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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028308/01596
 Material Information
Title: The Lake City reporter
Uniform Title: Lake City reporter (Lake City, Fla. 1967)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: John H. Perry
Place of Publication: Lake City Fla
Publication Date: 7/1/2011
Frequency: daily (monday through friday)[<1969>-]
weekly[ former 1967-<1968>]
daily
normalized irregular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Lake City (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Columbia County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Columbia -- Lake City
Coordinates: 30.189722 x -82.639722 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 95, no. 4 (Oct. 5, 1967)-
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000358016
oclc - 33283560
notis - ABZ6316
lccn - sn 95047175
sobekcm - UF00028308_01569
System ID: UF00028308:01596
 Related Items
Preceded by: Lake City reporter and Columbia gazette

Full Text




Pair charged
Local couple
0000 '"--'1n lf
13,
S120511 *** I

GAINESV E Fv OP3 F6RI


Lake


Indian summer
Fort White
football is
IT 326 going strong.
ports, I B


nily


Capital One Cup
UF claims top
honors in
athletics.
Sports, I B
j


Reporter


Friday, July 1,201 www.lakecityreporter.com Vol. 137, No. 133 0 75 cents
0


Big jump



in DROP


filings at


schools

Thursday was
deadline to beat
major cuts.

By LEANNE TYO
Ityo@lakecityreporter.com
Columbia County teachers and other
school workers entered the state's deferred
retirement program in vastly greater num-
bers this year, anticipating changes to the
program that take effect today.
About 40 district employees have entered
the Deferred Retirement Option Program
since May, compared to nine in May, June
and July of 2010, according to Frank Moore,
district director of human resources. More
than half of those are teachers.
The surge was due to a major cut in DROP
benefits that went into effect today.
Through yesterday, state workers could
declare for retirement then keep working
for up to five years. Meanwhile, their pen-
sion payments earned 6.5 percent interest
per year, leading to a lump-sum payout upon
actual retirement. As of today, however, those
signing up for DROP can expect only a 1.3
percent interest rate.
In addition, those enrolled in DROP are
DROP continued on 3A


Lifeguard luncheon


TONY BRITT/Lake City Reporter
Lauren Bannister, a Ken's Bar-B-Q catering staff member, serves tea to Chris Bethea (center)
and Zach Nicholson, Lifeguard Ambulance Service employees, during a luncheon sponsored by
Lifeguard Thursday afternoon at the Columbia County Fairgrounds exhibition hall. More than 80
attended the luncheon introducing the privatized ambulance service to the county. Lifeguard's
contract formally takes effect today.


Couple accused of forging stolen checks


Theft added
up to $6,700;
say police.

By TONY BRITT
tbritt@lakecityreporter.com,
TWo Lake City residents face
multiple charges for allegedly
writing $6,700 worth of fake
checks from an unknowing fam-
ily member's bank account
Natosha Michelle Murell,


Alachua County

crash claims 2;

local man hurt

By TONY BRITT
tbritt@lakecityreporter.com
ALACHUA COUNTY A Springhill
couple was killed and a Columbia County
man suffered minor injuries Wednesday
when their vehicles collided on Interstate
75.
Joseph Belanger, 74, and Dorothy
Belanger, 74, both of Springhill, died in
the crash.
Michael Lamar Williams, 44, of Lake
City, suffered minor injuries.
The wreck occurred at 12:35 p.m.
Wednesday on 1-75 at milemarker 394 in
Alachua County.
According to Florida Highway Patrol
reports, Joseph Belanger was headed
north in a 2004 Pontiac Montana on 1-75
in the right lane with Dorothy Belanger
Sas his passenger. The Belangers were
2 KILLED continued on 8A


22, and Michael Paul Taylor,
30, 449 SE Defender Ave., were
booked into the
ColumbiaCounty
Detention
F acti a. ity
Wednesday on
$160,900 bond
each. Murell and
Murall Taylor were both
charged with 15
counts of forgery, 15 counts of
uttering a forged instrument and
grand theft in connection with
the case.


According to Lake City Police
Department reports, one of
Taylor's relatives
went to a local
4I bank and lodged
a complaint accus-
ing Taylor and his
Girlfriend, Murell,
of stealing her
checks and then
Taylor cashing them.
The woman said she hadn't
received any bank statements for
several months and suspected
Taylor and Murell were deliber-


ately hiding or destroying her
statements.
"When she got her most recent
statement, she observed that she
was missing several thousands of
dollars," LCPD investigator David
Greear wrote in his report
Greear was able to query the
woman's account and collect digi-
tal images of the checks, upon
which he reported the suspects
were writing checks to themselves
then cashing them. Reports noted
the pattern occurred for several
months and totaled $6,700.


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Coming soon: Messiah's Mansion
Seth Greve (second from left), 17, of Spokane, Wash., uses a scale model Thursday to explain what will take
place during tours of a life-size replica of the tabernacle of Moses. Tours of the replica, being constructed on
US 90 West near the Suwannee County line, will be conducted July 2-9 from 1-7 p.m. and on July 10 from
1-5 p.m. The event is sponsored by Messiah's Mansion, an Oklahoma-based group. The tabernacle is a 'full
scale model of the wilderness temple built by Moses and the Israelites,' according to the group's website.
Also pictured are Abigail Shaw (from left), 7, of Fort White; Greve; Joshua Shaw, 5, of Fort White; and Chris
Bodden, 19, of Lake City.


School

grades

are up

across

Florida

All our As
were earned,
says Millikin.

By LEANNE TYO
Ityo@lakecityreporter.com
Superintendent of
Schools Mike Millikin
said Thursday that district
elementary and middle
schools have earned
the right to be proud of
the school grades they
received this year, which
includes eight A's.
According to the
Department of Education,
more than two-thirds of
Florida's public elemen-
tary and middle schools
received an A or 1 grade
on the state's annual
assessment
Millikin said district test
scores indicated progress
and the district worked to
target areas of improve-
ment to better its school
grades.
"We felt like particularly
our middle and elementary
schools, our writing scores
which came earlier in the
spring were improved
and the third grade data
looked promising as well,"
Millikin said. 'That was
an indication, plus two of
our elementary schools
- Eastside and Columbia
City are typically As,
but had some difficulty
with the lower quartile stu-
dents making large enough
learning gains in reading,
so they were penalized last
year. We really targeted
those areas and those stu-
dents improved and there-
fore the overall school
grade improved. They
made significant gains with
those students this year
so they're back up to A
status."
School grades are
primarily based on the
Florida Comprehensive
Assessment Test the
state's standardized assess-
ment in reading, math,
writing and science. The
proficiency level for writing
was raised, but the depart-
ment said it didn't have a
significant impact on the
overall grades.
To get an A, the lowest
performing 25 percent of
students also must make
one year's worth of prog-
ress in one year's time.
Otherwise, the grade is
dropped to a B. Interim
Education Commissioner
John L. Winn said 82
schools failed to meet this
standard, down from 119
last year.
While school grades are
up, Westside Elementary
was the only district school
to make Adequate Yearly

GRADES continued on 8A


CALL US:
(386) 752-1293
SUBSCRIBE TO
THE REPORTER:
Voice: 755-5445
1 Fax: 752-9400


95 69
T-Storm Chance
WEATHER, 2A


Opinion ................ 4A
Around Florida........... 2A
Obituaries .............. 5A
Advice & Comics......... 3B
Puzzles ................. 2B


TODAY IN
PEOPLE
Glenn Beck
leaves Fox.


COMING
SATURDAY
A look
at Lifeguard.


~8usP~asss~


sasa~~









LAKE CITY REPORTER DAILY BRIEFING FRIDAY, JULY 1, 2011


Thursday:
Afternoon: 6-8-0
Evening: 4-2-2


Thursday:
SAfternoon: 6-5-0-6
Evening: 8-2-3-4


evnftch
Wednesday:
1-19-24-26-36


PEOPLE IN THE NEWS



Beck has last Fox News Channel show


NEW YORK
Glenn Beck said goodbye
to Fox News Channel on
Thursday, airing his final
show before going into
business for himself. He
told his fans that he was determined
"to his last breath" to fix this country.
The colorful commentator will
begin streaming a daily two-hour
show for paying customers on his
own Internet network, GBTV, in
September.
His finale was vintage Beck, a con-
tinued monologue walking among
his signature chalkboards. He took
some shots at critics, promised fealty
to his fans, came close to tears but
didn't succumb and even poked
some fun at his image.
"I'm the only host who is suppos-
edly the most dangerous person in
America because of my influence
and the least influential person in
America because my ratings are sup-
posedly declining," he said.
Beck's conservative populism
resonated almost immediately with
Fox viewers when he started the day
before Barack Obama's inauguration
as president in January 2009, draw-
ing audiences unseen before in a late
afternoon time slot on cable news.
At his peak in January 2010, Beck's
show averaged 2.9 million viewers
each day. He'd warn darkly of things
going wrong in the world, some-
times spinning complex theories on
his blackboard.
His popularity faded, although Beck
still led his time slot He was averaging
1.86 million viewers a day so far this
year, down 23 percent from the same
period in 2010, the Nielsen Co. said.
An advertising boycott that began
after Beck said Obama had a "deep-
seated hatred for white people" led.
to more than 400 advertisers telling
Fox they didn't want their commer-
cials seen on his show.


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Beck, who burned bright and fast at
Fox News Chanhel, does his final show
on the network Thursday before going
into business for himself.

'The Voice' bringing
back 4 coaches
NEW YORK -NBC says the
four musician-coaches who have
helped make 'The Voice" a sum-
mer hit will be back for the next
round of the vocal competition.
NBC said Thursday that
Christina Aguilera (ag-wih-LEHR'-
uh), Cee Lo Green, Adam Levine
and Blake Shelton will all return
when "The Voice" resumes in mid-
season next year.
The series concluded its first
cycle on Wednesday. It features
these musician-coaches (don't
,call them judges) working with
the vocalists throughout the


competition.
A major success for NBC, "The
Voice" ranked in third and fifth
place in viewers last week.

Wood loves 'total
madness' of new show
NEW YORK (AP) Elijah
Wood's latest acting gig is ridicu-
lous, and he's OK with that.
The actor stars in the new
FX show "Wilfred," playing a
depressed guy named Ryan who
is on the verge of

a new zest for life
while hanging out
with his neigh-
bor's dog Wilfred,
except this dog is
quite different.
As Ryan sees it,
Wood Wilfred is a talk-
ing man in a dog
suit who also smokes cigarettes.
"There were days where there
would just be absurd situations that
my character and Wilfred would
get into and you'd step out of that
and thing 'what are we doing?
What total madness are we creat-
ing?" Wood said. "And there was a
gleefulness associated with it like
wow, this is really bizarre and won-
derful and it was a joy. So much
fun."
The show, based on a hit comedy
in Australia, had 2.6 million viewers
when it premiered June 23. That's
the best ratings FX has ever had
for a comedy.
Wood says over the course of the
season the character of a stuffed
bear that Wilfred is drawn to will
be developed.


* Associated Press


Celebrity Birthdays


* Actress Olivia de Havil-
land is 95.
* Actor Jamie Farr is 77.
* Actress Jean Marsh ("Up-
stairs, Downstairs") is 77.
* Actress Genevieve Bujold
is 69.
* Singer Deborah Harry of
Blondie is 66.
* Singer Fred Schneider of


the B-52's is 60.
* Actor Dan Aykroyd is 59.
* Actress Pamela Anderson
is 44.
* Actress Liv Tyler is 34.
* Actress Hilarie Burton
("One Tree Hill") is 29.
* Actors Stephen and
Andrew Cavarno ("Party of
Five") are 19.


HOW TO REACH US
Main number ........(386) 752-1293
Fax number ..............752-9400
Circulation ...............755-5445
Online... www.lakecltyreporter.com '
The Lake City Reporter, an affiliate of
Community Newspapers Inc., is pub-
lished Tuesday through Sunday at 180
E. Duval St., Lake City, Fla. 32055.
Periodical postage paid at Lake City, Ra.
Member Audit Bureau of Circulation and
The Associated Press.
All material herein is property of the Lake
City Reporter. Reproduction in whole or
in part Is forbidden without the permis-
sion of the publisher. U.S. Postal Service
No. 310-880.
POSTMASTER: Send address changes
to Lake City Reporter, P.O. Box 1709,
Lake City, la. 32056.
PublisherTodd Wilson .....754-0418
(twilson@lakecityreporter.com)
NEWS
Editor Robert Bridges .....754-0428
(rbridges@lakecityreporter.com)
ADVERTISING
Director Ashley Butcher ...754-0417
(abutcher@lakecityreporter.com)
CLASSIFIED
To place a classified ad, call 755-5440


BUSINESS
Controller Sue Brannon....754-0419
(sbrannon@lakecityreporter.com)
CIRCULATION
Home delivery of the Lake City Reporter
should be completed by 6:30 a.m.
Tuesday through Saturday, and by 730
a.m. on Sunday.
Please call 386-755-5445 to report any
problems with your delivery service.
In Columbia County, customers should
call before 10:30 a.m. to report a ser-
vice error for same day re-delivery. After
10:30 a.m., next day re-delivery or ser-
vice related credits will be issued.
In all other counties where home delivery
is available, next day re-delivery or ser-
vice related credits will be issued.
Circulation ...............755-5445
(circulation@lakecityreporter.com)
Home delivery rates
(Tuesday through Sunday)
12 Weeks ................ $26.32
24 Weeks .................$48.79
52 Weeks ................$83.46
Rates indude 7% sales tax
Mail rates
12 Weeks ................. $41.40
24 Weeks ................$82.80
52 Weeks................$179.40


CORRECTION


The Lake City Reporter corrects errors of tact in news
items. If you have a concern, question or suggestion, please
call the executive editor. Corrections and clarifications will run
in this space. And thanks for reading.


