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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028308/01589
 Material Information
Title: The Lake City reporter
Uniform Title: Lake City reporter (Lake City, Fla. 1967)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: John H. Perry
Place of Publication: Lake City Fla
Publication Date: 6/23/2011
Frequency: daily (monday through friday)[<1969>-]
weekly[ former 1967-<1968>]
daily
normalized irregular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Lake City (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Columbia County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Columbia -- Lake City
Coordinates: 30.189722 x -82.639722 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 95, no. 4 (Oct. 5, 1967)-
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000358016
oclc - 33283560
notis - ABZ6316
lccn - sn 95047175
sobekcm - UF00028308_01569
System ID: UF00028308:01589
 Related Items
Preceded by: Lake City reporter and Columbia gazette

Full Text









Belle resigns
CARC executive
director cites
personal reasons.
000016 120511 ****3-DIGIT 32
LIB OF FLORIDA HISTORY
PO BOX 117007
205 SMA UrNIV OF FLORIDA
GAINESVILLE FL 32611-1943


Photo gallery
More pictures from
Tuesday's Adult
Education graduation.
26 Inside, 6A


A


JAJ IIa


Local flavor
Two men with Lake
City ties face off
in MLB series.
Sports, IB


Reporter


Thursday, June 23,2011 www.lakecityreporter.com Vol. 137, No. 128 E 75 cents


Obama:


33,000

troops


home


in 2012

'The tide of war
is receding,'
says President.

By BEN FELLER and JULIE PACE
Associated Press
WASHINGTON -
Beginning to wind -down a
long and devastating war,
President Barack Obama
announced Wednesday night
he was pulling home 33,000
troops from Afghanistan
by next summer, withdraw-
ing the "surge" of forces he
had sent to rescue a flailing
effort. Said Obama to a coun-
try eager for an exit: "The
tide of war is receding."
A total of 10,000 troops
will leave the war zone by
the end of this year ful-
filling Obama's promise -
and more than 20,000 addi-
tional forces will leave by
the summer of 2012, shortly
before the president will-go
before voters in search of a
second term.
Still, almost 70,000 U.S.
troops will remain in an
unstable country, fighting in
a war bound to see more
Americans killed. Obama
said they will leave at a steady
pace, but the U.S. combat
mission is not expected to
end until December 2014 -
and even then, a sizable and
enduring contingent may.
remain in a different role.
Obama's announcement
from the White House came
in a perilous political envi-
ronment, with Americans
soured on the war and the
economy, many members
of Congress pushing him to
get troops home even faster,
and his Republican presi-
dential rivals taking shots
at his leadership at every
chance. Conceding the eco-
nomic strain of waging war
at a time of rising debt and
fiscal constraint, Obama said
it was time for America "to
focus on nation building here
at home."
The withdrawal is sup-
ported by the bold bottom-
line claims of his security
team: Afghanistan, training
ground for the Sept. 11,
2001, attacks on America,
is no longer a launching
pad for exporting terror-
ism and hasn't been for
years. Yet the White House
insists the U.S. must main-
tain a strong fighting force
in Afghanistan for now to
keep the country from slip-
ping back into a haven for
al-Qaida terrorists.
Obama said the materials
recovered during the raid
to get Osama bin Laden in
Pakistan showed that the al-
Qaida terror network was
under deep strain. He said
bin Laden himself expressed
concern that his network
would- be unable to effec-
tively replace senior leaders
that had been killed.


In honor of the fallen


Family, friends
gather to recall
lost firefighters.

By TONY BRITT
tbritt@lakecityreporter.com
DEEP CREEK The Deep
Creek Community Event was
slated to be an appreciation
dinner to thank forest rang-
ers, firefighters and others
for their work on containing
area wildfires. But after the
loss of two Florida Division of
Forestry Rangers and injury to
two others, the event became
something else: an oppor-
tunity. for family members,
friends and colleagues of the
fallen, men to grieve their loss
together.
The event, held at the Deep
Creek Community Center,
served as the first opportunity
for -the community to collec-
tively grieve the loss of Josh
Burch and Brett Fulton, who
were killed earlier this week in
the line of duty.
Josh Burch, 31, of Lake City
and Brett Fulton, 52, who has
a White 'Springs address' but
lived in Columbia County in
the Springville Community,
were killed Monday afternoon
fighting the Blue Ribbon Fire,
about 14 miles east of Jasper in,
Hamilton County.
Hollis Burch, Josh's father,
addressed his family members
and a crowd of law enforce-
ment and public safety work-
ers there to pay homage to the
two fallen rangers.-
"It fills my heart and it makes
me feel so glad and so proud
of the community," he said of
those attending the event.
He said the family is still
attempting to cope with the
sudden loss of Josh.
"We aren't doing well," he
said. "Right now, I'm OK, but if
I get to thinking about Josh I'll
,HONOR continued on 3A


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Mollie Gaylard hugs Fisher Ogden, 9, Wednesday while grieving for her
son, state Division of Forestry firefighter Josh Burch of Lake City.


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Roger Creamer consoles Nancy Moseley, the mother of state Division of
Forestry firefighter Brett Fulton Wednesday.


Doing their part
1- :


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Ken Meyer (from left), James Thiele and Frank Sedmera, members of Our
Redeemer Lutheran Church, stack 5-gallon buckets containing supplies for flood vic-
tims in the Mississippi and Missouri River basin on Wednesday. 'It's something that
we have to do as Christians,' Meyer said.
I


Funerals for local
firefighters set for
Friday, Saturday
From staff reports
TALLAHASSEE The families
of Josh Burch and Brett Fulton
announced funeral arrangements
today for their loved ones. Burch
and Fulton were firefighters in the
state Division of Forestry who lost
their lives Monday while fighting
the Blue Ribbon Fire in Hamilton
County.

Funeral for Josh Burch
Friday at 10 a.m.
Christ Central Ministries Church
217 S.W. Dyal Road
Lake City
(386) 755-2525

Graveside service
for Josh Burch
Friday, immediately
following the funeral.
Gateway Forest Lawn
Cemetery
3596 South Highway 441
Lake City
(386) 752-1954

Funeral for Brett Fulton
Saturday at 10 a.m.
Christ Central Ministries Church
217 S.W. Dyal Road
Lake City
(386) 755-2525
7he Florida- Division of Forestry
is accepting letters of condolence on
behalf of the families of Burch and
Fulton. Please mail correspondence
to:
Family of Josh Burch or Family
of Brett Fulton
c/o Director Jim Karels,
Division of Forestry
3125 Conner Boulevard
Tallahassee, Florida 32399


Belle quits as


head of CARC


Personal reasons
cited, according to
board president

By ANTONIA ROBINSON
arobinson@lakecityreporter.com
Mike Belle has resigned
as executive director of
CARC Advocates for
Citizens with Disabilities,


according
to officials.
"It was a
big shock
to all of us,"
said Herb
McClelland,
Belle C A R C
Board of
Directors president. "It cer-
tainly was not expected."
CARC continued on 3A


AC thefts not likely

spurred by heat wave


By TONY BRITT
tbritt@lakecityreporter.com
Thieves have made air
conditioning units their tar-
gets both window and
central units at an alarm-
ing rate in recent weeks
in Lake City. However, the


thefts likely have little to do
with the recent heat wave.
Police believe the units are
being stolen for the copper
they contain.
"We noticed that from
May 31 to June 21 we had
THEFTS continued on 3A


CALL US:
(386) 752-1293
SUBSCRIBE TO
THE REPORTER:
Voice: 755-5445
Fax: 752-9400


9471
Thunderstorms y _
WEATHER, 2A 7


Opinion
Around Florida.
Obituanes .
Advice & Comics
Puzzles ....


4A
... 2A
. . 5A
3B
S. 2B


TODAY
INSIDE
' 3,uatin, r
p1 dut lC-r'


COMING
FRIDAY
Police
.iridup


--------------------


Aft ., -- - _


-A. ty












LAKE CITY REPORTER DAILY BRIEFING THURSDAY, JUNE 23, 2011


3 Wednesday:
Afternoon: 3-1-6
Evening: 9-7-5


A Wednesday:
Afternoon: 7-0-0-6
Evening: 0-5-5-9


Vv Tuesday:
8-10-27-29-33


PEOPLE IN THE NEWS


Group launches 'Drops of Jupiter' wine
NEWYORK IL -. 1


The Grammy-winning
group Train has been
making waves with its
wine club, and now, the
trio is taking the next
step with its own wine.
Starting next week, fans will be
able to buy Drops of Jupiter Petite
Sirah wine from Train's online wine
club and other outlets. The name is
a nod to one of Train's earlier hits,
and is produced by the group's wine
company, Save Me, San Francisco
Wine Co., which takes its title from a
Train album.
But Train guitarist Jimmy Stafford
said the wine venture isn't an
attempt to make a profit on the Train
name it's more about creating
something special for fans.
"We're not really trying to get into
the wine business or anything. It's
really kind of helping to spread the
name out there, and something for
our fans," he said in a phone inter-
view Tuesday.
Train, which won a Grammy
Award this year for "Hey,. Soul
Sister," has had an online wine club
for a while. The group promotes a
wine of the month, has a blog and,
even an app.
Stafford said creating a wine was
the next logical step.
"Really, it goes in hand with our
wine club, and I guess what we set
out to do was kind of like Jimmy
Buffett Jimmy Buffet got known
for margaritas because of a song he
wrote. It almost created this com-
munity vibe," he said. "We're trying
to create just this little vibe, where
people come to our shows, bring a
picnic basket and bottle of wine."

Rowling to reveal the
secret of 'Pottermore'
LONDON Harry Potter fans
are holding their collective breath,
as J.K Rowling gets set to reveal
her latest project involving the boy


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Scott Underwood (from left), Patrick Monahan and. Jimmy Stafford from the band
Train arrive at the 2011 CMT Music Awards in Nashville, Tenn. on June 8.


Rowling


wizard.
Rowling has called
a news conference in
London on Thursday
to reveal details of
"Pottermore," a mys-
terious website that
has been taunting
fans with the words


"coming soon.".
Theories include a Harry Potter
encyclopedia, e-book versions of the
novels or an Internet-based game.

'Mad Men' star Hamm
signs 3-year contract
LOS ANGELES Jon Hamm,
who plays 1960s
advertising execu-
tive Don Draper
on AMC's Emmy
Award-winning
"Mad Men," has
signed a new con-
Hamm tract with series
studio Lionsgate.
Television Group.


Hamm's publicist, Slate PR, said
Tuesday that the deal keeps him
with the show for three more years.
The actor will receive a substantial
raise for the upcoming fifth season.

Octomom's fertility doc
moves to keep license
LOS ANGELES The fertil-
ity doctor who helped "Octomom"
Nadya Suleman become the mother
of 14 children through repeated in
vitro treatments is asking that he be
allowed to continue practicing medi-
cine while he appeals his license revo-
cation.
Dr. Michael Kamrava asked a Los
Angeles Superior Court judge Monday
to delay a decision that revokes his
license to practice medicine as of July
1.
The Beverly Hills fertility doctor
represented himself in the filing, which
claims the state's medical licensing
agency "exceeded its jurisdiction."

N Associated Press


, Celebrity Birthdays


* Singer Diana Trask is 71.
* Musical conductor James
Levine is 68.
* Rhythm-and-blues singer
Rosetta Hightower (The
Orlons) is 67.
* Actor Ted Shackelford is
65.


* Actor Bryan Brown is 64.
* Supreme Court Justice
Clarence Thomas is 63.
* Actor Jim Metzler is 60.
* "American Idol" judge
Randy Jackson is 55.
* Actress Frances
McDormand is 54.


Lake City
HOW TO REACH US
Main number ....... (386) 752-1293
Fax number .............752-9400
Circulation ..............755-5445
Online... www.lakecityreporter.com
The Lake City Reporter, an affiliate of
Community Newspapers Inc., is pub-
lished Tuesday through Sunday at 180
E. Duval St, Lake City, Fla. 32055.
Periodical postage paid at Lake City, Fla.
Member Audit Bureau of Circulation and
The Associated Press.
All material herein is property of the Lake
City Reporter. Reproduction in whole or
in part is forbidden without the permis-
sion of the publisher. U.S. Postal Service
No. 310-880.
POSTMASTER: Send address changes
to Lake City Reporter, P.O. Box 1709,
Lake City, Fla. 32056.
Publisher Todd Wilson .....)754-0418
(twilson@lakecityreporter.com)
NEWS
Editor Robert Bridges .....754-0428
(rbridges@lakecityreporter.com)
ADVERTISING
Director Ashley Butcher ...754-0417
(abutcher@lakecityreporter.com)
CLASSIFIED
To place a classified ad, call 755-5440


Reporter

BUSINESS
Controller Sue Brannon.... 754-0419
(sbrannon@lakecityreporter.com)
CIRCULATION
Home delivery of the Lake City Reporter
should be completed by 6:30 a.m.
Tuesday through Saturday, and by 730
a.m. on Sunday.
Please call 386-755-5445 to report any
problems with your delivery service.
In Columbia County, customers should
call before 10:30 a.m. to report a ser-
vice error for same day re-delivery. After
10:30 a.m., next day re-delivery or ser-
vice related credits will be issued.
In all other counties where home delivery
is available, next day re-delivery or ser-
vice related credits will be issued.
Circulation ..............755-5445
(circulation@lakecityreporter.com)
Home delivery rates
(Tuesday through Sunday)
12 Weeks....... ........ $26.32
24 Weeks....................$48.79
52 Weeks...................$83.46
Rates include 7% sales tax
Mail rates
2 Weeks .... ............ $41.40
24 Weeks...................$82.80
52 Weeks.................$179.40


CORRECTION

The Lake City Reporter corrects errors of fact in news
items. If you have a concern, question or suggestion, please
call the executive editor. Corrections and clarifications will run
in this space. And thanks for reading.


Wildfires lead
to fireworks bans
TALLAHASSEE -
Drought conditions and
rampant wildfires have
forced 29 Florida counties
to ban open fires. And for
22 of those counties, the
ban covers fireworks.
The Florida Division of
Forestry said Tuesday that
more than 440 active wild-
fires were roaring across
the state. Two forest
rangers were killed fight-
ing one of the fires at the
Georgia border Monday.
Heat and lack of rain
have contributed to one of
the worst years for wild-.
fires in recent history in.
Florida.

Female cheetah
put to sleep
MELBOURNE -
Brevard Zoo officials said
a 15-year-old cheetah
named Sasha has been put
to sleep.
The cheetah was in
declining health and her
kidneys were failing. Zoo
spokeswoman Andrea Hill
said Sasha was euthanized
Saturday.
Sasha was born in 1996
at the Memphis Zoological
Garden and Aquarium. She
was relocated to White
Oak Conservation Center'
near Jacksonville before
coming to the Brevard Zoo
in February 2010. Officials
said she was the star of
the cheetah exhibit in
Expedition Africa.
Hill said cheetahs live
from 10 to 15 years in cap-
tivity.

Woman found
covered in mud
HOLIDAY- A
62-year-old woman who
went missing over the
weekend was found cov-
ered with mud in a tangle
of mangroves in Pasco
County.
- Officials said Kathleen


ASSOCIATED PRESS

Summer has finally arrived
Randy Hodgh (left) and Karen Galvan, of New Port Richey,
enjoy the water and sun at Fred Howard Park Tuesday in
Tarpon Springs. The first day of summer was ushered in
Tuesday with temperatures in the 90's for most of the Tampa
Bay area.


Shino was taken to a medi-
cal facility in stable condi-
tion after she was located
Tuesday afternoon.
Pasco County Sheriff's
officials said someone
called 911 after hearing a
faint cry for help coming
from behind a shopping
center less than a mile
from Shino's home in
Holiday.
The woman's family
reported her missing over.
the weekend after she left
home without her vehicle,
keys and cell phone. She
also left her crutches
behind.

Boy, 1, drowns
in swimming pool
DELTONA Volusia
County officials said a
1-year-old boy drowned
in a backyard swimming
pool.
Sheriff's spokesman
Gary Davidson said a fam-
ily member found Chase
Wilson at the bottom of
the pool about 5 p.m.
Tuesday. A 911 dispatcher
told the frantic caller how
to perform CPR on the
child while deputies and
emergency responders
were on their way.


The first deputy arrived
four minutes after the call
but Davidson said the
child wasn't breathing
when pulled from the pool.

Family of 4 killed
in plane crash
WESTON A Florida
family of four is among the
victims of a plane crash in
Russia.
Broward School District
officials said Falcon Cove
Middle School student
Yelizaveta Simanova
was on the plane with
her mother, father and
younger sister, who was
registered for kindergar-
ten next year at a Weston
elementary school.
The flight from Moscow
slammed into a highway
in heavy fog Monday,
moments from landing at
an airport in Russia's north-
western province of Karelia.
The death toll rose to 45
Wednesday after one of
eight initial survivors died.
Lyudmila Simanova and
Alexander Simanov man-
aged a software company
from the family's Weston
home.


THE WEATHER


I -STORMS CHANCE CHANCE


"-~II 194 LO 71 HI 91 LO 70 ... "HI 91 LO 71 .". 'I 92 L 71 """1 92 LO 70
J 1


Tallahassee
92/72
Pensacola 92/72
88/75 Patamla City
85/78


TEMPERATURES
High Wednesday
Low Wednesday
Normal high
Normal low
Record high
Record low

PRECIPITATION
Wednesday
Month total
Year total
Normal month-to-date
Normal year-to-date


9 3/73 Jacksonville
Lake City, 92/76
94/71 Da, a
. 73inesville na Bea
93/71 91i^75
.".". Ocala \
"OA/7t -


City
Cape Canaveral
Daytona Beach
Ft. Lauderdale
Fort Myers
Gainesvllle
Jacksonville


Orlando Cape Canaveral k t
1 95/76 9/76 Lake City
,57 Miami
Tanpa Naples
West Palm Beach Ocala
88/79 1 Orlando
FtL auderdale Panama City
Ft.Myers, 90/78 0 Pensacola
94,74 Naples Tallahassee
'1/75 Miami Tampa
K,,e t ,e't 90/78 Valdosta
8Key81* e -' W. Palm Beach


On this date in
1969, 9 inches of
rain fell through
the morning over
the Salt Lick Creek
Watershed, Tenn.
The sent a 7-foot
high wall of water
rushing through
Red Boiling Springs,
Tenn.


for the area on u l*
a scale from 0
to 10+.

weather.com

weae wwForecasts, data and
Graphics 0 2011 Weather
water ww.weatherpubllsher.com


Gel Co noted


M Associated Press


Daily Scripture
"The Lord will keep you from
all harm he will watch over
your life; the Lord will watch
over your coming and going
both now and forevermore."
Psalm 121:7-8

Thought for Today
"Loneliness is the poverty of
self; solitude is the richness of
self."
May Sarton,
Belgian-born American poet (1912-1995)


AROUND FLORIDA


ich


9


Friday
7'76. I
89, 75,
89/79/t
89/75/t
90/70/t
89/74/t
89/81/sh
91/70/t
88/78/t
89/75/t
90/71/t
92/76/t
89/75/t
88/75/t
92/71/t
89/74/t
93/70/t
87/78/t


Saturday
88 74. i
89; 73, t
90/80/t
91/73/t
91/71/t
89/75/t
90/81/pc
91/71/t
90/78/t
88/76/t
91/71/t
91/75/t
88/75/t
90/76/t
91/71/t
90/74/t
92/70/t
89/78/t


SUN
Sunrise today
Sunset today
Sunrise torn.
Sunset torn.

