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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028308/01583
 Material Information
Title: The Lake City reporter
Uniform Title: Lake City reporter (Lake City, Fla. 1967)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: John H. Perry
Place of Publication: Lake City Fla
Publication Date: 6/16/2011
Frequency: daily (monday through friday)[<1969>-]
weekly[ former 1967-<1968>]
daily
normalized irregular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Lake City (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Columbia County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Columbia -- Lake City
Coordinates: 30.189722 x -82.639722 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 95, no. 4 (Oct. 5, 1967)-
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000358016
oclc - 33283560
notis - ABZ6316
lccn - sn 95047175
sobekcm - UF00028308_01569
System ID: UF00028308:01583
 Related Items
Preceded by: Lake City reporter and Columbia gazette

Full Text








Cold case
Suspect in 1998
Lake Placid killing


Qualifier begins
Ruth/Ripken baseball
tournament starts


000017 120511 ****3-DIGIT 326
LIB OF FLORIDA HISTORY
PO BOX 117007
205 SMA UNIV OF FLORIDA
GAINESVILLE FL 32611-1943


sided.
B


Moving on
Ft.White senior signs
letter of intent to play
college football.
Sports, I B


Lake uny Reporter


Thursday, June 16, 2011 www.lakecityreporter.com Vol. 137, No. 123 E 75 cents


New blaze erupts,



threatens homes


Latest county fire
brought under
control in hours.


By'TONY BRITT
tbritt@lakecityreporter.com
A brushfire ran through a local
neighborhood swallowing close to


Photos by TONY BRITT/Lake City Reporter
ABOVE: Tammy Young
walks away from the
treeline near her home as
smoke envelops the area
near the intersection of
Gum Swamp Road and
Ray Johnson Circle. A
brushfire consumed several
acres of property in the
area Wednesday. RIGHT: A
forestry service helicopter
flies through a cloud of
smoke as it prepares.to
drop water on the blaze
Wednesday.


10 acres of property Wednesday
afternoon and threatening at least
two homes when a local resident
felled a tree that struck a live power
line and started the blaze north of
town.
A host of local firefighting resourc-
es spent more than three hours fight-
ing the brushfire in the Gum Swamp
Road area, using helicopter water
drops, city and county firefighters
and Florida Division of Forestry
units.
The fire occurred at 1442 Gum
Swamp Road and ran to a forested
area near the intersection of Gum
Swamp Road and Ray Johnson
Circle. Firefighting units were dis-
patched to the scene around 3:45
p.m. and many remained on scene
past 6:45 p.m.
"Apparently someone cutting a
tree along the path where the fire
was, dropped it on a power line which
ignited the fire," said Tres Atkinson,
Columbia County Fire Rescue chief.
"The fire was contained to that spot
in the woods. There was no damage
to any structures."
Tammy Yoting, who lives on Gum
Swamp Road, was awakened from a
sound sleep by a loud "boom," she
said.
She rushed outside to find the
forested area adjacent to her home
in flames, so she called emergency
services, picked up a water hose.and
started spraying the forested area
next to her house.
"I'm all right as long as my house
doesn't catch fire," she said. "That's
what' I was worried about because
I got woke up. I heard 'boom' and
BLAZE continued on 3A


TONY QRITT/Lake City Reporter
Columbia County Fire Rescue Capt. Jeff Crawford (from left) directs
Arron Swears as Swears pulls a hose form' a fire truck. While Crawford
and Swears work with the hose, Columbia County firefighter Arness
Thomas (background) uses a chainsawito cut a pine tree off the cab of a
Columbia County Fire Rescue tanker orl Wednesday.


Cold case murder


suspect caught here


Apprehended
without incident
at local motel.
From staff reports

A suspect in a 1998 South
Florida murder case was
apprehended without inci-
dent at a Lake City motel
early Wednesday.
Prentiss Todd Legree,
39, was arrested on a
Highlands County war-
rant at the Scottish Inn on
US 90 West shortly after
midnight, according to Sgt
Ed Seifert of the Columbia
County Sheriff's Office.
Legree, whose lastknown
address was Lake Placid,
is wanted in the shooting


death of 43-year-old Samuel
Williams. Williams was
found dead in his vehicle
Oct. 7 by employees of
the South
Central
Express
Railroad
in Lake
Placid. The
vehicle had
crashed
into a Legree
railroad
embankment near the
intersection of Lake Mirror
Drive and US 27. Highlands
County authorities believe
Williams was killed nearby
the previous night. The
case has been under inves-
tigation since, according to
an HCSO press release.
Acting on a tip that


Legree may have been
traveling with migrant farm
workers, Highland County
detectives contacted Sgt.
Jeff Watson of CCSO, who
located Legree at the motel.
The Lake City Police Dept
assisted in taking Legree
into custody.
"'Sgt Watson acted expe-
ditiously with the informa-
tion he received from the
Highland County Sheriffs
Office," Seifert said. '"The
coordination with LCPD,
coupled with the quick
response to action, result-
ed in the arrest of Mr.
Legree."
Legree is being held at
the Columbia County jail
without bond awaiting
extradition to Highlands
County.


Help for tornado victims


ANTONIA ROBINSON/ Lake City Reporter
Christine Noland takes a pack of bottled water from Sharon Higgins to add to other relief
supplies collected for tornado victims Thursday. The North Central Florida and Baker
County Tea Parties are gathering the supplies for Alabama and Joplin, Mo. tornado
victims from 3-6 p.m. today and Friday and from 9 a.m. to noon Saturday in the grassy
triangular area at the'corner of Baya Avenue and U.S. 90. For a complete supply list visit
www.bakercountyteaparty.ning.com.


Vote coming on partial closure of Old Wire Road


By LEANNE TYO
Ityo@lakecityreporter.com
A portion of Old Wire
Road could soon be closed
as the county plans to move
forward with the next phase
of its Old Wire Road paving
project, an improvement


project with an overall cost
of about $4.5 million.
The Columbia-
County Board of County
Commissioners will vote
on closing the road in part
and making preparations to
acquire land rights neces-
sary for the project's sec-


ond phase at the board's
regular meeting today. Two
separate public hearings
- one to authorize the use
of eminent domain if neces-
sary will be held before
the board votes.
With Old Wire Road par-
tially closed, the board will


have "S-curves" in the road
that it no longer needs that
it can return to property
owners, said Dale Williams,
county manager.
"When you straighten out
what we call an S-curve,"
he said, "then the pieces of
the old road that we're no


longer needing, the coun-
ty has the right, not the
obligation, but the right,
to close those and return
them to adjoining adjacent
property owners. So they'll
be discussing whether to
do that or not."
Those parcels will offi-


cially close pending board
approval and the filing of
appropriate paperwork with
the county clerk, Williams
said, which usually takes
about three days.
"Portions of the existing
VOTE continued on 6A


CALL US:
(386) 752-1293
SUBSCRIBE TO
THE REPORTER:
Voice: 755.-5445
Fax: 752-9400


81 B I- o(?Ulj


9771
T-Storm Chance
WEATHER, 2A


- ~ '~. -


Opinion . . . 4A
Around Florida 2A
Obituaries . . 5A
Advice & Comics 3B
Puzzles .... .... 2B


TODAY IN
PEOPLE
r ittalie Portman
,-.elcomes baby.


COMING
FRIDAY
County commission
coverage.


s-'",.- .w'issssi "'- e -: ~:_:; ,'= % rJ & *t v *iflra?-3.*- i-, :, ];_,W- :.o,- .


-L C












LAKE CITY REPORTER DAILY BRIEFING THURSDAY, JUNE 16, 2011


CA$H 3 Wednesday:
. Afternoon: 7-7-2
-". Evening: 5-3-8


P lay4) Wednesday:
Afternoon: 2-0-2-4
Evening: 9-9-8-1


Tuesday:
1-7-12-19-32


PEOPLE IN THE NEWS



Portman gives birth to a baby boy


NEW YORK
Natalie Portman has a
baby boy to go along
with her Oscar.
The actress gave birth
to her first child with
fiance Benjamin Millepied, the cho-
reographer of "Black Swan," People
magazine reported.
The magazine gave no details. A
publicist for Portman did not return a
message seeking comment Tuesday.
The 30-year-old actress and
Millepied,' a well-regarded ballet
dancer and choreographer, met during
the making of "Black Swan," Darren
Aronofsky's psychological thriller that
stars Portman as a ballet dancer.
Portman won the best actress
Academy Award in February for her
performance in the movie.

4ophia Loren dubs
!Cars 2' mamma
ROME Sophia Loren says
, she has used her "thick Neapolitan
Accent" voice to dub a character in
"Cars 2" for the sake of her grand-
thildren and the late Walt Disney.
,Loren has lent her voice to Mama
,Topolino's (Mamma Mickey Mouse)
lines in the Disney sequel that opens
A-text week in Italy.
The actress said
Wednesday that she I .
did her first-ever
dubbing for an ani-
mated film for her
grandchildren, as
well as for Disney.
Loren said she hopes
he- three grandkids Loren
will now say that .
Mama Topolino is grandma..
"Who knows? Maybe watching
'Cars 2' they'll recognize the voice of
their grandmother," Loren said in a
brief interview on Italian state TV.


-I
ASSOICATED PRESS
Natalie Portman gave birth to her first
child with fiance Benjamin Millepied, the
choreographer of "Black Swan," People
magazine reported Tuesday.

Loren's voice will be featured in
the film in 21 countries, "or at least
that's what they tell me," she told
her interviewer with a laugh.
The 76-year-old Loren, looking
sharp in a trim, white pantsuit, said
at a separate photo call to promote
the film that years ago she had an
"unforgettable" meeting with Walt
Disney. She did not elaborate.

J-Lo undecided on
second season of 'Idol'
LONDON-- Jennifer Lopez may
come back'for a second year as a


judge on "American Idol." Or she
may not
"You know, this is the question of
the hour. I don't know, I don't know,"
Lopez said Tuesday in an interview
with Scott Mills of the BBC.
Lopez and another new judge,
Aerosmith frontman Steven Tyler,
brought a gentler attitude to the top-
rated show following the departure
of Simon Cowell.
"I had an amazing time doing it
and I loved it but I have a lot of other
things happening and it's gonna
come down to making a choice of
really what I want to do for the next
year," Lopez said.


Elizabeth Hurley, Arun
Nayar granted divorce
LONDON Actress Elizabeth
Hurley and businessman Arun Nayar
were divorced Wednesday after four
years of marriage.
The divorce decree was granted
at a brief hearing in London
Wednesday by District Judge Penny
Cushing.
Neither Hurley nor Nayar was in
court to hear their names read out
along with those of 27 other divorc-
ing couples.
The grounds given for the divorce
was Nayar's "unreasonable behav-
ior."
The British actress and Indian
businessman married in 2007 at an
English castle, with singer Elton
John giving the bride away. They fol-
lowed up the private civil ceremony
with a lavish and.traditional Hindu -
wedding in Jodphur, India.
Hurley announced last December
that 'the couple had separated. She
has since been romantically linked to
Australian cricket star Shane Warne.

U Associated Press


Celebrity Birthdays


* Musician Paul McCartney
is 69.
* Movie critic Roger Ebert
is 69.
* Actress Linda Thorson
("The Avengers") is 64.
* Keyboardist John Evans of
The Box Tops is 63.
* Actress Isabella Rossellini
is 59.
* Actress Carol Kane is 59.
* Actor Brian Benben ("Pri-


vate Practice") is 55.
* Singer Alison Moyet is 50.
* Country singer-guitarist
Tim Hunt is 44.
* Singer-guitarist Sice of
The Boo Radleys is 42.
* Singer Nathan Morris of
Boyz II Men is 40.
* Rapper Silkk The Shocker
is 36.
* Country singer Blake Shel-
ton is 35.


Lake City
HOW TO REACH US
Main number ........(386) 752-1293
Fax number .............752-9400.
Circulation ................755-5445
Online ... www.lakecityreporter.com
The Lake City Reporter, an affiliate.of
Community Newspapers Inc., is pub-
lished Tuesdaythrough Sunday at 180
E. Duval St.,. Lake City, Fla. 32055.
Periodical postage paid at Lake City, FRa.
Member Audit Bureau of Circulation and
The Associated Press.
All material herein is property of the Lake
City Reporter. Reproduction in whole or
in part is forbidden without the permis-
sion of the publisher. U.S. Postal Service
No. 310-880.
POSTMASTER: Send address changes
to Lake City Feporter, P.O. Box 1709,
Lake Cit, Pla. 32056.
PublisherTodd Wilson .....754-0418
(twilson@lakecityreporter.com)
NEWS
Editor Robert Bridges .... .754-0428
(rbridges@lakecityreporter.com)
ADVERTISING
Director Ashley Butcher .. .754-0417
(abutcher@lakecityreporter.com)
CLASSIFIED
To place a classified ad, call 755-5440


Reporter

BUSINESS
Controller Sue Brannon... .754-0419
(sbrannon@lakecityreporter.com)
CIRCULATION
Home delivery of the Lake City Reporter
should be-completed by 6:30 a.m.
Tuesday through Saturday, and by 7:30
a.m. on Sunday.
Please call 386-755-5445 to report any
problems with your delivery service.
In Columbia County, customers should
call before 1030 a.m. to report a ser-
vice error for same day re-delivery. After
10:30 a.m., next day re-delivery.or ser-
vice related credits will be Issued.
In all other counties where home delivery
Is available, next day re-delivery or ser-
vice related credit i ll be Issued.
Circulation ........... 755-5445
(circulation@lakecityreport r.com)
Home delivery rates
(Tuesday through Sunday)
12 Weeks................. $26.32
24 Weeks.......L...........$4879
52 Weeks ................$83.46
Rates include 7% sales tax.
Mail rates
12 Weeks.. ............ $41.40
24 Weeks.................... $82.80
52 Weeks..................$179.40


CORRECTION


The Lake City Reporter corrects errors of fact in news
items. If you have a concern, question or suggestion, please
call the executive editor. Corrections and .clarifications will
run in this space. And thanks for reading.


NASA fuels
shuttle Atlantis
CAPE CANAVERAL -
NASA fueled space shuttle
Atlantis on Wednesday, but
it was only a test leading
up to the last flight of the
30-year program.
Liftoff isn't until July 8.
Shuttffle managers want to
make sure that repairs to
the external fuel, tank are
good and that no cracks
pop up in any of the sup-
port brackets.
That very problem kept
shuttle Discovery ground-
ed late last year. The same
kind of patches applied
to the aluminum struts
in the center portion of
the tank were used for
Atlantis.
The struts, or brackets,
are located in an area
where there is no fuel,
only instruments. The
brackets were made 'from
an aluminum alloy that
was more brittle and that,
combined with assembly
issues, led to the crack-
ing on Discovery's tank.
Technicians will X-ray the
brackets on Atlantis' tank
beginning this weekend.
SWednesday's fueling
operation was delayed
several hours by thunder-
storms that pounded Cape
Canaveral on Tuesday.
Three lightning strikes
were reported near the
pad. Preliminary checks
show nothing was dam-
aged, although a power
circuit went offline.
A countdown rehearsal
for the final flight will be
conducted next week with
the four Atlantis astro-
nauts.

Boy, 2, found dead
in family's pool
OCKLAWAHA- A
2-year-old boy died days
after he was found in an
'above-ground pool at his
'family's north Florida
.home.
Authorities say Michael


ASSOCIATED PRESS

Wildfire fights continue
A Palm Coast firefighter knocks down hot spots on a brushfire
that threatened homes in the Seminole Woods subdivision in
Palm Coast Wednesday. '


Gagne died Sunday at
Shands at the University of
Florida in Gainesville.
Marion County Sheriff's
deputies say family mem-
bers had been playing
outside on Friday after-
noofi when everyone went
inside the house and lost
sight of the child. His
I mother found him in the
pool.
Authorities say some-
one began performing
CPR and rescue officials
responded.
The child was taken to
Munroe Regional Medical
Center in Ocala before
being transferred to
Gainesville.

Saltwater fishing
free this weekend
TALLAHASSEE
Saltwater fishing will be
free in Florida this week-
end to honor fathers and
their families.
The Florida Fish and
Wildlife Conservation
Commission on
Wednesday announced
that no license will be
required Saturday and
Sunday, which is Father's
Day.


The commission's
executive director, Nick
Wiley, said officials hope
Floridians who haven't wet
a line in a while will take
the opportunity to recon-
nect with the sport.
Wiley called Florida "the
fishing capital of the world."
He said recreational
saltwater fishing not only
is fun but good business.
The sport contributes more
thaif $4.5 billion to Florida's
economy every year.

Woman dies
during liposucion
WESTON A South
Florida woman stopped
breathing while undergo-
ing a liposuction proce-
dure and died a short time
later at a hospital.
Officials say 38-year-old
Marie Shortall under-
went the procedure at the
Alyne Center for Cosmetic
Medicine in Weston
on Saturday afternoon.
The Broward County
Medical Examiner's office
performed an autopsy
Monday, but a cause of
death has not been estab-
lished.


THE WEATHER


A, I I ,'I


Pensac
94/7


Tallahassee .
99/73 ...
4la *
9 Panama City
94/76


TEMPERATURES
High Wednesday
Low Wednesday
Normal high
SNormal low
Record high
Record low

PRECIPITATION
Wednesday
Month total
Year total
Normal month-to-date
Normal year-to-date


. 98/72
Lake City,,
97/71


Gainesville *
95/71
., Ocala
,97/71

Tamna
93/797


Ft Mye
95/76

K


102
80
90
69
100 in 1977
60 in 1919


0.00"
0.19"
14.30"
3.22"
20.47"


7a ip 7p la 6a
Thursday Friday







SFurecastiteumpntren "Fue lke temperature


* Jacksonville
Q95,73


City
Cape Canaveral


.... Daytona Beach
Dana Beach Ft. Lauderdale
Da9ona Beach Fort Myers
9j' Gainesville
\ 0 Jacksonville
Orlando Cape Canaveral Key West
95/73 88/74 Lake City
Miami
Naples
West Palm Beach Ocala
91/77 Orlando
. Ft. Lauderdale Panama City
S, 90/79 P Pensacola
6 Naples Tallahassee
91/75 Miami Tampa
S t' 91/78 Valdosta
Key West W. Palm Beach


90u81


SUN
Sunrise today
Sunset today
Sunrise torn.
Sunset tom.

MOON
Moonrise today
Moonset today
Moonrise torn.
Moonset tom.


6:29 a.m.
8:34 p.m.
6:29 a.m.
8:34 p.m.

9:32 p.m.
7:09 a.m.
10:17 p.m.
8:11 a.m.


(@eco
June July July July
23 1 8 15
Last New First Full


On this date in
1992, 65 torna-
does were reported
across the central
U.S., the second
highest one-day
total in history. A
total of 27 torna-
does occurred in
Minnesota, where
an F5 destroyed
half of the town of
Chandler.*


12

10 nies to buin
Today's
ultra-violet
radiation risk
for the area on
a scale from 0
to 10+.

