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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028308/01600
 Material Information
Title: The Lake City reporter
Uniform Title: Lake City reporter (Lake City, Fla. 1967)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: John H. Perry
Place of Publication: Lake City Fla
Publication Date: 7/6/2011
Frequency: daily (monday through friday)[<1969>-]
weekly[ former 1967-<1968>]
daily
normalized irregular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Lake City (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Columbia County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Columbia -- Lake City
Coordinates: 30.189722 x -82.639722 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 95, no. 4 (Oct. 5, 1967)-
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000358016
oclc - 33283560
notis - ABZ6316
lccn - sn 95047175
sobekcm - UF00028308_01569
System ID: UF00028308:01600
 Related Items
Preceded by: Lake City reporter and Columbia gazette

Full Text




Child burned
Clothing ignites
in accident


Woods out
Tiger to skip
British Open


with lighter, as leg heals.
Story below Sports, I B
000014 120511 k* *3- DLCT 326
LIB OF FLORIDA HISTORY
PO BOX 117 D0'7
205 iI.- UNiV OF F LORIDA
GAINESVILLE i, 32611 194'


All-State
Pilkington, Kvistad
earn first-team
honors.
Sports, I B





Reports


Wednesday, July 6, 2011 www.lakecityreporter.com Vol. 137, No. 137 0 75 cents


City OKs 3% raises to



offset pension pay-ins


Plan, approved on 3-2
vote, will only be in
effect through Sept. 30.

By ANTONIA ROBINSON
arobinson@lakecityreporter.comrn
The Lake City City Council voted 3-2,
with Councilman. George Ward and Mayor
Stephen Witt dissenting, to approve a tem-


porary pay hike for employees and council
members who use the Florida Retirement
System as their pension plan, in order to
offset a mandatory three percent pay-in that
took effect Friday. The pay hike, retroactive
to July 1, is only in effect until Sept. 30, the
end of the city's fiscal year.
"I'm asking the council to fund a subsidy,
not give a pay raise," said City Manager
Wendell Johnson.
With reduced contribution levels to the
state retirement system, the city would
have saved $37,488. After the three percent


pay increase, savings will be reduced to
$13,775.
The state's fiscal year began July 1 and
under a new state law, all participants in the
Florida Retirement System were forced to
contribute three percent toward their pen-
sions.
The city has 106 employees who par-
ticipate in the Florida Retirement System,
which includes council member Jake Hill
and Witt.
PENSION continued on 3A


'Geriactors' in action

Photos by JASON MATTHEW WALKERILake City Reporter
ABOVE: Moe Northern (left) and Frank
Hubert, members of the Geriactors Reader
Theatre Group, perform the classic Abbott
and Costello bit, 'Who's on First?' Tuesday
at the LifeStyle Enrichment Center in Lake
City. LEFT: Helen Flanagan (from left),
Nandy Ornelas and Peggy Woolard fight
over a red rose during a performance of
'Battle of the Roses' Tuesday. Along with
providing local entertainment, the Geriactors
Reader Theatre Group helps those with
memory loss due to strokes exercise their
minds, say organizers.


But what

about

schools,

county?

By TONY BRITT
tbritt@lakecityreporter.com

Despite tonight's action by the
Lake City City Council, as well
as more permanent measures
by municipalities and agencies
throughout the state, school
board and county officials say
it's unlikely they will be able to
offer employees a three-percent
pay increase to offset a state
mandate that requires them to
pay three percent of their sala-
ries into the Florida Retirement
System.
Columbia County Schools
Linard Johnson, Columbia
County School Board chairman,
said it's unlikely the school board
will be able to offer its employ-
ees a three percent pay increase
to offset the pension pay-ins.
"The Columbia County School
Board would love to do that, but
that's economically and budget-
arily impossible at this time," he
said.
The probability of a three-
percent pay increase was not
an issue raised during contract
negotiations with the local teach-
ers' union.
"Our negotiations with the
- teachers' union has ended for
this year," Johnson said. "So, the
salaries for the coming school
year have already been set and
agreed upon by the teachers'
union."
Johnson admitted that teach-
ers having to use three percent
of their pay as a contribution
towards their retirement will
have an adverse financial impact
on them.
"This obviously comes at a
very trying time financially for
families and employees of the
school district," he said. "I just
don't think the legislature was
very wise in its decision to in
effect give employees a pay
decrease enactment of a three
percent contribution for their
retirement"
Mike Millikin, Columbia:
County Superintendent of
Schools, said the school dis-
trict is not planning to give its
employees a three-percent pay
RAISES continued on 3A


Child seriously burned


in accident with lighter


Clothing ignites
while looking for
keys under bed.


By TONY BRITT
tbritt@lakecityreporter.com
A 12-year-old girl seriously burned while
using a cigarette lighter to search under a
bed for lost keys is recovering in an area
hospital, according to Columbia County
Fire Rescue officials.
The girl, whom authorities did not iden-
tify, suffered burns to the upper torso.
The incident occurred after 3 p.m.


Monday at a Lanvale Avenue address, east
of Lake City.
"She was trying to help her family find
some keys and was looking under a bed,
lay down on the floor and she was using
a lighter to provide light and she acciden-
tally set her clothes on fire," said David
Boozer, Columbia County Fire Rescue
Division chief. "She was burned on 20 per-
cent of her upper torso."
The child was taken by helicopter to
the University of Florida Burn Center for
treatment.
"She had first, second and third-degree
CHILD continued on 3A


Impassable Bay fire


now fully contained


By TONY BRITT
tbritt@lakecityreporter.comrn
Local wildfire activity .has decreased
in recent days and the Impassable Bay
Complex is 100 percent contained,
according to officials.
U.S. Forestry Service officials in a
release issued Tuesday morning said all
the fires in the Impassable Bay Complex
are fully contained, also noting that
there were an additional 17 smaller fires
sparked by lightning strikes that required
continued monitoring. The total acreage
consumed by the Impassable Bay blazes
was estimated at 12,130 acres.
The Impassable Bay fire was started


by a lighting strike on Monday, June 6,
and at its peak more than 200 firefighters
were working to contain it. The fire was
limited to the Osceola National Forest
which prevented it from impacting
private forest land.
Kidd's Incident Team was in charge
of handling command duties associated
with containing the blaze, but those
responsibilities will revert to officials at
the Osceola Ranger District beginning
today.
The Florida Division of Forestry
WILDFIRE continued on 3A


CALL US:
(386) 752-1293
SUBSCRIBE TO
THE REPORTER:
Voice: 755-5445
Fax: 752-9400


96
T-Storm chance
WEATHER, 2A


Opinion .
People.
Obiuaries .
Advice & Comics ..
Puzzles


. 4A
2A
5A
4B
2B


TODAY IN
PEOPLE
-, ,rd


COMING
THURSDAY
Fu llt -.:., s t o
Full ..-i:...n n


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.IIII1III1H.









LAKE CITY REPORTER DAILY BRIEFING WEDNESDAY, JULY 6, 2011


Tuesday:
Afternoon: 1-9-8
Evening: 1-4-0


. ';-4 Tuesday:
Afternoon: 7-7-3-5
Evening: 2-9-9-9


ez/mat -
Monday:
4-8-31-32-33


PEOPLE IN THE NEWS


Casey Anthony acquitted


ORLANDO
Casey Anthony was found
not guilty Tuesday of
killing her 2-year-old
daughter in a case that
captivated the nation as
it played out on national television
from the moment the toddler was
reported missing three years ago.
Anthony, 25, wept as the judge
read the verdict, which jurors
reached after less than 11 hours of
deliberation over two days. She was
charged with first-degree murder,
which could have brought the death
penalty if she had been convicted.
Instead, she was convicted of only
four counts of lying to investigators
looking into the June 2008 disap-
pearance of her daughter Caylee.
Her body was found in the woods six
months later and a medical examiner
was never able to determine how
she died.
She will be sentenced by the judge
on Thursday and could receive up to
a year in jail for each lying count
Anthony's attorneys claimed that
the toddler drowned accidentally in
the family swimming pool, and that
her seemingly carefree mother in
fact was hiding emotional distress
caused by sexual abuse from her
father.
Prosecutors contended that
Caylee was suffocated with duct tape
by a mother who loved to party, tat-
tooed herself with the Italian words
for "beautiful life" in the month her
daughter was missing and crafted
elaborate lies to mislead everyone
from investigators to her own par-
ents.


Casey Anthony (left) and one of her attorneys, Dorothy Clay Sims, wait in the
courtroom during the second day of jury deliberations in her murder trial in
Orlando on Tuesday. Anthony was found not guilty of first-degree murder in the
death of her daughter, Caylee. She was convicted of only four counts of lying to
investigators looking into the June 2008 disappearance of her daughter Caylee.


,-c Paris Hilton or her
home.
The sheriff's
department said in a
I. statement that some-
one called authori-
S, ties Monday after-
Hilton noon and reported
a man standing on a
beach looking into Hilton's Malibu
home. The caller recognized him as
James Rainford, who pleaded no con-
test to a battery charge in April.

Miss Brazil robbed at


....... .. .... 0 ffwv "T %4

Man arrested over Paris gunpoint in front of home
Hilton restraining order SAO, PAULO -- Miss Brazil has
nbeen robbed at unnoint in front'of


MALIBU Los Angeles County
sheriff's deputies have arrested a
man accused of violating a restrain-
ing order that bars him from being
within 200 yards (180 meters) of


UL .. 1. IVUJUU UL.. g M..I VA. J]U L 1L1. 1 J1 U ALU. V1
her home.
The Miss Brazil pageant press
office said that Debora Lyra
was held up at gunpoint as she
approached the entrance of her


Lyra
purse.


gated condo in Sao
Paulo on Sunday.
Monday's state-
ment said a well-
dressed man with
a pistol approached
Lyra as she pulled
up to her condo-
minium. He took her


Sheen next roastee
for Comedy Central
NEW YORK There should be
no shortage of material. Comedy
Central said Tuesday that Charlie
Sheen has agreed to b1 the subject
of its next celebrity roast. It will
be taped in Los Angeles and air on
Sept. 19. That is the same night that
Ashton Kutcher debuts on CBS com-
edy 'Two and a Half Men."
* Associated Press


Celebrity Birthdays


* Former first lady Nancy
Reagan is 90.
* Former President George
W. Bush is 65.
* Actor-director Sylvester
Stallone is 65.
* Actor Grant Goodeve is 59.

Daily Scripture


* Rapper Inspectah Deck
(Wu-Tang Clan) is 41.
* Rapper 50 Cent is 36.
* Actress Tia Mowry is 33.
* Actress Tamera Mowry is
33.
* Actor Jeremy Suarez is 21.


"In that day you will say: 'Give
praise to the Lord, proclaim his
name; make known among the
nations what he has done, and
proclaim that his name is exalt-
ed."
Isaiah 12:4

Thought for Today
"Freedom is always and exclu-
sively freedom for the one who
thinks differently."
Rosa Luxemburg,
Polish-German revolutionary (1871-1919)

Lake City Reporter
HOW TO REACH US
Main number ........(386) 752-1293 BUSINESS
Fax number .............752-9400 Controller Sue Brannon... .754-0419
Circulation ...............755-5445 (sbrannon@lakecityreporter.com)
Online... www.lakecityreporter.com CIRCULATION
The Lake City Reporter, an affiliate of
Community Newspapers Inc., is pub- Home delivery of the Lake City Reporter
lished Tuesday through Sunday at 180 should be completed by 6:30 a.m.
E. Duval St., Lake City, Fla. 32055. Tuesday through Saturday, and by 7:30
Periodical postage paid at Lake City, HFla. a.m. on Sunday.
Member Audit Bureau of Circulation and Please call 386-755-5445 to report any
The Associated Press, problems with your delivery service.
All material herein is property of the Lake In Columbia County, customers should
City Reporter. Reproduction in whole or call before 10:30 a.m. to report a ser-
in part is forbidden withoutthe permis- ce error for same day re-delivery. After
sion of the publisher. U.S. Postal Service 10:30 a.m., next day re-delivery or ser-
No. 310-880. e e iv or sr-
vice related credits will be Issued.
POSTMASTER: Send address changes In all other counties where home delivery
to Lake City Reporter, PO. Box 1709, is available, next day re-delivery or ser-
Lake City, Fla. 32056. vice related credits will be issued.
Publisher Todd Wilson..... 754-0418
(twilson@lakecityreporter.com) Circulation ...............755-5445
(circulation@lakecftyreporter.com)
NEWS Home delivery ratds
Editor Robert Bridges .....754-0428 (Tuesday through Sunday)
(rbridges@lakecityreporter.com) 12 Weeks..............:... $2662
24 Weeks....................$48.79
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Director Ashley Butcher ...754-0417 Rates include 7%/, sales ltax.
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CLASSIFIED 24 Weeks......... ......... $8280
To place a classified ad, call 755-5440 52 Weeks..................$179.40

CORRECTION

The Lake City Reporter corrects errors of fact in news
items. If you have a concern, question or suggestion, please
call the executive editor. Corrections and clarifications will run
in this space. And thanks for reading. *


Photographer
says no to deal
MIAMI A military
photographer has rejected
a deal that would have
averted a federal passport
fraud trial.
Elisha Leo Dawkins, 26,
remained in federal cus-
tody Tuesday. The govern-
ment said he made a false
statement in applying for a
passport in 2006 because
he failed to mention he
had previously applied.
Dawkins is an Iraq
Army veteran and served
in the Naval Reserves at
Guantanamo Bay.
If convicted this month,
-Dawkins faces up to 10
years behind bars. The
prosecutors' deal would
have allowed him to avoid
trial by participating in a
federal probation program.

25 injured when
truck hits bus
- MARGATE A col-
lision between a South
Florida transit bus and a
gasoline tanker truck has
left 25 passengers injured.
Margate Fire Rescue
--Division Chief Dan Booker
said the tanker truck rear-
-ended the Broward County
bus Tuesday morning.
Rescue crews took 22
.people to hospitals. Booker
;said one of them had seri-
o us injuries.
Three others were treat-
ed at the scene for minor
injuries. Booker said the
county transit buses have
no seatbelts, and that may
have contributed to the
number of injuries.

Fireworks leave 2
hospitalized
FORT LAUDERDALE
Two South Florida men
had to be hospitalized after
two separate July 4 fire-
works mishaps.
-The Coral Springs Fire
Department said one man
suffered serious injuries to


Sworn in on the Fourth
Nicole Perez, 5, watches her cousin, Adriano Caceres,
just after being sworn-in as a U.S. citizen during the City
of Homestead's Annual Grand 4th of July Celebration'at
the Homestead-Miami Speedway Monday afternoon in
Homestead. Caceres was one of seven military men sworn-in
as U.S. citizens by Joseph Hackbarth, Field Office Pirector,
and Frank J. Repinski, Immigration Service Officer, of the
Kendall Field Office.


his face after being struck
by fireworks.
The Pembroke Pines
Fire Department said a
27-year-old man injured his
right hand when fireworks
he was attempting to light
went off in his hand.
Misfired fireworks alsq
started a separate fire in
Coral Springs on Monday
night The fire department
said a lit firecracker was
shot into the garage of a
house. It started a fire that
caused significant damage
to the garage, but no one
was injured.

Boy, 2, drowns in
Florida hotel pool
DAYTONA BEACH
SHORES Police said
a 2-year-old boy died in a
central Florida hotel pool.
Daytona Beach Shores
Police Sgt. Mike Fowler
said Gabriel Alejandro
Guzman, of Orlando, was
swimming with several
family members Monday
at the Oceanside Inn.
Fowler said surveillance
video shows that no one
noticed the boy underwa-


ter for nine minutes.
The boy was pro-
nounced dead at a hospital.
Fowler said police are still
investigating. .

