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The Lake City reporter
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028308/01603
 Material Information
Title: The Lake City reporter
Uniform Title: Lake City reporter (Lake City, Fla. 1967)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: John H. Perry
Place of Publication: Lake City Fla
Publication Date: 7/9/2011
Frequency: daily (monday through friday)[<1969>-]
weekly[ former 1967-<1968>]
daily
normalized irregular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Lake City (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Columbia County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Columbia -- Lake City
Coordinates: 30.189722 x -82.639722 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 95, no. 4 (Oct. 5, 1967)-
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000358016
oclc - 33283560
notis - ABZ6316
lccn - sn 95047175
sobekcm - UF00028308_01569
System ID: UF00028308:01603
 Related Items
Preceded by: Lake City reporter and Columbia gazette

Full Text





Life lessons
Teaching the
value of math
-4- morp
000014 120511 ****3-DIGIT 326
LI0 OF FLORIDA HISTORY
PO BOX 117007
205 SMA UNIV OF FLORIDA
GAINESVILLE FL 32611-1943


Showcase
Top prospects
descend on
Lake City.
Sports, I B


0 A


IJ ILIW*V


Yankee pride
Jeter looking
to reach
3,000 hits.
Sports, I B


Reporter


Saturday, July 9, 2011 www.lakecityreporter.com Vol. 137, No. 140 E 75 cents


Betty


Ford


dies


at 93
Associated Press

DETROIT Betty Ford,
the former first lady whose
triumph over drug and
alcohol
addiction
became a
beacon of
hope for
addicts
and the
inspira-
tion for
her Betty
F o r d Ford in 1994
Center,
has died, a family friend
said Friday. She was 93.
Betty Ford, whose
husband, Gerald, died
in December 2006, had
undergone surgery for an,
undisclosed ailment in April
2007. During and after her
years in the White House,
1974 to 1977, Mrs. Ford
won acclaim for her can-
dor, wit and courage as she
fought breast cancer, severe
arthritis and the twin addic-
tions of drugs and alcohol.
She also pressed for abor-
tion rights and women's
rights.
But it was her Betty Ford
Center, which rescued
celebrities and ordinary
people from addiction, that
made her famous in her
own right. She was modest
about that accomplishment.
"People 'who get well
often say, 'You saved my
life,' and "You've turned my
life around,'" she recalled.
"They don't realize we
merely provided the means
for them to do it themselves
and that's all.
"'That's a God-given gift
as far as I'm concerned. I
don't take any credit for pro-
viding anything that wasn't
provided to me."
After the former presi-
dent died Dec. 26, 2006,
at age 93, his widow said:
"His life was filled with love
of God, his family and his
country." They had been
married in 1948, the same
year Gerald Ford was elect-
ed to Congress.
As she and their children
led the nation in mourn-
ing him, Americans were
reminded anew of her own
contributions, as well as his.
It was calculated then that
the Betty Ford Center had
treated 76,000 people.
"It's hard to imagine a
more important figure in the
substance abuse field than
Mrs. Ford," Rick Rawson,
associate director of the
integrated substance abuse
program at the University
of California at Los Angeles,
said at the time.
She and her husband had
retired to Rancho Mirage,
California, after he lost a
bruising presidential race
to Jimmy Carter in 1976.
She went to work on her
memoirs, "The Times of
My Life," which came out
in 1979. But the social whirl-
wind that engulfed them in
Washington was over, and
Betty Ford confessed that
FORD continued on 3A4


'Light this fire'


ASSOCIATED PRESS
The space shuttle Atlantis lifts off from the Kennedy Space Center Friday in Cape Canaveral.
Atlantis is the 135th and final space shuttle launch for NASA.


Shuttle lifts off for last time


MARCIA DUNN
AP Aerospace Writer
CAPE CANAVERAL Atlantis and four
astronauts thundered into orbit Friday on
NASA's last space shuttle voyage, writing
the final chapter in a 30-year story of daz-
zling triumphs, shattering tragedy and,
ultimately, unfulfilled expectations..
After days of gloomy forecasts full of
rain and heavy cloud cover, the spaceship
lifted off at 11:29 a.m. just 2? minutes
late and embarked on the 135th shuttle
mission. The crowd of spectators was esti-
mated at nearly 1 million.
"Let's light this fire one more time,"
Commander Christopher Ferguson said
just before taking flight.
The shuttle was visible for 42 seconds
before disappearing into the clouds.
It will be at least three years possi-
bly five or more before astronauts are
launched again from U.S. soil, and so this
final journey of the shuttle era packed in
crowds and roused emotions on a scale not
seen since the Apollo moon shots. NASA


has set of long-term goal of flying to an
asteroid and eventually Mars.
'Take a deep breath. Enjoy a little time
here with your families again. But we've
got a lot of work to do. We've got anoth-
er program that we've got to get under
way," NASA Administrator Charles Bolden
told the launch control team after Atlantis
reached orbit. He added: "We know what
we're doing. We know how to get there.
We've just got to convince everybody else
that we know what we're doing."
Atlantis' crew will deliver a year's worth
of critical supplies to the International
Space Station and return with as much
trash as possible. The spaceship is sched-
uled to come home on July 20 after 12 days
in orbit.
The four experienced space fliers rode
Atlantis from the same launch pad used
more than a generation ago by the Apollo
astronauts. NASA waived its own weather
rules in the final minutes of the countdown

SHUTTLE continued on 3A


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Crowds gather at Space View Park as they wait for the launch of space shuttle Atlantis
Friday in Titusville.


State lifts



license of



local M.D.

Department of Health accuses
Lake City physician of running
'a pill mill for monetary gain.'


From staff reports

In an emergency order
suspending, the medi-
cal license of Lake City
physician Joseph M.
Hernandez, the Florida
Department of Health
said Hernandez was
"using his medical license
to operate a pill mill for
monetary gain without
any regard for the health,
safety and well-being of
the persons he sees as
patients."
Hernandez, 62, was
arrested in February 2010
on charges of trafficking


in oxycodone. He was the
5th highest prescriber of
certain strengths of that
drug in Florida in 2010 to
Medicaid recipients using
Medicaid to pay for their
prescriptions, according
to the suspension order.
The order indicates
that of six of Hernandez's
patients for whom the
Department of Health
obtained records in
May, three died "as a
result of drug toxic-
ity from the very medic-
tions prescribed by Dr.
UCENSE continued on 3A


Charter review:

what lies ahead


By TONY BRITT
tbritt@lakecityreporter. corn

The Columbia
County Commission
and the Charter Review
Commission will hold
a joint meeting 6
p.m. Thursday in the
Columbia County School
Board Administrative
Complex auditorium, 372
W. Duval St.
The meeting will
serve as an organi-
zational meeting for
the Charter Review
Commission.
Dale Williams,
county manager, said
the Columbia County
Charter required that
by July 1, a new Charter
Review Commission be
appointed, which it was.
"The commission's
task is going to be to
review the charter and
to make recommenda-
tions to the public for
changes that will be


added to the general
election ballot in 2012,"
he said.
Charters allow
self-government and"
the Charter Review
Commission can repre-
sent the things that are
not consistent with gen-
eral law.
'The Charter
Commission has a lot
of authority and there's
a pretty wide range of
things they can address,
but I don't know of any-
thing specific that may
be targeted," Williams
said.
The Columbia
County Charter Review
Commission is com-
posed of 15 members.
Each Columbia County
Commissioner appointed
three members to
the Charter Review
Commission.
The Charter Review

CHARTER continued on 3A


Teaching the value

of math and more


From staff reports
Local students lead-
ers got a glimpse at how
school plays a part in
helping reach career
goals during a series of
mentoring activities.
Nakeria Dobson,
president, and Caitlin
Greene, secretary, of the
Ambassador Leadership
Council shadowed local
professionals recently.
Each of the profes-
sionals the students
shadowed shared how
their middle and high
school experiences
helped build the foun-
dation for their career
choices.
The students first


attended a Circuit Court
pre-trial conference with
Attorney Jim Hunt.
Hunt specializes in
criminal representation
and is a former pros-
ecutor, assistant public
defender and circuit
judge.
Math was the subject
he enjoyed in middle
and high school. He
also participated in
extracurricular activities
throughout high school.
Keith and Alice
Mobley, owners of
Mobley Seafood, taught
the students about
marine biology from the
perspective of the retail
SHADOW continued on 3A


CALLUS:
I (386) 752-1293
SUBSCRIBETO T-Storms
THE REPORTER:
II IVoice: 755-5445 WEATHER 2A
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O pinion ................
People ..................
Obituaries ..............
Advice & Comics.......
Puzzles .................


TODAY IN
PEOPLE
P .:'-, il t ur
," hlf.,r r,,i :i


COMING
SUNDAY
I le e -. I |.' I -i
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LAKE CITY REPORTER DAILY BRIEFING SATURDAY, JULY 9, 2011


, Celebrity Birthdays


July 8:
Afternoon: 3-1-1
Evening: 2-6-7


July 8:
Afternoon: 8-1-7-8
Evening: 0-0-1-9


Weiaich.-
July 7:
4-6-11-12-26


PEOPLE IN THE NEWS




Kate and William land in



Los Angeles for U.S. trip


LOS ANGELES
Trhe Duke and Duchess
of Cambridge arrived in
Los Angeles on Friday to
begin a whirlwind week-
end in Tinseltown.
They touched down at Los
Angeles International Airport just
before 4 p.m. local time (2300 GMT)
aboard a gray Canadian military jet.
Prince William and Kate had
departed Calgary earlier in the day
after wrapping up a nine-day trip to
Canada, their first foreign visit since
getting married in April.
Kate changed on the flight from
Canada and emerged under sunny
"skies in Los Angeles wearing a light-
colored knee-length sheath dress.
William wore in a navy blue suit with
a purple tie.
They were greeted by California
*Gov. Jerry Brown, Los Angeles
SMayor Antonio Villaraigosa, the
British ambassador and consul gen-
'eral and other officials.
They climbed into a black Range
Rover and headed for their first
event, a technology summit in
'Beverly Hills. It appeared they were
'able to avoid rush-hour traffic by
staying off the freeways.
Though Prince William has been
to America before, it will be Kate's
first trip to the U.S. William's late
mother, Princess Diana, who would
have turned 50 this month, charmed
Americans when she visited in the
1980s.
Authorities have put the paparazzi,
known for their cutthroat tactics,
on notice that aggressive actions
will not be tolerated. Photographers
were partly blamed for causing
the Paris crash that killed Princess
Diana in 1997.


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Prince William and Kate, the Duke and Duchess of Cambridge, arrive at Los
Angeles International Airport in Los Angeles on Friday.


New era of 'Dallas'
headed to TNT next
summer
NEW YORK A new generation
of "Dallas" is headed for the air-
waves.
TNT says it is moving ahead with
an updated version of the prime-time
soap that aired on CBS from 1978 to
1991.
The network announced Friday that
the 10-episode season will be broad-
cast next summer.


"Dallas" veteran Larry Hagman
will be back at Southfork Ranch,
as will his long-ago co-stars Linda
Gray and Patrick Duffy. Hagman
will reprise his role as villainous oil
baron J.R. Ewing. Gray will again
play J.R's wife, Sue Ellen, and Duffy
returns as his younger brother,
Bobby.
The new story focuses on the
Ewing offspring as they clash over
the future of the family dynasty. Josh
Henderson, Jordana Brewster and
Brenda Strong are among the new-
comers to the cast


0 Actor Brian Dennehy is 73.
E Author Dean Koontz is 66.
E Football Hall-of-Famer O.J.
Simpson is 64.
E Actor Chris Cooper is 60.
E TV personality John Tesh
is 59.
0 Actor Jimmy Smits is 56.
0 Actor Tom Hanks is 55.
N Actress Kelly McGillis is 54.
N Actress-rock singer Court-


Lake City
HOW TO REACH US
Main number ........(386) 752-1293
Fax number .............752-9400
Circulation ..............755-5445
Online ... www.lakecityreporter.com
The Lake City Reporter, an affiliate of
Community Newspapers Inc., is pub-
lished Tuesday through Sunday at 180
E. Duval St., Lake City, Ra. 32055.
Periodical postage paid at Lake City, Ra.
Member Audit Bureau of Circulation and
The Associated Press.
All material herein is property of the Lake
City Reporter. Reproduction in whole or
in part is forbidden without the permis-
sion of the publisher. U.S. Postal Service
No. 310-880.
POSTMASTER: Send address changes
to Lake City Reporter, P.O. Box 1709,
Lake City, Ra. 32056.
Publisher Todd Wilsop.... 754-0418
(twilson@lakecityreporter.com)
NEWS
Editor Robert Bridges .....754-0428
(rbridges@lakecityreporter.com)
ADVERTISING
Director Ashley Butcher ...754-0417
(abutcher@lakecityreporter.com)
CLASSIFIED
To place a classified ad, call 755-5440


ney Love is 47.
* Musician/producer Jack
White is 36.
* Rock musician Dan Estrin
(Hoobastank) is 35.
* Actor-director Fred Savage
is 35.
* Rhythm-and-blues singer
Kiely Williams (31w) is 25.
* Actor Mitchel (cq) Musso
is 20.


Reporter

BUSINESS
Controller Sue Brannon... .754-0419
(sbrannon@lakecityreporter.com)
CIRCULATION
Home delivery of the Lake City Reporter
should be completed by 6:30 a.m.
Tuesday through Saturday, and by 7:30
a.m. on Sunday.
Please call 386-755-5445 to report any
problems with your delivery service.
In Columbia County, customers should
call before 1030 a.m. to report a ser-
vice error for same day re-delivery. After
10:30 a.m., next day re-delivery or ser-
vice related credits will be Issued.
In all other counties where home delivery
is available, next day re-delivery or ser-
vice related credits will be issued.
Circulation ..............755-5445
(circulation@lakecityreporter.com)
Home delivery rates
(Tuesday through Sunday)
12 Weeks.................. $26.32
24 Weeks...................$$48.79
52 Weeks..................$83.46
Rates include 7% sales tax
'Mail rates
12 Weeks .............. $41.40
24 Weeks ............... $82.80
52 Weeks.................$179.40


CORRECTION

The Lake City Reporter corrects errors of fact in news
items. If you have a concern, question or suggestion, please
call the executive editor. Corrections and clarifications will run
in this space. And thanks for reading.


Woman gets 10
years for cleaning
murder scene
TAMPA A Tampa
Bay area woman has been
sentenced to 10 years in
prison for helping clean up
a murder scene.
A Hillsborough County
judge sentenced 39-year-
old Rosanna DiMauro on
Friday after she pleaded
guilty to being an acces-
sory after the fact to first-
degree murder.
Five suspects were
charged in the May 2010
death 26-year-old Robert
Mason Brewer, who was
attacked during an argu-
ment at a party.
Last year, 21-year-old
Brendan Terry received 30
years after pleading guilty
to second-degree murder
and kidnapping. DiMauro's
son, 19-year-old David
Link, previously pleaded
guilty to being an acces-
sory after the fact and was
sentenced to almost three
years in prison.
Two others 21-year-
old Kasey Ackerman and
35-year-old Randy Allen
Morris still await trial
on charges of first-degree
murder and armed kidnap-
ping.

Investigation
completed on
firefighter deaths
TALLAHASSEE State
officials say the two Florida
firefighters who died while
battling a blaze in north-
east Florida were blinded
by excessive smoke and
that the poor visibility
hindered their ability to
escape.
The Agriculture
Department's report
Friday also noted that
interference on radio
communication channels
created some confusion as
other firefighters fought
unsuccessfully to somehow


save their comrades who
died in the June 20 wild-
fire in Hamilton County.
Firefighters Josh Burch of
Lake City and Brett Fulton
of White Springs were
killed.
The report included
several recommendations
designed to avoid a similar
tragedy. It noted that fire
shelters lightweight
structures like a pop-up
tent were not used
by the two firefighters.
However, that equipment
would probably not have
saved the two because of
the intense heat, officials
said.

Judge denies
man's request to
represent himself
NAPLES A Naples
man accused of killing his
family repeatedly told a
judge that God is his law-
yer.
During a hearing Friday
morning, Collier Circuit
Judge Frank Baker asked
34-year-old Mesac Damas
if he wished to no longer
be represented by the
public defender's office.
Damas began preaching to
the judge and was briefly
removed from the court-
room.
Once he returned to
court, Damas continued to
say that God is his lawyer.
At that point, the judge
denied Damas' request to
represent himself.
Damas is charged with
first-degree murder in the
September 2009 deaths
of his wife, 32-year-old
Guerline Dieu Dama and
their five young children.
In June, Baker ruled
Damas was mentally com-
petent to stand trial.
No trial date has been
set.

Fineout to cover
political news in


Tallahassee
TALLAHASSEE Gary
Fineout, a veteran politi-
cal reporter in Florida,
has been hired by The
Associated Press to cover
legislative and political
news from the state's
Tallahassee bureau.
Fineout has spent his
entire 22-year career in the
capital, having worked for
the Tallahassee Democrat,
the Daytona Beach News-
Journal, The New York
Times' regional newspapers
and The Miami Herald. He
has spent the past three
years as a freelance report-
er working for various
media outlets, including
the AP and the New York
Times.
His stories for the
Herald in 2005 about how
lobbyists were paying for
trips and parties for state
legislators led to changes
in Florida law.
The appointment was
announced Friday by
South Editor Lisa Marie
Pane, Florida Chief of
Bureau Jim Baltzelle and
Florida News Editor Terry
Spencer.
"Florida always seems to
find itself at the center of
key moments in American
politics, never more so
than during presidential
campaign years. That's
especially true in 2012
since the state will be
hosting the Republican
National Convention.
Gary's reporting chops
will be a significant asset
to APs coverage," Pane
said. "Fineout will be a
welcome addition to an
already-strong bureau led
by Correspondent Brendan
Farrington."
"Gary's reporting depth,
sourcing and innate curios-
ity will add greatly to the
Florida AP report, which is
exactly the kind of investi-
gative journalism we need
in Tallahassee," Baltzelle
said. "I couldn't be more
pleased."


