<%BANNER%>

UFPKY NEH LSTA



PRIVATE ITEM
Digitization of this item is currently in progress.
The Lake City reporter
ALL ISSUES CITATION THUMBNAILS MAP IT! PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028308/01599
 Material Information
Title: The Lake City reporter
Uniform Title: Lake City reporter (Lake City, Fla. 1967)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: John H. Perry
Place of Publication: Lake City Fla
Publication Date: 7/5/2011
Frequency: daily (monday through friday)[<1969>-]
weekly[ former 1967-<1968>]
daily
normalized irregular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Lake City (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Columbia County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Columbia -- Lake City
Coordinates: 30.189722 x -82.639722 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 95, no. 4 (Oct. 5, 1967)-
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000358016
oclc - 33283560
notis - ABZ6316
lccn - sn 95047175
sobekcm - UF00028308_01569
System ID: UF00028308:01599
 Related Items
Preceded by: Lake City reporter and Columbia gazette

Full Text





Number 1
Top-ranked
Djokovic claims
000014 120511 ****3-DIGI'.T
LIB OF FLORIDA HISTORY
PO BOX 117007
205 SMA UNIV OF FLORIDA
GAINESVILLE FL 32611-1943


All-stars
Lake City
to host
326 irneys here.
ports, IB


Junior's down
Earnhardt unhappy
with Daytona-style
drafting.
Sports, IB


iAty


Reporter


Tuesday, July 5, 201 I


ALOS LEVY


ALFONSO LEVY
1928-2011



A local



legend



is lost


Alfonso William Levy


COURTESY PHOTO


Lake City's
'Music Man'

dead at 83.

By LEANNE TYO
Ityo@lakecityreporter.com
Alfonso William Levy, who died late
Sunday after a long illness, leaves behind
an extraordinary legacy. Known locally as
'The Music Man," he was a musician, edu-
cator, humanitarian, and more.
Levy, 83, died of kidney failure at Haven
Hospice in Lake City. His son, Wayne Levy,
said he had been hospitalized since late
November.
Wayne Levy said he and his fiancee,
Deborah McPhee, were with his father
when he passed. They got to say good-
bye, Wayne Levy said, and his mother
Alfonso's wife Celestine did too.
"I'm pretty happy for him because I
know he's going to heaven," Wayne Levy
said. "It would be so selfish for me to keep
him here when he's got a better place ... It
was a long life, he had a long and fruitful
and giving life. And you can't ask for any-
thing better than that. I felt like I was so
glad I was there to tell him that I love him
before he took his last and final breath on
the earth."
ALFONSO LEVY continued on 3A


Ocean Pond

visitor bitten by

rattlesnake
From staff reports

A visitor to Ocean Pond Campground in
Baker County was bitten by a rattlesnake
Sunday when he bent over to retrieve his
dropped cell phone, say witnesses.
The man, who was not identified, was
lifeflighted to Shands at Jacksonville with
a snakebite to his finger, sources say.
Reports indicate his condition yesterday
was stable.
The incident reportedly occurred
between 3 and 4 p.m. at the campground,
located near Olustee in the Osceola
National Forest.


www.lakecityreporter.com


Vol. 137, No. 136 N 75 cents


A big, beautiful 4th


Fireworks explode Monday during Lake City
DeSoto to see the display.

Under perfect skies,
25,000 gather to
celebrate.America.

By LEANNE TYO
Ityo@lakecityreporter.com

Crowd of 25,000 or more, many
decked out in red, white and
blue, flocked to Lake DeSoto
Monday for Lake City's
Independence Day celebra-
tion, which ended in a magnificent display
of fireworks over the lake.
Families arranged blankets, umbrellas
and lawn chairs on the lake's shore in
anticipation of the fireworks show., Others
strolled around the lake, enjoying an
array of musical entertainers and perus-
ing the wares of nearly 20 vendors.
Children played in bounce houses
hosted by First Baptist Church and oth-
ers waved miniature American flags,
eagerly awaiting the start of the fire-
works show.
For the past 12 years, Helda Montero
of Gainesville and her family have
attended the Independence Day cel-
ebration in Lake City.
"It's kind of a family tradition," she
said. "We come up here to enjoy the
fireworks and it's beautiful by the lake."
Montero said she likes that the event
is family-oriented.
'There's something for everybody
and I love that," she said. "It's good,
quality time with each other."
Husband and wife Roger and Pat
Siter of Lake City said they attend the
festivities every year with their family
FOURTH continued on 6A


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
y's Independence Day celebration. A crowd estimated at 25,000 lined the shores of Lake


Phdtos by JASON MATTHEW
WALKER/Lake City Reporter
LEFT: Christopher
Cornell, 6, of Lake
City, waves a pair of
American flags as
he enjoys the local
Independence Day
celebration Monday
at Lake DeSoto.
Cornell said waving
the flag is his favorite
Fourth of July activity.
BELOW: Eight-week-
old Penny Lane, her
toenails a patriotic
red, white and blue,
strains to greet a visi-
tor as owner Donna
Reckner of McAlpin
relaxes before the
start of the show.


.4'


tim ;h. ;
c?'
~ a '* F


., 'M.


!iq

rL


Space Coast feels pain of shuttle's end


MIKE SCHNEIDER
Associated Press
CAPE CANAVERA Workers at the
Kennedy Space Center always knew the
end of the shuttle program would bring
hard times to Florida's Space Coast
They just couldn't predict how much
pain.


Some 7,000 jobs are being cut, and
potential replacement positions evaporated
last year when President Barack Obama
scrapped plans to return astronauts to the
moon.
Soon-to-be-jobless space workers and
those who've already lost their jobs are
now competing for work in a labor market
where more than one in 10 is unemployed.


And the Space Coast is still reeling from
the housing crisis, making it tougher for
workers to sell their homes and move else-
where for a job.
"Everything is taking a turn for the
worst, it seems like," said Kevin Smith,
local president of the union for space center
SHUTTLE continued on 3A


1 84264 a 1002
.l:I , , w v~A.


CALL US:
(386) 752-1293
SUBSCRIBETO
THE REPORTER:
Voice: 755-5445
Fax: 752-9400


95
T-Storm chance
WEATHER, 2A


Opinion ................
Around Florida...........
Obituaries ..............
Advice & Comics.........
Puzzles .................


TODAY IN
PEOPLE
'Transformers'
hits $400M.


COMING
WEDNESDAY
City council:
Full coverage.


_ _II~;__








J


;!


Lam










LAKE CITY REPORTER DAILY BRIEFING TUESDAY, JULY 5, 2011


FLORID A"
LOR Saturday: fA$H
L.9T" 1 5-35-41-45-46-48
x3


Monday:
Afternoon: 8-2-5
Evening: 7-4-7


liay4)


Monday:
Afternoon: 0-1-6-6
Evening: 1-9-4-2


eUzatch_
Sunday:
2-16-21-23-29


PEOPLE IN THE NEWS


3-D lifts 'Transformers' to $400M globally


LOS ANGELES
he 'Transformers" robots
have put their 3-D ticket-
price advantage to good
use.
Distributor Paramount
Pictures estimated Monday that
'"Transformers: Dark of the Moon"
pulled in $116.4 million domestically
over the four-day Fourth of July
weekend and $181.1 million since
opening Tuesday night
SDirector Michael Bay's third
installment in the sci-fi franchise has
added $217 million overseas, bring-
ing its worldwide total to nearly $400
million.
The studio said 60 percent of
domestic business came from pre-
mium-priced 3-D admissions, which
cost a few dollars more than 2-D
screenings. Overseas, 3-D admis-
sions accounted for 70 percent of
ticket sales.
That's a good sign for Hollywood's
3LD business, which had waned as 3-D
revenues dipped to 50 percent or less
of the total for some recent releases.
"It proves that for 3-D to be suc-
cessful, it has to be attached to the
right kind of movie. This was this
monumental Michael Bay block-
buster, and for something like that,
people felt it's worth the money,"
.said Paul Dergarabedian, analyst for
'box-office tracker Hollywood. com.
"Its all about maintaining good qual-
ity. If they see three 3-D movies in
a row that look terrible, they're not
going to put the money down again."

Harry Potter star says
he no longer drinks
LONDON Harry Potter star
Daniel Radcliffe said he has given up
drinking alcohol after realizing he
was partying too hard.
The 21-year-old actor said he
began to drink too much while film-
ing "Harry Potter and the Half Blood
Prince," the sixth movie in the Harry
Potter series, in 2009.


ASSOCIATED PRESS
In this publicity image released by Paramount Pictures, Shia LaBeouf (left)
plays Sam Witwicky and Rosie Huntington-Whiteley plays Carly in a.scene from
'Transformers: Dark of the Moon.'


"I became so reli-
ant on (alcohol) to
enjoy stuff. There
were a few years
there when I was
just so enamored
with the idea of liv-
Radcliffe ing some sort of
famous person's life-
style that really isn't suited to me,"
Radcliffe said.


dent will conduct a probe of the false
postings and that "we will conduct
the appropriate follow up."
Hackers broke into the
FoxNewsPolitics account early
Monday, leaving a series of six
tweets reporting that Obama had
been shot to death in Iowa and the
shooter was unknown.

Coney Island preps


Secret Service to probe for hot dog spectacle


hack on Fox News Twitter
WASHINGTON The Secret
Service said Monday it will investi-
gate the hacking of Fox's political
Twitter account
over updates claim-
ing that President
Barack Obama had
been assassinated.
Secret Service
spokesman George
Obama Ogilvie said the law
enforcement agency
whose job it:is to protect the presi-


NEW YORK Ifs time again for
the annual Nathan's hot dog eating
contest on Coney Island where
contestants scarf down thousands of
calories in mere minutes.
This year, the women have a sepa-
rate Fourth of July match that starts
a half-hour earlier than the men's
competition.
The star of the female pigout is
Sonya Thomas, who ate a record-set-
ting 41 wieners and buns in 10.min-
utes in 2009.

1MAssociated Press


, Celebrity Birthdays


* Actress Katherine Helmond
is 82.
M Actress Shirley Knight is
75.
* Singer-musician Robbie
Robertson is 68.
* Julie Nixon Eisenhower is
63.
* Rock star Huey Lewis is
61.
* Baseball Hall-of-Fame


pitcher Rich "Goose"
Gossage is 60.
N Actor Dorien Wilson is 49.
S Actress Edie Falco is 48.
0 Actor Michael Stuhlbarg
is 43.
N Rapper RZA is 42.
0 Rhythm-and-blues singer
Joe is 38.
N Rapper Bizarre is 35.
N Actor Ryan Hansen is 30.


Daily Scripture
"Blessed is the nation whose
God is the Lord, the people he
chose for his inheritance."
Psalm 33:12

Thought for Today
"Aim above morality. Be not
simply good, be good for
something."
Henry David Thoreau,
American writer and abolitionist (1817-1862)

Lake City Reporter
HOW TO REACH US
Main number ........(386) 752-1293 BUSINESS
Fax number ..............752-9400 ControllerSue Brannon... .754-0419
Circulation ...............755-5445 (sbrannon@lakecityreporter.com)
Online... www.lakecityreporter.com CIRCULATION
The Lake City Reporter, an affiliate of
Community Newspapers Inc., is pub- Home delivery of the Lake City Reporter
lished Tuesday through Sunday at 180 should be completed by 6:30 a.m.
E. Duval St., Lake City, Fla. 32055. Tuesday through Saturday, and by 730
Periodical postage paid at Lake City, Fla. a.m. on Sunday.
Member Audit Bureau of Circulation and Please call 386-755-5445 to report any
The Associated Press. problems with your delivery service.
All material herein is property of the Lake In Columbia County, customers should
City Reporter. Reproduction in whole or call before 10:30 a.m. to report a ser-
in part is forbidden without the permis- vice error for same day re-delivery. After
sion of the publisher. U.S. Postal Service 10:30 am., next day re-delivery or ser-
No. 310-880. 10:30 amnext y ser-
N. 310-880vice related credits will be issued.
POSTMASTER: Send address changes In all other counties where home delivery
to Lake City Reporter, P.O. Box 1709, is available, next day re-delivery or ser-
Lake City, Ra. 32056. vice related credits will be issued.
Publisher Todd Wilson .....754-0418
(twilson@lakecityreporter.com) Circulation ...............755-5445
(circulation@lakecityeporter.com)
NEWS Home delivery rates
Editor Robert Bridges .... .754-0428 (Tuesday through Sunday)
(rbridges@lakecityreporter.com) 12 Weeks ........ ......... $26.32
24 Weeks .................. $48.79
ADVERTISING 52 Weeks..:............. $83.46
Director Ashley Butcher ...754-0417 Ratesindude 7% sales tax.
Mail rates
(abutcher@lakecityreporter.com) 12 Weeks ................. $41.40
CLASSIFIED 24 Weeks................. $82.80
To place a classified ad, call 755-5440 52 Weeks ............... $179.40

CORRECTION

The Lake City Reporter corrects errors of fact in news
items. If you have a concern, question or suggestion, please
call the executive editor. Corrections and clarifications will run
in this space. And thanks for reading.


Trial set for
accused abuser
. MIAMI Trial for a
,M"ichigan man accused
of abusing poor boys at a
residential center he ran in
Haiti has been postponed
until next year.
'- Matthew Andrew Carter,
66, of Brighton, Mich.,
Swas originally scheduled
Sto stand trial Tuesday
'ii Miami federal court
;He has been indicted on
'charges of child sex tour-
Ism.
"i: Carter's attorney asked
the judge for more time to
.prepare his defense. The
Trial is now scheduled to
.begin April 9, 2012.
' ,U.S. authorities said
'he forced boys at the
Viorning Star Center in
'Haiti's capital to engage
:in sexual conduct in
Exchange for gifts, money
,or continued care.

Officer, woman in
ATV accident
MIAMI BEACH -
Miami Beach police said a
woman was riding with an
officer patrolling on his all-
terrain vehicle when it got
into an accident in South
Beach.
In a statement Monday,
the police department
identified the officer as
Derick Kuilan, a five-year
veteran.
Police said Kuilan lost
control of his ATV and
got into an accident early
Sunday.
Police have identified
the woman riding with
Kuilan as Adelee Sharie
Martin, 27. She was
treated for minor injuries
Sunday.

Girl injured in
fireworks mishap
HOLLYWOOD -
Authorities said an
8-year-old girl was injured
during a backyard fire-
works display when she


ASSOCIATED PRESS

Digging for answers
Marseaux Katilone, of Sarasota, clips roots at a dig site in
Great Dismal Swamp, N.C. Katilone is one of the students
helping American University professor Daniel Sayers, who
has been working for a decade to piece together the stories
of thousands of people who once made their home in settle-
ments scattered on patches of dry land.


was hit in the head with a
piece of concrete.
According to the
Broward Sheriff's Office,
an adult was using a cin-
der block to stabilize the
fireworks Sunday night.
The explosion sent pieces
of concrete across the
Hollywood yard, hitting
the child about 30 to 40
feet away.

Firefighters save
boy from tree
ORLANDO -
Firefighters had to come
to the rescue of a
7-year-old Orlando boy
clinging to a tree branch
40 feet off the ground.
Matthew Simmons said
that he's an experienced
tree climber and "just
climbed up there like a
bear does" to get to a
branch that would carry
him across a 6-foot wide
drainage ditch in his back-
yard.
But Matthew got stuck
when he realized the
branch wasn't strong
enough to hold him. He
called for his parents,
who called in the Orange
County firefighters. They


used a ladder to reach the
boy.

Search starts for
2 missing boaters
RIVERVIEW -
Authorities are searching
for a man who fell from
a boat in the Tampa Bay
area and for a teenager
who swam away from a
campsite in the Panhandle.
Florida Fish and Wildlife
Conservation Commission
spokesman Gary Morse
said Frankie'Diaz, 44, of
Valrico, fell from an 18-foot
boat on the Alafia River
in Riverview on Sunday
night.
Meanwhile, the
Okaloosa County Sheriff's
Office said a 16-year-old
boy swam away from
his family's campsite on
Spectre Island in the Santa
Rosa Sound.
Sheriff's Office spokes-
woman Michele Nicholson
tells the Northwest Florida
Daily News that the boy
decided around 2 a.m.
Monday that he wanted
to swim to shore and go
home.


TEMPERATURES
High Monday
Low Monday
Normal high
Normal low
Record high
Record low

PRECIPITATION
Monday
Month total
Year total
Normal month-to-date
Normal year-to-date


91
67
91
70
99 in 1997
64 in 1975


0.00"
0.00"
19.89"
0.86"
24.89"


' I3 p 7p


E Associated Press


City Wednesday Thursday
SJacksonville Cape Canaveral '7 75 r 3 7 1
... 7 Daytona Beach J 9 j I
Ft. Lauderdale '. :.
Daytona Beach Fort Myers I I .
Gainesvllle '3 '1 i
a Jacksonville p' ', 4 1 I
K ey West I
Orlando Cape Canaveral Key est *' I.
',3 ; Lake City 9C ;'1 ', .
Miami ;7 i -4C' r
Naplesi \ i1 1
West Palm Beach Ocala:'
"; ',: Orlando '% .:. 4
S Ft. Lauderdale Panama City .- i : .
yers i 79 Pensacola 9 1
S Nples Tallahassee '- 7 i :i
4 Miami Tampa 'i ;I _
1g/7P Valdosta 96'|I] 95Aili
Key West, \W. Palm Beach ;9 -. .
- .. 8 -.._--. -- . . -.'its .!.A-.*.: a f S -


SUN
Sunrise today
Sunset today
Sunrise tom.
Sunset torm.