Man charged with
felony murder
BROOKSVILLE A
convicted felon who led
Tampa Bay-area law
enforcement officers on
a four-county chase has
been charged with felony
murder in the death of a
Hernando County Sheriff's
deputy who crashed.
Michael James Anthony
was in custody Tuesday
in Pinellas County. The
35-year-old also faces
a charge of fleeing and
attempting to elude law
enforcement and a proba-
tion violation. Jail records
did not show whether he
had an attorney.
Authorities said Anthony
was spotted driving reck-
lessly early Sunday in
Brooksville. He eventually
surrendered in Pinellas
County.


STHE WEATHER


CHANCE CHANCE CHANCE
-STORMS -STORMS -STORMS


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95 74 6,r
S Gainesville a
Panama City 96 70
0,' 75 Ocala
95. 71


Tampa *
93.' 77


FL Myer
94/76

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TEMPERATURES
High Tul .gh

Normal low
Record high
Record low

PRECIPITATION
Tuesday
Month total
Year total
Normal month-to-date
Normal year-to-date





7 Ip


Wednesday


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99 in 1902
64 in 19417

0.00"
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Daytona Beach 88 75,1


Ft. Lauderdale
Daytona Beach Fort Myers
90 73 Gainesville
0 Jacksonville
Orlando Cape Canaveral Key West
93.74 90 74 Lake Cty
Miami
Naples
West Palm Beach Ocala
88 Ii Orlando
* Ft. Lauderdale Panama City
tS 89. 78 Pensacola
Sl Naples Tallahassee
j1., 76 Miami Tampa
..Q!77 Valdosta


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MOON
Moonrise today 12:05 p.m.
Moonset today
Moonriso tom, 1:09 p.m.
Moonset tom. 12:12 a.m.


July July July July
8 15 23 30
First Full Last New


7p 1.u ,
Thursday


- Forecasteditemeratture "Faee Re" temnratur


N Associated Press


On this date in
1893. an F5 tor-
nado moved through
Storm Lake and
Pomeroy, Iowa.
Eighty percent
of Pomeroy was
destroyed, photos
from the town
showed most of the
town without build-
ings or trees left.


90' 79'1
91 :761I
96 72,'p,:
93 74,r
97 72,'1
90. 78,
90 ?6 I
95' ;.3,
92 75..
9(1 77
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95/74/t
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.W. Palm Beach 89 ;61


Friday
88, 75,1
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94 73.
91 78 t
59. 77 i
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91/77/t
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91 78 i


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service
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10 nitebst bbum
Today's by
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a scale from 0
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Page Editor: Jason M. Walker, 754-0430


li&P$HS









LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL & STATE WEDNESDAY, JULY 6, 2011


RAISES: 3% pay increase approved
Continued From Page 1A


increase.
"The school district will
be experiencing almost an
$8 million cut between state
and local monies this upcom-
ing year," he said. 'We're
concerned just about keep-
ing our employees employ-
eed and serving the children
the best way we can."
Millikin conceded the
issue could be readdressed
later, depending on financ-
es.
He said the school dis-
trict gets a significant
amount of its funding based
on the number of children
enrolled and school officials
are uncertain how many
students will be returning
for the 2011-12 school year.
"Because of the state bud-
get cuts and an anticipated
decline in the millage, we're
looking a decline of $8 mil-
lion from the operating bud-
get nextyear," Millikin said.
"Unfortunately it doesn't
look like we're going to
be able to do anything for
our employees because of
the significant decline of
incoming revenue for our
school district next year.
We know that we will be
operating on much less.
money this upcoming year
than we did this past year,
so it looks like any kind of,
an offset for the employee
contribution will be next to
impossible."

Columbia County
Columbia County offi-
cials were less than opti-
mistic about the chances of
a 3 percent raise as well.
Dale Williams, county
manager, said any adjust-
ments to county salaries
must be discussed by the
county commission as part'
of budget deliberations.


"The board, as it does
annually, will take a look at
overall salaries and poten-
tial raises, but no indication
has been made to me that
they are willing to address
on a specific basis, such
as the state's action, a pay
raise mid-year for just that
purpose," he said. "I think
the board will judge it on
the basis of whether a sal-
ary increase is needed
and necessary, not simply
because the state has cre-
ated a requirement"
Williams said he thinks
the commission would dis-
cuss the issue, if at all, in
general terms, and not in
light of state-mandated pen-
sion pay-ins.
The county commission
has 60-70 employees and
Columbia County overall
(constitutional officers and
other departments) has
close to 500 employees. All
employees, including county
commissioners, pay into the
Florida Retirement System.
Williams said Columbia
County is going to be short
about $750,000 compared
to lAst year's budget in rev-
enues from decreases in
property values (ad valor-
em tax dollars).
"We don'tyetknowwhat's
going to happen with state
revenue sharing or half-
cerit sales tax' distributions
and we don't know what's
going to happen with some
overall revenues," he said.
"I think it's best to look at
one time a year when you
have the whole picture, as
opposed to looking at one
small part at one point in
time. When we get into the
budget workshops we'll
have the entire picture, not
just a small snapshot. From
the county's perspective,
you can't just react to this


one issue, you have to react
to all the issues and'they all
won't be known until you
actually sit down and pre-
pare your budget"
Jody DuPree, Columbia
County Commission chair-
man, said it's premature
to discuss giving employ-
ees the three percent pay
increase.
"For starters I do notknow
how anybody can decide to
do it," he said. "We haven't
even started the discussion
because we don't know what
our state revenue is going to
be. We can't even start the
conversation until we know
what our (financial) position
is going to be."
DuPree said there is talk
that giving the three-per-
cent pay increase would
be revenue neutral, but he
said he doesn't see how.
"The cost of making
them (employees) whole is
substantial," he said, not-
ing that matching the three
percent contribution for the
county would include pay-
ing FICA, social security
and other benefits.
DuPree estimated thatfor
every dollar of contribution
from the employee, there is
about an additional 60-cent
pay-in for the county. ,
. "It could be a 10-15 per-
cent increase compared to
what's being paid today,"
he said. "I don't know that
we were planning on giv-
ing employees raises now,
I don't foresee that being
the case. We don't know
what our financial posi-
tion is going to be. These
people aren't .losing their
money, they're paying on
their retirements. They're
contributing to their retire-
ment and everybody in the
private sector has been
doing this for years."


PENSION: Plan in effect through Sept 30


Continued From Page 1A
Witt said he had mixed
feelings.
"I don't want to accept
the pay raise," he said
before voting no.
Johnson said he thinks
the increase is fair. Other
Florida cities are tak-
ing similar measures, he
noted.
Johnson said he's not
opposed to the state's
mandated pay-in, but noted
the city is on adifferentfiscal
schedule.
Ward said he disagreed
with the reasoning con-
cerning the pay-in not coin-
.ciding with the city's fiscal
year.
According to Johnson,
employees had an expec-
tation of being paid at the
same rate they had been,
through the end of the
city's fiscal year.
The city is going to
pay employees the extra
amount for three months,


CHILD

From Page 1A

burns," Boozer said. "I don't
know the exact areas as for
as the percentage."
Boozer said when fire-
fighters arrived at the scene,
a family member had extin-
guished the child's burning
clothes.
"The fire marshal's office
was contacted and did an
investigation and there was
no wrongdoing," he said.
Boozer said he checked
on the child Monday after-
noon and received a posi-
tive report from officials at
the hospital.
"They said she was in
good condition and didn't
have life threatening inju-
ries," he said. "She should
be fine."






0 LI


then discontinue the pro-.
gram; he said'. .-.-"-"-'. -
Ward rejected the plan..
"Leave it as it is and let
it (the mandated three,
percent pay-in) start now,"
Ward said.*
City employees have not
had a pay raise in three
years, said Councilman
Eugene Jefferson. State
employees, such as him-
self, have not received one
in five years.
Three percent may seem
a minimal amount, but to
some people it could mean
not being able to afford


childcare, prescriptions or
mortgage payments, he
said.
It would be an act of com-
passion on the part of the
city, he said.
"The bottom line is this
is only for a three-month
period," he said.
The city did not require
the pension pay-ins and is
. not responsible foi com-
pensating for what the state
does, Ward said. It has to
live within its means.
"We're stewards of the
taxpayers' money," he
said..


20 Year Reunion

Friday, July 15

Kazbors 7 PM

Saturday, July 16 '

The Country Club

Lake City. 8 PM
$50 Single *.$100 Couple *
Make checks payable rtx CHS Class of '' 1
Mail checks in advance or pay at the-door to
Patti Witt Summerlin
679 SW\' Alamo Drive Lake Cut. FL 320.25
Contact Pari Wittr Summerlin 386-28S-5938


OB/ YN

DAINA GREENEMD
WOMEN'S HEALTH WITH A WOMAN'S TOUCH
'.*.









a.


*Meet with a provider the day you come in
*Same day/next day OB appts.
*Dr. Greene is chief medical officer at Pregnancy
Care Center
*Free pregnancy tests
Call for appt. Mon.-Thurs. 8am-5:30pm
755-0500 449 SE Baya Dr. Lake City
Accepts All Insurance


WILDFIRE: Now fully contained

Continued From Page 1A


also reported decreased
fire activity in its six-
county operational area
of the Suwannee Forestry
Center.
According to Kurt
Wisner, Florida Division
of Forestry mitigation
specialist and public
information officer, there
are 11 active wilfires
impacting 6,322 acres in


the Suwannee Forestry
Center.
"Lightning currently is
the primary cause of fire in
the district," Wisner said.
"Even areas which have not
received thundershowers
in several days may still see
new starts from lightning
as these fires may smolder
until surface conditions
become dry enough to


ignite."
In Columbia County
the only active wildfire in
Columbia County under
the Division of Forestry
jurisdiction, is a fire on SE
Bennie Lane that is listed
as consuming one-tenth of
an acres.
The fire is being listed
as a yard trash fire, reports
indicate.


Partial closure of US 41 inWS planned


From staff reports

One lane of US 41 in White Springs
will be closed this week and possibly into
next, week to allow county work crews
to build a new driveway into the White
Springs Library, according to the Florida
Department of Transportation.
The lane closure will be between the


Spring House curve (near the Stephen
Foster State Park entrance) and the S&S
convenience store and is planned for, all
day Thursday. If the work is not complet-
ed on Thursday, county crews will return
to finish on Monday, July 11. ''V
Motorists should allow for extra time to
reach their destination during these lane
closures


A PLUS LEARNING ACADEMY,

,Now Enrolling for 2011-2012 School Year

Kindergarten thru 12th Grade
SOffering both traditional and non-traditional
students the chance to learn together in,
integrated, small classroom settings.
Accepting McKay and Step-Up
Students Scholarships
Enrollment Hours:
Mon.-Thurs. 7:30 a.m.-2:30 p.m.
Fri. 7:30 a.m.- 12:30 p.m.
A Plus Learning Academy will not discriminate on the basis of race, color creed, gender, sex. sexual
orientation, ethnicity, age or disability in admission of students or any other administration of its policies
or programs, and will provide to all the rights, pnvileges, programs and activities generally accorded or
made available to the students of the school
A Plus Learning Academy will not discriminate on the basis of race, color, creed, gender, sex sexual
orientation, ethnicity, age or disability in admission of students or any other administration of its educa-
tional policies, admissions policies, scholarship and loan programs and athletic and other school-ad-
ministered programs






Columbia County's Most Wanted I


Clarice Robinson
AKA: Clarice Robinson Young
DOB: 5/13/75
Height: 5' 10"
Weight: 175 lbs.
Hair: Black
Eyes: Brown
Wanted For: Passing a
Worthless Check


Esther Dee Martin
DOB: 7/29/77
Height: 5' 7"
Weight: 160 lbs. ,
Hair: Brown
Eyes: Green
Wanted For: Passing a
Worthless Check


WANTED AS OF 7/4111
ANYONE WITH INFORMATION ON THE WHEREABOUTS OF THESE INDIVIDUALS IS ASKED TO CALL CRIME STOPPERS OF COLUMBIA COUNTY.
WE DO NOT WANT YOUR NAME, JUST YOUR INFORMATION!
The likeness of suspects is supplied by the Columbia County Sheriff's Office Warrants Division and/or other law enforcement agencies.
The cases are active at the time of publication unless otherwise noted. Crime Stoppers of Columbia County, Inc., and their volunteers
are jointly and individually exempt from any and all liability which might arise as a result of the publication of public records.

CALL (386) 754-7099 OR
SUBMIT A WEB TIP AT
iOL BIA CONTY www.columbiacrimestoppers.net
Funded by the Crime Stoppers Trust Fund; Administered by the Office of the Attorney General


I


Page Editor: Brandon Finley, 754-0420












OPINION


Wednesday, July 6, 201 I


AN


AN
OPINION


Obama's

best

option

0 n its current
course, the United
States is four
weeks away from
defaulting on its
debt for the first time in its his-
tory. If that happens, business-
es will fail. Financial institutions
will fail. Home values will
decline. Mortgage rates will
skyrocket Spending and invest-
ment will all but disappear.
Social Security checks will stop
being mailed. Everything from
military pay to food inspection
will be compromised, if not
fully cut off. The millions upon
millions of Americans who are
unemployed or underemployed
will be joined by millions more.
Across the world, America's
second financial collapse in
three years will drag down
already fragile economies in
Europe, Latin America and
Asia, potentially creating a
"worldwide depression," as
Senate Majority Leader Harry
Reid described it In short, we
would be thrown back deep
into economic turmoil only
this time with even fewer tools
to crawl our way out
In theory, this is inthink-
able, and it will be remedied
by reasonable political parties
making reasonable conces-
sions across the negotiating
table. But Republicans have
been negotiating in bad faith,
unwilling to compromise even
an inch on their extremist and
absolutist positions. Some are
no longer willing to cbme to the
table at all. .- -.. --- .-
With that backdrop,
President Obama may find that
there is only one course left to
avoid a global economic calam-
ity: Invoke Section 4 of the 14th
Amendment, which says that
"the validity of the public debt
of the United States ... shall
not be questioned." This consti-
tutional option is one that the
president alone may exercise.
If the Aug. 2 deadline arrives
and.no deal has been made,
Obama could use a plain read-
ing of that text to conclude
statutory debt ceiling or not
that he is constitutionally
required to order the Treasury
to continue paying America's -
bills.
0 Washington Post

L ake City Reporter
Serving Columbia County
Since 1874
The Lake City Reporter is pub- .
lishdd with pride for residents of ,
Columbia and surrounding counties by
Community Newspapers Inc.
We believe strong newspapers build
strong communities -"Newspapers
get things done!"
Our primary goal is to
publish distinguished and profitable
coihmunity-oriented newspapers.
This mission will be accomplished
through the teamwork of professionals
dedicated to truth, integrity and hard
work.
Todd Wilson, publisher
Robert Bridges, editor
Sue Brannon, controller
Dink NeSmith, president
Tom Wood, chairman

LETTERS
' POLICY
Letters to the Editor should be
typed or neatly written and double
spaced. Letters should not exceed
400 words and will be edited for
length and libel. Letters must be
signed and include the writer's name,
address and telephone number for
verification. Writers can have two
letters per month published. Letters
and guest columns are the opinion of
the writers and not necessarily that of
the Lake City Reporter.
BY MAIL: Letters, P.O. Box 1709,


