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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028308/01598
 Material Information
Title: The Lake City reporter
Uniform Title: Lake City reporter (Lake City, Fla. 1967)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: John H. Perry
Place of Publication: Lake City Fla
Publication Date: 7/3/2011
Frequency: daily (monday through friday)[<1969>-]
weekly[ former 1967-<1968>]
daily
normalized irregular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Lake City (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Columbia County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Columbia -- Lake City
Coordinates: 30.189722 x -82.639722 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 95, no. 4 (Oct. 5, 1967)-
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000358016
oclc - 33283560
notis - ABZ6316
lccn - sn 95047175
sobekcm - UF00028308_01569
System ID: UF00028308:01598
 Related Items
Preceded by: Lake City reporter and Columbia gazette

Full Text






Race time
NASCAR roars

000015 120511 ****3-DIGIT
LIB OF FLORIDA HISTORY
PO BOX 117007
205 SMA UNIV OF FLORIDA
GAINESVILLE FL 32611-1943


Lake


Welcome back


326


Mike Rizzi returns
n< Fort White's
II coach.
ts, I B


City


Tennis upset
Sharapova loses
in straight sets in
Wimbledon final.
Sports, 4B


Reporter


Sunday, July 3, 201 I www.lakecityreporter.com Vol. 137, No. 135 E $1.00
ECNOI


FIGHTING FOR FREEDOM


ON THE FOURTH OF JULY


Lake City Marine
reflects on mission
from Afghanistan.
By LEANNE TYO
Ityo@lakecityreporter.com

or attending the
family reunion are
Independence Day
traditions that U.S.
Marine Corps Sgt. Jacob Wolfe of
Lake City will miss this year.
Wolfe, 24, is serving his country
on a seven-month deployment in
Camp Dwyer, Afghanistan.
"I'd like to be home," Wolfe said
in a phone interview Friday, "but I'm
glad to be here fighting."
Wolfe is a helicopter mechanic
with Marine Light Attack Helicopter
Squadron 269. His work includes
inspecting aircraft daily as well as
launching those aircraft on their mis- -
sions and recovering them. Wolfe
said he is proud to do it all.
"(I know) that I'm helping fellow
Americans protect our country," he
said.
"Our work, it's helping the troops
on the ground a lot," Wolfe said. '
Wolfe graduated from Columbia
High School in 2005 and has been in
the U.S. Marine Corps for four-and-a-
half years.
"Really I had nothing else going
on and I figured I'd give it a try and
went to the recruiting office," he
said.
Wolfe said he misses his family
- his wife, Tristan Ray, and his
parents, Rick and Patricia Wolfe
- but the separation has.become
routine.
"It's my fourth deployment, so I'm

FREEDOM continued on 3A


COURTESY PHOTO
U.S. Marine Corps Sgt. Jacob Wolfe of Lake City at Camp Dwyer, Afghanistan. 'It's my fourth
deployment, so I'm used to being away for holidays,' he said.


ECONOMIC
DEVELOPMENT


Search


goes on


for EDD


director

No applicant to date
meets all criteria,
says county manager.

By LEANNE TYO
Ityo@lakecityreporter.com
Applications for Columbia County's
open Economic Development Department
director job have been coming in, but
none of the candidates satisfy all the cri-
teria, officials said Friday.
"There's really not an applicant that just
possesses eveiy single skill, ability and
background experience that you'd want
them to have," said Dale Williams, county
manager. "A lot of applicants bring some-
thing to the table that is certainly going to
be needed, certainly would be worthwhile
to have that quality, but there's just not
that one candidate that absolutely has
every single desirable thing."
According to the county website, the
Economic Development director:
"Plans, organizes, directs, and super-
vises the programs, projects, opera-
tions, and personnel of the Economic
Development Department. Establishes
the department's goals, objectives, strate-
gies, and priorities in alignment with the
Board of County Commissioners' vision,
goals, and objectives. Prepares, admin-
isters, and directs annual departmental
budget and programs. Monitors financial
data related to tax abatements or other
EDD continued on 3A


Independence Day:

Big doings ahead


Music, food, more
will culminate in
fireworks display.
From staff reports

Lake City will mark
Independence Day Monday
with an evening celebration
full of'entertainment that will
end with a spectacular fire-


display.
festivities
will take
place
at Lake
DeSoto
in downtown Lake City.
Fireworks are set to begin at
9:20 p.m., with the national
CELEBRATION continued on 3A


3% raise for city workers

at issue again Tuesday


From staff reports
The Lake City City Council
will on Tuesday consider giving
some city workers 3 percent
raises to offset a mandatory
state pension pay-in that went
into effect Friday. The item was
on the agenda for the June 20
meeting but was tabled due
to the absence of two council
members.
City Manager Wendell
Johnson is behind the proposal.
He earlier told the Reporter


that most of the 106 city employ-
ees enrolled in the Florida
Retirement System and
thus subject to the mandatory 3
percent pension pay-in earn
relatively low salaries and have
not seen a raise in three years.
He added the proposal would
be revenue-neutral to the city.
Originally set for Monday,
tomorrow's meeting was
delayed due to the July 4 holi-
day.
The meeting will take place
at 7 p.m. at City Hall.


LEANNE TYO/Lake City Reporter
Help from afar for firefighters
Aaron Roggenkamp, 29, a helicopter sqaud leader for the Burns, Ore. office of the federal Bureau of Land
Management, explains his crew's helicopter, a Super 205 Bell model with tail number 15HX, at the Lake City
Helibase at the Lake City Municipal Airport Saturday. The helibase was established by the U.S. Forest Service to
support firefighters battling the Impassable Bay complex wildfire. Aircraft from around the state and nation are using
the helipad as they contribute to firefighting efforts throughout the region. 'We're down here to help out the whole
Southeast,' Roggenkamp said.


1 4214 0021


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O pinion ................
Business ................
O bituaries ..............
Life .................. ...
Puzzles .................


TODAY IN
BUSINESS
Gai prices
dr,.p here


COMING
TUESDAY
Full cco.erage,-
of the Fourth


I


t;


I, S










Page Editor: Todd Taylor, 754-0424


LAKE CITY REPORTER SUNDAY REPORT SUNDAY, JULY 3, 2011


^ -vath3. m1ay10 I .

Friday: Friday: Saturday: Saturday: Wednesday: Wednesday:
8-22-27-37 9 11-15-22-26-29 Afternoon: 6-0-5 Afternoon: 5-6-2-5 10-30-36-41-49-51 24-30-45-57-59
Evening: Unavailable Evening: Unavailable


AROUND FLORIDA


Miami police kill 4 masked, armed robbery suspects


MIAMI
police shot and
U led four
masked and
armed men in a
sting operation,
including one man who was
cooperating with Miami-
Dade police in an investiga-
tion of a series of violent
home robberies, authorities
said.
The shooting happened
Thursday evening at a resi-
dence owned by the Miami-
Dade Police Department
in a southwest section of
the county, in an area of
homes and plant nurseries.
Investigators say the men
believed there was a stash
of marijuana inside but were
instead confronted by offi-
cers, who told them to put
down their weapons.
The men did not comply
and a confrontation ensued
in which all four men were
shot, police spokesman
Detetctive Javier Baez said
Friday. No officers were
injured.
"An incident occurred
that our special response
team had to fire on these
individuals," Baez said. He
was not able to confirm
whether the men had fired
at police.'-
Those killed were identi-
fied as: Rosendo Betancourt
Garcia, 39, the cooperat-
ing defendant; Jorge Luis
Lemus, 39; and Roger
Gonzalez Valez, 52. The
fourth victim has not been
identified. A fifth person,
Roger Gonzalez, Jr., 32, was
outside in a car and taken
into custody.
The shooting capped
the end of what police


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Miami-Dade Police detectives investigate a police involved shooting where four subjects
were fatally wounded in Miami Friday. Authorities in Miami-Dade County say police shot and
killed four suspects during a confrontation after they got out of their vehicles wearing ski


masks and carrying guns.

described as a lengthy
investigation into a group
of individuals who targeted
marijuana grow houses.
Baez said the suspects at
times misidentified the resi-
dences and proceeded with
targeting, and torturing,
innocent individuals.
'These are career crimi-
nals," Baez said.


minor injuries. It wasn't
clear if anyone in the other
vehicle was injured.
Damage done in the
crash was described as
moderate.
The cause of the crash
remains under investiga-
tion.


Ala Passengers were taken
back to their departure gate
for a security rescreening,
but the TSA says nothing
was immediately found that
raised a concern.
The TSA wasn't revealing
the contents of the note or
what made it suspicious.


Note sends plane Scott supports


At least 5 injured back togate


in bus crash
WEST PALM BEACH,
Fla. Authorities say
at least five people were
injured in a crash involving
South Florida public bus.
Officials say the Palm
Tran bus was rear-ended
Friday evening. Five bus
passengers were taken
to a nearby hospital with


TAMPA A Southwest
Airlines plane headed for
Alabama returned to its
gate at Tampa International
Airport before takeoff
after a suspicious note was
found.
The Transportation
Security Administration
reports that the note was
found Friday evening on
Flight 1178 to Birmingham,


new campgrounds
ST. PETERSBURG
- Gov. Rick Scott says he
supports the idea of add-
ing new campgrounds in
more than 50 Florida state
parks, even though some
members of his own party
don't agree.
Scott said Friday in St
Petersburg that adding
amenities such as RV
camping will make people


want to use the state's
parks even more.
The idea has come
under fire by some
Republican lawmakers and
others opposed to camp-
grounds at the pristine
Honeymoon Island State
Park in the Tampa Bay
area and others that do not
presently offer camping.
State Department of
Environmental Protection
officials are pushing a
plan to let private contrac-
tors design, build and
operate new camp sites
in 56 state parks. The
list also includes popular
parks as Wakulla Springs
and Ichetucknee
Springs.

Man indicted
for smuggling
WEST PALM BEACH,
- A boat captain faces a
possible death penalty for
his part.in an immigrant
smuggling operation that
left a pregnant woman dead
and another woman criti-
cally injured last month.
Officials say 25-year-old
Tarran Maynard was indict-
ed in West Palm Beach
federal court this week on
28 separate counts, includ-
ing encouraging and induc-
ing aliens to enter the U.S.
resulting in death.
Following the June
14 incident, Maynard
told investigators he was
paid $10,000 to ferry 11
Bahamian, Jamaican and
Haitian nationals from
Freeport, Bahamas to South
Florida. He told federal
agents the money was lost


when the boat capsized off
Riviera Beach.
Five other men were also
indicted this week on charg-
es related to the smuggling
operation. They each face
up to 20 years in prison.

Woman's body
found buried
CLEARWATER--A
Tampa Bay area man has
been charged with killing
his girlfriend after authori-
ties reported finding her
body buried in his back-
yard.
The Pinellas County
Sheriff's Office reports
that detectives received
information earlier this
week that a homicide
had occurred more than
a month ago in an unin-
corporated area near
Clearwater. After obtaining
a search warrant, defl-
ties searched the home
of 35-year-old William
Routenberg.
During the search,
deputies found the body of
24-year-old Shanessa Lynn
Chappie. Authorities say
Routenberg confessed to
killing the woman during
an argument Chappie,
who was from northern
Kentucky, was living with
Routenberg at the time of
her death.
Routenberg a
convicted sex offender
was charged with first-
degree murder, probation
violation and several drug
counts. He was being
held without bail.

Associated Press


PEOPLE IN THE NEWS


Shriver files to divorce Schwarzenegger


LOS ANGELES

stood by Arnold
Schwarzenegger
when he ran for
California's gover-
norship in 2003, even after several
women accused him of lecherous
behavior.
On Friday, 25 years after their
fairytale wedding on Cape Cod, she
filed fpr divorce.
The former television journal-
ist and Kennedy family heiress
cited irreconcilable differences but
offered no additional details about
the breakup.
Shriver did not list a date when
the couple separated, although they
announced they had done so on May
9.
A week later, the former California
governor admitted he fathered a
child with a member of his house-
hold staff years ago.
The filing, which Shriver signed
nearly two weeks ago, signals an end
to a union that brought together a
rising film action star and a princess
of the Kennedy clan, herself an up-
and-coming network newscaster.
Shriver's filing does not indicate
the couple had a premarital agree-
ment
That means Schwarzenegger's
earnings from a career as a
Hollywood megastar, which allowed.
him to forgo a salary as governor
and commute by private jet to
Sacramento, likely will be evenly
divided with his estranged wife.
Shriver is seeking spousal support
but the amount will be determined
later, either through a settlement or
by a judge. The divorce is expected
to be handled mostly behind closed
doors.
Economic disclosure forms
filed when Schwarzenegger left as
California governor in January show
he has interests in at least eight enti-
ties each worth $1 million or more.
An exact tally of his wealth is impos-
sible to calculate.
The forms also show he still
retains rights to intellectual prop-
erty from his days as a fitness guru


ASSOCIATED PRESS
In this file photo, Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger celebrates with his wife Maria
Shriver after giving his acceptance speech, in Beverly Hills, Calif. Maria Shriver
has filed for divorce from Arnold Schwarzenegger in Los Angeles Superior Court
Friday.


and movie star.
Several of Schwarzenegger's big-
gest hits, including "Predator," 'True
Lies" and the blockbuster sequel
'Terminator 2" were made during
his marriage to Shriver.
Shriver was an award-winning tele-
vision journalist but put her career
on hold when Schwarzenegger ran
for governor.

Johansson, Reynolds
finalize divorce
LOS ANGELES
The Green
Lantern and Black
Widow, or at least
the actors who play
them on the big
screen, are official-
ly single again.
Reynolds Court records


show a judge finalized the divorce
Ryan Reynolds and Scarlett
Johansson on Friday in Los Angeles.
Reynolds appeared in the recent
film adaptation of
the DC comic "The
Green Lantern,"
filed for divorce in
December.
SThe filing came
shortly after the
couple, which kept
Johansson their courtship and
Johansson
nuptials private,
announced they had split.
The final divorce judgment filed
Friday did not say how the pair
would divide their assets.
Johansson portrays the Black
Widow in "Iron Man 2" and the
upcoming "Avengers" film.

* Associated Press


Celebrity Birthdays


* Movie director Ken Rus-
sell is 84.
* Actor Kurtwood Smith
("That 70s Show") is 68.
* Country singer Johnny
Lee is 65.
* Writer Dave Barry is 64.


* Actor Tom Cruise is 49.
* Actress Yeardley Smith
("The Simpsons") is 47.
* Keyboardist-guitarist
Kevin Hearn of Barenaked
Ladies is 42.
* Singer Tonia Tash is 32.


Daily ScriDture


"The heart is deceitful above
all things and beyond cure.
Who can understand it? 'I the
LORD search the heart and
examine the mind, to reward
each person according to their
conduct, according to what
their deeds deserve."

Jeremiah 17:9-10 NIV


CORRECTION

The Lake City Reporter corrects errors of fact in news
items. If you have a concern, question or suggestion, please
call the executive editor. Corrections and clarifications will
run in this space. And thanks for reading.


Lake City Reporter
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porter
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t any
should
a ser-
After

livery
r ser-

5445


26.32
18.79
83.46

41.40
82.80
'9.40










Page Editor: Todd Taylor, 754-0424 LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL & NATION SUNDAY, JULY 3, 2011


CELEBRATION: Fireworks and more

Continued From Page 1A


anthem, which will be sung
by Colby Craig, immediate-
ly preceding the fireworks.
The Lake City/Columbia
County Chamber of
Commerce is hosting the
celebration event and the
Lake City Reporter is title
sponsor for the 8th straight
year.
"It is going to be one of
the best shows in years,"
said Dennille Folsom, the
Chamber's executive direc-
tor. "We have eight food
vendors lined up and an
exceptional entertainment


line-up. No rain is in the
forecast, and we're one of
the few areas not to cancel
our show."
Lake City Reporter pub-
lisher Todd Wilson agreed.
"This is shaping up to
be the best Fourth of July
fireworks eveit ever in
Lake City," he said. "We're
expecting a record crowd.
We have excellent food
vendors, the entertainment
is top-notch and it is a great
family oriented good time."
Musical entertainment
will begin at 5 p.m., with


J.R. Lopez performing first.
Performances will continue
through the evening with
Bro.ken at 5:20 p.m., Willow
Martinez at 5:40 p.m., Colby
Craig at 6 p.m., the Miss
Firecracker winners at 6:20
p.m., Lauren Ogburn at 6:45
p.m., Sheena Allison at 7:05
p.m., Arteelia at:7:25 p.m.,
Crystal Black at 7:40 p.m.,
Papa Ross & Dominion at
8 p.m. and The Matt Johns
Trio at 8:40 p.m.
Kids' games, hosted by
First Baptist Church, will
also start at 5 p.m.


EDD: Search for chief continues


Continued From Page 1A


incentives. Directs and
supervises the compilation
and publication of statis-
tics and other information
important to the commerce
and industry of Columbia
County. Prepares reports
and makes presentations
to various public and pri-
vate groups. Ensures that
all Economic Development
Department activities com-
ply with County goals, poli-
cies, procedures, as well
as local, federal, and state
regulations "
The job requires a bach-
elor's degree in planning,
business administration,
economics or a closely
related field and eight years
"of increasingly responsi-
ble professional experience
in economic development
and related activities; or
any combination of experi-
ence, education, and train-
ing that would provide the
required knowledge, skills,
and abilities," according to
the county website.
The county has received
more than 20 applications
for the job during the past
few months, Williams
said.
At its April 21 meeting,
the board unanimously


approved using Colin
Baenziger & Associates
in Wellington, an outside
consulting firm, for about
$18,500 to help find qualified
applicants, if necessary.
So far, the county has
not used the firm, Williams
said.
Williams said he has been
reviewing the applications
and has identified a couple
of applicants he wants to
discuss with the Economic
Development Department
board chairman, County
Commissioner Rusty
DePratter. In the interim,
the county may decide to
make use of the consulting
firm, he said.
A salary for the director's
job has still not been set,
Williams said, and remains
negotiable.
'Qhe way we advertised it
is we advertised it as nego-
tiable and the board has
said it's going to depend
on qualifications and expe-
rience," he said.
Inthemeantime,Williams
said he and DePratter have
been maintaining contact
with current clients and are
responding to any calls and
inquiries from businesses
that may want.to move to


the area.
He and DePratter are
also preparing a response
to a prospective industry
looking for an area to locate
to in Florida. The county
learned ,of the. prospect
through Enterprise Florida,
Williams said.
A temporary secre-
tary specialist, Dedra
Hollingsworth, has been
hired at the Economic
Development Department
offices for about $10.50
an hour to assist with
the department's office
work.
"Dedraishelpingusmake
sure the office is open, that
the calls are received and
helping us with all of the
clerical aspects," Williams
said.
"So that's what we've
been doing in the inter-
im," he said. "The doors
are oben at the Economic
Development Department
and we're answering the
phone and doing every-
thing we can."
Former Economic
Development chief Jim
Poole left the post last
month to take a position as
legislativeliaisonwithhaven
Hospice of Gainesville.


FREEDOM: Marine reflects on mission


Obama: 'Nothing can


be off-limits' in budget


By ERICA WERNER
Associated Press

WASHINGTON -
President Barack Obama
said Saturday that "nothing
can be off-limits" in the bud-
get debate even though
Republicans have said tax
increases are. The presi-
dent said every tax break
and federal program must
come under scrutiny.
With an Aug. 2 deadline
looming to raise the govern-
ment borrowing limit, the
president used his weekly
radio and Internet address
to call on Congress to
make a deal.
He also renewed his
call for Congress to elimi-
nate some tax breaks for
the well-off as part of any
agreement. Republicans
want deep spending cuts
without any tax increas-
es while Obama and
Democrats call for what
they term a "balanced"
approach. That means
one that also includes
new revenue in the form
of higher taxes for some,
though Democrats steer
clear of using phrases like
"tax increases" or "higher
taxes."
"Now, it would be nice
if we could keep every
tax break, but we can't
afford them," Obama said.
"Because if we choose to
keep those tax breaks for
millionaires and billion-
aires, or for hedge fund
managers and corporate
Smitty's Western Store is
celebratingour 141' annivers
with a customer appreciation


jet owners, or for oil and
gas companies pulling in
huge profits without our
help then we'll have to
make even deeper cuts
somewhere else."
"Nothing can be off-lim-
its, including spending in
the tax code, particularly
the loopholes that benefit
very few individuals and
corporations," the president
said.
Lawmakers and the
administration are seeking
deficit cuts in the range of


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$2.4 trillion over the coming
decade to balance a similar
increase in the debt limit
- one that's large enough
to keep the government
afloat past the November
2012 election. Currently the
debt limit is $14.3 trillion,
and Treasury Secretary
Timothy Geithner says it
must be raised .by Aug.
2 to avoid defaulting on
the government's financial
obligations for the first
time in the nation's his-
tory.


Continued From Page 1A

used to being away for
holidays," he said.
Serving his coun-
try while it celebrates
Independence Day "feels
great," Wolfe said.
"Mainly just knowing
that I'm serving the coun-
try during the holiday is a
good feeling," he said.
The constant change in
his surroundings through
training and deployments
is what Wolfe likes best


about being a Marine.
It's also shown him what
those in the U.S. military
sacrifice on a daily basis.
"There's different
things going on besides
what's going on at home,"
Wolfe said. "It makes you
realize what other guys
are having to do when
you're in their shoes."
For Independence Day,
Wolfe wished his fellow
Lake City residents "a


happy holiday" and when
he returns in January
2012, he said he'll most
likely plan a vacation with
his family.
Wolfe said he's most
looking forward to com-
ing home safely, along
with his fellow troops.
What he wants most
is "just knowing every-
body's returned safe and
everybody's to their fami-
lies again," he said.


.5



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PUBLIC NOTICE

Lake City Naval Auxiliary Air Station

The Department of Defense (DoD) has conducted live-fire training and
testing of weapon systems at active and former military installations
throughout the United States to ensure force readiness and defend
our nation. Now, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, through the
Military Munitions Response Program, is assigning priorities to these
sites containing suspected ordnance, discarded military munitions
and/or munitions constituents, evaluating the potential for public
safety and environmental hazards.

The Corps' Jacksonville District is in the process of investigating
the Lake City Naval Auxiliary Air Station, Columbia County, Florida.
This site was used to train Naval and Army National Guard pilots
from 1942 through 1946.

The Corps recently completed a site inspection at the former Lake
City Naval Auxiliary Air Station, located about 1.5 miles east of the
City of Lake City. The results will be available for public review at'the
U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, 701 San Marco Blvd., Jacksonville,
FL 32207. To request a copy of the report, please contact us by
email at FUDS.Florida@usace.army.mil.

As part of our ongoing investigation, we are seeking additional
information from the public about the former Lake City Naval Auxiliary
Air Station. Information should be sent to: William Spence, Project
Manager, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, 701 San Marco Blvd.,
Jacksonville, FL 32207 or by email to:
FUDS.Florida@usace.army.mil.

For more information, please contact Amanda Ellison at
1-800-291-9413.


LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL & NATION SUNDAY, JULY 3, 2011


Page Editor: Todd Taylor, 754-0424


,1 -4


Senior- fq












OPINION


Sunday, July 3, 2011


OUR


OUR
OPINION


Celebrate

America's

strengths


heart is about fortitude.
It's a holiday that hon-
ors the fact that citizens
established the frame-
work of government and rule this
country.
It's a reminder that at our ances-
tral core, we are a gutsy bunch who
will stand our ground and not be
pushed around, by enemies foreign
or domestic.
It's a reminder that 235 years
ago, a group of regular citizens,
possessed of varying skills and
practicing many different trades,
came together against a tyranni-
cal government to say "enough is
enough." We can rule ourselves
and do a better job of it.
They put their thoughts on
parchment then signed their names
beneath, risking their livelihoods,
.their families, and their lives. They
did it for the dream of freedom.
As Americans today, we all,need
to ask ourselves if we're still that
passionate about freedom. You
don't need to wear knee britches
and a powdered wig to be a patriot
You don't need a special skill or
a special job to be a productive
American. Regular people founded
this country and set it in motion.
They carved the torch and lit it All
we have to do is hold it high and
keep it burning.
We urge you to stand for the
freedoms we have, the ones some
groups in oppressed areas envy
so much they're willing to die in
order to introduce them into their
countries.
We cannot take our freedoms for
granted. If we do, others will take
them away from us. Remember
this, and celebrate America and
her great tenacity on this Fourth
of July weekend.


Quote of the day...

"I predict happi-
ness for Americans
if they can prevent
the government from
wasting the labors of
the people under the
pretense of taking
care of them."

Thomas Jefferson

Lake City Reporter
Serving Columbia County
Since 1874
The Lake City Reporter is pub-
lished with pride for residents of
Columbia and surrounding counties by
Community Newspapers Inc.
We believe'strong newspapers build
strong communities -"Newspapers
get things done!"
Our primary goal is to
publish distinguished and profitable
community-oriented newspapers.
This mission will be accomplished
through the teamwork of professionals
dedicated to truth, integrity and hard
work.
Todd Wilson, publisher
Robert Bridges, editor
Sue Brannon, controller
Dink NeSmith, president
Tom Wood, chairman

LETTERS
POLICY
Letters to the Editor should be
typed or neatly written and double
spaced. Letters should not exceed
400 words and will be edited for
length and libel. Letters must be
signed and include the writer's name,
address and telephone number for
verification. Writers can have two
letters per month published. Letters
and guest columns are the opinion of
the writers and not necessarily that of
the Lake City Reporter.


BY MAIL: Letters, P.O. Box 1709,
Lake City, FL 32056; or drop off at
180 E. Duval St. downtown.
BY FAX: (386) 752-9400.
BY E-MAIL:
news@lakecityreporter.com


www.lakecityreporter.com


Come join us for the Fourth


I hope this beautiful
Sunday morning mid-
way,.through a holiday
weekend finds you
so relaxed it takes a
focused effort to lift the paper
and slowly turn the page. You
deserve the break.
Soak up the quiet time
because there's a community
party brewing and you're
invited. Tell your friends
and family. Bring the kids.
Everyone's invited. We're
looking for a record crowd
to top 25,000 visitors to
the downtown area by the
time the first firework is lit
Monday night.
Lake City has the best
in Fourth of July entertain-
ment. It's free and in down-
town Lake City on Monday
evening. The Fourth of July
Celebration begins at 5 p.m.
with kids' games, food ven-
dors and musical entertain-
ment downtown around Lake
DeSoto. Fireworks launch at
9:20.
' You will want to arrive
early, bring your lawn chair
or blanket, and stake out
your vantage point, then
enjoy the music and all the
food and festivities that make
Independence Day in America'
our special time.
The Lake City Reporter is
proud to be the title sponsor
of the fireworks event for


Todd Wilson
twilson@lakecityreportercom
the eighth consecutive year.
Stop by our tent in front of
the music stage for giveaways
and a free slice of water-
melon.
For the second year, the
Chamber of Commerce is
hosting the event and has
done a fantastic job of orga-
nizing the food vendors,
sound system provider and
fireworks display. Dennille
Folsom and Sonja Meads
have worked diligently to
make the pre-event staging as
smooth as possible.
This event showcases a per-
fect example of government
and the business community
working together for the good
of everyone. Both the City
of Lake City and Columbia
County governments donate
funds to make this fireworks
show happen. The business
community responded with
overwhelming generosity this
year and kicked in donations
to help grow the event. A big
thanks goes out to Harvey


Campbell, who served as
unofficial "fundraising chair-
man" for this Chamber event
and manned the phones to
secure donations.
As always, First Baptist
Church has rallied behind
this event, lending their
parking areas for the musi-
cal stage set-up and for the
kids games areas, which the
church members sponsor and
work.
Donald Johns of Starlight
Sound & Recording does an
excellent job of lining up the
musical acts and he will keep
the show running during the
evening.
The unsung heroes of this
event are the City of Lake
City's public works employees
who work this event. They
mark the vendor spaces, bar-
ricade the streets and make
sure the lakefront is ready.
Then, when the crowd leaves,
they clean up. Most likely
by daylight Tuesday, you
won't know there was a party
around the lake.
There are dozens of people
behind the scenes who vol-
unteer and make this event a
success and thanks goes to all
of them.
Celebrate American free-
dom and enjoy the fireworks!