AROUND FLORIDA


THE WEATHER


2 dead after
2 club shootings
LAUDERDALE LAKES
- Separate shootings at
two South Florida clubs
have left at least two peo-
ple dead and more than a
dozen injured.
Broward Sheriff's
Office spokeswoman Dani
Moschella says two men
were killed and 10 others
wounded after a shootout
inside a Lauderdale Lakes
club early Thursday.
Moschella says one man
drew a gun in an argument
Shots rang out after a secu-
rity guard tried to intervene.
The man with the gun
died in surgery, and another
man died in the club. The
guard was not injured.
In Riviera Beach early
Thursday, the Palm Beach
County Sheriffs Office
says shots were'fired from
a car into a strip club. Two
women were struck by fly-
ing glass, one man was shot
in the foot and another man
was shot in the lower leg.

Train fatally
strikes pedestrian
SEFFNER A train
has struck and killed a
pedestrian in the Tampa
Bay area.
Hillsborough County
Sheriff's Detective Larry
McKinnon says a west-
bound CSX Railroad train
struck 61-year-old Marvin
Edward Herring near a
crossing in Seffner late
Wednesday.
McKinnon says that
when deputies arrived on
the scene, they found the
Seffner man dead beneath
the train. Detectives say it
appears that Herring had
a medical condition and
collapsed between the rail-
road tracks.
An autopsy is planned
to determine the cause of
death. McKinnon says no
foul play is suspected.


ASSOCIATED PRESS

Saddling up for summer camp
Seven-year-old Michael Shikhaleev of Hollywood, center,
rides Red Cloud as other campers wait to ride during Smiling
Goatcamp Monday at Rancho Paloma Bonilla in Southwest
Ranches. Children are introduced to ranch life and outdoor
activities.


Scuba diving Plant repairs will
accident kills teen cost billions


CUDJOE KEY- A
teenager has died after
surfacing too quickly while'
,scuba diving in the Florida
Keys.
Family members tell
The Key West Citizen that
16-year-old Kevin Piper
Jr. of Cudjoe Key was
spearfishing with scuba
tanks Sunday when he
surfaced without decom-
pressing.
He died Tuesday at a
Miami hospital.
Piper's father says the
teen dove after a grouper
without realizing his tank
was low on air.
According to a Monroe
County Sheriff's Office
report, Piper ran out of air
and shot to the surface.


CRYSTAL RIVER
- Progress Energy
ratepayers could be on
the hook for as much
as $560 million to fix a
containment wall gap at
its Crystal River nuclear
plant.
That's just what insur-
ance won't cover. The
electric utility's plan
for repairs at the plant
could cost upward of $2'
billion.
Progress Energy out-
lined the repair plans
earlier this week. The
state Public Service
Commission is scheduled
to review the proposal at
its meeting July 14.

* Associated Press


CHANCE PARTLY
TORMS CLOUDY


95 LO 69 HI 9 70

. I I


SPensacola
92/77


SBldsta
95/70
Tallahassee Lake City,
95/71 '95/69
SGainesville
PanamaCty 93/70
90/76 Ocala
92/71


Tampa ,
90/75


FL Myer
91/73

K
8i


TEMPERATURES
High Thursday
Low Thursday
Normal high
Normal low
Record high
Record low

PRECIPITATION
Thursday
Month total
Year total
Normal month-to-date
Normal year-to-date





7a 1p
Friday







Focastz tmnprati


89
73
91
70
100 in 1898
66 in 1970


0.00"
5.31"
19.42"
6.78"
24.03"


7p la
Sab







rn "Fulsike


Jacksonville
91,70

Daytona Beach
89o73


City Saturday Sunday
Cape Canaveral 88 75 1 89 75 I


Daytona Beach
Ft. Lauderdale
Fort Myers
Galnesvllle
Jacksonville


Orlando Cape Canaveral Key West
92/73 89/74 Lake City
Miami
Naples
West Palm Beach Ocala
89/75 0 Orlando
S Ft Lauderdale Panama City
s 89/78 Pensacola
SNaples Tallahassee
87/75 Miami Tampa


39/


89/78 Valdosta
Nest* W. Palm Beach
81


SUN
Sunrise today
Sunset today
Sunrise torm.
Sunset torm.

MOON
Moonrise today
Moonset today
Moonrise tom.
Moonset tom.


6:33 a.m.
8:36 p.m.
6:33 a.m.
8:36 p.m.


6:46 a.m.
8:57 p.m.
7:48 a.m.
9:41 p.m.


*03L
July July July July 1 A
1 8 s15 23
New First Full Last is|
wea


6a On this date in
turday 1987, a thunder-
storm south of
Yakima Vally, Wash.,
produced strong
enough winds to
down trees which
were six feet in
S diameter.


%%0ilfqlj
Wrpaig


Today's
ultra-violet
radiation risk
for the area on
a scale from 0
to 10+.


87/72/pc
88/78/t
91/76/t
94/69/pc
91/72/pc
90/82/pc
95/70/pc
89/77/t
90/73/t
93/70/pc
91/73/pc
93/75/pc
94/75/s
96/71/pc
91/77/t
96/67/s
58 7J,.


89/72/pc
89/80/pc
92/76/pc
94/72/pc
92/74/pc
90/81/t
96/72/s
90/79/t
91/74/pc
93/73/pc
92/73/pc
93/77/pc
93/76/pc
99/71/pc
91/77/pc
99/69/s
89 77 I


An exclusive
service
brought to
our readers
by
The Weather
Channel.



weathercom
wethrMONO


S Forecasts, data and
graphics 20I1 Weather
I I v Central, LP, Madison, Wis.
their 7 www.weatherpubllsher.com






Get Connected




I. i f Q. .. q ,
-iI


(A I.3


Daily Scripture


"The LORD will be king over
the whole earth. On that day
there will be one LORD, and
his name the only name."


-Zechariah 14:9 NIV


Lake City Reporter


--. PARTLY
CLOUDY


HI 96 L073


- ------ ------------- -- ------------------------


Page Editor: Todd Taylor, 754-0424


0--=


---"











DROP: School district sees greatest rise in enrollment

Continued From Page 1A


exempt from an otherwise
mandatory 3 percent pay-
in to the state pension
fund, which also takes
effect today.
Moore said the increase
in entries was "absolutely"
due to the changes in
DROP.
"Some people had
reached the point to go
in," he said, "but I think by
and far, the vast majority
of those that went in were
going in because of the
interest rate change."
Those 40 employees
make up nearly 30 per-
cent of the district's 140
employees currently
enrolled in the Florida
Retirement System.
In the Florida
Retirement System, retire-
ments are usually effective
the first of the following
month, Moore said.
For those. 40 employees,
however, entry into DROP
will go into effect June 1
and not July 1, since they
beat the legislative dead-
line.
In March and April the
district human resources
office began working with
employees who were con-
sidering entering DROP,
Moore said.
'We strongly encour-
aged any of our folks here
that were thinking even
remotely about it to come
see us early," he said.
Moore said the depart-
ment began monitoring
potential changes to the
DROP program early on
and worked to keep dis-
trict employees abreast of
possible consequences.
'We were already coun-
seling people on the 'what
ifs' before the legislation


happened," Moore said.
"We were taking phone
calls and visits quite a bit."
"We would just ask them
questions to walk them
through and get them
thinking and evaluate, 'Is
this really for me,' Moore
said. "Everybody's life situ-
ation is different"
The other major change
to the state retirement sys-
tem that takes effect today
is a mandatory 3 percent
contribution to employees'
own pension plans. Those
enrolled in DROP are
exempt.
Neither measure, how-
ever, has spurred school
employees to quit, accord-
ing to Moore.
"Nobody's that's
resigned has said it's
because of any of these
changes," he said. "I can't
think of anybody who's
resigned, or even decided
to retire, because of it"

No exodus at county
Michele Crummitt,
Human Resources direc-
tor for the Columbia
County Board of County
Commissioners, also said
no county employees
resigned because of the
changes to DROP
"We've got people leav-
ing; but I think it was
planned or they found
other jobs," she said. "No
one's told me in an exit
interview that that was
the reason why they were
leaving."
Ten county employees
are currently in DROP,
Crummitt said, and one
signed up in time to
receive the June 1 effec-
tive date.


"I had one enter DROP
at this point that would be
eligible," Crumnmitt said.
The county saw three.
employees enter DROP in
2010, she said.
Crummitt said that the
county, too, had been com-
municating the potential
changes to employees
through items like news-
letters and FRS memos
since legislators went into
session.
'We did try to get the
word out as much as we
could," she said.
"It's probably been a.
good month now that
we've.been able to give
the exact information,".
Crummitt said.
Employees could
receive the June 1 effective
date if their DROP applica-
tion was submitted to FRS
by June 30, Crummit said.
"FRS has told me that
as long as it gets there by
June 30 and if you meet .
the eligibility require-
ments, you can still have
the June 1 effective date,"
she said.
Moore agreed, and
both Moore and Crummit
said employees also had
the option to request
that an estimate be run
on what their retirement
benefit would be. As long
as employees requested
that estimate by June 30,
Moore said, they will have
30 days from the time the
estimate is run to enter
DROP and still get a June
1 effective date.

City sees little effect
The City of Lake City
has six employees cur-
rently in DROP, said


City Manager Wendell
Johnson. Only one person
has applied this year.
A couple of employees
recently entered the pro-
gram. One has three years
remaining and another will
retire next year.
"Employee pension
reform is a big ticket item
tight now," he said. "It's
been a long time coming:"

Other agencies:
Clerk of court
SChad Crews, Columbia
County Clerk of Court
finance director, said all
employees at the clerk's
office are ENROLLED in
the Florida, Retirement
System and have the
option of either.joining
an investment plan or a
pension plan. The DROP
prograrp is a benefit of the
pension plan.
Crews said there are
three clerk office employ-
ees who are enrolled in
DROP.
Crews said there has
been ho increase in the
number of employees
enrolled in DROP, even
with the recent changes to
the program.
'We're a small.office and
that may be a function that
we don't have many people
who are eligible that didn't
sign up," Crews said.
He said an e-mail was
sent to all the employees
once the governor signed
the law, notifying them of
the changes.
"A lot of our people fol-
lowed it throughout the
session because it was a
major topics" he said.
He said the Florida
Retirement System also


sent out letters to employ-
ees' home addresses so
they would be familiar
with the changes.
'We've had nobody
apply for DROP in the last
30 days," he said.
According to Crews, no
Clerk's office employees
enrolled in the DROP
program last year and
he noted that the three
employees who are
enrolled in the program
did so before last year.

FHP
The Florida Highway
Patrol's chief of public
affairs, Capt. Mark Welch,
said three troopers from
Columbia Cointy and
five troopers who work at
Troop B in Lake City who
have enrolled in the DROP
program.
"They are all sworn law
enforcement officers a
sergeant, lieutenant and
three troopers," Welch
said, noting all joined the
DROP program after Gov.
Rick Scott signed the new
law.
Welch said he was
uncertain of the number
FHP employees from
Columbia County and
Troop B who enrolled in
DROP last year, but noted
all employees were given
information about the
upcoming changes.
"The department edu-
cated its members about
everything that was going
on in the legislature," he
said.

FWC
Anha Yawn, Florida Fish
and Wildlife Conservation


Commission personnel
services specialist, said one
employee at the FWC office
in Lake City was eligible to
sign up for the DROP pro-
gram prior to July 1.
The FWC's Lake City
office has seven employ-
ees enrolled in DROP.
With the interest rate
dropping from 6.5 percent
to 1.3 percent, Yawn said
she noticed an increase
"throughout the whole
agency" regarding number
of people who enrolled in
the DROP program.
She said FWC officials
have been keeping'employ-
ees up-to-date on changes
proposed by legislators
which may impact them.
"E-mail notifications.
were sent to all eligible
employees notifying them
of their eligibility to join
DROP based on their,
years of service or age,"
Yawn said. "We included
information on all pend-
ing or approved legislative
changes that could or would
affect their retirement"

Lake Shore Hospital
Authority
DROP will not have an
effect on the Lake Shore
Hospital Authority, said
Jack Berry, Authority man-
ager.
"No one is on DROP," he
said. "We're still working."
Berry said he opposes
the DROP program.
"They ought to do away
with it," he said. "Its a
rip-off of taxpayers. If they'
want to retire let them
retire."
Tony Britt and Antonia
Robinson contributed
reporting for this story. *


POLICE REPORTS


The following informa-
tion was provided by local
law enforcement agencies.
Thefollowing individuals
have been arrested but not
convicted. Those listed here
are innocent unless or until
proven guilty.

