Memorial meet near Zhukovsky, Russia,
.the opponent for Myers on July 3. Townsend's winning time of 22.84 was .05 better
Park. than fellow American Charonda Williams. Americans Queen
The championship game Harrison (12.88) and Kristi Castlin (12.97) placed 1-2 in the
is 9 a.m. today. 100-meter hurdles at the meet.


We pay 2.50/p'on checking.

Performance Plus Checking-The Cherry On Top


Earn Performance Ratres


2.50% AP,.
on balances up
to SI 5.000


0'


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on balances
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Base Rate

0.10% ,'-
it requirements
are not met


Free Nationwide ATM Fees + Online Banking


Requirements include: e-Statements, Direct Deposit or Automatic Debit and
12 Check Card Transactions per statement cycle.
.. . .,i,, ";.1 i "Y) paid on balances up to lM5,000 and 0.51'% APY paid on all amounts above
i .i cycle the minimum requirements are met.If you do not meet the requirements
qualifying cycle your account will still function as a r .... ...... 1 APA, however
S reeve ATM refunds tor that time period. If you d. ..... . ... -.. '. (3) consecutive
.. our account will le converted to a Regular '.... fees may appiy. APY is accurate
S 2010. We mave I.' interest rate ar .' -.1 .r ne after the account is opened.
No minin mum balance required, i .. you must deposit a mininimum of $100 to open this account.
Available to personal accounts only. No monthly service charge. Member FDIC


FHeritageBank
OF THE SOUTH


LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS SUNDAY, JULY 10, 2011


Page Editor: Brandon Finley, 754-0420!


ASSOCIATED PRESS









Lake City Reporter


Story ideas?

Robert Bridges
Editor
754-0428
rbridges@lakecityreporter.com

Sunday, July 10,2011


BUSINESS


www.lakecityreporter.com


CHAMBER BUSINESS






Dennille Folsom
,dennille@lakecitychamber.com

Chamber:

90 years

and going

strong

The Lake City Columbia
County Chamber of
Commerce is celebrating
90 years of service to our
community this week by
having a celebration mixer
on Wednesday, July 13 from
5-6:30 p.m. at GulfCoast
Financial. The event is
sponsored by GulfCoast
Financial and The Lake City
Advertiser. The Chamber
is looking forward to con-
necting with past board
members, former staff as
well as all of our current
members.
Planning for this event
gave me a chance to reflect
on how far we have come as a
community and a Chamber.
it also made me think of
and appreciate the 90 years
worth of members, volun-
teers, Board of Directors
and staff who have made
this landmark occasion pos-.
sible. The most interesting
thing I learned is that look-
ing back over information
we have on the first years of
CHAMBER continued on 2C


Jobs: Water's the wave of the future


New FGC program
will capitalize on
industry's growth.

By ANTONIA ROBINSON
arobinson@lakecityreporter.com
The water and wastewater
industries hold the jobs of the
future for a workforce seeking
employment, according to Banner
Center officials.
SCareers in the industry are
called fast growing occupations
based on U.S. Bureau of Labor
Statistics.
Growth is estimated at 14 per-
cent by 2018 in the state with
210 job openings, according to
the Florida Agency for Workforce
Innovation. Nationwide employ-
ment will increase 20 percent
to 4,690 job openings by 2018
according to the Bureau of Labor
Statistics.
The Florida Gateway College
Employ Florida Banner Center for
Water Resources is working to
meet the needs of the industry by
initiating an AS. degree in envi-
ronmental science technology.
The classes begin Aug. 22 and are
completely online.
The program is designed for
students interested in not only
environmental science but water
resources, said Tim Atkinson,
Employ Florida Banner Center for
Water Resources director. It is
also for experienced water and
wastewater operators who want to
advance careerwise in the indus-
try.
The program includes an online
water quality lab for participants
to get readings on water samples.
The AS. program will help train
for a future in careers such as city
manager, public works director,
environmental scientist and more,


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
John Hawes, a chemistry professor at Florida Gateway College, demonstrates how to load a vial containing water
samples into an auto sampler. After loading the samples, the entire process is automatic and can be monitored in
real time through a camera.


said Dr. John Rowe, Banner Center
for Water Resources Professor.
Rowe is the instructor for the
courses.
"There's quite an array of jobs,"
he said. "It's a huge umbrella of
things that go under it."
Rowe said the center hopes to
have a similar B.S. program in the
future.
Banner Centers are services of
Workforce Florida Inc., Atkinson


said. There are a total of 13 key
industries in the state targeted for
the centers. 4
Contracts are created between
educational institutions selected
to carryout out the mission of
Workforce Florida Inc. which is to
develop a pool of qualified appli-
cants for the industries, he said.
FGC became a banner center for
water resources Sept. 1, 2010.
"We're completing our first con-


tract year," Atkinson said.
FGC also has a banner center
for global logistics.
The college has previously
provided training for operators of
drinking and wastewater facilities
for the past eight years, Atkinson
said.
Just three years ago it embarked
on providing an online water
WATER continued on


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up to 24 months of age, and you could win!


TO ENTER:
Bring your baby's picture along with entry fee ($30.00)
to the Lake City Reporter,180 E. Duval St., mail to
P.O. Box 1709, Lake City, FL 32056.

All pictures will be published in the Lake City


WANT TO ENTER ONUNE?
You can e-mail your
photo and information to
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Subject line: BABY CONTEST


* **,I,


Reporter's July 17, 2011 edition. All voting bal-
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2011. So show off your child, grandchild,
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The winners will be published on July 31, 2011 /

DEADLINE: ..
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Section C


111


In


0









LAKE CITY REPORTER BUSINESS SUNDAY, JULY 10, 2011


- Yields Zig,
Prices Zag
Q Why do bond prices go up
when bond yields go down? -
N.P., Keene, N.H.
A Bond prices react to changes
in interest rates. If you buy.a
$1,000, 30-year bond with a 5 per-
cent interest rate, it'll pay you $50
per year until maturity, when you
get your $1,000 back.
But if interest rates rise, that 5
percent won't be able to compete
with newer bonds' higher rates.
The value of your bond will have
to drop to make it more attractive
to buyers.
Someone selling that bond, then,
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WATER: Wave of the future


'Continued From Page IA,
and wastewater pre-licensure program,
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Lawn worker accused

of taking $450,000 from

94-year-old client


OCALA Authorities say a man who
took care of a 94-year-old Ocala woman's
lawn stole $450,000 from her.
Marion County Sheriff's Office offi-
cials say 58-year-old Michael Charles
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in 2008. He was booked into the Marion
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count of exploitation of an elder per-
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Officials say Fluharty had the woman
write him checks and give him loans over
the years.


According to detective Janeen Henley-
Freeman, Fluharty took her money
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card transactions and cash.
An arrest affidavit says Fluharty
coerced her into giving him power of
attorney over her affairs. He also became
her sole executor and beneficiary. The
woman's name was not released.
It was not immediately clear what led
to his arrest

Associated Press


CHAMBER: Will celebrate 90th anniversary Wednesday with mixer
Continued From Page 1A


* the Chamber and the years since,
some things remain the same. I
Found a few stories I wanted to,
share to illustrate my point
On July 13, 1921 six men
gathered in the State Exchange
Bank Building (now GulfCoast
Financial) with the purpose of
creating a local Chamber of
Commerce for Lake City and
Columbia County. Under the
leadership of Dr. L.M. Anderson,
the first Chamber President, The
Lake City Columbia County
Chamber of Commerce was
formed. Initial membership dues
were $1. There were 216 original
members; however, many banks
and business leaders took out
multiple memberships to help
the Chamber get up and run-
ning. We still have many busi-
nesses that support the Chamber
through multiple memberships
today. This special group of
businesses is now referred to as
Chamber Leaders. How we refer
to them may have changed but
the goal is the same as it was in
1921, making sure the Chamber
is sustainable.
Another interesting fact I
found about our Chamber comes
from an article dated January
31, 1974. This article was in a
special insert in the Lake City
Reporter to commemorate the
Chamber's 53rd anniversary.
The headline reads: "Women's
Lib??? The C of C believes


in it!" The article boasts that
had Gloria Steinem been liv-
ing in Lake City she might not
have found much to complain
about. It goes on to tell that
five of the charter members of
the Chamber were women and
the first woman board member
was Mrs. Norma Hackney, who
served in 1955. Ten years later,
Mrs. Virginia Bishop was on
the board. My favorite thing
she said was, "I never felt like
I was at a disadvantage being a
woman, the male board mem-
bers were always fair and acted
very gentlemanly. They always
let me go first in the line for
lunch." To date, we have had
many women board members
and four women who served as
President of the Board: Susan
Lewis 1994, Suzanne Norris -
1998, Georgia Jones 2008, and
Jenny Scaff Drawdy 2010.
In the same insert I mentioned
earlier, I also found several inter-
views with past Presidents of the
Board as well as other officers and
Executive Directors. As someone
who is always trying to find a way
to make Lake City stand out from
other cities, I found this story to
be particularly amusing. Inman
Buie, who served the Chamber
as Treasurer, tells about how
Lake City had a unique way of
promoting itself throughout the
state. One of the first projects of
the newly formed Chamber in


the mid 1920's was td create a
community band since there was
none at the high school at that
time. The Chamber invested five
cents in each band member to
provide them uniforms with Lake
City Chamber of Commerce writ-
ten on the back of the garment
Once uniformed, the band trav-
eled as far as Tampa to send well
wishes from Lake City and play at
the state Fair.
Ray Kirkland, former Executive
Vice President of the Chamber
and later, the Mayor of Lake City,
was hired in 1971 under then
County Judge Terry McDavid's
presidency to run the Chamber.
McDavid noted that after hiring
Kirkland, they had a 40. percent
increase in membership! I found
it most interesting that while
Kirkland and I held the same posi-
tion 40 years apart, we agreed on
two of the best things about hav-
ing the job of Chamber Executive.
The first being able to make our
community a better place to live,
work and raise children followed
by having the opportunity to
work closely and get to know
the President of the Board. Mr.
Kirkland phrased it best when he
said, "No matter how busy the
President is in their own business
or profession, they always take
the time to work for Columbia
County." That is another thing
that hasn't changed in all these
years! To the 90 Presidents and


Board Members of our Chamber,
we sincerely thank you for all the
time, energy and effort you have
put in making our organization a
continued success.
I cannot imagine a Chamber
without an Ambassador
Committee. I call on our commit-
tee all the time to make people
feel welcome or deliver a new
member packet or simply to stop
in a new business in town to
welcome them. So when I found
out that it wasn't until 1969 that
the Ambassador Committee was
formed, I was surprised! Edward
J. Bond and Powell Summers
formed the first committee with
the purpose of gaining new mem-
bers, calling on past due mem-
bers as well as acting as the
official host for the Chamber. In
addition the club was charged
with calling on all new industry
and business firms regardless of
size to make them as welcome
and assist them as much as pos-
sible. Forty-two years later, the
Ambassador Committee is still
going strong and is still carrying
out the same mission as set in
1969. If you are looking for a way
to be more active in the Chamber
this is a great group to join!
There are so many other sto-
ries I would like to share with
you about the Chamber's past
and many more examples of how
the mission formed in 1921 is
still being carried out today. As
t


we start our next 90 years, take
a moment to reflect on what will
be the legacy you and I leave
behind for the next generation to
read about? What will we do in
our community to leave a lasting
impression? I urge you to become
an active member in the Lake
City Columbia County Chamber
of Commerce. Your membership
ensures a strong business com-
munity for many more genera-
tions to come. In closing, I wanted
to share a quote by a gentleman
who served as President of the
Board in 1938, 1939 and 1946,
Mr. Walter Hackney, Jr. When
asked about his feelings of the
future of the Chamber in 1974,
he said, "I feel we have the finest,
most aggressive Chamber in the
state. We have young leaders and
the cooperation of local people
as well as the city and county
officials. Columbia County is for-
tunate to have multiple industries
instead of one big one. I see noth-
ing but bright prospects for us."
The 2011 Board of Directors and
I are working hard to ensure our
future in Lake City and Columbia
County stays bright. We welcome
your input in our Chamber and
hope to see you to celebrate on
July 13!

* Dennille Folsom is the executive
director of the Lake City/Columbia
County Chamber of Commerce.


WIlMljT T





Page Editor: Robert Bridges, 754-0428


Google Goes Solar
Google (Nasdaq: GOOG) is
looking to get a little better return
on its cash by creating a $280
million fund with which SolarCity
can expand its residential leasing
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SolarCity is a full-service solar
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Google, laden with cash, has been
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energy. The company is invested
in building a $5 billion wind power
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Solar manufacturers should cheer
anything that helps make solar power
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Established higher-efficiency compa-
nies like SunPower, Trina Solar, and
Yingli Green Energy in particular
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owns shares of Google, and Motley
Fool newsletter services have recom-
mended buying shares of it.)
.. . *00.... . .*0












Page Editor: Robert Bridges, 754-0428


LAKE CITY REPORTER BUSINESS SUNDAY, JULY 10, 2011


- *,. #.. b -. *. .


r ,,.'.-


Weekly Stock Exchange Highlights

3 NYSE A Amex Nasdaq
8 410.19 -15.29 2,422.20 +63.33 5 2,859.81 +43.78


Gainers ($2 or more)
Name Last Chg %Chg
TorchEngy 2.51 +.00 +66.1
ChiNBorun 7.57 +2.32 +44.2
Ameron 85.24+18.97 +28.6
DoralFnd 2.60 +.52 +25.0
EndvSilv g 10.00 +1.80 +22.0
ArchCh 42.17 +7.44 +21.4
EvergErs 2.20 + 20.9
Valhi 59.58 +9.65 +19.3
NelQin n 6.33 +.99 +18.5
SilvrcpM g 10.77 +1.68 +18.5

Losers ($2 or more)
Name Last Chg %Chg
LumberUq 18.60 -7.46 -28.6
Lentuo n 3.42 -1.28 -27.2
Aeroflex n 15.40 -3.19 -17.2
NBGrepfA 7.72 -1.48 -16.1
ProUSSIvrs16.85 -3.05, -15.3
SK T1cm 15.97 -2.80 -14.9
MediaGen 3.25 -.51 -13.6
Vancelnfo 20.29 -3.12 -13.3
Imax Corp 28.42 -4.18 -12.8
ForestOil 23.74 -3.44 -12.7

Most Active ($1 or more)
Name Vol (00) Last Chg
S&P500ETF5660832134.40 +.48
BkofAm 4825232 10.70 -.39
FordM 2253748 13.88 -.14
SPDR Fncl2176661 15.46 -.17
iShJapn 2037627 10.58 +.06
iShR2K 2019949 85.13+1.30
iShEMkts 1952406 47.93 -.23
Pfizer 1918282 20.16 -.59
SprintNex 1795866 5.49 +.06
GenElec 1713516 18.99 -.21

Diary
Advanced 1,895
Declined 1,245
New Highs 364
New Lows 30
Total Issues 3,208
Unchanged 68
Volume 13,369,240,190


Gainers ($2 or more)
Name Last Chg %Chg
VimetX 38.89 +8.42 +27.6
Express-1 3.78 +.60 +18.9
Adventrx 3.56 +.56 +18.7
AlmadnM g 3.80 +.56. +17.3
VistaGold 3.32 +.49 +17.3
GtPanSilvg 3.73 +.48 +14.8
ChinaPhH 2.51 +.31 +14.1
ClaudeRg 2.18 +.27 +14.1
ChiMarFd 3.19 +.38 +13.5
DocuSec 3.60 +.40 +12.5

Losers ($2 or more)
Name Last Chg %Chg
T3 Motnrs 2.15 -.71 -24.7
B&HO 3.99 -.51 -11.3
BowlA 12.07 -1.43 -10.6
OrsusXel rs 4.60 -.54 -10.5
Geokinetics 6.99 -.81 -10.4
Crexendo 4.51 -.49 -9.8
GoldRsvg 2.35 -.25 -9.6
QuestRMg 6.10 -.65 -9,6
NewConcEn 2.33 -.20t -7.9
YM Bio g 2.74 -.22 -7.4

Most Active ($1 or morel
game Vol (00) Last Chg
NovaGld g 177778 9.93 +.86
KodiakO g 167804 6.40 +.49
NwGold g 113991 10.64 +.75
VimetX 110223 38.89+68.42
GoldStr g 99396 2.42 +.24
NA Pallg 97480 4.18 -.07
BarcGSOil 93832 24.84 +.44
GtPanSilv g 87005 3.73 +.48
ChenlereEn 82666 9.55 +.36
Hyperdyn 82385 4.30 -.01