MOON
Moonrise today
Moonset today
Moonrise tom.
Moonset tom.


6:34 a.m.
8:36 p.m.
6:35 a.m.
8:36 p.m.


11:01 a.m.
11:36 p.m.
12:05 p.m.


July July July July
8 15 23 .30
First Full Last New


10 niutestobu
Today's
ultra-violet
radiation risk
for the area on
a scale from 0
to 10+.

i. . .


An exclusive
service
brought to
our readers
by
The Weather
Channel.



weather.om


A Ve Forecasts, data and
graphics 2011 Weather
m r Central, LP, Madison, Wis.
weather www.weatherpubllsher.com


l Ag ,' Tl.- -, ,,,

Wednesday 1937, Montana sets
its all-time record
high temperature
with a reading of GO VVeII
117 degrees at
Medicine Lake.



Feelser tempieratwe1
^.^-I llffl^.l~fl'


AROUND FLORIDA


THE WEATHER



ISOLATED CHANCE :, CHANCE ,
S.--STORMS' ,. -STORMS' STORMS.

HI'. L0 HI LO HI L
:.-,- .-i ,, .' -..O S ,, ..-r-. ;,...., I,b,- ,.i ..


SValdosta
95671
Tallahassee Lake City
: Pensaa Gainesville
, Pensacola 1
92 Panama City ;'-
9 7 Ocala
' *- '4 ;


Tampa *
9 3 6


FL My
93


Page Editor: Jason M. Walker, 754-0430


..': .. 1 1 .. .


-, .- ,. : , .:, .. ,
,- -. ,.: .. :, ~ :-
, ; ;. ,. ,r.## ,- ,{,4 ..,


I=











Page EdItor: Todd Taylor, 754-0424 LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL & STATE TUESDAY, JULY 5, 2011


ALFONSO LEVY: A local legend passes

Continued From Page 1A


Alfonso Levy dedicated
his life to music and educa-
tion.
He began playing the
piano for his church in
Savannah, Ga. at the age
of 8. He earned a bache-
lor's degree in music and
art from -Clark Atlanta
University in Georgia and
later earned a master's
degree in music from The
Juilliard School, where he
played piano and sang.
In 1950, Levy moved to
Lake City after graduation
from Clark Atlanta to work
as a music teacher.
He became music direc-
tor for all the black schools
in the county and later,
after desegregation, held
the same position for the
entire county.
Levy became principal of.
Niblack Elementary School
in 1971, a position he held
for 15 years. He served the
Columbia County School
District for 30 years as a
teacher, music director and
principal.
'The Columbia County
schQol system family is
mourning the passing of a
true educator," said Mike
Millikin, superintendent of
schools. "He was an icon in
the community. He literally
started the music programs
for many Columbia County
schools." -
Tony Buzzella, Levy's
friend for more than 30
years and his music partner,
credited Levy with mak-
ing sure every Columbia
County school had an art
and music teacher, as they
do to this day.
"He brought culture and
class to a rural communi-
ty," Buzzella said, "and that
says a lot"
"He was down-to-earth
and very grounded in his
purpose," Buzzella said,
"and that was to educate,
entertain and bring music
to the lives of each and
every citizen in Columbia
County."
Levy was one of the
founders of the Music,
Art, Drama and 'Dance
Festival MADDFEST
- a 1960s celebration
of the arts. He also was
a member of two musi-
cal groups, Amigo Male
Singers from 1951 to 1976
and the Salt and Pepper
Trio (later rechristened
the Salt and Pepper Trio,
Plus One), for which he
sang and played key-
board from 1972 on.
On Oct 15, 1993, Florida
Gateway College named
its performing arts center
after Levy, in honor of his
many years of promoting
music and education in
Columbia County, as well
as endowing FGC with a
music scholarship.
"Florida Gateway
College, and formerly Lake
City Community College,
is saddened by the passing
of Dr. Levy," said Charles
Hall, FGC president. "He's


been a great influence
on the college as a board
member and as a supporter
and purveyor of the arts,
especially the musical arts
and to the point that the
PAC was named after him
in support and recognition
of all that he's done for the
college."
Levy for many years
directed community
choirs in performances
of Handel's "Messiah" at
FGC and later at St. James
Episcopal Church. He
also was musical conduc-
tor for the "Music Man,"
"Oklahoma," and "Lil'
Abner" at Columbia Little
Theatre and FGC.
Levy had served as
music director at St James
Episcopal Church's since
about 1998.
"He was incredibly inspi-
rational, an incredibly gift-
ed and talented man," said
Rev. Michael Armstrong,
the church's rector. "We
loved him dearly here. We
still do. We're very sad
about all of this and hell be
dearly missed."
Levy's community
involvement included
serving as president of
several local groups,
including the Lake City
Kiwanis Club, Florida
State Music Teachers
Association, and Lake
City Arts Council. He
was a board member for
the United Way and Lake
City-Columbia County
Chamber of Commerce.
Kyle Keen, Lake City
Kiwanis Club president,
said Levy organized the
music at the club's meet-
ings until recently and was
one of the club's longest
serving members.
"He was definitely a valu-
able, valuable member of
our club and our communi-
ty," he said. "Hell be great-
ly missed. You can't replace
an Alfonso Levy. Well defi-
nitely miss his presence in
our club."
Norbie Ronsonet Jr.,
a fellow Kiwanis Club
member who knew Levy
since he was Niblack
Elementary's,. principal,
said Levy was a person
who always gave.
"He was one of those
people that gave more
than he got," Ronsonet
said. "He was a sharer and
a giver, and if you were in
his life, you were lucky."
Levy was listed
in Who's Who in
American Education
and in the Dictionary of
International Biography
for Distinguished Service
and Achievement in
Music. He was cited by
Presidents Kennedy and
Nixon for service on the
Selective Service Board.
He also received numer-
ous other awards includ-
ing the Louis Armstrong
Jazz Award, Rotary Club
"Citizen of the Year"
Award dnd the Lake City


Reporter "Musician of the
Century" Award.
The Lake City/Columbia
County Beautification
Committee also honored
Levy by planting a tree
in his honor at Niblack
Elementary School on
Florida Arbor Day.
Buzzella said Levy was a
world-class musician who
could've made it even big-
ger than he did, but chose
to stay in Lake City and
make a difference here.
"H1 mentioned many
times that he felt like this
was where he needed to
be," Buzzella said.
"He could've been as big
as B.B. King if he wanted
to," Buzzella said, "but he
chose to stay in Lake City
and enrich the lives of
thousands of young people
and countless numbers of
adults that came to watch
him perform."
Buzzella said Levy was
a great educator, a great
entertainer, a dear friend
and a .tremendous musi-
cian.
"He was unlike any I'd
worked for," Buzzella said.
"I've played professionally
for more than 40 years,
and I can honestly say
there's no better show-
man than Alfonso Levy.
Alfonso was the best that
ever was, and I've played
with some of the best all
over the world, and I can
attest that he was a very
big fish in a small pond."
Buzzella noted that Levy
was a humanitarian who
lived peacefully through
integration, helping to
eliminate locally some of
the racial unrest that other
areas experienced.
"When integration
came along, he literally
walked the steets making
sure there was peace and
harmony in our commu-
nity...He was a champion
not only of education and
music, but a humanitar-
ian that had an eye much
greater than himself. He
looked at the big pic-
ture and he'll be greatly
missed. In my lifetime,
I've known many great
people, but none great-
er than Alfonso Levy,".
Buzzella said, overcome
with tears.
Harry Wuest, another
music partner and long-
time friend of Levy's,
said he and Levy never
stopped being friends
since they met more than
22 years ago. Levy was
also the best man in his
and Margaret's wedding,
Wuest said.
Wuest described their
friendship as a "love-hate
relationship," since they
always joked together and
played tricks on one anoth-
er.
"He was the best friend I
ever had," Wuest said: "He
was a wonderful man."
Wayne Levy and
Ronsonet both said Levy's


humor will be missed.
"We loved making peo-
ple laugh and enjoy them-
selves and enjoy our com-
pany," Wayne Levy said.
He also said some of his
fondest memories were of
his father's demeanor and
character.
The most valuable les-
son his father taught him
was about attitude, Wayne
Levy said.
"It was having a great
attitude about any situa-
tion, and it means a world
of difference," he said.
Alfonso Levy made an
impact on the community
through music fqr at least
five generations, Wayne
Levy said.
"He embodied music
24/7," Wayne Levy said.
"He made an impact of set-
ting the example for a great
leader, an impact on how
to be a great person, how
to be personable, how to
smile every day and how
to just love people. And in
turn, people loved him."
His father was a self-sac-
rificing, humble, gracious
and smart man, Wayne
Levy said, but still enjoyed
being the influential person
he was.
"He really enjoyed his
local celebrity," Wayne
Levy said, "he really, truly
enjoyed it. "
Wayne Levy said when
he played at the Blue Roof
Grill on Friday nights, he'd
make an announcement
when his father would
arrive to see him play.
"I'd make this announce-
ment, and the place just
erupts," Wayne Levy said.
"It'd take him 20 minutes
to get through the crowd
... He was in his 80s and he
was a rock star."
"He was big," Wayne
Levy said, "and when he
walks into a room, you
know Alfonso Levy is in the
building."
Alfonso Levy was the
patriarch of his family,
Wayne Levy said. He said
he'll miss the intelligent
conversations he had with
his father and his father's
laugh, which could fill a
room.
'There won't be a day
that goes by (that we
don't miss him)," he said.
"We're going to miss him
immensely."
A wake will be held
for Levy at St. James
Episcopal Church Friday
evening and the funeral
service will be at the
Alfonso Levy Performing
Arts Center Saturday,
Wayne Levy said. Exact
times for both events are
yet to be announced.


I 4A4-


SHUTTLE: Economic impact severe

Continued From Page 1A


BBQ fundraiser,

raffle to benefit

families of fallen


firefighters
From staff reports

WHITE SPRINGS The White Springs Fire
Department is hosting a barbecue fundraiser July 16
for fallen Florida Division of Forestry firefighters Josh
Burch and Brett Fulton.
Fulton and Burch lost their lives battling a forest
fire in Hamilton County on June 20.
All proceeds from this event will go to
their families.
The barbecue fundraiser will feature
l slab ribs for $20; rib dinners for $9;
chicken dinners for $7 (white meat)
and $6 (dark meat); rib and chicken
combo dinners for $11; rib sandwiches
Burch for $7 and half-chickens for $5. All din-
ners will include baked beans, potato
salad and bread. Dinners can be pre-
ordered and free delivery is available
for five meals or more.
The event features live music as well.
The fundraiser will also include, a
drawing at 3 p.m. for a four-in-one gas
grill, charcoal grill, smoke and sear
Fulton burner.
Tickets ($2 each or three for $5) are
available now at White Springs City Hall, Banks of the
Suwannee and Suwannee Hardware.
A silent auction will also be held.
The event will take place at Suwannee Hardware,
16660 Spring St (Highway 41), White Springs, during
the monthly swap meet from 6 a.m.-3 p.m.
To make donations or place orders, please call Don
Wilson at 623-4758. .


OVER 150 PROPERTIES MANY SELLING ABSOLUTE
T, ii Ha h. .1 Reb, i ,,d..A, .\,, R,.-, ,;.u' ." 4' 1 .. :.?2 .2L '. I
Imf i i Hffl) Rgs& l,vv'ond,. Tcuhm ,.-a a .- '" ,. ,-m- L -J .llj&. [jo ;. I
AUCTION EVENTS-Hr,:,:B I'. i Pr.: i''' a r 'il r ij-


V v r l t .1'EIT, r, ),'l I]'r:l'."b,-1 I *C ll:" n' : 6 Fv'lr. r ^ -,-r.9....I ^ l ,CI*T. H rr
vj-b%6


",-J/

Brightway
INSURANCE
Auto I Home I Business I Life
386.752.2345
vance.cox@brightway.com
brightway.com
742 SE Baya Dr., Suite 102
Lake City


firefighters, paramedics and
workers at emergency land-
ing sites. "What little is out
there, everybody is compet-
ing for." '
The Space Coast has
faced dire times before:
There was a gap between
the end of NASA's Apollo
program in the mid-1970s
and the first shuttle launch
in 1981. But at least space
workers and businesses
had the shuttle to look for-
ward to at the end of the
six-year hiatus.
No such program exists
for workers like engineer
Tony Crisafulli, who will
be laid off two days after
Atlantis returns from the last
shuttle mission in July.
'We're all out here work-
ing, knowing that we're los-
ing our jobs in a few days,"
said Crisafulli, who has been
at the space center for nearly
23 years.
Space workers had been
looking to the Constellation
moon program to cushion
the blow from the shuttle


program's end. The. cancel-
lation of that project elimi-
nated 2,000 jobs.
"We were all counting on
that to take us through the
transition," Crisafulli said.
"At least, that was some-
thing."
The Obama administra-
tion's space plan has NASA
building a new capsule and
giant rocket to take astro-


nauts to an asteroid, and
eventually Mars. It relies on
private companies to build
their own spacecraft to fly
cargo and astronauts to the
International Space Station.
The local jobs agency
estimates that NASA infuses
$1.2 billion into Florida's
economy, and that two jobs
are lost for each aerospace
job that is eliminated.


Boae and GrIe
Register with our
'Rfby Registry"

1 M 57ffum's
D eco 2r ue
168 N MARION AVENUE
DOWNTOWN
386-752-4009


John A Kasak CLU CPCU, Agent
904 SW SR 247 Branford Hwy
Lake City, FL 32025
Bus: 386-752-7521


Protect your family for less,
build cash value or even get
your premiums back if the
death benefit has not been
paid out at the end of the
level premium period.


(D State Farm
statefarm.comr
Adjustable Premium Level- n , ,, i i .. J r. i I ,

State Fam Life Insurance C p. ,,,. P ,,.,j,,I.. I .....i 1 ,,, I. r i and W i
Pa1 State Farm Life and Accident Assurance Company (Licensed in NY .i,1 1ii Hil. i
P09"015 2 ________________


Lot uS hel p The Bayway Group, LLC
Let us help BY WAY

your business AYWAY
^u iic Q SERVICES
S H! Meeting The Needs Of Home And Industry

COMMERCIAL & RESIDENTIAL
Janitorial Services Upholstery Cleaning
Tile, Grout and General Emergency Water [.
Floor Maintenance Extraction & Dry Down
Fire, Water and Carpet & Rug Cleaning
Storm Restoration Odor Control
24 hours a day 7 days a week emergency call out
(386) 362-2244 (386) 755-6142 1-888-849-8234

W3WHelvenston St. SE, Live Oak, Florida
www.baywayservlces.blz The Bayway Group, LLC dba Bayway Services


IF i~ i. i~rQ~I II1 I'li FITIIYTYIIjllll:~ 0:1 I :I~ - 6~. q?i~ I
I, ~n~ym: m* IIe Ibll(i Ciliill 1 I~~~ICICI~ 1.I- I: Il*TL Ll~


Page Editor: Todd Taylor, 754-0424


LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL & STATE TUESDAY, JULY 5, 2011












OPINION


Tuesday, July 5, 201 I


AN


A N
OPINION


A rare

look at a

national

treasure


visitors to the
Washington
Monument got
a rare treat in
advance of the July Fourth
weekend.
The elevator that takes
sightseers to the top of the
555-foot, 5-1/2-inch shaft
became stuck Thursday
evening. Eventually, rescue
workers were able to lower
the elevator safely to the
ground..
The visitors at the top had
to walk down and that
was the treat. The monu-
ment opened in 1888, and
guidebooks long advised
tourists to ride up and walk
down. But because of safety
and vandalism concerns,
the stairs were closed to the
public.
And that's too bad,
because the interior of the
monument has some 200
carved commemorative
blocks donated during its
construction. They rep-
resent states. There is a
Deseret block, Utah's name
before it became "Utah."
There are blocks from cit-
ies. One from New Bedford,
Mass., has a carving of a
whale. There are blocks
from foreign countries,
including one from the
sultan of Turkey that has
an inscription by the court
poet. There are stones from
fraternal and civic organiza-
tions; 22 from the Masons
alone.
And there is one from
the Pennsylvania Sons of
Temperance inscribed,
"The Surest Safeguard of
the Liberty of Our Country
is Total Abstinence from
all that Ittoxicates," a safe-
guard, we are obliged to
report, is largely ignored in
the capital.
Surely the inconvenience
of having to walk down 898
steps was a small price to
pay for a rare glimpse at
one of the national capital's
hidden treasures.
*-Scripps Howard News

