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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028308/01592
 Material Information
Title: The Lake City reporter
Uniform Title: Lake City reporter (Lake City, Fla. 1967)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: John H. Perry
Place of Publication: Lake City Fla
Publication Date: 6/26/2011
Frequency: daily (monday through friday)[<1969>-]
weekly[ former 1967-<1968>]
daily
normalized irregular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Lake City (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Columbia County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Columbia -- Lake City
Coordinates: 30.189722 x -82.639722 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 95, no. 4 (Oct. 5, 1967)-
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000358016
oclc - 33283560
notis - ABZ6316
lccn - sn 95047175
sobekcm - UF00028308_01569
System ID: UF00028308:01592
 Related Items
Preceded by: Lake City reporter and Columbia gazette

Full Text







Bailey cleared
County commissioner
not criminally liable
000016 120511 ****3- DIGT
LIB OF FLORID HISTORY
PO BOX 117007 T
205 SI4A UNIV OF FLORIDA
GAINES77ILLE FL 32611-1943


Lake


Poole leaving
County Economic
Development chief
irLing another post.
326 business, I C


ulcy


The big stage
Courson qualifies for
National High School
Finals Rodeo.
Sports, IB


Reporter


Sunday, June 26, 2011 I www.lakecityreporter.com Vol. 137, No. 129 $ $1.00





Saying goo dbye
/ [J J V


SEASON MATTHEW WALKERILa3ke Ci.o, reirr
The Florida Division of Forestry Honor Guard removes an American flag from the casket of firefighter Biett Fulton in preparation for presentation of the fla to Fulton's family .,:


Brett Fulton is bid a final farewell


Mourners from
throughout state
attend service.

By LEANNE TYO
Ityo@lakecityreporter.com
.Ceremonial bagpipe music float-
ed through the front entrance of
Christ Central Ministries Church
Saturday, signaling the start of
Brett Fulton's funeral.
SAs the music played, Fulton's
family proceeded through the mid-
dle of a double line at the sanctu-
ary's doors, a line formed by vari-
ous agencies' Honor Guards who
saluted the family, and uniformed
personnel ..who held their right
hands over their hearts.
More than 1,000 people attend-
ed the funeral to say their final
goodbyes to Fulton, paying their
respects to him and his family.
Fulton, 52, of the Springville


community, was a Florida Division
of Forestry ranger who died
Monday fighting the Blue Ribbon
fire in Hamilton
SCounty. The
blaze also took
the life of another
Division ranger
fighting the fire,
Joshua Burch of
Lake City, whose
Fulton funeral. services
were ,held at
Christ Central Ministries Friday.
Outside the church, the same
60 x 20 foot American flag that had
hung between two fire department
trucks' ladders for Burch's funeral,
waved agai~i for Fulton's.
Those in attendance for the
service included firefighters from
across Florida, public service and
government workers, police offi-
cers, elected officials and Fulton's
friends and family. Uniformed per-
sonnel wore a small, black strip of
cloth over their badges or a black


ribbon pinned to their shirts, as
they did at Burch's funeral.
As people took their seats for
the service, a slideshow of photo-
graphs of Fulton rolled quietly.. A
variety of flower arrangements and
wreaths adorned the space around
Fulton's casket, which stood at the
sanctuary's center and was cov-
ered by a flag.
"A hero is someone who is will-
ing to lay down their life for the
good of others," Christ Central
Ministries Pastor Lonnie Johns
told those assembled. 'Today, we
honor a true hero, a man who put
his life on the line."
Fulton's family and friends
spoke, honoring Fulton's memory
through reflections and noting
Fulton's love for both his family
and others. -
"His. memory will last longer
than the 52 years he lived because
of the lives he touched," said Andy
FAREWELL continued on 3A


Bailey cleared in FDLE


probe of business debt


Financial dispute
not a criminal matter,
says State Attorey.

By LEANNE TYO
Ityo@lakecityreporter.com
Columbia County Commissioner
Stephen Bailey has been cleared of
wrongdoing in a criminal probe into
claims his former business cheated a
Kentucky company out of more than


$6,700.
The dispute
should have been
handled by civil
authorities, accord-
ing to Third Circuit
SState Attorney Skip
Stephen Bailey Jarvis, who filed
papers Friday declin-
ing prosecution in the case.
The Kentucky firm, Consolidated
Industries of Hickory, "attempted to
use the criminal process to collect
what appears to be no more than a


civil debt," Jarvis told the Reporter.
The document filed Friday declined
prosecution on charges of grand theft
and cheating.
The debt, which Bailey did not dis-
pute, has since been paid.
'Tm glad that it's over and it shows
no wrongdoing on my part or on
the part of the company," Bailey said
Friday.
Bailey's role as a public official may
have played a part in how the matter
BAILEY continued on 3A


SJASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Jim Karels, the Director of the Florida Division of Forestry, presents a
folded flag to Florida'Division of Forestry firefighter Brett Fulton's wife,
Margaret, at Fulton's funeral.



GovScott names

new chief of staff


By BILL KACZOR
Associated Press
TALLAHASSEE -
Florida Gov. Rick Scott, who
campaigned as a political
outsider last year, named
Tallahassee insider Steve
MacNamara as his new chief
of staff Friday.
MacNamara, who is on an
extended leave from a fac-
ulty position at Florida State
University, most recently
was chief of staff and gen-
eral counsel for Florida
Senate President Mike


Haridopolos. '
"His experience and politi-
cal skill will be an asset to all
Floridians as we continue to
position Florida as an eco-
nomic leader," Scott said in a
statement
MacNamara replaces
Mike Prendergast, a retired
Army colonel and unsuccess-
ful Republican congressio-
nal candidate from Tampa
Prendergast came into the
job with no experience in
state government He was
SCOTT continued on 3A


CALL US:
(386) 752-1293
SUBSCRIBE TO
THE REPORTER:
Voice: 755-5445
Fax: 752-9400


95 71
T-Storm Chance
WEATHER, 8A


Opinion.......... ..... 4A
Business ................IC C
Obituaries .............. 5A
Around Florida........... 2A
Life .................... ID


TODAY IN
PEOPLE
A tribute to
Michael Jackson.


COMING
TUESDAY
UF opens
CWS play.


84264 0002


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Ipr*`rulullCl~lrar~lra~











LAKE CITY REPORTER SUNDAY REPORT SUNDAY, JUNE 26, 2011


., FLORIDA
en.atch CA$H3. A WO I FD

Friday: Friday: Saturday: Saturday: Wednesday: Wednesday:
21-27-32-38 1 9-19-28-31-36 Afternoon: 1-7-6 Afternoon: 5-6-2-6 2-6-19-31-36-39 12-15-19-46-59 PB12
Evening: 0-0-6 Evening: 1-7-9-4


AROUND FLORIDA


Judge adjourns Anthony trial until Monday


ORLANDO
he Casey
Anthony trial
is on hold until
next week.
Attorneys
for the Florida mother
charged with murdering
her 2-year-old daughter
were expected to con-
tinue calling witnesses on
Saturday. But after meet-
ing with lawyers from
both sides in the morn-
ing, the judge announced
that court would adjourn
until Monday. He said a
"legal matter" had come
up.
Outside the.court-
house, neither side would .
comment on the reason
for the early dismissal.
The Orlando Sentinel
reports that defense
attorney Cheney Mason
shouted at the throng of
reporters to get out of his
way.
Anthony has pleaded
not guilty to first-degree.
murder and could face ,'
the death penalty, if con-
victed of that charge. Her,
defense attorneys claim
Caylee Anthony acci--
dentally drowned in the
family's swimming pool.

Woman's body
found in car
PORT CHARLOTE.
- Authorities in south- '
west Florida are investigat-
ing the death of a woman .
whose body was found in
a car parked at a Wal-Mart,
Charlotte County
Sheriff's deputies
responded late Friday


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Attorneys with the defense, Cheney Mason, second from right, and Jose Baez, right, meet
with Judge Belvin Perry, center, in a sidebar with prosecuting attorneys, left, during the Casey
Anthony murder trial at the Orange County Courthouse in Orlando on Friday.


night to reports of a foul
smell coming from a car
in the Port Charlotte store
parking lot They found a
decomposed body in the
back seat Employees told
detectives the white car
had been in the parking lot
for several days.
The sheriff's office
released no further infor-
mationR about the woman.
The body has been "
taken t't6lhemedial exam-
iner's office for an autopsy
.and confirmation of-her
identity. .

Crist's wife sells
her condo,
MIAMI The wife of
former Gov. Charlie Crist


has sold her ritzy condo
near Miami for $3.5 mil-
lion.
The four-bedroom,
four-bath condo is located
on Fisher Island, Miami's
exclusive island that's
accessible only by ferry,
yacht or helicopter. It's
also said to be one of the
most expensive zip codes
in the country.
. The South Florida Sun-
'Sentinel reported Friday
that the 3,700-square-foot
apartment belonged to
Carole Rome when she
and Crist'dated and later
married when he was
governor. Rome bought
the condo in 2007 with
her previous husband.
The former governor


and his wife live in a
high-rise condo in down-
town St. Petersburg.
The unit is assessed at
$263,000.
Crist is working for a
personal injury law firm.

Massive drill
arrives for tunnel
MIAMI A massive,
$45 million drill has
arrived at the Port of
Miami to begin work on a
tunnel to connect the port
with neat-by expressways
and downtown Miami.
The drill arrived in
pieces aboard a'container
ship Thursday. Officials
say it's the most impor-
tant milestone in the $1


billion project.
The parts will be trans-
ported from the port to
the MacArthur Causeway
at Watson Island over
the next few days. The
machine will be assem-
bled over the next three
months.
Once completed, the
drill will be longer than
a football field and as tall
as a four-story building.
It's scheduled to begin
boring toward the port in
October.
Drilling to the port
from the causeway and
back is expected to take
a year. Officials want the
tunnel done by 2014.

Shorebirds roost
atop agency
MARATHON-- A flock
of threatened shorebirds
in the Florida Keys has
found a home atop a
building used by an agen-
cy tasked with protecting
the species.
Breeding populations
of roseate terns are found
only in the Florida Keys
and are protected by both
the state and federal gov-
ernment.
The birds have estab-
lished a major colony on
the roof of a government
building in Marathon
used by the Florida Fish
and Wildlife Conservation
Commission.
State biologist Ricardo
Zambrano says there are
67 nests atop the build-
ing. Gravel on the rooftop
is similar in color and
composition to the beach-


es where the birds would
naturally nest.
Scientists blame habitat
loss, increased preda-
tion and competition
from other birds for the
decline in the terns' popu-
lation to just 300 pairs in
Florida.

Haiti's president
meets in Miami
MIAMI Haiti's
president is in Miami.
to meet with Haitian-
Americans.
Haitian President
Michel Martelly is sched-
uled to attend a "Haitian
Diaspora Appreciation
Day" rally Saturday after-
noon in a soccer park
in Miami's Little Haiti
neighborhood. He's also
expected to meet with
investors.
Martelly has been
reaching out to the 2 mil-
lion Haitian emigrants
whose earnings abroad
have long helped keep
the struggling Caribbean
country afloat. :
Martelly once lived
abroad himself, in South
Florida.
Haiti's diaspora mostly
live in the U.S., Canada
and the Caribbean.
Residency requirements
prohibit them from own-
ing land or running for
office in their homeland.
Another rally and more
meetings with inves-
tors also planned for the
Haitian community in
New York.

* Associated Press


PEOPLE IN THE NEWS


Jermaine Jackson honors his late brother


TORONTO
Sermaine Jackson performed
a nostalgic tribute concert
Friday to his late brother
Michael Jackson to mark the
second anniversary of the
star's death as part of the 12th
International Indian Film Academy
festivities in Toronto. ,
Dressed in a Michael Jackson-.
inspired outfit, complete with a red
military-style jacket, V-neck white
shirt, fitted black slacks and a black
cummerbund with an emblazoned
number "5," the former Jackson
5 performer sang a medley of his
brother's hits including "Scream,"
"Wanna Be Startin' Somethin'" and
"Can You Feel It"
'This is a special moment in the
show because it's a tribute to my
brother," said Jackson moments
before joining Indian singer Sonu
Nigam to perform 'This is It," a
song written by Nigam after the
megastar's death, which the singers
dedicated to the pop icon.
The pair performed at IIFA Rocks,
a Bollywood-inspired concert and
fashion show bonanza which is part of
the academy's three days of film, song
and dance that culminates in Saturday
night's awards ceremony, often
referred to as the Indian Oscars.
IIFA Rocks also kickstarted the
awards portion of the weekend by
presenting some technical film awards
in between bouts of fashion runway
shows and high-energy musical per-
formances.
Romantic comedy "Band Baaja
Baarat" and the action movie
"Dabangg" led the pack, each scoop-
ing up three awards.
Toronto's Ricoh Coliseum was
packed with excited Bollywood fans
who could hardly contain their excite-
ment when South Asian superstars
including "Slumdog Millionaire" actor
Anil Kapoor, Bollywood king Shah
Rukh Khan and veteran stage and film
star Anupam Kher took the stage to
announce the winners.
The cheering was so raucous when
the venue's camera monitors flashed
on Bollywood superstars sitting in
their seats that it sometimes drowned
out the hosts.


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Jermaine Jackson, left, and Sonu Nigam perform at IIFA Rocks during the 2011
International Indian Film Academy Celebrations in Toronto Friday. Jackson per-
formed a nostalgic tribute concert Friday to his late brother Michael Jackson to
mark the second anniversary of the pop star's death as part of the 12th Indian
International Film Awards festivities in Toronto.


Jerry Lewis'out
of the hospital
SYDNEY Jerry Lewis was hos-
pitalized Friday after he was unable
to perform at a show in suburban
Sydney, but his publicist said he was
simply overtired and was released
after a few hours.
The 85-year-old actor, comedian
and tireless advocate for muscular
dystrophy research is on a fundrais-
ing tour for the Muscular Dystrophy
Foundation Australia. He arrived at
the Rooty Hill Returned Servicemen's
League club, where he was to per-
form, but he couldn't get out of the
car, said lan Lowe, the club's general
manager.
The foundation said the Sydney
show had been sold out CEO David
Jack apologized in a statement, saying
that Lewis was "not well enough to
take the stage," without elaborating.
Candi Cazau, Lewis' Las Vegas-
based publicist, said he was in the
hospital for about three hours before


going back to his hotel room, and that
doctors concluded that he was simply
overly tired.
"He's fine from what I understand,"
she said. "He was just feeling under
the weather."
Cazau said Lewis' staff was being a
bit cautious because Lewis contracted
viral meningitis some years before
during an earlier trip to Australia.
Lewis is the longtime chairman
of the U.S. Muscular Dystrophy
Association, which is separate from
the Australian organization, and
announced last month he was retiring
as host of the Labor Day telethon that
bears his name. He has battled a debil-
itating back condition, heart issues
and pulmonary fibrosis. He
She said Lewis has had a "ridicu-
lous" schedule in recent months. He
has been flying back and forth from
Las Vegas to New York, casting for
the stage production of "The Nutty
Professor," which he intends to debut
in January.

E Associated Press


* Singer Billy Davis Jr. of the
Fifth Dimension is 71.
* Singer Georgie Fame is 68
* Singer Brenda Holloway
is 65.
* Actor Robert Davi ("Pro-
filer") is 60.
* Musician Mick Jones of
The Clash is 56.
* Singer Chris Isaak is 55.
* Singer Patty Smyth is 54.


Daily Scripture

"Who can hide


* Singer Terri Nunn of Berlin
is 50.
* Singer Harriet Wheeler of
The Sundays is 48.
* Bassist Colin Greenwood
of Radiohead is 42.
* Writer-director Paul
Thomas Anderson ("Magno-
lia," "Boogie Nights") is 41.
* Actress Jennett McCurdy
("iCarly") is 19.


in secret places


so that I cannot see them?"
declares the Lord.'Do not I fill
heaven and earth?' declares the
LORD."
-Jeremiah 23:24 NIV


Lake City
HOW TO REACH US
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Fax number ..............752-9400
Circulation ............... 755-5445
Online... www.lakecityreporter.com
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Community Newspapers Inc., is pub-
lished Tuesday through Sunday at 180
E. Duval St, Lake City, Fla. 32055.
Periodical postage paid at Lake City, Fa.
Member Audit Bureau of Circulation and
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(twilson@lakecityreporter.com)
NEWS
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(rbridges@lakecityreporter.com)
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Reporter

BUSINESS
Controller Sue Brannon....754-0419
(sbrannon@lakecityreporter.com)
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CORRECTION

The Lake City Reporter corrects errors of fact in news
items. If you have a concern, question or suggestion,
please call the executive editor. Corrections and clarifica-
tions will run in this space. And thanks for reading.


Celebrity Birthdays


' '""' "''-"'''~'' "' "''"' ~'' '"'~' '~~~' ~~


Page Editor: Todd Taylor, 754-0424

















FAREWELL: Fallen firefighter mourned by family, friends, colleagues

Continued From Page 1A


Creamer, Fulton's nephew.
Andy Ross, Fulton's work
partner, spoke of Fulton's
love of firefighting and the
camaraderie and experience
he brought to the line.
"Brett will be sorely
missed and his mark will
be left on the world for
a long time," Ross said.
"We are all better people
for knowing you, Brett.
Godspeed, 680 (Fulton's
number)."
Speaking through tears,
Adam Parsons, a friend
of Fulton's, said Fulton
changed his life forever,
and Charlie Hartsfield,
another friend, said Fulton
was irreplaceable.
"Brett was one of the
greatest men I ever knew,"
Hartsfield said. "There's no
doubt about it, and it would
be hard for any man in this
room to stand up and fill his
shoes."
Speakers also noted
Fulton's love of University


of Florida football and later
in the service, the Gator
fight song was played, a
special request by Fulton's
family.
Fulton's family was pre-
sented with several com-
memorative items onbehalf
of Fulton a Wildland
Firefighter Foundation
statue in honor of Fulton's
service to wildland fire-
fighting, a coin given by
Florida Commissioner of
Agriculture Adam Putnam
and a medal given by
Florida Division of Forestry
officials.
Taps was played and
guests stood with hands
over their hearts as
the Florida Division of
Forestry Honor Guard
presented the honors,
ceremoniously folding the
flag on Fulton's casket,
solemnly saluting it one at
a time and then giving it
to Fulton's family with one
final salute.


Uniformed personnel
reformed the double line
outside the sanctuary for
the exit of Fulton's fam-
ily, who tearfully followed
the Florida Division of
Forestry Honor Guard as
they wheeled out Fulton's
casket.
Guests gathered outside
the back of the church,
where two Florida Division
of Forestry helicopters
made a ceremonial fly-by
as those on the ground
gave their last salutes t6
Fulton.
Friends wiped tears from
their eyes and Fulton's fami-
ly wept openly as his last call
was made over the radio.
"May you rest in peace,"
the call said. "Suwannee
680 is out of service."
Pallbearers placed
Vulton's: casket into the
hearse, while the music
of the bagpipes, this time
playing "Amazing Grace,"
resumed.


JASON MATTHEW WALKERILake City Reporter
Firefighters form a line as Florida Division of Forestry vehicles pass under a large American
flag Saturday.


SCOTT: Names new Chief of Staff

Continued From Page 1A


one of several top appoin-
tees Scott brought in from
outside state government or
outside Florida.
Scott and the Florida
Cabinet on Wednesday
appointed Prendergast to
head the state Department
of Veterans' Affairs.
Prendergast is one of
two top aides leaving the
governor's office as Scotfs
administration nears the
six-month mark and with
the Republican governor's
popularity in a tailspin. A
Quinnipiac University poll
last month showed voters


disapproved of Scott's job
performance by a 57 per-
cent to 29 percent margin.
Chief adviser Mary
Anne Carter this week also
resigned, saying she intend-
ed to stay only six months
when she took the job.
MacNamara also was chief
of staff for the Florida House
under then-Speaker John
Thrasher, now a Republican
state senator from St.
Augustine, and he headed
the state's business regula-
tion agency under Gov. Bob
Martinez.
He's held several posi-


tions at Florida State and
has tenure as an associate
professor of communica-
tions specializing in mass
media law and political
communications and strat-
egy.
MacNamara will get
$189,000 annually in his
new job. That's more than
Prendergast's $150,000
salary or the $175,000
MacNamara was paid by the
Senate.
Haridopolos, R-Merritt
Island, immediately
appointed Craig Meyer as
his new chief of staff.


BAILEY: Cleared in FDLE probe

Continued From Page 1A


was pursued, according to
Jarvis..
"Ihe person from whom
they were trying to collect
the debt was an elected offi-
cial and they tried to use
that against him," he said.
Bailey represents
District 4. on the County
Commission.
He was co-owner of
Bailey's Feed and Pet
Center on US 441 Soutli
until August 2010, when the
business was sold.
The dispute centered on
unpaid fees for a Weather
King portable building that
Bailey's company sold ,on
behalf of Consolidated in
September 2009, Florida
Department of Law
Enforcement records show.
After a $500 down pay-
ment, Consolidated was
due $6,781.35, according to
FDLE. The check was never
sent, however. Bailey's Feed
had received full payment
from the local buyers on
Sept 21,2009, FDLE reports
show.
Stephen Bailey and
brother. Emory Bailey,
then co-owners of Bailey's
Feed, each admitted to state
investigators the money was
owed, according to an FDLE
investigative report
However, there was "a
misunderstanding as to who
wrote the check," the report
said.
"Each thought the other
wrote the check," Jarvis told
the Reporter.
The Baileys had sold
other Weather King por-
table buildings on behalf
of Consolidated in the
past without incident, case
records indicate.
According to
Consolidated's attorney,
local law enforcement agen-
cies told a Consolidated
manager they would not
investigate the case.
Documents filed with
the sheriffs office show
David Bergdoll, retained by
Consolidated in May 2010
to help collect the debt,
told sheriff's investiga-
tors that the Third Circuit
State Attorney's office, the
Columbia County Sheriffs
Office and Lake City


Police Department all told
Consolidated's controller,
Matt Barnes, they would
not look into the matter.
Jarvis disputed that
"Bergdoll alleges that he
and his client were reluctant
to speak with the sheriffs
office due to Stephen.Bailey
being a county commission-
er and that the commission
controls the sheriffs bud-
get, thus creating a potential
conflict of interest," Jarvis
wrote in his order declining
prosecution. "He alleges that
Barnes contacted the State
Attorney's office, but their
request for assistance was
'refused' ... He claims that
Barnes spoke with Chief
Argatha Gilmore, Lake Gity
Police Department, but she
'refused' to provide assis-
tance. Each of these 'refus-
als' is incorrect"
Jarvis wrote that an inves-
tigator with his office, Ryan
Nydam, advised Bergdoll to
present his evidence to the
sheriffs office.
Meanwhile, Gilmore "has
confirmed she was never


lilt~t


contacted by Barnes nor
Bergdoll," Jarvis wrote.
The sheriffs office, "once
contacted by the victim,
immediately commenced an
investigation to the pointthat
they felt it proper to forward
it to-the Florida Department
of Law Enforcement to avoid
any possible appearance of
impropriety," Jarvis wrote.
"Sheriff Mark Hunter even
spoke with Stephen Bailey
to make him aware of the
problem and allow him the
opportunity to resolve it
Thus there were no 'refus-
als' as claimed and each
agency has acted properly."
The Reporterhas obtained
copies of CCSO investiga-
tive files in the case..
Jarvis said the case was a
civil matter from the start.
The facts of the case "fail
to show any criminal iihtent
on the part of Stephen Bailey
or any other owner 6f that
business," Jarvis reported.
Consolidated, which said
it would drop the criminal
complaint on receiving pay-
ment, ha since done so.


on--
Ia i


Panhandle's Morrison


Springs a refreshing break


By WENDY VICTOR
Northwest Florida Daily News
I
PONCE DE LEON -
The first thing you notice
about Morrison Springs
is the color of the water,
which ranges from light
clear blue to a deep tur-
quoise color much like
the water under the Destin
bridge on a perfect day.
Next, you notice the
water temperature. It's
'cold a bone-aching 67 to
70 degrees year-round.
Some folks creep in,
trying to acclimate them-
selves slowly to the cold.
Others hurl themselves in
from floating platforms,
cypress roots or railings
never intended to be jump-
ing-off points.
But the water tempera-
ture clearly doesn't affect
the park's growing popu-
larity. In fact, with local
heat indices topping 100
in the summer months,
that probably adds to the
spring's popularity.
Since being leased to
Walton County several years
ago and renovated, the park
has drawn so many visi-
tors that sheriff's deputies
and maintenance personnel
have a constant presence in
the summer months.
"It's so packed," said
Amy Seay, who works in
facilities maintenance for
the county. "Word of mouth
has spread very well. I get
people calling me from
Panama City, Alabama and
Georgia."
One of the big questions
she fields is how much it
costs to get in. The answer
is a popular one. There is
no charge to use the park.
"I'm* all about free,"
said Amy Boudreaux, a
Crestview woman who


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ASSOCIATED PRESS
This photo taken on June 11, 2011, shows visitors to the
Morrison Springs in Walton County. The 161-acre county
park has a 250-foot diameter pool surrounded-by old
cypress trees and stumps. Th water is very, blue and.clear .
with a year round temperature of 67-70 degrees F.


came to the park for the
first time with friends last
weekend.
'The water's very beau-
tiful," added her friend
Jennifer Taylor of Paxton.
"Clear, very clear."
Morrison Springs oper-
ated for decades as a pri-
vately run dive facility
before being acquired by
the state in 2004,
Divers have long favored
the park for its clear waters
and three underwater
caves.
In January 2008, a $1 mil-
lion renovation project was
begun, adding boardwalks,
parking, a boat ramp, out-
door showers and a diving
platform.
On a hot Saturday, visi-


tors ranged from local
folks who mourned the
loss of their quiet swim-
ming hole to folks visiting
from Pensacola, Panama
City, southern Alabama
and beyond.
"It's just always been
here," said Rhonda Hinote
of Chipley, who was there
for a family reunion.
She and her family have
been coming to the park for
so long that she pointed to
adults who had celebrated
their first birthdays at the
park.
Donnie Hall of Black,
Ala., is also a longtime
patron of the park.
"It's a good place just to
be away from home," he
said.


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LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL & STATE SUNDAY, JUNE 26, 2011


Page Editor: Todd Taylor, 754-0424


I
















OPINION


Sunday, June 26,201 I


www.lakecityreporter.com


OUR


OUR
OPINION


Right back

where we


started

St several publicly
funded entities are
planning to propose
3 percent pay raises
in order to offset
what their workers will soon
be paying into their own state
retirement accounts.
We think such proposals
are out of step with the new
economic reality of the times.
'Beginning July 1, public
employees enrolled in the
state retirement system will
be required to pay 3 percent
toward their own retirement
Considering the nature of the
new national economy, that's
not asking much.
Yet now the City of Lake
City, the Lake Shore Hospital
Authority, Santa Fe College
and the University of Florida
are all floating proposals to
hand out cost-of-living raises
in order to offset the state's
new cost-saving measures.
We will be watching closely
to see if other groups unveil
similar plans in the coming
weeks.
Rough estimates show
that Gov. Rick Scott's
restructuring of the state
retirement plan will save
Florida taxpayers $2 billion in
the first year alone. The cuts
coming from the governor's
office were designed to save
Florida taxpayers money,
not just as a break-even
proposition.
We do not begrudge the
employees the pay raise.
;ft's the method wefiid
,*troubling. Many of the same
,.organizations that just a few
"weeks ago were expressing
IV'agony over tight budgets
.suddenly found funding to
-'offset the state pension plan
reductions. It makes us
wonder if these groups are
.*really as cash-strapped as they
.claim.
: The private business
sector continues to battle
.a sluggish economy and
makes tough choices daily
. to stay vibrant. Families
"have scaled back spending
-'and, in many cases, learned
,'to live with less.
STaxpayer-funded entities
should be just as driven to do
'the same.

Lake City Reporter
Serving Columbia County
Since 1874
The Lake City Reporter is pub-
lished with pride for residents of
Columbia and surrounding counties by
Community Newspapers Inc.
We believe strong newspapers build
strong communities -"Newspapers
get things done!"
Our primary goal is to
publish distinguished and profitable
community-oriented newspapers.
This mission will be accomplished
through the teamwork of professionals
dedicated to truth, integrity and hard
work.
Todd Wilson, publisher
Robert Bridges, editor
Sue Brannon, controller
Dink NeSmith, president
Tom Wood, chairman

LETTER'S
POLICY
Letters to the Editor should be
typed or neatly written and double
spaced. Letters should not exceed
400 words and will be edited for
length and libel. Letters must be
signed and include the writer's name,
address and telephone number for
verification. Writers can have two
letters per month published. Letters
and guest columns are the opinion of


the writers and not necessarily that of
the Lake City Reporter.
BY MAIL: Letters, P.O. Box 1709,
Lake City, FL 32056; or drop off at
180 E. Duval St. downtown.
BY FAX: (386) 752-9400.
BY E-MAIL:
news@lakecityreporter.com


An oil release may be more


political than economic


Obama's release of
oil from the Strategic
Petroleum Reserve
has political and
economic benefits, but both are
likely to be transitory.
The timing is somewhat
puzzling because the price of
gasoline and crude oil has been
falling the past month and we
don't seem to be in the kind
of emergency the reserve was
designed for during the days of
the Arab price shocks back in
1975.
The reserve has been
breached only twice, and then
briefly, in 2005 when Hurricane
Katrina disrupted the Gulf oil
industry and in 1991 when
.the Gulf War rattled world oil
markets.
The White House insisted it
was acting to head off a possible
disruption at a time of peak
summer demand. Republicans
denounced it as a political
gimmick.
The United States acted .
in concert as part of the 28-
nation International Energy
Agency, formed in 1974


Dale McFeatters
mcfeattersd@shns.com


as a counterweight to the
Organization of Petroleum
Exporting Countries. The
U.S. will draw down 30 million
barrels from its stocks and
Europe, Japan and South Korea
30 million barrels from theirs.
IEA acted in response to the
loss of 1.5 million barrels a day
fromr Libya and OPEC's refusal,
earlier this month, despite the
best efforts of Saudi Arabia, to
raise production quotas.
Europe suffers most from the
loss of Libyan oil, so perhaps
maintaining international
economic harmony was reason
enough for Obama to order the
release. At 30 million barrels,
it's hardly a major dent in the
727-million barrel reserve.
But there are clear benefits to


the Obama administration. The
prospect of that oil reaching
refiners has caused analysts
to forecast gas prices will fall
from the current $3.61 a gallon
to $3.40 or lower by the July
Fourth weekend. That should
keep consumers on the road
during the summer driving
season. And cheaper energy
prices should give a boost to the
flaccid economy..
The impact of the release
may not last much past Labor
Day. However, if the release
succeeds in re-firing the
economy, Obama will get a-
pass, just this once, from the
proposition that the reserve
should be tapped only in a
genuine emergency.
The administration should
also address the supply side by
approving expanded drilling and
exploration off America's coasts.
Alternative energy only nibbles
at the margin of the problem.
We need oil.

Dale McFeatters is editorial
writer for Scripps Howard News
Service.


