<%BANNER%>

UFPKY NEH LSTA



PRIVATE ITEM
Digitization of this item is currently in progress.
The Lake City reporter
ALL ISSUES CITATION THUMBNAILS MAP IT! PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028308/01591
 Material Information
Title: The Lake City reporter
Uniform Title: Lake City reporter (Lake City, Fla. 1967)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: John H. Perry
Place of Publication: Lake City Fla
Publication Date: 6/25/2011
Frequency: daily (monday through friday)[<1969>-]
weekly[ former 1967-<1968>]
daily
normalized irregular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Lake City (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Columbia County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Columbia -- Lake City
Coordinates: 30.189722 x -82.639722 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 95, no. 4 (Oct. 5, 1967)-
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000358016
oclc - 33283560
notis - ABZ6316
lccn - sn 95047175
sobekcm - UF00028308_01569
System ID: UF00028308:01591
 Related Items
Preceded by: Lake City reporter and Columbia gazette

Full Text









Gators advance
UF baseball team defeats


team blasts Hamilton Vanderbilt for a spot
00o016 120511 **w*3-DIGIT 326 the CWS finals.
LIB OF FLORIDA HISTORY
PO BOX H11707 Sports, I B
205 SiMAi UNIJ OF FLORIDtAs
GAINESVILLE FL 32611-1943


Roddick falls
American tennis player
loses in three sets in third
round of Wimbledon.
Sports, IB


LaKe


Uity


Reporter


Saturday, June 25, 2011 www.lakecityreporter.com Vol. 137, No. 128 N 75 cents


Final farewell


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
The casket of Florida Division of Forestry firefighter Josh Burch, 31, is carried frm Christ Central Ministries Church Friday. Burchof Lake City, and fellow firefighter Brett Fulton, 52, of the
Springville community, died Monday while fighting the Blue Ribbon wildfire in Hamilton County. Services for Fulton will be held at Crist Central Ministries Church at 10 a.m. today.


Hundreds gather to say goodbye to Jsh Burch


Sanctuary overflows
with mourners for
fallen firefighter.

By TONY BRITT
tbritt@lakecityreporter.com
With white, gloved hands over
their hearts, police, troopers and
sheriffs deputies directed traffic
leading to Christ Central Ministries
Church for Josh Burch's funeral.
Hand to brow, they saluted
Josh and his memory.
Later they took those gloves off
to shake hands and share hugs
with Josh's family, in an effort to
comfort those left behind as Josh
was laid to rest.
Funeral services for Josh Burch,
31, of Lake City, were held Friday
morning at the Christ Central


Ministries sanctuary with hun-
dreds of mourners in atten-
dance. Burch, a
Florida Division
of Forestry
ranger, was
killed Monday
while fighting
the Blue Ribbon
fire in Hamilton
Burch County. Burch's
co-worker Brett
Fulton was also killed in the blaze.
Services for him are set for today.
Mourners included firefight-
ers from throughout and beyond
Florida, police officers, Florida
Highway Patrol troopers, various
state and national governmental
workers, and countless friends
and family members.
Many public service workers
had a black ribbon pinned to their
shirts, a piece of black cloth cover-


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Florida Highway Patrol troopers escort a hearse carrying the body of Florida Division of Forestry firefighter -
Joshua Burch as an onlooker salutes Friday.


ing their badges or a black strip of
cloth across their epaulets.
Firefighters, Division of Forestry
employees and. other public ser-
vice workers formed a double line


at the church's doors as Burch's
flagged-draped casket was carried
into the sanctuary. The uniformed
officers gave him and his family
a solemn salute as they entered


the church. American flags were
everywhere, including a 60 x 20
foot flag hanging between fire
FAREWELL continued on 3A


Columbia's Cason named

Florida Clerk of the Year
From staff reports

DeWitt Cason, Columbia
County Clerk of the Circuit
Court, was named Clerk
of the Year by the Florida
Association of Court Clerks
and Comptrollers at the
Association's annual confer-
ence in Tampa last week.
The President's Clerk of
the Year award is presented
by the association's presi-
dent at the organization's
annual summer conference
to one Clerk of the Circuit
Court who has undertaken COURTESY PHOTO
a special issue and shown DeWitt'Cason, left, and FACC President and Putnam County
Clerk Tim Smith at the Tampa conference at which Cason
CLERK continued on 3A was named Florida Clerk of the Year.


Lightning sparks 4


new area wildfires


By TONY BRITT
tbritt@lakecityreporter.com
Sparked by lightning
strikes, four new area
wildfires started Thursday
night, creating' additional
concerns for U.S. Forest
Service rangers battling
the Impassable Bay and
Kelly fires.
Kirsten Cannon, public
information officer for the
incident management team,
said none of the fires were
in Columbia County.
The Impassable Bay
fire, listed as 11,305 acres,
is burning in Columbia


and Baker counties in
portions of the Osceola
National Forest.
She said there are about
160 people, two water tank-
er trucks, two bulldozers/
tractor plows, 17 engines
and four helicopters are
working the Impassable
Bay and Kelly fires.
'The two main fires in the
area, the Impassable Bay
fire and the Kelly fire, they
remain the same size," she
said. "The four starts we
had, we have a line around
those and we are continu-
ing to patrol those fires."
Of the four fire starts


Thursday night, the larg-
est is reported to be
approximately 13 acres
and is near the commu-
nity of Taylor in Baker
County.
The Impassable Bay fire
is 15 miles northeast of
Lake City and the Kelly
fire is northwest of the
Impassable Bay fire.
Firefighters continue
their efforts to contain the
Impassable Bay and Kelly
fires. The Impassable Bay
fire is 70 percent contained,
with no reports of interior
SPARKS continued on 3A


CALL US:
(386) 752-1293
SUBSCRIBE TO
THE REPORTER:
Voice: 755-5445
Fax: 752-9400


96
T-Storm Chance
WEATHER, 2A


Opinion ...............
Faith .................
Around Florida...........
Advice & Comics........
Puzzles .................


TODAY IN
PEOPLE
Peter Falk
dies at 83.


COMING
SUNDAY
Firefighter funeral
coverage.


Wolves roll
Lake City basketball


1 I I 84264 0














LAKE CITY REPORTER DAILY BRIEFING SATURDAY, JUNE 25, 2011


3


Friday:
Afternoon: 0-3-9
Evening: 2-6-8


Friday:
Afternoon: 9-1-3-8
Evening: 0-1-8-4


Thursday:
1-3-7-11-22


PEOPLE IN THE NEWS



Peter Falk, TV's Columbo, has died


NEW YORK

celebrate Peter
Falk's life is
to savor how
Columbo, his
signature character, forti-'
fled our lives.
Thanks to Falk's affec-
tionately genuine portrayal,
Lt. Columbo established
himself for all time as a.
champion of any viewer
who ever felt less than
graceful, elegant or well-
spoken.
Falk died Thursday at
age 83 in his Beverly Hills,
Calif., home, according to a
statement released Friday
by family friend Larry
Larson. But Columbo lives
on as the shining ideal of
anyone with a smudge on
his tie, whose car isn't the
sportiest, who often seems
clueless, who gets dissed by
fancy people.
As a police detective,
Columbo's interview
technique was famously
disjointed, with his inevi-
table awkward afterthought
("Ahhh,,there's just one,
more thing") that tried the
patience of his suspect as he
was halfway out the door.
Columbo was underesti-
mated, patronized or simply
overlooked by nearly every-
one he met especially
the culprit
And yet Columbo, draw-
ing on inner pluck for
which only he (and an actor
as skilled as Falk) cold
have accounted, always
prevailed. Contrary to all
evidence, Columbo always
knew what he was doing.


ASSOCIATED PRESS
In this Aug. 9, 2007 file photo, actor Peter Falk arrives for the
Hollywood Foreign Press Association's annual installation
luncheon at The Beverly Hills Hotel in Beverly Hills, Calif.
Falk, the stage and movie actor who became identified as
the squinty, rumpled detective in "Columbo," died Thursday
at his Beverly Hills, Calif., home. He was 83.


Colbert, White
cut a record
NEW YORK -Stephen
Colbert wants to climb the
charts.
-Colbert
debuted
his new
Jack White-
produced
single,
"Charlene
Colbert II (I'm.


Over You)" on 'The Colbert
Report" Thursday night
Colbert has featured
White on "The Colbert
Report" all week during
his "rock odyssey" series,
"Dr. Pepper Presents
StePhest ColbChella,
'011 Rock You Like a
Thirst-Icane."
The former White
Stripe and his Nashville-
based record label; Third
Man Records, produced
the track. The Black


Belles, a goth girl rock
band on Third Man, per-
formed backup.
The reference of the
song is one only die-hard
members of the Colbert
Nation likely will grasp.
It's a follow-up to his
mock '80s new wave song,
"Charlene (I'm Right .
Behind You)."
Since 2006, Colbert has
occasionally alluded to the
song and suggested that
before his conservative
pundit character became
a TV show host, he was
the lead singer in a group
called Stephen and the
Colberts.
But the sequel,
"Charlene II (I'm Over
You)," is entering the real
world. The song is to be
available from iTupes and
Third Man Records.

Lambert to perfo
on 'The Voice'
LOS ANGELES -
Miranda Lambert is step-
ping into new husband
Blake Shelton's territory.
On next Wednesday's
season finale of NBC's
hit singing contest, 'The
Voice," Lambert will per-
form a duet with the final-
ist who was on Shelton's
team, Dia Frampton.
Lambert, a Grammy
winner for her single
"The House That Built
Me," said she was
"thrilled" to be part of
'The Voice."

0. Associated Press


Celebrity Birthdays


* Actress June Lockhart is
86.
* Singer Eddie Floyd is 74.
* Actress Barbara Montgom-
ery ("Amen") is 72.
* Singer Carly Simon is 66.
* Keyboardist Allen Lanier of
Blue Oyster Cult is 65.
* Actor-comedian Jimmie
Walker is 64.
* Singer Tim Finn of Split
Enz and Crowded House is
59.


* Keyboardist David Paich
of Toto is 57.
* Singer George Michael is
48.
* Actress Erica Gimpel (TV's
"Fame," "Profiler") is 47.
* Rapper Candyman is 43.
* Actress Angela Kinsey
("The Office") is 40.
* Bassist Mike Kroeger of
'Nickelback is 39.
* Actress Linda Cardellini
("ER," "Scooby Doo") is 36.


HOW TO REACH US
Main number.......(386) 752-1293
Fax number ..............752-9400
Circulation ..............755-5445
Online... www.lakecityreporter.com
The Lake City Reporter, an affiliate of
Community Newspapers Inc., is pub-
lished Tuesday through Sunday at 180
E. Duval St, Lake City, Ra. 32055.
Periodical postage paid at Lake City, Ra.
Member Audit Bureau of Circulation and
The Associated Press.
All material herein is property of the Lake
City Reporter. Reproduction in whole or
in part is forbidden without the permis-
sion of the publisher. U.S. Postal Service
No. 310-880.
POSTMASTER: Send address changes
to Lake City Reporter, P.O. Box 1709,
Lake City, Rea. 32056.
Publisher Todd Wilson .....754-0418
(twilson@lakecityreporter.com)
NEWS
.Editor Robert Bridges .....754-0428
(rbridges@lakecityreporter.com)
ADVERTISING
Director Ashley Butcher ...754-0417
(abutcher@iakectyreporter.com)
CLASSIFIED
To place a classified ad, call 755-5440


BUSINESS
Controller Sue Brannon... .754-0419
(sbrannon@lakecityreporter.com)
CIRCULATION
Home delivery of the Lake City Reporter
should be completed by 6:30 a.m.
Tuesday through Saturday, and by 730
a.m. on Sunday.
Please call 386-755-5445 to report any
problems with your delivery service.
In Columbia County, customers should
call before 1030 a.m. to report a ser-
vice error for same day re-delivery. After
10:30 a.m., next day re-delivery or ser-
vice related credits will be issued.
In all other counties where home delivery
is available, next day re-delivery or ser-
vice related credits will be issued.
Circulation ...............755-5445
(circulation@lakecityreporter.com)
Home delivery rates
(Tuesday through Sunday)
12 Weeks............... $26.32
24 Weeks ................ $48.79
52 Weeks .......... .........$83.46
Rates indude 7% sales tax
Mail rates
12 Weeks................ $41.40
24 Weeks....................82.80
52 Weeks .................$179.40


CORRECTION

The Lake City Reporter corrects errors of fact in news
items. If you have a-concern, question or suggestion, please
call the executive editor. Corrections and clarifications will
run in this space. And thanks for reading.


Woman pleads
guilty in death
GAINESVILLE
- A woman has been
sentenced to two years in
prison in connection with
the death of a University
of Florida student whose
body was found by fire-
fighters responding to a
brush fire.
State attorney's office
spokesman Spencer
Mann says Cassandra
Kimbrough pleaded
guilty Thursday to acces-
sory after the fact in the
December death of Saleha
Huuda. The plea agree-
ment requires her to
testify if needed against
co-defendant Antonio
Drayton, who is indicted
on a first-degree murder
charge.
Investigators allege that
the 24-year-old Drayton
killed Huuda, then worked
with Kimbrough to set
fire to Huuda's body to
-try to cover up the slay-
ing. Huuda and Drayton
had dated before Drayton
began dating the 42-year-
'old Kimbrough.
Huuda was a senior
majoring in family, youth
and community sciences.

Man shot and
killed by deputies
KEYSTONE HEIGHTS
- A north Florida man
was shot and killed by dep-
uties responding to a call
about a suspicious person.
Alachua County Sheriff's
Sgt. Todd Kelly tells The
Gainesville Sun that 43-
year-old Robert Scott
McBride received first aid
from deputies but died
at the scene in Keystone
Heights on Thursday after-
noon.
Kelly says passers-by
called 911 to report that
"something wasn't right"
about McBride's behav-
ior. Detectives have yet
to determine whether


Painting partners
Journi Loupe helps Winter, Clearwater Marine Aquarium's tail-
less dolphin, paint a matt for her with assistance from senior
trainer Cammie Zodrow, right, in Clearwater. She plans to put
a picture of her with Winter in the matt that she painted with
the dolphin.


McBride was armed and
why deputies opened
fire.
Two deputies involved
in the shooting have been
placed on administrative
leave.

Bacardi brings
back Cuban beer
MIAMI Bacardi
U.SA. is reintroducing
a Cuban beer in South
Florida.
The beer is called
Hatuey (ah-TWAY) and
named after a 16th century
Indian chief. It was first
brewed in 1927 in Santiago
de Cuba and became the
Caribbean island's most
popular beer.
The new version


is micro-brewed as a
small-batch, premium
golden-colored ale at
Thomas Creek Brewery in
Greenville, S.C.
Bacardi's previous, light-
er version of Hatuey was
mass-produced in the U.S.
beginning in 1995. When
the company stopped pro-
duction a year and a half
ago, it was selling 15,000
cases a year.
The new Hatuey will
arrive in Miami-Dade
and Monroe counties in
the coming weeks. The
Miami-based liquor com-
pany plans to expand the
brand to Broward and
Palm Beach counties later
this summer, and possibly
throughout Florida.


THE WEATHER


CHC OF CHC OF CHC OF CHCOF CHC OF
S-STORM STORMS STORMS STORMS STORMS


HI 96 L71 HI 97 LO 71 HI 93 0 71 HI 92 L071 HI 92 0 71
I. I M* I I


N s* City Sunday Monday
S6Jacksondvlle Cape Canaveral 90 75 I 8S 76 i
Tallahassee Lke 90/ 6 Daytona Beach 92/74/ t 90/ 74/t
95/73 96/71 Ft. Lauderdale 90/79/t 90/78/t
Pensacola Cainesville na Beach Fort Myers 93/75/t 92/74/t
93/76 PainamaCy 93/71 9175 Gainesvllle 97/71/t 92/T71/t
89/78 Ocala Jacksonville 90/74/t 91/74/t
92/72 ra Key West 89/83/pc 89/83/pc
Or9an6d Cape C ra Lake City 97/71/t 93/71/t
Miami 90/79/t 90/78/t
a Naples 93/77/t 89/77/t
92/ West Palm Bech Ocala 95/72/t 92/72/t
'.87/78 Orlando 95/76/t 93/75/t
Ft Lauderdale Panama City 92/76/t 88/76/t
FtL Mye, 89/77 0 Pensacola 92/77/t 90/81/pc
93/74 Nlaples Tallahassee 98/71/t 93/72/t
91/76 Mi Tampa 92/75/t 91/75/t
K W89/79 Valdosta 98/71/t 98/71/t
%ey 03 W. Palm Beach 89/79/t 88/78/t
5__________-______________ "U/IIIII___I_______... ... ....____


TEMPERATURES
SHigh Friday
Low Friday
Normal high
Normal low
Record high
Record low

PRECIPITATION
Friday
Month total
Year total
Normal month-to-date
Normal year-to-date


91
72
90
70
101 in 1950
62 in 1947

0.00"
1.98"
16.09"
5.38"
22.63"


7a ip 7p la


Saturday


SUN
Sunrise today
Sunset today
Sunrise torn.
Sunset torn.

MOON
Moonrise today
Moonset today
Moonrise tom.
Moonset torn.


6:31 a.m.
8:36 p.m.
6:31 am.
8:36 p.m.

2:04 am.
3:35 p.m.
2:39 a.m.
4:30 p.m.


July July July July
1 8 15 23
New First Full Last


On this date in
1987, afternoon
highs of 97 degrees
at Miami, Fla., 107
degrees at Medford,
Ore., and 111
degrees at Redding,
Calif. were new
records for the date.


Sunday


urecasmtd tanpsat "'FlIhiSetnpern


8
-t
15 inmtetlun
Today's
ultra-violet
radiation risk
for the area on
a scale from 0
to 10+.


An exclusive
service
brought to
our readers
by
The Weather
Channel.



weather.com


Forecasts, data and
S graphics 2011 Weather
fte I central, LP, Madison, Wis.
www.weatherpublisher.com


Get Conected



,'J'Aw, MI I1 1 r l)i]i t]


* Associated Press


Daily Scripture

"But the Lord is faithful, and
he will strengthen you and pro-
tect you from the evil one."