*I II ^


Friday
87, 74'pc
91/73. pc
88/79/pc
94/75/pc
94/72/pc
95/71/pc
89/80/pc
97/71/pc
90/79/pc
92/73/pc
95/72/pc
94/74/pc
91/77/pc
95/77/pc
98/74/pc
93/76/pc
98/73/pc
88/73/pc


Saturday
87, 73,'t
92: 71.'pc
89/78/pc
92/73/pc
92/71/pc
93/71/pc
88/80/t
97/71/pc
90/77/pc
90/75/pc
92/71/pc
94/72/pc
92/77/pc
95/77/pc
99/73/pc
92/77/pc
100/74/pc
89/76/pc


An exclusive
service
brought to
our readers
by
The Weather
Channel.



weather.com


yhi, Forecasts, data and
w e ww.y graphics 0 2011 iWeather
"*,I IV central, LP, Madison, Wis.
weather www.weatherpubllsher.comrn


Get Oonnscted
COMM



I PM.


* Associated Press


Thought for Today


"The father of a righteous
child has great joy; a man who
fathers a wise son rejoices in
him."
Proverbs 23:24 NIV


AROUND FLORIDA


M=~LTDI $O.TD CAC


riOLATED .-1ISOLATED CHANCE
.T-STORMS I T-STORMS -STORMS


HI 97 LO 71 HI 9 LO ? HI 96 LO 70
"*


j~K~~~liif~M- =~ili^


Page Editor: Todd Taylor, 754-0424


"MODAY


PlUE: CITY ALMANAC


J


I











LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL THURSDAY, JUNE 16, 2011


COURTESY PHOTO
The Suwannee River at Suwannee Springs at its lowest flow ever recorded. Several months
of rainfall deficits have led to historical low flows on the upper Suwannee River.


As drought worsens,


water conservation


becomes top priority

From staff reports


As drought conditions
worsen, the Suwannee
River Water Management
District stresses the need
to save water.
"We had the ninth driest
May since 1932, and the
upper Aucilla, Suwannee
and Santa Fe basins expe-
rienced rainfall deficits-
of nearly 25 inches com-
pared to an average year,"
said Megan Wetherington,
District senior professional
engineer.
Several months of below-
average rainfall has led to
record-breaking low flows
on the upper Suwannee
River, including the
Suwannee River at White
Springs with records going
back to 1906. Gages on the
upper Santa Fe reported
thatflowhas ceased. Coastal
rivers fell to much below
normal after five months
of near-normal flow, and all
16 District-monitored lakes
were below their historical
average level.
Groundwater levels fell
in 92 percent of' monitored


TIPS FOR SAVING WATER
Fix. leaky faucets and toilets, which can waste up
to 100 gallons per day.
Replace older fixtures and appliances with low-
flow, water-saving models.
Turn off tap while brushing teeth, shaving, or
washing dishes.
Water lawns and landscapes only one day per
week and not between 10 a.m. and 4 p.m.


wells. Levels in the Santa
Fe Basin were near the
15th percentile for the peri-
od of record, meaning that
almost 85 percent of the
time they have been higher
than they are now. In the
Suwannee River basin, lev-,
els fell to the 22nd percen-
tile.
According to the most
recent drought report, the
National Weather Service
classified drought condi-
tions in the Suwannee River
basin as severe. The Florida
Division of Forestry esti-
mated the fire danger for
most of the area as high or
very high.
.The District has taken,
the following actions to
urge the public to cut back


on water use:
Water Shortage
Advisory: Declared by the
District's Governing Board
in December 2010, the
advisory asks all users to
voluntarily reduce water
consumption indoors and
outdoors until further
notice.
Landscape Irrigation
Rule: Adopted into Florida
Administrative Code in
January 2010, the rule
requires homeowners,
businesses, and others to
limit lawn and landscape
watering to two days during
daylight saving time and
one day per week during
standard time. Irrigation
should not occur between
10 a.m. and 4 p.m.


BLAZE: Brought under control
Continued From Page 1A


I looked out the window
and there was a fire (in
the) trees right here. I
called 9-1-1, but by the
time they got here the
wind had already caught
it and it went."
Another nearby home
was also endangered.
Atkinson said firefight-
ers on the scene ben-
efited from air support
from Florida Division
of Forestry, which had
a helicopter dropping
water in the general area
of the fire.
"They were helping
ensure the fire lines the
plows were making," he
said.
Aid in battling the blaze
came from the Lake City
Fire Department, which
had one unit and two
administrative support
personnel on scene, as
well as two county fire
stations, which respond-
ed with five firefighting
units and one adminis-
trative unit. The Florida
Division of Forestry
responded to the scene
with two tractors (bull-
dozer/plows) and one
administrative support
unit.
No injuries were
reported as a result
of the blaze, although
Columbia EMS set up.
a rehab area to check
firefighters who were
battling the flames.
"They monitored a
couple of people due
to the 'heat," Atkinson
said.
The fire was estimat-
ed to have consumed
6-10 acres.
"Forestry will have
an exact total for us
later," Atkinson said.
"They were going, to
remain .on scene and
do some mop-up."
During the fire, sev-'
eral of the resources
on scene were redi-
rected to a brush fire
on Pounds Hammock


Road, which they had
reportedly been work-
ing on earlier in the day,
Atkinson said.
"Florida Division of
Forestry was working
that fire before they
called us and they can-
celed us before we got on
scene," Atkinson said.
A pine tree fell on a
county fire truck as fire-
fighters were battling the
blaze, causing consider-
able damage.
"The tree fell when
the Florida Division of
Forestry plow hit a tree
and it snapped back on
the truck," Atkinson said.
"It did about $3,500 worth
of damage."

Impassable Bay Fire
update
In addition to the'
local brush fires, Florida
Division of Forestry and
U.S. Forest Service per-


John W Burns III, Agent-
234 SW Main Boulevard
Lake City, FL 32056
Bus: 386-752-5866
john.burns.cnj5@statefarm.com


sonnel are continuing to
battle the Impassable Bay
wildfire in the Osceola
National Forest.
The Impassable Bay
Fire has consumed 8,010
acres, according to updat-
ed GPS figures provided
by the U.S. Forest Service
Wednesday morning.
Officials have not
released any new contain-
ment levels for the fire.
"Operations are nor-
mal," said Ivan Greene,
Osceola National Forest
District Ranger. "We
are still trying to do a
burnout and we hope the
weather will hold out to
allow us to do that."
Greene said there is
a total of 125 personnel,
composed of U.S. Forest
Service and Florida
Division of Forestry
employees, who are work-
ing'as firefighters or sup-
port staff in battling the
Impassable Bay wildfire.


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OPINION


Thursday, June 16, 2011


AN


AN
OPINION


Four

freedoms

go global


As incongruous as
it might sound
in these chaotic,
confusing and
dangerous times,
2011 could go down as the
year that Franklin Delano
Roosevelt's "four freedoms"
finally went global. ,
The urgent and deadly
struggles for freedom in the
Middle East and North Africa
are a vital moment for the
future of civilization. Although
you would never know it
from the political debate, this
moment is also an opportunity
to apply FDR's "four essential
human freedoms" to
dangerous budget problems at
home.
In what has become known
as the "four freedoms speech,"
FDR said in 1941 that free
people must engage in a
"perpetual, peaceful revolution."
He told an America in its final
throes of isolationism that all
people not just Americans
should have freedom of
expression, freedom of religion,
freedom from want and
freedom from fear.
It was one of the best
American political speeches
ever delivered, as powerful for
its timing as it was for its prose.
In the year of the nation's
greatest peril since the Civil
War, FDR was trying to prepare
the United States for entry into
World War II that came
11 months later at Pearl
Harbor.
FDR pandered to no one,
attacked no group or political
persuasion except those who
would profiteer off war, and
he included every American
in the challenges he said were
coming.
Exactly the opposite of what
has transpired in our budget
crisis.
Seventy years ago, the
threat was the march of armies
of Imperial Japan and Nazi
Germany.
Today, the peril comes from
drift and indecision at home,.
and from disparate threats
from terrorists under the
cloak of Islamic
fundamentalism..

USA Today

Lake City Reporter.
Serving Columbia County
Since 1874
The Lake City Reporter is pub-
lished with pride for residents of
Columbia and surrounding counties by
Community Newspapers Inc.
We believe strong newspapers build
strong communities -WNewspapers
get things done!"
Our primary goal is to
publish distinguished profitable
community-oriented newspapers.
This mission will be accomplished
through the teamwork of professionals
dedicated to truth, integrity and hard
work.
Todd Wilson, publisher
Robert Bridges, editor
Sue Brannon, controller
Dink NeSmith, president
Tom Wood, chairman

LETTERS
POLICY
SLetters to the Editor should be
,typed or neatly written and double
r-paced. Letters should not exceed
"400 words and will be edited for
length and libel. Letters must be
signed and include the writer's name,
>address and telephone number for
'verification. Writers can have two
letters per month published. Letters
and guest columns are the opinion of
the writers and not necessarily that of
the Lake City Reporter.
BY MAIL: Letters, P.O. Box 1709,


JLake City, FL 32056; or drop off at
(80 E. Duval St. downtown.
BY FAX: (386) 752-9400.
BY E-MAIL:
news@lakecityreporter.com


Before there was a
United States or a
Mexico, Bernardo de
Galvez, under orders
from Spain in 1779,
fought battles in Baton Rouge,
Natchez, Mobile, Pensacola
and Charlotte to prevent arms
and supplies from reaching the
British to be used against the
colonials.
That's why there's a statue
honoring Galvez in front
of the State Department in
Washington, D.C.
Arms embargoes are not
a new thing between the
neighboring territories, now
nations. Galvez was at George
Washington's hand in the first
July 4 parade.
Francisco MartIn Moreno, in
his June 3 column in Excelsior,
a Mexico City newspaper,
brought up bi-national arms
control embargoes of the past
Arms purchases might date to
field marshal Pedro Garibay,
who in 1809 proposed that
New Spain buy rifles, cannons,
ammunition and shrapnel
in Baltimore, Philadelphia
and New York from the
freewheeling arms dealers.
Once the Mexican
independence movement began,
Jose Maria Morelos, one of
Mexico's founding fathers,
waited for U.S. arms on the
Gulf Coast, but President James
Monroe got Congress to restrict
U.S. citizens from giving aid to
the insurgents against colonial
Spain. Madison went so far as to
declare which countries could
sell arms to Mexico.
In the first decade of the 20th
century, reform leader and later
president Francisco I. Madero
was supported by President
Howard Taft and New York
bank financing. Opposition Gen.
Bernardo Reyes was held in
the United States for conspiring
against Madero when Taft


www.Iakecityreporter.com


Jose De La Isla
joseisao3@yahoo.com

applied the "neutrality" laws.
Taft was the first to decree on-
.March 14, 1912, a prohibition of
arms exports to Mexico without
it being considered a violation
of the Second Amendment
In 1914, President Woodrow
Wilson lifted the arms embargo
as a way to minimize violence
in Mexico but did not hesitate
to intervene after Germany was
discovered supplying arms to
a rogue element. The United
States intervened at the port
of Veracruz to halt the arms
shipment
The United States even
applied its neutrality laws
and detained Gen. Victoriano
Huerta, who was returning
to Mexicd from exile through
U.S. territory in an attempt
to overthrow the new
constitutional government
These were all considered
discretionary acts by U.S.
presidents. At one point,
arms were sold to the rogue
revolutionist Pancho Villa. And
Calvin Coolidge made known
in 1928 the United States had
supplied arms to strengthen
President Alvaro Obregon's
government in the closing days
of the Revolution.
The point Francisco Martin
Moreno makes in his Excelsior
column is that President Barack
Obama has sufficient historical
and judicial precedent to declare
an arms embargo against those
who are supplying U.S. weapons
to the drug cartels.


International leaders have
made it abundantly clear
a new policy is needed to
decriminalize some drug use,
limit gunrunning, and money
laundering by enablers, who are
complicit in massive deaths.
Former Mexico President
Vicente Fox on June 8 said
the price paid by Mexico in
the drug war to keep U.S.
consumers on a neuroscience
high is too great He had once
had congressional approval to
legalize some drugs, similar
to the proposal put forward
recently by an imminent
international commission.
Fox's proposal was opposed
by President. George W. Bush.
The measure never got to
the Official Gazette, which is
required for a bill to become
law here.
Between 2007 and 2010, only
10,384 of the alleged 114,753
charged drug violators were
jailed. As a practical matter,
decriminalization might become
a practical necessity just to clear
the books.
Yet the heart of the matter
is the high number of violent
deaths. U.S.-encouraged
militarized measures have failed
to curb the drug trade, whose
henchmen have unfettered
access to U.S. arms.
If this keeps up, Francisco
Martin Moreno and others
interested in history might want
to research whether a Nobel
Peace Prize winner has ever
been recalled for failing to act
when he could. Or was there'
ever a Nobel laureate who failed
to act against death but made
hope the theme at the eulogies
of 45,000 graves?

* Jos6 de la Isla, author of "The
Rise of Hispanic Political Power"
writes a weekly commentary for
Hispanic Link News Service.


ANOTHER OPINION


Coulda, would, should


Don't be too hard on the
guys. Trash talk and talent
propelled the Miami Heat into
the playoffs and into the finals
before, well... you know.
This time, the Dallas
Mavericks were a cohesive
team looking for vindication
after the whupping the Heat
gave it in 2006. Thc Heat, how-
ever, consisted of three kings,
looking for the crowns they
promised us they'd be wearing
right about now.
Attitude, it seems, made all
the difference.
But roller-coaster rides, with
all the swooping and whooping
- and fear ultimately are
supposed to be fun. And the
team gave us the ride of our


lives. In fact, throughout the
season, the Heat gave us every-
thing we could have hoped for,
except for, well ... you know.
Let's face it, years of real
housewives and next top mod-
els and fired apprentices have
trained us to loooove manufac-
tured hype and drama and
we got it from the moment
Himself announced on live TV
where he would be playing this
season. From there the LeBron
love just flowed from the Magic
City along with some over-
the-top loathing from the jilted
Cleveland.
Plus, we got Chris Bosh in
the bargain, and there were the
three kings, strutting pouty-
mouthed through the mist


and the sparklers and all that
jazz, announcing that the three
shooting stars had arrived.
Then there was the boost to
the economy: Once they got
here, they bought glam real
estate, while the rest of us were
just trying to keep our roofs
above water; and those Miami
Beach steakhouses were in hog
heaven with the new royalty in
town.
But it wasn't all about the
glitz. The newcomers followed
in the footsteps of beloved
former Heat member Alonzo
Mourning, visiting schools,
thrilling kids and urging them
to always aim for the stars.
M Miami Herald


4A


Jay Ambrose
Speaktoaoy@aoo.com


Bias


in the


news?


Yep.

There was NBC's
Andrea Mitchell a ,
while back, huffily
saying that Israeli
Prime Minister
Benjamin Netanyahu had
treated President Barack
Obama "like a school boy"
in disagreeing publicly about
enemy-surrounded, tiny Israel
giving iip borders providing it
with a crucial buffer zone in
event of war.
Check out Internet videos.
In dutifully and inescapably
speaking on behalf of the
survival of his country's 7
million people, Netanyahu
was subdued, polite and'
deferential.
Mitchell's was a fairly mild
transgression. Her spouting
off about a possible speck of
dust landing on His Majesty
was not just oblivious to
substance, however, but the
kind of spin you too frequently
get from hard-news reporters.
Some stray from their role as
conveyers of current-events
information to take on the
work of editorial writers or
columnists, interjecting their
opinions amid cheers from
more and more colleagues
contending objectivity is
impossible and the search for
truth paramount.
Well, yes, pure objectivity
may be an unreachable ideal.
in the formulation of news
accounts that require some
degree of non-verifiable
interpretation to make them
coherent. But getting to
Truth of the "Big T' kind is a
tougher goal, can easily end
up as a resort to bias and,
when reporters abandon the
criteria of balance and fairness,
can cheat news consumers
of a chance to weigh matters
themselves.
The ethics codes of top
news organizations still call for
impartiality, and there are or
at least were realizable rules
of the game, such as giving
other sides of the argument
in a story focusing on the
explication of some clearly
controversial issue.
Do those who want to say
this is nonsense also want
to call it nonsense to give
the defense a chance to call
its own witnesses in legal
cases where law enforcement
officials are satisfied the
accused is guilty?
I'd suggest that when you
are a chief supplier of news to
the people of a self-governing
society, in certain stories you
have a responsibility
not wholly unlike a court
to avoid one-sided
favoritism.
If labeled as such,
commentary is fine, fooling
no one as somehow shorn
of intervening attitudes, a
valuable, dialectical way
of seeking out meaning,
provoking thought, moving
toward answers and
providing me paychecks.
Long may opinion writing
live, then, but not in the guise
of reporting the public sees
as having different objectives.
free speech.

Jay Ambrose, formerly
Washington director of editorial
policy for Scripps Howard news-
papersand the editor of dailies in
El Paso, Texas, and Denver, is a
columnist living in Colorado.


U.S. needs to embargo


arms to drug dealers













LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL THURSDAY, JUNE 16, 2011


COMMUNITY CALENDAR


* To submit your Community
Calendar item, contact Antonia
Robinson at 754-0425 or by
e-mail at arobinson@
lakecityreporter., com.


Today
Medicaid workshop
A free Medicaid work-
shop is 2 p.m. Thursday at
the LifeStyle Enrichment
Center. Teresa Byrd
Morgan of Morgan Law
Center for Estate &
Legacy Planning will expel
the myths and expand
the opportunities with
Medicaid Planning. The
LEC is located at 628 S.E.
Allison Court. Call Shana
Miller at (386) 755-1977 to
RSVP or for more informa- .
tion.

Branford Camera
Club meeting
The Branford Camera
Club is meeting 7 p.m.
Thursday at the Branford
Public Library. The
program this month
is presented by Skip
Weigel, a retired portrait
photographer. He will
discuss "Environmental
Portraiture," the art
of taking natural light
portraits, both inside
and outside. Contact
Carolyn Hogue, Program
Chair, (386) 935-2044;
Dick Madden, Technical
Consultant, (386) 935-
0296; or Skip Weigel,
Technical Consultant,
(386) 935-1382 for more
information.

Healthy Start meeting
Healthy Start of North
Central Florida Coalition
annual meeting is 2 p.m.
June 16 at WellFlorida
Council in Gainesville.
The public is invited. Call
Heather Hollingsworth
at (352) 313-6500 ext. 119
for more information.

Donors wanted
The LifeSouth
Bloodmobile is seeking
donors 10 a.m. -6 p.m.
Thursday at Walmart.
All donors receive juice,
cookies and a recognition
item.

Friday
Tobacco Treatment
Summit
The Third Annual
Tobacco Treatment
Summit is 8 a.m.-4:45
p.m. Friday at Pine Grove
Baptist Church in Trenton.
Lunch is provided. Contact
Susie Lloyd at slloyd@srah-
ec.org or visit www.ahecreg-
istration.org and select the
Suwannee River region.