Todd Wilson is publisher of the
Lake City Reporter.


ANOTHER OPINION


Don't play with debt ceiling


line for rais-
ing the debt
ceiling just
one month
away, it's worth asking what's
to be gained by the posturing
that prolongs the deadlock
in Congress and threatens
the creditworthiness of the
U.S. government The answer
is, Nothing, but keeping the
political suspense alive has a
downside.
Every day that passes as the
Aug. 2 date nears without a
deal increases the anxiety and
uncertainty in the markets and
that alone serves as a brake
on economic activity. A default
would once have been deemed
unthinkable by American lead-
ers, but if the debt becomes
hostage to political maneuver-
ing every time the debt ceiling
has to be raised, it's going to
cost more to borrow money
and attract bond investors.
No American benefits from a
default Even the current stale-
mate is serving as a drag on
the markets.
There was a time when
such increases in the debt ceil-
ing were considered routine.
Republicans did it several times
when they controlled Congress
under President Bush. The
unwillingness to go to the
brink over the debt ceiling
reassured investors. That and
the fundamental strength of
the economy made the dollar


the world's most trustworthy
currency. Even in the darkest
days of the current worldwide
economic slowdown, the dollar
became a refuge for those who
sought to put their own wealth
in a safe place while the storm
raged.
What is different now is the
ideological insistence that rev-
enue increases will not be con-
sidered. The government has
to bring spending under con-
trol. No one seriously argues
that the United States can tax
itself out of this budget crisis.
But a comprehensive solution
has to include changes in the
tax structure to close loopholes
and increases for those who
don't have to worry about sink-
ing into poverty anytime soon.
President Obania argues
that a balanced approach must
include reducing corporate tax
subsidies for the oil industry
and ethanol production, closing
tax loopholes for corporate jets,
and reducing tax deductions
on incomes for the biggest
earners. Hard to see a radical
approach in that
Some Democrats already
believe Mr. Obama has given
away the farm even before
entering into the negotia-
tions, as he did on the budget
deal late last year when he
extended Bush-era tax cuts for
the wealthiest Americans. Now
he proposes to redefine the
meaning of "rich" so that an
increase in rates would apply


to fewer tax filers. Whereas
the proposal last year was
to raise rates for individuals
earning $250,000 or more, the
new level would be $500,000
or more. Some Democrats in
Congress insist on a $1-to-$1
ratio between taxes and spend-
ing cuts in any deal, which
would clearly not fly. Mr.
Obama proposes, instead, a 3-1
ratio in spending cuts for every
new dollar in revenue.
Give the Republicans credit
for holding the administration's
feet to the fire. Without party
unity and an insistence'on fix-
ing the deficit, the argument
might take a back seat, using
the fragile recovery as a pre-
text to avoid taking any action.
They also deserve credit
for demanding an overhaul
that tackles major issues like
:Medicare and Social Security,
which are the big contributors
to the imbalance.
But playing chicken with
the debt ceiling is the wrong
approach. Default is a game-
changer, in a bad way. Failure
to bring the national debt
under control threatens
America's future, but a default
on the U.S. debt would freak
the markets out and create
great harm immediately. It
would leave the nation even
more poorly prepared to deal
with long-range problems.
Make a deal now.

The Miami Herald


4A


What

would you

risk for

liberty?

Special to the Reporter
would you be
willing to risk
your business,
family and life-
style to rebel
against your government? If
government were taxing you
without representation, would
you stand up and say "No
more taxes"? Would you be
willing to fight for your free-
dom and be jailed because you
signed a petition against your
government?
The signers of the
Declaration of Independence
were willing to sacrifice
everything they owned and
worked for to stop govern-
ment from interfering in their
lives. These 56 brave men
came from all walks of life:
farmers, lawyers, merchants.
They knew that signing the
Declaration of Independence
from Britain would be con-
sidered treason. Many of
these brave men fought in
the Revolutionary War, were
imprisoned as a result of war,
saw their homes and property
ransacked and their families
uprooted, lost their land and
livelihood and saw their sons
fight for the cause of freedom.
Throughout the history of
this great nation, we have wit-
nessed brave men and women
who willingly sacrificed their
lives to preserve the freedoms
Americans enjoy today. From
the Revolutionary War, the
World Wars to the War on
Terror, battles continue to be
raged to defend our nation's
freedom.
Not all wars are foughtwith
weapons. Citizens should
also be willing to stand up for
injustice, over taxation, govern-
ment interference in private
life, and even new and better
ideas for entrepreneurship
and liberty. What will lead
today's citizens to take a stand
for liberty? The greatness of
this country comes from the
people within who are willing
to protect the freedoms we
enjoy today. Think about what
is important to you and how
you could be involved to affect
positive changes in your com-
munity through government,
non-profit organizations, faith
based initiatives, community
activities and volunteerism.
This distinguished nation
began with a group of indepen-
dent men from all occupations
who came together to create
a homeland that would assure
life, liberty and the pursuit of
happiness. Preserving those
freedoms requires constant
vigilance from those who enjoy
them.
N Susann B. McConnell is a
freelance writer.and motivational
speaker who lives in Mobile, Ala.


HIGHLIGHTS
IN HISTORY
On this date:
1608, the city of Quebec
was founded by Samuel de
Champlain.
1775, Gen. George
Washington took command of the
Continental Army at Cambridge,
Mass.
1863, the three-day Civil
War Battle of Gettysburg
in Pennsylvania ended in a
major victory for the North as
Confederate troops retreated.
1890, Idaho became the
43rd state of the Union.
1898, the U.S. Navy
defeated a Spanish fleet outside
Santiago Bay in Cuba during the
Spanish-American War.
1944, during World War II,
Soviet forces recaptured Minsk.
1962, Algeria became
indepdent after 132 years of'
French rule:


N 1979, Dan White, convicted
of voluntary manslaughter in the
shooting deaths of San Francisco
Mayor George Moscone and
Supervisor Harvey Milk, was sen-
tenced to seven years and eight
months in prison.








LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL & NATION SUNDAY, JULY 3, 2011


COMMUNITY CALENDAR


Monday
Fireworks Celebration
Lake City Columbia
County Chamber of
Commerce is hosting
the 4th of July Fireworks
Celebration beginning 5
p.m. Monday around Lake
DeSoto. The event will
feature musical entertain-
ment, free children's activi-
ties, vendors and more.
The fireworks will be
released at 9:20 p.m.

Wood Carvers meeting
The Columbia County
Wood Carvers meet every
Monday at 1 p.m-at the
LifeStyle Enrichment
Center. Contact Ken Myer


at 719-9629 or Charles
Kime at 755-4937.

Tuesday
Theatre performance
Columbia County
Senior Services Inc. is
hosting a Geriactors
Theatre Performance "I
Can't Remember Why I'm
Mad At You" and three
vignettes 7 p.m. Tuesday at
the LifeStyle Enrichment
Center. Call (386) 755-0235.
The center is located at 628
SE Allison Court

Wednesday'
Spanish class
Columbia County Senior


Services Inc. is hosting a
beginners Spanish class
10-11 a.m. at the LifeStyle
Enrichment Center. Free
Blood Pressure Checks
are 11 a.m. to noon. Also
a Geriactors Matinee
Performance is 11 a.m.
and bingo is 1 p.m. Call
(386) 755-0235. The center
is located at 628 SE Allison
Court

Newcomers and
Friends Luncheon
The July Friendship
Luncheon of the Lake City
Newcomers and Friends
is 11:30 a.m. Wednesday
at Costa Del Sol located at
2260 W U.S. Highway 90.
All members, guests and
friends are welcome. Call


(386) 438-8100 or (386)
754-7227.

Thursday
Chair exercise
Columbia County Senior
Services Inc. is hosting
7th Chair Exercise 1 p.m.
Thursday at the LifeStyle
Enrichment Center, locat-
ed at 628 SE Allison Court.
Call (386) 755-0235.

Play in the Clay
Diane Hornby is teach-
ing "Play In The Clay"'
classes for the children's
summer vacation program
10 a.m.-11 a.m. Thursday
and 14 for $5 at the
Stephen Foster Cultural


* To submit your Community
Calendar item, contact Antonia
Robinson at 754-0425 or by
e-mail at arobinson @
lakecityreporter.com.


State Park. To register, call
the park Gift Shop at (386)
397-1920 or visit www.ste-
phenfosterCSO.org.To learn
more about the park, visit
www.FloridaStateParks.
org/stephenfoster.

Friday
Cold Potato
Columbia County Senior
Services Inc. is hosting
a "Cold Potato" game 1
p.m. Friday at the LifeStyle
Enrichment Center, locat-
ed at 628 SE Allison Court.
Call (386) 755-0235.

Japanese drumming
The Columbia County
Public Library is hosting


Japanese drumming with
Tampa Taiko 11 a.m. at
Fort White Community
Center and 2 p.m. at the
Main Branch Friday.

Saturday
Dog Days of Summer
Dog Days of Summer is
10 am.-4 p.m. Saturday at
Stephen Foster State Park.
There will be a parade of
paws, canine costumes
and trick competition, as
well as demonstrations. Dr.
Hawthorne from Lake City
Animal Hospital will answer
questions and Pet Smart
will have "free" give-a-
ways. Bring your own dog
on a leash. Regular park
entrance fees apply.


Romney watches for Iowa path as campaigns heat up


By THOMAS BEAUMONT
Associated Press

DES MOINES, Iowa -
The accelerating GOP pres-
idential campaigns in Iowa
probably will define front-
runrer Mitt Romney's chief
challengers over the next
six weeks and could force
the former Massachusetts
governor to reconsider
his decision to mount only
modest efforts in this early
voting state.
Rep. MicheleBachmann's
quick rise in popularity in
the leadoff caucus state and
former Minnesota Gov. Tim
Pawlenty's stubbornly low
poll numbers after mope
than a year of groundwork
in Iowa give Romney new
opportunities in the state
where he has worked to
lower expectations in his
second campaign.
Romney may stick with
his plan to tread lightly
in, Iowa .and look to New,
Hampshire's leadoff,.prif !
2mtary. for a. liftoff in 2012
if there is no opening for
him to seize as a consensus
choice.
'But Romney's healthy
fundraising, with as much
as $20 million in the three-
month reporting period
that ended last week, and
his lead in national polls
give, him flexibility his less-
known rivals lack and make
it possible for him to wait
to see how the chips fall
in Iowa this summer, and
decide later whether to up
his ante, :
"I think its awfully hard
for me at this stage to pre-
dict where we'll spend all
our time and devote all
our resources," Romney
told The Associated Press
this past week. "But we're
focused on running our
race, where we think best"
Minnesota's Bachmiann
was on her first sustained
Iowa campaign trip this
weekend. She's, coming off
a successful stretch marked
by a well-received nation-
al debate debut, a widely
covered campaign kickoff
in her native Iowa and a
strong showing in The Des
Moines Register's poll.
Bachmann nearly matched
Romney, the No. 2 GOP
caucus finisher four years
ago, for the early Iowa lead,
in the survey.
Criticized for. having lit-
tle caucus campaign heft
on her team, Bachmann
has named as her deputy
national campaign man-
ager David Polyansky,
who's credited with bring-
ing organizational and stra-
tegic weight to the 2008
campaign of caucus winner
Mike Huckabee.
Bachmann has feet in
Christian conservative
and tea party camps, and
will need to quickly orga-
nize within these groups.
Polyansky, who helped
Huckabee form relation-
ships with Christian home-
school advocates in Iowa, for
instance, can help behind
the scenes. Bachmann's
schedule had her headlin-
ing a tea party rally in Des
Moines on Saturday.
But caucus support is


more often sealed in per-
son than in crowds at a
rally or along a July Fourth
parade route. Bachmann
will have.to meet privately
with influential GOP activ-
ists, as she plans to begin
this weekend. She's also
staffing a phone bank to
drum up support for the
Aug. 13 straw poll. "We
can't make enough person-
al appearances in 40 days
to make that happen," said
Bachmann's Iowa campaign
chairman, Kent Sorenson.
Businessman Herman
Cain, a tea party favorite,
also will need strong sup-
port from this motivated
but untested segment of the
GOP electorate. Cain, third
.in the new Iowa poll, was
the only other candidate
in double digits, with 10
percent But his campaign
organization has suffered
some key staffing depar-
tures in Iowa.
Former Sen. Rick
Santorums.of Pennsylvania
has a foothold among social
conservatives. He's look-
ing for a straw-poll break-
through with help from a
top aide to Romney's 2008
campaign.
For Pawlenty, the task
in Iowa is the opposite of
Bachmann's.'He will spend
15 days in the state this
month trying to show that
the organization he has
built there can generate
enthusiasm.
Pawlenty has the larg-
est Iowa campaign staff,
has spent more than two
dozen days in the state
since November 2009 and
is airing the campaign's
first television ads. He
has a list of recognizable
Republican supporters,
from former statewide
officeholders to up-and-
coming figures. Yet he was
the choice of only 6 percent.
in the Register's poll.


everyday, f.r this I am thankful


After saying in January
he needed to "win or do
very well" in the caucuses,
he recently has tried to
lower expectations for the
straw poll, despite hiring
the consultant who helped
Romney win the 2007 straw
poll.
"As to the straw poll, I
don't know that we need
to win it," Pawlenty told
a conservative radio host
in Des Moines this past
week. "I think we need to
do well and show some
progress."
The pressure is on
Pawlenty to assemble
those pieces of the broad
GOP coalition he has long
said he can deliver, includ-
ing social and business
conservatives.
'Tim Pawlenty is com-
ing up on a pretty serious
EKG test in Iowa," said
Robert Haus, who ran the
2008 Iowa caucus cam-
paign for former Sen. Fred
Thompson of Tennessee.
"Is he going to ultimately
materialize into the big
challenger to Romney or
not?"
Pawlenty's lack of early
momentum could open the
door for Texas Gov. Rick
Perry, who could attract
support from Iowans look-
ing for a pro-business gov-
ernor besides Romney.
Perry, who's also popular
with social conservatives,
is considering a White
House run and plans a
national day of prayer in
.Houston for Aug. 6, a week
before the straw poll.
A top Perry adviser,
Dave "Carney, has made
inquiries in Iowa about
the timing and rules of
the straw poll and cau-
cuses, while Perry has
raised his profile with key-
appearances and private
meetings with influential
Republicans.


Mollie Burch Gaylard


ASSOCIATED PRESS.
In this file photo Mitt Romney heads to his car after speaking at the Mediacom 2012
Presidential Candidate Series in Des Moines, Iowa.


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R .: , .


On behalf of our entire family, we wish to thank everyone
who touched our lives in honor of my Son, Joshua 0.
Burch. To everyone across the United States and here at
home, US Forestry Service Lake Cioy please accept our
sincere thanks for the love and honor you have shown to
our family for Joshua, to Keith Osteen and all the Forestry
Service who worked with Joshua daily, his memory will
live on and on, he loved each one of 'ou. To all Forestry's
all over the United States, FHP, CCSO, LCPD, all
Military Seriice, Honor Guard. Another's, Father's,
Friends, Relatives, Sheriff Mark Hunter, Judge Vernon
Douglass, Gateway Funeral Home. Christ Central Alini,-
triei, James Roberts, all churches, organizmwnso. the beau-
tiful flowers, phone calls, food and kind words and above
all, "God" for allowing us to have oshua in our hli'e, for
every kindness shown to our family during the lo, of mv
Son Joshua Burch. IfIl bare forgotten anyone, thank you
from the bottom of my heart. Please keep Danielle. Jeremy
and Jacob in your prayers, He was always nmy "'HERO", I
will miss him so much, but I can feel him afl around me


I - --


Page Editor: Todd Taylor, 754-0424


4 t 1









LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL & STATE SUNDAY, JULY 3, 2011


Boy battling cancer gets


to swim with dolphins


By JANET BEGLEY
Scripps Treasure Coast Newspapers

SEBASTIAN Tyler
Manning of Sebastian had
one wish after he developed
cancer in his right leg.
The 12-year-old Sebastian
River Middle School stu-
dent wanted a chance to
swim with the dolphins.
But after having his leg
amputated in 2009, Tyler
thought he would never be
able to swim again, much
less with dolphins.
Thanks to the Make-A-
Wish Foundation and a cus-
tom-made, donated pros-
thesis, Tyler fulfilled his
dream when he swam with
the dolphins in Cozumel,
Mexico on June 17 while
on a weeklong Carnival
cruise.
The waterproof pros-
thesis, which was creat-
ed by Mike Hudak from
Advanced Prosthetics and
Orthotics in Orlando, cost
between $5,000 and $8,000
to manufacturer. Hudak
volunteered to create the.
prosthesis and collaborat-
ed with component manu-
facturers through Hanger
Prosthetics and Orthotics
of Jacksohville Beach to
have all of the materials
donated.
"I used to work in New
Jersey where we had a lot
of surfers," said Hudak.
"But this prosthetic is dif-
ferent because it flexes at
the ankle and if he wants
to go scuba diving, you can
even attach a fin."
Although Tyler didn't
scuba dive in the Caribbean,
-he was able to swim in the
ocean, as well as the ship's


Vivian L. Feagle Crews
Vivian L. Feagle Crews, passed
away June 29, 2011. She was
born October 7, 1924 in Dundee,
FL, raised in Lake City, FL.
ArA Ocoee resident since 1958.
She was a faithful member of.
First Baptist Church of Winter
Garden, FL.
Vivian was a
retired Elec-
tronic Assem-
bler for Martin "
Marietta, Or- --
lando and past -.
president ofthe
Ocoee Lions
Club Auxiliary. She is preceded
in death by her husband Charlie.
Mrs. Crews is survived by sons,
Tommy Elvin (Jan) Crews; Larry
Crews; daughter, Nancy (David)
Fuller; granddaughter, Rhonda
(Freddy) Clark and great-grand-
children, Courtney, Spencer and
Brandon Clark; brothers, Leroy
(Sharon) Feagle, David (Nora)
Feagle, Leon Feagle; sisters,
Bessie (the late Paul) Timmins,
Betty (the late Bub) Witt, Annie
Mae (Bud) Lands; sistef-in-law,
Nell Feagle. She leaves behind
numerous nieces and nephews,
many dear friends and church
family. Visitation will be held
from 6-8 pm, Tues., July 5, 2011
and from 10-11 am, Wed., July 6,
2011 at Woodlawn Funeral Home
followed by the Funeral Service
at 11 am. Acting as her Honorary
Pallbearers her dearly loved Sun-
day School Class. Arrangements
entrusted to WOODLAWN
MEMORIAL PARK &
FUNERAL HOME, Gotha, FL.
407-293-1361. Condolences
may be offered at www.wood-
lawnfuneralhomegotha. com.
Juanita "Tiny" Brittain
Mrs. Juanita "Tiny" Brittain,
wife of the late pastor, Carson
Brittain, passed away on July 2,
2011, after a brief illness. Mrs.
Brittain was born in Puncheon
Camp, Tennessee, on September
9, 1916, and grew up in Knox-
ville. She met her future hus-
band at Carson Newman College
in Jefferson City, TN, and they
were married on Thanksgiving
Day of 1940. In addition to her
husband, Mrs. Brittain was pre-
ceded in death by her son-in-law,
Keith McCray (Nancy). Mrs.
Brittain is remembered by many
former students who were in her
classroom at Lake City Junior
High School, where she taught
for a number of years. She had
a quick wit and ready smile, but
guided both her own children
and her students with a. firm
hand. She will be remembered
as a loving wife and mother.
She is survived by her chil-
dreti: David (Carol) Brittain
of Mexico Beach, FL, Mary
Manning of Franklin, NC, and
Nancy Collins (Carson) of Lake


saltwater pool.
"It was pretty cool,"" said
Tyler. "I was able to swim
with the dolphins, and they
pushed me along on a boo-
gie board. I danced with
them, and hugged them. I
had a great time."
The dolphin experience
was just one of several
shore excursions that Tyler,
his sister Kayla, 16, and his
parents Tonya and Belden
Manning, enjoyed during
the Western Caribbean
cruise.
"Carnival went out their
way for us," said Tonya
Manning. "They told us to
pick whatever we wanted
to do in each port and
they would make all of the
arrangements. We also had
a behind-the-scenes tour of
the ship, we met the danc-
ers, toured the kitchens
and met the captain."
Tyler was diagnosed
with synovial sarcoma, a
rare form of cancer in the
soft tissues that invades the
tendons, joints and mus-
cles in between bones, in
January 2009. After endur-
ing extensive chemother-
apy treatments that year,
the cancer still managed
to make its way to Tyler's
bone marrow, forcing doc-
tors at Shands Hospital in
Gainesville to amputate
his leg below the knee. He
will return to Shands this
month for further tests to
see that he remains cancer-
free.
"He's still very active,"
said Tonya Manning. "He's
a good hopper when he's
not wearing his leg and
really does very well. Tyler
doesn't let anything slow


OBITUARIES


City. In addition, she leaves five
grandchildren: Scott Brittain,
Melissa McCray Henderson,
Jeff Brittain, Haiying Man-
ning Han, and Joshua McCray,
and four great grandchildren.
A graveside service for family
and friends will be conducted at
Forest Lawn Memorial Gardens
Cemetery on Tuesday, July 5th,
at 9:00 A.M. with Rev. Stephen
Ahrens, pastor of First Baptist
Church of Lake City officiat-
ing. Interment will follow. No
Visitation hours are scheduled
but the family will be at the
home of Nancy and Carson
Collins, 1124 SW Flagler Ct.,
Lake City. In lieu of flowers,
the family suggests donations in
her name to Haven Hospice or
your favorite charity. Arrange-
ments are under the direction
of GUERRY Funeral Home,
2659 SW Main Blvd., Lake
City. Please.sign the guest book
at www.guerryfuneralhome.net.
Hughy Lee "H.L." Sistrunk
Mr. Hughy Lee "H.L." Sistrunk,
79 of Lake City passed away on
Friday, July 1, 2011 at the Lake
City Medical Center in Lake
City following a brief illness.
Mr. Sistrunk was born in Live
Oak, Florida and was raised in
Lake City. He was a graduate of
Columbia High School class of
1949, had served in the Florida
National Guard and retired from


him down."
But that was not always
the case. After the leg
was amputated, Tyler was
unable to wear a prosthesis
at all because he required
two surgeries to his leg to
deal with an infection.
"We didn't get his 'water
leg' until right before we
went on the cruise," said
Tonya Manning. "We
weren't really sure how it
would work out but he did
just great with it".
Tonya Maning wasn't
quite so lucky however.
After swimming with her
family at the Dolphin
exhibit in Cozumel, she
fell down several stairs
and broke her ankle. Still,
the family remains posi-
tive about their experience
with Make-A-Wish, and
encourages other families
with critically-ill children to
apply for the program.
Make-A-Wish candidates
are nominated for the pro-
gram and must be diag-
nosed with a life-threaten-
ing illness by a physician.
Nationwide, the foundation
grants more than 13,000
wishes each year through
67 chapters across the
United States.
For Tyler's dad Belden,
spending time with his fam-
ily on the cruise was a won-
derful gift.
"The cruise was so nice
for all of us," said Belden
Manning. "It was a great
stress reliever for all of us
after the past few years.
Carnival took great care of
us and Make-A-Wish made
Tyler's wish come true.
.That's what really mat-
ters."


Jurors see scant evidence


in Casey Anthony trial


By KYLE HIGHTOWER
Associated Press

ORLANDO After more than 33 days
of testimony, 400 pieces of evidence and
sweeping promises from attorneys to
prove how 2-year-old Caylee Anthony
died, neither prosecutors nor defense
attorneys have provided concrete evi-
dence showing whether the girl was
killed by her mother.
And when closing arguments begin
Sunday, jurors won't forget what they
were promised.
During opening statements in May,
prosecutors said Caylee was suffocated
with duct tape by a mother who loved
Sto party, tattooed herself with the Italian
words for "beautiful life" in the month
her daughter was missing and crafted
elaborate lies to mislead everyone from
investigators to her own parents. Defense
attorneys countered that the toddler acci-
dentally drowned in the family swimming
pool, and that her seemingly carefree
mother in fact was hiding emotional dis-
tress caused by sexual abuse from her
father.
However, a medical examiner never
determined precisely how Caylee died,
and 25-year-old Casey Anthony's DNA
was not found with her daughter's skel-
etal remains when they were found in
December 2008 in a wooded area near
the Anthony family home. The defense
team never offered firm proof of how'
the girl died, either, and never offered
any evidence that Casey Anthony was
molested by her father, George, who
has firmly denied the claim.
'This is an emotional case and I think
they made some promises early in the
opening and they have not been able to
deliver," said Tim Jansen, a former feder-
al prosecutor and criminal defense lawyer
in Tallahassee. "(The jury is) going to be
very skeptical in their closing arguments.
When I do my closing arguments, I can
tell you right away if they are listening to
me, if they are agreeing with me or if they
turn the other way and it's not a good feel-
ing to lose a jury."
The case has played out on national
television from the time Caylee was
reported misAing three years ago to the
trial that was broadcast across the coun-
try. Captivated observers have camped
outside the courthouse to jockey for
coveted seats in the courtroom gallery,


ASSOCIATED PRESS:
Judge Belvin Perry looks on during the
last day of testimony in the Casey Anthony
trial at the Orange County Courthouse in
Orlando Friday.


which has occasionally led to fights-
among those desperate to watch the:
drama unfold.
Casey Anthony has pleaded not guilty
to first-degree murder. She could face a
possible death sentence or life in prison:
if convicted of that charge. Anthony:
also is charged with aggravated child:
abuse, aggravated manslaughter of a:
child and four counts of providing false:
information to law enforcement. The:
child abuse and manslaughter charges:
each carry a 30-year prison term if;
convicted.
Judge Belvin Perry gave attorneys'
Saturday off so they could prepare their
final arguments for Sunday. He has said
the jury of seven women and five men:
could start deliberating by Sunday eve-
ning.
Prosecutors finished their rebuttal:
case Friday, after which defense attorney
Cheney Mason argued that the judge'
should grant a request to acquit Anthony.
He said in part about the state's case: "If
you separate facts from fiction and infer-
ences stacked on top of inferences ...
there is no proof."


Seaboard Coastline, now CSX,
with 37 years of employment.
Mr. Sistrunk had lived in Lake
City for the past 20 years hav-
ing moved here from Cedar Key
where he lived following his re-
tirement. He was a former mem-
ber of the First Baptist Church
of Cedar Key and currently the
Lake City First Christian Church.
Mr. Sistrunk is survived by his
wife, Marjorie Sistrunk, Lake
City, one daughter, Karen Bick-
nell (Wayne), Atlanta, GA, his
mother, Mildred Sistrunk, Lake
City and two grandsons, Ian
J. Bicknell, Atlanta, GA and
Brian D. Bicknell, Athens, GA.
Funeral services for Mr. Sistrunk
will be conducted on Wednesday,
July 6, 2011 at 11:00 A.M. in the
Chapel of Guerry Funeral Home
with Rev. Ray Shaw and Rev.
Arthur Peterson officiating. In-
terment will follow at 4:00 P.M.
at Cedar Key Cemetery in Cedar
Key, Florida. Visitation with the
family will be one hour prior
to the service from 10-11:00
A.M. on Wednesday. Arrange-
ments are under the direction
of GUERRY Funeral Home,
2659 SW Main Blvd., Lake
City. Please sign the guestbook
at www.guerryfuneralhome.net.