2 Thessalonians 3:3 NIV



Lake City Reporter


AROUND FLORIDA


Page Editor: Todd Taylor, 754-0424


[.LAIKE' VITYALMANAC


~3
11;1;


tyP)


I













LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL I& STATE SATURDAY, JUNE 25, 2011


FAREWELL: Hundreds mourn fallen firefighter

Continued From Page 1A


department ladder trucks outside
the church.
Burch's casket rested at the
center of the sanctuary, with a
State of Florida flag and Florida
Division of Forestry flag in the
background. A video with can-
did shots of Josh and his family
and friends was played before the
service. Soon the sanctuary filled
with those who came to pay their
respects.
The sanctuary, which seats
more than 800, was full, with an
additional 200-300 people outside
in the lobby.
"We all knew him in some ways
and knew him in different ways,"
Pastor Mike Tatem told those
assembled. "We gather in this
sacred moment to honor him."
Billy Billingsley, Josh's child-


hood friend, spoke with tears in
his eyes as he reflected on memo-
ries of Josh.
"There wasn't nothing like
hunting with him," Billingsley
said. "Mr. Hollis and Miss Mollie
(Josh's parents), y'all raised one
heck of a boy. It's going to hurt
for a long time. He's going to be
missed, but never forgotten."
A motorcade with close to 100
public service vehicles and rough-
ly the same number of personal
vehicles, followed the casket to
Gateway Forest Lawn Cemetery,
where Josh was laid to rest
A pair of Florida Division of
Forestry helicopters did a cer-
emonial fly-by as forestry work-
ers and others gave their last
salute to Josh. Moments later,
members of the Florida Division


of Forestry Honor Guard folded
the flag draping Josh's casket and
gave it to his family.
Taps was played and then a loud
speaker announced: "Suwannee
Forestry Unit 620; out of service.
Last call."
Citrus County Fire Rescue
Department Lt. Bob Bessler was
one of five crew members from
there to attend the ceremony.
"It was important to us to
attend the ceremony because the
Division of Forestry wildland fire-
fighters arefirefighters, ourbroth-
ers and we're a brotherhood," he
said. "We lost part of our family
and we felt anything we could'do
like bringing our massive flag up
here with our guard was tribute
.to these two firefighters. It was an
honor for us to be here."


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
J.D. Perryman plays the bagpipes during graveside services Friday for
Florida Division of Forestry firefighter Joshua Burch.


SPARKS: 4 more wildfires reported

Continued From Page 1A


torching yesterday. The esti-
mated date of containment
has been moved to June 30.
The Kelly Fire, at about 823
acres is 55 percent contained
and was "holding its own"
yesterday.
Along the northern
boundary of the U.S. Forest
Service's Osceola National
Forest, a night shift of fire-
fighters and engines was
added to the existing day


shift in anticipation of the
predicted unstable weath-,
er that could increase fire
growth potential overnight
and over the weekend.
Due to ongoing dry con-
ditions, the U.S. Forest
Service has issued tempo-
rary fire restrictions. The
ban 'includes operation of
any internal or external com-
bustion engines without a
spark-arresting device prop-


early installed and maintained
in good working order.
Firefighters continue to
mop up and reinforce the
containment line.
"As we continue to sup-
press the Impassable
Bay' and Kelly Fires, our
thoughts are with the fam-
ily and friends of Joshua
Burch as he is laid to
rest today," said Incident
Commander John Kidd.


CLERK: Cason takes top honors

Continued From Page 1A


statewide leadership skills
among.his or her peers.'
"I am proud to have
had the opportunity to be
involved with this major
project," Cason said. "This
has been an important role
for me, and I have been
pleased with the success of
the ePortal. The members
of the authority, the clerks
and the courts are work-
ing together as a team and
that is how things can be
accomplished. I appreciate
the honor of being selected
by our president Tim Smith
for this award. There were
probably 67 other candidates
who could have won, but it is
nice to be recognized."
Cason was chosen to
receive the President's
Award for his instrumental
role as chair of the Florida
Courts E-Filing Authority.
Tim Smith, Putnam
County Clerk and President


of the Florida Association
of Court Clerks and
Comptrollers, said Cason
was integral in providing
leadership with the forming
of the new Authority, which
is responsible for the devel-
opment, implementation
and operation of the Florida
Courts e-Filing Portal. The
web portal (https://www.
myflcourtaccess.com/) is a
statewide system whereby
lawyers can electronically
file paperwork to any court-
house in the state.
"DeWitt stepped up and
provided the leadership
the clerks needed to help
with the statewide e-fil-
ing initiative," Smith said.
"Implementation of the e-
filing process and e-Portal
is a major undertaking by
the clerks and the courts
and DeWitt has been able to
rise to the occasion in show-
ing the leadership needed


to allow for the successful
inception of statewide e-fil-
ing."
Cason has served as the
Columbia County Clerk of
the Circuit Court since 1987
and previously served as
president of the statewide
association in 2008-09. Cason
also serves on the FACC
Board of Directors and
served as chair of the FACC
Technology Committee this
pastyear.
The Authority was estab-
lished by Florida Statute in
June of 2010 and Cason was
named chair. During the last
year, Cason provided leader-
ship with the ePortal proj-
ect, which was moved frpm
development into full opera-
tion in the last year. The
ePortal opened in January
and as of June, 16 counties
are now using the portal and
more than 6,000 documents
have been e-filed.


Panel rejects federal


funds for the elderly


By BILL KACZOR
Associated Press

TALLAHASSEE A
Florida legislative panel
Friday rejected millions in
federal money designed to
help remove patients from
nursing homes and provide
them with similar care in
their own homes.
The Legislative Budget
Commission also approved
incentives of $4.5 million
and $3 million for two undis-
closed businesses consider-
ing moving to or expanding
in Florida and agreed to
consolidate and outsource
state e-mail service as a
cost-cutting measure.
The panel turned down
a $2.1 million federal grant
that would have fully paid
for administrative costs to
pave the way for Florida
to receive an additional
$35.7 million in federal
Medicaid funding. Those
dollars would pay for nurs-
ing home diversions of dis-
abled and elderly patients
over the next five years.
The money was offered
this year to Florida and 12
other states as part of the
federal health care over-
haul law that Floridais chal-
lenging in court They were
invited to join 29 states and
the District of Columbia,
which already participate
in the Money Follows the
Person demonstration pro-
gram.


Gov. Rick Scott, a
Republican, had recom-
mended accepting the grant
although he's been a lead-
ing opponent of the federal.
law, but the GOP-majority
commission rejected it on a
split vote.
Members from the Senate
voted 4-3 to accept it, with
two Republicans and two
Democrats in favor and three
Republicans againstThepro-
posal died, though, because
House members opposed it
on a straight party-line 5-2
vote. Such budget amend-
ments must get approval
from both chambers' com-
mission delegations.
Rep. Robert Schenck, a
Spring Hill Republican who
chairs the House Health
and Human Services
Committee, said the federal
program, which tracks indi-
vidual patients, is unnec-
essary and duplicates
Florida's existing nursing
home diversion efforts.
Commission chair-
woman Denise Grimsley,
a Sebring Republican who
also heads the House
Appropriations Committee,
agreed.
. "I realize that they are
federal dollars, but they
are also taxpayer dollars,"
Grimsley said.
Senate Democratic
Leader Nan Rich of Weston
had urged the panel to
accept the grant, which
was expected to result in


about 1,700 nursing home
transfers.
"Anyone that is pulled
out would save us Medicaid
money in the long run,"
Rich said. "It also would put
people in a better place."
The commission's
approval is needed for
spending authority not
included in the annual state
budget.
The economic incentives,
code-named "ProjectEquis"
and "Project Christmas,"
won unanimous approval
although some members
were uneasy about the
secretiveness.
'This whole process
gives me heartburn," Rich
said. 'There's no transpar-
ency here."
It's going to get even
'more secretive after July 1,
when a new law gives the
governor authority to offer
incentives up to $5 million
without the commission's
approval.
Sen. Don Gaetz, a
Niceville Republican who
chairs a budget subcommit-
tee that oversees economic
development spending,
said Rich had a point Gaetz
said the governor's office
will be asked to present
an economic development
business plan to legisla-
tive committees this fall' so
lawmakers will have a bet-
ter idea of how the "quiik
action closing funds" wil
be used.


Photographs show Caylee


climbing into family pool


By MIKE SCHNEIDER
Associated Press

ORLANDO Defense
attorneys for a Florida
mother charged with kill-
ing her 2-year-old daughter
showed jurors several pho-
tos on Friday that they hope
bolster their argument that
the toddler accidentally
drowned and wasn't mur-
dered.
Casey Anthony's attor-
neys showed photos of her
daughter Caylee climbing
a ladder into an above-
ground pool at the family's
home as her grandmother,
Cindy Anthony, supported
her from behind.
From the witness stand,
Cindy Anthony testified that
Caylee was able to open a
sliding glass door that led to
the backyard pool
"Even at that point, she
could even climb into the
pool," Cindy Anthony said
when shown a photo.
Cindy Anthony said she
found the removable ladder
in place against the pool on
June 16, 2008, the last day
Caylee was ever seen by
her grandparents. She said
she was so concerned that
she called her husband,
George Anthony, at work
to inquire if he had left the
ladder up.
Under cross-examina-


tion, Cindy Anthony con-
ceded that the ladder was
too heavy for Caylee to
move into place by herself
and that she obeyed her
grandparents' instructions
that she couldn't be in the
pool alone.
Casey Anthony's attor-
neys contend that Caylee
'accidentally drowned
in the pool and that her
mother didn't kill her.
Casey Anthony, 25, has
pleaded not guilty to first-
degree murder and could
face the death penalty if
convicted of that charge.
Prosecutors have argued
Casey Anthony suffocated
her daughter in June 2008.
She didn't report the girl
missing for 31 days after
the toddler was last.seen in
mid-June 2008.
Early in the morning,
Casey Anthony wiped away
tears while a video of her
playing with the girl was
viewed by the jury during
her mother's testimony, as
did her mother on the wit-
ness stand.
Later Friday, Casey
Anthony's brother, Lee, tes-
tified about stains found in
the trunk of his sister's car.
Cindy Anthony also has
testified about the stains,
saying they were present
when the family bought the
car in 2000.


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Casey Anthony sits at the
defense table before the
start of her murder trial at the
Orange County Courthouse
in Orlando on Friday.

Prosecutors claim the
child's body was in the car
trunk and then dumped
near the Anthonys' home in
Orlando in a wooded area.
Caylee's remains were
found nearly six months
after she disappeared.
Prosecutors have present-
ed extensive evidence of
human decomposition in


the car trunk, including
stains.
LeeAnthony started cry-
ing on the witness stand
when he recalled how he
didn't go to the hospital
for his niece's .birth. He
said he was angry at his
sister and mother for not
directly confiding in him
about Casey Anthony's
pregnancy.
His testimony support-
ed the defense's position
that Casey Anthony came
from a dysfunctional fam-
ily. In opening arguments,
defense attorney Jose
Baez explained Casey
Anthony's behavior of par-
tying with friends in the
days after her daughter
went.missing by claiming
her father molested her
when she was young.
Her father, George
Anthony, has denied ever
molesting his daughter, and
the defense so far has pro-
vided no testimony support-
ing the molestation allega-
tion.
After jurors left the
courtroom for the day,
defense attorneys told
the judge they expected
to wrap up their presenta-
tion in the middle of next
week. Prosecutors are
then expected to spend
a day or two on rebuttal
witnesses.


JUST PLAY ITSPORTS
9667 Hwy 129 South Live Oak, FL 386-208-0713,
Ping Pong Tournament
Friday, July 1 7 PM .
Winner receives Trophl and $50 Store Gih Cermicate Open to ail ages $5 Regislrallon Fee
GOLF STORE and TROPHY ROOM AND A GYM -
where you can enjoy: Indoor Volleyball
Baseball Softball Hitmng Lessons
SPing Pong Tournaments & more to come
PARTY ROOMS & GYM available for rental
Themed Party Planners also available! .'L .*,







Well, we thought you'd like something productive on
your pad to prove to your spouse that it's really a useful
tool for financial management. Well worth the invest-
ment you made to buy it. And so much more than just
a toy for playing Angry Birds.
See, you actually can do something useful with this new
technology. You can see if you've got paid yet, balance
your checkbook, pay a few bills, make a loan payment,
transfer funds to your kids away at college, and more!
Or you can just act like you're taking notes at that meet-
ing instead of updating your facebook page.
We also have old-fashioned internet banking for those
who've not yet convinced their spouse that they really
need the newest pad devices or cell phones.


Page Editor: Todd Taylor, 754-0424

















OPINION


Saturday, June 25, 2011


AN


AN
OPINION


Debt

defaults

as moral

fault

Back in the day of
Charles Dickens,
anyone not paying
a debt could be
arrested as a moral
menace to society. While
debtors' prisons aren't coming
back, it is worth recalling such
Victorian virtue in light of three
debt crises:
1. Come Aug. 2 the
deadline for raising the United
States debt ceiling Congress
may simply allow the US
Treasury to default if
lawmakers don't reach a budget
deal.
2. Greece appears headed
for a debt default (or
"restructuring"), which could
trigger Portugal, Ireland, and
other European countries to
follow. Last year, Greece's debt
woes dragged down the world
economy.
3. More than a quarter of
Americans holding mortgages
worth more than the value
of their home and who can
afford to pay say they would
consider walking away from
that payment promise. And the
percentage of these potential
deadbeats who may commit
such a "strategic default" has
doubled over the past year,
according to Fannie Mae.
If the world isn't careful, a
certain ethical callousness may
set in soon about the ease of
breaking one's word, as well as
ignoring the ricochet effects on
others.
Voluntary default, either,
by countries or individuals,
corrodes the trust needed to
hold a society together and
help it grow. Such a loss of
integrity can take years to
regain while dragging down
others with it.
Just look at American
neighborhoods where those
with "underwater" mortgages
simply pack up and leave.
The value of nearby houses
deteriorates and banks have
less money to lend. If enough
people default, the housing
market will worsen even more,
causing more government red
ink and slowing'the economy.
* Scripps Howard News Service

Lake City Reporter
Serving Columbia County
Since 1874
The Lake City Reporter is pub-
lished with pride for residents of
Columbia and surrounding counties by
Community Newspapers Inc.
We'believe strong newspapers build
strong communities -"Newspapers
get things done!"
Our primary goal is to
publish distinguished and profitable
community-oriented newspapers.
This mission will be accomplished
through the teamwork of professionals
dedicated to truth, integrity and hard.
work.,
Todd Wilson, publisher
Robert Bridges, editor
Sue Brannon, controller
Dink NeSmith, president
Tom Wood, chairman

LETTERS
POLICY
Letters to the Editor should be
typed or neatly written and double
spaced. Letters should not exceed
400 words and will be edited for
length and libel. Letters must be
signed and include the writer's name,
address and telephone number for
verification. Writers can have two
letters per month published. Letters
and guest columns are the opinion of
the writers and not necessarily that of
the Lake City Reporter.
BY MAIL: Letters, P.O. Box 1709,


Lake City, FL 32056; or drop off at
180 E. Duval St. downtown.
BY FAX: (386) 752-9400.
BY E-MAIL:
news@lakecityreporter.com


www.lakecityreporter.com


Kudos to Cantor


T hank you, Eric
Cantor. Thank
you for walking
out on useless
talks, presided
over by Vice President Biden,
addressing raising the limit on
our nation's debt.
According to press accounts,
Republican House Majority
Leader Cantor called it quits
on talks between Democratic
and Republican leaders because
Democrats refuse to give in on
raising taxes.
This, I am sure, is true. But
we also must understand the
deeper and broader issue.
We are in nothing less than
hand-to-hand combat, fighting
for what America is about and
what it takes to get this country
back on track of growth and
prosperity. Whether we are,
most fundamentally, a welfare
state in which government runs
the show, or whether this is
a free country, in which free,
private citizens run the show.
President Barack Obama
assumed the presidency in
January 2009, and, until this
year, Democrats have controlled
Congress.
Under their leadership,
we've had massive government
expansion and intervention into
our economy in the name of
saving it. The federal budget
has grown by a trillion dollars,
an expansion by one third.
Federal spending, historically 18
percent of our economy is now
25 percent.
Now, 30 months later, the
lowest unemployment rate
that America has known since
Barack Obama has been
president was the 7.8 percent
where it stood in the first month
when he assumed office.
What should trouble every
American is that there is not a


Star Parker
parker@urbancure.org
hint from the White House or
from Democratic leaders that
they have erred and have taken
our nation down the wrong
path. There is not a hint that
they have even considered that
their ideas and approach are
wrong.
What we are getting are jokes
from our president, regarding
the failure of the almost $900
billion "stimulus" package, that
"shovel ready was not as shovel
ready as we expected."
We are facing many dangers.
And one of them is that
Americans get used to the way
things are.
Unemployment currently
stands at 9.1 percent. It has
hovered between 9 and 10
percent for almost the entire
Obama presidency.
From this perspective, we
almost long for the 7.8 percent
where it stood in January 2009.
As this drags on, memories will
fade that when the American
economy is moving full tilt,
unemployment is around five
percent.
Let's also recall that back
in January 2009 there were
dissenting voices.
In that same month, the
Cato Institute ran full-page
newspaper ads challenging the
statement of our new president
that "There is no disagreement
that we need action by our
government, a recovery plan
that will help jumpstart the


economy."
The ad says "With all due
respect Mr. President, that
is not true." The ad is signed
by hundreds of economists,
including several Nobel Prize
winners.
The ad reviews the
historic failures of similar
attempts at economic revival
through government expansion
and concludes: 'To improve the
economy, policy makers should
focus on reforms that remove
impediments to work, saving,
and investment and production.
Lower tax rates and a reduction
in the burden of government
are the best ways to use fiscal
policy to boost growth."
I wrote a column in February.
2009 in response to which I'm
still getting letters. I wrote
then: "I thought we were on
the road to movig socialism
out of poor black communities
and replacing it with wealth
producing American capitalism.
But, incredibly, we are going
in the opposite direction.
Instead of poor American on
socialism becoming more like
rich America on capitalism,
rich America on capitalism
is becoming more like poor
American on socialism."
Any tax increases today
simply accommodates the
recent massive, misguided
and destructive expansion of
government. Spending cuts and
rollback of government are our
only hope.
Keep it up Mr. Cantor.



Star Parker is president of
CURE, Coalition
on Urban Renewal and Education
(www.urbancure.org) and author
of three books.


ANOTHER


Pivotal decision on Afghanistan


Measured against the expec-
tations of a war-weary nation,
President Obama's decision to
withdraw only 10,000 troops
from Afghanistan this year will
come as a disappointment. Isn't
10 years long enough? Aren't
President Hamid Karzai's errat-
ic behavior and unreliability suf-
ficient reasons to question the
wisdom of staying longer?
Yes, on both counts. The
length of the war, the huge
amount of money spent to wage
it, and the increasing reluctance
of our NATO allies to fulfill their
commitments have contributed
to the growing disenchantment
of Americans. More of them
than ever 64 percent, accord-
ing to the latest poll say the
United States should leave.