WhooWheee to perform
Mike Mullis and
WhooWheee are perform-
ing 8 a.m. Friday at the
Spirit of the Suwannee
Music Hall. Restaurant and
open and serving all you
can eat dinner specials.
Admission is $5 and it can
be used as a meal voucher.
This is a family friendly
event with music, games,
trivia, prizes and more.
Call (386)364-1703 for


LEANNE TYO/Lake City Reporter

Heroic act recognized at school board meeting
Mia Ann Rowe (center, right), 14, a Challenge Learning Cente'r ninth-grader, is recognized with a certificate by the Columbia
County School Board at its Tuesday meeting for saving the life of her fellow classmate, Bailey Bedenbaugh (center, left), 14,
by performing the Heimlich Maneuver on Bedenbaugh when she was choking on a piece of candy in school May 26. Also pic-
tured are Walt Davis (from left), who taught Rowe the Heimlich Maneuver in his Life Skills class at Challenge Learning Center;
Linard Johnson, .board chairman; Mike Millikin, superintendent of schools; and Deborah Hill, Challenge Learning Center princi-
pal. "I feel awesome having a student like Mia being a part of our student body and being able to make quick decisions when
needed," Hill said. "Mia's actions show that a student will do the right thing when given the opportunity."


more information.

Donors wanted
The LifeSouth
Bloodmobile is seeking
donors 1130 a.m.-3:30
p.m. at Lake Butler
Hospital and 4:30-8 p.m.
at Lake Butler's Hardee's
June 17. All donors
receive juice, cookies and
a recognition item.

library.hosts belly
dancing show
The Columbia County
Public Library is host-
ing a belly dancing
performance with Shael
Millheim 11 a.m. at Fort
White Community Center
and 2 p.m. at the Main
Branch Friday.

Buttlerfiles are Free
exhibit
"Butterflies Are Free"
by Leonard Gershe,
opens at the High
Springs Community
Theater Friday and runs
weekends through July
10. Tickets are available
at The Framery's new
location, 341 So. Marion
and Knox Streets, 754-
2780, and online at high-
springscommunitytheater
com:

Health & Candle sale
A Health & Candle sale
is 8 a.m.-5 p.m. Friday
at the Shands Lakeshore
Medical Center Gift Shop.
Fountains, crystals, can-
dles, and free massages
will be available.


Saturday
Rockin' in the 50's
Rockin' in the 50's,
benefiting March of
Dimes, is 7 p.m. Saturday
at the American Legion,
located at Hwy. 41 S. DJ
Mike Mullis will provide
the music. There will be
chance drawings, con-
tests with prizes, food
for sale and a cash bar.
Also, smoked chickens
and Boston butts will be
available. Tickets are $10
at Moe's Southwest Grill,
US 90 West, or call Linda
Waldron 755-2753 or
Maureen Lloyd 752-4885
for tickets or to pre-order
chickens or Boston butts.
Come early and see the
antique car display.

'Squares & Stars'
The Second Annual All
White Affair, "Squares
& Stars," is 8 p.m.-1
a.m. Saturday at the
Winfield Community
Center. Donations are
'$10 in advance and $15
at the door. The event is
hosted by Gold Standard
Lodge #167 and Gold
Standard Chapter #48.
Contact Leondra Fleming
at (386) 984-9853,
Shontez Strawder at (254)
317-3980, Chris Mirra
at (386) 623-3611 or
Raymond Brady at (386)
365-2535.

FGC featured at
Farmers Market
Florida Gateway College
is the featured organiza-


tion at theLake DeSoto
Farmers Market 8 a.m.-12
p.m. Saturday. The col-
lege will have exhibits and
activities featuring engi-
neering, science, nutrition
and butterflies, including
making ice dream with
liquid nitrogen! The mar-
ket is located in Wilson
Park, along Lake DeSoto
between the Columbia
County Courthouse
and Shands Lakeshore
Hospital.

lifeSouth seeks
blood donors
The LifeSouth
Bloodmobile is seeking
donors 12-7 p.m. Saturday
at Lake Butler Community,
Spire's Grocery Store.
All donors receive juice,
cookies and a recognition
item.

Sunday
Donors wanted
The LifeSouth
Bloodmobile is seeking
donors 9 a.m.-1 p.m. at
Sardis Baptist Church
and 2-5 p.m. at Spire's
Grocery Store Sunday. All
donors receive juice, cook-
ies and a recognition item.

Employment services
Vocational Rehabilitation
provides services for
eligible people who have
physical or mental impair-
ments that keep them
from working. These ser-
vice can help with medical
treatment, job placement
and training. Columbia and


Union Counties call (386)
754-1675.

Kindergarten
registration
Kindergarten registra-
tion is 7:30 a.m. until 5
p.m. Monday Thursday
at each elementary
school. Children must
be 5-years-old on or
before Sept. 1. The fol-
lowing items are needed
to register a child: Birth
Certificate, Immunization
Record, Record of
Physical Examination,
which must have been
completed within a year
before school begins and
a Social Security Card if
available.

Columbia County
Wood Carvers meeting
The Columbia County
Wood Carvers meet every
Monday at 1 p.m. at the
LifeStyle Enrichment
Center. Contact Ken Myer
at 719-9629 or Charles
Kime at 755-4937 for more
information.

Monday
Community diabetes
class
The next community
diabetes class is 9:30 a.m.
Monday at the Lake
Shore Authority Board
Building. The topic is
diabetes prevention and
Ann Milligan, RN, is
the speaker. The build-


ing is located at 259 NE
Franklin Street. Call
Wendy Fisher at (386)
292-7815 for questions.
Classes are free of charge
and no pre-registration is
necessary.

Columbia County
Relay For Life wrapup
A Columbia County
Relay For Life wrap-
up is 6 p.m. Monday at
McAlister's Deli Sponsors,
participants and teams will
be recognized.

Tuesday
NARFE monthly meeting
The next NARFE meet-
ing is 1 p.m. Tuesday at
the LifeStyle Enrichment
Center, 628 SE Allison Ct.
Nathan Riska, Rep. Ander
Crenshaw district repre-
sentative, is the speaker.,
Contact Miriam. Stanford
at 755-0907 for more
information.

. Senior Services meal
payment due
Payment for-the
Columbia County Senior,
Services Inc. Wednesday
homecooked meal is due
10 a.m. Tuesday at the
LifeStyle Enrichment
Center. The menu is
chicken pot pie, steamed
broccoli, country biscuits
and strawberry cake. Call
(386) 755-0235 for more
information.

Wednesday
Senior Services to host
Cowboy Dave
Columbia County
Senior Services Inc. is
hosting a performance
by Cowboy Dave 11-
11:45 a.m. June 22 at
the LifeStyle Enrichment
Center. Call (386) 755-
0235 for more informa-
tion.

Lady of the Lake
Quilting Guild
The Lady of the Lake
Quilting Guild it month-.
ly 9:30 a.m. June 22 at
Teen Town, 533 NW
Desoto St. The program
will feature quilting a
Chinese Auction. For
more details: Contact
President Loretta
Kissner, (386) 754-9330
or vice-president Sunny
Nadort, (386) 658-1555.

Thursday, June 23
Senior Services open
house
Columbia County
Senior Services, Inc. is
having an open house
10 a.m.-12 p.m. June
23. Entertainment at
11 a.m. by The Kitchen
Band. Come check out
the activities, the New
Heirloom Gift Shoppe
and more. Located at 628
S.E. Allison Court, call
(386) 755-0235 for more
information.


OBITUARIES


Laurie Bernice Byrd-
Milligan
Laurie Bernice Byrd-Milligan,
42 of Orlando, Florida went
home to be with the Lord early
Sunday, June 12, 2011 at home
in Orlando.
Born in Lake
City, Florida,
she was the
daughter of
Reverend Aar-
on Lewis and
Sarah Jones. "a i
She attended
school in Lake
City, Columbia
County gradu- ,
ating from Co-
lumbia High School Class of
1987. One daughter preceded
her in death, Aieral Milligan.
Survivors include: a devoted
loving fiance' Harvey "Bena-
rd" Thompson; children Caleb
and Cameron Milligan; parents
Sarah Jones and Aaron Lewis;
(7) sisters, (6) brothers, (1)
step-sister, and (1) step brother;
a devoted best friend, Paulette


(Jason) Julien; a devoted God
Mother, Paulette Rhodes; a
host of aunts, uncles, cousins,
nephews, nieces and friends.
Funeral services for Ms. Laurie
Bernice Byrd-Milligan will be
11:00am Friday, June 17, 2011
at the River of Life Christian
Center, 44 N. Corburn Avenue,
Orlando, Fl 32608. Pastor Mar-
vin A. Jackson and Saturday,
June 18, 2011 at ll:00am at the
Columbia County School Board
Auditorium, 372 West Duval
Street, Lake City, Florida 32055,
Pastor Alvin Baker, Officiating.
Arrangements entrusted to
COOPER FUNERAL HOME
251 NE Washington Street, Lake
City, Florida 32055 (386)752-
3566, Willis 0.' Cooper, LFD.

Tracy Russell Wurmnest
Ms. Tracy Russell Wurmnest,
39, of Wellborn, passed away
unexpectedly in the early hours
of Saturday, June 4, 2011. A
native of Killeen, Texas, Tracy
had been a resident of Wellborn


for the past three years having
moved here from Homestead,
Florida. Tracy was a bartender
currently working at Brooklyn
Boys and had formerly worked
at O'Dell's and at Billy's San-
ta Fe Bar. In her spare time
Tracy enjoyed motorcycle rid-
ing, swimming and she loved
life and lived it to its fullest.
Tracy is survived by her "soul
mate" and partner of ten years,
Glenn Fleming and her daughter,
Sarai Wurmnest both of Well-


bom, Florida; her parents, Jim &
Fran Russell of Daytona, Florida
and Jim & Jeanette Hales of Tas-
mania, Australia; her brother,
Brad Russell of Ormond Beach,
Florida and her step-sisters,
Tracey Murphy of Mt. Dora,
Florida and Ginger Shuman
of Asheville, North Carolina.
Private services for Tracy were
held Saturday, June 11, 2011.
Arrangements were under
the direction of the DEES-
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Page Editor: Todd Taylor, 754-0424











LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL & STATE THUMRSDAY, 1 II,1. (11- 164


Mexican journalists


seek asylum from U.S.


BY LAURA WIDES-MUNOZ
,Associated Pre.s Hispnwe
Affairs Wricti

LAKE BUENA VISTA
- Three Mexican journal-
ists facing death threats in
their native country urged
the U.S. government
Wednesday to speed up
approval of their asylum
petitions.
Emilio Gutierrez Soto
said he first received
threats in 2005 after
writing stories about
alleged military involve-
ment in drug trafficking
in the northern state of
Chihuahua. Three years
later, his house was ran-
sacked, and he received
more threats. After fil-
ing complaints with the
national government and
getting little response,
he fled the country in
2008 with his 15-year-old
son.
Gutierrez was held for
more than seven months
in a U.S. immigration
detention center, until his
story was aired on nation-
al television. His son was
held for four months. The
next hearing in his case is
not likely to happen before
2012.
Gutierrez called the
drug war a cancer destroy-
ing his country, during
a panel discussion at
the National Association
of Hispanic Journalists'
annual meeting in the
central Florida suburb
of Lake Buena Vista.
The former reporter for
Ciudad Juarez's El Diario
newspaper said losing his
country, was harder even
than the death of his par-
ents. He pleaded with the


"We are living in a legal limbo.We
are unable to have any emotional,
familial or employment stability."

-Emilo Gutierrez Soto
Mexican journalist seeking asylum


U.S. government to make
a decision in his case and
those of his fellow journal-
ists.
"We are living in a legal
limbo," said Gutierrez,
who has a temporary work
permit but has yet to find
a job. "We are unable, to
have any emotional, famil-
ial .or employment stabil-
ity."
Reporter Ricardo
Chavez Aldana, a native
of Ciudad Juarez, attacked
the drug cartels on his
radio show until his neph-
ews were killed outside
their home. He says he
and his wife, mother and
sor received repeated
death threats until they
crossed the border in 2009
into El Paso, Texas.
"I have covered more
than 4,000 .killings," he
told the group the several
hundred journalists gath-
ered at Disney's Coronado
Springs Resort.
. "They are destroying
Mexico. They are kill-
ing children, pregnant
women, "Chavez said,
his vice breaking as he
talked of the drug war in
Mexico.
Alejandro Hernandez
Pacheco was a TV cam-
eraman for Televisa when
he was kidnapped last July
in Durango, Mexico along
with three other report-
ers, allegedly by one of


the country's largest drug
cartels who demanded his
station no longer broad-
cast stories about the
gang. He was freed a week
later and crossed the bor-
der in October.
,All three men's asylum
cases are pending, and
they acknowledged that
while they may be able to
document the persecution
they've faced as journal-
ists, they face an added
challenge because of the
U.S. public's concerns
about the flood of immi-
grants from Mexico.
But all three said they
will not return to Mexico.
At least 66 journalists
have been killed in the
last four years in Mexico,
according to the coun-
try's government. The
U.S. receives hundreds
of asylum applications
from the country each
year, but approves only a
handful.
Angela Kocherga of
Belo TV, who has cov-
ered the journalists' asy-
lum cases, as well as life
and death along the U.S.-
Mexico border said the
violence against journal-
ists in Mexico has created
"zones of silence."
Added Kocherga: "It's
the war next door, and
we know more about
what's happening in
Afghanistan."


VOTE: Road maybe closed

Continued From Page 1A


road, which are not neces-
sary for the new (paved)
road will be closed,"
Williams said.
The first phase of the
paving project, which cost
more than $1.4 million, has
been completed, Williams
said. Before the second
phase can be bid out, right-
of-way land rights must be
acquired.


The board is purchasing
those land rights for Old
Wire Road as it's paved,
Williams said, and County
Attorney Marlin Feagle will
ask approval to file for emi-
nent domain, should it be
needed.
"In most cases, and' I
keep stressing this," he
said, "we're able to work
out arrangements with the


property owners, but just
in case, we have to be pre-
pared to move forward "
The Columbia
County Board of County
Commissioners will meet
at 7 p.m. at the Columbia
County School Board
Administrative Complex
auditorium, 372 W Duval
Street.
*


POLICE REPORTS


The following informa-
tion was provided by local
law enforcement agencies.
The following people have
been arrested but not con-
victed. All people are inno-
.cent unless proven guilty.

Friday, June 3
Columbia County
Sheriff's Office
Michael Vincent
Mosher, 27, no address
g' ven, warrant: Violation
f probation on original
charges of dealing in sto-
len property.
Christopher David
Mortberg, 26, unknown
address, warrant Violation
of probation on original
charge of possession of a
controlled substance.

Saturday, June 4
Columbia County
Sheriff's Office

m A.B. Webb, 25, 302
NW Gerson St, aggravated
assault with deadly weapon-
without intent to kill and
criminal mischief.
Diamond Demetrie
Lily, 24, 501 NW Sago
Glen, aggravated assault
and criminal mischief.
Brandon Earl
Winchester, 18, 248 SW
Aloe Court, burglary, lar-
ceny, petit theft,- disorderly
intoxication and loitering.


Sunday, June 5
Columbia County
Sheriff's Office
Michael Shane Lewis,
41, 2287 Dark Bay Drive,
Middleburg, driving
while license suspended/
revoked, possession of
marijuana, carrying a con-
cealed weapon and posses-
sion of drug paraphernalia.
Dana Carl Douglas,
23, 3865 SW Archer Road,
carrying a concealed weap-
on, improper exhibition of
a firearm and aggravated
assault.

Monday, June 6
Columbia County
Sheriff's Office
Justin Allen Bannister,
32, 310 U.S. Highway 90,
warrant Violation of pro-
bation on original charges
of possession of a con-
trolled substance.
Patricia Lynn Brandt,
21, 9227 NW 44th Lane,
Lake Butler, warrant
Violation of probation on
original charge of uttering
a forged instrument.
Kyle David Kaufman,
no age given, 314 W.
Garden Circle, Davie, war-
rant Violation of proba-
tion on original charge of
aggravated battery with
great bodily harm.
Phillip Alex Lanier, 30,
7809 97th Court, .Live Oak,


warrant Felony fleeing a
police officer in high speed
chase and aggravated
assault on a law enforce-
ment officer with a deadly
weapon.
m Amber Nicole Lashley,
22, 1002 SW Spring Lane,
larceny and dealing in sto-
len property.
Randall Eugene
Tanner Jr., 24, 2538 SE
Baya Dr., larceny and deal-
ing in stolen property.
Randall Eugene
Tanner, 46, 2538 SE Baya
Dr., larceny and dealing in
stolen property.
James Curtis
Williams, 25, 1557 SE
Alfred Markham Lane,
dealing in stolen prop-
erty.

Lake City
Police Department
William Maurice
Butler, 38, 452 NE
Broadway St., aggravated
battery.

Tuesday, June 7
Columbia County
Sheriff's Office
Joe Corbett Hughes,
18, 291 SW Lucky Drive,
warrant Violation of pro-
bation on original charges
of battery on a law enforce-
ment officer.

From staff reports.


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Chief Judge Belvin Perry listens to a motion for acquittal from the defense during day 19 '
of Casey Anthony's murder trial at the Orange County Courthouse in Orlando Wednesday.


After 19 days, Anthony


prosecutors rest case


By KYLE HIGHTOWER
Associated Press

ORLANDO -
Prosecutors spent 19 days
proving beyond any doubt
that Casey Anthony is a
liar who loves to party. But
did they also prove that
she murdered her 2-year-
old daughter Caylee?
. The prosecution rested
its case Wednesday after
introducing a wealth of
circumstantial and foren-
sic evidence that they
say shows that the young
single mother suffocated
her daughter by wrapping
duct tape around her head.
They say she left the girl's
body in her car until it
stank and then dfimped
it in the woods near the
home she shared with her
parents.
But there are holes.
They have no witnesses'
who saw the killing. No
one saw Anthony with
the body. And because,
the body was so decom-
posed, there is no abso-
lute proof that the child
was suffocated, just the
tape remnants on her
skull. Caylee's remains
were found in December
2008, six months after the
girl was last seen.
And while the pros-
ecution used Anthony's
friends, \ parents and
brother to show that she
lied repeatedly before and
after her child died, the
witnesses also all agreed
that she was a loving and
doting mother. If convict-
ed of first-degree murder,
Anthony faces a possible
death sentence.
"I think (the prosecu-
tors) did as best they
could with the evidence
that they have," said
Leslie Garfield, a crimi-
nal law professor at Pace
Law School in New York.
'"The problem is that all 12
jurors have to find a ver-
dict unanimously beyond
all reasonable doubt. So
you wind up having a pret-
ty heavy burden."
And, that's what
Anthony's attorneys will
bank on when they begin
their case Thursday but
they also set a high bar for
themselves. In his opening
statement, lead defense
attorney Jose Baez said
he will show that Caylee
accidentally drowned in
her grandparents' above-
ground swimming pool
and that Casey freaked
out. He said Anthony's
father, a former police
officer, made the death
look like a murder and
helped her dump the body.
George Anthony adamant-
ly denied the claim dur-
ing his testimony, along
with an accusation that
he molested Casey as a
child.
If the defense has no
witnesses to back up their
claims of a drowning and
cover-up, many lawyers
familiar with the case think
Anthony, 25, will have to
testify in her own defense,
opening her up scathing
cross-examination.
"That's really risky,"
Garfield said.
In her opening state-
ment, lead prosecutor
Linda Drane Burdick
didn't hide the central
mystery of the case: "What
happened to Caylee Marie
Anthony?"


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Casey Anthony arrives in the courtroom for her murder trial
at the Orange County Courthouse in Orlando Wednesday.