Diary
Advanced 329
Declined 184
New Highs 29
New Lows 15
Total issues 528
Unchanged 15
Volume 422,364,406


Gainers ($2 or more)
Name Last Chg %Chg
BkCarol 2.21 +1.22 +123.2
ChinaAulL 2.06 +.86 +71.7
ChinaNet 2.35 +.88 +59.9
APACC 8.44 +3.12 +58.6
CoffeeH 26.75 +9.25 +52.9
ChinaSky 3.12 +.96 +44.4
Tegal rs 2.74 +.72 +35.6
Sky-mobi n 10.43 +2.73 +35.5
HansenMed 4.59 +1.18 +34.6
FuweiFilm 4.05 +1.01 +33.2

Losers ($2 or more)
Name Last Chg %Chg
TransceptP 7.98 -3.01 -27.4
ZionO&G 4.35 -1.55 -26.3
Ixia 9.90 -2.82 -22.2
USecBc AL 3.75 -1.05 -21.9
NtScout 16.78 -4.40 -20.8
FstUtdCp 4.10 -1.03 -20.1
Satconh 2.03 -.51 -20.1
Seanrgyrs 4.55 -1.07 -19.0
HeliosM rs. 2.71 -.61 -18.4
OxygenBlo 2,44 -.53 -17.8

Most Active ($1 or more)
Name Vol (00) Last Chg
Cisco 2056056 15.74 -.06
Microsoft 1911824 26.92 +.90
PwShs QQQ190730359.03+1.12
SiriusXM .1766445 2.22 +.03
Intel 1630452 23.09 +.56
NewsCpA 1353949 16.75 -1.31
Level3 1033441 2.59 +.07
MicronT 993473 7.68 -.15
Oracle 971131 33.94 +.89
RschMotn 783781 28.98 +.05

Diary
Advanced 1,725
Declined 993
New Highs 310
New Lows 59
Total issues 2,786
Unchanged 68
Volume 6,618,551,557


STOCKS OF LOCAL INTEREST Weekly Dow Jones


Wkly Wkly YTD
Name Ex DIv Last Chg %Chg%Chg
AT&T Inc NY 1.72 31.14 -.11 -0.4 +6.0
Accenture NY .90 63.43 +2.56 +4.2 +30.8
AlcatelLuc NY ... 5.88 ... ... +98.6
Alcoa NY .12 16.38 +.07 +0.4 +6.4
AutoZone NY ... 298.28 +.66 +0.2 +9.4
BkofAm NY .04 10.70 -.39 -3.5 -19.8
BariPVixrsNY ... 20.35 +.06 +0.3 -45.9
BobEvans Nasd .80 36.00 +.04 +0.1 +9.2
CNBFnPA Nasd .66 14.13 +.27 +1.9 -4.6
CSXs NY .12 26.62 -.19 -0.7 +23.6
Chevron NY 3.12 105.89 +1.80 +1.7 +16.0
Cisco Nasd .24 15.74 -.06 -0.4 -22.2
Citigrprs NY .04 42.03 -.85 -2.0 -11.1
Cocacola NY 1.88 68.68 +.59 +0.9 +4.4
Delhaize NY 2.45 71.82 -3.27 -4.4 -2.6
FamilyDIr NY .72 54.49 +.48 +0.9 +9.6
FordM NY ... 13.88 -.14 -1.0 -17.3
GenElec NY .60 18.99 -.21 -1.1 +3.8
HomeDp NY 1.00 36.62 -.11 -0.3 +4.4
iShJapn NY .17 10.58 +.06 +0.6 -3.0
iShSilver NY ... 35.75 +2.75 +8.3 +18.5
iShEMkts NY .84 47.93 -.23 -0.5 +.6
iShR2K NY .94 85.13 +1.30 +1.6 +68.8
Intel Nasd .84 23.09 +.56 +2.5 +9.8
JPMorgCh NY 1.00 40.74 -.84 -2.0 -4.0
Level Nasd ... 2.59 +.07 +2.8+164.3
Lowes NY .56 23.61. -.21 -0.9 -5.9
MGM Rsts.NY ... 14.96 +1.27 +9.3 +.7


Wkly Wkly YTD
Name Ex DIv Last Chg%Chg%Chg
McDnlds NY 2.44 85.60 -.05 -0.1 +11.5
MicronT Nasd ... 7.68 -.15 -1.9 -4.2
Microsoft Nasd .64 26.92 +.90 +3.5 -3.5
NY Times NY ... 8.98 +.27 +3.1 -8.4
NewsCpA Nasd .15 16.75 -1.31 -7.3 +15.0
NextEraEn NY 2.20 57.70 -.48 -0.8 +11.0
NobilityH Nasd 7.84 +.07 +0.9 -3.3
OcciPet NY 1.84 106.27 +.75 +0.7 +8.3
Oracle Nasd .24 33.94 +.89 +2.7 +8.4
Penney NY .80 32.96 -1.87 -5.4 +2.0
PepsiCo NY 2.06 69.93 -.26 -0.4 +7.0
Pfizer NY .80 20.16 -.59 -2.8 +15.1
Potash s NY .28 59.19 +3.15 +5.6 +14.7
PwShsQQQNasd .42 59.03 +1.12 +1.9 +8.4
PrUShS&PNY ... 19.86 -.16 -0.8 -16.4
RschMotn Nasd ... 28.98 +.05 +0.2 -50.1
Ryder- NY 1.08 58.08 -.52 -0.9 +10.3
S&P500ETFNY 2.44 134.40 +.48 +0.4 +6.9
Schwab NY .24 15.60 -1.12 -6W7 -8.8
SearsHldgsNasd ... 74.68 +2.55 +3.5 +1.3
SiriusXM Nasd 2.22 +.03 +1.4 +36.3
SouthnCo NY 1.89 40.31 -.41 -1.0 +5.4
SprintNex NY 5.49 +.06 +1.1 +29.8
SPDRFncINY .18 15.46 -.17 -1.1 -3.1
SP Inds. NY .67 37.82 -.09 -0.2 +8.5
TimeWam NY .94 36.64 -.28 -0.8 +13.9
WalMat NY 1.46 54.08 +.57 +1.1 +.3
WellsFargo NY .48 28.30 -37 -1.3 -8.7


____________________________________________ __________________________________ i


Stock Footnotes: g = Dlrdendcsand earnings in Canadian dollars. h = Does no meetal continuw-listing standards
11 = Lale filing with SEC n = New in past 52 weeks p= Prelereo = Sic-ck has undergone a release Sfock spring
of al least 50 percent wfitn the past year rI = Rignt to Duy security i a specrea pnce a Stock nas spin by at
oeast 20 percent anihtin me last year un = Units vi = In Dankruplcy or receivar'hip ad = When adisnDuied wI =
When Issued. At = Warrarts
Mutual Fund Footnotes: bD Fee covering market cosas Is paid from fund assets a % ODearred sales charge or
redemption lee I = trgnl toed Iaes chargasl m r Mulliple lees are carrged. NA rot avalesine p pfeVlous day'S
net ase a ealue6e = lund 6pil shares dunng the week leA fund paid a isrdgDution during me week.Galner8 and
Loser mudl be aort-' at least $2 1o be 1lIsed in tables at lart Most Actives must be worn a leasi $1 Volunme in
nundired of shares Source: The Assooated Press Sales figures are unofficial


Currencies
SLast PvsDay


Australia .9305 .9282
Britain 1.6031 1.5963


Canada


.9614


.9591


Euro .7019 .6968
Japan 80.71 81.30


Mexyico


9 81611 11 5559


Dow Jones Industrials CLOSED -12.90 56.
Close: 12,657.20 1 1

13,000 ..... ................


12,500 ... ... ... ................


12,000.......


11 ,5 o o0 ...... ............ .. .... ......... ....... .... ............. .
11,500



'MUTUAL FUNDS'
Total Assets Total Return/Ri
Name Obj ($Mlns) NAV 4-wk 12-mo


PIMCOTotRetls Cl
American Funds GrthAmA m LG
Vanguard TotStldx LB
Fidelity Contra LG
American Funds CaplncBuA m IH
Vanguard Inilldal LB
Amencarn Funds CpWIdGrIA m WS
Armencar, Funds IncAmerA m MA
Vanguard 500A.dml LB
Vanguard TolSilAdm LB
Amerincan Funds InvCoAmA m LB
Dodge & Cox nuStk FV
Dodge & Co> Sitck. LV
Arerncan Funds WAMutlnvA m LV
Arnencarn Funds EurPacGrA m FB
Vanguard InslPlus LB
FrankTemp-Franklin Income A m CA
American Funds FnlnvA m LB
American Funds NewPerspA m WS
Vanguard TotIntl d FB
PIMCO TotRetAdm b CI
American Funds BalA m MA
Vanguard 500lnv LB'
Vanguard WelltnAdm MA
Harbor Intlnstl d FB
Fidelity GrowCo LG
Vanguard TotBdAdml Cl


142,222
66,606
62,404
61,672
60,731
60,307
56,815
55,356
54,186
51,740
49,434
46,279
43,847
40,746
39,594
37,510
36,555
35,358
34,184
34,163
32,808
32,769
30,461
29,812
29,804
29,343
28,544


11.04 +0.2
32.39 +5.0
33.96 +5.6
72.50 +6.1
51.95 +1.2
123.02 +5.2
37.10 +1.6
17.37 +1.9
123.85 +5.2
33.97 +5.6
29.39 +4.4
36.68 +0.7
114.75 +3.8
29.54 +5.3
43.31 +1.5
123.02 +5.2
2.24 +1.0
39.21 +4.1
30.16 +3.2
16.39 +1.9
11.04 +0.2
18.92 +3.6
123.85 +5.2
56.23 +2.6
64.69 +1.7
94.54 +7.8
10.75 -0.2


+6.5/8
+25.3/E
+30.3/A
+28.0/D
+18.4/C,
+28.0/B
+22.3/D
+20.9/B
+28.0/B
+30.5/A
+22.5/E
+23.9/B
+27.5/B
+28.3/B
+22.7/D
+28.1/B
+18.3/A
+27.3/C
+25.5/C
+24.1/C
+6.2/B
+21.2/A
+27.9/B
+18.8/C
+28.2/A
+41.1/A
+4.4/D


Switzerlnd .8367 .8452 CA Ce ve Allocation, CI -ntermedatetTerm Bond, ES -Europe Stock, FB Forein Lage Blend, F
Large Value IH-WWorld Alocation, LB -Large Blend, LG -4ae Grow, LV -Large Value, MA-Moderate
British pound expressed in U.S. dollars. All oth- Md-Cap Value, SH -Specialty-eath, WS World Stock To Return: Ch In AV with dividends rennv
ers show dollar in foreign currency. others wth sarne objectve:As In top 20%, Ein bottom 20%. MinInit lnvt; Mirflum $ needed toinvesti


Wkly YTD Wkly
Name DIv YId PE Chg %Chg Last
AES Corp ... ... 16 +.08 +7.2 13.06
AFLAC 1.20 2.6 9 -.92 -17.6 46.51
AKSteel .20 1.2 ... +.24 -.9 16.22
AMR ... ... ... -.02 -29.4 5.50
AT&Tlnc 1.72 5.5 9 -.11 +6.0 31.14
AUOptron .14 2.2 ... -.40 -38.9 6.37
AbtLal 1.92 3.6 14 +.23 +11.3 53.33
Accenture .90 1.4 22 +2.56 +30.8 63.43
AMD ... ... 7 -.16 -15.0 6.95
Aetna .60 1.4 10 -.93 +45.2 44.30
Agilent .... ... 21 -1.77 +21.2 50.23
AlcatelLuc ... ... ... ... +98.6 5.88
Alcoa .12 .7 23 +.07 .+6.4 16.38
AllegTch .72 1.2 56 -1.32 +11.7 61.61
Allstate .84 2.8 '12 -.36 -4.2 30.54
AlphaNRs ... ... 42 -1.46 -24.6 45.29
.'Altria 1.52 5.7 14 +.36 +9.2 26.89
AmBevs 1.43 4.3 ... -.97 +6.5 33.05
AMovilL s .26 1.0 15 -.62 -7.8 26.42
AmAxle ... ... 6 +.67 -9.8 11.60
AEagleOut .44 3.2 18 +1.00 -5.1 13.88
AEP 1.84 4.8 15 +.17 +6.6 38.35
AmExp .72 1.4 15 +.73 +23.6 53.07
AmlntlGrp ... ... 3 -.04 -L8.0 29.94
Anadarko .36 .5 ... +1;43 +4.2 79.34
Annaly 2.59 14.0 8 +.32 +3.3 18.52
Anworth 1.00 13.4 9 +.10 +6.7 '7.47
ArcelorMit .75 2.2 16 -.83 -9.8 34.40
ArchCoal .44 1.6 19 -.30 -23.9 26.69
ArchDan .64 2.1 10 +.21 +3.2 31.04
ArmourRsdl.44 18.8 10 +.26. ,-1.8 -.7.67,
ATMOS 1.36 4.0 15 +.10 +8.8 33.95
Avon .92 3.2 18 +.55 -1.8 28.53
BB&T Cp .64 2.5 21 -1.09 -.8 26.09
BHPBilILt 1.82 1.9 :.. +.39 +3.1 95.84
BRFBrasil .35 2.1 ...-1.06 -2.1 16.53
BakrHu .60 .8 31 +2.14 +31.3 75.07
BcoBrades .80 4.0 ... -.72 -1.4 20.00
BcoSantSA .82 7.6 ... -1.09 +1.2 10.78
BcoSBrasill.65 14.8 ... -.57 -18.2 11.13
BkofAm .04 .4 19 -.39 -19.8 10.70
BkNYMel .52 2.0 12 -.26 -14.6 25.80
Barclay .36 2.3 ... -1.29 -4.4 15.80
Bar iPVix rs ... ...... +.06 -45.9 20.35
BamickG .48 1.0 13 +1.46 -13.1 46.24
Baxter 1.24 2.0 17 +.69 +20.3 60.92
BerkHB ... ... 18 -1.19 -4.0 76.90
BestBuy .64 2.0 10 -.18 -7.2 31.82
Blackstone .40 2.4 ... -.36 +20.2 17.01
BlockHR .60 3.7 12 -.19 +35.3 16.12
Boeing 1.68 2.2 17 +.80 +15.0- 75.07
BostonSci. ... .... 20 -.06 -5.3 7.17
BrMySq 1.32 4.5 15 -.03 +10.0 29.12
CB REllis ... ... 35 -.11 +23.4 25.28
CBSB .40 1.4 23 +.12 +50.5 28.67
CSXs .12 .5 18 -.19 +23.6 26.62
CVSCare .50 1.3 15 +.13 +9.6 38.10
CblvsNYs .60 2.2 21 +1.26 +15.0 27.22
Cameron ... ... 23 +.72 +.8 51.15
CdnNRsgs .36 ...... -.30 -5.4 42.03
CapOne .20 .4 8 +1.06 +26.2 53.71
Carnival 1.00 2.7 16 -1.41 -18.9 37.38
Caterpillar 1.84 1.7 20 +1.79 +17.9 110.41
Cemex ... ... ... '-.29 -18.7 8.37
CenterPnt .79 4.0 17 -.04 +25.6 19.75
CntryUnk 2.90 7.2 12 -.72 -12.7 40.31
ChesEng .35 1.1 10 t.48 +18.0 30.58
Chevron 3.12 2.9 10 +1.80 +16.0 105.89
Chimera .62 17.6 6 -.02 -14.4 3.52
Citigrprs .04 .1 14 -.85 -11.1 42.03
CliffsNRs .56 .6 10 +3.72 +24.9 97.42
Coach .90 1.3 23 +.83 +20:8 66.82
CocaCola 1.88 2.7 14 +.59 +4.4 68.68
CocaCE .52 1.8 16 -.82 +15.8 28.99
ConAgra .92. 3.5 14 +.41 +16.5 26.31
ConocPhil 2.64 3.5 11 +.03 +11.5 75.91
ConsolEngy .40 .8 25 +1.91 +3.1 50.25
ConEd 2.40 4.5 15 -.50 +8.0 53.56
ConstellEn .96 2.5 17 +.22 +26.7 38.82