THE WEATHER



THUNDER- THUNDER- CHANCE
STORMS ) STORMS -STORMS


HI 92 LO 73 HI 93 LO75 HI 94LO75


CHANCE
-STORMS


HI 95 Lo 76


-r. -X- F-- Mr. s.


r*~'*"

F


I


Tallahassee *
93/75 ,
Pensacola t
94. 92/78


92'74
Lake City
92/73
\ Gainesv
,,92/7


Tan
90/


TEMPERATURES
High Friday
Low Friday
Normal high
Normal low
Record high
Record low

PRECIPITATION
Friday
Month total
Year total
Normal month-to-date
Normal year-to-date


79
73
91
71
102 in 1902
62 in 1988


0.28"
0.64"
20.53"
1.67"
25.70"


City
Jacksonville Cape Canaveral
S2' '7 Daytona Beach
Ft. Lauderdale
vile e DaytonaBeach Fort Myers
74 91,76 Gainesville
Ocala Jacksonville
"92/74 0 Key West
i Orando Cape Canaveral k est
94/76 9,76 Lake City
Miami
npa, Naples
78 West Palm Beach Ocala
90/78 Orlando
Ft Lauderdale Panama City
Ft Myersi 90/80 Pensacola
92/77 Naples Tallahassee
90/77 Miami Tampa
S \ 90/79 Valdosta
KeyWestW W. Palm Beach
89/82 982.


SUN
Sunrise today
Sunset today
Sunrise tom.
Sunset tom.

MOON
Moonrise today
Moonset today
Moonrise torn.
Moonset torn.


6:36 a.m.
8:35 p.m.
6:37 a.m.
8:35 p.m.


3:20 p.m.
1:29 a.m.
4:25 p.m.
2:13 a.m.


July July July Aug.
15 23 30 6
Full Last New First


7a lp 7p la 6a
Saturday Sunday







S-Frocasted temperature n"Feel ie" temperature


On this date in
1989, thunder-
storms over Lower
Michigan and north-
ern Indian produced
very heavy rain.
Over 5.6 inches of
rain was reported
in Berrien County,
Mich. The same
day, Sioux Falls,
S.D., reached a
record high of 108
degrees


13

10 niutestonum
Today's
ultra-violet
radiation risk
for the area on
a scale from 0
to 10+.

___--


Sunday
90 77 r
92 77 I
90/80/t
92/77/t
92/75/t
92/75/t
90/81/pc
93/75/t
91/80/t
92/76/t
93/75/t
95/77/t
92/78/t
94/79/pc
95/77/t
92/79/t
94/75/t
90/78/t


Monday
P 77 [
91 76 i
89/80/pc
93/77/pc
94/74/t
93/75/t
89/81/t
94/75/t
91/79/t
90/77/t
93/75/t
94/76/t
90/79/pc
95/79/pc
93/77/t
91/79/pc
95/76/t
90/77/t


An exclusive
service
brought to
our readers
by
The Weather
Channel.


Sweatherco


Forecasts, data and
S graphics 2011 Weather
m yI | / Central, LP, Madison, WIs.
weatherJ www.weatherpubilsher.com


Q"Qcjtu Kilt";lim


get i
E-edition Online Access
Absolutely

FREE

Call for login information.
iul


Daily Scripture


"I will bow down toward your
holy temple and will praise your
name for your unfailing love
and your faithfulness, for you
have so exalted your solemn
decree that it surpasses your
fame."
-Psalm 138:2NIV


AROUND FLORIDA


Page Editor: Brandon Finley, 754-0420


II~I~R~


F


I. -- I- --.. ---


F4i~N"











Page Editor: Brandon Finley, 754-0420 LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL & STATE SATURDAY, JULY 9, 2011


SHUTTLE: Lifts off for the last time

Continued From Page 1A


to allow the launch to go forward.
In the end, though, the liftoff was
delayed not by the weather but by
the need to verify that the launch pad
support equipment was retracted all
the way.
The last-minute suspense was fit-
ting in a way, since Florida's famous-
ly stormy weather delayed numer-
ous shuttle missions almost from the
start of the program and was a major
reason spaceflight never became
routine, as NASA had hoped for.
Spectators jammed Cape Canaveral
and surrounding towns for the
emotional farewell. Kennedy Space
Center itself was packed with shuttle
workers, astronauts and 45,000 invit-
ed guests.
NASA's original shuttle pilot,
Robert Crippen, now 73, was among
the VIPs. He flew Columbia, along
with Apollo 16 moonwalker John
Young, on the inaugural test flight
in 1981. Other notables on the guest
list: a dozen members of Congress,
Cabinet members, the chairman
of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, four
Kennedy family members, singers
Jimmy Buffett and Gloria Estefan,
and two former NASA chiefs.
"I'm a little bit sad about it, and
a little bit wistful," said Jennifer
Cardwell, 38, who came with her
husband, John, and two young sons
from Fairhope, Ala. "I've grown up
with it.".
The space shuttle was conceived
even as the moon landings were
under way, deemed essential for
building a permanent space station.
NASA brashly promised 50 flights a
year in other words, routine trips
into space and affordable service.
But the program suffered two
tragic accidents that killed 14 astro-


nauts and destroyed two shuttles,
Challenger in 1986 and Columbia in
2003. NASA never managed more
than nine flights in a single year.
And the total tab was $196 billion, or
$1.45 billion a flight.
Yet there have been some indisput-
able payoffs: The International Space
Station would not .exist if it were
not for the shuttles, and the Hubble
Space Telescope, thanks to repeated
tuneups by astronauts, would be a
blurry eye in the sky instead of the
world's finest cosmic photographer.
The station is essentially complet-
ed, and thus the shuttle's original
purpose accomplished. NASA says
it is sacrificing the shuttles because
there is not enough money to keep
the expensive fleet going if the space
agency is to aim for asteroids and
Mars.
Thousands of shuttle workers will
be laid off within days of Atlantis'
return from its 33rd flight, on top
of the thousands who already have
lost their jobs. And the three remain-
ing shuttles will become museum
pieces.
After Atlantis took flight, NASA
launch. director Mike Leinbach
choked up as he thanked the mem-
bers of his control team, some of
whom will be out of a job. "The
definition of godspeed I like the best
is 'have a prosperous journey,' and
folks, from the bottom of my heart,
good luck and godspeed," he said.
This day of reckoning has been
coming since 2004, a year after the
Columbia tragedy, when President
George W. Bush announced the
retirement of the shuttle and put
NASA on a course back to the moon.
President Barack Obama canceled
the back-to-the-moon program in


favor of trips to an asteroid and
Mars.
But NASA has yet to work out the
details of how it intends to get there,
and has not even settled on a space-
craft design.
The space shuttle demonstrates
America's leadership in space, and
"for us to abandon that in favor of
nothing is a mistake of strategic pro-
portions," lamented former NASA
Administrator Michael Griffin, who
led the agency from 2005 to 2008.
After Atlantis' lights-out flight, pri-
vate rocket companies will take over
the job of hauling supplies and astro-
nauts to the space station. The first
supply run is targeted for later this
year, while the first trip with astro-
nauts is projected to be years away.
Until those flights are up and run-
ning, American astronauts will be
hitching rides to and from the space
station via Russian Soyuz capsules,
at more than $50 million per trip.
Russia will supply the rescue ves-
sels for Ferguson and his crew if
Atlantis ends up severely damaged
in flight. But the Russian spaceships
can carry only three people, includ-
ing two crew members, and any res-
cue would require a series of back-
and-forth trips. That is why only four
astronauts are flying Atlantis, the
smallest crew in decades.
When Atlantis returns, it will be
put on display at the Kennedy Space
Center. Discovery and' Endeavour
already are retired and being
prepped for museums in suburban
Washington and Los Angeles.

Associated Press writers Mitch
Stacy in Titusville, Fla., and Seth
Borenstein at Cape Canaveral 'con-
tributed to this story.


SHADOW: Kids learn life lessons through program


Continued From Page 1A
sales industry.
The students learned
owning a seafood market is
more than just catching and
selling fish. It requires know-
ing industry regulations.
Fishing was a hobby
for the couple that led to a
career choice.
Council officers learned
about the middle and
high school experiences
of Dr. Tommy and Athena
Randolph of Randolph
"Medical Practices.


Tommy Randolph
learned from middle
school onward that his
pursuit of becoming a.
doctor required being the
very best
Her desire to be in the
medical field first began
in middle school and was
further developed through
the efforts of her guidance
counselors for Athena
Randolph.
The Randolphs advised
the students to study hard


and strive high.
The ALC develops lead-
ership skills with hands-on
Service. Each year mem-
bers shadow different pro-
fessions to help connect
academic achievement to
career choices.
Students selected for
the council must have a
minimum 2.5 grade point
average, demonstrate lead-
ership aptitude and submit
an essay for consideration
Members are required


to attend local government
meetings and perform
complete community ser-
vice projects', such as feed-
ing the homeless.
The council is accepting
seven more members prior
to the 2011-2012 school
year. Interested middle
and high school students
should send a letter of
interested to Greene at
PO. Box 15, Lake City,
Florida 32056.


Committee will set its own meeting sched-
ule. However, there is a specific date the
commission has to be completed with
its meetings and business in order for
any proposed changes be added to the
November 2012 general election ballot.
'"The first meeting is always the orga-
nizational meeting," Williams said. 'This
will give commission appointees a chance
to assemble together for the first time."


Williams said Marlin Feagle, Columbia
County attorney, rill address Charter
Review Committee members, explain-
ing the laws pertaining to charters, the
existing county charter and exactly what
they are charged with doing and the time
frame.
Charter Review Commission members
will also be asked to select a chairman
and vice chairman at the meeting.


FORD: Dies at 93

Continued From Page 1A;


she missed it.
"We had gone into the
campaign to win and it was
a great disappointment los-
ing, particularly by such a
small margin," she said. "It
meant changing my whole
lifestyle after 30 years in
Washington, and it was
quite a traumatic experi-
ence."
By 1978, she was addict-
ed to alcohol and prescrip-
tion drugs. She would later
describe herself during that
period as "this nice, dopey
pill-pusher sitting around
and nodding."
"As I got sicker," she
recalled, "I gradually
stopped going to lunch. I
wouldn't see friends. I was
putting everyone out of my
life." Her children recalled
her living in a stupor, shuf-
fling around in her bath-
robe, refusing meals in
favor of a drink.
Her family finally con-
fronted her in April 1978
and insisted she seek treat-
ment. She credited their
"intervention" with saving
her life.
"I was stunned at what
they were trying to tell me
about how I disappointed
them and let them down,"
Ford told The Associated
Press in 1994.
"I was terribly hurt -
after I had spent all those
years trying to be the best
mother, wife I could be. ...
Luckily, I was able to hear
them saying that I needed
help and they cared too
much about me to let it go


on," she said.
She entered Long Beach
Naval Hospital and under-
went a grim detoxifica-
tion, which became the
model for therapy at the
Betty Ford Center. She saw
her recovery as a second
chance at life.
"When you come back
from something that was as
disagreeable and unsettling
as my alcoholism, when
you come back to health
from that, everything is so
much more valuable," she
said in her book, "A Glad
Awakening."
Her own experience,
and that of a businessman
friend whom she helped
save from alcoholism, were
the inspiration for the cen-
ter, located on the grounds
of the Eisenhower Medical
Center. She helped raise $3
million, lobbied in the state
capital for its approval, 'and
reluctantly agreed to let it
be named for her.
"The center's name
has been burden, as well
as honor," she wrqte.
"Because even if nobody
else holds me responsible,
I hold myself responsible."
She liked to tell patients,
"I'm just one more woman
who has had this problem."
Her efforts won her a
Presidential Medal .,of
Freedom, the nation's high-
est civilian honor, from
the first President Bush
in 1991. In 1999 Gerald
and'Betty Ford both were
awarded Congressional
Gold Medals.



k Rountree Moore
:Chevrolet Cadillac
$:issan would like
to welcome
Tony Camiel
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LICENSE: Emergency suspension

Continued From Page 1A


Hernandez."
Hernandez "consistently
engages in a pattern of hap-
hazard and inappropriate
prescribing of extremely
potent and potentially dan-
gerous narcotic medica-
tions," according to the
suspension order. "Without
exception, Dr. Hernandez
failed to verify prescrip-
tions, failed to appropriate-
ly use patient urine drug
screens, failed to appropri-
ately. use standard tools of
risk assessment and failed
to meet the standard of care
for each of these patients."
The order, dated
Wednesday, indicates that
in May surveillance of Dr.
Hernandez's office at 826
SW Main Blvd. "revealed
vehicles registered in states
other than Florida, long lines
of patients waiting to see Dr.
Hernandez and the presence
of hired security personnel
on the premises. These fac-
tors strongly indicate that
Dr. Hernandez facilitates
a pill mill operation rather
than a legitimate pain man-
agement practice."
Hernandez's continued
work as a physician "consti-
tutes an immediate serious
danger to the health, safety,
or welfare of the public,"
the order reads.


The order.was signed by
Florida Surgeon General H.
Frank Farmer, Jr.
Hernandez's medical


Rewis Durwood Rossi, Jr.
Mr. Rewis.Durwood Rossi, Jr., of
Lake City ,died on July 6, 2011 at
the Orange Park Medical Center
Hospital after an extended illness.
He was the son of the late Rewis
Durwood Rossi, Sr and Win-
fred Stansel. He was a lifelong
resident of Lake City, a mem-
ber of the Qlad Tidings Assem-
bly Of God Church he enjoyed
taking pictures, watching t.v.,
reading and playing the piano.
Heissurvivedby hiswifeMariaN.
Tullume Chancafe, of Lake City,
FL; one sister Charlotte Truluck
of Lake City, FL; and a host of
nieces and nephews also survive.
Funeral services will be conduct-
ed on Monday July 11, 2011 at
11:00 A.M. in the Dees- Parrish
memorial chapel with Brother
LD. VanVelck officiating .Visita-
tion with the family will be Sun-
day, July 10, 2011 from 6P.M.
until 8P.M. at the funeral home.
Dees-Parrish Family Funeral
Home is in charge of all arrange-
ments 458 South Marion Avenue
Lake City, FL. (386) 752-1234.
Arrangements are under the di-
rection the DEES-PARRISH
FAMILY FUNERAL HOME,
458 S. Marion Ave., Lake City,
FL 32025 752-1234 please sign
our on-line family guestbook at
parrishfamilyfuneralhome. com


license .was briefly sus-
pended last month over
questions concerning his
eyesight.


Roland Henry Thomas
Mr. Roland Henry Thomas, 40
of Edgewater died Saturday at
Bert Fish Medical Center in New
Smyrna Beach. Mr. Thomas
was born in Jacksonville and
was a self-employed painter.
Mr. Thomas is survived by: His
wife "Cindy" Pearson-Thomas
of Edgewater. Three daughters:
Mary Thomas, Chelsea Thomas
and Jessica Thomas. One step-
daughter: Mikilin Pearson. Three
sons: Christopher Thomas, Josh-
ua Thomas and Michael Thomas.
One step-son:. Timothy Pearson.
His step-mother: Sandra Thomas.
His father: Claude Lester "C.L."
Thomas. Two grandchildren.
Funeral services will be held Sat-
urday, July 09, 2011 at 2:00 P.M.
at Harmony Free Will Baptist
Church near Worthington Springs
with Rev. Larry Clyatt officiating.
Burial will follow at Hunt Cem-
etery near Harmony Free Will
Baptist Church. ARCHER FU-
NERAL HOME on Friday, July
08, 2011 from. 6 P.M. to 8 P.M.

Obituaries are paid advertise-
ments. For details, call the Lake
City Reporter's classified depart-
ment at 752-1293.


