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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028308/01602
 Material Information
Title: The Lake City reporter
Uniform Title: Lake City reporter (Lake City, Fla. 1967)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: John H. Perry
Place of Publication: Lake City Fla
Publication Date: 7/8/2011
Frequency: daily (monday through friday)[<1969>-]
weekly[ former 1967-<1968>]
daily
normalized irregular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Lake City (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Columbia County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Columbia -- Lake City
Coordinates: 30.189722 x -82.639722 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 95, no. 4 (Oct. 5, 1967)-
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000358016
oclc - 33283560
notis - ABZ6316
lccn - sn 95047175
sobekcm - UF00028308_01569
System ID: UF00028308:01602
 Related Items
Preceded by: Lake City reporter and Columbia gazette

Full Text





New look
Customer service


reconfigu
a
S,


red


Weather woes
Shuttle's final
launch may
hr derlavpd


000014 120511 ***3-DIGIT 326
LI OFFLORIDA HISTORY IT 32
PO BOX 117007
205 SMA UNIV OF FLORIDA
GAINESVILLE FL 32611-1943


Tourney time
Lake City
teams split at
Cal Ripken event.
Sports, IB


Lake uity Reporter'


Friday, July 8,2011 www.lakecityreporter.com Vol. 137, No. 139 0 75 cents


Hall, a former Third Circuit pros-
ecutor for Hamilton County, claimed
she was fired in, May 2010 for speak-
ing at Tea Party rallies and other
political events. Jarvis said she left of
her own accord, after being given the
option of curtailing outside political
activities.
Hall filed a lawsuit soon after, claim-
ing her First Amendment rights had
been violated.
On Tuesday Hall and Jarvis attend-
ed a court-ordered mediation session
meant to resolve the case. The pro-
ceedings took place in U.S. District
Court, Middle District, Jacksonville
District.
The suit was filed against Jarvis in
his capacity as the Third Judicial Circuit
SUIT continued on 3A


County's solid waste

contract to new firm


By TONY BRITT
tbritt@lakecityreporter.com
Columbia.County will have a new
solid waste collection service provider
beginning Oct. 1.
During Thursday night's county
commission meeting, county officials
voted to male Veolia Environmental
Services the county's solid waste col-
lection service for. the next five years
- although the decision was made
with several motions and additions.
The county received six bids from
potential vendors and officials had
close to a month to review the bids.
However, they spent the lion's share
of the meeting discussing the propos-
als. Representatives from several of
the prospective vendors addressed
the commission before the final deci-
sion was made.
AmotionwasmadebyCommissioner
Ron Williams and seconded by
Commissioner Scarlet Frisina to reject
all the bids, butwas rejected by a 3-2
vote.


While potential service providers
turned in bids based on residential
curbside collection, there was also a
bid option which included collection
services with garbage carts.
County officials, however, voted to
toss out the cart options.
'They ain't gonna roll no cart in
District 1," said Williams. "Granny
ain't gonna roll no cart down there."
Commissioners Stephen Bailey,
Rusty DePratter and Frisina also said
they had concerns about residents
being forced to push the carts and
noted that many of their constituents
told them they did not want to push
the carts to the curbside:
The county's .current solid waste
collection provider is Waste Pro,
but the company's contract expires
Sept. 30.-
Veolia Environmental had the low
bid of $2.3 million annually. The con-
tract is to provide residential curbside
collection for 20,307 units.
CONTRACT continued on 3A


Lightning, storms threaten

to delay final shuttle launch

By MARCIA DUNN B '
AP Aerospace Writer
CAPE CANAVERAL -
Thunderstorms threatened to delay
NASA's last space shuttle launch set for .. .
Friday with lightning striking near the
pad as astronauts descended on Cape
Canaveral by the dozens on the eve of
the historic flight.
Despite a 70 percent "no-go" fore-
cast, senior managers said they would
try for an on-time launch of Atlantis
anyway.
NASA test director Jeff Spaulding
pointed ofit that space shuttles have
managed to launch with worse fore-
casts.
"There's some opportunity there,"
he said Thursday as the rain set in.
"It's a really tough day if you make a ASSOCIATED PRES
decision not to go and it turns out to be The Vehicle Assembly Building is seen
after a rain shower at the Kennedy
NASA continued on 3A Space Center Thursday.


'Fish locally'


JASON MATTHEW WALKERILake City Report&t
Lake City resident Michael Bright fishes for shellcrackers and bluegill Thursday at Lake DeSoto.
Bright, a frequent angler, uses wigglers as bait. 'I like the relaxation and the calmness,' Wright
said. 'Fishing gives rme something to do. With the economy the way it is, it's best to fish locally.'



Giving customer service

a new look at City Hall


Director's post
eliminated; aim
is efficiency.

By ANTONIA ROBINSON
arobinson@lakecityreporter.com
The City of Lake City is reorganizing its
customer service department for greater
efficiency, according to officials.
The customer service director position,
which had been held by Dorothy Tyre,
has been eliminated effective July 1, said
Wendell Johnson, city manager. The depart-
ment is now under the umbrella of the
finance department.
Renea E Smith will serve as customer service
manager for the department, Johnson said.
Tyre was hired by the city Aug. 19, 1999
and initially worked as finance director
before being reassigned as customer service
director Feb. 14, Johnson said. She replaced
Nick Harwell, who took over as assistant
general manager for the Lake City Gateway
Airport.
Donna Duncan began work as finance
director Feb. 14, he said. Duncan is a Florida
Certified Public Accountant and previously
performed contract work for the city includ-


ing preparation of its annual independent
auditing report.
Eliminating the customer service direc-
tor position was a management decision,
Johnson said.
"It's an observation process," he said. The
move was to achieve certain results, and
that did not happen. It's nothing
personal."
In addition, the City Council unanimous-
ly approved pursing a contract with First
Federal Bank of Florida for lock box services
during its regular meeting Tuesday night.
The service would cost about $16,000
for the first year, said Mike Housch, First
Federal senior vice president and chief tech-
nology officer.
The service allows mailed payments to be
directed to a separate post office box that
is collected daily by authorized staff from
the bank, he said. Night drop box payments
would also be collected by a courier.
The bank would process the payments and
extract the customer's account information
to develop a file for the city to import into its
accounting system, Housch said.
Using the lock box would reduce the
workload of employees and free up their
time for more efficiency, he said.
Customers will still be able to make pay-
ments in person at City Hall.


Iil8440002.0I 1


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Fax: 752-9400


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Opinion ................
People..................
Obituaries ..............
Advice & Comics........
Puzzles ........... ......


TODAY IN
PEOPLE
Potter premiere
draws thousands.


COMING
SATURDAY
* You bought a digital
camera. Now what?


Jarvis/Hall



suit settled,



say parties


State Attorney's office
will pay some of former
assistant's legal fees.

By TONY BRITT
tbritt@lakecityreporter.com
Third Judicial Circuit State Attorney
Robert L. "Skip" Jarvis Jr. and former
assistant state attorney KrisAnne Hall
have reached a settlement in a civil
lawsuit she filed last year.
The settlement, details of which
were not disclosed, was announced
in a joint statement by Jarvis and Hall
Thursday morning. Under its terms
the state attorney's office will pay a
portion of Hall's attorney fees.


- --- ------~----~-- -----------g-------~--a~


; %









LAKE CITY REPORTER DAILY BRIEFING FRIDAY, JULY 8, 2011


~y4)4


*- H ,3 Thursday:
Afternoon: 4-2-4
Evening: 3-5-6


Thursday:
Afternoon: 6-6-3-8
Evening: 2-6-1-2


' Wednesday:
S15-16-24-30-36


PEOPLE IN THE NEWS


Fans gather for Harry Potter premiere


, Celebrity Birthdays


* Singer Jerry Vale is 79.
M Singer Steve Lawrence is
76.
* Ballerina Cynthia Gregory
is 65.
* Actor Kevin Bacon is 53.
* Country singer Toby Keith
is 50.
* Actor Billy Crudup is 43.
A Actor Michael Weatherly
is 43.


* Singer Beck is 41.
* Christian rock musician
Stephen Mason (Jars of Clay)
is 36.
* Actor Milo Ventimiglia is 34.
* Actress Sophia Bush is 29.
* Rock musician Jamie Cook
(Arctic Monkeys) is 26.
* Actor Jake McDorman is
25.
* Actor Jaden Smith is 13.


LONDON
H arry Potter's saga is
ending, but his magic
spell remains.
Thousands of
fans from around
the world massed in London
Thursday for the premiere of the
final film in the magical adven-
ture series.
They thronged Trafalgar
Square, where a soggy red car-
pet awaited the stars, and nearby
Leicester Square, where the
movie will be shown in a plush
movie theater, braving the inevi-
table London rain with umbrel-
Jas, waterproofs and good cheer.
They came from around the
world. Many had camped out
overnight, some for days. Most
were young adults who grew
up with the boy wizard and his
adventures, and could not pass
up the chance to say goodbye.
"It's our childhood we made
friends because of Harry Potter,"
said Luis Guilherme, a
22-year-old graduate student
from Sao Paolo, Brazil. "I don't
know how my life would be
without it. I would be less imagi-
native, for sure, and less adven-
turous. I would never be here
in London. We'd never forgive
ourselves if we didn't come, one
last time." -
"Harry'Potter and the Deathly
Hallows:. Part 2" depicts Harry's
final confrontation with the forc-
es of evil Lord Voldemort an
epic showdown rendered, for the
first time in the series, in 3D.

Elizabeth Smart to work
as ABC commentator
SALT LAKE CITY Elizabeth
Smart is taking a job with ABC News
as a commentator focusing on miss-
ing persons and child abduction
cases.
The Utah woman who was kid-


'Al


ASSOCIATED PRESS
British actors Rupert Grint (from left),.Emma Watson and Daniel Radcliffe arrive in
Trafalgar Square, central London, for the world premiere of 'Harry Potter and The
SDeathly Hallows: Part 2,' the last film in the Harry Potter series, Thursday.


napped from her
S bedroom at knife-
point, raped and
held captive at age
14 by a Salt Lake
City street preacher
can provide view-
Smart ers with-a unique
perspective, network
spokeswoman Julie,Townsend' said
Thursday.

Children's book by Lopez
coming out in September
NEW YORK New dad Mario
Lopez, 37, is writing
a children's book.
Celebra Childreil's
Books announced
Thursday that
Lopez's new book,
"Mario and Baby
Lopez Gia," will come out
Sept. 27. The book
is named for Lopez's infant daugh-


ter, Gia Francesca. She is Lopez's
first child with girlfriend Courtney
Mazza, whom he met while perform-
ing in Broadway's "A Chorus Line."

ABC soaps may have
won online reprieves
NEW YORK A pair of canceled
ABC soaps may find new life on the
Internet.
ABC has licensed "All My
Children" and "One Life to Live" in
a multi-year deal allowing their sto-
ries to continue beyond their immi-
nent broadcast termination. The
announcement was made Thursday
by the network and by Prospect
Park, the media company that has
acquired both of the 4-decade-old
programs.
Prospect Park said it will pro-
duce and deliver the programs via
online formats and other platforms,
although it offered no specifics.
* Associated Press


Daily Scripture
"As for God, his way is perfect:
The Lord's word is flawless; he
shields all who take refuge in
him."
Psalm 18:30

Thought for Today
"History must stay open, it is
all humanity."
William Carlos Williams,
American author and poet (1883-1963)

Lake City Reporter


HOW TO REACH US
Main number ........(386) 752-1293
Fax number ..............752-9400
Circulation ............'..755-5445
Online... www.lakecityreporter.com
The Lake City Reporter, an affiliate of
Cotnmunity Newspapers Inc., is pub-
lished Tuesday through Sunday at 180
E. Duval St., Lake City, Fla. 32055.
Periodical postage paid at Lake City, Fla.
Member Audit Bureau of Circulation and
The Associated Press.
All material herein is property of the Lake
City Reporter. Reproduction in whole or
in part is forbidden without the permis-
sion of the publisher. U.S. Postal Service
No. 310-880.
POSTMASTER: Send address changes
to Lake City Reporter, PO. Box 1709,
Lake City, Fa. 32056.
Publisher Todd Wilson .....754-0418
(twlson@lakecityreporter.com)
NEWS
Editor Robert Bridges .....754-0428
(rbridges@lakecityreporter.com)
ADVERTISING
Director Ashley Butcher ...754-0417
(abutcher@lakecityreporter.com)
CLASSIFIED
To place a classified ad, call 755-5440


BUSINESS
Controller Sue Brannon....754-0419
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CIRCULATION
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Tuesday through Saturday, and by 730
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Please call 386-755-5445 to report any
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In Columbia County, customers should
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In all other counties where home delivery
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Circulation ...............755-5445
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Home delivery rates
(Tuesday through Sunday)
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52 Weeks ................$83.46
Rates indude 7% sales tax
Mail rates
12 Weeks .............. $41.40
24 Weeks ............... $82.80
52 Weeks ..................$179.40


CORRECTION

The Lake City Reporter corrects errors of fact in news '
items. If you have a concern, question or suggestion, please
call the executive editor. Corrections and clarifications will run
in this space. And thanks for reading.


Plane makes
emergency landing
WEST PALM BEACH
--A JetBlue plane travel-
in from Fort Lauderdale
to -New York made an
eilergency landing at
Plm Beach International
Airport.
Aviation officials said
'the Airbus A320 plane
left Fort Lauderdale-
plollywood International
Airport late Thursday
'morning. A short time
4lter, a pilot reported a
%peed indicator problem
ind safely landed at PBIA,
about 50 miles north of
here they took off.
P. Maintenance crews
- 'ere inspecting the plane
Thursday afternoon.

,Mark Foley to
have surgery
- TALLAHASSEE -
,ormer U.S. Rep. Mark
Foley will have his pros-
tate removed after being
diagnosed with cancer.
S' Foley will have the sur-
gery Tuesday in Orlando
eight weeks after learning
he had cancer. He said
the disease has not spread
beyond his prostate.
Foley said he had
skipped two years of annu-
al checkups and is now
telling others not to make
'the same mistake.
Foley, 56, of West Palm
Beach, resigned from
Congress in 2006 after it
was discovered he had
sent teenage former pages
explicit online messages.

3 officers face
criminal charges
TALLAHASSEE -
Three Florida corrections
officers have been fired
and now face criminal
charges for creating false
disciplinary reports on
13 inmates held at the
Wakulla Correctional
Institution and beating
one who had made a dis-


Wayans, in living color
Actor Keenen Ivory Wayans says hello to the crowd at the
-Colony Theater for the first night of the 15th Annual ABFF
American Black Film Festival in Miami Beach Wednesday.


paraging remark about
one of the guards, the
Florida Department of
Law Enforcement said
Thursday.
Maj. Joseph Garrison
of Crawfordville and
Capt. Megan Dillard were-
arrested Wednesday.
and processed through
the Wakulla County Jail
while the third, Andrew
Gazapian, was out of state
and ordered to turn him-
self in when he returns
Dillard and Gazapian are
from Tallahassee, about 30
miles north of the prison.

Juror names may
soon be released
ORLANDO The
judge in the Casey
Anthony murder trial said
he may soon release the
names of the jurors who
acquitted her.
Judge Belvin Perry
expressed concerns for
jurors' safety on Thursday
when hearing arguments
from attorneys represent-
ing The Associated Press
and several newspapers
and television statements.
They argued that under
state law, the names of
jurors are supposed to be
made public.
The judge put their
names under seal at the


beginning of the trial.
. Perry said he isn't wor-
ried about the news agen-
cies filing the motion, but
about other groups that
he feels don't have honest
motives.

Fla. soldier killed
in Afghanistan
.PORT ST. LUCIE A
Florida soldier has been
killed in Afghanistan.
The Department of
Defense said Thursday
that Spc. Jordan C.
Schumann, 24, of Port St
Lucie, died Tuesday in
Afghanistan's Paktia prov-
ince when enemy forces
attacked his unit with
an improvised explosive
device.
Staff Sgt. Joshua A.
Thlockmorton, 28, of
Battle Creek, Mich., and
Spc. Preston J. Suter, 22, of
Sandy, Utah, also died in
the attack.