Yet give the president credit
for this: When he announced
the 3,0,000 troop surge in
December of 2009, he made it
clear that the American com-
mitment was not open-ended,
and in his speech to the nation
Wednesday night he took the
first step-toward a withdrawal.
This is a pivotal decision, a turn
away from deeper involvement
and a signal to audiences over-
seas and at home that America
is declaring mission accom-
plished and heading for the exit.
Mr. Obama's measured reduc-
tion, coupled with a realistic view
of the situation on the ground,
offers some reasons for opti-
mism about the direction of the
war and American involvement:
"We know that peace cannot


come to a land that has known
so much war without a political
settlement." This is the clear-
est acknowledgement that the
United States is prepared to
accept some members of the
Taliban in a future Afghan gov-
ernment, and a far cry from
earlier, unrealistic expectations
that the United States would
eliminate this force altogether.
'The goal that we seek
is achievable, and can be
expressed simply: No safe
haven from which al Qaeda or
its affiliates can launch attacks
against our homeland or our
allies. We won't try to make
Afghanistan a perfect place."
Translation: No nation-building.
* Miami Herald


4A


Betsy Hart
betsysblog.com


A tale


for two


girls

Our story starts
at a girls' soccer
game in the west-
ern suburbs of
Chicago. Actually,
a semifinal.
"Hannah" is the daughter of
Smy friend "Katy" not their
real names and was one
of a few alternate kickers not
called in during overtime in
the important game. I know
this kid. She's 12 and a darn
good shot.
Well, her team won without
her help.
It turned out Hannah was
angry that she had not been
called in to help kick some win-.
ning shots herself. Katy and her
husband 'Tim" (also a pseud-
onym) didn't commiserate.
They explained to Hannah
that the coach was in charge,
and Hannah had to respect her
decision. Hannah protested
that she was better than the
other kickers. Katy and Tim
told her that that could even
be true but it just didn't
matter. Hannah still had to
graciously submit to what the
coach wanted her to do, for the
game to work for everyone.
They communicated that the
game wasn't all about Hannah.
In fact, what was happening
on the field was much bigger
than Hannah. (What a relief for
their daughter, by the way.)
Well, Hannah calmed down
and turned her attention to the
championship game to soon
begin.
I reflected on what my friend
told me as I read passages
in David Brooks' fascinating
new book, "The Social Animal:
The Hidden Sources of Love,
Character, and Achievement"
(Random House).
Brooks shares research
showing that success or failure
is not so much about having,
strong will power in certain
situations "I'm not going to
yell at my boss, I'm not going
to yell at my boss" or even
sharp reasoning skills about
our own self-interest, as in, if
"I yell at my boss I'm going to
get fired." But, rather, its in
how we evaluate various situa-
tions to begin with.
Brooks says that the person
of good character has learned
to unconsciously see things
the right way and that trig-
gers "... a whole network of
unconscious judgments and
responses in her mind, biasing
her to act in a certain manner."
Brooks says that, in so doing,
she's "rigged the game." Why?
Because then "reason and will
have a much easier time. They
will be up to the task of guid-
ing proper behavior."
In other words, the idea of
yelling at a boss would seem
so incredibly odd to begin
with to such a person that she
wouldn't have to work hard to
keep from doing it.
And so, for instance, in
some schools, Brooks says,
the general culture is one in
which kids routinely curse
at and humiliate teachers,
perhaps even physically attack-
ing them. In other schools
the general culture is one of
appropriately responding to
authority, including teachers,
at least while in front of them.
These kids don't even have to
think about it if they were to
see someone punch a teacher,
"they would gasp with shock
and horror."
Betsy Hart hosts the "It Takes
a Parent" radio show on WYLL-
AM 1160 in Chicago.


OPINION


















FAITH



Saturday, June 25, 201 v


&


VALUES


vww.lakecityreporter.com


'Do this in


remembrance


ofme'


he first five
books of the
New Testament
teach us many
things we are to
do, but some of them are
S unclear. It's only whenwe
apply the writings of the
letters to the churches and
the Epistles can we under-
stand their true meaning.
For instance, in Acts 6:1-
6, we find the institution of
the Office of the Deacon.
Paul explains in ITimothy
and Titus the true qualifi-
cations and responsibility
of the Office.
The same is true of
The Lord's Supper (or
Communion). If we look
in Matthew 26:26-29; Mark
14:22-25: Luke 22:17-20 we
would not understand the
meaning of it; and certainly
not the importance of the
"Lords Supper". Then in
the Gospel of John 13:2-20,
on the same night, John
only records the washing
of the disciples' feet; not
the breaking of the bread
and partaking of the fruit
of the vine.
1 Corinthians 11:23-34
explains the true mean-
ing of Communion. It
means "to share with or
join together with". The
first thing Paul did was
to correct the way the
Corinthians were conduct-
ing the ordinance. They
did not understand the
true meaning of it It is


BIBLE STUDIES


Hugh Sherrill Jr.
ems-hugh43@comcostnet


sad today many of our
churches also do not
understand the meaning of
it. Most only do it because
they think they are sup-
posed to. In many cases it
is only a ritual. They don't
seem to understand what
a solemn warning it is, and
not understanding, is no
excuse.
Paul gives, what I
believe are seven reasons
why we should partake
of this Ordinance. First,
it is "a divine command".
In verse 24 and 25 Jesus
said "this do", a command
to do. So one can never
avoid taking the "fruit of
the vine" and "bread",
thinking he will be OK.
Second, it is "a "blessed
privilege". Remember it
is the 'Table of the Lord".
Third, it is "a necessary
memorial". Jesus said
"Do this in remembrance
of Me." We are to remem-
ber the tremendous price

SHERRILL continued on 6A


CHURCH NOTES


Today
Open house party
An open house party
is 11 a.m.-2 p.m. today
at Grace City Ministries.
Free food and litera-
ture will be available.
Visit www.mygracecity.
org or contact Michelle
Buchanana at (386)
623-7987 or michelle@
mygracecity.org. The
church is located at
1086 SE Main Boulevard!
between Ethridge
Furniture and Green
Acres Learning Center.

Sunday
Homecoming services
Homecoming services
are 11 a.m. and 4 p.m.
Sunday at DaySpring
Missionary Baptist
Church. The morning
speaker is the church's
pastor, the Rev. Aaron
Thomas Lewis. Music
will be rendered by
the church choir. The
evening speaker is the
Rev. Stacey Lewis of
Beaumont, Texas. An old
fashion dinner will be
served after the evening
service. The church
is located at 839 NW
Congress Ave.

Perry Stone
A DVD showing of
Perry Stone preaching
at City Life Church in
Tampa is 6 p.m. Sunday
at the Wellborn Church
of God. DVDs of other
speakers at the 2011
Church of God Camp


Meeting at Wimuma will
also be shown on Sunday
nights throughout July
and August. Call 752-
8479 for more informa-
tion.

Bible School at Our
Redeemer Lutheran
Vacation Bible School
is 6-9 p.m. June 26-30 at
Our Redeemer Lutheran
Church. Dinner is
provided at 5:30 p.m.
Classes are for all ages
including adults. For
registration call (386)
288-5573. The church is
located on SR 47, one
mile past the interstate
and a half mile past
Dollar General to the
right.

Anniversary
Celebration
The 108th Church
Anniversary Celebration
is 3 p.m. Sunday at New
Mt. Zion AME Church,
Watertown. The speaker
is the Rev. Martin Kohn
of St. Paul AME Church
in Mayport. The colors
are black and white and
dinner will be served.
Contact Rev. Charles
Young at (904) 713-7877.

Dual Day celebration
The annual Dual
Day celebration is 3
p.m. Sunday at Trinity
United Methodist
Church. The theme is
"Continue to walk by
faith and not by sight."
The guest speaker is
The Reverend Tony


I .
", -. ,4 ' r ,. -. ..
$ >;- : .. . -' " "" "' -"- '","'. ":. '" :' ". ".. ... :.. .

."' i., : , ;, : % .o : 2 .' :: .- ; .. .


ADVENT CHRISTIAN
First Advent Christian
1881 SW McFarane Ave.
386-752-3900


Sunday School:
Sunday Service:
Wednesday Service:


9:45AM
11:00AM
7:00PM


ASSEMBLY OF GOD
GLAD TIDINGS ASSEMBLY OF GOD
993 NW Lake Jeffery Road
386-752-0620
Sunday Worship' 10:30AM & 6PM
Wed. Eam. Bible Study 7:00PM
"A church where JESUS is Real"

BAPTIST
BEREA BAPTIST CHURCH
SR47 S 755-0900
Sunday School 9:30AM
Sunday Worship 10:45AM & 6PM
Wednesday Eve. Service 7PM
Interim Pastor: Kenneth Edenfield

EASTSIDE BAPTIST CHURCH
196 SE James Ave. 386-752-2860
Sun. Bible Study 9:45AM
Sun. Worship 11AM & 6PM
Wed. Prayer Mtg/Bible Study 6PM
Rev. Brandon G. Witt

FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH
Sunday Bible Study 9:15AM
Sunday Worship 10:30AM & 6:00PM
Wed. 6:00PM Prayer Service, &
Children Ministry 6:15PM
Downtown Lake City 752-5422
Rev. Stephen Ahrens, Pastor

OLIVET MISSIONARY BAPTIST CHURCH .
541 N.E Davis Street
(386) 752-1990
Ronald V. Walters, Pastor
Sunday School 9:45AM
Sunday Morning Worship 11:00AM
Wed. Mid-WeekWorship 6:00PM
"In God's Word, Will &Way"


PINE GROVE BAPTIST CHURCH
1989 N US Hwy 441
386-752-2664
Sunday Bible Study
Sunday Worship 11AM
Wed. Kids & Youth Ministry
Pastor Ron Thompson


[


9:45AM
& 6PM
6:30PM


BAPTIST
ALEM PRIMITIVE BAPTIST
Sunday Services 10:30 AM
S.Pastor: Elder Herman Griffin
752-4198


SOUTHSIDE BAPTIST CHURCH
388 S.E. BayaDrive* 755-5553
Sunday:


Bible Study
Morning Worship
Evening Worship
Wednesday:
AWANA
Prayer & Bible Study


9:15AM,
10:30AM
6:15PM

5:45PM
6:15PM


TABERNACLE BAPTIST CHURCH
(Independent Baptist)
144 SE Montrose Ave. 752-4274


Sunday School
Sun. Mom. Worship
Sunday Eve.
Wed. Prayer Meeting
Pastor: Mike Norman


10AM
11AM
6PM
7:30 PM


CATHOLIC
EPIPHANY CATHOUC CHURCH
1905 SW Epiphany Court 752-4470
Saturday Vigil Mass 5:00 PM
Sunday Mass 8:15 AM, 10:30 AM,
5:00 PM (Spanish/English)
Sunday School/Religious Education
9:00 AM-10:15 AM

CHRISTIAN
CHRISTIAN SCIENCE SOCIETY
239 SE Baya Ave.
Sunday Service 11:00 AM
Wednesday Evening Service 7:30 PM

LAKE CITY CHRISTIAN CHURCH
Hwy 247 S. 755-9436
Sunday School 9:30 AM
Sun. Mom. Worship 10:30 AM
Wed. Prayer Meeting 7PM

CHURCH OF CHRIST
NEW HORIZON
Church of Christ
Directions & Times 386-623-7438
Jack Exum,Jr., Minister








Tires for every need.
US 90 West across from Wal-Mart
752-0054


CHURCH OF GOD
LAKE CITY CHURCH OF GOD
167 Ermine St.* 752-5965
Sunday School 9:45 AM
Sun. Worship 10:30AM & 6:00PM
Wed. Family Night 7PM
Wed. Youth Service 7 PM
Pastor: Carroll Lee

EVANGELCHURCH OF GOD
370 SW Monitor Glen 755-1939
Sunday School 9:45 AM
Sunday Worship 10:50 & 6:30
Wed. Spiritual Enrichment 7PM
"Shock Youth Church"
Boys and Girls Clubs
Bible Study
Pastor: John R. Hathaway

EPISCOPAL
ST. JAMES EPISCOPAL CHURCH
2423 SW Bascom Norris Dr.,
Lake City, FI 32025 386-752-2218
Website: www.stjameslakecity.org
HOLY EUCHARIST
Sun. 8 &10AM
Wed. 6:00 PM
Priest: The Rev. Michael Armstrong

LUTHERAN
OUR REDEEMER LUTHERAN CHURCH
LCMS
1 12 miles S. of 1-75 on SR 47
755-4299


Sunday Services
(Nursery Provided)
Christian Education Hour
For all ages at 10:45AM
Pastor: Rev. Bruce Alkire


9:30AM


SPIRIT OF CHRIST LUTHERAN
Hwy 90,1.5 miles West of 1-75 752-3807
Sunday Worship 10:00AM
Nursery Avail.
Wed. Pot Luck 6PM Worship 7PM
Vicar John David Bryant


Morrell's
Your Complete decorating and
home furnishings store
SW Deputy Jeff Davis Lane formerlyd Pinemount Rd.)
752-3910or 1-800-597-3526
Mont-Sat. 8.00-5.30 Closed Sunda)


METHODIST
First United Methodist Church
973 S. Marion Ave.
386-752-4488
Sunday School 9:45AM
Sunday Morning Worship
Casual Worship Service 8:50AM
Traditional Service 11:00AM
Program opportunities available in all areas
for all ages.
For a complete schedule
contact church office at
752-4488

WESLEY MEMORIAL UNITED
1272 SW McFarlane 752-3513
(Adjacent to Summers School)
Worship' 8:00 & 10:00AM
Sunday School 9:00AM
Nursery provided
Praise & Worship 6:00PM
AWANA Wednesdays 5:00PM
Pastor: The Rev. J. Louie Mabrey
www.weslevmem.com

WATERTOWN CONGREGATIONAL
METHODIST CHURCH
U.S. 90 E. turn on Cortez (next to Quality
Ind.) right on Okinawa.
Sunday School 9:45 AM
Sun. Worship 11AM & 6 PM
Wed. Night Service 7PM
Pastor, Randy Ogbum

NAZARENE
LAKE CITY CHURCH OFTHE NAZARENE
Services:
Sunday School 9:45AM
Sunday Worship 10:45AM
Wednesday 6:30PM
Adult, Youth Ministry, Children's Ministry
Pastor: Craig Henderson
Nursery Provided
SW SR 47 and Azalea Park Place

PRESBYTERIAN
FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
629 SW Baya Drive 752-0670
Sunday School 9:00AM
Sunday Worship Service 10:00AM
NURSERY PROVIDED
Pastor: Dr. Roy A. Martin
Director of Music: Bill Poplin


DeMarco Hansberry
Presiding Elder,
Suwannee-North District
East Conference,
Eleventh Episcopal
District of the African
Methodist Episcopal
Church. Several musi-
cal guests will perform-
ing including 17-year-
old old songwriter
Jeremiah AL' Curtis
Ross, Charles Martin,
Pastor, Compassion
Love Center, Lake City,
The Gospel Harmoners,
Ebenezer AME Church
Choir, Live Oak. The
church is located at 248
Martin Luther King Jr.
St.

Live Oak Bible School
program closure
A Vacation Bible
School cookout and
program closure is 5-8
p.m. Sunday at Live Oak
Church of God. The
church is located at 9828
U.S. Hwy. 129. Call the
church office 9 a.m. to
noon Monday-Friday at
(386) 362-2483 ext. 10.

First Full Gospel
close out service
The Annual Vacation
Bible School program
special close out service
is 6 p.m. Sunday for fam-
ily and friends at First
Full Gospel Church. The
church is located on the
corner of Jones Way and
Washington Street, next
to the Boys Club on Hwy.
90 E. Contact Heather
Register at (386) 344-
8555.



S OBSTETRICS& GYNECOLOGY
Il 3 .I ;-'1:. 1), Hi 6 irr.,.al l .
(386) 466-1106
-. : : L .:.4. L 1j


PENTECOSTAL
FIRST FULL GOSPEL CHURCH
NE Jones Way & NE Washington St
Sunday School 10:00AM
Morning Worship -11:00AM
Evangelistic Service 6:00 PM
Youth Services Wednesday 7:00PM
Mid-week Service Wednesday 7:00 PM
For info call 755-3408a Everyone Welcome
Pastor: Rev. Stan Ellis

NON-DENOMINATIONAL
CHRIST CENTRAL MINISTRIES
Leadership Services 9:00AM
Sunday Morning 11:00AM
Wednesday Service 7:00PM
217 Dyal Ave., from Hwy 90 take
Sisters Welcome Rd., go 5 miles, South,
church on left. 755-2525
Lead Pastor: Lonnie Johns
"A Church on the Move"

SCHRISTIAN HERITAGE CHURCH
Comer SR. 47 & Hudson Circle
SSunday Celebration 10:30 AM
Pastor Chris Jones *752-9119

FALLING CREEK CHAPEL
Falling Creek Road 755-0580
First and Third Sundays 9:30 A.M.
Second and Fourth Sundays 3:00 P.M.
Pastor: Rev. Cheryl R. Pingel

NEW BEGINNING CHURCH
Highway 242 E. of Branford Highway
Sunday School 10:00AM
Morning Worship 11:00AM
Sunday Evening 6:00PM
Wednesday 7:00PM
A Full Gospel Church Everyone Welcomed
(386) 755-5197


- HARRY'S
*- r Heating & Air Condiioning Inc.
Harry Mosley President


Po. 752-2308 W46


Monday
Layfield to speak at
AGLOW lighthouse


TJ Layfield,.a retired ,'
local businessman, is
sharing his testimony of '
how he was totally healed. I
from a stroke at the Lake
City AGLOW Lighthouse
7 p.m. Monday at New .
Generation School. Call
(386) 9354018, (386) 752-. -
1972 or (386) 2494380. ,;'

Tuesday
Support group
Greater Visions Support '
Group hosts a faith-based
addictions support group
at 7 p.m. every Tuesday at
Christ Central Church on
Sister's Welcome Road and
9:30 am. every Thursday
at the Suwannee Coalition
office on North Ohio
Avenue in Live Oak. The
group provides spiritual
and emotional support in
a non-judgmental setting.
Call 2081345.

Faithful and True
meetings
Faithful and True meet-
ings are 7 p.m. every
Tuesday at Christ Ceptral
Church in Lake City. The
perils of pornography and
other addictive sexual
behaviors are discussed.
Men are taught how to
live in freedom consistent-
ly everyday. The group is
strictly anonymous. Call
Tom at (386)965-6377.

CHURCH' cotinuedon 6A


MIKELLS POWER EQUIPMENT, INC.
Your Lawn & Garden Headquarters
MOWERS CHAIN SAWS TRIMMERS
1152 US 90 WEST LAKE CITY, FL.
386-752-8098




LAKE CITY
7F 8755-7050


BAYWAYj.antoria services
FIRE & Water Restoration
Floor & Carpet Care
Residential & Commercial
755-6142


North Florida
Pharmacy
7 Locations to Serve You
Lake City, Ft. White, Branford,
Chiefland, Mayo & Keystone Heights


Supercenter
"LOW PRICES EVERYDAY"
US 90 WEST 755-2427


GWHunter, Inc.
c won Chevron Oil
Jobber

Ii I


HollyEectric, Inc.
",Oaality work at a reasonable price"
We also do solar hook-ups
(386) 755-5944


FOOD STroIRB
Open 7 Das a Wvk
]036h D)usal lt. I.ak ( I I[
(386) 752-0(167
Fresh Meat. Fresh Pr,,,uc'
-I n d ll thng ,tnigh (hu rhh c ti .iclh mI

RICK'S CRANE SERVICE
Located at 25A (Old
Valdosta Hwy)l
386-752-5696 or
386-867-2035
after hours


5A-,.


Central States
Enterprises
Columbia County's Feed Headquarters
FEED PET SUPPLIES IAWN & GARDEN
ANIMAL HEALTH
668 NW Waldo St. 386-755-7445


01


I r



-"/.'*1'I
I'-.i''^


* '-* I'


I-:





.4 7





!*IjI
* I


Sulay Eectic ooperauve, ie,
Competitive rates, non-profit,
right here in your community.
Lake City District 386-752-7447
clayelectric.com


AWDERSON COLUMBIA CO., INC.
ASPHALT PAVING
COMMERCIAL 'INDUSTRIAL
Site Preparanon Road Building Parking Lots
Grading & Drainage
752-7585
871 NW Guerdon St, Lake City


III


* 4


1--














LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL & NATION SATURDAY, JUNE 25, 2011 Page Editor: Todd Taylor, 754-0424


COMMUNITY CALENDAR


* To submit your Community
Calendar item, contact Antonia
Robinson at 754-0425 or by
e-mail at arobinson @
lakecityreporter.com.


