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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028308/01588
 Material Information
Title: The Lake City reporter
Uniform Title: Lake City reporter (Lake City, Fla. 1967)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: John H. Perry
Place of Publication: Lake City Fla
Publication Date: 6/22/2011
Frequency: daily (monday through friday)[<1969>-]
weekly[ former 1967-<1968>]
daily
normalized irregular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Lake City (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Columbia County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Columbia -- Lake City
Coordinates: 30.189722 x -82.639722 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 95, no. 4 (Oct. 5, 1967)-
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000358016
oclc - 33283560
notis - ABZ6316
lccn - sn 95047175
sobekcm - UF00028308_01569
System ID: UF00028308:01588
 Related Items
Preceded by: Lake City reporter and Columbia gazette

Full Text








On the road
All-stars
to travel
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POLIOF FLORIDA HISTORY T 326
0 E AX O117007
205 SMA UNIV OF FLORIDA
GAINESVILLE FL 32611-1943


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Gators win
Florida shuts down
Vandy for 3-1
CWS victory.
Sports, IB




Reporter


Wednesday, June 22,2011 www.lakecityreporter.com Vol. 137, No. 127 0 75 cents






2 firefighters killed


Local men die
battling Hamilton

County blaze.

By TONY BRITT
tbritt@lakecityreporter.com
JASPER An area wildfire turned
deadly Monday when two veteran Florida
Division of Forestry rangers were killed-
as they battled the Blue Ribbon blaze
in Hamilton County. Two other rangers
were injured as they tried to rescue the
pair, Division of Forestry officials said.
Joshua Burch, 31, of Lake City and
Brett Fulton, of White Springs, were
killed in the blaze they were fighting on
County Road 6, about 14 miles east of
Jasper.
According to information from a num-
ber of sources, four tractors were plowing
fire lines when one of them got stuck on a
stump in the late afternoon.
FIREFIGHTERS continued on 3A


Joshua Burch Brett Fulton


'The wind has
been taken out
of our sails.'

By TONY BRITT
tbritt@lakecityreporter.com
When Josh Burch and Brett Fulton
died fighting the Blue Ribbon Fire
Monday, it left a hole not just in their
families but in the community where
two men who took pride in being
fathers and outdoorsman had made a
mark on many people's lives.
"It's tough it's only been a day,
but he's missed, very much," said
Danielle Burch, Josh's wife. "I lost my
soulmate. Josh died doing the thing he
loved to do. He loved his job and he
died trying to save somebody and that
to me is the most heroic act any man
can ever do. Not only was he my soul-
mate, he was my best friend. He was
IN MEMORIAM continued on 3A


4-year nursing program


is one step closer at FGC


From staff reports
TAMPA Florida Gateway College
took another step toward offering bac-
calaureate programs on Tuesday as its
S proposal for its Bachelor of Science in
Nursing proposal was approved by the
S Florida State Board of Education.
The proposal will now go before the
S Southern Association of Colleges and
:Schools for accreditation approval. College
officials hope to begin offering baccalaure-
ate-level programs in Fall 2012.
"It's really an exciting time for Florida
Gateway College and this is our first step


into baccalaureate programs," said FGC
President Charles Hall. "While we've taken
this step, we'll never forget or stop practic-
ing all of the good things that community
colleges do providing a quality educa-
tion, tutoring and financial aid and all of
the things that made Lake City Community
College and now Florida Gateway College
a success."
FGC has worked for more than two
years in its process to offer baccalaureate
programs. In addition to the Bachelor of
Science in Nursing, FGC is also seeking to
offer additional programs in the future.


Man faces kidnap charge


From staff reports
A Lake City man was charged with
kidnapping after his live-in girlfriend told
police she was forced into a car with him
against her will, reports show.
Keaven Leon Maeweather, 27, was
booked into the Columbia County Jail on
Monday. According to Lake City Police
Department reports, three witnesses said
they saw Maeweather threaten Shannon
Dionne Ault to get into a car with him. Ault
reportedly sent one of the witnesses a text
message indicating she entered the car
because she feared for her safety as well
as that of her family.
Ault later told police she did not see a
gun but knew "how short (Maeweather's)
temper is." The report also notes that
two witnesses to the alleged abduction
claimed to have seen Maeweather threat-
en Ault's brother with a gun on a previ-
ous occasion.


Maeweather and Ault had been living
together for about three weeks.
When taken into police custody
Maeweather reportedly told police he had
no weapon but "was very upset at having
approximately $3,000 stolen from his pants
as he slept"
Ault was apparently unharmed in the
incident but told police that Maeweather
"knows a lot of people and she now fears
for the safety of her family."
A search of a truck Maeweather had
been using reportedly turned up mari-
juana, an unidentified white pill, a police
scanner and a holster and a handgun box.
At the jail, an unused 9mm bullet was
found in Maeweather's pocket, reports
show.
In addition to kidnapping, Maeweather
faces charges of possession of ammunition
by a convicted felon and possession of a
controlled substance.


Police pursuit ends in arrest


From staff reports

A White Springs man was
arrested on reckless driving,
theft and other charges after
a police pursuit Tuesday,
according to Sgt Ed Seifert
of the Columbia County
Sheriffs Office.
Sheriff's Deputy


McCardle spotted Allen D.
Wilson in the area of previ-
ous gas thefts on NW Brown
Road, but as he approached,
Wilson fled in his 1997
Chevy pickup, said Seifert
McCardle, along with depu-
ties Smythe and Snipes,
brought Wilson's vehicle to
a halt without incident


Seifert said gas cans, plas-
tic tubing and other items
were found in Wilson's
truck.
Wilson, 41, was also
charged with fleeing and
eluding (felony), felony
driving while license sus-
pendd or revoked and crim-
inal mischief.


A job well done


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Stanley Williams Sr. (left) and Violet Williams, 18, embrace Stanley Williams Jr., 23, after
he received his diploma at the Adult Education Graduation Ceremony Tuesday held at the
Columbia County School Board Administrative Complex. About 140 students graduated. 'I
am so proud of him,' said Violet Williams, Stanley Williams Jr.'s sister. 'I'm next after him.'

~nk


JASON MATTHEW WALKERILake Cily Reporter
Arnold Oates poses for a photograph Tuesday with his diploma.


CALL US:
(386) 752-1293
SUBSCRIBE TO
THE REPORTER:
Voice: 755-5445
Fax: 752-9400


9874
Partly Cloudy
WEATHER, 2A


cI iI


Opinion ................
Around Florida .. .
Obituaries .. ....
Advice & Comics.
Puzzles ....


4A
2A
5A
4B .
2B -


TODAY IN
PEOPLE.
Tracy Morgan
apologizes.


COMING
THURSDAY
Police
roundup.


LlaKe


6.2 O"Il2


-- --s~----~---r- ------.----.918-Xs98-PIL-~+1


-- 3 ---I-s~----C--~T- %LP-91~--IR~YF-BP~B~L4ilEl~liE~3i~Ei~












LAKE CITY REPORTER DAILY BRIEFING WEDNESDAY, JUNE 22, 2011


V 3 Tuesday:
SAfternoon: 5-3-9
Evening: 2-8-2


NASHVILLE

delivered a personal
apology Tuesday to gay
advocacy groups and
Tennessee audience
members who were offended by an
anti-gay rant during his show there
.earlier this month.
Morgan met with the gay rights
advocates and some attendees of
the June 3 show before addressing
reporters at the Nashville Conventidn
SCenter. He did not take questions.
"I don't have a hateful bone in my
Bodyy" he said. "I don't believe that
anyone should be bullied or just
made to feel bad about who they
are."
It's the second public apology
from the "30 Rock" actor. He met
Switch homeless lesbian and gay
, youth Friday in New York City.
SMorgan agreed to the Nashville
meeting at the request of Gay &
Lesbian Alliance Against Defamation
,President Jarrett Barrios.
The former "Saturday Night Live"
cast member is known for an outra-
geous, unpredictable comedy style
where few subjects are taboo. He's
tackled homosexual themes and
characters before with little outcry.
But even Morgan admits he went
too far during his June 3 show at
Ryman Auditorium.
He said during his set that if his
son were gay, he would "pull out a
knife and stab" him, among other
anti-gay statements.

Queen of Soul fractures
toe on shoe heel
DETROIT The Queen of Soul
is performing in a hospital boot after
stumbling over a designer shoe and
fracturing a toe on her left foot
Spokeswoman Tracey Jordan said
Tuesday that Aretha Franklin has
not missed any gigs despite the mis-
step following a private performance


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Comedian and actor Tracy Morgan speaks at a news conference Tuesday in
Nashville as Herndon Graddick (right), senior director of programs for the Gay &.
Lesbian Alliance Against Defamation, looks on. Morgan apologized for anti-gay
remarks he made during a performance in Nashville on June 3.


in Dallas.
Franklin per-
.formed Thursday
at the home of an
"oil baron" and
was packing at her
hotel when the
Franklin spiked heel of a
Jimmy Choo shoe
"wrapped" around her toe.

Shakira in Israel to
promote education
JERUSALEM Colombian pop
singer Shakira promoted her global
education campaign
with a stop at a joint
Israeli-Arab school
in Jerusalem on
Tuesday.
Kicking off
Israel's third
n nual President's
Shakira Conference on
Tuesday with a plea for children's


education worldwide, Shakira, a U.N.
Goodwill Ambassador, said the Holy
Land was the:"perfect place to talk
about how urgent it is to invest in
education."

Songwriter's son may
eye plea in hotel death
NEW YORK Nicholas Brooks,
25, the son of songwriter Josephl
Brooks, who is charged with killing
Sylvie Cachay in a posh New York
hotel, may be considering a plea deal.
The judge mentioned ongoing "plea
discussions" during Brooks' brief
court appearance Tuesday.
Brobks has pleaded not guilty to
murder. He's due back in court Sept
19.
Cachay was found dead in an over-
flowing bathtub at the Soho House on
Dec. 9, hours after she and Brooks
checked in.

* Associated.Press


Tuesday:
Afternoon: 0-2-3-6
Evening: 4-4-0-3


Monday:
3-6-17-21-34


, Celebrity Birthdays


* Actor Ralph Waite is 83.
* Singer-actor Kris
Kristofferson is 75.
* Movie director John Korty
("The Autobiography of Miss
Jane Pittman") is 75.
* Actor Miqhael Lerner is 70.
* Broadcast journalist Brit
Hume is 68.
* Singer Peter Asher (Peter
and Gordon) is 67.

Daily Scripture


* Actor Andrew Rubin is 65.
* Actor David L. Lander is
64.
* Singer Howard "Eddie"
Kaylan is 64.
* Singer-musician Todd
Rundgren is 63.
* Actress Meryl Streep is 62.
* Actress Lindsay Wagner
is 62.
* Singer Alan Osmond is 62.


HOW TO REACH US
Main number ........(386) 752-1293
Fax number ..............752-9400
Circulation ............ 755-5445
Online... www.lakecityreporter.com
The Lake City Reporter, an affiliate of
Community Newspapers Inc., is pub-
lished Tuesday through Sunday at 180
E. Duval St, Lake City, Ra. 32055.
Periodical postage paid at Lake City, Ra.
Member Audit Bureau of Circulation and
The Associated Press.
All material herein is property of the Lake
City Reporter. Reproduction in whole or
in part.is forbidden without the permis-
sion of the publisher. U.S. Postal Service
No. 310-880.
POSTMASTER: Send address changes
to Lake City Reporter, PO. Box 1709,
Lake City, Ra. 32056.
Publisher Todd Wilson .... .754-0418
(twilson@lakectyreporter.com)
NEWS
Editor Robert Bridges .....754-0428
(rbridges@lakecityreporter.com)
ADVERTISING
Director Ashley Butcher ...754-0417
(abutcher@lakecityreporter.com)
CLASSIFIED
To place a classified ad, call 755-5440


BUSINESS
Controller Sue Brannon....754-0419
(sbrannon@lakecityreporter.com)
CIRCULATION
Home delivery of the Lake City Reporter
should be completed by 6:30 am.
Tuesday through Saturday, and by 7.30
a.m. on Sunday.
Please call 386-755-5445 to report any
problems with your delivery service.
In Columbia County, customers should
call before 10:30 a.m. to report a ser-
vice error for same day re-delivery. After
1030 a.m., next day re-delivery or ser-
vice related credits will be issued.
In all other counties where home delivery
is available, next day re-delivery or ser-
vice related credits will be issued.
Circulation ...............755-5445
(circulation@lakecityreporter.com)
Home delivery rates
(Tuesday through Sunday)
12 Weeks ................. $26.32
24 Weeks .................$48.79
52 Weeks..................$83.46
Rates indude 7% sales tax
Mail rates
12 Weeks................. $41.40
24 Weeks ............... $82.80
52 Weeks ................$179.40


CORRECTION

The Lake City Reporter corrects errors of fact in news
items. If you have a concern, question or suggestion, please
call the executive editor. Corrections and clarifications will run
in this space. And thanks for reading.


US deported 375
Haitians in 2010
MIAMI U.S. immi-
gration authorities have
released their figures on
deportations to Haiti in the
months before the devas-
tating 2010 earthquake.
The Department of
Homeland Security on
Monday posted its data on
immigration enforcement
actions for the 2010 fiscal
'year, which ended Sept 30.
The U.S. deported 375
Haitians that year, includ-
ing 125 criminals, before
all deportations to Haiti
were suspended after the
SJan. 12, 2010, earthquake.
The deportations of
Haitians convicted of.
violent crimes in the U.S.
Resumed this past January.

1 missing after
boat capsizes
HILLSBORO A multi-
Sagency search is under-
.i ay for a man missing
from a boat.that capsized
in Hillsboro Inlet, north of
S-Fort Lauderdale.
. Officials said a
* 9-year-old boy and a man
were pulled from the water
about 10 p.m. Monday
by nearby residents of a
nearby apartment complex
who heard their screams.
Broward County
Sheriff's spokesman Mike
Jachles said the missing
man drifted about a quar-
ter-mile west and was last
seen near the Hillsboro
Inlet Bridge.

Deputy shooting
leaves 1 injured
KENNETH CITY-
Tampa Bay-area authori-
ties are investigating a
deputy-involved shooting
that injured one suspect
and a crash that injured
a deputy en route to the
scene.
The Pinellas County
Sheriff's Office said depu-
ties approached the sus-


ASSOCIATED PRESS

From Gainesville to Broadway
Emily Hart, a recent Eastside High School graduate, sings
'Still Hurting' from the musical 'The Last Five Years,' in
Gainesville. Hart will travel to New York City as part of the
National High School Musical Theater Awards, where she will
compete to receive the Jimmy Award for best performance by
an actress.


pect at a Kenneth City con-
venience store Tuesday
morning to make an
arrest A struggle ensued,
during which the suspect
allegedly tried to remove
one deputy's gun.
Authorities said two
deputies fired at the sus-
pect, wounding him. The
suspect has been hospi-
talized and is expected to
survive.

Newborn dropped
off at,fire station
CORAL SPRINGS -
Authorities said firefight-
ers found an infant with
her umbilical cord still
attached outside their
South Florida fire station.
Coral Springs Fire
Department spokesman
Michael Moser said fire-
fighters found the baby
outside, wrapped in t-
shirts.
Firefighter James
Gochenour said the crew
used an obstetrics kit to
detach the cord.
The baby was taken
to Northwest Medical
Center, in good condition.
Florida's Safe Haven Law
allows parents to drop off
a newborn at a hospital or
fire station without fear of


prosecution.
Moser said Safe Haven
for Newborns will take
care of the child's place-
ment

More time needed
for Medicaid
S MIAMI Florida
Health officials have
requested a 30-day exten-
sion from federal authqri-
ties, allowing for more
time to finalize a dramatic
overhaul of'its Medicaid
program.
Florida's pilot program
privatized Medicaid in five
counties under a federal
waiver that expires at the
end of June. The.Legislature
expanded the program
statewide this session, put-
ting the care on nearly 3
million poor and disabled
residents into the hands of
for-profit companies and
hospital networks.
Supporters said the
overhaul could save $1
billion the first year.
Medicaid costs the state
about $21 billion a year.
Florida health officials
traveled last week for pub-
lic input before submitting
a final plan.


THE WEATHER


-., PARTLY CHANCE CHANCE CHANCE CHANCE
CLOUDY TORMS RMS STORMS STORMS


HI 98 L074 I I93 LO 711 8910 70 191 L 71 I"' 92 1 71


Tallahassee *
96/74 ..
SPensacola .Pa C..i
991/77


TEMPERATURES
High Tuesday
Low Tuesday
Normal high
Normal low
Record high
Record low

PRECIPITATION
Tuesday
Month total
Year total
Normal month-to-date
Normal year-to-date


-98172:
Lake City
98/74
\ Cainesu
\.97/7



Tatm
93/


97
72
90
69
100 in 1998
58 in 1965

0.00"
0.62"
14.73"
4.66"
21.91"


City
SJacksonvile Cape Canaveral
9 73 Daytona Beach
Ft. Lauderdale
ille aytinaBeach Fort Myers
4 9276 Gainesville
cala 7 Jacksonville
'97/73 Key west
7 Orlando Cape Canaveral Lake City
94/75 90/77 MLam
Miami
IP Naples
78 West Palm Biach Ocala
91/79 *, Orlando
\ Ft. Labderdal Panama City
Ft.Myers 90/81 0 Pensacola
95/75 Naples Tallahassee
9'3/76 Mlami Tampa
S 9/79 Valdosta
KeyWest. 2W. Palm Beach
89/82


SUN
Sunrise today
Sunset today
Sunrise torn.
Sunset tom.

MOON
Moonrise today
Moonset today
Moonrise tom.
Moonset torm.


6:30 a.m.
8:35 p.m.
6:30 a.m.
8:35 p.m.

12:33 a.m.
12:56 p.m.
1:03 a.m.
1:48 p.m.


0000
June July July July
23 1 8 15
Last New First Full


7a 1p 7p la 6a On this date in
Wednesday Thursday 1947, twelve inches
of rain fell in forty-
two minutes over
'- Holt, Mo., to estab-
lish a world record
for rainfall intensity.
S- The record would
later be tied on a
'sugar plantation in
Hawaii.


* Associated Press


12

1O0ilnstate
Today's
ultra-violet
radiation risk
for the area on
a scale from 0
to 10+.
-- --


Thursday
89 76,t
90. 75..
89/80/t
91/75/t
92/7i/t
92/72/t
89/81/pc
93/71/t
89/78/t
90/74/t
92/71/t
93/75/t
90/75/t
87/74/t
93/73/t
90/77/t
92/73/t
89/77/t


Friday
86/ 75/
88.' 75,'
89/79/t
91/75/t
89/70/t
89/71/t
89/81/pc
89/70/t
90/78/t
89/75/t
89/70/t
92/75/t
90/75/t
89/75/t
92/71/t
88/77/t
92/70/t
89/77/t


d--
An exclusive
service
brought to
our readers
by
The Weather
Channel.



weather.com
1I0


AJ g & Forecasts, data and
w e e graphics 0 201i Weather
' 11\ ~i Central, LP, Madson, Wise.
weather www.weatherpubllshef.com


'et Connected



/--,lImI, 1Im I> ll>
IL__jI..