Latin band Mana
savors success
MIAMI The band
Mana is savoring success
with its first tour in five
years. Billboard Magazine
lists the Latin rockers as
the third biggest grossing
act this week.
* Associated Press


I THE WEATHER


CHANCE I CHANt 1 HANI CHANCt CHANCE
OFT-I OFT-AF OFT-T- OFT- OF T-
STORMS STORMS STRM STORMS S STORMS S STORMS

193 LO 72 195 1.0 74 195 LO 75 "'I 94 LO 74 1'l 94 LO 74
S ,11


Pensacola
94, 78


95/73
Tallahassee Lake City
95/74 93/72
S9/ '\. Gainesv
Panama City 90,7
89; 76


Tam
S \ 89,


e-
Jacksonvile
S 92,'74


City
Cape Canaveral
Daytona Beach


\ Ft. Lauderdale
die D Oaytona Beach Fort Myers
3 87 75 Gainesville
cala3 Jacksonville
1/73 Key West
Orlando Cape Canaveral K e. t
90/75 8,776 Lake City
S Miami
ias Naples
< West Palm Bech Ocala
88/77 Orlando
Ft Lauderdale Panama City
Ft Myers 89/80 *" Pensacola
89/75 Naples Tallahassee
'-87/76 Miami Tampa
Key West 8t/78 Valdosta
eyiest* '-" W. Palm Beach


o89/81


C4 4 4 4BBH~


TEMPERATURES
High Thursday
Low Thursday
Normal high
Normal low
Record high
Record low

PRECIPITATION
Thursday
Month total
Year total
Normal month-to-date
Normal year-to-date


91
71
91
71
101 in 1900
62 in 1947


0.00"
0.00"
19.89"
S 1:47"
25.501


SUN
Sunrise today
Sunset today
Sunrise torm.
Sunset tom.

MOON
Moonrise today
Moonset today
Moonrise torm.
Moonset tom.


6:36 a.m.
8:35 p.m.
S6:36 a.m.
8:35 p.m.

2:14 p.m.
12:49 a.m.
3:20 p.m.
1:29 a.m. '


*003
July July July July
8 15 i 23 30
First Full Last New


12

10 lOmh to sbu
Today's
ultra-violet
radiation risk


Saturday
88 75,'1
90/75/t
89/80/t
93/76/t
93/75/t
95/75/t
90/80/sh
95/74/t
91/80/t
89/76/t
93/75/t
93/76/t
89/75/t
94/79/pc
95/74/t
91/77/t
95/71/t
90/79/t


Sunday
90. 77,'1
90/76/t
89/80/pc
92/77/pc
93/75/t
94/75/t
89/81/sh
95/75/t
91/79/t
91/77/t
93/75/t
93/77/t
90/75/t
94/80/pc
95/73/t
92/78/pc
95/72/t
89/77/t


An exclusive
service
brought to
our readers
by
The Weather
Channel


for the area on
a scale from o
to 10 4

l--== I
wether.com

Forecasts, data and
)' & graphics 201 Weather
SIV central, LP, Madison, Wi.
weatherJ www.weathefpubllshePconi


Elz' 'r -~INEHUR. I


7a pp 7p la 6a On this date in
Friday Saturday 1816, cool weather
stretched over New
England. Frost was
reported in low-lying
Spaces throughout
the region.


AROUND FLORIDA-


I


Page Editor: Jason M. Walker, 754-0430


tM.!!^!^^I


-1SPONSOEDBYBi


7386)79M


1










PageEd~or:Robet Bidgs, 74-028 AKE ITYREPRTER NEW FRDAYJUL 8,201


SUIT: Parties settle through mediation
Continued From Page 1A


State Attorney and sought,
court-ordered relief against
certain policies and practices
which Hall called unconstitu-
tional under the First and
Fourteenth Amendments to
the U.S. Constitution. The
suit also requested an award
of her costs, including rea-
sonable attorney's fee.
"Hall strongly believes
that she was exercising her
right to free speech under
the First Amendment of the
United States Constitution
and United States Supreme
Court precedent when she
spoke at certain political
groups' functions on issues
she felt were of public con-
cern that are subject to
serious debate," according
the joint statement issued
Thursday.
The statement continued:
"Jarvis strongly believes
that he, as the elected state
attorney, had the author-
ity to ask Hall to limit her
speech because of com-
plaints he was receiving
about her speech and his
belief that she was associ-
ating her ideas to the State
Attorney's Office... Jarvis
desired to preserve the
essential perception of neu-
trality of his office while at
the same time preventing
potential negative impact
on his office. Mr. Jarvis,


therefore, believed that he
gave Ms. Hall an option
to remain a state prosecu-
tor under such circum-
stances and that he was
not infringing on her First
Amendment rights, but was
protecting the integrity" of
the state attorney's office.
Finally: "We both agree
that government employ-
ees have an interest in
commenting upon mat-
ters of public concern,"
the statement read. "We
also agree that the SAO
(State' Attorney's Office),
has an interest in pro-
moting the efficiency of
public services, such as
prosecuting criminals,
it performs through its
employees. We further
agree that the United
States Supreme Court
has recognized that a
government employer,
like the SAO, needs a
significant degree of con-
trol over its employees'
words and actions and
that when a private citi-
zen enters government
service, the citizen must
accept certain limitations
on his or her freedom."
Hall, who had servedtwice
with the state attorney's
office since 2000 from
2000 to 2007, and from 2009
to May 2010 worked for a


constitutional law firm after
leaving the state attorney's
office in 2007.
She issued a separate
statement on her Facebook
page Thursday morning.
"We have settled our
lawsuit through media-
tion," she said. "My attor-
ney and I are very pleased
with the outcome. Mr.
Jarvis and I are bound
by oath to not comment
further than the official
statement. Thank you so
much for your prayers
and support as we took
this stand. My family is
ready to move on with the
important tasks ahead and
the call God has put on my
life to educate our patri-
ots. God bless."
Jarvis said he, too,' was
satisfied by the terms of the
agreement.
"I think the settlement
lays out that each side
recognizes the other had
an issue that each felt
strongly about," he said.
"Hopefully this matter is
now resolved."
The agreement calls for
the State Attorney's Office
to pay a' portion of Hall's
attorney fees in exchange
for her promise to drop her
lawsuit The amount to be
paid has been sealed by the
court.


NASA: Launch set for this morning

Continued From Page 1A


good weather."
Launch time is 11:26
a.m.
NASA is closing out its
30-year space shuttle pro-
gram to take aim at aster-
oids and Mars, destina-
tions favored by the White
House. Private companies
will take over the job of
hauling cargo and crews
to the International Space
Si:ta[ii.i, freeing NASA up to
focus on points beyond,
"Webelieve that on behalf
of the American people it Is
time for NASA to do the
hard things to go beyond
lovi-Earth orbit," NASAs
deputy administrator, Lori
Garer, told reporter gath-
ering for the launch
First, though, is one
more shuttle flight.
Late Thursday morning,
lightIg struck one-third
of a miae from the launch
pad, No Immediate damage
was reported, but techni-
dcas hurried out to check
for ay signs of electrical
problems Ughtning strikes
hawat delayed any shudfle
lanchs in recent years.
The odds of good fly-
iRg weather prove with
each passing day, said
shuttle weather officer
Kiay Winters. The launch
time moves slightly earlier
every day, and that helps
she said.
NASA has until Sunday,
possibly Monday, to get
Atlantis and its four astro-
nauts in orbit, Otherwise,
the sceraft will remain
gruaea d until the follow-
ing weekend because of


CONTRACT


The second low bid was
made by Rqepublc Services
((whic3 praoides curbside
eaian for the City of
Lake c y) at .-3.5. mil-
m wsaif Had tfhe cart
agtfiim bemE included in the
Eiini &d aimoings, Repubhc
Stffices wIma hae beesn

W te ro was not among
the wt l1bemr.


an Air Force rocket launch
taking priority.
Rain or shine, hundreds
of thousands of people are
expected to jam the area
for the launch. Some esti-
mates put the crowd at
close to 1 million. Dozens
of astronauts already are
in town, including the very
first shuttle pilot Robert
Crippen, who opened the
era aboard Columbia in
1981,
Along one of the main
roads leading into Kennedy
Space Center, businesses
and even churches joined
in the celebration with bill-
boards pronouncing "God
Bless Atlantis July 8" and
"Godspeed Atlantis and
Crew."


The countdown, at least,
was going well, with only a
few minor technical prob-
lems at the pad reported.
Atlantis is bound for the
International Space Station,
with a year's worth of provi-
sions. NASAwants the orbit-
ing outpost well-stocked in
case there are delays in
getting commercial cargo
hauls started. The first pri-
vale sponsored supply run
-- by SiI '- Exploration
Teclmologies Corp. is
tentatively scheduled for
"late this year,
NASA payload manager
Joe Delal got emotional as
he showed pictures of the
21foot-long, shiny metal
cargo carrier in Atlantis'
payload bay.


for A S4pmer "Beacl Blat"
Vacation Bible School
July 18-22
- 6 P. M. 8:30 P. M.
EASTSIDE BAPTIST CHURCH
196 S.E. James Ave.
Ages 3 Yrs. thru 61 Grade
Music Bible Study Crafts
Recreation Snacks
Pre-Registration Block Party
Saturday, July 16
1 P.M. 3 P.M.
Regisiratlion Games Fun
SFor info call 752-2860
Cm-


Obama: Still differences

on debt, new talks Sunday


By JIM KUHNHENN
Associated Press
WASHINGTON -
Under an urgent deadline,
President Barack Obama
and congressional nego-
tiators set their sights on
the nation's tax system
and cherished benefit pro-
grams Thursday in hopes
of striking a massive bud-
get deal to raise the nation's
debt ceiling. Obama said
the two sides were still far
apart and called everyone
back to the White House
on Sunday.
The president met with
the eight top Republican
and Democratic congres-
sional leaders for an hour
and a half Thursday, hop-
ing to bridge ideas held
by the two sides each
considered untenable
by the other. On Capitol
Hill, Democrats appeared
especially rattled that the
discussions included pro-
posals to cut spending for
Social Security as well as
Medicare and Medicaid.
High-level talks, after
dragging on for weeks,


have entered a suspense-
ful endgame. The shape
of an agreement is still in
doubt as the nation moves
ever closer to an Aug. 2
deadline to raise the gov-
ernment's debt ceiling.
Obama pushed for an
ambitious deficit reduc-
tion plan of roughly $4
trillion, the biggest of
three options he laid on
the table. It would require
sizeable tax revenues,
which many Republicans
oppose, and spending
reductions for entitlement
programs, opposed by
many Democrats. But the
idea of a potentially histor-
ic deal was well received
by the meeting partici-
pants, officials said later,
even though the details
remained in dispute.
After the 90-min-
ute session, Obama
said Democrats and
Republicans should be
prepared to show their
bottom-line demands
when they return to'the
bargaining table for the
rare Sunday session.
The negotiating stakes


are high. Without a deal
on deficit reduction,
Republican leaders say
they don't have enoitl
GOP votes to increase the
nation's borrowing author-
ity, raising the danger,.of
the first ever U.S. default
on its debts when the cur-
rent $14.3 trillion debt ceil-
ing is tapped out.
"Everybody ackno~l-
edged that we have to get
.this done before the hard
deadline of Aug. 2 to make
sure that America does not
default for the first timY
on its obligations," Obama
said. "And everybody
acknowledged that there's
going to be pain involved
politically on all sides."
That leaves little tim4
to agree on 10-year deficit
reductions of $2 trillion to
$4 trillion. The major clash
centers on how to reduce
spending on major entitle-
ment programs such as
Medicare, Medicaid and
Social. Security, all prized
by Democrats, and on
tax changes that would
close loopholes and end
certain corporate breaks.


M ATT R ESS


TRUCKLOAD


CLEARANCE
T- ll Iv i iin W I, i* -m -I s I iali m11


S -4
Sameay

N


LAKE CITY REPORTER NEWS FRIDAY, JULY 8, 2011


Page Editor: Robert Bridges, 754-0428


tull I~~lls a












OPINION


Friday, July 8, 201 I


AN,


A N
OPINION


America's

not in

Kansas

anymore

resident Obama's
decision to withdraw
33,000 US troops
from Afghanistan by
September of next
year and 68,000 by the end of
2014 must be viewed against
the changing backdrop of US
security circumstances.
These circumstances are:
personnel shifts among top
security advisers, acute US
budget constraints, realignment
of international forces, and the
changing face of Al Qaeda.
Ensuing weeks will see Leon
Panetta installed as Defense sec-
retary, Gen. David Petraeus as
CIA director, and Gen. Martin
Dempsey as chairman of the
Joint Chiefs. Hillary Rodham
Clinton says she will leave as
Secretary of State next year.
If Mr. Obama wins a second
presidential term, Sen. John
Kerry (D) of Massachusetts
may well succeed heroin that
post If a Republican contender
ousts Obama, all four of these
positions could be up for grabs.
Changing personnel certainly
means changes in nuance, and
perhaps direction.
The withdrawal of those com-
bat forces will mean substantial
savings for the United States at
a time when many Americans
at home are facing economic
hardships. Outgoing Defense
Secretary Robert Gates has
already offered up some sav-
ings in the Pentagon's budget
and warned against more cuts.
But the Defense-Department
can-expect cuts, especially
given Obama's expressed inten-
tion to limit new foreign mili-
tary involvement
Now consider the changing
lineup of America's potential
enemies. The days of the cold
war are long since over. While.
the US must be ready for any
contingency, a Russian attack
on the American homeland
is not in the forefront of the
Pentagon's concerns. While
China's increasing military
strength is a matter for some
uneasiness, it is' a confrontation
at sea, rather than a Chinese
attack on the American home-
land, that Pentagon planners
worry most about
* Christian Science Monitor

Lake City Reporter
Serving Columbia County
Since 1874
The Lake City Reporter is pub-
lished with pride for residents of
Columbia and surrounding counties by
Community Newspapers Inc.
We believe strong newspapers build
strong communities -"Newspapers
get things done!"
Our primary goal is to
publish distinguished and profitable
community-oriented newspapers.
This mission will be accomplished
through the teamwork of professionals
dedicated to truth, integrity and hard
work.
Todd Wilson, publisher
Robert Bridges, editor
Sue Brannon, controller
Dink NeSmith, president
Tom Wood, chairman

LETTERS
POLICY
Letters to the Editor should be
typed or neatly written and double s
spaced. Letters should not exceed
400 words and will be edited for
length and libel. Letters must be "
signed and include the writer's name,
address and telephone number for
verification. Writers can have two
letters per month published. Letters
and guest columns are the opinion of
the writers and not necessarily that of
the Lake City Reporter.
BY MAIL: Letters, P.O. Box 1709,


Lake City, FL 32056; or drop off at
180 E. Duval St. downtown.
BY FAX: (386) 752-9400.
BY E-MAIL:
news@lakecityreporter.com


www.lakecityreporter.com


Lightning bugs and


other things make us glow


t's not often that I dare
to expound on scientific
research. At least, not
in public. I have my
opinions, just as you
have yours, but I generally try
to keep mine to myself (or give
them to my kids, if I can get
them to listen), especially with
regard to matters about which
I know little or zip. I figure: If
you aren't willing to serve on
the refreshment committee, you
don't have the right to show up
late at the party and get picky
about what's in the punch.
On the other hand, you don't
necessarily need a degree in
neurobiology to speak with
some authority on things that
have long been part of your life.
Take, for example, the firefly,
a tiny beetle with yellow-striped
wings that is flat-out ugly until
it lights up. And then it will take
your breath away with a beauty
that lingers and a smell that
won't wash off your hands.
They're called lightning bugs
in the South, where I chased
them every summer of my
childhood, and still do, every
chance I get
I once read about a research
team at Tufts University
that announced a finding in
bioluminescence, the process
by which fireflies light up their
little bellies like lanterns in the
dark to attract mates and charm
the socks off humans.
The discovery was not that
the bugs light up (we already
knew that) but rather, how they
seem to control it, turning it


Sharon Randall
www.shoronrandall.com
off and on like a tiny electric
switch. What the researchers
found was the role that is played
by nitric oxide, a gas that acts
as a messenger in carrying out
certain tasks.
In humans, for instance, it
helps control blood flow to, well,
various parts of the body. And
in fireflies, it apparently allows
oxygen to be used as fuel for
tiny flashes of light
In other words, it's magic -
both in beetles and humans. But
it's not always about sex.
*I can't speak for lightning
bugs, but I can tell you from
personal experience, humans
light up for lots of reasons.
I don't think it was sex that lit
my grandparents up. Not that
they didn't like sex. They had
12 children, so they must have'
liked something. In their latter
years, they slept in separate&
rooms because one snored like
a sailor and the other kicked
like a mule. But she was forever
lit up by his corny jokes, just
as he was lit up by the sound of
her laughter.
They also slow danced in the
kitchen, and kissed a lot for old
people with false teeth, which


HIGHLIGHTS


Today is Friday, July 8, the
189th day of 2011. There are
176 days left in the year.
Today's Highlight in History:
On July 8, 1776, Col. John
Nixon gave the first public
reading of the Declaration of
Independence, in Philadelphia.
On this date:
In 1663, King Charles II
of England granted a Royal
Charter to Rhode Island.
In 1853, an expedition led
by Commodore Matthew Perry


LETTERS


very possibly fanned the flames.
My children, when they were
babies, lit up every time they
looked at me. Whether it was
about me or the food supply I
represented, I don't know. But
they lit up, time and again, and
it lit me up, too.
My old dog, Tuffy, who was
not the brightest bulb on four
legs, would turn absolutely
incandescent at the mention of
one word: Walk.
I know people so do you
- who light up for the pure joy
of discovery, whether it's an
answer to a clue in a crossword
puzzle, or gn odd sock that was
missing from the dryer'or the
ring you inherited from your
mother-in-law and accidentally
dropped down the sink.
I bet the researchers at Tufts
lit up like a pack of Chihuahuas
at a Christmas party when
they looked into the belly of a
lightning bug and figured out
what makes it flash.
I hope so. That is how life
should be, like a forest full of
fireflies on a sultry summer
night, all lit up and sparkling
and ready for love.
Why do bioluminescent
beetles glow in the dark? Joy?
Delight? Discovery? Sex? All of
the above? Who knows? Maybe
it's because they know we're
watching and they just love to
light us up.


a Sharon Randall can be con-
tacted at P.O. Box 777394,
Henderson, NV 89077.