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CHARTER: Commission to meet

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OBITUARIES


LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL & STATE SATURDAY, JULY 9, 2011


Page Editor: Brandon Finley, 754-0420












OPINION


Saturday, July 9, 201 I


AN
OPINION



What


Obama


wants
n Thursday,
President
Obama met with
Republicans to
discuss a debt deal.
We don't know exactly what
was proposed, but news reports
before the meeting suggested
that Mr. Obama is offering
huge spending cuts, possibly
including cuts to Social Security
and an end to Medicare's status
as a program available in full
to all Americans, regardless of
income.
Obviously, the details mat-
ter a lot, but progressives,
and Democrats in general, are
understandably very worried.
Should they be? In a word, yes.
Now, this might just be the-
ater: Mr. Obama may be pull-
ing an anti-Corleone, making,
Republicans an offer they can't
accept. The reports say that the
Obama plan also involves sig-
nificant new revenues, a notion
that remains anathema to the '
Republican base. So the goal
may be to paint the G.O.P. into
a corner, making Republicans
look like intransigent extrem-
ists which they are.
But let's be frank. It's getting.
harder and harder to trust Mr.
Obama's motives in the budget
fight, given the way his eco-
nomic rhetoric has veered to
the right In fact, if all you did
was listen to his speeches, you
might conclude that he basi-
cally shares the G.O.."s diag-
nosis of what ails our economy
and what shoulddbe done to
fix. it And maybe that's not a
false impression; maybe it's the
simple truth.
One striking example of this
rightward shift came in last .
weekend's presidential address,
in which Mr. Obama had this
to say about the economics.
of the budget "Government
has to start living within its
means, just like families do. We
have to cut the spending we
can't afford so we can put the
economy on sounder footing,
and give our businesses the
confidence they need to grow
and create jobs."*
That's three of the right's ,
favorite economic fallacies in
just two sentences.
* New York Times

Lake City Reporter
Serving Columbia County
Since 1874
The Lake City Reporter is pub-
lished with pride for residents of
Columbia and surrounding counties by
Community Newspapers Inc.
We believe strong newspapers build
strong communities -"Newspapers
get things done!"' .
Our primary goal is to
publish distinguished and profitable
commrunity-oriented newspapers.
This mission will be accomplished
through the teamwork of professionals
dedicated to truth, integrity and hard
work.
Todd Wilson, publisher
Robert Bridges, editor
Sue Brannon, controller
Dink NeSmith, president
Tom Wood, chairman

LETTERS
POLICY
Letters to the Editor should be
typed or neatly.written and double
spaced. Letters should not exceed
400 words and will be edited for
length and libel. Letters must be
signed and include the writer's name,
address and telephone number for
verification. Writers can have two
letters per month published. Letters
and guest columns are the opinion of
the writers and not necessarily that of
the Lake City Reporter.


BY MAIL: Letters, P.O. Box 1709,
Lake City, FL 32056; or drop off at
180 E. Duval St. downtown.
BY FAX: (386) 752-9400.
BY E-MAIL:
news@lakecityreporter.com


t's difficult to ignore the
Casey Anthony verdict
.unless you live in a,
bubble. And it would be
an even more arduous
task to find someone who hadn't
formed an opinion about her
and what the jury said she
didn't do to her two-year old
daughter.
Actually, the jury didn't
really say that It said that
the prosecution didn't prove
-thaftshe had taken the child's
life either deliberately or
accidentally, that the evidence
presented didn't meet the test
of being beyond a reasonable
doubt which is the cornerstone
of our criminal justice system,
especially in capital crimes.
It is rare for a jury to step
up to that responsibility these
days and those Floridians who
traveled from St. Petersburg to
Orlando to hear this tragic case
should be lauded. They did their
job quickly and efficiently and
then quietly retired, forgoing
efforts by the sensationalists
in our business immediately
afterwards to question them
about what brought them to
their conclusion on the core
charges of the indictment
against the 25-year-old mother.
The judge now says that
Anthony could go free as soon
as next week because of time
served and good behavior.
It would have been easy
for the 12 men and women
to ignore the fact that the'
prosecution's case was built
on evidence vulnerable to
impeachment. The evidence
was wholly circumstantial
without forensic or eyewitness o
corroboration. In fact, the
prosecution was left to make
its case on suppositions easy
enough for the gallery to


S imple lessons from
the presidencies of
Franklin Roosevelt and
Ronald Reagan point
to what's lik ly to be
the only successful approach to
containing government spend-
ing in the Barack Obama era.
In FDR's time, a surge in
spending by Washington was
a cornerstone of New Deal
efforts to lift the country out of
the Depression. But unemploy-
ment never dropped below 14%
in the 1930s and rose to 19% by
the end of the decade. "Now,
gentlemen, we have tried spend-
ing," Henry Morgenthau, FDR's
Treasury secretary, confessed


www.lakecityreporter.com


I




Dan K.Thomasson

believe but not in the jury
box where a higher standard
prevailed. The strategy failed
despite the fact that the millions
who sat glued to their favorite
cable channels overwhelmingly
bought her guilt
This was not the O.J. Simpson
case where solid evidence of
guilt was impugned by those
presenting it It was not a jury
that voted its sentiments, clearly
ignoring the facts. It was a panel
of citizens who understood
that convicting on a death
penalty charge needed the most
convincing evidence.
In reality this was a small
time case involving a mildly
attractive single mother who
longed to be a party girl and
her precious daughter that grew
into almost a national obsession
from the mouths of a half-
dozen talking heads desperate
to build cable audience in the
Simpson mode. Chief among
them was Nancy Grace who on
her nightly show made the case
a cause celebre, coining the
phrase 'Tot Mom" to describe
Anthony aid unfortunately on
at least one occasion apparently
pronouncing her guilty.
The media circus that grew
out of this is not new. What is
new is that before Simpson and
the ascent of cable, much of the
same thing was occurring in
newspapers. The Leopold and
Loeb case in Chicago in the '20s


to House leaders in 1939. "We
are spending more than we
have ever spent before and it
does not work."
Mr. Reagan understood this
lesson when he confronted a
recession in 1981, his first year in
the White House. He restrained
domestic spending and overall
spending actually declined in
1987. Since 1988, Mr. Reagan's
final year in office, spending,
has escalated to an estimated
25.3% of GDP in 2011 from 21.3%.
The national debt has grown by
nearly $4 trillion in Mr. Obama's
presidency. Yet a sharp. hike in
spending has worked no better
for Mr. Obama than it did for Mr.


and the Dr. Sam Sheppard case
in the 1950s in Cleveland are
prime examples.
The Sheppard incident
produced a Supreme Court
decision condemning the
journalists who the court said
created an atmosphere that
deprived Sheppard of a fair
trial by an impartial jury. The
television series and movie,
"The Fugitive," grew out of that
case and its final TV episode
drew the largest audience of
any of its kind up until then,
giving us a preview of what was
to come. That the court
was able to protect the sanctity
.of the jury in the Anthony
case from the taint of florid,
sensational "journalism" is
somewhat of a miracle even by.
selecting it from a pool 90 miles
from Orlando and sequestering
it for the duration of the trial.
The atmosphere outside
the courtroom could only be
described as ghoulish with
mobs of thrill seekers fighting
to get in and others visiting
Anthony's neighborhood and
even the site where Caylee
Marie's body was found.
But if Casey Anthony
didn't do it, who did? The
circumstances of her tragic
death may never be sorted
out Not even when, where and
how she was killed. There isn't
any other suspect, not even
the father who the defense
maintained tried to cover up the
child's death as an accident.
Remember, the jury didn't
say she didn't do it, just that it
wasn't proven. Like it or not,
that's the law.

* Dan K. Thomasson is former
editor of Scripps Howard News
Service.


Roosevelt And now we face a
borrowing and debt crisis caused
chiefly by the spending binge.
So here are the two relevant
lessons for the ongoing discus-
sions on raising the debt ceiling
between Congress and the White
House: 1) spending does little to
spur economic growth and job cre-
ation and 2) cuts are fleeting and
quickly overwhelmed by more
spending. Thus the solution to the
spending problem is straightfor-
ward: Rather than temporary cuts,
what's needed are a permanent
cap on spending and structural
changes in entitlement programs.
SWall Street Journal


4A


Deroy Murdock
deroy.murdock@gmail.com

Congress'

war on

light bulb

blows up

With its traffic
circles and
tree-lined
squares,
America's
capital sometimes resembles
a magical, otherworldly place.
Maybe that's why so many
who govern here think that
they can wave their legislative
wands and unleash beauty
free of costs and complica-
tions.
Of course, reality rarely
cooperates.
Consider Washington's
still-unfolding ban on Thomas
Edison's incandescent light
bulb. If left unchallenged,
January 1 will herald stricter
standards that Congress spe-
cifically designed in 2007 to
electrocute Edison's invention
and dragoon Americans into
using more energy-efficient
alternatives.
Courtesy of our federal
masters, Americans are endur- '
ing a parade of unforeseen
consequences as "the experts"
try to extinguish this landmark'
contribution to humanity.
Compact Fluorescent Lamps
(CFLs), which Washington
hopes will replace incandes-
cent ones, brighten slowly,
function poorly with dimmer
knobs, and emit a color of
light that many find unappeal- j
mg. Even worse, according to
EnergyStar.gov, each CFL con-
tains 4 milligrams of toxic mer-
cury. An average CFL includes
enough mercury to pollute 528
gallons of water, which would
fill 10.5 typical, 50-gallon resi-
dential water heaters.
As the EPA warns, "High
exposures to inorganic mer-
cury may result in damage to
the gastrointestinal tract, the
nervous system, and the kid-
neys."
Breaking a CFL triggers a
significant health hazard that
requires a 10-step cleanup.
Among other things, EPA rec-
ommends "opening a window
or door to the outdoor environ-
ment" No problem...unless
you occupy an apartment,
hotel room, or office with
sealed windows.
"Continue to air out the
room where the bulb was bro-
ken and leave the H&AC sys-
tem shut off, as practical, for
several hours," EPA counsels.
This might upset residents of
Phoenix, where temperatures
hit 105 degrees Tuesday.
Likewise, opening one's win-
dows in Minneapolis might be
unappealing in January, when
highs average 22 degrees.
Old CFLs should be dis-
posed of properly at recycling
centers. Dream on. Most
consumers will toss them in
the trash with their tea bags.
Mercury will accumulate in
America's landfills, possibly
with disastrous results.
As Washington has ham-
mered incandescents, some
have gravitated toward light-
emitting diodes. While LEDs
pose none of CFLs' health
risks, they present their own
problems.
Shifting from Edison bulbs
to LEDs can save cities and
states money. Changing street-
lights to LEDs has shrunk
Wisconsin's power bill by
$750,000 annually.
* New York commentator
Deroy Murdock is a columnist
with the Scripps Howard News
Service and a media fellow with
the Hoover Institution on War,
Revolution and Peace at Stanford
University.


Casey Anthony




jury did its job


ANOTHER OPINION

Sorting the Real From the Phony

Spending Cut Options


I


I














FAITH


&


VALUES


www.lakecityreporter.com


HEART MATTERS


CHURCH NOTES


Angie Land
angielond3@windstream.net


The real

meaning.

of liberty
Now that the
fireworks
are over, let's
continue to
celebrate
America's birthday by
considering the freedom
we enjoy as citizens.
Freedom is a powerful
thing, and like anything
powerful, it brings with
it a measure of risk and
uncertainty. Having
freedom means that no
one makes our choices for
us, but it also brings the
liability of those choices...
whether they produce
blessing or suffering, the
results are ours to claim.
Given that the driving
force behind America's
birth was religious
freedom, it is strange
that while our country
is associated with
independence, Christians
have long convinced
the world that we are
anything but free. It is
the common perception
that Christians have a long
list of impossible rules to
live by, (hence their sour
dispositions.) In his book

LAND continued on 6A


"

.
.- ^ -, .



ADVENT CHRISTIAN
First Advent Christian
1881 SW McFarlane Ave.
386-752-3900


Sunday School:
Sunday Service:
Wednesday Service:


9:45AM
11:00AM
7:00PM


ASSEMBLY OF GOD
FIRST ASSEMBLY OF GOD
1571 E. Duval Street
386-438-5127
Sunday Worship 10:30 A.M.

GLAD TIDINGS ASSEMBLY OF GOD
993 NW Lake Jeffery Road
386-752-0620
Sunday Worship 10:30AM & 6PM
Wed. Fam. Bible Study 7:00PM
"A church where JESUS is Real"

BAPTIST
BEREA BAPTIST CHURCH
SR47 S* 755-0900
Sunday School 9:30AM
Sunday Worship 10:45AM & 6PM
Wednesday Eve. Service 7PM
Interim Pastor: Kenneth Edenfield

EASTSIDE BAPTIST CHURCH
196 SE James Ave. 386-752-2860
Sun. Bible Study 9:45AM
Sun. Worship 11AM & 6PM
Wed. Prayer Mtg/Bible Study 6PM
Rev. Brandon G.Witt

FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH
Sunday Bible Study 9:15AM
Sunday Worship 10:30AM & 6:00PM
Wed. 6:00PM Prayer Service, &
Children Ministry 6:15PM
Downtown Lake City 752-5422
Rev. Stephen Ahrens, Pastor


OUVET MISSIONARY BAPTIST CHURCH
541 N.E. Davis Street
(386) 752-1990
Rdnnol dV WltOrs Pastonr


Sunday School
Sunday Morning Worship
Wed. Mid-Week Worship
"In God's Word, Will & Way"


9:45AM
11:00AM
6:00PM


Today
Messiah's Mansion
Messiah's Mansion,
a full scale model of the
mosaic sanctuary, is on dis-
play 1-7 p.m. July 9 and 1-
5 p.m. July 10. Tours begin
every 15 minutes and last
75 minutes. The tour is
located at 9206 W. Hwy. 90.
Call (386) 984-9704, e-mail
livesanctuaryll@yahoo.comn
or visit www.livesanctuary.
corn. Free admission.

Hawthorne preaching
Prophet Gregory L.
Hawthorne of New Life
Deliverance Ministries in
Winter Haven is preaching
10 a.m. July 9 at Miracle
Tabernacle Church. The
church is located at 1190
SW Sister's Welcome Road.
Call the church office at
(386) 758-8452.

Church anniversary
The 131st Church
Anniversary is 6:30 p.m.
July 9 and 11 a.m. and
3 p.m. July 10 at Mt Tabor
A.M.E. Church. The .
Saturday evening service
will consist of a musical
featuring several musical
groups and soloists. The
Sunday morning speaker


is the Rev. Alton Coles
of Jacksonville. The eve-
ning speak is the Rev. Joy
Gallmon and the member
of New. Mt. Pisgah A.M.E.
Church.

Sunday
Guest pastor
The Rev. Lantz Mills,
New Day Springs MBC
pastor, is ministering 6:30
p.m. July 10 at Miracle
Tabernacle Church.

Women's Day service
Women's Day Worship
Service is 11 a.m. July 10
at Philadelphia Baptist
Church. Nancy Robinson
is the guest speaker. The
church is located on CR
242 West. The theme is
"Wanted: Women Willing
to 'Go Ye Therefore ...'"


A Homecoming celebra-
tion is 10 a.m. July 10 at
Athens Baptist Church.
The church is located at
9090 SW CR 240. Clyde
Annandale will present
a Christian Drama the
Apostle John. Dinner on
the grounds will follow.
Contact Jen Chasteen at


755-4027.

Christian drama
See the Bible come alive
with a Christian drama
featuring Clyde Annadale 3
p.m. July 10 at Circle Cross
Cowboy Church. The
church.is located at North
Florida Live Stock Market
on Hwy. 441 South.

Monday

Ministerial Alliance
meeting
The Lake City
Ministerial Alliance is
meeting 6 p.m. July 11 at
Mt Pisgah AME Church.
All clergy, ministers and
pastors are invited to
attend. The church is locat-
ed at 345 Washington St.


Vacation Bible School
is 5-8 p.m. July 11-13 at
Bethel AME. The theme
is "Step up and Go Green
for Jesus!" and will feature
arts and crafts, recreation
and fun. Call 7524595. The
church is located on CR 242.

Tuesday


Support group
Greater Visions Support
Group hosts a faith-based
addictions support group
at 7 p.m. every Tuesday at
Christ Central Church on
Sister's Welcome Road and
9:30 a.m. every Thursday
at the Suwannee Coalition
office on North Ohio
Avenue in Live Oak.. The
group provides spiritual
and emotional support in
a non-judgmental setting.
Call 208-1345.

Faithful and True
meetings
Faithful and True meet-
ings are 7 p.m. every
Tuesday at Christ Central
Church in Lake City. The
perils of pornography and
other addictive sexual
behaviors are discussed.
Men are taught how to live
in freedom consistently
everyday. The group is
strictly anonymous. Call
Tom at 386-965-6377.

Thursday

English and literacy
classes
Free English speaking


and literacy classes pro-
vided by Columbia County
School District's Career
and Adult Education
Program is from 5:30-8
p.m. every Thursday at
Unity of God Ministries,
Inc. in Wellborn. Activities
for children will be pro-
vided. Call (386) 755-8190.
The church is located at
12270 County Road 137.

Saturday, July 16

VBS at Eastside
Preregistration for
Vacation Bible School is
1-3 p.m. July 16 at Eastside -
Baptist Church. Games and
fun will be available after reg-
istration. The VBS program,
"Beach Blast," is 6-8:30 p.m.
July 18-22. VBS is for ages
3-years-old to sixth grade
and will feature music, Bible
stulY, crafts, recreation and
snacks. Call 752-2860. The
church is located at 196 S.E. a
James Ave.

Submit Church Notes by
e-mail to arobinson@lakec- "
ityreportercom, fax to (386)
752-9400 or drop-off at 180.
E. Duval St., Lake City. Call
(386) 754-0425 with ques- Cl
tions. Church Notes run
as space is available each
Saturday.


