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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028308/01601
 Material Information
Title: The Lake City reporter
Uniform Title: Lake City reporter (Lake City, Fla. 1967)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: John H. Perry
Place of Publication: Lake City Fla
Publication Date: 7/7/2011
Frequency: daily (monday through friday)[<1969>-]
weekly[ former 1967-<1968>]
daily
normalized irregular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Lake City (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Columbia County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Columbia -- Lake City
Coordinates: 30.189722 x -82.639722 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 95, no. 4 (Oct. 5, 1967)-
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000358016
oclc - 33283560
notis - ABZ6316
lccn - sn 95047175
sobekcm - UF00028308_01569
System ID: UF00028308:01601
 Related Items
Preceded by: Lake City reporter and Columbia gazette

Full Text





$6,800 raised
Alter Eagles
fundraiser a
big success.
-004 1 1 ****3-DrIGIT 326
LIB OF FLORIDA HISTORY
PO BOX 117007
205 SMA UNIV OF FLORIDA
GAINESVILLE FL 32611-1943


"4611.U:


Storm brewing
Four local
players in
showcase.
Sports, I B


ity


On trial
Jury selection
underway in
Clemens case.
Sports, IB


Reporter


Thursday, July 7, 201 I www.lakecityreporter.com Vol. 137, No. 138 0 75 cents


ONE HURT IN CRASH

-I


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Officers from the Lake City Police Department and Columbia County Sheriffs Office confer at the scene of a
two-vehicle crash Wednesday morning on U.S. 90 near Publix. One of the drivers was taken to a hospital by
ambulance. Further details were not available at press time.



Services set for Alfonso Levy


From staff reports
Funeral services for Alfonso
William Levy are set for 11 a.m.
Saturday at the Florida Gateway
College facility named for him,
the Alfonso Levy Performing
Arts Center.
The family is receiving visi-
tors 5 to 7 p.m. Friday at St.
James Episcopal Church.
Levy, who died July 3, leaves
behind a legacy of music, edu-
cation and community service
in Columbia County.
He worked in the Columbia
County School District for 30
years as a music teacher, musi-


director and later principal of
Niblack Elementary School.
Levy served as president and
member of several local and
state organizations and was
musical conductor for a vari-
ety of performances. He was
also co-founder of the Music,
Art, Drama and Dance Festival
-MADDFEST.
FGC named its performing
arts center in his honor Oct.
15, 1993.
Donations to the Alfonso Levy
Memorial Scholarship Fund at
Columbia Bank are requested
in lieu of flowers.


COUNTY COMMISSION PREVIEW



County to iron


out details of


Lifeguard pact


By TONY BRITT
tbritt@lakecityreporter.com
Some of the final details in an
agreement privatizing ambulance
services in Columbia County will
be ironed out during tonight's
county commission meeting.
County officials are slated to
discuss at least four items related
to Lifeguard Ambulance becom-
ing the county's ambulance ser-
vice provider.
The meetingwilltakeplace 7p.m.
Thursday at the Columbia County
School Board Administrative
Complex Auditorium, 372 W.
Duval St.
Commissioners are slated to
adopt an interlocal cost-sharing
agreement with the city concern-
ing the combined dispatch center,
which will handle calls for both
city and county fire units as well
as EMS. The agreement callsfor.
the city to pay $177,154 annually
for the service. The agreement
has a five-year initial term, with a
30-day opt-out provision.
The total cost for the facility
was $1,418,682 and the county
paid a majority of the costs.
Officials are also slated to dis-
cuss lease agreements for EMS
buildings and equipment.
"Those are being provided
to Lifeguard during the initial
year for no lease payment," said
Dale Williams, county manager.
"They'll be re-evaluated at the end
of one year." .
The EMS stations will be
UFEGUARD continued on 3A


Solid waste
contract to be
considered

By TONY BRITT
tbritt@lakecityreporter.com
Columbia County could have
a new solid waste vendor at the
near future..
The county's contract with
Waste Pro, the current solid
waste collection provider, expires
Sept. 30 and county officials have
been accepting bids from pro-
spective service providers.
During tonight's 7 p.m.
Columbia County Commission
meeting, at the Columbia County
School Board Administrative
Complex Auditorium, 372 W.
Duval St, county officials are
scheduled to review the bids.
The county's solid waste collec-
tion agreements are for five-year
contracts.
Dale Williams, county manag-
er, said the county has received
six bids from potential vendors.
"I think realistically three of
those bids are being considered,"
he said, noting the bids are from
Waste Pro, Veolia and Republic
Services. (Republic services cur-
rently serves as the city's solid
waste collection provider.) .
Williams said the final decision
will be based on what options,
if any, county commissioners
WASTE continued on 3A


CRA will help

fund 2 projects


City accepts
donation of
Ezekiel House.
By ANTONIA ROBINSON
arobinson@lakecityreporter.com
Money from
the Community
Redevelopment Agency
will help fund two projects
for the City of Lake City.
The City Council
approved accepting a
property donation from
the Suwannee Valley
Rescue Mission after a
phase one environmental
audit comes back clean
during a regular meeting
Tuesday night
The city received a let-
ter from the rescue mis-
sion dated June 5 offering


to donate the property,
said Wendell Johnson, city
manager.
The property is a burned
down house located at 497
NE Hernando St., he said.
It was formerly known as
the Ezekiel House.
The property has accu-
mulated $1,632.58 in delin-
quent taxes, and demoli-
tion costs are estimated
at $5,250, Johnson said.
Funding for the demoli-
tion and payment of delin-
quent taxes would, come
from CRA Tax Increment
Financing.
Also during the meet-
ing, the council apprQved
funding an appraisal of the
Samuel P Vann Property
on NW Marion Avenue
CRA continued on 3A


COURTESY PHOTO
The Alter Eagles perform at Florida Gateway College Friday evening.

Benefit concert raises $6,800


From staff reports
It was a great night that turned into a
great benefit Florida Gateway College's
Alter Eagles performance on July 1.
brought in more than $6,800. Proceeds
from the event, after expenses, will go to
two local charities.
Nearly 1,000 people attended the
show, which took place in the college's
Howard Conference Center.
Proceeds from the event will be evenly


split between The Foundation for Florida
Gateway College and the United Way of
the Suwannee Valley. Each will receive
more than $1,500, according to Troy
Roberts, Public Information Coordinator,
Florida Gateway College.
The Foundation raises private funds to
support FGC students and enhance the
college mission. Since its inception in
1969, The
BENEFIT continued on 3A


Woman

jailed on

burglary

charges
From staff reports

A local woman is in jail
and faces multiple bur-
glary-related charges after
several stolen items were
discovered in her truck,
sheriff's officials said.
Kelly Elizabeth Johnson,
34, 130 SW Camel Glen,
was charged with burglary,
dealing in stolen property,
grand theft, petit theft, tres-
passing and violation of
probation. She was booked
into the Columbia County
Detention Facility on $2,498
bond.
According to Columbia
BURGLARY continued on 3A


Critics say NASA ignoring its 'backup plan' rule


By SETH BORENSTEIN
AP Science Writer

CAPE CANAVERAL A somewhat
generational battle over NASA's future is
escalating even as NASA is about to close
the book on the space shuttle era.
w^ ^m ~ s^v ^v .:!


Heroic former astronauts and some cur-
rent top managers are stepping up their
criticism of an agencyy they see ending its
only way to get astronauts into space and
going nowhere fast. NASA's chief counters
that his agency is heading somewhere
new for a change and dismisses critics as
people who "must all be living on another


planet."
The critics say NASA is ignoring its own
long-standing advice: Have a backup plan.
Once shuttle Atlantis has completed its
mission, NASA won't have a way to get
into space for years except hitching a ride
on the Russian Soyuz spacecraft. A new
design will come from private developers,


but that will take at least three years, prob-
ably longer, experts believe.
First moonwalker Neil Armstrong, first
American in orbit John Glenn, Mission
Control founder Chris Kraft, Apollo 13
commander Jim Lovell, first shuttle pilot
NASA continued on 3A


CALL US:
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Voice: 755-5445
Fax: 752-9400


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Opinion
People..
Obituaries ...
Advice & Comics
Puzzles .


TODAY IN
HEALTH
I .p' "- li1t". :.lte
*'_-,tter/, -nr,- .'.


COMING
FRIDAY
. '-,Ir-'j it .3 :;r.. r- ,
, ,-rt-r-r 2,1 ,- ,--I 32,


I I I










LAKE CITY REPORTER DAILY BRIEFING THURSDAY, JULY 7, 2011


S3 Wednesday:
A-, H Afternoon: 8-3-9


t;;t ;~


Wednesday:
Afternoon: 9-2-6-6


ezvuatdc.
Tuesday:
11-16-21-22-26


PEOPLE IN THE NEWS


Aniston goes raunchy for 'Horrible Bosses'


NEW YORK

I n her new film, "Horrible
Bosses," Jennifer Aniston's
character is one you haven't
seen her play before. She's a
dentist who sexually harasses
her assistant, complete with lewd
dialogue, revealing outfits and out-
landish advances.
She's the latest actress to take
on a raunchy role usually reserved
for men, following the recent trail
of trash talk from Cameron Diaz
in "Bad Teacher" and the cast of
"Bridesmaids."
Better known for playing sweeter
characters in romantic comedies,
Aniston acknowledges that her
"Bosses" role is a "departure," but
she said she couldn't resist sinking
her "teeth into something this juicy."
'The minute it showed up at my
door and I read her first scene I was
dying to do it," the actress said in a
recent interview to promote the film,
which opens Friday.
Aniston also admits, however, that
when it came time to do the charac-
ter, she wondered what she had got-
ten herself into.
'The truth is when you get there
you go, 'Oh God, now I have to do
this like in front of people,"' she said.
Aniston refers to one scene where
she's trying to blackmail her assis-
tant (Charlie Day) into having an
affair with her using photos she took
of him while he was unconscious.
"It's like, you think it's so hys-
terical and great," she explains, "but
then comes the day when you actu-
ally have to straddle sweet Charlie
Day with his pants down and it's
just that day, you're like, 'Oh God. I
choose to do this, right?' Yes."

James Spader hired full-
time for 'The Office'
NEW YORK NBC has signed
James Spader as a full-time cast
member of 'The Office."
The network announced


ASSOCIATED PRES
Jennifer Aniston, a cast member in 'Horrible Bosses,' signs autographs for fans at
the premiere of the film, Thursday in Los Angeles. The film is released on July 8.


[Wednesday that
Spader will reprise
his guest role
as manipulative
salesman Robert
SCalifornia when the
comedy returns this
Spader fall.
California will
have been hired over the summer
as the new manager of the Scranton
office of Dunder Mifflin paper com-
pany.

Michaels suit over Tonys
accident moved to NY
LOS ANGELES Bret Michaels'
lawsuit over an
accident at the Tony
Awards that he
claims nearly killed
him is heading east
after a federal judge
in Los Angeles
Michaels determined the case
should be heard in
New York.


U.S. District Judge Dolly Gee
ruled Tuesday it makes more sense
the case to be heard in Manhattan.
Michaels sued CBS Broadcasting
and organizers of the awards show
in Los Angeles in March, claiming
the injury contributed to a brain
hemorrhage that nearly killed him.

Family in Palin stalker
case files complaint
ANCHORAGE The family of a
19-year-old man accused of stalking
Sarah Palin is alleging harassment
by a Pennsylvania trooper in connec-
tion with the former Alaska governor
and 2008 Republican vice presiden-
tial candidate. A complaint filed this
week said trooper Thomas Powell
showed up at Shawn Christy's
McAdoo, Pa., home and asked the
teen if he was planning to attend a
book signing featuring Palin and her
daughter Bristol at Minnesota's Mall
of America. Christy has a restraining
order against him.
* Associated Press


, Celebrity Birthdays


* Rock star Ringo Starr is 71. N Actress Cree Summer is
* Actress Roz Ryan is 60. 42.
* Actor Billy Campbell is 52. 0 Olympic silver and bronze
* Actor-comedian Jim medal figure skater Michelle
Gaffigan is 45. Kwan is 31.
* Actress Jorja Fox is 43. N Rapper Cassidy is 29.
Daily Scripture
"Heaven and earth will pass
away, but my words will-never
pass away."
Matthew 24:35
Thought for Today
"Memory depends very much
on the perspicuity, regular-
ity, and order of our thoughts.
Many complain of the want of
memory, when the defect is in
their judgment; and others, by
grasping at all, retain nothing."
Margaret Fuller,
American critic and social reformer (1810-1850)

Lake City Reporter


HOW TO REACH US
Main number........(386) 752-1293
Fax number ..............752-9400
Circulation ...............755-5445
Online... www.lakecityreporter.com
The Lake City Reporter, an affiliate of
Community Newspapers Inc., is pub-
lished Tuesday through Sunday at 180
E. Duval St., Lake City, Fla. 32055.
Periodical postage paid at Lake City, Fla.
Member Audit Bureau.of Circulation and
The Associated Press.
All material herein is property of the Lake
City Reporter. Reproduction in whole or
In part is forbidden without the permis-
sion of the publisher. U.S.. Postal Service
No. 310-880.
POSTMASTER: Send address changes
to Lake City Reporter, P.O. Box 1709,
Lake City, Fla. 32056.
PublisherTodd Wilson.... 754-0418
(twilson@lakecityreporter.com)
NEWS
Editor Robert Bridges .....754-0428
(rbridges@lakecityreporter.com)
ADVERTISING
Director Ashley Butcher ...754-0417
(abutcher@lakecityreporter.com)
CLASSIFIED
To place a classified ad, call 755-5440


BUSINESS
Controller Sue Brannon... .754-0419
(sbrannon@lakecityreporter.com)
CIRCULATION
Home delivery of the Lake City Reporter
should be completed by 6:30 a.m.
Tuesday through Saturday, and by 730
a.m. on Sunday.
Please call 386-755-5445 to report any
problems with your delivery service.
In Columbia County, customers should
call before 10:30 am. to report a'ser-
vice error for same day re-delivery. After
10:30 a.m., next day re-delivery or ser-
vice related credits will.be issued.
In all other counties where home delivery
is available, next day re-delivery or ser-
vice related credits will be issued.
Circulation ...............755-5445
(circulation@lakectyreporter.com)
Home delivery rates
(Tuesday through Sunday)
12 Weeks .................. $26.32
24 Weeks............. ....$48.79
52 Weeks ................$83.46
Rates indude 7% sales tax
Mail rates
12 Weeks ............... $41.40
24 Weeks ................. $82.80
.52 Weeks .................$179.40


CORRECTION


A vote by the Lake City City Council to grant a tempo-
rary three percent pay raises to some employees occurred
Tuesday night. Due to an editing error, a reference in a relat-
ed story in the Wednesday edition suggested otherwise.


Beached pygmy
sperm whale dies
FORT PIERCE A
necropsy is underway to
determine why a pygmy
sperm whale beached
itself on central Florida's
Atlantic coast
Beachgoers tried to
keep the 10-foot-long male
whale alive Tuesday, but
the sea mammal died
shortly after a rescue
attempt The whale had
beached itself near the
Wabasso Beach Park in
Indian River County.
Steve McCulloch
of the Harbor Branch
Oceanographic Institute
in Fort Pierce said pygmy
sperm whales often suffer
from a heart condition.

Gimenez installed
as new mayor
MIAMI Miami-Dade
County officially has a new
mayor.
Carlos Gimenez was
sworn in during a ceremo-
ny Wednesday afternoon
in downtown Miami.
Gimenez beat out
former Hialeah Mayor
Julio Robaina in a runoff
election last week. They
were the top two vote-get-
ters in a crowded field
of 11 candidates vying
to replace former Mayor
Carlos Alvarez, who was
ousted in a March recall.
Former 2 Live Crew
rapper Luther "Luke"
Campbell was among the
other candidates in'the
May 24 special election.
He finished fourth, behind
former state Rep. Marcelo
Llorente.

Circuit judge
urged to withdraw
MIAMI- The
estranged wife of deceased
Venezuelan President
Carlos Andres Perez
wants the judge to step
aside from a family legal
struggle over Perez's final


A prayer goes a long way
Corey Stroud prays at a Caylee Anthony memorial in Orlando
Wednesday. Anthony waits to learn if she could spend her
first night out of jail in almost three years since she was first
accused in the case. It's possible that Judge.Belvin Perry
could sentence her Thursday to time already served for those
crimes. The four counts of lying to'sheriff's deputies each
carry a maximum sentence of one year.


burial site.
Attorneys for Blanca
Rodriguez de Perez con-
tend in a new motion
that Miami-Dade Circuit
Judge Arthur Rothenberg
is biased against her.
Rodriguez de Perez cites
comments Rothenberg ,
made last month referring
to Perez's temporary crypt
in Miami as his final rest-
ing place.