Lake City Reporter
Serving Columbia County
Since 1874
The Lake City Reporter is pub-
lished with pride for residents of
Columbia and surrounding counties by
Community Newspapers Inc.
We believe strong newspapers build
strong communities -"Newspapers
get things done!"
SOur primary goal is to
publish distinguished and profitable
community-oriented newspapers.
This mission will be accomplished
through the teamwork of professionals
dedicated to truth, integrity and hard
work.
Todd Wilson, publisher
Robert Bridges, editor
Sue Brannon, controller
Dink NeSmith, president
Tom Wood, chairman

LETTERS
POLICY
Letters to the Editor should be
typed or neatly written and double
spaced. Letters should not exceed
400 words and will be edited for
length and libel. Letters must be
signed and include the writer's name,
address and telephone number for
verification. Writers can have two
letters per month published. Letters
and guest columns are the opinion of
the writers and not necessarily that of
the Lake City Reporter.
BY MAIL: Letters, P.O. Box 1709,


Lake City, FL 32056; or drop off at
180 E. Duval St. downtown.
BY FAX: (386) 752-9400.
BY E-MAIL:
news@lakecityreporter.com


www.lakecityreporter.com


5 L9 n L,


IF'bA RTNM ANAT TNI


Black colleges need


to raise graduation rates


p resident Barack
Obama spoke
in August at the
University. of Texas
in Austin, urging
the United States to regain the
world lead in college graduation
rates by 2020. He underscored
the direct relationship between
education and economic growth,
Sand he warned that American
prosperity depends on a better-
educated work force.
Just a decade earlier, he
noted, the United States led
the world in college gradua-
tion rates. Now, according to a
College Board report, a mere
38.5 percent of Americans age.
55 to 64 have at least an associ-
ate's degree, placing us fourth in
a survey of 36 developed nations.
Regaining the international
lead in college graduation rates
will require that all U.S. institu-
.tions of higher learning criti-
cally evaluate their missions and
their effectiveness. The presi-
dent's goal puts new demands
on the nation's remaining 105
historically black colleges and
universities, popularly referred
to as HBCUs. For generations,
before civil rights legislation
changed admissions policies at
traditionally white schools, most
African-Americans graduated, in
high numbers, from HBCUs.
Today, however, the over-
whelming majority of HBCUs
have dismal graduation rates, a
phenomenon Obama was aware
of when he spoke in Austin.
The Associated Press studied
six-year graduation rates of 83
four-year HBCUs and found that
only 37 percent of black stu-
dents earned degrees within six
years. Just as worrisome as the
low completion rate was the fact
that the national graduation rate
for black students is 4 percent-
age points higher than that bf


Bill Maxwell
maxwell@sptimes.com
the HBCUs collectively.
More bad news came in May
from the National Collegiate
Athletic Association. The agen-
cy banned a record eight teams
from postseason play as a result
of their athletes' poor academic
performance. Four of the teams
are at HBCUs, and a fifth is
from a school in Illinois desig-
nated as predominantly black.
What do these statistics por-
tend? For one, they challenge
the cherished notion that histor-
ically black schools touted as
nourishing environments are
better at graduating black stu-
dents. They also mean that to
remain relevant, HBCUs must
find ways to play a crucial role
in improving the nation's educa-
tion attainment levels Obama
envisions for 2020. In short,
HBCUs must graduate more
students on time.
Obama appointed John S.
Wilson Jr. as the executive
director of the White House
Initiative on HBCUs. Wilson,
formerly an administrator at
George Washington University
and the Massachusetts Institute
of Technology, is studying data,
good and bad, that can help
HBCUs improve their gradua-
tion rates.
Wilson recently met in
Atlanta with about 100 HBCU
presidents during a confer-
ence hosted by the Southern
Education Foundation. In a
blunt speech, he told the presi-


dents that to achieve Obama's
goal, the nation will need to
produce about 8 million more
graduates 2 million of whom
need to be African-American, '
and 200,000 from black colleges.
"HBCUs and their productiv-
ity are built into the way we
see the problem being solved,"
Wilson said. 'That means we
have to go from about 36,000
graduates per year to some-
where north of 50,000 a year.
That is a big challenge."
Contributing to the challenge,
as Wilson has said often, is the
need for HBCUs to rewrite their
standard narrative of "against
great odds," which suggests
"survival" and "victimization."
Shortly after Obama hired him,
Wilson said: "Black colleges will
never be as strong as they can
be unless that narrative chang-
es.... We need to shift from how
to survive to how to thrive."
Wilson does not dismiss the
problems common to virtually
all HBCUs: low faculty sala-
ries, insufficient financial aid
for students from low-income
families, students with low SAT
and ACT scores and inadequate
facilities and equipment At the
same time, the schools are fac-
ing mounting questions from
state and federal legislators
about their relevance in an era
when education budgets are
shrinking, mainline colleges
and universities increasingly are
competing for black students,
and growing numbers of voters
are complaining about support-
ing HBCUs with public funds.
Still, HBCUs will need to
find ways to heed Obama's call.
They will need to prove their
worth by helping to boost the
nation's graduation rates.
a Bill Maxwell is a columnist
and editorial writer for the
St. Petersburg Times


ANOTHER OPINION


Gates leaves with success


this 2006 confir-
mation hearing to
become secretary
of Defense, Robert
Gates set the tone for
his leadership with two words.
"No, sir," he replied when a sena-
tor asked whether U.S. forces
were winning in Iraq. With that
single crisp answer, Gates blew
away three years of windy double-
speak about the Iraq War, signaling
that the new Pentagon chief would
be refreshingly honest and blunt
Whether he'd also be compe-
tent and effective was less clear.
But four-and-a-half years later,
Gates, who leaves office today to
return to private life, has turned
out to be one of the most success-
ful and widely admired Cabinet
members of the modern era, one
of those rare senior leaders who
make us wonder why more can't
be this good.
Why did Gates excel? For one
thing, his primary motivation


appeared to be public service, not
self-promotion or empire build-
ing. Gates, a former CIA director
and university president, was suf-
ficiently non-partisan to become
the only Defense secretary in
history to have served presidents
of different parties, Republican
George W. Bush and Democrat
Barack Obama.
Gates, 67, isn't without flaws
or blind spots. We disagreed, for
example, with his insistence that
the bloated Pentagon budget had
to keep growing every year in
real terms, even as he slashed
unneeded weapons programs and
proposed taking an overdue ax to
inflated health care benefits.
But he has been right far more
often than not, open-minded
enough to recognize that some
criticism is valid, and decisive
enough to force change. When
USA TODAYreported in 2007
that the Pentagon bureaucracy
was slow-walking the deployment


of special vehicles that could save
troops' lives in roadside bomb
explosions, Gates forced the
bureaucracy to field thousands of
MRAPs- mine-resistant ambush-
protected vehicles that saved
thousands of lives in Iraq and
Afghanistan.
Under President Bush, Gates
oversaw the surge of troops in
Iraq that helped turn the tide of
that war. And under President
Obama, he has managed the
surge of troops into Afghanistan
that reversed Taliban gains there.
Perhaps the most indelible mark
he'll leave on the military was
ending the homophobic "don't
ask, don't tell" policy, a change he
called a matter of "common sense
and common decency."
Despite the controversy sur-
rounding that change, he won the
loyalty of the servicemembers he
commanded.

* USA Today


4A


Dan K.Thomasson


Another

rush to

judgement

" "y' unfortunately, rushing
S to judgment seems to
S be an integral part of
the American justice
system and the latest
example of this is the imprudent
swiftness of the prosecution of '
Dominique Strauss-Kahn for the
alleged rape of a maid at an upscale ::
New York hotel.
You might have missed the
drama involving the former direc-
tor of the International Monetary
Fund, but only if you were living
under a rock. According to the
original allegations leveled by the
accuser, an immigrant from Guinea,
Strauss-Kahn charged odt of the
bathroom naked and assaulted her
as,she prepared to clean his room.
He later was arrested at the airport
as he prepared for a trip to France
where he was considered a good
bet to become the leading presiden--
tial candidate.
Now it seems in a case that paral-
lels one a few years ago involving
Duke University lacrosse players
there is.considerable doubt about
the veracity of the alleged victim.
Strauss-Kahn has been released
from house arrest and his $1 mil- :
lion cash bond returned. The
victim's story has changed and she:
now turns out to have mysterious
bank accounts, an incarcerated
boyfriend to whom she bragged
about Strauss-Kahn's wealth, and
a penchant for twisting the truth,
including claims of a gang rape in .
Guinea that didn't happen. New.
York District Attorney Cyrus Vance
Jr. may now face his own political
problems over this and rightly so.
The most glaring similarity
between this and the Duke matter
is that in both instances prosecu-
tors sped full steam ahead without
proper investigation of the person
making the allegations, seeing an
opportunity it seems to enhance
their political standings by nailing a
prominent figure or institution.
.Duke University officials com-
pounded the errors by moving
prematurely against the three play-
ers charged, cancelling the lacrosse
program and firing the coach, all
before the ink dried on the alle-
gations of the woman who had
fabricated them and a prosecutor
who bought her lie hook, line and
sinker. He was later censured for
prosecutorial misconduct, removed
from office and disbarred. He clear-
ly had proceeded in an effort to
enhance his reelection chances by
showing Durham's blacks that as a
white prosecutor he was not oblivi-
ous to the abuses of white students
against a black woman.
Vance apparently did not stop
to consider the ludicrousness of
the allegations to assess the
probabilities of a portly 62 year old
charging out of a bathroom nude
to assault a maid. He bought the
woman's story completely and fool-.o
ishly bolted ahead. Was there sex
involved? Forensic evidence would
indicate there was. It was not the
first time Strauss-Kahn had been
accused of rape. But determining
whether or not it was consensual
in this instance, as Strauss-Kahn
claims, depends pretty much on
whom one believes he or she
and it now has become much
more difficult if not impossible for a
jury to accept her version.
Tragickally, both cases aren't that
unusual in a prosecutorial system
that depends on the ability to con-
vict under any circumstance as
the key to success. No points are
scored for losing and the smell of
prominent blood is enticing. Vance,
since taking over for the revered
Robert Morgenthau, has had a list : "
of failures and this case might have> "*
erased some of that in the public's
mind, especially since it pitted the
downtrodden against the powerful.


* Dan K. Thomasson is former edi-.
tor of Scripps Howard News Service'


...,











Page Editor: Todd Taylor, 754-0424LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL TUESDAY, JULY 5, 2011


COMMUNITY CALENDAR


Today
Theatre performance
Columbia County Senior
Services Inc. is host-
ing a Geriactors Theatre
Performance "I Can't
Remember Why Im Mad
At You" and three vignettes
7 p.m. today at the LifeStyle
Enrichment Center. Call
(386) 7550235. The center
is located at 628 SE Allison
Court

Donors wanted
LifeSouth Bloodmobile
is seeking donors 11
a.m.-1 p.m. at Columbia
Bank, State Road 47 and
1:30 p.m.-5 p.m. downtown
today. Free ice cold slush-
ees and gifts for every
donor.

Wednesday
Spanish class
Columbia County Senior
Services Inc. is hosting a
beginners Spanish class
10-11 a.m. at the LifeStyle
Enrichment Center. Free
Blood Pressure Checks
are 11 a.m. to noon. Also


a Geriactors Matinee
Performance is 11 a.m.
and bingo is 1 p.m. Call
(386) 755-0235. The Center
is located at 628 SE Allison
Court.
Newcomers and
Friends Luncheon
The July Friendship
Luncheon of the Lake City
Newcomers and Friends
is 11:30 a.m. Wednesday
at Costa Del Sol located at
2260 W U.S. Highway 90.
All members, guests and
friends are welcome. Call
(386) 438-8100 or (386)
754-7227.

Donors wanted
LifeSouth Bloodmobile
is seeking donors 9
a.m.-5 p.m. Wednesday
at Walmart. Free ice cold
slushees and gifts for
every donor.

Thursday
Chair exercise
Columbia County Senior
Services Inc. is hosting
7th Chair Exercise 1 p.m.
Thursday at the LifeStyle


Enrichment Center, locat-
ed at 628 SE Allison Court.
Call (386) 755-0235.

Play in the Clay
Diane Hornby is teach-
ing "Play In The Clay"
classes for the children's
summer vacation program
10 a.m.-11 a.m. Thursday
and 14 for $5 at the
Stephen Foster Cultural
State Park. To register, call
the park Gift Shop at (386)
397-1920 or visit www.ste-
phenfosterCSO.org.To learn
more about the park, visit
www.FloridaStateParks.
org/stephenfoster

Friday
Cold Potato
Columbia County Senior
Services Inc. is hosting
a "Cold Potato" game 1
p.m. Friday at the LifeStyle
Enrichment Center, locat-
ed at 628 SE Allison Court.
Call (386) 755-0235.

Japanese drumming
The Columbia County
Public Library is hosting
Japanese drumming with


Tampa Taiko 11 a.m. at
Fort White Community
Center and 2 p.m. at the
Main Branch Friday.

Saturday
Dog Days of Summer
Dog Days of Summer is
10 am.-4 p.m. Saturday at
Stephen Foster State Park.
There will be a parade of
paws, canine costumes
and trick competition, as
well as demonstrations. Dr.
Hawthorne from Lake City
Animal Hospital will answer
questions and Pet Smart
will have "free" give-a-
ways. Bring your own dog
on a leash. Regular park
entrance fees apply.

RHS alumni meeting
A Richardson High
School alumni meet-
ing is noon Saturday.at
the Richardson Center.
Contact CJ at (386) 752-
0815.

Sunday
Library Author Program
The Friends of the


Carol Leah Burnette son, Wilbur (Anita) Burnette of of O'Brien, FL passed away
Lake City, Fla.: One sister, Inez on Sunday, July 3, 2011 of a
Mrs. Carol Leah Burnette, age Richards of Lake City, Fla.: One long illness. The Fayetteville,
73, of Lake City, Fla. died Satur- brother, Murray Reeves of High NC native moved to O'Brien
day, July 2, in the Suwannee Val- Springs, Fla.: Six grandchildren in 2005 from Lake City, FL.
ley Care Center, Lake City, Fla. and 13 great-grandchildren also Rick worked at the Suwannee
following an extended illness. survive. Funeral services will River Water Management Dis-
She was a native of Halo, Geor- be conducted at 2 p.m. Wednes- trict and was also a member of
gia and had resided in Lake City day, July 6, in the Chapel of Christian Home Fellowship.
for the past 55 years. She was Guerry Funeral Home with Rev. Mr. Johnston is survived by his
preceded in death by her par- Stan Ellis, Pastor of the First wife: Beth Johnston, O'Brien,
ents, Wilbir C. and Laura Cleo Full Gospel Church, officiat- FL; six daughters: Laina,
Raulerson Bennett, her husband ing. Interment will be in Carter Anna, Randa, Shonda, Caro-
Collice Lavelle Burnette and her Cemetery, Lake Park, Ga. Visi- line, and Charla Johnston, all
daughter, Barbara J. Hendry. She station will be from 6 to 8 p.m. of O'Brien, FL; three sons:
was a homemaker who enjoyed Tuesday, July 5, at GUERRY Daniel Johnston, Live Oak, FL;
watching T.V. and working in FUNERAL HOME, 2659 S.W. Samuel and Seth Johnston, both
her flowers and attended the Main Blvd., Lake City, Fla. of O'Brien, FL; sister: Gina
First Full Gospel Church of Lake www.guerryfunerathone.qom. Johnston, Chico, CA; brother:
City. She is survived by ,two .....-..... : .:..,t:- i:-.:f' .-:,, J.aDanny 'Johnston, Vista, CA.
daughters, Deborah Ann (Hey- Richard L. 'Rick' Johnston There will be a visitation from
ward) Christie and Dorira' (Cari) .-.r;;--: -- 5:00- 7:00 pm, Wednesday, July
Petty both of Lake City Fla.: Her Richard L. 'Rick' Johnston, 58, 6, 2011 at DANIELS FUNER-


AL HOME, Branford, FL. A
memorial service will be held at
6:00 pm, Thursday, July 7, 2011
at First Baptist Church, Bran-
ford, FL with Mr. Scott Johns
and Mr. Bill Prange officiating.
A private family graveside ser-
vice will be held earlier in the
day. In lieu of flowers, the fam-
ily asks donations to be made to
Johnston Educational Fund, c/o.
Capitol City Bank, Branford, FL.
Daniels Funeral Homes &
Crematory, Inc., of Live
Oak and Branford, FL in
charge of arrangements.


Obituaries are paid advertise-
ments. For details, call the Lake
'City'5eporter's classified depart-
ment at 752-1293. ,


* To submit your Community
Calendar item, contact Antonia
Robinson at 754-0425 or by
e-mail at arobinson@
lakecityreporter.com.


Library Author Program ,
will feature Terri DuLong
2 p.m. Sunday at the
Columbia County Public
Library Main Library.
DuLong, author of
"Spinning Forward" and
"Casting About," lives
in Cedar Key which is
also the setting for her


novels with a knitting
theme. Her first novella,
"A Cedar Key Christmas,"
appeared last fall in the
Fern Michael's holiday
anthology, "Holiday
Magic,".making her a
New York Times and USA
Today best-selling
author.