PEOPLE IN THE NEWS


Morgan gives apology in Nashville


"Whoever dwells in the shelter
of the Most High will rest in the
shadow of the Almighty."
Psalm 91:1

Thought for Today
"If you look at life one way,
there is always cause for
alarm."
Elizabeth Bowen,
Irish author (1899-1973)

Lake City Reporter


AROUND FLORIDA


~ I-- -- I-


I


Page Editor: Jason M. Walker, 754-0430


RYALMANA


ty Q4















LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL & STATE WEDNESDAY, JUNE 22, 2011


FIREFIGHTERS: 2 killed in line of duty

Continued From Page 1A


Another tractor went to
help but didn't arrive in
time.
Burch and Fulton
were Florida Division of
Forestry rangers with the
Suwannee Valley Center in
Lake City.
The men attempting
to rescue the two fallen
rangers Stephen
Carpenter, 35, of Madison
and Robert Marvin, 44, of
Jasper were treated for
smoke-related injuries and
released Monday night.
Carpenter and Marvin
are forestry rangers with
the Live Oak Forestry
Station, Florida Division of
Forestry officials said.
"As Florida faces a sig-
nificant threat from more
than 400 wildfires across
our state, we are saddened
to learn of the tragic loss of
two of our veteran firefight-
ers, Josh Burch and Brett
Fulton," said Gov. Rick


Scott in a prepared state-
ment released Tuesday
afternoon. "We pray for the
comfort and strength for
their families and fellow
firefighters.
"I had the privilege
of meeting many of our
dedicated firefighters last
week, and am not at all
surprised to learn of the
heroic efforts of co-work-
ers to rescue them," he
continued. "The selfless
commitment displayed
by all of the firefighters
across the state deserves
our utmost respect."
The Blue Ribbon fire
started June 16 and was
considered contained
until Monday when the
fire flared up again and
Division of Forestry
resources were sent to
the scene.
More than 35 people
have worked the Blue
Ribbon fire for more than


one day since it began.
This does not include
support personnel who
have worked on the fire.
The blaze was later
contained to 12 acres.
The Division of
Forestry's last fatality in
the line of duty came in
2000 when a helicopter
pilot crashed after dump-
ing water on a blaze near
Fort Myers. The last time
a ranger or firefighter
died battling a wildfire on
the ground was 1985.
According to informa-
tion from Scott's press
office, statewide there
are 632 certified fire-
fighters in the Division
of Forestry and they
are supported by about
100 additional personnel
including mechanics and
duty officers. They are
also supported by nation-
al, state, regional and
local partners.


Innocence Commission

offers recommendations


By BILL KACZOR
Associated Press

TALLAHASSEE A
panel set up by the Florida
Supreme Court to find ways
to prevent wrongful convic-
tions recommended new
lineup standards fot police on
Tuesday.
The Florida Innocence
Commission found that mis-
taken witness identification of
suspects is the leading cause
of erroneous guilty verdicts.
The recommendations in
the commission's interim
report, though, are nothing
more than that, simply urg-
ing police agencies to adopt
the standards. It notes law
enforcement officials told the
panel they believe it.lacks
"any authority to mandate
required changes in policy or
process."
That didn't dampen enthu-
siasm for the report by at
least one leading advocate for
the wrongly convicted.
"I could not be more
pleased," said former Florida
State University President
Talbot "Sandy" D'Alemberte,
who had pushed for cre-
ation of the' commission.
D'Alemberte,, also a former
American Bar Association
president, said he believes
thateventuallytheLegislature
will pass a law requiring com-
pliance with the standards


'We've known for years that
eyewitness testimony is unreliable.
I feel quite confident they can't
continue to put on eyewitnesses
who make misrdentifications.

-Talbot "Sandy" D'Alemberte
FormerFSU President


or judges will begin letting
lawyers use scientific studies
to challenge eyewitness iden-
tifications.
He said the mere fact the
commission has compiled
data and research on identifi-
cation errors should putpres-
sure on lawmakers, police,
prosecutors and the courts to
make the suggested chang-
es.
Two bills were introduced
during the recently ended
legislative session that would
have required police to follow
such standards when con-
ducting live or photo lineups.
One passed in the Senate, but
it never came to a vote in the
House.
The report makes no
recommendations to the
Supreme Court for any
changes to rules or jury
instructions. It does, though,
call upon the justices to ask
their Committee on Standard
Jury Instructions in Criminal
Cases to review what some


federal courts have been
doing in regard to witness
identification as well as a pro-
posal from a Florida Bar com-
mittee.
"We've known for years
that eyewitness 'testimony
is unreliable," D'Alemberte
said. "I feel quite confident
they can't continue to put on
eyewitnesses who make mis-
identifications."
Eyewitness misidentifica-
tion contributed to the con-
victions of 10 of the 13 people
in -Florida who have been
exonerated by DNA testing,
according to the Innocence
Project of Florida, a private
advocacy group.
Italso says thahasbeenthe.
casefor75percentofabout270
people exonerated by DNA
nationally Advocates contend
the DNA cases represent only
a fraction of those who have
been wrongly convicted, but
there are no records on how
many people have been exon-
erated for other reasons.


IN MEMORIAM: Loved ones look back

Continued From Page 1A


an awesome father and he
will be forever missed."
Josh Burch, 31, of Lake
City and Brett Fulton, 52,
who has a White Springs
address but lives in
Columbia County in the
Springville Community,
were killed Monday after-
noon fighting the Blue
Ribbon Fire, about 14
miles east of Jasper in
Hamilton County.
"We're coping but it's
hard. It's heart-wrenching
and it's heart-breaking. It's
indescribable pain," said
Christina Fulton-Mills,
Brett Fulton's daugh-
ter. "He was an honest,
hardworking man he
worked hard every day
of his life to take care of
his family. He was always
here for his family; always
the backbone of every-
thing. He will be greatly,
greatly missed."
Some rangers said they
wanted 'to comment on
the loss of their friends,
but said they had been
forbidden to speak to the
press by their superiors.
News of the men's
deaths spread quickly
Monday night after infor-
mation was released
by .Florida Division of
Forestry officials. The
news settled. over the
community like a sharp
blow rendering many
breathless with tears in
their eyes.
Tina Jones, Fulton's
sister, was moved to tears
as she offered insight
on her brother's life
away from work. She is
two years younger than
Brett. She said he was
named after his grandfa-
ther, Luther.
"We're beside ourselves
with grief," she said. "The
wind has been taken out
of our sails. Tragedy hit
us again as a family and
in adversity we-become
stronger together, but it's
certainly hard as a family
to lose a loved one in such
a tragic way and not know
how he suffered or if he
suffered we hope he
didn't."
Jones also thanked the
community for its outpour-
ing of prayers, support
and love in the family's
time of tragic loss.
"I would also like to say
thank you to the young
man who went in after


Brett who also lost his life
- Josh," she said.
Burch, 31, of Lake City,
was a Forest Ranger with
a wife, Danielle, and two
children. He worked with
the Florida Division of
Forestry for more than
10 years.
Danielle was married to
Josh for 12 years and she
described Josh as a quiet
man, but said if you were
his friend, "you couldn't
shut him up."
"He was so loving and
he would give you the
shirt off his back if he
knew you needed it," she
said. "There wasn't any-
thing too big or too small
he wouldn't do for any-
body."'
News of the tragedy
also set a somber mood in
the community and with
firefighters from other,
local agencies.
'Gerald Ford, a Lake
City firefighter, said he
had known Burch for'
more than 15 years.
"Josh was a super, -all-
around guy," he said.
"He would do anything
that I asked him to do
for me. He would come
and cut firelines around
our property. He loved
to fish and hunt. He did
a lot of fishing with my
cousin.
"My heart goes out
to his wife Danielle and
his sons," Ford contin-
ued. "I pray for them
and his family because
he's going to be greatly
missed because he was
a good father and a great
husband." '
Eugene Rivers, who
had known Burch for
close to 10 years, worked
with him at Lowe's, in
the garden center, before
Burch began working
with the Division of
Forestry.
"Josh was an all-around
good guy," Rivers said.
"He was a family man;
he loved his boys and he


loved to hunt and fish and
he loved his wife Danielle,
he was crazy about her.
If Josh could help you he
would give you the shirt
off his-back."
Fulton, .52, began his
Division of Forestry
career as a welder 12
years ago. He had been
a forest ranger for nine
years. He is survived by a
wife and two grown chil-
dren.
Don Wilson, a vol-
unteer with the White
Springs Volunteer Fire
Department, worked
with Fulton in the White
Springs unit.
Wilson said Brett Fulton
was a volunteer that just
joined up with the White
Springs volunteer fire
department.
"I've known him for
a while," he said. "We
became close friends
over the ages. He was an
awesome guy, an incred-
ible friend and would do
anything in the world for
you. He was a great guy.
He's going to be truly
missed. I can't believe
he's gone."
Debra Evans, owner
of Dees-Parrish Family
Funeral home, said Fulton
was a family friend.
"He was an avid hunt-
er and fisherman, but
most importantly he
was' a grandfather," she .
said. "His most favorite
pastime was the time he
spent with "his grandson,
Luke and granddaughter,
Sydney." '
Evans said Fulton also
loved to play Call of Duty
on the,XBOX 360 game
console and his gamertag
was Dozerboss.
Mills reminisced about
when she and her broth-
er were youngsters and
Fulton would take them
and several of their cous-
ins camping.
"He was aJways every-
body's second dad," she
said.


Surfs "" aGetC, gj"'CoW k tyr..pOr...t
-- -Ms '^ dOrl'1 ^ |B||1 rrO~


Masons raise $7,000-plus for Cady


From staff reports

Members of the Lake
City Masonic Lodge recent-
ly held a chicken pilau fund-
raiser for Candace (Cady)
Drain to help offset some
of her medical expenses. A
total of $7,327 was raised
for this cause. Cady recent-
ly went to the Children's
Hospital in Miami for more
treatment. Members of
the Lodge wish to thank
everyone for their support
and request that you keep
Cady and her family in your
prayers.


COURTESY PHOTO
Pictured above are Cady, her family, volunteers, and members of the Lake City Masonic Lodge #27.


Dozens mistakenly

told they'd won U.S.

visa sue government


By LAURA WIDES-MUNOZ
Associated Press

MIAMI Dozens of
people who were mistakenly
told they'd won a spot to
apply for a U.S. visa through
the annual visa lottery sys-
tem are suing the U.S. gov-
ernment
French native Armande
Gil is a psychologist in
Miami who is among those
seeking class action status
in a federal lawsuit filed last
week in Washington. Gil
said Tuesday she spent time


and money preparing for her
Snew life and was devastated
to learn it was just a bureau-
cratic snafu. She and others
want to be reinstated as lot-
tery winners.
Roughly 22,000 individu-
als were told in May they'd
been selected though they
would still have to pass
background checks. Then
immigration officials dis-
covered the supposedly ran-
dom selection was skewed
due to a computer glitch.
A new lottery is set for
July.


Here we are 43
years later and you
are still beautiful.
When we were
married on June
22, 1968 I was so
in love with you.
SNow it's June
22, 2011. I still
love you so very
Such. There has
'i never been even
one second in all
These 43 years that
I haven't loved my
S"Little Princess
Angel".
\ .~ ' C~~3


KP'VWk Vll
is pleased to announce the addition of
Sandy Kishton and Travis Land
I to our dependable and trustworthy team of Remax Professionals.


L t+--LLJI
Sandy Kishton Travis Land





OB/ YN

DAINA GREENE MD
WOMEN'S HEALTH WITH A WOMAN'S TOUCH

.-7











*Meet with a provider the day you come in
*Same day/next day OB appts.
*Dr. Greene is chief medical officer at Pregnancy
Care Center
*Free pregnancy tests
Call for appt. Mon.-Thurs. 8am-5:30pm
755-0500 449 SE Baya Dr. Lake City
Accepts All Insurance


'He was so loving and he would
give you the shirt off his back if he
knew you needed it.There wasn't
anything too big or too small he
wouldn't do for anybody.'

Danielle Burch, wife of Josh Burch


Page Editor: Todd Taylor, 754-0424















OPINION


Wednesday, June 22,201 I


AN


A N
OPINION



Does


prayer


exist?

Here's a great para-
dox of our time:
Half of the adults
in America now
rely on prayer for
healing a remarkable one-
third jump from the 1990s. Yet
the federal government recent-
ly decided not to study prayer
as an alternative to medicine
as it had done for years.
Why this sudden.disconnect
between Washington and half
the adult population? Must a
spiritual exercise so useful and
so common be labeled, as one
researcher put it, "parochial"
and "unconventional"?
Prayer is certainly central
to everyday life in the United
States. A large majority of peo-
ple believe in God, according
to polls. And again this year,
the US president proclaimed a
"national day of prayer" in May.
"We're seeing a wide variety
of prayer use among people
with good income and access
to medical care," says Dr. Amy
Wachholtz, a psychiatrist at the
University of Massachusetts
Medical School.
She and a fellow researcher
released a study last month
that is the first to look at trends
in the use of prayer for health
concerns. They saw a substan-
tial increase from 13.7 percent
of adults in 1999 to 49 percent
only eight years later.
That's quite a leap, one
that can't be easily ignored.
The data for that study, oddly
enough, relied on extensive
surveys conducted by the
National Institutes of Health.
"Yet while NIH's 2002 survey
data on prayer use was issued
in a report on complemen-
tary and alternative medicine
(CAM), the NIH decided not
to issue the data on prayer that
was collected in 2007.
As a reason for this shift
in policy, the NIH's National
Center for Complementary and
Alternative Medicine points
to studies that claim prayer is
outside the "mainstream" of
unconventional healing prac-
tices and is based on "belief'
and not "scientific laws."

Christian Science Monitor

: Lake City Reporter
Serving Columbia County
Since 1874
SThe Lake City Reporter is pub-
.lIhed with pride for residents of
Qolumbia and surrounding counties by
Community Newspapers Inc.
We believe strong newspapers build
strong communities -"Newspapers
get things done!"
SOur primary goal is to
publish distinguished and profitable
community-oriented newspapers.
Tbis mission will be accomplished
through the teamwork of professionals
dedicated to truth, integrity and hard
work.
Todd Wilson, publisher
Robert Bridges, editor
Sue Brannon, controller
Dink NeSmith, president
Tom Wood, chairman

LETTERS
POLICY
Letters to the Editor should be
typed or neatly written and double
spaced. Letters should not exceed
400 words and will be edited for
length and libel. Letters must be
signed and include the writer's name,
address and telephone number for
verification. Writers can have two
letters per month published. Letters
and guest columns are the opinion of
the writers and not'necessarily that of
the Lake City Reporter.
BY MAIL: Letters, P.O. Box 1709,


Lake City, FL 32056; or drop off at
180 E. Duval St. downtown.
BY FAX: (386) 752-9400.
BY E-MAIL:
news@lakecityreporter.com


The irrational sport


of CEO bashing


f you're inclined to swim
in that self-corroding
acid known as envy, read
some recent Washington
Post stories on super-rich
CEOs. Think about how much
better they live than you do. Tell
yourself its not fair, and even
if it benefits absolutely no one,
figure on some old fashioned
leftist revenge.
-Many of you won't, but for
the crowd that puts equality
of outcome above liberty and
opportunity, it must have been
wonderfully energizing to see
the Post saying that, in 2008,
"the top 0.1 percent of earners
took in more than 10 percent
of the personal income in the
United States.."
Qf the people in that
category, making at least $1.7
million a year, some 60 percent
are owners and managers
of their own businesses,
executives of non-financial
firms, supervisors at financial
firms or financial professionals
"at any sort of firm," the Post
says. Because the newspaper
sought out examples of
Extravagant luxuriating, hearing


Jay Ambrose
SpeaktoJoy@aolxcom
from economist Thomas Sowell
may help some readers calm -
down.
He says in an opinion piece,
that many insist the amount of
CEO pay is ridiculous without
understanding what it costs to
get first-rate leadership more
than' paying for itself. Conceding
some board directors who get
those positions through CEOs
might be anxious to please,
he points out that expert
investment firms pay more
"than these boards to CEOs
at corporations they own as
a means to the profitability
allowing their own ventures to
boom.
Giving CEOs' stock options is
also a way of encouraging them
to care about shareholders at no


meaningful cost to consumers,
though we do have studies
and fairly definite examples of
reimbursement overkill, usually
put to propagandistic use. I
have no problems with a variety
of tax reforms addressing
corporate and individual
deductions or with shareholders
giving anxious shoves to any
clearly negligent boards of
directors.
Itfs still absurd to think we can
come close to taxing our way out
of the deficit-entitlement mess by'
going after top income groups
already paying all but a fraction
of our income tax. Trying as
much would flatten owners of
small businesses and those
who invest most in industrial
expansion and would be a sure
way to stop any job growth.
Besides the rich getting richer,
the left would have you believe
everyone else is getting poorer.

Jay Ambrose, formerly
Washington director of editorial
policy for Scripps Howard news-
papers and the editor of dailies in
El Paso, Texas, and-Denver, is a
columnist living in Colorado.