Juror: Casey
Anthony needs help
ST. PETERSBURG -
An alternate juror in the
Casey Anthony murder
trial said he feels compas-
sion for the young woman
and hopes she will get
help.
Russell Huekler said
Anthony can, "no longer
live a life of lies."
Jurors acquitted
Anthony on Tuesday
of killing her 2-year-old
daughter Caylee. The case
was heard in Orlando but
the jurors were all from
Pinellas County due to
publicity surrounding the
case.
The 51-year-old high
school teacher said pros-


ecutors didn't establish a
motive or prove murder.
He said the jury worked
hard and the 12,jurors
who rendered the ver-
dict followed the judge's
instructions and likely
felt that "the prosecution
didn't meet their burden of
proof."

Dozens of parrots
found neglected
SEBRING Dozens
of parrots have been
found dead or dehydrated
and starving at a central
Florida home.
Jeff McLain of Orlando-
based Parrots As Pets
Rescue said he was con-
tacted about the birds
Monday by caretakers of a
rental property in Sebring.
McLain said about two
dozen parrots were found
alive and about 50 were
found dead.
McLain's group and
Florida Parrot Rescue
took the living birds from
a locked enclosure on the
property, where they had
been packed into insect-
infested cages under a
tarp.
* Associated Press


Pensacola
93j 77


Tallahassee *
95/74
. /.
Panama City
90.' 75


Valdosta
. 97/72
Lake City,
96/70
Gainesvifle *
96/70
Ocala


Tam
93,


A,
*AJ...~.tA.. *.A"~A A


TEMPERATURES
High Tuesday
Low Tuesday
Normal high
Normal low
Record high
Record low

PRECIPITATION
Tuesday
Month total
Year total
Normal month-to-date
Normal year-to-date,


96
71
91
70
99 in 1902
64 in 1947


0.00"
0.00"
19.89"
1.07"
25.10"


': -";"'" '-"' i ^ *;^" -'
. ;*-. ~.':j .. : ', .**-
. 7a Ip 7p
' Wednesday


.CHANCE CHANCE
-STORMS -STORMS


HI 94 LO 73 HI94 LO 74


City Thursday Friday
* Jacksondle Cape Canaveral ; ;5. r ;5 =
93 73 Daytona Beach 88/75/t 91/75/t
\ Ft. Lauderdale 90/79/t 91/79/t
D ayaBeach Fort Myers 91/76/t 92/77/t
90,73 Gainesville 96/72/pc 94/72/t


p5/71 0 i I ,..
5/n I Key West
Orando Cape Canaveral Lake City
93 14 90 7 ake City
Miami
'pa e Naples
West Palm Beach Ocala
8S 77 Orlando
S FL Lauderdale Panama City
Ft Myers S 7S Pensacola
9Q4. 6 Naples Tallahassee
S 1 ,6 Miami Tampa
y W 7 Valdosta
Key West W. Palm Beach


O1'J i'


SUN
Sunrise today 6:35 a.m.
Sunset today 8:36 p.m.
Sunrise tom. 6:35 a.m.
Sunset tom. 8:36 p.m.

MOON
Moonrise today 12:05 p.m.
Moonset today
Moonrise tom. 1:09 p.m.
Moonset tom. 12:12 a.m.


July July July July
8 15 23 30
First Full Last New


On this date in
1893, an F5 tor-
nado moved through
Storm Lake and
Pomeroy, Iowa.
Eighty percent
of Pomeroy was
destroyed, photos
from the town
showed most of the
town without build-
ings or trees left.


93/74/t
88/80/t
97'72?'t
91 ;;3 I




91 7 21
9 1-4

9t. p: [
89 6 I


93/75/t
90/81/t
94!73't
91 7i I
.9 i
93 ,4 I
9 2 7 ; c.
941 7 pc
q4 ic PC
97 74 p.
1 77 I
97 73 p,
91 78 I


An exclusive
service
brought to
RTM our readers
10mitestob by
Today's by
ultraviolet The Weather
radiation risk Channel.
for the area on
a scale from 0 -
to 10_+.

weather.com

**1 Forecasts, data and
graphics 2011 Weather
i I Central, LP, Madison, Wis.
weather J www.weatherpubllsher.com


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CHANCE CHANCE CHANCE
-STORMS -STORMS -STORMS


HI 96 LO HI 97 O 72to HI 94 LO 73


^ ^ j fl j~ ^ ^^ ^ .^ ^ ^ .r^


illr:II


Page Editor: Jason M. Walker, 754-0430


S


aJ cksonville











Page Editor: Brandon Finley, 754-0420 LAKE CITY REPORTER NEWS THURSDAY, JULY 7, 2011


NASA: Agency not following its own,on rules, say critics
Continued From Page 1A


Robert Crippen and others
are pushing for a last min-
ute reprieve for the about-
to-be-retired space shuttle
fleet. They're even urging
a delay of Friday's final
launch. They may get
a delay of a day or two
because of bad weather.
But the NASA veterans
are looking for a pause of
more than a year, until more
shuttle parts are ready to
keep flying and extend the
30-year program.
Back in June, as Atlantis
headed to the launch pad,


launch director Mike
Leinbach on a live audio
loop groused to his fel-
low workers "we're all vic-
tims of poor policy out of
Washington, D.C.," for not
having a iew mission for
the post-shuttle era.
Glenn, who returned
to space at the age of 77
by flying on the shuttle
Discovery in 1998, said: "I
told the president, 'We're
violating one of NASA's
critical design criteria.'"
That means there must
be a backup system for get-


ting into space and bring-
ing astronauts home from
the International Space
Station.
Armstrong, Kraft and
Lovell sent a letter June
30 to President Barack
Obama and NASA chief
Charles Bolden asking that
they. keep shuttles flying
and delay this final launch.
Glenn, who wasn't involved
in the letter campaign, is
also calling it a mistake
to end the space shuttle
program planned since
2004.


Kraft said he consid-
ered a backup crucial as
he ran Mission Control or
oversaw the people who
did missions from the
Mercury days of the 1960s
through early space shuttle
days. He said it is still pos-
sible at this late date to
put Atlantis' final mission
on hold while NASA builds
new external fuel tanks and
boosters for future shuttle
flights a process that
would delay the launch
about 18 months.
"It's a generational thing.


It's a culture thing and
mostly it's a political thing,"
said Kraft, 87. Nearly all
the signees of the letter are
in their 70s and 80s. Glenn,
who didn't sign the letter,
will turn 90 this month.
It's a fight Kraft has
waged for at least three
years, pulling in Armstrong,
80, and others. Armstrong,
in an email to The
Associated Press, wrote:
"Chris is an exceptional
engineer and manager who
has always been reliable in
the many cases where he


held the success or failure
of American human space
flight in his hands." He
wrote that if Kraft thinks
this is too risky a plan, "I
can readily accept that."
For his part, NASA
Administrator Bolden, a
former shuttle commander,
defended the shuttle retire-
ment and post-shuttle plans
in a speech last week at the
National Press Club.
"American leadership in
space will continue at least
for the next half century."
Bolden said.


BURGLARY: Local woman jailed


Continued From Page 1A
County Sheriff's reports,
on Sunday deputy Brian
Lucas investigated a
theft at a home in south-
ern Columbia County in
which the victim reported
the theft of two washing
,machines and pieces of
farm equipment The items
were valued at $300.
Ono Tuesday the same
victim saw what was
described as a "suspi-
cious" vehicle at the, same


home that was burglarized
Sunday.
'The victim notified the
Columbia County Sheriff's
Office that the suspect was
still on the property," said
Sgt. Ed Seifert, Columbia
County Sheriff's Office
public information officer.
'The victim observed that
the suspect had additional
stolen items from the prop-
erty in her truck. Deputy
sheriff Sean Sikes arrived


at the scene and took the
suspect into custody."
Seifert said Det. Glen
Wyche was able to link
both burglaries to the sus-
pect It was alleged that
the suspect was stealing
the items to sell for scrap,
Seifert said.
Johnson was arrested
around 6 p.m. Tuesday
and booked into jail
*without incident, reports
said.


CRA: Will fund two city projects


Continued From Page 1A
and Franklin Street.
The property has been
identified as a potential spot
for relocation of the Lake
City-Columbia County
Historical Museum.
The city and museum
have been in talks since
last September about pos-
sibly relocating, Johnson


said. The museum board
sent a letter of interest in
the project dated June 8.
City officials have
also talked to the Lake
City-Columbia County
Chamber of Commerce
about moving.
There is no commit-
ment from either organiza-


tion, but the appraisal is
the first step to see if the
move could be a reality, he
said.
"It's a step at a time,"
Johnson said.
The appraisal is estimat-
ed to not exceed $5,000
and will come from CRA
funding.


BENEFIT: Concert raises $6,800


Continued From Page,
Foundation for Florida
Gateway College has
funded almost $10 mil-
lion in support to the
college through student


scholarships and program
enhancement
United Way of the
Suwannee Valley collects
money and distributes


funds to approved agen-
cies who offer assistance
to people in need or to
%an agency of a donor's
choice.


LIFEGUARD: Final details WASTE


Continued From Page 1A

located in Columbia
City, Columbia County
Fairgrounds and at the Lake
City Public Safety Building,
through a separate agree-
ment with the City of Lake
City.
The county also plans
include Lifeguard in the
chain of custody where they
can share medical informa-
tion as part of its, Health
Information Portability and
Accountability Act (HIPAA)
requirements. The move is
a federal requirement.
County officials are also
scheduled to consider nam-
ing Lifeguard's Kim Landry
medical director for the
county.
'The county is required
to have a medical director
because our fire department
provides rescue assists,"
Williams said."The theory
is it makes sense and pro-
vides continuity to have the
same medical director as
the ALS/911 service."
Williams said the coun-
ty's existing medical direc-
tor has indicated he would
be willing to' remain in the
post if that's the board's
decision.
The contract with Landry,
if approved, would be for
$45,000 annually.
In other business, the


commission:
Has scheduled a public
hearing to discuss increas-
ing court facility fees from
$15 to $30 under the guide-
lines of the Court Facility
Fund Ordinance. The
increase is a surcharge
allowed on noncriminal traf-
fic infractions. The funds
generated will be used to
pay operational funds at the
courthouse.
Will set a public hear-
ing date to consider imple-
menting a "no wake" ordi-
nance on certain portions
of the Santa Fe River. The
.merits of the "no wake"
zone will not be discussed
during tonight's meeting.
Will consider options
for resolving mitigation
issues in the Cannon Creek
basin.
Has state funding to
resurface and widen State
Road 131 (Falling Creek
Road). However, the Falling
Creek Falls bridge is not
included for resurfacing
and widening work.or part
of the grant County staff is
expected request funding
to widen the bridge and
do resurfacing work on the
bridge to coincide with the
roadwork. The estimated
cost is $335,000 excluding
engineering costs.


From Page 1A

choose or want.
Columbia County and the
unincorporated area of the
county has had residential
curbside solid waste collec-
tion services for roughly 15
years. Waste Managemeint
was the county's solid waste
collection provider for the
first 10 years the county.

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LAKE CITY REPORTER NEWS THURSDAY, JULY 7, 2011


Page Editor: Brandon Finley, 754-0420


I














OPINION


Thursday, July 7, 2011


www.lakecityreporter.com


ANI


A N
OPINION


When a case

fizzles, a

reputation is

still ruined

M y high school
French is rusty
but service-
able enough
to understand
the hotel clerk's answer to my
question about Dominique
Strauss-Kahn: "C'est une catas-
trophe."
As it happened, we were in
Normandy, touring the D-Day
beaches, as the sexual assault
case against Strauss-Kahn col-
lapsed. So the inspiring tableaus
of the landing sites may have
had something to do with my
defensive reaction to the news.
,, More precisely: with my
defensive reaction to the
French reaction to the news.
The American cemetery in
Normandy contains the graves
of 9,387 servicemen who died
to liberate France. So perhaps
Could be forgiven for bristling
more than usual at expressions
of Gallic outrage over the bar-
baric American legal system.
'.As in Bernard-Henri Levy's
Daily Beast post denouncing
the "globally observed torture"
of Strauss-Kahn's perp walk.
"This vision of Dominique
Strauss-Kahn humiliated in
chains, dragged lower than
the gutter this degradation
of a man whose silent dignity
couldn't be touched, was not
just cruel, it was pornographic,"
Levy declared.
This is over the top but, I
have to admit, not as far as
I originally thought. In fact,
the more I learn about the
crumbling case arid the prose-
cution's conduct, the more con-
cerned I have become.
Some have argued that the
very fizzling of the case against
Strauss-Kahn represents the
triumph of the American legal
system. William Saletan.in
Slate: "What the collapse of this
case proves is that it's possible
to distinguish true rape accusa-
tions from false ones and
that the government, having
staked its reputation on an
accuser's credibility, diligently
investigated her and disclosed
her lies. The system worked."
Peter Beinart in the Daily
Beast "whether or not DSK.
goes free, his case reflects well
on American justice. We can
hold our heads high."
Washington Post

Lake City Reporter
Serving Columbia County
Since 1874
The Lake City Reporter is pub-
lished with pride for residents of
Columbia and surrounding counties by
Community Newspapers Inc.
We believe strong newspapers build
strong communities -"Newspapers
get things done!"
Our primary goal is to
publish distinguished and profitable
community-oriented newspapers.
This mission will be accomplished
through the teamwork of professionals
dedicated to truth, integrity and hard
work.
Todd Wilson, publisher
Robert Bridges, editor
Sue Brannon, controller
Dink NeSmith, president
Tom Wood, chairman

LETTERS
POLICY
Letters to the Editor should be
typed or neatly written and double
spaced. Letters should not exceed
400 words and will be edited for
length and libel. Letters must be
signed and include the writer's name,
address and telephone number for
verification. Writers can have two
letters per month published. Letters
and guest columns are the opinion of
the writers and not necessarily that of
the Lake City Reporter.
BY MAIL: Letters, P.O. Box 1709,


Lake City, FL 32056; or drop off at
180 E. Duval St. downtown.
SBY FAX: (386) 752-9400.
. BY E-MAIL:
Snews@lakecityreporter.com


SPRoMIl E TO TELL I JUST RAP1ENT
STIE TRUt1,TE HOLE M5REMEMBER IT.
TRUT aNoTme NGBur
ThE TR I, U NLESS...


Is decline of


U.S. exaggerated?


reports of his
death, Mark Twain
once humorously
said, were greatly
SR exaggerated. And
so are reports of America's
decline.
But there's an obvious
difference. Death is final
and definitive and has either
happened or it hasn't, which
means you cannot really
exaggerate it. Decline is a
process, and even when dismal
predictions go overboard, they
can be plausible enough not to
be funny.
One shut-ip-and-smile
response is to point to some
encouraging facts. Pre-
recession, the International
Labor Organization reported
that an American worker
left every other nation in the
dust in wealth produced per
year ($63,885), and came in
second only to Norway in
wealth produced per hour. For
more than 100 years, we have
manufactured more goods than
anyone else in the world,.
Yet isn't the middle class
shrinking? Yes. Guess why. As
economist Stephen Rose has
led the way in reporting, it is
shrinking because so many are
graduating, not because they
are dropping out. Just a few
years ago, he was writing how
the numbers in households
enjoying $100,000 and more a
year had leapt from 12 percent
to 24 percent in the past quarter
century while'there was no
jump in households making
under $30,000.
There's more good, such as
the possibilities of free trade
lifting us to new economic
heights, but whoa. Let's look


S_.

Jay Ambrose
Speaktojoy@aolcom
at the other side, starting with
how lots of American politicians
do not understand trade how
every job lost to industries that
do better overseas than here'
is replaced (and then some)
in industries that do better
here than overseas. They don't
understand how trade combats
inflation and saves families huge
amounts of money each year.
They may do us terrible
harm, consequently, and
meanwhile, President Barack
Obama and Democratic chums
are making their political living
disrespecting all businesses,
big and small. We desperately
need jobs, and their answer is
to punish the chief supplier of
those jobs small businesses
- with higher taxes on the
owners.
Thats just for starters,
because Obama just cannot stop
denigrating our corporations
even though, without them,
we would be a Third World
kind of place. If big is what
worries you, worry most about
government that also has the
coercive power to take your
money whether you want to
give it or not. Corporations
cannot force you to buy their
products, but your government
right now wants to force you to
buy health insurance on penalty
of offending Obama, along with


a fine.
Please, please remember
that as much as Wall Street
misplayed its hand in
the financial crisis, it was
government that took us there,
pressuring banks to extend
mortgage loans to people who
could not afford them, as one
means.
There's lots more: an
administrative state that is
now more in control of our
lives than ariy past generation
could have dreamed of and is
stifling entrepreneurship while
providing a huge percentage
of us with large portions of our
income so that we look to it
more and more for succor. This
administrative state has run
up a debt that could produce
economic mayhem of a kind the
recession only hinted at. At the
same time, we have a retiring
secretary of defense telling us
he does not want to be part of a
government stepping back from
engagement with the world.
Don't look too closely at the
citizenry because then you'll
see a genuine crisis of unwed
motherhood that largely cheats
children of a chance in life.
Let's stop before we make
the case that there really is no
exaggerating the decline. There
is truly much that remains
good and there are ways of
halting that which endangers
us, including elections and
community leadership.
We're still a spunky place.
SLet's do our thing.
a Jay Ambrose, formerly
Washington director of editorial
policy for Scripps Howard news-
papers and the editor of dailies in
El Paso, Texas, and Denver, is a
columnist living in Colorado.


