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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028308/01597
 Material Information
Title: The Lake City reporter
Uniform Title: Lake City reporter (Lake City, Fla. 1967)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: John H. Perry
Place of Publication: Lake City Fla
Publication Date: 7/2/2011
Frequency: daily (monday through friday)[<1969>-]
weekly[ former 1967-<1968>]
daily
normalized irregular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Lake City (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Columbia County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Columbia -- Lake City
Coordinates: 30.189722 x -82.639722 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 95, no. 4 (Oct. 5, 1967)-
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000358016
oclc - 33283560
notis - ABZ6316
lccn - sn 95047175
sobekcm - UF00028308_01569
System ID: UF00028308:01597
 Related Items
Preceded by: Lake City reporter and Columbia gazette

Full Text






Fuel, oil spilled
Dirt parking lot
inches deep
000014 120511 ****3-DIGIT
LIB OF FLORIDA HISTORY
PO BOX 11700
205 '. UNIV F LOP I
GAINESVILLE F1, 32611 94


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Finals set
Nadal, Djokovic
to face off for
\Aimbledon title.
326 I
ports, IB


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Looking ahead
LCMS football team


gets
CHS


an early taste of
training regimen.
Sports, IB


Reporter


Saturday, July 2, 201 I www.lakecityreporter.com Vol. 137, No. 134 0 75 cents



Lifeguard up



and running

Transition to private an overturned vehicle.
City and county officials signed contracts
ambulance service last month naming Lifeguard, a private firm,
as the ambulance service for Columbia ;
smooth, say officials. County, Lake City and Fort White.
Jason Kimbrell, Lifeguard Ambulance
By TONY BRITT Services regional director of operations,
tbritt@lakecityreporter.com called the transition a smooth one.
"We've had team members and experts
Lifeguard Ambulance Service, which from our company on the ground since
was set to take over as the county ambu- February, studying the county, studying
lance service Friday, actually began taking the operation and since February we've TONY BRITT/Lake City Reporter
calls early. Lifeguard's first call, at 8 a.m. Todd Godwin, a Lifeguard Ambulance Service EMT, inventories equipment at the
Tuesday, was to an auto accident involving UFEGUARD continued on 3A Columbia County Fairgrounds ambulance station Friday.


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TONY BRITT/Lake City Reporter
Columbia County firefighter Austin Kazmierski prepares to cordon off a fuel and oil spill in a local dirt parking lot Friday morning. The 40 X 40
lot appeared several inches deep with the mixture in places.


Spilled fuel, oil form toxic mess


Dirt parking lot Several un
staff and s]
was inches-deep Columbia C
in watery sludge, also 'respon
-' The park
By TONY BRITT of U.S. 90
tbritt@lakecityfeporter.com approximat
to be sever
Local emergency responders and emer- fuel mixed
agency management officials are investigat- taminated
ing a fuel and oil spill discovered Friday feet by way
morning in a dirt parking lot. Columbi;
ThM Columbia County Fire Department reports sai
responded to the scene at 10:29 a.m. nated from


Motorcycle,

SUV collide;

rider injured
From staff reports
A motorcyclist was injured in a colli-
sion with an SUV at the intersection of
U.S. 90 at Forest Meadows Avenue in
Lake City Friday afternoon.
According to preliminary Lake City
Police Department reports, the uniden-
tified motorcyclist was headed west on
U.S. 90 when the SUV attempted to enter -r....
the roadway and struck the vehicle. The -. -. ',
motorcyclist, who was awake and alert
at the scene, was taken to the Lake City '.
Medical Center. No other injuries were
reported and no other information on
the 1:36 p.m. accident was available at An unidentified
press time. Register followii


.~


its as well as administrative
pent close to an hour on-site.
county Sheriff's Office deputies
ded.
king lot, near the intersection
and East County Road 245, is
ely 40 x 40 feet and appeared
al inches deep in oil and diesel
with standing water. The con-
mixture migrated close to 75
of a nearby ditch.
a County Fire Department
i the fuel and oil mixture.origi-
a semi truck that was being


towed on a trailer.
Firefighters cordoned off the area and
notified Columbia County Emergency
Management Director Shane Morgan
who contacted the federal Environmental
Protection Agency,
Although no EPA representative showed
up to investigate, a local crew was sent to
the site around 12:30 p.m. and began
cleaning up soil in the contaminated area,
reports said.
Fire department reports did not esti-
mate how much oil and fuel was spilled on
the property.


TONY BRITT/Lake City Reporter
woman speaks to Lake City Police Department officers Ivan Useche and Garrett
ng a Friday afternoon crash in which a sports utility vehicle and motorcycle collided.


Milton

woman

killed

in crash

From staff reports
A Milton woman was killed in a crash
on 1-75 in Columbia County Thursday
when her 2001 Camaro hydroplaned
and struck a tree in the median, said
the Florida Highway Patrol.
Dead is Elizabeth Cassidy Sigler,
45. Her passenger, 3-year-old Brooke
Burgett, was transported to Shands
UF for treatment of minor injuries.
The crash occurred at 3:35 p.m.
south of US 441. Sigler's vehicle left
the roadway and spun counter-clock-
wise before hitting the tree with its
rear.
Sigler was wearing a seatbelt, said
FHP. The 3-year-old was buckled into a
child seat in the front passenger seat



Smoke

blamed

on Ga.

wildfire

From staff reports
A wind shift from the northeast
brought smoke from Georgia wildfires
to Columbia County and blanketed
downtown Lake City Friday morning.
Weather changes saw the wind shift
from the east-northeast Thursday
night, which caused smoke from the
Honey Prairie wildfire burning in the
Okefenokee National Wildlife Refuge
to drift over Florida. The Honey Prairie
fire is contained, but that means only
that fire lines are keeping the blaze
from spreading to a larger area. The
fire continues to burn within boundar-
ies set by firefighters.
The Reporter received a number of
calls inquiring about the smoke Friday.
By late morning the skies had mostly
cleared.
Satellite photos from early Friday
showed distinctive smoke visible
above the Okefenokee Swamp and
a light haze visible above North
Florida.


1 !- 11.- i u 1


CALL US:
(386) 752-1293
SUBSCRIBE TO
THE REPORTER:
Voice: 755-5445
Fax: 752-9400


96
T-Storm Chance
WEATHER, 2A


-i4 L


Opinion ................
Around Florida...........
Obituaries ..............
Advice & Comics.........
Puzzles .................


TODAY IN
PEOPLE
Star says he's
done with trilogy.


COMING
SUNDAY
Interview with
deployed Marine.


r~ -ti










LAKE CITY REPORTER DAILY BRIEFING SATURDAY, JULY 2, 2011


A$H 3 Friday:
SAfternoon: 7-7-0
Evening: 8-3-7


Play4'~


Friday:
Afternoon: 1-5-8-4
Evening: 9-0-5-1


-ePatcih.
Thursday:
14-15-20-32-35


PEOPLE IN THE NEWS



LaBeouf: This is my last'Transformers'


MOSCOW
hia LaBeouf's days of
battling the Decepticons
look to be over, with the
Transformers star saying
he has nothing more to
offer after three films playing kid-
next-door Sam Witwicky.
The 26-year-old American actor
said he was through with the action-
packed franchise.
"I'm done," he told The Associated
Press at the recent opening of
'Transformers: Dark of the Moon"
at the Moscow International Film
Festival. I'm sure they will make
more of them. It's still a very hot
franchise."
He added "I love making them
(the movies). I love the crew. I love
Michael (Bay). I love the cast. I
love Sam ... but I don't have any-
thing new to contribute and I don't
think there's anywhere to take Sam
really."
LeBeouf's nerdy character
helped one alien race of robots, the
Transformers, overpower another
race, the evil Decepticons, with
Earth as the battleground.
Directed by Michael Bay,
"Transformers 3" also stars Patrick
Dempsey, Frances McDormand,
John Malkovich and Victoria's
Secret model Rosie Huntington-
Whitely. Paramount Pictures said
the movie earned $37.3 million
Wednesday in the U.S. on its first
day a 40 percent drop from
its predecessor, "Revenge of the
Fallen."
LaBeouf explained Witwicky's
role in the latest movie.
"Nobody really cares about Sam
anymore. He has no purpose. He
saved the world twice and has sort
of been thrown to the side. This is a
dude who used to validate himself on
his involvement with these' robots,
(but) these robots no longer need
him," he said in the AP interview.


ASSOCIATED PRESS
In this photo provided by StarPix, Shia LaBeouf poses for photographs at the pre-
miere of "Transformers: Dark of the Moon" Tuesday in New York's Times Square.


Singer Jenni Rivera
honored with star
LAS VEGAS Singer Jenni
Rivera and former Major League
Baseball pitcher Esteban Loaiza
are each getting a place on the Las
Vegas Walk of Stars.
Granite stars recognizing the wife
and husband were scheduled to be
installed Saturday on the Las Vegas
Strip alongside stars dedicated to
Dean Martin, Elvis Presley and
Frank Sinatra. Stars for Rivera and
Loaiza will be located outside the


MGM Grand Hotel & Casino.
The Mexican power couple was
scheduled to attend a ceremony
in their honor Friday night at the
Eastside Cannery hotel-casino in Las
SVegas. Rivera was to give a concert
at the casino Saturday to mark her
42nd birthday.
Rivera is the singer of hits
"Contraband" and "Guilty or
Innocent."
Loaiza played for several teams
during his MLB career, including the
Los Angeles Dodgers.

Associated Press


Celebrity Birthdays


* Writer-director Larry David
is 64.
* Model-actress Jerry Hall
is 55.
* Bassist Dave Parsons of
Bush is 46.


Daily Scripture


* Singer Michelle Branch is
28.
* Actress Ashley Tisdale is
26.
* Actress Lindsay Lohan is


"[Humble Service in the Body
of Christ] For by the grace
given me I say to every one of
you: Do not think of yourself
more highly than you ought,
but rather think of yourself
with sober judgment, in accor-
dance with the faith God has
distributed to each of you."

-Romans 12:3 NIV


Lake City
HOW TO REACH US
Main number........(386) 752-1293
Fax number ..............752-9400
Circulation ...............755-5445
Online... www.lakecityreporter.com
The Lake City Reporter, an affiliate of
Community Newspapers Inc., is pub-
lished Tuesday through Sunday at 180
E. Duval St., Lake City, Fla. 32055.
Periodical postage paid at Lake City, Fla.
Member Audit Bureau of Circulation and
The Associated Press.
All material herein is property of the Lake
City Reporter. Reproduction in whole or
in part is forbidden without the permis-
sion of the publisher. U.S. Postal Service
No. 310-880.
POSTMASTER: Send address changes
to Lake City Reporter, P.O. Box 1709,
Lake-City, Fla. 32056.
Publisher Todd Wilson .....754-0418
(twilson@lakecityreporter.com)
NEWS
Editor Robert Bridges ... .754-0428
(rbridges@lakecityreporter.com)
ADVERTISING
Director Ashley Butcher ...754-0417
(abutcher@lakecityreporter.com)
CLASSIFIED
To place a classified ad, call 755-5440


Reporter

BUSINESS
Controller Sue Brannon... .754-0419
(sbrannon@lakecityreporter.com)
CIRCULATION
Home delivery of the Lake City Reporter
should be completed by 6:30 a.m.
Tuesday through Saturday, and by 7:30
a.m. on Sunday.
Please call 386-755-5445 to report any
problems with your delivery service.
In Columbia County, customers should
call before 10:30 a.m. to report a ser-
vice error for same day re-delivery. After
1030 a.m., next day re-delivery or ser-
vice related credits will be issued.
In all other counties where home delivery
is available, next day re-delivery or ser-
vice related credits will be issued.
Circulation ...............755-5445
(circulation@lakecityreporter.com)
Home delivery rates
"(Tuesday through Sunday)
12 Weeks ................ $26.32
24 Weeks ...............$48.79
52 Weeks ............... $83.46
Rates include 7% sales tax
Mail rates
12 Weeks .............. $41.40
24 Weeks ............... $82.80
52 Weeks.: .............. :.$179.40


CORRECTION


The Lake City Reporter corrects errors of fact in news
items. If you have a concern, question or suggestion, please .
call the executive editor. Corrections- and clarifications will
run in this space. And thanks for reading.


Woman injured in
roof collapse
GAINESVILLE
A woman was seriously
injured when a large sec-
tion of roof collapsed at
Queen of Peace Catholic
Church in Gainesville.
Fire officials say they
don't know what caused
30-by-50-foot section of
roof to fall Thursday after-
noon. Alachua County
building inspectors are
investigating.
Alachua County Fire
Rescue spokesman Ed
Kennedy says the woman
was in the kitchen of the
church's community cen-
ter when the accident hap-
pened.
He says the woman was
taken to Shands Hospital
in serious condition. He
said it took about 35 min-
utes to free the woman
from the rubble.
The name of the injured
woman has not been
released. Authorities say
she is a church employee.

1 boater found
dead, 1 injured
HILLSBORO INLET
Officials say one man
was killed and another
was injured when their
boat capsized off Broward
County.
The 18-foot Bayliner
was about a mile off
Hillsboro Inlet when it
overturned Thursday
afternoon during a thun-
-derstorm. Fishermen
aboard another boat res-
cued one man who was
clinging to the side of the
boat.
Broward Sheriff's
Office Fire-Rescue offi-
cials recovered the other
boater's body.
The Broward Sheriff's
Office is investigating but
a spokesman says the man
appears to have died due
to an accidental drowning.
The identities of the


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Christine Janks, president of Carson Springs Wildlife
Foundation and Sanctuary, visits her three-and-a-half-year-
old giraffe, Grace, in Gainesville Thursday.


boaters have not been
released.

Man gets life
for ax murder
PENSACOLA A
Florida Panhandle man
has been sentenced to life
in prison for killing his
mother's boyfriend with
an ax.
An Escambia County
judge sentenced 29-year-
old Nathan Smith on


THE WEATHER



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TEMPERATURES
High Friday
Low Friday
Normal high
Normal low
Record high
Record low

PRECIPITATION
Friday
Month total
Year total
Normal month-to-date
Normal year-to-date


90
69,
90
70
99 in 1902
62 in 1892


0.00"
0.00"
19.89"
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24.25"


Wednesday after a jury
convicted him a first-
degree murder.
Authorities say Smith
repeatedly struck 34-year-
old Brian Puckett with
the ax during an alterca-
tion in May 2010.
The sheriff's office
reports that Smith told
deputies after his arrest
that he loved every
swing.


SUN
Sunrise today
Sunset today
Sunrise tom.
Sunset tom.

MOON
Moonrise today
Moonset today
Moonrise tom.
Moonset tom.


City
Cape Canaveral
Daytona Beach
Ft. Lauderdale
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W. Palm Beach


6:33 a.m.
8:36 p.m.
6:33 a.m.
8:36 p.m.


7:48 a.m.
9:41 p.m.
8:53 a.m.
10:22 p.m.


0003
July July July July
8 15 23 30
First Full Last New


On this date in
1992, unusually
cold weather moved
through parts of the
Northeast. Saranac
Lake, N.Y., had a
low of 30 degrees,
while East Haven,
Vt., reached 29
degrees.


* Associated Press


Sunday


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An exclusive
service
9 brought to
VwWili our readers
15nuiltestobm by
Today's
ultra-violet The Weather
radiation risk Channel.
for the area on
a scale from 0
to 10+.

weather.com

0V0 Forecasts, data and
y. graphics 2011 Weather
m1\\ IV Central, LP, Madison, Wis.
weather www.weatherpubllsher.com


GO Connected

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AROUND FLORIDA


INIMET ililtt;ijlli A --fA


Page Editor: Todd Taylor, 754-0424


I












Page Editor: Todd Taylor, 754-0424 LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL & STATE SATURDAY, JULY 2, 2011


Fresh corn, patriotic jazz


at Farmers Market today


From staff reports

To kick off the
Independence Day
Celebrations around town,
the Lake DeSoto Farmers
Market is taking on a spe-
cial patriotic theme with
musical fun for the whole
family.
Returning by popu-
lar demand are musi-
cal guests Tony Buzzella
and Friends. Tony will
lead the band and playing
horns. Also featured are
Billy Bowker on drums,
Matt Johns on Guitar and
"Wildman" on keyboard.
Tony Buzzella and
Friends, one of the "most
versatile bands in Florida,"


play all types from music,
from jazz, blues and old
standards to classic rock
and country but this
Saturday will also feature
patriotic music.
This week's offerings
at the market include a
bounty of Florida-grown
melons, sweet corn, toma-
toes, blueberries, squash
and cucumbers along
with honey, goat milk,
cheese, free range eggs,
herbs and organic aru-
gula, mixed greens for
salads. There also herb
and native plants available
for your garden. Local art-
ists also share space with
local farmers, beekeep-
ers, downtown merchants


like Ruppert's Bakery
and local nonprofits such
as Voices for Children
of the Suwannee Valley,
Inc., which supports the
Third Circuit Guardian ad
Litem Program that gives
abused, abandoned, and
neglected children a voice
in Court proceedings.
The Lake DeSoto
Farmers Market is open
every Saturday from 8 a.m.
to noon in Wilson Park,
located along Lake DeSoto
between the Columbia
County Courthouse
and Shands Lakeshore
Hospital. For more infor-
mation about the Lake
DeSoto Farmer Market call
(386) 719-5766.


POLICE REPORTS


The following informa-
tion was provided by local
law enforcement agencies.
The following individuals
have been arrested but not
convicted. Those listed here
are innocent unless or until
proven guilty.