ANOTHER'OPINION


Congress, the


President and Libya


t's hard to believe that
the same President
Obama who as a senator
so aptly criticized former
President George
W. Bush for exceeding his
authority in fighting the war
pn terror can 'now, as chief
executive, blithely attempt to
ignore the restraints placed on
his own powers to wage war.
Mr. Obama says he does
not need Congress' approval.
to continue the U.S. role in
Libya, despite the provisions
of the War Powers Act of 1973,
because "U.S. operations do
not involve sustained fighting
or active exchanges of fire
with hostile forces, nor do they
involve U.S. ground troops."
No wonder leading members
of both parties have taken
Mr. Obama to task for this
ill-considered attempt to
circumvent the law.
House Speaker John
Boehner said that doesn't pass
the "straight face" test Mr.
Boehner, the GOP leader in the
House, has been a persistent
critic of the president but the
same "straight face" criticism
was echoed on Sunday by
Democratic Sen. Dick Durbin
of Illinois, the assistant
majority leader and one of the
president's most reliable allies
on Capitol Hill.
They're right
U.S. forces have spent $716
million in the first two months
in a series of air actions in


Libya, firing missiles from
remotely piloted drones and
helping NATO enforce the no-
fly zone over the region in an
attempt to topple the regime of
Moammar Gadhafi by force.
How does this not qualify as
hostile activity?
It would certainly seem to fall.
under the definition of Congress
when it passed the law almost
40 years ago, especially
after lawmakers substituted
"hostilities" for the original and
much narrower phrase "armed
conflict," which was in the
first draft. Clearly, Congress
intended to cast as wide a net
as possible to ensure that no
future president would be
able to wiggle out of the law's
requirements.
It's particularly surprising,
and disheartening, that a
president who has taught
constitutional law would try to
ignore the War Powers Act's
provisions.
The Pentagon's general
counsel, as well as the acting
head of the acting head of the
Justice Department's Office
of Legal Counsel advised Mr.
Obama that the NATO-led air
war, in which the United States
plays a prominent role, amounts
to "hostilities."
Beyond the clear
requirements of the law, it only
makes sense for Congress to
have a say in the Libya action.
After all, it is Congress, not the
president, which is granted the


explicit, enumerated power in
the Constitution "to declare war."
Instead of trying to get
around the law's requirements,
Mr. Obama should go to
Congress, and to the country,
and lay out a clear and forceful
case for a continuing role in
Libya. The president made the
correct decision to get involved
rather than have the United
States sit idly by and watch
a dictator slaughter his own
people. This put America on the
side of the forces for change in
the Middle East.
Mr. Obama also made a
wise decision to let NATO take
the lead rather than have this
country leading yet another
hostile action against a Muslim
country.
That Gadhafi has proven to
be a more tenacious enemy is
no reason to back out at this
stage. The president will have
plenty of support from both
Democrats and Republicans
if he seeks Congressional
approval of a resolution to stay
the course. That includes the
GOP presidential candidate in
2008, Sen. John McCain.
Mr. Obama is on the right
track, but he should cease
trying to hide from the clear
intent of the law by resorting
to weak and transparently thin
arguments. Congress has a role
to play and should be involved
in this decision.
* Miami Herald


4A


Dale McFeatters
mcfeattersd@shns.com


Wal-Mart

ruling a

setback for

broad class;

actions

The Supreme Court'
handed Wal-Mart, ;
and other large
employers facing
class-action suits,
a huge victory this week. The;:
aggrieved workers who filed
the suit didn't fare quite so
well.
Overturning an appeals
court, the justices unanimously;
ruled that the suit had been
improperly filed under
class-action rules. Rather than
sending the case back to be
properly filed, by a 5-4 vote the.
conservative mnd pro-business'.
majority threw the case out
altogether.
Some 1,600 of Wal-Martfs
women employees had alleged-
years of gender discrimination
in pay and promotion by the
giant employer. Both sides
submitted dueling statistics on
promotions to management ::
positions. .,
The plaintiffs were armed
with anecdotal evidence that
Wal-Mart's corporate culture
favored giving the men higher:
raises on the grounds that the.-
men had families to support
- an absolutely untenable : "
position, one would think, .
given the number of :
single mothers supporting
families.
Worldwide, Wal-Mart *
operates more than 8,000
stores with 2.1 million ::
employees. The company
delegates decisions over
pay and promotions to'its
individual store managers.
Writing for the majority,
Justice.Antonin Scalia said:
"Because respondents provide
no convincing proof of a
companywide discriminatory
pay and promotion policy, we
have concluded that they have
not established the existence
of any common question." In
short, he said, there was no
"glue", binding the plaintiffs
together.
This considerably raises
the bar in cases where the
discrimination is not a written
policy but an unspoken
understanding of an unfair
corporate culture.
Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg
retorted to no avail that
there was indeed a.common
issue because, "Wal-Mart's
delegation of discretion over
pay and promotions is a policy
uniform throughout all the
stores."
Scalia's ruling tightens the
standards for large class-action
suits, particularly on meeting
the criteria of common legal
and factual issues, perhaps
beyond what Congress
intended when it last revised :
the law in 2005.
Some of the plaintiffs plan to:'
pursue their grievance through:
individual cases with the Equal:
Opportunity Employment
Commission or through class-
action suits more
tightly targeted to individual
stores or regional groups of
stores. .
The Wal-Mart class action '
may have been, as the court
found, too much of a blunt =
instrument, but there has to be :
a better judicial :
mechanism to resolve
plausible claims of widespread :
discrimination.

a Dale McFeatters is editorial
writer for Scripps Howard News ,
Service.


www.lakecityreporter.com














Page Editor: Todd Taylor, 754-0424LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL WEDNESDAY, JUNE 22, 2011


COMMUNITY CALENDAR


M To submit your Community
Calendar item, contact Antonia
Robinson at 754-0425 or by
e-mail at arobinson@
lakecityreporter.com.


Today
Cowboy Dave
performance
Columbia County
Senior Services Inc. is
hosting a performance
by Cowboy Dave 11-
11:45 a.m. today at the
LifeStyle Enrichment
Center. Call (386) 755-
0235 for more informa-
tion.


Lady of the Lake
Quilting Guild
The Lady of the Lake
Quilting Guild is monthly
9:30 a.m. today at Teen
Town, 533 NW Desoto
St. The program will fea-
ture quilting a Chinese
Auction. For more details:
Contact President Loretta
Kissner, (386).754-9330
or vice-president Sunny
Nadort, (386) 658-1555
for more information.

Thursday
Children's workshops
The Florida
Department of
Environmental
Protection's Stephen
Foster Folk Culture
Center State Park will
host eight children's
workshops through July
21, to teach several dif-
Sferent craft related skills
to interested children.
Participants are welcome
to take part in a single
workshop or multiple
workshops.

Monthly landlord
meeting
The next monthly
landlord's meeting is
6 p.m. Thursday at the
Lake City Medical Center
Classroom 101. Dole
Crews, Columbia County
property appraiser is the
speaker. All managers
and realtors are welcome.
Call 755-0110 for more
information.

Play in the Clay
.Diane Hornby is teach-
ing "Play In The Clay"
classes for the children's
summer vacation pro-


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter


Graduation celebration
Friends and family members cheer as adult education graduates walkacross the stage during
Ceremony Tuesday.


gram 10 a.m.-ll a.m.
June 23 and July 7 and
14 for $5 at the Stephen
Foster Cultural State
Park. For adults wishing
to explore their craftier
side this summer, there is
a beginning wheel throw-
ing pottery class 2-5
p.m. June 23 and Aug.
11, 18 and 25. The class
meets for three hours
and costs $85. Students
make four vessels and
learn to glaze and fire
them. To register, please
call the park Gift Shop
at (386) 397-1920 or visit
www.stephenfosterCSO.
org.To learn more about
the park, visit www.
FloridaStateParks. org/ste-
phenfoster

Senior Services open
house
Columbia Couhty
Senior Services, Inc. is
having an-open house 10
a.m.-12 p.m. Thursday.
Entertainment at 11
a.m. by The Kitchen
Band. Come check out
the activities, the New
Heirlopm Gift Shoppe and


more. Located at 628 S.E.
' Allison Court, call (386)
755-0235 for more infor-
mation.

Friday
Hog entry deadline
approaching
The deadline for all
hog entries in the 2011
Columbia County Fair is
5 p.m. Friday. Children
must be between the ages
of 8-18 and enrolled in
public, private or home
school in Columbia
County. Entries must be
turned into the Columbia
County Fairgrounds
Office. Call 752-8822. The
beginning Hog weigh in
is scheduled for 8-10
a.m. July 9.

Magic with Miniature
Horses
The Columbia County
Public Library is host-
ing Reading is Magic
with Gentle Carousel
Miniature Horses 11 a.m.
at Fort White Community
Center and 2 p.m. at the


Main Branch Friday.


Satirdayv


the Adult Education Graduation




Monday


*vjU UOYBuilding Strong Bonds
Miss Florida Forestry mentoring program
Pa meant


The Miss Florida
Forestry State
Scholarship Pageant
is 7 p.m. Saturday at
Baker County Middle
School in Macclenny.
Admission is $10, and
tickets will be sold at
the door. Local queens
from Columbia County
are Little Miss Morgan
Royals, Junior Miss
Kimberlynne Norman,
Teen Miss Brittany
Wallace and Miss
Angela Cameron.

Columbia High School
reunion
The Columbia High
School Class of 1986
reunion is Saturday.
Contact Howey Brannon
at 386-397-4570 or Brian
'Tweet" Nicholson at
(727) 992-1978 or visit
http://chsclassofl986.com
for more information.


Calling all middle and
high school boys for
Building Strong Bonds
mentoring program 5-8
p.m. Monday. Meeting
is at 532 Marion Street
Contact Al Nelson at (386)
867-1601. Dinner included.
Transportation can be
provided if contacted one
week in advance.

Tuesday

Make and Take
workshop ,.
Back to BasidsiRain
Barrel "Make and
Take" Workshop from
6:30 8:00 p.m. Tuesday
Columbia County
Extension Office Located
on the Fairground in
Lake City Just call to
register 752-5384. Take
home your completed
rain barrel for $45 Learn
about the benefits of


Harvesting Rainwater.
Let us help you assemble
your very own Rain
Barrel.

Meet the Author at the
library
A Meet the Author pro-
gram featuring Mary Jane
Ryals is 7 p.m. Tuesday
at the Main Branch.
The event is sponsored
by the Friends of the
Library. Ryals is a poet,
novelist and Florida State'
University professor. In
2008, she was named
Poet Laureate of Florida's
Big Bend Region, a title
she will hold until 2012.
Her novel, "Cookie and
Me," was released in
September 2010 and
takes place in Tallahassee
in the 1960s.

Meal payment due
Payment for the
Columbia County Senior
Services Inc. Wednesday
homecooked meal is due
10 a.m. Tuesday at the
LifeStyle Enrichment
Center. The menu is ham-
burger steak, mashed
potatoes and gravy, broc-
coli casserole and peach
cobbler and ice cream.
Call (386) 755-0235 for
more information.

Wednesday, June
29
Beekeeping workshop
at extension office
A beekeeping work-
shop is 6-8:30 p.m.
June 29 at the Columbia
County Extension office.
The registration fee is $5
which includes materials
and honey. The class will
be taught with the help
of local beekeepers. Call
(386) 752-5384 for more
information.

Dubi Sisters perform
at Senior Services
Columbia County
Senior Services Inc. is
hosting a dancing per-
formance from the Dubi
Sisters 11-11:45 a.m.
June 29 at the LifeStyle
Enrichment Center.
Call (386) 755-0235.


OBITUARIES


Brett L. Fulton
Mr. Brett L. Fulton, 52, of Lake
City, died Monday, June 20,2011
while battling the Blue Ribbon
Fire located on the Hamilton/Co-
lumbia County
border on State
Road 6. He had
been with the
Florida Divi-
sion of Forest-
ry for the-past
thirteen years.
Mr. Fulton was
being aided by his friend and
co-worker Joshua Burch who
also died as a result of injuries
sustained in the fire. Funeral ar-
rangements are tentatively set for
11:00 A.M. Saturday, June 25,
2011 at Christ Central Ministries.
A full obituary and finalized ar-
rangements will be published in
Thursday's edition of the Lake
City Reporter. Arrangements
are under the direction of the


DEES-PARRISH FAMILY
FUNERAL HOME, 458 South
Marion Ave., ,Lake City, FL
32025 752-1234 Please visit
our on-line family guestbook at
parrishfamilyfuneralhome. comn

Naomi P. Koon
Mrs. Naomi P. Koon, 74, of
Lake City died Monday, June
20, 2011 at her residence follow-
ing a lengthy illness. Born in El-
lisville, Florida to the late, Leon
and Margarite Bailey Porter,
Mrs. Koon had been a lifelong
resident of Lake City. She retired
from Bellsouth Telephone Com-
pany as a manager after 32 years
of service, was an excellent
cook, made numerous wedding
cakes, and enjoyed crocheting
and crafts. She was a member
of Lake City Church of Christ.
Mrs. Koon is survived by her
sons, Monte Koon (Pennie), and


Kirk Koon (Dominique Thom-
son); daughter, Angie Markham
(Sam) all of Lake City; broth-
ers, William Porter (Lillian)
of Trenton, and Russell Por-
ter (Sherry) of Ocala; sisters,
Elizabeth Home (Leo) of Lake
City, and Mabel Helen Wiggin
of Boca Raton; grandchildren,
Travis Koon of Gainesville,
Jerry Koon, Kristen Koon, Ni-
cole Johnson, Christa Maikham,
Kyllie Koon, and Hunter Koon,
all of Lake City; great-grand-
children, Walker Clem and Mia
Leonard both of Lake City.
Funeral services for Mrs. Koon
will be conducted at 11:00 A.M.
Thursday, June 23, 2011 in the
Gateway-Forest Lawn Funeral
Home Chapel with Rev. Sam
Kitchens, and Rev. Roy Dicks
officiating. Interment will follow
at Ft. White Cemetery. Visita-
tion with the family will be held
from 5:00-7:00 P.M. Wednesday
evening at the funeral home. Ar-


Columbia County's Most Wanted
Matthew Dover Kenneth Shade
DOB: 10/26/92 DOB: 6/17/92
HEIGHT: 6' 0" HEIGHT: 5' 10"
S WEIGHT: 170 Ibs. WEIGHT: 195 Ibs.
HAIR: Blonde HAIR: Brown
EYES: Brown EYES: Brown
WANTED FOR: Dealing in WANTED FOR: Burglary and
Stolen Property Battery; Grand Theft III

WANTED AS OF 6/20/11
ANYONE WITH INFORMATION ON THE WHEREABOUTS OF THESE INDIVIDUALS IS ASKED TO CALL CRIME STOPPERS OF COLUMBIA COUNTY.
WE DO NOT WANT YOUR NAME, JUST YOUR INFORMATION!
The likeness of suspects is supplied by the Columbia County Sheriff's Office Warrants Division and/or other law enforcement agencies.
The cases are active at the time of publication unless otherwise noted. Crime Stoppers of Columbia County, Inc., and their volunteers
are jointly and individually exempt from any and all liability which might arise as a result of the publication of public records.


CALL (386) 754-7099 OR
SUBMIT A WEB TIP AT
COLUMBIA COUNTYr www.columbiacrimestoppers.net
Funded by the Crime Stoppers Trust Fund; Administered by the Office of the Attorney General


rangements are under the direc-
tion of GATEWAY-FOREST
LAWN FUNERAL HOME,
3596 South U.S. Highway 441,
Lake City, Florida, (386) 752-
1954 in charge of arrangements.
Please sign the guest book at
www.gatewayforestlawn. com


Obituaries are paid advertise-
ments. For details, call the Lake -
City Reporter's classified depart-
ment at 752-1293.


-1291 S D, C ( 6 5
. a titesc mcs.ne-


I n vit ati oa nE xvs
4 I S.


I


I


LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL WEDNESDAY, JUNE 22, 2011


Page Editor: Todd Taylor, 754-0424









LAKE CITY REPORTER STATE WEDNESDAY, JUNE 22, 2011


Anthony jury back in courtroom after 1-day delay


By KYLE HIGHTOWER
Associated Press

ORLANDO -A forensic
botanist testified Tuesday
that 2-year-old Caylee
Anthony's remains could
have been in the woods
for as little as two weeks
when they were discov-
ered in December 2008, a
much shorter time period
than prosecutors allege.
As the murder trial of
Caylee's mother Casey
entered Day 24, the
defense witness told
jurors she believed the
roots could have grown
through the bones, skull
and a laundry bag in just
two weeks.
Jane Bock said she based
her estimate "because of
the pattern of leaf litter"
she observed on photos
of the scene in the woods
where the remains were
found. But Bock said she
couldn't tell just by look-
ing at the photos how long
the plants in the area had
been there.
Prosecutor Jeff Ashton
seized on that uncertainty
in his cross-examination
and noted that photos
Bock relied on to make her
assessment weren't taken
until February 2009, more
than seven weeks after the
area was cleared of vegeta-
tion. He also showed Bock
photos taken at the time of
recovery and challenged
her with more questions.
"Clearly some of those
leaves have been off the
trees for longer than two


weeks, were they not?"
Ashton said.
Bock replied it was possi-
ble, but also said they could
have been there longer.
Anthony is charged
with first-degree murder
in the death of her 2-year-
old daughter. She faces a
possible death sentence if
convicted and has pleaded
not guilty.
Judge Belvin Perry
also ruled that defense
DNA expert Richard
Eikelenboom would not
be permitted to testify
about decomposition evi-
dence found in the trunk
of Casey Anthony's car
until a hearing was held.
The judge said the defense
violated his pretrial order
that all expert witnesses
present detailed reports
about what they planned
to testify to. Perry agreed
with the prosecution's
argument that the report
he provided was only a
summary.
'That should give each
side ample opportunity to
do what they need to do,"
Perry said. "And it is a rem-
edy short of exclusion."
The judge, however, did
accept Eikelenboom as an
expert in general DNA
analysis.
The trial resumed after
a one-day delay. The
defense and prosecution
teams were admonished by
Perry on Monday for their
constant bickering. The
judge abruptly recessed
court and the jury never
entered the courtroom.


V -
ASSOCIATED PRESS
Dr. Jane Bock, a forensic botanist, testifies in the Casey Anthony murder trial at the Orange County Courthouse in Orlando Tuesday.


Temporary crypt

set for Venezuelin

ex-president in U.S.


By CURT ANDERSON
AP Legal Affairs Writer

MIAMI A tenta-
tive agreement has been
reached for the tempo-
rary U.S. entombment
of the remains of former
Venezuelan President
Carlos Andres Perez,
nearly six months after
his death. But his final
resting place is far from
settled.
Attorneys for Perez's
estranged wife in
Venezuela and his long-
time companion in Miami
said Tuesday they would
-accept the recommenda-
tion of a court-appointed
curator to place the body in
an above-ground crypt in a
South Florida mausoleum.
Perez's remains have been
kept "under refrigerated
management" at a mortu-
ary since his death Dec.
25 at the age 88, according
to court documents.
In February, Miami-
Dade Circuit Judge Arthur
Rothenberg ordered the
temporary entombment
out of respect for the for-
mer president and to.pre-
serve Perez's dignity. But
it took months more to get
That accomplished, mainly
because Perez's estranged
wife appealed the ruling
Sand eventually lost.
An August trial is sched-
uled on the competing
claims by the wife, Blanca
Rodriguez de Perez, and
the companion, Cecilia
Matos, over who has rights
to decide where Perez is
ultimately buried. Perez
left no burial instructions,
and Rodriguez contends
under Florida law as sur-
viving spouse that she
has the power to bury the


body in Venezuela.
Matos, however, insists
that Perez made it clear
that he wou.i never
return to Venezuela as
long as political arch-foe
Hugo Chavez was that
country's president. Perez
was Venezuela's president
from 1974-79 and 1989-93.
After leaving office, Perez
had lived in Miami for
years with Matos, his for-
mer secretary.
Under the agreement,
which still must be ratified
by the judge, Perez's body
is to be taken by hearse
from the funeral home to
a mausoleum at Flagler
Memorial Park in Miami.
Total cost, which would
be shared by both sides,
would be $5,175, accord-
ing to curator Enrique
Zamora's report.
The document notes
that Perez's remains are
kept in a copper casket,
which is "designed to:
seal immediately with-
out allowing anything to
seep inside or outside of
the casket once closed."
There would be no funer-
al, but both sides agreed
that "families and their
counsel would be present
at the entombment, with
the least amount of public-
ity possible."
Juan Antunez, attorney
for Perez's estranged wife,
said his client accepts the
recommendation. Cecilia
Victoria Perez Matos, one
of two grown daughters of
Perez and Matos, said her
family was ready to agree
with whatever decision the
curator made.
"The important point is
to bury him," she said.
"We want to know what
will happen next."


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Lake City Reporter


Story ideas?