ANOTHER OPINION

Why are we defining democracy down?


n 1993, Daniel Patrick
Moynihan wrote a
brilliant essay in the
American Scholar in
which he argued that
America was "defining deviancy
down" that is, lowering
standards as to, what comprised
normal (as opposed to aberrant)
behavior in ways that skewed
society's proper judgments.
His addictive phrase spawned
a cottage industry thereafter
of things the country has
been "defining down." But I'd
wager that if Moynihan were
here today he'd agree that the
way we're defining democracy
itself down is among the most
depressing collapses we face.
Why this whine? Look
around. Our leaders now act


as if the highest achievement
we can expect from self-
government is to avert calamity.
Once upon a time Americans
could come together through
government and create
universal public education,
build interstate highways, bring
security to old age through
Social Security and Medicare,
and nurture the most dynamic
economy on Earth.
In our spare time government
even corralled the best minds in
the public and private sectors to
put a man on the moon.
Today, by contrast, our
leaders pop the champagne
corks when they avoid a
government shutdown. One
day soon, if the president's
little Thursday pow-wow at the


White House has its intended
effect, we'll be treated to a
news conference at which our
leaders congratulate themselves
for raising the debt limit, thus
avoiding what would have
been an entirely self-inflicted
economic catastrophe.
When relief masquerades
as accomplishment, you know
we've defined democracy down.
As DPM wrote nearly two
decades ago, "we have been
re-defining deviancy so as
to exempt much conduct
previously stigmatized, and also
quietly raising the 'normal' level
in categories where behavior
is now abnormal by any earlier
standard."
a Washington Post


" -
Dale McFeatters
mcfeottersd@shns.com


Should

we stay

or should

we go?



U.S. troops from
Iraq may divide the
country almost as
much as our arrival
did in the first place.
Several groups want us to
leave a substantial residual
force behind after Dec. 31
when the remaining 46.000
U.S. troops are supposed to go
home. The Kurds want us to
stay; so does the Iraqi military.
Sunni groups fearful of Shiite
militias privately want us to
stay. A major Shiite militia says
it will start a civil war if we do.
Prime Minister Nouri al-
Maliki, a study in inertia, says
he wants us to stay but only if
other major political factions
join him in asking. Several
probably would but don't want
to be the first.
The White House is offering
to leave 10,000 troops there
next year, for training, air
support and back up in anti-
insurgent missions. A White
House national security
spokesman said any requests
to keep U.S. forces there
"would be, given serious
consideration," meaning
please, please ask.
The evidence is that
conditions are indubitably
better but there are still
glaring gaps in security. Just
Tuesday a car bombing and
a roadside bomb killed 37
outside a municipal building
in a Sunni town north of
Baghdad. The bombings had
the hallmark of hardened
terrorists. The second bomb
went off when rescuers, police
and anxious bystanders rushed
in to tend the wounded.
Similar attacks have taken
place across the country
recently including a June
23 bombing in a Shiite
neighborhood that killed at
least 40. The Green Zone is
still subject to periodic mortar
and rocket attacks, the most
recent killing three women and
two children.
The key defense and interior
posts, vacant for six months, are
nominally held by al-Maliki who
seems incapable of doing either.
As tempting as it is, and as
great as the domestic political
pressure is, we cannot on
humanitarian grounds simply
pack up and leave, abandoning
the Iraqis to the murderous
factions that remain.
A possible solution is to
leave a sizable U.S. special
operations force behind and
largely out of sight until
needed. The Iraqi special
ops troops are much more
effective than the regular army
and they have a lengthy legacy
of working effectively with
their U.S. counterparts.
Together they can take out
the nastier elements of the
remaining terrorists while the
regular army and police work
to make the roads, markets
and neighborhoods safe.
There are rumors,
seemingly credible, that
assorted sectarian militias plan
to attack the last American
troops as they pull out in
order to make videos that
purportedly show them driving
out the U.S. invaders. With the
special ops troops there, we
could give these opportunistic
militias a fearful farewell gift.

Dale McFeatters is editorial
writer for Scripps Howard News
Service.


4A
















With royal visit, celeb



shooters under scrutiny


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Prince William and wife Kate, the Duke and Duchess of
Cambridge tour. Slave Lake, Canada, on Wednesday.


By ANTHONY McCARTNEY
and GREG RISLING
Associated Press

LOS ANGELES More
than a dozen years after
Princess Diana's death on
a Paris highway sparked
an international backlash
against the photogra-
phers who chased her, her
son's visit to the paparazzi
hotbed of Southern
California has officials on
high alert.
Prince William and bride
Kate will arrive Friday in a
state that in the years since
Diana's death has passed
three laws intended to curb
paparazzi abuses. The most
recent change, 'inspired in
part by Jennifer Aniston's


experiences, raises the pen-
.alties for aggressive driv-
ing by paparazzi from mere
infractions to misdemean-
ors punishable by up to six
months in jail and a $2,500
fine.
The newlyweds are two
of the world's hottest celeb-
rities right now and law
enforcement officials who
have hoped for a situation
to test the new laws think
they may get one when the
perfect storm of British and
. Los Angeles celebrity pho-
tographers jockey for shots
. of the royal couple.
"We want to make sure
everybody has a safe trip,"
Los Angeles police Sgt.
Mitzi Fierro said. She said
that would" extend to resi-


dents and the public, not
just the heavily guarded
royal couple.
Beginning Friday morn-
ing, police plan to close the
street of the British consul-
general's home in Hancock
Park, where the couple
will stay on their weekend
visit. Officers have already
obtained "No Trespass" let-
ters from neighbors, which
will be used to arrest any-
one who enters the adjoin-
ing properties to try to get
pictures or glimpses of the
couple.
"If anybody is behaving
inappropriately," Fierro
said, "we're going to take
whatever legal police action
we can to enforce the
laws."


That includes a trio of
anti-paparazzi state laws
that are ostensibly unused
and have done little to thin
the ranks of those who track
celebrities' every move.
Photo .agencies expect
shots of the newlyweds
in LA to sell for anywhere
from $25 to $1,000. "Every
move they make, every-
thing she does, there will
be 10,000 images," Bauer-
Griffin photo agency co-
owner Frank Griffin said of
the upcoming trip.
'This will be a pretty
good test of where we're
at," said Mark Geragos, a
celebrity attorney who has
helped clients deal with
aggressive shooters over
the years.


OBITUARIES


Grace Darley Mershon
Boone

Mrs. Grace DarIey Mershon
Boone, 77, of Lake City died Sat-
urday, July 2, 2011, peacefully at
her residence of 60 years sur-
rounded by her family and friends.
Mrs. Boone is survived by her
husband, Daniel Webster Boone
of Lake City, Fl.; son, Michael
Andrew Mershon (Shannon) of
Ft. White, Fl.; daughters, Mar-
cia Annette Mershon Boone
Knudsen (Erik) of Oxford, Fl.,
Amy Gail Boone Rachal (Rich-
ard) of England, two brothers;
James Darley of Lake City, Fl.,
Darrel Darley of Steinhatchee,
Fl.; eight grandchildren, two
great- grandchildren, and broth-'
er in law William "Bill" Jen-
kins (Kathleen) of Sebring, Fl.
Mrs. Grace is preceded in death
by her parents George Darley
and Marie Sills Darley; brothers
George W. Darley, Paul Darley;
sisters, June Woodward, Lavon
Joslyn and one son Walter Boone.
A memorial service will be
held' at a later date. Arrange-
ments are under the direction of
GATEWAY-FOREST LAWN
FUNERAL HOME, 3596 S.
HWY 441. Lake City. (386) 752-
1954.Please signthe guest bookat
www.gatewayforestlawn.com

Donald E. "Don" Dockery
Mr. Donald E. "Don" Dock-
ery, 78, resident of Lake City,
Fl, died a Shands At'University
of Florida Hospital in Gaines-
ville, Florida, Monday, June 27,
2011 after an extended illness.
He was a native of Gastonia,
North Carolina and had made
his home in Lake City, Fl since
1955, coming here from Fay-
ettville, North Carolina. He and
his partners established WGRO
Radio Station in 1960. After
selling his interest he purchased
the Lake City Advertiser and
owned it for 49 years until 2005.
He was very active in the com-
munity, serving as a Lake City
Volunteer Fire Fighter, and a
Lake City Commissioner for
4 years. He was active in his
church as well, serving as a Ves-
try Member and Lay Reader at
St. James Episcopal Church. He
was a loving and devoted hus-
band, father, and grandfather.
He is survived by his wife of
54 years, Cecile Dockery; sons,
Michael (Pam) Dockery and
Scott (Janna) Dockery; daugh-
ters, Donna (David) Vignes,
Terri (Melvin) Bass and Amy
(William) Shiver; grandchil-
dren, Michael Dockery, Eric
& Laura Cunningham, Eli &
Jake Dockery and Donald &
Clayton Shiver also survive.
Private graveside funeral ser-
vices were conducted at 11 A.M.
on Thursday, June 30, 2011 fol-
lowed by a family memorial
service at St. James Episcopal
Church in Lake City, Fl.. In
lieu of flowers the family asks
that donations in his memory
be made to the St. James Epis-
copal Church Fund for "Resto-
ration of the Historical Church"
at 2423 SW Bascom Norris
Drive, Lake City, Florida 32025.
GATEWAY-FOREST LAWN
FUNERAL HOME, 3596 South
U.S. Highway 441, Lake City,
Fl in charge of arrangements.
Please sign the guest book at
www. gatewayforestlawn. com.

Dr. Alfonso William Levy
Dr. Alfonso William Levy, age
83 resident of Lake City, Fl. de-
parted this life Sunday, July 3,
2011 at Suwannee Valley Care
Center (Haven
Hospice) ter-
minating an ex-
tended illness.
Dr. Alfonso
Levy was born
in Savannah,
Ga., on June
30, 1928. His
parents were the late Alfonso
and Annie Levy. Alfonso (Billy)
as he is known in Savannah,
graduated from A.E. Beach High
School and ranked third in his
class. During those formative


years, he was a school patrolman,
band member, and concert mas-
ter. Alfonso Levy was founder,
director, and pianist for the A.E.
Beach High School Concert Or-
chestra, a first at any high school
in the city of Savannah. At the
age of twelve, little "Billy" be-
came the pianist at the AME
Church where his Mother and
Grand Aunt sang in the Choir.
At graduation from high school,
he was awarded a music schol-
arship to attend Clark College
in Atlanta, Ga. He was a music
major with a minor in pipe or-
gan. Clark College recognizes
A.W. Levy among their most
outstanding alumni. After gradu-
ating from Clark, he moved to
Lake City, Fl. Lake City became
his home. Dr, Levy attended Jul-
liard and Columbia University.
He received a master's degree
in music from Columbia Univer-
sity in New York City. Dr. Levy
earned a second master's in the
area of Administration and Su-
pervision. He received a Mus.D.
from Clark University and a D.D.
from Logas Graduate School.
Dr. Alfonso Levy was employed
by the Columbia County School
Board for 36 years. He was su-
pervisor of music, music teacher
and principle ofNiblack Elemen-
tary School 15 years. He retired
in June of 1986. Dr. Levy was a
member of Trinity United Meth-
odist Church where he served
as Minister of Music for 36
years. He later became Director
of Music at the St. James Epis-
copal Church where he served
faithfully until his health failed.
Dr. Levy served faithfully on
many boards, organizations and
committees, including the Lake
City Commufiity College Board
of Trustees, Columbia County
Library, Guardian Ad Litem,
Chamber of Commerce, United


Way, Boys Club of Columbia
County, American Red Cross,
Happy House, Boy Scouts of
America and Kiwanis. His vol-
unteer work also included service
for New Bethel Baptist, St. Luke
Lutheran, Epiphany Catholic,
Mt. Pisgah A.M.E., and annual
Christmas and Easter, Services
for Civic and non-profit organi-
zations. Dr. Levy also served as
parade Marshall for: Richardson
High School Homecoming, Co-
lumbia High School Homecom-
ing, Jaycee's Annual Christmas
Parade, Annual Blue-Grey Army
Festival Parade and the Gen-
eral-Blue-Grey Army Festival.
Awards he earned include-Na-
tional Louis Armstrong Jazz
Award, Rotary Club "Citizen of
the Year"; Distinguished Service
Awards-Gateway Kiwanis Club,
Bi-Centennial Commission Hon-
oree, Proclamations: City ofLake
City, Lake City Community Col-
lege, Key to City of Lake City,
Good Neighbor Award 1987.
Dr. Levy has also been listed in
Who's Who in American Edu-
cation, and in the Directory of
International Biography for Dis-
tinguished Service and Achieve-
ment in Music. Dr. Levy served
as Chairman for Walk America
(1988), MAD Festival (20
years), Vice Chair LCCC Board
of Trustees, Education Commit-
tee, and Chamber of Commerce.
.He leaves to cherish his lov-
ing memory a devoted and
loving wife of 42 years, Mrs.
Celestine C, Levy; sons: Mr.
Dekoven Levy, Fort Lauderdale,
Fl., Mr. Wayne Levy (Deborah
McPhee), Lake City, Fl., and Mr.
Carl Walker, Queens, NY; One
brother: Dr. Jack Levy (Carla),
Tampa, Fl; brothers-in-law: Mr.
Virgil (Eva) Combs, Techapi,
CA. and Mr. Gorrie Combs,
NY; sisters-in-law: Mrs. Ethel


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L. Weston, Lake City, Fl., MS.
Beatrice Combs, Tx., Ms. Jaque-
line Combs, Lake City, Fl., and
Mrs. Dorcus Combs, Lake City,
Fl. Special nephews and nieces:
Mr. John Levy, Jr.. (Jennifer),
Gaithersburg, MD and Mr. Roy
Milledge (Claudia), Spring Hill,
Fl. Ms. Andrea Reddick, Suf-
folk, Va., Mr. Tyrone Weston
(Emma), Lake City, Fl., Mr.
Ronald Weston (Ruby Dean),
Houston, Tx., and Ms. Tyronda
Weston, Jacksonville, Fl. Grand-
children: Savannah Quinn Levy,
Boise, ID., Ms. Demika Levy,
Fort Lauderdale, Fl., Mr. DeRon
Levy, Lake City, Fl., Mr. Jason
(Chasity) Levy, Dallas, Tx., Ms.
LaShon Brown, NH., Mr. Barry
Brown (Sonia), Jacksonville,
Fl., Mrs. Michele Bell (James),
Orlando, Fl., Mr. Billy Walker,
Lakeland, Fl., Ms. Mona Jones
(Glenn), Fort Meade, MD.,
Kayana, Denatra; Amara and
Delayna Lewis, Tallahassee,
Fl. Several Godchildren: Ms.
Chacoa, Jefferson, Tx., Pastor
Alvin Baker and Mrs. Carolyn
Baker, Minister Narvell Kelly
and Mrs. Betty Kelly, Mr. Tony
Buzzella and Mrs. Charisse
Buzzella, Mr. George Hudson,
Jr., Mr. Tony Merrill and Mrs.
Lavonda Merrill, Ms. Deansye
Brown, Mr. Mark Brown and
Mrs. Tammy Brown, Lake City.
Special cousins: Mrs. Francena


(Chatham) Ferguson, Other
relatives and sorrowing friends.
The celebration of Dr. Levy's
life will be at 11:00 a.m. Sat-
urday, July 9, 2011, in the Al-
fonso Levy Performing Arts
Center, Florida Gateway Col-
lege, Lake City, Fl. The family
will receive visitors from 5:00
to 7:00 p.m., Friday, July 8 at
the St, James Episcopal Church.
In lieu of flowers, please make
donations to the Alfonso Levy
Memorial Scholarship Fund at
Columbia Bank in Lake City, FL.
Arrangements entrusted to
COOPER FUNERAL HOME,
251 NE Washington Street, Lake
City, Fl. Willis O. Cooper, L.F.D.