Today
Miss Florida Forestry
Pageant
The Miss Florida
Forestry State
Scholarship Pageant is
7 p.m. today at Baker
County Middle School in
Macclenny. Admission is
$10, and tickets will be
sold at the door. Local
queens from Columbia
County are Little Miss
Morgan Royals, Junior
Miss Kimberlynne
Norman, Teen Miss
Brittany Wallace and
Miss Angela Cameron.


Richardson High School
alumni meeting
A Richardson High
School alumni meeting
is noon Saturday at the
Richardson Center. For
additional information
contact: CJ at (386) 752-
0815.

CHS class of
1986 reunion
The Columbia High
School Class of 1986
reunion is today. Contact
Howey Brannon at
(386) 397-4570 or Brian
"Tweet" Nicholson at
(727) 992-1978 or visit
http://chsclassofl986.,
com.

Monday
Building Strong Bonds
mentoring program
Calling all middle and
high school boys for
Building Strong Bonds
mentoring program 5-8
p.m. Monday. Meeting
is at 532 Marion Street.


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter

Lending a helping hand
Esther Stair-Albrecht (left) and Sally Thomas-McGoldrick fill a bucket with supplies Tuesday as part of the Disaster Early
Response Team Program for the victims affected in the Mississippi and Missouri River basin area. The effort, which is a part
of the Disaster Early Response Team Program, will send 101 buckets weighing about 25 pounds each filled with sup-
plies like soaps, cleaners, gloves and mosquito spray.


Contact Al Nelson at
(386) 867-1601. Dinner
included. Transportation
can be provided if con-
tacted one week in
advance.

UfeSouth seeks
blood donors
LifeSouth is officially
in emergency need of
O negative blood types.
The bloodmobile is seek-
ing donors 2-10 p.m.
Monday at Walmart.
Free recognition items
for all donors.


Columbia County
Wood carvers meeting
The Columbia County
Wood Carvers meet
every Monday at 1
p.m. at the LifeStyle -
Enrichment Center.
Contact Ken Myer at 719-
9629 or Charles.Kime at
755-4937.

Tuesday
Make and Take
workshop
Back to Basics Rain
Barrel "Make and


Take" Workshop from
6:30 8:00 p.m. Tuesday
Columbia County
Extension Office Located
on the Fairground in
Lake City Just call to
register 752-5384. Take
. home your completed
rain barrel for $45 Learn
about the benefits of
Harvesting Rainwater.
Let us help you assemble
your very own Rain
Barrel.

Meet the Author
at the library
A Meet the Author pro-


gram featuring Mary Jane
Ryals is 7 p.m. Tuesday
at the Main Branch. '
The event is sponsored
by the Friends of the
Library. Ryals is a poet,
novelist and Florida State
University professor. In
2008, she was named
Poet Laureate of Florida's
Big Bend Region, a title
she will hold until 2012.
Her novel, "Cookie and
Me," was released in
September 2010 and
takes place in Tallahassee
in the 1960s.


Senior services
meal payment due
Payment for the
Columbia County Senior
Services Inc. Wednesday
homecooked meal is due
10 a.m. Tuesday at the
LifeStyle Enrichment
Center. The menu
is hamburger steak,
mashed potatoes and
gravy, broccoli casserole
and peach cobbler and
ice cream. Call (386)
755-0235.

Wednesday
Beekeeping workshop
at extension office
A beekeeping work-
shop is 6-8:30 p.m.
Wednesday at the
Columbia County
Extension office. The
registration fee is $5
which includes materials
and honey. The class will
be taught with the help
of local beekeepers. Call
(386) 752-5384.

Dubi Sisters perform
at Senior Services
Columbia County
Senior Services Inc.
is hosting a dancing
performance from the
Dubi Sisters 11-11:45
a.m. Wednesday at the
LifeStyle Enrichment
Center. Call (386) 755-
0235.

LifeSouth seeks
blood donors
LifeSouth bloodmo-
bile is seeking donors
1-5 p.m. Wednesday at
the Lake City Reporter.
Free hot dogs, lemon-
ade, juice, cookies and
a gift for each donor.


SHERRILL: Remembrance

Continued From Page 5A


that was paid for our salva-
tion. Fourth, it is "a willing
testimony". Paul says in
verse 26: 'For as often as
ye eat this bread and drink
this cup you show the Lord's
death till He comes". Fifth,
it is "a humbling confession".
It is a humbling confession
of our own helplessness to
save ourselves. It took the
death of our Lord Jesus to
pay our sin debt Sixth, it
is an "act of faith". It not
only looks backward to the
cross but forward to the
time we will dine with Him
at the "Marriage Supper of
The Lamb". Seventh, it is
"a solemn warning". The


Ordinance should cause us
to remember the great price
that was paid for our salva-
tion and make us want to get
sin out of our lives. And if
we don't, verses 28-32 tells
us what will happen. First
we are warned about taking
the cup unworthily and we
are told to exam ourselves.
Verse 29 says because we
don't do this "for this rea-
son many are weak and
sick among you and many
sleep". Please heed this sol-
emn warning.
* Hugh Sherrill is a preacher
in Lake City available for pul-
pit supply and revivals.


CHURCH: Events

Continued From Page 5A


Thursday
English and literacy
classes
Free English speaking
and literacy classes provided
by Columbia County School
District's Career and Adult
Education Program is from
5:30-8 p.m. every Thursday
at Unity of God Ministries,
Inc. in Wellborn. Activities
for children will be provided.
Call (386) 755-8190. The
church is located at 12270
County Road 137.

Saturday, July 2
Gospel music service
A summer gospel music
service is 6 p.m. July 2 at
The Church of Faith and
Deliverance Through Christ
Inc. The service will feature
gospel recording groups
such as The Florida Gospel
Travelers of Jacksonville,
The Spiritual Harmonizers of
Enviston and DVine One of
Lake City. Alove offering will


be collected to support the
music ministries. The church
is located at 379 NW Long St
Call Pastor Minnie (Williams)
Gomes at (386) 768-1886.

Spaghetti dinner
A spaghetti dinner
sponsored by Open Doors
Ministry is 11 a.m. 1 p.m.
July 2 at Deese Park in down-
town Fort White. Cost is $6
per plate. There will be prizes
for children, baked goods for
sale. Proceeds will benefit
the church and the Christian
Service Center.

Messiah's Mansion
Messiah's Mansion, a full
scale model of the mosaic
sanctuary is coming to Lake
City 1-7 p.m. July 2-9 and
1-5 p.m. July 10. Tours begin
every 15 minutes and last 75
minutes. The tour is located
at 9206 W. Hwy. 90. Call (386)
984-9704, e-mail livesanctu-
aryll@yahoo.com or visit
www.livesanctuary.com. Free
admission.


Mob boss brought back to Boston


By DENISE LAVOIE
AP Legal Affairs Writer

BOSTON James "Whitey"
Bulger's capture could cause a
world of trouble inside the FBI.
The ruthless Boston crime boss
who spent'16 years on the lam is
said to have boasted that he cor-
rupted six FBI agents and more
than 20 police officers. If he decides
to talk, some of them could rue the
day he was caught.
"They are holding their breath,
.wondering what he could say," said
Robert Fitzpatrick, the former sec-
ond-in-command of the Boston FBI
office.
The 81-year-old gangster was cap-
tured Wednesday in Santa Monica,
Calif., where he
apparently had
been living for
most of the time
he was a fugitive.
He arrived at the
tightly guarded
federal court-
Bulger house in Boston
on Friday after-
noon to answer charges he commit-
ted 19 murders. His girlfriend, who
was arrested with him, was sched-
uled to appear in court on charges
of harboring a fugitive.
Bulger, the former boss of the
Winter Hill Gang, Boston's Irish
mob, embroiled the FBI in scandal
once before, after he disappeared in
1995. It turned out that Bulger had
been an FBI informant for decades,
feeding the bureau information on
the rival New England Mafia, and
that he fled after a retired Boston
FBI agent tipped him off that he
was about to be indicted.
The retired agent, John Connolly
Jr., was sent to prison for protecting
Bulger. The FBI depicted Connolly
as a rogue agent, but Bulger
associates described more wide-
spread corruption in testimony at
Connolly's trial and in lawsuits filed
by the families of people allegedly
killed by Bulger and his gang.
Kevin Weeks, Bulger's right-hand
man, said the crime lord stuffed
envelopes with cash for law enforce-
ment officers at holiday time. "He
used to say that Christmas was for
cops and kids," Weeks testified.


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Assistant U.S. Attorney Robert Dugdale,'center, talks to reporters after an
arraignment of fugitive crime boss James "Whitey" Bulger outside the Roybal
Federal Building in Los Angeles, Thursday,


After a series of hearings in the
late 1990s, U.S. District Judge Mark
Wolf found that more than a dozen
FBI agents had broken the law or
violated FBI regulations.
Among them was Connolly's for-
mer supervisor, John Morris, who
admitted he took about $7,000 in
bribes and a case of expensive wine
from Bulger and henchman Stephen
.'The Rifleman" Flemmi. Morris tes-
tified under a grant of immunity.
In addition, Richard Schneiderhan,
a former Massachusetts state police
lieutenant, was convicted of obstruc-
tion of justice and conspiracy for
warning a Bulger associate that the
FBI had wiretapped the phones of
Bulger's brothers, one of whom,
William, was the powerful leader
of the Massachusetts Senate for 17
years.
Edward J. MacKenzie Jr., a for-
mer drug dealer and enforcer for
Bulger, predicted that Bulger will
disclose new details about FBI cor-
ruption and how agents protected
him for so long.
"Whitey was no fool. He knew
he would get caught. I think
he'll have more fun pulling all
those skeletons out of the clos-
et," MacKenzie said. "I think he'll
start talking and he'll start taking
people down."
A spokesman for the Boston FBI
did not return calls seeking com-
ment In the past, the agency has
said that a new generation of agents


has replaced most or all of the
agents who worked in the Boston
office while Bulger was an infor-
mant
Some law enforcement officials
said they doubt Bulger will try to cut
a deal with prosecutors by exposing
corruption, in part because he will
almost certainly be asked to reveal
what contact he had with his broth-
ers while he was a fugitive and
whether they helped him in any
way.
"If Bulger talks, he would have to
talk about his brothers, and I can't
see that happening, said retired
state police Detective Lt. Bob Long,
who investigated Bulger in the
1970s and '80s. "They are not going
to take selective information from
him it's either full and complete
cooperation or nothing."
Criminal defense attorney
and former Drug Enforcement
Administration agent Raymond
Mansolillo said Bulger may not
have any incentive to talk. "The
FBI may say, 'You're going to jail
or you're going to be killed. We're
not offering you anything,'" said
Mansolillo, who once represented
New England crime figure Luigi
"Baby Shacks" Manocchio.
But retired Massachusetts state
police Maj. Tom Duffy, one of the
lead investigators in the Bulger
case, said Bulger may agree to talk
if he.thinks it could help his girl-
friend, Catherine Greig.


Page Editor: Todd Taylor, 754-0424


LAKE CITY REPORTER


LOCAL & NATION SATURDAY, JUNE 25, 2011













Story ideas?

Contact
Tim Kirby
Sports Editor
754-0421
tkirby@lakecityreportercom


Lake City Reporter





SPORTS


Saturday, June 25, 201 I


CWS
BRIEFS


Rule

change

coming?
OMAHA, Neb. The
NCAA tournament would
open with 32 regionals
instead of 16 and empha-
size best-of-three play
under proposals the
Division I baseball com-
mittee will study next
month.
"The committee is
not looking to change
anything for the sake
of change," American
Baseball Coaches
Association executive
director Dave Keilitz said
Friday. "They're just look-
ing to see if we can do
something that's better.
Right now the system we
have, most people think
it's really good."
The current 64-team
format starts with 16 four-
team, double-elimination
regionals. Regional win-
ners advance to one of
eight best-of-three super
regionals, with those
winners moving to the
College World Series.
The baseball com-
mittee will look at two
proposals, both of which
would keep the tourna-
ment field at 64.
One would flip-flop the
current format. There
would be 32 best-of-three
regionals, with the win-
ners advancing to eight
four-team, double-elimi-
nation super regionals.
The other proposal
would add an extra round
call it a "super, super
regional" and add a
week to the season either
on the front or back end.
The tournament would
open with 32 two-team
regionals, 16 two-team
super regionals, eight two-
team super super region-
als and then the eight-team
College World Series. The
first three rounds would all
be best-of-three.

Broken-bat foul

There was a brief:scare
in the -eighth inning of
Friday afternoon's game
when Florida catcher
Mike Zunino's bat broke
off just above the handle
as he fouled off a pitch.
The handle stayed in
his hands, but the barrel
flew into the seats behind
the Gators' dugout. No
one was injured.
"He ran a fastball in,
and by the time I finished
my swing, I just felt it
crack up," Zunino said.
"I've never seen anything
like that before."
Zunino was swinging the
same bathe had been using
the past 20-25 games.

Glad he stayed

Virginia pitcher Tyler
Wilson never gave serious
thought to leaving school
when he was drafted in
the 35th round last year
by the Cincinnati Reds.
After he carried a shut-
out into the eighth inning
of Thursday's 8-1 win
over California, he's even
more sure he made the
right decision.
"Look what fd be missing
out on," he said. 'Tve said it
before many times that I love
the University ofVirginia It'fs
given me more than I ever
thought possible. As much
as I would like to think I've
given to it, it's given me 100


times more back"


www.lakecityreporter.com


Section B.


Roddick exits

Wimbledon in 3

sets in 3rd round


Lopez upsets
three time
runner-up.
By HOWARD FENDRICH
Associated Press
WIMBLEDON, England
- Head bowed, Andy
Roddick trudged off
Centre Court, his purple
Wimbledon towel dragging
along the turf.
As the three-time run-
ner-up at the All England
Club headed for the exit, he
passed some kids clamoring
for an autograph from their
front-row perch. Roddick
paused and tossed his blue-
framed racket underhand.
Thanks to his latest ear-
lier-than-anticipated Grand
Slam loss, the American
won't be needing it next
week.
The eighth-seeded


Roddick departed quickly
Friday, beaten 7-6 (2), 7-6
(2), 6-4 in the third round
by unseeded Feliciano
Lopez of Spain. Lopez
served spectacularly well,
hitting 28 aces, and finally
got the better of the 2003
U.S. Open champion after
losing all seven previous
matches they played.
Roddick turns 29 in
August, and he was asked
whether, as the years go by,
one particularly depress-
ing thought creeps into his
mind: He might never win
Wimbledon.
"Well, sure. You're
human. I mean, of course
it does," he replied. Then,
speaking directly to the
reporter, Roddick added:
"You know, you may never
get your favorite job, either
- no, offense to your
TENNIS continued on 3B


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Andy Roddick waves to the crowd as he leaves the court after being defeated by Spain's
Feliciano Lopez at the All England Lawn Tennis Championships at Wimbledon on Friday.


Wolves make


easy work


of Hamilton


By BRANDON FINLEY
bfinley@lakecityreporter.com
Lake City made easy
work of its opening game
in the Lake City Recreation
Department's Annual 2011
Goodwill Games Basketball
Tournament at Richardson
Community Center on
Friday.
Lake City's Wolves
jumped out to an early
lead and never trailed in
the game on their way to a
67-35 win against
Hamilton.
Trey Simmons led all
scorers with 15 points in
the contest, but all of the
Wolves scored at least one
point
Milton Sanders scored
nine points. Monte Tisdale,
Marquez Marshall and
Marcus Amerson each had
eight points.
Taylor Viens and Javonte
Foster each. had a three-
point field goal.


Davin Pierce had a buck-
et for two points and Shaq
Johnson had a free throw
for a point
Other teams in the tour-
nament include Eastside,
Valdosta, Gainesville,
Jacksonville, West Gadsden
and Suwannee.
Lake City will play three
games today. The Wolves
begin with Valdosta at
9 a.m. and Bell at 10:30
a.m. at Columbia High
School. Lake City returns
to Richardson Community
Center for the night game
against Eastside out of
Gainesville.
Richardson will host the
final four teams and cham-
pionship games on Sunday
beginning at 9:30 a.m.
Lake City's 10-under
team has two games today
beginning against Palatka
at 11:30 a.m. The 10-under
squad will wrap against
Gainesville at 4 p.m. Both
games are at CHS.


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Florida's Cody Dent (20) scores on a wild pitch as Vanderbilt
pitcher Mark Lamm covers the plate in the eighth inning of an
NCAA College World Series baseball game in Omaha, Neb.
Friday.


BRANDON FINLEY/Lake City Reporter
Lake City's Marquez Marshall goes up for a dunk against Hamilton during the opening.
game of the Lake City Recreation Department's Annual 2011 Goodwill Games Basketball
Tournament.