Tuesday, June 28
Columbia County
Sheriff's Office'
Adrian Jermaine


Anderson, 27, 510 SW
Twig Court, burglary and
larceny.
Travis Lee Cason, 22,
316 SE Woodhaven St, war-
rant Violation of probation
on original charge of DUI
and order revoking bond.
Jimmie Lee Dixon, no
age given, Jacksonville, tag
attached not assigned and
DUI.
Justin Greg Ferguson,
33, 271 SW Adobe Point
Lane, warrant Violation


of probation on original
charge of criminal mis-
chief.
Charles Allan
Hartsfield, 43, 1658 NW
Tiger Drain Road,:White
Springs, warrant: Second-
degree grand theft.
Michael John Malone
Jr., 26, 3935 284th Terrace
Branford, warrant Violation
of probation on'original
charges of burglary of a
structure/conveyance,
grand theft and petit theft.


see what


sunday

has in store


SGrill, Baby, Grill
Fire it up with PARADE's Ultimate Guide to
Summer Grilling! Guy Fieri and BBQ King
Steven Raichlen share important grilling tips
and 10 mistakes you want to avoid. *

Intelligence Report:
Is It Time for a New
National Anthem?
The Star-Spangled Banner is considered the
world's least singable national anthem, so is
it time for a change?


A Burning Kind of Love
Why men who can't boil water find the grill irresistible.

Views: A Grand Old Flag
An Ohio grandmother still treasures the Stars and Stripes her mother
hand-sewed 66 years ago, in defiance of the Nazis.


Wednesday, June 29
Columbia County
Sheriff's Office
S.Todd Ryan Cass, 38,


623 NE Lake Drive, war-
rant: Violation of proba-
tion on original charge
of third-degree grand
theft.
John Robert Dortch,.


27, 1084 SW Mount
Carmel Ave., warrant:
Failure to comply per
judge's orders for pos-
session of a controlled
substance. -.


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SUNDAY, July 3,2011 AA
Lake City Reporter www.parade.com


LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL FRIDAY, JULY 1, 2011


Page Editor: Todd Taylor, 754-0424












OPINION


Friday, July 1,2011


AN-


A N
OPINION


Peril of


Deep

Defense


Cuts

T ir^oday Leon Panetta
will take the oath to
become our nation's
23rd secretary of
Defense. After he
walks through the Pentagon's
river entrance and up the oak-
paneled stairwell to his office,
the weight of managing a three
million-person department
during wartime will sink in.
And Mr. Panetta's tenure
begins just as President Obama
and bipartisan majorities in
Congress are insisting on deep
cuts to defense spending. It
will be tempting to accede to
the White House's proposal
to carve out $400 billion, if
not more, from the national
security budget by 2023. It
would also be a grievous
mistake.
Every president and defense
secretary inherits the armed
forces and military capabilities
provided and shaped by their
predecessors. Procurement
decisions and budgetary
actions do not yield results,
or reveal their flaws, for years
and sometimes decades.
With no immediate outward
signs of negligence, the
political penalties for cutting
weapons systems and delaying
reinvestment in equipment
and infrastructure are close to
zero for those in office today.
But the penalty for being ill-
prepared tomorrow when the
unforeseen occurs-whether
another terrorist attack at home
or a major crisis abroad-can
be measured in American lives
lost.
The false comfort provided
by the end of the Cold War led
the administrations of George
H.W. Bush and Bill Clinton
to draw down the nation's
intelligence and military
Budgets. As director of the
Office of Management and
Budget and chief of staff for
President Clinton, Mr. Panetta
saw that process up close. Its
consequences did not become
starkly apparent until 9/11,
and the resulting scramble to
rebuild our capabilities in the
months thereafter.
* Scripps Howard News Service

Lake City Reporter
Serving Columbia County
Since 1874
The Lake City Reporter is pub-
lished with pride for residents of
Columbia and surrounding counties by
Community Newspapers Inc.
We believe strong newspapers build
strong communities -"Newspapers
get things done"
Our primary goal is to
publish distinguished and profitable
community-oriented newspapers.
This mission will be accomplished
through the teamwork of professionals
dedicated to truth, integrity and hard
work.
Todd Wilson, publisher
Robert Bridges, editor
Sue Brannon, controller
Dink NeSmith, president
Tom Wood, chairman

LETTERS
POLICY
Letters to the Editor should be
typed or neatly written and double
spaced. Letters should not exceed
400 words and will be edited for
length and libel. Letters must be
signed and include the writer's name,
address and telephone number for
verification. Writers can have two
letters per month published. Letters
and guest columns are the opinion of
'the writers and not necessarily that of
the Lake City Reporter.
BY MAIL: Letters, P.O. Box 1709,


Lake City, FL 32056; or drop off at
180 E. Duval St. downtown.
BY FAX: (386) 752-9400.
BY E-MAIL:
news@lakecityreporter.com


Today is Thursday, June
30, the 181st day of 2011. There
are 184 days left in the year.
Today's Highlight in History:
On June 30, 1936, the epic
Civil War novel "Gone with the
Wind" by Margaret Mitchell
was first published by The
Macmillan Co. in New York.
In 1859, French acrobat
Charles Blondin walked back
and forth on a tightrope above
the gorge of Niagara Falls
as thousands of spectators
watched.
In 1860, the famous Oxford
University Museum debate on
Darwin's theory of evolution
took place as Anglican Bishop
Samuel Wilberforce led his
side in denouncing the concept,
while biologist T.H. Huxley rose


www.lakecityreporter.com


Founding Fathers not


fans of paper money


f a time machine
whisked America's
Founding Fathers from
Philadelphia on July 4,
1776 to Washington,
D.C.'s Bureau of Engraving
and Printing on Independence
Day, 2011, what might they
think? Watching high-speed
presses spew giapt sheets of
greenbacks would dazzle the
eyes of even Benjamin Franklin,
a professional printer. Beyond,
that, though, they would be
disgusted.
'They would be appalled,".
says Dr. Judy Shelton, Ph.D,
co-director of the Sound Money
Project at the Atlas Economic
Research Foundation, with
which I am a Senior Fellow.
'The integrity of the dollar has
been utterly compromised by
fiscal malfeasance. Monetary
policy has become the default
mechanism for budgetary
irresponsibility."
Shelton echoes the Framers'
words:
As George Washington
wrote Thomas Jefferson on
August 1, 1786, "Paper money
has had the effect in your state
that it will ever have, to ruin
commerce, oppress the honest,
and open the door to every
species of fraud and injustice."
"Paper is poverty,"
Jefferson, in turn, observed in
1788. "It is only the ghost of
money, and not money itself."
In 1817, the author of the
Declaration of Independence
wrote that paper money's
"abuses also are inevitable and,
by breaking up the measure
of value, make a lottery of all
private property."
"Paper money is unjust,"
declared James Madison, chief
architect of the Constitution. "It
is unconstitutional, for it affects
the rights of property as much
as taking away equal value in
land."


Deroy Murdock
deroy.murdock@gmail.com


'The Founders recognized
the perils of legal-tender paper
money, which coerces people
to accept something that may
be inherently worthless as is
the case with our paper money
today," says Dr. Lawrence
M. Parks, Ph.D., executive
director of the Foundation for
the Advancement of Monetary
Education (FAME) in New York
City.
Why did the men who
launched this nation disdain
paper money? They had
watched British-colonial
governments debauch their
currencies and, consequently,
impoverish their citizens -
including some Founders.
During the American
Revolution, Virginia also issued
paper money. Its unbearable
lightness eventually made
Madison and Washington wince
as their tenants paid for leased
land with worthless currency.
For his part, Virginia's
devaluation left Jefferson on
the losing end of a large bond
transaction. He then lived
impecuniously and died broke.
Jefferson's experience with
fiat currency surely influenced
his views. "If we determine that
a Dollar shall be our Unit," he
wrote in 1784, "we must then
say with precision what a Dollar
is." Indeed, the Coinage Act of
1792 declared each dollar worth
371.25 grains of pure silver or
24.75 grains of pure gold.
SFor 179 years, the dollar
and gold remained linked.


But on August 15, 1971,
President Richard Nixon
ordered the Treasury "to
suspend temporarily" the dollar-
gold connection. Since then,
Washington has created cash as
easily as saying, "Shazzam!" The
"M3" money-supply measure
soared from $688.4 billion in
1971 to $10.3 trillion in March
13, 2006, whereupon the Fed
suddenly stopped publishing
these inconvenient truths.
This loose cash has helped
Washington boost the national
debt, from $398.13 billion in
1971 to $14.34 trillion today. The
dollar's purchasing power has
slid, meanwhile, even as gold
has climbed from $35 per ounce
in 1971 to $1,511 on Thursday.
Federal Reserve Chairman
Ben Bernanke once marveled
at the Fed's nearly supernatural
powers. It "has a technology
called a printing press (or,
today) its electronic equivalent)
that allows it to produce as
many U.S. dollars as it wishes at
essentially no cost"
From his lair high above
Manhattan's Midtown East,
Parks monitors all of this with
a single-mindedness that skirts
obsession. As the'repercussions
of letting politicians invent
money simmer in Washington
and boil in Athens, Greece,
Parks sees the path to economic
sanity as clearly in 2011 as the
Founders did in 1776.
"All we need to do is reassert
the monetary powers and
disabilities of the Constitution,"
Parks says, "which require that
America re-monetize gold and
silver as money."

New York commentator
Deroy Murdock is a columnist
with the Scripps Howard News
Service and a media fellow with
the Hoover Institution on War,
Revolution and Peace at Stanford
University.


to defend it
In 1908, the Tunguska
Event took place in Russiq as an
asteroid exploded above Siberia,
leaving 800 square miles of
scorched or blown-down trees.
In 1921, President Warren
G. Harding nominated former
President William Howard Taft
to be chief justice of the United
States, succeeding the late
Edward Douglass White.
In 1934, Adolf Hitler carried
out his "blood purge" of political
and military rivals in Germany
in what came to be known as
'The Night of the Long Knives."
In 1958, the U.S. Senate
passed the Alaska statehood bill
by a vote of 64-20.
In 1961, electronics inventor
Lee DeForest died in Hollywood


at age 87.
In 1963, Pope Paul VI was
crowned the 262nd head of the
Roman Catholic Church.
In 1971, the Supreme Court
ruled, 6-3, that the government
could not prevent The New York
Times or the Washington Post
from publishing the Pentagon
Papers. A Soviet space mission
ended in tragedy when three
cosmonauts aboard Soyuz 11
were found dead of asphyxiation
inside their capsule after it had
returned to Earth.
One year ago: President
Barack Obama talked about
the economy at a town hall in
Racine, Wis., saying, "We got
it moving again," and that he
intended to get "our debt and
our deficits under control."


4A


Betsy Hart
betsysblog.com

Odds

and ends

about

divorce
A another anniversary
of mine has just
come and gone. I
completely forgot
this one until I
noticed the date a week later.
Sort of interesting in its own
way, at least to me. It's the
anniversary of my then-hus-
band "choosing to go in a
different direction," as I some-
times put it, in June 2004.
Well, no big lessons about
divorce in this column. I've
spoken to those things many
times or at least tried to.
Rather, this is aboutthe back-
story. A little advice, a few
points to ponder for what
it's worth about the odds
and ends of divorce, includ-
ing some things to think
about before divorce. These
are observations that, when I
share with friends, I often hear
in response: "No one talks
about that!" So, like I said, for
what it's worth:
Perhaps especially if there
are children and the choice.
to divorce was one-sided, you
think at the time you will never
be able to deal with your ex
without some level of emotion-
al reactivity. And then, almost
suddenly, you will likely come
to feel an indifference toward
him (or her) that's surprising
to you. Guess what? The indif-
ference can be kind of sad.
H I have shared this with
women contemplating leav-
ing their husbands: "For one
thing, if you do this he's going
to bring women into your chil-
dren's lives and you will have
no control over that" They.
look at me like I have two
heads until they come back a
year later in tears because of
the woman (and her children?)
the ex has brought into their
children's lives.
M When a husband leaves
a wife and children, he with-
draws his protection from his
family, leaving them vulnerable
to a world of men. Not just
lousy ones, but good ones who
are still capable of breaking
the hearts of moms and kids
alike, all over again.
If your ex is at all faith-
ful about child support, say,
"Thank you." It goes a long,
long way. Let your children
know that you appreciate it,
too. As my mother used to say,
"You win more flies with honey
than vinegar."
If a fellow feels trapped
having to support a wife and
children while married, hell
really resent it when he has to
do it by court order and isn't
even living with them.
If you can't influence
a spouse much while living
together, he or she is not
going to suddenly be more
open to suggestion from a dif-
ferent household.
No matter what or who
ended the marriage, "he was a
great skier" or "she was really
funny" likely remains true.
Find ways to honestly praise
your ex to your kids.
If you were faithful to
your marriage and didn't
want it to end, then don't take
responsibility for ending it It
was your spouse's calling to be
committed to you even when
it was hard. Isn't that what you
did for him or her? It takes two
to make a marriage work, but
sometimes only one to leave it.
Learn from your mistakes, but
don't beat yourself up where
it's not necessary.

a Betsy Hart hosts the "It Takes a
Parent" radio show on WYLL-AM
1160 in Chicago.


