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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028308/01586
 Material Information
Title: The Lake City reporter
Uniform Title: Lake City reporter (Lake City, Fla. 1967)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: John H. Perry
Place of Publication: Lake City Fla
Publication Date: 6/19/2011
Frequency: daily (monday through friday)[<1969>-]
weekly[ former 1967-<1968>]
daily
normalized irregular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Lake City (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Columbia County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Columbia -- Lake City
Coordinates: 30.189722 x -82.639722 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 95, no. 4 (Oct. 5, 1967)-
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000358016
oclc - 33283560
notis - ABZ6316
lccn - sn 95047175
sobekcm - UF00028308_01569
System ID: UF00028308:01586
 Related Items
Preceded by: Lake City reporter and Columbia gazette

Full Text






Ticket to ride
Purple team
wins 13-10
S0001s 12051 **
20O5 HISTORy
'GA UNE s i F FLORIDA
-S L 32611-1943


Lake


Fair play
Umpires' role
in tournament


326


a big one.
Sports, I B


ui ty


3rd straight
Kurt .Busch
claims pole
yet again.
Sports, 3B


Reporter


Sunday, June 19, 2011 www.lakecityreporter.com Vol. 137, No. 126 N $1.00




Local jobs picture brightens


Unemployment
up a tick here, but
trends favorable.
By TONY BRITT
tbritt@lakecityreporter.com
The local jobless rate crept up slightly
in May, but long-term trends remain favor-
able, say officials.


Unemployment in Columbia County
stood at 9.7 percent in May, up from 9.6
in April. The May 2010 figure was 10 per-
cent. Florida's unemployment rate for May
was 10.6 percent, matching the lowest
figure since August 2009. All figures were
released Friday by the state.
John Chastain, Executive Director of
Florida Crown Workforce Board, Region
7, said area employment figures are show-
ing improvement
"The trend for this region showed


improvement in May with unemployment
dropping to 9.5 percent" he said. 'This
was a decrease of .4 percent from May
2010, so it shows we are slowly making
improvement and starting to see a few
more employers starting to hire again."
Florida Crown's Region 7 handles train-
ing and employment services for Columbia,
Dixie, Gilchrist and Union counties in
partnership with the state Agency for
Workforce Innovation.
Chastain said there are long-term goals


that Florida Crown Workforce is using to
assist local employers as they work to help
reduce the jobless rate.
"At our local level our long-term goal is
to provide post secondary education in the
high skills and high demand occupations
such as the medical and health occupa-
tions, information technology, transpor-
tation, law enforcement/corrections and
manufacturing/logistics," he said. "We
*JOBS continued on 3A


Blanche


suitor,


city still


in talks

Inquires about
asbestos, lead in
historic hotel.
By ANTONIA ROBINSON
;' arobinson@lakecityreporter.com
The City of Lake City is taking
things one step at time in securing the
future of the Blanche Hotel, according
to officials.
Talks are underway with a possible
prospect
for redevel-
loping the
Blanche, a
downtown
landmark,
said City
Mahlager
Wendell
Johnson
The
City first
expressed
an inter-
est in the
project in
September
ANTONIA ROBINSON/ Lake City Reporter 2009. A
The Blanche Hotel, a Lake prospect
City landmark. sent a let-
ter dated
March 21 to the City about possibly
acquiring the property in partnership
with the Community Redevelopment


BLANCHE continued on 3A


Air attack

critical to

fire fight

By TONY BRITT
tbritt@lakecityreporter.com
Aerial firefighting resources have
played a major role in beating back the
Impassable Bay wildfire and several
other small fires caused by lightning
strikes.
Whether it be air tankers or helicop-
ters, U.S. Forest Service and Florida
Division of Forestry officials have
utilized aerial resources for reconnais-
sance, water and fire retardant drops.
AIR POWER continued on 5A


A


TALE


OF TWO


FIRST-TIME DADS


Local men see holiday
differently, now that
they are fathers too

By LEANNE TYO
Ityo@lakecityreporter.com
D 'avi4 Breeden 9f Lake\City
has always celebrated
Fathers Day in recogni-
tion of his dad, but today
brings a different celebra-
tion -- his own.
"We always would celebrate my
dad's Fathers Day and now ifs neat
to be that," Breeden, 28, said. "Its my
turn."
This Fathers Day marks Breeden's
first. He and his wife, Keryn, had their
first child, Maggie, Nov. 24.
Dan Webb, 25, of Lake City, marks
his first Fathers Day as a dad today as
well. His wife, Megan, gave birth to
their first child, Abram, April 19.
"Growing up, we never really made
a huge deal out of Fathers Day," Webb
said, "so its weird to think, 'Oh, its
Father's Day. I should probably get
my dad a card,' and wait, now I'm a
dad."
Both Webb and Breeden said they
plan to celebrate the holiday with their
families, including their own fathers.
Fatherhood is an entirely new
aspect of his life, Breeden said, and
his daughter was the first baby he'd
ever held.
"Ifs like trying to work with a blank
slate or a blank piece of paper," he
said. "I don't know what to expect next
and I don't have anything else to relate
it to ... Everything was completely new
to me."
Webb said the responsibility of
being a dad can be intimidating.
"Being a father is awesome, but
it's also terrifying," he said. "It's like
the awesomeness outweighs the ter-
ror, I mean because there's so many
unknowns. You have to take it day by
day, because if I start thinking about
the future and him being a boy, and
then being a teenager and then being
an adult, it's so much to take in."
Responsibilities in.caring for his son
aren't limited to feeding him or keep-
ing him safe, Webb said, but extend to
how he'll raise him.
"I remember when I first thought
about the fact that yes, he's a baby,
he's going to be a little boy, but ulti-
mately, I'm raising a man here," Webb
said. "I have to raise him up to be a
man, not to be a child. When I first
had that realization, that was scary."
While the thought of his son grow-
ing up can weigh heavily, Webb said
DADS continued on 3A


Photos by LEANNE TYO/Lake City Reporter
TOP: David Breeden, 28, of Lake City smiles as he holds up his 6-month-old daughter, Maggie.
Breeden celebrates his first Fathers Day today. ABOVE: Dan Webb, 25, plants a kiss on
8-week-old son Abram's cheek. Webb is also a first-time dad this Fathers Day.


1 84264 0002 8


CALL US:
(386) 752-1293
SUBSCRIBE TO
THE REPORTER:
Voice: 755-5445
Fax: 752-9400


9872
Partly Cloudy
WEATHER, 2A


Opinion ................
Business ................
Obituaries ..............
Around Florida...........
Puzzles .................


TODAY IN
LIFE
Local band
seeks stardom.


COMING
TUESDAY
City council
roundup.


1~41--illlllll ~ s~llF1~--L------------.~-


- -IIICI~F~- --- ---- ~--11811C1~-1-~^-


I
-FUC(
)I











LAKE CITY REPORTER SUNDAY REPORT SUNDAY, JUNE 19, 2011


C(A$H3. Piayj i

Friday: Friday: Saturday: Saturday: Saturday: Saturday:
8-9-25-39 18 6-13-18-25-36 Afternoon: 3-3-4 Afternoon: 8-2-9-0 Unavailable Unavailable
Evening: 9-0-5 Evening: 4-0-7-0


AROUND FLORIDA


Defense expert: Autopsy on Caylee 'shoddy'


KYLE HIGHTOWER found in a wooded area in
Associated Press December 2008. He was
denied. He eventually came
ORLANDO A to Orlando to conduct his
renowned forensic expert own exam and visited the
testified Saturday that the crime scene, reviewed
autopsy done on 2-year- photos and read the official
old Caylee Anthony was
"shoddy" and that the duct autopsy re specks"
Florida prosecutors' There were "specks"
tape Floda prosecutors of decomposition sedi-
contend suffocated the
contenhild s not applied unthe ment inside the left side of
child was not applied until Caylee's skull, which Spitz
after her body had decom- C 's ind hicated the girl's
posed.said indicated the girl's
Dr. Werner Spitz offered death was not necessarily
Dr. Werner Spitz offered a homicide. Orange and
his opinion on the third Osceola County medical
day of the defenses case in examiner Jan Garavaglia
the murder trial of Casey determined that Caylee
Anthony, the Florida moth- was killed "by undeter-
er charged with murder in mined means."
Caylee's death. The state If the tape had suffo-
rested its case earlier in coated Caylee, evidence of
the week. skin would have been on
Spitz has been an expert the sticky side of the tape,
witness in several high-pro- he said. But there was no
file cases, including that of such evidence on the tape.
O.J. Simpson and record "I had problems with
executive Phil Spector. (the manner of death find-
Spitz also testified it was a ing)," Spitz said. "When a
failure that Caylee's skull body decomposes ... the
was not opened during the tape comes loose on the
official autopsy. Spitz con- skeletal structure. In this
ducted a second autopsy case, the only thing that
later. held the tape there was
'The head is part of hair and roots.
the body and when you "My strong opinion is
do an examination, you duct tape was placed there
examine the whole body," to hold the (decomposed)
Spitz said. "... That to me lower jaw in place."
is a signal of a shoddy Prosecutor Jeff Ashton
autopsy." attacked Spitz's assess-
Casey Anthony, 25, faces ments on cross-examina-
'a possible death sentence tionarguing that Spitz.
if convicted in her daugh- didn't have nearly as
ter's summer 2008 death muh information as
and has pleaded not guilty. much infmation as
The defense says the girl Garavaglia did when she
made her evaluation.
drowned in her grandpar- Ashton lso challenged
enSpitz swminMg pool. Spitz to cite a particular
pintedd t ated ae written protocol that said
Antehonys orieind aauoe the skull must'be opened
after hhonta. r~in wer!e ,,,, ,min every autopsy. ... .
after h6 r6m'Uns were


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Casey Anthony is shown during her murder trial at the Orange County Courthouse, Friday in Orlando. Anthony, 25, is charged
with killing her daughter Caylee in the summer of 2008.


Man gets life in
Largo strangling
LARGO A Tampa Bay area man
Shas been sentenced to life in prison
for strangling a woman he was living
with.
A Pinellas County judge sentenced
35-year-old Harold Joseph Foley ear-
lier this week after a jury convicted
him of murder.
Authorities say Foley and 46-
year-old Victoria Lynn Wilson
had only lived in their Largo
apartment for a few days in 2007 ;'
when Foley strangled her after an
;:argument.


Campfires banned in
wildlife areas
.TALLAHASSEE The Florida
Fish and Wildlife Conservation
Commission has banned campfires
on lands under its control.
The agency ordered the ban effec-
tive Friday due to drought conditions
and the growing threat of wildfires.
The law covers all lands con-
trolled by the ageficy including
wildlife management and environ-
mental areas.
The ban.covers open fires.on the
ground, but not cooking fires in com-
mercially designed devices.


2 ex-Medicaid leaders
overpaid $10M
COLUMBIA, S.C. Two state
workers who oversaw state Medicaid
operations that resulted in a $10 mil-
lion overpayment to a Florida com-
pany took jobs with the firm months
before the state discovered the prob-
lem, but both say they didn't have a
direct role in what the business was
paid. Now both the state agency and
Community Health have questions
for a consultant who crunched the
nuhinbers.: .

Associated Press ... '


PEOPLE IN THE NEWS


Bristol Palin calls her ex 'the gnat' in new book


NEW YORK Bristol Palin
writes in her new book of losing her
virginity to boyfriend Levi Johnston
on a camping trip after getting drunk
for the first time on too many wine,
coolers.
She awoke in her tent, alone, with
no memories of what had happened
as Johnston 'talked with his friends
on the other side of the canvas." She.
had vowed to' wait until marriage.
And she had lied to her parents
about where she was going.
Palin, a 20-year-old single mother
and the daughter of former Alaska
Republican Gov. Sarah Palin, tells a
story of "deception and disappoint-
ment" in thebook, "Not Afraid of
Life: My Journey So Far."
The memoir, co-written with
Nancy French, is scheduled for
publication by William Morrow next
week. The Associated Press pur-
chased a copy Friday.
Palin's book covers growing up
with her family, which she portrays
affectionately, and the excitement of
her mother's political life as gover-
nor and then, in 2008, as the GOP
vice presidential candidate. But the
main theme is her on-and-off-again
relationship with Johnston, with
whom she had a child and was brief-
ly engaged while caught in a media
spotlight
She blasts him as "the gnat named
Levi Johnston constantly spreading
false accusations against our family"
and calls him a self-involved slacker
"who cheated on me about as fre-
quently as he sharpened his hockey
skates."
But Palin, self-described as a good
girl and straight-A student, had been
drawn to him and his bad-boy man-
ner from the tinie they met in sev-
enth grade.
When she confronted him about
their sexual encounter, he said
what she wanted to hear: They
wouldn't do it again until they were
married.
It didn't work out that way, though
Palin notes that when she got preg-
nant she was on birth control pills
prescribed to treat her cramps. Only
by the eighth home pregnancy test,


she writes, was she convinced of the
positive results,
When she told her parents, they
were accepting, not condemning,
she writes, and focused on the
future, particularly her continuing
education.
Johnston's reaction wasn't so reas-
suring: "Better be a (bleeping) boy,"
he declared.
Palin writes of being awakened


ASSOCIATED PRESS
In this Nov. 24, 2010 file photo, former
"Dancing with the Stars" contestant
Bristol Palin arrives for an appearance
on ABC's "Good Morning America"
in New York. The daughter of former,
Alaska governor Sarph Palin has a
memoir published by William Morrow
called "Not Afraid of Life," expected this
summer.

early one morning in August 2008 by
her father, Todd Palin. He gathered
the kids, collected their cellphones
and announced they were going on a
surprise trip.
The destination was Dayton, Ohio,
where, the next day, Arizona's U.S.
Sen. John McCain, the GOP presi-


dential nominee, introduced his vice
presidential pick and her family to
the world.
By then, Sarah and Todd Palin
knew their daughter was expect-
ing. The public found out during
the GOP convention, when Sarah
Palin was shocked to see a TV
network carrying an unapproved
message from her commenting
on it.
The entire family, along with
Johnston,'appeared at the conven-
tion.
.Bristol Palin writes that, in her
mind, being there on display with
Johnston "somehow legitimized us
as a couple."
Biut soon after Tripp's birth in
December 2008, Palin writes that
she found a text on Johnston's
cellphone that revealed he had
been-cheating on her again. He
confessed and left the family's
house.
They reconciled one more time
.18 months later. Johnston presented
her with a ring, and they decided to
sell the story of their engagement
to Us Weekly magazine. But by
the time the story appeared, they
had split for good. Johnstorr had
informed her he had gotten another
woman pregnant
"I'd just made a complete fool
of myself and given my family the
middle finger," Palin writes of hear-
ing the news.
Johnston cashed in on his new-
found fame in ways Palin found
appalling. Her reaction to learning
that her son's father had posed nude
for Playgirl: "Puke!"
But Palin's unsought celebrity
brought her opportunities, too.
Last fall, she competed on ABC's
"Dancing With the Stars," where,
she writes, as each week passed and
she survived her rivals "got a little
colder."
In her book, Palin describes
herself as "just a normal girl who
couldn't hide her problems and
learned a few lessons along the
way."

N Associated Press


Celebrity Birthdays


* Actress,Gena Rowlands
is 81.
* Singer Spanky McFarlane
of Spanky and Our Gang is
69.
* Actress Phylicia Rashad
is 63.
* Singer Ann Wilson of Heart
is 61.
* Actress Kathleen Turner
is 57.
* Country singer Doug Stone
is 55.


* Singer-dancer-choreogra-
pher Paula Abdul is 49,
* Actress Mia Sara ("Ferris
Bueller's Day Off") is 44.
* Former Korn guitarist Brian
"Head" Welch is 41.
* Actress Robin Tunney is
39.
* Actress Poppy
Montgomery is 36.
* Actor Paul Dano ("Little
SMiss. Sunshine") is 27.


Daily Scripture

"Fathers, do not exasper-
ate your children; instead,
bring them up in the training



Lake City Reporter
HOW TO REACH US
Main number ........(386) 752-1293 BUSINESS
Fax number ..............752-9400 Controller Sue Brannon... .754-0419
Circulation ............... 755-5445 (sbrannon@lakecityreporter.com)
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CORRECTION

The Lake City Reporter corrects errors of fact in news
items. If you have a concern, question or suggestion,
please call the executive editor. Corrections and clarifica-
tions will run in this space. And thanks for reading.


-


Page Editor: Robert Bridges, 754-0428















Page EdItor: Robert Bridges, 754-0428 LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL & STATE SUNDAY, JUNE 19, 2011


Arrest log


The following information was provided by local law
enforcement agencies. Individuals listed here have
been arrested but not convicted. They are innocent
unless or until proven guilty.

Tuesday, June 7
Columbia County
Sheriffs Office
Emily Nicole Wilson, 22, 4015 NW Highway 129,
Live Oak, warrant: Violation of probation on original
charge of sell or delivery of a controlled substance and
possession of a controlled substance.

Wednesday, June 8
Columbia County
Sheriff's Office
Brett Everett Holcombe, 29, no address given, war-
rant Violation of probation.
Jennifer Rene Hollie, 35, 855 NW Redding Ave.,
warrant: Violation of probation.
Alexandra Kubitsky, 26, 9174 SW State Road 47,
warrant
Samuel. Kenneth Rice Jr., 25, 311 SE Lochlynn
Terrace, warrant Violation of probation on original
charges of possession of a controlled substance.
Florida Highway Patrol
Buddy Allen Gaston, 32, 10239 Rabbit Ridge,
Keithville, La., warrant Violation of probation.

Thursday, June 9
Columbia County
Sheriffs Office
Esteban Sanchez Cuevas, 33, 1654 Blossom Drive,
Branford, warrant Failure to appear for pre-trial confer-
ence.
n Stacy Ann Helmick, 23, 117 NW Knights Avenue,
- warrant Violation of probation.
Arthur Lee Baker, 69, 380 NW Lamar Place, dis-
orderly intoxication in a public place causing a distur-
bance, burglary and criminal mischief.
Bert Mario Peterson, no age given, 522 Granger
Mill Ave., possession of burglary tools, resisting a law
enforcement officer and criminal mischief.
Lake City
Police Department
Tevin Ja'Mal Gardner, 18, 988 Highlands Loop,
possession of drug paraphernalia, possession of mari-
juana and destroying evidence.
Jessie Duane Queen, 44, 715 NW Dixie Ave.,
aggravated battery.

Friday, June 10
Columbia County
Sheriffs Office
Kimberly Ann Bradshaw, 44, 284 SW Loren Court,
warrant Order revoking bond and order to take into
custody.
Louis Hagan DuBois Jr., 29, 16249 45th Road,
Wellborn, warrant Violation of probation on original
charge of brining contraband into county correctional
facility.
Rashaun L. Spencer, 21, 175 SW Pizarro Place,
aggravated battery.
Lake City . .
Police Department
Michael Joseph Carroll, 26, 448941 U.S. Highway
301, Callahan, carrying a concealed weapon.

Saturday, June 11.
Columbia County
Sheriff's Office
Brenda Jacqueline Greco, 51, 3350 NW 48th Ave.,
High Springs, sell/giving/serving person under 21
alcohoL
i Elizabeth Lynch, no age given, 192 SE Defender
Dr., possession of cocaine.
1 Ronnie Mitchell, 45, Northeast Craig St., posses-
sion of drug paraphernalia and possession of cocaine.
David Arthur Pauwels, 46, 434 NW Nye Hunter
Dr., dealing in stolen property.
Christopher James Robinson, no age given, 1682
Cline Feagle Road, giving false identification to law
enforcement officer and driving while license suspend-
ed/revoked (habitual violator).
Casey Leigh Wilcox, 19, 327 NW Orange St., lar-
ceny, burglary and dealing in stolen property.

Sunday, June 12
Columbia County
Sheriff's Office
Mick E. Rooker, 22, 269 SE Inspiration Court,
warrant

Monday, June 13
Lake City
Police Department
Patrick Blake Chaplin, no age given, possession
of marijuana and possession of drug paraphernalia.
U Jovanna Reshawn Macaspac, 34, 138 SE Bark
Court, aggravated battery.

Tuesday, June 14
Lake City
Police Department
Krista Ryan Harrington, no age given, 903 SW
Lamboy Road, grand theft.

Wednesday, June 15
Columbia County
Sheriffs Office
Ronnell Jamar Bass, 24, 2601 NW 23rd. Blvd.,
Gainesville, larceny (six counts).
A John Christopher Bazzell, 39, homeless, warrant
Violation of probation on original charge of possession
of a controlled substance..


Guerry Brock Espenship, 28, 2901 SW Pinemount
Road, warrant Possession of a weapon by a convicted
felon.
LaTodd Eugene Gainer, 19, 134 NE Sunnybrook
Road, warrant Violation of probation on original charge
of dealing in stolen property (trafficking).
Virginia Hope Howard, 32, 205 SE First Ave.,
Chiefland, warrant Violation of probation on original
charge of grand theft.
James Alphonso Jennings, 63, 1930 Ella St.,
Jacksonville, warrant: Violation of probation on origi-
nal charge of third-degree grand theft.
Dwaine Elmer Poole, 41, 20632 49th Drive, DUI,
driving while license suspended/revoked and grand
theft (motor vehicle).

From staff reports.


JOBS: Local employment outlook improving

Continued From Page 1A


also work with the area employ-
ers to upgrade the skills of their
current employees through the On
Job Training and Employed Worker
Training programs. This has enabled'
many employers to retain employ-
ees that might have been laid off
while at the same time helping them
to remain competitive by reducing
their training costs. The state is the
primary provider of training directly


to the employers and provides this
assistance through the Incumbent
Worker Training Program."
As employment numbers con-
tinue to improve, Chastain noted
that there are more job oppor-
tunities and greater demand for
skilled labor in some professional
areas.
"The biggest demand for skilled
labor in this region remains the


medical and healthcare occupa-
tions,", he said. "The demand for
registered nurses, physical ther-
apists, and virtually all health-
care professions has continued to
increase throughout this reces-
sion and will continue to expand
for the foreseeable future. Law,
enforcement and corrections are<
both professions that have contin-
ued to grow and are in demand."


DADS: Holiday has new meaning for 2 local men

Continued From Page 1A


watching him change is rewarding.
"Being able to look at him and
seeing the development, and how
every day, it's like, 'Look what he
did today,' or 'Oh, he's smiling,' "
Webb said.
Breeden agreed and said he felt
proud when the doctor told him his
daughter was sitting up and mov-
ing like a 7-month-old, when she's 6
months old.
"I like the satisfaction that I get
when I see her grow or meet cer-
tain goals early," he said.
"Its really neat to see how she's
growing and changing," Breeden
said, "and getting to see that every
day, and not just see it in glimpses,-
like you would with just knowing
other people."
Breeden said he hadn't antici-
pated the emotional impact of being


a father, such as the feeling of joy
he experiences when his daughter
reaches a goal.
"I've noticed that what emotions I
do have around her are just intensi-
fied," he said.
Webb said having a child is
teaching him selflessness and
Breeden said it's changed the way
he thinks.
"I used to look at things as either
it was something for me or it was
something for Keryn," Breeden
said, "and now I've noticed lately
that I look at things more from a
family perspective. If it's best for all
three of us, then we try to do it."
Both Breeden and Webb said
they are looking forward to spend-
ing time with their children as their
children grow.
"I can't wait until he's.(Abram)


walking around and talking and I
can play with him," Webb said.
"With her (Maggie) being only 6
months old, I'm really looking for-
ward to the conversations because
we can't have those right now,"
Breeden said.
Having a child is now what he is
accustomed to, Breeden said.
"When we first had her
(Maggie), I wasn't used to having
three people in the house,"he
said, "but now, I can't imagine not
having her.
Webb said after today, hell be
anticipating more Father's Day holi-
days to come.
"I'm looking forward to the
future of (Father's Day) and having
my son come to me and say, 'Happy
Father's Day,'" Webb said. "When
that day comes, it'll be rad."


BLANCHE; Redevelopment may be in works

Continued From Page 1A


Agency.
The Blanche's owners, members
of a trust, are aware of the commu-
nication between the city and the
prospect and stayed up-to-date on
the process, he said.
SJohnson said the prospect might
redevelop about 40,000 square feet
in the building. Early last week the
prospect sent a letter to the City
requesting information regarding
asbestos and lead paint within the
Blanche.
There are several ways the City
might be involved in the property's
redevelopment, Johnson said. It will
likely be asked to participate in the


redevelopment of the space.
Any contributions from the City
will depend on the capital invest-
ment from the prospect, he said.
The City is not in the real estate
business but about helping rede-
velope the community through the
CRA.
"We've got to show the public
their tax dollars will be used wise-
ly," John'son said.
Ideally the Blanche will one
day be redeveloped and updated
to modern standards while still .
maintaining its historical presence,
he said. The building could house
a nice mixture of small stores and


restaurants on the first floor, offices
and meeting space on the second
and residential on the third.
"I'd like to see the Blanche rede-
veloped," Johnson said.
The conditions created by the
economy have impacted the pro-
cess of attracting interested devel-
opers, but Johnson said he is opti-
mistic about the building's future
and expects to see some form of,
formal commitment the end of
Sthe year.
; "All the elements' willfal into .
place," he said. "It's been slow but
this last year and a half we've been
making steady progress."


Some evacuees return home from U.S. wildfires


By WALTER BERRY
Associated Press

PHOENIX Some resi-
dents evacuated because
of wildfires in Arizona and
New Mexico were allowed
to return to their homes
Saturday, as firefighters
battled strong winds and
hot weather to try to keep
more homes, dry forests
and stretches of high des-
ert from being consumed
by the flames.
With summer rains still
weeks away, forecasters
said crews would likely
have little relief from the
hot, windy weather that
has dogged them for days.
More high-wind warnings
and fire weather watches
were on tap for many areas
through the weekend.
In eastern Arizona along
the New Mexico border,
residents of Alpine were
allowed to return to their
homes Saturday morn-
ing. Greer residents still


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remain evacuated by the
largest wildfire in Arizona's
history.
The Wallow fire has con-
sumed 774 square miles
(2,005 square kilometers),
or 500,409 acres (202,513
hectares), and more than
4,500 firefighters are try-
ing to stop its advance.
The blaze this week,
exceeded a 2002 fire
that burned 732 square
miles (1,896 square kilo-
meters) and destroyed
491 buildings. Despite
its size, the latest fire
has destroyed just 32
homes and four rental
cabins.
U.S. Sen: Jon Kyl, who
owns a home in Greer,
was touring the fire area
Saturday along with Sen.
John McCain and Arizona
congressmen Jeff Flake
and Paul Gosar.
Containment rose to
38 percent Friday night,
but more winds were
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LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL & STATE SUNDAY, JUNE 19, 2011


Page Editor: Robert Bridges, 754-0428


v















OPINION


Sunday, June 19, 2011


OU


OUR
OPINION


Raising


gas tax a


bad idea


Columbia County
Commission's
discussion on
possibly raising
the gasoline tax is simple: It's
a very bad idea. Shelve it and
forget about it.
The idea was brought up by
one commissioner Thursday
night with the intent of using
the potential extra revenue
for road repairs. The thought
behind it: Part of the state fund-
ing now passed down to the
county for road repairs might
be reduced. Might be.
Thankfully, the idea did not
gain any immediate traction
with commissioners.
For the county to even con-
sider putting such a proposal
on the table makes little sense.
Columbia County already
boasts some of the most
expensive fuel prices in the
Southeastern United States.
Combine this with a sluggish
retail economy and unemploy-
ment hovering near 10 percent
and it's impossible to justify
raising the fuel tax on
consumers.
Road maintenance is impor-
tant in Columbia County, so in a
worst case scenario, county offi-
cials should trim government in
other areas to pay for it.
We need a break from the
condescending view that tax-
payers are an infinite source
of income to be tapped at the
government's whim.

HIG HLIG HTS
IN HISTORY
Today is Sunday, June 19,
Sthe 170th day of 2011. There
are 195 days left in the year.
This is Father's Day.
Today's Highlight in History:
On June 19, 1910, the
first-ever Father's Day was
celebrated in Spokane, Wash.
(The idea for the observance
is credited to Sonora Louise
Smart Do'dd.)
On this date:
In 1862, slavery was out-
'lawed in U.S. territories.
In 1977, Pope Paul VI
Proclaimed a 19th-century
: Philadelphia bishop, John
SNeumann (NOY-muhn), the
first male U.S. saint.