IS CRMAIO,0
35_.W iksLn,. oCiy L 25






D N. ,.
Ill CARING}SERI FOReni l



N RAUL TIOS T
201 RUENIA -DAISPROUdeTIVIYAlADWNNR N


present the
S 2011


with partner sponsors

SAvMED


FPL.


vNPT fg CapitalHealth CSX 'i Trcrid northhighland.
i W .,..-.......... ... ....
Accenture ACS Government Solutions Association Studios AT&T
Awards4U Bank of America Merrill Lynch Dominic & Debbie Calabro
Correctional Healthcare Companies Steve & Linda Evans
The Florida Network Florida Transportation Builders' Association
Infinity Software Development* MAXIMUS NorthgateArinso *NSI
Publix Super Markets Charities Tallahassee Memorial Healthcare
Fio"dak Tate Enterpriser-
www.floridataxwatch.org/dpa


E Posturepedic e Posturepedic C Post.trepedic


I
Spirit Wind


$499
Queen 2-pc Set


Salazor


$599
Queen 2-pc Set


Villages


$999
Queen 2-pc Set


Reader's Choice


CUTEST BABY


CONTEST
1 2ND & 3RD Place Prizes to be Awarded for Boys & Girls!

AGES 0-24 MONTHS
Send in the most adorable photograph of your child,
up to 24 months of age, and you could win!


TO ENTER:
Bring your baby's picture along with entry fee ($3b.00)
to the Lake City Reporter,180 E. Duval St., mail to
P.O. Box 1709, Lake City, FL 32056.


WANT TO ENTER ONLINE?
You can e-mail your
photo and information to
ads@lakecityreporter.com.
Subject line: BARY CNTrST


All pictures will be published in the Lake City l i,,re,.
Reporter's July 17, 2011 edition. All voting bal-
lots must be returned to the paper by July 25,
2011. So show off your child, grandchild,
godchild, niece or nephew. /J. .,"
The winners will be published on July 31, 2011 '-

DEADLINE:
July 14th, 2011 -
For More Information or if you are


eretni sted in becoming a sponsor
please Call Mary at 754-0401


OBITUARIES


ri


LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL TUESDAY, JULY 5, 2011


Page Editor: Todd Taylor, 754-0424


I


N








LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL' TUESDAY, JULY 5, 2011


FOURTH: Annual celebration and fireworks show draws a crowd of 25,000
Continued From Page 1A


and come early to sit in the
same spot
"We enjoy it all," Pat
Siter said, "the music, the
fireworks, and the excite-
ment We enjoy relaxing
by the water and this is a
good, clean fun time. We
love to bring our family for
that reason."
Family tradition and
the fireworks show also
drew Mary Tucker of Lake
City and her family to the
event
"We get together as a
family at home and have
barbecue and we kind of
time it just right to come
out and wait for the excit-
ing moment"
Tucker noted her
appreciation to the event's
sponsors for putting on the
show despite tight budgets
all around.
"We're very appreciative


that they're doing it," she
said. "It gives you a lot to
think about with things
going on in the world
today. It makes you reflect
on a lot of things, like
patriotism."
While people said the
fireworks display was the
main attraction, they said
their attendance was also
in celebration of America's
independence.
"Its important to
remember what our free-
dom means and that it
wasn't free," said Jackie
Wood of Lake City.
Her friend, Clarence
Duvall of Lake City,
agreed.
"It's a patriotic thing to
do," he said.
Tammy Luper, from
Hamilton County, said her
family attends to remem-
ber what the country has


---I
JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
-Ron Craig, of Glen St. Mary, helps his son Camron, 2, pick
out watermelon seeds Monday.


sacrificed for indepen-
dence.
"It's remembering our
country and all we went
through to be the great
country we are," she said.
Roger Siter said both he
and his father served in
the U.S. Military, another
reason to celebrate
Independence Day.
"We're very patriotic
people," he said, "and we
enjoy the freedom of our
country."
The fireworks almost
bring tears, Pat Siter said.
"When those fireworks
go off, you feel pride for
your country," she said.
The Lake City/Columbia
County Chamber'of
Commerce coordinated
the event for the second
year in a row, with the
Lake City Reporter as title
sponsor for the eighth
straight year. Reporter pub-
lisher Todd Wilson noted
that Harvey Campbell,
executive director of the
Columbia County Tourist
Development Council,
arranged fundraising for
the event.
Dennille Folsom,
Chamber executive direc-
tor, said thousands more
attended this year due
to surrounding areas
having canceled their
celebrations for budget-
ary reasons. In addition,
some local communities
had their fireworks shows
Sunday, Folsom said,
which drew more people
to Lake City's show on
Monday.
The Chamber hosted
the event to help fulfill its.


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Matthew Harris and his mother Olive take a bite of chilled watermelon Monday before Lake
City's Independence Day celebration. 'Watermelon is great,' Matthew Harris said. 'It's a great
way to cool you off on a day like this.'


mission of making Lake
City a better place to live
and work, Folsom said.
"We think having
events like this strength-
ens our community and
gives people something
to look forward to," she
said.
Wilson said the
community's attendance
proved the significance of
the event and he thanked
the event's supporters.
"Once again, the com-
munity came out and
showed how important
this event is to them," he
said. "Dozens of sponsors
and businesses, and gov-
ernment, worked together
to make this a reality. I
want to thank everybody
for making this event a tre-
mendous success."


'-


I..;.i
1
I
.. 1
,!
!.


... ., .
"- "' .' _, : .

; ,.i ,

....,,* ',L


-


IS ON










SIDE.





Open early, open late.



MERCANTILE BANK'

IS NOW TD BANK.



Visit one of our 1,250+ convenient
locations from Maine to Florida




Bank


America's Most Convenient BankO


1-888-751-9000 www;tdbank.com


LONGEST HOURS LEGENDARY SERVICE HASSLE-fg-SR

rWFDIC TD Bank, N.A.


-- r ,^-'-T-I--i:--

MARLON IVEY BAIL BONDS
DOING CUSTOMERS

S '11telhti n,-r q i o ,:n rn m.rrnr, ,nane 3c ll ,
Office: (386) 208-0645
Cell: (386) 344-2233
Marion IveV 24 Hour
LTD Suety Agent Service

i-, l- -If J I




For Real

: Pain Therapy...


Thera-Gesic' Pain Cream

It Really Works...Compare and SAVE.


Robert Woodard
Edward Jones Financial Advisor
MIAAING SENSE Of INT'E. TiNrG
S'" 148 North Marnon Av.'.
Lake Cqr. FL 32055-3915
Bus. 386-755-1215
TF Fa\ 800-217-2105
TF. 888-752-1215
robert.woodard, 'edwardjones.com
www.edwardjones.com


What Previous Participants Say...
LilyWoodard
ADP
"Because of Dale Carnegie Training, I have been
promoted to a higher position as well as being
accepted into ouir company's Leadership
Development Program.


DAI.: CARNEGIE :TRAIINING


Sponsored by


Lake City
Classes Begin Soon
For information
call 752-3690


Lake City Reporter


i I


Page Editor. Todd Taylor, 754-0424


''
1
'L
L


-II 6


u
.










Story ideas?

Contact
Tim Kirby
Sports Editor
754-0421
tkirby@lakecityreporter.com


Tuesday. July 5 201 I


Lake City Reporter





SPORTS


wvww.lakecityreporter.com


BRIEFS

FORT WHITE FOOTBALL
Team car wash
on Saturday
Fort White High
football players will wash
cars for donations from
8 am. to noon Saturday
at the S&S Food Store
on U.S. Highway 27 in
Fort White.
For details, call Fort
White Quarterback
Club president
Shayne Morgan at
(386) 3974954.

Q-back Club
meeting Monday
The Fort White
Quarterback Club has
an executive
committee meeting
planned for 7 p.m. .
Monday in the teacher's
lounge at the high
school. All board
members are urged to
attend.
The program
committee will meet at
6:30 p.m. prior to.the
executive committee
meeting. All those
helping with the 2011
program are asked to
attend.
SFor details, call
Shayne Morgan at
(386) 397-4954.
CHS SOCCER
Moe's fundraiser
set for July 19
Columbia High's
soccer teams will host a
Moe's Night fundraiser
from 4-8 p.m. July 19 at
Moe's Southwest Grill
on U.S. Highway 90 west
in Lake City. The soccer
program will receive a
percentage of sales.
For details, call
365-1877.
SWIMMING
Lessons offered
July 11-22
Youth and adult
swimming lessons are
offered at the Columbia
County Aquatic Complex.
Classes meet for two
weeks and six daily times
are offered, plus there
are two daily mom and
tot classes.
Three sessions remain
with the' next session
July 11-22. Cost is $50
per person.
Registration is at the
pool (755-8195) from
5-7 p.m. Wednesday and
all day Thursday arid
Friday.
GIRLS SOFTBALL
Crushers clinic
set July 11-15
Columbia Crushers
Softball Organization is
holding an elite softball
clinic for girls of all ages
from 8 am. to noon on
July 11-15. There will be
instruction in the funda-
mentals of fielding and
hitting. Registration is at
Brian's Sports; deadline
is today.
For details, go to
columbiacrushers@gmail.
corn or call 7554271.
YOUTH TENNIS
Johnny Young
offers camps
Johnny Young's Tennis
Camps are offered at The
Country Club at Lake
City at a cost of $65 for
club members and $75
for non-members. The
next clinic is July 18-22.
For details, call Young
at 365-3827.


* From staff reports


COURTESY PHOTO
Members of the Lake City Babe Ruth 9-under All-Stars are (front row, from left) Garrett Fennell, Gavin Justice, Trey Hingson,
Seth Ziegaus, Grayson Martin, Mikah Gustavson and Kameron Couey. Second row (from left) are bat boy Drew Minson,
.Tyler Shelnut, Hunter Shoup, Cal Gilliam, Lance Minson, Sammy Walker and bat boy Nick Shelnut. Back row coaches
(from left) are Lee Minson, manager Todd Gustavson and Larry Martin.


Lake City hosts state all-stars


Local 11U, 9U in
town; 16U softball
in PonteVedra.
By TIM KIRBY
tkirby@lakecityreporter.com
Babe Ruth/Cal Ripken
all-stars state tournaments
continue this week with
Lake City the stage for
three divisions..
Lake City Columbia
County Youth Baseball
will play host to'the Cal


Ripken North Florida State
Tournament in the 9-under
and two 11-under divisions.
Games are at the Southside
Sports Complex, beginning
Thursday.
Lake City Babe Ruth all-
stars will compete in 9-under
and 11-under divisions.
The 11-under all-star tour-
nament has two divisions
- the 11u70 competes on
70-foot base paths, while
the 11u60 uses 60-foot base
paths. Lake City is entered
in the 70-foot division.


As teams representing
the tournament host city,
the Lake City all-stars had
automatic entry into the
field. Lake City's 11-under
All-Stars opted to play in
the District 6 tournament
in Live Oak and defeated
Wakulla in a best-of-three
series. Lake City's 9-under
All-Stars skipped district
and tuned up in a tourna-
ment in Orlando.
The teams and opening
games for the three divi-
sions in the double elimina-


tion format follow.
ll-under/70 all-stars
(seven teams): Lake, City
vs. Tallahassee Myers Park,
9 a.m. Thursday; Bradford
County vs. Orange Park,
11 a.m. Thursday; Wakulla
vs. Jax Beach, 1 p.m.
Thursday; Julington Creek
also is in the field and plays
the Lake City/Myers Park
winner at 9 a.m. Friday.
The other winners in the
first round play at 11 a.m.
ALL-STARS continued on 3B


Path to great


Dale Jr.

down on

Daytona

racing

Love-bug style
drafting weird,
kindawrong.'

By JENNA FRYER
Associated Press
DAYTONA BEACH
Dale Earnhardt Jr. made
it clear he's no fan of the
current style of restric-'
tor plate racing before he S
even arrived at Daytona
International Speedway. :
"I'm not looking forn
ward to going to Daytona,
not with the way the
drafting is there," he said
a week before Saturday
night's race.
"Ifs' really weird and',
kinda wrong on some
levels to race that way,"'
he said'the day the track
opened.,
But if there was any
doubt, he ended it after
a frustrating 19th-place
finish that had his passion-
ate army of fans accusing
Hendrick Motorsports
teammateJimmieJohnson
of sabotaging Earnhardt's
chance to win.
"I am really ticked off.
It was a foolish ... race.
I don't know what to tell;
you," he fumed. "I don't
like this kind of racing
and you know it."
JUNIOR continued on 3B





Less
,'


ASSOCIATED PRESS


Serbia's Novak Djokovic celebrates during the men's singles final against Spain's Rafael Nadal at Wimbledon on Sunday.


No. 1 Djokovic adds Wimbledon championship


By HOWARD FENDRICH
Associated Press
WIMBLEDON, England -
Novak Djokovic is on the path to
greatness, and one way to fully
grasp that is to focus not on his
many successes but instead on a
setback.
Indeed, for all of his accomplish-
ments already in 2011 rising


to the No. 1 ranking Monday;
two Grand Slam titles, including
a victory over Rafael Nadal in the
Wimbledon final Sunday; $7.5 mil-'
lion in prize money; a 48-1 record
- what Djokovic himself.relishes
the most is how he set aside his
lone loss.
He was unbeaten in 43 matches,
dating to the Davis Cup final in
December, until that run ended


against 16-time Grand Slam champi-
on Roger Federer in four sets in last
month's French Open semifinals.
Djokovic could have been dev-
astated. He could have gone into
a tailspin. But after taking a brief
break, he returned to the tour at
Wimbledon and started a new win-
ning streak.
"I'm proud of many things, to
be honest, in this moment, but


something that comes up to my
mind is after having an incred-
ible run, an incredible year up to
Roland Garros, and then losing that
really epic semifinal against Federer
- a great match I managed to
recover and to come back in a great
style and to win Wimbledon for the
first time in my life," Djokovic said
TENNIS continued on 2B


Section B,,,


rrr i I


,If











LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS TUESDAY, JULY 5, 2011


TELEVISION

TV sports

Today
CYCLING
8 a.m.
VERSUS Tour de France, stage 4,
., Lorient to Mur-de-Bretagne, France
MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL
7 p.m.
ESPN Cincinnati at St. Louis
10 p.m.
MLB Regional coverage, 'San
Diego at San Francisco or Detroit at
LA.Angels
SOCCER
Noon
ESPN FIFA, Women's World Cup,
Group B, England'vs. Japan, at Augsburg,
Germany
ESPN2 FIFA, Women's World Cup,
Group B, New Zealand vs. Mexico, at
Sinsheim, Germany
2:30 p.m.
ESPN FIFA, Women's World
Cup, Group A, France vs. Germany, at
Moenchengladbach, Germany
ESPN2 FIFA Women's World Cup,
Group A, Canada vs. Nigeria, at Dresden,
Germany
WNBA BASKETBALL
9 p.m.
ESPN2 Los Angeles at Phoenix

BASEBALL

',AL standings

East Division
W L Pct GB
NewYork 50 32 .610 -
Boston 49 35 .583 2
Tampa Bay 47 38 .553 4'h
Toronto 42 44 .488 10
Baltimore 36 45 .444 13
Central Division
W L Pct GB
Cleveland 44 38 .537 -
Detroit 45 40 .529 'h
Chicago 42 43 .494 3'h.
Minnesota 37 46 .446 71
Kansas City 34 50 .405 II
West Division
W L Pct GB
LosAngeles 44 41 .518 -
Texas 44 41 .518 -
Seattle 41 43 .488 2'
Oakland 38 47 .447 6
Monday's Games
Toronto 9, Boston 7
Minnesota 7,Tampa Bay 0
Seattle at Oakland (n)
N.Y.Yankees at Cleveland (n)
Kansas City at Chicago White Sox (n)
Baltimore at Texas (n)
Detroit at LA.Angels (n)
Today's Games
N.Y. Yankees (Sabathia 11-4) at
Cleveland (C.Carrasco 8-4), 7:05 p.m. ,
Toronto (Cecil 1-3) at Boston (Lester
10-4), 7:10 p.m.
Baltimore. '(Undecided) 'at Texas
(M.Harrisori 6-7), 8:05 p.m.
!Kansas City (F.Paulino 0-2) at Chicago
White.Sox.(Peavy.4 I),8 L.01-pn.m.1
Tampa Bay (Shields 8-5) at Minnesota
(S.Baker 6-5), 8:10 p.m.
Detroit (Verlander 1 1-3) at LA.Angels
(Haren 8-5), 10:05 p.m.
Seattle (FHerhandez 8-7) at Oakland
(Cahill 8-6),10:05'p.m.
Wednesday's Games
Tampa Bay at Minnesota; 1:10 p.m.
Kansas City at Chicago White Sox,
2:10 p.m.
Detroit at LA.Angels, 3:35 p.m.
Seattle at Oakland, 3:35 p.m.
N.Y.Yankees at Cleveland, 7:05 p.m.
Toronto at Boston, 7:10 p.m.
Baltimore at Texas, 8:05 p.m.