ANOTHER OPINION


Obama as risk manager


of Afghanistan war


Anyone in a leadership posi-
tion can take a lesson from
President Obama's 13-minute
speech on Wednesday about the
Afghanistan war. It was a study
in how a commander often cal-
culates risk in modern wars.
War can be the riskiest ven-
ture of all, thus the phrase "the
fog of war." Yet both generals
and the public like to deal in
certainties, with defined threats
and predictable outcomes.
In Afghanistan, a precise plan
with unchangeable goals has
been difficult, a big reason why
the war has lasted nearly 10
years. The Taliban shift tactics,
the Afghans are often unreli-
able, and Pakistan is both friend
and foe, armed with nuclear
weapons.
In his speech, Mr. Obama
offered this simple US goal in
Afghanistan: "No safe haven
from which Al Qaeda or its affili-
ates can launch attacks against
our homeland." And he assured
Americans that his drawdown
of 33,000 troops by September
2012 is not risky. The war will
"come to a responsible end," he
said. "There is no jumping ship
here."
The next day, however,
his top generals revealed to
Congress a picture of clashing
risk assessments among the
Obama security team.


'The president's decisions
are more aggressive and incur
more risk than I was originally
prepared to accept," said Adm.
Mike Mullen, chairman of the
Joint Chiefs of Staff. "More
force for more time is, without
doubt, the safer course."
Army Gen. David H.
Petraeus, the departing top US
commander in Afghanistan,
declined to give a direct answer
on whether the Obama strategy
would achieve the mission.
Their hints at a rigorous
debate within the White House
show that Obama mainly treats
security as risk management.
Threats are not always tan-
gible but often only a potential.
Danger is treated the way a
quantum-mechanics physicist
would describe the positions of
electrons in an atom. There are
only "probability clouds."
After 9/11, George W Bush
reflected a traditional approach
to war. The enemy was to be
eradicated, not managed. Civil
rights could be ignored. He
posed a "zero tolerance" for ter-
rorists.
Of Iraq's alleged weapons
of mass destruction, Mr. Bush
said: "The danger is already sig-
nificant, and it only grows worse
with time." As during the cold
war, Bush left the impression
that America's very existence


was at stake.
Only later, as the wars in
Iraq and Afghanistan dragged
qn, did Bush's defense chief,
Donald Rumsfeld, speak of the
"unknown unknowns," reflect-
ing a more humble approach of-
simply reducing the uncertain-
ties of a war.
Obama sees risks that must
be averted rather than direct
threats that must be thwarted.
His approach is similar to
Israel's: Hamas and Hezbollah
could easily be eradicated, but
Israel chooses only to manage
the risks of more rocket attacks.
And instead of bombing Iran's
nuclear program, Israel only
undermines it with a computer
worm.
Bush saw mainly threats
and said "better to be safe than
sorry." Obama sees risks and
says "well find some margin of
safety."
Bush is the Issac Newton of
security while Obama is the
Werner Heisenberg (he of the
"uncertainty principle").
Under the Obama plan, will
Afghanistan implode after
US troops leave? Will Islamic
militants end up with Pakistan's
nukes?
These aren't easy questions
with firm answers.

* Christian Science Monitor


L----- --
Todd Wilson
twilson@lakecityreportercom


Let them

never be

forgotten


most of us were
simply relaxing and
enjoying a Father's
Day Sunday, getting
ready to ease into another rou-
tine work week.
Monday started as a nor-
mal summer day, but that's
when life usually comes out of
nowhere and lands a haymaker
on our chin. Or in our case in
Columbia County, grabs us by
the heart
I didn't know Josh Burch or
Brett Fulton personally, but
after hearing the testimonials,
speeches and stories offered
about these two local gentle-
men this week, it was clear
they were quality citizens of
our community.
Burch and Fulton, both
Columbia County residents
wl, worked for the Florida,
Div',. i of Forestry, died
Mond: afternoon fighting
the b-ae Ribbon Wildfire in
Hamilton County. Burch was
31; Fulton was 52.
In every account, they were
described as good people who
went out of their way to help
anyone seeking assistance with
the smallest need.
They were l9yeddeply by,
their friends and family merm-
bers.
It was a long week in Lake
City as our community rallied
around the families of these
brave men to offer Whatever
assistance was needed.
Our county responded to
this tragedy with a unified
front. It is at these times
when Columbia County's true
colors show through. These
are the times when we're still
a tight-knit small town; the
times when we rally around
our friends and neighbors
and show that we truly care
about our people.
Josh Burch and Brett
Fulton served our state well
in a job most of us never see
or hear about until there's
smoke in the forest.
The impact of the public
lives of these men was reflect-
ed Friday and Saturday as
crowds in the thousands gath-
ered to pay final respects at
each man's funeral. Hundreds
of dress-uniformed, white-
gloved mourners stood at
attention for a final salute to
their forestry and firefighter
brothers.
This was a solemn reminder
to all of us about the protec-
tion provided by the men and
women in this line of work.
Problems arise, they respond
to the call and, without a sec-
ond thought, they answer it.
They do their job to protect
people, property and natural
resources in the face of over-
whelming danger.
I'm very thankful for all of
our men and women in uniform
who patrol our streets or answer
alarm bells of any kind. They
keep us safe and they make a
positive difference in our com-
munity.
As public life begins a slow
return to normal tomorrow in
Columbia County, think about
Josh and Brett with respect
and offer prayers for their
grieving loved ones left to cope
with the unimaginable.
These men hugged their
families goodbye, went to
work as they had done hun-
dreds of days prior to last
Monday, and never returned.
Their selfless sacrifice
should never be forgotten.
* Todd Wilson is publisher of the
Lake City Reporter.


4A













Page EdItor: Todd Taylor, 754-0424 LAKE CITY REPORTER NATION SUNDAY, JUNE 26, 2011


Pharmacy


robberies are


sweeping U.S.

NEW YORK A wave anyone, but authorities
of pharmacy robberies is are worried the risk of
sweeping the United States bloodshed is increasing
as desperate addicts and as assaults multiply. In
ruthless dealers turn to vio- September, a clerk was
lence to feed the nation's fatally shot in the chest
growing hunger for narcot- and a pregnant woman
ic painkillers, wounded in the foot
From Redmond, Wash., when a shootout broke
to St. Augustine, Fla., out between a robber
criminals are holding phar- and an armed employee
macists at gunpoint and at a pharmacy in a sub-
escaping with thousands of urb of Sacramento, Calif.
powerfully In April, a
addictive gunman
pills that can 'It' anepidemic. killed a
sell for as These people pharmacist
much as $80 are depraved. in Trenton,
apiece on N.J., before
the street They'll kill you.' stealing
In one $10,000 in
of the most Michael Fox, pharmacist pills..
shocking The rob-
Scrimes yet, a beries mir-
robber walked into a neigh- ror a national rise in the
borhood drugstore Sunday abuse of narcotic painkill-
on New York's Long Island ers, DEA spokeswoman
and gunned down the phar- Barbara Carreno said.
macist, ,enage store "Drug addicts are
clerk 2 o customers always seeking ways to
before with a back- get their drugs," Carreno
pack f s containing said. "Whenever there's
hydrocoione'.' an increase in a problem,
"Its an epidemic," said you'll see it manifested in.
Michael Fox, a pharma- ways like this."
cist on New York's Staten Prescription painkill-
Island who has been ers are now the second
stuck up twice in the last most-abused drugs after
year. "These people are marijuana, with 7 million
depraved. They'llkill you." Americans using them
Armed robberies at illegallyinthepastmonth,
pharmacies rose 81 per- the U.S. Department
cent between 2006 and of Health and Human
2010, from 380 to 686, the Services says. The num-
U.S. Drug Enforcement ber of patients treated
Administration says. The in emergency rooms for,
number of pills stolen went prescription drug over-
from 706,000 to 1.3 million. doses more than dou-
Thieves are overwhelm- bled between 2004 and
ingly taking oxycodone 2008, from 144,644 to
painkillers like OxyContin 305,885.
or Roxicodone, or hydro- Drug dealers may be
codone-based painkillers turning to violence as
lili Vlodiri and Norco.'. ,authorities 'c-tack 'd-i n
fi 'New York state, the' on other ways' Pf:Tt-
number of armed robber-uting painkilllrs,'Carrrebo
ies rose from 2 in 2006 to said. Many states have
'28 in 2010. In Florida, they launched introduced com-
increased nearly six-fold, puter systems designed
from 11 to 65. California to prevent "doctor-shop-
saw 61 robberies in ping" by addicts, and fed-
2010, Indiana had 45 and eral investigations have
Tennessee had 38. shut down several shady
Most robbers don't hurt Internet pharmacies.


Gay marriage backers claim


NY vote has national impact


By DAVID CRARY
AP National Writer

NEW YORK Many
obstacles still lie ahead
for supporters of same-sex
marriage, and eventually
they will need Congress
or the Supreme Court to
embrace their goal. For the
moment, though, they are
jubilantly channeling the
lyrics of "New York, New
York."
"Now that we've made it
here, we'll make it every-
where," said prominent
activist Evan Wolfson, who
took up the cause of mar-
riage equality as a law stu-
dent three decades ago.
With a historic vote by
its Legislature late Friday,
New York became the sixth
and by far the most pop-
ulous state to legalize
same-sex marriage since
Massachusetts led the way,
under court order, in 2004.
With the new law, which
takes effect after 30 days,
the number of Americans
in same-sex marriage states
more than doubles. New
York's population, of 19 mil-
lion surpasses the combined
total of Massachusetts,
Connecticut, Vermont, New
Hampshire and Iowa, plus
the District of Columbia.
The outcome a prod-
uct of intensive lobbying by
Democratic Gov. Andrew
Cuomo will have
nationwide repercussions.
Activists hope the .New
York vote will help con-
vince judges and politicians
across the country, includ-
ing a -hesitant President
Barack Obama, that sup-
port of same-sex marriage
is now a mainstream view-
point and a winning politi-
cal stance.
"New York sends the
'message that marriage
e equality-across the country-"
is a question of 'When,' not
"i'* sai d Fred Sainz, a vice
president of the Human
Rights Campaign.
Wolfson, president of the
advocacy group Freedom
to Marry, said the goal is
attainable by 2020, or soon-
er, "if we do the work and
keep making the case."


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Revelers celebrate in front of the Stonewall Inn in Manhattan's west village following the
passing of the same sex marriage bill by a vote of 33 to 29, Friday in New York. Same-sex
marriage is now legal in New York after Gov. Andrew Cuomo signed a bill that was narrowly
passed by state lawmakers Friday, handing activists a breakthrough victory in the state where
the gay rights movement was born.


The work as envi-
sioned by leading activ-
ists is a three-pronged
strategy unfolding at the
state level, in dealings with
Congress and the Obama
administration, and in the
courts where several chal-
lenges to the federal ban on
gay marriage are pending.
"This will be abigboostto
our efforts nationally," said
Richard Socarides, a for-
mer Clinton White House
adviser on gay rights. "It
will help in the pending
Court cases to show that
more states are adopting
same-sex marriage, and it
will help in the court of
public opinion."
The New York bill
cleared the Republican-
controlled Senate by. a
33-29 margin, thanks to
crucial support from four
GOP senators who joined
all but one Democrat in vot-


ing yes. The Denrocratic-
led Assembly, which
previously approved the
bill, passed the Senate's
stronger religious exemp-
tions in the measure, and
Cuomo swiftly signed it
into law.
Gay rights activists
have been heaping praise
on Cuomo for leading the
push for the bill, seizing
on an issue that many poli-
ticians of both parties have
skirted. Yet the Senate
vote marked the first time
a Republican-controlled
legislative chamber in any
state has supported same-
sex marriage, and several
prominent Republican
donors contributed to the
lobbying campaign on
behalf of the bill.
For those engaged in the
marriage debate nationally,
recent months have been a
political rolleicoaster.
_.


Bills to legalize same-sex
marriage failed in Maryland
and Rhode Island despite
gay rights activists' high
hopes. However, Illinois,
Hawaii and Delaware
approved civil unions,
joining five other states
- California, Nevada,
New Jersey, Oregon and
Washington that provide
gay couples with extensive
marriage-like rights.
. Adding those eight states
to the six that allow gay
marriage, more than 35 per-
cent of Americans now live
in states where gay couples
can effectively attain the
rights and responsibilities
of marriage. Just 11 years
ago, no states offered such
rights.
For now, gay couples cdn-
not get married in 44 states,
and 30 of them have taken
the extra step of passing
constitutional amendments
a" ."', a s P


Jessie Parker
Jessie Parker, age 78, resident
of Dothan, Alabama and former
White Springs resident, passed
away Thursday, June 23, 2011 at
Flowers Hospital in Dothant. Mr.
Parker was born in Lake City,
Florida on October 6, 1932. He
retired from- Occidental after 20
years and moved to Dothan about
two years ago to be closer to his
daughter. While in Dothan he at-
tended Friendship Assembly of
God and was a member of White
Springs Church of God. Mr.
Parker was preceded in death by
his wife Marie in May of 1995.
Survivors include three daugh-
ters, Shirley Parker, Tallahas-
see, FL., Judy Carroll, Dothan,
AL., and Frances Burs, Talla-
hassee, FL.; four grandchildren
and three great grandchildren.
Graveside services will be
held at 3:00 P.M. Sunday, June'
26, 2011 at Riverside Cem-
etery in White Springs, FL.
Visitation was held between the
hours of 6:00-8:00 P.M. Sat-
urday, June 25th at Harry T.
Reid Funeral Home, Jasper, FL.

Obituaries are paid advertise-
ments. For details, call the Lake
City Reporter's classified depart-
ment at 752-1293.


OBITUARIES


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LAKE CITY REPORTER NATION SUNDAY, JUNE 26, 2011


Page Editor: Todd Taylor, 754-0424












LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL & STATE SUNDAY, JUNE 26, 2011


COMMUNITY CALENDAR


Monday
Building Strong Bonds
mentoring program
Calling all middle and
high school boys for
Building Strong Bonds
mentoring program 5-8
p.m. Monday. Meeting
is at 532 Marion Street.
Contact Al Nelson at
(386) 867-1601. Dinner
included. Transportation
can be provided if con-
tacted one week in
advance.

LifeSouth seeks
blood donors
LifeSouth is officially
in emergency need of
O negative blood types.
The bloodmobile is seek-
ing donors 2-10 p.m.
Monday at Walmart.
Free recognition items
for all donors.
Columbia County
Wood carvers meeting
The Columbia County
Wood Carvers meet
every Monday at 1
p.m. at the LifeStyle
Enrichment Center.
Contact Ken Myer at 719-
9629 or Charles Kime at
755-4937.

Tuesday
Make and Take
workshop
Back to Basics Rain
Barrel "Make and
Take" Workshop from


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter

A splashing good time
Albert Talley (from left), 12, plays with Seth Matos, 9, and Ashley Valenzuela, 9, at the Columbia Aquatic Complex recently.


6:30 8:00 p.m. Tuesday
Columbia County
Extension Office Located
on the Fairground in
Lake City Just call to
register 752-5384. Take
home your completed
rain barrel for $45 Learn
about the benefits of
Harvesting Rainwater.
Let us help you assemble


your very own Rain
Barrel.

Meet the Author
at the library
A Meet the Author pro-
gram featuring Mary Jane
Ryals is 7 p.m. Tuesday
at the Main Branch.
The event is sponsored


by the Friends of the
Library. Ryals is a poet,
novelist and Florida State
University professor. In
2008, she was named
Poet Laureate of Florida's
Big Bend Region, a title
she will hold until 2012.
Her novel, "Cookie and
Me," was released in


September 2010 and
takes place in Tallahassee
in the 1960s.

Senior services
meal payment due
Payment for the
Columbia County Senior
Services Inc. Wednesday
homecooked meal is due
10 a.m, Tuesday at the


* To submit your Community
Calendar item, contact Antonia
Robinson at 754-0425 or by
e-mail at arobinson@
lakecityreporter.com.


LifeStyle Enrichment
Center. The menu'
is hamburger steak,
mashed potatoes and
gravy, broccoli casserole
and peach cobbler and
ice cream. Call (386)
755-0235 for more infor-
mation.

Wednesday
Beekeeping workshop
at extension office
A beekeeping work-
shop is 6-8:30 p.m.
Wednesday at the
Columbia County
Extension office. The
registration fee is $5
which includes materials
and honey. The class will
be taught with the help
of local beekeepers. Call
(386) 752-5384 for more
information.

Dubi Sisters perform
at Senior Services
Columbia County Senior
Services Inc. is hosting
a dancing performance
from the Dubi Sisters 11-
11:45 a.m. Wednesday at
the LifeStyle Enrichment
Center. Call (386) 755-
0235.

LifeSouth seeks
blood donors
LifeSouth bloodmo-
bile is seeking donors
1-5 p.m. Wednesday at
the Lake City Reporter.
Free hot dogs, lemon-
ade, juice, cookies and
a gift for each donor.


As schools cut budgets, strains on counselors grow


By CHRISTINE ARMARIO
Associated Press-
COOPER CITY
r oslyn Wagner's
tone shifts from
cheerful to con-
cerned as she
.looks through
the grades of the teenage
boy seated before her.
"There's no reason for
this," the guidance coun-
selortells him.
Just three years ago,
Blake Mankin scored at
the highest possible level
on Florida's standardized
assessment in math. He
could be in honors math
classes, but had to repeat
algebra. He's just a fresh-
man, but his grades are so
low that if he doesn't raise
them, he could be in dan-
ger of not graduating from
Cooper City High School.
"What happened?"
Wagner asks.
He admits that he hasn't
worked hard enough.
Itis 10:02 a.m. and
already a group of students
await Wagner's attention.
The 15-year-old boy has to
get back to his gym class.
They both glance at the
clock
In all, Wagrer has to
register 600 freshmen in
this high school in a suburb
north of Miami for their
next year's classes, and
help another 200 12th grade
students through college
applications and graduation.
There are recommendation
letters to write, crises to
handle. On the one hand,
she must monitor low per-
forming students; on the
other, she must shepherd a
bevy of meticulous students
at this A-rated school vying
to get into the nation's most
prestigious colleges.
There's just not enough.
time but the boy is there,
and he needs her help.
Wagner takes an extra
minute.


The caseload wasn't
always this high; before
Wagner used to handle just
one grade. But two years
ago, one of the school's four
guidance counselors retired
and the Broward County
School District the


nation's sixth largest, now Admissions Counseling.
facing a shortfall of nearly "And its sad because we
$172 million hasn't ': should be doimg more.
replaced her. Thai left . --:. i a "W A
Wagner with the 600 stu- her office like a sort of
dents she previously guided triage center: She has
and a portion of the retired a brochure, book or
counselor's caseload, online resource for nearly
divided up among the three every student concern.
counselors that remain. Scholarships? Check.
"Its too many kids," Requirements to enter
Wagner says with a sigh. a state college? Check.
She's far from alone in Trouble deciding what
her predicament The aver- career path to choose? She's
age public school counselor got a book on that, too.
in the United States has Even with her limited
457 students. In Michigan,. time, Wagner's impact is
the average counselor had noticeable. Banners to col-
759 students in 2008-09. In leges where students have
California, it was 814. been accepted hang from,
"States and districts the walls this year's I
have been hit really hard graduating class includes F
by budget cuts and the students going to state col- g
recession," said Jill Cook, leges and prestigious Ivy
assistant director of the League universities. Parents
American School Counselor and students send her let-
Association. "There are ters of thanks. "It has been
positions being cut and jobs an amazing turnaround,"
lost" one parent wrote. "He is
One UCLA researcher now on the honor roll (all
calculated that public high As) and seems happier than
school counselors spend ever and is planning on col-
about 38 minutes each lege."
year per student A Public She advises her students
Agenda survey of first-year with the candor of a strict
college students conducted supervisor and the concern
found that more than half of a caring mother. On a
felt their counselors treated recent weekday, she is
them like "just another face scheduled to help register
in the crowd." about 20 freshmen for next
The same survey found year's classes. For many,
that those with little mean- it's the first time she's meet-
ingful interaction with coun- ing one-on-one with them.
selors were less likely to go They're pulled out of a gym
directly from high school to class and wait to be called in
post-secondary education from a small lobby outside
- an important predictor of her office.
future college completion. Mankin, whose talents
Researchers think these are evident but whose
high counselor-to-student grades have flagged, is
ratios are partially to blame among them. - -.
for why more students don't What does he want to be
go on to graduate from col- when he gets older? How
lege. A recent study from does he plan to get there?
Harvard University, for "The first thing is get-
example, cited the nation's ting a high school diploma,
weak guidance counsel- because then you'll get a
ing system as one of the better job," she explains.
reasons why more students Mankin doesn't quite
aren't making a smoother know what he wants to do.
transition into post-second- He's thought of something
ary education and careers, with cars or maybe an
and noted that many other invention; a math teacher
developed counties dedicate who saw him stick up for
significant more time and another student who was
resources to counseling. being teased recently sug-
"Parents get angry when gested he might make a
you don't do more," said good lawyer someday, and
Robert Bardwell, past presi- the idea is appealing.
dent of the New England But since middle school
Association for College he's lagged behind in class-


ASSOCIATED PRESS
n this photo, high school guidance counselor Roslyn Wagner, background, talks with Blake
Mankin, 15, at Cooper City High School in Cooper City. Wagner used to handle just one
jrade. But two years ago, one of the school's four guidance counselors retired and she hasn't
been replaced. That left her with the 800 students.


es. He says school stopped
seeming relevant to him. He
started hanging out more,
going to the beach or mov-
ies with friends.
"I don't think I ever
saw a counselor in middle
school," he says.
Mankin says he would
like to study at Florida
State University, where his
mother attended, but he'd
need to get his GPA up to at
least a 3.3 to attend. Wagner
goes through scenarios that
could bring him there. He
still has three years to turn
things around.
"Its doable," she says.
"How do you study?"
Wagner asks.
"Read," Blake replies.
'You can't just read,"
says Wagner. 'You have to
memorize."
She takes him through
a list of study techniques.
She shows him how even
just handing in homework
assignments could dramati-
cally improve his grades.
'You know what you
have to do, right?" Wagner
asks.
The boy nods.
Wagner calls in the next
student


The work is never
finished. This summer,
Wagner will go to the office
for a day every couple of
weeks, registering new
students for next year's


classes. In the past, she's
been paid for this, but after
years of budget cuts, she is
now a summer volunteer.
She does not complain.
"This is my school," she
says, simply.
Nor does she complain
that there was no time to
leave her post for lunch on
a recent day. She reached
into her desk for a jar of '
peanut butter and made a
sandwich.
"When you love what you
do, you don't mind," she
says. "But you do get tired."
It is not unusual for
Wagner to bring college
recommendations and other
work home. While her hus-
band reads or watches the
news, shell work at a table
nearby.
Does she feel like she is
able to meet the needs of
every student? Yes. But is
she as effective as before,
when she had fewer stu-
dents?
Not really. "You don't
have that personal contact,"
Wagner says.
Families, often reacting to
the high caseloads assigned
to public school counselors,
are increasingly hiring pri-
vate counselors to help their
children get ahead. And the
persistent struggles linked
to the recession parents
losing jobs, foreclosures
that have displaced families
for their homes mean
many children are coming


to school with a host of wor-
ries they didn't have before.
The nationwide coun-
selor-to-student ratio hasn't
risen in recent years, but
Cook said the numbers can
lag a year or two. The real
picture is clear in individual
states and districts, like
Broward. Schools through-
out Broward have proposed
further reducing the num-
ber of guidance counselors
in light of this year's budget
cuts. Spokeswoman Nadine
Drew said the guidance
cuts are in part an effort to
avoid teacher layoffs.
For Wagner, what were
once one-on-one meetings
with students are now
sometimes handled in large
groups.
She's been a counselor
for nearly 15 years; she
took the job after directing
a middle school produc-
tion of "Grease." At the
time, she was working as a
school speech pathologist,
and through the play, built
a close relationship with the
students, who often con-
fided in her.
'You need to see your
counselor about this," she
often found herself telling
them.
"When enough of those
situations came up,"
Wagner says, "I said, 'I want
to be a counselor.'"
Notwithstanding the cut-
backs, it was "the best deci-
sion I ever made." she says.


Page Editor: Todd Taylor, 754-0424












Page Editor: Todd Taylor, 754-0424 LAKE CITY REPORTER WORLD SUNDAY JUNE 26, 2011


ASSOCIATED PRESS
School students chant slogans against Libyan leader Moammar Gadhafi during a demonstra-
tion at the court square in the rebel-held capital Benghazi, Libya, Saturday.


Libyan state media says


NATO airstrike kills 15


By ADAM SCHRECK
Associated Press

TRIPOLI, Libya -
Libyan authorities on
Saturday accused NATO
of killing 15 people in an
airstrike that hit a restau-
rant and bakery in the east,
though the alliance said
there were no indications
that civilians had died.
It was the latest out-
cry from Libyan leader
Moammar Gadhafi's gov-
ernment blaming NATO for
killing civilians amid a four-
month uprising that has
sparked a civil war. NATO
insists it does all it can to
avoid such casualties.
Meanwhile, rebel repre-
sentatives said theirfighters
were coordinating around
the country for the "zero
hour" when their forces
would reach the capital of
Tripoli.
The rebels said they have
been working to cut fuel
supplies from the Tunisian
border in an attempt to
paralyze Gadhafi's forces.
.ebels also are making
homemade bombs and try-
ing to ferry other weap-
ons to their comrades in
Tripoli, a spokesman for
an underground guerrilla
group there said.
SLibya'sstate news agency
iguoted a military official in
ftadhafi's forces as saying
that NATO warplanes hit
a number of civilian sites
Saturday in the oil town of
Brega, including a restau-
rant and a bakery.
SThe official said 15 civil-
ans were. killed and 20-
ounded in the strike. The
ANA news agency' also
claimed five civilians were
killed Friday in Brega as,
well.
A NATO official said alli-
h'nce warplanes had hit sev-
eral targets in the vicinity of
Brega, but dismissed claims
that the attacks had resulted
in civilian casualties.
"We have no indications
of any civilian casualties
in connection with these
strikes," said the official,
who spoke on condition
on anonymity because
he was not authorized to
speak to the media on the
record. "What we know is
that the buildings we hit
were occupied and used by
pro-Gadhafi forces to direct
attacks against civilians
around Ajdabiya."
Ajdabiya is a city between
Brega and the rebel strong-
hold of Benghazi to the
northeast
NATO said Friday it also
hit multiple military com-
mand sites near Brega,
which has been a frequent
flashpoint between rebels
and Gadhafi's forces.
The alliance said Friday
that government forces had
moved into buildings in an
abandoned area of Brega
and started using them
as military compounds
to launch strikes on civil-
ians, putting rebel-held cit-
ies such as Ajdabiya and
Benghazi at risk.
Reports of civilian casu-
alties in NATO strikes have
provoked intense anger
among many Libyans in the
west of the country under
Gadhafi's control.
Images of dead civilians,
including young children,
described by the govern-
ment as "martyrs," can
be seen frequently at pro-
government rallies and on


state-controlled television.
NATO is investigating
whether one of its airstrikes
may have slammed into 'a
civilian neighborhood in
Tripoli on June 19, killing
several civilians.
A day later, alliance war-
planes struck a family com-
pound belonging to a close
Gadhafi aide, killing what
the Libyan government
says was 19 people, includ-
ing at least three children.
NATO called the site was
a "command and control"
center, and said it regrets
any civilian deaths that
resulted from the strike.
Rebel spokesman Abdel-
Hafidh Ghoga in Benghazi
said Gadhafi was to blame
for civilian casualties in the
fighting because "he keeps
his weapons in highly pop-
ulated civilian areas."
At least two explosions
could be heard in the capi-
tal of Tripoli on Saturday,
though it was not immedi-
ately clear what the NATO
airstrikes may have hit
The Libyan rebels began
their uprising in February
against Gadhafi, who has
been in power since 1969.
The conflict has turned into
a civil war, and Gadhafi's
forces are accused of
orchestrating deadly
attacks on civilians.
The rebels have taken
over much .of the eastern
half of Libya. They also
control pockets in the west,;
including the vital port city
of Misrata, about 125 miles
from the capital.,
A coalition including
France, Britain and the
United States began strik-
ing Gadhafi's forces under
a United Nations resolu-
tion to protect civilians on
March 19. NATO assumed
control of the air campaign
over Libya on March 31
and is joined by a number
of Arab allies.'
In Benghazi, Ghoga, the
spokesman for the reb-
els' National Transitional
Council, said 38 of Gadhafi's
military officers six
of them high-ranking -
defected to the rebel side
and fled to Tunisia Friday.
'This will lead to the fur-
ther isolation of the Gadhafi
regime," he said.
Ghoga said the rebels
have been informed that
Gadhafi is in contact with
leaders in South Africa and
France in an attempt to find
a possible home in exile.
Such claims have been fil-
tering out for weeks, but
there is no evidence that
the Libyan leader is seek-
ing a way out.
On Saturday, a spokes-
man for the rebels' western
mountain military council
confirmed that rebels are
coordinating with individu-
al cells and with an under-
ground rebel guerrilla
group known as the Tripoli
Council. The main goals
are to cut the fuel from
Gadhafi forces, Gomaa
Ibrahim said.
Meanwhile, a spokes-
man for the Tripoli Council
said that their fighters have
been carrying out selective
attacks on Gadhafi forces in
the capital.
The spokesman, who
requested anonymity for
fear of reprisals, said that
the rebels are coordinating
for "the zero hour, when
rebels from liberated cities
enter Tripoli."
"It will be a tremendous


mission. The city is now
besieged by 13 different
security brigades, well
armed and well equipped.
Gadhafi has always said*
that his loyalists will sabo-
tage the city if he falls. So
this will be our mission: to
mob it and clean it of mer-
cenaries."
In Benghazi, Ghoga said
there are constant contacts
between rebels in different
parts of the country, but he
did not elaborate.


Suicide car bomber


kills 35 at Afghan clinic


By RAHIM FAIEZ and
SOLOMON MOORE
Associated Press

KABUL, Afghanistan -
A suicide car bomber blast-
ed a small clinic Saturday
in eastern Afghanistan,
causing the building to
collapse as mostly women
and children lined up for
vaccinations, maternity
care and other services.
At least 35 people were
killed in one of the deadli-
est attacks against: civil-
ians this year.
Guards saw a sport util-
ity vehicle charging toward
the Akbarkhail Public
Medical Center, a com-
pound that provides health
care for the mountainous
area in the Azra district of
Logar province. But before
anyone could shoot the
driver or blow out the tires,
the SUV smashed through
a wall and exploded, local
officials said.
Wary of being blamed
for civilian casualties,
the Taliban denied it was
behind the bombing.
Violence has been .on
the rise since the Islamic


movement launched its
spring offensive and prom-
ised retaliation for the
death of al-Qaida leader
Osama bin Laden.
"This attack was not
done by our fighters;"
Taliban spokesman
Zabiullah Mujahid told The
Associated Press in a tele-
phone interview.
Survivors of the blast
and others who heard
the explosion frantically
dug through the rubble
with shovels and bare
hands. At least 35 bod-
ies were pulled from the
debris and 53 other people
were wounded, provin-
cial public health direc-
tor Dr. Mohammad Zaref
Nayebkhail said.
The victims most
women and children -
included patients, visitors,
and medical staffers.
'They were offering
important services for
the people. We had very
good services and lots of
patients. There were only
10 beds but lots of other
services in that center. It's
why the casualties were so
high," he said.


Nayebkhail said an
Afghan army helicopter
was dispatched to the area
to deliver medical supplies
and to ferry survivors to
other hospitals. He said
the clinic had recently
been expanded to meet the
health needs of the far-flung
district's population.
TheTaliban claims itdoes
not target civilians, but the
movement is fractured and
Saturday's attacks shared
characteristics of recent
violence.
Saturday's attack was the
deadliest since February,
when three men shot to
death 38 people at a Kabul
Bank branch in Jalalabad.
The Taliban claimed
responsibility, saying the
victims deserved their fates
because some worked for
the Western-backed Afghan
government, which they
perceive as illegitimate.
The Taliban also claimed
responsibility for a bomb
attack in February in
the northern province of
Kunduz which killed 31
people as they waited for
government identification
cards.