IN HISTORY


arrived in Yedo Bay, Japan, on
a mission to seek diplomatic
and trade relations with the
Japanese.
In 1889, The Wall Street
Journal was first published.
In 1907, Florenz Ziegfeld
staged his first "Follies," on the
roof of the New York Theater.
In 1911, cowgirl 'Two-Gun
Nan" Aspinwall became the first
woman to make a solo trip by
horse across the United States,
arriving in New York 10 months


after departing San
Francisco.
In 1947, demolition work
began in New York City to
make way for the new perma-
nent headquarters of the United
Nations.
In 1950, President Harry S.
Truman named Gen. Douglas
MacArthur commander-in-chief
of United Nations forces in,
Korea. (But Truman ended up
sacking MacArthur for insubor-
dination nine months later.)


TO THE EDITOR


Why must we pick up tab?


To the Editor:
An individual was elected as
Governor to try and correct the
major problem the state has
with spending by not increasing
taxes or making new ones. We
in Lake City have one council
member who wants to add an
additional gasoline tax to pay for
something do with roads. Now


we have the City Council giving
themselves a 3% pay raise to
compensate themselves for the
3% the State is requiring them
to pay into their own retirement!
Once again, the taxpayers are
"picking up the tab"! How do
we taxpayers get reimbursed
for this increase in taxes?? How
about cutting our taxes 3%??


This is an example of what is
wrong with the entire govern-
ment system in this country.
Most of us paid into our own
retirement and have not had any
increase for at least 3 years. I do
hope all the voters remember
this come the next election.
Alan J. Reiter
Lake City


4A


I


a Jos6 de la Isla, author of "The
Rise of Hispanic Political Power"
writes a weekly commentary for
Hispanic Link News Service.


,,a




Jose De La Isla
joseislo3@yghoo.com


How a

college

floundered

and failed

In the very early 1970s,
I helped found a
new college. It had a
curriculum that just
might have more to
offer today than it did back
then.
At the tender age of 29, I
was acting president of a new
Native Indian and Chicano
college in Davis, Calif., which
had land, buildings, students
and idealism but no money or
plan. My job was mainly to do
something about the latter two
while holding the other parts
together. The college was
called DQU.
I came to this challenge
after serving on the American
Association of Junior and
Community Colleges staff in
Washington, D.C.
After a controversial
takeover of a former U.S.
Army communications center
by students, the land was
turned over f6r the eventual
college. Community leaders
asked me to help write the first'
organizational document
The circumstances around
its founding, concern about
"militant" student activity of
that period and a polarized
society over anti-Vietnam war
activism and non-conformist
beliefs and attitudes cast a
suspicion over the rest of the
college's days.
The many accounts about
DQU since its founding
have mostly overlooked the
serious skull work and insight
that went into its intended
education program.
Also mostly overlooked is
that at the end of one year,
the college had $10 million
pledged for programs, an
architectural rendering and
plans for its facilities, another
$10 million in foundation
support in the offing, candidate
status with the main regional
accrediting association and an
education program about to
launch.
A pragmatic staff numbering
about 75 was responsible for
the preparations. Two of them,
Rick Ontiveros and Jackie
High, had PhDs, or nearly so,
from The Wright Institute at
Berkeley.
They greatly influenced the
innovation of the education
model, one that has bearing
today.
We designed associate- and
bachelor-degree programs that
were transportable anywhere
(Indian reservation, migrant
camps, urban communities,
etc.) where our institution was
home base.
Students had to meet our
standards, which took the
form of a contract. Part of the
curriculum could be taken
at another institution that
met with our approval. We
were already in discussion
for a specialized library and
a pre-med program involving
Stanford University.
Today's early-enrollment-for-
earning-college-credit-while-
still-in-high-school concept is
in the tradition of our model.
This matters as an object
lesson because institutions -
with their culture of monopoly
schooling will resist
education change.
But now they are having to
veer in this direction to meet
the diversity of interests.














Casey Anthony to be released next week


By MATT SEDENSKY and
KYLE HIGHTOWER
, Associated Press

ORLANDO Casey
Anthony will be freed next
week after spending nearly
Three years in jail on accu-
sations she killed her 2-
year-old daughter, punctu-
ating a case that captured
the nation's attention and
bitterly divided many over
whether she got away with
murder.
While cleared of charges
of killing and abusing her
daughter Caylee, Anthony
was convicted of lying to
investigators and sentenced
Thursday to four years, the
maximum punishment. But
she was given credit for the
time she has already served
and her good behavior, and
she was set to be released
Wednesday. Judge Belvin
Perry also fired her $1,000
on each of the four counts.
Before her sentenced
was announced, the 25-year-
old Anthony was animated,
smiling and occasionally
played with her hair, which
was let down for the first
time since her trial began
in late May. Perhaps she
thought, like many, that she
would be let go Thursday.
Her demeanor turned stone-
faced when she heard she
would be spending more
time in jail.
The scene outside the


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Casey Anthony and her attorney, Jose Baez, during her sentencing hearing in Orlando,
Thursday. Judge Belvin Perry sentenced Anthony to four years for lying to investigators but
says she can go free in late July or early August because she has already served nearly
three years in jail and has had good behavior. While acquitted of killing and abusing her
daughter, Caylee, Anthony was convicted of four counts of lying to detectives trying to find her
daughter.


courthouse highlighted the
divide that has had social
networking sites abuzz
since the not guilty verdict
was announced Tuesday.
Amid increased police pres-
ence, a throng of protest-
ers gathered, holding signs
that said "Arrest the Jury!!"
and "Jurors 1-12 Guilty of
Murder." Nearby, a handful
of supporters also turned
out, including 'a man who


held a sign asking Anthony
to marry him.
Anthony's release will
come almost exactly three
years since Caylee was
reported missing July 15,
2008. She was interviewed
by police the next day and
told them several lies, for
which she was convicted.
She lied about working
at the Universal Studios
theme park, going so far


as to take detectives to
the park, talk her way past
security guards and take
the detectives into a build-
ing before finally admitting
that she wasn't employed
there. She also lied about
leaving her daughter with a
non-existent nanny named
Zanny and later about leav-
ing the girl with friends.
She also told investiga-
tors she received a phone


call from .Caylee the day
she was reported missing,
another lie.
Her defense attorneys
argued before sentencing
that her convictions should
be combined into one, but
the judge disagreed, say-
ing law enforcement spent
a great deal of time, energy
and manpower looking for
Caylee. The girl's remains
were found in a swampy
area near the Anthony
home in December 2008.
At the time of the girl's
disappearance, Anthony, a
single mother, and Caylee
were living with Anthony's
parents, George and Cindy
Anthony, in suburban
Orlando, but she would often
stay withher boyfriend.
Prosecutors contended
Anthony, then 22, suffocat-
ed Caylee with duct tape
because she was interfer-
ing with her desire to be
with her boyfriend and
party with her friends.
When Anthony's parents
confronted their daugh-
ter about Caylee's where-
abouts, she told them the
girl had been missing for
a month and her mother
reported the disappearance
to police.
Defense attorneys coun-
tered that the toddler acci-
dentally drowned in the
family swimming pool. They
said that when Anthony
panicked, her father, a for-


mer police officer, decided
to make the death look like
a murder. They said he
put duct tape on the girl's
mouth and then dumped
the- body in woods about a
quarter-mile away.
The defense said
Anthony's apparent care-
free life hid emotional
distress caused by sexual.
abuse from her father. Her
father firmly denied both
the cover-up and abuse
claims. The prosecution,
called those claims absurd,
and said no one makes an
accident look like a mur-
der.
In mid-July 2008, Cindy
and George Anthony were
contacted by a towing yard
that their daughter's car
had been impounded for
being abandoned and would
be junked if not claimed.
When George Anthony
picked it up, he and the tow
yard manager said it had
the overwhelming stench of
human decomposition. The
defense said the smell was
caused by a bag of trash
that was iii the trunk.
In one of the biggest and
most important fights of the
six-week trial, a prosecution
scientist said the trunk con-
tained air molecules con-
sistent with a human body
having decomposed there
- but the defense ques-
tioned his methods and said
they were unproven.


OBITUARIES


Mary Louise Brown
Mrs. Mary Louise Brown born
March 29, 1933 a resident of
White Springs passed away
June 28, 2011.
Mrs. sMary
Louise Brown
is survived by
six children:
Oliver Young,
Kelvin Young,
Ma r t in e
Young, John-
nie Young, Anthony Brown
and Patricia Henderson.
Funeral services for Mrs. 'Mary
Louise Brown will be Saturday,.
July 9, 2011 fat 1:00 p.m. at thi
Beulah Baptist Church in White
Springs, Florida. Viewing and
Visitation for family:and friends
will be Friday, July 8, 2011
at the Beulah Baptist Church
from 6 p.m. until 8 p.m. Burial
will be in Swift Creek Cem-
etery in White Springs, Florida.
D.M. Udell Funeral Home is in
charge of all arrangements. Call
D.M.UDELLANDSONSat386-
362-4189 or cell 386-209-0223.
SMervin Alien Jones, Sr.
Mervin Allen Jones, Sr., Age
73, Husband/Father, Founder &
Minister of Church of the Living
God/The Pillar & Ground of the
Truth, Music Teacher/Band Di-
rector of Co- -
lumbia County
School System
(Lake City, FL)
for 40 Years,
Member of
Alpha Phi Al-
pha Fraternity,
Army Veteran, d
1962 Graduate
of Florida A&M .
University/ "
Member of The.
Marching 100, 1956 Graduate.
of Lincoln High School, Mem-
ber of NAACP died Sunday,
July 3, 2011, at the VA Medi-
cal Center (Gainesville, FL).
Homegoing Services (with Mili-
tary Honors) will be held 1:00PM
Saturday, July 9, 2011, at.Church
of God by Faith (Gainesville, FL)
where Bishop James McKnight
Sr. is Pastor, with his Brother,
Reverend Robert L. Jones, deliv-
ering the Eulogy. Burial will fol-
low at Forest Meadows Memorial
Park-East. Bishop Jones will be
viewed at the Funeral Home on
Friday 2:00-7:00PM At the
Church on Saturday 30 Minutes
prior to the Services And with
the Processional. The Procession
will form at Bishop & Mrs. Jones
residence, 1515 SE 15th Av-
enue, Gainesville, at 12:30PM.
Precious Memories will live on
in the hearts of : Wife (of 51 +
Years) Vernelle S. Jones of
Gainesville, FL; Sons Mervin
A. Jones, Jr. (& Mary) of Lake
Worth, FL, twins, Marion D.
Jones of Gainesville, FL and
Merlon B. Jones (& Sheila) of
Ellenwood, GA and Michael
T. Jones of Tallahassee, FL; 8
Grands; Sisters-Annie P. Chan-
iel (& Cecil) of St. Petersburg,
FL and Ethel M. Davis Jones
of Pinellas Park, FL; Brothers
- Robert L. Jones (& Gloria)
of Pinellas Park, FL, Samuel E.
Jones (& Betty) of Pinellas Park,
FL (Henry O. Jones, Jr. preceded
him in death); Sister-In-Law
- Gertrude E. Jones of Gaines-
ville, FL; Aunt; In-Laws; Nieces
& Nephews; Cousins; & Friends.
Arrangements By: DUN-
CAN BROTHERS' FUNER-
AL HOME, 428 NW 8TH
Street, Gainesville, Florida.


E. L. Minkley
Ernest Minkley passed
away after an extended ill-
ness on July 6, 2011 at this
home in Lake City, Florida.
Minkley was born to Curt and Ai-
leen Dean Minkley in Ludowici,
Georgia in 1923.
The family relo-
cated to Mount
Dora, Florida .
where he at-
tended school excelling in many
Sports. After graduation, he en-
teied the Naval Reserve in 1942
and served in the Submarine Ser-
vice on the USS Crevalle as a Tor-
pedoman patrolling in the Indian
Ocean and South China Seas.
Minkley was later employed by
Southern Bell Telephone and
STelegraph Co. as a lineman and
later as an equipment installer.
He held various positions in
the business section until being
appointed manager in Volusia
and Flagler Counties. His lat-
est assignment was as Manager
of the company's business op-
erations in Columbia, Dixie,
Gilchrist, and Levy counties.
Until his retirement, he was in-
terested in a wide variety of civic
activities accepting leadership
roles as president of Lake City-
Columbia County Chamber of
Commerce, Lake City Coun-
try Club, Rotary International


and as Chairman of The Char-
ity Horse Show. He chaired the
March of Dimes and had ac-
tive roles in the United Fund.
Survivors are his wife of 39
years, Sara Hill Minkley, three
children: Nancy Borden (Neil),
Raymond(Linda), Jane Zip-
pel (Randy) and stepson Ron-
nie Brannon (Tracy), Also four
sisters and a number of grand-
children, great grandchildren,
nieces and nephews. He was
predeceased by three brothers.
Friends of the family will be re-
ceived at 10:00 am on Friday, July
8, 2011 at Pleasant Grove United
Methodist Church. The services
will also be at Pleasant Grove at
11:00 am. Interment will be in
the Pleasant Grove Cemetery im-
mediately following the service.
In lieu of flowers, donations
may be made to: Haven Hos-
pice, 6037 W. US Hwy 90,
Lake City, Florida, 32055
Arrangements are under the di-
rection the DEES-PARRISH
FAMILY FUNERAL HOME,
. 458 S. Marion Ave., Lake City,
FL 32025 752-1234 please sign
our on-line family guestbook at
parrishfamilyfuneralhome. cor


Obituaries are paid advertise-
ments. For details, call the Lake
City Reporter's classified depart-
ment at 752-1293.


see what


sund ay

has in store


9I;! B('JMI


Summer Reading!
PARADE picks the season's 12 best books, and
S celebrities and authors reveal the page-turners
in their beach bags.

Intelligence Report:
Crazy for Quidditch
College students turn a wizardly game from
the Harry Potter series into a real-life sport.

The Sweetest Reading
Season
The beloved Southern author Pat Conroy
shares the joy of vacation reading.


Sunday with...John Grishman
The blockbuster thriller writer discusses his tricks of the trade, his writing
chair and his favorite book.