Obituaries are paid advertise-
ments. For details, call the Lake
City Reporter's classified depart-
ment at 752-1293.


I Furnished or Unfurnished
town homes on the
golf course

~.Updated apartments
w/tile floors & fresh paint

SJ Office space at Oakhill
Plaza for lease

Farm w/7 stall barn
S & apartment

Call Michelle 752-9626 for details
rllarlla


"B I r


Page Editor: Todd Taylor, 754-0424









LAKE CITY REPORTER ADVERTISEMENT SUNDAY, JULY 3, 2011


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LAKE CITY REPORTER WEATHER SUNDAY, JULY 3, 2011


THE WEAl




E PATCHY r CHANCEi
OG EARLY | R


H195L067


* dosta
96/67


Pensacla
93/75


Talahassee
94/71 ...


88/75


TEMPERATURES
High Saturday,
Low Saturday
Normal high
Normal low
SRecord high
Record low

; PRECIPITATION
SSaturday
;Month total
Year total
Normal month-to-date
Normal year-to-date


7a 1p 7p
Sunday








,


Lak
95,


.. . 93
68
S 90
70
99 in 1902
64 in 1962


0.00"
0.00"
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0.44"
24.47"


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CHANCE CHANCE CHANCE'
-OSSTORMS STORSTORMS



194LO1 194 LO 72 193 LO
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Jacksonvile
on/ 17iA


City
Cape Canaveral


e 67y, u/' Daytona Beach
/" Ft. Lauderdale
iaesville Daytona Beach Fort Myers
94/67 88J72 Gainesville
Ocala Jacksonville
93/70 *
93/70 Key West
Oriando Cape Canaveral Key West
93/73 86/73 Lake City
Miami
Tampa,* Naples
94/75 West Palm Beach Ocala
87/79 Orlando
S Ft Lauderdale Panama City
Ft.Myers:. 89/77 Pensacola
92/74 Naples Tallahassee
,92/75 Miami Tampa
88/77 Valdosta
Key West* W. Palm Beach
90/83


SUN
Sunrise today
Sunset today
SunriSe tom.
Sunset torm.


6:33 a.m.
8:36 p.m.
6:34 am.
8:36 p.m.


MOON
Moonrise today 8:53 a.m.
Moonset today 10:22 p.m.
Moonrise tom. 9:57 a.m.
Moonset tom. 10:59 p.m.



July July July July
8 15 23 30
First Full Last New


On this dale in
ondayB 1994, Tropical
Storm Ailer to mrade
landfall near Desirn.
Fla., withn inos
speeds of 65 mpn
and a minimum cen
tral pressure of 995
mb The slow moving
storm later Drought
flooding to much of
the Southeast.

-^^J^^


10

lOmoatsblus
Today's
ultra-violet
radiation risk
for the area on
a scale from 0
to 1-


NATIONAL FORECAST: A low pressure system extending from the northern Plains to the Mid-
Atlantic and Northeast will be responsible for scattered showers and thunderstorms for much
of the eastern United States today. A ridge of high pressure over the Upper Midwest will keep
portions of the Great Lakes and Midwest dry.



-":, ...
V .


Monday
88/74/pc
89/73/pc
88/79/pc
93/75/t
93/70/t
90/74/pc
90/80/sh
95/70/t
88/80/pc
91/76/t
93/71/t
93/75/t
90/79/t
92/78/pc
95/71/pc
93/74/t
95/69/t
88/79/pc


Tuesday
89 75 p,- '
90 74 p,

*?. 76 I

91/75 I
89/ 1 :r,
9L 1 I

93 77 t

93/76 p.:
87/79/pc
91/77/pc
95/72/t
92/76/t
95/71/pc
89/79/t


An exclusive
service
brought to
our readers


The Weather
Channel.




woathercom


Ve Forecasts, data and
S graphics 2011 Weather
i- I4 Central, LP, Madison, Wis.
weather J,. www.weatherpubllsher.com


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Low: 290, Stanley. Idaho '


Saturday Today Saturday Today


CITY
Albany NY
Albuquerque
Anchorage
Atlanta
Baltimore
Billings
Birmingham
Bismarck
Boise
Boston
Buffalo
Charleston SC
Charleston WV
Charlotte
Cheyenne
Chicago
Cincinnati
Cleveland
Columbia SC
Dallas
Daytona Beach
Denver


HI/Lo/Pcp. HI/Lo/W CITY
85/50/0 83/64/t Des I
89/73/0 93/69/pc Detro
53/50/.52 62/51/r El Pas
93/73/0 93/72/t Falrba
91/58/0 92/71/t Green
80 54 0 97/63/pc Hartff
96 -1 0 '97/72/t Honol
81/49/0 88/65/pc Houst
84/55/0 91/54/s Indlan
75/66/0 83/68/t Jacks
84/57/0 80/61/t Jacks
89/73/0 91/71/pc Kansa
87/64/0 90 68 I Las V
91/63/0 95 ;i:. i Uttle
74/56/0 '92 59 pc Los A
90/74/0 78/65/pc Memp
87/66/:01 89/67/t Miam
86/71/.15 80/68/t Mlnne
94/71/0 96/71/t Mobil
98/76/0 102/76/pc New
85/72/0 88/72/pc New
82/57/0 95/65/pc Oklah


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HI/Lo/Pcp. HI/Lo/W


86/69/0
95/69/0
91/73/0
64/49/0
90/65/0
84/61/0
81/73/.01
98/75/0
88/69/0
98/69/0
87/69/0
89/72/0
103/79/0
95/72/0
71/65/0
96/74/0
90/73/.20
84/67/0.
96/77/.10
97/79/0
86/68/0
99/72/0


83/67/pc
87/68/pc
97/74/pc
71/53/r
94/71/t
85/67/t
88/72/s
98/75/pc
89/68/pc
99/73/pc
90/74/pc
87/71/t
108/86/pc
98/75/pc
77/67/s
99/76/pc
S88/77/t
86/64/pc
93/73/t
95/77/t
83/71/t
100/73/pc


CITY
Omaha
Orlando
Philadelphia
Phoenix
Pittsburgh'
Portland ME
Portland OR
Raleigh
Rapid City
Reno
Richmond
Sacramento
St. Louis
Salt Lake City
San Antonio
San Diego ,
San Francisco
Seattle
Spokane
Tampa
Tucson
Washington


Saturday Today
HI/Lo/Pcp. HI/Lo/W.
83/71/0 83/68/t-
90/72/0 93/73/pc
87/68/0 89/72/t-
110/84/0 114/91/pce
85/60/0 85/63/t.
76/59/0 75/62/t
72/56/0 75/53/c
94/66/0 196/71/t
78/56/0 90/64/pc
89/59/0 96/60/s
91/65/0 95/72/t
91/62/0 100/64/s
98/77/0 93/74/t;
88/61/0 98/71/pc
92/78/0 95/73/pc
73/64/0 81/67/pc:
67/53/0 81/57/s
72/52/0 68/51/sh
74/52/0 79/49/sh'
89/73/0 94/75/pc
107/82/0 103/80/pc
S91/68/0 94/72/t


09


CITY
Acapulco
Amsterdam
Athens
Auckland
Belng
Berlin
Buenos Alres
CaIro
Geneva
Havana
Helsinki
Hong Kong
Kingston


Saturday
HI/Lo/Pcp.
79/75/4.10
64/50/0
na/na/na
59/41/0
82/75/0
55/52/0
52/25/0
91/70/0
73/52/0
90/73/0
86/68/0
90/82/0
S88/79/0


Today
HI/Lo/W
87/78/t
64/54/pc
82/72/s
59/53/c
92/71/t
70/57/sh
53/34/s
90/68/s
72/50/s
90/73/t
81/59/pc
89/83/t
86/77/c


CITY
La Paz
Uma
London
Madrid
Mexico City
Montreal
Moscow
Nairobi
Nassau
New Delhi
Oslo
Panama
Paris


Saturday
HI/Lo/Pcp.
46/32/0
68/63/0
73/55/0
97/66/0
68/59/0
82/66/0
84/61/0
81/59/0
91/81/0
97/82/0
63/57/0
88/77/0
70/52/0


Today
HI/Lo/W
52/27/sh
68/64/pc
73/57/pc
91/63/s
70/56/t
79/68/sh
81/64/t
78/63/pc
88/79/t
94/82/t
73/52/c
88/75/t
75/52/s


CITY
Rio
Rome
St. Thomas VI
San Juan PR
Santiago
Seoul
Singapore
Sydney
Tel Aviv
Tokyo
Toronto
Vienna
Warsaw


Saturday
HI/Lo/Pcp.
77/63/0
79/66/0
86/75/.04
82/75/.18
50/28/0
81/72/0
90/81/0
66/54/0
84/70/0
82/75/0
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Lake City Reporter


Story ideas?

Contact
Tim Kirby
Sports Editor
754-0421
tkirby@l kecityreporter.com


SPORTS


Sunday, July 3, 201 I


www.lakecityreporter.com


Section B


or


ZZ


Fort White High taps

former coach to take

over baseball program


By TIM KIRBY
tkirby@lakecityreporter.com
FORT WHITE Fort
White High baseball has
gone back to the man who
was there in the formative
years.
Mike Rizzi was recent-
ly announced as the new
baseball head coach for the
Indians. Rizzi takes over for
Chad Bonds, who was a
victim of job cuts at the
school.
"I felt like
the job just "Baseba
hasn't been life les
finished and that's ,
that's why I
jumpedback me thr<
in," Rizzi to teach
said. "I love
teaching the gam
the game of the gam
baseball." them w
Rizzi' s
first stint get
as head
coach at -Mi
Fort White Fort White Hig
began in
2001-02, the second year of
the school, and ran until
2008.
The Indians made the
playoffs as runner-up his
first year and added district
titles in 2003 and 2006. Fort
White won opening round
playoff games in both dis-
trict championship sea-
sons.
The signature win for the
school to date was a 9-8
extra-inning decision over
Dixie County High in 2003.
"We were playing at the
rec fields here and I talked
to Tom Clark about using his
field (Lake City Community
College)," Rizzi said. "We
had brought up Dusty
Parrish from the JV and he
mostly sat on the bench. He
pitched the last two innings
and hit the home run to win
the game."
Rizzi said Parrish's prep-
aration and performance
justified his philosophy of
the game.
"Baseball teaches life les-
sons and that's what got me
through," Rizzi said. "I try
to teach not only the game,
but how the game can help
them after they get older."
Rizzi had to rely on
those lessons when he was
relieved as coach at Fort
White after the 2008 sea-


aL
I
s

)
O1
h
E
f
I


ke
1gh


son. A rift had developed
among factions and he was
forced out.
"It was a valuable learning
experience from a coaching
standpoint," Rizzi said. "I
learned a lot from it and
I am a better coach today
because of it. It made me
more aware that the biggest
thing is communication. I
had something taken away
that I had a passion for. I
saw what I did wrong and
how to do better."
Rizzi
II teaches continued
ions and to support
vhat got Wth Frt
ugh. I try program.
I not only He served
as an
e, but how assistant
e can help coach for
hen they the mid-
dle school
older and last
year was
e Rizzi, an assis-
h baseball coach tant for
the junior
varsity.
In the middle year, he was
an assistant for Ron Brooks
at Santa Fe High. Brooks
went through a similar epi-
sode in his program and is
now at Buchholz High. Rizzi
took mental notes from see-
ing it unfold.
"It knocked the wind out
of me at first, but I had to
get back on the field," Rizzi
said about the Fort White
decision. "I had no desire
to leave Fort White -- it is
where I want to end up -
and I wanted to be around
the game."
His love of the game led
to a mid-life career change.
Rizzi graduated in 1974
from Cooper City High in
Broward County, where he
played football and base-
ball. He was all-conference
in both sports and led the
state with 14 interceptions
as a junior.
Rizzi had been accepted
at Florida and originally
planned to attend the school
and walk on for football.
"I was better as a defen-
sive back," Rizzi said. "I
sent out 200 letters to col-
leges. I got a letter from
Worthington Community
College in Minnesota. I
RIZZI continued on 4B


TOP: Newly hired Fort White
High baseball coach Mike
Rizzi was an assistant coach
for hitting at Santa Fe High
in 2010. The Raiders had a
team average of .321 and
posted a 23-2 record.



LEFT: Fort White baseball
coach Mike Rizzi has named
former middle school head
coach Chris Glenn as his
pitching coach. 'We preach
strikes and to command
the mound and have a
presence,' Rizzi said.



Photos by
JASON MATTHEW
WALKER/
Lake City Reporter


Ragan redeems himself

with Daytona victory


...... -
ASSOCIATED PRESS
A NASCAR official points the way to the garage for driver Trevor Bayne (21) who was
involved in an early wreck in the Coke Zero 400 auto race at Daytona International Speedway
in Daytona Beach on Saturday. Bayne won the Daytona 500 in February.


Roush Fenway
driver scores first
Sprint Cup win.
By JENNA FRYER
Associated Press
DAYTONA BEACH
- David Ragan earned the
first Sprint Cup victory of
his career Saturday night
with a push from teammate
Matt Kenseth that helped
Ragan atone for one of the
biggest gaffe's of his young
career.
He might have won the
season-opening Daytona
500 when he lined up as the
leader on a late restart in
NASCAR's season-opening


event But he was penalized
for passing too early, and the
life-changing victory instead
went to Trevor Bayne.
Now Ragan has his own
win at Daytona International
Speedway, albeit in the
lesser of the races. That
made little difference to the
25-year-old second-genera-
tion NASCAR driver.
"Everybody kept talking
about (the Daytona 500),
I just kept trying to zero it
out," Ragan said.
Ragan could now find
himself in contention for a
berth in the Chase for the
Sprint Cup championship.
The win pushed Ragan to
17th in the standings.
"Not a better night to


win," Ragan said.
Kenseth finished second;
to give Roush Fenway Racing'
a 1-2 sweep for Ford.
Joey Logano finished'
third in a Toyota for Joe,
Gibbs Racing. Kasey Kahne.
was fourth in a Toyota for'
Red Bull Racing and Kyle'
Busch was fifth for JGR.
Jeff Gordon made a ter-,
rific late-race save to avoid a;
race-ending wreck and fin-"
ished sixth in a Chevrolet
for Hendrick Motorsports..
Kevin Harvick was,
seventh for Richard"
Childress Racing and'
claimed the series points
lead after an early accident
caused previous leader Carl
Edwards to finish 37th.


/


- I I


Fr











LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS SUNDAY, JULY 3, 2011


TELEVISION

TV sports

Today
CYCLING
8 a.m.
VERSUS Tour de France, stage 2,
team time trial, at Les Essarts, France
3 p.m.
NBC -Tour de France, stage 2, team
time trial, at Les Essarts, France (same-
day tape)
dOLF
8 am.
TGC European PGATour, Open de
France, final round, at Paris
7 p.m.
TGC Champions Tour, Montreal
Championship, final round, at Blainville,
Quebec (same-day tape)
I p.m.
TGC PGA Tour, AT&T National,
final round, at 'ewtown Square, Pa.
3 p.m.
CBS PGATourAT&T National, final
round, at Newtown Square, Pa.
MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL
Noon
TBS -All-Star Game Selection Show,
at Atlanta
I p.m.
TBS N.Y.Yankees at N.Y. Mets
2:10 p.m.
WGN Chicago White Sox at
Chicago Cubs
8 p.m.
ESPN LA. Dodgers at LA.Angels
MOTORSPORTSS
8 am.
'SPEED' MotoGP World
Championship, Italian Grand Prix, at
Mugello, Italy (same-day tape)
S.6 pm.
SPEED-- MotoGP Moto2, Italian
Grand Prix, at Mugello Italy (same-day
tape)
SOCCER
7:45 a.m..
.ESPN2 -.FIFAWoIen's World Cup,
Group D.Australla vs. Equatorial Guinea,
at Bochum, Gerniany
Noon .
ESPN FIFA, Women's World Cup,
Group D. Brazil vs. Norway, at Wolfsburg,
Germany : ,
9 p.m.
ESPN2 MLS, Houston at Colorado.
TENNIS
9 a.m.
NBC The Championships, men's.
championship, match, at Wimbledon,
England

Monday
CYCLING
8 a.m.
VERSUS Tour de France, stage 3,
Olonne-sur-Mer to Redon, France.
MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL
1p.m.,
WGN Chicago Cubs at
Washington ,
1:30 p.m.
MLB Regional coverage,Toronto at
Boston or Houston at Pittsburgh
6:30 p.m.
MLB Regional coverage, N.Y.
Yankees at Cleveland or Philadelphia at
Florida (6 p.m. start)
SOCCER
8:30 p.m.
ESPN2 MLS, New England at Real
Salt Lake
\ 10:30 p.m.
ESPN2 MLS, Seattle at Los Angeles


BASEBALL

AL standings

East Division
W L Pet GB
NewYork 50 13 .617 -
Boston 48 34 .585 2'
Tampa Bay 46 37 .554 5
Toronto 40 44 .476 II'h
Baltimore 35 45 .438 14'%
Central Division
W L Pct GB
Cleveland 44 37 .543 -
Detroit 44 39 .530 I
Chicago 42 42 .500 3lh
Minnesota 35 46 .432 9
Kansas City 33 50 .398 12
West Division
W L Pct GB
Texas 44 39 .530 -
Los Angeles 42 41 .506 2
Seattle 40 42 .488 3'
Oakland 37 46 .446 7
Monday's Games
Toronto (Morrow 4-4) at Boston
(Lackey 5-7), 1:35 p.m.
Tampa Bay (Price 8-6) at Minnesota
(Duensing 5-7), 2:10 p.m.
Seattle (Pineda 7-5) at Oakland
(Moscoso 2-4), 4:05 p.m.
N.Y. Yankees (A.J.Burnett 8-6) at
Cleveland (Tomlin 9-4), 6:35 p.m.
Kansas City (Francis, 3-9) at Chicago
White Sox (Buehrle 6-5), 7:10 p.m.
Baltimore (Jakubauskas 2-1) at Texas
(C.Lewis 7-7), 8:05 p.m.
Detroit (Furbush I-I) at L.A. Angels
(Pineiro 3-3), 9:05 p.m.

Interleague play

Friday's Games
Philadelphia 7,Toronto 6
Chicago White Sox 6, Chicago Cubs 4
San Francisco 4, Detroit 3
Cleveland 8, Cincinnati 2
N.Y.Yankees 5, N.Y. Mets I
St. Louis 5,Tampa Bay 3
Atlanta 4, Baltimore 0
Boston 7, Houston 5
Texas 15, Florida 5
Colorado 9, Kansas City 0
Minnesota 6, Milwaukee 2
Oakland 5,Arizona 4
LA. Dodgers 5, LA.Angels 0
Seattle 6, San Diego 0
Saturday's Games


Philadelphia 5,Toronto 3
Chicago White Sox I, Chicago Cubs 0
Cleveland 3, Cincinnati I
N.Y.Yankees 5, N.Y. Mets 2
Boston 10, Houston 4
Atlanta 5, Baltimore 4
Tampa Bay 5, St. Louis I
Milwaukee 8, Minnesota 7
Colorado 9, Kansas City 6
San Francisco at Detroit (n)
Florida at Texas (n)
Arizona at Oakland (n)
L.A. Dodgers at L.A.Angels (n)


San Diego at Seattle (n)
Today's Games
San Francisco (Vogelsong 6-1) at
Detroit (Porcello 6-6), 1:05 p.m.
Philadelphia (CI.Lee 9-5) at Toronto
(Jo-.Reyes 3-7), 1:07 p.m.
Cleveland (Talbot 2-4) at Cincinnati
(Leake 7-4), 1:10 p.m.
N.Y.Yankees (FGarcia 7-6) at N.Y. Mets
(Dickey 4-7), 1:10 p.m.
Baltimore (Britton 6-6) at Atlanta
(Beachy 3-1), 1:35 p.m.
St. Louis (Lohse 8-4) at Tampa Bay
(Hellickson 7-7), 1:40 p.m.
Boston (Beckett 6-3) at Houston
(Lyles 0-3), 2:05 p.m..
Milwaukee (Greinke 7-3) at Minnesota
(Blackburn 6-6), 2:10 p.m.
Chicago White Sox (Floyd 6-7) at
Chicago Cubs (R.Lopez 0-2), 2:20 p.m.
Kansas City (Hochevar 5-8) at
Colorado (Hammel 4-7), 3:10 p.m.
Arizona (I.Kennedy 8-2) at Oakland
(G.Gonzalez 7-5), 4:05 p.m.
San Diego (Latos 5-8) at Seattle
(Undecided), 4:10 p.m.
Florida (Vazquez 4-8) at Texas
(C.Wilson 8-3), 8:05 p.m.
LA. Dodgers (Billingsley 7-6) at LA.
Angels (E.Santana 3-8), 8:10 p.m.

NL standings


Philadelphia'
Atlanta
Washington


East Division
W L
53 31
S49 35
42 4.2


NewYork 41 42 .494 11'
Florida 36 46 .439 16
Central Division
.. W L Pct GB
St. Louis 45 39 .536 -
Milwaukee 45 39 .536 -
Pittsburgh 42 41 -.506 2h
Cincinnati 42 42 .500 3
Chicago .34 ;,50 .405, II
Houston 29 55. .345 16
West Division
W L Pct GB
San Francisco 47 36 .566 -
Arizona 44 39 .530 3
Colorado 41 43 .494 6
'Los Angeles 37 46 .446 10
San Diego 37 46 .446 10
Friday's Game
Washington 2, Pittsburgh I
Saturday's Games
Pittsburgh 5,Washington 3, Ist game
Washington 4, Pittsburgh 3, 2nd game
Today's Game
Pittsburgh (Correla 10-6) 'at
Washington (Marquis 7-2), 1:35 p.m.
Monday's Games
Chicago Cubs (Dempster 5-6)- at
Washington (Zimmermann 5-7), 1:05 p.m.
Houston (Myers 3-7) at Pittsburgh
(Maholm 4-9), 1:35 p.m.
Arizona (D.Hudsbn 9-5) at Milwaukee
(Marcum 7-3), 4:10 p.m..
San Diego (Richard 4-9) at San
Francisco (Lincecum 6-6), 5:05 p.m:
Philadelphia (Worley 3-1) at Florida
(Nolasco 5-4), 6:10 p.m.
Cincinnati (Cueto 5-2) at St. Louis
(C.Carpenter 3-7), 6:15 p.m.
Colorado (Jimenez 3-7) at Atlanta
(Hanson 9-4),7:10 p.m.
N.Y. Mets (Capuano 7-7) at LA.
Dodgers (Lilly 5-8), 9:10 p:m.

College polls final

BASEBALL AMERICA
DURHAM, N.C. -The top 25 teams
in the Baseball America .poll with final
records and previous ranking (voting by
the staff of Baseball America):
Record Pvs
I.South Carolina 55-14 4
2. Florida 53-19 I
3.Virginia 56-12 2
4.Vanderbilt 54-12 3
5. North Carolina 51-16 13
6.Texas 49-19 5
7.TexasA&M 47-22 7
8. Florida State 46-19 6
9.Arizona State 43-18 .10
10.Oregon State 41-19 15
II. California 38-23 NR
12. C6nnecticut 45-20 18
13.Stanfoid .,, 35-22 "24
14.Cal State Fullerton 41-1.7 8
15. Rice '', 42-21 9
16.UC Irvine 43-18 NR
17. Mississippi State 38-25. NR
18. Dallas Baptist 42-20 NR
19.Texas Christian : 43-19 1.1,
20. Georgia Tech 42-21 12
21.Clemson 43-20. 14
22.UCLA '35-24 '17
23. Miami 38-23 16
24.Arkansas 40-22 19
25.East Carolina 41-21 23
COLLEGIATE BASEBALL
TUCSON, Ariz. The Collegiate
Baseball poll with final records, points and
previous rank.Voting is done by coaches,
sports writers and sports information
directors:
Record Pts Pvs
I.South'Carollna 55-14 497 4
2. Florida 53-19 492 I
3.Virginia 56-12 491 2
4.Vanderbilt 54-12 490 3
5. North'Carolina 51-16 488 7
6. California 38-23 485 8
7.Texas 49-19 483 5
8.Texas A&M 47-22 479 6.
9. Florida St. 46-19 477 9
10.Oregon St. 41-19 474 10
I I.Arizona St. 43-18 472 II
12.U.C.Irvine 43-18 471. 12
13. Connecticut 45-20-1 467 13
14.Stanford 35-22. 464 14
15. Mississippi St. 38-25 461 15
16. Dallas Baptist 42-20 457 16
17.Texas Christian 43-19 455 17
18. Cal St. Fullerton41-17 453 18
19.GeorgiaTech. 42-21 450 19
20. UCLA 35-24 449 20
21.Clemson '43-20 447 21
22. Miami 38-23 444 22
23. Oral Roberts 39-22 442 23
24. Rice 42-21 439 24
25.Arizona 39-21 437 25
26. Kent St. 45-17 434 26
27. Coastal Carolina42-20 432 27
28. Creighton 45-16 429 28
29. Arkansas 40-22 426 29
30. Stetson 43-20 424 30


BASKETBALL

WNBA schedule

Friday's Games
New York 81, San Antonio 75
Connecticut 75, Seattle 70


Phoenix 97, Chicago 84
Today's Game
Seattle atWashington,4 p.m.

AUTO RACING

Coke Zero 400

At Daytona International Speedway
Daytona Beach
Saturday
(Start position in parentheses)
I. (5) David Ragan, Ford, 170 laps,
107.3 rating, 47 points.
2. (16) Matt Kenseth, Ford, 170, 102.5,
43.
3. (37) Joey Logano.Toyota, 170, 105.6,
41.
4. (13) Kasey Kahne, Toyota, 170, 101,
41.
5. (38) Kyle Busch, Toyota, 170, 104.7,
40.
6. (4) Jeff Gordon, Chevrolet, 170,
85.6, 39.
7. (31) Kevin Harvick, Chevrolet, 170.
107.6,38.
8. (10) Paul Menard, Chevrolet, 170,
103.7,37.
9. (30) Juan Pablo Montoya, Chevrolet,
170,77.3,36.
10. (9) A J Allmendinger, Ford,' 170,
62.5,34.
11. (19) Tony Stewart, Chevrolet, 170,
'66.4,34.
12. (20) Brian Vickers,Toyota, 170,91.6,
32.
13. (36) Denny Hamlin, Toyota, 170,
84.9,32.
14. (25) Kurt Busch, Dodge, 170, 90.3,
31.
15. (26) Brad Keselowski, Dodge, 170,
64.5,30.
16. (39) David Gilliland, Ford, 170,
59.6,28.
S 17. (15) Marcos Ambrose, Ford, 170,
54.8,27.
18. (17) Greg Biffle,Ford, 170,69.9,27.
19. (6) Dale Earnhardt Jr., Chevrolet,
170,84.7,26. -
20. (8) Jimmie Johnson, Chevrolet, 170,
81.5,24.
21. (12) Jeff Burton, Chevrolet, 170,
70.6,24.
22. (.18) Jamie McMurray, Chevrolet,
170,69,23.
23. (II) Ryan Newmaq, Chevrolet,
170,82.3,23.
24. (28) Regan Smith, Chevrolet, 170,
85,21.
25.(23) David Reutimann,Toyota, 170,
82.9, 19.
26. (21) Landon Cassill, Chevrolet,
169,86.9,0.
27. (7) Andy Lally, Ford, 169,44.9, 17.
28. (41) Terry Labonte, Ford, 169,45.7,
16.
29. (27) Travis Kvapil, Ford, 169, 61.1,
0.
30. (43) Joe Nemechek, Toyota, 169,
64.3,0.
31. (24) Bobby Labonte, Toyota, 168,
39.3, 13.
32. (32) Casey Mears, Toyota, 164,
88.4, 13.
33. (1) Mark Martin, Chevrolet, 164,
68.3, 12.
34. (42) Robby Gordon, Dodge, 163.
35.2, 10. .
35. (34) Martin Truex Jr., Toyota,
accident, 162,81.7;10.
36. (3) Clint Bowyer, Chevrolet,
accident, 162,63.6,9.
37. (14) Carl Edwards, Ford, 144.50. ,
8.
38. (35) Geoff Bodine, Chevrolet,
wheel bearing, 143,30.6,6.
39. (40) Dave Blaney, Chevrolet,
accident, 47,31.5, 5.
40. (29) Mike Skinner, Toyota, wheel
bearing, 5, 28.4, 0.
41. (2) Trevor Bayne, Ford, accident,
4,29.5,0.
42. (33) Michael McDowell, Toyota,
electrical, 2,28.9, 2.
43. (22) Kevin Conway, Toyota, rear
gear, 1,27.3, 0.
Race Statistics
Average Speed of Race Winner:
159.491 mph.
Time of Race: 2 hours, 39 minutes,
53 seconds.
Margin ofVictory: Under CautiOn.
Caution Flags: 6 for 21 laps.:" '
Lead Changes: 57 among 25 drivers.
Top 12 in Points: K.Harvick, 586;
2. C.Edwards, 581; 3. Ky.Busch, 576;
4: Ku.Busch, 570;, 5. M.Kenseth, 564;
6. J.Johnson, 564;: 7. D.Earnhardt Jr.,
534; 8. J.Gordon, 519; 9. C.Bowyer, 505;
10. R.Newman, 498; II. D.Hamlin, 495;
12.T.Stewart 494.