Thelma Williams Lowe
Mrs. Thelma Williams Lowe,
92 of Ft. White passed away
on Monday, July 4, 2011 at the
North Florida Regional Medi-
cal Center in Gainesville. Mrs.
Lowe was a daughter to the late
Ressie and Matilda Raulerson
Williams and lifelong resident
of Columbia County and Ft.
White. She attended schools in
Ft. White, was the owner and
operator of Lowe's Tubeland
and a longtime member of Elim
Baptist Church in Ft. White.
Mrs. Lowe was preceded in
death by her husband of over


40 years, Mr. Leroy Lowe, two'
sons, Marvin and Jimmy Harp-
er, four brothers, W.C., Gerald;'
Robert and Charles Williams
and one sister, Euralee O'Steen.,
Mrs. Lowe is survived by tw6
sons, Chester Harper and Bil-'
lie Jo Harper both of Ft. Whitel
three sisters, Loice Porter"
and Eloise Harrison both of
Ft. White and Adell .Torcise,
Homestead, Fl, sixteen grand-
children and numerous greatly
and great great grandchildren.
Funeral services for Mrs. Lowe
will be conducted at 11:00
A.M. on Friday, July 8, 2011 at
Elim Baptist Church with Rev.
Charles Knight and Rev. Thont-:
as Bankston officiating. Interr'
ment will follow at the church-
cemetery. Visitation with the
family will be from 6-8:00 P.M.
Thursday evening at the funeral
home. Arrangements are un-.
der the direction of GUERRY
FUNERAL HOME, 2659
SW Main Blvd., Lake City.
Please sign the guestbook at:
www.guerryfunerallome. net...



Obituaries are paid advertise-
ments. For details, call the Lake
City Reporter's classified depart-'
ment at 752-1293.


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L'


LAKE CITY REPORTER NEWS THURSDAY, JULY 7, 2011


Page Editor: Brandon Finley, 754-0420















Auto industry, seeing new




life, is on hiring spree


By DEE-ANN DURBIN
Associated Press

DETROIT-Volkswagen
opened a plant in Tennessee
last month with 2,000 work-
ers. Honda is hiring 1,000
in Indiana to meet demand
for its best-selling Civic.
General Motors is looking
for 2,500 in Detroit to build
the Chevy Volt.
Two years after the end
of the Great Recession, the
auto industry is hiring again
and much faster than the
rest of the economy. As an
employer, it's growing fast-
.er than airplane manufac-
turers, shipbuilders, health
care providers and the fed-
eral government.
The hiring spree is even
more remarkable because
memories of the U.S. auto
industry's near-death
experience are fresh. In
2009, General Motors and
Chrysler both got govern-
.ment bailouts and entered
bankruptcy, and auto sales
hit a 30-year low.
In June of that year,
about 623,000 people were
employed by the auto indus-
try in the United States,
the fewest since the early
1980s. Now the figure is
almost 700,000, a 12 per-
cent increase.
Sales are back: up, too,
and automakers are hiring
by the thousands to meet
increased demand.
'The buzz is incredible
-around here about what
opportunity we're going
to get if we can build a
great product," says Ben
Edwards, who went to
work for Volkswagen in
Chattanooga, Tenn., last
year and is now a team
leader on an assembly line
that installs tires and seats.
Edwards was working as
a general contractor until


S. ~ ASSOCIATED PRESS
In this June 28 file photo, Ben Edwards, team leader on assembly line number 6, makes adjustments to the door frame of a
new Volkswagen Passat in Chattanooga, Tennessee. Mr. Edwards is a new auto employee at the Volkswagen plant which
opened on May 24.


the housing market dried
up. He says the pay at
Volkswagen, which starts
at $14.50 an hour, is fair and
the benefits are generous.
Besides hiring 2,000 peo-
ple itself, Volkswagen fig-
ures the plant, where it will
make its new Passat, will
create 9,000 spin-off jobs in
the region, including 500 at
auto-supplier plants that are
springing up nearby.
Automakers are hiring
again because car sales are
rising. Americans bought
10.4 million cars and trucks


in 2009 and 11.6 million in
2010. This year, they're'on
track to buy 13 million or
more, and auto companies
are adding shifts to meet
the demand.
"Everybody got so lean
and mean during the down-
turn that they're trying to
rebuild staff," says Charles
Chesbrough, a senior econ-
omist with IHS Automotive.
The auto industry's 12
percent increase in jobs
compares with a 0.2 percent
gain for the economy as a
whole, excluding farming


and adjusted for. seasonal
variation, since June 2009.
The Labor Department
reports Friday on jobs
gained or lost last month.
. In a normal economic
recovery, improvement in
the housing market leads
the way by creating con-
struction jobs. But home
prices haven't stopped fall-
ing, and the construction
industry has;shed 8 percent
of its workers since June
2009 474,000 jobs in all.
The gains in the auto
industry have been small


by comparison. But they
do create positive ripple
effects for the economy.
The Center for Automotive
'Research estimates that
every new auto manufactur-
ing job leads to nine other
jobs from parts makers
to restaurants that feed
autoworkers.
The auto gains have
been widespread, with the
Midwest the biggest ben-
eficiary. In Ohio -alone, auto
manufacturing jobs have
risen 31 percent the past
two years, while parts mak-


ers in Michigan have added
nearly 20,000 jobs.
Parts jobs are also up 15
percent in Alabama, where
workers make parts for
Mercedes SUVs and Honda
minivans, and in Kentucky,
where -the Cheyrolet
Corvette and Toyota Camry
are made.
Before the turnaround,
new auto jobs were scarce.
Detroit's auto companies
had too many factories,'
high wages and bloated,
bureaucratic management:
Jobs began disappearing in'
2006 and 2007 as U.S. auto-
makers tried.desperately to.
restructure. Dozens of auto
suppliers were pushed into:
bankruptcy.
Then came 2008, when
gas prices spiked and the'
financial crisis struck. The
industry lost almost one in.
every four of its jqbs. By
the time GM and Chrysler
got out of bankruptcy, in
June 2009, the industry
employed about half as
many people as it did in
2000.
Sales and profits have
risen ever since, and pay-
rolls have followed.
GM, Ford and Chrysler
are all making money for
the first time since the mid-
2000s and adding workers
to build popular models
like the revamped Ford
SExplorer. Foreign compa-
nies, stung by the high cost
of exporting cars to the U.S.
when the dollar is weak, are
racing to build more prod-
ucts here.
Automakers are doing it
with cheaper. labor. Four
years ago, the United Auto
Workers agreed to a con-
tract that allowed Detroit's
carmakers to hire some
new workers at $14 per'
hour, or half the starting
pay of workers at that time.


i~-s~

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~i: i


JEFF PRESSLEY/Lake City Reporter

rFreedom ride
Residents of Eastside Village in Lake City commemorate the Fourth of July with their annual
golf cart parade on Monday. Adorning their carts in red, white and blue, nearly a dozen
residents took part.


COURTESY PHOTO


70th class reunion
The Columbia High School Class of 1941 held its 70th reunion at Alligator Park recently.
Fourteen classmates and 14 guests attended. Front, from left: Pauline Kinard, Sara Winters,
Lois Register, Mable Howard, Mable Wolford and Bobbie Sue Blanton. Back row: Charles
Myers, Alva Dean Kelsey, Eloise Jackson, Bertie Mae Parsley, Joan Sandage, James
Howard, Raymond Colley and Herbert Bohrman.


Reader's Choice


CUTEST BABY



CONTEST
1 ST, 2ND & 3RD Place Prizes to be Awarded for Boys & Girls!

AGES 0-24 MONTHS
Send in the most adorable photograph of your child,
up to 24 months of age, and you could win!


TO ENTER:
Spring your baby's picture along with entry fee ($30.00)
to the Lake City Reporter,180 E. Duval St., mail to
P.O. Box 1709, Lake City, FL 32056.


WANT TO ENTER ONUNE?
You can e-mail your
photo and information to
ads@lakecityreporter.com.
.SlhirpFt blin. BAOv rVrerr


All pictures will be published in the Lake City i.: ,, -,u
Reporter's July 17, 2011 edition. All voting bal-
lots must be returned to the paper by July 25,
2011. So show off your child, grandchild,
godchild, niece or nephew. .
The winners will be published on July 31, 2011


DEADLINE:
July 14th, 2011

For More Information or if you are
interenct d in henpminn a sponsor


please Call Mary at 754-0401


I


I


LAKE CITY REPORTER NEWS THURSDAY, JULY 7, 2011


Page Editor: Brandon Finley, 754-0420


~117-


'*


. .


I










Page Editor: Robert Bridges, 754-0428


LAKE CITY REPORTER HEALTH THURSDAY, JULY 7, 2011


New danger found in asbestos town


Agony revisited
at Libby, Mont.
Superfund site.

By MATTHEW BROWN
Associated Press

LIBBY, Mont For
a decade, the people of
Libby have longed for
the day when they will be
rid of the asbestos that
turned their town into the *
deadliest Superfund site ih
America.
Now they are being
forced to live through
the agony all over again,
thanks to two giant piles
of bark and wood chips on
the edge of town.
SAn Associated Press
investigation fophd that
the federal government
has known for at least
three years that the wood
piles were contaminated
with an unknown level of
asbestos, everi as Libby
residents hauled truckload
after truckload of the mate-
rial away from the site and
placed it in yards, in city
parks, outside schools and
at the local cemetery. The
Environmental Protection
Agency did not stop the
removal of the material
until the AP began investi-
gating in early March.
Regulators still do not
know what effect the
material could have on
public health, but EPA
documents obtained by the
AP showed that the agen-
cy found potentially deadly
asbestos fibers in four of
20 samples taken from
the piles of scrap wood in
2007. The sprawling piles
came from a now-defunct
timber mill that took thou-
sands of trees from a for-
est tainted with asbestos
from a nearby mine.
The potential for more
contamination has frayed
nerves in the town of 3,000
people and further eroded
confidence in the govern-
ment to clean iup the mess
that to date has killed an
estimated 400 people and
sickened 1,750.
'We thought we were
coming to an end and now
we have this issue all over
again," said Lerah Parker,
who spread dozens of
truckloads of the material
around her property.
The source of Libby's
asbestos was a W.R Grace
vermiculite mine that at
its peak produced 2 mil-:
lion tons of ore annually
and employed 200 people.
Vermiculite stripped from
a mountain on the edge of
town was shipped around
the world to make insula-
tion, only for authorities
to later discover the ore
was loaded with deadly
asbestos.
The EPA has spent
more than $370 mil-
lion over the past 11
years cleaning up Libby.
Contractors in moon
suits carting off tainted
materials have become a
constant reminder of the
severity of the contamina-
tion.
; The wood chips and
bark became a popular
item for anyone in Libby
looking to add some land-
scaping touches.to their
yards, and for contractors
wvho packaged the product
and sold it around the
country.
Local officials estimate
that 1,000 tons were used
in landscaping and for ero-
sion control in Libby. Over
the past decade, as much
as 15,000 tons were sold
and hauled out of town
to destinations unknown,
according to the economic
development official who
was selling it.


The EPA is now
scrambling to gauge the
public health risk and is
preparing to issue guide-
lines about how residents
should handle the wood,
including warnings not
to move or work with the
material when it's dry to
avoid stirring up asbestos.
But the agency has decid-


ASSOCIATED PRESS
D.C. Orr, a city councilman in Libby, Mont., walks through a storage area, where bark and wood chips contaminated with undetermined levels of lethal dbes-
tos were stored. More than 15,000 tons of the material have been sold, used in and trucked out of the remote Montana town of 3,000 people over the last
decade, with unknown risks to public health.


ed it won't track down
where the chips went,
saying it no longer has
jurisdiction because the
material is now classified
as a commercial product.
Responding to the AFs
investigation, Montana
U.S. Sen. Max Baucus on
Tuesday pledged to launch
his own inquiry into the
use of the bark and wood
chips. The Democrat
a longtime advocate for
Lbby said he wanted to
find what EPA knew, when
they knew it and whether
more action was needed to
protect public health.
'The people of Libby
have already been poi-
soned in the name of
greed and I won't allow
them to be poisoned again
because of negligence,'
Baucus said.
The EPA's press office
declined repeated requests
from the AP to interview
senior officials within the
agency's Superfund pro-
gram about removal of the
material.
The agency instead
offered a written statement
saying its prior tests on the
material provided "incom-
plete information" and
were too limited to indicate
an imminent danger.
The local official who
was selling the wood and
bark, Paul Rummelhart,
dismissed concerns, say-
ing they unnecessarily
threatened to undermine
economic development
in the Libby area, where
roughly one in five people
are unemployed.
"I've got a file that's
three-feet thick on all
the (asbestos) sampling
that's been going on,"
Rummelhart said. "If you
have a few hits, so what?"
Federal officials have
acknowledged that
removal of the bark went
on for years without
their knowledge. Yet the
agency absolved the on-
scene contractor, CDM, of
responsibility, saying the
company's workers were
not charged with monitor-
ing movement of material


into and out of the former
mill site.
A CDM spokeswoman,
Marlene Hobel, referred
questions about the matter
back to the EPA.
'We're trying to take a
look backward at what's
there," EPA regional direc-
tor Jim Martin said, 'We're
trying to reconstruct histo-
ry and see what has been
moved and should it have
been moved."
The presence of the
bark has stoked fears of
widespread recontamina-
tion just after the EPA
in May declared it had
reduced the dangers fac-
ing Libby.
"How many more years
is it going to take?" asked
Parker, who suffers from
asbestosis, an incurable
disease caused by inhal-.
ing asbestos fibers that
scars the lungs and slowly
starves them of air. "Are
we supposed to sit here
and hold our breath?"
Parker and her hus-
band have been working
to restore their property
since it was demolished
during the cleanup. Over
the last several years, they
hauled about 30 loads of
the bark and wood chips
from the former Stimson
Lumber Co. mill.
They showed a reporter
more than 300 trees they.
had planted, each one
ringed with bark a foot
deep. Scattered across the
property were thousands
of newly planted berry
bushes, vines, shrubs and
other plants all ringed
with the bark.
The material is easily
found around town, where
landscapers, city work-
ers and homeowners paid
small fees to haul it out.
Those who have used it
described it as ideal land-
scaping material cheap,
plentiful and attractive.
After the EPA tested
samples from the piles and
found evidence of asbestos
in 2007, agency scientists
never determined just how
much contamination was
present Air samples taken


from the site were nega-
tive.
Truckloads of the chips
and bark continued to be
shipped from the site as
recently as last fall. A pile
that witnesses said once
towered as high as a four-
story building and cov-
ered five acres has been
reduced to remnants. A
second pile, now roughly
half gone, still towers at
least 20 feet
Results from additional
asbestos sampling on the
bark piles are due later
this month. The EPA also
said it will test the material
around town if requested
by any homeowner that
used it
Since the AP first ques-
tioned the safety of the
bark piles, based on con-
cerns raised by residents,
the EPA has warned the
mill's owner not to sell
the material. Regulators
said they were told most
was used to make fuel pel-
lets that are bagged and
sold nationwide at major
retailers. Agency officials
said it was unknown how
dangerous it would be to
burn those pellets, since
the amount of asbestos
in the material was never

UBBY continuedon 8A
*' ', .


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Lerah Parker holds bark potentially contaminated with lethal
asbestos that she and her husband used in the garden
around their home in Libby, Mont. More than 15,000 tons of
the material have been sold, used in and trucked out of the.
remote Montana town of 3,000 people over the last decade,
with unknown risks to public health.

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Health


& Wellness


Contact
Robert Bridges
Editor
754-0428
rhridtopeclnakecitvrponrtercom


Brought to you by

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Regional Medical Center
._ ;- -. -.'