Wednesday, June 29
Columbia County
Sheriff's Office

Brian Lanning
Johnson, 29, 299 SW
Forest Terrace, warrant
Contempt of court and


order revoking bond for
violation of probation
charges on two counts of
petit theft.
David Leslie LaPlaunt,
47, 400 SW Second St.,
Pompano Beach, warrant:
Sale of Oxycodone (two
counts) and attempted
purchase of a controlled
substance.
William Peter
Lockwood, 41, 638 SW
Dexter Circle, warrant:
Violation of probation on
original charges of felony
battery and third-degree
grand theft (specified prop-
erty).


Douglas Kyle Reid,
24, 10779 SW County
Road 240, warrant:
Failure to appear for vio-
lation of probation hear-
ing on bribery charges
and battery.

Lake City
Police Department
Troy Allen Melton,
no age given, 764 NW
Turner Ave., possession
of Oxycodone and war-
rant: Carrying a concealed
weapon.

From staff reports.


Testimony ends in Anthony

trial, closing arguments next


By KYLE HIGHTOWER
Associated Press

ORLANDO
Prosecutors in the
Casey Anthony murder
trial called witnesses Friday
to bolster their contention
that the woman's mother
couldn't have been home to
perform Internet searches
for a harmful chemical.
Testimony by two of
Cindy Anthony's co-work-
ers among the last of
the trial was intended
to disprove her'surprising
assertion this week that she
was the one who keyed in
searches for the term "chlo-
roform." Prosecutors have
argued that Casey Anthony
made the searches as she
plotted to kill her 2-year-old
daughter in 2008.
Prosecutors used parts
of Friday and the previous
day to give their rebuttal to
the defense's case. Closing
arguments are expected
to take place Sunday, after
which jury deliberations
will begin.
Gentiva Health Services
Chief Compliance Officer
John Camperlengo
answered questions about
Cindy Anthony's work his-
tory on two days in March
2008 when the "chloroform"
searches were done on a
computer at the Anthony
household. The company's
electronic records show
that she was logged into
her company's system for
most of the day on both
March 17 and March 21.
Using the latter date as
an example, Camperlengo
said the' system would not
have recorded Anthony's
presence if a person hadn't
been actively using the
work computer.
"Someone human was
pushing the enter button to
enter data," he said Friday.
Cindy Anthony's super-
visor at Gentiva, Deborah
Polisano, also testified that
electronic work records
show that Cindy Anthony
was on the clock for 10
hours on March 17 and
nine hours on March 21.
Earlier this week, Cindy
Anthony testified that she
had performed the Internet
searches for "chloroform"
while looking up informa-
tion on chlorophyll, a green


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Casey Anthony, right, looks over papers in the courtroom with
her attorney Jose Baez during her murder trial at.the Orange
County Courthouse Thursday in Orlando.


pigment found in plants.
Chloroform, on the other
hand, is a chemical that can
be used as a sedative and
is fatal to children in small
doses.
She testified that she was
home on the days when
the computer searches
were run. She said she
could leave work when she
wanted, and that the work
records might not have
reflected her absence.
Casey Anthony is
charged with first-degree
murder in the 2008 death
of her 2-year-old daughter,
Caylee. If convicted of that
charge, she could face the
death penalty. The pros-
ecution contends she used
duct tape to suffocate the
toddler, while the defense
says the girl accidentally
drowned in her grandpar-
ents' above-ground swim-
ming pool.
Also Friday, forensic
anthropologist Michael
Warren was called back to
dispute a defense expert's
claim that the medical exam-
iner made a mistake by fail-
ing to saw open Caylee's
skull to examine it. The
defense has tried to cast
doubt on the forensic evi-
dence in the trial.
"No sir, there is no proto-
col that I'm aware of to do
that," Warren said.
Both sides have Saturday
off to settle on final instruc-
tions forthe jury, and prepare
their closing arguments.
Earlier Friday, lead
defense attorney Jose Baez
said prosecutors had failed
to disclose all the informa-


tion a computer expert and
forensic anthropologist
planned to testify about.
Baez wanted the evidence
and witnesses to be exclud-
ed, but Perry only gave
him the option of taking
their depositions.
He 'did, causing an
unscheduled recess that
lasted throughout the
morning.
"Your honor, I will stay
here and do the work,
and stay here as long as it
takes," Baez said.
While the defense rest-
ed Thursday, experts said
defense attorneys may
have left lingering ques-
tions and failed to deliver
on promises they made at
the outset to explain how
the toddler died.
Casey Anthony did not
take the stand, and the
defense did not present con-
crete evidence that Caylee
accidentally drowned.
Her attorneys also never
produced any witnesses
bolstering the claim made
in opening statements that
Anthony had acted with-
out apparent remorse in
the weeks after her daugh-
ter's death because she
had been molested by her
father as a child, resulting
in emotional problems.
The prosecutors' case
relied on circumstantial and
forensic evidence, and it did
have holes. They had no
witnesses who saw the kill-
ing or saw Casey Anthony
with her daughter's body.
And there was no certain
proof that the child suf-
focated.


Barbecue fundraiser set

for fallen firefighters


From staff reports

WHITE SPRINGS -
The White Springs Fire
Department is hosting a
barbecue fundraiser for
fallen Florida Division of
Forestry Firefighters Josh
Burch and Brett Fulton.
On Monday, June 20,
Fulton and Burch lost
their lives battling a forest
fire in Hamilton County.
All proceeds from this
fundraiser will go to their


families.
The barbecue fundrais-
er will feature slab rib for
$20; rib dinners for $9;
chicken dinners; rib and
chicken combo dinners
for $11; rib sandwiches
for $7 and half chicken for
$5. All dinners will include
baked beans, potato salad
and bread. Dinners can
be pre-ordered and free
delivery is available for
five meals or more.
The fundraiser will


also include a raffle tick-
et sales for a four-in-one
gas grill, charcoal grill,
smoke and sear burner.
Tickets are $2 each or
three for $5. Tickets are
available at White Springs
City Hall, Banks of
Suwannee and Suwannee
Hardware.
A silent auction will also
be held.
To make donations or
place orders, please call
Don Wilson at 623-4758.


Scott approves Orlando's


commuter rail system


By BRENT KALLESTAD
Associated Press

TALLAHASSEE- A
long-awaited, highly
anticipated decision on
building a commuter rail
system to serve four cen-
tral Florida counties in
the greater Orlando area
got a thumbs-up Friday
from Republican Gov.
Rick Scott.
Transportation
Secretary Ananth Prasad
said he expects the first
phase of the $1.3 billion
project to be completed
in early 2014. Scott, who
did not attend Friday's
announcement, gave his
approval following a two-
hour meeting with Prasad
on Wednesday.
"This project is going
to be sort of a judgment-
day kind of project,"
Prasad said. "If we cannot
make SunRail successful,
probably there will be no
more trains in the state
of Florida. No more com-
muter trains. We have to
make this train, SunRail,
successful."


SA recalcitrant Scott
froze $235 million in
contracts shortly after
taking office in January,
concerned about the
feasibility and costs of
the SunRail project that
will connect downtown
Orlando with Osceola,
Seminole and Volusia
counties. SunRail will
eventually serve 17 sta-
tions along a 61-mile line
where trains will initial-
ly run every half-hour
during peak hours and
every two hours during
off-peak times.
"The SunRail project
was a local project that
the local community was
very supportive of," Scott
said Friday. "It had gone
through referendums, it
had gone through county
commissions, they had
supported it."
The Republican gov-
ernor's approval on the
SunRail project was any-
thing but a sure thing.
Earlier this year he reject-
ed $2.4 billion in federal
money for a high-speed
rail line from Orlando to


Tampa, angering even
some central Florida
lawmakers from his own
party.
"It's like comparing
apples to oranges," Scott
said after an appearance
at the annual Florida
Society of Newspaper
Editors convention in St.
Petersburg. "It wasn't like
high speed rail which was
a new project that had not
been appropriated."
The U.S. Department
of Transportation
announced two months
ago that they were ready
to proceed with a m'ulti-
year funding agreement
with Florida to build
SinRail. .Federal funds
will cover half the deal.
The state's share of the
costs was expected to be
$432 million to purchase
61.5 miles of track from
CSX and another $66 mil-
lion for operating subsi-
dies.
Prasad said he person-
ally committed to oversee
the project with an eye
to controlling cost over-
runs.


LIFEGUARD: Transition smooth

Continued From Page 1A


done our homework," he
said. "I think the transition
went as close to perfect as
possible. The best thing
Lifeguard has going for
us is that we're supported
by a strong communica-
tions center, supported by
the fire department and all
other public safety entities
and the -Board of County
Commissioners is actively
involved ensuring we're
on track."
Kimbrell said he thinks
the next step for Lifeguard
is making !sure they get
the right people in the
right places.
'Within the next 30-60
days is going to be that
data collection period
where we study the call vol-
ume and make sure we get
the appropriate response
times and making sure our
deployment model is the
right deployment model
to maximize ambulance
availability to the county,"
he said, noting there will
also be additional training
for the staff to familiarize
them with! area, as well
as staff training for a new
set of clinical and medical
protocols. 'The next 30-60
days is really that acclima-
tion and training phase.
We'll develop our team,
develop the operation and
then we'll find 'out what's
next"
Lifeguard has 28 "front
line team members" (para-
medic and Emergency
Medical Technicians), an
operations captain and a
billing representative.
"We've got 30 employ-
ees that are full time
employees and we've
got another 12 that are
part-time," said Kimbrell.
'We've got 42 employees
here in Columbia County
and that's an increase in
jobs from what was cur-
rently here."
Columbia County EMS
had 30-35 employees,


including fill-in positions
and billing staff.
Kimbrell said Lifeguard
was able to hire about 40
percent of the county's for-
mer staff members.
He said the county
EMS service staffed each
unit with two paramed-
ics, but Lifeguard will pair
an Emergency Medical
Technician with a para-
medic in each unit.
'The largest amount we
would have been able to
bring over was 12 employ-
ees," he said. "Eight of our
paramedics are existing
staff."
Kimbrell said not all of
the county's EMS staff
were county residents.
"We were able to bring
on more jobs in the com-
munity." he said. "It may
not be the same existing
staff, but it's more oppor-
tunities. With the decision
that the county commis-
sion has made, we're now
able to extend the services
to the community and add
jobs."
Lifeguard has six ambu-
lances, five of which will
be kept in regular use.
The other six will be used
as a back-up units. They
will operate with four
crews and three shifts.
In addition there will be
a 12-hour unit that oper-
ates from 10 a.m. -10 p.m.,
as well as an advanced
support SUV which will
be operated by the EMS
captain.
James Brinkley, for-
merly a paramedic with
Columbia County, will be
the officer in charge at
the local Lifeguard facil-
ity.
Kimbrell said Lifeguard
has ordered two addition-
al ambulances from an
Atlanta company.
"We have all intentions
of securing the greatest
level of coverage to the
community," he said.


Lifeguard's Columbia
County operations con-
sist of three stations, in
Columbia City, Lake City
and the Columbia County
Fairgrounds. An addition-
al station will be added
on the east side of the
county.
"The biggest change
right now to the entire
system is how we move
our ambulances around,"
Kimbrell said.
He said Lifeguard uti-
lizes as "dynamic deploy-
ment model," in which
ambulances are parked
near areas that historically
report high incident num-
bers.
When an ambulance
is called into service, the
others will move to com-
pensate for its absence.
According to its web-
site, Lifeguard oper-
ates in Brimingham and
Mobile, Ala.; Santa Rosa
County, Fla.; Chattanooga,
Knoxville and Nashville,
Tenn.; Dade County, Ga.;
Houston and Costa Rica, as
well as Columbia County.


LAKE CITY'REPORTER LOCAL & STATE SATURDAY, JULY 2, 2011


Page Editor: Todd Taylor, 754-0424













OPINION


Saturday, July 2. 201 I


AN_


A N
OPINION



Hugo


Chavez's


secret

Hugo Chavez's
announcement
that Cuban doc-
tors had found
and removed a
cancerous tumor, coming after
weeks of speculation about the
Venezuelan president's absence
from public life, touches a par-
ticular chord for Cubans.
For decades, the health of
the Cuban president was infor-
mation cloaked in secrecy. It
was the least transparent topic
in our national life, until real-
ity forced disclosure about the
physical state of our ruler. On
July 31, 2006, a proclamation
announcing the sudden ill-
ness of Fidel Castro was read.
I remember that night, when
my phone seemed on the verge
of exploding because all my,
friends called to confirm that
we had heard the news.
,The next day, the streets
of Havana were surprisingly
empty. Those who were out
tended to speak in whispers
and avoided looking each other
in the eye. Many of us, who had
been born and grown up under
the rule of one man, were in
shock. Some were filled with
sadness; others the great
majority, I must confess with
relief.
Then came the many months
when we were administered
doses of medical news, like
tablespoon-size updates.
Sometimes foreign visitors
would announce they had seen
the commander in chief. A Non-
Aligned Nations sumfiit held in
Havana that September named,
in absentia, the olive-green-
clad convalescent as its leader.
To us, however, he never
appeared. Speculation grew and
grew about whether he contin-
ued to breathe or had gone to
swell the pantheon of historical
figures.
But the official media main-
tained its silence, interspersed
with some triumphalist phrases
about his recovery. Few dared
to say aloud that the health of
our ruler couldn't be treated
as a state secret. Even fewer
called for his resignation on the
grounds that he was unfit to
carry out his duties.
* Washington Post

Lake City Reporter
Serving Columbia County
Since 1874
The Lake City Reporter is pub-
lished with pride for residents of
Columbia and surrounding counties by
Community Newspapers Inc.
We believe strong newspapers build
strong communities -"Newspapers
get things done!"
Ourprimary goal is to
publish distinguished and profitable
community-oriented newspapers.
This mission will be accomplished
through the teamwork of professionals
dedicated to truth, integrity and hard
work.
Todd Wilson, publisher
Robert Bridges, editor
Sue Brannon, controller
Dink NeSmith, president
Tom Wood, chairman

LETTERS
POLICY
Letters to the Editor should be
typed or neatly written and double
spaced. Letters should not exceed
400 words and will be edited for
length and libel. Letters must be
signed and include the writer's name,
address and telephone number for
verification. Writers can have two
letters per month published. Letters
and guest columns are the opinion of
the writers and not necessarily that of
the Lake City Reporter.
BY MAIL: Letters, P.O. Box 1709,


Lake City, FL 32056; or drop off at
180 E: Duval St. downtown.
BY FAX: (386) 752-9400.
BY E-MAIL:
news@lakecityreporter.com


www.lakecityreporter.com


"- NTEXT: THE FORMER


Bachmann's right about


minimum wage


R republican
presidential
candidate Michele
Bachmann has
drawn some media
flak about her views on the
minimum wage. -
She has said that the
minimum wage is a bad idea
and that getting rid of it would
bolster employment
Despite a considerable body
of academic literature and a
whole lot of common sense
that supports Bachmann's view,
some reporters seem to have a
hard time with it
A Washington Post columnist
blogged about a recent
exchange between Bachmann
and a morning talk show
host on this subject with the
headline: "Michele Bachmann's
Radical position on minimum
wage."
Here we sit today with over 9
percent unemployment, two and
half years after enactment of the
largest government stimulus-
spending bill in our nation's
history. There are a million
fewer Americans working today
than when the stimulus was
passed.
Yet, I recall no Washington
Post or New York Times headline
which read: "Obama's radical
idea to borrow a trillion dollars
to create jobs."
I made the point in my book'
"Uncle Sam's Plantation,"
originally published several
years before Bachmann
arrived in Washington, that
the minimum wage, like most
government programs targeted
to low income Americans,
hurts the very communities it
purports to help.
By government setting a floor
on the wage that an employer
is permitted to pay, individuals


Star Parker
parker@urbancure.org


whose employment value falls
below that wage simply will be
unemployed.
Rather than generally
lifting wages at the bottom
end of our work force, which
is the supposed objective of
the minimum wage, it simply
creates unemployment. A wage
of $6.50 an hour, 75 cents less
than today's minimum wage,
isn't much, but it's a lot more
than zero.
The last round of federally
dictated minimum wage
increases occurred just as we
entered the last recession.
So its perverse effects were
magnified.
The minimum wage was
increased in three steps from
$5.15 an hour before July 2007
to $7.25 an hour in July 2009.
When the first increase
occurred in July 2007, black
teenage unemployment was at
30 percent, 25 points higher
than the then 5-percent national
unemployment rate. After the
last increase to $7.25 an hour
went into effect, black teen
unemployment reached 50
percent, 40 points higher than
the national rate,
Regarding the impact of
minimum wage increases
over this period, Michael J.
Hicks, the director of the
Center for Business and
Economic Research at Ball State
University observed, "Instead


ANOTHER


of hiring a dozen teens to work
a popular summer restaurant or
theme park, a company would
hire six or less. Instead of filling
positions that required no skills,
companies were making due
with what they had. In the long
run, this hurt young, unskilled
workers."
A study from this Center
estimates that the minimum
wage may have led to
elimination of 550,000 jobs.
This is one study, but there
are others. And there are many
economists of note, including
Nobel Prize winners, who have
written about the perverse
effects of the minimum wage.
Economics has been called
common sense made difficult
In the case of the minimum
wage, you don't need fancy
models to draw the logical
conclusion of what to expect
Just think how any business
owner will behave when the
government sets a floor on
how much he or she can pay
workers. It's obvious that those
at the bottom of the scale will
get shut out
It should be equally obvious
that those shut out are the same
ones that in all likelihood have
dropped out or will drop out
of school and whose life can
be changed dramatically by
having the opportunity to work
and acquire skills and build a
resume.
If there is anything radical
about Michele Bachmann's
stand on the minimum wage,
it's not what she has said, but
that she has had the courage to
say it.
* Star Parker is president of
CURE, Coalition
on Urban Renewal and
Education