Wkly YTD Wkly
Name DIv YId PE Chg %Chg Last
APACC ... ... 20 +3.12 +39.0 8.44
Abraxas ... ... ... +.72 -1.8 4.49
ActivsBliz .17 1.4 28 +.23 -3.0 12.07
AdobeSy ... ... 17 +.01 .+2.5 31.54
AdvBattery ... ... 2 +.02 -71.7 1,09
Affymetrix ... ..... -1.27 +35.0 6.79
AkamaiT ... 34 +.17 -32.7 31.66
AlteraCplf .24 .5 18 -.69 +31.6 46.84
Amazon ... ... 94 +8.79 +21.3 218.28
ACapAgy 5.60 18.5 4 +.60 +5.1 30.20
AmCapLtd ... ... .3 +.11 +33.6 10.10
Amgen ... ... 12 -.64 +5.0 57.64
Amylin ... ... ... +.68 -3.3 14.22
ApolloGrp ... ... 17 +2.42 +23.8 48.88
Apple Inc ... ... 17+16.45 +11.5 359.71
ApIdMati .32 2.4 11 -.19 -6.8 13.10
AiadP ... ... 19 +.62 +138.4 12.16
ArmHId .13 .4 ... +1.18 +43.5 29.78
ArubaNet ... ...... +.74 +46.3 30.54
Atmel .,. ... 14 +.14 +17.3 14.45
Autodesk ... ... 39 +1.42 +5.0 40.12
AutoData 1.44 2.6 22 +.61 +17.8 54.50
Baidu ... ... 13 +4.43 +53.1 147.78
BioSante ... .... ... +.69 +119.5 3.60
Blkboard ... ... ... +.08 +7.1 44.25
BrigExp ... ... ... +.55 +14.5 31.18
Broadcom .36 1.0 17 +.21 -20.5 34.62
BrcdeCm ... ... 23 +.20 +27.6 6.75
CA Inc .20 .9 14 +.01 -5.2 23.18
Cadence ... ... 15 -.10 +28.1 10.58
CpstnTrb h ... ... ... +.08 +70.8 1.64
Celgene ... ... 32 +1.11 +4.8 61.99
CellTherrsh... ... ... -.19 -32.4 1.48
CienaCorp ... ... ... -1.14 -16.8 17.51
Cirrus 6 -.81 +.7 16.09
Cisco .24 1.5 12 -.06 -22.2 15.74
Clearwire ... ... ... -.02 -26.2 3.80
CoffeeH .12 .4 45 +9.25 +619.1 26.75


Name DIv YId
Coming .20 1.1
DR Horton .15 1.3
DTE 2.35 4.7
Danaher ,08 .1
Deere 1.64 1.9
DeltaAir ...
DenburyR ...
DevonE .68 .8
DrSCBrrs ... ...
DirFnBr rs ... ...
DrxEnBear .. ...
DrxFnBull.
DirxSCBull...
DirxEnBull ...
Discover .24 .9
'Disney .40 1.0
DomRescs 1.97 4.1
DowChm 1.00 2.7
DukeEngy 1.00 5.2
ECDang n ...
EMC Cp ...
Eaton s 1.36 2.6
EIPasoCp .04 .2
Elan ... ..
EldorGld g ..10 ...
EmersonEl 1.38 2.4


Wkly YTD Wkly
PE Chg .%Chg Last
8 -68 -7.6 ,17.86
63 +.30 +.4 11.98
15 -.43 +11.1 50.37
19 +.02 +15.6 54.54
15 +1.57 +3.7 86.11
15 +.06 -25.8 9.35
55 -.19 +4.0 19.86
9 +1.56 +2.3 80.32
...-1.62 -32.8 31.49
... +.74 -8.9 43.05
...'-.44 -39.3 13.69
-.60 -5.2 26.39
...+4.01 +23.5 89.44
... +2.08 +33.2 77.83
9 +.63 +46.4 27.12
18 +.19 +6.4 39.91
16 -.36 +13.8 48.63
19 +.06 +6.6 36.38
13 +.Q2' +7.2 19.09
... +1.87 -49.5 13.67
30 +.04 +21.7 27.87
17 -.12 +3.5 52.53
28 -.22 +46.9 20.21
... +.13+109.2 11.99
41, +1.59 -13.8 16.01
19 +.10 ... 57.19


.EnCanag .80. 2.6 87 -.31 +4.8 30.52
EndvSilvg .:. ... ... +1.80 +36.2 10.00
ENSCO 1.40 2.6 17 +.24 -.5 53.13
ExcoRes ,16 1.0 ... -1.88 -18.4 15.85
Exelon ., 2.10 .48, J4, +.28. +4,0 43.63
ExxonMbl 1.88 2.3 12 +.41 +12.7 82.42
RrstEngy 2.20 4.9 16 +.01 +20.6 44.64
FootLockr .66 2.8 1 -.11 +22.3 23.99
FordM ... ... 7 -.14 -17.3 13.88
ForestLab ... ... 11 -.80 +23.1 39.37
ForestOil ... ... 17 .-3.44 -37.5 23.74
FMCGs. 1.00 1.8 11 +1.62 -8.2 55.12
FrontierCm .75 9.1 59 ... -15.7 8.20
GafisaSA .29 3.3 -.56 -38.9' 8.88
-GameStop ... ... 10 -.08 +17.4 26.85
Gap .45 2.4 10 +.70 -13.9 18.98
GenGrPr n .40 2.3 ... +.55 +11.6 17.27
GenMagt ... ...... -.28 -67.7 1.05
GenMills 1.22 3.3 14 -.23 +3.4 36.81
GenMotn ... ... 8 +1.00 -14.3 31.58
GenOnEn ... ...... +.24 +8.4 4.13
Genworth ... ... 52 -.08 -20.2 10.48
Gerdau .27 2.5 ... -.22 -24.0 10.63
GoldFLtd .19 1.3 2 +.38 -19.3 14.63
Goldcrpg' .41 .8 16 +3.06 +9.8 50.49
GoldmanS 1.40 1.0 15 -2.57 -20.3 134.08
Goodyear ... ...... -.06 +45.4 17.23
Hallibrtri .36 .7 23 +2.75 +32.4 54.04
"HarleyD '.50 1.2 42 +.85 +23.9 42.94
HartfdFn .40 1.5 7 -.78 -.8 26.27
HeclaM ... ... 38 +.31 -29.0 8.00
Hess .40 .5 10 -.74 -2.4 74.68
HewlettP .48 1.3 9 -.62 -13.5 36.43
HomeDok 1.00 2.7 18 -.11 +4.4 36.62
HonwillntI 1.33 2.2 20 -.65 +12.0 59.54
HostHotls .12 .7 ... -.18 -2.4 17.45
Huntsmn .40 2.0 19 +.58 +27.2 19.86
iShGold ... ... ... +.55 +8.4 15.07
ISAstla 1.06 4.1 -.29 +2.0 25.95
iShBraz 3.42 4.7 ... -2.01 -6.8 72.15
IShGer .67 2.5 ... -.50 +11.3 26.64
IShHK .42 2.3 ... -.08 -1.7 18.60
iShJapr .17 1.6 ... +.06 -3,0 10.58
iSh Kor .50 .7 ... +1.40 +10.3 67.47
ISMalas .39 2.5 . -.05 +7.1 15.40
iSTaiwn .29 ...... -.21 -2.8 15.18
iShSilver ... ... ... +2.715 +18.5 35.75
iShChlna25-.85 2.0 ...-1.03 -1.9 42.27
iSSP500 2.45 1.8 ... +.50 +6.8 134.85
iShEMkts .84 1.8 ... -.23 +.6 47.93
iShB20 T 4.02 4.2 ... +1.74 +1.3 95.37
iS Eafe 1.68 2.8 ... -.97 +2.8 59.83
iSR1KG .77 1.2 ... +.78 +8.9 62.35


Wkly YTD Wkly
Name DIv YId PE Chg %Chg Last


Comcast .45 1.8
Comc spcl .45 1.8
Compuwre ...
CorinthC ...
Costco .96 1.2
Cree Inc
Crocs
CypSemi .36 1.5
Dell Inc
DeltaPtrh ...
Dndreon
Dentsply .20 .5
DirecTVA ...
DryShips ...
E-Trade ...
eBay
ElectArts ... ...
Enerl
Entegris
EntropCom ...
EricsnTel .37 2.6
Expedia .28 .9
ExpScripts ...
F5 Netwks ...
Fastenal s .52 1.4
FifthThird .24 1.9
Finisar
FstNiagara .64 4.7
Plextm ... ...
FocusMda .. .
GT Solar ...
GileadSci ...
GluMobile ...
Google
GreenMtC ...
HansenMed...
HercOffsh ...
HudsCity .32 3.9


19 -.22 +16.6 25.51
18 -.12 +18.2 24.48
21 +.32 -12.9 10.16
... +.18 -13.2 4.52
25 -.13 +12.7 81.41
20 -1.63 -51.1 32.23
33 +.95 +60.5 27.47
40 +1.68 +25.0 23.23
10 +.16 +26.5 17.14
... +01 -38.8 .47
... -.73 +16.5 40.67
21 +.71 +14.8 39.23
20 +1.32 +32.9 53.08
7 -.17 -24.6 4.14
... -.65 -13.8 13.80
24 +.868 +20.1 33.42
S... +.86 +52.9 25.05
... -.10 -74.4 .97
13 -.69 +30.5 9.75
11 +.04 -23.2 9.28
... -.17 +23.2 14.21
21 +1.14 +22.3 30.68
23 +.61 +1.0 54.57
48 +3.26 10.6 116.42
37 -.02 +22.3 36.63
16 -.41 -14.4 12.56
18 -.49 -38.2. 18.34
17 +.13 -3.6 13.48
9 -.01 -16.1 6.59
23 -.05 +44.8 31.75
13 +.33 +81.0 16.51
13 +.49 +17.1 42.44
... +.20+169.1 5.57
19+10.96 -10.4 531.99
... +5.85 +192.8 96.20
... +1.18 +208.1 4.59
... -.06 +57.5 5.48
... +.03 -35.0 8.28


New York Stock Exchange







TAKE CHARGE


OFYOUR FUTURE.


Create and implement a strategy designed to help you
achieve your long-term financial goals.


Do something positive for yourself. Call today for a no-cost,
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386-752-3847

www.edwardjones.com Member SIPCG


Wkly YTD Wkly
Name Div YId PE Chg %Chg Last
iShR2K .94 1.1 ... +1.30 +8.8 85.13
iShREst 2.09 3.3 ... +1.32 +12.0 62.70
ITW 1.36 2.3 16 +1.30 +10.3 58.91
IngerRd .48 1.0 ... -1.04 -2.3 46.02
IBM 3.00 1.7 15 +1.95 +20.3 176.49
IntlGame .24 1.3 21 +.28 +3.3 18.27
*IntPap 1.05 3.5 12 -.35 +11.1 30.26
Interpublic .24 1.9 26 +.01 +19.8 12.72
Invesco .49 2.1 15 +.01 -2.0 23.57
ItauUnibH .67 3.0 ... -1.14 -5.6 22.56
JPMorgCh 1.00 2.5 9 -.84 -4.0 40.74
Jabil .28 1.3 14 +.58 +6.3 21.35
JanusCap .20 2.0 10 +.23-24.2 9.83
JohnJn 2.28 3.4 15 +.27 +9.2 67.57
JohnsnCtl .64 1.5 18 +.07 +11.2 42.47
JnprNtwk... ... 30 +.09 -13.2 32.06
KB Home .25 2.6 e ... -.41 -27.7 9.76
KeyEngy ... ... 26 +1.31 +49.8 19.44
Keycorp .12 1:5 11 -.18 -6.7 8.26
Klmco .72 3.7 ... +.77 +8.1 19.50
KineticC ... ... 17 +6.66 +55.2 64.99
Kinross g .10 .6 25 +.88 -12.1 16.67
Kohls 1.00 1.8 15 +3.39 +1.5 55.18
Kraft 1.16 3.2 21 +.24 +13.3 35,71
LDK Solar ... ... 2 -.65 -33.7 6.71
LSI Corp ... ... +.02 +21.4 7.27
LVSands ... ... 56 +2.12 +.1 46.01
LenderPS .40. 2.0 6 -1.22 -31.5 20.23
LennarA .16 .8 36 +.13 +.5 18.85
illyEli 1.96 5.2 8 +.04 +7.6 37.71
Limited .80 2.0 16 +1.71 +32.2 40.62
UncNat .20 .7 10 -.57 +2.6 28.53


Wkly YTD' Wkly
Name DIv YId PE Chg %Chg Last


UoydBkg ...
LumberUq ...
LyonBas A .10 .2
MBIA
MEMC
MFA Fncl 1.00 12.0
MGIC
MGM Rsts
Macys .40 1.3
ManpwrGp .80 1.4
MarathnO sl.00 3.1
MarathPn .
MktVGold .40 .7
MktVRus .18 .5
MarlntA .40 1.1
Masco .30 2.5
McDrmlnts ...
MedcoHlth ...
Medtmic .97 2.6
Merck 1.52 4.2
MetLife .74 1.7
MetroPCS ...
Molycorpn ...
Monsanto 1.12 1.5
MonstrWw ...
MorgStan .20 .9
Mosaic .20 .3
MotriaSoln ...
MotriaMon ...
NCR Corp ...
NRG Egy ...
Nabors


-... 30 -28.2
21 -7.46 -25.3
... +1.96 +18.8
5 -.10 -25.2
47 -.54 -28.6
9 +.16 +2.2
... +.51 -35.1,
.. +1.27 +.7
14 +.54 +20.2
... +.65 -10.6
7 -.28 +45.3
-.79 +6.2
... +2.55 -8.4
... +.28 +3.9
31 +.35 -10.5
... -.46 -5.8
18 +1.16 +1.5
16 -1.57 -9.8
13 -.87 +2.5
1,6 +.52 +.2
12 -.86 -2.1
28 -.37 +37.8
... -3.29 +13.3
26 +2.80 +7.9
-.22 -38.0
12 -1.46 -18.0
14 +2.75 -7.6
..-1.42 +18.5
... -1.84 -25.6
15 +.23 +26.5
44 -.60 +23.8
52 -.44 +4.1


Name


Immucor
Intel .84
Intuit
Ixia
JA Solar ...
JDS Uniph ...
JetBlue ..:
KLA Tnc 1.00
LamResrch ...
Level3
UbtyMintA ...
luullemng ...
Majesco
MarinaB rs ...
MarvellT
Mattel .92
MelcoCrwn ...
MicronT
Microsoft .64
Move Inc ...
NetApp
Netflix
NewCpA .15
NewsCpB .15
Novius
Nvidia
OCZ Tech ..
OmniVisn ...
OnSmcnd ...
Oracle .24
Pacoar .48
PattUTI .20
Paychex 1.24
PeopUtdF .63
Popular
Power-One...
PwShs QQQ .42
Qualcom .86


Wkly YTD Wkly
DIv YId PE Cho %Che Last Name


... 22 +6.20 +35.8 26.93
3.6 11 +.56 +9.8 .23.09
... 25 -.55 +4.8 51.69
.. 41 -2.82 -41.0 9.90
... 3 -.63 -29.0 4.91
... 59 -1.07 +10.1 15.94
... 19 -.20 -8.5 6.05
2.4 11 +.80 +9.3 42.25
... 8 -1.10 -14.7 44.17
... ... +.07+164.3 2.59
... 18 +.55 +12.5 17.74
... 64 +4.63 +75.8 120.25
... 21 +.18 +315.6 3.20
... ... +.04 -85.0 .23
... 12 +.30 -16.9 15.41
3.3 15 -.34 +8.7 27.65
... ... +.39+119.8 13.98
13 -.15 -4.2 7.68
2.4 7 +.90 -3.5 26.92
... ... +.10 -10.9 2.29
... 31 -.84 -2.7 53.48
... 85+27.15 +68.0 295.14
.9 15 -1.31 +15.0 16.75
.9 16 -1.10 +5.5 17.33
11 -.93 +11.3 35.97
38 -.72 +.2 15.43
... ... +1.49 +100.6 9.67
... 16 -1.16 +13.6 33.64
... 14 -.17 +6.3 10.50
.7 20 +.89 +8.4 33.94
.9 33 +.20 -8.9 52.25
.6 27 +.40 +50.2 32.37
4.0 22 +.28 +1.4 31.33
4.6 33 +.09 -2.5 13.66
... ... +.01 -12.3 2.76
7 -.30 -22.5 7.91
.7 ... +1.12 +8.4 P9.03
1.4 26 +1.48 +19.9' 59.36