Lake City Reporter
Serving Columbia .County
Since 1874
The Lake City Reporter is pub-
Slished with pride for residents of
Columbia and surrounding counties by
Community Newspapers Inc.
We believe strong newspapers build
strong communities --Newspapers
get things done!"
Our primary goal is to
publish distinguished and profitable
community-oriented newspapers.
This mission will be accomplished
through the teamwork of professionals
dedicated to truth, integrity and hard
work.
Todd Wilson, publisher
Robert Bridges, editor
Sue Brannon, controller
Dink NeSmith, president.
Tom Wood, chairman

LETTERS
POLICY
Letters to the Editor should be
typed or neatly written and double
spaced. Letters should not exceed
400 words and will be edited for
length and libel. Letters must be
signed and include the writer's name,
address and telephone number for
verification. Writers can have two
letters per month published. Letters
and guest columns are the-opinion of
the writers and not necessarily that of
'the Lake City Reporter.
BY MAIL: Letters, P.O. Box 1709,


Lake City, FL 32056; or drop off at
180 E. Duval St. downtown.
;BY FAX: (386) 752-9400.
BY E-MAIL:
news@lakecityreporter.com


To the Editor.
I chewed a whole pack of
Redman and smoked a pack of
Winston cigarettes while my
wife was in labor with our first
child. As she was in labor for
twelve hours, I said to myself,
"This is our last child, I can't
take this." But when they rolled
my son out for me to see for the
first time, it hit me. I have go
to straighten up. I have to grow
up. Now there is another person
,depending on me to provide for.
My 20-year-old wife is ready for
all of this, but I'm not. I'm just
out of the Army, as an M.P and
taught I am better than every-
body else. I knock people in the
head for a living. I can't act like
I used to. I must change. There
are two people depending on
me now. It didn't happen over-
night, but after four boys, I now
know they are what life is about.
The Dad gladly puts his life
on hold and puts all attention
to the proper raising of his chil-
dren. It isn't about Mom or Dad
anymore, but all about the chil-
dren. Success is realized when
all four boys got on their own


www.lakecityreporter.com


Counting blessings



in path of wildfire


S sometimes events
beyond our control
affect our life and
these always occur
when we least expect
it. Wednesday was my day to
experience this.
One minute, I'm sitting at
work,'finishing my daily to-do
list. The next, I get an urgent
phone call from my husband
that there is a forest fire 50
yards from our home. Our
house and several others were
in danger of catching fire.
Flames were rolling our way
through the woods. He was
excited and out of breath on the
phone and I knew instantly it
was an emergency.
This is the home we built
and have lived in for 10 years.
The home I share with my
husband and daughter. The
place that holds our entire lives,
possessions and memories.
As I quickly drove away from
work, I was thankful because I
knew my family was safe, but I
had no idea whether everything
.we had worked for and built all
these years would survive.
. I had a very unsettling feeling
of what the future was about
to hold. That morning, I woke
up and the biggest thing on my


LETTERS


Mandy Brown
mbrown@lakecityreportercom


mind concerning my house was
that I had laundry to do, or I
needed to sweep the floor when
I got home. Then, at 4 p.m.,
I was praying I would have a.
house to clean when I arrived.
Realized how precious things
are to us when we are faced
with losing them.
As I drove down my road and
replayed the story my husband
told me, it amazed me how.
someone's careless mistake,
and through no fault of your
own, can take away everything
in a split second. Our neighbor
was cutting down a tree on his
property and it fell into a live
power line which hit the dry
forest floor and ignited. Within
seconds, the forest was ablaze
and my home and memories,
and several other homes nearby


were in danger.
When I arrived at my home,
,I was greeted with fire trucks,
police cars, smoke, flames and
utility trucks. My heart was
racing. I just wanted to know
the fire was contained and my
home would be safe. Through
the woods, I could see the blaze
no more than 50 yards from my
house. Overhead, a helicopter
dumped water directly on top
of the fire. Choking smoke was
everywhere.
Thankfully, with the very
quick response of Lake City and
Columbia County firefighters,
and the Division of Forestry
units, the fire was quickly
contained and burned only 10
acres of brush. There was no
damage to any nearby
buildings.
It makes me wonder if things
like this happen so that we
can remember to count our
blessings and appreciate the
things that we have and not take
them for granted. I am truly
blessed to have my family and
my'home safe and sound.


Mandy Brown is
circulation director of the Lake
City Reporter.


TO THE EDITOR


he planet

and now have families and earn this county off
a good living. The best words add more taxes b
a parent can hear is, "Dad county can't se
and Mom, I wouldn't change obligations on wl
anything in my childhood and already...Do av
it was great" Of course, the of those shovel r<
sugars from those grandchil- that do nothing
dren are the sweetest thing in to work and back
the world. Being a father is the balance your b
hardest job in the world, but the balanced and the
pay is also the best may, just may 1
Thank you, Lord, for giving The only problem
us our four precious sons for a when you get i
season Matthew, Brian, Luke want to keep it th
and Philip. this is by any c
ill Glover brought to the flo
Lake City on


Political scare tactics
To the Editor.
As I opened up my Reporter
today I was immediately struck
in the face with a very Liberal
Appeal to impose a further
county tax on fuel during these
very hard economic times!!
What in the world is this man
thinking about?? Gas is over
$3.50 per gallon and was almost
4 bucks a gallon and will sure-
ly increase again! I can't believe


by the people i
certainly hiope a
will fail. I will d
make sure it doe;
Mr. Dupree is
says, "A Cool Aid
sure. Sounds li
scare tactics to m


icial wants to
because the
;em to meet its
hat it has
way with some
ready projects
g to help us get
safely and
budget if it isn't
n maybe a tax
be justified.
n with that, is
t put on you
lere forever!! If
:hance at all
)or to be voted

n this county I
nd I believe it
to my utmost to
s. Evidently
as Bill O'Reilly
." drinker for
ke political
ne "If we don't


this, the sky will fall and ser-
vices will be curtaild" where
have I heard this line
before??!!
Maunel Enos,
Lake City


4A


Todd Wilson
twilson@Jokecityreportercom


A day for

fathers

and father

figures


about Father's
Day, my
memories of
everything my
Dad taught me and did for me
quickly turn into a Norman
Rockwell scene. The example
my father continues to set for
me as an all-around invincible
guy is one that I'll most likely
never live up to.
I have great memories of
the Americana moments: My
dad teaching me the prideful
"man tricks" of how a skilled
hand can manicure not
simply mow a lawn through
a careful symmetrical push-
mower pattern. And, how that
in .'L things, even chopping .
w, --s in the garden, there's
a i- :' way to complete even
the lest tasks. Do it right
the time, take care of
the e:ails, and it's finished.
Their e's no wasted time with a
do-over.
He took me fishing, even
though he does not care for
the sport. Seldom impatient,
he would sit under a shade
tree while I bank-fished for
hours.: ,
We played catch alopj"
was the catcher as I honed my
Babe Ruth League pitching
skills, working toward the
Majors of course, at the
expense of his shins. I can't
begin to guess how many 58-
foot curveballs bounced in the
dirt in front of him through the
years.
As the father of a daughter,
my role is somewhat different.
Yes, we play catch occasionally,
but I spend much more of my
recreational parenting time
cheering for things I know
very little about Jazz dancing,
balance beam routines, girl
stuff.
I know my place. I show up.
I cheer. I drive the vehicle.
I hope down the road, my
daughter will have better
memories of me than the two
of us repeatedly scratching
out math problem examples
and wading through a pile of
homework at our kitchen table.
The reality is the
relationship between fathers
and their children continues
to change rapidly. Like it or
not, the position of "father
figure" carries a broad-based
definition in today's world.
And, father figures are
replacing what once were true
stereotypical, in-home fathers
at a continually escalating rate.
There are a lot of single
mothers out there today
who play catch, climb trees,
go fishing and do it all by
themselves. They deserve the
Father's Day present today
just as much as the next
guy. The same can be said
for the growing number of
grandparents on
Round 2 of parenting, raising
their grandkids in our crazy
society.
Parenting begins at
home, but all of us have the
opportunity to give back and
provide a good example for
children wherever possible. A
mentoring program might be
an outlet, but even the
simplest word of good advice
or a kind gesture makes a
difference to a child in need of
attention.
To fathers and father figures
everywhere, enjoy your day.

* Todd Wilson is publisher of the
Lake City Reporter.


The hardest job


on















Page EdItor: Robert Bridges, 754-0428 LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL SUNDAY, JUNE 19, 2011


AIR POWER: Critical to firefighting efforts throughout region

Continued From Page 1A


Six helicopters are using
space at the Lake City
Gateway Airport as a tempo-
rary helibase.
Don Nicholas, helibase
manager, is in Lake City
working with the U.S. Forest
Service as they attempt to
wrangle the fires.
"We're strictly dropping
water on the fires," he said.
"We're not using any kind of
retardant or foams."
The helibase has been
set up for seven days and
Nicholas estimates that flight
teams have made well over
100 flights as they work to
douse area wildfires.
"We do a lot of reconning,
planning and mapping mis-
sions with the small helicop-
ters and they also do some
firefighting, but the medium
and large helicopters do a
majority of firefighting," he
said.
The helicopters used in
firefighting efforts often have
a collapsible bucket under-
neath, ranging from 144 gal-
lons to well over 400 gallons.
The buckets are tethered
to the helicopters by cables
and a "belly hook" The
hooks are electronic and if a
pilot were to get in trouble,
he need only press a button
to release the bucket
Pilots and firefghting crews
working on the aerial detail


Pnotos by TONY BRITT'L ily.P.'e :
LEFT: Chris Creamer, (left) pilot of N97PM, goes through his preflight inspection with Jeremy Blake as they prepare to make a reconnaissance flight over
area wildfires. RIGHT: Helicopter crew member Jon Haskell (foreground) puts on his gloves while Mitch Loggins adjusts his helmet as the two prepare to go
on a flight. Haskell and Loggins are U.S. Forest Servic6 employees who are in Lake City as part of helicopter crews battling wildfires across the area.


are from all over country,
including Salt Lake City, Utah;
Minnesota; California; Oregon;
Washington and Iowa
David Young, of East
Wenatchee, Wash., is the lead
mechanic performing heli-
copter maintenance on site.
He said preflight inspections
are done in the morning and


normally last an hour, while
post flight inspections could
take two or three hours.
"We do maintenance on
a daily basis," he said. "We
do a preflight inspection and
an end-ofthe day inspection.
Any time the helicopter shuts
down, we look for any signs
of leaks or stress."


Young also noted there are
special concerns regarding
maintenance of the helicop-
ters because of their firefight-
ing duties.-
"Because ifs carrying a
heavy load all the time, the
helicopter has more aggres-
sive operations and more
stress put on the helicopter


and its components," he
said. "We have to make sure
everything is inspected thor-
oughly."
Nicholas said having
helicopters as an available
resource on fires in this area
makes a substantial differ-
ence in thefirefighting effort
"Because of the remote


areas and the fact that so
many fires in North Florida
happen in places that you
can't walk or take equipment,
aerial firefighting plays a
key role," he said. "On the
Impassable Bay fire you can
not walk there and you can't
drive a tractor/plow because
they would just sink."


Mary L. King (Nana)
Mary L. King (Nana) died on
June 16, 2011 at the Suwannee
Valley Care Center after a tong
illness. She was born in Tampa,
Florida on
November 6,
1921 and lived
in. Lake City
for 18 years.
Survivors
include: Son,
Buzz Giddens,
daughter-in-
law Sherry Giddens,, Daughter,
Nancy Yvonne McCullough,
Significant Other, Ed Polbos,"
Many grandchildren, great grand-
children, a great great grand-
children and many friends. She
will be greatly missed, by all.
Memorial Services will be at
Epiphany Catholic Church, Lake
City, at a later date: I.istead of
flowers, please make a dona-
tion to: Skukkie Ackers Animal
Shelter, P.O. Box 769; 608 NW
Sophie Drive, White Springs,
FL 32096 in her honor. 'Fi-
nal arrangements by ICS
CREMATION & FU-
NERAL HOME. 752-3436.

LeRoy Rice
LeRoy Rice, 92, passed away
Thursday, June 2,2011 at Mitch-
ell Care Center in Mitchell,
Nebraska. A celebration of life
service will be held at 3:00 p.m.,
Sunday, June 26, 2011 at the
Lake City Sev-
enth-day Ad- I
ventist Church
with Pastor
Brendan White
officiating.
Cremation has
taken place
at Jolliffe Fu-
neral Home
in Scottsbluff, Nebraska in ac-
cordance with LeRoy's wishes.
LeRoy was born November 6,
1918 in Hewitt, Wisconsin. As
a young boy, he grew up in the
Northwood's of Wisconsin en-
joying the great outdoors & lov-
ing nature. His favorite season
of the year was the fall due to the
brilliant changing of the leaves.
When growing up, he became an
avid baseball player. He contin-
ued to play baseball throughout
his adult life and taught his chil-
dren the sport. LeRoy grew up
around jamboree bands includ-
ing one of which his father was a
band leader. He learned to play
the guitar, banjo and mandolin.
He played with various bands
until he moved
from Wiscon-
sin. When he
was 17 years "
old, he worked
in Hayward, Wisconsin for the
CCC (Civilian Conservation
Corps) that President Roosevelt
initiated to help provide relief
for unemployed youth who had
a hard time finding jobs during
the Great Depressidn. While
in the CCC, LeRoy was as-
signed to planting trees, building
roads, cleaning rivers, build-
ing fire lanes and fighting fires.
In the winter time, he helped
build fish hatcheries to stock.
the rivers and lakes with fish.
In 1940, LeRoy was drafted in to
the army. The day before he was
to be discharged home, the Japa-
nese attacked Pearl Harbor on
December 7, 1941 and his dis-
charge was cancelled. He was
assigned to the Pacific Theater


OBITUARIES

and fought against the Japanese
until the end of World War II.
While fighting in Burma, his unit
which had extensive experience
in jungle fighting was attached
to the Merrill Marauders. After
a fierce and heated battle, LeRoy
noticed a bullet hole through the
sleeve of his uniform but luckily
he was not wounded. He always
knew that God had protected him
throughout the war. Later he
was assigned to driving supply
trucks along the Burma Road.
Often the supply trucks were
bombed by the enemy as they
made their way to the front lines:
LeRoy was discharged from
the army after WWII ended.
Upon discharge from the mili-
tary, LeRoy returned home and
purchased an automotive garage
with his future father-in-law.
They named their business the
Brown-Rice garage. He was
baptized in to the Seventh-day
Adventist church in 1951. He
began dating Hazel Brown
whom he married on June 23,
1951.- LeRoy and Hazel had
three children, a son, Greg and
twin daughters, Maureer and
Marlene. He would plan and
Stake family vacations every year
to visit a different national park
throughout the United States.
LeRoy moved with his family
from Wisconsin to Takoma Park,
MD (1959) and then to Denver,
CO (1960). In both places he was
employed to maintain vehicles at
the Seventh-day Adventist hos-
pitals. LeRoy and Hazel moved
to Orlando, FL (1978) where
he worked in the Engineering
Department at Florida Hospital
until his retirement in 1984. He
longed to live in the country again
so in 1986 he and Hazel moved
to Fort White, FL where he loved
to work outside whether it was
gardening, planting of trees and
shrubbery, mowing the lawn or
working on any machinery that
needed repairs. He moved for
the last time in 2008 to Mitchell,
NE where he resided in a nurs-
ing home. He enjoyed sharing
his faith-with others, discussing
the history of WWII and keep-
ing current with world events.
LeRoy leaves his wife, Hazel,
of Mitchell; daughters, Mau-
reen Baird of Durango, CO,
and Marlene (Leland) Olson
of Fortuna, ND; 5 grandchil-


II tie iB


dren, Brandon (Becky) Young,
Zachary Young, Brent Young,
Trenton Baird, Ashleigh Baird
of Orlando, FL; 2 great-grand-
children, Kayla and Tyler Young
of Orlando, 'FL; sister-in-law,
Emily Rice of Mt. Airy, MD;
cousins, nieces, and nephews.
LeRoy was preceded in death
by his father in 1978; his mother
in 1979; son, Gregory, in 1986;
and his brother, Harlan, in 1985.
Alma Jean Morgan Mansfield
Alma Jean Morgan Mansfield,
73, resident of Lake City, FL,
died friday, June 17, 2011, at
Shands at Lake Shore Hospital
after a lengthy illness. She was
born in Homerville, GA to the
late Erlich Morgan and Emma
Lee Tomlinson Morgan Daniels
and moved to Lake City at an
early age where she attended the
Columbia County school system.
Prior to moving back to Lake
City forty years ago she had lived
in California, Georgia, Alabama
and in Europe. She was a mem-
ber of the First Baptist Church,
Lake City, FL and was a devoted
wife, mother, and grandmother.
Survivors include her husband
of 55 years, Roscoe C. Man-
sfield, Jr.; one son: Roscoe C.
'Rocky2 Mansfield, II; one
daughter: Vickie Lee Mans-
field Griffin (Mike), one sister:
Libby Rhoden (Donald); two
grandchildren: Matthew Mans-
field and Morgan Louise Grif-
fin, both of Lake City, Florida;
one great grandchild: Alyssa
Mansfield, Lake City, Florida.
Graveside funeral services will
be conducted Tuesday, June
21, 2011, at Memorial Cem-
etery in Lake City, FL. with
Bill Wheeler officiating.Visi-
tation with the family will be
from 10 A.M. to 11 A.M. on
Tuesday ( one hour prior to fu-
neral service) at GATEWAY-
FOREST LAWN FUNERAL
HOME, 3596 S. US Hwy 441,
Lake City, FL (386-752-1954.
Please sign the guest book at
www.gatewayforestlawn. com.



Obituaries are paid advertise-
ments. For details, call the Lake
City Reporter's classified depart-
ment at 752-1293.


iNOW""""":
* II$Pil




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SIncludes lenses & frames.
Some Restrictions Apply.
COUPON REQUIRED EXPIRES JUNE 30,2011
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Includes Lenses & Frames .
Some Restrictions-Apply.
COUPON REQUIRED. EXPIRES JUNE 30, 2011
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REMEMBER,1~






YOUR FLX PLAN NSURANC


The Volunteer Auxiliary at Lake City Medical Center is
looking for volunteers to work a few hours each week
in the Lighthouse Gift Shop. A variety of shifts are
available all you need is a smiling face and a
"Can-Do" attitude.
For more information or to apply,
call (386) 758-3498 or stop by the
front desk at Lake City Medical Center.


LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL SUNDAY, JUNE 19, 2011


Page Editor: Robert Bridges, 754-0428












LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL SUNDAY, JUNE 19, 2011 Page EdItor: Todd Taylor, 754-0424


COMMUNITY CALENDAR


* To.submit your Community
Calendar item, contact Antonia
Robinson at 754-0425 or by
e-mail at arobinson@
lakecityreporter.com.


Today
Donors wanted
The LifeSouth
Bloodmobile is seeking
donors 9 a.m.-1 p.m. at
Sardis Baptist Church and
2-5 p.m. at Spire's Grocery
Store Sunday. All donors
receive juice, cookies and
a recognition item.

Employment services
Vocational Rehabilitation
provides services for
eligible people who have
physical or mental impair-
ments that keep them
from working. These ser-
vice can help with medical
treatment, job placement
and training. Columbia and
Union Counties call (386)
754-1675.

Kindergarten
registration
Kindergarten registra-
tion is 7:30 a.m. until 5
p.m. Monday Thursday
at each elementary
school. Children must
be 5-years-old on or
before Sept. 1. The fol-
lowing items are needed
to register a child: Birth
Certificate, Immunization
Record, Record of
Physical Examination,
which must have been
completed within a year
before school begins and
a Social Security Card if
available.

Columbia County
Wood Carvers meeting
The Columbia County
Wood Carvers meet every
Monday at 1 p.m. at the
LifeStyle Enrichment
Center. Contact Ken Myer
at 719-9629 or Charles
Kime at 755-4937.

Monday :
Diabetes class
The next community
diabetes class is 9:30 am.
Monday at the Lake Shore
Authority Board Building.
The topic is diabetes pre-
vention and Ann-Milligan,
RN, is the speaker. The
building is located at 259
NE Franklin Street Call
Wendy Fisher.at (386) 292-
7815 for questions. Classes
are free of charge and no
pre-registration is neces-
sary.

Relay For Life wrapup
A Columbia County
Relay For Life wrap-
up is 6 p.m. Monday at
McAlister's Deli Sponsors,
participants and teams will
be recognized.

Kindergarten
registration
Kindergarten registra-
tion is 7:30 a.m. until 5
p.m. Monday Thursday
at each elementary
school. Children must
be 5-years-old on or
before Sept. 1. The fol-
lowing items are needed
to register a child: Birth
Certificate, Immunization
Record, Record of
Physical Examination,
which must have been
completed within a year
before school begins and
a Social Security Card if
available.


BRANDON FINLEY/Lake City Reporter

Practice makes perfect
Fort White All-Star Joseph Comesana practices with Henry Clancett during Lake City's Cal Ripken/Babe Ruth Rookie
Qualifier.


Colubmia Wood Carvers
meeting
The Columbia County
Wood Carvers meet every
Monday at 1 p.m. at the
LifeStyle Enrichment
Center. Contact Ken Myer
at 719-9629 or Charles
Kime at 755-4937.

Tuesday
NARFE monthly meeting
The next NARFE meet-
ing is 1 p.m. Tuesday at
the LifeStyle Enrichment
Center, 628 SE Allison Ct.
Nathan Riska, Rep. Ander
Crenshaw district repre-
sentative, is the speaker.
Contact Miriam Stanford
at 755-0907.

Meal payment due
. Payment for the
Columbia County Senior
Services Inc. Wednesday
homecooked meal is due
10 a.m. Tuesday at the
LifeStyle Enrichment
Center. The menu is
chicken pot pie, steamed
broccoli, country biscuits
and strawberry cake. Call
(386) 755-0235 for more
information.

Wednesday
Cowboy Dave
performance
Columbia County
Senior Services Inc. is
hosting a performance by
Cowboy Dave 11-11:45
a.m. Wednesday at the
LifeStyle Enrichment
Center. Call (386) 755-
0235.

Lady of the Lake
Quilting Guild
The Lady of the Lake
Quilting Guild is monthly
9:30 a.m. Wednesday
at Teen Town, 533 NW
Desoto St. The program
will feature quilting a
Chinese Auction. For


more details: Contact
President Loretta
Kissner, (386) 754-9330
or vice-president Sunny
Nadort, (386) 658-1555.

Thursday
Children's workshops
The Florida Department
of Environmental
Protection's Stephen
Foster Folk Culture
Center State Park will host
eight children's workshops
through July 21, to teach
several different craft
related skills to interested
children. Participants are
welcome to take part in a
single workshop or mul-
tiple workshops.

Landlord meeting
The next monthly land-
lord's meeting is 6 p.m.
Thursday at the Lake City
Medical Center Classroom
101. Dole Crews,
Columbia County property
appraiser is the speaker.
All managers and realtors
are welcome. Call 755-0110
for more information.

Play in the Clay
Diane Hornby is teach-
ing "Play In The Clay"
classes for the children's
summer vacation pro-
gram 10 a.m. 11 a.m.
June 23 and July 7 and
14 for $5 at the Stephen
Foster Cultural State
,Park. For adults wishing
to explore their craftier
side this summer, there is
a beginning wheel throw-
ing pottery class 2-5
p.m. June 23 and Aug.
11, 18 and 25. The class
meets for three hours
and costs $85. Students
make four vessels and
learn to glaze.and fire
them. To register, please
call the park Gift Shop
at (386) 397-1920 or visit
www.stephenfosterCSO.
org.To learn more about
the park, visit www.
FloridaStateParks.org/ste-


phenfoster

Senior Services open
house
Columbia County Senior
Services, Inc. is having an
open house 10 a.m.-12 p.m.
Thursday. Entertainment
at 11 a.m. by The Kitchen
Band. Come check out
the activities, the New
Heirloom Gift Shoppe and
more. Located at 628 S.E.
Allison Court, call (386)
755-0235 for more informa-
tion.

Friday
Hog entry deadline
approaching
The deadline for all
hog entries in the 2011
Columbia County Fair is
5 p.m. Friday. Children
must be between the ages
of 8-18 and enrolled in
public, private or home
school in Columbia
' County. Entries must be
turned into the Columbia
County Fairgrounds
Office. Call 752-8822. The
beginning Hog weigh in
is scheduled for 8 10
a.m. July 9.

Magic with Miniature
Horses
The Columbia County
Public Library is hosting
Reading is Magic with
Gentle Carousel Miniature
Horses 11 a.m. at Fort
White Community Center
and 2 p.m. at the Main
Branch Friday.


Saturday
Miss Florida Forestry
Pageant
The Miss Florida
Forestry State Scholarship
Pageant is 7 p.m. Saturday
at Baker County Middle
School in Macclenny.
Admission is $10, and
tickets will be sold at the
door. Local queens from
Columbia County are
Little Miss Morgan Royals,
Junior Miss Kimberlynne
Norman, Teen Miss
Brittany Wallace and Miss
Angela Cameron.

Columbia High School
reunion
The Columbia High
School.Class of 1-986
reunion is Saturday.
Contact Howey Brannon
at 386-397-4570 or Brian
"Tweet" Nicholson at
(727) 992-1978 or visit
http://chsclassofl986.
com.

Monday, June 27
Building Strong Bonds
mentoring program
Calling all middle and
high school boys for
Building Strong Bonds
mentoring program 5-8
p.m. June 27. Meeting
is at 532 Marion Street.
Contact Al Nelson at
(386) 867-1601. Dinner
included. Transportation
can be provided if con-
tacted one week in
advance.


Tuesday, June 28

Make and Take
workshop
Back to Basics Rain
Barrel "Make and Take"
Workshop Tuesday June
28th from 6:30 8:00
pm Columbia County
Extension Office Located
on the Fairground in
Lake City Just call to
register 752-5384. Take
home your completed
rain barrel for $45 Learn
about the benefits of
Harvesting Rainwater:
Let us help you assemble
your very own Rain
Barrel.

Meet the Author at the
library
A Meet the Author
program featuring Mary
Jane Ryals is 7 p.m. June
28 at the Main Branch.
The event is sponsored
by the Friends of the
Library. Ryals is a poet,
novelist and Florida State ''
University professor. In
2008, she was named
Poet Laureate of Florida's
Big Bend Region, a title
she will hold until 2012.
Her novel, "Cookie and
Me," was released in
September 2010 and
takes place in Tallahassee
in the 1960s.

Meal payment due
Payment for the
Columbia County Senior
Services Inc. Wednesday -
homecooked meal is due
10 a.m. Tuesday at the
LifeStyle Enrichment
Center. The menu
is hamburger steak,
mashed potatoes and
gravy, broccoli casserole
and peach cobbler and
ice cream. Call (386)
755-0235 for more infor-.
mation.

Wednesday, June
29
Beekeeping workshop
at extension office
A beekeeping workshop.
is 6-8:30 p.m. June 29
at the Columbia County
Extension office. The reg-
istration fee is $5 which
includes materials and
honey. The class will be
taught with the help of
local beekeepers. Call
(386) 752-5384 for more
information.

Dubi Sisters perform at
Senior Services
Columbia County
Senior Services Inc. is
hosting a dancing per-
formance from the Dubi
Sisters 11-11:45 a.m.
June 29 at the LifeStyle
Enrichment Center.
Call (386) 755-0235
for more information.


IS YOUR BANK...
Imposing More Fees? Holding Your Check Deposits?
Overwhelming You with Confusing Account Information?