MOON
Moonrse today
Moonset today
Moonrise tom.
Moonset tom.


MIBEI

10l nebstob n
Today's
ultra-violet
radiation risk


97
69
90
69
101 in 1895-
60 in 1965

0.00"
0.63"
14.74"
4.90"
22.15"


6:30 a.m.
8:35 p.m.
6:30 a.m.
8:36 p.m.

1:03.a.m.
1:48 p.m.
133 a.m.
2:41 p.m.


An exclusive
service
brought to
our readers
by
The Weather
Phennnl


June July July July
23 1 8 15
Last New First Full


I LAKE CITY ALMANAC


Page Editor: Jason M. Walker, 754-0430


-W E BY -TH" IOU


,













LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL THURSDAY, JUNE 23, 2011


HONOR: Firefighters remembered


Continued From Page 1

break down."
Michael Burch, Josh's
cousin from Brunswick,
Ga., said it's good that
people from so many
agencies attended the
ceremony and came
together to help.
"I feel honored to be
here because Josh lost
his life helping other
people that's special
to me," he said. "I hate
that it happened. It's a
very dangerous job and
they put their lives on
the line for it."
Close to 200 people
attended the event, for
which food was donated
and prepared by sev-
eral local businesses
and area volunteers.
Attendees formed a cir-
cle and prayed togeth-
er before organizers
released a batch of lime
green and yellow bal-
loons in honor of the
fallen rangers.
Reverend Howard
Thomas, Deek Creek
Advent Christian
Church pastor, opened
the event by addressing
the crowd.
"Certainly when this
was planned we had no


'Instead of just an appreciation,
we wanted to make a memorial
out of it for the two men who lost
their lives. Seeing the community
get together for this tells me that
God is good and he directs
people's thoughts.'

Reverend Howard Thomas


idea this would be any-
thing but a fun time,"
Thomas said. "This
was something we had
planned to do for over a
week to show our appre-
ciation to the firefight-
ers for keeping us safe.
Instead of just an appre-
ciation, we wanted to
make a memorial out of
it for the two men who
lost their lives. Seeing
the community get
together for this tells
me that God is good
and he directs people's
thoughts."
Alison Davis, an event
organizer, said several
local businesses made
contributions for. the
event.
"We had the Bugaboo


Fire up here about four
years ago and all of us
were displaced and our
store was closed. The
firefighters made it to
where we don't have to
do that now. They fight
harder and harder every
time they are here," she
said, explaining why
she wanted to stage the
appreciation event. "It
was nice for us to be
able to do something for
them."
Cora Fraser was one
of many volunteers serv-
ing food at the event.
"The other servers
had a great attitude. We
just want to help and
feed everybody because
it's a good cause," she
said.


THEFTS: 11 AC units stolen

Continued From Page 1A


five separate structures
where a total of 11 air
conditioners were taken.
That's an unusual close
proximity of time and quite
a large amount of air con-
ditioners taken," said Capt
John Blanchard, Lake City
Police Department public
information officer.
He said LCPD officials
have contacted' represen-
tatives from the Columbia
County Sheriffs Office and
surrounding law enforce-
ment agencies to see wheth-
erthose agencies had report-


ed a similar increase in the
number of air conditioner
thefts. No such increase was
noted, he said.
"For the most part these
thefts have been happening
at, residences," Blanchard
said, noting Niblack
Elementary School was
also targeted.
In recent years LCDPD
has investigated numerous
air conditioner thefts.
'That was happening on
and off over a period of
time and what was specifi-
cally happening was they


were gutting them and tak-
ing the copper out of them,"
Blanchard said. "In this
particular case the entire
air conditioners were being
taken."
Blanchard said the
LCPD is asking residents
to report any suspicious
behavior and be observant
in their neighborhoods.
Anyone having informa-
tion about the thefts can.
contact the Lake City Police
Department anonymously
on the department's TIP
line at 719-2068.


COURTESY PHOTO

Altrusa elects officers
The newly elected Board of the Lake City Altrusa Club. From left: President Joy Lizotte,
Secretary Lindsay Carter-Tidwell, President-Elect Sheryll Walker, 1st Vice President Mantha
Young, Director Heather Jennings,, Director Donna MacRae, and Immediate Past President :
Jan Smithey. Not pictured: Treasurer Georgia Jones and 2nd Vice President Lynn Causey.



CARC: Belle resigns; reasons unclear

Continued From Page IA


Belle's resignation, ten-
dered by letter Tuesday to
McClelland, was effective
immediately.
Belle resigned for per-
sonal reasons, according to
McClelland, but said Belle
did not elaborate.
Columbia County School
Board member Glenn
Hunter, also a member of
the CARC board, learned
of Belle's resignation at a
Tuesday night board meet-
ing, he said.
"I wanted to know a lot
more but there wasn't a
lot more information avail-
able," Hunter said.
Hunter said he hadn't yet
been able to discuss the
matter with Belle,.who was
not present at the board
meeting.
Belle did "a great job"


for the organization during
his six months as execu-
tive director, according to
Hunter.
"He gave us a new sense
of direction," Hunter said.
Belle, 30, was not avail-
able for comment at press
time.
Belle had worked previ-
ously as district aide for
former state Rep. Debbie
Boyd.
He was announced as
executive director of CARC
Dec. 8, 2010, replacing
Carol Jewett, who retired/
after 21 years with the orga-
nization. Belle started in
the position Jan. 4.
McClelland said Belle,
was a tireless advocate of
CARC clients and worked


CARC was formed by
community members in
1974 to provide train-
ing and services for
people with disabilities
in Columbia County.
According to its website,
CARC is a private, not-
for-profit service organi-
zation with more than 100
employees and a budget
of more than $2,000,000.
The organization will
continue day-to-day opera-
tions with staff on hand,
McClelland said.
Meanwhile, the board
will work to find Belle's
replacement.
Hunter suggested some
sense .of urgency in the
search.
"We have citizens that


hard to keep the:group in-- -need-oar support," he said.
the public eye.


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Page Editor: Todd Taylor, 754-0424
















OPINION


Thursday, June 23, 201 I


AN1


A N
OPINION


Bicycling

while

Hispanic


The mysterious
detention of U.S.
citizen Christopher
Zambrano as he was
bicycling across the
79th Street Causeway recently
is a perfect illustration of the
damage done by the hysteria
over illegal immigration and
what happens when overzeal-
ous enforcers decide they can
round up anyone who, in their
expert opinion, so much as
looks suspicious.
Mr. Zambrano was detained
by agents clad in black civil-
ian clothes after a forced stop
near North Bay Village as he
was going home. They never
identified themselves but acted
': with the swagger and author-
ity of law enforcement officers
when they stopped him and
arrogantly demanded that
Mr. Zambrano produce his
"papers." When he failed to
produce proof of citizenship
'on the spot, they placed him in
handcuffs.
He wss taken into custody
by Miami-Dade officers, who
transported him to the hoose-
gow because of an outstanding
bench warrant for driving with
an expired license in 2008. But,
presumably, the individuals
who pounced on him didn't
Know anything about a bench
warrant when they spotted him
on his bicycle. How could they?
To date, no reason has been
given for Mr. Zambrano's
S'detention in the first place.
Nor is it clear what violation
he committed biking while
Hispanic, perhaps? Nor is the
identity of the officers even
clear to this date,
What is most decidedly clear
from this incident, however, is
that it could happen to practi-
cally anyone. How many of us
carry around proof of citizen-
Sship wherever we go? What
exactly constitutes grounds for
detention? When did "Show me
your papers!" become a ques-
tion that everyone in this coun-
try must be prepared to answer
at a moment's notice upon
pain of detention and possible
arrest? Is anyone who "looks
Hispanic" or sounds Hispanic,
or Haitian for that matter, a
suspect?
Miami Herald

Lake City Reporter
Serving Columbia County
Since 1874
The Lake City Reporter is pub-
lished with pride for residents of
Columbia and surrounding counties by
Community Newspapers Inc.
We believe strong newspapers build
strong communities -"Newspapers
get things done!"
Our primary goal is to
publish distinguished and profitable
community-oriented newspapers.
This mission will be accomplished
through the teamwork of professionals
dedicated to truth, integrity and hard
work.
Todd Wilson, publisher
Robert Bridges, editor
Sue Brannon, controller
Dink NeSmith, president
Tom Wood, chairman

LETTERS
POLICY
Letters to the Editor should be
typed or neatly written .and double
.. spaced. Letters should not exceed
400 words and will be edited for
length and libel. Letters must be
, signed and.include the writer's name,
'. address and telephone number for
t verification. Writers can have two'
'., letters per month published. Letters
and guest columns are the opinion of
the writers and not necessarily that of
the Lake City Reporter.
BY MAIL: Letters, P.O. Box 1709,


,- Lake City, FL 32056; or drop off at
S 180 E. Duval St. downtown.
.. BY FAX: (386) 752-9400.
BY E-MAIL:
news@lakecityreporter.com


www.lakecityreporter.com


Fresco makes a meal of summer


cially summer, it
is a fitting time to
ask the seasonal
question: Who was
Al Fresco and why did he like
to eat outside? In fact, Al didn't
always like to have meals in the
garden or on the patio. He grew
up just an ordinary kid who
spent most of his time in the
great indoors.
Al liked eating mac and
cheese while watching cartoons
in front of the television. Later,
when his mother suggested that
he go outside to play, he pro-
tested that it might rain. While
his parents did make him play
Little League baseball, what he
liked most was eating snacks in
the dugout.
So, like many other American
kids, Al grew up fat and happy,
never guessing the pleasures of
outdoor dining or, indeed, out-
door anything.. Sometimes his
dad would fire up the old barbe-
cue and Al would sit glumly on
an outdoor bench, chewing on
a charred hot dog amid great
clouds of smoke. Al did not
thinkShis much of an improve-
ment.
Al continued for many years
in this housebound way, but the
indoor lifestyle gradually lost
its allure for him. A boy can't
watch cartoons and eat mac and
cheese all his life only until
about 25 or so.
But it was the experience
of high school cafeterias that
hastened his awakening. In
the penitentiary-style coziness
of the typical school cafeteria,
Al first encountered strange
meat-like substances in all gra-
dations of soggy, including the
ubiquitous sloppy joes. Like so
many before him, Al was moved
to ask the obvious questions:
Who was Joe and why was he
so sloppy?


Reg Henr*
rhenry@post-gozette.com


The real breakthrough came
when the adult Al discovered
beer gardens. It seemed a
magical concept to him. He had
never thought of beer bottles
blooming among the marigolds,
roses and petunias, creating
a veritable garden of earthly.
delights.
Of course, where beer is
consumed, buffalo wings are
served, giving Al his first taste
of the outdoor dining experi-
ence. The wings were delicious,
and Al knew he was doing good,
too, because if the wings of
buffaloes are allowed to grow,
to maturity, herds of them will
fly over the suburbs, creating
unhygienic conditions.
Happily, Al is still going
strong, and he is often featured
- in glossy magazines having a
meal on fashionable porches.
He gave up his day job Al
Fresco came from a long line
of mural painters to become a
full-time celebrity.
How did he do it? It's the old
story. He was the right man, at
the right place, at the right time
he was Al, the everyman, out
in the garden eating a charred
gourmet hot dog and drink-
ing a boutique beer just at the
moment when eating outdoors
became trendy.
He does have some regrets.
His name has become so synon-
ymous with outside dining that
he can't enjoy a sandwich under
a roof anymore.
Al's story is probably not so


different from yours or mine,
except for the final detail con-
cerning the onset of fame and
riches.
In my own case, I cannot
remember a single occasion
growing up when we ate outside
in the garden.
Of course, my old neighbor-
hood was not conducive to Al
Fresco-style dining. We did
Everything outside except eat
If family members had dared
to venture from the kitchen to
have a meal, a gang of tattooed
flies would have mugged the
would-be diners with garbage
can lids.
I don't know about you, but
I have been making up for lost
time. During summer, there. .
is hardly an evening when we
don't sit out on our little porch
to eat This is the essence of
summer for me a cold bever-
age, a fine grilled meal and
grass and leaves blown into the
salad.
SIf you make enough smoke
with the barbecue, bugs are not
a problem. Heck, with enough
smoke, you cannot see what has
made its way into the salad.
Summer is a season to be
savored one warm evening at
a time, because, for some cal-
endar-defying reason, it is the
most fleeting of the seasons.
Winter seems to go on forever;
summer is over before we know
it So eat, drink and be merry,
for tomorrow we will be eating
in the kitchen.
While there is still time, I
suggest inviting Al Fresco over
for a bite. (You can lure him
over with promises of mac and
cheese and cartoons.) You
might even invite sloppy Joe
over.

Reg Henry is a columnist for
the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette.


Eulogy for a hero: Brett Fulton


Editor's note: While it's
not generally our policy to
publish funeral orations on our
Opinion page, the loss of two
local heroes makes for changed
circumstances, and we think
it only appropriate here. The
following was written by Andy
Creamer, nephew ofBrett Fulton,
who along with Joshua Burch
died Monday fighting a Hamilton
County wildfire. Both Fulton and
Burch were Columbia County
residents.

gentle giant of a
man...a man among
men.
He would always
give his best to his friends,
family, and most of all...his
wife and children. He was a
man of good words and even
better deeds. The fact that
he sacrificed his self for the
protection of others is the truest
testament to this. Just as a


soldier or policeman would lay
down his life for others...so did
Brett do this for us.
All of you know Brett...
otherwise you wouldn't be here
to morn'his passing or celebrate
his life. You all know how good
of a man he was, or is,... just as
our maker does. His interests
were varied, but most of all he
took care of his family. Besides
raising two great children...he
also mentored his nieces and
nephews, as well as his grand
children, and was an integral
part of the good people we have
become.
I deeply regret that Brett
will not be here to be the type
of positive influence on his
grandchildren, and great nieces
and nephews. We will sorely
miss this in our family, but will
try to do him proud by picking
up and carrying this torch for
the family.
I will never forget the times
we shared. Whether it was


taking me to play basketball
or football on a weekend
afternoon, hunting, fishing,
going to a Gator game or
watching one on TV, etc... he
would always make it a special
memory...ones that, although
unbearably painful now, I will
always remember and cherish.
I will miss calling him, or
receiving a call from him and
whooping and hollering about a
touch down that the Gators had
made, as well as singing "It's
great to be a Florida Gator" with
him.
Brett will always have a
special place in our hearts. His
memory will last longer than
the 52 years he lived... because
of the lives he has touched.
He lived and loved the way he
wanted to...and would not have
had it any other way. Brett has
always been more than a father
to me and is, and always will be,
my Best Friend.
Andy Creamer


4A


Dale McFeatters
mcfeattersd@shns.com


Big Brother,

everybody

else is

watching

Mny citizens
who have
carried on
publicly and
unwisely can
take comfort in the words
of then-CIA director Leon
Panetta:
"I've often said that there's
a strong likelihood that the
next Pearl Harbor that we
confront could very well be a
cyberattack that cripples our
power systems, our grid, our
security systems, our financial
systems, our governmental
systems."
That's probably the only
way to get rid of the awkward
images of embarrassing
conduct that threaten to live
forever on the Web.
Take the New York woman
who berated a subway
conductor who reprimanded
her about dropping F-
bombs, "Do you know what
schools I've been to and
how well-educated.I am?"
The sympathetic cell phone
photographer who had posted
the exchange on YouTube took
Sit down but it was too late.
The post had gone viral
and, barring a really good
cyberattack, will still be there
when Internet archeologists
are studying random samples
of 21st century boorishness
the way we study Sumerian
clay tablets.
"Didn't they know they were
being photographed?" the
scientists will ask each other,
marveling at the stupidity of
their ancestors.
However, this past week
or so may have marked a
turning point in videographic
cluelessness.
Every city and college town
has a cadre of clods who feel
it is incumbent on them when
their team wins or loses a big
game to set fires, throw rocks
at the police and vandalize city
centers even though it was a
victory in which they had no
role in winning or a defeat in
which they played no part in
losing.
Last week there was a
challenge to the U.S. monopoly
on North American sports
boorishness by well-behaved
Canada of all places and of
all cities, Vancouver, a place
so beautiful there simply no
excuse for this sort of thing.
A riot-ready crowd awaited
the final game of the Stanley
Cup playoffs, augmented police
say by thugs and anarchists,
the anti-globalization nuts who
seem to infest the Northwest
and harbor the curious belief
that the quickest way to bring
the world order crashing down
is to throw a trash can through
a store window.
There was the predictable
setting fire to cars, throwing
rocks at the cops, dumping
trashcans into the street and
breaking store windows, the
usual sort of thing.
But the iconic images of that
riot was a couple lying down
and embracing in the middle
of an empty stretch of street,
she showing a fetching flash of
buttock.
Their faces are hard to make
out but they were quickly
identified as Scott Jones and
Alex Thomas by Jones' mother
who lives in Australia.
By Monday morning they
were on NBC's 'Today
Show."

Dale McFeatters is editorial
writer for Scripps Howard News
Service.


-
















Page EdItor: Todd Taylor, 754-0424 LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL THURSDAY, JUNE 23, 2011


COMMUNITY CALENDAR


Today
Children's workshops
The Florida
Department of
Environmental
Protection's Stephen
Foster Folk Culture
Center State Park will
host eight children's
workshops through July
21, to teach several dif-
ferent craft related skills
to interested children.
Participants are welcome
to take part in a single
workshop or multiple
workshops.

Monthly landlord
meeting
The next monthly
landlord's meeting is 6
p.m. today at the Lake
City Medical Center
Classroom 101. Dole
Crews, Columbia County
property appraiser is the
speaker. All managers
and realtors are welcome.
Call 755-0110 for more
information.