Lake City, FL 32056; or drop off at
180 E. Duval St. downtown..
BY FAX: (386) 752-9400.
BY E-MAIL:
news@lakecityreporter.com


www.lakecityreporter.com


Georgia's anti-immigrant


law sows- farm woes


Laws sometimes
have unintended
consequences, and
laws hastily passed in
time of high political
passions inevitably do.
Georgia, along with Arizona,
Utah and Indiana, has passed
one of those tough new state
immigration laws that make it
easier for police to check for
illegal immigrants, detain them
pending deportation and by
such devices as denying their
children places in state colleges
and universities make it
unpleasant for them to stay.
In reviewing a challenge to
the law-.all of the new state
immigration laws are under
challenge U.S. District Judge
Thomas Thrash wrote, "The
apparent legislative intent is
to create such a climate of
hostility, fear, mistrust and
*insecurity that all illegal aliens
will leave Georgia."
According to St. Petersburg
Times columnist Bill Maxwell,
'himself from a family of farm
workers, "Workers caught
with phony documents could
be fined up to $250,000 and
get 15 years in prison the
same sentence for murder in
Georgia."
Georgia's largely
undocumented farm workers


Dale McFeatters
mcfeattersd@shns.com
have quietly dropped out of
sight and the large crews of
workers that Georgia farmers
rely on for their seasonal
harvests are refusing to enter
the state.
'Thanks to the resulting labor
shortagei Georgia farmers have
been forced to leave millions
of dollars worth of blueberries,
onions, melons and other crops
unharvested and rotting inr
the fields," wrote the Atlanta
Constitution-Journal's Jay
Bookman.
"It has also put state officials
into something of a panic at
the damage they've done to
Georgia's largest industry."
The state's agricultural
commissioner estimates
Georgia farmers will need
11,000 more farm workers
over the rest of the season
and they're not getting them.
Atteinpts by desperate state
officials to cajole the jobless


and 2,000 unemployed criminal
probationers into doing
fieldwork have been almost
comically ineffective. Once they
get a taste of stoop labor in the
crushing heat, they're gone.
One frequently repeated
assertion is that the farmers
could simply raise the wages.
In the improbable event the
farmers could afford to do
so, and in the even more
improbable event that city
dwellers actually showed up
to work in the fields, Georgia
would be at a huge competitive
disadvantage in the price-
sensitive field of commercial
agriculture with other farm
states states that, for instance,
don't have punitive anti-
immigrant laws.
The hiding field hands aren't
the only ones hurting. There is
a real danger of farmers losing
their farms and even more
businesses shuttering on the
main streets of small farming
towns.
The consequences of these
harsh anti-immigrant laws were
certainlunintended, but they
were also eminently predictable.


N Dale McFeatters is editorial
writer for Scripps Howard News
Service.


ANOTHER OPINION


A Debt-Limit Breakout


' he debt-limit talks
Sin Washington are
bogged down in the
I hedgerows, with
L some Republicans
insisting on a balanced budget
amendment that can't pass
Congress and President Obama
insisting on tax increases that
Republicans oppose. What this
debate needs is a breakout *
strategy-to wit, Republicans
should answer Mr. Obama's tax
call by accepting his business
tax increases in return for a
lower corporate tax rate.
We've long favored such a
reform, and last year so did
the Simpson-Bowles deficit
commission and the White
House economic advisory
council headed by Paul Volcker.
But the cause has now acquired
no less a convert than Bill
Clinton. Speaking Saturday at
something called the Aspen
Ideas Festival, the former
President admitted that he
had once raised tax rates on
corporations.
"It made sense when I did it
It doesn't make sense anymore.
We've got an uncompetitive
rate," he said. "We tax at 35% of
income, although we only take
about 23%. So we should cut
the rate to 25%, or whatever's


competitive, and eliminate a lot
of the deductions so that we still
get a fair amount, and there's
not so much variance in what
the .corporations pay."
We opposed Mr. Clinton's
tax increases, not least because
corporations don't pay taxes
so much as they serve as a
collecting agent. But on the
rest of Mr. Clinton's riff, Milton
Friedman and Robert Mundell
couldn't have put it better,
though perhaps they'd think
that 25% is still too high.
We'd prefer 15% ourselves,
but Mr. Clinton is exactly right
on the failure of the 35% rate
(39% on average including
the states) to capture that
share of corporate income
in government revenue. We
wrote earlier this year about
Whirlpool, which had an
effective tax rate of zero due to
its many write-offs. Everyone
knows the notorious case of GE.
The average effective
corporate'rate varies by
industry but is far less than the
35% rate, and the injustice is that
some pay much less than others
if they can afford lobbyists to
write loopholes or they invest
in politically correct purposes.
Anyone not in thrall of class-war
symbolism understands that the


U.S. corporate tax code provides
the worst of both worlds:
It makes U.S. companies
less competitive even as it
is raises much less revenue,
than advertised. Mr. Obama
and Treasury Secretary Tim
Geithner have acknowledged
this in the past, the President as
recently as this year's State of
the Union address.
As for the debt-limit politics,
this is also a winner. Democrats
and Republicans say they've
agreed privately on sizable
spending cuts over a 10-year
budget window. No doubt some
of those cuts are less real than
others, and future Congresses
could rewrite any enforcement
.provisions passed this year.
But Republicans still have an
incentive to set spending on a
downward path, and Mr. Obama
has an incentive to show he is
no longer a hostage of Nancy
Pelosi as he runs for re-election.'
The political sticking point is
Mr. Obama's desire for some
Republican buy-in on raising
revenues.
His political left is still sore
that he agreed to extend the
Bush tax rates through 2012.

* Wall Street Journal


4A-


Robert Bridges
rbridges@Jlakecityreporter.com


Hitting


the right-.


note

W hen word
came early
Monday that
Alfonso Levy
.had died, we
thought hard about how to "
balance coverage of his pass-
* ing with that of Fourth of July
festivities to come.
A somber 1A, muted in tone,
out of respect to the man who
meant so much to so many?
SOr pay our respects duti-
fully, diligently and continue
on as planned.
' In the end it wasn't quite so
tough a call as we'd thought .
Staff writer Leanne Tyo
worked the phone all day,
speaking with family members,,
friends and colleagues of Mr.
Levy. She came away with
a heartfelt portrait of a man
Lake City will miss for a very
long time.
Still, much of the front page
was dominated by the upbeat
events of the Fourth.
I can't speak for a man I
never had the pleasure to
meet But considering Mr.
Levy's great passions music,
people, life we felt it only fit-
ting to carry on our coverage
as planned. The show was one
we bet he would have loved. :
., Our thoughts and prayers
are with the Levy family and
his countless friends.
* *

And what a show it was on
Monday.
Lake City has set itself apart
with its annual extravaganza
on Lake DeSoto.
Good job, Chamber of
Commerce, for coordinating
the event
Good job, Harvey Campbell,
for finding private money so
the show could go on.
And I'm proud that my own
newspaper has served eight
straight years as title sponsor.


Don't forget; folks, we want
your news, even if.we can't
always be there to get it our-
selves. Send us photos, stories,
whatever you have that's of
interest to the community, and
we'll get it in.
Thanks for the feedback on
last week's column.
Robert Bridges is editor of the
Lake City Reporter.


H IG H LI. G H TS
IN HISTORY
Today is Wednesday, July
6, the 187th day of 2011. There
are 178 days left in the year.
Today's Highlight in History:
On July 6, 1945, President
Harry S. Truman signed an
executive order establishing
the Medal of Freedom.
In 1777, during the
American Revolution,
British forces captured Fort
Ticonderoga.
In 1809, French troops
arrested Pope Pius VII, who
had excommunicated Emperor
Napoleon I; the pope was con-
fined for about five years.
In 1885, French scientist
Louis Pasteur tested an anti-
rabies vaccine on 9-year-old
Joseph Meister, who had been
bitten by an infected dog; the
boy did not develop rabies.
In 1917, during World
War I, Arab forces led by TE.
Lawrence and Auda Abu Tayi
captured the port ofAqaba
from the Turks.







Page Editor: Brandon Finley, 754-0420


LAKE CITY REPORTER NEWS WEDNESDAY JULY 6, 2011


ASSOCIATED PRESS
A man pumps gas at a crowded Shell gas station in Little Rock, Ark. on Saturday. Oil is
climbing as analysts ratchet up price forecasts for next year as supplies get tighter.

Oil settles near. $97 per barrel

By CHRIS KAHN Arabia might not be able refineries in Europe will
Associated Press to produce enough oil on continue to struggle to
its own" to meet increased replace Libyan oil that was
NEW YORK Some -world demand, analyst cut off when an anti-govern-
major investment banks are Stephen Schork said. ment uprising that began
still betting that oil prices Benchmark West Texas earlier this year. '"They're
will grow next year despite Intermediate crude on continuing to suffer the loss
an emergency injection of Tuesday gained $1.95, or 2 of those supplies, and that's
crude on. world markets. percent, to settle at $96.89 affecting everything," he
from the U.S. and other per barrel on the New York said. *
countries. Mercantile Exchange. In Goldman Sachs also point-
Higher oil prices should London Brent crude added ed out late last week that
eventually push gasoline $2.22 to settle at $113.61 per the IEA will actually release
prices up as well. barrel on the ICE Futures only about two-thirds of the
Benchmark crude exchange. oil it said it would. Goldman
climbed as high as $97.48 Barclays ,increased its analyst David Greely said
per barrel Tuesday after 2012 forecast for Brent about a third of the 60-mil-
Barclays Capital raised its crude by $10 to $115 per 'lion barrel total will come
2012 price forecast for Brent barrel.-on Tuesday, saying from limiting the amqunt
crude, used to price many prices will rise as global oil that countries are required
international types of oil. demand increases. Barclays to keep in emergency sup-
And Goldman Sachs said sees China, India, Saudi plies. Since the oil indus-
the International; Energy. Arabia and Brazil as the try tends to' :keep much
Agency's 'decision at the main sources for demand: more on hand than what's
end of June to release 60 growth. Barclays actually required, Greely said that
million barrels of oil from lowered its expectations the new limits will have an
its reserves won't cool. off for benchmark WTI oil, but "almost negligible impact
prices as much as originally its forecast for an average on oil prices."
thought. price of $100 per barrel sug- Greely said prices prob-
Independent oil analysts gests prices are still headed ably won't fall as much as
say prices still could head higher this year. he'd expected following,
lower this year. But some Barclays higher outlook the IEA announcement.
think lEA's announcement for Brent was enough to He revised his "near-term"
speaks volumes about its send all petroleum com- Brent crude price forecast
expectations for world oil modities higher, analyst from $117 to $109-$111 per
supplies. Jim Ritterbusch said. barrel, and his 2012 Brent
"I think it's antadiifs'-' The bottom' "line,' forecast frdo' $130 to $125-'
sion fromi'them that -Saudi Ritterbusch said,; -is -that $127 per barrel.


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these risk factors?


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. Are you mian Over 60? .
'"'.A e '- a*" i m n ', r '
* Are youa women over 5?:


I ouavehgh /
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,"Dio you have a family
history of abdominal
,artic aneurysm?


If so, you may be able to qualify for a free screening.
As part of our commitment to promote the awareness
of Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm (AAA), you may qualify .
to participate in a one time free AAA screening.
Ultrasound exam is a quick, painless, non-invasive
test designed to help identify at-risk patients.


Saturday, July 16,201.1

at the Holiday Inn, Lake City

BY APPOINTMENT ONLY

Community Vascular Outreach Day

Call today to pre-screen and schedule an appointment
for a FREE screening on Saturday, July 16,2011.

(352)317-5754
APPOINTMENTS ARE LIMITED


-Vascular


Home birth on the rise

by a dramatic 20. percent


By LEANNE ITALIE
Associated Press
NEW YORK One
mother chose home birth
because it was cheaper
than going to a hospital.
Another gave birth at
home because she has mul-
tiple sclerosis and feared
unnecessary medical inter-
vention. And some choose
home births after cesar-
ean sections with their first
babies.
Whatever their motiva-
tion, all are among a strik-
ing trend: Home births
increased 20 percent from
2004 to 2008, accounting
for 28,357 of 4.2 million
U.S. births, according to
a study from the Centers
for Disease Control and
Prevention released in
May.
White women led the
drive, with 1 in 98 having
babies at home in 2008,
compared to 1 in 357
black women and 1 in 500
Hispanic women.
Sherry Hopkins, a Las
Vegas midwife, said the
women whose home -births
she's attended include a


pediatrician, an emergency
room doctor and nurses.
"We're definitely seeing well-
educated and well-informed
people who want to give
birth at home," she said.
Robbie Davis-Floyd, a
medical anthropologist at
the University of Texas at
Austin and researcher on
global trends in childbirth,
obstetrics and midwifery,
said "at first, in the 1970s,
it was largely a hippie,
countercultural thing to
give birth outside of the
hospital. Over the years, as
the formerly 'lay' midwives
have become far. more
sophisticated, so has their
clientele." "
The American College
of Obstetricians and
Gynecologists, which cer-
tifies OB-GYN's, warns
that home births can be
unsafe, especially if the
mother has high-risk con-
ditions, if a birth attendant
is inadequately rained and
if there's no nearby hospi-
tal in case of emergency.
Some doctors also ques-
tion whether a "feminist
machoism" is at play in
wanting to give birth'at


home.
But home birthers say
they want to be free of
drugs, fetal monitors, IVs
and pressure to hurry
their labor at the behest
of doctors and hospitals.
They prefer to labor in
tubs of water or on hands
and knees, walk around
their living rooms or take
comfort in their own beds,
surrounded by loved ones
as they listen to music or
hypnosis recordings .with
the support of midwives
and doulas. Some even go
without midwives and rely
on husbands or other non-
professionals for support.
Julie Jacobs, 38,: of
Baltimore, who has mul-.
'tiple -scleri'osis', said she
"chose midwives inid hyp-
nosis because I wanted'
to surround myself with
people who would support
me as a birthing mother,
rather than view me as an
MS patient who would be a'
liability in need of interven-
tions at every tirn." *
Her first two children"
were born in a freestand-
ing birth center operated
by midwives.


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LAKE CITY REPORTER NEWS WEDNESDAY, JULY 6, 2011


Storms may wash out shuttle launch


By MARCIA DUNN
Associated Press
CAPE CANAVERAL -
NASA's last space shuttle
countdown is under way,
but lousy weather may
delay Friday's launch
attempt.
There's a 60 percent
chance that rain or thun-
derstorms will postpone
the liftoff of Atlantis, shut-


tie weather officer Kathy
Winters said Tuesday. The
weather improves with
each passing day, as the
launch time gets slightly
earlier.
The. countdown clocks
started ticking Tuesday
afternoon. The four astro-
nauts assigned to the
12-day flight arrived at
Kennedy Space Center on
Monday.


Atlantis is making one
final supply 'run to the
International Space Station
before retiring. As many
as 1 million spectators are
expected to jam the Cape
Canaveral area for the his-
toric send-off.
NASA test director
Jeremy Graeber said the
launch team is doing its
best to put off any emo-
tions associated with the


end of the 30-year shuttle
era, until Atlantis flies.
"The team gets into the
mode of this-is-launch-
countdown, and that's
really the focus that every-
body has," Graeber told
journalists. "The rest of the
emotion that really comes
with the end of the space
shuttle program, I think
will really kind of roll in as
launch is completed."


ASSOCIATED PRESS
In this June 30 file photo, registered veterinary technician
Mara Strauss. checks the sutures on a dog that was neutered
at the Marin Humane Society in Novato, Calif. Marin Humane
Society is credited with opening the first private, low-cost
spay and neuter clinic in the U.S.