~*


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Lake City Reporter


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LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL & STATE FRIDAY, JULY 8, 2011


Page Editor: Brandon Finley, 754-0420









LAKE CITY REPORTER NEWS FRIDAY, JULY 8, 2011


Stocks up on strong U.S. employment data


Associated Press


LONDON Stronger than
expected U.S. jobs figures helped
stocks rally Thursday and helped
investors brush off interest rate
increases in China and Europe.
The euro, meanwhile, was
helped by the European Central
Bank's indication that it would
increase its key rate again this
year after its widely expected
move to lift the rate by a quarter
point to 1.5 percent.
The main driver in stock mar-
kets was a forecast-busting U.S.
jobs report and a decline in the
number of weekly jobless claims.
In combination, they have eased
fears about Friday's government
figures, which often set the tone
in markets for a week or two after
their release.
Private payrolls firm ADP
reported that employers added
157,000 jobs in June, more than
double estimates of around 70,000..
Weekly jobless figures were also
encouraging, with unemployment
claims down 14,000 to 418,000.
"With strong ADP job data
from the U.S. lifting expectations
for a good payrolls result, inves-
tors clearly regained their risk
appetite," said David Jones, chief
market strategist at IG Index.
The hope .in the markets is
that the recent soft patch in the


U.S. economic dataflow may
have come to an end, providing
the global economy with further
impetus. Since stocks are a lead-
ing indicator of economic activity
in the months ahead, there are
many in the markets hoping that
the second half of the year could
see widespread gains.
In Europe, Germany's DAX
closed up 0.5 percent higher at
7,471.44whilethe CAC-40in France
rose 0.5 percent to 3,979.96. The
FTSE 100 of leading British shares
was up 0.9 percent at 6,054.55
after the Bank of England kept its
main interest rate unchanged at a
record low of 0.5 percent.
On Wall Street, the Dow Jones
industrial average was up 0.6 per-
cent at 12,705 while the broader
Standard & Poor's 500 index rose
0.8 percent to 1,350.
Friday's payrolls figures could
also potentially have a big impact
in the currency market.
Ahead of their release, trad-
ing has been fairly lackluster
though the euro garnered some
support on continuing ECB rate
hike expectations. While the ECB
is carrying on raising rates, its
peers, such as the U.S. Federal
Reserve and the Bank of Japan,
are showing few signs of lifting
their super-low borrowing costs
anytime soon.
"The ECB stands apart from


would not rise next month, or pos-
sibly the month after.
Regarding Europe's debt cri-
sis, Trichet repeated the bank's
insistence that Greece could not
be allowed to default. The bank
has significant exposure to Greek
debt since it accepts Athens'
bonds as collateral for loans that
help keep the economy afloat.
The ECB has repeatedly insist-
ed that a default on those obliga-


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ASSO IATED PRESS
Former IMF head Dominique Strauss-Kahn (left) leaves his
rented house escorted by security, Wednesday in New York.


Lawyers in

Strauss-Kahn case

hold private talks


By TOM HAYS and JENNIFER
PELTZ
Associated Press

NEW YORK Lawyers
for Dominique Strauss-
Kahn met with prosecutors
Wednesday for what the
defense called a productive
discussion, but there was
no immediate word on what
would happen to the sexual
assault case that has been
threatened by doubts about
the accuser's credibility.
The two sides met pri-
vately for about 90 min-
utes in Manhattan District
Attorney Cyrus R Vance
Jr.'s offices, but participants
were tightlipped about the
exchange, which came five
days after prosecutors said
the accuser had not been
truthful about her back-
ground and the aftermath


of the alleged attack.
Lawyers for the former
leader of the International
Monetary Fund called the
session with Vance and
assistant prosecutors "con-
structive." Vance's office
said only that it was continu-
ing to investigate and that
no decisions had been made
about the case's future.
Hours later, the wom-
an's lawyer asked Vance to
appoint a special prosecutor
to take over the matter, cit-
ing questions about the way
prosecutors have treated
the accuser.
In a letter, Kenneth
Thompson said he believes
the DA's office is behind
media reports that the 32-
year-old woman referred to
Strauss-Kahn's wealth in a
recorded telephone call to
an incarcerated friend.


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Page Editor: Brandon Finley, 754-0420


ASSOCIATED PRESS
In this June 22, file photo, Terence Toal, (left) talks to a fellow trader as
they work on the floor of the New York Stock Exchange. Global stock
markets pushed modestly higher Tuesday, as investors awaited a raft of
U.S. economic data this week that culminates with closely-watched pay-
rolls figures.


,ertC< 1I--V.,I-


= qb -, I


tions is out of the question.
By late Thursday afternoon,
the euro was up 0.1 percent at
$1.4346, having traded as much
0.6 percent lower before the
upbeat U.S. data apd the ECB
rate verdict.
Earlier in Asia, stocks eked
out modest gains despite the
People's Bank of China's decision
Wednesday to raise interest rates
once again as it tries to put a lid on
inflation. However, the decision
has not prompted many analysts
to think that China's economy will
slow down sharply. That's impor-
tant as China, the world's sec-
ond biggest economy, has been a
major prop to the global recovery
over the past couple of years.
Mainland Chinese shares were
mixed. The benchmark Shanghai
Composite Index lost 0.6 per-
cent to finish at 2,794.27 while
the Shenzhen Composite Index
edged up 0.1 percent to 1,202.32.-
Hong Kong's Hang Seng index
closed marginally up at 22,530.18
while South Korea's Kospi was
0.4 percent higher to 2,180.59.
Japan's Nikkei 225 dropped 0.1
percent to close at 10,071.14, a
day after hitting its highest level
since the country was battered
by an earthquake and tsunami
on March 11 that killed tens of
thousands of people and sent the
economy reeling.


its major counterparts ... in tak-
ing pre-emptive action to avert
possible second round inflation
effects from high energy and food
prices," said Michael Woolfolk, an
analyst at the Bank of New York
Mellon.
Trichet said the bank was
"monitoring very closely" price
developments that's code in
the markets that the tightening
cycle was not over but that rates










Story ideas?

Contact
Tim Kirby
Sports Editor
754-0421
tkirby@lakecityreporter.com


Friday, July 8, 201 I


Lake City Reporter





SPORTS


www.lakecityreporter.com


CHEAP SEATS


Tim Kirby
Phone:(386) 754-0421
tkirby@akecityreportercom


Dairy

Farmers

awards

The Florida
Dairy
Farmers'
athlete and
coach of the
year honors piled up and
several were released
at the end of the school
year. A list follows.
Mr. Basketball -
Austin Rivers of Winter
Park, signed with Duke;
Fred Ross of Dwyer, 32-1
and 5A state champions;
Miss Basketball -
Danielle McCray of Lake
Worth Trinity Christian,
signed with Mississippi;
Marcia Pinder of Dillard,
consecutive 5A state
champions;
Mr. Baseball Jose
Fernandez of Alonso;
Landy Faedo of Alonso,
6A state champions;
Miss Softball -
Emily Sanders of Bartow,
5A runner-up; Danny
'Hensley of Niceville, 26-4
and 5A state champions;
Boys soccer
Verneri Valimaa of
American Heritage, 32
goals/19 assists; Jobie
Hughes. of St. Thomas
Aquinas, 5A state
champions;
Girls soccer Dara
Spital of Miami Gulliver
Prep, repeat winner
with 49 goals/39 assists;
Everton Edwards of
Gulliver Prep, 3A state
champion with career
record of 49-1-1;
Boys weightlifting
Dian Henderson of
Bartow, 2A champion.
at 119 pounds; Scott
McDonald of Baker
County, 2A state
champions; "
Girls weightlifting
Mimi Ho of Palatka;
state champion at 101
pounds; Thomas Bennett
of.Spruce Creek, state.
champions;
Wrestling Earl
Hall of Homestead
South Dade, 52-0 and
state champion at 119
pounds (four-time state
champion); Eric Swensen
of 2A state champion
Springstead and Russ
Cozart of 3A state
champion Bartow;
Tennis Roy
Lederman and Lindsay
Graff of Pine Crest, both
2A state champions;
Tobias Croke of Gulliver
Prep;
Boys track -
Armando Del Valle of
Miami Columbus, state
champion in 1,600 meters
and 3,200 meters; Alex
Armenteros of 4A state
champion St. Thomas
Aquinas;
Girls track -
Octavious Freeman of
Lake Wales, state
champion in 100 meters,
200 meters and long
jump; Carmen Jackson of
4A state champion Miami
Northwestern.
Valimaa also was
named Gatorade's
soccer player of the year.
Meg Casscells-Hamby
of Trinity Prep was the
girl's soccer winner.

Tim Kirby is sports editor
of the Lake City Reporter.


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Tyson Ellis (45), of Lake City's 11-under team, looks up as he hits a fly ball Thursday in a game against Tallahassee Myers Park during the Cal Ripken North
Florida State Tournament at Southside Sports Complex in Lake City. Myers Park beat Lake City 10-5.


lit


Up-and-down


day for Lake


City's All-Stars


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Lake City's 9-under team hitter Tyler Shelnut (6) ducks to avoid a high ball Thursday in a
game against Jax Beach. Lake City fell to Jax Beach 19-10.


By TIM KIRBY
tkirby@lakecityrep6rter.com
Lake City's 9-under all-
stars roared back from
a 9-2 deficit to defeat Jax
Beach, 19-10, in Thursday's
opening round of the Cal
Ripken North Florida State
Tournament at Southside
Sports Complex in Lake
City.
Lake City's 11-under all-
stars fell behind Tallahassee
Myers Park early and never
could catch up. Myers Park
prevailed, 10-5.
Lake City's 9-under team
took a 2-0 lead, but'could not
throw a strike for the first


half of the second inning.
After a lead-off single, the
next five Jax Beach bat-
ters walked and all of them
scored. The tally reached
eight before the final out.
was registered.
After Jax Beach added
another run in the top of
the third inning, Lake City
matched the eight-run out-
burst with one of its won.
Cal Gilliam had a single and
RBI-double in the inning and
scored two runs. Grayson
Martin also had two hits in
the inning with an RBI and
run scored. Lance Minson
ALL-STARS continued on 2B


Owners, NFLPA members meet in New York


Sides looking to
end labor lockout
as season nears.
By BARRY WILNER
Associated Press
NEW YORK NFL'
teams owners and players'
association leaders met for
another long negotiating
session Thursday, hoping
to finally break the labor
lockout that has now lasted
more than 16 weeks.
NFL Commissioner
Roger Goodell and NFLPA
chief DeMaurice Smith
joined in the sixth set of
recent talks, which went for
more than 10 hours, stretch-
ing into the evening.
A regularly scheduled
conference call involving
players in a lawsuit against
the league also was planned


for Thursday, a person with
knowledge of the situation
told The Associated Press.
The person, who said the
call was not related to
Thursday's developments at
the negotiating table, spoke
on condition of anonymity
because the two sides are
not announcing details of
the talks. -
The players' group at the
meeting included NFLPA
president Kevin Mawae,
while the NFL owners were
represented by Robert Kraft
of the Patriots, John Mara
of the New York Giants and
Jerry Jones of the Dallas
Cowboys.
U.S. Magistrate Judge
Arthur J. Boylan, who
has served as a mediator
between the two sides,
also was involved. He is
scheduled to go on vaca-
tion Saturday, but talks are


expected to continue in his
absence.
Lawyers for both sides
gathered on Tuesday and
Wednesday to put togeth-
er some of the paperwork
that will be needed when
a deal on a new collective
bargaining agreement is
struck.
Players and owners
have been holding meet-
ings around the country
over the last several weeks,
with pressure mounting to
make a deal. A major stick-
ing point has been how to
divide revenues for a $9
billion business that is eas-
ily the most popular pro-
fessional sports league in
America.
Some training camps are
set to open in less than
three weeks and the first
exhibition game, at th.e
Pro Football Hall of Fame


inductions, is Aug. 7 in
Canton, Ohio. Hall of Fame
president Steve Perry has
said the plan now is that the
game will go on as sched-
uled.
The Buffalo Bills still
appear on track to hold
training camp at St. John
Fisher College in suburban
Rochester. Todd Harrison, a
faculty member who works
with the Bills in overseeing
camp, said school officials
"continue moving forward"
with their plans.
A person familiar with
the situation told the AP
that the college issued an
email invitation to train-
ing camp staff to attend an
annual orientation session
on July 18.
The person spoke on con-
dition of anonymity because
the email was not released
publicly. The Bills did not


return messages seeking
comment.
The pressure on play-
ers and owners to reach a
deal was turned up anoth-
er notch by the New York
attorney general's office,
which this week launched
an investigation into wheth-
er the lockout violates state
antitrust laws.
The players' lawsuit,
filed in federal court in
Minnesota, also is an anti-
trust case.
New York Assistant
Attorney General Richard
Schwartz said in a letter
to Goodell that the lock-
out will "inflict signifi-
cant economic injuries
statewide."
The New York Jets have
canceled their planned
training camp in the small
upstate city of Cortland, he
noted.


Section B


___











LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS FRIDAY, JULY 8, 2011


TELEVISION

TV sports

Today
AUTO RACING
8 a.m.
SPEED Formula One, practice for
British Grand Prix, at Northamptonshire,
England
S1:30 am.
SPEED NASCAR, Sprint Cup,
practice for Quaker State 400, at Sparta,
Ky.
1:30 p.m.
SPEED NASCAR, Sprint Cup,
"Happy Hour Series," final practice for
Quaker State 400, at Sparta, Ky.
3:30 p.m.
SPEED NASCAR, Nationwide
Series, pole qualifying for Feed the
Children 300, at Sparta, Ky.
5 p.m.
SPEED NASCAR, Sprint Cup, pole
qualifying for Quaker State 400, at Sparta,
Ky.
7:30 p.m.
ESPN NASCAR, Nationwide Series,
Feed the Children 300, at Sparta, Ky.
BOXING.
9 p.m.
ESPN2 Super middleweights, Henry
Buchanan (20-2-0) vs. Jesus Gonzales
(26-1-0), at Phoenix
CYCLING
8 am.
VERSUS -Tour de France, stage 7, Le
Mans to Chateauroux, France
GOLF.
9:30 a.m.
TGC European PGA Tour, Scottish
Open, second round, at Inverness,
Scotland
3 p.m
TGC PGATour.John Deere Classic,
second round, at Silvis, Ill.
5 p.m.
ESPN2 USGA, U.S.Women's Open
Championship, second round, at Colorado
Springs
6:30 p.m.
TGC Champions Tour, First Tee
Open, first round, at Pebble Beach, Calif.
MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL
10 p.m.
MLB Regional coverage, N.Y. Mets
at San Francisco or Seattle at LAAngels

BOWLING

League reports

Results of league bowling at Lake
City Bowl:
MONDAY NIGHT MAVERICKS
TRIO
Team standings: I.Team 12 (32.5-7.5);
2. Team'8 (30-10); 3. Lake City Bowl
(29-1 ).
High scratch game: I. Zech Strohl 278;
2. John Janki 249; 3. Robert Stone 248.
High scratch series: I.Zech Strohl729;
2. Robert Stone 712;3. D.. Suhl 647.
High handicap game: I. James Price
300; 2. Zech Strohl 278; 3. Patrick
Markham 274.
High handicap series: I. Robert Stone
754; 2. Zech Strohl 729; 3. James Price
726.
High.average: I. Zech Strohl 237.83;
2. Curtis Gutzmer 216; 3. Robert Stone
208.83.
(results from June 13)

BASEBALL

AL standings

East Division
'W L Pet GB
New York 51 34 .600 -
Boston. 51 35 .593 '2
Tampa Bay 48 39 .552 4
Toronto- 42 46 .477 10'
Baltimore 36 48 .429 14'%
Central Division
W L Pct GB
Cleveland 46 39 .541 -
Detroit 46 42 .523 I'h
Chicago 43 45 .489 4'h
Minnesota 38 47 .447 8
Kansas City 36 51 .414 II
West Division
W L Pet GB
Texas 47 41 .534 -
Los Angeles 46 42 .523 I
Seattle 43 44 .494 3'h
Oakland 39 49 .443 8
Wednesday's Games
Tampa Bay 12, Minnesota 5
Kansas City 4, Chicago White Sox I
Detroit 5, LAAngels 4
Oakland 2, Seattle 0
Cleveland 5, N.Y.Yankees 3
Boston 6,Toronto 4
Texas 13, Baltimore 5
Thursday's Games
Tampa Bay at N.Y.Yankees (n)
Toronto at Cleveland (n)
Baltimore at Boston (n)
Oakland at Texas (n)
Detroit at Kansas City (n)
Minnesota at Chicago White Sox (n)
Seattle at LA.Angels (n)
Today's Games
Tampa Bay (Hellickson 8-7) at N.Y.
Yankees (F.Garcia 7-6), 7:05 p.m.
Toronto (jo-.Reyes 3-7) at. Cleveland
(Talbot 2-5), 7:05 p.m.
Baltimore (Britton 6-6) at Boston
(Beckett 7-3), 7:10 p.m.
Oakland (G.Gonzalez 8-5) at Texas
(C.Wilson 8-3), 8:05 p.m.
Detroit (Porcello 7-6) at Kansas City
(Davies 1-7),8:10 p.m.
Minnesota (Blackburn 6-6) at Chicago
White Sox (Floyd 6-8), 8:10 p.m.
Seattle (Beavan I-0) at LA. Angels
(E.Santana 4-8), 10:05 p.m.
Saturday's Games
Tampa Bay at N.Y.Yankees, 1:05 p.m.
Minnesota at Chicago White Sox,
4:10 p.m.
Toronto at Cleveland, 7:05 p.m.