OPINION


Did Someone Say Tech Bubble?


ell Kevin Ryan
he's stealing our
business," said
an acquaintance I
bumped into this
week as I walked across the
Upper West Side to meet, well,
Kevin Ryan.
This young Manhattanite
happens to work in 'he clothing
industry; her company sells
overstock brand-name clothes
at a steep discount. But her
sentiment is pervasive in
businesses from travel to
gourmet food to computer
software. These days, 47-year-
old Kevin Ryan may be the most
disruptive entrepreneur on the
Web.
As CEO of AlleyCorp, Mr.
Ryan oversees a network of


startups in New York City's
Silicon Alley. The jewel in his
crown, at least for the moment,
is Gilt Groupe. Currently valued
at $1 billion, the four-year-old
business is by some. estimates
the most valuable U.S. e-
commerce company other than
Amazon.
Mr. Ryan is the kind of guy
who has 10 inventive ideas per
day-or hour. But the concept
for Gilt originated with a French
company called Vente Priv6e.
He travels regularly to France-
including for a year in 1990
at the business school Insead
where he met his (French)
wife-and he witnessed the
incredible popularity of the
online retailer.. "Why," Mr. Ryan
wondered, "is no one doing this


here?"
It clicked on 18th Street in
April 2007. "I was walking by
and these 200 women were
lined up, waiting in line for
a Marc Jacobs sample sale.
And I'm thinking: That's
unbelievable-the passion!"
he recalls. His next thought:
"There are 200 here, but how
many women would like to
be at this sample sale right
now? Obviously the ones in
Kansas would be. Even the
ones in Westchester. There's
women even two blocks away
in a meeting. So it means that
there's tens or hundreds of
thousands of people-and I
can do that. I can bring that to
them."
* Wall Street Journal


4A


I 1
Dale McFeatters
mcfeattersd@shns.com


North

Korea plans

a gala, but

not for the

starving

N north Korea's
leaders have
promised their
people that the
country will
have fully achieved its aim of'
becoming "a great, prosperous;.
and powerful nation" in 2012,.,;
the 100th anniversary of the :
birth of its founder, Kim II-
sung, according to t sTe British
paper The Telegraph. .
That's' also when it's
expected that current dictator'
Kim Jong-il, 69 and ailing, will ;:
begin turning over power to
his little-known and seldom-
seen son, Kim Jong-un. He
would be the third generation
of Kims to hold absolute sway,
over the reclusive but noisily
bellicose country.
The Associated Press reports
that Pyongyang is undergoing
a construction boom with
the goal of building 100,00
new apartments plus shops,
theaters and parks by 2012.
Similar showpiece projects are
said to be underway in other.
cities.
But that bustle may conceal
a country in crisis.
Videos smuggled out by
North Korean dissidents show
widespread starvation and
deprivation, filthy children
orphaned by the regime left
to subsist as best they can on
garbage and handouts. One
shows a grimy woman dressed
in rags who says she's 23
but looks 10 years younger.
She says she survives by
selling grass she cuts along a
roadside, whether for human
or animal consumption was left
unanswered. When asked what
she eats, the woman softly
replies, "Nothing."
South Korean news agencies
report that this past week the
North ordered its universities
to cancel all classes until next
April. Some analysts believe
it's to disperse the students
lest they start getting ideas
from the popular upheavals in
North Africa and the Mideast
But the fact that the students
were ordered to work in the
fields and on construction
projects suggests the road
to greatness, prosperity and
power is not going as smoothly
as the "Dear Leader" had
planned. The people would
probably just as soon settle for
food.

Dale McFeatters is editorial
writer for Scripps Howard News
Service.

HIGHLIGHTS
IN HISTORY
Today is Saturday, July 2,
the 183rd day of 2011..There
are 182 days left in the year.
On July 2, 1961, author
Ernest Hemingway shot him-
self to death at his home in
Ketchum, Idaho.
On this date:
In 1566, French astrolo-
ger, physician and professed
prophesier Nostradamus died
in Salon.
In 1776, the Continental
Congress passed a resolu-
tion saying that "these United
Colonies are, and of right
ought to be, free and indepen-
dent States."
In 1881, President James A.
Garfield was shot by Charles J.
Guiteau at the Washington rail-
road station; Garfield died the
following September.














FAITH


&


VALUES


www.lakecityreporter.com


BIBLICAL MEDITATION


Carlton McPeak
car/ton_mc@msn.com


Nations are


accountable


to 'The Most


High God'

n 1776 a statement of inde-
pendence was signed by
our founding fathers, along
with other documents, giv-
ing us certain freedoms. As
a nation we have come to enjoy
these freedoms, but with all of
these freedoms we as a nation are
still accountable to "the Most High
God."
Throughout history, as recorded
in the Bible, nations are judged
because of their obedience or dis-
obedience to God.
God promised Abraham that
his descendants would possess a
certain land but not now because
the "iniquity of the Amorite is not
yet complete" (Genesis 15:16). God
also said that He would "judge the
nation whom [the descendants of
Abraham] would serve" (Genesis
15:14).
The first part of Exodus tells
how God executed judgment
"against all the gods of Egypt"'
(Exodus 12:12) as well as judging
the Pharaoh.
Jeremiah (46-49) foretells of
God bringing judgment upon the
nations of the Philistines, Moab,

MCPEAK continued on 64




S, .
ri i."", '

i .' ,.- ; i .;" : .; '= . ";r-,. -";


ADVENT CHRISTIAN
Rrst Advent Christian
1881 SW McFirlane Ave.
386-752-3900


Sunday School:
Sunday Service:
Wednesday Service:


9:45AM
11:00AM
7:00PM


ASSEMBLY OF GOD
GLAD TIDINGS ASSEMBLY OF GOD
993 NW Lake Jeffery Road
S 386-752-0620
Sunday Worship 10:30AM & 6PM
Wed. Fam: Bible Study 7:00PM
"A church.where JESUS is Real"

BAPTISTI
BEREA BAPTIST CHURCH
SR47 S 755-0900
Sunday School 9:30AM
Sunday Worship 10:45AM & 6PM
Wednesday Eve. Service 7PM
Interim Pastor Kenneth Edenfield

EASTSIDE BAPTIST CHURCH
196 SE James Ave., 386-752-2860
Sun. Bible Study 9:45AM
Sun. Worship 11AM & 6PM
Wed. Prayer Mtg/Bible Study 6PM
Rev. Brandon G. Witt

FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH
Sunday Bible Study 9:15AM
Sunday Worship 10:30AM & 6:00PM
Wed. 6:00PM Prayer Service, &
Children Ministry 6:15PM
Downtown Lake City 752-5422
Rev. Stephen Ahrens, Pastor .

OLIVET MISSIONARY BAPTIST CHURCH
541 N.E. Davis Street
(386) 752-1990
Ronald V. Walters, Pastor
Sunday School 9:45AM
Sunday Morning Worship 11:00AM
Wed. Mid-Week Worship 6:00PM
"In God's Word, Will & Way"


PINE GROVE BAPTIST CHURCH
1989 N US Hwy 441
386-752-2664
Sunday Bible Study 9
Sunday Worship 11AM
Wed. Kids & Youth Ministry 6
Pastor: Ron Thompson


i:45AM
& 6PM
6:30PM


C iayfElectric Cooperative, Inc.
Competitive rates, non-profit,
right here in your community.
Lake City District 386-752-7447
clayelectric.com


Today
Gospel music service
A summer gospel music
service is 6 p.m. today at
The Church of Faith and
Deliverance Through Christ
Inc. The service will feature
gospel recording groups
such as The Florida Gospel
Travelers of Jacksonville,
The Spiritual Harmonizers of
. Enviston and D'Vine One of
Lake City. A love offering will
be collected to support the
music ministries. The church
is located at 379 NW Long St.
Call Pastor Minnie (Williams)
Gomes at (386) 758-1886.

Spaghetti dinner'
A spaghetti dinner spon-
sored by Open Doors
Ministry is 11 a.m.-1 p.m.
today at Deese Park in down-
town Fort White. Cost is $6
per plate. There will be prizes
for children, baked goods for


sale. Proceeds will benefit
the church and the Christian
Service Center.

Messiah's Mansion
Messiah's Mansion, a full
scale model of the mosaic
sanctuary is coming to Lake
City 1-7 p.m. July 2-9 and
1-5 p.m. July 10. Tours begin
every 15 minutes and last 75
minutes. The tour is located
at 9206 W. Hwy. 90. Call (386)
984-9704, e-mail livesanctu-
aryli@yahoo.com or visit
www.livesanctuary.com. Free
admission.

Sunday
Perry Stone showing
A DVD showing of Perry
Stone preaching at the 2011
Church of God Camp Meeting
at Wimuma is Sunday at the
Wellborn Church of God. Call
752-8479 for more informa-
tion.


Tuesday


Thursday


Addictions support group English and literacy classes


Greater Visions Support
Group hosts a faith-based
addictions support group at 7
p.m. every Tuesday at Christ
Central Church on Sister's
Welcome Road and 9:30 am.
every Thursday at the Suwannee
Coalition office on North Ohio
Avenue in Live Oak. The group
provides spiritual and emotional
support in a non-judgmental set-
ting. Call 2081345.

Faithful and True meetings
.Faithful and True meetings
are 7 p.m. every Tuesday at
Christ Central Church in Lake
City. The perils of pornogra-
phy and other addictive sexual.
behaviors are discussed. Men
are taught how to live in free-
dom consistently everyday. The
group is strictly anonymous.
Call Tom at (386) 965-6377 for
more information.


Free English speaking and
literacy classes provided by
Columbia County School
District's Career and Adult
Education Program is from
5;30-8 p.m. every Thursday
at Unity of God Ministries,
Inc. in Wellborn. Activities
for children will be provided.
Call (386) 755-8190 for more
information. The church
is located at 12270 County
Road 137.

Friday
Hawthorne preaching
Prophet Gregory L.
SHawthorne of New Life
Deliverance Ministries in
Winter Haven is preaching at
7:30 p.m. Friday and 10 a.m.

NOTES continued on 6A


Our Eternal Declaration of Independence


O n July 4, 1776
the Second
Continental con-
gress adopted a
document written
by Thomas Jefferson, signed
by 56 other men, declaring
the thirteen American colo-
nies free and independent of
Great Britain. This document
is known as "The Declaration
of Independence". This was
a great day in the history of
America. It meant freedom
from the control of another
government. Every year
July 4th is set aside to honor


BIBLE STUDIES


Hugh Sherrill Jr.
ems-hugh43@comcost.net


our Independence Day. It is
sad that America today, as a
whole, doesn't honor that day
as it should.


S ''*1* ;:
0~~~ ,. i.
-" L-'v-4~*.y*.i.. 'aao~..a-


BAPTIST
.SALEM PRIMITIVE BAPTIST
Sunday Services 10:30 AM
Pastor: Elder Herman Griffin
752-4198

SOUTHSIDE BAPTIST CHURCH
388 S.E. Baya Drive 755-5553 .
Sunday:
Bible Study 9:15 AM
Morning Worship 10:30AM
Evening Worship 6:15PM
Wednesday:


AWANA
Prayer & Bible Study


5:45PM
6:15 PM


TABERNACLE BAPTIST CHURCH
(Independent Baptist)
144 SE Montrose Ave. 752-4274
Sunday School 10 AM
Sun. Mom. Worship 11 AM
Sunday Eve, 6PM
Wed. Prayer Meeting 7:30 PM
Pastor: Mike Norman

CATHOLIC
EPIPHANY CATHOLIC CHURCH
1905 SW Epiphany Court- 752-4470
Saturday Vigil Mass 5:00 PM
Sunday Mass 8:15 AM, 10:30 AM,
5:00 PM (Spanish/English)
Sunday SchoolReligious Education
9:00 AM-10:15 AM

CHRISTIAN
CHRISTIAN SCIENCE SOCIETY
239 SE Baya Ave.
Sunday Service 11:00 AM
Wednesday Evening Service 7:30 PM


LAKE CITY CHRISTIAN CHURCH
Hwy 247 S., 755-9436
Sunday School 9:
Sun. Mom. Worship 10:
Wed. Prayer Meeting


30AM
30 AM
7PM


CHURCH OF CHRIST
NEW HORIZON
Church of Christ
Directions &Times 386-623-7438
Jack Exum,Jr., Minister
..






Tires for every need.
US 90 West across from Wal-Mart
752-0054


CHURCH OF GOD
LAKE CITY CHURCH OF GpD
167 Ermine St. 752-5965
Sunday School 9:45 AM
Sun. Worship 10:30AM & 6:00PM
Wed. Family Night 7PM
Wed. Youth Service 7PM
Pastor Carroll Lee

EVANGEL CHURCH OF GOD
370 SW Monitor Glen 755-1939
Sunday School 9:45 AM
Sunday Worship 10:50 & 6:30
Wed. Spiritual Enrichment 7PM
"Shock Youth Church"
Boys and Girls Clubs
Bible Study
Pastor: John R. Hathaway

EPISCOPAL
ST. JAMES EPISCOPAL CHURCH
2423 SW Bascom Norris Dr.,
Lake City, Fl 32025- 386-752-2218
Website: www.stjameslakecity.org
HOLY EUCHARIST
Sun. 8& 10 AM
Wed. 6:00 PM
Priest The Rev. Michael Armstrong

LUTHERAN
OUR REDEEMER LUTHERAN CHURCH
LCMS
1 1/2 miles S. of 1-75 on SR 47
755-4299


Sunday Services
(Nursery Provided)
Christian Education Hour
For all ages at 10:45AM
Pastor: Rev. Bruce Alkire


9:30AM


SPIRIT OF CHRIST LUTHERAN
Hwy 90,1.5 miles West of 1-75 752-3807
Sunday Worship 10:00AM
Nursery Avail.
Wed. Pot Luck 6PM Worship 7PM
Vicar John David Bryant


METHODIST
First United Methodist Church
973 S. Marion Ave.
386-752-4488
Sunday School 9:45AM
Sunday Morning Worship
Casual Worship Service 8:50AM
Traditional Service 11:00AM
Program opportunities available in all areas
for all ages.
For a complete schedule
contact church office at
752-4488

WESLEY MEMORIAL UNITED
1272 SW McFarlane* 752-3513
(Adjacent to Summers School)
Sunday School 9:00AM
Worship 10:00AM


Nursery provided
Vacation Bible School
9am-noon July 11-15
Pastor The Rev. J. Louie Mabrey
www.wesleymem.com

WATERTOWN CONGREGATIONAL
METHODIST CHURCH
U.S. 90 E. turn on Cortez (next to Quality
Ind.) right on Okinawa.


Sunday School
Sun.Worship 11,
Wed. Night Service
Pastor, Randy Ogbum


9:45 AM'
AM &6 PM
7PM


NAZARENE
LAKE CITY CHURCH OFTHE NAZARENE
Services:
Sunday School 9:45AM
Sunday Worship 10:45AM
Wednesday 6:30PM
Adult, Youth Ministry, Children's Ministry
Pastor: Craig Henderson
Nursery Provided
SW SR 47 and Azalea Park Place

PRESBYTERIAN
FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
629 SW Baya Drive 752-0670
Sunday School 9:00AM
Sunday Worship Service 10:00 AM
NURSERY PROVIDED
Pastor: Dr. Roy A. Martin
Director of Music: Bill Poplin


We just past Memorial
Day, May 30th, a day set
aside to remember all those
who fought and died to keep
America free. We often don't
realize the tremendous price
paid for our freedom. We to
often take it for granted.,
The Statue of Liberty, given
to America by France, was
dedicated on October 28,
1886. For almost 125 years
the Statue of Liberty has been
a symbol of freedom for all
to see. I am reminded of the
words of a song written years
ago. The first verse says "In


14'mri n sf. (zrc' C o/ 7J'i ciL a
S OBSTETRICS & GYNECOLOGY
j .. .. .. .
:* h' 4: ,
(386)466-1106



PENTECOSTAL
FIRST FULL GOSPEL CHURCH
NE Jones Way & NE Washington St
Sunday School 10:00 AM
Morning Worship 11:00 AM
Evangelistic Service 6:00 PM
Youth Services- Wednesday 7:00PM
Mid-week Service Wednesday 7:00 PM
For info call 755-3408' Everyone Welcome
Pastor: Rev. Stan Ellis

NON-DENOMINATIONAL
CHRIST CENTRAL MINISTRIES
Leadership Services 9:00AM
Sunday Moming 11:00AM
Wednesday Service 7:00PM
217 Dyal Ave., from Hwy 90 take
Sisters Welcome Rd., go 5 miles, South,
church on left 755-2525
Lead Pastor: Lonnie Johns
"A Church on the Move"

CHRIST*lN HERITAGE CHURCH
Comer SR. 47 & Hudson Circle
Sunday Celebration 10:30AM
Pastor Chris Jones 752-9119

FALLING CREEK CHAPEL
Falling Creek Road *755-0580
First and Third Sundays 9:30 A.M.
Second and Fourth Sundays 3:00 P.M.
Pastor Rev. Cheryl R. Pingel

NEW BEGINNING CHURCH
Highway 242 E. of Branford Highway
Sunday School 10:00AM
Morning Worship 11:00AM
Sunday Evening 6:00PM
Wednesday 7:00PM
A Full Gospel Church Everyone Welcomed
(386)755-5197


BIB HARRY'S
S Heating & Air Conditioning Inc.
Harry Mosley, President

Puon 752-2308 r'iS-


New York harbor stands a
Lady with a torch raised to
the sky, and all who see her
kndw she stands for liberty
for you and me. First cho-
rus: "I'm so proud to be called
an American, To be named
with the brave and the free,
I will honor our flag, and I
trust in God and the Statue of
Liberty". Verse 2: "On lonely,
Golgotha stood a cross, with
my Lord stretched to the
sky; and all who kneel there
live forever, as all the saved

SHERRILL continued on. 6A


Central States
Enterprises
Columbia County's Feed Headquarters
FEED PET SUPPLIES LAWN & GARDEN
ANIMAL HEALTH
668 NW Waldo St. 386-755-7445

MIKEL'S POWER EQUIPMENT, INC.
Your Lawn & Garden Headquarters
MOWERS CHAIN SAWS TRIMMERS
1152 US 90 WEST LAKE CITY, FL.
386-752-8098


LAKE CITY
,,, c,. 755-7050


BAYWAYjanitorial Services
FIRE & Water Restoration
Floor & Carpet Care
Residential & Conimercial
755-6142

North Florida
Pharmacy
7 Locations to Serve You
Lake City, Ft. White, Branford,
Chiefland, Mayo & Keystone Heights
r a, ~ a


a3ea 75455


Supercenter
"LOW PRICES EVEIY DAY"
US 90 WEST 755-2427

GWHunter, Inc.
Chevron Chevron Oil
Jobber
' I I


Holy Electr, Inc.
"Quality ork at a reasonable price"
We also do solar hook-ups
(386) 755-5944


FOOD STORES
10.161 l)]iial SI. I ak ( Cm I I.
(361) 752-01067
I:reshl MSC I rc]l l'rodudr c'


RICK'S CRANE SERVICE
Located at 25A (Old *' "r
Valdosta Hwy)
386-752-5696 or .s
386-867-2035 ,
after hours


Saturday, July 2, 201 I


CHURCH NOTES


5A


Morrell's
Your Complete decorating and
home furnishings store
SW Deputy Jeff Davis Lane (formerly Pinemount Rd.)
752-3910 or 1-800-597-3526
Mon.-Sat 8 00-5:30 Closed Sunday


1 SANDERSON COLUMBIA CO., INC.
ASPHALT PAVING
COMMERCIAL .INDUSTRIAL
Site Preparation Road Building Parking Lols
Grading & Drainage
752-7585
871 NW Guerdon St, Lake City


I









LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL SATURDAY, JULY 2, 2011


COMMUNITY CALENDAR


* To submit your Community
Calendar item, contact Antonia
Robinson at 754-0425 or by
e-mail at arobinson @
lakecityreporter.com.