8A www.lakecityreporter.com Thursday, July 7 201 I



LIBBY: Montana Superfund site faces new ordeal

Continued From Page 7A


completely quantified.
But the company that
took it says the material
was unsuitable for fuel
pellets, so it went to a
power plant in Canada.
Representatives of Eureka
Pellet Mills refused to
offer specifics to verify the
claim, and regulators said
they had no intention of
tracking down the mate-
rial.
Two of Eureka's cus-
tomers, Wal-Mart Inc.
and Home Depot, said
they were unaware of any
problems. Home Depot no
longer sells the material, a
spokeswoman said. A Wal-
Mart spokesman said his
company had investigated
and was unaware of any
contamination.
Libby City Councilman
D.C. Orr said the EPA's
failure to halt shipments
sooner or further investi-
gate the hazards "boggles
my mind." Orr, who runs
an excavation and contract-
ing business, said he took
multiple shipments of the
material before learning
the EPA had found it to be.
contaminated.
Those included deliver-
ies to local landscaping
businesses and into Orr's
yard, where the material
lines the ground beneath
a swing set used by his
grandchildren.
Studies by the EPA and
university researchers
have found the forests
around Libby are tainted
with asbestos at least eight
miles from the mine. The
barbed asbestos fibers
lodge themselves in cracks
and crevices in the bark
until they are released
when disturbed or burned.
'We're talking about mil-
lions of fibers per square


centimeter of bark surface
area," said University of
Montana researcher Tony
Ward. "The question is:
What is the dangerous
level? There's a lot of peo-
ple sick up there and you
can't argue withcthat.
'Theoretically it takes
just one fiber to get sick."
Timber sale records pro-
vided to the AP by the U.S.
Forest Service through a
Freedom of Information
Act request show that
trees on more than 9,000
acres have been harvested
from the vicinity of the
mine since it was acquired
by W.R. Grace in 1963.
Those trees produced an
estimated 76 million board
feet of lumber, the agency
said. Some of that wood
likely went to other mills
in Montana and Idaho, but
much of it was processed
through the Stimson mill
in Libby, Forest Service
officials said.
The government for
years delayed action
in Libby despite rising
deaths among locals and
widespread evidence that
asbestos was to blame.
SAfter the cleanup began in
2000, the EPA waited another
nine years before declaring a
first-of-its-kind public health
emergency in libby at the
prodding of federal lawmak-
ers. Last year alone, a local
Clinic diagnosed almost 300
people with asbestos-related
disease.
EPA officials said they
becameliware only last
year that the contaminated
piles at the timber mill
site were being so* A
Denver-based member of
the agency's cleanup team,
Rebecca Thomas, said she
saw trucks hauling away
material during one of her


periodic visits to the site
last fall.
Yet the shipments began
as early as 2004, according
to local.officials and resi-
dents. They said a steady
stream of truck traffic
exited the site for years
passing right in front of
the main office for one of
EPA's lead contractors on
the cleanup.
Thomas played down
the potential for a health
threat from the material
that was exported from
Libby. Officials suspect the
high rate of illness in the
town results from the high
concentration of asbestos
there conditions not
present outside the town.
Once the bark and
wood chips left, said EPA
spokeswoman Sonya
Pennock, they became a
commercial product no
longer subject to agency
regulation as a hazardous
substance.
"We certainly have some
legal obligations as well as
moral obligations to the
community," EPA regional
director Martin said. "But
our legal authority only
goes so far."
The remaining pile of
wood chips and bark at the
Stimson mill site is smaller
but still covers several
acres. Rummelhart recent-
ly hung "No Trespassing"
signs while he awaits fur-
ther word from the EPA
on the amount of asbestos
contamination.:
Rummelhart aid he was
"sick and tired of those
(asbestos) victims" ham-
pering the town's econom-
ic revitalization. He said he
intends to sell the material
if given the chance.
'We're moving on and
moving forward," he said.


71

'. .^a


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Road workers wear protective gear against possible asbestos contamination as they load
material from a road resurfacing project in downtown Libby, Mont.


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An unidentified road worker, wearing protective gear against
possible asbestos contamination, sprays water to keep down
dust as a crew resurfaces a road in downtown Libby, Mont.
More than 15,000 tons of bark and wood chips potentially
contaminated with lethal asbestos have been sold, used in
and trucked out of the remote Montana town of 3,000 people
over the last decade, with unknown risks to public health.


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Story ideas?









Lake City Reporter


Story ideas?

Contact
Tim Kirby
Sports Editor
754-0421
T i- ,' ',2 , ', I,: 7 1: ,:


SPORTS


Thursday, July 7, 2011


www.lakecityreporter.com


Section B


BRIEFS

YOUTH SOCCER
Fundraiser set
for travel team
The Columbia Youth
Soccer Association
Stingers under-14 travel
team is hosting a
pancake breakfast
fundraiser from 8-10 a.m.
Saturday at Applebees
on U.S. Highway 90 west
in Lake City. Tickets are
$8 and can be purchased
at the door. The soccer
team will receive a
percentage of the sales.
For details, call Eddie
Kurtz at 623-9507.
SWIMMING
Registration for
lessons today
Youth and adult
swimming lessons are
offered at the Columbia
Aquatic Complex.
Classes meet for two
weeks and six daily times
are offered, plus there
are two daily mom and
tot classes. Three
sessions remain with the
next session July li-22.
Cost is $50 per person.
Registration is at the
pool (755-8195) today and
Friday.
FORT WHITE FOOTBALL
Team car wash
on Saturday
Fort White High
football players will wash
cars for donations from
8 a.m. to noon Saturday
at the S&S Food Store
on U.S. Highway 27 in
Fort White.
For details, call Fort
White Quarterback
Club president Shayne
Morgan at 397-4954.

Q-back Club
meeting Monday
The Fort White
Quarterback Club has
an executive
committee meeting at
7 p.m. Monday in the
teacher's lounge at the
high school. All board
members are urged to
attend. The program
committee will meet at
6:30 p.m. prior to the
executive committee
meeting. All those
helping with the 2011
program should attend.
For details, call Shayne
Morgan at 397-4954.
YOUTH TENNIS
Johnny Young
offers camps
Johnny Young's Tennis
Camps are offered at The
Country Club at Lake
City. Camps are 8-11 a.m.
Monday through Friday
at a cost of $65 for club
members and $75 for
non-members. Remaining
dates are July 18-22,
Aug. 1-5 and Aug. 15-19.
Registration is at The
Country Club at Lake
City and Brian's Sports.
For details, call Young
at 365-3827.


* From staff reports


Clemens perjury trial

starts with jury selection


Boggs, Cone
could be called to
testify in case.
By NEDRA PICKLER and
MARK SHERMAN
Associated Press
WASHINGTON The
perjury trial of pitching
great Roger Clemens began
Wednesday with word that
Hall of Famer Wade Boggs
and former All-Star pitcher
David Cone could be called
to testify in their former
teammate's defense.
Boggs and Cone are
among 10 former ball-
players or people associ-
ated with the game whom
Clemens' attorneys said
could be either called as
witnesses' or mentioned
as part of their defense
against charges he lied to
Congress about the use of


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Former Major League Baseball pitcher Roger Clemens
(left) and his wife Debbie Clemens arrive at federal court in
Washington on Wednesday for his perjury trial.


Storm


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Fort White High's Taylor Douglass throws a pitch for the Lady Indians' in a game played in the
spring. Douglass will join Columbia High player Stephanie Pilkington as part of the Gainesville
Gold in this week's Jacksonville Storm Showcase at Southside Recreational Sports Complex
in Lake City. Kayli Kvistad and Michaela Burton, both of Columbia High, also will compete
in the Showcase. Kvistad will play for the Jacksonville Storm, while Burton wll be part of the
River City. Rebels.


performance-enhancing
drugs. Prosecutors listed
nearly 100 people who
could be part of their case
either by mention or on the
witness stand, including
players Barry Bonds, Mark
McGwire, Sammy Sosa,
Jose Canseco,Jason Giambi,
Jason Grimsley, Jorge
Posada, David Segui, Andy
Pettitte, Chuck Knoblauch
and Mike Stanton.
U.S. District Judge
Reggie Walton turned to
the selection of jury imme-
diately after opening the
trial Wednesday. The judge
hopes to find 12 jurors and
four alternates from a pool
of 125 Washington resi-
dents by early next week
for a trial that is expected to
last into August.
Clemens turned to face
the 50 potential panelists
as they filed into the court-
room, nodding at a couple


but mostly sitting with no
expression as the judge
questioned them. Clemens'
lead lawyer Rusty Hardin
pointed out Clemens wife,
Debbie, sitting in the back
of the courtroom and said
she would likely testify for
her husband. She stood and
gave a little wave.
Like other players who
have been indicted in base-
ball's steroids era, Clemens
has not been charged with
drug crimes, but is accused
of lying about drug use.
Clemens told a House
committee under oath in
2008 that he never used
performance-enhancing
drugs during a career in
which he won a record
seven Cy Young Awards as
his league's top pitcher.
Clemens won 354 games
in a career that spanned
CLEMENS continued on 6B


brewing


Four local


players to


compete in


showcase


By BRANDON FINLEY
bfinley@lakecityreporter.com
The largest softball
exhibition to ever hit Lake
City will begin Friday as
the Jacksonville Storm
Showcase switcheshomesto
the Southside Recreational
Sports Complex.
For Columbia High head
coach Jimmy Williams, it's
an event he's been pushing
to have locally over the last
three years.
"They put more people
in college than anyone else
combined," Williams said.
"They are the New York
Yankees of Jacksonville."
Columbia previously
hosted 64 teams in 2000
and 48 teams in 2009, but
this year the county will
host 75 teams.
Four local high school
players will compete in
the exhibition-style games
including Kayli Kvistad,
who plays for the Storm
organization.
Joining her will be
Stephanie Pilkington and
Taylor Douglass, who will
compete for the Gainesville
Gold and Michaela Burton
with the River City Rebels.
One of the biggest perks
for players is the ability to


be seen by college coaches
from around the country.
"College coaches can
only make so many visits,"
Williams said. "There will
be girls flying in from South
Carolina to play. They'll do
whatever coaches want
them to do."
More than 35 college
schools are' expected to
have coaches at the event.
Florida, Florida State,
Georgia, LSU, Jacksonville
and the University of North
Florida will be represented.
Williams was instrumen-
tal in moving the tourna-
ment from Cecil Field in
Jacksonville to Lake City.
It was a multi-year pro-
cess, but under new Storm
president, Addison Davis,
Williams has seen his idea
come to fruition.
"They were playing at
Cecil, which could only
host about 36 teams,"
Williams said. "Here, we'll
have 75. People won't have
to travel long to get to their
hotels and we have all of the
places to eat within driving
,distance."
It was an easy sell for
Williams as teams will
travel in from South
Carolina, Alabama and
throughout the southeast


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LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS THURSDAY JULY 7, 2011 Page Editor: Brandon Finley, 754-0420


TELEVISION

TV sports

Today
AUTO RACING
6 p.m.
SPEED NASCAR,Truck Series, pole
qualifying for UNOH 225, at Sparta, Ky.
(same-day tape)
8 p.m.
SPEED NASCAR, Truck Series,
UNOH 225, at Sparta, Ky.
CYCLING
8 am.
VERSUS Tour de France, stage 6,
Dinan to Lisieux, France
GOLF
9:30 am.
TGC European PGA Tour, Scottish
Open, first round, at Inverness, Scotland
3 p.m.
TGC PGATour,John Deere Classic,
first round, at Silvis, Ill.
5 p.m.
ESPN2 USGA, U.S.Women's Open
Championship, first round, at Colorado
Springs.
MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL
I p.m.
MLB Colorado at Atlanta
7 p.m.
MLB Regional coverage, Tampa Bay
at N.Y.Yankees or Baltimore at Boston
WGN Chicago Cubs atWashington

BASEBALL

AL standings

East Division
W L Pct GB
.1JewYork 51 33 .607 -
,Boston 50 35 .588 I1'
Tampa Bay 48 39 .552 4/h
'-Toronto 42 45 .483 10i'
'Baltimore 36 47 .434 14'/
Central Division
W L Pct GB
Cleveland 45 39 .536 -
"Detroit 45 42 .517 1/
t'hicago 43 45 .489 4
'.Minnesota 38 47 .447 7'h
Kansas City 36 51 .414 10'h
West Division
W L Pct GB
Los Angeles 46 41 .529 -
Texas 46 41 .529 -
Seattle 43 44 .494 .3
Oakland 39 49 .443 7'A
Tuesday's Games.
N.Y.Yankees 9, Cleveland 2
Boston 3,Toronto 2
Texas 4, Baltimore 2
Kansas City 5, Chicago White Sox 3
Minnesota 3,Tampa Bay 2
LA.Angels 1, Detroit 0
Seattle 4, Oakland 2, 10 innings
Wednesday's Games
Tampa Bay 12, Minnesota 5
Kansas City 4, Chicago White Sox I
Oakland 2, Seattle 0
Detroit at LA. Angels (n)
N.Y.Yankees at Cleveland (n)
Toronto at Boston (n)
Baltimore at Texas (n)
Today's Games
Tampa Bay (Niemann 3-4) at N.Y.
Yankees (Colon 6-3), 7:05 p.m.
Toronto (C.Villanueva 5-1) at Cleveland
(McAllister 0-0), 7:05 p.m.
Baltimore (Arrieta 9-5) at Boston
(A.Miller 2-0),7:10 p.m.
Oakland (Harden 1-0) at Texas
(D.Holland 6-4), 8:05 p.m.
Detroit (Scherzer 9-4) at Kansas City
(Duffy 1-3), 8:10 p.m.
Minnesota (Pavano 5-6) at Chicago
White Sox (Humber 8-4), 8:10 p.m.
Seattle (Fister 3-9) at L.A. Angels
(Weaver 10-4), 10:05 p.m.
Friday's Games
Tampa Bay at N.Y.Yankees, 7:05 p.m.
Toronto at Cleveland, 7:05 p.m.
Baltimore at Boston, 7:10 p.m.
Oakland at Texas, 8:05 p.m.
Detroit at Kansas City, 8:10 p.m.
Minnesota at Chicago White Sox,
8:10 p.m.
Seattle at LA.Angels, 10:05 p.m.

NL standings-

East Division
W L Pct GB
Philadelphia 55 32 .632 -
Atlanta 51 36 .586. 4
NewYork 44 42 .512 10/'
Washington 44 43 .506 II
Florida 38 48 .442 16'A
Central Division.
W L Pct GB
St. Louis 47 40 .540 -
Pittsburgh 45 41 .523 I h
Milwaukee 46 42 .523 I '
Cincinnati 43 44 .494 4
Chicago 35 52 .402 12
Houston 29 58 .333 18
West Division
W L Pct GB
San Francisco 48 39 .552 -
Arizona 47 41 .534 I'2
Colorado 41 45 .477 62/
San Diego 40 47 .460 8
Los Angeles 37 50 .425 II
Tuesday's Games
Washington 3, Chicago Cubs 2
Pittsburgh 5, Houston I
St. Louis 8, Cincinnati I
Atlanta 5, Colorado 3
Philadelphia 14, Florida 2
Arizona 7, Milwaukee 3
N.Y. Mets 6, .A. Dodgers 0
San Diego 5, San Francisco 3
Wednesday's Games
Milwaukee 3,Arizona I
Chicago Cubs at Washington (n)
Houston at Pittsburgh (n)
Colorado at Atlanta (n)
Philadelphia at Florida (n)
Cincinnati at St. Louis (n)
N.Y. Mets at LA. Dodgers (n)
San Diego at San Francisco (n)
Today's Games
Colorado (Nicasio 3-1) at Atlanta


'T.Hudson 7-6), 1:05 p.m.
Chicago Cubs (Garza 4-7) at
Washington (LHernandez 5-8), 7:05 p.m.
Houston (Happ 3-10) at Florida (Hand
,0-3), 7:10 p.m.
Cincinnati (H.Bailey 3-3) at Milwaukee
'(Narveson 5-5), 8:10 p.m.
Arizona (.Saunders 5-7) at St. Louis
'(McClellan 6-5), 8:15 p.m.
S N.Y. Mets (Gee 8-2) at LA. Dodgers
(Kershaw 8-4), 10:10 p.m.
San Diego (Luebke 2-2) at San
Francisco (Zito 2-1), 10:15 p.m.


Friday's Gaines
Atlanta at Philadelphia, 7:05 p.m.
Chicago Cubs at Pittsburgh, 7:05 p.m.
Colorado atWashington, 7:05 p.m.
Houston at Florida, 7:10 p.m.
Cincinnati at Milwaukee, 8:10 p.m.
Arizona at St. Louis, 8:15 p.m.
San Diego at LA. Dodgers, 10:10 p.m.
N.Y Mets at San Francisco, 10:15 p.m.

BASKETBALL

WNBA schedule

Tuesday's Games
Indiana 78, Seattle 61
Chicago 78,Washington 65
Phoenix 101, Los Angeles 82
Friday's Games
New York at San Antonio, 8 p.m.
Phoenix at Tulsa, 8 p.m.