Play in the Clay
Diane Hornby is teach-
ing "Play In The Clay"
classes for the children's
summer vacation pro-
gram 10 a.m.-11 a.m.
June 23 and July 7 and
14 for $5 at the Stephen
Foster Cultural State
Park. For adults wishing
to explore their craftier
side this summer, there is
a beginning wheel throw-
ing pottery class 2-5
p.m. June 23 and Aug.
11, 18 and 25. The class
meets for three hours
and costs $85. Students
make four vessels and
learn to glaze and fire
them. To register, please
call the park Gift Shop
at (386) 397-1920 or visit
www.stephenfosterCSO.
org.To learn more about
the park, visit www. -
FloridaStateParks. org/ste-
phenfoster.

Senior Services open
house
Columbia County
Senior Services, Inc. is
having an open house
10 a.m.-12 p.m. today.
Entertainment at 11
a.m. by The Kitchen
Band. Come check out
the activities, the New
Heirloom Gift Shoppe and
more. Located at 628 S.E.
Allison Court, call (386)
755-0235 for more infor-
mation.

Donors needed
LifeSouth is officially
in emergency need of
O negative blood types.
The bloodmobile is seek-


COURTESY PHOTO


Superior accomplishment award winners
The Florida Department of Transportation presented superior accomplishment awards to employees located in the District
Two area, which includes 18 counties in northeast and north central Florida. The employees live throughout the area but the
awards were presented at the FDOT district headquarters in Lake City on Tuesday. The winners, hometowns and awards
were (front row, from left) Teresa Thrasher, Lake City, Highway Engineering Award; Nelson Bedenbaugh, Lake City, Sustained
Exceptional Performance; Jamie Driggers, Live Oak, Sustained Exceptional Performance; Katrina Sadler, Jasper, Role Model
Award; (second row) Debi Dahlberg, Lake City, Exceptional Contribution Award; Joaquin Olivella, Gainesville, Role Model
Award; Kenny Geisendorff, Jacksonville, Bridge Engineering Award; Lori Williams, Gainesville, Distinguished Manager Award;
(third row) District Secretary Alan Mosley and Scott Blocker, McAlpin, Leader of the Year.


ing donors 2-8 p.m.
Thursday at American
Family Fitness (next to
Food Lion). Free hot
dogs, lemonade, and
recognition items for all
donors.

Community meeting
A Sheriff' Office
community meeting is
6-8 p.m. Thursday at
Fort White Community
Center.

Friday
Hog entry deadline
approaching
The deadline for all
hog entries in the 2011
Columbia County Fair is
5 p.m. Friday. Children
must be between the ages
of 8-18 and enrolled in
public, private or home
school in Columbia
County. Entries must be
turned into the Columbia
County Fairgrounds
Office. Call 752-8822. The
beginning Hog weigh in
is scheduled for 8-10
a.m. July 9.


Magic with Miniature
Horses
The Columbia County
Public Library is host-
ing Reading is Magic
with Gentle Carousel
Miniature Horses 11
a.m. at Fort White
Community Center and 2
p.m. at the Main Branch
Friday.


at Baker County Middle
School in Macclenny.
Admission is $10, and
tickets will be sold at the
door. Local queens from
Columbia County are
Little Miss Morgan Royals,
Junior Miss Kimberlynne
Norman, Teen Miss
Brittany Wallace and Miss
Angela Cameron,


Columbia High School RHS alumni meeting


reunion
The Columbia High
School Class of 1986
reunion is Saturday.
Contact Howey Brannon
at 386-397-4570 or Brian
'Tweet" Nicholson at
(727) 992-1978 or visit
http://chsclassofl986.corn
for more information.


Saturday
Miss Florida Forestry
,Pageant
The Miss Florida
Forestry State Scholarship
Pageant is 7 p.m. Saturday


A Richardson High
School alumni meeting
.is noon Saturday at the
Richardson Center. For -
additional information
contact: CJ at (386) 752-
0815.

Monday
Building Strong Bonds
mentoring program
Calling all middle and
high school boys for
Building Strong Bonds
mentoring program 5-8
p.m. Monday. Meeting
is at 532 Marion Street.
Contact Al, Nelson at


(386) 867-1601. Dinner
included. Transportation
can be provided if con-
tacted one week in
advance.

Donors needed
LifeSouth is officially
in emergency need of
O negative blood types.
The bloodmobile is seek-
ing donors 2-10 p.m.
Monday at Walmart.
Free recognition items
for all donors.

Wood carvers meeting
The Columbia County
Wood Carvers meet
every Monday at 1
p.m. at the LifeStyle
Enrichment Center.
Contact Ken Myer at 719-
9629 or Charles Kime at
755-4937 for more infor-
mation.

Tuesday

Make and Take
workshop
Back to Basics Rain


* To submit your Community
Calendar item, contact Antonia
Robinson at 754-0425 or by
e-mail at arobinson@
lakecityreporter.com.


Barrel "Make and
Take" Workshop from
6:30 8:00 p.m. Tuesday
Columbia County
Extension Office Located
on the Fairground in
Lake City Just call to
register 752-5384. Take
home your completed
rain barrel for $45 Learn
about the benefits of
Harvesting Rainwater.
Let us help you assemble
your very own Rain
Barrel.

Meet the Author at the
library
A Meet the Author pro-
gram featuring Mary Jane
Ryals is 7 p.m. Tuesday
at the Main Branch.
The event is sponsored
by the Friends of the
Library. Ryals is a poet,-
novelist and Florida State
University professor. In
2008, she was named
Poet Laureate of Florida's
Big Bend Region, a title
she will hold until 2012.
Her novel; "Cookie and
Me," was released in
September 2010 and
takes place in Tallahassee
in the 1960s.

Meal payment due
Payment for the
Columbia County .Senior
Services Inc. Wednesday
homecooked meal is due
10 a.m. Tuesday at the
LifeStyle Enrichment
Center. The menu
is hamburger steak,
mashed potatoes and
gravy, broccoli casserole
and peach cobbler and
ice cream. Call (386)
755-0235 for more infor-
mation.

Wednesday
Beekeeping workshop
at extension office
A beekeeping work-
shop is 6-8:30 p.m.
Wednesday at the
Columbia County
Extension office. The
registration fee is $5
. which includes materials
and honey. The class will
be taught with the help
of local beekeepers. Call
(386) 752-5384 for more
information.

Dubi Sisters perform
at Senior Services
Columbia County
Senior Services Inc.
is hosting a dancing
performance from
the Dubi Sisters 11-
11:45 a.m. Wednesday
at the LifeStyle
Enrichment Center.
Call (386) 755-0235.
for more information.


OBITUARIES


Joshua O. Burch
Joshua O. Burch, 31, died while
battling the Blue Ribbon Forest
Fire on the Hamilton / Columbia
County border, Monday, June
20, 2011. He was dedicated For-
est Ranger / Fire Fighter with
the Division of Forestry who
served the State of Florida and
it's citizens faithfully. First and
foremost though, he was. a hus-
band and father who loved to
spend time fishing on the river,
hunting in the woods he was
trying to protect and spending
time with his wife and two sons.
He is survived by his loving wife
oftwelve years, Danielle; his two
sons, Jeremy and Jacob of Lake
City, FL; father, Hollis Burch &
Judy Meadows ofPine Mountain,
GA; mother, Mollie (Loyd) Gay-
lard of Lake City, FL; half-broth-
er, Jason Burch, CA; numerous
aunts and uncles also survive.
Funeral services will be conduct-
ed on Friday, June 24, 2011 at
10:00 a.m. at Christ Central Min-
istries, with Pastor Mike Tatum
officiating. Interment will follow
in Forest Lawn Memorial Gar-
dens, Lake City; FL. Visitation
with the family will be Thursday
evening from 5:00 p.m. until
8:00 p.m. at the funeral home.
GATEWAY-FOREST LAWN
FUNERAL HOME, 3596
South U.S. Hwy 441, Lake City,
Florida 32025, (386) 752-1954
is in charge of arrangements.
Please sign the guest book at
www.gatewayforestlawn.comr


Brett L. Fulton
Mr. Brett L. Fulton, 52, of White
Springs, died Monday June 20,
2011 while fighting the Blue
Ribbon Fire
on the Colum-
bia/Hamilton
County Bor-
ders on State
Road 6. Mr.
Fulton was -
born in Co-
lumbus, Ohio
On June 26,
1958 and had worked for the
Parsons and Sons Seed Mill in
Wellborn, Florida for fourteen
year prior to working with the
Florida Division of Forestry for
the past thirteen years. Brett was
an accomplished welder and had
attained the rank of Senior For-
est Ranger within the Division
of Forestry. In his spare time
he enjoyed hunting and fishing
but his favorite time was spent
with his grandchildren Luke
and Sydney. He was a "father
figure" to many children who
desperately needed one. Brett
was preceded in death by his fa-
ther Richard M. Fulton Sr. and
was being aided at the time of
his death by his friend and co-
worker, Joshua Burch who also
died as a result of the fire. Mr.
Fulton was of the Baptist faith.
Mr. Fulton is survived by his
wife, Margaret Phillips Fulton;
his daughter, Christina Fulton
Mills of White Springs and her
husband, Jordon Mills (who is


currently deployed in Afghani-
stan with the U.S. Army;) his
son, Brett Michael Fulton of Or-
lando,'Florida; his mother, Nan-
cy Moseley (Larry) of Wellborn,
Florida; his grandson, Luke
Jarrell and his grand-daughter,
Sydney Jarrell both of White
Springs, Florida; his brother,
Richard Fulton Jr. (Betty Lau-
ria) of Lake City; his three sis-
ters, Debbie Hassebroek (Larry);
Tina Jones (Glenn Jr.) and Ju-
lia Fulton(Ottie Maddox) all
of Lake City; special nephews
Trey Fulton and Andy Creamer
both of Lake City and his part-
ner and best friend, Andy Ross
of Lake City. Numerous nieces,
nephews and other family mem-
bers and friends also survive.
Funeral services for Mr. Fulton
will be conducted at 10:00 A.M.
on Saturday, June 25, 2011 at
Christ Central Ministries. The
family will receive'friends from
6:00 until 8:00 Friday evening in
the chapel of the Dees-Parrish
Family Funeral Home. Follow-
ing the funeral service the family
will host a reception in the ban-
quet hall at the Columbia County
Fairgrounds. Arrangements were
under the direction of the DEES-
PARRISH FAMILY FUNER-
AL HOME, 458 South Marion
Ave., Lake City, FL 32025.
(386)752-1234 please sign our
online family guestbook at
parrishfamilyfuneralhome. corn


Jonathan L. Jones Sr.
Mr. Jonathan L. Jones Sr., born
March 6, 1971, son of the late
Theola Jones Sr. and the late Es-
sie Newsome Jones passed away
June 17, 2011 after an extended
illness. He was a resident of
Springville Community in Lake
City, Florida.
Mr. Jonathan
L. Jones Sr.
leaves to cher-
ish his mem-
ory four chil-
dren: Lamar
Jones, Jessica
Jones, Jona-
than L. Jones Jr. and Monique
Jones. Eight siblings: Gloria
McIntosh, Theola Jones Jr. (Van-
leesa), Ronald Jones (Madeline)
Hinesville, Ga. Mamie Wilson
(Terry), Jacqueline Williams,
Betty Wilson, Carolyn Jones
(Glenn) and Michael Jones
(Bonita), Jacksonville, Florida.
Also a host of nieces, nephews,
great nieces, great nephews and
sorrowing family and friends.
Funeral Services for Mr. Jona-
than L. Jones Sr. will be Satur-
day, June 25, 2011 at 11:00 am in
the Mt. Pleasant Missionary Bap-
tist Church, 3817 NW Suwannee
Valley Rd. Lake City, Florida.
Viewing and Visitation for fam-
ily and friends will be Friday,
June 24, 2011 at the Mt. Pleasant
Missionary Baptist Church, 3817
NW Suwannee Valley Rd. Lake
City, Florida from 5:00 p.m. un-
til 7:00 p.m. Rev. C.J. Cofield


will be officiating. Interment will
be in the Springville Cemetery.
D.M. Udell Funeral Home
is in charge of all arrange-
ments. Call D.M. UDELL
AND SONS at (386)362-
4189 or cell (386)209-0223.

Willie Mae Fleming Taylor
Willie Mae Fleming Taylor, 62 of
Fort White, FL., passed on Friday,
June 17, 2011 at Haven Hospice
in Lake City, FL. She was born
to the late Edward L. Fleming
and Juanita B. Fleming. She was
a member of Antioch Mission-
ary Baptist church and employed
as a Certified Nursing Assistant.
She was preceded in death by her
husband William George Tay-
lor, two sisters and one brother.
She leaves to cherish her memo-
ries a daughter Sharon Fleming;
four grandchildren, three great


grandchildren; step son Eyian
(Renorda) Taylor; her siblings
Lucy M. Robinson, Edward (Bar-
bara) Fleming, Idella Fleming, Ed-
ward (Lana) Fleming, Jr., Lunette
Fleming, Glenn (Mary) Fleming,
Sr., Lillie (Roger) Daies all of
Fort White; and other relatives.
Funeral Services for Ms. Taylor
will be held Saturday, June 25,
2011 at 11:00 AM at Antioch
Missionary Baptist Church, Fort
White, Rev. Donnell Sanders,
Pastor. Burial will following in
Philadelphia Memorial Garden,
Lake City. Visitation will be
Friday at funeral home 6-8 PM.
Arrangement entrusted to A.
JEROME BROWN FU-
NERAL HOME, 1560 NW
1st Avenue, High Springs, FL
Obituaries are paid advertise-
ments. For details, call the Lake
City Reporter's classified depart-
ment at 752-1293.


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LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL THURSDAY, JUNE 23, 2011


Page Editor: Todd Taylor, 754-0424













LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL & STATE THURSDAY, JUNE 23, 2011


More scenes from Tuesday's


Adult Education graduation ceremony


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Graduates Todd Bennett and Heather Betters move their tassels during the Adult. Education graduation ceremony
Tuesday.


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Donna Jeffers (left) hugs former student Jeanea Wilcox during the Adult Education graduation
ceremony Tuesday at the Columbia County School Board Administrative Complex. 'It's been a
long time coming. She finally made it,' Jeffers said.


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Glenn Hunter, a Columbia County School Board member, awards
Curleen Williams with a certificate for the Highest Overall Score
during the Recognition of Highest Achievement' at the Adult
Education graduation ceremony Tuesday. Williams also received
a certificate in Language Arts Reading and was a Florida
Gateway College Foundation scholarship recipient.


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Columbia County School Board member Keith Hudson (left) congratulates Doyle
Hunt while awarding him with a certificate in Recognition of Highest Achievement in
Mathematics. Hunt also received a certificate in Language Arts Writing. Other certificate
recipients in recognition of highest achievements were Norman Canipe for Science;
Katelyn Greer for the Award of Special Achievement; John O'Brien for Social Studies; and '
Rockelle Taylor for the Adult High School Outstanding Achievement.


Last space shuttle crew practices for July launch


By MARCIA DUNN
AP Aerospace Writer

CAPE CANAVERAL-The
four astronauts who will bid
goodbye to the space shuttle
program are practicing at the
.launch pad this week for their
July 8 send-off
Commander Christopher
Ferguson and his crew will
board Atlantis for a mock
countdown Thursday.
On Wednesday, the astro-
nauts met with dozens of
journalists at the base of the
pad, answering questions
and posing for pictures that
will go down in history as
NASA's 30-year shuttle pro-
gram ends.
It was such a momentous
occasion that even reporters
and photographers took turn
posing for the cameras, with
Atlantis' orange fuel tank and
two white boosters serving as
an irresistible backdrop. The
spacecraft itself was turned
inward toward the pad and
not visible.
"I couldn't think of a bet-
Ster backdrop," Ferguson said.


'For those of you who have ever had'
the opportunity to just stand under-
neath it and look up, I've always said
that the magic of the space shuttle
is just its magnitude.

Atlantis commander Christopher Ferguson


"For those of you who have
ever had the opportunity to
just stand underneath it and
look up, I've always said that
the magic of the space shuttle
is just its magnitude."
Astronaut Rex Walheim
said. he gets goosebumps
"thinking that we're going to
get to ride that in about two
weeks."
The two other crew mem-
bers are pil9t Douglas Hurley
and Sandra Magnus. All four
are experienced space fliers.
Atlantis got a new fuel
valve Tuesday. The old one,
removed from main engine
No. 3, showed a possible
leak when the external fuel
tank was filled last week to
check for cracking. So far,


the 50 reinforced brackets
on the tank show no signs
of cracks; technicians have
completed about half the
necessary X-rays. The new
valve, meanwhile, will be
tested this weekend.
Last November, Discovery
ended up grounded for four
months because of cracks
that were discovered in
the support brackets in the
central portion of the fuel
tank. The so-called intertank
region holds instruments
rather than fuel. The prob-
lem was 'traced to a brittle
aluminum alloy, combined
with assembly issues. The
same material was used for
Atlantis'brackets,whichwere
reinforced before last week's


test.
Only four astronauts are
assigned to the 12-day mis-
sion, versus the normal six
or seven, because of the
fact that there no longer
are any space shuttles on
standby for a potential res-
cue. In the event of serious
damage to the shuttle at
liftoff, the four would move
into the International Space
Station and return, one at
a time over the course of
a year, via Russian Soyuz
capsules.
Atlantis will carry up a full
load of space station sup-
plies. NASA hopes it will be
enough to keep the orbiting
complex going until private
companies are able to take
over cargo hauls.
This will be the 135th
time a shuttle has blasted
off. Discovery ended its fly-
ing career in March, and
Endeavour on June 1. All
three shuttles will retire to
museums; in the case of
Atlantis, the Kennedy Space
Center Visitor Complex will
be its final stop.


ASSOCIATED PRESS
The crew of space shuttle Atlantis, from left, mission spe-
cialist Rex Walhiem, mission specialist Sandy Magnus,
pilot Doug Hurley and commander Chris Ferguson attend
a news conference at Pad 39A during the Terminal
Countdown Demonstration Test at the Kennedy Space
Center in Cape Canaveral Wednesday.


Page Editor: Todd Taylor, 754-0424












Lake City Reporter





Health


& Wellness


Contact
Robert Bridges
Editor
754-0428
rbridgesl'akecityreportercom ,


Brought to you by

ShandsLakeS- i're
Regional Medical Center

T L. L I B r_


Thursday, June 23, 2011 www.lakecityreporter.com 7A


Medicaid for the



middle class?