Todd Sampson
(386) 487-3117 (Direct)
South Branch (514 SW State Road 47)
Downtown Branch (173 NW Hillsboro)


Connie Anderson
(386) 487-3145 (Direct)
Turner Branch (4785 W. U.S. Hwy 90)
West Branch (1720 W. U.S. Hwy 90)


Columbia Bank
Banking on a first name basis.
1912 2012

www.columbiabankflorida.com


LENDER


Member
FDIC


'i


-


Page Editor: Todd Taylor, 754-0424


LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL SUNDAY, JUNE 19, 2011


in--------















'Barefoot Bandit' to finally face prison


MANUEL VALDES
Associated Press
SEATTLE Colton
Harris-Moore gained
authority-mocking, cult
status as he ran from the
law for two years in sto-
len boats, cars and planes.
Now, he faces years in
prison.
The young Washington
state man dubbed the
"Barefoot Bandit" for a
cross-country his crime
spree pleaded guilty Friday
to seven felony charges,
ranging from stealing an
aircraft to possessing a
firearm.
"We're here today to say
that Mr. Harris-Moore's
flight from justice has
ended," U.S. Attorney
Jenny Durkan said after
the hearing. He will "spend
a significant time in prison
and will not make one dime
from his crimes."
Under a plea agree-
ment, Harris-Moore would
forfeit any future earnings
from movie, book, or other
deals from selling his story.
Earnings would be used to
pay off the $1.4 million in
restitution he owes to his
many victims.
Harris-Moore could
receive between 5 1/4 and
6 1/2 years in prison when
he's sentenced in October,
defense attorney John
Henry Browne said.
However, he still faces
state charges in several
counties, including the
county where his crimes
began.
Prosecutors have said
Harris-Moore hopscotched
his way across the United
States, frequently crash-
landing planes in rural
areas and stealing cars
from parking lots at small
airports. His escapades
were widely followed in
print and the Internet,
earning him the "Barefoot
Bandit" ,moniker. by com-
mitting some of' criies,.'
without shoes.
Harris-Moore, now 20,
smiled, and greeted his
lawyers as he entered the
court room Friday. He sat
quietly sometimes smil-
ing, sometimes holding his
hands and looking down
- as federal judge Richard
Jones went over the details
of the crimes.
The federal charges,
which included stealing an
aircraft, possession of fire-
arms and piloting without


a license, stemmed from
a spate of crimes in late
2009 and early 2010, when
Harris-Moore was accused
of flying a stolen plane
from Anacortes, in north-
western Washington, to
the San Juan Islands.
Authorities say he later
stole a pistol in eastern
British Columbia and took
a plane from a hangar in
Idaho, where investigators
found bare footprints on
the floor and wall. That
plane crashed near Granite
Falls, Wash., after it ran out
of fuel, prosecutors said.
He made his way to
Oregon in a 32-foot boat
stolen in southwestern:
Washington stopping
first to leave $100 at an ani-
mal shelter in Raymond,
Wash. From Oregon,
authorities said, Harris-
Moore traveled across the
United States.
In Indiana, he stole
another plane, flew across
half of the united States,
and crash landed in the
Bahamas, where he was
captured last July.
Harris-Moore also faces
several dozen charges in
four Washington coun-
ties, with the most seri-
ous charge being burglary
where a handgun was
involved. Those charges
will likely be consolidated
and a hearing should take
place in about a month,
San Juan County pros-
ecutor Randall K Gaylord
said.
Friday's agreement calls
for Harris-Moore to serve
his federal sentence con-
currently with whatever
prison time he may get
from the state.
But the state charges
could mean more time in
prison beyond what the
federal judge decides, as
well as an increase in the
restitution owed, accord-
ing to federal and local
prosecutors.
"All of this is up to
the judge," Browne said.
"We're very hopeful it'll
be around the same sen-
tence."
Browne added that
Harris-Moore's story
would attract enough
attention to pay off all the
restitution.
Asked what Harris-
Moore plans to do after
he's done with prison,
Browne said that he'd like
to go to college to stuidy
engineering.


ASSOCIATED PRESSISeattle Times, Greg Gilbert
John Henry Browne addresses the media after agreeing to a sentencing term with his client, Colton Harris-Moore on the steps
of the Federal Office Building, Friday, June 17, 2011 in Seattle. Colton Harris-Moore, who gained international notoriety during
a two-year run from the law in stolen boats, cars and planes pleaded guilty Friday to seven charges in the "Barefoot Bandit"
case.


I, ,
VfWW,.


Man charged


with homicide


after standoff


BETHLEHEM, Pa.-
Authorities in eastern
Pennsylvania say a man
taken into custody after
a five-hour standoff has
been charged with criminal
homicide.
Forty-five-year-old
William Ward of Bethlehem
was also charged Friday
night with aggravated
assault on law enforcement
officers, recklessly endan-
gering another person and
resisting arrest
Authorities in Lehigh
County have not released
the name of the victim or
provided any details about


the homicide.
Officers were called to
the house at about 10:50
a.m. Friday to check on
the welfare of a woman. At
about 4 15.m. Friday, offi-
cers rushed inside and took
Ward into custody.
Lehigh County Coroner
Scott Grim said the victim
was a woman but declined
to release other details.
Ward is being held in
Lehigh County Prison
without bail; it was unclear
whether he had an attor-
ney.
N Associated Press


Babysitter arrested

when child wanders


CROMWELL, Conn.
- Police said a 25-year-
old babysitter has been
arrested after a toddler she
was supposed to be watch-
ing was found wandering
alone in Cromwell toward
the edge of the Connecticut
River.
Police said Katrina
Challinor was babysitting
the 21-month-old boy when


she fell asleep around 10
a.m. on Friday.
Police said a motor-
ist later spotted the boy
wearing blue pajamas and
walking toward the river-
bank. The motorist and
a passenger grabbed the
boy before he reached the
river.
E Associated Press


DMAYrAG
Depend on us"


-I1m a


SHOP NOW FOR BEST SELECTION
ALL SALES FINAL, NO REFUNDS OR EXCHANGES. OPEN DAILY REGULAR HOURS. WE ACCEPT VISA, MASTERCARD, DISCOVER, AMERICAN
EXPRESS AND SEARS CARD. WE ACCEPT SEARS GIFT CARDS. DISCOUNTS DO NOT APPLY TO PREPAID GIFT CARDS. INVENTORY IS LIMITED
TO STOCK ON HAND. THIS STORE IS NOT PARTICIPATING IN CURRENT SEARS CIRCULARS. THIS EVENT EXCLUDES ELECTROLUX.


joirm",


IZ CRAFTS


LAKE CITY REPORTER NATION SUNDAY, JUNE 19, 2011


7A .


Page Editor: Robert Bridges, 754-0428


1.1














LAKE CITY REPORTER WEATHER SUNDAY, JUNE 19, 2011


THE WEATHER


PARTLY iSOLATED
CLOUDY I T-STORMS



HI 981 74I HI 95 L 72


4. F C M .foud ,J.n


Tlahasee *
99/75 .,,


93/77


S00/74 jacksnlle
Lakeity* 95/76
98/73
.G. inaile e Datona Beach
,98/73 9 73
Ocaa l
97/72
tOrdo Cape Canaveral
96/74 90/76
Tala ,


53 WestPahm Blach
90/77 *
\ Ft Lauderdale
R Myers. 90/77 t
94/74 Naples *
'90/75 Miami
Key West 90/78
90/80


TEMPERATURES
High Saturday 92
Low Saturday 68
Normal high 90
Normal low 69
Record high 101 in 1998
Record low 60 in 1933

PRECIPITATION
Saturday .00"
Month total 0.62"
Year total 14.73"
Normal month-to-date 3.94"
Normal year-to-date 21.19"


SUN
Sunrise today
Sunset today
Sunrise tom.
Sunset tom.


6:29 a.m.
8:35 p.m.
6:29 a.m.
8:35 p.m.


MOON
lyoonrise today 11:31 p.m.
Moonset today 10:12 a.m.
Moonrise tom,.
Moonset tom. 11:08 a.m.


City Monday
Cape Canaveral 91.:75 p,:
Daytona Beach 95/ 73/pc
Ft. Lauderdale 93/77/t
Fort Myers 94/72/t
Galnesvllle 95/71/pc
Jacksonville 98/75/pc
Key West 89/80/sh
Lake City 99/71/pc
Miami 92/77/t
Naples 92/75/t
Ocala 96/73/pc
Orlando 97/77/pc
Panama City 91/77/s
Pensacola 92/79/pc
Tallahassee 101/73/s
Tampa '95/73/t
Valdosta 101/72/pc
W. Palm Beach 90/77/t


10 sninbtoban
Today's
ultra-violet
radiation risk
for the area on
a scale from 0
to 1+.,
A061


Tuesday
90 74 t
93/73/1
90/78/pc
95/71/t
94/70/s
97/75/s
89/81/pc
97/70/s
90/78/pc
90/76/pc
95/72/s
94/77/t
93/77/t
91/79/pc
99/74/t
95/73/pc
101/73/t
90/78/pc


An exclusive
service
brought to
our readers.
by
The Weather
Channel.


0 a r I IA "III)
June July. July July 4 Forecasts, data and
23 1 8 15 graphics @ 2011 Weather
Last New First Full m Central, LP, Madison, WIs.
"WM JY. www.weatherpublisher.com


NATIONAL FORECAST: A vigorous low pressure system developing in eastern Colorado will
produce severe thunderstorms across portions of the Great Plains today. Showers and thun-
derstorms will also be likely from the western Great Lakes, through the Ohio Valley into the
Mid-Atlantic states. Cool and showery weather will affect much of the northern Intermountain
West, as well.


9 9 i1 9 **,'77^r"It^^?^Mi?^


YESTERDAY'S NATIONAL EXTREMES High: 1110,Wichita FallsTexas Low: 280,Angel FireN.Ms';i


CITY
Albany NY
Albuquerque
Anchorage
Atlanta.
Baltimore
Billings
Birmingham
Bismarck
Bolse
Boston
Buffalo
Charleston SC
Charleston WV*
Charlotte
Cheyenne
Chicago
Cincinnati
Cleveland
Columbia SC
Dallas
Daytona Beach
Denver


CITY
Acapulco
Amsterdam
Athens
Auckland
Belling
Berlin
Buenos Alres
Cairo
Geneva
Havana
Helsinkl
Hong Kong
Kingston .,


Saturday Today
HI/Lo/Pcp. HI/Lo/W CITY


83/63/0
91/62/0
,55/44/0
92/66/0
85/68/.07
72/48/0
93/71/0
77/45/0
69/56/0
83/64/.07
81/62/0
92/74/0
78/66/0
90/68/.02
69/45/.06
84/61/0
74/68/.07
80/64/0
94/72/0
102/79/0
93/71/0
77/49/0


INENTOALuuy ioyai~a Ud auta


amturday
HI/Lo/Pcp.
90 78, 02
64/55/0
86/64/0 .
68/57/0
.91/68/b
72/57/.06
61/48/0,
88/70/0
66/55/0
86/72/0
64/54/.08
90/81/0
88.873 0


78/51/s
94/58/s
62/51/sh
95/73/pc
86/71/t
69/50/t
97/74/pc
77/58/t
69/47/c
79/60/s
78/58/pc
97/77/pc
84/70/t
93/71/t
71/48/t
75/63/t
85/71/t
81/66/t
98/74/pc
100/79/pc
94/73/pc
83/52/t


loaay
HI/Lo/W
91/78/t
63/52/sh
86/70/s
63/57/pc
92/71/s
66/55/sh
6Q/55/sh
87/67/s
64/46/sh
90/75/t
64/52/r
89/83/t
88/77/t


Des Molnes
Detroit
El Paso
Fairbanks
Greensboro
Hartford
Honolulu
Houston
Indianapolis
Jackson MS
Jacksonville
Kansas City
Las Vegas
Uttle Rock
Los Angeles
Memphis
Miami
Minneapolis
Mobile
New Orleans
New York
Oklahoma City


CITY
La Paz
Uma
London
Madrid
Mexico City
Montreal
Moscow
Nairobi
Nassau
New Delhi
Oslo
Panama
Pads


Saturday Today
HI/Lo/Pcp. HI/Lo/W CITY
74/71/0 83/69/pc .Omah
82/62/0 79/63/pc Odrland
99/74/0 104/77/s Phllai
66/48/0 78/52/pc Phoel
89/68/0 91/69/t Plttst
84/62/0 83/57/s Portli
82/75/0 88/74/s Portl
98/82/0 97/79/s Ralell
80/69/.50 85/70/t Rapid
95/73/0 97/73/s Reno
90/67/0 95/76/pc Rich,
81/67/.06 88/73/pc Sacra
92/75/0 95/74/s St. Lo
94/79/0 96/74/pc Salt L
68/61/0 65/60/pc San
89/76/0 96/76/pc San D
92/80/0 90/78/t San F
72/70/.07 79/61/t Seatt
93/76/0 91/75/s Spok
95/79/0 92/78/s Tamp
83/64/0 83/63/s Tucsi
99/79/0 102/78/pc Wash


Satuay
HI/Lo/Pcp.
55/28/0
73/66/0
64/52/0
86/60/0
81/61/0
79/66/0
73/50/0
77/59/0
93/79/0
99/81/0
61/52/0
91/75/0
66/54/0


luuuy
HI/Lo/W
.59/29/s
71/65/pc
65/54/pc
91/64/s
81/61/t
77/59/pc
68/61/sh
77/61/t
89/79/c
96/86/t
66/48/sh
90/75/t
68/59/c


Saturday Today


la
do
delphla
nix
burgh
and ME
and OR
gh
ICity

nond
imento
ouis
Lake City
Antonio
Diego
Franclsco
le
ane
a
on
ilngton


CITY
Rio
Rome
St. Thomas VI
San Juan PR
Santiago
Seoul
Singapore
Sydney
Tel Aviv
Tokyo
Toronto
Vienna
Warsaw


HI/Lo/Pcp.
75/64/.35
93/73/0
86/68/0
100/77/0
79/64/.09
75/59/0
58/54/.14
94/68/0
74/45/0
77/56/0
92/72/0
78/55/0
81/68/.34
'78/50/0
99/75/0.
72/61/0
64/52/0
56/53/.28
60/50/0
92/79/0
99/75/0
89/69/0


Saturday
HI/Lo/Pcp.
78/66/0
81/64/0
91/81/.01
87/80/0
46/34/0
84/66/0
84/75/0
64/48/0
82/69/0
72/66/0
82/61/0
73/59/0
77/57/0


HI/Lo/W
84/71/pc
96/74/t
86/67/p..
104/77/s
82/66/t
75/53/pc
66/55/pc
91/70/t
72/54/t
75/52/s
88/70/t
89/60/s
92/76/pc
61/50/t
101/79/s
67/58/pc
66/56/pc
65/53/sh
70/49/sh
94/75/t
100/70/s
86/71/t


HI/Lo/W
77 65 5
88/64/pc
88/80/t
85/79/t
58/35/r
88/68/s
89/78/t
62/49/s
83/69/s
74/66/sh
75/57/s
64/59/sh
64/48/c


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Lake City Reporter


Story ideas?

Contact
Tim Kirby
Sports Editor
754-0421
tkirby@lakeatyreporter.com


SPORTS


Sunday. lune 19, 2011


www.lakecityreporter.com


Section 'B


BRIEFS

FORT WHITE FOOTBALL
Q-back club
meeting Monday
The Fort White
Quarterback Club will
meet at 7 p.m. Monday.
Summer fundraisers will
be discussed. All
members and anyone
interested in helping the
club are encouraged to
attend.
For details, call
club president Shayne
Morgan at
(386) 397-4954.
POP WARNER FOOTBALL
Registration
ends Monday
Lake City Pop Warner
football final
registration for new
players is 3-6 p.m.
Monday at Richardson
Community Center. Pop
Warner is seeking girls
ages 5-12 interested in
cheerleading.
For details, call
secretary Kim Stephens
at 623-2954 or e-mail kim
stephens1972@yahoo.corn.
FISHING
Bass tournament
on Saturday
An open bass
tournament to benefit the
Suwannee River Breast
Cancer Awareness
Association is Saturday
at Clay Landing. Cost
is $70 per boat with an
optional big bass pot of
$10. There is 60 percent
payback on the
tournament and 100
percent payback on big
bass pot.
For details, call Jamie
Albritton at
(386) 209-0166, Donnie
Feagle at 365-1191 or
Ruben Thomas at
(386) 288-4691.
YOUTH FOOTBALL
Jackson camp
in High Springs
Fort White High
football coach Demetric
Jackson is conducting a
football camp for
elementary and middle
school children at First
Baptist Church in High
Springs on Friday and
Saturday. Cost of the
camp is $40, with a $5
discount for an additional
sibling.
For details, call
Jackson at 365-3304.
GIRLS SOFTBALL
Crushers clinic
set July 11-15
Columbia Crushers
Softball Organization is
holding an elite softball
clinic for girls of all ages
from 8 a.m. to noon on
July 11-15. There will
be instruction in the
fundamentals of fielding
and hitting. Registration
is at Brian's Sports on
U.S. Highway 90 west.
Registration deadline is
July 5.
For details, go to
columbiacrushers@gmail.
corn or call 755-4271.
ADULT BASKETBALL
Men's games
at Richardson
Open basketball games
for men 18 and older are
played at Richardson
Community Center from
5-8 p.m. on Sundays.
Cost is $3 per session.
For details, call John
Henry Young Jr. at
623-4817.


* From staff reports


Mcllroy dominating


field at U.S. Open


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Rory Mcllroy reacts after making his birdie putt on the 11th
hole during the third round of the U.S. Open Championship
golf tournament in Bethesda, Md. on Saturday.


Ticket


Purple team beats
Rampage, 13-10,
to advance.
By TIM KIRBY
tkirby@lakecityreporter.com
The Lake City Purple "A"
All-Stars punched a ticket
to the state tournament in
their typical fashion with
a come-from-behind win.
The Purple beat MAA
Rampage, 13-10, oi Saturday
to post a perfect record in
the Babe Ruth/Cal Ripken
Rookie Qualifier's "A" All-
Stars' B bracket. Lake City
previously defeated Santa-
Fe and Bradford.
Lake City "A" seemed to
have the game in hand with
a 7-2 lead after 21/2 innings.
The Rampage erased that
margin and more with six
runs in the bottom of the
third for an 8-7 lead, and it
was back to business for the
Purple. Lake City matched
the six-run outburst in the
top of the fourth inning and
made it stand up.
"Our kids never quit,"
coach David Williams said.
"We have been behind every
game in this tournament.
We're used to it. We were
down 9-1 in two games in _, .... , ',, . .


ROOKIES continued on 4B


e kaL City Purple A All-Stars sh
Winning the bracket earned Lak


Young golfer on
pace to break
major record.
By EDDIE PELLS
Associated Press
BETHESDA, Md. Rory
McIlroy kept punishing the
golf course and the record
book Saturday, setting him-'
self up with an eight-shot
lead at the U.S. Open with
18 holes left between him
and his first major champi-
onship.
In a third round that felt
more like a regular day
on tour than the toughest
test in golf, McIlroy shot
3-under-par 68 to finish
at 14-under 199, breaking
Jim Furyk's record for the


best 54-hole score by one
stroke.
McIlroy leads Y.E. Yang
(70) by eight and Lee
Westwood (65), Jason Day
(65) and Robert Garrigus
(68) by nine.
The 22-year-old from
Northern Ireland will sleep
on the lead heading into the
final day of a major for the
second straight time. But
this lead is double the size
of the one he held at the
Masters two months ago;
when he blew up on the
back nine, shot 80 and fin-
ished 15th.
"Overall, I'm very happy
with the way I played
today," McIlroy said. "Now,
I just have to do that for 18
more holes."
Knowing their chanc-


es were slim to catch the
leader, the rest of the field
took its frustration out on
Congressional, a softy of
a course thanks to forgiv-
ing rough and rain-soaked
greens.
There were 26 rounds
under par, a record for
the third round of the U.S.
Open, and the 72 players
carded a total of 224 bird-
ies.
Could've been a scary
scene for McIlroy, who saw
the mid-60s on the board
before he ever reached the
first tee box, but he didn't
waver.
He played scrambling
golf over the first few holes,
while he was having trouble
OPEN continued on 2B


TIM KIRBY/Lake City Reporter
ow off their Rookie Qualifier medals while indicating where the team placed in its bracket.
e City 'A' a trip to the Babe Ruth/Cal Ripken State Tournament.


_Keeping it fair


BRANDON FINLEYILake City Reporter
Umpire Shayne Barber watches-over a game played between Fort White and San Jose's
All-Star teams during the third day of Lake City's Babe Ruth/Cal Ripken Rookie State
Qualifier on Saturday.


Umpires play
important role
in tournament.
By BRANDON FINLEY
bfinley@lakecityreporter.com
Those that have made
their way out to the Babe
Ruth/Cal Ripken State
Rookie Qualifier this week
have noticed some familiar
faces on the field. It's not
the players, but the men in
umpire uniforms.
These men have worked
hard to ensure the fairness
of the competition. For
Trey Hosford, he knows
what it's like being on the
other end of the spectrum
as a former basketball
coach at Columbia High. It
gives him extra motivation
to make the right calls.
'The first thing I want
people to notices is that I'm
working my butt off," he


said. "I want them to see
that I'm hustling to be in
the right position. I want to
do the right thing."
The competition is fierce,
even at this level, but he's
yet to deal with too many
unruly coaches.
'There hasn't been a lot
of controversy," he said.
'They understand it's win
or go home. It can get
intense. There have' been
comments, but nothing per-
sonal, just chatter."
It's not always easy for
the umpires at this level
either. Part of that is due
to the unpredictably of the
age group.
"With this age, you never
know where they're going
to throw it," Hosford said.
'There may be two outs
and a guy on third. Well,
a routine ball could be hit
to the pitcher and instead
UMPIRES continued on 2B


punched


I















Page Editor: Brandon Finley, 754-0420


2B LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS SUNDAY, JUNE 19, 2011


Associated Press

ORLANDO A new
wave of college football
head-coaching candidates
is going to school this
weekend.
Seven African-American
coaches, including three
former NFL players, were
participating Friday in The
Champion Forum, the top
tier of the NCAAs coaching
academy, during weeklong
convention of the National
Association of Collegiate
Directors of Athletics.
The academy is part
of the NCAA's effort to
increase the number of
"ethnic minorities" in head
coaching positions at the
583 institutions that have
football teams. The mes-


SCOREBOARD


TELEVISION

TV sports

Today
AUTO RACING
I p.m.
TNT NASCAR, Sprint Cup, Heluva
Good! Sour Cream Dips 400, at Brooklyn,
Mich.
3:30 p.m.
ABC IRL IndyCar, The Milwaukee
225, at West Allis,Wis.
4:30 p.m.
ESPN2 NHRA, Thunder Valley
Nationals, at Bristol, Tenn. (same-day
tape)
COLLEGE BASEBALL
2 p.m.
ESPN World Series, game 3,
California vs.Virginia, at Omaha, Neb.
7 p.m.
ESPN2 -World Series, game 4, South
Carolina vs. Texas A&M, at Omaha, Neb.
CYCLING
7 p.m.
VERSUS -Tour de Suisse, final stage,
individual time trial, at Schaffhausen,
Switzerland (same-day tape)
GOLF
1:30 p.m.
NBC USGA, U.S. Open
Championship, final round, at Bethesda,
Md.
MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL
1:30 p.m.
TBS Milwaukee at Boston
8 p.m.
ESPN N.Y. Yankees at Chicago
Cubs
MOTORSPORTS
3 p.m.
SPEED FIM World Superbike, at
Valencia, Spain (same-day tape)
12 Midnight
SPEED AMA Pro Racing, at
Birmingham.Ala. (same-day tape)

Monday
COLLEGE BASEBALL
-2 p.m.
ESPN -World Series, game 5, teams
TBD, at Omaha, Neb.
7 p.m.
ESPN2 -World Series, game 6, teams
TBD, at Omaha, Neb.
MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL
7.p.m.
ESPN N.Y.Yankees at Cincinnati
TENNIS
7 a.m.
ESPN2 The Championships, first
round, at Wimbledon, England

BASEBALL

AL standings


Boston
NewYork
Tampa Bay
Toronto
Baltimore

Cleveland
Detroit
Chicago
.Kansas Cit
Minnesota

Texas
Seattle
Los Angeli
Oakland


East Division
S W L Pct
42 27 .609
39 29 .574

5 35 .500,
31 36 .463
Central Division
W L Pct
37 31 .544
38 32, .543
33 38 .465
ty 31 39 .443
29 39 .426
West Division
W L Pct
37 34 .521
36 34 .514
es 34 37 .479
31 40 .437


GB



10

GB
5k

7
8

GB

3
6


Interleague play ,

Friday's Games
Chicago Cubs 3, N.Y.Yankees I
Washington 8, Baltimore 4
Cleveland 5, Pittsburgh I
Tampa Bay 5, Florida I
-LA.Angels 4, N.Y. Mets 3
Boston 10, Milwaukee 4
Toronto 3, Cincinnati 2.
Texas 6,Atianta 2 *
Minnesota 6, San Diego-5 f
Kansas City t, St. Louis 4
Colorado 13, Detroit S I
: Arizona 4, Chicago White Sox I
Oakland 5, San Francisco 2
Seattle 4, Philadelphia 2
Saturday's Games
BWashington 4, Baltimore 2
N.Y.Yankees 4. Chicago Cubs 3
Texas at Atlanta (n)
Pittsburgh at Cleveland (n)
Florida at Tampa Bay (n)
LA.Angels at N.Y. Mets (n)
Milwaukee at Boston (n)
San Diego at Minnesota (n)


Toronto at Cincinnati (n)
Kansas City at St. Louis (n)
Chicago White Sox at Arizona (n)
Detroit at Colorado (n)
San Francisco at Oakland (n)
Philadelphia at Seattle (n)
Today's Games
Pittsburgh (Karstens 4-4) at Cleveland
(Masterson 5-5), 1:05 p.m.
LIA. Angels (Chatwood 3-4) at N.Y.
Mets (Niese 6-5), 1:10 p.m.
Toronto (C.Villanueva 4-0) at
Cincinnati (Arroyo 5-6), 1:10 p.m.
Baltimore (jakubauskas 1-0) at
Washington (Gorzelanny 2-4), 1:35 p.m.
Milwaukee (Gallardo 8-3) at Boston
(Wakefield 3-2), 1:35 p.m.
Texas (Ogando 7-1) atAtlanta (jurrjens
8-3), 1:35 p.m.
Florida (Volstad 2-7) at Tampa Bay
(Shields 6-4), 1:40 p.m.
San Diego (Moseley 2-6) at Minnesota
(Uriano 4-6), 2:10 p.m.
Kansas City (Duffy 1-2) at St. Louis
(J.Garcia 6-2), 2:15 p.m.
Detroit (Verlander 8-3) at Colorado
(Cook 0-1), 3:10 p.m.
San Francisco (Cain 6-4) at Oakland
(Cahill 6-5), 4:05 p.m.
Chicago White Sox (Humber 6-3) at
Arizona (Collmenter 4-2), 4:10 p.m.
Philadelphia (Hamels 9-2) at Seattle
(Vargas 4-4),4:10 p.m.
N.Y.Yankees (Sabathia 8-4) at Chicago
Cubs (R.Wells I-I), 8:05 p.m.
Monday's Games '
Baltimore at Pittsburgh, 7:05 p.m.
Colorado at Cleveland, 7:05 p.m.
LA.Angels at Florida, 7:10 p.m.
N.Y.Yankees at Cincinnati, 7:10 p.m.
San Diego at Boston, 7:10 p.m.
Toronto at Atlanta, 7:10 p.m.
Houston at Texas, 8:05 p.m.
Chicago Cubs at Chicago White Sox,
8:10 p.m.
Tampa Bay at Milwaukee, 8:10 p.m.
Detroit at L.A. Dodgers, 10:10 p.m.

NL standings

East Division
W L Pct GB
Philadelphia 44 27 .620 -
Atlanta 39 32 .549 5
New York 34 36 .486 9'h
Washington 34 36 .486 9hl
Florida 32 38 .457 II'/
Central Division
W L Pet GB
Milwaukee 39 32 .549 -
St. Louis 38 33 .535 I
Cincinnati 37 34 .521 2'
Pittsburgh 35 '34 .507 3
Chicago 29 40 .420 9
Houston 26 45 .366 13
West Division
W L Pet GB
San Francisco 39 31 .557 -.
Arizona 39 .32 .549 'k
Colorado 34 35 .493 4'h
Los Angeles 31 40 .437 8'k
San Diego 30 41 .423 9'A
Friday's Game
Houston 7, LA. Dodgers 3
Saturday's Game
Houston atiLA. Dodgers (n)
Tloday's Game
Houston (No.ris 4-5) at LA. Dodgers
(Kuroda 5-8), 4:10 p.m.

CollegeWorld Series

AtTD Ameritrade Park Omaha
Omaha, Neb.
(Double elimination)
Saturday
Game I North Carolina vs.
Vanderbilt
Game 2 -Texas vs. Florida (n)
Today
Game 3 California (37-21) vs.
Virginia (54-10), 2 p.m.
Game 4 -South Carolina (50-14) vs.
Texas A&M (47-20), 7 p.m.
Monday
Game 5 Game I loser.vs. Game 2
loser, 2 p.m.
Game 6 Game I- winner vs. Game
2 winrer. 7 p.m.
Tuesday
Game. 7 Game 3 loser vs. Game 4
loser, 2p.m. ,
Game 8 Game 3, winner vs. Game
4 winner, 7 p.m. "

BASKETBALL'

'WNBA schedule'

Friday's Games
S Minnesota 96,Atlanta 85
Chicago 85, New York 73
San Antonio 101, Phoenix 99
Seattle 68, Indiana 54
Saturday's Game


Washington at Tulsa (n)
Today's Games
Chicago at Connecticut, I p.m.
Minnesota at Atlanta, 3 p.m.
Indiana at Phoenix, 6 p.m.
Seattle at Los Angeles, 8:30 p.m.