Fewer pets killed

because of spay,

neuter programs


By SUE MANNING
Associated Press
.LOS ANGELES When
Stephen Zawistowski got
his first dog 50 years ago,
she was the only dog in
the neighborhood that was
-spayed.
"She had an incision that
must have been a foot long
and was sewn up with what
looked like piano, wire,"
says Zawistowski, science
adviser for the American
Society for the Prevention
of Cruelty to Animals.
.It took years of cam-
paigning to change think-
ing about sterilizing pets,
but it has paid off. This
year fewer than 4 million
unwanted dogs and cats
will be euthanized, down
from as many as 20 million
before 1970.
There are several rea-
sons: Aggressive adopt-a-
pet campaigns are carried
out every day in cities all
,over the country and breed
rescues save many dogs.
But animal experts believe
spaying and neutering has
played tle biggest role in
saving so many lives.
Nearly every public shel-
ter, private rescue or ani-
mal welfare organization in
the country donates money,
space or time to low-cost
spay and neuter clinics.
Spaying and. neuter-
ing has become the law in
some states, counties and
cities. Many states require
all shelter animals to be
sterilized. Rhode Island
requires most cats to be
sterilized, and Los Angeles
requires most dogs and
cats to be spayed or neu-
tered by the time they are 4
months bld.
While shelters are firmly
onboard, the biggest prob-
lem has been selling steriliza-
tion programs to pet owners.
When pets are sterilized,
their reproductive organs
are removed so they can no
longer breed. Some people
consider that unnecessary
mutilation of their pets.
-There are those who say:
'You won't do that to my dog
because Iwouldn'twantit done
to me," Zawistowski says.
And it wasn't just pet
owners who had to be con-
vinced -'so did veterinar-


ians, he says.
Medical procedures have
caught up in the last half-cen-
i tury and a lot of people have
t changed their thinking.
"Now they make a one-
or two-inch incision and
use selt-absorbing sutures"
that mean a much quicker
t recovery for the animals,
Zawistowski says.
t Aimee Gilbreath, execu-
tive director of Found
Animals, a Los Angeles-
based charity, agrees. "It's
become a tenet of,respon-
sible ownership," she says
of spaying and neutering.
"I'm 36. My childhood
dog was never neutered.
We lived in some rural plac-
es and he roamed the coun-
tryside. Who knows how
many litters he fathered,"
Gilbreath says.
'Today my dog is neu-
tered. My parents' dog is
spayed. In my family, it's
gone from something you
didn't do to something that
is automatic."
In addition to eliminat-
ing shelter kills, spaying
and neutering can make
pets easier to manage, less
aggressive and healthier,
saidAndrewN. Rowan, pres-
ident and CEO of Humane
Society International and
chief scientific officer for
the Humane Society of the
United States.
So what drove the chang-
es, and what now?
The first public spay and
neuter clinic in the U.S. was
opened in Los Angeles in
1969 and was so success-
ful that there was a four-
month waiting list Another
opened four years later and
charged $17.50 for spaying
female cats and dogs and
$11.50 for neutering males,
said Linda Gordon, direc-
tor of facility development
for the city's Department of
Animal Services.
A low-cost shelter today
charges about $55 to neuter
a male cat and $60 to spay a
female cat, around $150 to
spay a female dog under 30
pounds and between $150
and $250 (depending on
size) to neuter a dog, said
Carrie Harrington, com-
munications director for
the Marin Humane Society
in Novato, north of San
Francisco.


REGULAR MEETING
LAKE SHORE HOSPITAL AUTHORITY
BOARD OF TRUST ES
NOTICE IS HEREBY (.Il I that the Board of I ruIce, of the Lake Shore Hospital Authority will hold their Regular
Meeting on Monday, July 11I, 2011 at 5:15 pm at the LSHA Administrative Cmniplc\. Conference Room, 259 NI, Franklin
Street, Lake t it;.. Florida. The purpose of the meeting is to take action on regular business. All interested persons are
invited to attend.
SI'EtIAL REQUIRI. MI1.Ni S: If you require special aid or services for the mcctin-u de nrnliI d above, as addressed in the
American Disabilities Act, please contact Sue raoze at (386) 755-1090.
KOBY ADAMS



S_ DISCOUNTS AT THIS STORE ONLY

Sars LAKE CITY
2724 W. US Highway 90.





STshop
*W ":; ."


I STORE FIXATU E Fi OR SALEI
ALL SALES FINAL, NO REFUNDS OR EXCHANGES. OPEN DAILY REGULAR HOURS. WE ACCEPT VISA, MASTERCARD, DISCOVER, AMERICAN
EXPRESS AND SEARS CARD. WE ACCEPT SEARS GIFT CARDS. DISCOUNTS DO NOTAPPLY TO PREPAID GIFT CARDS. INVENTORY IS LIMIT
TO STOCK ON HAND. THIS STORE IS NOT PARTICIPATING IN CURRENT SEARS CIRCULARS. THIS EVENT EXCLUDES ELECTROLUX.
SHO OR THR RE STRE FR RET RAGS NDGRATVAUE THT REHEET SAY
CAH~wfLL -0-6-63ORVSTSAS O T OAEYU EAETSASSOE


"Providing you and your
family with expert advice."


The Ear Experts

Hearing Hearing Aids Ringing Ear Wax
Dizziness Balance Disorders


Hearing Solutions, Inc. & Columbia Balance Center


Call today to reserve a time that's convenient for you.
www.HearingSolutioninc.com


Opinions


Page Editor: Brandon Finley, 754-0420


AU.D. Lake City, FL 386-758-3222


Live Oak, FL 386-330-2904










Story ideas?

Contact
Tim Kirby
Sports Editor
754-0421
tkirby@lakecityreporter.com


Lake City Reporter





SPORTS


Wednesdayjuly 6 20 1 1


www.lakecityreporter.com


Section B


BRIEFS

SWIMMING
Registration for
lessons today.
Youth and adult swim-
ming lessons are offered
at the Columbia Aquatic
Complex. Classes meet
for two weeks and six
daily times are offered,
plus there are two daily
mom and tot classes.
Three sessions remain
with the next session
July 11-22. Cost is $50
per person.
Registration is at the
pool (755-8195) from
5-7 p.m. today and all day
Thursday and Friday.
YOUTH GOLF
Camps offered
at Quail Heights
The third of five Junior
Summer Camp for ages
5-16 at Quail Heights
Country Club is
8:30-11:30 a.m. July 11-15,
at a cost of $65. There is
a 10 percent discount for
more than one child in a
family, or participation in
more than one camp.
For details, call the pro
shop at 752-3339.

Clinics offered
by Carl Ste-Marie
The third of five
Junior Golf Clinic at The
Country Club at Lake
City is 8-11 a.m.
July 11-15, at a cost of
$65 for club members
and $75 for
non-members. Drinks
and snacks are provided.
Clinics are limited to 24
golfers.
Registration is at The
Country Club at Lake
City and Brian's Sports.
For details, call Ste-Marie
at 752-2266 or 623-2833.

Junior tour
in Louisiana
The Arrowhead Junior
Golf Tour has a
tournament July 11-12 in
Baton Rouge, La. The
36-hole event for ages
12-18 is ranked by
the National Junior
Golf Scoreboard.
Tournament fee is $235.
Accommodations are
available at the Baton
Rouge Embassy Suites.
Call (225) 924-6566 for
reservations.
Registration deadline
is today. To enter, call
(318) 402-2446 or online
at' www.arrowheadjgt.com.
FORT lHITE FOOTBALL
Team car wash
on Saturday
Fort White High
football players will wash
cars for donations from
8 a.m. to noon Saturday
at the S&S Food Store in
Fort White.
For details, call Shayne
Morgan at 397-4954.

Q-back Club
meeting Monday
The Fort White
Quarterback Club has
an executive
committee meeting at
7 p.m. Monday in the
teacher's lounlge at the
high school. All board
members are urged to
attend. The program
committee will meet at
6:30 p.m. prior to the
executive committee
meeting. Those helping
with the 2011 program
are asked to attend.
For details, call Shayne
Morgan at 397-4954.


M From staff reports


Woods to skip British


Open as leg recovers


Tiger hasn't
played since
Players in May.
By DOUG FERGUSON
Associated Press
JACKSONVILLE -
Those "minor" injuries to
his left leg will keep Tiger
Woods from playing in a
second straight major, next
week's British Open.
In an announcement on
his website on Tuesday that
came as no surprise, Woods
said he will miss the British
Open because his injuries
have not fully healed.
"Unfortunately, I've been
advised that I should not
play in the British Open,"
Woods said. "As I stated at
the AT&T National, I am
only going to come back
when I'm 100 percent ready.
I do not want to risk further
injury. That's different for.
me, but I'm being smarter
this time.
"I'm very disappointed
and want to express my


Two


regrets to the British Open
fans."
It will be the second
time in the last four years
that Woods has missed
two majors in one sea-
son. He did not play the
British Open and U.S. PGA
Championship in 2008 while
recovering from recon-
structive surgery on his left
knee. These injuries are not
as easy to describe.
Woods said in May that
he suffered "minor injuries"
to knee ligaments and his
Achilles while hitting from
an awkward stance in the
pine straw on the 17th hole
in the third round at the
Masters. He skipped the
Wells Fargo Championship,
and withdrew after nine
holes from The Players
Championship a week later
because of injury.
Woods said last week it
was a mistake to go to The
Players, and that if he had
waited, he would be playing
golf right now.
"In hindsight, I probably
shouldn't have competed at-


The Players, but it's a big
event, and I wanted to be
there to support the tour,"
he said. "I've got to learn
from what I did there and
do it right this time and not
come back until I'm ready."
Woods was replaced at
Royal St. George's by Jason
Dufner, who said on Twitter,
"Looks like I am getting in
the open championship, I
am excited!"
Brendan Jones was the
next alternate, but the
Australian told the Royal
& Ancient he would not be
able to play because his
wife is expecting their first
child.
Woods called R&A chief
executive Peter Dawson to
tell him he .would not be
playing.
"I know how disappoint-
ed Tiger is not to be able to
play in the Open this year,",
Dawson said. "Naturally, we
are sorry that a player of
his caliber isn't able to join
us at Royal St. George's,
WOODS continued on 3B


By BRANDON FINLEY
bfinley@lakecityreporter.com
Columbia High's softball pro-
gram wracked up on last honor
when two of its players were cho-
sen as first team All-State players.
Junior Stephanie Pilkington and
freshman Kayli Kvistad earned
the honors given to the state's top
players.
Kvistad led the team in bat-
* ting average after hitting .635
for the season and broke the
Lady Tigers' single-season home
run record with 11 as a fresh-
man.
Pilkington was second on the
team in batting average with a
.531 percentage. She also led the
team in two categories with 51
hits and 23 stolen bases.
The two players helped lead
Columbia to the Elite 8 in the
5A softball. playoffs where
'the Lady Tigers lost against
Niceville. Columbia was 26-4 this
season.
Niceville coach Dan Hensley
won the state's Coach of the Year
honor after guiding his team to a


state championship.
"They work hard at it,"
Columbia coach Jimmy Williams
said of his players. '"They bring
a lot of attention to our team.
They're not a secret and everyone
I talk to has heard of them. The
south Florida people know who
Pilkington is, because she's com-
mitted to Florida International.
They both work hard, have a
passion for the game and deserve
everything they get. I'm excited
to be coaching them."
Miracle Sports also handles the
state's rankings.
'They are the people that took
over.after the sport's writer poll
went away," Williams said. "They
contact coaches from different
areas to compile the list."
This is the second time that
Pilkington has been an All-State
selection after being named as a
freshman.
The Lady Tigers also had the
state's Offensive Player of the
Year in their district. Brianna
Little, who has signed with the
University of Florida, won the
honor.


W. ',;
ASSOCIATED PRESS
Tiger Woods walks at the AT&T National golf tournament at
the Aronimink Golf Club on June 28 in Newtown Square,- Pa.
Woods says he won't play the British Open as his left leg
continues to heal. Woods announced Tuesday on his website
that he has been advised not to play'next week at Royal St.
George's.


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Columbia High's Stephanie Pilkington rounds first base in a game played last
season. Pilkington and Kayli Kvistad were named 1st team All-State by Miracle
Sports.


Clemens' trial

unlikely to hear

ex-Yanks' drug use


Steroid case to
begin today in
Washington.
By'NEDRA PICKLER and
MARK SHERMAN
Associated Press
WASHINGTON The
judge in the Roger Clemens
perjury trial, which begins
today, is considering just
how much of a salacious
allegation against the star
pitcher's chief accuser is
fair game, and he's probably
not going to let a parade of
Clemens' former New York
Yankee teammates testify


about their drug use.
U.S. DistrictJudge Reggie
Walton held a pretrial hear-
ing Tuesday to consider
what jurors will learn about
trainer Brian McNamee,
'who has said he injected
Clemens with steroids and
human growth hormone
several times during the
decade they worked out
together. Clemens' defense
is focused on convincing
jurors that McNamee is a
liar, and his attorneys also
wantto introduce allegations
that McNamee drugged
and raped a woman in a
CLEMENS continued on 3B


Roger Clemens (right) and his attorney Rusty Hardin, leave federal court in Washington,
Tuesday.


named All-State


Pilkington, Kvistad

earn first-team honors

from Miracle Sports


, ,-M











LAKE CITY REPORTER


SPORTS


WEDNESDAY, JULY 6, 2011


Page Editor: Tim Kirby, 754-0421


SCOREBOARD


TELEVISION

TV sports

Today
CYCLING
7:30 a.m.
VERSUS Tour de France, stage 5,
Carhaix to Cap Frehel, France
MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL
2 p.m.
WGN Kansas City at Chicago
White Sox
7 p.m.
ESPN N.Y.Yankees at Cleveland
SOCCER
11:45 a.m.
ESPN FIFA, Women's World Cup,
Group D, Equatorial Guinea vs. Brazil, at
Frankfurt, Germany
ESPN2 FIFA, Women's World
Cup, Group D, Australia vs. Norway, at
Leverkusen, Germany
1 2:30 p.m.
ESPN FIFA, Women's World Cup,
Group C. Sweden vs. U.S., at Wolfsburg,
Germany
ESPN2 FIFA, Women's World Cup,
Group C, North Korea vs. Colombia, at
Bochum, Germany

BASEBALL

AL standings

East Division .
W L Pct GB
New York 50 33 .602 -
Boston 49 35 .583 IA
Tampa Bay 47 38 .553 4
Toronto 42 44 .488 9hi
Baltimore 36 46 .439 13'1
Central Division
W L Pct GB
Cleveland 45 38 .542 -
Detroit 45 41 .523 I'h
Chicago 43 43 .500 3'A
Minnesota 37 46 .446 8
Kansas City % 34 51 .400 12
West Division
W L Pct GB
Los Angeles 45 41 .523 -
Texas 45 41 .523 -
Seattle 42 43 .494 2h
Oakland 38 48 .442 .7
Monday's Games
Toronto 9, Bostona 7
Minnesota 7,Tampa Bay 0
Seattle 2, Oakland I
Cleveland 6, N.Y.Yankees 3
Chicago White Sox 5, Kansas City 4
Texas 13, Baltimore 4
LA.Angels 5, Detroit I
Tuesday's Games
N.Y.Yankees at Cleveland (n)
Toronto at Boston (n)
Baltimore at Texas (n)
Kansas City at Chicago White Sox (n)
Tampa Bay at Minnesota (n)
Detroit at LA.Angels (n)
Seattle at Oakland (n)
Today's Games
Tampa Bay (W.Davis 7-6) at Minnesota
(Liriano-5-7);l:10p.m..:..''.-. : .
Kansas City (Chen 4-2) at Chicago
White Sox (E.Jackson 5-6), 2:10 p.m.
Detroit (Penny 5-6) at LA. Angels
(Chatwood 5-5), 3:35 p.m.
Seattle (Vargas 6-5) at Oakland
(Moscoso 2-4), 3:35 p.m.
N.Y. Yankees (P.Hughes 0-1) at
Cleveland (Masterson'6-6), 7:05 p.m.
Toronto (R.Romero 7-7) at Boston
(Wakefield 4-3),7:10 p.m.
Baltimore (Guthrie 3-10) at Texas
(Ogando 8-3), 8:05 p.m.
Thursday's Games
Tampa Bay at N.Y.Yankees, 7:05 p.m.
Toronto at Cleveland, 7:05 p.m.
Baltimore at Boston, 7:10 p.m.
Oakland at Texas, 8:05 p.m.
Detroit at Kansas City, 8:10 p.m. ,
Minnesota at Chicago White Sox,
8:10 p.m.
Seattle at LA.Angels, 10:05 p.m.