S The biggest problem in church


Hugh G. Sherrill
ems-hugh43@comcastnet


PINE GROVE BAPTIST CHURCH
1989 N US Hwy 441
386-752-2664
Sunday Bible Study 9:45AM
Sunday Worship 11AM & 6PM
Wed. Kids & Youth Ministry 6:30PM
Pastor: Ron Thompson

BAPTIST
SALEM PRIMITIVE BAPTIST
Sunday Services 10:30 AM
Pastor: Elder Herman Griffin
752-4198

SOUTHSIDE BAPTIST CHURCH
388 S.E. Baya Drive* 755-5553


Sunday:
Bible Study
Morning Worship
Evening Worship
Wednesday:
AWANA
Prayer & Bible Study


9:15 AM
10:30AM
6:15PM

5:45PM
6:15 PM


TABERNACLE BAPTIST CHURCH
(Independent Baptist)
144 SE Montrose Ave. 752-4274


Sunday School
Sun. Mom. Worship
Sunday Eve.
Wed. Prayer Meeting
Pastor: Mike Norman


10AM
11 AM
6 PM
7:30 PM


CATHOLIC
EPIPHANY CATHOULC CHURCH
1905 SW Epiphany Court 752-4470
Saturday Vigil Mass 5:00 PM
Sunday Mass 8:15 AM, 10:30 AM,
5:00 PM (Spanish/English)
Sunday School/Religious Education
9:00 AM-10:15 AM


CHRISTIAN
CHRISTIAN SCIENCE SOCIETY
239 SE Baya Ave.


Sunday Service
Wednesday Evening Service


11:00AM
7:30 PM


LAKE CITY CHRISTIAN CHURCH
Hwy 247 S.* 755-9436
Sunday School 9:30 AM
Sun. Mom. Worship 10:30 AM
Wed. Prayer Meeting 7 PM


It amazes me how
that thru many of
the books in the
New Testament
were written
because Churches turned


CHURCH OF CHRIST
NEW HORIZON
Church of Christ
Directions & Times 386-623-7438
Jack Exum,Jr., Minister
CHURCH OF GOD
LAKE CITY CHURCH OF GOD
167 Ermine St 752-5965
Sunday School 9:45 AM
Sun, Worship 10:30AM & 6:00PM
Wed. Family Night 7 PM
Wed. Youth Service 7 PM
Pastor Carroll Lee

EVANGEL CHURCH OF GOD
370 SW Monitor Glen 755-1939
Sunday School 9:45 AM
Sunday Worship 10:50 & 6:30
Wed. Spiritual Enrichment 7PM
"Shock-Youth Church"
Boys and Giris Clubs
Bible Study
Pastor: John R. Hathaway

EPISCOPAL
ST. JAMES EPISCOPAL CHURCH
2423 SW Bascom Norris Dr.,
Lake City, Fl 32025 386-752-2218
Website: www.stjameslakecity.org
HOLY EUCHARIST
Sun. 8 & 10 AM
Wed. 6:00 PM
Priest The Rev, Michael Armstrong

LUTHERAN.
OUR REDEEMER LUTHERAN CHURCH -
LCMS
1 1/2 miles S. of 1-75 on SR 47
7rr-r iftft


Sunday Services
(Nursery Provided)
Christian Education Hour
For all ages at 10:45AM
Pastor: Rev. Bruce Alkire


9:30AM


SPIRIT OF CHRIST LUTHERAN
Hwy 90, 1.5 miles West of 1-75 752-3807
Sunday Worship 10:OOAM
Nursery Avail.
Wed. Pot Luck 6PM Worship 7PM
Vicar John David Bryant


from the true Gospel back
to their old way of life and
to warn of false teachers
that had come teaching
false doctrines. We
have the books of I & II


METHODIST
First United Methodist Church
973 S. Marion Ave.
386-752-4488
Sunday School 9:45AM
Sunday Morning Worship
Casual Worship Service 8:50AM
Traditional Service 11:OOAM
Program opportunities available in all areas
for all ages.
For a complete schedule
contact church office at
752-4488

WESLEY MEMORIAL UNITED
1272 SW McFarlane 752-3513
(Adjacent to Summers School)
Sunday School 9:00AM
Worship 10:OOAM
Nursery provided
Vacation Bible School
9am-noon July 11-15
Pastor: The Rev. J. Louie Mabrey
www.wesleymem.com

WATERTOWN CONGREGATIONAL
METHODIST CHURCH
U.S. 90 E. turn on Cortez (next to Quality
Ind.) right on Okinawa.
Sunday School 9:45 AM
Sun. Worship 11AM & 6 PM
Wed. Night Service 7 PM
Pastor, Randy Ogbum

NAZARENE
LAKE CITY CHURCH OF THE NAZARENE
Services:
Sunday School 9:45AM
Sunday Worship 10:45AM
Wednesday 6:30PM
Adult, Youth Ministry, Children's Ministry
Pastor: Craig Henderson
Nursery Provided
SW SR 47 and Azalea Park Place

PRESBYTERIAN
FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
629 SW Baya Drive 752-0670
Sunday School 9:00AM
Sunday Worship Service 10:00 AM
NURSERY PROVIDED
Pastor: Dr. Roy A. Martin
Director of Music: Bill Poplin


Corinthians, Galatians, and
Hebrews. In every case
where people turned back
to their old way, it was
caused by immaturity. In I
Corinthians 3:1-3 Paul says


IWo an ( nr of tloida

.'..., I o .. r . lr .. .. o. 'o I
(386)466-1106


PENTECOSTAL
FIRST FULL GOSPEL CHURCH
NE Jones Way & NE Washington St
Sunday School 10:00 AM
Morning Worship 11:00 AM
Evangelistic Service 6:00 PM
Youth Services- Wednesday 7:00PM
Mid-week Service Wednesday 7:00 PM
For info call 755-3408* Everyone Welcome
Pastor: Rev. Stan Ellis

NON-DENOMINATIONAL
CHRIST CENTRAL MINISTRIES
Leadership Services 9:00AM
Sunday Morning 11:00AM
Wednesday Service 7:00PM
217 Dyal Ave., from Hwy 90 take
Sisters Welcome Rd., go 5 miles, South,
church on left. *755-2525
Lead Pastor: Lonnie Johns
"A Church on the Move"

CHRISTIAN HERITAGE CHURCH
Comer SR. 47 & Hudson Circle
Sunday Celebration 10:30 AM
Pastor Chris Jones 752-9119

FALLING CREEK CHAPEL
Falling Creek Road 755-0580
First and Third Sundays 9:30 A.M.
Second and Fourth Sundays 3:00 P.M.
Pastor: Rev. Cheryl R. Pingel

NEW BEGINNING CHURCH
Highway 242 E. of Branford Highway
Sunday School 10:OOAM
Morning Worship 11:00AM
Sunday Evening 6:OOPM
Wednesday 7:00PM
A Full Gospel Church Everyone Welcomed
(386) 755-5197


"And I, brethren could not
speak to you as to spiritual
people but as to carnal, as
to babes in Christ, I fed

SHERRILL continued on 6A

Central States
Enterprises
Columbia County's Feed Headquarters
FEED PET SUPPLIES LAWN & GARDEN
ANIMAL HEALTH '
668 NW Waldo St. 386-755-7445

MIKELLS POWER EQUIPMENT, INC.
Your Lawn & Garden Headquarters
MOWERS CHAIN SAWS TRIMMERS
1152 US 90 WEST LAKE CITY, FL.
386-752-8098







BAYWAYjanitorial Services
FIRE & Water Restoration
Floor & Carpet Care
Residential & Commercial
755-6142


D North Florida
Pharmacy
7 Locations to Serve You
Lake City, Ft. White, Branford,
Chiefland, Mayo & Keystone Heights








Supercenter .
"LOW PRICES EVERYDAY"
US 90 WEST 5a-2427
GWHunter, Inc.
Chon Chevron Oil
SJobber



Holly ectric, Inc.
Quality /work at a reasonable price"
We also do solar hook-ups
(386) 755-5944

FOOD STORES
()pcn 7 )s a \Vcck
1036 l )Dual Sl. Lake C(i FI..
(386) 752-0067
I resh Meat, I l'rcsh Produce!
"I ian do all thigl thniugh (1r- ht h trngthnlicth me'
hlhppl-an 4 Ij


WfClay Electric Cooperative, Inc.
Competitive rates, non-profit,
right here in your community.
Lake City District 386-752-7447
clayelectric.com


HARRY'S
S Heating & Air Conditioning Inc.
Harry Mosley, President

P4~r 752-2308 gWW


Saturday, July 9, 201 I


5A


VBS at Bethel
Hnmeconmin celebohratinn


Tires for every need.
US 90 West across from Wal-Mart
752-0054


Morrell's
Your Complete decorating and
home furnishings store
SW Deputy Jeff Davis Lane (fonnerl) I'nemount Rd.)
752-3910 or 1-800-597-3526
Mon -Sat 8:00-5:30 Closed Sunday


ANDERSON COLUMBIA CO., INC.
ASPHALT PAVING
COMMERCIAL -INDUSTRIAL
Site l'Preparation Road Building Parking Lots
Grading & Drainage
752-7585
871 NW Guerdon St., Lake City


To Advertise in
this Directory
Call Mary or Bridget
755-5440












-. SHERRIW Immaturity
~' ~ Continued From Page 1B


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Lake City's 9-under team hitter Tyler Shelnut (6) swings at a pitch Thursday in a game against Jax Beach. Lake City fell to
Jax Beach 19-10.


Today
Farmers Market
The Lake DeSoto
Farmers Market is open
every Saturday from a.m.
to 12 p.m. in'Wilson Park,
located along Lake DeSoto
between the Columbia
County Courthouse
and Shands Lakeshore
Hospital. For more infor-
mation about the. Lake
DeSoto Farmer Market or
the Market Manager posi-
tion call 386-719-5766.

Insurance seminar
A health insurance
seminar is 10 a.m. today
at Tustenuggee UMC. A
representative of SHINE,
Serving Health Needs
of Elders, will answer
questions on Medicare,
Medicaid, prescription
assistance and long term
health care. Take County
Road 131, Tustenuggee
Road, south, cross CR 18.
SThe church is one mile on
the left.


"A Scandalous Freedom",
author Steve Brown tells
the following story:
Abraham Lincoln went
to a slave market. There
he noted a young, beautiful
Africaii-American woman
being auctioned off to
the highest offer. He
bid on her and won. He
could see the anger in her
eyes and could imagine
what she was thinking,
"Another white man who
will buy me, use me, and
then discard me." As
Lincoln walked off with
his "property", he turned
to the.woman and said,
"You're free."
"Yeah. What does that
mean?" she replied.
"It means that you're
free."
"Does that mean I can
say whatever I want to
say?"
"Yes," replied Lincoln,
smiling, "it means that you
can say whatever you want
to say."
"Does it mean," she
asked incredulously, "that
I can be whatever I want
to be?"
"Yes, you can be
whatever you want to be."
"Does it mean," the
young woman asked
hesitantly "that I can go
wherever I want to go?"
"Yes, it means you are
free and can go wherever
you want to go."
'Then," said the young
woman with tears welling
up in her eyes, "I think I'll
go with you."
Galatians 5:1 says, "It


Alumni meeting
A Richardson High
School alumni meet-
ing is noon July 9 at
the Richardson Center.
Contact CJ at (386) 752-
0815.

Pooch parade
Dog Days of Summer is
10 a.m. 4 p.m. July 9 at
Stephen Foster State Park.
There will be a parade of
paws, canine costumes and
trick competition, as well
as demonstrations of all
description. Dr. Hawthorne
from Lake City Animal
Hospital will be available to
answer questions and Pet
Smart will have "free" give-
a-ways. Bring your own
dog'on a leash. Regular
park entrance fees apply

Theater performance
Performances of
. "Butterflies Are Free" by
Leonard Gershe is at the
High Springs Community
Theater and runs week-
ends through July 10.
Tickets are available at


is for freedom that Christ
has set us free. Stand
firm then and do not let
yourselves be burdened
again by a yoke of slavery."
God gives us freedom
because He wants us to
choose Him. Picture
this newly freed young
woman living and perhaps
even serving in Lincoln's
home...not because she
must, but because she
chooses, out of gratitude
and for her own protection.
In her world, there would
always be one waiting to
take her back to slavery...
she would not stay free on
her own.. .neither will we.
Our culture and our owrn
desires will lay the same
trap for us, so if we want to
stay free, we too will stay
close under the protection
of the One who grants our
freedom!
God is after a
relationship with you
and me...not a list of
rules. "Where the Spirit
of the Lord is, there is
freedom." (2 Corinthians
3:17) Healthy relationships
always reflect freedom
rather than bondage.
Experience real freedom...
it's your choice.. .because
your heart matters.
* Heart Matterisis a weekly
column written by Angie
Land, director of the Family
Life Ministries of the Lafayette
Baptist Association, where
she teaches bible studies,
leads marriage and family
conferences, and offers bibli-
cal counseling to individuals,
couples and families.


The Framery's new loca-
tion, 341 South Marion and
Knox Streets, 754-2780,
and online at highspring-
scommunitytheater.com.

Sunday

Meet the author
The Friends of the
Library Author Program
will feature Terri DuLong
2 p.m. July 10 at the
Columbia County Public
Library Main Library.
DuLong, author of
"Spinning Forward" and
"Casting About," lives in
Cedar Key which is also
the setting for her novels
with a knitting theme. Her
first novella, "A Cedar Key
Christmas," appeared last
fall in the Fern Michael's
holiday anthology, "Holiday
Magic," making her a
New York Times and USA
Today best-selling author.

Monday
Character camp
The Youngmen/
Youngwomen of Character
Camp is 8:30 a.m.-2:30
p.m. Monday through
Thursday at Oliver
Missionary Baptist
Church. The came is for
students in fifth through
10th grade. Contact the
church at 752-1990.


* To submit your Community
Calendar item, contact
Antonia Robinson at 754-
0425 or by
e-mail at arobinson@
lakecityreporter.com.



Cancer support group
The Women's Cancer
Support Group of Lake
City is meeting 5:30-6:30
p.m. July 11 at.Baya
Pharmacy East, 780 SE
Baya Drive. The guest
speaker is Dr. Paul G.
Goetowski, Board-Certified
Radiation Oncologist.
The two subjects he will
address are thyroid cancer
and the side effects of can-
cer treatments & medica-
tions. You don't have to be
a member to attend a meet-
ing. Additional information
at 386-752-4198 or 386-755-
0522.

Wood Carvers
The Columbia County
Wood Carvers meet every
Monday at 1 p.m. at the
LifeStyle Enrichment
Center. Contact Ken Myer
at 719-9629 or Charles
Kime at 7554937.

Girls mentoring
The Welcome to
Womanhood mentoring
program for middle and
high school girls meet-
ing 5-8 p.m. July 12 at
Hanging at the Zone, 532
Marion Street. Contact
Sandra Price at (386) 867-
1601. Dinner is included.
Transportation can be
provided if contacted one
week in advance.


you with milk and not
with solid food; for until
now you were not able to
receive it, and even now
you are still not able; for
you are still carnal. For
where there are envy,
strife, and division ariong
you, are you not carnal
and behaving like mere
men?" (NKJ)
Hebrews 5:12 (the key
to understanding the
book), the writer says
"For though by this time
you ought to be teachers,
you need someone to
teach you again the first
principles of the oracles of
God; and you have come
to need milk and not solid
food". Read verses 12-14.
Spiritual immaturity
is the greatest problem
with the Church today.
There are people teaching
in the churches that
still need to be taught
themselves. We turn now
to Galatians. The theme
of this book is "Salvation
by Grace". Grace as we
know is unmerited favor.
Salvation is by grace
wholly apart from the law.
Grace gives liberty where
the law places under
bondage. Paul went to
the area on his first and
third missionary journey
and preached to them the
Gospel of grace, but some
had come in who would
"distort the gospel of
Christ" (1:7). They
taught that while salvation
was by grace, work (law)
was also necessary for


salvation.
Paul wrote and I must
paraphrase Gal 1:6-9. He
said I preached the gospel
of the grace of Christ to
you, and someone has
come in to you with a
different gospel, and Paul
says that there is not
another gospel other than
the death, the burial, and
resurrections of Christ
(I Cor. 15:1-4). He gave
these so called preachers
a warning, a warning that
should be heeded today.
Paul said in verse 8 "But
even if we, or an angel
from heaven, preach any
other gospel to you than
what we have preached to
you, let him be accursed."
To be sure they
understood, he repeated
this again in the very next
verse. Grace is liberty.
Law is bondage.
The Bible preacher/
teacher has a tremendous
responsibility to preach
the same gospel that Paul
preached. They have the
duty to ensure that the
people they are teaching
grow in the grace and
knowledge of our Lord
and Savior Jesus
Christ.
This can only be done
if the preachers/teachers
spend time in
prayer, study, and
preparation. The Word
should be taught in such
a manner that challenges
people to want to know
more and apply it to their
lives.


~a ~


Rountree Moore
Chevrolet Cadillac
Nissan would like
to welcome
Ryan Westover
to our sales team


R 0lTR MO 41eUH
0 -et 0I.Ca d illa i n( 6 7 6 9 3 3


RO NTE MOOAR.E 431 6 West I~US Hwy 90*I
0-h 6- .0 Cdl ac isa 36. 7263


- ..- . .V..... .. : . .
l u*rjB,,.- '


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COMMUNITY



CALENDAR


LAND: Your heart matters
Continued From Page 1B


LAKE CITY REPORTER NEWS SATURDAY, JULY 9, 2011


Page Editor: Brandon Finley, 754-0420









Lake City Reporter





S PORTS


Story ideas?