Today
Coffee House season
The second half of the
2011 Coffee House sea-
son is 7-9 p.m. Saturday
in the Stephen Foster
Auditorium. The host-
ess for this gala is Lucy
Spencer. She works in the
events department at the
park and plays the piano.
The desert table will have
items for sale.

Monday
Fireworks Celebration
Lake City Columbia
County Chamber of
Commerce is hosting
the 4th of July Fireworks
Celebration beginning
5 p.m. Monday around
Lake DeSoto. The event
will feature musical enter-
tainment, free children's
activities, vendors and
more. The fireworks will
be released at 9:20
p.m.


Tuesday
Wood Carvers meeting


The Columbia County
Wood Carvers meet
every Monday at 1
p.m. at the LifeStyle
Enrichment Center.
Contact Ken Myer at
719-9629 or Charles
Kime at 755-4937 for
more information.


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter

Messiah's Mansion tour
Corey Leinneweber (fom left), 16, of Harrah, Okla., explains to Abigail Shaw, 7, and her brother, Joshua, 5, both of Fort White,
Thursday what to expect during a tour of Messiah's Mansion's life-size replica of the tabernacle built by Moses in the wilderness.


Theatre performance
Columbia County
Senior Services Inc. is
hosting a Geriactors
Theatre Performance "I
Can't Remember Why
I'm Mad At You" and
three vignettes 7 p.m.
STuesday at the LifeStyle


Enrichment Center. Call
(386) 755-0235. The cen-
ter is located at 628 SE
Allison Court.

Wednesday
Spanish class
Columbia County Senior
Services Inc. is hosting a
beginners Spanish class
10-11 a.m. at the LifeStyle


Enrichment Center. Free
Blood Pressure Checks
are 11 a.m. to noon. Also
a Geriactors Matinee
Performance is 11 a.m.
and bingo is 1 p.m. Call
(386) 755-0235. The center
is located at 628 SE Allison
Court.

Newcomers and
Friends Luncheon
The July Friendship


Luncheon of the Lake City
Newcomers and Friends is
11:30 a.m. July 6 at Costa
Del Sol located at 2260 W
U.S. Highway 90. All mem-
bers, guests and friends
are welcome. Call (386)
438-8100 or, (386) 754-7227.
Thursday
Chair exercise
Columbia County Senior


Services Inc. is hosting
7th Chair Exercise 1 p.m.
July 7 at the LifeStyle
Enrichment Center. Call
(386) 755-0235. The cen-
ter is located at 628 SE
Allison Court.

Play in the Clay
Diane Hornby is teach-
ing "Play In The Clay"
classes for the children's
summer vacation program
10 a.m.-ll a.m. July 7 and
14 for $5 at the Stephen
Foster Cultural State Park.
To register, please call the
park Gift Shop at (386)
397-1920 or visit www.ste-
phenfosterCSO.org.To learn
more about the park, visit
www.FloridaStateParks.
org/stephenfoster

Friday
Cold Potato
Columbia County Senior
Services Inc. is hosting
a "Cold Potato" game 1
p.m. July 8 at the LifeStyle
Enrichment Center. Call
(386) 755-0235. The center
is located at 628 SE Allison
Court.

Japanese drumming
The Columbia County
Public Library is hosting
Japanese drumming with
Tampa Taiko 11 a.m. at
Fort White Community
Center and 2 p.m. at the
Main Branch July 8.


SHERRILL: Independence

Continued From Page 5A


testify." Second chorus:
"I'm so glad to be called
a Christian, to be named
with the ransomed and
whole; as the Statue liber-
ates the citizen, so the
cross liberates the soul."
Verse 3: "The Cross is my
statue of liberty, It was
there that my soul was
set free; unashamed I'll
proclaim that old rugged
cross, is my statue of lib-
erty."
In John Chapter 8 begin-
ning inverse 12, there was
a conflict between Jesus
and the Pharisees. It had
to do with the origin of


Christ and that He is the
Light of the World.
As we know, the
Pharisees could not
accept Jesus as the
Savior, because they were
looking for a king. I often
say the nation of Israel
missed the donkey look-
ing for the whitt horse.
Jesus said in verse 12:
"I am the Light of the
World. He who follows
me shall not walk in dark-
ness but have the light
of life". Then in verse 31
"If you abide in My word,
you are my disciples
indeed", and verse 32 "And


you shall know the truth
and the truth shall make
you free." Jesus goes on
to say that "whoever com-
mits sin is a slave to sin";
but verse 36: 'Therefore
if the Son makes you free
you shall be free indeed".
This day and age we live
in with all the troubles,
one can only experience
true freedom when one
comes to know the salva-
tion of the Lord Jesus
Christ. (John 3:18).

* Hugh Sherrill is a preach-
er in Lake City available for
pulpit supply and revivals.


NOTES: Church events listed

Continued From Page 5A


Saturday at Miracle
Tabernacle Church, 10
a.m.. The church is locat-
ed at 1190 SW Sister's
Welcome Road. Call the
church office at (386)758-
8452 for more informa-
tion.


Saturday, July 9
Church Anniversary
The 131st Church
Anniversary is 6:30 p.m.
July 9 and 11 a.m. and 3
p.m. July 10 at Mt. Tabor
A.M.E. Church. The


Saturday evening service
will consist of a musical
featuring several musical
groups and soloists. The
Sunday morning speaker
is the Rev. Alton Coles of
Jacksonville. The evening
speaker is the Rev. Joy
Gallmon.


MCPEAK: Accountable

Continued From Page 5A


Ammon, Edom as well as
other nations.
The book of Jonah
records how the nation
of Assyria repented
because of the preach-'
ing of Jonah. Several
years later the prophet
Nahum announced that
God would destroy the
Assyrians because of
their wickedness.
The author of Daniel
records a letter the
great Babylonian empire
ruler Nebuchadnezzar
wrote "to all the peoples,
nations, and men of
every language that live
in all the earth" (Daniel
4:1). Using his own
words, Neluchadnezzar
recounts how he learned
that the dominion of
this "Most High God"
was "from generation to
generation" (Daniel 4:3).


Vivian L. Feagle Crews
Vivian L. Feagle Crews, passed
away June 29, 2011. She was
born October 7, 1924 in Dundee,
FL, raised in
Lake City,
FL. An Ocoee
resident since
1958. She
was a faith-
ful member
of First Bap-
tist Church of
Winter Garden, FL. Vivian was
a retired Electronic Assembler
for Martin Marietta, Orlando and
past president of the Ocoee Lions


Nebuchadnezzar was
accountable to this "Most
High God."
Nations as well as indi-
viduals are responsible
to God. The decision
makers of a nation (or
state or city or county)
are responsible to God
for their actions when it
comes to making deci-
sions about the affairs of
government. Our civic
leaders need to make
sure that their "votes"
please God and not just
"their constituents."
Before our lawmakers
today are some issues
that are very serious.
Their decisions could
be turning points in the
continued freedoms that
we currently enjoy. Just
like the kings of Israel
and Judah who made
ungodly laws and were


OBITUARIES

Club Auxiliary. She is preceded
in death by her husband Charlie.
Mrs. Crews is survived by sonrs,
Tommy Elvin (Jan) Crews; Larry
Crews; daughter, Nancy (David)
Fuller; granddaughter, Rhonda
(Freddy) Clark and great-grand-
children, Courtney, Spencer and
Brandon Clark; brothers, Leroy
(Sharon) Feagle, David (Nora)
Feagle, Leon Feagle; sisters,
SBessie (the late Paul) Timmins,
Betty (the late Bub) Witt, Annie
Mae (Bud) Lands; sister-in-law,
Nell Feagle. She leaves behind
numerous nieces and nephews,
many dear friends and church
family. Visitation will be held


subsequently punished,
our country could be pun-
ished also.
If a "ruling" pleases
God, then it will be the
best for the people. Just
because our government
documents say that we
have certain freedoms
does not mean that God
says we have that free-
dom.
If we as a nation please
God then we will continue
to have our freedom and
He will continue to bless
America.


* Carlton G. McPeak is an
evangelist working in the
Lake City area. All Scriptural
quotations are from the New
American Standard Bible,
Holman Bible Publishers,
unless otherwise stated.


from 6-8 pm, Tues., July 5, 2011
and from 10-11 am, Wed., July 6,
2011 at Woodlawn Funeral Home
followed by the Funeral Service
at 11 am. Acting as her Honorary
Pallbearers her dearly loved Sun-
day School Class. Arrangements
entrusted to WOODLAWN
MEMORIAL PARK &
FUNERAL HOME, Gotha, FL.
407-293-1361. Condolences
may be offered at www.wood-
lawnfuneralhomegotha. com.
Obituaries are paid advertise-
ments. For details, call the Lake
City Reporter's classified depart-
ment at 752-1293.


Reader's Choice


CUTEST BABY



CONTEST
1s, 2ND & 3RD Place Prizes to be Awarded for Boys & Girls!

AGES 0-24 MONTHS
Send in the most adorable photograph of your child,
up to 24 months of age, and you could win!


TO ENTER:
Bring your baby's picture along with entry fee ($30.00) WAX
to the Lake City Reporter,180 E. Duval St., mail to YouC
photo
P.O. Box 1709, Lake City, FL 32056. ads
SubjCt
All pictures will be published in the Lake City
Reporter's July 17, 2011 edition. All voting bal-
lots must be returned to the paper by July 25,
2011. So show off your child, grandchild,
godchild, niece or nephew.
The winners will be published on July 31, 2011


NT TO ENTER ONLNE?
can e-mail your
o and information to
@lakecityreporter.com.
ect line: BABY CONTEST


DEADLINE:
July 14th, 20 11

For More Information or if you are
interested in becoming a sponsor .
please Call Mary at 754-0401


Page Editor: Todd Taylor, 754-0424









Lake City Reporter


Story ideas?

Contact
Tim Kirby
Sports Editor
754-0421
tkirby@lokecityreportercom


SPORTS


Saturdayjuly 2 20 II


www.lakecityreporter.com


Section B


FROM THE SIDELINE
I -.1


New No. 1 Djokovic, old

No. 1 Nadal reach final


Brandon Finley
Phone:(386) 754-0420
bfinley@lakecityreporter.com


An


epic


failure
L ike any
good-natured
country boy,
I like to fish.
Sometimes, I
like it a little too much.
I'll be the first to admit
that I'm not very good at
it and a lot of times I'm
not very successful, but
this morning may have
been the most unsuc-
cessful of journeys.
As is the case with
most fishing trips, I
wanted to hit the water
early. This morning, I
probably wanted to hit
the water a little too early.
It was still dark when
I left home, tackle ready
and eager. Today would
be the day that I caught
a record catfish in ode of
my friend's secret holes.
So I thought
I departed on the trip,
made my way into the
woods and that's where
things got interesting.
Like many good fishing
ponds, this one was off
the beaten path.
I hit the first dirt road :
without many problems
in my Jeep Patriot, which
doesn't carry very much
power. Without
hesitation, I turned off
the first dirt road onto a
much narrower dirt road.
The second road
probably wasn't designed
for passenger vehicles. I
paid this no mind.
It looked like there
had been vehicles in
there recently. The road
was fresh with fails ...
or perhaps it was still wet
from the rain the night
before which I had failed
to take into account
I traveled through the
first rough patch of mud
without much trouble. It
was going to be a piece of
cake. Then,' trouble arose.
There was a match larger
body of water I would
need to cross and without
the sun's light shining
on me, I wasn't sure how
deep this hole was..
But, fish were yet to be
caught I had no choice
but to push forward or be
conquered by the road.
Little did I know that
pushing forward'would
ultimately end up in my
Jeep being conquered.
My tires hit the mud and
Began to spin without
traction. I was stuck and
going nowhere.
I never made it to the
fishing hole. Instead, the
morning was spent in an
attempt to pull my Jeep
from the mud. It's a good
thing I live surrounded
by so many country folk,
because there were more
than a few eager fellows
ready for the challenge of
pulling me out.
After a couple of trips
back and forth looking
for a snatch rope, my
Jeep escaped the mud by
noon. I went home
without fish. It was an
epic failure.
Brandon Finley covers
sports for the Lake City
Reporter.


- .
ASSOCIATED PRESS
Serbia's Novak Djokovic celebrates after defeating France's
Jo-Wilfried Tsonga in their men's semifinal at the All England
Lawn Tennis Championships at Wimbledon on Friday.


Upset-minded
Tsonga comes
up short.
By HOWARD FENDRICH
Associated Press
WIMBLEDON, England
--Having ensured his first
trip to a Wimbledon final
and first turn at No. 1 in the
rankings with a thrill-a-min-
ute victory, Novak Djokovic
dropped to his back at the
baseline, limbs spread wide,
chest heaving.
Moments later, he knelt
and kissed the Centre Court
grass, while his entourage
bounced giddily in unison,
huddling in a tight circle up
in Djokovic's guest box.
Clearly, it meant so much
to all of them that Djokovic
beat 12th-seededJo-Wilfried
Tsonga of France 7-6 (4), 6-
2, 6-7 (9), 6-3 Friday in an
entertaining and engaging


semifinal filled with diving
volleys and ,showmanship.
What would meiean even;
more; If Djokovio, who
is 47-1 in 2011, can beat
defending champion Rafaef
Nadal for the title Sunday at
the All England Club.
As a kid in war-torn
Serbia, Djokovic recalled,
"I was always trying to visiu-
alize myself on Sunday, the
last Sunday of Wimbledon.
Being in the Wimbledon
final it's 'the thing' for
me."
The top-seeded Nadal
extended his winning
streak at the grass-court
Grand Slam tournament
to 20 matches by ending
the latest so-close-yet-so-
far bid by a British man
at Wimbledon, eliminating
No. 4 Andy Murray 5-7, 6-2,
6-2, 6-4. It's the third con-
secutive year Murray has
lost in the semifinals.
The last British man to


win Wimbledon was Fred
Perry in 1936, and the last
to even reach the final was
Bunny Austin in 1938; since.
then, the host country's
men are a combined 0-11 in
semifinals.
"I feel sad for Andy,"
said Nadal, who showed no
signs of being hampered
by the aching left heel that
he's numbing with painkill-
ing injections as he seeks'
a third Wimbledon 'chamn'
pionship and 11th Grand:
Slam trophy overall.
No matter Sunday's,
result, the Spaniard will bp'
overtaken in the ATP rank-,
ings Monday by two-time
Australian Open champion
Djokovic, who'll rise from
No. 2.
It will be the first tim6
since February 2004 that
a man other than Roger.
Federer or Nadal has been'
TENNIS continued on 3B,


I


mmer


.Falcons using
Tigers to help :
summertraining.
By BRANDON FINLEY
bfinley@lakecityreporter.com
For the second season in'
a row, the Lake City Falcons
are training under the ways
of the Tigers.
Coach Billy Jennings'
strategy is to have
the Falcons ready for
Columbia's system by the
time the players turn into
ninth graders.
"We're doing the same
thing that we did last sum-
mer," he -said. 'We're put-
ting. in some of the high
school's offense."
After the departure of
head coach Craig Howard
and the arrival of Brian
Allen to .the Tigers, the
Falcons were left learning
something new again this
offseason.
"We're putting in more
west coast stuff," Jennings
said. 'There's .more tight
ends in our sets. It's not all
that different in the running
game with a lot of inside
BRANDON FINLEY/Lake City Reporter and outside zone stuff."
Lake City Middle School's Jake Stephens performs the clean and jerk during a summer training. session for the Falcons'
football team. FALCONS continued on 3B


NBA lockout on as sides:

fail to reach new deal


ASSOCIATED PRESS
NBA commissioner David Stern speaks to reporters after
a meeting with the players' union, Thursday in New York.
Despite a three-hour meeting Thursday, the sides could not
close the enormous gap that remained in their positions.