AUTO RACING

Race week

NASCAR
QUAKER STATE 400
Site: Sparta, Ky.
Schedule: Today, testing; Friday,
practice (Speed, 11:30 a.m.-3 p.m.),
qualifying (Speed, 5-7 p.m.); Saturday, race,
7:30 p.m. (TNT, 6:30-1 p.m.).
Track: Kentucky Speedway (oval, 1.5
miles).
Race distance: 400.5 miles, 267 laps.
Next race: Lenox Industrial Tools 301,
July 17, New Hampshire Motor Speedway,
Loudon, N.H.
Online: http:llwww.noscar.com
NATIONWIDE
FEED THE CHILDREN 300
Site: Sparta, Ky.
Schedule: Today, practice; Friday,
practice, qualifying (Speed, 3:30-5 p.m.),
race, 7:30 p.m. (ESPN, 7-1-30 p.m.).
Track: Kentucky Speedway.
Race distance: 300 miles, 200 laps.
Next race: New England 200, July
16, New Hampshire Motor Speedway,
Loudon, N.H.
CAMPING WORLD TRUCKS
UNOH 225
Site: Sparta, Ky.
Schedule: Today, practice, qualifying
(Speed, 6-7 p.m.), race, 8 p.m. (Speed, 7:30-
10:30 p.m.).
Track: Kentucky Speedway.
Race distance: 225 miles, 150 laps.
Next race: Coca-Gola 200, July. 16,
Iowa Speedway, Newton, Iowa.
INDYCAR
HONDA INDYTORONTO
Site:Toronto.
Schedule: Friday, practice; Saturday,
practice, qualifying (Versus, 5:30-7 p.m.);
Sunday, race, 2:50 p.m. (Versus, 2-5 p.m.).
Track: Streets of Toronto (street
course, 1.755 miles).
Race distance: 149.175 miles, 85 laps.
Next race: Edmonton Indy, July 24,
Edmonton City CentreAirport, Edmonton,
Alberta.
Onl,, hi'p ** ;.,r :.3r c'
IPORMULA ONE
BRITISH GRAND PRIX
Site: Silverstone, England.
Schedule: Friday, practice (Speed,
9-10:30 a.m.); Saturday, practice, qualifying
(Speed, 8-9:30 a.m.) Sunday, race, 8 a.m.
(FOX, noon-2 p.m.).
Track: Silverstone Circuit (road course,
3.667 miles).
Race distance: 190.6 miles, 52 laps.
Next race: German Grand Prix,july 24,
Nuerburgring, Nuerburg, Germany.
Online: http://www.formulal.com
NHRA FULLTHROTTLE
ROUTE 66 NHRA NATIONALS
Site: Joliet, Ill.
Schedule: Friday, qualifying; Saturday,
qualifying (ESPN2, 9:30-11:30 p.m.); Sunday,
.final eliminations (ESPN2, 9 p.m.-mid-
night).
Track: Route 66 Raceway.
Next event: Mopar Mile-High NHRA
Nationals,July 22-24, Bandimere Speedway,
Morrison, Colo.
Online: http:llwww.nhra.com
OTHER RACES
AMERICAN LE MANS SERIES:
American Le Mans Northeast Grand Prix,
Saturday (ESPN2, Sunday, 1-3 p.m.), Lime
Rock Park, Lakeville, Conn. Online: http://
www.americonlemons.com
GRAND-AM ROLEX SPORTS CAR
SERIES: Continental Tire Sports Car
Festival, Saturday (Speed, Sunday, 4-7 p.m.),
Mazda Raceway Laguna Seca, Salinas, Calif.
Online: http://www.grand-am.com

SOCCER


Women's Worl'd Cup

GROUP PLAY
Wednesday
Brazil 3, Equatorial Guinea 0
Australia 2, Norway I
Sweden 2, United States I
North Korea 0, Colombia 0
QUARTERFINALS
Saturday
England vs. France, Noon
Germany vs.Japan, 2:45 p.m.
Sunday
Sweden vs.Australia, 7 a.m.
Brazil vs. United States, 11:30 a.m.

CYCLING

Tour de France stages

July 6 Stage 5: Carhaix-Cap Frehel,
flat, 164.5 (102.2) (Mark Cavendish, Britain;
Hushovd)
July 7 -- Stage 6: Dinan-Lisieux, flat,
226.5 (140.7)
July 8 Stage 7: Le Ma-s-
Chateauroux, flat, 218 (135.5)
July 9 Stage 8: Aigurande-Super-
Besse Sancy, medium mountain, 189 (117.4)


Fifth stage
(A 102.2-mile, flat ride from
Carhaix to Cap Frehal)
I. Mark Cavendish, Britain, HTC-
Highroad, 3 hours, 38 minutes, 32 seconds.
2. Philippe Gilbert, Belgium, Omega
Pharma-Lotto, same time.
3. Jose Joaquin Rojas, Spain, Movistar,
same time.
4.Tony Gallopin, France, Cofidis, same
time.
5. Geraint Thomas, Britain, Sky
Procycling, same time.


Dahlkvist, Fischer lead



Sweden to 2-1 win over U.S.


By NANCY ARMOUR
Associated Press

WOLFSBURG, Germany
- Lisa Dahlkvist con-
verted a penalty, Nilla
Fischer scored on a free
kick and Sweden beat the
Americans for the first
time in World Cup play
on Wednesday night, a
2-1 victory that forces the
U.S. to play Brazil in the
quarterfinals.
Abby Wambach got the
Americans back in the
game in the 67th minute
with her first goal of the
tournament
But just as they have all
year, the Americans squan-
dered many other chances
to score.
It's the fourth loss since
November for the world's
No. 1 team after going more
than two years without a
defeat, and their second to
Sweden this year.
It's only Sweden's fifth
victory against the U.S. in
30 games, and first in four
World Cup meetings.
As the Group C winner,
Sweden will play Australia


ASSOCIATED PRESS
United States' Carli Lloyd trips next to Sweden's Antonia Goransson during the
Group C match between Sweden and the United States at the Women's Soccer World Cup
in Wolfsburg, Germany, on Wednesday.


on Sunday in Augsburg.
The Americans will face
Brazil, whom they beat in
the last two Olympic finals,
in Dresden.
As the final whistle


sounded, Sweden's players
rushed onto the field, gath-
ered in a circle and began
dancing. They then took
a victory lap around the
field, delighting the many


Swedish fans in the crowd
of 23,468 who whistled and
cheered.
Both teams were
already through to the
quarterfinals.


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LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS THURSDAY, JULY 7, 2011


Page Editor: Brandon Finley, 754-0420










LAKE CITY REPORTER ADVICE & COMICS THURSDAY, JULY 7, 2011


DILBERT


BLONDIE
SORR EVERYBODY'S BEEN WE WERE HAPPV AWW! YOU'RE IT'S BEEN WORKING SO WELL, WE'RE
YOU'RE SAYING THE SAME THING TO WAIT MORE TOO KIN! GONNA STAY OPEN ANO CLOSE
CLOSING! THAN AN HOUR AGAIN NEXT YEAR!
SNOEXONE LAST,(.
sA MEAL! A
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BEETLE BAILEY


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Fr .. .. AM .. ,, 7 .'.A .,.-.,- --I


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B.C.


FRANK & ERNEST


DEAR ABBY


Wedding production begins

with orchestrated proposal


DEAR ABBY: Has the
marriage proposal become
an invited ceremony like
the wedding, or am I out of
touch?
A few months ago friends
and family were invited to
a beach near Seattle for the
proposal. Our grandson and
his live-in went for a short
seaplane ride. The plane
returned, beached and the
couple got out. Then, sur-
rounded by the throng on
the sand and videotaped -
grandson proposed on bend-
ed knee and she, of course,
accepted.
Because we did not attend,
my daughter is still not
speaking to us. The young
couple will fly to Maui in a
few months for the wedding.
We are among the invited,
but the trip is too much
for us. Your comments,
please. BAFFLED IN
BRUNSWICK, MAINE
DEAR BAFFLED: I
have heard of brides get-
ting carried away and turn-
ing their wedding ceremony
into the equivalent of a stage
production, but this is the
first time I have heard about
a mother of the groom issu-
ing a command performance
for the proposal. Heaven only
knows what she's planning for
the birth of their first child.
DEAR ABBY: I am with a
man who treats me and my
kids great. He is kind, caring
and very generous. I trust
him. However, I have been


, :Il


Abigail Van Buren
www.dearobby.com
in a couple of bad relation-
ships. For some reason, I'm
drawn to "bad" boys. I'm not
sure if I really love this man
because there is no "spark."
None!
Should I stay with some-
one who is a really great
person and treats me good -
but there is no passion and
learn to live with it, or do I
end the relationship? NOT
SURE WHAT TO DO IN
CANADA
DEAR NOT SURE: You
might as well end the rela-
tionship now because soon-
er or later you will become
bored and it will end any-
way. The man you're seeing
deserves to have someone
who fully appreciates what
he has to offer, which you
seem unable to do. Continue
dating "bad boys" until you
finally stop confusing anxi-
ety and disappointment with
excitement You appear to
be one of those women who
has to learn whats impor-
tant through pain. You have
my sympathy.
DEAR ABBY: My hus-
band (second marriage)
keeps in touch with his ex-


wife. At one point, it was sev-
eral times a day. I expressed
my concerns to him and told
him I didn't like it and saw
no need for it It stopped -
but only for a while. I know,
because I check his call and
text log.
I know I shouldn't do
that, but recently I found
some text messages saying,
"Sorry I haven't called you."
That's not whafs bothering
me, though. Its how they
signed off She writes, "Love
you," and he writes, "Love
you mostest!"
Abby, thafs what he says
to me. How do I talk to
him about this? I snooped.
SNOOPED ON THE
EAST COAST
DEAR SNOOPED: I
don't blame you for feeling
hurt and threatened by this.
Almost any woman would.
When he's in a relaxed mood
and you can talk without
interruption, ask him if he is
still in love with his ex-wife.
If he says no, ask why he
feels the need to remain in
communication with her and
why he's telling her he loves
her mostestt" Expect him to
go on the attack because you
snooped. But you wouldn't
have done it if your intuition
hadn't made you feel inse-
cure. And it turns out you
were right
Write Dear Abby at
www.DearAbby.com or
P.O. Box 69440, Los
Angeles, CA 90069.


HOROSCOPES


ARIES (March 21-
April 19): Emotional ups
and downs can be expect-
ed. Keep situations and
-.partierships -as, equal as
possible. Your eagerness
to please someone may
work against you. A move
or desire to make changes
will not turn out as planned.

TAURUS (April 20-
May 20): Getting out,
visiting new places or tak-
ing time to indulge your-
self will help contribute to
your emotional well-being.
Consider inviting along
someone with whom you
enjoy spending time. Love
and romance are enhanced.

GEMINI (May 21-
June 20): Check out the
fun things you can do.
Consider activities that will
challenge you and allow
you to interact with others.
SThe people you meet now
will play an intricate role
in your future. Change is
upon you. *****
CANCER (June 21-
July 22): Donnt let nega-
tive influences drag you
down. A change at work or
to your status may leave you
in an emotional funk, but if
you look at the big picture,
the change will turn out to
be to your benefit. **
LEO (July 23-Aug.


THE LAST WORD
Eugenia Last

22): Travel and expand
your interests and knowl-
edge. A change will end up
being to your advantage.
Communication will be
your strong point and will
help you at interviews or
when trying to market an
idea or service. ****
VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept.
22): Don't get angry; get
moving. Someone is likely
to give you a hard time if
you try to make last-minute
changes. Donnt let prob-
lems at home influence
your productivity or a deci-
sion you must make. ***
LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct.
22): Youtll have trouble
sitting still. A change in
surroundings, lifestyle or
philosophy is bound to turn
your life upside down, but
at the same time improve
your health and well-being.

SCORPIO (Oct. 23-
Nov. 21): Put some cre-
ative thought behind your
living arrangements and
you'll come up with a way
to make things more to your
liking. Love is on the rise,
and someone who shares
your likes and dislikes will
work alongside you until
you get things exactly the
way you like them to be in


your personal life. ***
SAGITTARIUS (Nov.
22-Dec. 21): Add to the
fun and comfort of your
home to entice friends
to hang out at your place
more often. Money or a gift
will come to you from an
unusual source. Be grate-
ful for what you receive.
-**-
CAPRICORN (Dec.
22-Jan. 19): Stick close
to home and protect your
assets from anyone who
may be in a position to do
damage or take advantage
of you. Dealing with an
institution or agency will be
restrictive and cause emo-
tional upset **
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-
Feb. 18): Keep things
simple. A promise made
will not pan out as planned.
Don't be disappointed or
complain. Money matters
will improve if you get rid of
old.habits or acquaintances
that are costly. *****
PISCES (Feb. 19-
March 20): Younll be torn
between what you want to
do and what you have to
do. Try to fit everything
into your day by organiz-
ing your time precisely and
asking someone to lend
you a hand to speed up the
process. Love and romance
are highlighted for the eve-
ning hours. ***


CELEBRITY CIPHER


by Luis Campos
Celebrity Cipher cryptograms are created from quotations by famous people, past and present.
Each letter in the cipher stands for another.
Today's clue: E equals H
"ZBB EAWZM CJDMRI ZHJ ZBIG
KHJZW CJDMRI. KHJZWDMR LDJI


ZBB WZMFDMK LGRJLEJH."


TZO F


F,J H G A Z O
PREVIOUS SOLUTION:"My friends tell me I have an intimacy problem. But
they don't really know me." Garry Shandling
(c) 2011 by NEA, Inc. 7-7


FOR BETTER OR WORSE


__


Page Editor: Emogene Graham, 754-0415


CLASSIC PEANUTS











LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED THURSDAY, JULY 7, 2011

Lake City Reporter




CLASSIFIED


Classified Department: 755-5440


Take ADvantage of the
Reporter Classifieds!

755-5440


[BUY I





FIND I


-esnaIerhnds


One Item per ad 0 ion
4 lines* 6 days line $d15
Rate applies to private individuals selling
personal merhande totalling or less.
Each Item must Include a price.
Ths is a non-refundable ate.



One Item per ad ii
4 lines 6 days ln 1
Rate applies to private individuals selling
personal merchandise totaling $500 or lesa.
This Is a non-refundable rate.



One Item per ad $1
4 lines 6 days Eachadditional
line $1.15






4 lines 6 days Each4dd tional
Rate applies to private Indivduals selling
personal merchandise totalling 2,00 or less.
Each Item must Include a price
This is a non-refundable rate.



One Item per ad 1 7J 0
4 lines 6 rdaysEachadditional
4 lines 6 days line.$1.55
Rate applies to private Individuals selling
personal merchandise totalling $,000 or les.
Ech Item mu t Includle a price
This Is a non-refundable rate.,




One i tem per ad vic addvetion
4 lines, o6 days 1month....
SRate applies to private Inddal selling
personal merchandis totalling $4,00 or less.







Includes an additional $200 peri
This is a non-refundable rate.










ad for each Wednesday insertion.








You can call us at 755-5440,
Monday through Friday from 8:00
Some people prefer to place their

classified ads in person, and some
Includes an additional $2.00 per




ad categorea s will require prepay-




ment. Our office is located at 180
East Duval Street.
You can also fax or e-mail your ad
Monday through Friday from 8:00



copy to the Reporter.



FAX: 386-752-9400 Please
direct your copy to the Classified
Department.
EMAIL: classified ds@lakecityre-




Wednesday Motn.,1000oam Min.e9:00rpa
Thursday oed.,fiilcatm ed, 9:00a1 m








Friday t s., 10:00 a.m.. Thurs.,9:00a.m.
Saturday Fn.,10:00a.m. Fd., 9:00 am.
Sunday Fd., 10:00a.m. F., 9:001 m.
These deadlines are subject to change without notice.






the first incorrect insertion, and
East Duval Street.
You can also fax or email your ad












only tthe charge for the ad pace
FAX:in error. Please call 755-5440
direct your copy to the Classifiedorrec-
Depion and billing adjustments.rtment.
EMAIL: classifieds@lakecityre-












portCancellar.cons- Normal advertising












deadlines apply for cancellation.
Billion InqAp r ies- Call by: FaEma755-5440.l by:
Sh would further information. be,
Wednesday Mon., 10:00 a.m. Mon, 9:00 a.m.



















required regarding payments or
credit limits, your call will be trans-
Friday Thurs, 10:00 a.m.. Thurs., 9:00 a.m.
Saturday Fri., 10:01 a.m. K., 9:00 am,









feared to the10: accounting depart-.









ment.
These Adverteadling copy is susubect o change without notice.
Ad Errors- Please read your ad








approve the first day of publicatisher who
reserves the right to ednsibilit, reject, only
the first Incorrect tisements under








appropriate headings. Copy should
onlybe che charge for errors by the
advertiser on the first day of pub-5440
lication. Credit for promptublished errors









will be allowed for the first insertion
for that portion of the advertisements.









which was incorrect. Further, the
Publisher shall not be liable for any
omissiCancellaton advertisements ordered










to be published, nor for any general,
special or consequential damages.
Advertising language must comply
with Federal, State or local lation.
Billing Inquiries- Call 755-5440.











n action in employment, housing nd











public accommodations. Standard
abbreviations are acceptable; how-
ever, the first word of each ad may
not be abbreviated.n
not be abbreviated.