TENNIS

Wimbledon


At The All England Lawni Tennis &
Croquet Clb
Wimbledon, England :
Saturday
Singles
Women
Championship
Petra Kvitova (8), Czech Republic, def.
Maria Sharapova (5), Russia, 6-3, 6-4.
Doubles
Men
Championship
Bob and Mike Bryan (I), United States,
def. Robert Lindstedt, Sweden, and Horia
Tecau (8), Romania, 6-3, 6-4, 7-6 (2).
Women
Semifinals
Sabine Lisicki, Germany, and Sam
Stosur, Australia, vs. Marina Erakovic,
New Zealand, and Tamarine Tanasugarn,
Thailand, 6-3, 4-6, 8-6.
Championship
Kveta Peschke, Czech Republic, and
Katarina Srebotnik (2), Slovenia, def.
Sabine Lisicki, Germany, and Sam Stosur,
Australia, 6-3, 6-1.
Mixed
Semifinals
Mahesh Bhupathi, India, and Elena
Vesnina (4), Russia, def. Paul Hanley,
Australia, and Hsieh Su-wei, Taiwan, 6-2,
3-6,7-5.
Jurgen Melzer, Austria, and Iveta
Benesova (9). Czech Republic, def. Daniel
Nestor, Canada, and Chan Yung-jan (8).
Taiwan, 64,6-4.
Junior Singles
Boys
Championship
Luke Saville (16), Australia, def. Liam
Broady (15), Britain, 2-6, 6-4, 6-2.
Girls
Semifinals


Irina Khromacheva (3), Russia, def.
Caroline Garcia (2), France, 7-6 (5), 3-6,
6-1.
Ashleigh Barty (12),Australia, def. Indy
deVroome, Netherlands, 6-4, 6-1.
Junior Doubles
Boys
Semifinals
Oliver Golding, Britain, and Jiri Vesely
(1), Czech Republic, def.Andres Artunedo
Martinavarro and Roberto Carballes
Baena (3), Spain, 7-5, 7-6 (5).
George Morgan, Britain, and Mate Pavic
(2), Croatia, def. Liam Broady, Britain, and
Filip-Horansky (4), Slovakia, 6-3, 7-6 (2).
Girls
Semifinals
Eugenie Bouchard, Canada, and Grace
Min (2), United States, def. Beatriz Haddad
Maia, Brazil, and Mayya Katsitadze, Russia,
6-1,6-3.
Demi Schuurs, Netherlands, and Tang
Hao Chen, China, def. Irina Khromacheva,
Russia, and Barbora Krejcikova, Czech
Republic, 6-2, 6-2.
Wheelchair Doubles
Men
Semifinals
Maikel Scheffers and Ronald Vink
(I), Netherlands, def. Robin Ammerlaan,
Netherlands, and Stefan Olsson, Sweden,
6-0,6-3.
Stephane Houdet and Michael
Jeremiasz, France, def. Tom Egberink,
Netherlands, and Shingd Kunieda (2),
Japan, 6-7 (4), 7-6 (I), 6-4.

SOCCER


Women's World Cup

GROUP PLAY
Saturday
Sweden I, North Korea 0
United States 3, Colombia 0
Today
Australia vs. Equatorial Guinea, 8 a.m.
Brazil vs. Norway, 12:15'p.m.
Tuesday.
England vs.Japan, 12:15,p.m. '
New Zealand vs. Mexico6 12:15 p.m.
France vs. Germany, 2:45. p.m.
Canada ys, Nigeria, 2:45 p.m.
Wednesday
Equatorial Guinea vs. Brazil, Noon
.Australia vs. Norway, Noon
Sweden vs. United States,
2:45 p.m.
North Korea vs. Colombia, 2:45 p.m.

CYCLING

Tour de France stages

July 2 Stage I: Passage du Gois La
Barre-de-Monts-Mont des Alouettes Les
Herbiers.flat, 191.5 kilometers (119 miles)
(Stage: Philippe Gilbert, Belgium; Yellow
Jersey: Gilbert) -
July 3 Stage 2: Les Essarts, team
time trial,23 (14,3)
July 4 Stage 3: Olonne-sur-Mer-
Redon,flat. 198 (123.0)
First Stage
(A 119-mile flat stage from La Barre-de-
Monts to Mont des Alouettes)
I. Philippe Gilbert, Belgium, Omega
Pharma-Lotto, 4 hours, 41 minutes, 31
seconds.
2. Cadel Evans, Australia, BMC Racing
Team, 3 seconds behind.
3. Thor Hushovd, Norway, Team
Garmin-Cervelo, :06f
4. Jose Joaquin Rojas, Spain, Movistar
Team, same time.
S 5. Jurgen Van Den Broeck, Belgium,
Omega Pharma-Lotto, same time.
6. Geraint Thomas, Britain, Sky
Procycling, same time.


29
30
31
32
33

34
35
38


r


ACROSS 3
4
Sleep-stage 4
acronym
Plod along 4
Nurse a drink 4
Juan's gold 4
Actor- Reeves
-Marie Saint 5
Frieze (hyph.). 5
Bridegroom 5
Attempted 5
Arrowhead 5
rock 5
Brown of
renown
- Zedong
Heat to boiling
Non-student
residents
Roly- -
Pinch, in a way
RSVP part
Left Bank pal
Magazinefill-
ers
Deli-scale word
Whims
Stooped 1


Kirkman optioned


to Round Rock


Associated Press


ARLINGTON, Texas
- The Texas Rangers acti-
vated right-hander Darren
O'Day from the 60-day dis-
abled list prior to Saturday
night's game against the
Florida Marlins.
O'Day had been out
since April 27 with a par-
tial tear of the labrum in
his left hip. He compiled a
2.45 ERA in eight relief
appearances for Texas
before the injury.
After recovering from
surgery on the hip, O'Day
had a 3.68 ERA in six minor
league relief appearances
leading to his return to the
Rangers roster.
To create a spot for
O'Day on the 25-man roster,
the Rangers optioned left-


hander Michael Kirkman
to Triple-A Round Rock.
The additions of O'Day
and right-hander Tommy
Hunter, who was activated
from the disabled list on
Friday, will give the bullpen
a boost, but Rangers man-
ager Ron Washington said
the Rangers are not done
seeking relief help.
Kirkman had struggled
since being called up.
Kirkman's last outing
was Friday in the Rangers'
15-5 win over 'Florida. He
pitched 1 innings with.
three hits and three runs
(two earned). He struck
out two.
For the season, Kirkman
was 1-1 with 23%' innings
pitched in 11 appearances.
He had a 7.33 ERA with 18
strikeouts and 12 walks.


U.S. under-19 beat China


Associated Press


LIEPAJA, Latvia -
Jeremy Lamb of national
champion Connecticut
scored 17 points and Doug
McDermott of Creighton
had 15 points and eight
rebounds to lead the United
States to an 82-66 win over
China on Saturday in the
FIBA Under 19 World
Championship.
Tim Hardaway Jr. of




Unscramble these four Jumbles,
one letter to each square,
to form four ordinary words.

I LMYDA I


RHHUST




ELUOVM


Michigan and Khyle
Marshall of Butler both had
13 points for the U.S. (3-0),
the only team in the 16-
team field to finish the pre-
liminary round undefeated.
The three-game second
round begins Monday.
China (0-3) trailed
56-53 after three quarters.
McDermott hit a 3 to start
a 10-0 run and Lamb's steal
and layup closed it, making
it 68-55 with 5:25 to play.

THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME
by David L. Hoyt and Jeff Knurek


Now arrange the circled letters
to form the surprise answer, as
suggested by the above cartoon.


Ans:
(Answers tomorrow)
Saturday's Jumbles: SKIMP TAUNT THROAT MUFFIN
S Answer: The skunk would probably get fired from her
job because she STUNK AT IT


9 Old card game
0 Path to satori
1 Decided, as a
jury
4 Arrangers
8 Tax pro
9 Yard tool (2
wds.)
1 Geol. formation
2 Ohio Indians
3 Ballpark fig.
4 Okra morsel
5 Math groups
6 Depot (abbr.)

"DOWN

1 Judge's garb
2 Important
decades
3 Fallen log cov-
erer
4 Capriati foe
5 Put down
6 1300 hours
7 Horselaugh
8 Big rig
9 "Terrible" tsar
0 Huff and puff


12 Typed in
15 Political bash
19 Ban--
21 Swarms around
22 Wingspread
23 TV crooner of


Want more puzzles?
Check out the "Just Right Crossword Puzzles" books
at QuillDriverBooks.com


yore
24 Touched down
25 Kids
26 Witness'
phrase (2
wds.)
27 Hibernia
28 Luge
30 Prefix for sec-
ond
34 Kemo Sabe's
friend
36 Dot in the
Seine
37 Lots and lots
38 Road shoul-
ders
40 Divides into
districts
41 Mounties' org.
42 Game for (2
wds.)
43 Real estate
44 "Hot Lips"
Actress
45 Wool suppliers
46 Pause
47 Tijuana Ms.
50 you with it?


@ 2011 UFS, Dist. by Univ. Uclick for UFS


SCOREBOARD


Answer to Previous Puzzle

CRAB RUM LAMA
HUL EMO EGOS
ASTI S PURI OUS






P ST RAT E AIN


S P A 1LIPI lNIU DE ES
SP L APlNUD NEl S

NE TDRI TI N

PEE EK T R Y H E \WAN


7


Page Editor: Tim Kirby, 754-0421













Se Fowler, Watney tied for

,' lead at AT&T National


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Boston Red Sox teammates David Ortiz (right) and Adrian Gonzalez celebrate Ortiz's
three-run home run against the Toronto Blue Jays in Toronto on June 12.


AL all-star team loaded


with Red Sox, Yankees


By MIKE FITZPATRICK
Associated Press

Based on that final ballot-
ing update, it appears the
American League starting
lineup for the All-Star game
will be loaded with Ypnkees
and Red Sox.
Here we go again.
Alex Rodriguez, David
Ortiz, Robinson Cano,
Adrian Gonzalez. All
are probably headed to
Phoenix, with several other
teammates in tow.
That' might rankle fans
around the country, but
take a.look at the numbers.
With the exception of New
York catcher Russell Martin
and aging shortstop Derek
Jeter, most of the lead-
ing vote-getters do indeed
deserve those spots.
Who else has earned a
trip to the July 12 showcase?
Tough choices,: as usual.
Prince Fielder or Joeyr
Votto at first base. for the
National League? Carlos
Quentin or Jacoby Ellsbury
in the AL outfield? And how
many aces can the Phillies
put on the pitching staff?
"It can be a little daunt-
ing, to be honest," NL man-
ager Bruce Bochy of the
San Francisco Giants said.
"Sure, it's an honor and
you're excited about it, but
at the same time you know
that somebody's going to
get snubbed, supposedly.


There's nothing you can do
about it. It's not perfect."
One superstar who won't
be playing is St. Louis slug-
ger Albert Pujols, sidelined
by a broken wrist. He high-
lights a striking list of face-
of-the-franchise types who
figure to miss this All-Star
game because of injuries,
slumps or both.
Joe M4uer, Hanley
Ramirez, David Wright,
Evan Longoria, Chase
Utley, Ichiro Suzuki, Ryan
Zimmerman, Carl Crawford,
Buster Posey, Justin
Morneau, Josh Johnson,
Johan Santana.
In their absence, look for
talented first-timers such as
Asdrubal Cabrera, Rickie
Weeks and Matt Kemp.
Starting with the AL:
First Base Gonzalez
has been an RBI machine
in his first season with
Boston.
Second Base Cano is
the clear choice.
Shortstop Asdrubal
Cabrera has provided power
at the plate and spectacular
defense.
Third Base Rodriguez
also held a sizable lead in
fan balloting, but his num-
bers at the plate put him
neck-and-neck with Red
Sox rival Kevin Youkilis.
SCatcher Another
young player enjoying a
breakthrough season is
Tigers catcher Alex Arila.


Outfield Toronto
slugger Jose Bautista had
received more All-Star
votes than anyone else in
the majors. He starts in
right field, with New York's
Curtis Granderson in cen-
ter and Quentin from the
White Sox in left.
Designated Hitter -
Ortiz was running away
with the fan vote, and
deservedly so.
And in the NL:
First Base Fielder is
having a huge season for
Milwaukee in the final year
of his contract. The best
thing to do, however, would
be to start him at DH and
put Votto at first base.
Second Base Weeks
gives the Brewers a power-
ful threat at the top of the
lineup.
Shortstop New York
Mets dynamo Jose Reyes
has been the game's most
electrifying player this sea-
son.
Third Base Braves
switch-hitter Chipper Jones
takes a bow.
Catcher Atlanta's
Brian McCann, the MVP of
last year's All-Star game.
Outfield The starting
spots are easy: In center
field is Kemp, the first-half
MVP from the Los Angeles
Dodgers. He's flanked by
Milwaukee's Ryan Braun in
left and Lance Berkman of
St Louis in right.


Lee meets expectations


By ROB MAADDI
Associated Press

PHILADELPHIA Cliff Lee hit a shot
into the seats, drove a one-hopper over the
wall, in straightaway center and ripped a
liner to right on three consecutive batting-
practice swings.
He finished the round with a popup off
the top of the cage, and that didn't sit well
with the Philadelphia Phillies' left-hander.
Lee took an angry swing at the bouncing
ball as he walked out of the batter's box
and muttered an obscenity.
This is no ordinary pitcher.
"He plays the game hard," manager
Charlie Manuel said. "When he hits the
ball, he runs hard. He likes to'play, he likes
to hit."
Lee takes everything he does seriously,
whether its hitting, fielding or running the
bases. Of course, his superb pitching is the
reason he's become a superstar.
Lee has tossed three consecutive
shutouts during a phenomenal stretch
of 32 straight scoreless innings. He was
5-0 with an 0.21 ERA in June and enters
today's start against Toronto at 9-5 with a
2.66 ERA.
But that's not enough for the two-time
All-Star and 2008 AL Cy Young Award win-
ner. Lee strives to be a complete player.
"In the American League, you're a
pitcher. Over here, you have to pitch, hit
and run the bases," said Lee, who always
jogs to the mound and jogs back to the
dugout. "I just think it's fun. I feel more like
a baseball player in the National League
versus the American League."
For a pitcher, the lefty-hitting Lee has a
sweet stroke. He's helped himself at the
plate more than once, and was hitting .205
(8 for 39) with two doubles and five RBIs.
Manuel has even used him as a pinch-
hitter a couple times.
Lee hit a bases-loaded, ground-rule dou-
ble to dead center and had three RBIs in a
10-4 win against Cincinnati on May 26. He
had two hits and an RBI in a 3-0 win over
Florida on June 16, and hit a sacrifice fly off
Boston's Josh Beckett in his last start.


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Phillies' Cliff Lee pitches against the Boston
Red Sox in Philadelphia on Tuesday.

"Any time you cap do something to help
the team win, you should take pride in it,"
Lee said. "Hitting helps the team win. It's
important."
Lee stunned the baseball world when
he picked the Phillies over the New York
Yankees and Texas Rangers as a free agent
last winter. He turned down more money
Sand signed a $120 million, five-year deal to
return to Philadelphia, one year after the
Phillies traded him away to Seattle.
The addition of Lee to a staff that already
included reigning Cy Young Award winner
Roy Halladay, Cole Hamels and Roy Oswalt
made the Phillies instant favorites to win
the World Series.
So far, Lee and his teammates have lived
up to enormous expectations. The Phillies
lead the NL East and have the best record
in the majors. Halladay, Hamels and Lee
are' having All-Star caliber seasons. Oswalt
ended up on the disabled list.


Associated Press

NEWTOWN SQUARE,
Pa. Before he even teed
off, Rickie Fowler knew this
was going to be a different
day at the AT&T National.
The course record already
had been matched, with
several other low rounds in
progress at suddenly soft
Aronimink Golf Club.
One thought crossed his
mind: Go time.
That's the message
Fowler always puts on
Twitter right before he
plays, and off he went. He
birdied six of his opening
10 holes and. missed
two other chances inside
10 feet. He wound up with
a 6-under 64 on Saturday
and a share of the lead
with Nick Watney, who set
the course record with a
62 shooting 27 on the
back nine.
That broke the record
of 63 that Steve Marino
had about 20 minutes ear-
lier. Marino had matched
the record that Chris Kirk
posted about an hour
before that
Fowler and Watney were
at 9-under 201, one shot
ahead of 36-hole leader
KJ. Choi (69).

Montreal Championship
BLAINVILLE, Quebec
- Taiwan's Lu Chien-soon
shot a 9-under 63 to match
the course record and take
a one-stroke lead over John
Cookafterthe secondround
of the Champions Tour's
Montreal Championship.
The 51-year-old Lu
bogeyed the opening hole,
then had 10 birdies in a
13-hole stretch from Nos.
5 to 17 to reach 16 under
at Fontainebleau Golf
Club. He tied the course
-record set last year by DA.
Weibring and matched
Friday by Cook and John
Huston.
Cook, a.two-time winner
this year, had a 66. Huston
was two strokes back after
a 67.

French Open
SAINT-QUENTIN-
EN-YVELINES, France


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Rickie Fowler reacts to a missed putt on No. 17 during
the third round of the AT&T National golf tournament at-
Aroiiimink Golf Club in Newtown Square, Pa., on Saturday. '

- England's Mark Foster Derek Erhst.. ,
shot a 3-under 68 for a-- The 21-year-old Mills,-
share of the third-rounld ,rom Easley, S.C.; is the
lead with countryman "first qualifying medalist to
James Morrison in the win the title since former
French Open. Clemson star D.J. Trahan
Morrison had a 72 to in 2000.


match Foster at 9-under
204.
U.S. Amateur Public
Links
ABANDON, Ore. -
Clemson's Corbin Mills
became the first qualify-
ing medalist to win the
U.S. Amateur Public Links
in 11 years, holing a 5-,
foot par putt on the 37th
hole to finish off UNLV's


Women's U.S. Amateur
Public Links
BANDON, Ore. -
UCLA's Brianna Do won
the Women's U.S. Amateur
Public Links.
She beat Texas high
school star Marissa Dodd
1-up in the 36-hole final
on Bandon Dunes' Old
Macdonald course.


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Megan Rapinoe (left) congratules Carli Lloyd (second left) after Lloyd scored the
United States' third goal during the group C match between the United States and
Colombia at the Women's Soccer World Cup in Sinsheim, Germany, on Saturday.


U.S. advances in World Cup


By NANCY ARMOUR
Associated Press

SINSHEIM, Germany
- Anyone can sign auto-
graphs or pose for photos.
The U.S. women found a
better way to say "thank
you" to the American mili-
tary members who turned
their World Cup match into
a home game.
The U.S. advanced to
the quarterfinals of the
Women's World Cup with
a 3-0 rout of Colombia on
Saturday, delighting a sell-
out crowd made up almost
entirely of American
fans. The team lined up
for a military salute after
Heather O'Reilly's opening
goal, and Megan Rapinoe
grabbed a TV mic and sang
"Born in the USA" after
she scored.
'The troops came out


to practice the other day,
which was a fantastic
environment," said Carli
Lloyd, who scored the third
goal. 'We thought it would
be good to salute them.
It was fun, something
different."
The two-time World
Cup champions now play
Sweden, one of two teams
to beat them this year, on
Wednesday in Wolfsburg
to determine the Group
C winner. The Americans
and Sweden both have six
points, but the U.S. leads
the group on goal differen-
tial and can claim the top
spot with a victory or a tie.
Colombia is a team on
the rise; finishing fourth
at the Under-20 World Cup
last year. But this is its first
World Cup appearance, and
the youngsters were no
match for the deeper, more


experienced Americans.
The U.S. harassed goal-
keeper Sandra Sepulveda
relentlessly, forcing her to
work more in this game
than some goalkeepers will
work all tournament.
She didn't get much
help from her backline,
which was shredded by
the speedy O'Reilly time
and again.
"It's a growing experi-
ence,"-said defender Nataly
Arias, who was born and
raised in the Washington,
D.C., area. "It was their
size, their speed. They're
all big, they're all fast,
they're all agile."
And it could have
been even worse for
the Colombians. The
Americans missed at least
a half-dozen other chances,
and had a whopping 27-12
advantage in shots. Abby


LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS SUNDAY, JULY 3, 2011


Page Editor: Tim Kirby, 754-0421








Page Editor: Tim Kirby, 754-0421


Kvitova defeats Sharapova at Wimbledon


By CHRIS LEHOURITES
Associated Press
WIMBLEDON, England
- Petra Kvitova won
her first Grand Slam title
Saturday by defeating
Maria Sharapova 6-3, 6-4 at
Wimbledon, finishing with
an ace and dropping to her
knees in disbelief.
Kvitova was playing in
her first major final, but it
was three-time Grand Slam
champion Sharapova who
showed her nerves. The
2004 Wimbledon winner
double-faulted six times,
including twice to get bro-
ken to 4-2 in the first set.
"It was about the serve,
for sure, and the return,"
said Kvitova, who lost in
the semifinals last year. "I
know that"
The 21-year-old Czech is
the first left-handed woman
to win Wimbledon since
Martina Navratilova in 1990.
Using a fast and accurate
forehand, Kvitova did little
wrong on Centre Court as
Czech greats Navratilova
and Jana Novotna sat in
the Royal Box with other
former Wimbledon cham-
pions.
"It's hard to find some
words if I'm standing here


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Petra Kvitova of the Czech Republic returns a shot to Russia's Maria Sharapova during the ladies' singles final at the
All England Lawn Tennis Championships at Wimbledon on Saturday.


with the trophy and see the
great players in the Royal
Box," Kvitova said. "Well,
I'm so happy that I won."


Navratilova, a nine-time "A new star," Navratilova Kvitova kept Sharapova
Wimbledon champion, gave said. "It didn't happen over- on the run with 19 winners,
Kvitova two thumbs-up night, but she's a champion. and never seemed to lose
shortly after match point. It's great." confidence despite being


broken three times.
"She vias hitting really
powerful and hitting win-
ners from all over the court
She made a defensive shot
into an offensive one,"
Sharapova said. "And, yeah,
just kind of laid on a lot of
those shots. I think she was
just more aggressive than I
was, hit deeper and harder,
and got the advantage in
the points."
The magnitude of the day
was never lost on Kvitova.
"Of course, I was ner-
vous," she said. "I thought
I can win Wimbledon. But I
had to focus on each point"
Sharapova was the clear
favorite. Besides winning
at the All England Club
in 2004, she also won the
U.S. Open in 2006- and
the Australian Open in
2008. Shoulder surgery in
October 2008 slowed her
career.
"Besides the fact that I
lost, I think this is a big
step for me, being here in
the final," Sharapova said.
"(I) feel like I'm improving
this year. That gives me a
tremendous amount of con-
fidence for the rest of the
year."
Sharapova had not lost a
set heading into the final.


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Sears LAKE CITY
2724 W. US Highway 90


ASSOCIATED PRESS
United State brothers Mike Bryan (right) and doubles partner
Bob Bryan kiss their trophies after winning the men's doubles
final at Wimbledon on Saturday.

Bryans tie record

with doubles win


CL


RE




SIP


"Shop
Now For
reat Brands
& Values
"'''


By CAROLINE CHEESE
Associated Press
WIMBLEDON, England
- American twins Bob and
Mike Bryan won a record';
tying 11th .Grand Slam,
men's doubles title Satuiday, ,`
defeating Robert Lindstedt
of Sweden and Horia Tecau
of Romania 6-3, 64, 7-6 (2)
in the Wimbledon final.
.The Bryan brothers,
won at Wimbledon for the
second time and matched
Mark Woodforde and Todd'
Woodbridge's, Open era
record of 11 major titles.
'To equal the Woodies
- a team that we idolized,
the greatest team in our
mind is unbelievable,"
Mike Bryan said. 'To get
their title record and get
the Grand Slam record, I


mean, I'm trying to figure
out what's left. We weren't
even thinking about 11 until
Mark Woodforde came up
and said, 'Congrats on get-
ting that 11th."'
In the women's final,
Katarina Srebotnik of the
Czech Republic and Kveta
Peschke of Slovenia won
their first Grand Slam title
by defeating Samantha
Stosur of Australia and
;Sabine Lisicki of Germany
:6-3,6-1.
The No. 1-ranked Bryans
won their 62nd career
doubles title in 2010 in Los
Angelesto surpass therecord
of 61 held by Woodforde and
Woodbridge. Saturday's title
was the Bryans' 73rd.
"They're always support-
ive," Mike Bryan said of the
Australian pair.


RIZZI: Chemistry coach


Continued From Page 1B
visited the school and fell
in love with it I went to
play football mainly, but was
able to play both sports."
Rizzi squandered much
of the opportunity, leaving.
Worthington after one year.
He went to work, including
a successful cabinet busi-
ness with his brother.
"I went back to school
at age 40," Rizzi said. "The
reason to go back was to
coach. Baseball was my
sport since I was a young
guy."
After graduating from
Santa Fe Community
College in 1998 and Florida
in 2000 both with hon-
ors, Rizzi made his way to
Fort White and began the
journey that will resume
after he was sidetracked.
Rizzi's new Fort White
team will include assistant
Chris Glenn, who coached
the middle school last year.
'We have a. lot of the
same philosophies, despite
the difference in our ages,"
Rizzi said. "We plan on
being very positive. He


is my pitching coach and
pitching got us there the
last time. We preach strikes
and to command the mound
and have a presence."
SRizzi said he has a goods
mix among the classes of
the players and most of the
Indians are on all-star teams
this summer as well as at
teani practices.
"We have a great group
of guys and they are buy-
ing into the discipline with
hustle and enthusiasm,"
Rizzi said. "We will play
fundamentally sound and
show good character on
the field and off. We want
to teach guys how to be
leaders.Thatplays into being
successful."
Rizzi plans for success
right away, and has his eye
on seasons to come
'The toughest challenge
is to pull together as a team,"
Rizzi said. "I am'a team
chemistry guy. Talent is
not everything. I am always
looking at the future years
of a program. We try to take
out the peaks and valleys."