S e DISCOUNTS AT THIS STORE ONLY


2724 W. US Highwy 90
2724 W. US Highway 90


I STORE FIXTURES FOR SALE!
S ALL SALES FINAL, NO REFUNDS OR EXCHANGES. OPEN DAILY REGULAR HOURS. WE ACCEPT VISA, MASTERCARD, DISCOVER, AMERICAN
EXPRESS AND SEARS CARD. WE ACCEPT SEARS GIFT CARDS. DISCOUNTS DO NOT APPLY TO PREPAID GIFT CARDS. INVENTORY IS LIMITED
TO STOCK ON HAND. THIS STORE IS NOT PARTICIPATING IN CURRENT SEARS CIRCULARS. THIS EVENT EXCLUDES ELECTROUX.

: 1 1 r ,, I I Iv I I' ; ; a I' ; I


LAKE CITY REPORTER WORLD SUNDAY, JUNE 26, 2011


Page Editor: Todd Taylor, 754-0424














LAKE CITY REPORTER WEATHER SUNDAY, JUNE 26, 2011


THE WEATHER



SCT. C SCT. SCT. SCT. SCT.
STORMS -STORMS -STORMS -STORMS -STORMS



HI95L71 HI 95L0o HI 94 L HI 95WLO 1 1HI 93LO 71


Tallahassee *
95/73

Pana City
88/76


TEMPERATURES
High Saturday
LOW Saturday
Normal high
Normal lOw
Record high
Recbrd low

PRECIPITATION
Saturday
Month total
Year total
Normal month-to-date
Normal year-to-date


V*a
.96
Lake
95
Gai
95


91
73
90
70
102 in 1950
60 in 1985


0.00"
1.98"
16.09"
5.62"
22.87"


lma City
,/72 -. Jackseovlle Cape Canaveral
eCity 92/76 Daytona Beach
/71 Ft. Lauderdale
ansvle Daytona Beach Fort Myer
94/71 9 75 Galnesvllle
Ocaa Jacksonville
94/72 Key West
Orando Cape CanaverLake Cty
94/77 89/75 Lake Cty
Miami
npa Naples
93/75 West PanlmBeach Ocala
88/77 Orlando
S Ft Laulderdae Panama Cty
Ft. Myers 90/78 0 Pensacola
94/75 *Naples Tallahassee
%90/77 Miani Tampa
9Q/79 Valdosta
Key West, W. Palm Beach


SUN
Sunnse today 6:31 a.m.
Sunset today 8:36 p.m.
Sunnse tom. 6:31 a.m. EXMI
Sunset tom. 8:36 p.m. 10Mninsbbum
Toaay's
MOON ultra-violet
Moonrise today 2:39 a.m. radiation nsk
for the area on
Moonset today 4:30 p.m. for te area on
Moonrise tom., '3:18 a.m. a scale ro
to 10+.
Moonset tom. 5:26 p.m.



July July July July Vul Fore
1 8 15 23 grap
New Frst Full Last rCe
Ye W I, ww


Monday
90, 16, t
92/74/t
89/79/t
93/74/t
94/71/t
91/74/t
89/83/t
95/71/t
90/79/t
90/76/t
94/72/t
94/76/t
88/76/t
93/81/pc
94/73/t
93/75/t
97/71/t
87/81/t


Tuesday
88 76 t'
91, 73, (
89 79,t,
92 76.1
92.70 1'
90,74 1
89.,83 L1
'94'70 1
89,'80.t
90/77/t
92/71;1i
94/76,1
89 76/i
91 82 t
95, 72,'t
92; 75."t
96/71/t
85/81/t


at tewej





"t7 w e iff
sTive e~

akeMUM 1S
MMML I~aks


casts, data and
hics 0 201l Weather
:ral, LP, Madison, Wis.
r.weatherpubllsher.com


NATIONAL FORECAST: Showers and thunderstorms are expected across the northern Plains
and middle Mis.issippi Valley today. Some thunderstorms could be severe with large hail and
damaging winds. Locally heavy rain is also possible in the northern Plains. Rainfall is expect-
ed in parts of New England.


Stationary
Front

Occluded
Fonl


. '-. il ,
YEStER.DAS NATlONAI. EXTREMES ..--' I *' High:.'109o,Childress, Texas Low: 260, Stanley, Idaho
:,: *.'r, .-- ... .'" o '-_^ : ,"1 "-..-, .. .- _.


Saturday Today


CITY
Albany NY
Albuquerque
Anchorage
Atlanta
Baltimore
Billings
Birmingham
Bismarck
Boise
Boston
Buffalo
Charleston SC
Charleston WV
Charlotte
Cheyenne
Chicago
Cincinnati
Cleveland
Columbla SC
Dallas
Daytona Beach
Denver


HI/Lo/Pcp.
76/61/.06,
95/69/0
57/511.04
89/66/0
83/68/0
68/53/0
92/66/0
81/55/0
73/48/0
63/54/,05
67/61/.02
90/70/0
74/65/0
.86/62/0
19.52 0
78/58/0
79, 64 0
68, 6;, 0
86,'68 0
934, 78, C
89/71/.10
84/59/0


HI/LO/W
76/57/sh
103/65/s
64/51/sh
94/72/t
88/71/pc
74/52/t
96/72/t
72/53/t
75/48/pc
75/65/sh
72/59/pc
93/75/pc
S85/65/t
93/69/pc
83/52/pc
76/68/t
82/69/t
78/62/pc
96/73/pc
99/77/pc
92/75/t
94/58/s


Saturday Today


CITY
Des Molnes
Detroit
El Paso
Fairbanks
Greensboro
Hartford
Honolulu
Houston
Indianapolis
Jackson MS
Jacksonville
Kansas City
Las Vegas
Uttle Rock
Los Angeles
Memphis
Miami
Minneapolis
Mobile
New Orleans
New York
Oklahoma City


HI/Lo/Pcp. HI/Lo/W CITY
68/61/.28 83/71/pc Omaha
78/59/0 77/63/pc Orlando
102/74/0 106/77/s Philadelphia
77/59/0 79/55/sh Phoenix
86/67/0 91/68/pc Pittsburgh
77/57/0 79/61/sh Portland ME
82/76/0 89/74/sh Portland OR
93/75/0 95/76/pc Raleigh
78/58/0 80/69/t Rapid City
91/71/0 95/74/pc Reno
90/71/0 92/76/pc Richmond
79/63/.19 89/76/t Sacramento
98/81/0 103/82/s St. Louis,
97/72/0 97/75/pc Salt Lake City
69/62/0 71/62/pc San Antonio
91/73/0 96/77/pc San Diego
90/78/0 90/79/t San Francisco
68/61/.02 78/64/pc Seattle
92/71/0 94/74/t Spokane
92/76/0 92/77/pc Tampa
80 64 0 81/65/pc Tucson
98/77/0 102/78/s Washington


Saturday Today


HI/Lo/Pcp.
76/62/.77
89/74/.27
83/67/0
105/85/0
69/61/0
60/53/.31
67/50/0
89/70/0
78/55/0
79/53/0
88/67/0
81/56/0
79/67/0
81/59/0
94/77/0
70/63/0
64/52/0
61/51/:01
63/43/0
91/77/0
104/77/0
84/72/0


HI/Co/W
85/70/c
94/77/t
86/66/pc
114/85/s
82/61/pc
71/58/sh,
,76/54/s
92/69/pc
75/52/t
83/55/s
90/68/pc
91/60/s
92/74/t
84/60/pc
99/77/pc
72/61/pc
70/51/pc
70/53/s
71/47/s
93/75/t
108/78/s.
88/69/pc.


.er SA TINAL


Saturday Today
HI/Lo/Pcp. HI/Lo/W
90/79/0 91 I
63/54/0 ;, 6'), p.
89/74/0 79/64/s
59/50/0 57/48/sh
88/64/0 86/68/pc
66/52/0 72/57/sh
S50/37/0 52 '36,'s
95/72/0 89 t 69,
S77/48/0 85/62/s
88/72/0 91/75/t
66,'55'0 66,52,snr
91, 81,0 85/78/t
88/79/0 : 86/75/t


CITY
La Paz
LUma
London
Madrid
Mexico City
Montreal
Moscow
Nairobi
Nassau
New DeJl
Oslo
Panama
Paris


Saturday Today
HI/Lo/Pcp. HI/Lo/W
59/23/0 56/28/pc
68/64/0 70/65/pc
73/54/0 79/60/pc
97/64/0 99/69/s
75/59/0 70/52/t
70/59/0 72/64/sh
75/61/0 75/60/t
81/59/0 74/59/t
91/77/0 91/81/t
97/86/0 94/84/t
64/45/0 66/51/pc
86/77/0 88/75/t
79/59/0 86/60/s


KEYTO CONDIONS: c-cloudy, dr-drizzle, f-fair, fg-fog, h-hazy, i-ice, pc-partly cloudy, r-rain, s-sunny,
S. sh-showers,sn-snow, ts-thunderstorms, w-windy.


.1r


Pay off your home in 5 years!


IF : you have 30% or more equity in your home...
I a you want to avoid high closing costs...


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(Please call for other rates & terms)


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CAMPUS


c (JUSA
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Apply online at campuscu.com or call 754-2219 today!


Membership is open to everyone in Alachua, Clay, Columbia, Lake, Marion and Sumter counties!
1. Offer not available on existing CAMPUS loans. Offer is for new loans only. May not be combined with any other offer. Credit approval, sufficient income, adequate property valuation (maximum
LTV of 70%), and first mortgage position required. Owner-occupied property only. Offer excludes mobile homes; certain other restrictions apply. Property insurance is required; flood and/or title insurance may be required
at an additional expense to the borrower. Example: a $100,000 loan at 2.99% for 60 months would require 59 monthly payments of 51,796.69 and a final payment of S1,701.38, total finance charge of $7,967.94; for a total of
payments of $107,800.94. The amount financed is $99,833.00. APR=Annual Percentage Rate. APR is 3.057%. 2. Credit approval and initial $5 deposit required. Mention this ad and we'll waive the S15 new member fee.


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Lak C~i;~~iImfuhAU?~,ity18 W aco orrlu3is r.Gvil -E Cmus120SW5h v. .Capu 90 W 4h t Jnevll 07N 10h erae ute' Wl 515N dSt owrSqar 72 W 5h t
S a Is eat F*oo H1*pinhilsC mm ns92 0 V 3)9h Iv ,Oaa 0 7 *VColgeR at* cl 2 4 E ile S rng lv W st ai n11 1*W93dC ut d u m fed17 5 SHw .4


Penacola
92/76


CITY
Acapulco
Amsterdam
Athens
Auckland
BeUing
Berlin
Buenos Alres
Cairo
Geneva
Havana.
Helsinkl
Hong Kong
Kingston


U-


CITY
Rio
Rome
St. Thomas VI
San Juan PR
Santiago
Seoul
Singapore
Sydney
Tel Aviv
Tokyo
Toronto
Vienna
Warsaw


Saturday
HI/Lo/Pcp.
79/68/0
86/66/0
88/79/.08
88/78/0
61/30/0
70/64/0
86/79/0
66/46/0
86/72/0
81/70/0
70/61/0
68/55/0
68/52/0


Today j
HI/Lo/W
78/67/t
87/66/s
90/79/t
89/76/t
66/41/s
72/66/r
89/76/t
68/49/s
84/70/s
84/73/sh
79/63/pc
74/57/sh
68/51/sh


s -


. tAKE WY AUUVW


Page Editor: Todd Taylor, 754-0424


9/8 j













Story ideas?

Contact
Tim Kirby
Sports Editor
754-0421
tkirby@lkecityreportercom


Lake City Reporter





SPORTS


Sundayjune 26 20 II


www.lakecityreporter.com


Section B


BRIEFS


Camp next week
at Quail Heights
The next Junior
Summer Camp for ages
5-16 at Quail Heights
Country Club is
8:30-11:30 a.m.
June 27-July 1, at a cost
of $65.
For details, call the pro
shop at 752-3339.

Ste-Marie clinic
set next week
The next Junior Golf
Clinic at The Country
Club at Lake City is
8-11 a.m. June 27-July 1,
at a cost of $65 for club
members and $75 for
non-members. Drinks
and snacks are provided.
For details, call Carl
Ste-Marie at 752-2266 or
623-2833.

Junior tour in
Louisiana
The Arrowhead Junior
Golf Tour has a tourna-
ment July 11-12 in Baton
Rouge, La. The 36-hole
event for ages 12-18 is
ranked by the National
Junior Golf Scoreboard.
Tournament fee is $235.
Recommended accom-
modations are available
at the Baton Rouge
Embassy Suites. Call
(225) 924-6566 for reser-
vations.
Registration deadline
is July 6. To enter, call
(318) 402-2446 or enter
online at www.arrowhea4-
jgt.com.


Lessons offered
July 11-22
Youth and adult
swimming lessons are
offered at the Columbia-
County Aquatic Complex.
Classes meet for two
weeks and six daily times,
are offered, plus there
are two daily mom and
tot classes. Three ses-
sions remain with the
next session July 11-22.
Cost is $50 per person.
Registration is at the
-pool (755-8195) from 5-7
p.m. July 6 and all day
July 7-8. .

ADWu BASKETBALL
Men's games at
Richardson
Open basketball games
for men 18 and older are
played at Richardson
Community Center from
5-8 p.m. on Sundays. Cost
is $3 per session.
For details, call John
Henry Young Jr. at 623-
4817 or Mario Coppock
at 754-7095.

GIRLS SOFTBALL
Crushers clinic
set for July 11i-
15
Columbia Crushers
Softball Organization is
holding an elite softball
clinic for girls of all ages
from 8 a.m. to noon on
July 11-15. There will
be instruction in the
fundamentals of fielding
and hitting. Registration
is at Brian's Sports on
U.S. Highway 90 west.
Registration deadline is
July 5 and the camp is
limited to 100 girls.
For details, go to
columbiacrushers@gmail.
corn or call 755-4271.


M From staff reports


Allen likes 7-on-7 work


Atkinson shining' thrown the ball really good
at QB for Tigers in spurts," he said. "Nate
Ayers has made some real
in passing game. nice catches. (Rakeem
Battle) has done a good
By BRANDON FINLEY job of taking the ball out
bfinley@lakecityreporter.com of the backfield and turn-
ing it up into a touchdown.
One of the new fads in Jayce Barber has caught
high school football is 7-on- some balls at tight end.
7 camps. Columbia High is J.T. Bradley continues to
no stranger to that trend emerge. We're getting our
as the Tigers have been best athletes on the field."
involved in them over the It was a lot of praise for a
lastfew seasons under Craig position thatAllen seemed frus-
Howard. With new head treated with during the spring.
coach Brian Allen coming "It was one of our weaker
in not much is changing for spots, but you hear me con-
the Tigers. tinue to talk about the guys,"
Columbia has been Allen said. "And there are
involved with Fort White, others like Antonio Pelham-
Gainesville and Buchholz that made an amazing one-
high schools over the past handed catch, so we were
two weeks in scrimmages, doing pretty good."
The teams aren't keeping Defense is usually harder
score, but Allen has noticed to gauge in 7-on-7 scrim-
some standout performanc- mages, but Allen wasn't
es for the Tigers. short of names to praise on
"Nigel (Atkinson) has that side of the ball either.


"Darren Burch had a
pick-6," he said. "Zedrick
Woods, an incoming ninth
grader, had a pick-6 from
about 60 yards. Trey
Marshall had a pick and
we probably dropped about
four or five more as a team.
We saw some good things
while they were tossing the
ball around."
Allen was also looking
for subtle things'with his
defensive players.
"One thing that is big for
them to understand is route
concept," he said. "We want
them to recognize wide
receiver alignment and
things we coach in cover
2, 4 and'man schemes. We
want to see depth on deep-
thrown balls. In spurts I
was pleased, but in turn
there were spurts where
things weren't as good."
The Tigers will travel
to the FCA camp on July
21-23.


E


Courson qualifies

for 63rd National

High School

Finals Rodeo


By TIM KIRBY
tkirby@lakecityreporter.com

competes on
the diamond
and in arenas,
and soon he
will be on the big stage.
.The Columbia High
senior recently qualified for
the-63rd Annual National
High School Finals Rodeq,
The competition is July
17M23 in Gillette, Wy., and
features more than 1,500
contestants from 41 states
as well as Canada and.
Australia.
Courson competes in
team roping and qualified
for the national competition
with partner Seth
Richardson, a Madison
County High graduate
from Pinetta. The partners
competed through the
Florida High School Rodeo
Association, where they
placed in the top four to
qualify for the national
event.
Courson is the heeler in
the team roping tandem,
and Richardson is the
header.


In team roping both
riders follow the steer after
the animal gets a head
start. The heeler helps
keep the steer straight
and the header ropes the
horns. The header turns
his horse and tightens
the rope on the steer to
allow the heeler tocomne.in
behind and rope the back
two legs. The best time
wins it,'-
'We practice once a
week prior to the rodeos,"
Courson said. "We work
with our horses every *
day and rope three days a '
week."
Courson comes toti
Sroping naturally dad
Jerry Wayne Courson has
competed in Professional
Rodeo Cowboys.
Association events for 20
years aind made the South
Florida circuit finals more
than 10 times.
"I didn't start doing it
until a few years ago,"
Blaine said. "Iwas always
busy with baseball."
Now, Blaine balances
COURSON continued on 2B


JEN CHASTEEN/Special to the Reporter
Columbia High's Rakeem Battle runs the ball during a 7-on-7
game in Lake City Wednesday.


stage


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Blaine Courson shows offone of the belt buckles he won at the North Alabama
Championships in Rainsville, Ala. last week.


Kirkman sees action in

Rangers loss on Saturday


Lake City native
pitches three
innings of relief.
From staff reports

ARLINGTON, Texas -
Columbia High alumnus
Michael Kirkman saw his
10th major league pitch-
ing appearance this season
Saturday afternoon for the
Texas Rangers in a game
broadcast as the national
game of the week on Fox
TV.
Kirkman, a 6-foot-6 left
hander from Lake City,
entered the Rangers' inter-


league game against the
New York Mets with two
runners on and no one
out in the sixth inning in a
game that already was out
of control. The Mets led at
the time, 9-2.
Kirkman struggled
early in the sixth, giving
up two two-run doubles, a
single, a walk, and threw
a wild pitch that led to a
run before he recorded an
out, as the Mets built a
14-2 lead. Then he knuck-
led down and retired three
batters in a row to end the
inning.
Kirkman pitched four
complete innings and fin-


ished the mop-up work for
the Rangers in the 14-5
loss.
He retired the side in
order in the seventh and
eighth innings. He allowed
a meaningless single in
the ninth and finished the
game with two strikeouts.
Kirkman relieved Dave
Bush.
The reliever gave up four
runs all were earned
- in his first appearance
since a 2-4 loss against
the Atlanta Braves on Jun
19.
Kirkman is 1-1 with a
6.95 ERA since being called
up by the Rangers.


Lake City will

battle again today


10-under team
eliminated after
Saturday's play.
By BRANDON FINLEY
bfinley@lakecityreporter.com
Lake City picked up a 67-
53 win against Valdosta in
the second game of pool play
in the Lake City Recreation
Department's Annual 2011
Goodwill Games Basketball
Tournament on Saturday.
The Wolves used 13 points
from Marquez Marshall
and Monte Tisdale to set
the pace. After jumping out
to a 31-26 lead at the half,
the Wolves ran away in the


second half. Milton Sanders
was the only other player
in double figures with 11
points.
Lake City played in the
late game Saturday, but
with two wins will be in
the final four teams which
begin play at 9:30 a.m.
Lake City's 10-under
team fell in three games.
The 10-under Wolves lost
to Gilchrist 31-22, Palatka
in overtime, 31-29, and
Gainesville 46-31.
Trey Miller was the lead-
ing scorer through three
games with a combined
29 points. He scored 16
points against the Gilchrist
Gunners.


, ,u


_


4















LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS SUNDAY, JUNE 26, 2011


SCOREBOARD


TELEVISION

TV sports

Today
ATHLETICS
5 p.m.
NBC U.S. Outdoor Championships,
at Eugene, Ore.
AUTO RACING
Noon
FOX Formula One, European
Grand Prix, at Valencia, Spain (same-day
tape)
3 p.m.
TNT NASCAR. Sprint CupToyota/
Save Mart 350, at Sonoma, Calif.
8 p.m.
ESPN2 NHRA. Summit Racing
Equipment Nationals, at Norwalk, Ohio
(same-day tape)
GOLF
8:30 a.m.
TGC European PGA Tour, BMW
International Open, final round, at Munich
(same-day tape)
2 p.m.
TGC PGA of America, PGA
Professional National Championship, first
round, at Hershey, Pa.
3 p.m.
CBS PGA Tour, Travelers
Championship, final round, at Cromwell,
Conn.
4 p.m.
TGC LPGA Tour.Wegmans LPGA
Championship, final round, at Pittsford,
N.Y.
7:30 p.m.
TGC Champions Tour, Dick's
Sporting Goods Open, final round, at
Endicott, N.Y. (same-day tape)
MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL
2 p.m.
TBS Colorado at N.Y.Yankees
WGN Washington at Chicago
White Sox
8 p.m.
ESPN Cleveland at San Francisco
SOCCER
8:45 am.
ESPN2 FIFA,Women's World Cup,
Group A, Nigeria vs. France, at Sinsheim,
Germany
11:30 am.
ESPN FIFA, Women's World Cup,
Group A, Germany vs. Canada, at Berlin
2 p.m.
ESPN MLS, NewYork at Chicago

BASEBALL

AL standings


East Division
W L
Boston 44 31
NewYork 43 31
Tampa Bay 42 34
Toronto 37 39
Baltimore 34 39
Central Division
W L.
Cleveland 40 34
Detroit 40 36
Chicago 37 40
Minnesota 32 42
Kansas City 31 45
West Division
W L
Texas 41 36
Seattle 38 38
Los Angeles 38 39
Oakland 34 43


-Pct-GB,
.541. -
.526 I
.481 4'
.432 8
.408 10


Interleague play

Friday's Games
Arizona 7, Detroit 6
Pittsburgh 3, Boston I
Baltimore 5, Cincinnati 4, 12 innings
Colorado 4, N.Y.Yankees 2
Philadelphia I, Oakland 0
Texas 8, N.Y. Mets I
Tampa Bay 5, Houston I
Chicago Cubs 6, Kansas City 4
Milwaukee 4, Minnesota 3
Washington 9, Chicago White Sox 5,
14 innings
Toronto 5, St. Louis 4
LAAngels 8, LA. Dodgers 3
Seattle 5, Florida I
San Frahcisco 4, Cleveland 3
Saturday's Games
N.Y.Yankees 8, Colorado 3
San Francisco I, Cleveland 0
LA.Angels 6, LA. Dodgers I
N.Y. Mets 14,Texas 5
Chicago White Sox 3,Washington 0
Arizona at Detkoit (n)
Boston at Pittsburgh-(n)
Cincinnati at Baltimore (n),
Oakland at Philadelphia (n)
Tamnpa Bay at Houston (n)
Chicago Cubs at Kansas City (n)
Minnesota at Milwaukee (n)
Toronto at St. Louis (n)
Seattle at Florida-n)
Today's Games
Arizona (.Saunders 4-7) at Detroit
(Penny 5-6), 1:05 p.m.
Boston (A.Miller 0-0) at Pittsburgh (a.
McDonald 5-4), 1:35 p.m.
Cincinnati (H.Bailey 3-1) at Baltimore
(Guthrie 2-9), 1:35 p.m.
Oakland (Outman 3-1) at Philadelphia
(Halladay 9-3), 1:35 p.m.
Colorado (Nicasio 2- ) at N.Y.Yankees
(Nova 7-4), 2:05 p.m.
Tampa Bay (Niemann 2-4) at Houston
(Happ 3-9), 2:05 p.m.
Chicago Cubs (R.Wells I-1) at Kansas
City (Hochevar 4-8), 2:10 p.m.
Minnesota (Pavano 5-5) at Milwaukee
(Narveson 4-5), 2:10 p.m.
Washington (LHernandez 4-8) at
ChicagoWhite Sox (Humber 7-3), 2:10
p.m.
Toronto (R.Romero 6-7) at St. Louis
(McClellan 6-3),2:15 p.m.
N.Y. Mets (Gee 7-1) at Texas
(D.Holland 6-2), 3:05 p.m.
LA. Angels (Weaver 9-4) at LA
Dodgers (Kershaw 7-3), 4:10 p.m.
Cleveland (Carmona 4-9) at San
Francisco (Bumgamer 3-9), 8:05 p.m.
Seattle (Fister 3-8) at Florida (Ani.
Sanchez 6-1), 10:10 p.m.
Monday's Games
Toronto at Detroit, 6:05 p.m.
Cincinnati at Tampa Bay,7:10 p.m.
LA. Dodgers at Minnesota, 8:10 p.m.
Cleveland at Arizona, 9:40 p.m.
Kansas City at San Diego, 10:05 p.m.
Washington at LAAngels, 10:05 p.m.
Atlanta at Seattle, 10:10 p.m.


NL standings


Philadelph
Atlanta
Washingto
New York
Florida


Milwaukee
St. Louis
Cincinnati
Pittsburgh
Chicago
Houston


Arizona


East Division
W L
ia 47 29
43 33
3n 38 37
37 38
33 42
Central Division
W L
41 35
41 35
39 37
37 37
30 44
28 48
West Division
W L
42 34


San Francisco 41 '34 .547 'h
Colorado 37 37 .500 4
Los Angeles 34 42 .447 8
San Diego 32 44 .421 10
Friday's Game
San Diego I I.Adanta 2
Saturday's Game
Atlanta at San Diego (n)
Today's Game
Atlanta at San Diego, 4:05 p.m.
Monday's Game
Colorado at Chicago Cubs, 2:20 p.m.

College World Series

AtTD Ameritrade Park Omaha
Omaha, Neb.
(Double elimination)
Thursday
Virginia 8, California I, California
eliminated
Friday
Florida 6,Vanderbilt 4
South Carolina 3,Virginia 2, 13 innings
Championship Series
Best-of-3
Monday, June 27 Florida (53-17) vs.
South Carolina (53-14), 8 p.m.
Tuesday, June 28 Florida vs. South
Carolina, 8 p.m.
x-Wednesday, June 29 Florida vs.
South Carolina, 8 p.m.



BASKETBALL

WNBA schedule

Friday's Games
Phoenix 92,Atlanta 83
San Antonio 90, Los Angeles 80, OT
Seattle 65, Minnesota 55
Saturday's Games
Connecticut at Indiana (n)
Phoenix at Chicago (n)
Today's Games
San Antonio at Atlanta, 3 p.m.
Los Angeles at New York, 4 p.m.
Tulsa atWashington,4 p.m.
Indiana at Minnesota, 7 p.m.


BASKETBALL

2011 NHL Draft
Selections

SFirst Round
I. Edmonton, Ryan Nugent-Hopkins,
C, Red Deer (WHL).
2. Colorado, Gabriel Landeskog, LW,
Kitchener (OHL).
3. Florida, Jonathan Huberdeau, C,
Saint John (QMJHL).
4. New Jersey, Adam Larsson, D,
Skelleftea (Sweden).
5. N.Y. Islanders, Ryan Strome, C,
Niagara (OHL).
6. Ottawa, Mika Zibanejad, C,
Djurgarden (Sweden).
7.Winnijeg, Mark Scheifele, C, Barrie
(OHL).
8. Philadelphia (from Columbus), Sean
Couturier, C, Drummondville (QMJHL).
9. Boston (from Toronto), Dougie
Hamilton, D, Niagara (OHL).
10. Minnesota, Jonas Brodin, D,
SFarjestad (Sweden).
I Colorado (from St Louis), Duncan.
Siemens, D, Saskatoon (WHL).
12. Carolina, Ryan Murphy,. D,
Kitchener (OHL).
13. Calgary, Sven Baertschi, LW,
Portland (WHL).
14. Dallas, Jamie Oleksiak, D,
Northeastern (Hockey East).
15. N.Y. Rangers, J.T. Miller, LW, USA
U-18 (USHL).
16. Buffalo, Joel Armia, RW, Assat
(Finland),
17. Montreal, Nathan Beaulieu, D, Saint
John (QMJHL).
18. Chicago, Mark McNeill, C, Prince
Albert (WHL).
19. Edmonton .(from Los Angeles).
Oscar Klefbom, D, Farjestad (Sweden).
20. Phoenix, Connor Murphy, D, USA
U-i8 (USHL).
21. Ottawa (from Nashville), Stefan
Noeson, RW, Plymouth (OHL).
22. Toronto (from Anaheim), Tyler.
Biggs, RW,USA U-18 (USHL).
23.Pittsburgh,Joe Morrow, D,Portland
(WHL).
24. Ottawa (from Detroit), Matt
Puempel, LW, Peterborough (OHL).
25.Toronto (from Philadelphia), Stuart
Percy, D, Mississauga St. Michael's (OHL).
26. Chicago (from Washington), Phillip
Danault LW.Victoriaville (QMJHL).
27.Tampa Bay, Vladislav Namestnikov,
C, London (OHL).
28. Minnesota (from San Jose), Zack
phillips. C, Saint John (QMJHL).
29. Vancouver, Nicklas Jensen. LW,
Oshawa (OHL).
30. Anaheim (from Toronto through
Boston), Rickard Rakell, RW, Plymouth
(OHL).
Second Round
31. Edmonton, David Musil, D,
Vancouver (WHL).
32. St. Louis (from Colorado), T)y
Rattle, RW, Portland (WHL).
33. Florida, Rocco Grimaldi, C, USA
U-18 (USHL).
34. N.Y. Islanders, Scott Mayfield, D.
Youngstown (USHL).
35. Detroit (from Ottawa), Tomas
Jurco, RW, Saint John (QMJHL).
36. Chicago (from Winnipeg), Adam
Clendenin& D, Boston University (Hockey
East).
37. Columbus, Boone Jenner, C.
Oshawa (OHL).
38. Nashville (from New Jersey).
Magnus Hellberg G.Almtuna (Sweden-2).


39. Anaheim (from Toronto), John
Gibson, G, USA U-18 (USHL).
40. Boston (from Minnesota),
Alexander Khokhlachev C/LW, Windsor
(OHL).
41. St. Louis, Dmitrij Jaskin, RW. Slavia
(Czech Republic).
42. Carolina Victor Rask, C, Leksand
(Sweden-2).
43. Chicago (from Calgary through
Toronto), Brandon Saad, LW, Saginaw
(OHL).
44. Dallas, Brett Ritchie, RW, Sarnia
(OHL).
45. Calgary (from N.Y. Rangers),
Markus Granlund, C, HIFK Jr. (Finland-Jr.).
46. St. Louis (from Buffalo). Joel
Edmundson, D, Moose Jaw (WHL).
47. San Jose (from Montreal through
Florida), Matthew Nieto, LW, Boston
University (Hockey East).
48. Detroit (from Chicago), Xavier
Ouellet, D, Montreal (QMJHL).
49. Los Angeles, Christopher Gibson.
G, Chicoutimi (QMJHL).
50. N.Y. Islanders (from Montreal),
Johan Sundstrorti, C, Frolunda (Sweden).
51. Phoenix, Alexander Ruuttu, C,
Jokerit Jr. (Finland-Jr.).
52. Nashville, Miikka Salomaki, RW,
Karpat (Finlaild).
53. Anaheim, William Karlsson, C,
Vasteras Jr. (Sweden-Jr.).
54. Pittsburgh, Scott Harrington, D,
London (OHL).
55. Detroit, Ryan Sproul, D, Sault Ste.
Marie (OHL).
56. Phoenix (from Philadelphia), Lucas
Lessio, LW, Oshawa (OHL).
57. Calgary (from Washington
through Carolina and N.Y. Fangers),Tyler
Wotherspoon, D, Portland (WHL).
58. Tampa Bay, Nikita Kucherov W,
CSKA 2 (Russia-Jr.).
59. Florida (from San Jose), Rasmus
Bengtsson, D, Rogle (Sweden-2).
60. Minnesota (fromVancouver), Mario
Lucia, LW.Wayzata (Minn.) HS.
61. Ottawa (from Boston), Shane
Prince, C, Ottawa (OHL).