Baltimore at Boston, 7:10 p.m.
Detroit at Kansas City, 7:10 p.m.
Oakland at Texas, 8:05 p.m.
Seattle at LA.Angels, 9:05 p.m.
Sunday's Games
Tampa Bay at N.Y.Yankees, 1:05 p.m.
Toronto at Cleveland, 1:05 p.m.
Baltimore at Boston, 1:35 p.m.
Detroit at Kansas City, 2:10 p.m.
Minnesota at Chicago White Sox,
2:10 p.m.
Oakland atTexas, 3:05 p.m.
Seattle at L.A.Angels, 3:35 p.m.


NL standings


Philadelph
Atlanta
New York
Washingtc
Florida


St. Louis
Milwaukee
Pittsburgh
Cincinnati
Chicago
Houston


East Division
W L
ia 55 33
53 36
45 42
on 45 43
39 48
Central Division
W L
47 41
46 42
45 42
44 44
35 53
30 58
West Division


W L Pct GB
San Francisco 49 39 .557 -
Arizona 47 41 .534 2
Colorado 41 47 .466 8
San Diego 40 48 .455 9
Los Angeles 37 51 .420 12
Wednesday's Games
Milwaukee 3,Arizona I
Washington 5, Chicago Cubs 4
Houston 8, Pittsburgh 2
Atlanta 9, Colorado I
Florida 7, Philadelphia 6, 10 innings
Cincinnati 9, St. Louis 8, 13 innings
N.Y. Mets 5, LA. Dodgers 3
San Francisco 6, San Diego 5, 14
innings
Thursday's Games
Atlanta 6, Colorado 3
Chicago Cubs atWashington (n)
Houston at Florida (n)
Cincinnati at Milwaukee (n)
Arizona at St. Louis (n)
N.Y. Mets at LA. Dodgers (n)
San Diego at San Francisco (n)
Today's Games
Atlanta (Beachy 3-1) at Philadelphia
(Halladay 11-3), 7:05 p.m.
Chicago Cubs (R.Lopez 1-2) at
Pittsburgh (a.McDonald 5-4), 7:05 p.m.
Colorado (Hammel 4-8) atWashington
(Lannan 5-5); 7:05 p.m.
Houston (Lyles 0-3) at Florida
(Vazquez 4-8), 7:10 p.m.
Cincinnati (Leake 8-4) at Milwaukee
(Greinke 7-3),8:10 p.m.
Arizona (I.Kennedy 8-3) at St. Louis
(Lohse 8-5), 8:15 p.m.
San Diego (Latps 5-9) at LA. Dodgers
(Billingsley 7-7), 10:10 p.m.
N.Y.Mets (Dickey 4-7) at San Francisco
(Vogelsong 6-1), 10:15 p.m.
Saturday's Games
Atlanta at Philadelphia, 4:10 p.m.
San Diego at LA. Dodgers, 4: 10 p.m.
Chicago Cubs at Pittsburgh, 7:05 p.m.
Colorado at Washington, 7:05 p.m.
Cincinnati at Milwaukee, 7:10 p.m.
Houston at Florida, 7:10 p.m.
Arizona at St. Louis, 7:15 p.m.
N.Y. Mets at San Francisco, 9:05 p.m.
Sunday's Games
Houston at Florida, 1:10 p.m.
Atlanta at Philadelphia, 1:35 p.m.
Chicago Cubs at Pittsburgh, 1:35 p.m.
Colorado at Washington, 1:35 p.m.
Cincinnati at Milwaukee, 2:10 p.m.
Arizona at St. Louis, 2:15. p.m.
San Diego at LA. Dodgers. 4:10 p.m.
N.Y. Mets at San Francisco, 8:05 p.m.

3,000-hit club

(y-played prior to 1901)
Player Hits
I. Pete Rose 4,256
2.Ty Cobb 4,191
3. Hank Aaron 3,771
4. Stan Musial 3,630
5.Tris Speaker 3,514
6.CarlYastrzemski 3,419
7.y-CapAnson 3,418
8. y-Honus Wagner 3,415
9. PaulMolitor 3,319
10. Eddie Collins 3,315
I .Willie Ma)s 3,283
12. Eddie Murray 3,255
13.y-NapLajoie 3,242
14.Cal Ripken 3,184
15.George Brett 3,154
16. Paul Waner 3,152
17. RobinYount 3,142
18.TonyGwynn 3,141
19.DaveWinfield 3,110
20. Craig Biggio 3,060
21.Rickey Henderson 3,055
22. Rod Carew 3,053
23. Lou Brock 3,023
24. Rafael Palmeiro 3,020
25.Wade Boggs 3,010
26.AI Kaline 3,007
27. Roberto Clemente 3,000

AUTO RACING

Race week

NASCAR
QUAKER STATE 400
Site: Sparta, Ky.
Schedule: Today, practice (Speed,
11:30 a.m.-3 p.m.); qualifying (Speed,
5-7 p.m.); Saturday, race, 7:30 p.m. (TNT,
6:30-11 p.m.).
Track: Kentucky Speedway (oval, 1.5
miles).
Race distance: 400.5 miles, 267 laps.



SUnscramble these four Jumbles,
one letter to each square,
to form four ordinary words.


NATIONWIDE
FEED THE CHILDREN 300
Site: Sparta, Ky.
Schedule: Today, practice, qualifying
(Speed, 3:30-5 p.m.), race, 7:30 p.m. (ESPN,
7-1-30 p.m.).
Track: Kentucky Speedway.
Race distance: 300 miles, 200 laps.
INDYCAR
HONDA INDYTORONTO
Site:Toronto.
Schedule: Today, practice; Saturday,
practice, qualifying (Versus, 5:30-7 p.m.);
Sunday, race, 2:50 p.m. (Versus, 2-5 p.m.).
Track: Streets of Toronto (street
course, 1.755 miles).
Race distance: 149.175 miles, 85 laps.
FORMULA ONE
BRITISH GRAND PRIX
Site: Silverstone, England.
Schedule: Today, practice (Speed,
9-10:30 a.m.); Saturday, practice, qualifying
(Speed, 8-9:30 a.m.) Sunday, race, 8 a.m.
(FOX, noon-2 p.m.).
Track:Silverstone Circuit (road course,
3.667 miles).
Race distance: 190.6 miles, 52 laps.
Next race: German Grand Prix, July
24, Nuerburgring, Nuerburg, Germany.
Online: http://www.fbrmulal.com
NHRA FULLTHROTTLE
ROUTE 66 NHRA NATIONALS
Site:Joliet, II1.
Schedule: Friday, qualifying; Saturday,
qualifying (ESPN2, 9:30-11:30 p.m.);
Sunday, final eliminations (ESPN2, 9 p.m.-
midnight).
Track: Route 66 Raceway.
OTHER RACES
AMERICAN LE MANS SERIES:
American Le Mans Northeast Grand Prix,
Saturday (ESPN2, Sunday, 1-3 p.m.), Lime
Rock Park, Lakeville, Conn.
GRAND-AM ROLEX SPORTS
CAR SERIES: Continental Tire Sports
Car Festival, Saturday (Speed, Sunday,
4-7 p.m.), Mazda Raceway Laguna Seca,
Salinas, Calif.

BASKETBALL

WNBA schedule

Today's Games
NewYork at San Antonio, 8.p.m.
Phoenix at Tulsa, 8 p.m.
Saturday's Games
Washington at Indiana, 7 p.m.
Atlanta at Chicago, 8 p.m.
Connecticut at Minnesota. 8 p.m.
Los Angeles at Seattle, 10 p.m.

SOCCER


Women's World Cup

QUARTERFINALS
Saturday
England vs. France, Noon
Germany vs.Japan, 2:45 p.m.
Sunday
Sweden vs.Australia, 7 a.m.
Brazil vs. United States,I 1:30'a.mh.

CYCLING

Tour de France stages

July 2 Stage I: Passage du Gois
La Barre-de-Monts-Mont des Alouettes
Les Herbiers, flat, 191.5 kilometers (119
miles)
July 3 Stage 2: Les Essarts, team
time trial, 23 (14.3) (Garmin-Cervelo;
Thor Hushovd, Norway)
July 4 Stage 3: Olonne-sur-Mer-
Redon, flat, 198 (123.0) (Tyler. Farrar,
United States; Hushovd)
July 5 Stage 4? Lorient-Mur-de-
Bretagne, flat, 172.5 (107.2) (Cadel Evans,
Australia; Hushovd)
July 6- Stage 5: Carhaix-Cap Frehel,
flat, 164.5 (102.2)
July 7 Stage 6: Dinan-Lisieux, flat,
226.5 (140.7) (Edvald Boasson Hagen,
Norway; Hushovd)
July .8 Stage 7: Le Mans-
Chateauroux, flat, 218 (135.5)
July 9 Stage 8: Aigurahde-Super-
Besse Sancy, medium mountain, 189
(1 17.4)
July 10- Stage 9: Issoire-Saint-Flour,
medium mountain, 208 (129.2)
July II Rest day in Le Lioran
Cantal.
Sixth Stage
(A 140.7-mile ride In the rain from Dinan
to Lisieux, with two Category 3 climbs
and a 1.86-mile climb to the finish)
I. Edvald Boasson Hagen, Norway,
Sky Procycling, 5 hours, 13 minutes, 37
seconds.
2. Matthew Harley Goss, Australia,'
HTC-Highroad, same time.
3. Thor Hushovd, Norway, Garmin-
Cervelo, same time.
4. Remain Feillu, France, Vacansoleil-
DCM, same time.
5. Jose Joaquin Rojas, Spain, Movistar,
same time.
6.ArthurVichot, France, Francaise des
Jeux, same time.
THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME
by David L. Hoyt and Jeff Knurek


AI PAPERWORK WAS --
DNICTU A __oK
S- -Now arrange the circled letters
to form the surprise answer, as
suggested by the above cartoon.

A:
(Answers tomorrow)
Yesterday's Jumbles: BENCH TARDY FIASCO DRENCH
Answer: It didn't take'long for Richard Starkey's parents
to realize he was going to BE A "STARR"


ALL-STARS: Games continue today


SCOREBOARD


Continued From Page 11

had a bases-loaded triple.
Lake City clamped down on
Jax Beach over the final three
innings behind the pitching of
Martin and Garrett Fennell
While Jax Beach added one
more run, Lake City scored
four runs in the fourth inning
and five more in the fifth to
pull away.
Lead-off hitter Tyler
Shelnut reached base five
times. He had a double
and three singles with four
RBIs and four runs scored.
At the bottom of the line-
up Mikah Gustavspn had
three hits with two RBIs
and two runs scored.
Martin also finished with
three hits, with three RBIs
and a run scored. Sammy
Walker had a two-run triple
to go with a single and scored
two runs. Kameron Couey
had two hits and scored a
run. Hunter Shoup (run
scored) and Fennell (two
runs scored) had hits and
Gavin Justice scored a run.
Gilliam walked 'twice to
go with his two hits and
scored three runs. Minson
*had a hit along with his
triple and scored two runs.
Davis Griffin had two
doubles and a single with
an RBI and run scored for
Jax Beach. Ryan Bethman
(RBI, two runs scored)
and Nick Bengermino (run
scored) each had two hits.


Lake City was sched-
uled to play Orange Park
in a late game on Thursday.
Julidigton Creek beat
Suwannee Valley and will
play the Lake City/Orange
Park winner at 1 p.m.
today.
Suwannee Valley plays
Jax Beach in an elimination
game at 11 a.m. today. The
second elimination game is
3 p.m. today. -
A throwing error and
five walks helped put Lake
City's 11-under team in a
3-0 hole after three innings.
Lake City got one back in
the bottom of the third.
Ethan Umstead singled,
stole second and scored
when Hunter Houston's
hard grounder ate up the
shortstop.
Myers Park scored two
runs in the fourth inning
and added five runs in the
sixth.
Lake City got three
hits in the fourth inning,
but scored only. one run
and left the bases loaded.
Brock Edge singled and
was forced out by Tyson
Ellis. Dylan Blair and Noah
Tuten singled to load the
bases. Caleb Strickland
scored Ellis on a force
play.
Ellis reached base on an
error to lead off the sixth
inning. Blair singled and


BRIEF'S
BRIEFS


YOUTH SOCCER

Fundraiser for

14U travel team

The Columbia Youth
Soccer Association
Stingers under-14 travel
team is hosting a
pancake breakfast
fundraiser from 8-10 a.m.
Saturday at Applebees on
U.S. Highway 90 west in
Lake City. Tickets are $8 at
the door. The soccer team
will receive a percentage
of the sales.
For details, call Eddie
Kurtz at 623-9507.

SWIMMING

Registration for

lessons today

Youth and adult
swimming lessons are


ACROSS

1 Mouse catcher
5 Pindar forte
8 Dwindle
12 Tool with jaws
13 Ally opposite
14 vera
15 Envelope abbr.
16 Shoes
18 Witty rejoinder
20 Rainfall mea-
sure
21 Tire filler
22 Once named
23 Crescent moon
ends
26 Team cheer
29 Radiate
30 Two-timers
31 Dye container
33 Boot liner
34 Treadmill unit
35 Game show
name
36 Spin around
38 Milwaukee
cagers
39 Hurry along


offered at the Columbia
Aquatic Complex. Classes
meet for two weeks and
six daily times are offered,
plus there are two daily
mom and tot classes.
Three sessions remain
with the next session July
11-22. Cost is $50 per
person.
Registration is today at
the pool.

FORT WHITE FOOTBALL

Team .car wash

set for Saturday

Fort White High
football players will wash
cars for donations from
8 a.m. to noon Saturday
at the S&S Food Store on
U.S. Highway 27 in Fort
White.
For details, call Fort


10 Morsel
41 Terrarium plant
43 Unruffled
46 Rectangular
gem
48 Honk
50 Andy's radio
pal
51 Maple syrup
base
52 Long-active
volcano
53 Chicken wire
54 Non-earthlings
55 Hubby of Lucy

DOWN

1 Water-power
org.
2 Cracker brand
3 Wine region
4 Banner
5 Volunteer
6 Kind of prize
7 Want-ad abbr.
8 "Ring" opera
composer
9 Sir Guinness


White Quarterback Club
president Shayne Morgan
at (386) 397-4954.


Q-back Club

meeting Monday

The Fort White
Quarterback Club has
an executive committee
meeting at 7 p.m. Monday
in the teacher's lounge at
the high school. All board
members are urged to,
attend. The program
committee will meet at
6:30 p.m. prior to the
executive committee
meeting. All those helping
with the 2011 program are
asked to attend.
For details, call Shayne
Morgan at (386) 397-4954.

* From staff reports


Answer to Previous Puzzle

FALL BAL KS
MOSAIC ARROYO
AUSSIE FAK IRS
CRTS MIA SAO
OVERRAN
NRA INK BAND
YOGURT DORIES
COURTS RADNER
MENU PAR EMS


RI O TIN DOSE
ANTHEM EL IDED
MI TERS DEFO G S
SITIOINIE GYRO


10 Webster or
Beery
11 Always, in verse
17 Stadium levels
19 PFCs
22 Renoir model


Want more puzzles?
Check out the "Just Right Crossword Puzzles" books
at QulllDrlverBooks.com


23 Like cool cats
24 Khayyam or
Sharif
25 "Miami Vice"
cop
26 and hearty
27 With, to mon-
sieur
28 Pay attention
30 Reference
32 HBO receivers
34 Coon cat ori-
in
35 evolved
37 Sweet singer
38 eBay action
40 Traffic noises
41 Notoriety
42 They often
clash
43 Right away!
44 Big purse
45 Many years
46 Loud noise
47 Mao -tung
49 chi


2011 UFS, Dist. by Univ. Uclick for UFS


both advanced on a wild
pitch. Strickland reached
on an error as Ellis scored.
Umstead ripped a two-run
double for the final mar-
gin.
Tyler Olah jacked a
three-run home run for
Myers Park and added a
fourth RBI on a bases-load-
ed walk. Mike Petit had
two hits and scored three
runs. Garren Ferguson
had two hits with an RBI
and two runs scored. Zach
Karpinski had a two-run
single and scored a run.
Myers Park will play
Julington Creek at 9 a.m.
today; while Lake City will
play an elimination game
at 3 p.m. (Orange Park/
Wakulla loser).
In other under-11 play,
Orange Park beat Bradford
County and Wakulla beat
Jax Beach. The two win-
ners play at 11 a.m. today.
Friday's 1 p.m. elimination
game pits Bradford County
against Jax Beach. There
also is an elimination game
at 5 p.m.
hi the 11-under/60 brack-
et Tallahassee Meridian
Park beat Orange Park in
Thursday's opening game
andplayedMandarinAthletic
in the late game. The elimi-
nation game is 9 am. today
and the championship game
is at 3 p.m. today.