Contact
Tim Kirby
Sports Editor
754-0421
tkirby@lakecityreporter.com


Saturdayjuly 9 20 1 1


www.lakecityreporter.com


Section B


Three

out of

All-Star

game

A-Rod, Jeter,
Victorina need
replacements.
By BEN WALKER
Associated Press
Derek Jeter, Alex
Rodriguez and Shane
Victorino became the lat-
est All-Star scratches, fur-
ther threatening to turn
baseball's big show into
the All-Scar game.
Shortly after Jeter
pulled himself Friday to
rest an injured calf, his
New York Yankees team-
mate joined him. The club
announced Rodriguez
would be absent because
of a sore knee.
That made it three
Yankees who won't play
for the American League
on Tuesday in Phoenix.
Closer Mariano Rivera
will sit out to heal his
right triceps.
"Unfortunately, I won't
be able to go Jeter said
before Friday night's
game against Tampa Bay.
Earlier in the day, Andre
Ethier of the Los Angeles
Dodgers replaced injured
Shane Victorino of, the
Philadelphia Phillies in a
switch of NL outfielders.
New York Mets short-.
stop Jose Reyes previous-,
ly was excused because
of a hamstring problem
that put him on the dis-
abled list.
Los Angeles Angels
rookie closer Jordan
Walden is replacing
Rivera. More roster
changes are expected,
too, with some pitchers
starting this weekend
and other players nursing
injuries.
Among those hoping to
get in: St. Louis slugger
Albert Pujols, who recov-
ered much quicker than
expected from a broken
wrist.
Jeter was two hits
away from 3,000 going
into Friday night's game.
The 12-time All-Star was
elected by fans to start
Jeter came off the dis-
abled list this week after
recuperating from his calf
problem.
Yankees manager
Joe Girardi said it was
totally Jeter's decision to
skip the All-Star game.
Jeter talked it over with
Girardi; general manager
Brian Cashman and train-
er Gene Monahan.
"It's probably best
not to push it because
it's most important to be
ready for the second half.
That's where my focus
has to be," Jeter said. "It's
unfortunate because you
know;how much I enjoy
going to All-Star games."
"I'm trying to be smart
about it. I know I can be
stubborn a lot of times
with injuries," he said.
Rodriguez was getting
an MRI for knee trou-
ble that had seemingly
sapped his power. The
14-time All-Star had been
elected to start at third
base.
Shortly before the
decision was announced,
Girardi said it was up to
Rodriguez.
"Alex has to make that
choice. Would the rest
help him? Probably,"
Girardi said. "He's banged
up, he's played a lot"
Ethier finished second
to Victorino in online fan


voting.


TIM KIRBY/Lake City Reporter


The.Jacksonville Storm College Showcase welcomes teams and college coaches to the Girls Softball Complex in Lake City.


Showcase



arrives in



Lake City


Top prospects descend
upon Columbia County


By TIM KIRBY
tkirby@lakecityreporter.com
he Jacksonville.
Storm College
Showc.as
tou-nament not
' only hi lights top players;
but Columbia County as
well.
The annual tournament
moved to Lake City this
year behind an effort
by the Girls Softball
Association of Columbia
County. Greg Kennon
is president of the
organization. Tammy
Collins is vice-president
and Michele Padgett is
secretary.
"We talked to Addison
(Davis) about bringing the,
tournament here and we
are putting it own," said
Chad Padgett, a member of
the tournament committee.


By putting it on, the
softball association and
others are facilitating the
Jacksonville Storm which
directs the event
Columbia County
Landscape and Parks
Director Clint Pittman
directs the field
maintenance and the
Tourist Development
Commission coordinates
the relationship between
businesses and the
participating teams.
"When we made a
transition to Lake City,
we wanted to have the
support of the community,"
said Davis, a tournament
director. "The community
has done a great job. They
are the ones who really
closed the deal and made
it possible. We are really
happy to be here. It is a
great opportunity."
Davis said there are 75


ASSOCIATED PRESS
New York Yankees' Derek Jeter takes a moment before his
first at-bat against the Tampa Bay Rays during the first inning
of a baseball game Thursday at Yankee Stadium in New
York. Jeter doubled on the at-bat.

Pride of the

Yankees II: Jeter's

journey to 3,000


At 37, NewYork's
captain looks
for milestone.
By BEN WALKER
Associated Press
NEW YORK Hard
to imagine now, but there
was a time when Derek


Jeter didn't think he would
get a single hit in the big
leagues.
A skinny teenager in the
low minors, he would spend
lonesome nights calling his
parents back in Michigan,
crying that he was totally
overmatched at the plate.
JETER continued on 3B


TIM KIRBY/Lake City Reporter
Florida Fury coaches Linda Derk and Joe Catrone speak to thq Coral Springs players
between games at the Jacksonville Storm College Showcase on Friday.


teams in the tournament
and he expects at least 50
college coaches.
Michelle Frew, is the
head coach at Rollins
College. She was at the
tournament with assistant
coach (and husband) Steve
Frew and their 5-year-old
son, Dylan.
'We usually have a list
of kids we are looking at,"
Frew said. 'The first thing.
I do is go and look at their
grades. If we see a smart
kid listed, we are going to
go see her play."
Making it a family affair
works for Frew.
"When you have got to
SHOWCASE continued on 2B


TIM KIRBY/Lake City Reporter
Rollins softball coach Michelle Frew takes notes as she
scouts potential players for the Tars at the Jacksonville Storm
College Showcase on Friday.


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Brock Edge (11), of Lake City's 11-under team, safely slides back to first base after
attempting to steal second'Thursday against Tallahassee Meyers Park during the Cal
Ripken North Florida State Tournament at Southside Sports Complex in Lake City.


Lake City's 9-under


advance to region


11-under team
is eliminated
from tourney.
By TIM KIRBY
tkirby(r@lhltAcit, r 'porter, com
Lake City's 9unlder all-
stars advaticd( to region,
while the I1 -under all-stars
were two and out in the Cal
Ripken North Florida State


Tournament at Southside
Sports Complex.
Lake City beat Julington
Creek Stars, 15-13, in 9-
under play on Friday. In
11-under play, Lake City
was eliminated by Orange
Park, 5-1.
The top two all-star
teams in 9-under qualify
for southeast regional play
and Lake City will move on
to the tournament in North


Carolina later in July.
There is still work to be
done for the hosts. Lake
City is the only team left.
standing in the winner's
bracket, but the locals
will have to win another
game to nail down the state
championship.
The championship game
is 1 p.m. today and the
CHS continued on 2B


%GRN%" ,














LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS SATURDAY, JULY 9, 2011


TELEVISION

TV sports

Today
AUTO RACING
8 a.m.
SPEED Formula One, qualifying for
British Grand Prix, at Northamptonshire,
England
5:30 p.m.
VERSUS IRL, IndyCar, pole
qualifying for Honda Indy Toronto (same-
day tape)
7:30 p.m.
TNT NASCAR, Sprint Cup, Quaker
State 400, at Sparta, Ky.
9:30 p.m.
ESPN2 NHRA, qualifying for Route
66 Nationals, at Joliet, III. (same-day tape)
BOXING
10:15 p.m.
HBO Champion Aldkifumi Shimoda
(23-2-1) vs. Rico Ramos (19-0-0), for
WBA super bantamweight title; junior
middleweights, Paul Williams (39-2-0) vs.
Erislandy Lara (15-0-1), at Atlantic City,
N.J.
CYCLING
8 a.m.
VERSUS Tour de France, stage 8,
Algurande to Super-Besse Sancy, France
GOLF
8:15a.m.
TGC European PGA Tour, Scottish
Open, third round, at Inverness, Scotland
3 p.m.
CBS PGATour,John Deere Classic,
.third round, at Silvis, III.
NBC USGA, U.S. Women's Open
Championship, third round, at Colorado
Springs.
S6:30 p.m.
TGC Champions Tour, First Tee
Open, second round, at Pebble Beach,
Calif.
HORSE RACING
7 p.m.
ESPN NTRA. Hollywood Gold
Cup, at Inglewood, Calif.
MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL
4 p.m.
FOX Regional coverage, San Diego
at LA. Dodgers,Atlanta at Philadelphia, or
'Minnesota at Chicago White Sox
7 p.m.
MLB Regional coverage, Cincinnati
at Milwaukee or Baltimore or Boston
WGN Chicago Cubs at Pittsburgh
MAJOR LEAGUE LACROSSE
7 p.m.
ESPN2 All-Star Game, at Boston
MOTORSPORTS
10 p.m.
SPEED AMA Pro Racing, at
Lexington, Ohio (same-day tape)
SOCCER
11:30 a.m.
ESPN FIFA. Women's World
Cup; quarterfinal, England vs. France, at
Leverkusen, Germany
2:15 p.m.
ESPN FIFA, Women's World
Cup, quarterfinal, Germany vs. Japan, at
Wolfsburg, Germany

BASEBALL

AL standings

East Division
W L Pct GB
Boston 52 35 .598 -
NewYork 51 35 .593 "
Tampa Bay 49 39 .557 3'%
Toronto 42 47 .472 II
Baltimore 36 49 .424 15
Central Division
W L Pct GB
Cleveland 47 39 .547 -
Detroit 47 42 .528 I'4
Chicago 43 46 .483 5%
Minnesota 39 47 .453 8
Kansas City 36 52 .409 12
West Divisilon
W L Pct GB
Texas 48 41 .539 -
Los Angeles 47 42 .528 I
Seattle 43 45 .489 44
Oakland 39 50 .438 9
Thursday's Games
Tampa Bay 5, N.Y.Yankees I
Cleveland 5,Toronto 4
Boston 10, Baltimore 4
Texas 6, Oakland 0
Detroit 3, Kansas City I
Minnesota 6, Chicago White Sox 2
LA.Angels 5, Seattle I
SFriday's Games
Tampa Bay at New York, ppd., rain
Toronto. at Cleveland (n)
Baltimore at Boston (n)
Oakland atTexas (n)
Detroit at Kansas City (n)
Minnesota at Chicago White Sox (n)
Seattle at LA.Angels (n)
Today's Games
Tampa Bay (Price 8-7) at N.Y.Yankees
(A.J.Burnett 8-7), 1:05 p.m.
Minnesota (Duensing 6-7) at Chicago
.. White Sox (Buehrie 6-5),4:10 p.m.
Toronto (Mgrrow 5-4) at Cleveland
S(Tomlin 10-4), 7:05 p.m.
S Baltimore (lakubauskas 2-2) at Boston
(Lackey 5-8), 7:10 p.m.
S Detroit (Furbush 1-2) at Kansas City
(Hochevar 5-8),7:10 p.m.
Oakland (McCarthy 1.5) at Texas
(C.Lewis 8-7), 8:05 p.m.
S Seattle (Pineda 8-5) at LA. Angels
(Pineiro 4-3), 9:05 p.m.
Sunday's Games
S Tampa Bay at N.Y.Yankees, 1:05 p.m.
Toronto at Cleveland, 1:05 p.m.
Baltimore at Boston, 1:35 p.m.
Detroit at Kansas City, 2:10 p.m.
Minnesota at Chicago White Sox,
.;2:10 p.m.
..' Oakland atTexas, 3:05 p.m.
' Seattle at LA.Angels, 3:35 p.m.
Monday's Games
No games scheduled

NL standings


East Division
W L Pct GB
Philadelphia 55 33 .625 -
Atlanta 53 36 .596 2'k .
NewYork 45 43 .511 10
Washington 45 44 .506 10'A
Florida 40 48 .455 15
Central Division
W L Pct GB
Milwaukee 47 42 .528 -
St. Louis 47 42 .528 -
Pittsburgh 45 42 .517 I
Cincinnati 44 45 .494 3


Chicago 36 53 .404 It
Houston 30 59 .337 17
West Division
W L Pct GB
San Francisco 50 39 .562 -
Arizona 48 41 .539 2
Colorado 41 47 .466 8'A
San Diego 40 49 .449 10
Los Angeles 38 51 .427 12
Thursday's Games
Atlanta 6, Colorado 3
Chicago Cubs 1I0,Washington 9
Florida 5, Houston 0
Milwaukee 5, Cincinnati 4
Arizona 4, St. Louis I
LA. Dodgers 6, N.Y. Mets 0
San Francisco 2, San Diego I
Friday's Games
Atlanta at Philadelphia (n)
Chicago Cubs at Pittsburgh (n)
Colorado at Washington (n)
Houston at Florida (n)
Cincinnati at Milwaukee (n)
Arizona at St. Louis (n)
San Diego at LA. Dodgers (n)
N.Y. Mets at San Francisco (n)
Today's Games
Atlanta (Hanson 10-4) at Philadelphia
(CI.Lee 9-6),4:10 p.m.
San Diego (Harang 7-2) at L.A.
Dodgers (R.De La Rosa 3-4),4:10 p.m.
Chicago Cubs (Dempster 5-6) at
Pittsburgh (Correla 11-6), 7:05 p.m.
Colorado (Jimenez 3-8) at Washington
(Marquis 7-3), 7:05 p.m.
Cincinnati (Cueto 5-3) at Milwaukee
(Marcum 7-3), 7:10 p.m.
Houston (Myers 3-8) at Florida
(Nolasco 5-5), 7:10 p.m. "
Arizona (D.Hudson 9-5) at St. Louis
(C.Carpenter 4-7),7:15 p.m.
N.Y. Mets (Capuano 8-7) at San
Francisco (Uncecum 6-7), 9:05 p.m.
Sunday's Games
Houston at Florida, 1:10 p.m.
Atlanta at Philadelphia, 1:35 p.m.
Chicago Cubs at Pittsburgh, 1:35 p.m.
Colorado at Washington, 1:35 p.m.
Cincinnati at Milwaukee, 2:10 p.m.
Arizona at St. Louis, 2:15 p.m.
San Diego at LA. Dodgers, 4:10 p.m.
N.Y. Mets at San Francisco, 8:05 p.m.
Monday's Games
No games scheduled
Tuesday's Game
All-Star Game at Phoenix, Ariz.,
8:05 p.m.

BASKETBALL

WNBA schedule

Friday's Games
New York at San Antonio (n)
Phoenix atTulsa (n)
Today's Games
Washington at Indiana, 7 p.m.
Atlanta at Chicago, 8 p.m.
Connecticut at Minnesota, 8 p.m.
Los Angeles at Seattle, 10 p.m.
Sunday's Games
Chicago at NewYork. 4 p.m.
Tulsa at Phoenbix, 6 p.m.

AUTO RACING

Race week

NASCAR
QUAKER STATE 400
Site: Sparta, Ky.
Schedule: Today, race, 7:30 p.m. (TNT,
6:30-11 p.m.).
Track. Kentucky Speedway (oval, 1.5
miles).
Race distance: 400.5 miles, 267 laps.
INDYCAR
HONDA INDYTORONTO
Site:Toronto.
Schedule: Today, practice, qualify-
ing (Versus, 5:30-7 p.m.); Sunday, race,
2:50 p.m. (Versus, 2-5 p.m.).
Track: Streets of Toronto (street
course, 1.755 miles).
Race distance: 149.175 miles, 85 laps.
FORMULA ONE
BRITISH GRAND PRIX
Site: Silverstone, England.
Schedule: Today, practice, qualifying
(Speed, 8-9:30 a.m.) Sunday, race, 8 a.m.
(FOX, noon-2 p.m.).
Trackde Silverstone Circuit (road course,
3.667 miles).
Race distance: 190.6 miles, 52 laps.
NHRA FULLTHROTTLE
ROUTE 66 NHRA NATIONALS
Site: Joliet, Ill.
Schedule: Today, qualifying (ESPN2,
9:30-11:30 p.m.); Sunday, final eliminations
(ESPN2,9 p.m.-midnight).
Track. Route 66 Raceway.
OTHER RACES
AMERICAN LE MANS SERIES:
American Le Mans Northeast Grand Prix,
Today (ESPN2, Sunday, 1-3 p.m.), Lime
Rock Park, Lakeville, Conn.
GRAND-AM ROLEX SPORTS
CAR SERIES: Continental Tire Sports
Car Festival, Today (Speed, Sunday,
4-7 p.m.), Mazda Raceway Laguna Seca,
Salinas, Calif.

Quaker State qualifying

At Kentucky Speedway
Sparta, Ky.
Qualifying based on practice times
(Car number In parentheses)
I. (18) Kyle Busch, Toyota, Owner
Points.
2. (42) Juan Pablo Montoya, Chevrolet,
Owner Points.
3. (22) Kurt Busch, Dodge, Owner
Points.
4. (4) Kasey Kahne, Toyota, Ownert
Points.
5. (48) Jimmie Johnson, Chevrolet,
Owner Points.
6. (2) Brad Keselowski, Dodge, Owner
Points.
7. (99) Carl Edwards, Ford, Owner
Points.
8. (6) David Ragan, Ford, Owner
Points.
9. (14) Tony Stewart, Chevrolet,


Owner Points.
'10. (27) Paul Menard, Chevrolet,
Owner Points.
I I. (9) Marcos Ambrose, Ford, Owner
Points.
12. (78) Regan Smith, Chevrolet,
Owner Points.
13. (17) Matt Kenseth, Ford, Owner
Points.
14. (24) Jeff Gordon, Chevrolet,
Owner Points.
15. (20) Joey Logano, Toyota, Owner
Points.