By RICARDO ALONSO-
ZALDIVAR
Associated Press
" WASHINGTON
President Barack Obama's
health care law w6uld let
several million middle-class
people get nearly free insur-
ance meant for the poor, a
twist government number
crunchers say they discov-
ered only after the complex
bill was signed.
: The change would affect
early retirees: A married
couple could have an annu-
al income of about $64,000
and still get Medicaid, said
officials who make long-
range cost estimates for the
Health and Human Services
department.
After initially down-
playing any concern, the
Obama administration said.
late Tuesday it would look
for a fix.
Up to 3 million more
people could qualify for
Medicaid in 2014 as a result
of the anomaly. That's
because, in a major change
from today, most of their
Social Security benefits
would no longer be counted
as income for determining'
eligibility. It might be com-
pared to allowing middle-
class people to qualify.for
food stamps.
Medicare chief actuary
Richard Foster says the
situation keeps him up at
night,
"I don't generally com-
ment on the pros or cons of


ASSOCIATED PRESS
In a June 13, 2011 file photo, President Barack Obama
speaks to a group of supporters at a Miami fundraiser,
where he launched his bid for reelection in Florida. President
Obama's health care law would let several million middle-
class people get nearly free insurance meant for the poor, ,a
twist government number crunchers say they discovered only
after the complex bill was signed.


policy, but that just doesn't
make sense," Foster said
during a question-and-
answer session at a recent
professional society meet-
ing.
'This is a situation that
got no attention at all,"
added Foster. "And even
now, as I raise the issue
with various policymakers,
people are not rushing to
say ... we need to do some-


thing about this."
Administration .officials
said Tuesday they now see
the. problem. "We are con-
cerned that, asga matter of
law, some middle-income
Americans may be receiv-
ing coverage through
Medicaid, which is meant
to serve only the neediest
Americans," said Health and
MEDICAID continued on 8A


FDA concludes silicone

breast implants mostly safe


By LAURAN NEERGAARD and
MATTHEW PERRONE
Associated Press
SWASHINGTON Don't
expect breast implants to
last for life, the government
warned Wednesday: About
1 in 5 women who receive
them for cosmetic reasons
will have them removed
within 10 years, and those
odds are even higher for
cancer survivors.
It's not the first time
the Food and Drug
Administration has issued
.such a warning. But
the agency repeated it
Wednesday after reviewing
new data on silicone-gel
breast implants five years
after they returned to the
market following a health
scare. The agency conclud-
ed the implants are basi-
cally safe as long as women
understand they come
with complications. Those
include painful scar tissue
and ruptured implants.
"The longer you have the
implant, the more likely you
are to have complications,"
said FDA medical device
chief Jeff Shuren. He said
women should get regular
checkups including scans
to make sure the implants
haven't ruptured.
While FDA's safety
review concentrated on
silicone-gel implants, the
agency's updated advice
booklet for women makes
clear that saline-filled ver-
sions come with the same
complications women
getting those wind up back
on the operating table, too.
Plastic surgeons say
they've long told women
about those risks.
"It doesn't discourage a
single one of them, which


ASSOCIATED PRESS
In this Dec. 11, 2001 file photo, a silicone gel breast implant
is shown at Mentor Corp. manufacturing facility in Irving,
Texas. Federal health officials said Wednesday the latest
data on silicone breast implants show they are relatively safe,
despite frequent complications thatlead about one in five
women to have the implants removed within ten years.


is pretty amazing," said Dr.
Michael Zenn, vice chief
of plastic surgery at Duke
University Medical Center.
"This requires almost life-
time maintenance when
you have a breast implant
in. If you're not telling
patients that, you do them
a disservice."
Wednesday's update is


the latest in a 20-year saga
over the safety of breast
implants. The FDA banned
the silicone-gel type in 1992
amid fears they might cause
cancer, lupus and other dis-
eases. But when research
ruled out most of the dis-
ease concern, regulators

FDA continued on 8A


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Sunscreen eliminates


tinea versicolor


DEAR DR. GOTT: I
have been plagued with
an extensive tinea versi-
color skin infection on
my back and abdomen
since I was a teenager.
I was treated by at least
five doctors over the
years. One suggested
using Selsun Blue sham-
poo as a lotion overnight
for several days, which
was unpleasant and only
provided a few weeks
of relief. The infec-
tion even returned
within about four to six
months of taking oral
antifungal medication.
My last doctor said
these meds were dan-
gerous to the liver. I am
an otherwise healthy
woman in my 50s.
About three years
ago, I used the only
sunblock I happened to
have on hand, Banana
Boat for Kids SPF
50. After two days of
application following
my morning shower, I
noticed my tinea ver-
sicolor disappearing! I
kept applying it daily,
and the skin infection
completely cleared
within about a week.
With faithful daily use
of this or the "baby" ver-
sion of the brand, it has
never returned. This
was such an amazing
and accidental discovery
an easy, safe and low-
cost remedy that I
must share it to benefit
other sufferers.
Do you think the
Skey is the 2.4 percent
titanium dioxide? I am
a label, reader, and I
don't recall previously
using a lotion with this
component. I am con-
cerned .that someday
the manufacturer will
discontinue or change
the product, which is
another reason I hope
you will print this letter.


ON HEALTH


Dr. Peter Gott


DEAR READER:
Tinea versicolor is a
common fungal/infection
that causes patches of
skin to become discol-
ored or lose pigmenta-
tion. It is most common
in teens and young
adults.
Symptoms include
small, scaly patches of.
discolored (white, pink,
tan or dark brown)
skin and possible mild
itching. The patches
grow slowly and tend to
become more noticeable
following sun exposure.
It usually affects the
neck, back, upper arms
and chest.
Tinea versicolor may
be present on healthy
skin. It is when the fun-
gus becomes overgrown
that infection occurs.
This typically happens
during warm, humid
temperatures when
excessive sweating and
oily skin become more
common. It can also be
the result of hormonal
changes and a sup-
pressed immune system.
Treatment begins with
over-the-countei anti-
fungal creams. If these
fail to provide improve-
ment or the infection is
severe to widespread,
prescription topical or
oral medications may
be necessary. Ovpr-the-
counters include Selsun
Blue shampoo (or the
generic equivalent),
miconazole, terbinafine
and clotrimozle.
Unfortunately, infec-


tion can recur. Persistent
cases may require
once- or twice-monthly
medication to prevent
the fungus from over-
growing and infection
occurring.
I don't know why the
sunscreen works for
you, but I cannot argue
with a three-year suc-
cess rate. It is inexpen-
sive and safe, so I am
passing on your tip to
my readers. I hope other
sufferers have the same
fantastic.results you
have had.
DEAR DR. GOIT: I
am a 31-year-old single
mother who suffers from
severe back pain and
depression/anxiety. My
doctor currently has
me taking more than 13
prescription drugs daily,
I feel overmedicated, but
when I talk to him, all he
does it prescribe more :
pills. What can I do?
DEAR READER:
Based on your brief
note, it appears that your:
doctor isn't listening to
you at all. I recommend
you switch to another
physician who will sit
down with you to review
your medications and
determine which ones
can be eliminated. You
should also have a physi-
cal examination and
imaging studies to deter-
mine the cause of your
back pain. I also recom- -
mend blood work to ...
check your liver and kid-
ney functions and, more;-
important, to ensure that:
the medications aren't
causing more harm than
good.
* Dr. Peter Gott is a retired-.
physician and the author
of the book "Dr. Gott's No
Flour, No Sugar Diet," and
the recently published "Dr.
Gott's No Flour, No Sugar
Cookbook."


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Health


& Wellness


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Editor
754-0428
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Brought to you by

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8A www.lakecityreporter.com Thursday, June 23, 201 I


Docs overtesting for


cervical cancer virus


By LAURAN NEERGAARD
AP Medical Writer

WASHINGTON Too
many doctors are test-
ing the wrong women, or
using the wrong test, for a
virus that causes cervical
cancer.
The days of one-size-
fits-all screening for cervi-
cal cancer are long gone.
How often to get a Pap
smear and whether to
be tested for the cancer-
causing HPV virus at the
same time now depend
on your age and other cir-
cumstances.
i But a government study
reports Monday that a sur-
prising number of doctors
and clinics aren't follow-
ing guidelines from major
medical groups on how
to perform HPV checks,
suggesting a lot of women
are getting unnecessary
tests.
! That wastes money and
could harm women who
wind up getting extra
medical care they didn't
need, says Dr. Mona
S'araiya of the Centers
for Disease Control and
Prevention! who led the
research.
Even she wasn't pro-
tected from the confusion.
Saraiya was stunned to get
a bill showing that her
own doctor had ordered.
'-**'l: oo (l^a!.l,:10 3.-


testing for HPV strains
not connected to cervical
cancer.
The findings, reported
in the journal Obstetrics &
Gynecology, show women
have to be savvy to ensure
they're getting the right
checkups enough, but
not too much.
"It's extremely dis-
couraging," says Debbie
Saslow, gynecologic
cancer director at the
American Cancer Society,
who's had to argue with
her doctor against testing
too often. "We have not
been able to get that mes-
sage across."
Cervical cancer grows
so slowly that Pap smears
- which examine cells
scraped from the cer-
vix usually find it in
time to treat, or even to
prevent when precancer-
ous cells are spotted and
removed.
For decades,.Paps were
the only way to:screen.
for cervical cancer. Now'
doctors know that certain
strains of HPV, the human
papillomavirus, cause
most cervical cancer. HPV
testing isn't a replacement
for the Pap. But it can.pro-
vide extra information to
help determine if a woman
is at higher or lower risk
and thus guide her ongo-
ing care--- if it's-used.


correctly.
The new CDC study,
part of a national survey
of medical practices that
included 600 providers of
cervical cancer screening,
examined-how doctors are
using it.
The .study found 60
percent of doctors and
clinics say they give a
routine Pap-plus-HPV
test to women who are
too young for that combi-
nation. Guidelines stress
that so-called co-testing
is. only for women 30 and
older. If both tests are
negative, they. can wait
three years before their
next screening.
Why the age limit?
Saslow says HPV is near-
ly as common as the com-
mon cold; especially in
younger women but
their bodies usually clear
the infection on their
own and only a years-
long infection is risky.
Learning that a 20-some-
thing has HPV increases
the' odds of more inva-
sive testipg that in turn
can leave her cervix less
able to handle pregnan-
cy later in life. Younger
women are supposed
to get HPV testing only
if a Pap signals a pos-
sible problem and doc-
tors really need the extra
information. ..


FDA: Implants deemed safe

Continued From Page 7A


MEDICAID: Middle class in question

Continued From Page 7A


Human Services spokes-
man Richard Sorian. "We
are exploring options to
address this issue."
Administration officials
and senior Democratic
lawmakers initially defend-
ed the change, saying it
wasn't a loophole but the
result of a well-meaning
effort to simplify the rules
for deciding who would
get help under the new
health care law. Instead
of a hodgepodge, there
would be one national
policy.
But Sen. Orrin Hatch
of Utah, the ranking
Republican on the Senate.
Finance Committee, called
the situation "unaccept-
able" and said he intended
to look into it.
Governors have been
clamoring for relief from
Medicaid costs, com-
plaining that federal


rules drive up spending
and limit state options.
The program is now one
of the top issues in bud-
get negotiations between
the White House and
Congress. Republicans
want to roll back federal
requirements that block
states from limiting eli-
gibility.
Medicaid is a safety
net program that serves
more than 50 million vul-
nerable Americans, from
low-income children
and pregnant women
to Alzheimer's patients
in nursing homes. It's
designed as a federal-
state partnership, with
Washington paying close
to 60 percent of the total
cost.
Early retirees would be
a new group for Medicaid.
While retirees can now
start collecting Social


Security at age 62, they
must wait another three
years to get Medicare,
unless they're disabled.
Some early retirees
who worked all their
lives may.not want to join
a program for the poor,
but others might see it
as a relatively painless
way' to satisfy the new
law's requirement that
most Americans carry
health insurance starting
in 2014. It would help
tide them over until they
qualify for Medicare.
The actuary's office
said the early retirees eli-
gible for Medicaid would
be on top of an estimated
16 million to 20 million
new people that Obama's
law already brings into
the program, by opening
it to childless adults with
incomes near the poverty
level.


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returned the implants to
the market in 2006 with
the requirement that manu-
facturers continue studying
recipients to see how they
fare long-term.
Breast augmentation
remains the most popular
cosmetic surgery in the
U.S., with nearly 300,000
women undergoing it last
year. According to the
American Society of Plastic
Surgeons, more than 70,000
others received implants
for breast reconstruction.
Silicone-gel implants are
the most common kind.
Based on that data, FDA
said Wednesday that 20
percent to 40 percent of
patients who have implants
for cosmetic reasons will'
need another operation to
modify or remove them
within eight to 10 years.
For reconstruction
patients, the number is
qven higher at 40 to 70 per-
cent, FDA said.
The most common com-
plication remains scar tis-
sue that hardens around
the implant, and that can
become severe enough
to warp the shape of the
breast or cause pain. Other
problems include implant
rupture, wrinkling and
a lopsided appearance,
according to the report
The research also


showed a small link with
a very rare form of cancer
known as anaplastic large
cell lymphoma. The agen-
cy has learned of 60 cases
of the disease worldwide,
among the estimated 5 mil-
lion to 10 million women
with breast implants.
Why are reconstruction
patients so much more like-
ly to need another opera-
tion?
Radiation for breast can-
cer damages the skin so
that over time it becomes
stiffer, said, Dr. Evan
Garfein, a plastic and recon-
structive surgeon at New
York's Montefiore Medical
Center. It's not uncommon
for a woman who got two
implants so that both
sides start out matching
- to have the radiated side
eventually appear tighter
and higher on the chest
as the tissue around it con-
tracts. Also, women getting
an implant after a mastec-
tomy don't have a natural
layer of breast tissue to
cushion it
But Zenn said women get-
ting cosmetic implants also
need to understand that their
breasts also will change with
age or weight gain and
even if the implant doesn't
rupture or develop scar tis-
sue, the skin and fat around
it can droop or sag in unat-


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women considering preg-
nancy to put off implants,
because their breasts tend
to change afterward, and
says he won't perform large
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The services we offer include:
Skilled Nursing
Physical Therp3y
Occupational Therap,
Speech Therapy .,
Home Health Aide Aervies
Lymphedema & Other Care Management


PRIMARY

MEDICINE


* Preventative Care
* Physicals
* Geriatric Care
* Women's Health
* Diabetes
Management

386.754.DOCS (3627)
www.primarycaremedic.com


IJAdlih "Kaltr-
Nirweaa- ARNT
Best of
the Best
4 Years


IMostappontm t w


.. .. t..,
S-,i:-: :%%:


....LsP F... r ...
f-.


Th iL) hopaiW e should b. .. -
1037 US Highway 9oW, Suite 140 Lake City, FL 32055
386-754-6671 License # HHA299991704


PHYSICIANS
IMAGING





LAKE CITY


*MRI
* Ultrasound
*X-Ray
* CT-64- Slice Scanner
* Digital Mammography
* Bone Density
386.487.3970


trust .

* Physical Therapy
* Hand Therapy/
Splinting
* Osteoporosis Program
* Balance Disorders


386.755.3164


Story ideas?


I ccpin ewPaint


O i i ^!Fuer l..e.iJP r e ll lrice










Lake City Reporter


Story ideas?

Contact
Tim Kirby
Sports Editor
754-0421
tkirby@lakectyreporter.com


SPORTS


Thursday, June 23, 2011


www.lakecityreporter.com


Section B


BRIEFS
OUTn FOOTBALL
Jackson camp
in High Springs
Fort White High
football coach Demetric
Jackson is conducting a
football camp for
elementary and middle
school children at First
Baptist Church in High
Springs on Friday and
Saturday. Cost of the
camp is $40, with a $5
discount for each
additional sibling.
For details, call
Jackson at 365-3304.
YOUTH BASEBALL
Fundraiser for
all-star team
The Lake City "A"
8-under all-star team is
selling T-shirts and spots
as a fundraiser for its trip
to the Babe Ruth/Cal
Ripken State Tournament
in West Palm Beach. The
T-shirts will read "Lake
City All-Stars" on the
front and 'We've got your
back" on the back. For a
$10 donation,
contributors will get their
name printed on the
back. For a $20
donation, contributors
will get their name and a
T-shirt Deadline is today.
For details, call Jodie
Maxwell at 344-4380
(Oaczd@hotmail.com),
Wendy Holton at
288-5248 (holton.6@
hotmail.com) or Mike
Black at 344-4780
(m ikeblacki' aln m i:. troy.
edu).
FISHING
Benefit bass
tourney Saturday
An open bass
tournament to benefit the
Suwannee River Breast
Cancer Awareness
Association is Saturday at
Clay Landing. Cost is $70
per boat with an optional
big bass pot of$10. .
There is 60 percent
payback on the
tournament and 100
percent payback on big
bass pot
For details, call
Jamie Albritton at
(386) 209-0166,
Donnie Feagle at
365-1191 or
Ruben Thomas at
(386) 288-4691.
ZUMBA
Benefit for
tornado victims
A Zumbathon to
benefit Missouri tornado
victims is planned for
9-10:30 a.m. Saturday at
Teen Town Recreation
Center. Cost is $10.
Sponsored by the
Lake City Recreation
Department and Lake
City Zumba, the Saturday
Soaker Luau Zumba staff
reminds participants to
wear luau attire suitable
for dancing.
'For details, contact
Sarah at lakecityzumba@
gmail.com.