HIGHLIGHTS IN HISTORY


B w B










Page Erd l72E R RC


Senate candidates speak


to newspapers editors


ST. PETERSBURG -
One of the first forums with
all four Republican candi-
dates for U.S. Senate was
held Thursday, with little
disagreement in opinions or
ideas.
Mike Haridopolos,Adam
Hasner, George Lemieux
and Mike McCalister
addressed the annual
meeting of the Florida
Press Association and the
Florida Society of News
Editors.
Their views on various
issues toed the Republican
party line: if elected, all
pledge to cut federal
spending, lower taxes
and shrink government:
They also issued scathing
criticisms of the Obama
administration's policies,
and of Washington itself.
"Congress is the most
bizarre broken and dys-
functional institution," said
the 42-year-old Lemieux,
former chief of staff for
Gov. Charlie Crist who was
later appointed by Crist to
a U.S. Senate seat because,
Senator Mel Martinez left
office early.
The candidates all said
thatincumbentDemocratic
Sen. Bill Nelson who
is showing high early poll
numbers against all four
Republicans is part of
the problem, not the solu-
tion.
"Bill Nelson is the big-
gest cheerleader of the
Obama administration,"
said Hasner, 41, who is a
state representative from
Broward County." We can
do better. We need to get
America back on the right
track."
Haridopolos, 41, is the
state Senate president
from Brevard County. He
spent much of the forum
talking about his work in
Tallahassee and how he
reduced spending at the


state level.
"A lot of people talk
about what they would like
to do," he said. "I've done
it."
Among his ideas: allow-
ing for more competition
in the home insurance
market and shrinking
Citizens, the state-run
insurer of last resort for
homeowners. Haridopolos
also said he agreed with
Gov. Rick Scott when it
came to rejecting federal
money for an Orlando-to-
Tampa rail. "Washington,
let alone Florida, could not
afford this train," he said.
Hasner said that he is
"deeply concerned that
America's future is in jeop-
ardy," and that he would
like to cut spending in the
Environmental Protection
Agency, the National Labor
Relations Board and possi-
bly the military.
'There should be no
sacred cows in government
spending," he said.
Lemieux spent a portion
of the debate addressing
his previous ties to former
Gov. Crist, who left the
Republican Party to run for
U.S. Senate as an indepen-
dent Crist was defeated by
Marco Rubio, and Lemieux
said he had to choose his
Republican values over his
friendship with Crist when
it came to that race.
"Gov. Crist and I didn't
always agree on policy


issues," Lemieux said.
He said that his plan to
cap federal spending is to
operate at the 2007 budget
level. "We can live off of
that We'd balance the bud-
get We'd save America," he
said.
McCalister is the political
newcomer to the race. A 59-
year-old farmer and retired
Army colonel, he ran for
governor in 2010 and came
in third. During Thursday's
forum, McCalister spoke
passionately about the need
to maintain defense spend-i
ing in order to keep the
U.S. safe from terrorists and
other threats although
he said the federal gov-
ernment should eliminate
redundancy in the military
to save money.
"My objectives are to
make sure we have a strong
economy, strong national
defense, low taxes and less
government," he said.
Like the other candi-
dates, McCalister also does,
not support a cap-and-trade
plan to reduce emissions.
'The whole global warm-
ing, thing, I question the sci-
ence," said McCalister. "I'm
not seeing any solid data."
The four men want to
unseatincumbentDemocrat
Bill Nelson in the 2012 gen-
eral election, but first must
win the Republican prima-
ry.
Associated Press


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OBITUARIES


Mary Louise Brown
Mrs. Mary Louise Brown
born March 29, 1933 a
resident of White Springs
passed away June 28, 2011.
Mrs. Mary Louise Brown is
survived by six children: Oliver
Young, Kelvin Young, Martine
Young, Johnnie Young, Anthony
Brown and Patricia Henderson.
Funeral services for Mrs. Mary
Louise Brown will be Saturday,
July 9, 2011 at 1:00 p.m. at the
Beulab Baptist Church in White
Springs, Florida. Viewing and
Visitation for family and friends
will be Friday, July 8, 2011
at the,Beulah Baptist Church
from 6 p.m. until 8 p.m. Burial
will be in Swift Creek Cem-
etery in White Springs, Florida.
D.M. Udell Funeral Home is in
charge of all arrangements. Call
D.M.UDELLANDSONSat386-
362-4189 or cell 386-209-0223,
Richard Eugene Teems
Richard Eugene Teems, born
in Aurora, Illinois Septem-
Richard Teems
"Ricky" from
Lake City
Florida passed
away at his
residence
in Savan-
nah Georgia.
Preceded in death by his fa-
ther William Howard Teems Sr.


Survived by his wife Ashley
Jenkins Teems of Lake Butler,
Florida and a son Austin Rich-
ard Teems of Lake City Flori-
da. His stepfather and mother,
Angel and Gloria Martinez of
Lake City Florida and father and
mother in-law Sam and Linda
Jenkins of Lake Butler,Florida.
Four brothers William and Misty
Teerms of Lake Butler, Florida.
David and Karen Teems of Val-
dosta, Georgia. Manuel Martinez
of Lake City, Fl. Angel Luis of
Mayaguez, Puerto Rico. Four
Sisters, Melissa Teems of Lake
City Florida, Milagro, Mar-
garita and Angelita Martinez of
Mayaguez, Puerto Rico and one
sister in-law Samantha Jenkins
of Seattle Washington. Thirteen
nephews and fourteen nieces.As
well as many aunts and uncles.
A memorial service will be held
at First Full Gospel Church in
Watertown, Florida on Satur-
day, July 2 2011 at 12:00pm.
Evelyn Nadine Strickland
Tison
Evelyn Nadine Strickland Ti-
son, age 92, of Blairsville, GA
passed away June 29, 2011.
Mrs. Tison was born in Way-
cross, to John Steven Strickland
and Sally Mae Becton Strick-
land. She was a homemaker and
a member of First United Meth-
odist Church of Union County.
Preceding Mrs. Tison in death
was her husband, James Russell


Tison; son, James Russell Tison
Jr.; grandson, Russell Bryner;
three brothers: A.J. Strickland,
Walter Strickland, Woodrow
Strickland; four sisters: Eliza-
beth Maxwell, Janie Hague,
Polly Herring, and Irene Smith.
She is lovingly remembered
by family members: daughter,
Judith (Renny) Bryner, sister,
Madge Pennington, sister, Ove-
dia Hague, grandson, Charles
Berry Bryner, granddaughter,
Leslie (Gary) Rybka, grand-
daughter, Michelle (Mike) Rus-
sell, great granddaughter, Lacy
(Josh) Copeland Madrigal, great
granddaughter, LeAnne Copeland,
great grandchildren, Austin and
Brady Russell, great great grand-
daughter, Lila Marie Madrigal.
Funeral services are scheduled for
Saturday, July 2, at 11:00 a.m.,
in the Chapel of Cochran Funeral
Home of Blairsville. Burial will be
in Union Memory Gardens Cem-
etery. Visitation will be held at the
funeral home onthe same day ofthe
funeral Saturday, starting at 9 a.m.
If you wish, memorial contri-
butions may be made to either
the Crohn's Foundation, or
the American! Cancer Society.
Arrangements entrusted to
the COCHRAN FUNERAL
HOME of Blairsville, GA.
www. cochranfuneralhomes.-com
Obituaries are paid advertise-
ments. For details, call the Lake
City Reporter's classified depart-
ment at 752-1293. '


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Page Editor: Todd Taylor, 754-0424


LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL & STATE FRIDAY, JULY 1, 2011









LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL & STATE FRIDAY, JULY 1, 2011 Page Editor: Todd Taylor, 754-0424


COMMUNITY CALENDAR


* To submit your Community
Calendar item, contact Antonia
Robinson at 754-0425 or by
e-mail at arobinson@
lakecityreporter.corn.


Today
Aunt Jackie performs
Mike Mullis is perform-
ing with the Southern
Rock/Classic Rock band
"Aunt Jackie" 8 p.m.
today at the Spirit of the
Suwannee Music Hall. The
restaurant will be open.
Admission is $5 and it
can be used as a voucher
toward your meal. For
details and reservations
contact the music hall at
(386) 364-1703.

Alter Eagles
The Alter Eagles,
the Definitive Eagles
Tribute Band, perform
7:30 p.m. today at Florida
Gateway College Howard
Conference. Seating is
limited. Tickets are availal-
able by calling (386) 754-
4340. Proceeds will ben-
efit The Foundation for
Florida Gateway College
and United Way.

Patriotic trivia
Columbia County Senior
Services Inc. is hosting a
patriotic trivia game at 1
p.m. today at the LifeStyle
Enrichment Center. Call
(386) 755-0235. The center
is located at 628 SE Allison
Court

Reading program
SThe Columbia County
Public Library is hosting a
Ronald McDonald Reading
Program 11 a.m. at Fort
White Community Center
and 1:30 p.m. at the Main
Branch Friday.

Butterflies are Free
Performances of
"Butterflies Are Free" by
Leonard Gershe is at the'
High Springs Community
Theter and runs week-
endsff-roughruly 10.
Tick ,aailaale.a at .


JASON iATTHEW WALKERILake City Reporter
White Springs resident Le Simons, 67, uses a chisel to add more detail to a bust of a Native American Tuesday made of
basswood while attending a Columbia Woodcarvers meeting. 'You have to start with something simple then work your way
up,' Simons said. 'Don't be afraid to take off a little bit of wood.'


The Framery's new loca-
tion, 341 South Marion and
Knox Streets, 754-2780,
and online at highspring-
scommunitytheatercom.

Saturday
Coffee House season
The second half of the
2011 Coffee House sea-
son is 7-9 p.m. Saturday
in the Stephen Foster
Auditorium. The host-
ess for this gala is Lucy
Spencer. She works in the
events department at the
park and plays the piano.
The desert table will have
items for sale.

Monday
Fireworks Celebration
Lake City Columbia


County Chamber of
Commerce is hosting
the 4th of July Fireworks
Celebration beginning 5
p.m. Monday around Lake
DeSoto. The event will
feature musical entertain-
ment, free children's activi-
ties, vendors and more.
The fireworks will be
released at 9:20 p.m.


Senior Services Inc. is
hosting a Geriactors
Theatre Performance "I
Can't Remember Why
I'm Mad At You" and
three vignettes 7 p.m.
Tuesday at the LifeStyle
Enrichment Center. Call
(386) 755-0235. The cen-
ter is located at 628 SE
Allison Court.


Wood Carvers meeting Wednesday


The Columbia County
Wood Carvers meet every


Spanish class


Monday at 1 p.m. at the Columbia County Senior
LifeStyle Enrichment Services Inc. is hosting a
Center. Contact Ken Myer beginners Spanish class
at 719-9629 or Charles 10-11 a.m. at the LifeStyle
Kime at 755-4937. Enrichment Center. Free
Blood Pressure Checks
Tuesday are 11 a.m. to noon. Also
a Geriactors Matinee
Theatre performance Performance is 11 a.m.
and bingo is 1 p.m. Call
Columbia County .....(386) 755-023.5 Tlhe.center


is located at 628 SE Allison
Court.

Newcomers and
Friends Luncheon
The July Friendship
Luncheon of the Lake City
Newcomers and Friends is
11:30 a.m. July 6 at Costa
Del Sol located at 2260 W
U.S. Highway 90. All mem-
bers, guests and friends
are welcome. Call (386)
438-8100 or (386) 754-7227.

Thursday
Chair exercise
SColumbia County Senior
Services Inc. is hosting
7th Chair Exercise 1 p.m.
July 7 at the LifeStyle
Enrichment Center. Call
(386) 755-0235. The cen-
ter is located at 628 SE


Allison Court.

Play in the Clay
Diane Hornby is teach-
ing "Play In The Clay"
classes for the children's
summer vacation pro-
gram 10 a.m.-11 a.m.
July 7 and 14 for $5 at the
Stephen Foster Cultural
State Park. To register,
please call the park Gift
Shop at (386) 397-1920 or
visit www.stephenfoster-
CSO.org.To learn more
about the park, visit www.
FloridaStateParks. org/ste-
phenfoster

Friday, July 8
Cold Potato
Columbia County Senior
Services Inc. is hosting
a "Cold Potato" game 1
p.m. July 8 at the LifeStyle
Enrichment Center. Call
(386) 755-0235. The center
is located at 628 SE Allison
Court.

Japanese drumming
The Columbia County
Public Library is hosting
Japanese drumming with
Tampa Taiko 11 a.m. at
Fort White Community
Center and 2 p.m. at the
Main Branch July 8.