NL standings


East Division
W L
Philadelphia 54 32
Atlanta 50 36
NewYork 43 42
Washington 43 43
Florida 38 47
Central Division
W L
St. Louis 46 40
Milwaukee 45 41


Pet GB
.535 -
.523 I


Pittsburgh 44 41 .518 I'h
Cincinnati 43 43 .500 3
Chicago 35 51 .407 II
Houston 29 57 .337 17
West Division
W L Pct GB
San Francisco 48 38 .558 -
Arizona 46 40 .535 2
Colorado 41 44 .482 6'A
San Diego 39 47 .453 9
Los Angeles 37 49 .430 II
Monday's Games
Washington 5, Chicago Cubs 4, 10
innings
Pittsburgh 5, Houston 3
Arizona 8, Milwaukee 6
San Diego 5, San Francisco 3
Philadelphia I, Florida 0
St. Louis I, Cincinnati 0
Atlanta 4, Colorado I
N.Y. Mets 5, L.A. Dodgers 2
Tuesday's Games
Chicago Cubs at Washington (n)
Houston at Pittsburgh (n)
Cincinnati at St. Louis (n)
Colorado at Atlanta (n)
Philadelphia at Florida (n)
Arizona at Milwaukee (n)
N.Y. Mets at LA. Dodgers (n)
San Diego at San Francisco, (n)
Today's Games
Arizona (Collmenter4-5) at Milwaukee
(Gallardo 9-5), 2:10 p.m.
Chicago Cubs (R.Wells 1-3) at
Washington (Gorzelanny 2-6), 7:05 p.m.
Houston (Norris 4-6) at Pittsburgh
(Morton 7-4), 7:05 p.m.
Colorado (Cook 0-3) at Atlanta
(Jurrjens 11-3), 7:10 p.m.
Philadelphia (K.Kendrick 4-4) at
Florida (Ani.Sanchez 6-2), 7:10 p.m.
Cincinnati (Arroyo 7-7) at St. Louis
(Westbrook 7-4),8:15 p.m. .
N.Y. Mets (Niese 7-7) at LA. Dodgers
(Kuroda 6-9), 10:10 p.m.
San Diego (Moseley 2-8) at San
Francisco (Bumgarner 4-9), 10:15 p.m.
Thursday's Games
Colorado at Atlanta, 1:05 p.m.
Chicago Cubs atWashington, 7:05 p.m.
Houston at Florida, 7:10 p.m.
Cincinnati at Milwaukee, 8:10 p.m.
Arizona at St. Louis, 8:15 p.m.
N.Y. Mets at LA. Dodgers, 10:10 p.m.
San Diego at San Francisco, 10:15 p.m.

BASKETBALL

WNBA schedule

Tuesday's Games
Seattle at Indiana (n)
Washington at Chicago (n)
Los Angeles at Phoenix (n)

GOLF

Golf week

U.S. GOLF ASSOCIATION
U.S.WOMEN'S OPEN
Site: Colorado Springs, Colo, .
Schedule:Thursday-Sunday. '
Course: The Broadmoot East:Course
(7047yards, par 7.1). .. .
Purse: TBA ($3.25 million in 2010).
Winner's share:TBA ($585,000 in 2010).
Television: tSPN2 (Thursday-Friday,
5-9 p.m.) and NBC (Saturday-Sunday,
3-6 p.m.).
Online: http://www.usga.org
LPGATour site: http://www.lpga.com
PGATOUR
JOHN DEERE CLASSIC
Site: Silvis,,Ill.
.Schedule:Thursday-Sunday.
Course:TPC Deere Run (7,26B yards,
par 71).
Purse: $4.5 million. Winner's share:
$810,000.
Television: Golf Channel (Thursday-
Friday, 3-6 p.m., 9:30 p.m.-12:30 aJn.) and
CBS (Saturday-Sunday, 3-6 p.m.).
Online: http:/www.pgatour.com
CHAMPIONS TOUR
FIRSTTEE OPEN
Site: Pebble Beach, Calif.
Schedule: Friday-Sunday.
Courses: Pebble Beach Golf Links
(6,837,yards, par 72) and Del Monte Golf
Course (6,357 yards, par 72);
Purse: $1.6 million. Winner's share:
$240,000.
Television: Golf -Channel (Friday,
6:30-8:30 p.m.; Saturday, 1-3 a.m., 6:30-
9:30 "p.m.; Sunday, midnight-2 a.m.,
7-9:30 p.m.; Monday, midnight-2 a.m.).
EUROPEAN TOUR
SCOTTISH OPEN


Site: Inverness, Scotland.
Schedule: Thursday-Sunday.
Course: Castle Stuart Golf Links
(7,050 yards, par 72).
Purse: $4.82 million. Winner's share:
$803,695.
Television: Golf Channel (Thursday-
Friday, 9:30 a.m.-1:30 p.m.; Saturday, 8:15
a.m.-12:15 p.m., 2-6 p.m., 9:30-11:30 p.m.;
Sunday, 8:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m., 2-6 p.m.,
9:30-11:30 p.m.).
Online: http://www.europeahtour.com
NATIONWIDE TOUR
Next event: Chiquita Classic,
July 14-17, TPC River's Bend, Maineville,
Ohio.

SOCCER

Women's World Cup

GROUP PLAY
Tuesday
England 2, Japan 0
New Zealand 2, Mexico 2
Germany 4, France 2
Nigeria I, Canada 0
Today
Equatorial Guinea vs. Brazil, Noon
Australia vs. Norway, Noon
Sweden vs. United States,
2:45 p.m.
North Korea vs. Colombia, 2:45 p.m.

CYCLING

Tour de France stages

July 2 Stage 1: Passage du Gois
La Barre-de-Monts-Mont des Alouettes
Les Herblers, flat, 191.5 kilometers (119
miles)
July 3 Stage 2: Les Essarts, team
time trial, 23 (14.3) (Garmin-Cervelo;
Thor Hushovd, Norway)
July 4 Stage 3: Olonne-sur-Mer-
Redon, flat, 198 (123.0) (Tyler Farrar,
United States; Hushovd)
July 5 Stage 4: Lorient-Mur-de-
Bretagne, flat, 172.5 (107.2) (Cadel Evans,
Australia; Hushovd)
July 6 -Stage 5: Carhalx-Cap Frehel,
flat, 164.5 (102.2)
July 7 Stage.6: Dinan--Lisieux, flat,
226.5 (140.7)
July 8 -' Stage 7: Le Mans-
Chateauroux, flat, 218 (135.5)
July 9 Stage 8: Aigurande-Super-
Besse Sancy, medium mountain, 189
(117.4)
July 10 Stage 9: Issoire-Saint-Flour,
medium mountain, 208 (129.2)
July II Rest day in Le Lioran
Cantal.
July 12-Stage lOAurillac--Carmaux,
flat, 158 (98.2)
July 13 Stage 11: Blaye-les-Mines,-
Lavaur,flat, 167.5,(104.1)
July 14 Stage 12: Cugnaux-Luz-
Ardiden, high mountain,211 (131.1).
July 15 Stage 13: Pau--Lourdes,
high mountain, 152.5 (94.8)
July 16 Stage 14: Saint-Gaudens-
Plateau de Beille, high mountain, 168.5
.(104.7 .. .. ..
July 17 Stage 15: Limoux-
Montpelller, flat, 192.5 (119.6)
July 48 Rest day in the Drome
region.
July 19 Stage 16: Saint-Paul-Trois-
Chateaux-Gap;medium mountain, 162.5
(101)
July 20 Stage 17: Gap-Pinerolo,
Italy, high mountain, 179 (111.2)
July 21 -Stage 18: Plnerolo-Galibier
Serre-Chevaller, high mountain, 200.5
(124.6)
July22-Stage 19:ModaneValfrejus-
Alpe-d'Huez, high mountain, 109.5 (68.0)
July 23 Stage 20: Grenoble, indi-
vidual time trial, 42.5 (26.4)
July 24 Stage 21: Cretel--Paris
Champs-Elysees, flat, 95 (59)
Total 3,430 (2,131.2).

Fourth Stage
(A 107.2-mile, mostly flat stage from
Lorient to Mur-de-Bretagne with a
1.2-mile finishing ascent)
I.Cadel Evans,Australia, BMC, 4 hours,
I I minutes, 39 seconds.
2.Alberto Contador, Spain, Saxo Bank
Sungard, same time.
3. Alexandre Vinokourov, Kazakhstan,
Astana, same time.
4. Rigoberto Uran, Colombia, Sky
Procycling, same time.
5. Philippe Gilbert, Belgium, Omega
Pharma-Lotto, same time.


U.S. under-19 beats Lithuania in OT


Associated Press

RIGA, Latvia Jeremy
Lamb of national cham-
pion Connecticut scored
35 points, including a
baseline jumper with 1.5
seconds left in overtime, to
lead the United States to a
107-105 victory over
Lithuania on Tuesday
in the second round of
FIBA's Under 19 World
Championship..
The U.S. (5-0) led 94-
86 with 37 seconds left in
regulation, but Lithuania
(3-2) tied the game at 94 on
a goaltending call with 1.7
seconds to play.
Florida's Patric Young


had two three-point plays in
the overtime, helping erase
a six-point deficit for the
U.S.
After Lamb's tie-breaking
jumper Lithuania called a




Unscramble these four Jumbles,
one letter to each square,
to form four ordinary words.

SEFLNO I


timeout; but missed a des-
peration 3-point attempt
The defending cham-
pion U.S. ends the second
round against Croatia
(3-2) today.


THAT SCRAMBLED WQRD GAME
by David L. Hoyt and Jeff Knurek


I v z -Now arrange the circled 'letters
to form the surprise answer, as
S -- -- suggested by the above cartoon.

Answer here: jL ,I M
(Answers tomorrow)
Yesterday's Jumbles: THICK BRAVE CUDDLE ATTEST
Answer: The discussion about the weather was this -
HEATED


BABE RUTH ALL-STARS


Sliders tune up for state

Lake City's Babe Ruth 16-under All-Stars begin play in the Florida State Championships in
Ponte Vedra at 3 p.m. today against Branford. The Sliders played in a warm-up
tournament over the weekend and placed second. After a slow 1-2 start in the seeding
games on Saturday, the Sliders beat No. 3 seed River City Rebels, 4-3, and No. 2 seed
Jacks Fusion, 1-0, in Sunday's championship round. The final against Clay Elite was tied 1-1
after five innings,'before a two-run home run gave the victory to Clay.



New times for 11-under state start


COURTESY PHOTO
Brock Edge of the Lake City Babe Ruth 11-under All-Stars
pitches in the District 6 tournament in Live Oak.


From staff reports

The Cal Ripken North
Florida State Tournament
.for under-11 and under-9
all-stars begins Thursday at
Southside Sports Complex
in Lake City.
Thursday's game times
for the 11-under/70 teams
have been moved back one
hour:
10 a.m. Lake City vs.
Tallahassee Myers Park;
U Noon Bradford
County vs. Orange Park;
2 p.m. Wakulla vs.
Jax Beach.
Lake City's 9-underi
all-stars play Jax Beach at
11 a.m. Thursday in the
opening game for the five-
team division.
In 11-under/60 play,
Orange Park opens against
Tallahassee Meridian Park
at 9 a.m. Thursday.


Associated Press

AUGUSTA, Ga. The
original "Big Three" will be
together again on the first
tee at Augusta National


1
6
11
13
14 E
15

16
17

18 I
21
23 I
26-


next year.
Gary Player has agreed
to join Arnold Palmer
and Jack Nicklaus as an
honorary starter at the
Masters.


ACROSS 37 Joule fraction
38 Parent
Ant's morsel 39 Church part
ditarod puller 40 Forest mom
Ceremony 41 Cap with a
Golfer's iron pompom
Black Sea port 42 'Scottish for
Burning with John
passion 44 Hogan dweller
PC button 47 Rubbed out
Clean water 51 Leave in its
org. packaging
Dolt 52 Lie at rest
Share 53 Processed cot-
Mr. Vigoda ton
-Thurman of 54 Put off to a
'Gattaca" later date


27 Descartes'
name
28 A blast the
'past
29 Monastic hair-
cut
31 Powerful raptor
32 Overalls mate-
rial
33 Vanquish
35 Alpine goat
36 Slue


DOWN


- -Magnon
Disencumber
Sporty truck
Ruminate
Marching-band
need (2 wds.)
Shrew
Egg-grading
org.


They they will hit only
one shot in a ceremonial
start to the tournament
The tradition of an
honorary starter at the
Masters began in 1963.


Answer to Previous Puzzle

E L K T B L V D
SON HOOD LUAU
PROF.I LES URLS
NIXON AGREE K
LOS RE B
KURD UTTL ICY
IRIS AUG GEE
WAN VEG SODA


EAR DNA
VAMPS IRATE
EROS FREC KLED
NATO ROME SAN
ITEM YOUR ORA


8 Seashell seller?
9 Family members
10 Even so
12 More delicate
13 Prince Arn's
bride


18 Surpassed
19 It multiplies by
dividing
20 Made a breeze
22 Some sweat-
ers (hyph.)
23 Debated
24 Ravel classic
25.Come into
view
28 Online info
30 MNO on a
phone
31 Made beloved
34 .Slicker
36 Garfunkel's
ex-partner
39 Oohed and -
41 Package sealer
43 Ponytail site
44 Gist
45 Wheel buy (2
wds.)
46 Library abbr.
48 Sun, in
Mazatlan
49 NASA coun-
terpart
50 Susan of "L.A.
Law"


7-6 2011 UFS, Dist. by Univ. Uclick for UFS


Player joins Arnie, Jack as Masters starter


Want more puzzles?
Check out the "Just Right Crossword Puzzles" books
it QuillDrlverBooks.com










Page Editor: Brandon Finley, 754-0420


LAKE CITY REPORTER


SPORTS


WEDNESDAY, JULY 6, 2011


GOLF REPORTS


COURTESY PHOTO
The Blue team won the MGA Ryder Cup competition on June 11-12. Team members are Chris Cox, Bobby Hazel,
Jacob Soucinek, Steve Nail, Pete Skantzos, Luther Huffman, Bob McGraw, Garrett Odom, Al Greene, Ricky Crawford Jr.,
Luke Soucinek, Kevin Odom, Dion Cole and Kyle Hayes.
'S

Blue wins Ryder Cup match


QUAIL HEIGHTS
COUNTRY CLUB
Tammy .Gainey

The MGA. hosted
the 2011 Ryder Cup on1
June 11-12.
The Red team was cap-
tained by Tammy Gainey
and Mike Kahlich, while the
Blue team was captained by
Chris "Couples" Cox and
Bobby Hazel. Each team
had 14 players '
On Saturday, 27 holes
were played with three
different formats two--
person scramble, alternate
shot and best ball of the
twosome. After the first .. -
round, the Blue team led ... .
by 4'k points.
On Sunday, it was match ,4.
play with the Blue taking -
the victory from the Red by -
6 points. .,,
. luail-Heights--hostedi.,he J,.. 3.
GainesvilleJunior Golf Tour ,
on Monday. There was a COURTESY PHOTO
field of 56 ages 6-18. Tiara Carter of Lake City putts during the Gainesville Junior Golf Tour at Quail Heights.
Dean Soucinek shot 72


to win the boys 16-18 age
group. Jacob Soucinek won
the boys 12-13 age group
with an 80.
Other local winners were:
Ashley Mixon, second in
girls 16-18 with a 106; Matt
Soucinek, second in boys
10-11 with a 48; and, Tiara


Carter, second in girl
with a 65.
Wednesday
winners:
ADivision-BobW
+10, first; Shelton Ke
second; Bob McGra
third;
B Division -


s j0-11 Heavrin +9, first; Keith
Hudson +6, second; Jack
Blitz Tuggle +4, third;
C Division Jerry
rheary Perkins +7, first; Al Cohoon
een +5, +3, second; Bruce Park
aw +3, and Ronnie Ash +2, tied for
third.
Randy Chet Carter led the skins


assault with two. Chris
Sanders, Tim Tortoise,
Wheary, Park and Hearvin
each had one.
The pot carried over to
today.
Gerald Smithy won the
Top of the Hill with +7. Bob
McGraw was second at +2.