Basketball season
in jeapordy as
league closes door.
By BRIAN MAHONEY
Associated Press
NEW YORK The
memories of a thrilling
NBA season might have to
last for a while.
There's no telling when
basketball will be back.
The NBA locked out its
players early Friday when
its collective bargaining
agreement expired, becom-
ing the second major pro
sport shut down by labor
strife.
The players and owners
remained far apart on just
about every major issue,


from salaries to the salary
cap, revenues to revenue
sharing.
"We had a great year in
terms of the appreciation
of our fans for our game.
It just wasn't a profitable
one for the owners, and it
wasn't one that many of
the smaller market teams
particularly enjoyed or felt
included in," Commissioner
David Stern said. "The goal
here has been to make the
league profitable and to
have a league where all 30
teams can compete."
It is believed to be only
the second time that two
leagues have been shut
down simultaneously by
labor problems.
In 1994, both the NHL
and MLB were idle from


October through the end of
the year. The NHL locked
out its players from October
1994 until mid-January 1995
and reduced the 1994-95
season from 84 games to
48. MLB endured a 232-day
strike from August 12, 1994
until April 2, 1995, which
led to the cancellation of
the entire 1994 postseason
and World Series.
The NBA's long-expected
lockout puts the 2011-12
season in jeopardy and all
league business on hold'
- starting with the free
agency period that would
have opened Friday.
The NBA's sumnier.
league in Las Vegas already
has been canceled, and
NBA continued on 3B


, A9,I














LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS SATURDAY, JULY 2, 2011


TELEVISION

TV sports

Today
AUTO RACING
7:30 p.m.
TNT NASCAR, Sprint Cup, Coke
Zero 400; at Daytona Beach
BOXING
4:45 p.m.
HBO IBF/WBO championWIadimir
Klitschko (55-3-0) vs. WBA champion
David Haye (25-1-0), for IBF/WBO/WBA
heavyweight title, at Hamburg, Germany
CYCLING
8 a.m.
VERSUS Tour de France, stage I,
Passage du Gois La Barre-de-Monts to
Mont des Alouettes Les Herbiers, France
2 p.m.
NBC Tour de France, stage I,
Passage du Gols La Barre-de-Monts to
Mont des Alouettes Les Herblers, France
(same-day tape)
GOLF
8 a.m.
TGC- European PGATour, Open de
France, third round, at Paris
I p.m.*
TGC PGA Tour, AT&T. National,
third round, at Newtown Square, Pa.
3 p.m.
CBS PGA Tour, AT&T National,
third round, at Newtown Square, Pa.
4p.m.
tGC USGA, U.S. Men's &Women's
Amateur Public Unks Championships,
championship matches, at Bandon, Ore.
6:30 p.m.
TGC Chamnplns Tour, Montreal
Championship, second round, at Blainville,
Quebec (same-day tape)
MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL
4 p.m.
FOX Regional coverage, N.Y.
Yankees at N.Y. Mets, Chicago White
Sox at Chicago Cubs, or Cleveland at
Cincinnati
7 p.m.
MLB Regional coverage, San
Francisco at Detroit or Boston at
Houston
MAJOR LEAGUE LACROSSE
. 7:30 p.m.
ESPN2 Rochester at Chesapeake
( MOTORSPORTS
S p.tn
NBC AMA Pro Motocross, at
Buchanan, Mich.
S9p.m.
SPEED AMA Pro Motocross, at
,Buchanan, Mich. (same-day tape)
SOCCER
7:45 a.m.
ESPN2 FIFA, Women's World Cup,
Group C, North Korea vs. Sweden, at
SAugsburg,-Germany
11:30 a.m.
ESPN FIFA, Women's World Cup,
Group C, U.S. vs. Colombia, at Sinsheim,'
Germany
10.30 p.m.
. ESPN2 MLS, New York vs. San Jose
at Stanford, Calif.- -
TENNIS
9 a.m
NBC The m.Championships,
,women's championship match, at
Wimbledon,.England


BASEBALL

AL standings

East Division
W L Pct GB
New York 48 31 .608 -
Boston 46 34 .575 2'h
Tampa Bay 45 36 .556 4
Toronto 40 43 .482 10
Baltimore 35 43 .449 12'h
Central Division
W L Pct GB
Detroit 44 38 .537 -
Cleveland 42 37 .532 A
Chicago 40 42 .488 4
Minnesota 34 45 .4301 8'i
Kansas City 33 48 .407 10'
West Division
W L Pct GB
Texas .43 39 .524 -
Los Angeles 42 40 '.512 I
Seattle. 39 '42 .481 3'A
Oakland 36 46 .439 7

Interleague play

Thursday's Games
Boston 5, Philadelphia 2
N.Y.Yankees 5, Milwaukee 0
Detroit 5, N.Y. Mets 2
Chicago White Sox 6, Colorado 4,
10 innings
SFlorida 5, Oakland 4
S. Louis 9, Baldtimore 6
Pittsburgh 6,Toronto 2
Houston 7,Tqxas 0
Friday's Games
Philadelphia 7,.Toronto 6
Chicago White Sox 6, Chicago Cubs

SSan Francisco at Detroit (@)
"' Cleveland at Cincinnati (n) .
S N.Y.Yankees at N.Y. Mets (n)
St. Louis atTampa Bay (n)
SBaltimore atAtlanta (n)
Boston at Houston (n) .
Florida atTeI "(n) '( . -
Kansas City at Colorado (n)
. Milwaukee at Minnesota (n)
Arizona at Oakland, (n)
LA. Dodgers at LA.Angels (n)
San Diego at Seattle (n)
Tody's Games
SPhiladelphia (Halladay 10-3) atToronto
(C.Villanueva 5-1), I.07 p.m.
Chicago White Sox (Humber 7-4) at
Chicago Cubs (Garza 4-6), 4:10 p.m.
Cleveland (Cartnona 4-10) at
Cincinnati (H.Balley 3-2), 4:10 p.m.
N.Y.Yankees (Colon 5-3). at N.Y. Mets
(Gee 8-1),4:10 p.m.
Boston (A.Miller 1-0) at Houston


(Happ 3-9), 7:05 p.m.
San Francisco (Zito 1-1) at Detroit
(Scherzer 9-3), 7:05 p.m.
Baltimore (Arrieta 9-4) at Atlanta
(T.Hudson 6-6), 7:10 p.m.
.Milwaukee (Narveson 5-5) at
Minnesota (Pavano 5-6),7:10 p.m. -
St. Louis (McClellan 6-4) at Tampa Bay
(Ntemann 2-4),7:10 p.m.
Florida (Undecided) at Texas
(D.Holland 6-3), 8:05 p.m.
Kansas City (Davies 1-6) at Colorado
(Chacln 8-5), 8:10 p.m.
Arizona (.Saunders 4-7) at Oakland


(Outman 3-2), 9:05 p.m.
LA. Dodgers (Kershaw 8-3) at L.A.
Angels (Weaver 9-4), 9:05 p.m.
San Diego (Luebke 1-2) at Seattle
(Fister 3-8), 10:10 p.m.
Sunday's Games
San Francisco at Detroit, 1:05 p.m.
Philadelphia atToronto, 1:07 p.m.
Cleveland at Cincinnati, 1:10 p.m.
N.Y.Yankees at N.Y. Mets, 1:10 p.m.
"Baltimore at Atlanta, 1:35 p.m.
St. Louis atTampa Bay, 1:40 p.m.
Boston at Houston, 2:05 p.m.
Milwaukee at Minnesota, 2:10 p.m.
Chicago White Sox at Chicago Cubs.
2:20 p.m.
Kansas City at Colorado, 3:10 p.m.
Arizona at Oakland, 4:05 p.m.
San Diego at Seattle, 4:10 p.m.
Florida atTexas, 8:05 p.m.
LA. Dodgers at LA.Angels, 8:10 p.m.

NL standings

East Division
W L Pct GB
Philadelphia 52 3.1 .627 -
Atlanta 47 35 .573 4h'
NewYork 41 40 .506 10
Washington 40 41 .494 II
Florida 36 45 .444 15
Central Division


Milwaukee
St. Louis
Pittsburgh
Cincinnati
Chicago
Houston


W L
44 38
44 38
41 39
42 40
34 48
29 53
West Division


W L Pct GB
San Francisco 46 36 .561 -
Arizona 44 38 .537 2
Colorado 39 42 .481 6'A
San Diego 37 45 .451 9
Los Angeles 36 46 .439 10
Thursday's Game
Chicago Cubs 5, San Francisco 2, 13
innings
Friday's Game
Pittsburgh atWashington, 7:05 p.m.
Today's Games
Pittsburgh (Ja.McDonald 5-4) at
Washington (Lannan 5-5), 3:35 p.m., Ist
game
Pittsburgh (Undecided) atWashington
(LHernandez 5-8), 7:05 p.m., 2nd game
Sunday's Game
Pittsburgh at Washington, 1:35 pIm.

BASKETBALL

WNBA schedule

Thursday's Games
Atlanta 87, NewYork 81
Minnesota 101,Tulsa 71
Friday's Games
San Antonio at New York (n)
Seattle at Connecticut (n)
Chicago at Phoenix (n)
Sunday's Game
Seattle at Washington, 4 p.m.

AUTO RACING

Race week '

NASCAR
Coke Zero 400
Site: Daytona Beach
Schedule: 'oday, race, 7:30 p.m. (TNT,
6:30-Il p.m.).
Track: Daytona International Speedway
(tri-oval, 2.5 miles). '
Race distance: 400 miles, 160 laps.

Coke Zero 400 lineup

I Mark Martin (5) Chevrolet 182.065
2Trevor Bayne (21) Ford 182.002
3 Cliht Bowyer (33) Chevrolet 181.624
4 Jeff Gordon (24) Chevrolet 181.583
5 David Ragan (6) Ford 181.320
6 Robby Gordon (7) Dodge 177.904
7 Dale Earnhardt Jr. (88) Chevrolet
181.240
8Andy Lally (71) Ford 181.039
9 JimmIe Johnson (48) Chevrolet 180.995
10 A J AIImendinger (43) Ford 180.948
II Paul Menard (27) Chevrolet 180.934
12 Ryan Newman (39) Chevrolet
180.894-
13 Jeff Burton (31) Chevrolet 180.781
14 Kasey Kahne (4) Toyota 180.752
15 Carl Edwards (9,9) Ford 180.748
16 Matt Kenseth (17) Ford 180.661
17 Greg Biffle (16) Ford. 180.581
18 Jamie McMurray (I) Chevrolet
180.571.
19 Tony Stewart (14) Chevrolet 180.549
20 Brian Vickers (83) Toyota 180.469
21 Landon Cassill (5I) Chevrolet
180.343
22 Kevin Conway (97) Toyota 180.310
23 David Reutimann (00) Toyota 180.296
24 Bobby Labonte (47) Toyota, 180.242
25 Kurt Busch (22) Dodge 180.173
26 Brad Keselowski (2) Dodge 180.040
27Travis Kvapil (38) Ford 179.856
28 Regan Smith (78) Chevrolet 179.853
29 Mike!Skinner (60) Toyota 179.784
30 Juan Pablo Montoya (42) Chevrolet
179.734
31 Kevin Harvick (29) Chevrolet
179.65 I
32 Casey Mears (13) Toyota 179.616
33 Michael McDowell (66) Toyota
179.605
34 Martin Truex Jr. (56) Toyota 79.433
35 Geoff Bodine (135) Chevrolet
179.261
36 Denny.Hamlin (1I) Toyota 179.229
37 Joey Logano (20) Toyota 179.083
38 Kyle Busch (18) Toyota 178.855
39 David Gilliland (34) Ford 178.646
40 Davy Blaney (36) Chevrolet 178.618
41 Terry Labonte (32) Ford 178.586
42 Marcos Ambrose (9) Ford 178.038
43 Mike Bliss (32) Dodge 177.904
44 Joe Nemechek (87) Toyota 179.087

TENNIS

Wimbledon

Friday
Singles
Men
Semifinals
Novak Djokovic (2), Serbia, def. jo-
Wilfried Tsonga (12), France, 7-6 (4), 6-2,
6-7 (9), 6-3.
Rafael Nadal (I), Spain, def. Andy
Murray (4), Britain, 5-7, 6-2, 6-2, 6-4.
Doubles


Men
Semifinals
Bob and Mike Bryan (I), United States,
def. Michael Llodra, France, and Nenad
Zimonjic (6), Serbia, 6-4, 6-4, 6-7 (8), 6-7
(4), 9-7.
Women
Semifinals
Kveta Peschke, Czech Republic, and
Katarina Srebotnik (2), Slovenia, def. Sania
Mirza, India, and Elena Vesnina (4), Russia,
6-3,6-1.
Mixed
Quarterfinals
Paul Hanley, Australia, and Hsleh
Su-wei, Taiwan, def. Rohan Bopanna and
Sania Mirza (6), India, 1-6, 6-2, 6-2.
Mahesh Bhupathi, India, and Elena
Vesnina (4), Russia, def. Jonathan Erlich
and Shahar Peer, Israel, 6-4, 6-1I.
Daniel Nestor, Canada, and Chan
Yung-ian (8), Taiwan, def. Leander Paes,
India, and Cara Black (14), Zimbabwe,
6-3,6-2.
Jurgen Melzer, Austria, and Iveta
Benesova (9), Czech Republic, def. Bob
Bryan and Liezel Huber (I), United States,
walkover.
Junior Singles
Boys'
Semifinals
Liam Broady (15), Britain, def. Jason
Kubler,Australia, 6-4, 6-3.
Luke Saville (16),Australia, def. Kaichi
Uchida,Japan, 6-4,6-I.
Girls
Quarterfinals
Ashleigh Barty (12), Australia, def.
Victoria Duval (16), United States, 6-3,
6-2.
Irina Khromacheva (3), Russia, def.
Eugenie Bouchard (5), Canada, 6-2, 6-2.
Indy De Vroome, Netherlands, def.
Yulia Putintseva (7), Russia, 6-3,6-1.
Caroline Garcia (2), France, def.
Montserrat Gonzalez (6), Paraguay, 6-1,
6-7 (2), 8-6.
Junior Doubles
Boys
Quarterfinals
Andres Artunedo Martinavarro and
Roberto Carballes Baena (3), Spain, def.
Sam Hutt and Joshua Ward-Hibbert,
Britain, 6-3, 6-2.
Oliver Golding, Britain, and Jiri
Vesely (I), Czech Republic, def.-Maxim
Dubarenco, Moldova, and Vladyslav
Manafov, Ukraine, 7-6 (5), 6-3.
Liam Broady, Britain,and Filip Horansky
(4), Slovakia, def. BenWagland and Andrew
Whittington, Australia, 6-3, 6-3.
George Morgan, Britain, and Mate
Pavic (2), Croatia, def.Axel Alvarez Llamas
and Orial Roca Batalla, Spain, 6-4,6-2.
Girls
Quarterfinals
Demi Schuurs, Netherlands, and Tang
Hao Chen, China, def. Kamila Pavelkova
and Tereza Smitkova, Czech Republic, 6-
3,6-1.
Irina Khromacheva. Russia, and
Barbora Krejcikova, Czech Republic, def.
Lauren Herring and Madison Keys, United
States, 6-3,4-6,6-3. "
Eugenic Bouchard, Canada, and Grace
Min (2), United States, def. Katharina
Lehnert and Stephanie Wagner, Germany,
6-1,6-3.
Beatriz Haddad Maia, Brazil, and Mayya
Katsitadze, Russia, def. Ashleigh Barty,
Australia, and Miho Kowase (4), Japan,
walkover.
Wheelchair Doubles
Women
Semifinals
Esther Vergeer and Sharon Walraven
(1), Netherlands, def. Marlolein Buis,
Netherlands, and Annick Sevenans,
Belgium, 6-1,6-7 (5), 6-2.
Jiske Griffloen and Aniek van Koot
(2), Netherlands, def. Lucy Shuker and
Jordanne Whiley, Britain, 6-1, 6-2.

SOCCER

Women's World Cup

GROUP PLAY
Friday
Japan 4, Mexico 0
England 2, New Zealand I
Today
North Korea vs. Sweden, 8 a.m.
United States vs. Colombia,
Noon.
Sunday
Australia vs. Equatorial Guinea, 8 a.m.
Brazil vs. Norway, 12; 15 p.m.
Tuesday
England vs.Japan, 12:15 p.m.
New Zealand vs. Mexico, 12:15 p.m.
France vs. Germany, 2:45 p.m.
Canada vs. Nigeria, 2:4,5 p.m.
Wednesday
Equatorial Guinea vs. Brazil, Noon
Australia vs. Norway, Noon
Sweden vs. United States,


Z:45 F
No


>.m.
Drth Korea vs. Colombia, 2:45 p.m.