Page Editor: Brandon Finley, 754-0420














"Kerr, Anderson


lead at U.S. Open


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Drivers Jeff Gordon (left) and Dale Earnhardt Jr. talk in the garage area during a practice
session for the Sprint Cup Series auto race at the Kentucky Speedway on Thursday in
Sparta, Ky.


Kentucky Speedway

finally ready for close-up


By WILL GRAVES
Associated Press

SSPARTA, Ky. Carl
Edwards kept hearing
the same question over
and over every time the
NASCAR star would step
out of his hauler before a
Nationwide Series race at
Kentucky Speedway.
'They always ask when
are the Cup cars coming?
When are we getting a Cup
race?" Edwards said.
SEdwards, who admitted-
ly doesn't get too involved
with the politics of which
tracks get a Cup race and
which ones don't, never
really came up with a good
answer. Now he doesn't
have to.
:NASCAR's top series will
make its long-awaited debut
at the 1.5-mile oval tucked
in .the 'northern Kentucky
hills on Saturtlay night,a a
visit that has given the dog
days of the NASCAR sched-
ule a much-needed jolt.
Though the Nationwide
and Truck Series have
been coming to the track
annually almost from the
moment it opened in 2000
and Cup teams have logged
thousands of hours of test
laps here before the' series
cut down on testing to help
teams save money, Edwards
acknowledges things are a
little different this time.
"Right now it feels like
it's kind of a novelty event,"
said Edwards, who won his
first NASCAR event when
he captured the truck race
here in 2003. "There's a bit
of buzz in the air."
A sensation a long-time
coming for a state with deep
ties to stock car racing's
roots.
This isn't actually the first
time NASCAR's top series
has come to'the Bluegrass.
Corbin Speedway in south-
eastern Kentucky hosted a
Cup 'race in 1954, an event
won by Hall of Famer Lee
Petty.
,The Waltrip family, head-
ed by Darrell and Michael
Waltrip, is from Owensboro
in western Kentucky and
Michael will honor his
brother with a paint scheme
honoring Darrell's first
NASCAR win at Nashville
in 1975.
That history is one of the
reasons Jerry Carroll was
so eager to build a high-per-
formance track in the state.
The head of the ownership
group that opened the track
in 2000 was certain he could
build a facility good enough


to land a Cup date and the
tens of millions of dollars in
economic impact that come
with it.
Building the track turned
out to be the easy part,
move a few hundred mil-
lion cubic yards of dirt and
advertise stock car racing
to one of the most devout
NASCAR fan bases located
outside of the deep South
and things tend to work
out.
Kevin Harvick thought
the speedway was Cup
ready a decade ago when
he won the inaugural
Nationwide race in 2001.
He saw the packed grand-
stand Kentucky has
consistently led the one-off
tracks in Nationwide atten-
dance and the technical
prowess needed to success-
fully maneuver through the
bumpy-circuit and felt the
Cup could thrive here.
Ye~"I Harvck knows
enough to know it takes
more than nice digs, a ton
of fans and a quirky track
to get on the Cup schedule.
"When you do have a new
facility I think everybody
wants to see if it is able to
keep bringing the fans in
and keep the longevity of
that particular facility might
be proven to get to this
level of a race,". Harvick
said. "Its great to see here.
I know it took 10 years but
it's good."
Even if it took 10 years
too long for Carroll.
When NASCAR kept
brushing aside his
attempts to get a Cup date,
Carroll and the rest of
the ownership group took
NASCAR and International
Speedway Corp., to court,
claiming the two held an
unfair monopoly on stock
car racing.
The courts consistently
sided with NASCAR during
the lengthy four-year legal
battle as the ownership con-
tinued to pursue the fight
even after selling the track
to Speedway Motorsports
Inc. in 2008.
SMI chairman Bruton
Smith promised the day he
took over he would do what
Carroll couldn't and get a
Cup race. The state pledged
millions of dollars in tax
incentives if he could get
it done, and last August he
delivered when he moved a
Cup date from SMI-owned
Atlanta Motor Speedway to
Kentucky.
The last 11 months try-
ing to get through Smith's
lengthy to-do list.


Two days out, the fin-
ishing touches are still
being worked on, though
the majority of the, overhaul
Shas been completed head of
schedule.
Pit road has been moved
closer to the grandstands,
where more Than 40,000
seats have been .added.
The camping area has been
expanded to accommodate
4,000 vehicles and officials
claim to have sold tickets to
fans from all 50 states. Yes,
even Alaska.
A late ticket push has
led to a sellout, making the
race the second-biggest
event in the state behind
the Kentucky Derby.
It will also make for some
headaches.
Tony Stewart complained
Thursday the track could
use more SAFER bar-
riers, a notion vice presi-
dent of competition Robin
Pemberton would be evalu-
ated after the weekend.
The cars, however, went
through a pair of lengthy
test sessions during the
afternoon without an inci-
dent and several drivers
believe the layout will pro-
vide for multiple-line rac-
ing, something that can be
hard to come by on the
1.5-mile ovals.
"It's not just one groove
sitting on the white line,
single-file racing," Edwards
said. "It's a track where you
can chase down a guy and
pressure him."
Carroll, who has
remained on is an adviser,
is convinced the drivers will
put on a good show. He
knows they better because
of the traffic that awaits
shortly after the celebration
in Victory Lane on Saturday
night.
Interstate 71 serves as
the .only major road in
and out of the somewhat
remote ,area located about
halfway between Louisville
and Cincinnati. Though the
state has invested millions
of dollars in road improve-
ments in the immediate
area, the interstate is still
in the midst of several
construction projects that
could make the ride home
a lengthy one.
After waiting so ,long
to get a Cup race, Carroll
thinks a slow ride home is a
small price to pay.
"When it's over, we hope
the experience has been
so great that they're going
to accept the time it takes
to get out," he said with a
laugh.


Yanks' Jeter at 2,998 career hits


Associated Press

NEW YORK Derek
Jeter doubled for his 2,998th
career hit, then grounded
Out his next three times
up Thursday night, leaving
the New York Yankees star
two hits from reaching one
of baseball's biggest mile-
stones.
Jeter sharply lined the


first pitch he saw from
Tampa Bay's Jeff liemann
to left-center for a first-
inning double, drawing a
cheer from his parents in
the crowd.
With Yankee Stadiumfans
standing, Jeter bounced out
to third base with runners
on second and third to end
the second.
In the fifth, Jeter hit a


grounder down the line.
Third baseman Sean
Rodriguez made a sliding
stop on his knees and a
strong throw. Cameras
flashed as Jeter grounded
to shortstop to finish the
seventh.
Jeter is trying to become
the 28th player in major
league history to get 3,000
hits.


By EDDIE PELLS
Associated Press

COLORADO
SPRINGS, Colo. -
Instead of teeing it up
when she comes back to
the Broadmoor, Cristie
Kerr's next shot at the
U.S. Women's Open will
be a blast out of the bun-
ker on the front, right side
of the seventh green.
A difficult shot. It could
be worse.
A quirky day of thun-
der and lightning but
only spits of rain sus-
pended play Thursday
with 25 players making it
through the first round.
It was a bad break on the
opening day of the tough-
est test in golf balky
weather that figures to
turn one of the most diffi-
cult weeks on the sched-
ule into an even bigger
grind.
"That's part of the gam-
ble," said Christina Kim,
who will try to squeeze in
36 holes on Friday.
The rain halted a mini
streak for Kerr, who had
made two straight birdies
to get into a tie for the lead
at .2-under par with ama-
teur Amy Anderson. After
her second birdie, Kerr,
who opened her round
on theback, teed off into
the right rough on No. 7,
then hit her approach into
the sand. That's when the
siren sounded and the
players headed to the club-
house.
"At least I'll get to prac-
tice some long bunker
shots before we go out, so
maybe it's a good thing for
me," she said.
After halting play, the
USGA kept the players
in the clubhouse for 212
hours,.but with the thun-
der still rumbling and the
radar blinking red, officials
called play. There were 75


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Cristie Kerr waves after a birdie on the sixth hole during the
first round of the Women's U.S. Open golf tournament at the
Broadmoor Golf Club on Thursday in Colorado Springs, Colo.


players on the course and
66 who hadn't hit a shot.
That means nearly half the
field, including defending
champion Paula Creamer
and Yani Tseng, trying to
complete her career Grand
Slam, could face 72 holes
in three days.
The Broadmoor is the
first U.S. Women's Open
course to measure more
than 7,000 yards quite a
haul, even at 6,700 feet in
altitude.
"We were actually sitting
here debating, what's the
better draw?" Kim said. "Is
it the one we have and we
try to get 36 in in one day,
or the one whereyou have
19 hours between shots in
the same round?"


Sarah-Jane Smith of
Australia falls into the
latter category, but only
barely. After hearing her
name announced on the
first tee box, Smith striped
her first shot down the
middle of the fairway and
started walking. Suddenly,
the sirens blared and she
made a U-turn back to the
clubhouse.
"I've not teed off at all
before," she said. "But I've
never hit one, then walked
straight back in. I'm look-
ing forward to it."
Then, pointing to her
husband and caddie,
Duane, she' said, "He
should have the yardage
figured out by tomorrow
morning."


Reader's Choice


CUTEST BABY



CONTEST
1 2ND & 3RD Place Prizes to be Awarded for Boys & Girls!

AGES 0-24 MONTHS
Send in the most adorable photograph of your child,
up to 24 months of age, and you could win!


TO ENTER:
Bring your baby's picture along with entry fee ($30.00)
to the Lake City Reporter,180 E. Duval St., mail to
P.O. Box 1709, Lake City, FL 32056.


All pictures will be published in the Lake City
Reporter's July 17, 2011 edition. All voting bal-
lots must be returned to the paper by July 25,
2011. So show off your child, grandchild,
godchild, niece or nephew. 7
The winners will be published on July 31, 2011


DEADLINE:
July 14th, 2011

For More Information or if you are


WANT TO ENTER ONLINE?
You can e-mailyour
photo and information to
ads@lakecityreporter.com.
Subject line: BABY CflNTFST


OTOtni Sted in becoming a sponsor
please Call Mary at 754-0401


.*


ai


LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS FRIDAY, JULY 8, 2011


Page Editor: Brandon Finley, 754-0420


11









LAKE CITY REPORTER


ADVICE & COMICS


FRIDAY, JULY 8, 2011


DILBERT


BABY BLUES


BLONDIE


BEETLE BAILEY


HAGARTHE HORRIBLE


MAYRo iE
OL & ?// ye S


A O7 LaFT lOOK
RAM' NO &EWER


DEAR ABBY


Secretly remarried mom still

collects alimony from dad


DEAR ABBY: My parents
divorced 20 years ago. The
court approved a mutual
agreement that Dad would
pay monthly alimony until
Mom remarried or one of
them died. He has never
missed a payment.
I have recently discovered
that Mom secretly married
her live-in boyfriend 11
years ago, but has continued
receiving the alimony without
telling my father. Is she com-
mitting a crime for which she
could be arrested? And is her
husband guilty of any wrong-
doing?
I am extremely upset over
this and want to do something
to correct this injustice. It
isn't fair. What can I do?
FURIOUS IN NORTH-
WEST

DEAR FURIOUS: Mar-
riage certificates are public
records, so get a copy of
your mother's and mail it to
your father. He needs to stop
paying the alimony, and he
can sue her in family court
for any money she wasn't
entitled to. His next move
should be to consult an attor-
ney and decide how he wants *
to handle this.

DEAR AIBY: I appar-
ently have a problem com-
municating with people. I
have had conversations with
colleagues, managers, friends
-- even my girlfriend -- and
have been told my words


Abigail Van Buren
www.deorabby.com
were too harsh and made
them feel defeated. It's at the
point where people are afraid
before I even open my mouth.
I don't mean to be cruel.
I just speak the truth as it
comes to me and I don't
sugarcoat things. Some folks
appreciate my candor, but it's
getting in the way of having
Decent relationships. How do
I learn to communicate dif-
ferently when I'm just being
myself? The words flow natu-
rally out of my mouth. Am I
a jerk? UNVARNISHED IN
INGLEWOOD, CALIF.

DEAR UNVARNISHED:
You may be grossly insensi-
tive -or you may have a disor-
der of some kind. (Forgive
,my candor.) Because you are
having difficulty relating to
others and it has become a
handicap, you should discuss
the problem with a psycholo-
gist who can help you to gain
the tools for better communi-
cation.
DEAR ABBY: My wife
has a friend who rides to
work with her several times
a week. My wife is helping
"Libby" through a difficult


*;a t r"


HOROSCOPES


SNUFFY SMITH


ZITS


GARFIELD


B.C.


FRANK & ERNEST


ARIES (March 21-April
19): You7dl have plenty to
contend with if you complain
or refuse to help someone
who is counting on you.
Problems at home are appar-
ent, and the less time spent
indoors, the better. Physical
activity or an interesting
challenge will help ease ten-
sion. ***r

TAURUS (April 20-May
20):. DonAtt make a prom-
ise you might not be able
to keep. You have to look
at the big.picture and make
decisions based on what you
need to be happy. A love re-
lationship can be enhanced if
you both discuss your needs
and work toward a compro-
mise.***

GEMINI (May 21-June
20): Do your best to help
others and you will be
rewarded by the experience
you gain, the people you
meet and the possibilities
that arise. Your sincerity and
generosity will attract all
sorts or wonderful results.

CANCER (June'21-July
22): You are likely to take on
too much or to feel sick due
to stress. Try to shut out all
the requests that can wait un-
til you are in a better position
to deal with them. Someone
who loves you will step up


THE LAST WORD
Eugenia Last

and cover for you. **

LEO (July 23-Aug. 22):
You ate'ready to make' -
changes that will allow, you.
greater freedom to help those
in need. A long overdue trip
will allow you time to think
matters through so you dontt
make a mistake. ****

VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept.
22): Donnt let the almighty
dollar or the job you dontt
want to do stand in the
way of being a good friend
or neighbor. You have the
potential to help someone
in need. Your contribution
will lead to new friendships.


LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct;
22): Donat worry so much
about pleasing someone
who is difficult. You will get
some valuable information
through the talks you have
with people who share your
interests. ***

SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov.
21): Donnt waste time. You
will have only yourself to
blame if you wait to see what
everyone else is up to. Make
an effort to show your ap-
preciation to the people you
care about most. ***


SAGITTARIUS (Nov. :"
22-Dec. 21): Find out what's
actually expected of you and
what yourdl get in return
before you make a promise
or alter your life to please
someone else. A change in
your living arrangements
may seem drastic at first, but
in hindsight you will realize
how much you needed the
-change. ****

CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-
Jan. 19): Think with your "
head, not your heart, when it
comes to personal or partnei-
ship matters. Dontt take on
someone elseats burden when
you should be looking out
for your own interests. **

AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb.
18): Focus on what you can
do to improve your home
and your lifestyle. Getting
together with someone you
relate to emotionally will
help you decide what you
should do next. Rely on your
skills to help you formu-
late a moneymaking plan.