AUTO RACING

Race week

NASCAR
Heluva Good! Sour Cream Dips 400
Site: Brooklyn, Mich.
Schedule: Today,, I p.m. (TNT, noon-
4:15 p.m.).
Track-Michigan International Speedway
(oval, 2.0 miles).
Race distance: 400 miles, 200 laps.
INDYCAR
The Milwaukee 225
Site:WestAllis,Wis.
Schedule: Today, race, 3 p.m. (ABC,
2-6 p.m).
Track The Milwaukee Mile (oval, 1.0
miles).
Race distance: 225 miles, 225 laps.
NHRA FULLTHROTTLE
Thunder Valley Nationals
Site: Bristol,Tenn.
Schedule: Today, final eliminations
(ESPN2,4:30-7 p.m.),
Track: Bristol Dragway.

Michigan qualifying

At Michigan International Speedway
Brooklyn, Mich.
Saturday qualifying; race today
(Car number in parentheses)
I. (22) Kurt Busch, Dodge, 188.699
mph.
2. (00) David Reutimann, Toyota,
188.684.
3. (17) Matt Kenseth, Ford, 188.62.
4. (83) Brian Vickers, Toyota, 188.157.
5. (78) Regan Smith, Chevrolet,
187.607.
6. (14) Tony Stewart, Chevrolet,
187.578.
7. (16) Greg Biffle, Ford, 187.554.
8. (4) Kasey Kahne,Toyota, 187.534.
9. (27) Paul Menard, Chevrolet,
187.485.
10. (11) Denny Hamlin, Toyota,
187.437.
II. (56) Martin Truex Jr., Toyota,
187.393.
12. (51) Landon Cassill, Chevrolet,
187.232.
13. (39) Ryan Newman, Chevrolet,
187.227.
14. (1) Jamie McMurray, Chevrolet,
187.154.
IS. (88) Dale Earnhardt Jr., Chevrolet,
187.13.
16. (47) Bobby Labonte, Toyota,
187.062.
17. (21) Trevor Bayne, Ford, 187.032.
18. (9) Marcos Ambrose, Ford,
187.023.
19. (5) Mark Martin, Chevrolet,
186.969.
20. (6) David Ragan, Ford, 186.732.
21. (48) Jimmie Johnson, Chevrolet,
186.669.
22. (29) Kevin Harvick, Chevrolet,
186.669.
23. (99) Carl Edwards, Ford, 186.601.
24. (18) Kyle Busch.Toyota, 186.567.
25.(42) Juan Pablo Montoya, Chevrolet,
186.553.
26. (43) A J Allmendinger, Ford,
186.509.
27. (33) Clint Bowyer, Chevrolet,
186.403.
28. (38)Travis Kvapil, Ford, 186.22.
29. (87) Joe Nemechek, Toyota,
185.821.
30. (20) Joey Logano.Toyota, 185.749.
3.1. (24) Jeff Gordon, Chevrolet,
185.711.
32. (30) David Stremme, Chevrolet.-
185.644..
33. (31) Jeff Burton, Chevrolet,
185.553.
34. (46) J.J.Yeley, Chevrolet, 185.304.
35. (32) Mike Bliss, Ford, 185.252.
30. (71) Andy Lally, Ford, 184.776.
37. (7) Robby Gordon, Dodge,
184.686.
38. (66) Michael McDowell, Toyota,
184.573. ,
39%(13) Casey Mears,Toyota, 184.544.
40. (34) David Gilliland,,Ford, 184.44..
41. (2) Brad 'Keselowski, Dodge,
184.176.
42.(36) Dave Blaney, Chevrolet, owner
points.
43. (81) Scott Riggs, Chevrolet,
183.781.
Failed to Qualify
44. (37) Tony Raines, Ford, 183.744.
45. (92) Brian Keselowski, Chevrolet,
182.463.
46.(60) Mike SkinnerToyota, 181.539.


NCAA aims to increase


sage being delivered this
year is that today's head
coach has to do more than
teach blocking and tack-
ling.
"One of the things I've
taken is that there are a lot
more things to running a
program than the X-and-O
part of it," said Notre Dame
outside linebackers coach
Kerry Cooks, who played
for the Green Bay Packers
in 1998.
Among them are fund-
raising and budgeting;
media, alumni and booster
relations; compliance con-
siderations; and the man-
agement of a large staff.
"In 2011, you won't get a
job because you can coach,"
University of Virginia
Athletic Director Jon Oliver


said in a seminar Friday
morning. "You've got to
be a CEO.. You've got to
manage a lot of different
things."
Until recently, only
whites were consid-
ered for most jobs. Even
today, seven years after the
NCAA created the coach-
ing academies, only 18. of
120 Bowl Subdivision foot-
ball programs are coached
by members of an ethnic
minority.
"My personal opinion is
there's still, a long way to
go," Cooks said. "You look
at the number of Division
I head coaches and how
many minorities there are,
and it's astounding."
The percentage is even
lower in other divisions.


- HOLEI 112! 314 11 10i111 12 1311415 16 17J18


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Rory Mcllroy looks up at a leaderboard during the third round of the U.S. Open
Championship golf tournament in Bethesda, Md. on Saturday.


.OPEN: McIlroy has lead on field


Continued From Page 113


finding the fairway, then
made birdies on No. 5, 9, 11
and 14 to get to 14-under, a
'number never seen before
on a U.S. Open scoreboard.
Of course, that's old news
by now. On Friday, McIlroy
reached 13 under for the
first time in U.S. Open his-
tory and took a record-tying
six-stroke cushion into the
weekend.
His eight-shot advan-
tage is two short of the
lead Tiger Woods took to
Sunday at Pebble Beach in
.2000, when he routed. the
field by 15 shots. Though
McIlroy is drawing com-
parisons to Woods, he
wants no part of it
"I'm still looking for my
first one," McIlroy said.
"That's all I can say. I'm
looking for my first one. I
put myself in good position


to do it tomorrow and well
see what happens."
The way he's playing,
and with a cushion as soft
as the golf course he's
overrunning, it would take
something of epic propor-
tions to prevent it.
The rest of the players
realize that
"When you go in 12
behind somebody, you can
play as well as you'd like to
play but it's still going to be
a matter of the leader com-
ing back to you," Westwood
said. "No use thinking about
what Rory's doing. But I've
played with big leads in the
past It's not easy. We'll see
what happens."
McIlroy did, in fact, make
a bogey on No. 10 after hit-
ting his tee shot on the par-
3 into a back bunker.
But he came back on No.


11, hitting an approach shot
from the rough to 18 feet,
then sinking the putt and
fist pumping as he walked
to grab the ball from the
hole.
That put him back at 13-
under par. On 14, he hit
his approach to 6 feet and
made that.
On the front side,
McIlrqy wasn't nearly as
locked in early Saturday as
he was during the first two
rounds, when he set the
36-hole U.S. Open scoring
record at 11-under 131. He
missed fairways on 1, 3,
8 and 9 on the front side
and pushed his approach
into a greenside bunker on
No. 4. But he made par or
better on all those holes
and his lead six shots
at the beginning of the day
- never shrank.


UMPIRES: Play important role


Continued From Page 1B

of throwing to first, they
might throw home. So you
have to be on your toes."
Most of the umpires in
the organization have been
involved for quite a while.
Hqsford has been umpiring
games for 18 years.
"I like baseball, so I enjoy
doing it," he said. "The
money is way better than
when I started and I get to


ACROSS

1 Fugue master
5 Pizza Hut alter-
native
8 Heroic tale
12 Slick
13 Huntsville loc.
14 Fire brigade
tools
15 Sleep like -
16 Quakes
18 Added cinna-
mon
20 Gaynor or
Leigh
21 Mag execs
22 Coal scuttle
23 Zen riddles
26 Shah's domain
29 Lo-cal
30 Klaxon
31 Electrical unit
33 Rocky
Mountain hrs.
34 Tart
35 Pre-owned
36 Swallow up
38 Pithy saying


work along with friends."
Umpires earn $35 per
game. During the three-
day stretch in Lake City,
most umpires will do close
to 20 games. Hosford said
he could do 80 before the
end of the summer.
He gave thanks to Mike
Paphides, who is head of
the umpire association, for
making things run smooth.


39 Ben & Jerry
rival
40 Autumn mo.
41 Country's Buck

44 Relent (2 wds.)
47 Carrying to and
fro
49 Ancient empire
51 Wife, to a
lawyer
52 Uh-uh
53 Fibber, plus
54 Jacuzzis
55 RCMP patrol
zone
56 PDQ

DOWN

1 Glamorous
wrap
2 Catches cold
3 Filly's footfall
4 Cleanliness
5 Smith and
Winslet
6 Bolted
7 Trippet


"He handles all the book-
ing," Hosford said. "It
allows us to work and he
trust in us. I've got to thank
him and John Lucas. When
I first started they would
take two guys to the state
tournament, but now they
take all Lake City guys.
That's part to do with the
job Mike does. He deserves
a lot of the credit"


Answer to Previous Puzzle

S Ki ID METS CPA
IN Y ACDC HU M
BE N LOSE FAC E
A AT N E S


P-OA|K|E|N G NA W
S A L WN IAO I LY
H JIDIILI



A LO|E PEON LEO

YE S PRYO
SA SOAKEI
CAA O Ns pRY STR|B

LI LY PADS TAPE
E DO E VI L ER I E
F A DDEMO R ISK


8 Light lunches
9 Dendrite's part-
ner
10 "Primal Fear"
star
11 Type of prof


Want more puzzles?
e "Just Right Crossword Puzzles" books
at QuillDrlverBooks.com1


17 Borg of ten-
nis
19 Boombox plat-
ters
22 Frau's spouse
23 Dutch carrier
24 Seine feeder
25 Business let-
ter abbr.
26 Upswept hair-
do
27 "- -
Excited"
28 Attention-get-
ter
30 Grail descrip-
tor
32 Kind of poem
34 Frothy
35 Discloses
37 Jazz and rap
38 Admin. head
40 Darkness
41 Switch posi-
tions
42 Blubber
43 Funny
Bombeck
44 Eat away at
45 Put one's foot

46 Rose Bowl
org.
48 Quaint hotel
50 But is it -?


6-20 2011 UFS, Dist. by Universal Uclick for UFS


minority head coaches Check outth
1 1o i IA


LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS SUNDAY, JUNE 19, 2011


2B















LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS SUNDAY, JUNE 19, 2011


Edwards edges


Stenhouse in

Nationwide race


By NOAH TRISTER
Associated Press

BROOKLYN, Mich.
Carl Edwards was
impressed by how hard it
was to pass teammate Ricky
Stenhouse Jr. as the two
fought for the lead.
After Edwards finally
moved ahead, Stenhouse
remained in second to
give owner Jack Roush
a 1-2 finish at Michigan
International Speedway.
'This is coming home
* for me," said Roush, who
has ties to Michigan dating
to when he began working
for Ford during the 1960s.
'The fact that we've been
able to have the success
we've had in our backyard
is really fun."
Edwards passed
Stenhouse with less, than
10 laps remaining Saturday
to earn his fourth NASCAR
Nationwide victory of
the year. He had finished
second in three straight
Nationwide races since win-
ning at Dover in May, but he
was able to slip underneath
Stenhouse and then cut in
front of him before holding
on to win by 1,669 seconds
in the No. 60 Ford.
It was Edwards' 33rd
career Nationwide victory.
'The laps kept, ticking
down, and I was driving
harder and harder and I was
not catching himr," Edwards
said. "His car wasn't as bal-
anced as mine, and we were
able to get by him. With
15 to go, I didn't think we


were going to be able to get
him."
It was Roush Fenway's
record fifth series win at
Michigan. After his victo-
ry, Edwards did his usual
back- flip, then went run-
ning into the stands to
celebrate. He finished sec-
ond in a Nationwide race
at MIS in August and won
one in 2008. He also has
two Sprint Cup wins at this
venue and will race in that
series Sunday.
Mark Martin, seeking
his 50th Nationwide win;
was the leader coming out
of the third and final cau-
tion on the 100th of 125
laps. Edwards and Kyle
Busch quickly passed him,
but Stenhouse moved to the
lead not long after that
Stenhouse led laps 104-
116, but Edwards remained
patient and denied
Stenhouse what would have
been his second win of the
year.
"It was more work than I
thought it was going to be,"
Edwards said. "I really had
to drive hard. He is really
getting good at this. He is
going to be.very tough."
Edwards, the Sprint Cup
points leader, isn't eligible
to earn Nationwide points.
Stenhouse now leads the
series standings. Elliott
Sadler, eighth Saturday, is
second. Reed Sorenson, the
points leader entering the
race, finished 11th follow-
ing an early pass-through
penalty for a commitment-
line violation.


Kurt Busch takes

3rd straight

Sprint Cup pole


By NOAH TRISTER
Associated Press

BROOKLYN, Mich. -
Another race, another pole
for Kurt Busch. This is a
drill he's happy to get used
to.
'To be on the pole three
weeks, what it does there
are so many benefits behind
the scenes," Busch said.
"Picking your pit selection
first, having track position
right away in the race; ...
You could have a slow pit
crew, and you have that first
pit box, that's going to help
you get out in front of guys
throughout the day~."
Busch won his third
consecutive pole in the
NASCAR Sprint Cup series,
finishing first in qualify-
ing Saturday at Michigan
International Speedway
with a lap of 188.699 miles
per hour. He's the first
driver to win three straight
poles since Brian Vickers
in 2009, and two qualify-
ing sessions were canceled
during that streak. The last
person to win three poles
in three races was Ryan
Newman in 2007.
Busch is sixth in the



Unscramble these four Jumbles,
one letter to each square,
to form four ordinary words.


points standings and has
finished in the top 10 three
straight races, including
a second-place showing
last weekend 'at Pocono
Raceway. He has not won in
2011, but he's enjoyed bet-
ter results after taking his
Penske Racing team to task
earlier this season.
"I'm thankful that every-
body was able to pull togeth-'
er and understand that we
should just try something
different," he said. "It's
great to be able to see the
results pop up so soon. I
had no idea that we were
right around the corner."
Busch was forced to a,
backup car last weekend
after damaging his No. 22
Dodge in practice. There's
been less drama this time
around as he prepares for
Sunday's 400-mile race.
'This was a conventional
weekend, so to speak," he
said.
Busch was the pole-sitter
in Michigan last June as
well, and he finished third.
David Reutimann
(188.684 mph) was secondin
qualifying, and Matt
Kenseth (188.620) was
third.

THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME
by David L. Hoyt and Jeff Knurek


I THE MASSAGE THERAPIST
RA, I= k BOUGHT A NEW HEADSET
SFaR HER PHONE 50 SHE
VCTIYA COUUP o THIS.
S- Now arrange the circled letters
to form the surprise answer, as
suggested by the above cartoon.

A: EL
(Answers tomorrow)
Saturday's Jumbles: MIGHT PLUSH POISON MOTHER
Answer: The bartender in the bird bar was a -
STOOL PIGEON


Return of the Williams sisters


By HOWARD FENDRICH
Associated Press

Two simple words
at the end of a June 7
tweet said it all: "Serena's
back!"
And Venus is, too.
Yes, as SerenaWilliams
announced to the world
less than two weeks ago,
the most successful ten-
nis-playing siblings in
history are returning
from lengthy layoffs right
on time for Wimbledon,
where they just so hap-
pen to have won nine of
the past 11 singles cham-
pionships.
For Serena, it will be
her first Grand Slam tour-
nament and only sec-
ond event since she took
home a second consecutive
title from the All England
Club- in July 2010. Her
nearly yearlong absence
resulted from a series of
health issues, including two
foot operations and blood
clots in her lungs, that she
said left her depressed and
"on my deathbed." Venus,
meanwhile, was sidelined
by a hip injury from January
until June.
When the grass-court
Grand Slam tournament
begins Monday, all eyes
will be on them. -
"I feel like we've been on
a similar road together. Her
road hasn't been as arduous
oras long as mine, butIknow
what she's been through
coming back," Serena said
at a tuneup tournament
this week in Eastbourne,


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Venus Williams plays a return to Slovakia's Daniela
Hantuchova during their quarterfinal single tennis match
at the Eastbourne International grass court tournament in
Eastbourne, England, on Thursday.


England. "We've been really
enjoying our time just get-
ting back together and prac-
ticing next to her and look-
ing over and seeing her play
so well. I'm like, 'OK, I've,
got to do better."'
There are, to be sure,
other plot lines worth track-
ing during the fortnight
Among them: Can Roger
Federer.make a real run at
a seventh Wimbledon title?
Can Rafael Nadal extend
his recent excellence to
five titles in a span of six
Grand Slam tournaments?
Can Novak Djokovic recov-
er from the end of his 43-
match winning streak to
win a major title other than
the Australian Open? Can
Andy Murray finally and
mercifully put an end
to the locals' 75-year wait
for a British male cham-
pion at the All England
Club? Might No. 1-ranked


S R
G I
H H
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T L
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I K,- U -4

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B F
I.
SG X
Z V
I Z V


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V
W
E


A F
M Y.


M P


Caroline Wozniacki win
her first Grand Slam title?
Could China's Li Na win
her second in a row? Will
Maria Sharapova end her
3M-year major drought?
But the biggest curios-
ity, at least at the outset,
is: How will the Williams
sisters do?
Part of the interest
stems from wondering
how much longer they'll
be around. Venus turned
31 on Friday; Serena will
be 30 in September.
"Whenever they enter a
Grand Slam tournament,
it's double the excitement
and double the intrigue, I
think, that they bring to the
sport. They just bring a dif-
ferent level of tennis also,
as far as the power and
the emotional content,"
said ESPN2 analyst Chris
Evert, who won 18 Grand
Slam titles.


--- - - - - - - - *
E H T A F B S E I B A B
N ,X I V A V J B Q V T D
I
B L W R R ,F S L N K B E
W T B T Z X R N W L Z' A
Z E D V F R E W M X E
Q A I :L:G:G C T L..S S D V
,C: P; N A H, H H. '0.- X : B 0,
I
F D N Z E I G Z SI R L
Y N E I H L U W M B iE C
I A R F Q D A P H I A AA
R R 0 Q B R D X C K K N
U G U W I E H C H F F D.
O U T F D N- M A T F A Y
I
F J B P D K. N I A W S B
L Z JH JD E C SC T Q
E,A V Y P S L O 0 T I L I
D B W R Z N J V T F N N L
X D I N-W A P J E D B B
F Ni A J M K U N W U E V I


'It would be monumen-
tal in my mind if Serena
pulled off a win," Evert
added. "I personally don't
know how it's humanly
possible for someone to
take a year off like that and
have gone through what
she's been through physi-
cally with her ailments and
... it would almost shock
me if she did. But knowing
Serena and the way she's
come back before, you can
never count her out"
Evert --who said 'she
never was away from
the tour longer than four
months is one of only
five .women in tennis his-
tory who have won more
major championships than
Serena's 13. The others
are Margaret Court (24),
Steffi Graf (22), Helen Wills
Moody (19) and Martina
Navratilova (18). Among
active players, of course,
Serena ranks No. 1, fol-
lowed by Venus with seven.
No one else in this year's
Wimbledon women's field
has more than three Grand
Slam titles (Kim Clijsters
has four, but'she pulled out
with a foot injury).
Indeed, it's remarkable
to examine the measur-
able ways in which Serena
and Venus have domi-
nated women's tennis,
in general and the All
England Club, in particular
across the years. That's.
why Serena is seeded No.
7 at Wimbledon, despite
being ranked 26th; Venus
is seeded 23rd, despite
being ranked 33rd.
i


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Page Editor: Brandon Finley, 754-0420


11













LKCIYREOTR SO T SUDYJUE1,21Paedto:BndnFne,7400


BRANDON FINLEY/Lake City Reporter
Zion Burney of the Taylor All-Stars makes a catch during one of the afternoon games at the
Babe Ruth/Cal Ripken Rookie State Qualifier.


ROOKIES: Purple team wins bracket
Continued From Page 1B


Photos by BRANDON FINLEY/Lake City Reporter


a tournament in Belleview
and won both of them. The
kids played well. They hit
the ball every game about
as good as they could hit
it"
Lake City "A" made the
field at the Babe Ruth/Cal
Ripken State Tournament
on July 1-4 in West Palm
Beach. The team will be
playing to advance to the
regional in Alabama.
The Purple jumped out to
a 3-0 lead in the top of the
first inning, all.coming with
two outs. Cole Williams had
an infield hit, then Logan
Dicks (double), Devin
Landry and Ty Wehinger
(double) produced RBIs.
Mason Gray tripled to
lead off the second inning
and scored on a sacrifice fly
by Darren Eubank. Colby
Black and Zac Maxwell
later singled, but the Purple
stranded two runners. The
Rampage scored twice in
the bottom of the inning to
cut the lead in half.


Lake City looked like it
would blow the game open
with five consecutive hits to
start the third inning. Tyler
Yaxley (double), Dicks,
Landry (RBI), Wehinger
(RBI) and Colby Holton
(RBI) recorded the hits.
The MAA defense stiffened
and got three straight outs.
The Rampage scored
their six runs in the third
inning on seven hits, and
half came with two outs.
Five batters produced RBIs,
as MAA took the lead.
Maxwell started the win-
ning rally with a double.
Williams singled Maxwell
home and Yaxley added an
RBI-double. Dicks bunted
for a base hit and both
Landry and Wehinger sent
in runs with ground balls
to second base. Holton
capped the scoring with an
RBI-single.
Kade Jackson singled in
the fifth inning, but Lake
City could not add to its
13-9 lead.


The time-limit rule made
the bottom of the fifth
inning the last chance for
the Rampage. They scored
one run, but Lake City
tagged out a base runner
and Williams made a stab
at shortstop on a line shot.
Grey nestled under a fly
ball in left field to notch the
final out.
Anthony Taylor was
3-for-3 for MAA with \an
RBI and two runs scored.
Tyler Graves (double,
two runs scored), Luke
Lemesters (run scored),
Jacob Roberson (two
RBIs, two runs scored),
Victor Manuel (two RBIs,
run scored) and Connor
Phillips (two RBIs) had two
hits apiece.'
Lake City's "B" team
advanced to today's wild-
card round with a 12-7 win
against Jacksonville Beach
in one of the afternoon
games. The opponent and
time of the game were yet
to be determined.


ABOVE: Fort White All-Star Caedrin Blancett covers the base while Cal Leonard of the San
Jose All-Stars rounds third during a game on Satuday.

BELOW: Members of the Suwannee and Bradford All-Star teams shake hands after a game
on Saturday.


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LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS SUNDAY, JUNE 19, 2011


Page Editor:,Brandon Finley, 754-0420


CJ-











Lake City Reporter


Story ideas?

Robert Bridges
Editor
754-0428
rbridges@lakecityreportercom


BUSINESS


Sunday, June 19, 2011


www.lakecityreporter.com


Section C


Lake City Reporter

names Mandy Brown

circulation director


From staff reports

Mandy Brown has been
named Circulation Director
of the Lake City Reporter,
according to Publisher Todd
Wilson.
Brown, 34, moved to Lake
City as a teenager and is a
graduate of Columbia High
School. She attended Lake
City Community College.
She also is a Dale Carnegie
Management Course con-
tinuing education graduate.
Brown has been a circula-
tion accounting clerk with
the Reporter for the past
year. Prior to joining the
staff, she served as 'an audi-
tor in the banking industry.


"Mandy has great people
skills and has learned the
business of newspaper cir-
culation during the past
year," Wilson said. "She is
outstanding with customers,
our carrier contractors and
understands what it takes
to make sure the Lake City
Reporter is delivered to our
customers each morning. I
congratulate her on earning
this promotion."
Brown and her husband,
Steve, are the parents of one
daughter, Cheyenne.
"I am, excited for this
opportunity and I am look-
ing forward to continuing to
serve our readers," Brown
said.


SRWMD pilot program


stresses water conservation


By TONY BRITT and ANTONIA
ROBINSON
tbritt@lakecityreporter.com, aro-
binson@lakecityreporter.com
Conservation in the hotel,
motel and restaurant indus-
try is becoming a popular
trend as corporations make
moves to be environmentally
friendly.
Locally, several lodging
establishments are taking
part in programs designed to
promote being "green" busi-
nesses and conserving natu-
ral resources. Many are also
participating in the Suwannee
River Water Management
District's new pilot programs
in Columbia County promot-
ing water conservation.
Cindy Johnson,


Ichetucknee Partiership
Coordinator, recently made a
presentation to the Columbia
County Tourist Development
Council promoting the efforts
which are called Project
Planet and Water' Champ.
The programs are compli-
mentary programs of each
other and focus on reusing
linens and towels.
'We're trying to get as
many hotels and motels in
Columbia County and Lake
City involved in the program,
so we can promote water con-
servation and springs protec-
tion," Johnson said.
The use and reuse part
of the project focuses on
reducing the number of hotel
WATER continued on 2C


TONY BRIlake Ci Reporter
Cindy Johnson, Ichetucknee Partnership Coordinator
(from left), shows Suzpnne Moses, Super 8 general
manager and Rod Butler, Holiday Inn and Suites general
manager, Project Planet displays at a recent Columbia
County Tourist Development Council meeting.


4th of July Fireworks Celebration returns with a bang


p he Lake City
Columbia
County
Chamber of
SCommerce is
pleased to announce, that
we will be again hosting
the 4th of July Fireworks
Celebration. This is
'especially good news
considering many local
communities have had,
to cancel their fireworks
due to budget constraints.
Our local government
and business community


have stepped up to ensure
that the tradition of 4th of
July at Lake DeSoto will
continue. If you see these
businesses around town,
make sure to thank them
for helping to provide a
family fun activity to make
our community a better
place to live and work.
Title Sponsor: The Lake
City Reporter, Presenting
Sponsors: The City of
Lake City, Columbia
County Board of County'
Commissioners and First


CHAMBER BUSINESS


Dennille Folsom
dennille@lakecitychambercom
Baptist Chuich. Sponsors:
Anderson Columbia Co,
Inc., Baya Pharmacy,
Century Ambulance


Service, Columbia Bank,
Columbia County Tourism
Development Council,
Comfort Suites, First
Federal Bank of Florida,
Hampton Inn and Suites,,
Heritage Bank of the
South,'Lake City News-
Advertiser, Lifeguard
Ambulance Service,
Main Street Broadband,
Meridian Behavioral
Healthcare, New
Millennium, North Florida
Pharmacy, North Florida
Sales, Ole Times Country


Buffet, People's State
Bank, Rountree-Moore
Automotive Group, S&S
Food Stores, Sav A Lot,
Shands at Lake Shore, TD
Bank, Texas Roadhouse,
Vystar Credit Union and
Wal- Mart.
Our 4th of July event
draws over 25,000 people
from Lake City and sur-
rounding counties to
downtown Lake City. If you.
have never been to our
local celebration here is
what you can expect, musi-


cal entertainment, free
children's activities includ-
ing six bounce units, a
wide variety of vendors -
don't forget there will be
several who will be serv-
ing food so come hungry!
Plus many other surprises
along the way! The festivi-
ties will begin around the
lake at 5 p.m. on Monday,
July 4th. The fireworks will
be released at 9:20 p.m. or
when it is dark enough for

FOLSOM continued on 2C


.. in,.


A Proud Supporter of:

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10.- (386) 755-5110 www.danielcrapps.com
CALL OR COME IN FOR

FREE
LIST OF FORECLOSURE AND/OR SHORT-SALE PROPERTIES
ACT FAST... THESE DO NOT LAST


,MO N D A Y ,'_ -:.l-rr;--------


- - -- I - -- ----


-m.


'


F


I JU Y 4TH














I


Disregard That
Purchase Price
I bought a stock near its
all-time high. Should I hold
on, or sell it? A.G., West Palm
Beach, Fla.
A The price you paid for the
stock is important when you
sell it and calculate yo&r gain (or
loss) for tax purposes. But most of
the time, don't think about it too
much. What really matters is the
current price and your estimate of
the stock's true fair price.
For example, imagine you
bought shares of Carrier Pigeon
Communications (ticker:
SQUAWK) for $60 each and-
they're now trading for $40 each.
If you think the shares are, worth
$50, you should probably hang 'oi.
If you think they're worth less than
$40, selling might be best.
Ignore the fact that you're
down $20 per share. If you'd
bought the shares for $10 each,.
you'd be up $30 per share, but
your thinking should be the same..
hang on if you think more
growth is ahead, and sell if you
expect the shares to falter.
Never hang on to a stock just
in the hope of recouping your losses.
You can always try to make your
money back m another stock,
ideally one m which you have
much more confidence.