Wkly YTD Wkly
DIv YId PE Cha %Chg Last


RF MicD ...
RschMotn ..
Riverbed s ...
SanDisk
Sanofi rt
Satcqn h
SeagateT .72
SifyTech ...
SIcnware .28
Sina
SiriusXM ...
SkywksSol ...
SodaStrm n ...
Sonus
Spreadtrm .05
Staples .40
Starbucks .52
StiDynam .40
Symantec ...
TD Ameritr .20
Tellabs .08
TevaPhrm .83
TibcoSft ...
TiVo Inc
TriQuint
UrbanOut ...
Veecoinst ...
VirgnMda h .16
Vodafone 1.44
Windstrm 1.00
Xilinx .76
YRC Wwrs ...
Yahoo
Zagg
Zalicus
ZionBcp .04


15 +.23 -10.2 6.60
5 +.05 -50.1 28.98
... +1.05 +16.9 41.13
8 +.24 -13.7 43.04
... +.10 +8.1 2.54
-.51 -54.9 2.03
7 +.58 +12.7 16.93
... +.63 +137.6 5.37
19 -.46 -4.2 5.70
... +4.82 +65.0 113.58
... +.03 +36.3 2.22
24.+1.28 -13.7 24.72
82 +7.51 +139.6 75.68
... +.14 +26.6 3.38
10 -.75 -9.4 16.64
13 -.35 -31.6 15.57
28 +.16 +25.6 40.35
19 -.18- -11.3 16.23
26 -.10 +17.9 19.73
18 -.95 -.3 18.93
21 -.18 -34.4 4.45
14 +.47 -5.1 49.47
58 +1.36 +56.2 30.78
... -.05 +24.9 10.78
9 +.18 -11.8 10.31
21 +3.11 -10.6 32.03
5 -3.75 +4.4 44.84
... -1.24 +6.5 29.00
... -.15 +1.2 26.75
22 +.01 -5.8 13.13
15 -.82 +25.1 36.24
... -.08 -69.1 1.15
18 +.16 -6.1 15.61
25 -.14 +66.8 12.71
... +.43 +74.7 2.76
+.8 24.42


e D Y ly YTD Wkt
Name Div YId PE Chg %Chg Last


NBkGreece .29 ...
NatGrid 2.92 -5.9
NOilVarco .44 .5
NatSemi .40 '1.6
NY CmtyB 1.00 6.5
NY Times ...
NewellRub .32 2.0
NewmtM .80 1.5
Nexen g .20
NextEraEn 2.20 3.8
NISource .92 4.5
NikeB 1.24 1.3
NobleCorp 1.06 2.8
NoklaCp .55 8.8
Nordstrm .92 1.8
NorflkSo 1.60 2.1
Nucor 1.45 3.5
OcciPet 1.84 1.7
OfficeDpt ...
OilSvHT 1.71 .8
PG&ECp 1.82 4.3
PMI Grp ...
PNC 1.40 2.3
PPL Corp 1.40 5.0
PatriotCoal ...
PeabdyE .34 .6
Penney .80 2.4
PepsiCo 2.06 2.9
Petrohawk- ... ..
PetrbrsA 1.34 4.4
Petrobr l 1.28 3,8
Pfizer .80 4.0
PhilipMor 2.56 3.7
Potash s .28 .5
PS USDBull...
PrinFncl .55 1.8
ProLogis 1.12 3.0
PrUShS&P ...
ProUltQQQ ...
PrUShQQQ rs...
ProUltSP .35 .6
ProUShL20 ... ...
ProUSSP500...
ProUSSIvrs.. .
PrUltCrde rs...
ProUSR2K rs...
Prudent 1.15 1.8
PulteGrp
RadianGrp .01 .2
Raytheon 1.72 3.5
RegalEnt -.84 7.2
RegionsFn .04 .7
ReneSola ...
Renrenn ... ....
RiteAld ... ...
SAIC
SKTlcm ...
SLMCp' .40 2.4
SpdrDJIA 3.06 2.4
SpdrGold ...
SP Mid 1.65 .9
S&P500ETF2.44 1.8
SpdrHome .31 1.7
SpdrKbwBk .20 .8
SpdrLehHY4.35 10.0
SpdrRetl .46 .8
SpdrOGEx .47 .8
*SpdrMetM .42 .6
Safeway .58 2.5
SandRdge ...
Sanofi 1.82 4.6
SaraLee .46 2.3
Schlmbrg 1.00 1.1
Schwab .24 1.5
SemiHTr .70 2.0
SiderurNac .81 6.5
SilvWhtng .12 .3
SilvrcpM g .08
SouthnCo 1.89 4.7


... -.19 -22.6 1.30
... -.48 +11.6 49.53-
20 +1.90 +15.3 80.21
21 +.12 +80.1 24.78
12 -.16 -18.4 15,39
14 +.27 -8.4 8.98
15- -.17 -12.2 15.96
12 +1.02 -10.9 54.76
... -.04 -.3 22.83
15 -.48 +11.0 57.70
19 +.01 +16.9 20.60
,21 +1.42 +9.2 93.24
2.1 -2.33 +4.4 37.34
... -.20 .-39.7 .6.22
17 +2.0.1 +18.6 50.25
18 -1.25 +20.5 75.68
50 -.64 -6.6 40.93
17 +.75 +8.3 106.27
... -.07 -21.5 4.24
... +1.87 +10.0 154.52
16 -.23 -11.3 42.43
... +.40 -54.2 1.51
9 -1.06 -1.5 59.83
12 ... +6.5 28.02
... +.28 +18.6 22.98
19 +.56 -6.3 59.95
19 -1.87 +2.0 32.96
19 -.26 +7.0 69.93
... -.79 +34.6 24.57
... -.43 -10.7 30.53
... -.37,,-10.9 .33.703
19 -.59 +15.1 20.16
17 +2.66 +18.6 69.41
25 +3.15 +14.7 59.19
... +.22 -5.7 21.42
14 -.72 -7.4 30.15
... +.58 +16.0 36.78
... -.16 -16.4 19.86
... +3.47 +16.2 94.61
... -1.88 -19.2 46.99
... +.39 +14.1 54.84
... -1.25 -9.9 33.38
... -.19 -24.5 14.65
...-3.05 -57.1 16.85
... +1.34 -13.3 43.34
.... -1.30 -22.0 39.20
9 -.39 +9.7 64.38
... -.05 +3.3 7.77
... +.45 -41.5 4.72
8 -1.49 +5.8 48.62
42 -.79 ... 11.74
... -.15 -12.1 6.15
2 -.47 -45.4 4.77
... +1.66 -39.4 10.91
... -.04 +47.2 1.30
10 -.29- +5.4 16.71
... -2.80 -14.3 15.97
9 -.28 +32.6 16.70
... +.81 +9.3 126.39
... +5.32 +.3 150.25
... +1.74 +10.7 182.29
... +.48 +6.9 134.40
-.15 +5.2 18.30
... -.41 -7.3 24.03
... +.07 +1.6 40.35
... +1.47 +15.6 55.91
... +1.03 +15.0 60.68
... +.55 +2.4 70.42
15 -.16 +4.3 23.46
... +.26 +48.0 10.83
... -.63 +23.4 39.77
27 +.30 +12.1 19.62
25 +2.36 +7.7 89.96
27 -1.12 -8.8 15.60
-.12 +6.5 34.65
... -.21 -25.6 12.41
35 +3.84 -7.1 36.25
28 +1.68 -16.1 10.77
18 -.41 +5.4 40.31


AMEX Most Active


Wkly YTD Wkly
Name DIv Yld PE Chg %Chg Last
AbdAsPac .42 5.6 ... +.14 +10.4 7.45
Adventrx ... ...... +.56 +36.4 3.56
AlexcoR g ... ... .+.87 -1.6 8.06
AlIdNevG ... ....+3.30 +44.8 38.11
AmApparel ... +.16 -35.5 1.07
AntaresP ... +.07 +40.6 2.39
ArcadlaRs ... ... ...-.00 -76.7 .07
Augusta g ... ...... +.47 +30.4 4.97
Aurizong ... ...... +.47 -21.2 5.77
AvalRaren ... ...... -.. 3 +6.1 6.62
BarcUBS36 ... ...... +1.21 -1.4 48.42
BarcGSOil ... ... ... ,+.44 -3.0 24.84
Brigusgrs ... ... ... +.11 -15.7 1.77
CelSci ... ... ... -39.1 .50
CFCdag .01 ......+1.46 +3.9 21.54
ChenlereEn ... ...... +.36 +73.0 9.55
ChinaShen ... ...... -.08 -61.3 3.25
ClaudeRg ... ...... +.27 -.5 2.18
CrystaIRk 6 +.46 +76.5 1.20
DejourE g ... ... ... -.02 -3.1 .31
DenisnM'g ...+.11 -42.7 1.96
EVLtdDur 1.25 7.6 ... -.10 +2.9 16.52
ExeterR gs ... +.15 -29.5 4.38
Express-1 ... ... 25 +.60 +47.7 3.78
GabGldNR 1.68 9.2 +.38 -5.3 18.24
GascoEngy ... ......-.00 -32.0 .24
GenMoly ... ...... +.14 -30.4 4.51
GeoGloblR ... ...... -.08 -50.0 .40
GoldResrc .48 2.1 ...-1.08 -21.8 22.98
GoldStr g ... ......+.24 -47.3 2.42
GranTrra g ...+.02 -16.8 6.70
GrtBasGg ... .....+.01 -31.8 2.02
GtPanSllv g... ...4 +.48 +32.7 3.73
Hyperdyn ... ....... -.01 -13.3 4.30
InovioPhm ... ...... +.21 -29.1 .82
KodiakO g ... ...... +.49 -3.0 6.40
MadCatzg ... ... 8 +.07 +45.1 1.48
Metalico ... ... 15 +.06 +1.5 5.97


Name Div YId
SthnCopperl.94 5.5
SoUnCo .60 1.4
SwstAirl .02 ..2
SwstnEngy ...
SprintNex ..
SP Mails 1.30 3.2
SP HIthC .63 1.8
SP CnSt .83 2.6
SP Consum .59 1.4
SPEngy 1.06 1.4
SPDRFncl .18 1.2
SP Inds .67 1.8
SP Tech .35 1.3
SP Util 1.33 3.9
StarwdHtl .30 .5
StateStr .72 1.6
Suncor gs .44
SunTrst .04 .2
Supvalu .35 3.7
Synovus .04 1.9
TJX .76 1.4
TalwSemi .52 4.1
Talbots
TalismEg .27
Target 1.20 2.3
TeckRes g .60
TenetHlth.
Tesoro
Texlnstj, .52 -1.6
Textron .08 .3
3M Co 2.20 2.3
TimeWam .94 2.6
TotalSA 3.16 5.5
Transocn .79 1.3
Travelers 1.64 2.8
TrinaSolar ... '
TwoHrblnv 1.59 14.5
TycolntI 1.00 2.0
Tyson .16 .9
UBSAG
USAirwy ...
UnionPac 1.90 1.8
UtdCont ...
UtdMicro .08 3.2
UPS B 2.08 2.8
US Bancrp .50 2.0
US NGs rs ...
US OilFd ... ...
USSteel .20 .4
UtdhlthGp .65 1.2
Vale SA .90 2.7.
Vale SApf .90 3.0
ValeroE .20 .8
VangEmg .82 1.7
Ventas 2.30 4.2
VerizonCm 1.95 5.2
ViacomB 1.00 1.9
VimpelCm .80 6.2
Visa .60 .7
Walgm .70 1.6
Weathflntl .
WellsFargo .48 1.7
WendyArby .08 1.5
WDigital
WstnRefin.
WstnUnion .32 1.6
Weyerh .60 2.7
WmsCos .50 1.7
XL Grp .44 2.0
Xerox .17 1.6
Yamanag .18 1.5
YingliGm
Youku n
YumBmds 1.00 1.8


Name DIv YId
MdwGoldg ...
Minefnd g .
Neoprobe ...
Nevsun g .06 .9
NwGold g .
NA Pall g
NDynMn g ..
NthnO&G ..
NthgtMg ...
NovaGldg.
Oilsands g ..
.OpkoHith
Palatin rs
ParaG&S
PhrmAth
PionDrill
PolyMetg ...
Quepasa
RareEle g .
Rentech
RexahnPh.
Rubicon g ...
SamsO&G.
Taseko
TmsatlPet.
TriValley
TriangPet
TwoHrb wt ..
Ur-Energy ..
Uranerz
UraniumEn ...
VantageDrl...
VimetX
VistaGold
Walterlnv 2.00 8.2
WizzardSft ..
YM Bio q ...


3C


Money Rates
Last Pvs Week
Prime Rate 3.25 3.25
Discount Rate -0.75 0.75
Federal Funds Rate .00-25 .00-25
Treasuries
3-month 0.03 0.02
6-month 0.06 0.09
5-year 1.56 1.79
10-year 3.01 3.1
30-year 4.27 4.40


Nasdaq Most Active


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liviumw I I ._I.VI


y Y











LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED SUNDAY, JULY 10, 2011

Lake City Reporter





CLASSIFIED


IlBUY IT


[SELL IT^


laFIlND I


Classified Department: 755-5440


Take ADvantage of the
Reporter Classifieds!

755-5440


-Proal.ecanie


One Item per ad $25
4 lines 6 days dft"i
Rate applies to private Individual selling
personal merhandse totalingS100 or less.J



Each Item must Include a price.
This Isa non-refundable rate.



One Item per ad ir
4ines.6days i1.1
Rate applies ivate Individuals selling



prsonal merchandise totalling $5,00 or less.
Each item must include a price
This Is a non-refundable rate.




One Item per ad 1 16
4 lines .6 days E$ncdii.4
Rate applies to private individuals selling
persona merchandise totallg or less.
SSQ, Each Item must Include a price.



Inl e This Isa non.,-refundable u rate.
One Item per ad e additional
4 lines 6 days m ioth e1.955
Rate applies to private Individuals selling
personal merchandise totalling $ 2500 or less.
Each item msat Include a prices
This Is a non-refundable rate.



One Item per additional
4 lines 6 days ine $1.5








Rate applies to private Indivi dualse ng
personal merchandise iota ng 000 or les.
Each Item must Include a price.



This is a non-refunloabd rate.


Deprtmn,
1- d




Includer2Sfls. aLrhiInil
Limited to sm service type advertis-









4 lines, one monthdays ....92.00
$10.80 each additional line








IncludeThis an a dditional $200 per
ad for each Wednesday insertion.
4UII=#1750












You can ca ll Eus a.t 755-5440,,
Monday through Friday from 8:00
na.m. to 5:00 p.m. ,
Som4 lines, one prefer to cnth e their
Includes ansified ads in personal $2.00 per




ad categories will require prepay-
ad for eafich Wednesday insert nation.
WEas Dvac ptres ilie
You can call us at 755-5l your a440,,
Monday through Friday from 8:00







copyam. to 5:00 p.orm.

dirSome peyor ople prefer to the Clace their
East Duval Street. C
You can also fax or mail your ad
copy to the Reporter.


Department.
EMAIL: classifieds@lakecityre-
porter.com





Ad is to Appear Call by: FaxlEmail by:
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Thursday Wed., 10:00a.m. Wed.,9:00a.m.
Friday Thurns,, 10:0a.m. Thus., 9:00a.m.
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Sunday Fri., 10:00 am. ri.,9:00 a.m.
These deadlines are subject to change without notice.




Ad Errors- Please read your ad
on the first day of publication.
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the first incorrect insertion, and
only the charge for the ad space
in error. Please call 755-5440
immediately for prompt correc-
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Cancellations- Normal advertising
deadlines apply for cancellation.
Billing Inquiries- Call 755-5440.
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advertiser on the first day of pub-
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for that portion of the advertisement
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to be published, nor for any general,
special or consequential damages.
Advertising language must comply
with Federal, State or local laws
regarding the prohibition of discrimi-
nation in employment, housing and
public accommodations. Standard
abbreviations are acceptable; how-
ever, the first word of each ad may
not be abbreviated.