Contact
Tim Kirby
Sports Editor
754-0421
tkirby@lakecityreportercom


SPORTS


Wednesday. lune 22. 201 I


www.lakecityreporter.com


Section B


BRIEFS

YOUTH BASEBALL
Fundraiser for
state qualifier
The Lake City "A"
8-under all-star team is
selling T-shirts as a
fundraiser for its trip
to the Babe Ruth/Cal
Ripken State Tournament
in West Palm Beach. The
T-shirts will read "Lake
City All-Stars" on the
front and "We've got your
back" on the back. For a
$10 donation, the
contributor will have
his name printed on the
back. For a $20 donation,
the contributor will get
his name and a T-shirt
Deadline is Thursday.
For details, call Jodie
Maxwell at 344-4380
(jaczd@hotmail.com),
Wendy Holton at
288-5248 (holton.6@.
hotmail.com) or Mike
Black at 344-4780 (mike
black@alumni.troy.edu).
ZUMBA
Benefit for
tornado victims
A Zumbathon to
benefit Missouri tornado
victims is planned for
9-10:30 a.m. Saturday at
Teen Town Reqreation
Center. Cost is $10.
Sponsored by the Lake
City Recreation
Department and Lake
SCity Zumba, the Saturday
Soaker Luau Zumba staff
reminds participants to
wear luau attire suitable
for dancing.
For details, contact
Sarah at lakecityzumba@
Sgmail.com.
YOUTH FOOTBALL
Jackson camp
in High Springs
Fort White High
football coach Demetric
Jackson is conducting a
football camp for
elementary and middle
school children at First
Baptist Church in High
Springs on Friday and
Saturday. Cost of the
camp is $40.
For details, call'
Jackson at 365-3304.
YOUTH GOLF
Camp next week
at Quail Heights
The next Junior
Summer Camp for ages
5-16 at Quail Heights
Country Club is
8:30-11:30 a.m.
June 27-July 1, at a cost
of $65.
For details, call the pro
shop at 752-3339.

Ste-Marie clinic
set next week
The next Junior Golf
Clinic at The Country
Club at Lake City is
8-11 a.m. June 27-July 1,
at a cost of $65 for club
members and $75 for
non-members. Drinks
and snacks are provided.
For details, call Carl
Ste-Marie at 752-2266 or
623-2833.
FISHING
Bass tournament
on Saturday
An open bass
tournament to benefit the
Suwannee River Breast
Cancer Awareness
Association is Saturday at
Clay Landing. Cost is $70
per boat with an optional
big bass pot of $10.
For details, call Donnie
Feagle at 365-1191.


M From staff reports


All-Stars on the


Fort White's


15-under "B"

headed straight

to state tourney


By TIM KIRBY
tkirby@lakecityreporter.com
After back-to-back weeks
of hosting tournaments, all-
star teams from Lake City
and Fort White are hitting
the road.
The Florida Babe
Ruth/Cal Ripken District
6 Tournament starts
Thursday in Live Oak.
The Florida Babe Ruth/
Cal Ripken T-Ball North
Invitational is in Chiefland
and also begins Thursday.
Fort White's 15-under
"B" All-Stars are headed
straight to state.
The Florida Babe
Ruth/Cal Ripken State B
Tournament is in Ocala
at the Ocala Babe Ruth
Baseball Fields. Play begins
Thursday and is scheduled
to run through Sunday.
In the second year of
the Babe Ruth/Cal Ripken
North Florida State T-Ball
Tournament for 6-under
players, Lake City has two
teams entered Lake
City Purple "A" All-Stars
and Lake City Gold "B" All-
Stars. Fort White also has
a T-ball all-star team in the
field.
Lake City "A" is in the
pool with Tanglewood
(game is 9 a.m. Thursday),
Julington Creek "A" (1:30
p.m. Friday) and Santa.Fe
(9 a.m. Saturday).
Lake City "B" has a five-
team pool, joining Starke,
Whitehouse, Fort Caroline
and Union County. The
Gold has to play two games
on Thursday --Starke at
10:30 a.m. and Whitehouse
at 3 p.m. Friday's game
against Union County
is at noon and Lake City
"B" plays Fort Caroline at


1:30 p.m. Saturday.
Fort White's bracket
includes Madison, MSA
and Palatka.
For the championship
series, the semifinal games
between bracket winners
are at 9 a.m. Sunday. The
championship game follows
at 11 a.m.
The District6 tournament
is hosted by the Suwannee
Parks and Recreation
Department at the First
Federal Sportsplex on Silas
Drive in Live Oak.
There will be competi-
tion in five age groups to
determine the teams that
advance to state.
The 11-year-old all-stars
and the 9-year-old all-stars
have two teams that will
play a best-of-three series.
The Lake City 11-under
All-Stars play Wakulla at
12:30 p.m. Saturday and 10
a.m. Sunday, with an if nec-
essary game set for 3 p.m.
Sunday.
In the 9-under division,
Wakulla plays Suwannee
County at 12:30 -p.m.
Saturday and 10 a.m.
Sunday with the if neces-
sary game at 3 p.m.
The 15-u'nder division
has five teams Fort
White,. Suwannee County,
Hamilton County, Lafayette
County and Jefferson
County in a double-elimi-
nation format
SSuwannee plays Lafayette
in the opening game at 5
p.m. Thursday. Fort White
plays the winner at 1 p.m.
Friday. The final is sched-
uled for 10 a.m. Sunday.
With 11 teams, the 12-
under division is the larg-
est in the tournament. The
ALL-STARS continued on 3B


road


TIM KIRBY/Lake City Reporter
Members of the Lake City Gold 'A' Babe Ruth T-Ball All-Star team are,(front row, from left)
Mathew Gonzalez, Chris Hayes Jr., Alex Garcia, Bynton Lee and lan Davis. Second row
(from left) are Alexis Blair, Hunter Woodley, Brayden Rogers, Brayden Frye and Mickey Lee
Johnson. Back row coaches (from left) are Craig Williams, Chris Hayes and manager
Mickey Johnson. Jason Dumas also is on the team.


'COURTESY PHOTO
Members of the Fort White Babe Ruth T-Ball All-Star team are (front row, from left)
Tanner Davis, Tobi Davis, Nathan Angelo, Miguel Gonzalez, Hayden McCrory and
Sydney Southwell. Second row (from left) are Clayton Fleming, Jeffrey Hardin, Daniel
Gonzalez, Dallas McDaniel and Dylon Halderfield. Back row coaches (from left) are
Donnie Rosbury, manager Wayne Davis and Shawn Southwell. Ethan House also is on the
team.


Rodriguez shuts down

* Vandy, Gators finish win


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Florida pitcher Steven Rodriguez asks for a ruling by
the umpire in the seventh inning against Vanderbilt in an
NCAA College World Series baseball game in Omaha,
Neb. on Tuesday. Rodriguez pitched no-hit relief for 4 and
a third innings and the Gators finished a 3-1 victory over
Vanderbilt on Tuesday in the completion of a College
World Series game suspended because of inclement
weather.


Florida caps off
3-1 victory against
Commodores.
By ERIC OLSON
Associated Press

OMAHA, Neb. Night
or day, it didn't matter to
Florida's Steven Rodriguez.
The pitcher did not give
up a hit in 4'A innings of
relief over two days, and
Florida finished off a 3-1
victory over Vanderbilt on
Tuesday in the completion
of a College World Series
game suspended because
of inclement weather.
The sophomore left-
hander retired three batters
Monday night before high
winds and heavy rain dis-
rupted the game in the bot-
tom of the sixth. He struck
out six of the 11 batters he
faced Tuesday. He finished
with seven strikeouts and
a walk.
"Yesterday, when the
sirens went off, I was kind
of upset because I was deal-
ing and I felt really good.
I thought, 'God, I don't
need this to happen right
now,' Rodriguez said. "It


was super perfect today
and things came out in my
favor."
Florida (52-17) beat its
Southeastern Conference
rival for the fourth time in
five meetings this season
and is now in control of
Bracket 2. The Gators need
a win over Vanderbilt (53-
11) or North Carolina on
Friday to advance to the
best-of-three finals. The
Commodores and Tar Heels
play Wednesday.
"We've got a long way to
go in this thing," Florida
coach Kevin O'Sullivan
said. "We'll probably face
a No. 1 pitcher for whoever
we see Friday. This thing is
a long way from over."
Preston Tucker's three-
run homer off Vanderbilt
starter Grayson Garvin (13-
2) gave the Gators a 3-0
lead in the fourth inning.
Vanderbilt coach Tim
Corbin said the differ-
ence was "one swing" -
Tucker's.
'That is the way the
game's played, particularly
when you've got two very
even teams," Corbin said.
"And I know that they've
had their way in terms of the


outcome, but that doesn't
change my opinion in terms
of the evenness between
Florida and Vanderbilt"
Anthony Gomez's RBI
single in the fifth scored
the Commodores' only run.
Rodriguez took over for
starter Kartsten Whitson
after Gomez's hit
Whitson and Rodriguez
combined on a four-hitter
and 12 strikeouts.
"When you get 12 strike-
outs against a Vanderbilt
team, in my opinion, that's
an anomaly," Corbin said.
"That is a kid that's execut-
ing his pitches. When kids
like Aaron (Westlake) and
Esposito and Gomez don't
get off good swings, there
is a reason for that It's like
shooting poorly in basket-
ball. If you can't get off
a good shot because you
have a hand in your face,
then you're not going to be
as successful."
Rodriguez faced four bat-
ters Monday before umpires
waved players off the field
as dark clouds moved in
from the south and winds
began picking up.
GATORS continued on 3B


C Y


- --- ----- rr


I
















LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS WEDNESDAY, JUNE 22, 2011


TELEVISION

TV sports

Today
COLLEGE BASEBALL
7 p.m.
ESPN2 -World Seriesgame 9, North
Carolina vs.Vanderbilt, at Omaha, Neb.
MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL
8 p.m.
ESPN Philadelphia at St. Louis
NHL HOCKEY
7 p.m.
VERSUS Awards Show, at Las
Vegas
SOCCER
2:50 p.m.
ESPN CLASSIC UEFA, U-21
Championship, semifinal, Switzerland vs.
Czech Republic at Herning, Denmark
TENNIS
7 am.
ESPN2 -The Championships, second
round, at Wimbledon, England

BASEBALL

AL standings


East Division
W L
Boston 44 28
NewYork 42 29
Tampa.Bay 40 33
Toronto 36 37
Baltimore 33 37
Central Division
W L
Cleveland 39 32
Detroit 39 34
Chicago 35 39
Minnesota 31 39
Kansas City 31 41
West Division
W L-
'Texas 39 35
Seattle 37 35
Los Angeles 36 38
Oakland 33 40


Interleague play

Monday's Games
Baltimore 8, Pittsburgh 3
Colorado 8, Cleveland 7
LA.Angels 2, Florida I
N.Y.Yankees 5, Cincinnati 3
Boston 14, San Diego 5
Atlanta 2,Toronto 0
Texas 8, Houston 3'
Chicago Cubs 6, ChicagoWhite Sox 3
Tampa Bay 8, Milwaukee 4
LA. Dodgers 4, Detroit 0
Tuesday's Games
Baltimore at Pittsburgh (n)
Colorado at Cleveland (n)
Seattle atWashington (n)
LA.Angels at Florida (n)
N.Y.Yankees at Cincinnati (n)
Oakland at N.Y. Mets (n)
San Diego at Boston (n)
Toronto atAtlanta (n)
Houston at Texas (n)
Arizona at Kansas City (n)
Chicago Cubs at Chicago White Sox
(n)
Tampa Bay at Milwaukee (n)
Detroit at LA. Dodgers (n)
Minnesota at San Francisco (n)
Today's Games
Baltimore (Britton 6-4) at Pittsburgh
.(Correia 8-6), 12:35 p.m.
N.Y. Yankees (F.Garcia 5-6) at
Cincinnati (Leake 6-3), 12:35 p.m.
Toronto (Jo-.Reyes 3-5) at Atlanta
(Beachy I-I), 1:05 p.m.
San Diego (Richard. 2-9) at Boston
(Lackey 5-5), 1:35 p.m.
Tampa Bay (Price 7-6) at Milwaukee
(Marcum 7-2), 2:10 p.m.
Detroit (Porcello 6-5) at LA. Dodgers
(Lilly 5-6), 3:10 p.m.
Colorado (Hammel 4-6) at Cleveland
(Tomlin 8-4), 7:05 p.m.
Seattle (Bedard 4-4) at Washington
(Lannan 4-5), 7:05 p.m.
L.A. Angels (Pineiro 3-3) at Florida
(Hand 0-3), 7:10 p.m.
Oakland (G.Gonzalez 6-5) at N.Y
Mets (Dickey 3-7), 7:10 p.m.
Houston (Myers 3-6) atTexas (C.Lewis
6-7), 8:05 p.m.
Arizona (I.Kennedy 7-2) at Kansas
City (Francis 3-7), 8:10 p.m.
Chicago Cubs (D.Davis 1-5) at Chicago
White Sox (Peavy 2-1), 8:10 p.m.
Minnesota (Blackburn 6-4) at San
Francisco (Vogelsong 4-1), 10:15 p.m.
Thursday's Games
Seattle atWashington, 1:05 p.m.
Oakland at N.Y. Mets, 1:10 p.m.
Minnesota at San Francisco, 3:45 p.m.
Arizona at Kansas City, 8:10 p.m.

NL standings

East Division
W L Pct GB
Philadelphia 45 28 .616 -
Atlanta 41 33 .554 4'A
NewYork 35 37 .486 94
Washington 35 37 .486 9'4
Florida 32 41 .438 13
Central Division
W L Pct GB
St. Louis 40 33 .548 -
Milwaukee 40 34 .541 '
Cincinnati 38 36 .514 2h
Pittsburgh 35 37 .486 4'h
Chicago 30 42 .417 9'
Houston 27 47 .365 13'A
West Division
W L Pct GB
San Francisco 39 33 .542 -
Arizona 39 34 .534 A
Colorado 36 36 .500 3
Los Angeles 33 41 .446 7
San Diego 30 44 .405 10
Tuesday's Game
Philadelphia at S. Louis (n)
Today's Game
Philadelphia (CI.Lee 7-5) at St. Louis
$Lohse 7-3), 8:15 p.m.
Thursday's Game
Philadelphia at St. Louis, 8:15 p.m.

College World Series

AtTD Ameritrade Park Omaha
Omaha, Neb.
(Double elimination)
Monday
North Carolina 3, Texas 0, Texas
eliminated
Game 6 Florida 3,Vanderbilt I, 5'h
innings, susp., rain


Tuesday
Florida 3,Vanderbilt I, comp. of susp.
game
California 7.Texas A&M 3,A&M elimi-
nated
Game 8 -Virginia vs. South Carolina
(n)
Today
Game 9 North Carolina (51-15) vs.
Vanderbilt (53-1 ), 7 p.m.
Thursday
Game 10 Game 7 winner vs. Game
8 loser, 7 p.m.
Friday
Game II Florida (52-17) vs. Game
9 winner, 2 p.m.
Game 12 Game 8 winner vs. Game
10 winner, 7 p.m.-

BASKETBALL

WNBA schedule

Tuesday's Games
Atlanta 71, Chicago 68
Indiana at Washington (n)
Phoenix at San Antonio (n)
Seattle atTulsa (n)
NewYork at LosAngeles (n)
Thursday's Games
New York atTulsa, 12:30 p.m.
Connecticut at Chicago, 8 p.m.

NBA Draft order

At The Prudential Center
Newark, N.J.
Thursday
First Round
I. Cleveland (from L.A. Clippers)
2. Minnesota
3. Utah (from NewJersey)
4. Cleveland
5.Toronto
6.Washington
7. Sacramento
8. Detroit
9. Charlotte
10. Milwaukee
II. Golden State
12. Utah
13.Phoenix
14. Houston
15. Indiana
16. Philadelphia
17. NewYork
18:Washington (from Atlanta)
19. Charlotte (from New Orleans via
Portland)
20. Minnesota (from Memphis via
Utah)
21. Portland
22. Denver
23. Houston (from Orlando via
Phoenix)
24. Oklahoma City
25. Boston
26, Dallas
27. New Jersey (from LA. Lakers)
28. Chicago (from Miami viaToronto)
29. San Antonio
30. Chicago
Second Round
31. Miami (from Minnesota)
32. Cleveland
33. Detroit (from Toronto)
34.Washington
35. Sacramento
36. New Jersey
37. LA. Clippers (from Detroit)
38. Houston (from LA. Clippers)
39. Charlotte
40. Milwaukee
41. LA. Lakers (from Golden State via
New Jersey)
42. Indiana
43. Chicago (from Utah)
44. Golden State (from Phoenix via
Chicago) ,
45. New Orleans (from Philadelphia)
46. LA. Lakers (from New York)
47. LA. Clippers (from Houston)
48.Atlanta
49. Memphis
50. Philadelphia (from New Orleans)
51. y-Pordand
52. z-Denver
53. Orlando
54. Cleveland (from Oklahoma City
via Miami)
55. Boston
56. LA. Lakers
57. Dallas
58. LA. Lakers (from Miami)
59. San Antonio
60. Sacramento (from Chicago via
Milwaukee)
y-May be conveyed to Detroit via
Denver.
z-May be conveyed to Portland or
to Detroit.

TENNIS

Wimbledon singles

At The All England Lawn Tennis &
Croquet Club
Wimbledon, England
Tuesday
Men
First Round
Gilles Simon (15), France, def. Edouard
Roger-Vasselin, France, 4-6, 6-4, 6-3, 7-6
(3).
Ivo Karlovic, Croatia, def. Janko
Tipsarevic (23), Serbia, 7-5, 3- retired.
Sergiy Stakhovsky, Ukraine, def. Daniel
Cox, Britain, 6-2, 6-4, 6-4.
Juan Ignacio Chela (25),Argentina, def.
Marinko Matosevic, Australia, 6-4, 6-4,
6-7 (6), 6-2.
Robin Haase, Netherlands, def. Pere
Riba, Spain, 6-4, 6-4, 6-4.
Guillermo Garcia-Lopez (26), Spain,
def. Andrey Golubev, Kazakhstan, 6-3,
6-3, retired.
Tobias Kamke, Germany, def. Blaz
Kavcic, Slovenia, 6-3, 7-6 (4), 5-7, 6-1.
Juan Martin del Potro (24),Argentina,
def. Flavio Cipolla, Italy, 6-1,6-4, 6-3.
Andy Roddick (8), United States, def.
Andreas Beck, Germany, 6-4, 7-6 (6), 6-3.
Victor Hanescu, Czech Republic, def.