New winners onWednesday


A crop of winners not
beard from in recent weeks
picked up the marbles in
Wednesday's blitz.
Jerry West led the way
with +9, followed by Keith
Shaw in second with +6.
Charlie Timmons and.
Cory DePratter knotted for
second with +4.
DePratter's skin was the
only one posted by a blitz
winner. Buddy Slay and
Mike McCranie claimed
most of the purse with
two skins apiece. Donald
Roberts and Jordan Hale
had the other skins.
' Pot holes are still the
big target in Wednesday
play. The big pot hole went


COUNTRY CLUB-
at LAKE CITY
Ed Goff

unclaimed for the fifth week
and the second pot hole
continued to build for the
16th week.
The ladies staged a,blind
draw for partners to play
a two-person best-nine
format. Each partner con-
tributed a nine-hole score
to determine, the team's
final score.
Jane McGriff and Faye
Bowling-Warren had the
right match to take the
win with a net 69. Caroline
Stevens and Judy McGrath


were second at 70.5.
Match 1 of Good Old
Boys play was a three-way
contest that ended in a rare
shutout for one team.
Ed Snow, Joe Persons,
Jim McGriff and Dan
Stephens pulled out a
4-3 win over Stan Woolbert,
Monty Montgomery, Nick
Whitehurst and Bill Rogers.
Eli Witt, Bobby Simmons,
Dave Cannon, Jim Stevens
couldn't get anything going
and finished the match with
no team points.
Match 2 was a battle until
the last hole when Jerry
West, Tom Elmore, Howard
Whitaker and Bill Wheeler
nudged out Marc Risk, Jim


Bell and Carl Wilson, 8-7.
Risk (37-36-73) missed an
even-par round by one shot
to take medalist honors.
West (39-35-74), Snow (38-
37-75) and Montgomery
(37-38-75) were in close
pursuit. Woolbert (76) and
Whitaker (79) had the other
18-hole scores of note.
Witt picked up a victory
in nine-hole play on the
front side with a 39. Bell
had the back nine win, also
with 39.
A team pairing party for
the annual MGA 400 tour-
nament is 7 p.m. July 29.
The tournament is July 30
with tee times starting at
8 a.m.


Harrington has no fears for McIlroy


By STEVE DOUGLAS
Associated Press

INVERNESS, Scotland -
Padraig Harrington believes
Rory McIlroy will be well
prepared for next week's
British Open even though
he hasn't played since win-
ning the U.S. Open.
The break will
be more than three
weeks by the time the
22-year-old Northern
Irishman tees it up at the
British Open at Royal St
George's.
"He's very familiar with
links golf and he will play
quite a bit of links golf in
those three weeks at home,"
three-time major winner


Harrington said Tuesday.
"In terms of getting used
to it, that shouldn't be an
issue. He doesn't seem to
have any issue in terms of
competitiveness not play-
ing.
"He knows what he's
doing. If you can win oy
eight shots by not playing
the week before, I'd stick to
that routine."
Former Ryder Cup cap-
tain Colin Montgomerie
felt it would have been in
McIlroy's interests to have
played at least one event
between the majors.
Sixteen days have passed
since Mcllroy's stunning
U.S. Open victory, when he
broke several records, and


he continues to be the talk
of the tour.
His preparations for the
third major of the year have
come under scrutiny, with
Montgomerie saying on
Monday that McIlroy could
find himself "mentally tired"
dealing with the expected
barrage of back-patting in
the days leading up to the
British Open.
"There are going to be
so many people wanting to
congratulate him. Whether
it was (last week's) French
Open or the Scottish Open
(starting Thursday), he
could have got that out
of his system and out of
the way so he can start
the Open afresh," said


Montgomerie, still look-
ing for his first major title.
"Now he's got that ahead
of him."
Harrington acknowl-
edged that McIlroy's
buildup to the tournament
in Sandwich, southeast
England, which begins
July 14, will be hectic but
said having a major title to
his name will help him get
through it.
"There's always that
external stuff building up
and it does make it hard-
er," said the Irishman, who
has fallen to No. 57 since
winning the last of his
three majors the PGA
Championship at Oakland
Hills in 2008.


CLEMENS: Case to begin


Continued From Page 1.

Florida hotel pool while
on a trip with the Yankees
in 2001.
McNamee was ques-
tioned by local police and
admits misleading them,
but he has never been
charged and has said
he was trying to rescue
the woman from drown-
ing. Walton said he's con-
cerned that the rape allega-
tion would be "extremely
prejudicial," but Clemens'
attorneys say it shows why
' McNanree would have a
motive to fabricate evi-
dence that he injected their
client with illegal drugs.
The investigation
occurred in 2001, the
same year that Clemens
helped lead the Yankees to
a World Series champion-
ship and that McNamee
says he decided to save
needles and gauze that
he used to inject the star
pitcher.
McNamee's Yankee
contract was not renewed
after the Florida investi-
gation. Clemens attorney
Rusty Hardin said those
events in 2001 prompted
McNamee to begin fab-
ricating evidence against
Clemens to protect himself
financially. Clemens, how-
ever, hired McNamee as a
personal trainer for several
years, but Hardin has said
his client didn't then know
the full extent of what hap-
pened in Florida. Hardin
also referred Tuesday to
"another date rape inci-
dent" in Seattle involving
McNamee but didn't fully
explain what happened.
Walton said he would
reserve a final decision
on whether to allow the.
rape allegations to be men-
tioned until the trial is
under way.
Clemens listened close-
ly but didn't speak at the
hearing. He appeared
toned-down in a dark suit
and pale blue shift with
matching-tie gone were
the blond highlights and
flashy pinstripe suit with
silver tie from his last
appearance. He walked so
quickly out of the court-
house, surrounded by
news media, that Hardin
called out from. several
yards behind, "Rog, wait
up!"
Walton also is waiting
to decide whether former
Yankees Andy Pettitte,
Chuck Knoblauch and
Mike Stanton can testify
that they got performance-
enhancing drugs from
McNamee. Walton said his
tentative ruling is not to
allow it because it will lead
jurors to infer improperly
that Clemens must have
been getting illegal drugs
if his teammates were, but
he said hell see if some-
thing changes his mind
during the trial.
Walton said it would be
"extraordinary" to allow
such testimony and men-
tioned that he got corti-
sone shots from a trainer
as a college football player.
"I would not want to be


held responsible for doing
something inappropriate
based on what that trainer
was giving to other peo-
ple," Walton said.
Assistant U.S. Attorney
Steven Durham argued
that the other player's tes-
timony will corroborate
McNamee's credibility,
which is under attack by
the defense, because it
will prove the trainer had
knowledge and ability to
give drugs to Clemens. He
said he expects the defense
will argue that Clemens
thought McNamee was
getting vitamin shots from
his trainer, but the team-
mates will testify "there
was no misadvertising."
The hearing also raised
an issue that Walton wor-
ried could postpone the
trial. Attorneys revealed
that the U.S. House has
refused to turn over audio
tape of Clemens' deposition
by the House Government
Reform Committee staff
Feb. 5, 2008.
Clemens is accused" of
lying while under oath
during that deposition and
during testimony at a pub-
lic hearing eight days later
when he denied ever using
steroids or human growth
hormone. Bothprosecutors.
and the defense expressed
concern that jurors will
not be able to judge fully
from a transcript whether
Clemens was intentionally
lying.
Walton complained that
the issue wasn't raised ear-
lier. If he were to order
the tape turned over, the
House could appeal the
ruling and that would
delay the trial. Hardin said
he hoped the committee
could be "kindly and gen-
fly" persuaded to turn over
the tape, and Walton sug-
gested that Hardin remind
them of the country's cur-
rent fiscal condition. "Ifs
going to cost the court a
lot of money -to have this
trial delayed," Walton said.
Clemens is charged with
six felony counts, includ-
ing perjury, false state-
ments and obstruction of
Congress, which carry a
maximum sentence of up
to 30 years in prison and
a $1.5 million fine. But
even if jurors convict him
on all counts, it's unlike-
ly Clemens would, serve
nearly that long because
he doesn't have a criminal
record.
The trial, scheduled
to last four to six weeks,
begins with choosing 12
jurors and four alternates
from a pool of 125. Walton
plans to ask potential panel-
ists to answer 67 questions
about their background,
opinions and knowledge of
the case.
Both sides sought a
written questionnaire,
but Walton said that's not
his practice because it
"disadvantages less-edu-
cated people." He said he
would give attorneys wide
latitude to ask follow-up
questions.


WOODS: To miss Open
Continued From Page 1B


but we wish him well in his
recovery and hope to see
him back soon, competing
in front of the fans that
love to see him play the
game."
Woods tied for fourth in
the 2003 British Open at
Royal St George's, where
he started with a two-shot
penalty when he couldn't
find his opening tee shot
in the rough. He wound
up two shots behind Ben
Curtis.
He did not say whether
he expected to play in the
final major, the U.S. PGA
Championship,. which
starts on Aug. 11 at the
Atlanta Athletic Club.
As Woods mentioned
last week at Aronimink,
he doesn't have any idea
when he will next com-
pete. He said he has not
hit golf balls since May 12
at the TPC Sawgrass.


Woods has slipped to
No. 17 in the world, and is
likely to be out of the top 20
after the British Open. He
also is No. 116 in the FedEx
Cup standings on the U.S.
PGA Tour, and only the top
125 qualify for the playoffs.
If he doesn't return for the
U.S. PGA Championship,
he wouldn't be eligible for
any U.S. PGA Tour events
until October.
Asked last week if he
would be surprised he
didn't play another tourna-
ment the rest of the year,
Woods said, "I'd be very
surprised, because I'm
progressing."
But he's not making
enough progress to play
in the tournaments that
mean the most to him.
Woods remains on 14
career majors, four short
of matching the record set
by Jack Nicklaus.










Page Editor: Emogene Graham, 754-0415 LAKE CITY REPORTER ADVICE & COMICS WEDNESDAY, JULY 6, 2011 4B


DILBERT


BLONDIE


BEETLE BAILEY


HAGARTHE HORRIBLE


SNUFFY SMITH


ZITS


GARFIELD


B.C.


FRANK & ERNEST


DEAR ABBY


Wife in the dark about affairs,

wants husband to shed light


THIS YOU
CAN'T AREN'T
BE CAPABLE
DONE. OF DOING
IT.



S0


S I'1N NOT
SSAYING I'M
INCAPABLE! BECAUSE
S I COULD IT'S
DO THIS IN EASY.
MY SLEEP!


o


WHAT'S
F HAPPENING
HEREE!
NINTA.

C(


HOROSCOPES


ARIES (March 21-
April 19): Donnt let your
feelings get in the way of
a good decision. Your pro-
ductivity will falter if you
take on too much or over-
react to what's going on
around you. Charm and
diplomacy will be your sav-
ing grace. ***
TAURUS (April 20-
May 20): You have more
going for you than you
realize and must utilize
all your skills, talents and
experience to market your-
self. Love is highlighted
and can be enhanced if
you share your success-
es with someone special.

GEMINI (May 21-
June 20): Keep busy with
projects that will bring you
high returns. You need
to work quickly and take
advantage of whatever
is offered. Put emotions
aside when dealing with
someone from your past.

CANCER (June 21-
July 22): With a little
tender loving care at
home, you can turn a
cluttered area into a spec-
tacular entertainment
room or anything else
that suits your needs. Do
what suits your needs,
not what someone else
wants. ****
LEO (July 23-Aug.
22): You can chitchat all


THE LAST WORD
'Eugenia Last

you want, but if you don3nt
say something important,
you will waste time that
could be put to better use.
An interest in someone is
likely to lead to trouble if
you donnt keep things in
perspective. ***
VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept.
22): Finish what you start
You donnt want to be criti-
cized for something you
didn't do. Networking with
people from different back-
grounds will lead to a new
marketing idea. Romance
should highlight the %eve-
ning hours. ***
LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct.
22): Procrastination is not
going to help you out of a
tight spot Make a decision
one way or another so you
can keep moving. Donnt
be afraid to go it alone if
you donirt feel comfortable
with new developments in a
partnership. **
SCORPIO (Oct. 23-
Nov. 21): Do whatever
you can to improve your
health and emotional well-
being. A creative change
in lifestyle will help you
financially. Letting go of
things you no longer use
will ease your stress. Love
and romance are highlight-
ed. ****
SAGITTARIUS (Nov.


22-Dec. 21): Younll be
pulled in too many direc-
tions if you are incapable of
saying apo.- Stand up and
be counted when it comes
to changes in your com-
munity. If you donit speak
your mind, you will have
no right to complain later.
2 stars
CAPRICORN (Dec.
22-Jan. 19): You may feel
powerful, but if you donnt
do things according to the
rules, it isnnt likely you will
get what you want Love
is on the rise, and positive
changes at home can 'be
made. ***** -
AQUARIUS (Jan.
20-Feb. 18): Set guide-
lines that will enable you
to achieve your goals.
An interesting change at
home will set the stage
for the future. Donint be
tempted to live beyond
your means. You must
stand on your own two
feet if you want to gain
respect. ***
PISCES (Feb. 19-
March 20): Do something
that interests you. A cre-
ative hobby or fun project
you can do with someone
you love will ease your
stress. You should change
your appearance or update
the way you do things.
Added discipline will help
you finish something you
promised to take care of.
***


CELEBRITY CIPHER


by Luis Campos
Celebrity Cipher cryptograms are created from quotations by famous people, past and present.
Each letter in the cipher stands for another.
Today's clue: J equals K
"TM UHGWRXY OWKK TW G PCSW
CR. GROGTCDM VHNIKWT. ILO OPWM


XN R'O HWCKKM JRNZ TW."