* From staff reports


Interleague


has

Lake City has ties
on both sides of
Lone Star series.
By TIM KIRBY
tkirby@lakecityreporter.com
Interleague play in Major
League Baseball brings
teams together that sel-
dom meet The battle for
supremacy of the Lone Star
State features a Lake City
flavor.
The Texas Rangers and
Houston Astros wrapped
up a three-game series
at Arlington, Texas, on
Wednesday.
Columbia High gradu-
ate and Lake City native
Michael Kirkman plays for
the Rangers, and the Astros
now have a Lake City con-
nection.
Houston called up catcher
Carlos Corporan earlier this
month. Corporan played for
coach Tom Clark at Lake
City Community College.
Kirkman actually signed
with Lake City Community
College in 2005 before
deciding to accept a draft
offer with Texas. and .
embark on a minor league Texas Ra
journey that led him to the June 10.
World Series last year.
Kirkman began the 2011
season at the Rangers' games a;
Triple A farm club in has appe
Round Rock, Texas. He was since p
called up to the big club on inning (
May 27. June 10
Corporan was in at Minne
Oklahoma City, Okla., Kirkn
where Kirkman played talked t
before the Rangers rude tre
switched their Triple A wives r
teams. Houston purchased at the
Corporan's contract and he Champi<
joined.the Astros for a game New Yc
on June 10. won the
Kirkman did not see to the W
action in the first two The I


local


play


flavor


ASSOCIATED PRESS
fingers' Michael Kirkman of Lake City pitches against the Minnesota Twins during the ninth inning in Minneapolis on
Kirkman pitched a 1-2-3 inning, as the Rangers defeated the Twins 9-3.


against Houston.. He
eared in four games
itching a perfect
(one strikeout) on
in the Rangers' 9-3
esota.
aan and wife, Lorie,
his spring about
eatment the Texas
received from fans
American League
onship Series in
Irk. The Rangers
ALCS to advance
world Series.
Kirkmans' distaste


with New York only wors-
ened as the,Yankees swept
Texas in a three-game
series.
Kirkman gave up three
hits and three runs with one
walk and one strikeout in 22
innings in a 12-4 loss on
June 14. The Yankees won
3-2 in 12 innings on June 16
and Kirkman suffered his
first loss in the Majors. He
pitched 2'A innings with one
hit, one run, one walk and
one strikeout
On Sunday, in a 4-2 loss


to host Atlanta, Kirkman
pitched 1% innings with one
hit, one run, two walks and
one strikeout For the sea-
son he is 1-1 with a 6.50
ERA in nine games and 18
innings pitched. He has 14
strikeouts and I walks.
The Rangers won the first
two games against Houston
and improved to 4-6 in their
last 10 games. They hold a
two-game lead over Seattle
in the AL West
Corporan has seen regu-
lar action behind the plate


since arriving in Houston.,
He got a hit in his first at
bat, but is struggling at the
plate. In 10 games, he is
4-for-30 with two RBIs and
one run scored.
Coiporan got one at bat
with Milwaukee in 2009 and
had a base hit. His first
hit this season came off
Cincinnati shortstop Paul
Janish who was mopping
up in a blow-out loss. For
the brief time, Corporan
LOCALS continued on 6B


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Catcher Carlos Corporan; a former player at Lake City Community College, has seen plenty of action at the plate since being called up by the Houston
Astros. Corporan blocks the plate and tags Pittsburgh Pirates' Garrett Jones in the sixth inning of a game in Houston on June 16. Corporan (right) shows the
ball to the umpire to get the out call.


FOOD STORES


Sale prices
in effect
thru 7/4/11


Coca-Cola Brands 12 Pack Cans

3 for 1200 or $4ea.


Fill the

COOLER
with a 201b Bag of
Clean Cubed Ice

Only 9 $


The celebration is coming soon!


I



















LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS THURSDAY, JUNE 23, 2011 Page Editor: Brandon Finley, 754-0420


SCOREBOARD


TELEVISION

TV sports

Today
COLLEGE BASEBALL
7 p.m.
ESPN2 World Series, game 10,
California vs.Virginia, at Omaha, Neb.
GOLF
9 am.
TGC European PGA Tour, BMW
International Open, first round, at
Munich
12:30 pm.
TGC Wegmans LPGA
Championship, first round, at Pittsford,
N.Y.
3 p.m.
TGC PGA Tour, Travelers
Championship, first round, at Cromwell,
Conn.
MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL
I p.m.
MLB Regional coverage, Seattle at
Washington or Oakland at N.Y. Mets
8 p.m.
MLB-Regiomal coveragePhiladelphia
at St. Louis orArizona at Kansas City
NBA BASKETBALL
7:30 p.m.
ESPN Draft, at Newark, N.J.
SOCCER
10 p.m.
ESPN2 MLS, New York at Seattle
TENNIS
7 a.m.
ESPN2 -The Championships, second
round, at Wimbledon, England

BASEBALL

AL standings


East Division
W L
Boston 44 29
NewYork 43 29'
"Tampa Bay 40 34
Toronto 36 39
.Baltimore 33 39
Central Divison
W L.
Cleveland 39 33
Detroit 39 35
Chicago 36 39
Minnesota 32 39
Kansas City 31 42
West Division
W L
Texas 40. 35
Seattle 37 36
Los Angeles 36 39
Oakland 34 40

Interleague play


Pct GB
.603 -
.597 1/2
.5414 1/2
.480 9
.458101/2

Pct GB
.542 -
.527 I
.4804 I/2
.4516 1/2
.4258 1/2

.Pct GB
.533 -
.507 2
.480 4
.4595 1/2


Tuesday's Games
Pitsburgh 9, Baltimore 3
Colorado.4, Cleveland 3
Washlngton 6, Seattle 5
Florida 5, LA.Angels 2
- Oakland 7, N.Y. Mets 3
Sari Diego 5, Bgo stn'
Atanta 5,Tqronto. I. ,.
N.Y.Yankees at Cincinnati, ppd., rain
Texas 5, Houston 4, 11 innings
Arizona 7, Kansas City 2
Chicago White Sox 3, Chicago Cubs 2
Milwaukee 5,Tampa Bay I
LA Dodgers 6, Detroit I
Minnesota 9, San Francisco 2'
Wednesday's Games
Pittsburgh 5, Baltimore 4
N.Y.Yankees 4, Cincinnati 2, Ist,game
Atlanta 5,Toronto I
Tampa Bay 6, Milwaukee 3
San Diego 5, Boston 1,8'innings
Detroit at LA. Dodgers (n)
Colorado at Cleveland (n)
Seattle atWashington (n)
LAAngels at Florida (n)
N.Y.Yankees at Cincinnati, 2nd game
(n)
Oakland at N.Y.Mets (n)
Houston atTexas (n)
Arizona at Kansas City (n)
Chicago Cubs at Chicago White Sox
(n)
Minnesota at San Francisco (n)
Today's Games
Seattle (Pineda 7-4) at Washington
(Marquis 7-2), 1:05 p.m. -
Oakland (Godfrey 1-0) at N.Y. Mets
(Capuano 5-7), 1:10 p.m.
Minnesota (Duensing 4-6) at San
Francisco (Uncecum 5-6), 3:45 p.m.
Arizona (D.Hudson 8-5) at Kansas
City (FPaulino 0-0), 8:10 p.m.
Friday's Games
Arizona at Detroit, 705 p.m.
Boston at Pittburgh,7:05 p,m.
SCincinnati at Baltimore, 705 p.m.
Colorado at N.Y.Yankees, 7:05 p.m.
Oakland at Philadelphia, 7:05 p.m.
N.Y. Mets atTexas, 8:05 p.m.
Tampa Bay at Houston, 805 p.m.
Chicago Cubs at Kansas City,8:10 pnm.
Minnesota at Milwaukee, 8:10 p.m.
Washington at Chicago White Sox,
8:10 p.m.
Toronto at St. Louis, 8:15 p.m.
LA.Angels at LA Dodgers, 1010 pnm.
Seattle at Florida, 10:10 p.m.
Cleveland at San Francisco, 10:15 p.m.

NL standings

East Division
W L Pct GB
Philadelphia 46 28 .622 -
Atlanta 43 33 .566 4
Washington 36 37 .4939 1/2
NewYork 35 38 .479101/2
Florida 33 41 .446 13
Central Division
W L Pct GB
Milwaukee 41 34 .547 -
St. Louis 40 34 .541 112
Cincinnati 38 37 .507 3
Pittsburgh 37 37 .5003 1/2
Chicago 30 43 .411 10
Houston 27 48 .360 14
West Division
W L Pct GB
Arizona 40 34 .541 -
San Francisco 39 34 .534 1/2
Colorado 37 36 .5072 1/2
LosAngeles 34 41 .4536 1/2
San Diego 31 44 .4139 1/2
Tuesday's Game
Philadelphia 10, St. Louis 2
Wednesday Game
Philadelphia at St. Louis (n)
Thursday Game
Philadelphia (Oswalt 4-5) at St. Louis
(C.Carpenter I-7), 8:15 p.m.
Friday's Game


Atlanta at San Diego, 10:05 p.m.

College World Series

AtTDAmeritrade Park Omaha
Omaha, Neb.
(Double elimination)
Tuesday
Florida 3,Vanderbilt I, comp. of susp.
pme
California 7,Texas A&M 3,Texas A&M
eliminated
South Carolina 7,Virginia I
Wednesday
Game 9 North Carolina vs.
Vanderbilt (n)
Today
Game 10 California (38-22) vs.
Virginia (55-1 I), 7 p.m.
Friday
Game II Florida (52-17) vs. Game
9 winner, 2 p.m.
Game 12 South Carolina (52-14)
vs. Game 10 winner, 7 p.m.

BASKETBALL

WNBA schedule


Atlanta 71,Chicago 68
Indiana 89,Washington 80
Phoenix 105, an Antonio 98
Seattle 82,Tulsa 77
Los Angeles 96, NewYork 91
Today's Games
NewYork atTulsa, 12:30 p.m.
Connecticut at Chicago, 8 p.m.
Friday's Games
Phoenix at Atlanta, 7:30 p.m.
Los Angeles at San Antonio, 8 p.m.
Minnesota at Seattle, 10 p.m.

AUTO RACING

Race week

NASCAR
Toyota/Save Mart 350
Site: Sonoma, Calif.
Schedule: Friday, practice (Speed,
3-4:30 p.m.), qualifying (Speed, II p.m.-
I p.m.); Saturday, practice (Speed, 2:30-
5 p.m.); Sunday, race, 3 p.m. (TNT,
2-6:30 p.m.).
Tracd Infineon Raceway (road course,
1.99 miles).
Race distance: 218.9 miles, 110 laps.
Next race:, Coke Zero 4006,July 2,
Daytona International Speedway, Daytona
Beach

TENNIS

Wimbledon singles

At The All England Lawn Tennis &
Croquet Club .
Wimbledon, England
Wednesday
Men
Second Round
Richard Gasquet (17), France, def. Igor
Kunltsyn, Russia; 6-1,6-4,6-4.
Tomas Berdych (6), Czech Republic,
def. Julien Benneteau, France, 6-1, 6-4,
6-2.
Kevin Anderson, South Africa, def. Illya
Marchenko, Ukraine, 6-7 (5), 7-6 (7), 6-4,
4-6,6-1.
Grigor Dimitrov, Bulgaria, def. Cedrik-
Marcel Stebe, Germany, 7-5, 7-5,7-6 (5).
Mardy Fish (10), United States, def.
Denis Istomin, Uzbekistan, 7-6 (6), 6-4,
6-4.
Alex Bogomelov Jr., United States,
def. Juan Ignacio Chela (25), Argentina,
6-0,6-3,6-4.
Simone Bolelli, Italy, def. Stanislas
Wawrinka (14), Switzerland, 7-6 (5), 6-3,
7-6(4).
Rafael Nadal (I), Spain, def. Ryan
Sweeting, United States, 6-3, 6-2, 6-4.
Gilles Muller, Luxembourg, def. Milos
Raonic (31), Canada, 2-3, retired.
Andy Murray (4), Britain, def. Tobias
Kamke, Germany, 6-3, 6-3,7-5.
Lukasz Kubot, Poland, def..Ivo Karlovic,
Croatia, 7-6 (2), 6-3, 6-3..
Feliciano Lopez, Spain, def. Rainer
Schuettler, Germany, 7-6 (3), 6-7 (3),
6-2, 6-2.
Dmitry Tursunov, Russia, def. Ernests
Gulbis, Latvia; 6-3,3-6,7-6 (12), 7-6 (I).
Robin Haase, Netherlands, def.
Fernando Verdasco (21), Spain, 6-3, 6-4,
4-6,6-2.
Gael Monfils (9), France, def. Grega
Zemlja, Slovenia, 4-6,6-3,6-3,7-6 (7).
GIlles Simon (15), France, def. Dudi
Sela, Israel, 7-6 (3), 6-4,7-5.
Ivan Ljubicic, Croatia, def. Sergiy'
Stakhovsky, Ukraine,, 6-4, 6-46-2.
Andy Roddick (8), United States, def.
Victor Hanescu, Romania, 6-4,6-3, 6-4.
Olivier Rochus, Belgium, leads Juazn
Martin del Potro (24),Argentina, 7-6 (7),
susp., darkness.
Women
SFirst Round




Unrscramble these four Jumbles,
one letter to each square,
to form four ordinary words.


Agnieszka Radwanska (13), Poland,
def. Olga Govortsova, Belarus, 6-0, 3-0,
retired.
Julia Goerges (16). Germany, def.
Anabel Medina Garrigues, Spain, 6-3.6-0.
Andrea Hlavackova, Czech Republic,
def. Anastasia Rodionova, Australia, 6-1,
6-2.
Zheng Jie, China, def. Zuzana
Ondraskova, Czech Republic, 7-5, 6-0.
Jarmila Gajdosova (27), Australia, def.
Alona Bondarenko, Ukraine, 7-5, 6-3.
Evgeniya Rodina, Russia, def. Chanelle
Scheepers, South Africa, 6-3, 7-5.
Sabine Usicki, Germany, def.Anastasija
Sevastova, Latvia, 6-1,6-1.
Petra Cetkovska, Czech Republic, def.
Kristina Barrois, Germany, 6-2, 5-7, 6-2.
Dominika Cibulkova (24), Slovakia, def.
Mirjana Lucic, Croatia, 3-6, 6-3,8-6.
Flavia Pennetta (21), Italy, def. Irina-
Camelia Begu, Romania, 7-6 (3), 4-6, 6-2.
Mathilde Johansson, France, def.
HeatherWatson, Britain, 2-6, 6-4, 6-4.
Misaki Doi,Japan, def. Bethanie Mattek-
Sands (30), United States, 6-4,5-7, 7-5.
Polona Hercog Slovenia, def. Johanna
Larsson, Sweden, 6-7 (3), 6-3, 6-4.
Laura Robson, Britain, def. Angelique
Kerber, Germany, 4-6, 7-6 (4), 6-3.
Second Round
Venus Williams (23), United States,
def. Kimiko Date-Krummapan, 6-7 (6),
6-3,8-6.
Maria Jose Martinez Sanchez, Spain,
def. Monica Niculescu, Romania, 6-3, 6-0.
Tsvetana Pironkova (32), Bulgaria, def.
Petra Martic, Croatia, Cr6-1, 6-4.
SVictoria Azarenka (4), Belarus, def.
Iveta Benesova, Czech Republic, 6-0, 6-3.
Roberta Vinci (29), Italy, def. Rebecca
Marino, Canada, 7-6 (3), 6-2.
Vera Zvonareva (2), Russia, def. Elena
Vesnina, Russia, 6-I, 7-6 (5).
Ksenia Pervak, Russia, def. Pauline
Parmentier, France, 6-2, 1-6; 6-3.
Petra Kvitova (8), Czech Republic, def.
Anne Keothavong, Britain, 6-2,6-1.
Daniela Hantuchova (25); Slovakia, def.
Marina Erakovic, New Zealand, 6-3, 6-1.
Andrea Petkovic (I I), Germany, def.
Stephanie Dubois, Canada, 6-3,4-6,6-3.

GOLF

Golf week

LPGATOUR
'LPGA Championship
Site: Pittsford, N.Y.
Schedule:Today-Sunday.
Course: Locust Hill Country Club
(6,534 yards, par 72).
Purse: $2.5 million. Winner's share:
$375,000.
Television: Golf Channel (Today,
12:30-2:30 p.m.; Friday, midnight-2 a.m.,
12:30-2:30 p.m.; Saturday, midnight-2 am.,
4-7 p.m., 9:30- 1:30 p.m.; Sunday, 4-7 p.m.,
9:30-11:30 p.m.).
Online: http://www.lpgo.com
PGATOUR
Travelers Championship
Site: Cromwell, Conn.
,Schedule:Today-Sunday.
Course: TPC River Highlands (6,841
yards, par 70).
Purse: $6 million. Winner's share:
$1.08 million.
Television: Golf Channel (Today-
Friday, 3-6,p.m., 8:30-1 1:30 p.m.) and CBS
(Saturday-Sunday, 3-6 p.m.).
Online: http://www.pgatour.com
CHAMPIONS TOUR
Dick's Sporting Goods Open
Site: Endicott, N.Y.
Schedule: Friday-Sunday.
Course: En-Joie Golf Course ~6,974
yards, par 72).
Purse: $1.75 million. Winner's share:
$262,500.
Television: Golf Channel (Friday,
6:30-8:30 p.m.; Saturday, 2-4 a.m., 7:30-
9:30 p.m.; Sunday, midnight-2 a.m., 7:30-
9:30 p.m.; Monday, midnight-2 a.m.).
EUROPEAN TOUR
BMW International Open
Site: Nord-Eichenried, Germany.
Schedule:Today-Sunday.
Course: Munich Nord-Eichenried Golf
Club (7,025 yards, par 72).
Purse: $2.87 million. Winner's share:
$478,480.
Television: Golf Channel (Today-
Friday, 9 a.m.-12:30 p.m.; Saturday-Sunday,
8:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m.).
Online: http://www.europeantour.com
NATIONWIDETOUR
.Mexico Open'
Site: Leon, Mexico.
Schedule:Today-Sunday.
Course: El Bosque Country Club
(7,708 yards, par 72).
Purse: $700,000. Winner's share:
$126,000.
Television: None.
OTHER TOURNAMENTS
Men
PGA OF AMERICA. PGA Professional
National Championship, Today-Sunday,
Hershey Country Club, East and West
Courses, Hershey, Pa. Online: http://www.
pga.com/aotionalchampionshipl201 I

THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME
by David L. Hoyt and Jeff Knurek


EARLY ON, SHE
S TUGGLE-P TO SKATE
N THE SHAPE OF AN
EIGHT, 1UT SHE --

Now arrange the circled letters
to form the surprise answer, as
suggested by the above cartoon.


A:( I IT I IT I
(Answers tomorrow)
Yesterday's Jumbles: BOOTH THUMP SHRIMP BOTTLE
I Answer: She thought her subway ride was this -
THE PITS


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Venus Williams returns a shot during the match against Japan's Kimiko Date-Krumm at the
All England Lawn Tennis Championships at Wimbledon on Wednesday.