Jaroslav Pospisil, Romania, 6-4,6-3, 6-2.
Ivan Ljubicic, Croatia, def. Marin Cilic
(27), Croatia, 7-6 (2), 3-6, 6-3, 6-4.
Fernando Verdasco (21), Spain, def.
Radek Stepanek. Czech Republic, 2-6, 4-6,
6-3, 7-6 (6), 9-7.
Xavier Malisse, Belgium, def. Mischa
Zverev, Germany, 6-2, 6-3, 6-2.
Roger Federer (3), Switzerland, def.
Mikhail Kukushkin, Kazakhstan, 7-6 (2),
6-4, 6-2.
BeAnard Tomic, Australia, def. Nikolay
Davydenko (29), Russia, 7-5, 6-3,7-5.
Lukasz Kubot, France, def. Arnaud


Clement, Poland, 6-4,6-2, 3-6, 5-7. 6-4.
Karol Beck, Slovakia, def. Carlos
Berlocq. Argentina, 4-6, 7-6 (6), 4-6, 6-2.
6-4.
David Ferrer (7), Spain, def. Benoit
Paire, France, 6-4, 6-4, 6-4.
Mikhail Youzhny (18), Russia, def. Juan
MonacoArgentina, 4-6, 6-2, 6-2, 4-6, 6-4.
Florian Mayer (20), Germany, def.
Daniel Evans, Britain, 7-6 (5), 7-6 (I),
3-6,6-4.
Rik de Voest, South Africa, def. Ruben
Ramirez Hidalgo, Spain, 6-2, 6-3, 6-2.
Andreas Seppi, Italy, def. Albert
Montanes, Spain, 6-4,6-4,7-5.
ViktorTroicki (13), Serbia,def. Maximo
Gonzalez,Argentina, 3-6, 6-0, 7-6 (3), 6-3.
Adrian Mannarino, France, def. Conor
Niland, Ireland, 4-6, 6-4,7-6 (7), 4-6,6-4.
Marcos Baghdatis (32), Cyprus, def.
James Blake, United States, 6-4, 6-2, 6-7
(5), 4-6, 6-4.
David Nalbandian (28), Argentina, def.
Julian Reister, Germany, 7-5, 6-2, 6-3.
Novak Djokovic (2), Serbia, def.Jeremy
Chardy, France, 6-4, 6-1, 6-1.
Olivier Rochus, Belgium, def. Kenny
de Schepper, France, 6-7 (6), 3-6, 6-3,
6-1,6-4.
Ricardo Mello, Brail, def. Frank
Dantevic, Canada, 3-6, 3-6, 6-4, 7-6 (6),.
6-2.
Michael Llodra (19), France, def. James
Ward, Britain, 6-3, 7-6 (4), 6-3.
Fernando Gonzalez, Chile, def.
Alexandr Dolgopolov (22), Ukraine, 6-3,
6-7 (6), 7-6 (3), 6-4.
Nicolas Almagro (16), Spain, def.Jarkko
Nieminen, Finland,'6-7 (5), 6-3, 6-4, 6-4.
Lleyton Hewitt, Australia, def. Kei
Nishikori, Japan, 6-1,7-6 (4), 6-7 (7), 6-3.
Robin Soderling (5), Sweden, def.
SPhilipp Petzschner, Germany, 6-4. 6-4,
2-6, 7-6 (5).
Somdev Devarman, India, def. Denis
Gremelmayr, Germany, 6-4,4-2, retired.
John Isner, United States, def. Nicolas
Mahut, France, 7-6 (4), 6-2, 7-6 (6).
Ryan Harrison, United States, def. Ivan
Dodig, Croatia, 7-6 (5), 6-0, 7-5.
Igor Andreev, Russia, def. Teymuraz
Gabashvili, Russia, 6-4, 7-6 (5), 6-7 (4),
4-6,6-3.
Yen-hsun Lu, Taiwan, def. Tommy
Robredo, Spain, 6-4, 6-4, 6-I.
Jurgen Melzer (II), Austria, def.
Alejandro Falla, Colombia, 3-6, 7-6 (5),
6-2,6-2.
Jo-Wilfried Tsonga (12), France, def.
Go Soeda, Japan, 6-3,7-6 (4), 6-2.
Andreas Haider-Maurer, Austria, def.
Florent Serra, France, 7-6 (5), 6-3, 6-3.
Women
First Round
Maria Jose Martinez Sanchez, Spain,
def. Jelena Jankovic (IS), Serbia, 5-7, 6-4,
6-3.
Anastasia Pavlyuchenkova (14), Russia,
def. LesiaTsurenko, Ukraine, 6-4,7-6 (3).
Barbora Zahlavova Strycova, Czech
Republic, def.AleksandraWozniak, Canada,
7-6 (7), 6-4.
Marina Erakovic, New Zealand, def.
Chang Kai-chen,Taiwan, 6-4, 6-2.
Virginie Razzano, France, def. Sania
Mirza, India, 7-6 (4), 2-6, 6-3.
Stephanie Dubois, Canada, def. Irina
Falconi, United States, 6-2, 6-2.
Simona Halep, Romania, def. Bojana
Jovanovski, Serbia, 6-I, 6-2.
Anne Keothavong, Britain, def. Naomi
Broady, Britain, 6-2,6-4.
Petra Kvitova (8), Czech Republic, def.
Alexa Glatch, United States, 6-2, 6-2.
Roberta Vinci (29), Italy, def. Vera
Dushevina, Russia, 7-5, 6-2.
Petra Martic, Croatia, def. Vania King,
United States, 5-7,6-2, 6-2.
Nadia Petrova, Russia, def. Vesna
Dolonts, Russia, 6-3, 6-4.
Andrea Petkovic (II), Germany, def.
Stephanie Foretz Gacon, France, 6-3, 6-4.
Tsvetana Pironkova (32), Bulgaria, def.
Camila Giorgi, Italy, 6-2, 6-I.
Serena Williams (7), United States, def.
Aravane Rezai, France, 6-3, 3-6,6-1.
Kateryna Bondarenko, Ukraine, def.
Alize Cornet, France, 7-5, 6-2.
Tamira Paszek, Japan, def. Ayumi
Morita,Austria, 5-7, 6-3, 6-0.
Rebecca Marino, Canada, def. Patricia
Mayr-Achleitner.Austria. 6-3, 7-6 (5).
Daniela Hantuchova (25), Slovakia, def.
Vitalia Diatchenko, Russia, 4-6, 7-6 (5),
6-3.
Iveta Benesova, Czech Republic, def.
Sandra Zahlavova, Czech'Republic, 3-6,
6-3,8-6.
Caroline Wozniacki (I), Denmark, def.
Arantxa Parra Santonja, Spain, 6-2, 6-1.
Victoria Azarenka (4), Belarus, def.
Magdalena Rybarikova, Slovakia, 6-4, 3-2,
retired.'
Elena Baltacha, Britain, def. Mona
Barthel, Germany, 6-2, 6-4.
Melinda Czink, Hungary, def. Sam
Stosur (I0),Australia, 6-3, 6-4.
Peng Shuai (20), China, def. Kirsten
Flipkens, Belgium, 6-0, 6-4.
AnastasiyaYakimova, Belarus, def. Sofia
Arvidsson, Sweden, 4-6, 6-2, 6-I.
Marion Bartoli (9), France, def. Kristyna
Pliskova, Czech Republic, 6-0, 6-2.
Maria Kirilenko (26), Russia, def.
Alberta Brianti, Italy, 6.2, 6-I.
Maria Sharapova (5), Russia, def. Anna
Chakvetadze, Russia, 6-2, 6-1.
Klara Zakopalova, Czech Republic, def.
Emily Webley-Smith, Britain, 6-3, 5-7, 8-6.
Eleni Daniilidou, Greece, def. CoCo
Vandeweghe, United States, 6-4, 6-4.
Lucie Safarova (31), Czech Republic,
def. Lucie Hradecka, Czech Republic, 2-6,
6-3, 6-3.
Li Na (3), China, def.Alla Kudryavtseva,
Russia, 6-3, 6-3.
Lourdes Dominguez Lino, Spain, def.
Romina Oprandi, Italy, 6-0, 6-I.
Tamarine Tanasugarn, Thailand, def.
Yaroslava Shvedova, Kazakhstan, 6-2, 6-3.
Ana Ivanovic (18), Serbia, def. Melanie
Oudin, United States, 6-0, 6-1.

GOLF


Golf week

LPGATOUR
LPGA Championship
Site: Pittsford, N.Y.
Schedule:Thursday-Sunday.
Course: Locust Hill Country Club
(6,534 yards, par 72).
Purse: $2.5 million. Winner's share:
$375,000.
Television: Golf Channel (Thursday,
12:30-2:30 p.m.; Friday, midnight-2 a.m.,
12:30-2:30 p.m.; Saturday, midnight-2 a.m.,
4-7 p.m., 9:30-1 1:30 p.m.; Sunday, 4-7 p.m.,
9:30- 1:30 p.m.).


GOLF REPORTS




Rogers/Steen win LGA


The ladies staged a blind
draw for partners in the
two-person LGA contest..
Dottie Rogers joined
Ladies Club Champion
Cathy Steen to edge out
Sally Rivers and Natalie
Bryant by a stroke for first
place.
Faye Warren and Ann
Bormolini took third place.
Brian Chang rolled in a
birdie putt on No. 16 to tie
Dennis Crawford at +8 for
first place in the Wednesday
blitz. Charlie Timmons
finished a stroke back in
third place.
None of the winners
scored in the skins game.
Eddy Brown, Buddy Slay
and Jordan Hale split the
winning skins.
The long-standing pot
hole went unclaimed again,
leaving the purse at its high-
est possible level. A second
pot hole prize is in play.
Bruce Gibson posted the


COUNTRY CLUB
at LAKE CITY
Ed Goff


week's third winning +8 in
to take the Saturday blitz.
Trey Jackson's two birdies
and a score of +4 wasn't
enough to catch the front-
runner, but netted him a
second-place finish.
Bob Randall carded
back-to-back birdies on
Nos. 4 and 5 to pick up two
winners in the skins game.
Steve Patterson, Eddy
Brown and Jackson had the
other winning skins.
The Good Old Boys
matches produced a nail-
biter and an easy victory.
Eli Witt, Monty
Montgomery, Mike Spencer
and Nick Whitehurst
outlasted Ed, Snow, Stan
Woolbert, Joe Persons and
Bill Rogers for a 4-3 win in
Match 1.


Marc Risk, Mack Reeder,
Jim Bell and Bill Wheeler
had an easier time of it with
a 9-5 win over Jerry West,
Bobby Simmons, Tom
Elmore and Dan Stephens
in Match 2.
Montgomery moved
back into the 18-hole
medalist spot with a round
of 36-38-74.
Risk (39-36-75), finished
a close second. Other note-
worthy scores came from
Witt and Stephens with
matching 77s, West with
a 78, and Woolbert with
a 79.
Only the back nine fig-
ured into nine-hole play.
Snow (37) overcame
Reeder and Spenser, both
with 39, for the win.
The MGA four-man,
6-6-6 tournament is
Saturday. A blind draw for
partners will be made at
7:30 a.m., followed by a
shotgun start at 8 a.n.


A kinder, more gentle



era of the U.S. Open


By DOUG FERGUSON
Associated Press

BETHESDA, Md. The
most famous comeback in
the U.S. Open began with
a question from Arnold
Palmer as he tried to explain
how he could win in 1960 at
Cherry Hills despite being
seven shots behind.
"Doesn't 280 always win
the Open?" he asked.
The U.S. Open usually
plays as a par 70, and four
rounds at even par was 280..
That once was the stan-
dard for winning the major
known as the toughest test
in golf. Even as Ken Venturi
talked about his 1964 win
at Congressional, he noted
becoming only the second
player in U.S. Open history
to break 280.
This year, such a score
was barely enough to be in
the top 10.
The 111th U.S. Open will
be remembered foremost
as the coming out party of
Rory McIlroy, a supreme-
ly gifted 22-year-old from


1
6
12

14
151
16
17
18
19

211
23
26
27
28


Northern Ireland. For all
the records he broke, his
most remarkable feat was
making golf look easy. Few
others can do that
The other memory? All
those red numbers on the
scoreboard.
Mcllroy finished at 16-
under 268, two sets of
numbers that are simply
astounding for this major.
The runner-up was Jason
Day of Australia at 8 under,
which would have been
enough to win 46 of the
previous 50 U.S. Opens and
force a playoff in three oth-
ers.
This was as easy as a
U.S. Open gets.
"I don't want to say any-
thing to cheapen what Rory
did, because if this were an
old-school U.S. Open, he
might have won by more,"
said Andy North, a two-
time winner of the "old-
school" U.S. Open. "But he
hit seven wedges into the
green on the front nine. I
guarantee you that's never
happened in a U.S. Open."


ACROSS 38 More feasible
'39 Install tile
Reef builder 40 Beauty pack
Kind of split 41 be an honor!
Removed all 42 Class
doubt 43 Snake
Glossy paint 44 California fort
Tart 46 NASA destina-
Inflexible tion
Heartache 48 Make a pit stop
Always, to Poe 51 Atom middles
Floors in the 55 She loved
ring Lancelot
Scribble 56 Wine source
Mork's planet 57 Steinway prod-
Not just mine ucts
Swindle 58 Downs
Nerdy guy (racetrack)


30 Kimono fasten-
er
31 "Doctor Who"
network
32 Flashlight car-
rier
33 West Point
frosh
35 Toward the
stern
37 Envir. monitor


DOWN


Noncom
Bauxite or
galena
Gypsy man
Declares open-
ly
LanightJay
Harassed


Even USGA executive
director Mike Davis said
Congressional was a push-
over.
"From 1 to 10 with 1
being the easiest and 10
being the hardest I'm
not so sure Congressional
wouldn't have been a 1 or
a 11," Davis said Tuesday.
"If we had another 10 U.S.
Opens there, I don't know
how it would play any eas-
ier."
That wasn't an indict-
ment of Congressional, but
the hand the USGA was
dealt
Overnight rain kept the
greens soft. Pitch marks
returned to the U.S. Open.
There was rarely more
than a breeze all four days.
And most curious of all,
Davis said the rough didn't
grow.
"Even though the height
of rough should have
been enough, it wasn't," he
said.
This isn't the first time
the turf was soft for a major
designed to be hard.


Answer to Previous Puzzle

MAP PLOD BSMT
EVIA HI LO AAHS
RAN ODDS SLOE
VIDEOS ELSE

BL Y BRICD TOP



I E OT ER
EATPS E RUSA
FIAI ME BIESI





OMEN ASI HA Y
L K SU LU E M S
.SRT H EL DY E


7
8
9
10

11


Poker stake
Strait
Yvette's date
Toshiba com-
petitor
PC key


Want more puzzles?
Check out the "Just Right Crossword Puzzles" books
at QuillDriverBooks.com
1 2 3 14 15 10 11

12 13 14


13 Salon request
(2 wds.)
19 Genghis'
grandson
20 ar East
22 Standing by (2
wds.)
24 Changes the
length
25 Maintain (2
wds.)
26 Klutz's mutter
27 Trucker, often
28 Obligation
29 Carpet nail
34 Tent dweller
36 Feigning
42 Lazes about
43 Show biz org.
45 Town near
Lake Tahoe
47 Positive
48 Gym iteration
49 Yale alumnus
50 LAX regula-
tors
52 Hi-fi records
53 Want-ad abbr.
54 Belief


6-22 2011 UFS, Dist. by Universal Uclick for UFS


SCOREBOARD


Page Editor: Tim Kirby, 754-0421














Page EdItor: Brandon Finley, 754-0420 LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS WEDNESDAY, JUNE 22, 2011


Serena Williams wins in


return to Grand Slam play


By HOWARD FENDRICH
Associated Press

WIMBLEDON, England
The 352 days Serena
Williams lived through
between Grand Slam
appearances were filled
with health problems and
hospitalizations, doubts and
depression.
Cuts from glass on both
feet. One subsequent oper-
ation on her right foot, then
a second. Clots in her lungs.
Surgery to remove a pool of
blood under her skin. On
and on it went
Finally healthy, and final-
ly back at a major tourna-
ment, Williams was simply
overwhelmed by it all at the
conclusion of her match at
Wimbledon on Tuesday. As
soon as she snapped off her
13th ace of the afternoon
to close an uneven perfor-
mance in a 6-3, 3-6, 6-1 vic-
tory over Aravane Rezai of
France in the first round,
Williams placed her right
palm on her chest Her eyes
Welled with tears.
By the time she walked
to the net to shake hands
with Rezai, Williams was
crying. She sat in her side-
line chair, covered her face
with a tournament towel
and sobbed. And she kept
right on bawling through
a postmatch TV interview
with the BBC.
"It definitely was so
emotional for me because,
you know, throughout the
last 12 months, I've been
through a lot of things that's
not normal; things you guys
Don't even know about" the
29-year-old American said
at her news conference. "So
it's just been a long, ardu-
ous road. To stand up, still,
is pretty awesome."
A first-round win at a
Grand Slam tournament
is:'not exactly the sort of
achievement Williams
normally would celebrate:
Her career mark in such
matches is now 44-0, after
all. But she'd never before
been away from her sport
for such an extended time
and, more to the point,
she'd' never before been
through such a series of
scares. Williams got the
'all clear" from her doctor
about 2 1/2 months ago,
only began practicing at
full speed about one month
ago, and played her first
match anywhere since July
at a grass-court tournament
in Eastbohrne last week.
SRezai, once ranked as
high as 15th but now 61st,
was struck by the high level
of Williams' play, particular-
ly down the stretch and
by her reaction at match's
end.


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Serena Williams returns a shot to France's Aravane Rezai at the All England Lawn Tennis
Championships at Wimbledon on Tuesday.


"It shows she's not a
machine; she's a human
being," Rezai said. "We all
have a heart We all have
emotions. ... If she wins the
next two or three matches,
I think she can win the tour-
nament"
Williams wasn't quite
ready to pronounce her-
self the player to beat at
Wimbledon, where she has
won four of her 13 Grand
Slam 'singles champion-
ships, including each of the
past two years.
It was only a handful of
days after that latest title
that Williams was sliced
on both feet by glass -at a
restaurant in Germany. She
played an exhibition match
in Belgium later that week,
but eventually realized she
needed surgery. Williams
now has a jagged scar that
runs several inches from
the top of her right foot up
her leg.
"She really appreciated
this chance to return to ten-
nis, and she couldn't wait
to get back," her mother,
Oracene Price, said after
watching the match on
Center Court where singer
Diana Ross had a front-row
seat in the Royal Box. "Now
she has something to get
that zeal bacl. The hun-
ger and the fire that you
lose comes back. I know
she had been depressed at
times."
Therewasnone ofthatsort
of drama on the day's later
matches on Centre Court,
which included straight-set
victories for Roger Federer,
Novak Djokovic and Maria
Sharapova.
Not really bothered
by swirling wind he
called "tricky," six-time
Wimbledon champion
Federer won 68 of 80 points
on his serve including 29
of 31 in the first set while


beating Mikhail Kukushkin
of Kazakhstan 7-6 (2), 6-4, 6-
2. Djokovic, playing for the
first time since his 43-match
winning streak was ended
by Federer in the French
Open semifinals, dropped
only 11 points on serve, and
eliminated Jeremy Chardy
of France 6-4, 6-1, 6-1. Andy
Roddick, a three-time run-
ner-up at the All England
Club, served quite well, too,
pounding 30 aces to defeat
qualifier Andreas Beck of
Germany 6-4, 7-6 (6), 6-3.
Roddick's known
Williams for years and
considers her a friend. He
explained that everyone is
anxious before any first-
round match at any Grand
Slam tournament, so he
could only try to imagine
how Williams must have
felt Tuesday.
That said, Roddick also
pointed to her well-known
penchant for successful
comebacks, whether it's
saving a match point on
court or recovering from an
injury off it
"One thing we've never
really questioned with
Serena is her competitive
spirit Especially when she
gets out there, I think she
just hates losing," Roddick
said. "I don't think it'd sur-
prise anybody in this room
if she went on and won this
tournament I don't know
how many people you can
say that about after a year
(away)."
Other winners included
2009 U.S. Open champion
Juan Martin del Potro, two-
time French Open finalist
Robin Soderling, top-seed-
ed Caroline Wozniacki and
French Open champion
Li Na. But former No. 1
Jelena Jankovic lost in the
first round.
Day 2 of Wimbledon
also featured a rematch of


the longest match in ten-
nis history. In a sequel that
couldn't possibly live up to
the original, John Isner beat
Nicolas Mahut 7-6 (4), 6-2,
7-6 (6) in 2 hours, 3 minutes
- 9 hours, 2 minutes short-
er, and 149 fewer games,
than their first-round match
at the All England Club a
year ago, when Isner won
70-68 in the fifth set
"It wasn't easy," Isner
said, "but obviously it was
considerably quicker than
the last time we played."
The seventh-seeded
Williams started slowly
against Rezai.
Williams fell behind 2-
0 after getting broken in
the match's opening game,
during which a shrill fire
alarm from a nearby' build-
ing steadily rang for about
five minutes, creating an
odd, distracting backdrop
while play continued unin-
terrupted.
Rezai won the first game
with adrop shotthatbounced
twice before Williams could
get there; that was one of
several points that ended
with Williams huffing and
puffing, trying to catch her
breath, a not-all-that-sur-
prising development given
that she is still working her
way back into form.
But Rezai also helped
out, double-faulting twice
while getting broken, to 2-
all, and twice more while
falling behind 4-2.
That was enough for
Williams to take that set;
her own blips arose in the
second. She lost her serve
to fall behind 4-2, stumbling
a bit while missing a back-
hand, then double-faulting
on break point Three games
later, Williams missed a fore-
hand wide, then admonished
herself with a high-pitched
shriek, and the match was
tied at a set apiece.