She and her assistants
then 'methodically tried
to answer that question,
showing that Anthony had
been living the life of a
party girl before Caylee
disappeared in June 2008
- and didn't slow down
until she was arrested
weeks later. ,
They showed that
Anthony, then 22, lied-to
her parents and detec-
tives about working as a
party planner at Universal
Studios theme park. She
also maintained that a
nanny named Zanny had
taken the child in several
conversations with inves-
tigators a vastly dif-
ferent explanation from
the drowning story the
defense is now using.
Prosecutors showed
that in the days after
Caylee was last seen -
the period when -prosecu-
tors say she was murdered
- Anthony hid from her
parents, spent time with
her boyfriend, went shop-
ping and hung out with
friends.
When her parents and
brother visited her in jail
after her arrest, she insist-
ed she had no idea where
Caylee could be.
"Her conduct just sticks
out," said Karin Moore,
an assistant professor at
Florida A&M College of
Law. "If she knew her child
had died or was missing,
she was not acting like a
grieving mother. It may
be enough for a jury to
convict her."
Still, Moore says it's
risky for prosecutors to
rely so heavily on bad
character evidence.
"They're asking a jury to
decide, 'She's a bad person,
so she must have killed the
child.' I think thafs a big
leap for a jury to have to
make," Moore said.
Prosecutors used foren-
sic evidence to bolster
the case, primarily from
Anthony's car and Caylee's
remains.
Shortly after their
daughter and granddaugh-
ter disappeared in June
2008, Casey's parents got
a notice that their daugh-
ter's car had been towed
and needed to be claimed.
George Anthony and the
tow lot operator both
said the Pontiac Sunfire
smelled like death.
Prosecutors played
a tape of a frantic 911
call made by Anthony's


mother, Cindy, reporting
her granddaughter miss-
ing. Jurors took notes as
they watched the .griev-
ing grandmother drop her
head in tears while listen-
ing to the recording in
which she said: "It smells
like there's been a dead
body in the damn car."--l,
That smell is a major
comrhponent of -'te prose-
cution's case.
They called Arpad Vass,
a senior researcher at
the*Oak Ridge National
Laboratory in Tennessee,
who offered what's argu-
ably the mdst controver-
sial evidence so far. Vass
and a colleague used a
syringe to extract air from
a can holding, a carpet
sample from the Pontiac,
then injected the air into
a special instrument to
identify the substances it
contained.
The substances were
compared against a data-
base of more than 400
chemical compounds Vass
has previously identified
from the decomposition of
bodies. He backed up the
prosecutors' theory, tes-
tifying that.he smelled ah
"overwhelmingly strong"
odor of human decompo-
sition in the air sample
and that his machine
found high levels of chem-
ical compounds observed
when the body breaks
down, such as chloro-
form.
But Anthony's attor-
neys say the stench came
from a bag of trash left in
the trunk during the broil-
ing Florida summer. They
argue that Vass' tests
haven't been duplicated
elsewhere and that the
researcher has refused to
share his database, claim-
ing it is proprietary.
Prosecution expert's
also said a single strand
of hair found in the car's
trunk showed signs of
decomposition. But not
all the forensic scien-
tists agree on the level of
decomposition.
"I do have issues with
the validity and reliabil'
ity of the odor testing
because the doctor relied
on his own studies,"
Moore said. "It was not
peer-reviewed."
Still, Garfield said dis-
agreements in the testi-
mony of expert witnesses
may not necessarily cause
the jury to dismiss the
evidence.


Psge t.,...r- Td Taylor, 754-0424













Page EdItor: Todd Taylor, 754-0424 LAKE CITY REPORTER HEALTH THURSDAY, JUNE 16, 2011


Weighing cancer risks,


from cellphones to coffee


By MARILYNN MARCHIONE
AP Medical Writer

You're sitting in a freshly
drywalltd house, drinking
coffee from a plastic foam
cup and talking on a cell-
phone. Which of these is
most likely to be a cancer
risk?
It might be the sitting,
especially if you do that
a lot
Despite all' the recent
news about possible cancer
risks from cellphones, cof-
fee, styrene, and formalde-
hyde in building materials,
most of us probably face
little if any danger from
these things with ordinary
use, health experts say.
Inactivity and obesity may
pose a greater cancer risk
than chemicals for some
people.
"We are being bombard-
ed" with messages about
the dangers posed by com-
mon things in our lives, yet
most exposures "are not at
a level that are going to
cause cancer," said Dr. Len
Lichtenfeld, the American
Cancer Society's deputy
chief medical officer.
Linda Birnbaum agrees.
She is a toxicologist who
heads the government
agency that just declared
styrene, an ingredient
in fiberglass boats and
Styrofoam, a likely cancer
risk.
"Let me put your mind
at ease right away about
Styrofoam," she said.
Levels of styrene that leach
from food containers "are
hundreds if not thousands
of times lower than have
occurred in the occupa-
tional setting," where the
chemical in vapor form
poses a possible riskto.
workers. "In finished prod-
ucts, .,certainly .styrene, is
not an issue," and expo-
sure to it'from riding in a
boat "is infinitesimal," she
said.
Carcinogens are things
that can cause cancer, but
thatlabel doesn't mean that
they will or that they pose
a risk to anyone exposed
to them in any amount at
any time.
They have been in the
news because two groups
that periodically convene
scientists to decide wheth-
er something is a carcino-
gen issued new reports.
Last month, *the
International' Agency
for Research on Cancer,
part of the World Health
Organization, said there


ASSOCIATED PRESS
A unidentified man uses a cell phone in Oakland, Calif.,
Tuesday. Despite all the recent news about possible cancer
.risks from cellphones, coffee, styrene and formaldehyde in
building materials, most people face little if any danger from
these things, health experts say.

is a possibility cellphones have been deemed carcin-
raise the risk of brain ogens, 59 are called prob-
tumors. able carcinogens, and 266
"The operative word others are possible ones.
is 'possibility,"' said In this last category of
Lichtenfeld, who among possibles besides the
others has pointed out the electromagnetic energy
thin evidence for this and from cellphones are
the fact that cancer rates coffee, engine, exhaust
have not risen since cell- and talc-based body pow-
phones came out. der. Talc in its natural
Last week, the National form may contain asbes-
Toxicology Program, part tos, though products sold
of the National Institute for home use since the
of Environmental Health 1970s have been asbestos-
Sciences both of which free. Again, most risk is
Birnbaum Hleads issued thought to involve occupa-
its report :.;.... tional.or unusual exposure
It adds to the list of to natural talc.
known carcinogens form- The evidence on coffee
aldehyde, which is in build- has gone back and forth
ing materials and some for years, with no clear
hair-straightening prod- sign of danger and some
ucts, though Birnbaum suggestions of benefit.
said on-the-job exposure is However, known car-
the main concern. The list cinogens include alco-
also adds a plant substance holic beverages, estrogen
in some "natural" arthri- treatments for menopause
tis remedies, aristolochic symptoms, birth control
acid. Six other things were pills, certain viruses and,
dubbed "reasonably antici- parasites, and even some
pated" to be carcinogens, drugs used to treat cancer,
including styrene and such as cyclophosphamide
another herbal medicine' and tamoxifen.
ingredient, riddelliine (rih- "Most people would
DELL-een). probably be shocked to see
Since 1971, the interna- the number of things they
tional cancer agency has interact with every day"
evaluated more than 900 on these lists, Lichtenfeld
substances. Just over 100 said.


Double vision


is linked to


Graves' disease


Here's the problem: The
agencies that pass judg-
ment on a carcinogen
don't regulate it or deter-
mine what levels or routes
of exposure .are a concern
and for whom.
"People immediately
assume it's going to cause
cancer at any exposure
level, and that's simply
not true," said A. Wallace
Hayes, editor of the sci-
entific journal Food and
Chemical Toxicology, and
an industry consultant.
The rule is "RITE" -
Risk Is equal to Toxicity
times Exposure and
"they've left out half of the
equation" by not saying
how much exposure is a
concern, Hayes said.
"The organizations
that list these substances.
as possibly carcinogenic
have to be conservative.
That means if there's any
reasonable evidence, way
before it's a sure thing,
they have to say, 'Let's be
cautious.' That's their job
- to raise the flag," said
David Ropeik, a consultant
and author of "How Risky
Is It Really? Why Our
Fears Don't Always Match
the Facts."
It's human nature to fear
risks we didn't choose,
such as hazardous chemi-
cals, more than those we
did, such as lack of exer-
cise, poor diets or smok-
ing, he said.
"A risk that is imposed
on us scares us more than
a risk we take voluntarily,"
especially if it comes from
companies we don't trust,
Ropeik said.
Styrene is an example:
The government says it
is a component of tobacco
smoke and that is the big-
gest way most people are
exposed to it Smoking, of
course, is the most easily
preventable cancer risk.
To minimize risk, people
can take reasonable mea-
sures to avoid exposure
to possibly harmful things,
experts say.
"If you walk into a room
and you can smell formal-
dehyde, you probably want
to vent the room before
you spend a lot of time
in it That's just common
sense," Birnbaum said.
If you're concerned
about pesticides, you can
peel fruit and vegetables or
choose organic, though
there is some evidence
that organic products may
CANCER continued on 8A


ON HEALTH


DEAR DR. GOTr: Is
Graves' disease curable? I
have hyperthyroidism and
double vision I'm told is
from the disease. What can
I do?

DEAR READER:
Graves' disease is not cur-
able, but it's completely
treatable. This type of
hyperthyroidism occurs
when the immune system
mistakenly attacks the
thyroid gland, causing it
to produce an excess of a
hormone known as thyrox-
ine. The immune system
cannot be prevented from
attacking the thyroid gland,
but fortunately there are
several treatments available
to lower the production
of thyroxine and ease the
symptoms.
Signs of the disorder may
include a goiter (enlarged
thyroid gland), hand or
finger tremor, irregular
heartbeats, difficulty sleep-
ing, anxiety and weight loss.
The eyes may show signs
of Graves' ophthalmopathy,
which most notably causes
them to protrude beyond
their protective orbits. The
lids swell, the eyes might
become red and, infrequent-
ly, double or blurred vision
may be present.
Other serious complica-
tions from Graves' involve the
heart and include congestive
heart failure (CHF) and atrial
fibrillation. CHF occurs when
the heart is incapable of cir-
. culating sufficient blood to
meet the needs of the body.
Atrial fibrillation is an abnor-
mality of the rhythm of the
heart Then there's osteopo-
rosis from untreated Graves'
because excessive amounts
of thyroid hormone leaches
calcium from the bones, caus-
infhg ehm to becorie britte.
Treatment may include
drugs known as beta block-
ers, radioactive iodine or
anti-thyroid medication'
to prevent the thyroid
from producing excessive
hormones. Control with
radioactive iodine will cause
the gland to shrink, symp-
toms will be reduced, and .
the gland may ultimately
reverse to a state of hypo-
thyroidism (too little thyroid
hormone)*and require
supplemental thyroid hor-
mones. This treatment
option may worsen any
symptoms of Graves' oph-
thalmopathy, so this may
not be an option for you.
The use of anti-thyroid med-


New rules to clear up,


sunscreen confusion


M." FLORIDA PAIN ND REHABILITATIONCENTER
.,^ \ a Formerly Compr~e. sive Pain Management of.o.hiopda .
1 ) I:Www.cpmnf.com
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By MATTHEW PERRONE
AP Health Writer

WASHINGTON Help
is on the way to consum-
ers confused by the jumble
of sun protection numbers,
symbols and other claims
on sunscreens. Starting
next summer, consumers
can start looking for SPF
15 bottles with the label
"broad spectrum" and feel
confident they're being pro-
tected from an increased
risk of cancer.
Currently, standards of
protection apply only to one
part of the sun's spectrum,
ultraviolet B rays, which
cause sunburn. Under new
rules published Tuesday,
they will also have to pro-
tect against the more pen-
etrating ultraviolet A rays
associated with skin can-
cer.
The' guidelines, which
spent more than 30 years
in bureaucratic limbo, are
designed to enhance the
effectiveness of sunscreens
and make them easier to
use.
The key takeaway for
consumers: Look for a sun


protection factor, or SPF,
of 15 and above that also
says "broad spectrum."
That's the new buzzword
from the Food and Drug
Administration to describe
a product *that does an
acceptable job blocking
both types of damaging
rays.
Starting next summer,
sunscreens with less than-
an SPF of 15 or that aren't
"broad spectrum" will have
to carry a warning label:


shown only to help prevent
sunburn,, not skin cancer
or early skin aging."
That will help people
like Paul Woodburn, 55,
who says he mainly buys
brands he trusts and judg-
es sun screen by one fac-
tor
'The. SPF number is
what counts for me," the
Indianapolis resident said
.as he sat next to a public
pool. "Beyond the SPF, I


"This product has been SUNSCREEN continued on 8A


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ication for a year or two may
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of the disease; however,
relapse can occur.
Make an appointment
with an endocrinologist if
you haven't already done
so. Visit a nutritionist who
can review your diet and
recommend specific foods
'to combat any weakness or
fatigue. Plan to have labora-.
tory testing at least on an
annual basis. By taking care
'of your general health, you
should be able to lead a
long, normal life.

DEAR DR. GOTT: Is
it possible to live a normal
life without surgery for a
hernia? I've heard of people
years ago wearing various
trusses or supports of some
kind.

DEAR READER. Yes, it
is. Trusses were quite com-
mon years ago and are still
in existence today. A hernia
can result from lifting heavy
objects, chronic constipa-
tion, an undescended tes-
ticle, obesity and a host of
other reasons.
In most cases, if the her-
nia doesn't cause pain and
discomfort, there is no need
for surgical repair. It's when
it enlarges or strangulates .
(or there is increased risk
of this occurring) that inter-
vention is necessary.
Strangulation refers to the
tissue becoming stuck in a
Sole in the abdominal wall,
resulting in its blood supply
getting cut off. If the bulge
cannot be pushed back
through the hole to restore
the flow of blood, that spe-
cific portion of the intestine
will die.
If you have a hernia, I
recommend a visit to your
primary care physician or
surgeon. He or she will be
your best resource to deter-
mine the next step.'

E Dr. Peter Gott is a retired
physician and the author
of the book "Dr. Gott's No
Flour, No Sugar Diet," and
the recently published "Dr.
Gott's No Flour, No Sugar
Cookbook."


LAKE CITY REPORTER HEALTH THURSDAY, JUNE 16, 2011


Page Editor: Todd Taylor, 754-0424









LAKE CITY REPORTI HEALTH Tii,,, .,11111 i., [,-l n


SUNSCREEN: Various risks examined
Continued From Page 7A


don't think anybody really
watches." Woodburn said
he wasn't familiar with the
difference between UVA
.and UVB rays or the broad
spectrum label.
"These changes to
sunscreen labels are. an
important part of helping
consumers have the infor-
mation they need so they
can choose the right sun
protection for themselves
and their families," said Dr.
Janet Woodcock, director
of FDA's drug division.
The new regulations
require testing for the
more dangerous ultraviolet
A rays, which can penetrate
glass and pose the great-
est risk of skin cancer and
premature aging. Now, the
FDA only requires testing
for ultraviolet B rays that
cause sunburn. That's what
the familiar SPF measure is
based on.
"For the first time, the
FDA has clearly defined the
testing required to make
a broad-spectrum protec-
tion claim in a sunscreen
and indicate which type
of sunscreen can reduce
skin cancer risk," said
Dr. Ronald L. Moy, presi-
dent of The American
Academy of Dermatology
Association.
Under the new rules:
The FDA will pro-
hibit sunscreen marketing
claims like "waterproof"
and "sweatproof," which
the agency said "are
exaggerations of .perfor-


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Director of the FDA's Center for Drug Evaluation and
Research, Janet Woodcock speaks during a news confer-
ence about the new rules for sunscreen labeling at the U.S.
Food and Drug Administration building on Tuesday.


mance."
The FDA also pro-
poses capping the highest
SPF value at 50, unless
companies can provide
results. of further test-
ing that support a higher
number.
FDA says manufac-
turers must phase out a
four-star system currently
used by some companies
to rate UVA protection.
In reviewing more than
3,000 comments submit-
ted to the agency, the FDA
decided the star system
was too confusing. Instead,
protection against UVA
should be proportional to
protection against UVB,
which is already measured
using SPF.
The SPF figure indi-
cates the amount of sun
exposure needed to cause


CANCER: Various ris Continued From I'gr" 7A


be less .safe in terms ul
germs like E. coli and sal=
monella.
People worried about
cellphones can hold them
farther from the head,


I,.1 1., +1t. or u t| 8 l ,t-t' ,.i
earplece as Lit-hiiI-riffnl
doer, Ho was returTli
in- from a in.i r iianceri
conference in t l(ii .i-'


Ni[ week when a fel-
low rj,-1- pointed at
i, IJ tr j,-dl '.- Hi.llf'ooth
".,,ti ,i>,t r atd, "Do
-y,'n knt w l,.,'t lliin.: can
is+H + ,''- i


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sunburn on sunscreen-
protected skin compared
with unprotected skin.
For example, an SPF rat-
ing of 30 means it would
take the person 30 times
longer to burn wear-
ing sunscreen than with
exposed skin.
The rules were decades
in the making.
FDA announced its
intent to draft sunscreen
rules in 1978 and published
them in 1999. The agen-
cy delayed finalizing its
guidelines for years until
it could address issues
concerning both UVA and
UVB protection.
Some consumer advo-
cates complained that the
agency's final guidelines
were less strict than draft
proposals circulated over
the years.
"About 20 percent of
products that meet the
new FDA standards could
not be sold in Europe,
where UVA standards
are strict," said David
Andrews, senior scientist
with the Environmental
Working Group.

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Lake City Reporter


Story ideas?

Contact
Tim Kirby
Sports Editor
754-0421
tkjrby)akecityreporter.com


SPORTS


Thursday. June 16, 2011


www.lakecityreporter.com


Section B


BRIEFS
SWIMMING
Lessons sign-up
continues today
Youth and adult
swimming lessons are
offered at the Columbia
County Aquatic Complex.
Classes meet for two
weeks and six daily times
are offered, plus there
are two daily mom and
tot classes. Four sessions
remain with the next
session June 20-30. Cost
is $50 per person.
Registration is at the
pool (755-8195) today
and Friday.
POP WARNER FOOTBALL
Registration
for new players
Lake City Pop Warner
football registration for
new players is under way
from 3-6 p.m. through
Monday at Richardson
Community Center. Pop
Warner also is looking
for girls ages 5-12
interested in
cheerleading.
For details, call
secretary Kim Stephens
at 623-2954 or e-mail him
stephensl972@yahoo.com.
FISHING
Bass tournament
set for June 25
An open bass
tournament to benefit the
Suwannee River Breast
Cancer Awareness ,
Association is June 25 at
Clay Landing. Cost is $70
per boat with an optional
big bass pot of $10.
There is 60 percent
payback on the
tournament and 100
percent payback on big
bass pot.
For details, call Jamie
Albritton at ,
(386) 209-0166, Donnie
Feagle at 365-1191 or
Ruben Thomas at
(386) 288-4691.