Q Wch mutual funds pay the
most money to shareholders?
D.P.. Decanr, Ill.
A Income" funds aim to
"spit out cash regularly by
investing mainly in securities that
pay interest or dividends. Other
kinds of funds (such as "growth"
or "value" ones) typically aim to
reward shareholders mainly via
stock price appreciation.
For recommendations of
top-notch, low-fee mutual funds.
as well as some model portfolios,
take advantage ofa free trial of our
"Rule Your Retirement" newsletter
at www.ruleyourretiremenLcom.
Got a question for the Fool. Send it in
S-see hile to Us


The Motley Fool

To Educate, Amuse & Enrich


Fo ol's Schoo

Better Than a 401(k)
Your 401(k), 403(b) or 457 plan
may not be your single best bet for
retirement savings.
Economists Laurence J. Kotlikoff
and Jagadeesh Gokhale, for example,
have suggested that many investors
would have more money in retire-
ment if they contributed tp
accounts other than 401(k)s.
That's because withdraw-
als,from 401(k) accounts are
taxed as ordinary income, instead of
at the lower capital gains rates for
long-term holdings. The withdrawals
can also push retirees into higher tax
brackets. Qualified Roth IRA with-
drawals, meanwhile, are tax-free.
If your employer matches your
retirement plan contributions, Kot-
likoff and Gokhale advise contribut-
ing enough to take full advantage of
that free money. After that, you're
probably better off putting your next
dollars in a Roth IRA, if you're eli-
gible, to the.maximum allowed. (If
your employer doesn't offer a match,,
you might contribute the maximum
amount to a Roth IRA before even
considering another option.)
Oo o 0


Assets in an employer-sponsored
plan (and in a traditional IRA, for
that matter) must start being distrib-
uted by the time the account owner
turns 70 1/2, whether the money is
needed or not. The account owner
loses the benefit of tax-deferral on
money withdrawn. With a Roth
IRA, however, if the money isn't
needed, it can continue to grow,
tax-free, no matter how old you get.
Also, withdrawals from work
plans and traditional IRAs before
the account owner is age 59 1/2
result in immediate taxation and
a 10 percent penalty. Some plans
allow participants to borrow from
their plans, but many don't. Con-
tributions to (but not earnings in) a
Roth IRA may be withdrawn any-
time, penalty- and tax-free. That's
also true for earnings withdrawn for
first-time home purchases as long as
the money has been in the account
for at least five tax years. This isn't
always a smart thing to do, but if
you need the money, it's there.
Of course, everyone's situation is
different, and tax laws can change
over time. So before taking action,
learn more at www.fool.com/
retirement or www.irs.gov, or
consult a financial adviser.


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You probably don't know my


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Founded in 1923 as "Economics Laboratory"
and based in Minnesota, I employ more than
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be entered miri a drawing for a nifty prize!
02011 THEMonTuFoo0


.


Oil falls 2 percent, to


$93 a barrel; gas lower


By CHRIS KAHN
AP Energy Writer

NEW YORK Oil
dropped to about $93 per
barrel for the first tiie
since February as the
European financial crisis
kept investors on edge
about the international
banking industry and the
prospects for global eco-
nomic growth this year.
Benchmark West Texas
Intermediate crude for
July delivery lost $1.94,
or 2 percent, to' settle at
$93.01 per barrel on the
New York Mercantile
Exchange. Oil has retreat-
ed about 6 percent this
week. In London Brent
crude, which is used to
price many international
oil varieties, declined 81
cents to settle at $113.21
per barrel on the ICE
Futures exchange.
"There's still a case for
fairly lofty prices later this
year, but right now, there's
not that much confidence


that the economic picture
will improve," .said Tom-
Kloza, publisher and chief
oil analyst at Oil Price
Information Service.
Oil tumbled this week
as .Greece struggled to
generate support for criti-
cal financial reforms nec-
essary to continue bail-
out payments from the
European Union. Riots
broke out over auster-
ity measures, and' cred-
it agencies warned that
the country's financial
troubles could mean big
banking losses in other
countries.
In addition the dollar.
rose this week as the euro
and other currencies fell.
That helped push down
oil. Crude is priced in U.S.
currency and tends to fall
as the dollar rises and
makes oil more expensive
for investors with foreign
money.
Oil demand has been
falling, in the .U.S., and
the Energy Information


Administration said that
trend continued this week.
EIA said Wednesday that
petroleum consumption
fell 3.2 percent when com-
pared with levels from a
year ago. Wholesale gaso-
line demand was up 0.5
percent. That was the first
increase in weeks.
At the pump retail
gasoline prices fell by a
penny on Friday to a new
national average of $3.675
per gallon, according to
AAA, Wright Express
and Oil Price Information
Service. Gasoline has
dropped 25.1 cents in the
last month, but it's still
96.8 cents higher than a
year ago.
In other Nymex trading
for July contracts, heating
oil gave up 2.05 cents to
settle at $2.9833 per gal-
lon and gasoline futures
lost 0.34 cent to settle at
2.9460 per gallon. Natural
gas fell 8.7 cents to settle
at $4.325 per 1,000 cubic
feet.


FOLSOM: Celebration returns

Continued From Page 1C


optimal viewing. If you are
Interested in setting up a
vendor booth for the 4th
of July event, contact the
Chamber Office for more
information. Make plans
to come out early and
enjoy the beautiful setting
of Lake DeSoto as we cel-
ebrate Independence Day!
Our Chamber is always
looking for ways to increase
our member's exposure and
get business in their door.
One of the most effective
.ways we have found we can
do this is through our Leads
Clubs. Leads Club offers


organized, structured and a
positive networking environ-
ment where the emphasis
is placed upon finding qual-
ity leads and referrals. We
currently have two active
Leads Club who meet every
other week; one group
meets on Monday's at noon
and the other on Tuesday's
at 8:00am. Both groups
meet at the Holiday Inn
and Suites. We would love
to have you as our guest to
see if Leads Club is right
for you and your business.
Contact the Chamber for
the next meeting date.


The Lake City -
Columbia County Chamber
is looking forward to a
summer full of activities for
our members and bur com-
munity. Should you have
any questions about mem-
bership or any of the infor-
mation mentioned, please
feel free to give me a call at
752-3690. Your comments
and suggestions are always
welcome.

* Dennille Folsom is the
executive director of the
Lake City/Columbia County
Chamber of Commerce.


Rolling Reminders
About 12 years ago, I was living
in the San Francisco area, where
Webvan, the grocery-delivery
e-commerce service, was getting a
lot of positive buzz (as was every-
thing else that ended in ".com").
So I gave it a try as
a customer and abso-
lutely loved the concept
and service. I wrongly
believed that a great customer
experience correlated with a sound
business plan. Then, when the stock
started dropping, I saw that as a
great opportunity to snap up even
more shares. That was a $60;000
lesson. Ouch.
In the years that followed, I'd
occasionally see old Webvan deliv-
ery vehicles being driven around.
Whenever I did, I viewed them as
rolling reminders of how not to
invest. R.G., Hudson, Ohio


By CHRISTOPHER S.
RUGABER
SAP Economics' Writer.

WASHINGTON -
Unemployment rates
fell in fewer than half of
U,S. states, evidence that
slower hiring has affected
many parts of the coun-
try.
The unemployment
rates in 24 states dropped,
the Labor Department
said Friday. Rates rose in
13 states and Washington,
D.C, and were flat in 13.
That's a significant decline


towels and bedding that's
washed on a daily basis.
"Instead of using a new
towel every day, if you're
staying for two or three
days, you might want to
reuse your towel," she
said. "Or if staying for two
or three days instead of
changing sheets and lin-
ens everyday, change them
once every other day."
Johnson said the initia-
tive is estimated to save
more than 70,000 gallons
of water and 500 gallons of
detergent annually at each
medium-sized participating
hotel.
Rod Butler, Holiday Inn
of Lake City general man-
ager,,heard about the pilot
programs during Johnson's
presentation, and the hotel
is on board with the initia-
Stives.
Currently, Holiday Inn
has participated in the
Florida Green Lodging
Program, which is through
the state's Department of
Environmental Protection,
since 2008. It encourages
the lodging industry to con-


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the pay plans that do get shot down
show that shareholders are finally
starting to speak their minds.
Shareholders aren't confining their
complaints to compensation, either. A
r iinf t +t i l din thf AFT


The Fool Responds: Investors 5gUrUp UI mvpo'", iLuai U ,U i U.
in Webvan were excited about its CIO, the trustee of New York's larg-
promise, but before it went bank- est pension fund, and Trillium Asset
rupt in 2001, it was serving only 10 Management recently urged Chevroi
markets. You might have loved it to settle litigation related to alleged
in San Francisco, but most of the environmental damage in Ecuador.
country had yet to experience it. Corporations won't improve on
Getting in early can sometimes pay their own. If ydur company is pursue
off, but waiting for proven perfor- ing dubious tactics fo muzzle your
mance and financial stability can fellow investors, engaging in poor
also pay off, with less risk. practices, or paying its top executive
Doyouhavean embarrassing more than their performance actually'
lesna .. g wa merits, don't suffer in silence, or sur
lesson leaedthehardway? render and sell out. Vote your proxy
Boil it down to 100 words (or ballots, call your company's invest
less) and send it to The Motley Fool do My relations department, and raise as
Dumbest Investment. Got onethat worked? much ruckus as you can.
Submit to My Smartest Investment. If we (Motley Fool newsletter services
print yours, you'll win a Fool's cap! have recommended Chevron.)

LAST WEEK'S TRIVIA ANSWER
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I own seven of the top 15 brands in the world, and my brands include
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Write to Us! Send questions for Ask the Fool, Dumbest (or
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to Fool@foolcom or via regular mail c/o this newspaper, attn: The .
Motley Fool. Sorry, we can'tprovide individualfinancial advice.
ODIST. UNIVERSALU.C, 1 (FOR iiELEASE6/162011) . .. . . . . . .


from April, when 39 states
reported falling unemploy-
ment rates.
And only 22 states
reported a net gain in jobs
in May, while 27 states lost
jobs. That's much worse
than April, when: 42 states
gained jobs.
The changing trend in
state unemployment rates,
reflect a weaker economy
that has been hampered by
high gas prices and lower
factory output Nationally,
employers added a net
gain of only 54,000 jobs
in May, compared to an


serve and protect Florida's
natural resources through
energy and water conserva-
tion, waste reduction and
clean air practices.
It was the first hotel in
Columbia County to receive
the designation, Butler siad.
'We've always, as a hotel,
been familiar with conser-
vation practices and how it
effects the community," he
said.
The springs play vital role
in the area's tourism which
directly impacts attracting
visitors to the county.
"If by our water conser-
vation programs we're able
to help with conservation
of the springs, then in fact
we're helping not only the
community but our busi-
ness," Butler said.
The water conservation
program is ndt effective
without the participation of
guests, he said.
"I believe our guests
share our concerns regard-
ing the environment and
welcome the opportunity
to participate not only in
water conservation but also


average. of 220,000 per
month in the previous
three months. The U.S.
unemployment rate ticked
up to 9.1 percent .
California, New York
and Pennsylvania report-
ed large job losses, partly
reversing gains earlier
this year. California said
employers cut 29,200
jobs last month, with big
losses in professional and
business services, which
includes accounting, engi-
neering, and temporary
services. The construc-
tion sector also lost jobs.


hotel recycling programs,"
Butler said.
Project Planet and Water
Champ are fantastic pro-
grams for the area, said All
Gravely, Hampton Inn gen-
eral manger.
'That's what we are,
freshwater and outdoor
life," she said. "That's
entertainment in our area.
If we can't control or try
to stop the damage to the
outdoors, we lose."
Hampton Inn is also
certified with the Florida
Green Lodging Program,
Gravely said. The parent
company for Hampton Inn,
Hilton, strives as whole to
be more green-friendly in
the community. Most of
the information that will be
needed for the programs
is available through Florida
Green Lodging, she said.
Hotels control a large
amount of energy, water
and garbage and can also
play an important role in
conservation.
"It's doing what you do
at home on a much bigger
scale," Gravely said.


Unemployment rates


fell in 24 U.S. states


WATER: Conservation stressed

Continued From Page 1C


Isthe1o3


.Page Editor: Todd Taylor, 754-0424


LAKECITY REPORTER BUSINESS SUNDAY, JUNE 19, 2011

















Page Editor: Todd Taylor, 754-0424


LAKE CITY REPORTER


BUSINESS SUNDAY, JUNE 19, 2011


THE WEEK IN REVIEW THE WEEK IN REVIEW *THE WEEK IN REVIEW THE WEEK IN REVIEW THE WEEK IN REVIEW


1-. N'


8~'~
;sl'li ?.::' 1.-
- U r~.
;.
r. r .r..


Weekly Stock Exchange Highlights

NYSE Amex Nasdaq
8,000.11 -16.28 2,267.11 -52.14 2,616.48 -27.25


Gainers ($2 or more) Gainers ($2 or more) Gainers ($2 or more)
Name Last Chg %Chg Name Last Chg %Chg Name Last Chg %Chg
AmrRIty 3.96 +2.09 +111.8 Express-1 2.83 +.66 +30.4 RITTech 10.18 +7.23 +245.1
M&FWld 25.65 +8.69 +51.2 GoldRsvg 2.99 +.67 +28.9 PakvFn 20.56 +9.33 +83.1
Timbednd 43.03+13.04 +43.5 EstnlCap 3.71 +.66 +21.6 MediaMdn 21.94 +6.06 +38.2
GeterSd 11.02 +2.90 +35.7 UtdCap 28.90 +4.07 +16.4 LjfePrtsIf 4.41 +1.16 +35.7
Newcastle 5.59 +1.07 +23.7 ParaG&S 3.82 +.52 +15.8 EMSTch 32.85 +8.05 +32.4
CSVS2xVxS25.65,+4.31 +20.2 GtPanSilvg 3.03 +.38 +14.3 Conns 7.22 +1.54 +27.1
MediaGen 4.19 +.70 +20.1 DGSE 6.79 +.79 +13.2 UnvStainls 35.91 +7.60 +26.8
RelD n 24.76 +3.86 +18.5 Argan 9.90 +.95 +10.6 HutchT 2.59 +.52 +25.1
SoUnCo 33.56 +4.75 +16.5 MAGSIvg 9.14 +.70 +8.3 Hydrognc 6.26 +1.17 +23.0
GrahamPk 25.20 +3.25 +14.8 UOMTech 2.21 +.17 +8.3 Fundtch 20.67 +3.60 +21.1


Losers ($2 or more)
Name Last Chg %Chg
Renren n 7.03 -2.32 -24.8
KVPhmA 2.60 -.76 -22.6
GushanE rs 2.00 -.52 -20.6
KVPhmB 2.75 -.70 -20.3
ChiXFashn 2.86 -.72 -20.1
NeoPhoton 6.75 -1.61 -19.3
Qihod360n 17.48 -4.02 -18.7
Winnbgo 8.55 -1.96 -18.6
InterOilg 50.05-10.52 -17.4
ArborRT 4.36 -.88 -16.8

Most Active ($1 or more)
Name Vol(00) Last Chg
S&P500ETF10497387127.05+.08
BkofAm 8707118 10.68 -.12
SPDR Fnd5339661 14.89 +.12
FordM 4236993 12.77 -.58
iShR2K 3374437 78.23 +.23
SprintNex 2867961 5.19 -.03
iShEMkts 2650452 45.79 -.68
GenElec 2598152 18.49 +.32
NokiaCp 2416207 6.02 -.27
Citigrp rs 2350429 38.30 +.38

Diary
Advanced 1,535
Declined 1,635
New Highs 84
New Lows 175
Totalissues 3,216
Unchanged 46
Volume 19.927.473.670


Losers ($2 or more)
Name Last Chg %Chg
Accelr8 4.95 -2.18 -30.6
Baclein n 2.76 -.95 -25.6
T3 Moltnrs 3.70 -1.20 -24.5
ChinaShen 2.39 -.64 -21.1
PhrmAth 2.63 -.60 -18.6
CagleA 4.27 -.93 -17.9
Quepasa 6.59 -1.36 -17.1
PemixTh 8.50 -1.72 -16.8
OrsusXelrs 3.19 -.62 -16.3
eMagin 4.71 -.89 -15.9

Most Active ($s or more
Name Vol(00) Last Chg
KodiakOg 220259 5.55 -.42
NovaGld g 218480 8.80 -.91
GoldStrg 215852 2.27 -.17
NwGoldg 202636 9.19 -.02
ParaG&S 178882 3.82 +.52
GrtBasGg 177132 1.78 -.11
Hyperdyn 169017 4.16 -.40
CheniereEn153440 &.00-1.10
NthgtMg 141657 2.60 -.16
AlldNevG 138532 29.58-1.44

Diary
Advanced 196
Declined 327
New Highs 8
New Lows35
Total issues 543
Unchanged 20
Volume 647,082,978


Losers ($2 or more)
Name Last Chg %Chg
HarbinElec 8.39 -7.87 -48.4
DeerConsu 5.07 -2.22 -30.5
Toreador 3.65 -1.56 -29.9
ClevBioLh 3.59-1.52 -29.7
MagyarBc 3.80-1.60 -29.6
TIB nrs 11.85 -4.94 -29.4
ChinaYida 2.70 -.95 -26.0
HampRB rs 18.56.-6.37 -25.6
MFRI 7.30 -2.40 -24.7
RubiconTc 16.36 -5.30 -24.5

Most Active ($1 or more)
Name Vol (00) Last Chg
SinusXM 4646485 1.92 -.08
Cisco 3854801 14.97 -.15
Intel 2690219 21.19 -.19
Microsoft 2595396 24.26 +.56
PwShs QQQ257761853.79 -.72
MicronT 2106902 7.83 -.61
RschMotn 1957165 27.75 -8.81
Level 1638641 2.12 -.08
Oracle 1465162 31.19 +.01
DellInc 1322639 16.02 +.55

Diary
Advanced 1,252
Declined 1,488
New Highs 72
New Lows 289
Total issues 2,801
Unchanged 61
Volume 9,977,433,976


WklyWkly YlD
Name Ex Div Last Chg%Chg %Chg
AT&T nc NY 1.72 30.77 +.43 +1.4 +4.7
AutoZone NY ... 291.71 +1.51 +0.5 +7.0
BkofAm NY .04 10.68 -.12 -1.1 -19.9
BariPVixrsNY ... 25.24 +2.38 +10.4 -32.9
BobEvans Nasd .80 33.45 +1.25 +3.9 +1.5
CNBFnPA Nasd .66 12.87 -.03 -0.2 -13.1
CSXs NY .12 24.81 +.32 +1.3 +15.2
Chevron NY 3.12 99.17 -.50 -0.5 +8.7
Cisco Nasd .24 14.97 -.15 -1.0 -26.0
Citigrprs NY .04 38.30 +.38 +1.0 -19.0
CocaCola NY 1.88 65.62 +.70 +1.1 -.2
Delhaize NY 2.45 76.80 -.75 -1.0 +4.2
Dell nc Nasd .. 16.02 +.55 +3.6+18.2
DrxFnBull NY ... 23.50 +.45 +2.0 -15.6
FamayDlr NY .72 52.60 +.42 +0.8 +5.8
FordM NY ... 12.77 -.58 -4.3 -23.9
GenElec NY .60 18.49 +.32 +1.8 +1.1
HewletIP NY .48 35,00 -.13 -0.4 -16.9
HomeDp NY 1.00 34.53 +1.31 +3.9 -1.5
iShJapn NY .14 10.00 ... ... -8.3
iShSilver NY ... 34.95 -.30 -0.9 +15.8
iShEMkts NY .64 45.79 -.68 -1.5 -3.9
iShR2K NY .89 78.23 +.23 +0.3
Intel Nasd .84 21.19 -.19 -0.9 +.8
JPMorgChNY 1.00 40.80 -.25 -0.6 -3.8
Level Nasd ... 2.12 -.08 -3.6+116.3
Lowes NY .56 22.83 +.57 +2.6 -9.0
McDnlds NY 2.44 82.52 +2.16 '+2.7 +7.5


Name Ex Div
MicronT Nasd ...
Microsoft Nasd .64
NY Times NY
NextEraEn NY 2.20
NobilityH Nasd ..
NokiaCp NY .55
OcciPet NY 1.84
Oracle Nasd .24
Penney NY .80
PepsiCo NY 2.06
Pfizer 'NY .80
Potashs NY .28
PwShs QQQNasd .42
PrUIShS&PNY
RegionsFnNY .04
RschMotn Nasd
Ryder NY 1.08
S&P500ETFNY 2.44
SearsHldgsNas ...
SirusXM Nasd ...
SouthnCo NY 1.89
SprintNex NY
SPEngy NY 1.06
SPDRFndNY ,18
TimeWam NY .94
WalMart NY 1.46
WellsFargo NY .48
Yahoo Nasd ...


Wkly Wdy YO
Lat Chg %Chg %Chg
7.83 -.61 -7.2 -2.4
24.26 +.56 +2.3-13.1
8.18 +.33 +4.2-16.5
56.63 +1.14 +2.1 +8.9
7.56 -.49 -6.1 .6.8
6.02 -.27 -4.3 -41.7
102.19 -1.20 -1.2 +4.2
31.19 +.01 ... -.4
34.29 +4.37 +14.6 +6.1
68.72 +.03 ... +5.2
20.26 +.15 +0.7 +15.7
50.97 -4.17 -7.6 -1.2
53.79 -.72 -1.3 -1.2
22.32 -.08 -0.4 -6.1
6.27 +.1 +2.3 -10.4
27.75 -8.81 -24.1 -52.3
51.50 +1.05 +2.1 -2.2
127.05 +.08 +0.1 +1.0
74.02 +5.67 +8.3 +.4
1.92 -.08 -4.0 +17.8
39.81 +.48 +1.2 +4.1
5.19 -.03 -0.6 +22.7
71.69 -1.38 -1.9 +5.0
14.89 +.12 +0.8 -6.6
35.13 +.50 +1.4 +9.2
52.82 +.10 +0.2 -2.1
27.33 +1.05 +4.0 -11.8
14.70 -.51 -3.3 -11.6


Stock Footnotes- g : Dvdends and eamlr.nj an Ca.aln ouaoCllrs t nDO 1 nt mel cnrnued-Is ting standard
n = Late hng mIm SEC n = New n p,,I 52 weiLs pi = Prelened rs= Stock has undergone a reverse stoa p
f at lr 50 percent wirhn Inie past year n : Rigni ro buy security I a specfo prce a = Stock has sp illy at
i 1asi 2 percent cr.tikn me lasl yar ur, : UniL vI = In uanKtmpicy or r1ce1ursnip. wd When ol dIDuled wl =
Wn Eri l-&j m-i =w arrantf
Mutual Fund Footnotes D Fea coenrg mnarl nrcosts is paid from luna aesta d a Deerred sales cnarg. or
redemplion Ife rolad I tw a rIsd s cgasi m; Muople lees are changed NA notl viable. p prvaous aays
nei asset aiue 5 turud spi hBares during nre week S = lIna paid a disvbution dhrg me Waseinrsa aind
Loeas mull tsbe r*n least i 10 2 D Iooutef in I Dirs at ls1 MOm AC ivee mlust be wi at I lesa $1. Voture in
runairaed of ansast Source. The Asaocalmed PissA Sales figures are urotficial


II


________________________________________________ _________________________________________________:1


30-vear


4.20 4.18


Currencies -


Last Pva Day
Australia .9421 .9517
Britain 1.6178 1.6105
Canada .9805 .9866
Euro .6986 .7072
Japan 80.06 80.78
Mexico 11.9013 11.9961


Iuwiterind


Rd84


British pound expressed In U.S. dollars. All oth-
ers show dollar in foreign currency.


Dow Jones Industrials
Close: 12,004.36
1-week change: 52.45 (0.4%)
13,000 ............ ...... . .


1.06 123.14 -178.84


MON TUES WED


64.25 42.84


THUR FRI


12,500 ...... ....... ........ .... ........ ..... ....



12 D 00 ........... ................. ............... .. :--


11,500 D J F M A M J



MUTUAL FUNDS
Total Assets Total Return/ank Pct Min Init
Name Obj ($Mlns) NAV 4-wk 12-mo 5-year Load Invt


PIMCOTotRefls CI
American Funds GrthAmA m LG
VanguardTotStldx LB
Fidelity Contra LG
American Funds CaplncBuA m IH
Vanguard Instldxl LB
Arencan Funds CpWIGrdA x WS
Amencan Funds IrcAmerA m MA
Vanguard 500Admi LB
Vanguard TotStAam LB
Amencan Funds InvCoAmA m LB
Dodge Cox inlSl. FV
Dodge &Co Stock LV
American Funds WAMutnvA x LV
Amencan Funds EurPacGrA m FB
Vanguard InstPlus LB
FrankTerip-Franilin IncomeA m CA
Amencan Funds FnlnvA m LB
Vanguard Tollnt d FB
Amencan Funds NeePerApA m WS
PIMCOTolRelAdm b CI
American Funds BalAm MA
Vanguard 5001nv LB
delty GrowCo LG
Habor Intllnstl d FB
Vanguard WelltnAdm MA
Vanguard TotBdAdmr. CI


142,457
66,606
63,574
63,341
60,731
59,613
56,815
55,356
55,332
52,734
49,434
47,018.
45,565
40,746
39,594
38,775
37,117
35,358
35,062
34,184
33,011
32,769
32,019
30,427
29,967
29,966
28,473


-0.1 +7.0/B
-4.5 +13.3/D
-4.3 +17.1/A
-4.4 +13.6/D
-1.6 +16.0/B
-4.1 +16.2/B
-3.0 +18.0/C
-2.4 +16.3/A
-4.1 +16.2/B
-4.3 +17.3/A
-4.0 +13.7/D
-4.1 +17.8/D
-4.6 +15.5/B
-2.9 +18.5/A
-2.6 +17.8/D
-4.1 +16.218
-2.6 +15.7/A
-4.1 +16.6/B
-2.9 +18.9/C
-3.6 +17.0/C
-0.1 +6.7/C
-2.5 +14.3/A
-4.1 +16.1/B
-4.6 +20.9/A
-2.6 +22.2/A
-2.5 +13.4/B
+0.6 +5.3/D


+8.9/A
+2.5/D
+3.1/B
+4.6/B
+4.3/C
+2.5/B
+4.7/B
+4.2/8
+2.5/B
+3.2/B
+1.9/C
+3.5/A
-0.3/E
+2.2/B
+5.3/A
+2.5/B
+5.7/A
43.7/A
+3.5/B
+5.7/A
+8.6/A
+4.2/B
+2.4/B
+6.8/A
+6.9/A
+5.9/A
+6.7/B


NL 1,000,000
5.75 250
NL 3,000
NL 2,500
5.75 250
NL 5,000,000
5.75 250
5.75 250
NL 10,000
NL 10,000
,5.75 250
NL 2,500
NL 2,500
5.75 250
5.75 250
NL 200,000,000
4.25 1,000
5.75 250
NL 3,000
5.75 250
NL 1,000,000
5.75 250
NL 3,000
NL 2,500
NL 50,000
NL 50,000
NL 10,000


CA-Cvwvao Aloa Ct lntaendTerm Tr B dES -Eope Sto4FB Fog Lge Bled, F-Fo G n LargeOrs, FV-Frell
Lakg Vakie, IH WoAlocaim, LB urage Bnd, LG 4age GwMt, LV -le-s ya, MAtMderae AMo MB Id-ap d, V -
t.C Value, SH~Spiay. WS SHncTotl Retunm:Chngin N VwihAn ciiied s ivele d. RaBt How fund pedrfoed v
ohmwitsameodcve:Aishrto20% Einbok 20 Mhni nvt Mnmum $neededtoinvest fund. Sourwe:Mmingstar.