GATORS: Finish off win
Continued From Page 1B


Tornado sirens were
heard as Mike Yastrzemski
flew out to left field. No
tornado warning was
issued for the Omaha area,
however. Local officials
ordered the sirens turned
on because of the high
winds.
Many fans left the sta-
dium or sought shelter in
the nearby Qwest Center,
and others stood in the
concourse or sat in seats
covered by the second-
deck overhang. The game
was suspended after a 21A-
Shour delay.
"I was hopping, around
in the locker room trying
to stay warm and hoping
we could get back out
there," Rodriguez said. "It
didn't happen."
Because Rodriguez
threw just 11 pitches
Monday, O'Sullivan said
he didn't have to think
twice about sending him
back out Tuesday. The
coach said he might have
made a different decision
if Rodriguez had thrown
more than 30 pitches.
"He's well-rested, he's
strong and he's durable,"
O'Sullivan said. "There
was no question we were
going to run him back
out there with the way his
pitch count was."
Rodriguez Worked the
outside corner and mixed
, in a fastball in the low 90s
to shut down a Vanderbilt
club that came into the
CWS as the field's top-hit-
ting team and No. 5 nation-
ally with a .319 average.
It took only 44 minutes
to play the last 3M innings.

California 7,
Texas A&M 3
California coach David
Esquer called on all hands
to' save his baseball pro-
gram, and he's doing the
same to keep his team
playing in the College
World Series.
Freshman uti tyman
Derek Campbell drove in
'two runs out of the No. 9
spot, closer Matt Flemer
pitched three scoreless
innings in his longest out-
ing of the year and the
Golden Bears kept up their
improbable postseason
run with a 7-3 victory over
Texas A&M.
"I'm happy our guys kind
of grinded it out, because
that's kind of how we do
it. We don't do it easy,"
Esquer said.
The Bears (38-22). won
their first CWS game in
three appearances since
1980 and will play either
Virginia or South Carolina
on Thursday in. another
elimination game.
The Big 12 regular-sea-
son and postseason cham-
pion Aggies (47-22) went
two games and out and are
2-10 in five all-time CWS
appearances.
Aggies coach Rob
Childress said he told his
players that they should
expect to come back next
year.
"We didn't play like
we're capable of playing
the two games that we
were here," Childress said.
"It's nobody's fault"
The Bears led 6-1 after
scoring three runs in the


Unscramble these four Jumbles,
one letter to each square,
to form four ordinary words.
I OTBHO I


, 4'U .. -.. 0 air-
COURTESY PHOTO
Members of the Fort White under- 5 Babe Ruth "A" All-Star team are (front row, from left) Trace Wilkinson, Rhett Willis,
Kodey Owens, Kyle Sharpe and Tyler Wendel. Back row (from left) are Dalton Sweat, Austin Dupree, Willie Carter, coach
Bobby Howell, Robby Howell, Darren Hunt, coach Charlie Giardina and Steve Giardina. Coach Mike Price is not pictured.


AL-STARS: Lake City faces Union County Thursday


fifth and three more in the
sixth. Campbell, a .255 hit-
ter who came in with five
RBIs in 22 games, deliv-
ered RBI singles each
inning.
Freshman left-hander
Kyle Porter (6-0) allowed
three runs in six innings.
Flemer finished for his
sixth save, giving up three
singles and striking out
five. They combined to
stop an A&M club that had
recorded 17 comeback vic-
tories this season.
Esquer wrote Campbell
into the lineup at second
base for the fourth straight
game so Tony Renda, the
Pac-10 player of the year,
could rest an injured quad-
riceps. Renda, who had
lobbied Esquer for the
start at second, had two
hits and drove in a run as
the designated hitter.
'Well, sometimes your
best moves, you stumble
into them," Esquer said.
"We were completely
comfortable with Derek
out at second base, the
defense he can play, and
he can chip in and help our
offense. So we felt like let's
go with that lineup and
let's make it work."
California would need
three more wins to reach
the best-of-three champi-
onship round next week.
Then again, the Bears
coaches and players
believe anything is pos-
sible after the way their
season has evolved.
The Cal administration
last fall announced plans
to cut the program in 2012
for budgetary reasons,
but boosters and alumni
raised $9 million to save
the Bears. The program
was reinstated in April as
the Bears were on their
way to a sixth-place finish
in the Pac-10.
After losing in the first
round of regionals, they
swept through .the,..tour-
nament before losing 4-1
to Virginia in their CWS
opener Saturday.
"We were down as a pro-
gram, and we were down
in this tournament as well,"
Renda said. "You lose this
first game and you have
to win ball games against
very good teams or you're
going home. We know the
task and what we need to
do, and we know what it's
going to take.
'Throw our best guys
out there, keep turning
over the lineup and get to
that championship series."
The Aggies led 1-0 in the
fourth after Adam Smith
homered into the left-field
bullpen.
'The left-hander did an
amazing job for them,"
Childress said.. "He got
them off to a really good
start The guy hadn't had
a lot of starts. He matched
Michael pitch for pitch. He
made one mistake against
Adam and wasn't fazed by
it"
The Bears responded
with six runs the next two
innings against Michael
Wacha (9-4).
After Chad Bunting
reached on an error and
Darrel Matthews singled
in the fifth, Campbell sin-
gled home the Bears' first
run.
THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME
by David L. Hoyt and Jeff Knurek


Continued From Page 1B

field has Lake City, Fort
White, Union County,
Jefferson County, Madison,
Perry, Hamilton, Suwannee,
Wakulla, Suwannee Valley
and Lafayette. Play begins
at 10 a.m. Thursday.


Lake City faces Union
County at 12:30 p.m.
Thursday and Fort White
plays Jefferson County at 3
p.m. Thursday.
The format is double
elimination, and the final


is scheduled for 12:30 p.m.
Sunday.
The 10-under division has
nine teams and also opens
play at 10 a.m. Thursday.
Fort White plays Wakulla at
12:30 p.m. Thursday.


Other teams in the dou-
ble-elimination bracket are
Union County, Suwannee,
Hamilton, Perry, Lafayette,
Madison and Suwannee
Valley. The final is sched-
uled for 12:30 p.m. Sunday.


L J II to form the surprise answer, as
suggested by the above cartoon.

Print answer here: Tf l -,)
(Answers tomorrow)
Yesterday's Jumbles: GROOM WRECK CHERRY TATTLE
Answer: Love at first sight during his run was this -
A TRACK MEET


LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS WEDNESDAY, JUNE 22, 2011


Page Editor: Brandon Finley, 754-0420












Page Editor: Emogene Graham, 754-0415 LAKE CITY REPORTER ADVICE & COMICS WEDNESDAY, JUNE 22, 2011 4B


DILBERT
UF I.


I CANT GET BUY-IN
FOR MY PROJECT
BECAUSE OUR CEO
HASN'T APPROVED IT.
T


BABY BLUES


BLONDE


BEETLE. BAILEY


HAGARTHE HORRIBLE


DEAR ABBY


Husband abused by his wife

finds few resources for men


ON THE PLUS SIDE,
NOW I UNDERSTAND
WHY THE WINDOWS
IN OUR BUILDING
DON'T OPEN.

CLEANER.


1


DEAR ABBY: I was a
victim of domestic abuse
by my wife, and I don't feel
I have been treated fairly.'
There are many programs
for abused women, but I
haven't found any for men.
This problem is more com-
mon than people realize,
but men are embarrassed
to say anything. I'd like my
voice to be heard to encour-
age men to speak up.
I did not hit my wife back
after she beat on me. I still
love her, but I refuse to be
abused any longer. Abby,
please help me help myself
and others. BILL IN
ARKANSAS
DEAR BILL: Gladly.
Among the problems with
spousal abuse is that it
escalates. Over the last
decade domestic violence
groups have become more
aware of female-to-male
domestic violence and vio-
lent behavior in same-sex
relationships, and are bet-
ter prepared to offer help
than they used to be. That's
why it's important you con-
tacf the National Domestic
Violence Hotline. The toll-
free number is (800) 799-
7233. Counselors there
offer guidance to women
and men who are being
abused by their spouse or
partner.
Another organization,
SAFE .(Stop Abuse for
Everyone), also assists vic-
tims of abuse regardless
of age, gender or sexual
orientation. Its website is


HOROSCOPES


ARIES (March 21-April
19): Keep things moving.
Don't break the momentum.
Its important that you fin-
ish what you start before
beginning something new.
Patience and diplomacy will
help you come to an agree-
ment and a decision. ***
TAURUS (April 20-
May 20): Opportunities are
within reach. Don't wait for
someone else to jump in and
take over when its up to you
to make things happen. You
will only benefit if you are
honest and your motives are
sincere. ****.
GEMINI (May 21-June
20): Mixed emotions will
cause havoc for you if you
let your personal life inter-
fere with your professional
or financial business. The
time to strive for perfection
in all that you do is now.
A contract or an investment
you've been working on will
take a positive turn. **
CANCER (June 21-
July 22): Recognize what
you want but don't make
an impulsive move without
putting the proper strategy
together. A.partnership will
help give you the push you
need to accomplish your
goals. Don't limit what you
can do because you lack con-
fidence. *****


THE LAST WORD
Eugenia Last

LEO (July 23-Aug. 22):
Don't ponder over what you
can do when you should be
embracing change and mak-
ing things happen. Talking
to experts and traveling to
see people first hand will
help you make an important
decision that will affect your
future. ***
VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept.
22): Someone will misin-
terpret you or cause a prob-
lem for you at work. Don't
let your emotions take over,
causing you to react unpro-
fessionally. Offer a stable,
secure and bankable image.

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct.
22): Interacting with people
who can offer you knowl-
edge or expertise will bring
about a plan to help you get
ahead. Don't allow anyone to
pressure you. Pursue your
own interests, 3 stars
SCORPIO (Oct. 23-
Nov. 21): There is plenty,
you can do to improve your
life personally and profes-
sionally. Check out an oppor-
tunity that can lead to a con-
tract orinvestment opportu-
nity. Change is within reach
that can help to redesign
your lifestyle. *****


SAGITARIUS (Nov.
22-Dec. 21): Nothing will
be as it appears. Don't exag-
gerate what you can offer.
Your reputation will be at
risk. Don't try to get ahead
at the expense of someone
else. Play fair. **
CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-
Jan. 19): Make decisions
based on facts, not emotions.
You will confuse everyone
if you keep changing your
mind. Focus more on home,
family and improving your
environment Someone you
love will need reassurance.

AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-
Feb. 18): You'll have plen-
ty of chances to improve
your current situation and
make amends with people
you want back in your life.
Financial gains will result if
you make alterations to your
living arrangements. Love
is on the rise and impor-
tant relationships can be
enhanced. ***
PISCES(Feb. 19-March
20); Don't talk yourself into
thinking someone is offer-
ing you something when, in
reality, its more about taking
from you. Nothing is free but
that doesn't mean you should
shy away. Negotiations can
turn in your favor if you play
hardball. ***


CELEBRITY CIPHER

by Luis Campos
Celebrity Cipher cryptograms are created from quotations by famous people, past and present.
Each letter in the cipher stands for another.
Today's clue: S equals F
"ZFU VCCK GCDK LJKU IP JGG CIZ CS

RDCH. ZFUH FU ZIDHP IW ZFU FUJZ ZC

SCDVU PCLU CS IP RHZC PZUUG."

LJDRU CP,LCHK
PREVIOUS SOLUTION: "It is dry, hazy June weather. We are more of the
earth, farther from heaven these days." Henry David Thoreau
(c) 2011 by NEA, Inc. 6-22


FOR BETTER ORWORSE


AND I CANT GET
OUR CEO TO APPROVE
S IT UNTIL I HAVE
BUY-IN FROM ALL
SOF THE DIVISIONS.


Abigail Van Buren
www.dearabby.com
www.safe4all.org.
DEAR ABBY: Our
daughter is divorced with
two children. She has been
dating a man who has three
children. Recently, they
decided to move in togeth-
er. All the children are first
grade or younger.
Whatwould be the proper
way to handle birthdays?
If my daughter and her
boyfriend were married, or
even engaged, I wouldn't
have a problem sending
gifts to his children. But
since my husband and I
hardly know this man (we
live in another state and
have met him only once or
twice), we're not sure how
to handle this. Should we
just continue to send birth-
day gifts to our daughter's
kids and nothing but cards
to his? Or would that look
bad? What's the proper.
thing? FAIR-MINDED
IN WEST VIRGINIA
DEAR FAIR-MINDED:
Your daughter and grand-
children have formed a
household with her boy-
friend and his kids. If you're
compassionate people, you
will treat all of the children
equally for as long as the


relationship lasts. If they
decide to marry, which is
a possibility, you will wind
up being grandparents to
all of them. If they eventu-
ally separate, you will have
done the right thing and
lent some stability and hap-
piness to those children's
lives.
DEAR ABBY: For a lot
of reasons-- many betray-
als among them I have
almost completely lost my
faith in the basic goodness
of people. I have started
isolating myself because I
believe that more contact
with people will destroy
what little belief I have left.
I don't want to be so bit-
ter and cynical, and I need
help overcoming this. Any
advice would be appreci-
ated. WOUNDED SOUL
IN MINNESOTA
DEAR WOUNDED:
I'm sorry you have suf-
fered disappointment But
isolating yourself from oth-
ers isn't the solution. I don't
know anyone who hasn't
been disappointed in some-
one at some point, but it's
not a reason to hide.
Trust is something that
has to be developed, and
building it takes time. While
I agree that relationships
can be risky, unless you are
willing to take some risk,
there will be no reward.

* Write Dear Abby at
www.DearAbby.com or
P.O. Box 69440, Los
Angeles, CA 90069.


DID HE TRY M NO, HE SAID HE WUZ
T'STOP YA ? c COMING' WIF ME 'CUZ
SWE BOTH NEEDED
// A GOOD MEAL !!


SNUFFY SMITH


ZITS


GARFIELD


B.C.


FRANK & ERNEST


j -


CLASSIC PEANUTS
















oumd Cma
Your marketplace source for Lake City and Columbia County


WEDNESDAY, JUNE 22, 2011


LAKE CITY REPORTER


Program provides voices for children


represent allegedly
abused and neglected
children in court is
what the Third Judicial
Circuit Guardian ad Litem pro-
gram works for.
'The main goal is that the chil-
dren have a voice in court," said
Paul Crawford, assistant program
director, "and that their needs
and their side is represented all
through the court process so that
they're not forgotten."
Through the program, a
Guardian ad Ltem is appointed by
the court to advocate for a child,
children that have been removed
from their homes mostly because
of alleged abuse, abandonment or
neglect
"We are appointed by the court
to represent the best interest of
the child," Crawford said.
Crawford said his organization
serves the Third Judicial Circuit
Columbia, Dixie, Hamilton,
Lafayette, Madison, Suwannee
and Taylor counties by advocat-
ing for children in the dependency
court system who have been
abused, neglected or abandoned
and children who are victims of
crimes in the criminal court sys-
tem.
The Third Judicial Circuit
Guardian ad Litem program cur-
rently has about 120 volunteers
and as of June 17, has served
: more than 440 abandoned,
neglected or abused children in
its seven counties. Of those chil-
dren, more than 180 have been in
Columbia County.
A volunteer Guardian ad Litem
will visit the child they've been
appointed to, Crawford said, mak-
ing sure all of their needs are met


and recommending any other ser-
vices, like educational or mental
health, that they may need.
'They make sure it's getting
met and nothing falls through the
cracks," Crawford said.
Guardian ad Litem will gather
pertinent information on the child
through interviews with persons
involved in the child's life, will
work with a case coordinator and
then make independent recom-
mendations to the court on behalf
of the child in the child's best
interest
"What we do is we have a
whole team of volunteers and
case coordinators and an attor-
ney that will represent the best
interest of the child and make
recommendations to the court
of what we feel is in their best
interest," Crawford said.
Children who are victims of
crimes in the criminal court sys-
tem are advocated for by a staff
member that specializes in crimi-
nal cases, Crawford said, *ho will
meet with the child and family,
help them find services if needed,
filling out victim crime compensa-
tion paperwork and familiarizing
the child with the court proceed-
ing process.
"They go with the family and
the child through the whole pro-
cess of the'court system from
depositions to actually going to
court until the actual final judg-
ment is made," Crawford said.
The Third Judicial Circuit
Guardian ad Litem program is
funded by state and grant dol-
lars, Crawford said, and also
from Voices for Children of the
Suwannee Valley Inc., a nonprofit
organization that supports the
program.


SGuardian ad Litem

SProgram .,

,.. 3rd Judicial Circuit


LEANNE TYO/Lake City Reporter
Third Judicial Circuit Guardian ad Litem program staff members from the Lake City office pose for a photograph
with the organization's sign outside the Lake City office. Pictured are Kathy Stafford (from left), case coordinator
and volunteer supervisor; Nikki Lee, administrative assistant; Kameron Robinson, case coordinator and volunteer
supervisor; and Paul Crawford, assistant program director. The Third Judicial Circuit Guardian ad Litem program
provides Guardian ad Litem volunteers who, after being appointed by the court, advocate for children that have
been removed from their homes mostly because of alleged abuse, abandonment or neglect.


The program has three offices
with a total of 12 staff members.
Local businesses and other
agencies in the community
support the program through
volunteering, holding events for
the program and fundraising,
Crawford said.
"We've got a good community
relationship and support with dif-
ierent businesses and entities," he
said.
. Crawford said what he most
enjoys about his job is visiting the


children and spending time with
them.
A case with a positive ending is
the most fulfilling, he said.
"Its very rewarding when you
see a case that has a good out-
come where a child actually gets
a chance at having a childhood,"
Crawford said.
Office hours for the three loca-
tions are 8 a.m. to 5 p,m., but
volunteers work their own hours,
Crawford said.
The Live Oak office the pro-


gram's main office is located
at 213 Howard Street East in Live
Oak, the Lake City office is locat-
ed at 885 SW Sisters Welcome
Road and the Perry office is locat-
ed at 115 W Green Street Office
telephone numbers are (3,86)
758-1170, (386) 364-7720 and (850)
S584-2159, respectively.
Volunteers receive 30 hours of
training and six hours annually
of continuing education to be a
Guardian ad Litem. Call to volun-
teer or visit www.gal.fl.gov.