16. (56) Martin Truex Jr., Toyota,
Owner Points.
17. (00) David Reutlmann, Toyota,
Owner Points.
18. (39) Ryan Newman, Chevrolet,
Owner Points.
19. (29) Kevin Harvick, Chevrolet,
Owner Points.
20. (33) Clint Bowyer, Chevrolet,
Owner Points.
21. (16) Greg Biffle, Ford, Owner
Points.
22. (31) Jeff Burton, Chevrolet, Owner
Points.
23. (43) A J Allmendinger, Ford, Owner
Points.
24. (47) Bobby Labonte, Toyota,
Owner Points.
25. (13) Casey Mears, Toyota, Owner
Points.
26. (I I) Denny Hamlin,Toyota, Owner
Points.
27. (83) Brian Vickers, Toyota, Owner
Points.
28. (5) Mark Martin, Chevrolet, Owner
Points.
29. (88) Dale Earnhardt Jr., Chevrolet,
Owner Points.
30. (51) Landon Cassill, Chevrolet,
Owner Points.
31. (87) Joe Nemechek, Toyota,
Attempts.
32. (36) Dave Blaney, Chevrolet,
Owner Points.
33. (60) Mike Skinner, Toyota,
Attempts.
34. (I) Jamie McMurray, Chevrolet,
Owner Points.
35. (34) David Gilliland, Ford, Owner
Points.
.36. (46) J.J.Yeley, Chevrolet, Attempts.
37. (38) Travis Kvapll, Ford,Attempts.
38. (66) Michael McDowell, Toyota,
Attempts.
39. (71)Andy Lally, Ford,Attempts.
40. (81) Scott Riggs, Chevrolet,
Attempts.
41. (37) Tony Raines, Ford.Attempts.
42. (32) Mike Bliss, Ford, Owner
Points.
43. (7) Scott Wimmer, Dodge, Owner
Points.
Failed to Qualify
44. (30) David Stremme, Chevrolet.
45. (I5) Michael Waltrip,Toyota.
46. (50) T.J. Bell,Toyota.
47. (95) David Starr, Ford.
-48. (77) Robby Gordon, Dodge.

SOCCER

Women's World Cup

QUARTERFINALS
Today
England vs. France, Noon
Germany vs. Japan, 2:45 p.m.
Sunday
Sweden vs.Australia, 7 a.m.
Brazil vs. United States, 11:30 a.m.

CYCLING

Tour de France stages

July 2 Stage I: Passage du Gols
La Barre-de-Monts--Mont des Alouettes
Leas Herbiers, flat, 191.5 kilometers (119
miles)
July 3 Stage 2: Lea Essarts, team
time trial, 23 (14.3) (Garmin-Cervelo;
Thor Hushovd, Norway)
July 4 Stage 3: Olonne-sur-Mer-
Redon, flat, 198 (123.0) (Tyler Farrar,
United States; Hushovd)
July 5 Stage 4: Lorient-Mur-de-
Bretagne, flat. 172.5 (107.2) (Cadel Evans,
Australia; Hushovd)
July 6 Stage 5: Carhalx-Cap Frehel,
flat, 164.5 (102.2)
July 7 Stage 6: Dinan-Usleux, flat,
226.5 (140.7) (Edvald Boasson Hagen,
Norway; Hushovd)
July 8 Stage 7: Le Mans-
Chateauroux, flat, 218 (135.5) (Cavendish;
Hushovd)
, July 9 Stage 8: Aigurande-Super'
Besse Sancy, medium mountain, 189
(117.4)
July 10- Stage 9: Issoire-Saint-Flour,
medium mountain, 208 (129.2)
July II Rest day in Le Uoran
Cantal.
July 12-- stage lO:Aurillac-Carmaux,
flat, 158 (98.2)
July 13 Stage I I: Blaye-les-Mlnes-
Lavaur, flat, 167.5.(104.1)
July 14 Stage 1i: Cugnaux-Luz-
Ardiden, high mountain, 211 (131.1)
July 15 Stage 13: Pau-Lourdes,
high mountain, 152.5 (94.8)
( July 16 Stage 14: Saint-Gaudens-
Plateau de Beille, high mountain, 168.5
(104.7)
July 17 Stage 15: Limoux-
Montpelller, flat, 192.5 (119.6)
SJuly 18 Rest day In the Drome
region.
July 19 Stage 16: Saint-Paul-Trols-
Chateaux-Gap, medium mountain, 162.5
(101)
July 20 Stage 17: Gap-Pinerolo,
Italy, high mountain, 179 (111.2)
July 21 -Stage 18: Pinerolo--GAllbler
Serre-Chevalier, high mountain, 200.5
(124.6)
July 22 Stage 19: ModaneValfrejus-
Alpe-d'Huez, high mountain, 109.5 (68.0)
SJuly 23 Stage 20: Grenoble, Indi-
vidual time trial, 42.5 (26.4)
July 24 Stage 21: Cretell-Paris
Champs-Elysees, flat, 95 (59)
Total -3,430 (2,131.2)

Seventh Stage
(A 135.5-mile flat stage from
Le Mans to Chateauroux)
1. Mark Cavendish, Britain, HTC-
Highroad, 5 hours, 38 minutes, 53 sec-
onds.
2. Alessandro Petacchi, Italy, Lampre-
ISD, same time.
3. Andre Grelpel, Germany, Omega
Pharma-Lotto, same time.
4. Romain Felllu, France, Vacansolell-


DCM, same time.
5. William Bonnet, France, Francaise
des Jeux, same time.
6. Denis Gallmzyanov, Russia, Katusha,
same time.
7. Thor Hushovd, Norway, Garmin-
Cervelo, same time.
8. Sebastien Turgot, France, Europcar,
same time.
9. Jose Joaquin Rojas, Spain, Movistar,
same time.
10. Sebastien Hinault, France,AG2R La
Mondiale, same time.


Appeal court backs


lockout, overturns ruling


By BARRY WILNER
Associated Press

NEW YORK The
8th U.S. Circuit Court of
Appeals on Friday threw
out a judge's order lifting
the NFL lockout, handing
the league a victory as play-.
ers and owners returned to
negotiations.
The ruling was issued
shortly after NFL
Commissioner. Roger
Goodell and NFLPA chief
DeMaurice Smith opened
a second straight day ,of
labor talks at a law firm in
Manhattan.
The court overturned
an April 25 decision by
U.S. District Judge Susan
Richard Nelson that the
lockout should be lifted
because players were suffer-
ing irreparable harm. The
appeals court had already
put that order on hold and
said in its ruling that Nelson
ignored federal law in reach-
ing her decision.
"While we respect the
court's decision, today's
ruling does not change our
mutual recognition that this
matter must be resolved
through negotiation," the
league and NFLPA said in
a joint statement. "We are
committed to our current
discussions and reaching


a fair agreement that will
benefit all parties for years
to come, and allow for a full
2011 season."
During negotiations
Friday the rookie wage
scale and finalizing the
free agency rules were dis-
cussed, according to a per-
son familiar with the talks
who requested anonym-
ity because details are not
being announced publicly.
The appeals court rul-
ing allows the players'
antitrust lawsuit to move
forward, but the court did
.take issue with the NFL
Players Association's deci-
sion to decertify on March
11, a move that cleared the
way for players to file their
still-pending antitrust law-
suit against the league.
"The league and the play-
ers' union were parties to a
collective bargaining agree-
ment for almost, eighteen
years prior to March 2011,"
the appeals court said in
its 2-1 decision. "They
were engaged in collec-
tive bargaining over terms
and conditions of employ-
ment for approximately two
years ... Then, on a single
day, just hours before the
CBA's expiration, the union
discontinued collective bar-
gaining and disclaimed its
status...."


"Whatever the effect of
the union's disclaimer on
the league's immunity from
antitrust liability, the labor
dispute did not suddenly
disappear just because the
players elected to pursue
the dispute through anti-
trust litigation rather than
collective bargaining."
Judges Steven Colloton
and Duane Benton backed
the league Friday, just as
the two Republican appoin-
tees did in two earlier deci-
sions. Judge Kermit Bye,
appointed by a Democrat,
dissented both times, favor-
ing the players, and he did
so again Friday.
Bye had urged settle-
ment of the dispute to avoid
a ruling "both sides aren't
going to like."
The two sides have been
meeting for weeks to try
to reach a new labor pact.
On Friday, NFLPA execu-
tive board President Kevin
Mawae and owners John
Mara of the New York
Giants and Jerry Jones of
the Dallas Cowboys joined,
Goodell and Smith for more
negotiations.
On Thursday, talks
stretched on for more
than 12 hours, deep into
the evening. Some training
camps are set to open in
* two weeks.


SHOWCASE: Concludes on Sunday


Continued From Page 1t

be somewhere most every
weekend, you find times
to take the family along,"
Frew said. "There are
certain (tournaments) you
know you have to go to
and the Jacksonville Storm
does a great job with their
showcase."
Rich Bragg, one of the
tournament directors and a
coach of a 14-under team,
was at the welcoming
desk.
"The winners are .the
kids that get exposure
with all the coaches here,"
Bragg said. "We have
coaches from the smallest
community colleges to
the big boys. We have six
SEC schools here plus
South Florida and Central
Florida."


ACROSS


Driver's fill-up
Wild and reck-
less
Rubbish
Stein filler
End of a threat
Newsman -
Abel
Monroe -
Governess in
Siam
Fix a gash
La Scala site
Forbids
All ears
Less green
Striped ante-
lope
Source of iron
Ms. Dinesen
Hourglass filler
Burrito alterna-
tive
Country addrs.
British inc.
Crusty cheese
Wood strips


Bragg was handing
out player profiles; each
players wears an armband
designating year of
graduation or whether the
player has signed with
a two-year or four-year
school. The information
packet has stats and other
facts about each athlete,.
including academics if the
team provides them.
"We wanted to get
more exposure for female
athletes and this is like
one-stop shopping," Bragg
said. "We put them on eight
fields and the coaches only
have to walk a few yards to
see all of them."
The Storm Showcase
moved from Cecil Field
in Duval County and was
able to double the number


45 Devious
47 Bead
49 Farewell
51 Vote against
55 Just for guys
56 Not certain,
58 Feel sympathy
for
59 Norse god
60 Baby fox
61 Electrical units
62 Chinese ware-
house
63 Workout locale

DOWN

1 Roams around
2 Noted diamond
surname
3 Splinter group
4 Italian auto


of teams in Lake City.
Bragg said it brings in top
players from all over the
Southeast.
"We had limited facilities
in Jacksonville," Bragg
said. "We are able to
showcase a lot more local
teams here. The county
was so much more open to
have us here. They offer a
great facility, the parking is
great and the workers are
so professional."
The Storm Showcase
will continue through
Sunday with games
beginning in the morning.
"Everybody is
guaranteed a certain
amount of games," Bragg
said, "We try to give each
team as much exposure as
possible."


Answer to Previous Puzzle


TRAIP O|DIE WAIN|E
VISIE FO E ALOE
ATTN FOOTGEAR
ZTINGER INCH





[BA'GU EU~o
AIR NEE
HORNS HURRAH
EMIT CADS VAT
PAC MILE MERV
ROTATE BUCKS
HIE BIT
FERN SEDATE
BAG UETTE TOOT
AMOS SAP ETNA
MESH ETS DES 1


SUIFO pilot
6 FICA number 11 Large green par-
7 Crawl with rot
8 Possessive 16 Skimpy top
9 Radius neigh- 20 Not Dem. or
bors Rep.
10 Dingbat 22 Glided along


Want more puzzles?
Check out the "Just Right Crossword Puzzles" books
at QullDrlverBooks.com


24 Spoil
25 401(k) cousin
26 Delt neighbor
28 Hula accom-
paniment
31 r. in Bombay
33 Elev.
34 Utmost
35 Tooth pro's
deg.
37 Does a favor
for
39 Not level
42 Deli bread
44 Client mtg.
45 Weather alert
46 Pocatello's
state
48 Gymnast's
stickum
50 Yikes! (hyph.)
52 Acorn drop-
pers
53 Beauty parlor
sound
54 Jazzy -,James
55 Neill or Walton
57 Tokyo, once


7-9 2011 UFS, Dist. by Univ. Uclick for UFS


SCOREBOARD


Page Editor: Brandon Finley, 754-0420










Page Editor: Brandon Finley, 754-0420


LAKE CITY REPORTER


SPORTS


SATURDAY, JULY 9, 2011


ALL-STARS:- Play today


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Jeff Burton (31), Clint-Bowyer (33), Dale.Earnhardt Jr. (88) and Jimmie Johnson (48) drive on the track during the NASCAR
Coke Zero 400 auto race at Daytona International Speedway in Daytona Beach on Saturday.


Earnhardt, Johnson: no


hard feelings after Daytona.


By WILL GRAVES
Associated Press
SPARTA, Ky. Dale
Earnhardt Jr. heard about
how his fans flooded
Jimmie Johnson's Twitter
page after the five-time
NASCARchampion seemed
to abandon his Hendrick
Motorsports teammate
late in last week's race at
Daytona and couldn't help
but rib the social-media lov-
ing Johnson.
"I called him up and said,
'Now you know why I don't
have Twitter,"' Earnhardt
said Friday at Kentucky
Speedway, where the Cup
series will make its debut
this weekend.
Earnhardt couldn't help
but laugh, even if the fans
of the series' most popu-,
lar driver weren't quite
so forgiving bf Johnson's
late move to- pit for, gas
instead of trying to: nudge
Earnhardt to his first vi;-
tory, in more than three


years.
The duo spent most of
the 460-mile race work-
ing as a two-car tandem,
with Johnson serving as
the pusher much in the
same way Earnhardt
pushed Johnson to victory
at Talladega this spring. '
Yet as the laps dwindled
and the group' of lead-
ers started to pull away,,
Johnson crew chief 'Chad.
Knaus ordered his driver
to pit in hopes that .a little
extra fuel would provide
the difference if the there
were multiple green-white-
checkered finishes.
"It was just do what we
can to get our best finish
and kind of every man for
themselves because .we
were so deep, in the field,"'
Johnson said. /
The decision left
:Earnhardtto fend for himself
and he ended up 19th 'after
getting caught upin a wreck
on the final lap.. Frustrating?
Yes. Johnson's fault' Hardly.


The move didn't exactly help
him either. Johnson came in
20th.
"I figured Jimmie would
still have a good opportu-
nity to get up to me and
help us and pretty much
we were in fine shape until
people forgot how to drive
or people thought they
could disobey the laws
of physics 'or whatever
they were trying, to do,"'
Earnhardt said. "The cau-
tion was out. It was a good
time to go to pit road."
The disappointing night'
continued a mid-summer
swoon by Earnhardt. He's
finished no better than
19th in any of his last three
races, dropping him down
to seventh in the stand-
ings with two months to go
before the Chase for the
championship begins.
'It's hardly time to panic,
but it's not exactly the direc-
tion. Earnhardt would like
to be going as the series
enters the dog days.


"I hate what's happened*
the last couple weeks,"
Earnhardt said. "I have
some regrets. Maybe I
shouldn't have beat up the
car so much." : '
'And maybe, he allows,
his fans shouldn't:beat up
so much on Johnson, a
recent Twitter convert .
"I don't kijow if I
should be that surprised
at anything the fans (say),
because they're passionate
you know," Earnhardt said.
"They get it in their minds
what they think is right and
what they think happened
,and they get up and run
with.it." .
Johnson was quick to
point out that he received
pleint of positive feedback.
from Earnhardt support-
ers, and declared the deci-
sion to pit a'non-issue. It
didn't even come up during'
the weekly Tuesday team-
wide call.
"It was pretty cut arid
dry," Earnhardt said.


Continued From Page 11
challenger will have to beat
Lake City twice.
That challenger will be
set Saturday morning. Jax
Beach and Orange Park
played late Friday, with the
winner playing Julington
Creek to determine an
opponent for Lake City.
The Stars had Lake City
on the ropes, but could not
finish it off and Lake City
made them pay.
Lake City scored two
runs in the top of the sixth
inning to tie the game at 11-,
all. Julington Creek needed
only score one run in the
bottom of the inning to
win. The first two batters
reached base, but Lake City
left them stranded at sec-
ond and third.
In the first extra inning,
Mikah Gustavson ,got it
started for Lake City with
a one-out hit. Tyler Shelnut
was safe on a slow roller
to second. Sammy Walker
followed with an RBI-single
and Lance Minson added a
single to load the bases.
The Stars got a force out
at the.plate, then Grayson
Martin worked a wa)k to
send in a run. Hunter Shoup
followed with a shot by the
third. baseman to score two,
more runs in what proved
to be the final margin.
Shelnut had a single
Sand bases-loaded triple in
Lake City's ,seven-run third
inning. He opened the game
with a double and scored
two runs. Walker also had
three hits and scored three
runs. Minson had a two-run
triple to go with two singles
and scored three runs:
Martin'and Shoup both
had two hits and two RBIs.
Cal Gilliam had a hit, RBI
and run scored. Gustavson
scored two runs. Kameron
Couey had an RII and
scored a run. Garrett
Fennell scored two runs.
Fennell pitched, the final
two innings.