No license for
saltwater fishing
The Florida Fish and
Wildlife Conservation
Commission's second
license-free saltwater
fishing weekend is
Saturday and Sunday.
For details, visit
MyFWC.com/Fishing.
GIRLS SOFTBALL
Crushers clinic
set July 11-15
Columbia Crushers
Softball Organization is
holding an elite softball
clinic for girls of all ages
from 8 a.m. to noon on
July 11-15. There will
be instruction in the
fundamentals of fielding
and hitting. Registration
is at Brian's Sports on
U.S. Highway 90 west
Registration deadline is
July 5 and the camp is
limited to 100 girls.
For details, go to
columbiacrushers@gmail.
corn or call 755-4271.


BRANDON FINLEY/Lpke City Reporter
Fort White High's Zack Bentley signs a letter of intent to play college football at Kentucky
Weslayen College. Bentley was joined at the signing by parents Pam and Doug Bentley
(front row, from left), athletic director John Wilson (back left) and Indians' head coach
Demetric Jackson.


Playing


- Rookie Qualifier '
begins today
at Southside.
By .TIM IIRBY
tkirby@lakecityreporter.com
Pitching wheels will go
round and round as play-'
ers circle the bases in the
machine-pitch tournament
in Lake City.
The Babe Ruth/Cal
Ripken State Rookie
Qualifier begins today at
Southside Sports Complex.
There are 21 "A" Division
teams competing in five
brackets. The "B" Division
has 24 teams in six brack-
ets. Games begin at 9 a.m.
today, Friday and Saturday.
The goal for each team
is to advance to the Babe
Ruth/Cal Ripken State
Tournament in West Palm
Beach.
"It is all the Babe Ruth all-
stars in Florida with us and.
the tournament in Ocala,"
said David Williams, vice-
president of Lake City
Columbia County Youth
Baseball and tournament
director this week.
'Teams that win all the
games in their bracket auto-
matically qualify for state,"
Williams said. "There are
last-chance games on Sunday
where four teams play for the
remaining two spots."
Lake City has served as
the home for this Rookie
Qualifier for several years.
'"Throughout the Babe
Ruth community, every-
body knows Lake City and
everybody likes to. come
here.," Williams said.
"We send a big informa-


Bentley. signs

with Kentucky

Weslayen College


Versatile player
willbecome
Panther lineman.
By BRANDON F1NLEY
bfinley@lakecityreporter.con
FORT WHITE Fort
White head coach Demetric
Jackson said one of the
things that make Zack
Bentley a special Indian
was his ability to play mul-
tiple positions. The lineman
will use that versatility to
make the transition 4o the
collegiate level as he signed
a letter of intent to play at
Kentucky Weslayen College'
Wednesday.
The senior played all
three of the interior line
positions during two years
as a starter for the Indians
after moving up to the var-
sity at the end of his sopho-
more season.
"Zack is really depend-
able," Jackson said. "He


didn't mind the work and a
lot of times big guys don't
like it. During the sum-
mer, he didn't miss and-
he was real valuable to us
playing left guard, center,
right guard and even some
tackle."
Jackson knew he would
be an impact player for the,
Indians beginning at the.
end of Bentley's sophomore'
season.
"He actually played one
of the best games for us'
against Santa Fe," Jackson c
said. "I'm real proud of him -
and he deserves all the
things that come his way." ,
Bentley has watched his,'
strength become an impor-
tant part of his game. When
he began with the varsity, he
was at the 200-pound mark.
Since going through the'-
weight program, Bentley is
pushing 300 pounds.
"I've got a lot stronger and
BENTLEY continued on 2B


state


COURTESY PHOTO
The Lake City 8-under 'A' All-Stars Purple Division will play in the Babe Ruth/Cal Ripken State Rookie Qualifier that begins
today. Team members are (front row, from left) Colby Holton, Mason Gray, Cole Williams, Zac Maxwell and Darren Eubank.
Second row (from left) are Tyler Yaxley, Ty Wehinger, Kade Jackson, Logan Dicks, Colby Black and Devin Landry. Back row
coaches (from left) Josh Wehinger, Todd .Yaxley, Mike Black, Keith Jackson, Kevin Gray and David Williams.


tion sheet to each coach
and league. We also let the
eating places around town
know to be prepared for big
crowds."
Williams also is a coach
for the Lake City "A" all-
star team and knows the


effort required by players
and family, and the poten-
tial benefits.
"Everybody has a big fol-
lowing," Williams said. "For
every kid here there are 4-5
parents and grandparents.
They spend a lot of money


in the community."
Small League finals
The Babe Ruth Small
League State Tournament
in Fort White crowned
its all-star champions on


Tuesday.
Sans Souci won
15-under division
Suwannee. San Jose
the 12-under division
Melrose. Whitehouse
the 10-under division.
Perry.


the
over
won
over
won
over


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LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS THURSDAY, JUNE 16, 2011 -


TELEVISION

TV sports

Today
CYCLING
7 p.m.
VERSUS Tour de Suisse, stage 6,
Tobel-Taegerschen.* Switzerland to
Triesenberg, Liechtenstein (same-day
tape)
GOLF
10 am.
ESPN USGA, U.S. Open
Championship, first round, part I, at
Bethesda, Md.
3 p.m.
NBC USGA, U.S. Open
Championship, first round, at Bethesda,
Md.o
5 p.m.
ESPN USGA, U.S. Open
Championship, first round, part II, at
Bethesda, Md.
MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL
12:30 p.m.
MLB Regional coverage, Baltimore
at Toronto or Texas at N.Y. Yankees
(I p.m. start)
>2:10 p.m.
WGN Milwaukee at Chicago Cubs
7 p.m.
MLB Regional coverage, Boston at
Tampa Bay or N.Y. Mets at Atlanta
MAJOR LEAGUE LACROSSE
7:30 p.m.
ESPN2 Chesapeake at Long Island

'.; BASEBALL

,AL standings

East Division
W .L Pct GB
'Boston 39 27 .591 -
:NewYork 37 28 .569 I'h
-,j,Tampa Bay 36 31 .537 3h'
S, Toronto 33 34 .493 6'A
Baltimore 30 34 .469 8
Central Division
W L Pct GB
Detroit 37 30 .552 -
Cleveland 35 30 .538 1
Chicago 33 35 .485 4'A
Kansas City 30 37 .448 7
Minnesota 26 39 .400 10
West Division
W L Pct GB
Texas 36 32 .529 -
Seattle 34 34 .500 2
Los Angeles 33 36 .478 3'A
Oakland 28 40 .412 8
Tuesday's Games.
Detroit 4, Cleveland 0
N.Y.Yankees 12,Texas 4
Toronto 6, Baltimore 5, 11 innings
S" Tampa Bay 4, Boston 0 '
Chicago White Sox at Minnesota, ppd.,
rain
Kansas City 7, Oakland 4
LA.Angels 4, Seattle 0
Wednesday's Games
Cleveland at Detroit (n)>
Texas at N.Y.Yankees (hj-
Baltimoqe atToronto (n) .,. .
Boston at Tampa Bay (n)
Chicago White Sox at Minnesota (n)
Kansas City at Oakland (n)
LA.Angels at Seattle (n)
Today's Games
Baltimore (Guthrie i24-) 'at Toronto
(ZStewart 0-0), 12:37 p.m.
Cleveland (Talbot 2-3) at Detroit
(Scherzer 8-2), 1:05 p.m.
Texas (C.Wilson 7-3) at N.Y. Yankees
(B.Gordon 0-0), 1:05 p.m. I
Chicago White Sox (Buehrle 6-4) at
Minnesota (Blackburn 5-4), 1:10 p.m.
Kansas City (Francis 3-6) at Oakland
(G.Gonzalez 5-5), 3:35 p.m.
Boston (C.Buchholz 5-3) at Tampa Bay
(Price 7-5), 7:10 p.m.

Interleague play

Friday's Games
N.Y.Yankees at Chicago Cubs, 2:20 p.m.
Baltimore at Washington, 7:05 p.m.
Pittsburgh at Cleveland, 7:05 p.m.
Florida at Tampa Bay, 7:10 p.m.
LA.Angels at N.Y. Mets, 7:10 p.m.
Milwaukee at Boston, 7:10 p.m.
Toronto at Cincinnati, 7:10 p.m.
Texas at Atlanta, 7:35 p.m.
San Diego at Minnesota, 8:10 p.m.
Kansas City at St. Louis, 8:15 p.m.
Detroit at Colorado, 8:40 p.m.
Chicago White Sox at Arizona,
9:40 p.m.
San Francisco at Oakland, 10:05 p.m.
Philadelphia at Seattle, 10:10 p.m.

NL standings
East Division
W L Pct GB
Philadelphia 41 26 .612 -
Atlanta 38 30 .559 3'A
New York 33 34 .493 8
Florida 32 34 .485 8'A
Washington 31 36 .463 10
Central Division
W L Pct GB
Milwaukee 38 30 .559 -
St. Louis 38 30 .559 -
Cincinnati 36 33 .522 2
Pittsburgh 33 33 .500 4
Chicago 27 39 .409 10
Houston 25 43 .368 13
West Division
W L Pct GB
San Francisco 38 29 .567 -
Arizona 37 31 .544 I
Colorado 32 35 .478 6
Los Angeles 31 38 .449 8
San Diego 30 39 .435 9
Tuesday's Games
Philadelphia 9, Florida I
Washington 8, St. Louis 6"
N.Y. Mets 4,Atlanta 3
Chicago Cubs 5, Milwaukee 4, 10
innings
Pittsburgh I, Houston 0
Colorado 6, San Diego 3


San Francisco 6,Arizona 5
Cincinnati 3, LA. Dodgers 2
Wednesday's Games
Philadelphia 8, Florida I, I st game
Cincinnati at LA Dodgers (n)
San Diego at Colorado (n)
Florida at Philadelphia, 2nd game (n)
St. Louis at Washington (n)
N.Y. Mets at Atlanta (n)
Milwaukee at Chicago Cubs (n)
Pittsburgh at Houston (n)
San Francisco at Arizona (n)
Today's Games
Florida (Vazquez 3-6) at Philadelphia


(CI.Lee 6-5), 1:05 p.m.
Pittsburgh (Ja.McDonald 4-4) at
Houston (Lyles 0-1), 2:05 p.m.
Milwaukee (Greinke 6-1) at Chicago
Cubs (Garza 2-6), 2:20 p.m.
St. Louis (Lohse 7-3) at Washington
(Lannan 4-5), 7:05 p-m.
N.Y. Mets (Dickey 3-7) at Atlanta
(Minor 0-2), 7:10 p.m.
San Francisco (Vogelsong 4-1) at
Arizona (I.Kennedy 7-2), 9:40 p.m.
Fridayls Game
Houston at LA. Dodgers, 10:10 p.m.

College World Series

AtTD Ameritrade Park Omaha
Omaha, Neb.
(Double elimination)
Saturday .
Game I North Carolina (50-14) vs.
Vanderbilt (52-10),2 p.m.
Game 2 Texas (49-17) vs. Florida
(50-17), 7 p.m.
Sunday
Game 3 California (37-21) vs.
Virginia (54-10), 2 p.m.
Game 4 South Carolina (50-14) vs.
Texas A&M (47-20), 7 p.m.

BASKETBALL

WNBA schedule

Tuesday's Games
Indiana 82,Tulsa 74
Atlanta 79, New York 58
Today's Games
Connecticut atWashington, 7 p.m.
Friday's Games
Atlanta at Minnesota, 8 p.m.
NewYork at Chicago, 8:30 p.m.
San AiKonio at Phoenix, 10 p.m.
Indiana at Seattle, 10 p.m.

GOLF

Golf week

PGATOUR
U.S. GOLF ASSOCIATION
Site: Bethesda, Md.
Schedule:Today-Sunday.
Course: Congressional Country Club,
Blue Course (7,574 yards, par 71).'
Television: ESPN (Today-Friday,
10 a.m.-3 p.m., 5-7 p.m.) and NBC
(Thursday-Friday, 3-5 p.m.; Saturday,
2-8 p.m.; Sunday, 1:30-7:30 p.m.).

AUTO RACING


Race week

NASCAR
SPRINT CUP
Heluva Goodi Sour Cream Dips 400
Site: Brooklyn, Mich.
Schedule: Friday, practice (Speed,
12:30-2 -p.m., 3:30-5 p.m.); Saturday,
qualifying (Speed, I-3 p.m.); Sunday, I p.m.
(TNT, nooh-4 "l p. n)"'"'' "' -"
Track Michigan,lnterndtional Speedway,
(oval, 2.0 miles).
Race distance: 400 miles, 200 laps.
Next race;Toyota/Save Mart 350, June
26, Infineon Raceway, Sonoma, Calif.
Online: http;//www.nascar.com
NATIONWIDE
Alliance Truck Parts 250
Site: Brooklyn, Mich.
Schedule: Friday, practice (Speed,.
11:30 a.m.-12:30 p..h, 2-30 p.m.; Saturday,
qualifying (ESPN2, 10 a.m.-12:30 p.m.),
race 3:30 p.m. (ABC, 3-6 p.:m.).
Track: Michigan International
Speedway.
Race distance: 250 miles, 125 laps.
Next race: Bucyrus 200, June 25, Road
America, Elkhart Lake,Wis.
CAMPING WORLD TRUCKS
Next race:UNOH 225,July 7, Kentucky
Speedway, Sparta, Ky.
INDYCAR
The Milwaukee 225
Site:WestAllis,Wis.
Schedule: Friday, practice;' Saturday,
practice, qualifying; Sunday, race, 3 p.m.
(ABC, 2-6 p.m).
Track: The Milwaukee, Mile (oval. 1.0
miles).I
Race distance: 225 miles, 225 laps,
Next race: Iowa Corn Indy 250, June
25, Iowa Speedway, Newton, Iowa.
Online: http://www.indycar.com
NHRA FULLTHROTTLE
Thunder Valley Nationals
Site: Bristol,Tenn.
Schedule: Friday, qualifying; Saturday,
qualifying (ESPN2, 7-9 p.m.); Sunday, final
eliminations (ESPN2, 4:30-7 p.m.).
Track Bristol Dragway.
Next event: Summit Racing Equipmeht
NHRA Nationals, June 23-26, Summit
Motorsports Park, Norwalk, Ohio.
Online: http://www.nhra.com
FORMULA ONE
Next race: European Grand Prix, June
26,Valencia Street Circuit,Valencia, Spain.
Online: http'Jwww.formulal.com

Sprint Cup schedule

June 19 Heluva Good! Sour Cream
Dips 400, Brooklyn, Mich.
June 26 Toyota/Save Mart 350,
Sonoma, Calif.
July 2 Coke Zero 400 Powered By
Coca-Cola, Daytona Beach
July 9 Quaker State 400, Sparta, Ky.
July 17 Lenox Industrial Tools 301,
Loudon, N.H.
July 31 Brickyard 400, Indianapolis
Aug.7 Pennsylvania 500, Long Pond,
Pa.
Aug. 14 Heluva Good! Sour Cream
Dips at The Glen,Watkins Glen, N.Y.
Aug. 21 Michigan 400, Brooklyn,
Mich.
Aug. 27 Irwin Tools Night Race,
BristolTenn.

HOCKEY

Stanley Cup

Boston vs.Vancouver
Vancouver I, Boston 0
Vancouver 3, Boston 2, OT .
Boston 8,Vancouver I
Boston 4,Vancouver 0
Vancouver I, Boston 0
Boston 5,Vancouver 2
Wednesday
Boston atVancouver (n)


Progress made in NFL lockout


By BARRY WILNER
Associated Press

NEW YORK NFL
Commissioner Roger
Goodell and several own-
ers are meeting with NFL
Players Association chief
DeMaurice Smith and
a group of players for a
second straight day -in
Maryland.
A person with knowl-
edge of the talks tells The
Associated Press that the
negotiations have contin-
ued Wednesday and they
include lawyers for both


sides. The person spoke
on condition of anonymity
because details of the meet-
ing are not being made
public.
On Tuesday, several peo-
ple familiar with the talks
told the AP that significant
progress, was being made
toward ending the owners'
lockout of the players, now
in its fourth month. There
is even optimism that a new
collective bargaining agree-
ment could be reached by
early July, allowing training
camps to open on time later
next month.


"Probably a sense of
urgency with the season
just 'around the corner,"'
Saints quarterback Drew
Brees said Wednesday.
"The general understand-
ing from everybody is that
if we don't have something
done by July it would be
hard to start on time."
Previous "secret" meet-
ings have taken place in
Chicago and New. York.
Such sessions have been
critical in past NFL negotia-
tions, dating to the 1980s.
."I know .that we've been
talking pretty extensively


over the last few weeks,"
Brees added. "It seems like
things are moving in the
right direction, which is
very positive. It's what we
always hoped for as players
because' obviously we're
getting to crunch-time
here."
Movement toward an
agreement also might be
in both sides' best interest
after a federal appeals court
judge warned the owners
and players they might riot
like the upcoming decisions
in legal actions sparked by
the lockout.


BENTLEY: Looks to play early for Panthers

Continued From Page 1B


I'm still working this sum-
mer," Bentley said. "The
journey started as a junior
and everything. began to
click during the offseason
before my senior year."
Bentley believes that he'll
have a shot to play from
the start with the Panthers.
Again, it comes back to ver-
satility.
"I like playing guard best
if I could pick any, posi-
tion, but playing every posi-


tion helps my chances," he
said.
Playing time wasn't the
only factor for choosing
Kentucky Weslayen. The
size of the school played an
important role as well.
"When I visited the col-
lege. it reminded pie of
Fort White," he said. "It's a
small-town feel. They only
enroll around 8Q0 students.
My goal is to go in and win
a starting job."


And Bentley was sure
to remember those that
have helped him along the
way..
"My parents (Pam and
Doug) havebeeneverything
to me," he said. 'They've
been to all my games and
they made sure that I got to
everything possible. Coach
(Demetric) Jackson, (Ken)
Snider; (Dan) Marsee and
(Chad) Bonds helped me'
a lot. Coach Jackson has


been grooming me since
6th grade. Snider over the
last two years has also
grown really close to me
and he's a great motivator
in the weight room."
Originally from
Clearwater, Bentley now
feels fully at home in Fort
White.
"It was the best place we
could land," he said. "This
community is just so close
knit."


DeMAYrAG
Depend on us"


121j


SHOP NOW FOR BEST SELECTION!
ALL SALES FINAL, NO REFUNDS OR EXCHANGES. OPEN DAILY REGULAR HOURS. WE ACCEPT VISA, MASTERCARD, -DISCOVER, AMERICAN
EXPRESS AND SEARS CARD. WE ACCEPT SEARS GIFT CARDS. DISCOUNTS DO NOT APPLY TO PREPAID GIFT CARDS. INVENTORY IS LIMITED
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SCOREBOARD


ImW M


Page Editor: Brandon Finley, 754-0420


I- f ** ftS&f**I'I


0














Page Editor: Emogene Graham, 754-0415 LAKE CITY REPORTER ADVICE & COMICS THURSDAY, JUNE 16, 2011


DILBERT


BLONDIE


HAGARTHE HORRIBLE


DEAR ABBY


Elusive Mr. Right turns out


to be Miss Right instead


DEAR ABBY: I have
never been moved to write
in response to a letter until
I read "Concerned About
My Girl in Kentucky" (May
9). It was from a mom who
was worried that while her
daughter "Celia" had no
problem attracting men,
she has a problem keeping
them.
My intelligent, caring,
creative, adventurous and
beautiful daughter had suc-
cessful, handsome and won-
derful men throwing them-
selves at her. A couple of
dates and they were never
heard from again. When I
asked, "Whafs the prob-
lem?" she would shrug her
shoulders. I thought she was
being too picky, and when
the right man came along
he'd sweep her off her feet
and all would be well.
One day, my daughter
came to me and said she had
met someone. I said, 'Tell
me about him." She replied,
"Who said it has to be a
'him'?" My daughter was just
as surprised as I was to dis-
cover she is a lesbian.
She is nowin a relationship
with a wonderful woman.
I'm glad she realized this at
25 instead of 55, after living a
life that wasn't hers because
she thought that was what
was "expected." She's happy
now, and so am I.- PROUD
MOM IN ROCHESTER,
N.Y.