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4 fl1 I I * ItI II I = ; I


LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS SUNDAY, JULY 3, 2011


4B.












Story ideas?

Robert Bridges
Editor
754-0428
crisak@lakecityreporter.com

Sunday, July 3,201 I


Lake City Reporter





BUSINESS


www.lakecityreporter.com


COUNTY TOURISM


Harvey Campbell
386-758-1397

A busy

summer

ahead

A s a whole,
Florida's tour-
ism industry
fared well
during the
recently completed leg-
islative session. Tourism
and agriculture represent
our state's two largest
sources of economic
development. Marketing
dollars for the state's
public/private tourism
promotion agency fared
well with VISIT FLORIDA
receiving $34.9 million in
funding from the state for
the upcoming 2011-12 fis-
cal year which began July
1.,That represents a 31
percent increase over the
approximately $26 million
appropriation for VISIT
FLORIDA during the cur-
rent 2010-11 fiscal year.
In addition, there
was an attempt to
move VISIT FLORIDA
under the umbrella of
Enterprise Florida in
the Governor's office,
but the tourism agency
ultimately reniained as
an independent organiza-
tion with its own board
of directors under the
direction of the Florida
Tourism Commission.
Columbia County Tourist
Development (TDC)
Director Harvey Campbell
serves on both of those
boards.
Two other issues of
note during the legislative
session included collec-
tions of state sales tax
and Local Option Tourist
Development Tax, along
with a proposed Arizona
type immigration bill.
A long standing debate
has existed with many of
the on-line hotel book-
ing companies who sell
surplus lodging on the
internet. Those companies
obtain the rooms at dis-
counted rates and mark
them up to consumers.
The companies are pay-
ing taxes at the wholesale
price they pay for the
rooms, but don't pay the
taxes based on the retail
price charged to the con-
sumer. The .com compa-
nies attempted to get leg-
islation passed that would
have protected them from
efforts by many counties
in Florida to have taxes
charged based on the
retail amount. The legisla-
tion did not pass, but look
for the issue to reappear
in the 2012 session. The
Georgia Supreme Court
recently ruled in favor
of the City of Atlanta in
a similar action. There
are several pending court
cases in Florida about the
issue, including a class-
action suit against the on-
line booking companies.
Columbia County has
joined that action.
An Arizona-style immi-
gration law was also con-
sidered by the legislature,
but did not pass. Again,
expect that legislation to
be considered in 2012.
Many in the tourism
industry were concerned
that passage of the pro-
posed bill would have
resulted in boycotts of

CAMPBELL continued on 2C


Welcome news for the 4th:



Gas prices on the decline


By ANTONIA ROBINSON
arobinson@lakecityreporter.com
A decrease in gas
prices was expected to
bring some good news for
Independence Day travel
in Florida, according to
AAA Auto Club South offi-
cials.
The state average is
$3.51 per gallon, which
is a seven cent drop from
last week, said Jessica
Brady AAA Auto Club
South spokesperson.
"It will probably be an
increase in the number of
people traveling than ini-
tially projected," she said.
Gas prices are typically
higher during the summer
months as a result of high
fuel demand.
'That hasn't been the
case this year," Brady
said.
Lower gas prices also
helped usher in the
Fourth of July weekend
last year. The national
average was $2.73 per
gallon in July 2010 and
$2.62 one year earlier.The
Florida average was $2.67
in July 2010 and $2.65 in
2009.
Prices started dropping
at the beginning of May in
Florida, Brady said.
"We have seen prices
drop an average of five to

DECINE continued on 2C


New Rotary president


TODD WILSONILake City Reporter
Carlton Jones (left) was honored with a ceremonial gavel
as outgoing president of the Rotary Club of Lake City
on Thursday. Chris Candler, the club's new president for
2011-12 year, presented the award as he took over as the
club's leader.


Google among firms

looking to buy Hulu

By RYAN NAKASHIMA tive bidders, but it's too
Associated Press early to declare a front-
runner,'said the person,
LOS ANGELES who spoke on condition
Search giant Google Inc. of anonymity because the
is one of about a dozen discussions are confiden-
companies involved in tial.
talks to potentially buy The online video ser-
online video site Hulu, a vice began seeking bid-
person familiar with the ders early last week
matter said Friday. As after an unsolicited offer
the owner of YouTube, prompted Hulu's board
it would be a strategic to look for other inter-
buy for the Silicon Valley ested parties.
technology company, Hulu streams mov-
which has had a rocky ies and TV shows from
relationship with Hulu's broadcasters ABC, Fox
Hollywood owners. and NBC to personal
Hulu has begun pre- computers and, for a
sending its financial infor- monthly fee, to a range of
nation to many prospec- Web-connected devices.


JASON MATTHEW WALKERILake City Reporter
Beth Williams, 18, of Lake City, tops off her Jeep Liberty Thursday at the Chevron station at U.S. 90 and Marion Avenue.
Williams gets 20 miles a gallon in the city and about 23 miles a gallon on the highway. 'I think the gas prices are ridiculous,'
Williams said. They've gotten too high lately. I'll be driving home back and forth from college so I have to have good gas
mileage.'


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Section C


I__ __ ~









LAKE CITY REPORTER BUSINESS SUNDAY, JULY 3, 2011


Dividends
Demystified
Q What's a dividend? M.J.,
Santa Rosa, Calif
Alt's a payment that many com-
panies make to shareholders
out of their earnings. If Dodgeball
Supply Co. (ticker: WHAPP) earns
$2 per share in profit, it might
decide to issue $1 annually to share-
holders, using the balance in other
ways, such as building its business
or paying down debt.
It will probably pay out 25 ceits
per share every three months. This
may seem like peanuts, but it adds
up. If you own 400 shares of a
company that's paying $1.50 per
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Plus, healthy companies generally
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You'll often see a dividend
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dividend yield is its annual divi-
dend divided by its current stock
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year and trading for $50 per share
would have a yield of4 percent (2
divided by 50 is 0.04).

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fund? R Z, Richmond, a.
Ilt's a mutual fund that invests
A your money In short-term.
high-quality investments such
as Treasury bills, short-term
commercial debt and certificates of
deposit. Thus, it's a relatively
safe investment,
Money market yields vary
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rates and typically exceed rates
offered by standard bank accounts.
But they fall dramatically short of
the stock market's historical average
annual return of 10 prcenL They're
great for short-term savngsbut
ill-suited for long-term investments,
as your money won't grow very
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term savings and find good rates
at www.fool.com/savings and
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Imagine Global Telepathic
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No wonder operators are eager to
get shovels in the ground.
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ture and a growing middle class in
China, the next five years look like
prime time for Macau's casinos.
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DECLINE: Gas prices drop

Continued From Page 1C


six cents," she said. "We do expect
to see more of a decrease."
The main reason for the
decrease in fuel prices is slow
'economic growth, Brady said. The
initial push of 60 million barrels of
crude oil in the market drove retail
prices down even more.
Fuel demand has gone down
globally, she said.
The decrease in fuel prices is
projected to continue throughout
July, Brady said.
"Barring a major hurricane or
something of that magnitude,'" she .
said.
i However, prices are $1 higher
than last year, Brady said. Other
states still have higher fuel prices.


Alaska's average is $4.11 a
gallon, California is $3.81 and
Connecticut is $3.93, she said.
Georgia is at $3.46.
"We're about average (for the
nation)," Brady said.
It is projected fuel prices will
stay in the $3 range for quite some
time in Florida, she said. The oil
market goes up and down daily,
even hourly.
Factors are always trending,
and the market is on a constant
watch, Brady said. At this point
AAA is watching the market week
by week..
"The market is very volatile,"
she said. "One thing it's proven is
anything is possible."


US auto sales up in June,


but Japan still hurting


By DEE-ANN DURBIN and TOM
KRISHER
AP Auto Writers

DETROIT- Gas prices hit a
sweet spot-for automakers last
month. They fell far enough
to spur pickup truck sales, yet
remained so high that small cars
sold well, sometimes just hours
after reaching dealers' lots.
That made June a good
month for General Motors and
Ford, which have traditionally
relied on truck sales and now
have strong line-ups of smaller,'


fuel-efficient models as well.
Toyota and Honda couldn't
take advantage, however. Their
sales plummet more than 20
percent each as they ran short
of cars because of the ongo-
ing problems from the March
earthquake in Japan.
Those declines and the
continuing weakness in the
U,S. economy meant sales
grew more slowly in June than
they. might have. U.S. sales
rose 7 percent to 1.05 million.
Analysts had 'expected a dou-
ble-digit gain.


Sales aren't expected to pick
back up until fall, when Japanese
production is at full capacity.
"Some consumers have
decided to sit on their hands
and delay their purchases,"
said Don Johnson, GM's vice
president of U.S. sales.
General Motors Co. and
Ford Motor Co. both said their
sales rose 10 percent And the
Chevrolet Cruze small car
vaulted past perennial best-sell-
ers like the Toyota Camry and
the Honda Civic to become the
best-selling car in America.


CAMPBELL: A busy summer ahead

Continued From Page 1C


Florida by segments of both
domestic and international visi-
tors, resulting in economic and
job losses for the state.

Tourism Week awards lun-
cheon honors our industry
Approximately 80 members
of the tourism industry attended
the 2010 Suwannee River Valley
Tourism Week awards luncheon
which was held May 18.
The event was hosted at
the new meeting facility at the
Columbia County Fairgrounds
and featured a spectacular ,
catered luncheon and awards
being presented in each of
nine categories. Previously, the
awards luncheon was limited
only to Columbia County proper-
ties, but has been expanded to
include tourism businesses in
both Suwannee and Hamilton
Counties as part of the expand-
ing Suwannee River Valley
Marketing initiatives.
We would like to extend our
congratulations to all the win-
ners and the record number of
nominees put forth by manage-
ment in our tourism industry.
The winners are listed below:
Community Service Award -
Khrys Kantarze, Stephen Foster


Folk Culture Center State Park,
Citizen's Support Organization
president.
Outstanding Agri-Tourism
Partner Richard McCulley
and T.C. McCulley, owners of
McCulley Farms.
Outstanding Attractions
Employee Award Cindy Preston
of O'Leno State Park.
Outstanding Hotel Employee
Award Sharon Weyand of the
Fairfield Inn & Suites.
Outstanding Management
Employee Two winners were
honored in this category. Luc
Houle of the Holiday Inn and
Suites, along with Benjamin
Faure of Stephen Foster Folk
Culture Center State Park.
The "Always There" Award
- Bob Giarda of Stephen Foster
Folk Culture Center State Park.
The Dii ector's Award for
Excellence in Tourism Teena
Peavey of Spirit of the Suwannee
Music Park.
Best Strategic Partner Award
- Holiday Inn and Suites, repre-
sented by General Manager Rod
Butler.
Although there was a cat-
egory to honor the Outstanding
Campground Employee, there
were no nominees submit-


ted for the award. Columbia
County TDC Marketing Director
Paulette Lord emceed the
awards luncheon and presented
crystal statues to all of the win-
ners. Again, congratulations to
all of them for an outstanding job
representing the tourism indus-
try in Florida's Suwannee River
Valley.

Bed Tax collections and
Smith Travel show increases
for March
According to the Florida
Department of Revenue, Local
Option Tourist Development Tax
(bed tax) collections for March
of 2011 totaled $61, 905, com-
pared to $40,660'in 2010. Using
a comparison of the 2 percent
collection rate in 2010, versus
the 3 percent rate in 2011, col-
lections for the month were
approximately $1,000 higher this
year. The rate was increased
to 3 percent beginning April 1,
2010. Suwannee County has also
recently approved an increase
from 2 percent to 3 percent
Hamilton County increased
its levy to 3% prior to either
Columbia County or Suwannee
County doing so.
According to Smith Travel


Reports, occupancy at
Columbia County hotels was
up approximately .4 percent in
March of this year. Meanwhile
average daily rate increased
6.7 percent from $65.12 to
$69.49. Revenue per available
room (REVPAR) was up 7.9
percent and room revenues
for the month increased 8.0
percent compared to March
of 2010.

Lake City Super 8 honors
service men and women
American Motel
'Management, managers of
the Lake City Super 8 motel,
held a promotion to honor
active duty military personnel
in which the company donated
100 room nights at an approxi-
mate value of $6,000. The cam-
paign began May 11 and ended
Friday. Lake City Super 8 gen-
eral manager Suzanne Moses,
and her staff were recently
featured about the promotion
in the Lake City Reporter.
Congratulations to Ms.
Moses and American Motel
Management for creating such
a favorable public relations
promotion for the benefit of our
tourism industry.


Busy two months upcom-
ing for youth sports tourna-
ments
As we reported in our May
newsletter, June and July are
set to be busy months for
youth sports tournaments in
the Suwannee River Valley. A
total of 15 tournaments are
scheduled for the Southside
Recreation Complex and also
a tournament in Live Oak in
July. Our thanks to Columbia
County Landscapes and Parks
Director Clint Pittman and his
staff for the outstanding job
they do in maintaining playing
fields, restrooms, parking lots
and garbage collection to help
make a positive impression to
our visitors and participants
in these tournaments which
represent a sign cant economic
boost to our area.
-A complete list of these tour-
naments can be obtained by
contacting Brenda Clemente at
(386) 758-1312.


* Harvey Campbell is the execu-
tive director of the Columbia
County Tourist Development
Council. He can be reached at
(386) 758-1397.


0
0000000* *00000000 S


Page Editor: Todd Taylor, 754-0424











LAKE CITY REPORTER BUSINESS SUNDAY, JULY 3, 2011


THE WEEK IN REVIEW THE WEEK IN REVIEW THE WEEK IN REVIEW *THE WEEK IN REVIEW *THE WEEK IN REVIEW




The Week in Review


ANYSE A Amex A Nasdaq
8,425.48 +450.76 52,358.88 +98.21 2,816.03 +163.14


Gainers ($2 or more)
Name Last Chg %Chg
ChinaDEd 3.50 +1.20 +52.2
Renren n 9.25 +3.02 +48.5
Linkedlnn 94.54+24.60 +35.2
CtrySCkg n 14.30 +3.36 +30.7
Youku n 36.47 +8.53 +30.5
Pandora n 20.04 +4.67 +30.4
Continucre 6.21 +1.44 +30.2
Qihoo360n21.14 +4.90 +30.2
HovnanE 2.58 +.58 +29.0
Resolute wt 3.88 +.74 +23.6

Losers ($2 or more)
Name Last Chg %Chg
C-TrCVOL 24.05-12.50 -34.2
CSVS2xVxS16.28 -7.77 -32.3
BiPLSpxVM 9.93 -4.65 -31.9
iPSER2K 24.96 -9.32 -27.2
iPSXR1K 27.13 -8.76 -24.4
iP SESPX 28.42 -9.12 -24.3
BarcShtC 32.91 -9.00 -21.5
CSVS2xVxM42.13-11.12 -20.9
AmrRlty 2.57 -.61 -19.2
DrxEBearrsl4.13 -3.36 -19.2

Most Active ($1 or more)
Name Vol (00) Last Chg
BkofAm 9553495 11.09 +.57
S&P500ETF7997290133.92+7.11
SPDR Fnd3162396 15.63 +.87
FordM 2836234 14.02 +.78
iShR2K 2580710 84.09+4.15
iShEMkts 2369784 48.16+2.66
GenElec 2221557 19.20+1.23
SprintNex 2105246 5.43 +.43
Pfizer 1979645 20.75 +.67
JPMorgCh1745746 41.58+2.34

Diary
Advanced 2,785
Declined 391
New Highs 248
New Lows 62
Total issues 3,215
Unchanged 39
Volume 17,417,675,166


Gainers ($2 or more)
Name Last Chg %Chg
FlexSolu 2.95 +.58, +24.5
Waltednv 22.84 +3.73 +19.5
VoyagerOG 3.13 +.50 +19.0
B&HO 4.50 +.69 +18.1
PionDrill 15.61 +2.13 +15.8
BioTime 5.45 +.70 +14.7
GrahamCp 20.85 +2.65 +14.6
AdcareHft 6.20 +.78 +14.4
CheniereEn 9.19 +1.15 +14.3
SondeRgrs 3.30 +.41 +14.2

Losers ($2 or more)
Name Last Chg %Chg
Rubicon g 3.37 -1.17 -25.8
Accelrl8 4.17 -1.08 -20.6
T3Motnrs 2.85 -.55 -16.2
Neoprobe 3.29 -.41 -11.1
ATSCorp 4.30 -.45 -9.5
NewEnSys 2.14 -.22 -9.3
GoldenMin 17.87 -1.81 -9.2
ParaG&S 3.18 -.32 -9.1
Bamwell 5.03 -.47 -8.5
BovieMed 2.58 -.22 -8.0

Most Active ($1 or more
Name Vol (00) Last Chg
KodiakOg 210803 5.91 +.56
Hyperdyn 174991 4.31 -.01
Rubicon g 156649 3.37-1.17
CheniereEn135377 9.19+1.15
NAPallg 131623 4.25 +.50
GoldStrg 126014 2.18 -.07
NwGoldg 123160 9.89 +.18
TmsatlPet 108556 1.70 -.10
NovaGldg 106313 9.07 +.45
DenisnMg 91519 1.85 +.05

Diary
Advanced 340
Declined 177
New Highs 19
New Lows 24
Total issues 534
Unchanged 17
Volume 497,470,282


Gainers ($2 or more)
Name Last Chg %Chg
Icagenrs 5.96 +3.56 +148.3
TBS IntlA 2.15 +1.11 +106.7
HeliosMrs 3.32 +1.46 +78.2
Servidyne 3.38 +1.12 +49.4
Trunkbwn 2.96 +.90 +43.7
ChiCachen 10.07 +2.91 +40.6
e-Future 4.65 +1.34 +40.5
GSV Cap n 14.36 +4.09 +39.8
QuantFurs 4.83 +1.36 +39.2
Pansoft 3.90 +1.08 +38.3

Losers ($2 or more)
Name Last Chg %Chg
PainTher 4.02 -1.28 -24.2
HampRBrs 10.31 -3.13 -23.3
GlobTcAdv 3.73 -1.02 -21.5
PrUPShQQQ23.65-5.10 -17.7
Corcept 3.91 -.71 -15.4
BioMimeic 4.70 -.85 -15.3
AutoChina 25.53 -4.47 -14.9
Lantronix 2.74 -.46 -14.4
DemandTc 7.85 -1.31 -14.3
TOP Ship rs 3.24 -.51 -13.6

Most Active ($1 ore)
Name Vol(00) Last Chg
SiriusXM 3477627 2.19 +.21
Microsoft 3387354 26.02+1.72
Cisco 2831976 15.86 +.93
PwShs QQQ252156457.91 +3.53
Intel 2000700 22.53+1.33
MicronT 1692398 7.83 +.62
Level3 1538241 2.52 +.25
Oracle 1362517 33.05+1.91
Dell Inc 1134449 16.96+1.05
eBay 1078842 32.74 +4.39

Diary
Advanced 2,170
Declined 565
New Highs 242
New Lows 107
Total issues 2,790
Unchanged 55
Volume 8,740,385,706


Wkly Wkly YTD
Name Ex Dlv Last Chg %Chg %Chg
AT&Tlnc NY 1.72 31.68 +1.24 +4.1 +7.8
AMD NY ... 7.11 +.21 +3.0 -13.1
AlcatelLuc NY .. 5.88 +.69 +13.3 +98.6
AutoZone NY ... 297.62 +6.02 +2.1 +9.2
B4ofAm NY .04 11.09 +.57 +5.4 -16.9
BariPVixrsNY .. 20.29 -4.24 -17.3 -46.1
BobEvans Nasd .80, 35.96 +1.93 +5.7 +9.1
CNBFnPA Nasd .66 13.86 -.44 -3.1 -6.4
CSXs NY .12 26.81 +1.82 +7.3 +24.5
Chevron NY 3.12 104.09 +6.19 +6.3 +14.1
Cisco Nasd .24 15.86 +.93 +6.2 -21.6
Citigrprs NY .04 42.88 +3.29 +8.3 -9.3
CocaCola NY 1.88 68.09 +3.16 +4.9 +3.5
Delhaize NY 2.45 75.09 -.07 -0.1 +1.9
Dell Inc Nasd ... 16.98 +1.05 +6.6 +25.3
eBay Nasd ... 32.74 +4.39 +15.5 +17.6
FamilyDIr NY .72 54.01 +1.75 +3.3 +8.7
FordM NY ... 14.02 +.78 +5.9 -16.5
GenElec NY .60 19.20 +1.23 +6.8 +5.0
HomeDp NY 1.00 36.73 +1.65 +4.7 +4.8
iShJapn NY .17 10.52 +.40 +4.0 -3.6
iShSilver NY ... 33.00 -.36 -1.1 +9.3
iShEMkts NY .84 48.16 +2.66 +5.8 +1.1
iS Eafe NY 1.68 60.80 +3.70 +6.5 +4.4
iShR2K NY .89 84.09 +4.15 +5.2 +7.5
Intel Nasd .84 22.53 +1.33 +6.3 +7.1
JPMorgChNY 1.00 41.58 +2.34 +6.0 -2.0
Level3 Nasd ... 2.52 +.25 +11.0+157.1


Wkly Wkly YTD
Name Ex Div Last Chg%Chg%Chg
Lowes NY .56 23.82 +.57 +2.5 -5.0
McDnlds NY 2.44 85.65 +3.81 +4.7 +11.6
MicronT Nasd ... 7.83 +.62 +8.6 -2.4
Microsoft Nasd .64 26.02 +1.72 +7.1 -6.8
NYTimes NY ... 8.71 +.73 +9.1 -11.1
NextEraEnNY 2.20 58.18 +1.57 +2.8 +11.9
NobiliyH Nasd ... 7.77 -.30 -3.7 -4.2
NokiaCp NY .55 6.42 +.54 +9.2 -37.8
OcciPet NY 1.84 105.52 +7.06 +7.2 +7.6
Oracle Nasd .24 33.05 +1.91 +6.1 +5.6
Penney NY .80 35.03 +.79 +2.3 +8.4
PepsiCo NY 2.06 70.19 +1.74 +2.5 +7.4
Pfizer NY .80 20.75 +.67 +3.3 +18.5
Potash s NY .28 56.04 +3.50 +6.7 +8.6
PwShs QQQNasd .42 57.91 +3.53 +6.5 +6.3
PrUShS&PNY .. 20.02 -2.36-10.5-15.7
Ryder NY 1.08 58.60 +5.85 +11.1 +11.3
S&PSOOETFNY 2.44 133.92 +7.11 +5.6 +6.5
SearsHldgsNasd ... 72.13 +2.62 +3.8 -2.2
SiriusXM Nasd ... 2.19 +.21 +10.6 +34.4
SouthnCo NY 1.89 40.72 +1.29 +3.3 +6.5
SprintNex NY ... 5.43 +.43 +8.6 +28.4
SPDRFndNY .18 15.63 +.87 +5.9 -2.0
TaiwSemi NY .52 12,91 +1.03 +8.7 +3.0
TimeWam NY .94 36.92 +2.46 +7.1 +14.8
WalMart NY 1.46 53.51 +1.10 +2.1 -.8
WellsFargo NY .48 28.67 +1.41 +5.2 -7.5
Yahoo Nasd ... 15.45 +.57 +3.8 -7.1


Stock Footnotes: g = Dividends and earnings in Canadian dollars. h = Does not meet continued-listing standards.
If Late filing with SEC. n = New In past 52 weeks. pf = Preferred. rm Stock has undergone a reverse stock split
ofat least 50 percent within the past year. rt = Right to buy security at a specified price. s = Stock has split by at
least 20 percent within the last year. un = Units. vj = In bankruptcy or receivership. wd = When distributed, wi =
When Issued. wt = Warrants.
Mutual Fund Footnotes: b Fee covering market costs is paid from fund assets. d = Defrred sales charge, or
redemption fee.f = front load (sales charges), m = Multiple fees are charged. NA = not available, p = previous day's
net asset value. s = fund split shares during the week. x = fund paid a distribution during the week.Galners and
Loser must be worth at least $2 to be listed in tables at left.-Most Actives must be worth at least $1 Volume in
hundreds of shares. Source: The Associated Press. Sales figures are unofficial.


Mnna Ratae


IIlVIIVY IMIUl,
Last Pvs Week
Prime Rate 3.25 3.25
Discount Rate 0.75 0.75
Federal Funds Rate .00-25 .00-25
Treasuries
3-month 0.02 0.01
6-month 0.09 0.07
5-year 1.79 1.38
10-year 3.19 2.86
30-year 4.40 4.17


Currencies
Last Pvs Day
Australia .92ii .9321
Britain 1.6068 1.6069
Canada .9589 .9638


Euro .
Japan 8
Mlexico 11.
Switzerlnd .


6891 .6887
10.84 80.58
6194 11.7101


d848


A8dn


British pound expressed in U.S. dollars. All oth-
ers show dollar in foreign currency.


I I


Weekly Dow Jones

Dow Jones Industrlals 108.98 145.13 72.73 152.92 168.43.
Close: 12,582.77 I I) l t, I
1-week change: 648.19 (5.4%) MON TUES WED THUR FRI
13,000



12,500
12 ,0 0 0* .. .... . .. . . .... ..... ..






11 ,5 0 0 .. ........ ........ ..... ..... ...... .. .. .. ......
J F M A M J


MUTUAL FUNDS
Total Assets Total Retum/Rank Pt Min Init
Name Obj ($Mlns) NAV 4-wk 12-mo 5-year Load Invt


PIMCOTotRetls Cl
American Funds GrthAmA m LG
Vanguard TotStldx LB
Fidelity Contra LG
American Funds CaplncBuA m IH
Vanguard Instldxl LB
American Funds CpWldGrIA m WS
American Funds IncAmerA m MA
Vanguard 500Adml LB
Vanguard TotStlAdm LB
American Funds InvCoAmA m LB
Dodge & Cox IntlStk FV
Dodge & Cox Stock LV
American Funds WAMutlnvA m LV
Amn.:jn Fur.nd: EurPj,:GrA m FB
v'a,.iu.ard In:tIPlu:. LB
Frarn T.-Tp-Frnrlr, In.,rr,re A xCA
Amr,r.rjn Furd! FrirA m LB
varnq.u,ira TIllill ,1 FB
Amein.:.irnFui-:l; tn*PerlpAA m WS
PlbrM:CO rolRet[Ad., b Cl
American Funds BalA m MA
Vanguard 5001nv LB
Fidelity GrowCo LG
Harbor Intlnst d FB
Vanguard WelltnAdm MA
Vanguard TotBdAdml Cl


142,222
66,606
63,574
:3,341
60,731
59,613
56,815
55,356
55,332
52,734
49,434
47,018
45,565
40,746
39,594
38,775
37,117
35,356
35,062
34,184
32,808
32,769
32,019
30,427
29,967
29,966
28,473


+6.1/B
+29.6/E
+34.9/A
NA/E
+22.7/C
+33.0/B
+30.1/D
+24.1/B
+33.0/B
+35.0/A
+27.7/E
+31.8/C
+33.2/B
+33.4/B
+29.91/
+33.0/B
+20.7/A
+32.8/B
+31.5/C
+31.1/C
+5.9/B
+23.8/B
+32.8/B
+44.2/A
+36.4/A
+21.8/C
+3.6/D


NL 1,000,000
5.75 250
NL 3,000
NL 2,500
5.75 250
NL 5,000,000
5.75 250
5.75 250
NL 10,000
NL 10,000
5.75 250
NL 2,500
NL 2,500
5.75 250
5.75 250
NL 200,000,000
4.25 1,000
5.75 250
NL 3,000
5.75 250
NL 1,000,000
5.75 250
NL 3,000
NL 2,500
NL 50,000
NL 50,000
NL 10,000


CA -Conservave Alocaton, Cl -IntermealeTerm Bond, ES -Europe Stock FB -Foren Large Bnd,FG Foregn LargeGrowh, FV -Foreign
Large Value, IH -World Allocaon, LB -Large Bend, L -Lare Growt, LV -Large Value, MA 4koedrate Alocatn, MB Cap Blend, MY-
MdCap Value, SH -Speidaly-heath, WS -World Stock Total Return: Chn in NAwith dividends reiested. Rank Hfw lund peonned vs.
others with same objeive: Ais in lop 20%, E in bottom 20%. M Init In Minimum $ needed to invest in fund. Source: Momgsar.