In Print and Online
www.lalikcityreporter.com


Legal


NOTICE OF INTENTION TO
ADOPT ORDINANCE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that
the Board of County Commissioners
of Columbia County, Florida, on Ju-
ly 21, 2011 at 7:00 P.M., or soon
thereafter, in the Auditorium of the
School Board Administration Com-
plex, 372 West Duval Street, Lake
City, Florida, will consider adopting
an ordinance the title and substance
of said proposed ordinance being:
ORDINANCE NO. 2011- 15
AN ORDINANCE AMENDING
COLUMBIA. COUNTY ORDI-
NANCE NO. 2007-41, AS AMEND-
ED, THE COLUMBIA COUNTY
EDUCATIONAL SYSTEM IM-
PACT FEE ORDINANCE; PRO-
VIDING FOR THE CONTINUED
SUSPENSION OF COLLECTION
OF THE COUNTY'S EDUCA-
TIONAL SYSTEM IMPACT FEES;
PROVIDING FOR PERIODIC RE-
PORTS TO THE BOARD ON THE
STATUS OF THE ECONOMY
AND LOCAL BUILDING INDUS-
TRY DURING THE SUSPENSION
PERIOD; PROVIDING FOR NO-
TICE OF IMPACT FEE RATES
UPON EXPIRATION OF THE
SUSPENSION PERIOD; PROVID-
ING FOR SEVERABILITY; AND
PROVIDING AN EFFECTIVE
DATE.
The proposed ordinance may be in-
spected by the public at the Office of
the Board of County Commissioners
located in the County Administration
Building during regular business
hours.
All persons wishing to speak upon
the adoption of this ordinance are in-
vited to attend the meeting and they
shall be heard.
Should any person decide to appeal
any decision made by the Board at
this meeting, such person will need a
record of the proceeding and may
need to ensure that a verbatim record
of these proceedings is made.
In accordance with the Americans
with Disabilities Act, persons need-
ing a special accommodation or an
interpreter'to participate in the pro-
ceedings should contact Lisa K.B.
Roberts, at least seven (7) days prior
to the date of the hearing. Ms. Rob-
erts may be contacted by telephone
at (386) 758-1005 or by Telecommu-
nication Device for the Deaf.at (386)
758-2139.
DATED THIS _6th_ day of July,
2011.
ATTEST:
DEWITT P. CASON, CLERK
BOARD OF COUNTY COMMIS-
SIONERS
COLUMBIA COUNTY, FLORIDA
Jy: /s/ DeWitt P. Cason, Clerk
By: /s/_Jody Dupree, Chair
05526514
July 10, 2011
PUBLIC NOTICE
ON
REQUEST FOR PROPOSAL
RFP-027-2011
Sealed proposals will be accepted by
the City of Lake City, Florida, 205 N
Marion Avenue, Lake City, Florida
32055 until July 28, 2011 at 3:00
P.M. for:
AUDIT SERVICES
RFP documents may be viewed on
the City website
http://www.lcfla.com/purchasing.ht
m; by contacting
purchasing@lcfla.com. or by phone
(386) 719-5818 or (386) 719-5816.
05526513
July 10, 2011
NOTICE OF INTENTION TO
ADOPT ORDINANCE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that.
the Board of County Commissioners
of Columbia County, Florida, .on Ju-
ly 21, 2011 at 7:00 P.M., or soon
thereafter, in the Auditorium of the
School Board Administration Com-
plex, 372 West Duval Street, Lake
City, Florida, Vill consider adopting
an ordinance the title and substance
of said proposed ordinance being:
ORDINANCE NO. 2011-16
AN ORDINANCE AMENDING
COLUMBIA COUNTY ORDI-
NANCE NO. 2007-40,'AS AMEND-
ED, THE COLUMBIA COUNTY
COMPREHENSIVE IMPACT FEE
ORDINANCE; PROVIDING FOR
THE CONTINUED SUSPENSION
OF COLLECTION OF THE COUN-
TY'S EMERGENCY MEDICAL
SERVICES IMPACT FEES, FIRE
PROTECTION IMPACT FEES,
CORRECTIONAL FACILITIES
IMPACT FEES AND ROAD IM-
PACT FEES; PROVIDING FOR
PERIODIC REPORTS TO THE
BOARD ON THE STATUS. OF
THE ECONOMY AND LOCAL
BUILDING INDUSTRY DURING
THE SUSPENSION PERIOD; PRO-
VIDING FOR NOTICE OF IM-
PACT FEE RATES UPON EXPI-
RATION OF THE SUSPENSION
PERIOD; PROVIDING FOR SEV-
ERABILITY; AND PROVIDING







Land Clearing

Back Hoe, Dozer, Chopping, root
raking, bush hog, seeding, sod,
disking, site prep, ponds &
irrigation. Free Est! 386-623-3200

Lawn & Landscape Service

Clean Pine Straw,
You pick it up, $1.85 a bale
Delivery of 100 bales $260
386-688-9156

Services

DIVORCE, BANKRUPTCY,
RESUMES.
other court approved forms-
386-961-5896.

We come to you! Auto Detailing:
Wash, wax & vaccum. Pressure
Wash: Houses, mobile homes,


driveways, decks. 386-697-2224


Legal

AN EFFECTIVE DATE.
The proposed ordinance may be in-
spected by the public at the Office of
the Board of County Commissioners
located in the County Administration
Building during. regular business
hours.
All persons wishing to speak upon
the adoption of this ordinance are in-
vited to attend the meeting and they
shall be heard.
Should any person decide to appeal
any decision made by the Board at
this meeting, such person will need a
record of the proceeding and may
need to ensure that a verbatim record
of these proceedings is made. .
In accordance with the Americans
with Disabilities Act, persons need-
ing a special accommodation or an
interpreter to participate in the pro-
ceedings should contact Lisa K.B.
Roberts, at least seven.(7) days prior
to the date of the hearing. Ms. Rob-
erts may be contacted by telephone
at (386) 758-1005 or by Telecommu-
nication Device for the Deaf at (386)
758-2139.
, DATED THIS _6th_ day of July,
2011. '
ATTEST:
DEWITT P. CASON, CLERK
BOARD OF COUNTY COMMIS-
SIONERS
COLUMBIA COUNTY, FLORIDA
By: /s/ DeWitt P. Cason, Clerk
By: /s/_Jody Dupree, Chair
05526515
July 10, 2011


020 Lost & Found

FOUND BLACK PUPPY: On the
hospital side of Lake Desoto on
07/04/11, by the Gazebo.
Call (386)965-5707 to identify

Lost Dog: Black dog w/white
chest. Border Collie. Missing since
07/04 Hilton/Desoto. Name: Ali-
zaya. Cash reward' 386-292-3846

Missing dog. $200 Reward.
Thurs., 6/30. Aprox 25-301b Fe-
male, 15 yr old, black/white Bos-
ton Terrier. Last seen close to
Quail Heights. Has a scar between
her front legs. Call 386-754-6670

100 Job
Opportunities

ATTN: Team Drivers needed for
dedicated acct. contracted by
'Swift, CDL required, Six months
esxp., Call Shawn 904-517-4620
05526490
LINCARE, leading national
respiratory company seeks
results driven Sale
Representative. Create working
relationships with MD's, nurses,
social workers and articulate our
excellent patient care with
attentive listening skills.
Competitive Base + un-capped
commission. Drug-free
workplace. EOE.
Fax resume to center manager
(386)754-2795


Sales Position available for moti-
vated individual Rountree -Moore
Toyota, Great benefits, paid train-
ing/vacation. Exp. a plus but not
necessary. Call Anthony Cosentino
386-623-7442

FLORIDA
GATEWAY
COLLEGE
(Formeary Lake City Coirunity College)
ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR,
PRACTICAL NURSING
224 Duty Days Tenured Track
Conduct the learning experience in
the classroom, laboratory andfor
clinical area. Prepare for instruction -
syllabi, lesson plans, tests; use
assessment strategies to assist the
continuous development of the
learner; use effective communication
techniques with students and others.
Demonstrate knowledge and
understanding of the subject matter,
upe appropriate technology in the
teaching and learning process,
Minimum Qualifications Bachelor of
Science in Nursing degree and be
licensed in Florida or be eligible-for
licensure in Florida, Three years
experience as staff nurse (acute care
preferred). Ability to present
information in a coherent manner and
the ability to fairly evaluate student
retention of that information.
Desirable Qualifications: Computer
literate. Teaching experience. BSN
required, MSN preferred.
Salary: Based on degree and
experience, plus benefits.
Review of applications will begin
Immediately.
,Persons interested should provide
College application, vita, and
photocopies of transcripts. All foreign
transcripts must be Vibmitted with
official translation and evaluation.
Position details and applications
available on web at: www.fqc.edu
Human Resources
Florida Gateway College
149 S.E. College Place
Lake City Fl 32025-2007
Phone (386) 754-4314
Fax (386) 754-4814
E-Mail: hu man' ~dc.edu
Vr ADV] AI-Xfni-llt l I l:dh lr(l tl


100 Job
100 'Opportunities

05526521
HS and EHS Teacher Ad for
Lake City Reporter July 10, 12
and 13, 2011
Suwannee Valley 4Cs, area
grantee for nationally
recognized high-quality early
childhood program seeks,
applicants interested in a
teaching career in a professional
work environment.
Full Time Teachers for 3-5 yr
olds Full Time Teachers for
Birth-3 yr olds
Must have Child Care
Professional Certificate (CDA,.
FCCPC or ECPC), & 3 yrs
classroom exp w/relevant age.
Starting pay $8.65 per hour
Current 1st Aid/CPR preferred.
All applicants must pass
physical & DCF background
screenings.
Excellent Benefits, Paid
Holidays, Sick/Annual Leave,
Health/Dental
Insurance, Training/Scholarship
Opportunities and more.
Apply in person at:
236 SW Columbia Ave
Lake City, 32025 "
(754-2222) Or send resume
by email: arobinson@sv4cs.org
or Fax (386) 754-2220. EOE

05526472
Activities Assistant
Must be CNA, and able to work
2-3 weekdays and most
weekends. Applicant
must be dependable, motivated
and energetic. Full time
position. Please apply Baya
Pointe Nursing & Rehabilitation
Center 587-SE Ermine Ave.,
Lake City, Fl 32025
.EOE/DFWP

05526537
REEFER DRIVERS
NEEDED!
More Freight = Top Earnings!
Paid CDL Training
Available & Benefits
877-491-1112 or
www.primeinc.com

05526538
Meridian Behavioral
Healthcare Inc.
www.mbhci.ore
Please visit our website to view
current open opportunities
and to apply online :
Meridian is an active partner
with the National Health Service
Corps
Therapists:
Program Manager (Licensed)
Licensed, or Master's Level
in Outpatient
Bachelor's-Leyel in
Counselor Support
Case Management (adult &
child)
Master's Therapist in
Methadone Clinic
Administration:
Medical Records
Client Relations Specialist
Medical Services
RN Nursing Manager
DETOX ( Gville)
PRN RN, LPN, C.N.A.
Recovery Specialist (Direct
Care)
To see our current openings in
Mental Health and to apply
online, please go to:
www.mbhci.ore
EOE, DFWP, E-Verify





Aurora Diagnostics;
Administrative Assistant desired;
HR, AP, and clerical experience
preferred.
Fax resume to 386-719-9596


CDL Class A Truck Driver.
Flatbed exp. for F/T SE area.
3 years exp or more. Medical
benefits offered. Contact
Melissa or Mary @ 386-935-2773
Hiring Locally This Week
Liberty National Life
Insurance Company
Full Training Provided Potential
of $60K+ Annually. 401K, BCBS
Insurance & Pension for those who
qualify. Call 1-800-257-5500 to
set up an interview.
Industrial Maintenance
Technician, Experience Required
in Electrical, Controls and General
Millwright/ Mechanical work.
Experience in Hydraulics and
Pneumatics helpful. Send resume
to Maintenance Technician, 3631
US 90 East, Lake City Fl 32055.


120 Medical
120 Employment

05526321
Gainesville Women's Center
For Radiology
Arlene Weinshelbaum, M.D.
MAMMOGRAPHY TECH
wanted full time for private
Radiology office.ARRT &
Mammography certification req.
Fax resume to:
Tracy: (352)331-2044

RN's needed. Local med-surg
ER hospital shifts. Immediate.
work, instant pay, $300 sign-on
bonus. Call 352-336-0964
Lake City & Live Oak area.
www.suwanneemedical.com

240 Schools &
Education

04544843
Interested in a Medical Career?
Express Training offers
courses for beginners & exp
Nursing Assistant, $479
next class-07/11/10

Phlebotomy national certifica-
tion, $800 next class-07/11/11

Continuing education
Fees incl.books, supplies, exam
fees. Call 386-755-4401 or
expresstrainingservices.com



310 Pets & Supplies

4 beautiful black & white. 10 wk
old kittens w/crystal emerald
green eyes. Litter box trained.
Wormed and Flea Free!
Free to good homes. 386-755-1794
FREE TO Good Home. 1 Golden
Lab. 1 Chichuahua/JRT Mix.
4 kittens, 8 weeks old and I young
mama cat. (352)283-2488
KITTENS. 4 white and 1 long
haired black. Had 1st shots. 10
weeks old. Cute & spunky!
$25.00. ea. 386-961-8909
PUBLISHER'S NOTE
Florida Law 828.29 requires dogs
and cats being sold to be at least 8
weeks old and have a health
certificate from a licensed
veterinarian documenting they8
have mandatory shots and are
free from intestinal and external
parasites. Many species of wild-
life must be licensed by Florida
Fish and Wildlife. If you are
unsure, contact the local
office for information.

330 Livestock &
33 Supplies

Black Angus Cows & Heifers
Prices Vary
Registered & Commercial
386-719-4802


361 Farm Equipment

84 Ford 4610 Tractor.
2WD, Solid
2005 motor,$7,500. OBO
386-867-0005


402 Appliances

Frost Free Refrigerator.
Works great
$200.
386-292-3927 or 386-755-5331.
GE Dishwasher
Works great $90.
386-292-3927 or
386-755-5331.11
NEW 18 cu ft White Refrigerator
/bought for a buisness/was too
large/used 4 hrs !
$350 OBO 863-258-1049
Small used freezer.
Works good.
$50.00
SOLD
Whirlpool washing machine.
Works great, come see.
$100.
386-755-3682


407 Computers

Compaq Computer, Many extras.
Complete Computer
$80.00
386-755-9984 or 386-292-2170

408 Furniture

Love Seat.
Good shape. $35.
Beige background with stripes
386-292-3927 or 386-755-5331.


416 Sporting Goods

Golf Clubs. Mens RH. Complete
set. 8 irons, cougar, 2 wedges, 2
putters, 4 woods, Excellent bag.
$250. 386-758-7550 or 397-4629


420 Wanted to Buy

K&H TIMBER
We Buy Pine Hardwood &
Cypress. Large or small tracts.
Call 386-961-1961.
Wanted Junk Cars, Trucks, Vans.
$250 & up CASH! Free Pick Up!
NO title needed !386-878-9260
After 5pm 386- 752-3648.


430 Garage Sales

PUBLISHER'S NOTE
All Yard Sale Ads
Must be Pre-Paid.