Luke Ussery had three
hits for the Stars with two
RBIs and a run scored. C.J.
Brockmeier (three runs
scored) and Logan Flores
(double, RBI, run' scored)
each had two hits.
Lake City's 11-under team
was stymied by Michael
Styron. The Crush pitcher
fired a two-hitter and sat
down 13 batters in a row
during one stretch.
Noah Tuten led off the top
of the second inning with
a single. He stole second
base and went to third on a
wild pitch; Caleb Strickland
reached base on a bunt,
but Tuten had to stay at
third. Micah Krieghauser
followed with another bunt
to score Tuten.
Lake City, went quietly
until Dylan Blair singled
with two outs in the sixth
inning.
The Crush wiped out
Lake City's 1-0 lead with five
runs in the bottom of the
second inning. Three :hits
and a walk scored one run
and set up Chris Chaftdh
who blasted a grand slam.-
In Friday's 11-under divi-
sion action, Myers Park
beat Julingtop. Creek and
Wakulla beat Orange Park
to set up-a meeting, at 9 a.m.
today. .
Jax Beach beat Bradford
County in an eliiniation
,game and played.Julington
Creek in a late .game.
Orange Park will face the
winner at 11 a.m. today and
there will be another elimi-
nation game at 1 p.mrn;,
The championship game
is; scheduled for 9 a.m.
Sunday.
Metidian,: Park and
Orange Park played a
game late Friday in the
under-11/60 division. A
Meridain win would seal the
championship. An Orange
Park win would bring on an
if-needed game at 11 a.m.
'today.


JETER: Is a five-time champion


Continued From Page 1B


His fielding was worse
fans behind first base
would start ducking when
balls bounced to him, afraid
the scatter-armed shortstop
* would zing another throw
into the seats.
.From failure to the face
of perhaps the most famous
franchise in sports, the
Kid from Kalamazoo and
captain of the New York
' Yankees was two. hits away
from becoming only the
28th player in baseball his-
tory to get No. 3,000 enter-
ing Friday's game against
Tampa Bay.
All in a blink of those
cool, /green eyes. At least it
sometimes seems that way.
"It wasn't a goal of mine. I
didn't set out for that," Jeter
said as he approached the
milestone: "You set out to
play. You set out to get here
and you try to stay as long
as you can and tsy to be
consistent."'
Trying times lately. His
frame a bit thicker and his
hair a bit thinner, the hits
are harder to come by. The
Steroids Era never shad-
owed the Jeter Era, and at
37 it's not natural for play-
ers to get better with age,
Jeter got his 2,0098th
career hit Thursday night,
lining a double hi~ iret time
up against Tampa Bay. New
York hag thiee games left
at Yankee Stadium before
the AllWta6 break, atd he
datiitely want1 to 6 4 t it
home.
WMAtNs uext te he 6& ete


h *t te z W&






*f(ire ham. h *


All-Star and has gotten
more hits' than anyone in
team history. In an age of
straying free agents, he has'
stayed true to the Bronx.
That said, lots of ardent
*Jeter fins readily admit
that he's absent on the
team's Mount Rushmore.
Babe Ruth,' Lou Gehrig,
Joe' DiMaggio and Mickey
Mantle probably are at the
top.
Still, to many of this gen-
eration, Jeter represents
all that is good about the
game.
He called his manager
"Mr. Torre" without sound-
ing corny. He told then-
President George W. Bush
to throw a ceremonial first
ball from the mound and
"don't bounce it" without
sounding cocky. He talked
to young boys and girls
from the on-deck circle
without sounding phony.
He's remained ground-
ed, as much as anyone
could while growing into a



Unscramble these four Jumble i
one letter to each square,
to form four ordinary words
SAHRBO i

iOMI Ttbure Medift&Wt 'ItC

SUSIHS _

I T


Yankees great.
Umpire crew chief Tim
Welke, raised in the same
hometown, recalled a game
when there was a pitching
change and Jeter was on
second base. As the new
reliever warmed up, Jeter
wanted to talk sports with
Welke. Not'baseball, but
high school football.
"What about the new
coach "at Kalamazoo
Gefitral?" Jeter asked.
Relaxed, seemingly obliv-
ious to pressure. The all-
time leader in postseason
hits, in fact. It's a routine
that's become an October
ritual: He steps into the
batter's box, raises his right
hand to ask the umpire for
time to get set, waggles his
shiny black bat, .and then
whacko!
"We've always tried to
-keep things in a positive
perspective that doesn't
mean we're not realistic,"
said Charles Jeter, Derek's
dad.

THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME
by David L, Hoyt and Jeff Knurek


I ipLh4 A V"' -56&ifO

SC re i 'c V ,
M'O'', a,'i'al,*P pn, ,E ,'.*de l 'iIll~rt
fC, 'firt.T fl-'i.. ,,',',i=.lp .'.q npn'or ;.-,-
T Ir.'.yt~ ', 1, [_,* irIi. ir,,.'( ,sr', -,i"


y S^I', ,* ,PP.h' 'h," "' ih h,-.irnr,
I= 'F' r :' ', ;. as -- ,Q,:,T'F_ fIf E ,'_,


Reader's Choice


CUTEST BABY



CONTEST
1sT, 2ND & 3RD Place Prizes to be Awarded for Boys & Girls!

AGES 0-24 MONTHS
Send in the most adorable photograph of your child,
up to 24 months of age, and you could win!
TO ENTER:
Bring your baby's picture along with entry fee ($30.00) WANT TO ENTER ONLINE?
to the Lake City Reporter,180 E. Duval St., mall to You can 0-ml your
photo and Infonmiaton to
P.O. Box 1700, Lake City, FL 32056. adshtkedtpnforter.onto
SSublect dlin: BABY CONTEST
All pictures will be published in the Lake City m a
Reporter's July 17, 2011 edition. All voting bal-
Iots must be returned to the paper by July 25,
2011. So show off your child, grandchild,
godchild, niece or nephew. ,.
ThIe wimners will be published on July 31, 2011

DEADLINE:
J1Iuy 14"h, 20111

pf r W1@ I Ii ff" h W wir w O_ at

V{flb_?ft/ *IV Y '54IOW 1


I4 WI # Of-,- -m. --"-"--- -. ' U -- - - --- - .- ---


11 M. ,. ..,..-- -, ., ini i .iim-
. . -- .. . o










4B LAKE CITY REPORTER ADVICE & COMICS


DILBERT


BABY BLUES


BLONDIE


BEETLE BAILEY


HAGARTHE HORRIBLE


DEAR ABBY


Tween girl feels her life is


over before eighth grade


DEAR ABBY: I'm only
12 and I feel like my life
is ending. I just finished
seventh grade, I don't have
many friends and I feel like
the ones I do have don't
really care.
I do gymnastics and
volleyball, but my friends
there don't really care,
either. My family is no
help. My sisters are too-.
busy with their friends and
boys to care. My parents
don't know anything about
me. On top of that, there's
a boy I like who acts like
I don't exist What should
I do? FRIENDLESS IN
MICHIGAN
DEAR FRIENDLESS: I
find it interesting that when
people write to me, it's often
the LAST thing in their let-
ters that's the crux of the
problem. I'm sorry your
love life isn't going well at
the moment, but your life
isn't "over." In fact, it's just
beginning. Everyone has
days when they feel alone
in the crowd even kids
who are popular.
Your parents have known
you all your life. If they
don't yet know the person
you're becoming, it may
be because you haven't let
them. They have experi-
enced much of what you're
going through, and I'm sure
they'll be glad to share their
wisdom if they're given the
chance.


Abigail Van Buren
www.deorobby.com
As to the guy you lfke,
he may be shy or not yet
ready. for romance. Give
him some time to grow up
and appreciate you, and he
may start to like you, too.
DEAR ABBY: For the
past 10 years or so, at bridal
and baby showers I have
attended, blank envelopes
have been handed to guests
upon arrival with instruc-
tions to self-address them.
This, apparently, saves the
gift recipient time having
to address envelopes to the
gift-givers.
I usually set the envelope
aside and don't fill it out,
but last week the guest of
honor's mother handed me
an envelope and pen and
stood there until I complet-
ed the task.
After spending time
and money shopping for
pnd paying for a gift, I feel
insulted having to address
my own thank-you enve-
lope!
Can you think of an appro-
priate response when I'm
asked to participate in this
insulting new party ritual?


HOROSCOPES


B.C.


ONL-(Y IF IT POssN'T CLASH VlWTH
THE ecCm'S cL-OWNoM SUIT.


FRANK & ERNEST


ARIES. (March 21-April
19): If you try to cram
too much into your day,
you will fall short when
it comes to quality. A bur-
den or demand will slow
you down. Take proper
care of your health and
well-being or you will not
be able to finish your to-do
list. ***
TAURUS (April 20-May
20): Concentrate on get-
ting rid of old habits. The
more versatile yqu are
and the more time you
spend improving skills
that can be incorporated
into your professional
advancement, the better
you will feel. ***.
GEMINI (May 21-June
20): Before you jump in and
blurt out what's on your
mind, consider whether
your disclosure will hurt
someone. You can make
a good impression if you
handle matters with diplo-
macy. ***
CANCER (June 21-July
22): Today is all about
looking good and doing
even better. Focus on your
appearance .and the people
you love the most. A short
trip or activity that is chal-
lenging will help motivate
you to turn one of your
ideas or skills into a service
you can offer for a profit

LEO (July 23-Aug. 22):


THE LAST WORD
Eugenia Last

Avoid any type of contro-
versy that may cause a prob-
lem at home or with some-
one you love. Situations will
get blown out of proportion
if you aren't sensitive to
what those around you are
going through or feeling.

VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept.
22): Do what you can to
pick up information or find
an alternative way to raise
your income. Attending a
seminar or trade show or
traveling to visit someone,
you always learn some-
thing from will pay off.

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct.
22): Attending a function
that interests you will
enable you to connect with
someone who shares your
sentiments and wants to
make improvements that
are more conducive to
achieving your life goals.
Love is highlighted. ***
SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov.
21): Make choices that
will allow you to put more
into your home or your
community. Someone new
may be enticing but prob-
ably will take advantage of
you if given the chance.
Pick and choose your
allies with care. ***
SAGITTARIUS (Nov.


22-Dec. 21): Helping an
organization you believe
in will bring you ben-
efits. There is money to
be made and potential.
contracts, settlements or
proposals that offer you
greater security in the
future. A change at home
will pay off. ***
CAPRICORN (Dec.
22-Jan. 19): Expand your
networking potential by
marketing yourself to a
wider variety of business-
es or end users. Love is on
the rise, and romancing
someone you fancy will
bring you high returns.

AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-
Feb. 18): Itns .time to
make a smart move that
will help ease stress. You
can stabilize your finan-
cial situation if you pare
down and get rid of some
of the overhead you have
been carrying. Don't let
an emotional attachment
to something or someone
cost you. **
PISCES (Feb. 19-March
20): You can make a trade
or invest in something
that will help you get
ahead financially. Single
or not, you should spend
time doing something
that will enhance your
love life. Financial gain is
heading in your direction.
****4*


CELEBRITY CIPHER

by Luis Campos
Celebrity Cipher cryptograms are created from quotations by famous people, past and present.
Each letter in the cipher stands for another.
Today's clue: U equals B
"S WPJZ TYJJ. JSULE AZG DZSEN
TYJJYGIJD SGV XKSAYZGAJD CLE DLP,
CLE AF Z KEYHYJZIZ LC OYXOYGI DLP
LGXZ." TYJJYSW CSPJOGZE
PREVIOUS SOLUTION: "We protect aspirin bottles in this country better than
we protect guns from accidents by children." Gloria Estefan
(c) 2011 by NEA, Inc. 7-9


FOR BETTER OR WORSE
I DoNL- 'T I SR
Ddl-l&VC. IT: 1 HC I -TiF
MOf'OJFK SV&RIE& 9' ..
FSHreTLLTHS E-' '
B5U e-riD -
,.SHE oES I---o
OUT W ^
Hm O 9
H.._if,


CLASSIC PEANUTS


D) AR -MIS" KNoW. IT-ALL-
CAN A WOMAAN WEAR A WHITE & W'N
FOR HER FIFTH 4AAA-RIA&E P




I .- 702011 John L Hart FLP


SATURDAY, JULY 9, 2011


Or should I stay quiet and
accept that most people are
ignorant regarding good
manners? -- INSULTED
IN OHIO
DEAR INSULTED:
How about this for a
response: "After spending
my time shopping for a gift,
and my hard-earned money
to pay for it, it is insulting to
be expected to address my
own thank-you envelope. If
she likes the gift, she can
address the envelope her-
self. If not, she can return
the gift to me."
DEAR ABBY: Please
tell parents and teach-
ers to warn children that
when they walk on the
roads to walk facing the
traffic. We have come up
behind many people walk-
ing with their backs to the
traffic, some of whom are
listening to music or talk-
ing on their cellphones and
don't even know anyone is
around. -- COLLETIE IN
NEWBURGH, MAINE
DEAR COLLETIE: I'm
pleased to print your warn-
ing. There is a name for
pedestrians who do as you
have described and aren't
aware of their surround-
ings or impending danger.
It's "casualty."

* Write .Dear Abby at
www.DearAbby.com or
P.O. Box 69440, Los
Angeles, CA 90069.












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In Print and Online
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Legal

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
THIRD JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN
AND FOR COLUMBIA COUNTY,
FLORIDA
CIVIL ACTION
CASE NO.: 12-2010-CA-000317
DIVISION:
WELLS FARGO BANK, NA,
Plaintiff,
VS.
DEBRA SUE BROWN A/K/A DE-
BRA BROWN, et al,
Defendant(s)
NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE
SALE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pur-
suant to a Final Judgment of Mort-
gage Foreclosure dated June 23,
2011 and entered in Case No. 12-
2010-CA-000317 of the Circuit
Court of the THIRD Judicial Circuit
in and for COLUMBIA County,
Florida wherein WELLS FARGO
BANK, NA, is the Plaintiff and DE-
BRA SUE BROWN A/K/A DEBRA
BROWN; EDWARD MICHAEL
BROWN A/K/A EDWARD
BROWN; THREE RIVERS ES-
TATES PROPERTY OWNERS,
INC.; TENANT #1 N/K/A JOSHUA
BROWN N/K/A JOSHUA BROWN
and TENANT #2 N/K/A SHAN-
NON KINARD N/K/A SHANNON
KINARD are the Defendants, The
Clerk of the Court will sell to the
highest and best bidder for cash at
FRONT STEPS OF THE COLUM-
BIA COUNTY COURTHOUSE at
11:00 AM, on the 27th day of July,
2011, the following described proper-
ty as set forth in said Final Judg-
ment:
LOT 8, BLOCK 2, THREE RIVERS
ESTATES, UNIT NO. 23, AS PER
PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN
PLAT BOOK 4, PAGE 80 AND
80A, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS
OFIA LUMBIA COUNTY, FLOR-
IDA'
TOGETHER WITH A MOBILE
HOME LOCATED THEREON AS
A FIXTURE AND APPURTE-
NANCE THERETO
THERE IS A MOBILE HOME AF-
FIXED TO THE SUBJECT PROP-
ERTY 2005 KING, ID NO.
N811792A/N811792B, TITLE NO.
93097056/93096938.
A/K/A 1030 SW KENTUCKY
STREET, FORT WHITE, FL 32038
Any person claiming an interest in
the surplus from the sale, if any, oth-
er than the property owner as of the
date of the Lis Pendens must file a
claim within sixty (60) days after the
sale.
WITNESS MY HAND and the seal
of this Court on June 27, 2011.
P. DeWitt Cason
Clerk of the Circuit Court
By:/s/ B. Scippio
Deputy Clerk
NOTICE
If you are a person with a disability
who needs any accommodation in
order to participate in this proceed-
ing, you are entitled, at no cost to
you, to the provision of certain assis-
tance. Please contact Carrina Cooper,
Court Administration at 173 NE Her-
nando Avenue, Room 408, Lake
City, Florida 32055, 386-758-2163 at
least 7 days before your scheduled
court appearance, or immediately
upon receiving this notification if the
time before the scheduled appear-
ance is less than 7 days; if you are
hearing or voice impaired, call 711.
Florida Default Law Group, P.L.
P.O. Box 25018
Tampa, Florida 33622-5018
F10032112 NMNC-SPECFHLMC-
Team 5.
05526432
July 9, 16, 2011

Public Auction to be held
July 30, 2011 at 8AM at
Ozzie's Towing & Auto,' 2492 SE
Baya Ave. Lake City FL, 32025.
(386)719-5608
Following Vin Numbers:
90 Honda
Vin # 46GED041XL2041929
05526524
July 9, 2011


020 Lost & Found

FOUND BLACK PUPPY: On the
hospital side of Lake Desoto on
07/04/11, by the Gazebo.
Call (386)965-5707 to identify

Lost Dog: Black dog w/white
chest. Border Collie. Missing since
07/04 Hilton/Desoto. Name: Ali-
zaya. Cash reward. 386-292-3846
Missing dog. $200 Reward.
Thurs., 6/30. Aprox 25-301b Fe-
male, 15 yr old, black/white Bos-
ton Terrier. Last seen close to
Quail Heights. Has a scar between
her front legs. Call 386-754-6670


Land Clearing

Back Hoe, Dozer, Chopping, root
raking, bush hog, seeding, sod,
disking, site prep, ponds &
irrigation. Free Est! 386-623-3200

Lawn & Landscape Service

Clean Pine Straw,
You pick it up, $1.85 a bale
Delivery of 100 bales $260
386-688-9156

Services

DIVORCE, BANKRUPTCY,
RESUMES.
other court approved forms-
386-961-5896.