New York Stock Exchange


Wkly YTD Wky
DIv YId PE Chg %Cha Last Name


... +1.37 +16.2 26.08
16 +.86 +6.6 12.98
9 +3.13 -15.9 47.43
... +1.76 -2.4 15.98
... -.12 -29.1 5.52
9 +1.24 +7.8 31.68
14 +1.35 +10.8 53.10
21 +3.85 +25.5 60.87
7 +.21 -13.1 7.11
10 +1.95 +48,2 45.23
22 +3.51 +25.5 52.00
... +.69 +98.6 5.88
23 +1.08 +6.0 16.31
13 +1.47 -3.1 30.90
43 +4.04 -22.1 46.75
14 -.26 +7.8 26.53
16 +1.65 -5.7 27.04
16 +.40 -11.2 12.99
15 +1.08 +6.1 38.18
15 +4.18 +21.9 52.34
3 +1.53 -37.9 29.98
59 +2.53 +5.1 54.28
... +5.45 +2.3 77.91
14 +2.65 +6.1 39.97
7 +.15 +1.6 18.20
16 +3.21 -7.6 35.23
19 +1.69 -23.0 26.99
10 +1.53 +2.5 30.83
15 +1.55 +8.5 33.85
22 +1.89 +4.0 27.34
... +6.84 +2.7 95.45
26 +2.48 +5.1 50.36
30 +5.66 +27.6 72.93
.. +1.51 +2.1 20.72
... 1.21 +11.5 11.87
.. +1.86 -14.0 11.70
20 +,57 -16.9 11.09
... -58.1 1.11
12 +1.42 -13.7 26.06
... +1.76 +3.5 17.09
.. -4.24 -46.1 20.29
13 +1.74 -15.8 44.78
17 +1.73 +19.0 60.23
18 +2.47 -2.5 78.09
10 -.33 -6.7 32.00
... +1.35 +22.8 17.37
12 +.46 +36.9 16.31
16 +3.01 +13.8 74.27
21 +.34 -4.5 7.23
... +1.03 -12.5 9.27
15 +.55 +10.1 29.15
35 +2.10 +24.0 25.39
22 +1.76 +49.9 28.55
15 -1.13 +3.2 139.52
10 +3.78 +42.4 52.20
18 +1.82 +24.5 26.81
15 +1.55 +92 37.97
20 +2.31 +9.7 25.96
22 +4.73 -.6 50.43
... +3.57 -4.7 42.33
8 +3.14 +23.7 52.65
16 +2.54 +20.9 46.32
16 +1.49 -15.9 38.79
19 +8.61 +16.0 108.62
.. +.66 -15.9 8.66
18 +.84 +25.9 19.79
13 +1.87 -11.1 41.03
10 +2.18 +16.2 30.10
10 +6.19 +14.1 104.09
6 +.15 -13.9 3.54
14 +3.29 -9.3 42.88
9 +7.08 +20.1 93.70
23 +7.33 +19.3 65.99
13 +3.16 +3.5 68.09
16 +1.47 +19.1 29.81
... +5.78 +12.9 47.39
14 +.70 +14.7 25.90
11 +4.45 +11.4 75.88
15 +1.66 +9.1 54.06


ABBLtd 1.12 4.3
AES Corp...
AFLAC 1.20 2.5
AK Steel .20 1.3
AMR ...
AT&T Inc. 1.72 5.4
AbtLab 1.92 3.6
Accenture .90 1.5
AMD
Aetna .60 1.3
Agilent
AlcatelLuc ...
Alcoa .12 .7
Allstate .84 2.7
AlphaNRs ...
Altria 1.52 5.7
AMovilLs .26 1.0
AEagleOut .44 3.4
AEP 1.84 4.8
AmExp .72 1.4
AmlntlGrp ...
AmTower
Anadarko .36 .5
AnalogDev 1.00 2.5
Annaly 2.59 14.2
ArcelorMit .75 2.1
ArchCoal .44 1.6
ArchDan .64 2.1
ATMOS 1.36 4.0
BB&TCp .64 2.3
BHPBillLt 1.82 1.9
BJsWhls ..
BakrHu .60 .8
BcoBrades .80 3.9
BcoSantSA .79 6.7
BcoSBrasil 1.65 14.1
BkofAm .04 .4
Bklrelnd
BkNYMel .52 2.0
Barclay .36 2.1
Bar iPVix rs ..
BarrickG .48 1.1
Baxter 1.24 2.1
BerkH B ...
BestBuy .64 2.0
Blackstone .40 2.3
BlockHR .60 3.7
Boeing 1.68 2.3
BostonSci ...
BoydGm ...
BrMySq 1.32 4.5
CB RElis ...
CBSB .40 1.4
CF Inds .40 .3
CIGNA .04 .1
CSXs .12 .4
CVSCare .50 1.3
CblvsNYs .60 2.3
Cameron
CdnNRsgs .36
CapOne .20 .4
CardnlHIth .86 1.9
Camival 1.00 2.6
Caterpillar 1.84 1.7
Cemex
CenterPnt .79 4.0
CntryUnk 2.90 7.1
ChesEng .35 1.2
Chevron 3.12 3.0
Chimera .62 17.5
Citigrprs .04 .1
CliffsNRs .56 .6
Coach .90 1.4
CocaCola 1.88 2.8
Coc'CE .52 1.7
CBD-Pao s .38 .8
ConAgra .92 3.6
ConocPhil 2.64 3.5
ConEd 2.40 4.4


Wkly YTD Wkly
DIv Yld PE Cha %Cha Last


ConstellEn .96
Continucre ...
Coming .20
Covidien .80
Cummins 1.05
DR Horton :15
DTE 2.35
Danaher .08
Darden 1.72
Deere 1.64
DeltaAir
DenburyR ..
DevonE .68
DrSCBrrs ..
DirFnBr rs..
DrxEBear rs...
DrxFnBull
DirxSCBull ...
DirxEnBull ...
Discover .24
Disney .40
DomRescs 1.97
DowChm 1.00
DukeEngy 1.00
ECDangn ...
EMCCp
Eatons 1.36
ElPasoCp .04
Elan
EldorGldg .10
EmersonEl 1.38
EnCanag .80
ExcoRes .16
Exelon 2.10
ExxonMbl 1.88
FstHorizon .04
FstRepBn ...
FirstEngy 2.20
FlagstBcp ...
FootLockr, .66
FordM
ForestLab
FMCGs 1.00
FrontierCm .75
Gaflsa SA .29
GameStop ...
Gannett .16
Gap .45
GenGrPrn .40
GenMills 1.22
GenMotn .
GenOnEn ..
Genworth ..
Gerdau .27
GoldFLtd .19
Goldcrp g .41
GoldmanS 1.40
Goodyear
Hallibrtn .36
HarleyD .50
HartfdFn .40
HeclaM
Hess .40
HewlettP .48
HollyFront .60
HomeDp 1.00
Honwlllntl 1.33
HostHotls .12
HovnanE
Huntsmn .40
iShGold
iSAstla 1.06
iShBraz 3.42
iSCan .53
iShGer .67
iSh HK .42
iShJapn .17
iSh Kor .50
ISMalas .39


17 +1.46 +26.0
16 +1.44 +32.7
8 +.99 -4.0
16 +1.89 +18.7
17+10.75 -2.4
61 +.26 -2.1
15 +1.76 +12.1
19 +3.21 +15.6
16 +4.28 +13.7
15 +4.97 +1.8
15 -.14 -26.3
56 +1.35 +5.0
9 +2.15 +.3
...-5.59 -29.3
.. -8.29 -10.5
... -3.36 -37.3
.. +4.20 -3.1
...+11.88 +17.9
...+13.85 +29.6
9 +1.76 +43.3
17 +2.14 +5.9
16 +1.74 +14.7
19 +1.34 +6.4
13 +.56 +7.1
... +1.36 -56.4
30 +2.19 +21.5
17 +4.46 +3.7
28 +.97 +48.5
... +1.06+107.0
37 +.36 -22.3
19 +3.52 -.1
88 +1.88 +5.9
... -1.05 -8.7
14 +1.33 +4.1
12 +5.23 +12.2
... +.16 -17.7
41 -1.96 +6.5
16 +1.58 +20.6
... -.07 -25.2
1 -.14 +22.8
7 -.78 -16.5
11 +.84 +25.6
10 +5.07 -10.9
59 +.33 -15.7
... +.25 -35.0
10 +.81 +17.7
6 +1.01 -3.6
10 +.74 -17.1
... +.61 +8.0
14 +.50 +4.9
7 +.66-17.0
... +.15 +2.1
53 +.61 -19.6
... +1.17 -22.4
2 +.33 -21.4
15 +.59 +3.2
15 +5.74 -18.7
... +1.41 +45.9
21 +5.42 +25.6
41 +4.02 +21.4
7 +2.33 +2.1
37 +.40 -31.7
10 +6.38 -1.5
9 +2.15 -12.0
18+12.05 +76.3
18 +1.65 +4.8
20 +3.84 +13.2
...+1.52 -1.3
... +.58' -36.9
18 +1.79 +23.5
-.14 +4.5
.. +1.60 +3.1
.. +4.59 -4.2
...+1.90 +2.9
.. +1.78 +13.4
+.74 -1.3
... +.40 -3.6
...+3.56 +8.0
+.70 +7.4


HAPPY



FOURTH OF JULY

As we enjoy this Independence Day, let us also celebrate
our freedom. We are tree to set goals, make choices and
take steps to ppare for the future we want to live.


Call today to start taking steps toward your financial
independence.


Steve Jones, CFP
Financial Advisor
2929 West U S Highway 90
Suite 114
24e Lake City, FL 32055
386-752-3847


www.edwardjones.co Mimbr isPC


'R ^ ___^ ___


Wkly YTD Wkly
DIv YId PE Chg %Chg Last


+.79 -1.5
-.36 +9.3
+1.66 +.5
+7.06 +6.4
+2.66 +1.1
-3.03 -.5
+3.70 +4.4
+4.15 +7.5
+2.62 +9.7
+3.93 -.1
+9.47 +18.9
+1.26 +1.7
+1.83 +12.4
+1.25 +19.7
+1.64 -2.1
+1.71 -.8
+2.34 -2.0
+1.63 +3.4
+.81 -26.0
+2.24 +8.8
+3.23 +11.0
+1.95.-13.4
-1.59 -24.6
+.51 -4.6
+.83 +3.8
+.65 -16.7
+2.34 -4.7
+1.16 +12.6
+.55 -27.3
+.42 +21.0
+4.70 -4.5
+.72 +.1


Wkly YTD Wkly
DIv YId PE Chg %Chg Last


LillyEli 1.96 5.2
Limited .80 2.1
LincNat .20 .7
LloydBkg
LyonBasA .10 .3
MBIA
MEMC
MFA Fncl 1.00 12.2
MGIC
MGMRsts ...
Macys .40 1.3
ManpwrGp .80 1.4
MarathnO sl.00 3.0
MktVGold .40 .7
MarlntA .40 1.1
MarshM .88 2.8
Marshlls .04 .5
Masco .30 2.4
McDrmlnts...
McMoRn ...
Mechel
MedcoHh..
Medtmic .97 2.5
Merck 1.52 4.3
MetLife .74 1.7
MetroPCS ...
Molycorpn ...
Monsanto 1.12 1.5
MonstrWw ..
MorgStan .20 .8
Mosaic .20 .3
MotrlaSoln ...


8 4.91
16 +1.74
11 +2.39
+.52
.. +1.34
5 +.78
50 +.50
9 +.14
+.06
: +1.49
13 +1.86
... +3.11
7 +4.10
... +1.16
31 +2.86
19 +1.62
+.52
+.45
17 +.81
... +2.43
-.32
17 +3.52
14 +.72
15 +1.05
12 +3.39
28 +1.11
... +4.08
25 +6.69
... +1.37
12 +1.55
13 +4.23
... +1.10


ISTaiwn .29
iShSilver ...
IShChina25 .85
iSSP500 2.45
iShEMkts .84
iShB20 T 4.02
IS Eafe 1.68
iShR2K .89
iShREst 2.09
IngerRd ..48
IBM 3.00
IntlGame .24
IntPap 1.05
Interpublic .24
Invesco .49
ItauUnibH .67
JPMorgCh 1.00
Jabil .28
JanusCap .20
JohnJn 2.28
JohnsnCtl .64
JnprNtwk
K Home .25
Keycorp .12
Kimco .72
Kinrossg .10
Kohls 1.00
Kraft 1.16
LDK Solar
LSICorp
LVSands
LennarA .16


Name Div YId
MotraMon ...
NCRCorp ...
NYSEEur 1.20 3.5
Nabors
NBkGreece .29
NatGrid 2.92 5.8
NOilVarco .44 .6
NatSemi .40 1.6
NatwHP 1.92 4.5
NY CmtyB 1.00 6.4
NewellRub .32 2.0
NewmtM .80 1.5
Nexeng .20 ..
NextEraEn 2.20 3.8
NiSource .92 4.5
NikeB 1.24 1.4
NokiaCp .55 8.6
NorflkSo 1.60 2.1
Nucor 1.45 3.5
OcciPet 1.84 1.7
OfficeDpt ...
OilSvHT 1.71 .8
Owenslll
PG&ECp 1,82 4.3
PMIGrp ...
PNC 1.40 2.3
PPLCorp 1.40 5.0
PatriotCoal ...
PeabdyE .34 .6
Penney .80 2.3
PepsiCo 2.06 2.9
Petrohawk ...
PetrbrsA 1.34 4.3
Petrobras 1.28 3.8
Pfizer .80 3.9
PhilipMor 2.56 3.8
PhilipsEl 1.02 4.0
Potash s .28 .5
PS USDBull...
ProLogis 1.12 3.1
ProShtS&P ..
PrUShS&P ..
ProUltQQQ ...
PrUShQQQ rs..
ProUltSP .35 .6
ProUShL20 ...
ProUSSP500...
ProUSSv rs...
ProgsvCp 1.40 1.9
ProUSR2Krs... ...
Prudent 1.15 1.8
PulteGrp ...
QksilvRes ...
RadianGrp .01 .2
RadioShk .25 1.8
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RegionsFn.04 .6
ReneSola
Renren n
RiteAd ..
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SpdrDJIA 3.06 2.4
SpdrGold .
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Safeway .58 2.5
StJude .84 1.7
SandRdge ...
SaraLee .46 2.4
Schlmbrg 1.00 1.1
Schwab .24 1.4
SemiHTr .70 2.0
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ShawGrp .


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Name Div
SiderurNac .81
SilvWhtn g .12
SmithfF ..
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TenetHith ...
Tesoro
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Tycolntl 1.00
Tyson .16
UBSAG ...
US Aiwy ...
UtdCont ...
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USNGsrs ...
USOilFd
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Weyerh .60
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XLGrp .44
Xerox .17
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YingliGm
Youku n
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Nasdaq Most Active


AMEX Most Active


Wkiy YTD Wkly
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Name DIv
CftzRepBh ...
Clearwire ...
CognizTech..
Comcast .45
Come spcl .45
ConvOrg h ..
Cree Inc
Dell Inc
DeltaPtrh ...
Dndreon
DirecTVA ...
DishNetwk ..
DryShips ...
E-Trade ...
eBay
8x8 Inc
ElectArts ...
Emcore If ...
Enerl
Entegris
EntropCom ...
EricsnTel .37
Expedia .28
ExpScripts ...
F5 Netwks ...
Fastenal s .52
FifthThird .24
Finisar
FstNiagara .64
FstSolar ...
Flextm
FocusMda ...
Fortinet s ...
FuelCell ...
GT Solar ...
Garmin 2.00
GileadSci ..
GluMobile ...


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YId PE Chg %Chg Last


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... +.67+159.4 5.37


Name DIv YId
Google
HanmiFncl ...
HercOffsh ...
Hologic
HudsCity .32 3.9
Icagen rs
Intel .84 3.7
JA Solar ...
JDSUniph...
JetBlue
LawsnSft ...
Level3
UbtyMintA ...
UfeTech ...
Majesco
MarinaBrs ...
MarvellT ...
Mattel .92 3.3
MelcoCrwn ...
Microchp 1.38 3.6
MicronT
Microsoft .64 2.5
NetApp
Netflix
NewsCpA .15 .8
NewsCpB .15 .8
NwstBcsh .44 3.4
Nvidia ...
OnSmcnd ...
Oracle .24 .7
PDL Bio .60 10.2
PMC Sra
PainTher 2.00 ....
PattUTI .20 ,6
Paychex 1,24 4.0
PeopUtdF .63 4.6
Popular
PwShsQQQ.42 .7


Wkly YTD Wkly
PE Chg %Chg Last Name


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Wkly YTD Wkly
DIv YId PE Cha %Cho Last


Qualcom .86
RF MicD ..
RschMotn ...
Riverbed s ..
SanDisk
Satcon h
SeagateT .72
Slcnware .41
Sina
SidusXM ..
SkywksSol ...
Sonus
Spreadirm .05
Staples .40
StarScient ...
Starbucks .52
StlDynam .40
SuccessF ...
Symantec ..
TD Ameritr .20
Tekelec
Tellabs .08
TevaPhrm .8.3
TibcoSft
TiVo Inc
TriQuint
UrbanOut ..
Verisign 5.75
VirgnMda h .16
Vodafone 1.44
Windstrm 1.00
Xilinx .76
YRCWwrs...
Yahoo
Zagg
ZionBco .04


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25 -1.47 +68.6 12.85
.. +2.03 +.8 24.42


Name DIv
AbdAsPac .42
Adventrx
AldNevG
AmApparel ...
Anooraqg ...
AntaresP
ArcadiaRs..
Aurizong .
AvalRaren ...
BarcUBS36 ..
BarcGSOil ...
Brigus grs ...
CelSci
CFCdag .01
CheniereEn...
ChinaShen ...
DenisnM g ..
EVLtdDur 1.25
EntGaming ..
GabGldNR 1.68
GascoEngy ...
Gastar grs ...
GenMoly ..
GeoGloblR ..
GoldStr g
GranTrrag ...
GrtBasG g ..
GtPanSilv g ..
Hyperdyn ..
ImpOil gs .44
IndiaGC
InovioPhm ...
KodiakOg .
MadCatz g ..
MelroHith
MdwGoldg ...
Neoprobe
Nevsun .06


Wkly YTD
Yld PE Chg %Chg
5.7 ... +.12 +8.3
... ... +.15 +14.9
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... ... +.07 -45.2
... ... -.13 -60.1
S ... +.15 +36.5
... ... -.01 -75.7
... ... -.08 -27.6
... ... +.19 +9.8
... +.44 -3.9
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... ... +.03 -21.0
... -39.1
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... -03 -40.5
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1.0 ... -.04 -23.1


Wkly Wkly YTD Wkly
Last Name DIv YId PE Chg %Chg Last


NewEnSys,...
NwGold g ...
NAPallg ...
NDynMng ...
NthnO&G ...
NthgtM g ...
NovaGld 9...
Oilsandsg ...
OpkoHth ...
OrsusXel rs ...
Palatin rs ..
ParaG&S ...
PhrmAth ...
PionDrill ...
PotyMetg ...
Quepasa ..
QuestRMg ...
RareEleg ...
Rentech
RexahnPh ...
Rubicon g ...
SamsO&G ...
Taseko
TmsatlPetl ...
TravelCtrs
TriangPet ..
US Geoth ...
Ur-Energy
Uranerz
UraniumEn ...
VantageDrl ...
VimetX .50
VistaGold
VoyagerOG
Walterlnv 2.00
WT DrfChn .15
YMBiog ...


-.22 -72.3
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2.14
9.89
4.25
10.16
21.98
2.60
9.07
.30
3.72
5.14
1.22
3.18
3.10
15.61
1.74
7.26
6.75
10.93
1.10
1.25
3.37
2.89
4.93
1.70
5.69
6.54
.68
1.64
3.00
3.11
1.85
30.47
2.83
3.13
22.84
25.47
2.96


Weekly Stock Exchange Highlights STOCKS OF LOCAL INTEREST


Name


AMCNetn ...
Abraxas
ActivsBliz .17 1.4
AdobeSy ...
AdvBattery ... ...
AkamaT ... ...
Alancorsh ...
AlteraCp If .24 .5
Amazon
ACapAgy 5.60 18.9
AmCapLtd ... ...
Amgen
ApolloGrp ... ...
Apple Inc ...
ApldMatll .32 2.4
AriadP ... ...
ArmHId .13 .5
ArubaNet ...
Atmel
Autodesk ...
AutoData 1.44 2.7
AvagoTch .36 .9
AvanirPhm ...
Baidu
BedBath ...
Biogenldc ... ...
Blkboard ...
BrigExp ... ...
Broadcom .36 1.0
BrcdeCm ...,
CA Inc .20 .9
Cadence
CpstnTrbh ...
Celgene
CellTherrsh...
ClenaCorp ..
Cirrus
Cisco ,24 1.5


I I


' '1A


Page Editor: Todd Taylor, 754-0424


i









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a.m. to 5:00 p.m.
Some people prefer to place their
classified ads in person, and some
ad categories will require prepay-
ment. Our office is located at 180
East Duval Street.
You can also fax or mail your ad
copy to the Reporter.
FAX: 386-752-9400 Please
direct your copy to the Classified
Department.
EMAIL: classifieds@lakecityre-
porter.com





Ad is to Appear: Call by: Fax/Emil by:

SWednesday Mon., 10:00 m. Mon., 9:00 a.m.
Thursday Wedti .,10:00a.m. Wed., 9:00a.m.
Friday Thrs.,10:00a.m. Thurs., 9:00a.m.
SSaturday Fri.,10:00a.m. Fri.,S9:00a.m.
Sunday Fri.,10:00a.m. Fi.,9:00a.m.
These deadlines are subject to change without notice.




L Ad Errors- Please read your ad
o on the first day of publication.
We accept responsibility for only
the first incorrect Insertion, and
Only the charge for the ad space
Sin error. Please call 755-5440
immediately for prompt correc-
tion and billing adjustments.
SCancellations- Normal advertising
deadlines apply for cancellation.
bBilling Inquiries- Call 755e5440.
Should further information be
, required regarding payments or
, credit limits, your call will be trans-
* ferred to the accounting depart-
i ment.


Advertising copy is subject to
approval by the Publisher who
, reserves the right to edit, reject,
appropriate headings. Copy should
be checked for errors by the
advertiser on the first day of pub-
lication. Credit for published errors
will be allowed for the first insertion
t for that portion of the advertisement
, which was incorrect. Further, the
Publisher shall not be liable for any
to be published, nor for any general,
special or consequential damages.
Advertising language must comply
with Federal, State or local laws
regarding the prohibition of discrimi-
nation in employment, housing and
. public accommodations. Standard
*o' bbreviations are acceptable; how-


., ~ver, the first word of each ad may
S- not be abbreviated.

In Print and Online
www.iakeeityreporter.comn


010 Announcements
Know Your surroundings and the
Danger. Don't think you know it
all. If you do, You're making a
serious mistake. Martin Rivero

020 Lost & Found
FOUND SMALL brown & white
dog on 245A. 6/26/11. Injured.
Call 386-754-9297
If no answer leave message..
100 Job
100 Opportunities

05526330
Suwannee Valley 4Cs, area
grantee for nationally
recognized high-quality early
childhood program seeks
applicants interested in a
teaching career in a
professional work
environment.
Teachers (Full Time)
for 3-5 yr olds
Must have a Child Care
Professional Certificate
(CDA, FCCPC or ECPC)
or be currently enrolled in an
Early Childhood Professional
Certificate program
Preferred: 3 yrs classroom exp
w/relevant age children;
current 1st Aid/CPR; bi-lingual
(English/Spanish)
Starts at $7.56-$8.65 per hr
All applicants must pass
physical & DCF background
screenings.
Excellent Benefits, Paid
Holidays, Sick & Annual Leave,
Health/Dental Insurance,
Training/scholarship
opportunities and more.
Apply in person at: .
236 SW Columbia Ave
Lake City Or send resume
E-mail: arobinson sv4cs.org
Fax (386) 754-2220
EOE

Contracted Swift Transportation
owner operated on dedicated
account in Lake City, FL looking
for qualified drivers. Drivers must
have Class A lic and clean MVR.
We run team trucks only. No solo
positions available.
Contact Fred at (404)671-6362 or
Otis at 904-327-6886


FLORIDA
GATEWAY
COLLEGE
(Formetty Lake Crty Community College)
ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR,
PRACTICAL NURSING
224 Duty Days Tenured Track
Conduct the learning experience in
the classroom, laboratory and/or
clinical area. Prepare for instruction -
syllabi, lesson plans, tests; use
assessment strategies to assist the
continuous development of the
learner; use effective communication
techniques with students and others.
Demonstrate knowledge and
understanding of the subject matter,
use appropriate technology in the
teaching and leading process.
Minimum Qualifications Bachelor of
Science in Nursing degree and be
licensed in Florida or be eligible for
licensure in Florida, Three years
experience as staff nurse (acute care
preferred), Ability to present
information in a coherent manner and
the ability to fairly evaluate student
retention of that information.
Desirable Qualifications: Computer
literate. Teaching experience, BSN
required. MSN preferred.
Salary: Based on degree and
experience, plus benefits.
Review of applications will begin
Immediately.
Persons interested should provide
College application, vita. and
photocopies of transcripts. All foreign
transcripts must be submitted with
official translation and evaluation.
Position details and applications
available on web at: www.fqc.edu
Human Resources
Florida Gateway College
149 S.E. College Place
Lake City F1 32025-2007
Phone (386) 754-4314
Fax (386) 754-4814
E-Ma. il hu'lln n.hre '.l.i ,
Vi' D I'A .O ( 1ia alitw ant


Land Clearing

Back Hoe, Dozer, Chopping, root
raking, bush hog, seeding, sod,
disking, site prep, ponds &
irrigation. Free Est! 386-623-3200

Lawn & Landscape Service

Clean Pine Straw,
You pick it up, $1.85 a bale
Delivery of 100 bales $260
386-688-9156

Services

DIVORCE, BANKRUPTCY,
RESUMES.
other court approved forms-
386-961-5896.