TENNIS

Wimbledon singles

Men
Third Roynd
Tomas Berdych (6), Czech Republic,
def. Alex Bogomolov Jr., United States,
6-2,6-4,6-3.
Rafael Nadal (I), Spain, def. Gilles
Muller, Luxembourg, 7-6 (6), 7-6 (5), 6-0.
Mardy Fish. (10), United States, def.
Robin Haase, Netherlands, 6-3, 6-7 (5),
6-2, 1-I, retired. -
Juan Martin del Potro (24),Argentina,
def. Gilles Simon (15), France, 7-6 (8),
7-6 (5), 7-5.
Lukasz Kubot, Poland, def. Gael Monfils
(9), France, 6-3, 3-6,6-3,6-3.
Roger Federer (3), Switzerland, def.
David Nalbandian (28), Argentina, 6-4,
6-2,6-4.
Jo-Wilfried Tsonga (12), France, def.
Fernando Gonzalez, Chile, 6-3, 6-4, 6-3.
David Ferrer (7), Spain, def. Karol
Beck, Slovakia, 6 64-3, 6-3.
Bernard Tomic, Australia, def. Robin
Soderling (5), Sweden, 6- I,6-4, 7-5.
Michael Llodra (19), France, def.Yen-
hsun LuTaiwan, 6-3, 6-3, 6-1.
Mikhail Youzhny (18), Russia, def.
Nicolas Almagro (16), Spain, 4-6, 6-3, 7-6
(3), 6-3.
Xavier Malisse, Belgium, def. Jurgen
Melzer (I 1),Austria, 7-6 (5),6-3, 6-0.
Novak Djokovic (2), Serbia, def.
Marcos Baghdatis (32), Cyprus, 6-4, 4-6,
6-3, 6-4.
Women .
Third Round
Caroline Wozniacki (I), Denmark, def.
Jarmila Gajdosova (27),Australia, 6-3, 6-2.
Maria Sharapova (5), Russia, def. Klara
Zakopalova, Czech Republic, 6-2, 6-3.
Dominika Cibulkova (24), Slovakia, def.
Julia Goerges (16), Germany, 6-4, 1-6, 6-3.
Peng Shuai (20), China, def. Melinda
Czink, Hungary, 6-2, 7-6 (5).
Marion Bartoli (9), France, def. Flavia
Pennetta (21), Italy, 5-7, 6-4,9-7.
,.Petra Cetkovska, Czech Republic, def.
Ana Ivanovic (18), Serbia, 6-3, 7-6(0).
Sabine Lisicki, Germany, def. Misaki
Dol, Japan, 6-4, 6-2 '.
Serena Williams (7), United States, def.
Maria Kirilenko (26), Russia, 6-3, 6-2.
Tamira Pasrek, Austria, def. Francesca
Schiavone (6), Italy, 3-6, 6-4, 11-9.
Doubles
Men
Second Rbund
Christopher Kas,' Germany, and
Alexander Peya, Austria, def. Marrelo
Melo and Bruno Soares (13), Brazil,'6-7
(2),6-1,6-4,6-2.
Robert Lndstedt, Sweden, and Horia
Tecau (8), Romania, def. Julien Benneteau
and Nicolas Mahut, France, 6-4, 6-4, 5-7,
7-6 (4).
Amrnaud Clement, France, and Lukas
Dlouhy, Czech Republic, def. Mahesh
Bhupathi and Leander Paes (3), India, 2-6,
6-3,7-6 (1),6-4.
Juan Ignacio Chela and Eduardo
Schwank (12), Argentina, def. Matthias
Bachinger and Frank Moser. Germany, 6-2,
7-6 (4), 6-7 (5), 6-7 (6), 6-3.
James Cerretani, United States, and
Philipp Marx, Germany, de*. Daniele
Bracciali, Italy, and Frantisek Cermak (16),
Czech Republic, 4-6, 7-5, 7-6 (5), 6-4.
Kevin Anderson, South Africa, and
Julian Knowle, Austria, def. Max Mirnyi,
Belarus, and Daniel Nestor (2), Canada,
7-6 (2), 7-6 (7), 6-3.
Wesley Moodie, South Africa, and
Dick Norman (II), Belgium, def. jamie
Delgado and Jonathan Marray, Britain, 4-6,
7-6 (5), 7-6 (6), 6-2.
Women
Second Round
Vera Dushevina and Ekaterina
Makarova, Russia, def. Maria Jose Martinez
Sanchez and Anabel Medina Garrigues
(II), Spain. 6-3, 6-4.
Kveta Peschke, Czech Republic, and


Katarina Srebotnik (2), Slovenia, def.
Jarmila Gajdosova, Australia, and Klara
Zakopalova, Czech Republic, 6-3, 6-1.
Mixed Doubles
Second Round
Bob Bryan and Liezel Huber (I),
United States, def. Scott Lipsky, United
States, and Casey Dellacqua, Australia,
6-4.6-1.
Andreas Seppi and Alberta Brianti,
Italy, def. Jonathan Marray and Anne
Keothavong, Britain, 3-6, 6-4, 8-6.


COURSON: Competes for $300,000


Continued From Page IB

both sports and team
roping is becoming more
lucrative.
Last weekend at
the North Alabama
Championships in
Rainsville, Ala.,'Blaine won
two belt buckles and $2,500
in prizes, while dad took
home $2,000. More than
200 teams participated in
the event.
Blaine's mom, Tara,
and sister, Jara, also are
team ropers. Tara began
a couple of years back
and Jara will move up
from junior rodeos to the
Florida High School Rodeo
Association this fall.
"A lot of families are
involved," Tara said. "We
are all in the practice pen
almost every night during
the summer.".
The family plans to fly to
the national competition in
Wyoming.
"A lot goes into it," Jerry
Wayne said. "It is not just a
weekend thing."

The Coursons own
seven horses, which


are in various levels
of training for roping.
Blaine's competition horse
is Oakley, an 8-year-old
Palomino.
"I broke him and put the
first saddle on him," Blaine
said. "We started him two
years ago and are taking it
slow. I like being with the
horses and seeing Oakley
progress along with me
over the years. Dad
helped me a lot after I
got him broke, as far as
roping."
Oakley won't make the
trip to Wyoming, so the
Coursons arraigned for
Blaine to borrow a horse
from J.D. Dominego, a
friend they have made
through the rodeo
circuit
Oakley will be missed.
"It's a big deal to break a
horse and train it yourself,"
Tara said.

The National High
School Finals Rodeo has
cash and scholarship
prizes, and the opportunity
to earn the title "National


High School Rodeo
National Champion."
Two rounds of
competition cut the field
to 20 teams, who then
compete in the final
championship performance
on Saturday.
The family is tuning up
at the Eastern Regionals
in Murfreesboro, Tenn., in
two weeks, an event that
offers $300,000 in prize
money.
Blaine thanked his
sponsors Smitty's
Western Store, Central
State Enterprise and
Cactus Ropes.
"Itfs an expensive hobby,
but it is a lot of fun," Jerry
Wayne said. "You make a
lot of lifetime friends."
Baseball might be
fleeting, but the Coursons
said they meet 60- and
70-year-old ropers at most
every rodeo. That sounds
like a future for Blaine.
"I want to thank my dad
for teaching me to rope,
and my mom and dad for
carrying me to all the
rodeos," he said.


Players hold phone updates on lockout


Associated Press


NFL players have been
updated on all issues dis-
cussed in recent negotia-
tions with owners.
Buffalo Bills safety George
Wilson'tells The Associated
Press on Saturday this is the


ACROSS 41 Cc
42 Nc


1 Tight spot
4 Style
S8 Common ID
11 Hardly -
13 Not sunnyside
up
14 Perjure
15 Metric prefix
16 Nightclubs
18 Grab
20 Feels grateful
21 Drivers' org.
22 "When We Was

24 Blowing
27 Basic assump-
tions
30 To - (pre-
cisely)
31 Warm month
32 911 staffer
34 Flee hastily
35 Downy fungi
36 Pigeon talk
37 Diner's gaffe
39 Pig out
40 Diver's need


45 Sc
49 Sh
53 La
54 Nc
55 Te
sic
56 M(
57 Ar
58 Nc
59 To


first time in a while the play-
ers have been briefed on a
lockout in its fourth month.
Conference calls were
held in the last two days,
and the players were told
more updates will come
next week. Wilson adds
there will be such talks


container
nonexistent
holdingg
leer fabrics
zing about
it their
xtbook divi-
on
)vie theater
ly woman
ods off
Dyota product


DOWN


Marshy areas
Tsar name
Warrior prin-
cess
Gourmet cof-
fee
Caviar, actually
Society miss
Memorable
time
Vast number
Location
Monster's loch
Spin around


every week because "time
is of the essence."
One person with knowl-
edge of the discussions says
"not much progress" was
made in the fourth round of
recent meetings involving
the.commissioner, NFLPA,
several owners and players.


Answer to Previous Puzzle

URIL SITIA BIET I
KIAI S ILA Y OREIEO

DETARrE AICES



BR S1KSOOT HE
ROIBA E L N SALT
ASIEA MEN R IA
AXI MS ES T EET
LOARA P
BEEP AREAS
FA IR TAKE WING
E ULRODA|GED DI A
fED P AID A P B


17 Chenille item
19 Coral islet
22 Good buy
23 Wide st.
24 Pump abbr.
25 Rocky Mountain


Want more puzzles?
Check out the "Just Right Crossword Puzzles" books
at QuillDriverBooks.com


2011 UFS, Dist. by Univ. Uclick for UFS


state
26 Highway
cruiser
27 Big swallow
28 Gaudy sign
29 Urban haze
31 Bon -, mon-
sieur!
33 Half a fly?
35 Roman 1101
36 Acid in lem-
ons
38 Veal source
39 Tropical snake
41 Gnats and
mice
42 Pvt.'s superi-
ors
43 Nope (hyph.)
44 Trevi Fountain
coins
46 S&L protector
47 Humerus
neighbor
48 Wolf's expres-
sion
50 Enjoyable
51 - roll (lucky)
52 Bite


Page Editor: Brandon Finley, 754-0420


I












3B.'


Page ~ditor: Brandon Finley, 754-0420 LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS SUNDAY, JUNE 26, 2011


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Florida left fielder Tyler Thompson catches a fly ball hit by
Vanderbilt's Tony Kemp in the first inning of an NCAA College
World Series baseball game in Omaha, Neb. on Friday.


UF, USC meet


in league clash


for national


championship

By ERIC OLSON and Whitson (8-0) started
Associated Press against Vanderbilt on June
20.


OMAHA, Neb. No
one argues that the
Southeastern Cofiference is
the class of college baseball
this year.
Now it's time to find out
wh6 truly is best in the
league, and nation, when
defending champion South
Carolina and Florida meet
in the College World Series
finals starting Monday."
The Gamecocks (53-14)
and Gators (53-17) shared
the SEC Eastern Division
title with a Vanderbilt team
that also made it to the
CWS' final four.
Florida won the confer-
ence tournament, beat-
ing Vanderbilt, and South
Carolina owns a record 14
consecutive NCAA tourna-
ment victories.
South Carolina won two
of three games against
Florida in the regular sea-
son, but that was all the way
back in March.
Their finals matchup
marks the first time since
1998 that two teams from
the same conference will
square off for the champi-
onship.
"We know it's not easy.
We know there's a long way
to go in this thing," Gators
coach Kevin O'Sullivan said.
"But you have to get there.
So we're excited for playing
for the national champion-
ship but we're going to be
business as usual for the
next couple days."
O'Sullivan hasn't
announced a starting pitch-
er for Game 1. Sophomore
Hudson Randall (11-3)
and freshman Karsten
Whitson (8-0) are available.
Randall earned the win in
the Gators' CWS opener
against Texas on June 18,


Unscramble these four Jumbles,
one letter to each square,
to form four ordinary words.
I WIELH I


RSEYLU
7- S 1


Gamecocks coach Ray
Tanner said he was lean-
ing toward starting fresh-
man Forrest Koumas (6-1),
who last pitched June 5 in
regionals.
South Carolina's biggest
pitching concern is the
availability of closer Matt
Price, who threw 90 pitches
and got out of three bases-
loaded situations in a sea-
son-long 5 '2-3 innings in
Friday's 3-2, 13-inning win
over Virginia.
"What are the chances of
rain on Monday," Tanner
said, laughing. "We're cer-
tainly going to be able to
use two days (off), but a
third might not be bad."
The forecast calls for a 40
percent chance of scattered
storms on Monday. The
first CWS atTD Ameritrade
Park already has had its
share of weather problems,
with a strong thunderstorm
causing the suspension of
a game last Monday and
showers causing a 68-min-
ute rain delay the next day.
"We have to try to get
Matt turned around as best
we can in the next few days
and go.from there," Tanner
said. "At this point you just
Story to figure it out as you
go and do the best you can
with it"
South Carolina's path to
the finals has been much
smoother this year. A year
ago the Gamecocks lost
their first game here before
becoming the first team in
CWS history to roll off six
straight wins. They swept
UCLA in the finals.
The Gamecocks won
three straight to advance to
this year's finals, though it
took until their final at-bat
to win two of the games.

THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME
by David L. Hoyt and Jeff Knurek


Now arrange the circled letters
to form the surprise answer, as
suggested by the above cartoon.


Serena Williams leads past


champs into 4th round


By HOWARD FENDRICH
Associated Press

WIMBLEDON, England
- Serena Williams has
been known to say she
isn't satisfied with this or
that aspect of her game,
even after easily winning a
match, say, 6-3, 6-2.
So it was some-
how refreshing to hear
Williams actually praise
herself after a victory by
that very score over 26th-
seeded Maria Kirilenko at
Wimbledon on Saturday.
Yes, only'five matches
since returning to the
tour after nearly a full year
off because of a series of
health scares, Williams
produced a performance
worthy of the 13-time
Grand Slam champion that
, she is. And then Williams
talked the talk of someone
finally ready to concede
that British bookmakers
might very well have been
right to make her the pre-
tournament favorite.
Asked whether she.was
surprised by the odds, the
seventh-seeded American
smiled widely and said: "I
wouldn't bet against me."
After hitting 10 aces and
compiling a 32-9 edge in
winners against Kirilenko,
Williams termed the show-
ing her "best I've played
since I came back."


COLEMAN


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Serena Williams returns a shot to Romania's Simona Halep
in their match at the All England Lawn Tennis Championships
at Wimbledon on Thursday.


"I was a little more con-
sistenit, and I played my
game more," said Williams,
trying to become the first
woman since Steffi Graf in
1991-93 to win three con-
secutive Wimbledon titles.
"Wasn't as tight and ner-
vous and uptight. Iwas able
to relax more today."
She was part of a
parade of past champi-
ons who breezed into the
fourth round Saturday,
joined by Roger Federer,
Rafael Nadal and Maria
Sharapova, who all' were
straight-set winners, too.
Top-seeded Caroline
Wozniacki, seeking her
first Grand Slam title, and


two-time Australian Open
champion Novak Djokovic,
who is now 44-1 in 2011,
also moved on.
There were two upsets
of some significance.
Two-time French Open
finalist Robin Soderling,
who was seeded fifth, was
dealing with stomach prob-
lems and bowed out meek-
ly against 158th-ranked
qualifier Bernard Tomic of
Australia 6-1,6-4,7-5. Tomic
is the first 18-year-old to
reach the men's fourth
round at Wimbledon since
Michael Chang and Goran
Ivanisevic in 1990.
"I was very calm, but
inside I was bursting. I


tried not to show it to him.
He was getting a bit frus-
trated," Tomic said. "Tli -
way I've beei playing is
really good' If I can keep it
up like this, who kihows?"
No. 9 Gael Monfils lost
to 93rd-ranked qualifier
Lukasz Kubot of Poland 6-
3, 3-6, 6-3, 6-3. Kubot is
the first man from Poland
to make it this far at
Wimbledon since Wojtek
Fibak in 1981.
Wimbledon is the only
Grand Slam tennis tourna-
ment that schedules a day
off on the middle Sunday
- and the only one that
puts all 16 men's and wom-
en's fourth-round matches
on the second Monday.
When play resumes, these
are some of the men's
matchups: No. 1 Nadal vs.
No. 24 Juan Martin del
Potro, the 2009 U.S. Open
champion; No. 2 Djokovic
vs. No. 19 Michael Llodra;
No. 3 Federer vs. No. 18
Mikhail Youzhny; No. 4
Andy Murray vs. No. 17
Richard Gasquet; and -No.
10 Mardy Fish, the last
U.S. man left, vs. No. 6
Tomas Berdych, the 2010
Wimbledon runner-up.
Fish advanced Saturday
when Robin Haase retired
in the fourth set, while
Berdych wrapped up a rain-
suspended victory over
Alex Bogomolov Jr.


- - - - - - - - mm- --
A G X G E B C J M Z Z L K G T
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Y G 'W N
G H Z I


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I- D R E


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Find all 18 of the 'Camping'words hidden in the word search
above. Words can be found in the banners on the ads shown here.
Complete the puzzle and retum it to the Lake City Reporter, 180 E
Duval Street Lake City, FL by Wednesday, June 29 5:00pm, for your
chance to wini
Deadline is Wednesday, June 29, 2011
Lake City Reporter
lkl.:i N r Ti:,:r l YC':m Cl P.P. E P' T mdiT lne

ENTRY FORM

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Subscriber: IE Yes O No


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Print your answer here: I 1 -. )
(Answers tomorrow)
Saturday's Jumbles: TEETH FUSSY DOLLAR IMPAIR
Answer: They would have finished the project sooner
had they done this RUSHED MORE -


:-. ",. .ji- ,;
S--RL-L SLEE.l -A -
ORILL SLE E I W '


Li
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I I
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sFMELLOWS

COFFEE


LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS SUNDAY, JUNE 26, 2011


' Page Editor: Brandon Finley, 754-0420


'' ' i~t~


C









LAKE CITY REPORTER ADVERTISEMENT


SUNDAY, JUNE 26, 2011


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Lake City Reporter


Story ideas?

Robert Bridges
Editor
754-0428
rbridges@akecityreportercom

Sunday, June 26, 2011


BUSINESS


www.lakecityreporter.com


Poole taking on new challenge


Economic Development
chief, having made his
mark here, is leaving post

By LEANNE TYO
Ityo@lakecityreporter.com
After 18 and a half years of service to
the county, Columbia County Economic
Development Department Director Jim Poole
will be leaving his current post to take on a new
position.
Monday marks Poole's final workday with the
county. He said Friday that he will soon move
on to a new job with Haven Hospice as its vice
president of Community and Legislative Affairs.
"I'm excited about my next career," Poole
said.
Poole's work as economic development direc-
tor began in January 1993 when he was hired
as the executive director of both the Lake City/
Columbia County Chamber of Commerce and
the Columbia County Industrial Development
Authority entities that were partnered, but
split in 2009.
After the split, Poole remained as executive
director of the IDA. The IDA operated under
Poole's leadership as a dependent taxing
authority until it was moved under county
control in January as the Columbia County
Economic Development Department.
A number of large businesses have located
in the county during Poole's tenure, such
as Sitel in 1999; Hunter Panels in 2004; New
Millennium Building Systems in 2005; and
U.S. Cold Storage and the Target Distribution
Center in 2008.
Poole noted the first business to locate in the
county's industrial park was Quest Aviation in
1995. Homes of Merit built a new plant in the
area in 1996.


The county experienced a period of job
growth in the late 1990s, Poole said, showing a
gain of 125 jobs per month.
'That was everything, including construc-
tion, retail, manufacturing, that was everything
together," he said. 'The county was doing really
well."
Job growth dipped after 9/11, Poole said,
but picked back up until the current economic
nturn in 2008.
Columbia County had fewer than 18,000 jobs
when Poole signed on and the job count is now
at 28,000.
Poole has impacted the county for the better
overall. However, in September of 2010 an audit
revealed the IDA had over-
paid $60,000 in ad valorem
property tax rebates to
New Millennium Building
Systems, Hunter Panels and
Mayo Fertilizer in consecu-
tive years.
I P Poole called it a "calcula-
Poole tion mistake" and took his
share of the blame.
In November 2010, the
county adopted an ordinance creating tax abate-
ment ad valorem tax exemption that deletes
the tax liability from the tax bill as an incen-
tive for businesses locating to the area, moving
away from rebates, and preventing similar mis-
takes in the future.
Other notable accomplishments under Poole
include the county's proposed inland port site
that may receive and transport goods through.a
public-private partnership with the Jacksonville
Port abd Plum Creek.
Another accomplishment was obtaining an
enterprise zone designation for the inland'port
site, Poole said.
"I think that's (the inland port) a major tool
that we've pulled off and it'll turn out to be a
super project in the future," he said.


Poole also noted the county has received
about $9 million in transportation grants dur-
ing his time as economic development director
for projects like Sitel, New Millennium and
Target, including a $900,000 grant it received
in December 2010 to construct a road into
Columbia Technology Inc. Various grants
from Workforce Florida and Florida Crown
Workforce Board have also been used to help
existing businesses with training programs,
Poole said.
"We've been very blessed that we've had
some really great things take place," Poole said.
"If you're looking for what I think is the key to
the success, its not taking 'no' for an answer.
My philosophy is 'no' is not an option.
"Our goal is always to find a way to make it
happen," he said. "I've worked with a lot of great
people that were involved in helping to make all
of those things happen."
Daje Williams, county manager, said Poole's
departure is a loss on both the county and state
levels.
"Jim was not only one of the very key figures
in county government," Williams said, "but he
was also a key figure from a state perspective.
Jim was very knowledgeable, he had extremely
good contacts and he knew how to work those."
"It is a tremendous loss," Williams continued.
"He's (Jim) assured me hell always be there
as a resource as needed, but we wish him well
and we know hell be very successful in his new
venture."
Poole, recently recognized as co-
Regional Director of the Year by the Florida
Economic Development Council, said he's
enjoyed his time as economic development
director.
"I've thoroughly enjoyed it and I'm extremely
thankful for what we were able to accomplish
working with people who shared a common
interest in helping Columbia County to grow
and prosper."


Economy

grew a bit

faster in

1st quarter

By MARTIN CRUTSINGER
AP Economics Writer
WASHINGTON The
U.S. economy expanded a
little faster at the beginning
of the year than previously
estimated. But the pace
Iwas still anemic and econo-
mists don't see that chang-
ing until later this year.
The Commerce
Department on Friday said
the economy grew at an
annual rate of 1.9 percent
in the January-March quar-
ter. That's not much better,
than the 1.8 percent rate
estimated a month ago.
The small upward revision
reflected stronger exports ,
and more business spend-
ing on stockpiles.
High gas prices were
a major reason growth
slowed. The impact of
those prices has carried
over into to the current
quarter. The economy is
growing in the current
April-June quarter at a
rate of about 2.3 percent,
according to an Associated'
Press survey of 38 top
economists.
Stocks fell in early-morn-
ing trading. The Dow Jones

ECONOMY continued on 3C


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Business Hostilities
Q What's a'hostile takeover? -
B.L., Opelika, Ala.
AA typical takeover is friendly,
with one company agreeing
to be bought by another. Managers
from each firm will meet with each
other and freely shaie information
about themselves.
In a hostile takeover, though,
the acquisition target is not too
thrilled or cooperative. A hostile
takeover happens when a would-be
acquirer sees some strategic value
in another company. It may make
friendly overtures and be rebuffed.
If so, it may then move on to
dealing directly with the target's
shareholders, offering to buy their
shares from them for either a cer-
tain amount in cash or an exchange
of stock. If enough shareholders
respond, the acquirer can gain
control.
In order to entice shareholders,
the offer will generally be for a
price significantly higher than the
target's current stock price. (Com-
panies whose share prices have
slumped are extra-vulnerable to
takeovers.)
Some high-profile hostile take-
over bids have included IBM for
Lotus, Johnson & Johnson for
Cordis; AT&T for NCR, World-
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Metals, Norfolk & Southern for
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Cheerios turn 70; Iconic cereal endures, sells


By CAROLYN THOMPSON
Associated Press
BUFFALO, N.Y. -
Here's a little quiz for the
breakfast table:
What is the most
popular cereal brand in
American grocery stores?,
Hint It's been General
Mills' top name since 1951.
Another hint If you're a
parent, you've vacuumed
it from the minivan and
under the high-chair cush-
ion by the cupful.
The answer, of course, is
Cheerios.
The iconic cereal,
known by its distinctive
yellow box, is 70 years old
this year and still a force
on the breakfast cereal
market One out of every
eight boxes of cereal to
leave the shelf in America
carries the Cheerios name.
'They've been around
since the beginning of
man, right?" said Kathy
Scott in Cape Coral, Fla.
For her, the cereal's linked
to memories of childhood
Saturday morning car-
toons.
"My mother was very
old-fashioned, a stay-at-
home mom," Scott, 50,
said, "She made breakfast
every morning, but on
Saturday morning we were
allowed to have cereal.
Throw some fruit in there,
sit on the floor and watch
cartoons."
The tradition repeated
itself with her own two
children.
"Saturday morning car-
toons and Cheerios," she
said.
To make Cheerios, balls
of dough are heated and
shot out of a "puffing gun"
at hundreds of miles an
hour, according to General
Mills. The company's
waterfront plant in Buffalo


has been firing them off
since 1941, often cloaking
the city with a distinctive
toasty-with-a-sweet-fin-
ish aroma and inspiring
T-shirts announcing "My
city smells like Cheerios."
More than 10 shapes and
sizes were considered
before the makers settled
on little Os.
Since then, the compa-
ny's introduced several
New flavors,'starting with'
Ioney Nut in 1979 and last
year, chocolate.
In 2009, sales of Honey
Nut Cheerios surpassed
the original flavor for the
first time and remain in
the top spot today.
But Kathleen'Dohl, 30,
sticks to the originals, the
ones she refers to as the
"old-school, yellow box,
plain Jane" variety..She
buys it in bulk at Sam's
Club to keep her 6- and 3-
year-olds happy.
'That's one of the first
'real people' foods that
they ate," the Chester, Va.,
mother said.
"They know when we're
having a morning where
we're running late, they're
like, 'can I get a snack bag
of Cheerios?'" she said,
"because it's something I
can't say no to. I can say
no to chips. I can say no
to candy. I can say no to
a dozen other things, but
a snack bag of Cheerios?
How can you say no to
that?"
So yes, she's cleaned
them out of the car seats.
"At least they're not
sticky," she said, "so that's
Sa plus. And they're not so
colorful. Once you grind
them in they just look like
the rest of the dirt, they
don't look neon-colored."
Minneapolis-based
General Mills began adver-
tising Cheerios (first called


In this June 16 photo, boxes c
old this year.
Cheerioats) as a first food
for toddlers in 1974. Since
1999, the company has
focused on promoting the
cereal as healthy; it's made
from whole-grain oats,
with 3 grams of fiber and
1 gram of sugar per serv-
ing. But in 2009, federal
regulators took issue with
the cereal box's claim that
it was "clinically proven to
help lower cholesterol." In
a warning letter, the Food
and Drug Administration
said only FDA-approved
drugs can make such a-
claim.
General Mills, in its
response, stood by the
claims and said the FDA's
complaints dealt with how
the language appears on
the box, not the cereal
itself. The case is still
open, an FDA spokes-


ASSOCIATED PRESS
if Cheerios are shown in a store in Akron, N.Y. The iconic cereal from General Mills is 70 years


woman said.
"I went through a phase
in high school where
I drank Coca-Cola and
carried around a box
of Cheerios in my back
pack," said Dohl, whose
course schedule and year-
book duties often kept her
at the computer and in her
car through meals.
"That's literally what I
ate for breakfast, lunch
and dinner," she said. "...
At least I felt like it was
healthy."
Since cereal is the
major source of fiber for
Americans, something
most people shortchange
themselves on, Cornell
University nutrition expert
David Levitsky said it's
actually not a bad idea to
eat cereal as a relatively
low-calorie lunch or dinner


once in a while, even the
sugar-sweetened variety.
'They're seducing kids
to eat it," he acknowl-
edged. "It's a technique
that breakfast food com-
panies have learned and
it works... but it's got a
good aspect because that's
where they're getting their
fiber in the morning," he
said. "And all these cereals
are enriched."
Americans spent $6.4
billion on ready-to-eat
cereal in the 52 weeks
ending May 15, according
to SymphonyIRI Group,
a Chicago-based market
research firm that tracked
sales at supermarkets,
drug stores and mass mer-
chandise outlets, exclud-
ing Walmart
In honor of Cheerios'
70th Buffalo's Citybration


Festival highlighting its
assets will include a June
26 Cheerios breakfast in
sight (and smell) of the
General Mills facility.
"Cheerios are actu-
ally a more iconic food
to Buffalo than even the
ubiquitous chicken wing,"
said festival organizer
Marti Gorman. (The spicy
Buffalo wing came along
in 1964.)
'There just must be
something so gently
appealing about the prod-
uct," said Dave Hassett, a
school counselor whose
Born in Buffalo site sells
the Cheerios T-shirts
online and at local festi-
vals. Along with his 4-year-
old daughter, he said he
eats a bowl daily. "I hope
they stick around for 70
more years and beyond."


I -L ~sP8PP"slrma~llpaaslraPrr


Page Editor: Todd Taylor, 754-0424












ECONOMY: Grew a bit faster in 1st quarter than previously expected


Continued From Page 1C
industrial average dropped 100 points and
broader indexes declined.
Growth must be stronger to make a
noticeable dent in unemployment, which
was 9.1 percent last month. The economy
would need to grow 5 percent for a whole
year to significantly bring down the
unemployment rate. Economic growth
of just 3 percent a year would hold the
unemployment steady and keep up with
population growth.
There are signs that some of the fac-
tors that slowed the economy are starting
to ease. The average price for a gallon
of gas have fallen nearly 40 cents since
peaking at nearly $4 in early May.
And the impact of a parts shortage
stemming from the Japan crises may
be fading. The Commerce Department
said durable goods orders increased 1.9
percent last month, after a 2.7 percent
decline in April. The inability to get criti-
cal component parts in such industries as
autos and electronics was a major reason
U.S. factory production slowed. In May,
orders for autos and auto parts rose 0.6
percent after having fallen 5.3 percent in
the previous month.