Williams, Nadal, Roddick


advance at Wimbledon


.By STEPHEN WILSON
Associated Press

WIMBLEDON, England
-' Five-time champion
Venus Williams needed
three sets and nearly three
hours to overcome the
oldest player in the field
Wednesday and reach the
third round at Wimbledon.
With rain delaying play
on the other courts at the
All England Club, Williams
outlasted Kimiko Date-
Krumm 6-7 (6), 6-3, 8-6 in
a compelling battle under
the sliding roof of Centre
Court that featured great
shot-making from both
players.
Williams relied on her
big serve at key moments
to overcome a gritty chal-
lenge from the 40-year-old
Japanese player, who was
the second oldest woman
to reach the second round
herein the Open era after
Martina Navratilova.
-'"She doesn't play, any-:
where near her age," said
Williams, who again wore
her original one-piece
jumpsuit with a triangle cut
out in the back, a gold belt
and gold zipper.
Following Williams on
Centre Court was defend-
ing men's champion Rafael
Nadal, who cruised past
Ryan Sweeting 6-3,'6-2, 6-
4 to move into the third
round, showing just how


ACROSS

1 Shopping
places
6 Respond with
some action
11 Well-traveled
path
12 Google rival
13 Spoils taker
15 Weirdly
16 Nasal accents
18 Philosopher -
-tzu
19 Buniort site
21 Jo's sis
22 Tusked animal
23 Lost no time
25 Pilot's sighting
28 Unable to sit
still
30 Oklahoma
town
31 Prune a branch
32 Highest degree
33 Pipe bend
35 Coffee go-with
37 "Titanic" mes-
sage


tough he'll be to stop as he
chases a third Wimbledon
crown.
The top-ranked Spaniard,
who beat the American for
the third time this year, all
in straight sets, had only
seven unforced errors to go
with his 38 winners. Nadal
broke Sweeting five times
and lost serve just once.
"I was playing very well,"
said Nadal, who finished in
style on the last two points
with a running backhand
passing shot down the
line and a forehand volley
into the open court. 'The
second and beginning of
the third I had the match
completely under control,
but he had a few good
shots."
Also advancing was
fourth-seeded Andy
Murray, who beat Tobias
Kamke of Germany 6-3, 6-3,
7-5. The 24-year-old British
player never lost serve, sav-
ing the only break point he
faced;4as he again:pursues
his bid to become the first
hoinegr6wn male champi-
on here since Fred Perry
in 1936.
Three-time Wimbledon
runner-up Andy Roddick
played the final match
on Centre Court, beating
Victor Hanescu 6-4, 6-3,
6-4. The eighth-seeded
American had 15 aces and
only six unforced errors
and faced only one break


38 Do garden
work
40 Ceiling fixtures
41 Flight dir.
42 Mr. Danson
43 Moon buggy
46 Easy task,
informally
48 An outer planet
50 Foul-tasting
54 Powerful beam
55 Groovy
56 Make a remark
57 Glitch

DOWN

1 Rock network
2 "Exodus" hero
3 Shellac resin
4 Pup groups
5 Decelerate,
6 Whiskey
grains
7 Teacup handle
8 Hockey's-
Esposito
9 Kinks' tune of
1970


point.
"I felt pretty good out
there," Roddick said.
"Served well, returned well.
There was only a couple
shots that I wish I had back
there tonight."
In women's play, 2010
runner-up and No. 2-seed-
ed Vera Zvonareva beat fel-
low Russian Elena Vesnina
6-1, 7-6 (5).
The opening contest
ended with Date-Krumm
hitting a backhand pass-
ing shot just wide to lose
serve on match point after
2 hours, 56 minutes of play.
Among those giving the
players a standing ovation
were all guests in the Royal
Box, including Camilla, the
Duchess of Cornwall and
wife of Prince Charles.
Williams, who fell
behind 5-1 in the first set
before climbing back into
the match, finished with
12 aces and 45 winners,
one less than Date-Krumm.
.,Williams had--24 unforced
errors; while Date-Krumm
'Tad 31.
"It was tough. She came
out and I just couldn't seem
to get a game," Williams
said. "She played so well
and before I knew it the
ball was past me every time
in the first set"
It was the first time the
two players who have a
combined age of 71 have
met'in their long careers.


Answer to Previous Puzzle

COR AL BA lNIAINIA
PIRIOIV IEDIE INIAIMIEIL
EMOTNY S I I ICIT
WOE E E R

UR N DWIEIEIB

BI BBC USHER


E INEILIAI E PAS
i TD IL K ASI M
ORD ISS
E FUEL N UCL EI


IANOS EP S O1M


Goofball (hyph.)
Meadow grazers
- on (incited)
Sherpas, e.g.
Lone Ranger's
partner


20 Promises
22 Outlaws
24 Family mem-
ber
25 Arm bones .
26 Came upon
27 out (with-
draws)
29 Longbow
wood
34 Wolfish looks
36 More frequent-
ly
39 Antlered rumi-
nant
43 Unfinished
Berg opera
44 Latin I verb
45 Clipper ship
feature
46 Laird's accent
47 Novelist -
Grey
49 Once named
51 Coupe
52 "Quincy" reg-
ular
53 June bug


2011 UFS, Dist. by Universal Uclick for UFS


Want more puzzles?
Check out the "Just Right Crossword Puzzles" books
at QuillDriverBooks.com


Page Editor: Brandon Finley, 754-0420


LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS THURSDAY, JUNE 23, 2011


FIDARA
I L













LAKE CITY REPORTER ADVICE & COMICS THURSDAY, JUNE 23, 2011


DILBERT


I WANT YOU TO
USE "BLACK HAT"
METHODS TO RAISE
OUR WEBSITE'S
RANKING ON SEARCH
ENGINES.


BABY BLUES


BLONDIE
IT'SAYS HERE THAT MEN WHO
EXERCISE OAILV ADD TWO TO THREE
VEARS TO THEIR LIFE EXPECTANCY








BEETLE BAILEY


HAGARTHE HORRIBLE


SNUFFY SMITH


ZITS


GARFIELD


WHAT DO YOU LIKE
BEST ABOUT THAT
IDEA THE FACT THAT
IT'S UNETHICAL OR
THE NEAR CERTAINTY
OF GETTING
CAUGHT?


B.C.


DEAR ABBY


Thoughtful suggestions ease


hard times under one roof


DEAR ABBY: With so
Many families moving in
with relatives because of
personal struggles in their
lives, I thought it might be
helpful to offer a few sug-
gestions to help this work
for everyone. If you move in
with relatives:
1. Do not assume they
won't mind if you store
everything you own in their
garage. Get rid of it or pay
for a storage unit
2. Help with the house-
work, even if they say, "Oh,
don't bother." And keep your
space clean and orderly and
assist in keeping a shared
bathroom tidy.
3. Show you appreciate
having a place to stay. Feed
pets, carry out the trash,
rake leaves or shovel snow.
4. Do your own laundry.
Ask when is the most con-
venient time to do it Don't
leave clothes in the washer
or dryer, which prevrents
others from washing their
own things.
*5. If you are paying some-
thing toward your stay, don't
think that precludes your
helping in the home.
6. Work out the food
arrangements. Maybe you
have a shelf or drawer in the
fridge for your food. Prepare
your own meals unless every-
one agrees to share cooking
duties and food budgets.
7. If you don't have a
job, keep looking. Don't lie
around watching TV, sleep-


Abigail Van Buren
www.deorabby.com
ing or playing on the com-
puter.
8. Never gossip about the
household. You owe it to the
family who took you in.
To those who are going
through this, I wish you
luck and better times ahead.
- LOVING FAMILY
MEMBER
DEAR FAMILY
MEMBER: Your letter
is timely because, for vari-
ous reasons, millions of
Americans now live inmulti-
family and intergenerational
households. For some of
them, the arrangement will
be temporary. For others, it
is cultural, practical and will
be permanent Whatever the
reasons for cohabiting, the
suggestions you submitted
are thought-provoking and
worth space in my column.
Thank you for raising the
subject .
DEAR ABBY: I was mar-
ried for nine years to an out-
wardly sweet, but deceptive
woman who cheated and left
me. We have two children.
A custody battle is wAging,
and the divorce has not been
finalized due to financial dis-


putes.
I have found myself with
a dilemma. I am not a bad-
looking guy, and women
come on to me during social
events. On the occasion that I
find myself attracted and ask
a woman out, I end up telling
her the whole divorce/custo-
dy story no matter how hard
I try to avoid it or change
the subject After the date, I
regret the conversation.
How should these issues
be discussed with a potential
lover? I have avoided com-
mitment because of all the
"baby mama drama" some
of the women had, but I'm
now seriously interested in
someone and she's receptive
to seeing me. I'm a free-spir-
ited person and this problem
is weighing me down. Please
advise, Abby. "STUCK" IN
SOUTH CAROLINA
DEAR "STUCK":
Because you are seriously
interested, do the honorable
thing and let her know in
advance that a relationship
with you may be compli-
cated because your divorce
isn't final, and the reasons
why. If she's as interested
in you as you are in her, she
will respect you for it If your
almost-ex is vindictive, your
new lady will need to be pre-
pared for it

0 Write Dear Abby at
www.DearAbby.com or
P.O. Box 69440, Los
Angeles, CA 90069.


HOROSCOPES


ARIES (March 21-
April 19): Think before
you make an impulsive
move that. will have life-
altering effects. There are
other factors you aren'ttak-
ing into account, Patience
will be required if you don't
want to end up backtrack-
ing. ***
TAURUS (April 20-
May 20): Take advantage.
of any opportunity to pick
up information that can
help you expand your hori-
zons. Talk to people with
experience and knowledge
in what you want to pursue.
Once you make a decision,
don't waffle or someone
you need on your team
will lose confidence in you.

GEMINI (May 21-June
20): Your patience will be
tested if you get into an emo-
tional discussion with some-
one who needs your help.
You must be creative with
the way you go about assist-
ing others or you will be
taken for granted. A change
of plans will leave you won-
dering which way to turn.

CANCER (June 21-July
22): Someone will keep
changing plans. Refuse to
give in to anyone trying to
control your life. Focus on
what you can do to reach
your goals. An opportunity
is present with the potential
to lead to business prospects


THE LAST WORD
Eugenia Last

and partnerships. **
LEO (July 23-Aug. 22):
Keep .things gliple and!
don't exceed.your, budget,
no matter what you come
tip against. There will be a
chance to make changes that
will alter your life or your
geographical location and
you don't want to miss out
because you spent all your
cash elsewhere. Romance is
highlighted. *****
VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept.
22): Deception and disillu-
sionment are apparent espe-
cially where business and
dealing with colleagues are
concerned. An investment
may be tempting but, if it
goes above and beyond what
you can afford, take a pass.
Not. everyone will be legiti-
mate. ***
LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct.
22): Accept the inevitable.
but don't instigate change.
Youll have enough to con-
tend with just keeping up
with what's already hap-
pening all around you. Put
your time, effort and energy
into something construc-
tive. Socialize and network.

SCORPIO (Oct. 23-
Nov. 21): You can make
financial gains if you invest
properly or you take an
unusual approach to acquir-
ing property or items -that


can grow in' value. Keep
the momentum flowing and
the interest will continue
to mount until you are in
an excellent pq ition. ***
SAGITARIUS.-(Nov.,,22-
Dec. 21): You are overdue
for a change that will moti-
vate you to reestablish ties
with people who. can help
you get ahead now. You
will finally get the recogni-
tion you deserve. Love and
romance are highlighted.

CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-
Jan. 19): Youll feel bur-
dened by responsibilities.
The people who count on
you will be more demanding
than usual. You have to leave
room to take care of matters
that are important to you.
Giving too much will cause
emotional stress. **
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-
Feb. 18): You can make
changes to the way you
do things with regard to
your health and well-being.
Preparation will ensure that
you get better results. Your
expertise will be recognized
and rewarded. ****
PISCES (Feb. 19-
March 20): Someone who
isn't pleased with the way
you've been handling person-
al affairs will raise an issue
that you have been avoiding.
Offer an explanation before
inaccurate assumptions are
made. Express your con-
cerns openly. ***


CELEBRITY CIPHER


by Luis Campos
Celebrity Cipher cryptograms are created from quotations by famous people, past and present.
Each letter in the cipher stands for another.
Today's clue: N equals M
"BG JDG SALZPLKJCCV XJSGY TV
MDGJZ AFFADZKLPZPGI TDPCCPJLZCV
YPIMKPIGY JI PLIACKTCG FDATCGNI."
- CGG P J S ASSJ
PREVIOUS SOLUTION: "The good Lord made us all out of iron. Then he turns
up the heat to forge some of us into steel." Marie Osmond
(c) 2011 by NEA, Inc. 6-23


FOR BETTER ORWORSE


THAT'S
SSORT OF A TALKING
LOSERISH DOESN'T
THING TO WORK FOR
S SAY., PEOPLE
LIKE ME.


AND WHAT DO ) /THEY TAKE
THEY USE NAPS ON
THOSE EXTRA THE SOFA
YEARS FOR?






I I k
III "


Page Editor: Emogene Graham, 754-0415


CLASSIC PEANUTS














LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED THURSDAY, JUNE 23, 2011

Lake City Reporter





CLASSIFIED


- ADvantage


Classified Department: 755-5440 1


Take ADvantage of the
Reporter Classifieds!

755-5440


4 lines' days nE a5d 1itonal
Rate applies to private ndviduals selling
Personal merchandise totalling $100 or le.
Each Item must include a price.
This is a non-refundagle rate .


01
0 ah Itemm per ad $u pe1
4 pines r6daysn e lin 0 d0oa
Rate applies to private individuals selling
Spersonal merchandise totalling $00 or le.
B Each item must Include a price'
This i a non-refundable rate.



One Hem per ad 1
4 lines 6 days Each additional
n lines$.15
Rate applies to private Individuals selling
personal merchandise toaldng S000 or less.
This is a non-refundatde rate.



LOne Item per ad 3 ad0ti
4 lines days Each additional
SRate aOppies to private dva s ng
personal merchandise totalIng$2500o lss
Each Item must include a price
This is a nso-refdable rate.




One Item per ad $ 7 )




4 lines 6 da Each additional
E lines th6 ndays roi 0$1.55
Rate applies to private v s s
apersonsial merchandise olin g $4,000 ess
Each item most idciude a price
S This Is a on-refundable rate. -




|en. O ur ope iad lo Vt |
aa Each addtl onal
4 lines o6 days n ei 8.0
$1.0each adite tionde a price








Includes Sian Eaadditiallilirne1 65


Limited to service type advertis-
ing only.
4 lines, one month....$92.m00
$10.80 each additional line
Includes an additional $2.00 per
ad for each Wednesday insertion.



You can call us at 755-5440,
Monday through Friday from 8:00D
a.m. to 5:00 p.m.
Some people prefer to place their
classified ads in person, and some
ad categories will require prepay-
ment. Our office is located at 180
East Duval Street.
You can also fax or e-mail your ad
copy to the Reporter.
FAX: 386-752-9400 Please
direct your copy.to the Classified
Department.
EMAIL: classifieds@lakecityre-
porter.com







Wednesday Mon., 10:00a.m. Mon.,9:ela.m.
Thursday Wed., 10:00 a.m. Wed.,9:00 a.m.
Friday Thiis., 10:00am. Turs.,9:00am.
Saturday Fri.,10:00am. Fri.,9:00am.
Sunday Fri.,10:00am. F,9:N a.m.
These deadlines are subject to change without notice




Ad Errors- Please read your ad
on the first day of publication.
We accept responsibility for only
the first incorrect insertion, and
only the charge for the ad space
In error. Please call 755-5440
immediately for prompt correc-
tion and billing adjustments.
Cancellations- Normal advertising
deadlines apply for cancellation.
Billing inquiries- Call 755-5440.
Should further information be
required regarding payments or
credit limits, your call will be trans-
ferred to the accounting depart-
ment.p o f ae n


Advertising copy is subject to
approval by the Publisher who
reserves the right to edit, reject,
or classify all advertisements under
appropriate headings. Copy should
be checked for errors by the
advertiser on the first day of pub-
lication. Credit for published errors
will be allowed for the first insertion
for that portion of the advertisement
which was incorrect. Further, the

omission of advertisements ordered
to be published, nor for any general,
special or consequential damages.
Advertising language must comply
with Federal, State or local laws


abbreviations are acceptable; how-


ever, the first word of each ad may
not be abbreviated.

In Print and Online
www.lakeeityreporter.com


Legal

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
THIRD JUDICIAL CIRCUIT,
IN AND FOR COLUMBIA COUN-
TY, FLORIDA
VANDERBILT MORTGAGE AND
FINANCE,
CASE NO.: 2010 CA 804
INC., a Tennessee corporation au-
thorized to
CIRCUIT CIVIL DIVISION
transact business in Florida,
Plaintiff,
vs.
JOHN W. IVEY a/k/a JOHN WES-
LEY IVEY, III;
KIMBERLY T. IVEY; and UN-
IDENTIFIED JOHN
DOE(S) and/or UNIDENTIFIED
JANE DOE(S),
Defendants.
NOTICE OF ACTION
TO: JOHN W. IVEY a/k/a JOHN
WESLEY IVEY, Im
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action
to foreclose that mortgage, originally
in favor of Bombardier Capital, Inc.
dated May 9, 2001. and recorded on
May 11, 2011, in Official Records
Book 926, Page 994, as assigned to
Vanderbilt Mortgage and Finance,
Inc. by Assignment recorded in Offi-
cial Records Book 1058, Page 1540,
all of the Public Records of Colum-
bia County, Florida, encumbering the
following real and personal property
located in Columbia County, Florida,
to-wit:
Lot 15, Block B, Spring Hills Subdi-
vision, a subdivision as per plat
thereof, recorded in Plat Book 4,
Page(s) 33 and 33A, of the Public
Records of Columbia County, Flori-
da, together with that certain 1999
HOME OF MERIT CYPRESS
MANOR 24' x 48' Mobile Home,
ID No. FLHMLCY143020929A and
FLHMLCY143020929B,
has been filed against you and you
are required to serve a copy of your
written defenses, if any, to SONYA
K. DAWS, Plaintiffs attorney,.
whose address is Sonya Daws, P.A.
3116 Capital Circle NE, Suite 5, Tal-
lahassde, Florida 32308, within thir-
ty (30) days, and file the original
with the Clerk of this Court either
before service on Plaintiffs attorneys
or immediately thereafter; otherwise
a default will be entered against you
for the relief demanded in the "Com-
plaint.
WITNESS my hand and seal of this
Court on April 18, 2011.
P. DEWITT CASON, CLERK
COLUMBIA COUNTY CIRCUIT
COURT
By:/s/ P.A. Perry
Deputy Clerk
04544772
June 23, 30, 2011 '

NOTICE OF SALE
Notice is hereby given that on July 8,
2011 at 9:00 am at Mini-Storage &
Record Storage of Lake City,
442 SW Saint Margaret Street,
Lake City, FL 32025; will sell at
public sale by competitive bidding,
the personal property heretofore
stored with the undersigned:
F-18 Dale Brown
BB-37 Raymond Newton
CC-22 Kim Newton
EE-14 Kim Newton
H-01 Sharlene Williams
0-23 Kathryn Douglas
H10 Joe N. Barber
J-03 Sheila Odoms
G-03 Vikki Jones
R-21 Leisa Clark
J-01 Tiffany Robinson
BB-2 Alexandra Kubitsky
F-2 Carla Johnson
t-33 David Burkhalter
R-34 Wanda Gibson
W-318 Tamara Henderson
V-01 Ann Ruben
OP Ashley Lane'
OP Elizabeth Schaffer
05526242
June 23, 30, 2011

Public Auction
1997 V.W. 4 Dr.
VIN# 3YWTD81H4VM028471
at Auto Emporium of Lake City Inc.
2832 SE Main Blvd
Lake City FL. 32025
in Columbia Co. at 10:00 AM on
July 6, 2011
05526254
June 23, 2011


Land Clearing

Back Hoe, Dozer, Chopping, root
raking, bush hog, seeding, sod,
disking, site prep, ponds &
irrigation. Free Est! 386-623-3200


Lawn & Landscape Service

Clean Pine Straw,
You pick it up, $1.85 a bale
Delivery of 100 bales $260
386-688-9156

Landscape Maintenance Company
You can trust for knowledge &
pride, Mention this AD! '
Mow Green, LLC 386-288-6532


Services

DIVORCE, BANKRUPTCY,
RESUMES.
other court approved forms-
386-961-5896.