.Summer Cleaning done your
way. Let me Clean your home be-
fore you leave on Vacation. Come
back home & relax. 386-303-1496.
We come to you! Auto Detailing:
Wash, wax & vaccum. Pressure
Wash: Houses, mobile homes,
driveways, decks. 386-697-2224


100 Job
100 'Opportunities

05526387
Local company seeking
experienced,
"Transportation/
Logistic Coordinator"
Minimum qualifications:
v High School diploma
v 2 years experience
v PC Knowledge Microsoft
and Web based TMS/WMS
systems
v Routing/Dispatch
Fax resume to: 386-438-2080

05526416
Meridian Behavioral
Healthcare Inc.
www.mbhci.or
Please visit our website to view
current open opportunities
and to apply online :
Meridian is an active partner
with the National Health Service
Corps
Therapists:
Program Manager (Licensed)
Licensed, or Master's Level
in Outpatient
Bachelor's-Level in
Counselor Support
Case Management (adult &
child)
Master's Therapist in
Methadone Clinic
Administration:
Medical Records
Client Relations Specialist
Medical Services
*RN Nursing Manager
DETOX (Gville)
PRN RN, LPN, C.N.A.
Recovery Specialist (Direct
Care)
To see our currentt openings in
Mental Health and to apply
online, please go to:
www.mbhci.ore
EOE, DFWP, E-Verify





Associate Reps
SUMMER WORK/GREAT PAY
Immediate FT/PT openings,
Customer sales/service,
No exp needed, conditions,
Apply Now all ages 17+
(386) 269-0883
Hiring Locally This Week
Liberty National Life
Insurance Company
Full Training Provided Potential
of $60K+ Annually. 401K, BCBS
Insurance & Pension for those who
qualify. Call 1-800-257-5500 to
set up an interview.
MANAGEMENT POSITION
available at the CATO Store in
Live Oak, FL. Experience necessa-
ry. Apply within at Suwannee Pla-
za on Hwy 129 Live Oak.
Mobile Home Sales!
Experienced Salesperson
Needed to sell the South's
#1 rated product! Call Kevin
386-344-3975
Retired, widower with
Auto and Full size house
needs domestic help.
Call 386-719-8872
Sales Position available for moti-
vated individual Rountree -Moore
Toyota, Great benefits, paid train-
ing/vacation. Exp. a plus but not
necessary. Call Anthony Cosentino
386-623-7442

S a Sales
110 Employment
SeabreezeFood Service
Experienced food service Rep.
Send Resume to:
paulcucinella@yahoo.com

1 a Medical
120V Employment

05526321
Gainesville Women's Center
For Radiology
Arlene Weinshelbaum, M.D.
MAMMOGRAPHY TECH
wanted full time for private
Radiology office.ARRT &
Mammography certification req.
Fax resume to:
Tracy: (352)331-2044


120 Medical
120 Employment

05526385
Dietary Aide/Server, full time.
Experienced preferred.
Must be able to work evenings
and weekends.
Please apply Baya Pointe
Nursing & Rehabilitation
Center, 587 SE Ermine
Ave., Lake City, Fl 32025
EOE/DFWP

05526394
Medical Assistant
Requirements: HS diploma,
Phlebotomy Certification.
w/ 1 year exp.
Medical Assistant or equivalent
certification preferred
ONLY Qualified candidates
may send resumes to:
jpapesh(tcancercarenorthflori-
da.com
Busy family practice looking for a
full-time Nurse Practitioner. Send
replyto Box 05063, C/O The Lake
City Reporter, P.O. Box 1709,
Lake City, FL, 32056


230 Thtoring

Disappointed with your child's
FCat scores? Or just want to. give
your child a head start for next
.year? We can help, Father and son
Math tutoring with over 5 years'
experience in teaching. Helping
students with math from basic
math to calculus. Effective
tutoring with reasonable rates. call
497-3344 ask for Doug or Walt

240 Schools &
240 Education


04544843
Interested in a Medical Career?
Express Training offers
courses for beginners & exp
Nursing Assistant, $479
next class-07/11/10
Phlebotomy national certifica-
tion, $800 next class-07/11/11
Continuing education
Fees incl. books, supplies, exam
fees. Call 386-755-4401 or
expresstrainingservices.com


310 Pets & Supplies

AKC Lab Puppies. Black & gold
females. 9 weeks old. All papers
and shots provided great Pedigree.
$450. ea. Jennifer 386-438-0417

FREE KITTENS
To good home
Adorable
Call 386-755-8560
KITTENS. 4 white and 1 long
haired black. Had 1st shots. 10
weeks old. Cute & spunky!
$25.00. ea. 386-961-8909
PUBLISHER'S NOTE
Florida Law 828.29 requires dogs
and cats being sold to be at least 8
weeks old and have a health
certificate from a licensed
veterinarian documenting they
have mandatory shots and are
free from intestinal and external
parasites. Many species of wild-
life must be licensed by Florida
Fish and Wildlife. If you are
unsure, contact the local
office for information.

330 Livestock &
S Supplies

Black Angus Cows & Heifers
Prices Vary
Registered & Commercial
386-719-4802


361 Farm Equipment 630 obe Homes


84 Ford 4610 Tractor.
2WD, Solid
2005 motor,$7,500. OBO
386-867-0005

407 Computers
Compaq Computer, Many extras.
Complete Computer
$80.00
386-755-9984 or 386-292-2170

408 Furniture
KING SIZE BED
$100.00
755-9333 or
755-7773
Recliner Sofa
$75.00
755-9333 or
755-7773

420 Wanted to Buy
K&H TIMBER
We Buy Pine Hardwood &
Cypress. Large or small tracts.
Call 386-961-1961.
Wanted Junk Cars, Trucks, Vans.
$250 & up CASH! Free Pick Up!
NO title needed !386-878-9260
After 5pm 386- 752-3648.

430 Garage Sales
PUBLISHER'S NOTE
All Yard Sale Ads
Must be Pre-Paid.


440 Miscellaneous


Stop gnat & Mosquito bites! Buy
Swamp Gator All natural insect re-
pellent. Family safe. Use head to
toe. Available at The Home Depot.'
Summer Barbecue Special
Tow Behind
Grill/Smoker, $1,250 OBO.
386-719-4802
Womens clothing, young mens
clothing, American Eagle &
Holister jeans & shirts. Toys, 2
bird cages, boys bicycle, RCA TV
set. Purses, New coffee maker.
Have it all for $75. 752-1811

630 Mobile Homes
6 for Rent
2&3 BR MH. $395 $650. mo.
plus deposit. Water & sewer fur-
nished. Cannon Creek MHP
386-752-6422
2/2 Units, clean, well maintained,
nice safe park setting, 2 miles to
downtown Lake City, $575 month
+ $575 sec dep, 386-984-8448
13th Month FREE!!


2br /2ba SWMH $475. mo; also
Resid'l RV lots for rent between
Lake City & G'ville. Access to I
75 & 441 (352)317-1326 for terms
3/2 S of Lake City, (Branford area)
$575 month plus security
386-590-0642 or 386-867-1833
www.suwanneevalleyproperties.com
DWMH for Rent. 3br/2ba
Handicapped accessible.
$650. mo. $500. Dep. No Pets.
386-984-9634. ask for Amber.
Mobile Homes for rent in
White Springs, Lake City & Ft.
White Contact 386-623-3404
or 386-365-1919
Nice clean 2&3 bdrm, Five Points,
NO PETS,
also 3 bd on the .
Westside, 386-961-1482
X-Clean 2/2 SW, 8 mi NW of VA.
Clean acre lot, nice area. $500. mo
+ dep No dogs Non-smoking
environment.386-961-9181





White. Owner Fin. $3,000 dn.
$850mo. $99,900 352-215-1018
www.LandOwnerFinancing.com
PALM HARBOR Homes Has
Closed 2 Model Centers. Save up
to 60K on select models
Call Today! 800-622-2832
NEW D/W Reduced Thousands.
3br/2ba set, delivery, A/C
skirting, steps. $39,900.
Call Ken (386)754-8844
AS IS, WHERE IS...32X80,4/2,
LR/Den, needs carpet, paint, 2400
sqft. has metal roof, vinyl siding.
$31,000. Randy 386-754-0198
FIRE YOUR LANDLORD
TO OWN WHAT YOUR
THROWING AWAY IN RENT.
CALL MIKE 386-754-8844
NEW 32X70 4/3. 2K sqft+. L/R,
DenSidex side, glasstop range,
D/W. Del, set, Steps, A/C, skirt-
ing. $59,900. Ken (386)754-8844
OWNER FINANCE 40% Down
w/land Equity or CASH on any
new or used singlewide or Double-
wide. Randy 386-754-0198
The Economy has forced
me to cut the price on my
3 bedroom, 2 bath home to
$38K (352)-870-5983

71A0 Unfurnished Apt.
710 For Rent

04545256
SPRING HILL VILLAGE
Excellent High Springs location.
1, 2 & 3 bedroom floor-plans;
some with garages.
Call 386-454-1469
or visit our website:


AUTO AGLEAN


Seeking Salesperson to
join our team. No experience
necessary. Great benefits package.

Apply in person or call

Woody


386-758-6171


confused?



Call Lake City Reporter Classifieds!


WE CAN HELP 386-755-5440


I L


SADvantage










LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED SUNDAY, JULY 3, 2011


710 Unfurnished Apt.











2BR/1.5BA w/garage
5 minutes from VA hospital.
Call for details.
386-755-4590 or 365-5150
A Landlord You Can Love!
2 brApts $575. & up + sec. Great
area. CH/A washer/dryer hookups.
386-758-9351/352-208-2421
Furnished or unfurnished
Townhomes on the golf course.
$750. mo. plus security. Includes
water. 386-752-9626
NICE APT Downtown. Remod-
led 1 bedroom. Kitchen, dining,
living room. $450. mo plus sec.
386-362-8075 or 386-754-2951








The Lakes Apts. Studios & Brs
from $135/wk. Until. & cable n .





Sec 8 voucheres accepted, monthly
atesaal 3all 386-752-2741
dated apartments wtile loors
From $450. + sec.


72 0 Furnished Apts.
38-36280 For Rent3





CallT-ODA 2 Y 386-4762-065
SLbr Apnt. nc. water, elec, &o
cable. $5950. o. Good aea.
References & sec. req'd.
No pets. 386-719-4808
Rooms for Rent. Hillcrest, Sands,
Columbia. Ail furnished. Electric,
cable, fridge, microwave. Weekly
or monthly rates. 1 person $135,
2 persons $150. weekly
386-752-5808
Colu i Unfurnished

73 Home For Rent
* lbr/1.5ba Country Cottage, Cathe-
dral ceilings, brick fireplace, wash-
er/dryer,1 ac fenced, private, some
pets, lease. 1st, last, sec, ref. Lake
City area $650tno. 352-494-1989
lbr/lba Free ele. Utilities incl. 4mi
S. Lake City. $300dep. $375mo.
386-590-0642 or 386-867-1833
www.suwanneevalleyproperties.com
2 bedroom 1 bath on
5 acres. $700.00 per month.
First, last and R security.
386-590-5333
2br Private Country
Home. Remodeled,
everything is new. Large yard.
386-752-1444
2br/lba home. 3 avail. Lake City,
White Springs (River), Wellborn.
Jane S. Usher, Lie. Real Estate
Broker. 386-755-3500/365-1352
3br/1.5ba. Very clean, CH/A
Fenced (privacy) large back yard.
Nice area/location. $750, mo $750.
dep. Ref's req'd. (941)920-4535
4br/2ba in town.
Good neighborhood. $900. mo
1st & $900 security. No Pets.
386-755-6916
Family Home 3/2, lr, dr, fan rm
w/ fp,garage, fenced back yd.
Nice area. $1100 mo + dep Martha
Jo Khachigan, Realtor 623-2848


Bring the picture in or
we will take it for you!
* Ad runs 10 consecutive days
with a description and photo in the
newspaper and online E-edition.
* Ad runs 10 consecutive days as a
classified line ad online.
* You must include vehicle price.
* All ads are prepaid.
* Private party only.





2006 EF250
Ford Van
3/4 ton, metal work
shelves/ladder rack,
60K miles, exc. cond.
$10,500
Call
386-555-5555
If you don't sell your vehicle
during the first 10 days, you
can run the same vehicle ad
for 10 additional days for
only $15.00
Terms and conditions remain the
same for the additional run.



(386)B 755-5440TT^^^^


730 Unfurnished
730 Home For Rent

/ 11208 73rd Ct. Live Oak..
4/3 brick home in a country
subdivision $700./ mo + security
/ 204 NW Guerdon
Rd...Brand new 3/2 home re-
duced to $700./mo + security
/ 250 SW Wise Dr..3/2 Execu-
tive home in restricted Wise Es-
tates. $1350./mo + secuirty
/ 390 SW Wilshire Dr...
Gorgeous upscale 3/2 on
culdesac in Callaway
$1300./mo + security
/ COMING SOON! 4/2 brick
home in Springfield Estates on
Brandy Way. Call for additional
information!
Call Kayla Carbona @
386-623-9650

750 Business &
750 Office Rentals
FOR LEASE: Downtown office
space. Convenient to
Court house.
Call 386-755-3456
For Lease: E Baya Ave. Two -
1000 sqft office space units or
combined for 2000 sqft. 386-984-
0622 or weekends 386-497-4762
OFFICE SPACE for lease.
Oak Hill Plaza. 900 sqft
$675mo/$695. sec dep.
Tom 386-961-1086 DCA Realtor

770 Condos For Rent

05526400
Golf Course Condo for rent,
2BR/2BA, 1420 s.f., $1100/mo.
Rent includes all appliances,
basic cable, water/sewer/
garbage, pool & tennis ct.
access. Realtor/owner
call 386-344-0433


790 Vacation Rentals

Horseshoe Beach Scalloping Spcl
Gulf Front 2br, w/lg porch, dock,
fish sink. wkend $395./wk $895.
386-235-3633/352-498-5986
alwaysonvacation.com #419-181
"Florida's Last Frontier"

805 Lots.for Sale
1/4 acre, new well, septic and
power, paved rd, owner fin, no
down pyin't, $24,900,
($256 month) 352-215-1018
www.LandOwnerFinancing.com
,


805 Lots for'Sale
PUBLISHER'S NOTE
All real estate advertising in this
newspaper is subject to the fair .
housing act which makes it illegal
to advertise "any preference,
limitation, or discrimination based
on race, color, religion, sex,
disability, familial status or nation-
al origin; or any intention to make
such preference, limitation or
discrimination." Familial status
includes children under the age of
18 living with parents or legal
custodians, pregnant women and
people securing custody of chil-
dren under the age of 18. This
newspaper will not knowingly
accept any advertising for real es-
tate which is in violation of the
law. Our readers are hereby in-
formed that all dwellings adver-
tised in this newspaper are availa-
ble on an equal opportunity basis.
To complain of discrimination call
HUD toll free at 1-800-669-9777,
the toll free
telephone number to the hearing
impaired is 1-800-927-9275.


810 Home for Sale
HANDYMAN SPECIAL
2br/1.5ba. Half ac fenced lot
w/shed. Appraised at $68,000.
Asking $55,000. (352)335-8330

82O Farms &
Acreage
10-ac lot. Well/septic/pp. Owner
financing $300 dn, $663 mo 8.9%,
25 yrs. Deas Bullard Properties
386-752-4339 www.landnfl.com
4 1/2 acre lot. Lake Jeffery Road.
Gorgeous Oaks!Paved Rd
Owner Financing! NO DOWN!
$59,900. $525roo 352-215-1018.
www.LandOwnerFinancine.com
4 acres, Wellborn, New Well
installed, Beautifully wooded
w/cleared Home Site, owner fin,
no down, $39,900, $410 mon
Call 352-215-1018
www.LandOwnerFinancing.com
FARM- 7 stall barn, Apt.
17+ acres cross fenced.
Close in $895. mo.
386-961-1086

83O Commercial
Property
05526409
FOR SALE LAKE CITY
FORMER 84 LUMBER Zoned
"Commercial Intensive on,
4.2 +/- Acres with an 18,300
S.F. main building at 1824 W.
US Highway 90; contact
Crystal 724 228-3636 x 1349
4 UNIT Apt. Bldg. All 1/1/ w/ex-
tra rooms. Clean, good tenants and
remodeled. Downtown. $160,000.
386-362-8075 or 754-2951


8o0 Real Estate
Olv Wanted
I Buy Houses
CASH!
Quick Sale Fair Price
386-269-0605


2005 Yamana
VStar 650
11,000 miles, blue with
ghost flames, runs
great, new battery
Price Reduced to $2,800
Call
386-752-9645




pF al IopR t


Private Estate
Within the city limits. Beautiful old-
er home with mature landscaping
and lake views, 6 Br., 3.5 baths,
3 fireplaces, private paved drive.
39.7 acres of property included
with home. $994,000 or $3,000
mo. for rent. or home plus 2 acres
only $495,000. Call for additional
information and showings. "


-L 4


Listing Agent Mary Brown Whitehurst

(386) 965-0887
i8 t| or co-owner (386)397-5131


Bring your horses or cows on down WOW this Log Home on 11.16 Acres is a
to this 9.77 mini farm. Home features must to see. 3brs and 2.5 bath Suwannee
3br/3ba, large den, oversized living room River Stone fireplace in the great room.
with a buck stove. Detached garage and Outside features 3 horse stalls, tack
barn. mis 77431 $179,900 room, riding arena and more. mis 78237
$274,900


Emr- Ac' me
Want Privacy? This home sits on 2.3
acres in Picadilly S/D. Home is a 4 br/2ba.
Very open eat in kitchen. Formal dining
room, living room and large den with
fireplace. Florida room overlooking a
spacious backyard. mls 78347 $189,000


FORECLOSURES...Call for
our list today.

--ir21.


.r... ...,.

OWNERS Very motivated to sell this
3br/2ba DWMH on 5 acres off of CR 247.
Porcelan sinks, large master bedroom.
Outside features an above ground pool.
MLS 75830 $87,500


Call Deborah Myles
Broker-Associate
3864719-1224


930 Motorcycles
05 Yamaha VSTAR 650 11K mi.
Blue w/Ghost flames. Runs great!
New Battery. Price Reduced to
$2,800. 386-752-9645

950 Cars for Sale
1986 Chevy Monte Carlo SS,
78k miles, one owner. $10,000.
All original.
386-752-1313 or 904-718-6747
2006 Toyota Scion XB,
41,000 mi. $13,000.
Paid over $24,000 new.
386-752-1313 or 904-718-6747


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LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED SUNDAY, JULY 3, 2011 Classified Department: 755-5440


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Classified Department: 755-5440


igow-W-41


. i C













Story ideas?


Contact
Robert Bridges
Editor
754-0428


Sunday, July 3, 2011


Lake City Reporter





LIFE


www.lakecityreporter.com


Nichelle Demorest
dndemorest@ufl.edu


Add

fragrance

to your

garden

H ow many times
have you been
outdoors and
become sud-
denly aware
of a pleasant, flowery fra-
grance in the air? Maybe
you hadn't even been pay-
ing attention to the plants
around you until that teas-
ing scent made you stop
and take notice of your sur-
roundings. Of course, you
must slow down and enjoy
the garden for a moment as
you hunt down the source.
By incorporating plants
with fragrant blossoms into
your garden area, you can
add an unexpected element
of enjoyment to the garden
experience. People usually
purchase plants for their
leisure areas around decks,
pools and patios according
to visual qualities such as
leaf texture, size and flower
color.
Ongoing research is
uncovering the myster-
ies and science of flower
fragrances. There are
hundreds of aromatic com-
pounds that are responsible
for the scents produced by
plants. A specific fragrance
that one flower emits to
attract a particular pollina-
tor is the result of a precise
combination of some of
these compounds.
Historically, plant breed-
ers have selected plants
with flowers that are larger
or deeper in color, or plants
with longer lasting flowers.
But it is possible that some
of the fragrance is lost
in this selection process.
Newer roses may have
large blooms and a long
vase life, but what hap-
pened to the rose scented
petals?
A good way to add the
enjoyment of fragrance
to the garden is to first
choose plants that are
appropriate for the site and
fit your growth require-
ments. Then narrow the
search by selecting plants
that are fragrant. These
searches can be done on
the UF site http://florida-
yards. org/fyplants/index.
php.
If you are able to install
a variety of small flowers
or shrubs, try including a
few that bloom during each.
season. Some annuals to
try include sweet alyssum,
stock, nemesia and garden
verbena. There are many
fragrant perennials that are
worth considering such
as four o'clock, garden
phlox, dahlia and angel's
trumpet. Florida anise, tea
olive, mockorange, sweet
viburnum and sweetshrub
are just a few good shrubs
to consider. And don't for-
get to add some herbs.
Register now for "Back
to Basics: Growing Food
for the Family." This series
of classes will be held on
Tuesday evenings at the
Extension Office starting
onJuly26th.Call 752-5384
for details.
D. Nichelle Demorest is
a horticulture agent with the
Columbia County Extension
of the University of Florida
Institute of Food and
Agricultural Sciences.


GROWING UP GOSPEL


Live Oak teen
looks to change
lives with music.

By LEANNE TYO
Ityo@lakecityreporter.com
Offering hope to those
without it is the
musical mission of
17-year-old gospel
singer Jeremiah Ross
of Live Oak.
'To make someone change,
someone that was without hope
and make them regain hope,
things like that are the things that
matter to me," Ross said. "I'm a
people person and how people
are really affects me because I
long for people and how they feel,
and I want to change their world
with my music."
Ross said he began singing
gospel seriously at the age of 7,
but has been surrounded by it his
whole life, as his father, Alfonso
Ross, pastors Spirit and Truth
Ministry Inc. in Live Oak.
"You can almost just say I was
born into that position to be a
gospel singer," he said.
Ross's family, which had
formed a five-person gospel-sing-
ing group called Papa Ross &
Dominion, began singing pub-
licly in 2005, the year the group
released its album, "More Like
You."
As a child singing gospel, Ross
said he faced some negative com-
ments from others, but he heard
positive, too, especially from his
father.
"My father always taught me-
to be who you are and positive
things," he said.
He kept moving forward,
releasing his first solo album
- '"This Is My Story: Keeping It
Real at Age 13" in 2008.
"That was something I always
wanted to do," Ross said.
Ross's fan base began to grow
after the solo album's release
and opportunities arose as he
released another, "The Power of
Calvary," in 2010.
"As we worked down to the
2010 album, a lot of doors began
to open," he said, "a lot of big
doors, and big names started to
recognize me. I started getting
a few letters from people and
things like that."
R6ss's most recent album,
"Project 20-11: A Project of
Restoration," was released
Wednesday.
Throughout the albums' releas-
es, Ross said he has been giving


LEANNE TYO/Lake City Report a
Jeremiah Ross of Live Oak, a 17-year-old gospel singer, rehearses his song, "Let Me See Your Smile,", in the stud1O'
at Spirit aid Truth Ministry Inc., the church his father, Alfonso Ross, pastors. Ross will perform that song, which is
from his latest album, and others Monday during the Independence Day festivities at Lake DeSoto in Downtown
Lake City.


performances locally, both at
community events and churches
in Lake City and Live Oak.
He described the type of gospel
music he sings as inspirational.
"My hope and intentions are
to restore broken lives and give
hope to the hopeless," Ross said.
"Oftentimes we find stories on
TV about teens that are broken
down. I can turn the TV on today
and find a story right now, but we
never really get the story about
'the teen that's doing something
positive for the nation to see. So
right now, you have some like me
trying to be a good example for
people who are hopeless and lost.
I know that these albums will
give them hope."
Ross's skills flow through the
entire artistic process of album-
making, from writing his own
music arid lyrics to recording and
mixing the albums in a studio at
his father's church.
Writing his songs is a gift from
God, Ross said.
"Writing, for me, is every-
thing," he said. "If you take a
pen away from me, you might as
well take my life because words
have so much power. And writ-
ing songs, I could look at your
life and change it with these
words that I say. Let's just say I'm
GOSPEL continued on 2D


COURTESY PHOTO
Jeremiah Ross' third solo album, "Project 20-11: A Project of Restoration,"
released Wednesday, an album he wrote and produced himself.


Study: More pollution at beaches nationwide


By NOAKI SCHWARTZ
Associated Press

LOS ANGELES Those envi-
sioning July 4 celebrations at the
beach may be swimming at their
own risk according to a new
study that found the number of
beach closures nationwide due
to dirty water soared last year.
The Natural Resources Defense
Council, which released its annu-
al report Wednesday, found that
beach closures and .advisories
across the country increased by
29 percent in 2010 compared
to a year earlier. The 'conserva-
tion group used data from 3,000
locations nationwide and found
that waters in Louisiana, Ohio,
Indiana and Michigan had the
highest levels of contamination.
"It's a summer rite of passage,"
said David Beckman, a senior
attorney who directs the nonprof-
it's water program. "Unfortunately
it can also make you sick."
Eleven percent of California's
beaches reported elevated lev-
els of bacterial contamination,
the largest amount in five years.
Among those at the top of the
list were Avalon Beach, Cabrillo
Beach and Colorado Lagoon
in Los Angeles County, Poche
County Beach and Doheny


.-________-- ..-- -. ---
ASSOCIATED PRESS
Fran Spivy Weber, vice chairwoman of the State Water Resources Control Board speaks at press conference at
Santa Monica Beach in Santa Monica, Calif., Wednesday. Eleven percent of California's beaches reported elevated'
levels of bacterial contamination, the largest amount in five years.


State Beach in Orange County
and Candlestick Point in San
Francisco County.
Most bacterial contamination
occurs during winter, when heavy
rains overload storm drains and
sewage systems, washing waste
into the sea.


Swimming in such pollution
can cause gastrointestinal, respi-
ratory and other illnesses and
is of particular risk for children
and the elderly whose immune
systems may not be as strong.
The Environmental Protection
Agency estimates that up to 3.5


million people become ill from
contact with raw sewage from
overflows every year.
Swimmers are advised not to
swim near storm. drains or go
into the waters within 72 hours
of a rain when pollution levels
are typically higher.


Section D


I__ I _ __










LAKE CITY REPORTER LIFE SUNDAY, JULY 3, 2011


States consider

banning teens

from tanning beds


By SHAYA TAYEFE MOHAJER
Associated Press

LOS ANGELES If.
a proposed law passes,
California teens under 18
will need a fake ID to "fake
and bake" themselves to a
golden brown.
Citing skin cancer risks,
legislators have joined
lawmakers in at least 21
other states who have
debated bills this year to
ban or restrict tanning
bed use by minors.
Teens under the age
of 14 are already banned
from tanning beds in
California, and older
teens need parental per-
mission. But lawmakers
in the Golden State are
considering banning any-
one under age 18 from
using tanning beds, even
if a parent says it's OK
Sen. Ted Lieu, who pro-
posed the more stringent
legislation, says the parent
signatures on permission
forms are often forged,
and tanning salons ben-
efit financially by looking
the other way. The bill
has been approved by the
Senate and faces review
by the Assembly policy
committee Tuesday.
Lieu chides vain teens
who make a habit of slip-
ping into tanning beds,
saying they're short-
sighted because "you will
age doing this. Your skin
will look more leathery
later on."
According to the Food
and Drug Administration,
exposure to UV radia-
tion, whether from the
sun or a tanning bed,
can cause skin cancer,
burns, premature skin
aging and eye damage.
Approximately 30 million
Americans visit tanning
salons every year, and
2.3 million of those are
teens, the FDA says.
"There is no such thing
as a safe tan," according to
the agency. "The increase
in skin pigment, called
melanin, which causes
the tan color change in
your skin is a sign of dam-
age."
In 2009, a World Health
Organization research
group classified UV-emit- .
ting tanning beds as "car-
cinogenic," adding that
health officials should
strongly consider restrict-
ing minors' access to sun-
beds. WHO, the American
Medical Association and
the American Academy
of Dermatology all sup-
port legislation banning
the use of sunbeds and
lamps for teens younger
than 18.
Tanning businesses
across the country are
feeling the heat.
Along with California,
lawmakers in New
Jersey, New York and
Pennsylvania are consid-
ering banning tanning


beds for people under
age 18. Similar legislation
failed this year in Illinois,
Maryland, Minnesota and
New Mexico.
Legislators in
Massachusetts are con-
sidering a ban for teens
under 14 or 16 in two
separate bills. Lawmakers
in Florida, Kentucky,
Vermont and Washington
rejected such measures
this year.
John Overstreet, a
spokesman for the Indoor
Tanning Association,
said sunscreen sellers
are behind the legisla-
tive push and tanning
beds are not proven to
cause melanoma, the
most deadly type of skin
cancer.
California's bill is spon-
sored by the state's der-
matology association and
a cancer research group
called AIM at Melanoma,
which lists major drug
companies, including
Pfizer Inc. and Bristol-
Meyers Squibb Co., as
its sponsors.
Overstreet said busi-
ness.owners in his trade
group worry that the
legislation would hurt
small businesses already
struggling in the current
economy. There are now
about 878 tanning busi-
nesses in California, a
number that's seen a 24
percent drop since 2009
because business has
cooled, he said.
In areas where teens
do a lot of tanning like
college towns or affluent
areas, Overstreet said, the
legislation could mean a
10 percent hit to tanning
salons' income.
"UV tanning is by far
what people want," said
Overstreet, saying tan-
ning is a personal choice
that shouldn't be inter-
fered with by govern-
ment.
'Tanning lamps and
beds are designed to
mimic the noontime sun,
and you use them a mea-
sured amount of time,"
he said.
But according to
American Academy of
Pediatrics, powerful tan-
ning beds produce radia-
tion levels up to "10 to 15
times higher than that of
the midday sun" and fre-
quent tanners get a level
of radiation that is not
found in nature.
More than a million
cases of skin cancer were
diagnosed in the U.S. last
year, according to the
American Academy of
Dermatology.
Cancer survivor Lisa
Andrews, 41, said she
shouldn't have trusted
tanning salon salespeople
for medical advice. As a
teenager, she went in for
tanning bed stints one to
three times a week in the
winter months.