440 Miscellaneous

HIGH WHEEL Pushmower
$85.00
386-292-3927 or
386-755-5331.
Sony Playstation 2 System.
Memory card, one controller.
5 games. In good condition.
$95.00 386-984-7510
Stop gnat & Mosquito bites! Buy
Swamp Gator All natural insect re-
pellent. Family safe. Use head to -
toe. Available at The Home Depot.
Summer Barbecue Special
Tow Behind
Grill/Smoker, $1,250 OBO.
386-719-4802

630 Mobile Homes
for Rent-

2&3 BR MH. $395 $650. mo.
plus deposit. Water & sewer fur-
nished. Cannon Creek MHP
,386-752-6422
2/2 Units, clean, well maintained,
nice safe park setting, 2 miles to
downtown Lake City, $575 month
+ $575 sec dep, 386-984-8448
13th Month FREE!!.
3/1 w/security system. $800.mo.
Also, small home on 10 ac. $400.
Ft. White area. Avail 8/1. Call for
more deatils. 386-497-1464
3/2 DWMH, 1/2 ac. Shaded lot.
Paved Rd, 2 porches, 50'X50'
fenced small dog run. $600. mo +
$750 dep. References Req'd.
386-758-7184 or 984-0954
3/2 S of Lake City, (Branford area)
$575 month plus security
386-590-0642 or 386-867-1833
www.suwanneevalleyproperties.com
4 bedroom Den, w/d hook up. In
Ft. White. Appliance included.
$800. mo. $500. sec. Call Billie
386-754-6970 or 404-849-8277
Clean 2br/2ba on 5 acres. Nice un-
furnished MH w/well water. Coun-
try setting just north of LC. $400.
mo. 1st, last & sec. .(954)818-4481
Mobile Homes for rent in
White Springs, Lake City & Ft.
White. Contact 386-623-3404
or 386-365-1919
Nice clean 2&3 bdrm, Five Poifits,
NO PETS,
also 3 bd on the
Westside, 386-961-1482
X-Clean 2/2 SW, 8 mi NW of VA.
Clean acre lot, nice area. $500. mo
+ dep No dogs Non-smoking
environment.386-961-9181

640 Mobile Homes
640 for Sale

Handy man special, 94 Fleetwood
DWMH. 3/2 on 5 acres in Ft.
White. Owner Fin. $3,000 dn.
$850mo. $99,900 352-215-1018
www.LandOwnerFinancing.com
PALM HARBOR Homes
Repo's/Used Homes /Short Sales
3 or 4 Bedroom Doublewides
Wont Last!! 3,500-50K
Call Today! 800-622-2832
NEW D/W Reduced Thousands.
3br/2ba set, delivery, A/C
skirting, steps. $39,900.
Call Ken (386)754-8844
AS IS, WHERE IS...32X80, 4/2,
LR/Den, needs carpet, paint, 2400
sqft. has metal roof, vinyl siding.
$31,000. Randy 386-754-0198
FIRE YOUR LANDLORD
TO OWN WHAT YOUR
THROWING AWAY IN RENT.
CALL MIKE 386-754-8844
NEW 32X70 4/3. 2K sqft+. L/R,
DenSidex side, glasstop range,
D/W. Del, set, Steps, A/C, skirt-
ing. $59,900. Ken (386)754-8844
OWNER FINANCE 40% Down
w/land Equity or CASH on any
new or used singlewide or Double-
wide. Randy 386-754-0198
The Economy has forced
me to cut the price on my
3 bedroom, 2 bath home to
$38K (352)-870-5983


705 Rooms for Rent

New furnished bedroom apt in a
home, private entrance & bath, in-
cludes utilities, trash, cable, frig &


REPORTER Classifieds pest control. $450 mo + dep. Avail
REPORTERClassifieds 8/1 386-752-2020 SW ke Ci
In Print and On Line unfurnished Apt.
www.lakecityreporter.com 710U For Rent









SPRING HILL VILLAGE
Excellent High Springs location.
1, 2 & 3 bedroom floor-plans;
some with garages.
Call 386-454-1469
or visit our website:
S* www.springhillvillage.net


To place your
classified ad call


m %PPill5S


i


- ADvantage









LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED SUNDAY, JULY 10, 2011


710 iUnfurnished Apt.
For Rent


1 bedroom Apartment. Quiet,
Private street. $400. mo
plus security deposit.
386-344-3715
IBR APT.
Downtown Location, Clean.
$450 mo, plus Security.
NO PETS. Call 386-755-3456
2/1 w/garage & washer/dryer
hookups. East side of town,
Call for details
386-755-6867
2BR/1.5BA w/garage
5 minutes from VA hospital.
Call for details.
386-755-4590 or 365-5150
A Landlord You Can Love!
2 br Apts $575. & up + sec. Great
area. CH/A washer/dryer hookups.
386-758-9351/352-208-2421
Furnished or unfurnished
Townhomes on the golf course.
$750. mo. plus security. Includes
water. 386-752-9626
NICE APT Downtown; Remod-
eled 1 bedroom. Kitchen, dining,
living room. $450. mo plus sec.
386-362-8075 or 386-754-2951








Summer Special! 12th mo Free
w/signed yr lease. Updated, w/tile
floors/fresh paint. Great area.
From $450.+sec. 386-752-9626
The Lakes Apts. Studios & lBr's
from $135/wk. ti & cable incl.,
Sec 8 vouchers accepted, monthly
rates avail Call 386-752-2741

720 Furnished Apts.

cable. $595. mo. Good area. 7
sec. req'd. No pets. 386-719-4808
Neat as a Whistle! lbr., utilities,
AC TV, Cable, micro, clean, quiet,

Rooms for Rent. Hillcrest, Sands,
Columbia. All furnished. Electric,
cable, fridge, microwave. Weekly
or monthly rates. I person $135,
2 persons $150. weekly
386-752-58082
'2Unfurnished
730 Home For Rent
lbr/1.5ba Country Cottage, Cathe-
dral ceilings, brick fireplace, wash-
er/dryer, 1 ac fenced, private, some
pets, lease. Ist, last, sec, ref. Lake
City area $650mo. 352-494-1989
lbr/lba Free ele. Utilities incl. 4mi
S. Lake City. $300dep. $375mo.
386-590-0642 or 386-867-1833
www.suwanneevalleyproperties.com
2br Private Country
Home. Remodeled,
everything is new. Large yard.
386-752-1444
3/2 House, pet-friendly, $850 mo.
Broker-Owner, Details at
www.johnstanford.comi
putnam.html. 386-755-5936
3br/1.5ba. Very clean, CH/A
Fenced (privacy) large back yard.
Nice area/location. $750. mo $750.'
dep. Ref's req'd. (941)920-4535
Completely remodeled Brick.
3br/2ba 1750 sqft. Lg lot. Includes
washer, dryer, stove, & fridge.
$985. mo $985 dep. 386-752-7578
Family Home 3/2, Ir, dr, fam rm
w/ fpgarage, fenced'back yd.
Nice area. $1100 mo + dep Martha
Jo Khachigan, Realtor 623-2848
Unfurnished 2 bedroom/I bath
house. $700.00 per month.
First, last and security Firm.
386-590-5333 6

750 Business &
Sa Office Rentals
FOR LEASE: Downtown office
space. Convenient to
Court house.
Call 086-755-3456
For Lease: E Baya Ave. Two -
1000 sqft office space units or
combined for 2000 sqft. 386-984-
0622 or weekends 386-497-4762


750 Business &
5JI Office Rentals
OFFICE SPACE for lease.
Oak Hill Plaza. 900 sqft
$675mo/$695. sec dep.
Tom 386-961-1086 DCA Realtor


790 Vacation Rentals
Horseshoe Beach Scalloping Spcl
Gulf Front 2br, w/lg porch, dock,
fish sink. wkend $395./wk $895.
386-235-3633/352-498-5986
alwaysonvacation.com #419-181
"Florida's Last Frontier"

805 Lots for Sale
1/4 acre, new well, septic and
power, paved rd, owner fin, no
down pym't, $24,900,
($256 month) 352-215-1018
www.LandOwnerFinancing.com
PUBLISHER'S NOTE
All real estate advertising in-this
newspaper is subject to the fair
housing act which makes it illegal
to advertise "any preference,
limitation, or discrimination based
on race, color, religion, sex,
disability, familial status or nation-
al origin; or any intention to make
such preference, limitation or
discrimination." Familial status
includes children under the age of
18 living with parents or legal
custodians, pregnant women and
people securing custody of chil-
dren under the age of 18. This
newspaper will not knowingly
accept any advertising for real es-
tate which is in violation of the
law. Our readers are hereby in-
formed that all dwellings adver-
tised in this newspaper are availa-
ble on an equal opportunity basis.
To complain of discrimination call
HUD toll free at 1-800-609-9777,
the toll free
telephone number to the hearing
impaired is 1-800-927-9275.

810 Home for Sale
Handyman Special
Off Turner Rd. 2br/1.5ba.
Half acre fenced lot w/shed.
Asking $55,000. (352)335-8330

,OPEN HOUSE Sunday 2-4pm.
4br/2ba house in Plantation S/D
965 NW Savannah Cr.
Call (719)214-2181 for info.
Southern Oaks Country Club.
3br/2.5ba Aprox 3000 sqft. Split
flopr plan.'on the 9th Fairway.
New AC, 2.5 car garage. sprinkler,
concrete drive. Avail, furnished or
unfurnished. Move in ready wall.
appliances. Avail. now Built'in
1992. Open to serious offers.
(305)872-7911 View at
www.lakecitygolfvUilla.com
820 Farms &
O2 Acreage
10-ac lot. Well/septic/pp. Owner
financing $300 dn, $663 mo 8.9%,
25.yrs. Deas Bullard Properties
386-752-4339 www.landnfl.com
4 1/2 acre lot. Lake Jeffery Road.
Gorgeous Oaks!Paved Rd
Owner Financing! NO DOWN!
$59,900. $525mo 352-215-1018.
www.LandOwnerFinancing.com
4 acres, Wellborn, New Well
installed, Beautifully wooded
w/cleared Home Site, owner fin,
no down, $39,900, $410 mon
Call 352-215-1018
www.LandOwnerFinancing.com
FARM. 7 stall barn, Apt.
17+ acres cross fenced.
Close in $895. mo.
386-961-1086

3OA Commercial
83O Property
05526409
FOR SALE LAKE CITY
FORMER 84 LUMBER Zoned
Commercial Intensive on
4.2 +/- Acres with an 18,300
S.F. main building at 1824 W.
US Highway 90; contact
Crystal 724 228-3636 x 1349
4 UNIT Apt. Bldg. All 1/1/ w/ex-
tra rooms. Clean, good tenants and
remodeled. Downtown. $160,000.
386-362-8075 or 754-2951


Private Estate
Within the city limits. Beautiful old-
er home with mature landscaping
and lake view, 6 Br., 3.5 baths,
3 fireplaces, private paved drive.
39.7 acres of property included
with home! $994,000 or $3,000
mo. for rent or home plus 2 acres
only $495,000. Call for additional
information and showings.

Listing Agent Mary Brown Whitehurst

(386) 965-0887
MAE 'or co-owner (386)397-5131


870 Real Estate
u Wanted
I Buy Houses
CASH!
Quick Sale Fair Price
386-269-0605


..to never miss a day's
worth of all the
Lake City Reporter
has to offer:
Home delivery.
To subscribe call
755-5445


Bring the picture In or
we will take it for youl
* Ad runs 10 consecutive days
with a description and photo in the
newspaper and online E-edition.
* Ad runs 10 consecutive days as a
classified line ad online.
* You must include vehicle price.
* All ads are prepaid.
* Private party only.




2006 EF250
Ford Van
3/4 ton, metal work
shelves/ladder rack,
60K miles, exc. cond.
$10,500
Call
386-555-5555
If you don't sell your vehicle
during the first 10 days, you
can run the same vehicle ad
for 10 additional days for
only $15.00
Terms and conditions remain the
same for the additional run,

/To GEetYour


2005 Yamaha
VStar 650
11,000 miles, blue with
ghost flames, runs
great, new battery
Price Reduced to $2,800
Call
386-752-9645


2006 Toyota Scion
XB
41,000 mi.
Paid over $24,000 new.
$13,000
Call
386-752-1313
904-718-6747


1986 Chevy Monte
Carlo SS
78k miles, one owner.
All original.
$10,000
Call
386-752-1313
904-718-6747


,, onnectel


I:


Classified Department: 755-5440


can you,::.



e' e i nov?








LETRR CASFE SU'.A' JL1,0 Casfe Department: 755-5440


FPO, 0 eBz e


* No credit check
* No credit card required
(386) 344-2957

1 mainstreet


* 150 channels for $299
* FREE installation
. FREE movies
* No credit card required
* We finance your deposit
* Get TV TODAY!
(407) 460-9225
#1 Dealer in Town


MHusqvarna YTH21K46
.$A 1 .599'


BEDDING
Ortho Elite Pillow Top Beds
TWIN ONLY $269
QUEEN ONLY $399
ALL SIZES AVALIABLE.
timEeSS IIEMORIES
FUENITUBE ANTIQUES COLLECTIBLES
386-466-1888
1- 34 SW MAIN BLVD., BLVD CITY, FL 32055

Rountree Moore Toyota Bucks u0oohwmmmmftvmmft,,. Rountree Moore Toyota Bucks


I TOYOTA
Please present Rountree
Moore Toyota Bucks at
time of purchase No cash
value No reproductions
of the Rountree Moore
Toyota Bucks is allowed
Not valid with any other
coupon One coupon per
customer Fees taW
& shop supplies not
included
i 11Rht


I have a toothache,

and need to see

a dentist right away!

Give us a call.

We will see you today or tomorrow.


We are now a Cigna
PPO Dental Network
Savings Provider


We are now a
S& MetLife PPO Provider


* "Soft-Touch" Initial Exam (ADA-00110)
* Panoramic X-Ray (ADA-00330)


I


Diagnosis (if needed)


Coupon #008


PRL


I


or $2900
only


with this ad.
A savings of


Reg. $136
$107.00!


f Open 6 Days A Week
I M londay-Saturday 1


THE POLICY OF OUR OFFICE IS THAT THE PATIENT AND ANY OTHER PERSON RESPONSIBLE FOR PAN MENT
HAS A RIGHT TO REFUSE TO PAY. CANCEL PAYMENT, OR BE REIMBURSED FOR PAYMENT FOR ANY SERVICE,
EXAMINATION, OR TREATMENT IF PERFORMED AS A RESULT OF AND WITHIN 72 HOURS OF RESPONDING
TO THE ADVERTISEMENT FOR THE FREE. DISCOUNTED FEE. EXAMINATION OR TREATMENT.


ASPEN

DENTAL
[M U


www.aspenlakecity.com


High Speed Internet )
$29.99 DIRECT.
a month SATELLITE TELEVISION


~IS~l~)iejl~j


Dr. Rameek McNair


LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED SUNDAY, JULY 10, 2011


Classified Department: 755-5440


I


I












Story ideas?


Contact
Robert Bridges
Editor
754-0428
rbridges@lakecityreporter.com


Sunday, July 10, 2011


www.lakecityreporter.com


Section D


Time


for


grillin'


and

chilling'

As the
temperatures
rise to the 90's
and above,
the risk for
foodborne illnesses also
rises. The two main
reasons for this increased
risk are what is known as
the 'Temperature Danger
Zone", and increased
moisture.
According to the USDA,
most bacteria grows
between 400F and 140F;
however, bacteria
grows the fastest in the
'Temperature Danger.
Zone" which is 90F to
1100F.
With high temperatures
and high humidity, Florida
is the perfect grounds
for increased bacterial
growth, especially when
cooking and barbequing
outdoors during the -
summer. Following the 3
C's; CLEAN, COOK, and
CHILL; can decrease the
risk of foodborne illnesses.