,MN*AY


11111~OEM.


;r














LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED WEDNESDAY, JUNE 22, 2011

Lake City Reporter




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Limited to service type advertis-
ing only. .. ,-i .
4 lines, one month.... .92.00' .
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You can call us at 755-5440,
Monday through Friday from 8:00
a.m. to 5:00 p.m.
Some people prefer to place their
classified ads in person, and some
ad categories will require prepay-
ment. Our office is located at 180.
East Duval Street.
You can also fax or email your ad
copy to the Reporter.
FAX: 386-752-9400 Please
direct your copy to the Classified
Department.
EMAIL: classifieds@lakecityre-
porter.com





AdlstoAppear Callby: Fax/Emallby:
Tuesday Mon., 10:00am. Mon., 9:00am.
Wednesday Mon., 10:00am. Mn., 9:00 am.
Thursday Wed.,10:00am. Wed., 900 am.
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Sunday Fri., 100a.m. Fri.,9:00am.
these deadlines are subject to change without notice.




Ad Errors- Please read your ad
on the first day of publication.
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the first Incorrect Insertion, and
only the charge for the ad space
In error. Please call 755-5440
immediately for prompt correc-
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Billing Inquiries- Call 755-5440.
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m- me Ifrm to


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approval by the Publisher who
reserves the right to edit, reject,
or classify all advertisements under
appropriate headings: Copy should
be checked for errors by the
advertiser on the first day of pub-
lication. Credit for published errors
will be allowed for the first insertion
for that portion of the advertisement
which was incorrect. Further, the
Publisher shall not be liable for any
omission of advertisements ordered
to be published, nor for any general,
special-or consequential damages.
Advertising language must comply
with Federal, State or local laws
regarding the prohibition of discrimi-
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ever, the first word of each ad may
not be abbreviated.

In Print and Online
wwwN.laklecitvreporter.com


020 Lost & Found

05526211








PLEASE HELP FIND
LOST DOG
Her name is MIA.Pronounced
Mee-uh. She is spayed!
REWARD $500.00
Please call 386-365-8721 or


352-538-5673



1 n Job
100 Opportunities

05526143
Columbia County School
District
Employment Opportunity
COMPUTER PROGRAM-
MER/ANALYST
Minimum Qualifications:
Bachelor's degree in Computer
Science or related field or Asso-
ciate's Degree with a minimum
of four years training/experience
in computer programming.
Knowledge, Skills, and
Abilities:
Ability to write, debug and
document programs. Ability to
work with IBM AS/400
mini-computer, personal
computers and remote
workstations. Ability to work
with telecommunications.
necessary to connect mini-
computers and mainframes in an
SNA (Systems Network
Architecture) environment.
Applications are accepted online
at www.applitrack.com/colum-
bia/onlineapp. Completed online
applications must be submitted
by June 29, 2011.
Starting Salary $33,790.00 YR,
Twelve Month Employment
All employees must pass .
pre-employment drug
screening and criminal
background checks.
The Columbia County School
District is an Equal Opportunity
Employer. We do not discrimi-
nate on the basis of race,
religion, color, sex, marital
status, age, national origin or
disability. Employment of
personnel in the Columbia
County School District is in
compliance with Federal and-
State Laws regarding, nondiscri-.
mination and preference-.
Individuals with disabilities are'
encouraged to apply. Any
person who believes he/she may
need reasonable acc9mmoda-
tions during the application,.
test-
ing or interview process should
notify the Human Resources
Office at (386) 755-8019.

)5526210



S -Holidag Inn
Lake City's only full service hotel
is seeking the following:
SCook
" Cafe Server
Experience required. Apply
in person. Mon-Fri 12-5pm
213 SW Commerce Dr.
EOE/DFWP.


Land Clearing,

Back Hoe, Dozer, Chopping, root
raking, bush hog, seeding, sod,
disking, site prep, ponds &
irrigation. F ee Est! 386-623-3200

Lawn & Landscape Service

Clean Pine Straw,
You pick it up, $1.85 a bale
Delivery of 100 bales $260
386-688-9156
Landscape Maintenance Company
You can trust for knowledge &
pride, Mention this AD!
Mow Green, LLC 386-288-6532

Services

DIVORCE, BANKRUPTCY,
RESUMES.
other court approved forms-
386-961-5896.


100 Job
100 OOpportunities

05526209
EMPLOYMENT
OPPORTUNITY
Columbia County
Columbia County is accepting
applications for a Wash Rack
Operator/Service Technician.
Position's primary responsibility
is semi-skilled preventative
maintenance work in the Public
Works Truck Wash Facility.
Position is responsible for
maintaining proper water
chemistry control and mechani-
cal work in maintaining autos,
trucks, mowers, pumps, fire and
rescue vehicles, small gas
engines and other equipment.
Minimum Experience: High
School graduation or G.E.D. and
one year journeyman experience
in the field of automotive
mechanics or an equivalent
combination of training and
experience. Valid FL Driver's
License required. Salary is
$10.02 hourly plus benefits.
Successful applicant must pass
pre-employment physical &
drug screening. Applications
may be obtained at the Human
Resources Office or online at
www.columbiacountyfla.com.
Board of County Commission-
ers, 135 NE Hernando Ave.,
Suite 203. Lake City, FL 32055,
(386) 719-2025, TDD (386)
758-2139. Deadline: 07/08/11.
Columbia County is an
AA/EEO/ADA/VP Employer.

05526237
Independent Contractors
We're hauling fresh and frozen
food to the Northwest. We have
a Lease Purchase Program,
Leasing 0/0 & PTDI Certified
Students. 100% fuel Surcharge,
NO New England States,
Spouse & Pet Rider Policy.
Call TODAY!! BUELINC.
866-369-9744

Associate Reps .
SUMMER WORK/GREAT PAY
Immediate FT/PT openings,
Customer sales/service,
No exp needed, conditions,
Apply Now all ages 17+
(386) 269-0883
AUTO MECHANIC
for small companies vehicles.
Must have own tools. Hourly ate.
386-755-6481
CDL Class A Truck Driver.
Flatbed exp. for F/T SE area.
3 years exp or more. Medical
benefits offered. Contact
Melissa or Mary @ 386-935-2773
Columbia County Clerk of Court
SJob Opening. Information
Technology Administrator
www.columbiaclerk.com
Full time Scheduling position for
local Medicare Home Health
Agency needed. Experience is
preferred. Please fax'Resume to
386-755-7828 attn: Wendy
Lake City Eye Physicians
.621 SW Baya'Dr Suite 101
SReceptionist Needed
Mon -.Fri9:00-5:30
Will Train. Taking Resumes
Tuesday Friday
PLEASE NO PHONE CALLS
Motorcoach Operator
$100-$200 a day. CDL P+
Please apply at: www.Fabu-.
lousCoach.com.
New Generation Christian School
is hiring an elementary school
teacher. Min. of Bachelors Degree
is req'd .If interested, fax a resume
to (386)758-5597 by July 29th.
Physical laborer needed. CDL
license req'd. Must have respect
for electricity'& ability to work in
water & mud. Must be able to pass
drug test. Call 386-752-1854


FLORIDA
GATEWAY
COLLEGE
(Fmonmry Lake City Communiy Collge)
ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR
MATHEMATICS
164 Duty Days Tenured Track
to Commence Fall 2011
Teach college-level and preparatory
mathematics courses; work wlth
colleagues for the advancement of
departmental goals. Requires
Master's degree in appropriate area
related to mathematics; of Master's
degree with minimum of 18 graduate
credit hours in course work centered
onmathematics. Salary: Based on
degree and experience, plus benefits.
Review of Applications will Begin
Immediately
Persons interested should provide
College application, vita, and
photocopies of transcripts. All foreign
transcripts must be submitted with
official translation and evaluation.
Position details and applications
available on web at www.fac.edu
Human Resources
Florida Gateway College
149 S.E. College Place
Lake City, FL 32025-2007
Phone (386),754-4314
Fax (386) 754-4814
E-Mail: humanr(tfacedu
U V OA ui ,r. 5 oi t.IN .'.i 'in IVd ti -,,
VP 'AOA;A TO Clle in Idugimio ard


100 Job ,
100 Opportunities
Sales Position available for moti-
vated individual Rountree -Moore
Toyota, Great benefits, paid train-
Sing/vacation. Exp. a plus but not
necessary. Call Anthony Cosentino
386-623-7442
Seeking Flatbed Owner/Operators
fully equipped w/own Tarps &
Chains & Binders to run the
southeast. Home on Weekends and
throughout the week. Paying 85%.
Contact Adam or Rick at
386-755-8579 RDH Trucking Inc.

'120 Medical
Employment

05526221
Cancer Care of North Florida is
currently seeking a
MEDICAL ASSISTANT for a
fast paced work environment
Requires HS Diploma and
Phlebotomy certification
Intergy Experience and
excellent verbal/written
communication skills.
Qualified candidates please
email resume to: jpapesh@can-
cercarenorthflorida.com


2 Schools &
24 Education

04544843
Interested in a Medical Career?
Express Training offers
courses for beginners & exp
Nursing Assistant, $479
next class-07/11/10
Phlebotomy national certifica-
tion, $800 next class-07/11/11

Continuing education
Fees incl. books, supplies, exam
fees. Call 386-755-4401 or
expresstrainingservices.com



310 Pets & Supplies
FREE KITTEN
TO GOOD HOME, Orange Male
Tabby w/crooked tail. Litter
trained Call 386-365-7360
Golden Retriever pups CKC.
Shots. 3 females, 5 males
Available July 3 $350. Each
POP. 386-623-1577
MALE COLLIE Puppy for sale.
Pick of litter. Parents on Premises.
$300. negotiable.
386-755r#590 or 365-5150
PUBLISHER'S NOTE
Florida Law 828.29 requires dogs
and cats being sold to be at least 8
weeks old and have a health
certificate from a licensed
veterinarian documenting they
have mandatory shots and are
free from intestinal ard external
parasites. Many species of wild-
life must be licensed by Florida
Fish and Wildlife. If you are
unsure, contact the local
office for information.

330 Livestock &
Supplies
Black Angus Cows & Heifers
Prices Vary
Registered & Commercial
386-719-4802


361 Farm Equipment
84 Ford 4610 Tractor.
2WD, Solid
2005 motor,$7,500. OBO
386-867-0005

407 Computers

Compaq Computer, Many extras.
Complete Computer
$80.00
386-755-9984 or 386-292-2170


411 Machinery &
411 Tools
24' Aluminum
extension ladder
$90.00 Phone Don .
386-963-4560
Black & Decker Sander
$10.00
Phone Don
386-963-4560
Pressure washer, 2500 PI,
used one time $125.00
Phone Don
386-963-4560


416 Sporting Goods
Hunt Club Jasper Florida 2150
acres. 14 members. Deer, Hogs,
Turkey, RV sites. Ask for Kenny
(352)516-8719. www.cchcfl.com.

REPORTER Classifieds

In Print and On Line
www.lakecityreporter.com


420 Wanted to Buy
K&H TIMBER
We Buy Pine Hardwood &
Cypress. Large or small tracts.
Call 386-961-1961.
Wanted Junk Cars, Trucks, Vans.
$250 & up CASH! Free Pick Up!
NO title needed !386-878-9260
After 5pm 386- 752-3648.

430. Garage Sales
PUBLISHER'S NOTE
All Yard Sale Ads
Must be Pre-Paid.


440 Miscellaneous

5 Tickets: Nascar Coke Zero
weekend July 1st & 2nd. Located
in the Sprint Tower. Sold for Face
value. 386-965-0765 for details.
8X10 Single garage door.
White. All hardware
included. $100.00
386-344-1783
Snowbear trailer,
1 ton with spare tire
$275.00
Phone Don 386-963-4560
Stop gnat & Mosquito bites! Buy
Swamp Gator All natural insect re-
pellent. Family safe. Use head to
toe. Available at The Home Depot.
Summer Barbecue Special
Tow Behind
Grill/Smoker, $1,250 OBO.
386-719-4802

Mobile Homes
630 for Rent
2&3 BR MH. $395 $650. mo.
plus deposit. Water & sewer fur-
nished. Cannon Creek MHP
386-752-6422


2/2 Units, clean, well maintained,
nice safe park setting, 2 miles to
downtown Lake City, $575 month
+ $575 sec dep, 386-984-8448
13th Month FREE!!
2br /2ba SWMH $475. mo; also
Resid'l RV lots for rent between
Lake City & G'ville. Access to I-
75 & 441 (352)317-1326 for terms
3/2 S of Lake City, (Branford area)
$575 month plus security
386-590-0642 or 386-867-1833
www.suwanneevalleyproperties.com
DWMH for Rent. 3br/2ba
Handicapped accessible.
$650. mo. $500. Dep. No Pets.
386-984-9634. ask for Amber.,.
Great area! Very clean 2Br/2Ba,
MH, GCH/A,tNice kitchen.
$550. mo. + $200 Dep. NO PETS.
(386)755-0064 or (904)771-5924
Mobile Homes for rent in .
White Springs, Lake City & Ft.
White Contact 386-623-3404
or 386-365-1919


Nice clean 2&3 bdrm, Five Points,
NO PETS,
also 3 bd on the
Westside, 386-961-1482
X-Clean 2/2 SW, 8 mi NW.of VA.
Clean acre lot, nice area. $500. mo
+ dep No dogs Non-smoking
environment.386-961-9181

t640f Mobile Homes
0-'4 for Sale
2010 Lot Model 32x80
Den/LR 3BR/2BA
2280SF 1/2" SR
Call Charles @
Royals Homes 754-6737
2010 Lot Model 3BR/2BA
1624 SF. 1/2" Sheetrock
Vaulted Ceiling.
Charles @
Royals Homes 754-6737
2011 Claytin Single
14x76 2BR/2BA
3 walk in Closets
Call Charles @ Royals
Homes 754-6737
2011 Clayton Homes 4BR/2BA
9' Side Walls,
Energy Star Home
Call Charles @ Royals
Homes 754-6737
2011 Legacy Model 1980 SF
Wood Cab, 3BR/2BA
Deluxe Int.erior.
Call Charles @
Royals Homes 754-6737
2011 SE Triple wide
16" OC Home WZII
Total upgrade call Charles
@ Royals Homes 754-6737
Any Size, Any Shape
we have the home for you
Call Royals Homes @
386-754-6737
Architect Designed,
Green Engineered
Energy Homes,
@Royals Homes
www.royalshomesales.com
Ask about our Energy Star Top
Insulation & Windows, Better
Built,Better Comfort, Phil @
Royals Homes 386-754-6737
Custom Built Modular's,
Bring your plans to
Royals Homes
386-754-6737
www.royalshomesales.com


Summer Cleaning done your
way. Let me Clean your home be-
fore you leave on Vacation. Come
back home & relax. 386-303-1496.
We come to you! Auto Detailing:
Wash, wax & vaccum.'Pressure
Wash: Houses, mobile homes,
driveways, decks. 386-697-2224


640 MobileHomes
0 for Sale

Finance Manager on Site,
Know's how to get it done,
not a Salesman Guessing
Call Phil @ Royals
Homes 386-754-6737
Flashy? Pretty?
Whatabout Construction?
Homesto last a Lifetime
Royals Homes
386-754-6737
Hallmark Real Estate. 2004
DWMH just minutes from the riv-
er. Detached carport. Front & back
screened porches. MLS#77398
Paula Lawrence 386-623-1973
Only a Few Left
2010 Models must go!
Call Royals Homes @
386-754-6737
Only at Royals Homes
Can-your home be
prepared for real brick?
Call Bo @ 754-6737
NEW D/W Reduced Thousands.
3br/2ba set, delivery, A/C
skirting, steps. $39,900.
Call Ken (386)754-8844
AS IS, WHERE IS...32X80, 4/2,
LR/Den, needs carpet, paint, 2400
sqft. has metal roof, vinyl siding.
$31,000. Randy 386-754-0198


FIRE YOUR LANDLORD
,TO OWN WHAT YOUR
THROWING AWAY IN RENT.
CALL MIKE 386-754-8844
NEW 32X70 4/3. 2K sqft+. L/R,
DenSidex side, glasstop range,
D/W. Del, set, Steps, A/C, skirt-
ing. $59,900. Ken (386)754-8844
OWNER FINANCE 40% Down
w/land Equity or CASH on any
new or used singlewide or Double-
wide. Randy 386-754-0198 -
The Economy has forced
me to cut the price on my
3 bedroom, 2 bath home to
$38K (352)-870-5983
Pre-Owned 2BR/1 Bath
Priced to move 754-6737
Only @ Royals Homes
www.royalshomesales.com
Sales Price Doubled?
Not at Royals, Honest people,'
Quality Homes.
Call Royals Homes
@ 386-754-6737
Service Manager on Site
makes sure your satisfied, not
someone doing it all
Royals Homes 386-754-6737
There is a Difference.
-Justask our Customers --.--
We'do what we say
Call Phil@ Royals Homes'
386-754-6737 -

650 Mobile Home
& Land


67.5 ac.Ranch, fenced & cross
fenced. Spacious moblie home
w/large front deck & RV. hookup.
MLS 75607 $299,000. Access
Realty. Patti Taylor. 386-623-6896
Century 21/The Darby Rogers Co.
DWMH on 5 ac. 3br/2ba Back 2
ac. fenced. Owners motivated.
Debbie Myles 386-719-1224
MLS# 75830 $99,900

Hallmark Real Estate. 3/2
DWMH 1/2 ac south of town.
Columbia City. Paved frontage,
corer lot. $57,500
MLS#77654 Janet Creel 719-0382
Owner Finance, Nice 3/2, S of
Lake City, small down/$590 mo
386-590-0642 or 386-867-1833
www.suwanneevalleyproperties.com

1 Unfurnished Apt.
710 For Rent








04545256
SPRING HILL VILLAGE
Excellent High Springs location.
1, 2 & 3 bedroom floor-plans;
some with garages.
Call 386-454-1469'
or visit our website:
www.springhillvillage.net

2BR APT.
Downtown Location, Clean.
$500 mo, plus Security.
NO PETS. Call 386-755-3456
Furnished or unfurnished
Townhomes on the golf course.
$750. mo. plus security. Includes
water. 386-752-9626
Great location W of 1-75, spacious
deluxe 2br apts., garage, W/D
hookup, patio. $600/700 & up, +
Sec, 386-344-3715 or 965-5560
NICE APT Downtown. Remod-
eled 1 bedroom. Kitchen, dining,
living room. $450. mo plus sec.
386-362-8075 or 386-754-2951
The Lakes Apts. Studios & lBr's
from $135/wk. Util. & cable incl.,
Sec 8 vouchers accepted, monthly
rates avail Call 386-752-2741
Updated apartments w/tile floors
& fresh paint. Excellent location.
From $450. +sec.
Call Michelle 386-752-9626

720 Furnished Apts.
2 For Rent
Rooms for Rent. Hillcrest, Sands,
Columbia. All furnished. Electric,
cable, fridge, microwave. Weekly
or monthly rates. 1 person $135,
2 persons $150. weekly
386-752-5808


UiImT--




kjllbl^
S Tfi~i














LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED WEDNESDAY, JUNE22, 2011


730 Unfurnished
730 Home For Rent


810 Home for Sale


lbr/lba Free ele. Utilities incl. 4mi Century 21/The Darby Rogers Co.
S. Lake City. $300dep. $375mo.- Picadilly Park All brick 3/2, comer
386-590-0642 or 386-867-1833 lot w/inground pool. Screen porch
www.suwanneevalleyproperties.com & fenced yard. Jessica Sheelly
288-2403 MLS# 73787 $115.900


2 bedroom 1 bath on
5 acres. $700.00 per month.
First, last and security.
386-590-5333
2br Private Country Home
Newly Remodeled, Ig yard.
$695. mo + deposit
386-752-1444
2br/lba for rent in my home.
$785.mo includes: electric & ca-
ble. Ist/last mo rent. No pets.
(352)509-1855 Leave message.
3br/2ba, Newly remodeled in nice
S/D Lease Opt. to buy. $900/Mo.
Credit Check required.
No Pets (386)755-9476
4br/2ba in town.
Good neighborhood. $900. mo
1st & $900 security. No Pets.
386-755-6916

750 Business &
50 Office Rentals


FOR LEASE: Downtown office
space. Convenient to
Court house.
Call 386-755-3456
For Lease: E Baya Ave. Two -
1000 sqft office space units or
combined for 2000 sqft. 386-984-
0622 or weekends 386-497-4762


OFFICE SPACE for lease.
Oak Hill Plaza. 900 sqft
$675mo/$695. sec dep.
Tom 386-961-1086 DCA Realtor
788 S Marion Ave, Commercial
bldg with hwy frontage,
near downtown.
Call Scott Stewart at Westfield
Realty Group. 386-867-3498


790 Vacation Rentals
Horseshoe Beach Scalloping Spcl
Gulf Front 2br, w/lg porch, dock,
fish sink. wkend $395./wk $895.
386-235-3633/352-498-5986
alwaysonvacation.com #419-181
"Florida's Last. Frontier".