Interleague play

Sunday's Games
Detroit 6, San Francisco 3,
Toronto 7, Philadelphia 4
Cincinnati 7, Cleveland 5
N.Y. Mets 3, N.Y.Yankees 2,10 innings
Baltimore 5,Atlanta 4
Tampa Bay 8, St Louis 3
Boston 2, Houston I
Minnesota 9, Milwaukee 7
Chicago Cubs 3, Chicago White Sox I
SKansas City 16, Colorado 8
Oakland 7,Arizona 2
Seattle 3, San Diego I
Florida 6,Texas 4
LA.Angels 3, LA. Dodgers I

NL standings

East Division'
W L Pct GB
-Philadelphia 53 32 .624 -
Atlanta 49 36 .576 4
NewYork 42 42 .500 10'
.Washington 43 43 .500 10%"
Florida 38 46 .452 14'h
Central Division
W L Pet GB
Milwaukee 45 40 .529 -
St. Louis 45 40 .529 -
Pittsburgh 44 41 .518 I
'Cincinnati 43 42 .506 2
Chicago 35 51 .407 10'h
Houston 29 57 .337 16%h
West Division
W L Pct GB
San Francisco 48 37 .565 -
Arizona 45 40 .529 3
Colorado 41 43 .488 64'
San Diego 38 47 .447 10
Los Angeles 37 48 .435 II
Sunday's Game
Pittsburgh I0,Washington 2
Monday's Games
Washington 5, Chicago Cubs 4, 10
innings
Pittsburgh 5, Houston 3
Arizona at Milwaukee (n)
San Diego at San Francisco (n)
Philadelphia at Florida (n)
Cincinnati at St. Louis (n)
Colorado at Atlanta (n)


N.Y. Mets at LA. Dodgers (n)
Today's Games
Chicago Cubs (Ortiz 0-0) at
Washington (Detwiler 0-0), 7:05 p.m.
Houston (W.Rodriguez 6-4) at
Pittsburgh (Karstens 6-4), 7:05 p.m.
Colorado (Chacin 8-5) at Atlanta
(D.Lowe 4-6), 7:10 p.m.
Philadelphia (Hamels 9-4) at Florida
(Volstad 4-7), 7:10 p.m.
Cincinnati (Volquez 5-3) at St. Louis
.Garcia 7-3), 7:15 p.m.
Arizona (Duke 1-3) at Milwaukee


(Wolf 6-5), 8:10 p.m.
N.Y. Mets (Pelfrey 4-7) at LA. Dodgers
(Lilly 5-8), 10:10 p.m.
San Diego (Stauffer 4-5) at San
Francisco (Cain 7-4), 10:15 p.m.
Wednesday's Games
Arizona at Milwaukee, 2:10 p.m.
Chicago Cubs atWashington 7:05 p.m.
Houston at Pittsburgh, 7:05 p.m.
Colorado atAtlanta, 7:10 p.m.
Philadelphia at Florida, 7:10 p.m.
Cincinnati at St. Louis, 8:15 p.m.
N.Y. Mes at LA. Dodgers, 10:10 p.m.
San Diego at San Francisco, 10:15 p.m.

BASKETBALL

WNBA schedule

Sunday's Game
Seattle 73,Washington 63
Today's Games
Seattle at Indiana, 7 p.m.
Washington at Chicago, 8 p.m.
Los Angeles at Phoenix, 9 pm.

TENNIS

Wimbledon champions

Men's Singles Novak Djokovic (2),
Serbia
Women's Singles Petra Kvitova (8),
Czech Republic
Men's Doubles Bob and Mike Bryan
(I), United States
Women's Doubles Kveta Peschke,
Czech Republic, and Katarina Srebotnik
(2), Slovenia
Mixed Doubles Jurgen Melzer,
Austria, and Iveta Benesova (9), Czech
Republic
Gentlemen's Invitational Doubles
- Jacco Eltingh and Paul Haarhuls,
Netherlands
Senior Gentlemen's Invitational
Doubles Pat Cash and Mark
Woodforde,Australia
Ladies' Invitatiohal Doubles Undsay
Davenport, United States, and Martina
HIngis, Switzerland
Boys' Singles Luke Savllle (16),
Australia
Girls' Singles Ashleigh Barry (12),
Australia
Boys' Doubles George Morgan,
Britain, and Mate Pavic (2), Croatia
Girls' Doubles Eugenie Bouchard,
Canada, and Grace Min (2), United States
Men's Wheelchair Doubles -
Maikel Scheffers and Ronald Vink (I),
Netherlands
Women's Wheelchair Doubles -
Esther Vergeer and Sharon Walraven (I),
Netherlands

Tennis singles rankings

WTA
I. Caroline Wozniacki, Denmark, 9915
2. Kim Clijsters, Belgium, 7625
3.Vera Zvonareva, Russia, 6695,
4.Victoria Azarenka, Belarus, 6465
5. Maria Sharapova, Russia, 6141
6. U Na,China,5855 .
7. Petra Kvitova, Czech Republic, 5437
8. Francesca Schiavone, Italy, 4860
9. Marion Bartoli, France, 4230
10. Sam StosurAustralia, 3405
I I.Andrea Petkovic, Germany, 3305
12. Svetlana Kuznetsova, Russia, 3220
13. Anastasia Pavlyuchenkova, Russia,
2995
14. Agnieszka Radwanska, Poland,
2995
I 5.Jelena Jankovic, Serbia, 2775
16. Julia Goerges, Germany, 2715
17. Peng Shuai, China, 2580
18.Ana Ivanovic, Serbia, 2555
I 9.YaninaWickmayer, Belgium, 2470
20. Dominika Cibulkova, Slovakla, 2455
ATP
I.Novak Djokovic, Serbia, 13285
2. Rafael Nadal, Spain, 11270
3. Roger Federer, Switzerland, 9230
4.Andy Murray, Britain, 6855
5. Robin Soderling, Sweden, 4325
6. David Ferrer, Spain, 4150
7. Gael Monflls, France, 2780
8. Mardy Fish, United States, 2650
9. Tomas Berdych, Czech Republic,
2470
10.Andy Roddick, United States,2110
I Richard Gasquet, France, 2105


12. Jurgen Melzer,Austria, 2085
13. Nicolas Almagro, Spain, 1955
14. Jo-WIIfried Tsonga, France, 1945
15. Stanislas Wawrlnka, Switzerland,
1935
16.Viktor Trolckl, Serbia, 1930
17. Mikhail Youzhny, Russia, 1875
18. Gilles Simon, France, 1745
19. Juan Martin del Potro, Argentina,
1625
20. Florian Mayer, Germany, 1555

SOCCER

Women's World Cup

GROUP PLAY
Sunday
Australia 3, Equatorial Guinea 2
Brazil 3, Norway 2
Today
England vs. Japan, 12:15 p.m.
New Zealand vs..Mexlco, 12:15 p.m.
France yt. Germany, 2:45 p.m.
Canada vs. Nigeria, 2:45 pm.
Wednesday
Equatorial Guinea vs. Brazil, Noon
Australia vs. Norway, Noon
Sweden vs. United States,
2:45 p.m.
North Korea vs. Colombia, 2:45 p.m.

CYCLING

Tour de P-ance stages

July 2 Stage I: Passage du Gols
La Barre-de-Monts-Mont des Alouettes
Les Herblers, flat, 191:5 kilometers (119
miles)
July 3 Stage 2: Les Essarts, team
time trial, 23 (14.3) (Garmln-Cervelo;
Thor Hushovd, Norway)
July 4 Stage 3: Olonne-sur-Mer-
Redon, flat, 198 (123.0) (Tyler Farrar,
United States; Hushovd)
July 5 Stage 4: Lorlent-Mur de
Bretagne, flat 172.5 (107.2)
July 6- Stage 5: Carhaix-Cap Frehl,
flat, 164.5 (102.2)
July 7 Stage 6: Dinan-Usleux, flat,
226.5 (140.7)
July 8 -" Stage 7: Le Mans-
Chateauroux, flat, 218 (135.5)
July 9 Stage 8: Aigurand Super-
Besse Sancy, medium mountain, 189
(117.4)
July 10 Stage 9: Issore-Saint-Flour.
medium mountain, 208 (129.2)
July II Rest day in Le Lioran
Cantal.
July 12-Stage 10-Aurillac-Carmaux,
flat, 158 (98.2)
July 13 Stage I I: Blaye-les-Mines-
Lavaur, flat, 167.5 (104.1)
July 14 Stage 12: Cugnaux-Luz-
Ardiden, high mountain, 211 (131.1)
July 15 Stage 13: Pau--Lourdes,
high mountain, 152.5 (94.8)
July 16 Stage 14: Saint-Gaudens--
Plateau de Bellle, high mountain, 168.5
(104.7)
July 17 Stage IS: Limoux-
Montpellier, ait, 192.5 (119.6)*
SJuly 18-e Rest day in the Drome
region.
July 19 Stage 16: Saint-Paul-Trobs-
Chateaux-Gap, medium mountain, 162.5
(101)l
July 20 Stage 17: Gap-Plnerolo,
Italy, high mountain, 179 (111.2)
July 21 Stage 18: Pinerolo--Galbler
Serre-Chevaller, high mountain, 200.5
(124.6)
July22-Stage 19:ModaneValfrejus-
Alpe-d'Huez, high mountain, 109.5 (68.0)
July' 23 Stage 20: Grenoble, indi-
vidual time trial, 42.5 (26.4)
July 24 Stage 21: Cretell-Paris
SChamps-Elysees, flat, 95 (59)
Total- 3,430 (2131.2)
ThirdStage
(A 123-mile flat stage from
Olonne-sur-Mer to Redon)
I.Tyler Farrar, United States, Garmin-
Cervelo, 4 hours, 40 minutes, 21 seconds.
2. Romain Felllu, France, Vacansolell-
DCM, same time.
3. Jose Joaquin Rojas, Spain, Movistar,
same time.
4. Sebastien Hinault, France,AG2R La
Mondiale, same time.
I 5. Mark Cavendish, Britain, HTC-
Highroad, same time.


THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME
by David L. Hoyt and Jeff Knurek


Unscramble these four Jumbles,
one letter to each square,
to form four ordinary words.


DELDUC I




TTETAS
I 1
___^L __


THE PSCUSSION
ABOUT THE WEATHER
WA5 THIS.
Now arrange the circled letters
to form the surprise answer, as
suggested by the above cartoon.


Print your answer here:
(Answers tomorrow)
SYestJumbles: MADLY DITCH THRUSH VOLUME
SAnswer: When they decided to create the Declaration of
Independence, they did this MADE HISTORY


Watney wins AT&T


Associated Press

NEWTOWN SQUARE, Pa. Nick
Watney capped off an amazing weekend
at Aronimink to win the AT&T National on
Sunday, moving him to No. 10 in the world
and atop the PGA Tour money list for the
first time in his career.
Watney followed his 8-under 62 on
Saturday with a 66 on a steamy afternoon
in the Philadelphia suburbs, making three
big par saves and three birdies on the
front nine to seize control, then holding
off a late charge by KJ. Choi (67) for a
two-shot victory.
Watney finished on 13-under 267,
tying the tournament record by Tiger
Woods in 2009 when it was played at
Congressional.
Charles Howell III earned quite a con-
solation prize. He played bogey-free in the
final round for a 6-under 66 to tie for third
with Adam Scott (68) and Jeff Overton
(67). That made Scott eligible for the
British Open as the top finisher from the
top five who wasn't already exempt
Rickie Fowler, who shared the lead with
Watney going into the final round, fell out
of the hunt early with a double bogey on
the second hole and closed with a 74 to tie
for 13th.

Montreal Championship

BLAINVIILE, Quebec John Cook
won the Montreal Championship for his
third Champions Tour title of the year,
closing with a 6-under 66 for a tourna-
ment-record 21-under 195 total.
Cook, the runner-up last year at
Fontainebleau Golf Club, beat Taiwan's
Lu Chien-soon (70) by three strokes. Joey
Sindelar (68) was third at 17 under.
Bill Glasson (64), Corey Pavin (67) and
Dan Forsman (68) were another stroke
back. Canadian Rod Spittle broke the course
record with a 62 to finish at 15 under.


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Nick Watney hits to the 18th green from the
fairway during the final round of the AT&T
National golf tournament at Aronimink Golf
Club in Newtown Square, Pa., on Sunday.

French Open

SAINT-QUENTIN-EN-YVELINES,
France France's Thomas Levet won the
French Open, closing with a 1-under 70 in
windy conditions for a one-stroke victory
over Denmark's Thorbjotn Olesen and
England's Mark Foster.
Martin Kaymer (73) was three
strokes back in fourth place. The PGA,
Championship winner will overtake U.S.
Open champion Rory McIlroy for No. 3 in
the world ranking.


TENNIS: Rebound from French loss

Continued From Page 1B


Monday morning at the All
England Club.
"I think that's some-
thing that I maybe wasn't
managing to do in the
past," he added, "and right
now, I am able to mentally
switclr off and just recover
quickly and look to the next
challenge."
The key, Djokovic
explained, was thathe didn't
allow himself to get too low
after losing to Federer.
That was a problem for
Djokovic in the past, such
as when he went through
what he called "a crisis"
during the first half of 2010.
He lost in the quarterfinals
at the Australian Open and


French Open both times
frittering away substantial
leads and in one stretch
played in five consecutive
tournaments without ever
winning more than three
matches in a row.
He dwelled on those
defeats.
"But now I just didn't'
allow myself to get to that'
position anymore, because
it's just not worth it It's
sport You win; you lose,"
Djokovic said. "And I
have played good (against
Federer). I didn't have any-
thing to regret, because the
(other) player was .better
that day. So I just needed
to sleep, get some rest and


ACROSS 39 Veep's boss
40 Listener's need
Caribou kin 41 Molecular biol-
Entranced ogy topic
Wide st. 43 Boot uppers
Luke, to Darth 46 'Miffed, plus
Parka feature 50 Psyche's suitor
Feast with poi 51 Like many red-
Silhouettes heads
WWW address- 54 Its HQ is
es Brussels
Carter prede- 55 Forum site
cessor 56 Diego
Euclid, e.g. Chargers
Part of LAX 57 Bit of news
CSA defender 58 "Annie Get -
Mountain- Gun"
dweller of Iraq 59 Mouths, in
Tel. or elec. zoology


Frozen
Spring bloom
Leo mo.
Haw opposite
Unnaturally
pale
- out (relax)
Type of cracker
Sort
- majeste


DOWN


Sports channel
Petty or
Loughlin
Kentucky fort
Jungle charger
Yahoo! rival
Edgar Allan -


come here and perform
my best And I have done'
that"
Among the things on the;
24-year-old Serb's career
'To Do" list new are add-
ing championships at the
two major tournaments he
hasn't won the French
Open and the U.S. Open,
where he was the runner-
up to Federer in 2007, and
to Nadal last year and a
prolonged stay at No. 1.
"This is what I'm made
for: I want to win. I'm a
professional. I want to win
more majors, more titles,"
he said. "Obviously, the
U.S. Open is the next big
thing."


Answer to Previous Puzzle


0 RO K EANU EV A




SCALED TO IERS


I S T IAIRIE


C PA LA W NI OIW E R


PODNR SETSSET

MOIDESIEITISMSITIA


Six-pointers
Book jacket ad
Fisher's fly
Glen
Nightfall
Dog-ears


Want more puzzles?
Check out the "Just Right Crossword Puzzles" books
at QuillDriverBooks.com


19 Hair goop
21 More unctu-
ous
22 Equipped
23 Fruit or bird
24 Russian range
25 Skater's haunt
27 Work da.
28 Operatic
prince
29 Grant
30 Roll-call votes
36 Kind of plug
38 Scale notes
40 salts
42 More pleasant
43 "I came," to
Caesar
44 Trapped like

45 Dust particle
47 Plus
48 Run like crazy
49 Novelist -
Ferber
51 Saute
52 Kanga's kid
53 "Down under"
bird


7-5 2011 UFS, Dist. by Univ. Uclick for UFS


SCOREBOARD


donate A Boat

or Car Today!

Boa4'Angel


"2-Nlght Free Vacation!"



www.boatangel.cowm
\ uangthlimiatiuaBu M BIUUMiMWU UN


-


Page Editor: Tim Kirby, 754-0421


(


L















SSome lockouts




sports could use


ASSOCIATED PRESS
In this June 19 photo, Toronto Blue Jays outfielder Jose Bautista bats in an interleague
baseball game in Cincinnati. Bautista received the most votes in fan balloting for starting
spots in the Major League Baseball All-Star game on July 12.