Summer Cleaning done your
way. Let me Clean your home be-
fore you leave on Vacation. Come
back home & relax. 386-303-1496.
We come to you! Auto Detailing:
Wash, wax & vaccum. Pressure
Wash: Houses, mobile homes,
driveways, decks. 386-697-2224


Legal

NOTICE OF SHERIFF'S SALE
NOTICE is hereby given that pur-
suant to a Writ of Execution issued
in Circuit Court, of Columbia Coun-
ty, Florida, on the 25th day of Sep-
tember, 2006. In the cause wherein
Midland Funding NCC-2 Corp. as
successor in interest to Bank One,
N.A. was Plaintiff and Eddie Dent-
mon and Susan Dentmon, jointly and
severally, was Defendants, being
Case No: 05-416-CA, in said court,
I, Mark Hunter, As Sheriff of Co-
lumbia County, Florida, have levied
upon all the right, title, and interest
of the defendants, Eddie Dentmon
and Susan Dentmon, jointly and sev-
erally, in and to the following descri-
bed personal property, to-wit:
2004 Ford F150
VIN: 1FTRW12W14KC93401,
I shall offer this property for sale, at
the Columbia County Detention Fa-
cility Compound, 389 N.W. Quinten
Street, Lake City, Florida 32055,
County of Columbia, State of Flori-
da, on July 12,, 2011 at the hour of
10:00 A.M., or as soon thereafter as
possible. I will offer for sale all the
said defendant's, Eddie Dentmon
and Susan Dentmon, right, title, and
interest in the aforesaid personal
property, at public auction and will
sell the same, subject to taxes, all
prior Tens, encumbrances and judg-
ments whatsoever, if any to the high-
est and best bidder for CASH IN
HAND. The proceeds to be ,.applied
as far as may be to the payment., of
costs and the satisfaction of the
above described execution.
Mark Hunter, As Sheriff of
Columbia County, Florida
BY: Sergeant Robert Holloway
Deputy Sheriff

04545243
June 9, 16, 23, 30, 2011
a


020 Lost & Found

05526211


PLEASE HELP FIND
LOST DOG
Her name is MIA.Pronounced
Mee-uh. She is spayed!

FOUND


100 Opportunities

Bulldozer Operator, Part time.
Welder, Part time.
Call F.J. Hill Construction
386-752-7887

05526237
Independent Contractors
We're hauling fresh and frozen
food to the Northwest. We have
a Lease Purchase Program, -
Leasing 0/0 & PTDI Certified
Students..100% fuel Surcharge,
NO New England States,
Spouse & Pet Rider Policy.
Call TODAY!! BUEL INC.
866-369-9744

Lake City Eye Physicians
621 SW Baya Dr Suite 101
Receptionist Needed
Mon Fri 9:00-5:30
Will Train. Taking Resumes
Tuesday Friday
PLEASE NO PHONE CALLS

Seeking Flatbed Owner/Operators
fully equipped w/own Tarps &
Chains & Binders to run the
southeast. Home on Weekends and
throughout the week. Paying 85%.
Contact Adam or Rick at
386-755-8579 RDH Trucking Inc.
Associate Reps
SUMMER WORK/GREAT PAY
Immediate FT/PT openings,
Customer sales/service,
No exp needed, conditions,
Apply Now all ages 17+
(386) 269-0883


100 Opportunities

05526143
Columbia County School
District
Employment Opportunity
COMPUTER PROGRAM-
MER/ANALYST
Minimum Qualifications:
Bachelor's degree in Computer
Science or related field or Asso-
ciate's Degree with a minimum
of four years training/experience
in computer programming.
Knowledge, Skills, and
Abilities:
Ability to write, debug and
document programs. Ability to
work with IBM AS/400
mini-computer, personal
computers and remote
workstations. Ability to work
with telecommunications
necessary to connect mini-
computers and mainframes in an
SNA (Systems Network
Architecture) environment.
Applications are accepted online
at www.applitrack.com/colum-
bia/onlineapp. Completed online
applications must be submitted
by June 29, 2011.
Starting Salary $33,790.00 YR,
Twelve Month Employment
All'employees must pass
pre-employment drug
screening and criminal
background checks.
The Columbia County School
District is an Equal Opportunity
Employer. We do not discrimi-
nate on the basis of race,
religion, color, sex, marital
status, age, national origin or
disability. Employment of
personnel in the Columbia
County School District is in
compliance with Federal and
State Laws regarding nondiscri-
mination and preference.
Individuals with disabilities are
encouraged to apply. Any
person who believes he/she may
need reasonable accommoda-
tions during the application,
test-
ing or interview process should
notify the Human Resources
Office at (386) 755-8019.

CDL Class A Truck Driver.
Flatbed exp. for F/T SE area.
3 years exp or more. Medical
benefits offered. Contact
Melissa or.Mary @ 386-93,5-2773
Columbia County Clerk of Court
Job Opening. Information
Technology Administrator
www.columbiaclerk.com
Elementary & Secondary
teachers needed for private
Christian School BA req'd
Fax resume to: 386-755-3609
Full Time Chemistry instructor
wanted at North Florida
Community College. See
www.nfcc.edu for details.
Motorcoach Operator
$100-$200 a day. CDL P+
Please apply at: www.Fabu-
lousCoach.com.
New Generation Christian School
is hiring an elementary school
teacher. Min. of Bachelors Degree
is req'd. If interested, fax a resume
to (386)758-5597 by July 29th.
Physical laborer needed. CDL
license req'd. Must have respect
for electricity & ability to work in
water & mud. Must be able to pass
drug test. Call 386-752-1854
Sales Position available for moti-
vated individual Rountree -Moore
Toyota, Great benefits, paid train-
ing/vacation. Exp. a plus but not
necessary. Call Anthony Cosentino
.386-623-7442

1 Medical
120 Employment

05526221
Cancer Care of North Florida is
currently seeking a
MEDICAL ASSISTANT for a
fast paced work environment
Requires HS Diploma and
Phlebotomy certification
Intergy Experience and
excellent verbal/written
communication skills.
Qualified candidates please
email resume to: jpapesh@can-
cercarenorthflorida.com


240 Schools &
240v Education

04544843
Interested in a Medical Career?
Express Training offers
courses for beginners & exp
* Nursing Assistant, $479
next class-07/1 1/10

* Phlebotomy national certifica-
tion, $800 next class-07/11/11
Continuing education
Fees incl. books, supplies, exam
fees. Call 386-755-4401 or
expresstrainingservices.com


310 Pets & Supplies

FREE KITTEN
TO GOOD HOME, Orange Male
Tabby w/crooked tail. Litter
trained Call 386-365-7360


Free Kittens,
8 weeks,old
386-365-0042


Golden Retriever pups CKC.
Shots. 3 females, 5 males
Available July 3 $350. Each
POP. 386-623-1577
PUBLISHER'S NOTE
Florida Law 828.29 requires dogs
and cats being sold to be at least 8
weeks old and have a health
certificate from a licensed
veterinarian documenting they
have mandatory shots and are
free from intestinal and external
parasites. Many species of wild-
life, must be licensed by Florida
Fish and Wildlife. If you are
unsure, contact the local
office for information.

330 Livestock &
330 Supplies

Black Angus Cows & Heifers
Prices Vary
Registered & Commercial
386-719-4802


361 Farm Equipment
84 Ford 4610 Tractor.
2WD, Solid
2005 motor,$7,500. OBO
386-867-0005


403 Auctions

05526279
Auction Thursday, June 23rd,
2011 6:30 pm, prev. all day -
Singer Featherweight machine,
Clarke sandblast cabinet, Crafts-
man table and scroll saws, air
tools, power & hand tools, com-
pressors, comer hutch, antique
parlour chair, more! Pictures
weekly @
www.auctionzip.com, ID
#19590
Phoenix Auction Services,
1832 SE Third Ave, Trenton FL.
Ph: 352-463-0707
AB2866 AU1437 10% BP



407 Computers
Compaq Computer, Many extras.
.Complete Computer
$80.00
386-755-9984 or 386-292-2170

411 Machinery &
11 Tools
18" Stihl
chain saw $125.
Call Don
386-963-4560
24' Aluminum
extension ladder
$90.00 Phone Don
386-963-4560
Black & Decker Sander
$10.00
Phone Don
386-963-4560
Pressure washer, 2500 PI,
used one time $125.00
Phone Don
386-963-4560


416 Sporting Goods
Hunt Club Jasper Florida 2150
acres. 14 members. Deer, Hogs,
Turkey, RV sites. Ask for Kenny
(352)516-8719. www.cchcfl.com.


420 Wanted to Buy
K&H TIMBER
We Buy Pine Hardwood &
Cypress. Large or small tracts.
Call 386-961-1961.
Wanted Junk Cars, Trucks, Vans.
$250 & up CASH! Free Pick Up!
NO title needed !386-878-9260
After 5pm 386- 752-3648.


430 Garage Sales

05526268
TOWNHOMES 133 SE New-
ell Dr. (Hwy 100) BIG SALE.
Doors, windows, sheet rock,
molding, carpet, vinyl flooring,
rafters wet lumber, cook tops,
paint. Sat. 7-12.






MULTI-FAMILY, SAT. 6/25,
7:30-?, 4009 N.W. Colonial Gin.,
in Plantation Subdivision.,Hwy 90
W, clothes, fum., lots of misc.
PUBLISHER'S NOTE
All Yard Sale Ads
Must be Pre-Paid.


440 Miscellaneous
8X10 Single garage door.
White. All hardware
included. $100.00
386-344-1783

Craftsman 10 in miter saw. Pres-
sure washer 2000 PSI. Bench
grinder w/light. All new, in boxes.
Will trade for??? 386-487-5922
Snowbear trailer,
1 ton with spare tire
$275.00
Phone Don 386-963-4560
Stop gnat & Mosquito bites! Buy
Swamp Gator All natural insect re-
pellent. Family safe. Use head to
toe. Available at The Home Depot.
Summer Barbecue Special
Tow Behind
Grill/Smoker, $1,250 OBO.
386-719-4802

r3n Mobile Homes
630 for Rent
2&3 BR MH. $395 $650. mo.
plus deposit..Water &.sewer ftur- .'
nished. Cannon Creek MHP -
... 386-752-6422.. .
2/2 Units, clean, well maintained,
nice safe park setting, 2 miles to
downtown Lake City, $575 month
+ $575 sec dep, 386-984-8448
13th Month FREE!!
2br /2ba SWMH $475. mo; also
Resid'l RV lots for rent between
Lake City & G'ville. Access to I-
75 & 441 (352)317-1326 for terms
3/2 S of Lake City, (Branford area)
$575 month plus security
386-590-0642 or 386-867-1833
www.suwanneevalleyproperties.com
DWMH for Rent. 3br/2ba
Handicapped accessible.
$650. mo. $500. Dep. No Pets.
386-984-9634. ask for Amber.
Great area! Very clean 2Br/2Ba,
MH, CH/A, Nice kitchen.
$550. mo. + $200 Dep. NO PETS.
(386)755-0064 or (904)771-5924
Mobile Homes for rent in
White Springs, Lake City & Ft.
White. Contact 386-623-3404
or 386-365-1919

Nice clean 2&3 bdrm, Five Points,
'NO PETS,
also 3 bd on the
Westside, 386-961-1482
X-Clean 2/2 SW, 8 mi NW of VA.
Clean acre lot, nice area. $500. mo
+ dep No dogs Non-smoking
environment.386-961-9181
6 Mobile Homes
Sfor Sale

2010 Lot Model 32x80
Den/LR 3BR/2BA
2280SF 1/2" SR
Call Charles @
Royals Homes 754-6737
2010 Lot Model 3BR/2BA
1624 SF. 1/2" Sheetrock
Vaulted Ceiling.
Charles @
Royals Homes 754-6737


confused?



Call Lake City Reporter Classifieds!


WE CAN HELP 386-755-5440


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LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED THURSDAY, JUNE 23, 2011


640 iMobile Homes
640 for Sale
2011 Claytin Single
14x76 2BR/2BA
3 walk in Closets
Call Charles @ Royals
Homes 754-6737
2011 Clayton Homes 4BR/2BA
9' Side Walls,
Energy Star Home
Call Charles @ Royals
Homes 754-6737
2011 Legacy Model 1980 SF
Wood Cab, 3BR/2BA
Deluxe Int.erior
Call Charles @
Royals Homes 754-6737
2011 SE Triple wide
16" OC Home WZII
Total upgrade call Charles
@ Royals Homes 754-6737
Any Size, Any Shape
we have the home for you
Call Royals Homes @
386-754-6737
Architect Designed,
Green Engineered
Energy Homes
@Royals Homes
www.royalshomesales.com
Ask about our Energy Star Top
Insulation f Windows, Better
Built,Better Comfort, Phil @
Royals Homes 386-754-6737
Custom Built Modular's,
Bring your plans to
Royals Homes
386-754-6737
www.royalshomesales.com
Finance Manager on Site,
Kijow's how to get it done,
not a Salesman Guessing
Call Phil @ Royals
Homes 386-754-6737
Flashy? Pretty?
Whatabout Construction?
Homesto last a Lifetime
Royals Homes
386-754-6737
Hallmark Real Estate. 2004
DWMH just minutes from the riv-
er. Detached carport. Front & back
screened porches. MLS#77398
Paula Lawrence 386-623-1973
Only a Few Left
2010.Models must go!
Call Royals Homes @
386-754-6737
Only at Royals Homes
Can your home be
prepared for real brick?
Call Bo @ 754-6737
NEW D/W Reduced Thousands.
3br/2ba set, delivery, A/C
skirting, steps. $39,900.
Call Ken (386)754-8844
AS IS, WHERE IS...32X80,4/2,
LR/Den, needs carpet, paint, 2400
sqft. has metal roof, vinyl'siding.
S$31,000. Randy 386-754-0198
FIRE YOUR LANDLORD
TO OWN WHAT YOUR
THROWING AWAY IN RENT.
CALL MIKE 386-754-8844
NEW 32X70 4/3. 2K sqft+. L/R,
, .DenSidex side, glasstop range,
D/W. Del, set, Steps, A/C, skirt-
ing. $59,900. Ken (386)754-8844
OWNER FINANCE .4O%-Down
w/land Equity or CASH on any
new or used singlewide or Double-
wide. Randy 386-754-0198
The Economy has forced
me to cut the price on my
3 bedroom, 2 bath home to
$38K (352)-870-5983
Pre-Owned 2BR/1 Bath.
Priced to move 754-6737
Only @ Royals Homes
www.royalshomesales.com


Sales Price Doubled?
Not at Royals, Honest people,
Quality Homes.
Call Royals Homes
@ 386-754-6737


Service Manager on Site
makes sure your satisfied, not
someone doing it all
Royals Homes 386-754-6737,
There is a Difference.
Just ask our Customers
We do what we say
Call Phil@. Royals Homes
386-754-6737

650 Mobile Home
650 &Land
67.5 ac.Ranch, fenced & cross
fenced. Spacious moblie home
w/large front deck & RV hookup
MLS 75607 $299,000. Access
Realty. Patti Taylor. 386-623-6896
Century 21/The Darby Rogers Co.
DWMH on 5 ac. 3br/2ba Back 2
ac. fenced. Owners motivated.
Debbie Myles 386-719-1224
MLS# 75830 $99,900
Hallmark Real Estate. 3/2,
DWMH 1/2 ac south of town.
Columbia City. Paved frontage,
comer lot. $57,500
MLS#77654 Janet Creel 719-0382
Owner Finance, Nice 3/2, S of
Lake City, small down/$590 mo
386-590-0642 or 386-867-1833
www.suwanneevalleyproperties.com

710 Unfurnished Apt.
l For Rent







04545256
SPRING HILL VILLAGE
Excellent High Springs location.
1, 2 & 3 bedroom floor-plans;
some with garages.,
Call 386-454-1469
or visit our website:
www.springhillvillage.net

2BR APT.
Downtown Location, Clean.
.$500 mo, plus Security.
NO PETS. Call 386-755-3456
2br/lba duplex, NW Georgia
Ave. Renovated & energy effi- .
cient. Tile floors, W/D, $475/Mo.
$300 Dep. 386-755-1937
Furnished or unfurnished
Townhomes on the golf course.
$750. mo. plus security. Includes
water. 386-752-9626
Great location W of 1-75, spacious
deluxe 2br apts., garage, W/D
hookup. patio. $600/700 & up, +
Sec, 386-344-3715 or 965-5560


710 Unfurnished Apt.
710 For Rent
NICE APT Downtown. Remod-
eled I bedroom. Kitchen, dining,
living room. $450. mo plus sec.
386-362-8075 or 386-754-2951
The Lakes Apts. Studios & IBr's
from $135/wk. Util. & cable incl.,
Sec 8 vouchers accepted, monthly
rates avail Call 386-752-2741
Updated apartments w/tile floors
& fresh paint. Excellent location.
From $450. + sec.
Call Michelle 386-752-9626

'720 Furnished Apts.
2IV For Rent
Neat as a Whistle! lbr., utilities,
AC TV, Cable, micro, clean, quiet,
shady, Close to town. 41S,
$135 wk. 386-755-0110
Rooms for Rent. Hillcrest, Sands,
Columbia. All furnished. Electric,
cable, fridge, microwave. Weekly
or monthly rates. I person $135,
2 persons $150. weekly
386-752-5808

Unfurnished
730 Home For Rent

05526256
3/2, $1100.mo, 5 ac., dep neg.,
386-466-2391,
438-4054 or 752-1160 at
7137 S US Hwy 441, Lake City

lbr/lba Free ele. Utilities incl. 4mi
S. Lake City. $300dep. $375mo.
386-590-0642 or 386-867-1833
www.suwanneevalleyproperties.com
2 bedroom 1 bath on
5 acres. $700.00 per month.
First, last and security.
386-590-5333
2br Private Country Home
Newly Remodeled, lg yard.
$695. mo + deposit
386-752.1444
4br/2ba in town.
Good neighborhood. $900. mo
1st & $900 security. No Pets.
386-755-6916

750 Business &
Office Rentals
FOR LEASE: Downtown office
space. Convenient to
Court house.
Call 386-755-3456
For Lease: E Baya Ave. Two -
1000 sqft office space units or
combined for 2000 sqft. 386-984-
0622 or weekends 386-497-4762


OFFICE SPACE for lease.
Oak Hill Plaza. 900 sqft
$675mo/$695. sec dep.
Tom 386-961-1086 DCA Realtor
788 S Marion Ave, Commercial
bldg with hwy frontage,
near downtown.
Call Scott Stewart at Westfield
Realty Group. 386-867-3498


790 Vacation Rentals
_ ____-,


Horseshoe Beach Scalloping Spcl
Gulf Front 2br, w/lg porch, dock,
fish sink. wkend $395./wk $895.
386-235-3633/352498-5986
alwaysonvacation.com #419-181
"Florida's Last Frontier"


805 Lots for Sale
5 Acre Lot, Secluded & Cleared,
MLS# 67871 $55,000
Call Lisa Waltrip
@ 386-365-590Q
westfieldrealtygroup.com
Great Package Deal $43,500
Nicely wooded. 3 lots in Emerald
Cove. (1)Private cul-de-sac.
Aaron Nickelson 386-867-3534
Westfield Realty Group
Hallmark Real Estate. Owner
Finance with $5K down with
terms negotiable. Below assessed
value for the county. MLS# 74484
$17,900 Jay Sears 386-867-1613
Land for Sale. 12 acres in
nce area south of town.
MLS#77469 $55,000
Carrie Cason 386-623,2806
Westfield Realty Group


PUBLISHER'S NOTE
All real estate advertising in this
newspaper is subject to the fair
housing act which makes it illegal
to advertise '"any preference,
limitation, or discrimination based
on race, color, religion, sex,
disability, familial status or nation-
al origin; or any intention to make
such preference, limitation or
discrimination." Familial status
includes children under the age of
18 living with parents or legal
custodians, pregnant women and
people securing custody of chil-
dren under the age of 18. This
newspaper will not knowingly
accept any advertising for real es-
tate which is in violation of the
law. Our readers are hereby in-
formed that all dwellings adver-
tised in this newspaper are availa-
ble on an equal opportunity basis.
To complain of discrimination call
HUD toll free at 1-800-669-9777,
the toll free
telephone number to the hearing
impaired is 1-800-927-9275.