Wkly YTD Wkly
Name DIv YId PE Chg %Chg Last
ABBLtd 1.12 4.5 ... -.57 +11.2 24.96
AESCorp ... ..: 15 -.04 +.7 12.27
AFLAC 1.20 2.7 9 +.16 -20.2 45.02
AK Steel .20 1.4 ...-1.05 -13.5 14.16
AMR ... ....... -.01 -27.0 5.69
AT&TInc 1.72 5.6 9 +.43 +4.7 30.77
AbtLab 1.92 3.7 13 +.78 +7.9 51.68
Accenture .90 1.7 18 -1.59 +11.3 .53.95
AMD ... ... 7. -.59 -14.4 7.00
Aetna .60 1.4 10 +.35 +41.6 43.21
Agilent ... ... 20 -.76 +14.5 47.43
AlcatelLuc ... ... ... -.08 +73.6 5.14
Alcoa .12 .8 21 -.56 -4.4 14.72
Allstate .84 2.8 12 ... -7.0 29.65
AlphaNRs ... ... 39 -3.57 -29.8 42.12
Alria 1.52 5.6 14 +.45 +10.0 27.08
AMovilL .52 1.0 15 +1.70 -13.1 49.80
AEagleOut .44 3.5 16 -.13'-14.2 12.55
AEP 1.84 4.9 15 +.52 +4.6 37.64
AmExp .72 1.5 14 +.76 +13.0 48.50
AmlntlGrp ... ... 2 -.98 -42.0 27.98
AmTower ... ... 55 +.20 -2.8 50.20
Anadarko .36 .5 ...-2.34 -7.5 70.45
AnalogDev1.00 2.7 13 -1.29 -2.9 36.58
Annaly 2.62 14.2 8 +.22 +2.7 18.40
ArcelorMit .75 2.4 16 -.83 -17.3 31.53
ArchCoal .44 1.8 18 -.83 -28.5 25.07
ArchDan .64 2.1 9 +.63 +.3 30.17
ATMOS 1.36 4.3 14 +.33 +2.3 31.91
BB&TCp .64 2.4 21 +.36 -.4 26.19
BHP Bill 1.82 2.1 ...-1.22 -4.7 .88.55
BPZ Res ... ...... +.20 -25.8 3.53
BRFBrasil .18 1.1 ... -.15 -5.6 15.93
BakrHu .60 .9 28-2.74 +21.3 69.35
BcoBrades .80 4.2 ... -.06 -5.5. 19.17
BcoSantSA .79 7.0 ... +.19 +5.7 11.26
BcoSBrasil .70 6.3 ... +.54 -17.7 11.19
BkofAm .04 .4 19 -.12 -19.9 10.68
Bklrelnd ... ...... ... -55.5 1.18
BkNYMel .52 2.0 13 -.07 -13.2 26.20
Barclay .36 2.2 ... -.23 +.3 16.57
BariPVixrs ... ......+2.38 -32.9 25.24
BarrickG .48 1:1 12 -.38 -18.8 43.18
Baxter 1.24 2.1 16 +.73 +15.3 58.34
BerkHB ... ... 17 +1.45 -5.7 75.51
BestBuy .60 1.9 10 +2.58 -9.6 31.01
Blackstone .4 2.4 .... +.03 +17.5 16.63
Boeing 1.68 2.3 16 +1.47 +13.6 74.16
BostonSci ... ... 19 +.03 -10.3 6.79
BrMySq 1.32 4.8 14 +.07 +3.9 27.52
CBRElis ... ... 33 -.32 +17.1 23.98
CBS B .40 1.5 20 -.32 +35.9 25.88
CNOFincl ... ... 11 +.07 +6.2 7.20
CSXs .12 .5 17 +.32 +15.2 24.81
CVR Engy... ... 27 +1.44 +47.4 22.37
CVSCare .50 1.3 15 +.12 +7.4 37.33
CablvsnNY .60 1.7 28 +.78 +6.5 36.04
Camecog .40 ...... -2.22 -41.0 23.81
Cameron ...... 20 +1.33 -9.1 46.11
CdnNRsgs .36 .. .. -1.34 -12.6 38.82
CapOne .20 .4 7 -.70 +14.8 48.84
CarMax ... ... 18 +2.41 -8.2 29.25
Carnival 1.00,2.8 14 -.53 -23.5 35.27
Caterpillar 1.84 1.9 17 -.84 +2.4 95.95
Cemex ... ...... +.02, -24.9 7.73
CenterPnt .79 4.2 17 -.12 +19.2 18.74
CntryLink 2.90 7.4 12 -.64 -14.6 39.45
ChesEng .35 1.2 9 -1.22 +8.1 28,02
Chevron 3.12 3.1 10 -.50 +8.7 99.17
Chicos .20 1.4 20 +.87 +18.5 14.26
Chimera .66'19.1 6 -.10 -16.1 3;45
Citigrprs .04 .1 13 +.38 -19.0 38.30
CliffsNRs .56 .7 8 -3.31 +4.5 81.51
Coach .90 1.5 21 +.19 +7.2 59.31
CocaCola 1.88 2.9 13 +.70 -.2 65.62
CocaCE .52 1.8 15 +.62 +14.3 28.61
ColgPal 2.32 2.6 18 +3.18 +9.3 87.88
ConAgra .92 3.7 17 +.47 +9.2 24.65
ConocPhil 2.64 3.7 10 +.44 +5.6 71.93


Wkly. YTD
Name Div YId PE Chg %Chg


Abraxas
ActivsBliz .17
AdobeSy ...
Affymetrix ...
AkamaT ...
AllscriptH ...
AlteraCp If .24
Amarin
Amazon
'ACapAgy 5.60
AmCapLtd ...
AmerMed ...
Amgen
A123Sys ...
Apple Inc ...
ApldMatl .32
AriadP
ArmHId .13
ArubaNet ...
Atmel
Autodesk ...
AutoData 1.44,
AvanirPhm...
AvisBudg ...
Baidu
BedBath ...
BrigExp
Broadcom .36
BrcdeCm ...
CA Inc .20
Cadence ...
CpstnTrbh ...
Celgene
ChrmSh ...
CienaCorp ...
Cisco .24
CitzRepBh ..
CitrixSys ...


Name Dlv
ConEd 2.40
ConstellEn .96
Coming .20
Covidien .80
Cummins 1.05
DCT Indl .28
DRHorton .15
DTE 2.35
Danaher .08
Deere 1.64
DeltaAir
DenburyR ...
DevelDiv .16
DevonE .68
DrSCBrrs ...
DirFnBr rs ...
DrxEBear rs...
DrxFnBull
DirxSCBull ...
DirxEnBull .05
Discover .24
Disney .40
DomRescs 1.97
DowChm 1.00
DukeEngy .98
DukeRlty .68
ECDangn ...
EMCCp
Eatons 1.36
EIPasoCp .04
Elan
EldorGldg .10
EmersonE 1.38
EnCanag :80
Exelon 2.10
ExxonMbl 1.88
FairchldS ...
FstHorizon .04
FirstEngy 2.20
FordM
ForestLab ...
FMCGs 1.00
FroetierCm .75
Gafisa SA .29
Gap- .45
GenGrPrn .40
GenMills 1.12
GenMotn ...
GenOnEn
Genworth ...
Gerdau .27
GoldFLtd .19
Goldcrp g .41
GoldmanS 1.40
Goodyear
GrahamPk ..
HCA HId n
HCP Inc 1.92
HSBC 1.80
Hallibrtn .36
HarmonyG .07
HartfdFn .40
HtMgmt ...
HeclaM ...
Hertz ...
Hess .40
HewlettP .48
HomeDp 1.00
HonwIllntl 1.33
HostHotls .12
Huntsmn .40
IAMGId g .08
iShGolds ...
iSAslla .82
iShBraz 2.53
iSh HK .45
iShJapn .14
iSTaiwn .29
iShSilver ...


Wkly
Last Name


... -.44 -30.9 3.16
25 -.59 -12.6 10.87
18 -1.20 -1.0 30.47
... +41.2 7.10
31 +.04 -37.3 29.49
... -.72 -4:1 18.48
16 -.88 +20.2 42.78
... -1.94 +66.9 13.69
81 -.16 +3.5 186.37
4 +.05 +4.9 30.15
3 +.19 +18.3 8.94
27 +.03 +59.0 29.98
12 +.02 +5.7 58.01
... +.33 -49.2 4.85
15 -5.64 -.7 320.26
10 -.17 -11.7 12.41
15 -.24 +82.7 .9.32
-.80 +30.1 26.99
...-1.47 +15.0 24.01
12 -1.06 +1.9 12.56
35 -2.22 -6.6 35.69
21 -.27 +11.6 51.67
.. +.02 -10.5 3.65
15 -.29 +.9 15.70
10 -4.01 +21.9 117.68
17 -.92 +5.8 51.99
90 -2.29 -7.4 25.23
16 -1.49 -27.4 31.61
22 -.32 +21.8 6.45
13 +.08 -11.7 21.59
14 -.03 +21.4 10.03
... -.32 +38.5 1.33
30 -.43 -2.1 57.87
... -.17 +7.0 3.80
... -2.31 -20.5 16.73
12 -.15 -26.0 14.97
... -.05 +8.6 .67
47 -5.82 +8.4 74.19


Wkly'YTD Wkly
YId PE Chg %Chg Last
4.5 .15 +.95 +6.5 52.78
2.6 16 -.08 +19.8 '36.69
1.1 8 -.57 -7.9 17.80
1.5 16 -1.04. +15.0 52.50
1.1 15 +.75 -14.9 93.62
5.5 ... +.20 -4.1 5.09
1.4 79 +.33 -7.0 11.09
4.8 14 +.49 +8.6 49.24
.2 19 +.37 +9.9 51.84
2.1 13 -3.27 -5.4 78.53
... 15 +.36 -24.0. 9.58
... 52 -1.24 -1.7 18.77
1.2 ... +.76 -1.8 13.83
.9 9 -2.41 -2.0 76.95
... ... -.61 -11.4 41.47
... ... -1.30 +4.3 49.27
... .. +.81 -24.4 17.05
+.45 -15.6 23.50
... +.48 -4.5 .69.14
.1 ... -3.74 +9.9 64.25
1.0 10 +.57 +24.6 23.09
1.1 17 -.46 +1.4 38.04
4.1 15 +.13 +11.6 47.66
2.9 18 -.48 +1.3 34.59
5.2 13 +.46 +5.2 18.74
5.1 ... +.01 +7.9 13.45
... ... -1.80 -57,5 11.50
28 -.49 +12.8 25.83
2.9 15 +1.19 -7.4 47.00
.2 27 -.03 +43.5 19.75
... +.02 +79.4 10.28
... 35 -.46 -26.5 13.65
2.7 18 +.69 -8.9 52.06
2.6 '87-1.86 +4.6 30.47
5.0 14 -.12 +.2 41.74
2.4 11 -.76 +8.1 79.02
... 11 -.88 +1.3 15.81
.4 ... +.62 -13.2 10.22
5.0 16 +.53 +18.2 43.74
.. 6 -.58 -23.9 12.77
.. 11 +.73 +21.0 38.68
2.1 9-1.00-20.2 47.93
9.5 56 -.03 -19.1 7.87
3.1 ... -.96 -35.0 9.45
2.5 10 i.11 -19.1 17.83
2.4 ... +.82 +5.7 16.36
3.0 .15 +.39 +6.6 37.95
... 7 +.15 -21.3 29.00
... ... 20 -.5 3.79
... 51 +.10 -22.4 10.20
2.7 ... -.41 -28.8 9.96
1.3 3 -.36 -21.5 14.23
.9 15 -.67 +1.0 46.45.
1.0 15 +1.31 -18.4 137.23
.. -.19 +24.9 14.80
...... +3.25 +93.3 25.20
+.69 +11.5 34.59
5.2. 41 +2.06 +.8 37.09
3.7 ... -.94. -4.0 49.01
.8 19 -1.98 +12.7 46.02
.6 -.. -.68 -.8 12.44
1.6 6 +.18 -7.7 24.44
.15 +.05 +8.8 10.38.
... 33 -.39 -37.9 6.99-
25 +1.20 !+5.6 15.30
.6 9. -3.47. -9.5 69.28
1.4 9 -.13 -16.9 35.00
2.9 17 +1.31 -1.5 34.53
2.4 19 +.32 +5.1 55.85
.7 ... +.29 -10.0 16.09
.2.4 16 -.76 +7.6 16.80
... 19 -1.86 +4.2 18.55
... ... +.07 +8.1 15.03
3.2 ... +.08 -.1 25.41
3.6 ...-1.28 -8.4 70.89
2.5 ... -.28 -3.8 18.20
1.4 ... ... -8.3 10.00
...-.41 -4.5 14.92
... -.30 +15.8 34.95


New York Stock Exchanaa .


WITH SO MANY CHOICES,

WHY WOULD YOU CHOOSE



TO PAY TAXES?





1.90% TO 5.04% *

. Yield effective 06/14/2011, subject toevailability. Yield and market value may fluctuate if
sold prior to maturity and the amount you receive from the sale of these securities maybe less
than, equal to, or more than the amountoriginally invested. Bond investments are subject to
interest rate risk such that when interest rates rise, the prices 9f bonds can decrease and the
investor can lose principal value. Any bond called prior to maturity results in reinvestment
risk for the owner of the bond. May be subject to alternative minimum tax. Municipal bonds
may have original issue discount.

Some of the available issues of bonds are callable. Contact your local Edward Jones financial
advisor for more information about maturity dates and applicable call provisions.

To invest in tax-free bonds, call or visit your local
financial advisor today.
Steve Jones, CFP*
Financial Advisor
2929,West U S Highway 90
Suite 114
Lake City, FL 32055
386-752-3847 www.edwardjones.com Member SIPC


Wkly YTD
Name DIv YId PE Chg %Cha


iShChina25 .63 1.5 ...
iShEMKis .64 1.4
iShB20T 4.01 4.1 ...
iSEafe' 1.42 2.4
iShR2K .89 1.1
IShREst 1.98 33
IngerRd .48 1.1 ...
IBM 3.00 1.8 '14
IntlGame .24 1.5 19
IntPap 1.05 4.0 10
Interpublic .24 2.1 23
Invesco .49 2.1 17
ItauUnibH .67 3.0 ...
IvanhMg 1.48 ...
JPMorgCh1.00 2.5 9
Jabil 28 1.5 15
JanusCap .20 2.2 10
JohnJn 2.28 3.4 15
JohnsnCtl .64 1.7 16
JnprNtwk ... ... 26
KB Home .25 2.2 ..
Keycorp .12 1.4 11
Kimco .72 4.1 ...
Kinross g .10 .7 22
Kohls 1.00 2.0 13
Kraft 1.16 3.4 20
LDKSolar .. ... 7
LSI Corp ... ...
LVSands ... ... 47
LennarA .16 .9 26
UllyEli 1.96 5.3 8
Limited .80 2.3 14


Nasdaq Most Active


Wm YTD Wkly
Div YId PE Chg %Chg Last


Clearwire ...
CognizTech...
Comcast .45
Comc spcl .45
Cree Inc
Crocs
CypSemi .36
Dell Inc
DeltaPtr h ...
DirecTV A ...
DonlleyRR 1.04
DryShips ...
E-Trade ...
eBay
ElectArts ...
Eneri
EntropCom ...
EricsnTel .37
Expedia .28
ExpdlntI .50
ExpScripts ...
F5Netwks ...
FithThird .24
Finisar
FstNiagara .64
Flextm
FocusMda ...
GSICmceh...
GT Solar ...
GileadSci
Google
HarbinElec ...
HercOffsh ...
HudsCity .32
Intel .84
Intuit
JA Solar ...
JDS Uniph ..


.... ... -.39
... 27 -5.35
1-.9 17 -.24
2.0 16 -.19
... 2 -4.06
... 28 +1.57
1.8 34 -1.55
... 10 +.55
... ... +.02
... 17 -.07
5.5 14 -.39
... 7 +.18
... ... +.06
... 20 -1.13
... -.57
... ... +.21
... 9
2.7 ... -.20
1.0 19 +.03
1.1 27 +.51
... 24 -.73
..40 -8.19
1.9 15 +.31
... 14 -3.34
4.7 17 -.13
... 8 -.73
... 19 -.80
... ... +.26
... 11 +1.03
... 12 -.70
18-24.49
... 4 -7.88
... -.17
3.9 ...
4.0 10 -.19
... 24 -1.20
.. 3 +.08
... 57 -1.35


-30.1 3.60
-7.7 67.65
+8.1 23.65
.+8.3 22.42
-48.0 34.27
+35.6 23.21
+5.5 19.61
+18.2 16.02
-29.9 .53
+16.8 46.65
+9.2 19.08
-28.2 3.94
-14.3 13.72
+3.6 28.83
+35.8 22.24
-62.8 1.41
-37.3 7.57
+18.1 13.62
+7.7 27.03
-12.9 47.54
+3.0 55.68
-25.3 97.20
-14.5 12.55
-49.9 14.87
-3.2 13.53
-19.7 6.31
+20.5 26.43
+27.2 29.54
+47.3 13.43
+9.1 39.54
-18.3 485.02
-51.7 8.39
+51.1 5.26
-35.9 8.17
+.8 21.19
-.3 49.16
-26.4 5.09
+7.1 15.51


Name Div
JetBlue ...
KLATnc 1.00
LawsnSft ...
Level .
LibtyMIntA ...
LfeTech ...
inearTch .96
Majesco
MarvellT
Mattel .92
Maximlntg .84
MelcoCrwn ...
MicronT
Microsoft .64
Ness Tech
NetApp
Netflix
NewsCpA .15
Novlus
Nvidia
OdysMar ...
OnSmcnd ...
Oracle .24
PDL Bio .60
PMC Sra ...
Paccar .48
PatUTI .20
Paychex 1.24
PeopUtdF .63
Popular ...
PwShs QQQ.42
Powrwav ...
QIAGEN, ...
Qualcom. .86
RFMicD ...
RschMotn ...
Riverbeds ...
SanDisk


-.24 -2.3
-.68 -3.9
-.24 +3.0
-.47 +.8
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Nevsung .06 1.1 ...
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Oilsandsg ... ... ..
OpkoHfth ...
OrsusXel rs... ...
ParaG&S ... ... 17
PhrmAth ... ...
PionDrill ...
Quepasa ...
RadientPh ... ... ..
RareBeg ... ... ...
Rentech ... ...
RexahnPh ... ... ..
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SamsO&G ... .....
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.i. _


SOCKS OF LOCAL INTEREST Weekly Dow Jones


Money Rates
Last Pvs Week
Prime Rate 3.25 3.25
Discount Rate 0.75 0.75
Federal Funds Rate .00-25 .00-.25
Treasuries
3-month 0.03 0.04
6-month 0.09 0.09
5-year 1.52 1.56
10-veer 2.94 2.97


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Classified Department: 755-5440


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Lake City Reporter




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020 Lost & Found

05526211


PLEASE HELP FIND
LOST DOG
Her name is MIA.Pronounced
Mee-uh. She is spayed!
REWARD $200.00
Please call 386-365-8721 or


352-538-5673


100 Job
0 Opportunities

05526136
RECEPTIONIST/OFFICE
ASSISTANT :
White Springs, Florida
Verifiable job history, strong
computer skills. Able to operate
fax, copier and scanner
machines. Able to complete
duties without constant
supervision. Must be flexible
and team player. Great commu-
nication skills. POSITION
NEEDS TO BE FILLED
IMMEDIATELY. Please email
resuipe to: hr(@speced.org


05526137
Administrative Resource
Support Specialist
Non-Profit Early Learning
Coalition is seeking highly
motivated professional for'
assistance with daily administra-
tive duties; including but not
limited to: data entry of client
information, filing, mail
distribution, tracking client
flow, assistance with intake
reports, community awareness,
scheduling, reimbursement'
processing, copying, faxing, and
handling multi-phone lines.
Salary $9.00 -$14.50 plus
benefits. Fluently Bilingual in
English/Spanish preferred.
Send resumes by
June 27, 2011 to:
Early'Learning Coalition
Attn: HR, 1104 SW Main Blvd
Lake City, FL 32025 or fax to
386-697-3588

05526154
Meridian Behavioral
Healthcare Inc.
www.mbhci.ore
Please visit our website to view
current open opportunities
and to apply online :
Meridian is an active partner
with the National Health Service
Corps
Therapists:
Licensed, or Master's Level
in Outpatient
Bachelor's-Level in Counse-
lor Support
Case Management (adult &
child)
Master's Therapist in Metha-
Sdone Clinic
Administration:
Director of Dietary Svcs
(Gville)
Medical Services
RN Nursing Manager (Gville
)
PRN RN, LPN, C.N.A.
Recovery Specialist ( Direct
Care)
LPN (2) for Methadone
Clinic (new)
To see our current openings in
Mental Health and to apply
online, please go to:
www.mbhci.orE





EOE, DFWP, E-Verify


Seeking Flatbed Owner/Operators
fully equipped w/own Tarps &
Chains & Binders to run the
southeast. Home on Weekends and
throughout the week. Paying 85%.
Contact Adam or Rick at
386-755-8579 RDH Trucking Inc.


.100 Job
0 Opportunities
D5526210

oim
Holiday Inn
Lake City's only full service hotel
is seeking the following:
Cook
Cafe Server
Experience required. Apply
in person. Mon-Fri 12-5pm
213 SW Commerce Dr.
EOE/DFWP.R

05526213
Sales
S Branch
Management
'Trainee
Lake City, FL
Turn your drive into
leadership.
Springleaf Financial Services is one
of the nation's largest consumer
finance companies with 90 years of
consumer lending experience, 1050+
offices in 40 states, 5700 employees
nationwide and $19 billion in assets.
Our world-class training program
will prepare you to lead and develop
a branch office team, champion the
ultimate customer experience, and
build current and new customer
relationships. Promotional
opportunities begin during your
training.
Strong communication skills and
sales/leadership exp. required.
College degree preferred. Join us
and enjoy great advancement
opportunities, co ipetitive salary and
incentive compensation, health
insurance (eligible day one) and a
diversified 401(k). If you believe.
that this is the right opportunity for
you, then wait no longer.
Please email or fax resume to:
Springleaf
Financial Services
Email: renee.snell@slfs.com
Fax: 386-755-0096 .
www.springleaffinancial.com
EOE


Associate Reps
SUMMER WORK/GREAT PAY
Immediate FT/PT openings,
Customer sales/service, .
No exp needed, conditions,
Apply Now all ages 17+
(386) 269-0883
AUTO MECHANIC
for small companies vehicles.
Must have own tools. Hourly ate.
386-755-6481
CDL Class A Truck Driver.
Flatbed exp. for F/T SE area.
3 years exp or more. Medical
benefits offered. Contact
Melissa or Mary @ 386-935-2773
Columbia County Clerk of Court
Job Opening. Information
Technology Administrator
www.columbiaclerk.com
Hiring Locally This Week
Liberty National Life
Insurance Company
Full Training Provided Potential
of $60K+ Annually. 401K, BCBS
Insurance & Pension for those who
qualify. Call 1-800-257-5500 to
set up an interview.


DRIVE ME from
Lake City, Florida to
Augusta Maine.
Call Edward. 386-719-8872
Full time Scheduling position for
local Medicare Home Health
Agency needed. Experience is
preferred. Please fax Resume to
386-755-7828 attnr Wendy
Industrial Customer Service
Representative. Duties include
Estimating, Order Entry & '
Purchase Order via Phone, Email
& Fax. Must have Good phone,
math & computer skills. Apply in
Person Grizzly Mfg. 174 NE Cor-
tez Terr.- Lake City FL
Physical laborer needed. CDL
license req'd. Must have respect
for electricity & ability to work in
water & mud. Must be able to pass
drug test. Call 386-752-1854
Sales Position available for moti-
vated individual Rountree -Moore
Toyota, Great benefits, paid train-
ing/vacation. Exp. a plus but not
necessary. Call Anthony Cosentino
386-623-7442

120 Medical
SEmployment

05526129
We're looking for a motivated
RN or LVN. This position has
NO Patient care involved.
Put your clinical skills and
experience to work. We will
train you to perform medical
chart audits. Auditing
experience is preferred, as well
as knowledge of Excel and basic
computer skills.
You'll receive a competitive
salary, F/T benefits, M-F, and
No Nights or Holidays!
For consideration FAX resume
to: (303) 451-8340 or e-mail to
dale.anderson@nhri.com. EOE


240{ Schools &
240 Education

04544843
Interested in a Medical Career?
Express Training offers
courses for beginners & exp
Nursing Assistant, $479
next class-07/11/10
Phlebotomy national certifica-
tion, $800 next class-07/11/11
Continuing education
Fees incl. books, supplies, exam
fees. Call 386-755-4401 or
expresstrainingservices.com

04545222
OBTAIN YOUR
COMMERCIAL DRIVERS
LICENSE
CLASSES FORMING NOW
AT FLORIDA GATEWAY
COLLEGE
CLASSROOM TRAINING,
STATE-OF-THE-ART
SIMULATOR, BEHIND THE
WHEEL DRIVING
FINANCING AVAILABLE
FOR QUALIFIED
APPLICANTS


310 Pets & Supplies
FREE KITTENS.
1 Female & 3 males.
386-365-0042


Golden Retriever pups CKC.
Shots. 3 females, 5 males
Available July 3 $350. Each
SPOP. 386-623-1577

MALE COLLIE Puppy for sale.
Pick of litter. Parents on Premises.
$300. negotiable.
386-755-4590 or 365-5150

PUBLISHER'S NOTE
Florida Law 828.29 requires dogs
and cats being sold to be at least 8
weeks old and have a health
certificate from a licensed
veterinarian documenting they
have mandatory shots and are
free from intestinal and external
parasites. Many species of wild-
life must be licensed by Florida
Fish and Wildlife. If you are
unsure, contact the local
office for information.

330 Livestock &
Supplies
Black Angus Cows & Heifers
Prices Vary
Registered & Commercial
386-719-4802'

Cattle For Sale. 12-16 mos.
Bulls & heifers.
Pure bred black angus & cross
breeds. 386-365-1352


361 Farm Equipment
84 Ford 4610 Tractor.
2WD, Solid
2005 motor,$7,500. OBO
386-867-0005

407 Computers
Compaq Computer, Many extras.
Complete Computer
$80.00
386-755-9984 or 386-292-2170







Land Clearing

Back Hoe, Dozer, Chopping, root
raking, bush hog, seeding, sod,
disking, site prep, ponds &
irrigation. Free Est! 386-623-3200

Lawn & Landscape Service

Clean Pine Straw,
You pick it up, $1.85 a bale
Delivery of 100 bales $260
386-688-9156
Landscape Maintenance Company
You can trust for knowledge &
pride, Mention this AD!
Mow Green, LLC 386-288-6532

Services

DIVORCE, BANKRUPTCY,
RESUMES.
other court approved forms-
386-961-5896.

Summer Cleaning done your
way. Let me Clean your home be-
fore you leave on Vacation. Come
back home & relax. 386-303-1496.
We come to you! Auto Detailing:
Wash, wax & vaccum. Pressure
Wash: Houses, mobile homes,
driveways, decks. 386-697-2224


416 Sporting Goods 630 fMobe Homes


Hunt Club Jasper Florida 2150
acres. 14 members. Deer, Hogs,
Turkey, RV sites. Ask for Kenny
(352)516-8719. www.cchcfl.com.
HUNTING LEASE.
20 acres between Ft. White and
Columbia City. $800.
Call 386-965-9822

420 Wanted to Buy
K&H TIMBER
We Buy Pine Hardwood &
Cypress. Large or small tracts.
Call 386-961-1961.
Wanted Junk Cars, Trucks, Vans.
$250 & up CASH! Free Pick Up!
NO title needed !386-878-9260
After 5pm 386- 752-3648.

430 Garage Sales






PUBLISHER'S NOTE
All Yard Sale Ads
Must be Pre-Paid.



440 Miscellaneous
5 Tickets: Nascar Coke Zero
Weekend July 1st & 2nd. Located
in the Sprint Tower. Sold for Face
value. 386-965-0765 for details.
FREE!!I High Quality
Moving Boxes.
You pick up.
386-438-8355
Stop gnat & Mosquito bites! Buy
Swamp Gator All natural insect re-
pellent. Family safe. Use head to
toe. Available at The Home Depot.