GOSPEL: New album

Continued From Page 1D


blessed to be able to do
that,"
His favorite aspect of
the music industry is per-
forming, Ross said.
"I get to go one-on-one
with my fans and get
everybody reacting and
getting into the perfor-
mance and just changing
lives like that," he said.
"Just becoming one with
the people. Working in
the music industry, you're
really working for the
people and they're the
most important part of
anything."
Ross plans to take his
gospel music far, a dream
that he willingly pursues.
"I plan on being the
face of music," he said,
"the face of the music
industry, period. Not just


gospel music, R&B, rap,
* anything, I plan on being
the face of it all."
Ross and the gos-
pel-singing group he
belongs to is one of 12
musical acts performing
Monday at Lake DeSoto
in Downtown Lake City
for the Independence Day
festivities.
Visit www.spiri-
tandtruthministryinc.comn.
"I sing because I
want to," Ross said. "It's
embedded in me. It's
almost like a cell that I
was born with or some-
thing.
'The money part of it
really doesn't matter,"
he said. "I'll always sing,
unless something hap-
pens to me. I'll sing until I
die, pretty much."


ASSOCIATED PRESS
This product image courtesy of Target shows the Smith & Hawken Avignon Teak Extending table and chairs set. You don't
have to deal with the mess of tiki torches to create a warm ambiance. Instead, frame your best outdoor views with string lights
or paper lanterns that can range from whimsical to contemporary to sophisticated.


10 ways to jazz up an outdoor


summer dinner party


BY AMY LORENTZEN
For The Associated Press .

Keeping guests comfort-
able and entertained while
dining al fresco can seem
daunting' -
But a few fun items can
help you create a cozy space,
serve summer foods with
flair, and send guests on
their way with a reminder of
a special backyard barbecue
or patio party.
These 10 outdoor dinner
party essentials are easy to
find, easy to use and easy on
the budget
1. String Lights or
Paper Lanterns
You don't have to deal
with the mess of tiki torches
to create a warm ambiance.
Instead, frame your best out-
door views with string lights
or paper lanterns that can
range from whimsical to con-
temporary to sophisticated.
They're affordable and easy.
They also make a smooth
transition from the indoors
and help define the outdoor
dining area, says Stephanie
Grotta, lead designer for
Target .Corp.'s Smith &
Hawken line.
'You really want to create
that intimate environment,"
she says.
2. Outdoor Throw
Pillows
Provide plenty of seating,
and dress it up or tie togeth-
er mix-and-match pieces by
piling on colorful throw pil-
lows. The trend is to "make
the outdoors as comfortable
as your living room," says
Leigh Oshirak with Pottery
Barn Brands.
Use bold patterns, includ-
ing thick stripes, geometric
designs and Indian-inspired
florals. Or make your mark
with monogramming. Since
just about any eye-catching
color is in this summer, go
with the one ydu like best or
add to what you've already
got
3. MiAter and Fire
Bowl
When you're expecting
high temperatures, don't just
set up fans. Rent, borrow or
buy a mister to help' tame
the heat You can also find
inexpensive kits to turn your
garden hose into an effective
mister.
If the evening air cools
quickly, a. fire element will
make your outdoor space
cozy. Choose from wrought-
iron lanterns, fire bowls
and rings, or a chiminea.
Prepackaged outdoor fire
logs only require striking
a match. An added bonus:
Guests can get campy and
roast marshmallows or hot
dogs.
4. Insect Repellent
Put away the sticky
sprays, and provide guests
with wearable insect-repel-
ling items such as bracelets
and belt clips. For kids and
the young at heart, there
are stickers available in fun
shapes, including hearts,
flowers, dinosaurs and, of
course, insects. They'll help
protect from pests without


leaving residue on skin and
clothes.
5. Grilling Pizza Stone
Wantto make eating alfres-
co a little easier? Prepare
pizza dough beforehand and
use a grilling pizza stone on
your barbecue. Allow guests
to add sauces, slices of fresh
summer veggies and grilled
meats.
Myra Adkins, general
manager of Word of Mouth
Catering in Austin, Texas,
says portable food like
pizza "helps break the ice
if it's a group of folks who
don't know each other very
well."
6. Outdoor Drink
Dispenser
Give yourself even more
party time by setting up a
drink station where guests
can serve themselves. Many
department stores offer
plastic and glass dispensers.
in various shapes and sizes.
Add slices of lemon, lime
and, orange to water, or fro-
zen berries to adult drinks
for added color and flavor.
7. Pie Stand
Foodies are calling this
"The Year of the Pie," so
break out your pie tin and use
a decorative rack or stand to
serve up this all-American
favorite. Try seasonal fruits
for a classic pie, or get nos-
talgic with a smores.pie. For
something more elegant, try
a raspberry cheesecake pie
or a white chocolate banana
creme pie. Whipping up a
meringue or offering any
slice a la mode makes it an


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ASSOCIATED PRESS
This file product image courtesy of Puremodem.com shows an
Outdoor Fire Bowl. If the evening air cools quickly at your out-
door party, a fire element will make your outdoor space cozy.


even cooler treat
8. Party Playlist
Find out beforehand what
type of music your guests
enjoy and download their
favorite tunes. It's a mood
setter and a conversation
starter.
. If you don't want to compile
your own music, try a movie
soundtrack or best-hits CD.
That will provide smooth tran-
sitions between songs and
bring back memories.
9.. Personal Comfort
Items
Think "washroom atten-
dant's table" for the outdoors.
Offer a small table of essen-
tial summer items, including
sunscreen, lip balm, fresh
wipes, hand sanitizer and
insect repellents. At the end
of the evening, set out bot-
tfled water for guests to grab
for the ride home.
Tina Hayes, founder of


* ,,, ..


the School of Etiquette and
Decorum in Antioch, Calif.,
says planning for comfort is
just as important as prepar-
ing the meal.
"From the initial greet-
ing at the door to the last
goodbye, all should feel
welcomed, comfortable and
relaxed," she says.
10. Party Favors
For an even more memo-
rable event, hand out small
gifts that guests can use at
the party and then take with
them. Inexpensive favors can
include insulated bottle and
can holders, flip flops, color-
ful paper fans for the ladies
and tiny, battery-operated
fans for the men. Or give
guests a CD of that great
playlist you put together.
For special occasions such
as the Fourth of July, treat
guests to pinwheels, party
poppers and sparklers.


I











F,





j,~. 1.










:' .i~


Page Editor: Todd Taylor, 754-0424











LAKE CITY REPORTER ADVICE & CROSSWORD SUNDAY, JULY 3, 2011


DEAR ABBY


Best friend is bewildered


by wedding party exclusion


DEAR ABBY: My best
friend, "Beth," has finally
found her "Mr. Right" after
almost 35 years of singlehood.
She is being married soon and
I am thrilled for her. Over the
last 15 years, I have been her
sounding board. I have been
through every date, every
kiss, every heartbreak and
Every broken engageinent
with a string of men.
Beth has invited me to
the wedding, but she hasn't
asked me to stand up for her.
Because we live 2,000 miles
apart, we talk frequently on
the phone and I keep wait-
ing for her to ask, but she
never brings up the subject.
It's like the elephant in the
living room. Beth knows I can
afford the trip, so money isn't
a concern. Should I tell her
my feelings are hurt or ask
her who is going to stand up
for her? Or should I follow my
husband's advice and just "let it
go"? -- BROKEN-HEARTED
FRIEND IN OREGON
DEAR BROKEN-
HEARTED FRIEND: You
may be close friends with
Beth, but it's presumptuous
to expect you have the right to
dictate who should be in her
wedding party. Please don't
lay a guilt trip on her by say-
ing your feelings are hurt. A
better way to have your ques-
tion answered would be.to ask
who they plan to have in their
wedding party. Then once you
have your answer, take your


Abigail Van Buren
www.deorobby.com

husband's advice. Let it go and
don't let it destroy a long-term
relationship.
DEAR ABBY: My hus-
band, "Eric," has a fear of
heights. He doesn't like glass
elevators, never uses hotel bal-
conies or drives on winding
mountain roads. His parents
were the same way.
The problem is he won't
allow our young daughter to,
stand on the balcony, and he
recently cut down our favorite
mature tree because he was
afraid our little girl would fall
out of it. How can I stop my
husband from passing on his,
phobia to our daughter? I have
been patient with him, but cut-
ting down the tree told me he
has gone off the deep end.
Please help. -- RATIONAL
WIFE
DEAR RATIONAL WIFE:
A phobia is defined as "an
inexplicable or illogical fear
of a particular object, class of
objects or situation." There's-
nothing illogical about keep-
ing a small child off a balcony
or out of a tall tree. However,
cutting down the tree was an


overreaction.
As much as Eric loves the
child, he can't protect her
from everything he 'perceives
as a possible danger. He could
have accomplished his goal of
keeping her safe by impress-
ing upon her that tree-climb-
ing is dangerous something
that's off-limits and explain-
ing exactly why.
DEAR ABBY: I have been
working as a waitress for many
years. Some of my past employ-
ers have had policies regarding
discussing our tips. My current
job has no such policy.
One of my co-workers likes
to let everyone know how much
he earns. I don't hear anyone
else announcing their tips.
Someone will always make less,
and won't find it helpful having
it confirmed out loud.
I don't know how to let my
co-worker know this without
seeming like I'm being critical.
Your advice would be appre-
ciated. -- WAITRESS IN
CALIFORNIA
DEAR WAITRESS: It's
never a good idea to brag about
money because it can create
resentment among co-work-
ers. Because your restaurant
has no policy regarding this,
speak to the manager about
establishing one. Or, post this
column on the employee bul-
letin board for all to see.
N Write Dear Abby at
www.DearAbby. com or
P.O. Box 69440, Los
Angeles, CA 90069.


HOROSCOPES


ARIES (March 21-April
19): Put your time, money
and support into something
you enjoy doing and you will
encounter people who get
what you are trying to do.
Being a participant will make
the difference when it comes
to marketing what you have to
offer. Your love life is looking
good. ******
TAURUS (April 20-May
20): Expect family and house
expenses to escalate. Do as
much research and work
yourself before calling in a
contractor or outside help.
Emotional talks will lead to
a misunderstanding .that can
result in a financial or per-
sonal loss. **
GEMINI (May 21-June
20): You'll be anxious to put
things behind you and will
feel better at the end of the
day if you have been pro-
ductive. Someone you meet
will interest you but, before
you decide to move forward,
make sure that your motives
are good. ****
CANCER (June 21-July
22): Consider how you can
manage to earn more or
make adjustments or changes
to enable you to lessen your


THE LAST WORD
Eugenia Word

stress. A change of scenery
will do you good. An old friend
or lover is likely to come to.
mind. Proceed with caution.

LEO (July 23-Aug. 22):
Too much of anything will not
pay off Keep things simple. A
couple of alterations to your
plans will help you turn some-
thing you've been working on
into a positive and productive
endeavor. What you put out
you will get in return. *k**
VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept.
22): Making changes that
don't suit the needs of some-
one you are close to will cause
friction. Try to compromise.
Stabilize your future by utiliz-
ing your skills for a service
that will be needed for years
to come. ***
LIBRA (Sept 23-Oct
22): You will be able to entice
the people you meet to help
you with a plan or idea you
are trying to develop. Love
is on the rise. Discuss future
plans and you will be able
to set up a budget that will
help you reach your personal


CELEBRITY CIPHER
by Luis Campos
Celebrity Cipher cryptograms are created from quotations by famous people, past and present.
Each letter in the cipher stands for another
Today's clue: N equals V
" XUDR YM XOUC, EUNG YM HUG,
XJMNUNG Y M TGMUXZ OULZ CI
FYJDLMI OKX CI JDKELGMKVEG
HGLGMC'UDKLUYD." PYZD KHKCX
PREVIOUS SOLUTION:."It is a tremendous act of violence to begin anything...
I simply skip what should be the beginning." Rainer Maria Rilke
(c) 2011 by NEA, Inc. 7-4


goals. 4****
SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov.
21): Don't feel obliged to do
something because someone
is putting pressure on you.
Take a step back and let things
unfold naturally. Sticking to a
budget will be difficult if you
travel or arrange a family out-
ing.**
SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-
Dec. 21): Embrace change
and you will make personal,
professional and financial
gains. Make a move that will
keep you in touch with the
times and update you men-
tally and physically to fit the.
current trends. Love is in the
stars. *****
CAPRICORN (Dec.
22-Jan. 19): Don't let your'
friends, family or partner cost
you. Put your money into a
solid investment Inviting peo-
ple over to share your space'
can put you in a good position
with respect to family dynam-n
ics. ***
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-'
Feb. 18): Strive for perfec-
tion and research whatever
procedure or purchase you.
are going to make. Self-
improvement courses will
open your eyes to possibili-'
ties and help you incorporate
different lifestyles into your,
current situation. ***
PISCES (Feb. 19-March
20): Work from home and
you will accomplish and stay
out of trouble. Overreacting is
likely to affect your productiv-
ity and cause you to underes-
timate the value and time a
job you are working on will
take. ***


SUNDAY CROSSWORD


T MOBILE By David Levinson Wilk / Edited by Will Shortz, 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 9 10 11 l12 13 '14 15 15 6 178 19


Across
1 1988 Grammy
winner for
"Crying"
7 Tweak
13 Bosses
20 Cry from a
balcony
21 ___ pork
22 Many a Nevada
resident
23 Dance seen in a
Lincoln Center
performance of
"Don Giovanni"?
25 Penn State
campus site
26 Also-___ (losers)
27 Prefix with
caching
28 Baja's opposite
30 Author
31 "Hang. on __!"
32 Locale for a
cattail
33 "None of the
leading sales
people came in
today"?
36 Grandparents,
typically
38 With a wink, say
39 Berkeley campus
,nickname
40 Celebration after
a 1964
heavyweight
championship?
42 "You don't need
to remind me"
48 Not so big


For any three answers,
call from a touch-tone
hone: 1-900-285-5656,
1.49 each minute; or,'
with a credit card, 1-800-
814-5554.


49 Tampa paper,
briefly, with
"the"
50 Blackmore
heroine
51 Washed (down)
54 Female co-star in
"Love Crazy,"
1941
55 Stirrup?
57 Tolkien creatures
58 41-Down was
named after one:
Abbr.
59 Scarlett O'Hara's
real first name
60 Voiced
61 Summer sign
62 Little dipper?
63 Claimed
64 Chop
65 The Mavericks,
on scoreboards
66 Up for grabs, as
convention'
delegates
68 Shriners'
headwear: Var.
69 Gob
70 Ending with soft
or spy
71 Decide to sleep
in the nude?
73 Drink with one's
pinkie up, say
74 Some cats blow.
on them
75 Sodium
76 "Around the
Horn" cable
channel
77 Summer treats
79 1983 #1 hit with
the lyric "Put on
your red shoes"
81 What
whitewashers
apply?


84 ___ Friday's
85 Interlocks
86 __ acid
88 Response to the
query "Does Ms.
Garbo fist-
bump?"?
9.4 Summer mo.
95 "Rock 'n' Roll Is
King" band,
1983
96 Make it
97 Actress Polo
'9'8 See 33-Down
99 Polynesian
potable
100 They're often
said to be fair
102 Love before
war?
106 Looms
107 Shocking, in a
way
108 Leonard of
literature
109 'Sting, e.g.
110 Team that once
played at Enron
Field
111 Bob Evans rival

Down
1 Former German
chancellor
Adenauer
2 Imagine
3 One hit by a tuba
4 Singer Grant and
others
5 Prefix with -lithic
6 Stuffs oneself with
7 Shot, e.g.
8 Question that may
be answered
"And how!""
9 Garfield's owner
10 For the most part


11 Country star ___
Lynne
12 "Cosi fan "
13 Agcy. with a list
of prohibited
items
14 Tree whose two-
word name,
when switched
around,
identifies its
product
.15 A Fonda
16 Plane over
Yemen, maybe
17 College town just
off Interstate 95
18 Thief, in Yiddish
19 Wolf (down)
24 When doubled, a
number puzzle
29 Credit
32 "Totem and
Taboo" writer
33 With 98-Across,
showy play
34 Story teller
35 Judo-like
exercises
37 French beings
38 Offspring
41 Town on the
Hudson R.
42 Filmmaker Allen
43 Pipe shape
44 Apollo target
45 Bygone hand
weapon
46 Catch
47 Crib items
49 Lugs
51 Like a corkscrew
52 What Cher Bono,
e.g., goes by
53 Ceases
55 Soap units
56 River to the
North Sea


58 Artist Francisco
59 Director of the
major film
debuts of James
Dean and Warren
Beatty
62 No* live
63 Home to Sun
Devil Stadium
64 Tickled
67 Old Fords
68 Like Mussolini
69 Ranks


70 Didn't miss
72 Game whose
name is derived
from Swahili
73 Sean Connery
and others
74 Turn brown,
maybe
77 Jazz singer
Anderson
78 Busy '
80 Doesn't miss
81 Most murky


82 It's worst when.
it's high
83 High and softly
resonant
85 Alex of
"Webster"
87 Sweet-talks
88 Southwest
Africa's ___
Desert
89 Commercial
name suffix
90 Handles
91 Lifts


92 "___ could have
told you that!"
* 93 Seven: Prefix
94 Speck
98 Assns.
99 Alphabet string
101 Retired flier
103 It landed in the
Pacific Ocean on
3/23/01
104 YucatAit year
105 Drink with a
head


Answers to last Sunday's Crossword.
W AI ILS CAAN AMI 1IG|O AM FM
ASS ET AS AS T O WA ER RARA
S H UTUPSH OP A M 0 R N E R
PEZ FREEZEFRAME CODES
SNUFFED ADS SEWARD

MO T E A M 0 U N A IN
USHER OGLE SHOD AYN

ERE BOGEY RI D EWERS
SITCOJIS BUR AMERICA
SLATE SCAT EMCEE SOW
DONTLEAVEMEHANGIING
OPR B RA E ACBO LE SIN C GE
FAREW L LLADIRD ^ G EIE

MAISSON PEN GPAUTAMA
ORATE CA R RYONB A GS NAN
R OG ERBACON S RS I0 R S G H T

L-ESISEW|EDPGE OHOH EMERY


98 L 69 L 8 9L 6



6 6 9 ZL 8 9L




179 L 86 9 SZ L


S L 8 7 L 6 9 9


L V S L 9 8 9 6 Z


Z 6 L 9 17 L 9 8

9 8 9 1 Z 6 L L 7
989C~6L~f


1 2 3


7 4 9


9 8 34


92 8


3 5 7 4


7 8 6 5


6 3 4 1


2 7 6


5 1 8


Page Editor: Todd Taylor 754-0424










4D LAKE CITY REPORTER LIFE SUNDAY, JULY 3, 2011 Page Editor: Todd Taylor, 754-0424


Fireworks haulers get rules


break for the Fourth of July


By MICHAEL FELBERBAUM
Associated Press
RICHMOND, Va. -
Truckers hauling fireworks
to light up cities nationwide
are being given an exemp-
tion on federal driving rules,
for the July 4th holiday,
sparking concerns for safety
advocates. But the industry
says without it, some places
wouldn't have enough green
to pay for flashes of red,
white and blue.
The Federal Motor Carrier
Safety Administration has
granted an exemption to
hours-of-service rules for
members of the American
Pyrotechnics Association,
covering 3,000 commercial
drivers and about 50 compa-
nies carrying an estimated
10 million pounds of fire-
works across the country.
Those truckers will be
sharing the nation's roads
and highways with the 39
million motorists that the
American Automobile
Association predicts will
travel 50 miles or more
during the July 4th holiday
weekend.
'You've already got more
people on the roadways, so
it's already more danger-
ous," said AAA Mid-Atlantic
spokeswoman Martha
Meade. "Then you exempt
drivers who have explosives
in the back of their truck,
and it's almost like you can
see the headlines now."
Department of
Transportation spokesman
Duane DeBruyne referred
tothe Federal Register entry
when asked about the deci-
sion to grant the exemption.
The agency believes the
drivers will meet or exceed
current safety standqads,
and that it has "received no
accident notifications, nor
is the agency aware of any
accidents reportable under
terms of the exemption," the
entry says.
The fireworks industry


ASSOCIATED PRESS
The 53rd annual Target Fireworks light up the sky over the Detroit River Monday in Detroit.


group has been given exemp-
tions since 2004, after federal
driving rules were changed,
without incident Association
officials say extending the
amount of time truckers can
be on the road is needed to
get fireworks to cities and
to give drivers time to set
up and set off the displays
for holiday celebrations. The
drivers hauling the fireworks
are often the lead technician
responsible for filling the sky
with bursts of color.
Most of the trips are short,
but the time spent setting off
a fireworks display and get-
ting to the next location after
the show can cut into the 14-
hour maximum that drivers
can be on the road per day,
said Julie Heckman, execu-
tive director of the fireworks
industry group. Others in
the industry say the low
number of commercial driv-
ers with permissions to haul
hazardous materials adds to
the need for an exemption.
"We have a very narrow
window of opportunity to
put on well over 14,000
displays across this coun-
try for just the 4th of July
weekend," Heckman said.
"Without an exemption we


couldn't do it."
During an 11-day period
around July 4th, drivers
can exclude off-duty or rest
periods that would normally
count against their overall
workday. Drivers are still
subject to the 14-hour on-
duty limit and the 11-hour
driving time limit, as well
as weekly limits. They must
also have 10 hours off in
between shifts.
The exemption means
that a driver whose typical
day is from 8 a.m. to 10 p.m.
could work until midnight
if he spends two hours on
a break before a fireworks
show.
'The 4th of July is simi-
lar to our retail season,"
said Stephen Vitale, presi-
dent of Pennsylvania-based
Pyrotecnico, which uses
about 300 trucks to trans-
port enough fireworks to
produce about 600 fireworks
displays across the U.S.
around Independence Day.
The exemption makes it
"efficient and affordable" for
companies and communities
footing the bill, Vitale said.
An average fireworks display
around the holiday costs
about $15,000, and without


the exemption, those costs
could double because more
trucks and drivers would be
needed, he said.
In the association's fed-
eral exemption application,
it says if companies had
to have additional drivers,
those higher costs would
mean "many Americans
would be denied this impor-
tant component of the cel-
ebration of Independence
Day," according to an entry
in the Federal Register.
But that shouldn't come
at the cost of safety, con-
tends Henry Jasny, general
counsel for Advocates for
Highway and Auto Safety, a
safety and consumer group
supported by the insurance
industry.
'We don't want to be the
Grinch that steals 4th of
July from small towns, but
they are making a trade-off
between safety and cost of
fireworks displays," Jasny
said. 'To get that fireworks
display, they're allowing driv-
ers potentially to drive while
fatigued."


Great gazpacho

doesn't have to start

with tomatoes


By ALISON LADMAN
For The Associated Press
Gazpacho, -the toma-
to-based chilled soup,
can be one of the most
refreshing uses of sum-
mer produce. Sometimes
chopped, sometimes
pureed, sometimes
cooked, sometimes com-
pletely raw, gazpacho
can be made any number
of ways.
We opted for another
red icon of summer for
our base watermelon.
Going with a half chopped,
half pureed, completely
raw Version, we created
a super light dish that's
great as an appetizer, for
brunch or for a light and
refreshing snack.
CUCUMBER
WATERMELON
GAZPACHO
Start to finish: 2 hours
10 minutes (10 minutes
active)
Servings: 6
4 cups watermelon
chunks, seeded
|
1 cup peeled, seeded
cucumber, finely diced
1 cup peeled, seeded
cantaloupe, finely diced
1/2 teaspoon salt
Juice of 1 lemon
1 tablespoon fresh tar-
ragon, minced
1/2 cup creme fraiche
1 tablespoon fresh
basil, minced
1 tablespoon fresh


ASSOCIATED PRESS
This file photo shows
cucumber watermelon gaz-
pacho in Concord, N.H.

mint, minced
In a blender, puree
the watermelon until
smooth.
In a medium bowl,
combine the watermelon
puree, cucumber, canta-
loupe, salt, lemon juice
and tarragon. Refrigerate
until completely chilled,
or at least 2 hours.
Meanwhile, in a small
bowl, combine the creme
fraiche, basil and mint.
Serve the soup topped
with the herbed creme
fraiche.
Nutrition information
per serving (values are
rounded to the nearest
whole' number): 50 calo-
ries; 10 calories from fat
(15 percent of total calo-
ries); 1 g fat (1 g satu-
rated; 0 g trans fats); 0
mg cholesterol; 12 g car-
bohydrate; 1 g protein; 1
g fiber; 170 mg sodium.


Reader's Choice


CUTEST BABY


CONTEST
1ST, 2ND & 3RD Place Prizes to be Awarded for Boys & Girls!

AGES 0-24 MONTHS
Send in the modt'adorable photograph of your child,
up to 24 months of age, and you could win!


TO ENTER:
Bring your baby's picture along with entry fee ($30.00)
to the Lake City Reporter,180 E. Duval St., mail to
P.O. Box 1709, Lake City, FL 32056.

All nictures will he niuhlishAd in the I ak e Citv


Reporter's July 17, 2011 edition. All voting bal-
lots must be returned to the paper by July 25,
2011. So show off your child, grandchild,
godchild, niece or nephew. :
The winners will be published on July 31, 2011 ..

DEADLINE:
July 14th, 2011

For More Information or if you are
a . j M l _ *_ . ..- _ -" .. . . . .imi..i_ i~ii^ i^iiii _-


eretni sted in becoming a sponsor
please Call Mary at 754-0401


WANT TO ENTER ONLINE?
You can e-mail your
photo and information to
ads@lakecityreporter.com.
Subject line: BABY CONTEST


.1,1w-u..


MONDAY ---A


4D LAKE CITY REPORTER LIFE SUNDAY, JULY 3, 2011


Page Editor: Todd Taylor, 754-0424