Economists surveyed by the AP expect
growth will pick up in the second half of
the year. They estimate it will be around
2.6 percent, down from 2.9 percent for the
entire year.
The Federal Reserve also expects
stronger growth in the coming months,
although it has lowered its growth esti-
mate for this year in a range of 2.7 per-
cent to 2.9 percent.
The spike in gas has forced consumers
to spend less on discretionary items that
help boost the economy, such as appli-
ances, vacations and furniture. Consumer
spending is important because it makes
up 70 percent of economic activity.
Consumer spending slowed to a rate of
just 2.2 percent in the first three months
of the year, just about half the 4 percent
pace of spending growth in the previous
quarter. That estimate was unchanged
from last month.
Government spending fell at an annual
rate of 5.8 percent in the first three
months of the year, reflecting big cuts in
defense spending and state and local gov-
ernment outlays. Housing construction
was dropping at an annual rate of 2 per-


cent in the first three months of the year,
underscoring that home building remains
under severe strains.
Federal Reserve Chairman Ben
Bernanke warned that some problems,
such as the weak housing market, could
persist into next year. Under the Fed's fore-
cast, growth, would improve in the second
half of this year but many private econo-
mists believe the central bank, even with its
downgrade, is being too optimistic.
As a result, the Fed raised its unem-
ployment rate estimate slightly, saying it
would not fall below 8.6 percent this year.
The nation will add only about 1.9 mil-
lion jobs this year and the unemployment
rate will fall to only 8.7 percent, according
to the AP Economy survey. The economy
needs to generate at least 125,000 jobs
per month just to keep up with population
growth. And at least twice that many jobs
are needed to bring down the unemploy-
ment rate, which rose to 9.1 percent in
May.
Employers added only 54,000 net new
jobs in May, much slower than the aver-
age gain of 220,000 per month in the pre-
vious three months.


ASSOCIATED PRESS
In this June 22 photo, a woman pumps gas
into her car at a Little Rock, Ark., Conoco
Phillips station. The U.S. economy expanded
a little faster at the beginning of the year
than previously estimated. But the pace was
still anemic and economists don't see that
changing until later this year.


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LAKE CITY REPORTER BUSINESS SUNDAY, JUNE 26, 2011


Page Editor: Robert Bridges, 754-0428

















LAKE CITY REPORTER BUSINESS SUNDAY, JUNE 26, 2011


THE WEEK IN REVIEW oTHE WEEK IN REVIEW *THE WEEK IN REVIEW *THE WEEK IN REVIEW THE WEEK IN REVIEW


a- _


0i
r.. .J .


TheWeek in Review


W e yX Stoc Exchange Highlights STOCKS OF LOCAL INTEREST


Y NYSE
7,974.72 -25.39


Gainers ($2 or more)
Name Last Chg %Ch
Fusionion 28.73 +7.23 +33.6
ChinaGreen 5.00 +1.12 +28.9
Phannerica 13.12 +2.51 +23.7
AVuang 13.27 +2.26 +20.5
oUo 39.85 +6.44 +19.3
iSoftStnn 13.39 +2.14 +19.0
Talbots 3.66 +.58 +18.8
MarineP 6.78 +1.08 +18.5
ChiZenin 5.39 +.81 +17.7
ZateCp 5.67 +.84 +17.4

Losers ($2 or more)
Name Last Cig Chg
AmrRlty 3.18 -.78 .-19.7
PhfxNdan 8.00 -1.94 -19.5
BiPGCrb 23.00 -4.50 -16.4
BamesNob 17.26 -3.15 -15.4
Resolute wt 3.14 -.53 -14.4
RBSootnd 11.40 -1.62 -12.4
AcnveNtn 16.00 -2.21 -12.1
Naviosun 4.15 -.55 -11.7
LoydBkg 2.73 -.35 -11.4
Renrenn 6.23 -.80 -11.4

Most Active ($1 or more)
Name Vol (00) Last Chg
S&P500ETF9528622126.81 -.24
BkofAm 5942931 10.52 -.16
SPDRFnd3770476 14.76 -.13
iShR2K 3159489 79.94+1.71
FordM 2962299 13.24 +.47
GenEec 2800093 17.97 -.52
Pfizer 2519074 20.08 -.18
iShEMkts 2259695 45.50 +.18
SpnlNex 2191001 5.00 -.19
Ciigrp rs 2074254 39.59+1.29

Dia y
Advanced 2,052
Declined 1,119
New Highs 147
New Lows 107
Total issues 3,218
Unchanged 47
Volume 18,601,169,497


SAmex
2260.66 -6.44


Gainers ($2 or more)
Name Last Chg %Chg
OrsusXel rs .4.87 +1.68 +52.7
ChiaShen 3.60 +121 +50.6
QuestRMg 6.53 +1.35 +26.1
OrchidsPP 12.00 +2.34 +242
Medgenicn 3.92 +.72 +22.5
PTnnAih 3.20 +.57 +21.7
Innovaro 2.06 +.35 +20.5
Adventnr 2.85 +.48 +20.3
BreezeE 11.15 +1.65 +17.4
eMagm 5.53 +.82 +17.4

Losers ($2 or more)
Name Last Chg %Chg
GoldRsvg 2.52 -.47 -15.7
NewEnSys 2.36 -.42 -15.1
SoCTBcp 3.16 -.39 -11.0
A 4.10 -.50 -10.9
BakerM 21.55 -2.61 -10.8
Bamwell 5.50 -.51 -8.5
ParaG&S 3.50 -.32 -8.4
T3Motnrs 3.40 -.30 -8.1
Versar 3.01 -.21 -6.5
LGL Grp 9.51 -.65 -6.4

Most Active ($1 or more
Name Vol (00) Last Chg
Hyperdyn 293569 4.32 +.16
CheniereEn216927 8.04 +.04
ParaG&S 215741 3.50 -.32
KodiakOg 202738 5.35 -.20
TmsaatPet 174279 1.80 -.07
NwGoldg 150511 9.71 +.52
NovaGldg 143707 8.62 -.18
GrtBasGg 136997 1.97 +.19
Neoprobe 127177 3.70 +.23
VantageDri 126697 1.84 +.17

Digy
Advanced 344
Defined 180
New Highs 16
New Lows 29
Total issues 541
Unchanged 17
Volume 654,165,269


-l
S2,652.89 +36.41


Gainers ($2 or more)
Name Last Chg %Chg
HarbinElec 14.95 +6.56 +78.2
SGOCOn 3.30 +1.18 +55.7
DeerConsu 6.90 +1.83 +36.1
Sky-mobin 7.88 +1.98 +33.6
TowerBcp 26.89 +6.62 +32.7
BBCpfll 12.34 +2.94 +31.3
ChinaSun 2.10 +.50 +31.3
MetalFind 18.60+4.32 +30.3
ChinaTInfo 3.60 +.80 +28.6
AeroViron 34.40 +7.35 +27.2

Losers ($2 or more)
Name Last Chg %Chg
PainTher 5.30 3.34 -38.7
FFBArkrs 5.75 -2.98 -34.1
HampRBrs 13.44 -5.12 -27.6
FSIIntl 2.81 -.90 -24i3
DurectCp 2.13 -.65 -23.4
ECOtality 2.42 -.66 .-21.4
Dialogic n 3.88 -1.05 -21.3
RITTech 8.01 -2.17 -21.3
Oxignersh 2.53 -.61 -19.4
itaos h 4.61 -1.09 -19.1

Most Active ($1 or more)
Name Vol (00) Last Chg
Cisco 3546841 14.93 -.04
SiriusXM 3119122 1.98 +.06
Micosoft 2696552 24.30 +.04
MironT 2625808 7.21 -.62
PwShs QQQ252450254.38 +.59
Intel 2510611 21.20 +.01
RschMotn 2335390 28.57 +.82
Oracle' 2010351 31.14 -.05
Level3 1396157 2.27 +.15
Yahoo 1309941 14.89 +.19

Diary
Advanced 1,651
Dedined 1,093
New Highs 123
New Lows 196
Total issues 2,800
Unchanged 56
Volume 11,315,616,491


Name Ex Div Last
AT&TInc NY 1.72 30.44
AD NY ... 6.90
AlcatelLuc NY ... 5.19
AutoZone NY ... 291.60
BkofAm NY .04 10.52
BariPVixrsNY ... 24.53
BobEvans Nasd .80 34.03
CNBFnPA Nasd .66 14.30
CSXs NY .12 24.99
Chevron NY 3.12 97.90
Cisco Nasd .24 14.93
Cigrp rs NY .04 39.59
CocaCola NY 1.88 64.93
Delhaize NY 2.45 75.16
DrFnB NY ... 22.79
ExxonMbl NY 1.880 76.78
FamilyDIr NY .72 52.26
FordM NY ... 13.24
GenElec NY .60 17.97
HomeDp NY 1.00 35.08
iShSilver NY ... 33.36
iShEMkts NY .84 45.50
iShR2K NY .89 79.94
Intel Nasd .84 21.20
JPMorgCh NY 1.00 39.49
Level3 Nasd ... 2.27
Lowes NY .56 23.25
McDnIds NY 2.44 81.84


Wkly Wky YTD
Chg %Chg %Chg
-.33 -1.1 +3.6
-.10 -1.4 -15.6
+.05 +1.0 +75.3
-.11 ... +7.0
-.16 -1.5 -21.1
-.71 -2.8 -34.8
+.58 +1.7 +3.2
+1.43 +11.1 -3.4
+.18 +0.7 +16.0
-1.27 -1.3 +7.3
-.04 -0.3 -26.2
+1.29 +3.4 -16.3
-.69 -1.1 -1.3
-1.64 -2.1 +2.0
-.71 -3.0-18.2
-2.24 -2.8 +5.0
-.34 -0.6 +5.1
+.47 +3.7 -21.1
-.52 -2.8 -1.7
+.55 +1.6 +.1
-1.59 -4.5 +10.5
+.18 +0.4 -4.5
+1.71 +2.2 +2.2
+.01 ... +.8
-1.31 -3.2 -6.9
+.15 +7.1+131.6
+.42 +1.8 -7.3
-.68 /-0.8 +6.6


Name Ex Div
MicronT Nasd
Microsoft Nasd .64
NY Times NY
NextEraEnNY 2.20
NobilityH Nasd ...
NokiaCp NY .55
OcciPet NY 1.84
Orade Nasd .24
Penney NY .80
PepsiCo NY 2.06
Pfizer NY .80
Potashs NY .28
PwShs QQNasd .42
PrUShS&PNY
RschMotn Nasd
Ryder NY 1.08
S&P500ETFNY 2.44
SearsHdgsNasd ...
SiriusXM Nasd
SouthnCo NY 1.89
SprintNex NY
SPEngy NY 1.06
SPDR FndNY .18
TimeWam NY .94
WalMart NY 1.46
Weathflnti NY
WellsFargo NY .48
Yahoo Nasd


Wkly Wkly YTD
Last Chg %Chg %Chg
7.21 -.62 -7.9 -10.1
24.30 +.04 +0.2-12.9
7.98 -.20 -2.4 -18.6
56.61 -.02 ... +8.9
8.07 +.51 +6.7 -.5
5.88 -.14 -2.3 -43.0
98.46 -3.73 -3.7 +.4
31.14 -.05 -0.1 -.5
34.24 -.05 -0.1 +6.0
68.45 -.27 -0.4 +4.8
20.08 -.18 -0.9 +14.7
52.54 +1.57 +3.1 +1.8
54.38 +.59 +1.1 -.1
22.38 +.06 +0.3 -5.8
28.57 +.82 +3.0 -50.9
52.75 +1.25 +2.4 +.2
126.81 -.24 -0.2 +.8
69.51 -4.51 -6.1 -5.7
1.98 ,+.06 +3.1 +21.5
39.43 -.38 -1.0 +3.1
5.00 -.19 -3.7 +18.2
70.93 -.76 -1.1 +3.9
14.76 -.13 -0.9 -7.5
34.46 -.67 -1.9 +7.1
52.41 -.41 -0.8 -2.8
17.72 +.69 +4.1 -22.3
27.26 -.07 -0.3 -12.0
14.89 +.19 +1.3 -10.5


Stock Footnotes: g = Dividends and earnings in Canadian dollars. h Does not meet continued-lising standards.
If = Late filing with SEC. n.= New in past 52 weeks, pi = Preferred. rs = Stock has undergone.a reverse stock split
of at least 50 percent within the past year. rt = Right to buy security at a specified price, s = Stock has spit by at
least 20 percent within the last year. un = Units. vj = In bankruptcy or receivership. wd = When distributed. wi =
When issued. wt=Warrants.
Mutual Fund Footnotes: b = Fee covering market costs s paid from fund assets, d = Defeed sales dchae, or
redemption tee. f = front load (saees charges), m = Multiple tees are charged. NA = not available. p = previous day's
net asset value. s = fund split shares during the week. x = fund paid a distribution during the week.Galners and
Losers mustbe worth at least $2 to be listed In tables at left. Most Actlyee must be worth at least $1. Volume in
hundreds of shares. Source: The Associated Press. Sales figures are unofficial.


Money Rates
Last Pvs Week
Prime Rate 3.25 3.25
Discount Rate 0.75 0.75
Federal Funds Rate .00-25 .00-.25
Treasuries
3-month 0.01 0.03
6-month 0.07 0.09
5-year 1.38 1.52


i n-var


2.86 2.94
4.17 4.20


Weekly Dow Jones.

Dow Jones Industrials 76.02 109.63 -80.34 -59.67 -115.42
Close: 11,934.58 4 I) 7 T *
1-week change:-69.78 (-0.6%) MON TUES WED THUR FRI
13,000






12,000 .. : .. **



11'500 J ..



MUTUAL FUNDS
Total Assets Total Return/Rank Pct Mn Init
Name Ob| ($Mlns) NAV 4-wk 12-mo 5-year Load Invt
PIMCOTotRetls Cl 142,457 11.01 +0.1 +6.7/C +9.0/A NL 1,000,000
American Funds GrthAmA m LG 66,606 30.48 -3.3 +17.6/E +2.6/D 5.75 250
VanguardTotStdx LB 63,574 31.98 -3.2 +22.2/A +3.2/B NL 3,000
fidelity Contra LG 63,341 67.67 -3.0 +18.3/D +4.7/B NL 2,500
American Funds CaplncBuA m IH 60,731 50.57 -1.8 +17.0/B +4.2/D 5.75 250
Vanguard Instdxl LB 59,613 116.55 -3.5 +20.5/B +2.6/B NL 5,000,000
American Funds CpWldGrlA m WS 56,815 35.62 -2.8 +19.7/C +4.5/B 5.75 250
American Funds IncAmerA m MA 55,356 16.86 -2.2 +18.1/A +4.2/B 5.75 250
Vanguard500Adml LB 55,332 116.80 -3.5 +20.5/B +2.5/B NL 10,000
Vanguard TotStlAdm LB 52,734 31.99 -3.2 +22.3/A +3.3/B NL 10,000
American Funds InvCoAmA m LB 49,434 27.92 -3.3 +17.2/E +1.8/C 5.75 250
Dodge & Cox IntlStk FV 47,018 35.02 -3.6 +19.9/C +3.3/A NL 2,500
Dodge & Cox Stock LV 45,565 109.23 -3.9 +20.0/B -0.3/E NL 2,500
Amercan Funds WAMutnvA m LV 40,746 28.04 -2.4 +22.3/A +2,3/B 5.75 250
American Funds EurPacGrA m FB 39,594 41.45 -2.0 +19.2/D +5.2/A 5.75 250
Vanguard InrtPlus LB 38,775 116.56 -3.5 +20.5/B +2.6/B NL 200,000,000
Franke.Tp-Franidr, lii,..iw Am CA 37,117 2.19 -2.6 +15.8/A +5.7/A 4.25 1,000
Amenrar, Funda FnlinvA mr LB 35,358 37.13 -3.1 +20.7/B +3.7/A 5.75 250
vanquard Torill d FB 35,062 15.60 -2.3 +20.3/C +3.3/B NL 3,000
Amnerr.ar.FundsNewPe`pA m WS 34,184 28.55 -3.1 +19.5/C +5.5/A 5.75 250
PIMCOTotRetAdm b CI 33,011 11.01 +0.1 +6.4/C +8.8/A NL 1,000,000
American Funds BalA m MA 32,769 18.20 -1.8 +16.8/A +4.3/B 5.75 250
Vanguard 5001nv LB 32,019 116.80 -3.5 +20.3/B +2.5/B NL 3,000
Fidelity GrowCo LG 30,427 87.46 -2.7 +28.7/A +7.1/A NL.. 2,500
HarborIntllnstld FB 29,967 61.29 -2.3 +23.6/A +6.4/Ai NL .50,000
Vanguard WelltnAdm MA 29,966 54.80 -1.9 +15.6/C -+5.9/A NL 50,000
VanguardTotBdAdml Cl 28,473 10.80 +0.9 +5.3/D +6.9/B NL 10,000
CA-ConsevatveeAliocatin, C-Interme ia-Term Band,ES Eumpe SfodFBo FLaBlen, G -Foreign Larowt. FV-Fo
Lae Value, IH -Wold Allocai, LB .Larne Blend, LG -Large GroHl, LV large Vake, MA 4Moderate Alocan, MB kdCap Ble, MV.
Mkap Value, SH -Spedathealh, WS -Wor Stock To Rea: Chn NAV with dMends renvested. Rank How fund peed vs.
oe s with same objectee:A is intop20%, E ibatlm 20%. Minlnilt mnv imum $ needed io best n fun :Md.mb a.


Wkly YTD Wkly
Name DIv YId PE Chg %Chg Last


ABB Ltd 1.12
AES Corp .
AFLAC 1.20
AK Steel .20
AMR
AT&T Inc 1.72
AbtLab 1.92
Accenture .90
AMD
Aeropostl ...
Aetna .60
Agilent '...
AlcatelLuc ...
Alcoa .12
Allstate .84
AlphaNRs...
Altria 1.52
AMovilL .52
AEagleOut A.
AEP 1.84
AmExp .72
AmlntlGrp
Anadarko .36
Annaly 2.59
ArcelorMit .75
ArchCoal .44
ArchDan .64
ArmourRsd1.44
ATMOS 1.36
BB&T.Cp .64
BHP BillLt 1.82
BakrHu .60
BcoBrades .80
BcoSantSA .79
BcoSBrasil :70
BkofAm .04.
BkNYMel .52
Barclay .36
BariPVixrs...
BarrickG .48
Baxter 1.24
BerkH B ..
BestBuy .60
BlockHR .60
Boeing 1.68
BdstonSci .
BrMySq 1.32
CB REllis .
CBS B .40
CNOFincl...
CSXs .12
CVREngy ...
CVS Care .50
Camecog .40
Cameron
CdnNRs gs .36
CapOne .20.
CapitSrce .04
CarMax .
Carnival 100
Caterpillar 1.84
Cemex
ConterPnt .79
CntryUnk 2.90
ChesEng .35
Chevron 3.12
Chicos .20
Chimera .62
Citigrprs .04
CliffsNRs .56
CocaCola 1.88
CocaCE .52
ColgPal 2.32
ConAgra .92
ConocPhil 2.64
ConEd 2.40
ConstellEn .96
Coming .20
Cummins 1.05


-.25 +10.1
15 -.15 -.5
8 -.72 -21.5
... +.06 -13.1
-.05 -27.6
9 -.33 +3.6.
13 +.07 +8.0
19 +3.07 +17.6
7 -.10 -15.6
7 -.21 -30.4
10 +.07 +41.9
21 +1.06 +17.0
... +.05 +75.3
21 +.51 .-1.0
12 -.22 -7.7
39 +.59 -28.9
14 -.29 +8.8
16 +.98 -11.4
16 +.04 -13.9
15 -.54 +3.1
13 -.16 +12.6
2 +.47 -41.1
.. +2.01 -4.9
8 +.30 +4.4
16 +.49 -16.0
18 +.23 -27.8-
9 -.87 -2.6
-.19, -6.8.
15 +.39 +3.5'
21 -.74 -3.2
... +.06 -4.6
27 -2.08 +17.7
... +.15 -4.8
... -.60 +.1
.-.27 -19.7
19 -16 -21.1
12 -1.56 -18.4
...-1.24 -7.2
-.71 -34.8
12 -.14 -19.1
16 +.16 +15.6
17 +.11 -5.6
10 +1.47 -5.3
12 +.45 +33.1
16 -2.90 +9.2
20 +.10 -9.0
15 +1.41 +9.3
32 -.69 +13:7
21 +.91 +40.6
11 +.04 +6.8
17 +.18 +16.0
28 +A2 +50.1
15 -91 +4.7
... +1.00 -38.6
20 -.41 -9.9
-.06 -12.7
7 +.67 +16.3
18 +.01 -15.2
18 +2.68 +.2
16 +2.03 -19.1
18 +4.06 +6.8
... +.27 ;22.3
17 +.21 +20.5
12 -.29 -15.2
9 -.01 +8.1
10 -127 +7.3
21 +.76 +24.9
6 +.07 -14.4
13 +1.29 -16.3
9 +5.11 +11.0
13 -.69 -1.3
15 -.27 +13.2
18 -2.42 +6.3
13 +.55 +11.6
10 -.50 +4.9
14 -.38 +5.7
16 +.45 +21.3
8 -25 -9.2
15 +3.05 -12.1


Wkly YTD Wkly
.Name DIv YId PE Chg %Chg Last
DCTIndl .28 5.5 ... +.02 -3.8 5.11
DRHorton .15 1.3 82 +.33 -4.3 11.42
DTE 2.35 4.8 14 -.20 +8.2 49.04
Danaher .08 .2 18 -.51 +8.8 51.31
DeanFds ... ... 27 -.66 +35.7 12.00
Deere 1.64 2.1 14 +1.45 -3.7 79.98
DeltaAir ... ... 15 -.15 -25.2 9.43
DenburyR ... ...52 -.07 -2.0 18.70
Dex One ... ...... +.20 -69.2 2.30
DrSCBrrs ... ...... -2.77 -17.4 38.70
DirFnBrrs ... ... ...+1.33 +7.1 50.60
DrxEBearrs... ...... +.44 -22.4 17.49
DrxFnBull ... ... ... -.71 -18.2 22.79
DirxSCBull... ... ...+4.41 +1.5 73.55
DirxEnBull ... ... ...-2.35 +5.9 61.90
Discover .24 1.0 8 +1.70 +33.8 24.79
Disney .40 1.1 17 -.46 +.2 37.58
DomRescs1.97 4.2 15 -.41 +10.6 47.25
DowChm 1.00 2.8 19 +.64 +3.2. 35.23
DuleEngy 1.00 5.4 13 -.23 +3.9 18.51
ECDang n'.... ...... -1.06 -61.4 10.44
EMCCp ...... 28 -.19 +12.0 25.64
Eatons 1.36 2.8 15 +1.19 -5.1 48.19
EIPasoCp .04 .2 27 -.29 +41.4 19.46
Elan ... +.52 +88.5 10.80
EldorGidg 1- '.."36 +41 -24.3 14.06
EmersonEl1.38 -2.6 18 +1.51 -6.3 153.57
EnCanag ,0' 2.8 83'-1.52 -.6 28.95
Exelon 2.10 5.0 14 +.28 +.9 42.02
ExxonMbl 1.88 2.4 11-2.24 +5.0 76.78
FedExCp .52 .6 19 +4.88 -1.2 91.87
FstHorizon .04 .4 ... -.68 -19.0 9.54
FrstEngy 2.20 5.1 I5 -.69 +16.3 43.05
FlagstBcp ... .. ..; +.01 -20.9 1.29
FootLockr .66 2.7 1 +1.42 423.5 24.24
FordM ... ... 6 +.47 -21.1 13.24
ForestLab :.. ... 11 +.65 +23.0 39.33
FMCGs' 1.00 2.1 9 +.50 -19.3 48.43
FronierCm'.75 9.5 56 ... -19.1 7.87
FrontierOil .24 .8 14 -1.43 +59.2 28.68
GafisaSA 29 3.2 ... -.26 -36.. 9.19
Gap .45 2.5 10 -.17. -19.9 17.66
GenGrPrn .40 2.5 \... -.25 +4.1 16.11
GenMills 1.12 3.0 15 -1.10 +3.5 36.85
GenMotn ... ... 7 +.92 -18.8 29.92
GenOnEn ... :..... -.05 -1.8 3.74
Genworth ... ... 50 -.25 -24.3 9.95
Gerdau .27 2.8 ... -.28 -30.8 9.68
GoldFLtd .19 1.4 3 -.31 -232 13.92
Goldcrpg .41 .9 15 +.39 +1.9 46.84
GoldmanS 1.40 1.1 14 -6.32 -22.2 130.91
Goodyear... ... ... +1.08 +34.0 15.88
HCA Hdn .........-2.34 +4.0 32.25
Hallibrtn .36 .8 16 -.15 +12.3 45.87
HartfdFn .40 1.6 6 +.28 -6.7 24.72
HItMgmt ...... 15 -.04 +8.4 10.34
HeclaM ... ... 35 +.30 -35.3 7.29
Hertz ... ... 25 -.11 +4.8 15.19
Hess .40 .6 9 -.24 -9.8 69.04
HewlettP .48 1.4 9 -.10 -17.1 34.90
HomeDp 1.00 2.9 17 +.55 +.1 35.08
HonwIllntf 1.33 -2.4 19 +.50 '+6.0 .56:35
HostHotls .12 .7 ... +.05 -9.7 16.14
Huntsmn .40 2.3 17 +.69 +12.0 17.49
IAMGldg' .20 1.1 18 -.59. +.9 17.96
iShGold ... ... ... -.37 +5.5 14.66
iSAstla 1.06 4.3 ... -.33 .-3.1 24.64
iShBraz 3.42 4.9 ...-1.32 -10.1 69.57
iShGer .67 2.6 ... -.25 +5.9 25.6
iShHK .42 2.3 ... -.02 -5.2 17.94
iShJapn .17 1.7 ... +.21 -7.2 10.12
iShKor .50 .8 ... +.93 +2.2 62.51
iSTaiwn .29 ...... -.32 -6.5 14.60
iShSilver ... ... ... -1.59 +10.5 33.36
iShChina25 .85 2.0 ... +.25 -3.4 41.64
iSSP500 2.45 1.9 ... -.19 +.8 127.29
iShEMkts .84 1.8 '... +.18 -4.5 45.50
iShB20T 4.01 4.1 ... +.08 +3.0 96.98
iSEafe 1.68 2.9 ... -.42 -1.9 57.10


New York Stock Exchange


WITH SO MANY CHOICES,

WHY WOULD YOU CHOOSE



TO PAY TAXES?





1.26% TO 5.21% *

Yield effective 06/23/2011, subject to availability. Yield and market value may fluctuate if
sold prior to maturity and the amount you receive from the sale of these securities may be less
.than, equal to, or more than the amount originally invested. Bond investments are subject to
nterestrate risk such that when interest rates rise, the prices of bonds can decrease and the
investor can lose principal value. Any bond called prior to maturity results in reinvestment
risk'for the owner of the bond. May be subject to alternative minimum tax. Municipal bonds
may have original issue discount.

Some of the available issues of bonds are callable. Contact your local Edward Jones financial
advisor for more information about maturity dates and applicable call provisions.

> To invest in.tax-freebonds, call or visit your local
financial advisor today.
Steve Jones, CFP -
Financial Advisor
2929 West U S Highway 90
Suite 114
Lake City, FL 32055
S386-752-3847 www.edwardjones.com Member SIPc
,,t


Nae D Wkyd PE Cg WkLa
Name Div YId PE Chg %Chg Las


iShR2K -.89 1.1
iShREst .2.09 3.6
ITW 1.36 2.5
IngerRd .48 1.1
IBM 3.00 1.8
IntPap 1.05 3.6
Interpublic .24 2.1
Invesco .49 2.2
InvMlg'Cap3.94 18.7
ItauUnibH .67 3.0
JPMorgCh 1.00 2.5
Jabil .28,1.5
JartusCap .20 2.3
JohnJh 2.28 3.5
JohnsnCtl ,64 1.6
JnprNtwk ..
KB Home .25 2.1
Keycorp .12 1.5
Kimco .72 4.0
Kinrossg .10 .7
Kohls 1.00 2.0
Kraft 1.16 3.4
LDK Solar ...
LSICorp ...
LVSands ..
LennarA .16 .9
UllyEli 1.96 5.3
Limited .80 2.2
UncNat .20 .7
UoydBkg
LyonBasA .10 .3
MEMC


..+1.71
-.14
15 -.58
... -.52
14 +.63
11 +2.21
23 +.10
16 -1.12-
5 +.20
-.03
9 -1.31.
13 +.85
9 -.43
14 -1.23
17 +2.06
26 +.69
... +.42
11 -.37
.. +.35
23 +.08
13 -.68
20 +.12
7 -.19
... +.09
48 +.99
34 +.58
8 -.57
15 +1.70
10 -.19
-.35
+.70
48 -.38


i-Ion


Name Div YId PE Cha


MF Global
MFAFncl .94 11.7
MGIC
MGM Rsts...
Macys .40 1.4
ManpwrGp .80 1.5
MarathonO1.00 2.0
MktVGold .40 .8
MktVRus .18 .5
MarlntA .40 1.2
MarshM .88 2.9
Marshlls .04 .5
Masco .30 2.5
McDrmlnts ...
MedcoHth ...
Medtrnic .97 2.5
Merck 1.52 4.4
MetUfe .74 1.8
MetroPCS ..
Molycorpn ...
Monsanto 1.12 1.7
MorgStan .20 .9
Mosaic .20 .3
MotriaSoln ...
MotrlaMon ...
NCRCorp ... ...
NV Energy .48 3.2
NYSE Eur 1.20 3.8
Nabors
NBkGreece .29 ...
NatGrid 2.92 6.1
NOilVarco .44 .6


+.01
9 +.21
-.29
... +.10
13 +.75
... -.45
11 -1.04
+.61
.. -.92
29 +.81
18 +.13
-.12
... -.12
16 +.84
16 -1.87
12 +.21
15 -.84
11 +.62
26 +.64
... +6.83
27 +.11
12 -.62
13 +4.28
.. -.08
... -1.67
14 +.46
15 -.35
14 -1.47
70 -.99
... -.03
... -.37
18 +1.05


%Chg Last
-10.3 7.50
-1.5 8.04
-40.7 6.04
-17.8 12.20
+10.8 28.02
-16.6 5237
+33.8 49.55
-14.5 52.58
-2.7 36.88
-18.2 33.96
+9.4 29.92
+9.4 7.57
-5.1 12.01
-8.0 19.03
-13.0 53.31
+3.5 38.40
-4.1 34.55
-7.8 40.99
+31.9 16.66
+11.7 55.76
-5.3 65.96
-18.4 22.21
-16.7 63.60
+19.3 45.40
-20.6 23.11
+18.6 18.23
+7.5 15.10
+6.3 31.87
-1.8 23.04
-22.0- 1.31
+7.1 47.55
+4.2 70.10