Tucker's hit in 8th sends

Florida to CWS finals


Gators pick up
6-4 win over SEC
foeVanderbilt
By ERIC OLSON
Associated Press
OMAHA, Neb. Preston
Tucker drove in the go-
ahead run with a bases-
loaded single in the eighth
inning and Florida survived
some shaky bullpen work
to advance to the College
World Series finals with a
6-4 victory over Vanderbilt
on Friday.
The second-seeded
Gators (53-17) will play


South Carolina or Virginia
in the best-of-three cham-
pionship round starting
Monday.
Alex Panteliodis limited
Vanderbilt (54-12) to three
hits in six innings before
five relievers squandered
all of his 4-1 lead.
Daniel Pigott singled
and Cody Dent and Nolan
Fontana reached on back-
to-back bunts in the eighth
before Tucker drove a ball
into deep left field. The
Gators added another run
when Mark Lamm's break-
ing ball in the dirt bounced
away from Curt Casali,
allowing Dent to come


home.
Austin Maddox (3-0)
earned the win, which was
Florida's fifth in six meet-
ings this season against its
Southeastern Conference
rival.
Oakland Athletics first-
round draft pick Sonny
Gray (12-4) took the loss for
Vanderbilt, which was play-
ing in the College World
Series for the first time.
Gray, who struggled
despite winning his first
CWS outing against North
Carolina, was up and down
on Friday. He struck out
GATORS continued on 3B


---
















LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS SATURDAY, JUNE 25, 2011


SCOREBOARD


- TELEVISION

P sports


, ATHLETICS
5 p.m.
NBC U.S. Outdoor Championships,
it Eugene, Ore.
AUTO RACING
8 a.m.
SPEED Formula One, qualifying for
.European Grand Prix, at Valencia, Spain
Noon
SPEED Rolex Sports Car Series, at
Elkhart Lake.Wis.
2:30 p.m.
SPEED NASCAR, Sprint Cup,
practice for Toyota/Save Mart 350, at
Sonoma, Calif. (same-day tape)
3:30 p.m.
SPEED NASCAR, Sprint Cup,
"Happy Hour Series:'," final practice for
,Toyota/Save Mart 350, at Sonoma, Calif.
;(same-day tape)
5:30 p.m.
ESPN NASCAR, Nationwide Series,
'"Bucyrus 200, at Elkhart Lake,Wis.
"; 6:30 p.m.
VERSUS IRL, Indy ULights, Sukup
100, at Newton, Iowa
8 p.m.
VERSUS IRL, IndyCar, Iowa Corn
' Indy 250, at Newton, Iowa
10 p.m.
ESPN2 NHRA, qualifying for
Summit Racing Equipment Nationals, at
Norwalk. Ohio (same-day tape)
BOXING
10 p.m.
FSN Welterweights, Mike Jones
(24-0-0) vs. Raul Munoz (21-13-1), at
Philadelphia
COLLEGE BASEBALL
2 p.m.
ESPN -World Series,game 13,teams
TBD, at Omaha, Neb. (if necessary)
7 p.m.
ESPN2 World Series, game 14,
teams TBD, at Omaha, Neb. (if necessary)
GOLF
8:30 a.m.
TGC European PGA Tour, BMW
International Open, third round, at
Munich
3 p.m..
CBS - PGA Tour, Travelers
Championship, third round, at Cromwell,
Conn.
4 p.m.
TGC Wegmans LPGA
Championship, third round, at Pittsford,
N.Y.
7:30 p.m.
TGC Champions Tour, Dick's
Sporting Goods Open, second round, at
Endicott, N.Y. (same-day tape)
MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL
4 p.m.
FOX Regional coverage, N.Y. Mets
at Texas, Washington at Chicago White
Sox, LA. Angels at LA. Dodgers, or
Cleveland at San Francisco
7 p.m.
1'EMM- RegionalIcoverae, Mirnesota
at Milwaukee or Oakland at Philadelphia
WGN Chicago Cubs at Kansas
City
MOTORSPORTS
9:30 a.m.
SPEED MotoGP World
championship Dutch Grand Prix, at
*Assen, Netherlands (same-day tape)
12 Midnight
SPEED -AMA Pro Motocross 450, at
Lakewood, Colo. (same-day tape)
I 1a.m.
SPEED -AMA Pro Motocross 250, at
.Lakewood, Colo. (delayed tape)
TENNIS
7 a.m.
ESPN2 The Championships, third
round, at Wimbledon, England
I p.m.
NBC The Championships, third
round, at Wimbledon, England (live and
,same-day tape)


BASEBALL


,AL standings

East Division
W L
toston 44 30
-New York 43 30
Tampa Bay 41 34
Toronto 36 39
Baltimore 33 39
Central Division
W L
Cleveland 40 33
Detroit 40 35
Chicago 37 39
,Minnesota 32 41
Kansas City 31 44
West Division
W L
Texas 40 36
Seattle 37 38
Los Angeles 37 39
Oakland 34 42


Pct GB
.595 -
.589 lb
.547 3'h
.480 8h
.458 10


Interleague play

Thursday's Games
Washington I, Seattle 0
N.Y. Mets 4, Oakland I
San Francisco 2, Minnesota I
Arizona 5, Kansas City 3
Friday's Games
Arizona at Detroit (n)
Boston at Pittsburgh (n)
Cincinnati at Baltimore (n)
Colorado at N.Y.Yankees (n)
Oakland at Philadelphia (n)
N.Y. Mets at Texas (n)
Tampa Bay at Houston (n)
Chicago Cubs at Kansas City (n)
Minnesota at Milwaukee (n)
Washington at Chicago White Sox (n)
Toronto at St. Louis (n)
LA.Angels at LA. Dodgers (n)
Seattle at Florida (n)
Cleveland at San Francisco (n)
Today's Games
Colorado (Cook 0-2) at N.Y.Yankees
(Sabathia 9-4), 1:05 p.m.
Cleveland (Masterson 5-5) at San
Francisco (Cain 6-4), 4:10 p.m.
LA. Angels (Chatwood 4-4) at LA.
Dodgers (Kuroda 5-8),4:10 p.m.
N.Y. Mets (Niese 6-6) at Texas
(Ogando 7-2),4:10 p.m.
Washington (Gorzelanny 2-5)
at Chicago White Sox (Danks 3-8),
4:10 p.m.
Arizona (Collmenter 4-3) at Detroit


(Verlander 9-3). 7:05 p.m.
Boston (Wakefield 4-2) at Pittsburgh
(Karstens 4-4), 7:05 p.m.
Cincinnati (Arroyo 6-6) at Baltimore
(Matusz I-2), 7:05 p.m.
Oakland (Cahill 7-5) at Philadelphia
(Hamels 9-3), 7:05 p.m.
Tampa Bay (W.Davis 6-5) at Houston
(Norris 4-5), 7:05 p.m.
Chicago Cubs (Zambrano 6-4) at
Kansas City (Duffy 1-2), 7:10 p.m.
Minnesota (Liriano 4-6) at Milwaukee
(Gallardo 8-4),7:10 p.m.
Toronto (C.Villanueva 4-1) at St. Louis
O.Garcia 6-2), 7:15 p.m.
Seattle (Vargas 5-4) at Florida (Volstad
2-7), 10:10 p.m.
Sunday's Games
Arizona at Detroit, 1:05 p.m.
Boston at Pittsburgh, 1:35 p.m.
Cincinnati at Baltimore, 1:35 p.m.
Oakland at Philadelphia, 1:35 p.m.
Colorado at N.Y.Yankees, 2:05 p.m.
Tampa Bay at Houston, 2.05 p.m.
Chicago Cubs at Kansas City, 2:10 p.m.
Minnesota at Milwaukee, 2:10 p.m.
Washington at Chicago White Sox,
2:10 p.m.
Toronto at St. Louis, 2:15 p.m.
N.Y. Mets at Texas, 3:05 p.m.
L.A.Angels at LA Dodgers, 4:10 p.m.
Cleveland at San Francisco, 8:05 p.m.
Seattle at Florida, 10:10 p.m.
Monday's Games
Toronto at Detroit, 6:05 p.m.
Cincinnati atTampa Bay, 7:10 p.m.
LA. Dodgers at Minnesota, 8:10 p.m.
Cleveland at Arizona, 9:40 p.m.
Kansas City at San Diego, 10:05 p.m.
Washington at LA.Angels, 10:05 p.m.
Atlanta at Seattle, 10:10 p.m.

NL standings

East Division
W L Pct GB
Philadelphia 47 29 .618 -
Atlanta 43 33 .566 4
Washington 38 37 .507 8h4
New York 37 38 .493 9h
Florida 33 42 .440 13A
Central Division


Mllwa
St. Lo
Cincin
Plttsb
Chica
Housi


Arizo


W L
aukee 41 35
uis 41 35
inati 39 37
urgh 37 37
go 30 44
ton 28 48
West Division
W L
na 42. 34


San Francisco 41 34 .547 'A
Colorado 37 37 .500 4
Los Angeles 34 42 .447 8
San Diego 32 44 .421 10
Thursday's Game
St. Louis 12, Philadelphia 2
Friday's Game
Atlanta at San Diego (n)
Saturday's Game
Atlanta (jurrjens 9-3) at San Diego
(Mos'eley 2-6), 8:35 p.m.
Sunday's Game
Atlanta at San Diego, 4:05 p.m.
Monday's Game
Colorado at Chicago Cubs, 2:20 p.m.

College World Series.

At TD Ameritrade Park Omaha
Omaha, Neb.
Thursday
Virginia 8, California I, California
eliminated
Friday
Florida. 6, Vanderbilt 4, Vanderbilt
eliminated
South Carolina vs.Virginia (n)
Today
South Carolina vs. Virginia, 7 p.m. (if
necessary)


BASKETBALL

WNBA schedule

Thursday's Games
New York 94,Tulsa 82
Chicago 107, Connecticut 101,OT
Friday's Games
Phoenix atdtlanta (n)
Los Angeles at San Ant6nio (n)
Minnesota at Seattle (n)
Today's Games
Connecticut at Indiana, 7 p.m.
Phoenix at Chicago, 8 p.m.
Sunday's Games
San Antonio at Atlanta, 3 p.m.
Los Angeles at NewYork, 4 p.m.
Tulsa at Washington, 4 p.m.
Indiana at Minnesota, 7 p.m.

NBA Draft first round

At Newark, N.J.
Thursday
1. Cleveland (from L.A. Clippers),
Kyrie Irving, g, Duke.
2. Minnesota, Derrick Williams, f,
Arizona.
3. Utah (from New Jersey), Enes
Kanter, c, Kentucky/Fenerbahce Ulker
(Turkey).
4. Cleveland, Tristan Thompson, f,
Texas.
5. Toronto, Jonas Valanciunas, c,
Lietuvos Rytas (Lithuania).
6. Washington, Jan Vesely, f, Partizan
Belgrade (Serbia).
7.a-Sacramento (traded to Charlotte),
Bismack Biyombo, f, Fuenlabrada (Spain).
8. Detroit, Brandon Knight, g.
Kentucky.
9. Charlotte, Kemba Walker, g,
Connecticut.
10. b-Milwaukee (traded to
Sacramento), Jimmer Fredetteg, BYU.
I '.Golden State, Klay Thompson, g,
Washington State.
12. Utah,Alec Burks, g, Colorado.
13. Phoenix, Markieff Morris, f, Kansas.
14. Houston, Marcus Morris, f, Kansas.
15. c-Indiana (traded to San Antonio),
Kawhi Leonard, f, San Diego State.
16. Philadelphia, Nikola Vucevic, c,
Southern Cal.
17. New York, Iman Shumpert, g,
Georgia Tech.
18. Washington (from Atlanta), Chris
Singleton, f, Florida State.
19. d-Charlotte from New Orleans
via Portland (traded to Milwaukee),Tobias
Harris, f, Tennessee.
20. e-Minnesota (from Memphis via
Utah), Donatas Motiejunas, f, Benetton
Treviso (Italy).
21. Portland, Nolan Smith, g, Duke.


22. Denver, Kenneth. Faried, f,
Morehead State.
23. e.g-Houston (from Orlando via
Phoenix), Nikola Mirotic, f, Real Madrid
(Spain).
24. Oklahoma City, Reggie Jackson, g,
Boston College.
25. f-Boston, Marshon Brooks, g.
Providence.
26. i-Dallas,Jordan Hamilton, f,Texas.
27. f-New Jersey (from LA Lakers),
Jajuan Johnson, f, Purdue.
28. g,h-Chicago (from Miami via
Toronto), Norris Cole, g. Cleveland State.
29. San Antonio, Cory Joseph, g,Texas.
30. Chicago, Jimmy Butler, f,
Marquette.
Announced Trades
a-acquired from in a three-way trade
with Milwaukee and Sacramento.
b-acquired from in a three-way trade
with Charlotte and Milwaukee.
c-traded to San Antonio for G George
Hill.
d-acquired from in a three-way trade
with Charlotte and Sacramento.
e-Minnesota traded (No: 20) to
Houston for (No. 23).
f-Boston traded the rights to G
Marshon Brooks to New Jersey for the
rights to F Jajuan Johnson and a 2014
second-round draft pick.
g-Minnesota traded rights to F Nikola
Mirotic (No. 23 pick) for the rights to
Chicago for the rights to G Norris Cole
(No.28 pick) and the rights to G Malcolm
Lee (No. 43 pick).
h-Minnesota traded the rights to G
Norris Cole (No. 28 pick) to Miami
for the rights to G Bojan Bogdanovic
(No. 31 pick).
i-Dallas traded the rights to F Jordan
Hamilton (No. 26 pick) to Denver.


AUTO RACING

Race week

NASCAR
Toyota/Save Mart 350
Site: Sonoma, Calif.
Schedule:Today, practice (Speed, 2:30-
5 p.m.); Sunday, race, 3 p.m. (TNT,
2-6:30 p.m.).
Track: Infineon Raceway (road course,
1.99 miles).
Race distance: 218.9 miles, I110 laps.
NATIONWIDE
Bucyrus 200
Site: Elkhart Lake.Wis:
Schedule: Today, qualifying, race,
5:30 p.m. (ESPN, 5-9 p.m.)
Track: Road America (road course,
4.048 miles).
Race distance: 202.4 miles, 50 laps.
INDYCAR
Iowa Corn Indy 250
Site: Newton, Iowa.
Schedule: Today, race, 8 p.m. (Versus,
6:30-11 p.m.)
Track: Iowa Speedway' (oval, 0.875
miles).
Race distance: 218.75 miles, 250 laps.
NHRA FULL THROTTLE
Summit Racing Equipment NHRA
Nationals
Site: Norwalk, Ohio.
Schedule: Today, qualifying (ESPN2,.
10 p.m.-midnight); Sunday, final
eliminations (ESPN2, 8-11 p.m.).
Track: Summit Motorsports Park.
FORMULA ONE
European Grand Prix
Site:Valencia, Spain.
Schedule: Today, practice, qualifying
(Speed, 8-9:30 a.m.) Sunday, race, 8 a.m.
(FOX, noon-2 p.m.).
Track Valencia Street Circuit (road
course, 3.367 miles)
Race distance: 191.93 miles, 57 laps.


TENNIS

Wimbledon singles

At The All England Lawn Tennis &
Croquet Club
Wimbledon, England
Friday
Men
Second Round
David Ferrer (7), Spain, def. Ryan
Harrison, United States, 6-7 (6), 6-1, 4-6,
6-3,6-2.
Jurgen Melzer (I l),Austria,def.Dmitry
Tursunov, Russia, 6-3, 2-6, 7-6 (5), 7-6 (I).
Bernard Tomic; Australia, def. Igor
Andreev, Russia, 4-6, 5-7, 6-3, 6-4, 6- I.
Third Round
Feliciano Lopez, Spain, def. Andy
Roddick (8), United States, 7-6 (2), 7-6
(2), 6-4.
Richard Gasquet (17), France, def.
Simone Bolelli, Italy, 6-3, 6-2,6-4.
Andy Murray (4), Britain, def. Ivan
Ljubicic, Croatia, 6-4,4-6, 6- I,7-6 (4).
Rafael Nadal (1), Spain, leads Gilles
Muller, Luxembourg, 7-6 (6), rain.
Gael Monfils (9), France, vs. Lukasz
Kubot, Poland, 3-6,6-3, 3-3 (40-40), susp.,
rain.
nTomas Berdych (6), Czech Republic,
leads Alex Bogomolov Jr., United States,
6-2, 6-4,4-3 (15-0), susp., rain.
Juan Martin del Potro (24),Argentina,
leads Gilles Simon (15), France, 7-6 (8),
2-4 (30-30), susp., rain.
Women
Second Round
Caroline Wozniacki (I), Denmark, def.
Virginie Razzano, France, 6-1, 6-3.
Marion Bartoli (9), France, def.Lourdes
Dominguez Lino, Spain, 4-6, 7-5, 6-2.
Peng Shuai (20), China, def. Elena
Baltacha, Britain, 4-6, 6-2, 7-5.
Maria Sharapova (5), Russia, def. Laura
Robson, Britain, 7-6 (4), 6-3.
Third Round
Yanina Wickmayer (19), Belgium, def.
Svetlana Kuznetsova (12), Russia, 4-6,
6-3, 6-4.
Ksenia Pervak, Russia, def. Andrea
Petkovic ( II), Germany, 6-4, 7-6 (2).
Nadia Petrova, Russia, def. Kateryna
Bondarenko, Ukraine, 6-3, 6-2.


Venus Williams (23), United States.
def. Maria Jose Martinez Sanchez, Spain,
6-0, 6-2.
Petra Kvitova (8), Czech Republic. def.
Roberta Vinci (29), Italy, 6-3, 6-3.
Tsvetana Pironkova (32), Bulgaria, def.
Vera Zvonareva (2), Russia, 6-2, 6-3.
Victoria Azarenka (4), Belarus, def.
Daniela Hantuchova (25), Slovakia, 6-3,
3-6, 6-2.
Tamira Paszek.Austria, leads Francesca
Schiavone (6), Italy, 3-6, 6-4, 3-2, susp.,
rain.


TONY BRITT/Lake City Reporter

Modern Woodman support

The Columbia County Recreation Department participated in the Modern Woodmen of
America Matching Fund Grant for the second year. Through the program, local agents
Virginia Tiner and Mark McRae have matched contributions totaling $5000. The money is
used to provide and support youth programs and special events throughout the year.
Tiner has supported youth recreation programs for 20 years, during which time Modern
Woodmen of America has contributed more than $20,000 to Columbia Youth Football
Association, Columbia AAU Basketball Association, the Goodwill Games 17-and-under
Basketball Tournament and other organizations. Joining in the presentation are Columbia
County Recreation Department Senior Recreation Aide Adee Farmer (from left), Modern
Woodmen of America Chapter Secretary Stacy McRae, Shelby Christie, Columbia County
Recreation Department Director Mario Coppock, Virginia Tiner of Modern Woodman and
Modern Woodmen Financial Representative Mark McRae.


BRIEFS


CHS FOOTBALL GIRLS SOFTBALL

Fundraiser dinner Crushers clinic

at Olustee Park set for July 11-15


Columbia High football
supporters have a
barbecue chicken
fundraiser planned from
11 a.m. to 2 p.m. Friday at
Olustee Park. Dinners are
$5 and include a
quarter chicken, potato
salad, baked beans and
role. Sweet tea is $1.
Tickets can be purchased
at Hair's Mowei Parts and
Hunter Printing.
For details, call Clara
Crews at (386) 697-6524.

ZUMBA
Benefit today for

tornado victims

A Zumbathon to
benefit Missouri
tornado victims is
9-10:30 a.m. today at Teen
Town Recreation Center.
Cost is $10. Participants
should wear luau attire
suitable for dancing.
For details, contact
Sarah at lakecityzumba@
gmail.com.


ACROSS

1 Website
4 RR terminal
7 noire
11 Chiang ---
shek
12 Vanquish a
dragon
13 Sandwich
cookie
14 Relativity name
16 Favoritism
17 "The Wreck of
the Mary -"
18 Poker pair
19 Kennel sound
20 Books pro
21 Chilly
24 Give comfort
27' Filch
28 Joie de vivre
30 Season
32 Between ports
34 Revival shout
36 Estuary
37 Theorem foun-
dations
39 Helena rival


Columbia Crushers
Softball Organization is
holding an elite softball




Unscramble these four Jumbles,
one letter to each square,
to form four ordinary words.

I ETHTE


clinic for girls of all ages
from 8 a.m. to noon on
July 11-15. Registration is
at Brian's Sports.
For details, call
755-4271.

From staff reports

THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME
by David L. Hoyt and Jeff Knurek




"qr \ J


Hurry! Come on!
-< I.CW AX Get a moveon!
ODLR L We're behind schedule
THEY WOUL- HAVE
I N15HEP THE PROJECT
60 5QOONER HA TH-EY

PIMIRA PO T5.
Now arrange the circled letters
to form the surprise answer, as
suggested by the above cartoon.