Saturday, July 9
Dog Days of Summer
Dog Days of Summer
is 10 a.m.-4 p.m. July 9 at
Stephen Foster State Park.
There will be a parade of
paws, canine costumes
and trick competition, as
well as demonstrations
of all description. Dr.
Hawthorne from Lake City
Animal Hospital will be
available to answer ques-
tions and Pet Smart will
have "free" give-a-ways.
Bring your own dog on
a leash. Regular park
entrance fees apply.


Casey Anthony won't testify


By KYLE HIGHTOWER
Associated Press

SORLANDO Casey
Anthony did not take the
stand in her murder trial as
defense attorneys wrapped
up their case Thursday.
without presenting concrete
evidence that Anthony's 2-
year-old daughter Caylee
wasn't killed but accidentally
drowned.
Her attorneys also never
produced any witnesses bol-
stering the claim made in last
month's opening statements
that Anthony had acted with-
out apparent remorse in the
weeks after her daughter's
death because she had been
molested by her father as a
child, resulting in emotional
problems.
Instead, their 13-day case
primarily focused on poking
holes in the prosecution's
contention that Anthony
killed Caylee in June 2008
by covering her mouth with
duct tape. Prosecutors said
the woman dumped Caylee's
body in the woods near her
parents' home and then
resumed her life of party-
ing and shopping. Their case
relied on circumstantial and
forensic evidence, and it did
have holes. They had no wit-
nesses who saw the killing
or saw Casey Anthony with
hfer daughter's body. And
there was no certain proof
that the child suffocated.
' The defense said in its
Opening statement that
Caylee drowned and that
Anthony's father George, a
former police officer, helped
iher cover up the death by
making it look like a homi-
cide and dumping the body
pear their home, where it
wras found by a meter reader
six months later. George
Anthony has vehemently
denied any involvement in
Caylee's death, the disposal
of her body or molesting his
daughter.
SIf convicted of first-degree


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Krystal Holloway, also known as River Cruz, testifies during
the Casey Anthony trial in Orlando Thursday. Holloway claims
to have had an affair with Casey's father George Anthony.


murder, Anthony, 25, could
receive the death penalty.
The defense's final wit-
nesses Thursday included
Krystal Holloway, a woman
who claims she had an affair
with George Anthony that
began after Caylee disap-
peared. She said he told
her in November 2008 that
Caylee's death was "an acci-
dent that snowballed out of
control" George Anthony has
denied having an affair with
her but admitted visiting her
home on several occasions.
They also recalled
George Anthony to ask if
he had supplied duct tape
he used to put up posters
of his granddaughter when
she was missing. He said
he couldn't remember. Lead
defense attorney Jose Baez
also asked him if he buried
his pets after their deaths in
plastic bags wrapped with
duct tape. Anthony said he
had on some occasions.
Prosecutors have contended
Caylee's body was disposed
of in a similar manner. Under
prosecution questioning, he
said he had never thrown.
their carcasses in a swamp.
The prosecutionThursday
afternoon began its rebut-
tal case with photographs
of clothing taken at the
Anthony home: Court was
adjourned for the day later in
the afternoon, with prosecu-


tors set to continue Friday
morning. Closing arguments
would follow, probably on
Saturday, and the jury would
then get the case that eve-
ning or Sunday.
Caylee was last seen
in mid-June 2008. For the
next month, Casey Anthony
avoided her parents, telling
her mother and her friends
that Caylee was with a baby
sitter named Zanny.
Casey's parents soon got
a notice that their daughter's
car had been towed. George
Anthony and the tow lot
operator both said the Pontiac
Sunfire smelled like death.
Prosecutors played a
tape of a frantic 911 call
made by Anthony's mother,
Cindy, reporting her grand-
daughter missing. She tells
the operator, "It smells like
there's been a dead body in
the damn car."
Casey Anthony then told
detectives that Caylee had
been kidnapped by the
nanny, and a massive search
was launched.
Over the next several
weeks, hundreds of volun-
teers scoured central Florida
for any clues to Caylee's
whereabouts. Meanwhile,
numerous photos surfaced
of Casey Anthony drink-
ing, some of them allegedly
taken in the month after
Caylee disappeared.


Reader's Choice


CUTESI S BB


1 2ND & 3RD Place Prizes to be Awarded for Boys & Girls!


Bring your baby's picture along with entry fee ($30.00)
to the Lake City Reporter,180 E. Duval St., mail to
P.O. Box 1709, Lake City, FL 32056.

All pictures will be published in the Lake City
Reporter's July 17, 2011 edition. All voting bal-
lots must be returned to the paper by July 25,
2011. So show off your child, grandchild,
godchild, niece or nephew.
The winners will be published on July 31, 2011


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For More Information or if you are
interested in becoming a sponsor
please Call Mary at 754-0401


Page Editor: Todd Taylor, 754-0424


LAKE CITY REPORTER


LOCAL & STATE FRIDAY, JULY 1, 2011









Page Editor: Todd Taylor, 754-0424 LAKE CITY REPORTER STATE FRIDAY, JULY 1, 2011


Judge asked to


hold pension


contributions


By BILL KACZOR
Associated Press
TALLAHASSEE A
group of labor unions
Thursday asked a judge to
set aside public employee
pension contributions in an
interest-bearing account
until a'legal challenge to a
new law requiring those pay-
ments is resolved.
Circuit Judge Jackie
Fulford did not immediately
rule after listening to argu-
ments from union and state
lawyers.
The law that goes into
effect Friday requires teach-
ers, state and county work-
ers and many city employ-
ees to contribute 3 percent
of their pay to the Florida
Retirement System, which
previously was fully funded
by taxpayers.
The unions, led by
the Florida Education
Association, asked Fulford
to order the State Board of
Administration, which over-
sees pension investments, to
put the employee contribu-
tions in a separate account
to ensure they'll get their
money back if they win the
lawsuit
Blaine Winship, a special
counsel for the attorney gen-
eral's office, argued a fund is
unnecessary and unjustified
because the board and pub-
lic employers are good for
the money.
Fulford asked Winship if
he would be willing to sign
a stipulation to that effect
He declined, saying it should
be left to political leaders to
decide if the money should
be paid back by the pension
fund or state and local gov-
ernments.
"We're simply saying
well satisfy the judgment,"
Winship said. "How we do
it would have implications.
There will be political con-
siderations; there will be
fiscal considerations, all of
which have to be taken into
account"
"Your honor, that's rabba-
dabba for 'No; we won't
stipulate that the employees
get their money back,'" said
Ron Meyer, a lawyer for the
teachers union.
He argued that without
such a stipulation or set-aside


once their contributions go
into the retirement fund
employees can get money
out of the system only by
retiring, quitting their jobs,
hoping the administrative
board and their employers
agree to refund the money
or die, in which case their
heirs would get death ben-
efits.
Defendants in the suit
include Gov. Rick Scott, who
chairs the board, and the
panel's other two members,
Attorney General Pam Bondi
and Chief Financial Officer
Jeff Atwater.
The Republican gover-
nor is a strong advocate of
Sthe new law and had rec-
ommended a bigger contri-
bution of 5 percent. Scott
says it's a matter of fair-
ness because most private
sector workers and public
employees in other states
are required to contribute to
their pension plans.
Florida's public employ-
ees say they've been willing
to work for less in exchange
for better benefits including
a fully funded pension. State
employees, for instance,
haven't had a general pay
raise in five years.
The unions contend the
new law violates the employ-
ees' contract, property and
collective bargaining rights.
Fulford plans to address
those issues in October.
Regardless of how she
rules the case is expected to
wind up before the Florida
Supreme Court
The employee contribu-
tions are estimated to save
the state and local govern-
ments $806 million in the
first year.
Winship said that money
*would earn $45 million more
if left in the pension fund
"than it would get being put
in a shoe box" as the unions
proposed. That's because
the board gets a much bet-
ter return from its long-term
investments, he said.
Meyer argued that $45
million is a relatively insignif-
icant amount for the $131.5
billion pension fund while
the employees are facing the
prospect of losing even if
they win the lawsuit without
some guarantee their contri-
butions would be repaid.


Temporary U.S. crypt for


Venezuelan ex-president


By CURT ANDERSON
AP Legal Affairs Writer
MIAMI (AP) Family mem-
bers sang the Venezuelan nation-
al anthem and joined in-prayer as
the remains of former Venezuelan
President Carlos Andres Perez were
temporarily entombed Thursday
in a U.S. crypt, while a fight con-
tinues over his" permanent resting
place.
A judge ordered Perez's sealed
copper casket moved from a mortu-
ary refrigeration unit to a second-
floor mausoleum site to preserve
the former president's dignity. But
even that was.the subject of a bitter
battle between family members who
are feuding over whether the body
should go home to Venezuela or
remain in the U.S.
A court-appointed curator first had
to find a neutral mausoleum. Then,
there was a dispute over whether
any photos could be taken of the
ceremony the ruling was "no."
The decision was also made to have
cemetery workers carry Perez's cas-
ket, so there would be no perceived
advantage or slight to either side.
Perez's hearse had a motorcycle
police escort for the six-mile trip
from the mortuary.


ASSOCIATED PRESS
The hearse transporting the casket of former Venezuelan President Carlos
Andres Perez, whose body is to be temporarily entombed in a crypt, arrives at
the cemetery in Miami, Thursday. Perez died Dec. 25 atage 88. His estranged
wife says she has the right to bury him in Venezuela. But his longtime compan-
ion in Miami says Perez insisted he would never return with political foe Hugo
Chavez as president.


Attendance at the brief entomb-
ment was restricted to an agreed-
upon list of family, friends and attor-
neys aligned with the two sides:
Perez's estranged wife in Venezuela,
Blanca Rodriguez de Perez, and
his longtime companion in Miami,
Cecilia Matos. News media were


restricted from the ceremony, but
Matos spoke with reporters after-
ward.
"I am happy that God gave us the
privilege of the entombment," Matos
said in Spanish, according to an
Associated Press translation. "Now
we can rest after this nightmare."


Ser DISCOUNTS AT THIS STORE ONLY


SeaS LAKE CITY
W P 2724 W. US Highway 90


2 get off death

row, now face life

without parole


By BRENT KALLESTAD
Associated Press
TALLAHASSEE --The
Florida Supreme Court
overturned death sentenc-
es Thursday for convicted
killers from Jacksonville
and Zephyrhills.
The justices said Roy
Ballard will live out his
remaining days in prison for
the 2006 murder of his step-
daughter, Autumn Traub
.of Lakeland. According to
court records, authorities
believed Ballard, now 70,
wanted his 33-year-old step-
daughter out of the way
to be able to continue a
sexual relationship with
her 14-year-old daughter.
Traub's body has never
been found.
The state's highest court
also ruled that Kevin Scott
should spend the rest of
his life in a Florida prison
for his role in a 2007 rob-
bery. He was convicted
of fatally shooting Kristo
Binjaku in the face during
a coin laundry robbery on
Jacksonville's south side on
June 30, 2007.
While the first-degree
murder convictions were
upheld in each case, the
justices ruled 5-2 that the
death penalty was a dis-
proportionate punishment


Justices Charles Canady
and Ricky Polston dissent-
ed with the majority, affirm-
ing the death sentence in
both cases.
"Planning in advance and
executing a brutal murder
for the purpose of continu-
ing an inappropriate and
incestuous relationship
with the victim's daughter
... certainly qualifies as one
of the most aggravated,"
Polston wrote in his dissent
in the Ballard decision.
Ballard is 'incarcerated
at Union Correctional and
Scott, 25, at Florida State
Prison. Either or both could
be moved to another facility
after their reclassification
or remain where they are,
Department of Corrections
spokeswoman Gretl
Plessinger said Thursday.
She noted that 397 inmates,
including three women,
remain on Florida's death
row.
The last execution was in
February 2010 when Martin
Edward Grossman was put
to death for the 1984 mur-
der of state wildlife officer
Margaret Park in Pinellas
County. Grossman was the
69th person executed in
Florida since the death pen-
alty was reinstated in the
state in 1979 and the 25th to
die by lethal injection.


I STORE FIXTURES FOR SALE!
ALL SALES RNAL, NO REFUNDS OR EXCHANGES. OPEN DAILY REGULAR HOURS. WE ACCEPT VISA, MASTERCARD, DISCOVER, AMERICAN
EXPRESS AND SEARS CARD. WE ACCEPT SEARS GIFT CARDS. DISCOUNTS DO NOT APPLY TO PREPAID GIFT CARDS. INVENTORY IS LIMITED
TO STOCK ON HAND. THIS STORE IS NOT PARTICIPATING IN CURRENT SEARS CIRCULARS. THIS EVENT EXCLUDES ELECTROLUX.