Wkly YTD Wkly
Name Div Yld PE Chg %Chg Last
NatSemi .40 1.6 21 +.05 +79.1 24.64
NYCmtyB 1.00 6.7 12 -.96 -20.7 14.94
NY Times .. ... 12 -.20 -18.6 7.98
NewellRub .32 2.0 15 +.94 -13.9 15.66
NewmtM .80 1.5 12 +.68 -14.9 52.27
Nexeng .20 ...... -.99 -13.8 19.75
NextEraEn2.20 3.9 14 -.02 +8.9 56.61
NiSource .92 4.7 18 -.02.+10.6 19.48
NIkeB 1.24 1.5 19 +.07 -5.0 81.18
NobleCorp1.06 2.8 12 +.11 +5.4 37.71
NokiaCp -.55 9.4 ... -.14 -43.0 5.88
NorflkSo 1.60' 2.2 17 +.70 +14.1 71.67'
Nucor 1.45 3.7 48 +.11 -9.7 39.56
OcciPet 1.84 1.9 16 -3.73 +.4 98.46
OfficeDpt ... ...... +.35 -22.8 4.17
OfficeMax... ... 12 +.58 -56.6 7.69
OilSvHT 1.71 .8 ... -1.10 +.3 140.91
PG&ECp 1.82 4.4 16 -.37 -12.6 41.81
PNC 1.40 2.5 9 -1.18 -6.8 56.61
PPLCorp 1.40 5.2 12 ... +2.9 27.08
PatriotCoal .. ... ...+2.27 +9.7 21.25
PeabdyE .34 .6 18 +3.17 -10.8 57.04
Penney .80 2.3 20 -.05 +6.0 34.24
PepsiCo 2.06 3.0 18 -.27 +4.8 68.45
Petrohawk .. ...... +.14 .+27.3 23.24
PetrbrsA 1.34 4.6 ... -.80-15.4 28.92
Petrobras 1.28 4.0 ... -.83 -15.8 3187
Pfizer .80 4.0 19 -.18 +14.7 20.08
PhilipMor 2.56 3.9 16 -2.74 +112 65.10
PhilipsEl 1.02 4.3 ... -1.77 -22.6 23.76
-Potash s .28 .5 23 +1.57 +1.8 52.54
PS USDBull... ..... +.18 -4.8 21.63
ProLogis 1.12 3.3 ... +.46 +7.7 34.16
PrUShS&P .. ...... +.06 -5.8 22.38
ProUltQQQ ... ... ...+1.66 -1.2 80.45
PrUShQQQrs... ... ...-1.37 -4.4 55.61
ProUltSP .35 .7 ... -.19 +1.7 48.89
ProUShL20 ... ...... -.09 -12.3 32.50
ProUSSP500... ... ... +.05 -9.6 17.54
ProUSSlvrs... ...... +1.61 -50.2 19.58
ProgsvCp 1.40 1.9 12 +.20 +3.5 20.56
ProUSR2Krs... ...... -2.18 -10.6 44.92
Prudenll 1.15 1.9 9 +.52 +1.7 59.71
PulleGrp ... ... ... +.33 ... 7.52
QksilvRes ... ... 7 -.37 -.9 14.60
RadianGrp .01 .3 ... +.02 -51.4 3.92
RadioShk .25 1.9 8 +.22 -30.5 12.85
Raytheon 1.72 3.6 8 -.84 +4.3 47.93
RedHat ... ... 75 +3.83 -1.4 45.03
RegionsFn .04 .7 ... -.33 -15.1 5.94
ReneSola ... ... 2 +.11 -42.3 5.04
Renrenn ... ...... -.80 -65.4 6.23
RteAid ... .. ... ,+.13 +35.9 1.20
RylCarb ... ... 14 +1.61 -23.0 36.21
SLM Cp .40 2.4 9 +.70 +32.3 16.66
SpdrDJIA 3.06 2.6 ... -.54 +3.1 119.20
SpdrGold .... ......-3.68 +5.4 146.26
S&P500ETF2.44 1.9 -.24. +.8 126.81
SpdrHome .31 1.7 ... +.46 +2.9 17.89
SpdrKbwBk .20 .9 ... -.57 -11.3 22.99
SpdrLehHY4.41 10.4 +.07 -.7 39.45
SpdrRetl .46 .9 +1.37 +7.4 51.96
SpdrOGEx .47 .9 ... +.21 +4.5 55.12
SpdrMetM .42 .6 ... +2.53 -5.1 65.30
Safeway .58 2.6 14 -.04 +.3 22.55
StJude .84 1.8 16 -1.89 +8.3 46.30
SandRdge .. ..... +.04 +41.7 10.37
SaraLee .46 2.5 26 -.43 +6.2 18.60
Schlmbrg 1.00 1.2 22 -.87 -3.1 80.92
Schwab .24 1.5 28 -.13 -7.8 15.78
SemiHTr .70 2.1 .. +.34 +.4 32.66
SiderurNac .81 6.9 .. -.34 -29.2 11.81
SilvWhtng .12 .4 31 +1.56 -18.7 31.75
SilvrcpMg .08 .. 23 +.72 -31.3 8.82
SmithfF ... 8 +.14 +6.0 21.87
Solutia ... ... 12 -.26 -9.0 21.01
SouthnCo 1.89 4.8 17 -.38 +3.1 39.43
SoUnCo .60 1.5 20 +6.44 +65.6 39.85
SwstAirl .02 .2 19 +.42 -12.5 11.36


Name DIv
SwstnEngy ...
SpectraEn 1.04
SprintNex
SP MatIs 1.30
SPHIthC .63
SP CnSt .83
SP Consum .59
SPEngy 1.06
SPDR FncI .18
SPInds .67
SPTech. .35
SPUtil 1.33
StateStr .72
StillwtrM ...
Suncorgs .44
SunTrst .04
Supvalu, .35
SwiftTmsn ...
Synovus .04
TJX .76
TaiwSemi .52
Talbots
TalismE g .27
Target 1.20
TeckResg .60
Templelnld .52
TenetHith .
Teradyn
Tesoro
Texinst .52
Textron .08
Timberind ...
TimeWam .94
Total SA 3.16
Transocn .79
Travelers 1.64
TwoHrblnv 1.59
Tycolntl 1.00
Tyson .16
UBS AG .
US Airwy ...
UtdCon ...
UtdMicro .08
UPS B 2.08
US Bancrp .50
USNGsrs ...
USOilFd ..
USSteel .20
UtdhfthGp .65
UnumGrp .42
ValeSA .90
Vale SA pf .90
ValeroE .20
VangEmg .82
VeriFone
VerizonCm 1.95
ViacomB 1.00
Visa .60
Walgm .70
WsteMInc 1.36
Weathflnll ..
WellsFargo .48
WendyArby .08
WDigital ...
WstnRefin
WstnUnion .32
Weyerh .60
WhitingPts ...
WmsCos .50
XLGrp .44
Xerox .17
Yamanag .18
Youkun
YumBmds 1.00


Wkly YTD Wkly
YId PE Chg %Chg Last


25 -.32 +9.1
17 -.18 +5.8
-.19 +18.2
... +.83 -2.4
... -.09 +10.1
... -.53 +4.4
... +.55 +2.9
... -76 +3.9
-.13 -7.5
+.18 +2.2
... +.10 -2.6
... -.19 +4.7
14 -.10 -6.5
29 +1.42 -3.9
20 -.55 -2.2
69 -1.18 -15.3
... -.08 -11.0
.-.63 +2.2
... -.17 -19.7
16 -.34 +12.0
-.32 -1.1
10 +.58 -57.0
... -.33 -15.5
11 -.20 -23.0
... +1.88 -24.8
17 +1.69 +39.7
3 -.42 -10.5
7 +.35 +.6
12 -.03 +12.4
12 +.29 -3.0
55 +.62 -5.4
26 +.16 475.6
15 -.67 +7.1
... -.54 +.6
20 -1.46 -14.0
8 -1.24 +1.7
9 +.42 +7.9
'15 +.12 +12.5
8 +.72 +9.8
... -.52 +5.1
4 +.29 -13.2
17 -1.05 -3.5
7 -.06 -22.2
19 +1.95 -2.0
13 -.57 -11.3
..-.31 -10.5
..-.82 -8.2
..+.75 -28.4
12 +.50 +39.7
9 -.52 +1.2
+.80 -11.3
S+.72 -8.1
27 -.92 +.3
... +.07 -3.1
31 +1.29 +7.0
21 +.49 .+.6
15 +.47 +21.0
16 -1.06 +4.2
16 -3.28 +6.2
18 +.06 -.2
.. +.69 -22.3
11 -.07 -12.0
... +.03 +8.2
10 +1.71 +3.8
56 +1.11 +53.5
14 -.50 +3.6
+7.4
31 -1.15 -9.9
21 +.24 +15.5
12 -.14 -2.9
21 +.04 -14.1
16 +.07 -11.2
... -.10 -20.2
21 -.99 +9.8


40.84
26.45
5.00
37.47
34.68
30.61
38.50,
70.93
14.76
35.63
24.54
32.80
43.31
20.52
37.44
25.00
8.57
12.79
2.12
49.72
12.40
3.66
18.75
46.33
46.49
29.68
5.99
14.13
20.84
31.53
22.36
43.19
34.46
53.82
59.81
56.68
10.56
46.61
18.90
17.31
8.69
22.99
2.46
71.12
23.92
10.73
35.81
41.82
50.46
24.52
30.66
27.78
23.18
46.84
41.24
36.00
47.92
73.37
41.39
36.80
17.72
27.26
5.00
35.18
16.24
19.23
20.33
52.80
28.55
21.18
9.89
11.37
27.94
53.84


Nasdaq Most Active


Name Div YId PE


Achillion .
AcmePkt ...
ActivsBliz .17
AdobeSy ...
AdvBattery...
AkamaiT
AllscriptH
AlteraCp If .24
Amarin
Amazon
ACapAgy 5.60
AmCapLtd ...
Amgen
Apple Inc ...
ApldMatl .32
AriadP
ArmHId .13
AmnbaNet ...
Atmel
Autodesk
AutoData 1.44
AvagoTch .36
AvanirPhm ...
Baidu
BedBth ...
Biogenldc..
BrigExp ...
Broadcom .36
BrcdeCm ...
CAInc .20
Cadence
CapFdFrs .30
CpstnTrbh ...
Celgene
CellTher rsh...
CienaCorp ...
Cisco .24
CitRepBh ...


Wkly YTD Wkdy
Ch9 %Cho Last


... +1.04 +74.2
94 +2.57 +22.6
26 +.42 -9.2
16 -.50 -2.6
2 -.04 -72.2
31 -.24' -37.8
...+.22 -3.0
16 +.85 +22.6
., +.75 +76.1
83 +6.18 +7.0
4 -.02
3 +.20 +20.9
12 -.97 +3.9
16 +6.09 +1.2
10 -.01 -11.7
17 +1.31 +108.4
... +1.08 +35.3
.. +2.69 +27.9
13 +.50 +6.0
36 +1.01 -4.0
21 -.45 +10.7
18 +3.02 +25.0
... -.19 -15.1
11+11.00 +33.3
17 +4.60 +15.1
24 +8.67 +54.2
96 +1.66 -1.3
16 +.61 -26.0
21 -.26 +17.0
14 +.32 -10.4
14 +.17 +23.5
31 -.10 -1.0
... +.11 +50.0
31 +.90 -.6
... -.03 -9.1
... +1.03 -15.6
12 -.04 -26.2
... -.02 +5.2


7.23
65.16
11.29
29.97
1.07
29.25
18.70
43.63
14.44
192.55
28.73
9.14
57.04
326.35
12.40
10.63
28.07
26.70
13.06
36.69
51.22
35.52
3.46
128.68
56.59
103.42
26.89
32.22
6.19
21.91
10.20
11.79
1.44
58.77
1.99
17.76
14.93
.65


Name Div
Clearwire ...
CognizTech...
Comcast .45
Comc spcl .45
Cree Inc
Crocs
Dell Inc ...
DeltaPtr h.
DirecTVA ...
DishNetwk ...
DonlleyRR 1.04
DryShips ...
E-Trade ...
eBay
8x8 Inc
EectArts ...
Emcore I...
Enerl
EricsnTel .37
Expedia .28
ExpScipts ...
F5 Netwks ..
FithThird .24
Finisar
FstNiagara .64,
Flextm
FocusMda ...
Fortinets ...
GT Solar ...
GileadSci ...
GluMobile ...
Google
HanmiFnc...
HarbinEec ...
HercOffsh ...
HudsCity .32
HumGen ...
Incyte


Wkdy YTD Wkly
Yld PE Chg %Chg Last
... ... +.38 -22.7 3.98
... 28 +3.49 -2.9 71.14
1.9 17 -.07 +7.8 23.58
2.0 17 +.08 +6.6 22.50
... 21 -.31 -48.5 33.96
..30 +1.60 +44.9 24.81
... 10 -.09 +17.6 15.93
... -.02 -32.9 .51
... 18 +1.10 +19.6 47.75
10 +.25 +42.4 28.00
5.5 14 -.16 +8.3 18.92
7 +.02 -27.9 3.96
... -.34 -16.4 13.38
... 20 -.48 +1.9 28.35
.40 +.34 +68.9 4.02
... -.47 +32.9 21.77
... ... +.03+101.8 2.19
... -.26 -69.7 1.15
2.8 ... -.46 +14.1 13.16
1.0 19 +.93 +11.4 27.96
... 23 -2.74 -2.1 52.94
... 44 +8.90 -18.5 106.10
2.0 15 -.37 -17.0 '12.18
.15 +1.19 -45.9 16.06
4.9 17 -.42 -6.2 13.11
... 9 +.10 -18.5 6.40
.21 +2.58 +32.3 29.01
... 78 +3.19 +59.8 25.85
... 12 +1.87 +67.8 15.30
.12 +.18 +9.6 39.71
... ... +.17+127.1 4.70
... 17-10.14 -20.0 474.88
... -.16 -22.6 .89
... 7 +6.56 -13.8 14.95
... -.19 +45.7 5.07
4.0 ... -.23 -37.7 7.94
... -.24 +4.3 24.91
... +.44 +10.9 18.37


Name


Wkly YTD Wkly
Div YId PE Chg %Chs Last


Intel .84 4.0
Intuit
JA Solar ...
JDS Uniph ...
JetBlue ...
LawsnSft ...
Level3
UbtyMlntA ...
lululemng ...
MarvellT ...
Mattel .92 3.4
MelcoCrwn ...
MicronT
Microsoft .64 2.6
Nanosphere...
NetApp ...
Netflix ... ...
NewsCpA .15 .9
Nvidia
OCZTech ...
OdysMar ...
OnSmcnd ...
Oncothyr
Oracle .24 .8
PMCSra ... ...
PattUTI .20 .7
Paychex 1.24 4.1
PeopUtdF .63 4.9
Popular
PwShsQQQ.42 .8
Powrwav
ProspctCapl.21 12.0
QIAGEN ...
Qualcom .86 1.6
RF MicD ...
Rambus
RschMotn ...
Riverbed s ...


10 +.01 +.8 21.20
25 +1.34 +2.4 50.50
3 +.48 -19.5 5.57
59 +.50 +10.6 16.01
19 +.12 -8.3 6.06
.40 +.05 +21.2 11.21
...+.15+131.6 2.27
16 +.21 +1.3 15.97
56+11.00 +52.6 104.38
11 +.85 -24.2 14.06
14 +.63 +5.2 26.75
... +.74 +80.0 11.45
12 -.62 -10.1 7.21
6 +.04 -12.9 24.30
... -.62 -62.4 1.64
29 -.13 -10.4 49.22
74+11.29 +46.2 256.96
15 +.68 +14.9 16.73
38 -.07 +2.2 15.74
... +.86 +73.2 8.35
... -.38 +6.5 2.96
13 +.43 +2.9 10.17
... +.85 +174.5 8.95
19 -.05 -.5 31.14
34 +.07 -16.6 7.16
24 +.59 +31.4 28.32
21 +.36 -3.0 29.99
31 -.21 -8.2 12.86
.-.16 -15.3 2.66
+.59 -.1 54.38
41 +.13 +11.8 2.84
... -.55 -6.5 10.10
36 -.32 -3.9 18.78
24 +1.50 +9.5 54.19
13 +.71 -19.6 5.91
... +.26 -30.6 14.21
5 +.82 -50.9 28.57
... +2.95 -.8 34.88


Name


Wkly YTD Wkly
DIv YId PE Chg %Chg Last


SanDisk
Satcon h ...
SeagateT .72
Sina
SiriusXM ...
SkywksSol ...
Sohu.cm
Spreadtrm ...
Staples .40
StarScient
Starbucks .52
StlDynam .40
StemCells ...
SuccessF ..
SusqBnc .08
Symantec
TDAmertr .20
Tekelec ...
Tellabs .08
TevaPhrm .83
TibcoSft ...
TriQuint
UTStrcm
UranmRs
UrbanOut
VCA Ant ...
ValenceTh ...
Verisign 5.75
VirgnMda h .16
Vodafone 1.44
WarerCh s8.50
Windstrm 1.00
Xilinx .76
YRCWwrs ...
Yahoo
Zaqq


-2.00 -21.9 38.94
+.20 -52.2. 2.15
+1.10 +2.1 15.35
+8.78 +29.8 89.35
+.06 +21.5 1.98
-.29 -20.1 22.87
+2.65 +7.8 68.47
+.15 -23.2 14.10
+.06 -32.8 15.31
+.54+154.4 4.96
+1.91 +16.2 37.35
+.59 -14.4 15.66
-.01 -50.0 .54
-1.07 +2.1 29.58
-.61 -21.0 7.65
+.20 +12.0 18.75
-.10 -1.7 '18.66
+1.02 -26.0 8.81
+.38 -34.4 4.45
-.34 -9.6 47.15
+2.52 +33.5 26.32
-.21 -10.0 10.52
-.01 -27.2 1.50
+.12 -51.8 1.64
-.38 -20.6 28.43
-.69 -13.1 20.23
-.02 -28.0 1.21
+.03 +.2 32.74
+.94 +13.3 30.85
+.30 -.9 26.20
+.42 +3.7 23.40
-.04 -6.5 13.04
+1.69 +19.5 34.64
+.52 -69.9 1.12
+.19 -10.5 14.89
+2.02 +87.9 14.32


Name DIv
AbdAsPac .42
Adventrx
AlldNevG ...
AmApparel ...
AntaresP ...
AoxingPh
ArcadiaRs ...
Aurizon g ...
AvalRaren ...
Bacterin n ..
Ballanty
BarcGSOil ...
Brigus grs
CelSci
CFCdag .01
CheniereEn...
ChiGengM ...
ChinaShen...
DenisnMg....
eMagin
Express-1 ...
GabGldNR 1.68
GascoEngy ...
GenMoly ...
GoldResrc .48
GoldStr g ...
GranTrrag ...
GrtBasGg ...
GIPanSilv ...
HooperH ...
Hyperdyn ...
ImpOilgs .44
InovioPhm...
KodiakOg ...
LadT'aFn ..
Lannett
MadCatzg ...
MdwGoldq ...


YId PE


Wkdy YTD
Cha %Cha


5.8 ... +.03 +7.1
... ... +48 +9.2
...... +3.72 +26.6
... ... -.13 -49.3
... ... +.22 +27.6
... ... +.42 -49.8
... ... -.01 -73.8
... ... +.12 -26.5
... ... +.57 +6.7
... ... +.28 -64.2
... 9 -.10 -36.4
.. -.59 -8.4
... +05 -22.4
-.01 -39.1
... ... -.59 -1.3
... +.04 +45.7
+.41 -62.3
... +1.21 -57.1
-.01 -47.4
... 11 +.82 -7.8
... 21 +.30 +22.3
9.7 ... +.17 -10.5
...... +.00 -33.4
... ... +.19 -33.2
1.9 ... +2.71 -15.6
... ... -.02 -51.0
... ... -.03 -22.7
... ... +.19 -33.4
... 3 +.34 +19.9
... 46 -.01 +30.0
... ... +.16 -12.9
... -1.36 +8,3
... ... -.04 -48.6
... ... -.20 -18.9
... +.14 +19.7
... 38 +.26 -4.3
... 8 +.08 +32.4
... ... +.1 +144.0


WMy Wkly YTD Wldy
Last Name Div YId PE Ch %Ch Last
7.23 Minefndg ... ...... +.49 +9.7 12.11
2.85 Neoprobe ... ...... +.23 +79.6 3.70
33.30' Neuralstem ... ...... +.22 -21.7 1.66
.84 Nevsung .06 1.0 ... +.37 -22.2 5.86
2.17 NwGoldg ... ...... +.52 -.5 9.71
1.40 NAPallg ... ...... +.11 -46.0 3.75
.08 NDynMng ... ...... +.82 -34.1 9.41
5.38 NthnO&G ... ...... +1.23 -29.1 19.30
6.66 NthgtMg ... ... 37 -.02 -19.4 2.58
3.04 NovaGldg ... ...... -.18 -39.6 8.62
4.94 Oilsandsg ... ...... -.05 -21.4 .33
23.46 OpkoHlth ... ...... +.16 -6.0 3.45
1.63 OrsusXel rs... ......+1.68+138.7 4.87
.50 ParaG&S ... ... 15 -.32 -12.3 3.50
20.46 PhrmAth ... ...... +.57-24.3 3.20
8.04 PionDrill ... ...... +.33 +53.0 13.48
1.94 Quepasa ... ...... +.06 -43.2 6.65
3.60 QuestRMg.. ...... +1.35 +15.8 6.53
15.5 RareEleg ... ... ...+1.23 -33.6 10.67
5.3 Rentech ... ... ... +.14 -17.2 1.01
3.13
7.25 RexahnPh ...... -.01 +10.7 1.24
SRubicon g ... ...... +.56 -20.5 4.54
33 SamsO&G... +.26+114.4 2.83
24.81 Taseko .. ...... +.18-15.8 4.42
225 TmsatlPe ...... 9 -.07 -45.9 1.80
6.22 TriangPet ... ......+.12 -8.0 5.98
1.97 UQMTech ... .... +.08 2.29
3.37 Ur-Energy... ...... +.09 -45.8 1.62
.91 Uranerz ... ...... +.17 -23.8 3.04
4.32 UraniumEn... .... .. +.04 -48.8 3.09
43.89 VantageDr... ...... +.17 -9.4 1.84
.59 VimetX .50 ... 19 +1.80 +90.2 28.24
5.35 VistaGold ... ...... +.07 +15.9 2.77
1.4p VoyagerOG... ... +.33 -51.3 2.63
5.35 Walterlnv 2.00 10.5 14 +1.56 +6.5 19.11
1.35 WTDrtChn .15 ...... -.04 +.1 25.40
2.05 YM Bioq ... ... ... +.23 +14.6 2.67


Currencies
Last Pvs Day
Australia .9526 .9529
Britain 1.5974 1.5987
Canada .9880 .9799
Euro .'7057 .7038
Japan 80.52 80.58
Mexico 11.8949 11.8757
Switzerind .8377 .8388
British pound expressed in U.S. dollars. All oth-
ers show dollar in foreign currency.


AMEX Most Active


st


^_---------_-,--- ._ _--x-----


Page Editor: Todd Taylor, 754-0424















Classified Department: 755-5440


LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED SUNDAY, JUNE 26, 2011

Lake City Reporter





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Limited to service type advertis-
ing only, ... .. ... '. ,
4 lines, one month....$92.00
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Monday through Friday from 8:00
a.m. to 5:00 p.m. .
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Should further information be
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reserves the right to edit, reject,
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Advertising language must comply
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In Print and Online
ww.Ialkecityreporter.conm


Legal

NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING
CONCERNING A SPECIAL EX-
CEPTION AS PROVIDED FOR IN
THE CITY OF LAKE CITY LAND
DEVELOPMENT REGULATIONS
BY THE BOARD OF ADJUST-
MENTS OF THE CITY OF LAKE
CITY, FLORIDA, NOTICE IS
HEREBY GIVEN that, pursuant to
the City of Lake City Land Develop-
ment Regulations, as amended, here-
inafter referred to as the Land Devel-
opment Regulations, objections, rec-
ommendations, and comments con-
cerning a special exception, as de-
scribed below, will be heard by the
Board of Adjustments of the City of
Lake City, at a public hearing on
Wednesday, July 6, 2011 at 6:30
P.M., or as soon thereafter as the
matter can be heard, in the City
Council room on the second floor of
City Hall located at 205 North Mari-
on Avenue, Lake City, Florida.
Pursuant to a petition, SE 11-04, by
Vinod Malhotra, owner, requesting a
special exception be granted as pro-
vided for in Section 4.14.5 (4) of the
Land Development Regulations to
permit a Church in a Commercial
Central Business District (C-CBD)
zoning district, to be located on
property described, as follows:
537 & 543 North Marion Avenue
Columbia County Parcel Number
12010-000 & 12007-000
The public hearing may be continued
to one or more future dates. Any in-
terested party shall be advised that
the date, time, and place of any con-
tinuation of the public hearing shall
be announced during the public hear-
ing and that no further notice con-
cerning the matter will be published,
unless said continuation exceeds six
(6) calendar weeks from the date of
the above referenced public hearing.
At the aforementioned public hear-
ing, all interested parties may appear
to be heard with respect to the
amendment.
Copies of the special exception are
available for public inspection at the
Office of Growth Management, City
Hall, located on the second floor at
205 North Marion Avenue, Lake
City,.Florida, during regular.business
hours.
All persons are advised that if they
decide to appeal any decision made
at the above referenced public hear-
ing, they will need record of the pro-
ceedings, and that, for such purpose,
they may need to ensure that a verba-
tim record of the proceedings is
made, which record includes the tes-
timony and evidence upon which the
appeal is to be based.
05526313
June 26, 2011

100 Job
S Opportunities
Elementary & Secorridarl'' ."..
teachers needed for private
Christian School BA req'd
Fax resume to: 386-755-3609
05526309 DRIVERS WANTED
MORE MILES
MORE MONEY
Hiring solos, teams &.
contractors
$5,000 team sign-on bonus
$1,000 Owner Ojerator
sign-on bonus
Great pay & Benefits
The best equipment
Lease/purchase program
available
Recent CDL grads welcome
Requires CDL-A & 3 months
OTR experience.
Also hiring qualified driver
trainers-earn up to an
additional $17,000/yr.
Don't miss out! Call today!

U.[.S. EXPRESS\

www.xpressdrivers.com

888-808-6045

WANTED
*SE REGIONAL DRIVERS*
HOME WEEKLY!
2yr OTR Required,
809o Drop/Hook, No Force
Dispatch, 401K & Insurance,
Referral Bonus, Call RBI at '
888-298-6928 x230 or
apply @ www.rbitrucking.com.






Lahd Clearing


Back Hoe, Dozer, Chopping, root
raking, bush hog, seeding, sod,
disking, site prep, ponds &
irrigation. Free Est! 386-623-3200 "

Lawn & Landscape Service

Clean Pine Straw,
You pick it up. $1.85 a bale
Delivery of 100 bales $260
386-688-9156

Landscape Maintenance Company
You can trust for knowledge &
pride, Mention this AD!
Mow Green, LLC 386-288-6532

Services

DIVORCE, BANKRUPTCY,
RESUMES.
other court approved, forms-
386-961-5896.

Summer Cleaning done your
way. Let me Clean your home be-
fore you leave on Vacation. Come
back home & relax. 386-303-1496.
We come to you! Auto Detailing:
Wash, wax & vaccutn. Pressure
Wash: Houses, mobile homes,
driveways, decks. 386-697-2224


100 Job
0 Opportunities

05526155
Meridian Behavioral
Healthcare Inc.
www.mbhci.org
Please visit our website to view
current open opportunities
and to apply online:
Meridian is an active partner
with the National Health Service
Corps
Therapists:
Licensed, or Master's Level
in Outpatient
Bachelor's-Level in Counse-
lor Support
Case Management (adult &
child)
Master's Therapist in Metha-
done Clinic
Administration:
Director of Dietary Svcs
(Gville)
Medical Services
RN Nursing Manager (Gville
)
PRN RN, LPN, C.N.A.
Recovery Specialist (Direct
Care)
LPN (2) for Methadone
Clinic (new)
To see our current openings in
Mental Health and to apply
online, please go to:
www.mbhci.ore





EOE, DFWP, E-Verify


05526237
Independent Contractors
We're hauling fresh and frozen
food to the Northwest. We have
a Lease Purchase Program,
Leasing 0/0 & PTDI Certified
Students. 100% fuel Surcharge,
NO New England States,
Spouse & Pet Rider Policy.
Call TODAY!! BUEL INC.
866-369-9744

05526314
REEFER DRIVERS
NEEDED!
MoeFreright = Top Earnings!
Paid CDL Training
Available & Benefits
877-491-1112 or
www.primeinc.com
Associate Reps
SUMMER WORK/GREAT PAY
Immediate FT/PT openings,
Customer sales/service,
No exp needed, conditions,
Apply Now all ages 17+
(386) 269-0883

CDL Class A Truck Driver.
Flatbed exp. for F/T SE area.
3 years exp or more. Medical
benefits offered. Contact
Melissa or Mary @ 386-935-2773

Hiring Locally This Week
Liberty National Life
Insurance' Company
Full Training Provided Potential
of $60K+ Annually. 401K, BCBS
Insurance & Pension for those who
qualify. Call 1-800-257-5500 to
set up an interview.


Maintenance Person
Convenience Store Group is
seeking an experienced
Maintenance person. General
Experience to include Electrical,
plumbing and carpentry.
Refrigeration experience would be
a plus. Competitive salary, bonus,
paid holidays, vacation, company
vehicle and opportunity to join a
progressive and fast growing
company
Fax or Email Resunie to:
dtumer@fasttrackstores.com
Fax 1-352-333-1161

New Generation Christian School
is hiring an elementary school
teacher. Min. of Bachelors Degree
is req'd. If interested, fax a resume
to (386)758-5597 by July 29th.


FLORIDA
A GATEWAY
COLLEGE
(Fornterty Lake City Community College)
ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR
MATHEMATICS
164 Duty Days Tenured Track
to Commence Fall 2011
Teach college-level and preparatory
mathematics courses: work with
colleagues for the advancement of
departmental goals Requires
Master's degree in appropriate area
related to mathematics; or Master's
degree with minimum of 18 graduate
credit hours in course work centered
on mathematics. Salary: Based on
degree and experience, plus benefits.
Review of Applications will Begin
Immediately
Persons interested should provide
College application. vita, and
photocopies of transcripts. All foreign
transcripts must be submitted with
official translation and evaluation.
Position details and applications
available on web at www.fqc.edu
Human Resources
Florida Gateway College
149 S.E College Place
Lake City, FL 32025-2007
Phone (386) 754-4314
Fax (386) 754-4814
E-Mail: humanr iEfqc edu
Krf i. aie i !flA-<."fn um -f ::. : (i:el;;


100 Job
0 Opportunities
Sales Position available for moti-
vated individual Rountree -Moore
Toyota, Great benefits, paid train-
ing/vacation. Exp. a plus but not
necessary. Call Anthony Cosentino
386-623-7442
Seeking Flatbed Owner/Operators
fully equipped w/own Tarps &
Chains & Binders to run the
southeast. Home on Weekends and
throughout the week. Paying 85%.
Contact Adam or Rick at
386-755-8579 RDH*Trucking Inc.

120 Medical
1 .Employment

05526221
Cancer Care of North Florida is
currently seeking a
MEDICAL ASSISTANT for a
fast paced work environment
Requires HS Diploma and
Phlebotomy certification
Intergy Experience and
excellent verbal/written :
communication skills.
Qualified candidates please
email resume to: jpapesh@can-
cercarenorthflorida.com.

05526271-
Occupational Therapy
S Assistant
Hiring F/T licensed COTA at
SSuwannee Valley Nursing
Center in Jasper, FL; $5,000
Bonus! Contact Jennifer at
888-531-2204 or
janderson@fprehab.com

05526277
NEED TWO (2) either EDA or
CDA Dental Assistants for a tem-
porary position.
Positions will be approximately 36
hours per week four days per
week. Rotating schedule. Must be
able to work until 7:00 pm and
able to work
Saturday 1/2 day. Temporary po-
sition approximately end of July
through end of November to cover
for leave of absence for current as-
sistants.
If you are interested in making
some holiday money, please fax
resume to 386-752-8601 at your
earliest convenience.