Answer: ^
n (Answers Monday)

Yesterday's Jumbles: CRACK THEME BOUNTY UNFAIR
Answer: The orchard started by Yogi and Smokey was.
almost certain to do this BEAR FRUIT


41 Mauna-
42 Seance sound
43 Honk
45 Fields of study
48 Just
49 Fly (2 wds.)
52
Mark'sreplace
ment
53 Like good
cheddar
54 Width of a cir.
55 Early garden?
56 Hippie's digs
57 PD dispatch

DOWN

1 Luau strings
2 Maraud
3 Row
4 Lie dormant
5 Mai (rum
drink)
6 Author Rand
7 Wild felines
8 Cleveland's
lake
9 Mild brews


Answer to Previous Puzzle

DAM RPM BOD
OLE HEAT RAGE
VAN NKY Y AYLA
ENVD NG R N0 ELN



FWOLDR GO




ER I IM U RB


Dawn goddess
Bowling feat
Utters
GI address
Orange road
marker


Want more puzzles?
Check out the "Just Right Crossword Puzzles" books
at QuillDriverBooks.com


6-25


21 Two-piece part
22 Diva -
Ponselle
23 Mountain goat
24 Club (retail
chain)
25 Male deer
26 Journalist -
Ducommun
29 Prayer-wheel
turner
31 kwon do
33 Pilot's flap
35 Came closer
to
38 Comics cave-
man
40 Eject
42 Did a lawn
chore
43 Modem-speed
unit
44 Patrick's
domain
46 Verdi heroine
47 Lop off
48 Service
charge
49 Collect maple
sap
50 Turkish offi-
cial
51 Chat


2011 UFS, Dist. by Universal Uclick for UFS


Page Editor: Brandon Finley, 754-0420













LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS SATURDAY, JUNE 25, 2011


Two Florida players



drafted in second round


Associated Press

The Houston Rockets
reacquired the 38th over-
all pick from Minnesota for
cash and drafted Florida
forward Chandler Parsons.
The Rockets initially
dealt the 38th pick to the
Timberwolves as part of
a proposed deal that sent
the 23rd pick, a future first-
round pick and center Brad
Miller to Minnesota for 7-
foot Lithuanian Donatas
Motiejunas and point guard
Jonny Flynn.
The 6-foot-9 Parsons
averaged 11.3 points and
7.8 rebounds in 36 games
for the Gators last season.
Earlier, the Rockets used
the 14th overall pick to take
Kansas forward Marcus
Morris.
The Detroit Pistons
selected Florida's Vernon
Macklin in the second
round of the NBA draft with
the 52nd pick overall.


The 6-foot-lO Macklin
averaged 11.6 points per
game last season for the
Gators. He began his col-
lege career at Georgetown,
where he played two sea-
sons before transferring to
Florida to play two more.
The Pistons drafted point
guard Brandon Knight of
Kentucky in the first round
and 6-foot-8 Kyle Singler of
Duke earlier in the second.
The addition of Macklin
gives them another big
body inside along with
Greg Monroe, the team's
first-round pick last year.

Large player contingent
attends NBA labor
meeting

NEW YORK Dressed
in matching T-shirts urging
solidarity, NBA players are
meeting with owners with
less than a week left before
the expiration of the collec-


tive bargaining agreement.
The union's executive
committee was joined by a
large contingent of players
in New York for player rep-
resentative meetings who
decided to attend Friday's
negotiating session.
Executive director Billy
Hunter said he was told late
Thursday night that the play-
ers had decided to attend.
He said the message of their
attendance in shirts reading
"STAND" was "just solidarity,
that we have to stand togeth-
er, we have to be unified and
be prepared to address what-
ever the circumstance is, but
address it together."
The CBA expires June
30 and the sides remain
far apart. Both made new
proposals in a meeting
Tuesday, but Commissioner
David Stern considered the
union's economic move
to be "modest" and play-
ers believe owners haven't
budged on their insistence


for a hard salary cap.
And with both indicating
they may have reached the
limit for what they would
concede, there was a sense
that Friday's session could
be unproductive.
Owners are meeting
Tuesday in Dallas, where
they could vote to lock out
the players it a deal hasn't
been reached by the dead-
line. But Hunter feels nego-
tiations can continue past
that point.
"The 30th, it can be just
another date. They're the
ones who determine wheth-
er or not it should carry
more significance than it
really should," he said.
"What happens on the 30th
is thal the collective bar-
gaining agreement expires.
It doesn't mean that it has
to be the end of negotia-
tions, it doesn't mean that it
has to be a lockout. The ball
is in their court and they
will decide how to treat it."


ASSOCIATED PRESS
In this March 1 file photo Florida's Chandler Parsons (25)
shoots for three points while Tony Mitchell (5) tries to block
the shot in Gainesville.


ASSOCIATED PRESS
The No. 10 overall draft pick, BYU's Jimmer Fredette, who was selected by the Milwaukee
Bucks, smiles during the NBA basketball draft Thursday in Newark, N.J. He was traded to
the Sacramento Kings.


Kings end up with Fredette

after three-team trade


By JOSH DUBOW
Associated Press

SACRAMENTO, Calif:
- The Sacramento Kings
found a shooter they hope
they can eventually pair in
the backcourt with Tyreke
Evans and a high-profile
player'to help in market-
ing when they ended up
with high-scoring guard
Jimmer Fredette after
making a draft-day trade
Thursday with Charlotte
and Milwaukee.
The Kings moved from
seventh to 10th in the draft,
while also acquiring swing-
man John Salmons from the
Bucks and sending guard
Beno Udrih to Charlotte.
That created a need in
Sacramento for a shooter
in the backcourt who could
also play some point guard,
making Fredette an attrac-
tive option.
Fredette won nearly
every player of the year
award at BYU last season
after leading the nation in
scoring with 28.9 points
per game, including the
Naismith, Wooden, AP and
the USBWA awards. With
his seemingly unlimited
shooting range and a long
list of highlights, Fredette
was one of the most popu-
lar players in college bas-
ketball.
That popularity could
benefit the Kings, who
nearly moved to Anaheim
after this past season and


are hoping to generate
enough interest to build a
new arena in Sacramento.
The city must have a new
arena plan by March 1 or
the franchise will likely
relocate.
Fredette topped 30
points in 16 of his 37
games at BYU last season,
including three 40-point
games and a career-high
52 in one game against
New Mexico. He also avei-
aged 4.3 assists per game
and made 124 3-pointers
in helping BYU reach the
regional semifinals of the
NCAA tournament before
falling to Florida.
There were questions
heading into the draft
about Fredette's ability to
defend quicker and big-
ger NBA guards, but the
Kings believed the 6-foot-
2 Fredette would work
well in a backcourt with
Evans, who won the NBA
Rookie of the Year, award
in 2009-10. The 6-6 Evans
has the ability to match up
with bigger guards defen-
sively, easing the load on
Fredette.
The Kings also have
Marcus Thornton in what
figures to be a three-guard
rotation in the backcourt.
Thornton averaged 21.3
points in 23 games for
Sacramento after being
acquired in a midseason
trade with New Orleans.
While Evans' strengths
offensively are as a slasher


who is able to score in the
paint, Fredette gives the
Kings one of the best out-
side shooters who should
have room to operate on an
offense that also includes
last year's first-round pick,
center DeMarcus Cousins.
Fredette also gives the
Kings another ballhandler
and distributor to take pres-
sure off Evans, who is not a
natural point guard. Evans
was hindered this past sea-
son by plantar fasciitis in
his left foot. Evans played
just 57 games, averaging
17.8 points, 5.6 assists and
4.8 rebounds per game.
Those numbers were all
down from his spectacular
rookie season.
But the Kings are hoping
a healthy Evans, a more
seasoned Cousins and now
Fredette will help improve
a franchise that has had
five straight losing sea-
sons. Sacramento went 24-
58 last season, their third
straight year with fewer
than 30 wins. Washington
and Minnesota are the
only other teams that have
not reached 30 wins in any
of the past three seasons.
The Kings drafted for-
ward Bismack Biyombo of
Congo with the seventh
pick that they sent to
Charlotte. Guards Brandon
Knight and Kemba Walker
went with the next two
picks, creating a natural
comparison with Fredette
over the next few seasons.


GATORS: Move on to CWS final
Continued From Page 1B


eight but walked five, ,and
had trouble picking up
Nolan Fontana's bunt that
loaded the bases in the
deciding eighth inning.
Corey Williams came in
to face Tucker, who was
hitting .364 in the national
tournament. He drilled a


1-0 pitch over left fielder
Tony Kemp for his NCAA
tournament-leading 19th
RBI.
Panteliodis, the New
York Mets' ninth-round
draft pick, retired the last
eight batters he faced
before he turned the game


over to the normally reli-
able Florida bullpen.
Tommy Toledo faced
five batters, getting pulled
after Connor Harrell's two-
out single made it 4-2. Nick
Maronde walked the bases
full, then walked Kemp to
make it a one-run game.


TENNIS: Lopez knocks off Roddick
Continued From Page 1B


current employer."
Roddick lost to Roger
Federer in the 2004, 2005
and 2009 finals 16-14 in
the fifth set of that last one
- but only made it as far as
the fourth round last year,
and second round in 2008.
"What do you do? You
keep moving forward
until you decide to stop,"
Roddick said. "At this point,
I've not decided to stop, so
I'll keep moving forward."
He hasn't been past the
quarterfinals at any of the
past seven major tourna-
ments;' he withdrew from
the French Open in May
because of a right shoulder
injury, but said he's' healthy
at the moment.
That, in part, is why
Roddick figured he'd make
a deep run at the grass-
court Grand Slam tourna-
ment.
"He gears a lot of his
year for Wimbledon. It's a
tough loss," said Roddick's
coach, Larry Stefanki. "He's
disappointed. Very disap-
pointed."
It didn't help that Lopez
was nearly perfect, conjur-
ing up 57 winners and eight
unforced errors.
"Unbelievable," Lopez
said. "When I came back in
the locker room, my coach-
es told me. I was surprised
that I didn't miss anything,
almost."
Because of rain, only
one other third-round
men's match finished by
the early evening: No. 17
Richard Gasquet of France
beat Simone Bolelli of
Italy 6-3, 6-2, 6-4. Gasquet
next meets the winner of a
match between No. 4 Andy
Murray and Ivan Ljubicic
that was being played under
the Centre Court roof.
Roddick is the highest-
seeded man out of the tour-
nament so far. Two of the
top three women already
are gone: No. 2 Vera
Zvonareva, 'the runner-up
at Wimbledon and'the U.S.
Open in 2010, was elimi-
nated by No. 32 Tsvetana
Pironkova of Bulgaria 6-2, 6-
3 Friday, less than 24 hours
after No. 3 Li Na, the French
Open champion, lost.
Pironkova reached
the semifinals last year,
when she upset five-time
Wimbledon champion
Venus Williams, and they'll
have a rematch in the fourth
round next week. Williams
overpowered 76th-ranked
Maria Jose Martinez
Sanchez of Spain 6-0, 6-2 on
Court 1.
"I'm in the next round.
That's my main goal,
regardless whether I play
amazing, whether I play
halfway decent. Doesn't
matter," Williams said. "It's
just about finding a way to
win."
Looking ahead to facing
Pironkova, Williams said:
"Last year, you know, I think


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Spain's Feliciano Lopez celebrates a point during his match
against Andy Roddick of the US at the All England Lawn
Tennis Championships at Wimbledon on Friday.


I just got unhappy with how
I was playing, and I let that
affect my game. This year, I
won't let that happen."
Another past Wimbledon
winner, Maria Sharapova,
struggled at the start
against 17-year-old Laura
Robson of Britain before
righting herself to win their
second-round match 7-6 (4),
6-3, her shot-accompanying
shrieks as loud as ever.
Sharapova trailed 4-1
early, then fell behind 4-2 in
the tiebreaker, before tak-
ing the-set's last five points,
closing it with a 108 mph
service winner against 2008
Wimbledon junior cham-
pion Robson.
"She was much more
aggressive than I was in the
beginning," Sharapova said.
"But then I just kind of got
my rhythm a little bit and
started playing better."
STop-seeded Caroline
Wozniacki also won a
delayed second-round
match, as did 2007 finalist
Marion Bartoli. Defending
champion Rafael Nadal's
match was among several
in the third round stopped
because of rain Friday eve-
ning.
Having saved two set
points against Gilles Muller
of Luxembourg, the -top-
seeded Nadal came back
to take the opener 7-6 (6),
despite slipping behind the
baseline and tumbling to
his knees. At the ensuing
changeover, Nadal asked
to see the trainer for treat-
ment.
But play was suspend-
ed before the start of the
second set, then called off
for the day at about 7 p.m.
Shortly thereafter, Nadal


walked out of the club with-
out any noticeable hitch in
his gait.
It has rained on four of
the first five days of compe-
tition, but the tournament
press office said there hasn't
been consideration given to
scheduling matches for the
middle Sunday, tradition-
ally a day off at Wimbledon.
Saturday's forecast calls
for a chance of rain in the
morning, but dry weather
in the afternoon.
In three second-round
men's matches held over
from Thursday, 18-year-old
Bernard Tomic of Australia,
the youngest man left,
defeated Igor Andreev of
Russia 4-6, 5-7, 6-3, 6-4, 6-
,1; No. 11 Jurgen Melzer
of Austria beat Dmitry
Tursunov of Russia 6-3, 2-
6, 7-6 (5), 7-6 (1); and No.
7 David Ferrer of Spain
finished off a 6-7 (6), 6-1,
4-6, 6-3, 6-2 comeback vic-
tory over 19-year-old Ryan
Harrison of the United
States.
Harrison credited
Roddick with being a men-
tor.
"He's helped me deal
with every situation I've
faced, as far as all the new
stuff I haven't experienced
myself yet," Harrison said.
"He's made himself avail-
able to ask him any ques-
tions, whether or not it's
about tennis, life, priorities,
whatever. I can ask him and
talk to him about anything,
which has been a great help
to me."
Roddick never got com-
fortable against the 44th-
ranked Lopez, who played
his usual classic grass-court
style.


Page Editor: Brandon Finley, 754-0420















LAKE CITY REPORTER ADVICE & COMICS SATURDAY, JUNE 25, 2011


DILBERT


BABY BLUES

W4 ISb
A->A-M-MA-A.. TO
|[ ---

BLONDIE


BEETLE BAILEY


HAGARTHE HORRIBLE


SNUFFY SMITH


ZITS


GARFIELD


B.C.
I


FRANK & ERNEST.


DEAR ABBY


Girl bothered by little things

must think of bigger picture


DEAR ABBY: I am a
teenage girl and my fam-
ily is important to me. I
really wish I could treat
them better. My mom and
I always fight. She says
little things and I get mad
at her. I feel bad for snap-
ping at her and my sisters
all the time because I real-
ly want them to know how
much they mean to me.
They are the best family
you could ever get, and I
just push them away.
Mom is going through
a lot of health problems,
and I know my being mean
won't help her get better.
Abby, help me, please. -
- TEENAGE GIRL IN
OHIO

DEAR TEENAGE
GIRL: The first thing
you need to remember is
that because your moth-
er is experiencing health
problems, she may not
be at her best which
is why she says some of
those "little things" that
make you angry. Before
you react and take them
personally, you need to
remind yourself that she
may be having a bad day.
When you are upset and
under stress, you should
not take it out on your sis-
ters. A better way to cope
would be, rather than say-
ing something hurtful, to


Abigail Van Buren
www.dearobby.com
leave the room or take a
walk and organize your
thoughts. You'll then be
better able to communi-
cate your feelings in a
rational way and avoid a
fight.
Please try it. These are
skills that take practice,
but if you master them
they will serve you for a
lifetime. Now, go hug your
mother, tell her you love
her and apologize.

DEAR ABBY: I am
extremely overweight (5-
foot-6 and 331 pounds). I
am 38 years old, and the
weight is now catching up
with me. It hurts to get up
in the morning. My knees
hurt walking up the stairs,
and I can't bear to look at
myself (to the point that I
will not go out exceptto
work). I have started to
pull away from my family.
"Just lose 'the weight"?
Easier said than done!
I lost 110 pounds, then
gained it back and more.
I don't know who to turn


to, but I know I need help.
-- TOO BIG TO ENJOY
LIFE

DEAR TOO BIG: I'm
glad you wrote, because
I'm going to recommend
a multi-pronged approach.
The first person to con-
tact is your physician, and
tell him or her that you
are ready to take off the
weight and you need help.
Then ask for a referral to
a psychologist, to help you
understand the emotion-
al reasons you have put
on so much weight, and
also an American Dietetic
Association-registered
nutritionist who can help
you craft a healthy eating
program that works for
you.
You will also have to
make some lifestyle
changes, but they will
SAVE YOUR LIFE. And
remember, losing weight
will take time. You didn't
put it on overnight; it
won't come off overnight.
But by writing to me you;
have already taken your
first step in the right direc-
tion, and L'm urging you to
continue moving down the
same path.

M Write Dear Abby at
www.DearAbby.com or
P.O. Box 69440, Los
Angeles, CA 90069.


HOROSCOPES


ARIES (March 21-April
19): Don't jump to conclu-
sions, especially when deal-
ing with house and family
matters. You mustn't upset
someone who counts on
you or contributes to your
emotional well-being. Do
whatever it takes to please
the ones you love. ***
TAURUS (April 20-May
20): Attend a conference
or seminar that gives you
insight into something
you would like to pursue.
Temptation to exaggerate
will be difficult to over-
come but, if you give a false
impression, you will suffer
the consequences. ***
GEMINI (May 21-June
20): Get involved in chal-
lenging activities. Too
much time on your hands
will lead to arguments. A
moneymaking opportunity
is apparent Someone from
your past,is looking for you.
A secret will be revealed.

CANCER (June 21-July
22): Let'your imagination
run wild and you will come
up with a spectacular idea
for a service you can offer
others. Don't limit what
you can do because you
are afraid of failure. Do
your research and you will
find a way to start small
and build. **
LEO (July 23-Aug. 22):
Look for a little adven-
ture. Travel, socializing


THE LAST WORD
Eugenia Last

and enjoying a 'change of
scenery should be high
on your list. A mini vaca-
tion or stepping out with
friends or your lover will
lead to a chance to make
new acquaintances who
have something to offer
you. *****
VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept.
22): You'll face plenty of
opposition and trouble if
you aren't precise in the
way you express what you
want, know or need. Anger
will mount and mistakes
will be made. Honesty will
be the only answer. Keep
a tight hold on your cash.

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct.
22): Don't let work and
professional problems get
you .down. Concentrate
on 'what you can accom-
plish, learn or enjoy. Love
is in the stars and you can
enhance your current rela-
tionship or meet someone
special, if you are single.
Participation will be the
key.***'
SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov.
21): Talk to someone who
has walked a path similar
to the one you are walking
and you will get a valid
view of what you should or
shouldn't do. Real estate,
investments and money
owed to you can all play


a role in a decision you
make. ***
SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-
Dec. 21): Keep everything
out in the open so you
aren't accused of keeping
secrets or doing some-
thing behind someone's
back. A relationship with
someone will be tested if
you break a promise. Use
your imagination. **.*
CAPRICORN (Dec.
22-Jan. 19): Spend more
time with friends and fam-
ily. Personal opportunities
will develop if you disctfss
future plans with some-
one with whom you have
an emotional connection.
Put pressure on someone
who is behind, not doing
a good job or not fulfilling
promises made. *****
AQUARIUS Jan. 20-
Feb. 18): Overspending,
overdoing or overindulg-
ing will set you back. Don't
let a poor influence from
your past interfere in your
life now. Gravitate toward
people who can offer you
intellectual and physical
challenges. **
PISCES (Feb. 19-March
20): Be honest and true
to yourself. Don't try to
be someone you are not.
A problem with someone
you love must be taken
care of immediately if you
don't want matters to esca-
late. Speak from the heart.