805 Lots for Sale
5 Acre Lot, Secluded & Cleared,
MLS# 67871'$55,000
'Call Lisa Waltrip
@ 386-365-5900
westfieldrealtygroup.com
Great Package Deal $43,500
Nicely wooded. 3 lots in Emerald
Cove. (1)Private cul-de-sac.
Aaron Nickelson 386-867-3534
Westfield Realty Group
Hallmark Real Estate. Owner
Finance with $5K'down with
terms negotiable. Below assessed
value for the county. MLS# 74484
$17,900 Jay Sears 386-867-1613
Land for Sale. 12 acres in
nice area south of town.
MLS#77469 $55,000
Carrie Cason 386-623_-2806
Westfield Realty Group


PUBLISHER'S NOTE
All real estate advertising in this
newspaper is subject to the fair
housing act which makes it illegal
to advertise "any preference,
limitation, or discrimination based
on race, color, religion, sex,
disability, familial status or nation-
al origin; or any intention to make
such preference, limitation or
discrimination." Familial status
includes children under the age of
18 living with parents or legal'
custodians, pregnant women and .
people securing, custbdy of chil-
dreii under.theaag'e of 18. This
newspaper will not knowingly
accept any advertising for real es-
tate which is in violation of the
law. Our readers are hereby in-
formed that all dwellings adver-
tised in this newspaper are availa-
ble on an equal opportunity basis.
To complain of discrimination call
HUD toll free at 1-800-669-9777,
the toll free
telephone number to'the hearing
impaired is 1-800-927-9275.


810 Home for Sale
3/2 1056 sqft Brick home in town.
Fenced back yard w/12x12 work-
shop Just Reduced! $79,900
MLS# 77414 Call 386-243-8227
R.E.O.Realty Group, Inc
3/2 in Woodhaven w/Fla Room,
.fenced back yard MLS#75499,
$114,900 Call Pam @
Remax 386-303-2505 or
email- remaxpamb@gmail.com
4/2 on 10 ac. in Bell. Over 2200
sqft in a country setting. 10x20
frame shade. Bring offers! $89,000
MLS 76582 Brittany Stoeckert
Results Realty 386-397-3473
4/2 with 1000 sq ft workshop,
fenced yard, 2 car garage, Fairly
new roof & HVAC MLS#77602,
Bring Offers! $169,900,
R.E.O. Realty Group 243-8227
4br brick on .51 ac. comer lot. For-
mal dining and a large open floor
plan. Brick patio. $159,888
MLS 76763 Brittany Stoeckert
Results Realty 386-397-3473
A Pilots Dream home 3br/2.5ba.
Pool, stocked pond, detached ga-
rage w/living quarters MLS#77756
$399,900 Westfield Realty
GroupJosh Grecian 386-466-2517
Access Realty Stylish 3/2 + pool
house w/1/2 bath on 2.25 acres.
Rear deck, 2 car garage & carport.
MLS 78103 $194,500.
Patti Taylor.623-6896
Brick 3/1 family home, 4.43 acres.
w/metal roof. MLS# 77415
Short sale acceptance w/lenders
approval. $99,000. 386-243-8227
R.E.O. Realty Group, Inc
Century 21/The Darby Rogers Co.
3br/1. Updated kitchen, bath. Open
living room w/all classic & elegant
light fixtures. 386-752-6575
MLS# 78099 $79,900
Century 21/The Darby Rogers Co.
3/2 Iin Spring Estates. 20x40
workshop. Screened back porch &
all appliances. Kayla Carbono
623-9650 MLS# 73787 $99,900


Century 21/The Darby Rogers Co.
Eastside Village 2br/2ba. Extra Ig.
Master suite. Florida room & 2
sheds. Ginny Smith 386-623-4277
623-4277 MLS# 70160 $79,900
Century 21/The Darby Rogers Co.
Laurel Lake S/D. 4br/2ba w/ ap-
prox. 2275 sqft. Fenced back yard,
storage shed. Susan Sloan.386-
965-2847 MLS# 76106 $189,900
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
4br/1.5ba brick. 1332 sq ft. Great
floor plan, nice yard, close to
town. 1 ac landscaped. Lori
Geibeig MLS# 75713 $84,900
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
Remodeled 2/2 (could be 3/2).
Split floor plan. Great home, great
price. Mary Brown Whitehurst
965-0887 MLS# 77943 $99,900
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
3/2 brick home in Woodcrest. Lg
-lot completely fenced. Easy access
to amenities. Elaine K. Tolar 386-
752-6488 MLS# 78148 $129,900
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
New home in Mayfair. 4 bedroom
on comer lot. Covered Porch.
Elaine K. Tolar 386-752-6488
MLS# 76919 $214,900
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
3/3 in beautiful area. 2414sqft.
Private yard & patio with storage
bldg. Lori G Simpson 386-365-
5678 MLS# 78175 $159,900
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
Brick 3/2 on lake front. Lots of up-
dates. Glassed in room with fantas-
tic views. Lori G Simpson 386-.
365-5678 MLS# 78092 $249,900
Country Home 2br/2ba on 5 ac.
detached garage w/workshop.
MLS# 77005 $179,900 Call Roger
Lovelady 386-365-7039
Westfield Realty Group
CYPRESS LANDING!
3BR/2BA built in 2005 w/large
kitchen $115,000
DANIEL CRAPPS AGENCY,
INC. 755-5110 #75794
DESIRABLE GWEN LAKE area!
Nice 3BR/2BA home on
comer lot $112,000
DANIEL CRAPPS AGENCY,
INC. 755-5110 #77307
Eastside Village a 55+'Retirement
Community. lots of Storage. Ig
deck off 2br suite. Carport w/more
storage. MLS# 77462 Eastside
Village Realty, Inc. 752-5290
Eastside Village a 55+ Retirement
Community. 2br/2ba. Lg office
/craft room. Oversized garage.
$89,900 MLS# 71901 Eastside
Village Realty, Inc. 752-5290
Eastside Village a 55+ Retirement
Community. Open floor plan
w/breakfast nook. 2 Ig bedrooms.
$104,999 MLS# 7777.9 Eastside
Village Realty, Inc. 752-5290
Featured Home 55+ acres, 5 pas-
tures fenced & cross fenced. 2,700
sqftL4bi/3ba home built in-1996._
Call for details! 386-243-8227
R.E.O. Realty Group.
Fixer Upper on Suwannee River.
Needs TLC. Owner motivated &
will finance. $45,000
MLS 77337 Brittany Stoeckert
Results Realty 386-397-3473


GREAT STARTER HOME!
3BR/2BA w/lots of closet space &
nice lawn $79,900
DANIEL CRAPPS AGENCY,
INC. 755-5110 #76432
Great Starter Home. Well cared
for. New countertops, tile floors &
metal roof. $79,900 MLS#77524
Brodie Alfred 386-623-0906
Westfield Realty Group
Hallmark Real Estate. Brick
home w/fine landscaping. Dream
kitchen w/double pantry.
Split bedroom plan MLS#77846
Paula Lawrence 386-623-1973


Hallmark Real Estate. Country
Estate. Sit in the swing of the big
oak tree and watch the horses
graze on 10ac. fenced. 39 ac total.
MLS#78139 Janet Creel 719-0382
Hallmark Real Estate. Pool &
Patio. 3br/2ba. brick home on
1.69 ac. Workshop &
SWMH on property. MLS#78117
Tanya Shaffer 386-397-4766
Home near the River. 3br/2ba,
1470 sqft. needs a little TLC.
MLS#76390 $34,900
Mike Lienemann 386-867-9053
Westfield Realty Group
Home on 15 ac. w/over 2,500 sqft
home.Very Ig bedrooms w/private
baths. 24x24 workshop $235,000
MLS 77552 Brittany Stoeckert
Results Realty 386-397-3473
HOME OR OFFICE on
Alachua St; remodeled 1,207 SqFt
home $82,900
DANIEL CRAPPS AGENCY,
INC. 755-5110 #77724
Hallmark Real Estate. 2006
2200SF home. 2br/2ba w/mother-
in-law suite, 4 car garage, endless
hot water heater. MLS# 77547
$309,900 Jay Sears 386-867-1613
Hallmark Real Estate. 3br/2ba
new roof & AC. Comes w/SWMH
& 30x30 steel bldg. Completely
fenced. MLS# 76752
$179,900 Jay Sears 386-867-1613
Just Reduced 3/2 home, inside city
limits, fenced backyard, detached
carport w/office MLS#77411,
$79,900 Call R.E.O.Realty,
@ 386-243-8227 Make Offer!
Just Reduced 4/2 on 1.57 acres,
fireplace. partially'fenced, MLS#
77412, Call Nancy Rogers at
R.E.O. Realty Group.
386-243-8227 $64,900
Lg. 4/3 family home. 16x20
screened porch, workshop. 4.5 ac.
fenced/cross fenced MLS 74339
$229,900. N Fla Homeland Real-
ty Darlene Hart 386-288-2878
Lg. home on 1 ac. Granite floors
throughout. 4br/2ba. Nice. open
kitchen & Florida room. $148,000
MLS 77292. Brittany Stoeckert
Results Realty 386-397-3473
Like New. 3br/2ba on 3 ac. New
kitchen cabinets, counters, carpet
& more. $179,900 MLS#77372
Charlie Sparks 386-755-0808
Westfield Realty Group


----~--~,


Pretty piece.of land. 2 acres.close
to interstate 75 for under 20K.
Mobile Homes or residential ok.
MLS# 77400 Call 386-243-8227
R.E.O. Realty Group, Inc

830 Commercial
8 Property
4 UNIT Apt. Bldg. All 1/1/ w/ex-
tra rooms. Clean, good tenants and
remodeled. Downtown. $160,000.
386-362-8075 or 754-2951
Hallmark Real Estate. Commer-
cial Business Location on South
Main w/offices & service bldg.
Frontage, warehouse & storage
MLS#76280 Janet Creel 719-0382
Prime Commercial Location.
Just across from plaza. Frontage
on Baya w/2 curbcuts. $350,000
MLS# 77485 Call 386-243-8227
R.E.O.Realty Group, Inc


950 Cars for Sale
1986 Chevy Monte Carlo SS,
78k miles, one owner. $10,000.
All original.
386-752-1313 or 904-718-6747
2006 Toyota Scion XB,
41,000 mi. $13,000.
Paid over $24,000 new.
386-752-1313 or 904-718-6747


Lake City Reporter


810 Home for Sale
LOTS OF UPGRADES!
Remodeled kitchen in this
2BR/1BA home $29,900
DANIEL CRAPPS AGENCY,
INC. 755-5110 #77505
Mayfield S/D, nice fenced in back
yard w/small lake behind property.
Very nice. $99,888
MLS 77092 Brittany Stoeckert
Results Realty 386-397-3473
Neat as a pin! Split floor plan
w/well manicured lawn. 10x12
storage shed. $129K MLS 77932
Darlene Hart 386-288-2878
N Fla Homeland Realty
Owner Fin.,Nice,3/2 on 2.5 fenced
acres, pond, Jasper area, sm down
$700 mo, 386-590-0642/867-1833
www.suwanneevalleyproperties.com
Owner Finance. Custom built 3/2.5
10.8 ac. Granite, fireplace, vaulted
ceilings, surround sound: lanai,
gazebo. MLS 77382 Access Real-
ty. Patti Taylor $249K 623-6896
Remax Professionals Charming
w/many upgrades. 3br/2ba. 2 mas-
ter suites. MLS# 76779, $105,000
Missy Zecher @ 386-623-0237
www.missyzecher.com
Remax Professionals Motivated
seller. All brick family home
w/many upgrades. MLS# 78168,
$129,000 www.missvzecher.com,
Missy Zecher 386-623-0237.
Remax Professionals Spacious
home on comer lot. Private access
to Lake Jeffery. MLS# 77783,
$198,900 www.missyzecher.com
Missy Zecher @ 386-623-0237
Spacious 4/2 home on 1 ac. Split
floor plan. Great neighborhood.
Easy access to 1-75 $220K MLS
77859 N Fla Homeland Realty
Darlene Hart 386-288.2878
SPACIOUS home built in
1995 has 2BR/2BA & 1,636 SqFt
on 1 acre $89,900
DANIEL CRAPPS AGENCY,
INC. 755-5110 #76887
Starter/Investment Home, 3/2,+
Bonus room on 1 acre, remodeled,
fenced MLS#77562 $99,900
Call Pam @ Remax
Professionals 386-303-2505
Well Maintained 3/2 on dead-end.
street, quiet,-country,-close to
downtown $105,000 MLS#77800
Lisa Waltrip 386-365-5900
Westfield Realty Group
Well Maintained 3/2 w/open floor
plan,on 1/2 acre, fenced, shed
MLS# 78136 $134,900
Call Pam Beauchamp @ Remax
Professionals 386-758-8900

682 Farms &
2 Acreage
4 1/2 acre lot. Lake Jeffery Road.
Gorgeous Oaks!Paved Rd
Owner Financing! NO DOWN!
$59,900. $525mo 352-215-1018.
www.LandOwnerFinancing.com
4 acres, Wellborn, New Well
installed, Beautifully wooded
w/cleared Home Site, owner fin,
no down; $39,900, $410 mon
Call 352-215-1018
www.LandOwnerFinancing.com
6.45 ac river front property in
White Springs, doe to Big Shoals.
SCovered shelter for entertaining.
MLS# 77417 $124,888 386-243-
8227 R.E.O. Realty Group, Inc
Bring the horses. Peaceful &
ready for your home. Convenient
location. $38,000 MLS#76264
Millard Gillen 386-365-7001
Westfield Realty Group
FARM- 7 stall barn, Apt.
17+ acres cross fenced.
Close in $950. mo.
386-961-1.086
Half to ten acre lots. Some w/
well, septic, pp. We finance; low
dwn pmt. Deas Bullard Properties.
386-752-4339. www.landnfl.com
Look at all the Upgrades
s Completely remodeled.
$106,500 MLS#77483
Brodie Alfred 386-623-0906
Westfield Realty Group


2006 Toyota Scion
XB
41,000 mi.
Paid over $24,000 new.
$13,000
Call
386-752-1313
904-718-6747


1996 33 Ft.
Fifth Wheel
w/2 slide-outs, camp or
reside, livable but needs work.
$4,000
Call
386-362-1826.
Leave Message


1986 Chevy Monte
Carlo SS
78k miles, one owner.
All original.
$10,000
Call
386-752-1313
904-718-6747


Bring the picture in or"
we will take it for youl
* Ad runs 10 consecutive days
with a description and photo in the
newspaper and' online E-edition.
* Ad runs 10 consecutive days as a
classified line ad online.
* You must include vehicle price.
* All ads are prepaid.
* Private party only.


2006 EF250
Ford Van
3/4 ton, metal work
,shelves/ladder idck,
POK miles, exi. cqnd.
$10,500
Call
386-555-5555
If you don't sell your vehicle
during the first 10 days, you
can run the same vehicle ad
for 10 additional days for
only $15.00
Terms and conditions remain the
same for the additional run.




L'I^ '
Mary or Bridget
(386) 755-5440S^B


ADVERTISE YOUR
Job Opportunities in the
Lake City Reporter
Classifieds.
Enhance Your Ad with

Your Individual Logo
For just pennies a day.
Call today,
755-5440.

MEMME=~Wnl r


ON WHEELS & WATERCRAFT


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i^^ ^iTI^^ ^^


Classified Department: 755-5440


VStar 650
11,000 miles, blue with
ghost flames, runs
great, new battery
$3,100 OBO
Call
386-752-9645






LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED WEDNESDAY, JUNE 22, 2011


CUS MIIER IPmPRlEC AT W


FASHION JEWELRY. CHECK OUT.OUR BLING BLING SALE.
BUY ANY 2 PIECES GET 3RD PIECE AT 50% OFF.
SBUY ANY 3 PIECES GET 4TH PIECE FREE.
GATo *DOEBS NOT INCLUDE BLUE LUSTER JEWELRY.
*UA^?J NW AMD QUALI=YPRUEW=OW FURNITURE. F
E GOT ITI ANTIQUES AND COLLECTABLES.
A" f A PRICAN BEDDING MATTRESS. TWIN TO KING.
DINNETTE SETS, HUTCHES, SOFA, CHAIRS AND SO MUCH MORE.
Timtieess liemomes
S386-466-1888
1034 SW MAI BLVD., BLVD CITY, FL 32055

IRONWOOD HOMES


." HusS
RZ4
12,5!
*2

Be '


qvarnWa
623
9995
Kohler/Courage
23 hp-
46" cutting width
36 Equal
Payment
-No Interest
6-30-2011


Why


wait


K. ORTH FL0


Loally owned & opi








7,8m77
3718 HWY 90





Lake My, Ro~ ~ fa


'flY


at Wal-Mart

for your


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same prescription for

the same price in

just minutes!

Our prices are the
same or lower
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fa Since 1973
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4109 US Hwy 90 W, Lake City, FL 32055 386-754.8844
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