Clean
Salmonella and Shigella
(common causes of
foodborne illness) are often
present on the rind or peel
of favorites like tomatoes
and watermelons.
Washing all fresh foods
prior to cutting prevents
the bacteria from entering
the food and contaminating
it

Cook
When cooking meats,
the idea is to increase the
temperature high enough
to kill the bacteria most
often found in the meat
Because there are
different types of bacteria
that grow on different
types of meats, be sure
to follow the minimum
internal temperatures
to decrease the risk of
foodborne illnesses. Place
the thermometer into the
thickest part of the meat,
if it has reached minimum
internal temperature listed
below it is ready:
Whole poultry: 165 F
Poultry breasts:
165 F
Ground poultry:
165 F
Hamburgers, beef:
160 F
Beef, veal, and lamb
160 F
All cuts of pork:
160 F

Chill
Once food is cooked
there is still a chance
for bacterial growth. It
is important to keep hot
things hot, and cool things
cool.
If cooking outdoors,
remember when the
temperature is above
90 F, food should not sit
out for more than 1 hour. If
it does, throw it out! If the
temperature is
lower than 90 F, food
should still be discarded
if left out for more than 2
hours.
Following the 3 C's -
clean, cook, chill lowers
the risk of having a
KILLER cook out.
For more information
visit solutionsforyourlife.


corn, or call 386-752-5384


S WHERE THE CHURCH IS


Moore a charter
member of
historic site.
By ANTONIA ROBINSON
arobinson@lakecityreporter.com
or W.D.
"Gator" Moore
and his wife,
Ruth, Falling
Creek Chapel
is home.
"It's just a nice, quiet
place with everyone on
a first name basis," he
said.
Gator Moore serves as
caretaker of the church,
which has been a family
tradition, he said. He
is a fourth generation
member of the church.
He is also a charter
member of Falling
Creek Chapel Inc.,
which was formed in
1995 to acquire the
church from the Florida
Conference of the United
Methodist Conference,
Gator Moore said. The
conference was closing
smaller churches in the
circuit and absorbing
them into larger ones.
Members wanted
to secure the building
"to ensure that the
preaching and worship
of the Lord Jesus Christ
will always be available
within the walls of one
of the oldest churches
in Columbia County,"
according to the Rev.
Cheryl Pingel, pastor.
The church's building
is 130 years old and was
listed in the National
Register of Historic Places
April 4, 1996. Its history
dates back to the 1800s.
It was a Missionary
Baptist Church that met
in a log building built
around the 1850s to the
1860s, according to the
first written records.
Falling Creek Chapel
became a part of the
Methodist Conference
in 1866, and the pastor
served three churches
within a circuit
Original church records
were burned in a fire, but
oral history passed down
also indicates Falling
Creek was once a part
of the Adventist Church,
possibly Evangelical
Adventist.
The log building was
replaced with the present


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
The Falling Creek Chapel has stood as an icon in the Falling Creek community for decades. Original built around the 1850s,
it was reconstructed in 1866. The chapel has been rooted in the lives of hundreds of families, especially those who still live in
the Falling Creek area.


structure in 1887.
Winfield School used
the church as a place to
present special programs
to commemorate
Christmas or the end
of the school year. The
church was used during
the 1890s for singing
lessons offered by AW.
Jackson.
Behind the church is
a graveyard with graves
of veterans from the Civil
War, Seminole War and
World War II as well as
many unmarked plots.
The earliest grave site
with a date is Elizabeth.
Mole born 1841 and died
1871.
Currently Falling
Creek Chapel is a
non-denominational
congregation that meets
9:30 a.m. on the first and
third Sunday and 3 p.m.
on the second, fourth
and fifth. Other special'
programs during the
year include Christmas
Service, Easter Sunrise
Service and Homecoming.

CHURCH continued on 4D


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
W.D. 'Gator' Moore sits with his wife, Ruth, inside of the chapel, where the two were wed
more than 30 years ago. He was the first in the Moore family to be married in the chapel
since his grandparents.


Extreme coupon

cutters save cash,

teach their ways


ASSOCIATED PRESS
In this file photo taken June 28, Monica Knight, a dental hygienist and mother of two, shows
her coupon binder at her home in Boise, Idaho. Knight, a used to spend spent $600 a
month on groceries. Thanks to extreme couponing she's down to $100-150 a month.


Woman down
$100-150 a month
on grocery bill.
By JESSIE L. BONNER
Associated Press
BOISE, Idaho The
women sat expectantly as
Monica Knight told them
she once routinely spent
$600 a month on grocer-
ies for her family of four.
Breaking into a broad smile,
Knight says that figure has
been reduced to only $100
to $150 a month.
And now the dental
hygienist and mother of two
is about to tell them her
secret.
The women lean forward
in their seats. They're the
latest disciples of extreme
couponing; women who
carry pictures of their over-
flowing pantries on their


cell phones; savvy shoppers
who will spend hours flip-
ping through newspaper
and magazine advertise-
ments in search of their
bargains, and homemakers
who have pinched pennies
to put food on the table dur-
ing the recession and need
the extra help.
Most have watched the
television series "Extreme
Couponing," which debuted
on TLC in April and follows
shoppers whose intense
devotion to finding bar-
gains can whittle a $555.44
grocery store bill down to
$5.97, to cite one extreme
example.
Heather Border, a 36-
year-old mother of four in
rural Idaho, is a new to the
extreme coupon phenom-
enon. But she was hooked
a few weeks ago, after
COUPON continued on 2D


Lake City Reporter





LIFE










LAKE CITY REPORTER LIFE SUNDAY, JULY 10, 2011


Sand-colored


makeup hits


mainstream


By SAMANTHA CRITCHELL
Associated Press

NEW YORK Too tan
is a beauty no-no, but sand
or at least sand-colored
cosmetics can give you
a wearable and flattering
fresh-from-the-beach look.
There is no hard line
drawn to define these neu-
tral shades, offering almost
endless options to women
of varying skin tones and
style, types and that's
part of the appeal, says
Jenna Menard, global
color artist at Clinique.
"Depending on the sand,
the color changes."
The broad definition can
mean a hint of shimmery
champagne-colored eye
shadow on one person, to
a strong smoky brown eye
liner on another. There are
countless neutral-hued lip-
sticks, some with the bit
of coral you might associ-
ate with a tropical beach.
Others are more brown
like the New England
coastal dunes.
Menard often uses
brown mascara instead of
black during the daytime,
which is softer and more
relaxed looking. "You
want ease, not high main-
tenance."
However, she adds,
your best colors might
change as the summer
moves along, especially if
you are getting any natu-
ral tan. "Be aware of your
skin tone," Menard says.
"If you are pale and fair,
then soft brown isn't nude
on you it can be a very
strong color. ... When I'm
tan, even a light brown will
look very different than it
does in the winter."
For those with darker
skin _toes, --she.., jecoi- -
mends moving into more
golden shades.
On the cheeks, you can go
with a beige blush or even
a bronzer, but use a light
touch, says Menard. "A lot
of people get.scared when
they hear 'bronzed' look, so
'sandy' is a goqd twist"
There is the risk of a
one-dimensional appear-
ance .with a toned-down
palette, though. Celebrity
makeup artist Ricky
Wilson. steers clear of a
very matte look. He likes'
to blend complementary
colors that remind him of
glistening wet sand a
look that's tonal 'but not
monotone.
"You want neutral, not .


boring," says Wilson. ,
He adds: "So many
people associate summer
beauty with oranges, blues
and corals, but that's not
always the thing most
women want to do. Women
like browns and beiges."
Romero Jennings, a
MAC Cosmetics senior
artist, says he's into min-
eral makeup right now
especially the brand's
Mineral Mode shadow -
which has natural reflec-
tive qualities. "It's beige
but not- just beige, it'll be
beige with gold or silver or
white or copper."
One swirl of the brush
in that sort of mixed shad-
ow, and you have a rich,
interesting lid look without
working too hard, he says.
It also works to add a layer
of simple, sheer gloss over
a honey-colored lipstick or
even over a pencil-filled
lip, which will last.
And, .eyen if the colored
lip begins to fade, the
shadow gets rubbed in or
bronzer loses a little luster,.
there is no rush to reapply
because the colors really
should be blending in with
your skin and lips.
Wilson uses a beige lip-
stick (hell use Dior Route
No. 298 if model Jessica
Stam hasn't taken it out of
his bag) as a base, layered
with Dior Addict Lip Glow,
a "mood" lip balm with
SPF 10 that changes in
intensity of color depend-
ing on body heat.
"In the summer, you
don't want a feeling of a
heavy matte lipstick, but
you don't want clumpy
lip gloss streaks on your
cheeks when the wind
blows,, but really neutral
beige lips are hard, too.
Most people have a natural
rose tint to their lips and
you just want to enhance
that," Wilson says.
The whole idea is to cre-'
ate beach day or work
day .that just-flushed
glow you 'get from fun in
the sun, he says, without,
of course, getting any sort
of real burn.
For the evening, ifs just.
a simple freshening up of
the same colors maybe
using an eyelash curler to
add a little drama without
more makeup, recommends
Jennings. "You want to look
like you just came from the
pool and just picking up a
few things at the local mar-
ket even if you're going to
the office or out to dinner."


COUPON: Helping to cut cost at grocery stores


Continued From Page 11

coupons and store deals
brought her $180 grocery
bill down to $40.
"I was feeling a little con-
spicuous because people
were staring at me," Border
said. 'Then, I felt a rush."
She was among about 20
women who attended an
extreme coupon class on a
recent Saturday in Boise.
The three-hour course was
taught by. Knight and her
business partner, Cathy
Yoder. They own the
extreme couponing blog,
"Fabulessly Frugal."
The women oohed and
awed as Knight pulled out
the fat binder of coupons
that saves her 50 percent
to 90 percent on every
grocery bill. She showed
off pictures of the stock-
pile of food at her home,
where 46 boxes of cereal
are stowed in her children's
bedroom closet and pack-
ages of breakfast drink mix
are kept tinder a bed.
In their class, Yoder and
Knight warn against some
of the practices that have
given extreme coupon cut-
teis like themselves a ,bad
rap.
They instruct their stu-
dents to be kind to their
cashiers. They encourage
them to stockpile food to
help their families, but cau-
tion against "hoarding" or
clearing, shelves of items
that their families don't
need or won't use. They
also warned against pho-
tocopying coupons, which
can place stores on alert
and ruin deals for every-
one.
"I think the stores are a
little freaked out because
of the television show," said
Knight, who advises her
students to keep a copy of
grocery store policies on
hand during shopping trips
in case problems arise.
Even before the "Extreme
'Couponing" series, grocery
stores were put on alert
about counterfeit coupons
that were circulating online.
The National Grocers
Association issued a warn-
ing in 2009, as couponing
made a fierce comeback
during the peak of the
recession.
The coupon-processing
company Inmar Inc. report-
ed coupon use. doubling in
the first half of 2009 com-
pared with the same period
a year earlier,
The Internet has also bol-
stered coupon use, with a
wide range of online promo-
tions, databases of coupons'
and bloggers who regularly
post about the best deals.
"This is a whole new
ballgame," said Glenda
Glisson, 63, who attended


the extreme couponing
class in Boise.
The Kroger Co., which
operates the nation's largest
traditional grocery chain,
launched a website about
18 months ago that allows
customers to download
coupons to their store dis-
count cards or onto home
computers to print. The site
added a mobile phone cou-
pon app last year.
"We've seen slightly
more complex couponing,
which can take longer for
us to help our customers,
exit the store," said Kroger
spokesman Keith Dailey.
\The so-called extreme
couponers make up a small
portion of customers and
Kroger has not been forced
to limit coupon use because
of the trend, he said.
"But we're certainly keep-
ing an eye on the industry,"
Dailey said.
At Fabulessly Frugal,.
savvy shoppers can find
video .tutorials and state
specific coupon lists. The
site boasts nine bloggers,
including the coupon class
instructors Yoder and
Knight, who specialize in
specific grocery stores.
Yoder started the blog
about three years ago for
family and friends. She
knew Knight, who had
also started to clip cou-
pons, from her church and
the two started logging
together in November
2008. A few months later,
Yoder learned that she was
pregnant with her seventh
child, and then her hus-
band lost his job.
Her family, however, had
a reserve of food to fall
back on thanks to coupons,
Yoder said.
During her best shop-
ping trip, she purchased
165 boxes of cereal for
about $14.
It wasn't long before
Yoder and Knight realized
their extreme coupon web-
site could make money.
The site features advertise-
ments and they get paid per
click on about 75 percent of
the coupons found on the
website, Yoder said. They
made $35 the first month" it
featured the coupons, she
said.
"We make that in an hour
now," said Yoder, who now
supports her family with
the. website, which gets
about 30,000 hits per day.
The coupon craze is both
good and bad, she said.
On one hand, she makes
a living off it.
"At the same time there's
just an increased level of
frustration for everybody,"
she said in reference to the
long lines and sometimes


COURTESY PHOTO

Brannon anniversary

Laverne and June Brannon will celebrate their 50th
wedding anniversary 5 to 8 p.m. July 16 at the LDS
Church with family and friends at a party in their honor
given by their children.
All family and friends are invited for the casual drop-by
event. No gifts please.
The church is located at 1293 Bascom Norris Drive.


ASSOCIATED PRESS
In this file photo taken June 28, extreme coupon cutter
Monica Knight 'shows the stockpile of food she has stored
at her home in Boise, Idaho. Knight, a dental hygienist and
mother of two, used to spend spent $600 a month on
groceries. Thanks to extreme couponing she's down to
$100-150 a month.


empty shelves.
Yoder and other extreme
coupon cutters acknowl-
edge some participants do
cross the line.
In Idaho, two newspapers
reported this month that
coupon inserts were being
stolen from their racks. The
state's largest newspaper,
the Idaho Statesman, set up
a sting in Boise and filed a
police report after a woman
was caught pulling the ads
from more than a dozen
copies. .
In nearby Nampa, a
woman said she was
banned from Wal-Mart
stores because of an argu-
ment over her use of a com-
petitor's coupon.
"We should have accept-
ed the coupon, and we
understand that this could
have been handled differ-
ently from both sides. I've
since reached oit to the cus-
tomer and invited her back


SV Ik
r .A
f- i


to our store," said Lorenzo
,Lopez, a Wal-Mart spokes-
man based in Arkansas.
While some newspapers
have reported thefts, sev-
eral have also reported that
sales are up with help from
coupons.
In Washington state, the
Columbia Basin Herald
reported single copies
sales were up 12 percent
in May, compared to the
previous year. The news-
paper reported that more
than 800 newspapers were
sold at its Moses Lake,
Wash., offices on a recent
Wednesday afternoon.
While the coupon clip-
ping trend is probably not a
huge factor when it comes
to newspaper circulation,
the coupon business has
been very healthy during
the recession, said Rick
Edmonds, a media busi-
ness analyst at The Poynter
Institute in St. Petersburg.


China, Crystal,
Flatware and Gifts
Couples registered:
Haley Lipthrott
JT Brown
August 6, 2011

Jessica Stalnaker
Travis Melgaard
.September 10, 2011

Ashley Cloninger
Justin Brimmer
September 24, 2011

Jill Peck
Bryson Johnson
September 24, 2011
We know exactly what
they want in a wedding
or shower gift. We update
their list as gifts are
purchased, and gift wrap.

WARD'S
JEWELRY & GIFTS
156 N. Marion Ave.
Lake City
752-5470


Page Editor: Brandon Finley, 754-0420












Page Editor: Brandon Finley, 754-0420 LAKE CITY REPORTER ADVICE & CROSSWORD SUNDAY, JULY 10, 2011


DEAR ABBY


Mom teaches kids to make


their dreams come reality


DEAR ABBY: When my
children were young, I was a
single parent. I always putmy
children first We didn't have
a lot of money, but we got by.
If they asked for something
we couldn't afford, we would
discuss it I'd show them the Abigail Van Buren
budget and the bills, and wwwdearbbycom
we'd find a way to get what
they wanted.
They gave up snacks happy, willing and ready to
for six months so I could work hard and sacrifice to
set that money aside to achieve their, goals, then
buy them bikes. We also you are. a successful par-
decided we could go to ent If your household was
Disney World if we didn't harmonious until your hus-
have cable for two years. band entered it, you don't
If they wanted something, need a parenting class -
the answer was always yes, you need family therapy.
but I let them know we DEAR ABBY: Eight
needed to figure out how to months ago, I became
manage it They learned to involved with "Ted," who
budget and save for things was separated from his
they wanted. I believe if wife, "Erica." I fell head-
you work toward a. goal, over-heels for him, but in
you can achieve it the end, he decided to work
My new husband dis- things out with his wife.
agrees with me. We attend- When Ted told Erica
ed a parenting class togeth- about me, 'she said she
er and they' agreed with wanted to meet me. I decid-
him. This doesn't sit well ed I owed it to her, so we
with me. I feel that just say- met. Believe it or not, we
ing "no" is showing them hit it off. Within a couple of
we have the control, but weeks we were friends.
teaches them nothing. Am The problem, of course,
I wrong? ALREADY AT is that. hanging out with
ODDS IN NEW JERSEY Erica means I also see Ted. I
DEAR AT ODDS: No. I thought I was over him, but
disagree with your husband recently old feelings have
and the person teaching come back and I feel awful
the parenting class. If your, thinking about him while
children are respectful," being good friends with his


wife. I don't want to give up
the friendship with her, but
being around him is mak-
ing me sad. What should I
do? DISCONCERTED
FRIEND
DEARDISCONCER'ED.
You and I both know what
you should do. Put the
brakes on the relationship
with Erica and Ted, and
when she asks why, explain
that it, has nothing to do
with her but you have some
unresolved issues to work
out. Then back off until you
get your head straight, and
possibly, become involved,
with another man.
DEARABBY:Ifsomeone
tells a'white lie about some-
thing trivial, is it because
he/she is lazy and wants to
avoid conflict? Should the
lie be ignored or should I
be concerned about trust?
- SEARCHING FOR
ANSWERS
DEAR SEARCHING:
People tell white lies all the
time. Sometimes it's done to
avoid conflict, other times
it's an attempt to be polite.
When someone asks, "How
are you?" and you respond,
"Fine, thanks" instead of
describing your headache
or backache, that's a form
'of white lie.
* Write Dear Abby at
www.DearAbby.com or
P.O. Box 69440, Los
Angeles, CA 90069.