PISCES (Feb. 19-March
20): Put your heart and soul
into doing the things you
enjoy most with the person
you like to spend time with.
Romance is on the rise, and
putting more effort into your
love life will pay off. ***


CELEBRITY CIPHER

by Luis Campos
Celebrity Cipher cryptograms are created from quotations by famous people, past and present.
Each letter in the cipher stands for another.
S Today's clue: G equals B
TP KNBZPFZ EIKJNJM GBZZCPI JM
ZRJI F B A MZ N U G P ZZ P N Z R E M TP
KNBZPFZ WAMI XNBL EFFJYPMZI GU
FRJCYNPM." WCBNJE PIZPXEM

PREVIOUS SOLUTION: "All human beings are also dream beings. Dreaming
ties all mankind together." Jack Kerouac

(c) 2011 bv NEA. Inc. 7-8
CLASSIC PEANUTS


financial time by taking her.
The problem is, Libby wears
very strong perfume and ap-
pears to bathe in it rather than
use it sparingly.
The passenger seatbelt
and shoulder harness in
my wife's car have become
saturated with this smell. I
have reached the point that I
don't want to ride in her car.
My wife complains about it
as well.
Would it be rude for my ,
wife to ask Libby to cut back
or eliminate the use of the
perfume? I say we have that
right, but my wife is afraid
it wouldn't be polite. Please
help. HOLDING MY
NOSE IN FLORIDA

DEAR HOLDING
.YOUR NOSE: Many people.
are allergic to perfumes, and
others develop a sensitiv-
ity after frequent exposure.
It would not be rude for her
to tell Libby that the linger-
ing scent of her perfume has
made you uncomfortable
-- and that she should refrain
from wearing it during the
commute. (She can apply it
at work and ride home with '
someone else.)
P.S. The car may have to
be professionally cleaned and
detailed to get rid of (most)
of the smell. You have my
sympathy.
* Write Dear Abby at
www.DearAbby.com or
P.O. Box 69440, Los
Angeles, CA 90069.












Classified Department: 755-5440


BMWI


k.JjlllC>


SEiaLL


LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED FRIDAY, JULY 8, 2011

Lake City Reporter





CLASSIFIED


Take ADvantage of the
Reporter Classifieds!

755-5440


ADvantage


4 lines 6 days a ddlitional i
Rate applies to private Individualas selling
personall ,mehandle totalling $100 or le.
Each Item mua Include a prices.
This ls a non-refundable rate.



1
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4 lines 6 days line d0na
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personal merchandise totalling $1,00 or les.
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One Item per ad 16Each additional
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personal merchandise tolling $4,00 or le
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One Item per ad ^
4 lines 6 days aaddtional
Rate applied to private Individuals selling
person cal merhand toting 5,0or leas.
Ea :h ilem nr.urS i.clda a prie
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.4 to 50 1750
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nad categrcaiIes ewiotallreuirng,0epreIsm

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4 lines, one month....$92.00
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Includes an additional $2.00 per
ad for each Wednesday insertion.



You can call us at 755-5440,
Monday through Friday from 8:00
a.m. to 5:00 p.m.
Jome people prefer to place their
.classified ads in person, and some
ad categories will require prepay-
ment. Our office is located at 180
East Duval Street.
You can also fax or email your ad
copy to the Reporter.
FAX: 386-752-9400 Please
direct your copy to the Classified'
Department.
EMAIL: classifieds@lakecityre-
Rorter.com


Ad Isto Appea: Call by: FaxEmlal by:
Tuesday Mon.,10:00am. Mon., 9:00a.m.
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These deadlines are subject to change without notice.




Ad Errors- Please read your ad
on the first day of publication.
We accept responsibility for only
the first Incorrect insertion, and
only the charge for the ad space
In error. Please call 755-5440
Immediately for prompt correc-
tion and billing adjustments.
Canehllationt Normal advertising
deadlines apply for cancellation.
BUllingJnquirlra- Call 755-5440.
Should further information be
required regarding payments or
credit limits, your call will be trans-
ferred to the accounting depart-
ment.
1-1

Advertising copy is subject to
approval by the Publisher who
reserves the right to edit, reject,
or classify all advertisements under
appropriate headings. Copy should
be checked for errors by the
advertiser on the first day of pub-
lication. Credit for published errors
will be allowed for the first insertion
for that portion of the advertisement
which was incorrect. Further, the
Publisher shall not be liable for any
omission of advertisements ordered
to be published, nor for any general,
special or consequential damages.
IAdvertising language must comply
!with Federal, State or local laws
Regarding the prohibition of discrimi-
nation in employment, housing and
public accommodations. Standard
abbreviations are acceptable; how-
ever, the first word of each ad may
Inot be abbreviated.

1n Print and Online
www.laeeccityreporter.coni


Legal

ATTENTION COMCAST CABLE
CUSTOMERS
On August 8, 2011, Comcast will
add Si TV, channel 635, to the Digi-
tal Preferred tier.
This channel move affects current
and new residential and commercial
subscribers in Lake City and Live
Oak. A free preview of this service
may be seen by customers who sub-
scribe to Digital Preferred prior to
the effective date.
A digital-ready television set and/or
digital equipment may be required to
view some channels. Additional
service charges may apply. Services
not available in all areas, restrictions
apply.
For more information, please call 1-
800-934-6489.
05526380
July 8, 2011
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
THIRD JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN
AND FOR COLUMBIA COUNTY,
FLORIDA
CIVIL ACTION
CASE NO.: 12-2009-CA-000569
DIVISION:
WELLS FARGO BANK, NA
Plaintiff,
vs.
THOMAS L. SLEIGHT, et al,
Defendant(s)
NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE
SALE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pur-
-suant to a Final Judgment of Mort-
gage Foreclosure dated June 23,
2011 and entered in Case No. 12-
2009-CA-000569 of the Circuit
Court of the THIRD Judicial Circuit
in and for COLUMBIA County,
Florida wherein WELLS FARGO
BANK, NA is the Plaintiff and
THOMAS L. SLEIGHT; EKATRI-
NA GRINKOV; BANK OF AMER-
ICA, NA; are the Defendants, The
Clerk of the Court will sell to the
highest and best bidder for cash at
FRONT STEPS OF THE COLUM-
BIA COUNTY COURTHOUSE at
11:00 AM, on the 27th day of July,
2011, the following described proper-
ty as set forth in said Final Judg-
ment:
LOT 25, SUZANNE SUBDIVI-
SION, UNIT 5, -A SUBDIVISION
ACCORDING TO PLAT THERE-
OF RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK
4, PAGE 100, PUBLIC RECORDS
OF COLUMBIA COUNTY, FLOR-
IDA
A/K/A 233 SE KIWI WAY, LAKE
CITY, FL 32025
Any person claiming an interest in
the surplus from the sale, if any, oth-
er'than the property owner as of the
date of the Lis Pendens must file a
claim within sixty (60) days after the
sale.
WITNESS MY HAND:and the seal
of this Court on June 27, 2011.
P. DeWitt Cason
Clerk of the Circuit Court
By:/s/B. Scippio
Deputy Clerk
NOTICE
If you are a person with a disability
who needs any accommodation in
order to participate in this proceed-
ing, you are entitled, at no cost to
you, to the provision of certain assis-
tance. Please contact Carrina Cooper,
Court Administration at 173 NE Her-
nando Avenue, Room 408, Lake
City, Florida 32055, 386-758-2163 at
least 7 days before your scheduled
court appearance, or immediately
upon receiving this notification if the
time before the scheduled appear-
ance is less than 7 days; if you are
hearing or voice impaired, call 711.
Florida Default Law Group, P.L.
P.O. Box 25018
Tampa, Florida 33622-5018
F09086172 NMNC-SPECFHLMC-
R-UNASSIGNED-Team 5.
05526438
July 8, 15, 2011


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
THIRD JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN
AND FOR COLUMBIA COUNTY,
FLORIDA
CIVIL ACTION
CASE NO.: 12-2010-CA-000495
DIVISION:
WELLS FARGO BANK, NA SUC-
CESSOR BY MERGER TO
WELLS FARGO HOME MORT-
GAGE, INC.,
Plaintiff,
vs.
CHERYLA. WORMAN, et al,
Defendant(s)
NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE
SALE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pur-
suant to a Final Judgment of Mort-
gage Foreclosure dated June 23,
2011 and entered in Case No. 12-
2010-CA-000495 of the Circuit
Court of the THIRD Judicial Circuit
in and for COLUMBIA County,
Florida wherein WELLS FARGO
BANK, NA SUCCESSOR BY
MERGER TO WELLS FARGO
HOME MORTGAGE, INC., is the


Land Clearing

Back Hoe, Dozer, Chopping, root
raking, bush hog, seeding, sod,
disking, site prep, ponds &
irrigation. Free Est! 386-623-3200

Lawn & Landscape Service

Clean Pine Straw,
You pick it up, $1.85 able
Delivery of 100 bales $260
386-688-9156

Services

DIVORCE, BANKRUPTCY,
RESUMES.
other court approved forms-
386-961-5896.

We come to you! Auto Detailing:
Wash, wax & vaccum. Pressure
Wash: Houses, mobile homes,
driveways, decks. 386-697-2224


Legal

Plaintiff and CHERYL A. WOR-
MAN; TENANT #1 N/K/A DAN-
IEL CHARGER, and TENANT #2
N/K/A ROLAND WORMAN; are
the Defendants, The Clerk of the
Court will sell to the highest and best
bidder for cash at FRONT STEPS
OF THE COLUMBIA COUNTY
COURTHOUSE at 11:00 AM, on
the 27th day of July, 2011, the fol-
lowing described property as set forth
in said Final Judgment:
LOT 20, FALLING CREEK ES-
TATES, A SUBDIVISION AC-
CORDING TO THE PLAT THERE-
OF RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK
3, PAGE 105, OF TH E PUBLIC
RECORDS OF COLUMBIA
COUNTY, FLORIDA.
TOGETHER WITH THAT CER-
TAIN MOBILE HOME LOCATED
THEREON AS A FIXTURE AND
APPURTENANCE THERETO:
2001 HORTON MIRAGE SINGLE
WIDE HOME HAVING ID NO.
H173218G.
A/K/A 536 NW NYE HUNTER
DRIVE, LAKE CITY, FL 32055
Any person claiming an interest in
the surplus from the sale, if any, oth-
er than the property owner as of the
date of the Lis Pendens must file a
claim within sixty (60) days after the
sale.
WITNESS MY HAND and the seal
of this Court on June 8, 2011.
P. DeWitt Cason
Clerk of the Circuit Court
By:/s/ B. Scippio
Deputy Clerk
NOTICE
If you are a person with a disability
who needsany accommodation in
order to participate in this proceed-
ing, you are entitled, at no cost to
you, to the provision of certain assis-
tance. Please contact Carrina Cooper,
Court Administration at 173 NE Her-
nando Avenue, Room 408, Lake
City, Florida 32055, 386-758-2163 at
least 7 days before your scheduled
court appearance, or immediately
upon receiving this notification if the
time before the scheduled appear-
ance is less than 7 days; if .you are
hearing or voice impaired, call 711.
Florida Default Law Group, PL.
P.O. Box 25018
Tampa, Florida 33622-5018
F100501.39 NMNC-SPECFHLMC-
R-UNASSIGNED-Team 5.
05526430
July 8, 15, 2011
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
THIRD JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN
AND FOR COLUMBIA COUNTY,
FLORIDA
CASE NO. 11-283-CA
BRUCE C. FULWOOD and his
wife; WANDA G. FULWOOD,
Plaintiffs,
v.
PHYLLIS LOADHOLT, ALTON L.
MIKELL; MARY MIKELL; JERRY
TYRE; MARY EDITH BASS;
CARROLL STOVER; BARBARA
IMOGENE O'QUINN; MONROE
TYRE, and the unknown spouse,
heirs, devisees, grantees, successors
and assigns, creditors and other inter-
ested persons claiming by, through,
under or against CECIL D. HUNT-
ER and BEATRICE HUNTER, de-
ceased,
Defendants
NOTICE OF ACTION
TO: PHYLLIS LOADHOLT; AL-
TON L. MIKELL; MARY MI-
KELL; JERRY TYRE; MARY ED-
ITH BASS; CARROLL STOVER;
BARBARA IMOGENE O'QUINN;
and MONROE TYRE, and the un-
known spouse, heirs, devisees, grant-
ees, successors and assigns, creditors
and other interested persons claiming
by, through, under or against CECIL
D. HUNTER and BEATRICE
HUNTER, deceased.
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED
that Plaintiffs have filed a Verified
Complaint for Reformation of War-
ranty Deed in the above-styled court
as to the following described proper-
ty located in Columbia County, Flor-
ida:
TOWNSHIP 4 SOUTH RANGE
17 EAST
Section 28: The West Half of the
Southwest Quarter (W 1/2 of SW
1/4). Containing 80 acres, more or
less.
AND
TOWNSHIP 4 SOUTH RANGE
17 EAST
Section 28: One acre of land lying in
Northeast Quarter of Southwest
Quarter (NE 1/4 of SW 1/4), begin-
ning at Southwest corner of said
Northeast Quarter of Southwest
Quarter (NE 1/4 of SW 1/4) and run
North 150 yards, thence East 64 2/3
yards, thence South 150 yards,
thence West 64 2/3 yards to place of
beginning.
Tax Parcel No.: 28-48IS17-08835-
000.
You are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses, if any, to the
Complaint on MARLIN M. FEA-
GLE, ESQUIRE, Feagle & Feagle,
Attorneys, P.A., 153 NE Maditson
Street, Post Office Box 1529, Lake
City, Florida 32056-1529, on or be
foee August 10, 2011, ant file the
original with the Clerk of Clerk of
this Court either before service on
the Plaintiff's attorney or immeditle-
ly thereafter. If you fail to anIswer, it
default will be entered against you
for the relief demanded in the Com-
plaint.
DATED this 28 day of June, 2011
P. DEWITT CASON
Clerk of Court
By:/s/ B. Scippio
Deputy Clerk
05526442
July 8, 15, 22, 29, 2011
IN THE COUNTY COURT IN
AND FOR COLUMBIA COUNTY'
FLORIDA
CASE NO. 11-521-SC
Patricia A. Chambers
339 SW Lake View Drive
Lake City, FL 32025
Plaintiff
VS


Rodger N. Butler
301 SE Bream Loop
Lake City, FL 32025
Defendant
A law suit has been filed to deter-
mine ownership and title of a certain
vehicle described as a 1989 Chevy
Van with serial #
1GCEG25Z5K7148255 located in


Legal

Lake City, Columbia County, Flori-
da.
The flowing persons) may claim
some right lille or interest therein:
Patricia A. Chambers
If you have a chtim, interest, or de-
fense in this clause, you must file
your written iilnswer or objection
with the Clerk of Court of Columbia
County within I (ldays.
(seal)
CLERK OF COURTS
BY:/S/B. SCIPPIO
Deputy Clerk
05526131
June 17, 24, 2011
July 1, 8, 2011


020 Lost & Found

FOUND BLACK PUPPY: On the
hospital side of Lake Desoto on
07/04/11, by the Gazebo.
Call (386)965-5707 to identify
Lost Dog: Black dog w/white
chest. Border Collie. Missing since
07/04 Hilton/Desoto. Name: Ali-
zaya. Cash reward. 386-292-3846
Missing dog. $200 Reward.
Thurs., 6/30. Aprox 25-301b Fe-
male, 15 yr old, black/white Bos-
ton Terrier. Last seen close to
Quail Heights. Has a scar between
her front legs. Call 386-754-6670

00 Job
SOpportunities

05526472
Activities Assistant
Must be CNA, and able to work
2-3 weekdays and most
weekends. Applicant
must be dependable, motivated
and energetic. Full time,
position. Please apply Baya
Pointe Nursing & Rehabilitation
Center 587 SE Ermine Ave.,
Lake City, Fl 32025
EOE/DFWP

Associate Reps
SUMMER WORK/GREAT PAY
Immediate FT/PT openings,
Customer sales/service,
No exp needed, conditions,
Apply Now all ages 17+
(386) 269-0883
Aurora Diagnostics;
Administrative Assistant desired;
HR, AP, and clerical experience
preferred.
Fax resume to 386-719-9596
CDL Class A Truck Driver.
Flatbed exp. for F/T SE area.
3 years exp or more. Medical'
benefits offered. Contact
Melissa or Mary @ 386-935-2773
6 Temporary Farm Workers
needed. Employer: Green River
Tobacco LLC Daviess Co., KY.
Tobacco, Straw/Hay, Row Crop,
Row Crop Produce,
Greenhouse/Nursery & Alternative
Work. Employment Dates:
09/01/11 12/16/11. Wage of
$9.48/hr. Worker guaranteed 3/4
of contract hours. Tools provided
at no cost. Free housing provided
to non commuting workers.
Transportation & subsistence
reimbursed when 50% of contract
is met..Apply for this job at the
nearest KY Office of Employment
& Training Division of Workforce
& Employment Services
Office referencing the job order
#KY0431240.
Industrial Maintenance
Technician, Experience Required
in Electrical, Controls and General
Millwright/ Mechanical work.
Experience in Hydraulics and
Pneumatics helpful. Send resume
to Maintenance Technician, 3631
US 90 East, Lake City Fl 32055.
05526490
LINCARE, leading national
respiratory company seeks
results driven Sale
Representative. Create working
relationships with MD's, nurses,
social workers and articulate our
excellent patient care with
attentive listening skills.
Competitive Base + un-capped
commission. Drug-free
workplace. EOE.
Fax resume to center manager
(386)754-2795