In Print and Online
I t i .l:lctrvii reporter.com


Legal


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
COLUMBIA COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File No. 11-152-CP
Division Probate
IN RE: ESTATE OF
JACK OWEN CRAFT A/K/A
JACK O. CRAFT
Deceased
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
The administration of the estate of
Jack Owen Craft a/k/a Jack 0. Craft,
deceased, whose date of death was
April 24, 2011, is pending in the Cir-
cuit Court for Columbia County,
Florida, Probate Division, the ad-
dress of which is 173 NE Hernando
Avenue, Lake City, Florida 32055.
The names and addresses of the per-
sonal representative and the personal
representative's attorney are .set forth
below. All creditors of the decedent
and other persons having claims or
demands against decedent's estate on
whom a copy of this notice is re-
quired to be served must file their
claims with this court WITHIN THE
LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER
THE TIME OF THE FIRST PUBLI-
CATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30
DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF
SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS
NOTICE ON THEM. All other cred-
itors of the decedent and other per-
sons having claims or demands
against decedent's estate must file
their claims with this court WITHIN
3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE
OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE. ALL CLAIMS NOT
FILED WITHIN THE TIME PERI-
ODS SET FORTH IN SECTION
733.702 OF THE FLORIDA PRO-
BATE CODE WILL BE FOREVER
BARRED. NOTWITHSTANDING
THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH
ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED
TWO (2) YEARS OR MORE AF-
TER THE DECEDENT'S DATE OF
DEATH IS BARRED. The date of
first publication of this notice is June
17,2011.
Attorney for Personal Representative
/s/ John J. Kendron
Attorney for Robert Bruce Craft
a/k/a Bruce Craft
Florida Bar Number 0306850
Robinson, Kennon & Kendron, P.A.
PO Bok 1178
Lake City, FL 32056-1178
Telephone: (386) 755-1334
Personal Representative:
/s/: Robert Bruce Craft a/k/a Bruce
Craft
121 NE Semester Place
Lake City, Florida 32055
05526386
July 7, 14, 2011
Public Auction to be held
July 30, 2011 at 8AM at
Ozzie's Towing & Auto, 2492 SE
Baya Ave. Lake City FL, 32025.
(386)719-5608
FollowingWin Numbers:
93 Honda'" .'
Vin # 1HGEG8552PLO28266
05526455
July 7, 2011

To place your
classified ad call

755-5440
rip==fir~P~


Land Clearing

Back Hoe, Dozer, Chopping, root
raking, bush hog; seeding, sod,
disking, site prep, ponds &
irrigation. Free Est!386-623-3200

Lawn & Landscape Service

Clean Pine Straw,
You pick it up, $1.85 a bale
Delivery of 100 bales $260
386-688-9156

Services

DIVORCE, BANKRUPTCY,
RESUMES.
other court approved forms-
386-961-5896.

We come to you! Auto Detailing:
Wash, wax & vaccum. Pressure
Wash: Houses, mobile homes,
driveways, decks. 386-697-2224




Unscramble these four Jumbles,
one letter to each square,
to form four ordinary words.


Legal

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT, THIRD
JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR
COLUMBIA COUNTY, FLORIDA
CASE NO. 10-740-CA
FIRST FEDERAL BANK OF
FLORIDA, a Banking corporation
organized under the laws of the Unit-
ed States of America, f/k/a FIRST
FEDERAL SAVINGS BANK OF
FLORIDA
Plaintiff, .
V.
ISAAC HOLDINGS, INC., a Florida
Corporation, f/k/a ISAAC CON-
STRUCTION, INC., a Florida Cor,
portion, et al,
Defendants.
NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE
SALE
NOTICE is hereby given that P.
DEWITT CASON, Clerk of the Cir-
cuit Court of Columbia County, Flor-
ida, will on the 20th day of JULY,
2011, at 11:00 a.m. at the Columbia
County Courthouse in Lake City,
Florida, offer for sale and sell at pub-
lic outcry to the highest and best bid-
der for cash, the following described
property situated in Columbia Coun-
ty, Florida, to-wit:
Parcel 1: "
Lots 10 and 25, Oak Meadow Planta-
tion, Unit 3, a subdivision according
to the plat thereof as recorded in Plat
Book 8, Pages 43-44 of the public re-
cords of Columbia County, Florida
Parcel 2:
Lots 4,5, 6, 7, 8, and 9, Oak Meadow
Plantation, Unit 4, a subdivision ac-
cording to the plat thereof as record-
ed in Plat Book 8, pages 70-71, of
the Public Records of Columbia
County, Florida
pursuant to the Final Judgment of
Foreclosure entered in a case pend-
ing in said Court, the style of which
is a set out above, and the docket
number of which is 10-740-CA. Any
person claiming an interest in the
surplus from the sale, if any, other
than the property owner as of the.
date of the lis pendens must file a
claim within sixty (60) days after the
sale.
WITNESS my hand and the official
.seal of said Court, this 21st day of
June, 2011.
P. DEWITT CASON
Clerk of the Circuit Court
Columbia County, Florida
By: /s/B. Scippio
Deputy Clerk
05526319
June 30, 2011
July 7, 2011
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT, THIRD
JUDICIAL CIRCUIT,,
IN AND FOR COLUMBIA COUN-
TY, FLORIDA
FIRST FEDERAL BANK OF
FLORIDA, a Banking corporation
organized under the laws of the Unit-
ed States of America, f/k/a FIRST
FEDERAL SAVINGS BANK OF
FLORIDA
Plaintiff,
v.
CASE NO. 10-741-CA
ISAAC HOLDINGS, INC., a Florida
Corporation, ISAAC P. BRATKO-
VICH, and EMILY L. BRATKO-
VICH,
Defendants.
NOTICE OF, FORECLOSURE
SALE
NOTICE is hereby given that P.
DEWITT CASON, Clerk of the Cir-
cuit Court of Columbia County, Flor-
ida, will on the 20th day of JULY,
2011, at 11:00 a.m. at the Columbia
County Courthouse in Lake City,
Florida, offer for sale and sell at pub-
lic outcry to the highest and best bid-
der for cash, the following described
property situated in Columbia Coun-
ty, Florida, to-wit:
Parcel 1:
A part of the NW 1/4 of the SW 1/4
of Section 1 and part of the NE 1/4
of the SE 1/4 of Section 2, Township
5 South, Range 16 East, Columbia
County, Florida, being more particu-
larly described as follows: Com-
mence at the SW comer of the NW
1/4 of SW 1/4 of said Section 1 and
run N 00"10'43" West along the
West line thereof, 373.40 feet to the
Point of Beginning; thence S
89'24'45" West, 48.21 feet; thence N
00"58'46" West, 436.66 feet; thence
N 89"28'42" East, 54.31 feet to the
West line of said Section 1; thence
continue N 89'28'42" East, 537.79
feet; thence S 00'10'43" East, 435.98
feet; thence S 89'24'45" West
537.79 feet to the Point of Begin-
ning.
Parcel 2:
Lot 6, Cove at Rose Creek, a subdi-
vision according to the plat thereof
as recorded in Plat Book 8, Page
107-109, public records Columbia
County, Florida pursuant to the Final
Judgment of Foreclosure entered in a
case pending in said Court, the style
of which is as set out above, and the


THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME
by David L. Hoyt and Jeff Knurek


IT PI"NT TAKE LONG FOR
RICHARD STARKEY'S
PARENTS TO REAL-IZE HE
WAS GONG TO ---
Now arrange the circled letters
to form the surprise answer, as
suggested by the above cartoon.


Answer: r" L Tm'T -
(Answers tomorrow)
Yesterday's Jumbles: FELON POKER ZOMBIE INVEST
Answer: The cows had no chance of winning the debate
because everything they said was a "MOO" POINT


Legal

docket number of which is 10-741-
CA. Any person claiming an interest
in the surplus from the sale, if any,
other than the property owner as of
the date of the lis pendens must file a
claim within sixty (60) days after the
sale.
WITNESS my hand and the official
seal of said Court, this 16th day of
June, 2011.
P. DEWIT CASON
Clerk of the Circuit Court
Columbia County, Florida
By: B. Scippio
Deputy Clerk
05526337
June 30, 2011
July 7, 2011


020 Lost & Found

FOUND BLACK PUPPY: On the
hospital side of Lake Desoto on
07/04/11, by the Gazebo.
Call (386)965-5707 to identify

Lost Dog: Black dog w/white
chest. Border Collie. Missing since
07/04 Hilton/Desoto. Name: Ali-
zaya. Cash reward. 386-292-3846
Missing dog. $200 Reward.
Thurs., 6/30. Aprox 25-301b Fe-
male, 15 yr old, black/white Bos-
ton Terrier. Last seen close to
Quail Heights. Has a scar between
her front legs. Call 386-754-6670

100 Job
Opportunities

05526387
Local company seeking
experienced,
"Transportation/
Logistic Coordinator"
Minimum qualifications:
High School diploma
2 years experience
PC Knowledge Microsoft
and Web based TMS/WMS
systems
v Routing/Dispatch
Fax resume to: 386-438-2080

05526472
Activities Assistant
Must be CNA, and able to work
2-3 weekdays and most
weekends. Applicant
must be dependable, motivated
and energetic. Full time
position. Please apply Baya
Pointe Nursing & Rehabilitation
Center 587 SE Ermine Ave.,
Lake City, Fl 32025
EOE/DFWP
Associate Reps
SUMMER WORK/GREAT PAY
Immediate FT/PT openings,
Customer sales/service,
No exp needed, conditions,
Apply Now all ages 17+
(386) 269-0883

Aurora Diagnostics;
Administrative Assistant desired;
HR, AP, and clerical experience
preferred.
Fax resume to 386-719-9596


1 (

10

12
13 1
14 I
c
15

16 N
f
18 -


100 Job
1 Opportunities
CDL Class A Truck Driver.
Flatbed exp. for F/T SE area.
3 years exp or more. Medical
benefits offered. Contact
Melissa or Mary @ 386-935-2773
Industrial Maintenance
Technician, Experience Required
in Electrical, Controls and General
Millwright/ Mechanical work.
Experience in Hydraulics and
Pneumatics helpful. Send resume
to Maintenance Technician, 3631
US 90 East, Lake City Fl 32055.
MANAGEMENT POSITION
available at the CATO Store in
Live Oak, FL. Experience necessa-
ry. Apply within at Suwannee Pla-
za on Hwy 129 Live Oak.
Mobile Home Sales!
Experienced Salesperson
Needed to sell the South's
#1 rated product! Call Kevin
386-344-3975
Sales Position available for moti-
vated individual Rountree -Moore
Toyota, Great benefits, paid train-
ing/vacation. Exp. a plus but not
necessary. Call Anthony Cosentino
386-623-7442

120 Medical
0 Employment
Q 0 ,' 0
05526394
Medical Assistant
Requirements: HS diploma,
Phlebotomy Certification.
w/ 1 year exp.
Medical Assistant or equivalent
certification preferred
ONLY Qualified candidates
may send resumes to:
ipapeshiaicancercarenorthflori-
da.com
Busy family practice looking for a
full-time Nurse Practitioner. Send
reply to Box 05063, C/O The Lake
City Reporter, P.O. Box 1709,
Lake City, FL, 32056
RN's needed. Local med-surg
ER hospital shifts. Immediate
work, instant pay, $300 sign-on
bonus. Call 352-336-0964
Lake City & Live Oak area.
www.suwanneemedical.com

2 Schools &
240 1IO
S Education

04544843
Interested in a Medical Career?
Express Training offers
courses for beginners & exp
Nursing Assistant, $479
next class-07/11/10
Phlebotomy national certifica-
tion, $800 next class-07/11/11
Continuing education
'Fees incl. books, supplies, exam
fees. Call 386-755-4401 or
expresstrainingservices.com

REPORTER Classifieds

In Print and On Line
www.lakecityreporter.com


ACROSS 38 911 responder
39 Coast
Cool time 42 Popular cruise
Stops short stop
Stained-glass 45 Baking pan
art 46 Capsule,
Gulch maybe
Melbourne mate 50 Ball game
Hindu rope- opener
climbers 53 "Forgot" a letter
Some PC 55 Bishops' hats
screens 56 Clears the
Ms. Farrow of windshield
ilms 57 Cherry center
- Paulo, Brazil 58 Pita sandwich


19 Exceeded,as a
budget
23 Gun owner's
or .
26 Shirt-pocket
stain
27 Parade feature
30 Dairy-case buy
32 Fishing boats
34 Woos
35 Gilda of "SNL"
36 Waiter's offer-
ing
37 Average


DOWN


1 Trey topper
2 Exec. aide
3 Lariat
4 52, for Caesar


310 Pets & Supplies
4 beautiful black & white. 10 wk
old kittens w/crystal emerald
green eyes. Litter box trained.
Wormed and Flea Free!
Free to good homes. 386-755-1794
KITTENS. 4 white and 1 long
haired black. Had 1st shots. 10
weekss old. Cute & spunky!
$25.00. ea. 386-961-8909
PUBLISHER'S NOTE
Florida Law 828.29 requires dogs
and cats being sold to be at least 8
weeks old and have a health
certificate from a licensed
veterinarian documenting they
have mandatory shots and are
free from intestinal and external
parasites. Many species of wild-
life must be licensed by Florida
Fish and Wildlife. If you are
unsure, contact the local
office for information.

330 Livestock &
33 Supplies

Black Angus Cows & Heifers
Prices Vary
Registered & Commercial
386-719-4802


361 Farm Equipment
84 Ford 4610 Tractor.
2WD, Solid
2005 motor,$7,500. OBO
386-867-0005


402 Appliances
Frost Free Refrigerator.
Works great
$200.
386-292-3927 or 386-755-5331.
GE Dishwasher
Works great $90.
386-292-3927 or
386-755-5331.
NEW 18 cu ft White Refrigerator
/bought for a buisness/was too
large/used 4 hrs !
$350 OBO 863-258-1049
.Small used freezer.
Works good.
$50.00
386-755-7933
Whirlpool washing machine.
Works great, come see.
$100.
386-755-3682

407 Computers
Compaq Computer, Many extras.
Complete Computer
$80.00
386-755-9984 or 386-292-2170


408 Furniture
KING SIZE BED
$100.00
755-9333 or
755-7773
Love Seat.
Good shape. $35.
Beige background with stripes
386-292-3927 or 386-755-5331.


Answer to Previous Puzzle

ITTU M A HIUEY

DESSA A RDENT


OAF D IV Y ABE
U MAMRENEFROM
T OINIS|U JE B |A|GLIE
D EIN IIM CON Q U EIR
ONAD E SI E E



NOPE RA S E D
EAL N REED R E SI EL


5 Swimsuit nalf
6 Ozarks st. cial (hyph.)
7 Superman's 10 Big burger
girlfriend 11 Glues tight
8 Actress 12 Distant
Sedgwick 17 Tick off
9 Nothing spe- 20 Strong point


Want more puzzles?
Check out the "Just Right Crossword Puzzles" books
at QulllDriverBooks.com
1 12 13 14 5 16 17 I8 19


21 On the train
22 Ancient oint-
ment
23 UN locale
24 House compo-
nent
25 Chills and
fever
28 Number of
Muses
29 Consider
31 Footed vases
32 Emptied out
33 AARP mem-
bers
37 Frat letter
40 Modern-day
tellers
41 Uplift
42 Rear-ends
43 - for keeps
44 Comic-strip
dog
47 Skunk's
defense
48 Utah state
flower
49 Mag. staffers
51 Coop denizen
52 Sooner than
54 Trouser part


2011 UFS, Dist. by Univ. Uclick for UFS


SADvantage
A~vanta


RDEHNC
RDEHNC
/ 1/^~ """ """
-^ ^ _











LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED THURSDAY, JULY 7, 2011


408 Furniture
Recliner Sofa
$75.00
755-9333 or
755-7773


416 Sporting Goods
.Golf Clubs. Mens RH. Complete
set. 8 irons, cougar, 2 wedges, 2
putters. 4 woods. Excellent bag.
$250. 386-758-7550 or 397-4629

420 Wanted to Buy
K&H TIMBER
We Buy Pine Hardwood &
Cypress. Large or small tracts.
Call 386-961-1961.
Wanted Junk Cars, Trucks, Vans.
$250 & up CASH! Free Pick Up!
NO title needed !386-878-9260
After 5pm 386- 752-3648.