Bautista top vote-getter


for MLB All-Star game


By BEN WALKER
Associated Press

NEW YORK Joel
Hanrahan planned to spend
the break buying a couch.
Matt Joyce figured to be out
on a boat Ryan Vogelsong,
well, there was no telling
where he might be these
days.
They're now all headed
to the All-Star game, part of
the rosters released Sunday
after fans, players and
managers had their say on
who should be in Phoenix
on July 12.
Milwaukee's Prince
Fielder and Rickie Weeks
were among several players
who overcame voting defi-
cits in the final'week to earn
.starting spots. Dodgers out-
fielder Matt Kemp, Mets
shortstop Jose Reyes and
Detroit catcher Alex Avila
rallied to claim slots, too.
Overtaken by Avila,
New York Yankees catcher'
Russell Martin felt relieved.
"He's got much better
numbers than I do. I'm glad
he's going to get the start,"
said Martin, who still made
the AL team as a backup. "I
was kind of worried about
that, actually."
Derek Jeter and Alex


All-Star final voting
American League
CATCHER I, Alex Avila, Tigers,
4,144,384. 2, Russell Martin, Yankees,
3,646,033.3,Joe Mauer.Twins, 2,308,436.4,
Jarrod Saltalamacchia, Red Sox, 2,183,113.
5, Yorvit Torrealba, Rangers, 1,810,755.
6, Carlos Santana, Indians, 1,501,053. 7,
J.P Arencibia, Blue Jays, 1,024,020. 8, A.J.
Pierzynski,White Sox, 963,463.'
FIRST BASE I, Adrian Gonzalez,
Red Sox, 6,034,533. 2, Mark Teixeira,
Yankees, 4,174,690. 3, Miguel Cabrera,
Tigers, 3,473,849. 4, Mitch Moreland,
Rangers, 1,680,462.5, Paul Konerko,White
*Sox, 1,323,853. 6, Adam Lind, Blue Jays,
860,203.7, Justin Morneau,Twins, 781,717.
8, Matt LaPorta, Indians, 750,953.
SECOND BASE I, Robinson Cano,
Yankees, 6,679,976. 2, Dustin Pedroia, Red
Sox, 4,391,835. 3, lan Kinsler, Rangers,
2,729,450. 4, Orlando Cabrera, Indians,
1,538,135. 5, Ben Zobrist, Rays, 1,245,709.
6, Howie Kendrick, Angels, 1,079,227. 7,
Will RhymesTigers,671,674.8,Aaron Hill,
Blue Jays, 587,179.
THIRD BASE I, Alex Rodriguez,
Yankees, 5,277,823. 2, Adrian Beltre,
Rangers, 4,036,191. 3, Kevin Youkilis,
Red Sox, 4,018,641. 4, Evan Longoria,
Rays, 2,804,004. 5, Brandon Inge, Tigers,
1,113,787. 6, Maicer Izturis, Angels,
666,828. 7, Mike Aviles. Royals, 602,091.8,
Edwin Encarnacion, Blue Jays, 505,015.
SHORTSTOP I, Derek Jeter,
Yankees, 4,536,386. 2, Asdrubal Cabrera,
Indians, 4,073,992.3, Elvis Andrus, Rangers,
2,698,902. 4, Jhonny Peralta, Tigers,
2,301,524. 5, Marco Scutaro, Red Sox,
1,642,606. 6, Yunel Escobar, Blue Jays,
1, 104,761. 7, J.J. Hardy, Orioles, 956,073.8,
Alexei Ramirez,White Sox, 946,442.
DESIGNATED HITTER I, David
Ortiz, Red Sox, 6,324,793. 2, Michael
Young, Rangers, 3,072,467. 3, Victor


Rodriguez are among six
Yankees on the AL side.
Philadelphia, having
built the best record in the
majors on pitching, pro-
vided aces Roy Halladay,
Cliff Lee and Cole Hamels.
Adrian Gonzalez and David
Ortiz led a Boston quartet.
The Milwaukee trio of
Ryan Braun, Fielder and
Weeks will form a mini-
Brew Crew in the desert,
a nice nod to a team known
more for sausage races than
pennant races.
"It means the Milwaukee
Brewers have arrived on the
national scene," said Braun,
the top NL vote-getter.
* The small-market
Brewers celebrated -their
largest haul of All-Star
starters. Milwaukee draws
a lot of attention for its in-
game dash of meat mascots
- the team, however, has
made the playoffs just once
since 1982.
The World Series cham-
pion San Francisco Giants
added four arms, including
Vogelsong.
Vogelsong will certainly
be among the feel-good
stories. At 33, he'd spent
the previous four years in
Japan and the minors before
getting called up early this


Martinez,Tigers, 2,302,988.4,Jorge Posada,
Yankees, 1,998,551. 5, Johnny Damon,
Rays, 1,303,471. 6, Travis Hafner, Indians,
1,206,971. 7, Vladimir Guerrero, Orioles,
1, 136,364. 8, Billy Butler, Royals, 891,940.
QUTFIELD I, Jose Bautista, Blue
Jays, 7,454,753. 2, Curtis Granderson,
Yankees, 6,683,877. 3, Josh Hamilton,
Rangers, 4,646,394. 4, Jacoby Ellsbury,
Red Sox, 4,609,667. 5, Carl Crawford,
Red Sox, 3,213,581, 6, Nelson Cruz,
Rangers, 2,704,249. 7, Ichiro Suzuki,
'Mariners, 2,528,532. 8, Nick Swisher,
Yankees, 2,277,856. 9, Brett Gardner,
Yankees, 2,064,372. I 0,J.D. Drew, Red Sox,
2,009,877. 1 Matt Joyce, Rays, 1,597,334.
12, Jeff Francoeur, Royals, 1,505,399. 13,
David Murphy, Rangers, 1,458,420. 14,
Grady Sizemore, Indians, 1,283,993. 15,
Austin Jackson, Tigers, 1,254,267. 16,
Carlos Quentin, White Sox, 1,218,968.
17, Melky Cabrera, Royals, 1,201,982. 18,
Shin-Soo Choo, Indians, 1.158,749.19,Alex
Gordon, Royals, 1,120,683. 20, B.J, Upton,
Rays, 1,081,270. 21, Magglio Ordonez,
Tigers, 1,008,145. 22,Torii Hunter,Angels,
927,271. 23, Sam Fuld, Rays, 916,219. 24,
Michael Brantley, Indians, 878,556.
National League
CATCHER I,Brian McCann, Braves,
4,698,838. 2, Yadier Molina, Cardinals,
2,972,786.3,BusterPosey,Giants,2,418,923.
4; Jonathan Lucroy, Brewers, 2,271,498. 5,
Ramon Hernandez, Reds, 2,056,263. 6,.
Carlos Ruiz, Phillies, 1,864,675. 7, Ivan
Rodriguez, Nationals, 1,225,342. 8, Miguel
Montero, Diamondbacks, 1,149,461.
FIRST BASE- I Prince Fielder,Brewers,
4,864,523. 2, Joey Votto, Reds, 4,254,305.
3, Albert Pujols, Cardinals, 4,171,094. 4,
Ryan Howard, Phillies, 2,563.736. 5, Freddie
Freeman, Braves, 957,816. 6, Brandon Belt,
Giants, 917,044.7, Ike Davis, Mets, 824,681.
8,Todd Helton, Rockies, 761,928.
SECOND BASE I, Rickie Weeks,
Brewers, 4,460,395. 2, Brandon Phillips,


season.
"There's never been a
time in my career when this
seemed like even a real-
istic possibility," he said,
choking up while discuss-
ing his selection. "A year
ago, almost to the day, I got
released and didn't know if
I would ever pitch again."
Thisyear's squadincludes,,
13 first-time All-Stars in the
AL and 11 in the NL, with
Hanrahan among them.
The closer is Pittsburgh's
lone representative and said
he won't mind changing his
vacation plans.
Toronto outfielder Jose
Bautista, the reigning home
run champion, drew a
record 7.4 million votes. He
became the first Blue Jays
player elected to start since
Carlos Delgado in 2003.
Bautista homered
Saturday off Halladay, then
hit his major league-leading
27th homer Sunday against
Philadelphia's Cliff Lee.
"People are recognizing
that you're doing well and
for 'me it's been in three
different territories the
United States and Canada
and the Dominican,"
Bautista said. "I can't even
describe how good that
feels."


Reds, 4,273,079. 3, Chase Utley, Phillies,
3,345,845. 4, Freddy Sanchez, Giants,
1,627,733. 5, Dan. Uggla, Braves, 1,583,903.
6, Neil Walker, Pirates, 993,369. 7, Kelly
Johnson, Diamondbacks, 862,204. 8, Skip
Schumaker, Cardinals, 856,658.
THIRD BASE I, Placido Polanco,
Phillies, 4,410,701.2, ChipperJones, Braves,
2,849,578. 3, Scott Rolen, Reds, 2,251,425.
4, Pablo Sandoval, Giants, 2,213,057. 5,
David Wright, Mets, 2,106,800. 6, Casey
McGehee, Brewers, 1,877,744. 7, Aramis
Ramirez, Cubs, 1,192,220. 8, Ryan
Zimmerman, Nationals, 137,696.
SHORTSTOP I, Jose Reyes, Mets,
4,707,976. 2, Troy Tulowitzki, Rockies,
3,932,000. 3, Jimmy Rollins, Phillies,
2,311,689. 4, Yuniesky Betancourt,
Brewers, 1,695,431. 5, Stephen Drew,
Diamondbacks, 1,523,919. 6, Alex
Gonzalez, Braves, 1,476,368. 7, Miguel
Tejada, Giants, 1,265,544. 8, Paul Janish,
Reds, 1,168,551.
OUTFIELD I, Ryan Braun, Brewers,
5,928,004. 2, Lance Berkman) Cardinals,
4,345,766. 3, Matt Kemp, Dodgers,
4,293,626. 4, Matt Holliday, Cardinals,
3,948,268. 5, Jay Bruce, Reds, 3,218,003.
6, Andre Ethier, Dodgers, 3,013,030. 7,
Carlos Beltran, Mets, 2,631,991. 8, Shane
Victorino, Phillies, 2,370,351. 9, Corey
Hart, Brewers, 1,875,897. 10, Justin
Upton, Diamondbacks, 1,845,385. II,
Carlos Gonzalez, Rockies, 1,733,281.
12, Jason Heyward, Braves, 1,715,925.
13, Raul Ibanez, Phillies, 1,641,389. 14,
Drew Stubbs, Reds, 1,572,673. 15, Carlos
Gomez, Brewers, 1,508,939. 16, Andrew
McCutchen, Pirates, 1,343,144. 17, Hunter
Pence, Astros, 1,315,276. 18, Jonny
Gomes, Reds, 1,310,142. 19, Martin Prado,
Braves, 1,296,763. 20, Alfonso Soriano,
Cubs, 1,282;608. 21, Aubrey Huff, Giants,
1,240,980.22, Chris Young, Diamondbacks,
1,151,443. 23, Ben Francisco, Phillies,
1,124,361.24, Jason Bay, Mets, I,114,574.


* Commentary

By TIM DAHLBERG
Associated Press
he NFL lockout
has been going
on for months,
and the NBA
lockout could
drag on even longer. The
word lockoutitself is
becoming an unwelcome
addition to bar room
debates across the
country.
But maybe lockouts
aren't such a bad idea
after all. Imagine what
would happen if we locked
out some of these sports
figures:
BUBBA WATSON:
Take away this guy's
passport before he gives
new meaning to the term
Ugly American. Watson's
grand adventure in France
last week began with him
wondering out loud what
the Arc de Triomphe and
the Louvre were, then
somehow got worse. The
gglfer complained about
everything but the food
after missing the cut in
the French Open, and
said it might be his last
time playing in Europe.
Watson later reconsidered
after being told the British
Open one of golfs four
majors was in England.
DEREK JETER: I
understand the need to
instinctively bow to the
greatness that is Derek
Jeter, but even he should
be embarrassed to be
starting at shortstop for
the American League in
the All-Star game. Hold a
Parade for him if you want
when he reaches 3,000
hits, but save the starting
job for. someone,really
having an All-Star season.
GRUNTING WOMEN:
Wimbledon is usually
such a civilized place, with
the queen dropping by
occasionally andeveryone
slurping strawberries and
cream. Then the women
take the court, and it
starts sounding like some
deranged animals have


escaped from the London
Zoo. The beginning of'
the great grunting craze
is generally credited to
Monica Seles, but players
like Maria Sharapova and
Victoria Azarenka have
elevated it to new decibel
levels.
DAVID HAYE: A lot
of people thought Haye
would bring excitement
back to boxing's
heavyweight division. A
lot of people were wrong.
Haye pulled off one of the
biggest frauds in boxing
by hyping himself as the
next great heavyweight
champion to get a
lucrative fight against
Wladimir Klitschko, only
to forget to fight once he
got there. If that wasn't
embarrassing enough,
Haye blamed it all on a
broken toe, leading to a
bizarre sce.
NIKE: Michael Vick,
signed to a new
endorsement contract.
Enough said.-
HOT DOGS: Here's a
lockout that needs to end.
Six-time champ Takeru
Kobayashi remains
banned from the Coney
Island Fourth of July
hot dog eating contest
because he refuses to
sign a contract with Major
League Eating. Without
Kobayashi, big eating Joey
"Jaws" Chesnut is favored
to win a fifth straight
championship, but surely
eating aficionados
everywhere would have
relished the thought
of more mustard flying
between these two icons.
SCOREBOARD
OPERATORS: They can
figure out time left to the
tenth of a second in the
NBA, and overturn a call
by the length of a
fingernail in the NFL Yet
the scoreboard
operator in Seattle has
trouble counting to four.
The Mariners lost a :
game Saturday when San
Diego's Cameron Maybin
drew a walk on what was
really only the third ball
and came around to score.


Which begs a question:
Don't umpires use clickers
anymore?
TIGER WOODS: Take
away his parking spot at
the British Open. Ban
him from the champion's
locker room at the PGA
Championship. Last seen
Sunday with new facial
hair and without his clubs
at the tournament his
foundation sponsors near
Philadelphia, its time
for Woods to admit the
obvious and give up on
yet another lost season.
-Besides, after what Rory
McIlroy did in the U.S.
Open, who needs him
anyway?
CHIP KELLY: The
Oregon football coach
should be locked out of
his office if he doesn't
come forward and explain
why the university paid
$25,000 to become the
first client of a Texas
scouting service run by a
man who was a mentor to
a top running back recruit
who, coincidentally, signed
just before the payment
was made.
LANCE
ARMSTRONG: Actually,
he's already locked out
of the Tour de France,
the only bike race most
Americans care about
That leaves us free to
enjoy watching one rider
we've never heard of who
swdars he's not doping
chase another rider we've
never heard of who swears
he's riot doping.
And, finally, maybe it's
time to lock out
Mr. Lockout David Stern
has now presided over two
lockouts at the behest of
owners who pay him
millions to make them
even more millions.
If this one costs the
league a full season, then
it should cost Stern
his legacy as the
commissioner who
rescued the NBA.

* Dahlberg is a national
sports columnist for The
Associated Press. Write to
him at tdahlberg@)ap.oty.


JUNIOR: Prefers to control destiny


Continued From Page 11
Earnhardt didn't appear
to be "ticked off' at
Johnson, the teammate he
partnered with for the sec-
ond consecutive plate race.
He had pushed Johnson to
the win at Talladega.
There once was a
time when Earnhardt
didn't need help to win at
Daytona, when he could
just slice his way to the
front and hold off a train
of traffic in the closing
laps. That's how he did it
10 years ago, on his first


visit to the track follow-
ing his father's fatal acci-
dent in the 2001 Daytona
50(. And that's how he did
it 17 months ago, when
he charged from 10th to
second in the final two laps
of the season-opener.
But, drivers now need to
create a two-car hookup to
get around Daytona.
"I'd rather have control
of my own destiny and be
able to go out there and
race and just do my own
work and worry about my


own self," 'Earnhardt said
on Thursday. "Been grow-
ing up all these years racin'
for No. 1, looking' out for
No. 1, doing my job. This
is what I need to do, I
need to do this to get up
through the pack. This is
how my car drives. Now
you are doing it so differ-
ent Your thought process
and everything you think
about during the race is
nothing near that
"It is just different and
weird."


ALL-STARS: 8U A' squad 1-2 at state


Continued From Page 11
Friday and three elimina-
tion games follow, begin-
ning at 1 p.m. Saturday
games begin at 9 a.m. and
the championship game
is scheduled for 9 a.m.
Sunday.
9-under all-stars (five
teams): Lake City vs. Jax
Beach, 11 a.m. Thursday;
Suwannee Valley vs.
Julington Creek, 1 p.m.
Thursday; Orange Park
vs. Lake City/Jax Beach
winner, 5 p.m. Thursday.
Friday play has the
winner's bracket game
at 1 p.m. and elimination
games at 11 a.m. and 3 p.m.
Saturday's games begin at
9 a.m. with the champion-
ship game set for 1 p.m.
l1-under/60 all-stars
(three teams): Orange Park
vs. Tallahassee Meridian
Park, 9 a.m. Thursday;
Mandarin Athletic vs.
Orange Park/Meridian
Park winner, 3 p.m. *
The elimination game


is 9 a.m. Friday and the
championship game is
3 p.m. Friday.