Summer Barbecue Special
Tow Behind
Grill/Smoker, $1,250 OBO.
386-719-4802


450 Good Things
5 U to Eat

BLUEBERRY HILL
U-PICK opens
May 30th
386-963-4220


2&3 BR MH. $395 $650. mo.
plus deposit. Water & sewer fur-
nished. Cannon Creek MHP
386-752-6422
2/2 Units, clean, well maintained,
nice safe park setting, 2 miles to
downtown Lake City, $575 month
+ $575 sec dep, 386-984-8448
13th Month FREE!!
2br /2ba SWMH $475. mo; also
Resid'l RV lots for rent between
Lake City & G'ville. Access to I-
75 & 441 (352)317-1326 for terms
3/2 S of Lake City, (Branford area)
$400 dep, $600 month
386-590-0642 or 386-867-1833
www.suwanneevalleyproperties.com
DWMH for Rent. 3br/2ba
Handicapped accessible.
$650. mo. $500. Dep. No Pets.
386-984-9634. ask for Amber.
Great area! Very clean 2Br/2Ba,
MH, CH/A, Nice kitchen.
$550. mo. + $200 Dep. NO PETS.
(386)755-0064 or (904)771-5924
Mobile Homes for rent in
White Springs, Lake City & Ft.
White Contact 386-623-3404
or 386-365-1919

FLORIDA
A GATEWAY
COLLEGE
(Formewy Lake City Community Colege)
ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR
MATHEMATICS'
164 Duty Days Tenured Track
to Commence Fall 2011
Teach college-level and preparatory
mathematics courses; work with
colleagues for the advancement of
departmental goals. Requires
Master's degree in appropriate area
related to mathematics; or Master's
degree with minimum of 18 graduate
credit hours in course work centered
on mathematics. Salary: Based on
degree and experience. plus benefits
Review of Applications will Begin
Immediately
Persons interested should provide
College application, vita, and
photocopies of transcripts All foreign
transcripts must be submitted with
official translation and evaluation.
Position details and applications
available on web at: www.fcq.edu
Human Resources
Florida Gateway College
149 S.E. College Place
Lake City, FL 32025-2007
Phone (386) 754-4314
Fax (386) 754-4814
E-Mail: hunanrsfqcdu .
ilhe SiADuem Asecialw onf Colkngcs mand ~Le'.
ViP AO-uWI o0 rllne inaS d..iis an.o


I


~-------rr















LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED SUNDAY, JUNE 19, 2011


630 Mobile Homes
630 for Rent
Nice clean 2&3 bdrm, Five Points,
NO PETS,
also 3 bd on the
Westside, 386-961-1482
X-Clean 2/2 SW, 8 mi NW of VA.
Clean acre lot, nice area. $500. mo
+ dep No dogs Non-smoking
environment.386-961-9181

Mobile Homes
640 for Sale
2010 Lot Model 32x80
Den/LR 3BR/2BA
2280SF 1/2" SR
Call Charles @
Royals Homes 754-6737
2010 Lot Model 3BR/2BA
1624 SE 1/2" Sheetrock
Vaulted Ceiling.
Charles @
Royals Homes 754-6737
2011 Claytin Single
14x76 2BR/2BA
3 walk in Closets
Call Charles @ Royals
Homes 754-6737
2011 Clayton Homes 4BR/2BA
9' Side Walls,
Energy Star Home
Call Charles @ Royals
Homes 754-6737
2011 Legacy Model 1980 SF
Wood Cab, 3BR/2BA
Deluxe Int.erior
Call.Charles @
Royals Homes 754-6737
2011 SE Triple wide
16" OC Home WZII
Total upgrade call Charles
@ Royals Homes 754-6737
Any Size; Any Shape
we have the home for you
Call Royals Homes @
386-754-6737
Architect Designed,
Green Engineered
Energy Homes
@Royals Homes
www.royalshomesales.com
Ask about our Energy Star Top
Insulation & Windows, Better
Built,Better Comfort, Phil @
Royals Homes 386-754-6737
Custom Built Modular's,
Bring your plans to
Royals Homes
386-754-6737
www.royalshomesales.com
Finance Manager on Site,
Know's how to get it done,
not a Salesman Guessing
Call Phil @ Royals
Homes 386-754-6737
Flashy? Pretty?
Whatabout Construction?
Homesto last a Lifetime
Royals Homes
386-754-6737


Hallmark Real Estate. 2004
DWMH just minutes from the riv-
er. Detached carport. Front & back
screened porches. MLS#77398
Paula Lawrence 386-623-1973
Only a Few Left
2010 Models must go!
Call Royals Homes @
386-754-6737
Only at Royals Homes
Can your home be
prepared for real brick?
Call Bo @ 754-6737
IEW D/W Reduced Thousands.
3br/2ba set, delivery, A/C
skirting, steps. $39,900.
Call Ken (386)754-8844
AS IS, WHERE IS.:.32X80, 4/2,-
LR/Den,. needs carpet, paint, 2400
sqft. has metal roof, vinyl siding.
$31,000. Randy 386-754-0198
FIRE YOUR LANDLORD
TO OWN WHAT YOUR
THROWING AWAY IN RENT.
CALL MIKE 386-754-8844
NEW 32X70 4/3. 2K sqft+. L/R,
DenSidex side, glasstop range,
D/W. Del, set, Steps, A/C, skirt-
ing. $59,900. Ken (386)754-8844
OWNER FINANCE 40% Down
.. w/land Equity or CASH on any
new or used singlewide or Double-
wide. Randy 386-754-0198
The Economy has forced
me to cut the price on my
3 bedroom, 2 bath home to
$38K (352)-870-5983
Pre-Owned 2BR/1 Bath
Priced to move 754-6737
Only @ Royals Homes
www.royalshomesales.com
Sales Price Doubled?
Not at Royals, Honest people,
Quality Homes.
Call Royals Homes
@ 386-754-6737
Service Manager on Site
makes sure your satisfied, not
someone doing it all
Royals Homes 386-754-6737
There is a Difference.
Just ask our Customers
Wedo what we say
Call Phil@ Royals Homes
386-754-6737

6 Mobile Home
650 & Land

67.5 ac.Ranch, fenced & cross
fenced. Spacious moblie home
w/large front deck & RV hookup
MLS 75607 $299,000. Access
Realty. Patti Taylor. 386-623-6896
Century 21/The Darby Rogers Co.
DWMH on 5 ac. 3br/2ba Back 2
ac. fenced. Owners motivated.
Debbie Myles 386-719-1224
MLS# 75830 $99,900
Hallmark Real Estate. 3/2
DWMH 1/2 ac south of town.
Columbia City. Paved frontage,
comer lot. $57,500
MLS#77654 Janet Creel 719-0382
Owner Finance, Nice 3/2, S of
Lake City, small down/$625 mo
386-590-0642 or 386-867-1833
www.suwanneevalleyproperties.com

710 Unfurnished Apt.
710 For Rent


710 Unfurnished Apt.
7 For Rent

04545256
SPRING HILL VILLAGE
Excellent High Springs location.
1, 2 & 3 bedroom floor-plans;
some with garages.
Call 386-454-1469
or visit our website:
www.springhillvillage.net

2BR APT.
Downtown Location, Clean.
$500 mo, plus Security.
NO PETS. Call 386-755-3456
A Landlord You Can Love!
2 br Apts $575. & up + sec. Grqat
area. CH/A washer/dryer hookups.
386-758-9351/352-208-2421
Furnished or unfurnished I
Townhomes on the golf course.
$750. mo. plus security. Includes
water. 386-752-9626
Great location W of 1-75, spacious
deluxe 2br apts., garage, W/D
hookup. patio. $600/700 & up, +
Sec, 386-344-3715 or 965-55.60
The Lakes Apts. Studios & IBr's
from $135/wk. Util. & cable incl.,
Sec 8 vouchers accepted, monthly
rates avail Call 386-752-2741
Updated apartments w/tile floors
& fresh paint. Excellent location.
From $450. + sec.
Call, Michelle 386-752-9626

720 Furnished Apts.
72 For Rent

Rooms for Rent. HillcrestASands,
Columbia. All furnished. Electric,
cable, fridge, microwave. Weekly
or monthly rates. 1 person $135,
2 persons $150. weekly
386-752-5808

73 Unfurnished
730 Home For Rent
2 bedroom 1 bath on
5 acres. $700.00 per month.
First, last and security.
386-590-5333
2br Private Country Home
Newly Remodeled, Ig yard.
$695. mo + deposit
386-752-1444
2br/lba for rent in my home..
$785.mo includes: electric & ca-
ble. ist/last mo rent. No pets.
(352)509-1855 Leave message.
2BR/1BA Kitchen and.Den. on
,Alachua. $5000. mo.
\First, last & security.
386-397-0602
3br/1.5ba. Very clean, CH/A
Fenced (privacy) large back yard.
Nice area/location. $800. mo $800.
dep: Ref's req'd. (941)920-4535


3br/2ba Nice Brick home 1700 sf
for rent comer of Baya &
Defender. $950. m6. $950. dep.
386-344-5065
3br/2ba, Newly remodeled in nice
S/D Lease Opt. to buy. $900/Mo.
Credit Check required.
No Pets (386)755-9476
4br/2ba in town.
Good neighborhood. $900. mo
1st & $900 security. No Pets.
386-755-6916
Suwanee River Frontage. 2/1 in
Columbia Co.,near I-75/White
Spgs Jane S.Usher Lie. Real Estate
Broker 386-755-3500 or 365-1352

ff : lBusiness &
750 Office Rentals
FOR LEASE: Downtown office
space. Convenient to
Court house.
Call 386-755-3456
SFor Lease: E Baya Ave. Two -
1000 sqft office space units or
combined for 2000 sqft. 386-984-
0622 or weekends 386-497-4762
OFFICE SPACE for lease.
Oak Hill Plaza. 900 sqft -
$675mo/$695. sec dep.
Tom 386-961-1086 DCA Realtor


Bring the picture in or
we will take it for you!

* Ad runs 10 consecutive days
with a description and photo in the
newspaper and online E-edition.
* Ad runs 10 consecutive days as a
classified line ad online.
* You must include vehicle price.
* All ads are prepaid.
* Private party only.





2006 EF250
Ford Van
3/4 ton, metal work
shelves/ladder rack,
60K miles, exc. cond.

$10,500
Call
386-555-5555
If you don't sell your vehicle
during the first 10 days, you,
can run the same vehicle ad
for 10 additional days for
only $15.00
Terms and conditions remain the
same for the additional run.


To*J Gen t-'' Yor H Mi
Vehicle Soldi C'all


750 Business &
5 Office Rentals
788 S Marion Ave, Commercial
bldg with hwy frontage.
near downtown.
Call Scott Stewart at Westfield
Realty Group. 386-867-3498


790 Vacation Rentals

Horseshoe Beach Scalloping Spcl
Gulf Front 2br, w/lg porch, dock,
fish sink. wkend $395./wk $895.
386-235-3633/352-498-5986
alwaysonvacation.com #419-181
"Florida's Last Frontier"



805 Lots for Sale

5 Acre Lot, Secluded & Cleared,
MLS# 67871 $55,000
Call Lisa Waltrip
@ 386-365-5900
westfieldreiatygroup.com

Great Package Deal $43,500
Nicely wooded. 3 lots in Emerald
Cove. (1)Private cul-de-sap.
Aaron Nickelson 386-867-3534
Westfield Realty Group

Hallmark Real Estate. Owner
Finance with $5K down with
terms negotiable. Below assessed
value for the county. MLS# 74484
$17,900 Jay Sears 386-867-1613

Land for Sale. 12 acres in
nice area south of town.
MLS#77469 $55,000
Carrie Cason 386-623-2806
Westfield Realty Group

PUBLISHER'S NOTE
All real estateadvertising in this
newspaper is subject to the fair
housing act which makes it illegal
to advertise "any preference,
limitation, or discrimination based
on race, color, religion, sex,
disability, familial status or nation-.
al origin; or any intention to make
such preference, limitation or
discrimination." Familial status
includes children under the age of
18 living with parents or legal
custodians, pregnant women and
people securing custody of chil-
dren under the age of 18. This
newspaper will not knowingly
accept any advertising for real es-
tate which is in violation of the


Classified Department: 755-5440


e ood condition.
leather, 7 passenger.
$5,400

Call
386-365-2479


805 Lots for Sale
law. Our readers are hereby in-
formed that all dwellings adver-
tised in this newspaper are availa-
ble on an equal opportunity basis.
To complain of discrimination call
HUD toll free at 1-800-669-9777,
the toll free
telephone number to the hearing
impaired is 1-800-927-9275.


810 Home for Sale

3/2 1056 sqft Brick home in town.
Fenced back yard w/12x12 work-
shop Just Reduced! $79,900
MLS# 77414 Call 386-243-8227
R.E.O.Realty Group, Inc
3/2 in Woodhaven w/Fla Room,
fenced back yard MLS#75499,
$114,900 Call Pam @
Remax 386-303-2505 or
email- remaxpamb@gmail.com

4/2 on 10 ac. in Bell. Over 2200
sqft in a country setting. 10x20
frame shade. Bring offers! $89,000
MLS 76582 Brittany Stoeckert
Results Realty 386-397-3473

4/2 with 1000 sq ft workshop,
fenced yard, 2 car garage, Fairly
new roof & HVAC MLS#77602,
Bring Offers! $169,900,
R.E.O. Realty Group 243-8227

4br brick on .51 ac. comer lot. For-
mal dining and a large open floor
plan. Brick patio. $159,888
MLS 76763 Brittany Stoeckert
Results Realty 386-397-3473


810 Home for Sale
A Pilots Dream home 3br/2.5ba.
Pool, stocked pond, detached ga-
rage w/living quarters MLS#77756
$399,900 Westfield Realty
GroupJosh Grecian 386-466-2517
Access Realty Stylish 3/2 + pool
house w/1/2 bath on 2.25 acres.
Rear deck, 2 car garage & carport.
MLS 78103 $194,500.
Patti Taylor.623-6896

Brick 3/1 family home, 4.43 acres.
w/metal roof. MLS# 77415
Short sale acceptance w/lenders
approval. $99,000. 386-243-8227
R.E.O. Realty Group, Inc

Century 21/The Darby Rogers Co.
3br/l. Updated kitchen, bath. Open
living room w/all classic & elegant
light fixtures. 386-752-6575
MLS# 78099 $79,900

Century 21/The Darby Rogers Co.
3/2 Iin Spring Estates. 20x40
workshop. Screened back porch &
all appliances. Kayla Carbono
623-9650 MLS# 73787 $99,900

Century 21/The Darby Rogers Co.
Picadilly Park All brick 3/2, corer
lot w/inground pool. Screen porch
& fenced yard. Jessica Sheelly
288-2403 MLS# 73787 $115,900


K. CONDO AUCTION'
Sat June 25 @ 10AM 2 Dolphin Avenue
Ocean View sA-es hlana (HRE E)3BRF BAUI IS
UrobsruciedOcen Views /IBach ,cesswa ftn |n 0J
I I ,1 .I.1 ). o 1 j- J
JI1 c.-dL c '. .s. .. e-=-. e*


2005 Yamaha
VStar 650
11,000 miles, blue with
Ghost flames, runs
.great, new battery
$3,100 oB6
Call
386-752-9645


199633 Ft.

Fifth Wheel
w/2 slide-outs, camp or
reside, livable but needs work.
$4,000
Call
386-362-1826
Leave Message


L .. S. -
_______________________ ~. ~. -


810 Home for Sale
Century 21/The Darby Rogers Co.
Eastside Village 2br/2ba. Extra Ig.
Master suite. Florida room & 2
sheds. Ginny Smith 386-623-4277
623-4277 MLS# 70160 $79,900

Century 21/The Darby Rogers Co.
Laurel Lake S/D. 4br/2ba w/ ap-
prox. 2275 sqft. Fenced back yard,
storage shed. Susan Sloan 386-
965-2847 MLS# 76106 $189,900
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
4br/1.5ba brick. 1332 sq ft. Great
floor plan, nice yard, close to
town. 1 ac landscaped. Lori
Geibeig MLS# 75713 $84,900

Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
Remodeled 2/2 (could be 3/2).
Split floor plan. Great home, great
price. Mary Brown Whitehurst
965-0887 MLS# 77943 $105,000

Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
3/2 brick home in Woodcrest. Lg
lot completely fenced. Easy access
to amenities. Elaine K. Tolar 386-
752-6488 MLS# 78148 $129,900
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
New home in Mayfair. 4 bedroom
on comer lot. Covered Porch.
Elaine K. Tolar 386-752-6488
MLS# 76919 $214,900


CRAFT `I













LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED SUNDAY, JUNE 19, 2011


810 Home for Sale
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
3/3 in beautiful area. 2414sqft.
Private yard & patio with storage
bldg. Lori G Simpson 386-365-
5678 MLS# 78175 $159,900
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
Brick 3/2 on lake front. Lots of up-
dates. Glassed in room with fantas-
tic views. Lori G Simpson 386-
365-5678 MLS# 78092 $249,900
Country Home 2br/2ba on 5 ac.
detached garage w/workshop.
MLS# 77005 $179,900 Call Roger
Lovelady 386-365-7039
Westfield Realty Group
CYPRESS LANDING!
3BR/2BA built in 2005 w/large
kitchen $115,000
DANIEL CRAPPS AGENCY,
INC. 755-5110 #75794
DESIRABLE GWEN LAKE area!
Nice 3BR/2BA home on
comer lot $112,000
DANIEL CRAPPS AGENCY,
INC. 755-5110 #77307
Eastside Village a 55+ Retirement
Community. lots of Storage. Ig
deck off 2br suite. Carport w/more
storage. MLS# 77462 Eastside
Village Realty, Inc. 752-5290
Eastside Village a 55+ Retirement
Community. 2br/2ba. Lg office
/craft room. Oversized garage.
$89,900 MLS# 71901 Eastside
Village Realty, Inc. 752-5290
Eastside Village a 55+ Retirement
Community. Open floor plan
w/breakfastnook. 2 Ig bedrooms.
$104,999 MLS# 77779 Eastside
Village Realty, Inc. 752-5290
Featured Home 55+ acres, 5 pas-
tures fenced & cross fenced. 2,700
sqft, 4br/3ba home built in 1996.
Call for details! 386-243-8227
R.E.O. Realty Group
Fixer Upper on Suwannee River.
Needs TLC. Owner motivated &
will finance. $45,000
MLS 77337 Brittany Stoeckert
Results Realty 386-397-3473
GREAT STARTER HOME!
3BR/2BA w/lots of closet space &
nice lawn $79,900
DANIEL CRAPPS AGENCY,
INC. 755-5110 #76432


810 Home for Sale
Great Starter Home. Well cared
for. New countertops, tile floors &
metal roof. $79,900 MLS#77524
Brodie Alfred 386-623-0906
Westfield Realty Group
Hallmark Real Estate. Brick
home w/fine landscaping. Dream
kitchen w/double pantry.
Split bedroom plan MLS#77846
Paula Lawrence 386-623-1973
Hallmark Real Estate. Country
Estate. Sit in the swing of the big
oak tree and watch the horses
graze on O0ac. fenced. 39 ac total.
MLS#78139 Janet Creel 719-0382
Hallmark Real Estate. Pool &
Patio. 3br/2ba. brick home on
1.69 ac. Workshop &
SWMH on property. MLS#78117
Tanya Shaffer 386-397-4766
Home near the River. 3br/2ba,
1470 sqft. .,eeds a little TLC.
MLS#76390 $34,900
Mike Lienemann 386-867-9053
Westfield Realty Group
Home on 15 ac. w/over 2,500 sqft
home.Very Ig bedrooms w/private
baths. 24x24 workshop $235,000
MLS 77552 Brittany Stoeckert
Results Realty 386-397-3473
HOME OR OFFICE on
Alachua St; remodeled 1,207 SqFt
home $82,900
DANIEL CRAPPS AGENCY,
INC. 755-5110 #77724
Hallmark Real Estate. 2006
2200SF home. 2br/2ba w/mother-
in-law suite, 4 car garage, endless
hot water heater. MLS# 77547
$309,900 Jay Sears 386-867-1613
Hallmark Real Estate. 3br/2ba
new roof & AC. Comes w/SWMH
& 30x30 steel bldg. Completely
fenced. MLS# 76752
$179,900 Jay Sears 386-867-1613
Just Reduced 3/2 home, inside city
limits, fenced backyard, detached
carport w/office MLS#77411
$79,900 Call R.E.O.Realty,
@ 386-243-8227 Make Offer!
Just Reduced 4/2 on 1.57 acres,
fireplace. partially fenced, MLS#
77412, Call Nancy Rogers at
R.E.O. Realty Group
386-243-8227 $64,900


810 Home for Sale
Lg. 4/3 family home. 16x20
screened porch, workshop. 4.5 ac.
fenced/cross fenced MLS 74339
$229,900. N Fla Homeland Real-
ty Darlene Hart 386-288-2878
Lg. home on 1 ac. Granite floors
throughout. 4br/2ba. Nice open
kitchen & Florida room. $148,000
MLS 77292 Brittany Stoeckert
Results Realty 386-397-3473
Like New. 3br/2ba on 3 ac. New
kitchen cabinets, counters, carpet
& more. $179,900 MLS#77372
Charlie Sparks 386-755-0808
Westfield Realty Group
LOTS OF UPGRADES!
Remodeled kitchen in this
2BR/1BA home $29,900
DANIEL CRAPPS AGENCY,
INC. 755-5110 #77505
Mayfield S/D, nice fenced in back
yard w/small lake behind property.
Very nice. $99,888
MLS 77092 Brittany Stoeckert
Results Realty 386-397-3473
Neat as a pin! Split floor plan
w/well manicured lawn. 10x12
storage shed. $129K MLS 77932
Darlene Hart 386-288-2878
N Flu Homeland Realty
Owner Fin.,Nice 3/2 on 2.5 fenced
acres, pond, Jasper area, sm down
$700 mo, 386-590-0642/867-1833
www.suwanneevalleyproperties.com
Owner Finance. Custom built 3/2.5
10.8 ac. Granite, fireplace, vaulted
ceilings, surround sound. lanai,
gazebo. MLS 77382 Access Real-
ty. Patti Taylor $249K 623-6896
Remax Professionals Charming
w/many upgrades. 3br/2ba. 2 mas-
ter suites. MLS# 76779, $105,000
Missy Zecher @ 386-623-0237
www.missyzecher.com
Remax Professionals Motivated
seller. All brick family home
w/many upgrades. MLS# 78168,
$129,000 www.missvzecher.com
Missy Zecher 386-623-0237
Remax Professionals Spacious
home on comer lot. Private access
to Lake Jeffery. MLS# 77783,
$198,900 www.missvzecher.com
Missy Zecher @ 386-623-0237


810 Home for Sale
Spacious 4/2 home on 1 ac. Split
floor plan. Great neighborhood.
Easy access to 1-75 $220K MLS
77859 N Fla Homeland Realty
Darlene Hart 386-288-2878
SPACIOUS home built in
1995 has 2BR/2BA & 1,636 SqFt
on 1 acre $89,900
DANIEL CRAPPS AGENCY,
INC. 755-5110 #76887
Starter/Investment Home, 3/2 +
Bonus room on 1 acre, remodeled,
fenced MLS#77562 $99,900
Call Pam @ Remax
Professionals 386-303-2505
Well Maintained 3/2 on dead-end
street, quiet, country, close to
downtown $105,000 MLS#77800
LisaWaltrip 386-365-5900
Westfield Realty Group
Well Maintained 3/2 w/open floor
plan,on 1/2 acre, fenced, shed
MLS# 78136 $134,900
Call Pam Beauchamp @ Remax
Professionals 386-758-8900

80 Farms &
8 Acreage
4 1/2 acre lot. Lake Jeffery Road.
Gorgeous Oaks!Paved Rd
Owner Financing! NO DOWN!
$59,900. $525mo 352-215-1018.
www.LandOwnerFinancing.com
4 acres, Wellborn, New Well
installed, Beautifully wooded
w/cleared Home Site, owner fin,
no down,.$39,900, $410 mon
Call 352-215-1018
www.LandOwnerFinancing.com
6.45 ac river front property in
White Springs. ioe to Big Shoals.
Covered shelter for entertaining.
MLS# 77417 $124,888 386-243-
8227 R.E.O. Realty Group, Inc
Bring the horses. Peaceful &
ready for your home. Convenient
location. $38,000 MLS#76264
Millard Gillen 386-365-7001
Westfield Realty Group
FARM- 7 stall barn, Apt.
17+ acres cross fenced.
Close in $950. mo.
.386-961-1086


820 Farms &
Acreage
Half to ten acre lots. Some w/
well, septic, pp. We finance; low
dwn pmt. Deas Bullard Properties.
386-752-4339. www.landnfl.com
Look at all the Upgrades
s Completely remodeled.
$106,500 MLS#77483
Brodie Alfred 386-623-0906
Westfield Realty Group
Pretty piece of land. 2 acres close
to interstate 75 for under 20K.
Mobile Homes or residential ok.
MLS# 77400 Call 386-243-8227
,R.E.O. Realty Group, Inc

Commercial
'830 Property

Hallmark Real Estate. Commer-
cial Business Location on South
Main w/offices & service bldg.
Frontage, warehouse & storage
MLS#76280 Janet Creel 719-0382


830 Commercial
8 Property

Prime Commercial Location.
Just across from plaza. Frontage
on Baya w/2 curbcuts. $350,000
MLS# 77485 Call 386-243-8227
R.E.O.Realty Group, Inc

930 Motorcycles

2005 YAMAHA VSTAR 650
11,000 miles. Blue w/Ghost
flames. Runs great! New Battery.
$3,100. obo. 386-752-9645

951 Recreational
95 Vehicles

1996', 33ft Fifth Wheel
w/2 slideouts. camp or reside.
livable, needs some work. $4,000.
386-362-1826. Leave message.


Rountree Moore Toyota Bucks i Rountrese Moore Toyota Bucks


(0 TOYOTA
Please present Rountree
Moore Toyota Bucks at
time of purchase. No cash
value. No reproductions
. of the Rountree Moore
Toyota Bucks is allowed
Not valid with any other
coupon. One coupon per
customer Fees. lax,
& shop supplies not'
included.


4-10 OFF
Get $10 off your next
conventional Oil, Lube
and Filter Change,
Rotate and Balance of
Tires. Or or any other
service over $50.00.
Expires 7-15-11
Not Legal Tender

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E EW AND QUALITY PBEOWNED FURNITURE.
ANTIQUES AND COLLECTABLES.
SAVE ON AMERICAN BEDDING MATTRESS. TWIN TO KING.
9. DINNETTE SETS, HUTCHES, SOFA CHAIRS AND SO MUCH MORE.
JUST ARRIVED FASHION JEWELRY. CHECK OUT OUR BLING BLING SALE.
BUY ASY 2 PIECES GET 3RD PIECE AT 50% OFF.
BUY ANY 3 PIECES GET 4TH PIECE FREE.
*DOES NOT INCLUDE BLuE LuSTER JEWELRY.



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1034 SW MAIN BLD., BLVD Crry, FL 32055


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Story ideas?


Contact
Robert Bridges
Editor
754-0428
rbridges@lakeotyreporter.com

Sunday, June 19,2011


Lake City Reporter





LIFE




www.lakecityreporter.com


Nichelle Demorest
dndemorest@ufl edu


Crape


myrtle


season

is here
hh, the season of
the crape myrtle
has arrived. The
blossom colors
.L are so luscious
and vivid that they definitely
get my attention along roads
and in landscapes. If I had the
space and money, there would
be 5, 10, no, 50 different crape
myrtles growing in my unruly
yard.
Crape myrtles, or
Lagerstroemia cultivars, have
all season interest They set
flower buds in the early spring
and usually begin blooming
profusely by May. Some cul-
tivars keep on blooming right
on into the fall. During the
summer, bark strips peel away
on older plants to reveal tan
and cinnamon colors on the
trunk. In North Florida, we
can expect some show of yel-
low, orange, and red fall leaves.
After the leaves have fallen,
the attractively misshapen
silhouette of the crape myrtle
canbe a feoal pointby itself
The gnarled and crooked
branches.take on a character
somewhat resembling that of
an old faithful friend, tirelessly
biding time until spring.
Then there are the crape
myrtles that have been pruned
back to stumpy branches
every year. No wonder they
look like angry upheld fists all
winter. Fists are not calming
focal points in the garden.
The crape myrtle is one of
our North Florida's most versa-
tile landscape plants for sunny
locations. There are many dif-
ferent sized cultivars that can be
used as trees, shrubs, ground-
covers, and hanging baskets.
But the most widely available
ones are those that are best
used as small trees in Florida.
Established plants are very
drought tolerant and have
low fertility requirements.
Container grown plants should
be planted during the early sum-
mer, but newly installed plants
should be watered regularly for
the first few weeks. They prefer
a slightly acidic soil, but will
tolerate about anything except
wet soils.
Be on the lookout for pow-
dery mildew and crapemyrtle
aphid. The mildew appears as
a whitish powder that spreads
on the surface of leaves, stems
and flowers. The best wayto
avoid mildew is to plant in the sun
where there is free air movement
Crapemyrtle aphids suck
the juices from the undersides
of leaves. Black sooty mold is
usually associated with aphids.
Begin treatment with horticul-
tural oil sprays or insecticidal
soaps by the first of July if you
see signs of aphid infestations
to keep them under control.
Enjoy your crape myrtles, and
I will enjoy your crape myrtles,
too.
To learn more go to http://
ivww.solutionsforyourlife. corn
or call the UF/IFAS Master
Gardeners at 752-5384. Check
out Columbia County's upcom-
ing programs at http://colum-
bia.ifas.ufl.edu
D. Nichelle Demorest is
a horticulture agent with the
Columbia County Extension
of the University of Florida
Institute of Food and
Agricultural Sciences.