CYCLING


Tour de France stages

July 2 Stage I: Passage du Gois
La Barre-de-Monts-Mont des Alouettes
Les Herbiers, flat, 191.5 kilometers (119
miles)
July 3 Stage 2: Les Essarts, team
time trial, 23 (14.3)
July 4 Stage 3: Olonne-sur-Mer-,
Redon, flat, 198 (123.0)
July 5 Stage 4: Lorient-Mur de
Bretagne, flat, 172.5 (107.2)
July 6- Stage 5: Carhaix-Cap Frehel,
flat, 164.5 (102.2)
July 7 Stage 6: Dinan-Lisieux, flat,
226.5 (140.7)
July 8 Stage 7: Le Mans-
Chateauroux, flat, 218 (135.5)
July 9 Stage 8: Aigurande-Super-
Besse Sancy, medium mountain, 189
(117.4).
July 0 Stage 9: ssoire-Saint-Flour.
medium mountain, 208 (129.2)
July II Rest day in Le Lioran
Cantal.
July 12-Stage I 0Aurillac-Carmaux,
flat, 158 (98.2)
July 13 Stage 11: Blaye-les-Mines-
Lavaur, flat, 167.5 (104.1)
July 14 Stage 12: Cugnaux-Luz-
Ardiden, high mountain, 211 (131.1)
July 15 Stage 13: Pau-Lourdes,
high mountain, 152.5 (94.8)
July 16 Stage 14: Saint-Gaudens-
Plateau de Beille, high mountain, 168.5
(104.7)


Nike re-signs Vick to



endorsement deal


Associated Press

NEW YORK Nike re-
signed Philadelphia Eagles
quarterback Michael Vick
to an endorsement deal
Friday, nearly four years
after dropping him amid
his legal troubles.
Nike, which signed Vick
as a rookie in 2001, ter-
minated his contract in
August 2007 after he filed
a plea agreement admitting
his involvement in a dog-
fighting ring. Vick spent 21
months in prison.
CNBC first reported
the deal. Terms were not
released.
"Michael acknowledges


his past mistakes," Nike
said in a statement. "We do
not condone those actions,
but we support the posi-
tive changes he has made
to better himself off the
field."
Vick was. voted The
Associated Press Comeback
Player of the -Year after
missing two seasons and
playing sparingly in 2009.
"Michael is committed
to working with Nike and
wants to utilize his platform
as a professional athlete to
have a positive impact on
our youth," said Andrew
Stroth, the Chicago-based
attorney who negotiated
the deal for Vick.


Nike and Vick initially
renewed their relationship
in 2009, when the company
announced it had "agreed
to supply product" to the
quarterback, who was not
under contract. Nike has
.similar agreements with
several athletes with whom
they don't have endorse-
ment deals.
Vick signed a one-year
contract with the Eagles
in March, a few weeks
after being designated as
the team's franchise play-
er. He led the Eagles to a
10-6 record and the NFC
East title after replacing
an injured Kevin iKolb in
Week 1.


Seminoles top receiver


opts for pro baseball


Associated Press


TALLAHASSEE -
Florida State's most reli-
able receiver is leaving
school to pursue a profes-
sional baseball career.
Taiwan Easterling, a
three-year starter for the
Semirioles who had at least
one catch in each of his
last 24 games, signed a


Lake City 8U

all-stars win

first game at

state tourney
From staff reports


Lake City's 8-under "A"
All-Stars won their first
game at the Babe Ruth/Cal
Ripken State Tournament
in West Palm Beach.
Lake City "A" beat
Longwood, 9-8, in extra
innings.
Lake City is scheduled
to play Lakeland Highlands
at noon today and will face
Orange fPark at 9 a.m.
Sunday..
Lake City "A" is in the
Blue A Division Bracket
The championship round
begins at 9 a.m. Monday.


1
5
8
12 I

13 I
14

15 -
16 I
18 I
20 I
21


ACROSS 42 Rained ice
45 Hot spring
Shore catch 48 RN helper
Pitate's swig 49 Rubens sub-
Tibetan monk jects
Peanut cover- 53 Close by (2
ng wds.)
omic Philips 56 "Typical Male"
Theyoften singer
clash 57 Misfortunes
- spumante 58 Narrow inlet
Not genuine 59 Black bird
Ring up 60 Quick look
s, to Fritz 61 Make an effort
Understand 62 Rough-cut


22 Charm, maybe
25 Hack
28 Wax makers
29-- 1 (speed of
sound)
33 Talisman
35 Jazzman
Blake
36 Studied hard
37 Roomy sleeve
38 Classroom
sound
39 Heck!
41 Dawn goddess


DOWN


professional contract with
the Chicago Cubs and is
foregoing his final year of
football eligibility.
Easterling caught 43
passes for 551 yards and
five touchdowns last sea-
son at Florida State, includ-
ing the game-clinching
score in the Seminoles 26-
17 Peach Bowl victory over
South Carolina. Easterling



Unscramble these four Jumbles,
one letter to each square,
to form four ordinary words. .

I KIPSM I


finished his career with 108
catches for 1,315 yards and
eight touchdowns. His 108
catches rank,18th all-time
at Florida State, one ahead
of former Seminole Jesse
Hester.
Easterling hit .296 for
the Seminoles this season
highlighted by a 4-for-4
performance in the NCAA
Regional tournament

THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME
by David L. Hoyt and Jeff Knurek


RTOTAH j-.
STHE SKUNK WOUL-9

CO. T=-ROM HER JOB
FMINUF | "u ___
Now arrange the circled letters
to form the surprise answer, as
suggested by the above cartoon.

Answer: W ff'
(Answers Monday)
Yesterday's Jumbles: DRAWN WHIRL DENTAL BASKET
I Apswer: The group's expanding waistlines created
more of this "BAND WIDTH"


Answer to Previous Puzzle.

BRA MOO1T SIRII
URAL AG UA TAG
TINT CRIBBAGE
ATTACHE LAGER
RIO TEN
R 0


WAIST POTENT
ADA METAL SURE
DOGE HIDE BOD
SOAPED VESTS
ROE VET
TEENS CASCADE
HAMSTERS HURL
ISM ALOE ERIK
SEA LIIPS DAP


1 Roughen from
cold
2 Go headlong
3 Choir member


4 Dell crepes
5 Matter, in law 10 Wry face
6 Diamond 11 Like some
decider mgrs.
7 Hunts rodents 17 NFL linemen
8 Aloha token 19 Fix firmly
9 In a tizzy 23 Household


member
24 Overconfident
25 Yokums' cre-
ator
26 Gen.
Halftrack
27 Clingy seed-
pods
30 Equal to the
task
31 Hi or bye
32,Chicks' moth-
ers
34 Tolerates
35 Gobbled up
37 Squeal on
39 Banish
40 "The Bathers"
painter
43 Attorney's
deg.
44 Kind of treat
45 Trim the
hedge
46 Big name in
soccer
47 Grease gun
target
50 Catastrophic
51 Sufficient, in
verse
52 Hewn
54 For shame!
55 Moonbeam


SCOREBOARD


Page Editor: Brandon Finley, 754-0420















Stewart vows to keep




wrecking drivers who block


By JENNA FRYER
Associated Press

DAYTONA BEACH -
Tony Stewart vowed Friday
to wreck any driver who
blocks him on the track,
even if that policing costs
him 'a spot in NASCAR's
championship race.
Stewart intentionally
spun Brian Vickers last
week at Sonoma because
he felt Vickers was block-
ing him during the race.
Vickers retaliated later by
wrecking Stewart, who had
a car capable of contending
for the win but wound up
39th.
It dropped him to 12th
in the Chase for the Sprint
Cup championship stand-
ings. .
"I am drawing a line, in
the sand and the next guy
that blocks me, he is going
to also suffer the same fate,"
Stewart said at Daytona
International Speedway.


He also upped the ante,
stating in a calm manner
that he'd wreck the next
driver enough to ensure
he won't be able to come
back and retaliate against
Stewart
"It doesn't matter who it
is," he said. "I'll make sure
that when I do it the next.
time that the guy doesn't
have the opportunity to
come back and wreck me."
His stance seems to be
excessive, especially since
Stewart is on the bubble of
making the Chase with only
10 races left to qualify for
the 12-driver field. Under
new qualifying rules, only
the top 10 drivers are guar-
anteed a Chase berth.
The other two spots
will go to drivers ranked
between 11th and 20th who
have the most wins. Stewart
is winless this season.
But racing smart to guar-
antee a Chase berth isn't on
his agenda.


ASSOCIATED PRESS
NASCAR racer Tony Stewart looks on in the grandstand at
the Red River Valley Speedway on June 22 in West Fargo,


"I'm going to stay the
course on it," Stewart said.
"I'm just to the point where
I'm fed up with some of the
way some of these guys
are racing each other. If we


miss the Chase because of
it, so be it. That's not what
the team is going to want
to hear. That's not what our
sponsors are going to want
to hear, but so be it.


"It is what it is. There's
42 guys out there, and they
know how I race, they know
what I expect And I don't
race them that way, I don't
block guys and I'm not
going to block guys. But if
they block me, they will suf-
fer the consequences."
Stewart is often vocal
about on-track etiquette
and an unspoken code of
conduct, which he said
he learned early in his
NASCAR career from vet-
erans who made it clear
how things worked in this
series.
But the new "Boys, have
at it," policy, and a hunger
for drama and rivalries has
made it impossible to teach
young drivers the same les-
sons.
"When I came in here,
I thought I was going to
change how things worked,
too, and Dale. (Earnhardt)
Sr. taught me how to do it,
Dale Jarrett, Rusty Wallace,


my teammate Bobby
Labonte taught me, had
to grab me and shake me
beside a trailer one day and
say, 'Listen, you've got to
understand,"' Stewart said.
"Nothing like that hap-
pens in this day and age.
It's so glamorized when
two people do something
on the race track, itfs made
to be such a soap opera,
the whole point why it hap-
pened in the first place isn't
getting resolved."
Stewart and Vickers
have talked since Sunday,
and disagree on the root of
the issue. Vickers denies
he was blocking,, but
Stewart insists he was.
They are in agreement that
Vickers had every right to
retaliate.
"I told him, of all people,
I didn't want it to be you,"
Stewart said. "But I told
him I had drawn a line in
the sand.with the guys that
were doing it"


NBA: Lockout on for hoopsters


Continued From'Page 11
teams were prohibited
from having any contact
with their players.
The lockout comes
exactly one year after one
of the NBA's most antici-
pated days in recent years,
when LeBron James,
Dwyane Wade and the rest
of the celebrated class of
2010 became free agents.
That free agency bonan-
za highlight by the
James, Wade, Chris Bosh
trio in Miami got the
league started on a season
where ticket and merchan-
'dise sales, ratings and buzz
were all up. That success
contradicted the owners'
argument that the system
was broken beyond repair,
but it also demonstrated
why they wanted changes,
with Stern saying owners
feel pressured to spend as
much as possible to prove
their commitment to win-
ning to fans;
LeBron's move to Miami
and Dirk Nowitzki's title in
Dallas couldn't hide a sim-
ple fact Owners insisted
they were losing money,
perhaps $300 million this
season, and weren't inter-
ested in subsidizing a sys-
tem they felt guaranteed
they'd keep losing more.


The last lockout reduced
the 1998-99 season to just
a 50-game schedule, the
only time the NBA missed
games for a work stop-
page.
"I think we're either
going to not miss any,
games or we're going to
miss the whole season,"
said Cleveland Cavaliers
veteran forward Antawn
Jamison, a rookie during
the last NBA lockout.
But union chief Billy
Hunter Hunter said it's
too early to be concerned
about that.
"Obviously, the clock is
now running with regard
to whether or not there
will or will be a loss of
games," Hunter said. "I'm
hoping that over the next
month or so that there will
be sort of a softening on
their side and maybe we
have to soften our position
as well."
Hunter said he hopes the
two sides will meet again
in the next two weeks,
after the union has looked
at some additional docu-
meits it requested.
The players' association
seems unlikely, at least for
now, to follow the NFLPA's
model by decertifying


and taking the battle into
the court system, instead
choosing to continue nego-
tiations. Hunter said last
week he felt owners believe
the 8th U.S. Circuit Court of
Appeals in St. Louis, which
is debating the legality
of the NFL's lockout, will
uphold employers' rights
to impose lockouts.
Despite a three-hour
meeting Thursday and a
final proposal from the
players which NBA lead-
ers said would have raised
average player salaries to
$7 million in the sixth year
of the deal the sides
could not close the enor-
mous gulf between their
positions.
'The problem is that
there's such agap in terms
of the numbers, where they
are and where we are, and
we just can't find any way
to bridge that gap," union
chief Billy Hunter said.
Owners want to reduce
the players' guarantee
of 57 percent of basket-
ball revenue and weren't
moved by the players' offer
to drop it to 54.3 percent
- though players said that
would have cut their sala-
ries by $500 million over
five years.


BRANDON FINLEY/Lake City Reporter
Lake City Middle School's Brandon Little works out with the Falcons on Thursday.


FALCONS: Working hard in summer


Continued From Page 11

The Falcons weren't able
to put in much of the new
passing game during the
spring, but Jennings said
it's something he plans to
have in by the time" the
season kicks off against
Camden. County on Aug.
29.
"Right now, we didn't put
in a lot of the passing game
during the spring," he said.
"We've got about three or
four different plays, but we
can run it out of five or six
formations."


It's something that
plagued the Falcons dur-
ing the spring last year
as well. By the time the
season was over, Jennings
said that Lake City had
upwards of 50 plays.
One of the challenges
Jennings will have to deal
with is replacing most of
last year's team.
"We lost almost the
entire team," he said.
"Jake Thomas and Marcus
Zieglar are pretty much the
only returning starters."


Still, he feels that he may
have players ready to step
in and compete.
"The group we have
coming in has a lot of
speed," he said.
And the Falcons contin-
ue to .work on that speed
during the summer.
"We're probably the
only middle school in the
state using a speed track to
work on fast-twitch muscle
fibers," he said.
Jennings hopes that
speed pays off in the fall.


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Spain's Rafael Nadal celebrates defeating Britain's Andy Murray in the men's semifinal match
at the All England Lawn Tennis Championships at Wimbledon on Friday.


TENNIS: Nadal, Djokovic in finals


Continued From Page 1B

No. 1.
."Both of them are incred-
ibly consistent with their
success and so dominant
the last couple years. They
don't give you a lot of chanc-
es to become No. 1," said
the 24-year-old Djokovic,
beaten in last year's U.S.
Open final by Nadal. "So I
guess you need to.lose only
one match in seven months
to get there. If you can do
that, then well done."
Yes, Djokovic deserves
to hear a "Well done!" or
two for his surge, which
he says stems in part from
the confidence and pride
he gained while leading
Serbia to its first Davis Cup
title in December. His two
wins against France during
the final series at Belgrade
started a 43-match streak
that ended with a semifi-
nal loss to Federer at the
French Open a month ago.
Otherwise, Djokovic has
been perfect. He won the
first seven tournaments he
entered this year includ-
ing the Australian Open in
January and beat Nadal
in four finals.
"His total game is real-
ly complete," Nadal said.
"Good serve, very good
movements. ... His eyes
are very fast, and he can
go inside the court very
easy playing very difficult
shots."
The degree of diffi-
culty was extremely high
in Friday's first semifinal,
when Djokovic and Tsonga
put on quite a display.
The highlight-reel points
were numerous, starting
in the sixth game, when
Tsonga dove to his right
for a forehand volley that
Djokovic stretched to
volley back. Somehow,
Tsonga sprang up in time
to knock home a volley win-


ner, drawing a smile and
applause from Djokovic.
Tsonga walked 'toward
the Royal Box where
past Wimbledon champi-
ons Bjorn Borg and Goran
Ivanisevic were among the
guests and raised his
arms overhead, basking in
the raucous applause.
At 1-1 in the. third set,
both players wound up on
the turf, with Tsonga diving
to his left for a backhand
volley, Djokovic sprawling
as he stretched for a shot,
and Tsonga then launching
himself back to his right for
another tumble, only to see
his last shot land long.
Four games later, they
were at it again, with both!
men ending up face-down
on the grass.
"This is the only surface
you can really dive," Tsonga
observed, "because on the
others, if you dive, you go
directly to the hospital."
In the end, the outcome
hinged on Djokovic's
steadiness he made
only 13 unforced errors, 16
fewer than Tsonga and a
remarkable ability to extend
points, often sliding as if
there were clay underfoot,
his legs nearly doing the
splits.
"I can beat everybody
today, but not Djokovic,"
said Tsonga, who upset six-
time champion Federer in
the quarterfinals, "because
he just played unbelievable.
He was everywhere."
On Wednesday, Tsonga
became the first man to
overcome a two-set deficit
against Federer in a Grand
Slam match, and he dug
himself that same hole
against Djokovic. But when
Tsonga saved two match
points with an overhead
winner, then a 123 mph ace
- en route to winning the


third-set tiebreaker, sud-
denly this match no longer
seemed so lopsided.
"I tried to talk to myself
on the changeover between
sets," Djokovic would say
later, "and tried to focus
and be calm and hold my
emotions, not allow him to
come back."
Djokovic is quite an
excitable character, one
who gained attention a few
years back with his spot-
on impersonations of top
tennis players YouTube
is filled with clips of him
lampooning Nadal and oth-
ers and whose temper
occasionally flares, such as
when he mangled a rack-
et by whacking it on the
ground three times during
a match last week.
He also used to run into
problems in the latter stag-
es of majors, either because
of a dip in play or quitting
because of injuries or aller-
gy problems, and was 0-2
in Wimbledon semifinals
before Friday.
But against Tsonga, he
collected himself at the
start of the fourth set, tak-
ing the first eight points
and a 2-0 lead with a service
hold, then break.
Soon enough, Djokovic
was closing out the victory
with a 118 mph service win-
ner the serve is the part
of Djokovic's game that's
improved the most this
year then reveling in the
moment
"When I finished the
match, I didn't know how
to show my emotions. I was
really happy. This is one
of those moments where
you can't describe it with
the words," Djokovic said.
"You remember all your
career, all your childhood,
everything you worked
for."


LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS SATURDAY, JULY 2, 2011


Page Editor: Brandon Finley, 754-0420










LAKE CITY REPORTER ADVICE & COMICS SATURDAY, JULY 2, 2011


DILBERT
LET'S BEGIN THE
MEETING, BUT BE
AWARE THAT I AM
DOCUMENTING ALL
OF YOUR BULLYING
BEHAVIOR.


BABY BLUES


BLONDIE


BEETLE BAILEY


CAN YOU REPEAT THE
PART AFTER YOU
IMPLIED THAT I'M A
DELUSIONAL WITCH?


HAGARTHE HORRIBLE


DEAR ABBY


Non-drinker doesn't want

a party-pooper reputation


DEAR ABBY: I'm a 22-
year-old senior in college.
Much of college social life
revolves around alcohol. I
have no problem drinking
responsibly, but I take medi-
cation that prohibits me from
imbibing alcohol.
Strangers and friends
often ask, "Why aren't you
drinking?" They -either
assume it's for religious rea-
sons or I'm uptight Saying
I'm on meds seems like a bit
of a buzz-kill.
This is particularly trouble-
some when rm invited "out
for drinks" at a bar. I never
know what to order or say. I
hate feeling like Im obligated
to drink, but I don't want to
pass on events because of the
awkward questions.
What's a quick reply I
can give to those who ask
why I don't drink? And
how can I go out for drinks
without actually drinking? -
- STILL SOCIABLE AT
STANFORD
DEAR STILL
SOCIABLE: Order a "vir-
gin" whatever you're being
offered. There are many rea-
sons why people don't drink.
Among them: They don't
like the taste, they don't like
the buzz, the empty calories,
they're allergic, they don't
want to risk a traffic viola-
tion with alcohol in their sys-
tem, or they never started
drinking in the first place.
To imbibe or not is a per-


Abigail Van Buren
www.dearobby.comn
sonal choice. Its OK to be
different And if you're chal-
lenged, its perfectly fine to
just say, "No thanks!"
DEAR ABBY: We live in
a very nice neighborhood
frequented by walkers and
runners. For the second
time in just a few months,
several women who regular-
ly walk past our home have
approached me at neighbor-
hood eventstoaskaboutitems
I can only think were found in
our recycling bin. Specifically,
how did I like a particular
brand of pasta sauce, or would
I i~ecommend that bottle of
chardonnay?
Abby, our recycling
bins have lids and our bin
is never left open, which
means these women must
be peeking inside to check
out our eating and drinking
habits. I am now so self-con-
scious about our recycling I
have begun burying bottles
and cans under the news-
paper and watching the bin
to catch them in the act My
husband suggested leaving a
nasty note on top of our recy-
clables. Any suggestions? -


- FOR OUR EYES ONLY
IN MILWAUKEE
DEAR EYES ONLY:
Once garbage is put out
for collection it is no longer
private property. A certain
celebrity was embarrassed
to learn this firsthand when
some paparazzi rooted
through her garbage and dis-
covered to their glee some
empty containers of meds to
treat a private health matter.
It's possible the walkers
are just trying to be friendly
and strike up a conversa-
tion. But if your suspicions
are correct, there are several
ways to handle the situation.
The first would be to delay
putting out your recyclables
until just before they are to
be collected. Another would
be to visit a novelty shop and
pick up some fake hands or
feet or a large rubber rat
- and place them strategi-
cally in one of your bins. Or,
affix "sweet" Post-It notes to
your jars and bottles read-
ing, 'This was great!" or,
"Don't waste your money..."
If that doesn't discour-
age them from inventory-
ing your trash, then there's
always the direct approach.
Respond with, 'Why do you
ask?" And when they tell
you, let them know how you
feel about their answer.
E Write Dear Abby at
www.DearAbby.com or
P.O. Box 69440, Los
Angeles, CA 90069.


HOROSCOPES


ZITS


GARFIELD


B.C.


FRANK & ERNEST


FOR BETTER ORWORSE
MY BOTHER-I-RW IS EVERY NIGHT H-E
R GKEFrrGUy,--ER .- PRFcrs -TRFT
BUTHE's f lNNI- rUMFE--
TO

ARIES (March 21-April
19): Keep a close eye on
your valuables. Take care
of any pressing domestic
responsibilities you have to
friends and family members.
Once you have cleared your
to-do list, you can focus on
socializing with the people
you enjoy being with most

TAURUS (April 20-
May 20): Talk to the
experts and try new things.
It's important to expand
your knowledge and stay
current with trends and
technology if you want to
remain marketable. Don't
fight what's coming, when
embracing the future is the
way to go. ****
GEMINI (May 21-
June 20): The emotional
intensity that others bring
to the table may be unnerv-
ing if you aren't prepared
to walk away or deal with
the past in order to move
forward. Change is upon
you. Accept the inevitable.

CANCER (June 21-
July 22): Avoid emotional
situations that encourage
arguments and disrupt
your plans. Take an inno-
vative approach and you
will impress someone you
can learn from. Think and
respond in a practical and
timely manner. ***
LEO (July 23-Aug. 22):
You have some fabulous
ideas that you must share


THE LAST WORD
Eugenia Last

with people who can con-
tribute. An opportunity to
incorporate something you
have to offer with a group
or company you have been
involved with will transpire
into a prosperous venture.

VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept.
22): Take action but don't
put up with anyone trying
to take something away
from you or blaming you
for something you didn't do.
Opportunity is apparent but
so is jealousy. You will come
up with the best solution,
so follow your own ideas.

LIBRA (Sept 23-Oct.
22): Follow your heart and
your intuition when it comes
to love and friendships.
Travel plans should be made
but stick to destinations that
can help you out profession-
ally. Mixing business with
pleasure can bring interest-
ing results with greater pos-
sibilities. **
SCORPIO (Oct. 23-
Nov. 21): Put your emo-
tions on the back burner
and you will find it much
easier to make a personal
decision. Creating an inter-
esting space at home will
inspire and motivate you to
follow through with a project
you left unfinished. Updates
to your technology will
make your plans possible.


SAGITTARIUS (Nov.
22-Dec. 21): Put more into
yourhome, your investments
and your future. .There is
money to be made if you
maintain assets and upgrade
whatever you have that can
contribute to your overall
worth. A change to your cur-
rent situation at home will be
beneficial. *****
CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-
Jan. 19): Don't shove or
you will meet with an equal
and opposite reaction from
someone you least expect.
Use diplomacy. Busy your-
self with home improvement
or family projects that will
enhance your relationships
as well as your residence.

AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-
Feb. 18): Getting to know
someone better or making
a commitment to someone
who can contribute to your
world and make your life
better will manifest through
a social encounter. Love is
highlighted but don't over-
spend trying to impress
someone. ***
PISCES (Feb. 19-
March 20): Honesty will be
required if you want to make
progress. Help is available
but only if you are prepared
to admit your mistakes and
make amends with someone
you need in your corner.
Don't let a poor relation-
ship with someone hold you
back. ***


CELEBRITY CIPHER

by Luis Campos
Celebrity Cipher cryptograms are created from quotations by famous people, past and present.
Each letter in the cipher stands for another.
Today's clue: S equals V
"LE LA N EZFXFCPVIA NB E VM
SLVHFCBF EV GFKLC NCREWLCK... L
ALXTHR AULT DWNE AWVIHP GF EWF
GFKLCCLCK." ZNLCFZ XNZLN ZLHUF

PREVIOUS SOLUTION: "Horrifying as it was to crack up in the public eye, it
made me look at myself and fix it." Margot Kidder
(c) 2011 by NEA, Inc. 7-2


CLASSIC PEANUTS


E
8 UM... I'M NOT EVEN
r CLOSE TO BEING A
BULLY, BUT NOW YOUR
CONFIRMATION BIAS
J WILL MAKE EVERYTHING
I SAY SOUND LIKE
BULLYING TO YOU.
) ,H


Page Editor: Emogene Graham, 754-0415












Classified Department: 755-5440


LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED SATURDAY, JULY 2, 2011

Lake City Reporter





CLASSIFIED


ADvantage


Take ADvantage of the
Reporter Classifieds!

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o4 n n W H d a ysd tEch ad ditoal |
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personal merchandise totalling $500 or less.
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Rate applies to pvate Individuals selling
personal merchandise totalling 5500 or les.
Each team must Include a pce. a
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One Item per ad 16
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One Item per ad 2c37 ad
4 lines* 6 days n cd a io.as
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personal merchandise totalling $2,500 or les.
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One Item per ad $274 0
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Rate applies to private Individuals sailing
personal mrchandlas totalling $4,000 or s.
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One item per ad 3J i0 \
4 lines 6 daysEach add$tioan
Rate applies to private lIndividuals selling
personal merchandise totallng $60000 or ess.
Each Item must Include a price
Th's is a nonrss randl ratr.


0 7 I 100 Job
,41 $ A7 50 100 Opportunities


l I Hsa lEa I
Inllades26Sis Wahaddionlrtlm$,5


Limited to service type advertis-
ing only.
4 lines, one month....$92.00
$10.80 each additional line
Includes an additional $2.00 per
ad for each Wednesday insertion.



You can call us at 755-5440,
Monday through Friday from 8:00
a.m. tb 5:00 p.m.
Some people prefer to place their
classified ads in person, and some
ad categories will require'prepay-
ment. Our office is locatediat 180
East Duval Street.
You can also fax or email your ad
copy to the Reporter.
SFAX: 386-752-9400 Please
direct your copy to the Classified
Department.
EMAIL: classifieds@lakecityre-
porter.com





AdistoAppear: Callby: Fax/Emallby:
Tuesday Mon.,10:00am: Mon., 9:00a.m.
Wednesday Mon.,10:00a.m. Mon.,9:00a.m.
Thursday Wed., 10:00 am. Wed., 9:00 am.
Friday Tiurs.,10:00am. urs.,9:00 a.m.
Saturday Fri., 10:00am. Fri., 9:00 a.m
Sunday Fri.,10:00a.m. Fri.,9:00a.m.
These deadlines are subject to change without notice.




Ad Errors- Please read your ad
on the first day of publication.
We accept responsibility for only
the first incorrect insertion, and
only the charge for the ad space
in error. Please call 755-5440
immediately for prompt correc-
tion and billing adjustments.
Cancellations- Normal advertising
deadlines apply for cancellation.
Billing Inquiries- Call 755-5440.
Should further information be
required regarding payments or
credit limits, your call will be trans-
ferred to the accounting depart-
ment.


-Advertising copy is subject to
approval by the Publisher who
reserves the right to edit, reject,
or classify all advertisements under
appropriate headings. Copy should
be checked for errors by the
advertiser on the first day of pub-
lication. Credit for published errors
will be allowed for the first insertion
for that portion of the advertisement
which was incorrect. Further, the
Publisher shall not be liable for any
omission of advertisements ordered
to be published, nor for any general,
special or consequential damages.
Advertising language must comply
with Federal, State or local laws
regarding the prohibition of discrimi-
nation in employment, housing and
public accommodations. Standard
abbreviations are acceptable; how-
ever, the first word of each ad may
not be abbreviated.

In Print and Online
www.lalecityreporter.com


05526387
Local company seeking
experienced,
"Transportation/.
Logistic Coordinator"
Minimum qualifications:
v High School diploma
v 2 years experience
v PC Knowledge Microsoft
and Web based TMS/WMS
systems
v Routing/Dispatch
Fax resume to: 386-438-2080
4
Associate Reps
SUMMER WORK/GREAT PAY
Immediate FT/PT openings,
Customer sales/service,
No exp needed, conditions,
Apply Now all ages 17+
(386) 269-0883
Contracted Swift Transportation
owner operated on dedicated
account in Lake City, FL looking
for qualified drivers. Drivers must
have Class A lic and clean MVR.
We run team trucks only. No solo
positions available.
Contact Fred at (404)671-6362 or
Otis at 904-327-6886
MANAGEMENT POSITION
available at the CATO Store in
Live Oak, FL. Experience necessa-
ry. Apply within at Suwannee Pla-
za on Hwy 129 Live Oak.
Mobile Home Sales!
Experienced Salesperson
Needed to sell the South's
#1 rated product! Call Kevin
386-344-3975

Retired, widower with
Auto and Full size house
needs domestic help.
Call 386-719-8872

Sales Position available for moti-
vated individual Rountree -Moore
Toyota, Great benefits, paid train-
ing/vacation. Exp. a plus but not
necessary. Call Anthony Cosentino
386-623-7442


Legal

Public Auction to be held
July 30, 2011 at 8AM at
Ozzie's Towing & Auto, 2492 SE
Baya Ave. Lake City FL, 32025.
(386)719-5608
Following Vin Numbers:
96 Saturn
Vin # 1G8ZH1272TZ112857
72 Ford
Vin# F10GLP14577
03 Ford ,
Vin# 1FMZU84W13UA12076
90 Holiday
Vin# 46GEGD041XL2041929
05526381
July 2, 2011
Registration of Fictitious Names
We the undersigned, being duly
sworn, do hereby declare under oath
that the names of all persons interest-
ed in the business or profession car-
ried on under the name of H&H
SANDBLASTING., at 352 SW
TOMMY LITES ST., LAKE CITY,
FL., 32024

Contact Phone Number: 386-752-
7483 and the extent of the interest of
each, is as follows:
Name: CIMARON HOLT
Extent of Interest: 100%
by:/s/ Cimaron Holt
STATE OF FLORIDA
COUNTY OF COLUMBIA
Sworn to and subscribed before me
this 30th day of June, A.D. 2011.
by:/s/ KATHLEEN A. RIOTTO
05526405
July 2, 2011


010 Announcements

Know Your surroundings and the
Danger. Don't think you know it
all. If you do, You're making a
serious mistake. Martin Rivero


020 Lost & Found
FOUND SMALL brown & white
dog on 245A. 6/26/11. Injured.
Call 386-754-9297
If no answer leave message.


KITTENS. 4 white and 1 long
haired black. Had 1st shots. 10
weeks old. Cute & spunky!
$25.00. ea. 386-961-8909
PUBLISHER'S NOTE
Florida Law 828.29 requires dogs
and cats being sold to be at least 8
weeks old and have a health
certificate from a licensed
veterinarian documenting.they
have mandatory shots and are
free from intestinal and external
parasites. Many species of wild-
life must be licensed by Florida
Fish and Wildlife. If you are
unsure, contact the local
office for information.

30 Livestock &
3 Supplies

Black Angus Cows & Heifers
Prices Vary
Registered & Commercial
386-719-4802


361 Farm Equipment
84 Ford 4610 Tractor.
2WD, Solid
2005 motor,$7,500. OBO
386-867-0005


407 Computers
Compaq Computer, Many extras.
Complete Computer
$80.00
386-755-9984 or 386-292-2170

408 Furniture

KING SIZE BED
$100.00
755-9333 or
755-7773
Recliner Sofa
$75.00
755-9333 or
755-7773


420 Wanted to Buy

K&H TIMBER
We Buy Pine Hardwood &
Cypress. Large or small tracts.
Call 386-961-1961.

Wanted Junk Cars, Trucks, Vans.
$250 & up CASH! Free Pick Up!
NO title needed !386-878-9260
After 5pm 386- 752-3648.


430 Garage Sales
After the Move sale. Fri & Sat
7-12. 9/10th mi on Turner Rd on
left. Look for signs. Closet organ-
izer, table & chairs, clothing, misc.
BYRDS STORE CR 49. Fri.
Sat.& Sun, (8-5). 247-240R CR
49R, 247 Beachville. CR 49N, 252
Pinemount Rd CR 49L. Lots of
antiques, new items inside, outside
if no Rain watch for signs.


MOVING SALE Saturday only.
7-noon. 794 E. Duval St.
Household, lawn mowers (riding
& push). & much more!