Lake City's 16-under
Babe Ruth Softball
All-Stars are playing this
week in the Florida State
Championships in Ponte
Vedra. Lake City won, the
District 4 tournament.,
The double elimination
tournament has a seven-
team field, with the top
two teams qualifying to
advance to regional play in
Richmond, Va.
Lake City plays Branford
at 3 p.m. Wednesday in
the opening game of the
tournament.
Other Wednesday games
are Keystone vs. Ocala at.
5 p.m. and Altamonte vs.
Creeks at 7 p.m. MSA plays
the Lake City/Branford
winner at 1 p.m. Thursday
and a winner's bracket
game follows at 3 p.m.
Elimination games


are Friday at 1:15 p.m.,
5:15 p.m. and 7 p.m.
Saturday's two games are
at 7 p.m. The loser's brack-
et final is 11 a.m. Sunday,
followed by the champion-
ship game at 1 p.m.

Lake City's 8-under "A"
All-Stars played in the Babe
Ruth/Cal Ripken Rookie
State Tournament over the
weekend in Palm Beach
Gardens.
The Lake City team
made the state field as a
bracket winner in the Babe
Ruth/Cal Ripken Rookie
Qualifier.
Lake City opened with
a 9-8 win over Longwood
on Friday, but fell in the
next two games. Lakeland
Highlands nipped Lake
City, 11-9, on Saturday and
Orange Park won 14-8 on
Sunday.
Longwood came back to
win the bracket and Orange
Park was runner-up.


LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS TUESDAY, JULY 5, 2011


Page Editor: Tim Kirby, 754-0421









LAKE CITY REPORTER ADVICE & COMICS TUESDAY, JULY 5, 2011


DILBERT


BABY BLUES


BLONDIE


BEETLE BAILEY


HAGARTHE HORRIBLE


DEAR ABBY


Readers run hot and cold on

toilet brush in dishwasher


DEAR ABBY: The let-
ter from "Turned Off in
Texas" (May 18) caught
my attention. While I
agree that putting a toilet
brush in the dishwasher.
with the dishes was unex-
pected and off-putting -
- we don't ever want to
link the toilet with our
food I think your answer
showed a little overreac-
tion. Running the dishes
in another cycle should
take care of any concerns
as long as the water is
hot.
Studies have shown
that the inside of the aver-'
age public toilet bowl is
not as bacteria-laden as a
public drinking fountain.
Our disgust is emotional,
not likely fact-based. As
I told a colleague during
his wife's baby shower,
you have to believe in the
power of soap and water
or you won't survive par-
enthood.
While it's worthwhile
for 'Turned Off' to tell
his stepdaughter that this
practice is unacceptable to
him, it is no reason not to
eat at her house unless
she'd not cooking food
properly. FACTS OVER
EMOTION IN MIAMI
DEAR FACTS: Thank
you foryour letter. Frankly,
Swas as grossed out by
what "Turned Off' saw
his stepdaughter do as he


Abigail Van Buren
ww.deorabby.com

was. So it surprised me to
find that many of my read-
ers weren't as affected by
the "ew" factor. Read on:
DEAR ABBY: It's pos-
sible that what 'Turned
Off' perceived to be a toi-
let brush was never used.
for cleaning a toilet. I
bought a brand-new toilet
scrubber to keep under
the kitchen sink. I use it
only for cleaning the gar-
bage disposal. Afterward,
I wash it in the sink, not
the dishwasher. Let's
give the stepdaughter
the benefit of the doubt.
Things are not always
what they appear to be.
-- NOT DISGUSTED IN
ARCADIA, CALIF.
DEAR ABBY: I can top
the letter from the gentle-
man who said his step-
daughter, after cleaning his
house when his wife fell ill,
put the toilet brush in the
dishwasher. My daughter
has a close friend who told
* her she and her husband
,put the cat's litterbox in
the dishwasher when they
Want to clean it. I was mor-


tified, as was my daughter.
You'd never guess it she's
an otherwise clean-appear-
ing person. Well, needless
to say, we no longer eat
at this woman's home. -
- ANONYMOUS IN
CONNECTICUT
DEAR ABBY: I clean
houses for a living arid
I thought it was a smart
way to wash that scrub-
ber. The dishwasher uses
scalding hot water that
kills all germs. In addition,
most toilet cleansers con-
tain bleach, so there is little
chance germs could survive
on the brush. If you're still
concerned, you could run
it through the dishwasher
separately. -- TERESA IN
TENNESSEE
DEAR ABBY: I am a
retired doctor. I have been
in the Army, slept in the
woods and eaten three-day-
old food so I know a little
bit about germs. The hot
water and soap will take
care of any bacteria on the
brush. (It's unaesthetic, but
not unsanitary.) The brush
will be as clean as your
hands are when you wash
them after using the toilet.
I would be happy to eat off
the plates that came out of
that dishwasher. -- DR. M..

* Write Dear Abby at
www.DearAbby.com or
P.O. Box 69440, Los
Angeles, CA 90069.


HOROSCOPES


SNUFFY SMITH


ZITS


GARFIELD


B.C.


FRANK & ERNEST


ARIES (March 21-
April 19): Put greater
emphasis on performance.
The way you handle your-
self under pressure will
impress someone who can
help you advance. Donntt
let a bad vibe at home get
you down. If someone is
being difficult, keep your
distance. ***
TAURUS (April 20-
May 20): Take time to
have fun and explore new
avenues. Opportunities
will develop through the
people and pastimes you
encounter. Romance is in
the stars, so engage in an
activity conducive to love.

GEMINI (May 21-
June 20): Being playful
is good, but donnt have
fun at the expense of
someones feelings. You
have to be careful not to
say something that will
cause an emotional mis-
hap. Put your effort into
moneymaking proposals
or projects that expand
your interests. **
CANCER (June 21-
July 22): Make the first
move. Say what's on your
mind tactfully. Use your
insight when dealing with
emotional matters. A part-
nership will enable you to
build a secure and. stable
connection with someone.

LEO (July 23-Aug.
22): Nothing should mat-
ter aas much as what you


THE LAST WORD
Eugenia Last

have to. accomplish. Look
at the big picture and
donnt let the little things
get you down. If you are
calculating and precise,
you will fit everything in
to your schedule and still
leave room for something
new. ***
VIRGO (Aug. 23-
Sept. 22): Donnt be
afraid to show your emo-
tions. You stand a better
chance of getting what
you want if you are open
about the way you feel.
Changes at home or to
your geographical loca-
tion will pay off. Focus
on creativity, innova-
tion and, most of all,
romance. ***
LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct.
22): Get busy fixing up
your house, or planning
for something you want to
host. Do your best to sign
paperwork that can lead
to a secure future. Donnt
let someone or something
you love sway you from
making the right decision.

SCORPIO (Oct. 23--
Nov. 21): Say less and
do more. Once you have
established your priorities
and shown everyone what
you can do, the rest will fall
.into place. Love is on the
rise and a commitment will
help change your life for


the better. ****
SAGHITARIUS (Nov.
22-Dec. 21): Donrt get
angry over an emotional
matter. That is what every-
one expects and will criti-
cize. Instead, make the nec-
essary changes to alter a
situation that is bothering
you without making a fuss.
**
CAPRICORN (Dec.
22-Jan. 19): Set your
goals and stick to your
plans. Don't let a mishap
or someones change
of heart stand in the
way of your accomplish-
ments. Love is in the
stars, but'if you donut
do something conducive
to romance, you aren't
likely to enjoy the ben-
efits. *****
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-
Feb. 18): Donnt push
your luck when dealing
with friends, relatives or
neighbors. You have to
make allowances for others
if you want to keep things
running smoothly. Work
toward making your home
user-friendly. ***
PISCES (Feb. 19-
March 20): Love looks
very promising. Take the
initiative to make things
happen. Spend time devel-
oping a creative idea and
you will find a way to mar-
ket it successfully. You can
take care of a problem that
has been holding you back
if you go directly to the
source. ***


CELEBRITY CIPHER

by Luis Campos
Celebrity Cipher cryptograms are created from quotations by famous people, past ind present.
Each letter in the cipher stands for another.
Today's clue: E equals B
"PZH ZCFZTCFZP AN RL WZCTOZAAO
YIM RIXCDF RL EBAPZHB TISFZ MA
ZIBO PZIP NAAO WIRH ASP AN ZCM
DAIM H." FI BBCMAD XHCTTAB
PREVIOUS SOLUTION: "Sink or swim, live or die, survive or perish with my
country was my unalterable determination." John Adams
(c) 2011 by NEA, Inc. 7-5


FOR BETTER OR WORSE


R NI 1 USING HI6 SMARTPHONE
/ TO SARCO TH WNT FOR

ESTATLISiMENTS.
-I'M NOT G6TTIN6
S ANY AgA
-* CWt. vi 7-S


Page Editor: Emogene Graham, 754-0415


. .


\r-'-"l, y /-.5


CLASSIC PEANUTS











Classified Department: 755-5440


LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED TUESDAY, JULY 5,2011

Lake City Reporter





CLASSIFIED


Take ADvantage of the
Reporter Classifieds!

755-5440


- ADvantage


One Item per ad
4 lines 6 days ah additional
Rate applies to private individuals selling
person merchandise totalling $100 or less.
Each Item must Include a price
This s a on-reundable rate.




One item per ad d1. onal
4 lines 6 days^^^a0^ |
Rate applies to private Individuals selling
personal merchandi totalling500 or less






Rate applies to private Individuals selling
personal mrchandise totalling $1,000 or less.
Each item must include a price.
This Is a naon-trefunaledi .



One Iem r ad 3
4 lines 6 6 day Each additional
4 lines 6 days ~hne $1.45
Rate applies to private Individuals selling
personal merchandise totalling $2,500 or less.,
mis al hon atn-re vu2n F a s .M




One Item per ad H .. |
4 lines 6 days Each additional

This Is a non-refundable rate.




One Item per ad X^ V^
4 lines days 1ah ddtional
Rate applies to private Individuals selling
personal merchandise totalling $6,000 or less.
Each item must include a price.
This Is a non-refund Is ra^


4 fines 50
3 days 1 5
lIcldis I Signs Eaih addl onal Irip 1 65



Limited to service type advertis-
ing only.
4 lines, one month....s92.00
$10.80 each additional line
Includes an additional $2.00 per
ad for each Wednesday insertion.



You can callous at 755-5440,.
Monday through Friday from 8:00
a.m. to 5:00'p.m.
Some people prefer to place their
classified ads in person, and some
ad categories will require prepay,
ment. Our office is located at 180
East Duval Street.
You can also fax or email your ad
copy to the Reporter.
FAX: 386-752-9400 Please
direct your copy to the Classified
Department.
EMAIL: classifieds@lakecityre-
porter.con





Ad IstoAppear Call by: Fax/Emall by:
Tuesday Mon.,10:00.a.m. Mon.,9:00a.m.
Wednesday Mon.,10:00a.m. Mon.,9:00 a.m.
Thursday Wed., 10:00.m. Wed., 9:00 a.m.
Friday Thurs.,10:00a.m. Thurs.,9:00a.m.
Saturday .Fri, 10:00 a.m. r.,, 9:00a.m.
Sunday Fri., 10:00 a.m. Fri., 9:00a.m.
These deadlines are subjectto change without notice.




Ad Errors- Please read your ad
on the first day of publication.
We accept responsibility for only
the first incorrect insertion, and
only the charge for the ad'space
in error. Please call 755-5440
Immediately for prompt correc-
tion and billing adjustments.
Cancellations- Normal advertising
deadlines apply for cancellation.
Billing Inquiries- Call 755-5440.
Should further information be
.required regarding payments or
credit limits, your call will be trans-
ferred to the accounting depart-
ment.


Advertising copy is subject to
approval by the Publisher who
reserves the right to edit, reject,
or classify all advertisements under
appropriate headings. Copy should
be checked for errors by the
advertiser on the first day of pub-
lication. Credit for published errors
will be allowed for the first insertion
for that portion of the advertisement
which was incorrect. Further, the
Publisher shall not be liable for any
omission of advertisements ordered
to be published, nor for any general,
special or consequential damages.
Advertising language must comply
with Federal, State or local laws
regarding the prohibition of discrimi-
nation in employment, housing and
public accommodations. Standard
abbreviations are acceptable; how-
ever, the first word of each ad may
not be abbreviated.


Legal

IN THE COUNTY COURT IN
AND FOR COLUMBIA COUNTY,
FLORIDA
CASE NO. 11-563-SC
ROBERT SWEAT
9670 135TH LN
LIVE OAK, FL 32060
Plaintiff
vs.
JIMMY MARCUM
1334 NW TIPPLE RUN RD.
LAKE CITY, FL 32055
Defendant
A law suit has been filed to deter-
mine ownership and title of a certain
vehicle described as a 1988 Corvette
with serial #1G1YYZ186J5114349
located in Lake City, Columbia
County, Florida.
The following persons) may claim
some right title or interest therein:
ROBERT SWEAT
If you have a claim; interest, or de-
fense in this clause, you must file
your written response answer or ob-
jection with the Clerk of Court Co-
lumbia County within 10 days.
CLERK OF COURTS
By:/s/ D. Robinson
Deputy Clerk
05526331
Jine 28, 2011
July 5, 12, 19, 2011
' IN THE CIRCUIT COURT, THIRD
JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR
COLUMBIA COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
CASE NO. 11-135-CP
IN RE: The Estate of MARSHALL
JACKSON BLAIR
Deceased.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
The administration of the estate of
MARSHALL JACKSON BLAIR,
deceased, whose date of death was
MArch 16, 2011, and whose social
security number was xxx-xx-2635, is
pending in the Circuit Court for Co-
lumbia County, Florida, Probate Di-
vision, the address of which is Post
Office Box 2069, Lake City, Florida
32056-2069. The names and address-
es of the personal representative and
the personal representative's attorney
are set forth below.
All creditors of Decedent and other
persons having claims or demands
against Decedent's estate, on whom
a copy of this notice is required to be
served must file their claims with
this Court WITHIN THE LATER
OF THREE MONTHS AFTER THE
TIME OF THE FIRST PUBLICA-
TION OF THIS NOTICE OR THIR-
TY DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF
SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS
NOTICE ON THEM.
All other creditors of Decedent and
other persons having claims or de-
mands against Decedent's estate







Land Clearing

Back Hoe; Dozer, Chopping, root
raking, bush hog, seeding, sod,
disking, site prep, ponds &
irrigation. Free Est! 386-623-3200

Lawn & Landscape Service

Clean Pine Straw,
You pick it up, $1.85 a. bale
Delivery of 100 bales $260.
386-688-9156

Services

DIVORCE, BANKRUPTCY,
RESUMES.
other court approved forms-
386-961-5896.

Summer Cleaning done your
way. Let me Clean your home be-
fore you leave on Vacation. Come
back home & relax. 386-303-1496.
We come to you! Auto Detailing:
Wash, wax & vaccum. Pressure
Wash: Houses, mobile homes,
driveways, decks. 386-697-2224


Legal

must file their claims with this court
WITHIN THREE MONTHS AF-
TER THE DATE OF THE FIRST
PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE.
ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITH-
IN THE TIME PERIODS SET
FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF
THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE
WILL BE FOREVER BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME
PERIODS SET FORTH ABOVE,
ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2)
YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE
DECEDENT'S DATE OF DEATH
IS BARRED.
The date of the first publication of
this notice is June 24, 2011.
/s/: Virginia Blair
VIRGINIA BLAIR
Personal Representative
3225 SE 27th Avenue
Gainesville, Florida 32641
MORGAN LAW CENTER FOR
ESTATE & LEGACY PLANNING;
PLLC
/s/: Teresa Byrd Morgan
TERESA BYRD MORGAN
Florida Bar No. 0698954
234 East Duval Street
Lake City, Florida 32055
386/755-1977 (office)
386/755-8781 (facsimile)
Attorney for Personal Representative
05526274
June 28, 2011
July 5,2011

100 Job
Opportunities

05526387
Local company seeking
experienced,
"Transportation/
Logistic Coordinator"
Minimum qualifications:
v High School diploma
2 years experience
PC Knowledge Micrdsoft
and Web based TMS/WMS
systems
Routing/Dispatch
Fax resume to: 386-438-2080
Associate Reps
SUMMER WORK/GREAT PAY
Immediate FT/PT openings,
Customer sales/service,
No exp needed,, conditions,
Apply Now all ages 17+
(386) 269-0883
Contracted Swift Transportation
owner operated on dedicated
account in Lake City, FL looking
for qualified drivers. Drivers must
have Class A lic and clean MVR.
We run team trucks only. No solo
positions available.
Contact Fred at (404)671-6362 or
Otis at 904-327-6886
MANAGEMENT POSITION
available at the CATO Store in
Live Oak, FL. Experience necessa-
ry. Apply within at Suwannee Pla-
za on Hwy 129 Live Oak.
Mobile Home Sales!
Experienced Salesperson
Needed to sell the South's
#1 rated product! Call Kevin
386-344-3975
Sales Position available for moti-
vated individual Rountree -Moore
Toyota, Great benefits, paid train-
ing/vacation. Exp. a plus but not
necessary. Call Anthony Cosentino
386-623-7442

11 Sales
Employment

Seabreeze Food Service
Experienced food service Rep.
Send Resume to:
paulcucinella@yahoo.com

120 Medical
1 Employment

Busy family practice looking for a
full-time Nurse Practitioner. Send
reply to Box 05063, C/O The Lake
City Reporter, P.O. Box 1709,
Lake City, FL, 32056


n120 Medical
120 Employment

05526394
Medical Assistant
Requirements: HS diploma,
Phlebotomy Certification.
w/ 1 year exp.
Medical Assistant or equivalent
certification preferred
ONLY Qualified candidates
may send resumes to:
jpapesh()cancercarenorthflori-
da.com


240 Schools &
240 Education

04544843
Interested in a Medical Career?
Express Training offers
courses for beginners & exp
Nursing Assistant, $479
next class-07/11/10

Phlebotomy national certifica-
tion, $800 next class-07/11/11

Continuing education
Fees incl. books, supplies, exam
fees. Call 386-755-4401 or
expresstrainingservices.com



310 Pets & Supplies
AKC Lab Puppies. Black & gold
females. 9 weeks old. All papers
and shots provided great Pedigree.
$450. ea. Jennifer 386-438-0417
FREE KITTENS
To good home
Adorable
Call 386-755-8560
KITTENS. 4 white and 1 long
haired black. Had 1st shots. 10
weeks old. Cute & spunky!
$25.00. ea. 386-961-8909
PUBLISHER'S NOTE
Florida Law 828.29 requires dogs
and cats being sold to be at least 8
weeks old and have a health
certificate from a licensed
veterinarian documenting they
have mandatory shots and are
free from intestinal and external
parasites. Many species of wild-
life must be licensed by Florida
Fish and Wildlife. If you are
unsure, contact the local
office for information.