We come to you! Auto Detailing:
Wash, wax & vaccum. Pressure
Wash: Houses, mobile homes,
driveways, decks. 386-697-2224


10 0 Opportunities

05526472
Activities Assistant
Must be CNA, and able to work
2-3 weekdays and most
weekends. Applicant
must be dependable, motivated
and energetic. Full time
position. Please apply Baya
Pointe Nursing & Rehabilitation
Center 587 SE Ermine Ave.,
Lake City, Fl 32025
EOE/DFWP

Associate Reps
SUMMER WORK/GREAT PAY
Immediate FT/PT openings,
Customer sales/service,
No exp needed, conditions,
Apply Now all ages 17+
(386) 269-0883
ATTN: Team Drivers needed for
dedicated acct. contracted by
Swift, CDL required, Six months
exp., Call Shawn 904-517-4620
Aurora Diagnostics;
Administrative Assistant desired;
HR, AP, and clerical experience
preferred.
Fax resume to 386-719-9596
CDL Class A Truck Drivek.
Flatbed exp. for F/T SE area.
3 years exp or more. Medical
benefits offered. Contact
Melissa or Mary @ 386-935-2773
Industrial Maintenance
Technician, Experience Required
in Electrical, Controls and General
Millwright/ Mechanical work.
Experience in Hydraulics and
Pneumatics helpful. Send resume
to Maintenance Technician, 3631
US 90 East, Lake City Fl 32055.
2 Temporary Farm Workers
needed. Employer: OHL Farm
Businesses LLC Fleming Co.,
KY. Nursery Production &
Alternative Work. Employment
Dates: 09/01/11 12/21/11. Wage
of $9.48/hr. Worker guaranteed
3/4 of contract hours. Tools
provided at no cost. Free housing
provided to non commuting
workers. Transportation &
subsistence reimbursed when
50% of contract is met. Apply for
this job at the nearest KY Office of
Employment & Training Division
of Workforce & Employment
Services Office referencing the job
order #KY0430922.
05526490
LINCARE, leading national
respiratory company seeks
results driven Sale
Representative. Create working
relationships with MD's, nurses.
social workers and articulate our
excellent patient care with
attentive listening skills.
Competitive Base + un-capped
commission. Drug-free
workplace. EOE.
Fax resume to center manager
(386)754-2795


Sales Position available for moti-
vated individual Rountree -Moore
Toyota, Great benefits, paid train-
ing/vacation. Exp. a plus but not
necessary. Call Anthony Cosentino
386-623-7442

REPORTER Classifieds
In Print and On Line
www.lakecityreporter.com


1 Medical
120 Employment

RN's needed. Local med-surg
ER hospital shifts. Immediate
work, instant pay, $300 sign-on
bonus. Call 352-336-0964
Lake City & Live Oak area.
www.suwanneemedical.com

240 Schools &
S Education

04544843
Interested in a Medical Career?
Express Training offers
courses for beginners & exp
Nursing Assistant, $479
next class-07/11/10
Phlebotomy national certifica-
tion, $.800 next class-07/11/11
Continuing education
Fees incl. books, supplies, exam
fees. Call 386-755-4401 or
expresstrainingservices.com


310 Pets & Supplies

4 beautiful black & white. 10 wk
old kittens w/crystal emerald
green eyes. Litter box trained.
Wormed and Flea Free!
Free to good homes. 386-755-1794
FREE TO Good Home. 1 Golden
Lab. 1 Chichuahua/JRT Mix.
4 kittens, 8 weeks old and 1 young
mama cat. (352)283-2488
KITTENS. 4 white and 1 long
haired black. Had 1st shots. 10
weeks old. Cute & spunky!
$25.00. ea. 386-961-8909
PUBLISHER'S NOTE
Florida Law 828.29 requires dogs
and cats being sold to be at least 8
weeks olndand have a health
certificate from a licensed
veterinarian documenting they
have mandatory shots and are
free from intestinal and external
parasites. Many species of wild-
life must be licensed by Florida
Fish and Wildlife. If you are
unsure, contact the local
office for information.

330 Livestock&




386-719-4802


361 Farm Equipment

84 Ford 4610 Tractor.
2WD, Solid
2005 motor,$7,500. OBO
386-867-0005


402 Appliances

Frost Free Refrigerator.
Works great
$200.
386-292-3927 or 386-755-5331.


GE Dishwasher
Works great $90.
386-292-3927 or
386-755-5331.


402 Appliances
NEW 18 cu ft White Refrigerator
/bought for a buisness/was too
large/used 4 hrs !
$350 OBO 863-258-1049
Small used freezer.
Works good.
$50.00
SOLD
Whirlpool washing machine.
Works great, come see.
$100.
386-755-3682

407 Computers
Compaq Computer, Many extras.
Complete Computer
$80.00
386-755-9984 or 386-292-2170

408 Furniture
Love Seat.
Good shape. $35.
Beige background with stripes
386-292-3927 or 386-755-5331.

416 Sporting Goods
Golf Clubs. Mens RH. Complete
set. 8 irons, cougar, 2 wedges, 2
putters, 4 woods, Excellent bag.
$250. 386-758-7550 or 397-4629

420 Wanted to Buy
K&H TIMBER
We Buy Pine Hardwood &
Cypress. Large or small tracts.
Call 386-961-1961.
Wanted Junk Cars, Trucks, Vans.
$250 & up CASH! Free Pick Up!
NO title needed !386-878-9260
After 5pm 386- 752-3648.

430 Garage Sales
1564 NW Frontier Dr.
Lake City Country Club.
Lots of clothes, boys & ladies.
Saturday, July 9th. 8-12
Cleaning out, moving on. Inside &
out. Furn., clothing, computers,
Haviland China & more. Fri 8-5.
Sat 8-1. 493 NW Clubview Cr.
MOVING SALE. Sat. 8-? Lots of
Good Stuff. Grandview, right onto
Lake Montgomery Dr. Left to 493
SW San Juan, last house on left.
PUBLISHER'S NOTE
All Yard Sale Ads
Must be Pre-Paid.

Saturday, July 9th 7am ?
575 NW Gwen Lake Ave. Turn off
Hwy 90 by the Stop & Go.
Bike, clothes, household, Misc.

440 Miscellaneous
HIGH WHEEL Pushmower
$85.00
386-292-3927 or
386-755-5331.
Sony Playstation 2 System.
Memory card, one controller.
5 games. In good condition.
$95.00 386-984-7510


440 Miscellaneous
Stop gnat & Mosquito bites! Buy
Swamp Gator All natural insect re-
pellent. Family safe. Use head to
toe. Available at The Home Depot.
Summer Barbecue Special
Tow Behind
Grill/Smoker, $1,250 OBO.
386-7194802

630 Mobile Homes
630 for Rent
2&3 BR MH. $395 $650. mo.
plus deposit. Water & sewer fur-
nished. Cannon Creek MHP
386-752-6422
2/2 Units, clean, well maintained,
nice safe park setting, 2 miles to
downtown Lake City, $575 month
+ $575 sec dep, 386-984-8448
13th Month FREE!!
3/1 w/security system. $800.mo .
Also, small home on 10 ac. $400.
Ft. White area. Avail 8/1. Call for
more deatils. 386-497-1464
3/2 DWMH, 1/2 ac. Shaded lot.
Paved Rd, 2 porches, 50'X50'
fenced small dog run. $600. mo +
$750 dep. References Req'd.
386-758-7184 or 984-0954
3/2 S of Lake City, (Branford area)
$575 month plus security
386-590-0642 or 386-867-1833,
www.suwanneevalleyproperties.com
4 bedroom Denr, w/d hook up. In
Ft. White. Appliance included.
$800. mo. $500. sec. Call Billie
386-754-6970 or 404-849-8277
Clean 2br/2ba on 5 acres. Nice un-
furnished MH w/well water. Coun-
try setting just north of LC. $400.
mo. 1st, last & sec. (954)818-4481 .
Mobile Homes for rent in
White Springs, Lake City & Ft.
White. Contact 386-623-3404
or 386-365-1919
Nice clean 2&3 bdrm, Five Points, ,
NO PETS,
also 3 bd on the
Westside, 386-961-1482
X-Clean 2/2 SW, 8 mi NW of VA.
Clean acre lot, nice area. $500. mo
+ dep No dogs Non-smoking
environment.386-961-9181

A640 Mobile Homes
6 for Sale
Handy man special, 94 Fleetwood
DWMH. 3/2 on 5 acres in Ft.
White. Owner Fin. $3,000 dn.
$850mo. $99,900 352-215-1018
www.LandOwnerFinancing.com
PALM HARBOR Homes Has
Closed 2 Model Centers. Save up
to 60K on select models
Call Today! 800-622-2832
NEW D/W Reduced Thousands.
3br/2ba set, delivery, A/C
skirting, steps. $39,900.
Call Ken (386)754-8844
AS IS, WHERE IS...32X80, 4/2,
LR/Den, needs carpet, paint, 2400
sqft. has metal roof, vinyl siding.
$31,000. Randy 386-754-0198
FIRE YOUR LANDLORD,
TO OWN WHAT YOUR
THROWING AWAY IN RENT.
CALL MIKE 386-754-8844
NEW 32X70 4/3.2K sqft+. L/R,
DenSidex side, glasstop range,
D/W. Del, set, Steps, A/C, skirt-
ing. $59,900. Ken (386)754-8844


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Classified Department: 755-5440


LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED SATURDAY, JULY 9, 2011


64 Mobile Homes
640 for Sale
OWNER FINANCE 40% Down
w/land Equity or CASH on any
new or used singlewide or Double-
wide. Randy 386-754-0198
The Economy has forced
me to cut the price on my
3 bedroom, 2 bath home to
$38K (352)-870-5983

705 Rooms for Rent
New furnished bedroom apt in a
home, private entrance & bath, in-
cludes utilities, trash, cable, frig &
pest control. $450 mo + dep. Avail
8/1. 386-752-2020 SW Lake City
710 Unfurnished Apt.
1 For Rent








Excellent High Springs location.
1, 2 & 3 bedroom floor-plans;
Call 386-454-1469
some with garages.
or visit our website:
www.springhivilvillage.net
1 bedroom Apartment. Quiet,
Private street. $400. mo
plus security deposit.
386-344-3715
1BR APT.
Downtown Location, Clean.
$450 mo, plus Security.
NO PETS. Call 386-755-3456
2/1 w/garage & washer/dryer
hookups. East side of town,
Call for details
386-755-6867
2BR/1.5BA w/garage
5 minutes from VA hospital.
Call for details.
386-755-4590 or 365-5150
A Landlord You Can Love!
2 br Apts $575. & up + sec. Great
area. CH/A washer/dryer hookups.
386-758-9351/352-208-2421


Furnished or unfurnished
Townhomes on the golf course.
$750. mo. plus security. Includes
water.386-752-9626
NICE APT Downtown. Remod-
eled 1 bedroom. Kitchen, dining,
living room. $450. mo plus sec.
386-362-8075 or 386-754-2951








Summer Special! 12th mo Free
w/signed yr lease. Updated, w/tile
floors/fresh paint. Great area.
From $450.+sec. 386-752-9626
The Lakes Apts. Studios & lBr's
from $135/wk. Util. & cable incl.,
Sec 8 vouchers accepted, monthly
rates avail Call 386-752-2741

720 Furnished Apts.
7 V For Rent
1br Apt. includes water, elec, &
cable. $595. mo. Good area. 7
minutes from town.'References &
sec. req'd. No pets. 386-719-4808
Rooms for Rent. Hillcrest, Sands,
Columbia. All furnished. Electric,
cable, fridge, microwave. Weekly
or monthly rates. 1 person $135,
2 persons $150. weekly
386-752-5808

730 Unfurnished
7 Home For Rent
lbr/1.5ba Country Cottage, Cathe-
dral ceilings, brick fireplace, wash-
er/dryer,1 ac fenced, private, some
pets, lease. 1st, last, sec, ref. Lake
City area $650mo. 352-494-1989
lbr/lba Free ele. Utilities incl. 4mi
S. Lake City. $300dep. $375mo.
386-590-0642 or 386-867-1833
www.suwanneevalleyproperties.com
2br Private Country
Home. Remodeled,
everything is new. Large yard.
386-752-1444

/ 11208 73rd Ct. Live Oak..
4/3 brick home in a country
subdivision $700./ mo + security
/ 204 NW Guerdon
Rd...Brand new 3/2 home re-
duped to $700./mo + security
/ 250 SW Wise Dr..3/2 Execu-
tive home in restricted Wise Es-
tates. $1350./mo + secuirty
/ 390 SW Wilshire Dr...
Gorgeous upscale 3/2 on
culdesac in Callaway
$1300./mo + security
/ COMING SOON! 4/2 brick
home in Springfield Estates on
Brandy Way. Call for additional
information!
Call Kayla Carbona @
386-623-9650


zuu0 Yamana
VStar 650
11,000 miles, blue with
ghost flames, runs
great, new battery
Price Reduced to $2,800
Call
386-752-9645


730 Unfurnished
730 Home For Rent
3/2 House, pet-friendly, $850 mo.
Broker-Owner, Details at
www.johnstanford.com/
putnam.html. 386-755-5936
3bedroom/2bath in town
No Pets!
$650. mo. plus deposit
386-758-0057
3br/1.5ba. Very clean, CH/A
Fenced (privacy) large back yard.
Nice area/location. $750. mo $750.
dep. Ref's req'd. (941)920-4535
Completely remodeled Brick.
3br/2ba 1750 sqft. Lg lot. Includes
washer, dryer, stove, & fridge.
$985. mo $985 dep. 386-752-7578
Family Home 3/2, Ir, dr, fain rm
w/ fp,garage, fenced back yd.
Nice area. $1100 mo + dep Martha
Jo Khachigan, Realtor 623-2848
Unfurnished 2 bedroom/I bath
house. $700.00 per month.
First, last and security Firm.
386-590-5333

750 Business &
750 Office Rentals
FOR LEASE: Downtown office
space. Convenient to
Court house.
Call 396-755-3456
For Lease: E Baya Ave. Two -
1000 sqft office space units or
combined for 2000 sqft. 386-984-
0622 or weekends 386-497-4762


OFFICE SPACE for lease.
Oak Hill Plaza. 900 sqfl
$675mo/$695. sec dep.
Tom 386-961-1086 DCA Realtor


790 Vacation Rentals
Horseshoe Beach Scalloping Spcl
Gulf Front 2br, w/lg porch, dock,
fish sink. wkend $395./wk $895.
386-235-3633/352-498-5986
alwaysonvacation.com #419-181
"Florida's Last Frontier"

805 Lots for Sale
1/4 acre, new well, septic and
power, paved rd, owner fin, no
down pym't, $24,900,
($256 month) 352-215-1018
www.LandOwnerFinancing.com


PUBLISHER'S NOTE
All real estate advertising in this
newspaper is subject to the fair
housing act which makes it illegal
to advertise "any preference,
limitation, or discrimination based
on race, color, religion, sex,
disability, familial status or nation-
al origin; or any intention to make
such preference, limitation or
discrimination." Familial status
includes children under the age of
18 living with parents or legal
custodians, pregnant women and
people securing custody of chil-
dren under the age of 18. This
newspaper will not knowingly
accept any advertising for real es-
tate which is in violation of the
law. Our readers are hereby in-
formed that all dwellings adver-
tised in this newspaper are availa-
ble on an equal opportunity basis.
To complain of discrimination call
HUD toll free at 1-800-669-9777,
the toll free
telephone number to the hearing
impaired is 1-800-927-9275.

810 Home for Sale
Handyman Special
Off Turner Rd. 2br/1.5ba.
Half acre fenced lot w/shed.
Asking $55,000. (352)335-8330
OPEN HOUSE Sunday 2-4pm.
4br/2ba house in Plantation S/D
965 NW Savannah Cr.
Call (719)214-2181 for info.

820 Farms&
2O Acreage
10-ac lot. Well/septic/pp. Owner
financing $300 dn, $663 mo 8.9%,
25 yrs. Deas Bullard Properties
386-752-4339 www.landnfl.com
4 1/2 acre lot. Lake Jeffery Road.
Gorgeous Oaks!Paved Rd
Owner Financing! NO DOWN!
'$59,900. $525mo 352-215-1018.
www.LandOwnerFinancing.com
4. acres, Wellborn, New Well
installed, Beautifully wooded
w/cleared Home Site, owner fin,
no down, $39,900, $410 mon
Call 352-215-1018
www.LandOwnerFinancing.com
FARM- 7 stall barn, Apt.
17+ acres cross fenced.
Close in $895. mo.
386-961-1086
8 Commercial
8 0 v Property

05526409
FOR SALE LAKE CITY
FORMER 84 LUMBER Zoned
Commercial Intensive on
4.2 +/- Acres with an 18,300
S.F. main building at 1824 W.
US Highway 90; contact
Crystal 724 228-3636 x 1349
4 UNIT Apt. Bldg. All 1/1/ w/ex-
tra rooms. Clean, good tenants and
remodeled. Downtown. $160,000.
386-362-8075 or 754-2951


2006 Toyota Scion
XB
41,000 mi.
Paid over $24,000 new.
$13,000
Call
386-752-1313
904-718-6747


8 0 Real Estate
870 Wanted
I Buy Houses
CASH!
Quick Sale Fair Price
386-269-0605


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worth of all the
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has to offer:
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2006 EF250
Ford Van
3/4 ton, metal work
shelves/ladder rack,
60K miles, exc. cond.
$10,500
Call
S386-555-5555
If you don't sell your vehicle
during the first 10 days, you
can run the same vehicle ad
for 10 additional days for
only $15.00
Terms and conditions remain the
same for the additional run.


1986 Chevy Monte
Carlo SS
78k miles, one owner.
All original.
$10,000
Call
386-752-1313
904-718-6747


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