Abigail Van Buren
www.dearabby.com
DEAR PROUD MOM:
Thank you for sharing your
daughter's happy revelation.
The following responses
may offer other interesting
insights for "Concerned" to
consider. Read on:
DEAR ABBY: You sug-
gested Celia ask her friends
for feedback. My very attrac-
tive friend "Jan" has had two
failed marriages and four
short-term relationships. In
the last five years, she has
.had many first dates only.
She asks, "What is wrong
with these guys? Don't they
know what they want?" None
of us will respond., because
Jan isn't really looking for
an answer, and we're all
afraid of being the target of
her wrath. It's ALWAYS the
other person's fault When a
friend tries to be helpful by
offering gently worded sug-
gestions, this friend gets her
head bitten off and returned
on a platter.
Some people don't want to
improve themselves because
they're content to complain
and blame someone else
instead of taking their own


inventory. BACKING OFF
IN MASSACHUSETIS
DEAR ABBY: My moth-
er's dream was to have all
her children married with
six or more children and
living happily ever after in
wedded bliss. MY dream
was to live alone with five
dogs in a quiet, rural area.
"Concerned" may be put-
ting too much pressure on
her daughter, causing her
to. rush into relationships
and scaring the men away.
Celia needs to sit down and
figure out what she wants
for herself. Then, maybe,
the man of her dreams will
come to her. REALISTIC
READER IN MICHIGAN
DEAR ABBY: I had a
friend in college who was
smart, beautiful, funny and
a great cook. But she rarely
had a second date. Her prob-
lem was she never shut up!
She was constantly talking
and, qven when engaged in
a conversation, she would
frequently interrupt and
carry on without listening to
the other person. If she had
asked me why men avoided
her, I would have told her
the truth, but I was never
given the chance. -- IS IT
MY TURN TO TALK?

* Write Dear Abby at
www.DearAbby.com or
P.O. Box 69440, Los
Angeles, CA 90069.


HOROSCOPES


ARIES (March 21-
April 19): Ignore the peo-
ple giving you a hard time
and focus on those who
share your concerns and
interests. A pleasure trip or
visiting someone who lifts
* your. spirits will help you
make an important profes-
sional change. **
TAURUS (April 20-
May 20): Connecting with
old friends will bring back
a lot of memories but can
also lead to habits that were
hard to break. Don't fall
into a pattern that will set
you back. Position yourself
for success. *****
GEMINI (May 21-June
20): You'll be eager to
make changes but, before
you do, consider the cost
involved. Be smart about
your budget and personal
expenses. Don't let some-
one you love cost you finan-
cially. Focus on long-term
investments. ***
CANCER (June 21-
July 22): Keep every-
thing out in the open so
you aren't blamed for being
secretive or hiding informa-
tion. Offer what you can but
don't promise more than
you can do. Set personal
and professional boundar-
ies. Practical applications
will be your best bet ***
LEO (July 23-Aug. 22):
Spread the word around
regarding what your plans
are for the future and you


THE LAST WORD
Eugenia Last

will get a great response
and the help you need. Love
is in the stars and, whether
you nurture your current
relationship or are about to
embark on a new romance,
you will do well. ***
VIRGO (Aug. 23-
Sept. 22): Trying to hide
something will make you
look bad and will stand in
the way of your advance-
ment. Getting involved in
after-hour business events
will help you stay in touch
with colleagues or clients.
Change is good and can be
lucrative. *****
LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct.
22): Share your thoughts
and ideas with people of
like interests. You can get
the backing you need from
outsiders but don't expect
the people you are most
familiar with to understand
what you are trying to
accomplish. **
SCORPIO (Oct. 23-
Nov. 21): You will be able
to clear up a problem that
you have been forced to
deal with for some time. It's
up to you to ask for what
you want and to demand
justice and fair play. A part-
nership will develop that
can turn into a profitable
endeavor. Don't be shy;
welcome change. ****
SAGITTARIUS (Nov.


22-Dec. 21): You can turn
your ideas and plans into a
reality. Love, romance and
family are highlighted and
the things you do now to
make your personal life bet-
ter will bring about a stable
future. You can develop an
enhanced lifestyle that bet-
ter suits your personality.

CAPRICORN (Dec.
22-Jan. 19)- Don't hide
the way you feel or nothing
will change. Be aggressive
and go after what you want
so you can move forward. A
change at home will benefit
you personally, emotionally
and financially. Strive to
reach your goals. ***
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-
Feb. 18): Give whatever
you pursue your all. You
have everything to gain by
being a participant. Don't
be afraid of change it's
required in order to achieve
your dreams, hopes and
wishes. Wasting time is the
enemy. ***
PISCES (Feb. 19-
March 20): Steer clear
of emotional matters that
will bring you down. Get
out and interact with peo-
ple who enjoy the same
pastimes and who will con-
tribute, not hold you back.
Avoid making changes at
home that might be costly.


CELEBRITY CIPHER

by Luis Campos
Celebrity Cipher cryptograms are created from quotations by famous people, past and present.
Each letter in the cipher stands for another.
Today's clue: X equals V
"B KLEJF BS AFL YFVWRJ GBLLEBPF
JWFY RWS NFBL B XFET. YAF NBRSY
SW YFF NABS YAF EY PFSSERP."
AFTFR LWNTBRJ
PREVIOUS SOLUTION: "I don't get down on nobody else for doing whatever
else they do. To each his own." Little Richard
(c) 2011 by NEA, Inc. 6-16


FOR BETTER OR WORSE


CLASSIC PEANUTS


WnNT METo GO GET
IT? oK ,24ooU ,
IToRS&OL-V
LAJ- LZ-T IT
c_. BWJ ITL ? MO
y ITSFL?.


SNUFFY SMITH


ZITS


B.C.


LAKE CITY REPORTER


Page Editor: Emogene Graham, 754-0415


ADVICE & COMICS THURSDAY, JUNE 16,2011



















I -UT"N


J$ELL IT


I hFI~ND T


LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED THURSDAY, JUNE 16, 2011

Lake City Reporter





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In Print and Online
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Legal


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT, THIRD
JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR
COLUMBIA COUNTY, FLORIDA
CASE NO. 2010-CA-000670
COLUMBIA BANK,
Plaintiff,
vs.
J&O ENTERPRISES, INC., a Flori-
da corporation, JUSTIN M. FITZ-
HUGH and OAK MEADOW
PLANTATION AND FOREST
PLANTATION OWNERS ASSOCI-
ATION, INC. -
Defendants.
CLERK'S NOTICE OF SALE UN-
DER F.S. CHAPTER 45
NOTICE IS GIVEN that, in accord-
ance with the Summary Final Judg-
ment of Foreclosure dated May 25,
2011, in the above-styled cause. I
will sell to the highest and best bid-
der for cash at the Columbia County
Courthouse, Courtroom 1, 173
Northeast Hemando Avenue, Lake
City, Florida 32055 at 11:00 a.m. on
July 13, 2011, the following descri-
bed property:
Lots 11, 12, & 17, OAK MEADOW
PLANTATION UNIT 4, a subdivi-
sion according to the plat thereof as
recorded in Plat Book 8, Pages 70
and 71, of the Public Records of Co-
lumbia County, Florida.
ANY PERSON CLAIMING AN IN-
TEREST IN THE SURPLUS FROM
THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER
THAN THE PROPERTY OWNER
AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS
PENDENS MUST FILE A CLAIM
WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE
SALE.
Dated May 31, 2011
P. DeWitt Cason
Clerk of Court
By:/s/ B. Scippio
Deputy Clerk
04545191
June 9, 16, 2011
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT, THIRD
JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR
SCOLUMBIA COUNTY, FLORIDA
CASE NO. 2010-CA-000670
COLUMBIA BANK,
Plaintiff,
vs.
J&O ENTERPRISES, INC., a Flori-
da corporation, JUSTIN M. F1TZ-
HUGH and OAK MEADOW
PLANTATION AND FOREST
PLANTATION OWNERS ASSOCI-
ATION, INC.
Defendants.
CLERK'S NOTICE OF SALE UN-
DERF.S. CHAPTER 45
NOTICE IS GIVEN that, in accord-
ance with the Summary Final Judg-
ment of Foreclosure dated May 25,
2011, in the above-styled cause. I
will sell to the highest and best bid-
der for cash at the Columbia County
Courthouse, Courtroom 1, *173
Northeast Hernando Avenu h, Lake
City, Florida 32055 at 11:00 a.m. on
July 13, 2011, the following descri-
bed property:
COMMENCE AT THE SOUTH-
EAST CORNER OF THE SOUTH-
WEST QUARTER, SECTION 36,
TOWNSHIP 3 SOUTH, RANGE 16
EAST, COLUMBIA COUNTY,
FLORIDA AND RUN THENCE
SOUTH 89'53' WEST ALONG
THE SOUTH LINE OF SAID SEC-
TION 36, 50.00 FEET TO THE
POINT OF BEGINNING, THENCE
CONTINUE SOUTH 89*53' WEST
ALONG SAID SOUTH LINE
100.00 FEET, THENCE N 0'36'
WEST 503.60 FEET TO THE
SOUTH RIGHT OF WAY LINE OF
STATE ROAD NO. 10 (U.S. HIGH-
WAY 90), THENCE SOUTH 83*53'
EAST ALONG SAID SOUTH
RIGHT OF WAY LINE 100.00
FEET, THENCE SOUTH 0'40'46"
EAST 492.75 FEET TO THE
POINT OF BEGINNING.
ANY PERSON CLAIMING AN IN-
TEREST IN THE SURPLUS FROM
THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER
THAN THE PROPERTY OWNER
AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS
PENDENS MUST FILE A CLAIM
WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE
SALE.
Dated May 31, 2011 -
P. DeWitt Cason
Clerk of Court
By:/s/ B. Scippio
Deputy Clerk
04545192
June 9, 16, 2011

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT, THIRD
JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR
COLUMBIA COUNTY, FLORIDA
CASE NO. 2010-CA-000669
COLUMBIA BANK,
Plaintiff,
vs.
MERIDIAN FINANCIAL, INC., A
Florida corporation, JUSTIN M.
FITZHUGH, OLIVIA FITZHUGH
and DANIEL M. MAGSTADT,
Defendants.
CLERK'S NOTICE OF SALE UN-
DER F.S. CHAPTER 45
NOTICE IS GIVEN that, in accord-
ance with the Summary Final Judg-
ment of Foreclosure dated May 25,
2011, in the above-styled cause. I
will sell to the highest and best bid-
der for cash at the Columbia County
Courthouse, Courtroom 1, 173
Northeast Hemando Avenue, Lake
City, Florida 32055 at 11:00 a.m. on
July 13, 2011, the following descri-
bed property:
Begin at the Northeast corner of the
S 1/2 of Lot or Block 55 in the Cen-
tral Division of the City of Lake
City, Florida, and run 55 feet; South
along Hernando Street; thence West
109 1/2 feet; thence run North 55
feet; thence run East 1091/2 feet to
the Point of Beginning, lying and be-
ing in Columbia County, Florida, all
in Block 55, Central Division of the
City of Lake City, Florida.
ANY PERSON CLAIMING AN IN-
TEREST IN THE SURPLUS FROM
THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER
THAN THE PROPERTY OWNER
AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS
PENDENS MUST FILE A CLAIM
WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE
SALE.
Dated May 31, 201.1
P. DeWitt Cason
Clerk of Court
By:/s/B. Scippio
Deputy Clerk


04545233
June 9, 16, 2011


Legal

North Florida Broadband Authority
Request for Bids (RFB) Bids
Civil Installation Services of Site In-
frastructure
RFB#: NFBA2011-08
Notice is hereby given that the
NORTH FLORIDA BROADBAND
AUTHORITY (the "NFBA") is re-
questing sealed bids for the follow-
ing:
RFB#: NFBA2011-08 for Civil In-
stallation Services of Site Infrastruc-
ture at wireless telecommunication
sites (referred to herein as the "Civil
Installation Services RFB") as more
fully described herein and on the
NFBA website www.nfba-fl.org.
The NFBA is an inter-governmental
utility authority. In 2009, the NFBA
applied for funding under the Ameri-
can Recovery and Reinvestment Act
(ARRA) to design and deploy a
Wireless Broadband Middle Mile
Network (the "Network") to serve 15
counties in north central Florida in-
cluding: Baker, Bradford, Columbia,
Dixie, Gilchrist, Lafayette, Hamil-
ton, Jefferson, Levy, Madison, Put-
nam, Suwannee, Taylor, Union and
Wakulla Counties. Additional net-
work facilities will be deployed in
Leon, Marion, Clay and Alachua
counties. In early 2010, the National
Telecommunications and Informa-
tion Administration (NTIA), an
agency in the U.S. Department of
Commerce, awarded a $30,142,676
BTOP grant to .the NFBA for the
Network project.
This Civil Installation Services RFB
is presented by the North Florida
Broadband Authority (NFBA) to so-
licit information and bids from qualis-
flied licensed contractors ("Contrac-
tors") for Civil Installation Services
of Site Infrastructure at wireless tele-
communication sites in the NFBA
service area. The total number of
sites for which services are required
is currently estimated at 64 (subject
to change as the NFBA network de-
sign is finalized). NFBA intends to
award contracts to multiple Contrac-
tors who will be deployed simultane-
ously to work at sites throughout the
service area.
IMPORTANT INFORMATION
FOR PROSPECTIVE RESPOND-
ENTS
The NFBA will post the Civil Instal-
lation Services RFB on the NFBA
website, www.nfba-fl.org on June
15, 2011. Typed copies of the Civil
Installation Services RFB may be re-
quested by contacting the NFBA's
Clerk, Faith Doyle, at 407-629-6900,
or by e-mail addressed to
fdoyle@govmserv.com.
Sealed bids for the Civil Installation
Services RFB will be received by the
NFBA's General Manager, Govern-
ment Service Group, 1500 Mahan
Drive, Suite 250, Tallahassee, FL
32308 until 10:00 a.m. on July 5,
2011. All sealed bid received by that,
date and time will be publicly
opened 1:00 p.m. July 5, 2011 at the
same location. Any bid received af-
ter the designated closing time will
be returned unopened.
Any questions should be mailed to
Faith Doyle at
fdoyle@govmserv.com or faxed to
407-629-6963. All questions must be
received by Faith Doyle by 5:00 p.m.
on June 22, 2011. Answers to all
questions will be posted to the
NFBA website on June 30, 2011 at
the close of business.
All bids shall be submitted with (1)
signed original, marked "Original",
and eight (8) copies, marked "Copy,"
in a sealed package addressed to the
General Manager, North Florida
Broadband Authority, 1500 Mahan
Drive, Suite'250, Tallahassee, FL
32308 and marked with the notation
"Sealed Bid RFB# 2011-08 North
Florida Broadband Authority."
Bid packages must be complete and
received by the date and time due to
be considered. Successful respond-
ents will be notified by the NFBA
General Manager or his designee.
Bidders shall be required to provide
a bid bond or bid guarantee equiva-
lent to 5% of the bid price-for the
maximum total potential award of 64
sites. 100% Payment and Perform-
ance Bonds will be required to be
provided by selected vendorss.
Minority Business Enterprises
(MBE)/Women Owned Business En-
terprises (WBE)/Disadvantaged
Business Enterprises (DBE) are en-
couraged to participate. The NFBA
supports Equal Opportunity Employ-
ment and Drug Free Workplace poli-
cies.
All times stated in this notice are
Eastern Standard Time.
The NFBA reserves the right to ac-
cept or reject all bids and to waive
any technicalities or irregularities
therein. In the event that any or all
submittals are rejected or waived, the
NFBA reserves the right to solicit
and re-advertise for other qualified
respondents. The NFBA reserves the
right to select multiple respondents
for the Civil Installation Services
RFB. The NFBA further reserves
the right to award a contract to any
firm whose proposal best satisfies
the requirements of the Civil Instal-
lation Services RFB, at its sole deter-
mination. Final selection and con-
tract negotiations will be governed
by the laws and procurement regula-
tions of the NFBA, the State of Flori-
da, the BTOP and ARRA Programs,
and any other applicable regulations.
Robert E. Sheets
General Manager
North Florida Broadband Authority
Posted: June 15, 2011
05526075
June 16, 2011
Public Auction to be held
July 9, 2011 at 8AM at
Ozzie's Towing & Auto, 2492 SE
BayaAve. Lake City FL, 32025.
(386)719-5608
Following Vin Numbers:
Vin #1J4GZ58S1RC129944
94 JEEP
Vin# JS1GN78A8Y2103327
2000 SUZUKI
05526085
June 16, 2011


Legal

Notice is hereby given per Florida
Statue 98.075(2):
Last known address of:
Dortly, Billy Lamar
322 NE Bickle Dr.
Lake City, Fl 32055
George W. Lake
818 SW Tustenuggee Ave.
Lake City, Florida 32025
Allocco, Marcus A.
163 SW High St. Apt. 102
Lake City, FL 32025
James, Andrew M.
988 NE Bascom Norris
Lake City, Florida 32055
Geiger, Carla
277 SW Mill Lane
Lake City, Florida 32024
is potentially ineligible to be regis-
tered to vote. Please respond within
30 days of publication of this notice
by contacting the Supervisor of Elec-
tions Office at the address or phone
number below. If no response is re-
ceived within 30 days of this publi-
cation, it may result in determination
of ineligibility by the supervisor and
removal of the registered voter's
name from the statewide voter regis-
tration system.
Published one time in the Lake City
Reporter
Elizabeth "Liz" P. Home
Columbia County Supervisor of
Elections
971 W. Duval Street, Suite 102
Lake City, FL 32055
(386) 758-1026
05526035
June 16 2011
NOTICE OF SHERIFF'S SALE
NOTICE is hereby given that pur-
suant to a Writ of Execution issued
in Circuit Court, of Columbia Coun-
ty, Florida, on the 25th day of Sep-
tember, 2006. In the cause wherein
Midland Funding NCC-2 Corp. as
successor in interest to Bank One,
N.A. was Plaintiff and Eddie Dent-
mon and Susan Dentmon, jointly and
severally, was Defendants, being
Case No: 05-416-CA, in said court,
I, Mark Hunter, As Sheriff of Co-
lumbia County, Florida, have levied
upon all the right, title, and interest
of the defendants, Eddie Dentmonf
and Susan Dentmon, jointly and sev-
erally, in and to the following descri-
bed personal property, to-wit:
2004 Ford F150
VIN: 1FTRW12W14KC93401
I shall offer this property for sale, at
the Columbia County Detention Fa-
cility Compound, 389 N.W. Quinten
Street. Lake City, .Elorida 3205,.
County of Columbia, State of Flori-
da, on July 12, 2011 at the hour of
10:00 A.M., or as soon thereafter as
possible. I will offer for sale all the
said defendant's, Eddie Dentmon
and Susan Dentmon, right, title, and
interest in the aforesaid personal
property, at public auction and will
sell the same, subject to taxes, all
prior liens, encumbrances and judg-
ments whatsoever, if any to the high-
est and best bidder for CASH IN
HAND. The proceeds to be applied
as far as may be to the payment of
costs and the satisfaction of the
above described execution.
Mark Hunter, As Sheriff of
Columbia County, Florida
BY: Sergeant Robert Holloway
Deputy Sheriff
04545243
June 9, 16, 23, 30, 2011