05526321
Gainesville Women's Center
For Radiology
Arlene Weinshelbaum, M.D.
MAMMOGRAPHY TECH
-wanted full time fonprivate
Radiology office.ARRT & .
Mammography certification req.
Fax resume to:
Tracy: (352)331-2044


240 Schools &
.24 Education

04544843
Interested in a Medical Career?.
S Express Training offers
courses for beginners & exp
Nursing Assistant, $479
next class-07/11/10

Phlebotomy national certifica-
tion, $800 next class-07/1 1/11

Continuing education
Fees incl. books, supplies, exam
fees. Call 386-755-4401 or
expresstrainingservices.com


04545222'
OBTAIN YOUR
COMMERCIAL DRIVERS
LICENSE
CLASSES FORMING NOW
AT FLORIDA GATEWAY
COLLEGE
CLASSROOM TRAINING,
STATE-OF-THE-ART
SIMULATOR, BEHIND THE
WHEEL DRIVING
FINANCING AVAILABLE
FOR QUALIFIED'
APPLICANTS
CALL 386-754-4405



310 Pets & Supplies

4 beautiful black & white. 9 wk
old kittens w/crystal emerald
green eyes. Litter box trained.
To good homes. 386-755-1794
FREE KITTEN
TO GOOD HOME, Orange Male
Tabby w/crooked tail. Litter
trained Call 386-365-7360
Free Kittens,
8 weeks old
386-365-0042

Golden Retriever pups CKC.
Shots. 3 females, 5 males
Available July 3 $350. Each
POP. 386-623-1577
MALE COLLIE Puppy for sale.
Pick of litter. Parents on Premises.
$150. negotiable.
386-755-4590 or 365-5150


310 Pets & Supplies

PUBLISHER'S NOTE
Florida Law 828.29 requires dogs
and cats being sold to be at least 8
weeks old and have a health
certificate from a licensed
veterinarian documenting they
have mandatory shots and are
free from intestinal and external
parasites. Many species of wild-
life must be licensed by Florida
Fish and Wildlife. If you are
unsure, contact the local
office for information.

330 Livestock &
330 Supplies

Black Angus Cows & Heifers
Prices Vary
Registered & Commercial
386-719-4802


361 Farm Equipment

84 Ford 4610 Tractor.
2WD, Solid
2005 fnotor,$7,500. OBO
386-867-0005


407 Computers

Compaq Computer, Many extras.
Complete Computer
$80.00
386-755-9984 or 386-292-2170

1 Machinery
411 Tools
18" Stihl
chain saw $125.
Call Don
386-963-4560
24'Aluminum
extension ladder
$90.00 Phone Don
386-963-4560
Black & Decker Sander
$10.00
Phone Don
386-963-4560
Pressure washer, 2500 PI,
used one time $125.00
Phone Don
386-963-4560


416 .Sporting Goods

Hunt Club Jasper Florida 2150
acres. 14 members. Deer, Hogs,
Turkey, RV sites. Ask for Kenny
(352)516-8719. www.cchcfl.com.


420 Wanted to Buy

K&H TIMBER
We Buy Pine Hardwood &
Cypress. Large or small tracts.,
Call 386-961-1961.
Wanted Junk Cars, Trucks, Vans.,
$250 & up CASH! Free Pick Up!
NO title needed !386-878-9260
After 5pm 386- 752-3648.


430 Garage Sales
PUBLISHER'S NOTE
All Yard Sale Ads
Must be Pre-Paid.


440 Miscellaneous

8X10 Single garage door.
White. All hardware
included. $100.00
386-344-1783
Craftsman 10 in miter saw. Pres-
sure washer 2000 PSI. Bench
grinder w/light. All new, in boxes.
Will trade for??? 386-487-5922
My Double Dress Model
Size 10/12. Adjustable.
Like New, In Box $100
386-752-5162
Snowbear trailer,
1 ton with spare tire
$275.00
SOLD
Stop gnat & Mosquito bites! Buy
Swamp Gator All natural insect re-
pellent. Family safe. Use head to
toe. Available at The Home Depot.
Summer Barbecue Special
Tow Behind
Grill/Smoker, $1,250 OBO.
386-719-4802

630 Mobile Homes
630 for Rent

2&3 BR MH. $395 $650. mo.
plus deposit. Water & sewer fur-
nished. Cannon Creek MHP
386-752-6422
2/2 Units, clean, well maintained,
nice safe park setting, 2 miles to
downtown Lake City, $575 month
+ $575 sec dep, 386-98-,-8448
13th Month FREE!!
2br /2ba SWMH $475. mo; also
Resid'l RV lots for rent between
Lake City & G'ville. Access to I-
75 & 441 (352)317-1326 for terms
3/2 S of Lake City, (Branford area)
$575 month plus security
386-590-0642 or 386-867-1833
www.suwanneevalleyproperties.com


630 Mobile Homes
630 for Rent

DWMH for Rent. 3br/2ba
Handicapped accessible.
$650. mo. $500. Dep. No Pets.
386-984-9634. ask for Amber.
Great area! Very clean 2Br/2Ba,
MH, CH/A, Nice kitchen.
$550. mo. + $200 Dep. NO PETS.
(386)755-0064 or (904)771-5924
Mobile Homes for rent in
White Springs, Lake City & Ft.
White. Contact 386-623-3404
or 386-365-1919
Nice clean 2&3 bdrm, Five Points,
NO PETS,
S also 3 bd on the
Westside, 386-961-1482
X-Clean 2/2 SW, 8 mi NW of VA.
Clean acre lot, nice area. $500. mo
+ dep No dogs Non-smoking
environment.386-961-9181

640 Mobile Homes
0 for Sale

2010 Lot Model 32x80
Den/LR 3BR/2BA
2280SF 1/2" SR
Call Charles @
Royals Homes 754-6737
2010 Lot Model 3BR/2BA
1624 SF 1/2" Sheetrock
Vaulted Ceiling.
Charles @
Royals Homes 754-6737
2011 Claytin Single
14x762BR/2BA
3 walk in Closets
Call.Charles @ Royals
Homes 754-6737
2011 Clayton Homes 4BR/2BA
9' Side Walls,
Energy Star Home
Call Charles @ Royals
Homes 754-6737
2011 Legacy Model 1980 SF
Wood Cab, 3BR/2BA
Deluxe Int.erior
Call Charles @
Royals Homes 754-6737
2011 SE Triple wide
16" OC Home WZII
Total upgrade call Charles
@ Royals Homes 754-6737
Aly Size, Any Shape
we have the home for you
Call Royals Homes @
386-754-6737
Architect Designed,
Green Engineered
Energy Homes
@Royals Homes
www.royalshomesales.com


Ask about odr Energy Star Top
Insulation & Windows, Better
"Built,Better Comfort, Phil @
,Roy als Hoes 386-754-6,737
Custom Built Modular's;
Bring your plans to
Royals Homes
386-754-6737
www.royalshomesales.com
Finance Manager on Site,
Know's how to get it done,
not a Salesman Guessing
Call Phil @ Royals
Homes 386-754-6737
Flashy? Pretty?
Whatabout Construction?
Homesto last a Lietime
Royals Homes
386-754-6737
Hallmark Real Estate. 2004
DWMH just minutes from the riv-
er. Detached carport. Front & back
screened porches. MLS#77398
Paula Lawrence 386-623-1973
Only a Few Left
2010 Models must go!
Call Royals Homes @
386-754-6737
Only at Royals Homes
Can your home be
prepared for real brick?
Call Bo @ 754-6737
NEW D/W Reduced Thousands.
3br/2ba set, delivery, A/C
skirting, steps. $39,900.
Call Ken (386)754-8844
AS IS, WHERE IS...32X80, 4/2,
LR/Den, needs carpet, paint, 2400
sqft. has metal roof, vinyl siding.
$31,000. Randy 386-754-0198
FIRE YOUR LANDLORD
TO OWN WHAT YOUR
THROWING AWAY IN RENT.
CALL MIKE 386-754-8844
NEW 32X70 4/3. 2K sqft+. L/R,
DenSidex side, glasstop range,
D/W. Del, set, Steps, A/C, skirt-
ing. $59,900. Ken (386)754-8844
OWNER FINANCE 40% Down
w/land Equity or CASH on any
new or used singlewide or Double-
wide. Randy 386-754-0198
The Economy has forced
me to cut the price on my
3 bedroom, 2 bath home to
$38K (352)-870-5983
.Pre-Owned 2BR/l Bath
Priced to move 754-6737
Only @ Royals Homes
www.royalshomesales.com
Sales Price Doubled?
Not at Royals, Honest people,
Quality Homes.
Call Royals Homes
@ 386-754-6737
Service Manager on Site
makes sure your satisfied, not
someone doing it all
Royals Homes 386-754-6737


I


Bia


SEiLL


FINDIT14


I 1 .


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LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED SUNDAY, JUNE 26, 2011


. .. .. ... www.aspenlakecity.com


TRAC
YTH2


21 h
N h oa 46"


POWUEQUPM~fT. NC-, 152 ~ff 0 w., Fk


ivarna
TORS
1K46
9995
hp Kohler
cutting width
36 Equal
Payment-
No Interest
6-30-2011
ire ModelsAvailable


FASHION JEWELRY. CHECK OUT OUR BLING BLING SALE.
BUY ANY 2 PIECES GET 3RD PIECE AT 50% OFF.
BUY ANY 3 PIECES GET 4TH PIECE FREE.
GATR 'DOES NOT INCLUDE BLUD LUSTER JEWELRY.
GATO NEW AND QUALITY PREOWNED FURNITURE.
EGO Trr ANTIQUES AND COLLECTABLES.
SAVE ON AMERICAN BEDDING MATTRESS. TWIN TO KING.
DINNETTE SETS, HUTCHES, SOFA, CHAIRS AND SO MUCH MORE.

T imeeess memoRIEs

386-466-1888
1034 SW MAl NBLVD., BLVD CITT, FL 32055

Rountree Moore Toyota Bucks Rountree Moore Toyota Bucks

S T O Y O T A 0C
Please present Rountree
Moore Toyota Bucks at Get $10 off your next
time of purchase No cash conventional Oil, Lube
value No reproductions c
of te Rountree Moore and Filter Change,
Toyota Bucks is allowed Rotate and Balance of
Not valid wiln any other Tires. Or or any other
coupon One coupon per service over $50.00.
customer Fees tax.
& shop supplies not Expires 7-15-11
included
Not Legal Tender
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IRONWOOD HOMES


FREE LOCAL
FACTORY SERVICE
TOURS
Since 1973

Locally Built No Freight
4109 US Hwy 90 W, Lake City, FL 32055 386-754.8844


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Classified Department: 755-5440


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LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED SUNDAY, JUNE 26, 2011


640 Mobile Homes
6 for Sale
There is a Difference.
Just ask our Customers
We do what we say
Call Phil@ Royals Homes
386-754-6737

650 o Mobile Home
650 &Land
67.5 ac.Ranch, fenced & cross
fenced. Spacious moblie home
w/large front deck & RV hookup
MLS 75607 $299,000. Access
Realty. Patti Taylor. 386-623-6896
Century 21/The Darby Rogers Co.
DWMH on 5 ac. 3br/2ba Back 2
ac. fenced. Owners motivated.
Debbie Myles 386-719-1224
MLS# 75830 $99,900
Hallmark Real Estate. 3/2
DWMH 1/2 ac south of town.
Columbia City. Paved frontage,
comer lot. $57,500
MLS#77654 Janet Creel 719-0382
Owner Finance, Nice 3/2, S of
Lake City, small down/$590 mo
386-590-0642 or 386-867-1833
www.suwanneevalleyproperties.com

710 nUnfurnished Apt.
7 0 For Rent








04545256
SPRING HILL VILLAGE
Excellent High Springs location.
1, 2 & 3 bedroom floor-plans;
some with garages.
Call 386-454-1469
or visit our website:
www.springhillvillage.net

2BR APT.
Downtown Location, Clean.
$500 mo, plus Security.
NO PETS. Call 386-755-3456
2BR/1.5BA w/garage
5 minutes from VA hospital.
Call for details.
386-755-4590 or 365-5150
A Landlord You Can Love!
2 br Apts $575. & up + sec. Great
area. CH/A washer/dryer hookups.
386-758-9351/352-208-2421
Furnished or unfurnished
Townhomes on the golf course.
$750. mo. plug security. Includes
water. 386-752-9626
NICE APT Downtown. Remod-
eled 1 bedroom. Kitchen, dining,
living room. $450. mo plus sec.
386-362-8075 or 386-754-2951
The Lakes Apts. Studios & 1Br's
from $135/wk. Util. & cable incl.,
Sec 8 vouchers accepted, monthly
rates avail Call 386-752-2741
Updated apartments w/tile floors
& fresh paint. Excellent location.
From $450. + sec.
Call Michelle 386-752-9626

S FurnishedApts....
720 ~For Rent
Ibr Apt. incl. water, elec, & cable.
$595. mo. Close to college. Good
area in Lulu. References & sec.
req'd. No pets. 386-719-4808
Neat as a Whistle! lbr., utilities,
AC TV, Cable, micro, clean, quiet,
shady, Close to town. 41S,
$135 wk. 386-755-0110
Rooms for Rent. Hillcrest, Sands,
Columbia. All fumished. Electric,
S cable, fridge, microwave. Weekly
or monthly rates. 1 person $135,
2 persons $150. weekly
386-752-4808

Unfurnished
73V Home For Rent

05526256
3/2, $1100.mo, 5 ac., dep neg.,
386-466-2391,
438-4054 or 752-1160 at
7137 S US Hwy 441, Lake City

lbr/lba Free ele. Utilities incl. 4mi
S. Lake City. $300dep. $375mo.
386-590-0642 or 386-867-1833
www.suwanneevalleyproperties.com


2 bedroom 1 bath on
5 acres. $700.00 per month.
First, last and security.
386-590-5333
2br Private Country
Home. Remodeled,
everything is new. Large yard.
386-752-1444
3br/1.5ba. Very clean, CH/A
Fenced'(privacy) large back yard.
Nice area/location. $800. mo $800.
dep. Ref's req'd. (941)920-4535

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730 Unfurnished
730 Home For Rent
4br/2ba in town.
Good neighborhood. $900. mo
1st & S900 security. No Pets.
386-755-6916

750 Business &
Office Rentals
FOR LEASE: Downtown office
space. Convenient to
Court house.
Call 386-755-3456
For Lease: E Baya Ave. Two -
1000 sqft office space units or
combined for 2000 sqft. 386-984-
0622 or weekends 386497-4762
OFFICE SPACE for lease.
Oak Hill Plaza. 900 sqft
$675mo/$695. sec dep.
Tom 386-961-1086 DCA Realtor
.788 S Marion Ave, Commercial
bldg with hwy frontage,
near downtown.
Call Scott Stewart at Westfield
Realty Group. 386-867-3498


790 Vacation Rentals

Horseshoe Beach Scalloping Spcl
Qulf Front 2br, w/lg porch, dock,
Fish sink. wkend $395./wk $895.
386-235-3633/352-498-5986
alwaysonvacation.com #419-181
"Florida's Last Frontier"


805 Lots for Sale

5 Acre Lot, Secluded & Cleared,
MLS# 67871 $55,000
Call Lisa Waltrip
@ 386-365-5900
westfieldrealtygroup.com
Great Package Deal $43,500
Nicely wooded. 3 lots in Emerald
Cove. (1)Private cul-de-sac.
Aaron Nickelson 386-867-3534
Westfield Realty Group
Hallmark Real Estate. Owner
Finance with $5K down with
terms negotiable. Below assessed
value for the county. MLS# 74484
$17,900 Jay Sears 386-867-1613
Land for Sale. 12 acres in
nice area south of town.
MLS#77469 $55,000
Carrie Cason 386-623-2806
Westfield Realty Group


PUBLISHER'S NOTE
All real estate advertising in this
newspaper is subject to the fair
housing act which makes it illegal
to advertise "any preference,
limitation, or discrimination based
.on race, color, religion, sex,
disability, familial status or nation-
al origin; or any intention to make
-such preference, limitation or
discrimination." Familial status
includes children under the age of
18 living with parents or legal
custodians, pregnant women and
people securing custody of chil-
dren under the age of 18. This
newspaper will not knowingly
accept any advertising for real es-
tate which is in violation of the.
Ia., Our reader ; are hereby in-.
Frimed th ii all d ellings adv-er-
Mtis_.d in this rewspperare avail#a
bl on an equal opportunity bais..
To complain of discrimination call
HUD toll free at 1-800-669-9777,
the toll free
telephone number to the hearing
impaired is 1-800-927-9275.


810 Home for Sale
3/2 1056 sqft Brick home in. town.
Fenced back yard w/12x12 work-
shop Just Reduced! $79,900
MLS# 77414 Call 3.86-243-8227
R.E.O.Realty Group, Inc
3/2 in Woodhaven w/Fla Room,
fenced back yard MLS#75499,
$114,900 Call Pam @
Remax 386-303-2505 or
email- remaxpamb@gmail.com
4/2 on 10 ac. in Bell. Over 2200
sqft in a country setting. 10x20
frame shade. Bring offers! $89,000
MLS 76582 Brittany Stoeckert
Results Realty 386-397-3473
4/2 with 1000 sq ft workshop,
fenced yard, 2 car garage, Fairly
new roof & HVAC MLS#77602,
Bring Offers! $169,900,
R.E.O. Realty Group 243-8227


4br brick on .51 ac. corer lot. For-
mal dining and a large open floor
plan. Brick patio. $159,888
MLS 76763 Brittany Stoeckert
Results Realty 386-397-3473
A Pilots Dream home 3br/2.5ba.
Pool, stocked pond, detached ga-
rage w/living quarters MLS#77756
$399,900 Westfield Realty
GroupJosh Grecian 386-466-2517


810 Home for Sale
Access Realty Stylish 3/2 + pool
house w/1/2 bath on 2.25 acres.
Rear deck, 2 car garage & carport.
MLS 78103 $194,500.
Patti Taylor.623-6896
Brick 3/1 family home, 4.43 acres.
w/metal roof. MLS# 77415
Short sale acceptance w/lenders
approval. $99,000. 386-243-8227
R.E.O. Realty Group, Inc
Century 21/The Darby Rogers Co.
3br/l. Updated kitchen, bath. Open
living room w/all classic & elegant
light fixtures. 386-752-6575
MLS# 78099 $79,900
Century 21/The Darby Rogers Co.
3/2 lin Spring Estates. 20x40
workshop. Screened back porch &
all appliances. Kayla Carbono
623-9650 MLS# 73787 $99,900
Century 21/The Darby Rogers Co.
Picadilly Park All brick 3/2, comer
lot w/inground pool. Screen porch
& fenced yard. Jessica Sheelly
288-2403 MLS# 73787 $115,900
Century 21/The Darby Rogers Co.
Eastside Village 2br/2ba. Extra Ig.
Master suite. Florida room & 2
sheds. Ginny Smith 386-623-4277
623-4277 MLS# 70160 $79,900.
Century 21/The Darby Rogers Co.
Laurel Lake S/D. 4br/2ba w/ ap-
prox. 2275 sqft. Fenced back yard,
storage shed. Susan Sloan 386-
965-2847 MLS# 76106 $189,900
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
4br/1.5ba brick. 1332 sq ft. Great
floor plan, nice yard, close to
town. 1 ac landscaped. Lori
Geibeig MLS# 75713 $84,900
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
Remodeled 2/2 (could be 3/2).
Split floor plan. Great home, great
price. Mary Brown Whitehurst
965-0887 MLS# 77943 $99,900
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
3/2 brick home in Woodcrest. Lg
lot completely fenced. Easy access
to amenities. Elaine K. Tolar 386-
752-6488 MLS# 78148 $129,900
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
New home in Mayfair. 4 bedroom
an comer lot. Covered Porch.
Elaine K. Tolar 386-752-6488
MLS# 76919 $214,900
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
3/3 in beautiful area. 2414sqft.
Private yard & patio with storage
bldg. Lori G Simpson 386-365-
5678 MLS# 78175 $159,900
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
Bridk 3/2 on lake front. Lots of up-
dates. Glassed in room with fantas-
-:tic views. Lori G Simpson 386-
365-5678 MLS# 78092 $249,900
; Country Home 2br/2ba on 5 ac.
detached garage w/workshop.
MLS# 77.005 $179,900 Call Roger
Lovelady 386,365-7039
Westfield Realty Group
CYPRESS LANDING!
3BR/2BA built in 2005 w/large
kitchen $115,000
DANIEL CRAPPS AGENCY,
INC. 755-5110 #75794
DESIRABLE GWEN LAKE area!
Nice 3BR/2BA home on
-:--;corrfer lot $11 2,000- -
DANIEL CRAPPS AGENCY,
S INC 7 i.-5 1-1l17 n7


Eastside.Village a 55+ Retirement
Community. lots of Storage. Ig
deck off 2br suite. Carport w/more
storage. MLS# 77462 Eastside
Village' Realty, Inc. 752-5290
Eastside Village a 55+ Retirement
Community. 2br/2ba. Lg office
/craft room. Oversized garage.
$89,900 MLS# 71901 Eastside
Village Realty, Inc. 752-5290
Eastside Village a 55+ Retirement
Community: Open floor plan
w/breakfast nook. 2 Ig bedrooms.
$104,999 MLS# 77779 Eastside
Village Realty, Inc. 752-5290
Featured Home 55+ acres, 5 pas-
tures fenced & cross fenced. 2,700
sqft, 4br/3ba home built in 1996.
Call for details! 386-243-8227
R.E.O. Realty Group
Fixer Upper on Suwannee River. '
Needs TLC. Owner motivated &
will finance. $45,000
MLS 77337 Brittany Stoeckert
Results Realty 386-397-3473
GREAT STARTER HOME!
3BR/2BA w/lots of closet space &
nice lawn $79,900
DANIEL CRAPPS AGENCY,
INC. 755-5110 #76432.
Great Starter Home. Well cared
for. New countertops, tile.floors &
metal roof. $79,900 MLS#77524
Brodie Alfred 386-623-0906
Westfield Realty Group
Owner Fin.,Nice 3/2 on 2.5 fenced
acres, pond, Jasper area, sm down
$700 mo, 386-590-0642/867-1833
www.suwanneevalleyproperties.comn


810 Home for Sale
Hallmark Real Estate. Brick
home w/fine landscaping. Dream
kitchen w/double pantry.
Split bedroom plan MLS#77846
Paula Lawrence 386-623-1973
Hallmark Real Estate. Country
Estate. Sit in the swing of the big
oak tree and watch the horses
graze on O0ac. fenced. 39 ac total.
MLS#78139 Janet Creel 719-0382
Hallmark Real Estate. Pool &
Patio. 3br/2ba. brick home on
1.69 ac. Workshop &
SWMH on property. MLS#78117
Tanya Shaffer 386-397-4766
Home near the River. 3br/2ba,
1470 sqft. needs a little TLC.
MLS#76390 $34,900
Mike Lienemann 386-867-9053
Westfield Realty Group
Home on 15 ac. w/over 2,500 sqft
home.Very Ig bedrooms w/private
baths. 24x24 workshop $235,000
MLS 77552 Brittany Stoeckert
Results Realty 386-397-3473
HOME OR OFFICE on
Alachua St; remodeled 1,207 SqFt
home $82,900
DANIEL CRAPPS AGENCY,
INC. 755-5110 #77724
Hallmark Real Estate. 2006
2200SF home. 2br/2ba w/mother-
in-law suite, 4 car garage, endless
hot water heater. MLS# 77547
$309,900 Jay Sears 386-867-1613
Hallmark Real Estate. 3br/2ba
new roof & AC. Comes w/SWMH
& 30x30 steel bldg. Completely
fenced. MLS# 76752
$179,900 Jay Sears 386-867-1613 ,
Just Reduced 3/2 home, inside city
limits, fenced backyard, detached
carport w/office MLS#77411
$79,900 Call R.E.O.Realty,
@ 386-243-8227 Make Offer!
Just Reduced.4/2 on 1.57 acres,
fireplace. paniall) fenced. MLS#
77412, Call Nancy Rogers at
R.E.O. Realty Group
386-243-8227 $64,900
Lg. 4/3 family home. 16x20'
screened porch, workshop.-4.5 ac.
fenced/cross fenced MLS 74339
$229,900. N Fla Homeland Real-
ty Darlene Hart 386-288-2878
Lg. home on 1 ac: Granite floors
throughout. 4br/2ba. Nice open
kitchen & Florida room. $148,000
MLS 77292 Brittany Stoeckert
Results Realty 386-397-3473
Like New. 3br/2ba on 3 ac. New
kitchen cabinets, counters, carpet
& more. $179,900 MLS#77372
Charlie Sparks 386-755-0808
Westfield Realty Group
LOTS OF UPGRADES!
Remodeled kitchen in this
2BR/1BA home $29,900
DANIEL CRAPPS AGENCY,
INC. 755-5110 #77505
Mayfield S/D, nice fenced in back'
yard w/small lake behind property.
Very nice. $99,888
MLS 77092 Brittany Stoeckert
Results Realty 386-397-3473
Neat as a pin! Split floor plan
"'*l'v ll manicured lae(nI10'l 1
storage shed. $129K MLS 77932
Darlene Hart 386-288-2878
N Fla Homeland Realty
Owner Finance. Custom built 3/2.5
10.8 ac. Granite, fireplace, faulted
ceilings; surround sound. lanai,
gazebo. MLS 77382 Access Real-
ty. Patti Taylor $249K 623-6896
Remax Professionals Charming
w/many upgrades. 3br/2ba. 2 mas-
ter suites. MLS# 76779, $105,000
Missy Zecher @ 386-623-0237
www.missyzecher.com
Remax Professionals Motivated
seller. All brick family home
w/many upgrades. MLS# 78168,
$129,000 www.missyzecher.com
Missy Zecher 386-623-0237
Remax Professionals Spacious
home on corer lot. Private access
to Lake Jeffery. MLS# 77783,
$198,900 www.missyzecher.com
Missy Zecher @ 386-623-0237
Spacious 4/2 home on 1 ac. Split
floor plan. Great neighborhood.
Easy access to 1-75 $220K MLS
77859 N Fla Homeland Realty
Darlene Hart 386-288-2878
SPACIOUS home built in
1995 has 2BR/2BA & 1,636 SqFt
on 1 acre $89,900
DANIEL CRAPPS AGENCY,
INC. 755-5110 #76887
Starter/Investment HAme, 3/2 +
Bonus room on 1 acre, remodeled,
fenced MLS#77562 $99,900'
Call Pam @ Remax
Professionals 386-303-2505


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810 Home for Sale
Well Maintained 3/2 on dead-end
street, quiet, country, close to
downtown $105,000 MLS#77800
Lisa Waltrip 386-365-5900
Westfield Realty Group
Well Maintained 3/2 w/open floor
plan,on 1/2 acre, fenced, shed
MLS# 78136 $134,900
Call Pam Beauchamp @ Remax
Professionals 386-758-8900

820 Farms &
820 FAcreage
4 1/2 acre lot. Lake Jeffery Road.
Gorgeous Oaks!Paved Rd
Owner Financing! NO DOWN!.
$59,900. $525mo 352-215-1018.
www.LandOwnerFinancing.com
4 acres, Wellborn, New Well
installed, Beautifully wooded
w/cleared Home Site, owner fin,
no down, $39,900, $410 mon
Call 352-215-1018
www.LandOwnerFinancing.com
6.45 ac tiver front property in
White Springs, doe to Big Shoals.
Covered shelter for entertaining.
MLS# 77417 $124,888 386-243-
8227 R.E.O. Realty Group, Inc
Bring the horses. Peaceful &
ready for your home. Convenient
location. $38,000 MLS#76264
Millard Gillen 386-365-7001
Westfield Realty Group
FARM- 7 stall barn, Apt.
17+ acres cross fenced.
Close in $950. mo.
386-961-1086
Half to ten acre lots. Some w/
well, septic, pp. We finance; low
dwn pmt. Deas Bullard Properties.
386-752-4339. wwsw.landnfl.com
Look at all.the Upgrades
s Completely remodeled.
$106,500 MLS#77483
Brodie Alfred 386-623-0906
Westfield Realty Group
Pretty) piece of land. 2 acres close
to interstate 75 for under 20K,
Mobile Homes or residential ok.
MLS# 77400 Call 386-243-8227,
R.E.O. Realty Group, Inc

830 Commercial
00v Property
4 UNIT Apt. Bldg. All' 1/1/ /ex-
tra rooms. Clean, good tenants and
remodeled. Downtown. $160,000.
386-362-8075 or 754-2951
Hallmark Real Estate. Comnher-.
cial Business Location on South
Main wv/offices & service bldg.
Frontage, warehouse & storage
MLS#76280 Janet Creel 719-0382
Prime Commercial Location.
Just across from plaza. Frontage
on Baya w/2 curbcuts. $350,0)00
MLS# 77485 Call 386-243-8227
R.E.O.Realty Group, Inc


940 Trucks
1988 NISSAN Pickup w/topper.
One owner. 165k mi. 4 cyl.,
Reliable, $2000, ..
352-339-5158

950 Cars for Sale

1986 Chevy Monte Carlo SS,
78k miles, one owner. $10,000.
All original.
386-752.1313 or 904-718-6747
1995 HONDA Civic 4 dr.
Auto., AC., 180K miles.
New timing belt. Nice. $2000.
(352)339-5158
2006 Toyota Scion XB,
41,000 mi. $13,000. ,
Paid over $24,000 new.
386-752-1313 or 904-718-6747


Bring the picture in or
we will take it for you!
: Ad runs 10 consecutive days
with a description and photo in the
newspaper and online E-edition.
* Ad runs 10 consecutive days as a
classified line ad online.
* You must include vehicle price.
* All ads are prepaid.
* Private party only.





.2006 EF250
Ford Van
3/4 ton, metal work
shelves/ladder rack,
60K miles, exc. cond.

$10,500
Call
-5,...38fe5.-555 .,

during the first 10 days, you
can run the same vehide ad
for 10 additional days for
only $15.00
Terms and conditions remain the
Sesame for theadditional run.


"",0 6 E
For Van.


Private Estate -- "., ;
Within the city limits. Beautiful old- -
er home with mature landscaping
and lake views, 6 Br., 3.5 baths. r J
3 fireplaces, private pavea dnve.
39.7 acres of property includedd
with home. $994,000 or $3,000
mo. for rent or home plus 2 acres
only $495,000. Call for adalhonal
information and showings.

Listing Agent Mary Brwn Whitehurst

I(386) 965-0887

f 1M Or co-owner (386)397-5131





ON WHEELS& I WATERCRM









11,000 miles, blue with w/2 slide-outs, camp or
ghost flames, runs reside, livable but needs work.
great, new battery $4,000
$3,100 OBO Call
Call 386-362-1826
386-752-9645 Leave Message







2006 Toyota Scion 1986 Chevy Monte
XB Carlo SS
41,000 mi. 78k miles, one owner.
Paid over $24,000 new. All original.
$13,000 $10,000
Call Call
386-752-1313 386-752-1313
904-718-6747 904-718-6747


We're on target!


Lake City Reporter
lakedtyreporter.com CURRENTS magazine
Subscribe Today
386-755-5445


Classified Department: 755-5440










LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED SUNDAY, JUNE 26, 2011


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Story ideas?