LAKE CITY REPORTER STATE FRIDAY, JULY 1, 2011


Page Editor: Todd Taylor, 754-0424








LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL & NATION FRIDAY, JULY 1, 2011


Senate cancels recess


to work on debt limit


By ALAN FRAM
Associated Press

SWASHINGTON The
Senate canceled its planned
July Fourth recess on
Thursday, but partisan
divisions remained razor
sharp as the clock ticked
on efforts to strike a deal to
avoid a government default
and trim huge federal defi-
cits.
A day after President
Barack Obama accused
congressional leaders of
procrastinating over the
impasse, Senate Majority
Leader Harry Reid, D-Nev.,
announced that the cham-
ber would meet begin-
ning next Tuesday. The
Republican-run House is
not in session this week but
had already been scheduled
to be at work next week.
Despite the Senate's
schedule change, there was
Sno indication the two sides
had progressed in resolv-
ing their chief disagree-
fment. Democrats insist that
^ deficit-cutting package of
deep spending cuts also
include higher taxes for
;the wealthiest Americans
Sand fewer tax breaks for oil
'companies. Republicans say
'any such agreement would
,be defeated in Congress,
a point Senate Minority
rader Mitch McConnell,
R-Ky., made anew when
he invited Obama to meet
i with GOP lawmakers at the
'Capitol on Thursday after-
,noon.


'That way he can hear
directly from Republicans
why what he's proposing
won't pass," McConnell
said on the Senate floor.
"And we can start talking
about what's actually pos-
sible."
McConnell's invita-
tion seemed almost
like a taunt, since well
before McConnell spoke
the White House had
announcedthatObamawas
heading to Philadelphia to
attend Democratic fund-
raising events.
In Philadelphia, the
president was met outside
one fundraising event by
protesters demanding less
spending.
Later, at a donors home,
he reiterated his call for
spending cuts and new tax
revenues.
'The truth is you could
figure out on the back of
a napkin how to get this
thing done," he said. "The
question is one of political
will."
White House spokes-
man Jay Carney defended
Obama's decision to attend
the fundraisers, saying,
"We can 'walk and chew
gum at the same time." He
also said McConnell had
merely "invited the presi-
dent to hear what would
not pass. That's not a con-
versation worth having."
The Obama administra-
tion has warned that if the
government's $14.3 trillion
borrowing limit is not raised


by Aug. 2, the U.S. will face
its first default ever, poten-
tially throwing world finan-
cial markets into turmoil,
raising interest rates and
threatening the economic
recovery. Many congres-.
sional Republicans indi-
cate they're unconvinced
that such scenarios would
occur, and some adminis-
tration officials worry that
it could take a financial
calamity before Congress
acts.
One Democratic offi-
cial familiar with the debt
talks said the real dead-
line for reaching an bipar-
tisan agreement on the
debt and deficit reduction
is mid-July, in order to
give congressional leaders
time to win votes and put
final details of a deal into
shape. The official spoke
on condition of anonymity
to reveal details of private
negotiations.
Obama has said that
in talks, Republican and
Democratic negotiators
have found more than'$1
trillion in potential spend-
ing cuts over the coming
decade, including reduc-
tions favored by both
sides.
The Democratic offi-
cial said Thursday that
of those cuts, roughly
$200 billion would come
mainly from savings from
Medicaid and Medicare,
the federal health insur-
ance programs for the
poor and elderly.


GRADES: On the rise across state

Continued From Page 1A


Progress this year, a
standard imposed by the
federal No Child Left
Behind law. Statewide,
just 10 percent of all ele-
mentary, middle and high
schools met AYPE
Millikin said it is typi-
.cal for very few schools
to make AYP because
Florida requires proficien-
cy in 39 measured areas
- like various skills in
reading and math and cat-
egories such as speakers
of other languages or spe-
cial education students
- to meet the federal
standard.
"If you don't make AYP
in one of the 39 areas,"
he said, "you don't make
AYP. Florida sets the stan-
dard of proficiency at 39
measured areas and you
must make all 39 each
year. If you don't, then
you are flagged as 'needs
improvement.' "
Millikin said every


state is allowed to imple-
ment its own measure-
ment of AYP proficiency.
"Everybody can
implement its own test
and what's passing on
that test," he said. "On
Florida's scale, we have
implemented the standard
of must pass all 39 cat-
egories. Florida has some
of the most rigorous stan-
dards in the country."
Here are the grades
earned by county schools,
as reported in yesterday's
Lake, City Reporter:
Grades were as fol-
lows:
Columbia City
Elementary: A (Last year's
grade: B);
Eastside Elementary: A
(was B);
Five Points Elementary:
C (was C);
Fort White Elementary:
A (was A);
Lake City Middle: A
(was A);


Melrose Park
Elementary: A (was B);
Nieblack Elementary: C
(was D);
Pinemount Elementary:
A (was A);
Summers Elementary: A
(was B);
Westside Elementary: A
(was A).
High school grades
are not released until
graduation rates are
computed. An official
grade for Richardson
Middle School is pend-
ing as well, as some spe-
cial needs high school
students are assigned
there, Millikin said.
However, the school
earned an unofficial
numerical score equiva-
lent to a C. Five Points
missed a B by one point.
Millikin said the District
will appeal.
The Associated Press
contributed reporting to this
story.


2 KILLED: Lake City man hurt in crash

Continued From Page 1A


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter

Chamber mixer
Rod Butler (from left), Carolyn Burger, Lucrecia Williams and Dusty Bailey chat Thursday
during the Lake City/Columbia County Chamber of Commerce mixer at the Eye Center of
North Florida.


We would like to welcome
Chris Starling as the
newest funeral director to
the Dees-Parrish Family
Funeral Home team.


sEs-PARRis,


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Licensed Funeral Director


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Lake City
12. R\A/ Midtown Plarp


A,8 ~,fa-n inpp


towing a small, handmade
trailer.
A 2007 GMC .pickup
truck driven by Williams
was traveling in the right
lane in front of the van.
Joseph Belanger
changed crossed into
the center lane to pass
Williams' pickup truck,
and for unknown reasons
Belanger immediately
reentered the right lane,
causing the trailer to fish-
tail in front of Williams'
pickup.
- The front of Williams'
:vehicle struck the right
'rear corner of the trailer,
causing the van to leave
the roadway onto the right
shoulder.
SJoseph Belanger then
overcorrected and lost
control of the van, accord-
iing to FHP
The van began to over-
turn on the northbound
right shoulder, ejecting
Joseph Belanger, who was
unrestrained.
Alachua County Fire
Rescue personnel pro-
nounced Joseph and


Dorothy Belanger dead at
the scene. Reports said
Dorothy Belanger was not
wearing a seatbelt.
Williams, who was
restrained by a seatbelt,


suffered minor injuries
in the crash, but refused
to be taken to the hospi-
tal by Alachua County: Fire
Rescue personnel, reports
said.


.



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Lake City Reporter


Story ideas?

Contact
Tim Kirby
Sports Editor
754-0421
r- rr .,,. ,,' },i ,-;,: ri r%-r ....7 : ,-


SPORTS


Friday, July 1, 2011


www.lakecityreporter.com


Section B


CHEAP SEATS


Tim Kirby
Phone:(386) 754-0421
7.A rtvo,'jl',: ,-' i-x ep,:-1r! ":'rn

A track

standout

at Baylor

Tiffany
Townsend
recently put
the finishing
touches on a
standout career in track
at Baylor University.
Townsend placed 12th
in the 200-meter
qualifying and 15th in the
100-meter qualifying at
the USA Outdoor Track
& Field Championships
in Eugene, Ore. She
did not make the finals
in either event, but a
couple of weeks before
the senior led the Bears
at the NCAA Outdoor
Championships in
Des.Moines, Iowa.
Townsend ran a
school-record 22.58 in
the NCAA 200 meters.
She placed third in the
field with the fourth
fastest time in the world
this year. Townsend also
qualified for the final in
the 100-meter and placed
eighth with a time of
11.244. The seventh-place
runner beat her by .001.
Townsend was nanied
All-American in both
events, bringing her total
All-American honors
during her Baylor years
to 17. She holds the
Bears school record in
the 100 meters and 200
meters, and has several
Big 12 titles in sprints
and relays both
indoors and outdoors.
Townsend's home
town on her Baylor bio.is
listed as Killeen, Texas,
but she was born in Lake
City in 1989. She is the
granddaughter of Dottie
Coppock. Her interest in
track was sparked while
competing at the junior
high level in Lake City.
Texas A&M won both
the NCAA men's and
women's outdoor
championships this year.
The Aggie men won
with 55 points, followed
by Florida State with
54 and Florida with 53.
Texas A&M won the
women's side with 49
points. Florida State tied
for 20th with 14 points
and Florida was 34th
with eight'points.
Florida State
produced champions in
four events. Ngonidzashe
Makush won the 100
meters and long jump.
Maurice Mitchell won
the 200 meters. The
team of Kemar Hyman,
Makush, Mitchell and
Brandon Byram won the
4x100 relay.
Christian Taylor won
the triple jump for the
Gators.
* Tim Kirby is sports editor
of the Lake City Reporter.


DIA


su


ER


BRANDON FINLEY/Lake City Reporter
Fort White High seniors A.J. Legree (from left), Jonathan Dupree and Soron Williams work out by flipping tires during one of the Indians' summer workout
sessions in Fort White on Thursday.




Fort White going strong


By BRANDON FINLEY
bfinley@lakecityreporter.com'
Summers around the state are
all about getting stronger, faster
and better conditioned for high
school football teams. Fort White is
no different as the Indians continue
to gruel through summer work-,
outs.
The Indians are in their fourth
week of its summer condition pro-
gram, which includes strength
and conditioning excercises
designed to enhance Fort White's
on-field performance during the
fall.
"We're wrapping up our fourth
week before taking a week off for
the holiday," Fort White assistant


coach Ken Snider said. "Plus, we've
been running three weeks of 7-on-7
passing,leagues with Gainesville,
Buchholz and Columbia high
schools."
Fort White is smaller in size than
the schools the Indians are going
up against, but Snider sees that as
an advantage.
"It's a plus in the run and pass
offense as we continue to jet bet-
ter," he said. "The defense is con-
tinuing to get better in the passing
game as well." *
Numbers wise, Fort White can't
stack up to the bigger schools, but
Snider believes what the Indians
are lacking in numbers they are
making up for in heart
"As far as depth, we don't match


up," he said. "We have guys going
both ways on offense and defense.
The effort has been there on both
sides and we're getting a chance
to get a peak at different looks on
'offense and defense."
It's not only the skill-position
players, however, that are going
through grueling camps this sum-
mer. Fort White sent eight linemen
to the Down & Dirty Camp last
week, and the reviews have been
in its favor.
"Everything I hear is positive,"
Snider said. "Jonathan Dupree
pretty much stoodout according to
our coaches and a couple of college
coaches were impressed with what
they saw."
The Indians will take next week


off before coming back in prepara-
tion of the FCA Camp which runs
July 21-23.
"We're pretty much the smallest
school there," Snider said. "We're
going to go up with the big boys
looking to get better. It's been a
positive experience in.the past, so
we're hoping to go and come back
with everyone healthy and another
positive experience."
Fort White will have its own
camp starting on Aug. 8.
'We're going to come back, then
eat and sleep football," he said.
'We're going to bond and stay in
the gym. With this, the Down &
Dirty and the FCA camps, they're
all good chances for us to grow as
a team and bond together."


Florida athletics captures

first Capital One Cup


Stanford wins
inaugural
women's trophy.
From staff reports

McLean, Va. Capital
One Financial Corporation,
an official NCAACorporate
Champion,todayannounced
that the University of Florida
men's athletics program is
the winner of the inaugu-
ral Capital One Cup. The
school will be formally hon-
ored alorig with the wom-
en's Capital One Cup win-
ner, Stanford University, at
the ESPY Awards televised
by ESPN on July 13, during
which the Capital One Cup
trophy will be presented
along with a $200,000 dona-
tion to fund student-athlete


graduate-level scholarships.
Launched in the fall of 2010,
the Capital One Cup honors
NCAA Division I athletics
programs for their cumu-
lative on-field performance
across multiple men's and
women's sports.
"On behalf of the univer-
sity, our student athletes
and our fans, we are hon-
ored to accept the inaugu-
ral Capital One Cup trophy
and $200,000 scholarship,"
said University of Florida
Athletics Director Jeremy
Foley. "Our goal is to strive
for overall athletic success,
and we're extremely proud
of our men's program win-
ning the Capital One Cup
and our women's program
placing fourth. Thank you
to Capital One and its affili-
ated companies for, their


support of intercollegiate
athletics."
' Climbing from the sixth-
place position that they held
prior to the NCAA Men's
College World Series, the
Gators advanced all the
way to the championship
series at the CWS,'finishing
second in the USA Today/
ESPN Top 25 coaches'
baseball poll and securing
the necessary points to
claim an overall first-place
finish in the men's Capital
One Cup standings with a
total of 93 points. Like the
women's competition, the
winner of the men's Capital
One Cup came down to
the final NCAA Division I
championship of the year,
the NCAA Men's College
GATORS continued on 2B


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Florida's Mike Zunino claps following a solo home run against
South Carolina in the fourth inning of Game 2 of the NCAA
baseball College World Series in Omaha, Neb. on Tuesday.