PUBLIC NOTICE
CONCERNING FAIR HOUSING
AND FAIR HOUSING TRAINING
SESSION
On January 7, 1988, the Board of
County Commissioners of Columbia
County, Florida adopted Ordinance.
No. 88-1, which established the poli-
cy of the County to promote equal
opportunity to obtain adequate hous-
ing by all persons, regardless of race,
color, religion, ancestry, sex, place
of birth, physical handicap or nation-
al origin. Qn February 17, 1994, the
Board of County Commissioners of
Columbia County, Florida adopted
an Ordinance No. 94-3 amending Or-
dinance No. 88-1 to add familial sta-
tus as a protected class from discrim-
ination in the sale or rental of hous-
ing.
These ordinances are available for
public inspection at the Office of the
County Manager, County Adminis-
trative Offices located at 135 North-
east Hemando Street, Lake City,
Florida Monday through Friday be-
tween the hours of 8:00 A.M. and
5:00 P.M.
Any aggrieved person may file a
complaint of a housing discrimina-
tion act witfi the:
Florida Commission on Human Re-
lations 325 John Knox Road, Bldg.
F, Suite 240 Tallahassee, Florida
32303-4149
Toll-free Telephone: 1-800-342-
8170
or
U.S. Department of Housing and Ur-
ban Development
451 7th Street, SW.
Washington, D.C, 20410
Toll-free Telephone: 1-800-424-
8590
To request information or assistance
locally, you may contact the County
Manager, at the County Administra-
tive Offices or telephone (386) 755-
4100.
A training session on Fair Housing
and unlawful or discriminatory hous-
ing practices will be held on June 23,
2011 at 7:00 p.m., or as soon there-
after as the matter can be heard, in
the auditorium of the School Board
Administrative Complex located at
372 West Duval Street, Lake City,
Florida.
In accordance with the Americans
with Disabilities Act, persons need-
ing a special accommodation or an
interpreter to participate in the pro-
ceeding should contact Lisa K. B.


Legal

Roberts, at least seven (7) days prior
to the date of the training. Ms. Rob-
erts may be contacted by telephone
at (386)758-1005 or by Telecommu-
nication Device for Deaf at
(386)758-2139.
05526083
June 16, 2011

100 Job
Opportunities

05526071
Retail Auditor
S & S Office is hiring
A full-time Retail Auditor
Duties include: review and
check store paperwork.
Strong 10 key and excel
experience needed. Benefits
include: vacation, sick leave,
credit union, profit sharing,
dental, health and life insurance.
Drug Free Workplace EOE
Apply in person at
S & S Office
134 SE Colburn Ave.,
Lake City, FL 32025

Associate Reps
SUMMER WORK/GREAT PAY
Immediate FT/PT openings,
Customer sales/service,
No exp needed, conditions,
Apply Now all ages 17+
(386) 269-0883
AUTO MECHANIC
for small companies vehicles.
Must have own tools. Hourly ate.
386-755-6481
CDL Class A Truck Driver.
Flatbed exp. for F/T SE area.
3 years exp or more. Medical
benefits offered. Contact
Melissa or Mary @ 386-935-2773
CLOTH CUTTER .
for small .
sewing factory.
Hafner's 386-755-6481
Columbia County Clerk of Court
Job Opening. Information
Technology Administrator
www.columbiaclerk.com
1 TEMP Farmworker needed
7/11/11 5/11/12. Workers will
feed & water livestock, drive
tractors & other equip., clean stalls
& pens, cultivate soybeans & corn.
Random drug testing at employer's
expense. Guaranteed 3/4 of
contract hours. Tools provided at
no cost. Free housing provided for
non-commuting workers.
Transportation & subsistence
reimbursed to worker upon
completion of 50% of contract, or
earlier. $9.12/hr. Report or send a
resume to nearest local FL Agency
of Workforce Innovation office &
reference job # AL 672692. Frank
Turner Hayneville, AL
Full Time Chemistry instructor
wanted at North Florida
Community College. See
www.nfcc.edu for details.
Full time Scheduling position for
local Medicare Home Health
Agency needed. Experience is
preferred. Please fax Resume to
386-755-7828 attn: Wendy
Industrial Customer Service
Representative. Duties include
Estimating, Order Entry &
Purchase Order via Phone, Email
& Fax. Must have Good phone,
math & computer skills. Apply in
Person Grizzly Mfg. 174 NE Cor-
tez Terr. Lake City FL
14 Temporary Farm Workers
needed. Employer: Kamuf
Tobacco Company LLC Daviess
Co, KY. Tobacco, Straw/Hay,
Row Crop, Row Crop Produce,
Nursery/Greenhouse & Alternative
Work. Employment Dates:
08/05/11 12/02/11. Wage of
$9.48/hr. Worker guaranteed 3/4
of contract hours. Tools provided
at no cost., Free housing provided
to non commuting workers.
Transportation & subsistence
reimbursed when 50% of contract
is met. Apply for this job at the
nearest KY Office of Employment
& Training Division of Workforce
& Employment Services
Office referencing the
job order #KY0428937.
Mechanic Position open. Diesel
Mechanic experience required.
Mechanical skills with a Positive
Attitude. Please complete oline
application at:
www.fabulouscoach.com/career-
application
PT janitorial position. Exp pre-
fered. 2/3 hrs per day 5 days per
wk. Position open immediately.
352-331-0502 or Fax 352-373-
6012 or Barbara@allcleanfl.com
Sales Position available for moti-
vated individual Rountree -Moore
Toyota, Great benefits, paid train-
ing/vacation. Exp. a plus but not
necessary. Call Anthony Cosentino
386-623-7442


100 Job
100 'Opportunities
Seeking Flatbed Owner/Operators
fully equipped w/own Tarps &
Chains & Binders to run the
southeast. Home on Weekends and
throughout the week. Paying 85%.
Contact Adam or Rick at
386-755-8579 RDH Trucking Inc.

120 Medical
12v Employment

MEDICAL ASSISTANT -
exp in fast paced Medical office.
Must be dependable, efficient,
computer exp. Eye Care and EMR
experience desirable. Send cv to
Human Resources, Fax 755-1128
or Human Resources, PO Box 489,
Lake City, Florida 32056

240 Schools &
Education

04544843
Interested in a Medical Career?
Express Training offers
courses for beginners & exp
Nursing Assistant, $479
next class-07/11/10

Phlebotomy national certifica-
tion, $800 next class-07/11/11

Continuing education
Fees incl. books, supplies, exam
fees. Call 386-755-4401 or
expresstrainingservices.com



310 Pets & Supplies

FREE KITTENS.
1 Female & 3 males.
386-365-0042

Golden Retriever pups CKC.
Shots. 3 females, 5 males
Available July 3 $350. Each
POP. 386-623-1577
MALE COLLIE Puppy for sale.
Pick of litter. Parents on Premises.
$3Q0. negotiable.
386-755-4590,or 365-5150
PUBLISHER'S NOTE
Florida Law 828.29 requires dogs
and cats being sold to be at least 8
weeks old and have a health
certificate from a licensed
veterinarian documenting they
have mandatory shots and are
free from intestinal and external
parasites. Many species of wild-
life must be licensed by Florida
Fish and Wildlife. If you are
unsure, contact the local
office for information.

330 Livestock &
33 Supplies

Black Angus Cows & Heifers
Prices Vary
Registered & Commercial
386-719-4802
Cattle For Sale. 12-16 mos.
Bulls .& heifers.
Pure bred black angus & cross
breeds. 386-365-1352


361 Farm Equipment

84 Ford 4610 Tractor.
2WD, Solid
2005 motor,$7,500. OBO
386-867-0005







Land Clearing

Back Hoe, Dozer, Chopping,. root
raking, bush hog, seeding, sod,
disking, site prep, ponds &
irrigation. Free Est! 386-623-3200

Lawn & Landscape Service

Clean Pine Straw,
You pick it up, $1.85 a bale
Delivery of 100 bales $260
386-688-9156
Landscape Maintenance Company
You can trust for knowledge &
pride, Mention this AD!
Mow Green, LLC 386-288-6532

Services

DIVORCE, BANKRUPTCY,
RESUMES.
other court approved forms-
386-961-5896.

Summer Cleaning done your
way. Let me Clean your home be-
fore you leave on Vacation. Come
back home & relax. 386-303-1496.


Family Owned and Operated

Dealership
(Huntin' a good fit)

New S. Used Car Sales
Motivated Self-Starter
Honesty S. Good Character
$,50,000 plus a year
Benefit Pkg.

Apply in person at


7 Macclenny, FL
ElBUR KINS 273 E. Macclenny, Ave.
CHEVROLET


REPORTER Classifieds In Print and On Line

www.lakecityreporter.com















LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED THURSDAY, JUNE 16, 2011


407 Computers
Compaq Computer, Many extras.
Complete Computer
$80.00
386-755-9984 or 386-292-2170

413 aMusical
413 Merchandise
BEAUTIFUL BLACK Spinet
Acrosonic Baldwin Piano with real
ivory keys and bench. $1,800 obo.
Call (352)509-1855 leave message

420 Wanted to Buy
K&H TIMBER
We Buy Pine Hardwood &
Cypress. Large or small tracts.
Call 386-961-1961.
Wanted Junk Cars, Trucks, Vans.
$250 & up CASH! Free Pick Up!
NO title needed !386-878-9260
After 5pm 386- 752-3648.

430 Garage Sales-






PUBLISHER'S NOTE
All Yard Sale Ads
Must be Pre-Paid.

Too much to list! Hshold, furni-
ture, tools, dirt bikes & more.
S on 41 Rt on CR 242 follow sign.
Friday Saturday 8-3.

440 Miscellaneous
FREE!!! High Quality
Moving Boxes.
You pick up.
386-438-8355
Stop gnat & Mosquito bites! Buy
Swamp Gator All natural insect re-
pellent. Family safe. Use head to
toe. Available at The Home Depot.
Summer Barbecue Special
Tow Behind.
Grill/Smoker, $1,250 OBO.
386-719-4802

40 Good Things
450 to Eat


BLUEBERRY HILL
U-PICK opens
May 30th
386-963-4220

6 Mobile Homes
630 for Rent
2&3 BR MH. $395 $650. mo.
plus deposit. Water & sewer fur-
nished. Cannon Creek MHP
386-752-6422 '
2/2 Units, clean, well maintained,
nice sae park setting, 2 miles to
downtown Lake City, $575 month
+ $575 sec dep, 386-984-8448
13th. MonthFREE!!,,,.
2br /2ba SWMH; also Residential
RV lots fr rent between Lake Citr
& G'ville. Access to 1-75 & 441
(352)317-1326 Call for terms


3/2 S of Lake City, (Branford area)
$400 dep, $600 month
386-590-0642 or 386-867-1833
www.suwanneevalleyproperties.com
4 bedroom Den, w/d hook up. In
Ft. White. Appliance included.
$800. mo. $500. sec. Call Billie
386-754-6970 or 404-849-8277
DWMH for Rent. 3br/2ba
Handicapped accessible.
$650. mo. $500. Dep. No Pets.
386-984-9634. ask for Ainber.
Great area! Very clean 2Br/2Ba,'
MH, CH/A, Nice kitchen.
$550. mo. + $200 Dep. NO PETS.
(386)755-0064 or (904)771-5924
Mobile Homes for rent in
White Springs, Lake City & Ft.
White. Contact 386-623-3404
or 386-365-1919
Nice clean 2&3 bdrm, Five Points,
NO PETS,
also 3 bd on the
Westside, 386-961-1482
X-Clean 2/2 SW, 8 mi NW of VA.
Clean acre lot, nice area. $500. mo
+ dep No dogs Non-smoking
environment.386-961-9181

Mobile Homes
640 for Sale
2010 Lot Model 32x80
Den/LR 3BR/2BA
2280SF 1/2" SR
Call Charles @
Royals Homes 754-6737
2010 Lot Model 3BR/2BA
1624 SF. 1/2" Sheetrock
Vaulted Ceiling.
Charles @
Royals Homes 754-6737
2011 Claytin Single
14x76 2BR/2BA
3 walk in Closets
Call Charles @ Royals
Homes 754-6737
2011 Clayton Homes 4BR/2BA
9' Side Walls,
Energy Star Home
Call Charles @ Royals
Homes 754-6737
2011 Legacy Model 1980 SF
Wood Cab, 3BR/2BA
Deluxe Int.erior
Call Charles @
Royals HOmes 754-6737


1996 33 Ft.
Fifth Wheel
w/2 slide-outs, camp or
reside, livable but needs work.
$4,000
Call
386-362-1826
Leave Message


r640 Mobile Homes
640 for Sale
2011 SE Triple wide
16" OC Home WZII
Total upgrade call Charles
@ Royals Homes 754-6737
Any Size, Any Shape
we have the home for you
Call Royals Homes @
386-754-6737
Architect Designed,
Green Engineered
Energy Homes
@Royals Homes
www.royalshomesales.com
Ask about our Energy Star Top
Insulation & Windows, Better
Built,Better Comfort, Phil @
Royals Homes 386-754-6737
Custom Built Modular's,
Bring your plans to
Royals Homes
386-754-6737
www.royalshomesales.com
Finance Manager on Site,
Know's how to get it done,
not a Salesman Guessing.
Call Phil @ Royals
Homes 386-754-6737
Flashy? Pretty?
Whatabout Construction?
Homesto last a Lifetime
Royals Homes
386-754-6737
Hallmark Real Estate. 2004
DWMH just minutes from the riv-
er. Detached carport. Front & back
screened porches. MLS#77398
Paula Lawrence 386-623-1973
Only a Few Left
2010 Models must go!
Call Royals Homes @
386-754-6737
Only at Royals Homes
Can your home be
prepared for real brick?
Call Bo @ 754-6737
NEW D/W Reduced Thousands.
3br/2ba set, delivery, A/C
skirting, steps. $39,900.
Call Ken (386)754-8844
AS IS, WHERE IS...32X80, 4/2,
LR/Den, needs carpet, paint, 2400
sqft. has metal roof, vinyl siding.
$31,000. Randy 386-754-0198
FIRE YOUR LANDLORD
TO OWN WHAT YOUR
THROWING AWAY IN RENT.
CALL MIKE 386-754-8844
NEW 32X70 4/3. 2K sqft+. L/R,
DenSidex side, glasstop range,
D/W. Del, set, Steps, A/C, skirt-
ing. $59,900. Ken (386)754-8844


OWNER FINANCE 40% Down
w/land Equity or CASH on any
new or used singlewide or Double-
wide. Randy 386-754-0198
The Economy has forced
me to cut the price on my
3 bedroom, 2 bath home to -
$38K (352)-870-5983
Pre-Owned 2BR/1 Bath .
Priced to move 754-6737
Only @ Royals Homes
www.royalshomesales.com
Sales Price Doubled?.
Not at Royals, Honest people,
Quality Homes. "
Call Royals Homes
@ 386-754-6737


Service Manager on Site
makes sure your satisfied, not
someone doing it all
Royals Homes 386-754-6737
There is a Difference.
Just ask our Customers
We do what we say
Call Phil@ Royals Homes
386-754-673.7

650 Mobile Home
650 & Land
67.5 ac.Ranch, fenced & cross
fenced. Spacious moblie home
w/large front deck & RV hookup
MLS 75607 $299,000. Access
Realty. Patti Taylor. 386-623-6896
Century 21/The Darby Rogers Co.
DWMH on 5 ac. 3br/2ba Back 2
Sac. fenced. Owners motivated.
Debbie Myles 386-719-1224
MLS# 75830 $99,900


Hallmark Real Estate. 3/2
DWMH 1/2 ac south.of town.
Columbia City. Paved frontage,
comer lot. $57,500
MLS#77654 Janet Creel 719-0382


Owner Finance, Nice 3/2, S of
Lake City, small down/$625 mo
386-590-0642 or 386-867-1833
www.suwanneevalleyproperties.com

710 Unfurnished Apt.
For Rent







04545256
SPRING HILL VILLAGE
Excellent High Springs location.
1, 2 & 3 bedroom floor-plans;
some with garages.
Call 386-454-1469
or visit our website:
www.springhillvillage.net

2BR APT.
Downtown Location, Clean.
$500 mo, plus Security.
NO PETS. Call 386-755-3456
Great location W of 1-75, spacious
deluxe 2br apts., garage, W/D
hookup. patio. $600/700 & up, +
Sec, 386-344-3715 or 965-5560


Honda Odyssey
2000
White, very good condition,
leather, 7 passenger.
$5,400

Call
386-365-2479


710 Unfurnished Apt.
710 For Rent
The Lakes Apts. Studios & lBr's
from $135/wk. Util. & cable incl.,
Sec 8 vouchers accepted, monthly
rates avail Call 386-752-2741
Updated apartments w/tile floors
& fresh paint. Excellent location.
From $450. + sec.
Call Michelle 38.6-752-9626

720 Fdrnished Apts.
72 For Rent
Rooms for Rent. Hillcrest, Sands,
Columbia. All furnished. Electric,
cable, fridgd' microwave. Weekly
or monthly rates. 1 person $135,
2 persons $150. weekly
386-752-5808

7 0 Unfurnished
730 Home For Rent
2 bedroom 1 bath on
5 acres. $700.00 per month.
First, last and security.
386-590-5333
2BR/1BA Kitchen and Den. on
Alachua. $5000. mo.
First, last & security.
386-397-0602
3br/1.5ba. Very clean, CH/A
Fenced (privacy) large back yard.
Nice area/location. $800. mo $800.
dep. Ref's req'd. (941)920-4535
3br/2ba Nice Brick home 1700 sf
for rent comer of Baya &
Defender. $950. mo. $950. dep.
386-344-5065
3br/2ba, Newly remodeled in nice
S/D Lease Opt. to buy. $900/Mo.
Credit Check required.
No Pets (386)755-9476
4br/2ba in town.
'Good neighborhood. $900. mo
1st & $900 security. No Pets.
386-755-6916
Callaway S/D. Beautiful 4/2.
2250sf. 1/2 ac. privacy fenced lot.
Office, 1g. screened porch., fire-
place, hardwood floors. No pets.
$1500 mo. Avail. 8/1. 623-7617
New 3/2 Brick/HB on 1/2 ac.
w/many upgrades, Lake Jeffery
area. Will consider rent with
option to purchase.
Call 386-752-5035 x 3110
7 days 7-7 A Bar Sales, Inc
Suwanee River Frontage. 2/1 in
Columbia Co. ,near 1-75/White
Spgs Jane S.Usher Lic. Real Estate
Broker 386-755-3500 or 365-1352