- ACHHM


YPCRX KGRA

PREVIOUS SOLUTION: "The highlight of my childhood was making my brother
laugh so hard that food came out of his nose." Garrison Keillor
(c) 2011 by NEA, Inc. 7-6


FOR BETTER OR WORSE
| -PHIL, 1 \O]ST LW-- | |0 M'EX-HI
-THSUn-T.t ^
lT, M'I ( EX-Rw'/
I,- DoWTFyoo YX


CLASSIC 'PEANUTS


I


DEAR ABBY: How can
I forget and forgive my hus-
band for his actions? It has
been only a few months
since I found out about hi&
affairs which lasted' over
four months with three dif-
ferent women. One was
more intense than the oth-
ers. He says he has broken
off all contact with them and
is only with me now.
When I learned about the
affairs, I had no informa-
tion other than he was hav-
ing one. Someone I didn't
know told me, so I did not
have much to go on. I have
asked my husband some
questions, but he refuses
to answer them. He says I
should let it go and move on,
that my questions will lead
to no good, and if I don't stop
I'm going to push him away.
I think about what he has
done and different scenarios
daily and try to ignore the
hurt, but it's hard. Should
I ask questions, should
he answer them, and will
this pain ever go away? We
are "trying," and I'm run-
nihg mostly on love and the
hope that our relationship
will survive. IN PAIN IN
PITISBURGH
DEAR IN PAIN: Of
course you should be ask-
ing questions because you
have the right to know the
answers. And if your hus-
band is truly repentant, he'
should answer them. Your


Abigail Van Buren
www.dearobby.com
pain will persist unless you
both have counseling to
understand what triggered
his four-month "fling." If he'
refuses to go, go without
him.
Frankly, I am troubled
by your statement that your
husband is threatening you'll
push him away if you pursue
the answers you deserve.
That doesn't appear to me to
be the behavior of a contrite
spouse.
Ifyou haven't already done
so, see your physician and
be tested for STDs. All of the
emotions you're experienc-
ing are normal,'but whether
your relationship will sur-
vive under the present cir-
cumstances is debatable.
DEAR ABBY: I'm a
married woman in my 40s,
raising a family. I work full-
time doing a physical job
outdoors and after work I'm
often worn out
My hobby is art. I have
drawn and painted since I
was very young. My prob-
lem is, I'm afraid to .say no
when relatives ask me to
do arts and crafts for them.


^.-a&la


They even volunteer me to
do projects for their friends.
If money is offered, I usually
turn it down.
The issue is the time
involved. I'm stressed out
I drop everything when I
get these requests, and I'm
starting to feel overwhelmed
and annoyed. I have to do
these projects before and
after my regular job and on
weekends. My house and
family get neglected. And
because I can't devote, the
necessary time to the proj-
ects, I'm unhappy with the
result
I have dropped hints
about how I'm tired after
working a full-time job, but
no one seems to care. How
can I tell them I need a break
without upsetting them? --
BURNED-OUT PICASSO
DEAR BURNED-OUT:
You need to learn to say no.
For a people-pleaser this can
present a challenge, but in
your case it should be fol-
lowed with, "I'm too busy
to take that on right now."
You should also rethink
your refusal to accept, the
offer'of money. If you do, it
will probably result in your
being asked to do projects
less often trust me on that


* Write Dear Abby at
www.DearAbby.com or
P.O. Box 69440, Los
Angeleg, CA 90069.













olumbia.

Your marketplace source for Lake City and


Columbia County


WEDNESDAYJULY 62 1


LAKE CITY REPORTER


Open season for Columbia Aquatic Complex


Columbia County
School Board
Administrative
Complex, a dis-
trict water facility awaits
to meet the swimming
needs of the community
- the Columbia Aquatic
Complex.
The Complex, featuring
an outdoor Olympic-size
pool, offers a variety of
activities and lessons for
the community to partici-
pate in.
It is overseen by two
head lifeguards Brandy
Meeks, who runs the
office, and Dan Taylor,
who is in charge of the
pool's maintenance.
Meeks said the pool is
usually open between May
and either September or
October, depending on the
season's weather and the
swim teams' season sched-
ules who use the pool.
The facility provides
swimming lessons, water
aerobics classes and open
swim sessions to the com-
munity, Meeks said.
From May to June this
year, about 2,700 people
in the community have
used the pool, she said.
More than 860 students
and more than 350 adults
use the pool to swim
recreationally, Meeks
said, and so far this year,
almost 220 children have
learned to swim at the
Complex.
"We've taught 218 kids
to swim so far this sum-
mer from the month of
May to June (her most
recent report)," Meeks
said. .
The Columbia Swim


S' LEANNE TYO/Lake City Reporter
Arline Craft (from left) of Lake City, Ann Cowdrey of Lake City, Brandy Meeks, head lifeguard, and Stephanie Santos, Water Safety Instructor, share a laugh
during a water aerobics class at the Columbia Aquatic Complex. The Complex is open from May to either September or October each year and provides
swimming lessons, water aerobics classes and open swim sessions to the community.


Team rents lanes from
the facility for swim prac-
tice, Meeks said, and
Columbia High School's
swim team uses the pool
for summer condition-
ing. The Fort White High
School girls' soccer team
also uses the pool for
conditioning, Meeks said,
Other agencies make
use of the Complex for
training and certifica-
tions, Meeks said, like
the Columbia County
Sheriff's Office dive
team, the Florida Fish.--
and Wildlife Conservation


Commission and the
Florida Highway Patrol.
Meeks said the facil-
ity's staff consists of 17
lifeguards and seven
Water Safety Instructors.
Lifeguards take a
lifeguard class taught
by herself and Taylor,
Meeks said, and are also
certified in CPR, first aid
and AED automated
external defibrillator.
WSI's are dual certi-
fied, Meeks said, having
to pass both the lifeguard
class and the WSI class
taught by an American


Red Cross instructor.
'We have an instructor
that comes in and trains
us," Meeks said.
Meeks *said her favorite
aspect about working at
the pool is interacting
with a large amount of
people.
"I like being outside
and being around the
water," she said, "and
I really enjoy teaching
people how to swim. You
have to know how to
swim in Florida because
there's water .every-.......
where."


Teaching water
aerobics classes is also .
rewarding, Meeks said,
because people say they'
are healthier after taking
the class.
"A lot ofthem have told
me they've gotten off their
diabetic medication and
they all feel better after
taking class," she said. "So
I'm always excited about
that"
The pool is open
Monday through Saturday
at varying hours for all
of its activities and les- -
sons, and members have


extended hours. The pool
is closed Sundays, allow-
ing people to rent the pool
for private parties.
Monthly memberships
at varying costs are avail-
able for families, adults,
students 17 or younger,
senior citizens, lap swim-
mers and water aerobics
classes. Attendees can also
pay per day, Meeks said.
The Columbia Aquatic
Complex is located at
426 SW St. Johns Street
Call (386) 755-8195 for all
hours, information and
available activities.


Reader's Choice

CUTEST BABY


CONTEST
1sT, 2ND & 3RD Place Prizes to be Awarded for Boys & Girfs!

AGES 0-24 MONTHS
Send in the most adorable photograph of your child,
up to 24 months of age, and you could win!


TO ENTER:
Bring your baby's picture along with entry fee ($30.00)
to the Lake City Reporter,180 E. Duval St., mail to
PO. Box 1709, Lake City, FL 32056.

All pictures will be published in the Lake City
Reporter's July 17, 2011 edition. All voting bal-
lots must be returned-to the paper by July 25,
2011. So show off your child, grandchild,
godbhild, niece or nephew.
The winners will be published on July 31, 2011


DEADLINE:
July 14th, 2011 -

For More Information or if you are
i d ratar in ha in A ner


WANT TO ENTER ONLINE?
You can e-mail your
photo and information to
ads@lakecityreporter.com.
Subject line: BABY CONTEST
. ;l ,' I~r~lli[l {1, i,.. ii, i iiiiii i,,,


eretni s e n ecom ng a sponsor
please Call Mary at 754-0401


Featuring Your Favorite Blues Music *

MONDAY THURSDAY FRIDAY SATURDAY
Karaoke Karaoke Mike Mullis ive Music
w/Teddy Mac w/Teddy Mac Variety Show i
Doors Open 5pm Doors Open 5pm 8pm 8p _
Doors Open 5pm Doors Open Spm
All You Can Eat All You Can Eat ..
Whole Catfish Spaghetti & Meat | All You Can Eat | Prime Rib
S Sauce Sirloin Steak

Ask About Our Cabin Rentals
r- or Stay the Night In Our Famous Tree House!



)y~id ^^h tii I 1BB 1 %**]1









Classified Department: 755-5440


LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED WEDNESDAY, JULY 6, 2011


Lake City Reporter




CLASSIFIED


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U-liiii


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direct your copy to the Classified
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Billing Inquiries- Call 755-5440.
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Advertising copy is subject to
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special or consequential damages.
Advertising language must comply
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regarding the prohibition of discrimi-
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In Print and Online
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Legal


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT, THIRD
JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR
COLUMBIA COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
CASE NO. 11-100-CP
IN RE: The Estate of ROSEBUD
ALEXANDER,
Deceased.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
(summary administration)
TO ALL PERSONS HAVING
CLAIMS OR DEMANDS
AGAINST THE ABOVE ESTATE:
You are hereby notified that an Or-
der of Summary Administration has
BUD ALEXANDER, deceased, File
Number 11-100 CP, by the Circuit
Court for Columbia County, FL, Pro-
bate Division, the address of which
is Columbia County, Courthouse,
Post Office Box 2069, Lake City,
Florida 32056-2069; that the Dece-
dent's date of death was January 8,
2011; that the total value of the es-
tate is $40,000. and that the names
and! addresses of those to whom it
has been assigned by such order are:
NEW BETHEL BAPTIST
CHURCH, 550 NE Martin Luther
King Street, Lake City, FL 32055
ALL INTERESTED PERSONS
ARE NOTIFIED THAT
All creditors of the Decedent and
persons having claims or demands
against Decedent's estate,., other than
those for whom provision for full
payment was made in the Order of
Summary Administration must file
their claims with this court WITHIN
THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH
IN SECTION 733.702 OF THE
FLORIDA PROBATE CODE.
ALL CLAIMS AND DEMANDS
NOT SO FILED WILL BE FOREV-
ER BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING ANY OTH-
ER APPLICABLE TIME PERIOD,
ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2)
YEARS, OR MORE AFTER THE
DECEDENT'S DATE OF DEATH
IS BARRED.
The date of first publication of this
Notice is July 6, 13,2011.
MORGAN LAW. CENTER FOR
ESTATE & LEGACY PLANNING,
PLLC
By:/s/ Teresa Byrd Morgan
Florida Bar No. 0698954
234 East Duval Street
Lake City, Florida 32055
386/755-1977 (office)
386/755-8781 (facsimile)
Attorney for Estate
05526388
July 6, 13, 2011


PUBLIC AUCTION
2000 VOLO
VIN# YV1VS2556YF458211
CREAMER'S WRECKER SERV-
'ICE 290 NE SUNNYBROOK ST.
LAKE CITY, FL 32055
COLUMBIA COUNTY
386-752-2861 ..
SALE DATE: July 21, 2011
8:OOAM
05526449
July 6, 2011


020 Lost & Found,

Missing dog.'$200 Reward.
Thurs., 6/30. Aprox 25-301b Fe-
male, 15 yr old, black/white Bos-
ton Terrier. Last seen close to
Quail Heights. Has a scar between
her front legs. Call 386-754-667Q

100 Job
S Opportunities

05526387
Local company seeking
experienced,
"Transportation/
Logistic Coordinator"
Minimum qualifications:
High School diploma
v 2 years experience
v PC Knowledge Microsoft
and Web based TMS/WMS
systems
v RoutingDispatch
Fax resume to: 386-438-2080


Associate Rep "
SUMMER WORK/GREAT PAY
Immediate FT/PT openings, q
Customer sales/service,
No exp needed, conditions,
Apply Now all ages 17+
.,, '(386).269-0883

Aurora Diagnostics;
Administrative Assistant desired;
HR, AP, ahnd clerical experience
preferred.
Fax resume to 386-719-9596


Land Clearing

Back Hoe, Dozer, Chopping, root
raking, bush hog, seeding, sod,
disking, site prep, ponds &
irrigation. Free Est! 386-623-3200

Lawn & Landscape Service

Clean Pine Straw,
You pick it up, $1.85 a bale
Delivery of 100 bales $260
386-688-9156


Services

DIVORCE, BANKRUPTCY,
RESUMES.
other court approved forms-
386-961-5896.

We come to you! Auto Detailing:
Wash, wax & vaccum. Pressure
Wash: Houses, mobile homes,
driveways, decks. 386-697-2224


100 Job
0 Opportunities
CDL Class A Truck Driver.
Flatbed exp. for F/T SE area.
3 years exp or more. Medical
benefits offered. Contact
Melissa or Mary @ 386-935-2773
MANAGEMENT POSITION
available at the CATO Store in
Live Oak, FL. Experience necessa-
ry. Apply within at Suwannee Pla-
za on Hwy 129 Live Oak.
Mobile Home Sales!
Experienced Salesperson
Needed to sell the South's
#1 rated product! Call Kevin
386-344-3975
Sales Position available for moti-
vated individual Rountree -Moore
Toyota, Great benefits, paid train-
ing/vacation. Exp. a plus but not
necessary. Call Anthony Cosentino
386-623-7442

0 Medical
1 0 Employment

05526321
Gainesville Women's Center
For Radiology
Arlene Weinshelbaum, M.D.
MAMMOGRAPHY TECH
wanted full time for private
Radiology office.ARRT &
Mammography certification req.
Fax resume to:
Tracy: (352)331-2044

05526394
Medical Assistant
Requirements: HS diploma,
Phlebotomy Certification.
w/ 1 year exp.
Medical Assistant or equivalent
certification preferred
ONLY Qualified candidates
may send resumes to:
jpapesh(cancercarenorthflori-
da.com

Busy family.practice looking for a
full-time Nurse Practitioner. Send
reply to Box 05063, C/O The Lake
City Reporter, P.O. Box 1709,
Lake City, FL, 32056

0 Schools &
Education

04544843
Interested in a Medical Career?
Express Training offers
courses for beginners & exp
Nursing Assistant, $479
next class-07/11/10

Phlebotomy national certifica-
tion, $800 next claSs-07/11/11
Continuing education
Fees incl. books, supplies, exam
fees. Call 386-755-4401 or
expresstrainingservices.com



310 Pets.& Supplies
FREE KITTENS
To good home
Adorable
Call 386-755-8560
KITTENS. 4 white and 1 long
haired black. Had 1st shots. 10
weeks old. Cute & spunky!
$25.00. ea. 386-961-8909


PUBLISHER'S NOTE
Florida Law 828.29 requires dogs
and cats being sold to be at least 8
weeks old and have a health
certificate from a licensed
veterinarian .documenting they
have mandatory shots and are
free from intestinal and external
parasites. Many species of wild-
life must be licensed by Florida
Fish and Wildlife. If you are
unsure, contact the local
I office for information.