110n Sales
SEmployment
Seabreeze Food Service
Experienced food service Rep.
Send Resume to:
paulcucinella@yahoo.com

120 Medical
Employment

05526385
Dietary Aide/Server, full time.
Experienced preferred.
Must be able to work evenings
and weekends.
Please apply Baya Pointe
Nursing & Rehabilitation
Center, 587 SE Ermine
Ave., Lake City, Fl 32025
EOE/DFWP

05526394
Medical Assistant
Requirements: HS diploma,
Phlebotomy Certification.
w/ 1 year exp.
Medical Assistant or equivalent
certification preferred
ONLY Qualified candidates
may send resumes to:
jpapesh@cancercarenorthflori-
da.com

Busy family practice looking for a
full-time Nurse Practitioner. Send
reply to Box 05063, C/O The Lake
City Reporter, P.O. Box 1709,
Lake City, FL, 32056


230 Tutoring
Disappointed with your child's
FCat scores? Or just want to give
Your child a head start for next
year? We can help, Father and son
Math tutoring with over 5 years'
experience in teaching. Helping
students with math from basic
math to calculus. Effective
tutoring with reasonable rates. call
497-3344 ask for Doug or Walt

240 Schools &
240 Education

04544843
Interested in a Medical Career?
Express Training offers
courses for beginners & exp
Nursing Assistant, $479
next class-07/11/10

Phlebotomy national certifica-
tion, $800 next class-07/11/11

Continuing education
Fees incl. books, supplies, exam
fees. Call 386-755-4401 or
expresstrainingservices.com



310 Pets & Supplies
4 beautiful black & white. 9 wk
old kittens w/crystal emerald
green eyes. Litter box trained.
To good homes. 386-755-1794
$ AKC Lab Puppies. Black & g6ld
females. 9 weeks old. All papers
and shots provided great Pedigree.
$450. ea. Jennifer 386-438-0417
FREE KITTENS
To good home
Adorable
Call 386-755-8560


710 Unfurnished Apt.
710 For Rent

Furnished'or unfurnished
Townhomes on the golf course.
$750. mo. plus security. Includes
water. 386-752-9626
NICE APT Downtown. Remod-
eled 1 bedroom. Kitchen, dining,
livingroom. $450. mo plus sec.
386-362-8075 or 386-754-2951








The Lakes Apts. Studios & 1Br's
from $135/wk. Util. & cable incl.,
Sec 8 vouchers accepted, monthly
rates avail Call 386-752-2741
Updated apartments w/tile floors
& fresh paint. Excellent location.
From $450. + sec.
Call Michelle 386-752-9626

720 Furnished Apts.
S For Rent
lbr Apt. incl. water, elec, &
cable. $595. mo. Good area.
References & sec. req'd.
No pets. 386-719-4808
Rooms for Rent. Hillcrest, Sands,
Columbia. All furnished. Electric,
cable, fridge, microwave. Weekly
or monthly rates. 1 person $135,
2 persons $150. weekly
386-752-5808

S Unfurnished
730 Home For Rent
lbr/1.5ba Country Cottage, Cathe-
dral ceilings, brick fireplace, wash-
er/dryer,1 ac fenced, private, some
.pets, lease. 1st, last, sec, ref. Lake
City area $650mo. 352-494-1989
lbr/lba Free ele. Utilities incl. 4mi
S. Lake City. $300dep. $375mo.
386-590-0642 or 386-867-1833
www.suwanneevalleyproperties.com,


2 bedroom 1 bath on
5 acres. $700.00 per month.
First, last and security.
386-590-5333


Moving sale. Fri/Sat. 6:30 ? Off
Pinemount, left on Barwick, Rt on
Parker, left on Leonard, Rt. on
Charlie. Look for signs. Furn., rid-
ing lawnmower, wire rolls. Misc.
PUBLISHER'S NOTE
All Yard Sale Ads
.Must be Pre-Paid.


440 Miscellaneous
Stop gnat & Mosquito bites! Buy
Swamp Gator All natural insect re-
pellent. Family safe. Use head to
toe. Available at The Home Depot.
Summer Barbecue Special
Tow Behind
Grill/Smoker, $1,250 OBO.
386-719-4802
Womens clothing, young mens
clothing, American Eagle &
Holister jeans & shirts. Toys, 2
bird cages, boys bicycle, RCA TV
set. Purses, New coffee maker.
Have it all for $75. 752-18'11

63n Mobile Homes
630 for Rent
2&3 BR MH. $395 $650. mo.
plus deposit. Water & sewer fur-
nished. Cannon Creek MHP
386-752-6422
2/2 Units, clean, well maintained,
nice safe park setting, 2 miles to
downtown Lake City, $575 month
+ $575 sec dep, 386-984-8448
13th Month FREE!!
2br /2ba SWMH $475. mo; also
Resid'l RV lots for rent between
Lake City & G'ville. Access to I-
75 & 441 (352)317-1326 for terms
3/2 S of Lake City, (Branford area)
$575 month plus security
386-590-0642 or 386-867-1833
www.suwanneevalleyproperties.com
DWMH for Rent. 3br/2ba
Handicapped accessible.
$650. mo. $500. Dep. No Pets.
386-984-9634. ask for Amber.
Mobile Homes for rent in
White Springs, Lake City & Ft.
White Contact 386-623-3404
or 386-365-1919
Nice clean 2&3 bdrm, Five Points,
NO PETS,
also 3 bd on the
Westside, 386-961-1482
X-Clean 2/2 SW, 8 mi NW of VA.
Clean acre lot, nice area. $500. mo
+ dep No dogs Non-smoking
environment.386-961-9181

640 Mobile Homes
S for Sale
NEW D/W Reduced Thousands.
3br/2ba set, delivery, A/C
skirting, steps. $39,900..,
Call Ken (386)754-8844
AS IS, WHERE IS...32X80, 4/2,
LR/Den, needs carpet, paint, 2400
sqft. has metal roof, vinyl siding.
$31,000. Randy 386-754-0198
FIRE YOUR LANDLORD
TO OWN WHAT YOUR
THROWING AWAY IN RENT.
CALL MIKE 386-754-8844-
NEW 32X70 4/3. 2K sqft+. L/R,
DenSidex side, glasstop range,
D/W. Del, set, Steps, A/C, skirt-
ing. $59,900. Ken (386)754-8844
OWNER FINANCE 40% Down
w/land Equity or CASH on any
new or used singlewide or Double-
wide. Randy 386-754-0198
The Economy has forced
me to cut the price on my
3 bedroom, 2 bath home to
$38K (352)-870-5983

650 Mobile Home
650 & Land
Century 21/The Darby Rogers Co.
DWMH on 5 ac. 3br/2ba Back 2
ac. fenced. Owners motivated.
Debbie Myles 386-719-1224
MLS# 75830 $99,900

710 Unfurnished Apt.
710 For Rent

04545256
SPRING HILL VILLAGE
Excellent High Springs location.
1, 2 & 3 bedroom floor-plans;
some with garages..
Call 386-454-1469
or visit our website: .
www.springhillvillage.net







IBR APT.
Downtown Location, Clean.
$450 mo, plus Security.
NO PETS. Call 386-755-3456

2BR/1.5BA w/garage
5 minutes from VA hospital.
Call for details.
.386-755-4590 or 365-5150

A Landlord You Can Love!
2 br Apts $575. & up + sec. Great
area. CH/A washer/dryer hookups.
386-758-9351/352-208-2421


PUBLISHER'S NOTE
All real estate advertising in this
newspaper is subject to the fair
housing act which makes it illegal
to advertise "any preference,
limitation, or discrimination based
on race, color, religion, sex,
disability, familial status or nation-
al origin; or any intention to make
such preference, limitation or
discrimination." Familial status
includes children under the age of
18 living with parents or legal
custodians, pregnant women and
people securing custody of chil-
dren under the age of 18. This
newspaper will not knowingly
accept any advertising for real es-
tate which is in violation of the
law. Our readers are hereby in-
formed that all dwellings adver-
tised in this newspaper are availa-
ble on an equal opportunity basis.
To complain of discrimination call
HUD toll free at 1-800-669-9777,
the toll free
telephone number to the hearing
impaired is 1-800-927-9275.


810 Home for Sale
3/2 1056 sqft Brick home in town.
Fenced back yard w/12x12 work-
shop Just Reduced! $79,900
MLS# 77414 Call 386-243-8227
R.E.O.Realty Group, Inc
HANDYMAN SPECIAL
2br/1.5ba. Half ac fenced lot
w/shed. Appraised at $68,000.
Asking $55,000. (352)335-8330


810 Home for Sale
4/2 on 10 ac. in Bell. Over 2200
sqft in a country setting. 10x20
frame shade. Bring offers! $89,000
MLS 76582 Brittany Stoeckert
Results Realty 386-397-3473
4/2 with 1000 sq ft workshop,
fenced yard, 2 car garage, Fairly
new roof & HVAC MLS#77602,
Bring Offers! $169,900,
R.E.O. Realty Group 243-8227
41br brick on .51 ac. corer lot. For-
mal dining and a large open floor
plan. Brick patio. $159,888
MLS 76763 Brittany Stoeckert
Results Realty 386-397-3473
Brick 3/1 family home, 4.43 acres.
w/metal roof. MLS# 77415
Short sale acceptance w/lenders
approval. $99,000. 386-243-8227
R.E.O. Realty Group, Inc
Century 21/The Darby Rogers Co.
3br/j. Updated kitchen, bath. Open
living room wall classic'& elegant
light fixtures. 386-752-6575
MLS# 78099 $79,900
Century 21/The Darby Rogers Co.
3/2 Iin Spring Estates. 20x40
workshop. Screened back porch &
all appliances. Kayla Carbono
*623-9650 MLS# 73787 $99,900
Century 21/The Darby Rogers Co.
Picadilly Park All brick 3/2, comer
lot w/inground pool. Screen porch
& fenced yard. Jessica Sheelly
288-2403 MLS# 73787 $115,900
Century 21/The Darby Rogers Co.
Eastside Village 2br/2ba. Extra Ig.
Master suite. Florida room & 2
sheds. Ginny Smith 386-623-4277
623-4277 MLS# 70160 $79,900
Century 21/The Darby Rogers Co.
Laurel Lake S/D. 4br/2ba w/ ap-
prox. 2275 sqft. Fenced back yard,
storage shed. Susan Sloan 386-
965-2847 MLS# 76106 $189,900
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
4br/1.5ba brick. 1332 sq ft. Great
floor plan, nice yard, close to
town. 1 ac landscaped. Lori
Geibeig MLS# 75713 $84,900
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
Remodeled 2/2 (could be 3/2).
Split floor plan. Great home, great
price. Mary Brown Whitehurst
965-0887 MLS# 77943 $99,900
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
3/2 brick home in Woodcrest. Lg
lot completely fenced. Easy access
to amenities. Elaine K. Tolar 386-
752-6488 MLS# 78148 $129,900
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
New home in Mayfair. 4 bedroom
on comer lot. Covered Porch.
Elaine K. Tolar 386-752-6488 -
MLS# 76919 $214,900
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
3/3Ain beautiful area. 2414sqft.
Private yard & patio with storage
bldg. Lori G Simpson 386-365-
5678 MLS# 78175 $159,900
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
Brick 3/2 on lake front. Lots of up-
dates. Glassed in room with fantas-
tic views. Lori G Simpson 386-
365-5678 MLS# 78092 $249,900
Featured Home 55+ acres, 5 pas-
tures fenced & cross fenced. 2,700
sqft, 4br/3ba home built in 1996.
Call for details! 386-243-8227
R.E.O. Realty Group
Fixer Upper on Suwannee River.
NeedsTLC. Owner motivated &
will finance. $45,000
MLS 77337 Brittany Stoeckert
Results Realty 386-397-3473
Just Reduced 3/2 home, inside city
limits, fenced backyard, detached
carport w/office MLS#77411
$79,900 Call R.E.O.Realty,
@ 386-243-8227 Make Offer!
Just Reduced 4/2 on 1.57 acres,
fireplace. partially fenced, MLS#
77412, Call Nancy Rogers at
R.E.O. Realty Group
386-243-8227 $64,900


Lg. 4/3 family home. 16x20
screened porch, workshop. 4.5 ac.
fenced/cross fenced MLS 74339
$229,900. N Fla Homeland Real-
ty Darlene Hart 386-288-2878
Lg. home on 1 ac. Granite floors
throughout. 4br/2ba. Nice open
kitchen & Florida room. $148,000
MLS 77292 Brittany Stoeckert
Results Realty 386-397-3473
Mayfield S/D, nice fenced in back
yard w/small lake behind property.
Very nice. $99,888
MLS 77092 Brittany Stoeckert
Results Realty 386-397-3473


Land Clearing

Back Hoe, Dozer, Chopping, root
raking, bush hog, seeding, sod,
disking, site prep, ponds &
irrigation. Free Est! 386-623-3200

Lawn & Landscape Service

Clean Pine Straw,
You pick it up, $1.85 a bale
Delivery of 100 bales $260
386-688-9156

Services

DIVORCE, BANKRUPTCY,
RESUMES.
other court approved forms-
386-961-5896.


Summer Cleaning done your
way. Let me Clean your home be-
fore you leave on Vacation. Come
back home & relax. 386-303-1496.
We come to you! Auto Detailing:
Wash, wax & vaccum. Pressure
Wash: Houses, mobile homes,
driveways, decks. 386-697-2224


2br Private Country
Home. Remodeled,
everything is new. Large yard.
386-752-4444
3br/1.5ba. Very clean, CH/A
Fenced (privacy) large back yard.
Nice area/location. $750. mo $750.
dep. Ref's req'd. (941)920-4535
4br/2ba in town.
Good neighborhood. $900. mo
1st & $900 security. No Pets.
386-755-6916

750 Business&
75 Office Rentals
FOR LEASE: Downtown office
space. Convenient to
Court house.
Call 386-755-3456
For Lease: E Baya Ave. Two -
1000 sqft office space units or
combined for 2000 sqft. 386-984-
0622 or weekends 386-497-4762
OFFICE SPACE for lease.
Oak Hill Plaza. 900 sqft
$675mo/$695. sec dep.
Tom 386-961-1086 DCA Realtor


770 Condos For Rent

05526400
Golf Course Condo for rent,
2BR/2BA, 1420 s.f., $1100/mo.
Rent includes all appliances,
basic cable, water/sewer/
garbage, pool & tennis ct.
access. Realtor/owner
call 386-344-0433


790 Vacation Rentals
Horseshoe Beach Scalloping Spcl
Gulf Front 2br, w/lg porch, dock,'
fish sink. wkend $395./wk $895.
386-235-3633/352-498-5986
alwaysonvacation.com #419-181
"Florida's Last Frontier"


805 Lots for Sale


05526330
Suwannee Valley 4Cs, area
grantee for nationally
recognized high-quality early
childhood program seeks
applicants interested in a
teaching career in a
professional work
environment.

Teachers (Full Time)
for 3-5 vr olds
Must have a Child Care
Professional Certificate
(CDA, FCCPC or ECPC)
or be currently enrolled in an
Early Childhood Professional
Certificate program
Preferred: 3 yrs classroom exp
w/relevant age children;
current 1st Aid/CPR; bi-lingual
,(English/Spanish)
Starts at $7.56-$8.65 per hr
All applicants must pass
physical & DCF background
screenings.
Excellent Benefits, Paid.
Holidays, Sick & Annual Leave,
Health/Dental Insurance,.
Training/scholarship
opportunities and more.
Apply in person at:
236 SW Columbia Ave
Lake City Or send resume
E-mail: arobinson(asv4cs.org
Fax (386) 754-2220
EOE


IBUI^


I SnT-
Ei i iT

FIND


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LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED SATURDAY, JULY 2, 2011


Classified Department: 755-5440


810 Home for Sale
Neat as a pin! Split floor plan
w/well manicured lawn. 10x12
storage shed. $129K MLS 77932
Darlene Hart 386-288-2878
N Fla Homeland Realty
Spacious 4/2 home on 1 ac. Split
floor plan. Great neighborhood.
Easy access to 1-75 $220K MLS
77859 N Fla Homeland Realty
Darlene Hart 386-288-2878

820 Farms &
Acreage
10-ac lot. Well/septic/pp. Owner
financing $300 dn, $663 mo 8.9%,
25 yrs. Deas Bullard Properties
386-752-4339 www.landnfl.com
4 1/2 acre lot. Lake Jeffery Road.
Gorgeous Oaks!Paved Rd
Owner Financing! NO DOWN!
$59,900. $525mo 352-215-1018.
www.LandOwnerFinancing.com
4 acres, Wellborn, New Well
installed, Beautifully wooded'
w/cleared Home Site, owner fin,
no down, $39,900, $410 mon
Call 352-215-1018
www.LandOwnerFinancing.com
6.45 ac riverfront property in
White Springs, doe to Big Shoals.
Covered shelter for entertaining.
MLS# 77417 $124,888 386-243-
8227 R.E.O. Realty Group, Inc
FARM- 7 stall barn, Apt.
17+ acres cross fenced.
Close in $895. mo.
386-961-1086
Pretty piece of land. 2 acres close
to interstate 75 for.under 20K.
Mobile Homes or residential ok.
MLS# 77400 Call 386-243-8227
R.E.O. Realty Group, Inc
83 Commercial
830 Property
4 UNIT Apt. Bldg. All 1/1/ w/ex-
tra rooms. Clean, good tenants and
remodeled. Downtown. $160,000.
386-362-8075 or 754-2951
Prime Commercial Location.
Just across from plaza. Frontage
on Baya w/2 curbcuts. $350,000
MLS# 77485 Call 386-243-8227
R.E.O.Realty Group, Inc

870 Real Estate
SWanted
I Buy Houses
CASH!
Quick Sale Fair Price
386-269-0605

930 Motorcycles
05 Yamaha VSTAP 650 11K mi.
Blue w/Ghost flames. Runs great!
New Battery. Price Reduced to
$2,800. 386-752-9645

950 Cars for Sale
1986 ChevyMonte Carlo SS,
78k miles, one owner. $10,000.
All original.
386-752-1313 or 904-718-6747
2006 Toyota Scion XB,
41,000 mi. $13,000.
Paid over $24,000 new.
386-752-1313 or 904-718-6747















Bring the picture in or
we will take it for youl
Ad runs 10 consecutive,days
with a description and photo in the
newspaper and online E-edition.
Ad runs 10 consecutive days as a
classified line ad online.
You must include vehicle price.
All ads are prepaid.
Private party only.


2006 Toyota Scion
XB
41,000 mi.
Paid over $24,000 new.
$13,000
Call
386-752-1313
904-718-6747


1986 Chevy Monte
Carlo SS
78k miles, one owner.
All original.
$10,000
Call
386-752-1313
904-718-6747


2005 Yamaha
VStar 650
11,000 miles, blue with
ghost flames, runs
great, new battery
Price Reduced to $2,800
Call
386-752-9645


$10,500
Call
386-555-555
If you don't sell your vehide
during the first 10 days, you
can run the same vehicle ad
for 10 additional days for
only $15.00
Tenns and conditions remain the
same for the additional run,








RECYCLE
YOUR
PAPER


Seeking Salesperson to
join our team. No experience
necessary. Great benefits package.
Apply in person or call

Woody

386-758-6171


1\4 D AY


HIL -


41BIR