Local band dreams big


By ANTONIA ROBINSON
arobinson@lakecityreporter.com
Performing on America's
Got Talent in the future
is the goal for one Lake
City band.
"Thats my dream, to
be a musician, to be big," said Kyle
Green of Billboards & Byways.
Billboards & Byways is a
Christian acoustic rock band
formed five years ago, he said.
The band is a family affair for
its members who range in age
from 12 to 42. Members include
Kyle Green on rhythm guitar and
backing vocals, his wife, Carissa,
as lead singer, brother Klay on
drums and father Steve on bass
guitar.
The band is going to an audition
for America's Got Talent February
2012 in Orlando.
Kyle Green has watched the
show for several seasons, he said.
Making it on America's Got Talent
will expand the band's music to a
wider audience.
Kyle Green said he formed a
Christian band because of growing
up in the church. The name came
to him instantly.
"I was actually sitting in church
one day, and it popped in my
head," he said. "It sounded like a
cool indie name."
Music runs in the family, Steve
Green said. His brother, Earl
Green, is a member of the Mercy
Mountain Boys.
Once the band formed, it began
performing at events such as
birthday parties, festivals and
shows.
"We've played everywhere in
the community," he said.
, ThebandwritesoDriginal songs
and the lyrics contain a story that
people can relate to, Kyle Green
said. The music is written to touch


ANTONIA ROBINSON/ Lake City Reporter
Local Lake City band Billboards & Byways wants to share its musical talents with a wider audience. Band mem-
bers, from left, are Steve Green, Carissa Green, Kyle Green and Klay Green.


the audience's heart as well as
offer praise to God.
It makes him proud to see his
children working on reaching
their dreams, Steve Green said.'
"It's wonderful," he said.
Steve Green has years of music
experience from being in the '
music industry, he said. He was a
,, lemler with Pqshing Wind out"
of Macclenny and tries to share
his knowledge with the restof the
band.


Carissa Green said she has
been singing since the'age of 3.
She joined the band last October.
"I'd rather sing Christian
music," she said.
. At just 12 it feels good to be a part
of the band, Kay Green said.
"As young as I am other kids
can look up to me," he said.
The band has its share of dis-
agreements but comes together
to get a song done, Kyle Green
said. Its easier for them to practice


Because they live together.
They are closer as a family from
performing as a band, Carissa
Green said.
The band is always looking for
new places to perform in the com-
munity, Kyle Green said. They are
also looking to record an album in
the future.
The band can be reached via
Face6ook.cAm under its name or
by calling (386) 867-9587 and leav-
ing a message.


From whittling to knitting,



how modern men craft


By JENNIFER FORKER
For The Associated Press

Crafts for men have come a
long way since the days when
"Popular Mechanics" advised
returning World War II soldiers
in the rustic arts of whittling and
leather tooling.
A compendium from the mag-
azine's postwar archives, "Man
Crafts" (Hearst Books, 2009),
celebrates male-geared hob-
bies of yesteryear. It reads like
last year's cheeky book by Amy
Sedaris, "Simple Times: Crafts
for Poor People" (Grand Central
Publishing).
"It's meant more as an amuse-
ment and a fond look back,
more than anything else," says
Jacqueline Deval, a Hearst Books
vice president, although the
instructions in "Man Crafts" are
legitimate.
The book throws into contrast
how different things are today.
Some of its nostalgic hobbies
remain popular among women
and men, although there might
no longer be a market for tin-can
candle holders and tin serving
trays.
But a quick glance at Etsy.com,
an online avenue where people
sell handmade goods and old-
timey collectibles, also turns up
men making soap, glass works
and knitwear. Men designing T-
shirts and other clothing. Men
creating electrical gadgets and
making art journals.
And men brewing beer.
According to the American
Homebrewers Association, based
in Boulder, Colo., nearly 750,000
people brew beer at home at least
once a year in the United States.
One of them is Mitch Larsen,
of Lincoln, Neb., who likes the


challenge of crafting a great-tast-
ing beer.
"It's science-y," says Larsen, 41.
"There's a lot that goes into mak-
ing good beer. You can make beer
with a kit at the store, but it's not
going to be good beer."
Good beer, according to Larsen,
requires reading and research,
talking with other home brewers,
lots of taste testing and making
unfortunate mistakes.
"It's a creative outlet for me
because I formulate my own reci-
pes," says Larsen.
Joshua Zimmerman's creative
outlet is tinkering with small elec-
trical projects. The 28-year-old,
fourth-gradeteacherinMilwaukee
makes Altoid tin USB chargers
and flashlights, and small robots
from toothbrush heads and solar
battery chargers. His creations
usually can be made with a few
bucks and a few parts, often from
recycling old electronics.
"I spend way too much time on
researching this stuff for my own
amusement," Zimmerman says.
He simplifies ideas he finds
online, assembles them in kits,
and sells them from his online
shop, Brown Dog Gadgets, and
at Etsy. He also posts the instruc-
tions for all of his projects, most
of which take under an hour for
a novice and require a little metal
soldering.
Many of the men who sell
handmade wares on Etsy gravi-
tate to the site's "geekery" cat-
egory, which includes practical
jokes and quirky crafts, says
Emily Bidwell, who works in mer-
chandising for the online site,
based in Brooklyn, N.Y. A recent
perusal found more than 72,000
"geekery" items for sale, includ-
ing "zombie gnomes" and a 'Tera
Energy Superconducting Linear


ASSOCIATED PRESS
This undated image courtesy of Brian Kasstle shows a piece by Kasstle
titled "My Personal Maps." Kasstle, of Long Beach, Calif., dabbled in
scrapbooking and card-making before he hit upon art journaling, which
uses mostly collage, painting and image transfers. Each page tells a
story about his life, family or feelings, and he shares much of this at Brian
Kasstle's Blog.


Accelerator" ray gun (both made
by men).
Men's crafts often fall into that
comical, playful category, says
Bidwell, or can be more tradi-
tional and serious: metal, wood,
leather, ceramics, glass.
And while men may share the
same crafts as women, they often
put a male spin on it, Bidwell
says. For example, men are more
likely to make leather and canvas
courier bags, bicycle accessories
and luggage.
"It's not like a pretty purse for
a lady," Bidwell says. "They're
making things that they want for
themselves."
That explains the artwork of


both Brian Kasstle, 50, and Joe
Bagley, 26.
Kasstle, of Long Beach, Calif.,
dabbled in scrapbooking and
card-making before he hit upon
art journaling, using mostly col-
lage, painting and image trans-
fers. Each page tells a story about
his life, family or feelings, and
he shares much of this at Brian
Kasstle's Blog.
"I notice when I don't (journal),,
I get cranky," says Kasstle. "Ifs
just opened the world of art to
me. I love it as a form of expres-
sion."
Bagley, of Boston, painstaking-
CRAFT continued on 2D1


Section D















LAKE CITY REPORTERLIFE SUNDAY, JUNE 19, 2011 Page Editor: Todd Taylor, 754-0424


He thought he


was a billionaire


There are over 1,000
billionaires in the world
today and the U.S. has 40
percent of the world's bil-
lionaires.
This essay concerns a
man who thought he was
a billionaire. My Pad.
At the end of his life, he
wasn't giving away his bil-
ions but he was pass-
ing on all his riches. As I
write this, Dad has only
been gone a few months,
and I still cry. But it's
important that I pass
on his secret: there are
many ways to be rich.
Dad was born in 1930,
a child of the Depression.
As the oldest son of eight
children, much of the
family responsibility fell
to him. Like many other
Americans with agricultur-
al roots in small towns, he
grew up in a small home
with no plumbing and few
comforts. His family grew
their own food and Dad
and the other children
sometimes had to miss
school to tend the crops.
As a young teenager, his
front teeth were damaged
in an accident. He was too
embarrassed to attend
school, missing his front
teeth. Due to the miss-
ing teeth, he would never
smile or laugh as a young
man. This carried over
into his entire lifetime. His
parents could never have
afforded dental work, so
he quit school until he
could earn enough money
to have them replaced.
When he was only 15,
his father was injured in
a logging accident. Dad
missed his entire 10th
grade of high school to
take his father's place in
the logging woods. But
he got lucky when one of
his high school teachers
realized his potential and
arranged for him to attend
Henderson College to
make up his lost year and
get on track for college.
Perhaps this is where
Dad, the caretaker of
others, would model his
behavior on this teach-
er, who was looking out for
him. Her trust was well-
placed, and Dad eventu-
ally rose to a Supervisor's
level at Southwestern Bell
though he never got to
attend college full time.
Because Dad came
from such a humble back-
ground, he developed into
a careful man recycling
when he could, being
thrifty, shopping smart,
never wasting anything.
If there were leftovers, he
froze them for "another
day." He washed and
rinsed empty Coke cans
before donating them'to a
non-profit group.
No one in our family
could load the dishwasher,
because he knew how it
could be packed to the
max. He washed every
dish by hand before
loading them in the dish-
Washer. He put peelings
in baggies, relegated to
the freezer, until trash day
rather than use his gar-
bage disposal.
As a Deacon in our


Dr. Sheri Carder
sheri.carder@fgc.edu
Baptist church for 45
years, he continued his
role of caretaker min-
istering to many with his
gifts of his own home-
grown vegetables, visiting
those in the hospitals,
supporting them at times
of bereavement, sending
birthday cards. He wasn't
hard to find on a Sunday
morning he was the one
getting hugs and hand-
shakes from every one. He
was well-loved by many,
who often called him the
"sweetest, kindest man in
the world."
Just days before his
death, he asked Mom to
bring his checkbook to
the hospital so that he
could make his special
Thanksgiving offering
to the church. He made
me commit to getting it
to the church. He said, "I
have been so blessed. So
blessed. I have to share."
Dad always ended his
phone calls with, "I pray
for every one of you (kids)
every day." He treasured
his faith, his family, and his
friends.
Because I work in
advertising, I often think
in those terms. Remember
the slogan, "You're in good
hands with All State?"
That's how I felt about
my Dad. Remember the
other insurance agency,
Prudential, who used the
Rock of Gibraltar as their
logo? Dad was always The
Rock. Nothing could assail
us.
, Dad could hunt and
fish. He could spit-shine
a pair of shoes to make
them look new. He could
build or fix anything in
fact, he crawled under his
mama's house and single-
handedly installed indoor
plumbing in later years. He
could do anything. That's
why it never occurred to
me that he couldn't beat
this lung cancer.
He was just an average
man ... who thought he
was a billionaire. From
his humble beginnings,
he was able to take early
retirement from his career
job at age 55. In his later
years, he was able to take
up golf. He even owned a
few stocks. His kids were
all successful profession-
als in their fields. Riches
untold, to him.
He lent his time and
talents to those who
needed him. He believed
he was among the most
blessed men in the world.
Happy Father's Day,
Daddy. I guess you were a
billionaire.

* Dr. Sheri Carder is profes-
sor of marketing and man-
agement at Florida Gateway
College. She can be reached
at 386-754-4407.


ingly hand-cuts intricate
paper art, which he sells
at his Etsy shop, Papercuts
by Joe. An archaeologist
by training, he juggles
what have become twin
careers.
His paper-cutting skills
were honed at a young
age.
"I think the biggest rea-
son I fell in love with it is
that I was 10 and using an
Exacto knife," says Bagley.
"The draw of that, of get-
ting away with that."
Years of practice have
led him to a photorealistic
look with his art form.
A large, highly detailed


piece that takes a lot of
time can fetch $4,000.
"Once I felt like I was
doing something new and
different, it started to feel
exciting," he says.
Peter Clark of Park City,
Utah, is a 14-year-old who
likes to make Duct-tape
wallets and ramps for his
Tech Deck fingerboards
(small, finger-size skate-
boards). He's proud of
the cardboard rifle he cut
out, glued and wrapped in
black Duct tape.
"It's fun making it,
it's fun using it, and it's
fun destroying it," says
Jake.


How to make your dog's



days of summer safer


By SUE MANNING
Associated Press

LOS ANGELES -
Ready for your dog's days
of summer?
Everybody seems to
have a list of tips.
Most are no-brainers.
Don't leave dogs in hot
cars or let them walk
on hot asphalt, play too
hard or get too much sun.
,Apply flea and tick repel-
lents, and if you're in a
mosquito-prone area, talk
to your vet about heart-
worm prevention pills.
Take dogs on walks early
or late to avoid midday
heat and provide ample
drinking water.
But there are .other
risks that come with heat,
vacations and outdoor
play. Here are some ways
to keep dogs healthy and
comfortable this sum-
mer, with tips from vet-
erinarian Louise Murray,
vice president of the
American Society for the
Prevention of Cruelty to
Animals' Bergh Memorial
Animal Hospital in New
York City.
GROOMING: A dog's
coat is like insulation,
warding off cold in the
winter and heat in, the
Summer. Trim, but don't
give ypur dog a crew cut
or such a close shave that
it takes away that protec-
tion.
Dogs get sunburn and
skin cancer, so never cut
fur shorter than an inch.
(In some breeds, even an
inch is too short.)
Dogs shed more in
summer, so brush to get
rid of extra fur along with
fur that's matted from
water play. *
HEAT RELIEF: Most
pets find cool, shady spots
to lie down, but some,
especially animals that
are overweight or can't
tolerate heat, might ben-
efit from cooling beds,
mats or vests.
The mats get filled with
water, which mixes with a
high-tech gel to create a
cool, waterbed-like cush-
ion. Consumer reviews
are generally positive
but caution that some
beds spring leaks (or are
chewed by dogs).
FOOD: No food will
keep your dog cooler,
but food helps keep body
temperature up, so dogs
may not need to eat as
much in the summer.


China, Crystal,
Flatware and Gifts
Couples registered:

Jessica Clark
Tommy McAUister
June 24, 2011

Haley Lipthrott
JT Brown ,
August 6, 2011

Ashley Cloninger
Justin Brimmer
September 24, 2011
-'
Jill Peck
Bryson Johnson
September 24, 2011

We know exactly what they
want in a wedding or shower
gift. We update their list as gifts
are purchased, and gift wrap.


WARD'S
JEWELRY & GIFTS
156 N. Marion Ave.
Lake City
752-5470


ASSOCIATED'PRESS
This Saturday, June 11, 2011 photo shows animal groomer Ana Sondall as she gives her
client Bodie a summer cut at Petco in the Van Nuys section of Los Angeles. Adog's coat
is like insulation, warding off cold in the winter and'heat in the summer. Trim, but don't give
your dog a 'crew cut or such a close shave that it takes away that protection. Dogs can get
sunburn and skin cancer, so never cut fur shorter than an inch.
I


If your dog stays at a
dog-friendly hotel with
you or at a kennel, con-
sider bringing food from
home. A change in diet
can cause diarrhea.
Barbecues and picnics
are a veterinarian's night-
mare. Keep pets in the
house or on a leash to
prevent them from being
fed or lapping up things
that are bad for them,
whether it's spilled alco-
hol or onion dip. Onions,
garlic, grapes, raisins and
chocolate are the most
toxic foods for dogs.
VACATIONS: Dogs
can get carsick if they're
not used to driving, so go
for small trips before a
road trip.
On boats, consider a
doggie life vest. Protect
the dog from gasoline and
other toxic products. At
the beach, provide drink-
ing water so the dog does
not drink salt water.
On planes, if your pet
is small enough, keep it
in the cabin with you.
Call ahead because some
airlines limit animals per
flight. Be prepared to pay
a fee and check on neces-
sary paperwork.


If your dog must fly
as cargo, note that the
U.S. Department of
Transportation says
short-faced breeds like
pugs and bulldogs die
during air transport at
much higher rates-than
other breeds.
If you're boarding your
dog, remember that many
kennels require proof of
vaccines such as rabies
and kennel cough.
LAWNS: Some lawn
products' are toxic to
dogs and cats. Weed kill-
ers arid herbicides are
the worst some cause
cancer. Some fertilizers
are also toxic. All a dog
or cat has to do is walk on
the lawn and lick its paws
to be exposed.
In 2010, the ASPCA
Animal Poison Control
Center received more
than 4,000 calls related
to garden toxins. These
include herbicides, plants
(hydrangea, tulips, aza-
leas, lilies), insecticides,
mushrooms, fertilizers
and cocoa mulch.
OVERHEATING:
Recognize overheating if
you see it excessive
panting, difficulty breath-


ing, increased heart and
respiratory rate, drool-
ing, mild weakness, sei-
zures, and elevated body
temperatures over 104
degrees.
"A lot of dogs will
,just keep running until
they drop because they
have so much heart and
so much energy;" said
Murray. "You have to be
proactive."
Animals with flat faces,
like pugs and Persian
cats, are more suscep-
tible to heat stroke since
they cannot pant as effec-
tively.
Sponge the animal with
lukewarm water and seek
veterinary care if you
suspect overheating.
WINDOWS: Murray's
clinic sees two or three
pets a week that have
fallen or jumped from
apartment windows,
roofs, balconies or fire
escapes. Multiple limb
fractures or potentially
deadly internal or brain
injuries often result. Use
window screens, open
windows from the top
instead of the bottom,
consider child-safety win-
dow guards.


CRAFT: Ideas for men

Continued From Page 1A


LAKE CITY REPORTER LIFE SUNDAY, JUNE 19, 2011


Page Editor: Todd Taylor, 754-0424


rL""
i















LAKE CITY REPORTER ADVICE & CROSSWORD SUNDAY, JUNE 19, 2011


DEAR ABBY



Woman choses amicable


separation over


DEAR ABBY: I'm a 38-
year-old man who is in
love with a 45-year-old
woman. She. was married
for 20 years and has three
children. She was sepa-
rated for two years before
we started dating.
She and her ex are
extremely civil, and she
spends nights at his house
in order to see the chil-
dren. I support her in this
because I don't ever want
her to feel like I'm mak-
ing her' choose. Her ex
doesn't want her back, nor
does she want to recon-
cile. They are friends.
This morning she had
an appointment with a
divorce lawyer and came
home saying she isn't
ready to do it. She's afraid
her ex will become vindic-
tive aid use the kids as
leverage. I told her there
are custody arrangements
that protect both parents.
She says she loves me,
but she's worried that it
isn't fair for me. I told her
relationships aren't always
"fair." She expressed that
when she's with her kids
she misses me and rice-
versa.
I don't know what to
say or do. I love her, but
how do I comfort her? -
- STANDING BY IN


AbigailVan Buren
www.deaftbby.com

PENNSYLVANIA
DEAR STANDING
BY: Your lady friend may
be separated from her
husband, but she's not
yet-ready to move on. Or,
the lawyer may have said
something that frightened
her. You're doing all you
can to comfort her. But
she may need professional
counseling and more time
before she's ready to take
the next step and end the
marriage.
DEAR ABBY: My hus-
,band comes from a line
of men in his family who
don't like to go to the
doctor. I can't remember
the last time he went for
a physical. He puts off
going even when he has
an ailment.
We have three young
children, and I'm genuine-
ly concerned that my hus-
band could one day have a
sudden health emergency
or alife-threatening illness


divorce

that could have been pre-
vented if it had been dis-
covered in time. We love
him with all our hearts
and just want him to get
an annual physical to stay
healthy and be with us
for many, many years to
come. PLEASE help him
see the iniportance of reg-
ular exams. -- LOVING
WIFE IN OHIO
DEAR LOVING WIFE:
Let's do it together. There
are reasons why men have
a shorter life expectancy
than women in this coun-
try. I'm sad to say that one
of them is fear of going to
the doctor: Because today
is Father's Day, remind
your husband that he has
a family who loves him
and needs him healthy.
Remind your husband that
if anything should happen
to him he would leave all of
you not only heartbroken
but also likely struggling
financially. He needs to
understand that the great-
est gift he can give all of
you would be to schedule
an appointment with' his
physician for a baseline
checkup.

a Write DearAbby.at
www.DearAbby.cbh or
P.O. Box 69440, Lops
Angeles, CA 90069.


HOROSCOPES


ARIES (March 21-April
19): You will feel good about
what you can offer those in
need. A relationship with
someone you find exciting
has the potential to turn into
a moneymaking partnership,
if you combine your talents
to offer a unique service.

TAURUS (April 20-May
20): Before you disagree
with someone, make sure you
have the facts. You may end
up in an awkward position
if you let your stubbornness
lead to an angry dispute. Keep
things simple and let modera-
tion reign. **
GEMINI (May 21-June
20): You will impress some-
one who takes an interest in.
you and your talent Don't
be afraid to put your finger-
print on whatever you do.
Your creativity will separate
you from any competition.
There is money heading your
way from an unusual source.

CANCER (June 21-July
22): Visit places thatwill have
an impact on the way you.
think and do things in the
future. Don't limit the possi-
bilities because you are afraid

CELEBRITY I


STHE LAST WORD
Eugenia Word

to make a move, or be over-
whelmed when you should
embrace new beginnings.

LEO (July 23-Aug. 22):
Getting along with friends,
family and new acquaintanc-
es will require realism and
a down-toearth, approach to
whatever you do. Trying too
hard to make an impression
,by overspending or exagger-
ation will make you appear
wasteful. *
VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept
22): You'll be torn between
what you want to do and what
youmust do. Take care ofyour
responsibilities first Don't let
someone you are emotionally
attached to dictate what you
do and when. ***
LIBRA (Sept 23-Oct..
22): Your ability to pick up
information and skills quickly
will enable you to attract some-
one who wants to partnerwith
you personally or profession-
ally. You can position yourself
well as long as you don't over-
spend in order to make an
impression.'*****

CIPHER


S b by Luis Campos
Celebrity Cipher cryptograms are created from quotations by famous people, past and present.
S ach letter In the cipher stands for another.
Today's clue: M equals Y.
K"KWY SGAM KWF GED LFHX (PZEEY-I )
Z G T F T'FDZEIYY ZUSRK FD KWY U Z G T,
KW Y L R DI F'H Z GT B W Z K B,YT TS "
X Y F-K W .1 F H W Z I T D'
PREVIOUS.SOLUTION: "A:father's words are like a thermostat that sets the
temperature in the house." Paul Lewis
(c) 2011 by NEA, Inc. 6-20


SCORPIO (Oct 23-Nov. "
21): Don't let your emotions
stand in the way of a wise
choice. te realistic, especially
when it comes to money mat-.
ters. Back up your plans with '
solid evidence that you'can;
in fact, turn them into some-
thing tangible. **
SAGHITARIUS (Nov.
22-Dec. 21): The only thing
That will stand in your way is
dishonesty or exaggeration.
Stick to what you know and
do best and you.will leave an
impression. Erratic behavior
w ill end up costing you finan-
cially.***
CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-
Jan. i9): You'll be rerminded
of someone or,something that
meant a lot to you in the past
if you attend a reunion or you
visit an old hangout A change
at home will add to its value or
allow you greater freedom to
pursue old goals. ***
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-
Feb. 18): Look at past rela-
tionships and you will have a
better idea how to handle the
people.in your life now. You.
can form a-close bond with
someone who has similar
goals and interests. A change
at home will do you good.

PISCES (Feb. 19-March
20): Youll face many chal-
lenges but that doesn't mean
you have to alter your course.
SQuestion the motives of any-
one trying to coerce you in
a direction that goes against
your better judgment The.
choices you make now will
determine your future. *A--A


SUNDAY CROSSWORD

SNo. .0612:'

PULLET By C.W. Stewart / Edited by Will Shortz 1i7 3 4 5 6 7 10 112 13 14 15161718
'.I ." 3 4 1 1 16 7r 1 ".


Across "
1 Bushed
5 Entrance to many
a plaza
9 Rimsky-
SKorsakov's "The
Tale of_
Salta'n"
13. Exactly right
19 Free
21 __ avis
22 Attempted
something.
23 *Boardwalk
offering
25 Thought out loud
26 It might make
you snort
27 Home of the
World Health
Organization
28 Stickers?
30 ___ Day, May 1
celebration in
Hawaii
31 Must-have
33 Soft ball brand
35 mine!"
36 One on the way
out
38 *Diamond
substitute
44 1987 disaster
,movie?
46 Rest spot
47 Place for a
pickup?
48 Word with exit oi
express
For any three answers,
call from a touch-tone
phone: 1-900-285-5656,
$1.49 each minute; or,
with a crediftcard, 1-800-
S 814-5554.


49 Something that's
drawn
50 Whiz
51 Any hit by Little
Richard
53 Many a Bob
Marley fan
S54 Mideast title
56 Seaport on the
Adriatic "
58 Turned away
from sin
60 Earth
61 Outstanding
.63 Lawn tools
64 *Handy things
for a. toy?
68 ###
72 Free
73 Itching
78 Took a corner on
two wheels
8.1 Fix, as brakes
82 Vituperation, e.g.
83 Wake Island, e.g.
84 "Nothing __!"
86 Transplant, in a
way
87."Up in the Air"
actress Kendrick
88 Do followers
89 Navel buildup
90 Former flier, for
Short
91 Slugger
93 *Staple of
S "Candid
Camera"
97 Xerox product
98 Baseball's
Master Melvin
99.Loughlin of "Full
Hottse"


100 Nincompoop
101 Conditions
-104 Killjoy
109 Comparatively
statuesque
111 Point of view
113 Enfeeble
114 *Radio Flyer,
e.g.
117 Like a winter
wind
118 1997 Peter
Fonda title role
119 Ho;ax
120 Old-fashioned,
121 TV's Foxx
122 Brake
123 "Superman II"
villainess

Down
1 Kind of
metabolism
2 Military camp
3 *Certain study
session
4 Head'of Haiti
5 ___ formality
-6 Actbr Hauer -
7 Believe in it
8 Not.his'n
9 Ad-packed Sunday
newspaper
section
10 A giraffe might
be seen on one
11 Pound sound
12 You may catch
them on a boat,
in tvo different
Ways
13 Shrimp
14 Old Church of
England foe


15 lole in 2011's
"Thor"
16 Chinese dynasty
of 1,200 years
ago
17 Curved molding
'18 Drops (off)
20 Start of a
childish plaint
24 Believe in it
29 "Goody goody
gumdrops!"
32 At any time, to a
'bard
34 Ward (off)
37 Survey choice,
sometimes
38 Less cramped
39 Like some
maidens
40 Trolley sound-
41.Expedition
42 Keyboard key
43 Shows, as a
thermometer
does'a ;
temperature
44."Uh:.huh, sure it
is"
45r The very _
46 Hinder
50 Tes,t __
51 *Something to
Sand on
52.Piece over a door
or window
53 It had a major
part in the Bible
55 Descent of a sort
57 Many a summer
worker
59 Solitaire puzzle
piece
62 Wander


.65 Blue Angels' org.
66-Ain't fixed?
67 Classic brand of
hair remover
68 Line of cliffs.
69 Intolerant sort
70 Bouquet
71 ___ of the past
74 Taper off
75 *It may be found
near a barrel
76 Feudabserf


77 Fanny
79 Decrees
80 Lady of Spain
85 "_ do"
89 Service
arrangement
90 Know-how
91 Boo follower
92 They're often
acquired at a
wedding


95 Scribbled
96 Got up on one's
soapbox
97 One waving a'red
flag
100 Wild
102 Dentist's advice


103 Actress Berger
104 Bros, e.g.
105 Pass over


94 Drunk's activity 106 __ no good


107 S. C. Johnson
brand
108 "Dirty rotten
scoundrel," e.g.
110 Old NASA
landers
112 Half of a sitcom
farewell
115 Project closing?'
116 It might get
your feet wet


Answers to last Sunday's Crossword.
BIRD S SM I T HS AID E N E MIO
ATEU P T 0 W AR D U RN A DIP
R IS K Y ON E TH I N KA T T IM E
AS A N TR AA S.T H MA T C
KIN KO HEROA ID I E
VES- N D I D
GUSSET M IMEO E EAN C O DE
UNA LADY SI NK STH E BLUES
S R 0 W -EN A L E A T M E
H IAWATHA UFO 'HEN
THI S MA Y S TI N KAL T L E
NTS E NY ED S SR.0 LVE
R A N D A L X MA x N-OES
T H E L 0 R 0 F T H E R K YR 5
E AVE N E A SER NEEDTO
-iE L1 1 T R A- 0 0 N .
R EEL BIGBAN K THE RY
PAMDAW BER 0H. 0 OHGEE D
A W N KANDAPRAYER R ODAN
GENA YA0o DETECT ALERT
o DD S I M T 0 5 5 ES S EN S E


1 7 8 3 6


3 9 1 7


3 9 2 .7


45 9 6


6 2 4 8


83 5


5 7 8 3


2 4


9 5


19 .8 8C 9 L 6


L 9 L 19 6iZE 8 8


ZE 6 89LL 9


S6 L 9 L V E 8 z


L 8 V 8E 6 L 9


9 8 Z 6 8 L 9 V L

98 L6L 687L9



6 9 9L 6s 98 Z L
698L1986L


69E29SLSL


Page Editor: Todd Taylor, 754-0424


3D'















LAKE CITY REPORTER


ADVERISMENT


SUNDAY, JUNE 19, 2011


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JASON BISHOP SHOW: ILLUSIONIST


COUNTRY SUPERSTAR TBA


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