430 Garage Sales
1564 NW Frontier Dr.
Lake City Country Club.
Lots of clothes, boys & ladies.
Saturday, July 9th. 8-12
Cleaning out, moving on. Inside &
out. Fur., clothing; computers,
Haviland China & more. Fri 8-5.
Sat 8-1. 493 NW Clubview Cr.
Hugh Sale! Sat. 7/9. 8-? South of
town in the old Chrch on the Way
bldg near high school. Furniture,
mattresses, dishes, clothes, more.
PUBLISHER'S NOTE
All Yard Sale Ads
Must be Pre-Paid.

Saturday, July 9th 7am ?.
575 NW Gwen Lake Ave. Turn off
Hwy 90 by the Stop & Go.
Bike, clothes, household, Misc.

440 Miscellaneous
HIGH WHEEL Pushmower
$85.00
386-292-3927 or
386-755-5331.
Sony Playstation 2 System.
Memory card, one controller.
5 games. In good condition.
$95.00 386-984-7510
Stop gnat & Mosquito bites! Buy
Swamp Gator All natural insect re-
pellent. Family safe. Use head to
toe. Available at The Home Depot.
Summer Barbecue Special "':
Tow Behind
Grill/Smoker, $1,250 OBO.
386-719-4802

630 Mobile Homes
630 forRent






2&3 BR MH. $395 $650. mo.
plus deposit. Water & sewer fur-
nished. Cannon Creek MHP
S386-752-6422
2/2 Urfits, clean, well maintained,
nice'safe park-setting, 2 miles to
dowuitown Lake City, $575 month
+ $575 sec dep, 386-984-8448
13th M6onh FREE!!
3/1 w/security system. $800.mo.
Also, small home on 10 ac. $400.
Ft. White area. Avail 8/1. Call for
more deatils. 386-497-1464
3/2 S of Lake City, (Branford area)
$575 month plus security .'
386-590-0642 or 386-867-1833:
www.suwanneevalleyproperties.com
Clean 2br/2ba on 5 acres. Nice un-
furnished MH w/well water. Coin-
try setting just north of LC $400.
mo. 1st, last & sec (954)818-4481
Mobile Homie:for rent in :
White Springs, Lake City & Ft.
White. Contact 386-623-3404
or 386-365-1919
Nice clean 2&3 bdrm, Five Points,
NO PETS,
also 3 bd on the
Westside, 386-961-1482
X-Clean 2/2 SW, 8 mi NW of VA.
Clean acre lot, nice area. $500. mo
+ dep No dogs Non-smoking
environment.386-961-9181

640 Mobile Homes
for Sale
Handy man special, 94 Fleetwood
DWMH. 3/2 on 5 acres in Ft.
White. Owner Fin. $3.000 dIn
$850mo. $99,900 352-215-1018
www.LandOwnerFinancing.com
PALM HARBOR Homes Has
Closed 2 Model Centers. Save up
to 60K on select models
Call Today! 800-622-2832
NI.'1v I) R..'il.:.l i hoiius.ind'
3br/2ba set, delivery, A/C
skirting, steps. $39,900.
Call Ken (386)754-8844
AS IS, WHERE IS...32X80, 4/2,
LR/Den, needs carpet, paint, 2400
sqft. has metal roof, vinyl siding.
$31,000. Randy 386-754-0198
FIRE YOUR LANDLORD
TO OWN WHAT YOUR
THROWING AWAY IN RENT.
CALL MIKE 386-754-8844


NEW 32X70 4/3. 2K sqft+. L/R,
DenSidex side, glasstop range,
D/W, Del, set, Steps, A/C, skirt-
ing. $59,900. Ken (386)754-8844
OWNER FINANCE 40% Down
w/land Equity or CASH on any
new or used singlewide or Double-
wide. Randy 386-754-0198
The Economy has forced
me to cut the price on my
3 bedroom, 2 bath home to
$38K (352)-870-5983

705 Rooms for Rent
New furnished bedroom apt in a
home, private entrance & bath, in-
cludes utilities, trash, cable, frig &
pest control. $450 mo + dep. Avail
8/1. 386-752-2020 SW LItke City


710 Unfurnished Apt.
710 For Rent








SPRING HILL VILLAGE
Excellent High Springs location.
1, 2 & 3 bedroom floor-plans;
some with garages.
Call 386-454-1469
or visit our website:
www.springhillvillage.net

1BR APT.
Downtown Location, Clean.
$450 mo, plus Security.
NO PETS. Call 386-755-3456
2/1 w/garage & washer/dryer
hookups. East side of town,
Call for details
386-755-6867
2BR/1.5BA w/garage
5 minutes from VA hospital.
Call for details.
386-755-4590 or 365-5150
Furnished or unfurnished
Townhomes on the golf course.
$750. mo. plus security. Includes
water. 386-752-9626
NICE APT Downtown. Remod-
eled 1 bedroom. Kitchen, dining,
living room. $450. mo plus sec.
386-362-8075 or 386-754-2951









Summer Special! 12th mo Free
w/signed yr lease. Updated, w/tile
floors/fresh paint. Great area.
From $450.+sec. 386-752-9626
The Lakes Apts. Studios & 1Br's
from $135/wk..Util. & cable incl.,
Sec 8 vouchers accepted, monthly
rates avail Call 386-752-2741

Furnished Apts.
720 For Rent
lbr Apt. incl. water, elec, &
cable..$595. mo. Good area.
References & sec. req'd.
No pets. 386-719-4808

Rooms for Rent. Hillcrest, Sands,
Columbia. All furnished. Electric,
cable, fridge, microwave..Weekly
or monthly rates. 1 person $135,
2 persons $150. weekly
386-752-5808

130 .Unfurnished
i3J Home For Rent
lbr/1.5ba Country Cottage, Cathe-
dral ceihlgs, brick fireplace, wash-
er/dryer,I ac fenced, private, some
pets, lease. 1st, last, see, ref. Lake
City area $650mio. 352-494-1989
lbr/lba Free ele. Utilities incl. 4mi
S. Lake City. $300dep. $375mo.
386-590-0642 or 386-867-1833
www.suwann'eevalleyproperties.com
2 bedroom 1 bath on '
5 acres. $700.00 per;month.
First, last and security.
386-590-5333..
2br Private Country
Home. Remodeled,
everything is new. Large yard.
386-752-1444

/ 11208 73rd Ct. Live Oak..
4/3 brick home in a country
subdivision $700./ mo + security
/ 204 NW Guerdon
Rd...Brand new 3/2 home re-
duced to $7Noimo t- secunr
.V 250 SW Wie Dr 3/2 Execu-
time home in restricted Wise Es-
.taes. $l350./mio +' secuirty
/ 390 SW Wilshire'Di'...
Gorgeous upscale 3/2 on
culdesac in Callaway
$1300./mo + security
/ COMING SOON! 4/2 brick
home in Springfield Estates on
Brandy Way. Call for additional
information!
Call Kayla Carbona @
386-623-9650

3bedroom/2bath in town
No Pets!
$650.' mo. plus deposit
386-758-0057
Family Home 3/2, Ir, dr, fam rm
w/ fp,garage, fenced back yd.
Nice area. $1100 mo + dep Martha
Jo Khachigan, Realtor 623-2848

750 Business &
Office Rentals
FOR LEASE: Downtown office
space. Convenient to
Court house.
Call 386-755-3456
For Lease: E Baya Ave. Two -
1000 sqft office space units or
combined for 2000 sqft. 386-984-
0622 or weekends 386-497-4762
OFFICE SPACE for lease.
Oak Hill Plaza. 900 sqft
$675mo/$695. sec dep.
Tom 386-961-1086 bCA Realtor

770 Condos For Rent


05526400
Golf Course Condo for rent,
2BR/2BA, 1420 s.f., $1100/mo.
Rent includes all appliances,
basic cable, water/sewer/
garbage, pool & tennis ct.
access. Realtor/owner
call 386-344-0433


790 Vacation Rentals
Horseshoe Beach Scalloping Spd
Gulf Front 2br, w/lg porch, dock,
fish sink. wkend $395./wk $895.
386-235-3633/352-498-5986
alwaysonvacation.com #419-181
"Florida's Last Frontier"


805 Lots for Sale
1/4 acre, new well, septic and
power, paved rd, owner fin, no
down pym't, $24,900,
($256 month) 352-215-1018
www.LandOwnerFinancing.com
PUBLISHER'S NOTE
All real estate advertising in this
newspaper is subject to the fair
housing act which makes it illegal
to advertise "any preference,
limitation, or discrimination based
on race, color, religion, sex,
disability, familial status or nation-
al origin; or any intention to make
such preference, limitation or
discrimination." Familial status
includes children under the age of
18 living with parents or legal
custodians, pregnant women and
people securing custody of chil-
dren under the age of 18. This
newspaper will not knowingly
accept any advertising for real es-
tate which is in violation of the
law. Our readers are hereby in-
formed that all dwellings adver-
tised in this newspaper are availa-
ble on an equal opportunity basis.
To complain of discrimination call
HUD toll free at 1-800-669-9777,
the toll free
telephone number to the hearing
impaired is 1-800-927-9275.

810 Home for Sale
HANDYMAN SPECIAL
2br/1.5ba. Half ac fenced lot
w/shed. Appraised at $68,000.
Asking $55,000. (352)335-8330

820 Farms &
Acreage
10-ac lot. Well/septic/pp. Owner
financing $300 dn, $663 mo 8.9%,
25 yrs. Deas Bullard Properties
386-752-4339 www.landnfl.com
4 1/2 acre lot. Lake Jeffery Road.
Gorgeous Oaks!Paved Rd
Owner Financing! NO DOWN!
$59,900. $525mo 352-215-1018.
www.LandOwnerFinancing.com
4 acres, Wellborn, New Well
installed, Beautifully wooded
w/cleared Home Site, owner fin,
no down, $39,900, $410 mon
Call 352-215,1018
www.LandOwnerFinancing.com
FARM- 7 stall barn, Apt.
17+ acres cross fenced.
Close in $895. mo.
386-961-1086

830 Commercial
Property

05526409
FOR SALE LAKE -CITY
FORMER 84 LUMBER Zoned
Commercial Intensive on
4.2 +/- Acres with an 18,300
S.F: main building at 1824 W.
US Highway 90; contact
Crystal 724 228-3636 x 1349

4 UNIT Apt. Bldg. All 1/1/ w/ex-
tra rooms. Clean, good tenants and
remodeled. Downtown. $160,000.
S386-362-8075 or 754-2951

870 Real Estate
7O Wanted
I Buy Houses
CASH!
Quick Sale Fair Price
386-269-0605

950 Cars for Sale
1986 Chevy Monte Carlo SS,
78k miles, one owner. $10,000.
All original.
386-752-1313 or 904-718-6747
2006 Toyota Scion XB,
41,000-mi. $13,000.
Paid over $24,000 new.
386-752-1313 or 904-718-6747


Bring the picture in or
we will take it for youl
* Ad runs 10 consecutive days
with a description and photo in the
newspaper and online E-edition.
* Ad runs 10 consecutive days as a
classified line ad online.
* You must include vehicle price.
* All ads are prepaid.
* Private party only.


2006 EF250
Ford Van
3/4 ton, metal work
shelves/ladder rack,
60K miles, exc. cond.
$10,500
Call
386-555-5555
If you don't sell your vehicle
during the first 10 days, you
can run the same vehicle ad
for 10 additional days for
only $15.00
Terms and conditions remain the
same for the additional run.




MEryBoBrid
(386 755544


2005 Yamaha
VStar 650
11,000 miles, blue with
ghost flames, runs
great, new battery
Price Reduced to $2,800
Call
386-752-9645


2006 Toyota Scion
XB
41,000 mi.
Paid over $24,000 new.
$13,000
Call
386-752-1313
904-718-6747


1986 Chevy Monte
Carlo SS
78k miles, one owner.
All original.
$10,000
Call
386-752-1313
904-718-6747


NEED HELP!

Let Us Write
Y r
C ssiyoured Gd
V ~ ~ ~ S ( T1^ V ^ V'fl.. ^ ...aM- 'l ^ ^ ^


I


:7.-AR l !554 rixa


Classified Department: 755-5440


*









LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS THURSDAY, JULY 7, 2011


Mickelson to change approach at British Open


By STEVE DOUGLAS
Associated Press

INVERNESS, Scotland
Phil Mickelson is
banking on a change in
strategy on the greens in
the next two weeks to break
his tournament drought in
Britain.
The American left-hander
has finished in the top 10
at the British Open just


CLEMENS
From Page 1B
nearly a quarter-century.
At the outset, Walton said
hedidn'tunderstandwhythe
House of Representatives
has not turned over the
audio of Clemens' 2008
deposition to committee
staff, even though a tran-
script is available.
Walton said Congress
risks being seen by. the
public as "hiding behind
things." Still, he said he is
"not willing to delay the trial
over the issue.
William Pittard, a lawyer
for the House, said Clemens
never asked for the tape pre-'
viously and said it was disin-
genuous for him to come in
complaining he didn't get it
on the first day of his trial.
He said the House clerk has
the tape and it can only be
released by a House resolu-,
tion, which could possibly
have been arranged with
more time.
Pittard, who appeared in
the well of the courtroom to
address the issue, said the
tape is not very good and
the transcript is the House's
official record.
The judge said he might
allow other baseball players
to testify they knowingly
received performance-
enhancing drugs if Clemens'
defense team pursues its
theory that Clemens' chief
accuser made up allegations
he injected Clemens with
steroids and human growth
hormone as leverage to help
him deal with his own legal
troubles.
Clemens told a House
committee under oath
three years ago that he
never used performance-
enhancing drugs.
In connection with jury
selection, Walton plans to
ask potential panelists to
answer up to 82 questions
about their background,
opinions and knowledge of
the case. Both sides sought
a written questionnaire, but
Walton said thats not his
practice because it "dis-
advantages less-educated
people." He said he would
give attorneys wide latitude
to ask follow-up questions.
The case will pit Clemens
against his former trainer,
Brian McNamee, who says
he injected Clemens with
steroids and human growth
hormone several times
during the decade that he
helped shape him into one of
the most feared pitchers in
the major leagues. Clemens'.
attorneys say McNamee is a
serial liar who made up the
allegations against his star
client to save himself from
joblessness and prosecution
on drug charges.
Clemens' lawyers will try
to discredit McNamee, a
former New York City police
officer, by pointing out a
series of lies the trainer told
in the past. They also want
to introduce allegations
that he drugged and raped
an unconscious woman in
a Florida hotel pool while
traveling with the New York
Yankees in 2001.
The judge will have to
decide whether to let that
allegation in, considering
that McNamee was never
charged with a crime.
Prosecutors want to back
up McNamee's allegations
against Clemens through


testimony from his former
Yankee teammates Pettitte,
Knoblauch and Stanton.
All three admit they got
performance drugs from
McNamee, but Walton says
he probably won't let them
tell jurors about it because it
could cause them to unfairly
assume that Clemens must
have as well.


once at Troon in 2004
- and is using this week's
Scottish Open, on a links
course at Castle Stuart, as
preparation for the year's
third major.
Mickelson acknowledged
Wednesday that his failure
to master British greens is
the root of the problem.
"The biggest reason
is the greens," the sixth-
ranked Mickelson said. "I


have not putted well. The
grass is a little bit more.
coarse, a little thicker, has
a little bit more effect, and
you need to putt with less
break and more aggression
is what I've come to find.
"I'm going to try to do
that this week and next
week and see if that doesn't
combat some of the issues
that I've had putting here."
With the British Open


starting atRoyal St. George's
in southeast England next
week, Mickelson also will
use the warmup event in
Scotland to try out new
strategies in his famed
short game.
"Having a week now to be
able to see the way the ball
reacts, get my mind adjust-
ed to the short-game shots,
as well as the full shots,
how the ball reacts, I think


is going to play a big effect
- a big positive effect in
my performances," he said.
Mickelson has won four
major titles three at the
Masters and one at the U.S.
PGA Championship and
is widely considered one of
the greats of modern golf
despite never having held
the No. 1 spot.
That is mainly because of
playing in the Tiger Woods


era.
His aim is to seal the
Grand Slam of the four
majors, but he also said
improving his record in
Britain and in links con-
ditions will help him to
become a more "complete
player."
"It's something that I am
really starting to enjoy the
challenge of succeeding
over here," Mickelson said.


SU.:R C L .-R- NCE: 'EV.ENT .:... *fyZ.,. v'" .. ". .*-'- .''
Jee


Page Editor: Brandon Finley, 754-0420