.810 Home for Sale

3/2 1056 sqft Brick home in town.
Fenced back yard w/12x12 work-
shop Just Reduced! $79,900
MLS# 77414 Call 386-243-8227
R.E.O.Realty Group, Inc
3/2 in Woodhaven w/Fla Room,
fenced back yard MLS#75499,
$114,900 Call Pam @
Remax 386-303-2505 or
email- remaxpamb@gmail.com
4/2 on 10 ac. in Bell. Over 2200
sqft in a country setting. 10x20
frame shade. Bring offers! $89,000
MLS 76582 Brittany Stoeckert
Results Realty 386-397-3473


4/2 with 1000 sq ft workshop,
fenced yard, 2 car garage, Fairly
new roof & HVAC MLS#77602,
Bring Offers! $169,900,
R.E.O. Realty Group 243-8227


810 Home for Sale
A Pilots Dream home 3br/2.5ba.
Pool, stocked pond, detached ga-
rage w/living quarters MLS#77756
$399,900 Westfield Realty
GroupJosh Grecian 386-466-2517
Access Realty Stylish 3/2 + pool
house w/1/2 bath on 2.25 acres.
Rear deck, 2 car garage & carport.
MLS 78103 $194,500.
Patti Taylor.623-6896
Brick 3/1 family home, 4.43 acres.
w/metal roof. MLS# 77415
Short sale acceptance w/lenders
approval. $99,000. 386-243-8227
R.E.O. Realty Group, Inc
Century 21/The Darby Rogers Co.
3br/1. Updated kitchen, bath. Open
living room w/all classic & elegant
light fixtures. 386-752-6575
MLS# 78099 $79,900
Century 21/The Darby Rogers Co.
3/2 lin Spring Estates. 20x40
workshop. Screened back porch &
all appliances. Kayla Carbono
623-9650 MLS# 73787 $99,900
Century 21/The Darby Rogers Co.
Picadilly Park All brick 3/2, comer
lot w/inground pool. Screen porch
& fenced yard. Jessica Sheelly
288-2403 MLS# 73787 $115,900
Century 21/The Darby Rogers Co.
Eastside Village 2br/2ba. Extra Ig.
Master suite. Florida room & 2
sheds. Ginny Smith 386-623-4277
623-4277 MLS# 701(0 $79,900
Century 21/The Darby Rogers Co.
Laurel Lake S/D. 4br/2ba w/ ap-
prox. 2275 sqft Fenced back yard,
storage shed. Susan Sloan 386-
965-2847 MLS# 76106 $189,900
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
4br/1.5ba brick. 1332 sq ft. Great
floor plan, nice yard, close to
town. 1 ac landscaped. Lori
Geibeig MLS# 75713 $84,900
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
Remodeled 2/2 (could be 3/2).
Split floor plan. Great home, great
price. Mary Brown Whitehurst
965-0887 MLS# 77943 $99,900
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
3/2 brick home in Woodcrest. Lg
lot completely fenced. Easy access
to amenities. Elaine K. Tolar 386-
752-6488 MLS# 78148 $129,900
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
New home in Mayfair. 4 bedroom
on comer lot. Covered Porch.
Elaine K. Tolar 386-752-6488 '
MLS# 76919 $214,900 '
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
3/3 in beautiful area. 2414sqft.
Private yard & patio with storage
bldg. Lori G Simpson 386-365-
5678 MLS# 78175 $159,900


Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
Brick 3/2 on lake front. Lots of up-
dates. Glassed in room with fantas-
tic views. Lori G Simpson 386-
365-5678 MLS# 78092 $249,900


Country Home 2br/2ba on 5 ac.
detached garage w/workshop.
MLS# 77005 $179,900 Call Roger
Lovelady 386-365-7039
Westfield Realty Group
CYPRESS LANDING!
3BR/2BA built in 2005 w/large
kitchen $115,000
DANIEL CRAPPS AGENCY,
INC. 755-5110 #75794
DESIRABLE GWEN LAKE area!
Nice 3BR/2BA home on
comer lot $112,000
DANIEL CRAPPS AGENCY,
INC. 755-5110 #77307
Eastside Village a 55+ Retirement
Community. lots of Storage. Ig
deck off 2br suite. Carport w/more
storage. MLS# 77462 Eastside
Village Realty, Inc. 752-5290
Eastside Village a 55+ Retirement
Community. 2br/2ba. Lg office
/craft room. Oversized garage.
$89,900 MLS# 71901 Eastside
Village Realty, Inc. 752-5290
Eastside Village a 55+ Retirement
Community. Open floor plan
w/breakfast nool. 2 Ig bedrooms.
$104,999 MLS# 77779 Eastside
Village Realty, Inc. 752-5290
Featured Home 55+ acres, 5 pas-
tures fenced & cross fenced. 2,700
sqft, 4br/3ba home built in 1996.
Call for details! 386-243-8227
R.E.O. Realty Group
Fixer Upper on Suwannee River.
Needs TLC. Owner motivated &
will finance. $45,000
MLS 77337 Brittany Stoeckert
Results Realty 386-397-34Z3
GREAT STARTER HOME!
3BR/2BA w/lots of closet space &
nice lawn $79,900
DANIEL CRAPPS AGENCY,
INC. 755-5110 #76432
Great Starter Home. Well cared
for. New countertops, tile floors &
metal roof. $79,900 MLS#77524
Brodie Alfred 386-623-0906
Westfield Realty Group
Hallmark Real Estate. Brick
home w/fine landscaping. Dream
kitchen w/double pantry.
Split bedroom plan MLS#77846
Paula Lawrence 386-623-1973
Hallmark Real Estate. Country
Estate. Sit in the swing of the big
oak tree and watch the horses
graze on 10ac. fenced. 39 ac total.
MLS#78139 Janet Creel 719-0382'
Hallmark Real Estate. Pool &
Patio. 3br/2ba. brick home on
1.69 ac. Workshop &
SWMH on property. MLS#78117
Tanya Shaffer 386-397-4766
Home near the River. 3br/2bi,
1470 sqft. needs a little TLC.
MLS#76390 $34,900
Mike Lienemann 386-867-9053
Westfield Realty Group
Home on 15 ac. w/over 2,500 sqft
home.Very Ig bedrooms w/private
baths. 24x24 workshop $235,000
MLS 77552 Brittany Stoeckert
Results Realty 386-397-3473
HOME OR OFFICE on
Alachua St; remodeled 1,207 SqFt
home $82,900
DANIEL CRAPPS AGENCY,
INC. 755-5110 #77724


Hallmark Real Estate. 2006
2200SF home. 2br/2ba w/mother-
in-law suite, 4 car garage, endless
hot water heater. MLS# 77547
$309,900 Jay Sears 386-867-1613


Hallmark Real Estate. 3br/2ba
new roof & A'C. Comes w/SWMH
& 30x30 steel bldg. Completely
fenced. MLS# 76752
$179,900 Jay Sears 386-867-1613


810 Home for Sale
Just Reduced 3/2 home, inside city
limits, fenced backyard, detached
carport w/office MLS#77411
$79,900 Call R.E.O.Realty,
@ 386-243-8227 Make Offer!
Just Reduced 4/2 on 1.57 acres,
fireplace. partially fenced, MLS#
77412, Call Nancy Rogers at
R.E.O. Realty Group
386-243-8227 $64,900
Lg. 4/3 family home. 16x20
screened porch, workshop. 4.5 ac.
fenced/cross fenced MLS 74339
$229,900. N Fla Homeland Real-
ty Darlene Hart 386-288-2878
Lg. home on 1 ac. Granite floors
throughout. 4br/2ba. Nice open
kitchen & Florida room. $148,000
MLS 77292 Brittany Stoeckert
Results Realty 386-397-3473
Like New. 3br/2ba on 3 ac. New
kitchen cabinets, counters, carpet
& more. $179,900 MLS#77372
Charlie Sparks 386-755-0808 '
Westfield Realty Group
LOTS OF UPGRADES!
Remodeled kitchen in this
2BR/1BA home $29,900
DANIEL CRAPPS AGENCY,
INC. 755-5110 #77505
Mayfield S/D, nice fenced in back
yard w/small lake behind property.
Very nice. $99,888,
MLS 77092 Brittany Stoeckert
Results Realty 386-397-3473
Neat as a pin! Split floor plan
w/well manicured lawn. 10x12
storage shed. $129K MLS 77932
Darlene Hart 386-288-2878
N Fla Homeland Realty
Owner Fin.,Nice 3/2 on 2.5 fenced
acres, pond, Jasper area, sm down
$700 mo, 386-590-0642/867-1833
www.suwanneevalleyproperties.com
Owner Finance. Custom built 3/2.5
10.8 ac. Granite, fireplace, vaulted
ceilings, surround sound. lanai,
gazebo. MLS 77382 Access Real-
ty. Patti Taylor $249K 623-6896
Remax Professionals Charming
w/many upgrades. 3br/2ba. 2 mas-
ter suites. MLS# 76779, $105,000
Missy Zecher @ 386-623-0237
www.missyzecher.com
Remax Professionals Motivated
seller. All brick family home
w/many upgrades. MLS# 78168,
$129,000 www.missvzecher.com
Missy Zecher 386-623-0237
Remax Professionals Spacious
home on comer lot. Private access
to Lake Jeffery. MLS# 77783,
,$198,900 www.missyzecher.com
Missy Zecher @ 386-623-0237
Spacious 4/2 home on 1 ac. Split
floor plan. Great neighborhood.
Easy access to 1-75 $220K MLS
77859 N Fla Homeland Realty
Darlene Hart 386-288-2878
SPACIOUS home built in"
1995 has 2BR/2BA & 1,636 SqFt
on 1 acre $89,900
DANIEL CRAPPS AGENCY,
INC. 755-5110 #76887


Starter/Investment Home, 3/2 +
I onus room on 1 acre, remodeled,
fenced MLS#77562 $99,900
I Call Pam @,Remax
Professionals 386-303-2505
Well Maintained 3/2 on dead-end
street, quiet, country, close to
downtown $105,000 MLS#77800
Lisa Waltrip 386-365-5900 .
Westfield Realty Group
Well Maintained 3/2 w/open floor
plan,on 1/2 acre, fenced, shed
MLS# 78136 $134,900
Call Pam Beauchamp @ Remax
Professionals 386-758-8900

820 Farms &
S Acreage
4 1/2 acre lot. Lake Jeffery Road.
Gorgeous Oaks!Paved Rd
Owner Financing! NO DOWN!
$59,900. $525mo 352-215-1018..
www.LandOwnerFinancing.com
4 acres, Wellborn, New Well
installed, Beautifully wooded
w/cleared Home Site, owner fin,
no down, $39,900, $410 mon
Call 352-215-1018
www.LandOwnerFinancing.com
6.45 ac river front property in
White Springs, cloe to Big Shoals.
Covered shelter for entertaining.
MLS# 77417 $124,888 386-243-
8227 R.E.O. Realty Group, Inc
Bring the horses. Peaceful &
ready for your home. Convenient
location. $38,000 MLS#76264
Millard Gillen 386-365-7001
Westfield Realty Group
FARM- 7 stall barn, Apt.
17+ acres cross fenced.
Close in $950. mo.
386-961-1086

Iu-----uI


820 Farms &
820 Acreage
Half to ten acre lots. Some w/
well, septic, pp. We finance; low
dwn pmt. Deas Bullard Properties.
386-752-4339. www.landnfl.com
Look at all the Upgrades
s Completely remodeled.
$106,500 MLS#77483
Brodie Alfred 386-623-0906
Westfield Realty Group
Pretty piece of land. 2 acres close
to interstate 75 for under 20K.
Mobile Homes or residential ok.
MLS# 77400 Call 386-243-8227
R.E.O. Realty Group, Inc

830 Commercial
8 Property
4 UNIT Apt. Bldg. All 1/1/ w/ex-
tra rooms. Clean, good tenants and
remodeled. Downtown. $160,000.
386-362-8075 or 754-2951
Hallmark Real Estate. Commer-
cial Business Location on South
Main w/offices & service bldg.
-Frontage, warehouse & storage
MLS#76280 Janet Creel 719-0382
Prime Commercial Location.
Just across from plaza. Frontage
on Baya w/2 curbcuts. $350,000
MLS# 77485 Call 386-243-8227-
R.E.O.Realty Group, Inc


950 Cars for Sale,
1986 Chevy Monte Carlo SS,
78k miles, one owner. $10,000.
All original.
386-752-1313 or 904-718-6747
2006 Toyota Scion XB,
41,000 mi. $13,000.
Paid over $24,000 new.
386-752-1313 or 904-718-6747


We're on target!


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:- 755-5445



386-755-5440

L Ct RpIore


TERCRAFT W
.


2005 Yamaha
VStar 650
11,000 miles, blue with
ghost flames, runs
great, new battery
$3,100 OBO
Call
386-752-9645


2006 Toyota Scion
XB
41,000 mi.
Paid over $24,000 new.
$13,000
Call
386-752-1313
904-718-6747


1996 33 Ft.
Fifth Wheel
w/2 slide-outs, camp or
reside, livable but needs work.
$4,000
Call
386-362-1826
Leave Message


1986 Chevy Monte
Carlo SS
78k miles, one owner.
All original.

$10,000
Call
386-752-1313
904-718-6747


UH WHEELu R Wfll tUE I -
.=-- --- -









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LAKE CITY REPORTER


SPORTS


THURSDAY, JUNE 23, 2011


Page Editor: Brandon Finley, 754-0420


McIlroy says he can

handle pressure

of golf stardom


Associated Press

LONDON U.S. Open
champion Rory Mcllroy is
confident he can handle the
pressure that comes with
being considered the heir
apparent to Tiger Woods.
Comparisons were made
between Mcllroy and
Woods after the 22-year-old
Northern Irishman swept
to his first major victory
in record-breaking style at
Congressional on Sunday.
His status will undoubt-
edly soar as a result, but
Mcllroy said hell try to
stay grounded.
"With success comes
expectation, and I know the
expectation on me is going
to be pretty high," McIlroy
told Sky Sports TV on
Wednesday. "I expect big
things from myself but as
long as I can keep the com-
mitment and dedication and
put the hard work in, I don't
see why there's any reason
not to handle it OK"
McIlroy won the U.S.
Open by an eight-shot mar-
gin, reviving memories
of Woods' first major title
a 12-shot victory at the
Masters in 1997 at age 21.
Considering McIlroy had
previously won just two
tournaments in his profes-
sional career, it was a sur-
prise how easily he handled
the course and field over
four days.
"Last week was fantas-
tic, incredible," he said.
"The golf I played, I'd never
played before in my life.
I just hope I can keep it
going."
McIlroy returned to
Britain on Tuesday and
was back 24 hpurs later
at his hometown club in
Holywood, near Belfast,
the course where he was
groomed to be a star.
These are good times to
be a golf fan in Northern
Ireland 12 months
ago, McIlroy's compatriot
Graeme McDowell came
back from the U.S. Open at
Pebble Beach armed with a
'first major title.
McIlroy said McDowell's
victory was inspirational.
"I remember going up
to Poritrush and seeing
Graeme when he came
back home, and it's nearly
exactly a year later that
I'm doing the same thing,"
McIlroy said. "WhatGraeme
did last year at Pebble
Beach definitely inspired
me to go on and believe
that I can win major cham-
pionships, to follow in his
footsteps and bring the
trophy back to Northern
Ireland.
'To think that no
European had won it in 40
years before Graeme and
then the two of us won it
back to back. Growing up
in tough (golf course) con-
ditions, like the US Open
usually is, probably helped
us. But I don't think you
can explain having two
back-to-back U.S. Open


LOCALS
From Page 1B

was hitting 1.000 over two
seasons.
Lake City won the Mid-
Florida Conference in
Corporan's freshman year.
He hit .360 with 16 doubles,
three triples, two home
runs, 34 RBIs and 35 runs.
Corporan followed that
up in 2003 with a .319 aver-
age, 17 doubles, two triples,
nine home runs, 34 RBIs
and 34 runs.





-I!


E-eiiNE

laeitrpotrIo


winners from a country of 1'
million."
McIlroy is taking the
next three weeks off. His
first event back is the British
Open at Royal St. George's
in Sandwich, southeast
England, starting July 14.


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Rory Mcllroy is sprayed with
champagne while
holding the U.S. Open Golf
Championship Trophy at his
local club were he began
his golf at Holywood golf
club, Northern Ireland on
Wednesday.


I .- I

', I1