Sales Position available for moti-
vated individual Rountree -Moore
Toyota, Great benefits, paid train-
ing/vacation. Exp. a plus but not
necessary. Call Anthony Cosentino
386-623-7442

120 Medical
1 Employment
RN's needed. Local med-surg
ER hospital shifts. Immediate
work, instant pay, $300 sign-on
bonus. Call 352-336-0964
Lake City & Live Oak area.
w\vw.suwanneemedical.com

240 Schools &
A Utv Education0


Interested in a Medical Career?
Express Training offers
courses for beginners & exp
Nursing Assistant, $479
next class-07/11/10

Phlebotomy national certifica-
tion, $800 next class-07/11/11

Continuing education
Fees incl. books, supplies, exam
fees. Call 386-755-4401 or
expresstrainineservices.com

REPORTER Classifieds


In Print and On Line
www.lakecityreporter.com


310 Pets & Supplies

4 beautiful black & white. 10 wk
old kittens w/crystal emerald
green eyes. Litter box trained.
Wormed and Flea Fiee!
Free to good homes. 386-755-1794
FREE TO Good Home. 1 Golden
Lab. 1 Chichuahua/JRT Mix.
4 kittens, 8 weeks old and 1 young
mama cat. (352)283-2488
KITTENS. 4 white and 1 long
haired black. Had 1st shots. 10
weeks old. Cute & spunky!
$25.00. ea. 386-961-8909
PUBLISHER'S NOTE
Florida Law 828.29 requires dogs
and cats being sold to be at least 8
weeks old and have a health
certificate from a licensed
veterinarian documenting they
have mandatory shots and are
free from intestinal and external
parasites. Many species of wild-
life must be licensed by Florida
Fish and Wildlife. If you are
unsure, contact the local
office for information.

330 Livestock &
330 Supplies

Black Angus Cows & Heifers
Prices Vary
Registered & Commercial
386-719-4802


361 Farm Equipment

84 Ford 4610 Tractor.
2WD, Solid
2005 motor,$7,500. OBO
386-867-0005

402 Appliances

Frost Free Refrigerator.
Works great
$200.
386-292-3927 or 386-755-5331.

GE Dishwasher
Works great $90.
386-292-3927 or
386-755-5331.
NEW 18 cu ft White Refrigerator
/bought for a buisness/was too
large/used 4 hrs !
$350 OBO 863-258-1049
Small used freezer.
Works good.
$50.00
386-755-7933
Whirlpool washing machine.
Works great, come see.
$100.
386-755-3682


407 Computers

Compaq Computer, Many extras.
Complete Computer
$80.00
386-755-9984 or 386-292-2170


408 Furniture

Love Seat.
Good shape. $35.
Beige background with stripes
386-292-3927 or 386-755-5331.


416 Sporting Goods

Golf Clubs. Mens RH. Complete
set. 8 irons, cougar, 2 wedges, 2
putters, 4 woods, Excellent bag.
250. 386-758-7550 or 397-4629


420 Wanted to Buy

K&H TIMBER
We Buy Pine Hardwood &
Cypress. Large or small tracts.
Call 386-961-1961.

Wanted Junk Cars, Trucks, Vans.
$250 & up CASH! Free Pick Up!
NO title needed !386-878-9260
After 5pm 386- 752-3648.


430 Garage Sales

1564 NW Frontier Dr.
Lake City Country Club.
Lots of clothes, boys & ladies.
Saturday, July 9th. 8-12

Cleaning out, moving on. Inside &
out. Fum., clothing, computers,
Haviland China & more. Fri 8-5.
Sat 8-1. 493 NW Clubview Cr.
Hugh Sale! Sat. 7/9. 8-? South of
town in the old Chrch on the Way
bldg near high school. Furniture.
.mattresses, dishes, clothes, more.
PUBLISHER'S NOTE
All Yard Sale Ads
Must be Pre-Paid.

Saturday, July 9th 7am ?
575 NW Gwen Lake Ave. Turn off
Hwy 90 by the Stop & Go.
Bike, clothes, household, Misc.


440 Miscellaneous
HIGH WHEEL Pushmower
$85.00
386-292-3027 or
386-755-5331,.

Sony Playstation 2 System.
Memory card, one 'onult'ller.
5 games. In giood ondtto t.
$95.01, ,ISt t 4 7 t I


Stop gnat & Mosqlnut bites! Buy
Swamp Gatot All liaturl insect re-
pellent. Family stt'e, Use head to
toe. Available at The Home Depot.
Summer Barbecue Special
Tow Behind
Grill/Smoker, $1.250 OBO.
386-719-4802


630 Mobile Homes
630 for Rent







2/2 Units, clean, well maintained,
nice safe park setting, 2 miles to
downtown Lake City, $575 month
+ $575 sec dep, 386-984-8448
13th Month FREE!!
3/1 w/security system. $800.mo .
Also, small home on 10 ac. $400.
Ft. White area. Avail 8/1. Call for
more deatils. 386-497-1464
3/2 DWMH, 1/2 ac. Shaded lot.
Paved Rd, 2 porches, 50'X50'
fenced small dog run. $600. mo +
$750 dep. References Req'd.
386-758-7184 or 984-0954
3/2 S of Lake City, (Branford area)
$575 month plus security
386-590-0642 or 386-867-1833
www.suwanneevalleyproperties.com
4 bedroom Den, w/d hook up. In,
Ft. White. Appliance included.
$800. mo. $500. sec. Call Billie
386-754-6970 or 404-849-8277
Clean 2br/2ba on 5 acres. Nice un-
furnished MH w/well water. Coun-
try setting just north of LC. $400.
mo. 1st, last & sec. (954)818-4481
Mobile Homes for rent in
White Springs, Lake City & Ft.
White Contact 386-623-3404
or 386-365-1919
Nice clean 2&3 bdrm, Five Points,
NO PETS,
also 3 bd on the
Westside, 386-961-1482
X-Clean 2/2 SW, 8 mi NW of VA.
Clean acre lot, nice area. $500. mo
+ dep No dogs Non-smoking
environment.386-961-9181

64 Mobile Homes
640 for Sale
Handy man special, 94 Fleetwood
DWMH. 3/2 on 5 acres in Ft.
White. Owner Fin. $3,000 dn.
$850mo. $99,900 352-215-1018
www.LandOwnerFinancing.com
PALM HARBOR Homes. Has
Closed 2 Model Centers. Save up
to 60K on select models
Call Today! .800-622-2832
NEW D/W Reduced Thousands.
3br/2ba set, delivery, A/C
skirting, steps. $39,900.
Call Ken (386)754-8844
AS IS, WHERE IS...32X80, 4/2,
LR/Den, needs carpet, paint, 2400
sqft. has metal roof, vinyl siding.
$31,000. Randy 386-754-0198
FIRE YOUR LANDLORD
TO OWN WHAT YOUR
THROWING AWAY IN RENT.
CALL MIKE 386-754-8844
NEW 32X70 4/3. 2K sqft+. L/R,
DenSidex side, glasstop range,
D/W. Del, set, Steps, A/C, skirt-
ing. $59,900. Ken (386)754-8844
OWNER FINANCE 40% Down
w/land Equity or CASH on any
new or used singlewide or Double-
wide. Randy 386-754-0198
The Economy has forced
me to cut the price on my
3 bedroom, 2 bath home to
$38K (352)-870-5983


705 Rooms for Rent

New furnished bedroom apt in a
home, private entrance & bath, in-
cludes utilities, trash, cable, frig &
pest control. $450 mo + dep. Avail
8/1. 386-752-2020 SW Lake City

710 Unfurnished Apt.
0 For Rent








05526481
SPRING HILL VILLAGE
Excellent High Springs location.
1, 2 & 3 bedroom floor-plans;
some with garages.
Call 386-454-1469
or visit our website:
www.springhillvillage.net

1 bedroom Apartment. Quiet,
Private street. $400. mo
plus security deposit.
386-344-3715
IBR APT.
Dntotown Location, Clean.
$450 mo. plus Security.
NO PETS. Call 386-755-3456
2/1 w/garage & washer/dryer
hookups. East side of town,
Call for details
386-755-6867
2BR/1.5BA w/garage
5 minutes from VA hospital.
Call for details.
386-755-4590 or 365-5150
A Landlord You Can Love!
2 br Apts $575. & up + sec. Great
area. CH/A washer/dryer hookups.
386-758-9351/352-208-2421
Furnished or unfurnished
Townhomes on the golf course.
$750. mo. plus security. Includes
water. 386-752-9626
NICE APT Downtown. Remod-
eled 1 bedroom. Kitchen, dining,
living room. $450. mo plus sec.
386-362-8075 or 386-754-2951


^ P 4y U


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1. 2. N.. .1 bedroom",
Call TODAY 180-462 WiSh
or \ i,,il tl,, at onO lplaccoill
F(jual I hlilsill 01111,111111111\ I










Classified Department: 755-5440


LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED FRIDAY, JULY 8, 2011


710 Unfurnished Apt.
1 For Rent
Summer Special! 12th mo Free
w/signed yr lease. Updated, w/tile
floors/fresh paint. Great area.
From $450.+sec. 386-752-9626
The Lakes Apts. Studios & 1Br's
from $135/wk. Utit. & cable incl.,
Sec 8 vouchers accepted, monthly
rates avail Call 386-752-2741

720 Furnished Apts.
2v For Rent
lbr Apt. includes water, elec, &
cable. $595. mo. Good area. 7
minutes from town. References &
sec. req'd. No pets. 386-719-4808
Rooms for Rent. Hillcrest, Sands,
Columbia. All furnished. Electric,
cable, fridge, microwave. Weekly
or monthly rates. 1 person $135,
2 persons $150. weekly
386-752-5808

Unfurnished
730 HomeFor Rent
lbr/1.5ba Country Cottage, Cathe-
dral ceilings, brick fireplace, wash-
er/dryer, ac fenced, private, some
pets, lease. 1st, last, sec, ref. Lake
City area $650mo. 352-494-1989
lbr/lba Free ele. Utilities incl. 4mi
S. Lake City. $300dep. $375mo.
386-590-0642 or 386-867-1833
www.suwanneevalleyproperties.com
2br Private Country
SHome. Remodeled,
everything is new. Large yard.
386-752-1444

/11208 73rd Ct. Live Oak..
4/3 brick home in a country .
subdivision $700./ mo + security
/ 204 NW Guerdon
Rd...Brand new 3/2 home re-
duced to $700./mo + security
/ 250 SW Wise Dr..3/2 Execu-
tive home in restricted Wise Es-
tates. $1350./mo + secuirty
/ 390 SW Wilshire Dr...
Gorgeous upscale 3/2 on
culdesac in Callaway
$1300./mo + security
/ COMING SOON! 4/2 brick
home in Springfield Estates on
Brandy Way. Call for additional
information!
Call Kayla Carbona @
386-623-9650
3bedroom/2bath in town
No Pets!
$650. mo. plus deposit
386-758-0057
3br/1.5b'a. Very clean, CH/A
Fenced (privacy) large back yard.
Nice area/location. $750. mo $750.
dep. Ref's req4d. (941)920-4535
Callaway S/D. Beautiful 4/2.
2250sf. 1/2 ac. privacy fenced lot.
Office, Ig. screened porch., fire-
place, hardwood floors. No pets.
$1500 mo. Avail. 8/1. 623-7617
Family Home 3/2, Ir, dr, fam rm
w/ fp,garage, fenced back yd.
Nice area. $1100 mo + dep Martha
Jo Khachigan, Realtor 623-2848
Unfurnished 2 bedroom/1 bath
house. $700.00 per month.
First, last and security Firm.
386-590-5333
750 Business &
50 Office Rentals
FOR LEASE: Downtown office
space. Convenient to
Court house.
Call 386-755-3456
For Lease: E Baya Ave. Two -
1000 sqft office space units or
combined for 2000 sqft. 386-984-
0622 or weekends 386-497-4762
OFFICE SPACE for lease.
Oak Hill Plaza. 900 sqft
$675mo/$695. sec dep.
Tom 386-961-1086 DCA Realtor

790 Vacation Rentals
Horseshoe Beach Scalloping Spcl
Gulf Front 2br, w/lg porch, dock,
fish sink. wkend $395./wk $895.
386-235-3633/352-498-5986
alwaysonvacation.com #419-181
"Florida's Last Frontier"

805 Lots for Sale
1/4 acre, new well, septic and
power, paved rd, owner fin, no
down pyrri't, $24,900,
($256 month) 352-215-1018
www.LandOwnerFinancing.com
PUBLISHER'S NOTE
All real estate advertising in this
newspaper is subject to the fair
housing act which makes it illegal
to advertise "any preference,
limitation, or discrimination based
on race, color, religion, sex,
disability, familial status or nation-
al origin; or any intention to make
such preference, limitation or
discrimination." Familial status
includes children under the age of
18 living with parents or legal
custodians, pregnant women and
people securing custody of chil-
dren under the age of 18. This
newspaper will not knowingly
accept any advertising for real es-
tate which is in violation of the


.805 Lots for Sale
law. Our readers are hereby in-
formed that all dwellings adver-
tised in this newspaper are availa-
ble on an equal opportunity basis.
To complain of discrimination call
HUD toll free at 1-800-669-9777,
the toll free
telephone number to the hearing
impaired is 1-800-927-9275.

810 Home for Sale
Handyman Special
Off Turner Rd. 2br/1.5ba.
Half acre fenced lot w/shed.
Asking $55,000. (352)335-8330

820 Farms&
Acreage
10-ac lot. Well/septic/pp. Owner
financing $300 dn, $663 mo 8.9%,
25 yrs. Deas Bullard Properties
386-752-4339 www.landnfl.com
4 1/2 acre lot. Lake Jeffery Road.
Gorgeous Oaks!Paved Rd
Owner Financing! NO DOWN!
$59,900. $525mo 352-215-1018.
www.LandOwnerFinancing.com
S4 acres, Wellborn, New Well
installed, Beautifully wooded
w/cleared Home Site, owner fin,
no down, $39,900, $410 mon
Call 352-215-1018
www.LandOwnerFinancing.com
FARM- 7 stall bam, Apt.
17+ acres cross fenced.
Close in $895. mo.
386-961-1086

830 Commercial
8 Property

05526409
FOR SALE LAKE CITY
FORMER 84 LUMBER Zoned
Commercial Intensive on
4.2 +/- Acres with an 18,300
S.F. main building at 1824 W.
US Highway 90; contact
Crystal 724 228-3636 x 1349
4 UNIT Apt. Bldg. All 1/1/ w/ex-
tra rooms. Clean, good tenants and
remodeled. Downtown. $160,000.
386-362-8075 or 754-2951 .

870 Real Estate
7/v Wanted
I Buy Houses
CASH!
Quick Sale Fair Price
386-269-0605

950 Cars for Sale
1986 Chevy Monte Carlo SS,
78k miles, one owner. $10,000.
All original.
386-752-1313 or 904-718-6747
2006 Toyota Scion XB,
41,000 mi. $13,000.
Paid over $24,000 new.
386-752-1313 or 904-718-6747


Bring the picture in or
we will take it for youl
* Ad runs 10 consecutive days
with a description and photo in the
newspaper and online E-edition.
* Ad runs 10 consecutive days as a
classified line ad online.
- You must include vehicle price.
* All ads are prepaid.
* Private party only.




2006 EF250
Ford Van
3/4 ton, metal work
shelvesnadder rack,
60K miles, exc. cond.'
$10,500
Call
386-555-5555
If you don't sell your vehicle
during the first 10 days, you
can run the same vehicle ad
for 10 additional days for
only $15.00
Terms and conditions remain the
same for the additional run.


To et ou


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