330 Livestock &,
30 Supplies


Black Angus Cows & Heifers
",I Prices Vary
'Registered & Commercial
386-719-4802


361 Farm Equipment
84 Ford 4610 Tractor.
2WD, Solid
2005 motor,$7,500. OBO0
386-867-0005

402 Appliances


Whirlpool washing machine.
Works great, come see.
$100.
386-755-3682

407 Computers
Compaq Computer, Many extras.
Complete Computer
$80.00
386-755-9984 or 386-292-2170

REPORTER Classifieds

In Print and On Line
www.Ilakecityreporter.com


408 Furniture
KING SIZE BED
$100.00
755-9333 or
755-7773
Recliner Sofa
$75.00
755-9333 or
755-7773


416 Sporting Goods
Golf Clubs. Mens RH. Complete
set. 8 Irons, cougar, 2 wedges, 2
, putters, 4 woods, Excellent bag.
$250. 386-758-7550 or 397-4629

420 Wanted to Buy
K&H TIMBER
We Buy Pine Hardwood &
Cypress. Large or small tracts.
Call 386-961-1961.
Wanted Junk Cars, Trucks, Vans.
$250 & up CASH! Free Pick Up!
NO title needed !386-878-9260
After 5pm 386- 752-3648.

430 Garage Sales
Hugh Sale! Sat. 7/9. 8-? South of
town in the old Chrch on the Way
bldg near high school. Furniture,
mattresses, dishes, clothes, more.
PUBLISHER'S NOTE
All Yard Sale Ads
Must be Pre-Paid.


440 Miscellaneous
Sony Playstation 2 System.
Memory card, one controller.
5 games. In good condition.
$95.00 386-984-7510
Stop gnat & Mosquito bites! Buy
Swamp Gator All natural insect're-
pellent. Family safe. Use head to
toe. Available at.The Home Depot.
Summer Barbecue Special
Tow Behind
Grill/Smoker, $1,250 OBO.
386-719-4802

630 Mobile Homes
for Rent






2&3 BR MH.. $395 $650. mo.
plus deposit. Water & sewer fur-
nished. Cannon Creek MHP
386-752-6422
2/2 Units, clean, well maintained,.
nice safe park setting, 2 miles to
downtown Lake City, $575'month
+ $575 sec dep, 386-984-8448
13th Month FREE!!
2br /2ba SWMH $475. mo; also
Resid'l RV lots for rent between
Lake City & G'ville, Access to I-
75 & 441 (352)317-1326 for terms
3/1 w/security system. $800.mo .
Also, small home on 10 ac. $400.
Ft. White area. Avail 8/1. Call for


more details. 386-497-1


3/2 S of Lake City, (Branford area)
$575 month plus security
386-590-0642 or 386-867-1833
www.suwanneevalleyproperties.com
Clean 2br/2ba on 5- acres. Nice un-
furnished MH w/well water. Coun-
try-setting just north of LC. $400.
mo. 1st, last & sec. (954)818-4481
Mobile Homes for rent in
White Springs, Lake City & Ft.
White. Contact 386-623-3404
or 386-365-1919
Nice clean 2&3 bdrm, Five Points,
NO PETS,
also 3 bd on the
Westside, 386-961-1482
X-Clean 2/2 SW, 8 mi NW of VA.
Clean acre lot, nice area. $500. mo
+ dep No dogs Non-smoking
environment.386-961-9181


f640 Mobile Homes
640 for Sale
Handy man special, 94 Fleetwood
DWMH. 3/2 on 5 acres in Ft.
White. Owner Fin. $3,000 dn.
$850mo. $99,900 352-215-1018
www.LandOwnerFinancing.com

PALM HARBOR Homes Has
Closed 2 Model Centers. Save up
to 60K on select models
Call Today! 800-622-2832

NEW D/W Reduced Thousands.
3br/2ba set, delivery, A/C
skirting, steps. $39,900.
Call Ken (386)754-8844

AS IS, WHERE IS...32X80, 4/2,
LR/Den, needs carpet, paint, 2400
sqft. has metal roof, vinyl siding.
$31,000. Randy 386-754-0198
FIRE YOUR LANDLORD
TO OWN WHAT YOUR
THROWING AWAY IN RENT.
CALL MIKE 386-754-8844

NEW 32X70 4/3. 2K sqft+. L/R,
DenSidex side, glassfop range,
D/W. Del, set, Steps, A/C, skirt-
'ing. $59,900. Ken (386)754-8844

OWNER FINANCE 40% Down
w/land Equity or CASH on any
new or used singlewide or Double-
wide. Randy 386-754-0198

The Economy has forced
me to cut the price on my
3 bedroom, 2 bath home to
$38K (352)-870-5983

7min Unfurnished Apt.
/i For Rent

04545256
SPRING HILL VILLAGE.
Excellent High Springs location.
1, 2 & 3 bedroom floor-plans;
some with garages.
Call 386-454-1469
or visit our website: "
www.springhillvillage.net







1BRAPT.
Downtown Location, Clean.
$450 mo, plus Security.
NO PETS. Call 386-755-3456
2BR/1.5BAw/garage
5 minutes from VA hospital.
Call for details.
386-755-4590 or 365-5150
Furnished or unfurnished
Townhomes on the golf course.
$750. mo. plus security. Includes
water. 386-752-9626

NICE APT Downtown. Remod-
eled 1 bedroom. Kitchen, dining,
living room. $450. mo plus sec.!
386-362-8075 or 386-754-2951'


ON01PACATS
Alcu


The Lakes Apts. Studios & 1Br's
from $135/wk. Util. & cable incl..,
Sec 8 vouchers accepted, monthly
rates avail Call 386-752-2741

Updated apartments w/tile floors
& fresh paint. Excellent location.
From $450. + sec.
Call Michelle 386-752-9626

720 Furnished Apts.
i For Rent
lbr Apt. incl. water, elec, &
cable. $595. mo. Good area.
References & sec. req'd.
No pets. 386-719-4808

Rooms for Rent. Hillcrest, Sands,
Columbia. All furnished. Electric,
cable, fridge, microwave. Weekly
or inonthly rates. 1 person $135,
2 persons $150. weekly
S386-752-5808


730 Unfurnished
730 Home For Rent

lbr/1.5ba Country Cottage, Cathe-
dral ceilings, brick fireplace, wash-
er/dryer, 1 ac fenced, private, some,
pets, lease. 1st, last, sec, ref. Lake
City area $650mo. 352-494-1989

lbr/lba Free ele. Utilities incl. 4mi
S. Lake City. $300dep. $375mo.
386-590-0642 or 386-867-1833
www.suwanneevalleyproperties.com
2 bedroom 1 bath on
5 acres. $700.00 per month.
First, last and security.
386-590-5333
2br Private Country
Home. Remodeled,
everything is new. Large yard.
386-752-1444
2br/lba home. 3 avail. Lake City,
White Springs (River), Wellborn.
Jane S. Usher, Lic. Real Estate
Broker. 386-755-3500/365-1352

/ 11208 73rd Ct. Live Oak..
4/3 brick home in a country
subdivision $700./ mo + security
/ 204 NW Guerdon
Rd...Brand new 3/2 home re-
duced to $700./mo + security
./ 250 SW Wise Dr..3/2 Execu-
tive home in restricted Wise Es-
tates. $1350./mo + secuirty
/ 390 SW Wilshire Dr...
Gorgeous upscale 3/2 on
culdesac in Callaway
$1300./mo + security
/ COMING SOON! 4/2 brick
home in Springfield Estates on
Brandy Way. Call for additional
information!
Call Kayla Carbona @
386-623-9650
Family Home 3/2, Ir, dr, fam rm
w/ fp,garage, fenced back yd.
Nice area. $1100 mo + dep Martha
Jo Khachigan, Realtor 623-2848

750 Business &
J Office Rentals

FOR LEASE: Downtown office
space. Convenient to
Court house.
Call 386-755-3456

For Lease: E Baya Ave. Two -
1000 sqft office space units or
combined for 2000 sqft. 386-984-
0622 or weekends 386-497-4762
OFFICE SPACE for lease.
Oak Hill Plaza. 900 sqft
$675mo/$695. sec dep.
Tom 386-961-1086 DCA Realtor


770 Condos For Rent

05526400
Golf Course Condo for rent,
2BR/2BA, 1420 s.f., $.1100/mo.
Rent includes all appliances',
basic cable, water/sewer/
garbage, pool & tennis ct.
access. Realtor/owner
call 386-344-0433


790 Vacation Rentals

Horseshoe Beach Scalloping Spcl
Gulf Front 2br, w/lg porch, dock,
fish sink. wken'd $395./wk $895.
386-235-3633/352-498-5986
alwaysonvacation.com #419-181
"Florida's Last Frontier"


805 Lots for Sale

1/4 acre, new well, septic and
power, paved rd, owner fin, no
down pym't, $24,900,
($256 month) 352-215-1018
www.LandOwnerFinancing.com


FLORIDA
GATEWAY
< COLLEGE
(Formery Lake City Community College)
ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR,
PRACTICAL NURSING
224 Duty Days Tinured Track
Conduct the learning experience in
the classroom, laboratory and/or
clinical area. Prepare for instruction -
syllabi, lesson plans, tests: use
assessment strategies to assist the
continuous development of the
learner; use effective communication
techniques with students and others.
Demonstrate knowledge and
understanding of the subject matter,
use appropriate technology in the
teaching and learning process.
Minimum Qualifications Bachelor of
Science in Nursing degree and be
licensed in Flonda or be eligible for
licensure in Florida Three years
experience as staff nurse (acute care
preferred) Ability to present
information in a coherent manner and
the ability to fairly evaluate student
retention of that information.
Desirable Qualifications: Computer
literate. Teaching experience. BSN
required, MSN preferred.
Salary: Based on degree and
experience, plus beneflta.
Review of applications will begin
Immediately.
Persons interested should provide
College application, vita, and
photocopies of transcripts. All foreign
transcripts must be submitted with
official translation and evaluation.
Position details and applications
available on web at: www.fgc edu
Human Resorces
Florida Gateway College
149 S.E. College Place
Lake City FI 32025-2007


Phone (386) 754-4314
Fax (386) 754-4814
E.-Mail" hi jnnnr. f1cRd

VPADX I \ N n(I ,1 li, co kI ,II d
I "w4,-,, er


Seeking Salesperson to
join our team. No experience
necessary. Great benefits package.

Apply in person or call

Woody


386-758-6171


464


I









Classified Department: 755-5440

805 Lots for Sale


PUBLISHER'S NOTE
All real estate advertising in this
newspaper is subject to the fair
housing act which makes it illegal
to advertise "any preference,
limitation, or discrimination based
on race, color, religion, sex,
disability, familial status or nation-
al origin; or any intention to make
such preference, limitation or
discrimination." Familial status
includes children under the age of
18 living with parents or legal
custodians, pregnant women and
people securing custody of chil-
dren under the age of 18. This
newspaper will not knowingly
accept any advertising for real es-
tate which is in violation of the
law. Our readers are hereby in-
formed that all dwellings a4ver-
tised in this newspaper are availa-
ble on an equal opportunity basis.
To complain of discrimination call
HUD toll free at 1-800-669-9777,
the toll free
telephone number to the hearing
impaired is 1-800-927-9275.


810 Home for Sale
HANDYMAN SPECIAL
2br/1.5ba. Half ac fenced lot
w/shed. Appraised at $68,000.
Asking $55,000. (352)335-8330
820 Farms &
SAcreage
10-ac lot. Well/septic/pp. Owner
financing $300 dn, $663 mo 8.9%,
25 yrs. Deas Bullard Properties
S386-752-4339 www.landnfl.com
4 1/2 acre lot. Lake Jeffery Road.
Gorgeous Oaks!Paved Rd
Owner Financing! NO DOWN!
$59,900. $525mo 352-215-1018.
www.LandOwnerFinancing.com
4 acres, Wellborn, New Well
installed, Beautifully wooded
w/cleared Home Site, owner fin,
no down, $39,900, $410 mon
Call 352-215-1018
www.LandOwnerFinancing.com
FARM- 7 stall bar, Apt.
17+ acres cross fenced.
Close in $895. mo.
386-961-1086
3 Commercial
83 Property
05526409
FOR SALE LAKE CITY
FORMER 84 LUMBER Zoned
Commercial Intensive on
4.2 +/-Acres with an 18,300
S.F. main building at 1824:W.
US Highway 90; contact
Crystal 724,228-3636 x 1349
4 UNIT Apt. Bldg. All 1/1/ w/ex-
tra rooms. Clean, good tenants and.
remodeled. Downtown.4 160,000.
386-362-8075 or 754-2951

870 Real Estate'
Wanted,
I Buy Houses
.. 'CASH!
Quick Sale Fair Price'
'386-269-0605

950 Cars for Sale
1986 Chevy Monte Carlo SS,.
78k iiles, one owner. $10,000.
', All original.
386-752-1313 or 904-718-6747
2006 Toyota Scion XB,
41,000 mi. $13,000.
Paid over $24,000 new.
386-752-1313 or 904-718-6747


2005 Yamaha:
VStar 650
11,000 miles, blue with
ghost flames, runs
great, new battery
Price Reduced to $2,800
Call
386-752-9645


LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED 'WEDNESDAY, JULY 6, 2011


caSh

ADVERTISE YOUR

GARAGE SALE
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LAKE CITY REPORTER
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Ad runs 10 consecutive days
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Ad runs 10 consecutive days as a
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You must include vehicle price.
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Private party only.




: 2006 EF250
Ford Van
S/4 ton, metal work
shelves/ladder rack,.
.. K miles, exc. 0cod.
$10,500
Call
386-555-5555
If you don't sell your vehicle
during the first 10 days, you
can run the same vehicle ad
for 10 additional days for
only $15.00
Terris and conditions remain the
same for the additional run.


To Ge You

VeiceSl,"


2006 Toyota Scion
XB
41,000 mi.
Paid over $24,000 new.
$13,000
Call
386-752-1313,
904-718-6747


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755-5445



ME=.^'I


1986 Chevy Monte
Carlo SS
78k miles, one owner.
All original.
$10,000
Call
386-752-1313
9904-718-6747'


Tell 'em L.C. Reporter sent ya.



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LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED WEDNESDAY, JULY 6, 2011


,,, ff 6


'Runtree Moore Toyota Buckr Rountree Moore Toyota Bucks
R MOOR TOYOTA -i a V Si


4rigbton. BOAP,)DWA-L TOTE
S1SMITTY'S
y WESTERN STORE
& (586) 7,55-BOOTr
US HWY 90 LAKE CITY, L (3 MILES OFF 1-75)
S." Receive this Brighton Boardwalk Tote absolutely FPEE with a single
$100.00 Brignion Puichase. i,.t- c.r. 6 c. i.T *r.,,, u .,- .: ,.,r:r,. .
101.l I ncIuoaS me-OIndn-.ca -, i G-0l Cordo 6 rId a sjrs 10k nn I .rnalua 3 i 'AV p,) ..i. g dfo, Irn r


TimeLtess MEITmoRIes
FURnITmUU ANoxQUYes COLLECTIBLES
.. fashion Jewelry
so We have V
b Buy Any 2 pieces
Get 3rd piece 1/2 price
Buy Any 3 pieces
Get 4th piece FREE
*Blue Luster Jewelry not included
1034 SW Main Blvd. ,,, -- = J


_ ptr0UW'ID" 3000


Rear Engine Rider .
$1,39900
*125 hpBrigS &Straton
*26' i Vac Dec*
*2 Yu Waranty

n ... UPh.
12 mmftsii mlp
we I a"II
a?" Nod*i raggiibe


Why Waf


at Wal-Mart


for your

prescriptions?


We can fill the


sa e presc


for


in


just minutes!


S iOur prices are ".
same or lower
* We are "'ckr
SWe have Ph ...vPF '
* Convert ..ent Di"
ThrDs
* 90 Dav Suppty Ort


#se sicaoe fr er tetaisas


I-Iwo


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--r--------------------~-- r ----'


Classified Department: 755-5440


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