I__ I _ I












LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS FRIDAY, JULY 1, 2011 Page Editor: Brandon Finley, 754-0420


SCOREBOARD


TELEVISION

TV sports
Today
AUTO RACING
2 p.m.
ESPN2 NASCAR, Nationwide
Series, pole qualifying for Subway Jalapeng
250, at Daytona Beach
4 p.m.
SPEED NASCAR, Sprint Cup, pole
qualifying for Coke Zero 400, at Daytona
Beach
7:30 p.m.
ESPN NASCAR, Nationwide Series,
Subway Jalapeno 250, at Daytona Beach
BOXING
II p.m.
ESPN2 Welterweights, Mark Jason
Melligen (21-2-0) vs. Sebastian Lujan
(37-5-2), at San Antonio
GOLF
9 am.
TGC European PGATour, Open de
France, second round, at Paris
12:30 p.m.
TGC Champions Tour, Montreal
Championship, first round, at Blainville,
Quebec
3 p.m.
TGC PGA Tour, AT&T National,
second round, at Newtown Square, Pa.
6:30 p.m.
TGC USGA, U.S. Men's &Women's
Amateur Public Links Championships,
semifinal matches, at Bandon, Ore.
MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL
2:10 p.m.
WGN Chicago White Sox at
Chicago Cubs
7 p.m.
MLB Regional coverage, N.Y.
Yankees at N.Y. Mets or San Francisco
at Detroit
SOCCER
8:45 am.
ESPN FIFA, Women's.World Cup,
Group B, Japan vs. Mexico,'at Leverkusen.
Germany
Noon
ESPN FIFA, Women's World Cup,
Group B, New Zealand vs. England, at
Dresden, Germany
TENNIS
7 am.
ESPN2 -The Championships, men's
semifinals, at Wimbledon, England
Noon
NBC The Championships, men's
semifinals, at Wimbledon, England (live
and same-day tape)

AUTO RACING

Race week

NASCAR
Coke Zero 400
Site: Daytona Beach
Schedule: Today, qualifying
(Speed, 4-6:30 p.m.); Saturday, race,
7:30 p.m. (TNT, 6:30-1 p.m.).
Track: Daytona International Speedway
(tri-oval, 2.5 miles). "
Race distance: 400 miles, 160 laps.
NATIONWIDE
Subway Jalapeno 250
Site: Daytona Beach
Schedule: Today, qualifying (ESPN2,
2-4 p.m.), race, 7:30 p.m. (ESPN,
7-10 p.m.).
Track: Daytona International
Speedway.
Race distance: 250 miles, 100 laps.

BASEBALL

AL standings


East Division
W L
NewYork 48 31
Boston 46 34
Tampa Bay 45 36
Toronto 40 41
Baltimore 35 42
Central Division
W L
Detroit 44 38
Clevelard 42 37
Chicago 39 42
Minnesota 34 45
Kansas City 33 48
West Division
W L
Texas 43 38


Los Angeles
Seattle
Oakland


42 40
39 42
36 45


.512 I1
.481 4
.444 7


Interleague play

Wednesday's Games
Cincinnati 4,Tampa Bay 3
Minnesota I, LA. Dodgers 0
San Diego 4, Kansas City I
Atlanta 5, Seattle 3
Cleveland 6,Arizona 2
Philadelphia 2, Boston I
N.Y.Yankees 5. Milwaukee 2"
N.Y. Mets 16, Detroit 9
St. Louis 5, Baltimore I
L.A.Angels IWashington 0
Toronto 2, Pittsburgh I
Texas 3, Houston 2
Chicago White Sox 3, Colorado 2
Florida 3, Oakland 0
Thursday's Games
Boston 5, Philadelphia 2
N.Y.Yankees 5, Milwaukee 0
Detroit 5, N.Y. Mets 2
Chicago White Sox 6, Colorado 4,
10 innings
Florida 5, Oakland 4
St. Louis at Baltimore (n)
Pittsburgh itToronto (n)
Texas at Houston (n)
Today's Games
Philadelphia (K.Kendrick 4-4) at
Toronto (R.Romero 7-7), 1:07 p.m.
Chicago White Sox (EJackson 4-6) at
Chicago Cubs (R.Wells 1-2), 2:20 p.m.
San Francisco (Bumgarner 4-9) at
Detroit (Penny 5-6), 7:05 p.m.
Cleveland (Masterson 5-6) at
Cincinnati (Arroyo 7-6), 7:10 p.m.
N.Y.Yankees (Nova 7-4) at N.Y. Mets
(Niese 7-6),7:10 p.m.
St. Louis (Westbrook 6-4) at Tampa
Bay (W.Davis 7-5), 7:10 p.m.
Baltimore (Guthrie 3-9) at Atlanta
("urrjens 10-3), 7:35 p.m.
Boston (Wakefield 4-3) at Houston
(Norris 4-6), 8:05 p.m.
Florida (Ani.Sanchez 6-1) at Texas
(Ogando 7-3), 8:05 p.m.
Kansas City (Duffy 1-2) at Colorado
(Nicasio 2-1), 8:10 p.m.
Milwaukee (Gallardo 9-4) at Minnesota
(Uriano 4-7),8:10 p.m.
Arizona (Collmenter 4-4) at Oakland
(Harden 0-0), 10:05 p.m.
L.A. Dodgers (Kuroda 5-9) at LA.
Angels (Chatwood 5-4), 10:05 p.m.
San Diego (Moseley 2-7) at Seattle
(Vargas 5-5), 10:10 p.m.
Saturday's Games
Philadelphia atToronto, 1:07 p.m.
Chicago White Sox at Chicago Cubs,
4:10 p.m.
Cleveland at Cincinnati, 4:10 p.m.
N.Y.Yankees at N.Y. Mets, 4:10 p.m.
Boston at Houston, 7:05 p.m.
San Francisco at Detroit, 7:05 p.m.
Baltimore at Atlanta, 7:10 p.m.
Milwaukee at Minnesota, 7:10 p.m.
St. Louis at Tampa Bay, 7: 10 p.m.
Florida at Texas, 8:05 p.m.
Kansas City at Colorado, 8:10 p.m.
Arizona at Oakland, 9:05 p.m.
L.A. Dodgers at L.A.Angels, 9:05 p.m.
San Diego at Seattle, 10:10 p.m.
Sunday's Games
San Franciscoat Detroit, 1:05 p.m.
Philadelphia atToronto, 1:07 p.m.
Cleveland at.Cincinnati, 1:10 p.m.
N.Y.Yankees at N.Y. Mets, 1:10 p.m.
Baltimore at Atlanta, 1:35 p.m.
St. Louis atTampa Bay, 1:40 p.m.
Boston at Houston, 2:05 p.m.
Milwaukee at Minnesota, 2:10 p.m.
Chicago White Sox at Chicago Cubs,
2:20 p.m.
Kansas City at Colorado, 3:10 p.m.
Arizona at Oakland, 4:05 p.m.
San Diego at Seattle, 4:10 p.m.
Florida at Texas, 8:05 p.m.
LA. Dodgers at L.A.Angels, 8:10 p.m.

NL standings

East Division
W L Pct GB
Philadelphia 51 31 .622 -
Atlanta- 47 35 .573 4
NewYork 41 40 .506 9%
Washington 40 41 .494 10'A
Florida 35 45 .438 15
Central Division
W L Pct GB
Milwaukee 44 38 .537 -
St. Louis 43 38 .531
Cincinnati 42 40 .512 2
Pittsburgh 40 39 .506 2%
Chicago 33 48 .407 10'A


Houston 28 53 .346 15%
West Division
W L Pct GB
San Francisco 46 35 .568 -
Arizona 44 38 .537 2'
Colorado 39 41 .488 6A
San Diego 37 45 .451 9'
Los Angeles 36 46 .439 10'
Wednesday's Game
Chicago Cubs 2, San Francisco I
Thursday's Game
Chicago Cubs 5, San Francisco 2
Today's Game
Pittsburgh (Morton 7-4) atWashington,
(Gorzelanny 2-6), 7:05 p.m.
Saturday's Games
Pittsburgh at Washington, 3:35 p.m.,
I st game
Pittsburgh at Washington, 7:05 p.m.,
2nd game
Sunday's Game
Pittsburgh atWashington, 1:35 p.m.

BASKETBALL

WNBA schedule

Thursday's Games
New York at Atlanta (n)
Minnesota atTulsa (n)
Today's Games
San Antonio at NewYork, 7 p.m.
Seattle at Connecticut, 7:30 p.m.
Chicago at Phoenix, 10 p.m.

TENNIS

Wimbledon

At The All England Lawn Tennis &
Croquet Club
Wimbledon, England
Thursday
Singles
Women
Semifinals
Petra Kvitova (8), Czech Republic,
def. Victoria Azarenka (4), Belarus, 6-1,
3-6,6-2.
Maria Sharapova (5), Russia, def. Sabine
Lisicki, Germany, 6-4, 6-3.
Doubles
Men
Quarterfinals
Bob and Mike Bryan (I),United'States,
def. Jurgen Melzer, Austria, and Philipp
Petzschner (5), Germany, 6-3 6-4, 64.
Michael Uodra, France, and Nenad
Zimonjic (6), Serbia, def. James Cerretani,
United States, and Philipp Marx, Germany,
6-7 (3), 7-6 (7), 7-6 (5), 7-5.
Semifinals
Robert Lindstedt, Sweden, and Horia
Tecau (8), Romania, def. Christopher Kas,
Germany, and Alexander Peya,Austria, 6-3,
7-6 (3), 6-2.
Women
Quarterfinals
Kveta Peschke, Czech Republic, and
Katarina Srebotnik (2), Slovenia, def. Peng
Shuai and Zheng Jie (8), China, 6-2, 6-7
(7), 6-4.
Sabine Lisicki, Germany, and Sam
Stosur.Australia, def. Nadia Petrova Russia.
and Anastasia Rodionova (6), Australia,
7-5, 1-6,6-1.
Junior Singles
Boys
Quarterfinals
Jason Kubler, Australia, def. Julien
Cagnina, Belgium, 6-3.6-I.
Luke Saville (16),-Australia, def. Joris
De Loore, Belgium, 6-7 (I), 6-2, 6-2.
Liam Broady (15), Britain, def. Robin
Kern, Germany, 7-6 (4), 46, 13-11.
Kaichi Uchida, Japan, def. Mate Pavic
(8), Croatia, 4-6,7-6 (7), 10-8.

SOCCER

Women's World Cup

GROUP PLAY
Thursday
France 4, Canada 0
Germany I, Nigeria 0
Today
Japan vs. Mexico, 9 a.m.
New Zealand vs. England, 12:15 p.m.
Saturday
North Korea vs. Sweden, 8 a.m.
United States vs. Colombia,
Noon


Sunday
Australia vs. Equatorial Guinea,
8 a.m.


'BRIEFS


CHS FOOTBALL

Fundraiser dinner

at Olustee Park

Columbia High football
supporters have a
barbecue chicken dinner
fundraiser from 11 a.m.
to 2 p.m. today at Olustee
Park. Dinners are $5.
Sweet tea is $1. Tickets can
be purchased at the park.
For details, call Clara
Crews at (386) 697-6524.

FORT WHITE FOOTBALL

Quarterback Club

meeting July 11

The Fort White
Quarterback Club has an
executive committee
meeting planned for 7 p.m.
July 11 in the teacher's
lounge at the high school.
All board members are
urged to attend. The
program committee will
meet at 6:30 p.m. prior to
the executive committee
meeting. All those helping
with the 2011 program are
asked to attend.
For details, call Shayne


Morgan at (386) 397-4954.

SWIMMING

Lessons offered

July 11-22
Swimming lessons are



Unscramble these four'Jumbles,
one letter to each square,
to form four ordinary words.

WRNDA


July 11-22 at the pool. Cost
is $50 per person.
Registration at the pool
is 5-7 p.m. Wednesday and
all day July 7-8.

From staff reports

THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME
by David L. Hoyt and Jeff Knurek


Now arrange the circled letters
to form the surprise answer, as
__ suggested by the above cartoon.

Answer:. l ~ m
(Answers tomorrow)
Yesterday's Jumbles: GRIME FAVOR SUMMOM TACKLE
s Answer: The waiter's cold would soon force him -
OUT OF SERVICE


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Maria Sharapova returns to Germany's Sabine Lisicki during their semifinal match at the All
England Lawn Tennis Championships at Wimbledon on Thursday.


Sharapova reaches 1st


Wimbledon final since '04


By HOWARD FENDRICH
Associated Press

WIMBLEDON, England
- So what if Maria
Sharapova managed to
win only two of the first 13
points of her Wimbledon
semifinal Thursday, drop-
ping the first three games?
So what if she bungled
her serve so badly that she
double-faulted 13 times?
All that mattered to
Sharapova was that she
roared well, shrieked
- her way back into the
match, taking 12 of the
last 16 games to beat wild-
card entry Sabine Lisicki
of Germany 6-4, 6-3 and


return to the final at the All
England Club for the first
time since 2004, when she
won the title at 17.
"Ifs been many years, but
itfs a really great feeling,"
Sharapova said. 'Today
wasn't my best match of the
championships, so I was
real happy to get through
in two sets. But, yeah, it's
pretty amazing to be back
on that stage."
In Saturday's final,
Sharapova will play No. 8
Petra Kvitova of the Czech
Republic, who hit nine
aces and dictated points
throughout her 6-1, 3-6, 6-2
victory over No. 4 Victoria
Azarenka of Belarus.