HOROSCOPES


ARIES (March 21-April 19):
Donm let things get to you.
Erratic behavior will lead to
mistakes that will be difficult to
rectify. Emotions will be close
to the surface, and keeping con-
versations light will be impor-
tant if you want to avoid criti-
cism or controversy. 3 stars
TAURUS (April 20-
May. 20): Schedule activities
that will help you feel good
about who you are or what you
do. A day at a community event
that allows you to have a say
in what's happening in your
neighborhood will give you a
platform to show others what
you can offer. 3 stars
GEMINI (May 21-
June 20): Take care of your per-
sonal needs. A shopping spree
or a spa day will make you feel
good. You will be difficult to
beat if you take on a challenge.
Taking care of friends or rela-
tives will lead to an unexpected
bonus. 3 stars
CANCER (June 21-
July 22): Greater opportunities
will develop through an orga-
nization you volunteer to help.
Getting involved in an activity
that allows you to be creative
will inspire you to test your old
ideas. Get out and mingle with


THE LAST WORD
Eugenia Word

other singles or plan a romantic
.evening with your current part-
ner. 5 stars
LEO (July 23-Aug.
22): You may want to double-
check what you have before
you get rid of something you
may need. Overspending, over-
doing and overindulging will
lead to trouble. Someone with
whom you are close is likely to
cause an emotional scene if you
are too flirtatious with someone
else. 2 stars "
VIRGO (Aug. 23-
Sept. 22);. Itrs OK to push for
.what you want and to ask for
favors, as long as you are will-
ing to do: your fair share. An
innovative approach to helping
someone in return will warrant
forming a partnership. Love is
in the stars. 4 stars
LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct.
22): Donat limit the possibili-
ties by choosing not to partici-
pate in an event that interests
you. Getting out will be in your
best interest and can help you
acquire information that will
lead to a better job or additional
income. 3 stars


CELEBRITY CIPHER
by Luls Campos
C..wbrlty CIph.r cryptogam r. Oa, d from quo .aton by famr.* people. pat and present.
Emaoh leter In th olpher tnd, for an ger.
TODAY'S CLUE: R equals B
"C D H A FZ NDSI FAZO J L AFZ
TFDCOHDX J L AFZ R JDON DX N AFSV
UDV ODCVZN UCAF I OZ DA H.S VCT "
XDXTB VCXDAOD
PREVIOUS SOLUTION: "A mule will labor ten years willingly and patiently for
you, for the privilege of kicking you once." William Faulkner
(c) 2011 by NEA, Inc. 7-11


SCORPIO (Oct. 23-
Nov. 21): Love is in the stars,
and expressing your feelings
will pay off. An interesting con-
cept you come across should be
incorporated into a moneymak-
ing plan you want to develop.
An opportunity to partner with.
someone creatively is apparent.
3 stars
SAGITTARIUS (Nov.
22-Dec. 21): Travel if you get
the chance. Fixing up your
place will cost more than you
anticipate and can cause a rift
between you and a contractor or
someone affected by the altera-
tions you make. 3 stars
CAPRICORN (Dec.
22-Jan. 19): A little give and
take will work wonders for your
relationships with others. Love
and romance are highlighted
and should make up a good por-
tion of your day. Donxt worry
if someone makes a last-minute
change. 4 stars
AQUARIUS (Jan.
20-Feb. 18): Youidl be an
overachiever, so you may as
well focus on something that
will bring you a high return.
Socializing and networking will
open up a window of opportu-
nity regarding a personal rela-
tionship. 2 stars
PISCES (Feb. 19-
March 20): You have the piz-
zazz and wherewithal to take
charge and make things happen.
Love is on the rise, and spend-
ing time with someone special
will lead to a better relation-
ship. Consistency will pay :off.
5 stars


SUNDAY CROSSWORD


MY TREAT By Pete Muller / Edited by Will Shortz 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8- 9 1-0 1 12 14-: 15-:16

WHEN THIS PUZZLE IS DONE, THE CIRCLES WILL CONTAIN FIVE DIFFERENT LErIERS OF THE ALPHABET. CONNECT EACH SET OF CIRCLES 17 I 019 21 22
CONTAINING THE SAME LETTER, WITHOUT CROSSING YOUR LINE, TO MAKE A SIMPLE CLOSED SHAPE. THE RESULTING FIVE CLOSED SHAPES __2 ___ .
TOGETHER WILL FORM A PICTURE OFA 117-ACRoss. THE FIVE LETTERS CAN BE ARRANGED TO NAME A GOOD PLACE TO GET A 117-ACROSS. 23 24' .25 2


Across
1 Essence
5 Start of a nursery
rhyme.
9 "I w9n't bore you
with the rest"
12 Actress Davis
17 They're often
deep-fried
19 1964 title role
for Tony Randall
21 ___-jongg
22 Indy 500 legend
23 1950s NBC icon
24 Spanish for
"rope"
25 Some versions of
a 117-Across
27 Ingredient in a .
117-Across
30 "How is this
possible?"
31 Repeat
32 Green lights
34 "___, danke"
35 Reversal of sorts
36 "Top Chef" host
Lakshmi
40 Trouble's
.partner, in
Shakespeare
41 Kimchi-loving
land
42 "___ honor"
44 Some cuts
46 "___ straight!"
48 DKNY
competitor
49 1960s campus
grp.
For any three answers,
call from a touch-tone
phone: 1-900-285-5656,
1.49 each minute; or,
with a credit card, 1-800-
814-5554.


51 "In case you
weren't listening

53 Amazon's
business, e.g.
55 Whence
spiderlings
emerge
59 Ingredient in a
117-Across
64 Suffix with meth-
65 Island visited by
Captain Cook in
1778
67 Year Columbus
died
68 French kings'
coronation city
69. Imprudent
71 Ddvid of
television
73 Brawl
75 Thin. Japanese
noodle
76 Salsa seller'
78 Ready, with "up"
80 Broadway lights
82 Word with black
or stream
83 Utensil for a 117-
Across
86 Sugary drinks
88 ___ nothing
89 Like the
buildings at
Machu Picchu
91 Watched
92 ___ Fields
95 Filmmaker
Riefenstahl
96 Senator Hatch
98 ___ nova (1960s
dance)
102 Characters in
"The Hobbit"
104 "Web __
(ESPN segment
showing great
fielding plays)


107 Sniggled
109 A stake,
metaphorically
110 Holly genus
111 Attack fervently
113 Doing some
cartoon work
115 Cruise, say
117 Something
delicious to
drink
121 Version of a
117-Across
123 What a graph
may show
'124 Baltimore and
Philadelphia
126 Come to'___
127 "Catch-22"
bomber pilot
128 "Later,
alligator!"
129 Versatile utensil
130 Whizzes at
quizzes?
131 Name connector
132 Pizazz
133 Influence

Down
1 Fellas in
"Goodfellas,"
e.g. ,
2 Barely manages
3 Bad thing to be in
4 Container for a
117-Across
5 Cortisol-secreting
gland
6 Family member, in
dialect
7 Construction crane
attachment
8 It's crunched
9 Baby baby?
10 Besmirch
11 Like many a 117-
Across


12'Private eye Peter
of old TV
13 "___ Man" (1992
movie)
14 Obscure things
15 Neophytes
16 Manchester
United rival
18 Bristle
20 Wild ones may be
sown
26 Lived and
breathed
28 Pizazz
29 Gobble up
31 Me'as. of screen
resolution
33 Valuable iron ore
37 Possible response
to "You've got
spinach between
your teeth"
38 Fails
39 Excessively-
orderly,
informally
41 Jewish deli order
43 State straddling
two time zones:
Abbr.
45 Thailand, once
47 West Coast
evergreens
50 Like mountains
and computer
images
52 Burned things
54 Caustic cleaners
55 corn
56 Twisty tree
feature
57 "Beau ___
58 ___ sponte (of its
own accord)
60 Pots and pans for
baking
61 Spanish wine
62 It may be burnt


63 Hurdles for high-
school jrs.
66 Main lines
70 Six: Prefix
72 Mountain
sighting, maybe
74 Mountain
77 Breathing aids
79 Movie villain
who sought tot
disrupt a space
launch
81' Union opponent


84 Utensil-for a 117-
Across
85 Field unit
87 Quantity of a key
ingredient in a
117-Across
90 Scoreless score
92 Inside look?
93 The primary
instruction
94 Bit of gymwear
97 Winnemucca
resident, e.g.


,99 Low-rent district
100 Artist whose
name is an
anagram of
"artisan"
101 Director Lee
103 Offer, as a hand
105 French teacher
106 It may come
after a typo
108 ___ P6rignon
111 Need nursing,
say


112'Rents out
114 Cos. that offer
access
116 Old U.S.P.S.
routing codes
118 Manitoba tribe
119 Pull (in)
120 "And Winter
Came ..." artist
122 Is for two or
more?
125 Shade of blue


Answers to last Sunday's Crossword.
KD LIAIN|G AIDIJIU| S|TT IO| PIDDOGIS
0 R 0 M EUO M S HU SI E R R A N

RANS GEO ALTA PENNER
VOTERS S I LY CAL

FETEOFCLAY I REMEMBER
RUNT IER TRIB LORNA
H 0 SED LOY C W BOYB 0 0 ST
ENTS GEN KATIE SONANT




MENID E ASNS I C EPOPS
L E OvTS 0 NE I T AK IE N C O AR LS
T N P L A YIFEZlEIS TIA EIRU IWIAIR EI




MA MI DEIN EESPREM R I APS E XS



A MPEND S TASIG ELE ORlE
B A S S I i AA S T|ROS |DIEININIY S


6


7 9 4 5 8 6


1 5


5 2 1 9


9 61 8


7 2


2 1 4 3


41 68


3 2 6 7


6 9 8 8 9 L L

61 8 [ L9L6-- 919



7 9 9 6 LL E8

8 9 S L 9 1 6 LE



L 6 L 81 z 9 v 19


9 v 6 9 LL 8 Z8

9 L 8 9 EI 6 L


S8 L 6 V 8 9 9 L
9L89 St76" -A L -



^TEL-t'8 9LA


LAKE CITY REPORTER ADVICE & CROSSWORD SUNDAY, JULY 10, 2011


Page Editor: Brandon Finley, 754-0420













Neighbor vs. neighbor as homeowner fights get ugly


By MICHELLE CONUN and
TAMARA LUSH
Associated Press
The Inlet House condo
complex in Fort Pierce, was
once the kind of place the
55-and-older set aspired to.
It was affordable. The pool
and clubhouse were tidy,
the lawns freshly snipped.
Residents, push-carts in
tow, walked to the beach,
the bank, the beauty par-
lor, the cinema and the
supermarket. In post-crash
America, this was a dreamy
little spot. Especially on a
fixed income.
But that was Inlet House
before the rats started chew-
ing through the toilet seats
in vacant units and sewage
started seeping from the
ceiling. Before condos that
were worth $79,000 four
years ago sold for as little
as $3,000. And before the
homeowners' association
levied $6,000 assessments
on everyone and then
foreclosed on seniors who
couldn't pay the association
bill, even if they didn't owe
the bank a dime.
Normally, it's the bank-
ers who go after delin-
quent homeowners. But
in communities governed


ASSOCIATED PRESS
In this June 15, 2011 file photo, a near empty parking lot is shown behind the "Inlet House" condo sign, in Fort Pierce. The
complex was an affordable place that the 55-and-older set aspired to. But now the Homeowner's association has levied a
$6,000 assessment on every homeowner and then foreclosed on seniors who did not owe the bank a dime but could not
afford the association bill.


by the mighty homeown-
ers' association, as the sour
economy leaves more
people unable to pay their
fees, it's neighbor versus
neighbor.
"What the board is doing
is trying to foreclose on peo-
ple to force people out the


door," says Mike Silvestri,
75, who stopped paying his
dues at Inlet House in pro-
test over what he considers
unnecessary and unafford-
able assessments.
He and others say there
were cheaper ways to deal
with the rat infestation and


leaky sewage that led the
board to order up a costly
plumbing overhaul. '"They
are bamboozling old peo-
ple. I'm old, but I'm not
senile," he says.
In the past, housing asso-
ciations have gained infamy
for dictating everything


from the weight of your. dog
(one mandated a diet for a
hound) to whether you can
kiss in your driveway (not
if you don't want a fine).
Homeowners' associations
have served as the behavior
police, banning lemonade
stands, solar panels and


hanging out in the garage.
One ordered a war hero to
take down his flag because
of a "nonconforming" pole.
Another demanded that
residents with brown spots
on their lawns dye their
grass green.
Now, past the faux regal
gates, beyond the club-
houses, many property
owners in associations owe
more than their homes are
worth. Some are struggling
to pay their bills after they
lose a job. Others have had
their pay cut So they've
stopped paying their asso-
ciation dues.
To combat the rise in
delinquencies, boards are
switching off utilities, gar-
nishing income and axing
cable. They are yanking
pool passes and banning
the billiard room. And, in
the most extreme cases,
they are foreclosing.
'The treacherous' part
is that homeowners' asso-
ciations are acting like a
local government without
restraints, and they have
this extraordinary power,"
says Marjorie Murray,
a lawyer and founder of
the Center for California
Homeowner Association
Law.


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Moore is groundskeeper for the Moore Family Cemetery, a
role that has been passed down to him through four genera-
tions.

CHURCH: Historic site
Continued From Page 1D


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"It's one of the few
churches you can be a
member of it and anywhere
else," Gator Moore said.
One of the oldest
members of the church his
aunt, Esther, who turns 90
in January and still comes
to the church regularly,
Ruth Moore said.
The Moores were
married at the chapel more
than 30 years ago.
"As far as I know we
were the first ones of the
family to get married since
grandma and granddaddy,"
Gator Moore said.
Several other family
members have married
at the church since then,
including one of their sons,
he said.
A few upgrades have
been made to the building,
with the latest being a
new roof put up last week.
Gator Moore said between
him and his aunt neither
remember it being re-
roofed before.
"We don't know how old
it was before," he said.
The original pews built
by several members
are still in uses in the
sanctuary with the addition
of detachable cushions.
"My great-granddaddy
helped some of the pews,"
Gator Moore said.
Another addition for the
church is a new building
to house the children's
ministry, church office and
storage space.
The average age of
current members is 60
and the chapel wants to
reach younger adults and


children with the building,
Ruth Moore said. Work
began about a year and
a half ago and is still in
progress.
"As we have the money
to build it, we do,," she said.
The church is left
unlocked every day for '
the community to use,
he said. It has always
been unlocked during his
lifetime.
'"The only thing that
ever went missing was a
round piano stool back in
the 60s," Gator Moore said.
"That's the only thing that
walked off."
Many people often
come to the church to
worship at their leisure,
have weddings or take
pictures, Ruth Moore said.
The Mercy Mountain Boys
have even shot a music
video at the chapel. The
grandfather of one of the
members, Earl Green,
is buried in the
cemetery.
One family in the area
comes as a group come
to sing hymns during
Thanksgiving, she said.
"A lot of families in the
area have a family tradition
that involve the church
and are not necessarily
members," Ruth Moore
said.
Anyone wishing to
reserve or donate to the
church can call (386) 755-
0580.
"If you've never been
here, we'd love for you
to come out and take a
look," she said. "It's always
peaceful here."


STORE FIXTURES FOR' SALE!
ALL SALES FINAL, NO REFUNDS OR EXCHANGES. OPEN DAILY REGULAR HOURS. WE ACCEPT VISA, MASTERCARD, DISCOVER, AMERICAN
EXPRESS AND SEARS CARD. WE ACCEPT SEARS GIFT CARDS. DISCOUNTS DO NOT APPLY TO PREPAID GIFT CARDS. INVENTORY IS LIMITED
TO STOCK ON HAND. THIS STORE IS NOT PARTICIPATING IN CURRENT SEARS CIRCULARS. THIS EVENT EXCLUDES ELECTROLUX.

; 1 1lie., 1141111/14,74., W*lklt


LAKE CITY REPORTER LIFE SUNDAY, JULY 10, 2011


Page Editor: Brandon Finley, 754-0420