Contact
Robert Bridges
Editor
754-0428


Sunday. lune 26. 201 I


Lake City Reporter






LIFE


www.lakecityreporter.com


GARDEN TALK


Nichelle Demorest


Chinch

bugs can

ruin your

lawn


ust when I thought
my lawn couldn't
get any worse, it
did. There must
have been some St.
ustinegrass hanging on
among the weeds because
now I'm noticing patches
of yellow and brown turf.
Southern chinch bugs are
rapidly claiming the last of
my grassy survivors.
Chinch bugs can cause
severe lawn damage,
especially during hot, dry
weather. They damage
other southern turfgrasses,
but they are particularly
fond of St. Augustinegrass.
Feeding is evidenced
by yellowed and brown
patches of turf in dry,
sunny locations. 'Hot
spots' of dying grass are
common next to drives
or sidewalks where soil
is warmer and insects are
greedily sucking the plant
juices.
The yellow or brown-
ish patches of turf are not
necessarily indications of
chinch bugs. These symp-
toms are similar to drought
stress, root rot and other
diseases, nematodes, and
other insects.
To test for the presence
of chinch bugs, insert orne
end an open-ended cof-
fee can a couple inches
into the soil and continue
filling it with water for
several minutes. The bugs
will then crawl out onto
the leaf blades. Another
way to check is to pull
back the grass and look
for a minute black insect
with a white 'x' the wing.
Chinch bugs will be pres-
ept at the base of the leaf
blades, down along the
soil line.
The only thing you can
do when chinch bugs are
feeding on turfgrass is to
treat the area with insec-
ticides or watch the lawn
die. Homeowners can pur-.
chase products containing
bifenthrin, cyfluthrin, per-
methrin or lambda-dyha-
lothrin to treat for these
insects. Most insecticides
will not kill the eggs, so fol-
low the directions for any
needed repeat applications.
Lawn care practices can
help reduce the susceptibil-
ity of St. Augustinegrass
to chinch bug infestations.
Over watering and over
fertilizing causes grasses
to put on continuous
lush top growth which is
very attractive to a host
of insects. Mowing St.
Augustinegrass shorter
than 3 to 4 inches weakens
the root system and the
ability to survive an attack.
For more information, visit
http://edis. ifas.ufl. edu/
in383" http://edis. ifas.ufl.
edu/in383
Don't miss the UF 'Make
and Take' Rain Barrel
Workshop on July 28th at
6:30 pm.
Call 752-5284 and make
your reservations.


* D. Nichelle Demorest is
a horticulture agent with the
Columbia County Extension
of the University of Florida
Institute of Food and
Agricultural Sciences.


Partnership


By ANTONIA ROBINSON
arobinson@lakecityreporter. com

Partnering with Haven
Hospice Attic Resale Store
in Lake City through a
voucher system to ben-
efit its clients is a "win-
win" situation for Catholic
Charities, said Suzanne
Edwards, chief operating
officer.
"Collaborative partner-
ships arp essential in these
times of continued eco-
nomic downturn," she said.
"People c6me in everyday
to get services. Everyday
we have requests."
The store has been in
Lake City for 10 years, said
Michael Ingram, Haven
Hospice manager for retail
operations for Attic stores.
Items sold at the attic
generate profits to ben-
efit patient care at Haven
Hospice.
The partnership began
in October 2010, he said.
Through the partnership,
clients are screened at
Catholic Charities to deter-
mine their needs. Vouchers
are then issued for clients
to shop at the store.
Catholic Charities was
the first choice for the
partnership because of
its close proximity to the
store, Ingram said.
"We like to partner
with different organiza-
tions in the community
where we're located sim-
ply because we want to
be involved in community
work," he said.
In the past Catholic
Charities used to accept
donations.
"We've always had a
great turnout of people
who go through their
closets during (seasonal
changes)," Edwards said.
"We used to take all of
those items for years until
we outgrew our building
and we needed more office
space."
Donating to Haven'
Hospice helps the organi-
zation's clients, she said.
So many people have to
choose between rent or
food and can't afford to buy
clothing or other items for


ps community


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
James Carter, of Lake City, a frequent customer at the Haven Hospice Attic Resale Store, looks through the racks for a
shirt. Other customers, clients of Catholic Charities, are receiving vouchers to shop there.


their families.
"Donors can donate gen-
tly used items to Haven
Hospice and in turn they
provides us the availability
to give our clients a vouch-
er, which is just like dol-
lars, to go to the store and
shop for what they need,"
she said.
Haven Hospice does
great work in the commu-
nity, Edwards said. Clients
say they feel like they're
shopping at a boutique
with quality items at Haven
Hospice Attic.'
"We've had a very good
working relationship with
them," she said. "We're
happy with them."
Haven Hospice Attic


Resale Store has been
serving about 20 clients
a month from Catholic
Charities since the part-
nership began, Ingram
said. Clients have ranged
from a family whose house
burned down and lost
everything to a man need-
ing clothes for a job inter-
view.
"They're a great orga-
nization to work with and
we're very happy they
decided to work with us as
well," he said.
Haven Hospice doesn't
have the capabilities to
screen clients. and relies
on other organizations
to find out their needs,
Ingram said.'Other agen-


cies that service the com-
munity can contact Haven
Hospice about partnership
opportunities at (386) 752-
0230.
"We're excited about
working with Catholic
Charities and looking for
other groups who work
with people in need and
interested in the voucher
pIrogram," he said.
Donations can be
dropped off at the store
located at 1077 US
Highway 90 West, Suite
120 during its hours of
9 a.m. to 6 p.m. Monday
through Saturday.
"It allows us to help
people in the community
Where we are present," he


said. "It's important to us
that we're working with the
community to help improve
it not just in a health sense.
Lake City has been very
good to Haven Hospice,
and we want to be able to
give back. This is one of
the ways we're able to do
that"
Donations provided on
behalf of Catholic Charities
to Haven Hospice Attic
allows the community to
help support the organiza-
tion even if they can't con-
tribute money, Edwards
said.
"It helps us be a kinder
nation and a kinder com-
munity to each other," she
said.


Right at Home: beach decor with a difference


By KIM COOK
For The Associated Press

If you've ever carted home
some unfortunate monstrosity
from a beach vacation and rued
it, take heart. That's not the
kind of beach d6cor we're talking
about here.
This summer, retailers are
offering d6cor that evokes the
sand and surf, but with a sophis-
tication that makes it work as a
seasonal accent to most rooms
no matter what your decorating
style.
Wisteria has some lovely wall
art: colonial nautical charts in sea
blue with white type. Fantastic in
a contemporary space, the his-
torical ambiance of the pieces
would work equally well in a
more traditional room. An ivory
linen pillow embellished with a
spiny-finned fish in navy blue
strikes a chic and exotic note.
And a wood and metal tree for
votive holders, crafted to look
like a frond of coral, would pro-
vide interest on a summer dinner
table.
Get creative when hunting for
something interesting and sea-
sonal; often, you'll find it at a
store you might not usually go
to.
PBTeen has a host of quirky
yet delightful items that evoke
the theme: a tabletop angel fish
fashioned from driftwood bits;
wire art, including jaunty star-
fish hooks; a mountable shark's


head whose toothy maw can be
used as a receptacle for beach
hats, dog leashes and so on.
Wall mounted "surfboards"
give the cottage (or city apart-
ment) a laid-back spot to hang
a jacket. And a crisp cotton pil-
low is photo-printed with a regal
seagull perched atop a sign
pointing to what else? the
beach.
Bring some sea-life elements
to a couple of walls with Pottery
Barn's mounted faux sea urchin
collection, set in a soft white
frame; Branches of rosy coral are
silkscreened on linen to make
an elegant wall hanging. There
are also pretty cast-stone terra
cotta starfish, and shells, washed
white and framed.
A day's beachcombing often
yields some lovely finds, such as
gently hued, water-washed glass.
At Beach Grass Cottage, they've
gathered up lots of the stuff,
and their artisans have made
lampshade and mirror trims, as
well as wreaths that can be cus-
tom ordered in shades of milky
white, pastel pink, aqua and even
a few brighter blues. There are
alphabet letters encrusted with
sea glass, too what a great
house present.
A look at the Seaside Inspired
website is like a trip to some
remote stretch of sand. Here,
the Beach Finds lamp lets
you fill the base of the light
with your own scavengings.
Another, spherical lamp is craft-


ASSOCIATED PRESS
This product image courtesy of PBTeen shows their Wire Shark's Head.
This summer, retailers are offering decor that evokes the sand and surf, but
with a sophistication that makes it work as a seasonal accent to most rooms
no matter what your decorating style.


ed of fishing line, vines and
wire. Gossamer-like sea fans
are photo-etched on thin metal
that can be wrapped around
tea lights or hurricanes for the
patio. Cape Cod sand cloaks


little tea-light jars manna
for the city-bound entertainer.
And if yachting is a secret wish,
order the porthole wall mirror.
As realistic as you'll find, *and
fun for a powder room.


Section D


a I












LAKE CITY REPORTER LIFE SUNDAY, JUNE 26, 2011


At new NYC hotel, a robot

handles customer's luggage


By SCOTT MAYEROWIT
AP Business Writer

NEW YORK Forget
the bellhop. Meet the lug-
gage robot
It's the first of several
high-tech, sleek amenities
guests encounter at the
Yotel, a new hotel that aims
to provide a trendy stay at
an affordable price.
Purple lighting, throb-
bing music in the elevators
and futon-like sofas that
transform to lie-flat beds at
the touch of a button help
set the mood.
Or maybe they just dis-
tract you from the tiny size
of the rooms. At 170 square
feet, perhaps "room" is too
generous of a term. Yotel
prefers to call them cabins.
Aircraft designers were
hired to.make the rooms
feel larger than they are.
The tiny desk doubles as
a nightstand. An overhead
shower fixture delivers
water like rain, perhaps
to make the stall (no tub)
seem more spacious. Of
course there's no room for
a fridge or minibar.
But guests aren't expect-
ed to hang out in their
rooms. Yotel's massive
fourth-floor lobby includes
four bars, a 7,000-square-
foot outdoor terrace and
a restaurant inspired by a
sumo wrestling ring
YotelCEO Gerard Greene
- who dresses more like-
a nightclub promoter than
hotelier is seeking
guests that are "young at
heart" and considers his
property to be the "iPod of


the hotel industry."
Some of the design ele-
ments are jarring, even to
the man behind them.
Pointing to a mustard-
colored pullout sofa in
one of the larger rooms,
Greene said, "I think I must
have been jet-lagged jet-
lagged or hung-over -
when I chose that color."
Yotel opened its first
hotels in 2007 at two of
London's airports followed
the next year by one at
Amsterdam's airport The
chain aims to combine the
efficiency of airplane space
with the concept of tiny
Japanese capsule hotels.
The" New York hotel is the
first non-airport location
and the first Yotel outside
of Europe. At 669, rooms,
it is also the largest hotel
to open in New York since
2002, according to the city's
tourism authority.
Everything here is self-
serve.
The 20-foot-tall robotic
arm at the entrance auto-
matically stores bags in.
lockers for guests who.
want to wonder around the
city after the 11 a.m. check-
out time (and no, you don't
have to tip the robot). At
check-in, airport-like kiosks
spit out room key cards and
an invoice. Don't worry:
humans are standing by to
assist the technologically
challenged.
Worried about oversleep-
ing? Pick up the phone,
press a few buttons and
listen to a computer voice
prompt you to "press 1
to accept wake-up call."


Instead of room service,
prepared food is available
from the concierge desk,
dubbed Mission Control,
which also sells hotel sou-
venirs like metallic Yotel
water bottles.
But the real heart of the
hotel is the action-packed
terrace, already fast on its
way to become one of this
summer's hottest outdoor
bars. The varied tapas-style
menu of small plates is tasty
but the tab can quickly add
up. It would be a shame for
a meal and drinks there to
cost more than the room
upstairs. That said, the beef
sliders ($9) and crunchy
shrimp dish ($8) should
not be missed. The Spicy
Pepino Margarita was also
well worth the $13 price
tag.
My room went for an
introductory rate of $149,
or $179.47 with tax. After
August, Yotel is looking to
offer rooms with a base
rate in the $200 to $250
range. More expensive
suites have hot tubs and
rotating beds straight out
of an Austin Powers movie.
They go for $1,000 or more
a night
The Yotel throws in free
Wi-Fi, domestic phone calls,
morning yoga and rhuffins
and coffee for breakfast.
For the really budget-con-
scious, each floor has a
communal 'kitchen area
with a sink and microwave.
: New York has the high-
est average room rate in
the country: $236 a night in
April, according to research
firm STR


ENGAGEMENTS


Register-Abell

Buzz and Terry Register
of Moultrie, Ga. announce
the engagement and
approaching marriage
of their- daughter, Jessica
Caitlin Register, to Zachary
Darrell Abell..
He is the son of Jeff and
Judy W. Abell of Enigma,
Ga. and the grandson
of Curtis and Lunette
Williams of Enigma, Ga.,
Paul Abell of Nokomis, the
late Martha Abell and. the
late Gertrude Abell.
The future bride is
also the granddaughter
of Carolyn T. Cannon of
White Springs, the late
Jack Cannon and Loyd and
Jackie Register of Jasper.
The bride-elect is a
2007 graduate of Colquitt
County High School. She
received an Associate's of
Arts degree in family and
consumer sciences is 2008
from Abraham Baldwin
Agricultural College in
Tifton, Ga. She graduates
in 2012 with a Bachelor's of
Science degree in child and
family development from


the University of Georgia
in Athens, Ga.
The future groom is a
2007 graduate of Berrien
High School in Nashville,
Ga. and received an
Associates of Science
degree in psychology in
2009fromAbrahamBaldwin
Agricultural College in


Tiftofi, Ga. He graduates
in 2011 with a Bachelor's of
Science degree in practical
theology from Southeastern
University in Lakeland.
The wedding is planned
for Saturday, July 30 at First
Baptist Church of Moultrie.
All family and'friends are
invited.


BIRTH ANNOUNCEMENTS


Myla Winn Gagliano

Charles and Drucilla Gagliano of Lake
City announce the birth oJ their daughter,
Myla Winn Gagliano, March 20 at Shands
of UF in Gainesville.
She weighed 7 pounds, 5 ounces and
measured 20 inches.
She joins siblings: Makai Lau-ren, 10;
Raeden Carlee, 8; Charles Williams III, 6;
Roman Levy, 4; and Drue Mason, 3.
Grandparents are Levy and Laulaau
Sapp of Lake City, Karen and the late Carl
Plemmons of Milton and Charley and
Sharon Gagliano of North Carolina.

Madysen DanieUe Parrish

Dustin W. and Shannon M. Parrish of
Lake City announce the birth of their
daughter, Madysen Danielle Parrish, May
18 at Shands at UF in Gainesville.
She weighed 7 pounds, 3 ounces and
measured 19 1/4 inches.
Grandparents are Teresa Tompkins,
Greg Harden and Marilyn and Bobby
Parrish.
Great-grandparents are Ronald and Gail
Harden, Pauline McFatter, Novice Parrish
and,the late George and Jeanette Tompkins.
Great great-grandparent is Leona
Harden.


Meleane Auburn Wood

Jeff and Danielle Wood of Lake City
announce the birth of their daughter,
Meleane Auburn Wood, March 12 at
the Women's Center of North Florida in
Gainesville.
She weighed 9 pounds, 6 ounces and
measured 21 inches.
She joins siblings: Sinei, 2; Branson, 14;
Landon, 16; Taylor, 18; afd Walter, 19.
Grandparents are Levy and Laulaau
Sapp of Lake City, Lynn Wood and the late
Rebecca Wood of Alabama.
Great-grandparents are the late Pona
Tagalou and Anave Tagalou and Bertha
Wood of Alabama.

Duncan Steele McRae

Dustin and Shelby McRae of Johnstown,
Pa. announce the birth of their son, Duncan
Steele McRae, Jan 7. at Conemaugh
Memorial Medical Center in Johnstown,
Pa.
He weighed 7 pounds, 9 ounces and
measured 20 inches.
He joins a brother, Hayden Alexander,
6.
Grandparents are Levy and Laulauu
Sapp of Lake City and Ted and Jean McRae
of Lake City.


ASSOCIATED PRESS
This May 16, 2011 photo shows potato salad with smoked trout and watercress in
Concord, N.H. For AP's 20 Salads of Summer series, chef Peter Evans selected a recipe
for potato salad with smoked trout and watercress from his latest book, "My Grill: Outdoor
Cooking Australian Style."


Pete Evans: Good potato

salad focuses on potatoes


By J.M. HIRSCH
AP Food Editor

It may sound a bit obvi-
ous, but for Pete Evans
the key to a great potato
salad is using the right
potatoes.
"I love to use a small
waxy variety for salad,'"
says Evans, an Australian
chef, restaurateur and
cookbook author. "Baby
new potatoes in red or
white, or fingerlings will
work great, tob. You do
need to choose the right
potato for the job."
Of course, what you
do with the potatoes
matters, 'too: He says
the only way to cook
the potatoes is whole.
And be careful how you
dress them.
"I like the earthy fla-
vor of the potato skin to
come through my salad,"
he said in an email inter-
view. "For me that's what
can make an ordinary
salad taste extra' ordi-
nary skin on! Then
don't make the mistake
of drowning the potatoes
in a heavy mayonnaise.
Vinaigrettes or just herbs
and olive oil (particularly
dill), salt and pepper are
all you need for a quick
and easy dressing."
SFor AP's 20 Salads of
SSummer series, Evans
selected a recipe for
potato salad with smoked
trout and watercress
from his latest book, "My
Grill: Outdoor Cooking
Australian Style."
'The potato salad I
have chosen uses smoked


trout, which is a perfect
match with the creamy
potatoes and crunchy
green apple. Texture is
as important as flavor
when developing recipes
and this one nails both
of those elements. It will
work with smoked salm-
on or any kind of smoked
fish if trout is not avail-
able."

Potato Salad with
Smoked Trout and
Watercress
Start to finish: 30
minutes. 6 servings.

2 pounds fingerling
potatoes
Salt
4-ounce bag water-
cress
16 ounces smoked
trout
8-ounce container
(1 cup) creme fraiche or
sour cream
M 1 tablespoon'Dijon''
mustard
Ground black pep-
per
12 fresh chives,
chopped
1 Granny Smith
apple, cored and thinly
sliced
Juice of 1 lemon
3 tablespoons extra-
virgin olive oil, divided

Place the potatoes in
a large pot. Add enough
cool water to cover by 1
inch, then salt the water.
Bring to a boil and cook
until tender, about 15
minutes. Drain the pota-
toes, then rinse under


cool water. Arrange the
potatoes on a kitchen
towel to cool and dry
completely.
Meanwhile, fill a medi-
um bowl with ice water.
Add the watercress and
set aside to crisp.
Remove any skin and
bones from the trout,
then flake the flesh into
chunks. Set aside.
In a large bowl, mix
together the creme fra-
iche and mustard. Season
with salt and pepper.
When the potatoes
have cooled and dried,
slice them into 1/2-inch
pieces. Add the potatoes.
to the creme fraiche mix-
ture, gently stirring to
coat.
Drain and dry the
watercress, then in a
large bowl combine it,
the flaked trout, chives,
apple slices, lemon juice
and 2.tablespoons,of the
olive oil. Toss well.
To serve, arrange a
quarter of the potatoes on
each serving plate, then
top with the watercress-
trout mixture. Drizzle
each serving with a bit
of the final tablespoon of
olive oil.

Nutrition information
per serving (values are
rounded to the near-
est whole number):
363 calories; 122 calories
from fat (34 percent of
total calories); 14 g fat
(3 g saturated; 0 g trans
fats); 32 mg cholesterol;
32 g carbohydrate; 26 g
protein; 3 g fiber; 400 mg
sodium.


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LAKE CITY REPORTER ADVICE & CROSSWORD SUNDAY, JUNE 26, 2011


DEAR ABBY


In-your-face wedding ritual


deserves a good riddance


DEAR ABBY: I'm writing
you about a disgusting, rude
and, in my opinion, obscene
habit the bride and groom
shoving wedding cake in each
other's faces. The couple are
all dressed up in their beauti-
ful finery. They have a won-
dprful ceremony and a perfect
reception table. How rude and
insensitive to the person he or
she has just promised before
God to love, honor and cherish
- not to mention disrespect-
ful.
What do you think of this
"custom," and do you agree
with me? FAITHFUL LIT-
TLE ROCK READER

DEAR FAITHFUL: I do
agree with you. The cake-in-
the-face custom should have
been retired at least 50 years
ago. The significance of the
"ritual" is extremely demean-
ing to women.
According to the book "Cu-
rious Customs" by Tad Tuleja
(Stonesong Press, 1987): "The
cake-cutting at modem wed-
dings is a four-step comedic
ritual that sustains masculine
prerogatives in the very act of
supposedly subverting them.
"... in the first step of the
comedy, the groom helps direct
the bride's hand -- a symbolic
demonstration of male control
that was unnecessary in the
days of more tractable women.
She accepts this gesture and, as
a,further proof of submissive-
ness, performs the second step
of the ritual, offering him the


Abigail Van Buren
www.dearabby.com'


first bite of cake, the gustatory
equivalent of her body, which
he will have the right to 'par-
take of' later.
"In the third step, the mas-
ter-servant relationship is tepm-
porarily upset, as the bride
mischievously pushes the cake
into her new husband's face. ...
Significantly, this act of revolt
is performed in a childish fash-
ion, and the groom is able to
endure it without losing face
because it ironically demon-
strates his superiority: His
bride is an imp needing super-
vision.
"That the bride herself ac-
cepts this view of this is dem-
onstrated in the ritual's final
step, in which she wipes the
goo apologetically from his
face. This brings the play back
to the beginning, as she is once
again obedient to his wiser
judgment. Thus, the entire
tableau may be seen as a dra-
matization of the tensions in
favor of the dominance of the
male."

DEAR ABBY: After 24
years of a committed relation-
ship with my boyfriend, "Jes-


se" who I thought was my
knight in shining armor I
have decided to end it because
he doesn't want to marry me or
have children with me. We're
in our 40s now and have dated
since high school. We don't
live together.
If I leave Jesse, I know I'll
be broken-hearted, but there's
another man, "Pete," I have
known almost my entire life,
who has made it clear he'd like
to be more than friends. I have
recently found myself becom-
ing more and more attracted to
him.
Should I allow the friend-
ship with Pete to develop into
an intimate one, or could it
spell disaster? MIXED UP
IN MONTANA

DEAR MIXED UP: Be-
cause Jesse refuses to make a
commitment, you're right to
end the romance. Frankly, I'm
surprised you hung on as long
as you have. However, before
becoming intimate with Pete,
be sure you clearly understand
what he means by "more than
friends," or you could wind up
in another long-term relation-
ship that's headed nowhere.
See him for a while and find
out if he's serious and whether
your values and goals are simi-
lar. And if he's not The One,
recognize it and keep moving
on.

* Write Dear Abby at
www.DearAbby.com or
P.O. Box 69440, Los
Angeles, CA 90069.


HOROSCOPES


ARIES (March 21-April
19): Whether it's a day on the
golf course or out in the garden,
if it has a calming effect on you,
it's what you should be doing.
Ignore anyone trying to get you
worked up. ***
TAURUS (April 20-May
20): Be a part of whatever is
going on in your community.
The more you share, the more
you will gain. You'll have some
creative ideas but, before you
put them into motion, make
sure you are being realistic.

GEMINI (May 21-June
20): Take a look at your assets
and you will see a window of
opportunity that will allow you
to come out with more cash.
Someone from your past will
have a hot tip that should be'
considered. ***
CANCER (June 21-July
22): Volunteer, participate in a
fundraiser or sign up for any-
thing that will help your commu-
nity, and you will have fun and
meet new people. Opportunities
will develop from the connec-
tions you make, so be sure to
mingle. ***k'
LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): The
more adept you are at finding
solutions, the greater influence


THE LAST WORD

Eugenia Word

you will have on the outcome.
Think about what you can do
to make your life less stressful
by bringing your income up to
a satisfying level. "**
VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22):
You'll be a little confused by
what others do and what is
expected of you. Try to wade
through all the debris to get a
clear view of what's required.
A short trip will help you clear
up any problem swiftly, with
compassion and understanding.

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22):
Learning something new will
lead to extra income or help you
advance in your chosen field.
Put time aside for romance and
you won't be disappointed by
the outcome. Say less and do
more. A-A'
SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov.
21): The experience you gain
through the conversations you
have will help you develop
an idea or plan that can bring
in extra income. A couple of
worthwhile alterations at home
will raise. interest in buying
or selling something you own.


CELEBRITY CIPHER
by Luls Campos
Celebrity Cipher cryptograms are created from quotations by famous people, past and present.
Each letter In the cipher stands for another.
Today's clue: S equals L
"BFH RXF FHKHO SX DT WH Z. WH UXN
X T J X FY 'X R B FT RHF. WH UX N L B L L A
ZX OJ F X F Z WH U XN RA MOJH F Z."
- UXA FH FH U Y B F
PREVIOUS SOLUTION: "The two big advantages I had at birth were to have
been born wise and to have,been born In poverty." Stevie Wonder
(c) 2011 by NEA, Inc. 6-27.


SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-
Dec. 21): Face facts, especially
when it comes to your relation-
ship. Own up to what and who
you like and don't like. Once
you clear the air, you will feel
much better about moving in
a direction that is your choice.
Take care of personal paper-
work. **k'
CAPRICORN (Dec.22-Jan.
19): Spend time on what really
counts and with the people you
love most. You can make posi-
tive changes at home that will
suit your needs and allow you
more time to spend with fam-
ily, friends and doing the things
you enjoy. *****
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb.
18): Don't fold under peer pres-
sure. Too much of anything will
be a bad thing. Focus more on
the friends and family you care
about and less on the people
who drag you down or hold you
back. A realistic look at your
present situation will lead to
self-improvement. k'k
PISCES (Feb. 19-March
20): Hold off making any
moves, decisions or assump-
tions. Acting too quickly will
lead to mistakes. Someone you
thought you knew well will
surprise you by what transpires.
Express how you feel openly
and honestly. Proceed with cau-
tion. "A


SUNDAY CROSSWORD


SAY WHAT?! By Patrick Berry / Edited by Will Shortz 1 1234 5 6 17 18 IP [10 11 12 113 1 15. 16 17 I8


Across
1 Nursery sounds
6 Bates's "Misery"
co-star
10 Compadre
15 Having more than
Sone band
19 Weapon, e.g., in.
military-speak
20 Regarding
21 Something well-
preserved?
22 __avis
23 "I've heard
enough, retail
outlet!"
25 "I agree
completely, dog-
eared bit of
paper!"
27 What you might
ge.t by moving a
head?
28 "Stop right where
you are, picture
holder!"
30 "One if by land,
two if by sea"
and others
31 Extinguished,
with "out"
33 Spots before your
eyes?
34 Alaska Purchase
negotiator
35 Symbol of
royalty in old
Egypt
36 Skunk, e.g.
38 Big-screen
canine
40 Jeans brand
41 The majority

For any three answers,
call from a touch-tone
phone: 1-900-285-5656,
1.49 each minute; or,
with a credit card, 1-800-
814-5554.


44 "You're in
danger, tall
hill!"
49 Surname in a Poe
tale
51,Check out
.52 Like racehorses
53 Objectivist Rand
54 "The chair
doesn't
recognize you,
steakhouse and
chophouse'!"
59 Before,.to Byron
.60 Scorecard
blemish
61 Lift provider
.62 Vessels with
spouts
65 Light TV fare
67 Sticky seedcase
68 Explorer Richard
Byrd's plane
70 Writing surface
71 Make nonsensical
notes?
73 Roast V.I.P.
75 Work in the field
76 "I'd be miserable
without you,
tapestry!"
80 D.C.-based news
source
82 Australia's Lake
National
Park
83 See 93-Across
84 Inasmuch as
85 "Goodbye, place
I used to live!"
89 Philip with a
1975 best seller
on C.I.A.,secrets
90 Sistine Chapel
ceiling figure,
91 Like many
sunscreens
92 Cessation
93 Is 83-Across
95 Big name in
California wine


97 Endorser's need'
99 Another name for
Buddha
103 Speak for
everyone in the
room
104 "Just keep
doing what
you're doing,
.suitcases!"
109 One of the
Bobbsey twins
110 "I read you loud
and clear,
breakfast meat!"
112 "It was all my
fault, gun
attachment!"
114 Over again
115 Pop singer
Lopez
116 Addition to caf6
117 Keys in a chain
118 Amount that's
settled for
119 Caddie's
offering
120 "This looks like
trouble!"'
121 Manicurist's aid

Down
1 Some nest builders
2 Lacking color
3 Diesel engine
manufacturer
4 Rented out
5 Packs
6 Checked out
before robbing
7 Athlete who wrote
"Off the Court"
8 Complete
9 "You're mistaken"
10 Certificate on a
wall, maybe
11 "___ Pearl"
(Jackson 5 hit)
12 Gossip subject
13 One that's passed
along


14 Brute of fantasy
15 Sign symbol
16 Kipling poem
about Burma
17 Lack of
constraints
18 James of "X-
Men" films
24 Lay the
groundwork'
26 Great body
29 Old West
gambling game
32 Inevitable
34 "Rugrats" father
36 __ artist (film
crew member)
37 Soprano
pineapple and
others, briefly
38 Con
(tenderly)
39 Something that
shouldn't be flat
41 Patrons of the
arts
42 Green-skinned
god
43 Old Jewish
community
44 Pines
45 "Puss in Boots"
figure
46 Former carrier
name
47 Land heavily
48 Acronymic
weapon
50 "Mr.-___" (1983
Styx hit)
55 19th Amendment
beneficiaries
56 Cable network
with the motto
"Not.reality.
Actuality."
57 Panhellenic
Games site
58 Elementary
school grads,
typically


95

1036

110
o80 81

as 86




pos


114

118


63 Ascendant
64 Torch bearer
66 Key group
67 Objected to a
shearing,
possibly
68 Pines
69 "Shucks!"
71 With deviousness
72 Michael of
"Juno"
73 Lodge
74 Diner of 1970s-
'80s TV


77 Giveaway at the
poker table
78 Make
79 Not just big
80 Fictional island
in two Alistair
MacLean novels
81 Augurs
85 Situated at the
thigh
86 Bearer of a dozen
roses, maybe
87 A, in Arnstadt
88 Turn down


93 Showing
deviousness
94 Person of Perth
96 Nurses old
grudges, say
97 Runcible spoon
feature.
98 Banks known as
Mr. Cub
99 Wayne's pal in
"Wayne's World"
100 Fish
101 TV host with
"New Rules"


102 Unable to relax
104 Serious
attention
105 Lemon juice,
e.g.
106 Home of
Hallvard's
ruined cathedral
107 Life saver?
108 Vivacity
I11 "Incidentally,"
in chat rooms
113 Philosophy
suffix


Answers to last Sunday's Crossword.
B EAIT A RCHI TS AR S OTON
A T L E ISUREIR AR DA G O



LEI NEED NERF ITS
GO LNE REL FFIFP IHN E D
N M N AR A PS R I N G E S
G O TN TI P I C H E R
BS TH T A R OCT NA IPIEIIRAINIE





SHARPS RE LUEAS E E GLE
CAREENED R ELINE ABUSE E
AITIOIL L DO I NG 1 P OT ANN
REMI LINT SST H ITTERT

OTT L ORR I R FOOLRF ITS



B I T ING L E IE M E S "'
S T O DG Y E D S LU R S A


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6 5


18 62 9


1 4 2 7


7 6 5


5 73 18


9 5 1


3 7 8


2 4 5 3


9 9 L 6 7 9L 8


L Iz9 1v 9 L 6 8





V C 6 9 L 8 9 L




S 9 L 6 1V9 L 8 1




1 L L. 8 6 "!V 9

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Page Editor: Todd Taylor, 754-0424


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LAKE CITY REPORTER ADVERISMENT


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JASON BISHOP SHOW: ILLUSIONIST


SUNDAY, JUNE 26, 2011


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