Sharapova's seven-year
gap between Wimbledon
finals is the longest for a
woman in the Open era,
which began in 1968.
"I'm in a different stage
in my career. I'm 24 years
old. I have a lot of experi-
Sence behind my back," said
Sharapova, who hasn't lost
a set during the tourna-
ment. "But I'm still playing
tennis."
That wasn't always a
given: Months after win-
ning her third, and most
recent, Grand Slam title at
'the 2008 Australian Open,
Sharapova was sidelined
with a serious injury to her
right shoulder.


Continued From Page 1B

World Series, with six out of
the eight qualifying teams
having the chance to win
the inaugural men's Capital
One Cup. The University
of Virginia finished second
in the final men's Capital
One Cup standings with 82
points, followed by Auburn
and Texas A&M, who tied
for third place, and Stanford
University.
"On behalf of Capital One,
we'd like tq congratulate
the University of Florida
for winning the inaugural
men's Capital One Cup,"
said Capital One Chief
Marketing Officer, Bill
McDonald. "It was exciting
to see so many programs,
including schools like


1
4(
8
11

12
13 I
14 I
15 I

17

19
20

21
i.


Eastern Washington, stay
in contention for the trophy
throughout the year. The
Gators' performance at the
CWS and at multiple other
NCAA Division I champi-
onships, including their
National Championship at
the indoor track and field
championship, proves that
every game, match and
meet counts."
The Gators rounded out
the spring athletics season
with Top 10 finishes in out-
door track and field, tennis
and baseball. Earlier in the
year, Florida made strides
in the winter season with
Top 10 finishes in basket-
ball, swimming and diving,
and .an impressive first-


ACROSS 37 Physique,
slangily
Lingerie buy 38 Lathered
Open to debate 40 Goose-down
Hindu title items
Europe-Asia 42 Fish eggs
range 43 Zoo staffer
Water, in Baja 44 Prom
License plate attenders
Delicate color 47 Waterfall
Pegboard 51 Caged pets
game 53 Throw hard
Embassy staff- 54 Belief
er 55 Lotion additive
Pub brew 56 Viking name
Sugarloaf 57 Ocean
locale 58 They may be
Gymnast's sealed
goal 59 Skip stones


22 Middle
25 Very strong
28 Orthodontist's
grp .
29 Etc. relative (2
wds.)
31 You bet!
33 Ruler of
Venice
35 Lay low


DOWN


Liverpool chap
Diatribe
Wedding sites
Like a he-man
Horrible boss
Garcon's yes
Yellow pad


place finish at the indoor
track and field champion-
ship.
The final stretch of the
race for the Capital One
Cup took place during the
spring athletics season
with five sports in play to
determine the champion.
Highlights from the Capital
One Cup during the 2010
- 2011 men's athletics sea-
son include:
Seventy-five men's pro-
grams earned points.
Florida placed in the
Top 10 in six champion-
ships including basketball,
swimming and diving,
indoor track and field, ten-
nis, outdoor track and field
and baseball.


Answer to Previous Puzzle

PLATE WANE
CY BORG VACUUM


ACROSS TOT
HOST LEON
MOP SLY NEAT
UKES AM I SEE
GERE OPT LIMN
YARD IDA APE

EIARC BTIANGED

LOOKUP ENIGMA

P LONS OTTERS
SOAK SHEIK K


Just for guys
More than fume
Disney CEO
Bob -
Ms. Hagen of
films


Want more puzzles?
Check out the "Just Right Crossword Puzzles" books
at QuillDriverBooks.com


7-1 2011 UFS, Dist. by Univ. Uclick for UFS


16 Deadly poi-
sons
18 Quote from
21 Passed the
word
22 Crumple
23 Uproars
24 "Othello"
heavy
25 Not owing
26 Worn-down
pencils
27 Jogging gait
30 Quaker pro-
noun
32 Magazine
execs
34 Pulls down
36 Festive nights
39 Go (lose it)
41 Wrote on
glass
43 Florists' sup-
ply
44 Not that
45 Relaxation
46 Madame
Bovary
47 Wheat or corn
48 Mystique
49 Faucet prob-
lem
50 Broad-antlere
animal
52 Yale athlete



4


GATORS: Beat out Virginia for 1st


LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS FRIDAY, JULY 1, 2011


Page Editor: Brandon Finley, 754-0420


a










LAKE CITY REPORTER ADVICE & COMICS FRIDAY, JULY 1, 2011


DILBERT


BABY BLUES


BLONDIE
WOW, I VEAH, I KEEP
SEEMS LIKE GLANCING UP
THE CLOCKS AND TIME JUS
> ARE CREEPS ALONE
RESETTING,
THEMSELVES
15 MINUTES
EARULIE /

.^V '9

AJ


BEETLE BAILEY


HAGARTHE HORRIBLE


SNUFFY SMITH


ZITS


GARFIELD


OOPS. I DIDN'T KNOW
YOU LERE SINGLE.
MARRIED GUYS CAN
TAKE A HIGHER
SETTING.
8> a
L.( =


FRANK & ERNEST


DEAR ABBY


Constant state of fear around

men is abuse victim's legacy


DEAR ABBY: I'm writ-
ing because I'm afraid I will
never be able to have a nor-
mal, healthy relationship
with a man. Until recently, I
was the victim of a physical-
ly, verbally and sexually abu-
sive father. Now I find myself
unable to speak around even
the most nonthreatening boy.
At even the slightest
hint of aggression, or anger
I flinch and run away. I'm
afraid I will never escape the
shadow of what he did to
me. What should I do? -
SHY AND BATTERED IN
NEW JERSEY
DEAR SHY AND
BATTERED: For you to
move from victim to survivor
will take professional help.
Few people are able to com-
pletely overcome the abuse
you have experienced on their
own. A good first step would
be to contact RAI.N.N.,
the Rape, Abuse and Incest
National Network Its website
is www.rainn.org and its toll-
free phone number is 800656-
4673. The counselors there
can guide you in finding help
to repair your life.
Men like your father
belong behind bars, where
they can't hurt helpless chil-
dren. If he would sexually
and physically abuse you, no
child is safe around him. If
there are minors still living
with your parents, the police
should be notified about
what he did to you so they
can be rescued..
DEAR ABB\Y: I have'
been happily married for six


Abigail Van Buren
www.deorabby.com
years. My husband is kind,
caring and honest Our only
problem involves jewelry.
I'm not good at wearing my
wedding ring. I can be for-
getful and clumsy, and I have
misplaced it, almost dropped
it down the drain, etc. I have
tried wearing it around my
neck, but it gets in the way.
Myhusbandwears his ring
and says he doesn't mind if I
don't wear mine because he
trusts me. My .problem is
other people. My co-work-
ers are suspicious. My famn-
'ily thinks ifs "strange." Men
have hit on me, and when I
politely told them I'm mar-
ried, they became angry and
asked where my ring is.
I don't do or say anything
to lead people on, and I often
mention that I'm happily mar-
ried. I'mbecomingfrustrated
and have even considered
getting a tattoo on my ring
finger so people know I'm
married. My husband says
not to let it bother me; that
he doesn't care about what
others think. -- NO RING
ON IT, COLUMBIA, MO.
DEAR NO RING ON
IT: I do not recommend get-
ting your finger tattooed to
allay your co-workers' sus-


picions or because some
fool becomes angry that you
don't welcome his advances.
My recommendation is to
listen to the secure, mature
man you married and stop
worrying so much about-
what other people think.
DEAR ABBY: My wife
makes snarky comments to
our extremely nice daughter-
in-law. Our son finally had
enough and has issued an ulti-
matum to his mother: Either
change her ways or she won't
be able to see their child.
Our first grandchild is due
soon. Has our son gone too
far? What can this grandpa-
to-be do when Grandma-to-
be claims she "doesn't care,"
even though I know she's
lying to herself? -- NOT FAIR
TO ME IN SAN JOSE
DEAR NOT FAIR TO
YOU: Has your son said
that YOU won't be welcome
to visit your grandchild? If'
not, I'm sure you will be
welcome minus his mother.
I respect your son for draw;,
ing the line and insisting his
wife be treated with respect,
which his mother hasn't
been doing. Because you
can't control her behavior or-
her mouth, invest in cartons
of tissue because I predict
shell be needing a lot bf
them when the baby arrives
and she's sitting by herself,
persona non grata.

* Write Dear Abby at
www.DearAbby.com or
P.O. Box 69440, Los
Angeles, CA 90069.


HOROSCOPES


ARIES (March 21-April
19): A personal problem at
home will develop if you
aren't careful in the way you
handle people. The more
aware you are of the pit-
falls that can occur, the less
chance that you will end up
being disappointed and dis-
gruntled. **
TAURUS (April 20-May
20): New acquaintances
will develop with people
you meet through events
or activities. Your input will
intrigue someone who has
interesting plans that can
benefit from what you have
to offer. Don't underestimate
yourself K****
GEMINI (May 21-
June 20): Reuniting with
old friends will help you put
your life back in perspec-'
tive. Remembering your
dreams and aspirations will
help you make a decision
that will affect your future
prosperity. An unexpected
offering will set your mind
at ease. ***
CANCER (June 21-
July 22): Your emotions
will be difficult to control.
Spend time developing cre-
ative ideas or discussing
vacation plans with some-
one yo-- love. Learn what-
ever you can through expe-
rience or from an expert.
Don't let the changes dis-
rupt your world or cause
you worry. ***


THE LAST WORD
Eugenia Last

LEQ (July 23-Aug. 22):
Take a unique approach to
finance, budgeting aind
building your assets. You
don't have to overspend to
get ahead. Show your abil-
ity to be prudent, efficient
and practical and you can
advance. Take a trip if it will
lead to a promotion or pro-
fessional security. ***
VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept.
22): Choose to help others
and, in the end, you will be
helping yourself. Check out
opportunities by attending a
tradeshow or signing up for
a business seminar. Don't
let a relationship cost you
emotionally or financially.
Make last-minute changes to
prevent an unfortunate loss.

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct.
22): Do something that will
make you happy and boost
your confidence. A little rest
and relaxation or pampering
will do you good. Updating
your image will give you a
change of attitude regarding
your personal life arid what
you can achieve. **
SCORPIO (Oct. 23-
Nov. 21): You need to fig-
ure out what you want to do
next and there is no better
way than to do the things
you enjoy the most. Once
you are relaxed and feeling


good, you will recognize a
profitable endeavor that can
lead to personal and financial
victory. 5 stars
SAGMITARIUS (Nov.
22-Dec. 21): Love can"
be a wonderful thing, but
encountering a fickle situa-
tion with someone is likely-if
you let temptation take over.
Don't be led astray. Liven
up a good relationship that
needs a pick-me-up. *** ,..
CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-
Jan. 19): Don't let someone
Cost you. Paying for others'
mistakes doesn't help. Put
your money into your home,.
your family investments and
travel plans. Your strength
and courage will lead to your
success. ***
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-
Feb. 18): Stay within your
means and you will avoid a
stressful situation. A decision
regarding your residence
will .help to stabilize your
life.. Someone special will
make you an offer you can-
not refuse. A 'commitment
will help you stay focused.

PISCES (Feb. 19-
March 20): Initiate some of
your old ideas and incorpo-
rate them into your current
goals. Success awaits you.
Networking will allow you to
choose the best person pos-
sible to join your team. Don't
let love cost you emotionally
or financially. *****


CELEBRITY CIPHER

by Luis Camrpos
Celebrity Cipher cryptograms are created from quotations by famous people, past and present.
Each letter in the cipher stands for another.
Today's clue: L equals X
"PDH H RWSRE I TX RN B T X N D
OHTOV JM RE NPK MJUCRO KSK,
RN ATGK AK CDDV TN ASXKCW TEG


WRL R N "


- ATH I DN VRGGKH


PREVIOUS SOLUTION: "I want to die in the saddle. I love writing, producing,
acting, directing." Peter Fonda


(c) 2011 by NEA, Inc. 7-1


FOR BETTER OR WORSE


CLASSIC PEANUTS


RN' DRD SAYS
HE. KNOWS
HO) HE-
FEELS.




ib--AlZ_^-~


HEY WAIT! OMIGOSH!
ACCORDING IT IS!!
TO MY WATCH,
IT'S WAY I
AFTER 5 l" I
O'CLOCK! ,"


4^^-


S YOU'RE T / HAT'S FOR SURE!I
CERTAINLY WAIT'LL YOU HEAR
IN A GOOD ABOUT THE NEW
MOO / CLOCK IDEA I
CAME UP WITH!!



f\ ^^


3B'


Page Editor: Emogene Graham, 754-0415






LAKE CITY REPORTER ADVERTISEMENT FRIDAY, JULY 1, 2011

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