330 Livestock &
S Supplies

Black Angus Cows & Heifers
Prices Vary
Registered & Commercial
386-719-4802


361 Farm Equipment

84 Ford 4610 Tractor.
2WD, Solid
2005 motor,$7,500. OBO
386-867-0005


407 Computers

Compaq Computer, Many extras.
'Complete Computer
$80.00
386-755-9984 or 386-292-2170


408 Furniture
KING SIZE BED
$100.00
755-9333 or
755-7773
Recliner Sofa
$75.00
755-933.3 or
755-7773

To place your
classified ad call

755-5440

LO RXi2110r[ L Ma


420 Wanted to Buy
K&H TIMBER
We Buy Pine Hardwood &
Cypress. Large or small tracts.
Call 386-961-1961.

Wanted Junk Cars, Trucks, Vans.
$250 & up CASH! Free Pick Up!
SNO title needed !386-878-9260
After 5pm 386- 752-3648.


430 Garage Sales
PUBLISHER'S NOTE
All Yard Sale Ads
Must be Pre-Paid.


440 Miscellaneous

Stop gnat & Mosquito bites! Buy
Swamp Gator All natural insect re-
pellent. Family safe. Use head to
toe. Available at The Honie Depot.

Summer Barbecue Special
Tow Behind
Grill/Smoker, $1,250 OBO.
386-719-4802

Womens clothing, young mens
clothing, American Eagle &
Holister jeans & shirts. Toys, 2
bird cages, boys bicycle, RCA TV
set. Purses, New coffee maker.
Have it all for $75. 752-1811

630A Mobile Homes
630 for Rent
2&3 BR MH. $395 $650. mo.
plus deposit. Water & sewer fur-
nished. Cannon Creek MHP
386-752-6422

2/2 Units, clean, well maintained,
nice safe park setting, 2 miles to
downtown Lake City, $575 month
+ $575 sec dep, 386-984-8448
13th Month FREE!!

2br /2ba SWMH $475. mo; also
Resid'l RV lots for rent between
Lake City & G'ville. Access to I-
75 & 441 ,(352)317-1326 for terms

3/2 S of Lake City, (Branford area)
$575 month plus security
386-590-0642 or 386-867-1833
www.suwanneevalleyproperties.com

DWMH for Rent. 3br/2ba
Handicapped accessible.
$650. mo. $500. Dep. No Pets.
386-984-9634. ask for Amber.
Mobile Homes for rent in
White Springs, Lake City & Ft.
White Contact 386-623-3404
or 386-365-1919

Nice clean 2&3 bdrm, Five Points,
NO PETS,
also 3 bd on the
Westside, 386-961-1482

X-Clean'2/2 SW, 8 mi NW of VA.
Clean acre lot, nice area. $500. mo
+ dep No dogs Non-smoking
environment.386-961-9181


640 Mobile Homes
640 ~for Sale
Handy man special, 94 Fleetwood
DWMH. 3/2 on 5 acres in Ft.
White. Owner Fin. $3,000 dn.
$850mo. $99,900 352-215-1018
www.LandOwnerFinancing.com
PALM HARBOR Homes Has
Closed 2 Model Centers. Save up
to 60K on select models
Call Today! 8001622-2832
NEW D/W Reduced Thousands.
3br/2ba set, delivery. A/C
skirting, steps. $39,900.
Call Ken (386)754-8844
AS IS, WHERE IS...32X80, 4/2.
LR/Den, needs carpet, paint, 2400
sqft. has metal roof, vinyl siding.
$31,000. Randy 386-754-0198
FIRE YOUR LANDLORD
TO OWN WHAT YOUR
THROWING AWAY IN RENT.
CALL MIKE 386-754-8844
NEW 32X70 4/3. 2K sqft+. L/R.
DenSidex side, glasstop range,
D/W. Del, set, Steps, A/C, skirt-
ing. $59,900. Ken (386)754-8844
OWNER FINANCE 40% Down
w/land Equity or CASH on any
new or used singlewide or Double-
wide. Randy 386-754-0198
The Economy has forced
me to cut the price on my
3 bedroom, 2 bath home to
$38K (352)-870-5983

710 Unfurnished Apt.
For Rent

04545256
SPRING HILL VILLAGE
Excellent High Springs location.
1, 2 & 3 bedroom floor-plans;
some with garages.
Call 386-454-1469
or visit our website:
www.springhillvillage.net







1BR APT.
Downtown Location, Clean.
$450 mo, plus Security.
NO PETS. Call 386-755-3456
2BR/1.5BA w/garage
5 minutes from VA hospital.
Call for details.
386-755-4590 or 365-5150
Furnished or unfurnished
Townhomes on the golf course.
$750. mo. plus security. Includes
water. 386-752-9626
NICE APT Downtown. Remod-
eled 1 bedroom. Kitchen, dining,
living room. $450. mo plus sec.
386-362-8075 or 386-754-2951
The Lakes Apts. Studios & 1Br's
from $135/wk. Util. & cable incl..
Sec 8 vouchers accepted, monthly
rates avail Call 386-752-2741


3' -


.:'

; .
; '


In Print and Online
www.lakecityreporter.conm L


i.




I r -I- t


Seeking Salesperson to

join our team. No experience

necessary. Great benefits package.

Apply in person or call

Woody


386-758-6171


I I


MI


BiUYII



SEiLJ,


FINDsIT










LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED TUESDAY, JULY 5,2011


Classified Department: 755-5440


710 Unfurnished Apt.









Updated apartments w/tile floors
& fresh paint. Excellent location.
From $450. + sec.
Call Michelle 386-752-9626

720 Furnished Apts.
7 For Rent








br Apt. incl. water, elec, &
cable. $595. mo. Good area.
References & sec. req'd.
No pets. 386-719-4808
Rooms for Rent. Hillcrest, Sands,
Columbia. All furnished. Electric,
cable, fridge, microwave. Weekly
or monthly rates. 1 person $135,
2 persons $150. weekly
Ca 386-752-5808

720f Unfurnished
J73 Home For Rent
lbr/1.5ba Country Cottage, Cathe-
dral ceilings, brick fireplace, wash-
er/dryer,l ac fenced, private, some
pets, lease. 1st, last, sec, ref. Lake
City area $650mo. 352-494-1989
lbr/lba Free ele. Utilities incl. 4mi
S. Lake City. $300dep. $375mo.
386-590-0642 or 386-867-1833
www.suwanneevalleyproperties.com


2 bedroom 1 bath on
5 acres. $700.00 per month.
First, last and security.
386-590-5333


S2br Private Country
Home. Remodeled,
everything is new. Large yard.
386-752-1444
2br/lba home. 3 avail. Lake City,
White Springs (River), Wellborn.
Jane S. Usher, Lic. Real Estate
Broker. 386-755-3500/365-1352

/ 11208 73rd Ct. Live Oak..
4/3 brick home in a country
subdivision $700./ mo + security
/ 204 NW Guerdon
Rd...Brand new 3/2 home re-
duced to $700./mo + security
/ 250 SW Wise Dr..3/2 Execu-
tive home in restricted Wise Es-
tates. $1350./mo + secuirty
/ 390 SW Wilshire Dr...
Gorgeous upscale 3/2 on
culdesac in Callaway
$1300./mo + security
/ COMING SOON! 4/2 brick
home in Springfield Estates on
Brandy Way. Call for additional
information!
Call Kayla Carbona @
386-623-9650
Family Home 3/2, Ir, dr, fam rm
w/ fp,garage, fenced back yd.
Nice area. $1100 mo + dep Martha
Jo Khachigan, Realtor 623-2848

750 Business &
5v Office Rentals
FOR LEASE: Downtown office
space. Convenient to
Court house.
Call 386-755-3456
For Lease: E Baya Ave. Two -
1000 sqft office space units or
combined for 2000 sqft. 386-984-
0622 or weekends 386-497-4762
OFFICE SPACE for lease.
Oak Hill Plaza. 900 sqft
$675mo/$695. sec dep.
Tom 386-961-1086 DCA Realtor

770 Condos For Rent

05526400
Golf Course Condo for rent,
2BR/2BA, 1420 s.f., $1100/mo,.
Rent includes all appliances,
basic cable, water/sewer/
garbage, pool & tennis ct.
access. Realtor/owner
call 386-344-0433


790 Vacation Rentals
Horseshoe Beach Scalloping Spcl
Gulf Front 2br, w/lg porch, dock,
fish sink. wkend $395./wk $895.
386-235-3633/352-498-5986
alwaysonvacation.com #419-181
"Florida's Last Frontier"

805 Lots for Sale
1/4 acre, new well, septic and
power, paved rd; owner fin, no
down pym't, $24,900,
($256 month) 352-215-1018
www.LandOwnerFinancing.com

LAKE CITI REPORTER
Si


805 Lots for Sale
PUBLISHER'S NOTE
All real estate advertising in this
newspaper is subject to the fair
housing act which makes it illegal
to advertise "any preference,
limitation, or discrimination based
on race, color, religion, sex,
disability, familial status or nation-
al origin; or any intention to make
such preference, limitation or
discrimination." Familial status
includes children under the age of
18 living with parents or legal
custodians, pregnant women and
people securing custody of chil-
dren under the age of 18. This
newspaper will not knowingly
accept any advertising'for real es-
tate which is in violation of the
law. Our readers are hereby in-
formed that all dwellings adver-
tised in this newspaper are availa-
ble on an equal opportunity basis:
To complain of discrimination call
HUD toll free at 1-800-669-9777,
the toll free
telephone number to the hearing
impaired is 1-800-927-9275.


810 Home for Sale
HANDYMAN SPECIAL
2br/1.5ba. Half ac fenced lot
w/shed. Appraised at $68,000.
Asking $55,000. (352)335-8330


820 Farms&
Acreage
10-ac lot. Well/septic/pp. Owner
financing $300 dn, $663 mo 8.9%,
25 yrs. Deas Bullard Properties
386-752-4339 www.landnfl.com

4 1/2 acre lot. Lake Jeffery Road.
Gorgeous Oaks!Paved Rd
Owner Financing! NO DOWN!
$59,900. $525mo 352-215-1018.
www.LandOwnerFinancing.com
4 acres, Wellbom, New Well
installed, Beautifully wooded
w/cleared Home Site, owner fin,
no down, $39,900, $410 mon
Call 352-215-1018
www.LandOwnerFinancing.com
FARM- 7 stall barn, Apt.
17+ acres cross fenced.
Close in $895. mo.
386-961-1086

830 Commercial
Property

05526409
FOR SALE LAKE CITY
FORMER 84 LUMBER Zoned
Commercial Intensive on
4.2 +/- Acres with an 18,300
S.F. main building at 1824 W.
US Highway 90; contact
Crystal 724 228-3636 x 1349
4 UNIT Apt. Bldg. All 1/1/ w/ex-
tra rooms. Clean, good tenants and
remodeled. Downtown. $160,000.
386-362-8075 or 754-2951


Bring the picture in or
we will take it for youl
* Ad runs 10 consecutive days
with a description and photo in the
newspaper and online E-edition.
* Ad runs 10 consecutive days as a
classified line ad online.
* You must include vehicle price.
* All ads are prepaid.
* Private party only.





2006 =Y250
Ford Van
3/4 ton, metal work
shelves/ladder rack,
60K miles, exc. cond.
$10,500
Call
386-555-5555
If you don't sell your vehicle
during the first 10 days, you
can run the same vehicle ad
for 10 additional days for
only $15.00
Terms and conditions remain the
same for the additional run.

iTo rGe 'F!


870 Real Estate
870 Wanted
I Buy Houses
CASH!
Quick Sale Fair Price
386-269-0605

930 Motorcycles
05 Yamaha VSTAR 650 11K mi.
Blue w/Ghost flames. Runs great!
New Battery. Price Reduced to
$2,800. 386-752-9645

950 Cars for Sale
1986 Chevy Monte Carlo SS,
78k miles, one owner. $10,000.
All original.
386-752-1313 or 904-718-6747
2006 Toyota Scion XB,
41,000 mi. $13,000.
Paid over $24,000 new.
386-752-1313 or 904-718-6747




''-
I.
I Contact us


fat the paper.







S ASSIFIED ADS ,,
It 386-755-5440


Business Opportunity

Movie Extras Earn up to $250 per day To stand
in the backgrounds for a major film production
experience not required. All looks needed. Call
NOW!!! (877)435-5877

Education

ALLIED HEALTH career training-Attend
college 100% online. Job placement assistance.
Computer available. Financial Aid if qualified.
SCHEV certified. Call (800)481-9409 www.
CenturaOnline.com

Equipment For Sale

SAWMILLS -Band/Chainsaw -SPRING
SALE Cut lumber any dimension, anytime.
MAKE MONEY and SAVE MONEY In
stock ready to ship. Starting at $995.00. www.
NorwoodSawmills.com/300N (800)578-1363
Ext.300N

Financial Services

$$$ACCESS LAWSUIT CASH NOW!!! $$$
As seen on TV.$$$ Injury Lawsuit Dragging?
Need $500-$500,000++within 48/hrs? Low
rates APPLY NOW BY PHONE! Call Today!
Toll-Free: (800)568-8321 www.lawcapital.com

Help Wanted

JUST GRADUATE? Play in Vegas, Hang in
LA, Jet to New York! Hiring 18-24 girls/guys.
$400-$800 wkly. Paid expenses. Signing Bonus.
Call (877)259-6983

A Few Pro Drivers Needed Top Pay & 401K
Great Equipment & Benfefits 2 Mos. CDL
Class A Driving Exp (877)258-8782 www.
meltpntruck.com

Driver- Recession Proof Freight. Plenty of
miles. Need refresher? No out-of-pocket tuition
atFFE. $1000 Bonus for CO's & $1500 Incentive
for O/O's. recruit@ffex.net. (855)356-7121


Driver- PAY UP TO 42cpm! 2012 tractors
arriving daily! No forced dispatch to NYC or
Canada. CDL-A, 3 months recent experience
required. (800)414-9569. www.drivekilight.
com
L


OTR DRIVERS- Food Grade Tank Drivers.
CDL-A w/tank endorsement, Good MVR &
Hazmat within 90 days required. Up to 42cpm
w/additional mileage incentives & benefits.
(877)882-6537 or www.oakleytransport.com

Frac Sand Haulers with complete bulk
pneumatic rigs only. Relocate to Texas for Tons
of work. Great company/pay. Gas cards/Quick
Pay available. (800)491-9029

Drivers CDL-A Start up to 450 per mile!!
SIGN-ON BONUS!! GREAT HOME TIME!!!
Lease purchase available. Experience Req'd.
(800)441-4271xFL-100HomadyTransportation.
com


Miscellaneous


ATTEND COLLEGE ONLINE from Home.
*Medical, *Business, *Paralegal, *Accounting,
*Criminal Justice. Job placement. assistance.
Computer available. Financial Aid if qualified.
Call (888)203-3179, www.CenturaOnline.com

AIRLINES ARE HIRING Train for high
paying Aviation Career. FAA approved program.
Financial aid if qualified Housing available.
CALL Aviation Institute of Maintenance
(866)314-3769.

Real Estate

North Carolina Mountain Lakefront lots.
New gated waterfront community. Dockable
lots with up to 300'of shoreline, Low insurance,
Low property tax. Call Now (800)709-5253

Schools & Instruction

leat & Air JOBS Ready to work? 3 week
accelerated program. Hands on environment.
Nationwide certifications and Local Job
Placement Assistance! (877)994-9904



ANF
ADVEPfikINr.jG tJEOrP .F FROIIA


Clo'. died I DE.pl.y I Metro Daly


Week of July 4,2011


2005 Yamaha
VStar 650
11,000 miles, blue with
ghost flames, runs
great, new battery
Price Reduced to $2,800
Call
386-752-9645