CELEBRITY CIPHER

by Luis Campos
Celebrity Cipher cryptograms are created from quotations by famous people, past and present.
Each letter in the cipher stands for another.
Today's clue: H equals Y
"GFD GLC XPR TYZTAGTRDO P FTY
TG XPWGF LDWD GC FTZD XDDA XCWA
LPOD TAY GC FTZD XDDA XCWA PA


KCZDWGH."


- OGDZPD LCAYDW


PREVIOUS SOLUTION: "There's one major difference between James Bond
and me! He is able to sort out problems!" Sean Connery
(c) 2011 by NEA, Inc. 6-25


FOR BETTER ORWORSE


CLASSIC PEANUTS


a -


Page Editor: Emogene Graham, 754-0415

















5B


Classified Department: 755-5440


LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED SATURDAY, JUNE 25,2011

Lake City Reporter





CLASSIFIED


Take ADvantage of the
Reporter Classifieds!

755-5440


- ADvantage
A~vantag


Legal

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
COLUMBIA COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File No. 11-74-CP
Division Probate
IN RE: ESTATE OF BETTY LOU
HATCHER
Deceased.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
The administration of the estate of
BETTY LOU HATCHER, deceased,
whose date of death was August 7,
2010, is pending in the Circuit Court
for Columbia County, Florida 320F5.
The names and addresses of which is
173 NE Hemando Avenue, Lake
City, Florida 32055. The names and
addresses of the personal representa-
tive and the personal representative's
attorney are set forth below.
All creditors of the decedent and oth-
er persons having claims or demands
against the decedent's estate on
whom a copy of this notice is re-
quired to be serves must file their
claims with this court WITHIN THE
LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER
THE TIME OF THE FIRST PUBLI-
CATION OF THIS NOTICE ON
THEM.
All other creditors must file their
claims with this court WITHIN 3
MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE.
ALL CLAIMS NOT SO FILED
WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS SET
FORTHf IN SECTION 733.702 OF
THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE
WILL BE FOREVER BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME
PERIODS SET FORTH ABOVE,
ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2)
YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE
DECEDENT'S DATE OF DEATH
IS BARRED.
The Date of the first publication of
this notice is June 18, 2011
Attorney for Personal Representa-
tive:
By:/s/ Matthew C. Mitchell
Attorney for Betty Russ
Florida Bar No.: 0028155
Brannon, Brown, Haley & Bullock,
P.A.
116 NW Columbia Avenue
Lake City, Florida 32055
Tele: 386-752-3213
Email: mcm@bbattoreys.com
Personal Representatilve:
By:/s/ Betty Diane Russ
292 SE Sherrod Court
Lake City, Florida 32055


.f05526122
4 li s June 18, 25, 2011
3 days J175 I-t- --Jo
cl'""*"ls 2 si" ii100 Job
eOpportunities


Ltifited to service type advertis-
ing only. I
lines bne month....s92.00
$10.80 each additional line
Includes an additional $2.00 per
ad for each Wednesday insertion.



You can call us at 755-5440,
Monday through Friday from 8:00
a.m. to 5:00 p.m.
Some people prefer to place their
classified ads in person, and some
ad categories will require prepay-
ment. Our office is located at 180
East Duval Street.
You can also fax or email your ad
copy to the Reporter.
FAX: 386-752-9400 Please
direct your copy to the Classified
Department.
EMAIL: classifieds@lakecityre-
porter.com





AdistoAppearc Call by: FaxEmail by:
Tuesday Mon.,10:00am. Mon, 9:00a.m.
Wednesday Mon., 10:00 am. Mon., 9:00a.m.
Thursday Wed.,10:00a.m. Wed., 9:00 am.
Friday Thurs.,10:00a.m. Thurs., 9:0 a.m.
Saturday Fi., 10:00am. Fri., 00 am.
Sunday Fri.,10:00 am. Fri., 900am.
These deadlines are subject to change without notice.




Ad Errors- Please read your ad
on the first day of publication.
We accept responsibility for only
the first incorrect insertion, and'
only the charge for the ad space
in error. Please call 755-5440
immediately for prompt correc-
tion and billing adjustments.
Cancellations- Normal advertising
deadlines apply for cancellation.
Billing Inquiries- Call 755-5440.
Should further information be
required regarding payments or
credit limits, your call will be trans-
ferred to, the accounting depart-
ment.


Advertising copy is subject to
approval by the Publisher who
reserves the right to edit, reject,
or classify all advertisements under
appropriate headings. Copy should
be checked for errors by the
advertiser on the first day of pub-
lication. Credit for published errors
will be allowed for the first insertion
for that portion of the advertisement
which was incorrect. Further, the
Publisher shall not be liable for any
omission of advertisements ordered
to be published, nor for any general,
special or consequential damages.
Advertising language must comply
with Federal, State or local laws
regarding the prohibition of discrimi-
nation in employment, housing and
public accommodations. Standard
abbreviations are acceptable; how-
ever, the first word of each ad may
not be abbreviated.

In Print and Online
,-wiw.lakeeityreporter.com


05526237
Independent Contractors
We're hauling:fiesh and frozen
food to the Northwest. We have
a Lease Purchase Program,
Leasing 0/0 & PTDI Certified
Students. 100% fuel Surcharge,
NO New England States,
Spouse & Pet Rider Policy.
Call TODAY!! BUEL INC.
866-3,69-9744

Associate Reps
SUMMER WORK/GREAT PAY
Immediate FT/PT openings,
Customer sales/service,
No exp needed, conditions,
Apply Now all ages 17+
(386) 269-0883
Bulldozer Operator, Part time.
Welder, Part time.
Call F.J. Hill Construction
386-752-7887
SCDL Class A Truck Driver.
Flatbed exp. for F/T SE area.
3 years exp or more. Medical
benefits offered. Contact
Melissa or Mary @ 386-935-2773
Elementary & Secondary
teachers needed for private
Christian School BA req'd
Fax resume to: 386-755-3609
Seeking Flatbed Owner/Operators
fully equipped w/own Tarps &
Chains & Binders to run the
southeast. Home on Weekends and
throughout the week. Paying 85%.
Contact Adam or Rick at
386-755-8579 RDH Trucking Inc.
Sales Position available for moti-
vated individual Rountree -Moore
Toyota, Great benefits, paid train-
ing/vacation. Exp. a plus but not
necessary. Call Anthony Cosentino
386-623-7442







Land Clearing

Back Hoe, Dozer, Chopping, root
raking, bush hog, seeding, sod,
disking, site prep, ponds &
irrigation. Free Est! 386-623-3200

Lawn & Landscape Service

Clean Pine Straw,
You pick it up, $1.85 a bale
Delivery of 100 bales $260
386-688-9156
Landscape Maintenance Company
You can trust for knowledge &
pride, Mention this AD!
Mow Green, LLC 386-288-6532

Services

DIVORCE, BANKRUPTCY,
RESUMES.
other court approved forms-
386-961-5896.

Summer Cleaning done your
way. Let me Clean your home be-
fore you leave on Vacation. Come
back home & relax. 386-303-1496.
We come to you! Auto Detailing:
Wash, wax & vaccum. Pressure
Wash: Houses, mobile homes,
driveways, decks. 386-697-2224


100 Job
100 Opportunities

Maintenance Person
Convenience Store Group is
seeking an experienced
Maintenance person. General
Experience to include Electrical,
plumbing and carpentry.
Refrigeration experience would be
a plus. Competitive salary, bonus,
paid holidays, vacation, company
vehicle and opportunity to join a
progressive and fast growing
company
Fax or Email Resume to:
dtumer@fasttrackstores.com
Fax 1-352-333-1161


$250

4 alnes 6 days sEtional
personal merchandise totalling $00 or les.
Each Iam must Include a prc.
This I al non-refundable rate.


$ 1.10
One item per ad ditiona
4 lines 6 daysEc |ad i1ota
Rate applies to private Individuals selling
personal mrchandie totalling 500orless.
Each tem must Include a price.
Thls I a non-refundable rate.



One Item per ad l .

Rate applies to private Individuals sllng
personal merchandise totaling 1000 or less.
This Isa norn-reundable rate



One item per ad $2370
4 lines 6 days Ech additional
Rate apple to private individuals selling
personal merchandise totalling $2,500 or leu.
Each Item must Include a price.
This Is a non-refundable rate.




One Item per ad
4 lines 6 days ac t addtonal
Rate apple to private Individuals sellng.
personal mprchandlse totalling $4.000 or is.
Each Item m t Include a price.
This Is a non-retundabl rate.




One item per ad
4 lines 6 days Each addonal
Rate applies to private Individuals selling
personal merchandise totalling $6,000 or less.
Each item must Include a price
This is a no-relfundable rate.


i^-GarageS^
m~lSale


Free Kittens,
8 weeks old
386-365-0042


Golden Retriever pups CKC.
Shots. 3 females, 5 males
Available July 3 $350. Each
POP. 386-623-1577
MALE COLLIE Puppy for sale.
Pick of litter. Parents on Premises.
$150. negotiable.
386-755-4590 or 365-5150
PUBLISHER'S NOTE
Florida Law 828.29 requires dogs
and cats being sold to be at least 8
weeks old and have a health
certificate.from a licensed
veterinarian documenting they
have mandatory shots and are
free from intestinal and external
parasites. Many species of wild-
life must be licensed by Florida
Fish and Wildlife. If you are
unsure, contact the local
office for information.


330 Livestock &
SSupplies

Black Angus Cows & Heifers
Z Prices Vary
Registered & Commercial
386-719-4802


440 Miscellaneous
Summer Barbecue Special
Tow Behind
Grill/Smoker, $1,250 OBO.
386-719-4802


361 FarmEquipment Mobile Homes
361 Farm 630 for Rent


84 Ford 4610 Tractor.
2WD, Solid
2005 motor,$7,500. OBO
386-867-0005


407 Computers
Compaq Computer, Many extras.
Complete Computer
$80.00
386-755-9984 or 386-292-2170

Machinery &
411 Tools
18" Stihl
chain saw $125.
Call Don
386-963-4560
24' Aluminum
extension ladder
$90.00 Phone Don
386-963-4560
Black & Decker Sander
$10.00
Phone Don
386-963-4560
Pressure washer, 2500 PI,
used one time $125.00
Phone Don
386-963-4560


416 Sporting Goods

Hunt Club Jasper Florida 2150
acres. 14 members. Deer, Hogs,
Turkey, RV sites. Ask for Kenny
(352)516-8719. www.cchcfl.com.


420 Wanted to Buy
K&H TIMBER,
We Buy Pine Hardwood &
Cypress. Large or small tracts.
Call 386-961-1961.
Wanted Junk Cars, Trucks, Vans.
$250 & up CASH! Free Pick Up!
NO title needed !386-878-9260
After 5pm 386- 752-3648.


430 Garage Sales

05526268
TOWNHOMES 133 SE New-
ell Dr. (Hwy 100) BIG SALE.
Doors, windows, sheet rock,
molding, carpet, vinyl flooring,
rafters wet lumber, cook tops,
paint. Sat. 7-12.






MULTI-FAMILY, SAT. 6/25,
7:30-?, 4009 N.W. Colonial Gin.,
in Plantation Subdivision.,Hwy 90
W, clothes, fum., lots of misc.
PUBLISHER'S NOTE
All Yard Sale Ads
Must be Pre-Paid.


440 Miscellaneous

8X10 Single garage door.
White. All hardware
included. $100.00
386-344-1783
Craftsman 10 in miter saw. Pres-
sure washer 2000 PSI. Bench
grinder w/light. All new, in boxes.
Will trade for??? 386-487-5922
My Double Dress Model
Size 10/12. Adjustable.
Like New, In Box $100
386-752-5162 "
Snowbear trailer,
1 ton with spare tire
$275.00
SOLD
Stop gnat & Mosquito bites! Buy
Swamp Gator All natural insect re-
pellent. Family safe. Use head to
toe. Available at The Home Depot.


S.-P


2&3 BR MH. $395 $650. mo.
plus deposit. Water & sewer fur-
nished. Cannon Creek MHP
S386-752-6422
2/2 Units, clean, well maintained,
nice safe park setting, 2 miles to
downtown Lake City, $575 month
+ $575 sec dep, 386-984-8448
13th Month FREE!!
2br /2ba SWMH $475. mo; also
Resid'l RV lots for rent between
Lake City & G'ville. Access to I-
75 & 441 (352)317-1326 for terms
3/2 S of Lake City, (Branford area)
$575 month plus security
386-590-0642 or 386-867-1833
www.suwanneevalleyproperties.com
DWMH for Rent. 3br/2ba
Handicapped accessible.
$650. mo. $500. Dep. No Pets.
386-984-9634. ask for Amber.
Great area! Very clean 2Br/2Ba,
MH, CH/A, Nice kitchen.
$550. mo. + $200 Dep. NO PETS.
(386)755-0064 or (904)771-5924
Mobile Homes for rent in
White Springs, Lake City & Ft.
White. Contact 386-623-3404.
or 386-365-1919
Nice clean 2&3 bdrm, Five Points,
NO PETS,
also 3 bd on the
Westside, 386-961-1482
X-Clean 2/2 SW, 8 mi NW of VA.
Clean acre lot, nice area. $500. mo
+ dep No dogs Non-smoking
environment.386-961-9181

/640 Mobile Homes
640 'for Sale
2010 Lot Model 32x80
Den/LR 3BR/2BA
2280SF 1/2" SR
Call Charles @
Royals Homes 754-6737
2010 Lot Model 3BR/2BA
1624 SE 1/2" Sheetrock
Vaulted Ceiling.
Charles @
Royals Homes 754-6737


2011 Claytin Single
14x76 2BR/2BA
3 walk in Closets
'Call Charles @ Royals
Homes'754-67375
2011 Clayton Homes 4BRNBA
9' Side Walls,
Energy Star Home
Call Charles @ Royals
Homes 754-6737


New Generation Christian School
is hiring an elementary school
teacher. Min. of Bachelors Degree
is req'd. If interested, fax a resume
to (386)758-5597 by July 29th.


120 Medical
120 Employment

05526221
Cancer Care of North Florida is
currently seeking a
MEDICAL ASSISTANT for a
fast paced work environment
Requires HS Diploma and
Phlebotomy certification
Imtergy Experience and
excellent verbal/written
communication skills.
Qualified candidates please
email resume to: jpapesh@can-
cercarenorthflorida.com

05526277
NEED TWO (2) either EDA or
CDA Dental Assistants for a tem-
porary position.
Positions will be approximately 36
hours per week four days per
week. Rotating schedule. Must be
able to work until 7:00 pm and
able to work
Saturday 1/2 day. Temporary po-
sition approximately end of July
through end of November to cover
for leave of absence for current as-
sistants.
If you are interested in making
some holiday money, please fax
resume to 386-752-8601 at your
earliest convenience.


240 Schools &
Education

04544843
Interested in a Medical Career?.
Express Training offers;
courses for beginners & exp
Nursing Assistant, $479
next class-07/11/10

Phlebotomy national certifica-
tion, $800 next class-07/11/11

Continuing education
Fees incl. books, supplies, exam
fees. Call 386-755r4401 or
expresstrainingservices.com


310 Pets & Supplies

FREE KITTEN
TO GOOD HOME, Orange Male
Tabby w/crooked tail. Litter
trained Call 386-365-7360


640 Mobile Homes
6 for Sale

Hallmark Real Estate. 2004
DWMH just minutes from the riv-
er. Detached carport. Front & back
screened porches. MLS#77398
Paula Lawrence 386-623-1973
Only at Royals Homes
Can your home be
prepared for real brick?
Call Bo @ 754-6737
NEW D/W Reduced Thousands.
3br/2ba set, delivery, A/C
skirting, steps. $39,900.
Call Ken (386)754-8844
AS IS, WHERE IS...32X80, 4/2,
LR/Den, needs carpet, paint, 2400
sqft. has metal roof, vinyl siding.
$31,000. Randy 386-754-0198
FIRE YOUR LANDLORD
TO OWN WHAT YOUR
THROWING AWAY IN RENT.
CALL MIKE 386-754-8844
NEW 32X70 4/3. 2K sqft+. L/R,
DenSidex side, glasstop range,
D/W. Del, set, Steps, A/C, skirt-
ing. $59,900. Ken (386)754-8844
OWNER FINANCE 40% Down
w/land Equity or CASH on any
new or used singlewide or Double-
wide. Randy 386-754-0198.
The Economy has forced
me to cut the price on my
3 bedroom, 2 bath home to
$38K (352)-870-5983
Pre-Owned 2BR/1 Bath
Priced to move 754-6737
Only @ Royals Homes
www.royalshomesales.com
Sales Price Doubled?
Not at Royals, Honest people,
Quality Homes.
Call Royals Homes
@ 386-754-6737
Service Manager on Site
makes sure your satisfied, not
someone doing it all
Royals Homes 386-754-6737
There is a Difference.
Just ask our Customers
We do what we say
Call Phil@ Royals Homes
386-754-6737

650 obile Home
650 & Land
67.5 ac.Ranch, fenced & cross
fenced. Spacious moblie home
w/large front deck & RV hookup
MLS 75607 $299,000. Access
Realty. Patti Taylor. 386-623-6896


Century 21/The Darby Rogers Co.
DWMH on 5 ac. 3br/2ba Back 2
S ,ac. fenced. Owners motivated.
Debbie Myles 386-719-'1224
M MLS# 75830 $99,900


Hallmark Real Estate. 3/2
DWMH 1/2 ac south of town.
Columbia City. Paved frontage,
comer lot. $57,500
MLS#77654 Janet Creel 719-0382
Owner Finance, Nice 3/2, S of
Lake City, small down/$590 mo
386-590-0642 or 386-867-1833
www.suwanneevalleyproperties.com

710 Unfurnished Apt.
710 For Rent








04545256
SPRING HILL VILLAGE
Excellent High Springs location.
1, 2 & 3 bedroom floor-plans;
some with garages.
Call 386-454-1469
or visit our website:
www.springhillvillage.net

2BR APT.
Downtown Location, Clean.
$500 mo, plus Security.
NO PETS. Call 386-755-3456
2BR/1.5BA w/garage
5 minutes from VA hospital.
Call for details.
386-755-4590 or 365-5150
2br/lba duplex, NW Georgia
Ave. Renovated & energy effi-
cient. Tile floors, W/D, $475/Mo.
$300 Dep. 386-755-1937
A Landlord You Can Love!
.2 br Apts $575. & up + sec. Great
area. CH/A washer/dryer hookups.
386-758-9351/352-208-2421


.. .