750 Business&
5 Office Rentals
FOR LEASE: Downtown office
space. Convenient to
Court house.
Call 386-755-3456
For Lease: E Baya Ave. Two -
1000 sqft office space units or
combined for 2000 sqft. 386-984-
0622 or weekends 386497-4762.
OFFICE SPACE for lease.
Oak Hill Plaza. 900 sqft
$675mo/$,695. sec dep.
Tom 386-961-1086 DCA Realtor


788 S Marion Ave,-Commercial
bldg with hwy frontage,
near downtown.
Call Scott Stewart at Westfield
Realty Group. 386-867-3498


770 Condos For Rent

Furnished or unfurnished
Townhomes on the golf course.
$750. mo. plus security. Includes
water. 386-752-96261

790 Vacation Rentals
Horseshoe Beach Scalloping Spcl
Gulf Front 2br, w/lg porch, dock,
fish sink. wkend $395./wk $895.
3'86-235-3633/352-498-5986
alwaysonvacation.com #419-181
"Florida's Last Frontier"


805 Lots for Sale
5 Acre Lot, Secluded & Cleared,
MLS# 67871 $55,000
Call Lisa Waltrip
@ 386-365-5900
westfieldrealtygroup.com
Great Package Deal $43,500
Nicely wooded. 3 lots in Emerald
Cove. (1)Private cul-de-sac.
Aaron Nickelson 386-867-3534
Westfield Realty Group
Hallmark Real Estate. Owner
Finance with $5K down with
,terms negotiable. Below assessed
value for the county. MLS# 74484
$17,900 Jay Sears 386-867-1613
Land for Sale. 12 acres in
nice area south of.town.
MLS#77469 $55,000 .
Carrie Cason 386-623-2806 ;
Westfield Realty Group


PUBLISHER'S NOTE
All real estate advertising in this
newspaper is subject to the fair
housing act which makes it illegal
to advertise "any preference,
limitation, or discrimination based
on race, color, religion, sex,
disability, familial.status or nation-
al origin; or any intention to make
such preference, limitation or
discrimination." Familial status
includes children under the age of
18 living with parents or legal
custodians, pregnant women and
people securing custody of chil-
dren under the age of 18. This
newspaper will not knowingly
accept any advertising for real es-


zuub vamana
VStar 650
11,000 miles, blue with
ghost flames, runs
great, new battery
$3,100 oBO
Call
386-752-9645


805 Lots for Sale
tate which is in violation of the
law. Our readers are hereby in-
formed that all dwellings adver-
tised in this newspaper are availa-
ble on an equal opportunity basis.
To complain of discrimination call
HUD toll free at 1-800-669-9777,
the toll free
telephone number to the hearing
impaired is 1-800-927-9275.


810 Home for Sale
3/2 1056 sqft Brick home in town.
Fenced back yard w/12x12 work-
shop Just Reduced! $79,900
MLS# 77414 Call 386-243-8227
R.E.O.Realty Group, Inc
3/2 in Woodhaven w/Fla Room,
fenced back yard MLS#75499,
$114,900 Call Pam @
Remax 386-303-2505 or
email- remaxpamb@gmail.com
4/2 on 10 ac. in Bell. Over 2200
sqft in a country setting. 10x20
frame shade. Bring offers! $89,000
MLS 76582 Brittany Stoeckert
Results Realty 386-397-3473
4/2 with 1000 sq ft workshop,
fenced yard, 2 car garage, Fairly
new roof & HVAC MLS#77602,
Bring Offers! $169,900,
R.E.O. Realty Group 243-8227
4br brick on .51 ac. comer lot. For-
mal dining and a large open floor
plan. Brick patio. $159,888
MLS 76763 Brittany Stoeckert
Results Realty 386-397-3473
A Pilots Dream home 3br/2.5ba.
Pool, stocked pond, detached ga-
rage w/living quarters MLS#77756
$399,900 Westfield Realty
GroupJosh Grecian 386-466-2517
Access Realty Stylish 3/2 + pool
house w/1/2 bath on 2.25 acres.
Rear deck, 2 car garage & carport.
MLS 78103 $194,500.
Patti Taylor.623-6896
Brick 3/1 family home, 4.43 acres.
w/metal roof. MLS# 77415 ,
Short sale acceptance w/lenders
approval. $99,000. 386-243-8227
R.E.O. Realty Group, Inc
Callaway. Beautiful 4/2. 2250sf.
1/2 ac. privacy fenced. Office,
screened porch, firepic, hardwood
floors. 10x16 shed, new paint/
carpet. $209,900 386-623-7617
Century 21/The Darby Rogers Co.
3br/1. Updated kitchen, bath. Open
living room w/all classic & elegant
light fixtures. 386-752-6575
MLS# 78099 $79,900
Century 21/The Darby Rogers Co.
3/2 Iin Spring Estates. 20x40
workshop. Screened back porch &
all appliances. Kayla Carbono
623-9650 MLS# 73787 $99,900
Century 21/The Darby Rogers Co.
Picadilly Park All brick 3/2, comer
lot w/inground pool. Screen porch
& fenced yard. Jessica Sheelly
288-2403 MLS# 73787:$115,900


Century 21/The Darby Rogers Co.
Eastside Village 2br/2ba. Extra Ig.
Master suite. Florida room & 2
sheds. Giny SmiLth 386-623-4277
623-4277 MLS# 70160 $79,900


Century 21/The Darby Rogers Co.
Laurel Lake S/D. 4br/2ba w/ ap-
prox. 2275 sqft, Fenced back yard,
storage shed. Susan Sloan 386-
965-2847 MLS# 76106 $189,900


Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
4br/1.5ba brick. 1332 sq ft. Great
floor plan, nice yard, close to
town. 1 ac landscaped. Lori
Geibeig MLS# 75713 $84,900
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
Remodeled 2/2 (could be 3/2).
Split floor plan. Great home, great.
price. Mary Brown Whitehurst
965-0887 MLS# 77943 $105,000


1
0


11
12
13
1.4
15
16
17
19
23
26
28
29
31
33
34
35

36
39
40
AO


44


ACROSS,

Walrus teeth
Theater"
employee
Small accident
Moony
War ender
Counsel
Rim
Bona fide
Influence
Wya neighbor
RN's knack
Grasped
Sci-fi craft
Close
Generously
No later than
Crazes
Bon (witti-
cism)
Math course
Lunar new year
La tar pits
Octopi have
eight
"Minimum"
amount


810 Home for Sale
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
3/2 brick home in Woodcrest. Lg
lot completely fenced. Easy access
to amenities. Elaine K. Tolar 386-
752-6488 MLS# 78148 $129,900
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
New home in Mayfair. 4 bedroom
on comer lot. Covered Porch.
Elaine K. Tolar 386-752-6488
MLS# 76919 $214,900
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
3/3 in beautiful area. 2414sqft.
Private yard & patio with storage
bldg. Ldri G Simpson 386-365-
5678 MLS# 78175 $159,900
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
Brick 3/2 on lake front. Lots of up-
dates. Glassed in room with fantas-
tic views. Lori G Simpson 386-
365-5678 MLS# 78092 $249,900
Country Home 2br/2ba on 5 ac.
detached garage w/workshop.
MLS# 77005 $179,900 Call Roger
Lovelady 386-365-7039
Westfield Realty Group
CYPRESS LANDING!
3BR/2BA built in 2005 w/large
kitchen $115,000
DANIEL CRAPPS AGENCY,
INC. 755-5110 #75794
DESIRABLE GWEN LAKE area!
Nice 3BR/2BA home on
comer lot $112,000
DANIEL CRAPPS AGENCY,
INC. 755-5110 #77307
Eastside Village a 55+ Retirement
Community. lots of Storage. Ig
deck off 2br suite. Carport w/more
storage. MLS# 77462 Eastside
Village Realty, Inc. 752-5290

OPEN HOUSE
Saturday, June 18th
1-3pm
22071 220 Place (137 County Road)
4B/3BA MH on 5.28 acres

$99,000
All Serano Otero
(386) 984-0051
For additional information
Accredited Real Estate Services



Unscramble these four Jumbles,
one letter to each square,
to form four ordinary words.

SOIEVD I


ON WHEELS & WATERCRAFT 7








Bring the picture in or
we will take it for youl
* Ad runs 10 consecutive days
with a description and photo in the
newspaper and online E-edition.
* Ad runs 10 consecutive days as a
classified line ad online.
* You must include vehicle price.
* All ads are prepaid.
* Private part only.


2006 EF250
Ford Van
3/4 ton, metal work
shelves/ladder rack,
60K miles, exc. cond.
$10,500
Call
386-555-5555
If you don't sell your vehicle
during the first 10 days, you
can run the same vehicle ad
for 10 additional days for
only $15.00
Terms and conditions remain the
same for the additional run.







THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME
by David L. Hoyt and Jeff Knurek


LW LHAT THe MATH
TEACHER TOOK
.RGENVO I PL-ASUR- IN MAKING.
-- -Now arrange the circled letters
to form the surprise answer, as
suggested by the above cartoon.

A:
(Answers tomorrow)
Yesterday's JOmbles: UNION STUNG TOSSED PEOPLE
Answer: The staircase he built out of granite turned
into a STEPPING STONE


46 Charley horse
51 Hash over
54 Food bringer
55 Prevents.
56 Concert cry
57 Like the beach
58 Basalt or
gneiss

DOWN

1 Poop out
2 Manipulative
person
3 Thick carpet-
ing
4 Moss and
Capshaw
5 Go undercover
6 Karachi lan-
guage
7 Prime time
hour
8 "Bali -"
9 911 responder
10 Reuben bread
11 Rock network
12 Hannah of
"Splash"


Answer to Previous Puzzle

X --RAYSCOPE
JE RED D RK EIN
INVIT^EINURES

BASSJ ANZ -A P
TE

OR TA BO ED
O LS L U E
NE EEL

h E 0S
CO FAA VEG
FOREST THAIWIEID
ACCESS SERENA
ROADTMSE


Soprano coun-
terpart
Espresso with
milk
Dernier -
Kind of testing
Indifferent
Lunch counter
order
Que. neighbor
Seiznick stu-
dio
Storms about
Dander, plus
Trophy
Barely enough
Courtroom fig.
"Little Caesar"
role
Nile sun god
Just
Before, in
combos
German article
NASA excur-
sion
Big clock
Mr. Unsold


16 kwon do
18 Kid's question
20 Pianist Blake
21 Musical key (2
wds.) .
22 Acuff and Bean


Want more puzzles?
Check out the "Just Right Crossword Puzzles" books
at QuillDrlverBooks.com
*


I


Classified Department: 755-5440


4


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Classified Department: 755-5440


LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED THURSDAY, JUNE 16, 2011


810 Home for Sale
Eastside Village a 55+ Retirement
* Community. 2br/2ba. Lg office
/craft room. Oversized garage.
$89,900 MLS# 71901 Eastside
Village Realty, Inc. 752-5290
Eastside Village a 55+ Retirement
Community. Open floor plan
w/breakfast nook. 2 Ig bedrooms.
$104,999 MLS# 77779 Eastside
Village Realty, Inc. 752-5290
Featured Home 55+ acres, 5 pas-
tures fenced & cross fenced. 2,700
sqft, 4br/3ba home built in 1996.
Call for details! 386-243-8227
R.E.O. Realty Group
Fixer Upper on Suwannee River.
Needs TLC. Owner motivated &
will finance. $45,000
MLS 77337 Brittany Stoeckert
Results Realty 386-397-3473
GREAT STARTER HOME!
3BR/2BA w/lots of closet space &
nice lawn $79,900
DANIEL CRAPPS AGENCY,
INC. 755-5110 #76432
Great Starter Home. Well cared
for. New countertops, tile floors &
metal roof. $79,900 WS#77524
Brodie Alfred 386-&23-0906
Westfield Realty Group
Hallmark Real Estate. Brick
home w/fine landscaping. Dream
kitchen w/double pantry.
Split bedroom plan MLS#77846 :
Paula Lawrence 386-623-1973
Hallmark Real Estate. Country
Estate. Sit in the swing of the big
oak tree and watch the horses
graze on 10ac. fenced. 39 ac total.
MLS#78139 Janet Creel 719-0382
Hallmark Real Estate. Pool &
Patio. 3br/2ba. brick home on
1.69 ac. Workshop &
SWMH on property. MLS#78117
Tanya Shaffer 386-397-4766
Home near the River. 3br/2ba,
1470 sqft. needs a little TLC..
MLS#76390 $34,900
Mike Lienemann 386-867-9053
Westfield Realty Group
Home on 15 ac. w/over 2,500 sqft
home.Very Ig bedrooms w/private
baths. 24x24 workshop $235,000
MLS 77552 Brittany Stoeckert
Results Realty 386-397-3473
HOME OR OFFICE on
Alachua St; remodeled 1,207 SqFt
home $82,900
DANIEL CRAPPS AGENCY,
INC. 755-5110 #77724
Hallmark Real Estate. 2006'
2200SF home. 2br/2ba w/mother-
in-law suite, 4 car garage, endless
hot water heater. MLS# 77547
$309,900 Jay Sears 386-867-1613
Hallmark Real Estate. 3br/2ba
new roof & AC. Comes w/SWMH
& 30xiO steel bldg. Completely
fenced. MLS# 76752
$179,900 Jay Sears 386-867-1613
Just Reduced 3/2 home, inside city
limits, fenced backyard, detached'
carport w/office MLS#77411
$79,900 Call R.E.O.Realty,
@ 386-243-8227 Make Offer!
Just Reduced 4/2 on 1.57 acres,
fireplace. partially fenced, MLS#
77412, Call Nancy Rogers at
R.E.O. Realty Group
386-243-8227 $64,900
Lg. 4/3 family home. 16x20
screened porch, workshop. 4.5 ac.
fenced/cross fenced MLS 74339
$229,900. N Fla Homeland Real-
ty Darlene Hart 386-288-2878
Lg. home on 1 ac. Granite floors
throughout. 4br/2ba. Nice open
kitchen & Florida room. $148,000
MLS 77292 Brittany Stoeckert
Results Realty 386-397-3473
Like New. 3br/2ba on 3 ac. New
kitchen cabinets,,counters, carpet
& more. $179,900'MLS#77372
Charlie Sparks 386-755-0808
Westfield Realty Group
LOTS OF UPGRADES!
Remodeled kitchen in this
2BR/1BA home $29,900
DANIEL CRAPPS AGENCY,
INC. 755-5110 #77505
Mayfield S/D, nice fenced in back.
yard w/small lake behind property.
Very nice. $99,888
MLS 77092 Brittany Stoeckert
Results Realty 386-397-3473
Neat as a pin! Split floor plan
w/well manicured lawn. 10x12
storage shed. $129K MLS 77932
Darlene Hart 386-288-2878
N Fla Homeland Realty
Owner Fin.,Nice 3/2 on 2.5 fenced
acres, pond, Jasper area, sm down
$700 mo, 386-590-0642/867-1833
www.suwanneevalleyproperties.com
Owner Finance. Custom built 3/2.5
10.8 ac. Granite, fireplace, vaulted
ceilings, surround sound, lanai,
gazebo. MLS 77382 Access Real-
ty. Patti Taylor $249K 623-6896
Remax Professionals Charming
w/many upgrades. 3br/2ba. 2 mas-
ter suites. MLS# 76779,$105,000
Missy Zecher @ 386-623-0237
www.missygecher.com
SRemax Professionals Motivated
seller. All brick family home
w/many upgrades. MLS# 78168,
$129,000 www.missyzecher.com
Missy Zecher 386-623-0237
Reniax Professionals Spacious
home on corner lot. Private access
to Lake Jeffery. MLS# 77783,
$198,900 www.missvzecher.com
Missy Zecher @ 386-623-0237
Spacious 4/2 home on 1 ac. Split
floor plan. Great neighborhood.
Easy access to 1-75 $220K MLS
77859 N Fla Homeland Realty
Darlene Hart 386.288-2878
SPACIOUS home built in


1995 has 2BR/2BA & 1,636 SqFt
on 1 acre $89,900
DANIEL CRAPPS AGENCY,
INC. 755-5110 #76887
Starter/Investment Home, 3/2 +
Bonus room on 1 acre, remodeled,
fenced MLS#77562 $99,900
Call Pam @ Remax
Professionals 386-303-2505
Well Maintained 3/2 on dead-end
street, quiet, country, close to
downtown $105,000 MLS#77800
Lisa Waltrip 386-365-5900
Westfield Realty Group
Well Maintained 3/2 w/open floor
plan,on 1/2 acre, fenced, shed
MLS# 78136 $134,900
Call Pam Beauchamp @ Remax
Professionals 386-758-8900


820 Farms &
SAcreage

4 1/2 acre lot. Lake Jeffery Road.
Gorgeous Oaks!Paved Rd
Owner Financing! NO DOWN!
$59,900. $525mo 352-215-1018.
www.LandOwnerFinancing.com

4 acres, Wellborn, New Well
installed, Beautifully wooded
w/cleared Home Site, owner fin,
no down, $39,900, $410 mon
Call 352-215-1018
www.LandOwnerFinancing.com

6.45 ac river front property in
White Springs, cloe to Big Shoals.
Covered shelter for entertaining.
MLS# 77417 $124,888 386-243-
' 8227 R.E.O. Realty Group, Inc


820 Farms &
2 Acreage
Bring the horses. Peaceful &
ready for your home. Convenient
location. $38,000 MLS#76264
Millard Gillen 386-365-7001
Westfield Realty Group
FARM- 7 stall barn, Apt.
17+ acres cross fenced.
Close in $950. mo.
386-961-1086
Half to ten acre lots. Some w/
well, septic, pp. We finance; low
dwn pmt. Deas Bullard Properties.
386-752-4339. www.landnfl.com


820 Farms &
2f Acreage
Pretty piece of land. 2 acres close
to interstate 75 for under 20K.
Mobile Homes or residential ok.
MLS# 77400 Call 386-243-8227
R.E.O. Realty Group, Inc

Commercial
3O Property
Hallmark Real Estate. Commer-
cial Business Location on South
Main w/offices & service bldg.
Frontage, warehouse & storage
MLS#76280 Janet Creel 719-0382


Look at all the Upgrades Prime Commercial Location.
s Completely remodeled. Just across from plaza. Frontage
$106,500 MLS#77483 on Baya w/2 curbcuts. $350,000
Brodie Alfred 386-623-0906 MLS# 77485 Call 386-243-8227
Westfield Realty Group R.E.O.Realty Group, Inc


930 Motorcycles

2005 YAMAHA VSTAR 650
11,000 miles. Blue w/Ghost
flames. Runs great! New Battery.
$3,100. obo. 386-752-9645


951 Recreational
951 Vehicles

1996 33ft Fifth Wheel
w/2 slideouts. camp or reside.
livable, needs some work. $4,000.
386-362-1826. Leave message.


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