~g~b. .
wee in*your Sunday paper adav














O -,0




-as
In Weely Copon Svings


2011 Legacy Model 1980 SF
Wood Cab, 3BR/2BA
Deluxe Int.erior
Call Charles @
Royals Homes 754-6737
2011 SE Triple wide
16" OC Home WZII
Total upgrade call Charles
@ Royals Homes 754-6737
Any Size, Any Shape
we have the home for you
Call Royals Homes @
S386-754-6737
Architect Designed,
Green Engineered
Energy Homes
@Royals Homes
www.royalshomesales.com
Ask about our Energy Star Top
Insulation &.Windows, Better
Built,Better Comfort, Phil @
Royals Homes 386-754-6737
Custom Built Modular's,
Bring your plans to
Royals Homes
386-754-6737
www.royalshomesales.com
Finance Manager on Site,
Know's how to get it done,
not a Salesman Guessing
Call Phil @ Royals
Homes 386-754-6737
Flashy? Pretty?
Whatabout Construction?
Homesto last a Lifetime
Royals Homes
386-754-6737
Only a Few Left
2010 Models must go!
Call Royals Homes @
386-754-6737


BUY I


S Er LI Ti


FIND 11














Classified Department: 755-5440


LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED SATURDAY, JUNE 25, 2011


710 Unfurnished Apt.
710 For Rent
Furnished or unfurnished
Townhomes on the golf course.
$750. mo. plus security. Includes
water. 386-752-9626
NICE APT Downtown. Remod-
eled 1 bedroom. Kitchen, dining,
living room. $450. mo plus sec.
386-362-8075 or 386-754-2951
The Lakes Apts. Studios & IBr's
from $135/wk. Util. & cable incl.,
Sec 8 vouchers accepted, monthly
rates avail Call 386-752-2741
Updated apartments w/tile floors
& fresh paint. Excellent location.
From $450. + sec.
Call Michelle 386-752-9626

720 Furnished Apts.
l720 For Rent
lbr Apt. incl. water, elec, & cable.
$595. mo. Close to college. Good
area in Lulu. References & sec.
req'd. No pets. 386-719-4808
Neat as a Whistle! lbr., utilities,
AC TV, Cable, micro, clean, quiet,
shady, Close to town. 41S,
$135 wk. 386-755-0110
Rooms for Rent. Hillcrest, Sands,
Columbia. All furnished. Electric,
cable, fridge, microwave. Weekly
or monthly rates. 1 person $135,
2 persons $150. weekly
386-752-5808

730Unfurnished
730 Home For Rent

05526256
3/2, $1100.mo, 5 ac., dep neg.,
386-466-2391,
438-4054 or 752-1160 at
7137 S US Hwy 441, Lake City

lbr/lba Free ele. Utilities incl. 4mi
S. Lake City. $300dep. $375mo.
386-590-0642 or 386-867-1833
www.suwanneevalleyproperties.com
2 bedroom 1 bath on
5 acres. $700.00 per month.
First, last and security.
386-590-5333
2br Private Country
Home. Remodeled,
everything is new. Large yard.
386-752-1444
3br/1.5ba. Very clean, CH/A
Fenced (privacy) large back yard.
Nice area/location. $800. mo $800.
dep. Ref's req'd. (941)920-4535
4br/2ba in town.
Good neighborhood. $900. mo
1st & $900 security. No Pets.
386-755-6916

750 Business &
5 Office Rentals
FOR LEASE: Downtown office
space. Convenient to
Court house.
Call 386-755-3456
For Lease: E Baya Ave. Two -
1000 sqft office space units or
combined for 2000 sqft. 386-984-
0622 or weekends 386-497-4762
OFFICE SPACE for lease.
Oak Hill Plaza. 900 sqft
$675mo/$695. sec dep.
Tom 386-961-1086 DCA Realtor
788 S Marion Ave, Commercial
bldg with hwy frontage,
near downtown.
Call Scott Stewart at Westfield
Realty Group. 386-867-3498

790 Vacation Rentals

Horseshoe Beach Scalloping Spcl
Gulf Front 2br, w/lg porch, dock,
fish sink. wkend $395./wk $895.
386-235-3633/352-498-5986
alwaysonvacation.com #419-181
"Florida's Last Frontier"


805 Lots for Sale
5 Acre Lot, Secluded & Cleared,
MLS# 67871 $55,000
Call Lisa Waltrip
@ 386-365-5900
westfieldrealtygroup.com
Great Package Deal $43,500
Nicely wooded. 3 lots in Emerald
Cove. (1)Private cul-de-sac.
Aaron Nickelson 386-867-3534
Westfield Realty Group
Hallmark Real Estate. Owner
Finance with $5K down with
terms negotiable. Below assessed
value for the county. MLS# 74484
$17,900 Jay Sears 386-867-1613


805 Lots for Sale
Land for Sale. 12 acres in
nice area south of town.
MLS#77469 $55.000
Carrie Cason 386-623-2806
Westfield Realty Group
PUBLISHER'S NOTE
All real estate advertising in this
newspaper is subject to the fair
housing act which makes it illegal
to advertise "any preference,
limitation, or discrimination based
on race, color, religion, sex,
disability, familial status or nation-
al origin; or any intention to make
such preference, limitation or
discrimination." Familial status
includes children under the age of
18 living with parents or legal
custodians, pregnant women and
people securing custody of chil-
dren under the age of 18. This
newspaper will not knowingly
accept any advertising for real es-
tate which i- in violation of the
law. Our readers are hereby in-
formed that all dwellings adver-
tised in this newspaper are availa-
ble on an equal opportunity. basis.
To complain of discrimination call
HUD toll free at 1-800-669-9777,
the toll free
telephone number to the hearing
impaired is 1-800-927-9275.

810 Home for Sale
3/2 1056 sqft Brick home in town.
Fenced back yard w/12x12 work-
shop Just Reduced! $79,900
MLS# 77414 Call 386-243-8227
R.E.O.Realty Group, Inc
3/2 in Woodhaven w/Fla Room,
fenced back yard MLS#75499,
$114,900 Call Pam @
Remax 386-303-2505 or
email- remaxpamb@gmail.com
4/2 on 10 ac. in Bell. Over 2200
sqft in a country setting. 10x20
frame shade. Bring offers! $89,000
MLS 76582 Brittany Stoeckert
Results Realty 386-397-3473
4/2 with 1000 sq ft workshop,
fenced yard, 2 car garage, Fairly
new roof & HVAC MLS#77602,
Bring Offers! $169,900,
R.E.O. Realty Group 243-8227
4br brick on .51 ac. comer lot. For-
mal dining and a large open floor
plan. Brick patio. $159,888
MLS 76763 Brittany Stoeckert
Results Realty 386-397-3473
A Pilots Dream home 3br/2.5ba.
Pool, stocked pond, detached ga-
rage w/living quarters MLS#77756
$399,900 Westfield Realty
GroupJosh Grecian 386-466-2517
Access Realty Stylish 3/2 + pool
house w/1/2 bath on 2.25 acres.
Rear deck, 2 car garage & carport.
MLS 78103 $194,500.
Patti Taylor.623-6896
Brick 3/1 family home, 4.43 acres.
w/metal roof. MLS# 77415
Short sale acceptance w/lenders
approval. $99,000. 386-243-8227
R.E.O. Realty Group, Inc
Century 21/The Darby Rogers Co.
3br/l. Updated kitchen, bath. Open
living room wall classic & elegant
light fixtures. 386-752-6575
MLS# 78099 $79,900
Century 21/The Darby Rogers Co.
3/2 lin Spring Estates. 20x40
workshop. Screened back porch &
all appliances. Kayla Carbono
623-9650 MLS# 73787 $99,900
Century 21/The Darby Rogers Co.
Picadilly Park All brick 3/2, comer
lot w/inground pool. Screen porch
& fenced yard. Jessica Sheelly
288-2403 MLS# 73787 $115,900
Century 21/The Darby Rogers Co.
Eastside Village 2br/2ba. Extra Ig.
Master suite. Florida room & 2
sheds. Ginny Smith 386-623-4277
623-4277 MLS# 70160 $79,900
Century 21/The Darby Rogers Co.
Laurel Lake S/D. 4br/2ba w/ ap-
prox. 2275 sqft. Fenced back yard,
storage shed. Susan Sloan 386-
965-2847 MLS# 76106 $189,900
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
4br/1.5ba brick. 1332 sq ft. Great
floor plan, nice yard, close to
town. 1 ac landscaped. Lori
Geibeig MLS# 75713 $84,900
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
Remodeled 2/2 (could be 3/2).
Split floor plan. Great home, great
price. Mary Brown Whitehurst
965-0887 MLS# 77943 $99,900


810 Home for Sale
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
3/2 brick home in Woodcrest. Lg
lot completely fenced. Easy access
to amenities. Elaine K. Tolar 386-
752-6488 MLS# 78148 $129,900
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
New home in Mayfair. 4 bedroom
on comer lot. Covered Porch.
Elaine K. Tolar 386-752-6488
MLS# 76919 $214,900
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
3/3 in beautiful area. 2414sqft.
Private yard & patio with storage
bldg. Lori G Simpson 386-365-
5678 MLS# 78175 $159,900
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
Brick 3/2 on lake front. Lots of up-
dates. Glassed in room with fantas-
tic views. Lori G Simpson 386-
365-5678 MLS# 78092 $249,900
Country Home 2br/2ba on 5 ac.
detached garage w/workshop.
MLS# 77005 $179,900 Call Roger
Lovelady 386-365-7039
Westfield Realty Group
CYPRESS LANDING!
3BR/2BA built in 2005 w/large
kitchen $115,000
DANIEL CRAPPS AGENCY,
INC. 755-5110 #75794
DESIRABLE GWEN LAKE area!
Nice 3BR/2BA home on
comer lot $112,000
DANIEL CRAPPS AGENCY,
INC. 755-5110 #77307
Eastside Village a 55+ Retirement
Community. lots of Storage. Ig
deck off 2br suite. Carport w/more
storage. MLS# 77462 Eastside
Village Realty, Inc. 752-5290
Eastside Village a 55+ Retirement
Community. 2br/2ba. Lg office
/craft room. Oversized garage.
$89,900 MLS# 71901 Eastside
Village Realty, Inc. 752-5290
Eastside Village a 55+ Retirement
Community. Open floor plan
w/breakfast nook. 2 Ig bedrooms.
$104,999 MLS# 77779 Eastside
Village Realty, Inc. 752-5290
Featured Home 55+ acres, 5 pas-
tures fenced & cross fenced. 2,700
sqft, 4br/3ba home built in 1996.
Call for details! 386-243-8227
R.E.O. Realty Group
Fixer Upper on Suwannee River.
Needs TLC. Owner motivated &
will finance. $45,000
MLS 77337 Brittany Stoeckert
Results Realty 386-397-3473
GREAT STARTER HOME!
3BR/2BA w/lots of closet space &
nice lawn $79,900
DANIEL CRAPPS AGENCY,
INC. 755-5110 #76432
Great Starter Home. Well cared
for. New countertops, tile floors &
metal roof. $79,900 MLS#77524
Brodie Alfred 386-623-0906
Westfield Realty Group
Hallmark Real Estate. Brick
home w/fine landscaping. Dream
kitchen w/double pantry.
Split bedroom plan MLS#77846
Paula Lawrence 386-623-1973
Hallmark Real Estate. Country
Estate. Sit in the swing of the big
oak tree and watch the horses
graze on O0ac. fenced. 39 ac total.
MLS#78139 Janet Creel 719-0382
Hallmark Real Estate. Pool &
Patio. 3br/2ba. brick home on
1.69 ac. Workshop &
SWMH on property. MLS#78117
Tanya Shaffer 386-397-4766
Home near the River. 3br/2ba,
1470 sqft. needs a little TLC.
MLS#76390 $34,900
Mike Lienemann 386-867-9053
Westfield Realty Group
Home on 15 ac. w/over 2,500 sqft
home.Very Ig bedrooms w/private
baths. 24x24 workshop $235,000
MLS 77552 Brittany Stoeckert
Results Realty 386-397-3473
HOME O1 OFFICE on
Alachua St; remodeled 1,207 SqFt
home $82,900
DANIEL CRAPPS AGENCY,
INC. 755-5110 #77724
Hallmark Real Estate. 2006
2200SF home. 2br/2ba w/mother-
in-law suite, 4 car garage, endless
hot water heater. MLS# 77547
$309,900 Jay Sears 386-867-1613
Hallmark Real Estate. 3br/2ba
new roof & AC. Comes w/SWMH
& 30x30 steel bldg. Completely
fenced. MLS# 76752
$179,900 Jay Sears 386-867-1613


810 Home for Sale
Just Reduced 3/2 home, inside city
linlits, fenced backyard, detached
carport w/office MLS#77411
$79,900 Call R.E.O.Realty,
@ 386-243-8227 Make Offer!
Just Reduced 4/2 on 1.57 acres,
fireplace, partially fenced, MLS#
77412, Call Nancy Rogers at
R.E.O. Realty Group
386-243-8227 $64,900
Lg. 4/3 family home. 16x20
screened porch, workshop. 4.5 ac.
fenced/cross fenced MLS 74339
$229,900. N Fla Homeland Real-
ty Darlene Hart 386-288-2878
Lg. home on 1 ac. Granite floors
throughout. 4br/2ba. Nice open
kitchen & Florida room. $148,000
MLS 77292 Brittany Stoeckert
Results Realty 386-397-3473
Like New. 3br/2ba on 3 ac. New
kitchen cabinets, counters, carpet
& more. $179,900 MLS#77372
Charlie Sparks 386-755-0808
Westfield Realty Group
LOTS OF UPGRADES!
Remodeled kitchen in this
2BR/1BA home $29,900
DANIEL CRAPPS AGENCY,
ING. 755-5110 #77505
Mayfield S/D, nice fenced in back
yard w/small lake behind property.
Very nice. $99,888
MLS 77092 Brittany Stoeckert
Results Realty 386-397-3473
Neat as a pin! Split floor plan
w/well manicured lawn. 10x12
storage shed. $129K MLS 77932
Darlene Hart 386-288-2878
N Fla Homeland Realty
Owner Fin.,Nice 3/2 on 2.5 fenced
acres, pond, Jasper area, sm down
$700 mo, 386-590-0642/867-1833
www.suwanneevalleyproperties.com
Owner Finance. Custom built 3/2.5
10.8 ac. Granite, fireplace, vaulted
ceilings, surround sound. lanai,
gazebo. MLS 77382 Access Real-
ty. Patti Taylor $249K 623-6896
Remax Professionals Charmiig
w/many upgrades. 3br/2ba. 2 mas-
ter suites. MLS# 76779, $105,000
Missy Zecher @ 386-623-0237
www.missyzecher.com
Remax Professionals Motivated
seller. All brick family home
w/many upgrades. MLS# 78168,
$129,000 www.missyzecher.com
Missy Zecher 386-623-0237
Remax Professionals Spacious
home on corer lot. Private access
to Lake Jeffery. MLS# 77783,
$198,900 www.missyzecher.com
Missy Zecher @ 386-623-0237
Spacious 4/2 home on 1 ac. Split
floor plan. Great neighborhood.
Easy access to 1-75 $220K MLS
77859 N Fla Homeland Realty
Darlene Hart 386-288-2878


2005 Yamaha
VStar 650
11,000 miles, blue with
ghost flames, runs
great, new battery
$3,100 oBO
Call
386-752-9645


2006 Toyota Scion
XB
41,000 mi.
Paid over $24,000 new.
$13,000
Call
386-752-1313
904-718-6747


810 Home for Sale
SPACIOUS home built in
1995 has 2BR/2BA'& 1,636 SqFt
on 1 acre $89,900
DANIEL CRAPPS AGENCY,
INC. 755-5110 #76887
Starter/Investment Home, 3/2 +
Bonus room on 1 acre, remodeled,
fenced MLS#77562 $99,900
Call Pam @ Remax
Professionals 386-303-2505
Well Maintained 3/2 on dead-end
street, quiet, country, close to
downtown $105,000 MLS#77800
Lisa Waltrip 386-365-5900
Westfield Realty Group
Well Maintained 3/2 w/open floor
plan,on 1/2 acre, fenced, shed
MLS# 78136 $134,900
Call Pam Beauchamp @ Remax
Professionals 386-758-8900

820 Farms &
S Acreage
4 1/2 acre lot. Lake Jeffery Road.
Gorgeous Oaks!Paved Rd
O(vner Financing! NO DOWN!
$59,900. $525mo 352-215-1018.
www.LandOwnerFinancing.com
4 acres, Wellborn, New Well
installed, Beautifully wooded
w/cleared Home Site, owner fin,
no down, $39,900, $410 mon
Call 352-215-1018
www.LandOwnerFinancing.com
6.45 ac river front property in
White Springs, doe to Big Shoals.
Covered shelter for entertaining.
MLS#77417 $124,888 386-243-
8227 R.E.O. Realty Group, Inc
Bring the horses. Peaceful &
ready for your home. Convenient
location. $38,000 MLS#76264
Millard Gillen 386-365-7001
Westfield Realty Group
FARM- 7 stall barn, Apt.
17+ acres cross fenced.
Close in $950. mo.
386-961-1086
Half to ten acre lots. Some w/
well, septic, pp. We finance; low
dwn pmt. Deas Bullard Properties.
386-752-4339. www.larldnfl.com
Look at all the Upgrades
s Completely remodeled.
$106,500 MLS#77483
Brodie Alfred 386-623-0906
Westfield Realty Group
Pretty piece of land. 2 acres close
to interstate 75 for under 20K.
Mobile Homes or residential ok.
MLS# 77400 Call 386-243-8227
R.E.O. Realty Group, Inc

830 Commercial
8 Property
4 UNIT Apt. Bldg. All 1/1/ w/ex-
tra rooms. Clean, good tenants and
remodeled. Downtown. $160,000.
386-362-8075 or 754-2951


1996 33 Ft.
Fifth Wheel
w/2 slide-outs, camp or
reside, livable but needs work.
$4,000
Call
386-362-1826
S Leave Message


1986 Chevy Monte
Carlo SS
78k miles, one owner.
All original.
$10,000
Call
386-752-1313
904-718-6747


830 Commercial
Property
Hallmark Real Estate. Commer-
cial Business Location on South
Main w/offices & service bldg.
Frontage, warehouse & storage
MLS#76280 Janet Creel 719-0382
Prime Commercial Location.
Just across from plaza. Frontage
on Baya w/2 curbcuts. $350,000
MLS# 77485 Call 386-243-8227
R.E.O.Realty Group, Inc


940 Trucks
1988 NISSAN Pickup w/topper.
One owner. 165k mi. 4 cyl.,
Reliable. $2000.
352-339-5158

950 Cars for Sale

1986 Chevy Monte Carlo SS,
78k miles, one owner. $10,000.
All original.
386-752-1313 or 904-718-6747
1995 HONDA Civic 4 dr.
Auto., AC., 180K miles.
New timing belt. Nice. $2000.
(352)339-5158
2006 Toyota Scion XB,
41,000 mi. $13,000.
Paid over $24,000 new.
386-752-1313 or 904-718-6747


SuIWHELS a WATERCRAFT '









Bring the picture in or
we will take it for youl
Ad runs 10 consecutive days
with a description and photo in the
newspaper and online E-edition.
* Ad runs 10 consecutive days as a
classified line ad online.
You must include vehicle price.
All ads are prepaid.
Private party only.

I



2006 EF250
Ford Van
3/4 ton, metal work
shelves/ladder rack,
60K miles, exc. cond.
,$10,500
Call
386-555-5555
If you don't sell your vehicle
during the first 10 days, you
can run the same vehicle ad
for 10 additional days for
only $15.00
Terms and conditions remain the
same for the additional run.


To et ou


confused?





Call Lake City Reporter Classifieds!




WE CAN HELP 386-755-5440


:9~5~